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Your local cooperative news AUGUST 2016

Experience Medora! See page 12

Also this month: TrainND builds workforce, page 16 Høstfest returns in September, page 23

See page C1 for your local co-op news ndarec.com • ndatc.com • ndliving.com


Dee-lightful Care

Dee Carico Neurology Patient

The blankets & quilts Dee Carico loves to sew take precision and a pair of steady hands. However, when seizures suddenly began threatening Dee’s ability to control her own body, she turned to Trinity Health for help. Bahram Kordlar, MD Neurologist provided an expert diagnosis of a rare condition known as Rochester. This resulted in Dee getting the right treatment, close to home.

“Now, I’m free from my seizures and free to enjoy doing the things I love most.” Every day, the expert providers at Trinity Health help patients like Dee receive critical treatment with the power to change their lives.

(701) 857-DR4U trinityhealth.org

Minot, ND


North Dakota Living features

AUGUST 2016

Your Cooperative's local pages

AUGUST 2016 Volume 63, No. 2

116 E. 12th St. • New England, ND 58647 | 701-579-4191 • www.slopeelectric.coop

Keep your face always to the sunshine and the shadows will

fall behind you.

YOUR LOCAL COOPERATIVE NEWS C1-C8 Center 8-page section, following page 18 (most editions)

—Walt Whitman

What’s Inside •

Generational farm

Grain bin placement

Safety around grain bins and augers

Youth Tour recap and more …

• www.slopeelectric.coop

FEATURES 4 Editorial by Josh Kramer Continuing the legacy of NDAREC 8 NDAREC board tours carbon capture and storage facilities Crosby meeting features visit to Saskatchewan power producer 12 Legacy of giving continues in Medora Medora’s new education center serving student workers, volunteers 14 Amy Anderson making LPGA tour mark On LPGA tour, in life, NDSU grad wants to serve to succeed 16 TrainND keeps workforce skilled Colleges & employers collaborate to meet changing workforce needs 23 Norsk Høstfest adds to experiences Chicago, Neil Sedaka, Emmylou Harris headline in Minot, Sept. 28-Oct. 1

SLO PE ELECT R I C N EWS , AUGUST 2016 C1

pages C1-C8

page 8

page 16

ON THE COVER

The Medora Musical is “The Greatest Show In the West,” and with their new Marcil Life Skills Center, workers in Medora are preparing to create the greatest experience possible for visitors. PHOTO BY NDAREC/LIZA KESSEL

Published by white

type >>> Your Touchstone Energy Cooperative North Dakota Association of Rural Electric Cooperatives Your Touchstone Energy Cooperative

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FAVORITES 2 News Connections Pay heed to road construction 6 Telecom Country Fedorchak, Nelson address NDATC conference 22 Inspired Living by Roxanne Henke Laugh with me, or AT me 24 Reader Reply High winds, hot temperatures and dry conditions can keep rural firefighters busy in the summer. Tell us about a firefighter in your community or share an experience involving a fire. Let’s honor these local heroes — who are most often volunteers. 26 Teen-2-Teen by Emily Severinson When education is more than school 28 Calendar of Events 30 Recipe Roundup Food plays role in teens developing independence 31 Healthy Hints by Julie Garden-Robinson Celebrate Sandwich Month in August 32 Farm Byline by Al Gustin Zoccoli’s Deli evolves 34 Marketplace Forum 35 Advertisers’ Index 36 Co-op Country Behind the lens

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News Connections

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New Lewis & Clark bridge construction, U.S. Hwy. 85, between Watford City and Williston

Pay heed to road construction

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range cones once again line highways during construction season. The N.D. Department of Transportation (NDDOT) has approximately $680 million in projects being completed this year across the state. Maintenance and construction work zones allow highway workers to complete major projects on highways, and motorists are asked to drive carefully through these zones. “When motorists travel through a work zone, there is no room for error,” says Grant Levi, NDDOT director. “Last year, 155 crashes occurred in work zones, resulting in one fatality, as compared to 242 crashes and two fatalities in work zones in 2014. Drivers need to pay attention and minimize distractions.” Major road construction projects taking place this year include: • Westbound I-94 from near Montana state line to Missouri River • Roundabout at junction of U.S. 52 and N.D. 200 in Carrington |

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• Southbound I-29 from Argusville to the Hunter Separation • West Fargo Main Avenue • Dickinson northwest permanent bypass • North Washington Street in Bismarck • U.S. Highway 85B in Watford City. When traveling through a road construction work zone, motorists should follow a few basic tips: • Don’t speed. Obey posted speed limits at all times, even when workers aren’t present. • Minimize distractions. Don’t talk on your cell phone, change the radio station or do anything that takes your eyes off the road. • Be patient. Work zones aren’t present to inconvenience drivers, they’re an important part in maintaining and rebuilding our state’s infrastructure. • Stay alert. Dedicate your full attention to the roadway. n Source: N.D. Department of Transportation. For more information on the status of road construction projects, go to: www.dot.nd.gov/travel-info.

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Life is too beautiful not to smile.

Remember laughing? Remember smiling? Dr. Heringer enjoys putting smiles back on faces. Call us at 701.255.4850 or toll free 866.503.3883. Or visit drheringer.com today. w w w . n d l i v i n g . c o m

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Editorial

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Continuing the legacy of NDAREC

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PHOTO COURTESY NDAREC

ou may have noticed something different about this editorial. After 30 years of writing this editorial and managing this organization, Dennis Hill has retired. Please join me in thanking Dennis for his many years of dedication to the cooperative family. I, like many of you, have appreciated the leadership Dennis has provided to the electric industry, cooperatives, the members we serve and his contributions to rural America — as well as the mentorship Josh Kramer and knowledge he so willingly shared with the next generation of co-op leaders. On July 1, I assumed the role of executive vice president and general manager of the North Dakota Association of Rural Electric Cooperatives (NDAREC). I have a profound respect and admiration for this organization, its history, its impact, and the leadership it has provided through some of the most consequential times that our members and rural people have faced. To me, NDAREC has been on the right side of the issues that are most important. Throughout my career, I have been able to advocate on behalf of agriculture, serve in the military, and work for a trade association dedicated to farmers, ranchers and cooperatives. Most recently, I served in a leadership role with USDA Rural Development, an organization dedicated to improving the quality of life in rural America. The importance of cooperatives, their principles and the RECs are in my DNA. I grew up on a dairy farm in

NORTH DAKOTA AUGUST 2016 Volume 63, No. 2 Circulation: 104,000

LIVIng

Published monthly by North Dakota Association of Rural Electric Cooperatives 3201 Nygren Dr. N.W., P.O. Box 727, Mandan, ND 58554 © Copyright 2016 NDAREC; North Dakota Living (ISSN-1539-0063)

Contact us: 800-234-0518; 701-663-6501; www.ndarec.com Staff: Josh Kramer, editor-in-chief Kent Brick, CCC, editor Carmen Devney, CCC, communications specialist Clark A. Van Horn, advertising mgr. Clarice Kesler, e-communications mgr. John Kary, senior graphic designer Liza Kessel, graphic designer Tammy Kear, editorial assistant

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Emmons County, served by KEM Electric Cooperative and BEK Communications Cooperative. I have many memories of tagging along to annual meetings with my grandparents and learning the cooperative values. Today, my wife, Sarah, and our five children live north of Bismarck, and Capital Electric Cooperative serves our family. It was my experience with cooperatives that inspired me to pursue a career dedicated to service, and I plan to continue that commitment with the RECs. NDAREC and our member-cooperatives work every day to provide services and bring economic opportunities to our members, which is important to the continued success of our state. There have been and will be changes within our cooperatives. The people are changing, technology is changing, and our members and their needs are also changing. Yet, cooperatives are best positioned to meet the changes, challenges and opportunities of the future. I received some great advice from a friend as I began this new role. He said being successful with cooperatives is simple. “Keep grounded in the cooperative values, live the cooperative principles, and listen and be transparent with the membership … and you will be just fine.” Well folks, that is exactly what we, at NDAREC, intend to do — and that is our commitment to you, the member. n Josh Kramer, editor-in-chief of North Dakota Living, is executive vice president and general manager of the North Dakota Association of Rural Electric Cooperatives, Mandan. Comments can be mailed to Josh Kramer, NDAREC, P.O. Box 727, Mandan, ND 58554-0727 or by email to jkramer@ndarec.com.

Public Relations Advisory Committee: Maxine Rognlien, Chair, Verendrye Electric Cooperative Rod Stockdill, McLean Electric Cooperative Lynn Jacobson, Burke-Divide Electric Cooperative Paul Fitterer, Capital Electric Cooperative Jeanette Hoff, Reservation Telephone Cooperative Chris Baumgartner, Innovative Energy Alliance Martin Dahl, McLean Electric Cooperative Advertising sales: Paid advertising accepted, in conformity with NDAREC policy. Rates, editorial calendar, specifications, deadlines, contacts available at www.ndliving.com. Direct advertising orders, questions, comments about ad content to: Clark A. Van Horn, cvanhorn@ndarec.com; 800-234-0518. NDAREC neither endorses nor guarantees products or services described in these advertisements. Subscriptions: Members of electric cooperatives subscribe to North Dakota Living as part of their membership with and service from the cooperative. Nonmembers of electric cooperatives may purchase subscriptions at these levels: 12 issues - $14.50; 36 issues: $40. Single copies: $2, plus postage. Subscription purchase information is available by calling 800-234-0518; or at www.ndarec.com.

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Addresses/address changes/subscription terminations: when the member terminates service from the electric cooperative, the North Dakota Living subscription terminates. Non-member subscribers should communicate with NDAREC about address changes; send magazine label with former address, a note bearing new address to North Dakota Living Subscriptions, P.O. Box 727, Mandan, ND 58554; or contact tkear@ndarec.com. U.S. Postal Service Periodicals nonprofit postage paid at Mandan, N.D., and at additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to: North Dakota Living, P.O. Box 727, Mandan, ND 58554. In accordance with federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture Policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Ave., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call 202-720-5964 (voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. No portion of the editorial or advertising content of North Dakota Living may be reproduced without permission.

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bismarckstate.edu 224-5429 | 800-445-5073 |

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Telecom Country

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Fedorchak, Nelson address NDATC conference

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he shape of state and federal telecommunications policy held the spotlight at the 2016 Summer Conference of the North Dakota Association of Telecommunications Cooperatives (NDATC) in Fargo in mid-July.

Julie Fedorchak

“On the commission, we understand the responsibility we have to do the very best we can on behalf of the citizens of the state in the areas that we impact,” she said. Fedorchak also commented on the current PSC activity in the area of investigating and levying fines for violations of North Dakota One Call regulations. N.D. One Call is the set of regulations governing how underground excavation, with proper regard for underground utility facilities, is undertaken. She said the commission has improved its timeframe for adjudicating complaints about N.D. One Call violations, and is seeking to improve the collection of fines the commission imposes on violators.

GUBERNATORIAL CANDIDATE MARVIN NELSON

Marvin Nelson

KEYNOTE ADDRESS: COMMISSIONER FEDORCHAK “I want to thank you for the service that you are providing that makes access to fiber optic, high-speed service possible,” Public Service Commissioner Julie Fedorchak told the rural telecom leaders during the keynote address. Fedorchak applauded the rural telecom cooperatives and local companies for making and following plans to extend high-speed, fiber optics-based service across most of rural North Dakota. “This is a huge asset to North Dakota and to the rural businesses, and the farms and ranches and other ag-related businesses, and the energy sector that you serve,” she said. Fedorchak, a Williston native, was appointed by Gov. Jack Dalrymple to the PSC in December 2012. She is the state Republican-endorsed candidate for a six-year term on the PSC, in the general election. Fedorchak currently serves as chairman of the commission, with fellow commissioners Brain Kalk and Randy Christmann. In her remarks, Fedorchak said she is pleased with the progress the commission has made in pipeline siting, safety and reclamation, and in rail line safety. The PSC oversees inspection programs for pipelines and for railroad tracks.

The NDATC conference also served as a forum for remarks from state legislative representative Marvin Nelson, from Rolla. Nelson is the Democratic-NPL Party-endorsed candidate for governor in the 2016 general election. Nelson was raised on a farm near Rugby, and completed a degree in entomology from North Dakota State University. Nelson operates Nelson Sales & Service, an agriculture consulting firm. He told NDATC leaders his lifetime experience with rural telecommunication has spanned his first phone connection, advancing today to include fast and powerful worldwide telecommunications service. “I can remember so much wanting to connect to the outside world,” Nelson said, describing his early years on the farm. “You have really changed my life, and you have changed the lives of so many people in North Dakota. I really want to thank you for making that investment on their behalf.” Nelson said predicting the future in North Dakota is always a challenge. However, he added that modern service providers in the NDATC organization will be an indispensable part of a prosperous future for the state. “The thing that I really hope and pray for the future of North Dakota is that you will continue to be here and continue to provide the services, and continue to do it in a manner that all can benefit from it,” Nelson said. n

TELECOM COUNTRY is a feature from the North Dakota Association of Telecommunications Cooperatives. NDATC is the statewide organization of cooperatives and local companies providing telecommunications and broadband service to communities, businesses, and farms across North Dakota. NDATC officers: president, Matt Erhardt Jr., Center; first vice president, Ron German, Hankinson; second vice president, Lorena Lambrecht, Tioga; and secretary/treasurer, Jan Stebbins; Bowman. TELECOM COUNTRY is also available at www.ndliving.com. For information on NDATC and its member organizations, go to: www.ndatc.com. |

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www.applefest.org

KNOW WHAT’S BELOW CALL 811 BEFORE YOU DIG! OR FILE YOUR TICKETS WITH

ONLINE

10th Annual VISIT OUR WEBSITE - www.ndonecall.com www.facebook.com/NDOneCall

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12/9/15 3:11 PM

North Dakota Living on the go! Did you know that North Dakota Living is also available online in both a website and mobile version? Just visit www.ndliving.com. Watch videos about issues we all care about at www.youtube.com/ndarec. And follow us on Facebook so that you can stay updated about living in North Dakota. Join us online today!

Clarice Kesler, e-communications manager

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NDAREC board members, and guests from affiliated organizations, left photo, toured SaskPower generation stations, and carbon capture and storage facilities, right photo.

NDAREC board tours carbon capture and storage facilities S T O R Y

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s part of its summer meeting, held last month in Crosby, the board of directors of the North Dakota Association of Rural Electric Cooperatives (NDAREC) visited nearby carbon capture and storage facilities. NDAREC is the state organization serving the common interests of 16 local distribution cooperatives and five generation and transmission cooperatives doing business in North Dakota. Robert Grant, Berthold, is president of the NDAREC board. Josh Kramer is NDAREC executive vice president and general manager; the July board meeting was his first board meeting since becoming the NDAREC chief executive July 1. Burke-Divide Electric Cooperative, which serves rural residents and communities in the northwestern corner of the state, hosted the meeting. The NDAREC board, with organizational allies, made the half-hour trip north of Crosby, across the Canadian border to visit SaskPower facilities, near Estevan, Saskatchewan. There is interest in carbon capture and storage at power generation facilities among NDAREC member cooperatives. This interest is fueled by carbon emission reduction regulations called for in the federal Clean Power Plan (CPP) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In September, a federal appeals court will hear arguments on the ultimate legality of the CPP. Although this legal review is expected to proceed to the U.S. Supreme Court – and may result in invalidation of the CPP – electric cooperatives are proceeding to gather

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information on removing and safely disposing of carbon in the coal-fired electric generation process. SaskPower public information indicates SaskPower is the primary electricity provider in the Saskatchewan province. Almost 50 percent of the electricity generated in the province uses coal as a fuel source. SaskPower currently has three coal-fired plants in two Saskatchewan communities: • Boundary Dam Power Station (Estevan) • Shand Power Station (Estevan) • Poplar River Power Station (Coronach) The NDAREC board toured the carbon capture and storage process equipment that is now a feature of the Boundary Dam Station. This equipment became operational in 2014. It is the world’s first commercialscale carbon capture and storage (CCS) process at a coal-fired power plant. At the dedication of the CCS facilities at Boundary Dam Station, Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall said: “Over the past six years, Saskatchewan has become a global hub of innovation, especially in agriculture, mining, oil and gas, and now carbon capture and storage.” He said the rest of the world is interested to learn how they, too, can produce environmentally sustainable coal power. When fully optimized, SaskPower’s new process will capture up to a million tons of carbon dioxide annually, the equivalent of taking 250,000 cars off the road. The power unit equipped with CCS technology will continue to use coal to power approximately 100,000 Saskatchewan homes and businesses. The captured carbon dioxide will be used for enhanced oil recovery,

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The NDAREC board of directors convened last month in Crosby, which is right across the international border from Estevan, Saskatchewan, Canada, and SaskPower facilities.

with the remainder stored safely and permanently deep underground and continuously monitored. On the occasion of the launch of CCS processes at SaskPower, U.S. Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, from North Dakota, said: “The opening of this new SaskPower plant reinforces the great innovation and development that can take place if you have strong investment and partnerships from the government and industry.” “From my more than a decade working at Dakota Gasification in North Dakota,” Heitkamp continued, “I understand just how important it is that we look to the future in how we harness our energy. Coal is a key resource in both Canada and the U.S., and through the development of clean coal technology, we can create North American independence and energy security, while also reducing emissions.” While at the location of these SaskPower facilities, the NDAREC board also viewed the new SaskPower Carbon Capture Test Facility (CCTF), which was officially launched in 2015. Built in partnership with Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems Ltd., the CCTF is a high-tech laboratory that uses a small amount of exhaust (flue) gas from the neighboring Shand Power Station. This allows researchers to test carbon capture equipment, chemical innovation or engineering designs in a highly controlled environment. “It was Burke-Divide Electric’s pleasure to facilitate a tour of the SaskPower facilities,” said Lynn Jacobson, a member of the Burke-Divide Electric board of directors. Jacobson represents electric cooperatives in North Dakota on the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association board of directors, and holds the NRECA seat on the NDAREC board of directors. “With the potential effects of the Clean Power Plan looming on the horizon,” Jacobson said, “we must take a look at ways to reduce the carbon emissions so that w w w . n d l i v i n g . c o m

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we may continue to use our abundant, affordable and reliable fuel source that coal provides for our members. We are grateful that SaskPower went above and beyond our expectations in showing us this groundbreaking carbon capture and storage technology that they have been developing.”

PUBLIC OPINION SURVEY: POWER SUPPLY PREFERENCES Earlier this year, NDAREC commissioned its biennial public opinion survey of North Dakota adults; what North Dakotans prefer for power supply resources was a part of this year’s survey. This telephone survey, which NDAREC has sponsored biennially since 2000, probes public opinion of electric utility services, and of selected public issues. The 2016 edition of the survey reached 524 randomly selected North Dakotans, and was administered by the Applied Research Center in the University of North Dakota College of Business and Public Administration. Even though changes in the use of coal for electric generation are being considered, North Dakotans hold to the view that it is a very economical energy source. When asked about the lowest-cost sources of energy, 31 percent of survey respondents believe coal currently produces electricity at the lowest-cost, followed, in order, by wind (21 percent), solar (16 percent), natural gas (12 percent) and nuclear (11 percent). When asked for attitudes about electric power generation projects proposed for areas in which they live, survey respondents said the following: 30 percent strongly support; 40 percent somewhat support; 7 percent somewhat oppose; 8 percent strongly oppose. n Kent Brick is editor of North Dakota Living. He can be reached at kbrick@ndarec.com.

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Campus News BSC helps achieve goals

Every day, Bismarck State College’s nearly 4,000 students strive to achieve their educational goals. They may be enrolled in one of BSC’s 90-plus technical programs, preparing themselves for a career in a thriving industry. Or, perhaps they are starting strong toward a four-year degree, knowing they’ll be able to transfer seamlessly to the next phase of their education. No matter where BSC students are heading, they can get there without getting deeply into debt. BSC’s tuition is about $3,600 each year. With more than $650,000 in scholarships available annually as well, BSC is not only a smart and flexible choice, its affordable, too. On campus or online, BSC is where students find their beyond. For more information about all the options available at Bismarck State College, visit www.bismarckstate.edu.

MSU students can bundle degrees

Minot State University looks forward to the upcoming fall semester as it offers students and working adults undergraduate and graduate degrees. With convenient delivery options, you can “bundle” your degree by taking courses on campus, online, at Minot Air Force Base, on the Bismarck State College campus, via dual credit, at North Dakota State University (social work) or via video conferencing. MSU’s student-athletes compete in the NCAA DII Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference (NSIC). MSU invites you to take in a game while in Minot or when athletes are on the road. With access to all games via the Web, supporters can watch and cheer on the Beavers from anywhere. MSU invites prospective students and their families to visit with its advisors located at any of its sites. Call 701-858-3822 (campus), 701-727-9044 (MAFB), 701-224-5496 (Bismarck), or toll-free 800-777-0750 for more information. Campus tours are available Monday-Saturday. Like MSU on Facebook and follow on Twitter to stay abreast of campus happenings.

LEARN SMARTER and EARN FASTER at NDSCS

At the North Dakota State College of Science, you’ll LEARN SMARTER with expert instructors teaching real-world skills in more than 80 career options. And you’ll EARN FASTER by landing your dream career in just two years. NORTH DAKOTA STATE COLLEGE OF SCIENCE NDSCS’s industry partners and state-of-the-art equipment ensure your success and open doors to nearly 100 percent career placement. We call it The Science of Success®. You’ll call it the best way to get where you’re going. Visit NDSCS online at www.ndscs.edu and schedule a tour today!

UND offers opportunities

cutting-edge research and scholarship. UND is responding to regional, national and international trends with programs in rural health, petroleum engineering, unmanned aircraft systems and more. Eight academic colleges, including the state’s only Schools of Law and Medicine and Health Sciences, offer undergraduate and graduate programs in aerospace, arts and sciences, business and public administration, education and human development, engineering and mines and nursing and professional disciplines. Whether on campus or online, UND’s students are working with renowned faculty to advance knowledge and seek solutions. Discover the spirit that drives the University of North Dakota at www.UND.edu.

New offerings at Valley City State University

New at VCSU this fall is the Gaukler Family Wellness, Health and Physical Education Center, including court space, a swimming pool, a walking track, a cardiovascular fitness area and a weight room for student and community use. The building will also house the VCSU Kinesiology and Human Performance Department, including its athletic training and exercise science programs. Also new at VCSU is a master of arts in teaching (MAT) program, an online graduate program for non-teachers with bachelor’s degrees to add both a master’s degree and teacher certification in a content area, and for teachers to add graduate credentials for career and salary advancement. The MAT complements VCSU’s master of education program, also taught online, and the university’s undergraduate programs in elementary and secondary education.

DSU offers accessible programs

Dickinson State University is located on a beautiful 132-acre campus in Dickinson, serving as a cultural, social, recreational and intellectual center for the residents of the west river region. The university provides high-quality, accessible programs; promotes excellence in teaching and learning; supports scholarly and creative activities; and provides service relevant to economy, health and quality of life. Located directly along Interstate 94, Dickinson is the seventh largest city in the state. The university and the city are situated near the scenic North Dakota Badlands and Theodore Roosevelt National Park, the area where Roosevelt ranched prior to his ascendancy to national prominence. This region of North Dakota abounds with some of the country’s finest hunting, fishing, camping and hiking opportunities. Boasting a population of approximately 27,000-plus, Dickinson is also served by commercial air service transportation. n

The University of North Dakota is the state’s chief opportunity engine, providing a strong liberal arts education alongside |

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“Dickinson State University has the perfect learning environment. Professors are there for the one-on-one interaction. What other university can you attend where the professors interact like that?”

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Carlie Bowditch ‘18

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AskMSU.com 701-858-3350/1-800-777-0750 ext. 3350 w w w . n d l i v i n g . c o m

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Legacy of giving continues in Medora B Y

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The 26,000-square-foot Marcil Life Skills Center is the new home base for Medora’s youthful workforce, and its army of volunteers.

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he late Sheila Schafer often said she was “married to Santa Claus.” Her husband, Harold Schafer, the Theodore Roosevelt Medora Foundation’s founder, had a generous spirit. Whether it was getting the dinner tab for some newlyweds, paying for struggling college students’ tuition or even giving land to Bismarck State College, Schafer was eager to open his hand. That character trait rubbed off on the people he met throughout his life, and it’s why the 350 seasonal employees who gathered this spring in Medora were welcomed with a special gift of their own. The newly built Bill and Jane Marcil Life Skills Center, a $7 million student union-type cafeteria, exercise and training space, represents the first major investment made to the Theodore Roosevelt Medora Foundation (TRMF) staff and volunteers, says spokesman Justin Fisk. “It’s a place where we’ll be doing not only our big opening season training, but life skills training throughout the summer,” Fisk says. Before thousands of visitors fill the quaint, historical town in western North Dakota, the staff receives training in much more than basic customer service. TRMF President Randy Hatzenbuhler says the 26,000-square-foot facility, which includes a full-size replica of the Burning Hills Amphitheatre, allows the organization to communicate the message, morals and mission of the Foundation more effectively. “The building provides an opportunity to take care |

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of our staff and volunteers and really develop them into the future leaders of our region,” he says. The center also honors Sheila’s legacy and her dedication to education. “When we did spring orientation, she always brought down the roof at those things,” Fisk says. “She would always say, ‘You guys need to get out and experience Medora. Always keep learning.’ So part of the Life Skills Center will be to do that same thing, even though Sheila’s not here to do it herself.” He continues, “It’s our duty to carry on Harold and Sheila’s vision and what they dreamed Medora could be like.” Medora is served by Roughrider Electric Cooperative.

VALUABLE LESSONS The types of classes and training offered at the center will evolve over time, Hatzenbuhler says, based on want and need, but currently the roughly 100 international staff can take an English class and numerous employees are attending a money management course taught by local residents to guide the students with budgeting and finance skills. Also, Hatzenbuhler says some of the most valuable ideas for the construction of the center came directly from a brainstorming meeting with the staff and volunteers. “Many of the students who work in Medora come with an interest in theater and music, so they

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Theodore Roosevelt Medora Foundation President Randy Hatzenbuhler, far left, Mike Beaudoin, foundation chief operating officer, next to Hatzenbuhler, and the large team of Medora workers have put the new center to good use this summer.

requested rooms where they could practice and avoid falling behind on those skills during the summer,” Hatzenbuhler says. “The sound-proof rooms are always being used to practice their instrument, whether it is a clarinet or their voice.” Fisk says Harold and Sheila felt their success was due to the many skills they gained from others, and were thrilled that students could do that in Medora. When Bill and Jane Marcil donated $1 million to the project, they also saw it as an important tool to attract and retain talented young people. “Something like this takes Medora from one of those places where people can spend a summer and recall one of the best of their lives, but they spend a summer now and realize they are laying the foundation for the rest of a successful life,” Fisk says. “The Marcils realized that

and totally jumped in with the idea that we could help prepare the future leaders of the state and region.” Though Sheila can no longer address the hundreds of young people working in Medora, her message lingers through a facility designed with them in mind. “She was a lot like Santa Claus, too, because everybody that got to know her got a gift – whether it was something simple, like a little toy for kids or a piece of advice, she always offered the most welcoming hello and hug along with her coined phrase ‘Hello, you wonderful people,’ ” Fisk remembers. “It wouldn’t matter what kind of day you’re having, if you heard that you automatically turned and saw her smiling face and your life was better that day.” n Maxine Herr is a freelance writer from Bismarck.

WINERY OPENS NEAR DICKINSON

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n Dickinson, Medora’s neighboring community, a new winery is ready to welcome western North Dakota travelers. Fluffy Fields Vineyard and Winery, located just outside of Dickinson, is North Dakota’s newest winery, opening June 1. Fluffy Fields Vineyard and Winery is a familyowned-and-operated farm winery featuring grapes and fruit grown in its local vineyards, orchards and gardens, along with locally grown produce. Owners Kevin and Deb Kinzel had grown and created custom wines from their own vineyard and garden. The hobby, which started with crafting wines out of a garage, eventually turned into a business. The winery includes a restaurant and winetasting room, which is open year-round with a chef and pastry chef on staff. “We love getting farmers’ fruits and we’re farm to table, so we like to have things that are fresh in our community to serve in our tasting room,” Deb says. “It’s a fun, new tourism attraction for southwestern North Dakota.” Until the winery’s grand opening Aug. 26, it is serving other North Dakota wines. By August, it will have a Marquette, a red wine, and a Brianna, a white wine. Going forward, local wines are

being produced from grape vines, cherry and haskap bushes, fruit trees (including apple, plum and chokecherry), and the winery’s garden (which includes strawberry, rhubarb, carrots and pumpkin). Fruit, grape and a mead wine, made from North Dakota honey, will all be available. The winery, served by Roughrider Electric Cooperative, also offers tours of the grounds and facilities.

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To learn more, contact: Fluffy Fields Vineyard & Winery 2708 21st St. E., Dickinson, ND 58601 www.fluffyfields.com Phone: 701-590-2203 or 701-483-2242 D A K O T A

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Oxbow native Amy Anderson continues her progress as an LPGA tour golfer. COURTESY PHOTO

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n her third year on the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) tour, Amy Anderson forges ahead along a challenging path. While she’s poised to move into the upper tiers of pro golf, titles and rich purses are not her motivation. “It’s not about your journey,” Anderson says. “It’s about helping other people on their journey.” Anderson was raised in Oxbow, south of Fargo, in a family that emphasized work, faith, education and service. Her parents are Mark and Twyla Anderson, members of Cass County Electric Cooperative. As a young girl, Amy took up golf, and supportive family members and early coaching enabled her to excel. A home-schooled student, Amy graduated from high school at age 16, then entered North Dakota State University. In her collegiate career, Amy set the NCAA record for most career match victories (20), earned league golfer of the year honors four straight years, and earned academic all-American honors. She graduated from NDSU in 2013, with a degree in accounting. In 2015, her second year as an LPGA player, Amy exceeded $130,000 in earnings, and ended the playing year as the 81st ranked player. A highlight of her year was twice shooting 65 in tour events. While playing the 2015 tour, Amy successfully completed the rigorous certified public accountant exam. Amy’s results through the first half of the 2016 LPGA season have produced a little less success than she had hoped to achieve. “I was sort of struggling with my swing, and I was |

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at a plateau and wasn’t making progress,” she says. She said a helpful short game coach has moved into her full-time coach position, and they are making some adjustments to her swing. A best-ever finish in a major event – tie for 52nd at the U.S. Women’s Open in July – is a sign the adjustments are working. “My swing is in transition now, but I’m really excited going forward,” Amy says. As excited as she is about playing progress, Amy says this in not her primary focus. “My value as a person doesn’t come from my performance on the golf course,” she says. “My character is so much more important to me than my golf score. Whether I am at the top succeeding, or if I am struggling, I am going to treat people with the utmost respect. I am going to be kind,” she says. Amy forged these unselfish values in her North Dakota home. “My parents modeled this every single day for me – the hard work, the integrity, the kindness – always being there if somebody needs a helping hand. They are a huge inspiration to me.” She carries North Dakota attributes proudly and persistently. “The thing that stands out for me about North Dakotans is hard work – you just put your head down, and persevere no matter what,” Amy says. “And it’s about integrity, always operating with honesty, and treating people really, really well, no matter how they treat you. I’m really grateful for that foundation.” Calling herself a “process person,” Amy fits improvements in her golf game into her life process. “The results, how you play, of course that’s important, but it's not always in your control,” Amy says. “So it’s just keeping first things first, enjoying the process, and being grateful for every day you have and every opportunity you're given, because you just never know when that's going to be taken away.” Late last year, Amy seized another big opportunity – across the globe to the continent of Africa. She joined a team of LPGA players participating in “Golf Fore Africa,” a project dedicated to bringing clean water to African villages and remote areas. “Golf Fore Africa” is a foundation led by LPGA Hall of Fame member Betsy King, who was part of Amy's team. While in Africa, the LPGA players viewed how modern wells are delivering healthy water to villages that have long suffered with contaminated water supplies. n Kent Brick is editor of North Dakota Living. He can be reached at kbrick@ndarec.com.

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LEARN SMARTER.

 Students benefit from academic programs tuned to the job market, including Agribusiness, Business Process Integration Management, Computer Information Systems and Software Engineering.  The new Gaukler Family Wellness, Health and Physical Education Center—including fitness facilities for all students and a new home for VCSU’s athletic training and exercise science progams—will open this fall.  Outstanding offerings in Teacher Education now include an online Master of Arts in Teaching program, which complements our renowned undergraduate elementary and secondary education programs, and an online Master of Education program.

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s North Dakota adjusts to a changing economic environment, TrainND continues to partner with companies to assure the current workforce remains viable and valuable. TrainND is a workforce training network with points of contact at Bismarck State College (BSC), Williston State College, Lake Region State College in Devils Lake and the North Dakota State College of Science in Wahpeton. From those colleges, TrainND instructors reach out to businesses to offer customized training, whether it’s in the oil and gas industry, health care, manufacturing or other skills. Specific programs range from training employees to obtain their commercial driver’s license (CDL) to welding certification, to certified nurse assistant training to advancing computer skills. Programs also include soft skills training on topics such as teamwork, communications and conflict resolution. When TrainND was launched in 1999, its main goal was to attract new businesses and retain current businesses for North Dakota, says Deanette Piesik, with TrainND Northwest at Williston State College. “TrainND is committed to building tomorrow’s workforce by analyzing goals and developing training solutions to advance a business’ most important asset: human capital. TrainND will work with companies in providing business solutions and opportunities for organizations to succeed in today’s knowledge-based, high-tech economy,” says Sara Vollmer, with TrainND Southwest at BSC. When the oil boom exploded in western North Dakota, Piesik’s division was reaching out to 400 or more companies, training 16,000 workers a year. While those numbers have decreased with the slowing of the Bakken activity, the area’s TrainND program has adjusted to other areas. “We’re trying to think about the future skills that the oil and gas industry will need and start to offer that training to companies,” she says. For example, TrainND is offering more CDL training, crane training and lightduty industrial equipment training as companies invest in the skills they know their employees will need in the future. As companies have downsized their in-staff safety training personnel, TrainND is also stepping into that role more, conducting the monthly safety meetings for companies. “We have very good instructors throughout the state that we can share. That has added to our ability to meet the needs of business and industry in the state,” Piesik says. Instructors either go to the company, or employees

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Bismarck State College's mobile welding trailer.

go to the college campus for training. Basin Electric Power Cooperative’s Leland Olds Station in Stanton utilizes the TrainND welding program, says Jamey Backus, plant manager. “It keeps them in practice and reaffirms their skills and it gives us more confidence throughout the plant, knowing that our welders are meeting a standard,” he says. BSC brings a mobile welding trailer and an instructor to area power plants, making training accessible and more cost-effective for the industry. “The BSC welding trailer is such a valuable asset to all the power plants in the area, because that trailer can travel from one to another to make sure their employees have the skills they need,” Backus says. BSC offers programs ranging from welding to industrial training, but also offers mentorship, leadership and other professional development programs. Offering in-state training at a reasonable cost is TrainND’s goal, Piesik says. “It really is a cost-savings for the companies. When you can keep employees in the state, that’s a bonus for them,” she says. “For the state of North Dakota, it’s made us a leader in investing in the skills that our companies need as well as the skills that workers will need,” she says. TrainND also helps short-term training programs at colleges to grow skilled labor in the state, such as electricians and plumbers. TrainND trainees receive credit for prior learning, and documented skills training through TrainND can be applied to the college classroom to continue an education and obtain a degree. “As a state, if we want a more educated state, we have to look for avenues for workers to upgrade their skills and training that can provide that career ladder,” Piesik says. To learn more, visit www.trainnd.com. n Luann Dart is a freelance writer and editor who lives in the Elgin area.

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800 S 3rd St | Bismarck | 701.258.7700 |

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“Ann was very patient with us when we struggled to find the right home for our family. She worked around her busy schedule to find time to look at the houses we were interested in and found just the one we were looking for.” Holly and Anthony

Free wireless internet, microwaves & fridges in every room, business & fitness center, free bright side breakfast, 100% non-smoking building, indoor swimming pool & spa

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1035 S. Washington St., • Bismarck, ND 58504 D A K O T A L I V I N G |

Naomi Rossow, Broker 701-290-3931 Email: naomi@valleytel.net Licensed in North Dakota and South Dakota

View additional listings at www.landofdakota.com NEW LISTING in DIVIDE COUNTY. The natural beauty is in place and ready to become a small ranch headquarters or the home site of your dreams. 131.70 acres of rolling grass and tranquil landscapes. Property is fenced. Well and electricity. Excellent county road access. Eight miles NE of Grenora, ND and less than an hour from Williston. Go to www.landofdakota.com for photos. $330,000. NEW LISTING in STANLEY, ND at 403 5th St. SE. This stately brick home has been completely remodeled from top to bottom, both levels. Plumbing, wiring, heating systems, light fixtures, flooring, windows, bathroom fixtures, fireplace inserts…all new! Gorgeous mixed woods and top notch design throughout. Kitchen island with sink, stainless steel appliances, including 6 grill gas range with hood and pot filler. Dbl attached garage and sunroom. You can’t build a home of this quality and finish for the price. $399,000. Adjoining lots or small acreage can be purchased as well. Call to schedule an appointment. Go to www.landofdakota.com for photos. PRICE REDUCED BY $50,000 on this Badlands Beauty! Sellers are motivated to offer this property for another owner’s enjoyment. 169 acres nestled in the Badlands and 15 miles from Medora. Adjoins Forest Service and State Land. The 2 Bed, 1 Bath Bunkhouse has electricity and a land line…which is a BIG money saver for future plans on the property. Qualifies for gratis tag. Artesian for livestock. Scenic and private. $622,500. Go to www.landofdakota.com for photos. w w w . n d l i v i n g . c o m


Be the light. No one should go hungry. To help feed those in need in our communities, employees plant a garden each year with the help of local kids, so food pantries can serve fresh vegetables. Our business is providing power and light, but feeding the hungry shines a light brighter than any we can create.

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touchstoneenergy.com | N O R T H D A K O T A

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TAKE A TURN FOR THE BETTER. NEW Magnum™ Rowtrac™ tractors’ exclusive rear track oscillation keeps power on the ground through even the tightest turns. Get better flotation and more flexibility with handling that compares to wheeled tractors. See your Case IH dealer about a NEW Magnum Rowtrac tractor to get more in-field power on your ground.

YOUR NORTH DAKOTA CASE IH DEALERS Visit the Case IH website: www.caseih.com and ND Case IH Roughrider dealers website: www.CaseIHRoughriders.com ©2016 Case IH Dealers / All rights reserved. Case IH is a registered trademark of CNH America LLC. w w w . n d l i v i n g . c o m

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Inspired Living

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Laugh with me, or AT me

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hen the good Lord was handing out the “Betty Crocker baking gene,” it was almost time for His coffee break, He was hungry, thirsty, understandably distracted, and He totally overlooked me! Let me start by telling you, one of the best compliments my mother ever gave me was when I was sharing a meal with company at her house. I have no idea why, but the male guest looked at me and said, Roxanne Henke “Don’t you cook?” And, before I could even figure out why he would ask that, my mom (not one to hand out compliments easily) piped up and said, “Oh! Roxy is a great cook!” Not to toot my own horn—OK, I will—I am a good cook. But, I’ve learned, cooking and baking are two, completely different beasts. For instance, fragrant rosemary beef roast vs. from-scratch German chocolate cake. The first one happens all the time at my house, the second, never. It won’t take long and you’ll understand. I was going to surprise my husband by baking ginger snap cookies. As I mixed the batter, I could smell the molasses, the ginger, imagine the crispness of that thin shell of sugar rolled around the outside. Well, it’s a good thing I had a good imagination that day, because my ginger snaps were nothing like the ginger snaps of old. I opened the oven door to find cookies, well, to find a “cookie.” Yes, one, just one, large, flat (but fragrant) cookie. There was no stretch of my imagination that would allow me to call it a ginger snap, so I renamed it a “puddle cookie.” My lovingly made dough (which I’d even chilled) had melted into one solid puddle. Now, good, conservative, German-Russian that I am, would not allow me to take the pan straight to the garbage. Nope, I am a child of parents from the Great Depression and I was taught you don’t throw away anything that might possibly be any good. This includes cottage cheese containers, margarine tubs, stubs of candles, paper that has printing on only one side, and baked cookie dough that just might possibly taste good even though it is as flat as a credit card, and dark as fireplace ash. I let the pan cool for a minute, then took the edge of my spatula and sliced the cookie, the one gigantic cookie, into squares. I transferred the squares to a cooling rack. Then, good little German-Russian that I am, I got up my nerve, broke off a corner, and popped it in my mouth. Oh. Wow. Would you believe it was chewy and |

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good? My Depression-era parents had trained me right! So, fast forward a couple months and I have three, over-ripe bananas on my counter, which means it’s time to bake banana bread. Now, I have baked many a loaf of banana bread over the years, and only once did I forget to add the oil to the recipe. (It turned out just fine.) I pulled out my cookbook, and opened it to the well-worn quick bread/banana bread section. I was in a bit of a hurry, since I had to be somewhere at 10:30 a.m. My plan was to mix together the dry ingredients, then when I returned home, add the wet ingredients and bake. With my left hand, I grabbed my sugar container (in a cupboard above my head) and with my right, I grabbed the flour. You can probably predict what happened. The flour container slipped out of my hand, fell to the floor, the lid popped off, and yes, it looked like the blizzard of ’66 had blown through my kitchen. I had just enough time to sweep and scrub the floor and then I had to dash to my appointment. A couple hours pass and I’m back home ready to finish my baking project. The dry ingredients are mixed together (I used none of the flour from the floor, just for the record). I added the wet ingredients and stir. It seems just a little dry, so I pour in a tiny bit more milk and stir. Then I put the mixture into the greased and floured pan and pop it in the oven. Ta-da! I’m a clean-as-I-go cook, so I run a sink full of water and wash my mixing bowl. I reach for the measuring cups and what do I find lying on the kitchen counter? BANANAS! Three of them. Banana bread bananas! Yes, I just about went bananas when I spied them. I dashed to the oven and almost burned my fingers reaching for the baking pan. By my calculations, my banana bread had only been baking banana-less for three minutes. So, I scraped the batter out of the pan, into my newly washed mixing bowl, quickly mashed the brown bananas, re-oiled and floured the pan, dumped everything back into the pan and pushed it into the oven. I didn’t even dare say, “Ta-da.” I set the timer, washed my bowl (again), and waited. Fifty-five minutes later, my toothpick tester came out clean, and my new recipe invention: twice-baked banana bread sat gloriously browned on a cooling rack. And, I was spent. The moral of this little baking disaster tale is thus: If you are invited to my house for supper, that is what you will get: supper. If I were you, I’d BYOD – bring your own dessert. n Roxanne (Roxy) Henke lives and (rarely) bakes from her home in rural North Dakota. One of her favorite Bible verses is: Laughter does good like medicine. (Proverbs 17:22) She is the author of eight novels. You can contact her at roxannehenke@yahoo.com.

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Norsk Høstfest adds to experiences

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orsk Høstfest is celebrating 39 years by adding Scandinavian learning experiences and expanding its Viking Village, Author's Corner and Høstfest University. It all begins Sept. 27 with the Tuesday evening concert by Norway's brother duo, Solli-Tangen, accompanied by the Minot Symphony Orchestra. The concert will be held at Ann Nicole Nelson Hall on the Minot State University campus. The symphony organization is handling ticket sales. Norsk Høstfest week continues Sept. 28-Oct. 1 with the Great Hall of Viking daily concerts featuring Big & Rich, Neil Sedaka, Emmylou Harris, Daniel O’Donnell, Sara Evans, Dwight Yoakam, Chicago, and Tommy James & the Shondells. On the festival’s free stages, shows run continuously with a wide multitude of music and arts programs that include country and classic musicians, cloggers, Scandinavian dancers, and even a Danish comedian who juggles and performs magic tricks. In addition to entertainment, food probably ranks as the festival’s other biggest draw. “There is literally nowhere else between the West Coast and Minneapolis where you can enjoy Scandinavian dining such as our En To Tre and Scandi restaurants, where we bring in chefs from Norway to prepare and serve full-course meals,” Norsk Høstfest President David Reiten said. “We’ve also added kitchen demonstrations where these chefs share their knowledge and recipes.” Hands-on interests are being met with the development and growth of attractions, such as the Nordic Demonstration Kitchens, Høstfest University, Viking Village, the Author's Corner and new interactive games this year that teach participants about heritage and Scandinavia in a fun, entertaining manner. “What keeps us alive is that we are always evolving, always looking to make it bigger and better,” Reiten asserted. This year, Høstfest University, a Scandinavian folk school for adults, is offering 18 different courses. Arne & Carlos, knitters from Norway, are among instructors teaching for the first time. Woodcarving, rosemaling and jewelry making are among class options; participants take home the handcrafted item they have made. w w w . n d l i v i n g . c o m

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Book lovers of all ages enjoy the Author's Corner where various writers read from their books and talk about their life experiences. Hammered metal, flute making and drop spindling are among ancient Nordic arts being demonstrated in the Viking Village. Nearby is Trømsø Cultural Village, where artists from Norway demonstrate ancient crafts such as felting. “Unparalleled entertainment, food, shopping, learning and Scandinavian culture await you at Norsk Høstfest,” Reiten proclaimed. “If you’ve never been to the Scandinavian countries, this is the most authentic Scandinavian experience that you can find. It’s impossible to fully describe. You have to be here!” For more information and to purchase reserved tickets for the Great Hall of Vikings performers, En To Tre and Høstfest University classes, visit www.hostfest.com. n Candi Helseth is a freelance writer from Minot.

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n its role as a corporate sponsor, Touchstone Energy Cooperatives has been a Norsk Høstfest partner and supporter since 1999. Norsk Høstfest Association President David Reiten calls the Touchstone Energy Cooperatives partnership “integral to the success of the festival.” At the Touchstone Energy Cooperatives booth, Norsk Høstfest guests line up for free freshly baked cookies and an opportunity to register for great prizes. Last year, Touchstone Energy Cooperatives volunteers distributed more than 20,000 cookies. Heidi Robbins, who has volunteered every year since she began working at Burke-Divide Electric Cooperative (BDEC) in 2009, is among the employees, directors and retirees from 20 North Dakota, Minnesota and Montana cooperatives who volunteer during the event. “It’s fun to be part of Høstfest,” said Robbins, BDEC’s member services manager. “Every year, there are new attractions and additions that just keep improving the overall festival.” The Touchstone Energy Cooperatives-sponsored Copenhagen Hall boasts Scandinavian-inspired sidewalk cafes, two entertainment stages and the Artisans’ Heritage Village. “Our involvement at Høstfest allows us to connect with members at the end of the line and to show our members what the cooperative difference is all about,” said organizer Jeremy Woeste, Basin Electric Power Cooperative member media coordinator. Touchstone Energy Cooperatives is a national alliance of more than 750 member-owned electric cooperatives in 46 states. n

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High winds, hot temperatures and dry conditions can keep rural firefighters busy in the summer. Tell us about a firefighter in your community or share an experience involving a fire. Let’s honor these local heroes — who are most often volunteers. FIRES AND FIREFIGHTERS DON’T TAKE HOLIDAYS We had a ground hay fire on Christmas Eve Day. The Medina fire department responded in no time with all units and most of the volunteers. Even though they really couldn’t do much with the ground hay, they came. They cared. We are very proud of the Medina fire department and all the volunteers for a job well done. Bless them!

Kathy Hieb Member of Northern Plains Electric Cooperative

FOREVER GRATEFUL FOR LOCAL HEROES A few years ago on a warm fall day, my husband decided to burn some old stumps and tree branches. While the day started out calm, the winds picked up during the afternoon. My husband’s bonfire quickly got out of hand, threatening to burn nearby fields and woodlands. My frantic emergency call resulted in the prompt appearance of the Bismarck Rural Fire Department. Firefighters extinguished almost an acre of scorched earth. I never caught their names that day, but we will be forever grateful to these local heroes who volunteer their time to prevent disasters!

Deb Larson Member of Capital Electric Cooperative

SILENT PRAYER ANSWERED It was a beautiful October day with very little wind. It was a perfect time to burn garbage that had been piling up all summer. The burning barrels were full of bale string, old oil cans and paper of all kinds. I started burning paper and then the string. It burned slowly, and then some pieces fell alongside the barrel. I thought it would be fine; there was only more string to be burned. But the dry grass also caught on fire, spreading and burning along the wall of the old barn. I got the hose and started putting water on it, but the fire got away from me, moving faster than I could spray water. We live along a busy rural road, and someone passing by had seen me and called the fire department. I don’t know who did, but I was so glad. At first, I was embarrassed to have bothered the firefighters to come out for a small fire that I should have been able to handle. But later, when I realized it |

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could have been the old barn and all the wooden fence going up in smoke, I was ever so thankful. Someone had been my guardian angel that day and the fire department had been the answer to a prayer I had not even realized I had silently spoken. Bernice Wanner Member of Roughrider Electric Cooperative

TIMES HAVE CHANGED Back when I was a child in the early 1940s, there were few rural fire trucks and most small towns had limited coverage. During one summer storm, lightning started a grass fire about a mile west of our farm. All of our family grabbed dusty gunny sacks, soaked them in the cattle’s water tank, took along pails of extra water and headed to the fire. We used the wet sacks to hit the flames as they crept along in the dry grass. I remember it being smoky and hot, as I swung my sack to help beat the flames until we got the fire out. I was about 8 or 9 years old. Nobody got hurt. Thank goodness we now have 911 calls, powerful trucks with lots of water, and firefighters — including several in my family, who often risk their lives but do the job quickly and safely.

Marlene Kouba Member of Consolidated Telephone Cooperative

COMMUNITY EFFORT AND BEYOND In April 2012, southwest of Walcott, a nearby neighbor hired a construction company to remove some trees on her property. The company had a controlled burn that got out of hand due to blustery winds and dry conditions. The fire burnt two-miles long and one-mile wide across the surrounding grass fields. My house ended up being in the middle of the path of the fire. Volunteer firefighters from eight neighboring towns, along with the forestry service, came to fight the fire. My neighbor, Nick Jordheim, informed the firefighters that there was a house in the path of the fire. A nearby farmer, Dan Braaten, had a dozer in the next field. He and his dad, Julian Braaten, and his cousin, Randy Thompson, disked the CRP grass around my house and created a fire break. The fire jumped the break and kept moving toward my house. The farmers continued to fight the fire by disking grass land adjacent to my yard. There were times where you could not see the farm equipment due to all the smoke. Neighbors came from

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all over to help me get valuables out of the house. Crews were forced to start a back burn so the fire would not jump Highway 18 and burn the Sheyenne National Grasslands. An airplane was called in to dump water on the fire. Firefighters fought the fire most of the day. The American Red Cross was there to provide food for all of the people. The fire came within a football field of the house. Words cannot explain how grateful I am for my neighbors, nearby farmers, firefighters, forestry service, and the American Red Cross for helping fight the fire to save my house. To this day, I don’t know who all helped, so I am hoping those who did will read this and know my gratitude. Without your help, my house would have gone up in flames. I would have lost everything. I did lose some farm equipment, hunting blinds, fence and trees in the fire, but overall it is minor damage compared to what could have happened. My house was saved. Thank you to all who helped that day.

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UPCOMING READER REPLY QUESTIONS: SEPT.: This summer, North Dakota’s nursing homes were faced with big budget cuts due to an economic downturn. Lift up a nursing home in your area, and share how this valuable and vital service helps a family member or the community. Deadline for submission: Aug. 16 OCT.: The general election is quickly approaching, and your vote is important. As a North Dakotan, what issue is most important to you nationally and will guide you as a vote? NEGATIVE LETTERS WILL NOT BE PUBLISHED. Deadline for submission: Sept. 16 WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU: We pay $25 for each letter we print. Email to cdevney@ndarec.com or mail to READER REPLY, North Dakota Living, P.O. Box 727, Mandan, ND 58554-0727. w w w . n d l i v i n g . c o m

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When education is more than school

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This summer I had the privilege of attending North Dakota Governor’s Schools for English studies on the campus of North Dakota State University. NDGS is a six-week program for students with above-average scholastic abilities that is funded by the North Dakota Legislature. Other than English studies, students — or scholars — are able to immerse themselves in other disciplines such as science, performing arts, engineering, architecture, mathematics and Emily Severinson information technology. As scholars, we experienced an in-depth education regarding our various disciplines and more. We participated in fine arts workshops such as sculpture and ceramics. I was in drama, and we performed selected scenes from Marcus is Walking. The course work is rigorous, but I never found it to be impossible even though we were challenged academically and asked to step out of our comfort zones. NDGS immerses its scholars in an environment

that encourages individuality and personal growth. This experience gave me the opportunity to build relationships I’ll treasure for a lifetime. Participants were constantly reminded by NDGS Director Dr. Boyer that this isn’t high school. We were held to higher standards and surrounded by likeminded students who strove to go beyond what was expected of them in an academic setting. The staff, including our teachers, treated us like adults. We were encouraged to follow the 5 Ps: prompt, persistent, personable, present and principled. I intend to hold myself to these principles as I go into my senior year and throughout my life. I would highly recommend NDGS to students who want to get a taste of college life and grow both academically and individually. One of the many benefits is that scholars receive one high school credit in their area of study. After all, each discipline is essentially a crash course. This is extremely fulfilling. For information on NDGS, visit www.ndsu.edu/ govschool/. n Emily Severinson, 17, is a senior at Central Valley School in Buxton, where she participates in drama. She also enjoys writing, reading and binge-watching history documentaries. Emily is the daughter of Gordon and Elizabeth Severinson from Reynolds.

Trinity Regional Eyecare Western Dakota (701) 572-7641 (800) 735-4926 24-hour emergency services available. Call to schedule an appointment. No referrals necessary.

(701) 774-8785 (800) 735-4926

Trinity Community Clinic Western Dakota 1321 West Dakota Parkway • Williston, ND trinityhealth.org |

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only you’ll know you have it on. It’s comfortable and won’t make you feel like you have something stuck in your ear. It provides high quality audio so soft sounds and distant conversations will be easier to understand. Try it for yourself with our exclusive home trial. Some people need hearing aids but many just want the extra boost in volume that a PSAP gives them. We want you to be happy with Perfect Choice HD, so we are offering to let you try it for yourself. Call now, and you’ll find out why so many satisfied seniors are now enjoying their Perfect Choice HD, hearing their grandchildren and what the world has to say. Call today!

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81078

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Perfect Choice HD is NOT a hearing aid. It is a Personal Sound Amplification Product (PSAP). Hearing aids can only be sold by an audiologist or a licensed hearing instrument specialist following hearing tests and fitting appointments. Once the audiologist had you tested and fitted, you would have to pay as much as $5000 for the product.

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Calendar of Events AUGUST THROUGH Aug. 26 • “You Don’t Have to Put a Feather On It,” Plains Art Museum, Fargo. 701-551-6123. THROUGH Aug. 27 • “t(here): Recent Acquisitions,” Plains Art Museum, Fargo. 701-551-6123. THROUGH Aug. 31 • “Passages: Prints by Jessica Matson-Fluto,” Plains Art Museum, Fargo. 701-551-6123. THROUGH Sept. 10 • “Archetypes: Portraits by Justin Stevenson,” The Arts Center, Jamestown. 701-251-2496. 4, 11, 18, 25 • Bluegrass Jam Sessions, 7-9 p.m., Frontier Village, Jamestown. 701-320-2629. 6-13 • CANDISC Bicycle Tour, begins and ends in Garrison, with celebration lunch 11 a.m.1 p.m. in Garrison City Park. 800-799-4242 or 701-463-2345. 8-12 • Junior Zookeeper Camp, 1-4 p.m., Dakota Zoo, Bismarck. 701-223-7543. 10 • Grazing Lands Field Day and Tour, 1-5:30 p.m., Jed and Melissa Rider Ranch, near Alexander. 701-527-5169. 11 • First on First featuring Blue Ribbon Band, 5 p.m., downtown, Dickinson. 701-690-3451. 11 • Magic City Antique Car Club Meeting, 6:45 p.m., Pizza Ranch, Minot. 701-721-3617. 11 • Comstock House Lawn Game League: Skittles, 6:30 p.m., Comstock House, Moorhead, Minn. 218-299-5511, ext. 6737. 11 • Starlight Cinema Outdoor Movie “Labyrinth,” Sleepy Hollow Theatre and Arts Park, Bismarck. 701-319-0894. 12 • Pediatric Therapy Partners Free Developmental Screening, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., 4501 Coleman St. N., Suite 103, Bismarck. 701-751-6336. 12-13 • Bioethics Seminar, Gary Tharaldson School of Business, University of Mary, Bismarck. 701-355-8113.

12-13 • Devils Lake Rockfest, 1012 Woodland Dr., Devils Lake. 701-662-5996. 13 • Pipestem Creek Trail Run, Pipestem Creek Trail, Jamestown. 701-252-3982. 13 • Williams and Ree Concert, Frontier Village Amphitheater, Jamestown. 701-320-2629. 13 • Pioneer Days, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Frontier Village, Jamestown. 701-320-2629. 13, 20, 27 • Dirt Track Stock Car Races, 7 p.m., Jamestown Speedway, Jamestown. 701-251-2897. 13, 20, 27 • Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-noon, city park, Stanley. 701-595-0898. 13, 27 • Wild West Shootout, Frontier Village, Jamestown. 701-320-2629. 14 • Gear Grinder Mountain Bike Race, Pipestem Creek Trail, Jamestown. 701-252-3982. 14 • Dog Days of Summer Hike, Ft. Lincoln State Park, Mandan. 701-663-3215. 14 • Gospelfest, 1 p.m., Dykshoorn Park, Mandan. 701-663-3215. 14 • Village Fair, Prairie Village Museum, Rugby. 701-776-6414. 14, 21, 28 • Front Porch Chats, 2 p.m., Stutsman County Memorial Museum, Jamestown. 701-252-6741. 15 • Minot Association of Builders Past Presidents’ Golf Tournament, noon sign-in, Vardon Golf Club, Minot. 701-852-0496. 17, 24, 31 • Comics and Sequential Art with Leo Winstead, 5:30-9 p.m., The Arts Center, Jamestown. 701-251-2496. 18 • Nourishing Boomers and Beyond Program, 10-11 a.m., Bismarck Senior Center, Bismarck. 701-221-6865. 18 • Classic Saxophone Performance by Alan Wish, 7 p.m., The Arts Center, Jamestown. 701-251-2496. 18 • First on First featuring 32 Below Band, 5 p.m., downtown, Dickinson. 701-690-3451.

19 • Toby Keith Concert, 8 p.m., 4 Bears Casino and Lodge, New Town. 800-294-5454. 19-20 • Masters Walleye Circuit, Devils Lake. 580-765-9031. 19-20 • Wild West GrillFest, Dykshoorn Park, Mandan. 701-663-3215. 20 • Demolition Derby, Dacotah Speedway, Mandan. 701-663-3215. 20 • Kybiru Adventure Triathlon, Harmon Lake, Mandan. 701-663-3215. 20 • Acrylic Painting–Landscapes with Leo Winstead, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., The Arts Center, Jamestown. 701-251-2496. 20 • Art and Wine Walk, DeMers Avenue and Fourth Street, Grand Forks. 701-746-0444. 20 • Bubble Bliss, Gateway to Science Center, Bismarck. 701-258-1975. 20 • Southwest Speedway Championship Night, 7 p.m., 10 miles south of Dickinson. 701-483-8722. 20-21 • Northern Plains Ethnic Festival, Prairie Outpost Park, Dickinson. 701-483-8775. 21 • Corn Feed and Flea Market, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Buckstop Junction, Bismarck. 701-220-6311. 23 • Reader’s Theater, 7-9 p.m., The Arts Center, Jamestown. 701-251-2496. 25 • Comstock House Lawn Game League: Bocce Ball, 6:30 p.m., Comstock House, Moorhead, Minn. 218-299-5511, ext. 6737. 25 • Magic City Antique Car Club Cruise, Minot. 701-721-3617. 25 • Open Mic Night, 7-9 p.m., The Arts Center, Jamestown. 701-251-2496.

North Dakota Living publishes calendar events free of charge. We only publish the date, name of the event, time, place and location, and contact telephone number. To submit an item, email cdevney@ndarec.com or mail to: NDAREC, calendar of events, North Dakota Living, P.O. Box 727, Mandan ND 58554-0727. North Dakota Living does not guarantee the publication of any event.

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Conveniently located off Exit 159 at the intersection of Hwy. 83 & I-94

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Watch the Stars Come Out!

or (701) 223-9151

Aug.

Celebrate summer by shopping at a Farmers Market near you!

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Join us in Branson and

(800) DAYS-INN

It’s The Season For The Good Stuff

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25 • First on First featuring Chancey Williams Band, 5 p.m., downtown, Dickinson. 701-690-9451. 27 • Hops Harvestour, 10 a.m., Ostlie’s Sunnyside Acres, Carrington. 701-285-3344. 27 • Harmon Lake Trail Run, Harmon Lake, Mandan. 701-663-3215. 27 • Corn and Frank Feed, campground, Ft. Lincoln State Park, Mandan. 701-663-3215. 27 • Slide the City, Sunset Drive, Mandan. 701-663-3215. 27 • Ft. Stevenson Regatta and Beach Party, noon racing and 6 p.m. beach party, de Trobriand Marina and Fort Stevenson State park, Garrison. 800-799-4242 or 701-463-2345. 27 • Watercolor Painting–Floral with Leo Winstead, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., The Arts Center, Jamestown. 701-251-2496. 27 • Pioneer Day, Bonanzaville, West Fargo. 701-282-2822. 28 • Community Music Festival, 3-7 p.m., Atonement Lutheran Church, Jamestown. 701-368-9417. 28 • Railroad Day, N.D. State Railroad Museum, Mandan. 701-663-9322. SEPTEMBER 2-5 • Elks Labor Day Golf Championship, Jamestown Country Club, Jamestown. 701-252-8448. 3 • Wild West Shootout, Frontier Village, Jamestown. 701-320-2629. 3, 10, 17, 24 • Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-noon, city park, Stanley. 701-595-0898.

D A K O T A

The North Dakota Farmers Market and Growers Association, Inc.

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Branson Christmas Express

Tour #1 Oct. 31-Nov. 6, 2016 Tour #2 Nov. 28-Dec. 4, 2016 EXPERIENCE 9 SPECTACULAR SHOWS

Doug Gabriel • Wissmann Family SIX • George Dyer • Haygoods Hugh Brothers • Wade Lantry Conway Remembered Maxine, The Christmas Carol

Go to www.ndfu.org for details or call 800-366-8331 ext 108, Susan or ext 111, Jeff w w w . n d l i v i n g . c o m


THE F U T U R E OF

FARMING

2016

RED RIVER VALLEY FAIRGROUNDS

TUES-WED 9-5 • THURS 9-4

W E S T FA R G O , N D

7 0 1 - 2 8 2 - 2 2 0 0 • B I G I R O N FA R M S H O W. C O M

Big Iron Farm Show is a subsidiary of the Red River Valley Fair Association w w w . n d l i v i n g . c o m

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arly and Nicole Fornshell are busy teenagers; even during the summer months when some kids tend to be less active without a set schedule. An athlete, Carly wakes at 6 a.m. to run or lift weights. She is training to build strength and endurance, so she’s ready to play basketball, run crosscountry or participate in track. And Nicole, who is also involved in volleyball and track, has an important job.

PHOTOS BY CARMEN DEVNEY

Capital Electric Cooperative members Paul and Julie Fornshell (center) are raising independent, motivated daughters Carly (left) and Nicole (right). Training for today's events, they are preparing for life.

She is a teacher for Safety Village, a program sponsored by the Bismarck Parks and Recreation District, in which 5- and 6-year-olds learn about all kinds of safety including weather, traffic, electrical and more. As the siblings train for their respective sports at Century High School in Bismarck, they may not realize they are also preparing for the future. The daughters of Capital Electric Cooperative members Julie and Paul Fornshell, Carly and Nicole may not like to wake early — but when their schedules require that they do, they are making good use of their limited time, and preparing for the demands of the jobs and families they will have one day. No longer reliant on mom and dad for meals, yet appreciative for a break in their busy schedules when they can sit down as a family and eat a home-cooked meal, the sisters can make their own meals and snacks. This month, the Fornshell family shares recipes for Trail Mix and Energy Bites; two snacks they can grab and head out the door. Julie says the Energy Bites are hugely popular in their home. “We may eat it for breakfast, as a mid-day snack, or if I’m making supper, I’ll grab a couple energy bites rather than a cookie,” she says. |

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The original recipe called for flax seed and wheat germ, but Julie doesn’t keep those items on-hand. Instead, she adds more oatmeal, and the girls add protein powder to give their muscles and energy a boost. Carly believes a coach or athlete friend shared the recipe with her, and says a person can find many healthy alternatives to the recipe online. The Trail Mix, they all warn, is addicting. “It’s not healthy — but it is fun to eat,” Julie says. “It’s a little bit of that salty and sweet, and that’s what makes it so good in moderation.” Carly likes to make it and share with her friends as they travel for sports. Julie says when they make it for school-related events, they leave the peanuts out in case someone suffers from a peanut allergy. When the family learned that August is National Sandwich Month, Nicole hopped on the Internet and found the recipe for the Chicken Caesar Wrap. It’s an easy sandwich she and Carly can prepare without mom’s help, and it can be adapted to include ripe produce from a garden. To reduce preparation time, Julie buys pre-grilled chicken strips. The girls then heat it in the microwave and chop it. “What’s nice about this recipe is it has the basic ingredients, and if you want to add chopped tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers or olives, you can add whatever you want,” Julie says. While the recipe calls for Romaine lettuce, a person can replace it with Iceberg or Spinach, and place the filling in a whole-wheat or flavored wrap, tortilla or pita. “We thought it would be a fun recipe for people to customize,” Julie says. A farming family who raise cattle and crops, Julie and Paul are watching their daughters pursue their goals and develop independence. North Dakota Living thanks this busy family for sharing their recipes and a glimpse of what life is like with two motivated teenage daughters. n Carmen Devney is a communications specialist for the North Dakota Association of Rural Electric Cooperatives, Capital Electric Cooperative and Mor-Gran-Sou Electric Cooperative.

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Healthy Hints

Celebrate Sandwich Month in August

CHICKEN CAESAR WRAPS 3 2 6 ¼ ¼ ½ 5 to 6

cups shredded romaine lettuce cups cooked chicken, chopped slices cooked bacon, chopped cup grated parmesan cheese cup croutons cup Caesar dressing flour tortillas (8-inch)

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Julie’s test notes: If packing for a picnic, pack everything but the croutons and dressing in one bowl. Put the dressing in another and the croutons in a third. This keeps the croutons crunchy and the lettuce from getting too wilted. Julie Fornshell, member of Capital Electric Cooperative

TRAIL MIX 1 to

5 5 1 1 2 2 2

cups Cheerios™ cups Rice Chex™ or Corn Chex™ 10-ounce bag pretzels bag M&Ms® cups cocktail peanuts 12-ounce bags vanilla chips T. oil

Mix all ingredients minus vanilla chips and oil in a large bowl. Melt vanilla chips in microwave. Add oil for better coating consistency. Pour over ingredients and lay on wax paper to dry. Break and store in an airtight container. Julie’s test notes: The recipe makes a large batch, so cut in half if desired. Eliminate the peanuts if there is a concern about nut allergies. I once replaced the chips with vanilla almond bark, with a bit of paraffin melted in it. This worked well, also. Julie Fornshell, member of Capital Electric Cooperative

ENERGY BITES 1 cup quick cooking oatmeal ⅓ to ½ cup chocolate chips ½ cup peanut butter ⅓ cup honey 1 t. vanilla

Mix together. Refrigerate for 30 minutes. Roll into balls and store in a covered container in the refrigerator.. Julie’s test notes: You could substitute the peanut butter with sun butter, or the chocolate chips with white chips or butterscotch chips, depending on your taste.

COURTESY PHOTO

Add the first five ingredients to a medium bowl. Mix in Caesar dressing until evenly coated. Spoon into tortillas and enjoy. Serves 5 to 6.

hen I was a college student living on a frugal budget, I often packed a peanut butter sandwich for lunch. I put it in a plastic bag and placed it in my backpack with all my books. When I pulled out my crushed sandwich, my friends chuckled. My misshapen sandwich still had the same Julie Garden-Robinson, nutritional value, Ph.D., R.D., L.R.D. I reasoned. By the time I graduated, I was tired of peanut butter sandwiches and avoided them for several years. I have repaired my relationship with peanut butter sandwiches, though. Now I have a plastic container to store my sandwiches for work, so they retain their shape. According to food historians, sandwiches are often attributed to John Montagu, the fourth Earl of Sandwich. The Englishman liked to gamble and reportedly spent a solid 24 hours at a gaming table at one time. He didn’t want his gambling interrupted by sticky fingers, so he asked his cook to put meat between two slices of bread. Although the popular food is named after him, food historians do not list the earl as the “inventor” but more of the “diffuser” of the innovation. The earl was a worldwide traveler who saw delicious sandwiches in Greece and Turkey. He copied the concept and brought it back to England. What kinds of sandwiches do you like? We have a wide range of breads and fillings to keep sandwiches creative and tasty. You can boost the nutrition with your selections. Choose whole grains, lean protein and plenty of vegetables. Try fiber-rich hummus (chickpea dip) as a savory sandwich spread. Make use of seasonal fresh vegetables, such as lettuce, tomato, peppers, cucumber or onion slices. Chop some grapes or pineapple chunks to add to your sandwich. Until next time, check out “7 Steps to Creating a Sandwich” (available at www.ag.ndsu.edu/ pubs/yf/foods/fn1756.pdf) for some creative sandwich ideas. n Julie Garden-Robinson is a professor and food and nutrition specialist with the North Dakota State University Extension Service. To learn more, visit www.ag.ndsu.edu/food.

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amily-owned since 1948, Zoccoli’s Italian Delicatessen in downtown Santa Cruz, Calif., has survived into its third generation because it has adapted to changing consumer tastes and preferences. It began as a grocery, but secondgeneration owners Bob and Ann (my wife’s aunt) Zoccoli converted it to a deli when it became obvious that fewer people wanted to cook at home. The deli is now owned and managed by their sons, Russell and Craig Zoccoli, and Craig’s Al Gustin wife, Patty. The deli serves 800 to 1,000 meals a day to a clientele that includes tourists, college students and local workers, many of them in the tech industry. When we were there in late June, I asked the Zoccolis if, in fact, consumers today have an increased interest in things like organic, locally grown and sustainably produced food. They smiled, nodded and said all of that was true. The Zoccolis say they do buy locally whenever possible, which in the case of vegetables is not a problem. The adjacent Salinas Valley is often referred

to as the “salad bowl of the world.” They said they buy organic when possible, too, although organic produce is often cost-prohibitive. And they said some customers do ask if the foods were sustainably produced, although the Zoccolis said most people really don’t have a clear idea of what that means. Interestingly, the Zoccolis said they get more questions about gluten-free entrees than anything else, even though 5 percent or less of the population has gluten intolerance. Also during our brief stay, we took a tour of the Salinas Valley with guide Shawn Cassady, the Zoccolis’ brother-in-law. Cassady worked in the vegetable production industry and is now a broker, lining up trucks to haul vegetables all over the country. We saw hundreds of acres of strawberries, lettuce, broccoli, onions and other vegetables, all being harvested by migrant labor. We talked about efforts to restrict immigration or to deport undocumented workers. He said Salinas Valley agriculture would not survive without the migrants. Back at the deli, workers, some Hispanic, prepare food and serve entrees, some vegetarian, off a menu that continues to evolve so the Zoccolis can survive into another generation. n Al Gustin is a retired farm broadcaster, active rancher and a member of Mor-Gran-Sou Electric Cooperative.

A GRI I NTERNATIONAL

2017

OUR 4 0 TH YEAR! February 14-15, 2017

Bismarck Event Center - Bismarck, North Dakota Each year, thousands of farm and ranch families attend our premier regional mid-winter event. The KFYR Radio Agri International is a marketplace where farmers, ranchers and agri-businesses meet. Seminars, educational programs, a Living Ag Classroom and Farm Toy Show round out this popular event.

For more information, call 701-255-1234 or go to kfyr.com to download a booth contract.

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• Are your knees very stiff in the morning? • Do your knees hurt when going up and down stairs? • Do you frequently take Ibuprofen or Aspirin for your knee pain? • Do the activities you enjoy cause pain around your knees? If you answered YES to any of these questions, we offer a successful NON-OPERATIVE treatment program to relieve your knee pain.

Listen every weekday Beach .........................91.9 fm Bismarck.....................90.5 fm Bowman .....................91.9 fm Crosby ........................91.9 fm Devils Lake .................91.7 fm Dickinson ....................89.9 fm Fargo ..........................91.9 fm Grand Forks................89.3 fm Grand Forks................90.7 fm

Call today for a consultation on this new and exciting program combining Hyalgan lubricant injections with Theraciser Rehabilitation.

prairiepublic.org Hettinger .....................91.9 fm Jamestown .................91.5 fm Minot ..........................88.9 fm Thief River Falls ..........88.3 fm Tioga...........................91.9 fm Williston ......................88.7 fm Williston ......................89.5 fm Plentywood MT ..........91.9 fm ■ Roots, Rock, & Jazz ■ Classical

701.751.7750

10% OFF Select Portable Generators August 3 – 15

Grand Forks Bismarck Fargo Minot Williston

See store for complete details.

701-746-6481 • 800-732-4287 701-258-1267 • 800-472-2640 701-476-4600 • 800-437-4100 701-839-2263 • 800-247-0673 701-577-2263 • 855-648-2263

Home

Work

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Mon-Fri: 7AM - 5:30PM Sat: 8AM - 5:30PM

QUALITY • SERVICE • SELECTION • VALUE

We reserve the right to correct errors, limit quantities and terminate any offer at any time.

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Marketplace Forum

REAL

ESTATE

FARM

&

RANCH

WANTED

FOR

SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE • 1,300-sq.-ft. home with attached garage built in 2012 on four acres just off Interstate 94 and Highway 85 at Belfield. Price reduced to $215,000. • 6,400-sq.-ft. log home built in 2013 on 10 acres, just north of Belfield and right off Highway 85. Priced at $219,750. Additional acres available. • New 12,000-sq.-ft. shop/office building near Belfield on 4.16 acres. Floor heat, 24’ sidewall, white steel-lined inside, five drivethrough shop bays, seven offices, three baths. Priced reduced to $800,000. • 145-acre industrial park in Belfield. Annexed with city water and sewer, and has railroad access. Priced reduced to $900,000. • 9.5-acre ranchette in Bowman. Newer 1,900-sq.-ft. home, barn, arena. Nice! Just listed at $305,000. • Commercial and industrial-zoned lots for sale two miles north of Dickinson in Great Lakes First Subdivision with Highway 22 frontage. Lot sizes from three to 14 acres. • Commercial- and industrial-zoned lots for sale west of Dickinson off the new #56 Interstate 94 exchange and at the intersection of Highway 10 and 116th Avenue S.W. (new truck bypass). Lot sizes from two to 14 acres. Contact: Don Schmeling, Continental Real Estate, Dickinson. Call 701-260-5555 or 701-483-4400. View properties online at www.donschmeling.com.

1$ 5 O

Provide both open & closed cell foam insulation

www.icynene.com • profoamnd.com The Icynene Insulation System®

BIG TRACTOR PARTS STEIGER TRACTOR SPECIALIST Red & Green 10-25% savings on new replacement parts for your Steiger drive train. We rebuild axles, transmissions and drop boxes with one-year warranty. 50% savings on used parts. We buy running or damaged Steigers.

1-800-982-1769 www.bigtractorparts.com

WE BUY MINERALS We pay cash for producing or non-producing mineral interests.

Call Us Today!

1-888-735-5337 Let the ‘Foam Ranger’ rescue you from high energy costs! SYSTEMS Closed-Cell Spray-Foam Insulation. Locally Owned & Operated. 906 Airport Road Bismarck, ND 58504

LLC Residential & Commercial

(701) 400-7618 - Ken www.insulationsystemsllc.com

• Strengthens building structural integrity • Twice the insulating ability per inch of fiberglass or open-cell foam • Pole barn specialists • $$$$ Energy savings pays for investiture within 3 1/2 years

FARMERS & RANCHERS

FF

Call today to schedule

your CONCRETE jobs!

180 E Bismarck Expy. BISMARCK, ND • 701-222-3311

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Some black-out dates apply. No other discounts apply. Ample parking. Expires 1/30/2017. Code 4.

Floating slabs for: shops, garages, grain bins & barns Patios Driveways Sidewalks Parking pads Foundations Frost walls Retaining walls Rough grading Excavation Material hauling More! l

“Luxury for Less®”

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www.expresswayhotels.com

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1$ 5 O

the Across om street frd Mall oo Kirkw

9027 Hogue Road Bismarck, ND 58503 (701) 222-0377 Fax: (701) 222-4059 Mike Murray cell (701) 226-8323

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200 E Bismarck Expy. BISMARCK, ND • 701-222-2900

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Locally owned & operated since 2009.

Some black-out dates apply. No other discounts apply. Ample parking. Expires 1/30/2017. Code 4.

“Where a Good Night’s Rest Costs Less™” www.expresswayhotels.com |

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www.NorthlandCE.com 701.595.7305

Hankinson’s 15th Annual

Oktoberfest Saturday, September 24, 2016 Hankinson, North Dakota German music, food & fun for the entire family 10:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Sponsored by The Hankinson Commercial Club

For more information contact Julie Falk at 701-242-7414 or visit www.hankinsonnd.com

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TRAVEL

Advertisers‘ Index

OPPORTUNITIES

ƒƒ Acme Tools............................................................ 33

The Insulation Place

ƒƒ Ann Andre, Realtor.............................................. 18

“Spray-on Urethane”

Roofing & Insulation

ƒƒ Basin Electric Power Cooperative...................... 19

ESTABLISHED IN 1978

ƒƒ Best Western Ramkota Inn, Bismarck.............. 17

• • • • •

New Homes or Remodeling Cathedral Ceilings Commercial Buildings Farm Shops Cattle Confinements

GRAFTON (701) 352-3233 (800) 352-0620

BISMARCK (701) 255-0025 (866) 425-0025

Cowboy Inn 406 Hwy. 10 East Belfield, ND 58622 701-575-4245 15 miles to Medora and Theodore Roosevelt National Park. Western theme rooms are ground floor, non-smoking, non-pet, WiFi, cable, HBO, coffee maker, refrigerator and microwave. AARP and AAA rates. Friendly, western hospitality. EARLY CHECK-IN available.

ƒƒ Big Iron Farm Show.............................................. 29 ƒƒ Bismarck Cancer Center........................................ 7 ƒƒ Bismarck State College........................................... 5 Celebrating our 30th year in business.

Box 1113, Bismarck, ND 58502-1113 Phone: 800-283-4521 Fax: 701-258-1788 Email: apollosales@midconetwork.com www.colorbackpaintrenewer.com

ƒƒ Case IH............................................................. 20-21 ƒƒ CHI St. Alexius Health......................... Back cover ƒƒ Dakota Eye Institute............................................... 3 ƒƒ Days Inn, Bismarck.............................................. 28 ƒƒ Deeter Dental........................................ Inside back ƒƒ Dickinson State University................................. 11

FREE

Soon the “Mark” of the Beast will be enforced as Church and State unite! Let the Bible reveal. FREE BOOKS/DVDS. The Bible Says, P.O.B. 99, Lenoir City, TN 37771 thebiblesaystruth@yahoo.com • 1-888-211-1715

ƒƒ firstSTREET—Perfect Choice HD..................... 27 ƒƒ Heringer Dentistry................................................. 3 ƒƒ Jensen Travel......................................................... 17 ƒƒ Judy’s Leisure Tours Inc....................................... 25 ƒƒ Junk Yard Chic...................................................... 17

Want to reach more than 200,000 readers?

ƒƒ KFYR Radio........................................................... 32 ƒƒ LaQuinta Inns & Suites, Dickinson, Grand Forks and Minot....................................... 18

Advertise in North Dakota’s best-read publication.

ƒƒ Minot State University......................................... 11 ƒƒ Naomi Rossow Realty LLC.................................. 18 ƒƒ Norsk Høstfest...................................................... 25

For more great advertising opportunities contact: Clark A. Van Horn | 701-667-6436 cvanhorn@ndarec.com or visit www.ndliving.com

ƒƒ North Dakota Association of RECs e-communications.................................................. 7 ƒƒ North Dakota Farmers Market and Growers Association, Inc.................................................... 28 ƒƒ North Dakota Farmers Union Tours................. 28 ƒƒ North Dakota One Call......................................... 7

MARKETPLACE FORUM

IS AN EFFECTIVE PLACE TO SELL. Contact Clark,

ƒƒ Satrom Travel & Tour........................................... 18 ƒƒ Sleep Inn & Suites, Minot.................................... 11

ƒƒ Trinity Health............................Inside front cover ƒƒ Trinity Health Western North Dakota............. 26

or cvanhorn@ndarec.com |

ƒƒ Prairie Public Radio............................................. 33

ƒƒ Spine and Pain Center......................................... 33

800-234-0518

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ƒƒ North Dakota State College of Science........ 15, 17

N O R T H

D A K O T A

ƒƒ University of North Dakota.................................. 5 ƒƒ Valley City State University................................ 15 L I V I N G

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Co-op Country

BEHIND THE LENS North Dakota has some talented amateur photographers who have captured unique rural landscapes. While they may not be experts in shutter speed, aperture and sensitivity, they have learned one secret to capturing beautiful photos: snap and snap, and snap some more. Out of 10 photos taken, one might stand out based on the focus, composition, exposure and perspective. Well done, shutterbugs! Thank you for teaching and inspiring North Dakota Living readers.

Grazing peacefully at sunset on the family farm near Glenburn, these horses are hoping owner Erin Johnston will bring them a treat. A member of BurkeDivide Electric Cooperative, Erin says riding with her dad is good bonding time. She shot and submitted the photo. Dean Rummel spends a lot of time hiking in Theodore Roosevelt National Park near Medora and other rural areas with a supply of wildlife. Humble about his photography skills, Dean says he takes hundreds of photos like the one of this Great Blue Heron before he is satisfied with what he captures through the lens. Dean submitted the photo; he is a member of McKenzie Electric Cooperative and Consolidated Telcom.

With an eye for color contrasts, Dawn Adams tries to capture beautiful moments with her camera. Waiting for crops to ripen and flowers to bloom, her patience is rewarded when she discovers gems like this quivering hopper on a garden flower. Dawn and her husband, Jay, are members of Sheridan Electric Cooperative, Inc. and Nemont Telephone Cooperative, Inc. in Montana. Dawn submitted the photo.

Keeping a safe distance and using a zoom lens, photographer Katherine Plessner trailed this yearling moose, which was navigating the outskirts of Verona. Active, yet calm, the moose kept posing for the camera. Katherine and her husband, Kent, are members of Dakota Valley Electric Cooperative. Katherine submitted the photo.

North Dakota Living is seeking photos of fall activities, hunting, household helpers, grandparents, classic cars, technology and life on the farm/ranch. Of course, we also want other family favorites for upcoming Co-op Country pages. We’ll select and print them as space allows. Those whose submissions appear on this page will receive a check for $10 following publication of the magazine. We prefer high-resolution digital photos emailed to cdevney@ndarec.com, but you may also mail entries to Co-op Country, North Dakota Living, P.O. Box 727, Mandan, ND 58554-0727. Readers, North Dakota Living will not publish low-quality photos such as those taken on cell phones. When submitting photos, please include the following information: your complete name and address, your daytime phone number, and the name of your electric and/or telephone co-op. We will contact you prior to publication. NOTE: Please keep a duplicate photo, negative or file; the magazine is no longer able to return submitted photos. n |

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Putting Safety and Quality First Patient safety and high-quality care are top priorities at CHI St. Alexius Health Bismarck, which is why we are so proud that we earned an “A� grade from the Hospital Safety Score. In fact, CHI St. Alexius Health Bismarck was the only hospital in central and western North Dakota to receive the highest ranking. Our culture and commitment to patient safety begins with our associates, and we thank them for their dedication to the patients we have the privilege to care for.

900 East Broadway Bismarck, ND 58501 CHIStAlexiusHealth.org

A Spring 2016

Bismarck Medical Center A licensing fee of $6,000 was paid to the Leapfrog Group to publish this ranking.

HOSPITAL SAFETY SCORE SM

The Hospital Safety Score is an elite designation from The Leapfrog Group, an independent national standards for patient safety, quality, and transparency in health care.

North Dakota Living August 2016  

North Dakota Living August 2016

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