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Take your mark, get set...


Center for Gifted Education The College of William and Mary

Celebrating 25 Years 1988–2013 cfge.wm.edu

Research-Based Curriculum for Gifted Students Precollegiate Learner Programs Professional Development Research Opportunities Master’s and Doctoral Programs

Visit us in Booth 507 in the exhibit hall!


Welcome Sixty years ago NAGC was formed by members like you who cared deeply

about serving high-ability children. A milestone year for NAGC and the gifted community, we have taken this opportunity to showcase the advancement of the field while celebrating its past accomplishments. You are joining us at this exciting moment, a special occasion to review the decades and create a vision for the future. A 60th anniversary is defined by Hallmark cards as the diamond year. Fittingly, 2013 is a year to shine brightly and make a statement. We will celebrate with historical sessions highlighting the key influences of great thinkers, seminal research, and educational policy, along with a sweeping overview of the great ideas of giftedness. Our keynote speakers address national issues affecting education: the academic achievement gap; advances in and new uses of technology; changing demographics; scientific research on the brain; and the future of learning. The Convention will close with a stellar panel of past NAGC presidents who will share their perspective and insights, and offer ideas on how best to confront 21st-century challenges and opportunities faced by gifted education. At the prior evening’s party at the Indiana State Museum, the past NAGC presidents will be honored at a cake-cutting ceremony. NAGC’s past president, Ann Robinson, is presenting, along with some of the authors, stories of gifted greats from the newly edited book, A Century of Contributions to Gifted Education: Illuminating Lives. One of the presentations based on a book chapter, Recognizing Dr. Martin D. Jenkins, Father of the Study of African American Giftedness, is being videotaped, and preserved for future exposure. And, new this year, we’ve launched the NAGC Annual Fund. Please stop by our booth outside the Exhibit Hall to learn how you can join your colleagues in investing in your profession. Then, join us for our inaugural Donor Reception early evening on Saturday. In the program book (and your bag) you’ll find a treasure chest of material and in the days ahead you’ll discover your own gems of enlightening information, inspiring ideas and new tools, and words of wisdom.

Take your mark, get set…

Tracy L. Cross Convention Program Chair and President

60th Annual Convention

Nancy Green NAGC Executive Director

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NCSSSMST National Consortium for Specialized Secondary Schools of Mathematics, Science, and Technology

Thank you for joining us for our annual Professional Conference! We hope the conference provides you with a lot of valuable information and great networking opportunities. We are glad you are here to help us celebrate NCSSSMST’s 25th Anniversary! We look forward to charting our course together for the next quarter century. We are proud to partner with NAGC for the Professional Conference for the third consecutive year. We have a lot in common and a lot to share. We thank NAGC for its valuable support. The Board of Directors of NCSSSMST welcomes you. We look forward to having an opportunity to talk to with all of you at this important event.

The Board of NCSSSMST Tim Gott, NCSSSMST President Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science, Bowling Green, KY

Mark Godwin South Carolina Governor’s School for Science and Mathematics, Hartsville, SC

Crystal Bonds, NCSSSMST President-Elect High School for Math, Science and Engineering at City College, New York, NY

Bob Gregory Arkansas School for Mathematics, Science & the Arts, Hot Springs, AR

Jay Thomas, NCSSSMST Immediate Past President Aurora University, Aurora, IL

Cheryl Hach Kalamazoo Area Mathematics and Science Center, Kalamazoo, MI

Susan Caffery, NCSSSMST Secretary Academy of Science and Technology, Conroe, TX Hungsin Chin, NCSSSMST Treasurer Russell Math and Science Center, Alabama School of Fine Arts, Birmingham, AL

Christopher Kolar Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy, Aurora, IL

Amanda Baskett Rockdale Magnet School for Science and Technology, Conyers, GA

Letita Mason North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics, Durham, NC

Charmain Brammer Success Academy, St. George, UT

Luke Shorty Maine School of Mathematics & Science, Limestone, ME

Russell Davis Bergen County Academies, Hackensack, NJ

Heather Sondel Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology, Alexandria, VA

Alison Earnhart Liberal Arts & Science Academy High School, Austin, TX William Elliott Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA

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Rosemarie Jahoda The Bronx High School of Science, Bronx, NY

National Association for Gifted Children

Todd Mann Executive Director, NCSSSMST, Washington, DC

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Sponsors NAGC Appreciates the Support of these 60th Annual Convention Sponsors

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Table of Contents Guide to the Guide .................................................................................................................. vi Schedule of Events ............................................................................................................ ix – xi NAGC Network Events .................................................................................................xvi – xviii Thanks ............................................................................................................................xx – xxiii Awards and Recognition ......................................................................................................xxiv NAGC Board of Directors and Staff ......................................................................................xxv Wednesday Highlights .............................................................................................................1 Gifted Education Essentials Thursday Highlights ..................................................................................................................7 Gifted Education Applications NCSSSMST Conference .........................................................................................................15 Friday Highlights .....................................................................................................................23 Saturday Highlights ................................................................................................................87 Sunday Highlights ................................................................................................................149 Speaker Index .............................................................................................................158 – 163 Convention Floorplans ...............................................................................................164 – 165 Exhibit Floorplan ...................................................................................................................166 Exhibitor Listing ...........................................................................................................168 – 175 Exhibitor Workshops ...................................................................................................176 – 177 Certificate of Attendance .....................................................................................................197

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Guide to the Guide We want you to get the most out of your Convention experience! Here are some tips and information to assist you in planning your Convention schedule. • Are you interested in a particular topic? Turn to the Convention app to search by strand or speaker. • How to find a room? Consult the map of the JW Marriott and the Convention Center on pages 164-165. • Rooms marked CC are in the Convention Center.

THIS PROGRAM BOOK At the Front of the Book The Schedule contains meetings, workshops, and special events, in chronological order.

In the Back of the Book • Are you interested in a particular presenter? The Speaker Index lists presenters by last name, with corresponding page numbers for each of their presentations.

Session Descriptions make up the bulk of this Convention Guide. In addition to room location, each session listing contains the title, name of presenter(s), session description, and target audience. See sample below.

USING THE SESSION DESCRIPTION COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

Strand Session tle Presenters

Audience

Letters to Our Gifted Selves: What We Wished We Had Known When We Were Young Jaclyn M. Chancey, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Adrienne E. Sauder, Western University, London, ON What do you say to a gifted child who doesn’t quite understand why they are different from their peers? What would a gifted individual say to their younger self? This poster, intended for parents, teachers, and counselors, takes an analytical and interpretive look at the self-narratives of two gifted women as they reflect on what they wish they had known about giftedness as they were growing up. This examination of their own lived experiences illustrates how perceptions of giftedness influence personal, academic, and vocational development. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: Griffin Hall

Recorded Session

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National Association for Gifted Children

Poster Session

NCSSSMST

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Roundtable

Session is a Poster Session

Session Description

Room Location

Celebrating 60 Years


SESSION FORMATS

LOCATIONS

In addition to individual concurrent sessions, some of which are combined, you will find:

Most NAGC Convention activities take place at the JW Marriott Indianapolis during the day. Sessions held in the JW Marriott Indianapolis will include a room name or number.

Signature Series These timely and salient topics are invited by the NAGC Program Chair and focus on recent developments in the field of gifted education, success stories from peers who received awards this year, or expand the discussion of recently released NAGC books.

The 2013 NAGC Convention offers general sessions Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday, and a selection of mini keynotes from which to choose on Friday morning. Check out the “Highlights” for each day for details.

Various concurrent sessions and two of the mini keynotes will be held in rooms 120-128 of the Indiana Convention Center. There is no need to leave the Hotel to get to these rooms, just head to the second floor and you’ll find a walkway to the Convention Center across from Starbucks. If you wish to walk outside to the Convention Center, the entrance to the rooms for NAGC sessions is on West Maryland Street, just around the corner from the Hotel. Sessions held in the Convention Center have a “CC” before the room number in the program book.

Poster and Roundtable Sessions

Maps of the Hotel can be found on pages 164-165.

General Sessions and Mini Keynotes

You can find the poster and roundtable sessions Griffin Hall on the second floor of the JW Marriott Indianapolis. You may view these “posted” displays of research and other topics at your leisure. Presenters will be available at the times to discuss their poster presentation or facilitate a roundtable discussion. Please consult the listings by day in the session descriptions.

Putting It Into Practice

GRIFFIN HALL: YOUR NAGC PIT STOP Roundtables, Poster Sessions, or Exhibitor Workshops are found in Griffin Hall, located on the second floor. Signs and friendly volunteers will assist you in finding your way.

These sessions on Friday and Saturday, from 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM, focus on applications and strategies for the classroom.

Exhibitor Workshops These popular, content-oriented sessions are conducted by our business partners in the NAGC Pit Stop, located in Griffin Hall on the second floor of the JW Marriott Indianapolis during concurrent breakout sessions.

WE ARE “APP-Y” Check out the 2013 NAGC Convention App Available at the iTunes Store More info at www.nagc.org/2013app.aspx Thanks to Summer Institute for the Gifted for sponsoring our WiFi for Convention 60th Annual Convention

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Guide to the Guide PROGRAM CHANGES

EXHIBIT HALL

This information in this guide is current as of October 1, 2013. A list of any program changes, such as room locations or session cancellations that occurred after printing is in your Convention tote bag. You may view any additional changes (as they occur) and notices on our live Twitter feed #nagc13 or in the Convention App.

The NAGC Exhibit Hall is located in the JW Grand Ballroom on the third floor of the JW Marriott Indianapolis, right past the session rooms and the registration area. See the hall map on page 166. The exhibitors list begins on page 168. You can also find exhibitor information on the App. Please take time to meet with our exhibiting partners and tell them you appreciate them joining us in Indianapolis. Several events take place around the exhibits including the opening reception, entertainment, the game break, and coffee on Friday and Saturday morning!

MEALS We listened to 2012 Convention attendees and have provided a 45-minute break on Friday and Saturday. Use this time to relax and grab some lunch. Many eating establishments are within walking distance. NAGC Convention attendees have a number of dining options during the Convention. • The JW Marriott Indianapolis will have lunch items available for sale inside the Exhibit Hall (third floor) from 10:30 AM – 2:30 PM. • You can start your day with coffee in the NAGC Exhibit Hall on the third floor on Friday and Saturday beginning at 7:30 AM. • Don’t miss a sweet treat in the Exhibit Hall on Friday from 2:45 PM – 3:45 PM for the Game Break.

LEGEND OF ICONS Recorded Session Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Roundtable

Celebrating 60 Years

NAGC Central NAGC staff and volunteers are on hand to provide you a link to resources and information at NAGC Central in booth 321.

BOOTH

321

Check out the new NAGC publications and meet authors!

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Schedule of Events WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6

6 Registration Hours

8:00 AM – 5:00 PM NAGC Board of Directors Meeting Room 313 9:00 AM – 4:30 PM Gifted Education Essentials Gaining 21st Century Skills: Providing Rigor with Common Core and National Science Standards for High-Ability Learners (see page 2 – separate registration required)

The NAGC Convention Registration Desk is conveniently located at the top of the escalators on the third floor of the JW Marriott Indianapolis

Tuesday, Nov. 5 | 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM Wednesday, Nov. 6 | 7:00 AM – 6:00 PM

7:00 AM – 3:00 PM Council of State Directors Meeting White River A (First Floor)

Thursday, Nov. 7 | 7:00 AM – 6:00 PM

10:30 AM – 5:00 PM Twice Exceptional Summit (Invitation Only) Room: 205

Friday, Nov. 8 | 7:00 AM – 5:00 PM Saturday, Nov. 9 | 7:00 AM – 4:00 PM

3:00 PM – 6:30 PM NCSSSMST Registration Registration Desk (Third Floor)

Sunday, Nov. 10 | 7:30 AM – 12:00 PM (information only)

6:30 PM – 9:00 PM University Network Meeting Room 103/104 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM NCSSSMST Opening Reception Reverse College Fair w/NCSSSMST Affiliates White River B/C/D (First Floor)

For the most up-todate information and announcements, download the NAGC2013 app.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7 10:45 AM-11:45 AM NCSSSMST Concurrent Sessions

7:00 AM – 12:30 PM NCSSSMST Registration Registration Desk (Third Floor) 7:15 AM – 8:00 AM NCSSSMST Conference Continental Breakfast JW Grand Ballroom 9/10 (Third Floor)

12:00 PM-1:30 PM NCSSSMST Keynote Luncheon JW Grand Ballroom 9/10 (Third Floor) 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM NCSSSMST Concurrent Sessions

8:15 AM-9:15 AM NCSSSMST Concurrent Sessions

Additional fee for NAGC Convention attendees to attend NCSSSMST events. Stop by the NAGC Registration Desk for more details.

9:30 AM-10:30 AM NCSSSMST Concurrent Sessions

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Schedule of Events THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7 (CONT.)

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8

7:15 AM – 7:45 AM Action Labs Orientation JW Grand Ballroom 7/8 (Third Floor)

5:45 AM – 6:15 AM Fun Run/Walk with Back on Your Feet (see page 23), Meet in JW Lobby

7:45 AM – 2:30 PM Action Labs (Vans/Buses leave from Event Center Drive, 1st floor)

7:00 AM – 9:00 AM NCSSSMST Continental Breakfast (NCSSSMST registered attendees only) JW Grand Ballroom 10 (Third Floor)

7:30 AM – 2:00 PM Network Leadership Retreat (by invitation only) Room 209 8:00 AM – 3:00 PM Exhibit Hall Set Up/Poster Session Set Up 8:00 AM – 2:30 PM Gifted Education Applications: Critical Issues and Models for Delivering Successful Programs and Services (see pages 8-14. Separate registration required.) 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM Administrators’ Leadership Forum (by invitation only) Rooms 101/102 2:00 PM – 2:30 PM First-timers Orientation JW Grand Ballroom 8 (Third Floor) 3:00 PM – 4:30 PM Opening General Session “The Six Edges of Education Innovation” with Milton Chen White River Ballroom A-J (First Floor) 4:30 PM – 6:30 PM Exhibit Hall Opening Reception JW Grand Ballroom 1-6 (Third Floor)

7:30 AM – 5:00 PM Exhibit Hall Open Coffee 7:30 AM – 8:30 AM JW Grand Ballroom (Third Floor) 8:00 AM – 9:15 AM Mini Keynotes (choose one) (see page 24-25) 9:30 AM – 10:30 AM Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Exhibitor Workshops (see pages 26-36) 10:45 AM – 11:45 AM Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Exhibitor Workshops (see pages 37-47) 11:45 AM – 12:30 PM Break Concession area open in the Exhibit Hall (Cash and Carry) from 10:30 AM to 2:30 PM 12:30 PM – 1:30 PM Putting it Into Practice Sessions (see pages 48-57)

6:30 PM – 7:00 PM NAGC Business Meeting Room: 104

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Exhibitor Workshops (see pages 57-70)

6:45 PM – 9:00 PM Middle Grades, Early Childhood, and Special Schools & Programs Network Event (See page xvi)

2:45 PM – 3:45 PM Refreshment and Game Break with Sycamore School JW Grand Ballroom (Third Floor) 3:15 PM – 4:45 PM Legacy Series Taping: “Reflections on Making a Difference” with Dorothy Sisk JW Grand Ballroom 7/8/9 (Third Floor)

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3:45 PM – 4:45 PM Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Exhibitor Workshops (see page 72) 3:45 PM – 4:45 PM Torrance Awards Committee Meeting (Open to all) Room: 106 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM Celebration of Excellence Presidential Address/Awards/Leadership Reception White River Ballroom E/F (First Floor)

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM Putting it Into Practice Sessions (see pages 11-121) 1:45 PM – 2:45 PM Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Exhibitor Workshops (see pages 121-133) 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions (see pages 134-145) 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM E. Paul Torrance Creativity General Session “They Came from the Future: Sixty Years of Creativity” with 2013 E. Paul Torrance Creativity Award winner Barbara Kerr “Heavy MeNtal Variety Show” with The Amygdaloids White River Ballroom E/F (First Floor)

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM Network Evening Events (see pages xvi-xvii)

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9 7:00 AM – 9:00 AM State Affiliate Breakfast (by invitation only) JW Grand Ballroom 7 8:00 AM – 7:30 PM Indiana Association for the Gifted Parent Day (Separate registration required) CC 126-128

6:00 PM – 7:00 PM NAGC Annual Fund Donor Reception (by invitation only) Room 314 6:30 PM – 9:00 PM Indiana Night at the Museum Reception at Indiana State Museum (across the street from the Hotel)

7:30 AM – 4:00 PM Exhibit Hall Open Coffee 7:30 AM – 8:30 AM JW Grand Ballroom (Third Floor)

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Exhibitor Workshops (see pages 88-98)

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM Network Super Sessions (see pages 150-153)

7:30 AM – 12:00 PM NAGC Information Table

9:15 AM – 10:30 AM General Session “Driving in the Express Lane” with John Green White River Ballroom A-J (First Floor) 10:45 AM – 11:45 AM Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Exhibitor Workshops (see pages 100-110)

9:15 AM – 10:15 AM Network Super Sessions (see pages 154-157) 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM Closing General Session “Past, Present, and Future: Defining Moments in Gifted Education” with NAGC Past Presidents White River Ballroom E/F (First Floor)

11:45 AM – 12:30 PM Break Concession area open in the Exhibit Hall (Cash and Carry) from 10:30 AM to 2:30 PM

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Looking Back Sixty Years The National Association for Gifted Children was founded in 1954 by a group of 16 educators, administrators, and psychologists. This small group came together because of their mutual belief that there should be a national effort into the identification, education, and motivation of gifted children. The goals that these pioneers put forth for the Association still guide its activities today: • Stimulating and encouraging research and education of gifted children. • Making available and disseminating scientific information concerning gifted children. • Encouraging study of problems and practices in working with gifted children. • Providing classroom teachers with opportunities to study improved methods of working with gifted children. • Publishing and reporting scientific and experimental investigations related to gifted children and improved practices for working with them. Ann Isaacs, the founder of NAGC, and its President from 1954-1959, demonstrated her dedication to the Association by serving as both

Conference on Children and Youth (1960), the White House Task Force on the Gifted and Talented (1967), the Marland Study (the first federal report on gifted and talented education – 1972), and the Javits Act (1988). The 1993 National Excellence Report was unveiled at the NAGC Annual Convention that year.

Executive Director and Editor of the Gifted Child Quarterly for twenty years. In the 1970s, many new strides were made, including an increase in membership and convention attendance and a focus on more diverse and far-reaching issues. The Association also began looking for ways to include parents and state associations in its plans and programs and services. Since its inception, NAGC and its members have been involved in each major government initiative to identify and assist gifted children. These initiatives included the White House

More recently, thanks to the active involvement of many NAGC members and state affiliate organizations, we have been working on numerous initiatives to embed gifted students into federal education policy, restore funding for research, and increase public accountability for gifted student achievement. We continue looking for opportunities to bring the needs of gifted students and their teachers to the attention of policymakers. We are mindful of the debt we owe to the earliest NAGC leaders and visionaries. Their efforts put us on the path we are on today. And it is with great enthusiasm that we look forward to expanding further to meet the needs of our greatest resource – our nation’s children.

ANN ISAACS FOUNDER’S MEMORIAL AWARD RECIPIENTS 2012 – Nicholas Colangelo, University of Iowa 2011 – Donald J. Treffinger, Center for Creative Learning 2010 – Abraham Tannenbaum, Columbia University 2009 – Alexinia Y. Baldwin, University of Connecticut 2008 – Sylvia Rimm, Family Achievement Clinic and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

2006 – Joseph S. Renzulli, University of Connecticut 2005 – James Gallagher, University of North Carolina 2004 – Julian Stanley, Johns Hopkins University 2003 – John Feldhusen, Purdue University 2002 – Mary Frasier, University of Georgia

2007 – Nancy Robinson, Halbert and Nancy Robinson Center for Young Adults

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NAGC PRESIDENTS 1954-1958 1958-1960 1960-1962 1962-1964 1964-1965 1965-1968 1968-1969 1969-1970 1970-1972 1972-1974 1974-1976 1976-1978 1978-1980 1980-1981 1982-1983

Ann Issacs – Founder Walter Barbe Victor Goertzel Arthur Hughson John Gardiner William G. Vassar Ed Frierson Odgen Lindsley Norman Mirman A.W. Laird (deceased) John Gowan (deceased) Faye Schaeffer Joe Katena Juliana Gensley (deceased) John Feldhusen (deceased)

1983-1985 1985-1987 1987-1989 1989-1991 1991-1993 1993-1995 1995-1997 1997-1999 1999-2001 2001-2003 2003-2005 2005-2007 2007-2009 2009-2011 2011-2013

Catherine Bruch William R. Nash Mary Frasier (deceased) James Curry Barbara Clark James J. Gallagher Carolyn Callahan Sandra Kaplan Sally M. Reis Carol Ann Tomlinson F. Richard Olenchak Joyce VanTassel-Baska Del Siegle Ann Robinson Paula Olszewski-Kubilius

CONVENTION LOCATIONS 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979

Cincinnati, OH ? ? New York City, NY and Indianapolis, IN ? Cleveland, OH Miami, FL New York City, NY Chicago, IL Terre Haute, IN Chicopee, MA St. Louis, MO Omaha, NE Hartford, CT Chicago, IL New Orleans, LA Atlantic City, NJ Chicago, IL Long Beach, CA Chicago, IL St. Louis, MO Rosemont, IL Kansas City, MO San Diego, CA Houston, TX Baltimore, MD

1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

Minneapolis, MN Portland, OR New Orleans, LA Philadelphia, PA St. Louis, MO Denver, CO Las Vegas, NV New Orleans, LA Orlando, FL Cincinnati, OH Little Rock, AR

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1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001

Kansas City, MO Los Angeles, CA Atlanta, GA Salt Lake City, UT Tampa, FL Indianapolis, IN Little Rock, AR Louisville, KY Albuquerque, NM Atlanta, GA Cincinnati, OH

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Denver, CO Indianapolis, IN Salta Lake City, UT Louisville, KY Charlotte, NC Minneapolis, MN Tampa, FL St. Louis, MO Atlanta, GA New Orleans, LA Denver, CO

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Looking Back Sixty Years KEY DATES ACROSS THE COUNTRY 1952

Incorporated - Ohio Association for Gifted Children

1978

Gifted education services mandated by legislature - Kansas

1959

First appropriations for gifted education - Ohio

1978

1961

First formal guidelines for gifted programs - Kansas

1963

Dr. Calvin W. Taylor introduced concept of multiple talent teaching - Utah

Advocates, including Indiana DOE, begin meeting as offshoot of Indiana Council for Exceptional Children. This group becomes Indiana Association for the Gifted

1979

1963

Northwest Gifted Child Association is founded to provide support to parents of gifted children in the Pacific Northwest

State law creates Office for Gifted Education, Governor’s School, and the Governor’s Advisory Council for gifted education - Arkansas

1979

The Maryland Report is published providing the first federal definition of giftedness

Changes to funding structure, use multiple criteria to identify, program broadened - California

1979

State funds were provided on a competitive grant basis for programs for gifted students; these services were optional - Texas

1980

Regional service centers for gifted education established - Indiana

1972

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1973

Funding established for state-assisted gifted programs - Missouri

1975

First state gifted education law – North Carolina

1974

Educators gathered together to organize Arizona Association for Gifted and Talented- Arizona

1981

SENG (Supporting Emotional Needs of Gifted) formed to support the unique emotional needs of gifted children

1975

General Assembly mandates K-12 gifted identification and programs - Virginia

1982

1977

Texas Legislature passed its first legislation concerning education of GT students

1977

Formed: AGATE: Advocacy for Gifted and Talented Education in the State of New York (incorporated 1982)

All students entering New York State schools for the first time must be screened by qualified individuals for giftedness using appropriate screening tools, which are also language relevant New York

1983

First funding to districts for gifted students - Arkansas

1977

Law mandates the governing board of each school district to provide appropriate gifted education services to students of superior intellect or advanced learning ability in order to achieve at levels commensurate with the child’s intellect and ability. - Arizona

1983

First state funding to districts for highly capable programming – Washington

1983

Publication of A Nation At Risk, which calls attention to the achievement of America’s brightess students

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1984

State advisory council for the gifted and talented created - Kentucky

1985

Accountability provisions added to gifted education law - Texas

1985

Washington Coalition for Gifted Education is founded to act as the political advocacy arm of the Washington Gifted Education community

1999

Ohio General Assembly passes House Bill 282, which requires all school districts to have a policy and plan for the identification of children who are gifted. $5 million for gifted identification is appropriated.

2001

Adoption of standards by State Board of Education - California

2004

New teacher licensure rules to go into effect - Wisconsin

2007

House Bill 79 is passed, requiring all districts to establish acceleration policies - Ohio

1986

Categorical Line Item funding under Accelerated Learner Programs- Utah

1987

Ohio enacts legislation mandating the identification of all children who are gifted

2007

1987

Texas Legislature mandated that all districts must identify and serve G/T students

Mandate to identify and serve high ability children, K-12, in core content areas - Indiana

2011

1987

Arizona adopts requirements for a Gifted Education Endorsement

Definition of Basic Education Changed – Access to Highly Capable Programming now part of basic education – Washington

1988

General Assembly establishes Indiana Academy for Mathematics, Science and the Humanities, at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana

2011

1988

The Jacob K. Javits Gifted & Talented Student Education Act passed as part of the Elementary & Secondary Education Act. Funding for demonstration grants and the National Research Center continues for more than 20 years.

The Ohio Association for Gifted Children releases Grading on a Curve: the Illusion of Excellence, a report detailing the shortcomings of Ohio’s school accountability system

2013

All public school districts must develop a plan to provide highly capable program - Washington

2013

Increased public accountability for gifted services is mandated by the Texas Legislature - Texas

1993

Gifted Association of Missouri- approval to establish Missouri Fine Arts Academy

1993

Release of the federal National Excellence report calls attention to the neglect of the nation’s most talented youth.

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Have other key dates to add? Visit Griffin Hall to post your gifted education key dates

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Network Events Don’t miss a chance to meet and mingle with others who share your special interest/s within the field of gifted and talented education. The NAGC Network events are open to all; each NAGC individual member may “join” three Networks as part of their membership. The Convention offers you a great opportunity to explore what the Networks have to offer, as well as how to get involved, and to meet the leadership. Network Evening Events

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7 Middle Grades, Early Childhood, and Special Schools & Programs A Special Evening at Sycamore School for Gifted Children 1750 W 64th S., Indianapolis, IN 46260 6:45 PM – 9:00 PM (buses depart 6:45 from Event Center Drive at JW Marriott Indianapolis) Please join your friends from these three networks for an extraordinary evening at the Sycamore School, a school dedicated to nurturing the minds, bodies, gifts, and talents of high-ability children. Sycamore’s exquisite campus is located near the heart of Indianapolis and offers enriched curriculum and accelerated learning experiences for highly gifted children in preschool through 8th grade. Enjoy the warm hospitality of faculty, parents, and students. Munch, meander, and make meaningful connections with our hosts and fellow network members. Gather lesson and curriculum ideas, ideas to enhance GT programs, and more!

Learn new ways to incorporate STEAM activities into your own instruction. See how engineers use art and creativity. The STEAM Carnival will be held in large room with 15-20 stations. When you enter, select from the list of stations and join one group for the first of two or three rounds. We will have spontaneous celebrations between rounds! Come join the fun and you may win a prize from one of our NAGC Exhibitors!

Computers & Technology Speed Geeking White River Ballroom G (First Floor) 7:30 PM – 8:30 PM “Speed Geeking” is an interactive “speed date” with selfprofessed “tech geeks” who will rocket through a series of 5-minute presentations about educational uses of some of the best technology resources for teachers. You do not want to miss this lively and interactive session that will help to energize you and update your teaching for 2013 and beyond!

Conceptual Foundations

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8 NAGC Network events on Friday evening directly follow the NAGC Celebration of Excellence and kickoff with a reception that begins at 7:00 PM.

Legacy Series Taping: “Reflections on Making a Difference” with Dorothy Sisk JW Grand Ballroom 7/8/9 (Third Floor) 3:15 PM – 4:45 PM The Conceptual Foundations Network invites you to the videotaping for the next installment in their “Portraits in Gifted Education” series. You are invited to listen in as Dorothy Sisk, director of the Gifted Center for Education and Program and endowed chair in the education of gifted students at Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas, reflects on serving high-ability students.

Arts, Creativity, STEM STEAM Carnival White River Ballroom A-D (First Floor) 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM The popular Creativity Night has joined with Arts and STEM to create a Carnival of STEAMingly creative activities event.

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Recorded Session

Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

Curriculum Studies

Research & Evaluation

Curriculum Studies Awards Night White River Ballroom H (First Floor) 7:30 PM – 8:45 PM

Research Crackerbarrel and Research Gala Room: 101/102 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM (Research Crackerbarrel) 8:15 PM – 9:00 PM (Research Gala)

Please join us in celebrating the winners of the annual NAGC Curriculum Award. Award winners will receive their award as well as present their winning curriculum. This is a great opportunity to look at high quality units and ask questions of the authors. We look forward to seeing you there!

The Research and Evaluation Network is pleased to announce our Research Crackerbarrel and Research Gala event! The evening kicks off with the Research Crackerbarrel event from 7:00 PM to 8:00 PM. This is an opportunity for graduate students and early-career professionals to rub elbows with some of the gifted greats and learn what makes them tick. Also, this is a great opportunity to seek advice about different aspects of the research process from prominent researchers in our field. Don’t miss out!

Global Awareness Annemarie Roeper Global Awareness Award Presentation Room: 103 7:30 PM – 9:00 PM The Global Awareness Network proudly presents the first NAGC Annemarie Roeper Global Awareness Award recognizing one individual and one organization whose efforts further develop global awareness for and by gifted children and those who are concerned with them. Annemarie Roeper, co-founder of the Global Awareness Network, held profound insights into the multifaceted inner world of gifted children and deeply understood the need to foster global awareness to reflect the unique perspectives of gifted children and to respond to their inherent concerns about the world they live in. Come celebrate the award recipients whose work embodies the legacy of Annemarie Roeper.

The graduate student research gala is an annual event sponsored by R&E and will be held from 8:15-9:00 (following the Crackerbarrel). Four categories of papers (doctoral-level completed research, doctoral-level inprogress research, non-doctoral-level completed research, and non-doctoral-level in-progress research) are submitted each summer, judged by experts in the field, and the awards are presented at the gala event. Graduate students will be available to answer questions about their research. This is a great opportunity to network and to see the work of up-andcoming researchers in the field.

Special Populations Gifted And ____________: A Celebration of Diversity White River Ballroom J (First Floor) 7:30 PM – 8:30 PM

Parent & Community The Power of Play White River Ballroom I (First Floor) 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM The Parent and Community Network invites you to come out and play. Increasingly, research is indicating that play is of paramount importance to a child’s development. If you are the parent or teacher of a gifted child, you know how focused their play can be. Please join us as we play games, work collaboratively on puzzles, explore the world of digital media, discover the adventure of geocaching, conduct experiments, make “boring books” and crafts, create and build a game, and other fun activities

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Featuring a wide range of leaders in gifted education, reflecting on their own personal experiences of working with children who are gifted AND ________, we invite you to come talk to others who are also interested in special populations of gifted children who have multiple factors in the development of their abilities.

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Network Events NAGC Network and Special Interest Group (SIG) Meetings All meetings take place at the JW Marriott Indianapolis. Please attend your Network’s open business meetings to help plan the year ahead and meet your colleagues.

THURSDAY NOVEMBER 7

3:45 PM – 4:45 PM Computers & Technology Room: 105

6:30 PM – 7:30 PM

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Assessments of Giftedness (SIG) Room: 105

GLBTQ (SIG) (Business Meeting 7:00 – 8:00 and Social 8:00 – 9:00) Room: 105

FRIDAY NOVEMBER 8

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 9

9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Special Schools & Programs Room: 105 Counseling & Guidance Room: 106

8:00 AM - 9:00 AM STEM Room: 105

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

Parent & Community Room: 105 Professional Development Room: 106

Global Awareness Room: 105 Conceptual Foundations Room: 106

12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

11:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Curriculum Studies Room: 105 Early Childhood Room: 106

Research and Evaluation Room: 105

12:45 PM – 1:30 PM Research and Evaluation Work Session Room: 105

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM Special Populations Room: 105 Professional Development Work Session Room: 106

12:30 PM - 1:30 PM Twice-Exceptional (SIG) Room: 107

2:45 PM - 3:45 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

Middle Grades Room: 105

Arts Room: 105

3:00 PM – 4:00 PM Creativity Room: 105

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JAVITS-FRASIER SCHOLARSHIP FUND FOR DIVERSE TALENT DEVELOPMENT The National Association for Gifted Children Javits-Frasier Scholarship Fund for Diverse Talent Development seeks to:

Congratulations to the 2013 Javits-Frasier Scholars •

Lindsay Black, Kansas

Joyce Greco-Foster, Florida

 Identify passionate and innovative teachers and counselors in communities across the country where students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds have been underrepresented in gifted programs, and

Lacy McIntosh, Kansas

Chris Pauling, Florida

Angela West, Florida

 Impart scholarships to teachers and counselors from Title I schools to receive professional development focused on advanced students at the NAGC Annual Convention.

Molly Beam, Ohio

Catherine Ensell, Ohio

Lori Martin, Kansas

Mimi Pearle, New York

Andrea Witt, Georgia

Lisa Friend-Kalupa, Wisconsin

Bethany Spratley, New Mexico

 Increase culturally and linguistically diverse students’ access to talent development opportunities through educator training and support related to equity and excellence in gifted education,

In classrooms today the problems are real, the gap is wide.

Thanks to these Scholar Mentors

Dina Brulles, Kristina Collins, Tarek Grantham, Steve Hass, Tiombe Kendrick, Kim Landsdowne, Kathy Marks, Chrystyna Mursky, Valerie Tuck, Gyimah Whitaker, Frank Worrell, Jeff Danielian

Support the Javits-Frasier Scholarship Fund 1. Contribute as an individual. Our fundraising goal is to thank our continuing supporters and at least 50 new Fund contributors at each NAGC Annual Convention.

2. Contribute as a organization or corporation. Think about ways in which a group to which you belong or employed by can pool their donations.

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3. Nominate a teacher or counselor from a Title I school to receive the scholarship next year. In early 2014, visit www.nagc.org or call 202/785-4268 for an application. Application deadline is mid May.

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Special Thanks NAGC PROGRAM COMMITTEE Chair Tracy L. Cross Virginia Burney Shelagh Gallagher Ellen Honeck Susan Scheibel Helaine Zinaman

Jeff Danielian Tim Gott Amy Marschand Kristie Speirs Neumeister

INDIANA LOCAL ARRANGEMENTS COMMITTEE Co-Chairs: Virginia Burney | Amy Marschand | Kristie Speirs Neumeister Marcia Gentry Jamie MacDougall

Miki Hamstra Lisa Sarjeant Kathy Steele

NAGC NETWORK LEADERSHIP Arts John Gaa, Chair Hope “Bess” Wilson, Chair Elect

Creativity Laurie Abeel, Chair Kyung-Hee Kim, Chair Elect

Computers & Technology Cindy Sheets, Chair Kristina Ayers Paul, Chair Elect

Curriculum Studies Jennifer Beasley, Chair Leighann Pennington, Chair Elect Early Childhood Ellen Honeck, Chair Laura Beltchenko, Chair Elect

Conceptual Foundations Erin M. Miller, Chair Jennifer Riedl Cross, Chair Elect Counseling & Guidance Bronwyn MacFarlane, Chair Angela Housand, Chair Elect

Global Awareness Anne Beneventi, Chair Sharon Slodounik, Chair Elect

Middle Grades Wendy Miner, Chair Jamie MacDougall, Chair Elect

Special Populations Claire Hughes, Chair Wendy Leader, Chair Elect

Parent & Community Nancy Arey Cohen, Chair Keri Guilbault, Chair Elect

Special Schools & Programs Carol Carter, Chair Shannon Jones, Chair Elect

Professional Development Connie Phelps, Chair

STEM Scott Chamberlin, Chair Eric Mann, Chair Elect

Research & Evaluation Jill Adelson, Chair Megan Foley Nicpon, Chair Elect

SPECIAL INTEREST GROUPS Assessments of Giftedness Barbara Gilman, Chair

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National Association for Gifted Children

Gifted Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning (GLBTQ) Terry Friedrichs, Chair

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Twice Exceptional Lois Baldwin, Chair


With appreciation to our donors for their support of NAGC (September 1, 2012 – August 31, 2013) Katie Augustyn

Jeanne Balzuweit

Charles Beckman

Wendy A. Behrens

Jeana G. Buchanan

Virginia Burney

Tracy L. Cross

Arlene DeVries

Marcia Gentry

Kathy Jones

Catherine Little

Christine Nobbe

Paula Olszewski-Kubilius

Sylvia Rimm

Jennifer Robins

Patricia A. Schuler

Kristen Stephens

Hope E. Wilson

Marcia Wall

Andrea Wolfe David Young, IV

Javits-Frasier Scholarship Fund Donors Alexinia Baldwin

Linda Barnes-Robinson

Wendy A. Behrens

Virginia Burney

Nicholas Colangelo

Arlene DeVries

Thomas Hébert

Brian Housand

Lauri Kirsch

Sally C. Krisel

Joy Lawson Davis

Joseph Renzulli

Judith Roseberry

Mary Grace Stewart

Council of State Directors of Programs for the Gifted Pearson

A. Harry Passow Classroom Teacher Scholarship Fund Donors Noriko Chandler

Ann Robinson

SUPPORT THE NAGC ANNUAL FUND Your vital Annual Fund gift will help NAGC increase and expand its ability to reach students, parents, teachers and administrators through the following initiatives: • Teacher scholarships • Educational resource materials • Webinars and briefings on cutting edge issues • Research on low-income, high ability learners • Dissemination of gifted education best practices • Public education and advocacy • Resources and materials for parents Visit the NAGC Annual Fund Booth right outside the exhibit hall to make your pledge to donate and join us for the Donor Reception on Saturday, 6:00 – 7:00 PM, Room 314.

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Special Thanks Strand Reviewers Thousands of Convention proposals are submitted each year for consideration by the NAGC Network Strand Reviewers. The following individuals gave of their time to make certain that the Convention content is balanced and relevant, presenting diverse viewpoints in the field of gifted education. Arts

Counseling & Guidance

Magdalena Fitzsimmmons John Gaa, 2013 Program Chair Phillip Horne Sue Jackson Kelly Lee Michelle Matteis Nan Ochs Richard Olenchak Mayra Spont Missy Sullivan Juliana Tay Bess Wilson

Carrie Lynn Bailey Richard Cash Lori Flint Tom Greenspon Merla Hammack Malik Henfield Angela Housand, 2013 Program Chair P. Susan Jackson SaDohl Jones Stephanie K. Ferguson Cindi Lardner Maxine Levy Linda Livingston Bronwyn MacFarlane Michelle Muratori Jennifer Riedl Cross Wenda Sheard Debbie Troxclair Doreen Underwood

Computers & Technology Gerald Aungst April Coleman Tisha Duncan Brian Housand Kathy Ray Cindy Sheets Jennifer Troester, 2013 Program Chair

Conceptual Foundations Nora Cohen David Dai Stephanie Ferguson Michele Kane Kathi Kearney Derek Little Julie McDonald Erin Miller, 2013 Program Chair Jennifer Robins Bob Schultz Wenda Sheard William Southern Sandra Tanner

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Creativity Laurie Abeel Gae Anderson-Miller Ki Byung Chae Yiling Cheng Steve Coxon Bonnie Cramond Cindy Dwyer Maya Edgar Elizabeth Fairweather Kuba Glaze Sonya Hanson Murray Kyle Hartley Chi Huang Garrett Jaeger Kyung-Hee Kim, 2013 Program Chair Kathryn Kyd Wendy Leader Jonathan Leavitt

National Association for Gifted Children

Sakhavat Mammadov Stuart Omdal Meera Rastogi Gayle Roege Marianne Solomon Sarah Sumners Paula Thomson Michael Tomlinson Kristy Wagner James Weiner Alicia Michelle Welch Billie Woodel

Curriculum Studies Leigh Anne Akey Renee Bailey Jennifer Beasley, 2013 Program Chair Randee Blaire Norma Blecker Micah Bruce-Davis Kim Chandler Patti Coughlan Tresha Dipasquale Felicia Dixon Gwen Frank Elizabeth Hahn Paige Hendricks Chrystie Hill Paula Hinson Shannon Jones Bertie Kingore Eleni Liakaris Jennifer Martinez Cindy Massicotte Susan McPherson Theresa Newsom Angela Novak Roxanne Peer Leighann Pennington Kathryn Picanco Joann Price

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Jeb Puryear Matthew Reames Susannah Richards Shelly Sinclair Maggie Smith Burak Turkman

Early Childhood Jeanine Jechura Pam Clinkenbeard Denise Drain Barb Dullaghan, 2013 Program Chair Ellen Honeck Vidisha Patel Eileen Rutter Erika Tunson

Global Awareness Kate Bachtel Kathy Dustin Jenny Fredrickson Amy Gaesser Donna Hulsey Barbara Mitchell Hutton, 2013 Program Chair Karen Kimball Kelly Parks Linda Pfeiffer

Middle Grades Marla Capper Christine Deitz Patti Drapeau, 2013 Program Chair Jamie MacDougall Wendy Miner Barbara Prichard Susan Rakow Suzannah Richards Jennifer Rosenberg


Parent & Community Janet Chen Nancy Arey Cohen, 2013 Program Chair Debbie Dailey Susan Dulong Langley Keri Guilbault Katie Haydon Kathy Jones Christy McGee Stacia Taylor

Professional Development Kristina Ayers Paul Ann Batenburg Laura Beltchenko Lori Bland Catherine Brighton Dina Brulles Deborah Burnette Lori Comallie-Caplan Melanie Crawford Laurie Croft Beth Cross Sharon Dole Shirley Farrell Elizabeth Fogarty, 2013 Program Chair Debbie Gonzales Rebekah Hanson Sue Harvey Diane Heacox Kelly Hedrick Ashley Hines Gail Hubbard Clark Kopelman Julie Lamb Milligan Kimberly Lansdowne Catherine Little Wayne Lord Angela Lycan Kristy Mall Michelle Matteis Jason McIntosh Kirstin Miller Connie Phelps Brian Reid Linda Robinson Barbara Swicord

Toni Szymanski Joan Whitesides Patricia Woodberry

Research & Evaluation Cheryll Adams Stephanie Aubertin Carolyn Barber Rima Binder Janette Boazman Cecelia Boswell Annalissa Brodersen Kimberly Brownlee Jaclyn Cancey Linda Collins Alicia Cotabish Megan Foley Nicpon Reva Friedman Isabelle Gettys Crowder Nancy Hertzog Angela Housand Jennifer Jolly Jae Jung Chin-Wen Lee Matthew Makel, 2013 Program Chair Marcella Mandracchia Angie Miller Rachelle Miller Tracy Missett Jane Newman Sarah Oh Jill Olthouse Megan Parker Peters Connie Phelps Kianga Thomas Maria de los Dolores Valadez Russell Warne Hope Wilson Frank Worrell

Special Populations

Steve Coxon Ken Dickson Shirley Farrell Gwen Frank Matt Fugate Scott Furtwengler Jake Giessman Yvette Gittens Anne Gray Tarek Grantham, 2013 Program Chair Steven Haas Lisa Hancock-Rehrig Cindy Hansen Heidi Huey Claire Hughes Joan Jacobs Layne Kalbfleisch Beth Knees Vanessa Lancaster Richard Lange Wendy Leader Chin-Wen Lee Patry Lerwick Priscilla Lurz Ruth Lyons Kathy Marks Jan Martin Renae Mayes Tracy Missett Chrys Mursky Diane Naff Terry Neu Linda Neumann Tiffany O’Neill Jennifer Robins Catherine Schreiber Dorothy Sisk Peggy Thorpe Joann Tobin Donna Westberg Becky Whittenburg

Special Schools & Programs Carol Cater Randee Blair Lenore Cortina Susan Corwith Elizabeth Daniels, 2013 Program Chair Melissa Hamby Patricia Hollingsworth Gina Lewis Ruth Lyons Nikki Myers Lisa Perrault Eileen Rutter Michelle Ryder Schoeck

STEM Lori Anderson Heather Carmody Ron Carr Tutita Casa Scott Chamberlin, 2013 Program Chair Emmy Coxbill Daphne Duncan-Wiles Janine Firmender Kathy Gavin Barbara Kerr Christopher Kolar Eric Mann Nielsen Pereira Chris Schultz Linda Sheffield Luke Shorty Rena Subotnik

Luisa Abellan-Pagnani Kudbettin Aksoy Glenna Alexander Jaime Castellano Gail Collins Linda Collins Lisa Conrad Patty Costis

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Awards and Recognition The NAGC Board of Directors invites you to join them in celebrating commitment and honoring excellence in service to NAGC and to gifted and talented children.

NAGC CELEBRATION OF EXCELLENCE Friday, November 8 | 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM | JW Marriott Indianapolis | White River Ballroom E/F

Honorees President’s Award Wendy A. Behrens | Roy A. Weaver Distinguished Scholar Award Jonathan A. Plucker Frank C. Worrell Distinguished Service Award Sidney M. Moon NAGC/Ball State Administrator Award Maurine Donavan Hollingworth Award Maggie S. Smith Early Scholar Award Elizabeth Shaunessy-Dedrick Early Leader Award Jennifer L. Jolly Community Service Award Basilio Antonio Bonilla, Jr. Doctoral Student Awards Lori Andersen | Christine Deitz | C. Matthew Fugate Cindy Massicotte | Meihua Qian Gifted Child Quarterly Paper of the Year “Examining the Effects of Gifted Programming in Mathematics and Reading Using the ECLS-K” Jill L. Adelson, D. Betsy McCoach, M. Katherine Gavin Gifted Child Quarterly, January 2012; vol. 56, pp. 25-39

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NAGC Board and Staff NAGC BOARD OF DIRECTORS Tracy L. Cross College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA President

Joy Lawson Davis Virginia Union University, Richmond, VA At-Large Member

George Betts University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO President-Elect

Brain Housand East Carolina University, Greenville, NC At-Large Member

Paula Olszewski-Kubilius Northwestern University, Evanston, IL Past President

Sally Krisel Hall County Schools, Gainesville, GA At-Large Member

Lauri Kirsch Hillsborough County Public Schools, Tampa, FL Treasurer

Catherine Little University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT At-Large Member

Christine Nobbe Center for Creative Learning, Ellisville, MO Governance Secretary

Michelle Swain Round Rock, TX State Representative

Kimberley L. Chandler College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA Network Representative

Marcia Wall Coeur d’Alene, ID Teacher Representative

Susan Dulong Langley Framingham Public Schools, Milford, MA Parent Representative

NAGC NATIONAL OFFICE STAFF • Nancy Green Executive Director • Andrew Bassett Director of Finance and Administration • Jane Clarenbach Director of Public Education • Robin Feldman Director of Professional Development and Meetings

• Carolyn Kaye Manager, Stakeholder Outreach • Adriane Wiles Membership Manager • Karen Yoho Senior Director of Marketing & Member Services

PROGRAM SUPPORT • Carolyn M. Callahan Association Editor • Jeff Danielian Teacher Resource Specialist Editor, Teaching for High Potential • Dale Greenberg Global Project Manager, ConferenceDirect®

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• Jennifer Jolly Editor, Parenting for High Potential • Jennifer Kerhin Exhibit and Advertising Sales Management • D. Betsy McCoach and Del Siegle Editors, Gifted Child Quarterly • Kathleen Nilles Manager of Parent Services and Communications

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Looking for a speaker for a state or regional conference? It’s time for you to add an expert perspective to your event! NAGC current and past board members are available to local groups, State Affiliates and other conference planners to speak on numerous topics at a significant discount off their regular honorarium fee. NAGC appreciates the support of these ESP speakers: Katie Augustyn Carol Barnes* Susan Baum George Betts Jaime Castellano* Kimberley Chandler Mary Ruth Coleman Bonnie Cramond Tracy Cross Joy Davis* Ken Dickson Felicia Dixon Shelagh Gallagher

Marcia Gentry* Kris Haslund Diane Heacox* Thomas Hébert Patricia Hollingsworth Brian Housand Sandy Kaplan Frances Karnes Lauri Kirsch* Sally Krisel* Ric Ladt Susan Dulong Langley

Jann Leppien* Chrys Mursky* Christine Nobbe Rick Olenchak Paula OlszewskiKubilius* Stuart Omdal Jean Peterson* Jane Piirto Susan Rakow Diana Reeves* Sally Reis Sylvia Rimm*

Julia Link Roberts Ann Robinson* Karen Rogers* Bob Seney* Cindy Sheets Del Siegle* Mary Slade* Kristen Stephens Michelle Swain Frank Worrell Carol Tieso

* These speakers made ESP Presentations November 1, 2012 - October 31, 2013

And thanks to these conferences that welcomed an ESP expert: • Alabama Association for Gifted Children • Arizona Association for Gifted and Talented • Arkansans for Gifted & Talented Education • Austin Public Schools • Connecticut Association for the Gifted • Hormel Symposium • Irvine Unified School District • Montana AGATE • New England Conference for Gifted and Talented Education • New Mexico Association for the Gifted • Oklahoma Association of Gifted, Creative and Talented • Orange County Council for GATE • Wisconsin Association for Talented and Gifted


Welcome to Indianapolis! Our pre-Convention days feature both the practical and the experiential. You can’t open a newspaper (or a new website) without seeing headlines about the Common Core State Standards. Our Essential program this year, “Gaining 21st Century Skills: Providing Rigor with Common Core and National Standards for High-Ability Learners,” includes an opening and closing general session, materials, lunch, and your choice of Essential topics in the morning and afternoon. The National Consortium of Specialized Secondary Schools in Math, Science and Technology (NCSSSMST) joins us again this year and kicks off their conference this evening with a reception and reverse college fair.

Wednesday Highlights ighlights

WEDNESDAY HIGHLIGHTS | NOVEMBER 6

Wednesday 6 Schedule at a Glance 7:00 AM – 6:00 PM

Registration 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

NAGC Board of Directors Meeting Room 313

6:30 PM – 9:00 PM 9:00 AM – 4:30 PM

University Network Meeting

Gifted Education Essentials

Room 103/104

“Gaining 21st Century Skills: Providing Rigor with Common Core and National Standards for High-Ability Learners” (see page 2 – separate registration required)

7:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Council of State Directors Meeting

6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

NCSSSMST Opening Reception & Reverse College Fair White River B/C/D (First Floor)

White River A (First Floor)

3:00 PM – 6:30 PM

NCSSSMST Registration Open

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Wednesday

GIFTED EDUCATION ESSENTIALS November 6, 2013 | 9:00 AM – 4:30 PM Separate Registration Required |$159 (includes lunch, publication, and handouts) 6 A Day for Practitioners Gaining 21st Century Skills: Providing Rigor with Common Core and National Standards for High-Ability Learners Authors of the recent and popular NAGC Common Core State Standards (CCSS) books on using the CCSS with gifted and advanced learners in mathematics and English Language Arts will summarize the role of standards in designing and delivering high quality programs and present new books that highlight ways to develop comprehensive, coherent, and continuous learning experiences. In addition, a team of NAGC experts has created an exciting new book, which parallels the first NAGC CCSS books, that shows ways of differentiating the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) for gifted and advanced learners in grades K-12. Sessions within each of the three subject areas will offer ideas for balanced assessments, learning experiences for typical and advanced students, integrating concepts across multiple disciplines, acceleration and enrichment, practical strategies, and implementation.

Schedule (All sessions in the JW Marriott) 9:00 AM – 9:45 AM

10:00 AM – 11:45 AM

Opening General Session National Standards and Program Design: What Every Gifted Educator Needs to Know Leaders: Susan K. Johnsen, Baylor University, Waco, TX; Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary Williamsburg, VA; Cheryll M. Adams, Ball State University, Muncie, IN; Alicia A. Cotabish, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR What have we learned about Common Core implementation to date? How is the content in the second NAGC books on Math and English Language Arts different from the first? What can we expect from the new science standards book? How do the NAGC Pre-K-12 Gifted Education Programming Standards and 21st Century Skills align with the Standards? Meet the expert teachers and learn the goals for the day’s program before you roll up your sleeves and participate in designing more rigorous activities that you can apply in the classroom and at your schools. Room: JW Grand Ballroom 7/8

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National Association for Gifted Children

(choose a session by content focus) Modifying the National Standards for High-Ability Learners: Examples and Strategies for K-12 Educators All breakouts will cover: • Tailoring learning experiences by adding depth and complexity to the standards • Specific examples of differentiated learning experiences within the standards strands • Developing assessments for the differentiated assignments

6 BREAKOUT 1 Implementing Common Core English Language Arts Standards: Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language Usage Leaders: Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Claire E. Hughes, Ph.D., College of Coastal Georgia, St. Simons Island, GA ; Todd Kettler, University of North Texas, Denton, TX ; Elizabeth ShaunessyDedrick, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL Learn how to effectively differentiate English Language Arts standards for advanced and gifted students through the use

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Poster Session

NCSSSMST

of acceleration, depth, complexity, and creativity within and across grade levels. • Hear a wide arrange of examples across the information text and literary text standards • Obtain guidance on text selection for advanced learners at all grade levels • Understand strategies for effective classroom management and assessment, as well as building scope and sequence experiences. • Hear from a panel of Indiana teachers who will describe their units of study, based on the common core, that have been piloted and field-tested. Indiana teachers: Monica Plantan, 6th grade teacher, Zionsville Schools; Jen Conley, Instructional Coach, Carmel Clay Schools; Doris Fulwider, 1st grade, Crawfordsville Schools Room: JW Grand Ballroom 10

6 BREAKOUT 2 Implementing Common Core Mathematics Standards: Measurement and Data, and Statistics and Probability Leaders: Susan K. Johnsen, Ph.D., Baylor University, Waco, TX; Susan Assouline, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA ; Gail R. Ryser, Texas State University, Austin, TX Featuring classroom examples and a sequence of activities, you will discuss opportunities to interweave the domains of data and measurement and statistics and probability throughout elementary, middle, and high school as well as in advanced courses. • Discuss informal, traditional, and off-level assessments critical to making informed decisions about placement and programming. • Gain insight into ways to accelerate and enrich the CCSS mathematics standards • Take away practical ideas for implementing the Math standards for gifted and advanced learners. Room: JW Grand Ballroom 9

Roundtable

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6 BREAKOUT 3 Using the Next Generation Science Standards — Alignment to 21st Century Skills, Talent Trajectories: Creating Pathways to Excellence in Science, Science Resources; Differentiating NGSS for GT and Advanced Learners Leaders: Cheryll M. Adams, Ph.D., Ball State University, Muncie, IN; Alicia A. Cotabish, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR; Mary Cay Ricci, Baltimore County Public Schools, Baltimore, MD Learn how to provide rigor within the new national standards to allow students to demonstrate higher level thinking, reasoning, problem solving, passion, and inventiveness in science. • Explore specific examples of differentiated activities in science for high-ability learners • Teach students to develop skills, habits of mind, and attitudes toward learning needed to reach high levels of competency • Take home science resources and evidence-based practices for use in the classroom

Wednesday

Recorded Session

Room: 101/102

12:00 PM – 1:15 PM Networking Luncheon Room: JW Grand Ballroom 7/8

1:30 PM – 3:30 PM Modifying National Standards and Common Core for High-Ability Learners (continued) (choose a session in this timeframe)

6 BREAKOUT 1 Implementing Common Core English Language Arts Standards: Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language Usage Leaders: Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Claire E. Hughes, Ph.D., College of Coastal Georgia, St. Simons Island, GA ; Todd Kettler, University of North Texas, Denton, TX ; Elizabeth ShaunessyDedrick, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL Room: JW Grand Ballroom 10

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Wednesday

3:45 PM – 4:30 PM 6 BREAKOUT 2: Implementing Common Core Mathematics Standards: Data, and Statistics and Probability Leaders: Susan K. Johnsen, Ph.D., Baylor University, Waco, TX; Susan Assouline, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA ; Gail R. Ryser, Texas State University, Austin, TX Room: JW Grand Ballroom 9

6 BREAKOUT 3 Using the Next Generation Science Standards with Gifted and Advanced Learners — Alignment to 21st Century Skills, Talent Trajectories: Creating Pathways to Excellence in Science, Science Resources; Differentiating NGSS for GT and Advanced Learners Leaders: Cheryll M. Adams, Ph.D., Ball State University, Muncie, IN; Alicia A. Cotabish, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR; Mary Cay Ricci, Baltimore County Public Schools, Baltimore, MD

Closing General Session Ensuring Success: Your Leadership Role in Implementing National and Common Core Standards for Gifted and Advanced Learners All Leaders Gather to assess and examine the day’s learning objectives and results, and share key takeaways with your colleagues. Discuss how you and other gifted education professionals can play a leadership role in helping to implement differentiation strategies for gifted students within the Standards framework. Finally, take advantage of this opportunity to ask the experts any lingering questions. Room: JW Grand Ballroom 7/8

Room: 101/102

A Note about Handouts We are grateful to our convention presenters, many of whom provide handouts to those attending their sessions. NAGC gave presenters the additional opportunity to make their handouts available on the NAGC Convention website www.eventscribe.com/2013/NAGC/. In addition, session recordings will be available on the NAGC Live Learning Center in mid December and accessible free of charge to registered Convention attendees through June 2014. Just visit www.nagc.org/livelearningcenter.aspx.

If you have any questions, stop by NAGC Central Booth 321

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National Association for Gifted Children

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Please Join Us The NAGC Conceptual Foundations Legacy Series Continues a Dorothy Sisk Videotaping for the Next Offering in the Portraits in Gifted Education: The Legacy Series Friday, November 8 | 3:15 – 4:45 pm Grand Ballroom 7/8/9 The NAGC Conceptual Foundations Network, in concert with NAGC, continues to capture in video notable gifted advocates, researchers, and leaders in order to preserve their legacy for future generations. For our seventh annual videotaping, you are invited to share in a dialogue with Dorothy Sisk. Dr. Sisk holds an endowed chair in the education of gifted students at Lamar University in Beaumont, TX, where she is the director of the Gifted Center for Education and Programs. She served as the Director of the U.S. Office of Gifted and Talented and built the foundation for the field by increasing the number of state leaders who were professionally trained in gifted education. We are honored to have the opportunity to interview Dr. Sisk and allow her to share her insights and experiences with all NAGC attendees.


Thursday Keynote

THURSDAY – KEYNOTE | NOVEMBER 8

Dr. Milton Chen Senior Fellow and Executive Director, Emeritus at The George Lucas Educational Foundation (GLEF)

6 The Six Edges of Education Innovation Dr. Milton Chen, senior fellow and executive director, emeritus at The George Lucas Educational Foundation, will share examples of how 21st century schools are redesigning learning from Edutopia. org, the Foundation’s multimedia website. Utilizing the framework of his book, Education Nation, he will describe The Six Edges of Innovation: Dr. Chen will also address how these Edges enable gifted education to address “the whole gifted child’ and address the multiple intelligences of every learner.

Sponsored by

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This is the first “official” day of the largest annual event dedicated to gifted and talented education. Yet, just in the past 24 hours, the NAGC board of directors has been planning for the future, and still more friends of GT education learned how to design and deliver rigorous programs within the new Common Core State Standards. Buckle up for excellent programming! Action Labs take off for a day of experimental learning (Pre-registration required). Gifted Applications in the Classroom: Critical Issues and Models for Delivering Successful Programs and Services offers a more in-depth examination of gifted education applications in your area of interest. Lunch and materials are included in your registration fee. Space may still be available, so stop by the Registration Desk. If you’re interested in secondary school STEM issues, make plans to attend the NCSSSMST Conference concurrent sessions today. An additional fee is charged for materials, breaks, and lunch. (see pages xx-xx)

Thursday Highlights

THURSDAY HIGHLIGHTS | NOVEMBER 7

Find out what’s new in the field of gifted and talented education at the Exhibit Hall Opening Reception. Enjoy light refreshments as you take a walk through the exhibits. Make a point to talk to the exhibitors and discover a new resource or tool, or two or three!

Thursday 6 Schedule at a Glance 7:00 AM – 6:00 PM

2:00 PM – 2:30 PM

Registration open

First-timers Orientation JW Grand Ballroom 8 (Third Floor)

7:15 AM – 2:45 PM 3:00 PM – 4:30 PM

NCSSSMST Conference

Opening General Session “The Six Edges of Education Innovation” with Milton Chen White River Ballroom A-J (First Floor)

7:15 AM – 7:45 AM Action Labs Orientation JW Grand Ballroom 7/8 (Third Floor)

4:30 PM – 6:30 PM 7:45 AM – 2:30 PM Action Labs (Vans/Buses leave from Event Center Drive, 1st floor)

Exhibit Hall Opening Reception JW Grand Ballroom 1-6 (Third Floor)

6:30 PM – 7:00 PM 8:00 AM – 2:30 PM

NAGC Annual Business Meeting

Gifted Education Applications: Critical Issues and Models for Delivering Successful Programs and Services (separate registration required)

60th Annual Convention

0 November 7-10, 2013 0 Indianapolis, IN 0 www.nagc.org

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Thursday

THURSDAY PRE-CONVENTION: APPLICATIONS November 7 | 8:00 AM – 2:30 PM 6 Gifted Education Applications Gifted Education Applications: Critical Issues and Models for Delivering Successful Programs and Services Choose from topics designed to offer a more specialized approach to gifted education applications in your area of expertise. Whether you are an administrator or experienced gifted coordinator, or a classroom teacher, you’re sure to find something to increase your knowledge and advance your understanding! 8:00 – 9:00 AM

9:15 – 11:15 AM

Opening General Session State of the Nation in Gifted Education Paula M. Olszewski-Kubilius, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; Nancy Green, NAGC, Washington, DC Whatever your role in education, information about the national picture can make you more effective. What are the major national issues facing gifted education? What trends will affect the future of service delivery? What tools and resources are available to make you a better advocate and a more informed leader? Come away with a better understanding of the U.S. landscape, and resources available that can help you support gifted students.

Breakout Sessions

11:30 AM – 12:30 PM Networking Luncheon

12:30 – 2:30 PM Breakout Sessions Thursday’s topics have been identified as critical by leaders in gifted education. In order to tailor your experience, please choose one breakout session that best meets your needs in each of the two time slots.

Room: JW Grand Ballroom 9/10

Morning Sessions | 9:15 – 11:15 AM

T1

Beyond the Core: Infusing Critical and Creative Thinking into the Curriculum Susan Dulong Langley, Framingham Public Schools, Framingham, MA The Common Core State Standards developers acknowledge that the Standards do not define the intervention methods or materials necessary to support students who are well above grade-level expectations, and state that the Standards are a call to take the next step. What, then, is the next step? Explore strategies in curriculum and lesson design to establish essential elements, develop preformative and summative assessments to inform instruction, tier by cognitive complexity, and infuse creative-thinking skills. Room: 103

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National Association for Gifted Children

T2

Shared Reading Experience: How a Schoolwide Book Club Meets the Learning Needs of All Students While Strengthening the School Community Kathleen M. Poe, Theresa Petrick, Kenston Local School District, Chagrin Falls, OH With limited resources available and the increasing demand for rigor and relevance, how can a school create an enriching experience that addresses the learning needs of all students, including high-ability learners? Using a structure called “One School, One Book,” school principals and teachers can create a four- to six-week learning experience that addresses Common Core standards and extensive cross-curricular opportunities, builds community within the student and parent community, and has a

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capacity to extend instruction in order to challenge the most capable students. “When a whole school reads a book, there’s a lot to talk about.” (www.readtothem.org)

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

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Creating Transcendent & Trustful Relationships for Multicultural Classrooms through Literature Joy L. Davis, University of Louisiana, Lafayette, LA

Room: 206

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A Step Forward for Including Gifted Learners as Active Participants in Gifted Education George Betts, University of Northern Colorado, Greely, CO; Robin J. Carey, Douglas County School District, Castle Rock, CO; Blanche Kapushion, Jefferson County Public Schools, Golden, CO The Jefferson County Public Schools is implementing the Autonomous Learner Model (ALM) for all gifted learners involved in the district program and has included gifted learners at the center of the ALM, programming differentiation, and planning. Participants will receive specific steps to develop this approach in their schools and districts through a short presentation, role-playing with a learner, and specific instruments to use when they return home to begin the implementation. Small group work will be included so that synthesis will begin at the presentation. Room: 205

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Challenging and Supporting TwiceExceptional Learners through Frustration to Success Beverly A. Trail, Regis University, Henderson, CO Twice-exceptional children possess a unique combination of characteristics that can include incredible strengths and debilitating weaknesses. This presentation provides an expert perspective on how educators can implement interventions from both gifted and special education to meet these diverse needs. Participants will leave with everything they need to develop a comprehensive plan that addresses the child’s cognitive, academic, social, and emotional needs. This plan will include gifted and special education research-based interventions proven effective in developing the child’s potential and specific interventions to remediate skills in areas of weakness while developing skills in areas of strength.

The presentation will share a unit on Trust & Transcendence designed to nurture cross-racial relationships through Multicultural literature. Using the work of Langston Hughes, Tupac Shakur, Walter Dean Myers, Martin Luther King, Amy Tan, Sandra Cisneros, James Baldwin, Zora Neale Hurston, Maya Angelou, and others the presenter will demonstrate high-content, high-interest, culturally responsive lesson building that can be replicated in classrooms anywhere. The cross-grade level lessons designed will exemplify evidencebased practices in gifted education, be aligned with the English language Arts Common Core Standards, and be of high interest to pre-adolescent and adolescent learners from all cultural backgrounds.

Thursday

Recorded Session

Room: 203

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Delivering Specialized Instruction: Incorporating Second Language Education within Gifted Curriculum and Program Models Bronwyn MacFarlane, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR Unlike any other component of the curriculum, second language education literally opens up the world of possibilities for learners. Discover methods and materials for incorporating second language education within differentiated learning opportunities. Timid about a second language? Remember, the most inspiring educators motivate students to higher levels of performance with their own quests for life-long learning. In addition to traditional practices, the development of 21st century skills requires new types of literacy and linguistic instruction. Join this session focused on how educators can incorporate second language education within gifted curriculum and program models. Room: 202

Room: 204

60th Annual Convention

0 November 7-10, 2013 0 Indianapolis, IN 0 www.nagc.org

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Developing Talent in the STEM Fields in the Era of the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics (CCSS-M) and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) Linda Sheffield, Northern Kentucky University, Fort Thomas, KY; Scott A. Chamberlin, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY The Common Core State Standards in Mathematics (CCSS-M) and Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) stress rigor, depth, clarity, and coherence, but fall short of meeting GT students’ needs. In this session, participants will explore the CCSS-M and the NGSS and researchbased strategies, innovation, curriculum, and resources for serving diverse, promising STEM students. Participants will choose from roundtable groups as they actively investigate approaches to support and develop K-12 STEM students, and discuss current issues and implications of national initiatives with STEM experts.

high levels of student thinking and student learning? This session explores some of what we know about asking questions and listening to answers as key components of fostering strong thinking and discourse in the classroom. We will explore research on questioning in the classroom from inside and outside the field of gifted education, and we will discuss practical classroom applications of various questioning models and frameworks. We will also discuss ways of promoting professional development and reflection related to questioning practices, including suggestions for analyzing discussion, reflecting on listening, and encouraging elaboration in student responses. Room: 107

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Gifted Education Programming: A Sherpa Guiding Everyone to New Heights Sally C. Krisel, Hall County Schools, Gainesville, GA

Room: 201

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Everyone At The Table: How an Interdisciplinary Certificate in Creativity and Innovation Provides and Assures What it Promises. Bonnie Cramond, Sarah Sumners, Garrett Jaeger, University of Georgia, Athens, GA The rapidly increasing interest in creativity has cracked a levee of conventionality and standardization in workplaces and classrooms. This wave of inspired solutions to organizational and educational innovation often neglects a field of creativity research in its wake. We will share details of an interdisciplinary certificate in creativity and innovation that addresses the knowledge, skills, and dispositions frequently associated with the provocative words in its title, while also integrating a battery of assessments to assure it does what it promises. Now, don’t think this is solely an ivory tower endeavor. This model is transferrable to middle and high school students. Room: 108

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Questions and Answers and What Happens in Between: Examining HigherLevel Questioning in Instructional Practice Catherine Little, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT Gifted education experts have long emphasized the importance of high-level and high-quality questioning and discussion in the classroom to challenge advanced learners. Yet what do we really mean when we talk about this type of questioning, and what does it look like in action? Perhaps more importantly, how can we work on examining our questioning practices and strengthening them to promote

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National Association for Gifted Children

Refusing to focus on “adequacy” or take a deficiency view of children from diverse backgrounds, Hall County educators have chosen a pull-from-the-top approach to achievement. Systematically and collaboratively, they are developing challenging programs with roots in gifted education that allow teachers to recognize and develop gifts and talents in students from diverse populations. Included in this session will be discussion of highly personalized programming options, use of innovative technologies to add curriculum depth and complexity, and a district-wide reconceptualization of Response to Intervention. Learn about this counter-intuitive approach and start identifying potential Sherpa guides for your school or school system. Room: 104

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Paving the Road to Personalized Learning Marcia L. Wall , Coeur d Alene, ID Successful implementation of personalized learning involves a combination of creating good program options and establishing policies that remove any roadblocks to those choices. Extended Learning Internship is a program option that gives students freedom of choice for studies, while still lending a structure that guides learning. High performing students with more eclectic interests may require exposure to different forms of instruction than typical school curricula offers. Students often long for some control over their learning. Extended Learning Internship combines research, goal setting, and a mentor connection that takes the depth of the experience beyond fulfilling learning goals. Structuring programs that give students freedom while guiding them through their learning can be tricky. This

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session provides participants with a detailed framework and materials to create an independent study mentorship class that can work in small and large school settings. Examples and resources for creating policies to remove roadblocks to good learning options and pave the way for personalized learning will also be provided.

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

Socratic seminars in their classroom using TED talks as “text.” Examples of how to engage students with the text, craft thought-provoking questions, and design pre/ post seminar tasks will be shared along with classroom management ideas to help it all run smoothly. Room: 106

Room: 105

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Socratic Seminars Using TED Talks Michelle Swain, Round Rock ISD, Round Rock, TX

Socratic seminars are a highly engaging form of scholarly discourse for all ages. This session will provide participants with the knowledge and skills to successfully conduct

11:15 AM – 12:15 PM

Thursday

Recorded Session

Networking Lunch Room: JW Grand Ballroom 9/10

Afternoon Sessions | 12:30 – 2:15 PM

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Driving Achievement in English Language Arts through Curricular Interventions: Tools and Strategies for Use with Elementary Gifted Students Kimberley L. Chandler, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA The current emphasis on 21st century skills and rigorous standards in English Language Arts has resulted in a reexamination of the nature of appropriate curriculum for use with gifted students. In this interactive session, the presenter will discuss essential components of a highquality ELA curriculum for use with elementary gifted children: literature selections, non-fiction works including informational text, writing, research, language study, and oral communication. Information about choosing effective strategies tied to the curriculum will be discussed. Resources targeting the cognitive needs of verbally talented learners will be presented, along with ideas for vertical articulation across the elementary grades.

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Driving Positive Change: Leadership is the Key! Lauri Kirsch, Hillsborough County Public Schools, Tampa, FL Forward movement in gifted education requires more than just good ideas. Leadership is the key for shifting into high gear and bringing about positive change. Within our classrooms, districts, and communities are future leaders who must prepare to face the challenges, disparities, and ambiguities of the times. Attend this session to explore your own leadership potential and leave with ideas and resources that will help you put ideas into action and avoid spinning your wheels! Room: 105

Room: 103

60th Annual Convention

0 November 7-10, 2013 0 Indianapolis, IN 0 www.nagc.org

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Fueling Achievement Through the Evaluation of Potential Creativity Assessment in Gifted Children Todd Lubart, Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France; Connie L. Phelps, Emporia State University, Emporia, KS

Making a Difference: Steps to Reversing Underachievement Sylvia Rimm, Family Achievement Clinic, North Olmsted, OH; Del Siegle, D. Betsy McCoach, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

This interactive application session discusses the achievement of elementary and middle school gifted children using a user-friendly assessment instrument, the Evaluation of Potential Creativity (EPoC) test. This battery measures creative giftedness using two key modes of creative cognition: Divergent-Exploratory Thinking and ConvergentIntegrative Thinking through a series of eight verbal and graphic subtasks administered during two 45-minute sessions. The subtests are scored using an Internet-based system to generate student profiles that provide data for educators to evaluate and diagnose creative potential in school-aged children as they plan instruction to increase achievement of creatively gifted learners.

The underachievement of academically able students frustrates both parents and teachers. In this session we will share strategies for reversing the epidemic of underachievement that exists in today’s schools. We will discuss how to tell if a child is underachieving, ways that parents and schools might be unintentionally contributing to underachievement, how parents and educators can work together to reverse underachievement, and techniques to help children take more responsibility for themselves.

Room: 107

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Lifelines! Differentiation with Biography Ann Robinson, Merve Topak Jamsran, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR Teachers need lifelines to keep afloat in a busy classroom! The Common Core calls for more non-fiction reading. The NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Standards specifically note that biography meets the needs of gifted students. Whether you teach art, science, history, music, or math, there are highinterest, creative biographies you can use to differentiate any curriculum unit. Participate in engaging activities focused on talent development. Review exemplary biographies and teaching guides for grades K-8. Master the steps for creating your own guide, a Blueprint for Biography, for your favorite children’s biography. Take home a bibliography of recommended biographies. You’ll be surrounded by rich resources. Make biography your lifeline to differentiation.

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Room: 104

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Beyond the Newberry! Highlights of Recently Published Books for Highly Able Students Susannah Richards, Eastern Connecticut State University, Storrs, CT Encourage students to be life-long readers by exposing them to fabulous literature. Gleaning from examples of this year’s best literature choices for children, this session explores strategies and curriculum ideas geared toward high-ability learners in elementary and middle grades. This session offers insight into selecting appropriate literature for gifted students, strategies for differentiating curriculum, and writing ideas that stimulate creative and critical-thinking abilities. Resources include a bibliography of suggested literature choices. Room: 203

Room: 106

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National Association for Gifted Children

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REMIX! Content + Creativity + Technology Brian Housand, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC; Ian Byrd, Seal Beach, CA

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Mark Twain suggested there are no new ideas. Instead we place existing ideas into a “mental kaleidoscope” that is turned until something new and curious is created. Today’s youth have been raised in a culture where it seems that everything is a remix. A plethora of tech tools are available for the sole purpose of putting a new spin on existing ideas, products, and performances. Utilizing both classic literature and popular media, this session taps into the creative potential of gifted students and offers a menu of technology infused product choices and lessons designed to help students create something big!

Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate are commendable programs that offer advanced content for academically talented students. However, these programs alone are not adequate for addressing the holistic needs of gifted secondary students. Secondary gifted students require a range of services including sophisticated academic programming, as well as enhanced social/ emotional guidance and post-secondary and career advice. This session will demonstrate how to increase rigor in general education courses, with an emphasis on “differentiating up” for honors level courses. Participants will be offered programming methods for guidance and advising to prepare gifted secondary students for success in post-secondary and beyond.

Room: 202

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Robotics in the Classroom... Shifting STEAM into High Gear Christine Nobbe, Webster University, St. Louis, MO; Nicholas Kirschman, Webster Groves High School, Webster Groves, MO Robotics is an effective and popular STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math) topic for gifted learners of all ages. Robotic engineering allows students the opportunity to struggle with a problem, defend their engineering and programing decisions, and explain their answer in their own words and drawings. Join two veteran teachers, who teach grades 2-12, in a discussion of the joys and perils of starting a robotics program, whether it is part of the K-12 curriculum or a club. Recommendations on curriculum, hardware, sensors, and budget will be addressed. Participants will complete hands-on activities with several robots. (Limited to 20 participants) Room: 108

Secondary Programming for Gifted Students: Beyond AP and IB Richard M. Cash, Bloomington Pubic Schools, Bloomington, MN

Thursday

Recorded Session

Room: 206

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The Schoolwide Enrichment Model: Applying the Pedagogy of Gifted Education to Total School Improvement Joseph S. Renzulli, Sally M. Reis, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT This session summarizes research and practice on The Schoolwide Enrichment Model and specific strategies for implementing a model that is used in thousands of schools across the world. The model, based on four decades of research, practice, and development, is a comprehensive system for infusing “high-end learning” into total school enrichment efforts while simultaneously challenging gifted and talented students. The SEM has, at its core, 21st century skills such as critical and creative-problem skills as well as creative productivity, inventiveness, and innovation. Room: 204

60th Annual Convention

0 November 7-10, 2013 0 Indianapolis, IN 0 www.nagc.org

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Identifying and Nurturing Young Gifted Learners in the 21st Century Ellen Honeck, Institute for the Development of Gifted Education, Denver, CO; Bertie Kingore, P A Publishing, Austin, TX; Jack A. Naglieri, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA; Mary Ruth Coleman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC

T24

Sixty years ago NAGC emerged as a new organization advocating for gifted children. At that time, young gifted and potentially gifted children were largely ignored, as existing gifted identification procedures were typically limited to upper elementary and secondary grades. In the main, children identified as gifted were older, urban, White or Asian, middle or upper class, and high achievers. It’s time to move forward. Join a panel of experts examining the research basis and best practices that ensure that identification is equitable for all primary children. Discuss identification strategies and applications proven effective and efficient with young and underserved gifted learners.

The Common Core State Standards in Mathematics (CCSS-M) and Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) stress rigor, depth, clarity, and coherence, but fall short of meeting GT students’ needs. In this session, participants explore the CCSS-M and the NGSS and research-based strategies, innovation, curriculum, and resources for serving diverse, promising STEM students. Participants choose from roundtable groups as they actively investigate approaches to support and develop K-12 STEM students, and discuss current issues and implications of national initiatives with STEM experts. This session focuses on grades 6-12.

Room: 205

Room: 201

Developing Talent in the STEM Fields in the Era of the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics and the Next Generation Science Standards; 6-12 Linda Jensen Sheffield, Northern Kentucky University, Fort Thomas, KY; Scott A. Chamberlin, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY

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NCSSSMST ANNUAL PROFESSIONAL CONFERENCE November 7 | 8:15 AM – 2:45 PM National Consortium of Specialized Secondary Schools in Math, Science, and Technology (NCSSSMST) is the nation’s alliance of secondary schools and programs preparing students for success and leadership in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. It seeks to serve its members’ students and professionals, to foster collaborations, to inform STEM policy, and to advocate transformation in education.

8:15 AM – 9:15 AM An Engineering Design Competition Model to Engage Gifted Learners in the Next Generation Science Standards Amanda D. Baskett, Rockdale Magnet School for Science and Technology, Covington, GA The expectations in science classrooms are changing through the Next Generation Science Standards. One of the biggest potential conceptual shifts from traditional science standards is an embedding of engineering design and the roles of science, engineering, and technology in society. This session presents the results of a pilot program designed to address these needs in collaboration with Georgia Tech.

Best Practices in Advising and Accountability for Student Support Professionals at Residential Schools Mallory Melton, Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science, Bowling Green, KY Recognizing and meeting students’ academic and emotional needs is a unique challenge at residential secondary schools. Examine how residential school faculty and staff can collaborate to create and maintain support measures that facilitate executive functioning and improved academic performance.

Thursday – NCSSSMST

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: 303

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - High School, Parents Room: 301

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Thursday – NCSSS NCSSSMST

8:15 AM – 9:15 AM (Cont.) Best Practices in Counseling Talented Students: Revisiting Carl Rogers and Leta Hollingworth’s Client-Centered Approach in the Counseling Program at a STEM High School for the Gifted Kathryn Grubbs, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy, Aurora, IL Let’s get back to our roots! Whether you are a counselor, teacher, parent, or administrator, the historic work of Carl Rogers and Leta Hollingworth gives us the foundation for providing exceptional support and guidance to talented students. We review their approach to counseling and examine through the lens of the current counseling program at IMSA the reasons why the client-centered approach, when practiced in its entirety, is necessary and sufficient when working with talented students. Leave with strategies on implementing client-centered theory in your work, in the classroom, and at home. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Parents, Psychologists Room: 304 Flipped Science Classroom for Gifted High School Students Vikki Wismer, New Horizon’s Governor’s School for Science and Technology, Hampton, VA; Rhett Woo, New Horizon’s Governor’s School for Science and Technology, Hampton, VA The “flipped classroom” is an innovative method of teaching that is turning the traditional classroom on its head. This session provides a personal reflection of an endeavor into using the “flipped method.” An emphasis is placed on the technological tools that are used to help support students and increase student engagement both inside and outside the classroom. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers High School, Gifted Coordinators Room: 305

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National Association for Gifted Children

Fostering Student Autonomy Through Purposeful Goal Setting: Using System Management Tools for Advanced Learning Plans Diana Caldeira, Jefferson County Public Schools, Denver, CO Do your students believe goals are set for them…not with them? Student goals should reflect self-understanding, interests, passions, and self-esteem. The planning process using Goggle Docs and NAVIANCE for creating and merging the Advanced Learning Plan and system management tools is discussed. Strategies for creating awareness of strength areas and writing goals in a SMART goal format is addressed. Using an effective system based on a life cycle for Advanced Learning Plans with secondary schools in a large Colorado district, this session provides teachers/ counselors with a meaningful implementation process. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators Room: 306 The Politics of STEM Education Chad L. Phillips, Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science, Bowling Green, KY Race to the Top. Common Core. No Child Left Behind. As educators and administrators, we know that politics shapes education policy. However, understanding the political forces that shape education policy can be difficult. This presentation will examine how problems, policy, and politics can combine developing into viable STEM education policy. Further, this presentation discusses the roles that media and industry play in influencing education policy. The goal of the presentation is to provide the audience with an understanding of education policy development, and tangible tools to become more effective STEM education advocates. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Researchers Room: 302

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9:30 AM – 10:30 AM Appreciating Diversity Wylie G. Burgan, High School for Math, Science & Engineering @ City College of New York, New York, NY This workshop equips educators with skills to increase levels of sensitivity. Appreciating diversity in education aims for the highest level of intellectual functioning and at the affective level, aims for the highest level of socio-cultural competence for all. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: 304 Engaging Students in Inquiry Based Learning Embedded in Real World Contexts Lisa Gioe, Rebecca Stern, Emily Mottahedeh, Millennium Brooklyn High School, Brooklyn, NY How do we engage high school students in real-life work while making sure they gain critical thinking, reading, writing and problem-solving skills necessary for college and beyond? As part of our school’s quantitative research program, we designed a problem-based performance task unit which engaged students in taking on the role of researcher and government advisor as they explored the controversial topic of hydrofracking in New York State. Hear from high school students, teachers and school leaders about the process of unit design that supports investigating important political and social issues through analyzing reallife texts and data. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Researchers Room: 301 Making the Connection Mathematically Analytically, Numerically, Graphically, and Verbally - for all Gifted Math Students Lee Strassell, Madison Consolidated High School, Holton, IN Most gifted math students can express their math work analytically very well; that is, they can show all of the necessary algebra steps in a very nice and logical order. However, giving a graphical representation of this analytical work is a struggle for many students. It is even more difficult for the gifted math student to express their algebra work in meaningful written word, and giving a numerical approximation to analytical work is nearly impossible. This presentation provides several

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examples that show teachers how easily they can help their students make these very important connections through the use of “Connecting Sheets.” Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School Room: 305 Providing Structure within a Residential STEM Program Beth Hawke, Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science, Bowling Green, KY This session focuses on the unique needs of residential programs. Pulling from experiences at the Gatton Academy, topics discussed include those that directly impact residential life at similar STEM schools. Located on the campus of Western Kentucky University, our students interact with the general college population on a daily basis. Our residential program allows for the daily structure and support that high school students need and that parents expect while allowing students to become more independent.

Thursday – NCSSSMST

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Psychologists Room: 302 The Use of Digital Resources and Technology to Increase Engagement, Integration, and Higher-Order Thinking Among STEM Students John Willis, Jeff Mathews, Gwinnett School of Mathematics, Science, and Technology, Lawrenceville, GA STEM is an ever-growing initiative around the country. It is in response to the high demand of STEM knowledge and skills among the workforce. As educators explore new programs to support this initiative, it is important that every student experiences high levels of teaching and learning where students are actively engaged. STEM best practices, with the use of digital resources and technology, must provide students an opportunity to experience STEM courses that develop high cognitive independent thinking and collaborative problem solving in a relevant context. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - High School Room: 306

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Thursday – NCSSS NCSSSMST

9:30 AM – 10:30 AM (Cont.) Publishing Peer-Reviewed High School Research: The Final Step in Rigorous Scientific Inquiry Richard C. Wiggins, Ingenuity: Journal of Student Engineering and Science Research, Sigma XI, Research Triangle Park, NC Each year, thousands of secondary students are recognized for the quality of their investigations by such organizations as the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, the Siemens Competition, the Conrad Spirit of Innovation award, the Junior Academy of Science, and local, regional, and state science fairs and competitions. Yet few opportunities exist to gather and publish the best original research by students in STEM. Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society (founded 1886), intends to launch Ingenuity: Journal ofStudent Engineering and Science Research in spring 2014 to meet this need. Ingenuity will be an online, open access publication at no charge to students or schools. This presentation will outline our vision for Ingenuity and invite collaboration with NCSSSMST and member schools. Ingenuity intends to help students succeed in publishing peer-reviewed science, interact with STEM professionals and fellow students, communicate their work to the public, and learn about career fields and professional opportunities. Audience: Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: 303

10:45 AM – 11:45 AM Double Duty Differentiation Adds Up to Success Sarah Lee, Meigs Local School District, Albany, OH; Kim Allen, Wake County Public Schools, Coolville, OH Looking for an innovative approach to differentiate in the math classroom? Math contests are fun and the organizations have done the work for you. Use the contest materials to differentiate for those students that need extension. The regular classroom teachers can manage the contests with little preparation and planning. The model shared is based on Mathcounts, but could be used with multiple contests. By following this technique, participants have the ability to manage student movement, math exercises, grading, and credit.

How Do You Help Someone Who Does Not Want Help?: Counseling Resistant Gifted Students Pokey Bowen, Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science, Bowling Green, KY Working with gifted students can be a very rewarding and exciting experience. As we develop relationships with students, we can often see maladaptive behaviors that require intervention. This program offers real-life strategies and interventions for offering social and emotional help to those students that are very resistant to asking for and receiving help. Counseling and helping techniques are shared, focusing on helping teachers, gifted coordinators, and counselors that work with gifted students of any age. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists Room: 301 Integrating Research-Based Projects into a Classroom Curriculum to Strengthen STEM Education Jonathan Creamer, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN An effective strategy for teaching science and engineering is demonstrating an application to real-world issues. The School for Science and Math at Vanderbilt, a one day per week pull-out program focused on research-based learning, utilizes research projects as a teaching strategy throughout all grades. This presentation gives an overview of three real world-based research projects (analyzing rare plant phylogenies through gene sequencing, converting remote control vehicles into remote-sensing research tools, and examining global water issues using NASA images) and explains how they are integrated into the SSMV sophomore fall semester as class-wide, small-group projects. Audience: Classroom Teachers - High School Room: 304

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 303

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Lockstep Leadership: An Exercise in Cultivating Student Enthusiasm for Research Papers and Other Projects Christopher Shrock, Oklahoma School of Science and Mathematics, Oklahoma City, OK

Measurement and Modeling of Higher Order Skills in STEM Talent Development Using the College and Work Readiness Assessment Christopher Kolar, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy, Aurora, IL

What is the best way to encourage students to take initiative on school projects? Teamwork? Lots of choices? I suggest that the most important factor for cultivating enthusiasm for major projects is building student confidence by emphasizing project-related skills. To this end, a teacher-led, lockstep approach is more effective than either self-guided or team-based methods. In this session, learn techniques that aid students in the writing of research papers, and inclass exercises in elementary logic. Also discuss my recent failures and how to avoid them.

This session describes how a selective, public STEM high school has used the College and Work Readiness Assessment in efforts to model student performance and demonstrate achievement gains in critical thinking, analytical reasoning, problem solving, and written communication. In the context of both diagnostic utility and repeated measures of student growth, hear the results from over 400 students and learn how this new measure of higher-order thinking skills provides reliable results for advanced students. Also explore the institutional value of having normed data for value-added measures.

Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: 302

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 305

60th Annual Convention

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Thursday – NCSSSMST

Recorded Session

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Thursday – NCSSSMST

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM (Cont.)

12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

Counselors Roundtable Crystal Bond, High School for Math, Science and Engineering at City College, New York, NY

NCSSSMST 2013 Annual Conference: Luncheon Louis-Gregory Strolger, Space Telescope Science Institute Dr. Louis-Gregory Strolger is the Hubble Legacy Archive and Observatory Scientist at Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, MD, and an Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green, KY. Hailing from Yellow Springs, OH, Dr. Strolger received Bachelor’s at Earlham College in Richmond, IN, and received his PhD in Astronomy and Astrophysics from the University of Michigan. His prominent work has been on supernova cosmology and dark energy, and had an integral role in the Nobel Prize winning work on the accelerating universe. He continues to develop a standing data and science archive for the Hubble Space Telescope, and works on science software development for the James Webb Space Telescope.

This session is an open discussion for counselors and interested participants regarding the academic and social/ emotional issues that schools face daily. Topics may range from dealing with college prep concerns to dealing with tough mental health issues such as depression and selfharm. Participants are asked to share what issues they see in their schools and how they address them. Audience: Administrators, Counselors Room: 305 Empowering Teachers to Enhance Adolescents’ Motivation for Science: Demonstration of New Products for Secondary Science Teachers Lee Shumow, Jennifer A. Schmidt, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL

Room: JW Grand Ballroom 7

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM Administrators Roundtable Tim Gott, Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science, Bowling Green, KY Leading a school is a demanding job with very little time for networking with fellow administrators. This session will be an opportunity to connect with other leaders to discuss current topics in education, share best strategies in working with our schools, and develop connections for future relationships. Audience: Administrators Room: 302

This session demonstrates and disseminates a new set of research-based products designed to provide secondary science teachers with practical tools to enhance adolescents’ motivation for science. Special attention is paid to gender, as the products focus on enhancing motivation among male and female students. Products to be shared include a book, video exemplars that demonstrate the motivational constructs and practical suggestions described in the book, and an interactive website with ancillary professional development materials, resources, and research papers, which form the basis of the book. Participants receive copies of the book. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Professors Room: 301

OPENING GENERAL SESSION | 3:00 PM – 4:30 PM

6 The Six Edges of Education Innovation

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National Association for Gifted Children

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Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

Game Programming Is the Ideal STEM Course to Offer Gifted Students Cyril R. Pruszko, Eleanor Roosevelt High School, Greenbelt, MD

Wicked Problems: Applying STEM to Solve Environmental Issues Will Make You Popular Jeremy Kranowitz, Sustainable America, Stamford, CT

A course on programming games/apps is the ideal course to offer STEM students. It is very current and universal in interest. It challenges them yet gives them freedom to exercise their talents. It involves creativity, planning, and problem solving. It helps build analytical skills, problem decomposition and solving, patience, and perseverance. It is extremely diversified and supports students proceeding at their own speed, level, and intensity. It augments skills in teamwork, collaboration, and sharing as the students solve implementation problems, discover new features to add, and share their accomplishments and difficulties. The net gains and results are simply amazing.

Our nation faces significant environmental issues that will be solved by applying innovative thinking from STEM disciplines. Our transportation system is overwhelmingly dependent on oil, and our capacity to meet demand is becoming increasingly constrained. As population grows and as alternative demands on our agricultural land increase, our ability to provide more supplies is limited. Without adequate food or fuel, our economy would collapse. Yet, innovation at schools and in start-up companies around the country can help us find a more sustainable path forward. We need to raise student awareness about these types of problems and encourage them to use their STEM skills in relentless pursuit to solve them. Framing our lesson plans with this larger context in mind will set our students on a path to be the stars of the 21st century.

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School Room: 303

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Parents Room: 304

Thursday – NCSSSMST

Recorded Session

Happy 25th Anniversary to

60th Annual Convention

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NAGC Booth Number 321

Head to the Finish Line with these Winning NAGC Publications [

Organic Creativity in the Classroom: Teaching to Intuition in Academics and the Arts Jane Piirto, Editor

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Exploring Critical Issues in Gifted Education: A Case Studies Approach By Christine Weber, Cecilia Boswell & Wendy Behrens

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Critical Issues and Practices in Gifted Education: What the Research Says (2nd ed) Jonathan A. Plucker & Carolyn M. Callahan, Editors

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A Teacher’s Guide to Using the Common Core State Standards with Mathematically Gifted and Advanced Learners By Susan Assouline, Susan Johnsen, & Gail Ryser

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A Teacher’s Guide to Using the Common Core State Standards with Gifted and Advanced Learners in the English Language Arts By Claire Hughes-Lynch, Todd Kettler, Elizabeth Shaunessy-Dedrick, & Joyce VanTassel-Baska

[

Using the Next Generation Science Standards with Gifted and Advanced Learners By Cheryll Adams, Alicia Cotabish, & Mary Cay Ricci

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A Century of Contributions to Gifted Education: Illuminating Lives Ann Robinson & Jennifer Jolly, Editors

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2012-2013 State of the States in Gifted and Talented Education NAGC & CSDPG

also available online 22

National Association for Gifted Children

www.nagc.org

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FRIDAY HIGHLIGHTS | NOVEMBER 8

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

You’ll begin your first full day at the NAGC 60th Annual Convention with your choice of four mini keynotes (see next pages for details).

you through the paces to try out a few brain bending games and puzzles. Fuel your craving for snacks at this event.

Don’t forget to visit the Exhibit Hall right off the Registration Area. Make a point to talk to the exhibitors and discover a new resource or tool, or two or three!

Take a walk down the red carpet! The Third Annual NAGC Celebration of Excellence toasts the achievements of leaders in the field and celebrates the musical talents of Indiana students. The evening includes the presidential address and a reception, followed by numerous NAGC Network evening events. Check out pages xxiii-xv for details.

At the Game Break from 2:45 to 3:45 PM students from The Sycamore School will be on hand to take

Lace up your running shoes for the “Changing Gears, Changing Lives” Fun Run. At 5:45 AM, meet the Back on My Feet team leaders and program participants in the main lobby of the JW Marriott for a run/walk along the White River (across the street) for 25-30 minutes. There are three group leaders: one for the runners, one for the walk/runners, and one for the walkers. There is always a leader in the front and one in the back. No one will be left behind!

Friday Highlights

Recorded Session

Friday 6 Schedule at a Glance 7:00 AM – 5:00 PM

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM

Registration Open

Putting it Into Practice Sessions

5:45 AM – 6:15 AM

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM

Fun Run/Walk with Back on Your Feet Meet in JW Lobby

7:00 AM – 9:00 AM

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Exhibitor Workshops

2:45 PM – 3:45 PM

NCSSSMST Breakfast Meeting JW Grand Ballroom 10 (Third Floor)

Refreshment and Game Break with Sycamore School Exhibit Hall (Third Floor)

7:30 AM – 5:00 PM

3:15 PM – 4:45 PM

Exhibit Hall Open Coffee 7:30 AM – 8:30 AM provided by JW Grand Ballroom (Third Floor)

Legacy Series Taping: “Reflections on Making a Difference” with Dorothy Sisk JW Grand Ballroom 7/8/9 (Third Floor)

8:00 AM – 9:15 AM Mini Keynotes (Your choice of 4)

3:45 PM – 4:45 PM Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Exhibitor Workshops

9:30 AM – 10:30 AM Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Exhibitor Workshops

10:45 AM – 11:45 AM Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Exhibitor Workshops

11:45 AM – 12:30 PM

5:00 PM – 7:00 PM Celebration of Excellence: Presidential Address/Awards/Leadership Reception White River Ballroom E/F (First Floor)

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM Network Evening Events

Break Concession area open in the Exhibit Hall from 10:30 AM to 2:30 PM (Cash and Carry) 60th Annual Convention

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Friday Mini Keynotes

FRIDAY MINI KEYNOTES | 8:00 AM – 9:15 AM THE SHIFTING TERRAIN OF OUT-OF-SCHOOL LEARNING What makes out-of-school learning contexts especially agile at identifying and unleashing the exceptional talents of gifted youth? Drawing from a digital media and design project that his research team implemented, S. Craig Watkins addresses how the future of learning can and is happening now. While considerable attention has been devoted to the learning gaps that happen inside our nation’s schools, there is increasing evidence suggesting that America’s learning divide is substantially impacted by the learning opportunities that take place outside of schools. Watkins discusses how out-of-school learning environments provide a great opportunity to experiment with new models of learning that leverage social and digital media platforms,

S. Craig Watkins University of Texas at Austin Author, The Young and the Digital: What the Migration to Social Network Sites, Games, and Anytime, Anywhere Media Means for Our Future youth-driven interests, and the anytime/anywhere learning capabilities of mobile technology. Consideration will be paid to the obstacles and opportunities to making in-school learning as interesting and motivating as out-of-school learning. White River Ballroom E/F

CAPITALIZING ON COMPETITION: DOES IT BRING OUT THE BEST? Why do some less talented students manage to consistently outperform their smarter classmates in crucial exams? Studies show that competition can bring out the very best in some, while it serves as a source of pain or anxiety for others. How can we provide instruction, coaching, and interventions that enhance the strengths of competition as a motivator? And how can we minimize the drawbacks? Competition brings together individuals to invest in an activity of mutual interest; it can be used to make dull activities more interesting, or bring prestige to one’s school or community. But what is the value of competition in performance as well as in academic domains?

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An award-winning journalist, Merryman currently writes an online daily column for Newsweek.com and has written on the science of child development for Newsweek, New York Magazine, TIME and the Guardian. She lives in Los Angeles, where she has directed a small all-volunteer tutoring program for inner-city kids for 10 years. Indiana Convention Center Rooms 125-128 (Walkway to Convention Center is on the Second Floor of the JW Marriott, across from Starbucks)

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Ashley Merryman Co-author, Top Dog: The Science of Winning and Losing and NurtureShock: New Thinking About Children, a New York Times Best Seller.

After her mini-keynote, Ashley Merryman will explore research themes with panelists and elaborate on applying competition training methods to academic talent development. This will be followed by general audience participation. Moderator: Rena F. Subotnik, American Psychological Association, Washington, DC Speaker: Ashley Merryman Panelists: Tracy L. Cross, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Paula M. Olszewski-Kubilius, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; Frank C. Worrell, University of California, Berkeley, CA White River Ballroom A

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Thanks to Johns Hop kins Center for Talented Youth for sponsoring our Convention coffee!

Coffee in the Exhibit Hall | 7:30 AM – 8:30 AM

Exhibit Hall open | 7:30 AM – 5:00 PM | JW Grand Ballroom (Third Floor)

LOOK AT ME! CAN YOU SEE ME? THE COMPLEXITIES OF GIFTED BILINGUAL CHILDREN The U.S. Bureau of Census presented an increasingly obvious demographic reality: By the year 2050, nearly 50 percent of the U.S. population would be members of ethnic minorities. A group that is changing the intellectual complexion of America are advanced and bilingual children, who have historically been under-identified in the gifted education system. Esther Kogan, a long-time advocate for children, teachers and parents with a focus on early childhood, gifted education and bilingual education, discusses how the methods of identifying gifted bilingual children can vastly improve if they are developed in alignment with: 1. an understanding of what it means to be bilingual; 2. the impact of a second language in the intellectual, emotional and social needs of these children;

Esther Kogan Executive Dean of Faculty and Students, Speyer Legacy School, New York, NY 3. and, most importantly, the linguistic goal of the school (e.g. dual language or transitional program). 4. She believes that only when teachers and administrators “see” the full potential of gifted bilingual children in their classrooms that these children will have the equal opportunity to make a unique contribution to America’s intellectual future.

Friday Mini Keynotes

Wake up with C T Y

Indiana Convention Center Rooms 120-123 (Walkway to Convention Center is on the Second Floor of the JW Marriott, across from Starbucks)

ADVOCATING IN AN EVER-CHANGING EDUCATION CLIMATE: KEY FORCES AND TOOLS TO MAKE YOUR CASE The State of the States report provides a snapshot of how states regulate and support programs and services for gifted and talented learners. A panel of policy experts and pragmatists share the latest trends and tools to support advocacy efforts on behalf of gifted education. We will first ask the big-picture questions: what forces are shaping education? What are the game changers? The session will then take a practical turn, as our experts discuss new resources that inform our understanding of gifted education services in the U.S. and how well high-ability students are doing in schools today. Learn how to use the new State of the States report, “Excellence Gap” data, and survey data about how our schools are serving gifted students, to gain a fuller understanding of how gifted education is changing across the country, and how this research can best inform your advocacy strategy and better equip you with the necessary tools to advocate on behalf of gifted learners. JW Grand Ballroom 7/8/9

60th Annual Convention

Amber Northern, Thomas B. Fordham Institute, Washington, DC

Jonathan Plucker, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Tonya R. Moon University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

Catherine Little, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

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Friday

FRIDAY SESSIONS 9:30 AM – 10:30 AM

scope and sequence of verbal activities for the gifted K-12.

SIGNATURE SERIES Capitalizing on Competition: Does it Bring Out the Best? A Continuing Conversation with Ashley Merryman Rena F. Subotnik, American Psychological Association; Tracy L. Cross, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Paula M. Olszewski-Kubilius, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; Frank C. Worrell, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA After her mini-keynote, Ashley Merryman explores research themes with panelists and elaborates on applying competition training methods to academic talent development. This panel is followed by general audience participation. Audience: Administrators, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: White River A Gifted Education and the Common Core Standards: A Focus on English Language Arts Claire E. Hughes, College of Coastal Georgia, St Simons Island, GA; Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Todd Kettler, University of North Texas, Coppell, TX; Elizabeth Shaunessy-Dedrick, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL The need to differentiate the new Common Core State Standards in Language Arts for gifted learners is a real issue in schools today. Based on a second guide to assist educators with this process, the authors provide commentary on the design and development of differentiated task demands for gifted learners, based on the English Language Arts Common Core State Standards. The presenters address how the Standards may be appropriately differentiated, using the strategies of acceleration, remodeling, and integrating across standards within ELA and across other content domains. A panel of Indiana teachers who have developed and piloted differentiated units, based on the common core, will describe their results with gifted students. New assessment prototypes, emergent from the two consortia designing them for states, are shared and discussed. Implementation of the Standards in classrooms and schools is discussed along with a model

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National Association for Gifted Children

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators Room: White River G

Ball State Administrator Award Recipient “She Said…A Change Would Do Us Good!” Maurine Donavan, Rebecca H. Odoardi, Cache County School District, UT, Participants discover how a small rural district in Utah changed its practice to provide rigorous instruction for its gifted and talented students. The focus will be on how to overcome negative issues; how to utilize available resources; how to get the right people to help in the development of the program and most of all, how to sustain the program in this challenging educational environment. Learn what we did and how you can make these ideas work in your district. Audience: Administrators, Gifted Coordinators Room: 313

ARTS Examination of Motivational Differences of Gifted Students in Various Artistic Programs Justin Neil L. Young, Kelly M. Lee, John P. Gaa, F. Richard “Rick” Olenchak, University of Houston, Houston, TX Presenters examine the differences gifted students in visual art, theater, dance, instrumental music, vocal music, and creative writing have in their motivational goals. The 2 x 2 achievement goal theory is used as a framework where students are posited to have mastery-approach goals, mastery-avoidance goals, performance-approach goals, and/or performance-avoidance goals. Essentially, mastery-approach goals propel students to craft their art better, and mastery-avoidance goals drive students to maintain their current level. Performance-approach goals encourage students to perform better than their peers, while performance-avoidance goals enable students to avoid being the worst. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Researchers Room: 209

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COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY Animation Antics: Life in the Fast Lane with Technology Cindy Sheets, Shawnee Mission School District, Lees Summit, MO Do you want to learn to use animation just like Georges Melies in the movie HUGO? Stop motion animation is a motivating way to engage your students in creativity, problem solving, organizing, visualizing, collaborating, telling a story, or teaching a lesson. It’s a great way to share learning in science, language, or math. Take a look at some studentcreated animations, learn about some amazing tools from free to semi-professional on computer or mobile device, and demonstrate how easy it can be for you to get started. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 314 Blazing New Trails for Gifted Students, Our Trek into BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) Venicia Ferrell, Dornswalo Wilkins-McCorey, Lacy Krell, Virginia Beach City Public Schools, Virginia Beach, VA Participants converse with a panel of Virginia Beach teachers, specialists, and coordinators who are currently using BYOD in their classroom and the division to enhance and extend instruction. Numerous apps, sites, and strategies are shared throughout the session with authentic examples for each. Participants should BYOD. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 303 Why Game Programming Should Be Taught in Your School Cyril R. Pruszko, Eleanor Roosevelt High School, Greenbelt, MD Game Programming attracts girls, minorities, and other students to Computer Science and teaches them analytical thinking, logical reasoning, and problem solving. It involves creativity, planning and perseverance. They learn basic programming, make mazes, educational games, and live action games, in as little as 4 weeks. They complete a game of their own to run on their home computers, give out to friends and put on their iPhones, Androids and tablets. Using an inexpensive English-based computer language

60th Annual Convention

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

makes it easy to learn, teach and work with (requires little expertise). This is individualized, differentiated, and motivated learning at its best. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers High School, Counselors, Parents Room: 304

Friday

Recorded Session

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS Gifted, Impaired or Twice-Exceptional? Context Matters: Evidence from Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience M. Layne Kalbfleisch, George Mason University, South Riding, VA An active question alive in the field centers on aspects of giftedness that may mimic behavioral qualities of psychological, learning, or psychiatric conditions. How do you discern between giftedness and impairment based on behavior? How can you characterize twice-exceptionality more precisely? What is the nature of asynchrony in some gifted children? Recent evidence suggests that asynchrony is connected to the relationship between certain aspects of intelligence and executive function. This session answers these questions presenting a series of tipping points that will help you better understand the nuances among and differences between these types of learners. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 202

WHAT ARE POSTER SESSIONS AND ROUNDTABLES? Join informative and informal discussions around a range of topics at Poster Sessions and Poster Session Roundtables. You can find the poster and roundtable sessions in Griffin Hall on the second floor of the JW Marriott Indianapolis. Presenters will be Roundtable available at the listed times to discuss their poster presentation or facilitate a roundtable discussion.

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Friday

9:30 AM – 10:30 AM (Cont.)

and what they might mean for educators and others who work with high-ability students.

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS (Cont.) Using the Human Rights Campaign Curriculum with the Gifted to Discuss GLBTQ Rights Terence P. Friedrichs, Friedrichs Education, Mendota Heights, MN High-potential straight and gifted gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (GLBTQ) students alike increasingly desire information about, and discussion of, sexual-minority rights to marriage, employment, and military service. This session describes the validated Human Rights Campaign (HRC) curriculum for exploring these issues in organized fashion, through multiple-perspective, personallyimpactful readings, lectures, and discussions. The HRC curriculum, which addresses school district requirements and professional organization recommendations for building cultural sensitivity, has enhanced both pupil knowledge about and attitudes toward GLBTQ-equality issues. The presenter offers recommendations on adaptations for this curriculum to best meet the needs of gifted education students. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators Room: 103

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 104 Developing and Assessing Non-Cognitive Skills Among Gifted Learners Katrina Weimholt, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL New research is further underscoring the proposition that non-cognitive factors play a significant role in student success. Social skills such as cooperation, empathy and responsibility have a demonstrated impact on student performance and achievement. But is it possible to assess these skills and to develop them in students? How can educators do so in structured ways in an academic setting? Through the case study of a service-learning and experiential education program for gifted students, this session demonstrates strategies for cultivating psychosocial skills in gifted learners and introduces tools educators can use for their assessment. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators Room: 302

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE A Cross-Cultural Study of Self-Concept and Social Coping: A Comparison of Young Irish and American High-Ability Students Jennifer Cross, Mihyeon Kim, Sakhavat Mammadov, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Colm O’Reilly, Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland Many students in Ireland and America attend universitybased enrichment programs for gifted students in their respective countries. We describe a study exploring social coping strategies and their relationship to self-concept among high-ability Irish and American 3rd - 8th graders. Students in both countries engage in coping strategies to avoid the stigma of giftedness or high academic abilities, from denying their abilities to using them to help other students. The structure of coping strategies and relationship to self-concept differs. Discuss the cross-cultural differences

Motivating the Gifted But Reluctant Learner Diane G. Heacox, St. Catherine University, Edina, MN Not all gifted learners are productive students. Not all are “A” students. Some perform exceedingly well in a single curriculum area but appear to be average in others. Some gifted students establish a perplexing pattern of doing well or doing nothing. Some are reluctant, even resistant learners refusing to play the school game. This session explores well-documented research on underlying causes of low performance and creates distinctions between non-producers, selective producers and underachievers. Participants are guided through a process for diagnosing specific performance issues. Specific and targeted courses of action including counseling, guidance, and instructional interventions are suggested. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 203

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National Association for Gifted Children

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Reversing Underachievement in High School Students: One School’s Plan Missy Sullivan, Virginia Beach City Public Schools, Virginia Beach, VA Getting students to achieve in school can be difficult. Getting underachieving gifted students to “buy in” to classes where they are failing can be even more challenging. In this workshop, participants learn the current research about underachieving gifted students. View a video where teachers, parents, administration, and students discuss this issue. A program that one school has implemented to reverse underachievement will be shared and discussed. Participants will then determine if they can plan their own programs based on the content of this presentation. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 201 Under Pressure: Gifted Students’ Experiences with Stress Michelle Muratori, Kimberly J. Lohrfink, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD Today’s gifted youth are under pressure to be successful in a society that is replete with stressors. Educators and counselors of the gifted must assist able students with maximizing their potential without burning out or becoming overwhelmed. In this session, the presenters share findings from their study which explored how gifted high school students perceive and manage their daily experiences with pressure/stress and their methods of coping with it. They provide case examples, discuss the implications of their study, and offer recommendations to help participants interact more effectively with gifted youth as they encounter pressure/stress during high school. Audience: Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: White River D

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CREATIVITY 60 Minute Creativity Boost John Kauffman, Scholastic Testing Service, Bensenville, IL; Katie Haydon, Sparkitivity, Katonah, NY

Friday

Recorded Session

How can you identify and nurture your students’ creative attributes, including originality, fluency, elaboration, and expressiveness? E. Paul Torrance said, “Creativity is the highest form of mental functioning” and at no time in history are creative-thinking skills more critical to long-term success than they are today. This fast-paced, 60-minute session reinvigorates your own creativity, and you will leave with a packet of simple activities and resources to use to enhance your students’ (and your own!) creative attributes. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists Room: 309 Enfolding Both the Heart and State Standards with Poetry and Interactive Notebooking: Inventing, Imagining, Inferring and ReInventing Judith S. Youngers, Dinah Zike Academy, Comfort, TX When poetry goes far beyond mere verse and is seen, heard, tasted, experienced, and enfolded as “words and phrases that stretch our imaginations and make us dream of impossible things or unlikely worlds,” we can’t help but immerse GT learners in it. Three-dimensional graphic organizers become inviting portals to poetry in this handson, minds-on session where with simple paper tools, visuals, and interactive notebook foldables you invent, imagine, infer and re-invent. Participants depart with a mininotebook of springboards and strategies that recognize CCSS in preparing students for poetry test terms but simultaneously deliver delight and discovery. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators Room: 301

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Friday

9:30 AM – 10:30 AM (Cont.)

CREATIVITY (Cont.) Fueling Potential Through the Evaluation of Creative Potential (EPoC): A New Measurement of Creativity in Gifted Children Connie L. Phelps , Emporia State University, Emporia, KS; Todd Lubart, Université Paris Descartes, France This hands-on roundtable discusses the evaluation of creative potential in elementary and middle school gifted children using a user-friendly assessment instrument, the Evaluation of Creative Potential test. This battery measures creative giftedness using two key modes of creative cognition: Divergent-Exploratory Thinking and Convergent-Integrative Thinking through a series of eight verbal and graphic subtasks administered during two 45-minute sessions. The subtests are scored using an Internet-based system to generate student profiles that provide data for educators to evaluate and diagnose creative potential in school-aged children as they plan engaging instruction for creatively gifted learners. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: Griffin Hall

CURRICULUM STUDIES A Common Core ‘Think-Tank’ for Gifted Education Lori S. Moyer, Shari Valencic, Florida Association for the Gifted, Venice, FL The session provides a practical overview of the Common Core State Standards and how the Florida Association for the Gifted spearheaded collaboration among local and state cohorts of educators to “unpack” the standards and foster networking among gifted education advocates. CCSS documents, web resources, and lesson plans are shared with participants. Outcomes of FLAG’s 2012-2013 “think tanks” for gifted education are shared, which are among the first wide-scale conversations about CCSS’ implications for gifted education in the state.

Bridging the Common Core State Standards and Gifted Education: North Carolina’s Instructional Resources Project Caroline Cunningham Eidson, Sneha Shah Coltrane, NC Department of Public Instruction, Durham, NC New standards and accountability demand new thinking, and it’s time for gifted education to take advantage of the opportunity that they present to refocus itself on what really matters for gifted learners. The Instructional Resources Project is providing North Carolina teachers with over 600 lessons spanning all grade levels and ELA, math, social studies, and science. The presenters share their experiences as the project developers, including how best to support teachers as they are working at the intersection of new standards and gifted education, and provide ideas for implementing this project in your own state or district/ school. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: White River J Indiana ELA Units (K-4) Becky Butler, Kindergarten, Brownsburg Schools; Doris Fulwider, Grade 1 , Crawfordsville Schools; Jennifer Conley, Grade 2, Carmel Clay Schools; Diane Luken, Grade 3, Centerville- Abbington Schools; Brenda Kovich, Grade 4, Lake Central Schools In 2010, the Indiana Department of Education (IDOE) commissioned Joyce VanTassel-Baska to work with Indiana teachers to create 9 English Language Arts Units, one for each grades K – 8, designed specifically for gifted learners. These units are consistent with Common Core Standards and incorporate readily available, high quality materials. The units are research-based and vertically articulated. These units are available to Indiana teachers. The teacher authors will be available to explain the units to Indiana teachers and answer questions at grade-specific round tables. Audience: Indiana teachers Room: Griffin Hall

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: 305

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National Association for Gifted Children

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Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Putting it All Together: Providing a Continuum of Services to Promote Continuous Intellectual Growth Kirsten Maloney, Carol V. Horn, Fairfax County Public Schools, Falls Church, VA Participants explore a dynamic curriculum framework designed to promote continuous intellectual growth in a broad range of gifted learners. Through the collaborative efforts of practicing professionals in combination with research-based best practices, teachers are prepared to meet the needs and support high levels of achievement in today’s academically diverse classrooms. This dynamic framework enhances teaching practice, ensures high quality services, and allows gifted learners to pursue their interests and develop their talents and potential throughout their K-12 experience. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Researchers Room: 102

EXHIBITOR WORKSHOPS Empowering Gifted Underachievers Gayle Roege, Lineke Vantricht, Bureau Talent Participants will experience a hands-on activity that helps gifted underachievers understand personal learning needs, formulate a plan to acquire the needed skills, and evaluate individual progress. Participants will be able to apply the knowledge and skills learned in the session immediately, to empower and enable students to become self-directed. Room: Griffin Hall Best Practices in Abilities Testing for Gifted and Talented Education Victoria Driver, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Please join HMH – Riverside, publisher of the Cognitive Abilities Test™, for this interactive workshop. We will discuss trends in gifted education, the importance of assessing students across verbal, non-verbal, and quantitative, and of using multimeasure reporting to ensure proper identification of gifted & talented students.

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

GLOBAL AWARENESS A World on the Move: Teaching Primary Students About the Effects of Immigration and Migration From Personal to Global Levels Merzili Villanueva, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Friday

Recorded Session

Gifted students require a challenging and culturally responsive and sensitive curriculum that structures learning of meaningful content and 21st century skills while engaging students’ minds, bodies, and spirits. A classroom of diverse grade 2 students examined immigrants’ and migrants’ experiences of moving through participation in performance tasks surrounding the essential question, “Why do people move?” Session participants are introduced to segments of social studies and language arts-integrated units suited for students in grades 2-4, fusing elements of researchbased models and literature in gifted education to creatively explore the multifaceted issues surrounding immigration and migration through the lens of critical pedagogy. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators Room: 204 Breaking Through: Dabrowski’s Theory Experienced! Edith M. Burke, University of Arizona, West Winfield, NY; Amy H. Gaesser, University of Connecticut, Andover, CT Ever seen someone overcome with emotion when he/ she hears about a natural disaster? Ever felt paralyzed by the enormity of global need, poignantly wishing that there was something more you could do? Dabrowski’s Theory of Positive Disintegration offers a framework to better understand ourselves, access our gifts, and manifest them on community levels. Through engaging and multi-sensory activities, individuals will better understand the elements of TPD (Overexcitabilities, Developmental levels, and Dynamisms) and how to harness their potential. Participants leave with a better understanding of themselves, their interconnectedness, and their participation in the shaping of a global community. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 306

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Griffin Hall

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Friday

9:30 AM – 10:30 AM (Cont.)

Burmese Students and Gifted Readers Collaborating: A Good Idea? Algerine Hill, East Allen County Schools, Fort Wayne, IN; Gail Hickey, Indiana University, Fort Wayne, IN

GLOBAL AWARENESS (Cont.) Peace Be With You: A Year-Long Study of Peace and How to Become a Peacemaker Martha M. Champa, University of Toledo, Holland, OH “Peace Be with You!” greeted students as they entered their school for the 2011-2012 school year. The greeting decorated bulletin boards and headed the principal’s teacher and parent bulletins. Flying white doves and glittery peace signs from the 1960s announced the school theme that at the time was both elusive and beckoning. Peace…an abstract idea yet a common experience (or non-experience) for all. How does a teacher make the illusiveness of the idea of peace a pragmatic experience for the students? Through photographs, artifacts, and student writing/presentations, viewers will accompany these students on their journey of discovering peace during this poster session. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Gifted Coordinators Room: Griffin Hall

Why Some Kids Sound like Joe Friday: “Just the Facts, Ma’am!” Shelagh Gallagher, Engaged Education, Charlotte, NC Why is it that, despite your best efforts to provide inquirybased activities, some students demand facts? Or, when you teach necessary facts, others stare at you, wishing for ‘something more’? Does this have anything to do with giftedness? It might. William Perry’s scheme of intellectual development explains why student beliefs about education affect virtually every educational outcome. Learn the basics of the Perry scheme, see research documenting differences between gifted and typical middle school students, and discuss how the model can help chart a course of meaningful, relevant learning for gifted middle school students. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Psychologists, Researchers Room: White River C

National Association for Gifted Children

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: Griffin Hall

NCSSSMST Dancing and Geometry: Assessing Conceptual Understanding in Mathematics Through Problem Creation Jay Thomas, Aurora University, Aurora, IL

MIDDLE GRADES

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An estimated 17,000 refugees will enter the U.S. during fiscal year 2013, many of them as families with school-aged children. Researchers say U.S. acculturation is especially hard on adolescents. How are middle school teachers prepared to deal with the rapid influx of refugee families and students? What practices show promise for use with middle school gifted students? Presenters reflect on a teachertested strategy implemented in a northeast Indiana middle school — an area with a large Burmese refugee population. Burmese students’ social studies concepts and language proficiency improved through participation in the project. Gifted readers reported positive gains in social interaction.

This session presents findings and recommendations from a semester-long study in which students were asked to create mathematics problems rather than simply respond to problem sets. The original purpose of the study was to assess student motivation through problem posing, but the students’ reflections on the process revealed deep creativity, originality, and conceptual understanding. Sample problems, reflections, and implications for practice are presented. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: 206

For the most up-todate information on sessions and to search for sessions by strand or speaker, download the NAGC2013 app.

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Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

PARENT & COMMUNITY

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Is Online Education a Good Fit for Your Gifted Child and You? Katharine Thurlow, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

Alternative Modes for Teacher Professional Development: Achieving Teacher Change at a Distance Jerrell C. Cassady, Monica L. Heller, Cheryll M. Adams, Rebecca Pierce, Ball State University, Muncie, IN

Online education is expanding exponentially and many gifted students are eager to participate. But the demands of online education are completely different from those of the traditional schoolroom. Learning in the comforts of home is far more convenient than having to commute, but it is not for every student or parent. This presentation explores different types of online education available to gifted students and its unique demands on the student, parent, and instructor. It focuses on factors to be evaluated before deciding to participate in online education and on realistic expectations regarding parent involvement and instructor feedback. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 310

Friday

Recorded Session

Engaging teachers in professional development to support learners in elementary mathematics classrooms was explored in a 5-year, quasi-experimental design. Three groups of PD interventions were randomly assigned at the start of the project. These groups differed in the level of PD support provided (curriculum resources, pedagogy instruction, supportive coaching), all provided in a distributed delivery format (primarily at a distance). The results of this study and this poster session demonstrate the impact of the differing levels of teacher PD on student performance, teacher behaviors, and teacher confidence in the classroom. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Professors, Researchers Room: Griffin Hall

NAGC Learning Partner

60th Annual Convention

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Friday

9:30 AM – 10:30 AM (Cont.)

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT (Cont.) FLIPPED! Professional Development Meets 2.0 Technology Elizabeth A. Fogarty, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC What happens when 2.0 technology and Professional Developers unite? Participants get relevant, timely training that meets their needs and doesn’t break the bank. Innovative technology applications allow for ongoing, sustainable professional development where participants can continue to ask questions and receive information, even as their professional learning deepens. This session provides specific applications for delivering professional development either synchronously or asynchronously that will stimulate audience participation in your next session using simulations, and collaborative online tools such as blogs, YouTube, videos, as well as other free resources. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators Room: 308 Happy Teachers Will Change the World: Nurturing the Inner Life of Teachers of the Gifted Dorothy A. Sisk, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX; Michele Kane, Northeastern Illinois University, Long Grove, IL Thich Nhat Hanh, a world-renowned Zen master and peace activist says “happy teachers will change the world.” Teachers of the gifted often face similar challenges in the workplace as their colleagues. Demanding new initiatives and an educational landscape that is focused on assessment may erode enthusiasm. Teachers may cope with malaise and fatigue by

continually advocating for these gifted learners. This session is designed to foster a renewed sense of purpose and to develop tools to re-energize the inner life of teachers including contemplative practices, developing intuition, focusing on signature strengths and strategies to hone optimism. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators Room: 205

RESEARCH & EVALUATION Predictors of Educational Aspirations and Career Decidedness Among Gifted Adolescents Nanseol Heo, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA Gifted students have been characterized as superior in their career development. Meanwhile, external barriers such as parents’ educational level, social network and gender in career planning within the gifted and talented population have been relatively less studied. In addition, personal values in career planning have been emphasized; however, empirical research concerning its relationship with career aspiration or decidedness has not been conducted as one would expect. The primary purpose of this study snd poster session is to determine which combination of external and internal factors is best for predicting educational aspiration and career decidedness of gifted adolescents. Audience: Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Researchers Room: Griffin Hall

WHAT ARE POSTER SESSIONS AND ROUNDTABLES? Join informative and informal discussions around a range of topics at Poster Sessions and Roundtables. You can find the poster and roundtable sessions in Griffin Hall on the second floor of the JW Marriott Indianapolis. Presenters will be available at the listed times to discuss their poster presentation or facilitate a roundtable discussion.

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National Association for Gifted Children

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Poster Session

Roundtable


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

The Role of and Relationship Between Gifted Education in Research and in K-12 Schools Matthew McBee, East Tennessee State University, Kingsport, TN; D. Betsy McCoach, Jonathan Plucker, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Michael S. Matthews, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC; Scott J. Peters, University of Wisconsin - Whitewater, Whitewater, WI

behaviors. These court cases impact how attitudes and behaviors of students of color are viewed, how gifted and advanced program policies and practices are designed and implemented, and how the field of gifted education is viewed as a viable contributor to the educational community. Gain an understanding of the present-day concerns about race, equity, legal and policy issues in gifted education.

In 2012 Gifted Child Quarterly published a special issue related to a manuscript by authors Subotnik, OlszewskiKubilius, and Worrell. The issue addressed a proposed new direction for the field made by Subotnik et al. Although their position has merit for research, we believe it would not be the most appropriate focus for public schools. As the authors of one of the responses, we will present our alternative perspective that we believe is more targeted towards the context of K-12 schools and their students. Four topics are presented followed by a commentary from the Guest Editor of the 2012 special issue.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists Room: White River H

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: White River I

SPECIAL POPULATIONS Joining the National Conversation about Race and Unpacking Legal and Policy Implications for Gifted Education Jaime Castellano, Vida Charter School, Gettysburg, PA; Sally C. Krisel, Hall County Schools, Athens, GA; Ann Robinson, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR; Tarek C. Grantham, University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Mary Ruth Coleman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Blounts Creek, NC; Donna Y. Ford, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN; Joy L. Davis, Virginia Union University, Richmond, VA A moderated panel of leaders gather to discuss the implications of recent highly publicized rulings on Black, Latino, and other minority students who demonstrate gifted

60th Annual Convention

Friday

Recorded Session

Low-Income, High-Potential Program Lori L. Ford, Julie Luck Jensen, Barrington CUSD 220, Barrington, IL Follow one school district’s journey in striving to meet the needs of its high potential/low-income learners, many of whom are ELL. Through grassroot efforts and a creative use of funding, a program was created using community volunteers to work with K-2 promising learners on academic vocabulary and background knowledge. From this core, programs supporting academics and the social-emotional needs of middle and high school learners were developed. Professional development for teachers and parent education have also been added. Join us in learning how recent research-based reports and best practice can provide a foundation for uncovering masked potential. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Psychologists Room: 208

For the most up-todate information on sessions and to search for sessions by strand or speaker, download the NAGC2013 app.

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Friday

9:30 AM – 10:30 AM (Cont.)

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS Fueling Potential - Entrepreneurial Thinking as a School Curriculum Ginger Lewman, ESSDACK, Hutchinson, KS; Vincent Vrotny, Quest Academy, Palatine, IL In the 21st Century classroom, students are being asked to shift gears in their roles from being passive receivers of content who mirror back information, to becoming more entrepreneurial in their thinking, to become more actively innovative, more self-directed, more focused on problemsolving. True 21st Century students are learning to organize, manage, and take risks in their learning as they create knowledge and innovation for the world. This session will explore Project-Based Learning and Design Thinking to instill entrepreneurial mindsets. We will demonstrate how to implement hands-on, interdisciplinary projects, fueling students to take ownership of their full potential. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers High School, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 101 Successful Collaboration: Nurturing Gifted Students on a University Campus Erica Bailin, Kimberly Lansdowne, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ Highly gifted students need challenge. Throughout the U.S., there are few early entry (to University) schools designed to meet students’ educational, social, and emotional needs. Opening in 2011, the Herberger Academy is among the newest. Learning from the giants before us (Robinson Center, Davidson Institute, Early Entrance Program at Cal

State, etc.), a technologically rich accelerated learning environment was created. Students build partnerships with businesses, colleges, community organizations, and schools. Students discover, discuss, and collaborate with professors, teachers, business leaders, even students abroad. As emerging leaders, students reach across boundaries, learn about various cultures, and gain an appreciation of others. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists Room: Griffin Hall

STEM Helping Anxious Children Shift into High Gear Sylvia Rimm, Family Achievement Clinic, North Olmsted, OH Sensitivity and intensity can be excellent characteristics that some gifted children exhibit. They may permit children to experience great emotional depth and develop kindness toward others. Oversensitivity and perfectionism can also lead children toward being fearful and avoiding challenge and creativity. When sensitive adults respond intuitively to these oversensitive children they may unintentionally overprotect them and increase their anxiety. Their overanxiousness may empower children to avoid the challenges that schools provide and encourage them to shift into reverse. This session gives parents and educators tools for reversing the anxieties that prevent gifted children from shifting into high gear to fulfill their potential. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Parents Room: White River B

Thanks for joining us in Indianapolis Mark Your Calendar for these Upcoming NAGC Conventions

2014

61st Annual NAGC Convention & Exhibition Baltimore, Maryland | November 13-16, 2014

2015

62nd Annual NAGC Convention & Exhibition Phoenix, Arizona | November 12-15, 2015

The session proposal submission process begins in December. Registration details are available in late March.

www.nagc.org

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National Association for Gifted Children

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

10:45 AM – 11:45 AM

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

How to Talk (About Art) So Your Kids Will Listen Hope E. Wilson, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL

SIGNATURE SERIES Decades with a Difference: How Influential Thinkers Moved the Field Forward Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Jennifer Jolly, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA; Ann Robinson, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR; Frank C. Worrell, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA For more than a century, psychologists, educators, advocates, and social activists influenced gifted education. Their fascinating lives and work illuminate our past and point the way to our future. Binet, Dabrowski, Galton, Hollingworth, Marland, Terman, and Torrance are joined by figures whose names and lives may surprise attendees, but whose contributions shaped us. This interactive session is illustrated with primary sources—photos, documents, recordings, and original texts from our founding fathers and mothers to tell their stories and ours. A collaborative project from a group of leading contemporary scholars, “A Century of Contributions to Gifted Education: Illuminating Lives,” is a fitting tribute to the 60th anniversary of the NAGC. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Researchers Room: JW Grand Ballroom 10

ARTS How Does Creative Writing Talent Develop Across the Lifespan? Jill Olthouse, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV Based on approximately 45 hours of interviews with children, teens, and adults who display creative writing talent, this session looks at the markers of talent at each developmental stage. We focus specifically on writers’ goals, emotions, values, identity, and influences as these manifest themselves over time. Finally, enjoy writing together using some practical exercises based on writers’ strengths and interests that are indicated in the research.

No matter your background in art, this session will help you to incorporate art into your classroom, across disciplines! Learn how to use art history and art concepts in literature, reading, social studies, history, science, and even math! You do not need to have a degree in art to be able to talk about art with your gifted students in a variety of contents. This session helps to inspire you to incorporate art into your classroom lessons and provide resources to expand upon your knowledge!

Friday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Parents Room: 202

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY Beyond Content Delivery: Enhancing Thinking with Technology Eric Calvert, Northwestern University Center for Talent Development, Evanston, IL Technology is playing a growing role in teaching and learning, yet, most technology integration efforts to date emphasize using electronic devices and digital media to deliver “content.” However, recent research suggests that beyond exposing students to curricular resources in more engaging forms, these tools also have potential for scaffolding cognition, enhancing metacognitive abilities, and extending thinking. This session, drawing on Andy Clark and David Chalmer’s concept of the “extended mind,” examines the interaction of technology and human intelligence, highlights examples of technology augmenting natural abilities, and explores implications for the deployment of technology in gifted education programs. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 310

Audience: Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers High School, Parents, Professors, Researchers Room: 314

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Friday

10:45 AM – 11:45 AM (Cont.)

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY (Cont.) Experiments in Education - A Science Teacher’s Perspective David Schuth, Sycamore School, Indianapolis, IN The presenter describes various technologies used in the science classroom, both for experiments and for educational experimentation (Flipped Classroom, iPads, iPad apps, lab probeware, SmartBoard) that are particularly helpful lab equipment and software programs. An exceptional exposition deliberately designed to spark thoughts, generate ideas, stimulate the mind, and get Hippocratic humors flowing. A middle school science teacher attempts to meet the needs of children’s minds in a classroom of gifted students. While precisely calculated for current science teachers of gifted children, this session also provides teachers, administrators, and researchers with a nugget of gifted education gold. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Parents Room: 304 Flipping Out for Flipped Classrooms Lisa Davia Rubenstein, Ball State University, Muncie, IN Everyone is flipping for flipped classrooms! Across the country, teachers are transforming how content is presented and manipulated, allowing students to watch and process new content at home and providing classroom time for students to practice and discuss that content. While this is an intriguing concept, it requires deliberate planning to ensure student success. To be effective, the flipped classroom requires an awareness of the students’ interests and abilities, targeted and accessible content, and purposeful classroom activities. In this session, we examine each of these components and provide practical suggestions to make the most of the flipped classroom. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators Room: White River H

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National Association for Gifted Children

Threshold Concepts: A New Conceptual Framework for Powerful Curriculum Reva C. Friedman, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS; Olha Skyba, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI A considerable body of research, practice, and heated conversations focus on determining curriculum that is uniquely fitting for academically talented students. However, the field needs to consider new developments in learning, spotlighting a key question: what are the transformational, key “threshold” concepts that usher the learner into powerful, discipline-based learning? In this session, participants explore threshold concepts identified for a variety of disciplines, including specific content examples. The session features our experiences weaving threshold concepts into courses offered by the Wisconsin Center for Academically Talented Youth. We share our insights and hope to promote an ongoing dialogue. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Researchers Room: 208 Religiosity of Gifted Korean American Youths and Young Adults: Driving Force of Academic Achievement? Taekhil Jeong, Indiana University, Kokomo, IN Where religiosity refers to the feelings and behaviors involving the search for the sacred aspects of life, it increasingly deserves to be an integral focus for the study of gifted individuals’ psychological development. The current study examines the religiosity of gifted immigrant Korean American young adults in terms of its impacts on their world views, academic achievement, and ethnic identity. Using a qualitative research case study design, the current study conducts semi-structured interviews for data collection. The implications for parents and educators regarding religiosity as an ethnic identity of academic achievers of Korean Americans are discussed. Audience: Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: Griffin Hall

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COUNSELING & GUIDANCE Best Practices for Gender Equity: Helping Girls and Boys to Overcome Gender Barriers Barbara Kerr, M. Alexandra Vuyk, Nicole M. Farmer, Chris P. Rea, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS Gifted boys and girls in the Millennial Generation face both old and new barriers in the form of gendered practices in the schools. Millennial girls reach puberty sooner than their mothers’ generation; are more stressed out than boys, with more responsibilities in the home as well as in academic and social pursuits; and are exposed daily to the “Princess Industrial Complex.” Gifted boys are still more likely to be held back from kindergarten; to have their underachievement ignored; and to act out when bored. Practice strategies for creating fair, unbiased education.

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

Generate Some STEAM: Developing Creativity in STEM Through Arts Integration Steve Coxon, Maryville University, St. Louis, MO Creativity should be well developed in a nation dependent on innovation for economic growth, security, and quality of life improvements, but creativity is in decline among U.S. youth. Integrating the arts into science and math is one way this may be reversed while meeting the Common Core and Next Generation Science Standards. This session provides an overview of arts-integrated STEM activities, including using technology to create science-themed e-books and videos, LEGO robotics programming for dance and drawing, student-created science-themed theater, and note card architecture. This session will also report on experiences teaching and integrating the arts course for preservice teachers, including example products.

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists Room: 104

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors Room: 301

CREATIVITY

Shift Students onto the Fast Track with Highlevel, Interdisciplinary Independent Projects Melanie L. Bondy, Mind Vine Press, Lawton, MI

Body and Soul: A Conceptual Sequence of the Talent Development Process of Eminent Jazz Improvisers Anthony Washington, College of William & Mary, Richmond, VA The conceptual sequence presented in this session grew out of data generated and collected in exploring the talent development process of expert and eminent jazz improvisers. Grounded in the Differentiated Model of Giftedness and Talent by Francois Gagne, this sequence brings together the concepts of Purpose Development, Deliberate Practice, Mastery, Expert Performance, and Flow, and introduces the concept of Advanced Creative Expression as a mediator in the transition from expert performer to eminence.This presentation delineates the properties and dimensions of each step within the proposed conceptual sequence as they emerged from the data generated and collected.

Friday

Recorded Session

As the educational world has succumb to the NCLB mindset, the students now being “left behind” are our highest learners. Boredom, frustration, and lack of challenge are robbing gifted learners of their education. Act now! This motivational session discusses the creation of distinctive choice-based projects for gifted students in conjunction with national standards. Engage students with challenging, in-depth research that adapts to individual strengths and develops personal ingenuity. Integrate critical thinking, technology, and inquiry-based problem solving while students explore personal life goals such as careers. Turbocharge your gifted students onto the road to educational awakening and fulfillment! Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Gifted Coordinators Room: 313

Audience: Consultants, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 303

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Friday

10:45 AM – 11:45 AM (Cont.)

Latin 1, 2, 3, …and 4! Why and How Gifted Students Can Study Latin in the Primary Grades Frances R. Spielhagen, Mount Saint Mary College, Warwick, NY

CURRICULUM STUDIES Flexible Pacing Options for High Ability Students Lannie Kanevsky, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC Some highly able learners need to accelerate the pace of their progress through content and grade levels; some need to slow down to explore and investigate the complexities of ideas, issues, problems, their creative endeavors and more. Many students need different options in different subjects or at different times in their studies. Descriptions and examples of more than two dozen ways to accelerate and decelerate learning are shared so participants will be aware of a range of possibilities for modifying the pace of learning in different subjects, grades, and settings. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators Room: 305 Improving Your Differentiated Instruction: Insights from Motivation Research Leighann Pennington, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA Differentiated instruction advocates giving students choice, acknowledging their interests, and challenging them in their zone of optimal academic development. This session includes a primer on the motivation research from educational psychology that offers teachers insight into how differentiated instructional methods can motivate students to become learners who engage deeply in learning content and skills, while enjoying and valuing the discipline. This session brings together Tomlinson’s work on differentiated instruction with motivation research by Dweck, Eccles, and other motivation experts. A former middle school teacher/ gifted educator/education researcher shares lesson plans and user-friendly content on research and instructional methods. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 205

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National Association for Gifted Children

Should gifted elementary grade students study Latin? Absolutely! Latin is the foundation of rich and varied English vocabulary. Strong resources exist that offer appropriate experiences for young students and make study of Latin fun and informative. This session explores how primary grade teachers can infuse Latin into sound curriculum planning for their gifted students, while meeting both NAGC and Common Core standards. The session is also appropriate for parents who choose to home-school their gifted youngsters. Participants review existing and new resources for the study of Latin by children in grades 1 through 4. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers Early Childhood, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: Griffin Hall Ready, Set, Go! Improving Student Learning with Project-Based Learning Jason A. Helfer, Stephen T. Schroth, Knox College, Galesburg, IL; Christian Mahone, Nielson Elementary School, Galesburg Community Unit School District No. 205, Galesburg, IL How best can gifted children show what they know through a variety of modalities? Project-based learning has long been understood to be a way of understanding instructional planning and delivery that is grounded in differentiated instruction. This session explores approaches to structuring project-based learning experiences that afford high-ability children the opportunity to demonstrate developing content knowledge. Templates that assist teachers during the planning, construction, and presentation of student work are provided. Participants leave the poster session with awardwinning curricular materials, provided at no cost, which can be used to augment more traditional modes of instructional delivery. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators Room: Griffin Hall

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

What Does Gifted Learn from Scientist? A Case Study in Research and Education Program for Korean Science Gifted Students Jung Bog Kim, Ji Won Lee, Korea National University of Education, Chungbuk, Korea

Exhibitor Workshop

The purpose of this poster session is to have science-gifted students practice real research in a science laboratory with scientists. We investigated what students learn through a research and education program in the laboratory where interaction between atoms and laser fields for laser cooling has been studied. Science-gifted students researched the topic that was set by scientist in the lab. They designed the experiment and studied knowledge how to conduct experiments. They reported they learned practical knowledge, and how to research through R&E program.

Dr. Edward M. Hallowell said, “The most potent medication we have is also the most dangerous and abused drug. It is called food.” This exhibitor invites attendees to come learn how to make medicine for health, vitality, and optimal learning and to teach others to do the same.

Audience: Researchers Room: Griffin Hall

Spreading the Word: Taking Gifted Education Best Practices to Where they are Most Needed Karen Bendelman, International Gifted Education Teacher Development Network, Austin, TX

EARLY CHILDHOOD Common Core + Young Gifted Readers = Continuum for Success Elizabeth A. Fogarty, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC The Common Core has the potential to provide an ongoing continuum to move young gifted readers forward in their textual understanding. Specific examples of powerful texts, differentiated teaching strategies, and ideas for setting up a classroom environment that facilitates success are provided. Participants leave with practical methods and materials that can be used to strengthen existing reading programs and provide powerful differentiation for young, talented readers. In honor of NAGC’s 60th Anniversary, a list of the top 60 books for gifted readers will be shared. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 308

60th Annual Convention

Fueling our Children. The Link Between Diet and Behavior Val Bouchard, Juice Plus and Tower Garden

Friday

Recorded Session

Room: Griffin Hall

GLOBAL AWARENESS

The mission of the International Gifted Education Teacher Development Network is to bring worldwide best practices in gifted education to countries where they are not incorporated into national policies. It aims to assist schools in recognizing and nurturing the potential of culturally diverse learners. Attendees are exposed to experiences bringing gifted education to schools in countries such as Botswana and China, and the implementation of these programs, including successes and challenges. Administrators and teachers learn how to spread the word of gifted education to areas that are in need of student identification and support. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators Room: 306

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Friday

10:45 AM – 11:45 AM (Cont.)

NCSSSMST

MIDDLE GRADES Developing 21st Century Self-Management Skills for Gifted Middle School Students Carolyn Coil, Pieces of Learning, Marion, IL Many gifted students do well academically in elementary school but do not develop a number of necessary self-management skills necessary for success. By middle school, the lack of such skills is reflected in both their behavior and attitude. We examine several selfmanagement skills and explore practical strategies for developing them as we work with gifted middle school students. Targeted skills include goal setting, time management and organization, study skills, persistence and effort in attempting challenging tasks, using technology wisely, and the development of independence with responsibility. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: White River J The Different Effects of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation in Predicting Future Achievement Among Gifted and Non-gifted Students Daehyun Kim, Hyeri Park, Suehyeon Paek, University of Georgia, Athens, GA Many studies have confirmed the positive relationship between intrinsic motivation and achievement, while as the effects of extrinsic motivation on achievement remain controversial. This study examines the critical role of not only intrinsic motivation but also extrinsic motivation on future achievement based on a longitudinal perspective. This empirical analysis with the Education Longitudinal Survey shows how intrinsic and extrinsic motivation plays a role in predicting the future achievement of high school students, depending on their giftedness. The results suggest appropriate motivation strategies for the achievement growth of gifted students in terms of educational intervention and counseling. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: Griffin Hall

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National Association for Gifted Children

The Promise of Common Core and a Coherent High School Curriculum Crystal Bond, High School for Math, Science and Engineering at City College, New York, NY Almost all of the participants in this conference come from one of the 45 states that have adopted the Common Core State Standards. In our presentation we will propose that, while there is still debate over Common Core and some states may still pull out, the Standards offer support for our mission as educators. If the Standards are read and implemented in the spirit in which they were intended they can be used to improve classroom instruction in all schools, including the specialized high schools. This is not because the Standards prescribe how our teachers should teach, but rather because the document calls for a coherent, grade by grade, content based curriculum. Our presentation will describe how the body of knowledge that our school’s curriculum offers is consistent with the Common Core across all disciplines and thus meets the standards’ objective of preparing students for success in college and careers. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators Room: 206 Empowering Teachers to Enhance Adolescents’ Motivation for Science: Demonstration of New Products for Secondary Science Teachers (Repeated from Thursday) Jennifer A. Schmidt, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL This session demonstrates and disseminates a new set of research-based products designed to provide secondary science teachers with practical tools to enhance adolescents’ motivation for science. Special attention is paid to gender, as the products focus on enhancing motivation among male and female students. Products to be shared include a book, video exemplars that demonstrate the motivational constructs and practical suggestions described in the book, and an interactive website with ancillary professional development materials, resources, and research papers, which form the basis of the book. Participants receive copies of the book. Audience: Classroom Teachers – High School Room: 309

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

PARENT & COMMUNITY

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Academic Acceleration in a Response to Intervention (RtI) Framework: Tools to Fuel Gifted Learning Potential Susan R. Scheibel, Regis University, Littleton, CO; Stuart Omdal, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO

Building Collaborative Learning Cultures: Educators of the Gifted in Charge of their Own Professional Learning Kelly A. Hedrick, Virginia Beach City Public Schools, Virginia Beach, VA

When student learning pace, depth, and complexity does not match the school curriculum, what tools do parents have? Every student deserves an education that fits, to work hard at school, and to learn something new each day! Presenters share research and perspectives with frameworks that support student growth potential. Response to Intervention (RtI) and academic acceleration are appropriate for students. Theory, policies, survey results, and parent voices of experience are provided and discussed as tools for student advocacy. Best ways to communicate and collaborate effectively with school systems are presented.

Let’s face the fact that if education is going to attract and retain talented teachers, support the professional growth of seasoned veterans, and keep pace with the 21st century, then we need to grieve the loss of traditional forms of professional development and move on. But what do we put in its place to ensure attention to district initiatives as well as provide for individual growth and maximum success? In this session, participants examine a plan for shifting from traditional professional development to fostering a collaborative learning culture. Believe it or not, this is more economical!

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: White River C I AM My Child’s BEST Advocate: Multicultural Families Speak!! Joy L. Davis, Virginia Union University, Richmond, VA The stories of four culturally diverse families from different regions of the country are told of how they nurture their child’s giftedness at home and strategies they used to navigate school district protocols to have their highly able students evaluated and found eligible for gifted program services. The students, who originate from Hispanic, African American, Haitian Immigrant, and Native American backgrounds are now being served and are successful in gifted education programs in different parts of the country due to their parents’ direct advocacy. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: White River I

60th Annual Convention

Friday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators Room: 209 Preparing Teachers for Gifted Learners in Inclusive Classrooms: A Self-Efficacy Approach to Teacher Education Jodi L. Peebles, University of Alberta, Grande Prairie, AB; Sal Mendaglio, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB It is critical in today’s inclusive classrooms that teachers are prepared for the diversity they will face, including teaching the gifted. However, research demonstrates that gifted education is often overlooked or under-emphasized in general teacher preparation programs. In this session, two teacher educators and researchers discuss preservice teachers’ preconceived beliefs about gifted students, and the importance of a place and space for gifted education in teacher education programs. The presenters introduce an approach to teacher preparation, based on Bandura’s theory of self-efficacy, that focuses on providing preservice teachers with authentic experiences with gifted learners. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Researchers Room: 103

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Friday

10:45 AM – 11:45 AM (Cont.)

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT (Cont.) Assessment is Not a Snapshot but a Photograph Album: Using Sustained Professional Development to Support Teachers in Implementing a Continuum of Assessment Options for Advanced Learners Gail F. Hubbard, Prince William County Public Schools, Montclair, VA Based upon the 2010 NAGC Programming Standards, a series of professional learning sessions developed for teachers of advanced learners explores evidence-based practices about multiple, ongoing, and appropriate

assessments. Using analogies from photography, educators involved in the professional development sessions learn to distinguish among the purposes of different assessments. They learn how to use a range of assessment processes with advanced learners to provide instructional support, measure academic achievement, and report learner academic growth. These sessions have resulted in the increased use of multiple appropriate assessments with advanced learners. Participants will receive the comprehensive professional development plan including assessment examples. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators Room: CC 124

Combined Sessions 6 RESEARCH & EVALUATION 10:45 AM – 11:15 AM

11:15 AM – 11:45 AM

A Longitudinal Case Study of Exceptional Leadership Talent Thomas P. Hébert, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC This session presents a longitudinal case study of a gifted young man with exceptional leadership abilities. The study incorporated eight years of data collection that included in-depth interviews, observation, and archival documents and resulted in a vivid portrait of how a gifted male’s exemplary leadership talent emerged beginning in elementary school and continued through his graduate school experience and early career. Highlighted are the influential factors, critical incidents, and significant relationships that shaped the development of his leadership talents. A model for leadership development is presented and implications for gifted education practice are discussed. Audience: Psychologists, Researchers Room: 203

‘If I’d Known Then What I Know Now...’: Surveying Graduates of a Gifted Program as a Tool For Evaluation and Strategic Planning Merri Kae Vanderploeg, Commonwealth Governor’s School, Fredericksburg, VA; Dan Walker, University of Mary Washington, Partlow, VA What can we learn from surveying graduates of a gifted program? What are the benefits of using a comparison group drawn from graduates of the regular school programs? How can that be done in a rigorous manner that generates usable data? How can such a survey demonstrate that specialized homogeneous gifted programs can have lasting value, especially in comparison to standard “accelerated” course strands? Presenters discuss such an effort conducted by the Commonwealth Governor’s School and its lessons for program evaluation and development. They also present recommendations on conducting such surveys: opportunities and possible pitfalls. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 203

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National Association for Gifted Children

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

RESEARCH & EVALUATION “If I Knew Then What I Know Now!” Lessons for Graduate Students and Early Career Professionals Jill L. Adelson, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY; Michael S. Matthews, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC; Angela Housand, University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Greenville, NC Making the transition from doctoral student to scholar and working towards tenure or other career goals is not always easy. We share lessons that we’ve learned along the way as early and mid-career scholars in diverse institutions and positions. These lessons range from involvement in NAGC to publishing gifted education research to finding balance and everything in between. Bring your own burning questions about navigating the job market, negotiating salary and benefits for academic positions, conducting research, and more as time will be reserved for audience questions.

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

The Effectiveness of Gifted Programs: A Meta-Analysis Soohyun Yi, Jinmin Chung, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN A variety of research studies have resulted in conflicting findings concerning gifted programming effects on students. Imprecise measurement, small samples, and variable outcomes make generalizing program effects difficult. Therefore, using meta-analysis to examine results across multiple studies based upon categorized outcome variables, this study synthesizes gifted program research. First, outcome variables are categorized (e.g., academic achievement, academic motivation, creativity, cognitive, social-affective). Second, the effects of gifted programs are analyzed across studies on these variables. Third, the effects of different kinds of programs (e.g., enrichment, summer program, pull-out program) are investigated. Finally, significant moderators that influence gifted program effectiveness are discussed in this poster session.

Friday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: Griffin Hall

Audience: Professors, Researchers Room: White River G National Surveys of Gifted Programs at the Elementary, Middle, and High School Level: Key Findings and Implications Carolyn M. Callahan, Tonya R. Moon, Sarah Oh, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA Surveys of state department personnel provide a general level of information about policies and development of gifted programming opportunities at the state level; yet systematic and specific data on policy inputs (e.g., written mandates, state funding, and teacher qualifications) regarding programs for gifted students at the local level across the nation is lacking. The U.S. Department of Education commissioned a study to develop a portrait of the current status of gifted programs at elementary, middle, and high school levels. This presentation highlights key findings of the study and implications for policies and practices related to the education of gifted learners. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Researchers Room: White River D

60th Annual Convention

SPECIAL SCHOOLS Serving Gifted Students in Rural Districts Kathryn Picanco, Whitworth University, Spokane, WA Rural districts are in a unique position when determining the best fit for programming. School population size and limited funding call for creative solutions to meet the needs of gifted students. This session examines different ways to approach program development based on state and national guidelines for rural districts including identification, student services, program assessment, and professional development for teachers. Combining district initiatives to include serving the needs of the gifted to streamline efforts is explored. Developing a rich program for gifted students that enhances district services for all is within reach despite limited funds! Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators Room: 201

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Friday

10:45 AM – 11:45 AM (Cont.)

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

SPECIAL POPULATIONS I Hate to Write! Helping Students with Asperger’s Syndrome and High Abilities Achieve Success With the Writing Process Kathy Oehler, Carmel, IN; Cheryl Boucher, MSD Wayne Township, Carmel, IN Students with Aspergers Syndrome and high ability are often called “Twice Gifted.” These students share aboveaverage intelligence, but they also often share difficulties with organization, social interactions, sensory regulation, and written expression. Nearly all students with autism spectrum disorders struggle with the writing process. Teachers are charged with diversifying instruction to meet the unique learning needs of these students, helping them reach their highest potential and achieve academic standards. In this session, teachers learn evidence-based strategies to help reluctant writers with ASD and high abilities find success with writing tasks.

From the Ground Up: Best Practices for Building a New Program for Gifted Students Margaret A. Lee, Tracey A. Lucas, Frederick County Public Schools, Frederick, MD It takes a village to build a new programming for gifted students! Follow one district’s three year journey — starting with a “charge” to create a new program and ending with full implementation in 13 middle schools. Along the way, learn how to involve stakeholders, sustain momentum, keep teachers and parents informed, and lay the foundation for program success. Walk away with sample tools for organizing ideas, developing a communications plan, and monitoring fidelity in program implementation. Leave this session better equipped to move your district forward to meet the needs of gifted students. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators Room: White River A

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists Room: 101

Racing Toward the Finish Line: Gifted Programming for High School Students Incorporating the Autonomous Learner Model Blanche Kapushion, Jefferson County Public Schools, Denver, CO; George Betts, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO

Nonverbal Assessment and Gifted Identification: Challenges and Solutions Jack A. Naglieri, University of Virginia, Centreville, VA

Typically, gifted and talented programming options are full speed ahead during the elementary and middle school years. When gifted and talented students reach their high school settings, roadblocks and barriers are evident. At Wheat Ridge High School in Colorado, the Autonomous Learner Model is in its fifth year of implementation. We share vignettes of student profiles, their needs, success and challenges, as well as the 5-year process in making the ALM a universally applicable roadway to helping gifted learners finish their high school experience as champions.

There is no universally accepted definition of gifted and talented students, which is one reason the NAGC Programming Standard 2 states that educators need to know about all forms of assessment. The standards urge educators to use non-biased, technically adequate measures to ensure that students from diverse backgrounds are identified; which is where nonverbal tests provide a good solution. In this presentation the use of the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test-Second Edition to meet these goals is carefully examined and the use of national scores, local norms, and universal screening is discussed for nonbiased identification of gifted minorities.

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 204

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Researchers Room: 102

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National Association for Gifted Children

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

STEM Gifted Kids May Be Tech Savvy, but Are They Fluent? Carl Heine, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy, Aurora, IL; Susan Corwith, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL The assumption is that today’s children, being digital natives, are equipped to find, evaluate and appropriately use information found on the Internet. But, how skilled are they? Do they search thoughtfully and analyze critically? Information fluency (the capacity to locate and use digital information effectively, efficiently, and ethically) is critical. Although many gifted students believe they are proficient at these skills, a 5-year program that assessed the skills of over 2,000 gifted adolescents found a different reality. The good news is that information fluency can be taught. The presenters share findings and discuss frameworks for effective information fluency instruction. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators Room: 302 Gearing Girls Up for STEM Careers Sylvia Rimm, Family Achievement Clinic, North Olmsted, OH

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

women. While girls earn equal numbers of Ph.D. and MD degrees, 52% of women leave STEM careers never to return at similar high levels. Educators and parents are crucial for teaching girls assertiveness and resilience that are required to make contributions and persevere in STEM careers. Examples of how educators can help prepare girls to change gears for successful careers are shared.

Friday

Recorded Session

Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Parents Room: White River B What Does STEM Look Like in a Gifted Elementary Classroom? Kelly R. Masters, Zionsville Community School, Avon, IN Gifted students are some of our most curious and creative minds. Curiosity and creativity lead to innovation and at the heart of innovation is STEM. STEM is more than science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. It’s a way of thinking and teaching. During this poster session, participants will learn how to make your lessons more STEM friendly. You also receive great take-away pieces that you can use in your classroom and a list of my favorite STEM resources. Participants leave with an understanding of what STEM looks like at the elementary level. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Gifted Coordinators Room: Griffin Hall

Most recent statistics for women in STEM careers are discouraging. Percentages of women graduating with engineering degrees has decreased from 22% in 2004 to 17% in 2009. As of 2011, only 4.2 % of engineers are

11:45 AM – 12:30 PM BREAK

Catch your breath. Stretch your legs. Buy a bite to eat in the exhibit hall.

See you back at 12:30 PM!

60th Annual Convention

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Friday

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM

be able to conduct a free group video conference through Oovoo and differentiate content using wikis and products through engaging media such as Xtranormal. You’ll soon be Glogstering, Prezi-ing, and more!

ARTS Teaching History Through Art Carol Carter, Patricia L. Hollingsworth, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK Students of all ages from K-8, can learn the history of art, architecture, and culture through the use of drawing, movement, and chants. This hands-on session spans time periods from ancient Egypt through modern time. These interdisciplinary activities can be used in any classroom. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers Early Childhood, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 303

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY Building Collaborative Learning Environments Vincent Vrotny, Quest Academy, Palatine, IL A 21st century learning environment is one that allows learners to collaborate and interact outside the 45 minute block. This environment also allows for all types of learners, introverted or extroverted, in the same classroom, the same building, the same district, the same state, or across the globe to connect and co-learn using blended or online learning spaces.Participants learn about a variety of tools, their strengths and weaknesses, which can be used to construct spaces for their learning environments. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers High School, Gifted Coordinators Room: 305 EMERGENCY - Using Emerging Technologies to Differentiate for Gifted Students in Your Classroom Nancy N. Heilbronner, Mercy College, White Plains, NY Teachers sometimes feel that technology is evolving faster than they can keep up with it. Yet, technology can be our ally, especially when it comes to differentiating for gifted students. At this practical workshop, come and explore the latest computer-based emerging technologies and see how you may use them to differentiate in your classroom. You’ll

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National Association for Gifted Children

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: 310 Teaching With Your iPad - A Fantastic and Effective Tool Cyril R. Pruszko, Eleanor Roosevelt High School, Greenbelt, MD With the right apps, your iPad can replace every other device that you use in the classroom, and do it easier and better. You can write/draw on the screen, markup documents, record your lessons, project textbook pages, show student work live, fill in worksheets and more. Learn other innovative ways to use your iPad. You can do all of this from anywhere in the room. Walk around the class while presenting on the screen. Teach from the back of your classroom and add a new dimension to your teaching. Be right there with your students to help them. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School Room: 313 The Greatest Stories Never Told: Showcasing Our Gifted Classrooms Through Social Media and Web Tools Elvira G. Deyamport, Hattiesburg Public Schools, Hattiesburg, MS As social media and Web 2.0 tools become easier to use, educators of the gifted should take notice and take advantage of the benefits these tools have to offer. In this session, administrators, teachers, and gifted education coordinators explore how tools like blogs, Twitter, and Facebook can be used to showcase our gifted classrooms, while serve as advocacy tools for our unique learners. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators Room: 304

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

Teachers College—A Legacy to Gifted Education Jennifer Jolly, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA; Jennifer Robins, The College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA

I Want to Be ___ When I Grow Up: How Teachers and Parents Can Foster Career Pathways in Intellectually and Creatively Gifted Students Barbara Kerr, Nicole M. Farmer, M. Alexandra Vuyk, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS

Teachers College at Columbia University has been part of the fabric of gifted education from the very beginning. Beginning with Leta S. Hollingworth in the late 1910s, Teachers College stood at the forefront of this burgeoning body of research and contributed greatly to the field of gifted education. This presentation highlights the early foundational findings of Leta Hollingworth and how successive Teachers College researchers built off, expanded, and in some cases corrected the work of their Teachers College colleagues, past and contemporary— each leaving their own unique mark on gifted education. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - High School, Professors, Researchers Room: 209 An Asynchronous Flash Mob: Q&A with the Columbus Group Patricia Gatto-Walden, Boulder, CO; Christine S. Neville, Cheetah Project, Cushing, ME; Linda Kreger Silverman, Gifted Development Center, Westminster, CO; Stephanie S. Tolan, Institute for Educational Advancement, Charlotte, NC; Kathi Kearney, MSAD #60 North Berwick, ME, Friendship, ME; Michele Kane, Ellen D. Fiedler, Northeastern Illinois University, Long Grove, IL; Barbara Mitchell Hutton, NOVA School, Broomfield, CO And now for something completely different. No “presenter or presentation.” We build this interactive session to meet your needs from questions, comments, and exchanges with each other and the panel members. The definition of giftedness as asynchronous development has been around for more than 20 years—plenty of time for lots of questions to be raised. Instead of presenters telling you what they want you to know, this session will be created entirely by participants’ questions. Bring them on and get answers from the originators of the concept, those who have made it central to their work. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Psychologists Room: CC 126

60th Annual Convention

Friday

Recorded Session

In this applied session, learn career counseling interventions based on the latest vocational psychology research. Parents, teachers, and counselors can implement or encourage these interventions, which are powerful for intellectually and creatively gifted students and their unique vocational needs. At the Counseling Laboratory for the Exploration of Optimal States (CLEOS) at the University of Kansas, we counseled over 800 gifted adolescents integrating rational and intuitive techniques such as career assessments, goal-setting, visualizations, and flow state experiences. We hope to share everything we learned from, and with, the kids! Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Psychologists Room: 102

CREATIVITY f(Mathematical Thinking) = Creativity Eric Mann, Hope College, Holland, MI Mathematics is a discipline that embraces creativity and beauty yet often students are immersed in classroom activities where these attributes are hidden by an overemphasis on algorithms and computational speed. Creativity exists in all fields but the nature and manifestations differ based on the values and objectives within the discipline. While artists, authors, and musicians seek to invoke an aesthetic or emotional response, STEM disciplines focus on creating solutions to problems; a functional view of creativity. Yet creativity is often limited in K-12 classrooms where students mimic established algorithms to construct, as opposed to create, solutions to known problems. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers High School, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: CC 121

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Friday

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM (Cont.)

Differentiating Instruction for Gifted Learners Through Student Learning Objectives Leticia Hernandez de Hahn, Niagara University, Lewiston, NY

CREATIVITY (Cont.) Writing into the Future April Dennis, Future Problem Solving Program International, Melbourne, FL How might we provide exciting and challenging materials for students while at the same time meeting the demands of current curricular requirements and Common Core Standards? One option is for students to explore their future world through a highly engaging competitive program. This session examines opportunities to involve students in Scenario Writing of Future Problem Solving Program International– an authentically evaluated outlet for creative student writing. This session provides content or enrichment materials to benefit teachers of gifted, along with parents, administrators, or anyone who wants to learn more about the Future Problem Solving Program. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 302

CURRICULUM STUDIES Celebrating Excellence: Project-based Learning Activities and Showcase Julie Austin, Judy Eden, Dana Hartzell, Becky Juday, Pamela Stults, Felicia Gray, Muncie Community Schools, Muncie, IN Teachers in the Muncie Community School’s K-5 highability program share engaging and creative project-based learning activities that meet Common Core State Standards across the curriculum, and provide the flexibility and high interest needed for gifted learners. Make it real and make it count! The products of these kid-tested projects are proudly shared annually through the school district’s community showcase, “Celebrate Excellence.” Students interact with the community to share what they have learned and the journey they took to learn it. Video and student-generated project samples are featured throughout the presentation. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Gifted Coordinators Room: 314

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National Association for Gifted Children

Are you setting Student Learning Objectives for a particular subject or grade level? Are these objectives responding to the needs of all gifted students in your classroom? The SLO initiative led by the Race to the Top Support Network is an instructional process designed to strengthen teaching and improve student learning. This workshop examines how to begin the outcome-based process with a focus on differentiated learning strategies and provides guidelines for writing higher-level thinking SLOs. Participants will use various templates to set measurable tiered goals that lead to differentiated outcomes. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: 308 It Takes a School: Developing a Collaborative Model to Implement NAGC Evidence-Based Practices to Fuel Potential, Drive Achievement, and Accelerate the Pace Krista B. Kimble, Prince William County Public Schools, Centreville, VA; Gail F. Hubbard, Prince William County Public Schools, Montclair, VA An elementary school community in a diverse school system has used the evidence-based practices of the NAGC standards to develop a collaborative model for curriculum planning and instruction for advanced learners. The essential components of this model support a continuum of services and can be replicated in most elementary school settings through the innovative use of existing resources. Strategies range from fueling potential with inclusive opportunities for problem solving, to driving achievement with advanced core content cluster groups, to accelerating the pace through pre-assessment, to enhancing gifted education resource services. Results include improved academic growth and increased identification of diverse learners. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Gifted Coordinators Room: White River I

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Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

Teaching Psychology Through Literature: Moving Gifted Students Beyond the Common Core Terri Zazove, Kenneth J. Smith, Sunset Ridge School District 29, Chicago, IL

Writing a Winning Curriculum: Guidelines for Curriculum Studies Competition Carol Ann Williams, Richard Stockton College, Petersburg, NJ; Christine J. Briggs, Sally M. Dobyns, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA

Common Core Standards present increased challenges, yet gifted learners may still go beyond what these standards require. Rather than go to a higher grade-level’s standards, we propose adding more complexity to a project’s cognitive demands. We present a unit that does just that: A Freudian Analysis of Literature. In this model unit, we present how to teach Freud’s key concepts and then to have students use these concepts to analyze literature and to impact their writing. The sample texts are “Lord of the Flies” and “The Cat in the Hat.” This unit won the NAGC 2012 Curriculum Studies Award.

Educators use curriculum everyday to guide their teaching and provide challenge for their students. The Curriculum Studies network honors authors of high quality, challenging, differentiated curriculum designed to meet the diverse learning needs of gifted students. This session outlines the rules and requirements for the network’s annual competition. Participants learn how to submit a unit, the timeline for the review process, and the assessment rubrics. If you have a unit you would like to submit, this session provides the information you need.

Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators Room: CC 127

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators Room: 201

What’s the Big Idea? Using Books to Cultivate Talented Readers and Thinkers Across the Curriculum Susannah Richards, Eastern Connecticut State University, Storrs, CT

EARLY CHILDHOOD

This session provides an overview of appropriate challenging books and strategies to use to ignite, cultivate, and delight talented 2nd-5th grade readers in all curriculum areas. The focus is on creating opportunities for talented readers to develop their reading and thinking abilities as they explore their interests and expand their knowledge by reading quality fiction and nonfiction that extends the curriculum. A list of recently published “big idea” books and strategies for using picture books, novels, and nonfiction in both print and electronic formats to escalate student engagement will be shared.

Young gifted children develop literate understandings within their daily social environment. They juxtapose creativity with literacy as they engage in sociodramatic play. They draw maps to customers’ homes as they deliver pretend pizzas and create coupons for use at their play grocery store. One wonders what type of environments promote such behaviors. Bredekamp and Wohlwend develop cases for bringing play as literacy back into the early childhood classroom. Creativity, giftedness, and literacy explored as it is developed through play aids attendees in understanding the importance of these components in the lives of young gifted children.

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators Room: White River C

60th Annual Convention

Friday

Recorded Session

Creativity, Giftedness, and Literacy: Wrap It All Up in Play Jeanine Jechura, University of Toledo, Temperance, MI

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: CC 124

0 November 7-10, 2013 0 Indianapolis, IN 0 www.nagc.org

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Friday

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM (Cont.)

GLOBAL AWARENESS

EARLY CHILDHOOD (Cont.)

Infusing Service with Learning Katrina Weimholt, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

Promoting Higher-Level Thinking in Early Childhood Settings: Opportunities for Concept Development Nancy B. Hertzog, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Early childhood programs that promote developmentally appropriate practices do not necessarily provide opportunities for children to enhance their creative and critical thinking. Far too many primary classrooms are devoted to basic skills in literacy and math without attention to encouraging children to initiate questions and pursue their own lines of inquiry for conceptual understanding. The presenter discusses concept development in relation to the Classroom Assessment Scoring System and demonstrates strategies that promote higher-level reasoning within authentic learning activities. Specific examples on how to integrate problem solving, experimentation, classification, and evaluation will be shared.

How can service-learning challenge gifted students in new ways and provide opportunities for them to apply their skills in real-world settings? How can educators connect existing service experiences with academic curricula to maximize learning? This session explores service-learning pedagogy and discusses ways service-learning provides an optimal match for gifted learners and aids in the development of 21st century skills. Best practices for structuring high-quality service-learning projects, from planning to implementation to reflection and evaluation are shared. Attendees leave with concrete tools and strategies to implement in their own schools. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators Room: 104

MIDDLE GRADES

Audience: Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: 203

From the Mind & Words of Socrates: How to Successfully Design Socratic Seminars Gem C. Thomerson, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN

The Common Core State Standards at the Primary Grades: A Golden Opportunity to Nurture Math Talent Katherine Gavin, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Did you know that Socrates believed that questioning was the only defensible form of teaching? But how does a teacher get students to ask good questions? What does an appropriate Socratic seminar for the gifted learner look like? How does a teacher create an environment to solicit student engagement and thinking? Learn how to capture students’ profound thoughts and set up a classroom for implementing Socratic seminars. We will apply the Socratic framework as guided by the words of the “discourse master” himself. Come and engage in this exciting and interactive presentation. Leave with new thinking and seminar questions in-hand!

The Common Core State Standards are today’s new blueprint for curriculum and instruction. At the primary grades, these standards provide a more rigorous framework for learning mathematics that recognizes our young students can do much more than previously expected. In fact, the CCSS for Mathematical Practice embody the principles of gifted education pedagogy that encourage students to think and act like practicing mathematicians. Come learn how to develop talent with the CCSS using a classroom-proven communication model and awardwinning advanced math units for primary students. Practical, easy-to-implement features of the model and samples of student work will be shared.

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators Room: 103

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Researchers Room: White River J

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National Association for Gifted Children

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Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

NCSSSMST

PARENT & COMMUNITY

Virginia’s Governor’s Schools Donna L. Poland, Virginia Department of Education, Richmond, VA

Homeschooling Your Gifted Child Mary L. Morse, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

Unique to Virginia are the varied and expansive Governor’s School programs that are offered to gifted students. Virginia Governor’s Schools provide some of the state’s most able students academically and artistically challenging programs beyond those offered in their home schools. With the support of the Virginia Board of Education, the General Assembly, and local school divisions, the Governor’s Schools presently include 19 Academic-Year Governor’s Schools, seven Summer Residential Governor’s Schools and the 20 Summer Regional Governor’s Schools serving more than 9,000 gifted students from across the Commonwealth. This session discusses the formation, governance, funding, curriculum development, and student selection that supports the development and operation of these unique programs. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: 206

When a gifted child’s needs are not being met in a traditional school setting, homeschooling is an important educational option to consider. This presentation provides an introduction to homeschooling gifted children. It will focus on how to choose and adapt homeschool curriculum for high-ability learners. Techniques for supporting the unique emotional and developmental needs of gifted children are discussed. The presenter is a doctoral student in educational psychology researching how parents meet the needs of their gifted children through homeschooling. She is also an experienced homeschooling parent who is currently homeschooling a gifted child.

Friday

Recorded Session

Audience: Parents Room: 301 Exceptionally Gifted Children: A Documentary Film and Discussion P. Susan Jackson, Daimon Institute for the Highly Gifted, White Rock, BC, Canada Giftedness is a way of experiencing, perceiving, thinking, and creating that is fundamentally different from a more typical human experience. Exceptional and profound giftedness is captured brilliantly here in the lives of children, teens and young adults. This one-of-a-kind film delves into their (most often hidden) innerworlds, learning/educational pathways, passions and remarkable abilities, unique ways of processing, creating, communicating, and trademark unmitigated desire to connect and contribute in life. Twice exceptionality, misdiagnosis, mental health, family/peer relations, extraordinary sensitivity, advanced morality and emotionality is explored in the film, and through audience discussion.

For the most up-to-date information on sessions and to search for sessions by strand

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 309

or speaker, download the NAGC2013 app.

60th Annual Convention

0 November 7-10, 2013 0 Indianapolis, IN 0 www.nagc.org

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Friday

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM (Cont.)

The Anxious Family: What to Do When Everyone Frets! Joanna L. Haase, California Gifted Network, Pasadena, CA; Dan Peters, Summit Center, Walnut Creek, CA

PARENT & COMMUNITY (Cont.) Living With Intensity – Understanding the Sensitivity, Excitability, and Emotional Development of Gifted Youth Susan Daniels, California State University at San Bernardino, San Bernardino, CA Overexcitabilities – psychomotor, sensual, intellectual, imaginational, and emotional – are central to the personality, intellectual, physical, and social-emotional development of the gifted. Overexcitabilities confer certain advantages for gifted development and at the same time render the gifted vulnerable to being misunderstood, and potentially misidentified. This presentation addresses the challenges associated with overexcitability along with strategies for helping gifted children modulate their OEs and channel these energies most positively. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Consultants, Counselors, Parents, Professors, Psychologists Room: White River H Overcoming Underrepresentation: A Parent and School Engagement Perspective Ken Dickson, Baltimore County Public Schools, Upper Marlboro, MD This presentation focuses on ways to increase and retain culturally, linguistically, ethnically diverse learners and learners from diverse social and economic backgrounds in gifted programs through effective parent engagement practices. For at least four decades, gifted education has engaged in discourse concerning CLED learners. Multiple outcomes emerged. In this presentation, four outcomes are offered – attitude, access, assessment and accommodations - that represent research from several stakeholders, particularly those of Dr. Mary Fraiser, an African-American scholar and past president of NAGC dedicated her life to underrepresented groups and their participation in gifted programs.

Gifted children are often intense, driven, and struggle with overexcitabilities, perfectionism, and anxiety, just like their parents!! Typically, parents and professionals focus on managing the children’s anxiety, overlooking how anxiety affects family life, family relationships, and family fun. This workshop helps parents identify common anxiety “patterns” and provides practical, effective tools designed to help the entire family “tame the worry monster.” Audience: Counselors, Parents, Psychologists Room: CC 128

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT A Year of Learning: How 85 Classroom Teachers Learned to Meet the Needs of their Advanced Learners in the Regular Classroom Maggie Smith, Melanie Crawford, Minneapolis Public Schools, Minneapolis, MN What does it take to meet the needs of advanced learners in a large school system with no budget for gifted specialists? The solution in our district was to design a graduate certificate-style program in advanced differentiation and talent development for classroom teachers. Over the course of a year, teachers learned a vast array of strategies from depth and complexity to curriculum compacting. Because our assignments required immediate application of learning in teachers’ classrooms, a depth of understanding and professional change was possible. We share the design and process of this professional learning model, and our successes and challenges. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: White River D

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 306

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National Association for Gifted Children

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Supporting Elementary Teachers in Implementing the Next Generation Science Standards Cheryll M. Adams, Ball State University, Muncie, IN; Deborah D. Dailey, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR; Alicia A. Cotabish, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR With the release of the Next Generation Science Standards, a new vision for science education begins and will emphasize inquiry-based science at the elementary level. Unfortunately, many elementary teachers do not feel qualified to teach or lead gifted students in inquiry-based science experiences. This session provides participants with professional development methods and strategies to improve elementary teachers’ ability to facilitate inquirybased learning among gifted students. In particular, the focus of this session is on workshop strategies, curriculum options, and follow-up support methods to increase elementary teachers’ knowledge, pedagogical skills, and confidence in teaching science. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators Room: White River G Using DATA to Improve Professional Development Antonia Szymanski, Indiana University Northwest, Valparaiso, IN; Laurie J. Croft, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA Professional development is most successful when a gap faculty recognizes is between teacher beliefs and researchbased practices. Critical examination of administrative attitudes and overall school culture regarding academically advanced students begins by establishing an initial level of beliefs. The creation of the Determining Attitudes Towards Ability (DATA) questionnaire provides presenters with site specific information based on a psychometrically sound instrument. Come sample the DATA questionnaire and learn ways to create meaningful profession development sessions that foster communication. Participants leave this session with ideas to create custom sessions based on their site’s unique DATA results. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 101

60th Annual Convention

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

We Want YOU! How to Get More Involved in the Work of NAGC Carol L. Tieso, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Kristen R. Stephens, Duke University, Durham, NC; Christine Ohtani-Chang, Hawaii Gffted Association, Honolulu, HI; Marcia Gentry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; George Betts, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO; Jann H. Leppien, Whitworth University, Spokane, WA

Friday

Recorded Session

It is only through involved members that NAGC can fulfill the mission of addressing the needs of the gifted and talented children. There are many ways where your participation in the work of the Association is both welcomed and needed. Whether it be joining a special interest group, serving on a committee or running for the board of directors to name a few, your active participation is needed. Join Members of NAGC’s Leadership Committee to hear about the many ways, both small and large that YOU can become more involved in NAGC. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: JW Grand Ballroom 10

RESEARCH & EVALUATION How To Assess Creativity Using Authentic Performance Tasks Gyimah I. Whitaker, Gifted and Talented Coordinator, Atlanta Public Schools, Marietta, GA Have you ever wondered how authentic performance tasks may be used to promote and assess creativity? Join this session for insight and hands-on practice with implementing and scoring an innovative creativity performance task developed by the presenters. Implementation and correlation research data from an urban and suburban school district is provided. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Researchers Room: CC 120

0 November 7-10, 2013 0 Indianapolis, IN 0 www.nagc.org

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Friday

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM (Cont.)

RESEARCH & EVALUATION (Cont.) Measuring Academic Growth in Gifted Students: What Practitioners Need to Know D. Betsy McCoach, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT Recent conversations of educational effectiveness have underscored the importance of including growth in school accountability models; however, measuring academic growth in gifted students is not a simple task. Often, gifted students demonstrate less growth than their average peers. This lack of growth could be the result of multiple causes- two of the most common are inappropriate curriculum/instruction or problems with the test used to assess growth. In this session, we explore some of the common problems with assessing growth in gifted students and provide recommendations for educators and researchers who are interested in documenting the academic growth of gifted students. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Researchers Room: CC 125

SPECIAL POPULATIONS A Team Approach to Serving TwiceExceptional Students: Targeted Professional Development for Districts Lois Baldwin, Tarrytown, NY; Cheryl Franklin-Rohr, Adams 14 School District, Lakewood, CO; Jacquelin Medina, Wendy S. Leader, Colorado Department of Education, Denver, CO Because twice-exceptional students are one of the most underserved groups in our schools, the Colorado Department of Education has begun a series of projects to increase the capacity of individual school districts to recognize and serve this special population. Trained consultants use a local team approach to problem solving and programming by focusing on case studies, building rigorous curriculum, and nurturing strengths of twice-exceptional students rather than taking a deficit approach to their education. This presentation provides participants with an interactive project overview, a view of the manuals and online course used in training, and data from teachers involved. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Psychologists, Researchers Room: White River B

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National Association for Gifted Children

Developing Promotion Strategies for Self-Regulation: Critical Skills for Underrepresented Students’ Success in Gifted Programs Richard M. Cash, nRich Educational Consulting, Minneapolis, MN Self-regulation, the skills used to achieve success, is oriented toward facing challenges (promotion) or avoiding failure (prevention). Students with promotion orientation approach tasks with confidence, even in the face of obstacles and setbacks. Students from diverse and economically disadvantaged backgrounds may be underrepresented in gifted programming due to their lack of promotion strategies for self-regulation, or their overuse of avoidance strategies acquired during previous experiences. This session frames promotion orientation and growth mindset theories to provide techniques for teaching self-regulation strategies of achievement. Additionally, participants receive effective methods for supporting diverse students in gifted programs. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 205 Examining Validity of Referrals and Tests Adjusted for Opportunity to Learn in a Highly Diverse Setting Geoffrey Moon, Gallup McKinley County Schools, Gallup, NM Through use of subgroup norms, within-group rankings, and diverse data, more students from underrepresented groups may be identified for gifted education programs. How big are the differences? And do these alternate methods identify the right students? This presentation compares the racial, ethnic, gender, and socioeconomic characteristics of students referred for testing with and without adjustments for opportunity to learn. Whole-group normed tests, subgroup normed tests, and combinations of those tests with data on creative thinking, interest, and motivation are then compared with follow-up data to examine to what extent the alternative procedures are predictive of later success. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: CC 123

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

STEM Cloudy with a Chance of Science: Teaching STEM through a Classic Children’s Tale Corrin McBride, Laura Saxton, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD Getting elementary students engaged in STEM is often as easy as helping them to see connections to things they already know and love. In this session, presenters from the Center for Talented Youth discuss lessons they used to teach a variety of hands-on STEM lessons using the children’s book, “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs.” Participants leave with a unit outline, lesson plans, and ideas for how to incorporate STEM into Dr. Seuss, “Where the Wild Things Are,” and other children’s classics.

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

inclusive and exclusive schools (i.e., no entry or entry criteria). A national survey of STEM high schools that used various service delivery models (full-time, part-time, magnet, charter, and residential) provided data on the importance and frequency of specific curricular and instructional strategies and practices. Awareness of the curricular and instructional strategies and practices help administrators and teachers design and re-design effective STEM high schools.

Friday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - High School, Researchers Room: White River A

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM

SIGNATURE SERIES Audience: Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Parents Room: 202 Metacognition for Talented Learners in STEM / P-6 Engineering Context Ronald L. Carr, Purdue University, Lafayette, IN Metacognition in the Engineering Design Process was designed to teach elementary school students about metacognition through scaffolding of cognitive regulation activities while they learn the engineering design process. This session looks at the design and evaluation of this intervention and the research behind it that connects engineering, STEM, high-ability learners, and metacognition. Examples of student work and specific activities that can be easily adapted for all disciplines are featured. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Researchers Room: 208 STEM Schools of Excellence: Unique Characteristics and Effective Strategies Cindy M. Gilson, E. Jean Gubbins, Jennifer Foreman, Micah Bruce-Davis, Merzili Villanueva, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Carolyn M. Callahan, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA; Colby Tofel-Grehl, Utah State University, Logan, UT Over 800 STEM-focused high schools exist around the country. Learn about STEM schools’ unique curricular and instructional strategies, program and student assessment techniques, and identification policies and practices for

60th Annual Convention

Gifted Education and the Common Core State Standards: A Focus on Mathematics Susan K. Johnsen, Baylor University, Woodway, TX; Gail R. Ryser, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX; Susan Assouline, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA The adoption of the Common Core State Standards in almost every state is cause for gifted education as a field to reflect on its role in supporting gifted and high-potential learners appropriately in the content areas, including mathematics. Whether students plan to enter a STEM field in a career anywhere from astronomy to zoology or simply become well-informed citizens who can make sense of the world, recognize patterns, make generalizations and test conjectures, and make and defend logical decisions, mathematics is critical to their development. This session provides teachers and administrators with practical examples of ways of building a comprehensive, coherent, and continuous set of learning experiences for gifted and advanced students in mathematics. It describes informal, traditional, off-level, and 21st century math assessments that are useful in making educational decisions about placement and programming. Specific instructional and management strategies for implementing the standards within the classroom, school, and school district levels are discussed. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators Room: JW Grand Ballroom 10

0 November 7-10, 2013 0 Indianapolis, IN 0 www.nagc.org

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Friday

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM (Cont.)

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY iPads: Intuitive Technology for 21st-Century Students Del Siegle, University of Connecticut, Mansfield, CT iPads are among the most frequently requested technology gifts by young people. Educators can improve student motivation, increase student learning, promote creative productive, and differentiate learning for gifted students with this intuitive technology. In this session, a number of free or inexpensive apps that promote authentic learning are shared. These apps can be used to enhance the traditional curriculum or to provide students with opportunities to explore creative productivity similar to practicing professionals. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators Room: 308

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS A Psychologist and a Counselor Dialogue About How They Conceptualize the ‘Whole Gifted Child’ Jean S. Peterson, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Dan Peters, Summit Center, Walnut Creek, CA “The whole child” is a familiar concept in education. Yet in the performance-driven culture of schools, the “whole” may have low priority and may not resonate with how “giftedness” is conceptualized. The same may be true in programming. A psychologist and a counselor with clinical experience with gifted children and their families, will discuss concerns they see, how teachers and parents might address such concerns, how programming can embrace the whole child, when referrals should be made, how counselors and psychologists may differ in perspectives and approaches, and keys to mutually comfortable relationships with gifted youth.

A Dabrowskian Model for Teaching and Counseling Gifted Students Sal Mendaglio, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada Teachers and counselors of gifted students need a conception of giftedness to guide their work. With numerous established conceptions, it seems reasonable to assume that the task is one of selection from the menu available. Upon close examination, established conceptions may not suffice because they were not designed to direct processes of teaching or counseling. The purpose of this session is to present a model of giftedness that combines a conception of giftedness with Dabrowski’s theory of positive disintegration. Termed the affective model of counseling gifted individuals, it has been applied to both counseling and teaching gifted students. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors Room: White River B Self-Mentoring: A Guide for Becoming the Hero of Your Own Story! Angela Housand, University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Greenville, NC Partnering a gifted individual with a mentor can be as an important developmental stage in the process toward independently seeking out and establishing relationships that foster cooperation and growth. Unfortunately scarcity of time and resources often limit access to mentors who can help to create a foundation of confidence and necessary skills to accomplish one’s goals. This session introduces “self-mentoring” and provides a systematic framework for gifted adolescents and young adults that enables them to navigate the environments they encounter, achieve the goals they set, and establish a network of support for both personal and “professional” advancement. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: CC 124

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 305

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National Association for Gifted Children

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Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Letters to Our Gifted Selves: What We Wished We Had Known When We Were Young Jaclyn M. Chancey, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Adrienne E. Sauder, Western University, London, ON, Canada What do you say to a gifted child who doesn’t quite understand why they are different from their peers? What would a gifted individual say to their younger self? This poster session, intended for parents, teachers, and counselors, takes an analytical and interpretive look at the self-narratives of two gifted women as they reflect on what they wish they had known about giftedness as they were growing up. This examination of their own lived experiences illustrates how perceptions of giftedness influence personal, academic, and vocational development. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: Griffin Hall Lighting Leadership Spark in Gifted Girls Kate Bachtel, Eric Robertson, Mackintosh Academy, Boulder, CO The chameleon nature of gifted girls has been known for some time. Given this inherent adaptation and assimilation ability, how can we support gifted girls in revealing their true selves and growing into inspiring learners and leaders who affect positive change in the world? Join us for engaging discussion on ways to connect our gifted girls and fuel their beautiful fire within. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Psychologists Room: Griffin Hall

For the most up-todate information on sessions and to search for sessions by strand or speaker, download the NAGC2013 app.

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

CREATIVITY Organic Creativity 1: Infusing Creativity Into Academic Subject Matter Rebecca McElfresh, Akron, OH; Jane Piirto, Ashland University, Ashland, OH; George W. Johnson, Southern Local Schools, Logan, OH

Friday

Recorded Session

This session focuses on the autobiographical tales and professional experiences of subject matter domain experts. Long-time practitioners of school administration, foreign language, calculus, and the GT resource room discuss how they infuse intuition, improvisation, insight, risk-taking, group trust, inspiration, meditation, judgment-free feedback, openness to experience, incubation, insight, imagery, and the like into their classroom curricula. Four of the authors of chapters of this new edited book share their research, moderated by the editor. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists Room: 104 Revving Up E-motion: Creating Learning States of Mind Patti Shade, Denver Public Schools; Richard A. Shade, Jefferson County Public Schools, Denver, CO “There is no such thing as an unmotivated student. There are, however, students in unmotivated states!” How do your students walk into your classroom - distracted, full of energy, dragging? Participants explore how to adapt the learning process to powerfully engage student emotions to create learning states of mind. Discover how to get beyond the “attention getting signal” and understand how you can harness the power of transitioning student emotions in harmony with the creative learning process. Leave this session equipped with a set of purposeful activities that arouse curiosity, intensifying the learning experience. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators Room: 313

60th Annual Convention

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Friday

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM (Cont.)

CREATIVITY (Cont.) Using The Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking to Predict Creative Writing Ability in Gifted High School Students Jessi Cummings-Mengis, University of Houston, Houston, TX This session examines the use of the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking to predict creative writing ability within the classroom. The Torrance Test of Creative Thinking has been used longitudinally to predict creative achievement with success; however, little is known about its use in contentspecific areas. A current study employing the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking to validate its use in determining creative writing ability will be discussed. Given the need to identify creative individuals for content-specific programs, the use of appropriate creative instruments is extremely important. Implications for creative writing are discussed and interaction is encouraged. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Researchers Room: 302

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Multicultural Gifted Education: A Curriculum Model for Increasing Rigor and Relevance for ALL Gifted Students Michelle F. Trotman Scott, University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA; Donna Y. Ford, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN Multicultural curriculum is for ALL students. Gifted education curriculum is often based on Bloom’s Taxonomy to provoke critical thinking. This model promotes rigor to engage gifted students, but is not designed to provide students with a multicultural perspective. Likewise, multicultural curriculum may be relevant and engaging to students, but fails to promote critical thinking. The Bloom-Banks Matrix, originally created by Ford, has now been revised by Ford and Trotman Scott. It blends the best of critical thinking and multicultural curriculum. Participants will be introduced to the model and given examples of lesson plans based on the revised Matrix. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors Room: CC 125 Revving Up Alternatives to Seat Time for Credit Anne R. Flick, Cincinnati, OH

International Baccalaureate Programs as a Model of Gifted Best Practices Jeb S. Puryear, University of North Texas, Coppell, TX Research in the gifted field has yielded recurring themes regarding best practices. Curriculum models such as the Integrated Curriculum Model and Parallel Curriculum Model offer frameworks to guide gifted instruction. While International Baccalaureate programs are not specifically designed for gifted learners, they do provide a foundation for gifted enrichment and align with the research-based gifted pedagogy. This session articulates parallels with the ICM/PCM. Implications of the whole-school nature of the PYP and MYP are examined. Comparisons between the IB and other programs often targeted toward the gifted are made to demonstrate that it offers unique value-added benefits for the gifted.

Gifted education specialists and parents know well the benefits of accelerated pacing, internships, online courses, and independent study for certain students. Obtaining permission just to employ such strategies often is an uphill battle, let alone getting credit awarded for students’ prior knowledge. But now racing through the country faster than an Indy car are district- and state-level policies and legislation allowing—even requiring—high school credit for mastery, no matter when, where, or how quickly it is accomplished. Policy points of one statewide mandate and student experiences offer examples advocates can campaign for in their own districts and states. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 310

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 202

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National Association for Gifted Children

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

The Influence of Teacher Expectations About Twice-exceptional Students on the Use of High Quality Gifted Curriculum Carolyn M. Callahan, Marguerite M. Brunner, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA Twice-exceptional students show evidence of high academic potential and also have a disability that impedes their learning. Despite their abilities, 2e students remain underrepresented in gifted programs often due to negative beliefs and low expectations about 2e students by teachers’. Using data from surveys, observations, and interviews of teachers, the research presented addresses the influence of teacher beliefs and expectations about student ability on the ways teachers employ researchbased curricular models and instructional strategies with twice-exceptional students who have been placed in gifted programs. Case studies of teachers working with students with autism and emotional disorders are presented. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: White River A Using the Parallel Curriculum Model to Develop Thinking in the 21st Century Learner Karen L. Westberg, University of St. Thomas, Minneapolis, MN; Jann H. Leppien, Whitworth University, Spokane, WA How do we create and develop intellectual thinking in our students through the curriculum we design? This session explores how to infuse instruction in critical and creativethinking skills into standard content instruction in ways that both improve student thinking but also enhance deep content learning by using the Parallel Curriculum Model. Teachers are introduced to a lesson plan framework and provided with sample lesson design materials that include instructional strategies for effectively teaching thinking in each of the four parallels, including the use of question strategies and graphic organizers for thinking skillfully. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: CC 126

60th Annual Convention

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60th Annual Convention Event

EARLY CHILDHOOD How Primary Grade Teachers Can Create Their Own Screening Tools For Teaching Gifted Students Deborah L. Ruf, Educational Options, Golden Valley, MN

Friday

Recorded Session

The presenter’s extensive experience with public school teaching, teacher education, and test design, administration, and interpretation, makes this session invaluable and practical for those who wish to identify — and meet the needs of — young gifted children before they’ve been formally identified. Participants gain insight into what to look for and specific ideas about what to do to set up a classroom that differentiates the instruction, assignments, and daily interactions of the students in the classroom and school. Resources and templates are provided. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: CC 122 So Many Picture Books, So Little Time... Selecting Quality Literature to Enhance the Reading Abilities of High Ability Elementary Students (With A Dose of CCSS Thrown in for Good Measure!) Laura M. Beltchenko, National Louis University, Libertyville, IL Children’s literature is rich with storyline and illustrations that work in harmony to send a message. Using the illustrations in children’s literature as a focus, this session explores the influence of character, setting, and overall presentation format, which expands the thoughtfulness of the books’ message while incorporating “Close Reading” found in the ELA CCSS. This visual journey through the use of quality children’s literature supports our advanced young readers in their interpretation of textual/illustrative evidence. A bibliography of referenced books is provided as well as ideas to make children’s literature purposeful, productive, and thoughtful. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 303

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1:45 PM – 2:45 PM (Cont.)

Virtual Specialty Academies with Special Opportunities Muffie Sandberg, Connections Academy

EARLY CHILDHOOD (Cont.) Montessori Teachers’ Beliefs, Values, and Perceptions of Creativity Duna M. Alkhudhair, College of William & Mary, Richmond, VA; Paige Hendricks, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA Montessori educational practices and teachers focus on engaging, developing, and nurturing the interests of young children by providing an environment matching the diverse learning needs of their students. This open and self-directed learning process fosters opportunities for challenge and increased cognitive growth while nurturing childrens’ abilities to problem-solve, adapt and increase their flexibility of thought, and exhibit potential for creative outcomes. This presentation addresses the beliefs, values, and perceptions of creativity by Montessori teachers. Participants incorporate learned strategies promoting child interests, strengths, gifts, and talents into current school settings thereby increasing the potential for creativity in young children. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Parents Room: CC 128

EXHIBITOR WORKSHOPS Seeing My Time-Teaching the Gifted to Get Things Done Marydee Sklar, Executive Functioning Success Seeing My Time— Much More Than Time Management ™ is a unique structured course to teach executive functioning skills. The program is based on a workbook that is supported by an award-winning instructor’s manual and online or onsite training. Currently used in schools and private practices –individuals and groups.

Gifted Students are thriving and engaged in Connections Academy virtual schools with communities for: students who excels in theatre, dance, fine arts, photography, videography, and creative writing; students who interact while learning cutting edge science and technology; and gifted athletes who enjoy flexible schedules as they travel, train, and compete. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Parents Room: Griffin Hall

GLOBAL AWARENESS Moving Dabrowski Into the Pit: Addressing Dabrowksi’s Overexcitablies in the Classroom Robert (Bob) W. Seney, Mississippi University for Women, Mancos, CO Dabrowski’s Overexcitablities provide an excellent and informing framework in which to understand gifted individuals. In addition, the genre of picture books has developed into a surprisingly sophisticated resource for gifted readers of all ages. By using picture books and students’ penchant for reading, teachers have an appropriate springboard to meet social and emotional needs. By connecting Dabrowski, picture books, and gifted learners’ love for reading, we have a fast track on which we can guide gifted learners to a celebration of self and global awareness. A list of picture books connected to the overexcitablities is shared. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Parents Room: CC 123

Audience: All Room: Griffin Hall

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National Association for Gifted Children

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Valued and Engaged: Why Facebook is So Popular April DeGennaro, Peeples Elementary School, Fayetteville, GA Would students “like” your classroom on Facebook? The Facebook concept of “LIKE” is a hallmark of engagement because emotion is essential to learning. The need to be heard, to connect with others, to be touched and validated is primal. Gifted learners are vulnerable to feelings of isolation and need opportunities to validate unusual ideas and unique perspectives. Facebook provides unparalleled access to others and opportunities for validation on a global scale. Begin with the theoretical and end with practical ways to change your classroom culture to communities of 21st century learning, where shared knowledge through engagement is valued. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators Room: 103 Infinite Possibilities: How to See the Power of Our Thoughts Anella D. Wetter, Infinite Possibilities, Lexington, KY; Gretchen Ehret, Infinite Possibilities, Mays Landing, NJ This presentation is based on the book “Infinite Possibilities,” a NYT Bestseller that has been published in twelve languages. In the world of high-stakes assessments, an inevitable consequence is that the holistic needs of children, particularly their need to dream, is deemed as less important. This session provides a plan to teach: living deliberately; that every life is meaningful; and that we’re all here to learn that dreams do come true. As educators and parents who work with gifted children daily, our program teaches that we each have tremendous power to bring love, health, abundance, and happiness into our lives. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: CC 127

60th Annual Convention

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

MIDDLE GRADES Escalating English Language Arts/Reading for Talented Middle Grades’ Readers and Writers Susannah Richards, Eastern Connecticut State University, Storrs, CT

Friday

Recorded Session

While many students have demonstrated that they have met or exceeded the reading and writing objectives, these students often complete the same lessons and assignments as their peers. The goal for this session is to explore strategies and curriculum to support highly able middle grade readers and writers to escalate their abilities. Sample learning experiences, suggested literature, and teaching suggestions that capitalize on the capacities of Web 2.0 will be shared to model high level differentiated curriculum for these verbally talented students. The goal of this session is to create an environment that supports lifetime readers and writers. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: White River C Middle School Students’ Perceptions of Teacher Effectiveness Laurie J. Croft, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA What do talented middle school students say about their most influential teachers? Research has shown that “the teacher—more than any other factor—has the greatest influence on student achievement” (Flynt and Brozo, 2009). Models of teacher efficacy, however, rely on student outcomes on standardized instruments as the measure of success, far more than individualized student portfolios and projects that might better capture the progress of gifted students. Some scholars, however, recognize the value of student perceptions of effective teachers and classrooms; this presentation shares themes about teachers identified as important to gifted and talented middle school students. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: White River D

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Friday

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM (Cont.)

MIDDLE GRADES (Cont.) Enfranchising, Educating, and Empowering G/T Adolescents from Culturally Diverse Populations Karen Brown, Dina M. Brulles, Paradise Valley Unified School District, Phoenix, AZ Providing robust gifted services for middle school students from underrepresented populations presents challenges. This session describes an interactive and innovative program for diverse GT students who were predominantly identified on nonverbal ability tests. The highly qualified teaching team incorporates an interdisciplinary, thematic instructional approach in designing and implementing project-based learning founded on gifted education pedagogy and authentic practices. This approach provides a culturally rich, engaging learning environment that embraces, encourages, and empowers gifted students from underrepresented populations. The presenters share instructional units, teaching and assessment methods, along with data examining program development and resulting academic achievement. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers High School, Gifted Coordinators Room: 304 Like Peanut Butter and Jelly: PBL and the Common Core Shelagh Gallagher, Engaged Education, Charlotte, NC The Common Core State Standards presents a particular challenge to middle school teachers, requiring that they combine content objectives with skills encompassing reading, research, analyzing, and presentation—while still engaging students! Problem-Based Learning is the perfect medium for this integration. In this session we take a close look at how content, process, and engagement blend in PBL to create learning experiences that are both meaningful and engaging. Examples of how to align PBL and CCSS are provided from tested middle school science and social studies curricula, with evidence that students learned required content and enjoyed complex thinking during PBL! Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Researchers Room: 209

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The Four C’s: Consulting, Co-teaching, Coaching and Collaboration in Middle Schools Richard M. Cash, nRich Educational Consulting, Minneapolis, MN; Patti B. Drapeau, Patti Drapeau Educational Consulting Services, South Freeport, ME; Carolyn Coil, Pieces of Learning, Marion, IL; Diane G. Heacox, St. Catherine University, Edina, MN Many districts are moving to consultation, co-teaching, and instructional coaching models at the middle school level because of limited budgets and reductions in staffing. This situation has caused districts to redesign their gifted services. The presenters explore the ways in which we can deeply embed differentiation into classroom practice. We examine the use of consultation, coaching, and co-teaching models in the middle grades. In addition, we explore the ways in which these models can strengthen gifted services, better address differentiation essential for gifted learners and build strong collaborative relationships between GT and classroom teachers. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: White River I

NCSSSMST Integrating Research-based Projects Into a Classroom Curriculum to Strengthen STEM Education (Repeated from Thursday) Jonathan Creamer, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN An effective strategy for teaching science and engineering is demonstrating an application to real-world issues. The School for Science and Math at Vanderbilt, a one day per week pull-out program focused on research-based learning, utilizes research projects as a teaching strategy throughout all grades. This presentation gives an overview of three real world-based research projects (analyzing rare plant phylogenies through gene sequencing, converting remote control vehicles into remote-sensing research tools, and examining global water issues using NASA images) and explains how they are integrated into the SSMV sophomore fall semester as class-wide, small-group projects. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers – High School, Gifted Coordinators, Researchers Room: 314

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Poster Session

NCSSSMST

The Required Thinking to be Successful in STEM Tim Gott, Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science, Bowling Green, KY This session focuses on 6 Cs of Thinking: critical, creative, contextual, communicative, collaborative, and compassionate. As we move fully into the 21st century, these areas of thinking have been identified as essential for success in all areas of education, particularly in STEM fields. Participants explore what each of these looks like and how we can integrate this type of thinking into daily classroom activities. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers – High School, Gifted Coordinators, Researchers Room: 206 Optimizing Guided Inquiry Labs (in Chemistry) Hadan Kauffman, Thomas Jefferson High School For Science And Technology, Alexandria, VA Do the lab without inquiry. Or update old labs. Observe common mistakes. Use these to develop guiding questions for students. A good lab has divergent choices with guidance to allow students to inform themselves of what doesn’t work. Teacher uses observations and experience to determine a set of pre-lab “guiding questions.” As students make mistakes, teacher repeats guiding questions. Students gain a deeper understanding of the implications of the guiding questions. Method can maximize both knowledge and skill retention. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers – High School, Gifted Coordinators, Researchers Room: 309

WHAT ARE POSTER SESSIONS AND ROUNDTABLES? Join informative and informal discussions around a range of topics at Poster Sessions and Poster Session Roundtables. You can find the poster and roundtable sessions in Griffin Hall on the second floor of the JW Marriott Indianapolis. Presenters will be Roundtable available at the listed times to discuss their poster presentation or facilitate a roundtable discussion.

60th Annual Convention

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

PARENT & COMMUNITY Encouraging Excellence Without Pushing Perfection Thomas S. Greenspon, Greenspon Associates, Minneapolis, MN

Friday

Recorded Session

How do we encourage kids to “be all they can be,” without creating perfectionists? Perfectionism is the desire to be perfect, the fear of imperfection, and the emotional conviction that perfection is the route to personal acceptability. Mistakes are seen as signs of personal defects; perfectionism is a self-esteem issue. While the pursuit of excellence is vitalizing, perfectionism’s inseparable dark side is the intense anxiety about never being good enough. Perfectionism is not part of giftedness, though gifted kids can be vulnerable. Find out what perfectionism is, where it comes from, and how to encourage excellence, not perfection. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers High School, Consultants, Counselors, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 203 Evaluating a University-school Partnership: Using Data to Develop and Refine the Gifted Information Sessions and Advocacy (GISA) Project Elin Reuben, Roland-Grise Middle School, Carolina Beach, NC; Edward J. Caropreso, University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Wilmington, NC This roundtable provides background information on the assessment and evaluation of a university-middle school outreach partnership based on program review and participant feedback. The presenters share the evaluation findings and plans for expansion and discuss alternatives and options for outreach partnerships, either active ongoing partnerships or planned but not as yet implemented outreach activities. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: Griffin Hall

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Friday

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM (Cont.)

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT RtI and Potential: Leadership Drives Success! Robin J. Carey, Douglas County School District, Highlands Ranch, CO; George Betts, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO Educators of gifted learners must claim a leadership role in fully utilizing the Response to Intervention framework as a strength-based approach. Presenters provide an RtI self-assessment leadership tool to determine the knowledge and skills necessary for educators to implement this powerful framework to identify and serve high-potential learners. Participants gain an understanding of how implementing the RtI framework allows us to focus on the learner and not the labels they acquire as they pass through the school system. The session provides an opportunity for participants to self-assess readiness and plan next steps. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators Room: White River H Supporting the NAGC Standards Through Professional Development Wendy A. Behrens, Minnesota Department of Education, Roseville, MN; Christine L. Weber, University of North Florida, St. Johns, FL; Cecelia Boswell, Waco ISD, De Leon, TX Professionalism is enhanced when members share a body of knowledge, develop skills in decision making, and continue to evolve with experience. Thus, professional development, which provides a vehicle to engage the participants in the study of a variety of issues from a pedagogical and conceptual perspective, can be an effective tool especially for understanding and implementing the 2010 NAGC Programming Standards. The learning scenarios presented encourage a detailed analysis and critical reflection of the most current and prevalent issues in gifted education. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: 101

Factors of Underachievement of Gifted Students Jungsun Kim, Somyung Kim, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN The present study provides a comprehensive review of existing studies examining internal and external factors associated with underachievement among gifted students. Following a brief historical overview of the studies of underachieving gifted students, meta-analysis will yield weighted effect sizes of internal and external factors of the underachievement of gifted students. It will help to differentiate impacts of each factor on the underachievement. Categories are composed of motivational characteristics, school-related factors, family-related factors, and socialpersonality factors. Results revealed in this poster session provide greater awareness of the internal and external factors of underachievement that will help in developing interventions for gifted underachievers. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Researchers Room: Griffin Hall The Effects of a STEM Intervention on Gifted Elementary Students’ Science Knowledge and Skills Ann Robinson, Deborah D. Dailey, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR; Alicia A. Cotabish, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR Talent development in science should begin in the elementary grades to engage students so their interest will be maintained as they progress across grade levels. To support this progression, early experiences with inquirybased curricula relevant to students’ lives are necessary. This study was guided by the principle that implementation of a problem-centered science curriculum enacted by teachers and supported with sustained professional development positively influences science performance in young students. This session reports results from a twopart STEM intervention, consisting of 120 hours of teacher professional development and the implementation of inquirybased curriculum on gifted students’ science learning. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: White River G

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National Association for Gifted Children

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

SPECIAL POPULATIONS College Preparation and Culturally Diverse Students Tiombe B. Kendrick, Miami-Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL; Joy L. Davis, Virginia Union University, Richmond, VA The numbers of culturally and linguistically diverse and low socio-economic students gaining admission to college in the U.S. is on the rise. However, the college retention rate of many of these students is abysmal. Many of these students realize they are poorly prepared for college academically

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

only after they begin their journey. The road to college preparation for CLD students must begin long before they reach high school if they are to be successful. This presentation informs attendees of the multiple barriers CLD students face as it relates to college preparation and how this can be effectively addressed.

Friday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Psychologists Room: 306

Combined Sessions 6 RESEARCH & EVALUATION 1:45 PM – 2:15 PM

2:15 PM – 2:45 PM

An Exploration of the Relationship Between Identification Processes and Outcomes in a Curricular Intervention Tedra L. Thompson, Sarah Oh, Annalissa V. Brodersen, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

Effects of One Special School on Gifted and High-Ability Student Outcomes: Results of a Dissertation Study April Coleman, Mississippi University for Women, Tuscaloosa, AL

This research focuses on identification systems used in districts involved in a curricular intervention study. We are examining whether expanded identification criteria is associated with student outcomes. The research team developed a classification scheme to group narrow vs. broadened identification procedures. We determine if effects of the model based curriculum are differential according to the identification process in place.

The goal of modern education should be to equip students, especially our most able learners, to gain 21st century skills and become creative producers. However, in many U.S. schools today, needs of gifted students are being shortchanged due to a focus on standardized testing and a “one-size-fits-all” mentality. This mixed-methods study investigated effects of one district’s efforts to create a special school for gifted and high-ability students with talents and interests in the arts, sciences, and technology. Findings indicated significant differences in student project quality, academic engagement, and academic investment, as compared with a control group.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: CC 120

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers Middle Grades, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Researchers Room: CC 120

60th Annual Convention

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Friday

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM (Cont.)

Exploring Racial Identity, Motivation, and Achievement for African American High Ability Learners Antonia Szymanski, Indiana University Northwest, Valparaiso, IN

of subgroups of the population and may provide important information regarding African American learners. The relationships among racial identity, motivation, and academic achievement are examined. Information from this study helps teachers, administrators, and parents understand the unique needs of African American students and thereby create interventions that may aid the development of these learners.

Why are many high-ability African American students missing from gifted or advanced classes? Racial identity, while not often recognized by the majority culture, is a major factor in the creation of self-perception of members

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 301

SPECIAL POPULATIONS (Cont.)

Combined Sessions 6 SPECIAL POPULATIONS 1:45 PM – 2:15 PM

2:15 PM – 2:45 PM

Effectiveness of the UNIT and KBIT-2 in Identifying Gifted Students of Poverty Megan Parker-Peters, Kimberley F. Robertson, Tamra Stambaugh, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN How do we better identify gifted students of poverty? Are certain assessments more successful in finding students of poverty? If so, are they also predictive of classroom performance? Even though identification of gifted is well researched, the evidential support on appropriate identification measures for students of poverty is less comprehensive. In this session presenters share comparisons of test results from students of poverty who were assessed using both the Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test and the Kaufmann Brief Intelligence Test-2. These findings are then compared to their performance in an accelerated class. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 205

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National Association for Gifted Children

When Not All Kids Score the Same: A Discussion of Test Bias and Underrepresentation in Gifted and Talented Education Marcia Gentry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Scott J. Peters, University of Wisconsin - Whitewater, Whitewater, WI The underrepresentation of students from African American, Native American, Hispanic, low-income, and linguistically diverse families is an ongoing and pervasive problem in gifted and talented programming. One suggested cause for this issue is the culture insensitivity or outright “racism” of standardized tests when used to identify students for gifted and talented programming. This session addresses the issue of statistical assessment bias and when observed group differences in test scores do and do not indicate a fault in the instrument. Implications for gifted and talented student identification are shared including ways to ameliorate the issue of underrepresentation. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 205

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Match Maker Make Me A Match Kevin Besnoy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL This session provides teachers with easy to follow guidelines, which will help them to use the right instructional technology tool with twice-exceptional students. In addition, attendees discover new technologies that can be easily integrated into their classrooms. Attendess are provided with materials to help through a step-by-step process with which to evaluate an instructional technology tool’s effectiveness in meeting a twice-exceptional child’s instructional needs. Finally, learn about the assistive technology lending library which lends assistive technology tools to schools in this poster session. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers High School, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: Griffin Hall

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

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60th Annual Convention Event

The Da Vinci Academy: A Twenty-First Century One-Room Schoolhouse Sally C. Krisel, Hall County Schools, Athens, GA Imagine a school that uses Cloud Computing instead of textbooks and where a student-created museum has replaced the media center; where eager young learners equipped with laptops study a dozen languages, make movies and start businesses! Imagine middle school students who are passionate about art, science and technology engaged in a fully integrated curriculum, earning high school credit and college credit. And imagine it all happening at a fraction of the cost of a traditional middle school! This is the Da Vinci Academy in Gainesville, Georgia! Come learn how you can use this approach with your students!

Friday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 204

STEM

Replicating Success and Creating Joyful Learning: The Renzulli Academy Ruth E. Lyons, Renzulli Academy, Manchester, CT; Joseph S. Renzulli, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT The Renzulli Academy is a full-time school to service high potential/low-income urban youth that currently spans from Kindergarten to grades 4-9 with an anticipated growth of becoming a K-12 school by 2016. The Academy offers a challenging gifted curriculum and a variety of enrichment opportunities for a population that is underrepresented in gifted programs. In this session, the process of designing and starting an urban gifted and talented school model is shared and strategies for replicating the model in three other urban districts are described. Participants will be given access to a sample replication proposal. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: White River J

60th Annual Convention

How STEM and Service-Learning Make a Critical Impact on Schools and Community Partnerships While Creating Engaged Learners and Responsible, Resilient Citizens Jane L. Newman, University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL Do you want to know how to engage students in real world, high quality STEM science experiences that produce positive results in academics, civic responsibility, and resiliency? Replicate “how-to’s” for severe weather community awareness sessions that saved lives during Alabama’s historic April 27th tornados? Learn how an entire school follows the lead of 7th graders who share risks of obesity and benefits of exercise? Find out how students determine if their drinking water is the cause of their county’s high cancer rate? Join us to discuss how to transfer these projects and others to your classroom for positive results! Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 201

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Friday

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM (Cont.)

STEM (Cont.) Smart + Girl: Cognitive, Behavioral, and Affective Predictors of Highly-able Adolescent Females’ Success in Mathematics Kimberly Lansdowne, Robyn McKay, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ This research focuses on predictors of math success among middle and high school females enrolled in an early college entrance program. Despite high math achievement scores and exceptional General Ability Index and Perceptual Reasoning Composite scores on the WISC-IV, some adolescent girls continue to struggle with mathematics. We seek possible explanations for low mathematics performance among highly able girls. To that end, we examined affective, cognitive, and behavioral characteristics that predict success and poor performance. Based on our findings, we recommend psychological and educational interventions that we have designed at ASU’s Herberger Academy to improve girls’ performance in mathematics. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Psychologists Room: CC 121 Embracing Creativity to Attract Girls Justin Neil L. Young, University of Houston, Houston, TX Girls’ achievement in math and science has risen since the 1970s when it was thought to be the reason why there was low participation of women in STEM fields. However,

girls’ achievement in math and science has outpaced their participation in STEM fields. This discrepency is an indication that girls and women are not participating in STEM fields for reasons other than achievement. As such, the pedagogical aim of creativity is explored as a mechanism to increase female participation in STEM after girls expressed an interest in STEM upon completing curriculum that allowed them to be “creative.” Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Researchers Room: Griffin Hall So You Want to Start a Robotic Program? A Practical Guide to Utilizing Robots with Gifted Students Nicholas Kirschman, Webster Groves High School, St. Louis, MO; Christine Nobbe, Webster University, Saint Louis, MO Robotics has proven to be an effective and popular way to deliver STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math) educational programing to gifted students of all ages. Robotic engineering allows gifted students the opportunity to struggle with a problem, be able to defend their engineering and programing decisions, and explain their answer in their own words. Join two veteran teachers, who teach grades 2-12, in a discussion of the joys and perils of starting a robotics program, whether it is part of the K-12 curriculum or a club. Recommendations on curriculum, hardware, sensors, and budget are addressed. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 102

For the most up-to-date information on sessions and to search for sessions by strand or speaker, download the NAGC2013 app.

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3:15 PM – 4:45 PM

LEGACY SERIES Legacy Series Taping: Reflections on Making a Difference with Dorothy Sisk Dorothy A. Sisk, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX The Conceptual Foundations Network, in concert with NAGC, continues its dedication to videotaping notable gifted advocates, researchers, and leaders in order to preserve their legacy for future generations. For our seventh annual videotaping, you are invited to share

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in the reflections of Dr. Dorothy Sisk. Dr. Sisk holds an endowed chair in the education of gifted students at Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas, where she is the director of the Gifted Center for Education and Programs. She served as the Director of the U.S. Office of Gifted and Talented and built the foundation for the field by increasing the number of state leaders who were professionally trained in gifted education. We are honored to have the opportunity to interview Dr. Sisk and allow her to share her insights and experiences with all NAGC attendees.

Friday

Recorded Session

Room: JW Grand Ballroom 7/8/9

Get Your Game Face On Take a sweet break in the NAGC Exhibit Hall and try your hand (and your head!) at some of the games featured in the annual NAGC Toy List. Your “Pit Crew” are students from the Sycamore School. Game Break Friday, November 8 Exhibit Hall 2:45 – 3:45 PM

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Distinguished Scholar Award Recipient

SIGNATURE SERIES Gifted Education and the Next Generation Science Standards: Focus on Science Cheryll M. Adams, Ball State University, Muncie, IN; Mary Cay Ricci, Baltimore County Public Schools, Olney, MD; Alicia A. Cotabish, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR Based on the Framework for K–12 Science Education, the NGSS provide a means to improve science education and student achievement in science. Twenty-six states participated in the standards development, and all states were able to review the standards to provide feedback. The standards are formed from a combination of three dimensions: Practices, Content, and Crosscutting Concepts. Although the NGSS are more challenging than previous science standards, they still need to be differentiated to meet the needs of gifted learners. This session demonstrates how to read and understand the standards as well as ways to differentiate the learning progressions and assessments to provide rigor, relevance, depth, and complexity to support gifted students. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators Room: JW Grand Ballroom 10 Influential Leaders in Gifted Child Education You Never Heard Of... James R. Delisle, Growing Good Kids, North Myrtle Beach, SC; Robert A. Schultz, University of Toledo, Waterville, OH In this session, we rediscover the work of several profound scholars in the field whose work can inform and guide research and theory of the future. The presenters provide a summary of the seminal work of: Virgil Ward, Ruth Strang, T. Ernest Newland, James Mehorter, Joanne Whitmore, John Gowan and J.P. Guilford. These scholars contributed to many facets of the field we accept as “law of the land” in gifted child education. But, their work was anything but universally received. Join us for lively discussion and an opportunity to discover a rich history many do not realize exists. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: White River J

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Gifted Education’s Focus on Bias in Identification: Misinformed and Misdirected Frank C. Worrell, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, There are two things that we know to be true about the United States: (a) African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and some Asian American groups are underrepresented in gifted and talented education (GATE) and (b) racism and discrimination continue to play a role in American society. These two facts have been combined to create several narratives in our field. Two of the more prominent narratives state that the groups that are underrepresented in GATE are underrepresented due to systematic and intentional discrimination and that biased tests and racist teachers are the primary tools in this systematic discrimination. In this presentation, I argue that these perspectives are inaccurate and not supported by the extant empirical evidence, and that they also distract the field from focusing on solutions that are more likely to yield positive outcomes. Using data, I showcase the fact that bias in identification is minimal and I also point out that the role of ethnic and racial identity in achievement is complicated and generally misunderstood. I end with some suggestions for beginning to work on the difficult and lengthy task of achieving proportional representation in selective educational programs. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers, Professors, Researchers Room: 306

ARTS Strategies For Teaching Art to Gifted Children Eileen Prince, Sycamore School, Indianapolis, IN Gifted children are disproportionately able in the arts, but even those who are not particularly talented should be exposed to substantive art programs. The presenter has been teaching visual art to academically and artistically gifted students for over 25 years. Learn about her philosophy and strategies for creating a challenging, accelerated, differentiated art curriculum and explain why such programs are vital to our children. This is a disciplinebased art education approach that differs from the Getty

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model and explores the benefits of a fully integrated humanities curriculum. Specific lesson ideas are included. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: CC 125

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY Using Online Courses to Accelerate Curriculum for High-ability Students Katherine M. Degner, Clar Baldus, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA Online learning is increasingly popular in schools as a way to individualize curriculum and familiarize students with learning through technology. For the past 10 years, the Belin-Blank Center has coordinated the Iowa Online Advanced Placement Academy to offer high-ability students access to accelerated coursework. We report on the reasons for IOAPA’s success and discuss new directions with the program: online high school coursework for middle school students and the use of above-level testing to place students in accelerated online coursework. Educators and administrators can use the IOAPA program as a model for offering online accelerated curriculum to gifted students. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators Room: 314

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS Talent Development in Emerging Adulthood Thomas Shaff, University of Iowa, St Paul, MN

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framework is proposed to explain adaptation to changes in family relations, independence, cognitive maturation, and identity achievement that comprise the theoretical foundations of the transition. Results provide feedback on gifted education programs in K-12 and insight for counselors and teachers to connect talent development in school with realistic preparation for the world encountered by emerging adults.

Friday

Recorded Session

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Researchers Room: 304 Goal-orientations and Achievement Among Gifted Students in Korea: Replication and Extension Jinmin Chung, Jungsun Kim, Soohyun Yi, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN Contrary to some past findings that mastery and performance goal-orientations were correlated negatively, lately it has been accepted that performance-approach goalorientation correlates positively with learning goal-orientation. D. W. Chan’s study also finds that they have a significant correlation in Hong Kong. This presentation replicates and extends the research conducted by Chan by examining goal-orientations (learning, performance-approach, performance-avoidance, and social goal-orientation) and their relationships to achievement among Korean gifted students. This approach shows that performance-approach goal-orientation is correlated with learning goal-orientation by age and gender. Also, this poster session shows how cultural backgrounds affect social goal-orientation. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Parents, Professors, Researchers Room: Griffin Hall

Counselors, teachers, and researchers will learn about the psychology of talent development among adolescent talent award winners now in emerging adulthood, or ages 18-27. The focus is on the meaning of the lived experience under the volatile conditions of this period. A new conceptual

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3:45 PM – 4:45 PM Cont.)

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS (Cont.) NAGC Convention Themes: 21st Century Presentations Laurie J. Croft, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA NAGC provides information that many rely on to make decisions about gifted learners. Although NAGC currently communicates to members in a wider variety of ways, historically, the annual convention provided literally thousands of participants with essential understandings, including research-based best practices, innovative ideas, and analyses of the field from well-known leaders. What have we been talking about since the beginning of the 21st Century? A content analysis of NAGC convention presentations from 2001-2010, a time of transition in general educational imperatives, suggests the important themes that emerged in the field of gifted and talented education. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 102

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE Academic Acceleration for Advanced Learners: Questions and Answers Susan Assouline, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA Academic acceleration—tailoring the complexity and pace of the educational curriculum to individual students’ rate of learning—is an effective intervention for academic and affective needs. Attendees learn how to advocate for greater acceptance and use of acceleration in schools. Topics include identifying students for grade and content acceleration using Talent Search scores, online guides (e.g., IDEAL Solutions for STEM Acceleration), and decisionmaking instruments (e.g., the Iowa Acceleration Scale- 3rd edition); implementing acceleration practices in K-12 settings; and developing policy supportive of the informed use of acceleration using Guidelines for Developing an Academic Acceleration Policy. Audience: Administrators, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: White River A

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‘Boss it Back’ Taking Control of OCD and Other Anxiety Disorders Lori M. Comallie-Caplan, Marc A. Caplan, Ph.D., P.A. and Associates, Las Cruces, NM Some gifted children and teens seem to worry more than other children. They report a negative outlook or a tendency to report negative events with more frequency than positive ones. They may worry about everyday events or world tragedies. There are many types of anxiety disorders, including specific phobias, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and/or Generalized Anxiety Disorder. “Boss it Back!” helps gifted children and adolescents take control of their anxiety rather than letting it control them. Audience: Counselors Room: CC 121 Motivating to Enhance Executive Function in Gifted Children Carol S. Whitney, Julieann N. Ash, Midwest Educational Therapists & Associates, Columbus, OH Gifted children often struggle with issues related to executive function: impulsiveness, organizational issues, overexcitability, reluctance to write, poor writing, anxiety, and perfectionism. Educational Therapy, a psychoeducational, social-emotional and academic approach, provides motivational strategies that work positively to correct areas of deficit. It is not tutoring. ET is a brain-based approach that encompasses the whole child. This useful, practical session introduces some specific motivational strategies to address the most common executive function difficulties. Using these strategies gives gifted children the tools they need to express what they know. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists Room: White River G Solutions, Not Problems! Teaching Teachers, Families, and G/T Learners to Use SolutionFocused Principles Reva C. Friedman, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS Gifted/high-potential youngsters come to the attention of school personnel due to their cognitive and affective strengths. These professionals and the gifted student’s parents/family direct goal setting in the best interests of the young person. However, there is often reactance and resistance. In this session, we explore key solution-focused, strength-based principles and proven practices applicable

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to a variety of issues that affect bright students at home and at school. Participants learn how to think about problems as opportunities to use strength-based thinking in a variety of contexts. Audience: Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Psychologists Room: White River H Understanding Stereotype Threat: When Giftedness is Denied or Forgotten Lisa Erickson, Cowlitz Tribal Health, Seattle, WA This training reviews the robust research about stereotype threat and explores the implications of this for gifted students, educators, counselors, parents and concerned adults. The presenter links the research to the experience of giftedness, stereotypes about giftedness, and show how stereotype threat is a contributing factor to the phenomenon of forgetting and/or denying one’s gifts and talents. Understanding stereotype threat is particularly relevant for girls and for children of both sexes who are members of minority communities. The effects of stereotype threat are often invisible to the child and can persist long into adulthood. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists Room: CC 123

CREATIVITY Creative Problem Solving – An Essential for Any 21st Century Classroom Marianne Solomon, April Dennis, Future Problem Solving Program International, Melbourne, FL Subject matter has become so vast, forcing students to access alternative resources rather than memorizing provided data from any text book. The need for critical and creative thinking within the curriculum is now common knowledge; being able to take data/learning and realistically make application is critical. Learn how immersion in problem solving molds the students’ thought process, encouraging higher level thinking within any subject area, everyday life, and the future. Problem solving provides success in the work world of the 21st century and provides

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the skills necessary for future leaders and citizens involved in the changing world. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: CC 124

Friday

Recorded Session

eLABoration: Creative Explorations from Atoms to Zoetropes Angela R. Herbel, Houston County Schools, Warner Robins, GA “Does silence have a sound?” “What happens to color at night?” Have your students ever asked questions such as these? Wouldn’t you love to say, “I don’t know, how would you find that out? Let’s go in the lab and explore!” Learn techniques for setting up such a laboratory where you can nurture creative thinking and problem solving and encourage questioning and risk-taking. See how your students can become “eLABorators” – explorers who follow their curiosity, interests and intuition. Participate in hands-on experiments that promote creative exploration and can be used for your lab’s grand opening. Join us at the eLAB! Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 313 Get in Touch with Your Inner Core: Infusing Creativity Into the Common Core Standards Magdalena Fitzsimmons, Baltimore County Public Schools, Baltimore, MD Creativity and the Common Core State Standards: are they a match made in heaven or strange bedfellows? This session explores how the CCSS provide an excellent framework for creative thinking, collaboration, and innovation in the classroom, while providing gifted learners the opportunity to use critical and creative thinking strategies in solving problems within and across content areas. The connection between specific standards in reading and math and teaching strategies that promote creative thinking and the creative process are examined. Model lesson plans as well as student products are provided. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Gifted Coordinators Room: 208

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3:45 PM – 4:45 PM Cont.)

assessments, differentiated spelling lists, examples of writing prompts, a “Passport” used by students as they study translations, and a culminating event involving parents.

CREATIVITY (Cont.) Organic Creativity 2: Infusing Creativity Into Academic Subject Matter Jane Piirto, Ashland University, Ashland, OH; Sally Stephenson, Frostburg State University, Frostburg, MD; Stephanie S. Tolan, Institute for Educational Advancement, Charlotte, NC; Diane Montgomery, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK; Jennifer L. Groman, University of Akron, Wooster, OH; Todd Kettler, University of North Texas, Coppell, TX This second session of “Organic Creativity” focuses on the autobiographical tales and professional experiences of subject matter domain experts. Long-time practitioners of creative writing, literature, psychology and pre-service teaching, music and songwriting discuss how they infuse intuition, improvisation, insight, risk-taking, group trust, inspiration, meditation, judgment-free feedback, openness to experience, incubation, insight, imagery, and the like into their classroom curricula. Five of the authors of chapters of a new edited book share their research, moderated by the editor. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists Room: 104

Biographies Intertwined with Fiction: A Great Mix! Donna Olsen, PLUS Program, Indianapolis, IN; Denise O. Estelle, Western Wayne Elementary School, New Castle, IN Combining authors’ biographies, such as Beatrix Potter, Mark Twain, or C. S. Lewis, with their literature invites interdisciplinary studies that go beyond CCSS. The differentiated model includes opportunities for creative thinking, critical thinking, inquiry, and problem solving. Studies of the author’s life show how the writing was influenced. Issues such as bullying, grief, corporal punishment, diversity, parenting trends, and exceptionalities such as ADHD are addressed through examples in the books. Attendees receive examples of pre and post

National Association for Gifted Children

Competency Not Carnegie: Incorporating a Proficiency-based Model for High School Education Kimberly Lansdowne, Robert W. Walker, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ Living in an increasingly global, rapidly changing world, gifted high school students must keep pace! Changing graduation requirements from time based learning (Carnegie units) to proficiency based learning prepares students to achieve at advanced levels. Diplomas should NOT be certificates of attendance. Students at The Herberger Academy, a school for highly gifted students at Arizona State University, are participating in an educational initiative titled, Move On When Ready. Using Cambridge International syllabi, curriculum focuses on mastery of learning. We describe the strategies used to reconstruct an outdated system while preparing future leaders. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers High School, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: 301

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Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 305

Diverse Benefits for Students in Inquiry: An Empirical Study Cheryl L. Walker, Bruce M. Shore, Petra Gyles, McGill University, Montreal, PQ, Canada Inquiry-based teaching is widespread and recommended as a part of best practices in gifted programming. Learnercentered exploration with teacher guidance and support has an intuitive appeal, as well as ample supporting research. Benefits such as heightened achievement and motivation have been shown. Many other benefits have been proposed but have received little or no empirical attention or support, such as creativity and autonomy in learning. Teacher participants completed a questionnaire on a wide range of

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student-inquiry outcomes. The significant findings may help teachers implement inquiry in their classrooms. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Researchers Room: 205 Gaming Wicked Problems: How to Build Complex Problems Rebecca Vonesh, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI Great stories are defined by intriguing central conflicts and so are great courses. Yet designing problems that span an entire unit can be difficult as they must be open-ended and yet complex enough to drive the problem-solving process. Simply put, these problems must both engage and evolve. Problems that evolve are self-complicating situations that require higher-level thinking and great communication skills to explore. Come learn from game designers and city planners as we explore how to design deep, selfcomplicating problems that ratchet up the challenge each time a solution seems to have been reached. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Parents Room: CC 122 How to Pick the Right Strategy Sherri L. Wynn, Indiana Wesleyan University, Danville, IN Ever wish there were an easier way to find the best teaching strategy every day? Just as Howard Gardner classified intelligence into 9 categories, the PRIMAL Strategies Chart classifies curriculum and instruction into 6 types. This session shows you how these new types instantly match brain-friendly strategies to any curriculum for any gifted or bright learner. It also includes dozens of content area and teacher helps websites to make your lessons more rigorous yet still fun. This new approach gives you more control over guiding your students’ expanded learning. Free Charts as door prizes! Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors Room: CC 126

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Optimizing Learning: Movement and the Gifted Brain Dennis N. Corash, Vicki Nilles, Metropolitan State University of Denver, Denver, CO Research clearly demonstrates the importance of using movement consistently in the classroom and the direct physiological impact that movement has on learning for gifted students of all ages. The connection between movement and the production of the neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine (feel good neurotransmitters) will be explained and several strategies will be demonstrated for direct use in the classroom or home. Participants will have opportunities to move and practice the strategies that are being demonstrated and to ask any questions they may have in implementing movement with their own environments with gifted students.

Friday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors Room: White River H

EARLY CHILDHOOD Gifted Students with Asperger’s Syndrome: Arguments for Early Identification Mona A. Haji Mohammad Alimin, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA Gifted students with Asperger Syndrome are fast gaining public attention because the characteristics of giftedness and the symptoms of AS tend to overlap and thus, prevent or complicate early and effective identification and diagnosis. With a focus on early intervention and identification of gifted students with AS, this presentation highlights three areas: (a) how each condition is defined; (b) when does identification typically occur for each condition; and (c) whether the assessment instruments currently used are effective. Response to Intervention is highlighted as a possible philosophical framework to address issues of early intervention and identification. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: Griffin Hall

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The Importance of Play for the Gifted Child Nancy Arey Cohen, Educational Solutions, Falmouth, ME

EARLY CHILDHOOD (Cont.) Performance Assessments: Engaging and Assessing Students with the Products Toolbag Joan P. Brownlee, Prince William County Public Schools, Montclair, VA Performance assessments document acquisition of learning stated in the lesson objectives and allow choice that enrich and extend the learning. The Products Toolbag provides students with a choice. They meet professionals in the field, understand professional vocabulary and learning objectives, and receive professional tips from practitioners. It includes rubrics for the student and the teacher. Students are assessed in content, mechanics, presentation, critical thinking, creative thinking, and reflective thinking. There are 4 levels of achievement, from the beginner to the professional level. Post-assessment rubrics align with preassessment. Poster session participants receive electronic samples of assessments and rubrics. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood Room: Griffin Hall Social and Emotional Characteristics and Early Childhood Giftedness: Observations from Parents and Childcare providers Using the ECLS-B Hope E. Wilson, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL This presentation offers the findings from an analysis of a national sample of children. It demonstrates that parents and outside care providers provide different information concerning the social and emotional development in children. In addition, children with early reading abilities have different patterns of social and emotional characteristics. The presentation makes recommendations for teachers and parents of young children exhibiting gifts and talents. Practical applications and suggestions are provided. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 302

In this session, we discuss the importance of play, taking into account that play can mean very different things for different children. Whereas one child may play by building villages out of blocks, another may find creating games with rules and roles a form of play, and still another may consider taking appliances apart to be play. Whatever your child engages in freely, values, and considers fun can be defined as play. We discuss how to strike a balance between structure and play, as well as the implications of each for a child’s development. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Parents Room: 101 Young Gifted Readers and the Common Core State Standards Patti Wood, Samford University, Odenville, AL Reading instructional practices in K-3 classrooms have changed dramatically over the past decade, and now, with the new Common Core State Standards, more change is expected. Teachers will be responsible for tailoring learning experiences for their gifted readers to foster the development of advanced skills, knowledge, and conceptual understanding as detailed in the CCSS. This session focuses on implications for implementing the CCSS in ELA in grades K-3. Attendees will learn ways to differentiate the CCSS to meet the needs of young gifted readers, such as literacy stations, digital media, interdisciplinary studies, and novel guides. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Gifted Coordinators Room: CC 127

EXHIBITOR WORKSHOPS Administer Your Gifted Program from the Cloud Todd Stark, DataWerks Limited Wish your data was centralized and you could manage your gifted program from anywhere while saving time and improving communication in a safe and secure environment? Join us as we discuss how you can go to the cloud, centralizing your gifted data and streamlining your gifted program administration. Audience: Administrators, Gifted Coordinators Room: Griffin Hall

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Propel Students to Reach Beyond the Summit with Technology: How to Create a 21st Century Gifted Classroom Weston Kieschnick, Laura Leonard, Marketing Coordinator, Laurel Springs Today’s Gifted and Talented students have acquired a level of digital literacy that allows them to expand their capabilities at a rapid pace. In this session, we will experience digital strategies to engage these students as we seek to capitalize on their expertise and nurture achievement at the highest levels.

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products. Why? it’s often a time question – when do they have time to develop all the rubrics that must accompany products? It’s also an expertise question – how can they ensure the product is not only assessing the content learned, but that it is also of high quality? A protocol is the answer. This session explores the Developing and Assessing Product Tool that simplifies differentiation of products and their assessment.

Friday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators Room: White River B Serving Creatively Gifted Students in the Middle Grades Leighann Pennington, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA

Room: Griffin Hall

MIDDLE GRADES Articulating, Aligning and Accounting (AAA) Secondary Courses for Advanced Learners Richard M. Cash, nRich Educational Consulting, Minneapolis, MN Honors level courses are a common way to meet the needs of gifted secondary students. Teachers and school leaders struggle to come to consensus on what defines an honors level course. Without a universal definition, honors courses lack consistency of curricular and instructional practices. To ensure honors courses are truly rigorous and differentiated to meet the needs of advanced learners, join this session to learn how schools can articulate the specifics of an honors course; align the coursework to the comprehensive school curriculum; and put in place accountability measures to ensure fidelity and integrity of practice. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors Room: White River C Protocol Replaces Many Rubrics Tracy F. Inman, Julia L. Roberts, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY Educators want to offer choice to motivate students. They want to use products to differentiate learning experiences for their middle schoolers. Too often, they rely on the same

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How can you serve the creatively gifted students in the middle grades through the curriculum? Carefully crafted assignments, products, and a reflective process for intrapersonal contemplation can lead to emotional catharsis for students and a more conceptual assessment process by the teacher. Students will be challenged as they reflect upon and evaluate their work, while understanding their process. Sample bibliotherapy and cinematherapy lessons for understanding creative giftedness and sensitivity are shared. Teachers and gifted coordinators can meet the needs of creatively gifted students without sacrificing curricular standards, using conceptual frameworks, journaling, poetry, and multi-sensory approaches. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators Room: CC 128

WHAT ARE POSTER SESSIONS AND ROUNDTABLES? Join informative and informal discussions around a range of topics at Poster Sessions and Poster Session Roundtables. You can find the poster and roundtable sessions in Griffin Hall on the second floor of the JW Marriott Indianapolis. Presenters will be Roundtable available at the listed times to discuss their poster presentation or facilitate a roundtable discussion.

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PARENT & COMMUNITY

NCSSSMST Engaging Students in Inquiry Based Learning Embedded in Real World Contexts (Repeated from Thursday) Rebecca Stern, Emily Mottahedeh, Lisa Gioe, Millennium Brooklyn High School, Brooklyn, NY How do we engage high school students in real-life work while making sure they gain critical thinking, reading, writing and problem-solving skills necessary for college and beyond? As part of our school’s quantitative research program, we designed a problem-based performance task unit which engaged students in taking on the role of researcher and government advisor as they explored the controversial topic of hydrofracking in New York State. Hear from high school students, teachers and school leaders about the process of unit design that supports investigating important political and social issues through analyzing reallife texts and data. Audience: Classroom Teachers – High School Room: 206 Measurement and Modeling of Higher Order Skills in STEM Talent Development Using the College and Work Readiness Assessment (Repeated from Thursday) Christopher Kolar, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy, Aurora, IL This session describes how a selective, public STEM high school has used the College and Work Readiness Assessment in efforts to model student performance and demonstrate achievement gains in critical thinking, analytical reasoning, problem solving, and written communication. In the context of both diagnostic utility and repeated measures student growth, we describe results from over 400 students and explain how this new measure of high order thinking skills provides reliable results for advanced students. We also explore the institutional value of having normed data for value-added measures. Audience: Classroom Teachers – High School Room: 309

55 Years of Thriving: A Glance of History of Gifted Education in Kentucky Kathie M. Anderson, Kentucky Association of Gifted Education, Frankfort, KY; Denise Bailey, Kentucky Department of Education, Frankfort, KY; Echo H. Wu, Murray State University, Murray, KY In response to the historical perspective of NAGC’s 60th annual celebration, this presentation focuses on the historical development of gifted education in Kentucky. Started in 1958, after the Soviet Union’s launching of “Sputnik,” a Legislative research commission in Kentucky was developed to investigate issues related to exceptional children, including those with great potential. This presentation describes the major events that happened in the past 55 years, and analyzes the current situation of gifted education in Kentucky. Insights are offered on the future directions of development of gifted policies and programs in Kentucky. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 209 Collaboration Between Home and School: More Than Just a Pit Stop! Joan Jacobs, Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln, NE; Rebecca D. Eckert, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT Research suggests that academic performance is bolstered when families are engaged and involved in student learning, and that all students can benefit when caring adults in their support system are informed and welcomed as educational partners. Meaningful collaboration with families of gifted students is especially important as educators work toward the standards of developing self-understanding and building an awareness of needs. Whether you are working with a group or acting alone, this session provides you with research-based strategies and practical tools for overcoming barriers to involvement that will help fuel improved collaboration and communication between home, school, and community. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 306

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PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Facilitating a Paradigm Shift in Teacher Candidate Experiences Anne Johnson, Episcopal School of Acadiana, Lafayette, LA; Sally M. Dobyns, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Roxanne B. Speer, Christine J. Briggs, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA Teachers teach as they were taught, not as they were taught to teach. How might we raise the level of pre-service experiential learning by utilizing not only the interests of K-5 students, but also of teacher candidates, when designing their field experiences? In a university/elementary school partnership, pre-service teacher candidates satisfy a requirement of an early childhood curriculum course by cofacilitating an enrichment cluster of their choice. Presenters share their plan and the results of pre-and-post surveys completed by candidates whose self-selected experiences immersed them in the pedagogy of gifted education for all students. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Researchers Room: 202 Gifted Student Growth as Educator Evaluation: Handling Accountability with Fairness Ann Robinson, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR; Tonya R. Moon, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA; Pamela R. Clinkenbeard, Scott J. Peters, University of Wisconsin - Whitewater, Whitewater, WI; Chrystyna V. Mursky, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Madison, WI Student growth models (i.e. making sure that gifted children learn new content and skills, not just score “proficient” or “advanced”) are generally good for the gifted. NAGC and

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CEC-TAG have a position paper in favor of growth models for assessing gifted students’ achievement. However, there can be unanticipated consequences when using student growth measures as factors in teacher evaluation. “Educator effectiveness” models that include student outcomes may inadvertently penalize those who work with the gifted, since growth can be more difficult to demonstrate with high-achieving students. This panel raises issues, gives examples, and explores solutions.

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Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Researchers Room: White River I South Asian Students in Gifted Education: Importance of the Home-School Connection Gail Hickey, Indiana University, Fort Wayne, IN The U.S. South Asian school population is growing rapidly. Who belongs to this diverse ethnic population? From which countries do South Asians originate? How may their home lives differ? Which values and traditions do many South Asian families retain after moving to the United States? What should teachers, administrators, and counselors know about working effectively with the U.S. South Asian population? Participants will explore similarities and differences in South Asian and mainstream American societies, particularly issues related to child-rearing and schooling. Strategies for working more effectively with U.S. South Asian gifted learners and their families will be shared. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists Room: Griffin Hall

For the most up-to-date information on sessions and to search for sessions by strand or speaker, download the NAGC2013 app.

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Friday

3:45 PM – 4:45 PM Cont.)

RESEARCH & EVALUATION Exploring Teacher Implementation of Differentiation Practices and Process Skill Development in Elementary Classrooms Katherine B. Brown, Judia Jackson Harris Elementary Charter School, Athens, GA Differentiation and process skill development are important for all gifted learners in the regular classroom. This presentation discusses a study that examined teacher experiences through the implementation of process skill development and differentiation practices into regular education classrooms. This multiple case study design

collected data through interviews, observations, and journals from both the researcher and participants. Teacher experience was analyzed by examining teacher processes, external factors that affected implementation, and perceptions of teachers as they implemented differentiation and process skill development. The findings of the study are discussed in this poster session, in addition to implications for teachers, administrators, and teacher educators. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Researchers Room: Griffin Hall

Combined Sessions 6 RESEARCH & EVALUATION 3:45 PM – 4:15 PM

4:15 PM – 4:45 PM

2 New Scales for Rating the Behavioral Characteristics of Gifted English Language Learners and Gifted Economically Disadvantaged Students Maggie Smith, Minneapolis Public Schools, Minneapolis, MN As schools and districts across the nation face devastating budget cuts, equitable identification practices such as portfolio reviews have become cost prohibitive for many. Gifted English language learners and students from poverty in particular are likely to be increasingly under-identified as a result. However, scales for rating the behavioral characteristics of special populations, when well developed, provide a costeffective solution. This session provides an overview of a study focused on developing such a solution: two new scales for rating the behavioral characteristics of English language learners and economically disadvantaged students have been created and studied in two U.S. regions with very promising results. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: CC 120

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Finding Talent among Elementary English Language Learners: Beyond Project HOPE Nielsen Pereira, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY This study was an investigation of the validity and reliability of a teacher-rating scale for identifying gifted ELLs. Classroom and ESL teachers completed the HOPE Scale on elementary education students. Results indicated that the scale yields non-invariant indicator intercepts across ELL and English proficient samples. However, model fit results for the ELL and EP samples supported the use of the HOPE Scale with ELL or EP students separately. Educators and administrators should be cautious if using instruments that have limited validity and reliability evidence to make decisions on students’ placement in gifted programs. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Researchers Room: CC 120

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SPECIAL POPULATIONS Against All Odds: Academically Gifted, African American, Collegiate, Poor, and Male Alonzo Flowers, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA; Fred A. Bonner, Rutgers University, Millstone, NJ; Dave Louis, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI This presentation focuses on the gifted poor—particularly academically gifted African American male collegians who come from poverty. Topics of discussion include critical issues ranging from family influence and identity development to environmental incongruence and culturally specific mentoring. In addition, the presentation considers the relevance of intersectionality as a concept that offers

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promise in “theorizing the relationship between different social categories;” namely, the multiple and interlocking categories or statuses (i.e. gifted, African American, male, and poor). Ultimately the presentation highlights K-12 and higher education strategies to ensure success for this cohort.

Friday

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Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: White River D

Combined Sessions 6 RESEARCH & EVALUATION 3:45 PM – 4:15 PM

4:15 PM – 4:45 PM

Fidelity to the Theoretical Framework: Identifying Critical Components and Theoretical Underpinnings to Justify Modifications Lisa H. Foster, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; Sarah Oh, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA This presentation reports on a mixed-methods research study on the fidelity of implementation of a 3rd grade gifted intervention which: 1) Identified the theoretical underpinnings and critical components of the curricular intervention to measure fidelity to the theoretical framework and 2) Investigated the extent to which implementation occurred with fidelity relative to the theoretical underpinnings and the spirit of gifted education in general. Findings have implications for reporting to stakeholders and funders, furthering the development of fidelity measures with regards to theory and gifted curriculum, and understanding why identification of components prior to implementation is necessary.

Strengthening Causal Claims: Quasiexperimental Designs to the Rescue Andrea D. Frazier, Columbus State University, Columbus, GA One hurdle that educational researchers struggle to overcome is making plausible arguments of causation. Quasi-experimental designs can realize similar estimates of treatment effects to experimental design, and also allow for an understanding of and/or control of group formation. The designs explored in this presentation include interrupted time series and regression discontinuity. Moreover, we cover ways researchers can beef up nonequivalent group designs where assignment to groups is not well-known. The discussion centers on a conceptual understanding of these designs. Audience: Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 103

Audience: Professors, Researchers Room: 103

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Friday

3:45 PM – 4:45 PM Cont.)

SPECIAL POPULATIONS (Cont.) Fueling Potential Through Understanding the Problem: Gifted Students with Chronic Illnesses Felicia A. Dixon, Ball State University, Selma, IN; Diane E. Dungan, Taylor University, Upland, IN Hyperactivity, inattention, and hyper-sensitivities mask giftedness. These may be a result of disabilities such as AD/HD, LD, or Asperger syndrome. Students with Juvenile Diabetes may manifest these same behaviors when experiencing high or low glucose levels, resulting in underidentification for gifted programs. Likewise, their behavior in class often masks their giftedness, setting up barriers to achieving their potential. School systems are often unaware of requirements for meeting needs for students with chronic illnesses, and teachers are often ill-prepared to assist such students. In this session, role-play situations depicting practical ways for working with this neglected twiceexceptional population. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Researchers Room: 303 Serving Gifted Students from Refugee Backgrounds Margaret W. Hoffman, Chapel Hill Carrboro Schools, Durham, VA; Lisa Hoffman, Indiana University, New Albany, IN

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Reaching Gifted Native Americans with Culturally Sensitive Instruction and Strengthbased Programming Steven C. Haas, Gifted Development Center, Littleton, CO; Jerry A. Lassos, ISLA Project (Indigenous Students Leap Ahead), Lakewood, CO Gifted Native American children have a lower identification rate than their Hispanic and African-American peers and are over-represented in IEPs, discipline plans, and remedial learning plans. At reservation schools and in urban settings, the American Indian achievement gap is stagnant (reading) or widening (math) despite heightened attention to culturally relevant curriculum and Native language instruction. Content alone cannot solve the problem. This workshop presents information and data on the proven classroom success of using appropriate 21st century technologies to support instructional methods that are culturally sensitive to the traditional Native visual-spatial learning style. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 203

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS A District’s Transformation from ‘One Size Fits All’ to a Levels of Service Model for Gifted Service Delivery Thurma DeLoach, Matt Hayman, Bryan Painter, Kirkwood School District, Kirkwood, MO

The United Nations defines refugees as persons who have fled from their home country and cannot return for fear of their lives. War, famine, and other horrors lead refugees to run from their home communities to another country— often to a refugee camp—from which some families are eventually resettled in a third country. More than 1.8 million refugees have come to the U.S., and they are often resettled in communities with little prior experience serving international students facing special challenges. Join us to discuss gifted educators’ experiences serving promising students from refugee backgrounds.

In the spring of 2006, the Kirkwood Missouri School District conducted a comprehensive evaluation of its gifted services program using evaluators from the University of Virginia. This evaluation provided specific commendations and detailed recommendations for enhancements taht would bring the district’s gifted services in line with NAGC national standards. This presentation describes the process that resulted in the transformation of our gifted program from a “one size fits all” pull out enrichment program into a school-based resource program that supports advanced learners using a Level of Service model. A specific process for identifying and serving highly advanced learners is also shared.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: Griffin Hall

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 204

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A School Like No Other — From Middle School to College All in One Year! Nancy B. Hertzog, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Transition School is a Special School like no other. 7th or 8th grade students prepare not only for their first year of college in one classroom for one academic year, but they also transform themselves from middle schoolers to scholars! This presentation details their curriculum, support structures, and exceptional ways in which their social and emotional well-being is addressed and monitored throughout their rapid acceleration experience. The presenters also share an overview of the research that supports this unusual and rather unique positive educational experience. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 310

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STEM From STEM to STEAM: Engaging Creative Students Robyn McKay, Shawn Jordan, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ; Eric Mann, Hope College, Holland, MI; Barbara Kerr, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS

Friday

Recorded Session

The innovators society needs are not only scientists and engineers, but also people who combine STEM and arts and design abilities. If these innovators are critical to the future, how do we find them? How can they be helped to find their pathways toward positions in STEM, in art and design, and entrepreneurship? The vision of the STEM to STEAM project is to develop a simple, valid means for identifying creative young people and to create career education, creative mathematics, and STEAM engineering courses to provide pathways to innovative careers for creative adolescents. Audience: Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Researchers Room: 201

Don’t Miss the Network Reception and Friday Evening Events See page xvi-xvii

The NAGC Celebration of Excellence Friday, November 8 | 5:00 – 7:00 PM | White River Ballroom E/F Presidential Address:

Awards presented: Distinguished Scholar Award

Early Leader Award

“NAGC: One For All and All For One”

Distinguished Service Award

Community Service Award

Tracy L. Cross

NAGC/Ball State Administrator Award

Doctoral Student Awards

Hollingworth Award Early Scholar Award

Masters’ and Specialists’ Award Gifted Child Quarterly Paper of the Year

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Tracy L. Cross NAGC President

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SATURDAY – KEYNOTE Saturday, November 9 | 9:15 AM - 10:30 AM 6 Driving in the Express xpress Lane: The Power of the Nerdfighters Community Photo by Ton Koene

John Green will explore how online communities work to facilitate positive change and encourage the celebration of intellectualism. In 2007, John and his brother Hank ceased textual communication and began to talk primarily through videoblogs posted to YouTube. The videos spawned a community of people called nerdfighters who fight for intellectualism and to decrease the overall worldwide level of suck. (Decreasing suck takes many forms: Nerdfighters have raised hundreds of thousands of dollars to fight poverty in the developing world; they also planted thousands of trees around the world in May of 2010 to celebrate Hank’s 30th birthday.) Although they have long since resumed textual communication, John and Hank continue to upload two

John Green

videos a week to their YouTube channel, vlogbrothers.

New York Times bestselling author of Looking

Their videos have been viewed more than 200 million

for Alaska, An Abundance of Katherines,

times, and their channel is one of the most popular in the

Paper Towns, and The Fault in Our Stars.

history of online video.

About John Green John Green is the New York Times bestselling author of Looking for Alaska, An Abundance of Katherines, Paper Towns, and The Fault in Our Stars, which is now being made into a major motion picture. He is also the coauthor, with David Levithan, of Will Grayson, Will Grayson. He was the 2006 recipient of the Michael L. Printz Award, a 2009 Edgar Award winner, and has twice been a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. Book signing at NAGC’s booth (Booth 321) in the Exhibit Hall immediately following the session

Sponsored by

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Welcome, Parents!

the Exhibit Hall, it closes at 4:00 PM today.

We’ll welcome parents from throughout the state to Parent Day organized by the Indiana Association for the Gifted (IAG).

Our annual E. Paul Torrance Creativity Lecture Series takes place at 4:30 PM. The Creativity Network presents Barbara Kerr with the E. Paul Torrance Creativity Award, after which she will speak on “Sixty Years of Creativity.” Then you can rock out with The Amygdaloids and their “Heavy MeNtal Variety Show.”

Parents will join us for the morning session with John Green who has captured the hearts (and dare we say minds?) of the “nerd” community. Thousands of smart kids have joined his online environment where they feel welcome and can take pride in being an advanced learner. Take advantage of the energy of your convention colleagues as you meet them in between session, and grab a bite to eat with them in the Exhibit Hall. Speaking of

We appreciate the support of IAG and look forward to the reception they are co-hosting with NAGC at the Indiana State Museum. A special 60th anniversary commemoration honoring NAGC’s past presidents will be featured. Light hors d’oeuvres , cash bars, student entertainment, and engaging artifacts. Come and help us celebrate.

Saturday Highlights

SATURDAY HIGHLIGHTS | NOVEMBER 9

Saturday 6 Schedule at a Glance 7:00 AM – 4:00 PM

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM

Registration Open

Putting it Into Practice Sessions

8:00 AM – 7:30 PM

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM

Indiana Association for the Gifted Parent Day (Separate registration required) Convention Center

7:30 AM – 4:00 PM

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Exhibitor Workshops

3:00 PM – 4:00 PM Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions

Exhibit Hall Open Coffee 7:30 AM – 8:30 AM JW Grand Ballroom (Third Floor)

4:30 PM – 6:00 PM

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Exhibitor Workshops

9:15 AM – 10:30 AM

E. Paul Torrance Creativity General Session “They Came from the Future: Sixty Years of Creativity” with 2013 NAGC E. Paul Torrance Creativity Award Barbara Kerr “Heavy MeNtal Variety Show” with The Amygdaloids White River Ballroom E/F (First Floor)

6:00 PM – 7:00 PM

General Session “Driving in the Express Lane” with John Green White River Ballroom A-J (First Floor)

10:30 AM to 2:30 PM

NAGC Annual Fund Donor Reception (by invitation only) Room 313

6:30 PM – 9:00 PM

Concession area open in the Exhibit Hall

10:45 AM – 11:45 AM

Indiana Night at the Museum Reception at Indiana State Museum (across the street from the Hotel)

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Exhibitor Workshops

11:45 AM – 12:30 PM Break

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Saturday

SATURDAY SESSIONS 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

selected student projects. Specific steps for recreating the project are provided.

ARTS Arts Talent ID: The Identification of Talented Students in the Arts Joanne Haroutounian, George Mason University, Arlington, VA This session describes an effective procedure for identifying talent in the arts based on criteria stemming from research analysis. Participants examine rating scales, a mini-curriculum of arts activities, and performance/ portfolio assessment forms that broaden the concept of artistic talent beyond performance and product. The identification curriculum included in the process is based on “artistic ways of knowing,” which incorporates perceptual discrimination, creative interpretation, performance, and critiquing skills. The curriculum can be easily integrated into the classroom to assist in arts talent identification as well as to provide substantive content that encourages all students to perceive, think, and create as artists. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators Room: 209 Collages That Tell a Story Larry L. Wood, Stephens Elementary School Little Rock School District, Little Rock, AR; Betty K. Wood, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR A story in a 4th grade reader inspired a project where students create a collage. The story is about a boy who took a trip to New York City to visit his aunt and uncle, Nanette and Romie Bearden. Bearden was actually an African American artist who is best known for his collages. After reading the story, students create a collage and write a reflection. During this session, participants view some of Bearden’s works, the collage presented in the story, and

Audience: Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Gifted Coordinators Room: 314 Ekphrastic Poetry: The Dance of Visual Literacy and Poetic Expression Martha M. Champa, University of Toledo, Holland, OH Visiting an art museum tantalizes the mind to converse. The colors, the line, the foreground, the background, the subject, all draw the viewer in and beckon a response. Experience how one sees deeply into a painting, a sculpture, a piece of furniture, a hand mirror. Learn how sketching helps the seeing, how writing unfolds the viewing and voilà, a new piece of art, a poem, whispers, cries out, or simply mirrors a response. Experiment with the technique taught to the presenter by Lucas County’s (Ohio) Poet Laureate, Joel Lipman. View examples of Ekphrastic poetry displayed at the Toledo Museum of Art. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: CC 123

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY Achieving Equity for Minority AP Students Through Technology James C. Garner, Decatur High School, Decatur, AR; Rachel F. Stokes, Greenville Senior High Academy, Greenville, SC Participants will learn to use Edmodo (a secure internetbased educational platform) to create Online Learning Communities for AP students using blogs, small and large group discussions, assignment submission, rigorous

Wake up with C T Y

Thanks to Johns Hop kins Center for Talented Youth for sponsoring our Convention coffee!

Coffee in the Exhibit Hall | 7:30 AM – 8:30 AM

Exhibit Hall open | 7:30 AM – 5:00 PM | JW Grand Ballroom (Third Floor)

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responses, and collaboration in Advanced Placement. This presentation responds to an increasingly technological and culturally-diverse educational environment, providing equity and access for students to produce digitallybased products, navigate relevant Internet resources, and communicate appropriately in an online Advanced Placement setting. Minority and socioeconomicallydisadvantaged students often have limited resources to develop 21st-Century skills. This presentation addresses equity and access to technology and helps teachers create a culturally, economically, and racially-diverse Internet Learning Community. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators Room: 303 Advanced Math + iPads = Learning in a New Way Samantha Wuttig, Fairbanks North Star Borough School District, Fairbanks, AK Want to challenge students in mathematics while making learning engaging? Our district has developed a project to challenge 6th grade students in math by compacting curriculum and integrating technology. One powerful tool is the integration of iPads as an essential piece of the program. We will share strategies, activities and resources to engage students in math as well as describe how students are identified, teachers are supported, and plans for expanding in the future. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators Room: 309 If You Build It, They Will Come - Wiki Spaces for Kids April DeGennaro, Peeples Elementary School, Fayetteville, GA At Peeples Elementary, the Enrichment wiki is an integral and integrated part of the gifted resource classroom. Wikis work well K-12. Our wiki is a repository for shared resources

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for home and school, a site for collaborative project work, and a showcase for assignments! The beauty of the wiki is the kids do the work! Wikis allow student engagement in a secure environment and solved our students’ problem of being “gifted only one day a week!” Students (and session participants) can extend learning using any internet enabled device. BYOT and build a wiki space during this session.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators Room: 301

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE A Discussion about the Emotional and Social Development of Gifted Learners Within the Talent Development Framework Tracy L. Cross, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Paula M. Olszewski-Kubilius, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; George Betts, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO; Julia L. Roberts, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY There has been a lot of “buzz” within the gifted education community regarding the talent development framework, and specifically, how it addresses the social and emotional components of giftedness and needs of gifted children. In this session, proponents of the talent development perspective join with experts on the social-emotional and psychological development of gifted individuals to share viewpoints, raise and discuss concerns, identify points of agreement, discuss misperceptions and analyze differences. Come to this session to hear a lively discussion between experts on changing perspectives on giftedness and talent development. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: JW Grand Ballroom 10

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Saturday

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Cont.)

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE (Cont.) Bright Minds, Idealism, and Disillusionment James T. Webb, Great Potential Press, Tucson, AZ Bright minds are particularly likely to see opportunities and alternatives, to be concerned with fairness, and to be idealists. Yet with each passing year, they experience disillusionment. This session describes this process, which continues into adulthood, and which often leads to loneliness, dissatisfaction, cynicism, burnout, and depression. This session describes many less healthy ways, as well as more healthy ways, that gifted children and adults use as they cope with their disillusionments. Practical suggestions are offered so that educators and parents can encourage beneficial development that nurtures idealism. Audience: Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Psychologists Room: JW Grand Ballroom 9 Dabrowski, Naturally Edith M. Burke, University of Arizona, West Winfield, NY; Amy H. Gaesser, University of Connecticut, Andover, CT Dabrowski called imaginational, intellectual, and emotional Overexcitabilities “tragic gifts” which made individuals feel life’s experiences more deeply than those without these gifts. When understood within his Theory of Positive Disintegration, Dabrowski’s constructs provide gifted individuals with a context for deeper self-understanding and rewarding development. Using the analogy of an oak tree’s growth, this poster session provides a visual interpretation of Dabrowski’s TPD reflecting the “complex process of differentiation and sequences of changes in structural and functional organization of living organisms.” Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists Room: Griffin Hall

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Serving the Needs of Gifted Children in Grades 1 Through 5 Through Development of Innovative Affective Curriculum for the Converse College Athena Institute Summer Camp Tracy M. Ksiazak, Ansley Taylor Corson, Sarah Hunt-Barron, Converse College, Spartanburg, SC How can gifted children’s affective needs be addressed proactively within the framework of a week-long summer enrichment camp? We share the affective curriculum that we developed for the Summer 2013 Athena Institute’s 200 gifted students in grades 1 through 5. Leave this session with an enhanced understanding of creative ways to meet the social and emotional needs of gifted elementary school children. Thematically focused daily guidance activities that are tailored to reflect research on the affective needs of gifted students are provided. Activity topics will include self-concept, friendships, coping with others’ expectations, and self-care. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists Room: CC 124 You Don’t Know Me, How Can You Speak for Me?: School Counselors Knowledge of and Advocacy with Gifted Student SaDohl G. Jones, Albany, GA Given the risk of personal-social and academic issues associated with giftedness, gifted students need an educational professional who can advocate for them. The professional school counselor can be one such person. This presentation helps you to 1) understand the affective psychological/counseling needs of GT students; 2) understand the advocacy needs of these students; 3) learn the school counseling advocacy competency; and, 4) learn best practices in working with gifted students to help increase and retain students in gifted programs. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Counselors, Professors Room: Griffin Hall

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CREATIVITY Cognitive Processes in Divergent Thinking: Ways to Generate More and Original Ideas Selcuk Acar, University of Georgia, Athens, GA The purpose of this study is to investigate cognitive processes employed in divergent thinking tasks. In order to test this, six divergent thinking tasks from the Runco Creativity Assessment Battery were administered. In addition to the instructions provided in the battery, participants were encouraged to “think aloud.” Each session was conducted individually and audio recorded. Also, the items were presented on a computer screen. Twenty-one people participated in this study. Ideas and processes leading to these ideas have been identified and analyzed. Results are discussed with respect to the theory and assessment of creative thinking in this poster session. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Psychologists, Researchers Room: Griffin Hall Differences in Creativity and Activities Between Future Problem Solving and Nonfuture Problem Solving Students Two Years into a Longitudinal Study Marianne Solomon, Future Problem Solving Program International, Melbourne, FL; John Kauffman, Scholastic Testing Service, Bensenville, IL The Future Problem Solving Program was developed and founded by Dr. E. Paul and Pansy Torrance in 1974. Since then the program has involved many thousands of students, volunteers, affiliate directors, and executive directors. Future Problem Solving Programs International, a number of U.S. and international affiliates including students, volunteers, directors and Scholastic Testing Service, Inc. are in the second year of a longitudinal study. The study includes assessment of creativity and survey responses from fifth or sixth graders. This program presents the findings over the past two years. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Researchers Room: 206

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New Creative Teaching Strategies Derived from Interdisciplinary Exploration Don Ambrose, Rider University, Yardley, PA Creative teachers employ a variety of instructional models and strategies to invigorate the motivation and thinking of their gifted students. Some of these strategies are well known while others remain obscure in spite of their high potential. Still others have been invented recently. These new strategies are based on ideas from multiple academic disciplines including philosophy, complexity theory, and the natural sciences. This session illustrates examples of creative teaching and learning based on strategies such as chaos-order analysis, worldview analysis, metapattern inquiry, altruistic inquiry, and assertive-passive evaluation. Participants have opportunities to try out some of the new strategies.

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Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 204

CURRICULUM STUDIES Cope and Grow: A Model of Affective Curriculum for Talent Development David Y. Dai, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, NY A Cope-and-Grow Model of affective curriculum for talent development is introduced based on a dual process theory of expanding one’s personal agency and horizon (Grow) while dealing with stressful events and negative emotions (Cope). The Model specifies four stages of talent development, each stage having its distinct issues of Cope and Grow. The model identifies pedagogical tools and resources (experiential, social, and media) for implementing an affective curriculum, and related counseling and interventions. Significance of the Cope-and-Grow Model is discussed in terms of promoting a more personalized agenda of talent development. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: CC 121

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Getting a Handle on Reading Judith A. Holbrook, Fayette County Schools, Peachtree City, GA

CURRICULUM STUDIES (Cont.) Differentiating Common Core Standards for the Reading of American Nonfiction Michael C. Thompson, Royal Fireworks Press, Durham, NC The Common Core State Standards advocate a program of rigorous reading that extends beyond the usual fiction titles to major works of nonfiction. Incorporating major American nonfiction works such as “The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin,” “The Narrative of Frederick Douglass,” and, Henry David Thoreau’s “Walden” provides the teacher of gifted children with an array of opportunities that have been missing from fiction-centered curricula. These elements include a different strand of vocabulary, a different tone and voice, training in following an extended case for hundreds of pages, a sense of the nature of autobiography, and deep background in American History. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators Room: JW Grand Ballroom 8 Fueling Potential and Driving Achievement in Language Arts: Analyzing Informational Texts with A Focus on Higher Level Skill Development Kimberley L. Chandler, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA According to the Common Core State Standards, students must “actively seek thoughtful engagement with informational texts that builds knowledge, enlarges experience, and broadens worldviews.” In this session, the presenter shares a curricular framework for helping gifted students analyze informational texts. Participants review examples of the framework, which utilizes a research-based model for developing reasoning skills. Emphases is on designing activities to teach gifted students how to connect to prior knowledge, make inferences, and summarize information. Ideas for research projects, questioning, and writing exercises that require critical reading are included. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators Room: 208

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Do your students think they should practice reading only during a reading lesson or that reading only involves going through a text and answering questions? Do you want your students to be able to analyze, explain, relate to, and summarize the contents of a reading passage? We show you brain-friendly strategies that help your students solve the secrets to understanding what they read, practice reading across the curriculum, and use higher-level thinking skills to become proficient and advanced readers both in school and out. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: 305 Indiana ELA Units (5-8) MaryAnn Yedinak, Grade 5; Monica Plantan, Grade 6, Zionsville Schools; Ede Marquisse, Grade 7, Fort Wayne Schools; Jason Brumback, Grade 8, MSD Wayne Township In 2010, the Indiana Department of Education (IDOE) commissioned Joyce VanTassel- Baska to work with Indiana teachers to create 9 English Language Arts Units, one for each grades K – 8, designed specifically for gifted learners. These units are consistent with Common Core Standards and incorporate readily available, high quality materials. The units are research-based and vertically articulated. These units are available to Indiana teachers. The teacher authors will be available to explain the units to Indiana teachers and answer questions at grade-specific round tables. Audience: Indiana teachers Room: Griffin Hall Infusing a Global Dimension into Gifted Curriculum Marjorie Landwehr-Brown, Douglass Public Schools, Douglass, KS; Kay L. Gibson, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS Competencies needed for participation in the 21st century require an education that goes beyond basic skills proficiency. Gifted education supports student-centered curriculum through authentic learning. Infusion of a global dimension adds complexity to this curriculum, challenging learners to become active global citizens. This session examines the Global Learning Curriculum Model, which

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is based in real-world learning projects and provides a systematic approach for modifying curriculum to include global competencies such as intercultural communication, collaboration skills, knowledge of the interconnectedness and interdependence of humanity, attitudes of respect for diversity, and a sense of universal responsibility.

identifying academically gifted students in grades K-2. Many districts conduct screenings later in the elementary years, but waiting to screen can result in overlooking our youngest and brightest minds. Come hear more about the process, which includes referrals, screening, and cognitive testing and services for mathematics and language arts.

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: 203

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Psychologists Room: CC 120

Using Documentaries to Support Rigor in Nonfiction Text Analysis Pam DePinto, Northwestern University, Lake Forest, IL How can teachers encourage gifted students to delight and participate in thoughtful analysis around nonfiction topics? Experience strategies eliciting the Intellectual Standards from the Foundation for Critical Thinking that show educators how to use documentaries to help students become better readers and interpreters of nonfiction texts. Compare and evaluate techniques incorporating author’s purpose, tone, perspective, bias, and persuasion in both nonfiction print text and nonfiction visual text. Connect intellectual traits to the top ten educational documentaries. Receive lists of texts, documentaries, and websites. These strategies support the CCSS for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: 310

EARLY CHILDHOOD Fueling Potential: A System for Finding the Brightest Minds in K-2 Elizabeth P. Knees, Emily Vangermeersch, Julie Griffith, Mary K. Nichols, Poudre School District, Fort Collins, CO Are you trying to find a reliable way to identify academically gifted primary students in your district? Gifted identification specialists from Poudre School District in Fort Collins, Colorado, share the system they have developed for

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Stealth Dyslexia: Flying Under the Radar Bobbie Gilman, Gifted Development Center, Westminster, CO; Dan Peters, Summit Center, Walnut Creek, CA In an educational era that promotes “meeting expected grade requirements,” gifted children with learning disabilities are most often missed, and stealth dyslexia has become a primary culprit. Due to their advanced thinking and compensatory strategies, many gifted students with dyslexia exhibit “average” performance, while still struggling to sound out words, read fluently, spell, and write. Without early intervention and accommodations to counter increasing reading and writing demands, compensation grows less adequate and academic performance, selfesteem, and emotional functioning deteriorate. Learn how stealth dyslexia presents in gifted children, how to accurately diagnose it, and what to do about it. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists Room: 302

For the most up-todate information on sessions and to search for sessions by strand or speaker, download the NAGC2013 app.

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GLOBAL AWARENESS

Exhibitor Workshops Expanding the Roots of Knowledge Nick Bradvica, Marie’s Words Picture Words by Marie’s Words is the revolutionary English language and vocabulary learning tool developed in 2011 by Marie and Nick Bradvica. These 550 multi-sensory mnemonic devices amalgamate college-level vocabulary and language skills with fun individual and group activities. Although originally created for the SAT®, Picture Words has been endorsed for all ages and abilities and has helped thousands of students excel both inside and outside the classroom. Visit the Marie’s Words booth to see why Picture Words is sweeping the United States with its revolutionary mnemonics and games. Room: Griffin Hall The Exceptional Child and Zombies: Promoting Critical Thinking Through Fictional Crisis Kevin Minch, Truman Institute

Let’s Get Critical!: Social Justice Across the K-12 Curriculum William Hooper, Laughing Rabbit Farm, Storrs, CT; Merzili Villanueva, Micah Bruce-Davis, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT K-12 gifted students may exhibit heightened awareness and sensitivity to societal concerns regarding fairness, equity, and overall well-being. Their feelings may be intense, but they may not have an appropriate venue or the tools to communicate their sentiments and understandings. In this session, we introduce ways for teachers to guide their students in critically examining human, economic, and environmental issues across the curriculum. Selected topics are presented within thematic and interdisciplinary curricular models aligned to the Common Core as potential avenues for creatively and purposefully engaging students in content, while preparing them to become agents for social change. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: 101

Creative problem solving requires a willingness to engage in intellectual “risk taking”. This session explores efforts at Truman State University to use a fictitious zombie apocalypse to engage students in critical thinking about extreme “what if” scenarios. Techniques for using pop culture phenomena to engage in serious questioning are explored. Room: Griffin Hall

For the most up-to-date information on sessions and to search for sessions by strand or speaker, download the NAGC2013 app.

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MIDDLE GRADES

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Using Technology to Excite and Individualize Instruction for Middle Grade Students Melissa Thom, Renzulli Academy, Hartford, CT

Curriculum As Advocacy: Keeping Gifted Education Alive in Contemporary Society Dana Ruepert, Anna Williams, California Association for the Gifted, Los Angeles, CA; Lee Angela Reid, Capitol Advisors Group, Sacramento, CA; Sandra Kaplan, Jessica Manzone, Deborah C. Hazelton, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Every teacher experiences the frustration of not being able to systematically address learning needs and interests of individual students. It is important to offer engaging and exciting tools that motivate students to take their learning to higher levels. Edmodo allows teachers to join and to create online learning communities that are safe and engaging and that also involve parents. This session will include an introduction to Edmodo and a demonstration on integrating websites into daily instruction. Participants will learn an array of classroom-tested tips for its use as a management and differentiation tool based on experiences with 4th-6th graders. Laptops recommended. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades Room: 308 From a Birmingham Jail to Occupy Wall Street: Engaging Middle School Students in US History Carol L. Tieso, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA Question: How do you get from a Birmingham Jail to Occupy Wall Street? Answer: Join us and learn about challenging new US History units that have already helped students demonstrate improved achievement and engagement. Get a sneak peek into four new US History units guaranteed to motivate your students to explore and engage with the history of their nation and its people. Additionally, you will receive sample lesson plans that will introduce you to an authentic study of history and historiography. Finally, you’ll see how to create, remodel, and differentiate history curricula that represent multiple and diverse perspectives. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators Room: 313

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Recorded Session

Lack of fiscal support, permissive rather than mandatory laws, emphasis on raising levels of academic success among struggling learners, stress on English Learners, and the proliferation of charter schools are issues confronting educators working to maintain gifted education in California. A revised definition of differentiation related to the Common Core and GATE State Standards, the development of non-traditional identification systems for primary students, the concept of statewide demonstration classrooms as professional development, and new website design promoting hands-on applications to a “research journal” represent a set of activities educators can use to invent advocacy strategies that transcend traditional methods. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 202 Hu(Mans): A Course of Study- Classic Professional Development for the 21st Century Paige Hendricks, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Shelagh Gallagher, Engaged Education, Charlotte, NC As novel today as in 1963, Man: A Course of Study is a model of conceptually oriented inquiry-based curriculum unparalleled even today. Equally valuable are the MACOS professional development seminars that were designed to develop reflective practitioners capable of teaching inquiry-based, concept-centered, learner-oriented curricula. Participants engage in discussion of three seminars (openended questioning techniques, different student learning styles, and concept-based curriculum) and discuss how to incorporate them into professional development programs. By the session’s end, participants see that these resources connect the classic practices of the MACOS curriculum with 21st century best practice in gifted education. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators Room: 102

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Gifted Minority Students’ Perception of Teachers’ Behaviors and its Relationship with Academic Performance Nanseol Heo, Susan Assouline, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

the relationships between academic performance and students’ perception of teachers were investigated. The original sample for this study consisted of 1,420 students who participated in a university-based academic Talent Search program. This poster session of the result provides some evidence that gifted students’ academic selfperception can be strongly influenced by their ethnicity and race, regardless of their actual academic performance.

The primary purpose of this study is to examine if gifted minority students perceive their interaction with teachers differently compared to white gifted students. In addition,

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Professors, Researchers Room: Griffin Hall

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

Combined Sessions 6 RESEARCH & EVALUATION 8:00 AM – 8:30 AM

8:30 AM – 9:00 AM

A Differentiated Reading Approach: Helping Both Gifted and General Education Students in Title I Schools Make Reading Gains Linda Evans, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA; Myriam Lindo, University of South Florida, Miami Lakes, FL; Elizabeth Shaunessy-Dedrick, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL Schools and teachers face the challenge of meeting the needs of an increasingly culturally and linguistically diverse student population. The Schoolwide Enrichment Model – Reading is a program for reading that provides individualized and differentiated instruction using student self-selected texts. In this session discuss the findings of research conducted in SEM-R in Title I elementary schools with culturally and linguistically diverse populations, in a school district in the Southeastern United States. Findings of this study include reading comprehension gains for both gifted and general education students.

Mobility in High Achievers: Regression Artifact or Failure? Kyoungwon L. Bishop, Pearson, Iowa City, IA To be able to provide proper growth models for gifted population, this study investigates the trajectory of high level achievers from kindergarten to eighth grade in comparison to lower and middle level achievers’ growth using ECLS-K data. ECLS-K 1998-2007 data is the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, (K-8) from the National Center for Education Statistics. This growth model will take the regression to the mean artifact into account so that a more accurate growth trajectory can be obtained from all achievement groups. The results are intended to complement existing research on high math-achieving students. Audience: Researchers Room: 205

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Researchers Room: 205

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Combined Sessions 6 RESEARCH & EVALUATION 8:00 AM – 8:30 AM

8:30 AM – 9:00 AM

How Does Differentiation Affect TwiceExceptional Students’ Attitudes Toward Learning? F. Richard “Rick” Olenchak, John P. Gaa, University of Houston, Houston, TX Twice-exceptional students present a particular challenge to education. Differentiation is an integral practice for teaching gifted students in schools, yet little is known about how twice-exceptional students are influenced by differentiation. This session describes a mixed design study of 207 twice-exceptional students in grades 4-8 who participated in a highly structured implementation of differentiation in urban schools. Quantitative results revealed that differentiation, along with several other variables, appears to have a statistically significant relationship with twice-exceptional students’ attitudes toward learning. Four case studies extracted from the larger sample provide clarifications of the relationships among variables from the quantitative results. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: CC 122

Identifying Gifted Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder Megan Foley Nicpon, Erica Behrens, Margaret Candler, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

Saturday

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How do mental health professionals and educators properly screen for autism spectrum disorder in highability students? Answering this question is not easy because recent research findings indicate that existing screening measures have limited utility with high ability students. Attendees learn the research-based development of an autism spectrum screening measure specifically for twice-exceptional students, and how it can be utilized by professionals in a variety of settings. Developing this measure identified specific symptoms displayed by high-ability students with autism spectrum disorder that will be shared, as well as interventions that target the problem domains. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: CC 122

More RESEARCH & EVALUATION Combined Sessions 2

Convention Evaluation Your opinion is important to us! The NAGC Annual Convention Evaluation will be e-mailed to all registrants at the end of the Convention. We listen to your feedback and comments, and hope you’ll join us in Baltimore in 2014 to see how we did!

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Combined Sessions 6 RESEARCH & EVALUATION 8:00 AM – 8:30 AM

8:30 AM – 9:00 AM

Leader of the Pack: Academic Giftedness and Leadership in Early Adolescence Kristen Peairs, Matt C. Makel, Martha Putallaz, Philip Costanzo, Duke University, Durham, NC

Relationship Between Team-Play Participation and Leadership Skills Among Gifted Adolescents Carolyn M. Callahan, Sarah Oh, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

In contrast to what is known about leadership in adults, very little is known about leadership during adolescence. Even less is known about the talented and gifted youth who are ideally positioned to become the great leaders of the future. The current session shares findings from a study of academically gifted adolescents who are leaders among their peers. The presentation will report on the profiles of gifted leaders and highlight ways in which gifted leaders differ from other gifted students as well as other leaders. The implications of including leadership as part of giftedness will be discussed. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Counselors, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 306

While leadership has been included in the federal definition of gifted and talented over the last three decades, leadership has not received much attention in research or program development for gifted students. Even though leadership is sometimes included in regular school curricula, leadership skills may also be effectively developed through involvement in real-life situations such as organized team-play. This study investigates the relationship between team-play participation and leadership skills among gifted adolescents. Preliminary analyses suggest that participation in school sponsored activities such as student government or extracurricular clubs has significant and positive relationship with leadership skills among gifted adolescents. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Researchers Room: 306

Ready. Set. Learn!

Those who registered to attend the full Convention will have access to recorded sessions FREE. Now you really can be two places at once!

The sessions will be on the NAGC Live Learning Center in mid December. It gives you “just-intime”, 24/7 access to content by topic, all at YOUR convenience. You’re just a click away. Visit today.

You will have access to the sessions (audio synced to PowerPoint slides) and handouts (if provided by speakers) through June 2014.

The NAGC Live Learning Center is also “home” to the NAGC Webinars on Wednesdays.

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10:45 AM – 11:45 AM

SIGNATURE SERIES Program Designs that Develop the Talent of Low-Income and Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Gifted Learners Renee Haston, Duke University, Durham, NC; Carol V. Horn, Fairfax County Public Schools, Falls Church, VA; Paula M. Olszewski-Kubilius, Rhoda Rosen, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; Katherine Gavin, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT In November 2012, NAGC released a new report on the plight of low-income and culturally and linguistically diverse gifted learners. “Unlocking Emergent Talent: Supporting High Achievement of Low-Income, High-Ability Learners” documents that these students are under-identified and under-served in most schools and even in most gifted programs. The report also featured a number of successful school-based and outside-of-school programs designed to advance the talent development of low-income and CLD gifted students. In this session, representatives from these programs share their best practices regarding identification and talent development including: using enrichment to identify giftedness early, ways to extend the school day and increase learning time for students, scaffolding to ensure student success with advanced curricula, program designs that cultivate peer support for high academic achievement, and ways to increase social support and address psychosocial issues for low-income and CLD gifted learners. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Researchers Room: JW Grand Ballroom 7

ARTS Individualizing Instruction Within a Common Assessment in the Talented Theatre Classroom Megan S. Harms, Hahnville High Public Schools, Luling, LA

classroom where a percentage grade must be given for each student, it is difficult to determine the best way to assess all students when they are each working to meet the individual goals outlined on their IEP. Examples are given of ways to take a common project or assessment, design a common grading procedure, and still allow for individual strengths and interests to shine through in the finished product. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators Room: 206 Working Smarter, Not Harder—Using Technology to Assist Gifted Children’s Artistic Development Stephen T. Schroth, Jason A. Helfer, Knox College, Galesburg, IL; Christian Mahone, Nielson Elementary School, Galesburg Community Unit School District No. 205, Galesburg, IL Many parents and teachers ask “How can I help my child or student when I am not comfortable with artistic concepts and terminology?” Fortunately, recent software developments have greatly increased and enhanced the opportunities available to all. This session explores: 1) The importance of creation as a means to strengthen gifted children’s involvement with and opportunities in the arts; 2) Brief cases that give answers to the questions parents and teachers commonly experience; and 3) Specific software packages, including hardware and software requirements, that allow children, parents, and teachers to better assess the equipment needed for building creative and aesthetic experiences. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 201

Discuss the challenge of designing common assessments that measure student growth among a group of students while ensuring that instruction is still individualized. In a talented

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COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

Fidelity is the bridge between a curricular intervention and successful implementation outcomes. However, in order to back the outcomes of an intervention, researchers should be able to prove that the intervention is truly reflective of its theoretical framework. This session discusses the theoretical underpinnings of the CLEAR Curriculum Model and the identification and cross-referencing of the critical components as they are actualized in two curriculum units showing fidelity to theory—the first step in validating a curricular intervention.

It has been said that a picture is worth 1,000 words, but infographics are worth a million! These visual representations of text, numbers, and graphic data communicate complex information quickly and concisely on one page that go beyond “just the facts!” Students use both linguistic and non-linguistic systems to read and interpret them or, better yet, to develop these multi-layered data graphics that demonstrate analysis, evaluation, and synthesis of content and skills. You will enjoy “reading” their projects and they will enjoy making them! Leave this session with multiple resources to use or create these infographics in your classrooms.

Audience: Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Researchers Room: 301

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: 308

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE Guiding the Emotional Well-Being of Gifted Males in a Wired World Jeffrey S. Danielian, LaSalle Academy, Warren, RI; Thomas P. Hébert, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS No Longer an Island: Rethinking the Role of Gifted Education at the High School Level Kelly A. Hedrick, Virginia Beach City Public Schools, Virginia Beach, VA Current research suggests that AP and IB are not adequate in meeting the needs of gifted learners, yet they are routinely the programs identified by school divisions as their gifted program for high school students. It is time to look beyond traditional models and identify best practices for educating our most capable learners at the high school level. In this session, participants discuss the needs of gifted learners in high school and examine the use of cluster grouping within a collaboration model as the basis for effective gifted programming.

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The CLEAR Curriculum Model: Fidelity of Two Curriculum Units to the Theoretical Framework Lisa H. Foster, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

Visual Literacy Through Infographics Shirley J. Farrell, Alabama State Department of Education, Montgomery, AL

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators Room: 102

Roundtable

Saturday

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How can educators help gifted boys maintain emotionally balanced lives in our frenzied high-tech society? This session addresses this challenge by offering a rich menu of activities to support healthy psychosocial development in gifted adolescent males. These activities include both high-tech strategies and more traditional approaches to assist boys with issues of identity development, masculinity, peer, family and community expectations, and stress management. Teachers leave this session better equipped with user-friendly strategies and resources to guide the emotional well being of gifted young men in their classrooms. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Parents, Psychologists Room: CC 124

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10:45 AM – 11:45 AM (Cont.)

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE (Cont.) Positive Psychology is not a Spectator Sport: Simple Exercises that Support Talent Development and a Fulfilling Life for Kids and Adults Susan Waite, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX As K-12 schools increasingly focus on knowledge and skills that will help students to make a living, we should not forget education’s role in helping students to make a life worth living. Positive psychology exercises can help teachers and students to craft more fulfilling and flourishing lives. Some exercises also can promote domain-specific talent development. This session shares some simple but powerful positive psychology exercises that may be used with students in grades 4-12 and with adults and explains their importance for well-being and talent development. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Professors Room: Griffin Hall

CREATIVITY Developing Creative Curriculum for Summer Programs Differentiated for the Gifted Bronwyn MacFarlane, Betty K. Wood, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR

what educators who are involved in planning summer programs can do to ameliorate the creativity crisis. While creativity among American students has decreased at an alarming rate; school districts, institutions of higher education, and educational organizations have expanded summer program offerings widely, touting a variety of learning experiences for students. With specific tools and strategies for developing creative-thinking habits and skills, participants leave with a plan for developing summer program curriculum that is differentiated for increasing creativity among gifted students. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors Room: 302 The Creative Habit - How Educational Settings Can Encourage Innovative Thinking Gwen Olmstead, Western Connecticut State University, Kintnersville, PA In a time when the classroom is seemingly filled with creativity-killers such as testing, rewards, and teacher evaluations, this session shows how short and simple activities can help make creativity a daily habit in any setting. Students learn simple ways to break the barriers that can inhibit their own divergent thinking. Also discussed is how to foster the culture of borrowing inspiration through the practice of sharing and expanding upon others ideas. Additionally, assessments are provided

Summer programs are a natural place for creativity to be cultivated among students and this session focuses on

THE COOL BUS: A MOBILE LITERARY ARTS CENTER Kirstin Northenscold, University High School, Carmel, IN See the Cool Bus, a mobile literary arts center created out of a retrofitted school bus, firsthand, and meet the creators behind it. Created by Word On The Street, The Cool Bus partners with Indianapolis neighborhoods, schools, and nonprofits to offer workshops, tutoring, and free books throughout the city. Word On The Street is an Indianapolis-based group focused on engaging neighbors in reading, writing, and exploring in spaces that inspire imagination and wonder. In 2012 we created the Cottage Home Microlibrary. With the generous support of People for Urban Progress, the Cool Bus rolled out on June 28th for the 5x5 event at IndyHub. Take a look: http://www.thecoolbus.org Room: Event Center Drive, Exit on the First Floor

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CURRICULUM STUDIES

that give students meaningful and manageable goals to work toward in their Creativity Habit.

Accelerating Beyond the Common Core: Elementary Literacy and Writing Through Economics and Entrepreneurship Christy L. Harshbarger, Mayflower Mill Elementary School, Lafayette, IN; Gina D. Boyd, Tippecanoe School Corporation, Lafayette, IN

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 310 The Effect of Experiential Bias on both Divergent Thinking Tests and Creative Performance Daehyun Kim, Suehyeon Paek, Hyeri Park, University of Georgia, Athens, GA

Saturday

Recorded Session

Second and third graders creating products, marketing, selling, and writing reflections about the process. Fourth graders analyzing characters’ choices and opportunity costs in a novel. Fifth graders writing job applications and interviewing for positions. This session demonstrates how economics and entrepreneurship are effective vehicles for expanding Common Core Literacy and Writing Standards for high-ability learners while incorporating valuable social studies content. Thirty participants will receive a free copy of one of the following: Economics and Entrepreneurship: Operating a Class Business in the Elementary and Middle School, The Classroom Mini-economy, or Teaching Economics Using Children’s Literature.

Experiential bias is critical, since it interferes with identifying pure types of creativity. Thus, Runco and Acar tested the different effects of experientially non-biased and biased scores on creativity. However, the experiential bias should also be examined to determine the effects of measuring creative performance. Thus, this research aims to show the relationship between the experiential bias and the DT score, the creative performance respectively. The findings would demonstrate that the creative performance would depend on experience. Consequently, it could contribute to a more objective identification of individuals’ creativity.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 314

Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: Griffin Hall

Essential Questions as a Catalyst to Critical Thinking Ana Lizza Arroyo, Illinois School District U-46, Lake in the Hills, IL; April Wells, Illinois School District U-46, South Elgin, IL

Treatment of Science-gifted Students’ Insight in Scientific Problem Solving Ji Won Lee, Jung Bog Kim, Korea National University of Education, Chungbuk, Korea The purpose of this study was to investigate treatment to insight in scientific problem solving by 4 Korean science high school students. When the problem was presented, they tried to make a lot of hypothesis. Some ideas appeared suddenly from insight including the correct idea and the others came slowly with logical reasoning. Most of the idea was dismissed through interaction or self-verification. They even dropped the correct idea. But their knowledge structure changed gradually by peer discussion. In this poster session you will learn that the problem was solved not at once even though the correct insight was there.

Heavy lifting! Essential questions spark students’ curiosity and sense of wonder, and they derive from some deep wish to get to the heart of a discipline. Answers to essential questions must be invented. It is something like cooking a great meal. The researcher goes out on a shopping expedition for the raw ingredients, but “the proof is in the pudding.” Students must construct their own answers and arrive at their own meaning from the information they have gathered. Join us as we share our compilation of tried and true essential questions and list of corresponding picture books. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Gifted Coordinators Room: 313

Audience: Researchers Room: Griffin Hall

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Saturday

10:45 AM – 11:45 AM (Cont.)

Solving the CRISIS: Designing Real-World Gifted Programming Through Partnership with Content Specialists Julie Hess, Melissa A. Rains, Duke University, Durham, NC

CURRICULUM STUDIES (Cont.) Ready, Set, Go!: Math Games for Serious Minds Rande B. McCreight, Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln, NE Teachers become so enmeshed with the way they’ve always done things that they lose sight of whether the assignment engages students in thinking at high levels. The presenter has considered the plight of teachers and created a variety of math-based activities that engage students in a meaningful, appropriate manner. Most of these games use only a deck of cards or dice. The presenter will emphasize maximizing time spent thinking at high levels rather than on production. This session enables participants to play a number of games and experience how the activities feel from the perspective of the student. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood Room: 203 Revving up for Revision: Improving Writing Through Focus and Annotation Dawn Burnette, Burnette Academy, Blairsville, GA; Judith A. Holbrook, Fayette County Schools, Peachtree City, GA Do your students think spell check is all that separates rough drafts from final drafts? Most students don’t revise because they can’t adequately self-assess. And they can’t adequately self-assess until they learn to think like writers. This interactive session will teach you an innovative, research-based writing approach that allows students to think critically about their own writing and about the process of writing in general. The result of this approach is the removal of ceilings for your top writers and the removal of barriers for your struggling ones. Come prepared to change the way you think about writing instruction! Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators Room: 309

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As educators you have the experience designing realworld, meaningful lessons for your gifted students. What may be missing is the content-specific knowledge of a field for the rigor gifted students require. Learn how to develop partnerships with content specialists to create problem based, interdisciplinary projects that meet the differentiated needs of your classroom, while fully engaging students with a hands-on approach. The content specialist model focuses on the creation of a resource guide that establishes key ideas and concepts used in the development of objectives and lesson plans. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: 209 There is More to Spanish Literature than Don Quixote: Bringing Relevance to Gifted Mexican Students in Literature Classes Jaret W. Hodges, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN Mexican students represent the fastest growing student population in the United States. English/Literature/Language arts teachers can select literature that will bring relevance to Mexican gifted students and provide an opportunity for cultural enrichment and appreciation for non-Mexican students. Mexico and other Latin American countries have a rich literary history that is worth exploring in American classrooms. There is more to Spanish literature than Don Quixote. This poster contains an annotated selection of Latin American literature and suggestions for its use in 6-12th grade classrooms. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: Griffin Hall

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

EARLY CHILDHOOD

EXHIBITOR WORKSHOP

Early and Equitable Identification of Talented and Gifted First Grade Students Erin Croley, Hillsboro School District, Portland, OR; Ann Matschiner, Pacific University, Forest Grove, OR

Jacobs Ladder: An Advanced Reading Skills Framework for Grades K-9 Tamra Stambaugh and Joyce VanTassel-Baska for Prufrock Press

The early and equitable identification of talented and gifted first grade students research project is developing first grade classroom teachers to utilize instructional strategies useful for engaging diverse populations in learning and identifying characteristics of talented and giftedness among students. The classroom teachers are receiving professional development to analyze and evaluate student work for evidence of behaviors characteristic of talented and giftedness among students.

The Jacob’s Ladder Reading Comprehension Program from Prufrock Press is an evidence-supported framework designed to help students grades K-9 to develop critical thinking and reading comprehension. Aligned to the analysis of literature. Time will be allotted for guided modeling opportunities..

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators Room: Griffin Hall

MIDDLE GRADES

Rigor and Engagement for Young Learners: Developmentally Appropriate Applications Infusing the Common Core State Standards Bertie Kingore, PA Publishing, Austin, TX Ensure uninterrupted academic growth for young advanced children through rigor characterized by active engagement and developmentally appropriate challenge. Explore relevant learning experiences including ageappropriate inquiry, vocabulary development, active engagement techniques, and sophisticated non-linguistic products instead of only written work. Select from readyto-use, CCSS-aligned strategies that transform primary classrooms into rigorous learning environments promoting young learners’ complex thinking and construction of deeper meaning. Experience how to uplift lessons with rigor, relevance, and high-order thinking skills, implement assessments providing actionable data aligned to required instruction, and engage advanced children so they are motivated to exert the effort required to reach high expectations.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Room: Griffin Hall

I Think, Therefore I Read: Integrating Philosophy and Literature in Middle School Laila Sanguras, University of North Texas, Coppell, TX Letters above my classroom door spell out, “You are fascinating.” Students (and their parents) scoff when they see it, but, oh, I believe. After all, I’ve heard eighth graders debate the rationality of love, citing Plato or Montaigne, and have seen them hold their hands to their heads considering truth’s ambiguity, blaming Mill for “hurting their brains.” By experiencing literature and writing through a philosophical lens, gifted middle school students become philosophers critical and creative thinkers. This emphasis on conceptual understanding differentiates short stories for gifted learners. Participants leave with lesson ideas aligned with the Common Core State Standards. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Gifted Coordinators Room: CC 120

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: JW Grand Ballroom 9

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Saturday

10:45 AM – 11:45 AM (Cont.)

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

PARENT & COMMUNITY Eleven Key Issues for Parents of Gifted Children Arlene R. DeVries, Drake University, Windsor Heights, IA; James T. Webb, Great Potential Press, Tucson, AZ Eleven issues are primary concerns for parents of gifted children: (1) communication and relationships, (2) motivation and underachievement, (3) discipline and self-management, (3) stress and perfectionism, (5) acquaintances and peers, (6) siblings, (7) values and traditions, (8) idealism and depression, (9) complexities of modern parenting, (10) misdiagnosis, and (11) finding a good educational fit. These eleven issues have major implications for the education and life success of gifted children. Information and resources for each of these eleven issues are provided, along with implications of four major factors—range of ability, asynchronous development, overexcitabilities, and thinking styles. Audience: Counselors, Parents Room: JW Grand Ballroom 10 Supporting Resilience When You Can’t Fix the World Stephanie S. Tolan, Institute for Educational Advancement, Charlotte, NC Advocates have been working to change the world of education for gifted students for nearly 100 years. Success has been sporadic and temporary at best. This session does not suggest that parents and others give up advocacy, but presents ways to support the natural resilience of the gifted in the face of the world’s reluctance to change to meet their needs. Instead of “Why me?” we can teach children (and ourselves) to ask “What now?” and focus our very good minds on present moment solutions to change the story the only way we can: from the inside out. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Counselors, Parents, Psychologists Room: CC 122

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Building Capacity: A Statewide System for Helping Teachers Identify and Serve TwiceExceptional Students Lois Baldwin, Tarrytown, NY; Cheryl Franklin-Rohr, Adams 14 School District, Lakewood, CO; Wendy S. Leader, Jacquelin Medina, Colorado Department of Education, Denver, CO Twice-exceptional students are one of the most underserved groups in our schools. Few educators understand the characteristics and needs of this special population. The Colorado Department of Education has developed a statewide system of professional development that includes two levels of ongoing training, as well as online resources that are easily accessible to parents and others. This presentation acquaints participants with the professional development model, involves them in sample activities from the trainings, and provides them an opportunity to view the Level 1 and Level 2 training materials. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Researchers Room: 103 Co-teaching: A Collaborative Approach to Differentiation for Gifted Learners Diane G. Heacox, St. Catherine University, Edina, MN Co-teaching has emerged as a favored practice in inclusion classrooms. It also holds the promise for better supporting the unique needs of gifted learners through collaborative planning and co-teaching involving gifted education specialists and classroom teachers. Co-teaching can define services for gifted learners or be used to supplement direct services provided beyond the classroom. This session presents a comprehensive professional development plan and specific activities for introducing five co-teaching approaches for working together in the classroom. In addition, tasks for building trust, establishing individual and shared roles, and utilizing effective and efficient use of coplanning time are demonstrated. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Researchers Room: CC 125

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Defining Excellence in Qualitative Research Reporting: A Discussion with Key Informants Lisa Davia Rubenstein, Ball State University, Muncie, IN; Kristina Ayers Paul, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Universities and school systems prove to be collaborative partners in providing gifted licensure programs for teachers. With the advent of new technologies, it is no longer essential for such partners to reside within the same region. This session will detail an innovative licensure program that combines traditional face-to-face instruction, synchronous virtual class meetings, and asynchronous course modules to deliver program content. In addition, a capstone experience, consisting of clinical practice in a district-run enrichment camp, helps provides a sustainable professional development program for teachers in districts with limited financial resources. Join us as we share our exciting journey.

Revving up Professional Development of the English Language Arts Common Core State Standards for High Ability English Language Learners Kimberley L. Chandler, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Connie L. Phelps , Emporia State University, Emporia, KS Although the Common Core State Standards encompass English Language Learners, the guidelines are general in nature and lack specific suggestions and implications for those who work with high ability ELL students. Regular education teachers, gifted facilitators, administrators, support staff and parents must collaboratively advocate alignment of the CCSS with effective instruction for diverse gifted learners in order to accelerate the development of their academic potential in English Language Arts. In this session, the presenters share suggestions to fuel the professional development of academic content and pedagogical delivery of the ELA CCSS for advanced ELL K-12 learners.

60th Annual Convention Event

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

Powerful Partnerships: Preparing Highly Qualified Teachers of the Gifted Alissa P. Griffith, Kristen R. Stephens, Duke University, Durham, NC; Paula Wilkins, Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools, Winston-Salem, NC

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: 208

Roundtable

The rhetoric of our field signals a need for greater awareness of the hallmarks of quality qualitative research. The purpose of this panel is to engage in conversation regarding excellence in qualitative research reporting. After a brief description of the hosts’ study of qualitative research reporting in gifted education for the past 25 years, the hosts ask the panelists – experts in qualitative methodology and editorial leaders in gifted education – key questions that emerged during their research. Ultimately, the goal is to equip audience members with guidelines for developing, reviewing, and interpreting the quality of qualitative manuscripts.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Professors, Researchers Room: 202 Editors Panel on Publishing in Gifted Education Journals Susan K. Johnsen, Baylor University, Woodway, TX; Tracy L. Cross, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Don Ambrose, Rider University, Yardley, PA; Del Siegle, University of Connecticut, Mansfield, CT; D. Betsy McCoach, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Michael S. Matthews, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC Publishing in peer-reviewed journals can be a daunting experience. Come learn from the editors how you can maximize your chances for publication success. Some of the fields’ journal editors provide tips on how to best present your work when you are submitting it for review. Panelists will share tips and advice for publishing in peer review journals in gifted education and then take questions from participants. Audience: Researchers Room: 205

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: CC 123

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Saturday

10:45 AM – 11:45 AM (Cont.)

RESEARCH & EVALUATION (Cont.) Primary Teacher’s Instructional DecisionMaking with Differentiated Language Arts and Mathematics Units: The Role of Fidelity of Implementation Tonya R. Moon, Catherine Brighton, Sunhee Park, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA; Christine P. Trinter, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA To date little empirical evidence of the types of modifications teachers make to intended curricula is available. In today’s classrooms, teachers are faced with the challenges of teaching from curricular materials that at times have little relevance to their given context or to their students. In these situations, teachers make decisions that affect how they will implement the materials in their classrooms. Some

will implement the materials exactly as presented, others choose to modify or adapt the materials. In both cases, instruction and student learning is affected. This session presents results from two large-scale studies investigating fidelity of implementation. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Gifted Coordinators, Researchers Room: 303 Research and Evaluation 2013 Dissertation Award Winners Present Their Research Kate E. Snyder, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY; April Coleman, Mississippi University for Women, Columbus, MS Moderator, Angela Housand, University of North Carolina, Wilmington, NC The 2013 R&E Dissertation Award Winners present their award winning research in a combined session. The

Combined Sessions 6 RESEARCH & EVALUATION 10:45 AM – 11:15 AM

11:15 AM – 11:45 AM

Evaluation of Problem Based Learning and PBL Plus a Pull-Out Program on Math and Science Achievement for High Achieving Students Over the Course of Four Years Steven R. Wininger, Tracy F. Inman, Julia L. Roberts, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY This study examined changes in math and science achievement across three treatment groups over four years. Treatment groups consisted of students who received problem-based learning units on math and science, received PBL units plus attended a one-daya-week magnet school, and a control. Analyses were conducted on 257 select students from six elementary schools participating in the Gifted Education in Math and Science (GEMS) Project. Results indicated that students in the magnet group had significant gains when compared to those who received just PBL instruction or controls. The positive impact of the magnet program was most evident for science. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Researchers Room: CC 121

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Problem Finding: The First Step to Open Inquiry Research Marcia Delcourt, Western Connecticut State University, Stamford, CT Problem finding is a creative process whereby individuals develop original ideas for study. Secondary science students who successfully participate in authentic, novel, open inquiry science research must engage in problem finding to determine viable and suitable topics. This study examined problem finding strategies employed by students who successfully presented the results of their research at state and international science fairs. Creativity, inquiry strategies, and situated cognition learning theory framed the context for this qualitative study. This presentation explains how successful problem finding was derived from an idiosyncratic, nonlinear, and flexible understanding of inquiry. Audience: Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Researchers Room: CC 121

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

Serving Rural Gifted Students: Challenges and Solutions David Williams, Indiana Academy for Science, Mathematics, and Humanities, Muncie, IN; Linda E. Brody, Kimberly J. Lohrfink, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Aimee Howley, Craig Howley, Ohio University, Albany, OH; Susan Assouline, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; Joan D. Lewis, University of Nebraska at Kearney, Kearney, NE

audience will have the opportunity to ask questions and discuss the award-winners’ work. Angela Housand, Chair of the R&E Dissertation Awards, will moderate the session. Audience: Graduate Students, Researchers Room: 104 Note: The 2013 R&E Dissertation Award Winners present their award winning research in a combined session. The audience will have the opportunity to ask questions and discuss the award-winners’ work: Developmental Pathways in Underachievement (Kate Snyder); Effects of One Special School on Gifted and High Ability Students’ Project Quality, Academic Engagement, and Investment in Academic Learning (April Coleman). Angela Housand, Chair of the R&E Dissertation Awards, will moderate the session.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Gifted students in rural communities lack access to resources that are available to urban and suburban students. Their schools often have limited courses, few special programs, and lack a critical mass of intellectual peers. Their towns are unlikely to have the large libraries, museums, and universities that can enhance learning beyond the classroom. This session explores the challenges faced by rural gifted students, summarizes the research on this population, and describes the role online courses, residential schools, academic summer programs, and early college entrance can play in meeting the academic, social, and emotional development of rural gifted students.

SPECIAL POPULATIONS Out of the Silos: Building a Common Instructional Language for English as a Second Language (ESOL) Teachers and Gifted Education Teachers to Support English Language Learners Joan P. Brownlee, Gail F. Hubbard, Prince William County Public Schools, Montclair, VA

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 204

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS Faced with low achievement and gifted representation of English Language Learners, an innovative professional learning program was launched, framed around the NAGC Programming Standards. Responding to NAGC Standards regarding the needs of ELLs, David Hyerle’s “Thinking Maps for ELL Learners” was selected as the common visual language for the sessions. Gifted Education staff provided ESOL teachers with introductory Thinking Maps training. Both staffs were trained in the Thinking Maps for ELLs. Cross training included sessions on identification for ESOL staff and effects of language on academic performance for gifted education staff. Assessment of effectiveness included quantitative and qualitative data. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators Room: Griffin Hall

A Flexible Hybrid: Combining Rigorous Classroom Instruction and Acceleration with Homeschooling to Support Gifted Learners Jackie Douglas, Joy Davis, Gloria Deo Academy, Springfield, MO Advocates of gifted students learn how one independent school is attracting gifted students on accident. The benefits of a flexible schedule combining rigorous classroom instruction with homeschooling and flexible placement options including acceleration are discussed. Pros and cons are compared with other models sharing the intention of reforming gifted education. Visualize student achievement rates where education is personalized, students are given opportunities to develop intellectual peers, and the social/emotional needs of gifted learners are addressed. Participants leave with a desire to implement some or all of these practical strategies to innovate gifted education in their communities. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Researchers Room: 306

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Saturday

10:45 AM – 11:45 AM (Cont.)

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS (Cont.) Advanced Placement vs. Gifted and Talented Stephen Seedorf, Frontier Academy, Evans, CO Although AP classes provide excellent opportunities for students to receive accelerated and challenging content in a high school setting, it may not be able to take the place of a well-rounded GT program. Some administrators do not view the need for a GT program when the school offers a wide variety of AP classes. However, components of a GT program such as affective development leadership opportunities are left behind in the AP environment. This session investigates the differences between AP and GT programs and tools for teachers to use in school with limited programming options. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators Room: 305

STEM Common Core and Creativity: Adding a Ninth Standard for Mathematical Practices Linda Sheffield, Northern Kentucky University, Fort Thomas, KY The joint publication from NAGC, NCTM and NCSM, “Using the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics with Gifted and Advanced Learners,” includes a significant proposal for adding a ninth standard to the eight CCSS Standards for Mathematical Practice: “Solve problems in novel ways and pose new mathematical questions of interest to investigate.” In this session, explore proven strategies for supporting students’ mathematical creativity and innovation as they generate, share, assess, and collaborate on multiple and original solutions and pose related problems.

unattached algorithms. As we develop student talent in the STEM fields, contextualization of mathematics is essential. This session provides classroom examples of how to incorporate context in three ways: real-world applications, the historical background of common topics, and the broad realm of mathematics as the context. Come discuss how to move students beyond thinking of mathematics as one big spreadsheet to seeing it as an integrated way of thinking and communicating. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Gifted Coordinators Room: 101 Using Frasier’s 4A’s (Attitude, Access, Assessment, Accommodation) to ‘STEMmatically’ Develop Talent in Culturally Diverse Students Kristina Collins, Tarek C. Grantham, University of Georgia, Athens, GA As a case study for success of four students situated in a predominantly black, Title I school within a southern, rural region of America, this research offers a cultural responsive solution to influence gifted and talented culturally diverse students’ STEM self-concept in order to increase academic achievement; enrich educational experiences and relevance; and improve intellectual development trajectory. Connecting Mary Frasier’s 4A’s for gifted education to STEM talent development proves to have educational benefit to the culturally diverse students. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: 304

11:45 AM – 12:30 PM BREAK

Catch your breath. Stretch your legs. Buy a bite to eat in the exhibit hall.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors Room: JW Grand Ballroom 8 Context is Key: Showing Students the Bigger Picture in Mathematics Heather Carmody, Park Tudor, Indianapolis, IN Is the phrase “irrational number” vocabulary to memorize, or the source of controversy and possibly murder? Mathematics is so much more than rote procedures and

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See you back at 12:30 PM!

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY iRadio Dramas and iPads: Combining the Old with the New Martha M. Champa, University of Toledo, Holland, OH Remember storytelling without pictures? People gathered around their radios to hear the adventures of Little Orphan Annie, and The Shadow. Inspired by Esmé Raji Codell’s book, “How to Get Your Child to Love Reading,” I introduced radio dramas to my middle grades students. We listened to old radio broadcasts, collected spooky words from spooky books (after all, it was October), and wrote spooky settings. They became script writers, sound specialists, and actors and actresses. iPads were their recording devices and classmates were their audiences. Learn about this process. Collect websites. Listen to their creations. Let the screaming begin: Boo! Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 309 Take a Byte: Technology for 2e Students and Their Teachers: Tips for Supporting Student Exceptionalities Both Inside and Outside the Classroom Linda Collins, Blue Valley School District, Overland Park, KS; William J. Collins, Olathe School District, Overland Park, KS Glancing around the classroom, I noticed many students with their heads lowered. Were they distressed, perhaps meditating? No, they were texting, googling, messaging, elaborating their study skills via the latest mobile technology; our 2e students were some of the most adept at this. Twice-exceptional students, in particular, can struggle with organization because of executive function challenges, but their technological strengths can be used to support study and social skills. This interactive session offers multiple options for enhancing student affinity with technology, and can be used by teachers to for IEP goal maintenance.

NCSSSMST

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

Think Instruments, Think iPads: Apps Under $1 that Will Transform Your Science Investigations Kristy L. Zaleta, Danbury Public Schools, Danbury, CT; Nancy N. Heilbronner, Mercy College, White Plains, NY You don’t need a lot of money to teach science! Best practices suggest that students require opportunities to design their own science investigations, and for that they need scientific instruments. But how can you fund that in a classroom? At this hands-on and informative workshop, you’ll explore and be able to download instrument apps onto your iPad or iPhone. Almost instantly you’ll have metronomes, compasses, chronometers, teslameters and more at your fingertips! Explore these apps and then learn how to differentiate for high-ability students as they use them to design and carry out their own scientific investigations.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: 308 Using iTunes U as a Medium for Integrating Alternative Thinking and Accelerated Learning in Mathematics James M. Fetterly, Betty K. Wood, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR How can gifted mathematics and technology be integrated? In a day and age when technology is available in the typical classroom, teachers need exposure and experience with cutting-edge tools. This session considers innovative techniques to facilitate alternative thinking for classroom mathematics that relate to the Mathematical Practices of the Common Core. Potentially, virtual devices can afford the opportunity for students to have face-to-face experiences in an online environment. This session explores one such online instructional vehicle to assist students in a vast array of mathematical strategies and techniques. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 314

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 302

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Saturday

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM (Cont.)

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS The Hall of Fame of Famous Gifted Students from History: Who They Were, What They Accomplished, and How They Overcame Dan Shepherd, Indiana Wesleyan University, Upland, IN Throughout history, individuals of extreme giftedness have periodically arisen. Sometimes, their gifts were embraced by their society, and fame and fortune followed these gifted few throughout seemingly charmed lives. More often, the gifts were misunderstood, and some of the greatest minds and talents of their respective generations lived in obscurity, poverty, and occasionally, persecution. This session is a brief walk through biographical history, identifying those uniquely gifted individuals, their triumphs, and their tragedies. Then, these historical lessons are analyzed for application to contemporary gifted educational practices.

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and the Gifted: The Good, The Bad and the Ugly Mika Gustavson, Gifted Matters, Campbell, CA Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy enjoys a reputation as being one of the most well-researched, evidence-based approaches to talk therapy available. It’s also reviled by some as being a cold, manualized, and ineffective approach. Where does the truth lie? This talk, for providers and consumers of mental health services, is an exploration of the ways in which CBT can be helpful or harmful with the gifted population. Discussion includes strengths and weaknesses of CBT when used with gifted clients, ways to integrate CBT tools into other therapeutic modalities, and common pitfalls and how to avoid them. Audience: Consultants, Counselors, Parents, Psychologists Room: CC 121

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: JW Grand Ballroom 10

Keep on Keepin’ on: Low-Income Highability Students Imagining the Future in a Challenging Present Jennifer Cross, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Andrea D. Frazier, Columbus State University, Columbus, GA

Wasted Adult Potential: How is Adult Creativity Overlooked? Scott R. Furtwengler, San Jacinto College, Houston, TX; Justin Neil L. Young, Jessi Cummings-Mengis, Christine M. Peet, University of Houston, Houston, TX

In a course designed to help students develop an awareness of the requirements and challenges of achieving their academic and career goals, low-income, high ability 7th graders attending a 2-week summer residential enrichment program shared with us their experiences, expectations, and fears about the future. In the face of few economic resources, achievement looms large in the thoughts these students have about their immediate future. In focus group interviews, they discussed the barriers they perceive to their achievement. This session describes the personal development course, the possible selves the students articulated as well as barriers in their environment.

A dearth of research exists relating to giftedness in adulthood. Researchers recognize the paucity of studies in adult populations, yet few have addressed the implications of defining, identifying, and facilitating giftedness in adults. Ethical, social, and economic implications, however, make this problematic. This presentation builds on the “medical model” used to identify and facilitate adults with ADHD and expounds on creativity as a form of giftedness. Additionally, a conceptual foundation for assessing current definitions of giftedness, its identification processes, and measures in adults is presented as well as clarifying theoretical approaches, trends, issues, and future directions for research.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 208

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 205

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National Association for Gifted Children

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

CREATIVITY

We don’t need to choose between engaging in creative activities and addressing gifted students’ affective needs. In this interactive session, you’ll learn new ways to infuse creative-thinking skills into your curricula while still focusing on the social and emotional needs of diverse learners, especially those at risk for underachievement or perfectionism. Further, you will engage in creative practicing, explore sample affective lesson plans, and share challenges along the way. Please join us at the corner of creative thinking and social and emotional strengths by taking a risk that you’ll challenge yourself and have some fun at the same time!

Creative Expression Across the Globe: The 2013 Torrance Legacy Awards Stephen T. Schroth, Jason A. Helfer, Knox College, Galesburg, IL; Joan F. Smutny, Northern Illinois University, Wilmette, IL; John Kauffman, Scott Rich, Scholastic Testing Service, Bensenville, IL; Katie Haydon, Sparkitivity, Katonah, NY; Bonnie Cramond, University of Georgia, Athens, GA Now in its fifth year, the Torrance Legacy Awards competition has provided a unique avenue for gifted students to submit their finest work in writing, visual arts, and, beginning in 2013, musical composition. Seven organizers of the competition share their experiences and demonstrate how this opportunity enables students to tap into their creative gifts. Participants gain information on how they can become involved in the process and prepare talented students for the competition through activities and strategies that stimulate their imagination in new ways. Examples of the work of winning contestants are shared. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 102

60th Annual Convention

60th Annual Convention Event

Hearing Between the Lines: Creating Connections Among Stories and Poems, Sounds and Songs Gail N. Herman, Easthampton, MA; Sally Stephenson, Frostburg State University, Frostburg, MD

At the Corner of Creativity and Affective Needs: Check Foursquare and Meet Us There! Carol L. Tieso, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: JW Grand Ballroom 7

Roundtable

“Reading between the lines” evokes creative interpretations and implications, and deeper, creative connections with stories and poems. Using voice, creative sounds, and simple percussion instruments, participants experience “Hearing between the lines,” as we explore musical and vocal additions to reading and reciting stories and poems. When text is transformed or augmented by sound imagery, we give students time to create meaning from within, to become motivated to attend to the words, and more importantly we give students opportunities to feel comfortable creating soundscapes, a skill helpful for presentations in their future careers.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: White River D Incorporating Creativity into Classroom Curriculum Carla B. Brigandi, Windsor Public Schools, Vernon, CT According to the Partnership for 21st Century Skills, “A focus on creativity, critical thinking, communication and collaboration is essential to prepare students for the future.” Despite this endorsement, few curricula provide opportunities for students to learn creativity enhancing techniques or to apply those techniques to problem solve. This workshop examines methods and techniques for developing and enhancing creativity in ourselves and in our students. Specific examples of how to incorporate these techniques into classroom curriculum are provided. This workshop is interactive and requires active participation of attendees. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: CC 122

0 November 7-10, 2013 0 Indianapolis, IN 0 www.nagc.org

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Saturday

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM (Cont.)

CREATIVITY (Cont.) Strengthening Metaphorical Thinking in the Classroom Marissa K. Marler, Lynhurst 7-8th Grade Center, Indianapolis, IN; Katherine L. Marler, Phelps Center for Gifted Education, Springfield, MO Creative thought process is essential to valuable learning; however, young gifted minds must be trained and molded to fully develop these skills. In this session, participants discover several strategies to help students strengthen their divergent thinking skills. Teachers K-12 are shown a variety of methods through art, writing, improvisation, and technology in which they can incorporate metaphorical thinking. Whether one teaches math, language arts, science, art, social studies, or a combination, participants leave this session armed with a toolbox of practical, readyto-use approaches that they can adapt and use daily with their students. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers Middle Grades, Parents Room: 306

CURRICULUM STUDIES Fueling GT Potential Through Pushing the Envelope: Envelope Graphic Organizers Help Learners Design Knowledge for Themselves Judith S. Youngers, Dinah Zike Academy, Comfort, TX Enfold a fresh approach to portfolios, projects, and notebooks, using envelope graphic organizers that engage our GT students. Show them they are capable of accomplishing so much more than they may realize. Gain intentional, evidence-based strategies for immersing “eyegeneration” learners via 3-D graphic organizers, whereby they design and communicate knowledge for themselves. Retain your sanity while addressing CCSS and challenging learners to accomplish authentic, quality work and to build meaningful project standards. Depart with multiple, foldable project/portfolio formats constructed onsite, plus simple techniques and technology-integrating ideas that fuel higher order thinking skills. Watch these learners soar!

Independent Student Explorations: Where Do I Start? Katherine B. Brown, Abby Hughes, Judia Jackson Harris Elementary Charter School, Athens, GA; Karen Higginbotham, Clarke County Schools, Athens, GA Countless students have civic-minded aspirations and ideas for service learning projects, but often their lack of organization and inexperience with goal setting impedes them. How do we as educators provide students with tools to successfully complete a long term, independent project or product? Classroom teachers, gifted educators, and parents benefit from experiencing one school’s solution to this question. Participants walk through the initial planning process and learn how to support students in independent learning. Presenters provide graphic organizers, templates, and lesson ideas to use with any student who demonstrates a passion for independent inquiry. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 310 Meaningful Grammar: Fuel for Improved Writing Dawn Burnette, Burnette Academy, Blairsville, GA; Judith A. Holbrook, Fayette County Schools, Peachtree City, GA At the heart of our battle to help students improve as writers is the need to share with them a language for talking about writing. Although research has shown that teaching traditional grammar units is ineffective, dialogue about writing is more meaningful when students understand sentence structure. Learn to use our unique, researchbased approach to help students understand how grammar concepts work together in a meaningful way—a way that directly impacts their writing. This interactive session is appropriate for all grade levels and includes specific strategies for using grammar concepts to improve writing skills. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators Room: 101

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: 304

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National Association for Gifted Children

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Build, Play, Learn: Block Construction Projects that Promote Higher Order Thinking Ann Gadzikowski, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

Are you struggling to implement the new Common Core State Standards so that gifted and advanced students receive appropriately challenging learning experiences? Tiered lessons and assignments using Costa’s Three Levels of Thinking and Questioning may be just the fuel you need to drive home achievement at high levels! In this session you are introduced to Costa’s model and learn how to use his model to differentiate the CCSS at various grade levels to meet the needs of gifted/advanced students. The session focuses on English Language Arts and literacy across content areas.

What’s in Your Head? Using Formative Assessment Strategies to Support Cognitive Engagement of Gifted and Talented Students Kimberly M. McCormick, Salisbury University, Salisbury, MD Active engagement in learning has been found to be a strong predictor of student success in school. One important aspect of student engagement is how students cognitively engage with their learning. This component of engagement can be difficult to assess, since it is not what can be quickly quantified in a classroom. This session highlights aspects of the school experience that can support students’ cognitive engagement and strategies that teachers can utilize in their classroom so that gifted and talented students can be supported in today’s classrooms. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Gifted Coordinators Room: 313

60th Annual Convention Event

EARLY CHILDHOOD

Using Costa’s Levels of Questions to Tier Instruction for the Common Core State Standards Patti Wood, Samford University, Odenville, AL

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators Room: CC 124

Roundtable

Looking for ways to integrate more hands-on discoveryoriented activities into your math and science curriculum? Standard unit blocks, as inspired by Froebel and designed by Caroline Pratt, are based on the proportions 1:2:4. These open-ended building materials can be used to create challenging construction projects and problem-solving activities for young gifted children from Pre-K through grade 3. The presenter demonstrates projects and activities that measure and promote thinking skills at all levels of Bloom’s taxonomy. Activities and ideas will be shared for enriching your math and science curriculum.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Parents Room: 104 Compost: The Rot Thing for Our Earth Fred Estes, Nueva School, San Francisco, CA Everyone wants to be part of the solution and young children especially value opportunities to help the world in authentic ways. Combine very local ecology action with global awareness and problem solving through an integrated Science unit designed for early childhood education (ECE). This session demonstrates a simple, practical approach to add a Global Stewardship strand to the ECE curriculum, centering on classroom composting and gardening, linking inquiry science, math, and social studies while connecting to the larger community. Young children build basic concepts of ecology, sustainability, and limiting factors in earth bio-systems, preparing them to help preserve our planet. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 303

WHAT ARE POSTER SESSIONS AND ROUNDTABLES? Join informative and informal discussions around a range of topics at Poster Sessions and Roundtables. You can find the poster and roundtable sessions in Griffin Hall on the second floor of the JW Marriott Indianapolis. Presenters will be available at the listed times to discuss their poster presentation or facilitate a roundtable discussion.

60th Annual Convention

Poster Session

Roundtable

0 November 7-10, 2013 0 Indianapolis, IN 0 www.nagc.org

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Saturday

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM (Cont.)

Primary Mathematics: Accommodations and Assessments for Able Learners Kathy Paul, Johnston Community School District, Clive, IA

EARLY CHILDHOOD (Cont.) Fat Dogs and Coughing Horses: Changing Attitudes Towards Careers in Health Sciences Through Veterinary Medicine Amy J. Wackerly, Center for Inquiry at School #2, Indianapolis, IN; Ann Mennonno, Center for Inquiry at School #27, Indianapolis, IN; Sandra San Miguel, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN Veterinary professionals, assessment and education experts, and teachers partnered to develop this program to excite children about health sciences careers and help them develop skills to succeed in these disciplines. Books and curricular materials showing how animals contribute to the health of people and their pets are distributed. Interactive demonstrations of Foreign-Body Bingo and the Skull Game are presented as experiences that teachers can implement with students. This program is supported by a Science Education Partnership Award from the Office of Research Infrastructure Programs, a component of the National Institutes of Health. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood Room: 209 Finding Oz: Nurturing Potential and Promise in the Primary Years Wendy L. Ingalls, Debra Myers, Baltimore County Public Schools, Baltimore, MD As we prepare students for 21st century life and work environments, we must provide opportunities that nurture potential and provide a strong foundation for critical and creative thinking and problem solving. This session assists teachers in differentiating the primary reading and mathematics instructional program so that it is responsive to high-ability learners. This hands-on, interactive workshop offers a variety of strategies to increase critical and creative thinking and problem solving in our youngest learners. Practical, research-based, and effective strategies for providing challenge and enrichment for these students within the heterogeneous primary classroom are explored and modeled.

What do young gifted children need to be challenged in math? What materials are available to meet their needs, and how can we deliver appropriate services? Rationale for research-based services, as well as assessments and strategies to work with kindergarten-second grade children are covered. Learn how to provide stimulation in the regular classroom, in small flexible groups and with independent programming. Materials and best practices for finding and nurturing young mathematicians are demonstrated. Examples of how to pre-assess math ability and ways to “talk math” with young children are shared. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: CC 123

MIDDLE GRADES Comprehending Texts and Primary Documents Through the Process of Critical Thinking and Inquiry Gem C. Thomerson, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN The Common Core State Standards support the use of informational texts and literature. By integrating primary source documents and fiction teachers provide students with key interdisciplinary connections while incorporating depth and complexity to their lessons for gifted learners. This session focuses on how to use an evidence supported framework of scaffolding, Jacob’s Ladder, with primary source documents. Learn how to create opportunities for students to critically analyze texts by determining implications and consequences, generalizations, main ideas and/or creative synthesis. Discover the many ways to design and effectively implement “scaffolded” questions/ tasks using primary source documents to enhance students’ learning and thinking! Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators Room: White River A

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Parents Room: White River H

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National Association for Gifted Children

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Navigating the Road to a Successful Parent Day Patty A. Messer, Estrella Mountain Community College, Goodyear, AZ

Comic books and graphic novels are an ever-growing form of literature that is very popular among many of our students, especially boys. Why not use comic books to enhance and enrich your gifted students? See how one teacher used comic books in her mixed-ability middle school classroom to advance the gifted students in reading and writing. You see how the students combined literacy, complex writing skills, creativity, and collaboration to produce high quality products. The rigor can be easily tiered for different abilities and grades and is highly engaging for students.

The Intriguing Complexities of an Illustrious Renaissance Man - Leonardo Da Vinci Christie Bruns, Institute for the Development of Gifted Education, Denver, CO Bringing the world of Leonardo Da Vinci into a gifted classroom allows learners to experience the creative, inspiring, and influential period of the Renaissance. A study of Da Vinci provides an opportunity to engage in high-level and meaningful pedagogy around an influential artist, scientist, and inventor from our history. The complexity of the topics surrounding Da Vinci’s life, and the elements of intrigue, assure the engagement of middle school gifted learners. Specific background pieces are shared that focus on critical and creative thinking, affective needs, problem solving, self-engagement, and independent learning. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Gifted Coordinators Room: 103

60th Annual Convention

60th Annual Convention Event

PARENT & COMMUNITY

It’s a Bird! It’s a Plane! No, It’s…Superman! Using Comic Books and Graphic Novels to Engage and Enhance Students Writing Tina A. Jacks, Turkey Run Jr./Sr. High School, Bloomingdale, IN

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Gifted Coordinators Room: White River I

Roundtable

Creating a strong parent support network at the state level is imperative to the success of gifted programs. Come find out how the Arizona Association for Gifted and Talented created an amazing Parent Day Institute. This annual event serves parents, as well as the students, through the Super Saturday Enrichment Program. Participants walk away with tools and ideas to implement both programs!

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: JW Grand Ballroom 9

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Developing Math Talent Through Professional Learning Communities Shirley M. Chodakiewicz, Loudoun County Public Schools, Round Hill, VA; Marie Miller, Providence Academy, Lovettsville, VA In order to meet the needs of gifted mathematicians who are placed in a heterogeneously grouped elementary classroom, improvements must be made to increase teachers’ content knowledge, practices, and self-efficacy. This includes the use of appropriate mathematical terminology, making connections between topics, using both verbal and symbolic representations of concepts, and effectively using mathematics materials. An exploration of enhancement to all three areas – content knowledge, pedagogical practices, and self-efficacy – as effectuated through participation in a professional learning community are explored. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Researchers Room: 206

0 November 7-10, 2013 0 Indianapolis, IN 0 www.nagc.org

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Saturday

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM (Cont.)

SPECIAL POPULATIONS

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT (Cont.) Do as I Say And as I Do: Professional Development in a New Package Jennifer Rosenberg, A Rosey Outlook Consulting, Atlanta, GA Staff Development Day is approaching and you are having the same dilemma as always: How do you give staff what they want (a bag full of “stuff” to take to their classrooms the next day) and what you need them to have (the newest requirement from the district)? This session uses research-based teaching strategies to combine the two so everyone is happy at the end of the day. Come experience hands-on lessons using the latest research on professional development. Bring your own requirements and create an activity. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators Room: 203 Promoting Professional Teacher Reflection on Questioning and Listening Behaviors Cindy M. Gilson, Catherine Little, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT Higher-level questioning as an instructional strategy is a core element of a teacher’s repertoire and one that is often recommended as an essential approach with advanced learners. However, we often talk much more about questioning than about the equally important components of follow-up and listening. Follow-up questions may be used to deepen or support students’ understandings or promote elaborated responses. Effective use of followup questioning requires careful teacher listening to guide instructional decision-making and promote productive classroom discourse. In this session, discuss key elements of questioning and listening as well as strategies for promoting professional reflection around these behaviors. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Gifted Coordinators, Researchers Room: White River J

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National Association for Gifted Children

Bridging the Gap: Connecting Gifted and ESL Education Services in America’s Public Schools Keisha Baylor Mayfield, Young-Eun Son, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA Between 1989 and 2009, the population of White public school students decreased from 68% to 55% while other ethnic groups increased, notably Hispanics, who doubled in size from 11% to 22%. With expansion in the nation’s diversity, the underrepresentation of CLD students in gifted programs persists in America. Moreover, as the potential of gifted ESL students is often overlooked in the process of identification, a demonstrated need for K-12 interdepartmental collaboration exists. This session focuses on the challenges related to providing gifted services for ESL students as well as practical recommendations and strategies to navigate these program challenges. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: White River B Prediction and Prevention of Aggression in the Twice-Exceptional: Changes Over the Years Agnes Meyo, St.Louis Association for Gifted Education, Chesterfield, MO The 2e struggle with emotional intensity, rendering them easy targets for bullies. Professionals devised strategies for the 2e to manage the bullying. More recently, attempts by the 2e to defend themselves and/or retaliate gained attention. Research focused on the tendency to fight back when angry. Anger, a difficult feeling to control, could result in aggression. Early identification and intervention became the keys to best prediction and prevention of violence in the 2e. This presentation describes the identification of triggers and implementation of anger management strategies at home and school. Success stories are shared! Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Psychologists Room: JW Grand Ballroom 8

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Supporting Higher Order Thinking Skills Among Students with Emerging English Proficiency Margaret W. Hoffman, Chapel Hill Carrboro Schools, Durham, VA; Lisa Hoffman, Indiana University, New Albany, IN One common challenge of teaching gifted bilingual students is supporting higher-order thinking skills among students with lower-level English proficiency. In other words, how does a teacher lower the linguistic complexity of a task without watering down the level of intellectual challenge? This session provides educators with information about classroom activities that target the development of higherorder thinking skills among students who are not yet able to understand or speak English at the level of native Englishspeaking gifted students. Participants also receive tips for effectively scaffolding math and writing activities for gifted English learners.

60th Annual Convention Event

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS Cluster Grouping: Documenting Growth for All Students, Schools and Teachers Dina M. Brulles, Paradise Valley Unified School District, Phoenix, AZ As schools continue to cluster-group gifted students it becomes critical that they implement methods for documenting growth and determining progress. Successful clustering grouping requires examining critical elements. Learn how to prepare for cluster model evaluation by creating systems that track student achievement, determine necessary training, and monitor student populations identified and served. Participants learn to use school data to effectively plan advanced C&I, identify criteria for documenting student performance, provide requisite teacher training, establish appropriate identification procedures, and make effective student placements. Academic achievement studies for gifted and general education students—in cluster and regular classes—are shared.

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators Room: 301

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: White River C

Taboo No Longer- Why It Is Time for Gifted Programs and Researchers to Address Issues and Needs of LGBTQ Students Becky Whittenburg, Boulder Valley Public Schools, Boulder, CO; Alena R. Treat, West Des Moines Community Schools, West Des Moines, IA This presentation reveals not only psychological and social issues confronting students who are gifted and gay, but also includes results from a study of 965 participants that demonstrated the need to go beyond gender. President Obama has urged us to work together to correct the inequities presently experienced by our LGBT population. It is now time for us to do our part in addressing needs of our gifted sexually diverse students and for researchers to include sexual orientation. Part of this presentation involves an audience discussion of present initiatives and a sharing of ideas. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: White River G

Roundtable

Saturday

Recorded Session

Navigating Needs and Politics: How to Start and Grow a Private Program for Gifted Learners Donna B. Hulsey, Karen S. Langdon, Austin Gifted/ACE Academy, Austin, TX In a community that protests that “All students are gifted,” it takes commitment and perseverance, as well as solid evidence, to sell parents and professionals on the need for a special environment designed just for gifted learners. Austin Gifted has tackled the myths that cloud gifted education-”these are the kids that have it all; leave them alone and they will do fine; such a program is elitist”— and successfully launched three gifted programs in Austin, Texas. This presentation explores what it takes to create, sustain, and grow a full-time school, an award-winning summer program, and a community outreach mission for gifted. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 305

60th Annual Convention

0 November 7-10, 2013 0 Indianapolis, IN 0 www.nagc.org

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Saturday

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM (Cont.)

Robotics Brings Results: A Study of Creativity, Spatial Ability, and Robotics Steve Coxon, Maryville University, St. Louis, MO

STEM I Know the Answer…I Just Can’t Explain It! Janine M. Firmender, Saint Joseph’s University, Rosemont, PA; Katherine Gavin, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT How often have you heard this response from talented math students? Yet with the new CCSS and the new assessments that accompany them, students must be able to explain their reasoning in writing. Come learn how a research-based communication model used with advanced curriculum for elementary students has shown impressive achievement gains on open-ended written questions. This model focuses on classroom verbal discussion connected directly to the CCSS Mathematical Practices and the development of student writing to successfully outline problem solutions with justification. Practical, easy-to-implement features of the model and samples of student work are shared. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Researchers Room: CC 120 PBL in Elementary Classrooms: Action-Packed Learning Deborah D. Dailey, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR With the NGSS being released and the emphasis on 21st Century Skills, teachers are searching for curriculum options to engage gifted students in real-world learning. Problem-based learning (PBL) is an option that provides an emphasis on active learning, stakeholder collaboration, and real-world issues. In addition, research indicated PBL is an effective learning strategy for gifted students (Gallagher et al.). A typical PBL experience involves students working collaboratively as scientists to form solutions to a problem. Participants of this session will consider student and teacher roles in PBL, engage in a mini PBL experience, and examine multiple PBL resources. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Gifted Coordinators Room: 204

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National Association for Gifted Children

Robotics use in competition increases students’ spatial ability, creativity, and motivation to pursue STEM fields. It remains unknown if academic coursework utilizing robotics can lead to similar improvements. This session reports on a study of more than 50 gifted children ages 8-14 using robotics. Participants took both creativity and spatial pre- and post-assessments during an academic summer robotics program. The change in creativity and spatial ability is reported. The session includes an overview of the summer program, a demonstration of some LEGO robotics platforms, and an overview of the FIRST competitions involving robotics for practitioners. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Researchers Room: 202 The Occupational Choice Decision: A Critical Step in STEM Talent Development Lori Andersen, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS A review of High School Longitudinal Study data collected in 2009 from ninth graders shows that 38% of students who had high ability in mathematics do not have a career goal. Concerns for our economy and global leadership in innovation and research highlight the importance of these students’ decisions. Students with STEM promise are a key resource. The characteristics that distinguish those with career plans from those who do not have such plans are discussed, as well as how students made these decisions. The implications for parents, teachers, and counselors are discussed. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Researchers Room: 201

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

Distinguished Scholar Award

Using Science Notebooks in an Inquiry-Based Gifted Classroom Kelly R. Masters, Zionsville Community School, Avon, IN

Excellence Gaps in the U.S. and Abroad: How Can They Help Us Improve Advocacy for Gifted Students? Jonathan Plucker, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Jacob Hardesty, DePauw University, Greencastle, IN

Science notebooks are a powerful tool. They are essential in an inquiry-based science classroom. Notebooks give students a place to record their observations, refine their understanding of science concepts, and document their wonderings while at the same time giving them a purpose for writing and to enhance their communication skills. Participants learn how to set up and organize science notebooks, incorporate them in science to enhance understanding of science concepts, give students more opportunities to write expository text, make notebooks more interactive, and use them as an identification tool for gifted and talented students.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Over the past four years, several studies have been published on excellence gaps – achievement gaps at the highest achievement levels. Building on this body of research, we will summarize past research, share new excellence gap research, and discuss ways in which these data can be used to rethink advocacy for gifted and talented students. Audience: Advocates, Researchers Room: JW Grand Ballroom 7

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Gifted Coordinators Room: CC 125

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY Fueling Potential: GT Collaborative Technology Challenge Jenny Fredrickson, Tonia Heffley, Blanche Kapushion, Jefferson County Public Schools, Denver, CO

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM

SIGNATURE SERIES STEM and Humanities: Accelerating the Pace while Aligning the System Felicia A. Dixon, Ball State University, Selma, IN; Colleen M. Harsin, Davidson Academy of Nevada, Reno, NV; Patrick Widhalm, Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts, Natchitoches, LA; Luke C. Shorty, Maine School of Science and Mathematics, Limestone, ME STEM has permeated our language in education, emphasizing the importance of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics in the education of our highability students and for the future of our country. Indeed, in our global economy, schools must develop individuals to work on the cutting edge of future innovation, invention, and scientific advancement. So what about humanities courses? Where do they fit? Expert panelists from specialized schools for gifted secondary students discuss how the humanities align with high-powered STEM courses to educate critical and creative thinkers who solve problems and make wise decisions.

Join us as we share our experiences with the GT Collaborative Technology Challenge. The challenge focuses on students’ abilities to work collaboratively, research, analyze, and synthesize a topic or issue and inform/explain their learning through advanced technology to an authentic audience. Topics/issues begin with students writing their own essential guiding question. Thorough analysis and research is completed by student teams to answer their guiding question. Teams demonstrate their learning by creating an original, creative, and powerful technology project. Explore examples of how students have met the challenge and incorporated dynamic Web 2.0 tools. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators Room: 310

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: White River B

60th Annual Convention

0 November 7-10, 2013 0 Indianapolis, IN 0 www.nagc.org

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Saturday

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM (Cont.)

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY (Cont.) Geeking Out Online: How Tech Savvy Youth Use the Web to Develop Talent Eric Calvert, Northwestern University Center for Talent Development, Evanston, IL; Olha Skyba, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI Today’s teens seem constantly plugged into social networking sites, text messaging, and gaming networks. Yet we know so little about how these “geeking out” spaces influence their identity and learning. This session explores research on how gifted youth use the Web as a platform for cultivating their talents, and discuss ways schools might use lessons learned from data on patterns of online behavior and virtual communities to provide mentoring, give authentic feedback, and effectively guide through the learning process. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Researchers Room: 314 Mechanisms of Motivation: 5 C’s for Promoting Creative Productive Giftedness Brian Housand, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC; Angela Housand, University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Greenville, NC Today’s youth expect technology to merge seamlessly into their work and play. They do not use technology “just because it’s digital” but rather because it is an integral part of life itself. However, when left to their own devices, they seldom utilize the full potential of technology. How then do educators design and engage students in meaningful and relevant technology enhanced learning experiences? What are the MECHANISMS OF MOTIVATION that can be employed to promote talent development? Join us as we reveal a systematic approach with supporting free online resources for engaging gifted students in authentic and transferable learning opportunities. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: White River C

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National Association for Gifted Children

Promoting Responsible Driving as Students Zoom Down the Information Superhighway April Coleman, Mississippi University for Women, Tuscaloosa, AL 21st century students are almost constantly connected. Whether zooming down the information superhighway, sending shared documents flying in “the cloud,” or tweeting their way down the sidewalk, today’s students are faced with a huge amount of technological responsibility, although they often lack the knowledge and skills necessary to manage this freedom. This session introduces teachers and parents to practical strategies for teaching the millennial generation how to leave a positive digital footprint and achieve balance in using technology. Social media, cyberbulling, and uses of online tools to promote communication and collaboration among gifted peers are explored. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Researchers Room: 305

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS My Philosophy of Education: Taking it Beyond the College Essay Kimberly M. Berman, Summit Co. Educational Service Center, Cuyahoga Falls, OH; Jolene D. Reinhart, Summit Co. Educational Service Center, Norton, OH A philosophy of education is built in theory and concept. It is solidified in authentic classroom experience. Teacher leaders rise to the challenge of mentoring, coaching, collaborating, and leading building and district initiatives. They may advance their pedagogy further by creating a clearly articulated philosophy. Learn how to utilize a framework to discover your true Philosophy of Gifted Education. Take an introspective look into your own practice to identify guiding principles, solidify your values, and increase the positive impact on student learning. Apply a coherent framework, developed for and successfully used with a teacher-leader program, to build professional growth. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Researchers Room: 205

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Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

Revving Up to the Redline: Developing the Gifted Self Robert A. Schultz, University of Toledo, Waterville, OH

Giftedness and Peer Victimization Kristen Peairs, Duke University, Durham, NC; Kelly M. Lee, University of Houston, Houston, TX

Giftedness is a unique state of being that often isn’t fully shared by individuals bearing advanced abilities or insights. They hide their thoughts and understanding to fit in with the crowd--especially as teenagers. This can lead to unrealized or underutilized abilities and unexplored interests. In this session, discuss and explore the developing gifted self via motivation theory, imagination and creativity, social interaction, philosophical thinking, and awareness preparation. A theory of self-development for the gifted is presented and honed with audience input to establish guidelines gifted individuals can use to develop a sense of self and rev to their performance limits!

Given the widespread concern regarding the consequences of bullying, it is paramount to address these issues to ensure our students reach the extraordinary potential they possess. Currently the field is lacking consensus on whether gifted children are more or less victimized than their peers; however it appears a more nuanced examination is warranted. The presenters review the most recent information regarding bullying and rejection among gifted youth. The presentation provides a context for discussion with the audience regarding gifted children and victimization for educators, researchers, and parents.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Parents, Psychologists, Researchers Room: Griffin Hall

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 303

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

High-Ability Students from Two Worlds: Exploring High- and Low-Income Parent and Student Attitudinal and Belief Differences Jennifer Cross, Mihyeon Kim, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA

Attacked from Within: How Stereotype Threat and Impostor Syndrome Destroy the Gifted Lisa VanGemert, Mensa, Arlington, TX You may not have heard of them yet, but you’ve felt the effects of Stereotype Threat and Impostor Syndrome in your own life and those of your children and students. Come explore how these two threats to the gifted can bring the most talented individuals to their knees through internalized pressure from external expectation, as well as how to inoculate gifted youth against these threats. This engaging and passionate session leaves you feeling invigorated and confident, with concrete skills to help gifted youth (and adults) avoid making themselves their own worst enemies. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists Room: CC 120

60th Annual Convention

The underrepresentation of low-income students in gifted programs has been a source of concern to many in the field. The detrimental effects of poverty can overwhelm any advantage of a student’s exceptional abilities. Understanding the factors leading to the academic success of low-income students will help educators to guide more students to success. This study explored differences in attitudes toward giftedness among high- and low-income parents and self-concept and social coping strategy use among high- and low-income high-ability students. Differences between the high and low-income groups have implications for those who work with students from diverse socioeconomic levels. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: White River I

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Saturday

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM (Cont.)

CREATIVITY

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE (Cont.) Serving the Super-Bright: Profoundly Gifted Youths Take Your Questions Anne R. Flick, Cincinnati, OH In this extraordinary opportunity for professionals and parents to develop their understanding of the profoundly gifted, a facilitated panel of PG children and young adults share what supports helped them succeed and what practices proved toxic for them. Educators who may encounter a profoundly gifted child only once or twice in their careers can prepare to serve that student. Parents can build knowledge and confidence to advocate for truly appropriate interventions. Attendees are invited to pose questions directly to the students to have all their concerns addressed, from social opportunities to pressure and stress. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists Room: 302 Where Does Visual-Spatial End and Twice Exceptional Begin? Linda Kreger Silverman, Bobbie Gilman, Gifted Development Center, Westminster, CO Increasingly, counselors are called upon to differentiate between learning style and learning disabilities among gifted students. When parents and teachers differ in their perceptions, counselors need to mediate, often with incomplete information. How is a counselor to know when significant issues exist beyond giftedness or visualspatial learning style? The same symptom can have a variety of causes. The problem is magnified by the lack of comprehensive assessment services in the schools. In this session, we provide guidelines and checklists for recognizing twice exceptionality and stealth dyslexia and differentiating them from typical characteristics associated with giftedness or visual-spatial learning style. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 309

Creativity is the Key! Melissa Branigan, Deb Stewart, Sycamore School, Indianapolis, IN In our changing world, the need to develop creativity amongst students has never been more important. This interactive session explores the value of creativity, how to cultivate creativity through practical, ready-to-use activities, and how to assess creativity through measures developed by masters in the field of creativity, such as Joseph Renzulli and E.P. Torrance. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: CC 125

CURRICULUM STUDIES Drive Your Reading Instruction at High Speed: Adapting the Daily 5 and CAFE for Gifted Students Christy L. Harshbarger, Mayflower Mill Elementary School, Lafayette, IN; Gina D. Boyd, Tippecanoe School Corporation, Lafayette, IN The CAFÉ and DAILY FIVE system developed by Gail Boushey and Joan Moser is sweeping across the nation! How can teachers of self-contained gifted students utilize this tool for teaching Language Arts? Is there a way to adapt the philosophy to gifted education? Can gifted students benefit from the use of CAFÉ and DAILY FIVE? This session presents classroom-proven adaptations to accelerate and escalate the CAFÉ and DAILY FIVE framework for use with elementary gifted learners. Walk away with variations of the DAILY FIVE choices, ideas for compacting the CAFÉ menu, and options for gifted learners’ strategy groups. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 206

Don’t Forget . . .

Exhibit Hall closes at 4:00 PM JW Grand Ballroom (Third Floor)

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Poster Session

NCSSSMST

What are smart people like? From Mr. Spock in Star Trek to Temperance Brennan in Bones, images of intellectually gifted people abound in popular media. What do such depictions reveal about how our culture views the value and role of the intellect? Drawing from the Center for Talented Youth’s core writing curriculum, this workshop explores how to get gifted students excited about critical analysis and critical writing through the study of popular representations of the gifted and talented. We will also discuss incorporating the study of specific aspects of popular culture into a more traditional literature and writing curriculum. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators Room: 202 Turbo Charge the Common Core Standards: How to Choose the Right Tools to Differentiate On-Level Language Arts Standards to Meet the Needs of Gifted Learners Jennifer Conley, Carmel Clay Schools, Fishers, IN; Monica Plantan, Zionsville Community Schools, Zionsville, IN

Advanced Primary-Age Readers in Federal Legislation: Do They Fall Behind? Catherine Brighton, Tonya R. Moon, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA This session highlights a study focused on advanced readers in Reading First classrooms. The study’s purposes were: (1) to assess the longitudinal growth of advanced primary readers as compared to their non-gifted peers over a three-year time-frame, and (2) to determine the degree to which classrooms addressed the reading needs of advanced readers. Implications of the findings suggest that additional programs and services be put in place to address the needs of advanced readers and increased advocacy to ensure that the needs of gifted learners in proposed federal and state initiatives are addressed. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood Room: JW Grand Ballroom 8

As curriculum writers for the Indiana Department of Education, the presenters have been integrating the language arts common core standards in their lessons for the past three years. In this session, reading, writing, and speaking/listening standards are each addressed, and these teachers will offer both the elementary and middle school perspectives. The presentation will include differentiation strategies including acceleration, advanced content, creativity and innovation, complexity, conceptual thinking, and interdisciplinary projects. Curriculum models featured include Paul’s Reasoning Model, The College of William and Mary Teaching Models, Creative Problem Solving, Problem-Based Learning, and Bloom’s Taxonomy. They will share differentiated student tasks and actual student products. Throughout this interactive presentation, participants will have opportunities to discuss how these best practices apply to their current content. Debriefing will follow, and attendees leave with tools to implement common core in their own classrooms.

60th Annual Convention

60th Annual Convention Event

EARLY CHILDHOOD

Freaks and Geeks in Popular Media James B. White, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators Room: 103

Roundtable

Saturday

Recorded Session

Fueling Potential for Primary Gifted Students from Underserved Populations: Implications of Curriculum Research for Practice Kimberley L. Chandler, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA In order for the needs of primary gifted students from underserved populations to be addressed effectively, it is essential that curriculum interventions be designed and delivered in specific ways. In this session, the presenter delineates key elements of research-based interventions so that practitioners will have an easy reference for directing their efforts. The session includes information regarding the efficacy of various curriculum interventions with this target population, including a review of the extant materials and their common features. The presenter also shares practical, evidence-based recommendations for spotting and developing potential that have been derived from the research. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Researchers Room: White River H

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1:45 PM – 2:45 PM (Cont.)

GLOBAL AWARENESS

EXHIBITOR WORKSHOPS How to Develop a Mensa Mind: 15 Keys to Unlock Brain Power Lisa VanGemert, American Mensa, Arlington, TX Mensa knows minds, and we can help you boost your brain power with 15 tips & techniques that work for everyone. Come and learn how you and your students can optimize your minds. Room: Griffin Hall Mindsets in the Classroom Mary Cay Ricci for Prufrock Press Should we call students “smart”? How does the use of the term affect a child’s mindset about performance and effort? Participants learn ways to begin building and maintaining a Growth Mindset school culture that encourages hard work and effort and the importance of responsive instruction in your school/district.

Mother Earth & Father Sky: Promoting Living in a Harmonious State with the Environment Diana L. Beck, Stephen T. Schroth, Knox College, Galesburg, IL Does living in a harmonious state with the environment assist gifted children’s development? If so, how can I best support the gifted in exploring issues of sustainability so that their cognitive and social and emotional development are also supported? This session focuses on how environmental issues and sustainable practices can be incorporated into the curriculum, along with ways of promoting living “off the grid.” The Star School, a Department of Education “Green Ribbon” school, has created a joyful learning community where character, skills, and attitudes for increasing understanding are honored, and living in balance and serving others are accomplished. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: White River J

Room: Griffin Hall

Thanks to Indiana students and teachers who share their talents with us during the NAGC 60th Annual Convention. 126

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Poster Session

NCSSSMST

MIDDLE GRADES

While some middle grade gifted students embrace the written word, many others are reluctant to share their thoughts on paper. Often, this reluctance stems from students not being sure they have anything worthwhile to say. In this practical session, participants are provided with more than a dozen classroom-tested lessons that prompt personal, introspective and meaningful responses from students. Each activity includes actual student responses and, important in this era of accountability, each lesson is linked to particular Common Core objectives.

Challenging mathematically talented students is not as easy as 1-2-3; however there are straightforward processes for identifying mathematically gifted elementary or middle school students and developing programs. This practical session focuses on tiered options and a decision-making hierarchy that uses readily available resources to discover and develop high math aptitude. The core math curriculum can be modified to ensure systematic progression at a challenging pace. Because one program cannot fit all, presenters explain how to tailor instruction to individual needs. Case studies illustrate how to use the process. Presenters share favorite resources plus insights on selecting curriculum and long-term planning.

Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades Room: JW Grand Ballroom 9 What’s New in Young Adult Literature: 2013 Edition Robert (Bob) W. Seney, Mississippi University for Women, Mancos, CO

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers High School, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: White River D Finding Extraordinary in the Common: Differentiating the Language Arts Common Core in the Middle Grades Julie Lenner McDonald, Sandusky City Schools, Marblehead, OH; Laila Sanguras, Todd Kettler, University of North Texas, Coppell, TX While the Common Core State Standards for Language Arts may have increased the rigor of curriculum and instruction, they do not reduce the need for differentiated learning opportunities for gifted students. In this session, we demonstrate principles and practices of differentiated curriculum and instruction for middle school language arts students. Participants receive examples and explanations of differentiated learning tasks appropriate for gifted learners in the reading literature, reading informational texts, and writing standards as well as suggestions for text complexity, technology integration, and differentiated assessment for students in grades 6-8.

60th Annual Convention

60th Annual Convention Event

Into High Gear: Setting the Pace with Middle Grades Writers James R. Delisle, Growing Good Kids, North Myrtle Beach, SC

Developing Math Talent: Designing Programs and Selecting Curriculum Ann Lupkowski-Shoplik, Carnegie Mellon Institute for Talented Elementary Students, Pittsburgh, PA; Susan Assouline, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Gifted Coordinators Room: CC 121

Roundtable

Saturday

Recorded Session

Kick Into High Gear With Young Adult Literature! YA Lit, a rich resource for gifted learners, “hooks” students into positive reading experiences. Engaging and guiding gifted students into creative reading is a must. This session builds a rationale for using YA Lit with gifted learners and reviews new YA novels. THE Book List is provided. What’s New, a Middle Grades’ Tradition, will fuel reading potential, drive reading achievement, and accelerate readers into positive reading experiences. This year, looking back over almost 20 years of lists, past favorites are remembered. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Parents Room: White River A

For the most up-todate information on sessions and to search for sessions by strand or speaker, download the NAGC2013 app.

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Saturday

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM (Cont.)

Gearing Up for the Road Ahead: Motivation and Praise Kathy Jones, AHA-Learners, Chanute, KS; Cindy Sheets, Shawnee Mission School District, Lees Summit, MO

MIDDLE GRADES (Cont.) When ‘Lazy’ Doesn’t Make Sense: How Executive Functions Impact the Success of our Brightest Children Marydee Sklar, Executive Functioning Success, Portland, OR; Cynthia Z. Hansen, Ojai Valley School, Ventura, CA Difficulty starting a task, inconsistent motivation, and great ideas without follow-through, are often behaviors of the gifted profile. These are also behavior patterns indicating executive functioning difficulties. Many students struggle in middle school because of the increasing demands on their delayed executive skills, frequently gaining the label “lazy” by those who don’t understand the neurological basis of the child’s frustrations. This presentation describes how executive function delays can manifest in our gifted students, the implications of current research, identification of children (or adults) with executive skill deficits, and offers intervention strategies incorporating the home and school systems. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Psychologists Room: CC 123

PARENT & COMMUNITY Candyland or Chess? Hosting Parent Games Night Rande B. McCreight, Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln, NE Not all games are created equal, so how can parents make good choices for their children? This presentation focuses on structuring parent education so that they are able to participate in a variety of games that require complex thinking processes.

Most parents and teachers believe that praise is an important factor in motivating children. But not all praise is equally effective. In fact, some types of praise may harm more than they help. This session is based primarily on the work of Dr. Carol S. Dweck whose research has provided new insights into the effects of praise on the types of effort and motivation that lead to student success. In this easyto-understand, interactive session, parents and educators learn how to avoid praise with negative impact and promote motivation with appropriate types of praise. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists Room: 301 Homeschooling for Gifted Kids: The Real Deal Jen Merrill, Gifted Homeschoolers Forum, Libertyville, IL; Mika Gustavson, Gifted Matters, Campbell, CA More families of gifted kids are turning to full, parttime or serial homeschooling. And it’s no wonder: homeschooling can actually be the Cadillac of options -- an educational setting that is infinitely flexible, allowing a child’s weaknesses as well as areas of strength to be developed. Come join in a conversation with two of Gifted Homeschoolers Forum’s published authors, gifted experts, and real-life actual homeschooling moms. We will cover the whole range of questions, from “Is this actually legal” to “What about socialization?” and on into “How to I get any time alone?” We’ve done it, and you can too! Audience: Parents Room: Griffin Hall

The presenter has held a variety of games nights for parents and shares a list of games, and strategies for educating parents about how to make good choices for their children. Participants learn how to teach appropriate interaction for games, troubleshooting the process, and how to use parent-friendly language to maximize impact. Audience: Administrators, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 308

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Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

Parenting for Success and Happiness Across the Lifespan: Modeling and Fostering Reflection, Passion, Gratitude, and Grit Dona J. Matthews, Toronto, ON, Canada

Optimizing a Brain-Based Approach to Learning and Teaching for the Gifted Jean Chandler, South Carolina Consortium for Gifted Education, Charleston, SC

What parenting practices increase the likelihood of gifted children finding fulfillment in adulthood? Optimal longterm development is enhanced when children have ample opportunities for play, reflection, and imagination, and chances to discover how their interests might blossom into passions. Children who experience gratitude—rather than entitlement—are more likely to find happiness and success. And children who learn the benefits of persistence and effort are more likely to take on the challenges required for high achievement. Parents can model these attributes by taking time for reflection, exploring their own passions, expressing gratitude, and welcoming meaningful challenges.

Cognitive neuroscience is making rapid strides in areas highly relevant to gifted education. Knowing how to improve memory, sharpen attention span and sensory acuity will enhance learning and creativity for the gifted. However, there is a gulf between current science and direct classroom applications. Three brain-research principles--emotional safety, appropriate challenge, and self-constructed meaning- are paramount to success and the subject of this poster session. Brain-based instruction is cognizant of the brain’s natural learning system. Good instruction seeks to utilize the brain adeptly, in order to process, store and retrieve information. Discomfort through rejection, failure, pressure and intimidation may only harm cognitive development.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Psychologists Room: 304

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: Griffin Hall

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

Beyond the Test: Developing Thoughtful Questions to Create Critical Thinkers Sue A. Harvey, Joan Jacobs, Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln, NE Historically, questioning has been a skill of the educated class, a characteristic of creative individuals, and a way of life for toddlers. Questioning has unfortunately morphed into a test prep activity, focused on one right answer. Developing better questioning skills as a teaching strategy results in heightened motivation, increased participation, and deepening of critical and creative-thinking skills, yet frequently textbooks demonstrate poor questioning techniques. Participants consider the critical role of questioning in achievement, attitude, and attendance. Presenters demonstrate a variety of questioning formats for K-12 audiences. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators Room: 204

60th Annual Convention

Identification of Gifted Children in Schools Gabriela López Aymes, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico; Maria de los Dolores Valadez, University of Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Mexico As part of a broader research study 1,153 gifted children attending 4th and 5th grade schools in Guadalajara and Temixco, México, were nominated by peers to participate yet only 179 were identified as gifted. The results show a greater overlap between peer nomination and Raven scores while the nomination by teachers held little relationship. The results are discussed in this poster session in terms of the efficiency of the test used, and the importance of using combined procedures for the identification and evaluation of gifted children. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Professors, Psychologists Room: Griffin Hall

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Saturday

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM (Cont.)

RESEARCH & EVALUATION (Cont.) It’s More than Hard Work! Uncovering State of States Data for Driving Collaborative Efforts in Reform Jacquelin Medina, Colorado Department of Education, Denver, CO; Wendy A. Behrens, Minnesota Department of Education, Roseville, MN; Sneha Shah Coltrane, NC Department of Public Instruction, Durham, NC; Beth Hahn, Ohio Department of Education, Columbus, OH; Richard S. Blanchard, South Carolina Department of Education, Summerville, SC; Chrystyna V. Mursky, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Madison, WI

immediate context. Are we leveraging these efforts with state policy and guidelines to make dramatic changes in gifted program expectations and gifted student achievement? A panel of state directors reviews key points of the bi-annual “State of States” report, uplifts consistent practices across states, and reveals common challenges. This analysis of the data is used to suggest patterns, improvement strategies, and action steps that stakeholders may consider for driving change in and across states. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Researchers Room: White River G

Stakeholders in gifted education typically work with great effort to make a difference for gifted students in their

Combined Sessions 6 RESEARCH & EVALUATION 1:45 PM – 2:15 PM

2:15 PM – 2:45 PM

Critical Issues: What the Research Says about Mathematics Gifted Education Katherine Gavin, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Jill L. Adelson, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY

The Impact of Math Anxiety for Gifted Learners Jerrell C. Cassady, Rebecca Pierce, Cheryll M. Adams, Natalie Schelling, Ball State University, Muncie, IN

This session addresses the major issues facing educators, administrators, and parents in nurturing mathematical talent in students and provides researchers with an overview of what is known and what needs to be studied to understand mathematics gifted education. We present relevant research and guidance on the application of current research so that audience members can make informed decisions to benefit mathematically gifted students. Included in the presentation are such topics as identification of mathematically gifted students, research-based programming options, research-based instructional approaches and grouping models, and research-based curriculum appropriate for mathematically gifted students.

Children’s responses to surveys assessing math anxiety and indicators of personal and classroom motivational influences were examined in a sample of gifted learners involved in a statewide intervention targeting teacher professional development for mathematics. Data reveal strong negative correlations between math anxiety and perceived academic efficacy and academic press (indicator of teacher setting high mastery oriented goals). Children with math anxiety also reported a tendency to avoid novel learning tasks. Regression analysis demonstrated that Academic Efficacy was the strongest predictor of math anxiety. Relations to performance on standardized measures of math achievement are also reviewed.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Researchers Room: CC 124

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Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: CC 124

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

SPECIAL POPULATIONS Design, Development and Evaluation of Curricular and Emergent Activities to Explore the Effectiveness of an Interdisciplinary Team Intervention to Strengthen Social Emotional Skills in Twice Exceptional Children Ana G. Miro-Mejias, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan An interdisciplinary team designed, implemented, and evaluated activities to promote socioemotional skills in twiceexceptional students. The team included a psychologist, an educator, a communication specialist, and a counselor for collateral participation of parents. The activities addressed three main areas of social skills development: dealing with difficult situations and problem solving, verbal and non-verbal communication, and interpersonal relations. A curricular and emergent plan was used to reinforce the context related skills development such as: conflict management, expression of feelings, group agreements, introspection and forgiveness. Each activity was evaluated by the team and individual profiles were developed. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: Griffin Hall

When a gifted student does not achieve success in school, frustration abounds. Remediation attempts often fail when the focus is on deficits. Gifted children, including those with disabilities, need challenging learning opportunities to remain engaged in school. Participants leave with a comprehensive framework, grounded in research, to nurture gifted potential, support cognitive style, encourage academic achievement, foster interpersonal relationships, promote intrapersonal understanding, and empower twice-exceptional children to become self-actualized. Specific strategies are shared to support the development of skills to address executive functioning deficits, dyslexia, dyscalculia, dysgraphia, improve social relationship, and enhance emotional understanding.

60th Annual Convention

60th Annual Convention Event

Growing Up Gifted, Black, and Male: Recommendations for Meeting Students’ Social-Emotional Needs Malik Henfield, University of Iowa, Chicago, IL The achievement gap in education is pervasive, as is under-representation among Black males in gifted education. To date, K-12 gifted educators are far behind in terms of understanding the social-emotional needs of Black males, especially those who are identified as gifted. Without such information, these educators are left without an understanding of the non-cognitive issues associated with being identified as Black, male, and gifted. This presentation draws attention to common issues among gifted Black males and provides multicultural models, paradigms, and strategies that educators can adopt in attempts to meet these students’ unique needs. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: CC 122 Needs and Approaches for Gifted Students with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Literature-Based and First-Person Perspectives Terence P. Friedrichs, Friedrichs Education, Mendota Heights, MN; Brandon Less, Henry Sibley High School, West St. Paul, MN

Empowering Twice-Exceptional Gifted Children: A Framework for Success Beverly A. Trail, Regis University, Henderson, CO

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 201

Roundtable

Saturday

Recorded Session

Courageous gifted youth with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder increasingly are stepping forward, impelling schools and researchers to develop more sensitive curricula, educational staffs, and behavioral accommodations. This session provides literature search results, and a follow-up commentary from a gifted high schooler, on curricula, staffs and behavioral guidelines that have proven helpful to highpotential OCD students. Specifically, the session discusses three empirically supported elements for addressing these youths’ needs: 1) curricula providing both choice and structure, 2) staff who are experienced in both gifted and OCD, and 3) behavioral accommodations that encourage both student uniqueness and group adherence. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 209

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Saturday

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM (Cont.)

SPECIAL POPULATIONS (Cont.) Removing the Invisibility Cloak: A Case Study of the Academic and Personal Experiences of a Gifted Girl with ADHD Matthew C. Fugate, Purdue University, Houston, TX ADHD in girls can result in emotional and behavioral issues, placing stress on peer and family relationships. Coupled with giftedness, the characteristics of each often hide one another, a phenomenon known as masking, resulting in few educators recognizing either their talents or their challenges. It is important that education professionals develop an understanding of the experiences, perceptions, and needs of this unique population. In this session, hear the words of one gifted girl with ADHD and how she copes with the unique academic and social pressures associated with high school—providing insight into the challenges that have shaped her experiences. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers High School, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 102

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS Math/Science Night ‘K’Nex’ us to the Community Jessica Welker, Sarah Lee, Meigs Local School District, Albany, OH See how one school in a low-income region of Ohio uses a Math/Science Night to join together the community, parents, students and school for one night of fun STEM awareness. K’Nex, guest speakers, hands-on activities, and take-home materials are just a few of the ways we engage students and parents during this evening event. Come hear how our district secures funds and get examples to implement your own Math/Science Night in this poster session!

The School-Wide Enrichment Model: Shifting Gears in Serving the Gifted in Saudi Arabia Abdulrahman N. Cluntun, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia is one of the Gulf Countries Cooperation “GCC” that pays serious services and attention to mainstreaming the gifted and talented services in the public schools. Many projects and programs were invited and encouraged to serve the gifted. Learn how the local community is in favor of serving the gifted during the school daytime in this poster session. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Researchers Room: Griffin Hall Top Ten Lessons Learned in 29 Years of Gifted Summer Programming Angela Novak, Kate Vieillard, Summer Institute for the Gifted, Fairfield, CT There is immeasurable benefit in highlighting the love of learning for the sake of learning- education beyond the walls of the classroom! This session presents lessons learned from running summer, Saturday, after-school, and online programs. The top ten list includes lessons about students, staff and curriculum, and is heavily based on what you can apply to your current or prospective gifted program. Information presented will include research on alternative programs for gifted students as well as survey data from our program. Leave this session with action tips from the field that you can apply to your gifted program. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators Room: 306

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: Griffin Hall

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National Association for Gifted Children

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

STEM

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

Math Investigation Centers: Using Common Core Math Practice Standards to Meet the Needs of Mathematically Promising Students Sheri A. Sorensen, Granite School District, Salt Lake City, UT

Facilitating Creativity and Positive Affect with GT Mathematics Students Eric Mann, Hope College, Holland, MI; Heather Carmody, Park Tudor, Indianapolis, IN; Scott A. Chamberlin, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY

Teachers are faced with the dilemma of how to appropriately meet the needs of mathematically gifted students in ways other than subject acceleration. This presentation provides an overview of a district’s journey to develop math investigation centers for each grade level. Math Investigation Centers are based on the eight Standards for Mathematical Practice that educators should seek to develop in their students and provide mathematical extensions that are tied to Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. Participants review examples of Math Investigation Centers and receive information on designing activities for Math Investigation Centers.

Mathematics is full of opportunities for curiosity and challenge. Its patterns, problems, and potential can engage brilliant thinkers for decades. Unfortunately this type of excitement and fascination can be elusive in a classroom. Research shows that affect (i.e. feelings, emotions, and dispositions) and creativity are of primary importance in learning. However, few educators discuss how to create environments that foster positive affect and creativity. In this session, the interplay between affect and creativity will be discussed along with how stakeholders may promote them. Mathematical problem solving activities are discussed as the vehicle to promote positive affect and creativity.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators Room: 203

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 313

Unpacking Geometry Problems from Boxes You Create Nicholas J. Restivo, Math Olympiads for Elementary & Middle Schools, Bellmore, NY

Mathematics Mentorship Project: A Distancelearning Mentorship Program to Develop the Written Mathematics Communication Skills of Gifted 5th and 6th Grade Students Matthew Reames, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA The Common Core State Standards state the ability for students to communicate clearly and effectively is a necessary skill in mathematics. The Mathematics Mentorship Program was developed to provide an ongoing mathematics enrichment opportunity for gifted children in grades 5 and 6. The pilot study analyzes children’s written mathematical communication to understand aspects of children’s mathematical communication and to understand how mathematical communication changes over time and what mentor feedback is useful to participants. This session explains the on-line mentorship program, presents research from the program’s initial year-long pilot study, and describes the program’s next steps.

Participants will transform used greeting cards into boxes useful for small item storage, and more importantly for delivering a better understanding of the relationships among perimeter, area and volume. A major goal is to give students a better understanding of geometry terms and the nuances of definitions involved with polygons with a special emphasis on families of quadrilaterals. Ratio and proportion are discussed as they relate to sizing the boxes. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades Room: 104

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Researchers Room: 208

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0 November 7-10, 2013 0 Indianapolis, IN 0 www.nagc.org

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Saturday

3:00 PM – 4:00 PM

ARTS

SIGNATURE SERIES Recognizing Dr. Martin D. Jenkins, Father of the Study of African American Giftedness Donna Y. Ford, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN; Joy L. Davis, Virginia Union University, Richmond, VA Dr. Martin David Jenkins, a native of Terre Haute, Indiana, and alum of Indiana State and Northwestern University, was the first African American scholar to consistently study and publish scholarly works from 1934-1950 related to highly gifted Black children in our nation. Hear an overview of Dr. Jenkins’ life and legacy, including clips of contemporary African American highly gifted students from across the country whose lives and accomplishments exemplify Dr. Jenkins’ work. A panel featuring local African American gifted students are featured to allow students to share their own stories. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - High School, Classroom Teachers – K-12, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: JW Grand Ballroom 10

Early Leader Award Sidney Marland’s Intersection With Gifted Education Jennifer Jolly, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA The Marland Report is widely known in the gifted education community. It is most often associated with discussions involving definitions of giftedness. Considering how often the Marland Report is cited, there is very little dialogue regarding the man behind the report. Marland was a career educator and administrator who emerged from the “Quiet Corner” of Connecticut, eventually rising to the highest federal education position in the United States. This presentation will explore the man, his work, and contributions and legacy to gifted education.

Creative Encounters: Integrate Problem Solving and the Arts into Your Curriculum Elaine Reynolds; Kathy C. Frazier, Orange City Schools, Kent, OH Energize your curriculum with learning experiences that support creative problem solving and the integration of the arts. Instructional strategies that are “hands on/minds on,” intrinsically motivating, and cognitively stimulating are presented. Engage your students in experiencing, connecting, and becoming immersed in the arts. Lessons in Drama, Lyric Learning, Visual and Literary Arts are strategies to help you “shift into high gear” in challenging the 21st century gifted learner. Our motto: “Creativity does not have to be sacrificed to meet content standards.” Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: 102 Differentiating with Drawing Anne H. Stevens, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL As we broaden our search for talent across domains, we must explore early fluency and mastery of 21st century communication tools. Our talent search center in the Midwest is using graphical assessment to differentiate in arts-integrated and content-area courses. These assessments are a window into student visual language, which can be more sophisticated than their verbal or written vocabulary. We discuss our thesis: using drawing as a communication tool in traditional courses supports comprehensive differentiation. We demonstrate how drawing, as a means of differentiation, is within reach of all instructional staff and students, regardless of perceived artistic ability. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Researchers Room: 103

Audience: Administrator, Graduate Students Professors, Researchers Room: White River J

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National Association for Gifted Children

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

21st Century Webquests – Dusting Off an Oldie but a Goodie to Challenge Advanced Learners Kristy L. Zaleta, Danbury Public Schools, Danbury, CT; Nancy N. Heilbronner, Mercy College, White Plains, NY

Gifted Children’s Different Personalities: A Convergence of Findings from Three Theoretical Perspectives Shelagh Gallagher, Engaged Education, Charlotte, NC

Remember webquests? Webquest are still a valuable tool to challenge students through problem-based learning, but they need to be brought into the 21st century. Come to this engaging session and learn how to bring webquests into the 21st century by incorporating exciting new technology. Your students can communicate with experts around the world through Oovoo, Skype, or ePals. They can create dynamic presentations through Animoto or Glogster. You’ll also learn how to differentiate your webquest for the advanced learner. Time to dust off the webquest!

A fundamental assumption in gifted education is that gifted students are different, yet we still debate the nature of that difference. Especially controversial is the notion that gifted students are ‘qualitatively’ different from their age-mates. This presentation approaches the question of qualitative personality differences by comparing extensive research on personality and intelligence based on the Big Five model in psychology with research on gifted students using the Myers Briggs Type Indicator and Dabrowski’s overexcitabilities. Insights gained from a perspective outside of gifted education, the convergence of findings across theories, and a sacred cow are discussed.

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: 313

Audience: Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 202

Video Games and Gifted Kids: What Would Vygotsky Say? Brian Housand, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 10,000 HOURS: The amount of time many contend it takes to become an expert in something and the number of hours the average 21 year old has played video games. This begs the question, “Experts of what?” Using Vygotsky’s theory of constructivism as a lens, this session explores the inherent learning and skills developed in many popular video games and offers suggestions of how video games can be meaningfully integrated into gifted classrooms. Finally, resources and tools for moving students from being passive game players to being active and creative game designers are explored. Press START and GAME ON! Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: White River C

60th Annual Convention

Saturday

Recorded Session

Multisensory Learning for a Multisensory Age Cynthia Rundquist, Cherry Creek Schools, Denver, CO; Lawrence A. Baines, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK Even while tucked snugly in the womb, scientists tell us our senses begin providing information to the brain that will eventually allow us to make sense of the world. Sensory perception is an integral part of everyday life, providing the scaffolding on which memories, experiences, and knowledge are built. The session distills relevant sensory research from psychology, education, and the natural sciences to offer insights into how students learn. Participants learn multisensory strategies that can be used to increase student engagement, enhance enjoyment, and raise achievement. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors Room: 314

0 November 7-10, 2013 0 Indianapolis, IN 0 www.nagc.org

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Saturday

3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Cont.)

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS (Cont.) What Should Leadership Curriculum Include? Lessons Learned from Literature Kristina Ayers Paul, Jiaxi Wu, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN We often refer to gifted and talented students as the leaders of tomorrow, but how do we help develop the skills they will need in their leadership roles? A review of literature revealed limited research that addresses the systemic development of leadership skills in gifted youth. Considering the contemporary focus on “21st Century Learning Skills,” the time is especially ripe for a serious discussion of the development of leadership talent. Come to this session to hear an emerging theory of leadership development for gifted education, one that acknowledges different forms of leadership and provides actionable ideas for leadership development.

Shock and Awe: Mass Murderers Among Gifted Youth James R. Delisle, Growing Good Kids, North Myrtle Beach, SC Some places are forever etched into our collective memory by the mere mention of their name: Columbine, Aurora, Newtown, Virginia Tech. In each instance, the perpetrators of the horrendous crimes committed were individuals remembered by those who knew them with this description: “troubled...but brilliant.” In this session, common characteristics of these troubled young men are shared, along with a call to action for gifted educators and counselors to coalesce around the theme of “preventive counseling” to address issues of social and emotional concern for our brightest, yet most emotionally vulnerable youth. Audience: Administrators, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Psychologists Room: JW Grand Ballroom 9

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Researchers Room: 301

Supporting the Affective Needs of Grade 4-8 High Ability Students Julie Mast, Smith-Green Community Schools, Churubusco, IN

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

This session shares a layout of supportive discussion topics and activities for HA counseling programs appropriate for groups of identified HA students in grade 4 though 8. These sessions focus on uniqueness, leadership, and student goals, dreams, and influences. In grades 4/5, 6, and 8, these topics are introduced to students through ‘ice breakers’ and then followed by activities and discussions. The 7th grade program includes a book study and socratic seminar discussions. Program outlines ready for application are available through session attendance. This session is useful for newbies and veterans alike!

Attachment Style and Academic Outcomes Among Gifted College Students Anne N. Rinn, Maria-Trevino Rivera, University of North Texas, Denton, TX Little attention has been paid to the role of family as an influence on academic outcomes while in college, or to the influence of family on gifted college students’ development. In particular, the attachment style one has to one’s parents (i.e., secure, anxious-ambivalent, avoidant), can affect the way one experiences and achieves in college. The current study examines how gifted college students of varying attachment styles differ with regard to social comparison, locus of control, academic self-concept, and academic achievement. The researchers also examine the interactions of each variable in a hypothesized model. Implications are discussed.

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators Room: White River A

Audience: Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: CC 124

136

National Association for Gifted Children

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

CREATIVITY

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Developing Creative Thinking: Igniting a Passion for Learning Carolyn Coil, Pieces of Learning, Marion, IL

Examining Deep Approaches to Learning Through the Lens of Gifted Education Jeb S. Puryear, University of North Texas, Coppell, TX

Let’s ignite a passion for learning as we enhance the creative-thinking skills of our gifted students! Units of work developed using three user-friendly formats, Questivities™, SCAMPER and Six Thinking Hats are showcased in this interactive session. Understand how each is tied to the Common Core Standards while providing ways for gifted students to use their imaginations as they work on research skills, storytelling, the arts, writing and creative project activities. Session attendees actively participate in three mini-lessons, one for each format. Gifted students say: “Doing this is awesome!” and “This makes me think!”

This analysis explores the alignment of gifted education goals with the parameters of the Deep Approaches to Learning. Typically DAL includes three elements: reflective learning, integrative learning, and higher-order thinking. When analyzing the literature, recurring themes emerge in the study of DAL. The recurring themes show similarities with those found in the literature related to gifted education pedagogy. Alignment also exists with specific gifted teaching strategies when examining items on instruments created to measure DAL. This poster session also discusses future plans to evaluate gifted programs options for student engagement based on Deep Approaches to Learning.

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators Room: JW Grand Ballroom 8

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Researchers Room: Griffin Hall

Thinking Outside of the Box: Creative Classroom Practices that Support Talent Development in Young Children Laura A. Tuthill, Vanessa Ewing, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, Broomfield, CO This presentation explores curricular and instructional practices that support creative thinking and talent development in young children by challenging teachers to rethink their classroom practices. Following the suggestions of Feldhusen, learning activities should be structured to give students the opportunity to both explore and develop their talent potential. Examples of Reggio Emilia philosophical tenants, classroom elements, and teaching practices that stimulate both creative thinking and talent development in young children are examined during this interactive presentation and discussion. Participants leave with resources, tools, and suggestions to help implement the Reggio Emilia philosophy in their classrooms. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 204

60th Annual Convention

Saturday

Recorded Session

In Their Own Words: Young Adults Describe the Benefits of Gifted Programming in Their Lives Frances R. Spielhagen, Mount Saint Mary College, Warwick, NY Advocates for gifted programs argue convincingly about the benefits of those programs, yet very little longitudinal documentation exists to support those assumptions. This session presents compelling insights from young adults, now 30 years old, who had participated in a high school gifted program: what worked in that program, the effect of involvement on their lives as adolescents, and the long-term influence on their current lives. These case studies grew out of a larger exploration of problem-based service learning experiences, presented at NAGC in 2012. These young adults provide strong recommendations for best practice today. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators Room: Griffin Hall

0 November 7-10, 2013 0 Indianapolis, IN 0 www.nagc.org

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Saturday

3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Cont.)

The General Pre-Assessment of Students Instrument: A New Tool for Assessing Prior Knowledge and Student Motivation Jason S. McIntosh, Purdue University, Lafayette, IN

CURRICULUM STUDIES (Cont.) Project Based Learning for Middle School Deborah Carver, Janet Flores, Torry A. Ivey, Lake Ridge New Tech Middle School, Gary, IN Lake Ridge New Tech Middle School is using Project Based Learning as its primary mode of instruction. This session covers the purpose and how-to’s of creating project based lessons that meet the needs of high-ability students. The presenters provide ways in which PBL is being used including its impact on the curriculum and how to organize professional development for staff to ready them to implementation of PBL in their school.

Educators are taught from day one in teacher education programs how important it is to activate and assess students’ prior knowledge. Despite this fact, little attention has been placed on how to actually accomplish this difficult task. This presentation presents the results of a pilot study conducted to validate the General Pre-Assessment of Students instrument created by the author that measures both prior knowledge of a topic and the degree to which a student is motivated to learn about it. The G.P.S. requires minimal advanced preparation from the teacher and provides powerful information for instructional planning.

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Gifted Coordinators Room: CC 122

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: 206

Reflections in a Rear-View Mirror: Exploring Unexpected Parallels between Advanced Learners and Talented Drivers Gail F. Hubbard, Prince William County Public Schools, Montclair, VA With 50 years of experience as an educator and racing enthusiast, the presenter, a retired gifted education administrator, explores the parallels between supporting advanced learners and talented drivers. Curricula and racing cars meet design standards. Expert teams of educators implement and adjust curricula just as engineering teams prepare and modify racecars. Support for learners through responsive instruction mirrors support for drivers from pit crews and timers. When design, implementation, and support are successful, advanced learners demonstrate increased achievement and drivers win races. A curriculum evaluation rubric developed to review curriculum and instruction frames the session. Participants receive copies of the rubric.

EARLY CHILDHOOD Are You Smarter Than a Kindergartner? Keeping the Pace with High-Ability Five and Six Year Olds Becky Butler, Brownsburg Community School Corporation, Indianapolis, IN What do you do with a child who can describe 20 species of dinosaurs yet can’t tie his shoes? Looking through the lens of a self-contained, multi-age, high-ability classroom with kindergarten and first grade students five years after this teacher threw herself into the deep end of the pool. Participants walk away with strategies and resources that have been successful in fulfilling the academic and social development of high ability five and six year olds. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Gifted Coordinators Room: White River G

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: Griffin Hall

138

National Association for Gifted Children

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Parenting Young Gifted Children: Examining Successful Intelligence Jeanine Jechura, University of Toledo, Temperance, MI

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

Moral Sensitivity, Empathy and Giftedness: New Research Nancy B. Miller, Advanced Development Journal, Westminster, CO; Linda Kreger Silverman, Gifted Development Center, Westminster, CO; R. Frank Falk, Institute for the Study of Advanced Development, Westminster, CO

“The single most important thing a parent can do for a child is to help that child figure out his or her pattern of strengths and weaknesses.” Parents have the daunting obligation to guide young gifted children toward triumph. Sternberg defines “successful intelligence” as a person’s ability to attain success in life, whether by personal standards or by the standards of others. However, these skills may not be valued in schools. In this energetic presentation, attendees explore the seven strategies Sternberg suggests for parents as they help their child develop successful intelligence.

The Global Awareness Network was founded on clinical observations of high moral sensitivity and empathy in gifted children. However, there is a lack of empirical research to support these observations. Research with the Overexcitability Inventory for Parents revealed 6 factors, rather than the anticipated five overexcitabilities. Emotional overexcitability items split into two factors: “sensitivity” and “concern for others.” The relationship between these characteristics and IQ scores is analyzed for 600 children. Additionally, relationships between IQ scores and parental observations of sensitivity, compassion, and moral sensitivity are examined for 1500 children. The data are illuminated by anecdotal information.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists Room: 305

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: White River B

GLOBAL AWARENESS Innovative Learning Promoting Global Thinking Through Stunning and Hilarious Art Images: Student Presentations Karen Kimball, Richmond Community Schools, Richmond, IN To develop an attitude of global interdependence in today’s classrooms, the study of art must reach beyond the boundaries of traditional learning. To be effective global citizens, students must understand world cultures. To comprehend world cultures, students must study the art of humankind and develop personal responses with positive social action through a language that they own. The workshop provides practical lessons and resources for high school English, Social Studies, and Humanities teachers, realistic student input, and startling images to help students transcend world cultures while building selfreferential autonomy and deepening understandings of our commonalities through art. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Researchers Room: CC 123

MIDDLE GRADES #giftedmiddleschoolers: The Most Critical 36 Months of a Gifted Child’s Education Holly Ray, Stacey Schlichter-Burt, Discovery School, Murfreesboro, TN; Claire Caruthers-Cheek, Kingsley Elementary, Chicago, IL; Glenn Rutland, SRCS/HolleyNavarre Intermediate, Navarre, FL Growing up gifted can be a challenge, especially in middle grades. Join us for a session that explores the socio-emotional development of middle school gifted learners. Participants view a short documentary based on the experiences of five highly gifted students six years after elementary school. Strategies for teaching gifted middle schoolers and improving ability to self-advocate to helping them deal with their asynchronous development will be discussed. Additionally, suggestions from one county in Florida on improving gifted awareness in schools and the community is provided by Santa Rosa County’s Coordinator of GIfted Education. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 310

60th Annual Convention

0 November 7-10, 2013 0 Indianapolis, IN 0 www.nagc.org

139


Saturday

3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Cont.)

MIDDLE GRADES (Cont.) A Contract to Succeed: Turbo-Charge Your Efforts Shawn E. Jividen, Kimberly M. Berman, Summit Co. Educational Service Center, Cuyahoga Falls, OH Middle school students may face challenges from perceived societal and peer pressures. Participants receive concrete suggestions and a framework for addressing both social and emotional needs and academic challenges. The presenters share experiences as former middle school and high school gifted intervention specialists, coordinators, and consultants. Appropriate curriculum and high quality instruction rooted in research-based practices are key components in making the middle school years a positive and challenging experience for gifted students. “A Contract to Succeed” is a tried and true positive behavior shaping approach designed for underachieving students. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Researchers Room: 205 Planting STEM in Middle School Julie Martinek, Michael Tetzloff, Sky Vista Middle School, Aurora, CO STEM in the middle—where are the models? Gifted kids in middle school don’t just need access to more advanced applied science, they need a broader view of how STEM

fits in the world. Our goal was to develop a robust Middle School STEM program that would both complement our school’s current Parallel Curriculum Model and transcend the traditional real world, problem-based learning model of STEM to include the ethical, political, and social implications of student-proposed solutions. STEM teachers share this work including course curricula, lessons and student work. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Gifted Coordinators Room: CC 121 Middle School: More Than Just Hormones Nannette K. Janecke, Kelly Schultz, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI Adolescent students can be hard to reach – and difficult to teach! Because these years can be trying, middle schools frequently foster an artificially congenial culture to lessen the stress of pre-teen concerns. What if, instead, we embraced the common issues of middle school and used them to prepare gifted students for high school and beyond? This session focuses on a variety of life skills, including stress management, authentic assessment, academic risk-taking, intellectually and emotionally appropriate curriculum, finding a passion, and learning to communicate fully by listening, speaking up, asserting oneself, asking for help, and empathizing with others. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: JW Grand Ballroom 7

For the most up-to-date information on sessions and to search for sessions by strand or speaker, download the NAGC2013 app.

140

National Association for Gifted Children

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

PARENT & COMMUNITY

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

Fueling 21st Century Gifted Parenting with Creativity Patti Shade, Denver Public Schools, Denver, CO; Richard A. Shade, Jefferson County Public Schools, Denver, CO

Creating a Foundation for Intelligence Building: An Interactive Session for Parents Dona J. Matthews, Toronto, ON; Joanne F. Foster, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

All children are born creative. They are curious, imaginative, and need self-expression. Your challenge is to help your child become even more creative and support them to maintain their creativity through adolescence and adulthood. Creativity is a vital 21st century skill needed for the global workforce. Gifted students also need creativity to inspire passionate, life-long learning. Participants leave with strategies to foster and encourage creativity and creative thinking in gifted children. Explore how mistakes and “surprises of failure” in schooling have led to phenomenal innovations in our world. Help teach your child to think creatively without the box!

What can parents do to support their children’s developing intelligence? We present four cornerstones of parenting for intelligence: (1) appreciation of individual developmental differences; (2) attunement to the child; (3) encouragement of a growth mindset; and (4) thoughtful attention to teaching and learning, ensuring an ongoing educational match. Discuss each of these key points and, because meaningful engagement and learning are fueled by spirited discussion, session attendees are invited to challenge these four essentials. Together we’ll co-create a strong foundational base for supporting and encouraging highlevel development.

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 302

Audience: Parents Room: 306 Failure: The Pathway to Success Nancy Arey Cohen, Educational Solutions, Falmouth, ME

Heart of the Matter: What Your Children Want You to Know Patricia Gatto-Walden, Boulder, CO

Many gifted children (and adults) do not accept failure; however, through failure comes personal growth. One cannot learn coping mechanisms without ever facing difficulties. Similarly, one can never truly be successful without taking risks. In this session, we discuss the importance of accepting failure as a step on the pathway to success. We look at successful individuals’ failures that led to their ultimate achievements. What does failure mean? How do you deal with it? How do you respond when your child fails? What is resiliency and why is it so important?

Throughout 30 years of counseling gifted and highly gifted children and adolescents, I have asked these complex and intense youngsters to contemplate and record the five most important thoughts, feelings, and needs they wish parents understood of them and their perspective of the world. Their replies yielded five fundamental beliefs they assert are the “heart of the matter” for you as parents to appreciate and accept. Gain knowledge of parenting essentials to empathically respond to their appeals and learn specific actions that support their health and well-being.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: CC 125

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Counselors, Parents, Psychologists Room: 208

60th Annual Convention

Saturday

Recorded Session

0 November 7-10, 2013 0 Indianapolis, IN 0 www.nagc.org

141


Saturday

3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Cont.)

Shifting Advocacy into High Gear by Building Trust Christy D. McGee, Bellarmine University, Louisville, KY

PARENT & COMMUNITY (Cont.) Nurturing the Strength Aspects of Overexcitabilities in Gifted Children: Lessons for Parents from a School for the Gifted Eric Robertson, Kate Bachtel, Mackintosh Academy, Boulder, CO Overexcitabilities in gifted children are often viewed from a deficit lens at school, and as a result, at home as well. Yet when we hold our students/children and their unique composition through the lens of strength, we begin to nurture the very spark that will lead them to their passions, interests, and guide them to become their best selves. Drawing upon expertise in working with gifted children at our school in Boulder, Colorado, we share with parents tools and frameworks for child-study that can help guide in this healthy, joyful process in a fun, inspiring roundtable setting.

The audience participates in a lively discussion, question/ answer session concerning the importance gifted children to learn how to build trust in order to self-advocate. So many children become bored, frustrated, and angry because the work they are doing in school is not suited to their learning needs. Yet, most of these children sit in silence or act out instead of finding ways to speak up for themselves. Why? A lack of trust. Investigate the importance of trust and practical suggestions that assists parents, teachers, and administrators to help children learn to speak for themselves. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 308

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Psychologists Room: Griffin Hall Partnering with and Protecting our Gifted Learners in a Social Media World: Is There an App for That? Diana Caldeira, Lindsey Reinert, Tonia Heffley, Jenny Fredrickson, Jefferson County Public Schools, Denver, CO “Digital citizenship describes the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regards to technology use.” Are you in need of tips, strategies, and tools to enable you to partner with your gifted learner as they navigate the ever changing social media world? Join us as we set the stage to safely navigate our global, digital society. We explore the impact of social media, Internet safety, and cyberbullying and their relationship to the social-emotional intensities of gifted learners. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Researchers Room: 305

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Best Practice for Schools in Rural Areas to Involve Parents in Gifted Education Richard Dodson, Mary Ann Remsen, Echo H. Wu, Murray State University, Murray, KY Research indicates that parent and family involvement contribute significantly to gifted students’ outcomes as related to learning and school performance. However, getting parents involved in their children’s education at school is not an easy task, especially in small towns and rural communities, as parents are often reluctant to communicate with teachers for various reasons. This presentation discusses the results of interviews with 20 principals and teachers from schools in rural areas, offers insights on what schools should do to encourage parents’ involvement in children’s education, and shares ideas of best practice for rural schools to involve parents in gifted education. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators Room: 201

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Differentiating Digitally: Supporting Teachers & Students, Just a Click Away! Karen Brown, Dina M. Brulles, Paradise Valley Unified School District, Phoenix, AZ To effectively reach, teach, and assess gifted and high achieving students, teachers need resources at their fingertips! Learn how to incorporate a Gifted Resource Site for providing curriculum, supporting teachers, and documenting achievement. This dynamic site provides web-based training and methods for sharing curriculum, differentiated plans, and digital resources that includes classroom videos, examples of student-produced work, and programming options. The user-friendly site was developed using Google Groups and tools, free resources accessible to schools throughout the world. Learn how to create and utilize this format to provide and support a learning community designed for teachers by teachers. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators Room: White River D Leading Academic Rigor: Engaging Gifted Students Bertie Kingore, PA Publishing, Austin, TX Learning experiences without relevant mental, socialemotional, and process engagement squander precious class time and result in gifted students becoming cynics who consider school assignments busywork. Ensure students’ productive engagement by: 1) guiding colleagues to understand instructional implications related to gifted learning characteristics, and 2) authentically addressing teachers’ differentiation concerns for how to do it all. Explore research-based, CCSS-aligned strategies that increase gifted engagement and differentiation in all classrooms. Select from modeled low-preparation, highimpact applications incorporating nonfiction text, flexible group problem solving, replacement tasks, and formative assessment techniques that integrate high-level, complex thinking while facilitating beyond grade-level products and responses.

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

Start your Engines! Building a High Performance Program Using the NAGC Gifted Programming Standards James O’Neill, Faye Hanson, Jaffrey-Rindge Cooperative School School District, Jaffrey, NH Is your GT program in need of a tune-up? Is it time to tradein your old model or start a whole new program? Learn how a small, rural district developed a high-performance GT program using the NAGC Gifted Programming Standards as a guide.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: 101

RESEARCH & EVALUATION Notes from the Trenches: A Discussion of Research About Teacher Perceptions About Creativity Jessica Collins, University of Houston, Houston, TX Many educators know that creativity is an important skill to nurture in their students, but they often feel like they have to choose between open-ended activities that incorporate creativity or more knowledge-based skills that help them address the accountability and evaluation requirements imposed upon them. This poster session details the development of a new instrument that measures teacher attitudes and perceptions about creativity and how they feel about nurturing it in their classrooms. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Researchers Room: Griffin Hall

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: White River I

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Saturday

3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Cont.)

RESEARCH & EVALUATION (Cont.) Toward a Paradigmatic Approach to Research in Gifted Education David Y. Dai, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, NY We first define the term “paradigm,” and then delineate three paradigms in the historical context: the gifted child paradigm, the talent development paradigm, and the differentiation paradigm. We then compare and contrast the three paradigms to elucidate their continuities and

discontinuities. Under the three-paradigm framework, we identify 20 research questions that need to be addressed to move the field forward. Finally, we discuss the importance of articulating the paradigmatic nature of approaches for educational and research purposes. The ultimate purpose of articulating distinct paradigms is to seek a common research agenda with clarity, rigor, and relevance. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 203

Combined Sessions 6 RESEARCH & EVALUATION 1:45 PM – 2:15 PM

2:15 PM – 2:45 PM

Achievement Goal Orientations of Academically Talented College Students: Socioemotional Factors Contributing to Honors Program Participation Jaclyn M. Chancey, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Variation in Achievement Goal Orientation Across Gender and Ethnicity Among Students in a Community College Honors Program Scott R. Furtwengler, San Jacinto College, Houston, TX

For many academically talented students finishing high school, a college honors program serves to continue the gifted education they may be used to receiving. However, not all eligible students will choose to participate in honors programs, even if they attend schools that have them. This study investigated this decision through the lens of achievement goal orientation, or whether students tend to define their academic goals in terms of learning, demonstrating abilities, or avoiding failure. Other possible explanatory factors were also included, with a special focus on perfectionism as a construct linked to achievement goal orientation and gifted education.

A sub-group of high-ability students who attend community college may waive the opportunity to join an honors program because they adopt a performance-avoid achievement goal orientation, under the assumption that a penalty (i.e., lower GPA) is associated with participation in such programs. This study focuses on current members of a community college honors program. The researcher hypothesizes that the majority of participating students adopt a mastery-approach or performance-approach goal orientation, with fewer students representing a mastery-avoid goal orientation, and students adopting a performance-avoid goal orientation comprising the minority of students in the program.

Audience: Administrators, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Researchers Room: 303

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - High School, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: 303

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Poster Session

SPECIAL POPULATIONS Approaches to Serving Gifted English Language Learners: Examples from Three States Margaret W. Hoffman, Chapel Hill Carrboro Schools, Durham, VA; Lisa Hoffman, Indiana University, New Albany, IN Schools across the country vary widely in how they identify and serve high-ability English language learners. As the population of ELLs grows throughout the United States, schools are encountering an ever-increasing number of promising/gifted ELLs. In order to see how school districts are serving these learners, this study looked at three levels of service—state-level policy, district-level plans, and school-level implementation—at three sites in three states with recent rapid increases in the numbers of ELL students (Indiana, Kentucky, and North Carolina). Presenters share findings from the study, including emerging effective practices for identifying and serving this population.

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

Estudiantes Sobresalientes: Gifted Education in Mexico Jaret W. Hodges, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN Does Mexico have a gifted education program? If so, then what is it? Identification and building rapport with parents represents two of the obstacles impeding the ability of practitioners to make gifted education accessible to the estudiantes sobresalientes (Spanish for gifted children) in their schools. An overview of gifted education in Mexico will be presented as well how the gifted education system in Mexico affects the ability to build rapport with parents. To understand these children, an educator must understand from where they come.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: Griffin Hall

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: 309

The Conceptual Foundations Network of the National Association for Gifted Children presents Portraits in Gifted Education:

The Legacy Series

NEW! This sixth DVD in the series honors Sandra Kaplan,. Also Available: The Creative Voice of Don Treffinger An Afternoon with Alexinia Y. Baldwin Dialogue with Jim Gallagher A Conversation with Joe Renzulli An Evening with Annemarie Roeper

Please Join Us for the videotaping for the next DVD in the Series featuring Dorothy Sisk on Friday, November 8, 3:15 – 4:45 pm, Grand Ballroom 7/8/9

Get Your DVDs Today

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NAGC Central (booth 321) in the Exhibit Hall Or order online at www.nagc.org

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Saturday

3:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Cont.)

Write Like a Scientist: Teaching Elementary Students Scientific Writing Andrew G. Moss, Laura Saxton, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

STEM MetaMath: Prompts to Activate and Differentiate the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics Jared DuPree, Los Angeles Unified School District, Carson, CA; Jessica Manzone, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA The Common Core State Standards in mathematics exemplify the overlap between factual, procedural, and conceptual knowledge. Metacognitive knowledge is the fourth knowledge domain and is often least represented in discussions of mathematics curriculum and instruction. This session introduces a series of MetaMath (M²) prompts designed specifically to target the fourth knowledge domain. The MetaMath (M²) prompts function as a bridge between what is to be taught (CCSS-M content and dispositions) and the instructional strategies necessary to develop mathematically proficient scholars. Connections between MetaMath (M²) and the prompts of Depth and Complexity are highlighted. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators Room: 209

6:00 PM – 7:00 PM

NAGC Annual Fund Donor Reception (by invitation only) Your vital Annual Fund gift will help NAGC increase and expand its ability to reach students, parents, teachers and administrators. Visit the NAGC Annual Fund Booth right outside the exhibit hall to make your pledge to donate and join us for the Donor Reception. Room 314

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Strong scientific writing allows students to effectively communicate their discoveries about the world. This session demonstrates how to introduce and develop scientific writing skills in elementary students and how scientific writing enhances comprehension in both disciplines. Participants discuss theories on cross-curricular writing and learn step-by-step instructions to teach students how to write analytical, objective, and cogent scientific reports. The session concludes with a discussion of common challenges in scientific writing and strategies to overcome them. Participants leave with materials they may immediately implement in their classes. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators Room: 208

6:30 PM – 9:00 PM

Celebrate in State and Style at the Indiana State Museum! NAGC and the Indiana Association for the Gifted invite you to the spectacular Indiana State Museum for an evening of exploration and celebration. Be wowed by the visually stimulating architecture and beautiful views along the canal while you enjoy light refreshments, music, and access to many of the scientific, cultural, historical and art exhibits. See the famous Foucault Pendulum in action. Enjoy artifacts from the 50’s, 60’s, and 70’s on the Pop Culture Wall. After browsing the exhibits, stop at the Indiana State Museum’s two-story gift shop, where you will find a wide variety of souvenirs and gifts related to the Hoosier state, locally produced food items, unique jewelry, art and crafts by Indiana Artisans, books, games, and educational toys. A special 60th anniversary commemoration honoring NAGC’s past presidents will be featured.

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Roundtable

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SATURDAY – E. PAUL TORRANCE CREATIVITY SESSIONS Saturday, November 9 | 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM

6 They Came from the Future: Sixty Years of Creativity

Saturday

Recorded Session

For sixty years, educators have developed ways of encouraging creativity in the classroom; scholars have increased our understanding creative people and processes; and parents have shared their experiences of nurturing creativity in their homes. NAGC has been a home for those of us who “came from the future,” hoping to make the world safe for creative kids. What have we accomplished for creative kids? What lies ahead? Let’s take a journey through time, learning of our past, and looking to the future for creativity in the classroom, the laboratory, and at home.

Barbara Kerr, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, 2013 E. Paul Torrance Award recipient

6 The Amygdaloids’ Heavy MeNtal Variety Show The Amygdaloids are scientists who shed their scientific garb and take to the stage with songs about love and life peppered with insights drawn from research about mind and brain and mental disorders. The NYC band will play several suites of original songs on mind/brain topics: the mind-body problem, memory, emotion, unconscious processes, and mental disorders. Each suite will be preceded by a short discourse on the scientific or philosophical foundations of the topic by neuroscientist and Amygdaloid, Joseph LeDoux, or one of the other band members. The band believes that music, with its unique ability to trigger emotion and strengthen memories, can be used to stimulate interest in how the brain works.

NAGC appreciates the continued support of Scholastic Testing Service for the E. Paul Torrance Creativity Lecture Series

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SUNDAY CLOSING KEYNOTE | NOVEMBER 10 | 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM 6 PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE: Defining Moments in Gifted Education and What Lies Ahead for the Field Carolyn M. Callahan, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA; James Gallagher, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Charlotte, NC; Sandra Kaplan, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA; F. Richard “Rick” Olenchak, University of Houston, Houston, TX; Paula M. OlszewskiKubilius, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; Sally M. Reis, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Ann Robinson, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR; Del Siegle, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA

Room: White River E/F Join this “who’s who” in gifted education and leadership as they share their insights about milestones in the field, people who made a difference, and what the future holds. It will be a lively, candid discussion with a variety of important perspectives you won’t hear anyplace else. Celebrate the field and its leaders at this one-of-a kind conversation.

A Rich History of Serving Gifted Children

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Annual Meeting, 1957

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1967 Convention, Hartford, CT (left – right) Ed Frierson, George Peabody College for Teachers; Walter Barbe, Editor, Highlights Magazine; Paul Witty, keynote speaker and author; Ann F. Isaacs, NAGC Executive Director; William J. Stanton, Education Commissioner for the State of Connecticut; Barbara Vassar, parent; William J. Vassar, NAGC President.

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Gifted Child Quarterly, March 1974; 18 (1) Cover photo features NAGC founder and executive director Ann F. Isaacs

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Gifted Child Quarterly, January 1958; 2 (1)


Sunday

SUNDAY HIGHLIGHTS | NOVEMBER 10

It’s Super Sunday! We asked the NAGC Networks to give us their best and brightest for the final two session slots for our 60th Annual Convention. We close out the day with a line-up of luminaries in gifted education, who will share their insights about milestones in the field and what is coming down the track. Celebrate the field and its leaders at this one-of-a kind conversation.

Sunday 6 Schedule at a Glance 7:00 AM – 12:00 PM

9:15 AM – 10:15 AM

Information Table Open

Network Super Sessions

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

10:30 AM – 12:00 PM

Network Super Sessions

Closing General Session “Past, Present, and Future: Defining Moments in Gifted Education” with NAGC Past Presidents White River Ballroom E/F (First Floor)

Save the Date

NAGC 2014

Mark your calendars for the NAGC 61st Annual Convention in Baltimore, Maryland, November 13-16, 2014. Interested in speaking? Proposal submission website will open in December 2013. Registration opens in April 2014. It is sure to be a starspangled event!

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SUNDAY SESSIONS 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

Q&A practice time. Participants also learn helpful ideas for how to teach students about this vital topic.

ARTS It Takes a Village - And Partnerships with Arts Organizations to Develop Artistic Talent Stephen T. Schroth, Jason A. Helfer, Knox College, Galesburg, IL; Christian Mahone, Nielson Elementary School, Galesburg Community Unit School District No. 205, Galesburg, IL How can we provide gifted children with exposure to the arts when our budget has been slashed? This session shows how teachers, parents, and administrators can take advantage of no-cost partnerships with national and local arts organizations to both provide opportunities for gifted children to experience the arts and make available curricular materials for use in the classroom. This session highlights opportunities that exist and how to create other prospects for partnerships with arts organizations. Participants receive copies of curricular materials that can be used in the classroom as well as links to no-cost opportunities for children. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: White River C

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY Copyright Confusion and Fair Use in a Digital World Ginger Lewman, ESSDACK, Hutchinson, KS Increasingly, students and educators are turning to digital tools in our everyday work, creating grand projects with music, photos, and information quickly found online. But are we sure it’s legal? How do we best guide students through the fair and responsible use of digital media without squashing the excitement of creativity? This session actively walks educators through the decision-making process outlined by the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Education using actual classroom scenarios and

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Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: JW Grand Ballroom 8

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS Gifted Education Confronts Enormous 21st-Century Problems and Opportunities: An Interdisciplinary Analysis Tracy L. Cross, Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Paula M. Olszewski-Kubilius, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; Don Ambrose, Rider University, Yardley, PA; F. Richard “Rick” Olenchak, University of Houston, Houston, TX What aspects of giftedness and talent are best suited to the complex, turbulent 21st-century socioeconomic, cultural, and political context? This question serves as a focal point for leaders in our field who explore 21stcentury globalization through the lenses of several thought paradigms in gifted education (domain-specific eminence, social-emotional giftedness, curriculum development). The panelists connect these high-ability paradigms with a series of daunting 21st-century problems and huge opportunities derived from leading scholarship in economics, sociology, ethical philosophy, and other disciplines. Intended results include clarified notions of giftedness, talent, and creativity within the globalized 21st-century context. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: JW Grand Ballroom 10

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Poster Session

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Roundtable

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COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Affective Education for the Gifted: Over 150 Years of Involvement Linda Kreger Silverman, Gifted Development Center, Westminster, CO; James T. Webb, Great Potential Press, Tucson, AZ; James R. Delisle, Growing Good Kids, North Myrtle Beach, SC; George Betts, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO

Gifted Students as Producers of Differentiated Curriculum Sandra Kaplan, Jessica Manzone, Marge Hoctor, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Where have we been and where are we going for the development of the total gifted child? The presenters have a combined 150 years of experience in the emotional and social needs of gifted, talented and creative learners. Each presenter offers their philosophy and experiences with gifted learners, with emphasis on the affective needs. The presenters respond to each other about their views and then present ideas for the future affective development of these learners. There is time allotted for audience questions. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists Room: White River G

Sunday

Recorded Session

The concept of educators defining and constructing curriculum for the gifted has long been the traditional pathway of providing services for this unique group of students. The value of gifted students experiencing the roles of producers as well as consumers of knowledge is long standing. Extending this ideal, this session presents both the process and products of differentiated curriculum that have been produced FOR gifted students BY gifted students themselves. The role of the gifted student as producers of the differentiated curriculum AND compliant to the Common Core State Standards underscoring differentiated curriculum are shared. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators Room: White River H

EARLY CHILDHOOD CREATIVITY Fostering Creative Attitude and Creative Thinking Using The Torrance Creativity Tests Kyung-Hee Kim; Bonnie Cramond, University of Georgia, Athens, GA Creativity requires the creative CAT: Creative Climate, Creative Attitude, and Creative Thinking. Participants examine elements of creativity utilizing the Torrance Creativity tests. These creativity tests give participants a basic understanding of theories behind assessing creativity and the scientific methods used in measuring its elements. Participants gain increased practical knowledge to develop preliminary lesson strategies for fostering creativity in the classroom. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators Room: White River I

60th Annual Convention

Myths and Truths About Media and the Brain: a Guide to Gifted Students’ Positive Use of Media from Birth Through Early Childhood Leah Welte, Alpine School District, Orem, UT Media are a most powerful force, which permeates our lives, often without conscious awareness and beginning with the developing minds of our babies and young children. ‘The brain becomes what the brain does, and American children spend more time in front of electronic screens than any other activity besides sleeping. While some media result in positive learning, attitudes, and behavior, many influence the emotional brain in progressively harmful ways. The presenter intends to educate parents and early childhood professionals about the significant findings of well-known researcher, Douglas A. Gentile, while suggesting solutions to the media dilemma. Audience: Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Parents Room: 103/104

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8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Cont.)

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

GLOBAL AWARENESS Moving From Social Justice in a Global World to Social Action (8AM-10:15AM) Dorothy A. Sisk, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX; Michele Kane, Northeastern Illinois University, Long Grove, IL Genocide, global hunger, political uprisings, the spread of disease, terrorism, and increasing numbers of fundamental ideologies lead to the question: How can social justice be expounded and implemented in a global world? Gifted children with capacity to become future leaders and global citizens need the tools of knowledge, skills, and understandings to succeed in the 21st century and beyond. Tools including scenarios, YouTube and books to explore positive global social change are shared and demonstrated to address these controversial issues with gifted students. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators Room: 101/102

From Start to Finish: The Inside Track to National Board Certification for Gifted Education Teachers Christine Deitz, Little Rock School District, Little Rock, AR The National Board Certification process is a rigorous but doable professional development choice for K-12 educators. Recently, the certificate for Exceptional Needs Specialists was modified to include a certification path for educators who work with gifted populations. This session provides clear and comprehensive guidance for gifted educators who are interested in completing the National Board process through the Exceptional Needs Specialists area or any of the other 25 certification areas. Participants receive fresh-from-the-field strategies and first-hand information that guide them successfully from the initial stages of planning through submitting portfolio entries. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Gifted Coordinators Room: White River B

RESEARCH & EVALUATION MIDDLE GRADES Differentiation for Gifted Adolescents Through Disciplined Inquiry Richard M. Cash, nRich Educational Consulting, Minneapolis, MN; Diane G. Heacox, St. Catherine University, Edina, MN A highly effective differentiating technique for gifted students is through disciplined inquiry. Disciplined inquiry weds the skills, strategies, and mindset of critical reasoning to engage in complex learning experiences. The studentcentered process compels students to invest in building knowledge and acquiring new skills through the activation of their interests. The nature of disciplined inquiry requires learning to extend beyond the four walls of the classroom to the creation of authentic productions. This session shows you how to construct disciplined inquiry activities and share strategies for encouraging gifted youth to think at sophisticated levels. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: White River D

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Math and Science Education: From Sputnik to the Present and Beyond Rena F. Subotnik, American Psychological Association; Cheryll M. Adams, Ball State University, Muncie, IN; Matt C. Makel, Duke University, Durham, NC; Linda Sheffield, Northern Kentucky University, Fort Thomas, KY; Jonathan Plucker, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT Sputnik did more than launch the international space race, it also catapulted us into an educational race that continues today. Instead of being measured with a stopwatch, this race is measured through test comparisons, degrees earned, patents, and prizes. This session features a panel of experts presenting on where we are in the race, whether we are using the right measures of comparison, and how we can better train future race participants. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Parents Room: JW Grand Ballroom 7

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SPECIAL POPULATIONS

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

how staff are trained to facilitate discussion focused on nonacademic concerns related to “growing up,” how the flexible curriculum offers choice of topics, and how debriefings continue skills training.

Recruiting and Retaining Black and Hispanic Students in Gifted Education: UnderRepresentation and Equity Formulas and Strategies Donna Y. Ford, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN Black and Hispanic students are consistently and extensively under-represented in gifted education. At no time in the history of gifted education has this been reconciled. The session presents trends in gifted underrepresentation for both groups, along with achievement gap data. Factors that hinder recruitment and retention are also shared. After this overview, the session focuses on ways to calculate under-representation and an equity formula is shared that will help educators determine the minimal representation that must be targeted. The presenter ends by sharing legal and other resources (e.g., achievement gap, under-representation, Office for Civil Rights). Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: JW Grand Ballroom 9

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS Incorporating Affective Curriculum into a University-Based Summer Enrichment Program: Learning from a New Model Jean S. Peterson, Enyi Jen, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - High School, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Researchers Room: White River A

Sunday

Recorded Session

STEM Inspiring Inventive Genius in Middle and High School Students with Chain-Reaction STEAM Machines™ Shawn Jordan, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ; Nielsen Pereira, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY This hands-on workshop introduces participants to the STEAM Machines™ program, which integrates science, technology, engineering, arts, and math (STEAM) learning objectives using Rube Goldberg®-style chain reaction contraptions. Participants learn about the STEAM Machines™ curriculum and research completed on the program. Results of current design-based research on the STEAM Machines™ program with middle and high school students in summer camps for gifted students are presented. Participants have the opportunity to engage in a hands-on STEAM Machine™ design activity and discuss student pathways for participation in other engineering outreach programs, including the Rube Goldberg Machine Contest®. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Researchers Room: White River J

Small-group affective curriculum can be effective for helping gifted students develop positive social and emotional skills. Annually, thousands of gifted students participate in summer camps, experience advanced curriculum, and enjoy interacting with intellectual peers. Acknowledging the importance of attention to the whole gifted child, one university-based summer enrichment program addresses social and emotional development of gifted students with a small-group affective curriculum. The presenters explain

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9:15 AM – 10:15 AM

resources designed to promote creativity, critical thinking, collaboration, and productivity in you and your gifted students. START YOUR ENGINES!

ARTS Examination of Psychosocial Differences of Students Gifted in Visual Art and Theater Justin Neil L. Young, Kelly M. Lee, F. Richard “Rick” Olenchak, John P. Gaa, University of Houston, Houston, TX All adolescents experience identity development, but evidence suggests students who are gifted in the arts experience identity development differently, not only from general education students, but from other students gifted in different areas of art as well. Using Erikson’s Eight Stages of Psychosocial development, the presenters examined the differences of students gifted in visual art and theater as compared to students gifted in instrumental music, vocal music, and dance. Research suggests gifted visual art students and gifted theater students resolve initiative vs. guilt differently; however, these students may resolve identity vs. role confusion in a similar manner. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Researchers Room: White River C

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY 60 Tech Tools in 60 Minutes for NAGC’s 60th Brian Housand, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC Hardly a day goes by when a new technology resource does not emerge, but when we barely have time to check our email, how do we remain relevant and up to date? How do we employ selection criteria in the process and avoid the “TOOLISHNESS” of using technology simply for the sake of using technology? Traveling at a rate of A TOOL A MINUTE this fast paced and informative session will help bring you up to SPEED by categorizing and reviewing

154

National Association for Gifted Children

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: JW Grand Ballroom 8

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS Social Inequality, Gifted Education, and Frank Sinatra: Are We Avoiding A Necessary Debate? Jennifer Cross, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Lori Andersen, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS; Don Ambrose, Rider University, Yardley, PA Without strong commitment and attention to issues of social justice, education stratifies our society. Gifted education can play a role in this stratification, particularly when it ignores the powerful influence of environment in students’ preparation for school achievement. Identification practice is the omnipotent gatekeeper, excluding those who might meet criteria under different economic or cultural circumstances. In examining the trends and ethical concerns, we continue the debate over what one expert calls the Frank Sinatra Conundrum: how much of giftedness is and how much does – the “do be, do be, do…” debate and what that means for the field. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: JW Grand Ballroom 10

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Allies in Service: Theory, Research, and Practice Tracy L. Cross, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; P. Susan Jackson, Daimon Institute for the Highly Gifted, White Rock, BC; Jean S. Peterson, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Bronwyn MacFarlane, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR; Sal Mendaglio, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB

Rigor and Engagement for Gifted Learners in the Era of CCSS: Integrating Standards with Intellectual Integrity Bertie Kingore, PA Publishing, Austin, TX The Common Core and current research transform education’s focus from merely mastering content toward a major concern for rigor, relevance, depth, clarity, and understanding how instruction influences continuous learning and future lives. Explore how to: 1) implement the CCSS with pertinent expectations for high-ability students; 2) engage students in authentic intellectual work for higher achievement; 3) integrate rigor, relevance, and high-order thinking to uplift lessons and products; and 4) incorporate assessments that document deeper understanding and continuous learning with actionable data aligned to learning targets and gifted profiles. End with a flurry of 15 researchbased, CCSS-aligned strategies to implement immediately.

Psychological research supports counseling practice just as counseling practice informs psychological research, but without both, the social, emotional, and psychological needs of gifted youth would not be served as effectively. Using examples from years of professional experiences, distinguished individuals from both counseling and psychology highlight what they learned to illustrate how counseling and guidance practice has informed research and theory, and ways research into the social, emotional, and psychological characteristics of gifted children has enhanced effective practice.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Professors Room: White River H

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Researchers Room: White River G

EARLY CHILDHOOD

CREATIVITY The Creativity Crisis: What Can We Do About It? Laurie Abeel, University of Mary ashington, Fredericksburg, VA; Kyung-Hee Kim, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA

From Math Workshop to Mathematicians at Work: Adapting the Math Workshop to Engage Students in Problem Solving Janine M. Firmender, Saint Joseph’s University, Rosemont, PA

The study, “Creativity Crisis,” has attracted massive attention to the long ignored issue of creativity in education since the standardized assessment movement in the U.S. This study has been featured in Newsweek, the U.S. News & World Report, The Wall Street Journal, and other national and international newspapers, magazines, and TV shows. So, what can we do to reverse this Creativity Crisis? The session focus is on how K-12 educators can incorporate practical creativity strategies into their instruction within the realm of teaching the required standards.

Whether you already use math workshop or have never tried it before, come explore a math workshop approach that focuses on engaging primary students in investigative problem solving. Engaging students in problem-based tasks, centers, and discussion enables you to provide appropriate differentiation to meet the needs of your mathematically talented students and engage your young mathematicians in the CCSS Mathematical Practices of problem solving and reasoning. Participants explore practical ways to implement this math workshop approach with their primary students. Resources for implementation are also available.

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Researchers Room: White River I

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Gifted Coordinators Room: 103/104

60th Annual Convention

Sunday

Recorded Session

0 November 7-10, 2013 0 Indianapolis, IN 0 www.nagc.org

155


Sunday

9:15 AM – 10:15 AM (Cont.)

PARENT & COMMUNITY

GLOBAL AWARENESS Moving from Social Justice in a Global World to Social Action (double session) Dorothy A. Sisk, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX; Michele Kane, Northeastern Illinois University, Long Grove, IL Genocide, global hunger, political uprisings, the spread of disease, terrorism, and increasing numbers of fundamental ideologies lead to the question: How can social justice be expounded and implemented in a global world? Gifted children with capacity to become future leaders and global citizens need the tools of knowledge, skills, and understandings to succeed in the 21st century and beyond. Tools including scenarios, YouTube and books to explore positive global social change are shared and demonstrated to address these controversial issues with gifted students. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Researchers Room: 101/102

MIDDLE GRADES Moral Ethical Dilemmas: Ways to Study Values and Empathy for Gifted Adolescents Felicia A. Dixon, Ball State University, Selma, IN Both the NAGC Standards and the Common Core State Standards stress rigor in classrooms. Problem solving, making choices, and reasoning wisely are strategies that increase rigor and critical thinking in middle school students. Additionally, working with moral/ethical dilemmas, using a framework focusing on values and empathy in considering acceptable solutions, promotes a thinking and caring atmosphere using these critical strategies. In this session, participants examine moral and ethical dilemmas in “The Giver,” “The Hunger Games,” and the Greek myth, “Theseus and the Minotaur,” analyzing critical situations in politics, technology, and human relationships leading to wise solutions. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Consultants, Gifted Coordinators, Researchers Room: White River D

156

National Association for Gifted Children

The Rocket Science of Raising Gifted Kids -Resources for Parents and Kids Christine Turo-Shields, Kenosis Counseling Center, Greenwood, IN Gifted children can be both “delightful and draining.” They are special needs kids on the other end of the IQ spectrum. Asynchrony rules their lives, and challenges parents’ lives! Having the vocabulary of a 16 year old, the passion for world peace like a 34 year old, meltdowns and outbursts like a 2 year old . . . it’s hard to tell them to “act their age” because their age is so variable. Learn how to best deal with some of the more challenging parts of giftedness. Resources for gifted kids are plentiful. Add to your parent toolbox of resources. Audience: Counselors, Parents Room: White River J

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Sixty Years of Professional Development From Three Decades of Professional Development Network Leadership Kimberley L. Chandler, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Elizabeth A. Fogarty, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC; Connie L. Phelps , Emporia State University, Emporia, KS; Laurie J. Croft, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; Julia L. Roberts, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY A lively panel discussion led by seasoned leaders from the NAGC Professional Development Network provides perspective for 2013 by reflecting on the key trends, challenges and accomplishments during the past 60 years. What issues were on the forefront of professional development in 1953? How was professional development delivered in 1993? How has the standards movement impacted professional development in recent years? Comprised of three decades of Professional Development Network leadership, panelists are in high gear to discuss teacher training, in-service, advocacy, and standards from 1953 to 2013. This panel is revved up to respond to questions from session attendees! Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Researchers Room: White River B

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis


Poster Session

RESEARCH & EVALUATION The Great Ideas of Giftedness Matt C. Makel, Duke University, Durham, NC; Paula M. Olszewski-Kubilius, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; Sidney Moon, Purdue University; Ann Robinson, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR Eleanor Roosevelt once stated that, “Great minds discuss ideas; Average minds discuss events; Small minds discuss people.” This session features current and former editors of giftedness journals discussing the great ideas that have shaped the field. Focusing primarily on ideas grounded in empirical support, the speakers will reflect on the past and predict the future ideas of gifted education. Attendees will hear in-depth analysis of the ideas that shape how gifted youth are served now and in the future. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Classroom Teachers - Early Childhood, Classroom Teachers - Middle Grades, Classroom Teachers - High School, Gifted Coordinators, Parents, Professors, Researchers Room: JW Grand Ballroom 8

SPECIAL POPULATIONS Current Status of Twice-Exceptional Students: A Look at Legislation, Policy, and Standards Julia L. Roberts, Nielsen Pereira, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY This session focuses on the inclusion of twice-exceptional learners in state laws, policy, and standards across the U.S. Survey results from gifted and special education administrators indicate (1) few laws and policies relate to twice-exceptional students; (2) collaboration among general, gifted, and special education professionals is

NCSSSMST

Roundtable

60th Annual Convention Event

needed; (3) specific definitions and characteristics of the various combinations of gifts and disabilities are needed; and (4) stakeholders should look to states that have addressed the needs of twice-exceptional learners in legislation, policy, and standards as models for twiceexceptional initiatives. Presenters discuss implications for educators and policy makers.

Sunday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Psychologists, Researchers Room: JW Grand Ballroom 9

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS Spinning the Kaleidoscope: Lessons Learned from Fifty Years of the Governor’s School of North Carolina’s Program for Academically Gifted Secondary Students Linda P. Robinson, CONNECTIONS-NC, Raleigh, NC What lessons have been learned by those who put the first Governor’s School for the gifted in place in 1963? Which curricular approaches have worked, and which have failed? How can we change the teaching of secondary gifted learners to reflect the wisdom from these experiences? These questions are addressed with data from content analysis of curricular documents, observations in Governor’s School classrooms, interviews with key administrators and curriculum developers, and interviews with five decades of alumni of the program. The decisions made concerning the curriculum should enlighten our collective understanding of what works for secondary gifted learners. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers - High School, Consultants, Counselors, Gifted Coordinators, Professors, Researchers Room: White River A

SUNDAY CLOSING KEYNOTE | NOVEMBER 10 | 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM 6 PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE: Defining Moments in Gifted Education and What Lies Ahead for the Field Room: White River E/F

60th Annual Convention

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157


Speaker Index

A

Bonner, Fred A. ...................... 83

Carver, Deborah ................... 138

Boswell, Cecelia ..................... 66

Acar, Selcuk............................ 91

Bouchard, Val ......................... 41

Cash, Richard M. ............ 13, 56, 64, 79, 152

Adams, Cheryll M. 2, 3, 4, 33, 55, 72, 130, 152

Boucher, Cheryl ...................... 46 Bowen, Pokey......................... 18

Adelson, Jill L. ................ 45, 130

Boyd, Gina D. ............... 103, 124

Alimin, Mona A. Haji Mohammad....................... 77

Bradvica, Nick ........................ 94

Alkhudhair, Duna M. ............... 62

Brigandi, Carla B. ................. 113

Allen, Kim ............................... 18

Briggs, Christine J. ........... 51, 81

Ambrose, Don 91, 107, 150, 154

Brighton, Catherine ...... 108, 125

Andersen, Lori .............. 120, 154

Brodersen, Annalissa V. ......... 67

Anderson, Kathie M................ 80

Brody, Linda E. ..................... 109

Arroyo, Ana Lizza ................. 103

Brown, Karen .................. 64, 143

Ash, Julieann N. ..................... 74

Brown, Katherine B. ....... 82, 114

Assouline, Susan........... 3, 4, 57, 74, 96, 109, 127

Brownlee, Joan P. ........... 78, 109

Abeel, Laurie ........................ 155

Austin, Julie ............................ 50 Aymes, Gabriela L贸pez ........ 129

B

Bruce-Davis, Micah .......... 57, 94 Brulles, Dina M. ...... 64, 119, 143 Brumback, Jason ................... 92 Brunner, Marguerite M. ........... 61

Bachtel, Kate .................. 59, 142 Bailey, Denise ......................... 80 Bailin, Erica............................. 36 Baines, Lawrence A. ............ 135 Baldwin, Lois .................. 56, 106 Baskett, Amanda D. ............... 15 Beck, Diana L. ...................... 126

Bruns, Christie ...................... 117 Burgan, Wylie G. .................... 17 Burke, Edith M. ................. 31, 90 Burnette, Dawn............. 104, 114 Butler, Becky................... 30, 138 Byrd, Ian ................................. 13

Castellano, Jaime................... 35 Chamberlin, Scott A. 10, 14, 133 Champa, Martha M. . 32, 88, 111 Chancey, Jaclyn M. ........ 59, 144 Chandler, Jean ..................... 129 Chandler, Kimberley K. ... 11, 92, 107, 125, 156 Chen, Milton ............................. 6 Chodakiewicz, Shirley M. ..... 117 Chung, Jinmin .................. 45, 73 Clinkenbeard, Pamela R. ....... 81 Cluntun, Abdulrahman N...... 132 Cohen, Nancy Arey ........ 78, 141 Coil, Carolyn ............. 42, 64, 137 Coleman, April ........ 67, 108, 122 Coleman, Mary Ruth ........ 14, 35 Collins, Jessica .................... 143 Collins, Kristina..................... 110 Collins, Linda ........................ 111 Collins, William J. ................. 111 Coltrane, Sneha Shah .... 30, 130 Comallie-Caplan, Lori M. ....... 74 Conley, Jennifer .............. 30, 125

C

Corash, Dennis N. .................. 77

Caldeira, Diana............... 16, 142

Corson, Ansley Taylor ............. 90

Callahan, Carolyn M. ....... 45, 57, 61, 98, 148

Corwith, Susan ....................... 47

Beltchenko, Laura M. ............. 61

Costanzo, Philip ..................... 98

Bendelman, Karen ................. 41

Calvert, Eric .................... 37, 122

Berman, Kimberly M..... 122, 140

Candler, Margaret................... 97

Cotabish, Alicia A. ........... 2, 3, 4, 55, 66, 72

Besnoy, Kevin ......................... 69

Caplan, Marc A. ..................... 74

Betts, George .............. 9, 46, 55, 66, 89, 151

Carey, Robin J. ................... 9, 66

Behrens, Erica ........................ 97 Behrens, Wendy A.......... 66, 130

Bishop, Kyoungwon L. ........... 96 Blanchard, Richard S. .......... 130 Bond, Crystal.................... 20, 42 Bondy, Melanie L. ................... 39

158

Branigan, Melissa................. 124

Cassady, Jerrell C. ......... 33, 130

National Association for Gifted Children

Carmody, Heather ........ 110, 133 Caropreso, Edward J. ............ 65 Carr, Ronald L. ....................... 57 Carter, Carol ........................... 48 Caruthers-Cheek, Claire ....... 139

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis

Coxon, Steve .................. 39, 120 Cramond, Bonnie ... 10, 113, 151 Crawford, Melanie .................. 54 Creamer, Jonathan ........... 18, 64 Croft, Laurie J. .... 55, 63, 74, 156 Croley, Erin ........................... 105 Cross, Jennifer 28, 112, 123, 154


Cummings-Mengis, Jessi 60, 112

D

Dai, David Y. ................... 91, 144 Dailey, Deborah D. ... 55, 66, 120 Danielian, Jeffrey S............... 101 Daniels, Susan ....................... 54 Davis, Joy ............................. 109 Davis, Joy L. ... 9, 35, 43, 67, 134 DeGennaro, April.............. 63, 89 Degner, Katherine M. ............. 73 Deitz, Christine ..................... 152 Delcourt, Marcia ................... 108 Delisle, James R............ 72, 127, 136, 151 DeLoach, Thurma................... 84 Dennis, April ..................... 50, 75 DePinto, Pam ......................... 93 DeVries, Arlene R. ................ 106 Deyamport, Elvira G. .............. 48 Dickson, Ken .......................... 54 Dixon, Felicia A....... 84, 121, 156 Dobyns, Sally M. .............. 51, 81 Dodson, Richard .................. 142 Donavan, Maurine .................. 26 Douglas, Jackie.................... 109 Drapeau, Patti B. .................... 64 Dungan, Diane E. ................... 84 DuPree, Jared ...................... 146

E

Eckert, Rebecca D. ................ 80 Eden, Judy ............................. 50 Ehret, Gretchen ...................... 63 Eidson, Caroline Cunningham 30 Erickson, Lisa ......................... 75 Estelle, Denise O. ................... 76 Estes, Fred ........................... 115

Evans, Linda ........................... 96 Ewing, Vanessa .................... 137

F

Gavin, Katherine ............ 52, 100, 120, 130 Gentry, Marcia .................. 55, 68 Gibson, Kay L......................... 92

Falk, R. Frank ....................... 139

Gilman, Bobbie .............. 93, 124

Farmer, Nicole M. ............. 39, 49

Gilson, Cindy M. ............ 57, 118

Farrell, Shirley J. ................... 101

Gioe, Lisa ......................... 17, 80

Ferrell, Venicia ........................ 27

Gott, Tim ........................... 20, 65

Fetterly, James M. ................ 111

Grantham, Tarek C. ........ 35, 110

Fiedler, Ellen D........................ 49

Gray, Felicia ............................ 50

Firmender, Janine M..... 120, 155

Green, John............................ 86

Fitzsimmons, Magdalena ....... 75

Green, Nancy ........................... 8

Flick, Anne R. ................. 60, 124

Greenspon, Thomas S. .......... 65

Flores, Janet ......................... 138

Griffith, Alissa P. .................... 107

Flowers, Alonzo ...................... 83

Griffith, Julie............................ 93

Fogarty, Elizabeth A. 34, 41, 156

Groman, Jennifer L. ............... 76

Ford, Donna Y. .. 35, 60, 134, 153

Grubbs, Kathryn ..................... 16

Ford, Lori L. ............................ 35

Gubbins, E. Jean.................... 57

Foreman, Jennifer .................. 57

Gustavson, Mika .......... 112, 128

Foster, Joanne F. .................. 141

Gyles, Petra ............................ 76

Foster, Lisa H. ................ 83, 101 Franklin-Rohr, Cheryl ...... 56, 106 Frazier, Andrea D. ........... 83, 112 Frazier, Kathy C. ................... 134 Fredrickson, Jenny ....... 121, 142 Friedman, Reva C. ........... 38, 74 Friedrichs, Terence P. ...... 28, 131 Fugate, Matthew C. .............. 132 Fulwider, Doris ........................ 30

Speaker Index

Cross, Tracy L. .......... 24, 26, 89, 107, 150, 155

H

Haase, Joanna L. ................... 54 Haas, Steven C. ..................... 84 Hahn, Beth ........................... 130 Hansen, Cynthia Z................ 128 Hanson, Faye ....................... 143 Hardesty, Jacob ................... 121 Harms, Megan S. ................. 100

Furtwengler, Scott R. .... 112, 144

Haroutounian, Joanne............ 88

G

Harsin, Colleen M. ................ 121

Harshbarger, Christy L. 103, 124

Gaa, John P. ............. 26, 97, 154

Hartzell, Dana ......................... 50

Gadzikowski, Ann ................. 115

Harvey, Sue A. ...................... 129

Gaesser, Amy H. .............. 31, 90

Haston, Renee ..................... 100

Gallagher, James ................. 148

Hawke, Beth ........................... 17

Gallagher, Shelagh .... 32, 64, 95, 135

Haydon, Katie................. 29, 113

Garner, James C. ................... 88

Hazelton, Deborah C.............. 95

Hayman, Matt ......................... 84

Gatto-Walden, Patricia.... 49, 141

60th Annual Convention

0 November 7-10, 2013 0 Indianapolis, IN 0 www.nagc.org

159


Speaker Index

Heacox, Diane G. ............ 28, 64, 106, 152 Hebert, Thomas P. .......... 44, 101 Hedrick, Kelly A. ............. 43, 101 Heffley, Tonia ................ 121, 142 Heilbronner, Nancy N. ... 48, 111, 135 Heine, Carl.............................. 47 Helfer, Jason A. 40, 100, 113, 150 Heller, Monica L...................... 33

Kendrick, Tiombe B. ............... 67

Hutton, Barbara Mitchell ........ 49

Kerr, Barbara .............. 39, 49, 85

I

Kimball, Karen ...................... 139 Kimble, Krista B. ..................... 50

Ivey, Torry A. ......................... 138

Kim, Daehyun ................. 42, 103

J

Kim, Jung Bog ............... 41, 103

Jackson, Judia ..................... 114

Henfield, Malik ...................... 131

Jacks, Tina A. ....................... 117

Heo, Nanseol ................... 34, 96

Jacobs, Joan .................. 80, 129

Herbel, Angela R. ................... 75

Jaeger, Garrett........................ 10

Herman, Gail N..................... 113

Jamsran, Merve Topak ........... 12

Hernandez de Hahn, Leticia .. 50

Janecke, Nannette K. ........... 140

Hertzog, Nancy B. ............ 52, 85

Jechura, Jeanine ............ 51, 139

Hess, Julie ............................ 104

Jen, Enyi ............................... 153

Hickey, Gail....................... 32, 81

Jensen, Julie Luck .................. 35

Higginbotham, Karen ........... 114

Jeong, Taekhil......................... 38

Hill, Algerine ........................... 32

Jividen, Shawn E. ................. 140

Hoctor, Marge....................... 151 Hodges, Jaret W. .......... 104, 145

Johnsen, Susan K. .... 2, 3, 4, 57, 107

Hoffman, Lisa ......... 84, 119, 145

Johnson, Anne ....................... 81

Hoffman, Margaret W. ... 84, 119, 145

Johnson, George W. .............. 59

Holbrook, Judith A.

92, 104, 114

Jones, Kathy......................... 128

Hollingsworth, Patricia L......... 48

Jones, SaDohl G. ................... 90

Honeck, Ellen ......................... 14

Jordan, Shawn ............... 85, 153

Hooper, William ...................... 94

Juday, Becky .......................... 50

Jolly, Jennifer ............ 37, 49, 134

K

Kalbfleisch, M. Layne ............. 27

Housand, Brian 13, 122, 135, 154

Kane, Michele... 34, 49, 152, 156

Howley, Aimee ...................... 109

Kanevsky, Lannie ................... 40

Howley, Craig ....................... 109

Kaplan, Sandra ...... 95, 148, 151

Hubbard, Gail F. 44, 50, 109, 138

Kapushion, Blanche ... 9, 46, 121

Hughes, Abby ...................... 114

Kauffman, Hadan ................... 65

Hughes, Claire E. ........... 2, 3, 26

Kauffman, John ........ 29, 91, 113

Hulsey, Donna B................... 119

Kearney, Kathi ........................ 49

National Association for Gifted Children

Kieschnick, Weston ................ 79

Inman, Tracy F. ............... 79, 108

Jackson, P. Susan .......... 53, 155

Housand, Angela .... 45, 58, 108, 122

Kettler, Todd...... 2, 3, 26, 76, 127

Ingalls, Wendy L. .................. 116

Hendricks, Paige .............. 62, 95

Horn, Carol V. ....................... 100

160

Hunt-Barron, Sarah ................ 90

0 Shifting into High Gear 0 Indianapolis

Kim, Jungsun ................... 66, 73 Kim, Kyung-Hee ........... 151, 155 Kim, Mihyeon ................. 28, 123 Kim, Somyung ........................ 66 Kingore, Bertie 14, 105, 143, 155 Kirsch, Lauri ........................... 11 Kirschman, Nicholas ........ 13, 70 Knees, Elizabeth P. ................. 93 Kogan, Esther......................... 25 Kolar, Christopher............. 19, 80 Kovich, Brenda ....................... 30 Kranowitz, Jeremy .................. 21 Krell, Lacy ............................... 27 Krisel, Sally C. ............ 10, 35, 69 Ksiazak, Tracy M. ................... 90

L

Landwehr-Brown, Marjorie ..... 92 Langdon, Karen S. ............... 119 Langley, Susan Dulong ............ 8 Lansdowne, Kimberly. 36, 70, 76 Lassos, Jerry A. ...................... 84 Leader, Wendy S. ........... 56, 106 Lee, Ji Won ..................... 41, 103 Lee, Kelly M. ........... 26, 123, 154 Lee, Margaret A...................... 46 Lee, Sarah ...................... 18, 132 Leonard, Laura ....................... 79 Leppien, Jann H. .............. 55, 61 Less, Brandon ...................... 131 Lewis, Joan D. ...................... 109 Lewman, Ginger ............. 36, 150


Medina, Jacquelin .. 56, 106, 130

Oehler, Kathy .......................... 46

Little, Catherine ........ 10, 25, 118

Melton, Mallory ....................... 15

Oh, Sarah ............. 45, 67, 83, 98

Lohrfink, Kimberly J. ....... 29, 109

Mendaglio, Sal ......... 43, 58, 155

Ohtani-Chang, Christine ........ 55

Louis, Dave ............................ 83

Mennonno, Ann .................... 116

Lubart, Todd ..................... 12, 30

Merrill, Jen ............................ 128

Olenchak, F. Richard “Rick” .. 26, 97, 148, 150, 154

Lucas, Tracey A. ..................... 46

Merryman, Ashley................... 24

Luken, Diane .......................... 30

Messer, Patty A..................... 117

Lupkowski-Shoplik, Ann ....... 127

Meyo, Agnes ........................ 118

Lyons, Ruth E. ........................ 69

Miguel, Sandra San .............. 116 Miller, Marie .......................... 117

M

Miller, Nancy B...................... 139

MacFarlane, Bronwyn 9, 102, 155

Minch, Kevin ........................... 94

Mahone, Christian .. 40, 100, 150

Miro-Mejias, Ana G............... 131

Makel, Matt C. ........ 98, 152, 157

Montgomery, Diane ................ 76

Maloney, Kirsten ..................... 31

Moon, Geoffrey ...................... 56

Mammadov, Sakhavat............ 28

Moon, Sidney ....................... 157

Mann, Eric ................ 49, 85, 133 Manzone, Jessica .. 95, 146, 151

Moon, Tonya R. . 25, 45, 81, 108, 125

Marler, Katherine L. .............. 114

Morse, Mary L. ....................... 53

Marler, Marissa K.................. 114

Moss, Andrew G................... 146

Marquisse, Ede ...................... 92

Mottahedeh, Emily ........... 17, 80

Martinek, Julie ...................... 140

Moyer, Lori S........................... 30

Masters, Kelly R.............. 47, 121

Muratori, Michelle ................... 29

Mast, Julie ............................ 136

Mursky, Chrystyna V. ...... 81, 130

Mathews, Jeff ......................... 17

Myers, Debra ........................ 116

Matschiner, Ann .................... 105 Matthews, Dona J. ....... 129, 141 Matthews, Michael S. 35, 45, 107 Mayfield, Keisha Baylor ........ 118 McBee, Matthew .................... 35

Olthouse, Jill ........................... 37 Omdal, Stuart ......................... 43 O’Neill, James ...................... 143 O’Reilly, Colm ......................... 28

P

Paek, Suehyeon ............. 42, 103 Painter, Bryan ......................... 84 Parker-Peters, Megan ............. 68 Park, Hyeri ...................... 42, 103 Park, Sunhee ........................ 108 Paul, Kathy ........................... 116 Paul, Kristina Ayers....... 107, 136 Peairs, Kristen ................ 98, 123 Peebles, Jodi L. ...................... 43 Peet, Christine M. ................. 112 Pennington, Leighann ...... 40, 79

Neville, Christine S. ................ 49

Peterson, Jean S. ... 58, 153, 155

Naglieri, Jack A. ............... 14, 46 Newman, Jane L. ................... 69

McCoach, D. Betsy ... 12, 35, 56, 107

Nicpon, Megan Foley ............. 97 Nilles, Vicki ............................. 77

McCormick, Kimberly M. ...... 115

Nobbe, Christine .............. 13, 70

McCreight, Rande B. .... 104, 128

Northenscold, Kirstin ............ 102

McDonald, Julie Lenner ....... 127

Northern, Amber..................... 25

McElfresh, Rebecca ............... 59

Novak, Angela ...................... 132

McKay, Robyn .................. 70, 85

Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula M. .. 8, 24, 26, 89, 100, 148, 150, 157

Pereira, Nielsen .............. 82, 153

Nichols, Mary K. ..................... 93

McIntosh, Jason S................ 138

Olsen, Donna ......................... 76

N

McBride, Corrin ...................... 57

McGee, Christy D. ................ 142

Olmstead, Gwen .................. 102

O

Odoardi, Rebecca H. ............. 26

60th Annual Convention

Speaker Index

Lindo, Myriam......................... 96

Peters, Dan ................. 54, 58, 93 Peters, Scott J. ........... 35, 68, 81 Petrick, Theresa........................ 8 Phelps, Connie L. ............ 12, 30, 107, 156 Phillips, Chad L. ..................... 16 Picanco, Kathryn .................... 45 Pierce, Rebecca ............. 33, 130 Piirto, Jane........................ 59, 76 Plantan, Monica ............. 92, 125 Plucker, Jonathan .... 25, 35, 121, 152 Poe, Kathleen M. ...................... 8

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Speaker Index

Poland, Donna L. ................... 53

Rundquist, Cynthia ............... 135

Smith, Kenneth J. ................... 51

Prince, Eileen.......................... 72

Rutland, Glenn ..................... 139

Smith, Maggie .................. 54, 82

Pruszko, Cyril R. ......... 21, 27, 48

Ryser, Gail R. .................. 3, 4, 57

Smutny, Joan F. .................... 113

Puryear, Jeb S. ............... 60, 137 Putallaz, Martha...................... 98

Solomon, Marianne .......... 75, 91

Sandberg, Muffie .................... 62

Son, Young-Eun ................... 118

Sanguras, Laila ............ 105, 127

Sorensen, Sheri A................. 133

Rains, Melissa A. .................. 104

Sauder, Adrienne E. ............... 59

Speer, Roxanne B................... 81

Ray, Holly.............................. 139

Saxton, Laura ................. 57, 146

Spielhagen, Frances R. .. 40, 137

Rea, Chris P. ........................... 39

Scheibel, Susan R. ................. 43

Stambaugh, Tamra ......... 68, 105

Reames, Matthew ................ 133

Schelling, Natalie.................. 130

Stark, Todd ............................. 78

Reid, Lee Angela .................... 95

Schlichter-Burt, Stacey ......... 139

Stephens, Kristen R........ 55, 107

Reinert, Lindsey.................... 142

Schmidt, Jennifer A. ......... 20, 42

Stephenson, Sally .......... 76, 113

Reinhart, Jolene D. ............... 122

Schroth, Stephen T. ....... 40, 100, 113, 126, 150

Stern, Rebecca................. 17, 80

R

Reis, Sally M. .................. 13, 148 Remsen, Mary Ann ............... 142 Renzulli, Joseph S. ........... 13, 69 Restivo, Nicholas J. .............. 133 Reuben, Elin ........................... 65 Reynolds, Elaine................... 134 Ricci, Mary Cay ...... 3, 4, 72, 126 Richards, Susannah ..... 12, 51, 63 Rich, Scott ............................ 113 Rimm, Sylvia ............... 12, 36, 47 Rinn, Anne N. ....................... 136 Rivera, Maria-Trevino ............ 136 Roberts, Julia L. ...... 79, 89, 108, 156, 157 Robertson, Eric............... 59, 142 Robertson, Kimberley F. ......... 68

Schultz, Kelly ........................ 140 Schultz, Robert A. .......... 72, 123 Schuth, David ......................... 38 Scott, Michelle F. Trotman ...... 60 Seedorf, Stephen ................. 110 Seney, Robert (Bob) W. .. 62, 127 Shade, Patti .................... 59, 141 Shade, Richard A. .......... 59, 141 Shaff, Thomas ........................ 73 Shaunessy-Dedrick, Elizabeth 2, 3, 26, 96 Sheets, Cindy ................. 27, 128 Sheffield, Linda....... 10, 110, 152 Sheffield, Linda Jensen .......... 14 Shepherd, Dan ..................... 112

Robins, Jennifer ..................... 49

Shore, Bruce M. ..................... 76

Robinson, Ann ..... 12, 35, 37, 66, 81, 148, 157

Shorty, Luke C. ..................... 121 Shrock, Christopher ............... 19

Robinson, Linda P. ................ 157

Shumow, Lee .......................... 20

Roege, Gayle ......................... 31

Siegle, Del ........ 12, 58, 107, 148

Rosenberg, Jennifer ............. 118

Silverman, Linda Kreger ........ 49, 124, 139, 151

Rosen, Rhoda ...................... 100 Rubenstein, Lisa Davia .. 38, 107 Ruepert, Dana ........................ 95 Ruf, Deborah L. ...................... 61

162

S

Snyder, Kate E. ..................... 108

National Association for Gifted Children

Sisk, Dorothy A. 34, 71, 152, 156 Sklar, Marydee ................ 62, 128 Skyba, Olha .................... 38, 122

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Stevens, Anne H................... 134 Stewart, Deb ......................... 124 Stokes, Rachel F. .................... 88 Strassell, Lee .......................... 17 Strolger, Louis-Gregory .......... 20 Stults, Pamela ........................ 50 Subotnik, Rena F. ..... 24, 26, 152 Sullivan, Missy ........................ 29 Sumners, Sarah...................... 10 Swain, Michelle ...................... 11 Szymanski, Antonia .......... 55, 68

T

Tetzloff, Michael .................... 140 Thomas, Jay ........................... 32 Thomerson, Gem C........ 52, 116 Thom, Melissa ........................ 95 Thompson, Michael C. ........... 92 Thompson, Tedra L. ............... 67 Thurlow, Katharine .................. 33 Tieso, Carol L. .......... 55, 95, 113 Tofel-Grehl, Colby ................... 57 Tolan, Stephanie S.... 49, 76, 106 Trail, Beverly A. ................. 9, 131 Treat, Alena R. ...................... 119


White, James B. ................... 125

Tudor, Park ............................ 110

Whitney, Carol S. .................... 74

Turo-Shields, Christine ......... 156

Whittenburg, Becky .............. 119

Tuthill, Laura A. ..................... 137

Widhalm, Patrick .................. 121 Wiggins, Richard C. ............... 18

V

Wilkins-McCorey, Dornswalo . 27

Valadez, Maria de los Dolores ..... 129 Valencic, Shari ........................ 30 Vanderploeg, Merri Kae ......... 44 VanGemert, Lisa ........... 123, 126 Vangermeersch, Emily ........... 93 VanTassel-Baska, Joyce 2, 3, 26, 37, 105, 148, 150 Vantricht, Lineke ..................... 31 Victoria.................................... 31 Vieillard, Kate........................ 132 Villanueva, Merzili ....... 31, 57, 94 Vonesh, Rebecca ................... 77 Vrotny, Vincent .................. 36, 48 Vuyk, M. Alexandra........... 39, 49

W

Wilkins, Paula ....................... 107 Williams, Anna ........................ 95 Williams, Carol Ann ................ 51 Williams, David ..................... 109

Speaker Index

Trinter, Christine P.................. 108

Willis, John ............................. 17 Wilson, Hope E. ............... 37, 78 Wininger, Steven R. .............. 108 Wismer, Vikki .......................... 16 Wood, Betty K. ....... 88, 102, 111 Wood, Larry L. ........................ 88 Wood, Patti ..................... 78, 115 Woo, Rhett .............................. 16 Worrell, Frank C. ... 24, 26, 37, 72 Wu, Echo H. ................... 80, 142 Wu, Jiaxi ............................... 136 Wuttig, Samantha ................... 89

Wackerly, Amy J. .................. 116

Wynn, Sherri L. ....................... 77

Waite, Susan ........................ 102

Y

Walker, Cheryl L...................... 76 Walker, Dan ............................ 44 Walker, Robert W. ................... 76 Wall, Marcia L. ........................ 10 Washington, Anthony ............. 39 Watkins, S. Craig .................... 24 Webb, James T. ...... 90, 106, 151 Weber, Christine L. ................. 66 Weimholt, Katrina ............. 28, 52 Welker, Jessica ..................... 132

Yedinak, MaryAnn................... 92 Yi, Soohyun ...................... 45, 73 Youngers, Judith S. ........ 29, 114 Young, Justin Neil L. 26, 70, 112, 154

Z

Zaleta, Kristy L.............. 111, 135 Zazove, Terri ........................... 51

Wells, April ............................ 103 Welte, Leah........................... 151 Westberg, Karen L. ................ 61 Wetter, Anella D. ..................... 63 Whitaker, Gyimah I. ................ 55

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Floor Plans

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Elevators

Exhibitor Workshops Walkway to Elevators

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Service Area

Restrooms

Restrooms

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GRIFFIN HALL

Service

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Elevators

Restrooms

Restrooms

209

205

204

203

202

Prefunction

201

Starbucks Registration/O ce

Bridge to Prefunction

208

164

Elevators

207

206

National Association for Gifted Children

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Convention Center


302 301 303 Service Area

307

308

304

305

Floor Plans

300

306

Elevators

NAGC Registration

Exhibitor Hall

309

Elevators

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310

Restrooms

Restrooms

1

NAGC Annual 9 Fund Booth

JW GRAND BALLROOM

2 311 312

8

6

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Registration

3 Elevators

7

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314 Prefunction Prefunction 313

Elevators Registration / O ce

Convention Evaluation Your opinion is important to us! The NAGC Annual Convention Evaluation will be e-mailed to all registrants at the end of the Convention. We listen to your feedback and comments, and hope you’ll join us in Baltimore in 2014 to see how we did!

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Floor Plans NAGC

166

National Association for Gifted Children

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NAGC Appreciates the Support of these 60th Annual Convention Sponsors

60th Annual Convention

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Exhibitor Lisitings as of 9.30.2013

Exhibitor Listing

American Mensa

Borenson and Associates

1229 Corporate Drive Arlington, TX 76006 817-607-0060 marketingmanager@americanmensa.org www.americanmensa.org Booth 310

P.O Box 3328 Allentown, PA 18106 http://www.borenson.com info@borenson.com Booth 200

Bright Ideas Catalog / A.W. Peller & Assoc. Ball State Center for Gifted Studies

PO Box 377 Franklin Lakes, NJ 7417 http://www.brightideascatalog.com awpeller@optonline.net Booth 400

Ball State University Muncie, IN 47306 765-285-5390 www.bsu.edu Booth 421

Bureau Talent Baltimore 2014 Booth 622

G Belin-Blank Center 600 Blank Honors Center The University of Iowa Iowa City, IA 52242 (800) 336-6463 http://www.education.uiowa.edu/belinblank belinblank@uiowa.edu https://www.facebook.com/BelinBlank https://twitter.com/belinblank Booth *414

Bizworld Foundation 444 DeHaro Street #203 San Francisco, CA 94107 http://www.bizworld.org info@bizworld.com Booth 309

P.O. Box 1014 Corvallis, MT 59828 http://www.bureautalent.com info@bureautalent.com Booth 217

Camp Invention Invent Now / Camp Invention 3701 Highland Park NW North Canton, OH 44720 campinvention@invent.org http://www.campinvention.org campatmyschool@invent.org http://www.facebook.com/campinvention http://www.twitter.com/campinvention Booth 611

Center for Bright Kids Regional Talent Development Center

Blue Orange Games 1000 Illinois Street San Fransisco, CA 94107 (415) 252-0372 http://www.blueorangegames.com info@blueorangegames.com https://www.facebook.com/BlueOrangeGamesUSA http://www.linkedin.com/company/ blue-orange-games https://twitter.com/BlueOrangeGames Booth 522

7705 Wadsworth Blvd Unit F #300 Arvada, CO 80003 (303) 428-2634 http://www.centerforbrightkids.org cbk@centerforbrightkids.org https://www.facebook.com/CenterForBrightKids Booth 417

G NAGC thanks these 2013 Convention Sponsors for their support.

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National Association for Gifted Children

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1906 College Heights Boulevard Bowling Green, KY 42101 http://www.wku.edu/gifted julia.roberts@wku.edu Booth 602

Culver Academies 1300 Academy Rd, #157 Culver, IN 46511 http://www.culver.org admissions@culver.org Booth 423

DataWerks Limited G Center for Talent Development Northwestern University

6015 S. Sunbury Road Suite 2 Westerville, OH 43081 http://www.datawerkslimited.com Sales@datawerkslimited.com Booth 318

617 Dartmouth Place Evanston, IL 60208 http://www.ctd.northwestern.edu ctd@northwestern.edu Booth *415

Exhibitor Listing

Center for Gifted Studies, Western Kentucky University

Davidson Institute for Talent Development 9665 Gateway Drive Suite B Reno, NV 89521 775-852-3483 ext.424 http://www.davidsongifted.org jdudley@davidsongifted.org http://https://www.facebook.com/pages/Davidson-Institutefor-Talent-Development/107118226318 http://twitter.com/DavidsonGifted Booth 406

G College of William and Mary, Center for Gifted Education P.O. Box 8795 Williamsburg, VA 23187 http://www.cfge.wm.edu cfge@wm.edu Booth *507

Compass Learning DGP Publishing

203 Colorado Street Austin, TX 78701 512-481-3494 www.compasslearning.com Booth 617

630 Becky Road Blairsville, GA 30512 www.dgppublishing.com dburnette@dgppublishing.com Booth 115

Concordia Language Villages 901 8th Street South Moorhead, MN 56562 http://www.concordialanguagevillages.org clv@cord.edu Booth 518

Connections Academy 1001 Fleet Street 5th Floor Baltimore, MD 21202 www.connectionsacademy.com NMagiera@connectionseducation.com Booth 111

60th Annual Convention

Dinah-Might Adventures PO Box 690328 San Antonio, TX 78269 (800) 993-4624 http://www.dinah.com dma@dinah.com http://https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dinah-ZikeAcademy/321967520393 Booth 210

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Exhibitor Lisitings as of 9.30.2013

Exhibitor Listing

Disney Youth Programs

Executive Functioning Success

PO Box 10,111 Lake Buena Vista, FL 32830 www.disneyyouth.com dahlia.m.sanchez@disney.com Booth 320

Executive Functioning Success 6312 S.W. Capitol Hwy. Box 205 Portland, OR 97239 (503) 473-7762 http://www.executivefunctioningsuccess.com md@efsuccess.info http://https://www.facebook.com/ ExecutiveFunctioningSuccess Booth 520

Drake Universtiy 3206 University Ave. Des Moines, IA 50311 http://www.drake.edu/soe/graduate/endorsement sally.beisser@drake.edu Booth 221

G Duke University Talent Idenficiation Program Duke TIP 1121 W. Main St. Durham, NC 27701 (919) 668-9100 http://www.tip.duke.edu duketip@tip.duke.edu http://www.facebook.com/duketip http://www.twitter.com/duketip Booth *416

Florida Institute of Technology 150 West University Boulevard Melbourne, FL 32901 321-674-7544 www.fit.edu/continuing-ed Booth 316

Fox Imaging P.O. Box 541 Tilton, NH 3276 http://www.foximaging.com dave@foximaging.com Booth 100

EAI Education

Free Spirit Publishing

118 Bauer Drive, PO Box 7046 Oakland, NJ 7436 http://www.eaieducation.com btuzzeo@eaiusa.com Booth 211

217 Fifth Ave. N., Ste. 200 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (800) 735-7323 http://www.freespirit.com help4kids@freespirit.com http://www.facebook.com/freespiritpublishing http://www.linkedin.com/company/free-spirit-publishing http://twitter.com/FreeSpiritBooks Booth 407

East Baton Rouge Parish School System 1050 South Foster Drive Baton Rouge, LA 70806 www.ebrschools.org recruiting@ebrschools.org Booth 218

Engine-Uity, Ltd. PO Box 9610 Phoenix, AZ 85068 (800) 877-8718 http://www.engine-uity.com engine-uityltd@qwestoffice.net http://facebook.com/engine-uity Booth 301

Frog Publications 11820 Uradco Place Suite 105 San Antonio, FL 33576 (800) 777-3764 http://www.frog.com/ conferences@frog.com http://www.facebook.com/pages/FrogPublications/120811297947759 Booth 307

G NAGC thanks these 2013 Convention Sponsors for their support.

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National Association for Gifted Children

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INI, LLC

2015 Grant Place Melbourne, FL 32901 http://www.fpspi.org mail@fpspi.org Booth 410

7112 Cypress Hill Dr Gaithersburg, MD 20879 (800) 278-7279 http://www.dabblegame.com jvohra@inillc.com http://www.facebook.com/dabblegame?bookmark_t=page http://twitter.com/dabblegame Booth 219

Great Books Foundation 35 East Wacker Drive Suite 400 Chicago, IL 60601 http://www.greatbooks.org henri.perlman@greatbooks.org Booth 311

Institute for Development of Gifted Education / Ricks Center for Gifted Children 1999 E. Evans Ave., Suite 199 Denver, CO 80210 http://www.du.edu/idge ehoneck@du.edu Booth 319

Great Potential Press 1325 N. Wilmot Rd, #300 Tucson, AZ 85712 http://www.greatpotentialpress.com info@greatpotentialpress.com Booth 503

Exhibitor Listing

Future Problem Solving Program International

Interact 10200 Jefferson Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 http://www.interact-simulations.com access@socialstudies.com Booth 409

Handwriting Without Tears 8001 MacArthur Blvd. Cabin John, MD 20818 http://www.hwtears.com ali.bentolila@hwtears.com Booth 519

International Connections 1001 Fleet Street 5th Floor Baltimore, MD 21202 443-529-1281 www.internationalconnectionsacademy.com Booth 109

Hickory Grove Press 3151 Treeco Lane Bellevue, IA 52031 http://www.challengemath.com eszaccaro@aol.com Booth 514

Jack Kent Cooke Foundation

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt-Riverside 3800 Golf Rd Ste 200 Rolling Meadows, IL 60008 (800) 323-9540 http://www.hmhco.com RPC_Customer_Service@hmhpub.com http://https://www.facebook.com/HMHeducation http://https://twitter.com/hmheducation Booth 615

60th Annual Convention

617 Dartmouth Evanston, IL 60208 http://www.jkcf.org/ tammie-stewart@northwestern.edu Booth 419

Jodie Mahony Center for Gifted Education, UALR 2801 S. University Ave,SUA Rm 101 Little Rock, AR 72204 http://www.ualr.edu/gifted pmedison@ualr.edu Booth 308

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Exhibitor Lisitings as of 9.30.2013

Exhibitor Listing

G Johns Hopkins University Center for Talented Youth (CTY) 5801 Smith Ave., McAuley Hall Suite 400 Baltimore, MD 21209 http://www.cty.jhu.edu ctyinfo@jhu.edu Booth 418

LEGO Education 915 E Jefferson Pittsburg, KS 66762 http://www.legoeducation.us LEGOeducation@LEGOeducation.us Booth 314

Marie’s Words, Inc. Juice Plus and Tower Garden 9 Cambridge Court Buffalo Gove, IL 60089 vabouch@aol.com Booth 603

K12 Inc. 2300 Corporate Park Drive Herndon, VA 20171 (877) 895-1754 http://www.K12.com jewaterman@k12.com http://https://www.facebook.com/K12inc http://https://twitter.com/k12learn Booth 206

Kendall Hunt Publishing Company 4050 Westmark Drive Dubuque, IA 52002 http://www.kendallhunt.com/prek12 lsteines@kendallhunt.com Booth 508

Kiwi Kids Catalog PO Box 310251 Miami, FL 33231 http://www.parkwestpubs.com mail@parkwestpubs.com Booth 606

3602 Ames Place Carlsbad, CA 92010 Booth 103

Math Olympiads 2154 Bellmore Ave Bellmore, NY 11710 http://www.moems.org office@moems.org Booth 609

Mind Vine Press, Publisher of Envision 70727 Copper Blvd. Lawton, MI 49065 (269) 978-7227 http://www.mindvinepress.com melanie@mindvinepress.com http://https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mind-VinePress/195331250497126 Booth 204

Mirman School 16180 Mulholland Dr. Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 476-2868 http://www.mirman.org jbalaban@mirman.org Booth 317

Nathan Levy Books LLC Laurel Springs School 302 West El Paseo Road Ojai, CA 93023 http://www.laurelsprings.com academy@laurelsprings.com Booth 102

18 Moorland Blvd. Monroe Twp, NJ 8831 http://www.storieswithholes.com/nalebo1.html nlevy103@comcast.net Booth 404

G NAGC thanks these 2013 Convention Sponsors for their support.

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National Association for Gifted Children

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Pieces of Learning

1331 H Street, NW, Suite 1001 Washington, DC 20005 (202) 785-4268 http://www.nagc.org nagc@nagc.org Booth 321

1990 Market Rd Marion, IL 62959 http://www.piecesoflearning.com info@piecesoflearning.com Booth 605

Prufrock Press, Inc. National Beta Club 151 Beta Club Way Spartanburg, SC 29306 (800) 845-8281 http://www.betaclub.org smorris@betaclub.org http://www.facebook.com/nationalbetaclub http://twitter.com/betaclub Booth 608

P.O. Box 8813 Waco, TX 76714 (800) 998-2208 http://www.prufrock.com gbates@prufrock.com http://www.facebook.com/prufrockpress http://www.twitter.com/prufrockpress Booth 401

Exhibitor Listing

NAGC Bookstore

G Purdue Univesity / GERI Nexus Academy of Indianapolis 6101 N. Keystone Ave Suite 302 Indianapolis, IN 46220 http://www.nexusacademyschool.com naindianapolis@connectionseducation.com Booth 107

100 N. University St. BRNG 5108A West Lafayette, IN 47907 http://www.purdue.edu/geri sfolyer@purdue.edu Booth *101

Red Hen / Wholemovement PA Publishing

O-78 Leonard St NW Grand Rapids, MI 49534 (888) 573-3436 http://www.redhentoys.com scott@redhenllc.com http://facebook.com/wholemovement http://@redhentoys Booth 216

P.O. Box 28056 Austin, TX 78727 (866) 335-1460 http://www.kingore.com info@kingore.com Booth 207

Pearson 19500 Bulverde Rd San Antonio, TX 78259 http://www.pearsonassessments.com debra.guzman@pearson.com Booth 501

Royal Fireworks Publishing Co., Inc. P.O. Box 399 Unionville, NY 10988 http://www.rfwp.com mail@rfwp.com Booth 201

G Scholastic Testing Service, Inc. 480 Meyer Rd Bensenville, IL 60106 (800) 642-6787 http://www.ststesting.com sts@ststesting.com http://www.Scholastic Testing Service, Inc. http://www.@ststesting Booth 408

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Exhibitor Listing

SENG

G Summer Institute for the Gifted

P.O. Box 488 Poughquag, NY 12570 http://www.sengifted.org office@sengifted.org Booth 509

1 High Ridge Park Stamford, CT 6905 (203) 399-5101 http://www.giftedstudy.org kvieillard@giftedstudy.org http://www.facebook.com/SummerInstituteForTheGifted http://www.linkedin.com/summerinstituteforthegifted http://twitter.com/SIGifted Booth 601

Set Enterprises, Inc. 16537 E. Laser Drive Suite 10 Fountain Hills, AZ 85268 (800) 351-7765 http://www.setgame.com setgame@setgames.com http://https://www.facebook.com/Set.Enterprises http://https://twitter.com/set_game Booth 305

Sycamore School 1750 West 64th Street Indianapolis, IN 46260 317-202-2510 www.sycamoreschool.org Booth 223

Shattuck-St. Mary’s School 1000 Shumway Avenue P.O. Box 218 Fairbault, MN 55021 http://www.s-sm.org Kaylee.Reese@s-sm.org Booth 716

The Truman Institute at Truman State University

G SimplyFun

Tin Man Press

11245 SE 6th Street Suite 110 Bellevue, WA 98004 (877) 557-7767 http://www.simplyfun.com Homeoffice@simplyfun.com https://www.facebook.com/simplyfun https://twitter.com/simplyfun/ Booth *517

PO Box 11409 Eugene, OR 97440 http://www.tinmanpress.com tinman@tinmanpress.com Booth 511

Space Camp & Aviation Challenge 1 Tranquility Base Huntsville, AL 35805 http://www.spacecamp.com tomw@SPACECAMP.COM Booth 208

Stanford University EPGY 220 Panama St Stanford, CA 94305 (650) 721-9481 http://epgy.stanford.edu Jshogan@stanford.edu Booth 315

100 E. Normal Avenue Kirksville, MO 53501 http://institute.truman.edu kminch@truman.edu Booth 623

University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, College of Education 1420 Austin Bluffs Pkwy Colorado Springs, CO 80918 http://www.uccs.edu/coe/extstuandonline/online/ onlineprograms/onlinecurrmagt.html education@uccs.edu Booth 521

University of Connecticut Neag Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development 2131 Hillside Road, Unit 3007 Storrs, CT 0 http://www.gifted.uconn.edu judith.mathews@uconn.edu Booth 515

G NAGC thanks these 2013 Convention Sponsors for their support.

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National Association for Gifted Children

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WordMasters, LLC

303 Townsend Columbia, MO 65211 jacobsonj@missouri.edu Booth 516

5702 N. Pennsylvania St Indianapolis, IN 46220 (888) 385-5656 http://www.wordmasterschallenge.com lisa.kennedy@wordmasterschallenge.com http://https://www.facebook.com/wordmasterschallenge http://www.linkedin.com/pub/lisa-kennedy/52/9a8/972/ http://https://twitter.com/wordmasterslisa Booth 105

Usborne Books & More 607 Tower View Drive Taylor Mill, KY 41015 (800) 393-8224 http://www.usborneusa.com nawartman@aol.com http://facebook.com/UsborneUSA Booth 202

World Council for Gifted and Talented Children WKU, Ransdell Hall Room 2007 1906 College Heights Blvd #11030 Bowling Green, KY 42101 http://www.world-gifted.org tracy.harkins@wku.edu Booth 604

Venture Pearls & Sculpture 1919 2nd Street Winthrop Harbor, IL 60096 venturepearls@gmail.com Booth 214

Exhibitor Listing

University of Missouri Online Gifted Programs

YMIR, Inc/The Ultimate Puzzle 46 E. Peninsula Center #351 Rolling Hills Estates, CA 90274 (310) 567-1875 http://www.theultimatepuzzle.com ymirinc@aol.com Booth 209

Wisconsin Center 225 N Mills Street, Suite 264 Madison, WI 53706 608-890-3093 www.wcaty.wisc.edu Booth 616

Thanks for joining us in Indianapolis Mark Your Calendar for these Upcoming NAGC Conventions

2014

2015

61st Annual NAGC Convention & Exhibition Baltimore, Maryland November 13-16, 2014

62nd Annual NAGC Convention & Exhibition Phoenix, Arizona November 12-15, 2015

The session proposal submission process begins in December. Registration details are available in late March.

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Exhibitor Workshops

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8

Virtual Specialty Academies with Special Opportunities Muffie Sandberg for Connections Academy

9:30 AM – 10:30 AM Empowering Gifted Underachievers Gayle Roege, Lineke Vantricht for Bureau Talent Participants experience a hands-on activity that helps gifted underachievers understand personal learning needs, formulate a plan to acquire the needed skills, and evaluate individual progress. Participants are able to apply the knowledge and skills learned in the session immediately, to empower and enable students to become self-directed.

Gifted Students are thriving and engaged in Connections Academy virtual schools with communities for: students who excels in theatre, dance, fine arts, photography, videography, and creative writing; students who interact while learning cutting edge science and technology; and gifted athletes who enjoy flexible schedules as they travel, train, and compete. Room: Griffin Hall

Room: Griffin Hall Best Practices in Abilities Testing for Gifted and Talented Education Victoris Driver for Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Please join HMH – Riverside, publisher of the Cognitive Abilities Test™, for this interactive workshop. We will discuss trends in gifted education, the importance of assessing students across verbal, non-verbal, and quantitative, and of using multimeasure reporting to ensure proper identification of gifted & talented students.

Seeing My Time: Teaching the Gifted to Get Things Done Marydee Sklar for Executive Functioning Success Seeing My time - Much More Than Time Management ™ is a unique structured course to teach executive functioning skills. The program is based on a workbook that is supported by an award-winning instructor’s manual and online or onsite training. Currently used in schools and private practices - individuals and groups. Room: Griffin Hall

Room: Griffin Hall

3:45 PM – 4:45 PM 10:45 AM – 11:45 AM Fueling Our Children: The Link Between Diet and Behavior Val Bouchard for Juice Plus and Tower Garden Dr. Edward M. Hallowell said, “The most potent medication we have is also the most dangerous and abused drug. It is called food.” Learn how to make your own medicine for health, vitality, and optimal learning and to teach others to do the same.

Propel Students to Reach Beyond the Summit with Technology: How to Create a 21st Century Gifted Classroom Weston Kieschnick, Laura Leonard for Laurel Springs Today’s gifted and talented students have acquired a level of digital literacy that allows them to expand their capabilities at a rapid pace. In this session, we experience digital strategies to engage these students as we seek to capitalize on their expertise and nurture achievement at the highest levels.

Room: Griffin Hall Room: Griffin Hall

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Jacobs Ladder: An Advanced Reading Skills Framework for Grades K-9 Tamra Stambaugh and Joyce VanTassel-Baska for Prufrock Press

Wish your data was centralized and you could manage your gifted program from anywhere while saving time and improving communication in a safe and secure environment? Join us as we discuss how you can go to the cloud, centralizing your gifted data and streamlining your gifted program administration.

The Jacob’s Ladder Reading Comprehension Program is an evidence-supported framework designed to help students grades K-9 to develop critical thinking and reading comprehension, aligned to the analysis of literature. Time is allotted for guided modeling opportunities.

Room: Griffin Hall

Room: Griffin Hall

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM

8:00 AM-9:00 AM

Exhibitor Workshops

10:45 AM – 11:45 AM

Administer Your Gifted Program from the Cloud Todd Stark for DataWerks

How to Develop Mensa Mind: 15 Keys to Unlock Brain Power Lisa VanGemert for American Mensa

Expanding the Roots of Knowledge Nick Bradvica for Marie’s Words

Mensa knows minds, and we can help you boost your brain power with 15 tips & techniques that work for everyone. Come and learn how you and your students can optimize your minds.

Picture Words by Marie’s Words is the revolutionary English language and vocabulary learning tool developed in 2011 by Marie and Nick Bradvica. These 550 multi-sensory mnemonic devices amalgamate college-level vocabulary and language skills with fun individual and group activities. Although originally created for the SAT®, Picture Words has been endorsed for all ages and abilities and has helped thousands of students excel both inside and outside the classroom. Visit the Marie’s Words booth to see why Picture Words is sweeping the United States with its revolutionary mnemonics and games.

Room: Griffin Hall Mindsets in the Classroom Mary Cay Ricci, Baltimore County Public Schools, Baltimore, MD for Prufrock Press

Room: Griffin Hall The Exceptional Child and Zombies: Promoting Critical Thinking Through Fictional Crisis Kevin Minch for the Truman Institute

Should we call students “smart”? How does the use of the term affect a child’s mindset about performance and effort? Participants learn ways to begin building and maintaining a Growth Mindset school culture that encourages hard work and effort and the importance of responsive instruction in your school/district. Room: Griffin Hall

Creative problem solving requires a willingness to engage in intellectual “risk taking.” This session explores efforts at Truman State University to use a fictitious zombie apocalypse to engage students in critical thinking about extreme “what if” scenarios. Techniques for using pop culture phenomena to engage in serious questioning are explored. Room: Griffin Hall

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EXPERIENCES TO ENGAGE, ENRICH AND EXCITE. Disney Youth Education Series programs take place in the information-rich setting of the Disney Parks in Florida and California to give students – and their teachers – a hands-on, educational adventure. This collection of guided field studies, available in Science, Arts & Humanities and Leadership & Careers, is accredited, standards-based and specifically designed to reinforce your classroom lessons. Practice teamwork, critical thinking and problem-solving skills as your group participates in one-of-a-kind moments that use the magic of Disney to make learning even more impactful.

Student groups receive specially priced ticket packages which include a guided field study and theme park admission. For information on Disney Youth Education Series please visit us at Booth 320, or online at www.DisneyYES.com Like us on Facebook:

Facebook.com/DisneyEducation Like us on Facebook: Facebook.com/DisneyEducation The National Association for Gifted Children endorses Disney Youth Education Series.

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hmhco.com • 800.323.9540

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt–Riverside is committed to providing you with superior assessments, world-class customer service, and the highest quality professional development. We know that teaching and testing don’t happen in isolation—they’re part of the larger cycle of learning. Incorporate the best of assessment (Riverside) with the outstanding programs, platforms, and services provided by HMH to support your enrichment programming. Visit us at the NAGC Conference to learn more about the latest enhancements to CogAT®, the abilities test educators choose most often, as well as best practices in abilities testing for Gifted and Talented Education for your ELL students.

Stop by Booth #615 to see what’s new! Plus, get information on interactive workshops with Dr. David F. Lohman and HMH–Riverside staff. You can also visit us on the web at hmhco.com

Riverside®, CogAT®, and Iowa Assessments™ are trademarks or registered trademarks of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. © Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved. 09/13 MS82421

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Visit us in booth 508! Choose award-winning curriculum that meets the needs of your high-ability learners MATH INNOVATIONS

PROJECT M2

Developed by internationally-renowned researchers in the field of gifted education, Kendall Hunt’s programs can be used to challenge and motivate both gifted and toptier students. Recognized with NAGC’s Curriculum Studies Award and supported with high-quality professional development, our curriculum prepares both you and your students for advanced learning and establishes a deeper understanding of each discipline area.

Now with

Stop by to let us show you how you and your students can benefit from these outstanding programs!

interactive activities!

PROJECT M3

SOCIAL STUDIES

SCIENCE

LANGUAGE ARTS

1-800-542-6657 | kendallhunt.com/prek12

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BOOTH

GIFTED PROGRAM ADMINISTRATORS

HOW WOULD YOU LIKE AN EXTRA PAIR OF HANDS — OR FOUR?

318

See a preview during our exhibitor workshop at 3:45 on Friday. Your personal assistant for Gifted planning, tracking and communication

Visit myassist360.com for more information

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Free Webinar Contact us at sales@datawerkslimited.com or phone 877.776.1188

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Opportunity. For Life. Looking for lifelong opportunities for your gifted and talented students? The Duke University Talent Identification Program, a nonprofit organization dedicated to serving academically talented youth, will work with you to help identify, recognize, and engage your school’s gifted learners. Supplement your opportunities for gifted elementary to high school students through TIP’s nationally recognized programs: • Talent searches to identify, recognize, and support gifted youth • Dynamic educational experiences on the Duke University campus, throughout the United States, and abroad • Independent and distance learning opportunities • Educational resources for parents and educators

To learn more, visit booth 416, go to www.tip.duke.edu, or call (919) 668-9100.

CONNECTING BRIGHT MINDS; NURTURING INTELLECTUAL AND PERSONAL GROWTH

IEA is an independent, national non-profit that matches gifted children with customized educational programs designed to serve their complex intellectual, social, emotional, spiritual, and physical needs.

“Most programs for the brightest kids and young adults serve the unusual needs of their minds. IEA knows they are all more than their minds and serves the needs of the whole self.” - Stephanie Tolan, Writer IEA Senior Fellow

Academy

Caroline D. Bradley Scholarship

Apprenticeship Program

Yunasa Summer Camps for the Gifted

Year-round fun and challenging enrichment classes in Pasadena, CA, focusing on exploration and the application of knowledge in a wide variety of subjects Ages: K–8th graders

A summer residential program for gifted high school students offering hands-on experience working with mentors in fields such as science, medicine, law, and industrial design Ages: Current 9th–11th graders

Awards highly gifted students nationwide with a four-year scholarship to a high school that fits each Scholar’s individual intellectual and personal needs Ages: Current 7th graders

All-inclusive residential summer camps in Michigan and Colorado featuring lake activities, ropes courses, team building, and workshops led by nationally recognized experts in the field of gifted education Ages: 10-14 year-olds

Visit our website for applications and more information about these opportunities.

www.educationaladvancement.org 569 SOUTH MARENGO AVENUE, PASADENA, CA 91101 s 626-403-8900 s IEAGIFTED@EDUCATIONALADVANCEMENT.ORG

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Fundamentals of Gifted Education

A Century of Contributions to Gifted Education

Considering Multiple Perspectives

Illuminating Lives

Edited by Carolyn M. Callahan and Holly L. Hertberg-Davis

Edited by Ann Robinson and Jennifer Jolly

Published July 2012 504 pages Pb: 978-0-415-88151-7

Forthcoming October 2013 336 pages Pb: 978-0-415-89881-2

The mission of this book is to provide a coherent framework that instructors and service providers can use in planning effective programs, providing appropriate counseling services, and evaluating programs for the gifted.

A Century of Contributions to Gifted Education traces the conceptual history of the field of gifted education. Bookended by Sir Francis Galton’s Hereditary Genius published in 1869, and Sidney Marland’s report to the United States Congress in 1972, each chapter represents the life and work of a key figure in the development of the field.

To place an order visit www.routledge.com/education or call 1 (800) 634-7064.

www.routledge.com/education

Looking for a new way to help your students grow their vocabulary and verbal reasoning?

WordMasters Challenge

The ™ is a vocabulary competition based on completing analogies. •

Meets are held in your school three times a year.

Download word lists for your team's grade and difficulty level and get to work! A few weeks later, download the analogy tests.

Report your top ten scores to compete with schools throughout the country.

We Love WordMasters!

Visit our website or call for more information or to enroll your team. www.wordmasterschallenge.com

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Email: info@wordmasterschallege.com


remove black border

Master of Science in

Special Education 100% online — No on-campus visit required. Low, in-state tuition rates wherever you live. Accredited by the NCATE. Available in 9 specializations: • Autistic Spectrum Disorders – also available as a 12-credit online graduate certificate • Developmental / Cognitive Disabilities • Early Childhood Special Education • Emotional Disturbance New! • • Gifted / Talented Learning Disabilities • Special Education Strategist • Visual Impairment • General Special Education

Learn more today! educationonline.UND.edu

1.800.CALL.UND

GIFTED & TALENTED ACADEMY Our caring teachers and staff understand the unique abilities of gifted students. The Laurel Springs Gifted & Talented Academy offers a premier college preparatory experience for gifted students in grades 6-12. • Teachers with specialized training in gifted education • Student-centered, flexible schedule • Dedicated school counselors

www.LaurelSprings.com

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• Unique learning paths for each student • AP and Honors courses • UC a-g and NCAA approved courses

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The Frances A. Karnes Center for Gifted Studies College of Education and Psychology 2014 SUMMER RESIDENTIAL PROGRAMS Leadership Studies Program • June 15-20 • Grades 6-11 Summer Gifted Studies Program • June 22-27 • Grades 4-8 Summer Program for Academically Talented Youth July 6-25 • Grades 7-10 PROGRAMS FOR TEACHERS Certification in gifted education: master’s, specialist and doctorate with an emphasis in gifted education

118 College Drive #8207

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 601.266.5236

Email: gifted.studies@usm.edu www.usm.edu/gifted

AA/EOE/ADAI

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UC 69398.8207 8.13


Tracy L. Cross NAGC President

Nancy Green NAGC Executive Director

This certifies that the bearer attended the 60th Annual National Association for Gifted Children Convention November 7-10, 2013 | Indianapolis, IN

Certificate of Attendance


Notes

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Dynamic Pathways for Gifted Learners Center for Talent Development Northwestern University

VISIT CTD BOOTH #415 DURING THE 2013 NAGC CONVENTION!

The Center for Talent Development at Northwestern University is dedicated to helping gifted students, age 4 through grade 12, reach full potential. We provide research-based assessment, advanced programs and resources to enhance a child’s schooling. Our dynamic pathways lead students on a journey of intellectual, emotional and social growth. • • • •

Accurate assessment & targeted resources Saturday and weekend programs Online courses Residential and commuter summer programs • Leadership and civic engagement programs

ctd.northwestern.edu 847/491-3782


C

University of Connecticut

NFRATUTE

www.gifted.uconn.edu/confratute July 13-18, 2014

StrandS: Weeklong intensive courses. In-depth traInIng: In areas such as Schoolwide Enrichment, Differentiation, Cluster Grouping, & Personalized Learning Using Technology. LeaderShIp SerIeS: For both principals and teachers. SpecIaL topIcS: Daily workshops on exciting topics such as underachievement and technology. NATIONALLY KNOWN KeYnote SpeaKerS and Fac F ULt UL Y

FORUM FOR INTERNATIONAL EDUCATORS

◊ ◊ ◊ ◊

t x e N o t t f n i i h S mer r m u S h Ge a g i H Conn U t a

Earn a Ph.D. through a combination of summer classes, online classes, and a one-year sabbatical residency.

Begin Earning Your Ph.D. in the Summer

http://epsy.education.uconn.edu

Earn a Master’s Degree Over Three Summers Summer instructors include: Dr. Joseph Renzulli, Dr. Sally Reis, Dr. Del Siegle, Dr. Susan Baum, Dr. Jann Leppien, and Mary Sullivan

“We Give Summer School a Good Name!”

e Thre ers m SumGrraodguraatme P

June 29July 13, 2014 www.gifted.uconn.edu/3summers

We Are Training the Next Generation of Researchers and Leaders

Neag Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development * University of Connecticut 2131 Hillside Road Unit 3007 * Storrs, CT 06269-3007 * 860-486-4826 * www.gifted.uconn.edu