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Giftedness

Visit U s in Booth #701

Doesn’t Always Look the Same

Pearson’s assessments help you identify students for gifted and talented placement from multiple perspectives. Regardless of a student’s language or cultural background, we can help you identify their strengths so you can match them to appropriate gifted program options.

For more information about these or other Pearson assessments, please call 800.328.5999 l NNAT2.COM l OLSAT8.COM Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. or its affiliate(s). All rights reserved. NNAT, OLSAT, Always Learning, and Pearson are trademarks, in the U.S. and/or other countries, of Pearson Education, Inc. or its affiliate(s). 7365 11/12


Welcome to the 59th Annual Meeting! The air is humming in Colorado. You might blame it on the altitude, but we think it’s a combination of excitement and enthusiasm for the high quality, information-packed conference experience you’re about to embark on. In addition to a wonderful Denver local arrangements committee and host city providing a lively backdrop for learning, you have access to more than 500 concurrent sessions and posters, six general sessions presented by a variety of thought leaders, and countless opportunities to pick up good ideas at “Base Camp,” aka the Exhibit Hall. (See page xxiv for a list of activities happening there!) We congratulate you for committing the time and resources to join with your community in support of your own professional development. To make the most of your time in Denver, here are some recommendations for your “TO DO” list: • Recruit a few new friends and ask them to join you in attending the Saturday evening reception at the brand new Colorado History Museum. You can talk about Bob Sternberg’s captivating Creativity Lecture on your walk or ride over. • Download the official NAGC 2012 App! Receive daily alerts and critical information, even as you download your daily schedule onto your smartphone. • Carefully read through the materials you receive in your convention bag. You’ll find a gold mine of information—including a newly released report, Unlocking Emergent Talent: Supporting High Achievement of Low-Income, High-Ability Students. • Plan to try out all of the different session types offered at this year’s convention: poster sessions, regular session presentations, Putting It Into Practice sessions, Signature Series, and more! • Attend ALL of the general sessions—such a wide variety of experts will challenge you to reach new intellectual heights! • Stop by Base Camp —something is always going on in this interactive, informal space that is sure to energize you! You’ll also have a chance to connect with more than 100 exhibitors, grab a cup of coffee and a snack…it’s the “nerve center” of Convention this year! • Choose several sessions that are just outside your own comfort zone, but relevant to your school or context. Take notes so you can share your new knowledge with colleagues who were not able to attend the conference. • Attend at least one of the business meetings of the 15 NAGC Networks or 3 Special Interest Groups. This is a way to meet people who are interested in specific topics and areas within gifted education and learn more about ways to be involved in NAGC. We need volunteers like you!!! • Attend the poster sessions where you can talk one-on-one with authors and presenters about their work.

Thanks so much for joining us to “reach beyond the summit” with your own learning, and in turn, encourage the students with whom you work to scale even greater educational heights! We know you will be energized by what you experience here in Denver--and that your enthusiasm will continue even after you return home.

Tracy L. Cross Convention Program Chair and President-Elect

59th Annual Convention

Nancy Green NAGC Executive Director

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WHEREAS, the State of Colorado is home to over 63,000 gifted students who excel in one or several areas of their studies; and WHEREAS, the State of Colorado promotes high expectations for academic achievement and growth for all students through school and community partnerships formed to improve student outcomes in public education; and WHEREAS, providing rigor and challenge in the classroom for Colorado’s gifted students is vital to ensuring their intellectual, social-emotional, and academic development for post- secondary and workforce readiness; and WHEREAS, it is a goal of gifted education to promote school, parental, and community partnerships; Therefore, I, John W. Hickenlooper, Governor of the State of Colorado, do hereby proclaim November 12 - 18, 2012,

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National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


NCSSSMST is proud to partner with NAGC for the Reaching Beyond the Summit Convention

The Mission:

NCSSSMST is the nation’s alliance of secondary schools and programs preparing students for success and leadership in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Our mission is to serve our members’ students and professionals, foster collaborations, inform STEM policy, and to advocate transformation in education. We offer valuable opportunities each year for students and professionals: Summer Institutes with College and University Affiliate Members Annual Student Research Conference Annual Professional Conference

www.ncsssmst.org


Sponsors Please join us in thanking these sponsors for their support.

American MENSA

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Table of Contents Welcome to the NAGC Convention ............................................................................................................vii Schedule of Events ............................................................................................................................................x NAGC Network Events ................................................................................................................................ xiii Thanks .......................................................................................................................................................... xviii Awards and Recognition ............................................................................................................................ xxii NAGC Board of Directors and Staff ........................................................................................................ xxiii NAGC Base Camp .......................................................................................................................................xxiv Wednesday Highlights .....................................................................................................................................2 Gifted Education Essentials Thursday Highlights .........................................................................................................................................5 Gifted Applications in the Classroom NCSSSMST Conference.................................................................................................................................12 Friday Highlights ............................................................................................................................................23 Saturday Highlights ........................................................................................................................................95 Sunday Highlights ........................................................................................................................................169 Strand Index ..................................................................................................................................................180 Speaker Index ................................................................................................................................................212 Convention Floorplans ................................................................................................................................218 NAGC Base Camp Floorplan .....................................................................................................................221 Exhibitor Listing ...........................................................................................................................................222 Exhibitor Workshops ...................................................................................................................................230 Certificate of Attendance ............................................................................................................................253

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Welcome to the

NAGC Convention We want you to get the most out of your Convention experience! Here are some tips and information to assist you in planning your Convention schedule. Are you interested in a particular topic? The Strand Index lists all sessions presented by each program strand throughout the Convention in chronological order.

This Program Book At the Front of the Book

The Schedule contains meetings, workshops, and special events, in chronological order.

How to find a room? Consult the map of the Colorado Convention Center and hotels on pages 218–221.

In the Back of the Book

Session Descriptions make up the bulk of this Convention Guide. In addition to room location, each session listing contains the title, name of presenter(s), session description, and target audience. See sample below.

Are you interested in a particular presenter? The Speaker Index lists presenters by last name, with corresponding page numbers for each of their presentations.

Using the Session Description

Strand Session Title

Presenters

Audience

Parent & Community 21.1 F ocus on Assessment: Choosing an Appropriate Lens to Support, Measure, and Report Academic Growth of Advanced Learners

Session is a Poster Session

Gail Fischer Hubbard, Joan Brownlee, Prince William County Public Schools, Manassas, VA

Supporting, measuring, and reporting the academic growth of advanced learners requires a range of assessments. Using the analogy of choosing among standard, zoom, telephoto, and wideangle camera lenses clarifies the differing purposes of the forms of assessment. A range of concrete examples of assessment of actual student work, using different lenses, illustrates this concept. Assessment becomes a series of experiences to support learning rather than a single event to judge learning. Learn how different lenses focus on appropriate assessment of student work to support, measure, and report academic growth of advanced learners. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents

Session Description

Room Location

Room: Exhibit Hall A

Recorded Session

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Poster Session

NAGC Base Camp

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit

NCSSSMST


About Convention Events

• Pre-Convention (additional registration fee required – space may be available) • Wednesday: Essentials of Gifted Education • Wednesday: Action Labs • Thursday: Gifted Applications in the Classroom

Session Formats

In addition to individual concurrent sessions, some of which are combined, you will find: • Signature Series These timely and salient topics are invited by the NAGC Program Chair and focus on recent developments in the field of gifted education, success stories from peers who

received awards this year, or expand the discussion of recently released NAGC books. • General Sessions The 2012 NAGC Convention offers general sessions Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. Check out the “Highlights” for each day for details. General Sessions on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday take place in the Four Seasons Ballroom in the Colorado Convention Center. The Sunday closing General Sessions moves to the Hyatt Regency Centennial Ballroom. • Poster Sessions You can find the poster sessions in the NAGC Base Camp/ Exhibit Hall A of the Colorado Convention Center. Convention attendees have the opportunity to examine

Where’s What? Information Where

What You Will Find Here

Colorado Convention Center Level 1/Exhibit Level (Street Level – Enter on 14th Street)

• Exhibit Hall A is NAGC Base Camp • Exhibits • Student Artwork and Entertainment • Poster Sessions • Coffee Available Friday and Saturday, 7:30 – 8:30 AM • Exhibitor Workshops • Mensa Mind Games Break on Friday • Base Camp Sessions •Concession Area open for lunch 11:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Colorado Convention Center Level 2/Meeting Room Level

Gifted Education Applications (Thursday Pre-Con) Concurrent Sessions including Putting It Into Practice Sessions

Colorado Convention Center Level 3/Ballroom Level

Four Seasons Ballroom (General Sessions) and Student Entertainment (Thursday - Saturday)

Grand Hyatt

NCSSSMST Conference (Wednesday evening through Thursday 2:15 PM)

Hyatt Regency

• Gifted Education Essentials (Wednesday) • CAGT Leadership Forum (Thursday) • Celebration of Excellence (Thursday) • Legacy Series Taping (Friday) • Network Evening Events (Friday) • Parent Day at the National (Saturday) • All Convention Events on Sunday

History Colorado Center

Night at the Museum Reception with CAGT (Saturday)

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Welcome to the

NAGC Convention “posted” displays of research and other topics whenever the Exhibit Hall is open. Presenters will be available at the times to discuss their poster presentation. Please consult the listings by day in the session descriptions. There is also an index in the back of the Program. • Putting It Into Practice These sessions on Friday and Saturday, from 12:15 PM to 1:00 PM, focus on applications and strategies for the classroom. • Exhibitor Workshops These popular, content-oriented sessions are conducted by our business partners in the NAGC Base Camp/Exhibit Hall A during concurrent breakout sessions.

Locations Most NAGC Convention activities take place at the Colorado Convention Center (CC) during the day and the Hyatt Regency Denver in the evening. Items are marked throughout the program book. Maps of the Convention Center, Hyatt Regency, and Grand Hyatt can be found on pages 218–221.

Program Changes This information in this guide is current as of October 1, 2012. A list of any program changes, such as room locations or session

Base Camp Sessions The space available in Exhibit Hall A provides us with a unique opportunity

cancellations that occurred after printing is in your Convention tote bag. You may view any additional changes (as they occur) or notices on our live Twitter feed #NAGCConvention or in the Convention App.

Meals NAGC Convention attendees have a number of dining options during the Convention. • The Colorado Convention Center has Blue Bear Café in the lobby area. • The Convention Center is also opening concession areas in Exhibit Hall A Friday and Saturday, from 11 AM – 3:00 PM • You can start your day with coffee in the NAGC Base Camp/ Exhibit Hall A on Friday and Saturday beginning at 7:30 AM • Don’t miss a sweet treat in the NAGC Base Camp/Exhibit Hall A on Friday from 2:50 PM – 3:50 PM for the Mensa Mind Games break.

Exhibit Hall Exhibits are located in the NAGC Base Camp/Exhibit Hall A on Level One of the Colorado Convention Center, above the NAGC Registration area. See the hall map on page 221. The exhibitors list is on pp. 222-228. Please take time to meet with our exhibiting partners and tell them you appreciate them joining us in Denver. Several events take place around the exhibits including the opening reception, student artwork displays and entertainment, Exhibitor Workshops, and coffee on Friday and Saturday morning!

Legend of Icons Recorded Session Poster Session

to provide another venue for learning and sharing. We call them “Base Camp

NAGC Base Camp

Sessions” (Session times and descriptions are on pg. xxiv)

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National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit

NCSSSMST


We are “App-y”

NAGC Central

Check out the NAGC 2012 Convention App

NAGC staff and volunteers are on hand to provide you a link to resources and information at NAGC Central in booth 419.

www.nagc.org/ 2012app.aspx

New NAGC publications and more!

About the Big Blue Bear Downtown Denver is alive with public art. Take a stroll down any street and you will be amazed by the quantity and quality of art you encounter. There are over 100 public artworks waiting to be seen, heard and experienced on the streets and in buildings and parks downtown. Each work is a unique experience for the senses. One of the largest is the 40-foot Big Blue Bear at the Center. The artist of “I See What You Mean” is Lawrence Argent who utilized computer modeling to give life to a child’s tiny plastic toy. Next he employed animation software to give the figure character and the correct pose. It enabled him to ‘reduce’ his data, abstracting the bear into a few thousand triangular facets. When he was finally satisfied with his design, he ‘printed’ it using a machine that produces threedimensional thermoplastic models. The resulting miniature that emerged was a brilliant, startling blue. The color delighted the artist and though the bear’s final shade evolved from that of the little prototype, from that moment on, “the bear had to be blue.”

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Schedule of Events Registration Hours

The Registration Desk is conveniently located in the Colorado Convention Center Lower Lobby A (enter Center on 14th Street)

Tuesday

Wednesday Thursday

Friday

Saturday Sunday

4:00 PM – 7:00 PM 7:00 AM-6:00 PM 7:30 AM – 6:00 PM 7:00 AM – 5:00 PM 7:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Wednesday, November 14

The Information Desk at the Hyatt Regency

7:30 AM – Noon (information only)

Thursday, November 15

7:15 AM – 7:45 AM

All Ncsssmst Conference Events At Grand Hyatt

Hyatt Regency Mineral Hall

7:00 AM – 12:30 PM

7:45 AM – 4:00 PM (Times may vary)

Imperial Ballroom Foyer

Action Lab Orientation

Action Labs

Depart from Hyatt Regency Porte-Cochere

8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

NAGC Board of Directors Meeting Hyatt Regency Quartz

9:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Gifted Education Essentials

NCSSSMST Registration 7:15 AM – 8:00 AM

NCSSSMST Conference Continental Breakfast

There is no charge to attend the NCSSSMST concurrent sessions, but a fee of $50 will be charged for materials and refreshments including breakfast and lunch. Please visit NAGC Convention Registration for more information. See page 12-20

Supporting Gifted and High-Potential Learners in a Common Core State Standards Environment (see page 2 – separate registration required)

8:15 AM – 9:15 AM

9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

NCSSSMST Conference Concurrent Sessions

Council of State Directors Meeting Colorado Convention Center (CC) 102

4:15 PM-6:00 PM

Voices of Leadership: Perspectives From the Field Hyatt Regency Mineral Hall

6:30 PM – 9:00 PM

University Network Meeting

NCSSSMST Conference Concurrent Sessions 9:30 AM – 10:30 AM 10:45 AM – 11:45 AM

NCSSSMST Conference Concurrent Sessions 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

NCSSSMST Conference Keynote Luncheon 1:15 PM – 2:15 PM

NCSSSMST Conference Concurrent Sessions

Hyatt Regency Agate

7:30 AM – 2:00 PM

6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

Hyatt Regency Mineral Hall A

NCSSSMST Opening Reception Grand Hyatt Capitol Peak Ballroom

Network Leadership Retreat 8:00 AM – 2:15 PM

Gifted Education Applications: Critical Issues and Models for Delivering Successful Programs and Services (see pages 7-11. Separate registration required.)

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National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


9:00 AM – 2:00 PM

Colorado Leadership Forum (CAGT) (by invitation only) Hyatt Regency Capitol Ballroom

1:00 PM – 2:00 PM

First-timers Orientation CC 207

9:20 AM – 10:40 AM

General Sessions (Choose one)

(see page 22) “Gardner, Renzulli, and Sternberg: In Their Own Voices in Our Time” or “Helping Different Kinds of Minds to Learn” with Temple Grandin CC Four Seasons Ballroom

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

2:30 PM – 4:00 PM

Opening General Session “Education’s Neglect of High-Ability Learners and What We Can Do to Change It” With Chester Finn CC Four Seasons Ballroom

4:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Exhibit Hall and Base Camp Opening Reception Exhibit Hall A

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Exhibitor Workshops (see page 38-51)

11:00 PM – 3:00 PM

Concession areas open in NAGC Base Camp 12:15 PM – 1:00 PM

Putting it Into Practice Sessions (see page 52-63)

1:30 PM – 2:30 PM

5:00 PM – 7:00 PM

Celebration of Excellence

Presidential Address/Awards/Leadership Reception Hyatt Regency Capitol Ballroom

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Exhibitor Workshops (see page 64-77)

2:50 PM – 3:50 PM

Sweet Snacks and Mensa Mind Games Break

Friday, November 16

Exhibit Hall A

7:00 AM – 9:00 AM

State Affiliate Breakfast (by invitation only) Hyatt Regency Mineral Hall A

4:10 PM – 5:10 PM

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Exhibitor Workshops/Base Camp Sessions (see page 78-92)

7:30 AM – 5:00 PM

NAGC Base Camp/Exhibit Hall Open Coffee 7:30 AM – 8:30 AM Exhibit Hall A

4:10 PM – 5:30 PM

Legacy Series Taping: “Thinking Like a Master Teacher” with Sandra N. Kaplan Hyatt Regency Centennial Ballroom

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Exhibitor Workshops/Base Camp Sessions

5:30 – 6:30 PM

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM (Plus additional times)

5:30 PM – 5:45 PM

Hosted by Center for Bright Kids (See ad on page 252)

Hyatt Regency Mineral Hall

(see page 24-37)

GT Advocates Support Seminar

Legacy Series Reception

Hyatt Regency Centennial Ballroom

NAGC Business Meeting 5:45 PM – 9:00 PM

Network Evening Events (see pages xiii-xv)

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Schedule of Events Saturday, November 17 8:00 AM – 7:30 PM

CAGT Parent Day at the National (separate registration required) Hyatt Regency Centennial Ballroom D E F G H

7:30 AM – 4:00 PM

NAGC Base Camp/Exhibit Hall Open with Coffee 7:30 AM – 8:30 AM Exhibit Hall A

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Exhibitor Workshops/Base Camp Sessions (see page 96-110)

9:20 AM – 10:40 AM

General Session

“Getting it Write: Where Imagination Meets Creativity” with Ridley Pearson CC Four Seasons Ballroom

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Exhibitor Workshops (see page 111-125)

11:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Concession area open in NAGC Base Camp Exhibit Hall A

12:15 PM – 1:00 PM

Putting it Into Practice Sessions (see page 126-152)

1:30 PM – 2:30 PM

2:50 PM – 3:50 PM

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Base Camp Sessions (see page 153-167)

4:10 PM – 5:30 PM

E. Paul Torrance Creativity General Session “Creativity is a Decision” with Robert Sternberg CC Four Seasons Ballroom

5:50 PM – 7:30 PM

CAGT Night at the Museum

Reception at History Colorado Center, 1200 Broadway (see page 95, 167)

Sunday, November 18

All in the Hyatt Regency 7:30 AM – 12:00 PM

Information Table 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

Network Super Sessions (see page 170-174)

9:15 AM – 10:15 AM

Network Super Sessions (see page 175-178)

10:30 AM – 12:00 PM

Closing General Session

“Neurodiversity: Your Compass to a Changing World” with Jonathan Mooney Hyatt Centennial Ballroom

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Exhibitor Workshops (see page 138-152)

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NAGC Network Events Don’t miss a chance to meet and mingle with others who share your special interest/s within the field of gifted and talented education. The NAGC Network events are open to all; each NAGC individual member may “join” three Networks as part of their membership. The Convention offers you a great opportunity to explore what the Networks have to offer, as well as get acquainted with some amazing people.

Network Evening Events

Friday, November 16 5:45 PM – 9:00 P M

Conceptual Foundations

Network Evening Events Reception

Friday, November 16 | 4:10 PM – 5:30 PM

Portraits in Gifted Education: The Legacy Series “Thinking Like a Master Teacher with Sandra N. Kaplan” Hyatt Centennial Ballroom

Hyatt Regency, Cen tennial Ballroom Foyer

The Conceptual Foundations Network, in concert with NAGC, continues its dedication to videotaping notable gifted advocates, researchers, and leaders in order to preserve their legacy for future generations. For our sixth annual videotaping, you are invited to share in a dialogue with master educator and scholar Sandra N. Kaplan. Dr. Kaplan is a Clinical Professor in Learning and Instruction at the University of Southern California’s Rossier School of Education. She is a national leader in the fields of curriculum, instruction, and advocacy in support of the development of gifted students. We are honored to have the opportunity to interview Dr. Kaplan and allow her to share her insights and experiences with all NAGC attendees.

Early Childhood, Special Schools & Programs, Middle Grades

Reception hosted by the Curriculum Studies and Conceptual Foundations Networks immediately following the taping in the Centennial Ballroom Foyer.

Explore Ricks Center for Gifted Children: Serving the Needs of Gifted Learners Ages 3-14

Arts Friday, November 16 | 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM Hyatt Regency Mineral Hall G/H

The Arts Alive: Gifted Writers and Artists at Work

The Arts Network will celebrate the marvelous output of gifted children who are highly talented writers and artists. Come join our members for discussion regarding how best to develop talents in the arts.

59th Annual Convention

Thursday, November 15 | 7:15 PM – 9:00 PM

Ricks Center at the University of Denver, 480 South York Street Denver, CO (Buses depart at 7:15 from the Hyatt Regency)

The Early Childhood, Special Schoolss and Middle Grades Networks join together for the opportunity to highlight a program that meets the needs of gifted learners, ages 3 to 14 years of age. The evening will provide a handson learning opportunity to look at various curriculum options, learning environments, and teaching practices. Participants will mingle with teachers, content specialists, administrators, and network representatives during this informative evening. Transportation will be provided and heavy appetizers will be served while exploring the Ricks Center for Gifted Children.

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NAGC Network Events Computers & Technology

Creativity

Friday, November 16 | 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Friday, November 16 | 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Speed Geeking

Creativity Night

Hyatt Regency Mineral Hall B/C

Are you stuck in the 20th century when it comes to technology integration? Looking to update your technology resources, but cannot find the time to keep up? Let the NAGC Computers & Technology Network help! Self-professed “tech geeks” will rocket through a series of 5-minute presentations designed to introduce participants to the educational uses of some of today’s best free technology resources. You do not want to miss this lively and interactive session that will help energize you and update your teaching for 2012!

Hyatt Regency Centennial Ballroom B/C

Join us for a mile-high celebration of creative potential at Creativity Night, NAGC’s Creativity Network’s evening event. Creativity Night will be held in a large room with 15-20 stations. Select from the list of stations you’ll receive when you enter and join one group for the first of three 20-minute rounds. Spontaneous celebrations between rounds provide additional entertainment and very popular prize giveaways!

Global Awareness Friday, November 16 | 6:30 PM – 9:00 PM | Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall D/E

An Extraordinary Two-Part Global Gala Evening 6:30 PM – 7:30 PM

“The State of Education Going Forward”

Deb Delisle, Assistant Secretary, Elementary and Secondary Education, U.S. Department of Education It is an exciting time for gifted education now that President Obama has named former Global Awareness member, Deb Delisle, as Assistant Secretary of Elementary and Secondary Education. Prior to this national leadership position, Deb has been a gifted specialist, principal, district superintendent and Ohio’s Superintendent of Public Instruction. We are fortunate that she is lending a strong voice to education policy decisions that are sensitive to the needs of gifted students. Join the Global Awareness Network in congratulating Deb, while she shares her educational expertise and vision for the future, with a question and answer session to follow.

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7:45 PM – 9:00 PM

“Remembrance of Annemarie Roeper” 1918-2012

Founder of Roeper School, Roeper Review and Global Awareness The Roeper School will host a dessert reception and time of remembrance for Annemarie Roeper, a founding member of Global Awareness Network. The celebration of Annemarie’s life and expansive professional contributions will include tributes from the Roeper School community, Roeper’s Qualitative Assessment core group of advisors, eminent fellow colleagues in gifted education, and friends who wish to share their stories about this luminary matriarch in the field of gifted education. Please join us for a joyful commemoration of our beloved Annemarie.

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Curriculum Studies Friday, November 16 | 7:30 PM – 8:45 PM Hyatt Regency Mineral Hall A

Curriculum Awards Night

Come meet this year’s Curriculum Award Winners! Every year the Curriculum Studies Network celebrates the authors of outstanding curriculum with an evening devoted to showcasing their talents and their work and effect on students. You will hear from the curriculum developers, who are more than willing to share lessons and answer questions about their individual units. All of our award winners received outstanding evaluations based on our rubric for writing curriculums based on the needs of the gifted learner. Please join us in celebrating their efforts and excellence!

Research and Evaluation Friday, November 16 | 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM Hyatt Regency Centennial Ballroom A

Research Crackerbarrel and Research Gala The Research Crackerbarrel (6:00 PM-7:00 PM) is an opportunity for graduate students and beginning researchers to seek advice about different aspects of the research process

from more seasoned researchers. You can join one of several roundtables hosted by prominent researchers in our field. The Research Gala (7:30 PM-9:00 PM) celebrates the exciting new research conducted by graduate students. Gala participants will present posters of their research and the awards committee names winners in three categories: doctoral level completed research, doctoral level research in progress, and non-doctoral level research.

Special Populations and Parent & Community Friday, November 16 | 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM Hyatt Regency Capitol Ballroom 4

Trailblazers for Special Populations of Gifted Students: Past, Present, and Future

Join the Special Populations and Parent & Community Networks to honor educators, parents, and community members who have championed the diverse needs of gifted students from special populations. Celebrate the trailblazers from past, present, and future while enjoying an evening of entertainment provided by students from Stargate School for the Gifted. This K-8 public charter school has forged partnerships with parents, the community, and Regis University to advance their mutual interests. Students will share their music, projects, artwork, and service projects. Experience the possibilities created by a school where being gifted is the norm, all day, every day.

When we no longer know what to do, we have come to our real work and when we no longer know which way to go we have begun our real journey. The mind that is not baffled is not employed. The impeded stream is the one that sings.

—Wendell Berry

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NAGC Network and Special Interest Group (SIG) Meetings All meetings take place at the Hyatt Regency

Creativity

Thursday, November 15

Capitol Ballroom 6

Twice-Exceptional SIG

Early Childhood

Mineral Hall C

Capitol Ballroom 7

Research & Evaluation Work Session

Professional Development

Mineral Hall B

Capitol Ballroom 6

7:10 PM – 8:10 PM

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Friday, November 16 Computers & Technology 7:00 AM – 8:00 AM

1:30 PM – 2:30 PM

4:00 PM – 5:00 PM

GLBTQ SIG (Business Meeting & Social) 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM Capitol Ballroom 6

Capitol Ballroom 6

Saturday, November 17

Parent & Community

Special Populations

Capitol Ballroom 6

Capitol Ballroom 6

Conceptual Foundations

Assessment of Giftedness SIG

Capitol Ballroom 7

Capitol Ballroom 7

STEM

Curriculum Studies

Capitol Ballroom 5

Capitol Ballroom 6

Counseling & Guidance

Middle Grades

Capitol Ballroom 6

Capitol Ballroom 7

Special Schools & Programs

Global Awareness

Capitol Ballroom 7

Capitol Ballroom 6

Arts

Research & Evaluation

Capitol Ballroom 6

Capitol Ballroom 6

8:10 AM – 9:10 AM

8:10 AM – 9:10 AM

8:10 AM – 9:10 AM

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

12:15 PM – 1:15 PM

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1:30 PM – 2:30 PM

8:10 AM – 9:10 AM

8:10 AM – 9:10 AM

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

12:15 PM – 1:15 PM

1:30 PM – 2:30 PM

4:00 PM – 5:00 PM

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Take your mark,

get set ...

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Mile-High Thanks to NAGC Program Committee

Cheryll Adams Joy Lawson Davis Wendy Leader Susan Scheibel

Chair Tracy L. Cross

Jeff Danielian Shelagh Gallagher Amy Marschand Linda Sheffield

Colorado Local Arrangements Committee Co-Chairs: Julie Gonzales | Susan Scheibel

Terry Bradley Debbie Getzel Blanche Kapushion Robbi Makely Kathleen Robinson

Linda Crain Kathee Jones Karen Larsen Jacquelin Medina Deborah Rothenberg

Cheryl Franklin-Rohr Nanette Jones Wendy Leader Stuart Omdal Amy Rushneck

NAGC Network Leadership Research & Evaluation Jill Adelson, Chair Megan Foley Nicpon, Chair Elect

Arts John Gaa, Chair Hope Wilson, Chair Elect

Creativity Laurie Abeel, Chair Kyung-Hee Kim, Chair Elect

Middle Grades Christine Deitz, Chair Wendy Miner, Chair Elect

Computers & Technology Jennifer Troester, Chair Cindy Sheets, Chair Elect

Curriculum Studies Jennifer Beasley, Chair Leighann Pennington, Chair Elect

Parent & Community Christy McGee, Chair Nancy Arey Cohen, Chair Elect

Special Populations Claire Hughes, Chair Wendy Leader, Chair Elect

Early Childhood Ellen Honeck, Chair

Professional Development Connie Phelps, Chair Lori Bland, Chair Elect

Special Schools & Programs Carol Carter, Chair Shannon Jones, Chair Elect

Conceptual Foundations Elizabeth Romey, Chair Erin M. Miller, Chair Elect Counseling & Guidance Jillian Gates, Chair Bronwyn MacFarlane, Chair Elect

Global Awareness Anne Beneventi, Chair

STEM Linda Sheffield, Chair Scott Chamberlin, Chair Elect

Special Interest Groups Assessments of Giftedness Barbara Gilman, Chair

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Gifted Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning (GLBTQ) Terry Friedrichs, Chair

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit

Twice Exceptional Lois Baldwin, Chair


With appreciation to our donors for their support of NAGC

Karen Ailsworth

Katie Augustyn

Laura M. Beltchenko

Ginny Burney

Wanda Cowles

Jean Goerss

Jennifer & Chris Larrabee

Catherine Little

Paula Olszewski-Kubilius

Razel Solow

Kristen Stephens

David Young, IV

Zilber Family Foundation

The NAGC Nicholas Green Distinguished Student Award Fund Arkansans for Gifted & Talented Education (AGATE) Gifted Association of Missouri Illinois Association for the Gifted Kansas Association for the Gifted, Talented and Creative Minnesota Educators of the Gifted and Talented New Jersey Association for Gifted Children North Carolina Association for the Gifted and Talented Pennsylvania Association for Gifted Education

Javits-Frasier Scholarship Fund

Katie Augustyn

Wendy A. Behrens

Pamela Clinkenbeard

Barbara Dullaghan

Susan Dulong Langley

Chrystyna Mursky

Council of State Directors of Programs for the Gifted Massachusetts Association for Gifted

A. Harry Passow Classroom Teacher Scholarship Fund Kimberley Chandler

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Mile-High Thanks to Strand Reviewers Thousands of Convention proposals are submitted each year for consideration by the NAGC Network Strand Reviewers. The following individuals gave of their time to make certain that the Convention content is balanced and relevant, presenting diverse viewpoints in the field of gifted education.

Arts John Gaa Jeanie Goerts Joanne Hartounian Jason Helfer Jordan Lanfair Lou Lloyd-Zaninni Kelton Williams Stephen Schroth, Network and Program Chair 2011-2012 Computers & Technology Tisha Duncan Reva Friedman Kristina Ayers Paul Elfi Sanderson Cindy Sheets Kevin Simms Ola Skyba Jennifer Troester, Network Chair 2011-2012 Jennifer Vermillion Brian Housand, Program Chair Conceptual Foundations Sherry Bovey Abbey Cash LeoNora Cohen David Yun Dai Felicia Dixon Stephanie Ferguson Leslie Forstadt Gail Hanninen Jennifer Jolly Michele Kane Erin M. Miller Robert Schultz

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Wenda Sheard Tom Southern Sandra Tanner Kathi Kearney, Program Chair 2011-2012 Curriculum Studies Leigh Anne Akey Randee Blaire Norma Blecker Micah Bruce-Davis Marla Capper Kimberley L. Chandler Patti Coughlan Sally Dobyns, Network Chair 2011-2012 Chrystie Hill Ellen Honeck Shannon Jones Susan McPherson Leighann Pennington Susannah Richards Roxanne Speer Carol Williams Jennifer G. Beasley, Program Chair 2011-2012 Counseling & Guidance Carrie Lynn Bailey Linda Brody Jennifer R. Cross James Delisle Lori Flint Leslie Forstadt Jillian Gates, Network Chair Patricia Gatto-Walden Thomas S. Greenspon Merla Hammack P. Sue Jackson

Clark Kopelman Jason Kushner Maxine Levy Bronwyn MacFarlane Betsy McCoach Sal Mendaglio Michelle Muratori Connie Phelps Wenda Sheard Stephanie Tolan Debbie Troxclair Shalamit Widawsky Susannah Wood Angela Housand, Program Chair 2011-2012 Creativity Laurie B. Abeel Gae Anderson-Miller Ki Byung Chae Yiling Cheng Jill Cohen Cindy Dwyer Reva Friedman Kuba Glaze Kyle Hartley Kris Haslund Chi Huang Kathryn Kyd Christopher Lawrence Wendy Leader, Network Chair 2011-2012 Jonathan Leavitt Kimberly McCarthy Stuart Omdal Meera Rastogi Gayle Roege

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit

Jennifer Siebenaler Marianne Solomon Paula Thomson James Weiner Billie Woodel Kyung-Hee Kim, Program Chair 2011-2012 Early Childhood Laura Beltchenko Denise Drain Barbara Dullaghan, Network and Program Chair 2011-2012 Nancy Hertzog Ellen Honeck Shannon Jones Global Awareness Patricia Gatto-Walden, Network Chair 2011-2012 Cynthia Rhodes Anne Beneventi Barbara Mitchell Hutton, Program Chair 2011-2012 Middle Grades Marla Capper Christine Deitz, Network Chair Diane Heacox Jamie MacDougall Wendy Miner John Nussbaumer Susan Rakow Suzannah Richards Barbara Prichard Patti Drapeau, Program Chair 2011-2012


Parent & Community Katie Augustyn Janet Chen Susan Dulong-Langley Stephanie Ferguson Keri Guilbault Kathy Jones Christy McGee, Network Chair Nancy Arey Cohen, Program Chair 2011-2012 Professional Development Lori Bland Shirley Farrell Diane Heacox Catherine Little Kirstin Miller Ann Batenburg Dina Brulles Beth Cross Debbie Daily Elizabeth Fogerty, Network Chair 2011-2012 Kathy Green Sue Harvey Clark Kopelman Wayne Lord Kristy Mall Cindy Massicotte Michelle D. Matteis Julie Lenner McDonald Kristina Ayers Paul Kathy Paul Connie Phelps Brian Reid Rima Binder Linda Robinson Dan Rosenberg Mary Slade Barbara Swicord Toni Szymanski Joan Whitesides Patricia D. Woodberry Laurie Croft, Program Chair 2011-2012

Research & Evaluation Jill Adelson Susan Assouline Cheryll Adams Pureu Agca Carolyn Barber Carolyn Callahan Carol Carman Jamie Castellano Jin Min Chung Connie Phelps Alicia Cotabish Debbie Dailey Marcia Delcourt Felicia Dixon Janine Firmender Marcia Gentry Nancy Hertzog Angela Housand Catherine Little Maureen Marron Michael Matthews Matt McBee Tracy Missett Tonya Moon Kristina Ayers Paul Nielsen Pereira Scott Peters Karen Rambo Anne Rinn Ann Robinson Rena Subotnik Joyce VanTassel-Baska Carol Tieso Russell Warne Hope Wilson So Yoon Yoon Adena Young Megan Foley Nicpon, Program Chair Special Populations Luisa Abellรกn Rebekah Askeland Wendy Behrens Margarita Bianco

Randee Susan Blair Dina Brulles Liza Campbell Marybeth M. Cannon Richard M. Cash Jaime Castellano Linda Collins Alma Contreras-Vanegas Courtney Couvillon Steve Coxon Laurie L. Croft Sally David Joy Lawson Davis Amanda Davis-Holloway Felicia Dixon Sharon Dole Shirley Farrell Matt Fugate Marcia Gentry Tarek Grantham Lisa Hancock-Rehrig Diane Heacox Malik S. Henfield Claire Hughes Joan Jacobs Julie Luck Jensen Clark I. Kopelman Elizabeth Kotis Barbara LeMond Patry Lerwick Christian Mueller Chrys Mursky Linda Neumann Theresa Newsom Elizabeth Nielsen Neilsen Pereira Lesli Preuss Cynthia Rhodes Jennifer Ritchotte Meghan Salyers Patricia Schock Michelle Swain Julie Dingle Swanson Stacia Taylor Beverly Trail, Network and Program Chair 2011-2012

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Merzili Villanueva Rachael White Becky Whittenburg Leslie Weinbaum Charmaine Wierzbicki Special Schools & Programs Carol Carter Andrea Esperat Patricia Hollingsworth, Network Chair 2011-2012 Lisa Perrault Wanda Smith Elizabeth Daniels, Program Chair 2011-2012 STEM Jill Adelson Lori Andersen Deb Beckmann Lori Bland Heather Carmody Tutita Casa Kimberley L. Chandler Shelbi Cole Alicia Cotabish Daphne Duncan Janine Firmender Kathy Gavin Eric Mann Rachel McAnallen Nielsen Pereira Karen Rambo Chris Schultz Linda Sheffield, Network Chair Rena Subotnik Janet Tassell Joyce VanTassel-Baska Scott Chamberlin, Program Chair 2011-2012

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Awards and Recognition The NAGC Board of Directors invites you to join us in celebrating commitment and honoring excellence in service to NAGC and to gifted and talented children.

NAGC Celebration of Excellence Thursday, November 15 | 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM | Hyatt Regency | Capitol Ballroom (4th Level)

Honorees Ann Isaacs Founders Memorial Award Nicholas Colangelo President’s Award Chester E. Finn, Jr. Distinguished Scholar Award Ann Robinson Distinguished Service Award Julia Link Roberts NAGC/Ball State Administrator Award Kathleen Steele David W. Belin Advocacy Award Virginia Burney Hollingworth Award Carlton Fong Early Scholar Award Megan Foley Nicpon Early Leader Award Alicia Cotabish Community Service Award Terry and Betsy Considine Doctoral Student Awards Tracy Missett Nielsen Pereira Sarah Oh Yang Yang Masters’ and Specialists’ Award (formerly the Non-Doctoral Student Award) Jennifer Houghton Canady Gifted Child Quarterly Paper of the Year The Effects of Acceleration on High-Ability Learners: A Meta-Analysis Saiying Steenbergen-Hu, Duke University, Durham, NC; Sidney M. Moon, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, Vol. 55, issue 1, pp. 39-53

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National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


NAGC Board and Staff NAGC Board of Directors Paula Olszewski-Kubilius Northwestern University, Evanston, IL President Tracy L. Cross College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA President-Elect Ann Robinson University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR Past President Lauri Kirsch Hillsborough County Public Schools, Tampa, FL Treasurer Christine Nobbe Center for Creative Learning, Ellisville, MO Governance Secretary Michelle Swain Round Rock, TX State Representative

Kimberley L. Chandler College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA Network Representative Susan Dulong Langley Framingham Public Schools, Milford, MA Parent Representative Joy Lawson Davis University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA At-Large Member Brain Housand East Carolina University, Greenville, NC At-Large Member Sally Krisel Hall County Schools, Gainesville, GA At-Large Member Catherine Little University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT At-Large Member

Marcia Wall Coeur d’Alene, ID Teacher Representative

NAGC National Office Staff • Nancy Green Executive Director • Andrew Bassett Director of Finance and Administration • Jane Clarenbach Director of Public Education • Rachel Coleman Administrative Project Coordinator

• Robin Feldman Director of Professional Development and Meetings • Carolyn Kaye Office Assistant • Adriane Wiles Membership Manager • Karen Yoho Senior Director of Marketing & Member Services

Program Support • Ken and Robin Cibroski Exhibits and Advertising Sales Management • Jeff Danielian Teacher Resource Specialist Editor, Teaching for High Potential

• Jennifer Jolly Editor, Parenting for High Potential • D. Betsy McCoach and Del Siegle Editors, Gifted Child Quarterly • Carolyn Callahan Association Editor

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Base Camp The “Base Camp” of a mountain is an area used for staging an attempt at the summit. Base camps are positioned to be safe from the harsher conditions above. Welcome to the NAGC Convention Base Camp. To coordinate with our 2012 Convention theme, “Reaching Beyond the Summit: Educating with Altitude,” we’ve created a gathering spot where you will connect

and collaborate with other attendees. You’ll get your bearings and plot a course to successfully serve highability learners. Here’s what you’ll find in Exhibit Hall A: • Informative Exhibits • Enlightening Exhibitor Workshops • Useful Poster Sessions • Student Artwork

What is there to do in Base Camp? Friday, November 16 7:30 AM – 8:30 AM

11:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Coffee Available

Convention Center concession areas sell assorted lunch items

7:30 AM – 5:00 PM

• View Posters • View Student Artwork • Peruse Exhibits • Meet and Visit with Attendees

2:50 PM – 3:50 PM

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

• “ Getting to Know Your GLBTQ Special Interest Group: Leaders, Mission, and Opportunities” Presented by GLBTQ SIG • “ Using the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics with Gifted, Talented and Advanced STEM Students” Presented by STEM Network • “ Examining the Issues and Best Practices in the Education of TwiceExceptional Learners” Presented by Special Populations Network

Sweet Snacks and Mensa Mind Games Break 4:10 PM – 5:10 PM

Base Camp Sessions

Base Camp Sessions

• “Getting to Know Your GLBTQ Special Interest Group: Leaders, Mission, and Opportunities” Presented by GLBTQ SIG • “Making the Most of the Middle Grades: Solutions, Insights, and Support” Presented by Middle Grades Network

Saturday, November 17 7:30 AM – 8:30 AM

1:30 PM – 2:30 PM

7:30 AM – 4:00 PM

An informal meeting of Fulbright scholars and others interested in international issues about giftedness.

Coffee available • View Posters • View Student Artwork • Peruse Exhibits • Meet and Visit with Attendees 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

Base Camp Sessions

• “Getting to Know Your GLBTQ Special Interest Group: Leaders, Mission, and Opportunities” Presented by GLBTQ SIG

11:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Convention Center concession areas sell assorted lunch items

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Fulbright Alumni / Fulbright Exchanges

2:50 PM – 3:50 PM

Base Camp Sessions

• “ Equity and Excellence: Best Practices in Curriculum and Instructional Strategies for Special Populations of Gifted Students” Presented by Special Populations Network • “ Using the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics with Gifted, Talented, and Advanced STEM Students” Presented by STEM Network • “ Getting to Know Your GLBTQ Special Interest Group: Leaders, Mission, and Opportunities” Presented by GLBTQ SIG • “ Social Emotional Characteristics and Strategies for Early Childhood” Presented by Early Childhood Network • “ Trekking with Technology” Presented by Computers & Technology Network

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Wednesday Highlights November 14, 2012

Wednesday

W

elcome to Denver! This pre-Convention day features both the practical and the experiential as we launch a full day of our pre-Convention events. Action Labs kick off this year with an orientation program that provides participants a chance to catch their breath and become acquainted with others in their group. ★ ★ ★

In light of the transition to new curriculum across the country, our Gifted Education Essentials focuses on the Common Core State Standards. The Essentials event includes an opening general session, materials,

lunch, and your choice of Essential topics in the morning and afternoon. Space may still be available, so please stop by the NAGC Registration Desk. ★ ★ ★

This first day of NAGC in Denver ends on mountain peak, with “Voice of Leadership.” All are welcome to join NAGC leaders for what will be an enlightening and candid exploration. ★ ★ ★

The National Consortium of Specialized Secondary Schools in Math, Science, and Technology (NCSSSMST) is joining us in Denver and kicks off their conference with a reception this evening at the Grand Hyatt Hotel.

Wednesday Schedule at a Glance 7:00 AM – 6:00 PM

Registration Open 7:30 AM – 8:30 AM

Action Lab Orientation

Hyatt Regency Mineral Hall Action Lab departure times vary from Hyatt Regency Porte-Cochere A1. Go Boulder: Art, Education, Science, Flavor A2. Ricks Center for Gifted Children: Twenty-Eight Years of Successfully Educating A4. Experience the Old West on Colorado’s Front Range

4:15 PM – 6:00 PM

Voices of Leadership Hyatt Regency Mineral Hall

3:00 PM – 6:30 PM

NCSSSMST Registration Open Grand Hyatt Capitol Peak Ballroom Foyer

6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

NCSSSMST Opening Reception Grand Hyatt Capitol Peak Ballroom

9:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Gifted Education Essentials

Supporting Gifted and High-Potential Learners in a Common Core State Standards Environment Hyatt Regency

Legend of Icons Recorded Session NAGC Base Camp

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National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit

Poster Session NCSSSMST


Gifted Education Essentials November 14, 2012 | 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Supporting Gifted and High-Potential Learners in a Common Core State Standards Environment: What Every Teacher Leader Needs to Know The adoption of the Common Core State Standards in almost every state is cause for gifted education as a field to reflect on its role in supporting gifted and high-potential learners appropriately in the content areas, specifically English language arts and Mathematics. The day begins with a broad and practical overview of the role of standards in designing and delivering high quality programs. As the day moves forward, the focus gets more specific: targeting implementation issues related to curriculum, collaboration, use in various gifted education service models, and implications for professional development.

Wednesday

Separate Registration Required/Lunch and handouts included

All sessions are in the Hyatt Regency. 9:00 AM – 10:30 AM

General Session Building a Strong Foundation: Overview of Common Core Susan Johnsen, Baylor University, Waco, TX; Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary

The day will begin with an overview of what every gifted educator needs to know about designing and delivering excellent programs for high-ability learners including the use of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) to advance student development. Key discussion questions will include: • What do gifted leaders need to know about the CCSS? • How do our gifted students develop their talents over time? How might pathways to excellence be created within the CCSS? • How do the NAGC Pre-K-12 Gifted Education Programming Standards and 21st Century Skills align with the CCSS? • How is the role of acceleration and enrichment related to successful implementation? Room: Hyatt Mineral Hall

10:45 AM – 12:00 PM

Modifying the Common Core for High-Ability Learners: Let’s Get Specific

BREAKOUT 1

Implementing Common Core English Language Arts Standards: Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language Usage Expert session leaders: • Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA • Claire Hughes, College of Coastal Georgia, Brunswick, GA • Debra Troxclair, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX • Todd Kettler, University of North Texas, Denton, TX • Jennifer L. Jolly, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA Room: Hyatt Granite ABC

BREAKOUT 2

Implementing Common Core Mathematics Standards: Operations and Algebraic Thinking, Numbers and Operations-Fractions, Geometry, Measurement and Data, and Statistics and Probability Expert session leaders: • Linda Jensen Sheffield, Northern Kentucky University, Highland Heights, KY • Susan Johnsen, Baylor University, Waco, TX • Cheryll M. Adams, Ball State University, Muncie, IN • Alicia Cotabish, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR

(choose one session in this timeframe)

Room: Hyatt Agate ABC

In the next two timeframes, choose a session by content focus. Both breakouts will cover: • Tailoring learning experiences by adding depth and complexity to the standards • Specific examples of differentiated performance tasks within the standards strands • Developing assessments for the differentiated assignments

12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Networking Luncheon Room: Hyatt Mineral Hall

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Gifted Education Essentials November 14, 2012 | 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Wednesday

1:15 PM – 2:45 PM

Modifying the Common Core for High-Ability Learners (continued) (choose one session in this timeframe)

BREAKOUT 1:

3:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Relationships Between Program Models and the CCSS: What’s Your Role in Your Building and District? (choose one session in this timeframe)

Implementing Common Core English Language Arts Standards: Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language Usage • Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA • Claire Hughes, College of Coastal Georgia, Brunswick, GA • Debra Troxclair, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX • Todd Kettler, University of North Texas, Denton, TX • Jennifer L. Jolly, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

BREAKOUT 1:

Room: Hyatt Granite ABC

BREAKOUT 2:

BREAKOUT 2:

Implementing Common Core Mathematics Standards: Operations and Algebraic Thinking, Numbers and Operations-Fractions, Geometry, Measurement and Data, and Statistics and Probability • Linda Jensen Sheffield, Northern Kentucky University, Highland Heights, KY • Susan Johnsen, Baylor University, Waco, TX • Cheryll Adams, Ball State University, Muncie, IN •A  licia Cotabish, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR Room: Hyatt Agate ABC

Collaborating with general and special education (e.g., RtI) to better support high-ability students • Cheryll M. Adams, Ball State University, Muncie, IN • Claire Hughes, College of Coastal Georgia, Brunswick, GA • Chrystyna Mursky, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Madison, WI Room: Hyatt Mineral Hall

Connections Between Gifted Education Program Models (e.g., Pull Out, Magnet School, School-Wide Enrichment) and Implementation Of The Common Core State Standards • Alicia Cotabish, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR Room: Hyatt Agate ABC

BREAKOUT 3:

What Is Your Leadership Role In Implementation To Ensure Success—If You’re Going To Be Adopting The Ccss In Your District, What Professional Development Do You And Others Need? • Todd Kettler, University of North Texas, Denton, TX Room: Hyatt Granite ABC

4:15 PM – 6:00 PM

Voices of Leadership: A Range of Perspectives from the Field Moderator: George Betts, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO. Panelists: Richard Cash, Bloomington Public Schools, Bloomington, MN; Jean Sunde Peterson, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Mary Ruth Coleman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; Joy Lawson Davis, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA; Scott L. Hunsaker, Utah State University, Logan, UT Take advantage of this opportunity to reflect on your own leadership style as you learn from the stories and insights of

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these NAGC leaders. What personal leadership skills help them to be successful? What important choices have they made to further their careers, support high-ability learners, and make a difference in the field of gifted education? What big ideas, core values, and purposeful actions add up to success? This interactive and candid exploration will keep you engaged and entertained—for a great finish to an information-packed day! Room: Hyatt Mineral Hall

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Thursday Highlights Recorded Session

Poster Session

NAGC Base Camp

NCSSSMST

November 15, 2012

Our ascent begins!

Gifted Applications in the Classroom: Critical Issues and Models for Delivering Successful Programs and Services is designed to offer a more in-depth examination of gifted education applications in your area of interest. Lunch and materials are included in your registration fee. Space may still be available, so stop by the Registration Desk.

If you’re interested in secondary school STEM issues, make plans to attend the NCSSSMST Conference concurrent sessions on Thursday, November 15 at the Grand Hyatt. An additional fee is charged for materials, breaks, and lunch. (see pages 12-20.) Find out what’s new in the field of gifted and talented education at the Exhibit Hall Opening Reception in NAGC Base Camp. Enjoy light refreshments as you take a walk through the exhibits. Make a point to talk to the exhibitors and discover a new resource or tool, or two or three! Take a walk down the red carpet! The NAGC Celebration of Excellence toasts the achievements of leaders in the field and celebrates the musical talents of Colorado students. The evening includes the presidential address and a reception.

Thursday

T

his is the first “official” day of the largest annual event dedicated to gifted and talented education. Yet, just in the past 24 hours, the NAGC board of directors has been planning for the future, Action Lab attendees were getting an up-close look at the region, and still more friends of GT education learned how to design and deliver programs within the new Common Core State Standards. Hang on since there are four more days of excellent programming, experiential learning, and excitement!

Thursday Schedule at a Glance 7:30 AM – 6:00 PM

2:30 PM – 4:00 PM

9:00 AM – 2:00 PM

CC Four Seasons Ballroom

Registration Open

Opening General Session with Chester E. Finn

Colorado Leadership Forum (CAGT) Hyatt Capitol Ballroom

8:00 AM – 2:15 PM

Gifted Education Applications: Critical Issues and Models for Delivering Successful Programs and Services (Separate registration fee)

1:00 PM – 2:00 PM

First-timers Orientation CC 207 (meeting Room Level)

4:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Exhibit Hall Opening Reception at NAGC Base Camp Exhibit Hall A

5:00 PM – 7:00 PM

Celebration of Excellence and Reception with Presidential Address, “What Gifted Education Can Teach General Education: Sharing Our Stories of Success” Hyatt Capitol (4th Level)

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Thursday General Session November 15, 2012 | 2:30 PM – 4:00 PM | CC Four Seasons Ballrooom Education’s Neglect of High-Ability Learners and What We Can Do to Change It Chester E. Finn, President, Thomas B. Fordham Institute, Washington, D.C. Every motivated, high-potential young American deserves the opportunity to excel in school. Many never get the opportunity.

Thursday

Chester E. Finn, better known to friends, colleagues and pundits as “Checker,” can provide compelling data to back up this observation. Through research commissioned by the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, Finn can point to more than one data set and trend that speaks to public education’s neglect of high-ability students. During this session Finn will share his own observations on the performance of top students and where he sees opportunities for change. He also will provide key

For his leadership and steady commitment to shining a bright light on the needs of high

findings from his NEW book, Exam

potential learners—through

Schools: Inside America’s Most Selective

research and advocacy—

Public High Schools, coauthored with Jessica

Chester Finn will also be honored

Hockett, about what high quality education

with the NAGC President’s

for exceptionally able and high-achieving youngsters looks like.

Award during the session.

“If we want to compete in a global economy, don’t we need all our young people—including our highest achievers—to make steady progress, too?”

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— Chester E. Finn, Jr.

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Thursday Gifted Education Applications November 15, 2012 | 8:00 AM – 2:15 PM Separate Registration Required/Lunch and handouts included

8:00 AM – 2:15 PM

Gifted Education Applications: Critical Issues and Models for Delivering Successful Programs and Services Thursday’s program is designed to offer a more in-depth examination of gifted education applications in your area of interest. Whether you are an administrator or experienced gifted coordinator, you’re sure to find something to raise your knowledge and expertise to new heights.

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

Opening General Session: Gifted Leading the Way:  National Priorities and Opportunities for Action

Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; Nancy Green, NAGC, Washington, DC Whatever your role in education, information about the national picture can make you more effective. What are the major national issues facing gifted education?  How does NAGC plan to play a role? Attend to hear compelling findings from a “National Summit on Low-Income, High-Ability Learners,” that focus on both a research and practice agenda for the field. You’ll also come away with a new understanding of NAGC’s advocacy priorities and the tools you can use in your own environment to make the case for gifted education. Room: Four Seasons Ballroom

Applications Breakout Sessions 9:15 AM – 11:00 AM — Morning Session T1. GT Coordinator Support: Learn, Share, and Problem-Solve Together

Virginia Burney, Kristie Speirs Neumeister, Ball State University, Muncie, IN GT Program Administrators or Coordinators have a uniquely challenging job. They must be able to explain and defend and educate others about what, why, and how to identify and serve gifted students. They need to understand laws, rules, policies, guidelines, procedures, and budgets. They need psychometric, leadership, and curriculum knowledge and skills to be able to work with the range of K-12 teachers and administrators. This session shares best practices in the core areas of GT

programming including identification, services, and program effectiveness and provides opportunities to network and problem solve with others who share similar challenges. Room: 103

T2. Supporting Peak Performance 24/7: Creating Standards-Based Talent Development Programs in Your District

Thursday

Colorado Convention Center (CC)

Lauri Kirsch, Christie Ray, Hillsborough County Public Schools, Tampa, FL

While most districts focus on providing gifted programming within the parameters of the school day, the need for talent development opportunities extends beyond the confines of the school calendar. How has one district looked at students’ abilities, needs, and interests to provide self-supporting talent development opportunities beyond the school day and beyond the school year? Attend this session and learn about providing challenging academically-oriented enrichment programs through live and virtual options. Come with curiosity and leave with ideas and resources for expanding programming for gifted and talented students in your district! Room: 107

T3. D  igital Storytelling: Narratives for the 21st Century

Kristen Stephens, Susan Wynn, Duke University, Durham, NC Today’s students are accustomed to creating, consuming, and sharing information using an array of technologies. Digital storytelling is one method that can be used in the classroom that blends writing, technology, and emotion—addressing both the cognitive and affective domains. Joining personal narratives with images, video, voiceover, soundtrack, and effects, digital stories demonstrate what learning should look like in the 21st century. Participants are guided through the 7 elements of a digital story

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Thursday Gifted Education Applications November 15, 2012 and begin writing their own stories. Without a doubt, digital storytelling can bring out the artist, the storyteller, the techie, and the writer in you and your students!

Room: 201

Room:102

Elfi Sanderson, Amy Gyarmathy, Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

T5. Preparing Gifted Hispanic/Latino Students to be Successful Citizens of the World: What We Can Do to Help Them Now and In The Future

Jaime A. Castellano, Ganado Unified School District, Ganado, AZ

Thursday

Why is it important for our country’s best and brightest Hispanic/ Latino students to participate in advanced academic programs like gifted education, honors, Advanced Placement, and International Baccalaureate? Perhaps your insights in answering this question inform classroom practices and supervisory or administrative behaviors, attitudes, and perceptions. In part, this session focuses on the adult variable of the gifted education equation, inviting participants to engage in reflection, to think critically, and to collaborate and communicate with each other in how they are invested in serving this unique subgroup. It also addresses programmatic changes in practices that will help prepare our gifted Hispanic/Latino students to be successful. Room: 106

T6. Developing Talent in the STEM Fields in the Era of the Common Core State Standards (morning session focuses on grades K-5) Scott A. Chamberlin, Emily Coxbill, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY; Cheryll M. Adams, Ball State University, Muncie, IN; Ronald L. Carr, Daphne Duncan-Wiles, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Tutita Casa, Katherine Gavin, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Janet Tassell, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics are critical to our position as a global leader. The Common Core State Standards stress rigor, depth, clarity, and coherence, but fall short of meeting the needs of gifted and talented students. In this session, participants explore the CCSS in elementary mathematics and research-based strategies, innovation, curriculum, and resources for serving diverse, promising STEM students. Participants choose from roundtable groups as they actively investigate approaches to support and develop K-5 STEM students and discuss current issues and implications of national initiatives with STEM experts.

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T7. B  est Practices in Developing Online Classes for Gifted Students

With the explosion of K-12 online learning programs, there are myriad models from which to choose. This new venue holds great promise for gifted students providing greater access to academically rigorous curriculum, intellectual peers, and 21st century skills. What factors must be taken into consideration when creating or selecting high quality online courses? This session discusses the needs of the online gifted learner, the appropriate delivery of online content, and the use of the best available technology based on iNACOL’s National Standards for Quality Teaching and NAGC gifted programming standards. Room: 203

T8. U  ntethered Learning through the Use of Technology and Curricular Design: Part I Kristina Ayers Paul, Purdue University, West Lafayette; Jann H. Leppien, University of Great Falls, Great Falls, MT; Jennifer Troester, O’Neill Public Schools, O’Neill, NE

Educators and administrators in gifted education face the challenge of providing learning experiences for students and teachers who are stationed throughout a building, district, or even region. Several technology tools, when married with principles of sound instructional design, can untether learning opportunities from the obstacles of place and time. In this two-part session learn about technology solutions for providing educational experiences at a distance, discuss the principles of instructional design that must be considered when designing technology-based learning, and practice using one or more of the tools discussed. Room: 108

T9. Beyond the Core: Infusing Critical and Creative Thinking into the Curriculum Susan Dulong Langley, Framingham Public Schools, Framingham, MA

The Common Core State Standards developers acknowledge that the Standards do not define the intervention methods or materials necessary to support students who are well above grade-level expectations and state that the Standards are a call to

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Room: 205

T10. Secondary Programs for Advanced Learners: Effective Models & Services

Richard Cash, Bloomington Public Schools, Bloomington, MN

Applications Afternoon Sessions 12:30 PM – 2:15 PM — Afternoon Sessions T4. Early Entrance Programs for Young Gifted Children: Preparing for Four Year-Olds in Kindergarten

Kimberley L. Chandler, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Melinda Ness, Littleton Public Schools, Littleton, CO

Services for advanced secondary students are often limited to honors courses, Advanced Placement, and/or International Baccalaureate programs, which are not specifically differentiated to meet the needs of gifted adolescents. Well-rounded programs and services for secondary gifted learners nurture underrepresented students, provide sophisticated academics, and offer exacting guidance in unique social-emotional development. Participants learn the range of services and programming options and how they can be effectively implemented at the secondary level (grades 6-12).

Early entrance into kindergarten and first grade for highly gifted children is a new trend in many districts. Student success in these programs is contingent on superior levels of academic, social, and emotional proficiency. Presenters share the research supporting early entrance as well as information about possible pitfalls. The components for planning a thriving program, including: screening and identification procedures; changes needed in the K-1 classrooms to support these learners; professional development requirements; and classroom curricular and environmental needs are delineated. Participants receive a planning guide for developing their own early entrance programs.

Room: 104

Room: 108

T11. Gifted Education Programming: A Sherpa for Guiding Everyone to New Heights

T12. D  eveloping Talent in the STEM Fields in the Era of the Common Core State Standards (afternoon session focuses on grades 6-12)

Sally Krisel, Hall County Schools, Gainesville, GA

Refusing to focus on “adequacy” or take a deficiency view of children from diverse backgrounds, Hall County educators have chosen a pull-from-the-top approach to achievement. Systematically and collaboratively, they are developing challenging programs with their roots in gifted education that allow teachers to recognize and develop gifts and talents in students from diverse populations. Discussion includes highly personalized programming options, use of innovative technologies to add depth and complexity to curriculum, and a districtwide reconceptualization of RtI. Come learn about this counter-intuitive approach and start identifying potential Sherpa guides for your school or school system.

Linda Jensen Sheffield, Northern Kentucky University, Highland Heights, KY; Heather Gramberg Carmody, Park Tudor, Indianapolis, IN; Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Eric L. Mann, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Chris Schultz, Iowa State University, Ames, IA

11:15 AM – 12:15 PM

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics are critical to our position as a global leader. The Common Core State Standards stress rigor, depth, clarity, and coherence, but fall short of meeting the needs of gifted and talented students. Participants explore the CCSS in mathematics and research-based strategies, innovation, curriculum, and resources for serving diverse, promising STEM students. Participants choose from roundtable groups as they actively investigate approaches to support and develop STEM students in grades 6-12 and discuss current issues and implications of national initiatives with STEM experts.

Room: Four Seasons Ballroom 4

Room: 205

Room: 105

Applications Networking Lunch

Thursday

take the next step. What, then, is the next step? Explore strategies in curriculum and lesson design to support: establishing essential elements; developing pre-formative and summative assessments to inform instruction; tiering by cognitive complexity; and infusing creative-thinking skills.

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Thursday Gifted Education Applications November 15, 2012 T13. Untethered Learning Through the Use of Technology and Curricular Design: Part II Kristina Ayers Paul, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Jann H. Leppien, University of Great Falls, Great Falls, MT; Jennifer Troester, O’Neill Public Schools, O’Neill, NE

Thursday

Educators and administrators in gifted education face the challenge of providing learning experiences for students and teachers who are stationed throughout a building, district, or even region. Several technology tools, when married with principles of sound instructional design, can untether learning opportunities from the obstacles of place and time. In this two-part session, learn about technology solutions for providing educational experiences at a distance, discuss the principles of instructional design that must be considered when designing technology-based learning, and practice using one or more of the tools discussed. Room: 105

T14. Connections: Preparing for the Next 25 Years in Gifted Education

George Betts, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO; Blanche Kapushion, Jefferson County Public Schools, Golden, CO What if a new approach to gifted education were to be formed by educators, administrators, and parents with students as the central focus and as the leaders of this new programming? The result would be a collaborative approach with gifted learners as active participants in helping to determine and direct their learning. Components of this learner-centered approach include definitions, formal and informal identification, RtI, appropriate placement, programming, and assessment. Learn about this model and begin applying as soon as you return home. Room: 102

T15. Reaching a Higher Level through Personalized Learning Marcia Wall, Coeur d’Alene, ID

High-performing students with more eclectic interests may require different forms of instruction than typical school curricula offers. Students often long for some control over their

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learning. Extended Learning Internships combine research, goal setting, and a mentor connection that takes the depth of the experience beyond fulfilling learning goals. Structuring programs that give students freedom while guiding them through their learning can be tricky. This session provides a detailed framework and materials to create an independent study mentorship class that can work in small and large school settings. Room: 104

T16. Total School Cluster Grouping: Connecting Elementary Programming to Middle Grades Marcia Gentry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Total School Cluster Grouping, which focuses on differentiation and flexible grouping, provides full-time services to gifted students and benefits all students and teachers in the school. Research on TSCG has shown that student achievement increases, teachers widely implement gifted education strategies with all students, more students are identified as high achieving, and fewer students, including students from economically disadvantaged families and diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds, are identified as low-achieving. Participants learn about TSCG and leave with resources and tools to create staff and community buy-in, which are essential to a strong program. Room: 203

T17. Implementing the Schoolwide Enrichment Model

Sally M. Reis, Joseph S. Renzulli, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT This session summarizes research and practice on The Schoolwide Enrichment Model and specific strategies for implementing a model that is used in thousands of schools across the world. The model, based on four decades of research, practice, and development, is a comprehensive system for infusing “high-end learning” into total school enrichment efforts while simultaneously challenging gifted and talented students. The SEM has, at its core, 21st century skills such as critical and creative-problem solving skills, as well as creative productivity, inventiveness, and innovation. Room: 106

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

T18. Lifelines! Differentiation with Biography

Ann Robinson, Merve Topak Jamsran, University of Arkansas at Little Rock; Mary Kathryn Stein, Arkansas Department of Education, Little Rock, AR Teachers need lifelines to keep afloat in a busy classroom! The Common Core calls for more non-fiction reading. The NAGC PreK-Grade 12 Gifted Programming Standards specifically note that biography meets the needs of gifted students for culturally relevant instruction and career exploration. Whether you teach art, science, history, music, or math, there are high-interest, creative biographies you can use to differentiate any curriculum unit. Review exemplary biographies and teaching guides for grades K-8. Master the steps for creating your own guide, a Blueprint for Biography, for your favorite children’s biography. Take home a bibliography of recommended biographies. Make biography your lifeline to differentiation. Room: 201

T19. Rigor, Relevancy, & Relationships: Developing and Maintaining Engagement of High Potential, Culturally Diverse Middle and High School Students

Joy Lawson Davis, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA The goal of increasing access and representation of African American, Hispanic, and other culturally diverse students in gifted and advanced learner programs is coupled with the challenge of student retention in these programs. This session provides evidence-based practices and intellectually engaging instruction that are simultaneously culturally responsive, designed to affirm students’ cultural identity, and increase their self-esteem as scholars. Participants engage in small-group problem solving based on simulations of middle and high school core content and interdisciplinary instructional environments.

NAGC Base Camp

NCSSSMST

T20. Any Questions?

Stuart N. Omdal, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO; Kris Haslund, St. Paul Public Schools, St. Paul, MN Honing your skills in asking questions is vital in moving your students to think at higher levels and keeping them engaged in the learning process. Also important is teaching your students to ask questions about the content and related topics. This can awaken curiosity and help them build connections to other content areas, consider critical issues, expand ideas for further investigations, and help them become independent learners. In this session learn about the types of questions that elicit higher levels in both critical and creative thinking and ways to implement them. Room: 103

T21. U  -STARS~PLUS: Recognizing and Responding to Young Children of Promise

Mary Ruth Coleman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; Jacquelin Medina, Debbie L. Rothenberg, Colorado Department of Education, Denver, CO

Thursday

Recorded Session

Early recognition and nurturing of children of promise is critical to closing the achievement gap and ensuring equity within gifted education. Attendees learn how U-STARS~PLUS uses high quality science and literature instruction in K-3 to respond to student strengths with challenging opportunities, recognize children with high potential, and engage families in academic support. U-STARS~PLUS fits within multi-tiered supports and services (RtI) by focusing on nurturing children’s potential and building a body of evidence showing the child’s strengths for formal identification as gifted. Room: 601

Room: 107

When the mind is thinking, it is talking to itself. —Plato

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NCSSSMST Annual Professional Conference November 15, 2012 National Consortium of Specialized Secondary Schools in Math, Science, and Technology (NCSSSMST) is the nation’s alliance of secondary schools and programs preparing students for success and leadership in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. It seeks to serve its members’ students and professionals, to foster collaborations, to inform STEM policy, and to advocate transformation in education. In 2012, NAGC and NCSSSMST join forces to present the NCSSSMST

Thursday

Annual Professional Conference in conjunction with NAGC’s 59th Annual Convention and Exhibition in Denver, Colorado.

All NCSSSMST Sessions located at Grand Hyatt, 1750 Welton Street

7:00 AM – 12:30 PM

NCSSSMST Registration Open Imperial Ballroom Foyer

8:15 AM – 9:15 AM

Assessing the Impact of a School for Science and Math Jonathan Creamer, School for Science and Math at Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN The School for Science and Math at Vanderbilt is a parttime school teaching hands-on, interdisciplinary science to

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There is no charge to attend the NCSSSMST concur rent sessions, but a fee of $50 will be charged for materials and refreshments inc luding breakfast and lunch . Please visit NAGC Conven tion Registration for mor e information.

advanced public high school students. The initial impact of SSMV was evaluated by comparing SSMV student achievement to a matched group of non-attending students, gathering demographic data and completion of anonymous satisfaction surveys by SSMV students throughout the year. SSMV students were found to perform at higher levels academically and had high levels of satisfaction with the program. Additional impacts were also noted. This presentation will detail evaluation methods and results, and hopes to promote discussion about evaluating STEM educational programs. Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Columbia

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Bob Kolvoord, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA The new General Engineering program at James Madison University uses engineering design as the spine of its innovative curriculum and focuses on principles of sustainable design. This program was designed in response to many of the recent ideas about STEM reform and offers both an interesting model for Consortium schools as well as a destination for Consortium students. The presentation shares the details of the program and engages participants in a conversation about the affordances of such a curriculum in both secondary and tertiary education. Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Evans A

The Politics of Federal Funding for STEM Education Noah Pittman, University of Arkansas Honors College, Fayetteville, AR

Politicians from both parties like to stress the importance of STEM funding when education policy is discussed, but do they always follow through on their promises? The presentation first assesses political rhetoric concerning STEM and whether or not it has translated into meaningful policies on the federal level. Next, different public policy theories are applied to describe the issues STEM education funding proposals face when trying to gain the attention of policymakers. The presentation concludes with a brief discussion of the results of the 2012 federal election to help predict the next four years of STEM education policy. Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Wilson

Appreciating Diversity

Wylie Burgan, High School for Math, Science, & Engineering @ the City College of New York, New York, NY This workshop addresses the skills educators need to increase levels of sensitivity. Appreciating diversity in education aims for the highest level of intellectual functioning and at the affective level, aims for the highest level of socio-cultural competence for all.

When Counseling Services and Residential Life Join Forces: Social and Emotional Support for Gifted High School Students in a College Environment Christopher Bowen, Beth Hawke, Gatton Academy, Bowling Green, KY

This program shares the social and emotional support program created at The Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science. The Academy is a public, residential high school for juniors and seniors who have demonstrated a desire to pursue advanced careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields in addition to exceptional educational performance. We take a look at how the Academy Counseling Office and the Department of Residential Life work collaboratively to help prepare and support Academy students who live in a residence hall and take college courses at Western Kentucky University. We share our Adventure Week preparation program, our 3-Semester Skills Course, our Community Creed, our Peer support program and other practical transitional developmental initiatives that are implemented as part of the Academy’s social and emotional program.

Thursday

A New Look at Engineering: The General Engineering Program at James Madison University

Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Oxford

Mapping the New Science Standards to Successful STEM Schools

Heather Sondel, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, Alexandria, VA School administrators complain that two main obstacles to implementing STEM programs are local constraints on curricular requirements and standardized testing. However, successful STEM schools across the country offer challenging programs that stretch students to think, create, and problemsolve real problems in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology first, then see how their work fits into the standards. This session encourages educators to share successful strategies and practices that are aligned to the new science standards. Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Yale

Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Harvard

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NCSSSMST Sessions November 15, 2012 Alternative Assessments: From Group Quizzes to Portfolios Donita Robinson, Maria Hernandez, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics, Durham, NC

Thursday

As many teachers are making the transition to a more studentcentered classroom, they may fall back on traditional tests and quizzes as their only form of assessment. In this session, we share ideas for a variety of student assessments that help us get a broader perspective of student learning. We also share assessments used in our mathematics classes, many of which can be modified for use in science classes as well. Some student work will be shared; discussion is welcome. Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Evans B

Urban Pre-engineering Education: Challenges and Opportunities

Thomas Henning, HS for Math, Science, and Engineering, New York, NY The greatest untapped reservoir of future engineering talent is the urban youth in our cities. They also have the racial, ethnic, and linguistic diversity that is highly sought-after by universities and corporations. However, far too few become practicing engineers. Their academic challenges are well studied, but there are many less well understood barriers to urban youth interested in the field. This session will look at practical ways to engage students in engineering topics and give them classroom experiences relevant to the their urban lives, and highly limited tools, materials, and workspaces. Physical, non-computer-based activities are the focus of this session. Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Princeton

9:30 AM – 10:30 AM

Encouraging and Supporting Gifted and Talented Latino Students

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recognized three-year residential college-preparatory high school focused on the development of creative, ethical leaders in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Participants also develop multiple assessment criteria to better identify gifted and talented Latino students as a strategy for encouraging, supporting, and teaching them. Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Wilson

Problem or Project-Based Learning: Which Should I Do? Erik M. Francis, Imagine Schools, Phoenix, AZ

Understand the difference between problem and project-based learning. Learn how to use both strategies to incorporate higher-order thinking in instruction and learning. Determine which instructional strategy is most effective in relation to the subject area being taught, the needs of students, and the expected outcomes of a unit. Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Columbia

Fun with Physics: Catapults, Trebuckets, and Other Weapons of Mass Instruction Fred Douglas Estes, The Nueva School, Hillsborough, CA

Middle School students love building and firing catapults. Like everyone else, they learn best when they are actively engaged in learning with a project they find fun and challenging. Catapults can help teach the physics of projectile motion and system variables; they integrate well with math, design engineering, art, history, and the humanities. Teach mass, math, momentum, mechanical advantage, modularity, and medieval weaponry in the same unit. Catapult investigations can help students learn to conduct controlled experiments and apply math in the context of science. Teach and assess national standards for science with ancient weapons of mass instruction. Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Harvard

Aracelys Rios, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy, Aurora, IL

Cultivating STEM and Inquiry in a Comprehensive High School

Identification of Latino students for gifted and talented programs along with providing access to resources for working with such students could be a challenge. Participants examine resources for identifying and working with gifted and talented Latino students by offering program models at the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy. IMSA is an internationally

This session exposes administration, teachers, and counselors to the schoolwide effort to explicitly instruct and enhance inquiry in addition to 21st century skills across all content areas including: science, technology, engineering, math, English, social science, world languages, physical education, fine arts, and

Erin DeLuga, Megan Knight, Wheeling High School, Wheeling, IL

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


media. The session includes an overview of 21st century skills as they relate to inquiry; QUEST as a tool to access information and research; post-secondary career pathways; and staff development to connect all content areas with STEM.

What is the role of technology and new media in the problemsolving process?

Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Wilson

Statistics with Electricity but Without Electronics

Sarah Harrelson, Liberal Arts and Science Academy, Austin, TX Frustrated by smart students who don’t know how to think? Advanced math curriculums do a great deal to prepare students to take hard calculus classes in college, but how do we prepare students to develop original mathematics? How do you teach students how to prove? Inquiry-based learning is all about teaching without teaching. I’ll share my experiences working with both the most advanced math students at my school together with the most remedial in an inquiry-based format. We’ll discuss both successes and failures under the inquiry based method. Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Evans B

STEM Internship Portal: Doorway to Professionalism

Deborah Ann Lesko, Maureen McMahon, Anne Arundel County Public Schools, Annapolis, MD How do we assist our students in the transition from student to young professional at the high school level? This session shares the story of the creation and implementation of the AACPS STEM Internship Portal and the journey of the perspective intern and host in an engaging process that opens the door of professionalism for the student. Actual portal demonstration and anecdotal evidence to support the success of this Monster. com-style program enhances participants’ understanding of the complete picture – opening the Doorway to Professionalism. Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Princeton

Strategies for Purposeful Problem Solving Jeff Milbourne, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics, Durham, NC

Purposeful problem solving is critical to success in the 21st century. But what does purposeful problem solving entail? How can teachers help students become purposeful problem solvers?

Jane Hemelt, Michael Samordic, Rocco Menella, Eleanor Roosevelt High School, Greenbelt, MD Presenters discuss their STAT Manual, which is used by middle schoolers and high schoolers for data analysis and as a primary text in an Intro Statistics college course. This is “hands-on” statistics. When the student is finished, he or she “owns” his/ her analyses. This is totally unlike the typical software creating ‘pop-up’ stats that leave the student devoid of comprehension of what just happened. The characters of The STAT Manual take you into the world of confidence intervals and hypothesis testing, using several different probability distributions. Oddly, you and students can actually enjoy this and they might not even realize they are learning statistics.

Thursday

My Adventures in the Land of Inquiry-Based Learning

Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Oxford

Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Yale

9:30 AM – 11:45 AM

Multi-Level Outcomes of Specialized Science High Schools Study

Rena F. Subotnik, American Psychological Association, Washington, DC; Christopher Kolar, Illinois Math & Science Academy, Aurora, IL; Edward Crowe, Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, Washington, DC What role will specialized SMT schools play in fulfilling the nation’s aspirations to cultivate future generations of scientific researchers and engineering entrepreneurs? According to recent National Research Council reports, schools need to build science instruction on the accumulated knowledge and experiences of their students. What are the implications of these recommendations for adolescents entering high school with high levels of academic achievement in SMT subjects, as well as expressed interest in STEM-related careers? The findings from our study (data collection is with 25 different specialized schools [n=3,536] and 2 programs for talented youth [n=577]) suggest several potentially important outcomes. Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Evans A

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NCSSSMST Sessions November 15, 2012 10:45 AM – 11:45 AM

SCIENCE Articles Made Classroom-Accessible

Pamela J. Hines and Melissa McCartney, AAAS, Washington, D.C.

Thursday

It’s tough to jump right into the complex language and presentation formats of the formal scientific research literature. And yet, it’s that literature where the research first makes scientific headline. The research literature also represents the scientific dialogue that leads to new discovery. How can your students find their way into this specialist literature? Science in the Classroom is a project from Science magazine, the leading journal published weekly by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. SitC presents selected research papers from Science magazine, and adds informative resources to help the non-expert read the original text. Resources for teachers are included as well. This project is currently under construction, and feedback from teachers is welcome to help refine the project.

QUEST and Inquiry in Social Science, Language Arts, and Library at a STEM High School

Barry Hanrahan, Sandra Chico, Megan Knight, Jennifer ZornSargent, Alan Wahlert, Wheeling High School, Wheeling, IL This session shares a schoolwide inquiry model - called QUEST - from the high school perspective. Teachers from the language arts, social sciences, and library present specific examples from a variety of courses and student skill levels. Direct connections to 21st century skills in a STEM building are also discussed. A group discussion of successes from the audience concludes the session. Bring your inquiry examples to share. Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Yale

Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Columbia

The Conceptual Foundations Network of the National Association for Gifted Children presents

Portraits in Gifted Education: The Legacy Series Please Join Us

NEW!

The Creative Voice of Don Treffinger This fifth DVD in the series honors Dr. Donald J. Treffinger, an internationally known researcher, writer, teacher, and presenter in the area of creativity and Creative Problem Solving, as well as in the area of gifted and talented education.

Also Available: •

An Afternoon with Alexinia Y. Baldwin

Dialogue with Jim Gallagher

A Conversation with Joe Renzulli

An Evening with Annemarie Roeper

for the videotaping for the next DVD in the Series featuring Sandy Kaplan on Friday, November 16, 4:10 - 5:30 pm, Hyatt Regency Centennial Ballroom

Get Your DVDs Today

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NAGC Central (booth 419) in the Exhibit Hall Or order online at www.nagc.org

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Wylie Burgan, High School for Math, Science, & Engineering @ the City College of New York, New York This workshop addresses the distinction between cooperative learning and direct instruction including; distinguishing methods of grouping students; evaluating advantages and disadvantages of group work; distinguishing best and worst group work tasks; analyzing student and teacher behaviors involved in group work; developing criteria to assess group work; and examining things to consider in designing group work. Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Harvard

Assessment Strategies in STEM Classes

Heather Sondel, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, Alexandria, VA There is much discussion around the recommended and required content for STEM specialty courses, but it is equally important to focus on how students are assessed in these courses. STEM courses require mastery of both knowledge and process skills, and students must be evaluated in both of these areas. Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Princeton

It’s Not Just About the Robot

Hilary Mallar, Bronx High School of Science, New York, NY From leadership to partnerships to engineering, learn about the many opportunities afforded to students participating in our school’s FIRST Robotics program. Receive information on how to start your own team. Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Oxford

12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Keynote Lunch Suicidal Behavior of Students: Implications for Specialized Schools Tracy L. Cross, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA

Research about the suicidal behavior of talented students is quite limited. There has been so little empirical research conducted that it is difficult to say with authority what the actual prevalence rates of suicides. Even less is known about suicide ideation, gesturing, or attempts. This presentation will share the research on the suicidal behavior of students with gifts and talents. Specifically, psychological autopsies conducted about the lives of three gifted students who completed suicide and who had been students in a residential academy will be shared. From the research, further information about how to recognize intellectually students in distress and how to prevent future suicides will be shared.

Thursday

Cooperative Learning - Designing Group Work

Room: Grand Hyatt Imperial Ballroom

1:15 PM – 2:15 PM

Where Are We Ever Going to Use this *&^$#* Stuff Anyway? Gerald S. Greenbaum, Eleanor Roosevelt High School, Greenbelt, MD

Helping students understand the real-world application of complex concepts is critical to learning. I attempt to show that the topic of Linear Programming is a very useful tool in mathematical “real life” situations, which I then expand slightly to include all types of Linear Programming problems. Finally I attempt to do the same for conic sections, another topic that we teach but often do not explain why the students need to learn it. Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Evans B

To raise new questions, new possibilities, to regard old problems from a new angle, requires creative imagination and marks real advances. —Albert Einstein

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November 15-18, 2012 | Denver, Colorado

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NCSSSMST Sessions November 15, 2012 Mathematics Readiness Assessment for Physics

Jennifer Allard, Marianne Razzino, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, Alexandria, VA

Thursday

TJHSST math teachers share experiences with a collaborative math-science effort to assess student readiness for an 11th grade required physics course. We describe the process of developing and administering the tool as a collaborative, discuss lessons learned in analyzing the results, and share the process by which we communicated the results to students and their parents as well as some of the strategies for remediation for students who were found to be less prepared than their peers. Finally, we suggest ideas for how to develop and implement standards-based readiness assessments for other math and science courses.

Administrators Roundtable

Tim Gott, Gatton Academy, Bowling Green, KY Have you ever just wanted to pick the brains of experts on best ways to handle the problems which you face as an administrator in one of the Consortium schools? If you have this is your chance. We are offering the expertise of experts who “have been there and done that” in your job. If you are currently an administrator or if you someday aspire to be one, then join us for this informative session, lead by one of our Consortium Board of Directors. We may not have all the answers but as either the Japanese proverb or Charlie Brown mused -- “none of us is as smart as all of us.” Come and let’s explore. Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Princeton

Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Evans A

Let us think of education as the means of developing our greatest abilities, because in each of us there is a private hope and dream which, fulfilled, can be translated into benefit for everyone and greater strength for our nation. — John F. Kennedy

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National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Mark Godwin, South Carolina Governor’s School for Science and Mathematics, Hartsville, SC Have you ever just wanted to pick the brains of experts on best ways to handle the problems that you face in a residential school? This is your chance. We offer the expertise of experts who “have been there and done that” in your job. If you are currently working in a residential setting or if you someday aspire to, then join us for this informative session, lead by a member of our Consortium board of directors. We may not have all the answers but as either the Japanese proverb or Charlie Brown mused -“none of us is as smart as all of us.” Come and let’s explore. Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Harvard

Spirit of Innovation Challenge

Carrie Taylor, Conrad Foundation, League City, TX The Spirit of Innovation Challenge provides an opportunity for teams of students to create commercially viable products or services to address issues of global sustainability for the benefit of humanity. This annual competition is free and available to students, ages 13-18, from around the world. The Spirit of Innovation Challenge offers teachers, parents and afterschool coordinators a relevant and dynamic way to teach science, technology, engineering and math. Working with teachers and parents, together we go beyond the textbook and help students truly understand how what they are learning can be applied to something with large-scale social impact.

The Spirit of Innovation Challenge is not just a program … it is a movement to train the next generation and drive the economy of tomorrow. Along the way, world-renowned scientists, engineers and entrepreneurs are available as virtual mentors to help teams Get Their Genius On. Student teams compete for awards and recognition, including a chance to attend the annual Innovation Summit where they will present their products and vie for seed grants, patent support and commercial opportunities. Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Wilson

Admissions Protocol/Counselor Development Roundtable

Letita Mason, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics, Durham, NC Do you have questions on the best ways to handle the problems that you face as a counselor or admission officer in one of the Consortium schools? This is your chance to ask them. We are offering the expertise of experts who “have been there and done that” in your job. If you are currently a counselor or work with admissions or if you someday aspire to, then join us for this informative session, lead by one of the members of our Consortium board of directors. We may not have all the answers but as either the Japanese proverb or Charlie Brown mused — “none of us is as smart as all of us.” Let’s find out together.

Thursday

Residential Schools Roundtable

Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Yale

Opening Session — NAGC Convention 2:30 PM – 4:30 PM | CC Four Seasons Ballrooom

Education’s Neglect of High-Ability Learners and What We Can Do to Change It, with Chester E. Finn

59th Annual Convention

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November 15-18, 2012 | Denver, Colorado

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NCSSSMST Sessions November 15, 2012 Fund Raising and Development Roundtable

Professional Development Roundtable

Are you a fundraiser or developer or if you someday aspire to be one, then join us for this informative session, lead by a member of our Consortium board of directors. Pick the brains on best ways to handle the problems that you face as a fundraiser or developer in one of the Consortium schools. We may not have all the answers but as either the Japanese proverb or Charlie Brown mused -- “none of us is as smart as all of us.” Discuss your questions with others who have been there.

If you are currently responsible for professional development or if you someday would like to and you have questions on best ways to handle the problems that you face in setting up good professional development in one of the Consortium schools, then join us for this informative session. We may not have all the answers but as either the Japanese proverb or Charlie Brown mused — “none of us is as smart as all of us.” Come and let’s explore.

Heather Sondel, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, Alexandria, VA

Thursday

Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Columbia

Nicole Anne Culella, Brooklyn Technical High School, New York, NY

Room: Grand Hyatt Mt. Oxford

The NAGC Celebration of Excellence Thursday, November 15 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM Hyatt Regency Capitol Ballroom Awards presented: • Ann Isaacs Founders Memorial Award

• David W. Belin Advocacy Award

• Community Service Award

• Distinguished Scholar Award

• Hollingworth Award

• Doctoral Student Awards

• Distinguished Service Award

• Early Scholar Award

• Masters’ and Specialists’ Award

• NAGC/Ball State Administrator Award

• Early Leader Award

• Gifted Child Quarterly Paper of the Year

Plus awards presented by Colorado Association for Gifted and Talented

“What Gifted Education Can Teach General Education: Sharing Our Stories of Success” NAGC President Paula Oszewski-Kubilius Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

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National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Looking for a speaker for a state or regional conference? It’s time for you to add an expert perspective to your event! NAGC current and past board members are available to local groups, State Affiliates and other conference planners to speak on numerous topics at a significant discount off their regular honorarium fee. NAGC appreciates the support of these ESP speakers: Felicia Dixon

Jann Leppien

Shelagh Gallagher

Christine Nobbe

Katie Augustyn

Marcia Gentry

Rick Olenchak*

Susan Baum

Kris Haslund

Ann Robinson*

George Betts

Thomas Hébert

Paula OlszewskiKubilius

Jaime Castellano*

Patricia Hollingsworth

Stuart Omdal

Bob Seney

Laurence Coleman

Sandy Kaplan

Mary Ruth Coleman

Frances Karnes

Bonnie Cramond

Lauri Kirsch

Tracy Cross

Sally Krisel

Sally Reis

Ken Dickson

Susan Dulong Langley

Julia Link Roberts

Jean Peterson* Jane Piirto Diana Reeves Sylvia Rimm*

Karen Rogers* Cindy Sheets Del Siegle* Mary Slade Kristen Stephens Carol Tieso

*These speakers have spoken January 1- November 1, 2011

And “thanks” to these conferences that welcomed an ESP “expert:” •

Alabama Association for Gifted Children Association for Gifted Children

Florida Association for the Gifted

Gifted Association of Missouri

Independent S D 492 of Austin

Kansas Association for the Gifted Talented & Creative

Montana AGATE

New Mexico Association for the Gifted

North Carolina Assoc. for the Gifted & Talented

Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented

Orange County Council for Gifted

www.nagc.org/esp.aspx


Friday General Sessions November 16, 2012 | 9:20 AM – 10:40 AM

Your choice of two dynamic general sessions Gardner, Renzulli, and Sternberg: In Their Own Voices in Our Time Moderator: Carolyn Callahan, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA Joseph S. Renzulli, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Robert Sternberg, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK; Howard Gardner, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (via simulcast)

Friday

Gain intimate insights into the evolution of thinking in the field of gifted education by listening to these three influential individuals reflect on how their ideas evolved along parallel and complementary paths. This once-in-a-lifetime opportunity presents Gardner, Renzulli, and Sternberg together to reflect on their individual histories and the amazing ways in which their ideas have overlapped. Explore “multiples” in our time and field as a follow up to their reflections first presented in Gifted Child Quarterly. Four Seasons Ballroom 3-4

Helping Different Kinds of Minds to Learn Temple Grandin, Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, CO Temple Grandin is a professor, prolific author, and one of the most accomplished and renowned adults in the world with autism. During this captivating general session, she will share her personal story, as well as her insights into the vibrant population we know as twice-exceptional children. Too often these kids—both gifted and diagnosed with a disability—get lost in in an endless cycle of chasing diagnostic labels and are never given the tools to fully realize their potential. Come away with deeper insights into the challenges these learners face, as well as a fresh perspective on what we in the support community of parents and educators, can do to help some of our brightest children succeed. Four Seasons Ballroom 1-2 Following the session, Temple will be joined by co-authors, Diane Kennedy and Rebecca Banks for an 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM session, Bright Not Broken: Maximizing the Potential of All Kinds of 2e Minds. Room 207

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Friday Highlights November 16, 2012

Welcome back to the NAGC Convention and the first full day of sessions and more!

Don’t forget to use Base Camp as your location for learning and preparing your action plan for returning to school on Monday. Make a point to talk to the exhibitors and discover a new resource or tool, or two or three! Base Camp is also your destination for the Mensa Mind Games break from 2:50 PM to 3:50 PM. Snacks will be available and you

can meet with colleagues while trying a few brain bending games and puzzles. Thanks also to SimplyFun for providing toys that you can take for a test drive. Each year at NAGC Convention, we celebrate the legacy of a leader in our field. You are invited to share in a dialogue with master educator and scholar Sandra N. Kaplan. The sessions will be taped as part of the Conceptual Foundations “Portraits in Gifted Education” series. It’s a night for networking as the NAGC Networks offer opportunities to socialize. Check out pages xxiii-xv for details.

Friday Schedule at a Glance 7:00 AM – 5:00 PM

1:30 PM – 2:30 PM

Registration Open

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Exhibitor Workshops

7:30 AM – 5:00 PM

NAGC Base Camp/Exhibit Hall Open Coffee 7:30 AM – 8:30 AM

2:50 PM – 3:50 PM

Mensa Mind Games Break NAGC Base Camp in Exhibit Hall A

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Exhibitor Workshops/Base Camp Sessions 9:20 AM – 10:40 AM

4:10 PM – 5:10 PM

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Exhibitor Workshops/Base Camp Sessions

General Sessions (choose one of 2) CC Four Seasons Ballroom

4:10 PM – 5:30 PM

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Reception to follow Hyatt Centennial Ballroom

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Exhibitor Workshops 11:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Lunch items available for purchase in Base Camp 12:15 PM – 1:00 PM

Friday

W

e are pleased to present two concurrent general sessions from which to choose at 9:20 AM in the Four Seasons Ballroom: “Gardner, Renzulli, and Sternberg: In Their Own Voices in Our Time” or “Helping Different Kinds of Minds to Learn.”

Putting it Into Practice Sessions

Portraits in Gifted Education: “Thinking Like a Master Teacher with Sandra Kaplan”

5:30 PM – 5:45 PM

NAGC Business Meeting Hyatt Mineral Hall

5:45 PM – 9:00 PM

Network Evening Events

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM Signature Series Examining the Relationship between Executive Function and Intelligence in Twice-Exceptional Children with Asperger Syndrome and HighFunctioning Autism: Empirical Evidence and Practical Application Layne Kalbfleisch, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA

Friday

Twice-exceptionality is not a diagnosis widely supported in mainstream education. Yet, these gifted children who have disabilities such as attention disorders, autism, Asperger syndrome, and dyslexia, to name a few, are poised to contribute to the world in extraordinary ways with their unique skills and talents in the visual and performing arts, design, and STEM fields. This presentation presents the first neuropsychological model to characterize twice-exceptional children with highfunctioning autism and Asperger syndrome, making it possible to identify specific aspects of executive function that are preserved by intelligence and that can be remediated in the classroom and social environments. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 103

Second Language Learning and Gifted Education

Ariel Baska, Fairfax County Public Schools, Centreville, VA; Bronwyn MacFarlane, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR; Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Michael Clay Thompson, Royal Fireworks Press, Durham, NC This special panel, organized around the importance of teaching a second language to gifted learners, examines the issue from multiple perspectives. The session features several components that build the case for including second languagelearning as a part of all gifted education programs: emphasizing the rationale for such inclusion, providing linkages to the gifted population as well as to 21st century learning; providing examples of differentiation in language coursework and products to illustrate applications to the field of gifted education; emphasizing the ways that language learning promotes cultural understanding and relevance through interdisciplinary applications of themes; and offering model scope and sequences that allow for gifted students to master

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Coffee in NAGC Basecamp 7:30 AM – 8:30 AM at least two languages. Presenters discuss the optional and optimal ways such learning might occur in today’s schools. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 708

Distinguished Scholar Award What Can We Learn from Creative Lives? Biography as Research in Gifted Education Ann Robinson, Jodie Mahony Center for Gifted Education, University of Arkansas at Little Rock

The study of individuals through archival, documentary, and biographical research provides a rich picture of the development of creative lives in context. While the roots of biography are generally located within the humanities disciplines, social scientists have also applied various forms of biographical research to the study of creativity, eminence, innovation, and talent development. In this NAGC Distinguished Scholar address, I suggest fruitful approaches for the use of biography in understanding creative development, illustrate various research approaches with examples from the literature and from archival images, and draw parallels and distinctions between biographies and case studies of creative lives. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers Room: 712

Arts Global Images for Global Thinkers: Stunning and Hilarious Lucille Beisner, Nova University, New Paris, OH; Karen Kimball, Richmond Schools, Richmond, IN

To develop an attitude of global interdependence in today’s classrooms, the study of art must reach beyond the boundaries of traditional learning. To be effective global citizens, students

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

must understand world cultures. To comprehend world cultures, students must study the art of humankind and develop personal responses with positive social action through a language that they own. This session provides practical lessons and resources for high school English, Social Studies, and Humanities teachers, realistic student input, and startling images to help students transcend world cultures while building self-referential autonomy and deepening understandings of our commonalities through art. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Consultants, Parents, Researchers Room: 601

Affective and Identity Development of Artistically Talented Adolescents: Five New Directions from Research

John P. Gaa, Rick Olenchak, Maryam Hussain, Justin Neil Young, Kelly Michelle Lee, University of Houston, Houston, TX Although identity development is central for all adolescents, it may be more so for those adolescents talented in the arts. This session discusses the implications of identity studies undertaken to improve the field’s understanding of artistic talent. These studies examined resolution of Erikson’s Eight Psychosocial Stages, Marcia’s four categories of identity resolution, the identity tasks faced by immigrant students, the motivational ideology of dropouts, and the goal orientation of students talented in the arts. Implications of these studies for classroom teachers, counselors, administrators, and parents, are discussed and interaction with audience members is encouraged. Audience: Classroom Teachers 9-12, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 208

Computers & Technology Game Your Way to Learning

Robbi Makely, Candy McGregor, Denver Public Schools, Denver, CO Do not miss this exciting session as we share an Internet-based scavenger hunt that takes students to places even Leonard Nimoy hasn’t traveled! This game is interdisciplinary and adaptable in length and scope. The clues require research, analysis, and writing that culminate in a student-created technology product. Bloom would be amazed as every element of his taxonomy is

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addressed in a highly motivational manner. Using Google Earth and our wiki page full of clues, the game is offered complete with teacher and student instructions and EVERYTHING you will need for implementation (and it’s all free). Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents Room: 702

Propel Students to Reach Beyond the Summit with Technology: How to Create a 21st Century Gifted Classroom April N. Coleman, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL

In the 21st century gifted classroom, the “3 R’s” are quickly being replaced by the “4 C’s.” Gain knowledge of the latest and greatest high tech tools and apps and their potential uses to promote students’ 21st century skills of creativity, critical thinking, communication, and collaboration. Participants are introduced to new technologies and gain ideas for using familiar tools in new ways. From iPad apps to free Web 2.0 tools, there’s something for everyone in this exciting, practical session! (Note: Participants are encouraged to bring their personal laptop or handheld device, although this is not necessary.)

Friday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Parents Room: 706

Online Learning Tools: The Poster Boards of the 21st Century? Laila Sanguras, University of North Texas, Coppell, TX

Blog workshops, discussion board trainings, wiki in-services. We’ve listened and we’ve learned the terminology; now is the time to create learning experiences that utilize technology in a rigorous manner. Whether teaching in a traditional, blended, or fully online format, participants learn how to engage students in their content in an online learning environment. This session provides an introduction to innovative digital tools available to educators, methods for how to maintain the rigor of a gifted and talented classroom in an online format, and suggestions from a teacher who turned her traditional classroom into an online one. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: 711

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM Conceptual Foundations 13.3 The Incredible Shrinking Exceptionalities of Twice- Exceptional College Students

Terence Paul Friedrichs, Friedrichs Education, Mendota Heights, MN Increasingly, K-12 gifted students with disabilities are identified and are enrolling in postsecondary programs. However, these youth are generally treated less exceptionally than during K-12 schooling, with reduced access to appropriate, college-level, advanced, and

disability programming. In this three-part session, the presenter first describes several literature-based trends for twice-exceptional (2e) students: including ongoing institutional barriers to differentiated college instruction. Second, he makes these trends impactful through case studies of 2e youth, and finally, attendees share ways to facilitate 2e youths’ postsecondary transitions. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Parents Room: NAGC Base Camp/Exhibit Hall A

COMBINED SESSION

Conceptual Foundations

Friday

8:00 AM – 8:30 AM

8:30 AM – 9:00 AM

The Conundrums of Success

Rosemary B. Cathcart, REACH Education, Rotorua, New Zealand What does “success” mean for the gifted individual? How do we, as teachers, determine our “success” in working with such individuals? Is the true criterion for both the manifestation by the student of “outstanding performance”? Surely this is an entirely reasonable proposition - that what distinguishes the gifted individual is exactly that - outstanding performance. Or is this, as some argue, a misleading emphasis for the educator? This is a debate that is central to our understanding of the goals and purposes of gifted education. Which road should we take? Or is there an alternative route? Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

The Roles and Functions of Spirituality Among the Gifted and Talented Michael Sayler, University of North Texas, Denton, TX

Personal thriving for the gifted, of any age, involves development of talents, the development of good habits or character, and the development of who I am and why I am here. This session explores the spiritual dimension of giftedness. It presents a conceptual model, which in part shows how spirituality is related to personal thriving among the gifted. Also review the historical and contemporary philosophical and religious underpinnings of the role of spirituality in achieving personal thriving as a gifted person. Audience: Parents, Researchers Room: 202

Check out Base Camp Sessions p. xxiv

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Recorded Session

Poster Session

Counseling & Guidance Twice-Exceptionality and Psychological Issues: Can Special Support Change the Psychological Outlook for These Children? Karen B. Rogers, University of St. Thomas, Minneapolis, MN

One hundred five twice-exceptional elementary children were monitored over a three-year period to assess their motivational, self-efficacy, and academic progress when placed in homogeneous gifted classrooms. Their teachers were extensively trained to know when and how to adapt and accommodate gifted curriculum by integrating social skills,

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executive functioning skills, and self-awareness training within the challenging learning experiences. From pre- and post-data collected annually using Harter’s Self-Perception Scales and the CAIMI, extensive improvements in self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation were found, in addition to improved math and reading achievement, despite their second “exceptionality” (ADD, SLD, ASD, EBD). Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-5, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 603

COMBINED SESSION

8:00 AM – 8:30 AM

8:30 AM – 9:00 AM

Levels of Service: Contemporary Inclusive Programming for Talent Development

Donald J. Treffinger, Center for Creative Learning, Sarasota, FL; Stephen T. Schroth, Knox College, Galesburg, IL; Connie Collins, University of Saint Francis, Fort Wayne, IN The Levels of Service approach to programming for talent development focuses on systematically recognizing and responding in appropriate and challenging ways to the strengths and talents of many students. Through more than three decades of work, LoS has been implemented in schools, districts, and on broader levels, lending itself to either new program development or restructuring established programs that seek to become more comprehensive and inclusive. LoS programming emphasizes integration of the regular school program with a variety of supplementary, specialized opportunities for students. LoS blends 21st century skills, differentiation, and collaboration across school, home, and community. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators

Leadership and Response to Intervention: A Framework for Identifying Potential

Robin Carey, Douglas County School District, Castle Rock, CO; George Betts, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO

Friday

Conceptual Foundations

Leaders in the field of gifted education must have a voice in fully utilizing the RtI framework as a potential-based approach to serving students. Presenters focus on the knowledge and skills necessary for educational leaders to utilize this staff development leadership approach to facilitate RtI teams. Participants gain an understanding of how implementing the RtI framework focuses on the learner and not the labels they acquire as they pass through the school system. The session provides an opportunity for participants to self-assess readiness for implementation of this powerful framework to identify and serve high-potential learners. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers Room: 703

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM Counseling & Guidance A Balancing Act: Nurturing Healthy Gifted Children

Richard Cash, Bloomington Public Schools, Bloomington, MN The complex nature of gifted children’s academic motivation and social mindfulness may lead to significant struggles within and outside of school. Healthy individuals are those who can find balance in their personal, educational, and metaphysical lives. This session highlights some of the confounding personal, academic, and philosophical issues gifted learners encounter that may inhibit a successful school and life experience. This workshop highlights resources, ideas, and strategies to increase self-regulation, a significant tool for academic and life success. Participants are offered ways in which to moderate asynchronous social development that supports and nurtures healthy gifted children.

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: 707

The Captain of My Ship: Teaching GT Children to Use Solution Focused Therapy Principles for Problem Solving and Educational Planning Reva Friedman, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS

GT youngsters come to the attention of school personnel due to their cognitive and affective strengths. These professionals and the gifted student’s parents direct goal-setting in the best interests of the young person. However, there is often reactance and resistance. In this session, learn key solution-focused, strength-based principles and proven practices applicable to a variety of issues that affect bright students at home and at school. Also learn how to teach gifted children and youth to use these approaches to address personal issues and to advocate for their educational goals and needs. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors Room: 210/212

16.1 Be Mindful of the Absent-Minded

Carol S. Malueg, University of St. Thomas, Minneapolis, MN

Missing Homework? Always late? Scatter-brained? Desk in chaos? Dawdling again? Does this sound like a child you know? That incredibly bright, creative, amazing child, yelling “Just a minute!” or “I had it right here!” or “Who took my papers?” when the rest of the family is out the door, or the class is working on the next task? Find ways to help the absent-minded children in your life develop strategies that work with their strengths, discover tools that “talk” to them, and build systems that spark their interest. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

31.1 W  here Are They Now? A Five-Year Follow-Up of Creative Young Adults

Barbara Kerr, Maria Alexandra Vuyk, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS What happens to creative students after high school? For six years, the Counseling Laboratory for Exploration of Optimal States has provided individual career counseling to over 800 creative adolescents. This presentation describes the follow-up of the first five cohorts of students to visit CLEOS. These young people, now in college or graduate school, were located by a Facebook search as well as their permanent addresses. They were surveyed and interviewed concerning their academic progress, their creative accomplishments, their career goals, and their current relationships. Differences in the trajectories of women and men, as well as differences by domains are described. Audience: Classroom Teachers 9-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

Creativity Teaching Innovative Thinking for 21st Century Success

Michelle Miller, Denver Public Schools, Denver, CO

The 21st century demands dynamic, innovative thinkers who can creatively solve problems and propel our global society into the creative unknown. This session transforms the tested and proven strategies used to train adult professionals to think innovatively into

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accessible, teachable activities for the classroom. This session teaches how to create the perfect brainstorm, design a “dream space” within the classroom, encourage students to create prototypes, and employ experimentation all year. It also delivers practical strategies to help students observe closely, find problems that lead to innovative solutions, flesh out ideas, and cross-pollinate for innovative success. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 104

23.3 A Symmetry Game: Matrix Theresa Ferg, University of Denver, Denver, CO

The Symmetry game, Matrix is a curriculum unit that helps students understand the difference in how we are visually seeing objects in space (perspective) and mentally conceptualizing them (perception). Matrix introduces students to the challenging concepts of group theory (the language of mathematics today) in a fun and experiential way to learn the fundamentals of symmetry and group theory. Participants learn how the concepts of this game can be imbedded into a math classroom focusing on the connection between symmetry and group theory. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

Developing Creative Thinking and Productivity through a Digital Lens in Training Teachers of the Gifted Online

Gillian I. Eriksson, Learning and Leadership, Orlando, FL This presentation examines how to incorporate new technologies into the creative process and productivity in training teachers of the gifted in an online format. The Nature and Development of Creativity course is one of the five courses required for the endorsement in gifted education. This university-based course uses design principles in its syllabus, learning tasks, and assignments, or “creative outcomes,” and in portfolio development. Teachers explore a toolkit of multiple options for using new technology formats and are engaged in constructing meaningful objectives relevant to their own context while implementing key creativity strategies. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators

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Step Up! Create! After-School Enrichment Designed to Promote Success for Secondary Students Jo E. Dale, Pat Garlikov, Bessemer City Schools, Bessemer, AL

Community leaders and educators in a high poverty, minority city established a 21st century Community Learning Center for middle and high school students with a creative edge. “Step Up!” and learn how this after-school program bridges enrichment experiences and academics, inspires creativity and innovation, increases the desire to learn, and ultimately the success of its teenaged program participants. This “how to” session for educators, community members, and parents, provides resources, materials and practical suggestions for successfully initiating, developing, and implementing an after-school program that promotes student creativity through hands-on involvement with the arts, technology, project-based learning, and community service. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 206

Design Thinking for Gifted Students

Friday

Recorded Session

Caroline Payson, Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, New York, NY Design, or Design Thinking, is an organizational principle for problem solving that supports important 21st century skills such as visual and technological literacy, creative problem solving, communication, and teamwork. In this session, designed as a workshop, participants learn how design thinking can be incorporated across the curriculum - in mathematics, science, environmental studies, language arts, history, and art - to support the needs of gifted learners. Participants experience the design process firsthand and see it implemented in a variety of resources developed through collaboration between teachers and students from around the country and experts from CooperHewitt. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 108

Room: 610/612

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM Curriculum Studies Beyond the Basal: Advanced Literacy Lesson Design

Diane Cassidy, Fountain-Fort Carson School District, Fountain, CO Gifted readers are often the most difficult to challenge and grow academically. Advanced students are often left to silent read or endure low-level basal lessons. Even supplemental reading materials won’t ensure gifted students will make academic gains if teachers are unaware of the essential components of advanced literary instruction. Examine ways to move beyond the word wall, the basal, and the worksheet to create dynamic, highlevel, and engaging lessons. This interactive workshop guides participants in the creation of a flipbook highlighting the seven critical elements of advanced literacy lesson design and a rubric to evaluate instruction and high-level learning.

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents Room: 101

It is Never TOO Early to Start Thinking

Debra Ellen Holder, Cynthia Yates, Nancy Jacobs, Loudoun County Public Schools, Ashburn, VA It is never too early to start thinking! Discover an engaging, hands-on session that provides information on how Loudoun County Public Schools, one of the fastest growing counties in the nation, begins their gifted services in kindergarten using an innovated curriculum that spirals developmentally through five components: reasoning, perceiving, connecting, evaluating,

and creating. Each grade level uses these components at an increasingly more complex and abstract level. This session explains the curriculum through the use of hands-on activities, sample lesson plans, Promethean board lessons, observation/ assessment tools, and modeling of lessons. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Coordinators, Parents Room: 608

Using the Parallel Curriculum Model to Develop Thinking in the 21st Century Learner Jann H. Leppien, University of Great Falls, Great Falls, MT; Marcia B. Imbeau, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR

How do we create and develop intellectual thinking in our students through the curriculum we design? This session explores how to infuse instruction in critical and creativethinking skills into standard content instruction in ways that both improve student thinking and enhance deep content learning by using the Parallel Curriculum Model. Teachers are introduced to a lesson plan framework and provided with sample lesson design materials that include instructional strategies for effectively teaching thinking in each of the four parallels, including the use of question strategies and graphic organizers for thinking skillfully. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents Room: 205

I’ve never made a mistake. I’ve only learned from experience. —Thomas A. Edison

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Poster Session

Educating with Altitude to Meet the Needs of Underserved Populations: Implications of Curriculum Research for Practice

Kimberley L. Chandler, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA In order for the needs of underserved gifted students to be addressed effectively, it is essential that curriculum interventions be designed and delivered in specific ways. In this session, the key elements of research-based interventions are delineated so that practitioners have an easy reference for directing their efforts. The session includes information regarding the efficacy of various curriculum interventions with this target population, including a review of the extant materials and their common features. Practical, evidence-based recommendations that have been derived from the research for use by various stakeholders are shared. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers Room: 106

6.1 A One-Room Gifted School House for the 21st Century Isabelle Crowder, Piedmont College, Demorest, GA; Elizabeth Connell, Clarke Middle School, Athens, GA

Current school reform initiatives have resulted in a reduction in direct services for gifted students across the country. Gifted students are spending increased time in general education settings. Unfortunately, research shows that teachers do not consistently differentiate instruction for this population. Competitions like Future Problem Solving have been used extensively with gifted students. However, these programs are typically introduced as after-school activities. The presenters adapted FPS to address gifted students’ needs in the context of the school day. The presenters share findings and suggestions for how this model may be adapted using other competitions across grade levels. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors Room: Exhibit Hall A

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Early Childhood Thinking STEM? Start Early!

Deborah Dianne Dailey, Merve Topak Jamsran, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR; Alicia Cotabish, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR STEM Starters was developed to address the need to increase the quality and quantity of science education in elementary classrooms. The STEM Starters model implements a rigorous science curriculum in grades 2-5 and utilizes an innovative science coaching model. This session shares strategies incorporated by the STEM Starters model to increase science learning in the elementary grades. Specifically, participants are provided with tools and recommendations for identifying STEM talent in the early grades, resources for accessing differentiated STEM curriculum in grades K-5, and instructional examples to use in pull-out or cluster-grouped programs. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-5, Coordinators Room: 710

Getting off on the WRITE Foot: Motivating Pre-K and Primary Gifted Students to Write

Friday

Recorded Session

Helen M. Gilmore, Helen Gilmore Learning Center, West Palm Beach, FL

What are the baby steps that lead to good writing? This interactive workshop leads teachers and parents of very young gifted children to active learning of more than 25 “fun,” playful strategies, songs, and games. These tactics set an important emergent literacy foundation and help bright youngsters develop good writing skills, as well as a love of writing. Stressing ageappropriateness, the methods address beginning handwriting, vocabulary development, and the four types of writing: narrative, expository, persuasive, and descriptive. A 2-page handout helps cement the research-based ideas. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents Room: 105

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM Creating Safe, Engaging Spaces for Young Gifted Children

Middle Grades

This presentation examines ways in which learning environments for young gifted children communicate power, beauty, and depth. Based upon the seven principles of design as espoused by Deviney, Duncan, Harris, Rody, and Rosenberry in Inspiring Spaces for Young Children, such spaces meet the multivariate needs of young gifted of all ethnicities. Moving beyond primary colors and cluttered spaces, learning environments become communities promoting harmony and respect. Examinations of special spaces illustrate significant features that can expand spatial experiences for young gifted children and aid in their success and proficiency as learners.

Anne Horak, Joyce Pryde-Haskins, Fairfax County Public Schools, Falls Church, VA

Jeanine Jechura, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers

What’s the Problem? Evidence-Based Effectiveness of Problem-Based Learning

Frank Zappa said, “Without deviation from the norm, progress is not possible.” The culture of accountability has created a norm of teacher directed, test-preparation lessons devoid of modifications for the academically advanced. However, successful deviation from the norm is desirable and possible! Problem Based Learning can be used to create advanced, complex learning experiences consistent with both accountability requirements and the principles of high quality curriculum for gifted learners. Hear the story of a collaborative learning team’s brave decision to overcome so-called “obstacles” to implementing PBL. Evidencebased effectiveness of student achievement, engagement, relevance, and meaning is shared.

Friday

Room: 709

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 6-8, Coordinators, Researchers

Global Awareness

Room: 607

The Online Bargain Basement Goes Global: Totally Free Support for Gifted Kids’ Global Awareness

Differentiating Using the NAGC Gifted Programming Standards

Carolyn Kottmeyer, Hoagies’ Gifted Education Page, Downingtown, PA; Kathi Kearney, Eric L. Knowlton School, Berwick, ME

Hoagies’ Bargain Basement includes totally free online materials for gifted children and teachers, especially those living in poverty and in rural and developing areas. This year, the Online Bargain Basement goes global! Find resources to enhance global awareness, including world language and culture courses, global news and TV links, ways to connect students worldwide, online high school, AP, and college courses, professional development for educators in both developed and developing countries, and software for creating cross-cultural classes. Want to connect gifted students with the world? Come to the Online Bargain Basement! Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators

Julia Link Roberts, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY Teachers who are differentiating in a classroom gain support for doing so from the NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Programming Standards. The Standards guide teachers in differentiating and provide the research base for doing so. Student outcomes add to the motivation and vision for differentiating as teachers plan and follow through with putting the standards into practice in their classrooms. This session highlights the student outcomes that result from implementing the Gifted Programming Standards as well as provide ties between the components of the Standards, best practices and research, and practical strategies for implementation as teachers differentiate instruction. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators Room: 207

Room: 704

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National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

Parent & Community The Social-Emotional Price of Being Smart: Gifted Black Girls in STEM and other Advanced Programs

Gilman W. Whiting, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN

Stories and data collected over the past 5 years on academically gifted and talented Black girls involved in STEM and fine arts programs (FASA, Space and Science Center, and Interlochen) as well as private schools are discussed. A student’s perspective of personal experiences reveal coping mechanisms the young student used to remain focused”on track” and the emotional toll such effort exacts. Academic social-emotional development for young Black girls is introduced and explored. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 604

18.3 Perfectionism and Gifted Children

Rosemary S. Callard-Szulgit, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY

Perfectionism and Gifted Children explains how perfectionism can immobilize some children, cause social adjustment problems for others, and be a major contributing factor to why school assignments and personal responsibilities are not being completed by so many of today’s gifted children. As a recovering perfectionist herself, the presenter provides insight into perfectionism, discusses why so many gifted children are perfectionists, provides common sense solutions to this problem,

NAGC Base Camp

NCSSSMST

and also shares how to recover from perfectionism. Many of the concerns and questions asked by parents and teachers over the years regarding aspects of perfectionism are shared and answered as well. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

21.1 F ocus on Assessment: Choosing an Appropriate Lens to Support, Measure, and Report Academic Growth of Advanced Learners Gail Fischer Hubbard, Joan Brownlee, Prince William County Public Schools, Manassas, VA

Supporting, measuring, and reporting the academic growth of advanced learners requires a range of assessments. Using the analogy of choosing among standard, zoom, telephoto, and wideangle camera lenses clarifies the differing purposes of the forms of assessment. A range of concrete examples of assessment of actual student work, using different lenses, illustrates this concept. Assessment becomes a series of experiences to support learning rather than a single event to judge learning. Learn how different lenses focus on appropriate assessment of student work to support, measure, and report academic growth of advanced learners.

Friday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

The future is not some place we are going to but one we are creating. The paths are not to be found, but made, and the activity of making them changes both the maker and the destination. —John Schaar, Political Scientist

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November 15-18, 2012 | Denver, Colorado

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM 11.1 Parents as Advocates: Building Effective Bridges of Communication

Dana Reupert, California Association for the Gifted, Riverside, CA How can parents become a dominant presence in promoting education of the gifted? Find out how to ensure that students have access to the best quality gifted programs and services that school districts can offer. Specific strategies to identify the role of parents as advocates are discussed. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

3.3 F ive-Minute Professional Development: Snapshots of Best Practice That Can Be Put Into Practice Tomorrow

Jamie Christine Guess, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL Are you a K-12 educator looking for fresh ideas that you can implement tomorrow with the gifted students in your mixed- or high-ability classroom? The 5-Minute Professional Development series highlights various best practice techniques that educators can use right away and administrators can give to their staff on Monday morning. Combining theory and an explanation of techniques, along with a section for “putting it into practice,” the 5-Minute Professional Development series is a method of applied learning that both gifted and mixed-ability classroom teachers will find useful.

Friday

Professional Development

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Why We Run Our High School Like a Gifted Program

Room: Exhibit Hall A

What would it be like if high schools were run in such a way that the enrichments, differentiated teaching strategies, special programming, and flexibility common to high quality gifted programs were available to all? This high school opened doors and opportunities to increase rigor, develop student talent, and change mindsets to make it work. What was the catalyst? Administrative courage, a creative problem-solving spirit, and staff development as a start. In this session, participants hear an inspirational success story about how to transform a rigid institution into a child-centered school and reclaim excellence in a climate of minimum standards.

Melissa Stockton, Creative Flair Educational Consultants, Tolleson, AZ; Bertie Kingore, PA Publishing, Austin, TX

Linda Conlon, Quaker Valley School District, Sewickley, PA

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors Room: 605

Promoting Rigor and Engagement for Gifted Students: A Leader’s Role

Leaders promoting rigor and engagement in learning environments can attain the higher achievement expected from gifted students. Advanced levels of achievement result from a rigorous learning environment where gifted students engage in high-level learning processes, experience support so they learn at and beyond grade-level, and demonstrate understanding through high-end products that evidence relevant, sophisticated content. Investigate how to support differentiation while facilitating change among teachers and students. Examine research-based examples of how rigor and engagement can affect higher achievement for gifted learners without overwhelming teachers. Exit with timesaving applications of the five instructional priorities required in a rigorous learning environment. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 203

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Poster Session

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Research & Evaluation

Special Populations

College Choices of Academically Talented Secondary Students

In Their Own Words: The Experiences of Autistic Gifted Students in Online Public Schools

Hope E. Wilson, Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, TX; Jill L. Adelson, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY The decision-making process of academically talented students when making the transition to college is complex. This study investigates the factors that contribute to the selectivity of the colleges selected by AP and IB students. A multilevel model was created to find which variables were associated with college selectivity. This study found that students selected colleges with higher mean SAT scores when prestige of the college was the reason, the students had higher achievement, and the college was farther away. Academic self-concept and perceived challenge of their high school curriculum had no effect on the college selectivity.

Lorna Bryant, K-12 Inc., Livingston, NJ

This presentation focuses on the outcomes of a study involving 3 gifted autistic students enrolled in a full-time virtual public school. Interviews were conducted with the students and their parents to examine the participants’ reasons for enrolling in an online public school, to assess the extent to which the students and their parents felt the Virtual Learning Environment accommodated each child’s academic, psychological, and social needs, and to determine whether the participants perceived VLEs as capable of fostering acceptance and socialization among gifted autistic students.

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Room: 204

Room: 602

COMBINED SESSION

Friday

Recorded Session

Research & Evaluation 8:00 AM – 8:30 AM

8:30 AM – 9:00 AM

Why Are So Many More Gifted Students Being Identified?

Jonathan Wai, Martha Putallaz, Duke University, Durham, NC The New York Times reports that the number of gifted students being identified has risen. Why is this happening? One explanation is the Flynn effect – the rise in IQ scores across the last eight or more decades occurring all over the world. However, does the Flynn effect also occur within the gifted population? We examined over 1.7 million scores of gifted students from the Duke TIP Talent Search across 30 years. We found the Flynn effect occurs among the gifted and that more students are being identified as gifted. However, what causes the effect itself continues to remain a mystery. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Current State of Elementary Gifted Programs: A National Level Look

Tonya R. Moon, Carolyn Callahan, Sarah Oh, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA While little attention has been paid to the actual allocation of gifted programming opportunities at the K-12 levels across the nation, there is even less known about the policy inputs (e.g., written mandates, state funding) regarding elementary gifted programs. This study was commissioned by the U.S. Department of Education to gather data from school districts around the country for the purpose of developing a portrait of the current status of gifted programs as a result of concerns raised by policymakers, administrators, and researchers across the country about gifted programs and programming options. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers Room: 107

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM Special Populations

Special Schools & Programs

Gifted Children on the Edge: At-Risk and At-Promise

33.3 Examining Students’ Classroom Perceptions in a University-Based Residential Program

Dan Peters, Susan Daniels, Summit Center, Walnut Creek, CA Gifted children at risk include students who: come from lowincome families, are culturally disadvantaged, possess limited English proficiency, have physical, learning or emotional disabilities that mask their potential, come from dysfunctional family backgrounds, or possess a combination of these characteristics. These students also possess strengths that shore their development and support their gifts. This presentation addresses characteristics of resiliency in gifted children and provides strategies for building upon their strengths. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Friday

Room: 606

26.1 Striking a Balance: Potential Solutions for Serving Native American Youth Aligned with NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Programming Standards Marguerite C. Brunner, Annalissa Brodersen, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

This session aligns recent responses from Native American tribal leaders regarding the academic needs of indigenous youth to the Pre-K-12 gifted programming standards. This alignment’s critical aspects will allow researchers and teachers of these students to better understand culturally responsive educational practices to meet this special population’s needs. Participants have an opportunity to review specific concerns of tribal leaders, identify specific culturally responsive practices, and uncover support systems within indigenous settings to promote identification and development of gifts and talents in this traditionally underrepresented group. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

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Jiaxi Wu, Yang Yang, Enyi Jen, Marcia Gentry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN Appeal, challenge, choice, meaningfulness, and academic self-efficacy are five constructs closely related to students’ motivation and learning. This session focuses on examining the reliability and validity evidence of using the Students’ Perceptions of Classroom Quality instrument, which measures these five constructs, using a sample of 573 diverse, gifted students in grades 5 through 12 who participated in a universitybased residential program. Recommendations for using this instrument to evaluate summer residential programs are made with suggestions for revising the instrument; implications for practice for coordinators and teachers working in schools and residential programs are also provided. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

The DaVinci Academy: A 21st Century One-Room Schoolhouse

Sally Krisel, Cindy White, Kelly Schollaert, Teresa Haymore, Hall County Schools, Gainesville, GA Imagine a school that uses Cloud Computing instead of textbooks and where a student-created museum has replaced the media center; where eager young learners equipped with laptops study geospatial information systems, make movies, and start businesses! Imagine middle school students who are passionate about art, science, and technology and are engaged in a fully integrated curriculum, earning high school credit and taking college courses. Imagine it all happening at a fraction of the cost of a traditional middle school! Come learn how you can use this approach with your students! Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 6-8, Coordinators Room: 102

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Recorded Session

Poster Session

NCSSSMST

Price, Power, and Privilege

What Can We Learn from STEM Schools of Excellence?

E. Jean Gubbins, Micah Bruce-Davis, Cindy M. Massicotte, Merzili Villanueva, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Lisa DaVia Rubenstein, Ball State University, Muncie, IN National reports note students’ limited career aspirations in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, resulting in a proliferation of STEM-focused secondary schools around the country. Additionally, several reports emphasize the stilted performance of our nation’s students on competitive assessments. What can we learn from STEM schools’ curricular and instructional strategies that promote challenging learning opportunities for gifted and talented students? How do these schools identify and nurture the gifts and talents of all students, including those from culturally diverse communities? Learn how research experiences, mentorships, and problem-based learning support and enhance students’ abilities in STEM fields and promote STEM careers.

Diana Reeves, Rosemary Colt, Noelle Walters, Gordon School, East Providence, RI How long do you need to work to afford dinner at a restaurant? Does it matter? Looking through a multicultural lens and working from primary resources, our mixed-ability students collected, calculated, displayed, analyzed, and interpreted data in a series of activities to answer these questions. They used alternative algorithms, calculators, graphing applications, role play, and guided discussion to explore concepts of need, cost, and wage, and examined how differences in economic wealth impact families’ activities and quality of life. Participants receive a complete planning outline to aid students understanding of power and privilege. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5, Coordinators Room: 701

Friday

STEM

NAGC Base Camp

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 9-12 Room: 705

9:20 AM – 10:40 AM

General Sessions (Your choice of two dynamic general sessions) Gardner, Renzulli, and Sternberg: In Their Own Voices in Our Time

Moderator: Carolyn Callahan, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA Joseph S. Renzulli, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Robert Sternberg, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK; Howard Gardner, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (via simulcast) Four Seasons Ballroom 3-4

Helping Different Kinds of Minds to Learn Temple Grandin, Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, CO Four Seasons Ballroom 1-2

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM Signature Series What Administrators Can Teach Us about Making the Case for Gifted Students

Virginia Burney, Ball State University, McCordsville, IN; Ann Robinson, University of Arkansas at Little Rock , Little Rock, AR; Jacquelin Medina, Colorado Department of Education, Denver, CO; Debbie Blow, Cambrian School District, San Jose, CA; Buck Greene, Fulton County Schools, Atlanta, GA

Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; Tracy L. Cross, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Rena F. Subotnik, American Psychological Association, Washington, DC; Frank C. Worrell, University of California, Berkeley, CA; Steve Portenga, iPerformance Psychology, Denver, CO

Friday

Members of the NAGC Administrator Task Force discuss what it is that superintendents and principals want to know about gifted education. The Task Force identified what information about gifted education had been disseminated through administrator publications, identified missing information, honed in on what the administrators thought was most valuable and most needed, and identified the formats and channels through which they prefer to receive information. The Task Force then crafted the messages and ways to direct administrators to clear, concise information they can use to advocate for and implement services for gifted learners.

Sport and performance psychologists have been working for decades to enhance the physical and mental gifts of athletes in their care. This session focuses on the mental skills training that elite athletes undergo. The training is developmental, and has undergone extensive testing and experimentation toward the dual goals of optimal performance and protection of youth. What are the parallels between mental skills and optimal performance training in sport with talent development of academically gifted youth? What lessons can we learn from sport psychology that we might adapt to our endeavors? How would we begin? What aspects, if any, of elite sports development would we want to avoid at all costs?

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors

Room: 101

Room: 604

Bright Not Broken: Maximizing the Potential of All Kinds of 2e Minds

Computers & Technology

Diane M. Kennedy; Rebecca S. Banks, Jefferson County Public Schools, Louisville, KY; Temple Grandin, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO Traits of giftedness and disability are often misunderstood in 2e children, heightening the importance of the whole-child approach. This presentation examines the current diagnostic system and how it impacts understanding of the 2e child. Unfortunately, gifted behaviors are often mistaken for those associated with ADHD, Asperger/autism, and related conditions. This confusion stems from the DSM, which rarely accounts for higher IQs in its descriptions of disorders. Only when the many factors that underlie a child’s behaviors are understood as possible expressions of giftedness, rather than as traits of disability can parents and professionals more deeply support the whole child. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 207

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Sport and Performance Psychology: What’s in it for Academic Talent Development?

Differentiating Curriculum and Instruction Using iPads

Mary Ann Prevatte, Cynthia Hayes, Glenda Britt, Amby Taylor, Valerie Hammond, Heather Maynor-Lambert, Public Schools of Robeson County, Lumberton, NC Presenters share ideas for differentiating and integrating technology in the gifted curriculum based on the Common Core State Standards. Participants explore iPad applications selected to differentiate and integrate the curriculum in K – 8 classrooms. Demonstrations familiarize participants with the basic operations of the iPad and how to download applications from iTunes. Participants then explore applications for their grade level using provided iPads. The session concludes with opportunities to interact and share ideas and strategies. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-8, Parents Room: 703

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

How Are Districts Meeting the Needs of 21st Century Gifted Students Living on the Great Frontier?

Karen Kendig, Northeast BOCES, Haxtun, CO; Betsey Krill, San Juan BOCES, Durango and Dolores, CO; Emma Richardson, East Central BOCES, Limon, CO; Cyndi Swarts, Pikes Peak BOCES, Colorado Springs, CO; Sharon Maxwell, Dolores School District RE-4A, Dolores, CO Nine million people live on 56% of our nation’s land area known as frontier. Students in these small, isolated communities, far from services in distance and travel time, often face long rides to school coupled with seasonal travel barriers; unreliable or nonexistent internet access; and limited resources and opportunities for valuable student enrichment and programming. Yet many of these same students win national competitions, are awarded academic scholarships, and complete high school with an associate’s degree. Listen to a panel of administrators, teachers, students, and community representatives explain how frontier communities in Colorado are meeting the challenges of gifted programming. Room: 704 Audience: Administrators, Teachers, and Community Leaders

Herberger Young Scholars Academy: Education in a Digital Environment

Kimberly Elms, Kim Lansdowne, Herberger Young Scholars Academy, Phoenix, AZ How do we equip students with the knowledge and skills to thrive in a rapidly changing digital world? How can we give students opportunities to collaborate with others around the world? The answer is all around us. Students inhabit a rich digital environment

NAGC Base Camp

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that can be utilized to support learning, facilitate international collaboration, and provide tools to communicate understanding. Using the same technology employed at our school, virtually visit the academy, speak with students, and see how you too can support students to be confident collaborators, sophisticated consumers, and creative producers in the digital world. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 706

Conceptual Foundations Gifted Education Goes Hollywood: A Film Lover’s Guide to Our Field’s Future

James R. Delisle, Growing Good Kids, North Myrtle Beach, SC Bill Murray in Groundhog Day. Matthew Broderick as Ferris Bueller. Brad Pitt as Benjamin Button. All of these are fictional figures, yet they and many other movie characters have a lot they can teach us about the past, present, and future of gifted child education. This session is the equivalent of a backstage tour of important issues that continue to be neglected by advocates of gifted child education. The inclusion debacle; underachievement ignored; gifted teachers losing their jobs – come see how film characters just might teach us how we need to grow.

Friday

Recorded Session

Audience: Advocates /Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 206

Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness, that most frightens us. We ask ourselves, “Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, and fabulous?” Actually, who are you not to be? —Marianne Williamson

59th Annual Convention

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November 15-18, 2012 | Denver, Colorado

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM Reexamining the Conceptual Foundations of 21st Century Gifted Education: A Theory into Practice Approach

Return on Investment: Spending Political Capital on Gifted

A number of leaders in the field have called attention to a need for reexamining the mission and theoretical foundations of gifted education. This session presents a conceptual model that examines broader conceptions of giftedness and the ways that we can organize and deliver services that develop both cognitive and co-cognitive skills such as romance with a topic or discipline, sense of power to change things, social interactions, and a variety of leadership skills. A focus of the session is on teaching strategies and resources, examples of best practices, and practical applications for translating theoretical concepts into practice.

“The district is barely in the black, so how are we going to support and afford this?” This session highlights how a small urban district in Ohio is making gifted education a priority. From gaining the support of various stakeholders, convincing the doubters with data, and finally moving forward on a five-year plan, this session gives participants a gritty look at how the slow and deliberate moves of a few are paying off dividends for many gifted students.

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers

Room: 204

Joseph S. Renzulli, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Friday

Room: 603

Traversing the Precipice in Thin Air: Talent Development and Giftedness Robert A. Schultz, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH

This session uses a 40-year historical overview from scholarly journals to document and discuss growth of some trends and neglect of others within the field of gifted education. Current efforts emphasize talent development as a means of addressing gifted student needs in educational settings. But, what pitfalls exist in this emphasis? How does this theme or approach affect other areas within the field? Is this a “zero-sum game”? Participants are invited to discuss thoughts and concerns as we historically examine our field and attempt to traverse the precipice in search of educational opportunity for the gifted and talented. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Julie Lenner McDonald, Thomas Tucker, Sandusky City Schools, Sandusky, OH

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents

11.3 R  evisiting Paradoxical Effects of Praise and Critical Comments with Underachieving Gifted Students Jungsun Kim, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

How can teachers and parents identify appropriate feedback to motivate underachieving gifted students? This presentation focuses on effects of praise and critical comments for underachieving gifted students based on Moller’s paradoxical effects of praise and criticism study. Complex motivational patterns, fragile self-concepts, and external attribution of underachieving gifted students are investigated. Then, research procedures and results are shared: how these students interpret teachers’ praise or critical comments and evaluate their achievements in groups and the kinds of feedback gifted students want are discussed. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Consultants, Counselors, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

Room: 105

Poster Sessions • Posters are on display in the NAGC Base Camp (Exhibit Hall A) through Saturday, November 17. • Visit poster at time indicated to meet presenter/s.

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Poster Session

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Motivation and Gifted Students: Roots, Branches, and Seeds

Embracing Difference: Constructing Positive Gifted/GLBTQ Identities

What is the state of research on gifted students and motivation? What are the historical foundations of this area of inquiry, and where is new research on neuroscience taking us? An understanding of how motivation theory and research applies to gifted students can help us develop appropriate classroom and home environments to optimize their learning and design interventions to enhance their intrinsic desire to understand. An overview of the psychological and educational research is followed by practical implications and strategies for supporting motivation and preventing underachievement.

Because significant emphasis on fitting in is part of the American middle and high school experience, youth who are gifted as well as gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender can find themselves isolated, feeling that the differences that make them unique are burdensome. This workshop introduces the notion of positive identity construction around a multi-faceted model—one that de-emphasizes risk and allows youth to celebrate their differences as they build and integrate working identities. Participants learn concepts such as maintaining otherness vs. assimilation, nomadic identity development, and strategic identity deployment to implement for themselves and to share with teens in their lives.

Pamela R. Clinkenbeard, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, Whitewater, WI

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 710

Audience: Advocates / Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-8, Classroom Teachers 9-12 Room: 108

Counseling & Guidance 31.3 Counseling Gifted and Talented Students through the Understanding of Their Social, Emotional, and Developmental Needs

Kimberly M. McCormick, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN When working with gifted and talented students, it quickly can be determined that this population of students encompasses a variety of characteristics. However, what is often the case is that everything is focused on their academic outcomes, instead of widening the lens and looking at their social and emotional well-being. This session seeks to provide a brief overview of the importance of supporting their psychological well-being, offers background into GT students’ unique social and emotional characteristics, and highlights beneficial models of counseling for working with this unique population of students. Audience: Consultants, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

Teresa Manzella, Advocacy Consulting Services, St. Paul, MN

Creativity

Friday

Recorded Session

6.3 Overexcitability and Creative Perception

James A. Reffel, Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA Dabrowski’s theory of positive disintegration, specifically the concept of overexcitability (OE), has helped us understand creative individuals. Hébert described OE as heightened sensitivity. Creative individuals exhibit several OEs and the drive to create may be fueled by OEs. It was hypothesized that OEs would be positively correlated with factors of perceived creativity. Seventeen volunteers completed a perceived creativity inventory and the OEQII; significant correlation coefficients between totals and factors supported the hypothesis that perceived creativity is related to overexcitability. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM Gifted Authors and Artists Come Alive: The 2012 Torrance Legacy Awards

at graduation. Additional presentations discuss a new instrument for measuring attitudes toward creativity as well as the issue of time management and its role in creativity. Implications for real-world applications are also discussed and interaction with audience members is encouraged.

Since 2009, gifted and talented elementary through high school students have been submitting their finest work to the Torrance Legacy Awards. In honor of creativity pioneer E. Paul Torrance, the project is designed to recognize exceptional young writers and artists from all parts of the country and even overseas. Six facilitators share their experiences as sponsors for the competition and offer insights into the process through the creative submissions of contestants. The session also explores how teachers can involve their students in the competition as well as how they can inspire creativity in art and writing.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Joan Franklin Smutny, Maria Freeman, National-Louis University, Evanston, IL; Scott Rich, John Kauffman, Scholastic Testing Service, Bensenville, IL; Stephen T. Schroth, Knox College, Galesburg, IL

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5

Friday

Room: 607

An Interactive Discussion of Creativity Research and Its Implications: Four New Directions from Research John P. Gaa, Rick Olenchak, Dale D. Louhy, Jessi Mengis, Kelly Michelle Lee, University of Houston, Houston, TX

This session considers implications of a series of research studies aimed at enhancing the understanding of creativity. Presentations discuss whether the five scores on the Torrance Figural Test differ by gender, and whether scores at admission to a high school for adolescents gifted in the arts predict creativity

Room: 202

Curriculum Studies 26.3 Encourage Student Thinking with Questioning

Mihyeon Kim, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA Have you ever wanted to enhance questioning skills in your classroom? Good questioning involves responding to students in a way to help them think and helps teachers identify what they are thinking. How, then, do you ask the right questions to guide students in finding answers themselves while also encouraging them to ask new questions along the way? This session shares the ways to integrate questioning strategies into your classroom through interactive exercises and shares a lesson plan format used in an enrichment program. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-8, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

Leery of what is and hungry for what may be, giftedness sits comfortably outside of the box. Giftedness piggybacks on the tail of a question and, most essentially, the potential in asking it. Even among the most polarizing conservative and liberal definitions, is an underlying understanding that recognizes giftedness as an exceptional ability or seed demanding to be nurtured. —Rachael Browning

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Poster Session

Historical Inquiry: Supporting the Curious Minds of Young Adolescents

Virginia Hutcheson, Carol Tieso, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Meg Hoffman, Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools, Chapel Hill, NC Historical analysis and interpretation are important skills that allow students to think critically and creatively about history. A curriculum that incorporates these elements is motivating to underachieving promising learners. Examples from Project Civis, a middle grades American history study focused on underserved gifted students, funded by the Javits Act, are used to highlight a curriculum that supports student engagement in historical analysis and interpretation. Participants analyze lessons and performance assessments that reflect young adolescents’ capacity for historical inquiry. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 6-8, Coordinators, Researchers Room: 203

4.1 Integrating Inquiry, Creative Process, and Divergent Thinking in Chemistry Curriculum to Enhance Students’ Achievement Noparat Sricharoen, University of Georgia, Athens, GA

As the focus of science education is to promote scientific reasoning, it is essential to integrate inquiry and the creative process to develop students’ scientific knowledge and skills, and their creativity in chemistry. Creative process and divergent thinking should be incorporated in every component of the 5E inquiry-based learning model to increase the effectiveness of the inquiry model by allowing time for students to think about generating numerous possible outcomes and be capable of elaborating on their ideas and discovering originality. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Researchers

NAGC Base Camp

NCSSSMST

Early Childhood Using Picture Books as an Identification Tool for the Gifted in the Primary Classroom Mary Elizabeth Daily, Anne Brandt, Tina M. Spomer, Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln, NE

Do you struggle to feel comfortable in identifying primary students for gifted services? In this session, explore the use of picture books to lead to higher level, rich discussions. These conversations allow you to gain insight to determine potential gifted characteristics in primary students. Part of this session includes developing questions for your own literature selections. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5, Coordinators Room: 103

Beyond File Folder Games: Nurturing Young Learners Through the Use of Independent Learning Centers Jill Rodeffer, Julie Kelly, Sarah Reeps, Loudoun County Public Schools, Ashburn, VA

In this age of standards-based learning with its emphasis on remediation, early intervention is essential to developing the potential of our young, high-ability learners, so they may make one year of academic growth in a given school year. Participants are guided through the process of creating interest based and contract-driven, independent learning centers for students in the primary grades. These learning centers show how the elements of rigor, self-motivation, perseverance, and thinking skills are introduced in kindergarten through third grade to create a systematic approach for developing students into independent and engaged learners.

Friday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Coordinators Room: 601

Room: Exhibit Hall A

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM Illustrations in Children’s Literature: Purposeful, Productive, and Thoughtful Conversations with Curious Minds

Sustainability: Exploring the Intersection of Society, Economy, and Environment

Children’s literature is rich with story line and illustrations that work in harmony to send a message. Using the illustrations in children’s literature as a focus of the read-aloud, this session explores the influence of color, character stance, setting, and overall format, which expands the thoughtfulness of the book’s message. This visual journey through the use of quality children’s literature supports higher level cognitive and affective thinking and meaning in curious young minds. A bibiography of referenced books is provided as well as ideas to make children’s literature a purposeful, productive, and thoughtful part of every child’s literacy development.

Today’s generation has the power to affect positive change for the future. As the population of our planet tops 7 billion people, we must consider the social, economic, and environmental implications of our everyday choices. Gifted students, in particular, are often highly sensitive to issues of social justice and the environment. Through readings, debates, documentaries, site visits, and sustainable design/build projects, students can investigate innovative solutions to global issues. This session outlines a variety of ways to enhance students’ sense of connectedness and responsibility.

Laura M. Beltchenko, Wauconda CUSD #118, Wauconda, IL

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Counselors, Parents

Friday

Room: 709

Global Awareness 9.1 Valued and Engaged: Why Facebook Is So Popular

April Keck DeGennaro, Peeples Elementary, Fayetteville, GA Facebook offers users the opportunity to have their thoughts heard. It provides a forum for us to be human and to connect with an authentic audience. Gifted classrooms must be safe places to share unusual thoughts and where scholars have time to explain their thinking. Learn strategies to focus on the learner, and listen to the logic of thinking so your teaching becomes the offering of alternative paths for different conclusions. In this session, restructure the way you evaluate students’ thinking toward making your classroom safe, validating, personally relevant, and as popular as Facebook! Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents

Jennifer L. Smith, David M. Baxter, GEMS Academy, Bowling Green, Kentucky

Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-12, Coordinators Room: 712

Middle Grades The Common Core, Technology, and Five Minds for the Future

Patti B. Drapeau, University of Southern Maine, South Freeport, ME Will the Common Core State Standards really affect our teaching enough to make a difference in our instruction with gifted middle school learners? In this session, the CCSS as well as technology are discussed through the lens of Gardner’s five minds for the future. The presenter demonstrates how to make connections to the disciplined mind, the synthesis mind, the creative mind, the respectful mind, and the ethical mind. As we redefine educational excellence through the CCSS, let’s make sure we don’t just put a new face on an old system. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors Room: 708

Room: Exhibit Hall A

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National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Recorded Session

Poster Session

Gifted Dropouts: The Impact of Relationships and Middle School Traumas Jim Zabloski, Liberty University, Amherst, VA

In this presentation for middle school teachers, explore the life experiences of seven rural gifted individuals who dropped out of school. Uncover two overarching themes related to their decisions to drop out: relationships and traumas. Learn to identify reasons why gifted students drop out and formulate practical approaches toward prevention. By focusing on their progressively declining interest in school through the lens of relationships, uncover new data that adds to existing literature. Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-8

NAGC Base Camp

NCSSSMST

have a profound effect on what kind of instruction is successful. Come and learn the basics of the Perry scheme, look at research documenting differences between gifted and typically middle school students, and discuss the model as a guide for developing programs for gifted middle school students. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 6-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers Room: 711

Parent & Community Motivation for the Uphill Climb: Praise and Success

The “Musts” of a Differentiated Classroom Tracy Ford Inman, Julia Link Roberts, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY

Conscientious educators attend differentiation workshops or read books about strategies, excited to try out the ideas in their middle school classrooms. Unfortunately, many become frustrated with their lack of success. The bottom line is that, no matter how creative the differentiated lesson is, it will not be successful in a classroom that has not been intentionally designed for differentiation. What should be in place for successful differentiation? This session explores the “musts” of an effective differentiation classroom - from intentional teacher design, to beliefs about assessment, to the undergirding principles of content, process, and product. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators

Cindy Sheets, Shawnee Mission School District, Shawnee Mission, KS; Kathy Jones, Advocates for High Ability Learners, Chanute, KS Most parents and teachers believe that praise is an important factor in motivating children, but not all praise is equally effective. In fact, some types of praise may harm more than they help. This session is based primarily on the work of Carol S. Dweck whose research has provided new insights into the effects of praise on the types of effort and motivation that lead to student motivation and success. In this easy-to-understand, interactive session, parents and educators learn how to avoid praise with negative impact and promote motivation with appropriate types of praise.

Friday

Room: 205

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: 606

Room: 610/612

But What About REAL Learning? Gifted Students’ Beliefs about Knowledge Shelagh Gallagher, Engaged Education, Charlotte, NC

Does “being knowledgeable” mean knowing the most facts? Seeing all sides equally? Constructing ideas? William Perry describes how views of knowledge progress in predictable developmental stages. The scheme explains why some students yearn for memorization and others reject memorization and seek opportunities to put ideas together. Students’ beliefs can

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM Professional Development 24.1 Tell Us About Yourself: The Process of Developing the Teacher Interview Protocol

C. Matthew Fugate, Enyi Jen, Jiaxi Wu, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN There is a scarcity of teacher interview protocols based on sequent performance measures in the field of gifted education. This presentation shares a process for developing a researchbased teacher interview protocol using the objectives

of the Teacher Observation Form. The presenters share their experiences in developing an interview instrument, implementing the protocol questions, and examining how they correlate with the items on the Teacher Observation Form. Recommendations for using the Teacher Interview Protocol and Teacher Observation Form together and separately are discussed. Audience: Administrators Room: Exhibit Hall A

COMBINED SESSION

Professional Development

Friday

11:00 AM – 11:30 PM

Teachers’ Differentiation Practices in Cluster Classrooms: Professional Development Needs

Teachers of the Gifted Learning in Online Courses through the Use of Group Strategies

During these tough economic times, pull-out programs in gifted education are being eliminated and gifted students are being clustered together in general education classrooms. While this type of grouping has become a common practice in many schools, it is effective with gifted students only when the curriculum and instruction is matched to each student’s abilities. Using data from observations of 79 newly assigned teachers to cluster classrooms, the presenter examines how these teachers differentiated for gifted students in their classrooms and identifies the types of professional development that general education teachers need in serving gifted students.

Teachers are taking online courses to enhance their knowledge and skills in teaching gifted students. Learning content through interpersonal interaction is a key component of successful Internet courses. There are group strategies that are used in face-to-face environments to develop cohesive working groups based on positive interpersonal interaction, which should translate to the online environment. This presentation delineates group strategies that can be used to develop effective and positive learning groups in Internet courses.

Susan Johnsen, Baylor University, Waco, TX

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers

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11:30 AM – 12:00 PM

Paula Christensen, Northwestern State University of Louisiana, Natchitoches, LA

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 707

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


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NCSSSMST

Research & Evaluation

Special Populations

Gifted in the News: What the Rest of the World Knows About Gifted Education

The Power of Our Presence: The Need to Recruit Culturally Competent GT Teachers of Color

Matthew C. Makel, Kristen Peairs, Martha Putallaz, Duke University, Durham, NC

Does giftedness equal high IQ? Do gifted students really need special programming? Are gifted programs elitist? Are all gifted students the same? These are all questions educators are frequently asked. This presentation reports how giftedness has been reported by the mainstream media in the last year. Are myths, truths, or stereotypes reported? Is giftedness supported or questioned? Attendees will learn what the general population learned about giftedness in the last year and leave better equipped to communicate effectively with those outside the gifted community. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 104

R&E 2012 Dissertation Award Winners Present Their Research Alicia Cotabish, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR; Russell Wayne, Utah Valley University, Orem, UT; Karen E. Rambo-Hernandez, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO; Rachelle Miller, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

The three 2012 R&E Dissertation Award Winners (Russell T. Wayne, Karen Rambo, and Rachelle Miller) present their awardwinning research in a combined session. First, second, and third place winners of the 2012 R&E Dissertation Award each present the results of their dissertations, and offer an opportunity for the audience to ask questions and discuss the award-winners’ work. Dr. Alicia Cotabish, Chair of the R&E Dissertation Awards, will moderate the session. Audience: Researchers Room: 106

Margarita Bianco, Aaron Williams, University of ColoradoDenver, Denver, CO; Joy Lawson Davis, University of LouisianaLafayette, Lafayette, LA Culturally and linguistically diverse students represent 45% of our public school population while more than 88% of U.S. teachers are White, female, and monolingual English speakers. Much has been written about the need to diversify our teacher workforce and the benefits this would have for all students; however, little attention has focused on this need in gifted education - or the positive impact CLD teachers might have on increasing the representation of CLD gifted learners. In this session, examine these issues and hear directly from students about the need for CLD teachers - including GT teachers. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 107

Friday

Recorded Session

Working Memory Training, an Innovation for Twice Exceptional Students? Charles S. Shinaver, Pearson, Carmel, IN

Working memory has undergone little investigation related to gifted underachievement, yet working memory has been found to be associated with and predict academic achievement. Working memory has been found to be a primary deficit among children with ADHD and 80% of those with learning disabilities have working memory deficits. Research has found that working memory can be trained. Results have included improvement in visual-spatial working memory, verbal working memory, attention, following instructions, math, reading comprehension, and executive functions. This presentation argues that gifted children with ADHD and/or learning disorders should be targeted for this intervention. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 608

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November 15-18, 2012 | Denver, Colorado

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM Strategies to Raise Achievement of Gifted ELL Students in Poverty Colleen Urlik, Cheryl Lynn Franklin-Rohr, Deborah Welner, Adams County School District 14, Commerce City, CO

How do you raise academic achievement in a heterogeneous classroom including gifted ELL students in poverty with such risk factors as low parent involvement and education, high mobility rate, and generational poverty? Teachers from a Colorado urban school district share how they have differentiated their literacy instruction to overcome these factors so 66 % of their students surpassed their expected growth in reading. Ideas and strategies are shared, focusing on goal setting, vocabulary processes, imbedding literacy into science, flexible grouping, ongoing review, and explicit instruction in criticalthinking skills.

Numbers to Stand Behind: Project EXCITE Closes the Achievement Gap Rhoda Rosen, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

Underrepresented gifted learners face many unique challenges. Psycho-social pressures around mindset, race, gender, and class can negatively impact student performance. For 12 years, Project EXCITE has offered long-term supplemental educational experiences that have led to substantial increases in test scores and course placements in high school. Come to this session to learn more about Project EXCITE’s dramatic results and how you might make a difference in your community using this model. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators

Room: 701

Room: 602

Special Schools & Programs

Stirring Up the Gifts in Title I Schools: Partnerships for Talent Development between School and Faith-Based and Civic Organizations

Moderated Panel Discussion – What Does It Stand For And How Is It A Guiding Force In STEM Education?

Tarek C. Grantham, Kristina Collins, Sonja Fox, University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Michelle Frazier Trotman, University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA Title I schools that struggle to recruit and retain Black and Latino students for gifted programs can benefit by building partnerships with faith-based and civic organizations. Many organizations such as churches, synagogues, social groups, community centers, or fraternal organizations have a vested interest in and commitment to supporting the educational needs of children from minority and economically disadvantaged backgrounds. These organizations sponsor or support opportunities for students to develop talent, and they can contribute to identifying and nurturing gifts in children. This presentation calls attention to community organizations and specific approaches that educators may use to foster greater school-community collaboration. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Parents Room: 605

Randell Barclay, NCSSSMST Executive Director

This panel discussion will provide insight and clarity into the National Consortium for Specialized Secondary Schools of Mathematics, Science, and Technology (NCSSSMST). The mission of NCSSSMST, the nation’s alliance of secondary schools and programs preparing students for success and leadership in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, is to serve our members’ students and professionals, to foster collaborations, to inform STEM policy, and to advocate transformation in education. NCSSSMST offers many opportunities each year for students and professionals including an annual student research conference, an annual professional conference, and various summer institutes with college and university affiliate members. During this panel discussion, various representatives from the consortium’s schools will speak briefly about the educational experiences they provide their students. Audience members will be able to ask questions of the panel and discover the breadth and depth of resources NCSSSMST has to offer. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Coordinators, Parents, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 208

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National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

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NCSSSMST

19.1 The Social, Emotional, and Academic Characteristics of Profoundly Gifted Students Receiving Specialized Services

1.3 Instructional & Affective Lab Sites: Implementing Change Without Changing Everything

Profoundly gifted students are thought to have unique educational and social-emotional needs and characteristics compared to other gifted students. Survey results are shared on how the Davidson Academy and the Davidson Young Scholars Program impacted PG students. Survey questions, from both validated instruments and this institution, ask about demographic, socio-emotional, academic, and interpersonal characteristics such as peer and sibling relationships, selfefficacy, perfectionism, and life satisfaction. Teachers, parents, and counselors can benefit from a better understanding of the relationship between PG students’ educational settings and their academic and social-emotional development.

A panel of practitioners share perspectives on the changes they’ve implemented in three lab-site schools. Participants connect with leaders who’ve put into place instructional and affective programming including school widecluster grouping, freshman affective seminar, and a middle level advanced elective. Now in their third year, the lab sites have transformed gifted services and practices by building the capacity of schools to identify and serve gifted learners through replicable, research-based models. Session participants learn how to garner community support and understand the programming’s relevancy to research.

Clark Kopelman, Susan Assouline, Maureen Marron, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

Jennifer Barr, Annie Binion, Jonathan Wright, Brett Livingston, Boulder Valley School District, Boulder, CO

Audience: Consultants, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents

Room: Exhibit Hall A

Room: Exhibit Hall A

Creativity Challenge Community School (C3)

16.3 P  roblem-Based Learning with Gifted High School Students

Julia Miller Shepherd, Patti Shade, Karen Chapman, Lisa Hoyt, Nada Ahmed, Maureen Poli, Denver Public Schools, Denver, CO

In August 2012, Denver Public Schools opened an innovative elementary school based on integrating creative thinking into all teaching and learning. C3 uses creativity as an instructional tool and provides teachers with an organizational framework to help them design curriculum to support creative learners. Students are challenged to think creatively, consider diverse perspectives, and work collaboratively to solve problems. Students participate in enrichment clusters and engage in authentic learning experiences with community partners. The design team of staff and parents share the process of creating their dream school along with and overview of instructional and curricular strategies. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 705

Todd Kettler, University of North Texas, Denton, TX; Deana Harrell, New Tech High @ Coppell, Tabitha Branum, Coppell ISD, Coppell, TX

Friday

Recorded Session

New Tech High @ Coppell is a magnet high school in North Texas dedicated to problem-based learning and technology integration. The school serves 510 students who apply and are accepted by a modified lottery process. Over its first four years, the school has attracted and served a large number of gifted students; approximately 23 percent of the students are identified gifted. This presentation describes a high school learning experience with total technology integration and problem-based learning. Additionally we answer, why do a large number of gifted students choose the school, and how do they describe their experiences? Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Coordinators Room: Exhibit Hall A

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM STEM Making Higher Math Accessible and Interesting to Students of All Ages

Frank Y. Wang, Oklahoma School of Science and Mathematics, Oklahoma City, OK Drawing from experiences working with students from school districts and selective schools across the country, the presenter describes how concepts from higher math, such as abstract algebra, game theory and number theory, can be made understandable and interesting to students of all backgrounds and ages. The presenter is a pure mathematician by training and considers his mission and passion to be making the concepts of higher math understandable and interesting to students of all ages and abilities. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Coordinators

Friday

Room: 210/212

They say I’m obsessive. I say I’m passionate. They say I don’t conform. I say I’m rebellious. They say I’m a dreamer. I say that’s my reality. They say I need to find myself. I say this is who I am. Never let what they say, define

Diverse, High-Ability Students and STEM Talent Development: Why Do Many Opt Out?

Lori Andersen, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA Why do diverse, high-ability students opt out of the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics pipeline while in high school? Data from the NCES High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 is used to examine the psychological and motivational factors that affect this student decision and how these factors differ across race and gender. Students’ self-assessments of their science ability and personal assessments of the value of doing science affect their decisions to continue in the science pipeline. What can teachers and counselors do to promote science talent development in diverse students? Practical strategies to address this issue are discussed. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 102

14.1 J ump Rope Geometry

Daniel M. Rosenberg, The Pegasus School, Huntington Beach, CA Introduce elementary gifted students to the world of geometry using jump ropes! Using the ropes as visual representations of lines and angles, young children can become proficient in topics not typically discussed until high school. This session introduces teachers to a unit of study that provides a hands-on approach to creating and naming lines, rays, and angles. Discuss how to use the jump ropes to model alternate interior, corresponding, vertical, and same-side interior angles. Students are able to see the relationships among these angles and apply their understanding of these relationships to geometric proofs. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Exhibit Hall A

who you are. — Author Unknown

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National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Recorded Session

Developing Mathematical Talent and Creativity: Acceleration is Not the Only Answer

Linda Jensen Sheffield, Northern Kentucky University, Highland Heights, KY There is a critical need to develop, challenge, and motivate mathematically promising students so that they might become the leaders and innovators of tomorrow. Simply moving more quickly through the Common Core State Standards does not create these critical, passionate, innovative, and talented mathematicians. Students need curricular and extracurricular

Poster Session

NAGC Base Camp

NCSSSMST

mathematics programs, competitions, and other STEM activities that develop and enhance their mathematical abilities, passions, and creativity. Come explore these issues, investigate proven curriculum, and engage in exemplary teaching, learning, and assessment techniques and strategies designed to develop these future STEM leaders. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: 702

Popular Denver Neighborhoods Great places to eat, shop, and visit! With COUPONS inside!

Friday

http://nagc.wikispaces.com/Walk+the+Beat

Walk the Beat, Shop, & Eat

Compiled by Laurie Stolmack Eaton for the Colorado Local Arrangements Committee

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Putting It Into Practice November 16, 2012 | 12:15 PM – 1:00 PM Signature Series Publishing in Gifted Education Journals: Editors’ Tips

D. Betsy McCoach, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Tracy L. Cross, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Matthew T. McBee, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN; Susan Johnsen, Baylor University, Waco, TX; Don Ambrose, Rider University, Lawrenceville, NJ

Friday

Publishing in peer-reviewed journals can be a daunting experience. Come learn from the editors how you can maximize your chances for publication success. Some of the fields’ journal editors provide tips on how to best present your work when you are submitting it for review. Panelists will share tips and advice for publishing in peer review journals in gifted education and then take questions from participants.

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents

Audience: Researchers

22.1 The A, B, Cs of Bibliotherapy: It’s Easier than You Think!

Room: 103

Computers & Technology 15 Possibilities for Publishing Student Writing Jill Olthouse, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV

Brainstorm, draft, revise, edit ... but wait! How often do we publish our talented students’ writings? New technologies and a changing literary market have opened up new possibilities for young writers. In this session, discuss youth publishing contests, online writing communities, mobile publishing apps, hard copy and ebook publishers, and marketing and sales options. Great writers deserve readers! Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Parents Room: 708

Technology and the Whole Child: Nurturing Gifted Students’ Affective Development through Technology Projects Nanette H. Jones, Jennifer Yoswa, Jay Vean, Aaron Berthold, Aurora Public Schools, Aurora, CO

The social-emotional needs of gifted children are often overlooked. Using engaging and cutting edge technology, students

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can explore their affective side. The presenters demonstrate how YouTube, TED, and other Internet videos help GT students relate their own thoughts and feelings to others. Also, attendees learn how students can communicate their feelings, concerns, and self by creating presentations with Animoto, Glogster, Edmodo, and other Web2.0 tools. This presentation helps teachers connect students’ passion for technology with the development of a better understanding of their strengths and challenges as a gifted learner and their self as a whole.

Room: 710

Counseling & Guidance

Mary Whitman, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL When Robert Frost said, “A poem begins in delight and ends in wisdom,” he may have hoped that his readers would enjoy the process of self-discovery. Bibliotherapy is an inexpensive and successful way to help students gain personal and topical insight. By identifying with a character’s plight, in literature or other media, students can safely apply new understanding to their own lives. Learn how to facilitate the right atmosphere, books, and cathartic questions. The presenter supplies step-by-step guidelines and resources. It’s as easy as ABC! Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

Empowering Twice-Exceptional Gifted Children to Become Self-Actualized Beverly A. Trail, Regis University, Henderson, CO

The path to self-actualization can be difficult for 2e children to navigate. When gifted children do not achieve in school, frustration abounds. Interventions fail when the focus is on remediation. 2e children need challenging learning opportunities to remain engaged in school. This presentation provides a comprehensive framework grounded in research and designed for 2e children to nurture gifted potential, support cognitive style, encourage academic achievement, foster interpersonal

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

NAGC Base Camp

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relationships, and promote intrapersonal understanding. Learn specific strategies that empower 2e children to accept their imperfections, strive to develop the skills necessary for success, and set realistic goals necessary for self-actualization.

Creativity

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 704

Teachers of gifted elementary and middle school students experience ways to teach drawing, painting, composition, and art history in just 30 minutes a week. In many schools, schedules are so packed that often art gets put aside. This is a way to bring art back to the classroom.

Emotional Intelligence and the Gifted and Talented Student

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents

Mary Haynes, LifeBound, Denver, CO

While many GT students have IQs that are off the charts, some struggle with emotional intelligence, whether it is understanding their own complex emotions, connecting with others, or managing stress and anxiety. In this session for educators working with students of all ages, participants leave with tools to help students develop self-awareness, manage challenging emotions, self-motivate, foster empathy, and handle relationships. Facilitated group discussions give educators a chance to share the challenges their GT students face, and strategies for overcoming these challenges are shared. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Parents Room: 605

Life Coach or Counselor? A New Paradigm for Serving the Gifted Merla Hammack, Educational Solutions, Sycamore, IL

Not everyone needs a counselor, but everyone needs a coach. The question: Which one is the better “fit” for the gifted individual? The answer: It depends on personal goals, desired outcomes, and motivation. This session explores the differences between life coaching and counseling, clarifying the roles of each and explaining the benefits of both. The pathway to a gifted individual’s potential varies greatly between life coaching and counseling. Serving the gifted through counseling is well-established, but the new paradigm of life coaching redesigns the execution of serving gifted individuals.

30-Minute Art Lessons

Patricia Hollingsworth, Carol Carter, University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK

Room: 107

Fostering Creativity through Technology: Creative and Collaborative Tools for Student Products

Jaclyn M. Chancey, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Melissa S. Mitchell, Maine Regional School Unit 24, Lamoine, ME Creative problem solving can be used within core subjects to help students develop the 4Cs of 21st century skills: communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity. An important part of this process is having students communicate their results. In this session, see how students can use free or low-cost technology tools like Prezi, Capzles, LiveBinders, and Glogster as creative alternatives to reports and class PowerPoint presentations. The use of presentation tools can inspire creativity, promote collaboration, and allow students in the “digital generation” to work within their preferred learning and communication styles.

Friday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Consultants Room: 705

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: 106

59th Annual Convention

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November 15-18, 2012 | Denver, Colorado

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Putting It Into Practice November 16, 2012 | 12:15 PM – 1:00 PM Narration Nation

Brian P. O’Shea, University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Zachary Bernstein, Jewish Community Center of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA Narrative and narrative construction are not only a vital teaching tool, but also work as a vehicle for students’ understandings about the world. The heightened sensitivities of our gifted students - intellectual, emotional, and imaginational, in particular - are ripe for the use of stories and storytelling as a way of exploring the complex networks of connections within the world in which they live. Research highlighting the importance of narrative construction and several ways in which storytelling may be utilized in the classroom is highlighted as a way of tapping into the unique resources and experiences of our gifted children. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers

Friday

Room: 706

Curriculum Studies Moving from Procedural Knowledge to Disciplinary Practice: Nurturing Creativity Among Advanced and GT Learners

Dan Buehler, Kelly Smith, Sky Vista Middle School, Aurora, CO The Parallel Curriculum Model offers four parallels to guide instruction – core, connection, practice, and identity. This presentation focuses on practice. Early efforts in teaching practice featured skills and procedures used by practitioners. Frustrations resulted from the recognition that because a student could follow a disciplinary procedure or demonstrate technical proficiency did not necessarily mean that s/he was doing the work of a practitioner. This presentation re-conceptualizes practice, shifting attention away from product or procedural mastery to process. Specific strategies and instructional changes that need to occur to manifest student-practitioners and transform schoolwork to practice are offered. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators Room: 606

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Unlocking the Cultural Puzzle: Developing Research Skills Through Cultural Understanding Brooke Walker, Mary Ellen Sweeney, Denver Public Schools, Denver, CO

Would you like to find an engaging, high-level research unit for middle school students? Then this presentation is for you. In this unit, ethnography, a type of research conducted by anthropologists, is used as a vehicle for learning research skills while developing student understanding of the elements of culture. Activities provide students the opportunity to apply content-area skills. Learning is synthesized as students conduct their own “mini ethnographic studies.” Come and learn a unique and effective way to teach students the skills of research while they learn to appreciate the diversity of world peoples, languages, and cultures. Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-12, Coordinators Room: 608

Tiered Assignments 101

Kathryn Picanco, Whitworth University, Spokane, WA This workshop examines how to create tiered assignments for advanced learners in the regular classrooms in a few simple steps. The session starts with a tool to analyze student work to determine learner needs. Then, strategies to tier the next day’s lesson for depth and complexity are demonstrated and practiced. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants Room: 709

The Gifted Classroom: Purposeful Strategies to Engage Students

Paul Shepherd, Utah Association for Gifted Children; Sue Savage Sakashita, Granite School District, Salt Lake City, UT Engaging students in learning in an effective and meaningful way is fundamental to both the art and science of teaching. Gifted and talented students come to the classroom with unique characteristics that provide both challenges and opportunity for engaging them academically. This session examines the unique interplay between teacher and student; focusing on the characteristics of both teacher and student that should be considered and activated in order to maximize student

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

NAGC Base Camp

NCSSSMST

engagement and learning. Habits of Mind are introduced as a framework for engagement. The explicit instruction of these habits will be discussed and modeled.

The Brain Hooked on Inquiry Learning: When Adolescent Minds Focus and Remember

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12

For decades, teachers have observed adolescents becoming highly motivated by inductive and deductive thought processes activated during inquiry learning. Additionally, 20 years of brain research has revealed uniqueness in cognitive, emotional, and social functioning of adolescent brains, influencing their ability to maintain focused attention. This session links adolescent brain function and the inquiry pedagogical practices of group investigation, advance organizer, role play problem solving, Socratic dialogue, concept formation, and concept attainment. Teachers can implement inquiry learning with adolescents, enabling consistent focused attention to learn the skills, concepts, and generalizations espoused in the Common Core and 21st century skills.

Room: 102

Test is a Four-Letter Word

Juliet B. Frate, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; Eric Calvert, Ohio Department of Education, Columbus, OH Is assessment a(n) (un)necessary evil in your life? Are you frustrated by the number of assessments your students are required to take? Would you prefer to utilize more performancebased learning experiences but find yourself struggling to evaluate results? This session examines the role that assessment plays in the process learners use to construct meaning. Current assessment practices are considered, types and purposes of assessment are elucidated, and the difference between assessment strategies and tools is clarified. Participants leave with an assessment framework focused on the development of conceptual understanding. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators Room: 604

Gifted and Rural: Understanding the Promise of Place-Based Pedagogy Amy Azano, Annalissa Brodersen, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

While rural schools are plagued by funding inequities, limited resources, and poverty, place-based instruction responds to these challenges by promoting curricular relevance for students. One third of American children attend rural schools, yet little is done to understand and address their specific needs. Place-based educational practices purposely seek to tie the realities of place to instruction, particularly for the purpose of student engagement. Using examples from an elementary language arts curriculum, this session provides examples of place-based instruction and illustrates how “place” can make learning more relevant for gifted learners in rural schools. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators

Leah Welte, University of Southern California, Orem, UT

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Researchers Room: 607

Are You Game for Challenge?

Rebecca Vonesh, Olha Skyba, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI What is it about games that makes them so engaging that we often lose track of time? Why is it so difficult to achieve a similar level of focus and commitment in a classroom? Research on gaming has many interesting insights on how we set goals, handle challenge, achieve mastery, pace through the experience, and problem solve. If you are intrigued by the challenge of creating educational experiences full of serious fun, attend this session and finally merge the worlds of gaming and engaging curriculum design in a manner that is worthy of your students’ potential.

Friday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Parents Room: 204

11:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Convention Center concession areas sell assorted lunch items

Room: 711

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November 15-18, 2012 | Denver, Colorado

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Putting It Into Practice November 16, 2012 | 12:15 PM – 1:00 PM Early Childhood Classroom Cycles that Enhance Differentiation for K-3 Gifted Students

Scott L. Hunsaker, Utah State, Logan, UT; Katie Walker, Canyons School District, Holladay, UT The Integrated Curriculum Model is rooted in the premise that learners are given the most authentic experiences when curriculum is woven together to provide opportunities for application. It is best for young learners because they are able to make cross-curricular connections that will solidify their understanding of the material. ICM maximizes instructional time by meeting a variety of objectives in a single instructional time slot. Using animal characteristics, life cycles, and habitats as an organizing theme, a variety of instructional strategies are employed to demonstrate their natural applicability to the teaching-learning cycle within an ICM framework.

Spirituality and Gifted Education

Kristy Kowalske Wagner, University of Georgia, Hendersonville, NC Spirituality in education has gained increasing attention over the course of the past decade. This session offers an overview of various theories and definitions of spiritual intelligence and how spirituality is nurtured in the classroom. Based on the varying definitions, several researchers have designed instruments to identify spiritual intelligence and have identified characteristics of spiritually gifted students. In order to understand the current state of addressing the spiritual needs of children, this session examines school-based philosophies which nurture spirituality, curriculum designed to enhance spiritual intelligence, specific programs to implement, and techniques educators can employ in the classroom. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants

Room: 602

Room: 201

12.1 M  any Voices: Being Inclusive and Building Connections in Learning and Knowledge for All in Gifted Curriculum

Global Awareness 9.3 E-Mentorship: The Bridge for International Gifted Education Sonya Porcher, Disney English, Hangzhou, China

Teachers in countries such as China and South Africa are connecting to gifted educators in the U.S. through e-mentorship with the IGET Network to share best practices and strategies regarding gifted education. Through e-mentorship, ideas are shared to better serve our gifted populations. How to participate in an e-mentorship program, current gifted education issues, and best practices are shared with advocates, administrators, and K-12 educators.

Kevan A. Kiser-Chuc, Tucson Unified School District, Tucson, AZ How do we include the many voices of non-dominant cultures in the curriculum of the gifted in the United States? This can be achieved by developing a curriculum that is inclusive and rigorous with an intentional mindset and way of being that increases awareness and respects the culture of others. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

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National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

Educating Global Citizens: Embedding Human Rights into the Curriculum Ellen Honeck, Institute for the Development of Gifted Education, Denver, CO

In our ever-increasing global society, it is important for gifted students in all settings, across all cultures, to be familiar with human rights and the complexity of such issues. Utilizing a newly developed Human Rights Educational Model and integrating topics related to human rights into the curriculum develops the dispositions and skills gifted students need as global citizens in the 21st century. Participants become familiar with utilizing a model that integrates human rights topics into current curricular content. Examples of integration are highlighted from students ranging in age from K – 8. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 206

NAGC Base Camp

NCSSSMST

Middle Grades Exploring Informational Texts Using the Common Core State Standards: A Challenge for Gifted Middle Schoolers Carolyn Coil, Pieces of Learning, Marion, IL

One major characteristic of the CCSS is that they emphasize analysis, reflection, and research using informational texts. In an age where anything and everything can be put on the Internet with no screening, editing, or outside evaluation and review, teaching gifted middle school students how to read, use, assess, and evaluate informational texts is essential. In this session, identify several CCSS that focus on informational texts. Learn how to address and teach these standards by using differentiated activities and assessments in many subject areas and correlating them to the appropriate standards. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 6-8, Consultants, Coordinators

Listening Within: The Call to Meaning and Service

Room: 207

Certain intellectually gifted children have equally compassionate gifted hearts, caring deeply about the well-being of others around them and across the globe. Their intensities and sensitivities bring the outer world into their inner landscape. These special children innately live the guiding principle of brotherhood and interdependence and simplify what is essential and truly needed in a complex world. Utilizing 30 years of experience, this session defines their extraordinary consciousness, enumerates ways to activate their inner wisdom and direction, and facilitates answers to their quest, “What do I have to offer?” and “How can I be of service?”

April N. Coleman, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL

Patricia Gatto-Walden, Boulder, CO

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 105

Science in Action Service-Learning: Reach the Summit with Middle School Students

Friday

Recorded Session

Are you interested in learning how to engage middle school students in real-world, high quality science experiences that produce positive results in academics, civic responsibility, and self-efficacy? Find out how 8th graders test water to determine if it affects their county’s high cancer rate. Replicate 6th graders’ severe weather community awareness session that saved lives during Alabama’s April 27th tornadoes. Learn how an entire school follows the lead of 7th graders who share risks of obesity and benefits of exercise. Discuss how to transfer ideas to your classroom for positive results! Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 601

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November 15-18, 2012 | Denver, Colorado

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Putting It Into Practice November 16, 2012 | 12:15 PM – 1:00 PM It’s a Small World, But What Do We Know About Other Places?

Laurie J. Croft, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; Jerry Croft, Oklahoma State University, Tiffin, IA

R.E.A.C.H: Regional Enrichment Activities for Children with High Abilities

Imagine Disney’s “It’s a Small World” lyrics. If it was a small world in 1964, it’s a much smaller world now. Students need time to reflect on the perceptions they have about other places and other peoples, and they need to learn ways to systematically study a place to better understand its unique character. Middle school students are uniquely prepared to undertake both “location” studies, predicated on latitude and longitude (with geometric implications), and “place analyses,” examining perceptions and easily accessible data. Educators and parents practice successful learning strategies and receive resources, including websites appropriate for interdisciplinary and geographic explorations.

Learn how the New Jersey Association for Gifted Children developed REACH and how REACH can easily be adapted to your community. These half-day, low-cost/no-cost events reach out to families and educators to raise awareness of the characteristics and needs of gifted and high achieving children, share local, state, and national resources, provide a place for parents to network and advocate for their children, and offer family challenges and workshops for children, parents, and educators. Join us for this informative session and leave with plans to create your own!

Friday

Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents Room: 202

Building Potential: Meeting the Needs of Diverse Learners in Middle School Mathematics and Engineering

Amy Germundson, Matthew Reames, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

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Parent & Community

Donna Vaupel, Elaine Mendelow, New Jersey Association for Gifted Children, Mount Laurel, NJ

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: 702

27.1 Gifted Adolescents’ Relationships with Family Members and Peer Relationships Seon-Young Lee, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea

Wondering how to differentiate instruction for gifted leaners in middle school mathematics and engineering? Knowing that gifted students bring a diverse mix of learning needs to classrooms, creating academically responsive instruction to ensure challenge and deeper understanding is key to maximizing interest and potential in STEM fields. While demonstrating how engineering can be integrated into a mathematics curriculum, participants actively learn how to develop strong and defensible curriculum that is conceptually oriented and how to implement low-prep differentiated strategies that converge on these conceptual ideas in STEM fields. Lessons, examples of student thinking, and templates are provided.

This session presents how gifted adolescents and their parents perceived relationships among their family members and how their perceptions affected adolescents’ peer relationships. Survey data showed that parents perceived higher cohesion and intimacy at home than did their children, while gifted adolescents were more aware of distance and disengagement in the family. Adolescents who reported higher confidence and satisfaction with their peer relationships tended to rate positively about their family and perceived flexible atmosphere at home. Other results suggested that negative family components, such as disengagement and enmeshment, were significant variables explaining adolescents’ peer relationships.

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 6-8, Coordinators, Parents

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Room: 603

Room: Exhibit Hall A

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

Professional Development Cluster Grouping: Strategies for Success

Karen Westberg, University of St. Thomas, Minneapolis, MN Cluster grouping of gifted learners in classrooms is a viable option for providing gifted education services in schools. Cluster grouping is more widely used today because of concerns about providing appropriate curriculum and instruction to gifted learners on a daily basis. As with any viable programming, all stakeholders must be involved to create buy-in for cluster grouping. Preparation and program development must be addressed district-wide, at all levels. Strategies for providing ongoing professional development to cluster teachers and using a collaboration model are discussed in this session.

NAGC Base Camp

NCSSSMST

Pay it Forward: Professional Development to Foster Personal Creativity and Inspire Creativity in Students

Amy Clune, Clark County School District, Las Vegas, NV; Shannon B. Jones, Ricks Center for Gifted Children, Denver, CO

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents

Creativity: the word inspires, excites, intimidates, expands, and consumes. For those who identify themselves as creative, they find both stimulation and solace in the creative process. Others may fear creativity even as they seek to inspire creativity in their students. Developing personal creativity empowers teachers in their professional goals of fostering creativity in their own students. This session focuses on establishing a creative environment, personal exploration of creativity, and strategies for supporting and developing creativity in students. This unique professional development approach brings teachers together to explore creativity and the creative process while dispelling misconceptions and myths of creativity.

Room: 205

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators

4.3 Expanding Staff Development by Creating Online Communities of Practice

Room: 701

Can online staff development create and expand communities of practice to enhance instruction for gifted learners while minimizing the time, money, and distance that often separate gifted programs from their ideal? Technology allows educators to generate ideas and concepts, evaluate differentiated lessons, apply instructional strategies, and share resources. In this session, participants learn about the process that one university and school district underwent as they launched an initiative aimed at virtual staff development. Hear about the lessons learned during the decision-making process that reflect the benefits and constraints of online staff development regarding the platform, content, and overall response to the initiative.

Karen Larsen, Colorado Academy of Educators of the Gifted, Talented and Creative, Westminster, CO; Linda E. Pfeiffer, Thompson School District, Loveland, CO

Gabriella Juliana Ducamp, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

ED L L E C CAN

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators Room: Exhibit Hall A

Gifted in Colorado: The Focus on Student Growth and Professional Development for Teachers

Friday

Recorded Session

This combined session will provide an overview of the Colorado Academy of Educators of the Gifted, Talented and Creative (CAEGTC); an organization of educators dedicated to the purpose of recognizing, stimulating, and nurturing professional excellence in the delivery of services to the gifted, talented, and creative youth of Colorado; as well as providing a report of the findings from a short study of growth success for gifted middle school students in Colorado. Join us to learn how you can start an organization like CAEGTC and where the emphasis can be placed in your schools for student growth.  Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 6-8, Coordinators, Parents Room: 707

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November 15-18, 2012 | Denver, Colorado

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Putting It Into Practice November 16, 2012 | 12:15 PM – 1:00 PM Research & Evaluation 2.1 The Secret of Success? Defining the Role of Metacognition in High Achievement

Hillary Hettinger Steiner, University of Georgia, Loganville, GA Academically gifted children are often assumed to be reflective, metacognitive thinkers; however, in some aspects of metacognition, gifted children are outperformed by their peers. Failing to include gifted children in metacognitive and learning strategy training can lead to underachievement, especially in the later grades. Review the literature on metacognition in the gifted, consider the origins of high metacognitive abilities, hear recommendations for future research, and make the case for teaching metacognitive strategies to gifted children. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Researchers

Friday

Room: Exhibit Hall A

19.3 T o Be Engaged or Not Engaged, That is the Question: How to Support Student Engagement with Today’s Gifted and Talented Elementary Students Kimberly M. McCormick, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN

Research has found that a strong predictor of students’ success is the ability to connect to their school and be actively engaged in their learning. Even with the vast support for its positive effects, one area that has not been investigated is the idea of student engagement among elementary gifted and talented students. This concept is essential to understand because student engagement decreases with each grade-level. Through the qualitative analysis of student drawings and interviews, this research details what it means to be an engaged gifted and talented student and how it can be supported in today’s classrooms. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

COMBINED SESSION

Professional Development 12:15 PM – 12:40 PM

Supporting Teachers’ Peak Performance 24/7: Gifted PLCs and PD...Online!

Lauri B. Kirsch, Hillsborough County Public Schools, Tampa, FL School accountability, expanding choice options, and teacher performance pay are just a few of the driving forces behind the need for teachers to be at their peak performance every day. How can teachers tap into ongoing, collaborative, research-supported professional development without the limitations of time and distance? Attend this session to learn how one district uses distance-learning technology to implement PD and PLCs for gifted teachers, leave with ideas for creating virtual professional learning communities to support teachers in your district! Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators

12:40 PM – 1:00 PM

Using Questioning and Discussion Strategies to Engage Learners and Promote Critical Thinking Estee Aiken, University of Montana Western, Dillon, MT

All effective educators want their learners to be engaged thinkers. By asking great questions and providing opportunities for learners to actively discuss answers, educators can draw their learners in and keep them engaged without bells or whistles. This session details Question-Answer Relationships as well as Socratic Seminars and Fishbowl Discussions for use with students from elementary school to college and beyond, including staff development settings. While these are not necessarily new ideas, this is a new approach to their application for use in any academic setting. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 703

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National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

Special Populations 32.1 When Smart Kids Struggle: Strategies for Addressing Academic and Social Difficulties Melissa Kistler, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

Whether due to disability or learning and personality differences, gifted students are not immune to having academic and social struggles. Parents, teachers, and administrators working with gifted students with difficulties face a unique challenge in finding the right tools to help these students find success. Academic and social struggles of bright students in special academic programs for the gifted and strategies to help overcome these struggles based on communication, training, structure, and support are shared in this session. Participants analyze case studies to practice putting tools and supports in place to help these students find success and defeat frustration. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

34.3 Increasing Migrant Student Nominations for Gifted and Talented Programs

Gwen Frank, SUNY College at Oneonta, Oneonta, NY This presentation emerges from the lack of research on migrant students in gifted programs. Gifted migrant students are underrepresented and underserved in programs for the gifted throughout the country. Migrant students are a unique, at-risk population whose academic difficulties may be compounded by other problems including poverty and language barriers. Participants examine the critical need for staff development in order to inform stakeholders how giftedness may manifest itself in this unique student population and suggestions for identifying and serving them in GT programs. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors

NAGC Base Camp

NCSSSMST

24.3 Dual Differences — Social Coping of Gifted LGBTQ Adolescents

Virginia Hutcheson, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA This poster session gives teachers, parents, counselors, and administrators insights into the social coping mechanisms of gifted and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer adolescents through sample interview and survey responses. These teens are often doubly alienated from social peers, stigmatized for both their gifts and their sexual orientations. They resort to a variety of positive and negative strategies to cope with their feelings of differentness. By learning about these students’ unique social problems and coping strategies, caring adults can guide students toward healthy outlets and foster safe, productive learning environments where all gifted students can feel comfortable. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

Special Schools & Programs How Do You Identify and Meet the Needs of a Highly Gifted Learner?

Friday

Recorded Session

Lisa Clark Ashworth, Emily Sansale, Charlotte-Mecklenberg Schools, Charlotte, NC Whether you are an educator or administrator, leave this session with tangible ideas for identification of highly gifted learners as well as methods for meeting their diverse needs. Ideas for identification as well as real curriculum examples are presented in this multi-media session. Details of the Horizons program (a public school program for highly gifted learners in Charlotte, N.C.) are presented as well as the rationale for designing a curriculum that is accelerated, but keeps students with their ageappropriate social peers. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators, Parents Room: 610/612

Room: Exhibit Hall A

59th Annual Convention

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November 15-18, 2012 | Denver, Colorado

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Putting It Into Practice November 16, 2012 | 12:15 PM – 1:00 PM Identifying & Serving Gifted Students in Title I Schools

Lenae Lazzelle, Phelps Center for Gifted Education, Springfield, MO This presentation examines seven years of data collected, and the impact a Title I Gifted Program has made in our district and community. The BRIDGES program provides direct services to gifted students in grades two through five from underrepresented populations attending Title I elementary schools. The BRIDGES curriculum uses an inquiry-based approach to learning. A strong focus on community guides the BRIDGES curriculum, which includes: Thinking & Communication Skills, Personal & Group Dynamics, and Major Unit. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators Room: 104

Friday

STEM Developing Mathematical Creativity through Problem Writing

Vince Matsko, Illinois Math and Science Academy, Aurora, IL How does one foster mathematical creativity in the classroom? By writing original problems, students at the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy report that they are able to see mathematics as a creative endeavor, and that they are able to understand the topics they include in their problems more conceptually. Learn how to incorporate the writing of original problems in classrooms at all levels, and how to tailor this type of assignment to your specific teaching strengths and the particular needs of your students. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Coordinators Room: 210/212

Implementing the “E” in STEM: Engaging All Students in Engineering

Nicole Anne Culella, Randy J. Asher, Brooklyn Technical High School, New York, NY Brooklyn Technical High School is a Model Project Lead the Way School, offering a plethora of engineering course sequences

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to students in grades 6-12. Many of the projects and engineering initiatives taking place at Brooklyn Technical High School can be replicated and modified for students at any grade level. The presenters discuss their school’s approach to teaching engineering and the numerous engineering resources available for educators. This interactive presentation provides materials and information for educators interested in building a true STEM program. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators Room: 208

14.3 T oyota Math and Technology Leadership Academy — Creating Teachers with “Altitude”

Janet Tassell, Marge Maxwell, Rebecca Stobaugh, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY Picture a group of elementary school teachers integrating mathematics and technology into lessons while learning leadership, instruction, and assessment to change education in their schools. Kentucky is in great need of increasing leadership in mathematics instruction at the elementary level. Through leadership, instruction for diverse populations, and awareness of assessment techniques, coupled with technology, teacher leaders are being created through the Math and Technology Leadership Academy, a professional development initiative. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Coordinators Room: Exhibit Hall A

Rube Goldberg: Developing Engineering Talents

Nielsen Pereira, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY; Shawn Jordan, Odesma Dalrymple, Arizona State University, Mesa, AZ Rube Goldberg machines complete simple tasks in complex and fun ways. The design, construction, and observation of these machines provide gifted students with opportunities for creative and inventive hands-on physics and engineering. This presentation discusses the development of a Rube Goldberg curriculum for gifted students attending summer camps. Participants learn how to implement the curriculum and experience hands-on activities found useful for using Rube Goldberg in the classroom. The

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

presenters discuss how they have connected groups of gifted students attending summer camps in various sites having a common goal: designing Rube Goldberg machines! Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 101

Strategies to Expand Gifted STEM Education Mary Morse, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

Technology and online resources are proving to be effective learning tools for gifted learners, particularly in STEM areas. These tools, combined with problem-based learning strategies, can provide the depth, challenge, and authenticity that gifted learners need. This session demonstrates tools and outlines strategies to engage students in STEM research. Through an interactive presentation and demonstrations, participants learn techniques for using online resources, facilitating gifted learning through guided inquiry, and enhancing student engagement and collaboration.

NAGC Base Camp

NCSSSMST

Higher Thinking by Thinking Small: Adventures in Nanotechnology

Patricia Darlene Woodberry, Lynn Pleveich, Richmond City Public Schools, Richmond, VA Nanotechnology, the study of managing matter at a very small scale, is one facet of the next big frontier. Using basic elementary activities, explore why size matters, new tools that have led to the explosion in nanotechnology applications, engineering bottom up and top down, size properties, self-assembly, and application of carbon knowledge. With itty-bitty budget activities, teachers are able to lead students in examining the vast array of opportunities for growing knowledge in nanotechnology. Given the complex thinking capacities of gifted students, simple concrete activities can be used to make connections between what has been and is to come. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5 Room: 108

Friday

Recorded Session

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators, Parents Room: 712

NAGC CENTRAL NEW at NAGC Central

Booth 419

Gifted Program Evaluation: A Handbook for Administrators and Coordinators Kristie Speirs Neumeister, Ph.D. and Virginia Hays Burney, Ph.D.

Using the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts with Gifted and Advanced Learners Edited by Joyce VanTassel Baska

Using the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics With Gifted and Advanced Gifted Children

Plus books by General Session Speakers Chester Finn, Ridley Pearson, and Temple Grandin

Edited by Susan K. Johnsen, Ph.D., Linda J. Sheffield, Ph.D. VanTassel Baska

Implementing RtI with Gifted Students: Service Models, Trends, & Issues Edited by Mary Ruth Coleman, Ph.D. and Susan K. Johnsen, Ph.D.

Educating for Creativity & Innovation

Donald J. Treffinger, Ph.D., Patricia Schoonover, Ph.D., Edwin C. Selby, Ph.D.

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November 15-18, 2012 | Denver, Colorado

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 1:30 PM – 2:30 PM Signature Series Supporting Low-Income, High-Ability Learners: Next Steps in the Research and Policy Agenda Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, Northwestern, Evanston, IL; Carol Horn, Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax, VA; Jonathan Plucker, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Tamra Stambaugh, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN; Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Frank C. Worrell, University of California, Berkeley, CA

Friday

Last May, NAGC hosted more than 60 experts and researchers at a “National Summit on Low-Income, High-Ability Learners,” to consider a research agenda for the field focused on the needs of promising learners from poverty.  Discussions and presentations culminated in a white paper outlining a research and policy agenda, first released here at the NAGC convention. Presenters share findings from the white paper including: what we already understand about the characteristics and development of low-income, high-ability learners, barriers to these students’ educational achievement, effective practices and programs that develop their talents, and the unique psychosocial issues that these students face and the skills needed to deal with them.  Come away with additional insight from these presenters about success factors and recommended best practices, and a direction for future research for the field. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room Four Seasons Ballroom

High-Ability Secondary Students: How Do We Teach Them to Maximize Their Talents? Penny Kolloff, Illinois State University, Eau Claire, WI; Felicia A. Dixon, Ball State University; Ken Stuart, Indiana Academy for Science, Mathematics, and Humanities, Muncie, IN; Shelagh Gallagher, Engaged Education, Charlotte, NC; Janice Krouse, Branson Lawrence, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy, Aurora, IL

High-ability students are a national treasure. At the secondary level, teachers encourage talent development through rigorous curriculum, strategies that challenge critical thought, and products requiring creative insights. While these are not easy tasks, they are necessary in preparing high-ability students to reach their potential. This panel of experts each teaches

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secondary students in a high-powered school. They share their teaching philosophy, strategies that make sense in fostering growth in students, what they do to prepare their students for contribution to 21st century life, and how they modify their techniques to respond to students’ unique needs. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 106

Administrator of the Year Rock, Paper, Hammer

Kathleen Steele, Ball State University, Muncie, IN You have just been asked to meet the new superintendent. During the past 15 years, you have taught in the gifted program. Now you are the gifted coordinator and proud of the progress you have made. The first question that the superintendent asks you is, “How have you kept this elitist program going all these years?” You immediately run through all the problem-solving skills you know. How do you answer this question? Just think about what gifted education offers your students, community and the world? Come and get energized about what you do. Audience: Administrators, coordinators Room: 101

Distinguished Service Award Advocating: To Whom and For What?

Julia Link Roberts, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY Advocacy for gifted children is essential if policy, law, and funding are to be developed and supported. What steps must be taken to build a strong advocacy base? Who needs to be advocating, and what are the messages that resonate? Where do gifted education and talent development come together as the focus for advocating for children with gifts and talent, or do these messages clash? Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders Room: 108

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

Arts Do You Hear What I Hear? Using Instructional Technology to Build Gifted Learners’ Musical Repertoire Stephen T. Schroth, Knox College, Galesburg, IL

What are effective ways to explore music with gifted children? Many recent technological developments allow elementary school students and teachers to use challenging curriculum that explores music of others and to compose their own. Gifted children’s exposure to opera, symphonic works, ballet, and the like supports teachers and parents who seek to build students’ aesthetic percipience, writing, and critical-thinking skills. Using technology to build musical awareness is especially useful to teachers and parents possessing limited proficiency with music. A variety of resources are shared that allow music to be implemented in enrichment settings, gifted classrooms, or with mixed-ability classrooms. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators, Parents Room: 711

Computers & Technology Embracing Ebooks: Increasing Students’ Motivation to Read and Write Del Siegle, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Ebooks offer unlimited differentiation opportunities to not only read great literature, but also the creative possibilities of students writing and producing their own ebooks. Students are more motivated when they produce authentic products for authentic audiences, and ebooks afford this opportunity. Learn how to create authentic ebooks three ways: create and view them online through one of the many cloud publishing sites; create online with a cloud site, but download and read the ebook with one of the popular ebook readers; and create on our computer using free downloadable software.

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The Effects of Learning Style on Knowledge Construction Using Hypermedia-Supported Environments

Edna Leticia Hernandez de Hahn, Niagara University, Lewiston, NY Is your incorporation of hypermedia technology responding to the learning styles of gifted students in your classroom? Recent developments in Web-based implementations have led scholars to reconsider the role of learning style in hypermedia-based environments and have found that gifted students experience higher levels of engagement and advanced thinking when the use of technology responds to their learning preferences. Examine the relationship of hypermedia to knowledge construction and experience how interactive hypermedia can be used as an instructional tool for addressing individual learning style differences in gifted students. Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-12, Consultants, Researchers Room: 705

Conceptual Foundations 30.1 S  caling New Heights: The Examined Life and Journey of Gifted Adults

Friday

Recorded Session

Kimberly M. Berman, University of Toledo, Findlay, OH

We have been given various snapshots of the gifted child. Who is the photographer? Let us turn the camera to focus on those who have spent their careers spotlighting the gifted child. How do the needs of the gifted adult experts differ from typical adults? What unique challenges and/or gifts do they experience or possess? Broad categories of giftedness that impact or influence these adults, including their personal definitions and descriptions with or about giftedness, are shared. Join in an insightful look at the lives of experts on giftedness. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Parents Room: 712

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 1:30 PM – 2:30 PM 12.3 C  onceptually Challenging Curriculum: Restoring the Why to Learning

Sensory Sensitivities: The Yoke of Being Gifted

If what we teach produces educated, yet insensitive (or even indifferent) individuals, then what is the point? With a pressure to cultivate the gifted into globally competitive beings, it is becoming more difficult to make the case to teach in a humanistic manner. Learn how essential questions and authentic learning tasks empower gifted students to make meaning from curriculum that can seem irrelevant or outdated. The point is this: Who we are is just as important as what we know, and teaching through a humanities lens allows us to cultivate globally competitive humans.

What is the relationship between heightened sensory sensitivity and anxiety in gifted students? How does heightened sensory sensitivity affect a gifted person’s experience of environmental stimuli? What cognitive and behavioral strategies can gifted students and adults use to manage their experience of offending stimuli? Join us in this interactive session and delve into the research about gifted students’ heightened sensory sensitivity and anxiety; address the implications of the research for parenting, counseling, classroom practice, and environmental design; and learn strategies for managing one’s personal response to offending environmental stimuli.

Laila Sanguras, University of North Texas, Coppell, TX

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Exhibit Hall A

Friday

Counseling & Guidance Adolescents in the Academic Crowd: Relationships with Peers and Parents

Jennifer Riedl Cross, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA In a study of students in a Midwest, rural high school, 30% of students identified themselves as members of an academic crowd, the smart/nerd crowd. Thirty percent of these students were National Honor Society members, suggesting a large proportion of them are gifted students. An analysis of these academically oriented students’ crowd affiliations, their activities, and their perceptions of their parents’ responsiveness and demandingness can help us to better understand adolescents’ social coping with both school and parental influences. In this session, profiles of these students are highlighted and ways in which counselors may put this information to use are shared. Audience: Classroom Teachers 9-12, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Angela M. Housand, University of North Carolina-Wilmington, Greenville, NC

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Parents Room: 610/612

Get Understanding... Get Trust... Get Success

Colleen Anthony, JEFFCO Public Schools, Golden, CO; Amy Dolci Graham, Evergreen High School, Evergreen, CO Why is it important to explain giftedness to students? This presentation outlines steps used with secondary students to promote an understanding about what it means to be gifted. Strategies applied with a clustered group of gifted students provide the foundation for the information presented. A sequence of topics, agendas for discussion, presentations ideas, and student feedback to resources used are shared. What was gained? Trust and understanding of self and others, as well as strategies to navigate the future based on strengths, interests, and confidence. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors Room: 606

Room: 605

Life’s about using the whole box of crayons. — Author Unknown

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National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

The Challenge of the Caring Classroom: Supporting Gifted Learners Holistically

Michele Kane, Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL; Dorothy A. Sisk, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX Educational experiences that have a framework centered on care, concern, and compassion create a classroom climate where happiness and timeless learning can flourish. Many asynchronous gifted learners are particularly sensitive to the social-emotional atmosphere during learning opportunities. This session examines the beliefs of noted authors, including Nel Noddings, who envision alternatives to mastering skills and acquiring information as the purpose of learning. Suggestions for building a rich intellectual life and increasing happiness through the power of caring are shared. Creative activities and resources for teachers, parents, and counselors are provided that encourage and invite gifted youngsters to develop optimally. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: 603

FAQ Regarding Social and Emotional Needs of the Gifted: Results from an Analysis of a National Listserv

Susannah Wood, Laurie J. Croft, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA Gifted students have unique social and emotional needs. Many educators of the gifted have little training about identifying or best serving these needs. An international listserv is one place educators of the gifted can seek advice, information, and ask questions about how best to serve gifted youth. What do teachers ask? What advice do they give their peers? This presentation discusses the results of an analysis of listserv posts focused on social and emotional needs of gifted students including suggestions and advice for interventions provided by subscribers and implications for professional development. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors Room: 710

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Fostering Hopefulness in Gifted Learners: Internal and External Factors that Impact Hope in the Gifted Education Setting

Janette Boazman, University of Dallas, Irving, TX; Anne N. Rinn, University of North Texas, Denton, TX You have to have hope! What exactly shapes hopefulness in gifted students? According to Snyder, hope is comprised of the ability to see multiple pathways to goals and personal beliefs about one’s capacity to move on those pathways toward attaining goals. In the gifted education setting, hope, as defined by Snyder, is an important psychological undercurrent that aids students in the learning environment. This presentation examines factors that impact hopefulness in gifted students from two universities. The findings from this study with college students provide information for K-12 practice. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 601

Creativity 7.3 Learn, Do, Inspire - One Child at a Time

Friday

Recorded Session

Linda Conlon, Amanda Coffman, Adrienne Floro, Lisa Johnston, Quaker Valley School District, Sewickley, PA During fifth grade, in this district-wide, interdisciplinary adventure in personal creativity, we challenge our students to decide what they will spend their year becoming an expert about. Throughout the eighth grade, we indulge growing minds and active bodies by requiring them to design and produce a tangible product. In grade ten, as students are taking stock of who they are and what they will become, they complete a Personal Project that will define them and inspire others. Dozens of inspirational examples are offered, along with the scope and sequence of cognitive, affective, and vocational skill development our students’ experience. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors Room: Exhibit Hall A

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 1:30 PM – 2:30 PM Curriculum Studies Differentiation at Its Best: Multicultural Gifted Education Donna Y. Ford, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN

As our nation becomes increasingly diverse, it is essential that teachers find ways to engage them along two lines - critical thinking and problems and multiculturalism. This session presents the culturally responsive model developed to guide teachers in their efforts to increase rigor for all gifted students, but especially culturally different gifted students. The BloomBanks Matrix is presented along with a few lesson plans in different content areas. The primary goal is to help teachers learn how to combine rigor with relevance. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators Room: 102

Friday

There’s No “I” in Team: Creating an Optimal Group-Work Environment for Bright Students Cheryl L. Walker, Petra D. T. Gyles, Bruce M. Shore, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada

Gifted individuals have varied learning preferences when working with others, which are dependent upon the learning situation. Inquiry-based teaching and learning environments are often well-suited to gifted learners. The current study investigates group dynamics among two groups of Grade 4 and Grade 5/6 students working in teams of four on collective projects. The nature of

the group-work activity, personality of each member, and the pedagogical and classroom-management actions of the teacher all influence the effectiveness and outcomes of the group as a team. The presentation explores optimizing settings for gifted students working together within inquiry-based classrooms. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 608

Writing a Winning Curriculum: Guidelines for Curriculum Studies Competition Christine J. Briggs, Sally M. Dobyns, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA; Carol Ann Williams, Richard Stockton College, Petersburg, NJ

Educators use curriculum every day to guide their teaching and provide challenge for their students. The NAGC Curriculum Studies Network seeks to honor authors of high quality, challenging, and differentiated curriculum designed to meet the diverse learning needs of gifted students. This session outlines the rules and requirements for the Curriculum Studies Network’s annual competition. Participants learn how to submit a unit, the timeline for the review process, and the assessment rubrics. If you have a unit you would like to submit, this session provides the information you need. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators Room: 604

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National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

25.1 Educational Leadership in the Next Decade: Administrative Issues in Gifted Education

Paul Shepherd, Utah Association for Gifted Children; Sue Savage Sakashita, Granite School District, Salt Lake City, UT This presentation is designed to wrestle with the common issues faced by public school administrators and provide a background and rationale for implementing or continuing programs for the gifted and talented learner. Discuss and reflect on common issues faced in public school administration in the areas of identification, programming, and school/district organization. Key research in each area has been incorporated to help guide the discussion and promote the development of administrative rationale, philosophy, and effective organizational strategies for providing gifted education within a school community. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators Room: Exhibit Hall A

Teach Common Core with Style

Olha Skyba, Rebecca Vonesh, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI The new Common Core State Standards stress rigor, clarity, application, and coherence, but are they built with enough depth and complexity to challenge gifted and talented students? This session is for those who are ready to upgrade their understanding of Common Core standards and explore how they align to allow working on students’ critical, creative, and systemic thinking skills. Join this hands-on session as we translate Common Core recommendations into GT friendly language and explore curricular resources, interdisciplinary activity ideas, rubrics, and technology-enriched options that help put Common Core Reading and Writing Standards on the next level for your gifted students. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators Room: 105

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Early Childhood Differentiating Early Childhood Curriculum with the Integrated Curriculum Model

Bronwyn MacFarlane, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR Are you interested in early childhood curriculum for gifted youngsters? This session leads attendees through the steps taken in designing and differentiating an early childhood curriculum for advanced, high-ability four-year old children across the three realms of mental functioning: cognitive (thinking), affective (emotions), and conative (motivation) with appropriate challenging activities. Learn how the three components of ICM, advanced content, high-level process and product work, and concept development are incorporated into an early childhood curriculum in use state-wide with parents, high-ability children, and early childhood educators. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 709

Tiered Instruction: Realistic and Engaging Ways to Make It Work

Friday

Recorded Session

Bertie Kingore, Professional Associates Publishing, Austin, TX Many teachers are more skilled at supporting struggling students than appropriately challenging young gifted children. Tiered instruction promotes continuous learning for all students while providing complexity and depth appropriate for primary gifted learners. Discover the interdependent relationship of assessment, tiered instruction, and achievement while learning researchbased ways to tier instruction to increase engagement and promote high-level thinking at a developmentally appropriate pace and level. Explore applications tiered in content, process, and/or product according to the readiness and capabilities of gifted learners. Exit with timesaving strategies characterized by simple preparation and multiple applications that enable reluctant, overwhelmed teachers to tier instruction. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors Room: 201

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 1:30 PM – 2:30 PM Global Awareness Unwrapping India’s Gifts

Kathy Hargrove, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX The presenter spent 5 months in India as a Fulbright Scholar in 2011-2012 focusing on teacher education with an emphasis on gifted education. This presentation provides information about the state of gifted education in India as well as offer resources for potential Fulbright Scholars. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Parents Room: 607

Approaching a Global Understanding of Giftedness

Friday

Bob Seney, Mississippi University for Women, Columbus, MS; Mark Mishou, Montezuma-Cortez School District RE-1, Cortez, CO At the 2011 Prague World Conference, the reaction to the concept that giftedness is defined by culture was surprising. Has this concept not yet had its full “fifteen minutes” of fame? This presentation addresses the concept of understanding giftedness through cultural lenses. Principles of a global understanding of giftedness are identified. The concept is developed by focusing on three different Nations of Southwest Colorado Native Americans. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors Room: 103

Communities Creating Change: Teaching Active Democratic Citizenship through Service-Learning Merzili Villanueva, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Implementing social justice in the primary classroom is essential for developing gifted students’ critical-reasoning skills and nurturing global consciousness and compassion. A classroom of diverse grade 2 students planned and participated in a service-

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learning project to support a Chicago school’s struggle for a library, and in the process realized they could generate positive change through creative collaboration, collective resistance, and by using their voice in constructive ways. Participants are introduced to a differentiated social studies and language artsintegrated unit on the concept of community-fusing elements of Understanding by Design, Community Problem Solving, and Type III Enrichment. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 706

Middle Grades When “Lazy” Doesn’t Make Sense: How Executive Functions Impact the Success of Our Brightest Children Cynthia Z. Hansen, Tri-Counties GATE Council, Ventura, CA; Marydee Sklar, Executive Functioning Success, Portland, OR

Difficulty starting a task, staying focused on school tasks, and great ideas without follow-through, are all symptoms of Executive Functioning difficulties. Executive Function skills are stronger indicators of educational success than IQ, especially for our gifted community. Many students struggle in middle school because of the increasing demands on their delayed skills, often gaining the label “lazy” by those who don’t understand the neurological basis of the child’s frustrations. This session discusses current brain research, how to identify a child (or adult) with executive function skill deficits, and how parents and teachers can support them at home and at school. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: 602

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

More than a Cluster Group: A District’s Approach to Middle Years Gifted Education

Christine Abbot, Hillcrest Middle School, Coquitlam, BC, Canada Participants learn how a district gifted cluster class addresses needs of and supports high ability and high-potential learners. This interactive session shares instructional practices for differentiation in core subjects (including online literature circles, individualized math programs) and ways to engage gifted and talented learners in middle school through inquiry-based projects and multi-disciplinary units. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 6-8, Coordinators Room: 708

10.1 C  areer Planning to Stretch Potentials of High-Ability Students

Mihyeon Kim, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA Have you ever been concerned about gifted students’ career development? One of the myths about gifted and high-achieving students is that they are self-directed and know where they are heading. In reality, drop-out rates for such students are a concern for many prestigious colleges. Talented students may need more guidance in career development for their own satisfaction as well as to contribute more responsibly to society. This session helps high-ability students plan their careers by sharing responses from middle school and high school students and their parents who participated in a career-related conference. Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

A Life Less Ordinary: Exploring Extraordinary Lives through Biography

Christine Deitz, Ann Robinson, Merve Topak Jamsran, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR A great biography in the hands of a child will accomplish what no other genre can. Biographies provide middle school gifted children with important role models and ignite sparks of inspiration and imagination. In addition, biographies provide a path for understanding the motivation behind eminent people. During this session, learn the bountiful benefits of biographies, experience extraordinary examples of beautifully written biographies, dabble in curriculum guides created for

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the instruction of biography, and sample ample applications for inspiring the 21st century’s van Goghs, Marian Andersons, and Ada Lovelaces. Handouts include tools for analyzing portraits and primary-source documents. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Parents Room: 206

Demystifying Differentiation in Middle School for the Digital Age Bob Iseminger, Creative Curriculum Catalysts, Roanoke, VA

This session is intended for middle school educators seeking practical strategies and activities that assist in differentiating the Common Core curriculum for students who are digital natives. Educators sample a variety of tools and strategies that assist in the design of differentiated lessons specifically targeting middle school curriculum. The session highlights the unique learning needs of this digital generation of gifted learners. Process and product strategies are modeled to increase the amount of student talk about content in place of classroom lecture and to build kinesthetic activities into lessons based on Common Core standards. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 6-8, Consultants, Coordinators

Friday

Recorded Session

Room: 702

When you enter this classroom… You are scientists. You are explorers. You are important. You are loved. You are respected. You are a friend. You are the reason we are here!

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 1:30 PM – 2:30 PM Parent & Community

Professional Development

Naughty or Gifted: Finding a Positive Perspective

Sharing Gifted Strategies for the AP/IB Classroom

Gifted students require attention to their strengths as well as their weaknesses. Unfortunately, many schools fail to attend to the strengths until negative behaviors have ceased, leading many bright students to be labeled for a variety of services other than gifted. Sometimes parents struggle to understand the behaviors that interfere with the school’s ability to recognize the gift. A framework for targeting and agreeing on goals can be helpful in this situation. Presenters demonstrate differential diagnosis techniques to provide parents with tools to improve behaviors and increase the likelihood for the staff to view children in a positive light.

This session is designed to provide an opportunity for AP or IB teachers to share their best practices on how to meet the needs of gifted students in their AP/IB classes. Topics for discussion will include: differentiation in AP/IB classes, providing enrichment opportunities, and underachieving gifted students.

Pat Schock, Joan K. Jacobs, Sue Harvey, Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln, NE

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: 204

17.3 Tapping Psychology for Tips: A Framework to Raise Your Gifted Child

Francisca E. Peterson, Anne E. Walden, Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln, NE Parents and teachers are sometimes at a loss when trying to support the many needs of gifted children by choosing to support intellectual needs only. Information from different schools of psychology can support the development of a framework that benefits social-emotional needs and addresses such issues as perfectionism, procrastination, intensity, and other behaviors that put gifted students at risk. Participants receive information on social and Adlerian (Individual) Psychology and mindfulness geared towards developing individuals who have skills to meet their own needs and embark on a successful life journey. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents

Diana Kennen, Susan Gary, Rockdale Magnet School for Science and Technology, Conyers, GA

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Coordinators Room: 208

Research & Evaluation 22.3 Development and Utilization of a Teacher Identification Form of Student Interest in Mathematics

Steven R. Wininger, Tracy Ford Inman, Julia Link Roberts, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY This presentation explains the development of a teacher identification form of student interest in mathematics, presents results of quantitative and qualitative data collection assessing reliability, validity, practical challenges, and suggestions for improvement, and prompts discussion about the practical challenges identified. The form was developed based on the characteristics of individual interest as defined by Hidi and Renninger’s Four-Phase Model of Interest Development. The form was piloted and tested with second through sixth-grade mathematics teachers in six elementary schools. Follow-up data were collected six months, one year, and two years later. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

Room: Exhibit Hall A

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Recorded Session

Poster Session

Quantitative Research Methods in Gifted Education: A Methodological Review

Gokhan Oztunc, Sedat Sen, University of Georgia, Athens, GA Quantitative research methods have been used extensively in the field of gifted education. With the new methodological developments, researchers are more able to obtain the most accurate results from empirical studies. This presentation offers a comprehensive look at the quantitative methods used in gifted education research. The articles published over the last five decades in Gifted Child Quarterly are reviewed and

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the quantitative research methods used in those articles are examined in terms of methodological strengths and weaknesses. This session provides crucial methodological suggestions based on the review findings while also highlighting the importance of methodological training in graduate programs. Audience: Researchers Room: 104

COMBINED SESSION

1:30 PM – 2:00 PM

2:00 PM – 2:30 PM

Teachers’ Conceptions of Giftedness

Daniel Hernández-Torrano, Charo Bermejo, Rosario Bermejo, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain This study analyzes the characteristics that lead teachers to judge a child as gifted. Analyze the cognitive and noncognitive profile of a sample of secondary school students who have been nominated as gifted by their teachers based on different theories of intelligence, aptitude, and creativity. Examine the differences in the students’ profile by gender and grade. Finally, a reflection on the influence of teachers’ beliefs, biases, and expectations on the selection of students for gifted and talented programs is provided. Audience: Classroom Teachers 9-12, Researchers

The Potential Pitfalls and Possibilities of Involving Teachers in Gifted Education Identification

Scott J. Peters, University of Wisconsin - Whitewater, Whitewater, WI; Marcia Gentry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Matthew T. McBee, East Tennessee University, Johnson City, TN

Friday

Research & Evaluation

Teachers have served as a source of information in gifted education student identification for decades. However, perhaps no other source of data in gifted identification carries more potential for increased system accuracy if used correctly, but also for serious pitfalls if used incorrectly. This session outlines the research basis for the various ways teacher ratings, nominations, recommendations, and checklists can be used in identification as well as highlights the potential benefits and limitations of each method. Research is shared concerning the unintended consequences of using generic teacher recommendations as the initial catalyst to additional screening for giftedness. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers Room: 207

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 1:30 PM – 2:30 PM Special Populations Increasing Minority Participation in GT Programs Using the New Norms for the NNAT2: From Theory to Practice Jack A. Naglieri, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA; Dina Brulles, Paradise Valley USD, Phoenix, AZ

Under-representation of minority children in gifted programs is a significant problem. Some suggest that traditional IQ tests that contain verbal and quantitative content create a barrier to children with limited English language skills and those who live in poverty. The impact of traditional IQ tests that contain verbal and quantitative scales is examined and the value of using nonverbal tests discussed. Evidence supporting the use of the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test-2nd Edition is summarized. Issues related to implementation of the NNAT2 for screening and instructional needs for these students are also discussed.

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators Room: Room 707

20.1 Removing the Mask: Working Memory and Creativity in Students with Characteristics of Giftedness and ADHD

C. Matthew Fugate, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN Researchers have found close ties between working memory and fluid intelligence – the ability to flexibly reason, problem-solve, and manipulate information. Additionally, recent research has shown a connection between fluid intelligence and creativity which, along with divergent thinking, is necessary for effective problem solving. Students diagnosed with ADHD have been found to have higher incidents of deficiencies in working memory capacity. We discuss the possibility that creativity in students identified as both gifted and having characteristics of ADHD may exceed those of traditional gifted students, and this creative ability may serve as compensation for working memory deficiencies.

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Practical Instructional Strategies for Twice-Exceptional Students Using the CLEAR Curriculum Model

Tracy C. Missett, Carolyn Callahan, Amy Azano, Tonya R. Moon, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA; Kimberly Landrum, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY Teachers working with gifted students who also have a learning disability are challenged to simultaneously offer rigorous academic experiences while providing appropriate accommodations to address the unique learning needs of twiceexceptional students. Teachers of gifted students are often at a loss when designing learning experiences that address the needs and characteristics of these students. The CLEAR Curriculum Model, which integrates key components of the Schoolwide Enrichment Model, the Differentiation Instruction Model, and the Depth and Complexity Model, provides a variety of instructional strategies that can be tailored to appropriately support the needs of 2e students. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers Room: 205

27.3 Using Bibliotherapy to Support African American Students Facing “Acting White” Accusations

Winfred Harris Biddle, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA This session shares how educators and parents can use bibliotherapy to support the psychological and social needs of their African American gifted students who are facing accusations of “acting White.” First, we present a discussion of the “acting White” phenomenon and gifted students. Second, we present a brief overview of African American children’s literature related to the topic. Third, we link these two discussions. Finally, suggestions are offered for educators and parents to address the needs of gifted African American students who experience accusations of “acting White.”

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents

Room: Exhibit Hall A

Room: Exhibit Hall A

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

2.3 S  hared Advocacy Strategies for Marginalized Gifted Groups

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Special Schools & Programs

Terence Paul Friedrichs, Friedrichs Education, Mendota Heights, MN; Teresa Manzella, Advocacy Consulting Services, St. Paul, MN

Applying the Schoolwide Enrichment Model at the Renzulli Academy

Advocacy is essential to visibility and equity for many marginalized gifted populations. Some effective, schoolingrelated advocacy approaches can be used across special populations. Dissemination across groups of successful techniques enhances these populations’ advocacy knowledge and can stimulate mutually supportive advocacy. Presenters summarize literature on conducting effective school advocacy for gifted marginalized youth, through clarifying rules, organizing for change, and battling unhelpful policies. They show how such advocacy has expanded sensitivity toward diverse gifted students. Next, they describe one district’s multigroup collaboration using these approaches and share relevant advocacy strategies with attendees

The Renzulli Academy is a full-time school to service high potential minority youth. The Academy currently spans from Kindergarten to grades 4-9 with an anticipated growth of becoming a K-12 school by 2016. The Academy offers a challenging gifted curriculum and a wide variety of enrichment opportunities for students that are nationally underrepresented in GT programs. The process of implementing the Schoolwide Enrichment Model in an urban school setting is shared. This enrichment pedagogical approach assists teachers and students to encourage creative productivity. Examples of implementation are shared and the Enrichment Triad Model is explored.

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators Room: Exhibit Hall A

32.3 P  ink Is for Girls while Blue Is for Boys

Terry Wayne Neu, Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, CT While the influence of gender expectations has greatly improved and equalized in recent years, issues still exist of which parents and educators must be aware. This session discusses case studies of high-ability students, female and male, that related how gender expectations have affected their school experience (e.g., how these areas impacted their identification for gifted services, their ability to achieve commensurate with their abilities, and their overall social and emotional well-being).This session focuses on how gifted young people found avenues for success in challenging and overcoming gender bias in school and their professional career. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

Ruth Lyons, Renzulli Gifted and Talented Academy, Hartford, CT

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers Room: 703

15.1 W  here the Wild Thinkers Are Gifted Programming for Non-Traditional GT Learners

Friday

Recorded Session

Chris Johnston, Westgate Community School, Northglenn, CO Many traditional gifted programs are designed around the needs and strengths of high-achieving gifted students. For gifted students who are not high achieving, traditional programs may not be the best fit. By using a flexible, alternative model that includes elements of Universal Designs for Learning, gifted students with non-traditional learning styles can be better supported. The model is designed to serve a diverse group of gifted learners by combining instructional strategies from both gifted education and special education to create a learning environment where non-traditional gifted learners succeed. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 1:30 PM – 2:30 PM STEM Using Journal Clubs in High School to Improve Scientific Literacy

Amanda Baskett, Rockdale Magnet School for Science and Technology, Conyers, GA Do your gifted science students need more than the textbook or school laboratory has to offer? Journal clubs are a research-based practice and are used increasingly as a teaching tool in graduate schools. Clubs support students to process higher-level reading material and interact with cutting-edge science. Four different classroom models are presented that all center on students reading, presenting, and discussing current scientific literature. Participants watch and score a sample student journal club and hear lessons learned over three years of implementation in 10th and 11th grade courses. Editable peer and teacher rubrics are provided and adaptations discussed.

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Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Coordinators Room: 210/212

Math Olympiads for Mathematically Talented Elementary Students

Creating Opportunities for Excellence: Open-Ended Math Projects

Heather Gramberg Carmody, Park Tudor School, Indianapolis, IN; Eric L. Mann, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Scott A. Chamberlin, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY Bill Gates’ money, global warming, and a professional lacrosse player’s salary...a strange combination, but all examples of topics students have explored with open-ended mathematics projects. These projects provide “opportunities for excellence” described in Preparing the Next Generation of STEM Innovators. Students can demonstrate creativity and giftedness as they integrate their interests into mathematics. Participants learn an approach for middle school mathematics projects and share examples of student work. Attendees receive classroom materials and resources which will enable them to create projects that encourage students to pursue greater mathematical complexity and engagement. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 6-8, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 704

Keri M. Guilbault, Harford County Public Schools, Bel Air, MD

Creativity and Complexity in Math and Science

In this session, learn how to implement Mathematics Olympiads for Elementary and Secondary Students as an enrichment intervention for mathematically talented students. MOEMS is an international program in which students explore a topic or strategy in depth and utilize creative problem solving. Students participate in five contests that include non-routine problems and require creative-thinking skills. MOEMS aligns with NAGC PK-12 programming standards, Common Core standards in math, and can enhance school STEM initiatives. Hands-on activities and practice problems are shared as well as results from its use in an elementary school in Maryland.

Students who are gifted in mathematics and science often present different kinds of challenges for their classroom teachers. This session looks at characteristics of these students as well as ways that the regular mathematics and science curricula can be expanded to address their learning needs, including the use of creativity. Using the Common Core Standards in mathematics and the National Science Education Standards, the presenters demonstrate how two topics, one in math and one in science, can be modified to provide more creativity, complexity, depth, and abstractness for students gifted in mathematics and science.

Cheryll M. Adams, Ball State University, Muncie, IN

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5, Coordinators, Parents

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators

Room: 701

Room: 203

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Poster Session

NanoScience!

Lori Andersen, Amy Schmidt, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA NanoScience! is a newly developed science unit that introduces the science behind nanotechnology to gifted middle school students using the concept of scale. Nanotechnology holds the promise of great benefits to society, but at what cost? The toxicity of nanoparticles is relatively unknown and there are ethical considerations for the introduction of nano-sized monitoring

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devices. In this presentation, teachers are given tools to assist students with exploring nanotechnology including its risks and benefits. Learning strategies such as critical thinking, creative thinking, problem solving, and inquiry are used in the unit. Science talent development and career exploration opportunities are included. Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-8, Coordinators Room: 107

You are the master of your own destiny. Use your strengths well. They are the keys to your destiny and your success in life. Once you know yourself and take action to realize your dreams, you can

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unlock the doors to your own potential. Good Luck. And may the success you want in life one day be yours. — Neil Somerville

Get Your Game Face On Take a sweet break . . . . in NAGC Base Camp/Exhibit Hall A Exhibit Hall during “Mind Games” Here’s your opportunity to visit with exhibitors and fellow attendees and try a few games provided by American Mensa, our Mind Games sponsor. NAGC also appreciates the support of

American MENSA

®

SimplyFun.

Mind Games Break

Friday, November 16 NAGC Base Camp/Exhibit Hall A 2:50 PM - 3:50 PM

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 4:10 PM – 5:10 PM Signature Series Gifted Education and the Common Core State Standards: A Focus on English Language Arts Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA: Todd Kettler, University of North Texas, Denton, TX; Jennifer L. Jolly, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA; Claire Hughes, College of Coastal Georgia, St. Simons Island, GA; Debra Troxclair, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX

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While the new Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts are a positive movement for all of education, it is important to be mindful of the ongoing need to differentiate them appropriately for our top learners. It is essential that we see the CCSS not as an end in learning, but rather as a set of experiences – a learning trajectory - that will advance students to the next level of interest, motivation, and capacity to perform in domain areas that will enrich their lives and ours. Teaching ELA to gifted learners using the CCSS still requires acceleration and enriched opportunities to learn in more complex and creative ways. This session demonstrates the ways in which the CCSS need to be customized to meet the needs of our top learners. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Parents Room: 105

Arts Looking at Art with a Critical Eye

Jeanie Goertz, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY; Anne Djokic, Grand Junction, CO To learn about criticism of a work of art one needs to use creative and critical reasoning skills. Participants see how students cite their proof and support their reasons for liking or disliking a piece of art. Gallagher suggests that many gifted children never learn to give reasons to support their arguments and may use their advanced language skills to camouflage what they don’t understand. Participants consider the intellectual aspects of an art study presented in levels of difficulty using Bloom’s Taxonomy and elements of art as a framework for looking at art with a critical eye. Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-12, Consultants, Coordinators

Revision Tools to Improve Student Writing and Increase Classroom Engagement Megan Freeman, Peak to Peak Charter School, Lafayette, CO

Is improving student writing one of your professional goals for this year? Are you looking for ways to help gifted students maximize the drafting/revision process to significantly improve their writing in meaningful, lasting ways? This workshop introduces easy-to-use classroom tools that improve students’ word choice, sentence fluency, ideas/content, and grade-level readability, as well as increasing their accountability and raising their levels of engagement and participation. Leave with tools that you can use in your classroom tomorrow. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: 601

Computers & Technology Technology: A Critical Tool for Developing Differentiated Curriculum Jann H. Leppien, University of Great Falls, Great Falls, MT

Have you ever wondered how to use technology to address the diverse learning needs of students in your classroom? This session presents how the Internet and other technology tools help teachers locate meaningful curricular resources and tools that require students to apply critical and creative thinking as they solve problems, explore complex decisions, or respond to meaningful text. Participants view interesting sites, discuss criteria for selecting resources for students based on the principles of differentiated instruction and the 21st century learning standards, and investigate technology tools teachers can use to design challenging learning tasks. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents Room: 707

Check out Base Camp Sessions p. xxiv

Room: 604

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National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

Conceptual Foundations 13.1 Leadership Experiences for the 21st Century

Mary Duffy, Nebraska Department of Education, Lincoln, NE; Briana Duffy, Aire Libre School, Paradise Valley Public Schools, Phoenix, AZ In the 21st century, students are asked to work collaboratively via face to face, distance learning, or online. The amount of knowledge that a person has is only part of what is required for our students to function successfully. Students must receive practice in collaboration, planning skills, project management, and time management. This session discusses some instructional strategies to provide these opportunities for our future decision makers. Participants are given the opportunity to participate in some simulations that may be used in their respective classrooms. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Exhibit Hall A

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Getting to the Heart of the Brain: Scientific Literacy for the Gifted Education Community Layne Kalbfleisch, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA

This presentation is a primer to make the neuroimaging literature accessible to gifted education professionals and to increase the evaluative capacity of the educated consumer of cognitive neuroscience. It gives gifted education professionals a primary source view of neuroscience relevant to modern definitions and conceptions of giftedness while helping them understand the methods and vocabulary of human brain imaging. The overarching goal is to increase scientific literacy to generate a clearer understanding of both the utility and limitations of neuroscience and a set of operating principles to employ when reading about neuroimaging studies from both primary and secondary sources. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 101

Thanks for joining us in Denver! Mark Your Calendar for these Upcoming NAGC Conventions

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Recorded Session

2013 60th Annual NAGC Convention & Exhibition Indianapolis, Indiana November 6-10, 2013 2014 61st Annual NAGC Convention & Exhibition Baltimore, Maryland November 13-16, 2014

The session proposal submission process begins in December. Registration details are available in late March.

www.nagc.org/nagcconvention.aspx 59th Annual Convention

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 4:10 PM – 5:10 PM Counseling & Guidance The Problem of Misdiagnosis in Gifted Children

Paul Beljan, Beljan Psychological Services, Scottsdale, AZ Some gifted children suffer from psychiatric disorders, but many of the developmentally normal behaviors of gifted children are pathologized into misdiagnoses that are commonly treated with psychotropic medication. Unfortunately, most of the allied health care professionals that diagnose and/or prescribe have little or no training about the typical characteristics or common difficulties of gifted children. This workshop describes how to differentiate whether a child suffers from a disorder or whether the child is simply showing typical behaviors of giftedness. The session also discusses dual diagnoses with an emphasis on disorders that occur more often among gifted child populations.

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Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: 205

Affective Curriculum for the Gifted: Linking Social-Emotional Needs and Content Standards

Tamra Stambaugh, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN; Susannah Wood, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA Gifted students have unique needs and issues that need to be addressed. In this age of accountability, it is difficult for teachers to provide a separate social-emotional needs curriculum. This session highlights common social-emotional issues of gifted students and provides strategies for incorporating them in K-12 curriculum and the Common Core standards. Presenters discuss specific developmental needs of gifted students, popular models and specific strategies for integrating social and emotional aspects into core curriculum and across disciplines, and provide resources for planning.

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In Their Words: Stories and Statements of Giftedness

Robert A. Schultz, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; James R. Delisle, Growing Good Kids, North Myrtle Beach, SC Based on surveys with thousands of gifted adolescents and conversations with hundreds of young adults, this session shares experiences and stories about growing up gifted in categories such as: “Friends, Peers and Fitting In”; “The Many Stories of School”; and “Family Life.” The session is a study guide to the successes and pitfalls of being gifted in a world not necessarily aware of, or welcome to, the diverse and sometimes unique needs of these individuals. Attendees have the opportunity to experience some of the worries and wonders gifted young people currently have through engaging “Your Turn” activities in the presentation. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 207

Gifted At Risk for ADHD Misdiagnosis: A Call to Action

James T. Webb, Great Potential Press, Scottsdale, AZ; Marianne Kuzujanakis, SENG, Ipswich, MA; Rosina M. Gallagher, SENG, Chicago, IL Recent organizational actions could lead to an increased misdiagnosis of ADHD in gifted children. The medical profession has proposed extending the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD to children as young as four years of age, yet alarmingly fails to address the relevance of intellectual giftedness in children and adolescents. SENG and its Professional Advisory Committee have responded to redress this situation nationally and internationally. This session describes actions taken thus far and progress to date and seeks active involvement of others. Audience input in dealing with this critical issue is welcome and needed.

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Room: 710

Room: 709

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

Personality and Giftedness as Predictors of Peer Victimization Kelly Michelle Lee, University of Houston, Houston, TX

There is research literature to suggest that certain personality characteristics may be more susceptible to bullying or peer victimization. Personality factors that are common in gifted students (such as high introversion and sensitivity) may predict victimization and place gifted students at high risk for bullying. This session discusses the current literature on bullying/peer victimization and personality, and how giftedness is related to this field of study. Implications for these associations are discussed for gifted students, parents, teachers, and administrators, and audience interaction is encouraged. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 706

Social Coping and Self-Concept in Young Gifted Students

Jennifer Riedl Cross, Mihyeon Kim, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA Gifted children often believe they must engage in social coping strategies to have normal relationships. In this presentation, we describe a study of social coping among gifted students in grades 3-8. Coping strategies were evident in even the youngest gifted participants and there was no significant difference in strategy use by elementary and middle school students. Beliefs about relationships with parents and peers and academic self-concept play an important role in the social coping strategies children adopt. We discuss ways these findings can be put to use by counselors, teachers, and parents in helping children adjust to their social environment. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-8, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 605

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RtI and the Twice-Exceptional Child

Bobbie Gilman, Gifted Development Center, Westminster, CO; Kathi Kearney, MSAD #60, Berwick, ME; Dan Peters, Summit Center, Walnut Creek, CA; Michael Postma, Minnetonka Public Schools, Minnetonka, MN Current school eligibility policies for gifted programs, RtI, special education, and 504 accommodations often under-identify and contribute to inappropriate programming for gifted children with disabilities. Weaknesses are missed by RtI policies that focus on performance below grade level regardless of student ability, and giftedness may elude detection by intelligence screeners that penalize gifted children with processing skills weaknesses. This session explores the expanding role of counselors, psychologists, and school administrators in providing comprehensive assessment options, equity in program placement, and supports to maximize the participation of twice-exceptional children in appropriate services for both their giftedness and their disabilities. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: 712

The Next Generation of Gifted Gripes

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Recorded Session

Megan Parker Peters, Laura McLean, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN Concerned that your gifted students are not satisfied with their education? What about the teachers? Parents? Are we making progress in terms of gifted education? This session reflects on Galbraith’s seminal 1985 research study, 8 Great Gripes of Gifted Kids, which found that some of the greatest difficulties of gifted students include boredom at school, lofty expectations, teasing, feeling different, and feeling overwhelmed. We asked gifted students, their parents, and their teachers about their current gripes. Participants learn if current educational interventions for gifted students have helped alleviate or change the difficulties associated with being gifted. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 702

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 4:10 PM – 5:10 PM Creativity Math Studio: Extending Learning through Arts Integration Anne Hayden Stevens, Dana Thomson, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

Arts integration is a promising path toward encouraging creativity and innovative thinking in the classroom. Recent research, as well as increased parent demand, led one talent search center to pilot a series of K-8 arts integrated, enrichment course offerings. Included in these offerings were one-week supplemental/afternoon “math studios” led by artist-educators and designed to allow students to extend what they were learning in their morning math courses through arts exploration. Presenters discuss how the studios were designed, a sampling of the activities offered, student products, and the results of preand post-assessments of creative thinking.

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Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 108

Curriculum Studies 25.3 Fostering Critical Thinking in Economics: Three Instructional Strategies

Alexandra Shiu, McLennan Community College-Business Programs, Waco, TX This presentation provides three instructional strategies to foster critical thinking in the subject area of economics adapted from the book, Developing Adult Learners: Strategies for Teachers and Trainees. The strategies are a group discussion, collaboration, and simulation, which can be used in the regular classroom, with advanced learners, and with any subject.

Back to the Future: Literature for the Common Core State Standards

Penny Britton Kolloff, Illinois State University, Eau Claire, WI The Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts include examples of texts and suggest grade levels for which they are appropriate. Although the intent of the standards is to elevate the level of literature for all learners, those who work with gifted learners note that many suggested titles do not challenge advanced learners to exceed the standard curriculum. Often, older titles, including classic literature, provide more complex and rewarding literary experiences for gifted learners. The presenter reviews criteria for literature selection and offers discussion and examples of possibly over-looked titles that are particularly suited to verbally talented learners. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators Room: 701

Respect, Reflection, Resilience: Long-Term Benefits of Service Learning Experiences for Gifted Adolescents

Frances R. Spielhagen, Mount Saint Mary College, Newburgh, NY This session describes the long-term benefits of service-learning for gifted adolescents and their community. An original problem-based service-learning activity for ninth grade gifted students evolved into a three-year project in which students engaged in research, lobbying, community activism, real-life problem-solving, and the creation of a soup kitchen. In 2012, 11 years after these students graduated from high school, the soup kitchen continues to serve 60 people each day, and the young adults responsible for its creation testify to the lasting effects of that experience in their lives as young adults. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 602

Audience: Classroom Teachers 9-12 Room: Exhibit Hall A

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Poster Session

Discussion Groups: A Focused, But Flexible, Affective Curriculum

Jean Sunde Peterson, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Terry Bradley, Boulder Valley School District, Boulder, CO; George Betts, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO The growing emphasis on social, emotional, and career development reflects a sense that gifted individuals’ experience of development is qualitatively different. Discussion groups can be effective development-oriented, affective curriculum. More facilitative than didactic, these open-ended experiences move gifted students out of a competitive, evaluative environment to a place where they can be “human,” make social connections, challenge achiever and underachiever stereotypes, develop strategies for coping with stress, find peer support, and consider the fit of personality and needs with career. The presenters, with extensive group experience, involve the audience in examples of components in a group curriculum. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors Room: 606

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3.1 C  omparing Summative Assessment Outcomes on a Traditional SelectResponse Test vs. a Performance-Based Assessment on 3rd Grade Language Arts Units

Mona Aliana Mohammad Alimin, Carolyn Callahan, Tonya R. Moon, Amy Azano, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA Classroom assessment performance is the least researched area in gifted education, despite its potentially positive influence on teachers’ decision-making. Quality assessments can also inform students and parents of learning progress. With assessment trends favoring alternative assessments on the assumption they would yield differential data, traditional select-response formats are often overlooked. This study compared student outcomes on two assessment types, performance assessment task and multiple-choice tests. Preliminary results indicate no significant differences in student outcomes between the two assessment types. Practical implications for teachers are discussed. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5, Coordinators, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

Shifting to the 21st Century

Amy Wilfong, Julie Kelly, Loudoun County Public Schools, Ashburn, VA Gifted students demand more than enrichment to prepare for the 21st century. They need new approaches to their learning experiences. With the current emphasis on standards-based curriculum and assessments, gifted education programs need to provide their students with learning skills that cross disciplines and last a lifetime. Developing goals inspired by Costa’s Curriculum Shifts, we restructured our gifted education curriculum to span all grades and all disciplines. We extended complex thinking into applications that allow students to structure meaning, find problems to solve, and evaluate their own learning. Take the steps to turn theory into practice. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators Room: 607

NAGC Base Camp

Early Childhood

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Recorded Session

The Language of Learning: Questions and Conversations to Challenge Young Gifted Students

Ann Gadzikowski, Victoria Hutchen, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL This session helps early childhood teachers challenge young gifted students in both gifted programs and pre-k, preschool, and kindergarten classrooms. Among the strategies discussed are: creating a classroom culture that values the language of learning, asking questions that promote higher-level thinking, providing specific and authentic feedback to students, documenting the learning process, implementing story dictation and dramatization, and providing a forum for reflection and self-assessment. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 103

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 4:10 PM – 5:10 PM 33.1: Quid Latine? Why Latin Matters in Gifted Education

Megan Gorman, Ricks Center for Gifted Children, Denver, CO You teach Latin to first and second graders?!? Latin programs have become a thing of the past. However, Latin programs can provide a dynamic aspect to the classroom that builds English vocabulary, makes connections to the Romance languages, and creates a love of ancient civilizations. This presentation discusses the benefits of teaching Latin in early childhood classrooms through the use of etymology, mythology, and Latin vocabulary. Learn methods of integration into the primary unit of the classroom. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

Global Awareness

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8.1 Today’s Youth: Technologically Savvy Global Learners and How to Keep Them Savvy

Karen Kimball, Richmond Schools, Richmond, IN; Kristyn Kimball, Sotheby’s Institute of Art, New York, NY Education is inundated with googling/binging images and demands. The modern classroom is challenged to globalize teaching while taming the mighty standardized test serpent. Somewhere in these consignments there must survive the sense of wonder and joy that comes from creative thinking and how it connects profoundly with the wisdom in the world. Rothstein proclaimed that wonder is unsettling, poised detachment, restless amazement. Through wisdom and wonder, students are moved to explore. Technology builds a platform to reinforce studying and utilizes new techniques for incorporating lesson plans and relevant learning. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

5.3 Multibilities Philosophy and Program

Patti Shade, Denver Public Schools; Rick Shade, Jefferson County School District, Denver, CO

Creativity is a dynamic that challenges mindsets and elevates student learning to passionate levels of productivity. Perceptions of creativity are changing as educational initiatives are being driven by global

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forces. Viewing creative thinking as a concept that can be integrated into the teaching and learning process for gifted and talented students requires a philosophy and a program design that is both meaningful and practical. In this session, explore the conditions conducive for supporting the creative learning Mulitibilites Philosophy, as well as discuss program tools and strategies that best support and maintain these conditions. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

10.3 Cross-Cultural Implication of the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test Jessi Mengis, University of Houston, Houston, TX

This session examines the cross-cultural use of the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test. Pearson Publishing indicates that the NNAT is culturally neutral, unbiased, can be used with non-English speakers, and with students who have limited access to knowledge. Contemporary research evidence is limited and somewhat contradictory. A current study employing the NNAT to identify student abilities in Zambia is discussed. Given that diverse students are underrepresented in gifted programs, the use of appropriate cross-cultural instruments is extremely important. Implications of cross-cultural validity of the NNAT for educational professionals and parents are discussed and interaction is encouraged. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

Middle Grades 15.3 Effects of A Special Middle School on Gifted and High-Ability Students: Results from a Dissertation Study April N. Coleman, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL

Middle school is a crucial time for students with advanced gifts and talents, and innovative program models for this population are few and far between. This session presents details of a dissertation study that investigated one full-time special program for gifted and high ability students in grades 6-8 centered in the arts and sciences and operating under a cost-effective model. Specific outcomes

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

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under investigation included students’ project quality, academic engagement, and perceptions toward their in-class activities. Participants learn about characteristics and effects of this special school setting, as well as implications for current and future fulltime schools/programs.

Writing From the Peaks: Supporting a Young Gifted Writer

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers

In this session, designed for parents, a parent, a gifted student, and a writing mentor share the joys and challenges of nurturing a young gifted writer. Greg, a multi-gifted young man, showed an incredible ability for writing at a young age. Cheryl, his mother, shares the journey of moving through Greg’s school years and how she assisted in nurturing Greg’s writing and academic achievement. Bob, a late coming mentor, worked with Greg as he polished his work for publication. Suggestions and guidelines for parents in supporting their gifted children will be shared and Greg will read from his works.

Room: Exhibit Hall A

Parent & Community The Importance of Advocating for Talent Development Among Children of African Descent

Tiombe Bisa Kendrick, Miami-Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL This presentation introduces participants to the NAGC definition of giftedness. Participants become familiar with the hardships many families of African descent face as they often try to find resources to help reduce costs associated with talent development. Participants learn to identify the barriers many children from African descent encounter in their quest to develop their talents and identify current resources that are available to help GT students reach their dreams and potential in a variety of domains. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Counselors, Parents Room: 104

It Takes a Village: Parenting Gifted Black Kids

Michelle Frazier Trotman, University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA The African Proverb, “It takes a village to raise a child” is indicative of many African American families and communities of today. The village is committed to building, strengthening and maintaining social bonds and responsibilities of all types, including academics. This session will discuss the roles that community and fictive kinship families play in the expectations and retention of gifted African American children and recommendations that can be used to enhance their academic success. Community programming and suggestions for successful home, school, and community relations will also be discussed.

Bob Seney, Mississippi University for Women, Columbus, MS; Cheryl Lynn Franklin-Rohr, Adams County School, District 14, Lakewood, CO

Audience: Parents Room: 102

Professional Development Getting Involved: Leadership Development in NAGC

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Recorded Session

Scott L. Hunsaker, Utah State University, Logan, UT; Rosanne Malek, Iowa Department of Education, Des Moines, IA NAGC is committed to developing leadership among its members to advance service to the field and the ongoing work of the organization. Presenters describe the roles and responsibilities of various leadership positions within NAGC, including Committee, Network, and Board positions, as well as opportunities for parent, teacher, and state-level involvement. The presenters share suggestions regarding paths to leadership development for members of all backgrounds and discuss questions from participants about involvement in NAGC leadership. The primary purpose is to provide information and resources for individuals interested in becoming more involved in NAGC leadership. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 608

Audience: Advocates / Association Leaders, Consultants, Parents Room: 201

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 4:10 PM – 5:10 PM 30.3 Authentic Educational Practice: Knowing the Good and Doing It

teacher of the gifted through the lens of the teacher effectiveness literature and the lens of TPD with a focus on dynamisms and developmental potential.

What does it mean to act in the best interest of gifted students? Although the teacher effectiveness literature has contributed to instructional quality in gifted education, Dabrowski’s Theory of Positive Disintegration provides a more holistic framework to explore the authentic development of gifted teachers of gifted students. This session presents a portrait of an inspirational

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Janneke M. Frank, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada

Room: Exhibit Hall A

COMBINED SESSION

Professional Development

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4:10 PM – 4:40 PM

Online Teacher Training: Research to Real World

Angela Lycan, Summer Institute for the Gifted, Stamford, CT; Katie Lewis, Texas A&M International University, Laredo, TX So, you’d like to start an online training program for teachers, but you’re not sure where to start. What steps do you take? What platform will you use? What format best serves the online community? This session shares research in teacher training as the basis for the creation of an online gifted training program. Experiences in online teacher training, from the collegiate model to the private, non-profit sector are also shared. Bring your ideas and your questions and leave with suggestions and a plan for implementation! Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers

4:40 PM – 5:10 PM

Elevating Expectations for Teacher Candidate Experiences: Facilitating a Paradigm Shift

Sally M. Dobyns, Roxanne B. Speer, Christine J. Briggs, University of Louisiana at Lafayette; Anne Johnson, Episcopal School of Acadiana, Lafayette, LA Teachers teach as they were taught, not as they were taught to teach. How might we raise the level of pre-service experiential learning by utilizing not only the interests of K-5 students, but also of teacher candidates, when designing their field experiences? In a university/elementary school partnership, pre-service teacher candidates satisfy a requirement of an early childhood curriculum course by co-facilitating an enrichment cluster of their choice. Presenters share their plan and the results of pre- and post- surveys completed by candidates whose self-selected experiences immersed them in the pedagogy of gifted education for all learners. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Researchers Room: 610/612

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Poster Session

Professional Development What’s Out There? Connecting Parents and Teachers to Internet and Community Resources for Enrichment

Rebekah C. Hanson, ImagineIt Consulting, Minneapolis, MN This session focuses on ways to enrich existing curriculum and suggest methods for differentiation through the use of Internet and community resources. These activities are intended to engage gifted learners in activities that require them to extend

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their critical and creative thinking as a means of broadening their understanding of a topic and provide opportunities to evaluate and synthesize their learning within and between content areas. Participants explore various programs and consider ways to integrate these technologies and resources into existing standards-based curriculum. Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-8, Coordinators, Parents Room: 703

COMBINED SESSION

4:10 PM – 4:40 PM

4:40 PM – 5:10 PM

Supporting Teachers Is Just a Click Away!

eTips: A Unique Professional Development Model

To effectively reach, teach, and assess gifted students, teachers need resources, guidance, and communication at their fingertips! Learn how to incorporate a Gifted Resource Site for providing curriculum, supporting teachers, and documenting achievement. This dynamic site provides Web-based training, teacher meeting agendas, and methods for sharing curriculum, differentiated lesson plans, and digital resources that includes videos of classroom demonstrations, examples of studentproduced work, and programming options. The presenters demonstrate how to create a learning community for sharing ideas, strategies, assessment tools and outcomes, and a method for forming flexible learning groups and documenting growth for students learning beyond grade-level.

Do you struggle with providing low-cost, effective professional development for teachers who work with gifted learners? Here is a model that utilizes email to provide practical strategies that can be incorporated into instruction easily and efficiently. A series of “tips” is sent by a district coordinator to assist teachers in recognizing gifted learners and responding to their educational needs. This model is sustainable over time with the potential for producing growth and change in classroom instruction with minimal cost to a district. Join us for a step-by-step guide to creating this unique professional development opportunity.

Karen Lynnette Brown, Dina Brulles, Paradise Valley USD, Phoenix, AZ

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators

Mary Patton, Regis University, Centennial, CO; Frank Rainey, Carol M. Norberg, CO Academy of Educators for the Gifted, Talented, and Creative, Longmont, CO; Shannon B. Jones, Ricks Center for Gifted Children, Denver, CO

Friday

Professional Development

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators Room: 202

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 4:10 PM – 5:10 PM Research & Evaluation Breaking the Barrier: Reflections from Gifted Scholars Publishing Outside the Field

Megan Foley Nicpon, Susan Assouline, David Lohman, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; Steven I. Pfeiffer, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL; Frank C. Worrell, University of California, Berkeley, CA; Mary Ruth Coleman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC

Recent special issues of the Journal of Applied School Psychology and the Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment showcased ideas from gifted education scholars. Their contributions emphasized paradigm shifts in gifted education that influence psychological

assessment and school psychology. As professionals move toward a developmental approach to giftedness, identifying and serving high-ability students becomes a more complex task, making cross-disciplinary discussion efforts even more important. Participants gain valuable information from the authors about identification, nonverbal assessments, RtI, and acceleration so they too can bring gifted education messages to professionals outside the field. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors Room: 203

COMBINED SESSION

Friday

Research & Evaluation 4:10 PM – 4:40 PM

The Impact of Advanced Math Curriculum on the Math Achievement and Creative Problem Solving of Mathematically Promising English Learners in Elementary Schools

Seokhee Cho, Jenny Yang, St. John’s University, New York, NY Math talents of many ELL students are not recognized or nurtured simply because their English is limited. The problem is compounded with inadequate evidence of effective STEM educational practices for these students. This study evaluated the effects of M³, a research-based curriculum, on the achievement levels of mathematically talented ELL students. Treatment group students who received the M³ program demonstrate higher math achievement, math creative problem solving ability, and English proficiency than the control group. These findings indicate that a challenging program that emphasizes problem solving, inquiry, and communication is effective in developing math talents of ELL students. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers

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4:40 PM – 5:10 PM

Characteristics Of Students With High Ability In Math: A View From Nationally Representative Data

Maureen Marron, Kyoungwon Bishop, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA The national emphasis on providing STEM education highlights the need to understand the factors associated with the development of STEM talent and innovation. We use data from the High School Longitudinal Study, a nationally representative survey designed for the study of STEM, to conduct descriptive and SEM analyses on the characteristics of 9th grade math-talented students and to examine the individual, home, and school factors associated with math achievement. Our results can complement extant research on math-talented students and can be used by school administrators, school counselors, and parents to support the development of STEM innovators. Audience: Researchers Room: 106

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

Special Populations Researching the Questions About Gifted, Gay Youth

Becky Whittenburg, Boulder Valley School District, Boulder, CO This session outlines the need for research into the confluence of gifted and gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgender youth. Questions generated by the NAGC GLBT Task Force remain unanswered. Confusion between observations and assumptions about gifted-GLBT individuals and research are highlighted. Most educational research originates from and is implemented at the collegiate level, yet for several reasons research in gifted-GLBT lags behind research about other gifted populations. This session explores the issues that prevent research from being conducted and can motivate students, colleges, and universities to see gifted-GLBT as an area ripe for exploration.

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20.3 Student Beliefs about Second Language Acquisition: Significant Differences in Individual Beliefs between High-Ability, Intermediate, and Average Students in General Classes Lin Pan, Yang Yang, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Researchers

Student beliefs about Second Language Acquisition play a critical role in determining their learning behaviors and thus influence their language achievement. How are high-achieving foreign language students’ beliefs about SLA different from those of other groups of learners? This session addresses this question by reporting a quantitative study identifying statistically significant individual beliefs from a belief about language learning inventory held by 201 college students in China who passed the College English Test-Band 4. Implications are discussed with suggestions for practice in changing K-12 students’ learning beliefs as a way to improve their foreign language achievement in the long run.

Room: 107

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Parents, Researchers

Talented Native American Children and Youth: A Call for Recognition and Service

Room: Exhibit Hall A

Marcia Gentry, Jiaxi Wu, C. Matthew Fugate, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

18.1 P  arents’ Perspectives on Their Children’s Participation in a TwiceExceptional Research Study

No special population of students has been more overlooked within the field than gifted, creative, and talented Native Americans. These children come from a variety of cultural groups and nations and, because issues of poverty and geography often exacerbate their circumstances, they remain at risk of continued marginalization. Most Native children and youth with high potential go unrecognized in today’s schools, resulting in the underdevelopment of their gifts and talents and ultimately a loss to their communities. Issues of culturally relevant identification and programming are examined in the context of ongoing research with these youth and their educators.

Parents of the experimental subjects in a three-year study on twice-exceptionality were surveyed about three key components of the study: how the teacher training affected parent-studentteacher communication, changes in student motivation and school success, and the effectiveness of the parent discussion groups. The parent’s perspectives are as unique and interesting as their children’s! This session presents an overview of the results of the survey as well as a closer look at what matters most to parents when it comes to parenting and finding a good educational fit for their 2e children.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Friday

Recorded Session

Carol S. Malueg, University of St. Thomas, Minneapolis, MN

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5, Parents, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

Room: 204

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 4:10 PM – 5:10 PM Special Schools & Programs 28.1 The Schoolwide Enrichment Model in Saudi Arabia and Bahrain

Abdul-Rahman N. Cluntun, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia This study covers a quarter century of hard work in implementing the Schoolwide Enrichment Model in Saudi Arabia and Bahrain. Many studies have provided results of implementing SEM for different school levels, different genders and teachers’ genders, as well as school types (male students with male teachers, male students with female teachers, and female students with female teachers) and several locations. As a result, new adaptations came up in modifying both identifying (such as modifying SRBCSS) and enriching the students’ interests (such as SEM) that are suitable to the area.

Develop Your Brain with Action-Based Learning

Elizabeth Daniels, Eileen Rutter, University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK Today schools, teachers, and parents are focused more than ever on academic achievement. Research-based active learning not only promotes physical fitness, but also improves academic learning. Students that participate in these activities on a regular basis have shown increases in test scores and levels of concentration. This is achieved by students using both right and left sides of their brain. When students participate in actionbased learning they are crossing the “midline” of their bodies and developing new connections in their brains. These new connections help to spur brain growth, which in turn promotes greater academic achievement. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers

Room: 603

Room: Exhibit Hall A

STEM

Philosophy by Children

Internationalizing a STEM School’s Curriculum: Increasing Gatton Academy Study Abroad Participation to 75%

Christine Nasserghodsi, GEMS Wellington International School, Dubai, UAE A standing room only elementary philosophy club? Students chasing you through the hall asking if they can have philosophy twice a week? This is exactly what we’ve experienced at Wellington International School. In this session, participants learn how to leverage students’ curiosity and passion along with 21st century resources to breathe new life into an esteemed, but accessible, discipline. From ‘The Philosophy of Dr. Seuss’ to ‘The Philosophy in Your Lunchbox,’ lessons, strategies, websites, and videos are shared that inspire deep and rigorous thought - and are a lot of fun! Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers Room: 708

Derick Brandon Strode, Corey Alderdice, Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science, Bowling Green, KY Since its creation in 2007, the Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky has increasingly valued internationalization within its science and mathematics curriculum. The school’s three annual study-abroad programs in Costa Rica, England, and western Europe are discussed, as well as the STEM + Critical Languages curricular track, where students study Mandarin Chinese for each of four semesters. Presenters will discuss how global learning fits into any STEMoriented student’s portfolio and how the Gatton Academy progressed to sending 75% of their students abroad before high school graduation. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 208

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Recorded Session

Poster Session

What Works in STEM

Heather Sondel, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, Alexandria, VA Current data and news stories point to a crisis in U.S. student performance and participation in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics coursework. The public need not look far to see the excellent programs and strategies that are taking place in STEM-focused programs and schools throughout the country. Anyone looking to start a STEM program in their

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district has excellent models to learn from and implement. This session highlights successful STEM programs, philosophies and introduces participants to the individuals who make it happen. Participants also see examples of research programs. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers Room: 210/212

COMBINED SESSION

4:10 PM – 4:40 PM

4:40 PM – 5:10 PM

Affect and Creativity in Mathematics: Why And How To Include Them In Your Classroom

Eric L. Mann, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Emmy Lois Coxbill, Saratoga Elementary School, Saratoga, WY; Scott A. Chamberlin, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY; Heather Gramberg Carmody, Park Tudor School, Indianapolis, IN Affect (e.g. attitudes, emotions, and beliefs) and creativity are often neglected in the classroom. However, they may largely explain students’ academic successes and struggles in mathematics. Participants investigate affect and creativity from the lenses of teachers and researchers. Participants leave the session with increased awareness of affect and creativity and how they influence student performance in mathematics. Examples from the presenters’ elementary, middle school, and college classrooms highlight choices teachers can make to improve affect and encourage creativity. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants

STEM in the Trenches

Daphne Duncan Wiles, Eric L. Mann, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Heather Carmody, Debbie Dominguez, Park Tudor School, Indianapolis, IN

Friday

STEM

With the current push for success in STEM, teachers are finding exciting ways to make these subject areas attractive to students. In this interactive session, practicing teacherresearchers and administrators lead a discussion about practical ways to make STEM captivating for students in elementary and middle school. The session covers topics such as making STEM appealing and accessible to all students, promoting positive attitudes towards STEM, and helping dispel misconceptions about STEM. Presenters share ideas and strategies and lead a discussion among attendees to help all develop a richer understanding of what’s really working in today’s classroom. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators, Researchers Room: 704

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 16, 2012 | 4:10 PM – 5:10 PM 23.1 Following the STEM Pipeline through College

Jaclyn M. Chancey, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Adrienne E. Sauder, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada The National Science Board has put out a call for an increase in the number of STEM innovators in the workforce. In order to pursue STEM careers, students generally need to complete college degrees in STEM fields. The ongoing push for quality math and science education in grades K-12 should result in increased interest and success in STEM fields at the college level. This presentation explores the success of STEM majors in attracting and retaining our most academically talented students, based on student records from a large public university, with particular attention to the role of gender. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Friday

Room: Exhibit Hall A

Incorporating Mathematical Processes and Practices in Instruction for Mathematically Talented Students

Janine M. Firmender, Saint Joseph’s University, Philadelphia, PA This session explores the integration of both the NCTM Process Standards and the Common Core State Standards Mathematical Practices into their curriculum and instruction for mathematically talented students. Participants are involved in the analysis of mathematical tasks to examine how the mathematical processes and practices are addressed in the lesson. In addition, participants are actively involved in the development of mathematical tasks that integrate practices such as problem solving, reasoning about mathematics, communicating about and constructing arguments in mathematics, and using mathematical representations. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators Room: 705

Please Join Us

The NAGC Conceptual Foundations Legacy Series Continues

Thinking Like…A Master Teacher with Sandra N. Kaplan Videotaping for the Next Offering in the Portraits in Gifted Education: The Legacy Series

Friday, November 16 4:10 pm - 5:30 pm Hyatt Regency Centennial Ballroom The NAGC Conceptual Foundations Network, in concert with NAGC, continues to capture in video notable gifted advocates, researchers, and leaders in order to preserve their legacy for future generations. For our sixth annual videotaping, you are invited to share in a dialogue with master educator and scholar Sandra N. Kaplan. Dr. Kaplan is a Clinical Professor in Learning and Instruction at the University of Southern California’s Rossier School of Education. She is a national leader in the fields of curriculum, instruction and advocacy in support of the development of gifted students. We are honored to have the opportunity to interview Dr. Kaplan and allow her to share her insights and experiences with all NAGC attendees. A light reception, hosted by the NAGC Conceptual Foundation Network and Curriculum Studies Network, will follow the taping.

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Networking Evening Events November 16, 2012 Conceptual Foundations

Global Awareness

4:10 PM – 5:30 PM

6:30 PM – 9:00 PM

Portraits in Gifted Education: The Legacy Series “Thinking Like a Master Teacher with Sandra N. Kaplan” Hyatt Centennial Ballroom

Global Gala (“The State of Education Going Forward” with Deb Delisle, Assistant Secretary, Elementary and Secondary Education, U.S. Department of Education and “Remembrance of Annemarie Roeper”) Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall D/E

Arts

Curriculum Studies 7:30 PM – 8:45 PM

The Arts Alive: Gifted Writers and Artists at Work

Curriculum Awards Night

Computers & Technology

Research & Evaluation

Hyatt Regency Mineral Hall G/H

7:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Hyatt Regency Mineral Hall A

6:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Speed Geeking

Research Crackerbarrel and Research Gala

Creativity

Special Populations and Parent & Community

Hyatt Regency Mineral Hall B/C

Hyatt Regency Centennial Ballroom A

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Friday

7:00 PM – 8:30 PM

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Creativity Night

Trailblazers for Special Populations of Gifted Students: Past, Present, and Future

Hyatt Regency Centennial Ballroom B/C

Hyatt Regency Capitol Ballroom 4

5:30 PM – 5:45 PM

NAGC Business Meeting Hyatt Regency Mineral Hall

Network Evening Events Reception 5:45 PM – 9:00 PM Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom Foyer

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General Session

November 17, 2012 | 9:20 AM – 10:40 AM | CC Four Seasons Ballroom

Getting it Write: Where Imagination Meets Creativity Bestselling author Ridley Pearson carries you into the world of his imagination, describes how he ended up inside Walt Disney World after dark, and illustrates how he connects with school groups on the joys of writing. NAGC wishes to thank Disney Educational Productions and Disney Youth Programs

Saturday

While reading the classic Peter Pan to his daughter, she asked, “How did Peter meet Captain Hook in the first place?” A light went off in his head: how did a boy become Peter Pan in the first place? He took the question to Dave Barry, one of the funniest men on the planet, and decided to try to answer that together. The result? Peter and the Starcatchers is a series of 5 books and now a Broadway play, and soon, a television movie! The Kingdom Keepers series was inspired by a visit to the Disney parks, where, when leaving after the fireworks he realized none of the characters were leaving with them. So what were they up to all those hours the park was closed? Ridley Pearson will be in the Disney Youth Programs Booths 621, 623 following the General Session.

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Saturday Highlights

November 17, 2012

Welcome, Parents!

Parent Day at the National We’ll welcome parents from throughout the state to Parent Day at the National organized by Colorado Association for the Gifted & Talented (CAGT). We appreciate the support of CAGT and are looking forward to the “Celebrate Colorado” reception they are hosting for NAGC Convention attendees at the History Colorado Center.

Colorado Night at the Museum The Colorado Association for Gifted and Talented invite you to the brandnew, state-of-the-art History Colorado Center. The museum’s hands-on and high-tech exhibits take you on an inspirational journey that will ignite your imagination and touch your heart. Visit with convention attendees at Denver’s newest museum and be part of the story! Buses begin departing from the Colorado Convention Center Welton Street Entrance at 5:30 PM.

Saturday Schedule at a Glance 7:00 AM – 4:00 PM

12:15 PM – 1:00 PM

Parent Day - Colorado Assocaition for Gifted and Talented (CAGT)

1:30 PM – 2:30 PM

Hyatt Centennial Ballroom

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Exhibitor Workshops

7:30 AM – 4:00 PM

2:50 PM – 3:50 PM

Putting it Into Practice

NAGC Base Camp/Exhibit Hall Open Coffee 7:30 am – 8:30 am

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Base Camp Sessions

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

4:10 PM – 5:30 PM

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Exhibitor Workshops/Base Camp Sessions 9:20 AM – 10:40 AM

E. Paul Torrance Creativity General Session With Robert Sternberg CC Four Seasons Ballroom

General Session - Ridley Pearson

5:50 PM – 7:30 PM

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

History Colorado Center 1200 Broadway — 7:30 PM Final buses depart from Museum and return to Hyatt Regency

CC Four Seasons Ballroom

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Exhibitor Workshops

Saturday

Registration Open

Colorado Night at the Museum Reception

11:00 PM – 3:00 PM

Lunch items available for purchase in Base Camp

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM Signature Series Reflections on the Intersection of Rural Locale and Giftedness

Craig Howley, Aimee Howley, Ainsley Kuhn, Derek Sturgill, Christopher Wilson, Michael Smith, Ohio University, Athens, OH This session provides three perspectives on the intersection between rural locale and giftedness. First, students from a highly selective undergraduate honors program provide summaries of essays describing and reflecting on their experiences in rural schools and communities. Second, graduate students and faculty members discuss findings from a research study using large-scale data sets from the National Center for Education Statistics to examine the distribution of mathematics talent in rural locales. Finally, with an eye toward the future of rural communities (and their schools), one of the panelists presents an apocalyptic vision tempered by a glimmer of hope in which gifted contributions to community well-being provide a source of sustenance. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 201

Saturday

Talent Development: A Framework for Our Work with Gifted Children

Laurence J. Coleman, Coleman Consort, Toledo, OH; Katie Augustyn, Gifted Education Consultants of Connecticut, Westport, CT; Elissa Brown, Hunter College, New York, NY; Frank C. Worrell, University of California, Berkeley, CA; Sally Krisel, Hall County Schools, Gainesville, GA Moderator: Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL Talent development, as a framework to understand and develop giftedness, was proposed more than 25 years ago. This perspective differs from the traditional conception of giftedness in that talent development gives greater emphasis to domain-specific talent and achievement. What are the defining aspects of a talent development perspective? What are the implications of this approach for identification, programming, curriculum, and psychosocial services for gifted children and how do they differ from those that currently predominate in schools? Can various perspectives on giftedness and talent be

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Coffee in NAGC Basecamp 7:30 AM – 8:30 AM

Sponsored by Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth combined? In this session, a lively combination of scholars and practitioners will present their views on the meaning, implications, and advantages and disadvantages of a focus on “talent development” as a framework for research, policy, and practice with gifted children. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 206

Computers & Technology Lessons Learned From Developing and Implementing A SMART Gifted Data System Bo Yan, Mark Schmidt, Beth Cochran, Blue Valley School District, Overland Park, KS

The identification of gifted students involves collecting and using data to make decisions. In many districts, this is still largely a paper-and-pencil based process. Teachers must spend much time collecting, compiling, and analyzing data. In addition, it is often difficult for administrators to evaluate actual identification practices to spot and address issues such as inconsistency between schools or teachers in a timely fashion. In this session, Learn about an electronic data system that addresses these problems by automatically collecting and analyzing data, generating evaluation reports, and pushing the reports to gifted education teachers and administrators. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 708

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

Conceptual Foundations

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Super Bright Students: Hollingworth’s Speyer School Experiment

31.2 Exploring the Differentiated Characteristics of Goal- Orientation Theory for Gifted Children: An Instructor’s Approach to Such Theory

Exceptionally bright students present unique challenges in the classroom. This session describes a simple, contentrich approach to teaching students with sky-high IQs. Leta Hollingworth knew how exciting learning could be when super-bright students were introduced to stimulating content; the Speyer School Experiment was a lifeline program that challenged each student’s ability. Participants learn from Speyer alumni how to engage highly intelligent students so they soar and enjoy the ride.

What’s the difference between the goals of gifted children and other children? How do you teach gifted children who have their own goals? What’s the effect of the teacher’s guidance? This presentation shares such curiosities and exchanges ideas on how to use the students’ goals in class. The effort to identify the difference between gifted children and other children is made by reviewing recent theory on motivational goals of gifted children. Also, teaching strategy for typical goals is introduced and discussed for the benefits of teachers and parents.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Parents, Researchers

Room: 701

Intellectual Intensity, Emotional Overexcitability, Imaginational Inspirations: Dabrowski’s Descriptions over Decades

Willard L. White, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL

Pulling It All Together: A Synthesis Model for Differentiated Curriculum for the Gifted Learner Richard Courtright, Duke University, Durham, NC

This session presents a model that illustrates the interrelationships among a variety of systems and models in gifted and general education. Understanding the model can enable teachers and other educators to design appropriately differentiated curriculum for gifted learners. Drawing together the work of Gallagher, Bloom, Hirsch, Adler, Renzulli, Kaplan, Sternberg, and others, the end result offers a graphic representation of the correlation of the individual’s endogenous characteristics, the design of the curriculum and the implementation of instruction. Highlighting the interrelated factors of these concepts fosters the disposition that differentiation is possible. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 104

Jinmin Chung, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Room: Exhibit Hall A

Norma Lu Hafenstein, Ricks Center for Gifted Children, Denver, CO Intensity, sensitivity, overexcitability - these characteristics can provide a foundation for understanding giftedness. How do these traits manifest similarly or differently in various age groups? What does intellectual overexcitability look like in a five year old compared to a fifty year old? Using Dabrowski’s Theory of Positive Disintegration and Overexcitabilities as descriptors, this session examines the similarities and differences presented in contrasting age groups. Data collected through interviews, observations, and self-report illustrate and highlight emotional, imaginational, intellectual, physical, and sensual overexcitabilities. Intellectual, imaginational, and emotional elements are most descriptive and frequent. Implications for education, relationships, and life skills are presented.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 105

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM Counseling & Guidance Unfolding, Not Molding the Gifted Child: A Collaboration Between School Counselor and Gifted Intervention Specialist

Debra Smith, Jill Minor, Forest Hills Local Schools, Cincinnati, OH The collaboration between school counselor and gifted specialist is integral to the social and emotional development of gifted children. Just because students are gifted doesn’t mean that their self-identities are in line with their academic strengths. In many cases, the opposite is true. Gifted students need guidance to navigate the often murky waters of school, friendships, and the meaning of giftedness. Discover basic tenets of an affective curriculum adapted to the elementary student. Get activities for classroom guidance or small groups to help students with challenges that include perfectionism, isolation, communication, and other intensities of being gifted. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors Room: 704

Two Faces of Perfectionism: Inner Trait vs. Inner Shame Lisa Erickson, Seattle, WA

Saturday

Did you know that perfectionism has more than one cause? For many gifted kids, perfectionism is intrinsic and related to their passion to learn. It is a natural expression of self, even if it can be difficult and frustrating. For others, perfectionism is a response to external events like trauma and loss. For these kids, perfectionism is an attempt to regulate painful, shame-based feelings associated with a negative experience. Examine different strategies for helping children cope with perfectionism. Identifying the type of perfectionism helps improve your effectiveness and compassion, especially when trauma is the source. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents

23.4 Multi-Potentiality Inventory Development

Nanseol Heo, Nick Colangelo, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA The term, multi-potentiality refers to an individual who can select and develop any number of competencies to a high level when provided with appropriate environment. Although this concept has been widely reported by clinicians and educators, the debate regarding this concept had continued. In this session, presenters review previous research and explain the process of developing the inventory to measure multi-potentiality and suggest how this inventory could be applied in research and counseling for gifted students. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Consultants, Counselors, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

Creativity Creative Meaning through Inquiry: Inquiry-Based Reading Instruction

Brian Crawford, Seattle Country Day School, Seattle, WA NCTE Standards for Language Arts emphasize understanding texts - a process suggesting passivity and receiving a message, as opposed to creating meaning. In this session, teachers participate in activities designed to spur learners to generate meaning from literature using inquiry, movement, drawing, sculpture, and music. Teachers get up and jump into texts, shaping understanding through these different modalities, forming hypotheses, and then testing and re-evaluating these against the data - the literature itself. Participants receive a toolbox of practical, inquiry-based activities that they can use on Monday morning to bring the art back to language arts. Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: 107

Room: 205

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Recorded Session

Poster Session

Curriculum Studies What’s the Big Idea? Using Books to Cultivate Talented Readers and Thinkers across the Curriculum

Susannah Richards, Eastern Connecticut State University, Storrs, CT This session provides an overview of appropriately challenging books and instructional approaches to use to support talented 2nd5th grade readers in all curriculum areas. The focus of the session is on creating opportunities for talented readers to develop their reading and thinking abilities as they explore their interests and

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expand their knowledge by reading quality fiction and nonfiction that extends the curriculum. Explore strategies for using picture books, novels, and nonfiction in both print and electronic formats to escalate student engagement with the content. A bibliography of recently published big idea books is provided. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents Room: 103

COMBINED SESSION

Creativity 8:30 AM – 9:00 AM

Using Model-Eliciting Activities to Identify Creatively Gifted Mathematics Students

Emmy Lois Coxbill, Saratoga Elementary School, Saratoga, WY; Scott A. Chamberlin, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY Model-eliciting activities hold great promise for gifted mathematics learners who are difficult to identify in upper elementary and middle grades. In this presentation, the use of MEAs as an identification tool for creatively gifted mathematicians is based on a process used by two researchers, a grade 3 teacher, and a college professor. The protocol was developed based on a series of classroom MEAs with students in grade 3 and 6. From this presentation, attendees, learn the assessment capabilities of MEAs. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Researchers

What Can Studying Creative Adults Tell Us About Working with Gifted Students? Dawn Horton, Columbia University, New York, NY

Large-scale studies of gifted or high IQ students have shown that identification as gifted or high IQ does not necessarily correlate with creative adult achievement. A research study on a large group of outstanding adult creators illuminates some of the process and product characteristics of creative adults. These results in turn suggest means of working with gifted students to enhance the likelihood that they will become creative innovators. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Coordinators, Researchers

Saturday

8:00 AM – 8:30 AM

Room: 709

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM Reflective RtI: Rationale and Resources to Create Instructional Plans for the 2e Learner

Susan M. Baum, Bridges Academy, Storrs, CT; Robin Schader, San Francisco, CA; Sherry Dismuke, Boise State University; Robin Sly, Boise School District, Boise, ID With increasing numbers of bright students identified as twice exceptional, teachers must gain skills in planning comprehensive curriculum that accommodates the needs of 2e youngsters. This session provides interactive experiences showing how to identify and organize information about students’ strengths and weaknesses that guide learning modifications in the regular classroom. Matching needs to curricular approaches takes an innovative, collaborative, problem-solving process - aligning standards and academic and behavioral needs with curriculum and instruction. Use of the “Reflective RtI” framework ensures that 2e students have opportunities to engage and produce at a level commensurate with their high abilities. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: 711

Saturday

The Right Stuff: Making Curriculum Compacting in Mathematics a District-Wide Practice

Margaret S. Smith, Melanie Crawford, Minneapolis Public Schools, Minneapolis, MN When curriculum compacting in mathematics is implemented across many schools, the greatest barrier to success is a lack of access to appropriate “replacement” learning activities for students showing mastery of key concepts and skills. In order to make curriculum compacting in mathematics a reality in our district, we undertook the task of designing “Advanced Differentiation Resources Guides.” These unit-by-unit resource collections were aligned with state standards and provided a flexible framework for daily differentiation and extremely flexible grouping. This session presents the details of how the guides were designed and implemented and the findings of our field test. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers Room: 606

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1.2 S  ocratic Circles in the Classroom

Sarah M. Blaser Murray, Jennifer Martinez, Eagle County School District, Eagle, CO

Too often, our best readers fly through texts without taking time to think deeply about the material. How can we help our gifted students develop their critical thinking and critical-reading skills? The Socratic Circle discussion format teaches students to question both the text and their own thinking. It also gives them structured practice at responding to and building on the ideas of others. As a result, students become more deliberate thinkers and readers and are better able to support and express their own reasoning. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators Room: Exhibit Hall A

Using ICM to Design Second-Language Learning for the Gifted

Ariel Baska, Fairfax County Public Schools, Centreville, VA; Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA This session presents the key features of the Integrated Curriculum Model and demonstrates their application to world language teaching. Featuring major themes that can be taught within and across languages, the session also demonstrates how to use higher-level questions and activities within secondlanguage learning to challenge and stimulate the gifted. Examples are provided for teaching Latin, French, and Japanese. The session also presents the rationale for teaching world languages to the gifted; resources for the incorporation of second-language learning into classrooms and programs are provided. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: 601

The End of the World? The Marvels of the Maya

Gay Carlson, Ricks Center for Gifted Children, Denver, CO; Hilda Sanchez, Kimberly Hammond, University of Denver, Denver, CO With December 21, 2012, approaching, the Maya calendar has become newsworthy, inspiring increased awareness and interest in this remarkable culture. Discover the astronomy, art, architecture, complex mathematical systems, melding of religious customs, and prophesies. A study of the Maya provides an opportunity to engage in high-level, culturally responsive

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

pedagogy and multicultural education as one of the few ancient cultures that survived through the centuries. The complexity of the topic and elements of intrigue assure the engagement of gifted learners. Participants are provided background information, curricular activities and assessments, and a resource list to bring the Maya into the classroom. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators Room: 604

8.4 Teaching to the Visual-Spatial Learner Sandraleigh Sprecker, Silver Mountain Center, Lempster, NH

Everyone is to some extent a visual-spatial learner, at least for some tasks. Gifted individuals are more so and in more domains. What does that mean, and what are the most effective methods for teaching to these creative, challenging students? Learn effective teaching methods that help gifted, visual-spatial learners tap into their full potential and that also benefit the whole classroom. Cover the basics of how the brain and memory work; leave with a toolbox of easy, engaging, fun techniques for presenting a wide range of material. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

Curriculum As a Non-Traditional Approach to Identification

Marge Hoctor, Jessica Manzone, Sandra N. Kaplan, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA The development of a set of tasks that promote the expression of the characteristics of giftedness are being implemented to recognize and subsequently identify students of cultural, linguistic, and economic diversity in urban center schools. Supported by the California Association for the Gifted and the California Foundation for the Gifted, the range of curriculum tasks and how they are implemented within the context of a classroom, along with the data and subsequent results of the curricular tasks to identify potential among young children are shared. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5

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Assessing for the Academic Growth of Gifted Learners in the 21st Century Carol V. Horn, Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax, VA

How do we account for the achievement and progress of gifted learners in today’s classrooms? How do you design an assessment system that incorporates 21st century skills and accommodates high levels of performance? Participants explore and identify criteria for student performance that documents in-depth knowledge, an advanced application of skills, and a deep understanding of the content, issues, and problems inherent in a field, subject area, or discipline. Discover how complex performances and real-world applications may be integrated into the learning process to prepare students for 21st century challenges and to document and report advanced intellectual growth. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 702

Global Awareness 21.2 Changing the World Together: Integrating Social Justice Education into Curricular and Extra-Curricular Activities Micah Bruce-Davis, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Tap into the youthful enthusiasm and passion of your students and help them learn to work together to make an impact. Students in gifted programs often demonstrate concern about fairness and equity in the world. Utilizing carefully selected texts, questioning techniques, and action research methods, help students deconstruct social oppression and work toward a more just and fair world. Through an examination of youth participatory action research, participants learn to adapt or create curricula to enhance students’ gifts for the betterment of the world.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

Room: 707

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM World Council: International Perspectives and Opportunities

Julia Link Roberts, Western Kentucky University; Tracy Harkins, World Council for Gifted & Talented Children, Bowling Green, KY The World Council for Gifted and Talented Children is a worldwide non-profit organization that provides advocacy and support for gifted children. The WCGTC is a diverse group with an active membership of educators, scholars, researchers, and parents and is well-known for its biennial World Conference, which will be held in 2013. WCGTC members have gained valuable insight through networking at world conferences and through the WCGTC’s new website that enables members to share research ideas across international boundaries. WCGTC Executive Committee members and Delegates share information concerning opportunities offered by the WCGTC. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 102

28.4 Lead Your Ship to the Diverse World: Cultural Openness and Student Leadership to Navigate for Success in Multicultural Settings Jungsun Kim, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Saturday

This study investigates cultural openness and leadership roles and expectations of domestic and international student leaders in multicultural collegiate settings. Thirty-two percent more international students attended U.S. colleges and universities in 2011. Domestic students are expected to increase cultural

awareness and accept diversity. However, international students should also be prepared to meet diversity. As such, researchers ask high-ability student leaders in both groups whether they are ready to meet diversity and leadership roles in multicultural settings. Differences between grades and institutions are compared. Finally, each group of student leaders is asked to provide expectations about the other group of students. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Coordinators, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

3.4 Inspire, Engage, Lead: ServiceLearning Pedagogy and Gifted Students

Kristen Stephens, Alissa Griffith, Duke University, Durham, NC Are you looking for a way to authentically engage students in global issues and real world problems? Service-learning pedagogy is the answer! Service-learning involves both action and reflection, engaging and challenging students while encouraging them to think critically and creatively about their world. This session helps distinguish service learning from community service as well as provide an overview regarding how service learning pedagogy can be integrated into the curriculum. Examples of successful service learning projects are shared; secure the tools to nurture a classroom of globally engaged citizens! Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors Room: Exhibit Hall A

Poster Sessions • Posters are on display in the NAGC Base Camp (Exhibit Hall A) through Saturday, November 17. • Visit poster at time indicated to meet presenter/s.

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Parent & Community How to Develop a Vibrant Local Gifted Community

Becky Whittenburg, Terry Bradley, Barbara Mitchell Hutton, Michelle Eckstein, Tricia Carpenter, Boulder Valley School District, Boulder, CO Attendees learn how to form and sustain a vibrant local GT affiliate organization. Panelists share experiences both positive and challenging as well as surprises met along the way. Panelists talk about how a GT affiliate finds its unique place in a community which serves public, private, and charter schools; how it forms partnerships and relationships with school districts and other parent organizations; and how it deals with unforeseen challenges. What started with a handful of people gathered around a dining table has grown in five years to a group that brings from 40-800 people to monthly events.

NAGC Base Camp

The Melody of MP3: How Parents Can Help Design an Articulated Mathematics Education Janet Tassell, Rebecca Stobaugh, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY; Linda Jensen Sheffield, Northern Kentucky University, Fort Thomas, KY

Middle grades are a critical time for capturing the interest and imagination and developing the potential of mathematically promising students. This is a time for students to make sense of mathematics and set the course for the highest levels of mathematics in the future. This is not just a time for them to explore their music MP3 players, but also a time to explore their mathematical MP3: mathematical promise, passion, and perseverance. We suggest a number of questions for parents to discuss with their middle grades student to help determine the best fit and greatest support for maximizing their MP3. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Counselors, Parents

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Parents

Room: 712

Room: 106

Moving Past Perfect: A Guide to Recovery From Perfectionism

Take a Stand Against Bullying: Creating Emotionally Safe Environments

Cathy A. Risberg, Minds That Soar, Palatine, IL; Rosina M. Gallagher, Illinois Association for Gifted Children, Chicago, IL Just what does it take to ensure that each gifted child’s social and emotional needs are met at school and at home? This interactive session provides strategies to help create emotionally safe learning environments and promote empathy, assertiveness, and self-control. Learn why the gifted may be at greater risk for bullying and what educators and parents can do to build a culture of compassion that helps students reach new heights academically. Come and share your success stories and challenges and begin to draft an action plan to bring positive change to your school and your home. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents

NCSSSMST

Thomas S. Greenspon, Greenspon Associates, Minneapolis, MN Perfectionism seems like a puzzle: since few things can be done perfectly, why all the angst? Perfectionism is the desire to be perfect, the fear of being imperfect, and the emotional conviction that perfection is the route to personal acceptability. Mistakes are seen as signs of personal defects. While the pursuit of excellence is vitalizing, perfectionism’s inseparable dark side is the intense anxiety about never being good enough. Although perfectionism is not a part of giftedness, gifted kids can be vulnerable. Find out what perfectionism is, where it comes from, and how to encourage excellence without seeming to require perfection. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents

Saturday

Recorded Session

Room: 108

Room: 605

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM Professional Development 11.2 Deciphering the Mixed Messages: Establishing Professional Development for Successful RtI Implementation Stephen Seedorf, Frontier Academy, Greeley, CO

How can PD facilitate a paradigm shift in GT teachers’ philosophies about RtI so we are no longer on the outside looking in, but in control? Without ongoing and purposeful PD, mixed messages have made implementation of RtI in GT programs difficult. Research on teacher perceptions of RtI was conducted in 2011. The findings of this research indicate a variety of approaches in PD with predictably a variety of results. The research also indicated a clear need for targeted PD centered on a very clear definition of RtI. This research culminated in recommendations for PD and a pathway for implementation. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators Room: Exhibit Hall A

Spice Up Your Spanish (or French or Chinese or…) Teaching! Kathryn Haydon, Ignite Creative Learning Studio, Ojai, CA

Saturday

Are you an elementary, middle school, or early childhood foreign language teacher who would like new ideas and ways to connect with your students to energize and excite them about language learning? Participate in stories, play games, incorporate content, and sing in this active session that models how the presenter turned a school culture of “Spanish is boring” on its head to create student and parent Español enthusiasts. Learn how to communicate the importance of early foreign language learning to your students, and why learning a foreign language is ideal for gifted students, especially if approached with gusto! Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8

Response to Intervention: The Promising Future for Gifted Education

Daphne Pereles, Colorado Department of Education, Denver, CO; Lois Baldwin, Tarrytown, NY; Stuart N. Omdal, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO Most schools focus their RtI efforts on the struggling learner. Ideally, RtI is the development of a problem-solving culture that addresses the needs of all students including gifted learners. This presentation addresses why the Problem-Solving/RtI model is a promising approach for gifted education. The presenters describe the theoretical and practical implications for this model and indicate how gifted education can be an integral part of a school and district’s RtI implementation. A set of implementation rubrics is shared for use in schools and districts. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 603

Practice What We Preach: Differentiated Professional Development

Marla Read Capper, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA In this session, participants learn about the benefits of using a professional development model that is ongoing and differentiated based on an individual teacher’s interests and needs. The presenter introduces a professional development model called My Teaching Partner. This model involves coaching teachers through the use of the CLASS-S. Both MTP-S and CLASS-S were developed at UVA. Participants discuss the potential impact of this type of professional development on, not only teachers, but the high-ability learners in their classrooms. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: 204

Room: 203

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Research & Evaluation 18.4 The Gifted Victim: Profile Analysis of Gifted Adolescents Who Experience Peer Rejection and Victimization

Kristen Peairs, Martha Putallaz, Matthew C. Makel, Duke University, Durham, NC There is growing concern regarding the consequences of bullying, stemming from a disturbing rise in bullying-related incidents. Although gifted youth, as a group, are not at greater risk for experiencing peer victimization than their peers, very

Poster Session

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NCSSSMST

little is known about gifted students who are victims of bullying. In a preliminary step toward identifying gifted youth most vulnerable to bullying, this session profiles a group of gifted adolescents marginalized by their peers and who experience high levels of victimization. Findings have implications for informing intervention programs to meet the unique socio-emotional needs of the most vulnerable gifted youth. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

COMBINED SESSION

Research & Evaluation 8:30 AM – 9:00 AM

Beyond Exceptional Content Mastery: The Importance of Metacognition in Mathematics Giftedness

Scaling Success: Lessons from Implementation Science

Adena Young, University of California, Berkeley, CA

Mary Ruth Coleman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC

What makes a student gifted in mathematics? This presentation uses case studies to illustrate and distinguish between two types of mathematics abilities found in gifted students: content mastery and metacognition. Research findings suggest that some students who present (and are often designated) as mathematically talented based on their exceptional content mastery lack important metacognitive skills necessary for problem solving and critical thinking. This presentation highlights the importance of metacognition in the instruction and assessment of gifted mathematics students, and gives parents, educators, researchers, and policy makers a new lens through which to view students’ developing mathematics abilities.

Implementation Science provides guidance for bringing success to scale through systems thinking, capacity building, fidelity combined with flexibility, and practical applications for change. Implementation Science offers a way to study reform efforts and provides guidance for bringing success to scale. This approach has wide applicability for improving education with practical methods to support change and innovation. Two examples, CO’s RtI/PBIS and U-STARS~PLUS (nurturing potential in young children from culturally/linguistically diverse families), demonstrate these principles in action. Participants learn about implementation science and see the principles of this work put to use to support school improvement.

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Researchers

Saturday

8:00 AM – 8:30 AM

Room: 208

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM 33.4 T he Impact of Accelerated Math Curriculum on the Improvement of English Proficiency of Mathematically Promising English Learners in Elementary Schools Seokhee Cho, Marcella Mandracchia, Audrey Murphy, St. John’s University, New York, NY

The Mentoring Mathematical Mind program is implemented with 100 promising English Language Learners with emphasis on mathematical communication with language scaffolding strategies such as talk moves, vocabulary instruction, and writing journals. Differences between treatment and control groups in gains in math achievement and English proficiency between pre- and post-tests are found to be significant. With parental monitoring, implementation of the M³ strategies best predicts the improvement of ELLs’ English Proficiency measured by Stanford English Language Proficiency. It implies that the effect of M³ program is likely to be multiplied by parental monitoring at home.

Marcia Gentry, C. Matthew Fugate, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN Developing giftedness, creativity, and talents among Native Americans has been largely overlooked within gifted education – from research to programming to identification. The limited, dated, and over-generalized literature in this area begs for updated, culturally relevant assumptions and new research agendas. Diné, Lakota, and Ojibwe educators helped identify relevant assumptions, correct misconceptions, and create a relevant research agenda, which is shared with current research efforts concerning identification, programming, and teacher training. We seek involvement and input from participants as we work to ensure that developing talents among Native American youth receives muchneeded attention from researchers in our field.

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Room: Exhibit Hall A

Room: 710

Identifying Talent: Developing a More Effective and Inclusive Screening Process

Higher-Level Questioning: Closing the Citation Gap

David Lohman, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

Saturday

Most school districts screen students for possible inclusion in their talent development programs. Students who score well on the screening test are considered for special educational programming using other information on the match between their needs, interests, and abilities, and the services that the school offers. This session shows how to design a screening program that avoids the twin pitfalls of failing to identify students who should be included or wrongly including students who do not need special services. Examples of exemplary practices and common pitfalls are illustrated using the CogAT Form 7 Screening Form. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers Room: 207

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Gifted, Creative, and Talented Native Americans: A Call for Relevant Research for Marginalized Cultures

Kelly Kearney, Catherine A. Little, Cindy M. Massicotte, Ashley Ruegg, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT The importance of asking higher-order questions is a widely shared value among educators of gifted students; such questioning behaviors are considered a fundamental “best practice” of the field, consistently recommended to practitioners and assumed as a key feature of gifted programs. Nevertheless, our support for higher-level questioning in the literature is fairly perfunctory, and little attention is given to questions for further research. This session reports on a review of the limited citations used in the gifted literature to support higherlevel questioning and highlights current promising directions from general education for future research and practice. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Researchers Room: 703

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Recorded Session

Using Large-Scale National Databases to Research Giftedness

Poster Session

Jill L. Adelson, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY; Hope E. Wilson, Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, TX; Tonya R. Moon, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA; Ann Robinson, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR; Matthew T. McBee, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN The work presented in this session is an overview of the work done by the NAGC Workgroup on National Educational Databases as well as a sharing of experiences from researchers who have used some of the national databases. We provide a description of several

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databases available to researchers, including ECLS-B, ECLS-K, HLS, and Common Core & Staffing, and specific variables as well as challenges that each of those databases presents to gifted education researchers. We also briefly touch on some special considerations when using these databases, such as restricted vs. public use, using weights, and training opportunities. Audience: Researchers Room: 705

COMBINED SESSION

Research & Evaluation 8:00 AM – 8:30 AM

8:30 AM – 9:00 AM

Karen E. Rambo-Hernandez, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO; D. Betsy McCoach, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT Despite the research supporting acceleration, some teachers are still hesitant to recommend acceleration for advanced students. The Teacher Attitudes toward Subject-Specific Acceleration instrument was designed to uncover the factors that influence teacher decisions to recommend students for subject-specific acceleration. In this study, we examined the validity of the established measurement model, construct validity, and implications for gifted education. The most important findings were: teacher self-efficacy toward acceleration was universally important in predicting attitudes and behavior; administrative support was critical; and teachers appeared to give more weight to potential negative outcomes of acceleration than positive ones. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers

Concurrent Validity of the SRBCSS Content Scales

Geoffrey Moon, Gallup McKinley County Schools, Gallup, NM The Scales for Rating Behavioral Characteristics of Superior Students in Science, Math, and Reading content scales were used to assess practical qualities important to talent development (interest, motivation, persistence) as part of a multidimensional identification system. Correlational analyses compared these measures to reasoning and achievement measures in their respective domains and to each other. Mild correlations were found with other measures in each domain, while moderate to strong correlations were found among the SRBCSS scales. Implications for interpretation and use in talent identification are discussed.

Saturday

Teacher Attitudes toward Subject-Specific Acceleration: Initial Instrument Validation

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers Room: 602

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM Special Populations 26.2 Race Bullying and “Acting White” Accusations

Winfred Harris Biddle, Tarek C. Grantham, University of Georgia, Athens, GA This session connects the African American, gifted student’s experience with the “acting White” phenomenon with bullying research. We present a discussion of the “acting White” phenomenon and gifted students and then present a brief overview of bullying research as it relates to gifted and African American students. Finally, we link the two discussions and offer suggestions for educators and parents to address the needs of gifted African-American students who experience race bullying. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

16.2 Recognizing & Supporting the Highly Gifted Learner

Donna Stumpp, Jennifer E. Rix, Colorado Association for the Gifted and Talented, Westminster, CO

Saturday

Most educators have likely worked with a gifted learner. However, highly gifted and talented (HGT) learners are more curious, more sensitive, and more intense. It’s quickly evident that HGT students are a special population and as such require different strategies. Poster session visitors learn recognition and identification strategies and better understand the HGT student and the special needs specific to this population. Creative and

appropriate affective and academic support strategies and research-based techniques are highlighted. Handouts with additional resources are available. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

Dual Differentiation: A Gifted Program in an LD Setting

Eleni Elias Liakaris, Christopher Ongaro, Gateway Middle School, Astoria, NY Dual differentiation, although not common or easy, is necessary and possible. This presentation introduces a special education middle school that identifies and supports the gifted potential of its students through comprehensive services that accommodate both exceptionalities simultaneously. The session outlines the gifted education program’s structure and delineates specific methods for practical application in a range of educational settings. Session highlights include case study descriptions of apprenticeships, mentorships, and small interest-based groups. Featured instructional approaches such as competition and authentic tasks as motivators, and differentiation in multiple domains provide the underpinnings for the students’ growth in each area of exceptionality. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers Room: 610/612

Love… The most rewarding things you do in life are often the ones that look like they cannot be done. — Arnold Palmer

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Common Core State Standards: Implications for Programs, Services, and Instruction for Diverse, Special Populations of Gifted Learners

Peter C. Laing, Arizona Department of Education, Phoenix, AZ; Jaime A. Castellano, Ganado Unified School District, Ganado, AZ Schools across the country are transitioning to the new Common Core State Standards. What are the implications of this transition for programs, services, and instruction for diverse gifted and advanced learners-particularly in a time of limited budget and resources? Practical ideas and critical framework elements for implementing and supporting program and services models serving diverse, special populations of gifted and advanced learners during and after the transition to the new standards are shared. Suggestions for aligning the NAGC PreKGrade 12 Gifted Programming Standards and Knowledge and Skills Standards in Gifted and Talented Education to the CCSS are provided.

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The Ups and Downs of Academically-Selective High Schools Jessica A. Hockett , Charlottesville, VA

This session will highlight findings from Chester E. Finn, Jr. and Jessica Hockett’s book Exam Schools: Inside America’s Most Selective Public High Schools. A unique investigation of a neglected corner of public education, this descriptive study identified 165 secondary schools that select students based on academic criteria. Through surveys, site visits, and interviews, the authors sought to uncover how these schools came to be, how they decide who gets in, and what goes on inside. Session participants will gain a bird’s eye view of the “exam school” universe, ponder issues they face and raise, and ultimately consider whether gifted education should advocate for more such schools, or fewer. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers

Room: 101

Room: 607

STEM

Special Schools & Programs

Robotics for STEM Success: Evaluation of a Project to Start Robotics Teams in HighPoverty Schools

Going Up in Dreams and Esteem: Description of the Crimson G.U.I.D.E. Mentoring Program

Kevin D. Besnoy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL The Crimson G.U.I.D.E. Mentoring Program provides high school gifted students and elementary behaviorally and academically at-risk students with an opportunity to develop the academic, social, and leadership skills necessary for lifelong success. The program utilizes a cross-age mentoring intervention called Developmental Mentoring, which has demonstrated effectiveness with improving attachment to school, self-esteem, and social skills. The curriculum focuses on relationship building between mentor and protégé and includes academic and socialemotional foci. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors

Steve Coxon, Maryville University, St. Louis, MO

JuniorFIRST LEGO League teams were started at three highpoverty schools in a midwestern urban center. Results from the evaluation are shared. Students, their coaches, and their families participated in the evaluations that included a pre- and post-assessment of student spatial ability and a survey gauging changes in student interests in STEM fields. Along with the results of the evaluation, this session includes an overview of the JFLL, the benefits of participation for the gifted, and a demonstration of the LEGO WeDo robotics kit that may be used in the competition.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers Room: 608

Room: 210/212

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM Tiered Challenges for Math-Talented Students: They Don’t Have to Be Bored to Tears

13.4 G  ot Text? The Standards Take on Informational Text

This practical session focuses on tiered options to prevent mathtalented students from being bored to tears. A decision-making hierarchy that uses easily available resources designed for the discovery and development of mathematically able students is presented. We describe modifications to the regular math program so students are challenged and progress systematically. This process recognizes that students demonstrate a variety of abilities and no one program fits all students so we must tailor instruction to individual needs. Case studies illustrate the process for individuals and classrooms. Presenters share insights about selecting curriculum, long-term planning, and “musthave” resources.

Informational texts on art, literature, science, math, or social studies can be used to develop textual connections in any curriculum unit. Within the Common Core State Standards for ELA and Literacy, informational text is linked as a multidisciplinary means of helping students to meet the particular challenges of reading, writing, speaking, and listening within various content areas. Explore strategies and activities for incorporating such texts effectively to differentiate the rigorous curriculum. Learn about a blueprint for tiering texts while reviewing examples within the provided bibliography for middle and high school classes.

Ann Lupkowski-Shoplik, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA; Susan Assouline, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents

Cathy Singletary, Louisiana State University-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA

Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Exhibit Hall A

Room: 706

9:20 AM – 10:40 AM

Saturday

General Session Getting it Write: Where Imagination Meets Creativity Ridley Pearson

CC Four Seasons Ballroom

Teachers are those who use themselves as bridges, over which they invite their students to cross; then having facilitated their crossing, joyfully collapse, encouraging them to create bridges of their own. — Nikos Kazantzakis

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Making the Case with Malleable Minds: Translating Research to Exemplary Professional Development

Ann Robinson, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR; Pamela R. Clinkenbeard, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, Whitewater, WI; Del Siegle, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA

opportunities and depth and complexity to motivate and support advanced students. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 605

The case approach to professional development presents engaging vignettes that build professional knowledge about the real world of schools and classrooms. The Malleable Minds project developed lively cases you can use to explore key concepts from psychology and neuroscience applied to practices in gifted education. Cases focused on thinking programs for gifted preschoolers, motivation loss in talented adolescents, and teacher beliefs about instructional practice in elementary classrooms are presented in an interactive format. Join a panel of leaders in the field to discuss the importance of cases for translating research to professional development in a format teachers will enjoy.

Arts

Audience: Administrators, Advocates / Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Researchers

Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-12, Parents, Researchers

Room: 203

Gifted Education and the Common Core State Standards: A Focus on Mathematics

Linda Jensen Sheffield, Northern Kentucky University, Fort Thomas, KY; Susan Johnsen, Baylor University, Waco, TX; Cheryll Adams, Ball State University, Muncie, IN; Alicia Cotabish, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR; Chrystyna Mursky, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Madison, WI; The adoption of the Common Core State Standards in almost every state is cause for gifted education as a field to reflect on its role in supporting gifted and high-potential learners appropriately in the content areas, including mathematics. Whether students plan to enter a STEM field in a career anywhere from astronomy to zoology or simply become wellinformed citizens who can make sense of the world, recognize patterns, make generalizations and test conjectures, and make and defend logical decisions, mathematics is critical to their development. This session discusses the skills, habits of mind, and attitudes toward learning students need to reach high levels of competency as well as the classroom strategies for working with the CCSS in math that provide enriched and accelerated

Talented Teen Poets on Literacy and Life Jill Olthouse, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV

Between 1985 and 2001, Merlyn’s Pen magazine published the top 1% of teen writings submitted from across America. Amidst the 372 poems published, this session includes a close examination of 25 poems that touch on the theme of “literacy.” Look at the skills of these top young poets and how they interpret literacy. We will discuss the practical implications of these findings and try out some quick poetry writing exercises inspired by these poems.

Room: 204

Computers & Technology 9.2 Waypoints Across Curriculum: Geocaching with Gifted Students

Karen Janish Micko, University of Toledo, New Albany, OH Finding ways to integrate technology into classrooms and to provide opportunities to get students out of the confines of school walls sparks interest in teachers, parents, and students alike. Geocaching asks students to problem solve by following a GPS to locate coordinates for “caches” containing treasures while noting destinations, inspiration, and insights along the way. This orienteering process offers an exploratory means for collaborative learning, individual curiosity, and a multitude of curriculum applications. Intended for teachers and parents, this session explains how to use Geocaching in geography, language arts, and Earth and space science classrooms on various curriculum levels.

Saturday

Signature Series

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-8, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM Shift into Higher Thinking

Victoria Schoenly, Sarah Reeps, Julie Kelly, Loudoun County Public Schools, Ashburn, VA In an effort to develop a curriculum which will prepare students for “mind shift” thinking, participants learn how to develop K-3 lessons using the Five Thinking Keys (perceiving, connecting, reasoning, evaluating, and creating), how to share them with other teachers using academic software, and how to deliver those lessons via interactive whiteboards in order to prepare students to become self-actualized learners. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Coordinators Room: 210/212

The Gamification of Education

Angela M. Housand, University of North Carolina- Wilmington, Wilmington, NC; Brian C. Housand, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC

Saturday

Learn to harness the principles of game design to assail apathy, boredom, and underachievement in our gifted learners! Substantial evidence shows that gaming environments support and enhance intrinsically motivated learning. That’s because game designers know how to create intensely engaging experiences that require focused learning to achieve specific outcomes – exactly what we endeavor to do as educators. In this session, examine technology tools that allow you to create motivating quests that result in customizable learning experiences, multiple paths through a curriculum, and tap into the same principles that game designers use to motivate, focus, and engage. GAME ON! Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 709

Conceptual Foundations The Right Mix: Georgia’s 2012 Gifted Education Rule

Annette Eger, Georgia Department of Gifted Education, Atlanta, GA This session presents the trials and tribulations experienced on the road to the adoption of GA’s 2012 Gifted Education Rule. Although GA’s 1994 multiple-criteria-based rule served GA’s students well, it was determined that the rule needed updating. The decision to revise the rule was risky and the path to approval was sometimes rocky, but the trip was successful. Participants learn about the research supporting the changes, the adoption process, and the new rule’s impact on gifted education. Participants also receive a copy of GA’s new gifted education rule. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors Room: 608

Contemporary Policies, Post-Modern Politics, and the Vanishing 2e Individual Kathi Kearney, Eric L. Knowlton School, Berwick, ME; Bobbie Gilman, Gifted Development Center, Westminster, CO

There is an emerging crisis for 2e individuals. Policies and politics from several unrelated spheres recently coalesced, threatening to make the 2e an endangered species. In this session, explore the impact of RtI; the unintended consequences of widely touted “new” achievement-oriented definitions of giftedness; attempted removal of the Aspergers diagnosis from the DSM-V; and misdiagnoses of ADHD in young gifted children in the field of medicine. Trace the history of each trend and how, together, they combine to jeopardize needed services for 2e students and even threaten societal recognition of the actual existence of such individuals themselves. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 206

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Poster Session

Leadership for Innovation and Achievement for All

Sally Krisel, Hall County Schools, Gainesville, GA While we all believe that fragile learners deserve special attention and opportunities to master basic skills, this session describes a counter-intuitive way to improve achievement for all students - focusing on excellence instead of adequacy! Hear how one district has dramatically increased the number of students taking challenging coursework and won approval for multiple IB

NAGC Base Camp

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Diploma programs and more than a dozen charter schools and programs of choice based on gifted education strategies while slashing the number of schools not making AYP. Learn how you might lead reform efforts to pull your school up to the top! Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 601

COMBINED SESSION

Conceptual Foundations 11:30 AM – 12:00 PM

The Gifted Friends Wish List: Qualities Highly Able Teens and Young Adults Value In Their Friends

Bruce M. Shore, Cheryl L. Walker, Petra D. T. Gyles, McGill University, Montreal, QB, Canada In a continuing analysis of the qualities of gifted youth friendships, 283 secondary and college students, gifted and not, were asked to give a pseudonym to up to five of their good friends and to list the principal benefits they gained from each friendship. Examples of gifted and other respondents’ comments were similar: they were comfortable with each other, could share confidences without judgment, had fun together, and shared humor; friends were caring, interested in their success, provided trust and support, and listened. In short, the main benefit that gifted and other students highlighted from their friendships was positive emotional support. Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-12, Consultants, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

The Fog of Learning Styles and Cognitive Abilities

Steven C. Haas, Gifted Development Center, Westminster, CO Many educators are now using cognitive abilities, learning styles, and subject abilities interchangeably. “Math” replaces “quantitative,” auditory-sequential gets mixed up with “verbal” and with “reading” and “writing,” and “nonverbal” is treated as synonymous with “visual-spatial.” In the midst of this fog, recommendations for effective instructional programming get tied to student profiles generated from results of the CogAT. This presentation removes the fog. Based on results of current research, the differences between cognitive abilities and learning styles are spelled out, the small intersection of the two is mapped, and concrete suggestions are offered for effective instructional programming.

Saturday

11:00 AM – 11:30 AM

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers Room: 102

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM 24.2 Leadership Giftedness: The Review of Leadership Studies in Gifted Education between 2004 and 2011

Jinmin Chung, Jungsun Kim, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN This presentation redefines leadership giftedness and is intended to shed new light on the importance of leadership education for gifted children. Although leadership giftedness has been included in the federal definition of gifted and talented students since 1972, leadership giftedness has been overlooked. Analysis of leadership definitions, and current leadership studies and practices in gifted education are investigated to understand the relationships between leadership giftedness and achievement, other giftedness domains, and gender. Participants complete a survey about their experiences with these relationships and discuss the result to propose new directions of leadership education for tomorrow’s leaders. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

Asynchronous Development at Age 20: 1992-2012

Saturday

Linda Silverman, Gifted Development Center, Westminster, CO; Stephanie S. Tolan, Institute for Educational Advancement, Charlotte, NC; James R. Delisle, Growing Good Kids, North Myrtle Beach, SC; Barbara Mitchell Hutton, Barbara Mitchell Hutton Consulting, Bloomfield, CO The Asynchronous Development definition of giftedness was created by the Columbus Group in 1992. Since its inception, this definition became accepted across cultures and countries. Used by the World Council for the Gifted, it is not limited by typical cultural expectations of gifted children. A panel of experts shares experiences with gifted children and asynchronous development. Panel members present many aspects of asynchronous development, including historical perspectives of the definition; life experiences and mixed blessings of asynchrony; psychological and educational implications; and types of special schools and programs best suited for children to whom the definition applies. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Parents

Holy Grails, Lost Arks, and National Treasures: The Search for the Perfect Identification Instrument

Scott L. Hunsaker, Utah State University, Logan, UT; David Lohman, Megan Foley Nicpon, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; Bonnie Cramond, University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Karen Westberg, University of St. Thomas, Minneapolis, MN Gifted education and the field of psychometrics share a long history beginning with the work of Lewis Terman and the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale. Since that time, despite the development of complex views of human intelligence and giftedness, and despite professional standards and expert recommendations to the contrary, some scholars and practitioners continue endeavors to create or locate the definitive test for identifying learners as gifted and talented. Pulling from metaphors of mythic searches, this session features a panel of experts in testing who discuss the utility and futility of such an endeavor. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 710

Creativity Insights and Instructional Applications of Problem-Solving Style

Edwin Selby, Patricia Schoonover, Center for Creative Learning, Sarasota, FL; Laurie B. Abeel, University of Mary Washington, Fredericksburg, VA Instructional applications of creative-problem solving style are vital to 21st century skills and provide direction for differentiation of instruction, coaching academic teams, or for university-level instruction. Recent analysis of data using the VIEW assessment provides insights into preferences for novelty; addresses structure, authority and autonomy; and provides specific search strategies. This session presents an overview of the VIEW assessment and a discussion of recent research findings, as well as applications in classroom-based creativity instruction,

Room: 107

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Poster Session

with creative problem-solving teams, and with university-level courses in teacher education and gifted education. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 106

Surprising Creative Connection Making through Interdisciplinary Exploration Don Ambrose, Rider University, Lawrenceville, NJ

Generating creative ideas can be surprisingly easy even when the academic content is complex and difficult. This session reports the results of four large-scale interdisciplinary projects that connected over 200 ideas from leading scholars in 29 academic fields. Revolving around the themes of creativity, ethics, and dogmatism, the projects capitalized on the process of creative association; the combination of remotely associated ideas from diverse disciplines generated new insights with implications for gifted education. Examples of these new insights are provided along with recommendations for injecting more interdisciplinary creative association into curriculum and instruction for the gifted. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 105

Inspiring Students to Reach the Peaks through Creativity Heather Check, Melissa Stockton, Creative Flair Educational Consultants, Phoenix, AZ

Develop and cultivate higher-order thinking by stretching student’s creativity using critical thinking while reinforcing written expression in multiple content areas. Explore inspiring resources that enrich creativity in a cross-curricular approach aligned with the use of questioning skills, originality, and imagination beyond everyday lessons. Strategies discussed foster creative thinking and the creative process in K-5 mixed-ability classrooms. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-5, Coordinators

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26.4 The Creativity Profiles of Successful Adults in Various Domains

Seon-Young Lee, Kyung Hyun Park, Yun-Jae Hwang, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea This session presents creativity profiles of successful adults and relationships between the profiles of creativity and personality. The Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking and the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator were administered to 167 adults who took a six-week creativity workshop. Participants were in high-ranking professions in various domains including business and public service. Results included improvement on TTCT following the workshop although changes varied by the components of the test. On MBTI, ESTJ and ISTJ were the two most noticeable indicators, and different profiles were found by profession. Relationships between TTCT and MBTI, and differences by demographic background are discussed. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

From the Inside Out: Exploring the Unique Creative Potential of Introverts

Jacque Cork, Linda E. Collins, Blue Valley Southwest High School, Overland Park, KS Looking for ideas to unlock hidden creative power in yourself or in a gifted student you know? If you’ve ever had a desire to facilitate the creative potential of someone who looks at life from the inside out – an introvert – this session is for you. Designed for educators and parents alike, this session helps you gain powerful insights about the relationship between introversion and creative potential. Participants leave with proven theories and practical strategies for encouraging creativity among those who view life and relationships from the inside out.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 205

Room: 604

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM 6.4 The Differentiated Creativity Model: A New Approach to Identifying and Nurturing Creativity in Gifted Students

explores the convergence of two internationally acclaimed programs: The Virtues Project and Destination ImagiNation in one gifted pull-in session and the impact it had in engaging not only students, but an entire community.

Differentiation has always been considered one of the most crucial aspects of teaching in gifted education. Is it really enough for teachers to differentiate curriculum and instruction only when working with gifted students? How about differentiating creativity? Why not identify the creative profiles of gifted students and nurture their creative talents based on those unique profiles? This session presents the Differentiated Creativity Model and provides specific strategies for nurturing the creative talents of gifted students based on their creative profiles.

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents

Gokhan Oztunc, University of Georgia, Athens, GA

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

Making the Most of a Pull-In Situation: DI Meets the Virtues Susan Picard, Grande Prairie Public School District, Grande Prairie, AB, Canada

Saturday

What do you do when you live in a jurisdiction where the number of gifted students does not warrant a full-time gifted program? Even though teachers may be working hard to differentiate, gifted students still need the opportunity to interact with other like-minded students in addition to exploring the affective curriculum in light of their giftedness. This session

Curriculum Studies 29.2 Adults Reflect on Prior Experiences in Middle School and High School Talented and Gifted Programs Ann L. Matschiner, Pacific University, Forest Grove, OR

Too often gifted students feel bored and lack challenge and stimulation in middle school and high school programs. This presentation identifies curricular and instructional strategies that are a direct response to the learning needs of gifted learners as identified in interviews with adults who reflected on their talented and gifted programs in middle school and high school. This session offers participants effective and easy-to-implement differentiated projects with handouts. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

11:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Convention Center concession areas sell assorted lunch items

What is necessary and sufficient for the nongifted is necessary but insufficient for the gifted, who need more and different learning experiences to match their potentials. — A.J. Tannenbaum

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Engaging the Gifted Through Historical Thinking

21.4 L essons from the Field: Listening to the Gifted

Historical thinking allows teachers to move beyond the text to foster higher-level thinking as their students learn to pose questions, collect and analyze sources, struggle with issues of significance, and ultimately build their own historical interpretations. Historical thinking and its five components are defined and illustrated through an Understanding by Design instructional unit on the Revolutionary War and Philadelphia. The unit demonstrates how historical thinking can be implemented at different grade levels, used to differentiate instruction, develop reasoning skills by addressing complex, meaningful problems, and engage students’ intellect and creativity through deeper understandings.

Teachers of the gifted often find it challenging to understand and help their students deal successfully with the social and emotional issues associated with their giftedness and how those issues affect their unique learning needs. What specific skills are necessary for listening with empathy and understanding? How does one listen for what the gifted mean rather than to what they say? This interactive and informational session offers participants tools to enhance their interactions with the gifted, and ways to effectively help them navigate their unique social and emotional worlds.

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators

Room: Exhibit Hall A

Room: 603

Getting More into Shapes Across the Younger Grades

David C. Williams, Ken Stuart, Indiana Academy for Science, Mathematics, and Humanities; Margot F. Williams, Ball State University, Muncie, IN

14.2 Understanding Program Differentiation through Control Teachers’ Experiences in Gifted Classrooms

Carolyn Callahan, Echo Wu, Amy Azano, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA This research study explores program differentiation through the perceptions and practices of teachers from comparison group in a larger research study, “What Works in Gifted Education.” Sixteen third-grade GT teachers from five states were observed during 40-60 minute language arts classes and interviewed following the observations. Analysis of observation and interview indicates that the teachers, especially those with little GT experience, need further professional development training on best practices in gifted education. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators

Debra Anne Mishak, Des Moines Public Schools, Windsor Heights, IA; Paula Christensen, Northwestern State University of Louisiana, Natchitoches, LA

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors

Tutita M. Casa, Katherine Gavin, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Where is geometry? Well, it’s all around us! Young students naturally view their world geometrically, but they often are not sufficiently challenged during instruction. Come investigate research-based activities from the NAGC award-winning Project M² series that raises the bar for all students. Explore shapes young students can come to learn about more in-depth by looking at foundational geometric concepts as we progress from 2-dimensional to 3-dimensional to a merging of both perspectives. Review student work, view students as they learn, and participate in fun and enriching games. Take part in engaging activities you can use with your own students.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5, Coordinators Room: 702

Room: Exhibit Hall A

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM Early Childhood

Global Awareness

The Power of Play to Enhance Learning, Build Social Connections, and Encourage Curiosity

Curriculum for a Crowded World

Martha M. Kaufeldt, Begin with the Brain, Scotts Valley, CA

Could it be that the need to “play” is hardwired into our brains? What happens to children’s brains when more time is spent sitting indoors in front of a screen? Rather than “free” play in unstructured time frames, children have more scheduled organized play experiences. This session looks thoughtfully at the role of parents and schools as they promote early literacy and academic achievement at younger ages. Learn ways that teachers can encourage curiosity by using novelty, humor, challenge, and movement. Play is fun, natural, and necessary for developing brains. Expect to laugh and learn during this light-hearted session. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Counselors, Parents Room: 101

Controllable But Ignored: Environmental Factors in Early Childhood that Impede School Success Steve Coxon, Maryville University, St Louis, MO

Saturday

Most people know about the potential harm that lead poisoning poses to young children’s developing brains, but there are other common and avoidable factors that limit potential. Young children are often heavily doused with non-educational television and foods that are unhealthy. While the negative impacts of television and certain foods are incremental and may be less immediately obvious than lead poisoning, a growing body of research suggests lower attention, health problems, and even lower ability scores may result from television viewing and certain foods. This session reviews the current research to help guide teacher and parent decision making. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Consultants, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Bill Baird, Auburn University, Castle Rock, CO Broaden gifted students’ global awareness while building critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Engage students in handson activities that explore current global challenges, including world population growth, natural resources use, and social justice. For integrated instruction, all activities address content standards in math, life sciences, social sciences, and language arts. Activity formats include class discussion, role-playing simulations, and problem-solving challenges. Take home a free CD-ROM of lesson plans. Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-8 Room: 712

4.2 Cultural Community Connections: A Global Schoolwide Enrichment Experience

Michelle Lynn Vecchio-Weinmeister, Clarke County School District, Athens, GA Experiences are events promoted as schoolwide enrichment opportunities that encourage and provide rich, thoughtprovoking global experiences for middle school students. C3 experiences are grounded in the Schoolwide Enrichment Model and an IB framework that encourages intercultural awareness and effective communication. Participants learn how teachers and gifted collaborators can effectively develop or initiate local or onsite global experiences, implementation procedures, possible obstacles, C3 extension and reflection exercises, and C3 student benefits and outcomes. Middle school teachers and gifted collaborators benefit from exploring how this innovative C3 approach complements any schoolwide enrichment program. Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-12, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

Room: 606

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Middle Grades 19.2 Explicit Programming for GT CLD Students in the Middle School Dina Brulles, Paradise Valley USD, Phoenix, AZ

Providing gifted services for culturally diverse middle school students can present a challenge. This session introduces the Nonverbal Honors Core, a program for GT students identified on a nonverbal ability test, taught by teachers holding bilingual/ELL and gifted certifications. The teaching team integrates a thematic approach in designing and implementing project-based learning founded on gifted education pedagogy. This approach provides a culturally rich, highly engaging learning environment that embraces, encourages, and challenges gifted students of diverse populations. The presenter shares sample instructional units, teaching methods, and schedules, along with data examining program development and resulting academic achievement. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 6-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

16.4 Nuturing Emotional Intelligence in Adolescents

Jean Chandler, Palmetto Scholars Academy, Charleston, SC Through social and emotional learning, adolescent children may bolster their emotional intelligence providing them an enormous edge in their personal and professional futures. Social and emotional development and learning can influence student attitudes, motivation, behavior, study habits, and subject mastery. Students who receive an exclusively academic education may be ill-equipped for future challenges. Creating a supportive emotional environment requires deliberation and strategizing. A classroom may become a venue for social and emotional learning as an effective school environment and student skill development strategy as well as a problem prevention strategy. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents

NAGC Base Camp

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Learner-Based Curriculum Differentiation in the 21st Century

George Betts, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO At the middle school level, many teachers, resource specialists, and district coordinators have become experts in curriculum differentiation and instruction. Standard-based differentiated curriculum is the foundation of gifted education and provides flexibility, depth, and complexity for GT, creative learners. But there is more. The highest levels of learning are Learner-Based Differentiated Curriculum. We have prepared our learners through standard-based differentiated curriculum and now it is time to teach them the basic process of differentiated curriculum and facilitate our learners in developing their own content. Middle school is the ideal place to let go and provide them new opportunities. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 6-8, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 207

Parent & Community A Parent’s Guide to Academic Acceleration: Advocating for an Appropriate Education

Keri M. Guilbault, Harford County Public Schools, Bel Air, MD; Susan R. Scheibel, Regis University, Littleton, CO Presenters share their research and experience with academic acceleration and provide practical tips for parent advocates who have questions regarding acceleration options for their child. Presenters share and discuss best ways to communicate and collaborate effectively with local school systems. Results from questionnaires and interviews with school gatekeepers, as well as the voices of experience from other parents, are included so that participants gain tools to support their advocacy efforts keeping in focus the social, emotional and cognitive needs of their gifted children.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Parents Room: 108

Room: Exhibit Hall A

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM 31.4 S  tudents as Self-Advocates: Why and How GT Learners Should Craft Their Own Digital Footprints Ginger Lewman, ESSDACK, Hutchinson, KS

When you last “Googled” your name, what did you find? All learners should ponder those results when considering potential colleges, scholarships, jobs, and even future mates. Is it better for the results to come up poorly or not at all? How do we positively cope with online bullying issues? Come learn how we can help our children become more digitally literate, prepare their virtual resumes, all while behaving responsibly online and earning an A+ in Digital Citizenship! Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents

Professional Development Embracing the New Normal: Proactive Steps to Prevent Crises from Dismantling Your Program

Joan K. Jacobs, Sue Harvey, Pat Schock, Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln, NE When disasters strike, it’s too late to begin procedures to alleviate the damage. This session focuses on steps you can take now to prevent irreversible harm to your gifted program when fires, floods, and school board decisions threaten its well-being. Presenters have weathered storms of their own and can provide strategies for putting your program in a position to anticipate problems before they occur, thereby mitigating damage. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors

Room: Exhibit Hall A

Room: 711

The Tri-Identities of Gifted African American Children

An FOI Tool for Planning Differentiated Professional Development

Nedra Fears, Fears Consulting and Training, LaGrange, GA

Saturday

Gifted African American children’s diverse identities inform their sense of selves and world views. Learn how positive identities empower their academic success. Discover why culturally competent and relevant curricula and teachers can enhance and advance Black children’s sense of self. Learn why cultural competency supports and underpins academic social justice. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: 202

Tonya R. Moon, Catherine Brighton, Sunhee Park, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA In the context of the What Works Clearinghouse and a National Research Council panel report, more rigorous studies have been called for to identify effective instructional materials for impacting student outcomes. However, insufficient consideration has been given to documenting and describing the implementation of instructional programs and materials. This presentation shares a framework for fidelity of implementation of a curriculum model based upon problem-based learning, differentiation, and dynamic technology. The FOI framework can be used to guide professional development of teachers. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 703

Every great dream begins with a dreamer. Always remember, you have within you the strength, the patience, and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world. — Harriet Tubman

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Training Makes a Difference! Models for Deepening Teacher Effectiveness with Gifted Learners Penelope P. Heinigk, Tonia Heffley, Jeffco School District, Lakewood, CO

Educators who recognize that gifted students learn differently and can adapt instruction using an array of strategies can help these children soar. Unfortunately, many teachers receive little training on the nature and needs of the gifted. Join us as we share our experiences guiding teachers of gifted students. Explore various modes that can be used for professional development and strategies that ignite teachers’ desire to deepen their understanding, as well as examine options for credentials. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors Room: 704

Professional Development Overhaul!

Elizabeth A. Fogarty, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC

Do you give professional development sessions? If you yearn to move away from depending upon PowerPoint presentations, but feel a little nervous at the thought of standing in front of an audience with no PowerPoint, this session provides you with new ideas and strategies to give you the confidence to overhaul your presentation style. Jumpstart audience participation in your next session using simulations and collaborative online tools such as blogs, wikis, and YouTube, as well as other free resources aligned with effective principles of human learning (movement, participation, and collaboration). Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 104

NAGC Base Camp

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Tapping into Gifted Centers for Professional Development Connie L. Phelps, Emporia State University, Olathe, KS

Centers for Gifted and Talented provide excellent ongoing support to the gifted education community at reasonable or no cost. Learn about the 20 Centers for Gifted and Talented located on university campuses across the country providing professional development experiences for P-12 teachers, administrators, and/or counselors through on-site, Internet, and social media resources. Dozens of electronic newsletters on a wide variety of specialized topics are available through subscription without charge. With the shortage of funding to support professional development experiences, Centers may be the answer! Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 602

Research & Evaluation 34.2 Differing Perspectives of Teachers and Students toward An Online Program

Mary E. Fanning, Richland School District 2, Columbia, SC Technology is increasingly seen as the solution to educational challenges and an effective way to meet the needs of gifted programs, but there are always questions relating to relevance, value, and usage. After an online technology program, Renzulli Learning, was adopted and implemented in an elementary gifted pullout program, teachers and students were surveyed and interviewed concerning their attitudes towards the program and usage levels. This mixed methods research study identified significant differences between teachers and students and also between teachers based on their length of time in the program.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5, Coordinators, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM Special Populations 29.3: Caring About Cross-Cultural: How Schools Can Work with Parents of Low Income and Minority Students in the Early Years for the Betterment of All Shawn R. Cherry, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Under identification of minority and low income students of high ability has been a perennial concern of US educators. Immigrant populations are increasing in states that have historically had low non-white populations. Low income

families, no matter how long they have been in this country, may by definition lack familiarity with how the US educational system works and the variety of post-secondary educational opportunities available. This session will explore exemplary programs at inner city schools in several states and show ways in which administrators, teachers, and counselors worked together to create educationally supportive home environments, including internet access. Room: Exhibit Hall A

COMBINED SESSION

Research & Evaluation 11:00 AM – 11:30 AM

Teachers’ Perceptions and Practices of Differentiated Instruction at an Innovative Middle School for GT Students Isabelle Crowder, Piedmont College, Athens, GA

Saturday

This presentation is a discussion of findings from an evaluation of an innovative middle school program for GT students. As such programs evolve there is a need for research to support their effectiveness. The risk is that schools may rely solely on existing research as justification for new programming. Teachers’ perceptions and practices of differentiated instruction are specifically examined in this mixed-methods case study. This evaluation contributes to the existing body of research on differentiated instruction and provides useful information to other school districts interested in implementing a similar program. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers

11:30 AM – 12:00 PM

Exploring How Differentiation Influences Gifted Student Attitudes toward Learning

Rick Olenchak, John P. Gaa, University of Houston, Houston, TX Differentiation has become not only an accepted but also an integral practice for serving the needs of gifted students in schools. This session describes a mixed-design study of 1,578 gifted students in grades 4-8 who participated in a highly structured implementation of differentiation in urban schools. The quantitative results revealed that differentiation, along with several other variables, appears to have a statistically significant relationship with gifted students’ attitudes toward classroom learning. Additionally, four case studies extracted from the larger sample provided some clarifications and explanations for the relationships among variables from the quantitative segment of the study. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers Room: 607

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Recorded Session

Poster Session

NAGC Base Camp

NCSSSMST

Talent Development Paths of Women in Gifted Education

versus full-time work, and careers that offer enough autonomy to blend well with significant parenting responsibilities. In this session, accomplished women in the field of gifted education, representing several generations, share their personal stories and reflect on the implications for the talent development of gifted females.

The talent development paths of gifted women are unique, varied, and complicated. Because of the desire of many gifted women to combine challenging careers with rich and full family lives, their paths are often different than those of gifted men. Special issues for gifted women include the timing of having children, part-time

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; Sally M. Reis, D. Betsy McCoach, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Kristie Speirs Neumeister, Ball State University, Muncie, IN

Room: 705

COMBINED SESSION

Research & Evaluation 11:00 AM – 11:30 AM

11:30 AM – 12:00 PM

Lisa Hall Foster, Harvard Graduate School of Education, Cambridge, MA

This presentation investigates whether teacher self-report of implementation of a curricular intervention can be utilized as a reliable alternative to direct observations or if self-report needs to be used in conjunction with direct observations. Findings indicate that teacher self-report can be a reliable alternative when teacher logs and measures are clear and directly reflective of the curriculum being implemented. Furthermore, the likelihood of self-report matching direct observation fell on a continuum of “very likely” to “not very likely.” The higher the observed rating, the more likely a teacher is to report in a manner consistent with the observer. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers

Fidelity: Snapshots of implementation of a curricular intervention Lisa Hall Foster, Harvard Graduate School of Education, Cambridge, MA

This presentation reports on a three-fold, mixed-methods research study on the fidelity of implementation of a grade 3 gifted intervention that investigated the extent to which a curricular intervention was implemented by identifying the critical components of the intervention, developing guiding principles for determining acceptability of adaptations, and measuring teachers’ adherence to the components; examined the relationship between self- and observerreported fidelity; and identified adaptations and examined teachers’ rationale for changes. Findings from the three components facilitate further understanding of fidelity measurements and the field of gifted curriculum.

Saturday

Self-Reporting During a Gifted Intervention: Can It Be the Sole Measure of Adherence?

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers Room: 706

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM Affective Guidance for the Diverse GT Learner: What It Looks Like in a Mainstream Classroom

Heather Nolen, Lisa M. Garcia, Adams City High School, Commerce City, CO; Cheryl Lynn Franklin-Rohr, Adams County School District 14, Lakewood, CO Especially in an urban setting, GT learners come to classrooms with a host of needs in addition to their “regular” requirements as students. In a mainstream classroom, in which modifications must be made for the gifted and talented learner, a teacher must also plan for the inevitable affective guidance required for those students, particularly in cases of underachievement. Presenters share strategies from two school districts and address GT student needs. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: 201

Identification and Programming Practices for Bilingually Gifted Students in a Two Way BiLiteracy Program

Michelle Renee DuBois, Sharon Trompeter, Carlota Loya, Tamara Sotillo, Silvia Latimer, Columbine Elementary School, Boulder, CO

Saturday

Culturally and linguistically diverse GT students are some of our most at-risk students. These learners come with unique academic, intellectual, social, and emotional needs. In this session, learn how a preschool through fifth grade elementary school, with a two-way bi-literacy program is identifying, developing, and nurturing both bilingual talent and potential. Identification practices, instructional strategies, and programming ideas for serving linguistically diverse learners are shared by staff members of a school that is becoming a champion in their school district through strong leadership and a commitment to innovation and excellence. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 208

Gifted Education and Legal Issues: An Update

Frances Karnes, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS Everyone involved with gifted children must be monitors of potential legal problems in gifted education. Topics include

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negotiation, mediation, due process, and the courts. The following are among the problems and issues addressed: early admission of gifted students to kindergarten, screening and identification, appropriate instructional programming, teacher certification, tort liability, awarding of Carnegie units for graduation, misrepresentation and fraud, dual enrollment, and home schooling. Attention is directed to the role of the Office for Civil Rights in matters pertaining to the gifted and their education. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 701

Creating a Supportive School Environment for Spanish-Speaking Gifted Students Kathryn Haydon, Ignite Creative Learning Studio, Ojai, CA; Olivia Bolanos, Santa Maria-Bonita School District, Santa Maria, CA

What easy and effective steps can you take to improve communication with your Spanish-speaking students’ families and increase participation in parent meetings, school volunteerism, and gifted programs? Gain a deeper understanding of the needs of Spanish-speaking gifted students through the lens of research, culture, and best practices, and learn concrete and easy-to-implement action items that uplift your school culture and the progress of your Spanish-speaking students and their families. Feel free to bring your own school’s best practices on the topic to share with the group. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers Room: 610/612

Military and Gifted: The Battles They Fight

Diane Cassidy, Gifted Coordinator, Fountain-Fort Carson School District, Fountain, CO Many of us are familiar with the profound effects ten years of war have had on our soldiers. But few are aware of the silent sacrifices made by the soldier’s family, especially the children. Children most at risk are those with special needs. Districts throughout our nation enroll military dependents on a continual basis. Educators must be familiar with the impact of a military lifestyle. Gain a perspective of the battles military

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

gifted children face in regard to restrictive identification practices and inconsistent programming. Develop an understanding of how to best support and advocate for this very special under-served population. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 103

1.4 Social Skills Development in TwiceExceptional Children through Interdisciplinary Interventions

Ana Miro, Parents’ Association for Gifted Children of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR A pilot study was conducted to explore the effectiveness of an interdisciplinary intervention – including education, psychology, and communication – for the development of social skills in six 2e children, ages 6 to 11 with collateral participation of parents through counseling. The context created takes into consideration various real-life contexts to rehearse social skills based on emergent planning. A multiple single case research approach is adopted with a pre-experimental AB design to compare measures of each child before and after the 12 week intervention, and their performance during the intervention. Results and recommendations are presented for future social interventions and research. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

11.4 When Being Gifted Isn’t Enough: Disengagement and Dropout Among Gifted Students

NAGC Base Camp

NCSSSMST

and findings from a longitudinal study regarding the relationship between student engagement, underachievement, and high school dropout in gifted students is shared. Finally, implications for intervention and prevention, as well as gifted service provision are discussed. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

STEM Inspiring Inventive Thinking to Develop STEM Talents Laurie J. Croft, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

Inventive thinking curriculum gained popularity in American schools in the 1980s. Recognized as a way to enhance global competitiveness and endorsed by leaders in business and science, inventive thinking was promoted by agencies as prestigious as the U.S. Patent and Trade Office. Invention programs facilitated critical and creative thinking within domain-specific and multidisciplinary environments. Fast forward to today’s emphasis on STEM: the call from business, science, and political leaders revolves around the same goals. Educators and parents can practice and learn more about innovation strategies and about invention programs that provide an environment to attract and retain STEM talent. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents Room: 707

Saturday

Recorded Session

Rebecca N. Landis, University of Georgia, Atlanta, GA How do some of our schools’ most high-achieving students leave high school without graduating? This session describes research regarding underachievement and high school dropout among gifted students. Student engagement, a critical variable in understanding and predicting high school dropout, is described,

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Putting it Into Practice November 17, 2012 | 12:15 PM – 1:00 PM Arts Creating a Photo Collage

Betty K. Wood, University of Arkansas at Little Rock; Larry Wood, Little Rock School District, Little Rock, AR Participants are introduced to the work of a successful contemporary artist who uses the camera to capture landscapes, time, people, or still life and arranges composite images on a rectangular grid to create a photo collage. The type of photo collage was done as projects in the presenters’ classroom. The presenters will display several of their students’ completed photo collage projects along with some done by the presenters themselves. Participants in this session are able to complete a simple project of their own and leave with instructions for doing this project. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators Room: 101

Computers & Technology

Making Movies, Making Meaning

Christine N. Nobbe, Rockwood Gifted Program; Nicholas Kirschman, Webster Groves High School, St. Louis, MO Making movies is a motivating way for students to develop communication, teamwork, creative and critical thinking, and problem-solving skills. Through the process of moviemaking, students collaborate, find creative solutions to myriad problems, make decisions, write persuasively, and have fun completing a challenging project. In this session, participants learn about free software, inexpensive equipment, and online resources that can be used for moviemaking; they experience the process of storyboarding and moviemaking; and make curricular connections. After brainstorming ideas, participants leave with a moviemaking project in mind that can be developed by students in their classrooms Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents Room: 709

Digital Storytelling with Interactive Fiction

Using Virtual Worlds to Engage Gifted Learners

Come learn how to build a story and a world in which the reader is an integral part. Digital storytelling is a genre growing in popularity that merges the skills of telling a story with computer tools, particularly those that enable students to incorporate multimedia elements. Teachers who want to focus on the power of text often feel limited to tools like word processors. The resurgence of a form of computer gaming called “Interactive Fiction” brings a powerful new tool to teachers who want to explore new ways for students to create content in an engaging, flexible, and unique way.

Come discover Quest Atlantis, a complex computer program that has a protected 3-D virtual world with personalized avatars. The 3-D world is a protected environment that only other elementary and middle school students and their teachers from all over the world can enter. There is one view for elementary and one for middle school. The curriculum is strongly linked with both state and national standards. Quest Atlantis is a challenging program that incorporates affective components, high-level analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. We include classroom discussions and activities that take place offline. Students receive personalized feedback for their online submissions of assignments.

Gerald W. Aungst, School District of Cheltenham Township, Elkins Park, PA

Saturday

Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-12, Coordinators Room: 710

Alena R. Treat, Little Rock School District, Little Rock, AR

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 707

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Recorded Session

Online Games and Simulations: Effective Learning Tools or Time Wasters?

Katharine Thurlow, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD An important debate in gifted education, and in education in general, concerns the growing interest in games and simulations as a means to promote active, student-centered learning. While much research shows that these engaging environments can improve learning outcomes and encourage persistence, many are concerned that they are inefficient learning tools that lead to compulsive overuse, wasted time, and distraction. This presentation explores both sides, drawing on new, experimental research conducted at Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth. Examples of serious games are demonstrated, along with free software tools used to create educational games and simulations. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers Room: 705

Poster Session

NAGC Base Camp

NCSSSMST

Bully Proofing our High-Ability Students

Terry Wayne Neu, Sacred Heart University, Griswold, CT Using state definitions as a common language to describe bullying behaviors, this presentation supports classroom professionals as they work with students. Exercises in identifying and classifying bullying behavior helps participants recognize the bullying situations that gifted students are reporting. Descriptions of safe and supportive classroom environments with case-study examples are provided. Activities that model de-escalation and mediation as a tool for preventing bullying are shared. Recognizing and reporting of Cyber Bullying is also addressed. This workshop encourages teachers and others to examine their own understanding of bullying in schools. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: 205

Creativity

9.4 L eadership Development for Gifted Students in Community Service Programs

Terence Paul Friedrichs, Friedrichs Education, Mendota Heights, MN; Amos Asher Gewirtz, Henry Sibley High School, Mendota Heights, MN Gifted students’ dedication to service, steeped in longdocumented affective traits, increasingly is demonstrated in community-service leadership. Through school-based skill development, these youth can extend socially conscious leadership beyond K-12, into adult careers and volunteerism. However, K-12 teachers currently lack knowledge on developing these important competencies. This session conveys traits of young gifted leaders and “gifted-sensitive” community-service programs, and describes in detail the high-school leadership experiences provided by two exemplary programs. Finally, attendees offer observations on such youths’ traits and effective community leadership-training programming.

17.2 The Creative Process: A Mathematical and Psychological Model

Min Ma, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium Our research aim is to arrive at a measurable model of the creative process by putting creativity in the context of a learning process. We provide a detailed description of how creative thinking fits in a general description of the learning process without trying to go into an analysis of a biological description of the brain activity. Our tool is the aspect deformation process of an indicator process partially ordered by causality, using mathematical method to prove this process.

Saturday

Counseling & Guidance

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

Audience: Classroom Teachers 9-12, Counselors, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

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Putting it Into Practice November 17, 2012 | 12:15 PM – 1:00 PM Power Up Your Creative Mind: Activate Creative-Thinking Skills

Kathy C. Frazier, Elaine Reynolds, Kent State University, Kent, OH Change is on the horizon in education today. What will it take to successfully prepare our students to reach beyond the summit? This session presents a hierarchy of creative-thinking skills to help your students power up their creative minds. Beginning with the brain and its role in the creative process, participants are engaged in strategies to develop curriculum connections that integrate relaxation, visualization and idea generation tools such as Brainstorming, The Category List, and SCAMPER. Take the challenge: travel through the creative thinking zone! Leave with lots of new ideas that help you “Educate with Altitude! Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 608

Curriculum Studies Socratic Teaching and Critical Reflection

April Keck DeGennaro, Peeples Elementary School, Fayetteville, GA Socratic teaching can be one of the most powerful ways to reach the highest levels of thinking. When paired with critical written reflection it becomes even more effective. This session extends a brief Socratic discussion with a system of critical written reflection to demonstrate how these instructional strategies combine to maximize students’ ability to think and write critically. This paired strategy, based in the literature on reflective practice extends the literature on intellectual engagement and developing higher-level thinking abilities through writing. This session identifies why the most powerful use of classroom time is that set aside for critical written reflection. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Parents

14.4 Where is Creativity? Mapping Creative Hot Spots and Inventive Networks

Room: 606

Mapping and social network analysis provides new ways of finding the creative “hot spots” and interrelated creative activities in your own school. These methods can be used to develop a visual map of where creativity is emerging and where it is thriving. Best of all, mapping and social network analysis can be a project for students who want to learn these cutting edge ways of discovering how behaviors like creativity grow and spread through a community.

Alexander R. Pagnani, University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO

Barbara Kerr, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS

Saturday

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

32.2 Gifted Male Readers: Current Understandings and Suggestions for Future Research

While much research has been conducted on the topics of gifted males and male readers, surprisingly little work has focused on “gifted male readers” as a distinct population. What research has been conducted, however, portrays a worrisome state of affairs for these talented young men. The literacy gender gap, it seems, has left males of all ages racing to catch up to their female classmates, regardless of their literary ability. This session explores the known causes and effects of this gender disparity, searches diverse academic fields for clues to its solution, and offer insights for new avenues of research. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

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Differentiation through Choice: Giving Students the Freedom to Learn Tisha Admire Duncan, Meredith College, Raleigh, NC

Are you doing all the work in your classroom? Are you telling students where, what, and how to write? Are they truly learning information or are they regurgitating it for a test? Let’s put the power back in their hands! Join the presenter to discuss how to design, develop, and create learning contracts with students of all ages. When we give students the ability to choose, we give them the ability to make decisions and think for themselves. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Parents Room: 605

The Sustainable Design Project

Kathryn Picanco, Whitworth University, Spokane, WA The Sustainable Design Project is an interdisciplinary project utilized in the state of Washington to encourage innovative ways to create solutions to authentic problems for a more sustainable future. The project’s framework easily facilitates the process of place-based learning to detect and solve a community issue related to the environment or equitable society. Students participating in the project identify and work with community partners to reach a successful conclusion. This service oriented approach to place-based learning is meaningful and relevant to K-12 general and gifted education classrooms. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 107

Help! My 1st Grader Reads at a 5th Grade Level!

Joe B. Helbling, Cindy M. Massicotte, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT Finding literature that is challenging yet age-appropriate for young talented readers is a common dilemma for teachers and parents. In addition to quantitative measures of text complexity, qualitative factors and the ways in which students interact with text are critical considerations to ensure appropriate match between student and text. Participants walk away with tools, such as free online resources and booklists, as well as research-based

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strategies for selecting appropriately challenging literature and engaging students in higher-level thinking and discussions. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5, Parents Room: 206

reSEARCH Ahoy! A Treasure Hunt for the Ultimate Booty (Knowledge)!

Brian C. Housand, Elizabeth A. Fogarty, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC Without a treasure map, students may steer off course when surfing the Internet landing them not at a treasure chest of useful information, but tangled in a “net” of disreputable sites yielding only fools’ gold. Students need a compass points for successful Internet searching and resource evaluation. Internet collaboration allows gifted students to share the results of their research with authentic audiences. A defensible method for teaching students how to search and evaluate sources of information, as well as how to share acquired information is the focus of this session. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers Room: 607

Journey Books, Portfolios and E-folios: Using Authentic Assessment in a Meaningful Way Ellen Honeck, Institute for the Development of Gifted Education, Denver, CO

Journey books, portfolios, and digital portfolios are exciting and meaningful assessment tools that document the growth of a child using pictures, samples of work, and more. These tools provide students the opportunity to reflect on work, document growth, and recognize challenges. Teachers utilize these assessment techniques to develop an in-depth understanding of, and identify areas of growth and challenges for the student. When these assessment techniques are utilized, parents are able to see the depth and insight into the learning as well as the documented skill level for the student. Discover the joy and amazement of utilizing these Authentic Assessment techniques.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators Room: 708

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Putting it Into Practice November 17, 2012 | 12:15 PM – 1:00 PM 22.2 M  otivational Effects on Gifted Students’ School Achievement and Creativity Burak Turkman, University of Georgia, Athens, GA

The goal of this study is to examine the creativity-based curriculum activities’ effects on students’ motivation, academic achievement, and social well-being. Additionally, this study aims to show how these kinds of creativity-based curriculum activities can be a good option in order to overcome gifted students’ school boredom and social-emotional problems. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

24.4 Understanding the Factors That Influence Implementation of a Curricular Intervention

Lisa Hall Foster, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

Saturday

This presentation investigates the reasons teachers gave for making or not making adaptations to a curricular intervention. Using quantitative results to develop typologies of fidelity (high, moderate, low levels of fidelity), the researcher used qualitative analysis to understand the changes that teachers made to the curriculum and the rationale behind those adaptations. A crosssectional analysis was completed to understand their similarities and differences in order to address influencers. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Coordinators, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

Early Childhood Young Children Reaching Beyond the Summit through PBL and Technology Kathy Ray, Leavenworth County Special Education Cooperative, Lansing, KS

Quality early-childhood education helps students develop the academic and social skills they need to become lifelong learners. Using technology to help children develop cognitive, social, and motor skills through authentic, real-world experiences keeps

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gifted students of all ages engaged as learners. This session explores how the primary gifted facilitator can use Problem Based Learning for our younger learners, either in a gifted pull-out setting or through an inclusion setting using student interests, skill strengths, web tools, and various technology like flip-cams, GPS, and iPads. This session explores how to integrate PBL using technology. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents Room: 711

Young Gifted Readers + Great Books = Grand Conversations Patti Wood, Samford University, Birmingham, AL

One of the most serious dilemmas for teachers in K-3 classrooms is how to meet the needs of their young gifted readers. Many teachers are burdened with inflexible and prescribed reading curriculum, geared toward struggling readers. The inevitable has occurred: young gifted readers are left out of classroom reading instruction. What are the unique needs of early readers who have demonstrated proficiency? How can teachers differentiate reading curricula to meet those needs? This session explores best practices for building a reading program for young gifted readers using great books that foster grand conversations. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: 610/612

Educating Primary Gifted Students with Altitude: Analyzing Nonfiction Books with a Focus on Higher-Level Skill Development Kimberley L. Chandler, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA

According to the Common Core State Standards, students must “actively seek thoughtful engagement with informational texts that builds knowledge, enlarges experience, and broadens worldviews.” The presenter shares a framework for helping young gifted students analyze nonfiction books, focusing on informational texts. Participants review examples of the framework, which utilizes a research-based model for the development of critical-thinking skills. Emphases on designing activities to teach primary students how to connect to prior

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


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Room: 702

is qualitatively different from those of their general age peers. Proactively exploring affective curricula can give appropriate attention to current emotional needs of gifted students and help them deal with potential future difficulties. Based on theories and practical teaching experiences, the presenter shares lesson plans, the rationale for designing and using affective curricula, and lessons learned during the teaching process.

Keeping Assessment Simple: Criteria Cards and Rubrics for Young Gifted Learners

Audience: Classroom Teachers 9-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors

knowledge, make inferences, and summarize information, and on ideas for research projects, questioning, and writing exercises that require critical reading are included. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators

Dodie Merritt, Fine Lines Graphic & Educational Design, Genoa, IL Reaching the summit happens when expectations are well understood before embarking on new challenges. Vital for all populations of students, the clearly stated guidelines in rubrics also focus, pace, and motivate young gifted learners. Consider the different advantages of simple, complex, holistic, analytic, formative, summative, task-specific, and unit rubrics. Since time constraints are always a concern, the use of formative criteria cards, primary-level task checklists, and “simple� rubrics to streamline this assessment process are presented and a variety of teachercreated models for criteria cards, checklists, and rubrics is shared. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5, Coordinators Room: 704

Middle Grades 2.2 Incorporating Affective Curricula in School to Help High Ability Adolescents Enyi Jen, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Room: Exhibit Hall A

Student Engagement: Having Fun with Rigor Valerie Davis, Brush Schools, Brush, CO; Gail Stine, Englewood Schools, Englewood, CO

Rigor and fun can be used in the same sentence. Rigor has been described as giving thoughtful, intellectually demanding work. Are you looking for ways to increase classroom rigor while maintaining student engagement beyond paper and pencil activities? This session leads teachers through a sample lesson using language arts and math examples that can be adapted to use with any age group. The lesson that is presented focuses on allowing gifted students to create a product while interpreting abstract material. These engaging techniques, designed to motivate students, can be easily and immediately adapted into your classroom. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 602

Adolescents experience developmental transitions as they search to establish their self-identities. Because of sensitivities, intensities, and other characteristics associated with giftedness, the social and emotional development and needs of gifted adolescents

Saturday

Recorded Session

There is something in us which responds to the challenge of this mountain and goes out to meet it... — George Leigh Mallory

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Putting it Into Practice November 17, 2012 | 12:15 PM – 1:00 PM Dollars and “Sense”: Teaching Personal Financial Literacy to Middle School Students

Parent & Community

As social studies standards now require students to learn personal financial literacy, how do we provide opportunities for high-ability middle school learners to engage in meaningful, rigorous learning around this important topic? In this session, learn how one middle school, grant-winning GT specialist teamed with a social studies teacher to create a year-long learning opportunity that takes students on a “life journey” navigating the tumultuous waters of employment, life trials, savings, investing, credit, and more. Participants leave with materials and ideas to allow them to show their learners the pitfalls and the tools to help build personal financial success.

Kelly Schultz, Nan Janecke, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI

Linda E. Pfeiffer, Thompson School District, Loveland, CO

Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-8, Coordinators Room: 208

Bring it On! Conquering the Challenges of Adolescent Gifted Learners

Richard Cash, Bloomington Public Schools, Bloomington, MN; Diane Heacox, St. Catherine University, Edina, MN; Patti B. Drapeau, Patti Drapeau Educational Consulting, South Freeport, ME; Carolyn Coil, Pieces of Learning, Marion, IL

Saturday

Join expert practitioners in differentiation for the gifted as we tackle ongoing issues common with middle gifted learners. This highly interactive session begins with the specialists each presenting their ideas on the most pressing middle school issues including how to improve student motivation, engage under-performers, implement effective management techniques, and enhance curriculum for gifted learners. Get up-close and personal with these specialists as you choose discussion groups focusing on the topics on which you want more in-depth advice. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors Room: 601

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Organizational Strategies for the Gifted Student

Advanced and accelerated students are often among the most organizationally challenged, often in contrast to the expectations of the adults in their lives. Learn methods and techniques for use at school and at home to help students become more organized. Solutions to problems with homework, planners, backpacks, and time management are offered, and prizes awarded to participants with the most helpful ideas. Participants gain ideas from this hands-on session that can be implemented immediately to help the disorganized students in their lives. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: 202

Your Guide to Advocacy: The NAGC P-12 Gifted Programming Standards

Kathy Jones, Advocates for High Ability Learners, Chanute, KS There is no national mandate for gifted education services. How children’s needs are addressed varies state-to-state, district-todistrict, and classroom-to-classroom. The rules and practices are inconsistent, but there is hope! NAGC’s new standards for gifted education programming are the basis for our advocacy. Homeschoolers and other parents can use them as a guide to ensure their children meet appropriate outcomes. Since “all advocacy is local,” using standards increases the consistency of our messages. Get introduced to the standards and learn to incorporate them into your advocacy efforts. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: 104

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

Getting Dads Involved in Talent Development at Home and School

Tarek C. Grantham, University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Malik Henfield, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; James Wingo, Fatherhood Initiatives, Cleveland, OH Dads are critical to the education of gifted children, but few educators know how to effectively get them engaged in academics at school or home. Many fathers are proactively seeking ways in which to become engaged, and educators must be prepared to invite them into the school context. Whether being directly involved, accessible, or simply demonstrating responsibility for their gifted children, fathers want to and can be involved. Join us for this presentation to discover strategies that you can use to facilitate Dads’ involvement.

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Infusing Gifted Education in Regular Education Staff Development

Mary L. Slade, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA Despite the best efforts of many leaders in the field, most school personnel preparation programs do not include formal studies in gifted education. As a result, teachers enter the classroom and administrators move into leadership positions with limited or no knowledge about the best education of gifted learners. Therefore, educators’ only access to the knowledge base and skill sets of the field are through staff development programming. This presentation focuses on how to infuse gifted education training in staff development for all educators. Model programs and sample activities are provided.

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Parents

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators

Room: 102

Room: 603

Professional Development

Program Evaluation as Professional Development for Local Programs and Services for Gifted Students

Promoting U-STARS ~ PLUS in Colorado

Deborah L. Rothenberg, Colorado Department of Education, Denver, CO; Mary Ruth Coleman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC U-STARS CO began as a Javits funded project in Colorado in 2006 and is modeled after U-STARS~PLUS. The purpose of this session is to introduce the goals of the program – high end learning, teacher’s systematic observation, hands-on inquiry in science, and family involvement. Appropriate for all students, the target group has been diverse, underrepresented, primary age students and their families who receive a rich science curriculum, using engaging literature as the “hook.” Researchbased and standards driven, this supplemental science program helps classroom teachers develop students with promise.

Vicki DeMao, Centerville-Abington Community Schools, Centerville, IN

Program evaluation can move an entire school district forward to bring awareness to the needs of gifted students; to provide staff development through a study committee; and to design new programs and services for gifted students based upon research and best practices. This process can be the moving force that gives new life to a long-standing program or become the impetus for a school or district to develop new programs and services. In this session, participants study the new program standards from NAGC and create an action plan for their own school/district for the purpose of program evaluation.

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Room: 201

Room: 204

59th Annual Convention

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November 15-18, 2012 | Denver, Colorado

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Recorded Session

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Putting it Into Practice November 17, 2012 | 12:15 PM – 1:00 PM Beating the Gap: Increasing Teacher Capacity to Support Traditionally Underrepresented Students in AP STEM Courses

Amy Germundson, Amy Azano, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA How do we effectively support teacher understanding and enactment of inclusive STEM teaching practices? What conditions and learning processes support the professional growth of AP teachers with diverse teaching experiences and beliefs? In this session, explore key elements of an effective professional development approach that incorporates a sustained focus on how diverse students learn in STEM fields, teacherstudent partnerships in curriculum design and implementation, and encourages teachers to become researchers and leaders of their own practice. Insights and curriculum examples from AP teachers are provided. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Coordinators, Researchers Room: 712

Integrating STEM Components into Your Gifted Program: Creating an Investigative Classroom Culture

Saturday

Alicia Cotabish, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR; Deborah Dianne Dailey, Ann Robinson, University of Arkansas at Little Rock; Mary Kathryn Stein, Arkansas Department of Education, Little Rock, AR In the interest of developing our nation’s future STEM innovators, changes in our science programs are necessary, especially in the elementary grades. To address this problem, gifted programs can maximize STEM learning opportunities while promoting critical and creative thinking. By utilizing instructional approaches such as inquiry-based instruction and problem-based learning, gifted educators can establish an investigative classroom that cultivates young STEM talent. This session provides participants with instructional strategies and an activities guide. Participate in hands-on activities designed to promote an investigative classroom.

Growing Leaders in Your Own Backyard: The GT Teacher Leader Model Jennifer Barr, Annie Binion, Lisa Turner, Michelle Renee DuBois, Jennifer Gamblin, Boulder Valley School District, Louisville, CO

As gifted director or coordinator, are you a “department of one?” As a teacher with passion and expertise in gifted education, are you seeking a leadership role? Come learn about a viable, sustainable structure that builds professional capacity in programming, curriculum, assessment, and instruction. The teacher leader model gives qualified educators a career pathway to move from the classroom to a leadership position while keeping those two vital roles linked. Hear from teachers in their second year of the program who are growing as leaders and bolstering professional development district-wide. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors Room: 210/212

A Culture of Change: How a Large, Urban School District Transitioned to a Collaborative Model in Gifted Education

Margaret S. Smith, Melanie Crawford, Minneapolis Public Schools, Minneapolis, MN Our district underwent a dramatic transition that redefined the role of the Gifted Specialist, moving away from a “Gifted and Talented Teacher” and toward an “Advanced Differentiation Specialist” who consults and collaborates with classroom teachers. In a state with no mandate for gifted education, this transition was marked by unique challenges. This session presents four case studies and discusses the elements that created the greatest success in transition to a consultation model. A detailed outline of the staff development process is presented, along with highlights from our reflection process. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 203

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators Room: 207

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National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

Research & Evaluation 29.4 The Influence of Institutional Experiences on the Development of Creative Thinking in Artistically Gifted Individuals

Angie L. Miller, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN

Using data from the Strategic National Arts Alumni Project, this study explores whether satisfaction with aspects of institutional experience contributes to perceived development of creative thinking for artistically gifted individuals, and looks at differences in patterns between undergraduate and graduate alumni across a variety of academic majors. Results of several regression analyses indicate greater numbers of significant predictors for creative thinking in undergraduate alumni, compared to graduate alumni. The two strongest, most consistent predictors across all models are satisfaction with freedom and encouragement to take risks and instructors in classrooms, labs, and studios. Differences across majors are also discussed. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

Special Populations No Less Gifted/No More Broken: Exploding the Top 10 Myths About 2e Students Linda E. Collins, Jacque Cork, William J. Collins, Blue Valley Southwest High School, Overland Park, KS

Twice-exceptional students are no less gifted than other gifted students, although our educational community often responds as if they are, applying prescriptive treatments that are hit or miss at

NAGC Base Camp

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best. This session covers 2e myths, discovering their basis, exploring their foundation in biases or misunderstandings of this unique population. Look at how to explode the myths and educate the stakeholder community. Participants examine the Top 10 Reasons to serve 2e students, viewing anecdotal evidence and information from students, parents, and teachers. Attendees leave with practical research-based resources to take with them. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 703

Clustering for Success!

Dina Brulles, Paradise Valley USD, Phoenix, AZ Schools today are experiencing dramatic changes in how they serve gifted students. Gifted programs that have prevailed for years are disappearing while our diverse gifted populations are growing. In response, an increasing number of schools are turning to the Schoolwide Cluster Grouping Model, an inclusive model that allows gifted students to learn together all day, every day, with teachers that receive specialized training. Implementing the SCGM enfranchises underrepresented populations, yields desirable achievement outcomes for all students, yet requires no additional funding. The presenter provides an overview, discusses methods for implementation, and demonstrates ways to support the cluster-grouping model. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: 105

Saturday

Recorded Session

To fly we have to have resistance. —Maya Lin

59th Annual Convention

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November 15-18, 2012 | Denver, Colorado

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Putting it Into Practice November 17, 2012 | 12:15 PM – 1:00 PM Strategies to Challenge and Support 2e Gifted Children

Beverly A. Trail, Regis University, Henderson, CO; Claire Hughes, College of Coastal Georgia, St. Simons Island, GA Twice-exceptional learners have the characteristics of gifted students and students with disabilities. They can appear unmotivated, defiant, and oppositional, yet these students are emotionally fragile. This presentation provides strategies from gifted and special education proven effective in meeting the academic, social, and emotional needs of 2e children. Learn specific strategies you can implement in your school to assist 2e children in developing skills in thinking, executive functioning, language, writing, fluency, and processing speed. Strategies supporting social and emotional development are equally important for students dealing with dysfunctional perfectionism, emotional regulation, interpersonal relationships, intrapersonal understanding, and learning appropriate social behavior. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 108

Special Schools & Programs

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27.2 “ Acting White” Phenomenon on a Predominantly White College Campus

Winfred Harris Biddle, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA This session presents research concerning the insights and experiences of high achieving, African American college students concerning the “acting White” phenomenon. These students, like many other gifted African Americans, have successfully overcome formidable challenges as they have worked to reach the top. In order to improve minority student

achievement, it is important that educators become better informed about the “acting White” phenomenon and its impact on Black students. This session discusses the relationship of society’s conceptions of “Blackness” and “Whiteness” to academic achievement. Resources for lessening the impact of the “acting White” phenomenon in school are offered. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

Creating a Summer Program to Enrich the Social and Academic Needs of Gifted Learners

Mary Patton, Regis University, Centennial, CO; Blanche Kapushion, Deborah Marshall, Jeffco Public Schools, Golden, CO; Amy Elizabeth Bainbridge, Cherry Creek School District, Denver, CO Gifted students need the opportunity to connect to content that is challenging, interest-based, and differentiated to meet their unique individual needs. SPARKS (Summer Program for Able and Remarkable Kids) was created to enhance and enrich the social and academic needs of gifted learners. This session introduces participants to the ins and outs of designing, creating, coordinating, and teaching in a summer enrichment program designed for the gifted student. Program creators share their experiences and include everything you need to know to design and implement an enrichment program for your school or district. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: 106

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Recorded Session

Poster Session

7.2 Acarkent Doga College

Cem Hafizogullari, Aysegul Islekeller, Doga College, Istanbul, Turkey Doga College is the largest private school in Turkey, with more than 40 campuses and 25,000. Acarkent Doga Campus is the first school for gifted children in Turkey. Our unique “Nature Based Learning System” opens up new vistas for the audience. Learn about our smart classes, which are designed by our worldwide partners like Apple, Promethean, and Pearson. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

STEM African American High-Achieving Females in (STEM): Influences on Their Educational and Career Aspirations

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The Common Core in Action: Awesome Algebra for Young Mathematicians

Katherine Gavin, Tutita M. Casa, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT Algebraic thinking is a significant focus of the Common Core State Standards woven throughout the upper elementary grades. This is good news since some of the most enjoyable, challenging experiences for talented students are investigating patterns and relationships, creating and solving equations, and connecting algebra to real-life problems. From discovering algebra at the mall to creating Wacky World Records, participants engage in activities from NAGC award-winning units that develop algebraic thinking in the most engaging ways. These activities also promote the CCSS Standards of Mathematical Practice as students persevere in problem solving and justify and critique mathematical arguments. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 604

This session focuses on current results of a 3-year National Science Foundation grant project as it relates to African American college students majoring in STEM. More specifically, a focus of this session is on the factors that most influenced African American female students’ choice of major and career orientation. The researchers also offer specific recommendations to parents, K-12 education professionals, and college representatives. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 103

My father instilled in me the attitude of prevailing. If there’s a challenge, go for it. If there’s a wall to break down, break it down.

Saturday

James L. Moore, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

— Donny Osmond

59th Annual Convention

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November 15-18, 2012 | Denver, Colorado

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 1:30 PM – 2:30 PM Signature Series

Computers & Technology

Implementing RtI with Gifted Students: Service Models, Trends, and Issues

Using Digital Storytelling with Secondary Students

Daphne Pereles, Colorado Department of Education, Littleton, CO; Donna Y. Ford, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN; Sally M. Reis, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; George Betts, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO Moderators: Mary Ruth Coleman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; Susan Johnsen, Baylor University, Waco, TX RtI provides a wonderful opportunity to enhance collaboration to meet the needs of all learners – but does “all” really include learners with gifts and talents? This panel addresses service models and approaches for meeting the needs of gifted learners within an RtI framework. Discussion includes trends of school reform and issues that must be addressed to ensure a goodnessof-fit for gifted learners. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Parents Room: 210-212

Arts

Saturday

How to Use Your Community Resources to Supplement Art Programs in the Schools

Tina M. Spomer, Mary Elizabeth Daily, Anne Brandt, Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln, NE In today’s economic climate, many programs have to consider the challenges of sustaining a quality art program with rapidly declining budgets. When faced with the threat of reducing arts programs in order to have more time and money for subjects that are tested, gifted programs need to think about how to use existing resources to maximize impact. Using resources from our own community creates opportunities for students to foster their imagination and problem solving skills. This presentation offers practical ideas and solutions to supplementing visual art programs using the resources most closely found in the community.

Susan Wynn, Kristen Stephens, Duke University, Durham, NC Looking for engaging ways to integrate content, writing, and technology? Digital storytelling is a tool that can be used to synthesize all three. As a part of the oral tradition, digital stories are typically personal narratives supported by images, video, and voiceover. However, teachers can repurpose digital stories in a variety of ways. One way is for assessment of student knowledge and understanding of a specific unit of study. Come learn about a 21st century instructional strategy that challenges middle and high school students to demonstrate their understanding of content-specific units in more creative, critical, and visually interesting ways. Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-12, Coordinators, Parents Room: 712

12.4 C  an Uruguay Reinvent Gifted Education by Giving “One Laptop Per Child?”

Karen Bendelman, International Gifted Education Teacher Development Network, Austin, TX In 2009, Uruguay, a developing country without a history of attention to gifted learning needs, became the first country to give a laptop to each primary student, under the “one laptop per child” project. The goal of OLPC is the creation of affordable educational devices for use in the developing world. Hear about the experiences learned during the ongoing implementation of the project, its successes, and some of its challenges, including curriculum adaptation, software development, budget constraints, teacher training, and attention to different learning styles and needs in the classroom. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators Room: 606

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National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Recorded Session

Poster Session

Neuroscience for Gifted Students: Using Biofeedback Apps to Understand Creativity

Barbara Kerr, Linzi Gibson, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS Not long ago, neuroscience was only conducted in medical and university laboratories. New availability of low-priced apps used by athletes make it possible to bring neuroscience into the classroom. This presentation introduces heart rate variability and brain state apps that can be used to help students understand the “busy” mind of ordinary learning; the flow state of creativity; and the calm state of mindful relaxation. An HRV monitor is demonstrated with a participant visualizing a state of creative flow, and a projection shows the audience the mind at work on a creative problem. Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-12, Coordinators, Researchers Room: 709

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Lives, Histories, and Big Ideas: Adventures in the Conceptual Foundations of Our Field

Jennifer L. Jolly, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA; Karen B. Rogers, University of St. Thomas, Minneapolis, MN; Ann Robinson, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR; Thomas P. Hébert, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC Beginning with the foundational work of Francis Galton and ending with the landmark report issued by Sidney Marland, Jr., the individuals included in a forthcoming compendium, Illuminating Lives, lay claim to some of the most influential advances in the field of gifted education in the last 100 years. This presentation focuses on the life stories and contributions of individuals to the field and provides the first in-depth investigation into the figures who helped evolve gifted education from a fledgling cousin of educational psychology to a standalone line of inquiry and practice. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Researchers

Conceptual Foundations

Room: 605

Irrational Fears About Grade Acceleration

32.4 Exclusion of Education Paradigm, Pre Vs. Post 1962/63: Why It Is Not O.K.

Despite grade skipping’s benefits, some resist the practice, believing that grade skipping can harm students’ social and emotional lives. Researchers have often attempted to explain this largely groundless fear. However, no explanation has discussed loss aversion. Loss aversion is people’s tendency to avoid loss even at the expense of potential significant gain. This causes adults to decide to avoid some potential affective harm to grade accelerated students, even if the students could make significant academic and affective gains. This presentation explains loss aversion, how it influences decisions about grade acceleration, and how to counteract it. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 707

Heather Phyllis Hurt, Kentucky Annual Conference, United Methodist Church, Edmonton, KY Why do we say we want people to have the best education; we don’t want to limit their exposure or possibilities, but we don’t want to teach anything Christian? The exclusion of church is a lack of education. How do we combine the pre-1962/63 Supreme Court decision: Separation of Church & State paradigm with the post-to make a new paradigm? Revisionists change everything to reflect their own beliefs and paradigm, what are taught as truth. The original truths aren’t mentioned, even denounced. People teaching us, professing specialties, have never seen nor know about original documentation.

Saturday

Daniel Winkler, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

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November 15-18, 2012 | Denver, Colorado

139


Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 1:30 PM – 2:30 PM Synchronicity and Curriculum in a Re-Enchanted Cosmos

Counseling & Guidance

In broadest terms, Western culture is going through a profound transformation that is the end of the Cartesian-Newtonian worldview with its disenchanted cosmos. We are also at the beginnings of a quantum worldview and a re-enchanted cosmos. It is during this time that we educators do well to discern the two world views and work in such a way that nurtures our students for a time we will not see. Synchronicity offers itself as an opening to that emerging re-enchanted cosmos.

Mary Whitman, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL

F. Christopher Reynolds, Berea City School District, Berea, OH

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 101

5.2 Create Like M.A.D.D.: StudentCreated Bibliotherapy

Music? Art? Drama? Dance? Do you have students who love, or even need, to express themselves through these artistic avenues? Invite them to use such gifts to get in touch with their issues or to help others identify messages that spark great social concern. This presentation provides an overview of bibliotherapy, and shows how, when combined with Type III activities, students can develop new tools to reach greater personal understanding. Handouts include sample lesson plans and resource lists. Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-12, Counselors Room: Exhibit Hall A

COMBINED SESSION

Conceptual Foundations 1:30 PM – 2:00 PM

Saturday

Using Qualitative Reasoning to Advance the Potential of Gifted Education Research J. Sean Callahan, University of Georgia, Athens, GA

This project brings together the fields of gifted education and art education by exploring what students learn from their engagement with hip hop art forms. To that end, this paper develops a theory of qualitative reasoning in order to understand how university students create and express knowledge through and with hip hop art forms. Qualitative reasoning is the ability to interpret sensory qualities through the muse of sight, sound, and gesture. This project advances the potential of gifted education research by contributing different concepts for understanding the aesthetic and socialemotional development gifted individuals. Audience: Consultants, Counselors, Researchers

2:00 PM – 2:30 PM

Threshold Concepts and Troublesome Knowledge: Reconceptualizing Curriculum for Gifted and Talented Students Reva Friedman, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS

A considerable body of research and practice focuses on what and how to teach GT students. However, these approaches overlook an important question: what are the transformational, key concepts that usher the learner into powerful, discipline-based learning, and troublesome knowledge? There are information and concepts that must be mastered within any discipline. In this session, participants explore threshold concepts and troublesome knowledge. Examples drawn from the research of Meyer and Land are shared and unpacked. Methods are generated for facilitating a learning process that results in irreversibly transformed and integrated thinking and learning. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Coordinators, Researchers Room: 608

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Poster Session

20.2 W  hat Impacts Mathematics Self-Concept?

Mihyeon Kim, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA Results from the Third International Mathematics and Science Study revealed a disappointing fact: U.S. fourth graders performed comparatively better in mathematics than eighth graders. How about self-concept in math, then? Many studies show that self-concept in mathematics is related to their achievement. How individuals perceive themselves can impact all areas of their lives. A study of students in a university-based enrichment program explored self-concepts using the Marsh Self-Description Questionnaire-I. From the result of this study, this session discusses factors influencing self-concept in math of 3rd-8th grade students. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

Meeting the Academic, Social, and Emotional Needs of Highly Gifted Students: Lessons Learned from SET Michelle Muratori, Linda E. Brody, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

Students with extremely advanced abilities and/or achievement often lack adequately challenging school programs or opportunities to interact with intellectual peers. Counselors at the Study of Exceptional Talent at Johns Hopkins work with high-scoring Talent Search students to find appropriate resources and opportunities and track their progress over time. Students’ individual strengths and weaknesses, interests and motivation, and resources in the school and community are considered in choosing educational options to help them achieve their potential. Lessons learned from many years of observing and studying SET students has implications for others seeking to optimize the talent development of exceptionally talented students. Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: 711

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Creativity 2.4 Teaching Practices for Creativity: Students’ Motivation and Academic Achievement in Mathematics

Eunice Soriano Alencar, University of Brasilia; Alessandra Otaviano, Catholic University of Brasilia, Brasilia, Brazil This presentation addresses high school students’ perception of the use of educational practices for creativity by their mathematics teachers, motivation towards mathematics, and the relationship between students’ motivation and achievement in mathematics. The Inventory of Educational Practices for Creativity and a Scale of Motivation in Mathematics were administered to 396 students. The results reveal a positive relationship between students’ perception of the use of educational practices for creativity by their mathematics teachers and students’ motivation in mathematics, as well as a significant relationship between motivation in mathematics and academic achievement in this subject. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Consultants, Coordinators Room: Exhibit Hall A

Curriculum Studies 7.4 Using Set Curriculum to Plan for County GT Differentiation

Eric Thomas Rippeth, Eagle County Schools, Edwards, CO Eagle County Schools has established a set curriculum for all grades in tested subjects. Our GT team has been helping teachers adapt to the extreme changes by utilizing the curriculum in planning that successfully differentiates for our gifted learners. Using planning grids that are adapted to reach all areas of Bloom’s thinking levels, we have come up with a way to assist in initial planning to the evolution of extension menus. These menus are being created by teachers who publish and store them on our county website for all teachers to use, adapt, and implement in their classrooms.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators Room: Exhibit Hall A

59th Annual Convention

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November 15-18, 2012 | Denver, Colorado

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 1:30 PM – 2:30 PM Curriculum Studies Academic Prejudice

Sandra N. Kaplan, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA There are curriculum designs and instructional strategies that thwart rather than facilitate the learning opportunities of cultural, linguistic, economic, and academic diverse gifted learners. These learning experiences inhibit the potential and participation of gifted students in the classroom and result in

misconceptions about the students’ giftedness and contribute to their underachievement and attrition from gifted services. Academic prejudice renders as much harm to the development of gifted learners as does any other form of prejudice. This session demonstrates both curriculum and instruction that cause and remedy academic prejudice in the classroom. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Parents Room: 705

COMBINED SESSION

Creativity 1:30 PM – 2:00 PM

Evaluating the Future Problem Solving Program International

Edwin Selby, Donald J. Treffinger, Marianne Solomon, Center for Creative Learning, Sarasota, FL

Saturday

Founded by E. Paul Torrance, the Future Problem Solving Program International serves thousands of students worldwide. Working in teams, students address the challenges of the future and go on to compete in Global Issues Problem Solving, Scenario Writing, and Community Problem Solving. A recent evaluation study shows a high degree of satisfaction on the part of students, parents, and coaches. Participants report that the goals of the program are well met, with students, developing creative and criticalthinking skills, an understanding of the problem-solving process, research and inquiry skills, time-management skills, and an active interest in the future. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

2:00 PM – 2:30 PM

Some Ways Future Problem Solving Students Are More Creative Than Non Participants

John Kauffman, Scholastic Testing Service, Bensenville, IL; Marianne Solomon, Deb Woythal, Future Problem Solving Program International, Sarasota, FL Future Problem Solving Program International and Scholastic Testing Service are in the second year of a six-year longitudinal study to determine differences in creativity test scores between FPSPI students and non-FPSPI students in the same grade and school as the FPS students. The students took the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking and have completed surveys regarding in-school and out-of-school activities and work in their homes. The study has begun with groups of fifth or sixth graders. This program presents summary data for both sets of students and an overview of their activities. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 708

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Poster Session

15.2 Beyond Class Novels: Challenging Gifted Readers in the Internet Era

Elizabeth A. Fogarty, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC Literacy has come a long way since the days of Gutenberg’s printing press, but has the teaching of literacy evolved at a commensurate rate? It is no longer sufficient to think of reading novels as novel practice. Observers in today’s reading classrooms are more likely to see textbooks than texting, choral reading than collaboration, and workbooks than computer work stations, possibly indicating the predominance of a focus on standardization rather than one based on open-endedness and creativity. This session will demonstrate how online applications of reading can enhance print-based literacy programs to create challenge and meaningfulness for gifted readers.

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Socio-Emotional Needs of Young Gifted Children: How Parents Guide and Nurture for Important Life Skills Jeanine Jechura, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH

This engaging presentation examines how parents guide and nurture their young gifted children by meeting their socioemotional needs. Through active discussions, the audience learns about Ellen Galinsky’s essential life skills that every child needs. In her book, Mind in the Making, Galinsky identifies skills such as focus and self-control, critical thinking, and self-directed engaged learning that are particularly meaningful for young gifted children. In this presentation, examine how closely life skills, and socioemotional needs of young gifted, and parenting are aligned.

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents

Room: Exhibit Hall A

Room: 103

Early Childhood

Engaging the Imagination of Young Gifted Children through the Arts

Early Access: Fostering Future Academic Success through the Acceleration of Young Gifted Children Penelope P. Heinigk, Lindsey Reinert, Jeffco School District, Golden, CO

Gifted children come to us with theories, notions, and motivation to make sense of their world; they are not merely empty vessels to be filled. Come explore a programming model that reaches highly gifted learners before they become disengaged with school. Early access to kindergarten and first grade for highly gifted children widens the options in finding the right educational fit. Presenters share four years of experience in creating an acceleration process for a large public school district, including application procedures, cognitive testing, reviewing portfolios, conducting observations, and selecting appropriate candidates.

Joan Smutny, National Louis University, Chicago, IL Integrating the arts in the curriculum has proven highly effective in meeting the unique learning needs of gifted students. Yet, the arts remain under-used as catalysts for the imagination and creative thinking of highly able students. Designed for classroom teachers, this workshop enables participants to use the arts to address the learning needs of young gifted students in language arts, social studies, and science. Through a range of resources and creative strategies shared by the facilitator, classroom teachers gain a practical understanding of how to integrate the arts into the curriculum to enhance imagination, invention, and higher-level thinking.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5 Room: 703

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors Room: 106

59th Annual Convention

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November 15-18, 2012 | Denver, Colorado

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 1:30 PM – 2:30 PM Precocious and Perfectionistic: Affective Needs of Young Gifted Children

Middle Grades

Perfectionism, heightened sense of justice, sensitivity, and a feeling of being different are all psychological aspects of giftedness. How are these characteristics displayed in behaviors of young gifted children both at school and at home? How can we recognize these characteristics as positive, and when is there a need for intervention? How early are these traits displayed? What can educators and parents do to support and nurture healthy psychological development in gifted young children? Through in-depth analysis of these characteristics and suggestions for support and growth, this session examines the affective and emotional facets of giftedness in young children.

Kristyl Boies, Pueblo West Elementary School, Pueblo West, CO

Inger Schiller, Norma Lu Hafenstein, Ricks Center for Gifted Children, Denver, CO

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Counselors, Parents Room: 108

Global Awareness Service Learning to Social Action: A Continuum of Community Service Opportunities

Saturday

Shannon B. Jones, Ricks Center for Gifted Children, Denver, CO Gifted children are particularly sensitive to problems in their community and around the globe. Their well-developed sense of justice and their natural empathy help them to identify issues, but they may feel powerless or ill-equipped to act as agents of change. Gifted children are capable of formulating and implementing meaningful steps towards resolution of many current issues. Service learning provides an outlet for the development of creative resolutions. Session participants learn more about selecting appropriate service learning projects and engagement of students, and receive samples of service-learning projects for students ages 3 through 8th grade. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators

Impact of Night of the Notables Then and Now: Gifted Learners Reaching Beyond the Summit

How can gifted learners come to understand their own giftedness? By completing in-depth studies of eminent people with Night of the Notables, a comprehensive unit for gifted programming or the regular classroom! Participants hear from a panel of “veteran” GT learners – former sixth graders who turned this unit into a successful public performance. Now, as young adults, these gifted individuals share special testimony as to the lasting impact of their experiences. Participants hear how these learners studied eminent people, became a live part of themed museum exhibits, and realized their own merit and notoriety. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Parents Room: 706

Escalating Language Arts/Reading for Talented Middle Grades Readers and Writers

Susannah Richards, Eastern Connecticut State University, Storrs, CT While many students have demonstrated that they have met or exceeded the reading and writing objectives, these students often complete the same lessons and assignments as their peers. This session explores strategies and curriculum to support highly able middle grade readers and writers to escalate their abilities. Sample learning experiences, suggested literature, and teaching suggestions that capitalize on the capacities of Web 2.0 are shared to model high level differentiated curriculum for these verbally talented students. The goal of this session is to create an environment that supports lifetime readers and writers. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators Room: 202

Room: 104

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Parent & Community My “Top Ten” for Preventing and Reversing Underachievement

Sylvia Rimm, Family Achievement Clinic, Watertown, WI Based on my experience in clinical work, and in advising parents, I target ten areas for assisting parents and educators in preventing and reversing underachievement for gifted children. I give practical strategies for avoiding problems and correcting them at home and in school. Advice includes everything from how to develop a child’s achieving persona, how to advocate for positive and more challenging curriculum in the classroom, to how to help gifted students balance academics and social life. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Parents Room: 603

Parent Power: How to Make It Work

Arlene R. DeVries, Drake University, Windsor Heights, IA This session describes successful efforts in achieving appropriate services for gifted children from the perspective of the presenter who worked for 24 years in a public school as the liaison to parents of gifted. Specific tips are given on how to approach the local school regarding services for an individual child; how to organize at a local and state level; and ways parents can contribute both directly and indirectly. The role of parents is examined including when to be an insistent “pushy parent” and when to compromise. Participants are encouraged to share success stories from their local communities. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Parents Room: 105

22.4 Cultivating Gifted Enrichment Opportunities in the Community Setting

Abby Alexander, School District of Lancaster, Lancaster, PA The local community setting is often overlooked as an integral piece to school enrichment programs. Alternative enrichments within the community provide gifted students opportunities to exchange traditional school experiences for more hands-on learning and investigating that assist in developing an awareness and application of knowledge to their local school and community environment. Students who make connections in their community increase their awareness of societal issues and level of civic engagement. Participants

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receive resources and strategies for cultivating gifted enrichments across various community settings and with limited budgets. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Coordinators, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

Training Your Broncos: Lessons in Self-Advocacy

Christy McGee, Bellarmine University, Louisville, KY; Nancy Arey Cohen, Educational Solutions, Falmouth, ME We discuss how to teach children to be comfortable advocating for themselves in personal and educational settings. There are instances when parents must step in and advocate for their children, but there are many more day-to-day instances in which children should be able to stand up for themselves. Our goal is to help parents teach their children self-advocacy strategies that prepare them for everyday life now and in the future. Come join us in discussing this important topic. Discussion is encouraged and participants are invited to share personal experiences in teaching self-advocacy. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Counselors, Parents Room: 203

Self-Advocacy: Lessons for a Lifetime

Kathee Jones, Colorado Association for Gifted and Talented, Golden, CO Self-advocacy, the ability to recognize and successfully address one’s interests and concerns, is a critical life skill. Over time particular challenges may change, yet many complexities presented by giftedness and twice-exceptionality persist in adulthood. While seeking to support students, adults often determine solutions without giving ear or experience to those most invested in the outcome: the children. Future self-advocates can be nurtured through empowering environments, positive experiences with failure, and teaching thoughtful communication. Focus on self-advocacy as a learned skill promotes the confident, proactive, and empathetic adulthood we hope for our children, but cannot simply bestow.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: 204

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 1:30 PM – 2:30 PM Parenting Your Creative Child

Dan Peters, Susan Daniels, Summit Center, Walnut Creek, CA Creative children think outside the box and are driven by curiosity and innovation. Parenting them, however, can be both exciting and exhausting. Participants learn strategies for cultivating and supporting creativity, as well as parenting strategies for nurturing the social and emotional development of their creative children. Maximizing a creative child’s potential is critical for their positive development in a current educational climate that may not be able to support their creative strengths. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: 207

10.2 How to Differentiate for the Gifted Family: A Team Approach

Royal Toy, Mississippi University for Women, Columbus, MS

Saturday

Have you ever fretted due to over-scheduling, lack of time with your family, or having to be too many places at once? This session addresses the many stresses that are present in an everyday family full of exceptionality. As social beings, we crave the opportunity to be together, and the home seems a natural place for this to happen; however, it is possible that the home is the last place that everyone can be together at the same time. This session explores the social condition in a family where many forms of exceptionality are present. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

Help! The Teacher Insists My 2e Child is “Average” and “Just Fine!”

Bobbie Gilman, Gifted Development Center, Westminster, CO Current school policies concerning identification and eligibility for specialized educational services are contributing to a dramatic increase in the under-identification of gifted children

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with learning disabilities or other deficits – the twice exceptional child. What can concerned parents do to clarify a child’s needs and obtain the early intervention essential to academic success? Improve your skills at recognizing common weaknesses in gifted children and how to assess/document them. Learn how educators may miss 2e needs due to RtI policies, why intelligence screeners underestimate such children’s potential, and what steps to take to ensure a rewarding education for your child. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Parents Room: 102

Professional Development The Best of the Midwest

Wendy A. Behrens, Minnesota Department of Education, Roseville, MN; Elizabeth Hahn, Ohio Department of Education, Columbus, OH; Chrystyna Mursky, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Madison, WI; Rosanne Malek, Iowa Department of Education, Des Moines, IA Professional development has the potential to improve the quality of services offered to gifted, creative, and talented students through effective training programs for education professionals. Contrasting with short-term single events, professional development assumes teaching is a dynamic profession requiring leadership and ongoing commitment to personal growth. As leaders, state directors of gifted education have a unique opportunity to observe and provide professional development in a variety of settings. Four state directors speak candidly about outstanding professional development aligned with the outcomes and evidence based practices outlined in Standard 6: Professional Development of the NAGC Pre-K-12 Programming Standards. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers Room: 604

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


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Poster Session

Research & Evaluation The Use of Remote Network Cameras: Advancing the Field for the Collection of Data

Tonya R. Moon, Catherine Brighton, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

Remote network cameras were installed in 30 elementary classrooms and used as data collection tools for a federally funded grant. Over 900 hours of lessons were captured over two years. Because of camera capabilities (56° wide-angle lens,

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360° rotation, 40x optical zoom, high-resolution video) data collected were of the highest quality and the collection procedure facilitated in-depth investigations into classrooms that would not have been possible without the tool. Lessons learned from this project paved the way for others to follow, ensuring future success with this form of data collection. Recommendations and lessons learned are shared during this session. Audience: Researchers Room: 702

COMBINED SESSION

Research & Evaluation 1:30 PM – 2:00 PM

2:00 PM – 2:30 PM

Katherine Gavin, Tutita M. Casa, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Janine M. Firmender, Saint Joseph’s University, Philadelphia, PA This session presents research findings from Project M², a National Science Foundation grant aiming to develop talent in all young student mathematicians and measure achievement. In the M² units, advanced geometry and measurement content is presented in depth, and students are encouraged to think like mathematicians. Results indicate that students significantly outperformed their peers in geometry and measurement concepts with large effect sizes. Although the Project M² students studied geometry and measurement for a longer period of time (12 weeks) than their peers, they performed at least as well on all math concepts. Sample activities and work samples are presented. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers

Moving the Past Forward: Preliminary Results from Project CIVIS

Carol Tieso, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA This presentation summarizes results from Year 1 of a multi-year study of social science achievement among diverse middle school students. Participating teachers implemented four U.S. History units, based on principles of gifted curriculum and instruction and developed from retired NAEP items from grades 4, 8, and 12 in diverse school districts across the southeast. Results indicated that students in the treatment groups had significantly higher mean scores on the post-test after controlling for the pre-test. Additionally, students in treatment classes had higher mean scores on subscale measures of critical-thinking skills vital to the practicing social scientist.

Saturday

The Impact of Advanced Math Curriculum on Kindergarten, First, and Second-Grade Students

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Researchers Room: 601

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 1:30 PM – 2:30 PM Early College Entrance Programs Across Nations: Practices, Research, and Perspectives

David Yun Dai, State University of New York-Albany, Albany, NY; Michael Sayler, University of North Texas, Denton, TX; Nancy B. Hertzog, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Jae Yup Jung, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia In this panel presentation, researchers introduce their respective early college entrance programs in three countries and present research findings on benefits and challenges of such programs (academically, affectively, and socially) for the early entrants.

Specifically, the panelists address the commonalities and differences of early college entrance programs across nations with respect to specific practices; the benefits and challenges of such programs, and the factors that contribute to the success of such programs; and the theoretical and practical insights we can derive with respect to early entrants’ optimal development. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Counselors, Researchers Room: 206

COMBINED SESSION

Research & Evaluation 1:30 PM – 2:00 PM

Impact of Different Gifted Identification Rules and Cut Scores on Population Size and Composition Kelly A. O’Shea, D. Betsy McCoach, E. Jean Gubbins, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Saturday

The current study examined the differences in population size and composition of a hypothetical gifted program depending on what cut scores and identification rules were used with the Cognitive Abilities Test. The sample included 3,107 students from the What Works in Gifted Education Study. An estimated latent IQ score was created for each student using structural equation modeling. Three different cut scores and rules were applied with the estimated latent IQ serving as an indicator of student’s gifted status. Independent t-tests were also conducted to determine if there were group differences in teacher nominations, gender, and minority status. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Researchers

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2:00 PM – 2:30 PM

Academically Talented Students’ Choice of Learning versus Performance Goals Frank C. Worrell, University of California, Berkeley, CA

In this study, we investigated two questions related to Dweck’s conception of fixed versus malleable views of ability. First, we asked what percentage of academically talented students would choose a performance goal versus a learning goal. Second, we compared these two groups on a variety of outcome variables. Results indicated that only 51.7% of academically talented students chose challenge goals. Students who chose challenge goals reported significantly and meaningfully higher enjoyment scores than their peers who chose performance goals. However, students did not differ meaningfully in achievement, time spent on homework, and amount learned. Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-12, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 704

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


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Poster Session

The Relationship between Gifted and General Secondary Students’ Perceptions of their Classroom Quality and Their Achievement in China

Yang Yang, Yukiko Maeda, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN Student Perceptions of Classroom Quality is an instrument that measures five motivational constructs (appeal, challenge, choice, meaningfulness, and academic self-efficacy) closely related to gifted and general students’ optimal motivation and achievement in current U.S. and Chinese literature. The present study uses SPOCQ to examine Chinese gifted and general students’

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perceptions of their math classrooms and the relationship between student perceptions and their math achievement. The presenters will share with the audience results from the study, steps in using an instrument within a different culture, the importance of examining student perceptions of their classes, and suggestions for classroom practices. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Coordinators, Researchers Room: 607

COMBINED SESSION

Research & Evaluation 1:30 PM – 2:00 PM

2:00 PM – 2:30 PM

The Relationship between Divergent Thinking and Critical Thinking in Advanced Language Arts Middle School Students

The Effects of Problem-Based Learning in Math and Science on High-Potential Elementary School Students

Researchers have long been interested in the cognitive mechanisms involved in the creative process, including divergent, convergent, and critical-thinking processes. While the relationship between divergent thinking and convergent thinking (IQ) has been widely researched, with many studies showing them to be distinct constructs, the relationship between divergent and critical thinking is poorly understood. Using the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking and the Cornell Critical Thinking Test, the relationship between divergent thinking and critical thinking scores for 89 advanced language art middle school students was investigated. Results suggest that divergent and critical thinking have low correlations and are distinct processes.

Stemming from data gathered in the Javits-funded Project GEMS, this presentation explores the results of a two-year study examining the effects of problem-based learning on growth in math achievement and science process skills in high ability or high-potential elementary students, particularly those from low-socioeconomic backgrounds. Students belonged to one of three treatment groups including ability-grouped target classes and a one-day-a-week magnet program. This session outlines the goals, design, methods, and results of the study. Of particular relevance is the impact of PBL in various grouping situations and with students from low SES.

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers

Tracy Ford Inman, Steven R. Wininger, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY

Saturday

Tracy C. Missett, Carolyn Callahan, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Coordinators, Researchers Room: 205

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 1:30 PM – 2:30 PM Special Populations 27.4 Effects of an Intervention to Reverse Gifted Underachievement on Student Engagement and Achievement Jennifer Ritchotte, Michael S. Matthews, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC

This session describes a recent experimental study that examined the effects of a goal valuation intervention on the engagement and achievement of middle school gifted underachievers. Educators learn how to use this intervention to help gifted students who are underachieving due to low motivation and goal valuation. Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-8, Researchers

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 602

Room: Exhibit Hall A

Special Schools & Programs

Preparing Special Populations of Gifted Students to be Successful Citizens of the World

Young, Gifted, and Black Males: Enhancing Recruitment, Retention, and Graduation Using Whiting’s Scholar Identity Model

Jaime A. Castellano, Ganado USD, Ganado, AZ; Peter C. Laing, Arizona Department of Education, Phoenix, AZ

Saturday

How we prepare a largely diverse group of gifted and advanced learners today informs their future in an increasingly complex and ever-changing global society. The research is explicit in what this preparation should look like; knowledge-transfer skills require students to be able to use what one knows to understand or solve related problems, in addition to applying this knowledge to a new concept or experience. Reflection as a process is another critical skill and includes the analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of information and data. Preparing special populations of gifted students to be successful citizens is the session focus. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 710

From ‘Cool Pose’ to ‘Bossed Up’: The Varying Nature of Black Male Masculinities

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identities – and how said sense-making has implications for their mental health and wellness in general and their academic performance, more specifically. Gifted educators have not been as vigilant about discussing this topic up to this point, providing only cursory exploration of the topic. This presentation discusses masculine identity development with implications for educators charged with educating Black males in gifted education and advanced programs.

Gilman W. Whiting, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN

Too often teachers and administrators of backgrounds different than their students are left to unravel the riddle of reaching the young Black male student. Using Whiting’s Scholar Identity Model via eMotivation has the potential to aid in the recruitment and retention of Black males in gifted and AP settings. Disciplinary actions (e.g. suspension, expulsions) have direct links to drop out and incarceration of many of America’s best and brightest students. This workshop features the wSIM and its ongoing work with school districts across the country. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 610/612

25.2 Considerations in Ethics: Ethical Lenses and Moral Reasoning in High School Students

Malik Henfield, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

Jerald Thomas, Aurora University, Aurora, IL; Lee Eysturlid, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy, Aurora, IL

Scholars in other fields directly and indirectly associated with education have taken great care to explore how Black males make sense of their identities – particularly masculinity

This presentation provides an overview of the Considerations in Ethics program, a year-long seminar for gifted high school juniors in a STEM school. CinE introduces students to historical/

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

contemporary models of ethics and allows students to apply their developing understanding to real-world contexts (e.g., conversations with medical ethicists). First, an overview of the experience is provided: readings, curriculum, structure, or the typical seminar. Second, findings are shared from multiple sources (program review, survey research, standardized measures of ethical development) to provide evidence of the efficacy of the program and of the characteristics students in CinE.

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gifted education must always define the needs of these students so clearly that they can connect to larger resources within each community. A panel of leaders from various schools for gifted students share definitions of giftedness and examples of educational needs that have been helpful communication tools in their communities and have provided ways to establish community connections.

Audience: Classroom Teachers 9-12, Counselors, Researchers

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators

Room: Exhibit Hall A

Room: 201

30.2 Gifted to the Core

Replicating the ATYP Model: Finding Success with a Regionally Cooperative Program for the Highly Gifted

Stephen Seedorf, Frontier Academy, Greeley, CO What can Core Knowledge charter schools do to enhance the already challenging curriculum for gifted learners? Limited funding in charter schools and a demanding curriculum to begin with makes developing a GT program a difficult endeavor. A teacher spent 4 years advocating for and developing a GT program, which has now been fully funded and is in the fifth year of implementation. Through this process, many unanticipated roadblocks were encountered. In an effort to help other teachers advocate for and develop their own programs, the experiences and pitfalls of this experience are shared. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators Room: Exhibit Hall A

Communicating the Needs of Gifted Students During Times of Limited Resources Nikki Myers, Academy for Advanced and Creative Learning, Colorado Springs, CO; Pat Garner, Broomfield Academy, Broomfield, CO; Cindy Wallace, Beacon Country Day School, Centennial, CO; Ellen Honeck, Institute for the Development of Gifted Education, Denver, CO

The need to define and advocate for gifted educational needs has always been present, but never more so when resources for all students are increasingly limited. Schools that specialize in

Kelly Schultz, Western Michigan University; Nan Janecke, Partners in Learning for Unlimited Success of Southwest Michigan, Kalamazoo, MI; Kathee McDonald, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; Mary Nell Baldwin, Kent Intermediate School District, Grand Rapids, MI; Michael Long, Newaygo County Regional Educational Service Agency, Fremont, MI; Lisa Frissora, Hope College, Holland, MI Throughout Michigan, programs based on the Academically Talented Youth Program model teach high school curriculum to gifted middle school students through fast-paced, vastly compacted courses. These regionally cooperative programs demonstrate how school districts, ISD’s, and universities can work together to provide challenging educational opportunities for their most gifted learners. A panel of program coordinators from around the state addresses issues such as: identification, curriculum, pacing, administration, funding, coordinating with local schools, social/emotional benefits, and quantifiable results. Discover how ATYP might serve as a model for gifted programming elsewhere in the country.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents Room: 107

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 1:30 PM – 2:30 PM STEM Comparisons of Student Performance and Satisfaction in Individually Paced and Teacher-Led Mathematics Courses Susan Corwith, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

Specialized gifted programs frequently offer individually paced mathematics courses where instructors serve as facilitators, but students work independently at a pace commensurate with their abilities. Individually paced instruction is methodologically sound, but many educators and parents doubt the effectiveness

of the approach. The presenter shares findings from a threeyear study that asked the questions: Do gifted students taking individually paced math courses perform differently from students taking teacher-led courses? Does the level of satisfaction with the learning experience differ? Through presentation and discussion, participants examine findings, to gain insights about ways to improve practice in schools and specialized programs. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Coordinators Room: 701

COMBINED SESSION

STEM 1:30 PM – 2:00 PM

Mathematical Modeling for Elementary and Middle School Students Daphne Duncan-Wiles, Ronald L. Carr, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Scott A. Chamberlin, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY

Saturday

Mathematics classrooms are filled with diverse learning needs so how can teachers help all students achieve? In this session, educators learn about and participate in an innovative, engaging, mathematics teaching strategy aimed at providing challenging mathematics for all children. Model-eliciting activities are complex, authentic, open-ended math problems that provide differentiated mathematics instruction. These client-based, data-driven problems encourage teamwork in developing generalizable solutions (mathematical models). MEAs draw on the mathematical knowledge of each student, encouraging various appropriate answers for each problem. Educators are given information and instruction, time for application and reflection, and materials for classroom use. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-8, Researchers

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2:00 PM – 2:30 PM

Designing an Airplane: Engineering for Elementary Students

Ronald L. Carr, Daphne Duncan-Wiles, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN Engineering design is a fun, effective way to integrate science content and engineering principles while challenging and engaging students. This hands-on session provides the opportunity to experience engineering design as participants work in teams to fulfill a client’s needs by designing, creating, and testing a product that meets given specifications. Engineering design challenges provide an exciting method of incorporating higher-level thinking, problem solving, and student autonomy into existing classroom curriculum. Ideas for using design challenges in an elementary classroom are shared. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators Room: 208

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Base Camp Sessions November 17, 2012 | 2:50 PM – 3:50 PM Early Leader Award Creating Leadership Opportunities within Gifted Education: Lessons from an Early Leader and a Dancing Guy

Alicia Cotabish, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR Creating leadership opportunities that contribute to the field of gifted education is not rocket science. Whether you wish to lead a program or organization at the district or state level, or want to be involved in service and leadership that benefits NAGC, there are pathways and opportunities for you! The 2012 NAGC Early Leader Award winner will share some strategies aimed at teachers, coordinators, and all who are willing to serve and be involved in gifted education leadership ?and you may learn a thing or two from a dancing guy. Audience: Classroom Teachers, Coordinators Room: 602

Adrienne E. Sauder, Alan L. Edmunds, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada; Jill Olthouse, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV Creative writing is one of the most powerful ways to communicate feelings and experiences; adults can learn much about gifted students’ day-to-day life in school by reading exemplary student creative works depicting learning in school. We present a hermeneutic analysis of 25 such writings, written by teens, that were selected for publication in the highly competitive national print publication Merlyn’s Pen. The four themes expressed in these writings include intellectualism, geekdom, competition, and detachment. We discuss how these works can serve as models for other student writers and can inform instructional decisions. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Counselors, Parents Room: 206

Reaching Right Brain Learners through Tableau

Valerie Davis, Brush School District, Brush, CO How do we reach right-brain learners? How do we motivate and challenge learners who are not interested in paper and pencil activities? How do we foster creative expression and make learning come alive for all students? The answer is Tableau, which can be used with all age groups, any subject matter and with very little preparation or materials needed. A tableau is a freeze frame or snapshot of a moment in time. Students visualize mental images to form unique interpretations and clarify thinking. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators

Computers & Technology When High-Tech Becomes High-Touch: Linking Gifted Students through Global Networks for Productive Projects Gillian I. Eriksson, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL

This presentation describes a global education project that links students in many countries. A collaborative project between Australia and the U.S.A., this project has brought students and teachers together for more than 25 years. Today, new technology formats are able to link international students as partners in learning both synchronously and asynchronously. This affords the development of connections for authentic learning for global education on a range of critical issues. Current projects are described including: Cyber Partners Across the World, teachersof-the-year as mentors across countries; Vietnam-FL cultural exchange project and; International Writer’s Week.

Saturday

Arts

Room: 710

School Stories: How Do Exemplary Teen Writers Portray Academics?

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents Room: 712

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Base Camp Sessions November 17, 2012 | 2:50 PM – 3:50 PM LOL...OMG! What You Need to Know about Online Reputation Management for You and Your Students

28.2 Gifted Children and Friendship: Finding Balance Between Research and Reality

The ease with which anyone can share digital content online requires not only the ability to be a discerning consumer of information but also a certain amount of savvy regarding reputation management, digital citizenship, and cyberbullying. This session examines the many ways that students are experiencing unintended (sometimes) negative consequences of their digital decisions. Using actual case studies, discuss strategies and best practices that can be used to clean up and maintain a positive online presence and become responsible digital citizens.

Do you know a gifted child who does not play well with others? Much research supports that gifted children do not struggle with friendship any more than other children, but reality often says otherwise. In this session explore gifted children and friendship, what research really says, and what that has to do with reality. Look at how play contributes to the discussion. While information and strategies are offered, group discussion is also an important part of this session. Come join the conversation about gifted children and friendship!

Stephanie K. Ferguson, Mary Baldwin College, Staunton, VA

Estee Aiken, University of Montana Western, Dillon, MT

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Counselors, Parents

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Room: 711

Room: Exhibit Hall A

Conceptual Foundations

Practical Conceptual Development in Our Fragmented-Porous-Contested Field

The Confluence of Historical, Contemporary, and Proposed Future Theories on Minorities in Gifted Programs Alexinia Baldwin, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Saturday

This presentation assists attendees in evaluating theories regarding intellect, giftedness, talent, and potential ability as they are reflected in the historical, contemporary, and prospective theories on these issues. An outline of these events, and how they have, and are coming together to create a viable construct of giftedness to ensure minority student inclusion in future programs for the gifted is advanced. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 6-8, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers Room: 105

Laurence J. Coleman, Coleman Consort, Toledo, OH; David Yun Dai, University of Albany, Albany, NY; Tracy L. Cross, Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; James Gallagher, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC After finding that gifted education is a fragmented, porous, and contested field, a group of scholars recently articulated some practical implications of the analysis. This session extends the discussion of practical implications while also connecting the analysis with two recent collaborative projects that revealed the prevalence of dogmatism in gifted education, creative studies, and other fields. There are both benefits and pitfalls embedded in the structure of gifted education. Recommendations for capitalizing on the benefits and avoiding the pitfalls include generating stronger connections between theorists, researchers, and practitioners and developing stronger support for evidencebased practices. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Researchers Room: 108

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Counseling & Guidance 8.2 Setting Motivation Traps with the Autonomous Learner Model for Underachieving Gifted Students in Grades 6-12

Connie L. Phelps, Amber Miller, Emporia State University, Emporia, KS Educators of underachieving gifted students in grades 6-12 find motivating them a real challenge due to their lack of interest in school. This session suggests motivation traps to encourage collaborative projects and engage students. Using a five-step process, motivation traps help students understand relevance in both the immediate school setting and future applications. By integrating motivation traps with the Autonomous Learner Model, the session advocates a student-centered curriculum as a critical ingredient to help students reach their potential in schools. This session helps attendees spark student interest and develop their understanding of intrinsic motivation.

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Grit, Mindset, and Neural Plasticity: Inquiry-Based Social-Emotional Learning

Daniel Sweeney, Jane Hesslein, Duffy Lord, Amy Colfelt, Seattle Country Day School, Seattle, WA The world that our students will inherit does not yet exist. How do we prepare a child for the unknown? Will high IQ be enough? We posed these questions to students at an independent K-8 school for the gifted. During this session, grapple with these same questions just as the students did and learn practical ways to approach these topics with your students. By integrating social-emotional and academic learning through literature, selfstudy, experience, and discussion, students form a foundation on which to grow, as well as to connect deeply with curriculum, themselves, and others. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-8, Counselors, Parents Room: 603

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Making Mentorships: Bridges to Hope

Room: Exhibit Hall A

Learn how National Honor Society high school students mentored gifted fifth graders from poverty in a Title I school through Socratic seminars, creating a win-win relationship for students and the school district. The mentorship builds relationships between students. Hopeful encouragement for fifth graders from poverty showing that hard work and scholastic performance creates opportunities that include scholarships for college is the message, while NHS students gain community service and develop a sense of pride and accomplishment. A gifted mentorship that doesn’t require expensive background checks for the school district is easy. You can do it too; learn how.

Lit from Within: Motivation and the Gifted Student

Lisa Van Gemert, American Mensa, Arlington, TX How does a teacher or parent create a climate conducive to developing intrinsic motivation on the part of learners? Learn the pitfalls of rewards and when it is appropriate to use them. Discover what the research says about motivation and what it means on a day-to-day basis in the classroom. Be inspired by the stories of individuals with strong internal drive and find out how these stories can inspire your children. In this session, learn what the research says and take away practical tips for helping gifted children achieve the seemingly impossible: becoming lit from within. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Mary Worner, Michael Chamberlin, Colorado Springs School District 11, Colorado Springs, CO

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 604

Room: 210/212

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Base Camp Sessions November 17, 2012 | 2:50 PM – 3:50 PM Counseling & Guidance 3.2 Locus of Control and Cheating among Gifted College Students

Anne N. Rinn, Ann Jackson, University of North Texas, Denton, TX; Janette Boazman, University of Dallas, Irving, TX Are gifted students with an external locus of control more likely to cheat than those with an internal locus of control? According to Rotter, locus of control refers to a person’s belief about how much control they have over what happens in their lives. Both

internal and external loci of control are examined to discover the relationship between locus of control and cheating behaviors among a sample of gifted college students from two universities. Several keys ways to transform an external locus of control into an internal locus of control are also presented. Audience: Classroom Teachers 9-12, Counselors, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

COMBINED SESSION

Creativity 2:50 PM – 3:20 PM

3:20 PM – 3:50 PM

Transcend Traditional Teaching Rules with Instructional Patterns for Developing Creative Thinkers

Facilitating Creativity for Teachers and Students with K-12 Professional Development

This session focuses on teaching creativity and creative problem solving. The presenters have created an evaluative checklist for frequency of creative teaching techniques and increasing teacher awareness for overtly teaching creative thinking. The use of the checklist and strategies for teaching and planning for fostering creativity are discussed. Attendees encounter and leave with strategies and activities that cultivate creative thinking and the creative process in content areas such as math and language arts.

The 21st century skills framework places an emphasis on creativity, collaboration, and problem solving, yet while many teachers report that creativity is important for learners in the 21st century classroom, they also state “I am not creative” and “There is no time to add creativity in the class day.” This session presents a professional development model that has been implemented with teachers in K-12 settings to increase their understanding and valuing of creativity along with strategies to foster, nurture, and integrate creative teaching and learning across the curriculum in K-12 classrooms. A link to a substantial online handout is provided.

Betty K. Wood, Bronwyn MacFarlane, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR

Saturday

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents

Susan Daniels, California State University, San Bernardino, CA

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers Room: 708

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Poster Session

Creativity Creative Thinking for the Gifted and Talented Maureen Breeze, LifeBound, Denver, CO

Daniel Pink, author of A Whole New Mind, describes the need for students to develop creative-thinking skills as we shift from the Information Age driven by logical and linear thinking to the Conceptual Age fueled by inventive, big-picture thinking. In this session, educators learn how to promote creativity and innovation as a way to differentiate instruction, engage students in deeper-level thinking, and apply problem-solving strategies to real-world issues. Examples of interactive lessons and kinesthetic activities are demonstrated, giving teachers tangible tools for helping students ignite their imaginations, brainstorm solutions, and collaborate on problem-solving teams. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors Room: 208

Creativity by Design: A STEM Approach Eric L. Mann, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Creativity exists in all fields, but the nature and manifestations differ based on the values and objectives within the discipline. While artists, authors, and musicians seek to invoke an aesthetic or emotional response, STEM disciplines focused on creating solutions to problems – a functional view of creativity, yet creativity is often limited in K-12 classrooms where students mimic established algorithms to construct, as opposed to create, solutions to known problems. Participants leave the session with a deeper understanding of how to infuse and assess creativity in learning activities designed to develop talent in the STEM discipline.

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on journaling, introduces multiple formats of journaling and journals, explores creative prompts, highlights content connections, and discusses issues related to management and privacy. Discover visual journals, writers’ sketchbooks, and inspiration and quotation journals. Participants explore journaling as an effective teaching tool that encompasses a wide range of creative exploration, content based skills, habits of mind, self-reflection, and emotional awareness. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators Room: 205

Curriculum Studies Effective Strategies to Motivate and Challenge Gifted Spanish-Speaking Students in the Regular Classroom

Gina M. Estrada Danley, Santa Maria-Bonita School District, Nipomo, CA; Joan Smutny, National-Louis University, Evanston, IL Seeking ideas for motivating and challenging gifted Spanishspeaking students? Explore how to adjust traditional teaching strategies and learn about innovative methods that are successful with this population, while still engaging all gifted learners. Bring your own practices for differentiating the curriculum and learn how, with minor adjustment, catering to students who are learning English as a second language can be made simple. Presenters also focus on ways to lead Spanish-speaking parents to play an integral role in the growth of their gifted children. Even educators who do not speak Spanish can effectively bring these parents on board.

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Room: 201

Room: 706

Saturday

Recorded Session

Journals Unwrapped: The Hidden Power of Journaling

Shannon B. Jones, Ricks Center for Gifted Children, Denver, CO

Check out Base Camp Sessions p. xxiv

Spanning time and cultures, journals have contributed to our understanding of the human condition and provided individuals with a unique opportunity to explore their emotions, creativity, understandings, and experiences. This session reviews literature

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Base Camp Sessions November 17, 2012 | 2:50 PM – 3:50 PM Four-Level Literature for Gifted Children: A Differentiated Strategy

Michael Clay Thompson, Royal Fireworks Press, Durham, NC A strong literature program not only exposes students to literature in itself, it also reinforces vocabulary, grammar, and writing instruction. It is one of the reasons that those elements are taught. Literature curricula for gifted children often fall short; however, because the texts are of insufficient quality and quantity. Furthermore, novels are often taught as isolated units, unconnected with other titles, and the evaluation methods applied to the literature are often convergent, focusing on right answers to tedious and conventional questions. This presentation provides a strategy for cumulative literature with a wide range of high-level evaluation.

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers Room: 705

Early Childhood 18.2 T eaching with Type: Applying Personality Type Theory in the Classroom

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Parents

Charlene Brekka Brock, Linda Pearlman, Charlene Brock Consulting, Centennial, CO

Room: 610/612

Participants learn about the personality preferences identified and described by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and the Murphy-Meisgeier Type Indicator for Children. By using this trusted system of understanding and describing behavior, discuss how the GT community compares to the general population. Specific strategies are described that have been successfully implemented in schools to increase student engagement in learning as well as student comfort level within the classroom. The lens of psychological type theory is used to explore the different ways students express their creativity.

Mindset in the Classroom: Using Dweck’s Work to Plan Curriculum that Reinforces Effort and Reflection in the Classroom

Jennifer G. Beasley, University of Arkansas, Springdale, AR; Marla Read Capper, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

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promote the growth mindset. Time is provided for participants to apply the principles learned while mapping out their own curricular ideas. Finally, presenters provide a list of classroom practices and behaviors that support a mindset for growth.

Many high-achieving students are preoccupied with grades. How do we keep them focused on the learning process? Due to their label, gifted students are susceptible to behaviors that can lead to underachievement such as opting out and avoiding challenges. What messages are we sending our students about intelligence and achievement? In this session, presenters share sample lessons that

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Counselors, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

Above all challenge yourself. You may well surprise yourself at what strengths you have, what you can accomplish. — Cecile M.Springer National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

NAGC Base Camp

Global Awareness

Middle Grades

10.4 How Can I Change My World?

What’s New In Young Adult Literature: 2012 Edition

Jennifer Lemoine, Red Hawk Ridge, Parker, CO

How can I change my world today? This is the question I asked a group of 20, fourth graders that opened the doors to a world of possibility. Together, we explored ways we could help our community and then chose and implemented a project. During this session, meet some of the students involved in the project and learn the process we created together to build social capital within our community. You will have the chance to ask questions and learn about our successes and our roadblocks along the way.

NCSSSMST

Bob Seney, Mississippi University for Women, Columbus, MS

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators, Counselors

Young Adult Literature, a high powered vehicle for Educating with Altitude, aids gifted students to deal with a world not equipped to deal with them. YA Lit provides the resource to “hook” gifted learners into positive reading experiences. It is imperative to engage gifted students in creative reading. This session builds a rationale for using YA Lit with gifted learners and reviews new novels for middle and high school students. The “Book List” is provided. What’s New, a Middle Grades tradition, helps us climb the slopes of Young Adult Literature as we talk and share new books.

Room: Exhibit Hall A

Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-12, Parents

Skyping with Kyrgyzstan: Opportunities in Global Education for Student Involvement and Professional Development

Room: 101

Nicholas Kirschman, Webster Groves High School; Christine N. Nobbe, Webster University, St. Louis, MO Interested in connecting gifted students with students internationally through technology? Interested in grants both for students and educators to travel to foreign countries? This presentation covers three developments in international education for gifted students and their educators. Look at secure social networks sponsored by the U.S. State Department, which connects American students with students across the world; discover international educational opportunities for high school students to study foreign cultures and languages; and discuss international education opportunities for educators, both overseas and in your own hometown. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents Room: 204

15.4 M  atters of Principle: Middle School Principals in Gifted Education

Julie Lenner McDonald, Sandusky City Schools, Sandusky, OH; Laila Sanguras, Coppell ISD, Coppell, TX Middle school principals are charged with cultivating a learning environment that promotes equity and excellence for all their students. Teachers of the gifted, in collaboration with districtlevel administrators, can be an indispensable support network for principals to carry out this mission for gifted learners. This session offers participants the opportunity to gain deeper understanding of the role middle school principals play in gifted education from the teacher and district administrator’s perspective. Various scenarios and strategies for developing the principal’s knowledge of gifted and sustaining support for programs and services are shared.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Consultants, Coordinators Room: Exhibit Hall A

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Base Camp Sessions November 17, 2012 | 2:50 PM – 3:50 PM Parent & Community Parental Involvement in Online Education for Gifted Students — What Works

Katharine Thurlow, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

Many gifted students benefit from taking challenging online courses tailored to their special needs. Yet, parents are often unsure what is expected of them once their child is engaged in an online program and are also uncertain which online alternative is the best fit for their gifted child. This presentation explores the topic of parental involvement in online learning; the focus is on specific factors in curriculum design, instructor communication, and parental involvement that result in successful student outcomes in both grades and satisfaction. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-8, Parents Room: 107

Using a Parent Advisory Council to Create Guardians of the Gifted

Jason Scott McIntosh, Purdue University, Lafayette, IN Parent support can make or break a gifted program. One way to foster positive relationships with parents and reduce the overall workload of the program coordinator is to form a gifted program parent advisory council. Guidelines and principles for creating such an entity are presented including discussions on creating operational norms, choosing members of the council, generating a list of appropriate tasks to undertake, and knowing when it is time to disband. Wonderful things can happen when you work as a team. Come learn how to do it effectively! Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents Room: 605

Resilient, Calm, and Deeply Engaged: 27 Strategies to Promote Optimal WellBeing in Our Brilliant, Intense, and Asynchronous Kids

Professional Development

In this highly interactive and practical session parents, teacher and mental health practitioners learn 27 field-tested strategies designed specifically to promote healthy and productive gifted kids. Topics include: dealing with stress/anxiety; finding balance and joy in daily life; managing multiple gifts and interests; friendships; parents as effective multi-level mediators; understanding food, nutrition, exercise, and mind-body care; understanding and dealing optimally with perfectionism, intensity, willfulness and sensitivity; and managing screen time. Maximize the inner (often idiosyncratic) workings of the gifted child and family using these sure-fire strategies designed by a veteran therapist, researcher, and parent.

In this professional development session, participants learn how performance assessments can offer insightful analysis of student learning not readily available in instruments with ceiling effects, such as standardized tests. Based on data from a Javits grant national research project, participants have an opportunity to see how performance assessments can indicate learning beyond the fixed measures reflecting learning beyond objectives and to engage in formative evaluation of curriculum based on learner outcomes in order to develop more challenging opportunities for students.

P. Susan Jackson, Daimon Institute for the Highly Gifted, Surrey, BC, Canada

Saturday

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents

Beyond The Measure: An In-Depth Look into Performance Assessment Marguerite C. Brunner, Sunhee Park, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators Room: 601

Room: 104

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Recorded Session

Poster Session

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COMBINED SESSION

Research & Evaluation 3:20 PM – 3:50 PM

Are Intelligent Students More Conscientious Than Their Peers?

Rosario Bermejo, Mercedes Ferrando, Murcia University, Murcia, Spain This Work aims to study the relationship between personality trait conscientiousness and intelligence. 644 students (M = 13.90, DT = 1.28) participated in this study. DAT-5 and BFQ-NA are used to measure intelligence and conscientiousness. Two factors of conscientiousness are identified: one related to perseverance and other related to adherence to rules. Results show that perseverance correlates positively with the intelligence variables, whereas, adherent to rules correlates negatively. Adherence to rules does predict intelligence better than perseverance does. Also differences in adhesion to rules were found, favoring higher intelligent students. Audience: Classroom Teachers 9-12, Counselors, Researchers

Developing Social Capital in Young People through Different Types of Volunteer Experiences: An Empirical Study

Michelle Sands, North Salem Central School District; Nancy N. Heilbronner, Western Connecticut State University, Danbury, CT A mixed-methods study grounded in Renzulli’s Houndstooth Intervention Theory examined the impact of different types of volunteer experiences on the six co-cognitive factors (optimism, courage, romance with a topic/discipline, sensitivity to human concerns, physical/mental energy, and vision/sense of destiny) associated with the development of social capital in high school students. Results indicated that volunteer experiences, which encourage students’ selection of and active involvement with community-based projects, may positively impact physical/mental energy. Also, allowing students face-to-face time with dissimilar volunteer recipients may positively impact sensitivity to others. Implications for educators and researchers are discussed. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Researchers Room: 709

And as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people the permission to do the same.

Saturday

2:50 PM – 3:20 PM

— Nelson Mandela

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Base Camp Sessions November 17, 2012 | 2:50 PM – 3:50 PM Research & Evaluation 33.2 Measurement Invariance in a Test of Intelligence: Identifying Gifted Students from Poverty

Maria Lazo, Tammy Ramos, Fatih Kaya, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX Why do diverse students tend to score lower on standardized tests of intelligence than White students? Some researchers claim that intelligence tests are biased against culturally diverse

students because they contain content and language that is more familiar to White students. This session targets researchers, administrators, and coordinators who are interested in learning about the identification of gifted students from poverty. Attendees learn to identify appropriate tests of reliability to ensure a sound measure of intelligence for their identification needs. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

COMBINED SESSION

Research & Evaluation 2:50 PM – 3:20 PM

What Matters in Gifted Classrooms?

Sarah Oh, Carolyn Callahan, Amy Azano, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

Saturday

Class size and instructional time have been studied as important factors influencing student achievement in general education classrooms; however, researchers have reached different conclusions. Therefore, little is known about the influence of class size and instructional time on student achievement in gifted education. Embedded in a larger curriculum intervention with a randomized experimental design, the current study investigates the influence of instructional time and class size on student achievement beyond students’ prior achievement and treatment effect using multilevel analyses. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Coordinators, Researchers

3:20 PM – 3:50 PM

Factors Influencing Pre-Service Teachers’ Instructional Practices with Gifted Students

Susan Johnsen, Krys Goree, Baylor University, Waco, TX The presenters describe results from a qualitative study examining the factors that contributed to eight pre-service teachers’ differentiation of instruction for gifted students. Factors considered were organized around four main themes: campus factors (student demographics, social support, supervision, materials, mentoring, and curriculum), individual characteristics (attitudes and beliefs, cognitive ability, and social support), professional standards (knowledge, skills, and dispositions), and university factors (seminars/courses, social support, supervision, collaboration, and curriculum). Four factors that emerged as having the greatest influence were interns’ beliefs, characteristics of mentor teachers, characteristics of supervisors, and coursework during their senior year. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers Room: 707

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Recorded Session

Poster Session

13.2 Revisiting the Big-Fish-Little-PondEffect in Academically Talented Students

Frank C. Worrell, Adena Young, University of California, Berkeley, CA In this study, we compared gifted students’ academic selfconcepts and ability self-ratings in relation to their home schools and a selective summer program, and we examined differences in GPA, ability rating, and ASC between prospective returning and non-returning students. Findings supported the presence of the Big-Fish-Little-Pond-Effect, but differences were

NAGC Base Camp

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substantially greater for ability ratings than for ASC. Moreover, there were no meaningful differences on any of the variables between students who indicated that they would return and those who indicated that they would not return, suggesting that the BFLPE may not have an impact on some student behavior. Audience: Counselors, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

COMBINED SESSION

Research & Evaluation 2:50 PM – 3:20 PM

3:20 PM – 3:50 PM

Angie L. Miller, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN; Kristie Speirs Neumeister, Virginia Burney, Ball State University, Muncie, IN The current study explores the potential relationships among perceived parenting style, conscientiousness and neuroticism, perfectionism, and achievement goal orientation in a high ability and high-achieving young-adult population. Using data from honors college students at a Midwestern university, a path model suggests that neuroticism and conscientiousness have positive effects on self-oriented perfectionism, which in turn has a positive effect on performance goal orientation; however, authoritarian parenting style, uninvolved parenting style, and socially prescribed perfectionism did not have significant effects in the model. Potential reasons for these findings, along with implications for educational programming and interventions, are discussed.

Dealing with Academic Stress: Perspectives of Successful and Struggling IB and AP Students

Elizabeth Shaunessy, Shannon Suldo, Robert Dedrick, Rachel Roth, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL Academic stress is commonly experienced by students in IB and AP programs, though research about the nature of these stressors and the coping strategies students employ has been limited. Based on findings from interviews with 31 thriving and struggling AP and IB students, this presentation addresses the critical role students attribute to work ethic, valuation of time and task management, and the pressures students place on themselves regarding extra-curricular activities and social experiences. Representative statements from student interviews as well as connections to relevant research of high-achieving students are provided.

Saturday

The Influence of Personality, Parenting Styles, and Perfectionism on Performance Goals in High-Ability Students

Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-12, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers Room: 102

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/ Base Camp Sessions November 17, 2012 | 2:50 PM – 3:50 PM Research & Evaluation It’s all about the Audience: Alternative Methods for Sharing Research and Evaluation Findings with Non-Research Audiences Kristina Ayers Paul, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Researchers in gifted education often find themselves in front of non-research crowds, whether reporting the results of a gifted program evaluation to a school board or presenting to the local parent group. At times like these, it is important to think

outside of the APA-box and carefully consider the best methods for providing information in ways that will speak clearly to the audience. In this session, explore data-visualization tools and non-traditional reporting formats for providing research and evaluation findings in ways that are engaging, meaningful, and accessible for audiences of all types. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers Room: 608

COMBINED SESSION

Research & Evaluation 2:50 PM – 3:20 PM

The Cullowhee Experience: A Follow-Up Study of a Summer Program for Highly Gifted Students Lisa Bloom, Sharon Dole, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC

Saturday

The Cullowhee Experience was a renowned summer residential program for highly gifted students. Data were collected from surveys, interviews, and artifacts to determine what long-term impact the program had on participants. One of the most interesting results is that the camp experience fulfilled the social and emotional needs of the highly gifted participants and aided in identity formation. For some participants, the Cullowhee Experience was lifechanging; for instance, participants formed bonds that have lasted well into adulthood. Implications of the research for classroom practice are discussed. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

3:20 PM – 3:50 PM

Using Summer Growth Patterns in Reading to Assess the Impact of Schools on Gifted and High-Achieving Students

Karen E. Rambo-Hernandez, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO; D. Betsy McCoach, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT We compared gifted and average students’ growth in reading (cohort of 3rd grade students from 2000 schools) over 3.5 years. Contrasting summer and school year growth rates, we examined how schools change gifted and average students’ trajectories. We found that gifted students showed little change in their trajectory from school-year to summer, and the school-year rate for gifted students was slower than average students. By contrast, average students grew dramatically during the school year and experienced no growth in the summer. These findings support the use of alternative educational methods for gifted, such as acceleration and within-class ability grouping. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 704

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Poster Session

Special Populations Desegregating Gifted Education: Recruitment and Retention of Black Students Donna Y. Ford, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN

The under-representation of Black students in gifted education is an albatross that plagues our field. Some schools and districts are doing better at recruiting Black and other under-represented students in gifted education; however, more attention and effort must focus on retention. The two are not mutually exclusive. Correcting under-representation is next to impossible without considering and addressing recruitment and retention issues and barriers. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

NAGC Base Camp

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Using the New Wechsler Nonverbal Scale of Ability for Identification of Gifted Children Jack A. Naglieri, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA

The value of nonverbal tests of general ability has been recognized for some time, but recently this approach has gained popularity because of the growing concern about fair assessment of diverse populations. The Wechsler Nonverbal Scale of Ability is described in detail. Particular attention is given to the unique method of administration that includes pictorial directions and opportunities for examiner-examinee interaction. The presentation includes description of subtests and psychometric characteristics and its utility for identification of gifted children, particularly gifted children from culturally and linguistically diverse populations.

Room: 202

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors

20.4 High Flying Vocabulary for All

Room: 607

Linor Thomas, Quitman Public School, Quitman, AR; Mary Kathryn Stein, Arkansas Department of Education, Little Rock, AR Students from impoverished backgrounds often come to kindergarten with a significantly smaller vocabulary than their middle class classmates. Learners of English as a second or even third or fourth language also need additional support to master both the academic and everyday words needed to promote success. What are the best practices for accelerating vocabulary development in these populations? Come learn classroom strategies including technology that can help your students master high flying vocabulary. Yes, there’s an app for that! Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

Opening Traditional Gifted Programs to High-Potential Students from Low-Income Families

Rachelle Miller, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Nielsen Pereira, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY Research shows that students from low-income families experience various obstacles that limit their participation in enrichment opportunities. What would happen if schools used non-traditional measures, such as teacher rating scales, to widen the pool and chose to enrich these students through traditional gifted programs? The purpose of this session is to describe the perceptions of high-potential students from low-income families who received scholarships and participated in an out-of-school enrichment program that offered advanced content and a stimulating learning environment. Implications of the students’ perceptions and the strategies used to identify and provide services to these students are discussed.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: 207

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Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions November 17, 2012 | 2:50 PM – 3:50 PM Stealth Dyslexia: Disability of Hidden Talent? Rosina M. Gallagher, Illinois Association for Gifted Children, Chicago, IL

Dyslexia was first recognized in the late 1890s as a reading disorder indicative of low intellectual ability. Increased research, personal stories, and legislation now affirm dyslexia is a hidden condition that can be common among gifted children. Stealth dyslexia, a term coined by researchers Brock and Fernette Eide, captures the subtle condition that may be responsible for underperformance in gifted learners. This session reviews dyslexia, causes and misconceptions, describes basic presentations that may occur singly or in combination, discusses predictors of early reading difficulties, and explores ways to work with gifted children who manifest dyslexia-related symptoms. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents Room: 703

Special Schools & Programs 25.4 Gifted Programming: Building a Dynamic Continuum of Services with Minimal Funds

Karen Lynnette Brown, Dina Brulles, Paradise Valley USD, Phoenix, AZ

Saturday

Learn how one school district provides a continuum of services for a diverse, burgeoning gifted population with minimal funds. Paradise Valley USD has designed, implemented, and documented success of a continuum of services that addresses the learning needs of all gifted students, including those who almost qualify, highly/profoundly, 2e, ELL/CLD, and preschool and high school students. PVUSD’s thriving programs include: cluster grouping, honors, enrichment, self-contained, digital learning experiences, IB, AP, nonverbal core, pre-engineering and fine arts academies, STEM, and more. PVUSD serves nearly 5000 gifted students, drawing from neighboring districts, charters, privates, and home-schooled populations. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents Room: Exhibit Hall A

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30.4 D  eveloping a High Quality Summer Enrichment Program for Gifted Children Jiaxi Wu, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

What elements constitute a quality summer commuter program for elementary students? Many classes or integrated curricula; full-day or half-day schedules; school or university settings? This session provides some answers from a coordinator’s perspective. Although most summer commuter camps last only a few weeks, preparation occurs throughout the year, requiring careful planning and site selection. In this session, the presenter discusses Super Summer, a university-run day camp held at a local elementary school. Developing and selecting curriculum; the benefits and pitfalls of choosing different locations; and program lengths are discussed and compared, together with staff-hiring procedures, and on-site coordination. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers Room: Exhibit Hall A

Changing “Altitudes”: Talented and Gifted for All

Karen Smits, Ashley Bagwell, West Side Elementary, Marietta, GA Learn about a school where all students are provided opportunities to tap into their special gifts and talents through GT classes. This program provides K-5 students a global, academic program designed to uncover and develop the unique talents and gifts of all students. The focus of this program is on developing the various aptitudes and potentials for advanced learning and creative productivity that exist in all student populations. Students take four courses a year in four clusters: the arts, math/technology, science/ environment, and media/culture. Each course culminates in student created projects and presentations. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5 Room: 106

Brain Energizers

Elizabeth Daniels, Eileen Rutter, University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK Motor development is an important aspect of neural processing, the development of thinking and reasoning skills. Giving children regular opportunities to engage in purposeful movement helps on many levels. Come learn about and practice a collection of fitness

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


Poster Session

NAGC Base Camp

NCSSSMST

and health lifestyle activities that are developmentally appropriate and provide success for all students. Learn 5 minute brain energizers for the classroom, paper plate dancing, and many more.

Threading Universal Concepts through the Fabric of Secondary Mathematics

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5

In order to discover the breadth, depth, and complexity of secondary mathematics, students must be able to recognize the continuity between the seemingly discrete subject areas within the discipline. The teaching of mathematics using universal concepts or organizing principles function as the means by which cohesion between the branches of mathematics including algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and calculus is generated. This presentation models the design of curriculum centered around universal concepts and highlights how educators can create learning opportunities for their students to construct these inextricable and vital connections within and across the discipline of mathematics.

Room: 203

Using an Honor System to Create an Academic Community

Stuart Gluck, Andrew Moss, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD Why should you implement an honor system? Gifted students need to understand the rationale behind expectations and play an active role in shaping them. Instead of simply dictating rules of conduct, an honor system is a framework and an opportunity for students and educators to collaboratively define a safe learning environment. Within this safe environment, students thrive as they work more cohesively and motivate themselves and one another. By reviewing various honor systems and applying the Theory of Collective Efficacy to education, participants develop an understanding of how to implement an effective honor system.

Jared DuPree, University of Southern California, Carson, CA

Audience: Classroom Teachers 9-12 Room: 701

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Parents Room: 103

STEM How Do We Attract Gifted Girls to STEM? Razel Solow, Hunter College, New York, NY

Despite the many advances of gifted girls in all academic areas over the past 20 years, too few young women enter and stay in STEM professions. Why do we still have so much trouble attracting these bright and capable females into STEM college majors? When they do major in science, math, engineering, or technology, why can’t we keep them in their careers? Current research from the gifted education and STEM fields helps answer these questions and illuminates ways for teachers, coordinators, and parents to stimulate and nurture gifted girls’ scientific interests from elementary school through college.

Colorado Night at the Museum The Colorado Association for Gifted and Talented invite you to the brand-new, state-ofthe-art History Colorado Center. The museum’s hands-on and high-tech exhibits take you on an inspirational journey that will ignite your imagination and touch your heart. Visit with convention attendees at Denver’s newest museum and be part of the story! Buses begin departing from the Colorado Convention Center Welton Street Entrance at 5:30 PM.

Saturday

Recorded Session

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: 606

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E. Paul Torrance Creativity Lecture November 17, 2012 | 4:10 PM – 5:30 PM CC Four Seasons Ballroom

Creativity is a Decision Robert Sternberg

What does it take to unlock creativity in children and adults? What happens if we lack creative vision? Is it really just as simple as deciding to be creative? Robert Sternberg will take the audience on a journey through the concept of creativity and the roles that educators play in helping their students choose to be creative in the classroom and beyond. Sharing examples from business, education, politics, and the arts, Sternberg reveals the intuitive method the creative person employs to predict early on which ideas and products will gain popularity and how that person promotes his or her ideas effectively despite initial resistance. You’ll learn how the creative person typically finds ways to subvert institutions that seek to squelch creativity in order to promote their ideas.

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Psychologist. Psychometrician. Author. Professor and Provost. Above all, Robert Sternberg is a researcher who has greatly contributed to the field’s current conceptualization of intelligence. In addition to his Triarchic Theory of Intelligence, Sternberg is known for several influential theories related to creativity, wisdom, and thinking styles. Recognized by numerous academic organizations including NAGC, Sternberg’s research has led to innovations in instruction that enhance children’s performance by building on their learning strengths. Honored with the E. Paul Torrance Award by the NAGC Creativity Network in 2006 and the NAGC Distinguished Scholar Award in 1985, Sternberg serves as Regents Professor of Psychology and Education and Provost at Oklahoma State University.

NAGC appreciates the continued support of Scholastic Testing Service for the E. Paul Torrance Creativity Lecture Series.

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Sunday Highlights November 18, 2012

It’s Super Sunday! Our final day in Denver begins at the Hyatt Regency with two sets of “Super Sessions.” NAGC Network leaders have culled some of the most current topics and provocative content for these morning sessions.

Sunday Schedule at a Glance All Events On Sunday At The Hyatt Regency 7:30 AM – 12:00 PM

9:15 AM – 10:15 AM

Information Desk

Network Super Sessions

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

“Neurodiversity: Your Compass to a Changing World” with Jonathan Mooney

Colonial ballroom

Network Super Sessions

10:30 AM – 12:00 PM

Hyatt Regency Centennial Ballroom

10:30 AM – 12:00 PM Closing General Session

Jonathan Mooney

Welcome to a new world, where the good kid doesn’t sit still. A world where some of the smartest kids in the class don’t read well or don’t read at all. A world where the popular kids don’t make eye contact, don’t shake hands, and definitely don’t back slap. In this world, these kids enjoy academic success and personal fulfillment at places like the MIT Media Lab and MET High School in Providence, Rhode Island, one of the top charter schools in the country. Then, they go on to run companies in Silicon Valley, New York and Tokyo.

Sunday

Neurodiversity: Your Compass to a Changing World

Unlike ever before, this century proves their cognitive differences are more than “quirks”—they are the groundwork for innovative ideas and skills to solve problems most of us wouldn’t anticipate. Think Google. Jet Blue. Apple. Renowned writer, neuro-diversity activist and author Jonathan Mooney vividly, humorously and passionately brings to life this wonderful world of neuro-diversity: the research behind it, the people who live in it, and the lessons it has for all of us who care about the future of education. Explaining the latest theories, Jonathan helps teachers and parents redefine what it is for students in the 21st century to think and to learn and to be successful. He provides concrete examples of how to prepare students and implement frameworks that best support their academic and professional pursuits.

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Network Super Sessions November 18, 2012 | 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM Arts Teaching Problem Solving with Art

Kathy Henderson, Center for Creative Learning, Sarasota, FL The visual arts are a problem-solving process from beginning to end, so what better way to teach problem solving (while having fun in the process) than to use art as a teaching tool? A story, which includes a question, introduces the artistic problem. Vegetables are used as the inspiration for student art

work, starting with generating ideas. Ideas are evaluated with the Creative Problem Solving CARTS model for criteria. Action plans are also discussed, and ideas for teaching problem solving lessons with art appreciation are shared. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators, Parents Room: Mineral B

Creativity Creativity Extravaganza in Centennial Ballroom C o Powerful Strategies to Enhance the Creativity of Gifted and Highly Capable Students

o Beyond Multiple Choice: Increasing Creativity During an Era of Cutbacks

This workshop explores numerous proven ways to reach gifted learners in uniquely challenging and creative ways. The objective is to have participants leave with new strategies and specific ideas to help students become better creative and critical thinkers. A variety of successful teaching techniques are shared as well as numerous thinking and writing strategies.

In today’s economic climate, one of the first changes that schools make is to cut everything that isn’t tied to a test score. With fewer minutes devoted to anything that isn’t being tested, teachers often find it impossible to imagine where they’d put creativity in such a setting. This session enables participants to think past these barriers to create possibilities for themselves, places to find time, and methods for instilling enthusiasm in their learners. A variety of strategies for infusing creativity into classes without risking test scores is shared.

Nathan Levy, Nathan Levy Books, Monroe Township, NJ

Sunday

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

o VanGogh, da Vinci, Galileo, and ME!

Angela R. Herbel, Houston County Schools, Warner Robins, GA Painters, musicians, poets, and inventors alike have looked to the heavens for creative inspiration. Explore a variety of techniques for developing the creative talents of students using the sky above as muse. Investigate elements of creativity such as risk taking, sensitivity to aesthetic elements, and curiosity with hands-on activities to take back to your classroom. Come and see how a starry night or the man in the moonlight spark your students’ enthusiasm to create. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Coordinators

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Anne Brandt, Tina M. Spomer, Mary Elizabeth Daily, Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln, NE

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators

o Using Think Tanks to Spur Creative Thinking

Rick Shade, Jefferson County Schools; Patti Shade, Denver Public Schools, Denver, CO Are you looking for a versatile tool that offers an interesting and fun way to learn for every gifted student in every subject area? This session introduces the four Elements of Creativity as the basic instructional skills for understanding creativity. To take these Elements to the next level, explore and practice the following Think Tanks: Creativity, Content,

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


What Do You Get When You Cross an iPad with a Teacher of Talented Students?

Kristina Ayers Paul, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Brian C. Housand, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC; Ginger Lewman, ESSDACK, Hutchinson, KS; Janine M. Firmender, St. Joseph’s University, Philadelphia, PA iPads are becoming increasingly more common in the classroom. As with the advent of any new technology, it is easy to get caught

Creative Writing, Sensory, No Problem, Innovation, and Alpha. See how these tools, in a supportive and challenging environment, lead to “big leaps” in creative-thinking abilities for all students in all content areas. Audience: Administrators, Advocates / Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors

o Digging Deeper: Examining the Mysteries of Harris Burdick Kelley Simpson, Rachel Kelly, Ricks Center for Gifted Children, Denver, CO

For decades, school children and famous authors alike have pondered the question, “Who is Harris Burdick?” Chris Van Allsburg first introduced the world to Harris Burdick with the The Mysteries of Harris Burdick, a set of mysterious illustrations, and the captions that accompany them. The original illustrations spark a natural curiosity within the gifted mind. During this session, samples of how gifted learners were able to dig deep with their curiosity, imagination, and creativity are shared. The high interest, inter-disciplinary unit appeals to the artist, the scientist, the epicurean, the detective, and the writer in everyone.

up in the novelty of iPads in the classroom and lose sight of the real goal, which is to facilitate learning and progress toward instructional goals. In this session, four active members of the Computers & Technology Network demonstrate a variety of iPad apps that can be used to facilitate gifted education pedagogy. Presenters demonstrate apps that enhance critical thinking, creative thinking, problem-based learning, and assessment. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators Room: Mineral F

o Finding by Folding: Foldables for Researching and Analyzing

Evalee Parker, Dinah Zike Academy, San Antonio, TX Effective research methods and strategies are shared with interactive and hands-on techniques using Foldables. For gifted students to be well-versed in thinking and learning we need to inspire and give them practical tools. This session demonstrates Foldables as these tools and encourages the differentiation needed for exploration and laying a foundation for inquiry. Come learn, fold, and increase research and inquiry through 3-D graphic organizers. Audience: Administrators, Advocates / Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers Room: Centennial Ballroom C

Sunday

Computers & Technology

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors

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Network Super Sessions November 18, 2012 | 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM Conceptual Foundations How Good Gifts Can Promote Good Works: The Role of Gifted Education in the Production of Social Capital Joseph S. Renzulli, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Nancy N. Heilbronner, Western Connecticut State University, Danbury, CT; Elizabeth A. Fogarty, Eastern Carolina University, Greenville, NC; Michelle Sands, North Salem Central School District, Danbury, CT

We have recently witnessed astonishing examples that suggest a global decline in social capital, or the norms that shape our behaviors towards each other. For example, unscrupulous Wall Street analysts arguably set in motion the greatest global worldwide economic collapse of our times. This alarming development occurred despite a plethora of programs designed to instill ethical behavior in young people. This panel will discuss factors that promote students’ ethical behavior and how it may be developed through Houndstooth Intervention Theory (HIT), which builds on the work of Renzulli. Educational and research implications will be discussed. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: Centennial Ballroom A

Sunday

Joint Session Counseling & Guidance and Research & Evaluation Research on the Social, Emotional, and Psychological Characteristics of Gifted Populations

Jean Sunde Peterson, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Maureen Neihart, National Institute of Education, Singapore; Tracy L. Cross, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Paula OlszewskiKubilius, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; P. Susan Jackson, Daimon Institute for the Highly Gifted, Surrey, BC, Canada A panel of distinguished speakers discusses the topics of social, emotional, and psychological research. They address such questions as: What does the empirical literature say about social, emotional, and psychological characteristics of gifted children? What is fact, and what is fiction? Are these inherent in being gifted or a result of

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environment and the interaction between individual and context? The session ends with an opportunity for the audience to engage the speakers on the topic. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-8, Counselors, Parents Room: Capitol Ballroom 3

Curriculum Studies The Effects of Transfer from a Differentiated Curriculum Jessica Manzone, Sandra N. Kaplan, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

The results of a research study of elementary gifted students of diversity illustrates that transfer has been more assumed than explicitly taught. Data indicates that the initial presentation of differentiated skills or subject matter taught in one area anchors the learning in that area. Gifted students, when asked to perform a skill or discuss content that previously has been taught, often state, “I don’t know how.” The issues of discipline-related context, instructional strategies, and reliance on personal attitude are demonstrated to illustrate how transfer can and should be taught as an integral feature of a differentiated curriculum. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5, Coordinators Room: Mineral G

Early Childhood Early Childhood Science: Relevant, Comprehensive, and Creative

Amy Jacobs, College of Lake County, Skokie, IL; Kathryn Haydon, Ignite Creative Learning Studio, Ojai, CA Developing and implementing a rigorous, hands-on science program can challenge even the most experienced educator. Designing such activities for gifted, young students proves an additional challenge. In this session, learn how to use essential questions to help guide your planning. View examples of tiered learning practices that allow for deeper exploration of complex scientific ideas and explore creative ways to include music,

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


8:00 AM – 10:15 AM | Double Session

Professional Development Elaborating on Malleable Minds: Cases for Professional Development

Ann Robinson, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR; Pamela R. Clinkenbeard, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, Whitewater, WI; Del Siegle, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA Case Studies provide vignettes that build professional knowledge about the real world of schools and classrooms. This Super Session introduces lively cases developed through the Malleable Minds project and provides an opportunity to analyze a case carefully, exploring key concepts critical to gifted education. Actively explore cases in small groups, and discuss your conclusions with a panel of leaders in the field to learn more about embedding cases in your own professional development. Audience: Administrators, Advocates / Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Researchers Room: Capitol Ballroom 4

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Consultants, Parents Room: Capitol Ballroom 6

Global Awareness What the Kids Want You to Know— It Is My Life

Patricia Gatto-Walden, Boulder, CO; Stephanie S. Tolan, Institute for Educational Advancement, Charlotte, NC In a study conducted 20 years ago in England, gifted teens gave surprisingly negative responses to a speech given at the World Council focusing on the need to develop the talents of bright children and assure high levels of achievement for the benefit of society. Kaufman’s longitudinal Presidential Scholar research results have shown a similar outcome in the U.S. While gifted youngsters desire academic success and want to make a difference, they dislike being “used.” The presenters report the responses of highly gifted children attending a summer camp to the 2011 NAGC Presidential Address as written in NAGC’s e-newsletter, Compass Points.

Middle Grades Common Core and More: The 10 Best Lessons Ever for Gifted Middle School Students James Delisle, Growing Good Kids, Inc., North Myrtle Beach, SC

Today’s middle school students are used to (and tired of) writing activities that must fit a specific, testable format. There is little excitement to be found in composing a 5-paragraph essay. In this session, participants are presented with more than a dozen writing activities that enhance character, creativity, self-awareness, and individual expression. Some activities are brief and humorous, while others require more extensive, introspective responses. Each lesson has been “classroom-tested” in both gifted and mixed-ability middle school classrooms. Interested in turning your reluctant writers into wordsmiths? This session is for you. Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-8 Room: Centennial Ballroom B

Sunday

dramatic play, art, and writing into your everyday science lessons. Early childhood teachers and administrators leave with a fresh understanding of science instruction! Come with a science unit in mind.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: Mineral E

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Network Super Sessions November 18, 2012 | 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM Parent & Community

Special Schools and Programs

Fathers Shaping the Motivation and Achievement of Their Gifted Sons

Cluster Grouping: Using Data to Monitor Progress

Fathers of gifted males play a significant role in shaping the motivation and achievement of their sons. This session presents a parenting model derived from research studies conducted on paternal influence on gifted males. The parenting model offers ways in which fathers teach their sons life lessons and skills, instill a strong work ethic, nurture achievement, support them in their decision-making and independence, and guide them in developing their identities as gifted males. Specific strategies to carry out the parenting model are highlighted. Implications for parents hoping to better support the intellectual and emotional development of their sons are discussed.

Cluster grouping models are increasing in popularity, with varying degrees of success. Success in the model requires that teachers and administrators routinely plan for and examine critical elements. The presenter demonstrates methods for structuring and evaluating progress in the model by tracking student achievement, determining necessary professional development for cluster teachers, and monitoring student populations identified and served. Learn how to use school data to effectively plan advanced curriculum and instruction, provide teacher training, establish appropriate student identification procedures, and make student placements. Academic achievement studies for both gifted and general education students are also shared.

Thomas P. Hébert, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Parents Room: Mineral C

Special Populations Hear Our Stories! Culturally Diverse Families Navigating the World of Gifted Education

Dina Brulles, Paradise Valley USD, Phoenix, AZ

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-8, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: Capitol Ballroom 1

Sunday

Joy Lawson Davis, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA; Margarita Bianco, University of Colorado, Denver, CO; Nedra Fears, Precocious Kids Publishing, LaGrange, GA

STEM

Understanding giftedness from the perspective of those who know their children best is crucial to designing services that are inclusive and culturally responsive. To do this, it is important for school personnel to increase their engagement with families of culturally and linguistically diverse groups. This session provides an overview of a national survey of culturally diverse families with gifted children. The survey was designed to enable diverse families to “tell their own stories” of the many challenges of raising gifted children who are often overlooked by the gifted education community.

Jeffrey S. Danielian, LaSalle Acadamy - PEGASUS, Warren, RI

Open Science and 21st Century Naturalist Studies

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

The Encyclopedia of Life is an online database of scientific information for all life on Earth. Content providers, including more than 180 scientific organizations and individual scientists, provide media, maps, text, references, and other relevant information, ensuring that educators and students have access to current and reliable information. The presenter demonstrates how to utilize EOL’s features to enhance and enrich science curricula. Attendees leave with a plan for students to complete observational research in natural sciences, create virtual field guides, collaborate on field notes, and work on a long term project. Learn how to incorporate the Encyclopedia of Life into your curriculum.

Room: Capitol Ballroom 2

Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-12, Coordinators Room: Capitol Ballroom 7

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Network Super Sessions November 18, 2012 | 9:15 AM – 10:15 AM

I Think I Can, I Think I Can!: Planning Differentiated Arts Instruction to Benefit Each Learner Stephen T. Schroth, Knox College, Galesburg, IL

The importance of planning differentiated instruction in the arts is greater than ever before, as teachers are asked to serve more gifted children exclusively in the regular education classroom. While many teachers have extensive experience planning differentiated instruction for other areas, some are unsure about how best to increase the difficulty of work for the arts. This session covers the basics for differentiating instruction to best serve gifted children, and distributes templates, tools, and sample lessons that would assist teachers new to working with gifted children or with multiple readiness levels in a single classroom. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators, Parents Room: Mineral B

Computers & Technology Planet of the APPS

Brian C. Housand, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC The number of Internet resources and mobile apps increases on an almost daily basis, but as a teacher you barely have time to keep up with your email. This game show-based session presents a collection of some of the best web-based tools and mobile applications for use with gifted students to promote critical thinking, collaboration, and creativity. Brief overviews

of a dozen resources are provided, but audience participation determines which tools move on to the Tech Tools Smackdown round. In-depth lessons for implementation aligned with standards are provided for each tool. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: Mineral F

Conceptual Foundations Rediscovering Calvin W. Taylor: Man of Many Talents Kathy D. Austin, Oregon State University, Salem, OR

Calvin W. Taylor was largely responsible for changing our fundamental notions of giftedness, earlier viewed as a single dimension focused on intelligence and academics. He recognized the old definition was insufficient for predicting success in later life, but creative talents were keys that transform giftedness to eminence. This interactive session focuses on Calvin Taylor’s contributions to multiple talent teaching, his factor-analytic research on assessment of these talents through biographical inventories, his creativity conferences, and why our field should again pay attention to his historically unique conceptions of giftedness and creativity. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers Room: Centennial Ballroom A

A master can tell you what he expects of you. A teacher, though, awakens your own expectations.

Sunday

Arts

— Patricia Neal

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Network Super Sessions November 18, 2012 | 9:15 AM – 10:15 AM Counseling & Guidance Extreme Sensitivity: Maladaptive Strategy or Defining Characteristic

George Betts, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO; Linda Silverman, Gifted Development Center, Westminster, CO; Sal Mendaglio, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; Stephanie S. Tolan, Institute for Educational Advancement, Charlotte, NC; P. Susan Jackson, Daimon Institute for the Highly Gifted, Surrey, BC, Canada It long has been held by many that gifted individuals are more sensitive and respond more intensely to various stimuli, and that their experience of the world is qualitatively different from their same-age peers. Some even suggest that this sensitivity and heightened emotional and behavioral response are actually the catalyst for advanced achievement and creative productivity in gifted individuals. Despite research that supports this idea, the premise that gifted individuals are unique in their experience of and response to stimuli continues to be debated within the field. Join our panel of distinguished guests as they answer questions about the sensitivities of gifted students and address the implications for practice. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: Capitol Ballroom 5

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you are familiar with CPS, you learn our latest refinements and innovations for educational settings. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: Mineral A

Curriculum Studies The Common Core: Getting to the Heart, the Action and the Outcome Carol Ann Williams, Norma Blecker, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Petersburg, NJ; Christine J. Briggs, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA

What teachers ask students to think about and do plays an important role in the level of learning taking place. By focusing on concepts found in the Common Core teachers can change what and how they plan instruction and raise the level of rigor through tasks assigned. How teachers use big ideas, concepts, and essential questions help to make this happen. Learn how to identify key concepts in the Common Core Standards, write essential questions, and also learn how to make informed instructional decisions to provide appropriate challenge for students in your classrooms.

Creativity

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12, Coordinators

Creative Problem Solving: Five Decades Supporting 21st Century Skills

Room: Mineral G

Donald J. Treffinger, Patricia Schoonover, Kathy Henderson, Center for Creative Learning, Sarasota, FL; Barbara Bishop, Center for Creative Learning, Kelowna, BC, Canada Creative Problem Solving builds on more than five decades of theory, research, and worldwide applications in education and businesses. CPS offers a comprehensive synthesis of creative and critical thinking and problem-solving skills for individuals, teams, and organizations, applicable across ages (from the primary grades through adults), curriculum areas, and reallife experiences. CPS has changed throughout its history, and continues to evolve through research and practice. If you are new to CPS, this session offers an introduction and overview; if

Early Childhood Social Justice in Early Childhood: Making the Implicit Explicit Nancy B. Hertzog, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Marcia V. Burns, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL

Rigorous, challenging curriculum has defined early childhood gifted education. Less attention in our field has been focused on the development of social and emotional competencies or the importance of positive social behaviors for a caring

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


learning community. This presentation engages the audience in another dimension of curriculum development: social justice. What elements of a social justice curriculum – teaching racial consciousness, teaching multicultural awareness in such a way that the teacher and students are of equal status, and valuing cooperation and collaboration – can be found implicitly and explicitly in early childhood gifted education?

their arts “labels,” scientists discover their callings to science, and lawyers and politicians often lead student councils. It’s an important time for teachers to inspire extremely gifted students to reach beyond peer conformity. These students often feel alone with their talent and need support through sometimes difficult highs and lows. Practical strategies to guide teachers and parents on how to identify, encourage, and challenge these students are presented.

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Coordinators, Parents

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Counselors, Parents

Room: Capitol Ballroom 6

Room: Centennial Ballroom B

Parent & Community

A Stunning Look at Global Problems through the Eyes of Nobel Laureates Dorothy A. Sisk, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX

Global leadership is not about filling a gap, but igniting a field of inspired connections and actions to address macro-problems with macro-opportunities. Gifted students are concerned about the future and global problems, and many feel overwhelmed and powerless. This session examines the lives of Nobel Laureates in their journey to help make the world a better place. Participants examine engaging lessons and how they can be used to develop action research and service projects. A DVD of the Nobel Laureates, lessons, and references are available. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents

Partnering with and Protecting our Gifted Learners in a Social Media World

Lindsey Reinert, Diana Caldeira, Jenny Fredrickson, Tonia Heffley, Jefferson County Public Schools, Denver, CO Digital citizenship describes the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regards to technology use. Are you in need of tips, strategies, and tools to enable you to partner with your gifted learners as they navigate the ever-changing social media world? Join us as we set the stage to safely navigate our global, digital society. Explore the impact of social media, Internet safety, and cyberbullying and their relationship to the social-emotional intensities of gifted learners. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers 6-12, Parents Room: Mineral C

Room: Mineral E

Middle Grades Reaching Beyond the Summit for Middle Schoolers

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Global Awareness

Sylvia Rimm, Family Achievement Clinic, Sheffield Lake, OH While the middle school years are often considered important times for exploring, they are often a time that extremely talented children find their identity. Musicians and artists often receive

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Network Super Sessions November 18, 2012 | 9:15 AM – 10:15 AM Research & Evaluation

Special Schools & Programs

Critical Issues in Acceleration: Advancing Learning Opportunities for High Ability Students

Gifted Services at Full Spectrum: Special School, Research, Publications, Training and Outreach

Nick Colangelo, Susan Assouline, Maureen Marron, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; Jacquelin Medina, Colorado Department of Education, Denver, CO Education leaders from across the nation met in Washington D.C. earlier this year for the summit, Creating Advanced Learning Opportunities for High-Ability Students: The Critical Need for Academic Acceleration Policies. Session attendees will hear key results from this summit that focus on identifying instruments designed to determine readiness for acceleration, issues specific to math acceleration, as well as establishment of acceleration policies. Panelists will include issues central to advocacy, leadership, and implementation of acceleration programs at the state and national level.

For nearly three decades, the needs of gifted students have been met through a university setting-based school dedicated specifically to educating this special population. What are the unique elements of the school? How does research inform practice? How is curriculum developed, piloted and published? What outreach services have been most effective? How has the school changed and developed over the years? This session describes school services and associated publications, research, outreach, and training elements within a university environment. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-8, Counselors, Parents

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Researchers

Room: Capitol Ballroom 1

Room: Capitol Ballroom 3

STEM

Special Populations

Engineering the Future: Inspiring Interest in STEM through Robotics and Engineering Activities

Reaching Beyond the Summit to Serve UnderIdentified Gifted Learners

Sunday

Blanche Kapushion, Jefferson County Public Schools; Jan Perry Evenstad, Metropolitian State College of Denver, Denver, CO

The gifted identification data in Jefferson County schools indicated a gap in the numbers of gifted minority and gifted children in poverty in 2008. Over the past three school years, identification process, procedures, and tools have changed in an effort to decrease the identification gap and increase the numbers of gifted underserved and under-identified children. Hear the data, the strategies, stories, and programming structures implemented as the presenters reached beyond the summit to meet the identification, programming, and structure needs of these incredible children. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors Room: Capitol Ballroom 2

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Norma Lu Hafenstein, Ricks Center for Gifted Children, Denver, CO

Caroline Ann Hanson, Aspen Middle School; Julie Wille, Aspen Elementary School, Aspen, CO Robots are now exploring Mars, but closer to home, they are enhancing classroom instruction in math, science, and engineering, inspiring young people to solve complex problems. Enhance your classroom with activities that demand complex problem solving, creativity, and perseverance and which provide immediate feedback. This hands-on workshop allows you to explore robotics possibilities using LEGO-NXT and WeDo platforms in elementary and middle school classrooms. Lesson plans for immediate use addressing ratio and proportion, project ideas, introductory games, troubleshooting strategies, online resources, and an overview of the FIRST LEGO League program allow attendees to apply learning immediately. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-8, Coordinators, Parents Room: Capitol Ballroom 7

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


10:30 AM – 12:00 PM

Join Us for the Closing General Session with

Jonathan Mooney

Neurodiversity: Your Compass to a Changing World You’ve scaled the heights and have reached the summit! We want to send you off the remainder of your trek with an inspiring storyteller, Jonathan Mooney. Jonathan weaves his experiences and forward-thinking philosophies with his broad academic knowledge of education, psychology, sociology and history of learning and disability. Hyatt Regency Centennial Ballroom, Level 4

Sunday

Jonathan will be available to sign books immediately following the sessions in the Ballroom Foyer.

59th Annual Convention

|

November 15-18, 2012 | Denver, Colorado

179


Strand Index Arts Friday, November 16 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Global Images for Global Thinkers: Stunning and Hilarious Room: 601

2:50 PM - 3:50 PM

Reaching Right Brain Learners Through Tableau Room: 710

 

2:50 PM - 3:50 PM

School Stories: How Do Exemplary Teen Writers Portray Academics? Room: 206

8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Affective and Identity Development of Artistically Talented Adolescents: Five New Directions From Research Room: 208

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

Do You Hear What I Hear? Using Instructional Technology to Build Gifted Learners’ Musical Repertoire Room: 711

4:10 PM - 5:10 PM

Looking at Art with a Critical Eye Room: 604

Sunday, November 18 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Teaching Problem Solving with Art Mineral B

9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

I Think I Can, I Think I Can! Planning Differentiated Arts Instruction to Benefit Each Learner Mineral B

Computers and Technology

4:10 PM - 5:10 PM

Revision Tools to Improve Student Writing and Increase Classroom Engagement Room: 601

Saturday, November 17

Friday, November 16 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Game Your Way to Learning Room: 702

 

8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Room: 204

Propel Students to Reach Beyond the Summit with Technology: How to Create a 21st Century Gifted Classroom

12:15 PM - 1:00 PM

 

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Talented Teen Poets on Literacy and Life  

Creating a Photo Collage Room: 101

 

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

How to Use Your Community Resources to Supplement Art Programs in the Schools Room: 606

 

Room: 706

8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Online Learning Tools: The Poster Boards of the 21st Century? Room: 711

 

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Differentiating Curriculum and Instruction Using iPads Room: 703

 

180

National Association for Gifted Children | Reaching Beyond the Summit


11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Herberger Young Scholars Academy: Education in a Digital Environment Room: 706

 

 

Room: 709

 

12:15 PM - 1:00 PM

Room: 708

 

Digital Storytelling with Interactive Fiction

12:15 PM - 1:00 PM

Technology and the Whole Child: Nurturing Gifted Students’ Affective Development Through Technology Projects Room: 710

 

Room: 710

 

12:15 PM - 1:00 PM

Making Movies, Making Meaning Room: 709

 

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

Embracing Ebooks: Increasing Students’ Motivation to Read and Write Room: 712

12:15 PM - 1:00 PM

Using Virtual Worlds to Engage Gifted Learners Room: 707

 

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

The Effects of Learning Style on Knowledge Construction using Hypermedia-Supported Environments Room: 705

 

12:15 PM - 1:00 PM

Online Games and Simulations: Effective Learning Tools or Time Wasters? Room: 705

 

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

4:10 PM - 5:10 PM

Technology: A Critical Tool for Developing Differentiated Curriculum Room: 707

Using Digital Storytelling with Secondary Students Room: 712

 

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

12.4: Can Uruguay Reinvent Gifted Education by Giving “One Laptop Per Child?”

Saturday, November 17 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Lessons Learned From Developing and Implementing a Smart Gifted Data System Room: 708

 

9.2: Waypoints across Curriculum: Geocaching with Gifted Students  

Room: 210/212

The Gamification of Education

15 Possibilities for Publishing Student Writing

Room: Exhibit Hall A

Shift into Higher Thinking 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

12:15 PM - 1:00 PM

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Room: Exhibit Hall A

 

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

Neuroscience for Gifted Students: Using Biofeedback Apps to Understand Creativity Room: 709   2:50 PM - 3:50 PM

When High-Tech Becomes High-Touch: Linking Gifted Students Through Global Networks For Productive Projects Room: 712

59th Annual Convention

|

November 15-18, 2012 | Denver, Colorado

181


Strand Index 2:50 PM - 3:50 PM

LOL...OMG! What You Need to Know About Online Reputation Management for You and Your Students Room: 711

Sunday, November 18 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

What do you get when you cross an iPad with a Teacher of Talented Students? Room: Mineral F

 

9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

Planet of the APPS Room: Mineral F

Conceptual Foundations Friday, November 16 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

13.3: The Incredible Shrinking Exceptionalities of Twice-Exceptional College Students Room: Exhibit Hall A

 

Leadership and Response to Intervention: A Framework for Identifying Potential Room: 703

 

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Gifted Education Goes Hollywood: A FIlm Lover’s Guide to our FIeld’s Future Room: 206

 

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Reexamining The Conceptual Foundations of 21st Century Gifted Education: A Theory Into Practice Approach Room: 603

 

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Traversing the Precipice in Thin Air: Talent Development and Giftedness Room: 105

 

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Return on Investment: Spending Political Capital on Gifted Room: 204

 

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

The Conundrums of Success