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NYU Student Center Naomi Benatar | New York School of Interior Design | 642 MFA-1 Thesis Preparation | November 28, 2019


Table of Contents

1 2 3 4 5

Introduction

4-9

Research Report

10-21

Case Studies

22-61

Program

62-75

Site Analysis

76-89


6 7 8 9 10

Base Building Drawings

90-105

Blocking & Stacking Diagrams

106-109

NYC Building Code & ADA & LEED

110-143

Goals

144-147

Bibliography

148-151


1 1 2 3

Introduction

Topic

7

User Groups

8

Quantitative Questions

9


6


Topic

Inspired by The Ohio State University student center, The Union, the university student center will be a space that inspires students to work effectively, engage with their school community, and expand their personal horizons. In order to appeal to the growing reliance on technology, the student center will incorporate modern technology with plans in place to accommodate developments in future technologies. To merge the growing concern for climate change with the proven benefits of biophilic learning environments, sustainability and natural design elements will be prioritized.

Photo courtesy of ohiounion.osu.edu

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User Groups

PRIMARY USERS • Students Age 18-30 Local, national, and international Study abroad, undergraduate, and graduate Broad range of financial background Broad range of cultural and religious backgrounds • Faculty Age 30-65 Local, national, and international Middle and upper class Broad range of cultural and religious backgrounds Highly educated (most with doctorate degrees)

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SECONDARY USERS • • • •

• • • • Delivery Drivers (age 25-65) • Family Visitors (0-90) • Prospective Students/Parents (18-65) • Performers/Guest Speakers (18-65) • Janitorial Staff (age 25-65) Cafe Staff (entirely run by students) IT Staff (age 25-65) Tutors (students)

TERTIARY USERS

• • • •

WISH LIST Casual work/hangout zone Cafe Meeting rooms Small, medium, and large available to reserve study groups student organizations faculty office hours Open work area Individual, quiet study space Tech center Library outpost IT


Quantitative Questions

1. How many individual study rooms? 2. How many students per study room? 3. How much open study space versus open social space? 4. What kind of reception is necessary? 5. How large should the reception desk/area be? 6. Should a ballroom be included? Should it convert into a lecture hall? 7. Should a cafe be included? Should it be full service or grab n’ go? 8. Should a library outpost be included? Should there be a pickup desk or only a returns bin? 9. Should there be a post office of some kind? Should it be associated with Amazon, USPS, UPS, FedEx? 10. How many bathrooms are necessary? What size? 11. How many elevators are necessary? 12. How big should it be overall? How many different functions should the space include? Should it be focused on study spaces or should it include other functions such as banking, post office, events, cafe etc. 13. How big should the social areas be? Should there be several different social areas? Or one big space? 14. Should social spaces be large enough for an entire club meeting? Should social space be small for friend groups? 15. How many people fit into a small meeting room? 16. How many people fit into a medium meeting room? 17. How many people fit into a large meeting room? 18. How many people fit into a ballroom/lecture hall? 19. Should a tech center be included? 20. How many tech center desks should there be? 21. How many IT desks/offices are necessary? 22. How big is the cafe? How many students work there? 9


2 1 2

Guiding Questions Report

Research Report

13 15-21


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Guiding Questions

1

Is the current model of student centers still appropriate? Is the future of student centers as huge complexes or to disperse or reduce the nature of functions?

2

How can design encourage student interactions in a space? How much time do students want to spend studying versus socializing in the space?

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From the original student center as an ideal of leisure

the focal point for the “academic and intellectual mission”

to the modern fusion of fun and focus, student centers

of the college and defines the “learning-living culture

have evolved with changing student demographics and

of the institution”. By the time this was realized, the term

updated educational pedagogy. The history of the student

“campus center” replaced the previous term “student

union began over 120 years ago at Houston Hall at the

union”. Now, in the twenty-first century, the campus center

University of Pennsylvania. In 1896, the student union was

is evolving again. A “’hybrid,’ ‘fusion,’ or mixed-use facility”

described as “a unique experiment in college education,

has become the norm and combines library and campus

the frank and practical recognition of the importance of the leisure hour”. It included a lounge, reception area, bowling alley, swimming pool, music room, gymnasium, theater, and billiards room. Quickly, this model for a student union, originally inspired by the debating societies of Cambridge and Oxford, was copied at universities all over the United States. The size of institutions and diversity of students expanded so, by the 1950s, many universities updated their student unions. In the 1960s and early 1970s, universities became aware of the need to address social and political aspects of student life. This led to a new wave of construction to broaden the functions of student unions to include dedicated space for student organizations, cafes, and limited meeting space. The biggest shift in campus planning was the acceptance that the student union was

Image 1: 21st century students are more diverse than ever before (Fishman, Ludgate and Tutak). 15


center functions as well as recreational and lifestyle uses (Neuman). Just as the diversity of students experienced a shift leading to the 1950s, so too has the modern college student demographic. 21st century college students are a more diverse group than ever before – from their age, income level, family structure, and nation of origin (Fishman, Ludgate and Tutak). The old model for student unions was industrial and based on “universal furniture provisions” complete with “self-contained classrooms designed on a square-foot-perstudent” method (Gensler). Progressive schools are working on “learning personalization” which can help learning environments to keep up with “unprecedented changes in education” (Gensler). This includes a wide range of updates to learning environments to help facilitate the modern students’ need to easily switch modes of learning.

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Image 2: David Thornburg’s three optimal settings for promoting active, experiential learning (Arieff). watering hole is “where exchanges happen,” it is the space where academic discourse takes place (Arieff). Lastly, the

The new educational model considers “learning as

cave is “where individual work is done,” where students

a team sport” (Arieff). The modern student center needs

hunker down for focused study time (Arieff). While there are

to seamlessly balance the “Campfire,” “Watering Hole,”

many technical design approaches to facilitate this shift in

and “Cave” (Arieff). The campfire is “where stories are

thinking, in a lot of ways this is a mental and metaphorical

told,” where students can gather to socialize (Arieff). The

switch that challenges the staff perceptions on learning


and teaching (Boys). It requires an acknowledgment that

helps to shift focus away from the design of the space and

outward and inward learning are not opposite (Boys).

onto students’ work. Writable and projectable walls allow

Learning takes place through the “negotiation of shared,

every surface to be an opportunity for learning and create

social meaning, in the spaces in-between these forms of

an immersive experience. Providing enclosed seating

collective knowing and our own individual knowing” (Boys).

within an open, social area can allow for focused work

Learning is “informed not just by our ‘location’ within a

time without sacrificing the feeling of belonging. Stadium

community of practice, but also what we bring to it” (Boys).

seating can transform a space from a casual hangout

By creating spaces for the campfire, watering hole, and

zone to an informal work space to a formal presentation

cave, a student center can be a place of intersection on

auditorium. Spaces that are designed for focused work

collective and individual learning.

provide generous surfaces which allow for multiple study

According to research conducted by Gensler, there are a plethora of physical design elements that encourage this metaphorical shift. Design that encourages students to position themselves in circular formations naturally facilitates interaction. Creating standing settings allows students to quickly transition from one activity to another. Integrating fluid technology throughout the space helps students

materials. Comfortable furniture encourages students to linger for longer. In a space that is blending work and fun, it is important to find the right balance of enclosure. Too many walls or walls that are full height can create too much separation while fewer walls, glass walls, or partial walls can encourage productivity (Gensler Reimagining Learning, 2283).

collaborate easily and eases the transition from social time

Students choose student centers rather than libraries

to focused work time without a necessary change in physical

for study time because they are seeking a comfortable

location. Pinup spaces or short throw projectors can allow

place with a “reasonable level of distraction” (Neuman).

students to show off their work and to learn from each other

“Properly configurated circulation spaces” provide this

in a formal or informal way. Incorporating natural materials

intermediate level of distraction which includes “occasional 17


socializing and snacking” (Neuman). When properly

locations. It is designed to be a space where campus tours

distributed throughout the student center, these moments

start, classes take place, professors and students mingle,

of distraction allow the space to remain focused while

live events are hosted, and much more. Student centers

keeping students in the building longer (Neuman).

are intentionally diverse spaces that are meant to be

Studies show that when students spend longer on campus, even if some time is spent socializing, they maintain a more academic mindset and have greater opportunity for academic growth and success. Especially as an increased portion of the student body is older, with family and work during the school year, keeping students on campus as much as possible is essential to focus and success. Student centers can help provide a “sense of place” outside of the classroom so that students feel comfortable and welcome to stay on campus. In addition to maintaining an academic mindset, spending time in the student center can offer “opportunities for social development” which prepares students to “navigate the profession world” upon graduation (Leavitt).

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changed again and again. The student center becomes an “incubator/accelerator space” that is a “hybrid combination of workspace, learning space, and social space, most of it flexible and multiuse” (Arieff). The student center is a vital part of the success of the university as a whole. The campus center has been elevated to the importance of the great room of the house, it is a “place of warmth, gathering, conversation, and sustenance” (Neuman). It is an essential element in the attraction of potential students, but even more so, the student center is the key to student retention and “evangelism” by housing the shared experience, identity, and loyalty to the institution itself (Daughtrey). In one study, students picked the library as their top choice for quiet study time, even though they were unhappy with acoustics, availability of

Today, universities are eager to “leverage real

space, and hours of operation. Their second most-preferred

estate” and create a student center that can host a range

study space were dorms because they could transform

of campus activities that used to be housed in distinct

into spaces that were “academically productive, socially


Image 3: Well designed interiors can help to facilitate various ways of learning (Gensler). 19


dynamic, and culturally rich” (Gensler Remaking Student Living). The modern student center is designed as the union of the quiet study opportunity found at the library and the diverse academic and social function of the residence hall. Transitional space is an essential component to the success of the modern student center. Students need space to transition from “social to private modes” based on individual personality and learning type (Gensler). This oscillation can occur multiple times throughout the day so the transition between social and study space and group study space and private study space is of vital importance (Gensler). A common way of supporting this oscillation is in the activation of circulation areas. By creating circulation with built-in seating, impromptu interactions take place organically. This connection blurs the boundary between work and fun and helps to allow students to learn from one another in an informal way. Modern students “see every

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university student center (Leavitt). With the increasing use of technology in education, students and educators are more able to adapt the educational experience for individual learning styles. Student centers should be designed to facilitate this mission with a wide range of technologies available and convenient throughout the space. Student centers should be diverse in their design in order to “provoke and support a full spectrum of learning behaviors”. A range of different spaces can help spark different types of learning, creativity, and exploration. They should be adaptable to “allow for dynamic interchange among activities”. Flexible spaces that can change quickly and easily allow students to feel a sense of ownership over their work space and its ability to cater to the needs of that moment, project, or group. Lastly, they should be multimodal to “provide choice” to

person as an educator” and continue to “crave meaningful

students by “ensuring a wide variety of learning settings”.

face-to-face interaction with educators and one another”

Each student needs space that allows for relaxation, space

despite an increasing integration of and reliance on

that enables group work, space that empowers creative

technology (Gensler). Just as the ancient Roman forum was

problem solving, and space that facilitates quiet, focused

the hub of activity and community life, so too is the modern

study (Gensler).


Student centers include a small range of standard,

moveable furniture. In the student centers of the future, this

essential functions including social, study, and eating

adaptation will be focused as much on the physical space

spaces. These functions are intentionally distanced from one

as on the technology and digital integration around it. This

another so that the circulation draws “the user past as many

will include a plethora of existing and evolving technologies

activities as possible, much in the same way that shopping

such as fabrics that change color (perhaps to coordinate

malls, with anchor tenants, are organized” (Neuman).

with the colors in a presentation), decorative objects

The “most important room in the campus center is not a

that can morph (such as a table that can move, project,

room at all, but rather the space that connects the rooms

and record a student’s notes), and lights that reflect our

– the networks of lobbies, hallways, and stairs” (Neuman).

natural circadian rhythm (or lights that purposefully defy

With the shift in interpersonal relationships brought on by

our natural rhythm to keep students focused during all-

technology, the student center has extended to become

night study sessions) (Nabil). As technology continues to

a “three-dimensional social network” and lifestyle magnet

dominate our attention and advance our approach to

for students (Leavitt). Now, the “prospects of chance

education, the design of student centers as spaces that

encounters” and the “‘see-and-be-seen’ factor” are the

seamlessly incorporate technology but still value in-person

greatest attractions (Neuman).

interaction will become even more relevant. As more

The future of student centers as a “three-dimensional

student activities that once required an in-person presence

social network” will include much more than the standard

can be accomplished remotely, the interpersonal aspects

eat, study, and lounge spaces of the current mode

of education will become more centralized in the student

(Neuman). A broadening range of additional functions such

center. This acknowledgment of the invaluable human-to-

as academic advising, lecture halls, shopping experiences,

human connection will become the driving force behind

and more will become the norm (Neuman). The current

both the social and educational aspects of the student

level of adaptation in student centers rarely extends beyond

center. 21


3 1 2 3

Case Studies

New South Student Center at Georgetown University

24-33

University of California at San Diego Price Center East

34-43

The Diana Center at Barnard College

44-61


Photo 24 courtesy of archdaily.com


New South Student Center at Georgetown University

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Name: Healey Family Student Center Address: 3700 O Street Northwest, Washington, DC 20057 Architects: Ikon.5 Architects Area: 45,000 Square Feet Year: 2014

Images courtesy of archdaily.com

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Why this project? • Directly applicable to my thesis • Aesthetically pleasing • LEED Gold • Very diverse range of functions • Ability to learn a lot from space plan • Similar size-range to my thesis History of Facility/Mission/Goals: • Renovation and addition to existing Mid-Century residence hall • Designed to be the university living room • Inspired by “Hoya Saxa” (“what rocks!”)– official college chant/identity of Georgetown students • Responds to location which overlooks the Potomac • Casual and formal study spaces and alternative food venues to campus dining hall • Contemporary architectural language that evoke the heritage of the university • Green wall and window wall with views of the Potomac Program: • Purpose: Student center – small group study space, social space, bar, smoothie café, art gallery, music/dance practice rooms, large meeting room, dividable ballroom Images courtesy of archdaily.com

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Primary User Group: • Students -125-200 people on an average day -200-800 on days with events in the ballroom -Interact regularly with secondary user group (ex. Tutoring, getting food/drink) -Interact infrequently (if at all) with tertiary user group (ex. If their parents visit, attending guest performance) -Age 18-30 -Local, national, and international -Study abroad, undergraduate, and graduate -Broad range of financial backgrounds -Broad range of cultural, ethnic, and religious backgrounds • Faculty -15-75 on an average day -Interact regularly with secondary user group (ex. working with IT staff to set up presentations) -Interact infrequently (if at all) with tertiary user group (ex. Attending guest lectures/ performances) -Age 30-65 -Local, national, and international -Middle and upper class -Broad range of cultural and religious backgrounds -Highly educated (most with doctorate degrees)

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Images courtesy of archdaily.com


Secondary User Group: • 25-50 on an average day • Interact frequently with primary user group (ex. Bar/ café staff serving students) • Interact frequently with tertiary user group (ex. IT staff must work with guest performers to set up light and sound for performance) • Janitorial Staff (age 25-65) • Cafe Staff (25-65) • Bar Staff (25-65) • IT Staff (age 25-65) • Tutors (students)

Tertiary User Group: • 5-100 depending on prospective student tours, if there is a guest performer • Interact infrequently with primary/secondary user group • Delivery Drivers (age 25-65) • Family Visitors (0-90) • Prospective Students/Parents (18-65) • Performers/Guest Speakers (18-65)

Images courtesy of archdaily.com

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Aesthetics: • Emphasis on natural light (large walls of windows, skylight), minimal and simple artificial lighting • Lots of concrete to tie in with “Hoya Saxa” • Lots of greenery – including green wall • Circular hearth at center of lounge space, fireplace outsides, inside is lounge, sightlines from front entry • Natural wood, neutral gray, warm brown, and green • Modular lounge furniture • Carpet, soft furnishings and green walls for acoustic control, otherwise mainly hard surfaces • Modern and clean aesthetic

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Evaluate Design: • Very successful design • Seems very functionally laid out • Natural light and quality views • Concrete represents “Hoya Saxa” • should have more branding • Good balance of social space and work space • Good that eating/ drinking spaces are far from each other • Good use of circulation that also has seating • Minimal and modern but still cozy/inviting • Multi-functional spaces

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Relation to Thesis Question: 1. This is a very successful model of a student center. It emphasizes circulation, includes more than ample space for socialization and snacking, and incorporates a range of functional private work spaces. This space shows that the future of student centers is as large, multi-functional complexes. In this space, they have a TV lounge, bar, cafĂŠ, stage, ballroom, music practice rooms etc.

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Relation to Thesis Question: 2. The round, cozy hearth, as well as the many other social spaces, encourage students to interact socially. There aren’t any private study rooms that seat fewer than four people, which encourage student interaction during work time. Based on the ratio of open public space versus closed study rooms, it is safe to assume that students want to spend at least as much time socializing as they spend on focused work time.

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34 Photo courtesy of archdaily.com


University of California at San Diego Price Center East

35


Name: Price Center East Address: La Jolla, San Diego, California Architects: Yazdani Studio Area: 172,000 sf new construction, 66,000 sf renovated, 238,000 total sf Year: 2008

Images courtesy of archdaily.com

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Why this project? • Directly applicable to my thesis • Beautiful exterior architecture • Interesting circulation • Urban environment – vertical not horizontal spread • Equivalent of LEED Silver • So many different functions included (alumni center, groceries, retail) • Engagement with exterior surroundings History of Facility/Mission/Goals: • Existing student center had “introverted” configuration – central courtyard with building on three sides, program elements face inward • University growth necessitated an expansion • Expansion was designed to be the opposite – an “extroverted” addition with a lot of points of entry and monumental staircase to play to street experience • 172,000 sf addition expands bookstore, makes space for retail, food, student organizations, reinforces exterior campus circulation • Aim to turn the University Center in to a “town center” – lively pedestrian hub at the heart of campus

Image courtesy of archdaily.com

Program: • Purpose: Student center – dining space, shopping space, social space, advising space, study space, event space • Exactly like my proposed project, many additional program elements, but larger scale

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Primary User Group: • Students -500-1000 people -Interact regularly with secondary user group (ex. getting food/drink) -Interact infrequently (if at all) with tertiary user group (ex. If their parents visit) -age 18-30 -local, national, and international -study abroad, undergraduate, and graduate -broad range of financial background -broad range of cultural and religious backgrounds • Faculty/Student Services Staff/Cross Cultural Center Staff -75-400 on an average day -Interact regularly with secondary user group (ex. Getting food/drink, working with IT staff to setup presentations) -Interact infrequently (if at all) with tertiary user group -age 30-65 -local, national, and international -middle and upper class -broad range of cultural and religious backgrounds -highly educated (most with doctorate degrees) Images courtesy of archdaily.com

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Secondary User Group: • 125-250 on an average day • Interact frequently with primary user group (ex. Bar/ café staff serving students) • Interact frequently with tertiary user group (ex. IT staff must work with guest performers to set up light and sound for performance) • Janitorial Staff (age 25-65) • Café/Retail/Grocery Staff (25-65) • IT Staff (age 25-65) • Tutors (students)

Tertiary User Group: • 25-150 depending on prospective student tours, if there is a guest performer • Interact infrequently with primary and secondary user group • Delivery Drivers (age 25-65) • Family Visitors (0-90) • Prospective Students/Parents (18-65) • Performers/Guest Speakers (18-65) Image courtesy of archdaily.com

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Aesthetics: • Minimalist exterior • Minimalist interior • Clean, simple design • Bold use of pops of color • Metal and concrete throughout • Minimal artificial light • Emphasis on natural light, lots of skylights • Emphasis on open, airy feeling, lots of open to below spaces • Large focal space in center • Vertical circulation stairs border central hub

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Evaluate Design: • Lots of different spaces/functions which is good • Functional organization seems random • Not enough soft surfaces, does not feel cozy • Very open, anticipate bad acoustics • Nice vertical circulation, stairs in consistent location • Not enough spaces dedicated to study, only one dedicated spot • Very flexible, all furniture is light and move-able • Not enough emphasis on circulation, no activated circulation paths

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Relation to Thesis Question: 1. This student center is certainly an appropriate model as it provides many necessary services including campus dining, grocery shopping, student services/advising etc. This student center is a massive complex with a very wide range of functions. The goal of the design was to create a town center with a range of services and they definitely succeeded in that.

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Relation to Thesis Question: 2. The vast social/ dining spaces do encourage interaction because they are so open. Based on the allocation of square footage, these floorplans indicate that this student center is more focused on student services – advising, retail, groceries, campus-dining, alumnimentoring, etc. – than on providing abundant study space.

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44 Photo courtesy of archdaily.com


The Diana Center at Barnard College

45


Name: The Diana Center Address: 3009 Broadway, New York, NY 10027 Architects: Weiss/Manfredi Area: 98,000 Sq. Ft. Year: 2010 Date Visited: September 13, 2019

Images courtesy of archdaily.com

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Why this project? • Directly applicable to my thesis • Beautiful exterior architecture • Close – easy to visit in person • Includes a theater/performance space • Urban environment – vertical rather than horizonal spread • Winner of Progressive Architecture Award & National AIA Award History of Facility/Mission/Goals: • Aims to bring focus and community to campus lawn • Diagonal void through the building aims to create visual juxtaposition and encourage students of different disciplines to interact • 500-seat multipurpose room • 100-seat black box theater • Luminous curtain wall, calibrated to programs and public functions • Sustainable focus, green roof and ecological learning center Program: • Purpose: Student center – space for art, architecture, theater, and art history departments, faculty offices, dining room, café • Exactly like my proposed project, much larger scale Image courtesy of archdaily.com

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Primary User Group: • Students -250-500 people -Interact regularly with secondary user group (ex. getting food/drink) -Interact infrequently (if at all) with tertiary user group (ex. If their parents visit) -Age 18-30 -Local, national, and international -Study abroad, undergraduate, and graduate -Broad range of financial background -Broad range of cultural and religious backgrounds • Faculty/Student Services Staff/Cross Cultural Center Staff -50-100 people -Interact regularly with secondary user group (ex. Getting food/drink, working with IT staff to setup presentations) -Interact infrequently (if at all) with tertiary user group -Age 30-65 -Local, national, and international -Middle and upper class -Broad range of cultural and religious backgrounds -Highly educated (most with doctorate degrees) Images courtesy of archdaily.com

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Secondary User Group: • 50-100 people • Interact frequently with primary user group (ex. Bar/ café staff serving students) • Interact frequently with tertiary user group (ex. IT staff must work with guest performers to set up light and sound for performance) • Janitorial staff (age 25-65) • Café staff (25-65) • IT staff (age 25-65)

Tertiary User Group: • 25-500 depending on prospective student tours, events in multipurpose room or theater • Interact infrequently with primary and secondary user group • Delivery Drivers (age 25-65) • Family Visitors (0-90) • Prospective Students/Parents (18-65) • Performers/Guest Speakers (18-65) Image courtesy of archdaily.com

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Aesthetics: • Terracotta and glass exterior • Minimalist interior • White and concrete interiors with red furniture and carpeting • Purple lounge outside theater • Warm woods in event space

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Evaluate Design: • Feels cold, only colors are white, gray, and bright red • Not enough soft surfaces • Very confusing circulation, stairs are in a different location on each floor • Feels lackluster • Very loud in café, no soft materials • Cannot access green roof without being in a class

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Relation to Thesis Question: 1. This student center has the intention of responding to the future model of student center with a wide range of functions centralized in one location. However, I do not think that they succeed. The main functions of this student center are the cafĂŠ and dining room, study space, faculty offices, and the two event spaces. Considering that the event spaces are not used on a regular basis, the main daily functions are only studying and eating. I do not feel that the spaces are very adaptable for other uses. I also did not notice any technology which I believe is a crucial element of student centers in the future.

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Relation to Thesis Question: 2. Again, because I do not feel that spaces were very adaptable, I don’t think there was an inherent encouragement of student interaction. They tried to encourage student interaction with the void space/atria which I do not feel was very successful. In the dining area and cafÊ, there were group tables where students could chat but the study room had a lot of individual pods which really discourage interaction. I do love that The Diana Center has a direct connection to a residence hall. I think that seamless transition encourages students to take advantage of The Diana Center for social and study time more than they otherwise would (especially in the winter).

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Interview with Yael Rayport, Third Year Student

Image courtesy of archdaily.com

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Q. How often do you spend time at The Diana Center? What do you do when you go (study, eat, club meetings, class etc)? A. As a student, I probably go to Diana at least once a day to get food or study. Q. Where do you choose to study most often? Why? (If not The Diana Center, why not? What does the place that you like to study have that The Diana Center does not?) A. I primarily study at Milstein, the library, to get a quieter and studious atmosphere. Diana would be great though for group projects. Q. When you spend time at The Diana Center, where do you choose to spend your time? Why? How long do you typically stay? A. I would spend most of my time on the second floor, usually in the dining room. Some semesters I would study there for hours before dinner and then eat with friends. Q. Do you feel comfortable there? Why or why not? A. I always feel comfortable at Diana, surrounded by my Barnard buddies. Q. Aesthetically, does The Diana Center inspire you? Why or why not? A. Diana can be very inspiring -- when looking out the large bright windows or the vibrant orange/red walls and furniture. Q. Do you think it is easy to navigate the space? Can you find the spaces you are looking for quickly? Why or why not? A. Diana was easy to navigate. Q. Do you feel that you can both relax and be productive in The Diana Center? Why or why not? A. Yes, I could relax and chat with friends over a meal and also study in between classes. Q. Do you spend time at The Diana Center alone or in a group? What about the facility makes you feel more comfortable in a group/alone? A. I generally prefer to study and eat with friends, but I do go to Diana alone and don’t feel uncomfortable.

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Q. If you had free reign, what would you change about The Diana Center? (this can be lighting, furniture, layout, acoustics, anything else, all of the above, etc.) A. Diana has a green roof that is off limits to unsupervised students. I wish they would allow students to go there and had tables on it. It would also be nice if they had more good outdoor seating by the cafe on the first floor (with chairs that are ergonomic and not flimsy fold up ones!) Q. What about the physical space at The Diana center makes it conducive to group work? A. Because the Diana center is designated as the student life building, a social place, students are encouraged to talk and work together. It is also filled with tables that can fit ~4 students so people tend to sit together and talk (about life or school). In contrast, Milstein is filled with cubicles, conducive to individual study sessions. Q. What specifically about the Milstein library do you like for a quiet study atmosphere? Is it lighting? A difference in furniture? A closed off study room? A. Milstein is a great place for a quiet study atmosphere. A great design of the building is that as you go up the floors of the library, people's volume is supposed to get quieter. While the first floor has a cafe and people speak freely, by the time you are on the fourth floor, you are only supposed to speak in hushed tones. Milstein is also filled with quiet cubicles and closed off study rooms, but I prefer the big open tables on the fourth floor where I can study text to friends, but also be in a quiet space. Q. What about the physical environment at The Diana Center makes you feel comfortable? In addition to your friends, is there anything about the physical space that makes you feel this way? Is it lighting, comfortable furniture, branding with school colors? A. The Diana feels comfortable because it is always bright with its large windows during the day or lights at night. The furniture is standard school furniture, not super comfortable, but not uncomfortable. The furniture is also in bold colors like red or orange, creating a warm atmosphere, as opposed to stark whites. Q. When you would relax and chat with friends in The Diana Center, did you spend that hangout time in the cafe area? Is there anywhere besides the cafe where you would spend very extended periods of time? What about the cafe made you feel more comfortable to relax there as opposed to elsewhere in the center? A. I spend most of my time in the second-floor dining area with friends or studying because it usually has the most available tables. The cafe on the first floor is often crowded, with no free places to sit, and has loud music playing. I don't usually go beyond the second floor -- either because I'm lazy or because there are only offices and classrooms above. 57


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Interview with Susan Palefsky, Senior

Image courtesy of archdaily.com

59


Q. How often do you spend time at The Diana Center? What did you do when you went (study, eat, club meetings, class etc)? A. In my first few years before the new library opened, I used to spend a lot of time in Diana. I would both study, eat, and socialize there. I would often go to the cafe to get food, get coffee from Liz’s Place, and study on the 3rd floor in the 3rd floor study room or computer lab. Now that the new library has opened, I tend to spend less time studying in Diana and more time studying in the Milstein Center (the new library). I have also had one or two classes that met in Diana. Q. Where do you choose to study most often? Why? (If not The Diana Center, why not? What does the place that you like to study have that The Diana Center does not?) A. I really study in a variety of libraries and spaces across the Columbia campus. I found that my favorite study locations have changed each year to correspond with study spaces that are close to my classes and dorms. My first year, I liked to study in the Brooks Reading Room (first floor study space in the freshman dorms), Kent/East Asian Library, Butler, and Diana (I also visited a lot of libraries on campus to see which ones I liked the best) My sophomore year, I liked to study in SIPA Library, Teachers College Library, Diana and Butler (especially Butler floor 4). My junior year, I tended to study in The Milstein Center (Barnard Library), Diana, and Butler. This year so far, I have studied in the Milstein center the most, then Butler, then Diana (the least). I will say that while the Barnard library was under construction, Diana was a very hot space to study and was always very crowded. If you came during peak study times, it would be hard to get a seat. Now that the new library has opened, it is much easier to get a seat to study in Diana. Q. When you spend time at The Diana Center, where do you choose to spend your time? Why? How long do you typically stay? A. I often stop by Diana for a few minutes if I need to get coffee or for a short period if I want to get lunch/dinner. If I wanted to study, I would usually go to the third floor. I could stay studying anywhere from 30 minutes to several hours. I also used to try to go to Diana when they had the roof open during lunch (I think I went a few times in my sophomore year). Q. Do you feel comfortable there? Why or why not? A. I do feel comfortable (as in safe) in Diana. I also feel pretty comfortable generally. One of my complaints about the building is that it has terrible heat/air regulation. Many of the rooms are either very hot or very cold. The reading room on third floor and the cafe eating area on the second was designed so sun could come through but then would be trapped and the rooms can get very hot. For some reason, the bathrooms are almost always freezing cold.

60


Q. Aesthetically, does The Diana Center inspire you? Why or why not? A. I don’t think it necessarily inspires me (though I don’t know if architecture normally inspires me). I do appreciate having lots of windows in my study space though. Q. Do you think it is easy to navigate the space? Can you find the spaces you are looking for quickly? Why or why not? A. I do think it is generally easy to navigate the space. The only difficult aspect can be the staircase. The staircase has different entrances depending on the floor. Sometimes it may be on end of the hallway and on the floor above the entrance to the stairs may be in another spot. Sometimes even after entering the entrance to the stair you have to walk down a long hallway which can also be confusing. There also are two stairways right next to each other that lead the second floor. I think that may be confusing to know which one to take. Q. Do you feel that you can both relax and be productive in The Diana Center? Why or why not? A. I feel that I can both relax and be productive. If I want to relax and hang out with friends, I go to the first or second floors which are more social spaces because of the cafe. If I want more serious study space, I go to a space like the third floor which is designated as a study area. Q. Do you spend time at The Diana Center alone or in a group? What about the facility makes you feel more comfortable in a group/alone? A. I spend time in Diana both alone and in a group. I come both alone and in a group whether I want to get food or study depending on the day. There are lots of smaller sized tables for two or four people on the second floor which makes it a nice place to eat lunch with a friend or two. But I also sometimes come with friends to study in the independent cubicles on the third floor study space. Q. If you had free reign, what would you change about The Diana Center? (this can be lighting, furniture, layout, acoustics, anything else, all of the above, etc.) A. I would change the fact that the event oval blocks off half of the first floor. The entrance and main space of the event oval is on the lower level. But since Barnard is on a hill, it is designed far into the ground to have a high ceiling, they made the event oval the height of two floors. When you walk into the Diana center, the first floor feels cut off because a lot of the space can’t be used. I wish there was more space for gathering/tables to study and socialize on the first floor (similar to how there is in the Milstein center). I also wish they could fix the temperature in the building so rooms weren’t either extreme (too hot or too cold).

61


4 1 2 3

Program

Program Charts

64-71

Bubble Diagram

72-73

Quantitative Questions

74-75


Program Summary Department

Secondary Users

Primary Users

Reception Lounge Café Administration Study Space Outposts Auditorium Shared Functions Subtotal:

43 150 160 14 320 12 4 0

60 0 25 2 0 0 150 0

Total:

Program Area

Reception

SUBTOTAL Circ. Factor 30% TOTAL

64

Program Summary ‐ Outdoor Space Area (SF)

Department Dining/ Study Lounge Subtotal: Total:

2340 4680 4320 1728 9708 1416 3180 2496 29868

Primary Users

Secondary Users 100 50

Area (SF) 15 15

3250 3250 6500 6904

33416

Space within  Program Area Security Desk

Lobby Bag/coat check

# of  # of Primary  Visitors Users 4

25

35 4

35 0

43

60

# of  Areas 1

1 1

Sq. Ft. per  Area 50

1000 500

Extension   

50

1000 750 1800 540 2340

Functional Description

FF&E

Security and  information desk

Custom desk

Seating area for  socializing, waiting  for campus tours Bag/coat check

Sofas, lounge chairs,  coffee/side tables,  carpet Shelving, hanging


Program Area

Lounge

SUBTOTAL Circ. Factor 30% TOTAL

Space within  Program Area

# of Primary  # of  Users Visitors

# of  Areas

Sq. Ft. per  Area

Extension   

Lounge Seating

95

50

2

1000

2000

Games Area

35

0

1

1000

1000

Charging Stations

0

0

8

25

200

Beverage Bar

0

0

130

50

8

50

400 3600 1080 4680

Functional Description

FF&E

Sofas, lounge chairs,  Lounge space with  coffe tables,  flexible work surface  adjustable side  options tables, carpeting Ping pong table,  Ping pong, pool ,  pool table, arcade  arcade games games Lockers where  students can leave  backpack/jackets  Custom, built in  and charge tech lockers Drinks and grab and  Bar counter and  go snack counter shelving

65


Program Area

Café

SUBTOTAL Circ. Factor 20% TOTAL

66

Space within  Program Area

Service Bar Seating Kitchen

# of Primary  # of  Users Visitors

# of  Areas

Sq. Ft. per  Area

Extension   

5

0

1

300

300

150 5

25 0

1 1

3000 300

3000 300 3600 720

160

25

4320

Functional Description Counter to place  orders or pickup  grab and go items Informal café  seating Café kitchen

FF&E

Bar, shelving behind  bar, bar stools Café tables, café  chairs Kitchen equipment


Program Area

Administration

SUBTOTAL Circ. Factor 20% TOTAL

Space within  Program Area

Manager's Office

# of Primary  # of  Users Visitors

1

2

# of  Areas

1

Sq. Ft. per  Area

200

Extension   

200

Mangement Offices

8

0

1

500

500

Conference Room  for 12

0

0

1

300

300

IT Office Restroom

5 0

0 0

14

2

1 2

300 70

300 140 1440 288 1728

Functional Description

Office for the  building manager

FF&E

Desk, desk chair,  guest seating, file  storage

Collaborative desks,  Open office for  desk chairs, file  lower management storage Conference room  for building  Conference table,  managers chairs

Open office for IT Private restrooms

Collaborative desks,  desk chairs, file  storage

67


Program Area

Study Spaces

Space within  Program Area

Open Study  Space 4 Person Study  Rooms 12 Person Study  Rooms

SUBTOTAL Circ. Factor 30% TOTAL

68

25 Person Study  Rooms

# of Primary  # of  Users Visitors

100

48

72

0

0

0

100

0

320

0

# of  Areas

2

12

6

4

Sq. Ft. per  Area

750

180

308

490

Extension   

Functional Description

FF&E

1500

Open study space,  flexible to be  adjusted for study  groups of a range of  Tables, chairs,  sizes writable surfaces

2160

Small study  booths/rooms

Tables, chairs,  writable surfaces

1848

Medium study/meeting  rooms

Tables, chairs,  writable surfaces

Large conference  rooms

Tables, chairs,  writable surfaces

1960 7468 2240.4 9708.4


Program Area

Outposts

Space within  Program Area

# of  Areas

Sq. Ft. per  Area

Extension   

Library Outpost

1

0

1

10

10

Library Outpost  BOH

3

0

1

500

500

Postal/Package Outpost Postal/Package  Outpost BOH

SUBTOTAL Circ. Factor 20% TOTAL

# of  # of Primary  Visitors Users

Functional Description

FF&E

Small booth where  students can drop  off or pickup library  items Counter Storage for all  library holds and  pickups Shelving

1

0

1

10

10

3

0

1

500

500

Small booth where  students can drop  off or pickup items Counter Storage for all items  and returns Shelving Small booth where  students can pick up  tech to use while in  the building Counter

Technology Room

1

0

1

10

10

Technology Room  BOH

3

0

1

150

12

0

150 1180 236 1416

Storage for various  Shelving, charging  types of tech stations

69


Program Area

Auditorium

SUBTOTAL Circ. Factor 20% TOTAL Program Area

Shared Functions

SUBTOTAL Circ. Factor 20% TOTAL

70

Space within  Program Area Ticketing

# of  # of Primary  Visitors Users 4

0

# of  Areas

Sq. Ft. per  Area

1

150

Extension   

150

Ticketing booth Convertible  auditorium, can  convert from  ballroom to lecture  to event space Storage for  seating/tables/ sound,lighting, stage equipment

Auditorium

0

150

1

2000

2000

Storage

10

0

1

500

14

150

500 2650 530 3180

# of  Areas

Sq. Ft. per  Area

Space within  Program Area

# of  # of Primary  Visitors Users

Functional Description

Extension   

Communicating Stair

0

0

2

300

600

Restrooms

0

0

20

70

1400

Water Fountains

0

0

8

10

0

0

80 2080 416 2496

Functional Description

FF&E

Booth, counter

FF&E

Communicating stair Gender neutral  restrooms Toilet, vanity, sink 4 water stations per  floor


Program Area Outdoor  Dining/Study SUBTOTAL Circ. Factor 30%

Space within  Program Area Dining/Work  Tables

TOTAL Program Area

Outdoor Lounge SUBTOTAL Circ. Factor 30% TOTAL

Space within  Program Area

Lounge Seating

# of Primary  # of  Users Visitors 100

15

100

15

# of Primary  # of  Visitors Users

50

15

50

15

# of  Areas 1

Sq. Ft. per  Area 2500

Extension   

2500 2500 750

Functional Description 4 top tables for  dining or study

FF&E Outdoor tables and  chairs

3250 # of  Areas

1

Sq. Ft. per  Area

2500

Extension   

2500 2500 750 3250

Functional Description

Lounge space

FF&E Outdoor sofas,  recliners, coffee  tables, side tables,  chairs

71


72


Administration Reception

Manager’s Office, Management Offices, Conference Room, IT Office, Restrooms

Security Desk, Lobby, Bag/Coat Check

Outdoor Lounge Lounge

Lounge Seating, Games Area, Charging Stations, Beverage/Snack Bar

Outdoor Dining/Study

Outposts

Library Outpost, Postal/ Package Outpost, Technoloogy Room, BOH

Auditorium Ticketing, Auditorium, Storage

Shared Functions Communicating Stair, Restrooms, Water Fountains

Study Space

Open Study Space, 4 Person Study Rooms, 12 Person Study Rooms, 25 Person Study Rooms

Cafe

Service Bar, Seating, Kitchen

73


1. How many individual study rooms?

22 closed study rooms and 2 open study spaces

2. How many students per study room?

12 rooms with 4 people, 6 rooms with 12 people, 4 rooms with 25 people

3. How much open study space versus open social space?

Equal space for café and lounge, about twice as much space for study spaces.

4. What kind of reception is necessary?

Security, reception, and bag and coat check

5. How large should the reception desk/area be?

About 2300 sq. ft. It includes a reception desk, booth for coat/bag check, reception lounge.

6. Should a ballroom be included? Should it convert into a lecture hall? Convertible auditorium with large storage room so that it can convert from ballroom to lecture to event space. 7. Should a cafe be included? Should it be full service or grab n’ go?

Full service café as well as grab n’ go snack/drink bars in the lounge spaces.

8. Should a library outpost be included? Should there be a pickup desk or only a returns bin?

Yes, a small pickup and drop off booth (with storage).

9. Should there be a post office of some kind? Should it be associated with Amazon, USPS, UPS, FedEx?

Postal/package outpost with pickup and returns (with storage).

10. How many bathrooms are necessary? What size?

20 individual unisex restrooms plus 2 restrooms for the administrative wing.

11. How many elevators are necessary?

4 passenger elevators and 1 freight elevator

12. How big should it be overall? How many different functions should the space include? Should it be focused on study spaces or should it include other functions such as banking, post office, events, cafe etc. About 33,000 sq. ft. (excluding the core) plus almost 7,000 sq. ft. of outdoor space. It includes reception/security, lounge, café, study space, library outpost, postal outpost, technology outpost and an auditorium. 74


13. How big should the social areas be? Should there be several different social areas? Or one big space? Almost 5,000 sq. ft. of social space (separate from the reception lobby). This larger program space includes lounge seating, games, snack/beverage areas, and charging stations. 14. Should social spaces be large enough for an entire club meeting? Should social space be small for friend groups? There are study rooms that can be used for club meetings. Social space will focus on smaller friend groups. 15. How many people fit into a small meeting room? 4 16. How many people fit into a medium meeting room? 12 17. How many people fit into a large meeting room? 25 18. How many people fit into a ballroom/lecture hall? 150 19. Should a tech center be included? Yes. A technology booth where you can check out equipment which is geotagged to the building so that it can be used on any floor of the building. 20. How many tech center desks should there be?

One checkout and returns booth (with storage and charging stations).

21. How many IT desks/offices are necessary?

IT services housed in administrative wing with space for 5 dedicated IT desks.

22. How big is the cafe? How many students work there? The cafĂŠ is almost 4,500 sq. ft. total with 5 people working front of house and 5 working in the kitchen.

75


5 1 2

Site Analysis

Building Information

78-81

Diagrams

82-89


51 Astor Place Appropriate Location • Located a few minutes walk from New York University • Located on the edge of the East Village and Greenwich Village • Less than a block away from nearest 6 line subway East Village and Greenwich Village Neighborhoods • Lively downtown neighborhoods, lots of night life • Food and drink scene - many restaurants & bars • Historically a favorite neighborhood of writers and musicians and home to the Beatnik generation, lots of hole-n-wall and little bookstores and record shops • Home to St. Marks Place - popular destination for bars, restaurants, quirky shops • Home to Washington Square Park Stylistic & Aesthetic Qualities • Sleek and modernist exterior • Structural steel frame and concrete slabs • Facade is energy efficient low-e structurally glazed glass and aluminum curtain wall • 12 stories • LEED Gold • Designed by Fumihiko Maki • Completed in 2013 Possible Building Modifications • Some parts of terrace might be enclosed Images courtesy of 51asatorplace.com

78


Floor Plans

Fifth Floor

Sixth Floor

79


Sections

Section 1

80

Section 2


Elevations

Elevation 1

Elevation 2

81


Site Plan

82


Size Diagram

19,043 sq. ft.

19,043 sq. ft. 12,124 sq. ft.

Fifth Floor

Sixth Floor

83


Relation to NYU Buildings NEW YORK UNIVERSITY W. 18TH STREET

E. 18TH STREET

1 W. 17TH STREET

W. 16TH STREET

M

3

C H

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IRVING PLACE

2

E. 17TH STREET

S

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U N I O N S Q UA R E

2

E. 16TH STREET

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W. 15TH STREET

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3

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W. 14TH STREET

E. 14TH STREET

PATH

5

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6 E. 13TH STREET

W. 13TH STREET

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E AV

14

13

H RT

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W. 11TH STREET

12

U FO

BR

11

E. 11TH STREET

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E. 10TH STREET

ST .

W. 10TH STREET

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YV E

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RL

ST U

W. 9TH STREET

ES

FIRST AVENUE

9

SECOND AVENUE

8

THIRD AVENUE

UNIVERSITY PLACE

10

FIFTH AVENUE

SIXTH AVENUE

7 W. 12TH STREET

G

C

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31

29

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ST .

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WASHINGTON SQ. EAST

WASHINGTON PL.

WASHINGTON SQ. WEST

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WAVERLY PLACE

WAS H I N GTO N S Q UA R E PA R K

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41 42 43

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E. 3RD STREET

BOND STREET

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ST . RO Y

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SULLIVAN STREET

MACDOUGAL STREET

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94

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W. HOUSTON STREET

84

52

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E. 4TH STREET

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MINETTA LANE

T

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ST R

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37 E. 6TH STREET

GREAT JONES STREET

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W. 3RD STREET

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70 71 69

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WASHINGTON SQUARE SOUTH

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WASHINGTON PLACE 53 54 55

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25

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T A This campus map is the gift of

JEFFREY S. GOULD, WSC ‘79 Updated Spring, 2018


Transit Map

85


Nearby Amenities Bars

86

Fast/Casual Dining


Traffic and Noise Diagram

87


Sun Diagram

88


Views 12/1/2019

12/1/2019

100 E 9th St - Google Maps

Stuyvesant St - Google Maps

Stuyvesant St

100 E 9th St

/1/2019

12/1/2019

179 E 8th St - Google Maps Image capture: Aug 2013

179 E 8th St

New York

79 Cooper Sq - Google Maps

© 2019 Google

Image capture: Aug 2013

Google

© 2019 Google

79 Cooper Sq

New York Google

Street View - Aug 2013

Street View - Aug 2013

Image courtesy of google.com/maps Image capture: Jun 2014

New York Google

Street View - Jun 2014

© 2019 Google

Image capture: May 2009

New York Google

© 2019 Google

89


6 1 2 3 4

Base Building Drawings

Site Plan

92-93

Floor Plans

94-97

Sections Elevations

98-101 102-111


92


51 Astor Place

Images courtesy of 51asatorplace.com

93


Fifth Floor Plan


Sixth Floor Plan


Section 1, East-West Through Elevator Lobby


Section 2, North-South Through Elevator


Elevation 1, Southwest (Astor Place)


Elevation 2, South Podium (Plaza)


7 1 2

Blocking & Stacking Diagrams

Blocking Diagrams

108

Stacking Diagram

109


Blocking Diagram Shared Functions

Admin

Shared Functions

Study Space

Auditorium Lounge

Entry

Outposts Lounge

Cafe Dining/ Study

Fifth Floor 108

Lounge

Shared Functions Study Space

Sixth Floor


fe

a

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En

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g

D St inin u g d / y

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A

S Fu ha n re c d tio n s

Stacking Diagram

109


8 1 2 3

NYC Building Code & ADA & LEED

NYC Building Code

112-127

ADA

128-141

LEED Goals

142-143


Occupancy Group A-2

112


Occupancy Group A-3

113


Occupancy Group B

114


Plumbing Fixture Requirements

115


Interior Finishes

116


Interior Finishes

117


Occupancy Load

118


Stairs, Corridors, and Doors

119


Stairs, Corridors, and Doors

120


Stairs, Corridors, and Doors

121


Stairs, Corridors, and Doors

122


Stairs, Corridors, and Doors

123


Stairs, Corridors, and Doors

124


Exit Travel Distance

125


Dead End Corridor

126


Minimum Exits for Occupant Load

127


ADA Standards

128


ADA Standards

129


ADA Standards

130


ADA Standards

131


ADA Standards

132


ADA Standards

133


ADA Standards

134


ADA Standards

135


ADA Standards

136


ADA Standards

137


ADA Standards

138


ADA Standards

139


ADA Standards

140


ADA Standards

141


Sustainability Goals

1. Indoor Environmental Quality Credit for Interior Lighting -include daylight sensors, use tunable LED fixtures which can be programmed to respond to natural shift of light

from warm to cool throughout the day

2. Indoor Environmental Quality Credit for Daylight -take advantage of windows/natural light, be mindful of solid full height walls that cut off access to natural light 3. Indoor Environmental Quality Credit for Acoustic Performance -thoughtfully include sound absorptive materials to allow for quiet spaces 4. Indoor Environmental Quality Credit for Low Emitting Materials -specify environmentally friendly products with EPDs and HPDs 5. Water Efficiency Credit for Indoor Water Use Reduction -specify low flow plumbing fixtures

142


LEED Scorecard LEED v4 for BD+C: New Construction and Major Renovation Project Checklist Y

?

N Credit

0

0

0

0

Y

0

0

Project Name: Date:

Integrative Process

0 Location and Transportation

1 16

Required

Prereq

Construction and Demolition Waste Management Planning

Required

Credit

Building Life-Cycle Impact Reduction Building Product Disclosure and Optimization - Environmental Product Declarations Building Product Disclosure and Optimization - Sourcing of Raw Materials

Sensitive Land Protection

1

High Priority Site

2

Credit

Surrounding Density and Diverse Uses

5

Credit

Credit

Access to Quality Transit

5

Credit

Credit

Bicycle Facilities

1

Credit

Credit

Reduced Parking Footprint

1

Credit

Credit

Green Vehicles

1

0 Sustainable Sites

10

Y

Prereq

Y

0 Y

0

13

Storage and Collection of Recyclables

Credit

Building Product Disclosure and Optimization - Material Ingredients Construction and Demolition Waste Management

0 Indoor Environmental Quality Prereq

5 2 2 2 2

16

Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance

Required

Prereq

Construction Activity Pollution Prevention

Prereq

Environmental Tobacco Smoke Control

Required

Credit

Site Assessment

1

Credit

Enhanced Indoor Air Quality Strategies

2

Credit

Site Development - Protect or Restore Habitat

2

Credit

Low-Emitting Materials

3

Credit

Open Space

1

Credit

Construction Indoor Air Quality Management Plan

1

Credit

Rainwater Management

3

Credit

Indoor Air Quality Assessment

2

Credit

Heat Island Reduction

2

Credit

Thermal Comfort

1

Credit

Light Pollution Reduction

1

Credit

Interior Lighting

2

Credit

Daylight

3

Credit

Quality Views

1

Credit

Acoustic Performance

1

0 Water Efficiency

Required

Y

Prereq

Indoor Water Use Reduction

Required

Y

Prereq

Building-Level Water Metering

Required

Credit

Outdoor Water Use Reduction

2

Credit

Indoor Water Use Reduction

6

Credit

Cooling Tower Water Use

2

Credit

Water Metering

1

0 Energy and Atmosphere

Y

11

Required

0

0 Materials and Resources

Credit

16

Outdoor Water Use Reduction

0

0

LEED for Neighborhood Development Location

Prereq

Y

0

Credit

0

0

0

0

33

0 Innovation Credit

Innovation

Credit

LEED Accredited Professional

6 5 1

0 Regional Priority

4

Credit

Regional Priority: Specific Credit

Credit

Regional Priority: Specific Credit

1 1

Prereq

Fundamental Commissioning and Verification

Required

Credit

Regional Priority: Specific Credit

1

Y

Prereq

Minimum Energy Performance

Required

Credit

Regional Priority: Specific Credit

1

Y

Prereq

Building-Level Energy Metering

Required

Y

Prereq

Fundamental Refrigerant Management

Required

Credit

Enhanced Commissioning

6

Credit

Optimize Energy Performance

18

Credit

Advanced Energy Metering

1

Credit

Demand Response

2

Credit

Renewable Energy Production

3

Credit

Enhanced Refrigerant Management

1

Credit

Green Power and Carbon Offsets

2

Y

Image courtesy of usgbc.org

0

0

0 TOTALS

Possible Points:

Certified: 40 to 49 points, Silver: 50 to 59 points, Gold: 60 to 79 points, Platinum: 80 to 110

110

143


9 1

Goals

Goals

146-147


146


Goals 1. Strike a balance between eating, study, and social spaces -All my research supported the idea that eating, socializing and studying are the primary functions of the modern

student center. My goal is to make sure that these are the three most emphasized spaces within the design, and to make sure that one does not heavily out weigh the others.

2. Emphasize and activate circulation areas -My resources discussed at length the idea that activated circulation areas allow for impromptu conversations

which facilitate deeper thinking and relationships. I want to focus on integrating seating into the stairway, having nooks along primary circulation paths, and minimizing the number of circulation paths.

3. Achieve good ratio of open and closed spaces -It is very important for my design to have the right ratio of closed and open spaces. All of my research warned of

having all open or glass- enclosed spaces as being overly distracting. But some sources said that students chose the student center in order to have a reasonable level of distraction. I will need to be thoughtful and careful about how many spaces are totally open, glass-enclosed, and completely enclosed.

4. Integrate current technology and incorporate space for future technology -Possibly the biggest challenge of this design will be to ensure that it heavily integrates current technology while

also finding ways to accommodate for future technological advancements. One main way that I am trying to accomplish this is with the technology outpost where students can borrow tech that is geotagged to the building.

5. Effective branding -As the student center is the living room of the campus and also a huge draw for potential students, it is very

important to have effective branding throughout the entire space. This should be much more subtle than simply slapping the logo on all the walls. It should appear in colors, motifs, and overall aesthetics. 147


10 1

Bibliography

Bibliography

150-151


Bibliography

Books: Boys, Jos. Towards Creative Learning Spaces: Re-Thinking the Architecture of Post-Compulsory Education. Routledge,

2011. <https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/nysid-ebooks/detail.action?docID=667938>.

Department of Justice. (2010). 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design. Gensler. Re Imagining Learning: Strategies for Engagement. Gensler, 2015. <https://www.gensler.com/uploads/ document/406/file/Reimagining-Learning-US.pdf>. Neuman, David J. Building Type Basics for College and University Facilities. John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2013. <https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/nysid-ebooks/detail.action?docID=1204090>. New York City Department of Buildings. (2014). NYC 2014 Construction Codes. New York. U.S. Green Buildling Council. (2012). LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors. Periodicals: Arieff, Allison. “Education Gets Its Game On.” Dialogue 2015: 2-9. Magazine. September 2019. <https://www.gensler. com/uploads/document/399/file/Gensler-Dialogue-27.pdf>. Daughtrey, David. “Branding Across Campus.” Learning By Design (2014): 16-18. <http://pubs.royle.com/ publication/?i=226171&p=18#{%22page%22:18,%22issue_id%22:226171}>.

150


Bibliography Articles: 51 Astor Place. Renderings. n.d. November 2019. <http://www.51astorplace.com/mobile/renderings.shtml>. Compass. East Village. n.d. November 2019. <https://www.compass.com/neighborhood-guides/nyc/east-village/>. Compass. Greenwich Village. n.d. November 2019. <https://www.compass.com/neighborhood-guides/nyc/greenwich- village/>. Fishman, Tiffany Dovey, Allan Ludgate and Jen Tutak. Success by design: Improving outcomes in American higher education. 16 March 2017. September 2019. <https://www2.deloitte.com/us/en/insights/industry/public-sector/ improving-student-success-in-higher-education.html>. Gensler. A High-Performance Place for Learning. 2016. September 2019. <https://www.gensler.com/research-insight/ gensler-research-institute/a-high-performance-place-for-learning>. Gensler. Remaking Student Living. 2016. September 2019. <https://www.gensler.com/research-insight/gensler-research- institute/remaking-student-living>. Gensler. The Dynamics of Place in Higher Education. 2011. September 2019. <https://www.gensler.com/research-insight/ gensler-research-institute/the-dynamics-of-place-in-higher-education>. Harsma, JaDee. Where the Coeds Gather: The Impact and Importance of Student Unions. 24 May 2017. September 2019. <https://www.dlrgroup.com/media/articles/harsma-student-unions/>. Leavitt, Brett. Student Center(ed): Is the Student Union the Key to Retention? n.d. September 2019. <https:// hmcarchitects.com/news/student-centered-student-union-key-retention/>. Nabil, Sara. Interior design of the future will seem like magic. 15 February 2019. October 2019. “Student Center at Georgetown University / ikon.5 architects” 09 Jun 2015. ArchDaily. Accessed 24 Sep 2019. <https:// www.archdaily.com/639726/georgetown-university-ikon-5-architects/> ISSN 0719-8884 “The Diana Center at Barnard College / Weiss/Manfredi” 19 Dec 2010. ArchDaily. Accessed 4 Oct 2019. <https://www. archdaily.com/97256/the-diana-center-at-barnard-college-weiss-manfredi/> ISSN 0719-8884 “UCSD Price Center East / Yazdani Studio of CannonDesign” 11 Jun 2009. ArchDaily. Accessed 24 Sep 2019. <https:// www.archdaily.com/24519/ucsd-price-center-east-yazdani-studio/> ISSN 0719-8884 151

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Naomi Benatar University Student Center Thesis Research Book  

Naomi Benatar University Student Center Thesis Research Book  

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