__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

-

NA PALI Issue 1, 2014 / 2015 COLLECTOR’S EDITION

Coast Magazine

Kauai’s Photo Tour Nā Pali Coast

+

MAPS TOP 10 “TO DO” BEACHES STORIES & MORE

A publication from Nā Pali Riders Raft Tours . Kaua’i


The Only Raft Company Touring the Entire Na Pali Coast!

Not only the best day of your vacation, but possibly one of the best days in your life!

808.742.6331 www.NapaliRiders.com

Scan this code with your smart-phone to watch our introductory video!

• Na Pali Coast • Snorkeling • Sea Caves • Dolphins conditions permitting

Meet in Waimea Town


A publication from Nā Pali Riders Raft Tours . Kaua’i Scan QR code to Watch the Nā Pali Riders’ Introductory Video

Updated Daily! Raft Tour Photos & Videos

Contents

Captain’s Log ......................................... 5

Kaua’i Maps ............................................ 13 Taking in Nā Pali Coast ..................... 21 Dolphins Living on Nā Pali .............. 43 Sea Cave Review.................................... 49 Story: Nā Pali Gump ........................... 65

-

Scan QR code to view the Nā Pali Coast Gallery

10,000+

NACoastPALI Magazine

Photos & Videos

Chris Turner Publisher Ani Turner Editor CONTRIBUTORS

Nā Pali Riders Raft Tours www.napaliriders.com

Brad Cate Design

www.bradcatedesign.com

Calendar of Events Art Nights Farmers Markets Live Music Yoga Local News

1

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014/2015

ADVERTISING INQUIRIES

web: address: phone: email:

www.napalicoastmagazine.com P.O. Box 1082 Kalaheo, HI 96741 808.742.6331 info@napalicoastmagazine.com

2


Living on Nā Pali Coast Illustration by Brad Cate Design

Nu’alolo Kai

In contrast to the north end Nā Pali Coast, there’s very little vegetation on the cliffs at Nu’alolo Kai—it looks as if someone forgot to turn on the sprinklers here. But if you have a good boat guide to direct your eyes and tell of Nu’alolo’s history, on those black, sheer lava cliffs, you’ll notice 2 distinctly colored, gray lava dikes on the east-facing wall that form the letter “X.” Directly below that mark is the area where a Hawaiian fishing village once stood, with a population of approximately 100 people. Nā Pali’s Nu’alolo Kai reef juts out into the sea , forming a natural jetty that protects the inner bay from the strong, northeast trade winds that bring crashing waves to this area year-round. In ancient times, the protected reef teemed with fish and other wildlife such as sea turtles, seaweed, and edible sea shells, making life at Nu’alolo Kai quite sustainable for its inhabitants.

3

Call 808.742.6331

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014/2015

www.napaliriders.com

4


Captain’s Log Nā Pali Riders Raft Tours Scan the QR code to watch the video

April 27,C2012 —C T aptain

hris urner

A

pril 27 2012. 1-mile northwest of the Forbidden Island of Ni’ihau. Today the unexpected happened— mating Humpback whales caught on film. This act has never been filmed before, so you can imagine that both my head and heart were spinning with delight at my discovery. I didn’t even know that I had the video until a good 8 hours later, when I found it while skimming through the day’s video footage Whale specialists theorize that whales mate very quickly, explaining why the act, to this date, has never been captured on film. My own theory is that after the males battle it out over a chosen female, the winner and his new “bride” vanish into the dark depths of the blue sea to consummate their love in a place no camera man or woman is welcome to. Imagine my shock and speechlessness when I discovered mating footage on my camera—it took me a while to register what I saw happening before me on the screen. Reading National Geographic and watching the Nature Channel as a youth, my hero was Jacques Cousteau, the ocean explorer who brought the secrets of the sea into America’s living rooms. For the last twenty plus years of captaining boats (yes, I’m that old), I’ve had the opportunity to live a little bit like Jacques Cousteau, exploring the nooks and crannies of Kaua’i’s coastline, and experiencing endless encounters with the Humpback whales while they visit Kaua’i from December through May of each year. I have always wondered what these whales do under the surface of

Lehua Rock , just north of Ni’ihau, reveals the morning’s sun beams shining through the Keyhole and electrifying the water color.

You can see the male Humpback whale’s pectoral fin firmly wrapped around the female, holding her steady in the mating position as they both surface for air.

Continued on page 7

Call 808.742.6331

5

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014 / 2015

www.napaliriders.com

6


Captain’s Log—April 27, 2012  A n d now this w h a l e -a ddic t ca p ta i n has whales a p p r o ac h i n g de a d on t o wa r d s h i s b oat, w i t h e n g i n e s o f f, f l oat i ng i n t h e m i ddl e of a b s o l u t e ly now here .

And

h e h a s no clu e he i s a bou t t o h av e a o n c e in-a-lifetime e x per i e nce , a sne a k pe a k into the secret l i f e of h u m p b ac k s …

the ocean, and if I would ever be lucky enough to stumble upon that “holy whale grail”—actual mating in the wild. Let me begin my story with the events that led up to this incredible day. My first mate Wayne Daniels joins me for a “Jacques Cousteau” adventure to the Hawaiian Island of Ni’ihau, located 17 miles off of Kaua’i. We are like a couple of boy scouts getting ready for our first camping trip—totally excited, a bit nervous, and 100% ready to take the plunge. 5:30 am. On this day the ocean conditions appear perfect, and we begin our trek to Ni’ihau at dawn. The first glow of the rising sun stands behind us as we start our journey.

Light, Hawaiian variable winds blow rarely at Ni’ihau, at best only 20% of the year. Days of no wind are even rarer. So we’re certainly blessed this morning with extremely light winds and pancake-flat waters. The channel door to Ni’ihau is literally wide open! Our visibility from the boat to Ni’ihau is almost 15-miles, but hazy. We can’t yet see the island. I would have to rely on my compass, steering 270 degrees, to cross just north of the island, lining up with nearby Lehua Rock. The water clarity is the opposite—visibility is at 100 feet or more,

(continued)

Underwater you can see the challenge that the male Humpback whale faces. Incapable of seeing what he is doing, he feels for and carefully lines up his target. You can see he completes his mission, just needing slight penetration for a very quick and short amount of time to achieve his innate desires to procreate. You could compare the scene to two fighter jets refueling in the sky.

clear and perfect for underwater filming. The superb, stainedglass ocean hypnotizes me as we cross it, with colors changing from deep purple to cobalt blue. As we near the island of Ni’ihau, we see a glowing ring of electrifying, Windex-blue waters surrounding the shallows. 7:45 am. On every trip to Ni’ihau we first pay homage to the amazing keyhole rock formation on the west side of Lehua Rock. Wayne has already started to focus on filming the keyhole because by 8:00 am, a beam of sunlight will pour through the crack and illuminate the surrounding water with a glow that reflects off of the bottom, just 50 feet below. Multi-colored fish can be seen dancing through the beam of light. I literally squeak the boat through the keyhole crack several times with only inches to spare. I was certainly pressing my luck hoping to get that perfect photo opportunity. “ Wh a les! ” I 9:00 am. A pod of Hawaiian spinner

dolphins has come over to our boat. y e l l t o Wa y n e . We hurry to lower our GoPro camera “ Mom! Ba by ! equipment into the water. I fear I will “butter finger” in my excitement and 1, 0 0 0 f e e t awa y , drop the multi-camera rod into Davey 1 o ’cl ock ! ” Jones’ Locker forever. I remind myself “ Ye a h , t h e y ’ r e to breathe slowly, to relax. The clear water and angle of sunlight is now com i ng right giving us some remarkable underwater t o u s ,” W a y n e dolphin footage. My eye connects with the dolphins’ making me feel like I’m replie s. connecting with my soul mate. We hear their high-pitched squeaks and see the bubbles streaming from their blow holes as they “dolphin-talk” all around us. I have seen dolphin pods a lot larger in size, but this one is small and close-knit. Maybe that’s the way they like it here at Ni’ihau. It is now close to 9:45 am. Wayne and I talk about feeling so very satisfied with the day’s events—that we have “scored” so remarkably in the scenery, ocean conditions, and wildlife encounters. We feel satisfied. We have barely finished this conversation when we think we see 2 sharks on the surface, side-by-side and heading straight towards us. Red alert! Get the cameras back into the water! Now I have no problem telling you that sharks give me the creeps (thank you Peter Benchley). So you can understand how pleased I am that the 2 shark fins turn out to be the twin-wing tips of a single, giant manta ray. This one is a continued on page 9

7

www.napalicoastmagazine.com

www.napaliriders.com

8


Captain’s Log—April 27, 2012  larger-than -average sized individual with s at i s f i e d w i t h wings spanning ~7 t h e a b ov e feet across. With mouth wide open, s u r fac e s i g h t s it approaches us, at n i ’ i h au . I skimming the surface for its breakfast. w o u l d h av e 10:00 am. It’s time to consi dered explore the coastline and we head south, a l r e a dy down the west coast h av i n g w o n of Ni’ihau. About the whale halfway along, we stumble upon our Superbow l . first Humpback whale mother and her calf. We excitedly wait in anticipation for the two creatures to surface, like kids waiting for Christmas morning presents. A good 10 minutes later I see 2 blows happening off in the distance—1 big puff, followed by 1 small puff. Clearly, they’re not in the mood to socialize. Not expecting any more Humpbacks, we decide to move to the next Windex-blue bay at Ni’ihau to have lunch. Two monk seals snoozing on the deserted beach serve as our entertainment. i wa s t o t a l ly

(continued) Staring at the deserted beaches of Ni’ihau, I cannot help having thoughts of what Hawai’i was like before man had set foot here. 11:00 am. Now we’re closing to the climax of this day’s adventure. It started something like this: “Whales!” I yell to Wayne, “Mom! Baby! 1,000 feet away, 1 o’clock!” “Yeah, they’re coming right to us,” Wayne replies. I turn off the engines right there, and wait for the whales to approach our boat. We sit there lining them up like bowling pins, thinking this will be a relatively close swim-by. We set up the cameras and wait. And then the magic moment began. The whales pass around the boat’s port-side as we drift with the bow pointed south. Suddenly, they turn, heading right for our bow at the 12:00 position. Mom and baby slowly

approach us, baby is ~18 feet long, looking very thick and healthy. Mom is huge, close to 50 feet in length. This whale has been on our planet for quite some time, she is no stranger to a boat and is not the least bit concerned about our presence. Once the whales get to the “red zone” at 30 feet away, I get this “Whale Super Bowl” feeling like I’m in the 4th quarter with a 2 minute warning, and beaming with confidence Powerful bolts of adrenalin take over my body. The boat is the goal line, and the closer the whales get, the greater my confidence level becomes that we are going to score! And now this whaleaddict captain, has whales approaching dead on towards his boat, with engines off, floating in the middle of absolutely nowhere. And he

has no clue that he is about to have a once-in-alifetime experience, a sneak peak into the secret life of Humpbacks—their underwater mating ritual, to be revealed on film. Today, went far and beyond any normal whale watch. We were like kids excitedly watching a fireworks show, not knowing that the finale portion was still to come. I had already been beyond overwhelmed at the glory of our day trip to Ni’ihau. I was totally satisfied with the above surface sights. If that were it, if there were nothing more, I would have considered us already having won the “Whale Superbowl. “ 8:00 pm. So appreciate my surprise later that evening, and the thrill I felt upon witnessing the unexpected—the secret whale world revealed to me by my underwater cameras. 8 hours after the actual event, the whale fireworks finale truly exploded on my screen. And here’s what the video showed: Scan the QR code to watch the video

Whale breaching on the Nā Pali Coast. Call 808.742.6331 www.napaliriders.com

9

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014/2015

10


EXPLORING THE ISLAND OF KAUA‘I

NORTH SHORE

Taro Fields in Hanalei

Hanalei Bay Kilauea Lighthouse

Kē’ē Beach

North Shore Roads Dirt Roads Hiking Trails Snorkel Spots Surf Spots

Note of Caution: The waters around Kaua‘i are known for dangerous currents, large surf, shore breaks, and sneaky waves. It is critical that you check ocean conditions and consult with a lifeguard before going into the water. Lifeguarded Beaches: Anahola Beach, Haena Beach, Hanalei Pavilion, Ke’e Beach, Waioli Beach Pine Trees

13

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014 / 2015

Secret Beach

Lighthouse Rd

d

Princeville Hanalei Pier Hanalei Hanalei 56 Bay Rd Aku Rd 560 Bridge eke W Hanalei

Kalihiwai Beach Anini Rd

aR

Hā‘ena

‘Anini Beach

au e

au

Hā’ena Beach Park

Wainiha Beach Lumaha‘i Park Beach

Ka Ha ku R d

d

i. 4M

lal Ka

ail Tr

560

Hideaways Beach

R ai iw lih Ka

i. 2M

Tunnels Beach

Kil

Kē’ē Beach

Kīlauea Lighthouse

Kalihiwai Rd

Kāhili Beach

Pila‘a Beach Nā‘AiNāKai Botanical Garden Wailapa Rd N. Waiakalua Rd

Kilauea

Kuhio Highway

Ko ‘ol au

Larsen’s Beach

Rd

Moloa‘a Bay Rd a‘a

olo M

Kīlauea Point National Wildlife Refuge is a sanctuary for seabirds. Signage throughout the refuge identifies the area’s bird species, including the Hawaiian goose (Nēnē), Frigatebirds, Shearwaters, Boobies and Albatross. See them soaring through the sky above the refuge, and nesting in the cliffs and nearby island. Kilauea Lighthouse is the northernmost point of the main Hawaiian Islands. Built in 1913, it houses the largest lens of its kind.

Anahola Beach Park d Anahola R Anahola

56

Call 808.742.6331

www.napaliriders.com

14


EXPLORING THE ISLAND OF KAUA‘I

EAST SIDE

East Side

Kuhio Highw ay

56

ola nah Kai

a ihun Mail

Rd aR

n ohe ‘Ol

K No uam un o‘o ou Tr ail

Kamalu

15

Kapa‘a

Waipouli Beach Park

Waipouli Beach Wailua Bay

Kuhio H ighway

Wailua Falls

Lydgate Beach Park

Nukoli‘i Beach

d

50

Keālia Beach

Kapa‘a Beach Park

Ha lei lio R Wailua d

56

583

50 wy li‘i H mua u a K Puhi

Trail

Wailua Falls

lo R a‘a

Lifeguarded Beaches: Anahola Beach Kealia Beach Lydgate Beach

581

580

M

Note of Caution: The waters around Kaua‘i are known for dangerous currents, large surf, shore breaks, and sneaky waves. It is critical that you check ocean conditions and consult with a lifeguard before going into the water.

Kua mo‘o Rd

Kuhio Hwy

Roads Dirt Roads Hiking Trails Snorkel Spots Surf Spots

Nou nou Mt

d

Ka pa‘ aB ypa ss

Trai l

Nā wi liw ili R

56

51

Hanamā’ulu Wilcox Hospital

Ka pu le Hw y

Mo alep e

l rai eT rlin we Po

Kuilau Ridge Trail

Kawaihau Rd

Hanamā’ulu Bay

Eucalyptus Grove

Kipū Ranch

Ahukini Rd

Lihu‘e Ri ce St

Lihu‘e Airport

d

Kalapakī Beach

51

58

Nāwiliwili

Nāwiliwili Bay

Opaeka’a Falls

Call 808.742.6331

www.napaliriders.com

16


EXPLORING THE ISLAND OF KAUA‘I

SOUTH SHORE

South Shore Roads Dirt Roads Hiking Trails Snorkel Spots Surf Spots

50

Ka um ual i‘i H wy

Lifeguarded Beaches: Poipu Beach, Salt Pond Beach Kalāheo Hanapēpē

Lāwa‘i

530

H

Lawa‘i Bay

Spouting Horn

Po‘ipū Rd

Hanapēpē Bay Glass Beach

St

Rd

520

d

ale wi li R

d

‘Ele‘ele

Salt Pond Beach Park

wi liw ili

Lihu‘e

Tree Tunnel

Lawa ‘i Rd

ass) Byp o‘ipū a– P Kolo iki ( Kino Ala

540

R loa Ko

50

Ri ce

Maluhia Rd

Ka um ua li‘i Hw y

y

Nāwiliwili

Note of Caution: The waters around Kaua‘i are known for dangerous currents, large surf, shore breaks, and sneaky waves. It is critical that you check ocean conditions and consult with a lifeguard before going into the water.

Pākala Beach

w li‘i H mua Kau Puhi

Kōloa

Lawa‘i Po‘ipū Rd pū Beach Baby o‘i P Kōloa Beach Landing Shipwreck Kiahuna Brennecke Beach Beach Po‘ipū Beach Beach Park

Ha‘ula Beach Kawailoa Bay

Gillin’s Beach

South Shore Shoreline

Spouting Horn Po‘ipū Beach

17

Po‘ipū Beach

Call 808.742.6331

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014 / 2015

www.napaliriders.com

18


EXPLORING THE ISLAND OF KAUA‘I

WEST SIDE

Polihale State Park

Waimea Canyon

Milita ry Bou ndary

550

Ku ku iT ra il

Waimea Canyon Lookout

d Ko ke‘ eR

wy ‘i H ali

Pacific Missile Range Facility

Rd Canyon Waimea

u um Ka

Waterfall next to Koke‘e Road

Wa ime aC

any on T rail

Waimea Pier

552

550

50

Kekaha Beach Park

Ke ka ha

Rd Kekaha

n yo an C e ai‘ Ko

West Side Roads Dirt Roads Hiking Trails

Note of Caution: The waters around Kaua‘i are known for dangerous currents, large surf, shore breaks and sneaky waves. It is critical that you check ocean conditions and consult with a lifeguard before going into the water. Lifeguarded Beaches: Kekaha Beach Salt Pond Beach

Waimea

h

Kīkīaola Small Boat Harbor Check-in Point Lucy Wright Beach Park Nā Pali Riders Raft Tours Pākāla Beach Ka um ua li‘i Hw y

Waimea Canyon

Call 808.742.6331

www.napaliriders.com

19

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014 / 2015

50

Hanapēpē ‘Ele‘ele

20


-

NA PALI COAST

EXPLORING THE ISLAND OF KAUA‘I

ta k i ng i n

the Nā Pali Coast

3

3a

Page 23

4

Page 25

2

1

Page 24

Kē‘ē Beach

5

Page 25

Page 27 Page 28

Pirates Cave

7

Wai ‘ahuakua Valley Double Door Cave 6

Pohakanoa Falls

Page 30

5

7

8

Open Ceiling Cave

9

8

Honopu Beach

Awa‘awapuhi Valley Nu‘alolo Kai

Page 33

Miloli‘i Beach

13

9 Makaha Valley

Page 34 Makole

Polihale

21

www.napalicoastmagazine.com

12

10

11

Nu‘alolo ‘Āinā Valley

Mil oli‘i Rid ge T rail

Roads Dirt Roads Hiking Trails Snorkel Spots

Note of Caution: The waters around Kaua‘i are known for dangerous currents, large surf, shore breaks and sneaky waves. It is critical that you check ocean conditions and consult with a lifeguard before going into the water.

Kalalau Valley Ka lal au Va lle 2M yT i. rai l

Koke‘e Aw State a ‘a wap uhi Park Tra 3.2 5M il i

Nu ’alo lo T rail 3.2

K

Ho ‘olulu Valley

Hanakoa Valley

5

Page 29

3a

3

4

M i.

6

i. 4M

Hanakapi’ai Falls

10

Page 36

Hanakoa Lookout

.

l rai uT a l ala

i. 2M

2

Hanakapiai Falls Trail

Hanakapi’ai Beach

1

11

5M i.

Page 37

550 13

12 Page 39

Page 41

Call 808.742.6331

www.napaliriders.com

22


TAKING IN THE

Nā Pali Coast

…just outside

Left to right: Looking to the west end of the beach and beyond, winter surf exposes an array of surf-rounded rocks, a summer beach day

the reef the ocean turns a

2

m a g i c a l c o b a lt blue… in the e a r ly m o r n i n g look for dancing

Hawai ian spinner

Ke‘e Beach paradise and the gateway to the Nā Pali Coast

dolphins here, as

HANAKAPI’AI

The Hanakapi’ai Trail is a 2-mile hike from Ke’e Beach, taking you to Hanakapi’ai Beach. Here, you will encounter a sandy beach surrounded by a heavenly rainforest-like valley. A natural ammonia scent fills the air, caused by fermenting b e w a r e o f guava fruit and tropical plants. Hiking further into the valley, there exists an amazing waterfall that creates a refreshing, bubbling stream, t h e t e m p t i n g that winds through the valley and cuts through the beach, flowing o c e a n h e r e , over large boulders and finally out to sea. Beware of the tempting ocean here, the Nā Pali Coast ocean currents are an invisible killer at t h e N ā Pa l i this location, taking 86 people’s lives over the years—when in doubt C o a s t do not go out.

they perform

currents are

like jesters

an invisible

i n t h e r o ya l

k i l l e r at t h i s

court of

l o c at i o n ,

Left to right: Visitors sun and swim in the Ke’e lagoon, Hawaiian spinner dolphins play outside L a k a the reef, Heiau of the hula goddess Laka located slightly past the coconut grove

ta k i n g

Early season winter waves begin their onslaught on Hanakapi’ai Beach.

86

people ‘s lives

1

KE‘E BEACH

over the years.

Ke’e Beach is located at the end of the north shore’s road on Kaua’i. It is also known as the gateway to the Nā Pali Coast by way of the Kalalau Trail. As you face to the west, look to the left, and along the cliff, semi-covered by a coconut tree jungle, protrudes an area of black lava rock walls. This is the heiau complex at Ke’e, home of the sacred hula goddess Laka. The setting of this heiau at Ke’e Beach is about as exotic as it comes in Hawai’i. Just outside of the reef the ocean turns a deep, cobalt blue color. In the early morning look for dancing Hawaiian spinner dolphins here, as they perform like jesters in the royal court of Laka.

Call 808.742.6331

23

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014 / 2015

www.napaliriders.com

24


TAKING IN THE

3

Nā Pali Coast

HO ‘OLULU VALLEY Ho’olulu means “protected bay or waters.“ The cove and sea caves below Ho’olulu Valley are the home of noddy tern marine birds which nest along the cliffs and inside the walls of the sea caves. The water here is an electrifying blue color, especially in the sea caves when the summer sun shines into them, reflecting off of the shallow, white sandy bottom. Looking overhead one sees a towering cliff and an overhang of vegetation at the top of prominent Space Rock. Natural springs of water trickle over the bowl-shaped cliffs. The springs reflect the light of the sun beams, creating a magical display of color. Left to right: Looking out of Zebra Cave at Ho’olulu, electrifying water colors inside the cave, the sheer lava rock cliffs at Ho;olulu

t h e w at e r t u r n s electric blue, e s p e c i a l ly i n t h e s e a c av e s w h e n the summer sun shines down on it reflecting off of the white, san dy bot tom

Looking from east to west towards Zebra Cave.

3a

PIRATES CAVE The Pirates Cave is the largest, or shall we say the deepest sea cave on the Nā Pali Coast. Entering the cave takes you through a cascading waterfall. The green moss on the ceiling and white calcium streaks from the natural fresh water springs glow in the shadows of the cave. It will remind you of the spooky cave from the movie The Goonies, with the smell of your favorite old seafood restaurant at the same time.

Left to right: Kayakers deep in the Pirates Cave, cascading waterfall at the entrance, looking out towards the sea

Prominent Rockin foreground. Pirates Cave andSpace Space Rock 25

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014 / 2015

Call 808.742.6331

www.napaliriders.com

26


TAKING IN THE

4

Nā Pali Coast

WAI ‘AHUAKUA VALLEY DOUBLE DOOR CAVE

This is the most awesome sea cave on the Nā Pali Coast. This cave has it all, with a separate entrance and exit. First, there is a large, cathedral ceiling room, and bright pinkish-red rock walls that look like a submerged hippo. Next, there is the spooky darkness at the sharp,180-degree turn in the interior of the cave. Here, your eyes must quickly adjust towards a distant bright light that symbolizes the end of the dark tunnel that leads back out to the ocean. Right before exiting the cave, you hear a gushing water sound and then the sight of a cascading waterfall coming through a hole in the ceiling surprises you. This is the kind of waterfall you expect to see mermaids swimming in, it’s just so mysterious. And there’s more... at a certain time of day in summer afternoons, something extraordinary happens. Through the hole in the ceiling where the waterfall comes through, there appears a beam of light that literally lights up the waterfall like a bolt of lighting. It creates an electrifying-green cathedral glass circle in the water. The calcium deposits coming up from the mixing of freshwater with the ocean appear like ghostly apparitions moving up towards the beam of light. Conditions must be just right to see this event. Left to right: The water fall inside of the cave, the glowing light coming through the ceiling’s hole

The two ridges left and right of the valley make up a large portion of the Bali Hai Ridge, made famous from the movie South Pacific

5

HANAKOA VALLEY

A large portion of the Bali Hai Ridge is here, comprised of two lava dike ridges protruding up like sentries guarding both sides of the tropical rain forest valley at Hanakoa. In the middle of the valley you will see a waterfall cascading down the mountain. Along the near-shore coast line one can’t ignore the bright orange-rust earth color created by red iron ore in the soil. In contrast to this color are the darkgreen hala trees, which resemble something from a Dr. Seuss book. Further back on the ridge the sisal plant thrives and looks like a 20-foot high asparagus stalk made just for giants. Everything here looks enormous, there is a Jurassic feeling. You almost expect a Pterodactyl or flying dinosaur to swoop down from the cliffs at any moment. Left to right: East valley peak, middle of the valley, east valley ridge on a summer day.

Call 808.742.6331

27

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014 / 2015

www.napaliriders.com

28


TAKING IN THE

Nā Pali Coast

t h e c r y s ta l c l e a r w at e r f a l l splits like t h e fa n g s o f a snake, as it slithers and fa l l s i n to t h e o ce an ’s electric green w at e r b e l o w

Looking west out of the sea arch is a panoramic view of the Nā Pali Coast

Kalalau grotto in the foreground with the Kalalau cathedrals in the background

7

KALALAU VALLEY

Remote, deep and hushed is Kalalau, grandest of Nā Pali’s nearly inaccessible valleys. Bowl-shaped and tucked within mountainous walls of rain forests, it’s 3-miles in diameter. Kalalau’s mystic spell C r e at o r i s is felt in the quiet air that surrounds it, broken only momentarily by tour helicopters that appear like tiny, hovering mosquitoes high giving us above in the distant sky. The valley’s west wall ends toward the sea a r e a l in cascading cathedrals of stone, with lava dikes thrusting upwards, g l i m p s e , together forming three towering, knife-edged pyramids, commonly referred to as the “Guardians of Kalalau.” They take command of a s l i g h t their valley, steadfast and true, and are the second highest sea cliffs ta s t e , in the world.

there is no

doubt the

Left to right: Looking east into the Sea Arch on a summer day, the Sea Arch entrance

6

POHAKANOA FALLS

The grayish-black lava Sea Arch is highlighted by Pohakanoa Falls flowing behind it. This crystal clear waterfall splits like the fangs of a snake, as it slithers and falls into the ocean’s electrifying green water below. When sea conditions are extremely calm, the opportunity presents itself to raft right through the Sea Arch. Upon entering, you will be treated to a panoramic view of the entire Nā Pali Coast. Peering down, you are rewarded with the beautiful sight of the magicallylighted, emerald-green water below. Cool, misty spray coming off of the waterfall is a refreshing treat on a warm, summer day.

29

o f h e av e n

To truly describe Kalalau is to compare it biblically, as Kauai’s very own “Garden of Eden.” There are hidden delights in the valley such as cascading waterfalls, slippery-slides carved into boulders from millions of years of water flows, and fairy tale-like streams flowing gently through a mystic, hobbit-like valley. continued on page 31

Call 808.742.6331

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014 / 2015

www.napaliriders.com

30


TAKING IN THE

7

Nā Pali Coast

KALALAU VALLEY

Kalalau Stream is like a natural spa treatment center. Its boulders form a series of Jacuzzi tubs to relax one’s tired muscles. The rocks are shaped like massage tables for the masseuse wanting to perfect their craft. Other exposed boulders are naturally heated up by the sun, and act like beach mats without the nuisance of sand. Campers are sighted on the rocks, basking in the warmth of the sun, with eyes relaxed and shut, and ears tuned to the music of the running streams, and to the birds whose songs blend with the trancelike rhythmic beat of ocean waves crashing against the cliffs in the background. The fragrant scent of wild ginger flowers is so sweet that one cannot help but fall asleep under the warmth of the sun. When they awake from their slumber the beautiful Pacific Ocean is as far as the eye can see, and dolphins and whales jump in the horizon. Kalalau is magic, it’s nature extraordinary. Hikers return to Kalalau year after year, in hopes of recapturing their past experiences. One visit would fill a treasure chest full of memories to last a lifetime—of acrobatic dolphins spinning through high-flying jumps just off the beach, and of the tastesampling of assorted fruit varieties found deep inside the valley. To many this is where just about every human sense can be satisfied. It’s the complete feeling of peace that draws people back for more. To me, there is no doubt that the Creator is giving us a glimpse, a slight taste of Heaven, here, at Kalalau. Every year thousands make the Kalalau pilgrimage, from every walk of life. Some take the challenge by kayak. Others, brave

(continued) To m a n y t h i s

Every year

is where

thousands make the

just about

K al al au

every human

pilgrimage, from

sense can be

e v e ry walk

s at i s f i e d ; t o

of life.

ot h e r s i t ’s the complete feeling of n at u r e ’ s p e a c e t h at d r a w s them back for more.

A magical Kalalau Valley morning scene

and energetic, hike the 11-mile trail from the end-of-the-road at Hā’ena State Beach Park. The Kalalau Trail is rated a ‘9’ out of ‘10’ for difficulty by the Sierra Club. This trail is no cake walk. One section is nicknamed, not figuratively, “Crawlers Ledge.” To many, it’s a right-of-passage to reach that 11th mile. Some finish the trail in one day, while others take it by sections, camping overnight to break up the strenuous journey. But no matter how you do it, the experience shapes and challenges every participant’s character.

The grotto with its rock chase lounges. K al al au Stream i s l i k e a n at u r a l s pa t r e at m e n t c e n t e r .

Its boulders form a series of

Jacuzzi tubs

to r e l a x o n e ’s tired muscles.

Call 808.742.6331

www.napaliriders.com

31

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014 / 2015

32


TAKING IN THE

Nā Pali Coast

HONOPU BEACH

8

H o n o p u For Hollywood (a.k.a. “Nā Pali-wood”), Beach made its biggest

H o l ly w o o d debut in

Th e

Man with the

Golden

Honopu Beach is a favorite movie filming An endangered monk seal location. Six Days Seven Nights, King sleeps by the Honopu Arch. Kong, and Pirates of the Caribbean are just a few productions that easily come to mind. Honopu Beach made its biggest Hollywood debut in The Man with the Golden Gun, in an incredible scene with the infamous James Bond riding in a red helicopter, being chased under and through Honopu’s natural seaside archway.

G u n , i n a n Honopu is also known as “The Valley of the Lost Tribe.” This name incredible scene with t h e i n fa m o us

James Bond riding in

refers to ancient times when this now silent, brooding valley was the home to native peoples. According to one legend, 300 Hawaiians lived in this remote site, shielded by its over 3,000-foot high, sheer cliffs. Some believe their ancient spirits still wander forlornly through the valley. They tell of a “chicken skin” feeling, of ghostly intangibles heard, and of that uncomfortable feeling of being watched, or being followed.

Th e

r e s u lt i s a

s tag g e r i n g co l o r pa l e t t e l i k e o f a d i v i n e a r t i s t at p l ay w i t h e l e c t r i c blue lightning b o lt s b l e n d e d i n t o l i g h t b l u e , da r k blue, and greens— a l l co n t i n u o u s ly changing.

I t ’s

spellbinding

The Open Ceiling Cave is a heavenly place.

a red helicop ter , being chased under and through

H o n o pu ’s

Left to right: Looking up towards the sky through the hole in the ceiling, looking out towards the sea from inside of the cave, passing by the cave’s entrance

n at u r a l seaside

9

a r c h w ay .

Honopu Beach and valley on a perfect sun-lit day.

33

OPEN CEILING CAVE The Open Ceiling Cave is a hollowed-out lava tube (e.g. the ceiling has crashed in). When you are inside of the cave, you can literally look upwards to the sky above. In the summer season, the mid-morning sunlight streams through the cave’s dark entrance, penetrating the crystal clear waters and reflecting off of the white, sandy bottom. The result is a boldly blended color palette of electrifying blues and greens—it’s spellbinding. It must be seen first-hand to be fully appreciated.

Call 808.742.6331

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014 / 2015

www.napaliriders.com

34


TAKING IN THE

Nā Pali Coast

…t h e m o r e a c c u r at e t r a n s l at i o n …

Top to bottom: The waterfall, hanging gardens on the east cliff, heiau on the west point

10

AWA‘AWAPUHI VALLEY Awa‘awapuhi is the narrowest and deepest of Nā Pali’s remote, isolated valleys. Some say the name refers to the valley’s sinuous curves and twists that wind between its 3,000-foot walls, like a slithering eel, or puhi. But the more accurate translation is more romantic, for ‘awapuhi is the Hawaiian word for the wild ginger that grows here. Revered for its decorative and fragrant flowers, ‘awapuhi also has many practical uses—for food and fiber, and most notably for the natural shampoo that oozes from its flowering stalk.

35

f o r ‘a w a p u h i i s t h e n at i v e word for the wild ginger

Sea cave spring-fed hanging gardens and sheer cliff trail at Awa’awapuhi

t h at g r o w s here.

Nowadays, this valley (awa) of the wild ginger appears far less lush than it was in ancient times, since the irrigated terraces for cultivating taro plants have long since fallen away. By sea, the valley itself is hidden from view by towering cliffs, for it hangs above a low sea cliff, with the valley’s main stream ending in a waterfall to the sea. At the base, there is now a tall natural screen of dark green hau, a native Hawaiian bush from the hibiscus family, whose bark was once used for rope-

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014 / 2015

making. There can still be seen a multitude of half-washed away rock dams that at one time went completely through the stream to create perfect terraces for growing taro. On its western side, at the point overlooking the ocean, is a rock wall heiau, or temple platform designed for worship. It could be the place where the gods of the sea and fishing were once supplicated, or perhaps a

dedication site to Ku, the god of war, to whom human sacrifice and cannibalism was sometimes offered. To the far right, are remains scattered wild taro. This wild taro community is the actual descendant of the same taro once cultivated by those ancient Polynesians who lived out their lives in this lonely valley.

Revered

for

i t s d e c o r at i v e and fr agr ant flowers, it also had many pr ac tic al uses—for food and fiber

Call 808.742.6331

www.napaliriders.com

36


TAKING IN THE

11

Nā Pali Coast

NU‘ALOLO ‘ĀINA VALLEY Nu‘alolo ‘Āina is remarkable for its remains of taro-growing terraces. People resided in this valley for hundreds of years, well into the early 20th century. Adjacent to it, and once connected by a primitive ladder over the separating cliff, is the Nu’alolo Kai Beach and Valley, which also contains multiple, elaborate lava rock terraces visible from the ocean. The terraces left at Nu’alolo ‘Āina are a reminder that a substantial amount of taro was grown here. With the

steep topography of the valley one has to wonder if the farmers were able to produce enough taro to feed the local population, on a consistent basis. With frequent devastations to crops caused by landslides and flash floods, it was surely a challenge to produce enough crop. This became especially challenging in the winter season when fishing or reef gleaning were made impossible by dangerously high surf crashing against the shorelines and cliffs. The people had to successfully cultivate

enough taro because it was literally their only food source at certain times of the year. Taro, or kalo, grows in watery paddy fields and upland rainy areas, and is considered a perfect food plant all around. Its heart-shaped green leaves have a delicious, spinach flavor, while its starchy tuber is similar in consistency to a potato. Poi, the gray paste made from pounding the taro’s tuber into a silky paste, is a popular Hawaiian side-

dish. Most tourists have reluctantly tasted it at a Hawaiian lū‘au. Taro was Nā Pali’s main food crop in ancient times. Its production was literally a matter of life or death for the people. The best producing taro fields and fishing locales were probably valued more than we value diamonds and gold today, and likely a source of much envy and conflict during times of hunger.

Ta r o

wa s

N ā Pa l i ’s main food crop during ancient times.

Its

production wa s l i t e r a l ly a m at t e r of life of d e at h f o r the people.

It

wa s

their most reliable food

Taro field lava rock terraces are still visible from afar

Nu‘alolo ‘Āina on a gorgeous summer morning 37

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014 / 2015

source...

Call 808.742.6331

www.napaliriders.com

38


TAKING IN THE

Nā Pali Coast

A premier fishing vill age once flourished here, t h o u g h o n ly t r a c e s of it now remain.

........ For a depiction of Top to bottom: Endangered green sea turtles sun their shells, Nu’alolo Kai Reef with the Kalalau cliffs in the background, the most beautiful water colors on the planet.

12

m ay h av e l i v e d at

N u ’a l o l o K a i , s e e pa g e s

3-4.

NU‘ALOLO KAI Nu‘alolo Kai Beach was the portal to the sea for the people of the adjoining Nu’alolo ‘Āina Valley. A trail and ladder down the separating cliff led to this location which boasted a freshwater spring, expansive beach and abundant coral reef. A premier fishing village once flourished here, though only traces of it now remain. Plantings behind the beach provided some food and medicine for the people, but it was the surrounding reef that was most prized for its supply of multicolored fish, seaweeds, and shellfish, such as ‘opihi limpets and pipipi snails. Even sharks were caught, like the white-tip reef shark, which, if not

39

how ancient people

Looking across the low tide reef to the area where the fishing village once stood

steadfastly patrolling the reef, sleeps in the crevices bordering the white sandy bottom. Fish and turtle pens were probably set up to hold live catches until they were eaten. Outrigger canoes most likely lined the beach, ready for offshore fishing when schools of oceanic fishes like aku, akule and ‘ōmilu came near. The reef, of the fringing type, is shallow and extends out from the

sandy beach like a natural jetty. Besides providing seafood, it also buffered the persistent onslaught of trade wind swell that rolls in nearly 80 percent of the year. At the lowest tides, half of the reef top will be above water, and virtually dry, the summer sun toasting its crop of golden brown seaweed. This marine plant, a kind of Sargassum (as in the Sargasso Sea) is a favorite

food of resident green sea turtles. During low tide the turtles gather and patiently wait just outside the reef. They gently glide in as the tide slowly swells, trying to be first to sample their favorite seaweeds. For a depiction of how ancient people may have lived at Nu’alolo Kai, see pages 3-4.

Call 808.742.6331

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014 / 2015

www.napaliriders.com

40


TAKING IN THE

13

Nā Pali Coast

MILOLI‘I BEACH Miloli‘i Beach is a wide, expansive beach and a favorite camping spot for kayakers during the spring and summer months, when the huge winter waves have subsided on the north shore. The beach at Miloli‘i, with its warm and dry, sagey air, is a welcome respite. Miloli‘i is a small valley that soon becomes a narrow passage between dry, 1,500-foot walls. It gets less than a quarter of the rainfall of nearby Kalalau, yet its stream still flows year-round. Thus, it is the last of

the valleys having perennial water. This made human settlement here possible for the native population. Besides being a source of life-giving water, the stream was the home to native shrimp and ‘o‘opu gobys (the latter is a fish famous for having a ventral sucker that enables climbing of waterfalls). These animals spend the early stages of their lives in the sea, and later ascend and colonize the mountain streams. The Miloli‘i people also irrigated taro on the back shore flats behind the

beach, and fished the surrounding fringing reef, whose bounty is revealed even today by the plethora of shells it offers to collectors. With the coming of summer, green sea turtles that had taken shelter on the sandy beach (to avoid the tiger sharks hunting the murky wave-stirred shoreline), now move back out to the calm, clear waters of the reef to feed. An endangered Hawaiian monk seal is often found sleeping on the beach, probably

digesting its belly full of fish and resting for its next hunt. Unlike Kalalau, there is no connecting hiking trail into Miloli‘i. It is accessible only by small boat or kayak, and the narrow channel through the reef is especially tricky to navigate when the trades blow strong. The risk of being shipwrecked here might appeal to some romantics, but if actually realized, would surely be a nightmare.

Top to bottom: Busy summertime kayak season, over looking the beach, and orange cliff stain of the seasonal waterfall, the cliffs do an imitation of the Grand Canyon.

Looking up the valley at Miloli’i 41

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014/2015

Call 808.742.6331

www.napaliriders.com

42


dolphins

living O N T H E N Ā PA L I C O A S T

S T O R Y B Y C A P TA I N C H R I S | P H O T O S B Y N Ā PA L I R I D E R S

E

very morning on our tour, we start with an ocean life and safety briefing before we head out to the Nā Pali Coast. I find passengers are shocked again and again by the dolphin portion of the briefing, where I describe what was revealed in the movie The Cove. The movie was a shocking documentary about the dolphin trade, where rich corporations are funding the exploitation of dolphins for bigprofit returns. These intelligent animals are inhumanely put into saltwater tanks to live, where as dolphins in the wild are pelagic creatures (e.g. they travel in family pods on migratory routes in the ocean’s deep scattering layer at night, and move back to shallow, coastal waters in the early mornings). Most would be appalled that dolphin exhibitions can fetch over $150,000.00 for a marine park show, and stunned to learn that the dolphins are often drugged in their tanks to keep them alive and able to cope with the stress of their artificial surroundings, which would otherwise drive them to suicide.

Continued on page 45

Call 808.742.6331

43

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014 / 2015

www.napaliriders.com

44


Dolphins Living On the Nā Pali Coast

When people ask what the dolphin population numbers are today, the sad answer is that they have plummeted. I watch people’s faces cringe when I tell them that in 2010, 23,000 dolphins in Japan were slaughtered and fed unknowingly to innocent children and adults. In some places of Japan, certain dolphin species are extinct. This makes one think, what would our planet be like without dolphins as part of the ecosystem?

45

(continued)

Many of our clients are American baby boomers that grew up watching Flipper, a television show that put Flipper the dolphin into every household in America. The Academy Award-winning movie The Cove, documents the Ric O’Barry (aka the pioneer trainer of Flipper the dolphin) story, In my opinion, this was the best movie ever made about dolphins because it created an awareness of what humans are

doing to our oceans and to the animals living in it. The movie demands that we become accountable to our actions, to our habits, and to our lifestyle. The survival of one of the most intelligent creatures on the planet, the dolphin, is in our hands. What can we do to help? Three simple things can be done to change the world for the better: 1) Help pick up trash and/or recycle so it doesn’t end

up in the ocean; 2) Use aluminum beverage bottle containers instead of plastic ones; 3) Support products whose packaging shows a commitment to create less waste. Remember that the average plastic bottle takes over a thousand years to decompose, and there are thousands of miles of floating plastic garbage in the sea at the present time.

Call 808.742.6331

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014 / 2015

www.napaliriders.com

46


W at c h i n g d o l p h i n a c r o b at i c s i n t h e w i l d t o p s a n y r e h e a r s e d p e r f o r m a n c e at a t h e m e pa r k .

We need to stop trying to

c h a n g e t h e n at u r a l b e h av i o r o f d o l p h i n s i n t o m a n - m a d e performances.

A n d w e s h o u l d n o t ta k e t h e m o u t o f t h e i r

n at u r a l h a b i tat , w h e r e t h e y a r e h a p p y a n d f r e e .

Remember,

dolphins need to and deserve to be in the ocean.

Questions people ask me...

W

hy are dolphins so important to humans? Do I look down on Sea World? OK, Good questions, that I will answer from a captain witnessing thousands of dolphin encounters over my years. Dolphins are extremely intelligent, they will risk their lives to keep humans safe. Throughout history, there are endless accounts of dolphins rescuing people from people from drowning, or of dolphins protecting surfers and swimmers from sharks. A dolphin will literally put itself between a human and a shark, and won’t hesitate to bump into a shark to fend it off. I grew up in Southern California, very close to Sea World, and what I believed was fine and normal dolphin behavior in tanks is such a sharp contrast to the perspective I have now as a captain seeing dolphins everyday in the wild. It is not acceptable for dolphins to live in captivity. They are quick and agile creatures, they move effortlessly in the wake of the boat, they show their happiness as they excitedly jump and flip through the air. Our emotions are touched by the sight of new babies that spin next to their mothers, like bouncing little footballs. And then there’s the “eye chat” where we catch them staring straight at us from below the water’s surface. They are connected to us. Watching dolphin acrobatics in the wild tops any rehearsed performance at a theme park . We need to stop trying to change the natural behavior of dolphins into man-made performances. And we should not take them out of their natural habitat, where they are happy and free. Remember, dolphins need to and deserve to be in the ocean.

Call 808.742.6331

47

www.napalicoastmagazine.com

www.napaliriders.com

48


I t i s t h e c al m i n g s pr i n g an d sum m e r t i m e co n d i t i o n s o n t h e

N ā P ali C oa s t t hat

allow o u r r af t t h e b e s t chan ce s

Sea Cave to e n t e r t h e s e a c av e s an d arch e s .

I

Inside the Open Ceiling Cave

R e v i e w

always know this question is coming,“Will we be able to get into the sea caves today?” I reply that it is never a guarantee, every day the ocean conditions can change, and we will enter as long as we can exit as well.

Story by Captain Chris Photos by Nā Pali Riders

Inside Zebra Cave at Ho’olulu

The caves on Nā Pali Coast are highly alluring. They represent mystery and magic, they are Mother Nature’s creation. Most will admit to never having seen anything like them before. “How did this form”? What makes that heavenly, Windex-blue color glow in the Open Ceiling Cave? How did the waterfall form there? What kind of birds are nesting in there? What movies were filmed here?” The onslaught of questions fire at me like a machine gun from the excited passengers, but the truth is that I am just as excited as they are. You can’t get into the sea caves every day, but when you do, it is always a new experience. Let Nā Pali Riders Raft Tours describe in detail the caves and arches you will be visiting on the Nā Pali Coast of Kaua’i.

49

www.napalicoastmagazine.com

Yo u c a n ’ t g e t i n t o t h e s e a c av e s e v e r y d ay , b u t w h e n yo u d o , i t i s a lway s a new experience.

A gushing waterfall flows inside of the Double Door Cave

Call 808.742.6331

www.napaliriders.com

50


First visit is the Open Ceiling Cave. As our raft enters the cave, look for the electrifying-blue glow of the water which contrasts with the shadowed, black ledge that looks a lot like beaten metal. Sunbeams shine into the cave and penetrate through the summertime calm, crystal-clear waters. They reflect off of the white, sandy bottom, giving forth a heavenly, blue color to the water. The feeling imparted is surreal.

Open Ceiling Cave

The entrance to the Open Ceiling Cave with its heavenly, blue color

On a calm, summer day the raft can navigate through the Open Ceiling Cave

51

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014 / 2015

Call 808.742.6331

www.napaliriders.com

52


Honopu Sea Cave has its own unique features and views. As you enter, glance back at the waterfall which is framed in by the cave’s entrance. Look for schools of small fish hiding in the shadows and possibly a whitetip reef shark looking to make a meal out of those fish. See nesting seabirds in the crevices of the walls. As you get deeper into the cave, the walls of the cave edges stand out even more. The grayish-black lava rock contrasts with the pinkish-red coral growing at the surf line.

Honopu Sea Cave

L o o k f o r s c h o o l s o f s m a l l f i s h b e l ow, h i d i n g i n t h e s h a d o w s a n d m ay b e a w h i t e - t i p r e e f shark looking to make a meal of those fish

Call 808.742.6331

53

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014 / 2015

www.napaliriders.com

54


Its ominous cliffs tower over 3,0 0 0 f e e t , w i t h f l u t e d wa l l s c o n t r a s t i n g from lime to dark green.

Honopu Sea Arch Honopu Sea Arch is a popular Hollywood movie setting. Many movies have been made at this location, including Pirates of the Caribbean, King Kong, and The Man with the Golden Gun with the dramatic helicopter scene of James Bond flying right through the arch. There is an air of mystery here, for the backdrop of Honopu Valley has been nick-named Valley of the Lost Tribe. Its ominous walls tower over 3,000-feet high. Many stories are told of this valley as being haunted by ancient warrior spirits of long ago.

55

Call 808.742.6331

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014 / 2015

www.napaliriders.com

56


Nā Pali Sea Arch

Nā Pali Sea Arch is around the corner from Hanakoa Valley. On rare occasions when the sea conditions are calm, the experience of rafting through the Sea Arch may be realized. Upon exiting, the view looking west is truly a “post card moment” capturing a panoramic view down the Nā Pali coastline with waterfalls plunging into the sea from rugged sea cliffs above, and the expansive Pacific Ocean all around.

57

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014 / 2015

T h e v i e w l o o k i n g w e s t a s yo u b e g i n t o e x i t t h e a r c h i s a t r u ly a

“post card moment” ...

Call 808.742.6331

www.napaliriders.com

58


Wa’iahuakua Sea Cave, is known to most as the Double Door Cave because it has a separate entrance and exit. Entering through the back door of the cave, with a trickling waterfall above, you are led through a narrow channel that turns left, where you continue down a long, dark tunnel towards a distant light at the end. As your eyes adjust to the darkness, you are pleasantly surprised with a huge waterfall inside the corridor. When the afternoon summer light shines through the hole , a spotlight appears in the water below. Calcium deposits creeping up the rocks, seem to rise through the spotlight appearing like ghosts. Looking at the waterfall, one almost expects to see mermaids sitting along the rocks.

Wa‘iahuakua Sea Cave

A s yo u r e y e s a d j u s t t o t h e d a r k n e s s , yo u a r e p l e a s a n t ly s u r p r i s e d w i t h a wat e r fa l l i n s i d e t h e c o r r i d o r

Call 808.742.6331

59

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014 / 2015

www.napaliriders.com

60


Ho’olulu Sea Cave is nicknamed the Pirates Cave. A rushing waterfall guards its entrance, providing every passenger daring to enter with a cool, freshwater shower. It is the largest of the Nā Pali sea caves.

Ho’olulu Sea Cave A r u s h i n g wat e r fa l l g u a r d s its entr ance, providing every pa s s e n g e r d a r i n g t o e n t e r w i t h a c o o l , f r e s h wat e r s h o w e r

Call 808.742.6331

61

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014 / 2015

www.napaliriders.com

62


Ho’olulu Cove

Ho’olulu Cove is surrounded by three caves. On the far right is Zebra Cave with stripes of white calcium against black lava; in the middle is the Godzilla Egg Cave with big round rocks covered in bright pink corals; and to the left is the Skull Cave shaped like a skull.

Call 808.742.6331

63

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014/2015

www.napaliriders.com

64


I once met a Vietnam Veteran who told me a story about his unique experience on

N ā Pa l i

C o a s t. Th i s m a n h a d heard about

N ā Pa l i

from an army buddy who proclaimed it to be the most special place on earth.

Well, the army

buddy didn ’t make it out of

Vietnam, but this man

was determined to visit a n d pay t r i b u t e t o h i s lost friend.

nā pali

gump continued on page 67

Call 808.742.6331

65

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014 / 2015

www.napaliriders.com

66


O n e o f t h e h i p p i e s g r ac i o u s ly l oa n e d h i m a s u r f b oa r d , a n d a d v i s e d h i m t o ta k e a pa d d l e ov e r t o n e a r by j u s t a r o u n d t h e co r n e r f r o m

A

t the start of the Kalalau Trail, he was surprised to stumble upon a camp of hippies living in tree houses in a clothing-optional lifestyle. They had created gardens of organic fruits and vegetables, and yes, even the marijuana was organic. He did not know until later that he had stumbled upon the now infamous Taylor Camp. After nearly a week of being adopted by this new community of friends, who shared countless tales of the Nā Pali’s famous Kalalau Valley, this man decided to begin his journey down the treacherous 11-mile trail to Kalalau. Along the trail at Hanakoa, a stampede of goats rushed past him, and nearly knocked him off the cliff. If it weren’t for a conveniently located notch in the earth, he would have certainly met his death

67

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014 / 2015

H o n o p u B e ac h ,

K a l a l au

as there was a 300-foot drop to the sea below. Completely shaken, he relaxed his nerves with a little bit of kind herb gift from his Taylor Camp friends, and set forth on the trail. When he finally reached Kalalau Valley, it was everything he had been told, and more. He was immediately befriended by another group of hippies, similar to the last set at Taylor Camp. One of the hippies graciously loaned him a surfboard, and advised him to take a paddle over to nearby Honopu Beach, just around the corner from Kalalau. So this man, already naked, Continued on page 70

Call 808.742.6331

www.napaliriders.com

68


jumped on the surfboard with rubber slippers and a sack of granola held in his teeth, and paddled over to Honopu. Just picture it, a naked guy on a surfboard. When he reached the first cliff at Honopu, he attempted, in vain, to climb the practically vertical wall of rock, and quickly gave into letting the waves take him on to the beach instead. So tired at that point, and so thirsty was he, that he found the waterfall at Honopu and laid to rest. He awoke a few hours later to the sound of crashing waves thumping on the sandy beach, and the harsh reality set in that he would not be able to get back to Kalalau that day. But remember, he was still naked, and the day turned to night and boy did it get cold. So cold did it get that he had to dig a hole in the sand and bury his body in it to prevent hypothermia. He claimed that all through the night he saw the rocks stand up and take short walks on the beach, probably visions resulting from heat stroke. And all night he negotiated with God to let him live and he will promise to be a better this or that. And sure enough, the next morning the surf had subsided and he quickly paddled back to Kalalau. He swore to never go back to Honopu Valley again, it was haunted for sure. And I looked into his eyes and believed that, well, at least part of his story had to be true.

H e c l a i m e d t h at a l l t h r o u g h t h e n i g h t h e s a w t h e r o c k s s ta n d u p a n d ta k e s h o r t w a l k s o n t h e b e a c h , p r o b a b ly v i s i o n s r e s u lt i n g f r o m h e at s t r o k e

Call 808.742.6331

69

www.napalicoastmagazine.com | 2014/2015

www.napaliriders.com

70


“I got some great photos snorkeling with Na Pali Riders!”

Ornate Butterfly

White Spotted Puffer

Mermaid (Mom)

Yellowfin Surgeonfish

Golden Chubb

Moorish Idol

Trumpet Fish

Bluefin Trevally

Bluestripe Snapper

Spiny Lobster

Green Sea Turtle

Whitebar Surgeonfish

Two Spot Butterfly

Not only the best day of your vacation, but possibly one of the best days of your life!

808.742.6331 www.NaPaliRiders.com


*conditions permitting

aptain Chris of Na Pali Riders has the only raft company consistently touring the ENTIRE 17 miles of the Na Pali Coast.* Captain Chris says, “Touring the Na Pali Coast truly is a once-in-a-lifetime experience. We make sure that our passengers get to see it all including the famous sites of Hanakoa Valley, Hanakapi‘ai Valley, the Pirates Sea Cave, and the Double Door Cave. These are some of the most significant attractions on the Na Pali Coast and should not be missed.” The Na Pali Riders’ difference starts with attention to detail in all aspects of our Na Pali Coast Raft Tour. We offer a ride on our state-of-the-art Zodiac raft. Departures are from the West Side’s Kikiaola Harbor in Waimea, the closest harbor to the Na Pali Coast. Snorkeling takes place at one of three different locations depending on currents, water clarity and conditions permitting. All beginning snorkelers have our experienced and knowledgeable crewmen as their personal guides. The Na Pali Riders difference is unbelievable. We are the only ones to guarantee satisfaction or you can go again FREE. Call direct (808) 742-6331 for reservations. We also provide discounts for Military, Kama’aina and Groups.

Explore Sea Caves

“Natures Dis -Jane Em neyland!” ery LA Sp lash Mag

azine

Scan this QR code with your smart-phone to watch our video!

photos by Erik Van Enbden

808.742.6331

www.napaliriders.com • napali@hotmail.com

Double Door Cave Visit “Na Pali Riders” fan page for current photos and videos.

Profile for Na Pali Coast Magazine

Kauai Guide to Na Pali Coast  

This publication from Na Pali Riders Raft Tours in Kauai is a must read. It contains detailed maps and gorgeous photos of the most amazing...

Kauai Guide to Na Pali Coast  

This publication from Na Pali Riders Raft Tours in Kauai is a must read. It contains detailed maps and gorgeous photos of the most amazing...

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded