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NOVEMBER 2016

Official publication of your electric cooperative www.ohioec.org

Favorite fall

scenes

Local co-op pages Reflections from Mt. Kilimanjaro Holiday travel guide for go-to events Find the perfect Christmas gift

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KEEPING THE LIGHTS ON ISN’T ENOUGH.

We’re not your typical electric company– we’re Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives. We represent your local, not-for-profit electric cooperative, and we power our communities with more than just electricity. We bring jobs and investment to the area.

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To learn more about the cooperative difference, visit ohioec.org.

YOUR SOURCE OF POWER. AND COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP.

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inside F E AT U R E S

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REFLECTIONS FROM MT. KILIMANJARO Lessons in humility: Climbing Africa’s highest mountain for rural electrification gave a Country Living staffer a new vision.

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BELMONT COUNTY SHERIFF’S RESIDENCE MUSEUM

Because of a state law that once required Ohio sheriffs to live on the county jail premises, Belmont County built a sheriff ’s residence adjoining its lockup in 1890.

10 HOLIDAY TRAVEL GUIDE

’Tis the season to enjoy Ohio holiday events, so mark your calendar now for these upcoming festivities.

14 TOPS FOR TURKEY

Bowman & Landes turkey farm has grown into a year-round destination.

23 FIND THE PERFECT CHRISTMAS GIFT

Ideas for stuffing everyone’s stocking — including your own!

26 SHIPWRECKED

Reflections of the sole survivor of a Great Lakes disaster.

28 MEMORIAL GARDENS

Create a long-lasting tribute to loved ones.

38 FAVORITE FALL SCENES

Co-op members show the beauty of the season from all corners of Ohio.

D E PA R T M E N T S 2 COOPERATIVE CONNECTION

19 LOCAL CO-OP PAGES

4 POWER STATION

26 WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

8 OHIO ICON

34 NOVEMBER CALENDAR

14 CO-OP PEOPLE

36 OHIO QUIZ

16 FOOD SCENE

38 MEMBER INTERACTIVE

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Cooperative Connection PAT O’LOUGHLIN, PRESIDENT & CEO • OHIO RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES & BUCKEYE POWER

Be aware, be involved, and be thankful ANOTHER IMPORTANT ELECTION DAY has arrived. Some view the election as historic. Some are passionate about candidates and issues, and others are disappointed with the negative tone that the various campaigns and protests have taken. Regardless of your view of the candidates or the issues, please take time to appreciate the rights of expression that we have been given. Our veterans, who are honored in November, have sacrificed much for our rights, and those who are no longer with us have paid the ultimate price for our freedoms. I encourage everyone to reflect upon the issues and candidates, remember that your vote counts, and that your actions matter. Each of us can make a difference in our community, in our country, and around the world. In this month’s issue, we feature how one family — that of our own Associate Editor Samantha Rhodes — scaled Mt. Kilimanjaro to raise funds and awareness for the NRECA International Foundation’s efforts to bring electricity to some of the poorest corners of the world. Read more about Samantha’s adventure, check out some breathtaking photos from her trip, and learn how you can support the cause on pages 4-7. Finally, as we prepare for Thanksgiving, please take time to relax and enjoy the holiday season, with gratitude for our blessings. Thank you for your support of your country, your community, and your local electric cooperative. Happy Thanksgiving! 

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November 2016 Volume 59, No. 2

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org

Patrick O’Loughlin Patrick Higgins Jeff McCallister Samantha Rhodes

President & CEO Dir. of Communications Managing Editor Associate Editor

COUNTRY LIVING (ISSN 0747-0592) is the official publication of Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. With a paid circulation of 294,359, it is the monthly communication link between the electric cooperatives in Ohio and West Virginia and their members. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced in any manner without specific written permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. All rights reserved.

Alliance for Audited Media Member

National advertising representatives: NATIONAL COUNTRY MARKET, 800-NCM-1181 State advertising representatives: Sandy Woolard 614-403-1653 Tim Dickes 614-855-5226 The fact that a product is advertised in Country Living should not be taken as an endorsement. If you find an advertisement misleading or a product unsatisfactory, please notify us or the Ohio Attorney General’s Office, Consumer Protection Section, 30 E. Broad St., Columbus, OH 43215, or call 1-800282-0515. Periodicals postage paid at Columbus, OH and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and advertising offices at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

ohioec.org Check out the mobile-friendly website and digital edition of Country Living, as well as other timely information from Ohio’s electric cooperatives. Online exclusives More non-traditional Thanksgiving recipes Thanksgiving — the word evokes images of pilgrims, football, family reunions, pumpkin pie, and roasted turkey. But if you’re looking to mix up the holiday palate this year, Food Editor Margie Wuebker has turkey-free recipes you can clip on pages 16-17 and even more online.

Follow Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives on social media Search for Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and YouTube to learn about careers with co-ops and how co-ops make a difference in communities all across Ohio.

DID YOU KNOW?

The first police car was a wagon run by electricity on the streets of Akron, Ohio, in 1899. It could only go about 16 miles per hour and needed to be recharged every 30 miles.

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Country Living staff cannot process address changes.

In this issue: St. Clairsville (p. 8) New Carlisle (p. 14) Ashtabula (p. 26)

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Lessons in humility

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S T O R Y A N D P H O T O S BY S A M A N T H A R H O D E S

How climbing Kilimanjaro inspired a clearer vision for rural electrification

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“Why do you climb this mountain?” I asked Little Man, an enthusiastic, yet slow-speaking porter nicknamed for his compact size. “I want to make your biggest dream come true,” he said, turning to look at me with all-too-serious eyes. “If you reach the top, it makes us very happy.” Then he proceeded to pump water into my canteen with his bare hands, as he’d done every day after breakfast before hitting the trail, saving my fingers from the biting wind of Summit Crater Camp’s 18,700-foot elevation. As a new porter on Mt. Kilimanjaro’s most dangerous Western Route in Tanzania, Little Man had already made this climb 10 times — still paling in comparison to lead guide Ben’s 200-plus trips to the summit. But this was my first time even venturing out of the United States, and after the fifth early morning of crawling from a tent into howling darkness up unpredictable inclines, 4

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I knew this was the craziest thing I’d ever done. My dad, Steve, stepmom Tami, and I were on a mission: to climb Mt. Kilimanjaro in a fundraising campaign to raise $30,000 for the NRECA International Foundation’s rural electrification efforts in Africa and around the world. We wanted to help “Electrify Africa” by joining the around 50,000 people who flock to Kilimanjaro, the tallest mountain in Africa, every year in an attempt to cross “reach the 19,340-foot summit” off their bucket lists. What the tour companies don’t tell you is that one-fourth of all Kili climbers don’t make it to the summit, and up to 10 die each year — not including those that go unreported — from altitude-related sickness, avalanches, falls, and heart attacks. They also don’t tell you that your 10-person team’s success is largely dependent on 58 super-fit Tanzanian strangers: the cook

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staff, guides, and porters, who carry everything you need up and back down the mountain — mess hall and personal sleeping tents, chairs, food and water, and your precious 22-lb. duffle bag of cold-weather gear. Even more unbelievably, the porters carry this 50-plus-pounds of baggage on their heads or necks, many without using their hands to balance the load.

Climbing the beast

We didn’t realize how diverse the landscape would be until it changed on us two days into the climb on the Shira Plateau. The breeze suddenly felt more like wind, and jackets were soon pulled over our sweaty T-shirts. We grew to despise the red, volcanic dust that blew around us like fog, making our noses run black. But I was in awe to find that five different climate zones exist on the mountain, and nearly every type of ecological system can be found there: cultivated land, lush rainforest, heath, moorland, alpine desert, and an arctic summit. By now, we could see Kili straight ahead, looming over us, its snowy top completely obscured by clouds — the place we were somehow supposed to reach in only a few short days. Looking the gigantic monster of a mountain straight in the eye was intimidating to

say the least, and it took a toll on our confidence. To our horror, on Day 4, my stepmom fell ill with what we believe was dustinduced bronchitis, hacking up so much phlegm she bruised her ribs. She refused to give up, but shortly after, we lost our first group member, Christine, who decided she couldn’t handle Kili or the constant shivering any longer. As I watched a porter escort her down the ruthless mountain out of sight, a deeper truth sank in: Victory here was more dependent on mental willpower than physical fitness. Green slowly faded from view and was replaced by slippery, brown-black volcanic gravel and enormous, speckled boulders. Day 5 was without a doubt the toughest and most dangerous test. A sign marked “Challenge Spot: Beware of falling rocks” even warned us as we approached the murderous Western Breach, jaggedly carved out over the years by melting glacier runoff and rock falls from above. Just last year, a hiker was killed on the breach by a merciless rolling rock, and in 2006, three Americans were killed in the same fashion, but while sleeping in their tents. I told myself not to look up — no amount of neck straining would help me see the end goal in the clouds. It’s a miracle we were able to drag our swollen feet up to the next camp. Those of us taking Diamox, an overthe-counter medicine to help prevent altitude sickness, were grateful not to feel overly nauseated, though many of us still had to pop an Advil nearly every day for headaches. By the end of Day 6, we kept to ourselves and moved like sloths, consumed with our own oxygen-deprived

thoughts and why-am-I-doing-thisagain questions. We posed with the massive glaciers about 1,000 feet from the summit and then curled up in our sleeping bags as the wind howled and shook our tents violently. I prayed they would delay our final ascension climb; we can’t hike with wind like this…right? Wrong. Even after all we had been through, nothing prepared us for summit day. On Day 7, we woke by 4 a.m. and hiked ever-so-slowly up the slippery, narrow dirt path by headlamp. Though my helmet pinched my head, I was grateful for the added layer of wind protection. Arriving at the summit during sunrise was nothing like I’d expected: insanely cold, crowded, and short-lived. International crowds lined up beside the Uhuru Peak sign, speaking languages indiscernible to me and seemingly incapable of taking turns for photo ops. I snagged a few celebratory photos, hugged my family, and enjoyed the rich view. But in the midst of the chaos, I crashed into the realization like a brick wall: This was the real deal, and somehow I was here in flesh and blood by the grace of God on the continent’s tallest mountain, nearly halfway around the world from home. I was above the clouds, now only an ocean of mist beneath me. I’d never felt so in touch with nature as I did looking down from the top of Africa that day. Then suddenly we were heading downhill — the more painful two-day segment of the trip nobody warns you about. Total muscle exhaustion is a real ordeal; our guide told us around 12 people a day have to be carried down in

Porters Little Man (left) and Jungle Boy (right) chat with me before entering the mess tent for dinner and our vitals check. Behind us, Leki stands waiting to sanitize everyone’s hands. N OVE M BE R 20 16

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Funding big change We knew our climb up Mt. Kilimanjaro would be tough, but we were fueled by the knowledge we were doing it for a good cause. Now, since fostering friendships with the locals, our passion for and dedication to raising money for the NRECA International Foundation’s rural electrification efforts in developing countries has only doubled. On the six-hour, unpaved drive back to the airport, we rode through the rural villages of Arusha, passing “houses” so dilapidated I had trouble believing families could find shelter from the elements there, let alone know what electricity was or how it could change their lives. NRECA reports that only 10 percent of rural Africa’s population has access to electricity. Smack-dab in the middle of nowhere, dust upon dust and miles from any practical buildings, thin children in rainbowcolored clothing ran out to smile, hoot, and wave at us, nearly splitting my heart in two. Thanks to generous donors across the country, I’m grateful to say we’ve raised about $36,800 for rural electrification. We surpassed our original goal by nearly $7,000, but we’re not ready to call it quits. We want to hit the $40,000 benchmark. There are people in the dark all around the globe, and every donation counts. Climbing Kilimanjaro was thrilling, but the best part is yet to come: the improved standard of living that results when electric poles are set and power lines are strung in impoverished villages before wide-eyed children and grateful parents. I started this trip knowing I wanted to raise money to help Africans. But now I’ve returned knowing whose lives I want to electrify — and that makes all the difference. To make a donation, learn more about the NRECA International Foundation and its work, or see more photos from the family’ trip, visit their blog at www.RhodestoKili.com.

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iron stretchers after their quads give out, no longer able to hold their own body weight. I’d never hiked downhill for that many hours straight, and knowing now what each step does to your knees, shins, and calves, you couldn’t pay me to do it again. Toes crunched into the front of your boots is not a pleasant feeling; my dad and Tami actually each ended up losing their big toenails as a result.

The unexpected takeaways

It was during this tedious descent that my mind began to whirl. We had successfully reached the summit…but was it all really over, just like that? After all this time, the climax, the thing we had been working toward, was over in less than 20 minutes. Ironically, my camera’s photos told a different story. The long-awaited summit photo — you know, the one that fuels your decision to buy the plane ticket in the first place — had turned out pretty lackluster with poor lighting. Meanwhile, dozens of gorgeous landscape shots over the seven-day uphill trek were what struck a chord in me. I was preoccupied with making a trophy memory out of the summit, but what I didn’t realize was that each day’s photos were key memory bricks I had laid in time that together could be used to build an honest, more life-changing house of experience. Yes, everyone knows the adage: The destination isn’t as important as the journey itself. The same was true of my Kilimanjaro adventure. Unexpectedly, the local people — especially the porters — were some of the kindest, most inspiring people

I’ve ever met. Aside from being the key physical factor in our Kili success, the porters were also our cheerleaders, always passing our panting, weary team line with a “hakuna matata” — meaning “no worries” in Swahili — and an encouraging smile or singalong song. Nearly every morning, three porters, including Little Man, would knock on my tent door, too enthusiastically wish me a good morning, and serve hot coffee with milk and sugar. Insistent on helping and saving your energy, they refused to let me even strap on my own ankle gaiters. I was at the complete mercy of these third world strangers for all of my needs, and watching them conquer the trail twice as quickly bearing five times as much weight in scanty hiking garb, flimsy jackets, and torn-out tennis shoes — all while focusing on getting me, a helpless tourist, to the top and down safely — was a slap-inthe-face dose of humility. They were living examples that there’s no reason not to take the best possible attitude in any given situation, even when you aren’t sure of the outcome.  To read more or see additional photos, visit www.RhodestoKili.com.

SAMANTHA RHODES is Country Living’s associate editor.

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Top: My stepmom, Tami (left), me, and my dad, Steve, as we celebrate making it to Shira I Camp at the end of Day 2. Middle left: Thrilled to have made it safely back down to the bottom of Kilimanjaro, we strike victory poses. Middle right: Day 8’s descent saw a porter from another group carrying the “iron bird,” as the porters call it — a metal stretcher on one wheel — up the mountain to rescue someone in need. Bottom left: A peep into the cook staff’s tent proved chef Doodoo (right) was hard at work preparing soup. Bottom right: At Lava Tower Camp, elevation more than 15,000 feet, the sunset on Day 4 was stunning. Page 6, left: Some members of our team and porters try to catch their breath during a water break. Page 6, right: Exhausted, we lean against the giant glacier at Summit Crater Camp near our tents at 18,700 feet. The next morning at about 6:30 a.m., we ascended less than 1,000 feet more to the summit. N OVE M BE R 20 16

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Belmont County Sheriff ’s Residence Museum St. Clairsville

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It’s a little known fact that: Joseph Warren Yost was the architect of both the Belmont County Sheriff ’s Residence Museum and the Belmont County Courthouse, an elaborate Second Empire building that was completed in 1888. Born in Monroe County in 1847, the eminent architect designed numerous courthouses and public buildings in Ohio, including Ohio State University’s venerable Orton Hall. 

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DAMAINE VONADA is a freelance

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writer from Xenia. If you go: What: The Belmont County Sheriff ’s Residence Museum Where: 101 E. Main St., St. Clairsville, OH 43950 When: Open Thursday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Group tours by appointment. Contact: 740-298-7020 or bcsrmuseum@gmail.com

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we have in Appalachian Ohio is our history, and a building that was an eyesore is now almost a work of art,” Favede says. Currently: Because all of Belmont County’s communities were invited to provide photos, documents, heirlooms, and artifacts that portray their heritage, the museum’s exhibits range from Imperial Glass items made in Bellaire to a model of the U.S.S. Constitution, which was partly designed by Colerain Township settler Josiah Fox. Other displays showcase Arthur St. Clair, who was the governor of the Northwest Territory and St. Clairsville’s namesake; Quaker and abolitionist Benjamin Lundy, who published an anti-slavery newspaper; Martins Ferry resident Betty Zane, whose daring dash to obtain gunpowder for Fort Henry’s defenders made her a Revolutionary War heroine; and, of course, the series of sheriffs’ families who lived in the residence.

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Location: Next to the Belmont County Courthouse along the old National Road, U.S. 40, in downtown St. Clairsville. Provenance: Because of a state law that once required Ohio sheriffs to live on the county jail premises, Belmont County built a sheriff ’s residence adjoining its lockup in 1890. The Romanesque-style structure was big enough to house an entire family because in those days, it was customary for sheriffs’ wives to cook inmates’ meals and look after female prisoners. Sheriff George Neff and his family were the Belmont County residence’s last occupants. After they moved out in 1976, it was used for offices until the 1990s and then sat empty for years. The dilapidated residence might have been demolished had St. Clairsville resident Ginny Favede not spearheaded a campaign to turn it into a county history museum. “Saving the sheriff ’s residence was a 10-year effort by myself and many, many other people in the community,” says Favede, a Belmont County commissioner and former St. Clairsville councilwoman. In addition to obtaining grants needed to fund the building’s transformation, the history-minded locals tapped the expertise of Akron-based Chambers, Murphy & Burge Restoration Architects, and they collaborated with students from Belmont College’s building preservation and restoration program, who refurbished a stained glass window. Significance: Opened in December 2014, the Belmont County Sheriff’s Residence Museum was honored in 2015 with a Preservation Merit Award from the Ohio History Connection’s State Historic Preservation Office. “One of the greatest resources


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2016 HOLIDAY TRAVEL GUIDE

Think road trip. ’Tis the season to enjoy Ohio holiday events, so mark your calendar now for these upcoming festivities BY DA M A I N E V O N A DA

A Glorious Christmas, Granville Nov. 9 through Dec. 30 Nothing shows off Christmas decorations better than a beautiful residence, and the Avery-Downer House delivers one of the most splendid holiday settings you’ll ever see. Dating back to the 1830s, it’s not only a magnificent showcase for the Robbins Hunter Museum’s 18th- and 19th-century decorative arts, but also one of the nation’s best examples of Greek Revival architecture. During the Yuletide season, bright lights accent the exterior’s signature columns and pediment, while the house’s interior delights visitors with lush greenery on the curved staircase and authentically decorated Christmas trees from the 1870s to 1960s. 740-587-0430; www.robbinshunter.org

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Photo courtesy of Zanesville-Muskingum County Chamber of Commerce

A Storybook Christmas, Zanesville and Muskingum County Nov. 30 through Jan. 5 From Zanesville to nearby communities such as Dresden and New Concord, more than 80 Muskingum County attractions and businesses celebrate the season with decorations inspired by storybooks. Their visions of sugar plums include Santa’s Favorite Story, How the Grinch Stole Christmas, and A Churchmouse Christmas, and visitors

can pore over the novel displays by car or by foot. Along with joyous light and music shows at downtown Zanesville’s courthouse, local shops, galleries, churches, and museums offer glad tidings with continual Christmas concerts, treats, and activities. 800-743-2303; www.visitzanesville.com

Holiday Open House at Hanby House, Westerville Dec. 6, 10, and 11 Benjamin Hanby was a prolific folk music composer whose ballad “Darling Nellie Gray” became a Civil War standard. In 1864, he also wrote “Up on the Housetop,” a jolly tune that is considered the first Christmas song about Santa Claus. While attending Otterbein College, Hanby lived in an antebellum house where his abolitionist father harbored runaway slaves. That home is now on the National Register of Historic Places, and in December, visitors can view its Civil War–era antiques and exhibits, enjoy cider and cookies, and of course, listen to holiday music in the parlor. 614-891-6289; www.hanbyhouse.org Photo courtesy of the Hanby House

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Photos courtesy of Lebanon Area Chamber of Commerce (above) and Peter DeMott (below)

Lebanon Horse-Drawn Carriage Parade and Christmas Festival, Lebanon Dec. 3

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One of Ohio’s largest one-day festivals brings upwards of 150,000 people to downtown Lebanon on the first Saturday of every December. What’s the big attraction? Two gigantic parades — one at 1 p.m. and another at 7 p.m. — featuring horses, carriages, wagon, and surreys that are all decked out in holiday finery. The horses range from miniatures to Clydesdales, Lebanon’s antique and specialty shops stay open late, and free carriage rides depart from the historic Golden Lamb inn. 513932-1100; www.lebanonchamber.org

Lights on the Lake, Ashtabula Nov. 25 through Jan. 1 White Christmases are almost a given in Ashtabula, which, thanks to the white stuff that blows in from Lake Erie, is one of Ohio’s snowiest spots. That Great Lake also makes a magnificent backdrop for Lights on the Lake, the town’s annual holiday spectacle. Held in 54-acre Lakeshore Park, the drive-through attraction dazzles visitors with some 70 displays illuminated with LED lights. The show includes a Nativity, a snowman, and other holiday favorites, but it also features only-in-Ashtabula scenes, such as a lighthouse, assorted boats, and a covered bridge. 440-993-1051; www.aclotl.com Photo courtesy of Lights on the Lake 12

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Photo courtesy of Historic Fort Steuben & Steubenville Visitor Center

Nutcracker Village and Advent Market, Steubenville Nov. 22 through Jan. 8 The late Dean Martin performed in many movies, but did the singer and actor ever play a nutcracker? He’s playing one now in his hometown of Steubenville, where a Dean Martin nutcracker is among the 100 life-sized nutcrackers exhibited throughout the holidays in Fort Steuben Park. Designed and made in Steubenville, the fanciful nutcrackers also include portrayals of Ebenezer Scrooge, St. Francis, and the Phantom of the Opera. Visitors can view the nutcrackers during the day or at night, but on weekends, food vendors, crafters, carolers, and trolley rides add even more holiday spirit. 740-283-1787; www.oldfortsteuben.com

The Polar Express at Dennison Railroad Depot Museum, Dennison Dec. 2-4 and Dec. 9-11 Storytellers read from Chris Van Allsburg’s Christmas classic The Polar Express as an Ohio Central Railroad train leaves Dennison’s Victorian depot on an imaginary journey to the North Pole. During the trip, elves sing carols and serve hot chocolate and cookies to pajama-clad passengers, and when the train arrives at the North Pole, everyone can see Santa Claus’s workshop through the railroad cars’ windows. Santa himself boards the train, and taking a page out of Allsburg’s beloved book, he presents every child with a jingle bell. 740-922-6776; www.dennisondepot.org Photo courtesy of Dennison Railroad Depot Museum N OVE M BE R 20 16

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S T O R Y A N D P H O T O S BY DA M A I N E V O N A DA

CO-OP PEOPLE

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Bowman & Landes farm is...

Tops for turkey

Four generations have raised turkeys on this family farm near New Carlisle — and though the holiday season is when they are busiest, their product has grown into a year-round staple and their business has become a nest-to-table operation.

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WHEN CARL BOWMAN WAS GROWING UP IN THE 1950S, he routinely hand-fed

turkeys and carried water to the barns at the Bowman & Landes turkey farm. Those chores are ancient history for the Bowman and Landes families’ children and grandchildren. “Today, of course, we have automatic waterers and feeders,” says Bowman, who co-owns the 2,200acre farm near New Carlisle with 14

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Steve Landes, Stan Landes, and Anita Bowman-Hamber. Though farming certainly has changed since Bowman’s late father, Kenneth Bowman, teamed up with Dennis Landes in 1948, their families’ relationship has remained constant. “It’s been a wonderful partnership,” Bowman says. “We’re not related, but the Bowman kids and Landes kids are like brothers and

sisters. They grew up side by side.” And in an era when small, independent farms often struggle, Bowman & Landes has thrived. “We’re unique because we have two families and a fourth generation working here, and after 68 years, we still enjoy each other,” Bowman says. A Pioneer Electric Cooperative member, the Bowman & Landes farm specializes in free-range

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turkeys raised without antibiotics and fed a homegrown diet of corn and soybeans. The farm purchases white-feathered hybrid turkeys when they’re 1 day old, and then keeps the poults inside heated barns. When they’re big enough to be on their own, the turkeys go into fenced pastures, where they roam in fresh air and sunshine. In addition to shelters, the pastures have rows of corn that provide the turkeys with shade and a hiding place if, for example, a loud noise frightens them. “We check the turkeys at least twice a day to make sure they’re happy and healthy,” Bowman says. “We look at their droppings and how much they’re drinking and eating.” Bowman & Landes typically grows 80,000 turkeys every year, raising seven flocks during the summer and one in the winter. It takes between 14 and 20 weeks for the turkeys to reach market weight of 10 to 30 pounds. Hens are generally smaller than toms, but that doesn’t mean they’re better to eat. “People always ask if hens are more tender, and the answer is no,” Bowman says. “Toms are just as tender, and they taste the same, too.”

Turkey’s rising popularity When Bowman & Landes began, most Americans ate turkey once a year. “Back then, turkeys were just for Thanksgiving, and we sold whole birds. It wasn’t until the 1950s that we started cutting them up and selling parts,” says Dennis Landes, who, at 94 years young, still keeps an eye on the farm he co-founded.

Because turkey offers a low-fat alternative to red meat, it’s now gobbled up year-round and is growing in popularity. According to the National Turkey Federation, turkey is the nation’s fourth-favorite protein, and U.S. turkey consumption and production have more than doubled since 1970. Bowman & Landes has carved out a singular niche in the turkey market as a nest-to-table operation. “We produce, process, and market all of our turkey products, which is very unusual because most farms don’t do all of that,” Bowman says. An on-site processing plant makes everything from turkey bacon to raspberry chipotle turkey breast, and an array of Bowman & Landes items is sold at the farm’s retail meat shop and deli, including whole turkeys, ground turkey, smoked turkey, turkey sausages, and turkey breast mignon. Because the shop also carries Amish cheeses and locally made breads, pies, and maple syrup, it doubles as a farm market. “We try to stock a lot of local things that other stores don’t,” Bowman says. Although Bowman & Landes products are available at numerous grocery stores in Ohio and surrounding states, many locals patronize the shop for farm-fresh turkey. The scenic country drive and the opportunity to catch a glimpse of turkeys toddling around the pastures are all bonuses.

While the shop is open throughout the year, November through mid-December is the busiest season. Bowman & Landes hires more than a hundred extra employees for the Thanksgiving rush. “In the three days before Thanksgiving, we sell a turkey every 30 seconds,” Bowman says.  DAMAINE VONADA is a freelance writer from Xenia.

If you go: What: Bowman & Landes Turkeys Inc. Where: 6490 E. Ross Rd., New Carlisle, OH 45344 Contact: 937- 845-9466 or visit www.bowmanlandes.com for more information about the farm, retail shop and deli, turkey products, cooking tips, recipes, and placing orders.

TALKING TURKEY In 2015: • U.S. turkey consumption was 16 pounds per person. • Ohio raised more than 5.2 million turkeys. • The value of Ohio’s turkey production exceeded $169 million. • Ohio ranked ninth nationally for turkey production. Sources: Ohio Poultry Association; National Turkey Federation

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S T O R Y BY M A R G I E W U E B K E R P H O T O S BY C H E R Y L B AC H

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NO turkey for Thanksgiving? NO problem! IN SOME HOUSEHOLDS, turkey does not reign supreme on Thanksgiving. Steve Stover of Columbus has adopted the philosophy of author Calvin Trillin, who believes spaghetti carbonara should be proclaimed the nation’s Thanksgiving dish. “Nobody knows for sure whether the pilgrims really ate turkey on that first Thanksgiving Day,” says Stover, who has taught cooking classes for more than 30 years and has presented weekly restaurant and food commentaries. “So I changed up other dishes over the years.” Spaghetti carbonara, a hearty pasta dish with bacon or pancetta 16

and two cheeses, has been the entrée of choice in recent years when Stover’s family gathers in Boston to celebrate the holiday. He does the cooking using a recipe that appeared in the New York Times. Ashley Werling of Osgood grew up in South Carolina, where family members enjoyed ham loaf on Thanksgiving. The recipe from her step-grandmother, Sue Gregory of Canton, features a sweet glaze and a creamy mustard sauce. With a chuckle, she remembers proposing the addition of ham loaf to the holiday menu once she had a family of her own. Her husband was uncertain at first, but one taste banished all qualms. Now he requests it frequently throughout

the year, and so do other family members. “The recipe makes two loaves, one to serve and the other for the freezer,” Werling says. “And leftovers taste just as good as the first time around.” Other popular non-turkey Thanksgiving entrées are beef roasts, seafood, and whole hams. Still eager for apples? October’s apple recipe contest yielded so many entries, we’ve added more online at www.ohioec.org/ country-living. 

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MARGIE WUEBKER is Country Living’s food editor.

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Deluxe Beef Tenderloin Ingredients

Spaghetti Carbonara Ingredients

Salt 2 large eggs and 2 large yolks (at room temperature) 1 oz. (about 1/3 packed cup) grated pecorino romano cheese, plus more for serving 1 oz. (about 1/3 cup packed) grated Parmesan Coarsely ground black pepper 1 Tbsp. olive oil 3½ oz. slab pancetta or bacon, sliced into pieces about ¼ inch thick by 1/3 inch square 12 oz. spaghetti Place a large pot of lightly salted water (no more than 1 Tbsp.) over high heat and bring to boil. Fill large serving bowl with hot water and set aside. In mixing bowl, whisk together eggs, yolks, and pecorino romano and parmesan cheeses. Season with a pinch of salt and generously with black pepper. Set water to boil. Meanwhile, heat oil in large skillet over medium heat and add pork; sauté until the fat just renders on the edge of crispness but not hard. Remove from heat and set aside. Add pasta to water and boil until a bit firmer than al dente. Just before pasta is ready, reheat pancetta or bacon in skillet if needed. Reserve 1 cup of pasta water; drain pasta and add to skillet over low heat. Stir for a minute or so. Pour hot water from serving bowl; dry bowl and add hot pasta mixture. Stir in cheese mixture, adding some reserved pasta water if needed for creaminess. Serve immediately, dressing with a bit of additional grated cheese and pepper. Yields 4 servings.

Mustard Sauce Ingredients

2 Tbsp. flour 1½ cups sugar 2 cups milk 4 egg yolks, beaten 2 Tbsp. dry mustard 1 cup white vinegar Mix dry ingredients. Combine milk and beaten egg yolks and add to dry ingredients. Add vinegar and cook mixture in double boiler until thickened. Mixture will thicken more as it cools down. Note: Sauce can be made in microwave.

2 lbs. whole beef tenderloin 2 Tbsp. butter, softened ¼ cup green onions, chopped 2 Tbsp. butter 2 Tbsp. soy sauce ¼ tsp. black pepper 1 tsp. Dijon mustard ¾ cup dry sherry Coat outer surface of tenderloin with 2 Tbsp. butter; place in shallow baking dish. Bake uncovered at 400 degrees for 20 minutes. Cook onions in butter until tender. Add soy sauce, pepper, and Dijon mustard. Stir in sherry and heat to boiling. Pour over tenderloin. Continue to bake at 400 degrees for 20 to 25 minutes more, basting frequently with sauce. Timing instructions will produce a medium-rare roast. Check for desired doneness. Remove tenderloin from oven, slice, and serve immediately with sauce from pan. Yields 6 servings.

Ham Loaf Ingredients

2 lbs. ground ham 1 lb. ground pork 2 eggs ½ cup or 1 sleeve Ritz crackers, crushed ½ cup brown sugar For glaze: ½ cup brown sugar ½ cup apple cider vinegar ½ cup water Mix meat, eggs, crushed crackers, and brown sugar well; form into two loaves. Bake at 350 degrees for 10 minutes. Place glaze ingredients in pan and mix well. Boil 1 minute before pouring over ham loaves and returning to oven to continue baking for 50 minutes. Serve with mustard sauce (recipe at left). Yields 12-15 servings.

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S T O R Y BY D I A N E YOA K U M , R D , L D

THINNER

Make a Thanksgiving game plan THIS TIME OF YEAR brings a plethora of opportunities to sabotage an otherwise healthy lifestyle. The season of holiday celebrations — and eating — kicks off when the turkey and dressing are served on Thanksgiving and proceeds through New Year’s Day. The best of nutritional intentions often go by the wayside, resulting in overindulgence and weight gain. The average American will consume about 3,000 calories at the Thanksgiving meal alone, which, if continued at that pace, could lead to a gain of about 10 pounds during the six-week holiday season. No one is immune from the treats lurking about at family gatherings, office potlucks, and special holiday events. But everyone has the capability to use a few solid strategies to ensure there’s not a lot of extra work to get back to health once the holidays are over. Food portions play a big role. Start the day by eating a light breakfast in anticipation of the calories ahead. Instead of second helpings during the feast, opt for leftovers at a meal later in the day or over the next few days.

Avoid too much snacking before the big meal and mindless munching later in the day, which, on average, adds up to 1,500 extra calories — for a whopping total of 4,500 calories by day’s end. Strive for weight maintenance, not weight loss, during this season by simply watching out for those moments when extra calories really add up. Weight loss goals are better met once the new year begins and the festivities die down. Exercise is one of the best ways to combat overconsumption from the holiday buffet. A brisk walk after a heavy meal can reverse any repeated run-ins with the dessert table. In addition, creating a calorie deficit is your best bet for keeping the scale in check. Work out prior

Low-Fat Chocolate Cheesecake 6 chocolate graham crackers, finely crushed 12 oz. Neufchatel (a third less fat than cream cheese) 1 cup white sugar 1 cup low-fat cottage cheese ¼ cup plus 2 Tbsp. unsweetened cocoa ¼ cup all-purpose flour ¼ cup Kahlua or strong coffee 1 tsp. vanilla extract ¼ tsp. salt 1 egg 2 Tbsp. semisweet mini chocolate chips 18

to attending your get-together, after the meal to combat overindulgences, and a bit more before bedtime for good measure and a restful night’s sleep. If holiday shopping is your cup of tea, head to the mall over the weekend and walk off those extra calories as you get a jump on your gift purchases. Remember that Thanksgiving comes once a year, and a bit of an indulgence is okay, especially for holiday favorites that are rarely served. Even if you don’t do your best, pick up where you left off with your health goals and get back on track in the new year. It’s never too late to choose health.  DIANE YOAKAM is a registered and

licensed dietitian.

Sprinkle graham cracker crumbs in bottom of 8-inch springform pan; set aside. In food processor, combine Neufchatel and next 7 ingredients. Process until smooth; add egg and process until blended. Fold in mini chocolate chips. Slowly pour mixture over crumbs in pan. Bake at 300 degrees for 65 to 70 minutes or until cheesecake is set. Let cool in pan on wire rack. Cover and chill at least 8 hours. Remove sides of pan and transfer cheesecake to a serving plate. Garnish with chocolate curls, if desired. Yields 12 servings.

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CarrOll ElECtriC LOCAL PAGES

Raise your voice and VOTE By Larry J. Fenbers, CEO/General Manager Low voter turnout has been a topic of conversation for the last several election cycles. Since the 1960s, voter turnout during presidential elections has seen a steady decline, with the occasional uptick here and there. In the 2016 primary election cycle, voter turnout in most states was only 21 to 30 percent, and this was still a record year for primary voter turnout. In our “battleground state” of Ohio, where we get a lot of attention during presidential elections, we saw a primary voter turnout of over 43 percent. That’s great, but we can do better. Some speculate the reason for the decline is because average Americans are not as engaged in politics as they have been in the past. And who can blame us? We may feel like candidates are not speaking to the issues we care about. Or perhaps we don’t feel like we understand enough about the candidates’ stances on the issues, or even the issues themselves. But we can change this. Here at Carroll Electric, we want to see civic engagement in our rural communities increase. We want to give you what you need to make informed decisions about candidates at all levels of government, not

BOARD OF TRUSTEES Harold Sutton • president Gary Snode • vice president Harold Barber • secretary-treasurer Kenneth Brown • Robert McCort • Diane Tarka Frank Chiurco • William Casper • Kevin Tullis Larry Fenbers • CEO/general manager

just the presidential race. And we want you to know more about the issues that could affect our local communities. America’s electric cooperatives are doing their part by informing co-op staff and members through Co-ops Vote, a nonpartisan campaign with one simple goal: increase voter turnout this November. By visiting vote.coop, you can learn about your candidates, access voter registration information, and read about the issues that are especially important to rural America. We encourage you to visit vote.coop and take the pledge to learn more about the issues that impact us locally. Let’s work together to improve our communities by increasing voter turnout and changing our country, one vote at a time.

Join us. Vote Nov. 8. CARROLL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC. P.O. Box 67 • Carrollton, Ohio 44615 1-800-232-7697 • www.cecpower.coop Office Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Carroll Electric accepts Visa and MasterCard, personal checks and money orders for bill payment. Yvonne Ackerman, editor (e-mail: yackerman@cecpower.coop) N OVE M BE R 20 16

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TOUR SHOWCASES coal-fired generation Odds are, you’ve never considered where your electricity comes from until an outage interrupts your day. But did you know that as a consumer-member of Carroll Electric, you own the cooperative and the co-op’s power plant? Carroll Electric members toured the memberowned Cardinal Station, near Brilliant, Ohio, on Sept. 29. Cardinal, which was named after the state bird of Ohio, is one of the cleanest coal-fired facilities of its type in the world. Cooperative leaders have worked to ensure that Cardinal’s impact on the environment is minimal, installing equipment that removes more than 99 percent of the ash from burning coal, along with 95 percent of sulfur dioxide, 90 percent of the nitrogen oxide, and 85 percent of the mercury. Plant employees answered questions and explained the day-to-day operations while Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives employees provided information about the cost of electricity and how the Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Power Plan may impact the generation of electricity. Members viewed the modernized control room and the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system, all part of the environmental upgrades that were completed in 2012. Members saw additional environmental control equipment that works in tandem with the FGD system. Below: Co-op members tour Cardinal Sept. 29.

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Cardinal’s 49-year alliance with AEP Cardinal Station is the first-ever alliance of an investor-owned electric utility — American Electric Power — and a member-owned electric utility — Buckeye Power, a not-for-profit generation and transmission cooperative — to construct and operate a power station to serve both their consumers. Buckeye Power is an organization owned by 25 electric cooperatives, including Carroll Electric. AEP owns Cardinal Unit 1 and placed it in commercial operation in late 1967. Unit 2 was placed in commercial operation later that same year and is owned by Buckeye Power. Each unit has generation capacity of 590 megawatts (MW). Unit 3, also owned by Buckeye Power, began operation in 1977 and has generating capacity of 620 MW. AEP operates the facility on behalf of all owners.

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CarrOll ElECtriC LOCAL PAGES

Carroll Electric aims to share warmth and joy this Christmas This holiday season, consider donating to your favorite charity or help Carroll Electric forward our mission to give back to the communities we serve. Carroll Electric has joined Carroll County’s Coats for Kids campaign and the Department of Job and Family Services’ Share Christmas program to bring warmth and joy to those less fortunate. Our employees will be donating their hard-earned dollars to buy new coats and gifts for children served by the co-op. And you can give, too.

Make closet-cleaning charitable Do you or your children have a used coat that is still in good condition, but you don’t like it or can’t wear it anymore? Then you have a donation that will go a long way to keeping a child warm this winter. Donate your gently used coats to our Coats for Kids drive. We will accept new and gently used coats, hats, mittens, and gloves for children birth to 18. Monetary donations will also be accepted. Make checks payable to Carroll County Coats for Kids and mail to: Coats for Kids c/o Carroll Electric P.O. Box 67 Carrollton, OH 44615 Donations may also be dropped off at our office, 350 Canton Road NW, Carrollton.

Make a child’s Christmas wish a reality Carroll Electric employees have adopted a family (served by the co-op) through the Share Christmas program. Employees will be shopping for the family as they shop for their own children, buying a few must-have Christmas gifts for each. If you have a few extra bucks you’d be willing to donate, we promise to do the shopping for another child participating in the Share Christmas program. All proceeds donated will go directly toward the purchase of gifts for children enrolled in Share Christmas.

Deadline to donate: December 8. Call 1-800-232-7697 for more information.

Office closed on Veterans Day

Office closed for Thanksgiving

Carroll Electric will be closed on Veterans Day, Nov. 11. Emergency service is available by calling 1-800-232-7697. Thank you, veterans, for our freedom.

Carroll Electric will be closed for Thanksgiving Nov. 24 and 25. Emergency service is available by calling 1-800-232-7697. Have a safe and happy holiday.

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CarrOll ElECtriC LO CA L PAGES

Carroll Electric board of trustees reorganizes at special meeting The Carroll Electric board of trustees reorganized at a special meeting Sept. 27 at the cooperative office. one zero zero zero one zero zero Following the guidelines set forth by the Carroll Electric code of regulations and amended at the Aug. 29, 2015, annual members meeting, Harold Sutton was re-elected to serve as board president. Gary Snode was elected to serve as vice president, and Harold Barber will serve as secretary and treasurer. Each officer will serve his office until the first board meeting following the 2017 annual members meeting.

Pictured from left are (seated) Secretary/treasurer Harold Barber, District 3; Vice President Gary Snode, District 1; (standing) Larry Fenbers, CEO/general manager; Kenneth Brown, District 7; Kevin Tullis, District 5; President Harold Sutton, District 4; Frank Chiurco, District 8; Robert McCort, District 6; William Casper, District 9; and Diane Tarka, District 2.

Energy Efficiency Tip of the Month

WORKING TOGETHER 2016

TO RAISE THE BAR

Energy Efficiency Tip of the Month

68 72 80 Municipal Utilities

Investor-Owned Carroll Electric Utilities Cooperative, Inc.

Heating your living space uses more energy than any other system in your home — typically making up about 42 percent of your utility bill. By combining proper maintenance with recommended insulation levels, air sealing, and thermostat settings, you can save about 30 percent on your energy bill.

Member satisfaction data from Q1 and Q2 2016

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HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE BY DA M A I N E V O N A DA

Ideas for stuffing everyone’s stocking — even your own Artisans, crafters, and entrepreneurs throughout Ohio produce unique and high-quality items that make it easy to give your loved ones something special this holiday season. Ready to go shopping? We’ve selected these Ohio originals to get you started.

COLLECTIBLES

Carruth Studio, Waterville

George Carruth’s stone sculptures add artistry with a touch of whimsy to homes and gardens. His ever-popu ever-popular “Garden Smile” botanical face lent its name to Carruth’s retail store, and his delightful fruits and veggies are perfect pieces for foodies. (Photo courtesy of Carruth Studio.) 800-225-1178; www.carruthstudio.com

Amish Wares, Mansfield

Retailers Vern and Kelli Christian specialize in handcrafted items from Ohio’s Old Order Amish communities. Give a child hours of homespun fun with a sturdy wooden tree swing; classic pull toys in duck, horse, or dog shapes; doll cradles that can be custom-painted; or a nifty pedal-powered pony cart. (Photo courtesy of Amish Wares.) 419-756-1941; www.amishwares.com

Don Drumm Studios & Gallery, Akron

Don Drumm spearheaded the artistic use of cast aluminum and, with his wife, Lisa, founded one of the nation’s finest, most comprehensive contemporary craft galleries. Capture the spirit of the season with ornaments that are also works of art, such as his splendid Peace Angel and Stars or daughter Leandra Drumm’s Earth Angel night light. (Photo courtesy of Don Drumm Studios & Gallery.) 330-253-6268; www.dondrummstudios.com

St. Louisville Glass, St. Louisville

A member of The Energy Cooperative, based in Newark, glassblower Aaron Buchholz creates gorgeous vases, bowls, flowers, and paperweights at his Licking County studio. His sparkling ball ornaments come in swirl and spotted patterns and look lovely hanging from a window or on a Christmas tree. (Photo courtesy of Melinda Buchholz.) 740-877-6638; www.stlouisvilleglass.com

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Crossroads Original Designs Candles, Bucyrus

All the materials brothers Jason and Justin McMullen use for their clean-burning, hand-wicked wax candles are made in the USA. Crossroads’ signature candle scent, Buttered Maple Syrup, is delectable, but try Balsam Fir, Bayberry & Cinnamon, or Hollyberry for some holiday flare. (Photo courtesy of Crossroads Original Designs.) 866-247-0156; www.crossroadscandles.com

Westbrook’s Cannery, Canton

Kristina Clark turned her love of gardening into a blossoming business that processes an amazing array of all-natural, vegan, and gluten-free vegetables, krauts, pickles, relishes, sauces, salsas, jellies, and jams. Westbrook’s Zesty Zucchini Relish is a customer favorite, and yummy Christmas Jam blends cranberries, apples, and strawberries. (Photo courtesy of Kristina Clark.) 234-214-8215; www.westbrookscannery.com

Crazy Monkey Baking, Ashland Sweet Thing Gourmet, Bexley

Kyla Touris cooks up the ultimate homemade jam in her own kitchen. She hand-stirs, hand-pours, handcaps, and even hand-labels every batch. Varieties range from tried-andtrue strawberry and peach to trendy cherry cognac, lemon blueberry, and chai apricot. (Photo courtesy of Sweet Thing Gourmet.) 614-252-1830; www.sweetthinggourmet.com

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Firelands Electric Cooperative member Teresa Humrichouser concocts Granola Cookie Crunch, a healthy snack combining the sweet satisfaction of cookies with all-natural ingredients like organic whole grain cornmeal and organic oats. Although Dark Chocolate Chip and Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip are best-selling flavors, she also makes Pumpkin Seed & Spice and Ginger White Chocolate for the holidays. (Photo courtesy of Teressa Humrichouser.) 419-207-8188; www.crazymonkeybaking.com

Carhop’s Burger Sauce, Willowick

A tasty blast from the past, the mayonnaise-based sauce made and marketed by Annette Restifo and Gina Giallombardo has no sugar, gluten, dairy, carbs, or high-fructose corn syrup. It’s versatile enough for burgers, fish, chicken, or dips, but to spice things up, try NITRO, the hot version of the sauce. (Photo courtesy of Carhop’s Burger Sauce.) 440-823-1742; www.carhopsburgersauce.com

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WEARABLES Amy D Aprons, Lewis Center

Amy Dalrymple makes things that make people happy. Channeling humor into every design, she transforms salvaged and recycled materials into clever coffee sleeves, wine bags, and aprons with handy pockets for your favorite beverage. (Photo courtesy of Amy Dalrymple.) www.madebyamyd.com

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Liz Franklin Arts, Dublin

Jewelry artist Liz Franklin’s Ohio Pride line proves that the Buckeye State is a gem. Hand-wrought in textured copper and aluminum, her “industrial chic” earrings, bracelets, rings, and necklaces affectionately salute the state with heart shapes and text. (Photo courtesy of Liz Franklin Arts.) 614-906-1400; www.lizfranklin.net

The Social Dept., Cuyahoga Falls

Want a gift that salutes the Cleveland Cavaliers? Or Cuyahoga National Park? Or maybe Kent State? Look no further. Regionally themed shirts from designing couple Andy and Christy Taray will suit everyone on your list to a tee. (Photo courtesy of Andy Taray.) 234-206-0186; www.thesocialdept.com

Glenn Avenue Soap Company, Columbus

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Ohio Valley Beard Supply, Cincinnati

Get bearded friends into a lather with grooming aids formulated by hairdresser Scott Ponder and smartly packaged by company co-founder Patrick Brown. Elixirs soften and moisturize stubble; finishing balms tame whiskers; and macho scents like Hemingway (juniper, cedar, and grapefruit) or Melville (bay rum, clove, and black pepper) let you choose between naughty and nice. (Photo courtesy of Patrick Brown.) 513-967-3019; www.ohiovalleybeard.com

Using essential oils and organic ingredients, Sandra and Phil Metzler make moisturizing bar soaps, naturally scented foaming soaps, and healing body butters and lotions at their craft soaphouse. Not a Brown Trout soap features exfoliating coffee grounds, while spicy Bandit’s Oil soap is great for guys or gals. (Photo courtesy of Phil Metzler.) 614-706-7221; www.glennavesoap.com N OVE M BE R 20 16

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WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

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THE GREAT LAKES, known as the Five Sisters, are the largest body of fresh water on the planet. These inland seas are so vast and treacherous that Herman Melville even compared them to the world’s oceans in his famous 1851 whaling novel, Moby Dick. And there is no more dangerous time of year on the Great Lakes than autumn, as storm after storm blasts across the waters out of the northwest, sometimes with hurricane-force winds. Seasoned mariners

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refer to these sudden storms as the “Witch of November,” but in reverent, hushed tones. They live with the constant fear that any one of these major blows can turn deadly. In 1964, at age 24, Dennis Hale was living in Ashtabula, a small town along the Lake Erie shoreline in extreme northeast Ohio. To support his wife and young family, he took a job as a crewman on the steamship Daniel J. Morrell, an ore freighter plying the waters of the Great Lakes. Two and a half

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years later, the mighty ship fell victim to the Witch of November, breaking apart one night in a screaming storm and taking 28 crew members down with it. Dennis Hale was the sole survivor. November 2016 marks the 50th anniversary of Hale’s ordeal. He passed away last year from cancer, but I had the opportunity to speak to him before he passed. “On Nov. 28, 1966, the ship was making its way north in Lake Huron on its way to Taconite Harbor, Minnesota,” Hale remembered. “I had stood the 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. watch then went to the galley for something to eat before going to bed about 10. I was awakened sometime the following morning, the 29th, by a loud bang. “At first I thought it was the anchor bouncing on the bow of the ship,” Hale said. “But then there was another loud bang, and all the books fell off my bookcase beside my bunk. I reached to turn on my bunk light, but it wouldn’t come on. At that moment, I knew something terrible was wrong.” Hale jumped out of bed wearing only a pair of undershorts and grabbed a life jacket. He stepped into the hallway, headed for the main deck, and saw another crewman ahead of him, headed the same direction. When the crewman arrived at the opening to the main deck, he turned around and said, “Oh, my god! Oh, my god!” and returned to his room. Hale stepped out onto the main deck and couldn’t believe his eyes. “As I looked toward the stern of the ship, the boat had hogged (buckled upwards), the bottom had broken, and the midships was higher than the stern. Although it was still attached, I couldn’t see the rear of the ship.” Hale hurried to the portside cabins where he encountered three other crewmates, one of whom, Norman Bragg, had been on the Steinbrenner when it went down in Lake Superior in 1958. “We asked Bragg what was happening, and he said the bottom of our ship had cracked and that we would soon be in the water. ‘It’s time to get to the life raft, fellows,’ Bragg said. ‘And it’s been good to know you.’” Of the 29 crew members aboard the Morrell, only Hale and three other men made it to the life raft. But before he abandoned ship, Hale, still clad only in a life jacket and pair of undershorts, had the presence of mind to return to his cabin and grab a wool pea coat, putting it on over his life jacket. It was that pea coat that was instrumental in saving him from dying of hypothermia. Hale and the three others were on the life raft for 38 hours, fighting 35-foot seas and 65-mph winds; the air temperature

was 33 degrees and the water 44 degrees. “The raft continually went right through those huge waves, not over them,” Hale said, “drenching us every time with ice water for hours. By dawn, two of my shipmates were dead from hypothermia. The third man died around 4 that afternoon, 14 hours after the ship sank. I was rescued 24 hours later.” The life raft was finally blown to shore 3 miles south of Huron City, Michigan, where Hale was rescued by a Coast Guard helicopter and taken to a local hospital. “We didn’t expect to find anyone alive,” one of the rescuers said. When Hale arrived at the hospital, his body temperature was only ‘As I looked toward the 94.6 degrees. After stern of the ship, the boat being stabilized for a few days, he was had hogged (buckled uptransferred to a hoswards), the bottom had pital in Ashtabula, where he continued broken, and the midhis lengthy recovery. ships was higher than As might be expected followthe stern. I couldn’t see ing such a horrific the rear of the ship.’ trial, Hale suffered for years from post-traumatic stress disorder, a common reaction to an uncommon life event. “I kept asking myself why I survived the shipwreck and no one else did,” Hale said. “And to make matters worse, while paying a visit to the widow of one of my closest shipmates, she got very angry with me, resenting the fact that I had survived and her husband didn’t. She somehow blamed me.” Hale eventually found healing by talking publicly about the sinking of the Daniel J. Morrell. For years he was a popular speaker at maritime events around the Great Lakes, and he wrote a book about his ordeal, Shipwrecked: Reflections of the Sole Survivor, which is available online at www.greatlakessurvivordennishale.com. And when asked what advice he had for others forced into traumatic life events beyond their control, he said, “Never give up. No matter how dire the situation or circumstances, never give up!” 

W.H. “CHIP” GROSS is Country Living’s outdoors editor and a member of Consolidated Electric Co Cooperative. Have an outdoors story idea or photophoto graph to share? Send it to Chip at whchipgross@ gmail.com or visit www.chipgross.com.

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•  COU NTRY L I V I N G

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GARDENING LANDSCAPE

S T O R Y BY K R I S W E T H E R B E E

M

P H O T O S BY R I C K W E T H E R B E E

B t

S c p o o w ( ( (

Create a long-lasting tribute to loved ones with a

memorial garden

C f g p a s u a h

MEMORY GARDENS AND MEMORIAL PLANTINGS are a meaningful way to retreat, reflect, and rejoice in our memories of loved ones who are no longer with us. Planning and creating a memorial garden can also be cathartic during the grief process. It may be a personal time of reflection that you wish to do on your own, but it’s also a great project to enlist family or friends to help with, healing and strengthening the bond of everyone involved.

T b o

Getting started

A memorial garden can be as simple or as elaborate as you like, from a single rose bush to a new flower bed, a garden vignette featuring your loved one’s favorite plants and garden chair, or plants that were gifted or handed down to you. Other examples are a trio of containers on your porch or deck, a box on the balcony or beneath a window, a flowering vine growing up a trellis, or a favorite ornamental grass growing by a birdbath or sundial. A tree is also a timehonored way to pay tribute to a loved one.

Choose your plants

Choose plants, trees, or flowers favored by the person you are honoring. You might also decide on digging up bulbs, tubers, or other plants from their garden and planting them in yours. Find inspiration in your memories.

Personalize the space

Include mementos, whimsical garden art, and other meaningful outdoor pieces, perhaps one you shopped for together, such as a statue, a classic stone planter, or a wooden bench or chair. You might choose a birdbath simply because your loved one enjoyed the backyard birds. You might also inscribe a favorite quote on a stepping stone, rock, or plaque. Memorial gardens are specific to each person, so there are no rules. What’s most important is that it becomes a place of treasured memories of your loved one.

28

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MEMORIAL GARDEN PLANNING TIPS Bring your planning into focus with these sources of inspiration.

attract butterflies is ideal if for lovers of butterflies, or a culinary herb bed.

Seasons. If your loved one enjoyed the changing of fall colors, then choose a plant that shines in autumn. For a lover of winter landscapes, think about trees or shrubs that bloom in winter, such as witch hazel (Hamamelis), star magnolia (Magnolia stellata), wintersweet (Chimonanthus praecox), or hellebores (Helleborus).

Fragrance. Sometimes a particular scent is all it takes to evoke a fond memory of a loved one. Roses and lavender are favorite fragrances for many. If you’re looking for something spicy, you might consider pinks (Dianthus Allwoodii hybrids, D. gratianopolitanus; D. plumarius), or the intoxicating summersweet (Clethra alnifolia). Angel’s trumpet (Brugmansia) is exotically sweet. And vanilla is a favorite for many, such as the beloved annual, common heliotrope (Heliotropium arborescens).

Colors. Shades of a color can range from serene to stunning in a small garden or vignette, such as blues and purples, warm reds and oranges, or a subtle mix. Whether featuring a single color or combination of hues, using accents of garden neutrals, such as silver, white, or green will help highlight and unify the space.

Names. There are several avenues of expression when it comes to plants and their names. For instance, you might choose names that are reflective of your loved one’s personality or character, such as Hosta ‘So Sweet’ or Clematis ‘Gipsy Queen.’ Ideas for plants that represent your feelings might include

Themes. Focusing on a theme can bring emphasis to aspects of your loved one’s life. For example, plants that

forget-me-not, bleeding heart, or ‘Peace’ rose. Or plants with specific meanings might be fitting for your memorial garden, such as rosemary (remembrance), pink carnations (I’ll never forget you), Easter lilies (faith and new life), coreopsis (always cheerful), or amaranth (everlasting beauty). 

KRIS WETHERBEE writes on gardening from the West Coast.

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pp 32-33 Harbor Freight ad.indd 32 hft_countryliving_1116_spread_M-REG80858.indd 2-3

10/19/16 2:10 PM

59

comp at

89 $159.99

99

SAVE $100

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$

99 $

Customer Rating

2500 LB. ELECTRIC WINCH WITH WIRELESS REMOTE CONTROL

ITEM 61840/61297/68146 61258 shown

R PE ON SU UP CO

21

comp at Customer Rating

comp at

19999 $399

139

Customer Rating

14$31.47

comp at

$

$

comp at

$369.99

99

Customer Rating

ITEM 32879 60603 shown

154 $19999

• Pair of arbor plates included

SAVE $215

20 TON SHOP PRESS

LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day. coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SAVE 71%

$ 99

899

ITEM 96289 shown 63104/62340/62546

1500 WATT DUAL TEMPERATURE HEAT GUN (572°/1112°)

R PE ON SU UP O C

$

$

1999

29 comp at

$33.66

• 225 lb. capacity

99

SAVE 74%

8 $26.99 comp at

6 $ 99

$ 99

Customer Rating

ITEM 60758 62689 shown

10 PIECE DRAGONFLY SOLAR LED STRING LIGHTS

LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP O C

comp at

8999

$119.99

$

comp at

$319.01

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$

ITEM 95659 shown 61634/61952

Customer Rating

26", 4 DRAWER TOOL CART

WOW

comp at

11999 $163.06

$8999

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$

SAVE $73

ITEM 60338/69381 shown

TS 900 PEAK/700 RUNNING2 WAT CC) CYCLE Customer Rating 2 HP (63 GAS RECREATIONAL GENERATOR

SUPER COUPON

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SAVE $209

• 580 lb. capacity

R PE ON SU UP O C

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$

LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$

$

Customer Rating

ITEM 67514

EASY-STORE STEP LADDER

R TWO TIER PE ON SU UP COLLAPSIBLE CO

SAVE 99 40%

ITEM 61969/61970 Customer Rating 69684 shown

R PE ON SU UP O C

259

$

12" SLIDING COMPOUND DOUBLE-BEVEL MITER SAW WITH LASER GUIDE SAVE

R PE ON SU UP CO

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$29.99

1199

99

SAVE 60%

TORQUE WRENCHES

Item 239 shown

• Accuracy within ±4%

comp at

179$497

SAVE $60

• 3-1/2 Pumps Lifts Most Vehicles • Weighs 34 lbs.

ITEM 69252/68053/62160 62496/62516/60569 shown

Customer Rating

RAPID PUMP® 1.5 TON ALUMINUM RACING JACK

SUPER COUPON

WOW

14999 $5999 $ 99

$

SAVE $347

Customer Rating

ITEM 69091/67847 shown 61454/61693/62803

2.5 HP, 21 GALLON 125 PSI VERTICAL AIR COMPRESSOR

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP CO

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$

$

ITEM 2696/61277 807/61276 62431/239

YOUR CHOICE

DRIVE 1/4" 3/8" 1/2"

How Does Harbor Freight Sell GREAT QUALITY Tools at the LOWEST Prices? We have invested millions of dollars in our own state-of-the-art quality test labs and millions more in our factories, so our tools will go toe-to-toe with the top professional brands. And we can sell them for a fraction of the price because we cut out the middle man and pass the savings on to you. It’s just that simple! Come visit one of our 700+ Stores Nationwide.

R PE ON SU UP CO

Limit 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, Extended Service Plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day Parking Lot Sale item, automotive lifts, compressors, floor jacks, saw mills, storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, trenchers, welders, Admiral, Badland, Bremen, CoverPro, Daytona, Diablo, Doyle, Earthquake, Franklin, Grant’s, Hercules, Holt, Jupiter, Lynxx, Maddox, Portland, Predator, Quinn, Stik-Tek, StormCat, Union, Vanguard, Viking. Not valid on prior purchases. Nontransferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/21/17.

ANY SINGLE ITEM

20% OFF

SUPER COUPON

QUALITY TOOLS LOWEST PRICES EVERYDAY

2

$ 99

SAVE 78%

19

comp at

$59.97

99 12 $ 99 $

ITEM 61637 shown 5889/62281

Customer Rating

29 PIECE TITANIUM NITRIDE COATED HIGH SPEED STEEL DRILL BIT SET

$

comp at

$269

99 99 99

179

$

SAVE $169

ITEM 69512/61858 69445 shown

1 TON CAPACITY FOLDABLE SHOP CRANE

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

Customer Rating

• Includes Ram, Hook and Chain

R PE ON SU UP CO

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R PE ON SU UP CO

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$59.99

4799 comp at

$

SAVE 20%

62306 shown

R 3-IN-1 PORTABLE POWER PE ON PACK WITH JUMP STARTER SU UP O Customer Rating C ITEM 38391/62376

LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$ 99comp at $8.48

4

SAVE 64%

ITEM 69249/69115/69137 69129/69121/877 shown

R 7 FT. 4" x 9 FT. 6" PE ON ALL PURPOSE WEATHER SU UP CO Customer Rating RESISTANT TARP


pp 32-33 Harbor Freight ad.indd 33

10/19/16 2:10 PM 9/9/16 3:09 PM

comp at

$

$29.98

99

19 $2499

SAVE 33%

ITEM 62890 shown 61939/62884/69580

$ $19.97

• 1000 lb. capacity

SAVE 59%

ITEM 60497/93888 shown 61899/62399/63095/63096 63098/63097

On All Hand Tools

• 700+ Stores Nationwide • Lifetime Warranty

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comp at

99

Customer Rating

7 10

$ 99

R PE ON SU UP CO

• 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed • Over 30 Million Satisfied Customers • No Hassle Return Policy

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R PE ON SU UP CO

MOVER'S DOLLY

57 comp at 99 $59 .99

Customer Rating

• 3-1/2 ton capacity

ITEM 60668/6530 shown

99

45$

$

SAVE 23%

42" OFF-ROAD/ FARM JACK

3/8" x 50 FT. HEAVY DUTY RUBBER AIR HOSE

99 comp at $1029.99

99 359 379

$

Customer Rating

ITEM 69387/63271 62744/68784 shown

R PE ON SU UP CO

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$

SAVE $670

44", 13 DRAWER INDUSTRIAL QUALITY ROLLER CABINET • Weighs 245 lbs.

$404

139

comp at

99

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$119

99 $

ITEM 62514 62656 67646 shown

SAVE $284

• 300 lb. capacity • 23 configurations

Customer Rating

17 FT. TYPE I A MULTI-TASK LADDER

WOW SUPER COUPON

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP CO

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VALUE

$ 97

7

ITEM 61313/62583/62728 47770/62570 shown

6 PIECE SCREWDRIVER SET

WITH ANY PURCHASE

FREE

SUPER COUPON

presented. Valid through 2/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

8999

$ comp at

$135

6999

$

599

SAVE $459

$

99

ITEM 68530/63086 63085/69671 shown ITEM 68525/69677 63087/63088 CALIFORNIA ONLY

comp at

$999

53999

• 76 dB Noise Level

99$133.89

99 79 99

• HarborFreight.com • 800-423-2567

5

comp at

$14.99

10" 8"

6"

SAVE 60%

$

99comp at $24.99

11

$9

7/60690 99 Cust6942 omer Rating

ITEM 903 shown

WRENCH SET

calling 800-423-2567. Cannotl or HarborFreight.com or by ses after 30 days from origina l LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores t or coupon or prior purcha le. Origina be used with other discoun . Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferab er per day. receipt l origina one coupon per custom purchase with Valid through 2/21/17. Limit coupon must be presented.

12"

WOW SUP4 PIEERCECOUADJPONUSTABLE

$ 99

LIMIT 6 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

Not for highway use.

3

SAVE 73% $ 99

Customer Rating

ITEM 69385/62388/62409 62698/30900 shown

10" PNEUMATIC TIRE

At Harbor Freight Tools, the “comp at” price means that the same item or a similar functioning item was advertised for sale at or above the "comp at" price by another retailer in the U.S. within the past 180 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning of "comp at" should be implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.

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comp at

$

$

SAVE 53

R 12 VOLT Customer Rating PE ON 15 GALLON SPOT SPRAYER SU UP ITEM 61263 CO 9583 shown $

Fits flat screen TVs from 37" to 70".

• 176 lb. capacity

ITEM 62289 61807 shown

Customer Rating

LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

comp at

through 2/21/17.

TILTING FLAT PANEL TV MOUNT

SAVE 65%

2999 $57.37

1999

$

$

R PE ON SU UP CO

8750 PEAK/ ER 7000 RUNNING WATTS UP PON S U 13 HP (420 CC) O SUPER GAS GENERATORS C QUIET

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP Customer Rating CO

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$

SAVE $65

ITEM 69995 shown 60536/61632

1500 LB. CAPACITY MOTORCYCLE LIFT Customer Rating

• Lift range: 5-1/4" to 17"

R PE ON SU UP CO

coupon must be presented. Valid

SAVE 52%

99$199.99 comp at

SAVE comp at

799 $10.40

5$

$ 99 42%

Customer Rating

ITEM 66287 shown 60450/62371/62716/62714

SPLIT LEATHER WORK GLOVES WITH COTTON BACK - 5 PAIR

Customer Rating

99 199 $326.55 comp at

$

17999

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$

SAVE $146

10 FT. x 17 FT. PORTABLE GARAGE

ITEM 69039/62286/62860 63055/62859 shown

R PE ON SU UP CO

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NOVEMBER 2016 CALENDAR

NORTHWEST THROUGH NOV. 8 – “I Approve This Ad:

Decoding Political Messages,” Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St., Toledo. Free. 419-255-8000 or www. toledomuseum.org/exhibitions. THROUGH NOV. 23 – “Fighting for

Freedom: WWII in Fulton County,” Fulton Co. Museum, 229 Monroe St., Wauseon, Tues.–Sat., noon–5 p.m. 419337-7922 or www.fultoncountyoh.com. NOV. 5 – Hardin Northern Band

Boosters Christmas Bazaar and Craft Show, Hardin Northern School, 11589 St. Rte. 81, Dola, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. $1. 419759-3587. NOV. 5, 6 – Tri-State Gun Show, Allen

Co. Fgds., 2750 Harding Hwy., Lima, Sat. 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m. $5. 419-647-0067 or www.tristategunshow.org. NOV. 5, 6 – Homespun Holiday Art and

Craft Show, Stranahan Great Hall, 4645 Heatherdowns Blvd., Toledo, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. 419-842-1925 or www.toledocraftsmansguild.org.

PLEASE NOTE: Country Living strives for accuracy but strongly urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling long distances to events. Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event by writing to Country Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or events@ohioec.org. Country Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address of where the event takes place or a number/website for more information. NOV. 25–JAN. 1 – North Pole Express,

NOV. 10–12 – ’Tis the Season Christmas

12505 Co. Rd. 99, Findlay, Fri. and Sat. 5–9 p.m., Sun. 5–8 p.m. $3, C. $2. 419423-2995 or http://nworrp.org.

Open House, 4363 St. Rte. 39, Millersburg, 10 a.m.–6 p.m. 330-8933604 or tistheseasonchristmas.com.

NOV. 25–JAN. 8 – Hayes Train Special

NOV. 11–13 – Christkindl Market, Canton

Exhibit, Hayes Museum, Spiegel Grove, Fremont, Mon.–Sat. 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 12–5 p.m. $7.50, Srs. $6.50, C. $3. 419332-2081 or www.rbhayes.org. NOV. 26, DEC. 3, 9, 10 – Holiday Lantern

Tours “Yuletides of Yesteryear,” Sauder Village, 22611 St. Rte. 2, Archbold, 4–8:30 p.m. $13, C. $7. Reservations required. An interactive look at American Christmas traditions from 1850 through the 1920s. 800-5909755 or www.saudervillage.org.

NORTHEAST THROUGH NOV. 8 – Josiah for President,

Ohio Star Theater, Carlisle Inn, 1357 Old Rte. 39, Sugarcreek, 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. $27–$52.50. 855-344-7547 or www. dhgroup.com/theater. THROUGH DEC. 31 – “Glass: Selections

NOV. 11, 12 – Buckeye Farm Antiques

Annual Swap Meet, Shelby Co. Fgds., Sidney, Fri. 8 a.m. till dark, Sat. 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Consignment auction Sat. 9 a.m. $2 per day. Food available. 937693-4893 or 937-726-2485. NOV. 12 – Blade Holiday Parade,

Summit St. at Jefferson St., Toledo, 10 a.m., staging at 8 a.m. One of the largest and best holiday parades in the Midwest. 419-724-6394, 800-243-4667, or email mpeddicord@toledoblade.com. NOV. 18–DEC. 31 – Lights Before Christmas, Toledo Zoo, 2 Hippo Way, Toledo, Sun.–Thur. 3–8 p.m., Fri. and Sat. 3–9 p.m. 419-385-5721 or www. toledozoo.org.

from the Kent State University Museum Collection,” Rockwell Hall, 515 Hilltop Dr., Kent, Wed.–Sun., hours vary. Collection spans the Roman era to the 20th century. 330-672-3450 or www.kent.edu/museum. NOV. 4, 5 – Season’s Splendor Arts and

Craft Show, Greenbriar Conference and Party Ctr., 50 Riffle Rd., Wooster, Fri. 5–9 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Free parking/admission. Lunch available. 330-682-2926. NOV. 5 – 29th Annual Buckeye Book

Fair, Fisher Auditorium, OARDC campus, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m. $2. 330-262-3244 or www. buckeyebookfair.com. NOV. 5 – “Building a Model Railroad,”

NOV. 25–DEC. 31 – Firelands Festival

Lakeland Community College AFC Gym, 7700 Clocktower Dr., Kirtland, 9 a.m.–2 p.m. Free. Each topic taught by experienced model railroaders. Presented by National Model Railroad Association MCR–Div. 5. www.MCR5.org or 440256-8141.

of Lights, Sawmill Creek Resort, 400 Sawmill Creek Dr., Huron. 419-4333800 (ext. 784) or www.facebook.com/ FirelandsFestivalOfLights.

NOV. 5, 6 – Akron Comicon, John S. Knight Convention Ctr., 77 E. Mill St., Akron. $15, two-day pass $25, free for under 13. akroncomicon.com.

NOV. 22 – Farm Toy Show, Champaign

Co. Fgds., 384 Park Ave., Urbana, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. 937-826-4201.

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Museum of Art, 1001 Market Ave. N., Canton, Fri. and Sat. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Northeast Ohio’s premier juried, holiday-inspired fine arts and fine crafts show. 330-453-7666 or www.cantonart.org/christkindl. NOV. 12 – “A Fugitive’s Path: Escape

on the Underground Railroad,” Hale Farm and Village, 2686 Oak Hill Rd., Peninsula, 5:40–10 p.m. $12–$20. Reservations required. 330-666-3711 or www.wrhs.org/events. NOV. 12–20 – Warther’s Christmas Tree

Festival, Warther Museum, 331 Karl Ave., Dover, 11 a.m.–8 p.m.; 20th, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. $5. 330-343-7513 or http://thewarthermuseum.com. NOV. 19, 20 – Fall Avant-Garde Art and

Craft Show, Rocky River Memorial Hall, 21016 Hilliard Blvd., Rocky River, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. $3, free under 12. Food available. 440-2278794 or www.avantgardeshows.com.

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NOV. 2–5 – Amish Country Quilt Shop

Hop, Gramma Fannie’s Quilt Barn, 4363 St. Rte. 39, Millersburg. 330-893-3243 or www.grammafanniesquilts.com. NOV. 3, 4 – Five Nights on Campus:

Sugar: The Musical Comedy, OSU Marion, Morrill Hall Auditorium, 1465 Mt. Vernon Ave., Marion, 7:30 p.m. Doors open at 7 p.m. 740-725-6340 or https://osumarion.osu.edu/initiatives/ cultural-arts/five-nights.html.

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NOV. 10–12 – Tis the Season Christmas

Open House, Schrock’s Amish Farm and Village, 4363 St. Rte. 39, Millersburg, 9 a.m.–7 p.m. 330-8933604 or www.tistheseasonchristmas. com. NOV. 26, 27 – Scott Antique Market,

Ohio Expo Ctr., Bricker Bldg., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, Sat. 9 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. 800–1,200 exhibit booths. www.scottantiquemarket.com. NOV. 4–6 – The Mousetrap, May

Pavilion, Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, Fri./Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. $16. Agatha Christie’s classic whodunit mystery is fun theater for the whole family. 740-383-2101 or www. marionpalace.org. NOV. 5 – Dinner with the Presidents,

META Solutions Bldg., 100 Executive Dr., Marion, 5:30–8:30 p.m. Step back in time as you dine with different presidents from U.S. history. 740-387-4255 or www.marionhistory.com.

NOV. 25–JAN. 8 – Steubenville Nutcracker Village and Advent Market, 120 S. 3rd St., Steubenville. Life-size, hand-painted nutcrackers in an outdoor display. 866-301-1787.

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NOV. 26, 27 – International Tree and

Model Train Display, Black River Transportation Ctr., 421 Black River Lane, Lorain, Sat. 5–9 p.m., Sun. 3–7 p.m. http://lorainwinterfest.com.

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NOV. 26, DEC. 3 – Christmas in the

NOV. 12 – Veterans Celebration,

Alpaca Barn, 16800 Cowley Rd., Grafton, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. 440-477-4300 or www.ourlittleworldalpacas.com.

Stradley Park, 36 S. High St., Canal Winchester, 10 a.m. 614-837-8276 or www.canalwinchesterohio.gov.

NOV. 26 – Thanksgiving Train Show, Train Collectors Association, Lake Erie Chapter, UAW Hall, 5615 Chevrolet Blvd., Parma, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. All-gauge show including O, S, HO, N, Z, and large scale. $6, free under 12. 440-845-2700 or e-mail tcalakeerie@gmail.com.

NOV. 12 – Annual America Recycles

Day Eco Art Show, May Pavilion, Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Fine art and handcrafted gifts made from recycled material. 740-223-4120. or www.wastenotmarion.com.

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NOVEMBER 2016 CALENDAR NOV . 13 – Beyond the Ropes, Harding

Home, 380 Mt. Vernon Ave., Marion, 1:30 and 3:30 p.m. $10. Reservations required, limited seating. 740-387-9630 or www.hardinghome.org. NOV. 17 – Florence Harding Shopping

Spree, Scioto Shoe Mart, 206 James Way, Marion, 8–10 p.m. $10–$15. Reservations required. 740-387-9630 or www.hardinghome.org.

SOUTHEAST THROUGH NOV. 27 – “Mastery:

Sustaining Momentum,” Dairy Barn Arts Ctr., 8000 Dairy Ln., Athens, Tues.–Sun.12–5 p.m., Thur. 12–8 p.m. $10, Sr./Std. $8, under 18 free. Exhibit features bold, contemporary, largescale works by 12 master quilters. 740-592-4981 or www.dairybarn.org/ events-2. NOV. 1–JAN. 2 – Dickens Victorian Village, Wheeling Ave., Cambridge. Outdoor display of Dickens-era scenes and life-size, handmade mannequins wearing real vintage clothing. 800-9335480 or www.dickensvictorianvillage. com. NOV. 1–JAN. 2 – Guernsey Co.

NOV. 20 – Fall Harvest Festival,

Dixieland Jazz Bands, Makoy Ctr., 5462 Center St., Hilliard, 1–6:30 p.m. $10–$20, free under 18. 614-794-1977 or www.cohjs.org. NOV. 22 – Delaware Holiday Parade,

step-off at Mingo Park, 500 E. Lincoln, Delaware, 3 p.m. 740-362-6050.

Courthouse Holiday Light Show, Wheeling Ave., Cambridge, 5:30–9 p.m. 800-933-5480 or www.dickensvictorianvillage.com. NOV. 5 – Miller’s Automotive Swap

Meet and Cruine In, Ross Co. Fgds., 344 Fairgrounds Rd., Chillicothe, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. 740-701-2511 or 740-7013447. NOV. 6 – Mandolin Orange, Stuart’s

Festival of Lights, 5601 Westfall Rd. SW, Lancaster, Sun.–Thur., dusk to 10 p.m.; Fri./Sat., dusk to 11 p.m. 740-9692283.

Opera House, 52 Public Square, Nelsonville, 7 p.m. Songwriting duo performs their mix of folk, country, and bluegrass music. 740-753-1924 or www.stuartsoperahouse.org.

NOV. 30–JAN. 5 – “A Storybook

NOV. 18–20 – Jingle Bell Weekend,

Christmas,” Zanesville and Muskingum Co. locations, Sun.–Thur. 6–9 p.m., Fri. and Sat. 6–10 p.m. Drive by or walk to view the storybook-themed decorations at nearly 100 participating businesses. 740-455-8282, 800-743-2303, or www. visitzanesville.com.

126 W. Second St., Waverly. Features arts and craft shows, an illuminated Christmas parade, and more. 740947-9650 or www.piketravel.com/ JingleBell.

NOV. 24–JAN. 1 – Annual Collison

NOV. 20 – Christmas at the Cabin, 1482

Glass Rock Rd., Glenford, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. E-mail mtairvfarm32@hotmail.com or 740-743-2215.

NOV. 19 – Grand Holiday Ball, 1930 E.

NOV. 12–JAN. 3 – Christmas at the

Wheeling Ave., Cambridge, 7 p.m. $25, couples $45. 740-405-0400.

Junction, EnterTRAINment Junction, 7379 Squire Court, West Chester. Take a “Journey to the North Pole,” where you’ll meet Santa and Mrs. Claus. 877898-4656.

NOV. 20 – 27th Annual Zanesville Handbell Festival, 516 Shinnick St., Zanesville, 7 p.m. 740-455-8282 or www.thursdaymusic.org. NOV. 23 –Gallipolis in Lights Park

Lighting Ceremony, Gallipolis City Park, 300 block of Second Ave., Gallipolis. Activities begin at 5:30 p.m., lighting at 7:00 p.m. 740-446-6882. NOV. 26 – Country Christmas Concert

with the Ohio Valley Opry, 10660 Burr Oak Lodge Rd., Glouster, 7 p.m. 740767-2112 or www.stayburroak.com. NOV. 26 – Morgan Co. Christmas Parade, Main St., McConnelsville, 7 p.m. 740-962-4909. NOV. 26–DEC. 11 – Holidays at Adena,

Adena Mansion and Gardens, 847 Adena Rd., Chillicothe, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. 800-319-7248 or www.adenamansion. com. NOV. 26–DEC. 18 – Santa Train, Hocking

Valley Scenic Railway, Nelsonville Depot, 33 W. Canal St., Nelsonville, 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. 740-249-1452 or www. hvsry.org/trainlist.

SOUTHWEST

NOV. 24–DEC. 25 – Christmas by

Candlelight, Marion Co. Fairgrounds, 220 E. Fairground St., Marion, Thur.–Sun. 6–10 p.m., except week of Christmas. Drive-through holiday light display featuring animated characters. Live Nativity on Sat. and Sun. nights. $6 per car. 740-382-2558 or www.marioncountyfairgrounds.com.

NOV. 5, 6 – 41st Annual Dayton

Train Show, 1475 Upper Valley Pike, Springfield, Sat. 11 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11–4 p.m. $7. www.daytontrainshow. com. NOV. 11 – Veterans Day Parade, Main

St., St. Rte. 41, West Union, 11 a.m. 937386-0293. NOV. 11 – Southern Ohio Indoor Music

Festival, 123 Gano St., Wilmington, 10 a.m.–11 p.m. One of the Midwest’s premiere bluegrass events. 937-372-5804 or www.somusicfest.com. NOV. 19 – Gingerbread House Workshop, The Castle, 418 Fourth St., Marietta, 10 a.m.–noon. $25 per kit, $5 helper fee. Reservations required. 740373-4180 or www.mariettacastle.org.

NOV. 18–20 – Christmas in the Country,

Highland Co. locations, Fri. 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 2–5 p.m. Unique gifts by local artisans. Visit their studios. 937-927-5321 or e-mail brendabradds@yahoo.com. NOV. 18–20 – Christkindlmarkt,

Germania Wies’n, 3529 West Kemper Rd., Cincinnati, Fri. 5–10 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–10 p.m., Sun. 12–5 p.m. $3, free under 14. www.germaniasociety.com/ christkindlmarkt. NOV. 18–JAN. 1 – Holiday Lights on the

Hill, 1763 Hamilton-Cleves Rd., St. Rte. 128, Hamilton, Mon.–Thur. 6–9 p.m., $20 per car; Fri.–Sun. 6–10 p.m., $25 per car. 513-868-1234 or http://pyramidhill.org/holiday-lights. NOV. 19 – Hometown Holiday Horse

Parade, S. Broadway, Greenville, 7 p.m. 937-548-4998 or www.downtowngreenville.org. Space Station, U.S. Air Force National Museum, Wright-Patterson AFB, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Free. 937-255-3286 or www.nationalmuseum.af.mil.

NOV. 11, 12 – Springfield Swap Meet

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Craft Show, 2556 Lebanon Rd., Clarksville, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Over 100 vendors, artisans, and crafters. 513897-1946.

NOV. 19 – Family Day: Destination

NOV. 18–20 – Christmas Open House,

downtown Cambridge. Tree-lighting ceremony, horse-drawn carriage rides, and more. 800-413-4118 or www.chillicothedowntown.com/events.

NOV. 12 – Christmas in the Country

and Car Show, Clark Co. Fgds., Springfield, 8 a.m.–5 p.m. $8. 937-3760111 or www.ohioswapmeet.com.

NOV. 26 – Hometown HoliDazzle Illuminated Parade and Festival, Main St., Wilmington, 10 a.m.–9 p.m. Parade at 7 p.m. 937-302-1528 or www.hometownholidazzle.com. NOV. 26, 27 – Old-Fashioned Christmas

in the Country, 4872 Cincinnati Brookville Rd., Shandon. Experience a Christmas celebration in Ohio’s first Welsh settlement. 513-738-4180.

WEST VIRGINIA NOV. 18–DEC. 31 – Christmas Fantasy Light Show, Krodel Park, Point Pleasant, 6-9 p.m. 304-675-3844. NOV. 19–DEC. 31 – Holiday in the

Park, City Park and Southwood Park, Parkersburg, 6–9 p.m. A holiday light drive-through display. 304-480-2655. NOV. 27 – Holiday Historic Homes

Tour, Fairmont, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. 304367-5398 or www.marionhistorical.org/ pages/events.php.

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OHIO MARKETPLACE

HEALTH INSURANCE OPEN ENROLLMENT November 1 thru January 31

Are you getting a subsidy on your health insurance? Farmers and Self-employed Qualify! Ask for a Quote! Enroll in 30 minutes CALL 800-321-3671 OHIO FARMERS UNION Is your policy being cancelled? We can help - give us a call! ohfarmersunion.org • insurance@ohfarmersunion. org

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OHIO QUIZ

Appetizing Ohio by Damaine Vonada Because November is synonymous with Thanksgiving, this month’s quiz features Ohio foods. We’ll serve the clues; you dish up the answers. For example, if the clue is “Ohio ranks among the top 10 states that produce this particular poultry,” the answer would be “Turkeys.”

CLUES 1. It’s served three-way, four-way, or five-way but always on spaghetti. 2. Heinz cooks up this condiment at its Fremont factory. 3. This international Orrville company achieved sweet success with apple butter, which its founder — and namesake — first marketed in 1897. 4. Its hamburgers may be small, but this Columbus-based chain of eateries has a super-sized following. 5. Bubbly and festive, it was first made in the United States in 1825 from native Catawba grapes grown by Cincinnati’s Nicholas Longworth. 6. Headquartered in Toledo, its selection of sausage and cheese has made this company one of America’s favorite holiday gift food brands. 36

7. This classic pasta casserole originated at Marzetti’s restaurant in Columbus in the early 1900s. 8. Toledoan Jamie Farr, a.k.a. Corporal Max Klinger, made M*A*S*H fans hungry for this signature sandwich from Tony Packo’s Café. 9. The largest fruit indigenous to the United States, it’s a southeast Ohio staple and supposedly was George Washington’s favorite dessert. 10. Dave Thomas named this famed restaurant chain for his daughter, and the first one opened Nov. 15, 1969, at the corner of Fifth and Broad in downtown Columbus. 11. Invented by Clevelander Clarence Crane, these ring-shaped hard candies have been a matter of life and breath since 1912. 12. Nicknamed the “Oatmeal King,” Akron’s Ferdinand Schumacher introduced these “shot from cannons” cereals in the early 1900s.

ANSWERS ON PAGE 37

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Ohio Quiz

(Answers from page 36)

1. Cincinnati chili 2. Tomato ketchup 3. J.M. Smucker Company 4. 5. 6. 7.

White Castle Sparkling wine Hickory Farms Johnny Marzetti

8. Hungarian hot dog 9. Pawpaw 10. Wendy’s 11. Life Savers 12. Puffed oats and puffed rice

Learn more at OhioK12Online.com or call 614-501-9473

School of Ohio

l iomrmtuuna V ity C

Ohio’s fastest growing Non-Profit K-12 Virtual Academy


MEMBER INTERACTIVE

Our members’ favorite fall landscapes Susan K. Green South Central Power Company and GuernseyMuskingum Electric Cooperative member

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“Fall is my favorite season, and discovering unexpected natural beauty is a special gift. So this my favorite fall scene during a morning walk at my farm: Fog is rising over the pond as the sun brings warmth to the new day, the leaves are turning colors, the air is fresh and crisp, the sky is blue, and natural beauty is all around me as I begin my day. Life is good!”

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“Autumn is a second spring, when every leaf is a flower.”

— Albert Camus

Teresa Clapper Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative member “Painters Hollow, October 2013”

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Bobby Barnett Buckeye Rural Electric Cooperative member “The world’s largest apple basket in Frazeyburg, Ohio, at the Longaberger Homestead. It is 29 feet high and 19 feet in diameter at the base.”

• NOV EMBER 2016 10/19/16 1:38 PM


Cynthia Boles South Central Power Company member

Ann Hauser Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative member

“My sons Jacob and Nathan jumping into a mound of leaves. Remember the words of Linus VanPelt: ‘Never jump into a pile of leaves with a wet sucker!’”

“Autumn in Cascade Park, 2010”

Jill Ladrick (left) South Central Power Company member “My favorite fall scene was taken in my back yard under a yellow maple tree while the sun shone through the leaves. A beautiful day against a blue sky.”

Michelle Williams (above) Buckeye Rural Electric Cooperative member “Cabin at Lake Katherine” Mike and Deb Ebbeskotte (below) Paulding Putnam Electric Cooperative members “Our great-nephew, Brody Kuhlman” Tonya Moran Bess (below) South Central Power Company member

Patty Quaglia (above) South Central Power Company member “Bark Camp State Park, Belmont, Ohio”

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Robin Mata Butler (right) Butler Rural Electric Cooperative member

Norma Weyrick Carroll Electric Cooperative member Janet Tyler Buckeye Rural Electric Cooperative member

“Ashtabula County reflections”

Send us your photos! If we use your photo, you’ll get a Country Living tumbler. For May, send us photos of “new life” by Feb. 15. For June, send us photos of your most memorable family vacation by March 15. Guidelines: 1. One entry per household per month. 2. Upload your photos at www.ohioec.org/ memberinteractive or by U.S. mail: Editor, Country Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229.

Christy McMillan Frontier Power Company member

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3. Include your name, mailing address, phone number or e-mail, the name of your electric co-op, the month you’re submitting for, and who the person(s) in the photo is, as well as an explanation of the photo. If you do not provide this information, we cannot print your submission. 4. Send a self-addressed stamped envelope if you want your photo returned.

• NOV EMBER 2016 10/19/16 1:40 PM


COMMITMENT TO COMMUNITY WE BRING SMILES TO OUR COMMUNITY

We work to improve our members’ quality of life by investing time, money, and expertise to better local communities and strengthen relationships with member-owners. To learn more about the cooperative difference, visit ohioec.org.

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WE ARE OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK; 8 AM – MIDNIGHT EST, SUNDAY 9 AM – MIDNIGHT EST. OFFER ONLY GOOD FOR NEW DISH SUBSCRIBERS. All calls with InfinityDISH are monitored and recorded for quality assurance and training purposes. Offer for new and qualifying former customers only. Qualification: Advertised price requires credit qualification and eAutoPay. Upfront activation and/or receiver upgrade fees may apply based on credit qualification. Offer ends 1/16/17. 2-Year Commitment: Early termination fee of $20/mo. remaining applies if you cancel early. Included in 2-year price guarantee at $39.99 advertised price: Flex Pack plus one add-on Pack, HD service fees, and equipment for 1 TV. Available with 2-year price guarantee for additional cost: Programming package upgrades ($54.99 for AT120+, $64.99 for AT200, $74.99 for AT250), monthly fees for additional receivers ($7 per additional TV, receivers with additional functionality may be $10-$15) and monthly DVR service fees ($10). NOT included in 2-year price guarantee or advertised price (and subject to change): Taxes & surcharges, add-on programming (including premium channels), Protection Plan, and transactional fees. Premium Channels: Subject to credit qualification. After 3 mos., you will be billed $60/mo. for HBO, Cinemax, Showtime, Starz and DISH Movie Pack unless you call to cancel. Other: All packages, programming, features, and functionality are subject to change without notice. After 6 mos., you will be billed $8/mo. for Protection Plan unless you call to cancel. After 2 years, then-current everyday prices for all services apply. For business customers, additional monthly fees may apply. Free standard professional installation only. HBO®, Cinemax® and related channels and service marks are the property of Home Box Office, Inc. SHOWTIME is a registered trademark of Showtime Networks Inc., a CBS Company. STARZ and related channels and service marks are property of Starz Entertainment, LLC. Visa® gift card must be requested through your DISH Representative at time of purchase. $50 Visa® gift card requires activation. You will receive a claim voucher within 3-4 weeks and the voucher must be returned within 30 days. Your Visa® gift card will arrive in approximately 6-8 weeks. InfinityDISH charges a one-time $49.99 non-refundable processing fee which is subject to change at any time without notice. Indiana C.P.D. Reg. No. T.S. R1903.

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10/18/16 12:30 PM

Country Living November 2016 Carroll  

Country Living November 2016 Carroll

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