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Convention Guide


Identify Gifted Students From Diverse Populations NNATŽ2 is a group administered, nonverbal measure of general ability that can be used to identify potentially gifted students. This test provides a fair assessment of ability regardless of a student’s QSJNBSZMBOHVBHF DVMUVSF PSCBDLHSPVOE0áFSFEPOMJOFPSBTBQBQFSBOEQFODJMUFTUGPSNBU  NNAT2 requires only 30 minutes to administer.

Free Book Signing

Attend Dr. Jack A. Naglieri’s Session

Come meet and talk with Dr. Naglieri

From Assessment to Instruction: Application of the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Tests

Friday, November 4 2:45 p.m. - 3:45 p.m. Booth 501

Authored by Jack A. Naglieri, PhD

Visit us at booth 501

Saturday, November 5 3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. Grand Salon Section 12

Copyright Š 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. or its affiliate(s). All rights reserved. Pearson and NNAT are trademarks, in the U.S. and/or other countries, of Pearson Education, Inc. or its affiliate(s). 5901 11/11

The first 100 visitors will receive a free, autographed copy of Dr. Naglieri’s book Helping All Gifted Children Learn: A Teacher’s Guide to Using the NNAT2


WELCOME from NAGC Many education associations have made New Orleans the site of their convention recently. For some it’s an opportunity for service--convention delegates have chipped in time and resources to help local residents and schools. For others it’s the amazing creativity and spirit that flow from this city--its culture, atmosphere, food, and nightlife. For others it’s purely the enriching experience brought about when a national organization convenes its leaders, bold thinkers, and committed members for learning all under one roof. For these reasons and more NAGC selected New Orleans for this meeting, and we want to welcome you to the 58th Annual Convention and Exhibition! In addition to a fabulous host city, an exhilarating educational experience also awaits. Thanks to NAGC’s 15 Networks and National Program Committee, you’re able to select from more than 500 sessions and posters, hear national opinion leaders, and be entertained by famous personalities and thinkers. In tough economic times it is so important to keep your professional network and knowledge strong and your skill sets sharp. We congratulate you for committing the time and resources to join with your community in support of your own professional development. To make the most of your time with us, here are some recommendations for your “TO DO” list: tRecruit several new friends and ask them to join you in attending the Saturday evening event that combines an interactive presentation on imagination with a tour of Mardi Gras World. tPlan to try out all of the different session types offered at this year’s convention, poster sessions, regular session presentations, Putting It Into Practice sessions, Jam sessions, and more!! tStop by the Learning Quarter when you have a free moment—something is always going on in this interactive, informal space that is sure to energize you! t8IFUIFSZPVUFBDIJOUIFBSUTBSFBPSOPU attend some of the sessions on arts curriculum and arts integration, a special focus and theme of this year’s convention. Look for ways to enrich your teaching with the addition of an arts focus. tChoose several sessions that are relevant to your particular school or context. Try to listen carefully and take notes so your can share your new knowledge with colleagues who were not able to attend the conference. tDesignate a special place in your purse and bag to hold business cards so that you can connect with friends and colleagues when you return home. t*GZPVIBWFOFWFSEPOFTPCFGPSF attend at least one of the business meetings of the 15 NAGC Networks or 3 Special Interest Groups. This is a way to meet people who are interested in more specific topics and areas within gifted education and learn more about ways to be involved in NAGC. We need volunteers like you!!! tBe sure to visit the exhibits to explore new books in gifted education and the products of many education vendors!! This is a great place to find new resources for your teaching, learn about the services of gifted centers around the country, and get information about graduate programs in gifted education. The NAGC Learning Quarter also will have some unique and fun learning experiences. tAttend the poster sessions where you can talk one-on-one with authors and presenters about their work. Thanks so much for joining us to advance your OWN potential, and in turn the educational promise of the students you touch. We know you will be excited and JAZZED by what you experience here in New Orleans--and that your enthusiasm will continue even as you return to your own classroom or office. Laissez les bon temps rouler!!

Paula Olszewski-Kubilius 2010 Program Chair and President

Nancy Green NAGC Executive Director

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Sponsors Please join us in thanking these sponsors for their support.

Duke

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


| Table of Contents Schedule of Events .................................................................................................................. vi Welcome to the NAGC Convention ........................................................................................vii NAGC Network Events ............................................................................................................xii Thanks ..................................................................................................................................... xv Awards and Recognition ...................................................................................................... xviii NAGC Board of Directors and Staff .......................................................................................xix The NAGC Learning Quarter .................................................................................................. xx Wednesday Highlights .............................................................................................................1 Essentials of Gifted Education Thursday Highlights ..................................................................................................................7 Gifted Applications in the Classroom Friday Highlights .....................................................................................................................14 Saturday Highlights ................................................................................................................99 Sunday Highlights ................................................................................................................181 Network Super Sessions ...................................................................................................182 Your Personal Convention Planner .......................................................................................190 Certificate of Attendance .....................................................................................................191 Strand Index ..........................................................................................................................192 Speaker Index .......................................................................................................................223 Convention Maps .................................................................................................................228 Exhibitor Workshops .............................................................................................................233 Exhibit Hall Floorplan ............................................................................................................228 Exhibitor Listing .....................................................................................................................236

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Schedule of Events Registration Hours

The Registration Desk is conveniently located on the first floor of the Hilton New Orleans Riverside as you head towards the Grand Ballroom (Exhibit Hall) and Grand Salon (General Session and Concurrent Sessions)

Tuesday

5:00 PM – 7:00 PM

Wednesday

7:00 AM – 7:00 PM

Thursday

7:30 AM – 6:00 PM

Wednesday, November 2 7:30 AM – 3:00 PM Action Labs (separate registration required) Buses depart from the first floor 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM NAGC Board of Directors Meeting Compass

Saturday

7:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Sunday

7:30 AM – 10:30 AM (information only)

8:00 AM – 2:15 PM Gifted Applications in the Classroom (See pages 8–13. Separate registration required) 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM First-timers Orientation Versailles Ballroom

10:00 AM – 4:00 PM Essentials of Gifted Education (see page 2 - separate registration required)

2:30 PM – 4:00 PM Opening General Session Let’s Change the World! A Conversation with Bill Nye the Science Guy® Grand Salon

12:00 PM – 5:00 PM Council of State Directors Meeting (by invitation only) Port

4:00 PM – 5:30 PM Exhibit Hall Opening Reception Grand Ballroom

12:00 PM – 1:00 PM Board of Directors/Council of State Directors Luncheon River

5:00 PM – 7:00 PM Celebration of Excellence and Reception Napoleon Ballroom

4:15 PM – 6:00 PM Leadership and Life Lessons from the Field (see page 4) Salon A 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM University Network Meeting River

Thursday, November 3 7:00 AM – 2:30 PM Council of State Directors Meeting (by invitation only) Port 7:30 AM – 2:00 PM NAGC Network Leadership Retreat (by invitation only) Marlborough A

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Friday

7:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Friday, November 4 7:00 AM - 8:30 AM State Affiliate Breakfast (by invitation only) River 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM JAM Sessions/Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions (See pages 15–30) 8:45 AM – 10:15 AM Mini Keynotes (See page 31) 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM Exhibit Hall Open 10:30 AM – 11:30 AM Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions (See pages 32–47)

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


11:45 AM – 12:30 PM Putting it Into Practice Sessions (See pages 48–57)

12:45 PM – 1:30 PM Putting it Into Practice Sessions (See pages 139–149)

12:45 PM – 1:30 PM Putting it Into Practice Sessions (See pages 58–66)

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions (See pages 150–164)

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions (See pages 67–82) 2:45 PM – 3:45 PM Exhibit Break, Dessert and Game Tables 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM JAM Sessions/Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions (See pages 83–97) 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM Portraits in Gifted Education: “The Creative Voice of Don Treffinger” (See page 87) Versailles Ballroom 5:30 PM – 5:45 PM NAGC Business Meeting Melrose

3:00 PM – 4:00 PM Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions (See pages 165–178) 4:00 PM Buses begin to depart for Crescent City Celebration…And All That Jazz at Mardi Gras World (see page 179) 5:00 PM – 6:00 PM E. Paul Torrance Creativity General Session Creating with Michele and Robert Root-Bernstein 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM Taste of Louisiana Reception 8:00 PM Final buses depart from Mardi Gras World return to Hilton

6:00 PM – 9:00 PM Network Evening Events (See page xii) Riverside Conference Center

Sunday, November 6

Saturday, November 5

8:00 AM - 9:00 AM Network Super Sessions (See pages 182–185)

Parent Day (separate registration required) (See page 98) Virtual Convention

9:15 AM - 10:15 AM Network Super Sessions (See pages 186–189)

7:30 AM – 8:30 AM JAM Sessions/Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions (See pages 100–114)

10:30AM – 12:00PM Closing General Session George Rodrigue: The Blue Dog Artist at Work Napoleon Ballroom

8:45 AM – 10:15 AM Mini Keynotes (See page 115) 8:00 AM – 3:00 PM Exhibit Hall Open 10:30 AM – 11:30 AM Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions (See pages 116–129) 11:45 AM – 12:30 PM Putting it Into Practice Sessions (See pages 130–138)

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Welcome to the NAGC Convention We want you to get the most out of your Convention experience! Here are some tips and information to assist you in planning your Convention schedule.

Your Convention Guide At the Front of the Book

The Schedule contains meetings, workshops, and special events, in chronological order.

In the Back of the Book

Are you interested in a particular presenter? The Speaker Index lists presenters by last name, with corresponding page numbers for each of their presentations. Are you interested in a particular topic? The Strand Index lists all sessions presented by each program strand throughout the Convention in chronological order. The Personal Planning Calendar on page 190 provides space for you to map your own schedule.

NAGC Game Time

Take a break for dessert in the NAGC Exhibit Hall for “NAGC Game Time” on Friday, November 4 from 2:45 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. This is your opportunity to visit with exhibitors and your peers and try a few games from a variety of companies. NAGC appreciates the support of these sponsors:

How to find a room? Consult the map of the Hilton New Orleans Riverside on pages 229–231. Session Descriptions make up the bulk of this Convention Guide. In addition to room location, each session listing contains the title, name of presenter(s), session description, and target audience. See sample on next page.

About Convention Events Pre-Convention

(additional registration fee required – space may be available) Wednesday: Essentials of Gifted Education Wednesday: Action Labs Thursday: Gifted Applications in the Classroom

Session Formats In addition to individual concurrent sessions some of which are combined, you will find:

Signature Series

These timely and salient topics are invited by the NAGC Program Chair and focus on recent developments in the field of gifted education, success stories from peers who received awards this year, or expand the discussion of recently released NAGC books.

NAGC Central NAGC staff and volunteers are on hand to provide you a link to resources and information at NAGC Central in booth 809. t$IFDLPVUUIFMBUFTUSFMFBTFTBOEOFX books, including the State of the States in Gifted Education 2010-2011. t7JFXUPZTUIBUNBEFUIFParenting for High Potential 2011 Toy List.

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


Mini-Keynotes

Putting It Into Practice

General Sessions

Exhibitor Workshops

Poster Sessions

Jam Sessions

Choose from three sessions on Friday morning and three sessions on Saturday morning where invited presenters address critical issues facing our field.

The 2011 NAGC Convention offers general sessions Thursday and Sunday. Check out the “Highlights” for each day for details. All General Sessions take place in the Grand Salon on the first floor of the Hilton New Orleans Riverside.

These sessions have a new “home” this year and you can find them in the NAGC Learning Quarter on the second floor. Attendees have the opportunity to examine “posted” displays of research and other topics. Presenters will be available at specific times to discuss their poster presentation. Please consult the listings by day in the session descriptions.

These sessions on Friday and Saturday, from 11:45 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 12:45 p.m. to 1:30 p.m., focus on applications and strategies for the classroom.

These popular, content-oriented sessions are conducted by our business partners in the NAGC Learning Quarter during concurrent breakout sessions. See a complete list of the sessions on pp. 233–235.

The space available in the NAGC Learning Quarter provides us with a unique opportunity to provide another venue for learning and sharing. We call them “Jam Sessions” and you will find them at the beginning and end of Friday and Saturday. On Friday, the Jam Sessions are organized by NAGC Networks. On Saturday, topics will be presented based on attendee feedback. Look for topic and facilitator info on signs in the “Quarter.”

Using the Session Description Strand

Session will be recorded

Session Title Presenters

Session Description

Audience Room Location

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Welcome to the NAGC Convention Locations

Meals

This year all Convention activities take place at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside with the exception of the Crescent City Celebration on Saturday evening (see page 179) and two network events. Maps of the hotel can be found on pages 228–232.

NAGC Convention attendees may choose from a number of dining options during the Convention. The Hilton will have “grab and go� stations around the facility during the midday hours on Friday and Saturday where you may purchase lunch items. Coffee breaks occur in the Exhibit Hall on Friday at 9:00 AM and Saturday at 8:00 AM. Don’t miss the Dessert Break/NAGC Game Time in the Exhibit Hall, from 2:45 PM to 3:45 PM. You’ll also find coffee in the NAGC Learning Quarter on the second floor on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 AM. Beverages will be available at 11:45 AM in the NAGC Learning Quarter. Many UIBOLTUPPVSTQPOTPSTGPSUIFTFSFGSFTINFOUCSFBLT7BOEFSCJMU University Programs for Talented Youth, SimplyFun, and Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth.

Program Changes This information in this guide is as of October 1, 2011 A list of any program changes, such as room locations or session cancellations that occurred after printing this Convention Guide is in your Convention tote bag. You may view any additional changes (as they occur) or notices on our live Twitter feed #NAGCConvention. You may view the Twitter feeds on screens at Registration and in the NAGC Learning Quarter.

Icon Legend Poster Session

Posters are on display at NAGC Learning Quarter on the second floor through Saturday, November 5. Presenters will be available at the session time indicated to present and answer questions.

Recorded Session

Available in the NAGC Live Learning Center in mid December. ALL Convention attendees will have full access through June 30, 2012.

Virtual Session

5IFTFTFTTJPOTBSFQBSUPGUIF/"($7JSUVBM Convention on Saturday, November 5.

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards These sessions are led by members of the Workgoup that developed the standards.

In the NAGC Learning Quarter

A variety of events and learning opportunities take place in the NAGC Live Learning Quarter. Just like the Crescent City, it is vibrant, energetic, and friendly.

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Exhibit Hall Exhibits are located in the Grand Ballroom on the first floor, directly across the hall from the Grand Salon and adjacent to the NAGC Registration area. See the hall map on page 228. The exhibitors list is on pp. 236–242. Please take time to meet with our exhibiting partners and tell them you appreciate them joining us in New Orleans. Several events take place in the Exhibit Hall including the opening reception

NAGC Hotel Information Hilton New Orleans Riverside (Location of Convention Registration, all Sessions and Exhibit Hall) Two Poydras Street 504/561-0500 Doubletree New Orleans (.3 miles/6-minute walk from the Hilton New Orleans Riverside) 300 Canal Street 504/581-1300 Embassy Suites New Orleans Convention Center (located .4 miles/8-minute walk from the Hilton New Orleans Riverside) 315 Julia Street 504/525-1993

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


on Thursday and the NAGC Game Time break on Friday, as well as coffee on Friday and Saturday morning. NAGC hopes you will support our business partners that are supporting the association.

t.BLFOPUFPGFNFSHFODZFYJUTJOUIFIPUFM t*GZPVSFDFJWFBOVOFYQFDUFELOPDLPOZPVSSPPNEPPS from someone who says they are a hotel staff member, call the front desk to confim.

Need Help Getting Around?

Convention Etiquette

If you need a wheelchair or electric scooter while at the Convention, check with the hotel. They can let you know if they have one on hand, or can refer you to a local vendor.

With an average of 2,500 attendees, a successful NAGC Convention requires that we extend professionalism and courtesy to one another. The following tips will ensure a pleasant experience for all participants: t"SSJWFFBSMZUPTFTTJPOT CVUEPOUCMPDLPUIFSQBSUJDJQBOUT from exiting a meeting room. t1BSUJDJQBOUTBSFFODPVSBHFEUPTIBSFNBUFSJBMTBOESFGSBJO At any convention, losses, thefts, and petty crimes may occur. from taking more than one copy of handouts. Please exercise adequate caution by following these tips: t#SJOHCVTJOFTTDBSETGPSOFUXPSLJOHBOESFRVFTUJOH t"TJOBOZCJHDJUZ CFBMFSUXIFOXBMLJOHBSPVOE FTQFDJBMMZ material from presenters. at night. Travel with a companion or two, when possible t5VSOPGGDFMMQIPOFT and remove your convention name tag when leaving the t*GJUJTOFDFTTBSZUPMFBWFBTFTTJPOFBSMZPSBSSJWFMBUF  hotel. make the interruption as nondisruptive as possible. t$BSSZDBTIBOEWBMVBCMFTXJUIZPVJOBTBGFQMBDF PSVTF your hotel’s safe. Note that hotels are not responsible for items lost or stolen from guest rooms.

Personal Safety

!"#$%&"'($)%"*'+,$)%We are grateful to our convention presenters, many of whom provide handouts to those attending their sessions. NAGC gave presenters the additional opportunity to make their handouts available on the NAGC Live Learning Center. Any handouts that were uploaded by speakers are accessible to registered Convention attendees through June 2012. Just visit www.nagc.org/livelearningcenter.aspx.

!"#$%&#'()*#(+$#,&*-./%+-0#-.%1#2$#3456#6*+.7(8#9%%.'#:;<# 58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| NAGC Network Events Don’t miss a chance to meet and mingle with others who share your special interest/s within the field of gifted and talented education. The NAGC Network events are open to all; each NAGC individual member may “join” three Networks as part of their membership. The Convention offers you a great opportunity to explore what the Networks have to offer, as well as get acquainted with some amazing people.

Lending a Hand: A Unique Service Action Lab The NAGC Global Awareness Network presents their TFDPOEBOOVBM(MPCBM7JTJPOT4FSWJDF1SPKFDUXJUI)BCJUBUGPS Humanity on Wednesday, November 2,7:30 am - 3:00 pm. Transportation will depart at 7:30 am from the first floor, right outside NAGC Registration. The Global Awareness Network designed this program in 2010 to build a network of engaged citizens (NAGC members, local students, community members and organizations) working in collaboration to directly impact homelessness, affordable housing, and related issues in the NAGC annual convention host city. Those who register for

Network Evening Events

this program will participate in hands-on, direct service to demonstrate and model the belief that there is interdependence among all people. Registrations are first-come, first-served until the maximum of 50 registrants is reached. (A waiting list will be maintained should there be any cancellations.) In order to cover a portion of the costs for transportation and lunch, each registrant is required to pay $15. Check at registration to see if there is space available.

All events take place on Friday, November 4, in the Hilton New Orleans Riverside EXCEPT the Special Schools & Programs and the Arts Networks’ Reception & Meeting at the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts (see below).

Center for Creative Learning, and an internationally known researcher, writer, teacher, and presenter in the area of creative learning and creative problem solving. All NAGC Convention attendees are encouraged to attend. Reception following the taping is co-sponsored with the NAGC Creativity Network.

Conceptual Foundations Network

Research & Evaluation Network

The Legacy Series Taping: The Creative Mind of Don Treffinger Versailles Ballroom The NAGC Conceptual Foundations Network, in concert with NAGC, continues to capture in video notable gifted advocates, researchers, and leaders in order to preserve their legacy for future generations. Join us for this taping as we celebrate the work of Don Treffinger, president of the

Research Crackerbarrel and Research Gala River The Research Crackerbarrel (6:00 PM - 7:00 PM) is an opportunity for graduate students and beginning researchers to seek advice about different aspects of the research process from more seasoned researchers. You can join one of several roundtables hosted by prominent researchers in our field. The Research Gala (7:30 PM - 9:00

Friday, November 4 | 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM

Friday, November 4 | 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Thursday, November 3 | 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Special Schools & Programs Network Arts Network Reception & Meeting at the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts 2800 Chartres Street (Buses depart at 7:00 PM from the Hilton New Orleans Riverside) Both the Special Schools & Programs and the Arts

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Networks were invited by Dr. Robbie McHardy, director of the Academic Studio of the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts (NOCCA) to have their receptions and business meetings at the Center. NOCCA is a preprofessional arts training center that offers intensive instruction in the arts to secondary school students.

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


PM) celebrates the exciting new research conducted by graduate students. You will watch as Gala participants present posters of their research and the awards committee names winners in three categories: doctoral level completed research, doctoral level research in progress, and nondoctoral level research. Light hors d’oeuvres and beverages will be served.

Global Awareness

Friday, November 4 | 6:30 PM – 9:00 PM Global Gala Pelican Our annual Gala party is a time of celebration, relaxation, meeting new friends and forging professional connections. This year will be a very special evening as we will respond to the concerns of gifted children about our global community. Our Gala event will inspire us to persist in the noble cause of enriching the lives of these discerning and dedicated children through our support of interdependence of all people, and the preservation and protection of natural resources.

Computer & Technology Network

Creativity Network

Friday, November 4 | 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM Creativity Night: Celebrating Creative Potential Mardi Gras Style Port and Starboard Downtown New Orleans will shine with a Mardi Gras celebration of creative potential at Creativity Night, NAGC’s Creativity Network’s evening featuring an explosion of rhythmic Mardi Gras music, surprising Fat Tuesday inspired sensory experiences, and mind expanding, engaging activities to transport you to a creativity carnival. Creativity Night will be held in a large room with approximately 30 stations. Select from the list of stations you’ll receive when you enter and join one group for the first 20-minute round. Two additional rounds follow and spontaneous celebrations between rounds provide additional entertainment and very popular prize drawings. Creativity Night follows the reception that the Network is co-hosting with the NAGC Conceptual Foundations Network following the Legacy Series taping.

Special Populations Network

Friday, November 4 | 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Friday, November 4 | 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Speed Geeking Kabacoff If you are looking to update your technology resources and teaching strategies, let the Computers and Technology Network help! “Speed Geeking” is an interactive speed date with self-professed tech geeks who will rocket through a series of five-minute presentations about some of the best technology resources for teachers. Do not miss this lively and interactive session that will energize you and update your teaching practice!

Middle Grades Network

Friday, November 4 | 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Celebrating Trailblazers for Special Populations: Past, Present, and Future Compass All NAGC convention attendees are invited to meet and honor the leaders and trailblazers who have championed the needs of special and underserved populations in gifted education. Join the Special Populations Network, Colorado Association for Gifted and Talented, and others in celebrating those who have profoundly changed the way people think about gifted children. Raise a glass to our trailblazers of the past, present, and future…and then dance the night away!!

Curriculum Studies Network

Friday, November 4 | 7:15 PM - 8:30 PM Using Children’s Literature to Teach about Wisdom Bridge Children’s literature and picture books offer an amazing springboard to helping gifted students understand their world and future. These seemingly simple books have a powerful impact on the wisdom level of gifted children. This session shares an extraordinary collection of books that focus on wisdom across cultures. Divided into Brown’s Categories of Wisdom Appreciative, Discerning, Behavioral, Communal, Transcendent, and Ethical - these 50 books encourage gifted learners to consider their world and themselves from a new perspective. A curricular grid of teaching ideas applying William’s Model for Creative Thinking, a bibliography, and live music will be provided.

Curriculum Awards Night Steering Come meet this year’s Curriculum Award Winners! Every year the Curriculum Studies Network celebrates the authors of outstanding curriculum with an evening devoted to showcasing their talents/work and effect on students. You will hear from the curriculum developers themselves, who are more than willing to share lessons and answer questions about their individual units. All of our award winners received outstanding evaluations based on our rubric for writing curriculum based on the needs of the gifted learner. Please join us in celebrating their efforts and excellence!

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| NAGC Network Events Network Business Meetings Thursday, November 3

Saturday, November 5

Arts 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM New Orleans Center for Creative Arts, 2800 Chartres Street (Buses depart at 7:00 PM from the Hilton Riverside)

Conceptual Foundations 7:30 AM – 8:30 AM Durham

Special Schools & Programs 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM New Orleans Center for Creative Arts, 2800 Chartres Street (Busses depart at 7:00 PM from the Hilton Riverside) Research & Evaluation Network Work Session 7:30 PM – 9:00 PM Port

Friday, November 4 Counseling & Guidance 7:30 AM – 8:30 AM Durham Computers & Technology 10:30 AM – 11:30 AM Durham Middle Grades 11:35 AM – 12:35 PM Durham Global Awareness 12:40 PM – 1:40 PM Durham Curriculum 1:45 PM – 2:45 PM Durham Research & Evaluation 2:50 PM – 3:50 PM Durham

Creativity 10:30 AM – 11:30 AM Durham Professional Development 11:35 AM – 12:35 PM Durham Parent & Community 11:45 AM – 12:30 PM Early Childhood 12:40 PM – 1:40 PM Durham STEM 1:45 PM – 2:45 PM Durham Special Populations 2:50 PM – 3:50 PM Durham

Special Interest Groups Friday, November 4 Twice Exceptional 5:30 PM – 6:30 PM Windsor GLBTQ (the event includes a Business Meeting plus a Social Gathering) 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM Durham

Saturday, November 5 Assessments of Giftedness 1:45 PM - 3:45 PM Norwich

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


| Heartfelt Thanks to The NAGC Program Committee Chair Paula Olszewski-Kubilius Linda Crain Laurie Croft Shelagh Gallagher Marion “Suzy” Johnson Susan Scheibel

Bonnie Cramond Jeff Danielian Wendy Leader Judy McIntyre Gyimah Whitaker

New Orleans Local Arrangements Committee Co-Chairs: Judy Huckabay | Judy McIntyre Lisa DeJean Jonathan Frishberg Marion “Suzy” Johnson

Donna Laurent Debbie Lefort Eva Savoy

Sherry Scardina Maryanne Smith

NAGC Network Leadership Arts Stephen Schroth, Chair John Gaa, Chair Elect

Creativity Wendy Leader, Chair Laurie Abeel, Chair Elect

Middle Grades Christine Deitz, Chair Wendy Miner, Chair Elect

Special Populations Beverly Trail, Chair Claire Hughes, Chair Elect

Computers & Technology Jennifer Troester, Chair Cindy Sheets, Chair Elect

Curriculum Studies Sally Dobyns, Chair Jennifer Beasley, Chair Elect

Parent & Community Christy McGee, Chair

Conceptual Foundations Elizabeth Romey, Chair

Early Childhood Barbara Dullaghan, Chair Ellen Honeck, Chair Elect

Professional Development Elizabeth Fogarty, Chair Connie Phelps, Chair Elect

Special Schools & Programs Patricia Hollingsworth, Chair Carol Carter, Chair Elect

Global Awareness Patricia Gatto-Walden, Chair Anne Beneventi, Chair Elect

Research & Evaluation D. Betsy McCoach, Chair Jill Adelson, Chair Elect

Counseling & Guidance Jillian Gates, Chair Bronwyn MacFarlane, Chair Elect

STEM Linda Sheffield, Chair Scott Chamberlin, Chair Elect

Special Interest Groups Assessments of Giftedness Barbara Gilman Gifted Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning (GLBTQ) Terry Friedrichs Twice Exceptional Lois Baldwin

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Heartfelt Thanks to With appreciation to our donors for their support of NAGC Katie Augustyn

Alison Bodily

Carrie Garmezy Hrousis

Wendy Lake

Betsy Peterson

Nancy Schifo

Kristen Stephens

John Kauffman

Paula M. Olszewski-Kubilius

Jean Sunde Peterson

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Zilber Family Foundation

The NAGC Nicholas Green Distinguished Student Award Fund Katie Augustyn

Barbara Branch

Liz Crosby

Martha Flournoy

Jamison L. Ginsberg

Maryanna Gray

Kimberley J Gullo

Deborah C. Hazelton

Kathy Jones

Joan Lindsay Kerr

Andrew Leslie

Karlette Porter

Dana M. Reupert

Patricia K. Scrivner

Julie Smith

Colorado Association for Gifted & Talented Idaho - The Association for the Gifted Kansas Association for the Gifted, Talented & Creative Kentucky Association for Gifted Education Oregon Association for the Talented & Gifted Pennsylvania Association for Gifted Education 7JSHJOJB"TTPDJBUJPOGPSUIF(JGUFE

Javits-Frasier Scholarship Fund  

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Pamela Clinkenbeard

Nicholas Colangelo

Carolyn R. Cooper

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Lauri Kirsch

Bianka Kortlan-Cox

Sally C. Krisel

Brent Adams Mundt

Joseph Renzulli

Sylvia Rimm

Turner Industries

Donations from September 1, 2010 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; August 25, 2011

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


We Appreciate the Strand Reviewers

Thousands of convention proposals are submitted each year for consideration by the NAGC Network Strand Reviewers. The following individuals gave of their time to make certain that the convention content is balanced and relevant, presenting diverse viewpoints in the field of gifted education. Arts John Gaa Jeanie Goertz Joanne Haroutounian Jason Helfer Jordan Lanfair Lou Lloyd-Zannini Stephen Schroth, Network Chair 2010-11 Computers & Technology Kevin Besnoy Ian Byrd Tisha Duncan Janine Firmender Michelle McGuire Reva Freidman-Nimz Kristina Ayers Paul Dallas Price Elfi Sanderson Cindy Sheets Kevin Simms Ola Skyba Sita Thiruvadi +FOOJGFS7FSNJMMJPO Brian Housand, Network Chair 2010-11 Conceptual Foundations Kimberly Berman Sherry Bovey Jenn Broome Abbey Cash LeoNora Cohen Laurence Coleman Leslie Forstadt Kathi Kearney Jamie MacDougal Suzanne McPherson Susan Rakow Barbara Romey Wenda Sheard Stephen Schroth Robert Schultz, Network Chair 2010-11 Counseling & Guidance Julie Donaldson Lori Flint Leslie Forstadt Jillian Gates Thomas S. Greenspon Tom HĂŠbert Cindi Lardner Connie Phelps Wenda Sheard Debbie Troxclair Susannah Wood P. Susan Jackson, Network Chair 2010-11 Creativity Gae Anderson-Miller Cindy Dwyer Susan Keller-Mathers Tracy Missett Edwin Selby Marianne Solomon Billie Woodel Wendy Leader, Network Chair 2010-11

Curriculum Studies Leigh Anne Akey Jennifer Beasley Randee Blaire Norma Blecker Kimberley Chandler Patti Coughlan Chrystie Hill Ellen Honeck Shannon Jones Eric Mann Susan McPherson Leighann Pennington Susannah Richards Cindy Sheets Roxanne Speer Carol Williams Sally Dobyns, Network Chair 2010-11 Early Childhood Gae Anderson-Miller Laura Beltchenko Kim Chandler Jaqueline Drain Nancy Hertzog Ellen Honeck Elaine Gold Shannon Jones Susan Gold Kathy Ray Leigh Tucker Barbara Dullaghan, Network Chair 2010-11 Global Awareness Barbara Mitchell Hutton Karen Kimball Kenton Maine Dodie Merritt Linda Pfeiffer Trevor Tebbs Patricia Gatto-Walden, Network Chair 2010-11 Middle Grades Patti Drapeau Christine Deitz Jamie MacDougall Susan Rakow Susannah Richards Diane Heacox, Network Chair 2010-11 Parent & Community Mary Jean Banter Janet Chen Nancy Cohen Bev Fink Stephanie Georgiades Keri Guilbault Deborah Kotzubei Christy McGee Lori Rubin-Williamson Susan Scheiber Royal Toy Pauline Bowie, Network Chair 2010-11

Professional Development Nancy J. Bangel Ann Batenburg Candyce Briggs Joan Brownlee Patricia Cameron Kimberley Chandler Alicia Cotabish Laurie Croft Debbie Dailey 7JDUPSJB%BMFZ Sharon Dole Cindy Dwyer Debbie Gonzales Gail Fischer Hubbard Catherine Little Julie Lamb Milligan Kristina Ayers Paul Connie Phelps Brian Reed Linda Robinson 7BMJKB3PTF Razel Solow Frances Spielhagen Sheri Stewart Barbara Swicord Antonia (Toni) Szymanski Elizabeth Fogarty, Network Chair 2010-11 Research & Evaluation Cheryll Adams Jill Adelson Janette Boazman Carol Carman Kathy Clark Alicia Cotabish Debbie Dailey Abdullah Ficui Steven Hass Angela Housand Todd Kettler Mait Makel Michael Matthews Rachelle Miller Scott Peters Connie Phelps Rebecca Pierce Karen Rambo Nancy Robinson Rena Subotuik "MFY7VZL Russell Warne Kris Wiley Bess Wilson So Yoon Yoon D. Betsy McCoach, Network Chair 2010-11 Special Populations Luisa AbellĂĄn Wendy Behrens Margarita Bianco Kristine Blatter Dina Brulles Liza Campbell Marybeth Cannon Richard M. Cash Jaime Castellano

Nancy Cohen Linda Collins Steve Coxon Joy Davis Felicia Dixon Jaqueline Drain Jennie Farmer Shirley Farrell Matt Fugate -JTB7FYMFS(FISJOH Tarek Grantham Lety Hahn Malik S. Henfield Claire Hughes Rachael Jeffers Julie Luck Jensen Pamela Keel Elizabeth Kotis Kimberly Lansdowne Shahanna McKinney-Baldon Suzanne McPherson Rachelle Miller Christian Mueller Chrys Mursky Theresa Newsom Elizabeth Nielsen Neilsen Pereira Lesli Preuss Karen Rumley Meghan Salyers Anne Smith Michelle Swain Gloria Taradash Leslie Weinbaum Becky Whittenburg Fred Woodworth Beverly Trail, Network Chair 2010-11 Special Schools & Programs Carol Carter Melissa Cesarano Marilyn Cox Andrea Esperat Robert Gold Debra Price Patricia Hollingsworth, Network Chair 2010-11 STEM Cheryll Adams Jill Adelson Heather Carmody Deborah Beckmann Tutita Casa Scott Chamberlin Kimberley Chandler Shelbi Cole Daphne Duncan Janine Firmender Kathy Gavin Eric Mann Rachel McAnallen Karen Rambo Chris Schultz Linda Sheffield, SIG Chair 2010-11

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Awards and Recognition The NAGC Board of Directors invites you to join us in celebrating commitment and honoring excellence.

NAGC Celebration of Excellence Thursday, November 3 | 5:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7:00 PM | Napoleon Ballroom Reception follows

Honorees Ann Isaacs Founders Memorial Award Don Treffinger Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Award Susan Johnsen Distinguished Scholar Award Tracy Cross Distinguished Service Award Del Siegle NAGC/Ball State Administrator Award Cheryl Quatrano-Hatzidimitriou David W. Belin Advocacy Award Jacquelin Medina Hollingworth Award Stephanie Robertson Early Scholar Award Kyung Hee Kim Early Leader Award Richard M. Cash Community Service Award James Webb Doctoral Student Awards %FCPSBI%BJMFZt+BOJOF'JSNFOEFSt"MFYBOEFS31BHOBOJ -JTB%B7JB3VCFOTUFJOt$IFSZM8BMLFS Mastersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and Specialistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Awards Mary Lin McNeill GCQ Paper of the Year â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Efficacy of Academic Acceleration for Gifted Minority Studentsâ&#x20AC;? Seon-Young Lee, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea; Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, (FPSHF1FUFSOFM /PSUIXFTUFSO6OJWFSTJUZ &WBOTUPO *- 7PM JTT QQ

xviii

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


| NAGC Board and Staff NAGC Board of Directors t1BVMB0MT[FXTLJ,VCJMJVT Northwestern University, Evanston, IL President t5SBDZ$SPTT $PMMFHFPG8JMMJBN.BSZ 8JMMJBNTCVSH 7" President-Elect t"OO3PCJOTPO University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR Past President t,BUJF"VHVTUZO Connecticut Association for the Gifted, Westport, CT Treasurer t,SJTUFO4UFQIFOT Duke University, Durham, NC Governance Secretary t-BVSJ,JSTDI Hillsborough County Public Schools, Tampa, FL State Representative t.BSDJB8BMM Coeur dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Alene, ID Teacher Representative

t,JNCFSMFZ$IBOEMFS $PMMFHFPG8JMMJBN.BSZ 8JMMJBNTCVSH 7" Network Representative t4VTBO%VMPOH-BOHMFZ Milford, MA Parent Representative t+BJNF$BTUFMMBOP Ganado Unified School District, Ganado, AZ At-Large Member t4BMMZ,SJTFM Hall County Schools, Gainesville, GA At-Large Member t$BUIFSJOF-JUUMF University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT At-Large Member t4UVBSU0NEBM University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO At-Large Member

NAGC National Office Staff tNancy Green Executive Director tAndrew Bassett Director, Finance and Administration tJane Clarenbach Director of Public Education tRachel Coleman Administrative Project Coordinator tNicole Daniel Membership & Marketing Coordinator

tDerrick Johnson Director, Meetings and Professional Development tCarolyn Kaye Office Assistant tAdriane Wiles Membership Manager tKaren Yoho Senior Director of Marketing & Member Services

Program Support t$BSPMZO.$BMMBIBO Editor, Gifted Child Quarterly t+FGG%BOJFMJBO Teacher Resource Specialist Editor, Teaching for High Potential

t+FOOJGFS+PMMZ Editor, Parenting for High Potential t.BSJBN8JMMJT Parent Outreach Specialist

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| The Learning Quarter We have created a destination at the Hilton for a new spin on learning and networking. Just like the Crescent City, it is vibrant, energetic, and friendly. Open conversation. Jam Sessions. Handson demos. Poster sessions. Exhibitor Workshops. Roundtable discussions. Consider it your neighborhood where you will connect and collaborate with other attendees. NAGCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Learning Partner

What is there to do in the Learning Quarter? Friday, November 4

Saturday, November 5

7:30 AM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:00 PM

7:30 AM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4:00 PM

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View Posters Meet and visit with attendees

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10:30 AM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 11:30 AM t&YIJCJUPS8PSLTIPQT 

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t/"($4UBUF"GmMJBUF.FFUVQTo"SLBOTBOTGPS(JGUFE Talented Education 12:45 AM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1:30 PM t$PNQVUFST5FDIOPMPHZ/FUXPSL%FNPOTUSBUJPOT t&YIJCJUPS8PSLTIPQT 

t/"($4UBUF"GmMJBUF.FFUVQTo,FOUVDLZ"TTPDJBUJPOGPS Gifted Education 1:45 PM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2:45 PM t&YIJCJUPS8PSLTIPQT 

t1PTUFS4FTTJPOT t/"($4UBUF"GmMJBUF.FFUVQTo5FYBT"TTPDJBUJPOGPSUIF Gifted and Talented 4:00 PM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:00 PM t+BN4FTTJPOTo'BDJMJUBUFECZ/FUXPSLT 4FFQBHF

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xx

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


November 2, 2011

W

elcome to New Orleans! This pre-Convention day features both the practical and the experiential as we launch our pre-conference events.

For 2011, Action Labs have moved to Wednesday and kick off at approximately 7:30 am. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gifted Education Essentialsâ&#x20AC;? are designed to provide a practical overview of what constitutes quality programs and services for gifted students within the framework of the revised NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Programming Standards. The event includes an opening general

Wednesday

| Wednesday Highlights

session, materials, lunch, and your choice of Essential topics in the afternoon. Your day ends on a high note, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Leadership and Life Lessons from the Field.â&#x20AC;? Space may still be available, so please stop by the NAGC Registration Desk.

Schedule at a Glance 7:00 AM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8:00 PM

Registration open 7:30 AM

Action Labs begin departing (pre-registration required)

2011 Action Labs: t4QFDJBM4DIPPMTGPS4QFDJBM4UVEFOUT-PVJTJBOB4DIPPMGPS.BUI 4DJFODF BOEUIF"SUT and New Orleans Center for Creative Arts t%JGGFSFOUJBUFE'SFODI2VBSUFS8BMLJOH5PVS t)FSJUBHF&EVDBUJPO%FTUSFIBO1MBOUBUJPO%FTUSFIBO1MBOUBUJPO t"SUT#BTFE&EVDBUJPO-VTIFS$IBSUFS4DIPPM , t-FOEJOHB)BOE"6OJRVF4FSWJDF"DUJPO-BC (MPCBM"XBSFOFTT/FUXPSL

8:00 AM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:00 PM

NAGC Board of Directors Meeting Compass

10:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Gifted Education Essentials: Your Toolkit for Delivering Successful Programs and Services (separate registration required) 4:15 PM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6:00 PM

Leadership and Life Lessons from the Field Salon A

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Wednesday Essentials Wednesday

Wednesday, November 2 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Gifted Education Essentials: Your Toolkit for Delivering Successful Programs and Services Separate Registration Required/Lunch and handouts included 10:00 AMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 11:30 AM

Essentials of Gifted Education: Designing and Delivering Excellent Programs for High-Ability Learners Susan Johnsen, Baylor University, Waco, TX This session will provide a combination of big picture and practical application. The standards should be the first component in every gifted toolkit! t8IBUBSFUIFLFZDPNQPOFOUTPGBOFYFNQMBSZHJGUFE program? t)PXEPUIF/"($1SF,(SBEF(JGUFE1SPHSBNNJOH Standards fit into the bigger policy and service picture? t)PXBSFTUBOEBSETDVSSFOUMZCFJOHVTFEUPTVQQPSUBOE deliver successful programs in classrooms and districts? Room: Grand Salon A 11:30 AMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12:45 PM

Networking/Table Topic Luncheon Room: Napoleon Ballroom

research-based program models for gifted learners. Models include various accelerative options such as whole-grade acceleration and subject-area acceleration, rapid progress models, partial-day and send-out models, after-school or extra-curricular program models, grouping models, and more. This session is designed to help teachers and coordinators become aware of the various ways in which schools and districts can deliver an appropriate education to our gifted children. Room: Grand Salon 10

W2. Designing and Choosing Effective Curriculum for Gifted Learners: Key Considerations Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA What are the characteristics of quality curriculum for gifted students and what criteria should be used to choose curricular materials for them? What features are critical to consider in designing curriculum units for gifted learners? This session focuses on the design specifications for rich, complex, and challenging curriculum including attention to over-arching themes and concepts, inclusion of authentic activities and assessments, infusion of inquiry and problem-based learning activities, a focus on developing metacognition and habits of mind, and making interdisciplinary connections. Examples of curricula that meet these criteria are shared. This session is designed for teachers who are interested in learning how to provide rigorous, content-based curriculum to their gifted students.

1:00 PM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4:00 PM

Essential Topics (Check your ticket for session you registered to attend) W1. Program Models and Program Design in Gifted Education Karen Rogers, St. Thomas University, Minneapolis, MN New to the field of gifted education or wanting to learn more about possible program types for your gifted students? Choose this session if you want to review

2

Room: Grand Salon 13

W3. Creating Classroom Environments to Foster Social and Emotional Development Tom HĂŠbert, University of Georgia, Athens, GA This session provides a wide variety of activities to assist educators in creating classroom environments where gifted students feel welcome and respected. This interactive session will also focus on how to guide young people to self-understanding and achievement. Teachers and counselors will appreciate learning how

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter

to facilitate nonthreatening and enjoyable activities to create a climate of positive support and enhance selfawareness and achievement in gifted students. Room: Grand Salon 16

W4. Best Practices in Identification and Assessment Susan Johnsen, Baylor University, Waco, TX What are the components of a comprehensive, cohesive identification system that allows all students to demonstrate their diverse characteristics and behaviors? This session begins by exploring the issues related to identification and how educators might establish challenging learning environments so that students may express their gifts and talents. This introduction will be followed by a review of alternative and traditional assessment procedures that are non-biased and technically adequate. The session concludes by sharing ways of organizing and interpreting assessment information. Participants will have opportunities to discuss various identification procedures and examine case study information. Room: Grand Salon 19

W5. Middle Grades Essentials for the 21st Century Susan Rakow, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH Middle schools continue to be a “turning point” in a student’s education, yet too few middle schools provide substantive gifted education programs. This session offers new insights in understanding gifted adolescents and improving their middle school experiences. Specific instructional strategies for gifted and advanced learners will be presented and resources and co-curricular programs specific to the needs of gifted students will be shared. Connections are made to “This We Believe,” an idealistic philosophy guiding middle schools on how they should function. Participants will receive Educating Gifted Students in Middle School: A Practical Guide (2nd ed.).

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

W6. Instructional Strategies for Differentiation within the Classroom Julia Link Roberts, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY Making sure that gifted students are challenged in heterogeneous classrooms requires thoughtful consideration of student differences and related needs. This session will focus on the practice of differentiating curriculum and instruction within the regular classroom. What are some practical ways you can identify which best practices will meet the needs of particular gifted learners? Some of the strategies covered in this session include tiered assignments, differentiated products, differentiated cluster grouping, and pre assessments. You’ll learn to employ strategies that improve engagement and optimize classroom resources to maximize learning and help students achieve their full potential.

Wednesday

Virtual Session

Poster Session

Room: Grand Salon 12

W7. Implications and Uses of the Pre-K-12 Gifted Education Programming Standards to Identify Gifted Students from Special Populations Jaime Castellano, Ganado Unified School District, Ganado, AZ; Beverly Trail, Regis University, Henderson, CO Identifying gifted students from special populations continues to be problematic for many schools and school districts. This session will provide participants with the information needed to develop comprehensive, cohesive, and ongoing procedures for identifying gifted students from special populations. Participants will learn the uses and limitations of qualitative and quantitative information and be able to develop nonbiased and equitable identification strategies. Finally, participants will learn how to use this information to create appropriate programming options to enhance performance of special populations of gifted students. Room: Grand Salon 15

Room: Grand Salon 22

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Wednesday Essentials Wednesday

W8. Understanding and Addressing the Needs of Young Gifted Children

W9. Developing a Philosophy of Gifted Education for the 21st Century

Richard M. Cash , Bloomington Public Schools, Bloomington, MN

Elizabeth Fogarty, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC; Connie Phelps, Emporia State University, Emporia, KS

What do we do when we encounter a student in the primary classroom reading and performing math far above grade level? Teachers of primary students may not have the resources or expertise to address the young gifted learners’ academic or social/emotional complexities. Addressing these needs is critical to their future academic and social success. This session will describe and discuss the characteristics of young gifted learners and share strategies and techniques to advance curriculum in the early years, develop talent, enhance social maturity, and recognize and nurture emergent potential in low-income young children.

What are the conceptual foundations of gifted education? How can Pre-K-12 gifted facilitators develop mission statements that become the backbone of gifted programs responding directly to the needs of highability learners? During this session participants view film clips from the NAGC Legacy Series to evaluate the degree to which the conceptual foundations of the field mirror their own and district beliefs about giftedness and gifted students and develop or strengthen an effective mission statement for gifted programs. Attendees also embed principles of creative thinking that prepare gifted learners for the 21st century into their mission statement and program goals.

Room: Grand Salon 18 Room: Grand Salon 21

4:15 PM – 6:00 PM

Leadership and Life Lessons from the Field Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Karen Rogers, St. Thomas University, Minneapolis, MN; Julia Link Roberts, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY; George Betts, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO Moderator: Del Siegle, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT You won’t want to miss a rare opportunity to get “up close and personal” with some of gifted education’s most well-respected leaders in this refreshingly candid session. In a “fireside chat” format, you’ll hear reflections and lessons learned: from what they wish they had known when they first started, to where the field is headed. Ask questions of your own during this lively discussion that will keep you engaged and entertained. Room: Salon A

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


Mark your calendars for

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reaching Beyond the Summit: Educating with Altitudeâ&#x20AC;? The 59th Annual NAGC Convention & Exhibition takes place November 15-18, 2012, in Denver, Colorado.


| Thursday General Session Thursday, November 3 | 2:30 PM - 4:00 PM

Let’s Change the World!

A Conversation with the Science Guy® — Bill Nye

N

ot many people can say their mother was a codebreaker, they studied with Carl Sagan, and hold a patent for ballet toe shoes. But

Thursday

most people just know him as Bill Nye the Science Guy®. And he

closes each email with “Let’s Change the World!”

His work on television over the last couple of decades has highlighted the efforts of teachers in classrooms across the nation. For each episode Nye defined learning objectives and provided hands-on, experiential learning for his viewers. And he threw in humor to help make the lessons stick! In his hopeful message to NAGC Convention attendees, Nye will share with us various ways educators can encourage young minds toward STEM fields. He’ll describe where our knowledge can take us, and how problem-solving skills and creative thinking can build our future.

Was this “Science Guy” once a “Science Kid?” Let’s find out what role teachers had in developing his talent and interest in science and math, and what characteristics effective teachers possess that truly make a difference for bright learners. We’ll learn ideas he has for engaging high-ability learners in the classroom and beyond.

Scientist, engineer, comedian, author, and inventor, Nye is a man with a mission: to help foster a scientifically literate society, to help people everywhere understand and

What role do “teachers play in creating scientists?

appreciate the science that makes our world work. Meet Bill Nye at the Disney Youth Groups Program booth 114. Check your Program Addendum and signs for exact time.

Science Rules! NAGC wishes to thank Disney Educational Productions and Disney Youth Programs for their support. www.DisneyEducation.com

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


| Thursday Highlights Welcome to New Orleans!

8:00 AM – 2:15 PM

2:30 PM - 4:00 PM

Gifted Applications in the Classroom

Opening General Session

(See page 8. Separate registration required)

Let’s Change the World! A Conversation with the Science Guy® — Bill Nye

Wednesday’s Essentials program provided the foundation. Thursday’s program is designed to offer a more in-depth examination of gifted education applications in your area of interest. Whether you are an administrator or experienced gifted coordinator, you’re sure to find something to advance your knowledge and expertise. Lunch and materials are included in your registration fee. Space may still be available, so stop by the Registration Desk.

4:00 PM – 5:30 PM

Exhibit Hall Opening Reception Find out what’s new in the field of gifted and talented education. Enjoy light refreshments as you take a walk through the exhibits. Make a point to talk to the exhibitors and discover a new resource or tool, or two or three!

Thursday

This is the first “official” day of the largest annual event dedicated to gifted and talented education, but in the past 24 hours the NAGC board has been planning, those who attended an Action Lab were getting an up-close look at the region, and still more friends of G/T education learned how to design and deliver programs within the NAGC Pre-K-Grade12 Gifted Programming Standards. A lot has been accomplished, but there are four more days, filled with experts, excellent program, experiential learning, and excitement!

1:00 PM – 2:00 PM

First-timers Orientation Find out how to navigate the 58th Annual NAGC Convention. Here from veterans and NAGC staff on the ins and outs of this four-day event. Refreshments available.

5:00 PM – 7:00 PM

Celebration of Excellence and Reception Take a walk down the red carpet! The NAGC Celebration of Excellence toasts the achievements of leaders in the field and celebrates the musical talents of Louisiana students and their teachers. The evening includes the presidential address and a reception.

Schedule at a Glance 7:30 AM – 7:00 PM

Registration

4:00 PM – 5:30 PM

Exhibit Hall Opening Reception Grand Ballroom, First Floor

8:00 AM – 2:15 PM

Gifted Applications in the Classroom 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM

First-timers Orientation Versailles Ballroom, Third Floor

5:00 PM – 7:00 PM

Celebration of Excellence and Reception with Presidential Address, “Being at the Table” Napoleon Ballroom, Third Floor

2:30 PM – 4:00 PM

Opening General Session Let’s Change the World! A Conversation with the Science Guy® Grand Salon, First Floor

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Thursday Gifted Education Applications 8:00 AM – 2:15 AM

Gifted Education Applications in the Classroom: Critical Models for Delivering Successful Services Separate Registration Required/Lunch and handouts included Wednesday’s Essentials program provided the foundation. Thursday’s program is designed to offer a more in-depth examination of gifted education applications in your area of interest. Whether you are an administrator or experienced gifted coordinator, you’re sure to find something to advance your knowledge and expertise.

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

Thursday

Opening General Session State of the Nation in Gifted Education Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; Nancy Green, NAGC, Washington, DC Whatever your role in education, information about the national picture can make you more effective. What are the major national issues facing gifted education? What trends will affect the future of service delivery? Based on NAGC’s latest bi-annual State of the States Report and other key research, you’ll hear about some bright spots as well as hard truths. Come away with a better understanding of the U.S. landscape, and resources available that can help you build the case for gifted services. Room: Versailles Ballroom

9:15 am – 11:00 am | Morning Sessions T1. Thinking in the Future Tense: Creating Positive Futures for Gifted Students Lauri Kirsch, Hillsborough County Public Schools, Tampa, FL How can stakeholders in gifted education learn to think in the future tense and develop the traits of passion, vision, and action…all essential to successful outcomes for gifted programs? While the Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards provide a roadmap for schools and districts that endeavor to design and develop options for gifted learners, the journey to successful gifted outcomes begins with creating the mindset for empowering a positive future. Attend this session to experience the power of scenario thinking and leave with tools and strategies for creating a positive future in your own school or district!

T2. Digital Storytelling: Narratives for the 21st Century Kristen R. Stephens, Susan Wynn, Duke University, Durham, NC Today’s students are accustomed to creating, consuming, and sharing information using an array of technologies. Digital storytelling is one method that can be used in the classroom that blends writing, technology, and emotion— addressing both the cognitive and affective domains. Joining personal narratives with images, video, voiceover, soundtrack, and effects, digital stories demonstrate what learning should look like in the 21st century. Participants are guided through the seven elements of a digital story. Sample digital stories are shared and participants begin writing their own stories. Without a doubt, digital storytelling will bring out the artist, the storyteller, the techie, and the writer in you and your students! Room: Elmwood

T3. Using Technology to Differentiate Learning Del Siegle, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT Understand how to use technology to differentiate for gifted and talented learners. Gifted students were born into the digital age while most of their instructors are digital immigrants, trying to keep up with and use technology tools that emerge daily and working to ensure that students are competent in digital literacies. Web 2.0 and Google tools have the power to help teachers respond to gifted students’ needs for faster pacing, academic challenge, creative expression, and contact with other gifted students. Take away a list of specific websites and other classroom technology tools to bring 21st century learning into your classroom. Room: Oak Alley

Room: Rosedown

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


T7. Maximizing Outcomes for TwiceExceptional Children: What Educators Need to Understand and Be Able To Do

Barbara Dullaghan, Bloomington Public Schools, Bloomington, MN

Beverly Trail, Regis University, Henderson, CO; Claire Hughes, College of Coastal Georgia, Brunswick, GA

Ready to change what you’ve been doing for years? Come to this session to learn how to make over your classroom with an eye to the 21st century skills movement! The presenter will challenge participants to think carefully about the physical, emotional, and instructional environment that is most appropriate for highly able primary students. Learn how to blend the tenets of early childhood education with the elements of 21st century learning to provide a dynamic and challenging classroom setting for young gifted students while still meeting the expectations of your district’s standards.

Educators learn how to use the problem-solving process to develop a comprehensive plan that integrates strategies from both gifted and special education. Twice-exceptional children have diverse needs with incredible strengths and debilitating weaknesses. Participants will develop an individual education plan with a focus on developing 21st century skills and nurturing strengths like creativity and problem solving. Utilize technology to assist children with weaknesses in written expression and executive functioning. Learn strategies to assist children in developing the interpersonal skills essential for collaborating with others and intrapersonal skills that are a prerequisite to selfactualization.

Room: Magnolia

T5. Invest in America’s Future: Maximize the Challenge for Elementary STEM Students Cheryll Adams, Ball State University, Muncie IN; Scott Chamberlin, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY; Katherine Gavin, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Kimberley Chandler, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Daphne Duncan, Purdue University, Lafayette, IN; Janet Tassell, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY

Thursday

T4. Extreme Classroom Makeover: The 21st Century Primary Classroom for Gifted Students

Room: Trafalgar

T8. Developing Leaders for Today’s World: Service-Learning for Gifted Students Katrina Weimholt, Lindsey Wall, Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) are critical to our economy, national security, and global leadership in innovation and research. In this session, participants will have an opportunity to explore global researchbased strategies, creativity techniques, curriculum, and resources for identifying and nourishing promising, inventive, and productive STEM students. Participants may choose from roundtable groups as they actively investigate these techniques and resources for supporting and developing elementary STEM students from all backgrounds, and discuss current issues, research, and implications of recent national initiatives with STEM experts.

Our world faces countless social problems — poverty, disease, global warming — that our brightest young people need to be prepared to address. Service-learning as an instructional strategy integrates rigorous academics with meaningful service to train and inspire students to become active, engaged citizens. This session explores servicelearning pedagogy and discusses ways service-learning provides an optimal match for gifted learners and aids in the development of 21st century skills. Presenters share best practices for structuring high quality service-learning projects and facilitate small-group planning exercises. Attendees leave with concrete tools and strategies to implement in their own schools.

Room: Belle Chasse

Room: Norwich

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Thursday Gifted Education Applications T9. At the Corner of Creativity and Affective Needs Carol L. Tieso, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Patti Wood, Samford University, Birmingham, AL

Thursday

We don’t need to choose between engaging in creative activities and addressing gifted students’ affective needs. In this interactive session, you’ll learn new ways to infuse creativethinking skills and habits of mind into your curricula while still focusing on the social and emotional needs of diverse learners, especially those at risk for underachievement or perfectionism. Several creative-thinking skills approaches that may be infused into your differentiated affective curricula are highlighted. Further, we will engage in creative practicing, explore sample affective lesson plans, and share successes and challenges along the way. Please join us at the corner of creative thinking and social and emotional strengths by taking a risk that you’ll challenge yourself and have some fun at the same time!

T11. Harnessing the Power of Technology to Increase the Potential of Curriculum and Instruction Cindy Sheets, Shawnee Mission School District, Shawnee Mission, KS; Brian Housand, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC How do we go about providing experiences for gifted students that transcend the compartmentalized gradelevel curriculum and prepare them to participate in a global society? How can we engage them in experiencing the wider world beyond their school buildings? Students are no longer tied to the knowledge and skills found within their school walls, and are able not only to research areas of interest, but also to connect with others that share their same deep interests. Let’s take a tour through a multitude of technology resources and project ideas that empower students to develop their critical, creative, and problem-solving and inquiry skills, while learning to be a good digital citizen.

Room: Jasperwood

T10. Response to Intervention: A Leadership Framework for Identifying Potential George Betts, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO; Robin Carey, Douglas County Public Schools, Castle Rock, CO

Room: Durham 11:15 AM - 12:15 pm

Networking Luncheon Room: Versailles Ballroom

Educators in the field of gifted education must have a voice in fully utilizing the Response to Intervention framework as a strength-based approach. Presenters will focus on the knowledge, skills, and steps necessary for educators in gifted education to utilize this Staff Development Leadership Approach (SDLA) to facilitate RtI teams to gain an understanding of how implementing the RtI framework will allow us to focus on the learner. This session provides an opportunity for participants to self-assess readiness and to implement this powerful framework to identify and serve highpotential, highly able learners. Room: Newberry

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12:30 PM – 2:15 PM | Afternoon Sessions T12. Response to Intervention, Gifted Education, and Twice-Exceptional Students Stuart N. Omdal, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO; Daphne Pereles, Colorado Department of Education, Denver, CO; Lois Baldwin, Tarrytown, NY Schools across the country are moving to the Response to Intervention (RtI) approach for identifying and providing services for exceptional children. This approach has great potential as a means of addressing the needs of advanced

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Room: Durham

T13. Tools and Strategies for Promoting 21st Century Literacy for Young Gifted Students Kimberley Chandler, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA The goal of literacy instruction for pre-K-3rd grade high-potential students is to provide a rigorous yet age appropriate view of learning to read and reading to learn. The implementation of 21st century skills in instruction requires new types of literacy instruction in addition to traditional practices. Using children’s literature as a foundation for best practice instruction, the presenter will share myriad children’s books and Internet resources that promote 21st century skill development. Participants receive a bibliography of print resources and online sites to explore for use in early childhood reading programs for high-ability students.

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

T15. Educators and Parents as “Counselors”: Skills for Meeting Gifted Kids Where They Are Jean Sunde Peterson, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN This session will focus on skills to facilitate “intentional” communication with gifted youth, regardless of achievement level, heritage and socioeconomic background, type of concern, and developmental stage. Teachers, especially, have a special vantage point for informally observing well-being and making referrals to the school counselor, if warranted. However, most important here are skills that can help simply to build appropriate, supportive relationships with gifted kids, who might believe that invested adults are concerned only about performance, not “humanness.” Hands-on activities will help educators and parents gain skills for working with high-stress achievement, underachievement, debilitating perfectionism, anxiety, and bullying

Thursday

learners or twice-exceptional learners who may have both remedial and advanced needs. This workshop addresses why the RtI approach with a problem solving/consultation model is a promising fit for these students. Topics to be discussed include theoretical and practical implications for twice-exceptional students, critical elements in the problem solving approach, and case studies of gifted and twiceexceptional students.

Poster Session

Room: Belle Chasse

T16. Instructional Programming for Special Populations of Gifted Students: Preparing Them for the 21st Century Jaime Castellano, Ganado Unified School District, Ganado, AZ; Dina Brulles, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ; Shawn Cherry, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Room: Oak Alley

T14. I Always Knew I Was Smart. What Took Y’all So Long? Our Response to that Question Two Decades Later Sally Krisel, Hall County Schools, Gainesville, GA “I Always Knew I Was Smart. What Took Y’all So Long?” These words were spoken 20 years ago by 10-year-old Troy, a subject in the NRC/GT’s groundbreaking research on multiple-criteria identification of gifted children from underrepresented groups. What did we learn from Troy and the other students in that study? How have findings from that early study and the ongoing work of educators across the country shaped best practices in identification of children from diverse backgrounds? Come learn the answers to these questions and explore ways you can use the NAGC Standards on assessment and programming to recognize and develop students’ gifts and talents.

21st century student outcomes describe the skills, knowledge, and expertise students must master to succeed in work and life. Those who can think critically and communicate effectively must build on a base of core academic subject knowledge. Creativity and innovation, critical thinking and problem solving, and communication and collaboration are the skills needed to prepare for an increasingly complex life and work environment. But what about those special populations of gifted students who have gaps in these areas, what do we do for them? This session is devoted to answering that question by offering lessons and strategies needed to fill those gaps and that are culturally responsive to the students served. Room: Jasperwood

Room: Trafalgar

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Thursday Gifted Education Applications November 3, 2011 | 12:30 pm – 2:15 pm | Afternoon Sessions

Thursday

T17. Beyond the Core: Infusing Critical and Creative Thinking into the Curriculum

T19. Implementing the Schoolwide Enrichment Model in Your School or District

Susan Dulong Langley, Framingham Public Schools, Framingham, MA

Joseph Renzulli, Sally Reis, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

The Common Core State Standards developers acknowledge that “The Standards set grade-specific standards but do not define the intervention methods or materials necessary to support students who are well below or well above grade-level expectations,” and that, “These Standards are not intended to be new names for old ways of doing business…. They are a call to take the next step.” What, then, is the next step? We will explore strategies in curriculum and lesson design to support: Establishing essential elements; developing pre-formative, and summative assessments to inform instruction; tiering by cognitive complexity; and infusing creative-thinking skills.

This session provides an overview of the Schoolwide Enrichment Model (SEM) and specific strategies for implementing the model in a variety of schools with students of different ages and demographic backgrounds. The model, based on more than 30 years of research and development, is a comprehensive talent development approach for infusing levels of enrichment and differentiation for all students while simultaneously implementing strategies to challenge all gifted and high-achieving students. Specific strategies including the development of Total Talent Portfolios, Curriculum Modification Techniques, and Enrichment Teaching and Learning will be introduced as will new directions in the SEM.

Room: Magnolia

T18. Get a Life! Differentiation with Biography Ann Robinson, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR Nothing is as interesting as someone else’s business! Life stories—biographies—have been used to teach lessons for centuries. Whether you teach art, literacy, science, social studies, music or math, there are creative biographies that can be used to differentiate any curriculum unit. In the new NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards, biography study is specifically noted in Standard 3, Curriculum Planning and Instruction, as a means of meeting the needs of gifted students for culturally relevant experiences and career exploration. Learn strategies for incorporating biography effectively to differentiate the curriculum. Engage in cross-curricular learning activities to implement in your classroom. Review example trade biographies. Master the steps to creating a teacher guide, a Blueprint for Biography, for your favorite life story. Leave this session with biography-based activities that focus on talent development. And…take home a bibliography of exemplary biographies for the elementary grades.

Room: Elmwood

T20. Tech THAT: Gifted Children Online Brian Housand, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC; Angela Housand, University of North Carolina-Wilmington, Wilmington, NC; Jennifer Troester, O’Neill Public Schools, ONeill, NE In this highly interactive session participants will explore the social and psychological implications of living in a world with boundless technology opportunities. Using case studies and current research we will explore how to help students create balance, navigate digital environments safely, and advocate for their own well-being. This session addresses the tough questions facing teachers, parents, and administrators as they help students navigate a new world online: How do gifted students deal socially, emotionally, and intellectually with “constant connectivity”? How do teachers and parents bridge the digital divide to support gifted students while keeping them safe online? Room: Newberry

Room: Norwich

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Linda Sheffield, Northern Kentucky University, Highland Heights, KY; Chris Schultz, Iowa State University, Ames, IA; Deborah Beckmann Kotzubei, Mirman School for Highly Gifted, Los Angeles, CA; Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Nielsen Pereira, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY; Odesma Dalrymple, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ; Boyd Gilbert, Imagine Schools ILSAW, Indianapolis, IN Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) are critical to our economy, national security, and global leadership in innovation and research. In this session,

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

participants will have an opportunity to explore global researchbased strategies, creativity techniques, curriculum, and resources for identifying and nourishing promising, inventive, and productive STEM students. Participants may choose from roundtable groups as they actively investigate these techniques and resources for supporting and developing middle and secondarâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;y STEM students from all backgrounds, and discuss currents issues, research, and implications of recent national initiatives with STEM experts. Room: Rosedown 2:30 PM

Opening General session Grand Salon

4:00 PM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:30 PM

Thursday

T21. Invest in Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Future: Maximize the Challenge for Middle and Secondary STEM Students

Poster Session

Exhibit Hall Opening Reception Grand Ballroom, First Floor

The NAGC Celebration of Excellence Thursday, November 3 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM Napoleon Ballroom We â&#x20AC;&#x153;kicked it up a notchâ&#x20AC;? for the NAGC Awards Ceremony and Presidential Address that takes place on Thursday evening. We added performances by Louisiana gifted and talented educators and students and made it a spicy event, worthy of our location! Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our Celebration of Excellence. Also featured will be the NAGC Presidential Address. Awards presented: t"OO*TBBDT'PVOEFST.FNPSJBM"XBSE t1SFTJEFOUT"XBSE t%JTUJOHVJTIFE4DIPMBS"XBSE t%JTUJOHVJTIFE4FSWJDF"XBSE t/"($#BMM4UBUF"ENJOJTUSBUPS"XBSE t%BWJE8#FMJO"EWPDBDZ"XBSE t&BSMZ4DIPMBS"XBSE t&BSMZ-FBEFS"XBSE t$PNNVOJUZ4FSWJDF"XBSE t%PDUPSBM4UVEFOU"XBSET t.BTUFSTBOE4QFDJBMJTUT"XBSE t(JGUFE$IJME2VBSUFSMZ1BQFSPGUIF:FBS

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being at the Tableâ&#x20AC;?

NAGC President Paula Olszewski-Kubilius Northwestern University Evanston, IL

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Friday Highlights 8:45 AM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10:15 AM

Schedule at a Glance

Mini Keynotes

7:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Panels of veteran voices, talent development mavens, and information pioneers address: t4FQBSBUJOHUIF8IFBUGSPNUIF$IBGG8IBU3FBMMZ Constitutes Differentiation for Gifted Learners? t$SJUJDBM2VFTUJPOTJO5BMFOU%FWFMPQNFOU"OTXFSFE through 40 Years of Longitudinal Research by Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth (SMPY) t4UFSFPUZQFTBOEUIF/BUVSFBOE/VSUVSFPG*OUFMMJHFODF

Registration

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

JAM Sessions/Concurrent Sessions/ Poster Sessions 8:45 AM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10:15 AM

Mini Keynotes

9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Exhibit Hall Open 10:30 AM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 11:30 AM

2:45 PM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3:45 PM

NAGC Game Time is Back

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions 11:45 AM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12:30 PM

Putting it Into Practice Sessions

Take a break in the NAGC Exhibit Hall for NAGC Game Time and play. In addition to the tasty games, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be tempted by dessert! Please join us in thanking Simply Fun, MindWare, ThinkFun, and Fox Games for their support of this event.

12:45 PM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1:30 PM

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

2:45 PM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3:45 PM

NAGC Conceptual Foundations Legacy Series: The Creative Voice of Don Treffinger Join us for the taping of the next offering in the Portraits in Gifted Education: The Legacy Series. The Conceptual Foundations Network invites you to celebrate the work of Don Treffinger, president of the Center for Creative Learning, and an internationally known researcher, writer, teacher, and presenter in the area of creative learning and creative problem solving. A light reception, hosted by the NAGC Conceptual Foundation Network and Creativity Network, will follow the taping.

Putting it Into Practice Sessions 1:45 PM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2:45 PM

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Exhibit Break, Dessert and Game Tables 4:00 PM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:00 PM

JAM Sessions/Concurrent Sessions/ Poster Sessions 4:00 PM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:30 PM

Portraits in Gifted Education: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Creative Voice of Don Treffingerâ&#x20AC;? Versailles Ballroom

5:30 PM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:45 PM

NAGC Business Meeting Versailles Ballroom

6:00 PM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9:00 PM

Network Evening Events

Hilton Riverside Conference Center

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM SIGNATURE SERIES

Are Response to Intervention and Gifted Education Compatible? A Dialogue In 4 Parts Laurence Coleman, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Mary Ruth Coleman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; Susan Johnsen, Baylor University, Waco, TX; Thomas Southern, Miami University, Oxford, OH

Superintendents, curriculum directors, gifted coordinators, building principals, and other administrators are sought to assist in this effort to provide practical, easy-to-use information about gifted learners and appropriate school services to administrators at large. Others who have ideas about what is needed are also encouraged to attend. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Parents Room: Grand Salon 9

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers Room: Versailles Ballroom SIGNATURE SERIES

Calling All Administrator Advocates for the Gifted Ann Robinson, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR; Virginia Burney, Ball State University, Muncie, IN NAGCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Administrator Task Force is seeking input from building and district administrators regarding the type and format of information to provide school personnel about GT students. In this session, members of the Task Force present preliminary ideas for input and facilitate discussion of other ideas to develop.

SIGNATURE SERIES

Getting involved: Leadership Development in NAGC Scott Hunsaker, Utah State University, Logan, UT; Rosanne Malek, Iowa Department of Education, Des Moines, IA NAGC is committed to developing leadership among its members to advance service to the field and the ongoing work of the organization. In this session, a panel describes the roles and responsibilities of various leadership positions within NAGC, including Committee, Network, and Board positions, as well as opportunities for parent, teacher, and state-level involvement. The panel shares suggestions regarding paths to leadership development for members of all backgrounds and discusses questions from participants about involvement in NAGC leadership. The primary purpose is to provide information and resources for individuals interested in becoming more involved in NAGC leadership.

Friday

As the RtI model becomes more common in districts across the country, educators and advocates are asking whether and how to use RtI for gifted students. The presenters have discovered that they have divergent and harmonizing thoughts about the melding of RtI and gifted education. They appear like-minded, but are they? Are their means and goals compatible or irreconcilable? Join four advocates in a dialogue about the philosophical, historical, conceptual, and practical issues associated with these models.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12 Room: Jefferson Ballroom

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

JAM sessions in the NAGC Learning Quarter (2nd Floor) In post-NAGC Convention evaluations, attendees have noted the time spent in smaller, more intimate discussions were the most productive and provided them the best learning opportunities. NAGC Jam Sessions to the rescue! The Jam Sessions in the NAGC Learning Quarter on Friday are offered by the NAGC Networks. The following sessions will be roundtable style, led by NAGC Network volunteers. Make a point to drop in and jam! 7:30 AM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8:30 AM ARTS

MIDDLE GRADES

Arts Alive! Advancing Potential for the Gifted

Favorite Raves...Instructional Ideas that Bring out the Best in Gifted Middle School Students

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

The Future of Gifted Education: Where is it Going?

PARENT AND COMMUNITY

How to Start a Parent Group SPECIAL POPULATIONS

CREATIVITY

Friday

Everyone has a Story to Tell: Creative Classroom Identifying Special Populations of Gifted Students Techniques STEM

EARLY CHILDHOOD

How do we Help Gifted Primary Students Learn The Relationship of Common Core State Standards in Mathematics to STEM Curriculum Organizational Skills? for GT students Coffee Break 7:30 AM in the NAGC Learning Quarter 9:00 AM in the Exhibit Hall ARTS

3.4 Affective and Artistic Development of Artistically Talented Students: A Systematic Research Agenda Richard Olenchak, John Gaa, Kelly Lee, University of Houston, Houston, TX This session focuses on the need for more extensive research agendas that examine the affective and artistic development of students talented in the arts. The predominant focus of research on gifted and talented individuals has been on the cognitive domain with individuals who are intellectually

16

talented. This session reviews the results of a systematic, multiyear research agenda which has sought to investigate affective characteristics of artistically talented adolescents across artistic domains, as well as providing data to be compared with adolescents who are intellectually gifted and those not identified as gifted. This research has studied the areas of gender identity, identity versus role confusion, categorical ego identity, artistic identity, and creativity. The authors are also interested in attendeesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; suggestions for additional research concerns that can be incorporated into systematic research agendas to advance our knowledge in the field. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

Developing your Personalized, Professional Learning Network (P2LN) through Technology

Entering the Ecosystem: The Thoughtful Integration of iPad Apps into your Gifted Classroom

Are you the only gifted specialist (or one of a few) in your school system? Is it difficult to form a Professional Learning Community to meet your professional development needs as a teacher of gifted and talented students? Welcome to better living through technology! Explore the plethora of professional development opportunities available for gifted specialists at little to no cost, including social networks, blogs, webinars, wikis, Moodle courses, and other websites that allow teachers (or students) to collaborate. If you cannot find what meets your needs, then learn how to start your own PLC!

Shawn Cherry, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Nancy Heilbronner, Western Connecticut State University, Danbury, CT Technology today is undergoing an amazing transformation, especially within the Apple ecosystem. Smaller affordable devices such as the iPad allow teachers to bring computing power into the classroom. Thousands of free or inexpensive educational apps are available for use on the iPad. At this informative workshop, learn how to search for and integrate some of these top iPad apps into your classroom in a thoughtful way. Leave with information on potential sources of funding for bringing iPads to your students. Are you ready to enter the ecosystem?

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Newberry

Room: Grand Salon 15

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

4.4 Learn to Diigo: Teachers as Researchers and Collaborators

Patterns of Technology Use Among Gifted Students: Implications for M-Learning

Sita Periathiruvadi, University of North Texas, Richardson, TX; Anne Rinn, University of North Texas, Denton, TX

Patricia Wallace, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

This session introduces teachers of the gifted to the popular social bookmarking Web tool Diigo. With the advent of so many online social networks, websites, blogs and wikis, how can a busy teacher keep up with the latest advancements in teaching and technology? More importantly, how can they guide their students to navigate the Web critically and collaboratively? The session explores if online social bookmarking can be the answer to these questions. Audience: Administrators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Friday

Shirley Farrell, Alabama State Department of Education, Montgomery, AL

A common assumption about gifted students is that they will be on the bleeding edge -- eagerly adopting new technologies and mastering them effortlessly, yet little is known about how gifted students use cell phones, computers, and other technologies, how they judge their own competence, and what attitudes they hold. This presentation draws on new data to show how gifted students are using technologies, and what role these tools play in their lives. The emerging trends lead to insights about promising mobile learning strategies, and an m-learning demo is presented. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Eglinton and Winton

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

From Overwhelmed to Organized: Technology as a Friend vs. Foe

Using Technology to Enhance and Differentiate Student Projects

April Coleman, University of Alabama, Northport, AL

Del Siegle, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Are you a manic multi-tasker who feels entrenched in technology? Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t delay; end your love-hate relationship with technology today! This session provides tried and true tips, tricks, and tools to help you organize and simplify your personal and professional life through purposeful and productive uses of technology, as well as offers ways to teach our children and students to find balance in our technology-infused society. Featured tools include Google Apps, Sqworl, Delicious, Diigo, Jing, and many more new, emerging technologies. Learn how to make technology work for you, not against you!

Effective educators differentiate gifted studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; learning by content, process, product, and learning environment. While technology can play a key role in each of these areas, it is particularly beneficial in enhancing and differentiating the products students produce. Not only can the sophistication of paper projects be enhanced, but product options can be easily extended to include audio, video, Web, and interactive game formats. A variety of easy-to-use free cloud and downloadable programs are available for student use. Some examples of these programs and how they can be used to enhance student products are shared.

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Friday

Room: Magnolia Room: Rosedown

COMBINED SESSION CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

Reframing Gifted Advocacy Kathee Jones, Colorado Association for Gifted and Talented, Golden, CO The metaphor of photography is used to explore challenges in finding common vision within gifted education. Educators struggle with increasingly scarce resources and lament parental involvement. Parents can find themselves frustrated with school policies or teachers. Students are seldom asked for input. Community members feel TFQBSBUFEGSPNFEVDBUJPO7JFXJOHUIF(5QJDUVSFGSPN these different angles, sometimes there seems like little overlap. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s valuable to consider how educators, parents, students and community members might have different perspectives on shutter speed (time), aperture (individuality), equipment (curriculum, costs) and composition (context). Common focus on gifted students makes taking a new view worthwhile.

Nurturing The Gifted And Talented: The Hanoi Tower Model of Excellence Nga Giap, University of Munich, Munich, Germany The Hanoi Tower Model of Excellence is based on a psychometric classification approach with several types of talent factors. This multidimensional model consists of variety relatively independent ability factor groups, various performance domains, and personality traits as well as social environment factors that serve as moderators for the transition of individual potential into excellent performance in various domains. Its application to guide instruction and a future plan as a part of the model are given. Audience: Administrators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers Room: Elmwood

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

18

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

The Roles and Functions of Friendships Among the Gifted and Talented

6.4 Uniqueness and Purpose in Gifted Education and Beyond

Michael Sayler, University of North Texas, Denton, TX

Susan Waite, Texas State University-San Marcos, San Marcos, TX

Friendship is something deeply desired by everyone, including the gifted. This session explores the value and function of friendships of the gifted across their lifespan. It presents a conceptual model that in part shows how friendships are related to personal thriving among the gifted. Review the philosophical underpinnings of what friendship is all about and provide practical guidance as to how to be friends and how to help the gifted develop positive friendships.

Marketization discourses, the use of new technologies, and research bases in gifted education are expanding with little philosophical discussion within the field of gifted education. Within these contexts, what is the purpose of gifted education? These discussions are critical for informing current and future actions within the field. In this session, philosophical concepts are used to explore some possible directions for gifted education.

Room: Grand Salon 16

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Researchers

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

Reading Virgil Ward: Re-Examing Principles of Differentiation

Epistemological and Disciplinary Considerations in Acceleration: History as an Example

Marie Peine, Metrolina Regional Scholars Academy, Charlotte, NC 'SPNBYJPNTUPCFTUQSBDUJDFT UIFXSJUJOHTPG7JSHJM8BSE include foundational principles for differentiating instruction. As an early leader of considerations about differentiation, Wardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work covered over three decades of examination of who are the gifted, who should teach gifted children, what curriculum might look like, and how curriculum might be delivered. This session examines his writings and proposes a case for continued use of his constructs about differentiated education for gifted learners. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Fountain

Laurie Croft, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

Friday

Audience: Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Disciplines such as history are often overlooked in discussions about acceleration, even though acceleration is one of the most effective ways to meet the academic needs of gifted learners. This may be because it is difficult to conceptualize what acceleration means in a field that has little agreement on either sequence or scope at any particular level. Considering the national standards in a field, however, as well as relevant taxonomies for the development of skills in a field, acceleration becomes the facilitation of expertise and the utilization of professional research in order for students to develop as young professionals. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 9-12 Room: Marlborough B

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

“Everything Old is New Again”: The Historical Dimensions of Differentiation

8.1 Phenomenological Exploration of Middle School Gifted Students

Kathi Kearney, Project Excel, Berwick, ME

Paula Christensen, Northwestern State University of Louisiana, Natchitoches, LA

“Curriculum differentiation is the crucial issue.” A savvy 21st century quote? Hardly! This is a World War I-era statement. Differentiation isn’t brand-new. It had its genesis in the 20th century’s earliest years, influenced by the individual differences and progressive education movements, and the emergence of junior high schools. This presentation explores these early iterations of curriculum differentiation, their application to gifted students, and the strong influence of the individual differences movement. The work of luminaries in both general and gifted education such as Bagley, Hollingworth, Pressey, and Witty challenge notions that today’s emphasis on differentiation is anything new.

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 24 COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

Setting Motivation Traps with the Autonomous Learner Model for Underachieving Gifted Students in Grades 6-12 Connie Phelps, Emporia State University, Emporia, KS; Amber Miller, High Plains Educational Cooperative, Leoti, KS Educators of underachieving gifted students in grades 6-12 find motivating them a real challenge due to their lack of interest in school. This session suggests motivation traps to encourage collaborative projects and engage students. Using a five-step process, motivation traps help students understand relevance in both the immediate school setting and future applications. By integrating motivation traps with the Autonomous Learner Model, the session advocates a student-centered curriculum as a critical ingredient to help students reach their potential in schools. This session helps attendees spark student interest and renew their appreciation for intrinsic motivation.

Two groups of 8th grade gifted students were provided an opportunity to engage in a phenomenological exploration in order to enhance their learning. They explored their interests, values, problem-solving abilities, decision-making skills, and creativity consciousness. This presentation provides a group of strategies for working with middle school gifted students in order to develop their knowledge and skills in 8th grade as well as prepare them for high school. Audience: Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-8 CREATIVITY

Alternative Pathways to Talent Development: A Collaborative Study with an Eminent SingerSongwriter from the Philippines Rhoda Myra Bacsal, National Institute of Education, Singapore A collaborative study with an eminent singer-songwriter from the Philippines reveals alternative pathways to talent development that diverge from Bloom’s model. It appears that early exposure to the area of talent in the context of daily living, the absence of any formal mentors, using art as commodity, and eventual perception of art as a conduit to promote social change may resonate more with the reality of an artist coming from a disadvantaged background. The session is especially useful to creativity researchers and arts educators, since it highlights a different model of creativity that has implications in actual classroom practices. Audience: Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Prince of Wales

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Grand Salon 3

20

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

CREATIVITY

CREATIVITY

10.1 Wisdom and Creative Perception

Creativity21 and Beyond!

James Reffel, Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA

Rick Shade, Jefferson County Schools, Golden, CO; Patti Shade, Denver Public Schools, Denver, CO

Wisdom has been described as an integration of the affective, conative, and cognitive aspects of human abilities in response to lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tasks. Creativity has been defined as acts of creation that express the uniqueness of the person. Claxton merges these constructs by describing wisdom as advanced creativity. Thirty-eight volunteers completed a creativity inventory and a wisdom scale. Both instruments yielded an overall score and several factor scores. Significant correlation coefficients between totals and various factors supported the hypothesis that perceived creativity is related to wisdom.

Perceptions of creativity are changing as educational initiatives are being driven by global forces. Major educational organizations have recently included creativity as an outcome designed to best prepare students for future work environments. Creativity is a dynamic that challenges mindsets and elevates student learning to passionate levels of productivity. In this session, participants are introduced to the four elements of creativity and the seven components of the Creativity Fan Model as frameworks for instructional and curricular design. Practical instructional strategies and templates are shared, including a Creativity Thinking Curriculum Organizer and Think Tanks!

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

CREATIVITY

Room: Windsor

Future Problem Solving Programs and Creativity: An Initial Report of a Longitudinal Study

CREATIVITY

John Kauffman, Scholastic Testing Service, Bensenville, IL; Marianne Solomon, Future Problem Solving Program International, Melbourne, FL

Friday

Virtual Session

Poster Session

Domain Specificity of Creativity: Dispositional and Environmental Differences Among Scientists, Humanists, and Artists Dong Gun An, University of Georgia, Athens, GA

The Future Problem Solving Program was developed and founded by E. Paul and Pansy Torrance in 1974. Since then the program has involved many thousands of students, volunteers, affiliate directors, and executive directors. At this time there are over 40 state and international Future Problem Solving Programs as well as several mentored regions. Future Problem Solving Program International and Scholastic Testing Service, have undertaken a longitudinal study that has begun with assessment of creativity and administration of brief surveys to 5th and 6th graders. This program presents the first findings for these sites. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Melrose

This study explores the dispositional and environmental differences among creative people in different domains and their domain-specific creativity based on their interactions within their field. Different personality traits and domain differences in the severity of psychopathology contrasted among natural scientists, social scientists, humanists, and artists. In addition, different environmental trends, such as birth order and family background are demonstrated. Learn how 4 doctoral students in different domains interact within their fields/social systems (e.g. comprehensive exams) by analyzing the relationship between their different dispositional/environmental traits and their field systems. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 9-12 Room: Trafalgar

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

21


| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM CURRICULUM STUDIES

Preparing for Tomorrow: Making Students Ready for the 21st Century and Beyond Carol Ann Williams, Norma Blecker, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Galloway, NJ; Christine Briggs, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA What teachers ask students to think about and do plays an important role in the level of learning taking place. By incorporating 21st century skills and themes into already existing skills and curricula, teachers can change what and how they plan instruction and raise

the level of rigor in assigned tasks. How can teachers make student learning connect to the world in which students live? During this session, participants identify 21st century learning and innovation skills and learn how to infuse them into required content to guide students to see the relevance of their learning. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 4

COMBINED SESSION CURRICULUM STUDIES

Friday

Empowering Gifted Students as Agents of Change DeAnna Beam, Benton School District, Benton, AR Gifted learners view issues with more passion, analyze situations with more insight, and seek information with more voracity. These students are capable of making a difference, and teachers can empower them as agents of change! Capture energy and ability with engaging, empowering, real-world research projects that begin with relevant problem statements, interject student-developed solutions, and measure real-world results. Learn strategies for implementing authentic research projects, gain insight on finding and utilizing resources, and glean tips for collaborating with colleagues and community members. Walk away with clear-cut flow charts, assessment checklists, and rubrics to make the process manageable. Audience: Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

22

Design Thinking For Gifted Students Liz Albert, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD Design, or Design Thinking, is an organizational principle for problem solving that supports important 21st century skills such as visual and technological literacy, creative problem solving, communication, and teamwork. In this session, participants learn how design thinking can be incorporated across the curriculum -- in mathematics, science, environmental studies, language arts, history, and art -- to support the needs of gifted learners. Participants experience the design process first hand and see it implemented in lesson plans developed through a collaboration between New Orleans public school teachers and students and experts from the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 7

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


CURRICULUM STUDIES

CURRICULUM STUDIES

14.3 Perspective-Taking: Exploring Students Choices of Cognitive Moves During Disagreements Among Friends

12.3 Utilizing Shared Inquiry to Improve Academic and Social Progress

Cooperative and collaborative learning environments encourage the growth of constructive argumentation that leads to conflict resolution. In this study, examine perspectivetaking within friendships of gifted learners as well as high and average-ability students from high school and university. How do students use cognitive moves such as maintaining the same position, asking for explanations, and modifying one’s position during disagreements with their friends. Overall, undergraduates accord less importance to all three variables compared to high school students. Learning objectives include examining possible links between cognitive moves and the task-oriented competitive goals across school and academic performance levels within the groups.

Jordan Lanfair, Diana Beck, Stephen Schroth, Knox College, Galesburg, IL Enrichment services should provide gifted learners with many opportunities to develop talents and capacities as critical readers, writers, thinkers, and speakers. Recent emphasis upon literacy and numeracy as measured only by tests, however, has sometimes resulted in many more sophisticated instructional strategies being excluded. This session explores the benefits of infusing a Junior Great Books experience into arts, social studies, and science education. In doing so, gifted learners may explore new realms of creative expression that consolidate their learning through reading. Materials and sample lessons are provided. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 9-12

MIDDLE GRADES

CURRICULUM STUDIES

O’Henry! Teaching Gifted Adolescents How to Write Using Classic Short Stories

Poetry and Giftedness Michael Clay Thompson, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

Barbara Dullaghan, Bloomington Public Schools, Bloomington, MN

As curricular content, poetry, and the technical poetics used to write poetry have had an ambiguous status. The right things are said about the importance of poetry, but it has not taken a prominent place in most English curricula. Poetry is the victim of obscuring stereotypes, and it is often relegated to the sidelines of education, to be read superficially if a free day occurs. The problem for gifted children is that poetic techniques are a central component of great prose; gifted students who miss poetics miss novels as well. Poetics is critical intellectual content for gifted children.

Many gifted students love to write but may not be able to craft stories that follow the traditional story arc. This session presents strategies for teaching gifted adolescents literary elements and short story writing by analyzing the classic short stories of O’Henry. Using these techniques, students will be able to create prose that follows the classic short story form. Additionally, by framing the concept of perspective, students also learn how to use their own worldviews to enhance their writings. Examples of lessons and assessments that demonstrate the teaching and learning of classic writing is shared.

Audience: Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-8

Room: Belle Chasse

Room: Ascot

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

Friday

Tanya Chichekian, Petra Gyles, Bruce Shore, Cheryl Walker, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada

23


| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM MIDDLE GRADES

MIDDLE GRADES

Academic Success As An Ethnic Identity Among Middle School Gifted Korean American Students

17.1 Bibliotherapy: Gifted Middle School Students Developing an Understanding of Individual Characteristics

Taekhil Jeong, Indiana University Kokomo, Kokomo, IN

Ann Matschiner, Pacific University, Forest Grove, OR

School success is an ethnic identifier for Korean American students, and the identity as an academic achiever is an integral part of self-identity among highly gifted KoreanAmerican students. Through focus group interviews, this study examines the factors that affect the academic achievement of highly gifted Korean American middle school students. The major findings of the current study indicate that the exceptional academic success is attributed to six personality factors and two contextual factors; the personality factor refers to the each individuals internal attributes and the contextual factor is defined as the influences of their immediate Korean-specific ethnic environments.

The presenter shares how gifted middle level students use bibliotherapy to influence understanding of their gifted characteristics. The study considers meaningful connections and insights by assessing the gifted middle level studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; understanding of their own characteristics before and after reading young adult literature with gifted characters and learning about gifted characteristics. Student discussions and a variety of projects conveying gifted students learning are presented. This session offers participants a framework for an effective and easy-toimplement differentiated project with handouts.

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 6-12

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-8 MIDDLE GRADES

Room: Cambridge MIDDLE GRADES

Middle School GPS: Helping Gifted Students Navigate Adolescence

Assessing Adolescent Learning in the 21st Century

Julie Donaldson, Bloomington Public Schools, Maple Grove, MN

Catherine Susewind, Great Neck Middle School; Eric Bone, Kemps Landing Magnet School, Virginia Beach, VA

Group gifted adolescents together + a rigorous curriculum = good gifted programming! Missing from this equation is one critical component: an effective way to nurture the social and emotional growth of our top students. Providing students with a rigorous course of study along with strategies to navigate the challenges of adolescence is important, especially because gifted tweens and teens often experience those challenges more intensely. Learn how to infuse a social and emotional curriculum into your gifted program as the presenter shares a cost-effective, user-friendly model for meeting the social and emotional needs of gifted adolescents.

If we want our students to be motivated learners who are truly engaged in the learning process, achieve at high levels, and produce quality evidence of their learning, we must involve students in the assessment process. Research shows that students who can accurately assess their own work are more likely to become independent, self-directed learners. This session teaches practical strategies that can be used to deepen gifted studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; understanding by making them partners in the assessment process. Learn how to develop assessment criteria with your students and provide effective, appropriate feedback for students through self, peer, and teacher evaluation. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers 6-8

Audience: Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers 6-8 Room: Grand Salon 13

Room: Grand Salon 18

24

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

MIDDLE GRADES

PARENT & COMMUNITY

A Legacy of Letters: Using Primary Sources for Classical Mentorship

Technology and 21st Century Parenting Arlene DeVries, Drake University, Des Moines, IA

Jamie MacDougall, Purdue University, Duluth, MN The personal and professional letters of Darwin, Dickinson, Rilke, Carroll, Rachel Carson, Wolfe; exchanges between Jefferson and the Adamses, Hawthorne and Melville, 7BO7FUDIFOBOE)VHIFTQSPWJEFIJTUPSJDBMWJFXTPGXPSMET of discovery via primary sources. This session outlines the use of critical and creative-thinking skills as students learn to identify, analyze, and evaluate the primary sources of eminent minds. Learn how to take these penned notes and organize them into mentorship opportunities from the masters in your own classroom. The interdisciplinary nature of this material provides connections for all middle grades teachers regardless of grade, subject area, or experience.

As parents, are we role models for our children in the use of technology? The intensity of gifted students and their perfectionistic tendencies can lead to technology addiction. This session provides statistics regarding adult and child technology use, and the negative consequences from excessive screen time. A recent study indicated that more than two hours a day spent watching television or playing computer games can put a child at greater risk for psychological problems. Tips are provided on limiting technology, guidance on keeping children safe from negative Internet sites, and strategies for increasing communication and family time. Audience: Counselors, Parents Room: Grand Salon 12

Room: Jasperwood PARENT & COMMUNITY MIDDLE GRADES

Preassessment: The Linchpin of Defensible Differentiation Tracy Inman, Julia Link Roberts, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY Without preassessment, it is difficult to determine what learning has occurred. Answers given on the end assessment may very well have been known if a preassessment had been given. Think of the learning that could have gone on during that time period! Preassessment makes differentiation possible; it is what makes differentiation defensible. Based on readiness, learning profile, and interests, preassessment helps determine appropriate content, process, product, and assessment for each child. Designed for the middle school educator, this session focuses on practical preassessment strategies complete with practice, preassessment samples, and student examples.

19.4 Advancing Support for Gifted Education in your Community

Friday

Audience: Counselors, Classroom Teachers 6-12

Rebecca Eckert, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Joan Jacobs, Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln, NE Looking for innovative ways to help decision makers and community members recognize the value of gifted education? Often, a positive, proactive approach is the best way to avoid budgetary cutbacks or program elimination and to build support for continued growth and development of the services and options gifted students need to achieve. Whether you are working with a group or acting alone, this session provides you with tips, tools, and techniques for generating enthusiasm and support for gifted programs and services while also helping you strengthen and enrich the communication between home, school, and community. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers 6-8 Room: Oak Alley

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

25


| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Creating Community And Engagement In Professional Development

Using Peer Coaching as a Form of Professional Development: The Catalyst for Change

Mary Slade, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA

Deborah Dailey, Alicia Cotabish, University of Arkansas at Little Rock; Krystal Nail, Arkansas Department of Education, Little Rock, AR

Professional development is greatly enhanced when participants become a community of learners who actively engage with the training content. This session focuses on techniques and strategies that specifically help professional development facilitators in gifted education build community among participants or students as well as promote their engagement in the learning process. University professors and district staff developers benefit from the methodologies and activities presented during the session. Exemplary strategies and activities are demonstrated and distributed to the session attendees. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators

Friday

Room: Grand Salon 21

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Room: Grand Salon 10

20.4 Changing Mindsets: Teaching How to Cultivate Intelligence Through an Online Book Study

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Kathy Marks, Gwinnett County Public Schools, Lawrenceville, GA Is intelligence completely natural or developed by effort? Are you in a fixed or growth mindset? How can we help our students see it’s about learning new things, not looking good with high grades? All audiences are invited to find out how an elementary school utilized Carol Dweck’s Mindset in an online book study to change teacher, staff, and student mindsets about intelligence and learning. Students of all races, ethnicities, incomes, and backgrounds can benefit from educators who encourage love of learning and development of intelligence and talent through oldfashioned hard work and effort. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

26

Teachers need ongoing and sustained professional development in order to transfer learning to the classroom. Peer coaching is a form of embedded professional development that allows learning to be extended beyond the initial training and also can be utilized in training classroom teachers and administrators. This session focuses on utilizing peer coaching at the classroom and district level as a catalyst for change. Participants learn peer coaching techniques that can be used to train classroom teachers in specific content areas like science, and with GT program administrators to carry out program action plans.

23.1 Principals as Stakeholders Julie Lenner McDonald, Sandusky City Schools, Sandusky, OH; Todd Kettler, Coppell ISD, Coppell, TX Principals make decisions on a daily basis that impact gifted children’s access to an education commensurate to their abilities. This session shares the experiences of principals and how they support gifted education. The essence of these experiences forms a foundational understanding from which we can learn. This learning has the possibility of impacting how we advocate for policy and practice reform in curriculum, instruction, and assessment as well as for the social-emotional well-being of gifted students. Participants gain insight and practical strategies for working with building administrators on behalf of gifted students. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


RESEARCH & EVALUATION

24.2 Profiles of Mathematics Giftedness: An Examination of Content Mastery, Metacognition, and Accelerated Course Success Adena Young, University of California, San Francisco, CA What does it mean to be mathematically gifted? Do all mathematically gifted students think and perform the same on math-related tasks? Four profiles are presented of

mathematically gifted middle and high school students, all of whom exhibit high levels of mathematics achievement at school based on their mathematics content mastery, metacognitive abilities, and performance in accelerated mathematics courses. This study gives researchers, mathematics teachers, and parents a deeper understanding of the components that make students gifted in mathematics. Implications for future research and practice in schools are discussed. Audience: Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 6-12

COMBINED SESSION Test Speededness - An Overlooked Threat to Reliability and Validity Emily Hailey, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA Reliability and validity are integral concepts in assessment design. Test speededness, the influence of time constraints on test-taker performance, is an often overlooked threat to both reliability and validity, especially in classroom-based testing. This study evaluates the degree of test speededness of classroombased assessments that have been developed and tested for a curricular reading intervention study with third grade gifted students. The results of the study inform researchers about whether the validity and reliability estimates for classroom assessments are sound and therefore whether the subsequent analyses from the assessments are reasonable. Audience: Researchers

Predictors of Attitudes Toward Gifted Programs: Support vs. Perceptions of Elitism Among Pre-Service Teachers Jae Yup Jung, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW, Australia

Friday

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

In this study, a number of cultural orientation, sociodemographic, academic achievement, and personal/ personal experience variables are investigated to establish whether they predict attitudes toward the provision of programs for gifted students. A survey completed by 103 Australian pre-service teachers is analyzed using confirmatory factor analysis and multiple regression analysis. The findings suggest that: self-perceptions of giftedness and high academic achievement in high school predict support for gifted programs, and low power distance orientation, selfperceptions of giftedness, low perceived knowledge of giftedness, and contact with gifted persons predict the perception that gifted programs are elitist. Audience: Researchers Room: Grand Salon 19

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

27


| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM RESEARCH & EVALUATION

SPECIAL POPULATIONS

26.3 A Pilot Study of Total School Cluster Grouping in Urban Schools

Successful Transition and Integration Of Underrepresented Populations into a Gifted Learning Environment: One School’s Approach

Rachelle Miller, Marcia Gentry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN The Total School Cluster Grouping model has been shown to improve student achievement and positively influence teacher practices. Previous research has shown that over time, more students are identified as high-achieving and fewer students identified as low-achieving. Nine urban elementary schools comprised the matched-comparison sample. Extant achievement data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and repeated measures to examine how TSCG affected student identification and achievement scores after first year of implementation. Results showed improvement in math scores in most treatment schools and an increase in the number of low-income and minority students identified as high-achieving.

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5 SPECIAL POPULATIONS

I Do Belong Here: Increasing Minority Student Retention and Success in AP Courses Holly Hertberg-Davis, Carolyn Callahan, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA While participation of minority students in AP courses has risen dramatically, retention and success rates lag behind. A fiveyear, Javits-funded project is investigating the impact of social and emotional supports on minority student success in AP courses. This session explores preliminary findings indicating that a structured system of supports (including summer bridge programs; social events; study groups; and relationshipbuilding between students, teachers, and counselors) has dramatic impacts on student retention and re-enrollment rates in AP courses and on students’ beliefs in their ability to tackle challenging curriculum. Practical recommendations for school systems looking to implement similar programs are offered. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 9-12

Jennifer Mangum, Emalie Dunn, Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts, Natchitoches, LA Since 2003, the Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts has successfully aided in the transition and integration of underrepresented populations into its gifted learning environment. The school decided to proactively help these students transition into the community through the EXCEL program, which is a recruiting and retention program that uses a summer bridge program combined with faculty mentoring to help promote the graduation of underrepresented populations. In this session, presenters detail ACT improvements and graduation rates, structure and staffing of the bridge component, failures and successes of EXCEL, and anecdotal data on post-graduate student success. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Grand Salon 6 SPECIAL POPULATIONS

27.4 Helping Gifted Minorities Enhance Creative Abilities Through Exposure to Different Cultures Daehyun Kim, University of Georgia, Athens, GA Multicultural experiences are important in developing children’s creativity, and developing creativity is beneficial for the growth of achievement, especially for gifted minority students. This session focuses on the ways of enhancing creative abilities through exposure to different cultures with gifted minority students. The presenter also shares unique characteristics of gifted minorities and suggests how to provide culturally responsive education as parents, teachers, and educators who understand students’ diverse backgrounds. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-5

Room: Chequers

28

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

30.2 Teaching Social Skills, Anger Management, and ProblemSolving Techniques

It Takes a Village to Help TwiceExceptional Children Thrive in School

This session demonstrates how we use the Second Step program along with individual learning plans at our school to help improve behavior, attitude, and self-esteem. This presentation shows how to teach social skills, help students succeed socially, and how to avoid aggression towards peers. Presenters demonstrate a variety of techniques to use with the students. The presenters focus on empathy skills, emotion management, and anger management. 7JUBMTLJMMTOFFEFEUPIFMQZPVSTUVEFOUTBQQMZFNPUJPO management and problem-solving strategies are presented.

Karen Rogers, University of St. Thomas, Minneapolis, MN Project 2Excel, a Javits-funded program, has experienced remarkable success in helping twice-exceptional learners (and their teachers!) thrive in self-contained gifted classrooms. This presentation focuses on how one urban school has used the team approach to developing student â&#x20AC;&#x153;profilesâ&#x20AC;? that collaboratively use the school nurse, school social worker, the special education teachers, and the classroom teacher when the achievement, motivation, and self-efficacy of these remarkable children are at stake. The actual profile form used by this team as well as examples of the changes it has wrought for specific children, are shared.

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-5

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-8

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

Room: Napoleon Ballroom

31.3 Still Just Regular Teens: The Lived Experiences of Eight Early-Entrance College Students

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

Alexander Pagnani, University of Georgia, Athens, GA This session introduces attendees to the lives of eight, current, early-entrance college students, as illustrated by their own words and experiences. What motivated these students to leave high school behind and move on to college when they were only 14-16 years old? How have they coped with the increased academic pressure, and how have their social lives been affected? Most importantly, are they happy with their decisions, and would they advise other highly gifted students to consider doing the same? Attendees also receive information regarding early entrance programs nationwide that may be helpful in advising their own students. Audience: Administrators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 9-12

Friday

Wanda Smith, Patricia Hollingsworth, Lisa Perrault, University School at the University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK

34.1 Discover Gems and Go Beyond The Books - Connecting 21st Century Skills for the Gifted Robin Owens, Frederick County Public Schools; Joy Kirk, Admiral Byrd Middle School, Winchester, VA The longitudinal approach to gifted education in Frederick County Public Schools meets the criterion for addressing the 21st century skills needed by gifted students. Elementary, middle, and high school teachers work to develop a curriculum that builds on studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; prior knowledge and experiences in order to develop depth and increase community involvement. Serving 14,000 students in 19 schools, 6 full-time and one part-time gifted resource teachers serve gifted students on a budget any school system could support! Please join an elementary, middle, and high school gifted resource teacher to experience a 3-in1 successful gifted resource program. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

Chart(Er)Ing a Course to the Future: The Palmetto Scholars Academy Stacey Lindbergh, Palmetto Scholars Academy, Charleston, SC; Shelagh Gallagher, Engaged Education, Charlotte, NC The Palmetto Scholars Academy is a charter school for gifted students in grades 6-8, with plans to expand to twelfth grade by 2015. Starting a charter school presents both opportunities and challenges that are different from starting a private school or a traditional public school. Come and hear how dedicated parents and community members have joined to make this dream a reality. Hear the story of how the charter application was approved, the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s curriculum model, strategies for recruiting students and staff, and fundraising ventures along with our triumphs, frustrations, tips, and tricks learned along the way.

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Marlborough A STEM

Crashing Through The Glass Ceiling Of Middle School Math Steven Haas, Gifted Development Center, Littleton, CO Typical programming for mathematically gifted middle schoolers provides a yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s acceleration into algebra in 7th grade and geometry in 8th grade, but the mathematical needs of exceptionally gifted students often require more. Interventions should focus on deeper and wider explorations,

different instructional approaches to accommodate studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; learning styles, and compacting and acceleration that break out of lock-step instructional sequencing and are open-ended into even more advanced material. The presentation provides lots of classroom-ready instructional strategies for a sampler of algebra topics, using the presenterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s extensive experience teaching and mentoring mathematically precocious students. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Grand Salon 22 STEM

36.2 Managing Math Contests in the Regular Classroom Sarah Lee; Kim Allen, Athens Meigs Educational Service Center, Athens, OH Looking for an innovative approach to the application of math skills? Math contests have proven to be a great way to incorporate fun into the classroom with the incentive of students winning scholarships/prizes/prestige. Without sacrificing lunch, planning, or personal time, regular classroom teachers can manage the contests based on the MathCounts Model. Following this inspiring technique, participants leave the session with the ability to manage student movement, math exercises, grading, and credit. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers 6-12

Poster Sessions

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


| Mini Keynotes Friday, November 4, 2011 | 8:45 AM - 10:15 AM

Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Catherine Little, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT ; Tamra Stambaugh, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN; William E. Harner, Cumberland Valley School District, Mechanicsburg, PA; Jennifer Hoffman, Waldwick School District, Waldwick, NJ; Kelly A. Hedrick, Virginia Beach City Public Schools, Virginia Beach, VA Differentiation has become the new buzzword in the field of education. It is being used to describe any individualized effort in classrooms for students with many different profiles, only some of whom are gifted. Has this term, which originated within gifted education, been hijacked and its meaning and application corrupted? Has differentiation dissolved into a new philosophy of individualization of learning for everyone? Since most gifted children are served primarily in heterogeneous classrooms, a major issue facing gifted educators is defining what really constitutes an appropriate education. In this session you will hear leading researchers and practitioners give their views on what differentiation really is and what it is not.

Critical Questions in Talent Development: Answered through 40 Years of Longitudinal Research by Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth (SMPY) David Lubinski, Camilla Benbow, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN What has SMPY learned in 40 years? Who among talent search participants become eminent and creative as adults? Do educational interventions in adolescence boost adult creativity and professional accomplishment? Can we enhance the likelihood that true excellence will emerge? What happens to mathematically talented women? Do we systematically miss certain groups of individuals with current talent search procedures? These and other compelling questions on talent development will be addressed using longitudinal data collected over four decades on 5,000 talent search participants within the top 1% in ability. Room: Jefferson Ballroom

Stereotypes and the Nature and Nurture of Intelligence Joshua Aronson, New York University, New York, NY

Room: Napoleon Ballroom

Want to Know More about NAGC Networks? Learn more about the NAGC Networks before and after the Mini-Keynotes on Friday and Saturday at information tables in Court Assembly on the third floor.

Friday

Separating the Wheat from the Chaff: What Really Constitutes Differentiation for Gifted Learners?

This thought-provoking session goes beyond the concept of stereotype threat, self-esteem, motivation, and attitudes to explore the nature and the nurture of human intelligence. For more than a decade, Dr. Joshua Aronson has been studying stereotypes, working closely with Claude Steele on exploring the phenomenon of stereotype threat. The presenter also discusses the social conditions that promote intelligent thought and those that impair it. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll learn how to use this knowledge to help your students perform better on tests, maintain motivation in the face of challenges, and enjoy the learning process. Room: Versailles Ballroom

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent & Poster Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM Exhibit Hall open | 9:00 AM 5:00 PM

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

SIGNATURE SERIES

1.1 Mind The Gap! Engaging Gifted Digital Natives Through Technology In The Classroom

Best Practices in Using Standardized Tests to Identify Talent Among Low Income And ELL Children David Lohman, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

Friday

Effective talent identification requires measuring both the general and specific aptitudes needed for rapid learning in particular academic domains. Nonverbal tests help measure general abilities but not the specific aptitudes and other personal characteristics needed to excel academically. A simple but highly effective way to consider both general and specific aptitudes is to use local and subgroup norms. Thus, one measures similar abilities and achievements for all children but then uses local or subgroups norms to better account for differences in opportunity to learn. Such norms are easy to compute using a spreadsheet and to identify academic talent in all children. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers

Kristy Mall, The Discovery School, Murfreesboro, TN As teachers of the gifted, we must be prepared to teach our digital natives in ways that are both engaging and effective. In this session, explore why they must be taught differently by exploring differences in their processing, learning styles, and how they retain information, as well as the effect of “velcro learning” in classes that don’t utilize technology. In addition, attendees walk away with strategies, free resources, videoconferencing opportunities, grant resources, podcasting and software overviews, lesson ideas, and sound websites that can be utilized in classrooms of all ages and disciplines to create globally competitive students. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Versailles Ballroom

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

ARTS

Keeping Up with Digital Natives!

1.2 Let’s Dance to All that Jazz! Developing Artistic and Social Intelligence with Partner Dancing

Jennifer Lemoine, Red Hawk Ridge Elementary, Parker, CO; Christy Green, Polton Elementary, Englewood, CO

Bronwyn MacFarlane, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR Partner dancing skills can be a source of enjoyment and social benefit. However, opportunities for children to learn to socially partner dance are not widely taught despite that the need for developing humanitarian competencies is at an all-time high. This Big Easy session focuses on how to use partner dance education for developing aesthetic appreciation, artistic expression, social intelligence, and emotional awareness among the gifted and talented. Participants examine the current context of K-12 dance education in the 21st century and explore remedies for incorporating relevant dance education into the arts curriculum to resonate with bodily-kinesthetic talented children.

Do you have students who can text, watch video, listen to an iPod and not miss a beat? We are teaching digital natives in the 21st century using 20th century methods. We need to learn to present materials in an engaging format for our techno multitaskers. Participants in this session learn the basics of using notebook software with or without an interactive white board to create engaging lessons across content areas. Attendees learn various strategies for integrating notebook software into their daily lessons as well as into centers and as assessment tools. Audience: Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-5 Room: Marlborough B

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

Bridging the Digital Divide: How to Encourage High-Ability Girls to Pursue Advanced Coursework in Technology

Answering the ‘Why’ and ‘How’ of Integrating Gifted Programming and Response To Intervention

Vicky Blanas, Amy Gyarmathy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

Heather Baskin, Mesa County Valley School District #51, Grand Junction, CO

Recent research indicates that while girls have narrowed the gender gaps in math and science, the gap is actually broadening in technology. Undergraduate women majoring in computer science has dropped 79% between 2000 and 2008. While the Center for Talent Development’s first-year research confirmed that young elementary girls are more likely to take tech courses, it also confirmed that this likelihood decreases with age. What steps can be taken to encourage continued participation? CTD’s strategies for developing programs, securing grant funding, and working with girls in the classroom are discussed, along with survey results, class observations, and case studies.

RtI was born out of the reauthorization of Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and is often conceptualized as the pathway to special education; however, the RtI model supports every student needing something outside of the standard norm (with or without technical qualifications). Participants explore the foundations of RtI with a gifted education lens, and apply this knowledge to effective student programming. This session also outlines an individual school model used to integrate RtI and gifted education, while providing suggestions to fit other systems already in place. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-8

Room: Ascot

Room: Grand Salon 21

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

Advancing Potential Through Inventive Thinking: Focusing on 21st Century Skills

6.3 How do Preservice Teachers Conceptualize Giftedness? A Metaphor Analysis Jill Olthouse, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV Most of the teachers that gifted children interact with have no training in gifted education. What preconceptions do they bring to the classroom about the origins, expressions, and value of giftedness? This questionis answered by analyzing the metaphors that preservice teachers create regarding gifted students. The metaphor of a gifted child as a “diamond in the rough,” for example, would equate to a conceptualization of giftedness as rarity, potentiality, and commodity. Attend this session and compare preservice teachers’ conceptions of giftedness to the conceptualizations of prominent researchers in the field and discuss classroom implications.

Friday

Virtual Session

Poster Session

Felicia Dixon, Ball State University, Muncie, IN The importance of intellectual capital is highlighted in the current document on 21st century skills. Gifted adolescents are highly able to meet the cognitive challenges of inventive thinking, focusing on creativity and risk-taking experiences. These tasks, laced with creative and critical reasoning provide challenge and rigor for gifted adolescents. Dweck cautions that test scores tell where a student is, but they do not tell us where a student could end up! Focusing on current trends and needs, the presenter suggests strategies for growth, the theory supporting growth, and how to meet the demand for rigor. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Rosedown

Audience: Coordinators, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent & Poster Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

Using Policy Definitions to Improve Gifted Education

The Asynchronous Cheetah: Integrating Metaphor and Definition for Practical Use in the 21st Century

Rebecca Eckert, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Jane Clarenbach, NAGC, Washington, DC Definitions of giftedness can be powerful, determining not only who will qualify to receive gifted education services, but also which services are offered, when they are offered, and even why they are offered. Join us for a conversation about the current policy landscape and the central role of a policy definition among the interdependent components of effective gifted education programming. Advocates and practitioners leave this session with ideas and suggestions for how policy-related definitions develop a lasting support system that recognizes all gifted students and sustains their growth and continued achievement at the federal, state, and local level.

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers

Stephanie Tolan, Institute for Educational Advancement, Charlotte, NC Two expressions of foundational concepts of giftedness, the cheetah metaphor and the Columbus Group definition of giftedness as Asynchronous Development, entered the world in 1992 to challenge the idea that giftedness could/should be equated with achievement. Since then, both have spread around the world and helped to shape attitudes toward the gifted, but both have also given rise to interpretations that fail to grasp their full implications. This session integrates the two and provides a fuller exploration of their complexity in order to help us truly meet the needs of a new generation of asynchronous cheetahs. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Grand Salon 13 Room: Belle Chasse

COMBINED SESSION CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

Frenemies: The Fit Between Gifted Education and Special Education

Policy Perspectives on Gifted Identification

Claire Hughes, College of Coastal Georgia, Brunswick, GA

Scott Hunsaker, Utah State University, Logan, UT; Paul Shepherd, Utah Asssociation for Gifted Children, Salt Lake City, UT

Is gifted education part of special education? What happens when a professional in one has a child in the other? This session examines the shared and diverging histories, policies, philosophies, and directions of the two fields. More recently, special education and gifted education are working with similar issues of inclusion, RtI, and educational reform, however, there are some key differences in histories, assumptions about best practices, and diversity issues. It is critical that professionals understand each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s viewpoints and concerns in order to more effectively advocate for scarce resources. Learn about implications for practice and policies. Audience: Administrators, Parents

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Policy has been defined as the rules and standards by which scarce resources are allocated to unlimited wants and needs. Each element of this definition--determining need, allocating resources, and establishing rules--is examined from the foundational perspectives of gifted identification and policy studies, with a special emphasis given to the complex nature of the task of policy formation. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents Room: Marlborough A

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

Gifted Friendships: Perceived Versus Actual Numbers of Friends Bruce Shore, Tanya Chichekian, Petra Gyles, Cheryl Walker, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada Our previous research indicates that intellectually gifted students may have more specialized expectations for their friends, inside and outside school, whereas other students might have more common expectations for the benefits gained from all of their friends. The current study further examines the role of friendships for gifted students amongst

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

several different groups of high school and university students. Questions are asked regarding how many friends these individuals currently have and how many friends they ideally would like to have. Learning objectives include gaining further insight into how this information can increase knowledge regarding an important aspect of socialemotional well-being. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 15

COMBINED SESSION Surviving the Deluge: Trying to Understand the Characteristics Individuals who are Gifted And Talented

Recognizing and Developing Potential

Royal Toy, Dana Seymour, Mississippi University for Women, Columbus, MS

The word “potential” commonly appears in definitions of giftedness, gifted education program goals, or in mission statements of school districts. What is the nature of potential? To what degree can we know and/or measure a person’s potential? If we know the degree of a person’s potential, then what do we do to help them reach their full potential? The areas commonly associated with potential are: intelligence, creativity, giftedness, and emotional self. Participants gain a new understanding of potential and how their conception has an impact on defining, identifying, and providing services in gifted and regular education settings.

This session examines assumptions relating to characteristics of gifted and talented learners. Discussion focuses on a review of literature as well as survey research regarding these characteristics, and the implications for current/future practices with identification, research, and services. Participants leave this session with a comprehensive understanding of traditional characteristics. Participants are tasked with forming either a more comprehensive approach to identification or looking for sub-groups of characteristics to create new types of learners who are gifted and talented. Which characteristics are most important? Or do they all hold the same value for identification?

Stuart Omdal, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO

Friday

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Fountain

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent & Poster Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

This Isn’t your Grandmother’s Classroom: Expanding the Theory of Developmental Differentiation for 21st Century Citizens

Minority Student Attitudes Toward AP Courses: Preliminary Findings from the AP Challenge Program

Barbara Hutton, Barbara Mitchell Hutton Consulting, Broomfield, CO; Kathi Kearney, Project Excel, Berwick, ME

Robert Izzo, Mona Mohammad Alimin, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA; Michael Matthews, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC

Friday

In 1990, the Columbus Group defined giftedness as asynchronous development, yet two decades later, approaches to differentiation seldom consider complex multiple layers of individual developmental asynchrony. Many modifications differentiate curriculum, but do not match the wide-ranging asynchronous development of the individual child. This session expands the theory of developmental differentiation, focusing on the asynchronous developmental paths of gifted individuals. %SBXJOHVQPOUIFPSJTUT7ZHPUTLZ %BCSPXTLJ )PMMJOHXPSUI  and Feldman, explore the wider and deeper development of the gifted individual required in the 21st century, and how developmental differentiation differs from common practice in today’s schools. Practical implementation strategies are provided.

Minorities are underrepresented in high school Advanced Placement courses. AP Challenge Program is a longitudinal intervention project, addressing the root causes of this problem. The goals of APCP include cognitive and affective outcomes assessed by the School Attitude Assessment Survey-Revised and the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory. Data from APCP students focusing on student’s perceptions of the APCP serve as a basis for helping conference participants understand the challenges and adaptations students make to those challenges. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 9-12 Room: Grand Salon 7

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 24 COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

The Gifted Child’s Guide to Making True Friends Leighann Pennington, TVT Community Day School, Irvine, CA How can parents, teachers, and counselors help gifted children find true friends? How do the challenges of asynchronous development and finding intellectual peers impact gifted children in their quest for true friendship? Leave this session with practical advice from a gifted educator and a school counselor, including tips, discussion points, book recommendations for all ages, and encouraging anecdotes that will light the way along the journey to finding true friends with your gifted child! Audience: Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

9.2 Research into Cyberbullying and High-Achieving Students Melissa Mitchell, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT Cyberbullying is one of the hottest topics in the online news world. Based on doctoral dissertation research, this presentation provides insight into the development of a more accurate profile of a cyberbully and a cyberbullying target. What are the specific actions reported by those involved in cyberbullying. What is the extent to which students report an understanding of the consequences of Internet behaviors? Are there specific characteristics that are more significantly related than others to being a cyberbully and to being cyberbullied? More specifically, this research creates a profile of high-ability students who are involved in cyberbullying. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Windsor

36

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

CREATIVITY

CREATIVITY

Partners in Innovation: Creative and Spatial Abilities

Gifted Authors and Artists Come Alive: The 2011 Torrance Legacy Awards

Steve Coxon, Maryville University, St. Louis, MO

Joan Smutny, The National Louis University, Wilmette, IL; John Kauffman, Scholastic Testing Service, Bensenville, IL; Jason Helfer, Stephen Schroth, Knox College, Galesburg, IL

Audience: Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Grand Salon 19

Since 2009, gifted and talented elementary through high school students have been submitting their best work to the Torrance Legacy Awards. In honor of creativity pioneer, E. Paul Torrance, the project recognizes exceptional young writers and artists from all parts of the country and even overseas. Five facilitators share their experiences as sponsors for the competition and provide insight into the process through the creative submissions of contestants. The session also explores how teachers can involve their students in the competition as well as how they can inspire and support creative composition in their own classrooms. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

CREATIVITY

Creativity x 3 Carolyn Coil, Pieces of Learning, Marion, IL Important 21st century learning skills - creative problem solving and critical and creative thinking - are showcased in this interactive session. This session uses three user-friendly formats - Questivities, SCAMPER and Encounter Lessons, appropriate for enhancing creativity in gifted students. Each provides ways for students to consider and answer a series of divergent questions. These questions stimulate outsidethe-box thinking, give practice in both research skills and storytelling, and provide a springboard for students to develop creative products and performances. Participants will see examples of each format and actively participate in one minilesson in each format. Audience: Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 3

Room: Melrose CREATIVITY

Friday

What do Picasso, Einstein, Gehry, and Tesla have in common? Spatial and creative abilities! Both abilities are needed for innovation, which requires both originality and the need to visualize something that does not yet exist. A sculpture, a film, an artificial lumbar disc, and a robotic submarine are all examples of products that required both abilities to innovate. Both abilities are improvable in schools. The session begins with a brief overview of the research on both abilities and ends with fun activities to stretch both abilities that you can use in your classroom tomorrow to stretch your students.

Give ‘Em a Break: The Role Of Recess in 21st Century Classrooms Jo Dale, Remeka Little, Bessemer City Schools, Bessemer, AL Free play that promotes creativity and problem solving and “doing well at school” have become mutually exclusive to many. This perception has resulted in the elimination of one of the last vestiges of creative freedom in schools - recess. Today, more than ever, children need the opportunity during school to get outside and work, interact with nature, and play with their peers, especially our at-risk gifted children living in urban, impoverished areas. When recess is deemed unproductive in a test-centric school, gifted teachers need to rationalize creative outdoor play through instructional objectives, curriculum connections, and teaching resources. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Trafalgar

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent & Poster Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM CURRICULUM STUDIES

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Making Problem-Based Learning Happen

A Defense Of Formal Language Study for Gifted Children

Hilary Dack, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

Michael Clay Thompson, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL Problem-based learning demonstrates increased motivation and development of collaboration and problem-solving skills over traditional instruction. Students can master content in an authentic context as they pursue a creative solution to a messy problem. Putting the units in place, though, can be daunting. Come talk with the authors of several PBL units and see some of the Project Parallax curriculum, which won the NAGC Curriculum Studies award in 2010. We will draw on the development and implementation of six elementary PBL STEM units to explore guidelines in unit creation, address the research, and discuss potential pitfalls. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Gifted children have suffered because recent decades have seen the decline of formal language study in American schools. Every element of formal language study has been attacked; vocabulary, grammar, and academic writing have all been not only neglected but denounced. Many school systems discontinued the study of traditional grammar. Classic literature was replaced with high-interest reading. Serious evaluation of student writing and correction of student errors has been portrayed as inappropriate and even abusive. In the process, schools themselves have become the centers of anti-intellectual influence. It is time to articulate the value of academic language standards.

Friday

Room: Prince of Wales

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Room: Oak Alley

12.1 I Think; Therefore, I Question: Developing Purposeful, Engaging Questioning Strategies

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Sue Harvey, Joan Jacobs, Pat Schock, Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln, NE John Dewey said, “To think is to question.” The role of questioning has morphed into a test prep activity, focused on one right answer. Throughout history, questioning has been a skill of the educated class, a characteristic of the creative individuals, way of life for toddlers. James Thurber wrote, “It is better to know some of the questions than all of the answers.” Students deserve to learn the skill of questioning, not just for a test, but for the inquiry process that leads to future learning. Participants consider the critical role of questioning in achievement, attitude, and attendance. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-12

Learning Styles: What We Know, Don’t Know, and Need to Know Carol Tomlinson, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA Many educators differentiate instruction based on what they believe to be students’ varied learning style preferences. Simultaneously, experts in a number of educational specialties argue that the concept of learning style is ill-informed and that using learning styles in instructional planning amounts to little more than educational quackery. This session examines the vocabulary of learning style to help establish some consistency in thinking about the topic and then explores the objections of experts to using learning styles in the classroom. Finally, the session explores viable instructional practices based on current best thinking about the topic. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Napoleon Ballroom

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


CURRICULUM STUDIES

EARLY CHILDHOOD

14.2 Conceptions of Giftedness: Examining Varying Theories and their Application to Evidence-Based, Differentiated Instruction

Advancing Potential in Information Literacy and Critical-Thinking Skills: 21st Century Skills for Conducting Research Kimberley Chandler, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA

Kimberly McCormick, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN Information literacy and critical thinking, essential competencies for conducting research, are two areas emphasized in 21st century skills. Gifted studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; needs are the context for a discussion about original research in which real-world problems are investigated. The presenter provides a metacognitive scaffold for developing challenging research projects for primary gifted students. The session includes an emphasis on research-based strategies, information about a model of critical thinking for guiding student investigations, and an introduction to digital tools appropriate for use with young gifted children. Participants receive management ideas, project guidelines, assessment ideas, and a bibliography of online resources.

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-8

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Room: Magnolia

Differentiated Instruction Versus Differentiated Curriculum

GLOBAL AWARENESS

Deborah Hazelton, California Association for the Gifted, Los Angeles, CA; Marge Hoctor, Sandra Kaplan, Jessica Manzone, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA Current discussions shift emphasis from what to teach to how to teach. The What (curriculum) and the How (introduction) are symbiotically related; however, most often the terms are considered to be synonymous. Pedagogical practices using classic models of teaching such as group investigation, concept attainment, and advance organizer are demonstrated to illustrate how the principles of a differentiated curriculum can be integrated into these pedagogical practices. Data from a five-year Javits grant studying the effects of differentiated instruction with diverse gifted students are shared with lessons to exemplify and reinforce the relationship between differentiated curriculum and instruction. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Friday

When working with gifted and talented students, it is essential that best practices are put into place. Curriculum and instruction should be designed and implemented according to their unique needs. This session provides a brief overview of the varying ideas and conceptions of giftedness and highlights the reasons behind the variation in definitions, draws attention to the research surrounding evidence-based, differentiated gifted and talented instruction, and finally offers recommendations for curriculum and instruction models that can be implemented in todays schools.

The Universe in a Single Atom: The Convergence of Science and Spirituality Belinda Veillon, Nippersink School District, Richmond, IL; Michele Kane, Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL This is the seventh year that the Global Awareness network offers a book club selection for group discussion. The Universe in a Single Atom: The Convergence of Science and Spirituality by the Dalai Lama is the featured book. The purpose of this work is an effort to examine two important human disciplines for the purpose of developing a more holistic and integrated way of understanding the world around us. Participants are invited to share their views with regards to implications for gifted education as well as explore how these topics address the social and emotional needs of gifted individuals. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Chequers

Room: Elmwood

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent & Poster Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM GLOBAL AWARENESS

MIDDLE GRADES

16.1 The Schoolwide Enrichment Model (SEM) Type II Skills: Multicultural Awareness and Creativity Development

Building Resilience in Girls During the Middle Grades

Daehyun Kim, University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Katherine Brown, Judia Jackson Harris Elementary Charter School, Athens, GA

The notion that successful girls will automatically become successful, fulfilled women is incorrect. The specific need for building resilience among girls shows itself in the continuing dropping out of professional careers among women. Forty percent leave professions mid-career and more than half exit science, engineering, and mathematics careers. Resilience in competition and coping with unfriendly environments for women still play major roles that lead to inequities. The middle school years are crucial for sensitizing girls to the strength and perseverance required to make contributions to society. Examples of programs for teaching resilience are shared.

Friday

Types I, II, and III from Renzulli’s Schoolwide Enrichment Model (SEM) are important for children to learn based on their interests and strengths. Particularly, Type II skills are essential to helping students become lifelong learners in authentic situations. This session focuses on sharing class experiences that were designed to enhance creative abilities by developing Type II skills, including multicultural awareness, moral reasoning, making analogies, comparing, contrasting, and creative problem solving through exposure to different cultures such as Korean and other Asian cultures.

Audience: Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Jefferson Ballroom

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-5 MIDDLE GRADES

17.2 Diffusin’, Oozin’ And Schmoozin’: A Differentiated Approach to Microscopy Tracy Carney, Sterling School, Greenville, SC Want to capitalize on adolescent desires to work with their friends, use manipulatives, view cool videos, and perform hands-on activities? In this workshop, middle school teachers see how a student-centered unit utilizes a plethora of strategies to engage and motivate high-achieving students as they learn about the microscopic world. Many learning styles are accommodated as students work collegially using GIZMOS, United Streaming, textbooks, and lab tools. The focus of this science unit is principles of diffusion and microscopic organisms, but the desire for gifted students to work actively and collaboratively with their peers is applicable across all content areas. Audience: Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers 6-8

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Sylvia Rimm, Family Achievement Clinic, Sheffield Lake, OH

MIDDLE GRADES

Self-Advocacy: Preparing Gifted Students to be Partners in their Own Education Deborah Douglas, Wisconsin Association for Talented and Gifted, Fitchburg, WI The typical adolescent urge for less dependence on parents and guardians makes it especially important for gifted students to take charge of their own education. Too often, however, their naive attempts at self-advocacy fail to bring about the desired change and instead gets them into trouble. Session participants learn to create a series of interactive seminars for gifted teens that will help them discover their own strengths and learn to communicate their needs effectively. Included in the session is a follow-up to the action research on self-advocacy originally published 8 years ago in the Roeper Review. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Grand Salon 22

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

PARENT & COMMUNITY

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

19.3 Parenting the Gifted

22.4 Parents and Professionals Working Together in a Professional Development Model: Theory, Practice, and Innovation

In this poster-session we provide information and support for parents of gifted children. The challenges of parenting gifted children are addressed with information from authentic research. Tips from experienced educator/ parents are shared as the presenters are two educators, who are also parents of grown-up gifted children and have a combined experience of nearly 30 years of parenting, teaching, and advocating for gifted children. The session focuses on the Love and Logic parenting program by Jim Faye, Foster Klein, and Charles Fay. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Parents PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

What’s the Plan? Designing a Teacher Support System for Developing Model Lessons for Gifted Learners Christine Weber, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL; Jodi O’Meara, Jodi O’Meara, Inc., Parrish, FL; Suzanne Rawlins, Volusia County Schools, Deland, FL Do your teachers plan for their gifted students with a fuzzy enrichment idea or fun activity? This session illustrates how to provide guidance toward the development of systematic, intentional, rigorous learning. Participants follow the decision-making path taken by three designers developing rigorous and challenging curricula incorporating the Parallel Curriculum Model, the Florida Frameworks for K-12 Gifted Learners, and research-based practices. Session leaders share issues and challenges faced when taking on such a large scaled project and begin to identify a path for a district, state, or teacher. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 4

Ana Miro-Mejias, University of Puerto Rico, Ro Piedras, San Juan, PR A Parent’s Association for Gifted Children designs, develops, and evaluates a professional development model. This is implemented with teachers from two schools. During the first semester, the teachers attend 7 classes covering several topics including: identification, characteristics, curriculum, team work, creativity, social emotional skills, and administration of programs for gifted students. In the second semester, participants develop and implement a project at their school, related to the topics previously covered. Assistance is provided during this semester through monthly meetings and ongoing communication. Research data is collected to assess knowledge gains, effectiveness of the professional development and adequacy of the projects. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Friday

Gina Lewis, Debra Price, University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

24.3 Acceleration Policies & Possibilities In Canada Lannie Kanevsky, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada; Debbie Clelland, Adler School of Professional Psychology, Vancouver, BC, Canada What types of acceleration are supported by Ministries/ Departments of Education in Canada? Policy and resource documents from all Canadian provinces and territories were analysed to get a comprehensive view of the governments’ positions on each of the 17 forms of acceleration identified by the 2009 Workgroup on Acceleration. Substantial differences were found between the provinces and territories in the nature, strength, and extent of support for these accelerative options. These findings enable advocates to locate resources that support their efforts to expand access to accelerative possibilities in locations where they do not exist, in Canada and beyond. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Researchers

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent & Poster Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM RESEARCH & EVALUATION

A National Study of the Perceptions and Attitudes of High School Principals Toward Gifted Education Carla Bryant, Southern Arkansas University, Magnolia, AR; Ann Robinson, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR

giftedness. The study revealed several distinct attitudes and perceptions of high school principals. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Eglinton and Winton RESEARCH & EVALUATION

The study explored the attitudes and perceptions of high school principals (N = 2000), employed at a public school located in one of 24 states across the nation, toward gifted students and gifted programs. The survey instrument titled, Perceptions and Attitudes of High School Principals Toward Gifted Students and Gifted Education, included 29 questions to measure three specific attitudes and perceptions: support for gifted students and gifted programs, the view of gifted education as an elitist program, and self-perceptions of

Stephanie Robertson, Steven Pfeiffer, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL Gifted students are among the most underserved population in American schools and are some of the most

Friday

COMBINED SESSION RESEARCH & EVALUATION

Combining Scores in Multiple Criteria Assessment: A Psychometric Investigation Matthew McBee, Yi Pan, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; Scott Peters, University of Wisconsin - Whitewater, Whitewater, WI Best practice in gifted and talented identification procedures involves making decisions on the basis of multiple measures; however, the psychometric qualities of identification decisions based on combining scores from multiple measures have not been rigorously investigated. This study used simulation to examine the performance of a multiple-criteria assessment scheme based on Georgia state law. Results indicated that the GA scheme may perform poorly. Alternative methods with better performance are identified. Attendees use assessment criteria to evaluate when considering the use of multiple measures as well as results regarding optimum and more realistic performance of such systems. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Researchers

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Serving The Gifted: A National Survey of School Psychologists

Normalizing Data for Gifted Identification Sharon Ryan, Avoca School District 37, Wilmette, IL National gifted standards recommend that educators select and use multiple assessments that measure diverse abilities, talents, and strengths. As such, gifted coordinators are faced with multiple data types (ability tests, achievement tests, teacher checklists) to analyze in their selection of students for gifted program identification. Considering best practices in gifted identification and using an identification matrix, learn how to normalize these multiple data types using student screening and selection procedures that are statistically accurate. Use of this identification matrix also simplifies the disaggregation of data, which can be used in the identification process of under-served gifted populations. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators Room: Grand Salon 18

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Researchers Room: Cambridge RESEARCH & EVALUATION

26.2 The Relationship Between Differentiated Instruction and Teacher Control in Gifted Clustered Classrooms Xiaopeng Gong, Cheryll Adams, Rebecca Pierce, Ball State University, Muncie, IN As part of a statewide intervention program, the aim of the current study is to examine the possible change of differentiating instruction rate in cluster-grouping classrooms and the impact of differentiation on teacher control. Ninetysix elementary teachers were randomly assigned to three groups, with varying degrees of professional development and curriculum support from gifted education experts. Results indicated the pedagogical and curriculum support significantly increased differentiation (from 23% for baseline data to 71% after intervention), and that classrooms where teachers use differentiated instruction are significantly more learner-directed with lower rates of overt teacher control for learning activities. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5

SPECIAL POPULATIONS

29.4 Where Do I Fit In? : Struggle of African American Males in Gifted Education Programs Candyce Briggs, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; SaDohl Goldsmith, Albany State University, Albany, GA African-American males fall behind both their AfricanAmerican female and White male counterparts; and are more likely to face academic and social challenges. The purpose of this presentation is to understand the affective psychological/ counseling needs of students who are gifted and ethnically or culturally diverse; understand the experiences of gifted Black males; Learn how to address issues of identity among gifted African-Americans; and Learn best practices in working with gifted African-American students as educators to help increase and retain these students in gifted programs. Audience: Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-12 SPECIAL POPULATIONS

Promise Fulfilled or Promises Broken? Exceptionally Gifted Children Grown Up

Friday

underperforming in the world. In order to improve services for the gifted, possible gaps in training and service delivery must first be identified. The presenters conducted a national survey of school psychologists to evaluate the amount of time they allocate for gifted assessment and consultation with teachers and administrators; information was collected about graduate school and in-service training on gifted topics, familiarity with prominent figures in the gifted field, and gifted assessment methods.

Miraca Gross, University of NSW, Sydney, NSW, Australia A 27-year longitudinal study of 60 young adults of IQ 160+ has found that while a minority were assisted to fulfill their remarkable potential, severe, ongoing academic underachievement was imposed on others by schools unwilling to make special provisions. Examine the academic and socio-emotional outcomes of various forms of acceleration and grouping, compared with retention in the mainstream classroom, and discuss the young peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feelings about achievement and underachievement, self-esteem, friendship and love relationships, career choice, family support, and what they believe to be optimal educational environments for highly gifted children and adolescents. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 12

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent & Poster Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM SPECIAL POPULATIONS

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

Proficiency Views of Native Speakers of Spanish: Identifying, Challenging, and Diversifying with AP And IB

30.1 Gifted Science Students’ Interpersonal Abilities and Their Home Environment: Comparisons Between Korean and American Students

Laurie Ecke, Belinda Sauret, West Hall High School, Oakwood, GA What might happen if we built on the unique strengths of students who are native speakers of Spanish and other languages, instead of seeing them as students who needed to learn English before they could be challenged with advanced classes? West Hall High identifies gifted and high-achieving native speakers of Spanish and places them in AP Spanish, honors classes, and then an International Baccalaureate Bilingual Program. Find out how internationalism, language, and a Third Thing combine to create a school environment where diverse gifted students can reach their potential!

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Grand Salon 6

Seon-Young Lee, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea; Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL This presentation is about gifted science and math students’ perceptions of their interpersonal abilities and home environment. Over 450 students from South Korea and the U.S. responded to a survey. The Korean sample attended a specialized science high school, while the American sample attended an outside-of-school academic program for gifted students. Results found differences between these two groups in rating their abilities to interact with others, resolve conflicts, deal with being gifted, and social self-concept. Other differences included perceived emotional closeness and relationships among family members. Results are discussed in association with their special learning environments. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers

SPECIAL POPULATIONS

Using Academics to Enhance Social Skills Among Twice-Exceptional Learners L. Dennis Higgins, Elizabeth Nielsen, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM Just as there are rules for punctuation and sentence formation, there are rules for social behavior. With the growing population of gifted students with disabilities (including Asperger’s syndrome), teachers of the gifted are facing new challenges. How can teachers help twiceexceptional learners acquire the powerful social rules necessary for them to successfully build and maintain friendships? Based on the work of Michelle Garcia-Winner and Temple Grandin, strategies have been designed and classroom tested within programs for twice-exceptional learners in Albuquerque, NM. Examples of how these strategies can be integrated into science and social studies content areas are shared.

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

31.4 Conventional Resources; Unconventional Results Pam Lewandowski, Aleice Gauthier, Central Community Schools, Baton Rouge, LA Building a successful gifted and talented program can be overwhelming because of the lack of support from the community or school, lack of interest, and lack of resources. In this presentation, teachers view examples of collaboration versus competition with regular classroom teachers and how to develop a program that is effective, appealing to students and is an innovative approach to learning. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Grand Salon 9

44

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

The Da Vinci Academy: A 21st Century One-Room 33.4 Jazz Up Your Enrichment Program: Schoolhouse Easy Steps for Enrichment Cluster Implementation

Imagine a school that uses Cloud Computing instead of textbooks and where a student-created museum has replaced the media center; where eager young learners equipped with laptops study a dozen world languages, make movies, and start businesses! Imagine middle school students who are passionate about art, science, and technology engaged in a fully integrated curriculum, earning high school credit, and taking college courses. Imagine it all happening at a fraction PGUIFDPTUPGBUSBEJUJPOBMNJEEMFTDIPPM5IJTJTUIF%B7JODJ Academy in Gainesville, Georgia. Come learn how you can use this approach with your students! Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Katie Bieh, Ellen Sabatini, Allyson Griffith, Clarke County School District; Meg Easom Hines, University of Georgia, Athens, GA The Schoolwide Enrichment Model is proven to be an effective and worthwhile program for providing all students with challenging and enriching experiences. Each component of SEM is designed to open the doors to real-world, authentic learning; however, providing these kinds of experiences can prove to be an intimidating and often complex task for any school. For those considering implementation of the SEM, this session provides a look into the ins-and-outs of exciting feature-enrichment clusters. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Friday

Sally Krisel, Teresa Haymore, Arcelia Dalton, Kelly Schollaert, Cindy White, Hall County Schools, Gainesville, GA

Room: Grand Salon 10

!"#$%&"'(&"%)"*+&,%&" !"#$%&"$%'('")(*$+,)+'-$+.(/'%0)+'/(1+0('")-#( ')12")#/(3#$4('")(1#)1(1#)(/2")0%5)0('$(6)#3$#4( 1'(),)+'/.(/%2"(1/('")/)7 !"#$%&'()*+,-.*/* * * A$4&'()*+,-.*B* 8'<#$&'()*+,-.*F* * 8#3&'()*+,-.*G*

0123435*6232$'7*82%%4,3 9:"4;4<*='77*0123435 >272;$'<4,3*,?*9:@27723@2 C434DE2(3,<2% C434DE2(3,<2% >$2%@23<*>4<(*>272;$'<4,3 >7,%435*6232$'7*82%%4,3

81+9('"1+:/(&$('$('")(/'%0)+'/(1+0(')12")#/(3$#(/"1#-+&('")-#(4%/-215('15)+'/(;-'"(%/<( =)(15/$(166#)2-1')('")(2$$6)#1'-$+($3('")-#(61#)+'/.(')12")#/.(1+0(/2"$$5/<( !")/)(166)1#1+2)/(1#)(2$$#0-+1')0(>9(,$5%+'))#/($+('")(?$215(@##1+&)4)+'/(*$44-''))<( 58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

45


| Concurrent & Poster Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM STEM

36.1 Teaching Computer Science to Gifted Middle School Students with Scratch Fatih Gelgi, Accord Institute for Education Research, Westminster, CA Scratch is developed by MIT media lab for all ages to learn programming easily without intensive code writing and practice. Unfortunately, it is not used effectively in teaching Computer

Science topics such as searching, sorting, and Graph Theory in middle schools. Instead, kids are guided more on working simple animations or games in Scratch. The interactive session focuses on how to teach CS to gifted middle school students utilizing Scratch. The attendees learn how to design CS problems in Scratch in a more enjoyable and motivating fashion. Sample CS assignments are provided to the attendees. Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-8

Exhibitor Workshops

Friday

Publish Hardcover Books in Your Classroomâ&#x20AC;ŚIn Minutes!

Building a Learning Community with Talents Unlimited

Janice Miller, Lintor Make-A-Book

Lynn Huey, Talents Unlimited

Learn how to create hardcover books right in your classroom! Come see a myriad of publishing ideas for your K-12 students showcasing the Lintor Make-A-Book process for easy and affordable classroom publishing. See how much fun it is to integrate technology and literacy while meeting national/state standards.

The Talents Unlimited model provides a structure for teaching students how to solve problems and use information they have learned in new ways. By incorporating the Talents critical/creative thinking skills model into the current instructional program, the school leaders can create an effective learning community that enhances creativity, innovation, and collaboration.

NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area A NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area B

Poster Sessions

t1PTUFSTBSFPOEJTQMBZJOUIF/"($ Learning Quarter (second floor) through Saturday, November 5. t1SFTFOUFSTXJMMCFBWBJMBCMFBUUIF session time indicated to present and answer questions.

46

Hungry? Check out the grab and go food carts in the Hotel.

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

STEM

Advancing Potential in Gifted Through Stem Integration ...And All That Jazz!! Linda Hutchinson, Marietta Center for Advanced Academics, Marietta, GA How do we meet America’s commitment to advancing science, technology, engineering, and math while promoting a challenging curriculum for advanced learners? Through STEM integration!! This development of critical 21st century skills must begin with early educational experiences and opportunities. At the Marietta Center for Advanced

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

Academics, elementary gifted classes are taught through interdisciplinary STEM courses. Students are exposed to engineering and the engineering design process as they solve real-world problems through project-based instruction. This session details the development and implementation of an integrated STEM/gifted education program and explores the STEM units at the heart of the school’s curriculum. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Grand Salon 16

COMBINED SESSION Building Elementary Teachers’ Capacity to Teach Stem Content Through Problem-Based Curricula

Spanky, The Three-Toed Slothematician: Exploring the Common Core Math Standards Through Characters in Children’s Literature

Tonya Moon, Catherine Brighton, Christine Trinter, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

Shelbi Cole, Connecticut State Department of Education, Hartford, CT

A recently released National Science Board report noted: The development of our nation’s human capital through our education system is an essential building block for future innovation. Currently, the abilities of far too many of America’s young men and women go unrecognized and underdeveloped, and, thus, they fail to reach their full potential. One of the first steps in building youths’ capacity in STEM areas is building teachers’ capacity to teach the STEM content. This presentation shares a framework used to increase elementary students’ opportunity to learn mathematics by building teachers’ mathematics content and pedagogical content knowledge.

The human hands are wonderful, convenient manipulatives for teaching children to add within ten. Kindergarteners are able to use their ten fingers to find sums, such as 3 + 5, but can they help Spanky the Three-Toed Slothematician complete the same task using only his six sloth toes? Children’s literature provides a creative vehicle for engaging students in mathematics concepts highlighted in the Common Core State Standards. You are invited to meet the characters who are turning K-2 mathematics lessons into creative learning opportunities for all students.

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-5

Friday

STEM

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-5 Room: Jasperwood

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

47


| Putting it into Practice Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM ARTS

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

Artistic Ways Of Knowing: Arts Talent Identification

Students as Researchers: Creating a Digital Archive

Joanne Haroutounian, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA

Barbara Romey, Elizabeth Romey, Phenix City Schools, Phenix City, AL

This session describes an effective procedure for identifying talent in the arts based on criteria stemming from research analysis. Participants examine rating scales, a minicurriculum of arts activities, and performance/portfolio assessment forms that broaden the concept of artistic talent beyond performance and product. The identification curriculum included in the process is based on artistic ways of knowing, which incorporates perceptual discrimination, creative interpretation, performance, and critiquing skills. The curriculum can easily be integrated into the classroom to assist in arts talent identification as well as to provide substantive content that encourages all students to perceive, think, and create as artists.

Participants have the opportunity to gain the necessary expertise to turn classroom research into a digital archive VTJOHUIFNPEFMFTUBCMJTIFEUISPVHIUIF$JWJD7PJDFT website but focusing on issues that are specific to that school community. The relevant example is the NASA Explorer School in Alabama that developed its own archive memories of the space program for all age groups that will continue as a yearly project for 7th graders and serve as a digital data base for researchers both within and beyond the community through Internet access. Audience: Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators

Room: Magnolia

Room: Grand Salon 21

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

ARTS

Heat Up Reflection with Technology! Engaging Students in Differentiated Reflection Through Hots and Web 2.0

Improving the Blank Page: From Inspiration to Revision in Creative Writing Toby Daspit, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA Poetry should be made by all, the French author Lautramont declared; yet, the terror of the blank page confronts all writers, novice and expert. This workshop introduces several engaging exercises that can be used by teachers and gifted/high-ability students alike to spark creativity and refine the written word. Although creative writing, poetry, and flash fiction, is the focus, techniques are shared that improve all writing. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 16

April Coleman, Jane Newman, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL Reflection is a key component of project-based learning through which students make connections and personalize their learning. However, traditional paper-pencil activities often fail to engage today’s digital learners. Teachers and gifted specialists learn how to incorporate Talents Unlimited, a renown gifted education model for teaching higher-order critical- and creative-thinking skills (productive thinking, decision making, forecasting, planning, and communication), with free technology tools in order to “heat up” students’ personal reflection and promote authentic learning, collaboration, and idea sharing. Featured tools JODMVEF(PPHMF%PDT 7PLJ 1SF[J 8PSEMF (MPHTUFS  Animoto, bubbl.us, and many more new and emerging technologies. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 6

48

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

Defining the Gifted Self: Improvisational Performance as a Way of Life

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

self via motivation, social interaction, philosophical thinking, and awareness preparation. A theory of self-development is presented and honed with audience input to establish guidelines gifted individuals can use to develop a sense of self and all that jazz!

Robert Schultz, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Grand Salon 7

www.nagc.org/esp.aspx www.nagc.org/esp.aspx

Friday

When jamming, jazz musicians adapt their musical expertise to the developing flow. This leads to unique combinations as performers learn to keep the conversation going. For gifted individuals, this sense of reading your surroundings and adapting to the flow is a survival skill, yet, many gifted individuals lack this sense of self-awareness. In this session, discuss and explore the developing gifted

Looking for a speaker for a state or regional conference? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time for you to add an expert perspective to your event! NAGC board members and other leaders are available to local groups, State Affiliates, and other conference planners to speak on numerous topics at a significant discount off their regular honorarium fee. NAGC appreciates the support of these ESP speakers: Katie Augustyn

Marcia Gentry

Rick Olenchak*

Bob Seney

Susan Baum

Kris Haslund

Paula Olszewski-Kubilius

Cindy Sheets

George Betts

Thomas HĂŠbert

Stuart Omdal

Del Siegle*

Jaime Castellano*

Patricia Hollingsworth

Jean Peterson*

Mary Slade

Laurence Coleman

Sandy Kaplan

Jane Piirto

Kristen Stephens

Mary Ruth Coleman

Frances Karnes

Diana Reeves

Carol Tieso

Bonnie Cramond

Lauri Kirsch

Sally Reis

Tracy Cross

Sally Krisel

Sylvia Rimm*

Ken Dickson

Susan Dulong Langley

Julia Link Roberts

Felicia Dixon

Jann Leppien

Ann Robinson*

Shelagh Gallagher

Christine Nobbe

Karen Rogers*

*At least one keynote appearance January 1- November 1, 2011

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Putting it into Practice Friday, November 4, 2011 | 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

CURRICULUM STUDIES

The Value of the Cohort Supporting Students in A Community Collaborates: Uniting Early Admittance to College Programs Students, Teachers, and Community Leaders in Project-Based Learning Nancy B. Hertzog, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Many universities accept younger students as full-time matriculated undergraduates; however, the lack of a social community can put these students at risk as they make their way through college much younger than their peers. Radical acceleration is an adjustment not only for the child, but also for the family. Parents are not always prepared for the independence they will encounter in their children as they enter the college environment. This presentation focuses on the development of cohorts for both students and families to ensure the emotional well-being as well as academic success of the students. Audience: Administrators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Friday

Room: Grand Salon 22 COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

New Rules for Gifted Girls: Lessons from NSF Gender Equity Projects

Margaret Simon, Sally Bonin, Germaine Comeaux, Beth Demahy, Karen DeRouen, Iberia Parish School Board, New Iberia, LA Eight teachers, 14 elementary schools, one to five sixth graders at each: What’s a gifted teacher to do? Participants learn how a frustrated gifted department used creative problem solving to unify community leaders, school employees, and 36 isolated students across a district in a year-long, interdisciplinary, project-based collaboration. Loosely based on Renzulli’s Schoolwide Enrichment Model, merged with lessons from Box City, this project motivated gifted students, piqued their interest in local history, and developed processes of city growth and management. Teacher guided and student-driven, the collaboration grew to include projects focusing on service, community, and product presentation. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers 6-8 Room: Marlborough A

Barbara Kerr, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS

CURRICULUM STUDIES

More than 200 National Science Foundation Gender Equity projects since 1993 provide clear guidance for teachers and counselors of gifted girls. Increasing numbers of smart girls are navigating the barriers to their success, finding their voices, and going on to become accomplished women. A new generation of successful young women allows an understanding of the new rules for achieving one’s full potential. A synthesis of the NSF Gender Equity findings is provided, as well as vivid examples from interviews with talented young women conducted for the NSF Milestones and Danger Zones project.

Advancing Potential Through the Use of the Parallel Curriculum Model

Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Belle Chasse

Jann Leppien, University of Great Falls, Great Falls, MT; Marcia Imbeau, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR The Parallel Curriculum Model serves as a catalyst for advanced learners’ continued advancement as thinkers and learners. PCM is comprised of four distinct types of curricular experiences. Inherent in each parallel is a set of questions and prompts that promote an escalation of thinking that moves students into the depth and complexity within and across disciplinary fields. This session focuses on the structure and function of each parallel and its questions as participants view video excerpts of teachers using PCM to redesign their instructional units and lessons. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Napoleon Ballroom

50

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


CURRICULUM STUDIES

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Curiosity, Creativity, and Risk-Taking: Can You Dig It?

Team Teaching: Rethinking the Role of the Gifted Specialist

Felicia Dixon, Ball State University, Muncie, IN; Deirdre Fulton, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

Shirley Chodakiewicz, Loudoun County Public Schools, Round Hill, VA; Jill Broaddus, Marcy Lyle, Cool Spring Elementary School, Leesburg, VA Gifted children exist in every classroom and therefore every teacher in the 21st century must be prepared to meet the needs of these high-ability students. This session outlines and discusses a team-teaching model that was successfully implemented when a gifted/math specialist worked daily with a first grade teacher to enhance and differentiate the math curriculum. The success of this program translated to a variety of schoolwide initiatives resulting in increased student achievement. The findings and strategies used to implement such a program are presented from the perspective of an administrator, a classroom teacher, and a gifted/math specialist.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 6-8

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-5

Room: Rosedown

EARLY CHILDHOOD

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Build It and They Will Come: Creating a Program for Primary Gifted Learners

Inspiring Students to Become 21st Century Independent Problem Seekers

Room: Grand Salon 3

Friday

The 21st century skill of inventive thinking includes a clear focus on activities that prompt curiosity, creativity, and risk-taking. Archaeologists regularly use these skills on digs as they explore the past, seeking to understand how it influenced today’s global and complex environments. The dig experience is interdisciplinary, with science, literature, history, mathematics, art, and languages used to understand artifacts found in excavations. In this session, the presenters, including a practicing Middle-Eastern archaeologist, describe a middle school curriculum that immerses students in the dig experience through group activities in which students experience a dig, design a seal, and reconstruct pottery.

Richard M. Cash , Denise DuBois, Barbara Dullaghan, Carla Wallace, Bloomington Public Schools, Bloomington, MN

Cindy Massicotte, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT As educators continue to respond to calls to prepare the next generation of 21st century creative problem solvers, it would be advantageous to take a step back to examine how students learn to become independent problem seekers. Participants in this interactive session learn how to promote problem-seeking skills by cultivating students’ sense of curiosity, desire for social justice, and individual interests in current events. Learn practical strategies that inspire and empower future 21st century problem seekers through an examination of an interdisciplinary enrichment unit based on Graham Wallas’ model of the creative process. Audience: Parents, Classroom Teachers K-8

Join the educators and administrators who developed and implemented a self-contained, classroom-based program designed to meet the unique educational and social/emotional needs of young gifted children. The presenters share the important factors involved in creating a program for primary gifted learners, including garnering strong senior administrative support, using expert knowledge of young gifted children and managing limited financial resources. Learn how to construct a program so that it responds to the needs of young gifted learners. Participants are given advice in framing primary programs using advanced content-based curriculum, differentiated instruction, and social/ emotional support and guidance. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-5

Room: Grand Salon 4 Room: Elmwood

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

51


| Putting it into Practice Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM EARLY CHILDHOOD

EARLY CHILDHOOD

Twice-Exceptional Children: Knowing When and How to Intervene Effectively in Early Childhood

Bright, Young, and At Risk Linda Hall, Ardene Bunch, Virginia Beach City Public Schools, Virginia Beach, VA

Beverly Trail, Regis University, Henderson, CO Many gifted children experience asynchronous development in early childhood. Some developmental milestones are achieved early, while the attainment of other are delayed. Research findings stress the importance of early interventions, but determining when and how to intervene effectively can be difficult. Cognitive, physical, social, emotional, and speech and language development milestones can alert parents and educators when further assessments are necessary. Participants learn how to infuse the arts and combine effective gifted and special education interventions to develop 21st century skills in creativity, critical thinking, problem solving, collaboration, goal setting, and self-regulation to help children achieve their potential.

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5

Underrepresented population groups have been an ongoing concern in gifted program identification. Practitioners demonstrate how the profile approach benefits identification of young children in ethnically diverse, transient, or impoverished populations. Multiple criteria, including grade-level screening, anecdotal notes, parent and teacher recommendation forms, and performance tasks are reviewed. This session overviews the screening and referral processes in place for primary students and offers suggestions on how to implement a program of early identification to ensure that all students are afforded equal opportunity for early development of 21st century skills. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-5 Room: Grand Salon 13 EARLY CHILDHOOD

Room: Windsor EARLY CHILDHOOD

Compost: The Rot Thing for Our Earth

Primary Thinking Skills For Advancing Potential... And A Lot More Jazz!

Fred Estes, The Nueva School, Hillsborough, CA

Merla Hammack, Sycamore CUSD, IL, Sycamore, IL; Dodie Merritt, Genoa-Kingston Community Unit School District, Genoa, IL

Everyone wants to be part of the solution and young children especially value opportunities to help the world in authentic ways. Combine very local ecology action with global awareness and problem solving through an integrated science unit designed for early childhood education. This session demonstrates a simple, practical approach to add a Global Stewardship strand to the ECE curriculum, centering on classroom composting and gardening, linking inquiry science, math, and social studies while connecting to the larger community. Young children build basic concepts of ecology, sustainability, and limiting factors in earth biosystems, preparing them to help preserve our planet.

Need an infusion of inspiration and playfulness to ignite critical and creative 21st century thinking in your primary classroom? Engage students in convergent, divergent, evaluative, and visual problem-solving through a fun program of whole-class lessons and small group activities that reach gifted/talented students across traditional cultural, linguistic, or socio-economic roadblocks. Build behavioral portfolios for identification purposes that highlight talents many traditional measures miss by using checklists aligned to these thinking strategies to raise identification of students from underserved populations. Or just need a personal metacognitive break? Brainstorm, solve mysteries, and make criterion-based choices -- come join the fun!

Audience: Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-5

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-5

Room: Jasperwood Room: Grand Salon 18

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

EARLY CHILDHOOD

GLOBAL AWARENESS

Why Play?

Slurpy Saving Lives Using Rocks to Purify Your Water

It long has been said that play is the work of the child; yet programs for the young gifted child often feel conflict around the amount of time dedicated to play vs. providing structured learning experiences to students. What is the role of play in programming for the young gifted child? Play remains the clearest glimpse into the rich inner workings of the young childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mind. This session focuses on the careful examination of play and how to use play as the catalyst for curriculum and instruction. Classroom applications and experiences of teachers using play are shared. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-5

Tracy Carney, Sterling School, Greenville, SC A Slurpee may be a tasty treat from 7-Eleven for some people, but for others SLURPY could mean the difference between safe and toxic water. The current cholera epidemic in Haiti gives high-achieving students an opportunity to engage in problem-solving skills to tackle a current health crisis. Participants learn how students can design and build an extremely effective, yet simple and inexpensive, water purification system using plastic trash containers, rocks, and gravity. Sensors and chemical tests are utilized to verify the effectiveness of water filtration systems by testing local groundwater samples before and after filtration Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers 6-8

Room: Grand Salon 24 Room: Ascot GLOBAL AWARENESS GLOBAL AWARENESS

Service Learning: An Experiential Instructional Strategy that Teaches More Than Standards G.A.U.G.E. (Global Awareness Utilizing Global Experiences) Through Service!

Friday

Ellen Honeck, Ricks Center; Shannon Jones, Institute for the Development of Gifted Education, Denver, CO

April DeGennaro, Peeples Elementary, Fayetteville, GA

Service Learning engages and develops core knowledge as well as moral components essential for positive personality development. 21st century skills such as content area integration, critical thinking, and application of skills in authentic contexts are integral to service learning. This session describes an example of service learning in grade 2. Techniques and resources for incorporating service learning in elementary classrooms are shared. Attendees participate in a simulation to identify standards and learning outcomes for a potential community service learning partner. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5

Cyd Rogers, Texas Future Problem Solving Program, Austin, TX; Marianne Solomon, Future Problem Solving Program International, Melbourne, FL GAUGE the limitless possibilities for your students and experience the impact Community Problem Solving, a component of the Future Problem Solving Program International, can have on globally aware students from across the world. Enjoy student videos and samples of successful projects as you witness the influence that young people can have through thoughtful and meaningful community problem solving. Challenge your students through authentic learning and hands-on global experiences through an International Community Problem Solving Program. Participants learn how Community Problem Solving GAUGES student performance while enhancing learning through service to others.

Room: Grand Salon 12 Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Eglinton and Winton

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

53


| Putting it into Practice Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM MIDDLE GRADES

MIDDLE GRADES

Are We Teaching Our Best Writers To Write Like Beginners?

What Really Works in the Middle? Kathy Paul, Johnston Community School District, Johnston, IA

Kenneth Smith, Sunset Ridge School District 29, Northfield, IL Research suggests that talented writers engage in a qualitatively different process than do their more typical age peers. Talented writers tend to view writing as problem solving, requiring them to continually generate, solve, and integrate several problems at once. In this workshop participants see a review of the research defining expert and beginning writers. Evaluate a complete character-driven writing project--including student samples--that implements the expert model. The focus is on drama and character development to teach expert strategies. Participants also see how to integrate the model into their classroom instruction. Audience: Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12

What options to differentiate curriculum do teachers actually implement? Curriculum compacting, tiered assignments, student choice, cluster grouping, pre-assessment, independent study, and flexible grouping are some specific programming that you may have used with middle level students. How can all teachers be informed so that more options are utilized? This session focuses on the practical application of what you need to know in order to differentiate within the classroom. The results of differentiation techniques teachers have actually chosen to use most often are shown, as well as choices that students report as most beneficial. Utilize these options in your school. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers 6-8

Friday

Room: Prince of Wales Room: Fountain MIDDLE GRADES

STEM in the Middle Grades Susan Rakow, Cleveland State University, Cleveland Heights, OH You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t turn around in education these days without hearing about STEM! So what should science, technology, engineering, and math look like for middle school gifted students and their teachers? Attendees at this session find out. Participants receive a resource list as well as specific suggestions for classroom application based on the most recent research on the topic. This presentation is based on a new chapter that was written for the second edition of Educating Gifted Students in Middle School: A Practical Guide. Audience: Coordinators, Classroom Teachers 6-8 Room: Grand Salon 19

MIDDLE GRADES

Beyond Numbers: Creating Defensible and Differentiated Mathematics Curriculum and Instruction for Gifted Learners Amy Germundson, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA Wondering how to extend math beyond the numbers for gifted learners? Knowing that gifted students in the middle years bring a diverse mix of learning needs to math classrooms, creating academically responsive instruction to ensure genuine challenge and deeper understanding in this discipline is key to maximizing interest and potential! Guided by best practice literature and insights from working with math teachers, participants learn how to develop strong and defensible curriculum that is concept/big idea oriented and how to implement low-prep differentiated strategies that converge on these concepts/big ideas. Curriculum templates and resources are provided. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-8 Room: Chequers

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


PARENT & COMMUNITY

A Delicate Balance: Can Parent Advocacy Work Without Opposition?

watching. Diplomatic strategies, respect, and sensitivity are crucial for parents’ successful advocacy. Case examples demonstrate both respectful and oppositional advocacy and their outcomes. Strategies and questions are discussed.

Sylvia Rimm, Family Achievement Clinic, Sheffield Lake, OH Audience: Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Parent advocacy has always been crucial to the success of gifted children, but parent advocacy can be a doubleedged sword if it becomes oppositional. Children can copy oppositional patterns and decide to pick and choose when they are willing to put forth effort based on their interpretations of parent attitudes and behaviors. Parents don’t deliberately intend opposition, but children are

Room: Cambridge

COMBINED SESSION How Well Do Teachers and Parents Understand Underachieving Students’ Motivation Beliefs?

Achievement Goal Orientations and TeacherRated Engagement in Gifted Elementary School Students

Del Siegle, D. Betsy McCoach, Lisa Rubenstein, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Kate Snyder, Duke University, Durham, NC;

Students do well in school when they believe they have the skills necessary to perform tasks, find tasks meaningful, and see their environment as supportive. When these factors are present, students self-regulate and achieve. Gifted underachievers were askedto rate themselves on each of these elements. Their parents and teachers were also asked to rate the same students on these elements. Male students rated themselves lower on self-regulation and female students rate themselves lower on self-efficacy. Parents and teachers appeared to base their perceptions of how meaningful students find school on how well the students selfregulate their academic behaviors.

Friday

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

Data from 81 fifth-grade public school students (22 gifted) was used to examine if motivational beliefs function uniquely for gifted students. Within a regular classroom, the relation between student-reported motivation and teacher-reported disengagement varied as a function of gifted status, with performance-approach goals predicting minimal effort for gifted students and performance-avoidance goals predicting several forms of disengagement for typical students. For gifted students, mastery goals were associated with lower levels of off-topic thinking in both the regular and gifted classroom; however, the relations for performance-approach goals varied across context and were only maladaptive in the regular classroom. Audience: Researchers

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Newberry

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

55


| Putting it into Practice Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

SPECIAL POPULATIONS

Advancing Potential for Teaching Reading to Gifted Learners

Developing Leadership in Special Populations in Middle School

Kathy Austin, Oregon State University, Salem, OR

Theresa Newsom, School District 11, Colorado Springs, CO; Marilyn Eggleston, North Middle School, Colorado Springs, CO

This session, presented by a veteran reading specialist, invites pre-service and in-service teachers to examine how reading begins with gifted children, how reading instruction is addressed in school and at home, and how to structure deliberate reading instruction for gifted learners. This workshop discusses what is known from the research on reading instruction for gifted students and offers practical strategies teachers can use with gifted readers that truly differentiate instruction. Findings and their implications for in-service and pre-service teacher preparation programs from the presenterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s research study on gifted readers are discussed and participants are invited to raise questions.

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

GT students are identified using traditional identification characteristics: verbal, nonverbal, and mathematical (reasoning). The Marland Report states that leadership is to be developed in GT students; yet leadership development through curriculum integration continues to be lacking in gifted educational programming. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more, students in special populations who possess gifted leadership skills, but are not identified as gifted are not receiving the necessary training to develop their leadership, which ultimately would be channeled in positive ways. Strategies for developing leadership attributes for special populations to redirect negative behaviors into positive productive actions for their academic success are shared. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 6-8

Room: Marlborough B Room: Trafalgar RESEARCH & EVALUATION

Writing the LIT Review and Discussion in an Empirical Journal Article Sidney Moon, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Carolyn Callahan, Holly Hertberg-Davis, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

SPECIAL POPULATIONS

Up a Creek Without a Paddle? 2e Survival Strategies for Stressed-Out Parents, Teachers, and Students Linda Collins, Blue Valley School District, Overland Park, KS; William Collins, Olathe School District, Olathe, KS

This â&#x20AC;&#x153;how toâ&#x20AC;? session helps researchers to write a powerful literature review and discussion sections for research studies they submit to prestigious empirical journals. Three experienced researchers share tips for conceptualizing, organizing, and writing the literature review and discussion sections of an empirical article. The session is offered in a workshop format with presentations and application activities. Participants learn the characteristics of strong literature reviews, problem statements, and discussion sections and are able to apply the skills they gain in future research studies, elevating the quality of published research in our field.

7PJDFNBJMGSPNBFQBSFOUi)FMQ*NDPVOUJOHUIFEBZTVOUJM winter break.â&#x20AC;? The rigors of our educational system are not always amenable to students, especially gifted students who have the added stress of an additional exceptionality/disability. This session focuses on strategies that help to soothe the stress of everyday interactions at school. Participants look at effectual plans to preempt stressful situations, receive advice from parents, teachers, and students who have worked through issues like organization, scheduling honors/AP classes, communication, and difficult sensory and affective situations. Real-life examples, video interviews, and a â&#x20AC;&#x153;paddleâ&#x20AC;? are provided.

Audience: Researchers

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Oak Alley

Room: Grand Salon 9

56

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

Bridges Academy for Twice-Exceptional Students: Programming for Success Susan Baum, Bridges Academy, Storrs, CT

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

Exhibitor Workshops Differentiating Instructions with Menus in the Multiple-Ability Classroom Laurie Westphal, Prufrock Press

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Grand Salon 15 STEM

Science Olympiad Is STEMtastic! Kelly Price, Forsyth County Schools, Cumming, GA This presentation includes hands-on lessons on how to incorporate Science Olympiad competitive events into science and math classroom instruction. The success of the Science Olympiad competitions can lead to increased student engagement in science and math classrooms. The engineering skills of teamwork, technical writing, structural efficiency, and problem solving are included as well. Methods for classroom implementation are shared along with strategies for building interest in advanced science classes. This interactive presentation leaves participants eager to learn more about Science Olympiad; take home activities and strategies ready to use the next day of class. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Jefferson Ballroom

Through the use of choice menus, teachers meet the needs of all students, especially their gifted. This session introduces menus, their various uses from compacting to extension and the basic considerations when implementing them in the classroom. Templates will be shared! NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area A

Navigator Study Guides Kimberley Chandler, College of William & Mary Developed by the Center for Gifted Education at the College of William & Mary as a language arts resource for teachers and students, each Navigator is a collection of questions and activities intended to support group or independent study of a selected novel or picture book. Novel studies should encourage advanced readers to develop their skills at analyzing and interpreting literature through structured questions and activities that highlight themes and concepts, literary elements, and realworld connections contained within the books. In addition, novel studies are opportunities for students to develop their own vocabulary and writing skills by exploring and emulating the language and style used by authors.

Friday

Bridges Academy is a college preparatory school for “twice-exceptional” students in grades 5-12. Bridges Academy empowers students to thrive academically and socially through small classes, differentiated instruction, and a compassionate community in which both gifts and differences are recognized and respected. Student-centered is the best word to define the students’ educational experience. The curriculum and educational opportunities are built on profound understanding of twiceexceptional students. Participants become familiar with the Bridges Educational Model and its use in planning for success for gifted youngsters with social, attention, and/or learning differences.

NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area B

Poster Sessions

t1PTUFSTBSFPOEJTQMBZJO the NAGC Learning Quarter (second floor) through Saturday, November 5. t1SFTFOUFSTXJMMCFBWBJMBCMFBU the session time indicated to present and answer questions.

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

57


| Putting it into Practice Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM ARTS

All The World’s A Stage! Incorporating Theatre Arts into your K-5 ELA Classroom! Jamie Hipp, East Baton Rouge Parish Public School System, Baton Rouge, LA Incorporating the theatre arts is the ideal way to differentiate instruction. Theatre reaches out and grabs all three types of learners: visual, auditory, and kinesthetic. Additionally, a three-year Guggenheim Museum-funded study, “Teaching Literacy Through Art” concluded that arts education increases literacy in elementary students. This presentation, designed for teachers as well as parents, imparts the positive effects of using theatre arts in the English Language Arts classroom, with hands-on activities that increase student achievement, imagination, and confidence. Audience: Parents, Classroom Teachers K-5

Friday

Room: Grand Salon 16 COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

Using Skype in the Gifted Classroom Elvira Deyamport, Hattiesburg Public Schools, Hattiesburg, MS In an effort to incorporate 21st century learning skills, Skype allows gifted learners and teachers the opportunity to connect and collaborate. This session is geared towards teachers of the gifted in K-12 settings and focuses on how to get started, ideas of how to effectively incorporate Skype in the gifted classroom, and several resources for finding partners and projects.

best practices for using technology in your classroom? The presentation will describe the research on technology in gifted education using the NAGC 2010 K-12 Programming standards as a back-drop. Participants will learn about using technology in six areas: learning and development, ongoing assessments, differentiation of curriculum and instruction, different programming options such as tele-mentoring, different learning environments such as online social networks, and professional development in/with technology. Audience: Administrators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Marlborough B COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

Student-Created Movies: Advancing Potential and Passions with Moviemaker and iMovie Nicholas Kirschman, Webster Groves High School; Christine Nobbe, Rockwood School District, St. Louis, MO When students make movies, learning occurs! From idea conception to final editing, communication skills, creativity, critical thinking, and collaboration are utilized. Session participants experience the process, learning how moviemaking develops essential skills in students of all ages. Become familiar with the basic process of developing a message, writing a script and storyboard, using images and special effects, performing voice-overs, and editing. Participants take home a curriculum-connected concept that can be implemented using freeware (Audacity, MovieMaker, and iMovie) and accessible hardware. Turn any classroom into a movie studio to develop potential, find passions, develop skills, and motivate learners!

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12 Audience: Administrators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Ascot Room: Marlborough A COMPUTERS AND TECHNOLOGY

Research on Technology Use in Gifted Education - What Should Teachers Know?

Hungry?

Check out the grab and go food carts in the Hotel.

Sita Periathiruvadi, Anne Rinn, University of North Texas, Richardson, TX You know technology can benefit your students, but how do you start integrating technology in your instruction? Why not attend our crash course on gifted research literature and learn about the

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

How and Why to use Social Networks in your Classroom

A Conceptual Model for Optimal Development of Gifted Students

Elizabeth Fogarty, Brian Housand, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC

Barbara Kerr, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS

Friend me! With over 500 million users, Facebook has irrevocably altered the way that we interact with one another, but what are the educational implications? How can social networks be utilized to increase gifted students’ interactions in meaningful ways? This session explores how to use free tools like Edmodo, Shelfari, and yes, even Facebook to deliver content and instruction and to support the social and emotional needs of gifted and talented students 24/7. This is one session that makes you want to click the “LIKE!” button. Audience: Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-8

A conceptual approach for coaching gifted students requires clear, non-overlapping categories that link directly to differentiated activities. The Counseling Laboratory for the Exploration of Optimal States has provided college and career planning and personal coaching to over 700 carefully profiled experts, healers, innovators, and visionary students while collecting the kind of personality, interests, and neurofeedback data that led to the current Beehive model. Understand the easily identifiable characteristics of each cluster and the differentiated services needed for optimal development. Audience: Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 9-12 Room: Belle Chasse

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

Response to Intervention and Advancing Potential: Promising Practice Robin Carey, Douglas County School District, Castle Rock, CO The RtI framework is used with varying degrees of fidelity in schools across the country, particularly when considering its use with highly able learners. This presentation addresses the effective utilization of the RtI framework in meeting the needs of all learners, with a lens for highly able and gifted learners. The presentation includes applicable strategies for practitioners and also addresses implications for future practice. Topics covered in the presentation include administrative leadership and support, collaborative problem solving, data informed decision-making, family and community involvement, professional development, and effective instructional practice. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

CREATIVITY

Teachers Jazz Up Creativity in their Classrooms

Friday

Room: Grand Salon 19

Wendy Leader, Mesa County Valley School District 51, Grand Junction, CO; Colleen Anthony, Jefferson County Public Schools, Golden, CO; Cindy Gifford, Brighton, CO While teachers learn the importance of nurturing creativity in students, what do teachers know about their own creative practices? Classroom teachers were asked to reflect on what they were already doing that would increase the creativity of their students. Teachers studied data from the use of this reflective instrument to self-assess creativity in their instruction. This session for teachers, coordinators, and administrators of K-12 students describes current practices to promote creativity, as well as suggest strategies to enhance this well-recognized 21st century skill. The emphasis of this session is on selfassessment of best practices in implementing creativity. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Oak Alley Room: Prince of Wales

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

59


| Putting it into Practice Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM CURRICULUM STUDIES

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Integrating Math And Literature For Gifted Middle Grade Learners

Stations for High School Gifted Students: Engage, Inform, and Differentiate in a 21st Century Classroom

Pendred Noyce, Noyce Foundation; Dotty Corbiere, Meadowbrook School, Weston, MA Even gifted students often see themselves as good in mathematics or English but not both. This participatory session presents a five-week unit integrating mathematics and literature, using the novel Lost in Lexicon: An Adventure in Words and Numbers. Literary themes of conflict, the hero’s journey, poetry, and metaphor combine with mathematical ideas about transformations in the coordinate plane, slope, irrational numbers, and propositional logic. Inter-disciplinary assignments that build on student strengths are shared. Middle grade teachers and coordinators for gifted and talented programs gain practical strategies and tools for teaching literature and mathematics together while enriching both subjects.

Friday

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-8

Leslie Giraldo, Cindy Hitt, Ware County High School, Waycross, GA Gifted students appreciate choice, especially when choice results in engaging, informative activities clearly targeted for high-ability learners. Stations--a staple of the elementary classroom--are an overlooked but invaluable tool in a middle or high school English classroom. In this session, participants learn how to design stations that target different ability levels and interests while incorporating 21st century skills. Target desired outcomes, plan for flexible groups, and facilitate your students’ learning. Stations may be a simple reconfiguration of existing lessons and activities, or stations may become a revolution in your teaching methods and in your students’ education. Audience: Classroom Teachers 9-12 Room: Grand Salon 6

Room: Eglinton and Winton CURRICULUM STUDIES CURRICULUM STUDIES

RtI With Differentiated Instruction For The Gifted Learner Jodi O’Meara, Jodi O’Meara, Inc., Parrish, FL What does RtI look like for gifted students? How does differentiated instruction look at each tier of an RtI framework? As a published author on the subject, the presenter shares practical, research-based strategies and tools to use the tiers of RtI to meet the needs of the diverse gifted learners. Differentiated supports and services are matched to each level of the framework. Geared toward teachers and administrators, this session focuses on research-based application rather than simply theory and provides a clear picture on how gifted students’ needs fit with an RtI framework. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-8

Nil Novi Sub Sole: An Old Language for a New World Ariel Baska, Fairfax County Public Schools, Centreville, VA; Frances Spielhagen, Mount Saint Mary College, Newburgh, NY In the 21st century, teachers look forward to new discoveries, when we still have much to learn from the past. The study of Latin has always provided students with the code for understanding how language works, a rich sense of history and storytelling, and the key to the most influential civilization in the Western world. Latin represents the greatest blend of content across continents, disciplines, and discoveries, making it a perfect enrichment option for students, classrooms, and programs at any level. This session explores how teachers and administrators can use old and new technology to teach this ancient language. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Grand Salon 21 Room: Grand Salon 7

60

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

CURRICULUM STUDIES

EARLY CHILDHOOD

The Parallel of Practice: Designing Real World Learning Opportunities to Enhance 21st Century Skills

Rethinking Early Childhood Education: Preparing the Young and Gifted for the 21st Century

Jennifer Beasley, University of Arkansas, Springdale, AR

Laura Ganus, Western State College of Colorado, Crested Butte, CO; Vanessa Ewing, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, Thorton, CO

The Parallel Curriculum Model incorporates four parallel lenses on authentic, disciplinary content that challenge students to look beyond the standards. The Parallel of Practice intends for students to use the skills and methodologies of the discipline by asking students to function as a practicing professional in a discipline. Involving students in authentic, real-world learning experiences takes commitment and focus on the part of the teacher and is imperative to enhance 21st century skills. In this session, participants look at learning experiences that are designed with the intent of this parallel in mind.

How can we rethink the education of young gifted children for the demands of tomorrow’s world? This presentation explores the skills young gifted children need to be successful. Discuss the latest thinking about creativity, problem solving, and project-based learning from several leading scholars in the field of education. Topics include successful strategies for curriculum and instruction, working with parents, at-home learning opportunities, training teachers, and providing additional supports to students. Presenters give examples of practical strategies that put theory into practice.

Room: Grand Salon 12

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Missing in Context: The Hole in Vocabulary Curricula Michael Clay Thompson, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL For years we have crouched under a whole-language loudspeaker that blared, “The direct study of vocabulary is not best practice. Students should discover words in the context of literature.” Looking up words encountered in stories was good; studying vocabulary was bad. The attractive sound of that dogma obscured a critical fact: the stories students were reading in their dumbed-down textbooks contained neither the advanced vocabulary that had been removed from them nor the Latin-based vocabulary that becomes more prominent in higher-order academics. A foundation in Latin and Greek stems is a necessity in the curriculum for gifted children.

Room: Grand Salon 13

Friday

Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

EARLY CHILDHOOD

Engaging Explorations for Young Gifted Children Cynthia Cho, Randee Blair, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

How can parents help satisfy their young gifted children’s unquenchable search for knowledge? The Center for Talent Development set out to answer the call by offering an online program for families of K-2 students. Filled with multiple activities from which to choose, parents and children work together to explore science in the kitchen, transportation over time, the math involved in sports, and ecosystems near their homes. See what types of activities you can encourage families to do with their children or deliver in your own classroom to help our youngest students explore and discover their world.

Room: Grand Salon 10

Audience: Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-5 Room: Grand Salon 3

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

61


| Putting it into Practice Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM EARLY CHILDHOOD

EARLY CHILDHOOD

Addressing Different Skill Levels and Learning Types by Creating Learning Centers

The Teacher as the Creative Thinker: Critical Decisions in Early Childhood Classrooms

Wanda Smith, Carol Carter, Lisa Perrault, University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK

Nancy B. Hertzog, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Differentiation is necessary even among gifted students. 7BSJPVTUZQFTPGMFBSOFSTNBZJODMVEFWJTVBMMFBSOFST  auditory learners, and kinesthetic learners. Students may have learning challenges such as dyslexia, attention deficit disorder, or Asperger Syndrome. This session examines a sample of how differentiation is achieved in the classroom PGWBSZJOHMFBSOJOHTUZMFT7JFXFYBNQMFTPGBTNBMMHSPVQ curriculum, designed to involve and engage the minds of all types of learners. Hear many varied ideas of how to use learning centers in the classroom and how using smaller groups proves to be very effective.

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-5

Bright young children often present challenges to teachers in early childhood classrooms. What are the decisions that teachers make to address their needs? Should content be accelerated or go in-depth? Should students be encouraged to work in groups to improve their social competencies, or should they be guided toward independent study projects? How can teachers be proactive and answer these questions before resolving them becomes problematic in the classroom? The presenter shares some tried-and-true strategies that facilitate decision-making, and empower the teacher to be a creative thinker in creating an environment that fosters optimal learning. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-5

Room: Grand Salon 18 Room: Grand Salon 22 EARLY CHILDHOOD

Developing and Evaluating Questioning Strategies for Use with Young Gifted Children Rosalind Walsh, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia

GLOBAL AWARENESS

Investigating, Informing, and Introducing the Stonewall Award Books: Meeting a Global Need Bob Seney, Mississippi University for Women, Mancos, CO

This presentation reports on an innovative research study conducted in an Australian childcare center examining the use of Williamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s teaching strategies with young children in order to stimulate higher-order thinking. This study found that not only were young children capable of answering higherordering thinking questions, but their quality of response also improved when challenged to do so providing an evidence base for what many of us know intuitively. Participants are guided through the development of the questioning techniques and learn how to evaluate their own questioning in order to more fully challenge the children in their care. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5

In 2010, the American Library Association inaugurated the Stonewall Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Young Adult Literature Award, honoring books with exceptional merit relating to the GLBT experience. Creating acceptance of diversity is a global awareness 21st century skill. Literature provides the understanding upon which acceptance is built. This skill of engendering understanding is crucial for gifted learners, both gay and straight, because of heightened sensitivities. By investigating, informing, and introducing The Stonewall Books, students and teachers possess a resource and tool that directs them in making a difference. In this session, the 2010 and 2011 Award and Honor Books are reviewed. Audience: Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12

Room: Jasperwood Room: Fountain

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


GLOBAL AWARENESS

MIDDLE GRADES

Empowering Gifted Students to Help Change the World Through Global Awareness and Understanding

Science in Action: Gifted Education and Service-Learning Share Success in Middle School

Dorothy Sisk, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX

Jane Newman, April Coleman, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Jefferson Ballroom

Instead of just reading about water contamination in their textbooks, middle school students are studying their countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water purity and its relationship to a high cancer rate! Check out the exciting use by 850 students of a $100,000 greenhouse, which originated from selling popcorn at basketball games. Who would think that middle schoolers would have the energy to rise early and accompany parents to exercise before school as part of a nutrition/obesity study in science? Learn the positive impacts and how to implement a variety of service-learning projects sponsored by a STEM grant based on GT pedagogy.

GLOBAL AWARENESS

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

The Other 3 Rs: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

Room: Grand Salon 15

Jackie Palka, Josetta LeBoeuf, East Baton Rouge Parish School System; Derek Reese, Exxon Mobil, Baton Rouge, LA

PARENT & COMMUNITY

As part of a statewide Earth Day celebration, gifted students at Glasgow Middle School participated in Exxon Mobilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Science Challenge. Competition centered on the creation of lessons/demonstrations to educate younger students about waste reduction issues. Projects focused on the 3 Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s: reduce, reuse, recycle. The gifted site coordinator, science teacher, and Exxon engineer, who was project liaison, shares details about the design/implementation of the project and TIBSFQFSTQFDUJWFT TVDDFTTFT BOEMFTTPOTMFBSOFE7JEFP evidence of student work, student/teacher reflections, ideas about applicability to similar projects, and changes in student attitudes relative to environmental issues are included. Audience: Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Friday

This session examines what we can do in our own way to encourage global understanding focusing on the Arab world. Strategies used with secondary gifted students in building understanding of the Arab people and their cultures are shared, with the results of shattering many myths students have about Arabs, and myths Arabs have about us. James Zogbyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book Arab Voices: What they are Saying to Us, and Why it Matters, and the implications for education in the 21st century for peaceful coexistence are discussed.

A 24/7 Problem: An Introduction to Cyberbullying Melissa Mitchell, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT This presentation provides an overview of the phenomenon of cyberbullying. How does cyberbullying happen? How can you tell cyberbullying is occurring? What are the signs that your child is a target or a bully? In this presentation, we clearly define the problem, help participants understand the phenomenon, discuss meaningful answers as to how to help students deal with cyberbullying, and share preventive measures that can be implemented in schools. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Magnolia Room: Rosedown

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Putting it into Practice Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

SPECIAL POPULATIONS

Engaging The Insatiable Mind With Inquiry: Matching the Gifted Learner with Depth, Complexity, and Choice

Engineering Design for Elementary Students

Bill Keilty, WholeLotta, Wyoming, MN

Engineering design challenges are a fun and effective way to integrate science content and engineering principles during an activity that students find engaging and challenging. This hands-on session provides attendees the opportunity to experience the steps of a design challenge as they work in teams to fulfill a clientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needs by designing, creating, and testing a product that meets given specifications. Engineering design challenges provide an exciting method of incorporating higher-level thinking, problem solving, and student autonomy into existing classroom curriculum. Examples of student work and ideas for using design challenges in an elementary classroom are shared.

Participants gain a deeper understanding of inquiry learning and how it can support their capacity to engage their gifted learners. Complex, in-depth learning, coupled with choice, has long been the principle element of a challenging learning menu prescribed for gifted students. The inquiry process provides that challenge. Critical and creative thinking are at the core of inquiry, and choice provides the hook to learning. Participants in this session learn how to support the inquiry process in their classroom and gain a deeper understanding of the processes of the inquiry model.

Daphne Duncan, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Classroom teachers K-5, Coordinators

Room: Cambridge

Room: Windsor

SPECIAL POPULATIONS

Building Black Gifted Studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Self-Esteem & Cultural Legacy Through Culturally Relevant Materials Joy Lawson Davis, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA The urgency and absence of culturally relevant materials in classrooms for gifted black students is well known. Providing materials that reflect the primary culture of students with advanced learning potential contributes to their self esteem, development of connections between the learner and the educational experience, and the retention of Black students in gifted education programs. This session will share culturally relevant curriculum materials designed to more fully develop the critical thinking and creative thinking skills of African American Gifted learners while supporting their healthy psychosocial development. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12, Other

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

Introducing and Exploring The Davidson Academy of Nevada: A Public School for Profoundly Gifted Pupils Robert Schultz, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH Opened in the fall of 2006, The Davidson Academy of Nevada is a public school for profoundly gifted middle and high school students. In this session, explore the curriculum and programming opportunities available and used by students to fulfill their varied learning needs, including the process used to develop and refine each students Personalized Learning Plan-the roadmap for academic and personal growth. Come learn about the curricular process used to educate some of societys most unique and talented learners. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Trafalgar

Room: Grand Salon 9

64

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

STEM

Ethics for 21st Century Leadership: Preparing Gifted Students Through the Global Learning Program

Exploring Shapes Through Games: Geometry for Talented Primary Students

This session discusses the Global Learning Curriculum Model, a program where students exchange knowledge and build relationships with their international counterparts through technology, in order to develop ethical 21st century leadership skills and values necessary for effective global participation. Components of the Global Learning Curriculum program are explained with special emphasis on the development of the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of ethical global leaders. The presenters, with experience in designing and implementing successful K-12 global learning curriculum, demonstrate the use of their model template and website. Participants are encouraged to exchange global learning ideas, initiatives, and programs. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Katherine Gavin, Tutita Casa, Janine Firmender, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT What do kindergarten, first- and second-grade students typically learn about geometry? The answer: the same thing - recognition of shapes. The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics recommends that one-third of each year be devoted to geometry. Come explore new, advanced, research-based curriculum that helps talented students develop a deep understanding of shapes. As they work with their bird friends at Amazon Birds Consulting, students are immersed in creating, playing, and analyzing shape games. They move beyond recognizing shapes to describing, sorting, and classifying shapes. Participants leave with games to play and challenging questions to provoke rich discussions. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5 Room: Grand Salon 24

Room: Elmwood STEM SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

Developing Gifted Services to Address the Whole Child: Lessons from a Rural School District

Friday

Marjorie Landwehr-Brown, Douglass Public Schools, Douglass, KS; Kay Gibson, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS

Three Challenges In Science: Why We Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Know What We Think We Know Nancy Heilbronner, Western Connecticut State University, Danbury, CT

Micah Bruce-Davis, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Discover the possibilities of what can be accomplished when teachers, administrators, parents, and students work together to develop gifted services that address studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; academic, social, and emotional needs. In response to parent concerns, a small, rural district has developed a full-time gifted center that utilizes acceleration and enrichment to address the needs of gifted and high-achieving students. This presentation focuses on the development of this unique center. In addition, challenges and successes are shared to demonstrate how coordinated efforts can lead to dynamic change in gifted services. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

This engaging workshop presents a series of three basic science challenges. Whether youre an elementary or secondary teacher, the level of difficulty might surprise you! Solve the challenges, and along the way, understand more about how you and your students learn science, the misconceptions you could both hold, and why. Participants leave with a handout outlining the three challenges so that you can try them in the classroom, as well as resources for diagnosing students misconceptions and ways to implement effective inquiry-based science lessons. Are you up to the challenge? Audience: Administrators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Melrose

Room: Grand Salon 4

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Putting it into Practice Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM STEM

Strategies For Teaching and Assessing Conceptual Understanding in Science

of the macro-concept change. Participants explore concept mapping as a means to help students integrate understanding of change to form relationships across topical concepts in science. The presenter discusses how to use each strategy for instruction and assessment.

Lori Bland, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5 This session focuses on teaching and learning models that can be used to help young gifted children develop conceptual understanding in science. This session provides participants with the opportunity to use a vocabulary development model to understand â&#x20AC;&#x153;What is a scientist?â&#x20AC;? Participants use the Taba Model of Concept Formation as a means to develop understanding

Room: Newberry

Exhibitor Workshops

Friday

Notebook FoldablesÂŽ: Interactive Notebooking + 3D Notetaking

Albertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Insomnia: All your Answers for K-8 math!

Evalee Parker, Dinah Might Adventures

Rick Buchner, RJB3 Games

Come learn how Notebook Foldables can bring interactive notebooks to a whole new level. Cut, fold and glue to â&#x20AC;&#x153;advance potentialâ&#x20AC;? and interests in any content. Participants will leave with an example and Foldable ideas that are brain-friendly.

Albertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Insomnia comes fully equipped for the educator to easily differentiate the level of play based on the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s abilities and skill levels. With this affordable tool, educators can add to their curriculum to solidify math facts, teach order of operations, and develop critical and creative skills. It is a great mental â&#x20AC;&#x153;warm-upâ&#x20AC;? to prepare and focus the mind for learning any subject.

NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area A

NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area B

Poster Sessions

t1PTUFSTBSFPOEJTQMBZJOUIF/"($-FBSOJOH2VBSUFS TFDPOEnPPS UISPVHI4BUVSEBZ  November 5. t1SFTFOUFSTXJMMCFBWBJMBCMFBUUIFTFTTJPOUJNFJOEJDBUFEUPQSFTFOUBOEBOTXFSRVFTUJPOT

66

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM SIGNATURE SERIES

SIGNATURE SERIES

Stereotyped Threat and Identification of Gifted Students of Color: A Conversation with Dr. Joshua Aronson

The Revised NAGC P-12 Gifted Programming Standards: The Foundation for Quality Gifted Education Services

Joshua Aronson, New York University, New York, NY

Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Susan Johnsen, Baylor University, Waco, TX This session describes the process and revisions to the current NAGC’s P-12 Programming Standards, such as alignment with the NAGC/CEC-TAG Teacher Education Standards, reframing of the standards into student outcomes with evidencebased practices incorporating program and instructional characteristics, and related empirical, literature/theory, and practice-based research. Standards are divided into these six criterion: Learner Characteristics, Assessment, Curriculum Planning and Instruction, Learning Environments, Programming, and Professional Development. Revisions and Implications for policymakers and practitioners will be discussed.

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Grand Salon 22

Room: Grand Salon 10

SIGNATURE SERIES

SIGNATURE SERIES

Finding Funding for Gifted Programs and Services

Advocacy 101: Tips to Keep Gifted Education Alive in your State and District

Sally Krisel, Hall County Schools, Gainesville, GA; Lauri Kirsch, Hillsborough County Public Schools, Tampa, FL

Del Siegle, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Virginia Burney, Ball State University, Muncie, IN; Jane Clarenbach, NAGC, Washington, DC; Julie Gonzalez, Cherry Creek Schools, Centennial, CO; Ann Sheldon, Ohio Association for Gifted Children, Gahanna, OH

In these economic times, it is increasingly challenging to find funds to support gifted programs and services. In this session, two very experienced gifted educators, talk about the ways they have tapped into Title I and other funds to support training for teachers and programming for gifted students within their schools and districts. Ways to implement low-cost programming options for gifted students are also discussed. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Friday

Attendees will have the opportunity in this session to ask the presenter, a leading expert in the psychology of stigma among students from historically disadvantaged groups that results in racial and gender achievement gaps, about his research examining environmental influences on testing performance and learn how psychological factors can improve achievement and interest in school. This phenomenon, which he and his mentor, Claude Steele, have coined “stereotype threat,” has large implications for the identification of gifted students. Discussion centers on how these principles are relevant to gifted education and the continued quest to make identification practices and gifted programming equitable for individuals from diverse backgrounds.

The phrase, “If you are not at the table, you are on the menu,” particularly rings true as state and local school budgets are being stretched. During these times, the voices of advocates for gifted programs must be heard louder and more clearly than usual. During this session, learn tips for increasing advocacy success with state and local leaders. Advocacy begins at home, and it must involve everyone interested in providing appropriate educational opportunities for gifted children. This session helps you let your voice be heard.

Room: Marlborough A Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders Room: Grand Salon 3

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM ARTS

3.2 Translating Prose for the Stage Heather Feierabend, McKinley Middle Magnet School for the Visual and Performing Arts, Baton Rouge, LA Create your own intriguing play scripts! This presentation reveals a process to translate a piece of prose into a dramatic text that can then be acted on stage. This activity provides the opportunity to explore the differences in genre from a literary point of view. Students have handson experience with the functions of narration, dialogue, and action in storytelling. At the end of this instructional process, the product is a unique script, created by students, and ready for production. This project can be used collaboratively across the curriculum or could be used by English or Theatre classes.

Friday 68

special emphasis on the arts as a means for increasing understanding of the scientific process, research in the arts, special schools and special programs in the arts, the role of creativity, the integration of arts into gifted programs, and encouraging/teaching creativity. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Magnolia ARTS

1.3 A Comprehensive Arts Program Lisa DeJean, Robert Fisher, St. Charles Parish Public Schools; Megan Harms, Hahnville High School, Luling, LA

Lou Lloyd-Zannini, Henry Barnard Lab School, Providence, RI; John Gaa, Richard Olenchak, University of Houston, Houston, TX

Arts programs across the country seem to be on the chopping block; however, it is still important to develop artistic talent in our best and brightest students. Come take a glimpse into an arts program offered in St. Charles Parish where they work hard to identify and serve students with strong talents in visual arts, music, and theatre. Hear suggestions on how to be your own public relations person, how to pull in support from administration and how to develop a curriculum from the standards. Examples of student products, presentations and performances are shared.

Participants are invited to interact with the panel concerning the role of the arts in growing up gifted, with

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Classroom Teachers K-5, Classroom Teachers 6-8, Classroom Teachers 9-12 ARTS

Unfolding Wings: The Role of the Arts in Growing Up Gifted (Part 2)

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

Improving 21st Century Information Fluency Skills

Developing Visual Thinking with Information Graphics

Susan Corwith, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; Carl Heine, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy, Aurora, IL

Olha Skyba, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 6-12

We now create as much content in two days as we did from the dawn of man through 2003. Processing a large amount of information is a challenge we face on a daily basis. This session is dedicated to an elegant solution of this complex problem. Infographics promise an advent of a new world where information is beautiful and learners use the art of information architecture to map and synthesize their knowledge. Explore basic principles of data visualization, share best resources for finding and creating infographics, and discuss practical ideas for incorporating visual thinking exercises into various subjects. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Oak Alley CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

Room: Ascot COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

Teaching Technology Through Interest Projects Jennifer Brooks, Cherokee County School District, Canton, GA What are your interests? What gets you excited about learning? Rarely do we ask these questions to students, but the answers can guide our instruction and influence the learning capacity of our students. With the freedom to explore their personal interests, students learn correct uses of technology for researching and creating multimedia presentations. Students learn and apply the National Educational Technology Standards in a fun and interesting way. Attendees see samples of students projects in PowerPoint, documentary filmmaking, and Scratch; learn the methods used to teach technology through individual interests, and leave with engaging and challenging resources. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Intelligences Outside the Normal Curve: Creating Social Capital Leadership Potential in Young People

Friday

Students utilize the Internet frequently, but how skilled are they at using the information effectively and critically (information fluency)? Although gifted students perceive themselves as skilled web users (rating themselves good to advanced on a recent survey), when tested, the average score was 45% (poor to average competence). Improving studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; competencies requires practice, but few schools teach fluency skills. A summer program and informationfluency consulting firm piloted web-based modules designed to improve web competencies and found students made statistically significant gains with just a few hours work. Using the study results, participants consider possible frameworks for effective information fluency instruction.

Joseph Renzulli, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT This session addresses two major questions that contribute to the development of gifted behaviors. What causes some people to mobilize their interpersonal, political, environmental, ethical, and moral realms of being in such ways that they place human concerns and the common good above material gain, ego enhancement, and selfindulgence? How do young people develop an action orientation that allows them to demonstrate leadership skills in challenging situations? Two theories and practical suggestions for curricular integration are discussed and research findings and case studies of student undertakings are presented. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Jefferson Ballroom

Room: Trafalgar

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

6.2 A Historical Perspective of a 33-Year Program for Gifted and Talented Students

A Gift or Curse: The Challenges of Gifted Black Males

F. Neil Mathews, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA The presentation provides an in-depth historical analysis of a 33-year program for gifted and talented students. The program factors discussed include: an explanation of the student services provided; a review of the most significant changes; an evaluation of the most significant improvements; and an analysis of the most challenging problems past, present, and future. This session is intended for program administrators, teachers, and researchers interested in historical foundations and perspectives of program development. Attendees gain knowledge and understanding of the impact that gifted and talented programs have upon students, teachers, school systems, and their communities.

Tiombe-Bisa Kendrick, Miami-Dade County Public School District, Miami, FL This workshop focuses exclusively on addressing the unique social-emotional needs of gifted Black males. Workshop participants are introduced to theories in the field of African-Centered Psychology and their authors. Participants develop an increased understanding of how culture and history have negatively impacted the lives of gifted Black males once they have been exposed to the theories related to African-Centered Psychology. Participants are able to identify ways gifted programs can address the social-emotional needs of Black males. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-12

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Cambridge

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

NAGC Programming Standards: A Guiding Light to Educational Excellence for Gifted Students in Georgia

Judging by Performance: A Different View of Mindset and the Improvement of Gifted Self-Experience

Celita Allen, Hall County Schools, Gainesville, GA; Gyimah Whitaker, Atlanta Public Schools, Atlanta, GA

Thomas Greenspon, Minneapolis, MN

The NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Programming Standards provide a bright beacon for guiding schools to the harbor of educational excellence. Although we all set our compasses toward this goal, each state is coming from a different point. This presentation maps Georgia’s voyage of using the NAGC standards to aid districts in achieving high quality programming for gifted students across the state. The presenters represent a group of state and district leaders, administrators, and teachers who have worked collaboratively to adapt the national standards to align with the language and political environment currently pervasive in Georgia. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

The experience of giftedness is a central part of selfexperience as a whole, and it can be positive or negative. Carol Dweck has observed that certain gifted students encounter difficulties when asked to perform tasks. Her work focuses on the students’ fixed intellect mindsets, but a more fundamental dynamic may be at work. These students’ self-esteem may be affected by their belief that poor performance calls their giftedness into question. Parents, teachers, and counselors can help students undo this belief and create a path toward more positive selfexperience and improved performance. Audience: Administrators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 24

Room: Grand Salon 15

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

CREATIVITY

Supporting The Social And Emotional Development Of Twice-Exceptional Males

9.3 Student Perception of Classroom Climate for Creativity and Self-Concept

Many twice-exceptional young men face difficult issues including challenges with identity development, stress and frustration that impacts self-esteem, difficulties with peer relationships, a need to understand the twice-exceptional diagnosis, and living with a learning disability. This session presents a discussion of these issues through an interactive dialogue with a high achieving twice-exceptional male who overcame challenges and met success in college and in his professional life. Implications for counseling twiceexceptional males and effective strategies for teaching them are presented. Participants receive a bibliography of resources to support twice-exceptional males. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Denise Fleith, University of Brasília; Eunice Alencar, Catholic University of Brasília, Brasília, Brazil The purpose of this study was to examine the perception of the classroom climate for creativity and self-concept of 504 5th grade students. The results indicated that students had a positive classroom climate perception and self-concept. Differences were observed for these variables regarding school type and gender. The private school students evaluated the classroom climate for creativity in a more favorable way in comparison to public school students. Male students from private schools had a more positive selfconcept. The classroom climate for creativity concerning Portuguese language was better evaluated by students when contrasted with the Mathematics classroom climate.

Room: Fountain

Audience: Administrators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

CREATIVITY

All in the Family: The Family System in Counseling the Gifted

Adaptation, Culture, and Creativity

Christopher Lawrence, Katherine Hermann, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA What about the family? While literature on gifted students describes a family’s impact as considerable, influential, and vital to children’s social, emotional, and academic growth, information is limited on how counselors can serve this population. This multimedia presentation aids attendees in conceptualizing gifted families and fosters understanding of the unique social, emotional, and developmental challenges of gifted students and families. Presenters describe interventions to facilitate counselors’ work with gifted learners and their support systems, and engage the audience in dialogue and activities to improve counselor effectiveness. Audience: Counselors

Friday

Tom Hébert, Brendan Leahy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA

LeoNora Cohen, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR Adaptation is an important issue in development of creativity, focusing on the fit of person to environment, less studied in creativity research. This presentation focuses on definitions of adaptation and their relationship to culture and creativity. Explaining creativity in childhood and eminence, a continuum of adaptive creative behaviors is proposed that explores the shift in adaptation from individual fit to environment to environmental and cultural adaptation to the individual. Paradoxes in creativity related to adaptation, culture, and ethics are discussed in an interactive PowerPoint presentation. Coordinators, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Eglinton and Winton

Room: Newberry

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM CREATIVITY

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Making Creative Assessment an Effective and Exciting Tool in the Middle School Classroom

12.2 Vibrant Vocabulary

Rebecca O’Brien, Glasgow Middle School, Baton Rouge, LA

Patty Messer, Maricopa Community College, Avondale, AZ

Students learn in a variety of ways, from logical to kinesthetic to auditory. Teachers are expected to differentiate instructional methods to match learning styles, but are rarely asked to differentiate assessment methods to align with the different instructional methods. It is important to provide an opportunity for students to be tested in a way that matches their learning style. This presentation includes how to develop a method of assessment that not only fits the state learning criteria, but also allows students to tap into their innate creativity in a manner that also suits their learning needs.

Can you illustrate a grim expression, or absurd conduct? 7PDBCVMBSZJTBXFBLBSFBGPSNBOZTUVEFOUT CVU vocabulary instruction typically ends up being handwriting practice. Given a list of words to learn, many students will complete the assignments given, but will not have the time to actually learn what the words mean. This presentation provides participants with a wealth of vocabulary activities that will help students develop their vocabulary as part of their knowledge structure. Participants leave with a variety of activities that they can put into practice immediately. Exult with jubilation from these ideas!

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers 6-12

Audience: Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Friday

CURRICULUM STUDIES Room: Windsor CREATIVITY

10.2 Impact of Creative Strategies on a Non-Native Teacher’s Identity Constructed by Interaction with Gifted Students Dong Gun An, Bonnie Cramond, Seung-Yun Lee, University of Georgia, Athens, GA This study explores the influence of the creative strategies used in a foreign language class at college level. In particular, this study examines the construction of the relationships between the teacher and the students, and that of their identities. The foreign language course focuses on the development of gifted students’ Traits, Behaviors, and Aptitude. This focus provides new learning environments to both teacher and students and encourages them to construct new interactions. Micro-ethnography and discourse analysis are two research methods for collecting and analyzing data. Interviews, classroom observations, and collection of relevant archives are the methods to collect data.

What’s the Big Idea? Using Books to Cultivate Talented Readers and Thinkers Across the Curriculum Susannah Richards, Eastern Connecticut State University, Storrs, CT This session provides an overview of appropriate challenging books and instructional approaches to use to support talented 2nd-5th grade readers in all curriculum areas. The focus of the session is on creating opportunities for talented readers to develop their reading and thinking abilities as they explore their interests and expand their knowledge by reading quality fiction and nonfiction that extends the curriculum. Explore strategies for using picture books, novels, and nonfiction in both print and electronic formats to escalate student engagement with the content. A bibliography of recently published big idea books is provided. Audience: Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Rosedown

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

72

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

CURRICULUM STUDIES

GLOBAL AWARENESS

The Bridge Curriculum: A Readiness Curriculum for Gifted Students of Diversity

16.2 Public Art as Service Learning

Sandra Kaplan, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

David Fox, Lafayette Parish School System, Maurice, LA

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

This presentation consists of an overview of arts-based service learning projects conducted with K-12 students from at-risk populations. Examples presented: public awareness campaigns, public celebrations/performances, creating environmental artworks, a community arts initiative, and the development of architectural effects. Strategies for engaging reluctant learners, developing assessment criteria, a recounting of funding sources and organizational infrastructure from selected projects are included. Including students in the creation of public art projects not only makes them stakeholders, but also provides them with authentic opportunities to develop skills including teamwork, perseverance, and the interdependency of citizenship. Audience: Administrators, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12 MIDDLE GRADES

Room: Elmwood CURRICULUM STUDIES

14.1 Engaging Gifted Students in Exploring the Big Ideas of History: Thinking Like a Historian Joy Lawson Davis, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA Historical thinking is essential to the in-depth study of history and other social sciences. In historical thinking, students are engaged in raising questions to support their answers. Historical thinking can best be described as a teaching strategy designed to foster higher-order thinking skills. Engaging gifted learners in historical thinking nurtures and excites their intellect, creativity, and sensitivity for the interconnections between events and human issues over time. This session engages participants in a review of various strategies and materials found most effective in teaching gifted students to develop the habits of mind of historians.

Building Strong Writers in the Middle School: The Top 12 Lessons You Will Ever Need

Friday

A contributing factor causing both the attrition and underachievement of gifted students of cultural, linguistic, economic, and academic diversity is the lack of readiness to participate in a differentiated curriculum once they have been identified. The Bridge Curriculum (K-8) introduces the meaning of scholarliness and scholarship as students learn how to make the transitions from the academic and affective expectations of the core or regular to the differentiated curriculum. Some examples of the transitions include: from convergent to divergent questioning, from focusing on facts to big ideas, and from teacher–directed to independent study.

James Delisle, Growing Good Kids, North Myrtle Beach, SC Today’s middle school students are used to (and tired of) writing activities that must fit a specific, testable format or structure; however, there is little joy to be found in a 5-paragraph essay. In this session, participants are presented with 12 writing activities that enhance character, creativity, self-awareness, and individual expression. Several activities are brief and humorous while others require extensive, introspective responses--and each of these lessons has been “classroom-tested” in both gifted and mixed-ability middle school classrooms. Interested in turning even your reluctant writers into wordsmiths? This session is for you. Audience: Coordinators, Classroom Teachers 6-8 Room: Napoleon Ballroom

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

Friday

MIDDLE GRADES

MIDDLE GRADES

Explicit Programming for Gifted and Talented Culturally Diverse Learners: The Middle School Nonverbal Honors Core

17.3 Strategies To Motivate and Extend Gifted Language Arts Middle School Students

Dina Brulles, Paradise Valley Unified School District, Peoria, AZ

Jennifer Toney, University of Georgia, Athens, GA;

Providing gifted services for culturally diverse middle school students can present a challenge. This session presents one TDIPPMT/PO7FSCBM)POPST$PSF BQSPHSBNGPSHJGUFEBOE UBMFOUFETUVEFOUTJEFOUJmFEPOUIF/BHMJFSJ/PO7FSCBM"CJMJUZ Test. Teachers hold bilingual/ELL and gifted certifications. The teaching team incorporates an integrated, thematic approach in designing their instructional units of study and a project-based approach for implementation. This combination provides a culturally rich, highly engaging learning environment that embraces, encourages, and challenges gifted students of diverse populations. Presenters share sample instructional units, teaching methods and schedules, along with data examining program development and academic achievement.

Many middle school gifted language arts students exceed standards on standardized tests, yet they are often required to do the same work as general education students. This session enlightens participants with new strategies and lessons that will motivate these students beyond typical language arts assignments. The presenters share their experiences with proven activities that are student centered, yet require critical-thinking skills, encourage creativity, and are easily adaptable. Participants leave with practical ideas, lessons, and activities to motivate gifted middle school language arts students. Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-8 PARENT & COMMUNITY

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers 6-8 Room: Grand Salon 6 MIDDLE GRADES

Educational Initiatives, Curriculum, and Gifted Middle School Students Patti Drapeau, University of Southern Maine, South Freeport, ME We can talk the RtI talk in our support of tiered services for gifted students. We can talk the 21st century learning talk through our support of critical and creative thinking, communication, and problem solving. In this session, participants rethink how to challenge gifted middle school learners by seeing how a new vision of curriculum for 21st century learners works with these initiatives. In this session, participants learn how complexity and rigor exists in the rigor/relevance/relatedness/recursion framework. This framework provides an organizational design and tools to challenge gifted middle school learners. Actual lesson plans demonstrate how this framework works.

19.2 Keeping Gifted Education Alive: Parents as Advocates Dana Reupert, California Association for the Gifted, Riverside, CA How can parents become a dominant presence in promoting education of the gifted? Find out how to ensure that students have access to the best quality gifted programs and services that school districts can offer. Specific strategies to identify the role of parents as advocates are discussed. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 4

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Creating Learning States of Mind

Demystifying Understanding By Design and Differentiated Instruction: Providing Thoughtful and Comprehensive Professional Development

“There is no such thing as an unmotivated student. There are, however, students in unmotivated states!” How do your students walk into your classroom - distracted, full of energy, dragging? Participants explore how to adapt the learning process to powerfully engage student emotions to create learning states of mind. Discover how to get beyond the “attention getting signal” and understand how you can harness the power of transitioning student emotions in harmony with the learning process. Leave this session full of confidence and equipped with a set of purposeful activities that arouse curiosity, intensifying the learning experience. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Eric Bone, Kemps Landing Magnet School; Catherine Susewind, Great Neck Middle School, Virginia Beach, VA Demystifying Understanding by Design and Differentiated Instruction is a set of seven professional development courses offered to teachers and administrators seeking ways to design rigorous and relevant curricular units that are responsive to the intellectual demands of 21st century learners. This series engages participants in the process of designing high quality, differentiated units of study using the UbD framework while incorporating rigor and relevance throughout the units that are created. Join us as we share and discuss our comprehensive, unified, and fluid model of differentiated professional development that can be easily adapted to your setting, program, and needs.

Room: Grand Salon 9 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

21.1 Boosting the Cognitive Complexity of Instructional Tasks and Assessments Rebecca Stobaugh, Janet Tassell, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY Teachers still struggle with designing instructional activities and assessments that require students to use critical-thinking skills. Attendees are shown how to boost the cognitive complexity of instructional tasks and assessments by utilizing scenarios, quotes, and graphics. The presenters model each strategy and show several examples in various content areas and grade levels. After each strategy is presented, attendees develop assessment items or instructional activities that utilize the demonstrated technique.

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 13

Friday

Rick Shade, Jefferson County Schools, Loveland, CO; Patti Shade, Denver Public Schools, Denver, CO

Poster Sessions

t1PTUFSTBSFPOEJTQMBZJO the NAGC Learning Quarter (second floor) through Saturday, November 5. t1SFTFOUFSTXJMMCFBWBJMBCMFBU the session time indicated to present and answer questions.

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Changes in Teachers’ Attitudes Toward Teaching Twice-Exceptional Learners Through Focused Professional Development Karen Rogers, University of St. Thomas, Minneapolis, MN Through Project 2Excel, teachers of twice exceptional learners in four districts have been trained via an online certificate program, monthly “teaching topics”, paid writing and planning time for curriculum development, and project consultant observers who visit their classrooms monthly. This 4-pronged professional development-model has produced remarkably positive results in teachers’ attitudes about working with these children from a talent development rather than deficit perspective. The students themselves have also made remarkable adjustments in the two years of this program, with marked improvements in selfregulation, organization, math and reading achievement, and the lessening of stress and anxiety.

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Prince of Wales PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Javits Project Version Three: The Utah High-Ability Student Initiative Project! Rebecca Odoardi, Michele Riggs, Granite School District, Salt Lake City, UT From Advanced Readers At Risk to the Utah High-Ability Student Initiative Program, this new version of the Utah Javits Project is making a difference for teachers throughout the state. Teachers can get their GT endorsement nearly free, be coached live using a high-tech videoconferencing system, and also have access to videos, PowerPoints

and other information on the project’s interactive website. Participants learn about the program components, including how it was expanded from the original Javits program, and have the opportunity to watch one of the program coaches conduct a live session with a teacher in Utah! Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Marlborough B PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

22.3 From Audit To Awesome: A Framework for Developing Quality Programs in North Carolina Sneha Shah-Coltrane, Elissa Brown, North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, Raleigh, NC North Carolina has had legislation governing gifted education since 1961, exemplifying a strong commitment to gifted education for nearly 50 years. Undergirded by legislation and state-wide funding, the NC Department of Public Instruction developed the NC Academically and/or Intellectually Gifted (AIG) Program Standards to serve as a state-wide framework for quality programs while honoring local context and flexibility. The standards have guided the development of plans and become a tool for continuous program improvement and personnel preparation. Discuss the standards development and implementation and look at how they are improving gifted services, transforming districts, and cultivating quality programs. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Poster Sessions

t1PTUFSTBSFPOEJTQMBZJO the NAGC Learning Quarter (second floor) through Saturday, November 5. t1SFTFOUFSTXJMMCFBWBJMBCMFBU the session time indicated to present and answer questions.

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

Going to Graduate School In Gifted Education: Choosing a Program, Surviving, and Succeeding

24.4 Emotional Intelligence in Adolescents With and Without Talent

Cheryl Walker, Petra Gyles, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; Lorna Bryant, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, AR; April DeGennaro, Peeples Elementary, Fayetteville, GA; Lisa Rubenstein, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Mara de los Dolores Valadez Sierra, University of Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Mexico

Audience: Counselors, Researchers RESEARCH & EVALUATION

Audience: Researchers Room: Grand Salon 21 RESEARCH & EVALUATION

Elementary Teacher Perceptions And Concerns About Science Teaching And Learning Deborah Dailey, Alicia Cotabish, Gail Hughes, Ann Robinson, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR Project STEM Starters focuses on improving differentiated, content-specific science instruction in the elementary and gifted classrooms through sustained and targeted professional development. This specific study targets teacher perceptions about science teaching and learning and their concerns about the implementation of a STEM initiative. Early results from this study suggest experimental teachers have gained confidence in their abilities to lead students in developing science content and process skills. Results and implications from these firstyear results are presented in this session.

Comparing Skills and Competencies for Artistically Gifted High School, Undergraduate, and Graduate Alumni

Friday

Graduate student life in gifted education is very rewarding, but can be challenging. Deciding upon a school, graduate program, and supervisor, and successfully presenting research through conferences, and academic writing are examples of the topics that are discussed. First-hand accounts provide valuable opportunities to develop as an emerging professional. Objectives of the session include learning from the advice and tips provided by graduate students and having an opportunity to ask questions to students who have insights based on personal experiences. The session audience is open to everyone, but is of particular interest to graduate students in gifted education.

The aim of this study was to compare the emotional intelligence of a sample of other talented teens who are not gifted. 363 adolescents participated in the study, 94 were previously identified as talented. All adolescents answered UIF&2*:75IFTDPSFTPOFBDITVCTDBMFTGSPNUIFUBMFOUFE group and Not Talented group were compared. Results indicated statistically significant differences for the talented in stress management and total emotional intelligence, thus confirming a positive adjustment and ruled out the presence of mismatches in this area in talented people.

Angie Miller, Amber Lambert, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN This study investigates findings from the Strategic National Arts Alumni Project, comparing institutional contributions to the development of skills and competencies across high school, undergraduate, and graduate arts training programs. Responses from 4,031 arts alumni suggest significant differences by school level for skill development in artistic technique, communication skills, social skills, personal growth, research skills, and technology skills. High school alumni report greater perceived contributions to their artistic technique, communication skills, social skills, and personal growth. Graduate alumni report greater perceived contributions to their research and technological skills. Potential experiential and curricular reasons for these differences are discussed. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 9-12

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Researchers Room: Chequers Room: Belle Chasse

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM RESEARCH & EVALUATION

26.1 Myths At Work: Exploring Teachers’ Perceptions Of The Construct of a Child Who Is Gifted Amanda Latz, Erica Hurley, Cheryll Adams, Rebecca Pierce, Ball State University, IN NAGC recently published a pamphlet titled10 Myths about Gifted Education. Using this publication as a starting point, the presenters conducted a qualitative analysis of word data collected from third, fourth, and fifth grade teachers involved with Project CLUE-Plus, a Javits grant funded university-

multiple school collaboration, to explore the prevalence of mythological barriers operating within teachers’ perceptions of children who are gifted. Findings indicated that 48% of teachers expressed a belief in one or more myths about children who are gifted. During this session, findings, implications, and practical applications from the study are presented. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5

COMBINED SESSION RESEARCH & EVALUATION

Friday

Korean Middle School Students’ Spatial Ability: Investigation of its Relationship with Mathematics and Science Talent

The Identification of Gifted Children in Science and Mathematics: Outcomes From Three Contexts In India

So Yoon Yoon, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Marcia Delcourt, Western Connecticut State University, Danbury, CT; Ajith Basu, Agastya International Foundation; Anitha Kurup, National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bangalore, India; Jyoti Sharma, University of Delhi, Delhi, India

This study explored the spatial ability of 308 middle school students in Korea and investigated how spatial ability of students who were identified as gifted in mathematics and science domains differed from general education students. In addition, using path analysis modeling, the probability of students being identified as gifted in mathematics and science domains was examined by constructing plausible associations among participants spatial ability; academic achievements in three different domains, language, mathematics, and science; and demographic variables. Audience: Researchers, Classroom Teachers 6-8, Other

India has 193 million school-age children. A government priority is to recognize and nurture its highly able students, especially in science and mathematics. Resulting from an Indo-US round table discussion to create a road map for identifying and mentoring gifted children in India, three programs were approved for initial funding. While there are differences in language, ethnicity, and economic status, identification systems and educational programs are evolving in both rural and urban environments. The procedures for founding these programs are compared. Teachers and program directors have also addressed key research questions that are reported during this session. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Grand Salon 18

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RESEARCH & EVALUATION

SPECIAL POPULATIONS

The Role of Teacher Mathematical Content Knowledge in Developing Talented Math Students

Gifted on the Autism Spectrum

The NCES reports little increase in elementary student mastery of complex mathematics and science concepts over the last three decades. Research also suggests that elementary teachers, in particular, have less developed math content proficiency. One of the objectives of this study was to understand the degree to which elementary teachers possess mathematical content knowledge to adequately challenge high-ability elementary students. Qualitative analysis data, based on Strauss and Corbin’s analytic techniques, suggest that teachers have limited content knowledge proficiency and textbook-laden practices that prevent them from addressing gifted students’ needs in mathematics. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers

What does it mean to be gifted on the Autism Spectrum? Join four professionals as they discuss the controversy that surrounds the identification and suggested interventions for gifted students who meet the criteria for a disorder on the Autism Spectrum. These students have specific needs socially, emotionally, and educationally. Hear experts describe the strengths of these students and how to use those strengths to help compensate for weaknesses. Learn how to adapt their experiences into your teaching or counseling of gifted students who have Asperger’s syndrome or Autism. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Grand Salon 7 Room: Grand Salon 12 SPECIAL POPULATIONS

Emancipate Asian-American Students from Stereotypes and Misunderstandings Sarah Oh, Mona Mohammad Alimin, University of Viriginia, Charlottesville, VA Asian-American students’ high achievement in education has been well documented; however, this positive image potentially serves as an argument to exclude them from programs focused on growing academic potential and masks the struggles of many Asian-American students. When viewed as a single group, the dominant educational success of some Asian-American subgroups provides a false sense of complacency faced by other subgroups. This session raises such issues to dispel myths surrounding Asian American students and to move towards accepting differences within the group. Practical strategies for promoting academic and social/emotional well-being in education are also discussed.

Friday

Tonya Moon, Catherine Brighton, Christine Trinter, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

Patricia Schuler, Creative Insights, Castleton, NY; Edward Amend, Amend Psychological Services, Lexington, KY; Megan Foley Nicpon, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; Claire Hughes, College of Coastal Georgia, Brunswick, GA

SPECIAL POPULATIONS

Stuck In The Middle Michelle Frazier Trotman Scott, University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA; Donna Ford, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN; Deborah Harmon, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI; Malik Henfield, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA African-American students are consistently underrepresented in gifted education, especially those living in poverty. These students are referred at much lower rates than their non-African-American counterparts and recent data indicate that this trend is permeating into the middle class realm. The presenters discuss case studies of AfricanAmerican students who are ‘stuck in the middle’ – gifted, but not identified and provide recommendations and points of information for parents, teachers, and administrators of students who deal with daily educational barriers that are just “too high to get over and too low to get under.”

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Grand Salon 16

Room: Melrose

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM SPECIAL POPULATIONS

28.1 Gifted Students With Emotional Disabilities: The Neglected Population of Twice-Exceptional Students Tracy Missett, Marguerite Brunner, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

Friday

Although twice-exceptional students have received increased attention in the gifted education literature, one group of twiceexceptional students continues to be ignored: gifted students with emotional disabilities. This session addresses the unique educational needs and behavioral profiles of gifted students with emotional disabilities. It also identifies factors that often prevent their inclusion in gifted programs, such as the negative perceptions held towards these vulnerable students and the focus on remediation of behavioral difficulties rather than on academic gifts. Finally, it provides parents and educators with suggestions for addressing the affective and educational needs of such twice-exceptional students with emotional disabilities. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 SPECIAL POPULATIONS

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 9-12 SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

32.1 The Integration of Faith and Learning Within Gifted Education Programs Jessica Cannaday, Azusa Pacific University, Running Springs, CA Christian teacher educators often struggle to integrate faith and learning within both private parochial and traditional curricular approaches. This presentation discusses methods for legally integrating faith and learning within GATE programs (both public and private), and is specifically focused on seamlessly weaving the research on faith integration into the main research focuses currently seen in gifted education circles (e.g, moral GATE identification, Service Learning, Differentiation, social and emotional needs of the gifted). Teachers and GATE coordinators interested in faith integration within gifted programming are encouraged to attend.

29.3 The Malleable Mind, The Gifted Learner: Reducing Stereotype Threat Through Experimental Interventions

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Classroom Teachers K-12

Katharine Meyer, Carolyn Callahan, Robert Izzo, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

33.3 The Identification and Placement of Gifted Students in Korea: In Case Of SNUE

Students holding a malleable mindset achieve higher grades and identify more with school than students who subscribe to a fixed intelligence mindset. These differences are even more pronounced when students encounter challenging tasks and situations. The AP Challenge Program provides support structures for low-income and minority high school students who would not have otherwise considered the AP track. That these students hold a malleable mindset is especially important considering the academic rigor of these classes. Data from our intervention

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suggest strategic interventions affect the strength and development of malleable mindsets in APCP students.

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

Mangoo Park, Shin Ho Jang, Wan Kang, Jae-Young Kim, Kapsu Kim, Chi-Soon Kwon, Seoul National University of Education, Seoul, South Korea The purpose of this presentation is to address the identification and placement process of mathematically and scientifically gifted students. Currently, most Korean institutions that educate gifted students change their identification and placement processes from achievement-

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

oriented to observation-oriented. The presenters explain the background of the process and results of the change. Participants rethink the definition of giftedness and the process of identification and placement by comparing those of their own systems.

math and no one program will fit all students. Case studies of individual children and sample exemplary programs in large and small schools illustrate the steps of the process. Presenters share insights about selecting curriculum, long-term planning, and evaluation, and provide a list of must-have resources.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-8

STEM

Room: Grand Salon 19

Raising the Bar: Challenging Math-Talented Students

In this practical session for parents and educators, learn how to modify the regular math program and establish a comprehensive, systematic program for math-talented students. Discuss how to determine the level of studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ability and achievement and tailor instruction to their individual needs. Recognize that students demonstrate a variety of abilities in

Poster Sessions

t1PTUFSTBSFPOEJTQMBZJO the NAGC Learning Quarter (second floor) through Saturday, November 5. t1SFTFOUFSTXJMMCFBWBJMBCMFBU the session time indicated to present and answer questions.

Friday

Ann Lupkowski-Shoplik, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA; Susan Assouline, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

Exhibitor Workshops Research-Based Teaching Models That Engage Gifted Students Kimberley Chandler, Kendall-Hunt Publishing For nearly 25 years the Center for Gifted Education at the College of William & Mary has documented the value of teaching and learning models and created curricula based upon that research. Learn about practice models for language arts, science, and social studies that promote high-level thinking and engage advanced learners.

Demystifying the Learning of Algebra Mary Anne Lane, Borenson & Associates Hands-On EquationsÂŽ demystifies the learning of algebra. Learn about the visual and kinesthetic system for introducing algebraic concepts to young students. See how it applies to verbal problems. NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area B

NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area A

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM STEM

STEM

Middle Grades Mathematics: Plateau, Peak, or Passion

35.4 Solving the Equation: Fostering Mathematics Talent Among Diverse Populations

Linda Sheffield, Northern Kentucky University, Fort Thomas, KY Middle grades are a critical time for mathematically promising students. This is the time when students should develop a passion for math, create innovative approaches to problem solving and problem posing, and build a strong foundation for high school and beyond. It is not a time when brain development reaches a plateau. Rather, it should be a time of brain growth, maturity, and excitement about increasingly complex ideas. Join us to experience questioning and discourse strategies and a new, complete, challenging mathematics curriculum focused on reasoning, sense making, and creativity designed to prepare this next generation of STEM innovators.

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 6-8 Room: Jasperwood

Frances Spielhagen, Mount Saint Mary College, Newburgh, NY The most recent PISA mathematics scores indicate that only 1.9% of U.S. students scored at the 95th percentile, when compared with their peers in the international arena, scoring below the average of 3% of the total sample of students from OECD member nations, and well below the top students in Korea, Japan, Switzerland, China, and Singapore. The key to mathematics proficiency is algebra. This presentation explores how providing strong algebra instruction for all students at l east by 8th grade can close the opportunity gap for diverse populations and enhance advanced mathematics instruction for gifted students well before 8th grade. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers

Get Your Game Face On Take a break for dessert in the NAGC Exhibit Hall during “NAGC Game Time.” Here’s your opportunity to visit with exhibitors and fellow attendees and try a few games provided by ThinkFun, SimplyFun, Fox Games, and Mindware. NAGC appreciates the support of these companies.

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz

GAME TIME Friday, November 4 Exhibit Hall 2:45 PM - 3:45 PM


| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM SIGNATURE SERIES

SIGNATURE SERIES

Successful Strategies for Underserved Gifted Students

Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth (Smpy): How 40 Years of Longitudinal Research and Theory Development Might Shape Educational Policy and Human Capital Initiatives

Throughout the U.S., classrooms are filled with gifted students who are underserved and who have academic gaps that may prevent them from reaching their maximum potential. Many of them are low-income, culturally and linguistically diverse, twice-exceptional, or have nontraditional learning styles. As educational and instructional leaders in gifted and talented education, how do we accommodate these students? What strategies help fill these gaps? This session helps answer these questions through “live demonstrations” of strategies that engage, motivate, and are connected to a gifted student’s sense of competition. Many of these strategies do not cost a penny and are created using materials and supplies routinely found in classrooms and schools. If you work with such students as a parent, teacher, mentor, consultant, assistant, or administrator, this is a must-attend session. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 3

Hungry?

Check out the grab and go food carts in the Hotel.

Camilla Benbow, David Lubinski, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN; Major findings uncovered by SMPY -- five cohorts of more than 5,000 intellectually talented participants recruited throughout 1972-1997 and tracked over the past 40 years -- are reviewed. These findings have important implications for understanding the psychological differences and educational needs of students who gravitate toward the humanities versus STEM disciplines. The scope of individual differences within the top 1% of mathematical reasoning ability is huge across both intellectual (mathematical, spatial, and verbal abilities) and nonintellectual attributes (interests and personality); and these differences create contrasting developmental trajectories and organizational climates. They cannot be ignored. A model highlighting the multi-dimensionality and scope of human individuality is provided, because taking into account human differences in psychological orientation facilitates educational practice and talent development. This model also helps to identify untapped pools of talent. Among other revealing findings, there does not appear to be an ability threshold (even within the top 1%); more ability is better for enhancing the likelihood of creative achievement in middle age. True “multi-potentiality,” is very rare. And nonintellectual personal attributes in addition to intra-individual ability strength, play a role in determining the domains within which intellectually talented individuals make their creative advances, but opportunity and hard work are both required as well.

Friday

Jaime Castellano, Ganado Unified School Disrtict, Ganado, Az; Norma Hernandez, Greenwell Springs, LA

Audience: Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 6-8 Room: Grand Salon 7

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

JAM sessions in the NAGC Learning Quarter (2nd Floor) In post-NAGC Convention evaluations, attendees have noted the time spent in smaller, more intimate discussions were the most productive and provided them the best learning opportunities. NAGC Jam Sessions to the rescue! The Jam Sessions in the NAGC Learning Quarter on Friday are offered by the NAGC Networks. The following sessions will be roundtable style, led by NAGC Network volunteers. Make a point to drop in and jam! 4:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:00 PM COMPUTERS AND TECHNOLOGY

How to use Technology and Portable Devices to Produce and Create COUNSELING AND GUIDANCE

Bullying: Is it Inescapable and What Can we do About It?

Friday

CURRICULUM STUDIES

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

21st Century Tools for Conducting Professional Development RESEARCH & EVALUATION

Program Evaluation and Assessment and Identification Issues SPECIAL SCHOOLS

Differentiating Instruction in the Days of Louisianaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Comprehensive Curriculum How to Make the Most of the School Day GLOBAL AWARENESS

Global Awareness: Embracing and Contributing to Our Global Community

AWARDS SESSION

2011 NAGC/Ball State Administrator Award Cheryl Quatrano-Hatzidimitriou, BELL Academy, Queens, NY In 2007, an innovative, progressive Renzulli Schoolwide Enrichment Model middle school opened its doors for the first time. In only three years, BELL Academy has risen to the 98th percentile in middle school student performance in NYC and currently has close to 700 students on its waiting list for admission. The academic success of this diverse

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population of students, including high percentages of special education students and English Language Learners, has resulted in record numbers of student acceptances into the most competitive NYC specialized high schools and many other distinguished programs of their choice. Please join us to learn how to start and grow a total school enrichment program that challenges the gifts and talents of all students and how BELL Academy has defined 21st Century Gifted Education for all middle school students. Room: Grand Salon 9

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

ARTS

ARTS

Engaging The Imagination of K-5 Gifted Students Through the Arts

1.4 Approaching Diversity Through Drama

Joan Smutny, National Louis University, Wilmette, IL

Melanie Marty, Clarke County Schools, Athens, GA

Integrating the arts into the curriculum has proven highly effective in meeting the unique learning needs of gifted students. Yet, the arts remain under-used as catalysts for the imagination and creative thinking of highly able students. Designed for classroom teachers, this workshop enables participants to apply and adapt arts practices to address the learning needs of gifted students in language arts, social studies, and science. Through a range of resources and creative strategies shared by the facilitator, classroom teachers gain a practical understanding of how to integrate art processes into the curriculum to enhance imagination, invention, and higher-level thinking.

This session leads participants through dramatic exercises to address the difficulties educators go through on the job. Participants act out scenes based on their own experiences, perform suggestions to resolve conflict, and discuss how to use performance techniques to assist students with interpersonal, linguistic, and cultural issues.

Audience: Consultants, Classroom Teachers K-5

Kicking It Up a Notch: Using Online Research Modules in the 21st Century Gifted Classroom

ARTS

3.1 Soul Behind The Skill, Heart Behind the Technique: Experiences of Flow Among Talented Singaporean Teenagers Rhoda Myra Bacsal, National Institute of Education, Singapore The session highlights the experiences of flow (i.e. clear goals, intense concentration, enjoyment, loss of selfconsciousness, transformation of time) among 14 teachernominated adolescents who are talented both in the arts and their academics and are enrolled in a specialized arts secondary school in Singapore. Environmental supports that enable expressions of artistic inclinations and identities within the Singapore context were revealed and implications for arts-educators and artist-practitioners were explored. This session is most useful to educators of young artists on how they could consistently engage their students interest and motivation in and passion for the arts.

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

Magdalena Fitzsimmons, Baltimore County Public Schools, Baltimore, MD Online research modules provide students with a wide variety of exciting learning opportunities, allowing them to actively engage in problem-solving activities that are selfdirected, authentic, and based on the use of 21st century technology resources. Session participants learn about the components of an effective online research module and strategies for creating learning scenarios that allow students to develop proficiency in problem solving, self-directed learning strategies, and acquire content knowledge through investigative activities.

Friday

Room: Eglinton and Winton

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Marlborough B

Audience: Counselors, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 9-12

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

Maximum Impact: Using Webinars Effectively

5.2 An International Perspective on What We Know About New Technology Integration with Differentiated Instruction

Cynthia Cho, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; Robyn Kogan, Northbrook/Glenview District 30, Northbrook, IL; Kathleen Ross, Community Consolidated School District #64, Park Ridge, IL New to hosting webinars? Then, this session is for you! Experience a live webinar to see how this technology can help you deliver efficient, customized professional development targeting teachers of gifted students. See how these tools can also be used to reach gifted students who may be spread out across your district. Presenters focus on content especially appropriate for gifted. Key points include understanding the challenges of effective and sustained professional development while leveraging technology tools. Discuss and collaborate on how best to reach your instructors and students without a large technology budget any time, any place!

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Most teachers know how to use computers, but are trying to find effective ways to differentiate instruction by using technology. In particular, high-ability learners need activities that challenge them in classrooms. A comprehensive review of how three countries developed and integrated technologies to differentiate instruction are presented in UIJTTFTTJPOUIF7JSUVBM4BWBOOBIJO6, UIFTUBUFXJEF e-learning of the state of Maine in the U.S., and the digital textbook in South Korea. These examples provide educational insights for the future and a rationale to explain why we need more funding to differentiate instruction. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

Room: Grand Salon 24 COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

Playing With the Future: Developing Gifts Through Computer Game Creation Karen Bendelman, Austin Independent School District, Austin, TX As educators and parents, we generally think of computer games at best as a distraction for our children, and at worst as promoters of violence and negative stereotypes. Can computer games design be the right tool to develop gifts? In this session, teachers are exposed to developing computer games as a type III enrichment product that can be used to enhance the creativity of students. The state of the art in the area is discussed, as well as experiences implementing enriched curriculum for middle school students in a school for gifted learners.

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Jungsun Kim, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

The Instructional Design Process of Creating Effective and Engaging Online Learning Modules Nikki Kim, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN Student-focused differentiation is the basis of one online staff development module associated with a Javitsfunded study of cluster grouping. This module details and provides examples of 25 strategies that teachers can use to differentiate curriculum and instruction. The presenter reviews the instructional design process from start to finish and the resulting implications that apply to creating effective and engaging online learning modules for professional development. Responses from teachers across the country to the instructional technologies used in this module as well as how they implemented the content within their classrooms are provided.

Audience: Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers

Room: Fountain

Room: Windsor

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

The Digital Natives Are Restless: Web 2.0 Tools To The Rescue!

6.1 How Much is a GT Student Worth?

David Baxter, Jennifer Smith, GEMS Academy, Bowling Green, KY

Derek Little, Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts, Natchitoches, LA

Are you looking for new ways to incorporate technology without sacrificing rigor? 21st century learners are eager to communicate, create, and collaborate, and you can empower your students by putting them in the producer’s seat. From Glogster to Prezi and Xtranormal to PhotoPeach, the Internet offers a wealth of free tools to engage students and make their work come alive. Come see actual products created by high-ability students in grades 3-6. Participants receive a free disc with links to over a dozen online resources.

Ever wonder how much money is gained by having a GT student successfully graduate high school and college and enter the skilled and creative workforce? Do you ever wonder how lackluster U.S. student performance translates into diminished economic growth? Recent data show the top five percent of U.S. students being ranked last in performance when compared to thirty other developed nations. This session frames education in its larger context of creating educational capital and addresses the costs of the current U.S. achievement gap. Attendees leave with a clear argument for GT advocacy efforts.

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents

Friday

Room: Grand Salon 19

Friday, November 4 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM Versailles Ballroom

The NAGC Conceptual Foundations Legacy Series Continues “The Creative Voice of Don Treffinger”

Videotaping for the Next Offering in the Portraits in Gifted Education: The Legacy Series The NAGC Conceptual Foundations Network, in concert with NAGC, continues to capture in video notable gifted advocates, researchers, and leaders in order to preserve their legacy for future generations. Join us as we celebrate the work of Don Treffinger, president of the Center for Creative Learning, and an internationally known researcher, writer, teacher, and presenter in the area of creative learning and creative problem solving. We are privileged to be honoring this humanitarian and trailblazer, and know you will want to participate in this enlightening event (audience questions are planned). A light reception, hosted by the NAGC Conceptual Foundation Network and Creativity Network, will follow the taping.

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

Changing Mindsets: Gifted Students and Project-Based Inquiry Petra Gyles, Tanya Chichekian, Cheryl Walker, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada

Friday

Dweck’s ability attribution-framework identifies fixed and growth mindsets. Fixed mindset individuals believe they have unchangeable intellectual abilities; persons with growth mindsets believe these abilities can develop, thus are eager to learn and grow. Inquiry--prominent in gifted education models--is a social-constructivist, active pedagogy, that fosters empowerment, motivation, and curiosity-driven learning. Inquiry encourages learners to seek and solve novel problems. Inquiry environments appear optimal for fostering growth mindsets. Secondary students varying in ability helped address the questions: Can inquiry-learning engagement influence mindsets? Does this influence vary with ability? This presentation addresses teachers and researchers about interconnections among educational experiences, ability, and mindsets.

participants learn about a collection of affective-cognitive interventions that served to reverse underachievement of both the psychosocial and academic types. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 10 COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

Greasy Hair and Pocket Protectors: Profiling Early College Students Alessa Giampaolo, Hand In Hand Educational Services, Reisterstown, MD; Stacia Taylor, Texas Parents of the Profoundly Gifted, Houston, TX

More Than Thinking: Underachievement’s Social and Emotional Underpinnings

Many educators won’t consider grade skipping because a child doesn’t fit the stereotype of a profoundly gifted student. They’re too immature. He hasn’t memorized his multiplication facts. She hasn’t gotten her period, yet. So, what does a PG child who has successfully navigated radical acceleration look like? How can you tell if early college is the right choice for a gifted student? Blending research from Early Entrance Programs with case studies of specific students, learn from academic histories, test scores, teacher evaluations, and personal student narratives to identify academic and social-emotional indicators that can help guide acceleration choices.

Richard Olenchak, John Gaa, Kelly Lee, University of Houston, Houston, TX

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12

Perhaps the most distressing form of underachievement is the sort that insidiously causes young people to develop psychosocial problems. Utilizing a foundation of research from neurobiology and psychology, this session builds on the fact that the very kinds of cognitive skills that schools encourage (learning, attention, memory, and decision making) are not only profoundly influenced by but are in fact subsumed within the mental processes of emotion. Relying on case studies,

Room: Newberry

Audience: Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 15 COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

Building a Safety Net to Bridge To 21st Century Skills Lindsey Reinert, Jenny Fredrickson, Jefferson County Public Schools, Golden, CO 21st century learning skills include communication, collaboration, creativity, and critical-thinking. The anxiety that affects gifted students both in and out of school serves as a barrier to these pillars. Anxious kids can learn to process and dismiss their worries, but only if you teach them. Explore the concept and role of anxiety in the life of a gifted

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

child, manifestations of anxiety, and strategies for helping your students learn to manage their stress. Learn how to empower your students to take control of the anxieties that are blocking their pathway to an emotionally happy and healthy life.

how students can cope more efficiently with demands, and how effort can be fortified now, not later.

Audience: Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-8

Room: Magnolia Ballroom

Room: Prince of Wales

CREATIVITY

COUNSELING AND GUIDANCE

Creativity for 21st Century Skills: How to Embed Creativity into the Curriculum

Laurie Richard, Leah Lentz, Cindy Allen, Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts, Natchitoches, LA If all gifted students went to Harvard, the need for education about the college admissions and financial aid process for gifted students and their parents would not be so important. This session describes a program at that addresses issues related to success in the college admissions process for our most capable students The goal of this program is to answer question such as, How do I choose a college among so many options?, How can I best market myself to selective colleges?; How do I pay for college? Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 9-12

Jane Piirto, Ashland University, Ashland, OH This session describes the creative process as real creators practice it. Based on extensive biographical research and field-tested by teachers, the program focuses on Five Core Attitudes for Creativity, Seven I’s, and General Practices. It also describes how to focus on creativity within an institution. Practical strategies for embedding these principles into the classroom atmosphere and into various academic subjects--language arts, mathematics, sciences, social sciences-- are described further and elaborate on this way of looking at the creative process. The session will focus on a few of these strategies.

Friday

All Gifties Go To Harvard…

Audience: Consultants, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 13

Room: Napoleon Ballroom COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

Procrastination and High-Ability Learners: If Not Now, When? Joanne Foster, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada This session discusses procrastination - including its underpinnings, implications, benefits, and drawbacks. Examine issues pertaining to giftedness, perfectionism, effective learning environments, self-regulation and thinking processes, motivation, and goal-setting. Consider strategies teachers and parents can use to help stem children’s procrastination and enable them to develop productive mindsets so as to propel the pursuit of excellence. Share insights about procrastination experiences, and ponder what we can learn from them. Discuss how learning is modifiable,

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM CREATIVITY

10.3 Nuturing Creativity in Young Children Jean Chandler, Charleston County School District, Charleston, SC

the next generation by demonstrating successful strategies for delivering curriculum that is personally meaningful and socially significant. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Grand Salon 4

Friday

Creative sparks fly in this session on keeping creativity alive in young children. Strategies need to ensure that young people experience a range of creative opportunities and ways of working individually and in teams, with space to think, support to take risks without fear of failure, and to review critically the outcomes of their work. The session maps current access and progression routes in creative disciplines, reviewing links to, and the capacity of, provision that supports all who would benefit, especially talented young people. Creativity is not limited to the arts but should be embedded across the whole curriculum. Creativity is not at odds with raising standards or an end in itself but should produce outcomes of real value. Pupils who are creative will be prepared for a rapidly changing world, where they may have to adapt to several careers in a lifetime. Many employers want people who see connections, have bright ideas, are innovative, communicate and work well with others, and are able to solve problems. In other words, they need creative people.

Filmmaker, Historian, Artistâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Oh My! Karen Williams, Meg Reed, Moss Bluff Elementary School, Lake Charles, LA

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5

Students go back in time to explore an ancient culture and return with a replica of that historical period. This session provides ideas fostering creativity, enhancing research skills, and incorporating valuable technology skills allowing for the ultimate hands on opportunity to encounter the culture. Experience user friendly presentation software enabling students to create a documentary complete with music, graphics, and narration; create an historic replica that students decorate reflecting the time period being studied. 7JFXBNVTFVNFYIJCJUJPOPGQSPEVDUTUIBUSFnFDULOPXMFEHF of cultural traditions. All session participants leave with a genuine Art In History sample ready to decorate!

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-8

Making It Matter: Using Transformational Play to Engage Learners

Room: Trafalgar

Kimberly Lansdowne, Kimberly Elms, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s youth have inherited a computer-based world and have been bombarded with media since birth, making them a unique group of learners. Our schools have been slow to give up tired paradigms and adopt new strategies to deliver curriculum, thus creating a great paradox for educators: How do we prepare students for a rapidly emerging future using outdated tools and techniques that were developed for an antiquated industrial economy? This session describes how to transform learning for

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CURRICULUM STUDIES

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Raising the Bar: English Language Arts Standards and Gifted Education Penny Kolloff, Illinois State University, Normal, IL; Felicia Dixon, Ball State University, Muncie, IN The English Language Arts Common Core Standards present the national vision of what defines a literate person in the 21st century by outlining competencies to ensure that all high school graduates are college and career ready in literacy. How will these expectations for all students affect what we offer gifted learners? In what ways should educators adapt the Standards to meet the needs of the

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


gifted? This session focuses on the English Language Arts standards, primarily those for reading literature and informational text. The presenters propose a process for examining current literature curricula for gifted learners and incorporating the new standards.

CURRICULUM STUDIES

13.4 Co-Constructing Curriculum for Greater Student Engagement Lori Flint, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC

Room: Grand Salon 12 CURRICULUM STUDIES

11.4 Current Issues Related to the Schoolwide Enrichment Model Stuart Knapp, Wesley College, Dover, DE Across the literature of gifted children and youth, there is almost no conceptual framework that has captured the attention of more researchers and practitioners than that of the Schoolwide Enrichment Model. This graphic poster QSFTFOUBUJPOEFUBJMTUIFTFNJOBMXPSLPG3FO[VMMJ 3FJT 7BO Tassel-Baska, Feldhusen, and other investigators who have built upon their research. The presentation is interactive, as the presenter elaborates several kinds of services appropriate for identified students. Two kinds of giftedness are described along with 3 types of enrichment. Several delivery structures are described with examples. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Gone are the days when most gifted students just sit down and do the work prescribed for them just because it is expected. This session teaches how to engage students at a much higher level and increase learning by co-constructing curriculum and activities with students instead of just giving it to them. An andragogical instead of pedagogical approach is offered, as are specific language and strategies that work well with the needs of students who are gifted, no matter their age or grade level. This method has been successfully used with students from K-graduate school. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 MIDDLE GRADES

Assessing Higher Order Thinking in 21st Century Middle School Classrooms

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Diane Heacox, St. Catherine University, Edina, MN; Patti Drapeau, Maine Department of Education, South Freeport, ME In 21st century classrooms, teachers are encouraged to focus on students as thinkers. In order for students to know and understand how to get better at their thinking, teachers must use an assessment and feedback system that accurately represents these processes. Traditional assessment tools, rubrics, and performance assessments often assess only content and/or product. This session demonstrates how to assess thinking using criteria that are quantitatively and qualitatively specific, measureable, and observable against evidence. How to assess higher-order thinking in a single formative or summative assessment as well as document growth over time is also addressed. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Marlborough A

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM MIDDLE GRADES

PARENT & COMMUNITY

17.4 A Picture Paints a Thousand Words and Can Add Creativity to the School Experience!

19.1 Does Tiger Momâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Effect Exist? Patterns of Parental Authority among Gifted Asian and Caucasian Students

Linda Pfeiffer, Thompson School District, Loveland, CO

Yi-Lung Kuo, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD What is black and white and draws gifted middle school students like flies to honey? The art of black and white photography! Using a workshop model and a professional photographer, students are taught the language of photography. Whether you are looking for a stand-alone enrichment activity or a motivational product concept that will stretch your highest-ability students in the regular classroom, this is an idea that must be looked at. Together the presenters have decades of experience in leading middle school students in these powerful workshops. Student work examples are shown and do-it-yourself handouts are provided.

Friday

Audience: Coordinators, Classroom Teachers 6-8

Amy Chuaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book The Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother has caused a stir in the media. This session reports on a study investigating differential patterns of authority among parents of highly gifted Asian-American and Caucasian students. Students who earned 700 or more on either SAT-CR or SAT-M before the age of 13 and their parents were surveyed using the Parental Authority Questionnaire and Work Preference Inventory. The results provide insight into the parenting practices among Asian-American and Caucasian families of exceptionally gifted students. The implications of these findings for talent development and psychosocial adjustment are discussed. Audience: Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 6-12

MIDDLE GRADES

Products Create 21st Century Learners Julia Link Roberts, Tracy Inman, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY How can you engage middle schoolers in high-level learning where they think creatively and critically, whether as self-directed learners or cooperative group members? How can you incorporate 21st skill building in units? One powerful way is engaging in product development. To encourage authentic assessment of real-world products, use a protocol that ensures ease, consistency, and clarity. Developing and Assessing Product Tools guide students in product development, facilitate differentiation, simplify assessment, and remove the learning ceiling. With consistent components, innovative scale, and varying tiers with levels of expectation based on preassessment, DAP Tools are one strategy to promote high-level learning. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers 6-8 Room: Rosedown

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Exploring Case Studies in Professional Development Christine Weber, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL; Wendy Behrens, Minnesota Department of Education, Roseville, MN; Cecelia Boswell, Austin Creek Education Systems, De Leon, TX Although the best way to provide opportunities for educators to analyze various situations in education is through hands-on practice, it is not always easy to organize such encounters with professionals, especially in gifted education. Case studies situate learning in authentic and meaningful contexts and provide the data and stories that end in a dilemma. This session engages participants in a reflective analysis of case studies through discussion questions, activities, extensions, and suggestions for further reading. Cases that are keyed to national standards offer participants professional development opportunities to better serve gifted and talented students. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Elmwood

92

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

Gifted Education and a K-12 Commitment to Delivering Rigorous Educational Programming

Causal Research in Gifted and Talented Education: Regression Discontinuity Design

This presentation details the exciting transformation IBQQFOJOHJOUIF$VNCFSMBOE7BMMFZ4DIPPM%JTUSJDUJOUIF areas of student expectation, rigorous programming, and data-driven, systems-thinking leadership. The presentation focuses on all aspects of this initiative and provides a potential roadmap to teachers, administrators, and all school constituents who aspire to exceeding the minimal expectations associated with the age of standardized testing. Qualitative and quantitative data will uniformly support the growth of practices and programs that demand educational excellence from our students in the context of a transition from traditional pedagogy to a focus on 21st century instruction and assessment.

Scott Peters, University of Wisconsin - Whitewater, Whitewater, WI; Michael Matthews, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC Educational research has long been plagued by a major limitation: random assignment, which is the feature that allows one to make causal inferences, can be inappropriate and also sometimes unethical. This has caused many researchers to resort to observational studies that are unable to yield causal inferences. This session presents Regression Discontinuity Design, a method that allows for the estimation of treatment effects without the requirement of random assignment. Attendees are shown how RDD can be used to permit causal inferences in gifted education research, as well as some of its specific requirements and limitations. Audience: Researchers

Audience: Administrators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Grand Salon 18

Room: Melrose

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

25.1 Parental Satisfaction With a Gifted Education Program

22.2 RtI: Helping Classroom Teachers Meet the Needs of Gifted Children Shirley Farrell, Alabama State Department of Education, Montgomery, AL How can coordinators and teachers of gifted programs provide ongoing, professional development for classroom teachers to meet the RtI for gifted learners? Attendees discover different methods to provide ongoing PD to form and revise collaborative teams between gifted specialists and classroom teachers not only to meet RtI but to provide a continuum of services for gifted learners. These resources can be used for in-service trainings with teachers and administrators from Professional Learning Communities to faculty meetings. Multiple resources and online tools are shared to help classroom teachers meet the RtI for gifted learners.

Friday

William E. Harner, David Mihan, Cumberland Valley School District, Mechanicsburg, PA

Caleb Tipple, Cheryll Adams, Xiaopeng Gong, Amanda Latz, Rebecca Pierce, Ball State University, Muncie, IN In an effort to measure parental satisfaction with a gifted education program, a quantitative analysis of the gifted education programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parent satisfaction survey was conducted. This study demonstrates the parent satisfaction survey is a reliable and valid measure effective for examining parent impressions of gifted education and the survey identified positive gains in our teacher intervention program on two measures of parent approval. The two factors examine issues of teacher communication, outreach, and interaction with the parents regarding their childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s education as well as the quality of educational activities the children are engaged in at their schools. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-8

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-12

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM RESEARCH AND EVALUATION

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

Effect Of Teacher Characteristics On Student Outcomes In Two Reading Curricular Units For Gifted Students

25.4 Formative Assessment: Teacher Perceptions and Practices Marguerite Brunner, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

Sarah Oh, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA The field of gifted education has little information on its teaching workforce and limited studies have sought to identify and describe the teacher traits related to learning outcomes with high-ability learners. As a part of a study using a curricular intervention with gifted students, teacher characteristics and student outcome achievement data were collected from 87 schools in 11 states. Teacher characteristics (e.g., teaching experience in classrooms designated for gifted students, gifted endorsement status) are entered in multilevel analyses in order to investigate association between teacher characteristics and student learning outcomes in classrooms for gifted students.

Friday

Audience: Classroom teachers K-5, Administrators, Coordinators, Researchers

Formative assessments are an instructional tool used to gauge student learning. Moreover, formative assessments provide a practical way to differentiate instruction to diverse gifted students. In a federally funded research study conducted in 11 states with 87 teachers and 1,179 gifted third graders, observational and interview data was collected and analyzed to determine the effectiveness of formative assessments, as well as teachers’ perceptions of this strategy. This mixed-methods study employed &SJDLTPOT"OBMZUJD*OEVDUJPOBOE"/$07"BOBMZTJTUP determine the effect of teacher use of formative assessment data with fidelity upon learner post-test performance outcome. Audience: Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Grand Salon 22 SPECIAL POPULATIONS RESEARCH & EVALUATION

Discoveries from the National TwiceExceptional Needs Assessment Megan Foley Nicpon, Susan Assouline, Nick Colangelo, Alissa Doobay, Claire Whiteman, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA A national twice-exceptional needs assessment was conducted to survey professionals about current intervention systems for, and beliefs about, twice-exceptional students. Sessions attendees learn the results of this assessment, where data was gathered concerning participants’ familiarity with state and federal guidelines for special education, RtI, and gifted education; understanding of and experience with specific groups of twice-exceptional students (i.e., gifted students with ADHD, autism spectrum disorder, or learning disabilities); and use of specific interventions with these populations. Prevalence estimates are reported along with qualitative reports of states’ current practices and policies relevant for twice-exceptional students.

28.2 Growing Up With Gifts and Learning Disabilities Nicholas Gelbar, Sara Renzulli, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT Little research has been conducted about the paths followed by gifted students with learning disabilities who have succeeded in academic settings. This session addresses problems and successes of students with gifts and learning disabilities, focusing on the compensation strategies needed to enable these students to succeed in school and life. Attention is focused on the special needs of these students as well as the specific compensation strategies necessary to succeed in challenging academic environments. Audience: Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 21

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


SPECIAL POPULATIONS

SPECIAL POPULATIONS

RtI & Twice Exceptional: A Promising Fit

2.3 Every Day, Every Child, High Expectations

Lois Baldwin, Tarrytown, NY; Stuart Omdal, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO; Daphne Pereles, Colorado Department of Education, Littleton, CO

Mindy Blankenship, Cynthia Sumner, Carson Middle School, Greensboro, GA

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Oak Alley SPECIAL POPULATIONS

Gifted, Black, and Female: Blacked-Out, Whited-Out, and Cast Out Deborah Harmon, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI; Donna Ford, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN Gifted Black females perform better in school than gifted Black males, have higher grade point averages, are identified by teachers as better students, believe that achievement leads to upward mobility, and have high self-esteem. Yet, they are at a greater risk of underachieving and dropping out of school than gifted White females and gifted African-American males. Research on the experiences of African-American females has been almost non-existent. This session focuses on their unique experiences and challenges with updated research, resources, and supportive strategies for counselors, teachers, and parents.

Setting high expectations for all learners has allowed us to identify more gifted and talented students in a rural Georgia, predominately Black, Title I middle school. When you teach all students as if they are gifted, with rigor and relevance, they rise to the challenge. Carson Middle made AYP for the first time in five years by setting high standards for every child. Staff was trained to use NUA Strategies and Thinking Maps, and they delivered the IB Middle Years Programme to all students. This growth model tracks progress of gifted students. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers 6-8 SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

32.2 Connecting Rural Schools For AP Achievement

Friday

Books and articles have been written about an RtI model of service delivery for students who are struggling learners. Little has been written about this model’s usefulness for addressing the needs of advanced or twice-exceptional learners whose needs are both remedial and advanced. This presentation addresses why the RtI model with the problemsolving/consultation process is a promising fit for the twiceexceptional student. The presenters describe the theoretical and practical implications for these special students and take the participants through a case study of a gifted student who has both learning and behavioral challenges.

Linor Thomas, Quitman Public Schools, Quitman, AR; Mary Kathryn Stein, Arch Ford Education Service Cooperative, Plumerville, AR How can small rural schools promote achievement among gifted and AP students on their AP exams and other highstakes tests? How can these students become more aware of the opportunities available to them? From blogging to Saturday study sessions, numerous methods exist for developing the potential of rural secondary students. Learn how schools can pool resources to provide equitable educational experiences through technology and teacher collaboration without “busting” the budget. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 9-12

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Belle Chasse

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Friday, November 4, 2011 | 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

STEM

Homeschooling: A Unique Option and Opportunity for Gifted and Talented Students

34.2 Identifying Tomorrowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Math Superstars: Testing Math Creativity for 8-12 Year Olds

Merle Tamsberg, Chelsey Mintz, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC Throughout history, children have been educated at home. Recently, however, more and more parents are choosing homeschooling for their GT children. This is a unique opportunity for GT children, yet very little research has been completed on this exclusive programming option. This session provides an overview of a current homeschooling situation that has proven to be successful with three elementary-aged siblings. Homeschooling allows for individual programming for GT students. Their program of study, curriculum options, and extra-curricular plan are discussed.

Friday

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5

Olha His, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine This session is suitable for anyone who wants to learn about math creativity and how it is measured. A math creativity test has been developed for children 8-12 years old to identify math talents as early as possible. The following are discussed: skills related to the math creativity and logical abilities and measurement method and verification. At the end of this session, participants are able to list qualities related to the general math skills, identify 10 skills related to the math creativity and logical abilities, describe measuring method of these skills, and discuss design goals of the math creativity test. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5

Room: Cambridge STEM SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

33.2 How Does Super Summer Serve Gifted Students Under the Framework of my Class Activities? Jiaxi Wu, Marcia Gentry, Nielsen Pereira, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN Summer enrichment programs serve as an alternative for regular school for gifted students by meeting their academic, social, and emotional needs. In this session, the presenters discuss Super Summer, a commuter, summer enrichment program for elementary students and how four dimensions of motivation and learning - interest, challenge, choice, and enjoyment - have been incorporated into curriculum design. Students evaluated the program using My Class Activities, an instrument that measures their perceptions of their enrichment class. Implications for developing and implementing special programs with curricula that incorporate the four MCA dimensions are discussed.

Creative Thinking through Classroom Science Taylor Thompson, Georgetown College, Georgetown, KY Wondering, imagining, brainstorming, innovating, communicating, and displaying are all creative things gifted kids should do in science class. Participants learn some of the theory of creative thinking and, in collaborative teams, improve chosen science lessons so as to include activities that promote the creative thinking of the students. Team results are shared in the session and then compiled and sent to participants post-conference. Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Grand Salon 16

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

STEM

STEM

Future Engineers, Mathematicians, and Scientists: Nurturing Children with Spatial Strengths

Mathematical Modeling in the Elementary and Middle Grades Daphne Duncan, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

The need for engineers, mathematicians, and scientists in the U.S. is profound. Gifted children with spatial strengths are natural candidates for these positions, yet their areas of strength are often not addressed in school. Many of these children appear to wrestle with easy concepts but thrive on complexity. Strength-based instruction is needed to help these gifted students succeed in our verbally based schools. This presentation gives specific instructional strategies for use with these children. Techniques for working with spatial learners to develop basic competencies while using strengths in imagery, creativity, and higher level thinking are shared.

Today’s classrooms are filled with diverse learning needs, so how can teachers ensure all are being met? In this session, educators have the opportunity to learn about and participate in an innovative, engaging mathematics teaching strategy aimed at providing challenging mathematics for all children. Through complex, authentic, open-ended math problems, model-eliciting activities provide appropriate differentiated mathematics instruction. These client-based, data-driven problems encourage students to work in teams to develop solutions (mathematical models) that will generalize to later data sets. Educators are given information and instruction, time for application and reflection, and materials for classroom use.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Classroom teachers K-8, Coordinators Room: Jasperwood

Room: Chequers STEM

Using Dynamic Geometry Software to Discover Key Math Concepts Claire Arabie, Julia Williams, Lafayette Parish School System, Lafayette, LA

Friday

Rebecca Mann, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

5:30 PM – 5:45 PM

NAGC Business Meeting Melrose

Come discover what can happen when students, mathematics, and technology meet! Learn how to engage students in a way of thinking that goes beyond reaching a particular solution or response to a particular problem. Utilize software to represent knowledge and thinking in multiple ways. Discover how to explore mathematics in a far more meaningful way than in the past. Teach students to engage more with the material and have more control over their learning. Learn ways to encourage student-directed inquiry, get students actively engaged and investigating mathematics, and improve students’ attitude towards mathematics!

TIMES VARY

Network Evening Events (includes refreshments!) See page xii Hilton Riverside Conference Center

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Grand Salon 6

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Parent Day Saturday, November 5, 2011 Held in conjunction with the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) Annual Convention, and produced by the NAGC Parent & Community Network and the NAGC Parent Advisory Committee and local Louisiana parents and educators, NAGC’s Parent Day is a one-day event that gives parents tools and networking opportunities to help you support your children’s optimal development and ensure their continued growth. 7:00 AM

Registration Opens Parent Day Attendees will experience the educational offerings, network opportunities, throughout the day, including full access to the Exhibit Hall from 8:00 AM to 3:00 PM. At 4:00 PM they can join the fun for the Crescent City Celebration! In addition, they have a special lunch from 11:45 am to 12:30 pm in Kabacoff.

Parent Day-at-a-Glance 7:30 AM – 8:30 AM

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM

8:00 AM – 3:00 PM

3:00 PM – 4:00 PM

JAM Sessions/Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions (your choice) Exhibit Hall Opens

Saturday

8:45 AM – 10:15 AM

Mini-Keynotes (your choice) 10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Concurrent Sessions (your choice) 11:45 AM – 12:30 PM

Networking Lunch/Table Topics Kabakoff

JAM Sessions/Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions (your choice) Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions (your choice) 4:00 PM

Buses to Mardi Gras World 5:00 PM – 6:00 PM

E. Paul Torrance Creativity Lecture 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Crescent City Celebration

12:45 PM – 1:30 PM

Putting it Into Practice Sessions (your choice)

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


| Saturday Highlights Saturday, November 5, 2011 Welcome, Parents! Louisiana Parent Day 8:45 AM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10:15 AM

Mini Keynotes Today, three panels of counseling crusaders, arts integrators, and probing parents address: t"'PDVTPOUIF"SUT"SUT*OUFHSBUJPOBOE"SUT Programming for Gifted Students t#VMMZJOHPGBOECZ(JGUFE$IJMESFOBOE5FFOT t$POOFDUJOHGPS)JHI1PUFOUJBM)PX1BSFOUT  Teachers, and School Counselors Can Work Collaboratively to Reverse Underachievement for Gifted Students

Michele and Robert Root-Bernstein and Taste of Louisiana Reception. Remember to wear your convention name badge.

4:00 PM - 8:00 PM

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Is the room crowded or is it just me?â&#x20AC;?

Crescent City Celebrationâ&#x20AC;ŚAnd All That Jazz

On Saturday, selected sessions will be part of the NAGC 7JSUVBM$POWFOUJPO5IFTFTTJPOTJODMVEFUIFUISFF.JOJ Keynotes, and three virtual sessions in each time slot. Those featured sessions are marked in the program.

The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Crescent City Celebrationâ&#x20AC;ŚAnd All That Jazzâ&#x20AC;? event includes the E. Paul Torrance Creativity Keynote with

Schedule at a Glance 7:00 AM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4:00 PM

1:45 PM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2:45 PM

7:00 AM - 7:30 PM

3:00 PM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4:00 PM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

4:00 PM

Parent Day (separate registration required) JAM Sessions/Concurrent Sessions/ Poster Sessions 8:45 AM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10:15 AM

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions JAM Sessions/Concurrent Sessions Buses begin to depart for Crescent City Celebrationâ&#x20AC;ŚAnd All That Jazz at Mardi Gras World

Mini Keynotes

5:00 PM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6:00 PM

8:00 AM - 3:00 PM

Creating with Michele and Robert Root-Bernstein

Exhibit Hall Open 10:30 AM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 11:30 AM

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions 11:45 AM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12:30 PM

Putting it Into Practice Sessions

Saturday

Registration

E. Paul Torrance Creativity General Session 6:00 PM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7:30 PM

Taste of Louisiana Reception 8:00 PM

Final buses depart from Mardi Gras World return to Hilton

12:45 PM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1:30 PM

Putting it Into Practice Sessions 58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM SIGNATURE SERIES

Common Core State Standards and Smarter Balanced Consortium: Implications for Gifted Education Elissa Brown, NC Department of Public Instruction, Raleigh, NC; Geoff Coltrane, Institute for Educational Policy, Durham, NC

Saturday

The Common Core State Standards Initiative, a state-led effort coordinated by the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), has created a set of common, grade-level standards for English-language arts and mathematics for grades K-12. The standards were developed in collaboration with teachers, school administrators, and national experts to provide a clear and consistent framework to prepare students for college and the workforce. 44 states and the District of Columbia have adopted the standards, and while two national consortia of states are building assessments on the standards with the intent that all students across the states will know their progress toward college and career readiness. Both the Common Core State Standards and the work of the assessment consortia have implications for gifted education with regards to content, instruction, program delivery, assessment, and accountability. This session provides an overview of the Common Core State Standards and the work of one of the assessment consortia, the 45-state Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium, and provides appropriate strategies for consideration in gifted education. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Researchers Room: Grand Salon 19 SIGNATURE SERIES

The 21st Century Learner: Implications for Gifted Education Richard M. Cash, Bloomington Public Schools, Bloomington MN It’s no longer enough to be smart, talented, and knowledgeable. For gifted students to be well-prepared for success in this century, they must be well-versed in new ways of thinking and learning. Today’s classroom must be designed

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not to “fill up” students with existing knowledge, but rather to increase their ability to learn independently and to produce new knowledge. This requires teachers of the gifted to possess substantial skills in differentiating curriculum and instruction, and in laying the very foundations of thinking. Strategies like critical reasoning, creative idea generation, problem finding and solving, and decision making get students to “think to learn” and “learn to think.” This session introduces 21st century thinking and learning skills essential for the future success of gifted learners and provides ready-to-use techniques for developing student thinking and ways to encourage gifted students to be more autonomous in their own learning. Audience: Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 16 SIGNATURE SERIES

Common Ground for Maximizing High Potential: Psychology, Neuroscience, and Education Ann Robinson, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR; Rena Subotnik, American Psychological Association, Washington, DC; Nancy Robinson, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Pam Clinkenbeard, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, Whitewater, WI; Carolyn Callahan, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA How can we use the insights gained from Malleable Minds, a collaborative project of NAGC, the American Psychological Association, the NRC/G/T and the U.S. Department of Education? By bringing together psychologists studying beliefs about ability, neuroscientists investigating brain plasticity, selective attention, executive functioning, and memory, and educators committed to developing high potential, we have found connections, directions, and common ground. Drawing on research, translations to gifted and talented education, and engaging studies of classrooms and schools, an interactive panel of experts explores answers and questions about the development of talents. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Rosedown

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

JAM sessions in the NAGC Learning Quarter (2nd Floor) In post-NAGC Convention evaluations, attendees have noted the time spent in smaller, more intimate discussions were the most productive and provided them the best learning opportunities. NAGC Jam Sessions to the rescue! Topics for the Jam Sessions in the NAGC Learning Quarter on Saturday were suggested by Convention attendees in a poll sent out in October. Check the Addendum in your bag for a list of the Jam Sessions for 7:30 AM – 8:30 AM and 1:45 PM – 2:45 PM. Also check out the Twitter feed for NAGC. Join us for coffee beginning at 7:30 AM in the NAGC Learning Quarter. At 11:45 AM we’ll provide refreshments.

Follow us on

@nagcconvention

SIGNATURE SERIES

2011 Distinguished Scholar Award: Twenty-five Years of Research on the Psychology of Students with Gifts and Talents

This presentation will highlight 25 years of research into

Room: Grand Salon 7

Saturday

Tracy Cross, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA

various aspects of the psychology of students with gifts and talents. Topics ranging from lived experience to social stigma to suicidal behavior will be covered. A personal account of the researcher’s journey across discoveries will be used as a vehicle to tie the topics together.

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virtual convention

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Saturday, November 5

www.nagc.org/virtualconvention.aspx

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM ARTS

COMPUTERS AND TECHNOLOGY

2.1 Creative Writing in the 21st Century Thinking About the Future

Baby, You Can Drive My C.A.R.S.: Differentiating Instruction with the Collaborative Active Reading Strategy

Vicki Stein, Marianne Solomon, Future Problem Solving Program International, Melbourne, FL In this age of testing, standards, essay requirements, and information overload, few students have an opportunity to improve their skills through creative writing. Teachers can, however, address all of the 21st century skills using creative writing as a vehicle. Preview the FPS Scenario Writing component, discover how it can be incorporated into any classroom, and learn to create a semester long unit culminating in authentic academic competition. Audience: Parents, Classroom Teachers K-5, Classroom Teachers 6-8, Classroom Teachers 9-12

Kevin Besnoy, Northern Kentucky University, Highland Heights, KY Have you ever wanted to maximize the power of digital text to differentiate reading content for your students? The Collaborative Active Reading Strategy (C.A.R.S.) allows you do to just that. By utilizing wikis and blogs, learn how a class of students can read, decode, and create a web-based text. Research shows that students reading comprehension increases when they are actively engaged with text. This strategy inspires a diverse group of students to manipulate a single digital document and create personalized meaning that can be shared with a larger group. You will love driving your own C.A.R.S.

COMPUTERS AND TECHNOLOGY

4.3 Technology for Teachers and Parents to Enhance 21st Century Skills Sarah Lee, Kim Allen, Athens-Meigs Educational Service Center, Athens, OH

Saturday

Always looking for ways to enhance the technology skills of the tech-savvy generation, but rarely find time to check your email? Do you feel intimidated by the many options available or how much more kids know about and use technology? Join us as we introduce a multitude of technology resources available to move you into the 21st century while staying within a budget: FREE! You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to miss this session that will transform the way you see and use the technology around you every day! Audience: Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 18 COMPUTERS AND TECHNOLOGY

If This Is The 21st Century, Where Is My Jetpack? Brian Housand, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC; Angela Housand, University of North Carolina - Wilmington, Wilmington, NC We are now in the second decade of the 21st century. Our world is filled with amazing technological advances, yet our schools and classrooms have largely gone unchanged since the late 19th Century. The promise of the future is attainable with available free tools like cloud computing, mobile devices, game based learning, and augmented reality. Join us as we explore how gifted students are and could be using technology to lead us into the future. This session explores past predictions for the future and demonstrates how the technology of today can create the classroom of tomorrow. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Versailles Ballroom

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

COMPUTERS AND TECHNOLOGY

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

5.3 Virtual Learning Environments and Gifted Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

7.4 High School Gifted: You Don’t Have to Reinvent the Wheel

Lorna Bryant, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR In many public schools, the mismatch between the needs of gifted students and the services they receive is particularly pronounced when those students, in addition to their giftedness, are faced with the additional challenge of a developmental disability such as Autism or Asperger’s Syndrome. This presentation discusses the growing body of research, as well as anecdotal evidence that indicates that online public schools can be effective in meeting the unique needs of these students. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12

Beverly Fink, Manhattan High School, Manhattan, KS High school can be a very stressful time for our young people. A major portion of that stress for students stems from the necessary preparation for the post-secondary experience--academic classroom work, testing, locating scholarships, as well as choosing and applying for colleges with appropriate majors. This session pulls together all parts of this procedure, including resources from a multitude of sources, including Internet sites. Learn how to set a timeline so the senior year will not be overwhelming, and the student may actually enjoy that final year before the new adventure called COLLEGE. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 9-12

Risky Business: Gifted Adolescents Respond

Not The Same Old Project Again...Let’s Add A Creative Flair and Design Something New

Michele Kane, Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL; Dorothy Sisk, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX

Heather Check, Melissa Stockton, Cartwright School District, Phoenix, AZ

Think of an adolescent and risky behaviour and it seems like a recipe for disaster, yet, healthy risk-taking is essential as teenagers navigate the waters to adulthood. Since adolescence is recognized as a time period of heightened vulnerability for risk-taking, it is essential to have a deeper understanding of how gifted youngsters approach risktaking behaviors. This session provides self-reports of gifted adolescents when presented with unfinished stories that describe risky situations. These stories have potential for both positive and negative risks. Discussion includes implications regarding the culture of risk-taking, the developing adolescent brain, and the gifted student responses.

Emphasize creativity with flair through critical thinking and written expression strategies that reinforce and cultivate higher-order thinking from all students. How can teachers adapt well-written teacher resources to meet the unique needs of students in mixed-ability classrooms? Attendees view dynamic resources that align with the use of questioning skills, originality, and imagination beyond everyday lessons. Participants work together to promote and foster their own creativity style and walk away with a packet containing strategies that can be implemented the next day in the classroom.

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Saturday

CREATIVITY COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Newberry

Room: Grand Salon 22

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM CREATIVITY

CURRICULUM STUDIES

8.3 What Neuroscience Says About the Creativity Process

11.3 Get A G.R.I.P. On Differentiation by Utilizing Interest-Based Projects

Sureyya Yoruk, University of Georgia, Athens, GA

Glenda Hawk, Connie Foreman, Goochland County Public Schools, Goochland, VA

Even though scholars have been working on creativity processes since the 1950s, we still donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know much about it. Today, most of the scholars think that the creativity process can best be understood with a diverse approach and admittedly neuroscience is one of the most important. In this session, explore the latest studies conducted by neuroscientists on convergent and especially divergent thinking process. Find out what those studies mean to researchers, educators, and parents, and in what ways teachers can apply those findings to education. Audience: Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 CREATIVITY

Creativity and Focused Attention: The Yin and Yang of our Cognitive Functioning

This session provides a strategic, organized method to design and implement G.R.I.P. (Gifted Research Interest-based Projects) with students. This open-ended approach to learning utilizes the Talents Unlimited Model to foster creative thinking. Participants are guided through an interactive model incorporating 21st century skills including: problem solving, creativity, managing time and resources, communication skills, self-direction, real-world impact, and technology. Establishing these skills provides gifted students with the knowledge and confidence to master the multi-dimensional abilities required of them in the future! Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-5 CURRICULUM STUDIES

Saturday

Melinda Meszaros, Enginomix Consulting, Vancouver, BC, Canada

To Group or Not To Group: Is That the Question?

Creative children often underachieve in traditional educational settings. They are described as scatterbrains, uninterested, and unable to focus on the required material, often lost in their daydreams. In contrast, students who perform best academically are often not very creative. Creative individuals also report the need for a hypofocused state for the generation of novel ideas. Recent brain research revealed a compelling explanation for this phenomenon through the study of resting-state brain networks. This session describes how the functioning of these networks contributes to the contrary but also complimentary nature of focused attention and creativity.

Miraca Gross, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Audience: Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Cambridge

Decisions on ability grouping of academically gifted students are often dictated by political concerns. Educational decisions should be based on what research reveals about how students learning and social needs are best served. This session explores research on cognitive and affective outcomes of a range of ability-grouping procedures. Does ability grouping decrease self-esteem or lead to conceit or arrogance? Does it enhance academic achievement? Does it depend on the forms of ability grouping employed? This session helps schools decide what forms of grouping might be appropriate for their particular students and their particular situation. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 9

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


Poster Session

Recorded Session

Virtual Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

CURRICULUM STUDIES

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Using Tiered Centers to Differentiate Instruction in Geometry

12.4 Weaving a Vertically and Horizontally Aligned 21st Century Curriculum: Crafting the Warp and the Weft

Kim Paris, Elko Institute for Academic Achievement, Elko, NV Creating tiered learning centers is a time-consuming process, yet, the results of these efforts are well worth the work in terms of student outcomes. Studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; time on task, engagement, and achievement are all noticeably enhanced when students are provided with independent, leveled activities that address the standards in the geometry strand in mathematics. In this session, the presenter shares the process for creating tiered centers aligned with eight geometry standards as well as a set of complete centers for each standard that have been implemented successfully in a Grade 5 classroom. Audience: Administrators,Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-8

Gail Hubbard, Prince William County Public Schools, Manassas, VA Developing and maintaining an aligned and sequential curriculum with limited resources can be a daunting task. Learn how one school system used collegial agreement on big ideas and concepts to construct vertical curriculum alignment and a carefully designed curriculum rubric and template to structure horizontal curriculum alignment. Staff members are crafting a tightly woven curriculum framework by agreeing upon the vertical warp and by using a curriculum rubric and template to structure the development of standards-based units that form the horizontal weft. Participants examine copies of the rubric, the template, and the plan used to weave the curriculum design.

Room: Prince of Wales

Artful Curriculum Design: A Practical Path Kelly A. Hedrick, Virginia Beach City Public Schools, Virginia Beach, VA It is a challenge for teachers and administrators alike to ensure a coherent, comprehensive, and seamless gifted curriculum across the K-12 continuum. What if we created a scope and sequence of curriculum and instruction for the gifted that included field-tested resources proven to be appropriate for gifted learners? In this session, participants examine a comprehensive plan for developing gifted curriculum in a variety of settings: cluster grouping, select schools, and specialized classes. Learn how to create curriculum focused on gifted learner outcomes through a blend of district-developed curriculum with resources and a plethora of instructional strategies. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 CURRICULUM STUDIES

Advancing Potential in Analyzing Non-Fiction Books: Focus on the 21st Century Skill of Critical Thinking Kimberley Chandler, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA In this session, the presenter shares a framework for helping gifted students to analyze non-fiction books. Participants review examples of the framework, which utilizes a research-based model for the development of critical thinking and reasoning skills in the language arts, in preparation for developing resources of their own. Emphases of the session is on developing questions, and on designing activities to teach students how to summarize information, make inferences, explore concepts, and connect to prior knowledge. Ideas for appropriate research activities, vocabulary-building exercises, and writing skills work are also shared.

Saturday

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Audience: Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Jefferson Ballroom Room: Marlborough A

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM CURRICULUM STUDIES

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Assessing 21st Century Skills and Knowledge Through Creative Products

Upgrading Grading in the Standards Era with Side Benefits for Gifted Students

Kristen R. Stephens, Duke University, Durham, NC; Frances Karnes, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS

Anne Flick, Creative Connections Group, Cincinnati, OH

Preparing future-ready learners has become a central theme embedded in educational reform initiatives. So, what are 21st century skills? How are such skills taught and assessed? Creative product development may hold the key to addressing these questions. This session examines the use of products for assessing student progress, presents strategies for organizing creative product development in the classroom, and details a sampling of 21st century products that allow students to demonstrate both their knowledge in a domain and those essential process skills necessary for success in their future. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Saturday

Room: Grand Salon 4

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Room: Grand Salon 21

Portraits of Student Work Produced in an Elementary Mathematics Classroom Using Problem-Based Learning Curricula

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Christine Trinter, Catherine Brighton, Tonya Moon, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA In reviewing the NCTM Standards, Deal and Wismer concluded that the standards do not adequately address the academic needs of gifted students. When using curriculum such as PBL, Stein, et al. found knowing how much students learn may be less important than knowing what and how they learn. This session highlights examples of student work reflective of the process of learning as well as what was actually learned. Recommendations for how to use/modify/develop curricula to meet the needs of gifted math learners in the heterogeneous classroom are shared. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5 Room: Belle Chasse

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Decades into the standards era, many schools still utilize outdated grading practices that often penalize gifted students; however, the literature from national grading experts presents nearly universal agreement on appropriate, ethical grading practices, all rooted in the standards system. Coincidentally, these best practices also provide a better fit for gifted learners. Come examine outmoded, persistent grading procedures and discover the common-sense corrections recommended by experts. Participate in an exciting discussion of modernizing various grading approaches, from formative assessment to group projects. Determine how you can bring grading in your classroom, school, and district into ethical alignment with best practices.

Hu(Mans): A Course of Study— A Legend Returns Shelagh Gallagher, Engaged Education, Charlotte, NC What makes human beings human? How did they get that way? How can they become more so? These questions frame Jerome Bruner’s seminal curriculum Man: A Course of Study. MACOS brought Bruner’s theories to life in an elegantly constructed year-long, inquiry-based, concept-centered investigation of people and animals. Most of the MACOS materials are now available online, providing invaluable classroom resources as well as models of curriculum design and professional development. Hear the fascinating, controversial history of this 5th/6th grade curriculum, an overview of the materials and a discussion of the alignment with gifted education and current educational objectives. Audience: Coordinators, Classroom Teachers 5-6 Room: Marlborough B

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


EARLY CHILDHOOD

EARLY CHILDHOOD

15.3 Lionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Share of Learning: How Inquiry-Based Instruction Led First Grade Scientists to the National Zoo

Independent Study: 21st Century Skills For The Inquisitive Primary Mind

Brenda Bailey, Prince William County Schools, Manassas, VA Each week, first-grade students receiving gifted services don their lab coats, clip on their ID badges, and begin their work as true scientists. Scientific concepts and processes are explored through hands-on investigation and real-world problem solving. Find out how inquirybased science instruction led these pint-sized scientists to join forces with the Washington Post and the Smithsonian National Zoo to name one of the seven new lion cubs born at the Zoo. Learn how increasing student involvement in outcomes and utilizing process-oriented curriculum goals enhance the development of 21st century skills.

Dodie Merritt, Genoa-Kingston Community Unit School District, Genoa, IL Bored??? Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bored? Not in independent study! Use these explorations of student choice to set the foundation for the 21st century skills of critical thinking, problem-solving, creativity, collaboration, and leadership by offering primary students independent learning experiences through shortterm ICEbreakers (Individual Challenge Experiences) or longterm REPs (Resident Expert Projects) for exploring personal passions. Build self-esteem as students develop a sense of responsibility for their own learning. Since the success of such programming options hinges on management, this session explores the tools and strategies that make these approaches effective for K-5 students.

Classroom Teachers K-5 Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-5 EARLY CHILDHOOD

Mary Banbury, Colleen Klein-Ezell, Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA In this interactive session, participants explore how to use both Universal Design for Learning and differentiation to deliver instruction to traditionally underserved populations of gifted early childhood students. Lesson ideas and planning incorporate the three UDL principals: representation, action and expression, and engagement, as well as strategies such as, multiple formats, flexible materials and methods of presentation, differentiated processes and products, and stimulating choices that address both the advanced and special learning needs of twice-exceptional young children. Classroom Teachers K-5

Room: Grand Salon 13 EARLY CHILDHOOD

Building Community through the Lens of the Socio-Emotional Needs of Young Gifted Children in School Jeanine Jechura, University of Toledo, Temperance, MI Early childhood educators are often baffled by young gifted children who are highly sensitive to the expectations and feelings of other children and adults. They demonstrate deep emotional intensity and advanced moral judgment. Teachers deserve to learn about the nature of such children so that they can develop strong emotional foundations within the classroom that lead to self-confidence, close companionship, and heightened academic potential. In this energetic presentation, the presenter shares strategies to help young children problem solve as they build on collaborative, cooperative, and community building skills in their daily programs.

Saturday

Universal Design for Learning: Meeting the Diverse Needs of Twice-Exceptional Early Childhood Students

Room: Fountain Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5 Room: Melrose

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MIDDLE GRADES

The Survey Toolkit: Integrated Curriculum Research Survey Projects

Knowing Your Adolescent Reader: How an Instructional Model Affects the Emotional Lives of Bright Students

Thomas Walsh, Ames Community Schools, Ames, IA

Ruth Lyons, Joe Helbling, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT The Survey Toolkit is a constructivist, project-based research learning methodology for middle school students to develop surveys on topics across the curriculum including Chinese culture, Hinduism, alternative fuels, working physics, and nanotechnology. This session provides a PowerPoint presentation featuring the use of the Survey Toolkit with grade six students, along with resource manual activities and journal publication available at The Journal of Statistics Education (JSE) website. A demonstration of the integrated TinkerPlots software is also provided using NAGC participant-collected data on hours of sleep and teaching longevity.

Can an instructional model have significant social and emotional implications for gifted students? Implementation of the Schoolwide Enrichment Model Reading Framework has influenced not only reading achievement, but also students’ relationships with teachers and the teacher’s understanding of individual learners. This session delves deeply into the effect of individual conferences of SEM-R have had on the emotional lives of students. Attendees leave with practical resources for maximizing their one-onone time with students, while gaining insight into the power of listening. The affective benefits of the SEM-R can be transferred to any classroom, and this session explains how.

Saturday

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 6-8

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-8

Room: Ascot

Room: Grand Salon 3

MIDDLE GRADES

PARENT AND COMMUNITY

16.4 Use Debate: Challenge Your Gifted Middle School Learners by Researching, Writing, Collaborating, and Thinking

Homeschool Families: A Starting Point

Donna Mammarella, Rena Toth, Suzanne Wilson, Stafford County Public Schools, Stafford, VA Gifted learners become gifted debaters when given the opportunity to analyze, organize, and develop their passions of real-world problems in a collaborative forum. This presentation gives audience participants a fully detailed handbook on how to teach debate to students in the classroom as well as plan for a district debate competition. See your students become actively engaged in research while using critical-thinking skills to address and solve real-world problems. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers 6-8

Jennifer Jolly, Jonathan Nester, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA; Michael Matthews, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC In gifted education much attention has been granted to the gifted identification process, yet relatively little has been devoted to examining parents whose children would qualify for gifted programming but have chosen not to attend public or private schools. In this pilot study, we examine the reasoning why parents decided to pursue homeschooling despite the availability of public/private schooling. Preliminary analyses of approximately 15 semistructured interviews suggest that parental dissatisfaction with public school policies and climates or teacher/staff attitudes may be equally important as perceptions of academic quality in guiding parents’ decisions to pursue non-public educational options. Audience: Parents, Researchers Room: Trafalgar

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

PARENT AND COMMUNITY

PARENT AND COMMUNITY

The Perfect Storm: When Factors Converge With Bullying to Cause Tragedy for Gifted Preteen Boys

20.3 If She’s So Smart, Why Can’t She? Looking Beyond the IQ Score Francisca Peterson, Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln, NE

Brad Tassell, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY How many gifted boys between the ages of 11-13 have committed suicide in the last two years? How many are at risk because of being bullied? What factors help create a helpless victim at risk, or a gifted boy who thrives even in a culture of bullying? There might just be a convergence of factors that if identified and understood can reduce the risk to gifted preteen boys. We look at what those factors are and how they can exacerbate one another to the detriment of the gifted student everybody is supposed to be educating. Audience: Administrators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-8

Parents and teachers wonder why children with a high IQ scores don’t produce or behave as expected. Children may be labeled lazy or underachieving frustrating everyone, including themselves! Although IQ scores may be helpful, examining other issues can help us better understand why some smart children have trouble succeeding in various contexts. Participants learn about executive functions, mind set, and social-emotional issues and how these skills interface with IQ to influence the success or failure of gifted children. Participants receive information and easy to use techniques/resources to strengthen areas of challenge and support success in all settings. Audience: Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-8

Room: Grand Salon 10 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Kicking Learning Potential Up A Notch: The Effects Of Praise Cindy Sheets, Shawnee Mission School District, Shawnee Mission, KS; Kathy Jones, Advocates for High-Ability Learners, Chanute, KS Praise can be effective - a positive motivating force, but not all praise is equally effective. In fact, some types of praise may harm more than they help. This session is based primarily on the work of Dr. Carol S. Dweck whose research has provided new insights into the effects of praise on the types of effort and motivation that lead to student success. In this easy-to-understand interactive session, parents and educators learn how to support the gifted children in their lives so that they can maximize their learning potential. Audience: Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

21.4 Professional Development for Improving Creative Teaching Skills Chun-Ryol Ryu, Yoojung Chae, Hyun-chul Jung, KAIST: The Korean Society for the Gifted, Daejeon, South Korea This study was designed to examine the effects of the Professional Development for Improving Creative Teaching skills (PDICT) that is a kind of continuous professional development program for supporting teachers to teach classes using various instructional methods. PDICT consisted of the 1-week online learning, 1-week camp, and 1-semester practicum programs. Twenty-four science magnet school teachers in diverse subject areas had participated in PDICT, and had been observed in the classrooms to receive feedback. In this presentation, the structure and contents of the PDICT and 1-semester supports at real classroom environments are introduced, and the effects of the PDICT are discussed.

Saturday

PARENT AND COMMUNITY

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 9-12

Room: Napoleon Ballroom

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

From Candidate to Accomplished: A Gifted Educator’s Guide Through the National Board Process Christine Deitz, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR The National Board Certification process is a rigorous but doable professional development choice for K-12 educators. The path to certification involves evidence of accomplished teaching in one of 25 teaching areas and can take up to three years to complete. Although the areas of certification apply to 95 percent of teachers, the path to National Board Certification for gifted educators is not obvious. Luckily, experts in gifted education have blazed a brilliant trail for others to follow. For teachers who work with gifted populations and are interested in successfully

completing the National Board process, this session provides clear and comprehensive guidance. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Elmwood RESEARCH & EVALUATION

24.1 Building Thoughts and Ideas: Learning with LEGO Serious Play Cindy Little, Innovation Research and Consulting, Woodway, TX The results of this mixed-methods study on the impact of LEGO Serious Play, a constructivist learning process that allows students to build thoughts, ideas, and solutions to

COMBINED SESSION PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Effective 21st Century Practices for Underserved Gifted Students

Saturday

Cheryll Adams, Ball State University, Muncie, IN; Cecelia Boswell, Austin Creek Education Systems, De Leon, TX

An Administrator’s Toolbox: Blueprint for Facilitating Faithful Implementation of Curriculum Lisa Foster, Amy Azano, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

Enrichment, acceleration, and differentiation that increase academic achievement of and provide opportunities for the traditionally underserved gifted, such as culturally, linguistically, and ethnically diverse students and those who are twice exceptional, are the focus of this session. The aim is to describe and provide examples of effective practices to find and meet these students’ needs. Presenter examples provide information about effective practices to facilitate teachers’ efforts to accommodate these students in any setting, including all levels of Response to Intervention. Examples of lessons and units created for these special populations are shared.

Fidelity is the bridge between a new curriculum and successful implementation outcomes. Schools and school districts invest time and finances into new curriculum, so it is only prudent that steps are taken to ensure high fidelity. Other than internal teacher factors, building-level administrators and gifted coordinators have the biggest internal influence on teacher fidelity of implementation. This session shares factors and practices that influence teachers when implementing curriculum in the classroom. The Administrators Toolbox designed for all levels of administrators comes complete with a master plan and suggested tools for building organizational capacity conducive to higher levels of fidelity.

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 6

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problems, on student motivation and problem solving in 4th grade classrooms is presented. Three separate study objectives (flow, intrinsic motivation, and problem solving skills) were met, and overall data analysis revealed very positive results.

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

Audience: Administrators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5

Rosalind Walsh, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Davidson Fellows: Case Studies in Science Talent Development Ann Batenburg, Salem College, Winston-Salem, NC This study examined talent development using the Differentiated Model of Giftedness and Talent. Participants were five male science winners of the Davidson Fellowship, which recognizes students under the age of 18 who have completed a significant piece of original work in one of six fields: science, technology, mathematics, music, literature, or philosophy. Parents of four of the Fellows also participated in the multiple-case study, which used semistructured phone interviews to gather data. The crosscase analysis of this multiple-case study revealed that the Fellows traveled multiple pathways to success, the positive catalysts protecting their efforts from negative catalysts.

Single-subject experimental designs have long been used in special education to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for exceptional children: however, the design has not been used widely in gifted education. This presentation is a discussion of the main features of single-subject design and its potential for application in the field of gifted education. The results of a pilot study investigating the effects of higher-order questioning conducted with a young gifted child are used to illustrate the application of the methodology. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5 Room: Chequers

Saturday

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

The Use of Single-Subject Experimental Design With Gifted Children: Results From a Pilot Study

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 24

Exhibit Hall Open 8:00 AM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3:00 PM Coffee break at 8:00 AM 58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM RESEARCH & EVALUATION

Effects of Differentiated Reading Instruction on Middle School Student Achievement Catherine Little, D. Betsy McCoach, Sally Reis, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT Talented readers are often overlooked in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s schools, with the focus on basic proficiency levels and use of remedial approaches. Such approaches limit challenge and do not foster lasting reading enjoyment. This Javits-funded study of middle school reading examined the effect on achievement of an instructional approach involving choice, differentiation, and supported independent reading. Preliminary analyses indicate similar results for treatment and control groups, but with variation by school context. Preliminary results for one assessment suggest a treatment effect that is more marked for students functioning at higher reading levels, a potentially important finding for gifted education researchers. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 6-8 Room: Windsor SPECIAL POPULATIONS

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To Find and To Serve: Experiences Identifying and Serving Talented Students in a LowIncome School Steve Coxon, Maryville University; Brooke Bilby, Ladue School District, St. Louis, MO A project was undertaken to identify and serve high-ability students in a high-poverty, high-minority public PK-8 school setting within a housing project in a large, urban district. The school had no gifted services in place beforehand. Implementation occurred in four parts: teacher education for in-class differentiation, student identification, summer programming, and parent education. Teacher education

was provided with an on-site, graduate level course in gifted curriculum and instruction tailored for the school in which nearly all teachers participated. Student identification was conducted with a mixture of ability and performance measures. Experiences in implementation are shared. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-5 Room: Eglinton and Winton SPECIAL POPULATIONS

28.3 Extracurricular Interests of Gifted Minority Students: Opportunities for Student Engagement and Development David Duys, Nick Colangelo, Malik Henfield, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA Presenters investigated the reported extracurricular interests and activities of N=51,148 gifted high school students who took the ACT in 2006. Gifted students were identified as the top 5% performers (with composite scores of 30 or better on the ACT exam). Differences in extracurricular activities were found across six minority groups. Findings showed diverse interests in a wider variety of activities than previously reported in the literature. Implications for counselors and gifted educators are discussed with special attention to issues related to mentoring, studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; social and emotional development, and challenges related to student engagement. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

SPECIAL POPULATIONS

SPECIAL POPULATIONS

27.3 Promising Practices for Gifted ELLs and High-Potential Students from Low-Income Families

Systematic Child Find Strategies That Work - Increasing the Identification of Minority Gifted Students

Rachelle Miller, Nielsen Pereira, Yang Yang, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Lynn Howard, Tara Strang, Leah Meulemans, Hamilton County Department of Education, Chattanooga, TN

The achievement gap, at the highest levels of performance, continues to widen between students from low-income and nonlow-income families and between English Language Learners and non-ELL students. Research has shown promising identification and classroom practices that positively influence the achievement of these students such as casting a wider net when identifying them, implementing cluster grouping as a total-school program, offering mentoring programs, differentiating instruction, and providing culturally responsive teaching. These practical strategies and how they can directly influence the academic performance of these students are discussed and action steps for addressing the achievement gap are provided.

Active Gifted Child Find has been in place since the Office for Civil Rights investigated our district and mandated equitable identification and service delivery. Twelve years experience from ongoing child find, a new configuration of personnel, and extensive research and field testing have improved these procedures. Both the result of these streamlined procedures and the careful selection of assessment tools and instruments have significantly increased the identification of underrepresented gifted students in the districts low performing schools. Participants replicate any or all of our process to enhance or begin their own gifted child find.

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Jasperwood

SPECIAL POPULATIONS

Terence Friedrichs, Friedrichs Education, Mendota Heights, MN; Shawn Cherry, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Teresa Manzella, Metropolitan State University, St. Paul, MN NAGCs (GLBTQ) Special Interest Group asks for your input so that the recently formed group can undertake the most needed activities for the benefit of gifted GLBTQ students, their teachers, and their parents! Hear about the history of GLBTQ efforts in NAGC and about the new SIGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s potential activities. Offer your ideas on how to make this great group work even better. Hear how you can be a charter member of the SIG, providing meaningful, far-reaching assistance to GLBTQ youth, their teachers, and families. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

SPECIAL SCHOOLS AND PROGRAMS

31.2 Radical Acceleration: The Academic and Social Effects of Grade Skipping and Early College Entrance Alexander Pagnani, University of Georgia, Athens, GA A great majority of parents, teachers, and guidance counselors are reluctant to consider grade skipping or early college entrance for students of exceptionally high ability, usually out of sincere concern for their academic preparedness or social well-being. Meanwhile, these students are typically bored with their curriculum, craving academic challenge, and finding that they share more in common socially with older students of a similar mental age. This session examines four decades of research concerning grade skipping and early college entrance, outlining exactly what we know about its academic and social effects. Is it time to re-evaluate our basic assumptions?

Saturday

Help Build the NAGC Gay-Lesbian-BisexualTransgender-Questioning Special Interest Group

Audience: Administrators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Grand Salon 12

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

Saturday

SPECIAL SCHOOLS AND PROGRAMS

SPECIAL SCHOOLS AND PROGRAMS

Building an Academic Future on the Pedagogy of a Successful Arts Conservatory

If You Build It, They Will Come: How We Started a School for Gifted Children

Robbie McHardy, New Orleans Center for Creative Arts, New Orleans, LA

Robert Gold, Susan Gold, Feynman School, Darnestown, MD

How does a nationally recognized arts conservatory for high school students double its commitment to talented students? We conducted a multi-year deep analysis of what made our half-day programs in classical music, creative writing, culinary arts, dance, drama, jazz, media arts, musical theatre, theatre design, visual arts, and vocal music successful for the past 38 years. The dynamics we uncovered, called our Creative DNA, became the basis for development of a radical new curriculum format which we call the NOCCA Model. Come learn about how the relationships forged among pre-professional artists and their teachers can drive innovation in secondary education.

In August 2010, our new science-focused, bilingual gifted school opened its doors to eight bright-eyed, curiousminded children ages three to five--the culmination of nearly two years of research and planning. In this rousing session, learn how to successfully found a gifted school. Discuss key topics such as forming an entity, curriculum, selecting a location, marketing, admissions, teacher hiring, and fundraising. Participants leave the session prepared to assess the viability of launching a gifted school, and to begin the planning process in an effective manner. Materials include a checklist and realistic timetable for opening a new school.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 9-12

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-5

Room: Oak Alley

Room: Magnolia

SPECIAL SCHOOLS AND PROGRAMS

STEM

32.3 Career Internships That Change Studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Lives--How to Start an Internship Program in your District

34.3 Jump Rope Geometry

Lyndi Cooper-Schroeder, Washoe County School District, Reno, NV Are AP or IB classes enough to successfully serve gifted high school students? For many multi-talented students, it can be difficult to narrow college choices, decide what to major in, and focus on career goals. Through our internship program, we offer opportunities and mentors for students to help them figure out what they want to do and, just as important, what they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to do. Learn tools and information so you can set up and implement an internship program in your district. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 9-12

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Daniel Rosenberg, The Lippman School, Akron, OH Introduce elementary gifted students to the world of geometry using jump ropes! Using the ropes as visual representations of lines and angles, young children can become proficient in topics not typically discussed until high school. This session introduces teachers to a unit of study that provides a hands-on approach to creating and naming lines, rays, and angles. We discuss how to use the jump ropes to model alternate interior, corresponding, vertical, and same-side interior angles. Students will be able to see the relationships among these angles and apply their understanding of these relationships to geometric proofs. Classroom Teachers K-5

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


| Mini Keynotes Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 8:45 AM – 10:15 AM

Karren Ryder, St. Landry Parish Schools, Opelousas, LA; Pat Widhalm, Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts, Natchitoches, LA; Kyle Wedberg, New Orleans Center for Creative Arts, New Orleans, LA; Bethany A. France, Louisiana Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism, Baton Rouge, LA Attend this session to learn about the various ways to include the arts in your school’s gifted programming. The state of Louisiana mandates programming in the arts for students so identified. The Talented Arts Program requires the development of curriculum for the visual arts and performance instruction for all Louisiana students. Hear from leading Louisiana educators about their arts programs and models. One incorporates the arts into a residential, state-supported school that also focuses on math and science. Others integrate the arts into elementary, middle, or high schools that serve primarily minority students or rural students. Another program is community-based and serves students in an urban area on a part-time basis. You’re sure to hear ideas to apply to your own program. Room: Napoleon Ballroom

Bullying of and by Gifted Children and Teens Jean Sunde Peterson, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Dan Peters, Walnut Creek, CA; Tom Hébert, University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Michelle Haj-Broussard, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, LA

who are gifted, and vulnerabilities related to bullying. All panelists will share thoughts related to cyberbullying, family- and school-systemic strategies for countering bullying, current legislation related to bullying, assessment of risk for self-harm for victims, and why intervention for bullies may be as important as attention to their targets. Room: Jefferson Ballroom

Connecting for High Potential: How Parents, Teachers, and School Counselors Can Work Collaboratively to Reverse Underachievement for Gifted Students. Sylvia Rimm, Family Achievement Clinic, Sheffield Lake, OH; Del Siegle, D. Betsy McCoach, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT Nothing is more distressing or perplexing to parents and educators when students with tremendous ability and talent are disengaged from school or achieving below their potential. The causes of underachievement are complex and approaches to ameliorating it must be multi-faceted. In this session, we examine the family, school, and psycho-social factors that contribute to underachievement among talented students. Panel members have expertise about family dynamics and family systems related to achievement, gifted education programming and instructional practices to engage learners, and psychological issues that affect motivation and achievement. Each panel member will present on their area of expertise followed by a discussion on how schools, families, and counselors can work collectively to reverse underachievement. Room: Versailles Ballroom

Experts on the social and emotional development of gifted youth present perspectives related to bullying of and by gifted children and teens. They will discuss unexpected findings in a qualitative national study of bullying experienced by gifted students, what teachers should be alert to and how they can address bullying, how therapists might approach working with victims or perpetrators

Saturday

A Focus on the Arts: Arts Integration and Arts Programming for Gifted Students

Want to Know More about NAGC Networks? Learn more about the NAGC Networks before and after the Mini-Keynotes on Friday and Saturday at information tables in Court Assembly on the third floor.

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM SIGNATURE SERIES

ARTS

To Group or Not To Group, That Is the Question

Visual Arts Talent Development In Magnet High School Gifted Students

Bruce Shore, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; Karen Rogers, University of St. Thomas, Minneapolis, MN; Lannie Kanevsky, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada Do gifted students learn better when they work on their own or in groups? When do they prefer to work alone or with others? Which is best: full-time grouping, cluster grouping or mixed-ability classes? Each of the presenters presents research findings related to these questions as well as tapping in to the years of investigations surrounding this controversy. The answers to these questions have important classroom implications for teaching bright students and for managing collaborative and peer instruction. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Napoleon Ballroom ARTS

Louisiana’s Talented Arts Program

Saturday

Debbie Lefort, Donna Laurent, St. Tammany Parish Schools, Covington, LA Participants are given an overview of the state of Louisiana’s Talented Arts Program, which is open to all exceptionally talented art, music, and/or theatre students, not just the academically gifted. The characteristics of these exceptionally talented students and the screening and evaluation process for each area are discussed and student examples viewed. Louisiana’s Talented Arts Program curriculum overview, course description, and scheduling are explored for art, music, and theatre. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 15

Connie Phelps, Emporia State University, Emporia, KS; M. Alexandra Vuyk, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS Examining program course offerings, faculty perceptions, and study response, the study examined talent development in academically gifted students in a Midwest magnet high school visual arts program. Interviews with faculty addressed program formation, goals, and outcomes. Seven gifted students in the visual arts magnet area answered individual written questionnaires and participated in structured group interviews. With a student population of 567, the school enrolled 60 gifted students with approximately 25% of the school population enrolled in the visual arts magnet. Study outcomes indicated supportive programming blending creative learning experiences and cognitive challenge resulted in artistic talent development and academic distinction. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5, Classroom Teachers 6-8, Classroom Teachers 9-12, Room: Grand Salon 7 COMPUTERS AND TECHNOLOGY

Beyond the Page: Teaching Talented Readers 2.0 Elizabeth Fogarty, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC Plugging into new technologies just may be the silver bullet in the fight against illiteracy. The literate of today’s society are not only those who can read printed text, but those who can navigate the Internet to access information and utilize technology to communicate. As our definition of literacy expands, our instructional techniques must evolve. Free resources like Shelfari and GoodReads can enhance the learning experience of elementary through high school readers and add social contexts to students’ reading experiences. Grab your iPad or iPod Touch, log in to your favorite social media site, and go beyond the page. Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 6

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In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

COMPUTERS AND TECHNOLOGY

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

2.2 Rampaging Robots: Results of an Intervention Study Of Spatial Ability and LEGO Robotics

The Muddled Middle: Gender and Sexuality in Early Adolescents

Steve Coxon, Maryville University, St. Louis, MO Spatial ability plays an important role in many fields, especially the physical sciences and engineering. Several studies suggest that spatial ability is improvable through practice with spatial tasks. Improving gifted children’s spatial ability has the potential to increase the pool of talented scientists and engineers. The activities of building and programming LEGO robots include many spatial tasks. This presentation provides an overview and the results of an experimental intervention study involving treatment with a curriculum unit based on the FIRST LEGO League competition and a measure of spatial ability as a pre- and post-assessment. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-8

Susan Rakow, Cleveland State University, Cleveland Heights, OH; Sylvia Rimm, Family Achievement Clinic, Sheffield Lake, OH Much has been written about middle school gifted girls and the challenges they face. More recently, research and writing have focused on gifted boys, especially those from minority backgrounds. This session updates participants on important gender issues and also helps them understand gifted GLBTQ students. Some are “coming out” at home and school as early as the middle grades. Specific strategies, background information, and a local student panel will help educators develop the knowledge and skills they need to help early adolescents deal with bullying, achieve, thrive, and develop balanced healthy identities. Audience: Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Grand Salon 10

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

James Delisle, Growing Good Kids, North Myrtle Beach, SC

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

7.3 2e: The Paradox of Dual Exceptionality Melissa Sornik, LI-TECA, Sea Cliff, NY

Bill Murray in “Groundhog Day.” Matthew Broderick as “Ferris Bueller.” Brad Pitt as “Benjamin Button.” All of these are fictional characters, yet they and other movie characters have much they can teach us about the current state of gifted child education. This session is akin to a “backstage tour” of important issues that continue to surround the conceptual foundations of our field. Neglected issues such as underachievement are reviewed, a rational approach to student identification is discussed, and the absurdity of the inclusion debacle is revealed all through the magic of movie characters you’ve come to know. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents Room: Belle Chasse

Both gifted and learning disabled, twice-exceptional (2e) students are a challenge both academically and behaviourally; however, with understanding and appropriate motivation and support, they can become enthusiastic and productive learners. This workshop presents 2e through a positive lens, providing a comprehensive description of the social, emotional, and learning characteristics of 2e students, and explains the impact of those characteristics on behavior and academic performance. Emotional sensitivities of 2e students are discussed, including the effect of asynchronous development on 2e learners. Participants learn effective interventions and strategies that support the needs of 2e children and adolescents.

Saturday

Gifted Education Goes Hollywood: A FilmLover’s Guide to Our Field’s Future

Audience: Consultants, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

Gifted Adults: You Don’t Just Outgrow It! Ellen Fiedler, Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL; James Webb, Great Potential Press, Scottsdale, AZ Gifted? Me? Unbelievable! Most gifted adults are unaware of how bright they are and how it affects their lives. Regardless of whether they were ever identified as such, those who are gifted remain so as adults, even if their giftedness goes unrecognized by anyone, including themselves. Like children, adults go through life stages, and gifted adults seem to encounter these stages earlier and more intensely. This interactive session describes characteristics of gifted adults along with issues they may encounter and tasks involved at various life stages. The focus is on exploring the meaning and ramifications of giftedness throughout the lifespan. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12, Other Room: Grand Salon 21 COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

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Developing Future Moral Leaders: Striving for Excellence Above and Beyond Academics

school is building moral leadership and cultivating a caring community among its gifted students. Participants leave with an understanding of some necessary ingredients for promoting a culture of moral excellence. Audience: Administrators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Grand Salon 4 COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

College Counseling For TwiceExceptional Youth Terence Friedrichs, Friedrichs Education, Mendota Heights, MN Some gifted students with disabilities need additional preparation for college. To achieve better personal adjustment and academic success in college, some twice-exceptional youth need to enhance their selfunderstanding, self-esteem, and scholastic planning, both as high school seniors and as college freshmen. Drawing on three decades of gifted education and counseling literatures and of direct clinical experience in instruction and counseling with college bound, twice-exceptional youth, the presenter explains traits of three college-bound gifted youth with dyslexia/ADHD, Asperger’s Syndrome, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. The session describes approaches that successfully enhanced each youth’s self-esteem, self-understanding, and scholastic planning in grades 12 and year one in college.

Andrea Esperat, John Dewey Academy, Great Barrington, MA Gifted students have the potential to do great things, and unfortunately, the potential to do great harm. What can parents and educators do to promote moral leadership among the gifted? This presentation summarizes key research and theory from various fields, including Haidt’s work on moral emotions, Kegan’s constructive-developmental theory, neuroscience, and positive psychology. Using a social-intuitionist approach to understand moral judgment, examine how one high

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents Room: Grand Salon 24

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


CREATIVITY

CREATIVITY

8.4 Innovatively Supporting Students with a “Fashionably Right” Mix: Teaching for Creativity with a Unique Curriculum

Lil’ Wayne, Postmodern Rapper: A Study in Creative Development

Roxanne Speer, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA Is fashion really frivolous, or does fashion provide a unique curriculum that marks student success, which leads them to career paths and higher education? This session provides educators a clear example of how teaching fashion for creativity builds learning communities of 21st century skills, originality of ideas, and innovative design. A secondary classroom sets the scene for the story of a uniquely written curriculum based on gifted pedagogy and interdisciplinary connections with core academics. Program benefits include a culturally responsive and differentiated curriculum for undiscovered talent. Students celebrated joyful learning while mastering essential skills, critical thinking, problem solving, and collaboration. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 6-12

Jennifer Jolly, Daniel Winkler, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA Lil’ Wayne (Dewayne Michael Carter, Jr.), has garnered both critical and financial success as a rap artist. A native of New Orleans, Lil’ Wayne’s postmodern lyrical selection and exceptional use of rhythm have made him one of the most celebrated modern rappers. This research examines Lil’ Wayne’s career trajectory from prodigal childhood to eminent adulthood through Gardner’s four principal components in the study of creativity. This research also seeks to better understand traditionally underserved population in gifted and talented programs and to suggest the mechanisms that have allowed Lil’ Wayne to overcome barriers to success. Audience: Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Magnolia

A New Look at Divergent Thinking Test Scoring Techniques Jonathan Plucker, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN Divergent thinking tests are among the most popular techniques for measuring creativity. The validity evidence for DT tests, as applied in educational settings, is inconsistent partly due to different scoring methods. Although previous studies suggest that the objective percentage scoring technique might be the best candidate to score DT tests, this study provides a new perspective by exploring the reliability and validity of five scoring methods for administering and scoring two real world DT tests. The potential impact on educational research and practice is discussed in detail. Audience: Administrators,Consultants, Counselors, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 6-8, Classroom Teachers 9-12

Twelve Stories of Academic Acceleration Karen Westberg, University of St. Thomas, Minneapolis, MN; Marcia Imbeau, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR; Jann Leppien, University of Great Falls, Great Falls, MT; Kim Paris, Elko Institute for Academic Achievement, Elko, NV We describe the academic and social experiences of gifted learners who recently have experienced various types of acceleration in school, including early entrance to high school, grade skipping in elementary school, early entrance to kindergarten, and subject acceleration. From interviews with students, their parents, and teachers, we learn their perspectives about and experiences with academic acceleration, including circumstances surrounding the initial decision to accelerate these 12 students. It is time to end the myth making on this topic.

Saturday

CURRICULUM STUDIES CREATIVITY

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Oak Alley

Room: Eglinton and Winton

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM CURRICULUM STUDIES

CURRICULUM STUDIES

11.2 Enriching Learning Experiences to Stretch Potentials in a Hong Kong Classroom: Antarctica Expedition 2011

13.1 Formative Assessment: Practical Strategies For Differentiating Instruction

Patrick Hak-Chung Lam, Pui Kiu College, Hong Kong

Marguerite Brunner, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

The overarching aims of this paper are to share our experience of planning a humanities unit (Antarctica Expedition 2011) and trying out some teaching strategies such as enrichment tasks in catering for the needs of gifted students in one school. Qualitative data was collected from a focus group interview with six students participating in the trial unit, as accompanied by the secondary data of students learning products. Some practical hints for teachers who are interested in gifted education are discussed. Audience: Coordinators, Classroom Teachers 6-12

While gifted students are often treated as a homogenous group in gifted and talented programs, they are indeed a diverse group. Because of this diversity, differentiation is essential, but often not practiced in gifted classrooms. Differentiation’s component of formative assessment is a crucial step for informing instruction to meet diverse needs. This session examines the use of formative assessment in two reading units, as well as teacher perceptions of its benefits and limitations. Strategies to create and respond to formative assessment data are explored to identify key components that can be used to benefit both teacher and student.

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Audience: Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

The CLEAR Curriculum: What Works In Gifted Education

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Saturday

Amy Azano, Carolyn Callahan, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA; Kimberly Landrum, Bellarmine University, Louisville, KY The CLEAR Curriculum model (Challenge Leading to Engagement, Achievement, and Results) is a framework for designing high quality, authentic curriculum appropriate for diverse learners, including gifted students and those capable of advanced work. The curriculum, comprised from three curriculum models considered best practice in the field of gifted education (differentiation, depth and complexity, and schoolwide enrichment), capitalizes on the instructional elements of continual formative assessments, clear learning goals, data-driven learning experiences, authentic products, and rich curriculum. The session provides an overview of the theoretical models underlying the CLEAR Curriculum, two reading units based on the model, and sample lesson plans.

Developing Wisdom Using Understanding by Design: Examples from a Lesson David Williams, Indiana Academy for Science, Mathematics, and Humanities, Muncie, IN This session focuses on developing lessons for the purposeful teaching of wisdom using the planning processes of Understanding by Design. Robert Sternberg believes that “wisdom is a largely neglected form of giftedness” and it can be taught in the context of any subject matter. Wisdom, as defined by Sternberg, is explained and a written lesson presented along with video clips showing its actual implementation. As the lesson is explained, the session leaders demonstrate how to embed the teaching of wisdom into instructional units through UbD and use the video clips to illustrate each step. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Ascot Room: Marlborough A

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

EARLY CHILDHOOD

EARLY CHILDHOOD

Paths to a Growth Mindset

15.2 Using a Continuum of Rubric-Based Performance Assessments to Support Young 21st Century Learners.

Can giftedness be cultivated at a young age? Absolutely, if educators adapt a growth mindset! Many students enter middle school with a fixed mindset so we must start cultivating a growth mindset early. This session builds on Dweckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s growth mindset theory as practical ways to support her findings are presented. Strategies include: building a growth mindset culture in your school/district, ways to nurture/maintain growth mindsets in students, and ways to reach parents. Learn strategies that teach young students, educators, and parents about the brain, effort, and the benefits of adapting and nurturing a growth mindset. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-5

Joan Brownlee, Prince William County Public Schools, Manassas, VA Learn how young students in one school system apply their knowledge and skills in real-world applications within a framework of 21st century student outcomes. Guided by a continuum of rubric-based performance assessments with ascending levels of expertise, students understand, use, and transfer essential knowledge and skills to authentic practices and problems. The rubric addresses levels of expertise in terms of content, mechanics, presentation, critical and creative thinking, and reflection. Participants analyze sample performance assessments and learn to create performance assessments for young learners.

Room: Windsor

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-5

EARLY CHILDHOOD

MIDDLE GRADES

Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Too Naughty to be Gifted: Using Differential Diagnosis to Increase Identification of Young Children

16.3 Enlivening Middle School Minds through the Arts in English and History Classes

Sue Harvey, Joan Jacobs, Pat Schock, Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln, NE

Leighann Pennington, TVT Community Day School, Irvine, CA

The student who fails shoelace tying and cries easily, but breezes through STEM, wins the chess tournament, and cites thoughts of favorite authors would certainly not be viewed in the same way by all elementary teachers. When learning disabilities and personality are factored in, many bright young people may find themselves overlooked when gifted identification occurs. Early childhood teachers often focus on skill acquisition rather than on high-level thinking, much to the detriment of their gifted students.

Have you ever wanted to integrate art and music into your English or History classes without sacrificing concepts and standards? Your classroom will transform into a world of higher-level thinking and a welcoming learning community as middle schoolers access your discipline through hands-on, interactive lessons that use art as an entry point into English and History. This session shares the top five ways to integrate arts into your class through sample lessons, instructional methods, and classroom routines. Integrating the arts into a unit is exemplified through the award-winning and published unit, Experience Poetry.

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-5

Saturday

Mary Cay Ricci, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD

Audience: Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Jasperwood

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM MIDDLE GRADES

PARENT AND COMMUNITY

18.2 Differentiating Across the Middle Level Curriculum Using Children’s Literature: Graeme Base

Facts, Fun, and the Future: Fostering the Gifted Brain

Betty Wood, University of Arkansas at Little Rock; Larry Wood, Little Rock School District, Little Rock, AR Differentiating curriculum in middle level classrooms can be done using the work of popular children’s book author, Graeme Base. This interdisciplinary, differentiated unit based on Base’s books makes the lessons meaningful to students, meets their needs and interests, and the lessons become more than just learning facts. Drawn in by interest in the books, students are challenged by activities that are far from routine and boring. Participants leave the session with activities from several books written by Base.

Discover how the gifted brain is different from the nongifted brain, be introduced to some fascinating new brain research, and learn strategies on how to encourage and stimulate the gifted brain. Recent developments in brain research through the use of fMRI technology have changed the way science understands the brain. Discover and discuss this brain research and all its implications for gifted children.

Audience: Coordinators, Classroom Teachers 6-8

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-8

PARENT AND COMMUNITY

Room: Grand Salon 13

Successfully Parenting Your Gifted Child Using the SENG Formula

PARENT AND COMMUNITY

Lori Comallie-Caplan, Las Cruces, NM; Sheri Plybon, Plano, TX

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Liza Campbell, Consolidated School District 158, Algonquin, IL

This session is an interactive discussion on the challenges of parenting gifted children through their unique social emotional issues such as asynchronicity, motivation, self-discipline, intensity, perfectionism, and idealism. The facilitator provides and elicits from session participants strategies for parents to use to help their gifted child with stress management, communication skills, underachievement, and peer and sibling relationships. Special attention is given to the challenges of disciplining gifted children. The facilitator also educates parents on finding the right mental/medical health provider for their gifted child and the potential for misdiagnosis of gifted children.

Include Students, Parents and Teachers in the Process for Maximum Results Katie Augustyn, Gifted Education Consultants of Connecticut, Westport, CT For the challenging job of raising and teaching gifted children, it is important to realize that whatever parents need to know, teachers need to know, and vice versa. Learn about an approach taken by a state advocacy organization that includes all stakeholders - the students, parents and educators - in the process. Specific programs that can be replicated in your community or state are shared, along with materials to take home. Everyone benefits from working together!

Audience: Parents

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-8

Room: Grand Salon 18

Room: Cambridge

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Sustaining Gifted Youth and Their Families in the New Millennium: Case Studies from Australia

Pebbles, Rocks, and Boulders: Supporting Change from Direct Instruction to Facilitated Learning

Helen van Vliet, Australian Catholic University, Strathfield, NSW; Fiona Smith, Gifted Minds, Coogee, Australia

Sally Dobyns, Christine Briggs, University of Louisiana at Lafayette; Kay Couvillon, J. W. Faulk Elementary School, Lafayette, LA; Elizabeth Connell, Clarke Middle School, Athens, GA

The new millennium represents multiple tensions, contradictions, responsibilities, and possibilities for gifted youth, their families, and schools. Discourses of childhood, giftedness, educational success, and good parenting intersect in ways that highlight tensions for children, families, and teachers. In this presentation, we consider case studies of youth growing up in Australia at the start of the 21st century and identify common forces acting to influence development and learning, including technology, health, economics, and globalization. An analysis of these cases highlights possibilities for gifted children, families, and schools to move forward in ways that acknowledge changing social, economic, and political landscapes.

We all want students to achieve their potential. We share concern for those who are underrepresented in advanced programs that will develop their talents. These students may demonstrate need for support in traditional instructional models. What if we try to change strategies and provide studentcentered, interest-based, real-world connections for these students along with graduate coursework in gifted education for every faculty member and administrator in one school? Will there be pebbles, rocks, and boulders blocking the process? What might these be, and how might we climb over them? Stories of one Louisiana school’s substantive change process are shared.

Audience: Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5

Room: Grand Salon 16

Room: Newberry

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

21.3 The Gifted Education Professional and the 500 Hats

23.4 PLC Book Studies: TLC For Educators Of The Gifted

Catherine Blando, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; Rosanne Malek, Iowa Department of Education, Des Moines, IA

Laurie Croft, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

School-based gifted education professionals regularly serve in multiple capacities in today’s schools. The majority are classified as program teachers who instruct, advise, and counsel students. Often, these teachers are also expected to serve as curriculum developers, consultants, teacher trainers, policy makers, and program evaluators. Are program teachers prepared for these very different responsibilities? What skills are needed to teach, advise, and counsel students? What skills are needed to work effectively with colleagues? Find out about one state’s comprehensive efforts, over decades, to address these teacher needs through legislative action and professional development.

Teachers matter most in our classrooms. NAGC-CEC Teacher Knowledge and Skill Standards provide a researchbased outline for professional development of the kinds of understandings that ensure that gifted learners are not languishing in today’s classrooms. Book studies afford educators with the powerful professional development that allows collegial sharing of new ideas and research-based practices become part of daily work, and deepen knowledge among teams of teachers. This session for teachers provides suggestions for books about gifted education, as well as tips to facilitate successful study groups.

Saturday

PARENT AND COMMUNITY

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-12

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Using Wikis for Teaching and Learning Beyond Boundaries Sharon Dole, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC; Kristy Wagner, Henderson County Schools, Hendersonville, NC The use of collaborative tools such as wikis and blogs has increased substantially in teacher education in recent years. This interactive session explores how wikis can be used in a teacher education program to enhance student involvement in their own learning processes and in the integration of technological and pedagogical content knowledge. Products from the course, Current Issues in Gifted Education, are shared to demonstrate the power of a wiki in collaborative research and writing, creative use of multimedia, and critical peer evaluation. The presentation features the perspective of the student as well as that of the instructor.

in gifted classrooms. Certified, self-contained gifted teachers will discuss self-contained programs and GT curriculum and activities, as well as their roles as leaders and mentors for pre-service teachers. The principal from a gifted site will share her perspective as a public school administrator. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-18 Room: Rosedown RESEARCH & EVALUATION

Academic Effects of Cluster Grouping on Gifted and General Students from Diverse Cultural Groups Marcia Gentry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Dina Brulles, Paradise Valley Unified School District, Peoria, AZ; Scott Peters, University of Wisconsin - Whitewater, Whitewater, WI

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators Room: Elmwood PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Saturday 124

Mentoring pre-service teachers: Approaches, merits, and pitfalls of field experience and student-teaching in gifted classrooms Douglas Samson, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA; Patrice Hudson, Carolyn Hingle, Buchanan Elementary School, Baton Rouge, LA Faculty and staff from LSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College of Education, gifted educators, and administration from the East Baton Rouge School System, will conduct a panel discussion and answer questions about their pre-service teacher preparation program as it relates to gifted education. Topics include preparation, placement, supervision, and monitoring of 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th year field experience and student-teachers

An increasing number of schools are implementing clustergrouping models as a cost-effective way to provide gifted services. This inclusive approach can provide full-time services to gifted students and enhance the education of general students. Cluster-grouping can result in increased achievement and improve representation of gifted students from traditionally underrepresented groups. Research findings from three studies conducted in rural and urban schools with diverse populations of African-American, Latino, and low-income students are presented. Findings include academic performance and identification information of gifted and general students in cluster grouping programs. Suggestions and logistics for developing sound, cluster-grouping programs are provided. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Fountain

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

25.2 Cognitive Abilities and Learning Styles: A Correlation Analysis Steven Haas, Gifted Development Center, Littleton, CO Many educators are now using cognitive abilities, learning styles, and subject abilities interchangeably. Math replaces quantitative, auditory-sequential gets mixed up with verbal and with reading and writing, and nonverbal is treated as synonymous with visual-spatial. Effective instructional

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

programming is tied to student profiles generated from results of the CogAT. A population (N=284) was studied XJUICPUI$PH"5TDPSFTBOETDPSFTGSPNUIF7JTVBM4QBUJBM Identifier to examine the degree of correlation of those two measures. Specifically, the hypothesis was tested to see if high scores on the nonverbal component of the CogAT NBUDIDPSSFTQPOEJOHMZIJHITDPSFTPOUIF74* Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

COMBINED SESSION Needs of Parents of Gifted Children: Step One in the Development of a Research Tool

Is Tiger Mother Parenting the Best? Investigation of Social Capital Role in Supporting Educational Aspirations

Debbie Clelland, Adler School of Professional Psychology, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Zeb Lim, Barbara Kerr, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS

Despite the recommendations that parents provide a home environment to support talent development of their gifted children, little research has asked parents about what families need in order to create this environment. This study developed a needs assessment survey, Needs of Parents of Gifted Children, to assess parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; needs for information and concerns. Using this instrument would allow facilitators to develop curriculum that targets the needs of specific groups of parents. This presentation will outline the development of the NPGC survey, including the results from participants (n = 525) from four Canadian provinces. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Researchers

On January 8, 2011, Amy Chua, ignited a public controversy by claiming the superiority of Chinese parenting in raising a successful child with her article titled, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why Chinese Mothers are Superiorâ&#x20AC;? in the Wall Street Journal. Her essay suggests that Chinese children are exceptionally successful because their parents devote a significant amount of time monitoring their childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s academic achievement and laying down strict house rules regulating their childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s out of school social behaviors. This study delineates the extent of Asian-American parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; involvement (social capital) on their gifted childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s educational aspirations in comparison with gifted European American children.

Saturday

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Grand Salon 22

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

125


| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM SPECIAL POPULATIONS

SPECIAL POPULATIONS

Using the NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Programming Standards in Identifying Students From Diverse Backgrounds

27.2 New Ways of Identifying Potential Gifted Students Without Any Tests Jiyoung Ryu, Hyun-Chul Jung, ChangHo Oh, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, DaeJeon, South Korea

Susan Johnsen, Baylor University, Waco, TX This session describes how to use the NAGC Pre-KGrade 12 Gifted Programming Standards in developing a comprehensive identification system that allows all students to demonstrate their diverse characteristics and behaviors. After exploring issues related to identification, participants learn how to develop a challenging learning environment so that students may express their gifts and talents. This introduction is followed by a review of alternative and traditional assessment procedures that are non-biased and technically adequate and methods for organizing and interpreting assessment information. Participants have opportunities to discuss various identification procedures and examine case study information. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Versailles Ballroom

Saturday 126

SPECIAL POPULATIONS

28.4 Linking Rampage Shootings to GT With Emotional/Behavioral Disorders: A Discussion Meghan Salyers, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND

In Korea, there are more students who want gifted programs than the allotted students in the gifted classes, therefore the identification processes need to be prepared carefully. Current identification methods with scholastic aptitude tests failed to identify economically disadvantaged students. We suggest a new identification model based on class observation and interviews. The goals of this model is to give opportunities to the students unidentified from the tests, and to identify students who have giftedness or potential abilities rather than the skills developed by training. A pilot study shows that this method works effectively for identifying students from low-income families. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-8 SPECIAL POPULATIONS

Honoring Alexinia Baldwin and Mary Frasier: An Anthology of Multicultural Gifted Education Donna Ford, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN; Tarek Grantham, University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Deborah Harmon, Eastern Michigan University, Ann Arbor, MI; Malik Henfield, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; Michelle Frazier Trotman Scott, University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA

Nontraditionally gifted students have unique emotional characteristics that are widely underserved in public education. Neglecting the inimitable emotional design of this population in the academic environment may have violent consequences. This presentation and discussion focuses on the meta-analytic findings of a historiographical study that illuminated potential links between the ill-defined worlds of rampage shootings and twice-exceptional GT students with Emotional/Behavioral disorders. Attend the presentation and participate in a discussion that ties research to policy and practice.

This panel session focuses on the two founding ‘mothers’ of a sub-field of gifted education that likely would not exist without Drs. Alexinia Baldwin and Mary Frasier. This sub-field — multicultural gifted education -- is dedicated to addressing inequities in gifted education and ensuring that Black and other culturally different students have access to gifted and AP classes. The panelists share this foundational work and other best practices from a historical and contemporary perspective.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Grand Salon 9

Audience: Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Classroom Teachers 6-8, Classroom Teachers 9-12

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


SPECIAL SCHOOLS AND PROGRAMS

SPECIAL SCHOOLS AND PROGRAMS

31.1 Hidden Gifts: The Power of Social Context at Residential High Schools for the Gifted

Three New Rs: Research, Rubrics, and Realities In Saturday, Weekend, and Summer Programs

Dana Seymour, Mississippi University for Women, Columbus, MS Each budget year, to convince legislators of the value of public residential high schools for gifted students, administrators point to quantitative evidence of the students success, e.g. scholarship totals and test scores. In this study, the alumni of one public residential high school reflect on the experience more than 20 years after graduation. Surprisingly, responders overwhelmingly report that the strongest long-term impact of the high school has been affective, rather than academic. Audience: Administrators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers 9-12 SPECIAL SCHOOLS AND PROGRAMS

Action-Based Learning to Develop Your Brain

Jennifer Pitts, Tamra Stambaugh, Jay Watson, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN Concerned about the quality of student assessment in your specialty academic program? How do you guide instructors to provide meaningful feedback to students? What are the realities of student evaluations in not-forcredit settings? From instructional planning to measuring effectiveness of student learning and curriculum, a welldesigned assessment rubric is a key tool in a successful specialty academic program. This session addresses several research-based rubric assessment techniques for K-12 gifted students participating in accelerated Saturday, weekend, and summer programs. Participants examine samples of student evaluation rubrics and discuss the underlying research informing each rubric. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 12

Gina Lewis, Elizabeth Daniels, University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Prince of Wales

Preparing Gifted Students to Succeed in Specialized STEM High Schools Christopher Kolar, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy, Aurora, IL; Heather Sondel, Thomas Jefferson School of Science and Technology, Alexandria, VA; Randy Asher, Brooklyn Technical High School, Brooklyn, NY

Saturday

SPECIAL SCHOOLS AND PROGRAMS Today schools, teachers, and parents are focused more than ever on academic achievement. Research-based active learning not only promotes physical fitness, but also improves academic learning. Students that participate in these activities on a regular basis have shown increases in test scores and levels of concentration. This is achieved by students using both right and left sides of their brain. When students participate in action-based learning they are crossing the â&#x20AC;&#x153;midlineâ&#x20AC;? of their bodies and developing new connections in their brains. These new connections help to spur brain growth, which in turn promotes greater academic achievement.

This session describes the academic skill sets and preparation necessary for students to succeed in high performing STEM centered high schools. Scope and sequence of curricula of several different models are outlined. By having an understanding of the continuum of academic coursework students may experience, middle schools can make informed decisions to better prepare students for success in these competitive academic settings. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Trafalgar

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM SPECIAL SCHOOLS AND PROGRAMS

STEM

Quest for Knowledge and Competition Experience: Quiz Bowl for 4th and 5th graders

Jazzed About Javits: GEMS Data Showing Impact on Student Learning in STEM

Betty Turner, Amy Ogea, Becky Ford, Calcasieu Parish, Lake Charles, LA;

Janet Tassell, Tracy Inman, Julia Link Roberts, Steven Wininger, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY

Quiz Bowl is an academic, competitive pursuit already well-established on the high school and middle school levels. Our goal is to demonstrate how to incorporate this powerful learning experience to the 4th and 5th grade students. This session covers strategies in: conducting tryouts, writing suitable questions, training teams, networking among schools, and hosting a tournament.

Identifying students with high levels of interest in STEM allows educators to provide advanced instruction to these students, ultimately resulting in higher achievement. Two years of data from the Javits-funded Project GEMS (Gifted Education in STEM) show the impact on identification and on student learning in mathematics and science. In this session, learn about the treatment design, identification protocol, and data. Experience an engaging hands-on discussion activity in which you peruse and critique documents that are outcomes of the grant, including the mathematics and science teacher identification protocol/ tools and caretaker survey.

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5 Room Grand Salon 3 STEM

STEM Starters Toolbox: Nuts, Bolts, and Tools for Elementary Gifted Teachers

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5 Room: Melrose

Alicia Cotabish, Deborah Dailey, University of Arkansas at Little Rock;

Saturday

Project STEM Starters, a Javits project, is focused on improving differentiated, content-specific science instruction in the elementary classroom, and increasing teacher science content knowledge. Utilizing the teaching strategies and curriculum from Project STEM Starters, project personnel introduce elementary science concepts, curriculum, and activities that focus on conceptual change and content integration. Whether you are a newbie to teaching elementary science in your gifted pull-out program or an old pro, there is something for everyone. Attendees walk away with a Project STEM Starters elementary science lab manual and differentiated science activities to take back to their classrooms.

Hungry?

Check out the grab and go food carts in the Hotel.

Audience: Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-5, Classroom Teachers 6-8 Room: Jefferson Ballroom

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

STEM

40 Years after the Founding of SMPY: What do we Know about Developing Mathematical Talent? Linda Brody, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD This year marks the 40th anniversary of the founding of the Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth by Julian Stanley at Johns Hopkins. What began as a program on behalf of a small group of students has evolved into a

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

worldwide effort by CTY and other Talent Search programs to serve students with exceptional academic potential. This session reviews the core principles and practices of SMPY, the programs that evolved from it, and research on Talent Search participants. The audience engages in a discussion of the relevance of this approach for meeting the needs of today’s mathematically talented students. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Chequers

Exhibitor Workshops Using to Play to Build the 7 C’s of Resiliency

Leveling Up From Player to Designer

Patty Pearcy, SimplyFun

Brian Alspach, Gamestar Mechanic

Children have abilities and strengths that help them cope with everyday life. An importance life skill to have is strong resiliency and is build upon through the 7 C’s: Competence, Confidence, Connection, Character, Contribution, Coping and Control. What better way to strengthen this skill than through the power of PLAY!

Explore the power of video game design to educate, engage, and empower students, develop critical 21st Century skills and build a motivation for STEM learning and careers.

Saturday

NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area B

NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area A

NAGC Career Center Poster Sessions

t1PTUFSTBSFPOEJTQMBZJO the NAGC Learning Quarter (second floor) through Saturday, November 5. t1SFTFOUFSTXJMMCFBWBJMBCMF at the session time indicated to present and answer questions.

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www.nagc.org/careercenter.aspx 58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Putting It Into Practice Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM ARTS

COMPUTERS AND TECHNOLOGY

Jazzin’ It Up: Integrating Literature, Social Studies, and the Arts to Teach About the 1920’s

Differentiating For the Gifted Using Interactive Knowledge Organizers

Sara Newell, Pamela Dechau, Charles Townes Center, Greenville, SC

Edna Hernandez de Hahn, Niagara University, Lewiston, NY

What do jazz, visual art, drama, and poetry have in common? How can we help gifted students make connections to history and art and inspire creative responses? Activities include: analyzing, comparing, and responding to the work of Langston Hughes, Romere Bearden, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Billie Holliday; reFOBDUJOHUIF4BDDPBOE7FO[FUUJUSJBMSFTFBSDIJOH XSJUJOH about, and presenting creative responses to topics that changed America and more. Participants receive a menu they can tailor to best fit their students’ needs. Resources, links, rubrics, and examples of actual student work are showcased as this era comes alive through the arts.

Do you have students who enjoy discovering original patterns and relationships among apparently unconnected ideas? Gifted learners are able to conceptualize quickly and tend to see relationships between things that at first might seem unrelated. This session presents various strategies and technology tools that allow students to communicate and elaborate upon the connections that they discover between concepts. Participants view how technology can be used to create interactive knowledge organizers that depict the novel patterns and connections that gifted learners see among ideas and fields of knowledge. Audience: Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Grand Salon 18

Room: Newberry

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

COMPUTERS AND TECHNOLOGY

Talkin’ ‘Bout My Generation: Examining Giftedness from A Generational Perspective

Saturday

The Sky’s the Limit! Elfi Sanderson, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL What can gifted kids do when they are turned loose to explore their passions? Plenty! Especially, if they are allowed to work anytime and anywhere with mentors who share their enthusiasm. Come see the possibilities of what you might try in your own school, online, or a hybrid of both. Hear about the creation and implementation of the online Architecture Club, The Physics of Swimming Project, a prosthetic arm built by a 10 year old, music composed beyond Garage Band, assisting a doctoral student with a dissertation and more! Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Claire Hughes, College of Coastal Georgia, St. Simons Island, GA; Christy McGee, Bellarmine University, Louisville, KY The social network captures elements of giftedness in today’s media and quickly developing world. The latest culture wars involve the generational divides between Boomers, X-ers, and Millennials; however, there is a new generation in the elementary schools- children born since 2001. This generation is just beginning to form shape, and in a prescient foreshadowing, Strauss and Howe hypothesized that they would be shaped by crisis, forming an adaptive mentality. This presentation develops an understanding of the differences between generations, implications for parenting and teaching, and an understanding of how their generational context shapes the development of giftedness.

Room: Trafalgar Audience: Administrators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Jefferson Ballroom

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CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

Factoring Inservice Learning: Developing Dabrowskian Developmental Potential through Community Service

Meeting the Needs of TwiceExceptional Students: Techniques from a Researcher and Classroom Teacher

Elizabeth Romey, Barbara Romey, Phenix City Schools, Phenix City, AL

Jillian Gates, Anchorage School District, Anchorage, AK

This presentation examines the relationship between service learning programs like the Community Problem Solving component of Future Problem Solving and Dabrowskiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s third factor or developmental instinct the impulse felt by some gifted individuals to transcend basic physical needs and social conformity in service to a self-selected goal of perceived greater importance. For gifted young people already displaying a strong developmental instinct, service-learning programs like CmPS can provide an organized outlet for their self-chosen goals. For students whose third factors are still emerging, such programs can provide an environment where their third factors can flourish.

Students who experience twice-exceptionality are difficult to identify, and once identified are often difficult to serve. This session offers educational practitioners researchbased, classroom-tested suggestions for identifying and meeting the social, emotional, and academic needs of the child who experiences twice-exceptionality. Time for questions and collaboration is offered to learn from professionals in the field. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Melrose

Room: Grand Salon 21 COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

Teaching Gifted Students to Use Biographies as Career Mentors: A Road Map to Success Thomas Fairweather, Elizabeth Fairweather, South Walton High School, Destin, FL Gifted students often cannot decide which careers are best for them. This presentation provides teachers and parents of adolescents with the means of guiding them in the use of biographies to identify careers that maximize their talents and fit their interests. The presenters give tips for finding appropriate resources and demonstrate strategies students can use to identify traits, skills, dispositions, and experiences that led eminent individuals to their chosen careers. Also, the presenters show how students can use this information to determine actions they can take to strengthen the likelihood of success in their chosen career.

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

College Major Choices of Gifted Students Jaclyn Chancey, The University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Adrienne Sauder, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada We often focus on getting our students into college. However, very little is known about the experiences of gifted and talented students once they get there. In this session, intended for teachers, counselors, and parents, we look at a critical decision for students: the choice of a college major. What fields are most commonly chosen and why? Are academically talented students more or less likely to enter college with no major declared, or to change majors? How do studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; expectations and those of others influence this decision? Finally, what are some of the implications of major choices, changes, and indecision?

Saturday

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Grand Salon 16

Audience: Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Elmwood

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| Putting It Into Practice Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

CREATIVITY

Coordinating Services for Gifted Secondary School Students

Alive And Kickin’: Engaging Students through Arts Integration and Problem Solving

Beth Winton, Jay Wiltshire, Columbia Public Schools, Columbia, MO

Kathy Frazier, Touching the Future Through Creative Encounters; Deborah Walker, University of Akron, Kent, OH

Gifted students are part of the at-risk population and transtitions between schools can be especially challenging. Resources and services must be provided to assist students in successfully making the transition from junior high to high school. We will discuss the targeted transition efforts and interventions within one suburban, mid-west school district.

This session is designed for K-12 educators who wish to energize their curriculum with learning experiences that support creative thinking, problem solving, and the integration of the arts. Instructional strategies that are hands on/minds on, intrinsically motivating, and cognitively stimulating are presented. Engage your students in experiencing, connecting, and becoming immersed in the arts. Ready to implement lessons related to lyric learning, filmmaking, and visual and literary arts are just a few strategies to help you jazz up your curriculum in challenging the 21st century gifted students. Creativity does not have to be sacrificed to meet content standards.

Audience: Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Grand Salon 22 COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

Lovingkindness Practice for Managing Intensity and Sensitivity for the Gifted

Audience: Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Prince of Wales

Zeb Lim, M. Alexandra Vuyk, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS CREATIVITY

Saturday

Lovingkindness practice is a complementary practice to the currently much promoted mindfulness practice. Lovingkindness practice actively cultivates acceptance and compassion towards self, and others, for being just the way we are. For many gifted individuals, judgments towards self and judgment from others often cause mild to severe anxiety and depression that may hamper one’s optimal development. In this session, participants learn the history of lovingkindness practice, review the research of this practice, and put it into use with gifted individuals. Handouts and resources for participants to continue the practice at home or in school are provided. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Marlborough B

Grandfather Tang: A Side of Tangrams Will Campbell, Michelle Lewis, Norfolk Public Schools, Norfolk, VA Ever wonder how to use tangrams to foster children’s natural creative and critical-thinking skills while infusing all the core content areas? Take a journey with Grandfather Tang’s Story and see how it can be done. As classroom instruction becomes more data-driven, opportunities to utilize manipulatives to encourage “out-of-the-box” thinking have been minimized. This prohibits the enhancement of right brain creativity. Participants leave with a collection of effective strategies to add to their toolbox to encourage their students to use their own language to explain and build new ideas and solutions. Classroom Teachers K-5 Room: Chequers

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In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

CREATIVITY

CREATIVITY

Tinkering Child, Adult Scientist: Creativity and Integrated Art/Science Curricula

Instructional Applications of the Creative Problem-Solving Style

Rhoda Rosen, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

Laurie Abeel, University of Mary Washington, Fredericksburg, VA

Audience: Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-8

In what ways are your gifted students creative? How do they manage change and deal with working in groups to make decisions? It is important to consider gifted students’ perceptions of creativity and creative problemsolving style when developing challenging lessons. Based on the work of Selby, Treffinger, and Isaksen, this session will help teachers view creativity from a new perspective and shows them how to implement the creative problemsolving style into lessons that challenge and meet both the cognitive and affective needs of our gifted learners. Examples of lessons developed by teachers are shared.

Room: Grand Salon 7

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-12

CREATIVITY

Room: Jasperwood

The Business of Creativity: Y.E.S. For Arkansas

CREATIVITY

Faye Hanson, Little Rock School District, Little Rock, AR

Creativity: It’s Not Just for Art Class

Creativity and innovation are the engines of the new economy. Organizations such as Apple and Google seek the best and brightest creative thinkers to keep their companies at the forefront. What can be done to foster creative entrepreneurship among high-ability students? Come and learn about one program, the Young Entrepreneurs Showcase (Y.E.S.), that offers students in grades 5-8 the opportunity to apply creative thinking to develop a business, product, and marketing materials and win cash prizes for their efforts. This unique program promotes teamwork and innovation, as well as the application of literacy and math skills in the real world.

Kerry Young, Karen Graham, Cynthia Salsedo, Penfield Central School, Penfield, NY

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-8

The NAGC PK-12 Grade Gifted Programming Standards indicate that creativity is an essential part of addressing the needs of students with gifts and talents. Gifted learners often struggle with tolerance for ambiguity, flexibility, risk taking and accepting the ideas of others. By developing creative habits of mind in their students, teachers can help gifted learners overcome these struggles. Focusing on Torrance’s four aspects of creativity, participants learn ways to infuse creative-thinking strategies into daily lessons. Participants experience how incorporating improvisation and activities that promote vocabulary fluency and exploring perspective and collaboration can enhance students’ creativity.

Saturday

Looking for ways to encourage your technically skilled budding scientists to translate their mastery to the science of everyday life? This session begins by examining a number of contemporary collaborations between artists and scientists and shows how these have impacted what we understand as the main qualities of the kind of creative thought necessary for scientific discovery. Strategies for teaching these identified qualities of creativity in the classroom by bringing art and science together in a single curriculum are discussed. Audience members leave the session with a curricular framework to introduce into their elementary school science classrooms.

Room: Ascot Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Belle Chasse

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| Putting It Into Practice Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM CURRICULUM STUDIES

CURRICULUM STUDIES

It Sounded So Good at Conference: A Journey to Implement Socratic Seminars in Elementary School

Differentiation and Technology: An Instructional Match Jann Leppien, University of Great Falls, Great Falls, MT

April DeGennaro, Peeples Elementary, Fayetteville, GA Socratic teaching can be one of the most powerful ways to reach the highest levels of thinking, but as Kaplan points out, a mismatch between content and pedagogy can stop the most enthusiastic teacher from implementing this effective strategy. Join an honest and revealing journey to implement a Socratic teaching model within a first to fifth grade elementary resource setting in multiple subject areas. Begin with the basics and walk away with resources and lessons learned. Participate in a Socratic discussion and learn how this powerful instructional strategy can transform teacher, students, and everything you believe about classroom design.

Saturday 134

Are you wondering how to better use technology to address the diverse learning needs of students in your classroom? This session presents how the Internet and other technology tools help teachers locate meaningful curricular resources that require students to apply critical and creative thinking as they solve problems, explore complex decisions, or respond to meaningful text. Participants view interesting sites, discuss criteria for selecting resources for advanced-level students based on the principles of differentiated instruction, and investigate technology tools teachers can use to design challenging learning tasks. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Oak Alley

Room: Grand Salon 13

CURRICULUM STUDIES

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Challenging Talented Readers with 21st Century Skills

Multicultural Gifted Education: Another Way to Differentiate the Curriculum

Sally Reis, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

How to challenge gifted students is always on the minds of educators and families. Just as important, educators are seeking ways to make sure that the curriculum is relevant and engaging for all students, especially culturally different students. While differentiation is an effective means of educating gifted students, and a number of models exist for ensuring that curriculum is rigorous and challenging, neglected in the discussion of differentiation is multicultural or culturally responsive curriculum. Using the Bloom-Banks Matrix, this session focuses on the dual purpose or goal of making the curriculum rigorous, both cognitively and multiculturally.

This session summarizes research on talented readers (grades 1-8) and current instructional programming for these students. The special needs of this group are discussed as are specific differentiated strategies that enable them to make continuous progress in reading using the Schoolwide Enrichment Reading Framework with three phases of reading instruction. Stimulating read-alouds are implemented, accompanied by higher-level critical and creative questioning focusing on reading strategies that challenge and engage talented readers. This researchbased approach includes opportunities for independent reading with differentiated conferences focusing on analysis and synthesis using advanced reading strategies and self-selected in-depth project-based work.

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-8

Room: Grand Salon 19

Room: Versailles Ballroom

Donna Ford, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


CURRICULUM STUDIES

EARLY CHILDHOOD

Make It “Notebookable”!

Arts in Investigative Projects: A Method to Advance Thinking and Learning in Young Children

Ellen Marino, Mandeville Middle School, Suzanne Buras, Lake Harbor Middle School, Mandeville, LA “Make It Notebookable” is a journey into the idea of interactive notebooks that can be used in any subject at any grade level. The notebooks are a process that is “tweakable” to fit the needs of the student and teacher alike. Notebooks help balance lessons between “data, discussion, and doing” by including creative ways of conveying information, engaging in inquiry, and other learning tools. Whether housed in a binder, spiral, or composition notebook, they become a working portfolio of student work and provide students with a sense of ownership and investiture in the curriculum. Audience: Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Jinju Kang, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL; Nancy B. Hertzog, University of Washington, Seattle, WA The presenters share authentic opportunities for young children to engage in visual and performing arts to facilitate their learning in investigative projects. The arts provide languages for young children to express themselves, represent their thinking and advance their learning. The presenters share examples of the use of varied media, intentionally designed aesthetic environments, opportunities for children’s collaboration, interdisciplinary learning, and the use of technology to offer authentic and challenging learning experiences for young children. The presenters also share how their personal reflections of documenting students’ work facilitated more meaningful arts activities to challenge children with diverse needs.

Room: Windsor Audience: Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5

If They Can Say Tyrannosaurus Rex, They Can Say Triangular Prism: Nurturing Children’s Mathematical Language

Room: Grand Salon 12

Tutita Casa, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Middle School Readers...What We’ve Learned

Come learn how to nurture young children’s development of mathematical vocabulary that helps them acquire the appropriate terms as they build an understanding of the math concepts represented by them. Attendees participate in activities from Project M2, a National Science Foundationfunded research-based project developing advanced geometry and measurement units for primary students. Participants view kindergarten video of young student mathematicians as they learn math vocabulary words that express their growing understanding of advanced concepts and analyze written work. A multitude of strategies that can be used to support your own students’ mathematical language are shared.

Janine Firmender, Joe Helbling, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Classroom Teachers K-5

Audience: Coordinators, Classroom Teachers 6-8

Room: Rosedown

Room: Grand Salon 9

MIDDLE GRADES

What do middle school students prefer to read? Can we engage middle school readers in appropriately challenging books? During the implementation of a differentiated model of reading instruction, middle school students used a reading log to document reading habits with self-selected books and completed a reading preference inventory. This session presents what we have learned through two years of research about middle school students’ reading habits and preferences and how this can be applied to your talented middle school readers.

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

Saturday

EARLY CHILDHOOD

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| Putting It Into Practice Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM MIDDLE GRADES

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Using Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Literature to Teach About Wisdom

A Crash Course in Practical Counseling Strategies for Teachers of the Gifted

L. Dennis Higgins, Elizabeth Nielsen, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM

Michelle Muratori, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Laurie Croft, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s illustrated books inspire middle school gifted learners to explore their world from an artistic and thematic perspective. This session shares an extraordinary collection of books that investigates the theme Wisdom Across Cultures. Divided into six specific types of Wisdom - appreciative, discerning, behavioral, communal, transcendent, and ethical, these 50 books encourage gifted learners to consider their world and themselves at a deeper level. A curricular grid of teaching ideas using the Williams Model, live music, and handouts containing the list of books are provided. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-8

To increase competence and confidence when interacting with gifted students, teachers must be equipped with basic counseling skills and strategies to employ in their classrooms. NAGC/CEC Professional Standard 5 emphasizes five skills educators should master; new Program Standards emphasize positive learning environments and social skills educators should model and facilitate. In this interactive session, teachers learn basic counseling skills, putting them into practice through role playing exercises. The presenters explain basic psychological concepts that impact the dynamics between educators and students. To illustrate these concepts, case examples are provided and discussion encouraged.

Room: Marlborough A

Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Room: Napoleon Ballroom

Art-Inspired Poetry/Songs as Poetry: Analysis, Writing, Creating

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Saturday

Pamela Schmidt, Caddo Parish Magnet High School, Shreveport, LA This presentation covers all seven ELA state standards. The first part of this presentation focuses on professional poetry inspired by works of art. Participants read, explicate/annotate/analyze a few poems for diction, mood, tone, detail, and theme followed by group analysis of a poem and examples of the student culminating activity of writing an original poem from student-chosen art. Part 2 involves listening to and analyzing/annotating songs as poetry, in a large group, then in small groups. Finally, the presenter explains the process that students follow to lead a class discussion of their chosen poem.

Learning to Lead Katie Couillard, Melissa Follin, Virginia Beach City Public Schools, Virginia Beach, VA Making the transition into the role of a gifted specialist brings new opportunities as well as new challenges. What does a gifted specialist need in order to have a smooth transition and be successful? This session looks at one school divisions program designed to provide a supportive network and advance the potential of their new leaders. Be guided by gifted specialists that not only went through the program, but are leading others as they jump into their new role. Interviews with new and seasoned gifted specialists help capture the importance of having an effective transition program.

Audience: Classroom Teachers 9-12 Room: Grand Salon 15

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 24

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In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

What Works in Gifted Education: Integrated Reading Curricular Models for Gifted Students

The DNA of Moral Compass in Careers of Gifted

Carolyn Callahan, Amy Azano, Emily Hailey, Sarah Oh, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA There is limited research documenting the impact of curricular models in large-scale studies across multiple settings. Two reading units based on the CLEAR curriculum model (based on the critical components of Differentiation, Depth and Complexity, and Schoolwide Enrichment models) were developed to provide differentiated instruction to gifted students. This study describes achievement results for gifted students in 3rd grade classroom from 87 schools in 11 states. Data analyses indicate statistically significant differences favoring the treatment group over the comparison group on outcome measures. These results attest that two CLEAR curricular units for gifted students have positive impact on student achievement.

Karen Kimball, Richmond Community Schools, Richmond, IN; Marjorie Beisner, Nova University, New Paris, IN A longitudinal study of gifted students examines students studied from grades K-12 then followed throughout college into adulthood with an examination of how their education and talents were interwoven to produce their professions. Some students dropped out. Several earned numerous college credits while enrolled in high school. Many soared to Ph.D. degrees in Neuroscience, English, Psychology, Japanese, Business, and Spanish, while others joined Teach for America, became preeminent environmentalists, college professors, and United Nations field workers in Africa. What made them excel? How have they accomplished what they have? What role did education have in their development and productiveness as adults? Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers 9-12

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Researchers Room: Grand Salon 4 Room: Grand Salon 6 RESEARCH & EVALUATION

High-Achieving African American Male College Students: Reasons for their Academic and Career Choices in STEM James Moore III, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Lamont Flowers, Clemson University, Clemson, SC The three researchers were recently awarded a 3-year National Science Foundation grant. This session focuses on current results of the grant project as they relate to African American male college students majoring in STEM. More specifically, a focus of this session is on the factors that most influenced these studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; choice of major and career orientation. The researchers also offer specific recommendations to parents, K-12 education professionals, and college representatives. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Action Research: Becoming a Teacher Researcher Patti Wood, Samford University, Birmingham, AL Have you shied away from conducting research based on fear or misunderstanding? Then, fear not--this session is for you! Classrooms are rich environments with unlimited opportunities for teachers to examine their practice through a systematic research process. Action research will improve your instructional skills, the learning experiences of your students, and assist you in your professional growth. In this session, learn how to conquer your fear of conducting research. Scenarios of teacher action research projects are presented as well as suggestions to help you take the first step toward becoming a teacher researcher!

Saturday

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

Audience: Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Magnolia

Room: Grand Salon 3

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| Putting It Into Practice Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM SPECIAL POPULATIONS

Teach Writing Processes To Build Academic Success Geoffrey Moon, Richard Donaghey, Gallup McKinley County Schools, Gallup, NM; Pamela Sutcliffe, Albuquerque Public Schools, Albuquerque, NM Within the puzzle that is gifted underachievement, poor writing and organization often lurk. These problems may be intertwined, with organization necessary for successful writing, and writing necessary to build organized thinking. This presentation will explore an explicit method for teaching nonfiction writing to gifted students, which builds off creative writing methods, Taba’s concept development method, and use of document commenting. Come see student products move through various stages of development as students unlock academic success. Audience: Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 10 SPECIAL SCHOOLS AND PROGRAMS

Igniting 21st Century Skills with Highly Engaging Real-World Projects

Saturday

Bill Roche, PowerPlay Strategies, Surrey, BC, Canada Grounded in theoretical models and related best practices, this innovative presentation features highly successful and practical strategies for infusing 21st century skills into grades 4-8 classrooms. Experiential learning projects with real-life themes

are highly engaging for GT learners; they provide dynamic opportunities for advanced skill development, including exceptional levels of critical and creative thinking, innovative problem solving, and effective written and oral communications. This interactive presentation uses specific case studies to illustrate how to design engaging real-world projects and provide insight for creating an optimal learning environment for GT learners. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Cambridge STEM

STEAM: Science,Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math In the Design of a Miniature Golf Course Kenneth Smith, Susan Stonequist, Sunset Ridge School District 29, Northfield, IN This workshop presents the steps for teaching an interdisciplinary project in which students integrate science, technology, engineering, art, and math to create a miniature golf course. Students view the principles of these disciplines as one large body PGDPOUFOU %B7JODJ$BMMFEUIJTJOUFHSBUFECPEZPGLOPXMFEHF “philosophy”) To design the golf course, students begin by creating a set of pentominoes and learn to generate hypotheses. They then validate these hypotheses by developing mathematical proofs and collecting data. Once their designs meet the scientific, artistic, and mathematical criteria, students build the golf course. Audience: Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Eglinton and Winton

Exhibitor Workshops Radical Acceleration and Gifted Girls

Academic Achievement is Only the Beginning

Stephanie Ferguson, Program for the Exceptionally Gifted, Mary Baldwin College

Karen Gilliam, Amy Summers, The National Beta Club

Proper educational placement can mean the difference between gifted girls reaching their potential or simply biding their time in school. This presentation will discuss the research surrounding radical acceleration and how the Program for Exceptionally Gifted at Mary Baldwin College utilizes it effectively.

Academic achievement is the foremost requirement for membership in The National Beta Club but that is only the beginning. Join us to learn how National Beta Club members are putting their achievement into action by serving their local and global communities. NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area B

NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area A

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


| Putting It Into Practice Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM

Publish with NAGC Lou Lloyd-Zannini, Henry Barnard Lab School, Providence, RI; Anne Rinn, University of Houston – Downtown, Houston, TX; Susan Assouline, Belin-Blank Center for Gifted Education, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; Carolyn Callahan, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA; Felicia Dixon, Ball State University, Selma, IN; Jeff Danielian, NAGC, Washington, DC; Sidney Moon, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Jennifer Jolly, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA; Tracy Inman, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY Do you have a great idea to share with other teachers, parents, or researchers? Have you wondered how you might contribute an article or column to Parenting for High Potential, Teaching for High Potential, or Gifted Child Quarterly? Then join NAGC publication editors to learn how you can turn your idea into a NAGC publication. The NAGC association editor, the editors of NAGC periodicals, and the associate editors of service publications, collaborative publications and e-media demystify the publication process and provide practical tips for developing books, articles, columns, and electronic publications that benefit gifted children.

development. Some have even suggested that giftedness itself is a misnomer, mistaken for the results of endless practice or social advantage. In surveying the landscape of current knowledge about giftedness and gifted education, this session advances a set of inter-related arguments: the abilities of individuals matter, particularly their abilities in specific talent domains; developmental trajectories exist for talent domains with variations as to when they start, peak, and end; and opportunities provided by society are crucial at every point in the talent development process. It is clear from the research knowledge base that psychosocial variables are determining influences in the successful development of talent. Outstanding achievement or eminence—with its attendant benefits to society and for the gifted individual—ought to be the chief goal of gifted education. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Researchers Room: Grand Salon 16 ARTS

Art History, Appreciation and Interpretation Through Puppets, Song Writing, and Movement Gail Herman, Lesley University, Cambridge, MA; Sally Stephenson, Frostburg State University, Frostburg, MD

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12, Parents Room: Fountain SIGNATURE SERIES

Rethinking Giftedness and Gifted Education: A Proposed Direction Forward Based on Psychological Science Rena Subotnik, American Psychological Association, Washington, DC; Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL For nearly 100 years, scholars have sought to understand, measure, and explain giftedness. Succeeding theories and empirical investigations have often built on earlier work, complementing or sometimes clashing over conceptions of talent, or contesting the mechanisms of talent

Art standards include history, appreciation, and aesthetic criticism for the K-8 population. In this session, presenters demonstrate and engage participants in three methods to develop students’ abilities to observe carefully, describe, and interpret art creatively. One primary art teacher uses her puppet replicas to role-play artists in art history. Another uses movement to help elementary students observe, describe, and experience the energy in the elements of artworks. A third collaborates with older students who transform visual images into descriptive language to interpret the mood and meaning of artworks into a poem or song.

Saturday

SIGNATURE SERIES

Audience: Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-5, Classroom Teachers 6-8 Room: Grand Salon 3

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| Putting It Into Practice Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM ARTS

COMPUTERS AND TECHNOLOGY

Viola Spolin Theater Games

Ideas Worth Spreading: Using TED Talks to Create Socratic Seminars

Christina DeRosier, St. Tammany Parish School Board, Covington, LA 7JPMB4QPMJOTUIFBUSFHBNFTXFSFDSFBUFEEVSJOHIFSXPSL with the Works Progress Administration’s Recreational Project in 1939. The games have been used not only in actor training programs around the world, but also in regular and gifted education. Spolin Games allow the player (student) to learn through direct experience while encouraging spontaneity, creative self-expression, imagination, group problem-solving, and interpersonal verbal and non-verbal communication skills. There are games that focus on sensory awareness, physical involvement, environment, and many of the elements of theatrical training necessary for facilitating self-growth.

Lisa Rubenstein, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT What makes an idea worth spreading? Are we spreading those ideas in the classroom? In this thought-provoking session, examine how to use TED talks to spark student discussion. TED.com is a free website that selects dynamic innovators to lecture on their visions. These talks offer an excellent foundation for Socratic Seminars, which allow students to wrestle with meaningful, relevant ideas. This session explores strategies for developing effective Socratic Seminars. From choosing the right talk to creating appropriate questions, this session prepares you to lead your students in a discussion of ideas truly worth spreading.

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Grand Salon 18

Room: Oak Alley

COMPUTERS AND TECHNOLOGY

COMPUTERS AND TECHNOLOGY

Tech Tool Time: Jazzing Up Lessons for 21st Century Learners

Integration of iPads and iPods

Saturday

Cindy Sheets, Shawnee Mission School District, Shawnee Mission, KS Everywhere you turn there are wonderful technology tools available and the number is growing daily. Teaching, however, is not really about the tools; it’s about learning how certain tools can increase the potential of learning. Where do great technology tools fit into the quality lessons and curriculum you’re already teaching in order to make it even more meaningful and relevant to students? How does technology help create an authentic audience? Look at tools such as Skype, Audacity, Animoto and Google Docs to determine where these great tech tools can be integrated into your curriculum plans to enhance lessons.

Angie Sealey, Cynthia Hayes, Mary Ann Prevatte, Tammy Wilkerson, Glenda Britt, Public Schools of Robeson County, Lumberton, NC How can the latest technology be used in a classroom? This session offers ideas as well as hands-on experiences so educators and parents can determine for themselves the value of iPods and iPads in the classroom. Audience: Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Belle Chasse

Hungry?

Check out the grab and go food carts in the Hotel. Audience: Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Jasperwood

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

Growing Even Smarter Brains: How Everyone Can Increase His/Her Intelligence

A Framework for Affective Growth: Developing Social-Emotional Autonomy

Martha Kaufeldt, Begin with the Brain, Scotts Valley, CA By using Carol Dweck’s Mindset work and linking an understanding of neural plasticity, educators can design strategies that can help each student give his or her best effort and even increase intelligence. Research from Educational Neuroscience assures us that with perseverance and effort, you can grow even smarter brains! Come and grow some new dendrites in this fastpaced, engaging session.

Sheri Nowak Stewart, Growing Great Minds, Overland Park, KS; Reva Friedman-Nimz,, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS Although we know the importance of affective growth for our gifted students, it often occurs in a rather serendipitous manner. The Affective Growth Framework uses the research and stages of both Erickson and Bronfenbrenner to map a developmental growth journey that provides stages and increasing spheres of influence. In addition to learning the functions of this framework, participants will be engaged in activities which stretch students and move them from an internal focus toward being citizens of the world!

Audience: Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 24

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-12

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

Room: Rosedown

Developing Optimism in Gifted Adolescents

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

The presenter’s recent doctoral dissertation focused on psychological well-being in academically advanced high school students. Although overall global self-concept was similar to that of more typical students, frequent worry and nervousness were found in many of the 280 participants, and some specific concerns for girls were uncovered. In this workshop, designed for educators, counselors, and parents, strategies are presented to build optimism and reduce anxiety in gifted middle and high school students. Participants focus on helping students understand their giftedness, develop balanced lifestyles as well as their talents, reduce stress, and create positive approaches to challenge. Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Ascot

How Do Math Talented Students Compare to Average-achieving Students on Measures of Psychosocial Characteristics? Yi-Lung Kuo, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD This study investigated differences in psychosocial characteristics for math talented and non-math talented students. Of the 2,525 8th grade students who completed EXPLORE, 139 math talented (+ 1.7 SD) and 1,898 math average students (± 1 SD) were examined. The Student Readiness Inventory for Middle School was used to assess students’ psychosocial characteristics. Results show that math talented students evidenced significantly higher scores on seven (of 10) SRI scales measuring motivation, social engagement, and self-regulation. Findings highlight the importance of psychosocial assessment when identifying and understanding gifted students, and for facilitating psychosocial interventions that can assist skill development.

Saturday

Janice Robertson, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA

Audience: Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 9-12 Room: Marlborough A

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| Putting It Into Practice Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM CREATIVITY

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Dungeons and Dragons And Gifted Students: Sating Dabrowski’s Imaginational Overexcitability Through a Cross-Curricular Approach

Deconstructing Bloom’s Taxonomy: Letting Go of Bloom

Gregory Harrison, Mobile County Public Schools, Daphne, AL

It is past time to question Bloom’s Taxonomy and its revision. Gifted learners certainly don’t know something and then understand it. If they know it, they must have at least some degree of understanding or they wouldn’t know it. In this session, participants compare thinking through levels that exist within each type of thinking to the revised Bloom’s Taxonomy. Each level shifts from superficial to great depth and breadth and all types of thinking are inextricably linked. Participants receive tools and strategies that make this way of thinking explicit.

This session demonstrates how Dungeons and Dragons can be used in the gifted classroom as an exciting medium for enrichment that many gifted students enjoy. A large cross-curricular approach can be used ranging from creative writing to mathematics. This session also addresses Dabrowski’s imaginational overexcitability and its connection to Dungeons and Dragons. This session is aimed primarily at teachers, but parents may have an interest in using the ideas in the home or may have questions about overexcitabilities in general. Audience: Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12

Patti Drapeau, University of Southern Maine, South Freeport, ME

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Prince of Wales CURRICULUM STUDIES

Room: Elmwood

Saturday

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Teaching in Context - The Key to Improving Academic Outcomes

All In Good Time: Giftedness and the Use of Collaborative Improvisation in the Classroom

Darcy Blauvelt, Elm St. Middle School, Nashua, NH; Richard Cote, Manchester, NH

David Ross, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada

The presenters have documented that academic outcomes improve when lessons are taught using realworld applications. Eight contextual units, including two NAGC award winners, are reviewed in this workshop. An exploration of these units will enable gifted specialists to learn to provide services while students are actively engaged in curriculum; teachers learn to use context to reach all students; and administrators learn about a mechanism that leads to increased collaboration among teams of teachers. Particular attention is paid to issues that enable attendees to adapt units to meet local needs.

One characteristic often attributed to gifted learners is perfectionism, both in the positive sense of setting high standards and pejoratively as maladaptive behavior. Collaborative improvisation provides learners in school settings with a framework that simultaneously provides a context for high levels of achievement and minifies maladaptive forms of perfectionism. The improvisationbased pedagogical approach known as Process Drama provides a nurturing learning context that both creates a challenging setting for elaboration by gifted students and elicits participation at all levels of ability. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers 6-8 Room: Melrose

Room: Grand Salon 21

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GLOBAL AWARENESS

Constructing Rubrics and Criteria Cards for Young Gifted Learners

If You Want Global Citizens, Teach Global Art: Banking On Banksy and an Educated Mind

Dodie Merritt, Genoa-Kingston Community Unit School District, Genoa, IL

Marjorie Beisner, Nova University, New Paris, IN; Karen Kimball, Richmond Community Schools, Richmond, IN

Success comes when expectations are met; so knowing those expectations before embarking on differentiated learning tasks is vital for all populations of students, including the gifted. Clearly stated guidelines in rubrics also serve to focus, pace, and motivate young gifted learners. Consider the different advantages of simple, complex, holistic, analytic, formative, summative, taskspecific, and unit rubrics. Since time constraints are always a concern, the use of formative criteria cards, primary-level task checklists, and simple rubrics to streamline this assessment process are presented and a variety of teacher-created models for criteria cards, checklists, and rubrics will be shared.

To develop an attitude of global interdependence in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s classrooms, the study of art must reach beyond the boundaries of traditional learning. To be effective global citizens, students must understand world cultures. To comprehend world cultures, students must study the art of humankind and develop personal responses with positive social action through a language that they own. The workshop provides practical lessons and resources for high school English, Social Studies, and Humanities teachers, realistic student input, and startling images to help students transcend world cultures while building self-referential autonomy and deepening understandings of our commonalities through art.

Audience: Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-5

Audience: Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 9-12

Room: Grand Salon 22

Room: Trafalgar

EARLY CHILDHOOD

MIDDLE GRADES

Space That Teaches: Why Environment Matters

Self-Regulation: Critical Skills for Adolescent Gifted Learners

Shannon Jones, Institute for the Development of Gifted Education, Denver, CO

Richard M. Cash , Bloomington Public Schools, Bloomington, MN

Much more than just a physical space, the environment inspires, intrigues, challenges, responds to, and sometimes impedes the work of students and teachers. Educators in Reggio Emilia ascribe to the idea of the environment as the third teacher. Discover the compelling evidence between the relationship the classroom has with the experiences of their students and teachers. The focus is on elements of environment such as acoustics, lighting, furniture placement, and organizational systems that best fit the needs of gifted students. Strategies and tools for practical application are shared with participants as they reflect on their own classroom environment.

As children move into adolescence, motivation to learn becomes more complex, especially for gifted students. In many cases, adolescent gifted learners may not have amassed the required strategies of self-regulation to manage complex curricula and projects. It is essential that teachers assist gifted adolescents in developing the skills of self-regulation, including planning, organizing, and meta-cognition. Self-regulation is critical in becoming an autonomous responsible learner. This session demonstrates how to infuse self-regulation strategies into everyday lessons and activities. Participants are also guided through a continuum of teaching and learning that can lead students to greater learning autonomy.

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-5

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Grand Salon 13

Room: Versailles Ballroom

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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EARLY CHILDHOOD

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| Putting It Into Practice Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM MIDDLE GRADES

PARENT AND COMMUNITY

Building Momentum in your School for Gifted Programming

Look Both Ways Before Crossing The Street: Instilling Digital Responsibilities for the Digital Highway

Brandon Smith, South Hall Middle School, Flowery Branch, GA

Kevin Besnoy, Northern Kentucky University, Highland Heights, KY

Saturday

How do you use the research of today’s field of gifted to recruit, identify, serve, and influence today’s diverse gifted population? This session is about how to take the Renzulli Triad Model combined with leadership skills to create educational environments that will catalyze the community to action. Leave with multiple models and programming designs along with real action steps that jazz up your programming in a creatively attractive way. Learn how to build showcases to highlight student work, museums to inspire creative learning across the board, and real tips on how to serve students of diverse backgrounds.

If you have ever taught your kids not to take candy from strangers or to look both ways before crossing the street, then this session is for you. Given the amount of time that gifted youth spend on social networking sites, blogging about their lives, and posting content to YouTube, parents must teach their children how to safely navigate the digital arena. Attendees learn about different ways their gifted children digitally interact with one another and strategies they can use to help their children to successfully navigate this world.

Audience: Classroom Teachers 6-8

Audience: Administrators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Jefferson Ballroom

Room: Grand Salon 6

PARENT AND COMMUNITY

PARENT AND COMMUNITY

Heightened Senses: The Superpowers of the Gifted

Building Bridges Of Communication Between School Districts and Parents

Sara Shinneman, Lead On Leadership Development Consulting, Plano, TX

Judy McIntyre, Louisiana School for Math, Science, & the Arts, Natchitoches, LA

Explore the “Superpowers of the Gifted.” The heightened responses to specific stimuli, particularly found in gifted individuals, were first identified by Dabrowski as the concept of overexcitabilities. Review the five areas and associated characteristics of these “superpowers.” Break into groups and share ways to both capitalize on these heightened responses and lessen related frustrations. Take away strategies that the whole family can use to enjoy these superpowers instead of finding them stressful.

In this session, parents learn more about their child, more about their child’s GT program, and more about how to build bridges of communication between themselves and the school. Parents are given a variety of resources, links, names of GT experts, book lists, and helpful information so that they can be an informed and active participant in the IEP process. Parents are also given information about the district policies on acceleration and encouraged to volunteer to serve on the Pupil Progression Plan committee.

Audience: Parents

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Windsor

Room: Grand Salon 15

144

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

PARENT AND COMMUNITY

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Mind The Connections: Growth Model, RtI, and Academic Acceleration

How Do You Motivate Gifted Learners? Changing Underachievement and Maladaptive Perfectionism Into Optimal Motivation. Stijn Smeets, Tamra Stambaugh, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN

Building connections between a Growth Model that tracks studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; achievement over time, Response to Intervention, and Academic Acceleration provide an effective opportunity to meet the educational needs of highly able children. This session helps parents and teachers look beyond the goals of catching up and keeping up to a focus on moving up. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s create collaborative RtI interventions that connect differentiated instruction and flexible grouping to support academic acceleration, challenge, and fit. Based on current research including the critical advocacy role of parents during early childhood, participants will learn ways to collaborate to develop responsive academic plans.

How do you motivate gifted learners? What evidencebased frameworks and strategies are available and how might they be applied to gifted learners? This interactive session applies Dweckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Achievement Goal Theory and Deci and Ryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Self-Determination Theory to develop motivational strategies for gifted learners. This session focuses on task structure, instruction language, role modeling, and evaluation as essential features in developing motivated learners. After a discussion of AGT and SDT, break into small group discussions to help apply these theories to a motivational problem of your choice and solicit feedback from colleagues about your strategy.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Grand Salon 9

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Technological Tools to Teach and Practice Differentiating the Curriculum

One Degree from Kevin Bacon: Six Simple Rules My Students Taught Me LeoNora Cohen, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR We all know the game, Six Degrees from Kevin Bacon. Kevin was my student in 4th and 6th grade, making me one degree away. He and his extraordinary classmates taught me important rules for teaching gifted/creative students. Our classroom was a laboratory for learning what worked that advanced my studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; potential and my growth, helped me initiate Philadelphiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mentally Gifted Program, and shaped my conceptions of giftedness and research agenda over the years. The six rules that evolved are based on best practices, research, and theory, easily grasped by educators. Each rule is illuminated with what the children taught me. Audience: Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Magnolia

Marge Hoctor, Sandra Kaplan, Jessica Manzone, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA; Deborah Hazelton, California Association for the Gifted, Solana Beach, CA A combination of face-to-face and online professional development experiences has resulted in the implementation of some new technological tools designed exclusively to introduce, reinforce, and/or extend the competencies needed to differentiate curriculum for gifted TUVEFOUT5IF7JSUVBM$MBTTSPPNBOEUIF%SPQBOE%SBH are two of the technological tools that are demonstrated and shared for their potential to augment professional development face-to-face or online.

Saturday

Susan Scheibel, Colorado Association for Gifted and Talented, Littleton, CO; Stuart Omdal, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Napoleon Ballroom

Room: Grand Salon 7

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

145


| Putting It Into Practice Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Partners in PBL: Harmony is in All Things 21st Century Jane Seidel, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy, Aurora, IL; Karen Lindebrekke, iBIO Institute, Chicago, IL Participants see that by orchestrating partnerships with business and schools in solving real-world problems we are modeling the integration of interdisciplinary content with life, career, learning, and innovation skills blended with technological ingenuity to be global-ready. The complexity of these 21st century challenges mandates that we prepare our students to become reflective thinkers, problem solvers, and collaborators; skills fostered in a Problem-Based Learning environment. Learners understand how they learn and develop the resilience necessary to be competitive in an increasingly changing world. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 19 RESEARCH & EVALUATION

Saturday 146

The Nature of Leadership Practices on Teacher Implementation of a Newly Introduced Gifted Curriculum Lisa Foster, Amy Azano, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA The call for measuring fidelity of implementation of core curriculum interventions during efficacy or effectiveness studies is receiving increased attention. FOI measurements are equally critical for curricular interventions designed to improve learning for gifted students. Optimizing FOI is dependent on identifying the factors that impede or enable implementation as intended

and determining the role of school level actors in addition to the teacher. Little systematic investigation has pursued understanding the role of building-level administrators or gifted coordinators in the implementation of curriculum for the gifted. This study explores the influence of leadership practices at both levels on FOI. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers Room: Eglinton and Winton SPECIAL POPULATIONS

Scaffolding for Maximum Output for the English Language Learner and Student of Poverty Patry Lerwick, University of North Texas, Plano, TX Many students that come from poverty or who are English Language Learners are identified as gifted based on nonverbal scores. Unfortunately, a big gap exists between nonverbal ability and verbal ability, which cause these students to struggle in advanced programs. The goal of this workshop is to share practical strategies that can help the gifted student master the skill set necessary for verbal development and conceptual understanding by using critical-thinking skills and creativity. A strong focus is given to Kaplanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s framework of layering the curriculum and the essential use of depth and complexity across the disciplines. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 10

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


SPECIAL POPULATIONS

Double the Label; Double the Need: Strategies For Twice-Exceptional Children Every Educator Should Know Beverly Trail, Regis University, Henderson, CO; Claire Hughes, College of Coastal Georgia, Brunswick, GA Collaborative planning with a focus on developing 21st century skills improves outcomes for twice-exceptional children with a unique combination of strengths and weaknesses. Learn how to nurture incredible strengths in creativity and problem solving. Utilize technology to assist children with debilitating weaknesses

in written expression and executive functioning. Develop interpersonal skills essential when collaborating with others and intrapersonal skills a prerequisite to self-actualization. This presentation provides an expert perspective on how children, parents, and educators can develop a comprehensive plan integrating strategies from both gifted and special education to meet diverse cognitive, academic, social, and emotional needs of twice-exceptional children. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 12

Poster Sessions

Ready? Set? Learn!

All Convention attendees have access to recorded sessions FREE. Now you really can be two places at once! You will have access to the sessions (audio synced to PowerPoint slides) and handouts through June 2012.

Saturday

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The new NAGC Live Learning Center will launch in mid December. It gives you â&#x20AC;&#x153;just-in-timeâ&#x20AC;?, 24/7 access to content by topic, all at YOUR convenience. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just a click away.

Visit today.

Live Learning Center

â&#x201E;˘

The NAGC Live Learning Center is also â&#x20AC;&#x153;homeâ&#x20AC;? to the NAGC Webinars on Wednesdays.

www.nagc.org 58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Putting It Into Practice Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM SPECIAL POPULATIONS

Establishing Equity - One School at a Time Pamela Sutcliffe, Albuquerque Public Schools, Albuquerque, NM; Geoffrey Moon, Gallup, NM What does equity mean to the districts we work in and how can we achieve it? Equitable identification for gifted service has been a long-standing problem in this country. When we are not able to identify and develop the skills of all the members of

the different groups in our communities what have we lost? This session will talk about the steps taken in one large district to work toward appropriately identifying students in our Title I schools. An outline of our steps and a question and answer period will help others address their process. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Researchers Room: Marlborough B

COMBINED SESSION STEM

Delving Into Data: Nurturing our Talented Elementary Mathematicians Katherine Gavin, Tutita Casa, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Saturday

Come learn how to introduce our talented elementary math students to the tools and methods that research mathematicians use. Participants take part in engaging, real-world investigations that develop the inquiry-based research process including gathering, analyzing, and reporting data. In these investigations, elementary students delve into research using NAGC award-winning curriculum focused on the NCTM Standards and exemplary practices in gifted education. These units are researchbased with proven achievement gains for talented math students. Participants leave with differentiated, hands-on investigations that encourage students to think and act like practicing mathematicians to use in their classrooms.

Going Green with Math Manipulatives Betty Wood, University of Arkansas at Little Rock; Larry Wood, Little Rock School District, Little Rock, AR With “going green” being at the top of most everyone’s list, recycling our junk into math manipulatives is the thing to do. Parents and teachers are introduced to “green” manipulatives that they can create from what might have been headed to the trash can or recycle bin. Pizza boxes, tissue boxes, or bottle caps become fun and useful math manipulatives. Session attendees participate in activities using some “green” manipulatives and they leave with ideas and instructions for useful “green” manipulatives for use at home or at school. Audience: Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-5, Classroom Teachers 6-8 Room: Newberry

Audience: Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-5

148

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

SPECIAL POPULATIONS

SPECIAL SCHOOLS AND PROGRAMS

Programming for Gifted, Talented and Diverse Learners: Rigor and the Culturally Responsive Classroom

Radical Programming for the Highly Gifted

In order to ensure proper education of all students who attend public schools in America, we must create supportive, engaging, and demanding classrooms. This should especially be the case when educating historically underrepresented gifted students such as English language learners. Our session will provide teachers with classroom examples they can use with ESL students who are identified as gifted to build cultural sensitivity and rigor into daily instructional practices. Educators will also learn how to create a rigorous classroom environment to engage students and to address their social and emotional needs.

Highly gifted learners need curriculum and opportunities that reflect their voracious need to learn, appetite to create, drive to make connections, and need to make a significant difference in the world. Their optimal learning interface is flexible, dynamic, multifaceted, and rich in content. It is essential that all aspects of their developing person are addressed. Based on the Integral Practice for the Gifted model, this presentation provides educators with a fluid, substantive framework. Learn how to develop highly effective processes and tools, select resources, and design comprehensive learning experiences that support these extraordinary students inside and outside the classroom.

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Chequers

Room: Cambridge

Exhibitor Workshops Developing and Administering a School for the Highly Gifted

Build and Experiment with a BYO-Bot An affordable behavior based robot

John Thomas West, Mirman School for Gifted Children

Steve Goodgame, KISS Institute for Practical Robotics

The Mirman School serves highly gifted elementary and middle school students ranging from ages 5-15 and grades 1-9. This workshop presents aspects of the governance, mission, program, and sustainability of this independent non-profit school.

A BYO-bot is a mechanically reprogrammable robot that responds to light. It is a great introduction to the world of robots. They have been used as an introduction to transistor electronics, demonstrating feedback and closed-loop control. Easily assembled by children in grade three and above. Attend and build one.

Saturday

Cheryl Franklin-Rohr, Adams County 14, Lakewood, CO; Lisa Garcia, Adams City High School, Commerce City, CO

Bill Roche, PowerPlay Strategies; P. Susan Jackson, The Daimon Institute for the Highly Gifted, Surrey, BC, Canada

NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area A NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area B

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM SIGNATURE SERIES

Our Sputnik Moment Susan Rakow, Cleveland State University, Cleveland Heights, OH Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s middle grades students face similar critical moments in their lives as did their predecessors. Sadly, not much has changed in the schools they attend. Digital natives, their use of new technologies is as natural to them as radio and records were to many of us. Diverse populations of gifted learners remain under-identified and underserved in the middle grades. The emphasis on STEM as a key component of global competitiveness must begin in middle school - but how? This session explores these key issues and potential solutions including programming structures, acceleration, service learning, subject area strategies, and the role of summer and co-curricular programming. Creativity and the will to step out of our comfort zones helps us seize this moment and inspire middle grades students to contribute to the greatness of our nation and the larger global community. Audience: Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-8 Room: Napoleon Ballroom

Audience: Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 16 ARTS

The Development of Identification Measures for Artistically Gifted Students from LowIncome Families Seon-Young Lee, Yun-Jae Hwang, Ji HyeYu, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea

Saturday

SIGNATURE SERIES

What if you could Design a Perfect Environment for Adolescent Talent Development? Would It Take the Form of a Special High School? Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; Rena Subotnik, APA; John Almarode, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA Adolescents with interests and talents in specific arts or sciences are likely to pursue further study in these domains when they are provided with challenging curricula, expert instruction, and peer stimulation. There are many ways of generating such academically stimulating conditions. One increasingly prevalent means is establishing selective secondary schools. Intuitively, concentrating talented youth interested in science, for example, with the faculty and facilities best suited to nurture and challenge their intellectual development seems to be an obvious course of action; however, as with most things, the devil lies in the details. These details

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include, among other factors, the reasons students choose to attend, the rigor of the offered coursework, instructional strategies employed in classrooms, and the availability of authentic research opportunities. The evidence base for the presentation is derived from a study of eight specialized high schools and a comparison group of equally able and interested adolescents not attending those schools. The study is funded by the National Science Foundation. This sessionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goals are to address the overall effectiveness of intensive talent development environments in STEM subjects, identify which components of these environments seem to have most impact, and propose how this information might be applied in a wider array of school environments.

This session is about the development of identification measures for artistically gifted students from low-income families. Artistically gifted students are often unrecognized in the process of identification and placement in gifted programs because educational services for gifted students mainly aim for academic talent development. Given that parental support at early ages is crucial for artistic talent development, students from low-income families may be dismissed even more in the identification procedure. This session presents the development of multiple criteria, using quantitative and qualitative measures, for identifying disadvantaged gifted children in the areas of music, visual arts, and dance. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Ascot

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


JAM sessions in the NAGC Learning Quarter (2nd Floor) In post-NAGC Convention evaluations, attendees have noted the time spent in smaller, more intimate discussions were the most productive and provided them the best learning opportunities. NAGC Jam Sessions to the rescue! Topics for the Jam Sessions in the NAGC Learning Quarter on Saturday were suggested by Convention attendees in a poll sent out in October. Check the Addendum in your bag for a list of the Jam Sessions for 7:30 AM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8:30 AM and 1:45 PM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2:45 PM. Also check out the Twitter feed for NAGC. Join us for coffee beginning at 7:30 AM in the NAGC Learning Quarter. Cold beverages available at 11:45 AM.

4.2 Gifted 2.0 Kerri McBride, South Orangetown Middle School, Blauvelt, NY Gifted 2.0 will integrate technology, curriculum, and instruction in order to differentiate for gifted learners. Presenters demonstrate how technology can support individualization, faster pacing, academic challenge,

@nagcconvention

creative expression, and collaboration with peers. Presenters align free technology resources with Bloomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Taxonomy to support goals and objectives of 21st century lessons. GT 2.0 provides attendees with specific examples of problem-based activities that incorporate digital media (podcasts, wikis, glogster, moodles, blogs) that create conversations and collaboration around student learning. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Saturday

COMPUTERS AND TECHNOLOGY

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM COMPUTERS AND TECHNOLOGY

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

5.4 Using Technology and Creativity to Differentiate for the Talented Foreign Language Learner

Bullying: How It Impacts GT Students and How you Can Root Out a Major Cause

Bronwyn MacFarlane, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR Break out of the foreign language lab with new technologies targeted for foreign language acquisition with computer assistance programs. Session participants learn alternatives for using technology to creatively differentiate for the talented foreign language learner who is ready for new levels beyond the standard language level routines. The latest computer technologies for foreign language acquisition are reviewed. With the backdrop of New Orleans, teaching creativity within the foreign language acquisition process is modeled and presented. Finally, the process for how multiple foreign languages are delivered to multi-lingual students in an Austrian language training program are discussed. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Shawn Cherry, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Richard Olenchak, University of Houston, Houston, TX The phenomenon of bullying is one that can impact any student, and yet its impact on GT students is different than on other students. This session explores the ways in which bullying uniquely impacts the GT student populations and ways in which administrators, teachers, counselors, and other students can help to root out homophobia, a major cause of bullying. GT students can be at greater risk for bullying due to homophobia as they frequently do not fit in with their peers as well as many regular education students might, or conform to rigid gender-based roles. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Oak Alley COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

Saturday

7.2 SENG (Supporting Emotional Needs Of The Gifted) We’re Here For You! Heidi Molbak, Loyola University New Orleans, LA; TiombeBisa Kendrick, Miami-Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL; Lori Comallie-Caplan, Las Cruces, NM; Rosina Gallagher, Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL SENG is the premier international organization committed to the social and emotional aspects of giftedness. Social and emotional issues of gifted children are receiving more attention in recent years as evidenced by SENG’s rapidly growing community. SENG provides resources to all 50 states and many foreign countries. This session describes the programs and services SENG offers including: local parent support groups, webinars, professional CE for mental health professionals, annual conference and publications. This session also describes SENG’s commitment to understanding the unique needs of diverse populations.

The Academic, Social, and Emotional Implications of Entering College Early: A Case Study Valija Rose, University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Michelle Muratori, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD The academic, social, and emotional dimensions of young entrants’ college experiences intertwine and add to the complexity of the challenges they may encounter. By highlighting the educational and personal experiences of a young entrant who earned her undergraduate degree from a well-respected public university at age 17 and a law degree from a highly selective private institution before age 21, the presenters bring to life key issues, challenges, and choices that early entrants must contend with. In this session, teachers, counselors, and parents gain a deeper understanding of the academic, social, and emotional implications of early college entrance. Audience: Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 9-12

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

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Room: Grand Salon 10

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

CREATIVITY

CREATIVITY

Fostering Creativity Through Technology: Critically and Creatively Thinking About Collaborative Communication

A Comprehensive Model for Evaluating Creative Problem-Solving Programs

Jaclyn Chancey, Melissa Mitchell, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT Creative problem solving can be used within core subjects to help students develop the 4Cs of 21st century skills: communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity. An important part of this process is having students communicate their results. In this session, see how students can use free technology tools like Prezi, Scratch, Xtra Normal, and GoAnimate as creative alternatives to reports and class PowerPoint presentations. The use of presentation tools can inspire creativity, invite collaboration, and allow students in the “digital generation” to work within their preferred learning and communication styles.

Tracy Missett, Carolyn Callahan, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA In a global environment characterized by constant and accelerating changes, many educators recognize that creative problem-solving and critical-thinking skills are essential competencies for today’s students. Creativity programs such as Destination ImagiNation and Future Problem Solvers purport to teach these skills; however, as scant research exists demonstrating the effectiveness of these creativity programs in teaching skills associated with creativity, comprehensive evaluations documenting program outcomes become crucial. Using a recent evaluation of the Destination ImagiNation program as a model, this session provides a multi-modal model for evaluating creative problem-solving program outcomes and impacts.

Room: Grand Salon 6

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers

CREATIVITY

Room: Belle Chasse

9.1 Meaningful Economics: A Competition Promoting Individual and Group Creativity

CREATIVITY

Denise Hall, William B. Keene Elementary School, Newark, DE For more than 25 years students in the Delaware have enjoyed participating in a unique competition called Meaning Economics and Entrepreneurship. It is sponsored by the Center for Economic Education at the University of Delaware. During the course of the competition day, students are engaged in meaningful economic, creative activities. Teams are given a real-world problem for which they have to present a solution. They are expected to brainstorm, develop a business plan, and present an advertisement promoting their product or service to judges. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-8

Take the “A” Train: Jazz Improvisation as an Intellectual Construct and Vehicle for Creative Development Anthony Washington, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA

Saturday

Audience: Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12

Imagine having a conversation that changes topics every 4 seconds in which you are not only required to switch subjects in an instant, you must make sense of the transition among topics. This conflict mirrors what a jazz musician is faced with when improvising a solo. This session provides insight into the creative process of the jazz improviser as an intellectual construct and provides some innovative ways to use the concepts contained within jazz music to foster creativity and increase student interest in core area subjects. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Newberry

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM CURRICULUM STUDIES

CURRICULUM STUDIES

11.1 Thinking Like A Writer: Creativity, Identity, And New Perspectives On Anne Frank

Differentiation and The Brain: Using 21st Century Knowledge To Support Student Growth

Leighann Pennington, TVT Community Day School, Irvine, CA

Carol Tomlinson, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

How can I build lessons and units that respond to students as creative thinkers and writers? Learn to create high quality conceptual curriculum using essential questions and 21st century skills. Explore the ideas behind a creative new way to teach The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank, which views Anne as a gifted child and writer, integrating active reading skills, thinking like a writer and building an identity as a gifted person and writer, addressing the Curriculum of Identity and Practice. A reading guide that encourages close reading and introspection, book recommendations, interactive multimedia resources is provided. Audience: Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-12

At the outset of a new century, an increasingly helpful source of information for classroom planning is the emerging field of neuroscience. While still evolving, insights from this area are increasingly illuminating in understanding how students learn and why particular practices do (or donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t) work. This session examines findings from neuroscience related to differentiated instruction with the goal of helping educators understand more fully how the brain responds to curricular and instructional decisions for high-performing and highpotential learners. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Versailles Ballroom

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Infusing Service Learning Into Advanced Curriculum

Saturday

Mary Slade, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA Service learning is a valuable teaching paradigm for all learners. Gifted and other advanced-level learners, however, can benefit in a variety of ways from the experience. Adding service learning to an advanced class or in the differentiation of a regular classroom for gifted learners can enhance rigor and satisfy acceleration and enrichment goals. This session focuses on the use of service learning at all grade levels and every subject matter. Exemplary practices are demonstrated as well as models for success. A plan for implementing service learning as a part of the advanced curriculum is provided. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 13

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CURRICULUM STUDIES

I Hate School: Addressing Affective Needs in Your Gifted Curriculum Alessa Giampaolo, Hand In Hand Educational Services, Reisterstown, MD The gifted child: stubborn, committed to justice, empathic, intense, and the list goes on. Without thoughtful instructional support, these endearing (and not so endearing) gifted traits can transform into obstacles to achievement. Examining peer-reviewed literature and organizing gifted characteristics at the autonomous, relational, and operational levels, attendees gain a developmental understanding of the affective needs of the highly gifted child. Participants also explore how they can integrate an affective scope and sequence into their current curriculum in order to support the needs of the whole gifted child. Audience: Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Jefferson Ballroom

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


CURRICULUM STUDIES

EARLY CHILDHOOD

13.2 Using The Purdue Three-Stage Model To Design Theme-Based, Interdisciplinary Curricula

15.1 Get Your Hands Dirty! Project-Based Learning for Preschool and Primary Gifted Students

Jiaxi Wu, Enyi Jen, Rebecca Mann, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Sabina Puri, Benjamin Franklin Elementary, New Orleans, LA

Do you feel frustrated when designing theme-based, interdisciplinary curricula for high-ability students? Try using the Purdue Three-Stage Model (PTSM) and experience the smooth flow from teacher-directed instructions to teacher-facilitated activities, and finally to students’ independent learning stage! Above-grade level materials and hands-on activities centered on Ancient Civilizations and Ecological Systems within condensed instruction hours are shared. Student evaluations of their involvement in the unit are also shared. Participants learn how to develop their own curricula used either in gifted education settings or in differentiated classrooms by effectively using the PTSM. Audience: Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Participants encounter a high-energy make-and-take session, and come away empowered and motivated to try new and exciting activities, strategies, and real-life lessons to share with the youngest gifted learners. The presentation highlights in- and out-of-classroom experiences, proven through use with youngsters in a diverse, urban public school. Participants hear about our school’s outreach, identification and inclusion activities through a schoolwide enrichment program. Presenters share examples of project-based learning using real-life experiences, including creative problem solving, community volunteer projects, non-traditional field trips, student-created assessment methods, and Renzulli Type 3 activities. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5

Engaging the Young Advanced Reader in Quality Literacy Experiences Laura Beltchenko, Wauconda CUSD #118, Wauconda, IL In this literature-rich session, participants examines the many facets of children’s literature. The attributes of literature and quality illustrations for the young, advanced readers are discussed, global themes and essential questions that enhance critical and creative thinking are shared using literature examples, and there will be a focus on literacy strategies that promote higher-level thinking in a balanced yet advanced literacy program that promotes comprehension of text. Please join this lively session as we ponder quality children’s literature and appropriate chapter books for young yet precocious consumers of literature.

Skyping With Kyrgyzstan: Opportunities In International Education for Student Involvement and Professional Development Nicholas Kirschman, Webster Groves High School, Webster Groves, MO; Christine Nobbe, Rockwood School District, St. Louis, MO

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-5

Interested in connecting gifted students with students internationally through current technological advances? Interested in grants both for students and educators to travel to foreign countries? This presentation covers three developments in international education for gifted students and their educators; first, look at secure social networks sponsored by the U.S. State Department, which connect American students with students across the world; second, learn about international educational opportunities for high school students to study foreign cultures and languages; and then discuss international education opportunities for educators, both overseas and in your own hometown.

Room: Windsor

Audience: Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Saturday

GLOBAL AWARENESS EARLY CHILDHOOD

Room: Grand Salon 18

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM GLOBAL AWARENESS

MIDDLE GRADES

Beyond Environmental Education: Ecological Literacy For Gifted Students

Escalating Language Arts/Reading for Talented Middle Grades Readers and Writers

Ellen Fiedler, Michele Kane, Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL Gifted students’ concerns about the world and the impact of commonplace practices on the environment need to be honored and given voice. Ecological literacy goes far beyond environmental education. The emphasis of ecological literacy centers on a sense of place and the interdependency that exists between each individual and the planet including how individual decisions affect the world. Ecological literacy has been defined as “the ability to ask ‘What then?’.” Gifted students are particularly suited for asking such questions. This interactive session explains ecological literacy and describes hands-on service projects that allow gifted students to put their disquietude into action. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Susannah Richards, Eastern Connecticut State University, Storrs, CT While many students have demonstrated that they have met or exceeded reading and writing objectives, these students often complete the same lessons and assignments as their peers. The goal for this session is to explore strategies and lesson ideas to support highly able middle grade readers and writers to escalate their abilities. Sample learning experiences, suggested literature, and teaching suggestions that capitalize on the capacities of Web 2.0 are shared to model high level differentiated curriculum for these verbally talented students. The goal of this session is to create an environment that supports lifetime readers and writers. Audience: Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-8

Room: Cambridge Room: Rosedown MIDDLE GRADES

Saturday

I Luv Sh8kspr: Teaching 21st Century Skills Through the Timeless Classics of the Bard Sara Newell, Jennifer Johnston, Linda Reynolds, Charles Townes Center, Greenville, SC

PARENT AND COMMUNITY

Goldilocks Parenting: Effects of Too Much, Not Enough, and Just the Right Amount of Involvement Nancy Cohen, Educational Solutions, Eden Prairie, MN

Gifted adolescents in the 21st century have needs that surpass those of previous generations. Learn how to build a Shakespearean repertoire culminating in a festival that celebrates classic themes using new and nontraditional methods. Participants in the activities receive a menu detailing many more options to take home and use immediately to further develop your students’ technology, communication, and critical thinking skills. Festival events include: 60-second Shakespeare videos, a recitation contest, study of abridged and unabridged versions of plays, a Shakespearean Sonnet Slam, Twitterature, Romeo and Juliet text-based adaptations, and more.

Sometimes parents feel like Goldilocks, trying to decide how much involvement is “just right” for their child’s well-being. In this session, discuss both the positive and negative short-term and long-term psychological effects of over-parenting, under-parenting, and parenting “just the right amount”-- if there is such a thing. This session is interactive, allowing time for attendees to discuss issues of concern with the presenter and each other.

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Chequers

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Counselors, Parents

Room: Grand Salon 7

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

PARENT AND COMMUNITY

PARENT AND COMMUNITY

Following the Autonomous Learner: A Proactive Approach to the Development of the Gifted And Talented

18.3 Planning Home Activities for Gifted Students: The Atalay Family from Turkey

Royal Toy, Dana Seymour, Mississippi University for Women, Columbus, MS

Wendy Behrens, Minnesota Department of Education, Roseville, MN; Elizabeth Hahn, Ohio Department of Education, Columbus, OH

Parents and teachers alike are often befuddled when trying to provide for all of the needs of a gifted child. Where to begin? How do I start? This session involves the participants in a journey that underlies philosophy and services to help gifted kids become autonomous learners. Our journey begins with the child rather than programming for the child. Often children know what they want, but not always what is available to them. Participants leave with activities that they can implement at home or in the classroom to assist in developing autonomous learners. Audience: Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

This case study is to display the skills development of gifted children, and the adjustments that would enrich their home environment. The Atalay Family’s three gifted children, who are the main analysis units of this study, are part of after-school activities, 2 days a week for 6 months. As an examplatory study case, the developmental effect of the adjustment in their homes and other activities on 3 gifted children is documented using the document analysis method. Audience: Coordinators, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5

Room: Melrose PARENT AND COMMUNITY

mLearning: Personalized Gifted Education in Every Parent’s Pocket

Celebrating Intensity, Diversity, and Discrepancy

Cathy Risberg, Minds That Soar, Palatine, IL

Kathy Jones, Kathy Ray, Advocates for High-Ability Learners, Shawnee, KS

Have you ever wondered what you can do to personalize your child’s gifted education? This interactive session provides practical strategies that leverage your child’s strengths and the power of mobile technology to promote 21st century skills. Learn to unlock and advance your child’s potential by utilizing the mobile learning devices (such as digital cameras, cell phones, iPod Touch, game consoles) you already use at home. Bring your MLD and be prepared to come away with new ideas and get started on an action plan for mlearning advocacy in your child’s school.

Intensity, diversity, and discrepancy are descriptors that seem to fit all gifted children. Whether you are a novice to the needs of gifted children or a seasoned veteran, this session renews your sense of joy as you interact with them. The presenters, with experience as teachers, parents, and grandparents, also provide resources that support your interactions with these quirky kiddos. Whether you are a parent, grandparent, or educator join us in this interactive presentation filled with humor and based on experience and solid research.

Audience: Parents

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Trafalgar

Saturday

PARENT AND COMMUNITY

Room: Fountain

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM PARENT AND COMMUNITY

PARENT AND COMMUNITY

Making the Impossible Possible: Fifteen Strategies for Overcoming Adversity and Building Resilience

20.1 Parenting Possibility: How to Help Your Daughter Cope with the Gift of Multipotentiality

Lou Lloyd-Zannini, Henry Barnard Lab School, Providence, RI

Carol Malueg, University of St. Thomas, Minneapolis, MN

Even the brightest and best of us hit a wall sometimes, and find ourselves confronting a seemingly impossible situation that tries our will to succeed and taxes our reserves. When this happens, what often determines whether or not we will succeed is our resiliency our ability to face adversity, work around or through the obstacle, and move forward to accomplishment despite the hardship. For some, this resilience seems innate. Others need help developing it. In this session, hear about proven strategies for taming the impossible and persevering through difficulty to accomplish it.

When I grow up, I want to be an actress-chemistastronaut-veterinarian-chef-mother-professor-doctorauthor! And, I want to keep horses, breed dogs, and have a ceramics studio. And if I can’t be that, then I don’t want to be anything! Does this sound like your daughter, and maybe you, too? Join the club! Join the discussion about girls who can do anything, but can’t do everything. Or can they? In this informal, interactive session, look at the interesting, non-linear career paths of several successful women, and discuss ways to help our girls create their own unique pathways to success.

Audience: Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Audience: Counselors, Parents Room: Prince of Wales

COMBINED SESSION PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Saturday

What About Me Can’t You Teach? Gae Anderson-Miller, Edinboro University, Erie, PA Gifted students who are members of atypical cultures and low socio-economic families often feel that their teachers do not understand who they are. Most teacher education programs focus on teaching pedagogy designed to reach and teach a mainstream population of students. This workshop is designed to help change that perspective. Based on practical experience and research, participants discover the difference in learning styles of gifted diverse students and practice teaching techniques designed to meet the unique needs of these students. Participants receive a “What About Me Can’t You Teach?” guidebook. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-8

Eight Essentials for Engaging Gifted Learners Colleen Anthony, Jefferson County Public Schools, Evergreen, CO; Jennifer Gottschalk, Cherry Creek School District, Greenwood Village, CO; Jacquelynn Truckey, Summit School District, Breckenridge, CO Think about a student that you know or suspect may be gifted. What keeps him or her engaged in learning? Where do you see the highest potential for involvement? This session explores eight essentials for engagement of gifted learners, and defines and discusses the optimal conditions for motivation, through the lens of 21st century skills. This K-12 session delves into topics of data-driven instruction, affective guidance, integration of media and technology, as well as other essentials to foster the excitement that learning can bring. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 3

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


23.3 Addressing the Under-Identification of Gifted Minority Students with School-Based Professional Development for Educators Charles Alvarez, Rockdale Magnet School for Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA; Ellice Martin, Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA Is the paucity of teacher education on giftedness the reason why minority youth represent a disproportionately small number of students identified as gifted? This session is an opportunity to compare the effects of professional development on giftedness for 100 certified classroom teachers in Georgia to the number of minority student gifted referrals at an urban high school over one school year. Presenters demonstrate how professional development on an urban school system’s state-approved criteria for giftedness affects teacher attitudes toward making a gifted referral for identification through the use of pre- and postintervention questionnaire data. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Transforming Top-Down into Grass Roots: Creating Buy-In in Required Professional Development Holly Hertberg-Davis, Amy Azano, Amy Germundson, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

session describes a teacher-centered PD system combining professional learning communities, lesson study, and microteaching that encourages teachers to become the creators and leaders of their own professional development and researchers of their own practice. While focused primarily on AP teachers, this approach can be effective with all teachers and all PD initiatives. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers Room: Magnolia RESEARCH & EVALUATION

The Effects of a STEM Project on Teachers’ Science Process Skills and Science Content Knowledge Ann Robinson, Alicia Cotabish, Deborah Dailey, Gail Hughes, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR Leaders in STEM want long-term educational investment. Unfortunately, systemic opportunities for learners talented in science, technology, and engineering are limited in the elementary school. To answer the call, Project STEM Starters, a Javits project, was developed. Project STEM Starters is focused on improving differentiated, contentspecific science instruction in the elementary classroom and increasing teacher science content knowledge. The current study reveals preliminary data focused on elementary teachers’ science process skills and knowledge of science content after one year of sustained professional development. This session presents these results and implications.

Saturday

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Researchers How do we encourage AP teachers to differentiate instruction for diverse learners? How do we support growth in teachers already considered to be successful educators? Research indicates that PD efforts are most effective when teachers have voice and choice in what and how they learn. This

Room: Grand Salon 21

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM RESEARCH & EVALUATION

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

R&E 2011 Dissertation Award Winners Present Their Research

Does Birthdate Affect Recognition Of Giftedness?

Kristen Pearis, Duke University, Durham, NC; Janice Robertson, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Jill Olthouse, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV

Rima Binder, Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL

This session highlights research by the 2011 Research & Evaluation Network’s Dissertation Award winners. First, second, and third place winners of the 2011 R&E Dissertation Award each present the results of their dissertations, and offer an opportunity for the audience to ask questions and discuss the award-winners’ work. Audience: Researchers Room: Marlborough A RESEARCH & EVALUATION

On Becoming Themselves: The 1964-1968 Presidential Scholars 45 Years Later

Malcolm Gladwell’s popular book, Outliers, provides provocative findings regarding the success of individuals depending on date of birth. This study examines over 500 cases of elementary students identified for testing as gifted from two school districts. It seeks to determine whether birthdates favorably affect the view of teachers concerning those within a given cohort. A birthdate affect was found. The implications for parents and teachers regarding the academic performance of individuals are discussed. Participants gain understanding of the affect of birthdate on the awareness of giftedness, and how teacher perception affects recommendation for assessment of giftedness. Audience: Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Eglinton and Winton

Saturday

Felice Kaufmann, NYU Child Study Center, New York, NY

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

While longitudinal studies of individuals identified as gifted provide a wealth of information for educators and parents, such investigations are rare and often limited by quantitative methodology. The focus of this presentation is the narratives provided by participants in a follow-up study of the 1964-1968 Presidential Scholars. Participants learn the range of outcomes of these individuals’ lives as well their reflections on such issues as achievement, recognition, challenge, and education in ways that quantitative compression does not and cannot convey. Taken together, their stories reveal what it means to fulfill one’s potential and help us rethink our views of success.

Introduction and Application Of Program Evaluation in the Gifted Education Context

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Jasperwood

Matthew Makel, Duke University, Durham, NC; Michael Matthews, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC One of the greatest struggles in gifted education is rationalizing our programming to policymakers and administrators. In this session, we share a variety of ways attendees can evaluate and showcase their gifted programming. We offer examples to help audience members envision how they can apply similar methods to their own programs. The discussion addresses pre- and post-program assessments, growth-based models of student achievement, the application of qualitative and quantitative information in evaluating gifted services, examining student perceptions of gifted and regular classrooms, and the use of low-base rate outcomes. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers Room: Grand Salon 24

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In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

SPECIAL POPULATIONS

27.1 Blurred Boundaries: Exploring the Expectations and Aspirations of Gifted Asian Indian Females

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

underserved students for a summer residential experience, including support that is emotional and logistical, as well as financial and academic. Student experiences are shared to demonstrate the tremendous impact that this partnership has played over the course of ten years. Ways to replicate this experience are generated by presenters and participants.

Priya Voleti, Teachers College, New York, NY

Audience: Counselors, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 SPECIAL POPULATIONS

29.1 Partnerships Between Foundations and Summer Programs: Advancing the Potential of Underserved Gifted Students Barbara Swicord, Summer Institute for the Gifted, Stamford, CT; This presentation shares the experiences of an educational foundation and a residential summer program for gifted students for the purpose of demonstrating one way that partnerships can be formed to advance the potential of underserved students. Representatives from both organizations discuss the processes of preparing

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-5, Classroom Teachers 6-8, Classroom Teachers 9-12 SPECIAL POPULATIONS

Creating Positive Personal Growth For Diverse Gifted Learners Jordan Lanfair, Diana Beck, Stephen Schroth, Knox College, Galesburg, IL A host of talented children often are underserved by traditional gifted education programs. Sometimes these programs do not exist or fail to identify students from diverse backgrounds. More often, however, many gifted children of color, English language learners, and students from low-SES backgrounds have difficulty adapting to gifted education programs once admitted. Subtle changes in the curriculum, parental communications, and classroom management is often useful in increasing retention and success of diverse learners. This session provides strategies and materials helpful to differentiating instruction to better meet diverse learnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; interests, multicultural-guided investigations, and field-tested classroom management techniques. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-12

Saturday

While there has been an increased focus on Asian Americans in research, the majority of literature has continued to treat Asians as a monolithic group. By exploring the unique experiences of 2nd generation Asian Indian women, this study deconstructs this assumption of homogeneity and begins to shed light on the ways in which they have negotiated various contexts throughout their schooling years. This study also helps educators and researchers better understand the complexity of their experience and the implications of conflicting expectations, thus holding the potential to inform the educational and counseling practices for Asian Indian students.

Room: Grand Salon 4

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM SPECIAL POPULATIONS

SPECIAL SCHOOLS AND PROGRAMS

Moving Beyond Budget: Implementing and Supporting Diverse Programs/ Services with Limited Resources

Profoundly Gifted Students Benefit from Specialized Schools And Specialized Learning Opportunities

Peter Laing, Arizona Department of Education, Phoenix, AZ; Jaime Castellano, Ganado Unified School District, Ganado, AZ

Maureen Marron, Susan Assouline, Nick Colangelo, Clark Kopelman, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

Culturally and linguistically diverse gifted and advanced learners are some of our most at-risk, with unique academic, intellectual, social, and emotional needs. Learn how schools can actively identify, develop, and nurture talent and potential in a time of limited budgetary resources. Practical ideas and critical framework elements for implementing and supporting program and services models serving diverse learners are shared. Case studies are shared from K-12 schools from a variety of settings (from urban to rural Native American reservation) that have become champions for serving their diverse learners, through strong leadership and their commitment to innovation and excellence.

Profoundly gifted students (i.e., 99.9th percentile score on ability tests) need accelerated, individualized educational opportunities to accommodate their exceptional cognitive and academic accomplishments. The Davidson Academy and the Davidson Fellows program support the development of such students. Attendees learn about the positive impacts of being recognized as a Davidson Fellow, the case histories of Fellows in the STEM disciplines, and the positive outcomes of large dosages of educational experiences. Attendees hear about an inprogress project exploring how participating in the unique climate of the Davidson Academy benefits Academy studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; personal and academic growth.

Saturday

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12

Room: Grand Salon 9

Room: Grand Salon 12

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

SPECIAL SCHOOLS AND PROGRAMS

30.4 Ways That Gifted Schools Support Social and Emotional Needs

32.4 The State of Gifted Education in 21st Century Independent Schools

Patricia Hollingsworth, University School at the University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK; Melissa Cesarano, San Tan School for the Gifted, Gilbert, AZ; Andrea Esperat, John Dewey Academy, Great Barrington, MA; Ellen Honeck, Ricks Center, Denver, CO

Jamie MacDougall, Marshall School, Duluth, MN

Teachers and administrators from four different schools for the gifted describe strategies they use to help students deal with social and emotional issues. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Independent schools possess unparalleled potential to address the need of gifted students as a result of their typically autonomous nature. Small school size and admissions data lend themselves naturally toward differentiated and individualized instruction; however, the mention of articulated programming for gifted students in heterogeneous independent schools appears absent in leading field or gifted education journals. Based on a Midwestern study and a review of the limited research, this session examines the state of gifted education in independent schools and identifies recommendations for future professional development for teachers, program coordinators, and administrators. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

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In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

SPECIAL SCHOOLS AND PROGRAMS

36.4 The Model of Research and Education: The Specialized Mentoring System in Korean Science Magnet Schools Chun-Ryol Ryu, Yoojung Chae, Hyun-chul Jung: The Korean Society for the Gifted, Daejeon, South Korea; Jiyoung Ryu, ChangHo Oh, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, DaeJeon, South Korea

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

for learners in ways that magnify giftedness including intellectually, socially, leadership, academic areas, arts, and athletics. Learn how teachers recognize the gifts throughout the day versus a more narrow pull-out strategy. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Grand Salon 22 STEM

The adults who work in the fields of students’ interest areas can positively affect the students as mentors or role models. In Korea, more than 20 science magnet schools have provided students research and education programs that connect students with professors, researchers, or other field specialists, considering their interest areas. Hear the results of surveys and interviews, regarding the differentiated characteristics of the R&E programs. Based on the results, find adequate R&E mentoring program models for gifted students in science magnet high schools. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 9-12

Fractions Aren’t Trains, They Don’t Run on a Schedule, They Happen all Year Long Rachel McAnallen, Zoid and Company, Storrs, CT Teach fractions any time of the year by attending this hands-on workshop, which begins by introducing the learners to the language of fractioneze. This language can be taught as early as kindergarten, but it must be taught to all students at any grade level if they are to grasp the basic concepts of fractions. Using cool junque material, people, and the learners’ surroundings, your students will begin to understand that they are bombarded by fractions.

SPECIAL SCHOOLS AND PROGRAMS Audience: Consultants, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 19

Stephanie Georgiades, Betty George, Joyce Swarzman, Linda Wenzel, Independent Day School; Elizabeth Shaunessy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL A private school returns to its roots by collaborating with USF College of Educations Gifted Graduate program to earn gifted endorsements for the entire faculty and administration. Over a period of five university semesters, an entire school focused on literature, research, and strategies to tap into talents of all learners who attend the Pre-k-8th grade school. Differentiation takes on a new level of raising the ceiling

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

Saturday

Gifted: Eliminating An Imposed Ceiling

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions/Jam Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM STEM

STEM

36.3 Ocean Explorations: Hands-on science in the classroom and beyond!

35.1 How The Parents of Promising ELL Students Respond to their Low Math Achievement?

Kimberly Kelly-Young, Project Challenge Teacher, Cinnaminson Elementary School, Cinnaminson, NJ The students in Cinnaminson Elementary School’s Project Challenge program received hands-on ocean-themed science supplemental programming from the staff at the New Jersey Academy for Aquatic Sciences. The partnership was created to increase the students’ already existing love of the marine environment and expand on their in-class science programs. The total experience included in-class lessons, field trips that supplemented the lessons, and concluded with post program activities for follow-up in class. Audience: Classroom teachers K-5, Coordinators

Seokhee Cho, Jenny Yang, St. John’s University, Jamaica, NY Approximately one in five school-age children in the U.S. come from an immigrant family. Understanding the relationship between parental involvement and educational achievement of ELL students is more important than ever. This study illustrates how students’ poor performance affects the level of parental involvement. We have found that ELL students who scored lower on the standardized math test perceived their parents to provide more support and supervision at home than those whose children scored well on the test. We interpret this finding to indicate immigrant parents’ active effort to address and reverse their children’s poor achievement. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers

Saturday

Looking for more about NAGC?

Visit NAGC Central/Booth 809 in the Exhibit Hall NAGC staff and volunteers are on hand to provide you a link to resources and information at NAGC Central in booth 809.

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Pick up the 2010-2011 State of the States in Gifted Education

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Check out the latest releases and new books

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View toys that made the Parenting for High Potential 2011 Toy List.

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz

Poster Sessions t1PTUFSTBSFPOEJTQMBZJO the NAGC Learning Quarter (second floor) through Saturday, November 5. t1SFTFOUFSTXJMMCFBWBJMBCMF at the session time indicated to present and answer questions.


| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM SIGNATURE SERIES

SIGNATURE SERIES

Redefining Giftedness for a New Century: Shifting the Paradigm

2011 Early Leader Award: In Search of UnderIdentified Students: Considering more than Culture and Poverty

Kristie Speirs Neumeister, Ball State University, Muncie, IN; James Webb, Great Potential Press, Scottsdale, AZ; Laurence Coleman, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; James Gallagher, University of NC, Chapel Hill, NC; Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, Northwestern University, Evanston, Il In October 2008, Del Siegle, then President of NAGC, appointed a workgroup to update, define, and refine the generic terminology of gifted education and giftedness—no small undertaking. Over the following 18 months, this workgroup of 15 experienced persons developed a new definition of giftedness that was approved as a formal position paper by the NAGC Board of Directors in March 2010. In this session, discuss this redefinition and likely implications for the field of gifted and talented education. Learn the component parts of the definition and discuss their relevance for the field in terms of identifying, serving, and advocating for gifted learners. Audience: Administrators, Advocates, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Richard M. Cash, Educational Consulting, Bloomington, MN Of significant concern in the field of gifted education is the under identification of students from culturally, linguistically, and socio-economically diverse backgrounds. How do we open the doors to advanced programs to students who may not have demonstrated high levels of achievement in the general classroom? In many cases it has little to do with the students’ abilities and more to do with their lack of accumulated academic skills. These schoolhouse skills, also known as self-regulation, include the abilities to set goals, plan, organize, study, and monitor the self. This session will help you focus instruction on self-regulation tools, which can have a considerable impact on student achievement and ultimately on diverse student inclusion in gifted/advanced programs. Room: Marlborough B SIGNATURE SERIES

SIGNATURE SERIES

The New CogAT: An Ability Test for the 21st Century David Lohman, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA The newly released Form 7 of CogAT represents the most substantial revision of the test since the first edition was published in 1963. Eight years in the making, Form 7 was designed to measure the abilities of an increasingly diverse student population. The test is fully accessible to ELL children yet measures verbal and quantitative reasoning in addition to nonverbal reasoning. Other new features include: a short screening test, an online test, free practice materials, and new talent identification software and reports. The purpose of this session is to introduce the first 21st century-ability, group-administered ability test to the field.

2011 Distinguished Service Award: Get Involved Del Siegle, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 7PMVOUFFSTBSFUIFCBDLCPOFPGNPTUHJGUFEFEVDBUJPO organizations. Learn how you can become involved at a local, state, and national level to support the needs of gifted and talented students. We will also share tips for being a more welcomed and effective volunteer. Nothing happens without volunteers. As Woody Allen once said, “Showing up is eighty percent of life.

Saturday

Room: Grand Salon 19

Room: Marlborough A

Audience: Advocates, Coordinators, Counselors, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 16

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM ARTS

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

2.4 No Sewing Required: Quilts in the Fabric of Curriculum

7.1 The Paradoxical Effects Of Praise, Criticism, and No-Feedback for Underachieving Gifted Children

Suzanne McPherson, Van Buren School District, Van Buren, AR Far beyond coloring blocks for a classroom quilt, try out activities surrounding quilts of yesterday and today that substantially teach art concepts and connect the aesthetics and heritage of this art form in the fields of literacy (with questions for over 35 children/teen books), math, social studies (including primary source investigations, multiculturalism, and quilts as political statements), and careers. The activities incorporate both creative thinking and creative production with reasoning. Learn how anyone could include quilts in a variety of units. Numerous resources and plans are included that are aligned with the Common Core and NAGC Standards.

Jungsun Kim, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN This session focuses on motivational issues associated with underachieving gifted students. Drawing on the works of Dweck, Meyer, and Kohn techniques discussed include using praise, criticism, and not providing feedback. Praise does not always motivate children, nor does criticism always discourage children. Underachieving gifted children have different cognitive/motivational factors than general students, which cause them to respond differently to feedback. The paradoxical effects of these feedback types are illustrated with video clips and samples from research questionnaires. Audience members have the opportunity to practice feedback before applying the motivation theory with their children.

Audience: Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 ARTS

4.1 Podcasts and Presentations Using Digital Media

Saturday

Christy West, St. Tammany Parish School Board, Covington, LA Learn to create a portable recording studio in a classroom. The project started in a Talented Music classroom and spread to the school through a club that took over producing, sound design, editing, and recording of events around the school. Hear successes and challenges with others interested in creating a portable recording studio in their own classroom. Equipment is provided to have a hands-on experience. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-8

Audience: Consultants, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

21st Century Skills for Gifted Learners: Responsibility, Persistence, Collaboration, and Resilience Carolyn Coil, Pieces of Learning, Marion, IL Explore societal mindsets that discourage achievement and encourage gifted students to slide by in school, underachieving because they put forth minimal effort and work. In this session, learn practical, proven strategies to motivate, encourage, and help your gifted students develop the 21st century skills of responsibility, persistence, collaboration and resilience. Assist them in becoming more responsible for their own learning, accepting academic challenges, learning from failure, being persistent when working toward a goal, collaborating with others, and developing resilience when experiencing times of stress and disappointment. These strategies focus on both the academic and social-emotional needs of gifted children. Audience: Administrators,Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Versailles Ballroom

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

CREATIVITY

CREATIVITY

Fabulous Failures! Welcoming the 4Cs Into the 21 Century Classroom

Off the Charts Creativity for the Gifted Howard Fuchs, Hunter College, New York, NY

Erika Crumley, Anchorage School District, Anchorage, AK In this interactive, hands-on session, attendees use duct tape, mousetraps, Habits of Mind, and more to motivate the most stubborn underachiever while infusing the 4Cs (critical thinking and problem solving, communication, collaboration, and creativity) into the curriculum. Learn ready-to-apply initiatives that place students in control of their own ROWE (results only work environment). Create opportunities for students to fail with flair. Practice implementing easy to use, inexpensive tools and techniques with which to lead students through insightful debriefing sessions and to evaluate their mindset. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Do your gifted students forget basic academic facts because their minds are delving into more complex matters? This research-supported session addresses the use of creativity, critical-thinking skills, and DADA art to enable students to learn and retain basic mathematical facts and skills. While the methodology created by the presenter is applicable to other disciplines, examine mathematical operations with fractions, polynomials, and radicals. As a recent visiting delegation of Korean teachers and administrators to the Hunter College Gifted Center demonstrated, this session has international appeal and application. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 4

Room: Newberry CREATIVITY

9.2 Creative & Critical-Thinking Skills From Our Brains To Yours! Caroline Winfield, Pam Bayless, Richardson Independent School District, Richardson, TX Come join the Brain Ladies from Richardson ISD as they show you fun and creative ideas to implement with all students to promote creative and critical-thinking skills. Activities are literature based and can be used in K-2 classrooms yet easily adapted for older students. This is a hands-on workshop; have fun while learning how to use the ideas presented as soon as you return to your classroom. Walk away with book titles and a plethora of activities that will keep your students engaged and wanting more! Audience: Parents, Classroom Teachers K-5

Using The Creative Constructs of the Ttct to Stimulate Creativity in Core Content Lessons Gae Anderson-Miller, Edinboro University, Erie, PA; John Kauffman, Scholastic Testing Services, Bensenville, IL In this workshop, participants will learn how the ever popular, most used Worldwide, creativity assessment (Torrance Test of Creative Thinking) is formulated using 18 separate Creative Constructs. Attendees learn to recognize each of the Constructs and practice how to embed their characteristics into core content classroom activities. Each participant receives a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Creative Constructs in the Content Areas Handbook,â&#x20AC;? filled with core lessons in math, science, and reading that have been adapted to include applied constructs in creativity. Come and experience how to translate the Creative Constructs so that you can orchestrate creative adaptations to your classroom core content.

Saturday

CREATIVITY

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Rosedown

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM CURRICULUM STUDIES

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Rules, Schmules: How Effective Classroom Management Benefits the Gifted Learner

Thinking Critically About Effective Curriculum and Instruction For Mathematically Talented Elementary Students

Lisa Van Gemert, Mensa, Arlington, TX This presentation explores ten things you can put into practice on Monday that will change the way you teach and the way kids in your classroom learn forever. Learn how something as simple as a right answer can be a powerful tool in mind expansion and growth. Explore what a plane crash in New Zealand has to teach about good teaching. Does running a classroom well mean being boring, staid, and uninteresting? Quite the opposite! This presentation shows you how to free your studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; minds and potential through the true meaning of discipline. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Windsor

Janine Firmender, Tutita Casa, Katherine Gavin, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT This session explores components of effective curriculum and instruction for talented math students, such as promoting an in-depth conceptual understanding, providing engaging and challenging learning experiences, encouraging students to develop the skills of a practicing mathematician, and requiring students to think critically and creatively during in-depth mathematical investigations. Participants examine lessons from the Project MÂł: Mentoring Mathematical Minds units and think critically about how the curriculum components and instructional practices relate to the ways they are addressing the needs of their mathematically talented students. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-8

CURRICULUM STUDIES

10.4 Teaching Talented Writers

Saturday

Jill Olthouse, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV What are the common characteristics of young talented writers? How can writing talent and the motivation to write be supported in elementary, middle, and high school? This session combines a review of the research with interactive writing activities that nurture writing talent. Participants are encouraged to join in the writing exercises and share their work. Audience: Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Grand Salon 9 CURRICULUM STUDIES

Writing A Winning Curriculum: Guidelines For Curriculum Studies Competition Christine Briggs, Sally Dobyns, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA; Eric L. Mann, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Carol Ann Williams, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona, NJ Educators use curriculum every day to guide their teaching and provide challenge for their students. The Curriculum Studies Network seeks to honor authors of high quality, challenging, differentiated curriculum designed to meet the diverse learning needs of gifted students. This session outlines the rules and requirements for the Curriculum Studies Network annual competition. Participants learn how to submit a unit, the timeline for the review process, and the assessment rubrics. If you have a unit you would like to submit, this session provides the information you need. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Melrose

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CURRICULUM STUDIES

CURRICULUM STUDIES

The Return Of A Legend: (Hu)Mans, A Course Of Study

From The Lorax To Farenheit 451: A Study Of Utopian/Dystopian Societies

Stacey Lindbergh, Palmetto Scholars Academy, Charleston, SC

Rebecca Gallagher, Ricks Center for Gifted Children, Denver, CO

What makes human beings human? How did they get that way? How can they become more so? These questions frame Jerome Bruner’s seminal curriculum Man: A Course of Study. MACOS brought Bruner’s theories to life in an elegantly constructed year-long inquiry-based conceptcentered investigation of people and animals. Most of the MACOS materials are now available online, providing invaluable classroom resources, as well as models of curriculum design and professional development. Hear the fascinating, controversial history of this curriculum, an overview of the materials, and a discussion of the alignment with gifted education and current educational objectives. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-8

Many classical novels focus on the concept of utopian or dystopian societies. A Brave New World, The Giver, Lord of the Flies, and Farenheit 451 are just a few of these beloved books. Even Dr. Seuss brought us many. And more current novels, The Uglies, for example, touch on the topics of what makes a utopian society. The concepts of equality, justice, and fairness are touchstones in the lives of gifted adolescents. This presentation focuses on the benefits of studying utopian/ dystopian societies with gifted middle school students, including activities that go beyond the novel studies. Audience: Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-8 Room: Prince of Wales CURRICULUM STUDIES

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Blowing the Dust Off Of History: Bringing Social Studies Alive For All the Senses Laura Compton, Circe Bridges, Zachary Community School District, Baton Rouge, LA Just because history is in the past does not mean lessons have to be dry and dusty! Learn how social studies can be the most exciting part of the day for your students. Presenters exhibit lessons ranging from Aztecs to the American Revolution, incorporating elements for all the senses. Students will be able to create art, sample foods, dance, and have tea with the British. Learning history through art, drama, food, and simulations is guaranteed to open your students’ eyes to the world around them. Detailed handouts and access to online documents are available. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5, Classroom Teachers 6-8, Classroom Teachers 9-12 Room: Grand Salon 10

Connecting Gifted Curriculum to Content Standards Using Current Brain Research Approach Carol Whitney, Olentangy Local Schools, Lewis Center, OH; Barbara Cockroft, Walsh University, North Canton, OH; Richard Whitney, Licking Memorial Hospital, Newark, OH Gifted curriculum becomes substantive today when engrained into the curriculum standards of the state. This session empowers the teacher/administrator to act upon the standards, benchmarks and targets of a state curriculum while keeping in mind current brain research. Too often our gifted programs are criticized for offering a “fluff” curriculum and become the first to be cut when there are local funding failures. This session clearly defines how to avoid these criticisms by making the gifted curriculum the accelerated standard. How do we know it’s working? Formative and summative assessments prove growth in a typical gifted class.

Saturday

Room: Grand Salon 15

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Cambridge

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM CURRICULUM STUDIES

EARLY CHILDHOOD

13.3 Harry, Katniss, And Percy: Learning Critical Reading Skills Through Popular Literature

Developing Thinking Skills in Young Children: Research-Based Strategies from Psychology and Neuroscience

Paula Christensen, Northwestern State University of Louisiana, Natchitoches, LA

Pamela Clinkenbeard, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, Whitewater, WI; Nancy Robinson, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Gifted students should have a curriculum based on their unique learning needs and interests. Using popular literature in which gifted students indicate an interest, they can learn critical reading skills that will aid them in dealing with social justice issues. Critical reading means going beyond the story elements. This presentation provides a differentiated curriculum for gifted students based on the use of popular literature to learn critical reading skills, specifically social justice issues. Audience: Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-12 EARLY CHILDHOOD

To Infinity And Beyond: Challenging Highly Able Primary Mathematics Students Debra Myers, Wendy Ingalls, Baltimore County Public Schools, Towson, MD

Saturday

How do you challenge a first grader who understands the infinite nature of numbers? What do you do with a second grade student who can draw and describe equivalent fractions? This presentation addresses the need to differentiate the mathematics program for primary students utilizing instructional practices and curriculum approaches that are responsive to the needs of high-ability learners. Teachers discover how to meet the unique needs of this age group with strategies that encompass problem solving, critical thinking, questioning, and attention to individual learning preferences and interests. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-5 Room: Belle Chasse

What does new research have to tell us about the development of young childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thinking? Neuroscientists and psychologists are moving outside of their labs and are testing curriculum strategies with preschoolers and primary students. Current research examines the plasticity of thinking skills: how parents and teachers can foster young childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s early neural functioning, including outcomes such as selective attention, working memory, self-regulation, and language. Session participants receive an overview of recent research, learn some specific research-based curriculum methods and parent strategies, and discuss how to motivate and nurture gifted thinking skills in young children. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5 Room: Jasperwood EARLY CHILDHOOD

14.4 Self-regulated learning abilities, learning styles, and perceived giftedness in Korean children K-6 Woo-kyung Lee, Gangdong Elementary School; Ji Ae Lee, Moo-kwang Kim, Pusan Nationa University, Pusan, South Korea Through the elementary school age giftedness can be identified and developed. Teachers should provide appropriate learning activities for students and assist them according to their learning styles to raise motivation, creativity, and potential of young learners. The purposes of this study are to examine self-regulated learning abilities, learning styles, and perceived giftedness of children in elementary schools and to explore the relationship between learning styles, perceived giftedness, and self-regulated learning abilities in order to collect useful informations about characteristics of elementary school children in Korea. Audience: Classroom Teachers K-5

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In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

GLOBAL AWARENESS

PARENT AND COMMUNITY

Connecting Gifted Students to the Global and Local Community

Underachievement Among Gifted Black Students: Update, Issues, and Recommendations

Deborah Holt, Long Beach School District, Long Beach, MS

Recorded Session

Donna Ford, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN

Audience: Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Trafalgar MIDDLE GRADES

18.1 Accepting the Challenge: Supporting, Measuring, and Reporting Academic Growth in Advanced Middle School Students Gail Hubbard, Joan Brownlee, Prince William County Public Schools, Manassas, VA How do you support, measure, and report academic growth in advanced learners to increase the success of those learners in the 21st century? One school system began by establishing a limited number of discipline-specific outcomes as well as outcomes based upon interdisciplinary conceptual understanding. Once these outcomes were aligned K-12, committees revised curriculum, refined progress reports, and modified service plans. The greatest challenge became supporting, measuring, and reporting academic growth of diverse middle school advanced learners. Participants have access to the tools used to overcome that challenge and foster academic growth in middle school learners. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-8

Underachievement is a perplexing issue in general but can be even more baffling when students are gifted. Nonetheless, underachievement among gifted students is a serious concern for parents/families, educators, and administrators, all of whom are concerned about how best to understand and reverse underachievement among gifted Black and Hispanic students. This session presents an overview and update to underachievement, with stress on the achievement gap. Issues, barriers, and recommendations are provided for families/parents and others interested in this national problem. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Elmwood PARENT AND COMMUNITY

Dreaming With Your Eyes Open: Engaging Gifted Parents and Children Outside of the School Day Jason McIntosh, Avondale School District, Avondale, AZ In the age of cluster grouping and decreasing funding for gifted education, it is more important than ever to find creative and economical ways to get gifted students and their parents together outside of the school day. Participants receive step-by-step instructions for implementing three creative strategies for engaging and supporting gifted parents and their children. These strategies include creating a mini-TED conference using volunteers in your community, cheaply building life-size board games, and holding a gifted parent institute for just the cost of your time and a little paper.

Saturday

Connecting gifted students with their local and global communities meets 21st century skills of global awareness and civic literacy, as well as many NAGC program standards. This presentation provides a clear understanding of how to encourage gifted students to collaborate, use computer skills, and utilize cross-cultural communication while giving students the opportunity to gain a greater appreciation of diversity and tolerance of other cultures, as well as a realization that they can make a difference in their local community.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 22

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM PARENT AND COMMUNITY

PARENT AND COMMUNITY

18.4 Democracy In Action: A Community Drop Out Project

High-Achieving Millennial Males and their Fathers

Barbara Romey, Elizabeth Romey, Phenix City Schools, Phenix City, AL

Tom Hébert, University of Georgia, Athens, GA

The Community Drop Out Project combines the skills of university and foundation professionals and high school researchers to develop an action plan that will answer one of the questions identified about why students drop out of school. The high school students host a community forum and gather the data that is collected during the meeting. Then, in conjunction with their sponsors both in the civic and academic community, they implement a plan of action to reduce the number of drop outs in their community. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 9-12

Fathers of gifted males play an important role in shaping the motivation and achievement of their sons. This is especially true with the millennial generation, given their unique characteristics and experiences. This session presents a study of 10 high achieving young men and their fathers. The study examines the powerful influence of fathers in developing the talents of their sons. Significant themes across the father-son relationships highlighting successful parenting practices are presented. Implications for parents hoping to better support the intellectual and emotional development of their sons are discussed. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

PARENT AND COMMUNITY

Academic Acceleration: Resources for Identification, Policy, and Advocacy

Room: Fountain PARENT AND COMMUNITY

Saturday

Maureen Marron, Susan Assouline, Nick Colangelo, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

Accepted On Condition: What Perfectionism Is, and How to Help

Academic acceleration is an educational intervention that tailors the complexity and pace of the educational curriculum to an individual student’s rate of learning. Despite the effectiveness of acceleration in providing appropriate academic challenge, some schools are reluctant to accelerate students. Attendees receive suggestions for discussing acceleration as an option, and learn about strategies and resources to use when advocating for changes to grade-based and contentbased acceleration polices and practice at their school. Advocacy tips are rooted in the recommendations of the NAGC Advocacy Toolkit but adapted specifically for acceleration.

Thomas Greenspon, Minneapolis, MN

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Parents

Perfectionism can sap emotional energy, cause difficulties in relationships, and interfere with performance. It is not about pushing one’s limits or pursuing excellence; its about the desire to be perfect, the fear of being imperfect, and the emotional conviction that personal acceptability requires a struggle to meet certain conditions. Mistakes are signs of personal defects that threaten acceptance. Although perfectionism is not a part of giftedness, gifted kids can be vulnerable in certain ways. Find out what perfectionism is, where it comes from, and how to encourage excellence without seeming to require perfection. Audience: Administrators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Napoleon Ballroom Room: Chequers

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PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

22.1 Asset Mapping for Gifted Education

A 3-Tiered Comprehensive Approach to Providing Online Training and Certification to Gifted Teachers

Dana Seymour, Mississippi University for Women, Columbus, MS As stakeholders in gifted education, it’s easy to get discouraged; in the face of budget woes and public apathy, it can be difficult to provide gifted students with the high quality educational opportunities they need and deserve. What to do? In this session, look at the community-organizing movement for inspiration. Rather than focusing on deficits, learn to systematically plumb the assets around you, identify resources in your surroundings, and implement and sustain initiatives that support and engage gifted students. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Christine Weber, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL; Lauri Kirsch, Hillsborough County Public Schools, Tampa, FL How can a plan for a statewide teacher training system in gifted education take advantage of the new technologies that are available? This session presents an overview of a 3 tiered comprehensive approach used in Florida that provides online training and certification to teachers at the state level, through the Working on Gifted Issues Project, at school district levels that build on Florida State Training Modules for local relevance, and at university levels that can be incorporated into a graduate Master’s Degree with a specialization in Gifted Education. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators Room: Grand Salon 24

COMBINED SESSION Zoom-A Perspective of Gifted Education in the Classroom

Using data to design differentiated professional development: A fidelity approach

Sonya Porcher, Pro Education Services, Hoschton, GA

Catherine Brighton, Tonya Moon, Christine Trinter, Associate Professor, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

What are the sights and sounds of a gifted classroom? General teaching behaviors and differentiated teaching behaviors are highlighted from observations made of various gifted classrooms at the elementary, middle and high school level. Evaluation procedures for examining the gifted education program in the resource, Advanced Placement, and collaborative classroom are shared to assist in determining effective ways to address the learning needs of all gifted learners. Program coordinators, administrators, and K-12 teachers receive examples of tools and strategies used to reflect upon teaching practices and student engagement in order to increase academic performance.

Teacher professional development is instrumental to improving student achievement. The Teaching Commission reports that teachers must recognize the diverse student population and be able to effectively address their various special needs. Similarly, professional developers must recognize the diverse teacher population and respond to their various unique needs. This session presents a fidelity tool that measures how teachers enact specific curricula in reading, math, and science that allows for identification of patterns of teachers’ needs. Also discuss how the tool can be modified for use in other contexts to differentiate other kinds of professional development.

Audience: Administrators, Counselors, Classroom Teacher K-12

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers

Saturday

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Room: Grand Salon 18

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

23.2 Passion: The Fuel of Achievement

Teachers Reflect: How Does Interaction with Exemplary Curriculum Change Teachers’ Perceptions of Planning and Teaching?

Janine Caffrey, New York City Department of Education, New York, NY Passion for learning has been nearly eliminated in our nation’s schools. It seems that we have forgotten how passion fuels a child’s desire to achieve, in favor of teaching everyone to pass minimal skills tests. This trend has been particularly harmful to gifted children, who are systematically muted and crushed in our race to mediocrity. Learn how to bring passion back into the classroom so that all children can develop their gifts. Learn how simple changes in school structures and practices can result in nurturing the brilliance in all students and liberate gifted students to truly reach their full potential. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Connections: Preparing for the Next 25 Years in Gifted Education

Saturday

George Betts, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO; Blanche Kapushion, Jefferson County Public Schools, Golden, CO What if a new approach to gifted education were to be formed by educators, administrators, and parents with students as the central focus and as the leaders of this new programming? The result would be a collaborative approach with gifted learners as active participants in helping to determine and direct their learning. Modules of a learner-centered approach include definitions, formal and informal identification, RtI, appropriate placement, programming, and assessment. Begin to apply this model in your schools as soon as you return home. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 13

Wendy Leader, Mesa County Valley School District 51, Grand Junction, CO; Amy Azano, Carolyn Callahan, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA Teachers who serve gifted youth should be qualified to do so, according to the 2010 NAGC PreK-12 Gifted Programming Standards. Due to budget constraints, professional development in gifted education practices may be more than some school districts can support. Teachers in a curriculum implementation study through the National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented reflected on their attitudes, beliefs, and practices after teaching the curriculum and after a full-day workshop with researchers. They saw changes in their own teaching practice, the way they plan, and what they believe constitutes good curriculum for gifted students. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5 Room: Grand Salon 3 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Teacher Training: Effective Methods for Confronting Bullying and Keeping Gifted Students Safe Liz Albert, Andrew Moss, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD Even with national attention on preventing bullying, incidents continue. Gifted students are especially vulnerable to bullying because their intellects make them stand out in classroom and social settings, and they are not immune to becoming bullies themselves. This session centers on Zero Indifference, an approach that empowers teachers and students to intervene before conduct escalates into bullying. It provides intervention techniques to address conduct both in and outside the classroom, including cyberspace. Using tested scenarios, participants learn to recognize and confront mild and extreme situations and leave with training materials to help them successfully implement these strategies. Audience: Administrators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Oak Alley

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

Assessing The Creative Process: Development And Evaluation Of The Creative Process Questionnaire

Gifted Students’ Most Positive Experiences: Applying A Core Virtues Framework From Positive Psychology

Elizabeth Fairweather, South Walton High School, Destin, FL

Jean Sunde Peterson, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

This session focuses on a research study aimed at developing and evaluating an instrument for assessing adolescents’ levels of engagement in each of the stages of the creative process. The Creative Process Questionnaire, which is based on Wallas’ four stage model of the creative process and on contemporary creative process models, is a self-report, Likert-style questionnaire. Analysis of the data indicates that the CPQ is a promising instrument for assessing the creative process among adolescents. Reliability and validity evidence is shared during the presentation; the presenter discusses the implications of the results.

In a qualitative study, gifted high school graduates were asked to reflect on their most positive K-12 experiences. Themes in their language overlapped themes in the language of nonmainstream cultures in another study, with an emphasis on arts as expression, service, wisdom, humility, hard work, non-bookish learning, and family. Positive experiences provided balance to stressors related to academics and activities and were related to connection, contribution, meaning, mastery, satisfaction, and self-care. Core virtues from positive psychology, including transcendence, were reflected in students’ narrative descriptions. Findings call attention to a multitude of possibilities for future research and directions for programming.

Audience: Coordinators, Researchers Room: Eglinton and Winton

Audience: Administrators,Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Grand Salon 21

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

An External Evaluation Of The Schoolwide Enrichment Model: What Do Students And Teachers Think? Isabelle Crowder; Melissa Freeman; Katherine Brown, Judia Jackson Harris Elementary Charter School, Athens, GA When Synergy Professional Development Elementary School, opened in the fall of 2009, serving the largest percentage of Latino students and students eligible for free and reduced lunch in the district, the expectations for results were high. Among some of the instructional considerations implemented was the Schoolwide Enrichment Model. This presentation is a discussion of findings from an external evaluation conducted during the school’s first year. These evaluation results contribute to the existing body of research on SEM, and are further useful to other schools interested in implementing this model. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-8

Assessment Of An Online Gate Certification Program: Successes And Areas Of Improvement Jessica Cannaday, Azusa Pacific University, Running Springs, CA In a 2006 doctoral study, the researcher looked at teacher perceptions in regards to endorsement and certification needs in one school district. It was determined that teachers believed strongly in alternative certification options, including online university coursework, as well as in-house professional development. In response to this finding, the researcher has created and implemented a fully online GATE certification and master’s degree program at the researcher’s institution and surveyed participants regarding the efficacy, successes, and areas for improvement of such an endeavor. This study looks at teacher participant perceptions of the program and suggestions for further implementation. Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Researchers

Saturday

COMBINED SESSION

Room: Magnolia

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM RESEARCH & EVALUATION

SPECIAL POPULATIONS

25.3 Gender Differences In Cognitive Abilities Among The Intellectually Talented For The Last 30 Years

26.4 Cinematherapy, Aspergerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, and Meeting Social and Emotional Needs For Students and Parents

Jonathan Wai, Megan Cacchio, Matthew Makel, Martha Putallaz, Duke University Talent Identification Program, Durham, NC

Leighann Pennington, TVT Community Day School, Irvine, CA

One factor in the discussion surrounding male-female representation in STEM has been intellectually talented male-female math ability differences. Using a sample of over 1.7 million SAT, ACT, and EXPLORE scores, malefemale ability differences between 1981-2010 were examined, introducing a male-female difference that has not been previously discussedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;science reasoning. The male-female math ratio has declined, but now appears fairly stable and we seek to explore some unresolved questions surrounding this important issue. What were the reasons for the rapid decline and will these differences continue? What does this mean in the context of other important factors? Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 RESEARCH & EVALUATION

Saturday

Schizophrenia and Creativity: A Meta-Analytic Review Selcuk Acar, Nur Cayirdag, Noparat Sricharoen, University of Georgia, Athens, GA Both empirical studies and eminent lives seem to support the so-called mad-genius hypothesis that proposes that exceptional creativity is related to psychopathology. Suicide, depression, addiction and other unfortunate life experiences have been documented in eminent lives; however, some researchers have regarded that as a misconception or myth. Taking a more objective perspective than other review studies, a metaanalytic review of the empirical studies would help to resolve the controversy. Following an initial meta-analysis of the relationship between creativity and psychoticism, this study aimed to examine the relationship between creativity and schizophrenia, which was considered as the most extreme form of psychoticism.

You can use cinematherapy or a variation of this method as a springboard for discussion among students, UFBDIFST PSQBSFOUHSPVQT7JFXDMJQTGSPNNPWJFTBOE 57TIPXTUIBUJODMVEFDIBSBDUFSTXJUI"TQFSHFSTXIP are portrayed in an accurate, sensitive manner. Learn background information on this method, helpful tips, and discussion guides about three distinct ways to use cinematherapy: raise awareness among parents, students, or teachers about Aspergerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s syndrome and giftedness; alleviate social and emotional needs of students as they relate to the characters; and support parents through sharing examples from the show Parenthood. Audience: Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 SPECIAL POPULATIONS

From Assessment to Instruction: Application of the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Tests Jack Naglieri, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA; Dina Brulles, Paradise Valley Unified School District, Peoria, AZ; Kimberly Lansdowne, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ 5IF/BHMJFSJ/PO7FSCBM"CJMJUZ5FTUJTBOPOWFSCBMNFBTVSF of general ability that does not rely on language, yet predicts scholastic success. Learn what the NNAT2 measures and how to use it for GT identification. Establishing that students identified on nonverbal instruments possess innate ability underscores the process. The NNAT2 research and ways to use the scores for programming, classroom instruction, and training are discussed. Additionally, discuss how school administrators and teachers of the gifted, especially gifted minority children, can use the NNAT to identify more minority children and improve academic performance for all students. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-8

Audience: Researchers Room: Grand Salon 12 Room: Grand Salon 6

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SPECIAL POPULATIONS

SPECIAL SCHOOLS AND PROGRAMS

The Twice-Exceptional Learner: What Have We Learned and What Is Next?

30.3 Summer Enrichment For Gifted Learners

Lois Baldwin, Tarrytown, NY; Susan Baum, Bridges Academy, Storrs, CT

Carol Carter, Lisa Perrault, Wanda Smith, University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK

Many changes have occurred in our theoretical and practical understanding of the twice-exceptional student since approximately 30 years ago when a federal grant established the first programs for students who were referred to as gifted/handicapped. We now refer to those same gifted students who have learning and behavioral issues as twice-exceptional. A great deal of research has been conducted and a variety of programs and schools has been developed. The presenters discuss current research and various successful programming options. There is also a discussion of future needs and directions.

See how this summer enrichment program meets both the social and academic needs of the gifted learner. Meet students’ needs by providing activities that teach both partner and team-building skills. Older students may plan a virtual vacation or go fishing while younger students may learn to be a cowboy or perform in a student-created circus. Academics are exciting as students discover the cultures of East Asia or Africa, learn the anatomy of pigs through hands-on dissection, or taste delicious creations from the kitchen while learning about chemistry.

Room: Jefferson Ballroom SPECIAL POPULATIONS

29.2 One Valedictorian’s Freshman Year in Engineering School Carol Graham, Johns Creek High School, Johns Creek, GA Though research in the field of gifted females in STEM reveals much yet to be accomplished, there is much to celebrate! If we are to prepare our gifted females for the remaining frontier of inaccessible domains, we must be equipped with sound advice and research findings of programs that have worked. The case study of one gifted female valedictorian’s first year of engineering school provides teachers, parents, and administrators a cautionary tale informing program implementation. More importantly, Elyse’s story provides young women who come after her with a visual reminder that they can also achieve success in engineering school.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-8 SPECIAL SCHOOLS AND PROGRAMS

33.1 The Mentoring Program for Mathematically Gifted Students Mangoo Park, Shin Ho Jang, Wan Kang, Jae-Young Kim, Kapsu Kim, Chi-Soon Kwon, Seoul National University of Education, Seoul, South Korea This presentation investigates the mentoring system for mathematically gifted students in Korea. One of the important aspects of gifted education is educating identified gifted students. A mentoring program along with whole-group instruction can be a supplementary approach to help gifted students develop their mathematical potential at their own pace and level. The presenters address the mentoring program of a gifted institution funded from the Ministry of Education in Seoul, Korea. Participants have an opportunity to share ideas on how mentoring programs can contribute to gifted education.

Saturday

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-5

Audience: Administrators, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

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| Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions Saturday, November 5, 2011 | 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM SPECIAL SCHOOLS AND PROGRAMS

STEM

GT@UT: A Summer Program Kickin’ It Up a Notch

35.2 Networked Learning for the Net Generation

Kimberly Berman, Findlay City School District, Findlay, OH; Robert Schultz, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH

Carl Heine, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy, Aurora, IL

The future promises to challenge the knowledge and abilities of leaders, scientists, and creators. As a society, we need to provide our best and brightest learners the opportunity and experience to grow into these positions of tomorrow. The University of Toledo’s GT@UT program is designed to give our kids the skills to challenge their thinking, add to their knowledge, increase their awareness of self and others, give them time to experience the atmosphere of a university, and just plain have fun. Join in the discussion during our interactive session kickin’ it up a notch for gifted and talented kids.

Online collaboration platforms provide today’s Net Gen learners with dynamic, new ways to engage in STEM learning. This session explores online problem-based projects designed for networked learning: how they are created, facilitated and developed using CoolHub.IMSA, a free collaborative innovation platform. Projects reveal how STEM teaching and learning are transformed using interactive resources and the power of online networking. Applications include easy ways to connect classrooms around the world, link students to mentors for inquiry learning and bring experts into classrooms using Internet video and Web 2.0 tools.

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Room: Grand Salon 7

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

Crescent City Celebration Creativity and all that Jazz Mardi Gras World, located on the banks of the Mississippi River and less than a mile from the Hilton (bus transportation will be provided), will be the backdrop for our NAGC Convention Saturday evening events that include the E. Paul Torrance Creativity Keynote with Michele and Robert RootBernstein and Taste of Louisiana Reception. Enjoy strolling through the actual sculpture and prop studios where artists and crews create world famous icons of Mardi Gras, from mega-floats with fiber optic lighting to breathtaking giant figures. From there you’ll be transported back in time to New Orleans’ only indoor antebellum mansion replica complete with brick walkways, moss-draped oaks, a starry night sky, and winding waterway. This is an once-in-a-lifetime evening for NAGC attendees!

2011 E. Paul Torrance Creativity Session

Thanks to Scholastic Testing Service for their support

5:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Robert and Michele RootBernstein, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI

The Taste of Louisiana Reception is sponsored in part by

Join us for a playful, handson exploration of the imaginative thinking tools necessary to creating. Building on their work in Sparks of Genius, the Root-Bernsteins share compelling stories of creative people and draw us into re-creating for ourselves their imaginative skills and strategies. Heighten observation, form patterns, think with body and play your way to an understanding of creative imagination across the arts and sciences.

Buses begin to depart the Hilton New Orleans Riverside at 4:00 pm. Buses load right outside NAGC registration on the street level. To board the bus you must have your Convention name badge. Last bus will return to the Hilton from Mardi Gras World at 8:00 pm.

Saturday

CREATING

U

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| Closing General Session Sunday, November 6, 2011 | 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM

George Rodrigue: The Blue Dog Artist at Work Seems simple, doesn’t it? It is a painting of a dog that just happens to be blue. But what we may not see on first glance is the creative process and the contextual references that the artist brings to the canvas. Creative juices will be flowing when you join us for this unique closing general session. Louisiana’s Artist Laureate George Rodrigue will create a new blue dog artwork as his wife, Wendy, provides insight into his career and the rich process that goes into each new piece of artwork. Listen to his story as he turns a blank canvas into something captivating. You’ll be front and center, taking part in his creative process.

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ABOUT GEORGE RODRIGUE Born and raised in New Iberia, Louisiana, the heart of Cajun country, Rodrigue’s work remains rooted in the familiar milieu of home. He discovered his love of art at age eight, when his mother gave him his first paint by number set to relieve his boredom the summer he was bedridden with polio. Later Rodrigue studied art at the University of Southwest Louisiana in Lafayette, followed by the Art Center College of Design in Los Angeles, where the graduate school’s curriculum provided him a nuts-and-bolts foundation in drawing and painting. Rodrigue developed his unique style when he returned to Louisiana. From the beginning, he graphically interpreted Louisiana with hopes of preserving the fading Cajun culture. It was a Cajun myth, the loup-garou, which inspired Rodrigue’s most famous series, the Blue Dog. The legend said nothing about the loup-garou’s color, but Rodrigue thought the night sky would cast a blue-

grey shade on its fur. Over time the image on his canvas became friendlier, with a brighter hue and increasingly abstract settings. No longer the loup-garou, the Blue Dog, as well as other series such as Bodies, Hurricanes, and Reflections continue to challenge Rodrigue artistically. In 2009 Rodrigue formed the George Rodrigue Foundation of the Arts (GRFA). In addition to providing financial assistance in the arts and other areas, GRFA plan, develops, and implements a series of unique educational art programs that are specially designed to enhance and expand art curriculums, despite continuing state and federal cutbacks. Like many talented individuals, he has shared his gifted with many worthwhile causes, but his primary focus is to expose children to education in the visual arts, hoping to inspire in others an early and on-going creative passion similar to his own.

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


| Sunday Highlights Sunday, November 6, 2011 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM 9:15 AM – 10:15 AM

Network Super Sessions We could call today “Super Sunday,” but in a football town like New Orleans, that could be dangerous! Convention attendees will want to rise and shine for the two sets of “Super Sessions” we have in store thanks to the NAGC Networks. Network leaders have culled some of the most current topics and provocative content for these morning sessions. 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM

George Rodrigue: The Blue Dog Artist at Work Louisiana’s Artist Laureate George Rodrigue will create a new blue dog artwork as his wife, Wendy, provides insight into his career and the rich process that goes into each new piece of artwork. Listen to his story as he turns a blank canvas into something captivating. You’ll be front and center, taking part in his creative process.

Schedule at a Glance 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Network Super Sessions 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

Network Super Sessions

Sunday

10:30AM – 12:00PM

Closing General Session George Rodrigue: The Blue Dog Artist at Work Napoleon Ballroom

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| Network Super Sessions Sunday, November 6, 2011 | 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM ARTS

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

Singing About Gifted Student Success: Collaborating With the Lyric Opera of Chicago

Can Gifted Education Avoid Contributing To Social Inequality?

Jason Helfer, Stephen Schroth, Knox College, Galesburg, IL

Jennifer Cross, Lori Bland, Kimberley Chandler, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Don Ambrose, Rider University, Lawrenceville, NJ; Nancy Robinson, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Engaging with the arts is a vital part of gifted children’s education. Funding issues have left many teachers and parents struggling to provide gifted children with arts education despite little outside support. Fortunately, a wealth of free and accessible resources exists that allow any teacher or parent to enrich gifted children with the arts through collaboration with arts organizations. This session focuses on educational materials developed by the Lyric Opera of Chicago that allow teachers and parents to work with gifted children to explore great musical works. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 4 COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

The Google Geek Squad: Rockin’ in the Free World Kristina Paul, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC; Brian Housand, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC

Sunday

Just as the music industry has evolved from classic rock on vinyl to indie rock on Pandora, Google has a similar evolutionary history. Once only a search engine, Google has now become the computer. Learn how to take advantage of some of the FREE tools and resources that Google has to offer. With an eye on practical application for increasing creativity and productivity in teachers and students, work your way from classic tools to more recent developments out of the Google lab. Participants leave with a playlist of free technologies that will rock their classroom! Administrators, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Belle Chasse

A panel of experts takes multiple perspectives in examining the current state of gifted education and the ways in which it contributes to social inequality, a phenomenon that has been called the most serious problem of the 21st century. In the ideal, this relationship is not a necessary aspect of gifted education. Many supporters of gifted education work strenuously to attain fair education goals. Others are more concerned with maximizing achievements of gifted students. Structurally, some efforts to provide gifted education will exacerbate the inequality in a community, regardless of positive intentions. Panelists propose future directions for the field. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Researchers Room: Grand Salon 6 COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

Self-Concept of Gifted Students: What Teachers and Counselors Should Know Sal Mendaglio, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada It is difficult to overstate the importance of self-concept in teachers’ and counselors’ work with students. While general knowledge of self-concept is useful when working with gifted students, it is not sufficient. There are factors unique to self-concept development for these students due to their giftedness. This session discusses three factors that influence gifted students’ self-concepts: being identified gifted, social coping strategies, and the “big fish little pond” effect. Factors are discussed and illustrated using counseling vignettes. Audience: Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Magnolia

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Poster Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

CREATIVITY

EARLY CHILDHOOD

Toward a Better Understanding of Creativity and Problem-Solving Styles of Talented Secondary School Students

Play-Based Assessment: Identifying Gifted Preschoolers

Billie Woodel, Ridgefield Public Schools, Ridgefield, CT; Marcia Delcourt, Western Connecticut State University, Danbury, CT What might be gleaned from relationships among creativethinking abilities and problem-solving styles of talented students? Profiles of over 100 high school athletes, science students, and visual artists were examined. Results indicated TJHOJmDBOUSFMBUJPOTIJQTCFUXFFOUIF55$57FSCBMXJUIUIF TTCT Figural. Little if any relationship was observed between creative thinking on either TTCT instrument and students QSPCMFNTPMWJOHTUZMFT BTNFBTVSFECZ7*&84PNFPCTFSWFE relationships differed by talent area. This session presents evidence for the psychometric qualities of these instruments across domains. It also highlights the value of individuality through the case studies of nine of these talented students.

Recorded Session

Ellen Honeck, Institute for the Development of Gifted Education, Denver, CO Small, smart, sensitive--we recognize the gifted child, but how do you identify giftedness or potential giftedness in our youngest learners? Is the identification of a young child meaningful? Our youngest learners need programming that matches their intellectual, social, emotional, physical, and aesthetic needs. Identifying these needs is challenging and often formal measures are intimidating to parents as they begin the journey of parenting a gifted child. Discover a playbased assessment model used successfully for more than 25 years. Learn more about an identification system that utilizes questionnaires, play-based activities and experiences and more to identify potential. Audience: Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-5

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers 9-12

Room: Marlborough B

Room: Jasperwood

GLOBAL AWARENESS

CURRICULUM STUDIES

Sharing A World Of 7 Billion: Lessons For Global Citizenship

Deborah Ruf, Educational Options, Golden Valley, MN Why do some children fit their school environment better than others? What steps can teachers take to maximize the social, emotional, and academic health of their students? Classroom teachers learn how to recognize student personality dimensions of introversion or extroversion, sensing or intuition, feeling or thinking, and judging or perceiving. Based on the MurphyMeisgeier Type Indicator for ChildrenÂŽ and Myers-Briggs Type IndicatorÂŽ for adults, the session shows how to design social and academic expectations and opportunities according to a childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personality. When gifted students are understood and allowed to go with their strengths, they are more likely to thrive.

Carole Mashburn, Hannan Magnet Academy, Columbus, GA World population will reach seven billion by the end of 2011, creating a powerful teachable moment for educators on global trends and their effect on individual lives. Discover innovative, interdisciplinary, hands-on activities to broaden studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; awareness about global interdependence, competition for finite resources, and the challenges ahead for creating sustainable, healthy societies. Engage in games, role-playing, and creative problem-solving activities to build studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; knowledge and skills in social studies, life sciences, and mathematics around a unifying theme. Free CD-ROM of activities.

Sunday

Using Personality Factors to Support the Social, Emotional, and Academic Health of Gifted Children

Audience: Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Grand Salon 7

Audience: Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Melrose

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| Network Super Sessions Sunday, November 6, 2011 | 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM MIDDLE GRADES

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

What’s New in Young Adult Literature: 2011 Edition

Using The 2010 NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Programming Standards In Professional Development

Bob Seney, Mississippi University for Women, Columbus, MS Young Adult literature is an often overlooked resource for advancing potential and addressing 21st century skills. Reading underlies all skills, so creative engagement in reading is crucial. YA literature is a highly appropriate, rich literary resource for hooking gifted students into productive and creative reading. This session builds a rationale for using YA literature with gifted learners and reviews new novels, emphasizing middle and high school works. Application to curriculum is addressed. A book list will be provided. “What’s New” is a Middle Grades tradition. Come and join the Book Jazz in this fun sharing of new books. Audience: Parents, Classroom Teachers 6-12 Room: Oak Alley

Susan Johnsen, Baylor University, Waco, TX; Todd Kettler, Coppell ISD, Coppell, TX; Wayne Lord, Augusta State University, Augusta, GA This session describes how to use the 2010 NAGC PreK-Grade 12 Gifted Programming Standards in ongoing professional development activities. Examples are provided that include tiered levels of district-sponsored workshops, independent studies, mentored activities, and university courses. Presenters also show ways of assessing the effectiveness of professional development by aligning the activities to student outcomes. These student outcomes include the students developing not only their talents and gifts but also socially and emotionally. Specific examples of assessments are provided. Time is allotted for discussing opportunities and challenges in implementing the programming standards.

PARENT & COMMUNITY

Help! I Want To Be Creative With My Children, But I Don’t Know How!

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Marlborough A

Gae Anderson-Miller, Edinboro University, Erie, PA RESEARCH & EVALUATION

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Come ready to be creatively energized during this fastpaced, hands-on workshop designed just for parents of bright children. Learn just how creativity is measured and complete a test to score your own levels of creativity. Practice some humorous activities that can be used to help parent/child communication at home. Each participant receives a “Creative Connections Handbook” filled with many ready-to-use mind benders and brain flexers to delight the curious youngsters at home. Audience: Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Grand Salon 9

Is Giftedness A Qualitative or Quantitative Construct? David Lohman, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; David Dai, State University of New York – Albany, Albany, NY; D. Betsy McCoach, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Tracy Cross, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA Is giftedness best viewed as a categorical or a continuous variable? Are gifted students quantitatively or qualitatively different from other students? How are these views of giftedness different and what implications do the two different viewpoints have for researchers and practitioners in the field of gifted education? What are the consequences (or implications) of

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

treating giftedness as a categorical rather than as a continuous variable? Our distinguished panel of scholars debates these and other issues during this thought-provoking session. Audience: Advocates, Coordinators, Researchers, Administrators Room: Elmwood SPECIAL POPULATIONS

The Schoolwide Cluster Grouping Model: Restructuring Gifted Education Services For The 21st Century Dina Brulles, Paradise Valley Unified School District, Peoria, AZ Schools today are experiencing dramatic changes in the ways they serve gifted students. Gifted programs that have prevailed for years are disappearing while the diverse populations schools serve are expanding. In response, an increasing number of schools are turning to the Schoolwide Cluster Grouping Model, an inclusive model that allows gifted-identified students to learn together all day, every day, with teachers that receive specialized training. Implementing the SCGM enfranchises underrepresented populations, yields desirable achievement outcomes for all students, yet requires no additional funding. The presenter provides an overview, discusses implementation, and demonstrates ways to support the cluster grouping model.

Poster Session

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

The Renzulli Academy: Creation of a School From the Bottom Up and the Outside In Ruth Lyons, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT In 2009, the Hartford Public School District opened The Renzulli Academy, a full-time school for gifted and talented students that offers a challenging gifted curriculum and a wide variety of enrichment opportunities for a population of students that are nationally underrepresented, urban minority students. In this session, learn about the process of starting a school/program and how to create a culture of opportunity for students in your district. Topics such as identification of high poverty, urban students, enrichment clusters, specialized curriculum options, the use of technology, grant writing, parent relationships, and staff support and collaboration are discussed. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Prince of Wales STEM

Without Geometry, Life Is Pointless or Paper Folding and Mathematically Talented Students

Room: Grand Salon 3

Paper folding benefits spatially mathematically talented students by exposing them to transformational geometry. It begins with using hands and motion to understand something intellectually as well as tactilely. Inherent in all square or circular paper folding is the wonderful world of geometry including correct geometric vocabulary. Participants leave with several models in hand to enrich and challenge the mathematically talented student. Come prepared to be challenged and be sure to bring your sense of humor. Audience: Consultants, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

Sunday

Rachel McAnallen, Zoid and Company, Storrs, CT Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-8

Room: Rosedown

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| Network Super Sessions Sunday, November 6, 2011 | 9:15 AM – 10:15 AM ARTS

CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

Making the Arts Come Alive: Incorporating The Arts Across The Curriculum

Gifted Education Is Fractured, Porous, and Contested: What Should We Do About It?

Stephen Schroth, Diana Beck, Jason Helfer, Jordan Lanfair, Melvin Taylor, Knox College, Galesburg, IL

Joyce VanTassel-Baska, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Laurence Coleman, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Tracy Cross, The College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Don Ambrose, Rider University, Lawrenceville, NJ; James Gallagher, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC

Teachers and parents of gifted children naturally focus a great deal on English/language arts, mathematics, social studies, and science instruction. The arts--visual art, music, dance, and theatre can be used to augment and enrich all of these areas. This session focuses on practical and easy ways to incorporate the arts into every content area. A variety of free resources, including lesson plans, online resources, BOEJOTUSVDUJPOBMTUSBUFHJFTTVDIBT7JTVBM5IJOLJOH Strategies, Auditory Thinking Strategies, and access to a community of like-minded collaborators are shared. Audience: Administrators, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 4 COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY

Jamming With Problem-Based Learning and Technology Kathy Jones, Kathy Ray, Advocates for High Ability Learners, Shawnee, KS; Ginger Lewman, ESSDACK, Emporia, KS

Sunday

Students are sometimes assigned projects but they are generally a culminating activity. In problem-based learning the problem directs the learner to uncover or discover answers to driving questions. Like jazz musicians, PBL participants interact with a spontaneity and vitality of production in which improvisation plays a role and mirrors the individuality of the performers while developing technology expertise that drives them toward solutions. This session provides a framework and some excellent technology-rich web 2.0 examples of PBL. Resources are provided to connect with others and help to feel comfortable implementing PBL. Audience: Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

Recently, a group of scholars determined that the field of gifted education is fragmented, porous, and contested in contrast with unified, insular, and firmly policed fields. Employing a framework borrowed from four disciplines in the social sciences and humanities, the collaborators discovered that gifted education suffers from and benefits from fragmentation, interdisciplinary porosity, and conflict at the levels of practice, research, and theory. In this session, they take the next step by attempting to answer Harry Passow’s “so what?” question. If the field truly does fit this pattern, how can practitioners and scholars capitalize on it and avoid its pitfalls? Audience: Administrators, Advocates, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers Room: Grand Salon 6 COUNSELING & GUIDANCE

Laying Waste Sue Jackson, Daimon Institute for the Highly Gifted, White Rock, BC, Canada Anxiety-based disorders can be crippling and terrifying for the sensitive, intense gifted child. Truly insidious, with bona fide indicators eluding easy diagnosis - especially for the gifted - anxiety symptoms fall on a continuum ranging from mild to severe. Extreme occurrences fully incapacitate while more mild symptoms masquerade in countless ways: as perfectionism, hyper-vigilance, underachievement, and forms of self-abuse. Co-occurrence with depression and other maladies complicate diagnoses and recovery rates. In this interactive and probing session, parents, educators and mental health professionals receive compelling case study material depicting symptom profiles, multi-modal therapeutic

Room: Belle Chasse

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In the NAGC Learning Quarter Virtual Session

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Magnolia CREATIVITY

Adding Complexity And Depth To Teaching For Creativity

Recorded Session

NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Education Programming Standards

understand what they mean for young advanced readers, writers and thinkers. We look at the suggested fiction and nonfiction literature and explore beyond these titles leading to a discussion of the impact these standards may have on gifted programs for young advanced readers. A brief overview of the proposed assessment systems share timelines, procedures, and how students share their knowledge for the purposes of accountability. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers K-5 Room: Marlborough B

Diane Heacox, St. Catherine University, Edina, MN

GLOBAL AWARENESS

Distinguished as one of the essential skills for the 21st century, educators of the gifted have long committed themselves to the skills of divergent thinking; however, it is time to go beyond skills and more into tactics that strengthen the core of creativity. This session focuses on pedagogy that encourages students to experiment, innovate, and explore new avenues. Such pedagogy takes students deeper into complex tasks that support rather than trivialize creativity. In addition, attention is given to the role of collaboration, diversity, idea exchange, and the ability to build on another’s achievements in the creative process.

Teaching Tolerance To Tomorrow’s Leaders

Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Jasperwood EARLY CHILDHOOD

Common Core Standards: What Does It Mean For Our Young Advanced Readers

F. Margret Atkinson, Zachary Community Schools, Baton Rouge, LA; The Holocaust and Jewish Resistance Teachers Program and Holocaust Museum Houston have played an integral part in the development of pedagogy for teaching tolerance to future leaders of tomorrow. Join a Louisiana and a Texas educator as they share their experiences, through both HAJRTP and HMH, how it has affected their pedagogy, and how it can affect yours. An HMH representative and Holocaust survivors are both attending the session, in an effort to demonstrate how personal experience helps to create poignant understanding about the need for tolerance in this world. Audience: Administrators, Advocates / Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12 Room: Grand Salon 7

Laura Beltchenko, Wauconda CUSD #118, Wauconda, IL The Common Core State Standards have been released and adopted by most states. They are described as “fewer, clearer and higher.” The word “higher” is the focus of this presentation. Participants take a look at the K-3rd grade Reading Standards and take an interpretive journey to

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

Sunday

protocols, and powerful strategies to combat anxiety and increase resilience.

Poster Session

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| Network Super Sessions Sunday, November 6, 2011 | 9:15 AM – 10:15 AM MIDDLE GRADES

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Activities and Assessments for Gifted Middle School Students Using the Common Core Standards

Teacher Instructional Quality in a UniversityBased Enrichment Program: Lessons Learned From the Observer’s Perspective

Kathy Balsamo, Carolyn Coil, Pieces of Learning, Marion, IL

Enyi Jen, Jiaxi Wu, Yang Yang, Marcia Gentry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Teachers of gifted middle school students need to know, understand, and apply the Common Core Standards for grades 6-12. These college and career readiness standards can provide appropriate guidelines that lead to the rigor suitable for gifted middle schoolers. The developers of these standards delineate broad anchor standards within each strand. Middle school teachers of the gifted can differentiate by applying such standards through enrichment, extension, and accelerated activities. In this session, examine examples of appropriate differentiated activities and assessments focusing on a variety of broad Common Core Standards in literature, science, and social studies. Audience: Administrators, Consultants, Coordinators, Classroom Teachers 6-8 Room: Oak Alley PARENT & COMMUNITY

Changing Family Structures: New Roadmap for the Future Michele Kane, Ellen Fiedler, Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL

Sunday

Parenting gifted children is most demanding in terms of time, energy, and intensity. Additionally, the family structure itself is changing with traditional family constellations now the minority. Parents are often ill-equipped for the demands as sensitivities and asynchrony converge. Therefore, life in gifted families can be a difficult journey without a clear roadmap. Complicating daily interactions are life-changing situations over which a child has no control: divorce, moving, parent illness, death. This session provides guidance for parents and educators in addressing changes in the gifted family. Coping strategies to support the social and emotional needs of all involved are addressed. Audience: Administrators, Advocates / Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Counselors, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-12

In this session, presenters share lessons from teacher observations conducted in a university-based enrichment program. Using a sample of 85 teachers, over two years, instructional methods used by teachers of humanities and STEM courses are described and their strengths and weaknesses analyzed. Comparisons of experienced and first-time gifted teachers, and between teachers of primary-aged and upper-elementary students are made. These findings inform participants about possible areas to emphasize in teacher-training sessions when developing enrichment programs and courses. The presenters also discuss differentiating teacher training to improve the professional development for teachers with different backgrounds and experiences. Audience: Administrators, Advocates / Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-8 Room: Marlborough A RESEARCH & EVALUATION

The “G” Word: Defining or Debunking Giftedness Joseph Renzulli, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; Nancy Robinson, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; James Gallagher, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; James Borland, Columbia University, New York, NY Even a cursory review of the literature in our field reveals a lack of consensus about the term “gifted.” Although NAGC has recently proposed a definition of giftedness, controversy still surrounds the term and its meaning. What is giftedness? Is giftedness a stable individual difference variable? Is giftedness an educationally useful construct? Is the term a help or a hindrance? Does the term actually hurt our advocacy efforts? Do we need to identify students as gifted

Room: Grand Salon 9

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to meet their academic needs? This panel of distinguished scholars debates the definition, pros, and cons of the “G” word. Audience: Administrators, Advocates, Parents, Researchers, Classroom Teachers K-12

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

Schoolwide Enrichment Model: Getting Enrichment Clusters To Work For You Traci Vedros, Jackie Boudreaux, Christine Henderson, Jefferson Parish Public School System, Gretna, LA

Room: Elmwood

U-STARS~Plus Using Science, Talents And Abilities, Promoting Learning For Under-Represented Students: A Framework For K-3 Programming Sneha Shah-Coltrane, North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, Raleigh, NC; Mary Ruth Coleman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC Join the developers of the U-STARS~PLUS framework to better understand how to cultivate, recognize, and respond to K-3 students in the regular education setting. Recognizing and cultivating potential in young children from our underrepresented populations (economically disadvantaged and/or culturally/linguistically diverse families and children with disabilities) is critical in ensuring that every child optimally develops, closing the achievement gap, and appropriately identifying children for gifted education. U-STARS~PLUS addresses these needs by: providing intellectually and emotionally nurturing environments; recognizing outstanding potential; engaging families with their child’s academic success; supporting high-quality science instruction; and responding to childrens’ strengths with advanced educational experiences. Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Consultants, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-5 Room: Grand Salon 3

10:30 AM – 12:00 PM

Closing General Session Napoleon Ballroom

Are you struggling with how to make the Schoolwide Enrichment Model work for you and your students? Does scheduling enrichment clusters present you with a nightmare? For the past five years, these presenters have reviewed and revised their Enrichment Program and have finally found a program that works. This session is a practical overview of how to select enrichment clusters, schedule students, provide a low student-teacher ratio, and provide student-driven enrichment clusters. Hear their tips, get a glimpse into Enrichment Clusters, and have your questions answered. Audience: Administrators, Classroom Teachers K-5 Room: Prince of Wales STEM

Snapshots of Gifted Science Programs Inspiring and Engaging Elementary Students and Driven By Best Practices Tammy Wood, Circe Bridges, Zachary Community School District, Zachary, LA Science captures the imagination of children and is the perfect subject to engage gifted students in hands-on learning, problem solving, in-depth research, and scientific inquiry. This dynamic workshop actively engages teachers of elementary gifted students in discovering how to create an exemplary elementary science program for the advanced learner in a variety of classroom settings. Original curriculum developed by the presenters and driven by national science, math, and technology standards as well as best practices in gifted education is shared.

Sunday

SPECIAL POPULATIONS

Audience: Administrators, Advocates/Association Leaders, Coordinators, Parents, Classroom Teachers K-5 Room: Rosedown

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| Your Personal Convention Planner WHEN

WHAT

WHERE

Opening General Session Let’s Change the World! A Conversation with the Science Guy®

Grand Salon

4:00 PM – 5:30 PM

Exhibit Hall Opening Reception

Grand Ballroom

5:00 PM – 7:00 PM

Celebration of Excellence

Napoleon Ballroom

Thursday, November 3 2:30 PM – 4:00 PM

Friday, November 4 7:30 AM – 8:30 AM

JAM Sessions/Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions

8:45 AM – 10:15 AM

Mini Keynotes

9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Exhibit Hall Open/Coffee

10:30 AM – 11:30 PM

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions

11:45 AM – 12:30 PM

Putting It Into Practice

Grand Ballroom

Grab and Go lunch for sale outside Exhibit Hall 12:45 PM – 1:30 PM

Putting It Into Practice

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions

2:45 PM – 3:45 PM

Exhibit Break, Dessert and Game Tables

4:00 PM – 5:00 PM

JAM Sessions/Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions

4:00 PM – 5:30 PM

Legacy Series Taping

7FSTBJMMFT#BMMSPPN

5:30 PM – 5:45 PM

NAGC Business Meeting

Melrose

5:45 PM – 9:00 PM

Network Evening Events

Grand Ballroom

Saturday, November 5 7:30 AM – 8:30 AM

JAM Sessions/Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions

8:45 AM – 10:15 AM

Mini Keynotes

8:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Exhibit Hall Open/Coffee

10:30 AM – 11:30AM

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions

11:45 AM – 12:30 PM

Putting It Into Practice

Grand Ballroom

Grab and Go lunch for sale outside Exhibit Hall 12:45 PM – 1:30 PM

Putting It Into Practice

1:45 PM – 2:45 PM

JAM Sessions/Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions

3:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Concurrent Sessions/Poster Sessions

5:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Crescent City Celebration…And All That Jazz at Mardi Gras World (Buses: 4:00 PM – 8:00 PM)

Sunday, November 6

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8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

Super Sessions

9:15 AM – 10:15 AM

Super Sessions

10:30 AM – 12:00 PM

Closing General Session George Rodrigue: The Blue Dog Artist at Work

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz

Napoleon Ballroom


Nancy Green NAGC Executive Director

November 3-6 New Orleans, Louisiana Paula Olszewski-Kubilius NAGC President

This certifies that the bearer attended the 2011 National Association for Gifted Children Annual Convention

Certificate of Attendance


| Strand Index Signature Series Friday, November 4 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

7:30 AM - 8:00 AM

Are Response to Intervention and Gifted Education Compatible: A Dialogue in 4 parts Versailles Ballroom Calling All Administrator Advocates for the Gifted Grand Salon 9 Getting Involved: Leadership Development in NAGC Jefferson Ballroom Best Practices in Using Standardized Tests to Identify Talent among Low Income and ELL Children Versailles Ballroom Stereotyped Threat and Identification of Gifted Students of Color: A Conversation with Dr. Grand Salon 22 Joshua Aronson Advocacy 101: Tips to Keep Gifted Education Alive in Your State and District Grand Salon 3 Finding Funding for Gifted Programs and Services Marlborough A The Revised NAGC P-12 Gifted Programming Standards: The Foundation for Quality Gifted Grand Salon 10 Education Services Successful Strategies for Underserved Gifted Students Grand Salon 3 How to Start and Grow a Total School Enrichment Program: An Administratorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Perspective Grand Salon 9 Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth (SMPY): How 40 years of longitudinal research and theory development might shape educational policy and human capital initiatives Grand Salon 7 2011 Distinguished Scholar Award: Twenty-five Years of Research on the Psychology of Students with Gifts and Talents Grand Salon 7

Saturday, November 5 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM

12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

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The 21st Century Learner: Implications for Gifted Education Grand Salon 16 Common Ground for Maximizing High Potential: Psychology, Neuroscience, and Education Rosedown 2011 Distinguished Scholar Award: Twenty-five Years of Research on the Psychology of Students with Gifts and Talents Grand Salon 7 To Group or Not to Group, That is the Question Napoleon Ballroom Rethinking Giftedness and Gifted Education: A Proposed Direction Forward Based on Psychological Science Grand Salon 16 Publish with NAGC Fountain Our Sputnik Moment Napoleon Ballroom What if you could design a perfect environment for adolescent talent development? Would it take the form of a special high school? Grand Salon 16

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

2011 Early Leader Award: In Search of Under-Identified Students: Considering more than culture and poverty! Marlborough B 2011 Distinguished Service Award: Get Involved Marlborough A The New CogAT: An Ability Test for the 21st Century Grand Salon 16

Arts Friday, November 4 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

3.4 Affective and Artistic Development of Artistically Talented Students: A Systematic Research Agenda Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 1.2 Lets Dance to All that Jazz! Developing Artistic and Social Intelligence with Partner Dancing Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Artistic Ways of Knowing: Arts Talent Identification Grand Salon 21 Improving the Blank Page: From Inspiration to Revision in Creative Writing Grand Salon 16 All The World’s A Stage! Incorporating Theatre Arts Into Your K-5 ELA Classroom! Grand Salon 16 3.2 Translating Prose for the Stage Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Unfolding Wings: The Role of the Arts in Growing Up Gifted (Part 2) Magnolia 1.3 A Comprehensive Arts Program Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 3.1 Soul Behind the Skill, HeART behind the Technique: Experiences of Flow among Talented Singaporean Teenagers Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 1.4 Approaching Diversity Through Drama Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Engaging the Imagination of K-5 Gifted Students Through The Arts Eglinton and Winton

Saturday, November 5 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM

2.1 Creative Writing in the 21st Century - Thinking about the Future Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Louisiana’s Talented Arts Program Grand Salon 15 7JTVBM"SUT5BMFOU%FWFMPQNFOUJO.BHOFU)JHI4DIPPM(JGUFE4UVEFOUT Grand Salon 7 Jazzin’ it Up: Integrating Literature, Social Studies and the Arts to teach about the 1920’s Newberry Art History, Appreciation and Interpretation through Puppets, Song Writing, and Movement Grand Salon 3 7JPMB4QPMJO5IFBUFS(BNFT Grand Salon 18

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Strand Index 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

The Development of Identification Measures for Artistically Gifted Students from Low Income Families Ascot 2.4 No Sewing Required: Quilts in the Fabric of Curriculum Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 4.1 Podcasts and Presentations Using Digital Media Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter

Sunday, November 6 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

Singing about Gifted Student Success: Collaborating with the Lyric Opera of Chicago Grand Salon 4 Making the Arts Come Alive: Incorporating the Arts across the Curriculum Grand Salon 4

Computers & Technology Friday, November 4 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM

12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM

194

Developing your Personalized, Professional Learning Network (P2LN) through Technology Newberry 4.4 Learn to Diigo: Teachers as Researchers and Collaborators Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Entering the Ecosystem: The Thoughtful Integration of iPad Apps into Your Gifted Classroom Grand Salon 15 Patterns of Technology Use Among Gifted Students: Implications for M-Learning Eglinton and Winton Using Technology to Enhance and Differentiate Student Projects Rosedown From Overwhelmed to Organized: Technology as a Friend vs. Foe Magnolia 1.1 Mind the Gap! Engaging Gifted Digital Natives Through Technology in the Classroom Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Keeping Up With Digital Natives! Marlborough B Bridging the Digital Divide: How to Encourage High-Ability Girls to Pursue Advanced Coursework in Technology Grand Salon 21 Computers & Technology Business Meeting/Work Session Durham Students as Researchers:Creating a Digital Archive Magnolia Heat Up Reflection With Technology! Engaging Students in Differentiated Reflection Through HOTS and Web 2.0 Grand Salon 6 Research on Technology Use in Gifted Education - What Should Teachers Know ? Marlborough B Using Skype in the Gifted Classroom Ascot Student Created Movies: Advancing Potential and Passions with MovieMaker and iMovie Marlborough A

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

How and Why to Use Social Networks in Your Classroom Grand Salon 19 Improving 21st Century Information Fluency Skills Ascot Teaching Technology through Interest Projects Trafalgar %FWFMPQJOH7JTVBM5IJOLJOHXJUI*OGPSNBUJPO(SBQIJDT Oak Alley Kicking It Up a Notch: Using Online Research Modules in the 21st Century Gifted Classroom Marlborough B Maximum Impact: Using Webinars Effectively Grand Salon 24 The Digital Natives Are Restless: Web 2.0 Tools to the Rescue! Grand Salon 19 Playing with the future: developing gifts through computer game creation Fountain 5.2 An international perspective on what we know about new technology integration with differentiated instruction Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter The Instructional Design Process of Creating Effective and Engaging Online Learning Modules Windsor

Saturday, November 5 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

4.3 Technology for Teachers and Parents to Enhance 21st Century Skills Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Baby, You Can Drive My C.A.R.S.: Differentiating Instruction with the Collaborative Active Reading Strategy Grand Salon 18 If this is the 21st Century, where is my JETPACK? Versailles Ballroom 7JSUVBM-FBSOJOH&OWJSPONFOUTBOE(JGUFE4UVEFOUTXJUI"VUJTN4QFDUSVN%JTPSEFST Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 2.2 Rampaging Robots: Results of an intervention study of spatial ability and LEGO robotics Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Beyond the Page: Teaching Talented Readers 2.0 Grand Salon 6 The Skyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Limit! Trafalgar Differentiating for the Gifted using Interactive Knowledge Organizers Grand Salon 18 Tech Tool Time: Jazzing up Lessons for 21st Century Learners Jasperwood Ideas Worth Spreading: Using TED Talks to Create Socratic Seminars Oak Alley Integration of iPads and iPods Belle Chasse 4.2 Gifted 2.0 Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter

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| Strand Index 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

5.4 Using technology and creativity to differentiate for the talented foreign language learner Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter

Sunday, November 6 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

The Google Geek Squad: Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in the FREE World Belle Chasse Jamming with Problem-Based Learning and Technology Belle Chasse

Conceptual Foundations Friday, November 4 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

".".

".".

196

The Roles and Functions of Friendships Among the Gifted and Talented Grand Salon 16 Reframing Gifted Advocacy Nurturing the Gifted and Talented: The Hanoi Tower Model of Excellence Elmwood 3FBEJOH7JSHJM8BSE3FFYBNJOH1SJODJQMFTPG%JGGFSFOUJBUJPO Fountain 6.4 Uniqueness and Purpose in Gifted Education and Beyond Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Epistemological and Disciplinary Considerations in Acceleration: History as an Example Marlborough B â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything Old is New Againâ&#x20AC;?: The Historical Dimensions of Differentiation Grand Salon 24 6.3 How do preservice teachers conceptualize giftedness? A metaphor analysis Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Answering the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Whyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Howâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; of Integrating Gifted Programming and Response to Intervention (RTI) Ascot Advancing Potential Through Inventive Thinking: Focusing on 21st Century Skills Rosedown Using Policy Definitions to Improve Gifted Education Grand Salon 13 The Asynchronous Cheetah: Integrating Metaphor and Definition for Practical Use in the 21st Century Belle Chasse Gifted friendships: Perceived versus actual numbers of friends Grand Salon 15 This isnt Your Grandmothers Classroom: Expanding the Theory of Developmental Differentiation for 21st Century Citizens Grand Salon 24 t  Surviving the deluge: Trying to understand the characteristics individuals who are gifted and talented tRecognizing and Developing Potential Fountain tPolicy Perspectives on Gifted Identification t'SFOFNJFT5IF'JU#FUXFFO(JGUFE&EVDBUJPOBOE4QFDJBM&EVDBUJPO Marlborough A

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Defining the Gifted Self: Improvisational Performance as a Way of Life Grand Salon 7 Response to Intervention and Advancing Potential: Promising Practice Oak Alley A Conceptual Model for Optimal Development of Gifted Students Belle Chasse Intelligences Outside the Normal Curve: Creating Social Capital Leadership Potential In Young People Jefferson Ballroom 6.2 A Historical Perspective of a 33-Year Program for Gifted and Talented Students Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter NAGC’s Programming Standards: A Guiding Light to Educational Excellence for Gifted Students in Georgia Grand Salon 15 6.1 How Much Is A GT Student Worth? Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Changing mindsets: Gifted students and project-based inquiry Grand Salon 15 The Legacy Series Taping: The Creative Mind of Don Treffinger Versailles Ballroom

Saturday, November 5 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM

12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Conceptual Foundations Business Meeting/Work Session Durham Gifted education goes Hollywood: A film-lover’s guide to our field’s future Belle Chasse Talkin’ ‘Bout My Generation: Examining Giftedness from a Generational Perspective Jefferson Ballroom Factoring In Service Learning: Developing Dabrowskian Developmental Potential Through Community Service Grand Salon 21 Growing Even Smarter Brains: How Everyone Can Increase His/Her Intelligence Grand Salon 24 7.1 The paradoxical effects of praise, criticism, and no-feedback for underachieving gifted children Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter

Sunday, November 6 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

Can Gifted Education Avoid Contributing to Social Inequality? Grand Salon 6 Gifted Education Is Fractured, Porous, and Contested: What Should We Do About It? Grand Salon 6

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Strand Index Counseling & Guidance Friday, November 4 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Setting Motivation Traps with the Autonomous Learner Model for Underachieving Gifted Students in Grades 6-12 Grand Salon 3 8.1 Phenomenological Exploration of Middle School Gifted Students Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Counseling & Guidance Business Meeting/Work Session Durham The Gifted Childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guide to Making True Friends Windsor Minority student attitudes toward AP Courses: Preliminary findings from the AP Challenge Program Grand Salon 7 9.2 Research into Cyberbullying and High Achieving Students Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 5IF7BMVFPGUIF$PIPSU4VQQPSUJOH4UVEFOUTJO&BSMZ"ENJUUBODFUP$PMMFHF1SPHSBNT Grand Salon 22 New Rules for Gifted Girls: Lessons from NSF Gender Equity Projects Belle Chasse A Gift or Curse: The Challenges of Gifted Black Males Cambridge +VEHJOH#Z1FSGPSNBODF"%JGGFSFOU7JFXPG.JOETFUBOE5IF*NQSPWFNFOUPG(JGUFE4FMG Experience Grand Salon 24 Supporting the Social and Emotional Development of Twice Exceptional Males Fountain All in The Family: The Family System in Counseling the Gifted Newberry Procrastination and High-Ability Learners: If Not Now, When? Magnolia More than Thinking: Underachievements Social and Emotional Underpinnings Grand Salon 10 Greasy Hair and Pocket Protectors: Profiling Early College Students Newberry Building a Safety Net to Bridge towards 21st Century skills Prince of Wales All Gifties Go to Harvard.... Napoleon Ballroom

Saturday, November 5 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

198

Risky Business: Gifted Adolescents Respond Grand Salon 22 Coordinating Services for Gifted Secondary School Students Grand Salon 1 7.4 High School Gifted: You Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Have to Reinvent the Wheel Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM

11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM

12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Sunday, November 6 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

The Muddled Middle: Gender and Sexuality in Early Adolescents Grand Salon 10 7.3 2e: The Paradox of Dual Exceptionality Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Gifted Adults: You Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Just Outgrow It! Grand Salon 21 Developing Future Moral Leaders: Striving for excellence above and beyond academics Grand Salon 4 College Counseling for Twice-Exceptional Youth Grand Salon 24 Teaching Gifted Students to Use Biographies as Career Mentors: A Road Map to Success Elmwood Meeting the Needs of Twice-Exceptional Students: Techniques from a Researcher and Classroom Teacher. Melrose Lovingkindness Practice for Managing Intensity and Sensitivity for the Gifted Marlborough B College major choices of gifted students Grand Salon 16 A Framework for Affective Growth: Developing Social-Emotional Autonomy Rosedown How Do Math Talented Students Compare to Average-achieving Students on Measures of Psychosocial Characteristics? Marlborough A Developing Optimism in Gifted Adolescents Ascot 7.2 SENG (Supporting Emotional Needs of the Gifted) Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Here for You! Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Bullying: How it impacts G/T students and how you can root out a major cause Oak Alley The Academic, Social, and Emotional Implications of Entering College Early: A Case Study Grand Salon 10 21st Century Skills for Gifted Learners: Responsibility, Persistence, Collaboration, and Resilience Versailles Ballroom

Self Concept of Gifted Students: What teachers and counselors should know Magnolia Laying waste Magnolia

Creativity Friday, November 4 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

Alternative pathways to talent development A Collaborative Study with an eminent singer/ songwriter from the Philippines Prince of Wales 10.1 Wisdom and Creative Perception Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Future Problem Solving programs and Creativity: An initial report of a longitudinal study Melrose

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Strand Index 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Creativity21 and Beyond! Windsor Domain Specificity of Creativity: Dispositional and Environmental Differences Among Scientists, Humanists, and Artists Trafalgar Partners in innovation: Creative and spatial abilities Grand Salon 19 Creativity x 3 Grand Salon 3 Gifted Authors and Artists Come Alive: The 2011 Torrance Legacy Awards Melrose Give ‘em a Break: The Role of Recess in 21st Century Classrooms Trafalgar Teachers Jazz Up Creativity in Their Classrooms Prince of Wales 9.3 Students Perception of Classroom Climate for Creativity and Self-Concept Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Adaptation, Culture, and Creativity Eglinton and Winton Making Creative Assessment an Effective and Exciting Tool in the Middle School Classroom Windsor 10.2 Impact of Creative Strategies on a Non-native Teachers Identity Constructed by Interaction with Gifted Students Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Creativity for 21st Century Skills: How to Embed Creativity Into the Curriculum Grand Salon 13 10.3 Nuturing Creativity in Young Children Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter

Saturday, November 5 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM

200

Not the Same Old Project AGAIN...Let’s Add a Creative Flair and Design Something New Newberry 8.3 What Neuroscience Says about the Creativity Process Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Creativity and focused attention: The yin and yang of our cognitive functioning Cambridge A new look at divergent thinking test scoring techniques Eglinton and Winton Lil’ Wayne, Postmodern Rapper: A Study in Creative Development Magnolia 8.4 Innovatively Supporting Students with a “Fashionably Right” Mix: Teaching for Creativity with a Unique Curriculum Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Creativity Business Meeting/Work Session Durham Alive and Kickin: Engaging Students through Arts Integration and Problem Solving Prince of Wales Grandfather Tang-A Side of Tangrams Chequers

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Tinkering Child, Adult Scientist: Creativity and Integrated Art/Science Curricula Grand Salon 7 The Business of Creativity: Y.E.S. for Arkansas Ascot Creativity: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Not Just For Art Class Belle Chasse Instructional Applications of Creative Problem Solving Style Jasperwood Dungeons and Dragons and Gifted Students: Sating Dabrowskiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Imaginational Overexcitability Through a Cross-Curricular Approach Elmwood A Comprehensive Model for Evaluating Creative Problem Solving Programs Belle Chasse Fostering Creativity Through Technology: Critically and Creatively Thinking about Collaborative Communication Grand Salon 6 9.1 Meaningful Economics, a Competition Promoting Individual and Group Creativity Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 5BLFUIFi"w5SBJO+B[[*NQSPWJTBUJPOBTBO*OUFMMFDUVBM$POTUSVDUBOE7FIJDMFGPS$SFBUJWF Development Newberry Fabulous Failures! Welcoming the 4Cs into the 21 Century Classroom. Newberry 9.2 Creative & Critical Thinking Skills From Our Brains To Yours! Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Off The Charts Creativity for the Gifted Grand Salon 4 Using the Creative Constructs of the TTCT to Stimulate Creativity in Core Content Lessons Rosedown

Sunday, November 6 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

Toward a Better Understanding of Creativity and Problem-Solving Styles of Talented Secondary School Students Jasperwood Adding Complexity and Depth to Teaching for Creativity Jasperwood

Curriculum Studies Friday, November 4 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM ".".

12.3 Utilizing Shared Inquiry to improve Academic and Social Progress Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Preparing For Tomorrow: Making Students Ready for the 21st Century & Beyond Grand Salon 4 tEmpowering Gifted Students as Agents of Change t%FTJHO5IJOLJOHGPS(JGUFE4UVEFOUT Grand Salon 7

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| Strand Index 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM

11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM

12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM

12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

202

14.3 Perspective-taking: Exploring students choices of cognitive moves during disagreements among friends Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Poetry and Giftedness Belle Chasse Making Problem-Based Learning Happen Prince of Wales 12.1 I think; therefore, I question: Developing purposeful, engaging questioning strategies Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter A Defense of Formal Language Study for Gifted Children Oak Alley Learning Styles: What We Know, Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Know, and Need to Know Napoleon Ballroom $PODFQUJPOTPG(JGUFEOFTT&YBNJOJOH7BSZJOH5IFPSJFTBOE5IFJS"QQMJDBUJPOUP Evidence-Based, Differentiated Instruction Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter %JGGFSFOUJBUFE*OTUSVDUJPO7&3464%JGGFSFOUJBUFE$VSSJDVMVN Elmwood A Community Collaborates: Uniting Students, Teachers, and Community Leaders in Project Based Learning Marlborough A Advancing Potential Through the Use of the Parallel Curriculum Model Napoleon Ballroom Curiosity, Creativity, and Risk-Taking: Can You Dig It? Rosedown Inspiring Students to Become 21st Century Independent Problem Seekers Grand Salon 4 Team Teaching - Rethinking the role of the gifted specialist Grand Salon 3 Integrating Math and Literature for Gifted Middle Grade Learners Eglinton and Winton RTI with Differentiated Instruction for the Gifted Learner Grand Salon 21 Stations for High School Gifted Students: Engage, Inform, and Differentiate in a 21st Century Classroom Grand Salon 6 Nil Novi Sub Sole: An Old Language for a New World Grand Salon 7 The Parallel of Practice: Designing Real World Learning Opportunities to Enhance 21st Century Skills Grand Salon 12 .JTTJOHJO$POUFYU5IF)PMFJO7PDBCVMBSZ$VSSJDVMB Grand Salon 10 7JCSBOU7PDBCVMBSZ Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Big Idea? Using Books to Cultivate Talented Readers and Thinkers Across the Curriculum Rosedown The Bridge Curriculum: A Readiness Curriculum for Gifted Students of Diversity Elmwood

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

14.1 Engaging Gifted Students in Exploring the Big Ideas of History: Thinking like a Historian Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Curriculum Studies Business Meeting/Work Session Durham Making it Matter: Using Transformational Play to Engage Learners Grand Salon 4 FILMMAKER, HISTORIAN, ARTIST â&#x20AC;&#x201D; OH MY! Trafalgar 11.4 Current Issues related to the Schoolwide Enrichment Model Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Raising the Bar: English/Language Arts Standards and Gifted Education Grand Salon 12 13.4 Co-constructing curriculum for greater student engagement Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter

Saturday, November 5 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

11.3 Get a G.R.I.P. On Differentiation By Utilizing Interest-Based Projects Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter To Group or Not to Group: Is That the Question? Grand Salon 9 Using Tiered Centers to Differentiate Instruction in Geometry Prince of Wales Artful Curriculum Design: A Practical Path Jefferson Ballroom 8FBWJOHB7FSUJDBMMZBOE)PSJ[POUBMMZ"MJHOFETU$FOUVSZ$VSSJDVMVN$SBGUJOHUIF8BSQ and the Weft Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Advancing Potential in Analyzing Non-fiction Books: Focus on the 21st Century Skill of Critical Thinking Marlborough A Assessing 21st Century Skills and Knowledge through Creative Products Grand Salon 4 Portraits of Student Work Produced in an Elementary Mathematics Classroom Using ProblemBased Learning Curricula Belle Chasse Upgrading Grading in the Standards Era with Side Benefits for Gifted Students Grand Salon 21 Hu(Mans): A Course of Studyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;A Legend Returns Marlborough B Twelve Stories of Academic Acceleration Oak Alley Enriching learning experiences to stretch potentials in a Hong Kong classroom: Antarctica Expedition 2011 Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter The CLEAR Curriculum: What Works in Gifted Education Marlborough A 13.1 Formative Assessment: Practical Strategies for Differentiating Instruction Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Developing Wisdom Using Understanding by Design: Examples from a Lesson Ascot

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| Strand Index 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

It Sounded So Good at Conference: A Journey to Implement Socratic Seminars in Elementary School Grand Salon 13 Multicultural Gifted Education: Another Way to Differentiate the Curriculum Grand Salon 19 Make It â&#x20AC;&#x153;Notebookableâ&#x20AC;?! Windsor Differentiation and Technology: An Instructional Match Oak Alley Challenging Talented Readers With 21st Century Skills Versailles Ballroom All in Good Time: Giftedness and the Use of Collaborative Improvisation in the Classroom Grand Salon 21 Deconstructing Blooms Taxonomy: Letting Go of Bloom Prince of Wales Teaching in Context - The Key to Improving Academic Outcomes Melrose 11.1 Thinking Like a Writer: Creativity, Identity, and New Perspectives on Anne Frank Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Infusing Service Learning into Advanced Curriculum Grand Salon 13 Differentiation and the Brain: Using 21st Century Knowledge to Support Student Growth Versailles Ballroom 13.2 Using the Purdue Three-Stage Model to Design Theme-based, Interdisciplinary Curricula Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter I Hate School: Addressing Affective Needs In Your Gifted Curriculum Jefferson Ballroom Connecting Gifted Curriculum to Content Standards Using Current Brain Research Approach Cambridge 10.4 Teaching Talented Writers Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Thinking critically about effective curriculum and instruction for mathematically talented elementary students Grand Salon 9 Rules, Schmules: How Effective Classroom Management Benefits the Gifted Learner Windsor Writing a Winning Curriculum: Guidelines for Curriculum Studies Competition Melrose The Return of a Legend: (Hu)Mans: A Course of Study Grand Salon 15 Blowing the Dust off of History: Bringing Social Studies Alive for All the Senses Grand Salon 10 From the Lorax to Farenheit 451: a Study of Utopian/Dystopian Societies Prince of Wales 13.3 Harry, Katniss, and Percy: Learning Critical Reading Skills through Popular Literature Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter

Sunday, November 6 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

204

Using Personality Factors to Support the Social, Emotional & Academic Health of Gifted Children Melrose

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


Early Childhood Friday, November 4 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM

Advancing Potential in Information Literacy and Critical Thinking Skills: 21st Century Skills for Conducting Research Magnolia Build it and they will come: Creating a Program for Primary Gifted Learners Elmwood Twice-Exceptional Children: Knowing When and How to Intervene Effectively in Early Childhood Windsor Compost: The Rot Thing for Our Earth Jasperwood Bright, Young, and At Risk Grand Salon 13 Primary Thinking Skills for Advancing Potential ... and A Lot More Jazz! Grand Salon 18 Why Play? Grand Salon 24 Rethinking Early Childhood Education: Preparing the Young and Gifted for the 21st Century Grand Salon 13 Engaging Explorations for Young Gifted Children Grand Salon 3 Addressing different skill levels and learning types by creating learning centers Grand Salon 18 Developing and Evaluating Questioning Strategies For Use With Young Gifted Children Jasperwood The Teacher as the Creative Thinker- Critical Decisions in Early Childhood Classrooms! Grand Salon 22

Saturday, November 5 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

15.3 Lionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Share of Learning: How Inquiry-Based Instruction Led First Grade Scientists to the National Zoo Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Universal Design for Learning: Meeting the Diverse Needs of Twice-Exceptional Early Childhood Students Fountain Independent Study: 21st C. Skills for the Inquisitive Primary Mind Grand Salon 13 Building community through the lens of the socio-emotional needs of young gifted children in school Melrose Paths to a Growth Mindset Windsor Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s too naughty to be gifted: Using differential diagnosis to increase identification of young children Jasperwood 15.2 Using a Continuum of Rubric-Based Performance Assessments to Support Young 21st Century Learners. Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter

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| Strand Index 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM

11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 12:40 PM - 1:40 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

If They Can Say Tyrannosaurus Rex, They Can Say Triangular Prism: Nurturing Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mathematical Language Rosedown Arts in investigative projects: A method to advance thinking and learning in young children Grand Salon 12 Early Childhood Business Meeting/Work Session Durham Constructing Rubrics & Criteria Cards for Young Gifted Learners Grand Salon 22 Space that Teaches: Why Environment Matters Grand Salon 13 Engaging the Young Advanced Reader in Quality Literacy Experiences Windsor 15.1 Get Your Hands Dirty! Project Based Learning for Preschool and Primary Gifted Students Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter To Infinity and Beyond: Challenging Highly-Able Primary Mathematics Students Belle Chasse Developing Thinking Skills in Young Children: Research-based Strategies from Psychology and Neuroscience Jasperwood 14.4 Self-regulated learning abilities, learning styles, and perceived giftedness in Korean children K-6 Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter

Sunday, November 6 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

Play Based Assessment: Identifying Gifted Preschoolers Marlborough B Common Core Standards: What Does it Mean for Our Young Advanced Readers Marlborough B

Global Awareness Friday, November 4 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 12:40 PM - 1:40 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM

206

The Universe in a Single Atom: The Convergence of Science and Spirituality Chequers 16.1 The Schoolwide Enrichment Model (SEM) Type II Skills: Multicultural Awareness and Creativity Development Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Service Learning: An Experiential Instructional Strategy that Teaches More than Standards Grand Salon 12 SLURPY Saving Lives Using Rocks to Purify Your water Ascot G.A.U.G.E. Global Awareness Utilizing Global Experiences through Service! Eglinton and Winton Global Awareness Business Meeting/Work Session Durham The Other 3 Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Magnolia Investigating, Informing and Introducing the Stonewall Award Books: Meeting A Global Need Fountain

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


12:45 PM - 1:30 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

Empowering Gifted Students to Help Change the World Through Global Awareness and Understanding Jefferson Ballroom 16.2 Public Art As Service Learning Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter

Saturday, November 5 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

If You Want Global Citizens, Teach Global Art: Banking on Banksy and an Educated Mind Trafalgar Skyping with Kyrgyzstan: Opportunities in International Education for Student Involvement And Professional Development Grand Salon 18 Beyond Environmental Education: Ecological Literacy for Gifted Students Cambridge Connecting Gifted Students to the Global and Local Community Trafalgar

Sunday, November 6 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

Sharing a World of 7 Billion: Lessons for Global Citizenship Grand Salon 7 Teaching Tolerance to Tomorrow’s Leaders Grand Salon 7

Middle Grades Friday, November 4 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

O’Henry! Teaching Gifted Adolescents How to Write Using Classic Short Stories Ascot Academic success as an ethnic identity among middle school gifted Korean American students Cambridge Assessing Adolescent Learning in the 21st Century Grand Salon 18 17.1 Bibliotherapy:Gifted Middle School Students Developing Understanding of Individual Characteristics Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Middle School GPS: Helping Gifted Students Navigate Adolescence Grand Salon 13 A Legacy of Letters: Using Primary Sources for Classical Mentorship Jasperwood Preassessment: The Linchpin of Defensible Differentiation Oak Alley 17.2 Diffusin’, Oozin’ and Schmoozin’ - A Differentiated Approach to Microscopy Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Building Resilience in Girls During the Middle Grades Jefferson Ballroom Self-Advocacy: Preparing Gifted Students to be Partners in their Own Education Grand Salon 22

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| Strand Index 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:39 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM

12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Are We Teaching Our Best Writers to Write Like Beginners? Prince of Wales STEM in the Middle Grades Grand Salon 19 What REALLY Works in the Middle? Fountain Beyond Numbers: Creating Defensible and Differentiated Mathematics Curriculum and Instruction for Gifted Learners Chequers Science in Action: Gifted Education and Service-Learning Share Success in Middle School Grand Salon 15 Building strong writers in the middle school: The top twelve lessons you will ever need Napoleon Ballroom Explicit Programming for Gifted and Talented Culturally Diverse Learners: The Middle School /PO7FSCBM)POPST$PSF Grand Salon 6 Educational Initiatives, Curriculum and Gifted Middle School Students Grand Salon 4 17.3 Strategies to Motivate and Extend Gifted Language Arts Middle School Students Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Assessing Higher Order Thinking in 21st Century Middle School Classrooms Marlborough A 17.4 A Picture Paints A Thousand Words AND Can Add Creativity to the School Experience! Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Products Create 21st Century Learners Rosedown

Saturday, November 5 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

208

The Survey Toolkit: Integrated Curriculum Research Survey Projects Ascot 16.4 Use Debate: Challenge Your Gifted Middle School Learners By Researching, Writing, Collaborating and Thinking Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Knowing Your Adolescent Reader: How An Instructional Model Affects The Emotional Lives Of Bright Students Grand Salon 3 16.3 Enlivening Middle School Minds Through the Arts in English and History Class Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 18.2 Differentiating Across the Middle Level Curriculum Using Children’s Literature: Graeme Base Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Middle School Readers...What We’ve Learned Grand Salon 9 Using Childrens Literature to Teach About Wisdom Marlborough A Self-Regulation: Critical Skills for Adolescent Gifted Learners Versailles Ballroom Building Momentum in Your School For Gifted Programming Jefferson Ballroom I Luv Sh8spr: Teaching 21st Century Skills Through the Timeless Classics of The Bard Grand Salon 7

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Escalating Language Arts/Reading for Talented Middle Grades Readers and Writers Rosedown 18.1 Accepting the Challenge: Supporting, Measuring, and Reporting Academic Growth in Advanced Middle School Students Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter

Sunday, November 6 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

Whats New in Young Adult Literature: 2011 Edition Oak Alley Activities and Assessments for Gifted Middle School Students Using the Common Core Standards Oak Alley

Parent & Community Friday, November 4 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Technology and 21st Century Parenting Grand Salon 12 19.4 Advancing Support for Gifted Education in Your Community Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 19.3 Parenting the Gifted Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter A Delicate Balance: Can Parent Advocacy Work Without Opposition Cambridge A 24/7 Problem: An Introduction to Cyberbullying Rosedown 19.2 Keeping Gifted Education Alive: Parents as Advocates Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 19.1 Does Tiger Momâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Effect Exist? Patterns of Parental Authority among Gifted Asian and Caucasian Students Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter

Saturday, November 5 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Homeschool Families: A Starting Point Trafalgar The Perfect Storm, When factors converge with bullying to cause tragedy for gifted preteen boys Grand Salon 10 Kicking Learning Potential Up a Notch: The Effects of Praise Napoleon Ballroom 20.3 If Shes So Smart, Why Cant She? Looking Beyond the IQ Score Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Successfully Parenting Your Gifted Child Using the SENG Formula Grand Salon 18 Facts, Fun, and the Future: Fostering the Gifted Brain Grand Salon 13 Include Students, Parents, and Teachers in the Process for Maximum Results Cambridge

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Strand Index 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM

12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Sustaining gifted youth and Their families in the new millenium: Case studies from Australia Grand Salon 16 Parent & Community Business Meeting/Work Session Heightened Senses: The Superpowers of the Gifted Windsor Look Both Ways Before Crossing the Street: Instilling Digital Responsibilities for the Digital Highway Grand Salon 6 Building Bridges of Communication Between School Districts and Parents Grand Salon 15 MIND THE CONNECTIONS: Growth Model, RtI, and Academic Acceleration Grand Salon 9 Goldilocks Parenting: Effects of Too Much, Not Enough, and Just the Right Amount of Involvement Chequers mLearning: Personalized Gifted Education in Every Parentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pocket Trafalgar 18.3 Planning the Home Activities for Gifted Students A Case Study: Atalay Family from Turkey Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Celebrating Intensity, Diversity and Discrepancy Fountain Making the Impossible Possible: Fifteen Strategies for Overcoming Adversity and Building Resilience Prince of Wales 20.1 Parenting Possibility: How to Help Your Daughter Cope with the Gift of Multipotentiality Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Following the Autonomous Learner, a proactive approach to the development of the gifted and talented Melrose Underachievement Among Gifted Black Students: Update, Issues, and Recommendations Elmwood Dreaming With Your Eyes Open: Engaging Gifted Parents and Children Outside of the School Day Grand Salon 22 Accepted On Condition: What Perfectionism Is, And How To Help Chequers 18.4 Democracy in Action: A Community Drop Out Project Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter High Achieving Millennial Males and their Fathers Fountain Academic acceleration: Resources for identification, policy, and advocacy Napoleon Ballroom

Sunday, November 6

210

8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Help! I Want to be Creative With my Children But I Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Know How! Grand Salon 9

9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

Changing Family Structures: New Roadmap for the Future Grand Salon 9

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


Professional Development Friday, November 4 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Creating Community and Engagement in Professional Development Grand Salon 21 20.4 Changing Mindsets: Teaching How to Cultivate Intelligence Through an Online Book Study Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Using Peer Coaching as a Form of Professional Development: The Catalyst for Change Grand Salon 10 23.1 Principals as Stakeholders Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Whats the Plan? Designing a Teacher Support System for Developing Model Lessons for Gifted Learners Grand Salon 4 22.4 Parents and Professionals Working Together in a Professional Development Model: Theory, Practice and Innovation Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Advancing Potential for Teaching Reading to Gifted Learners Marlborough B Engaging the Insatiable Mind with Inquiry: Matching the Gifted Learner with Depth, Complexity and Choice: Cambridge Creating Learning States of MInd Grand Salon 9 21.1 Boosting the Cognitive Complexity of Instructional Tasks and Assessments Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Demystifying Understanding by Design and Differentiated Instruction: Providing Thoughtful and Comprehensive Professional Development Grand Salon 13 Changes in Teachersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Attitudes Toward Teaching Twice Exceptional Learners Through Focused Professional Development Prince of Wales +BWJUT1SPKFDU7FSTJPO5)3&&5IF6UBI)JHI"CJMJUZ4UVEFOU*OJUJBUJWF1SPKFDU Marlborough B 22.3 From Audit to Awesome: A Framework for Developing Quality Programs in NC Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Going to graduate school in gifted education: Choosing a program, surviving, and succeeding Grand Salon 21 Exploring Case Studies in Professional Development Elmwood 22.2 Response to Instruction (RtI): Helping Classroom Teachers Meet the Needs of Gifted Children Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Gifted Education and a K-12 Commitment to Delivering Rigorous Educational Programming Melrose

Saturday, November 5 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

t&GGFDUJWFTU$FOUVSZ1SBDUJDFTGPS6OEFSTFSWFE(JGUFE4UVEFOUT t"O"ENJOJTUSBUPST5PPMCPY#MVFQSJOUGPS'BDJMJUBUJOH'BJUIGVM*NQMFNFOUBUJPOPG$VSSJDVMVN Grand Salon 6

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Strand Index 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 11:35 AM - 12:35 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM

12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

1:45 PM - 2:15:00 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

1.1.

212

21.4 Professional Development for Improving Creative Teaching skills From Candidate to Accomplished: A Gifted Educatorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guide through the National Board Process Elmwood 21.3 The Gifted Education Professional and The 500 Hats Using Wikis for Teaching and Learning Beyond Boundaries Elmwood Pebbles, Rocks, and Boulders: Supporting Change from Direct Instruction to Facilitated Learning Newberry Mentoring pre-service teachers: approaches, merits, and pitfalls of field experience and student-teaching in gifted classrooms. Rosedown 23.4 PLC Book Studies: TLC for Educators of the Gifted Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Professional Development Business Meeting/Work Session Durham Art-Inspired Poetry/Songs as Poetry -Analysis, Writing, Creating Grand Salon 15 A Crash Course in Practical Counseling Strategies for Teachers of the Gifted Napoleon Ballroom Learning to Lead Grand Salon 24 One Degree from Kevin Bacon: Six Simple Rules My Students Taught Me Grand Salon 7 Partners in PBL: Harmony is in All Things 21st Century Grand Salon 19 How do you motivate gifted learners? Changing underachievement and maladaptive perfectionism into optimal motivation. Magnolia Technological Tools to Teach and Practice Differentiating the Curriculum Napoleon Ballroom 23.3 Addressing the Under-Identification of Gifted Minority Students with School-Based Professional Development for Educators Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter t8IBU"CPVU.F$BOU:PV5FBDI tEight Essentials for Engaging Gifted Learners Grand Salon 3 Transforming Top-Down into Grass Roots: Creating Buy-In in Required Professional Development Magnolia 22.1 Asset Mapping for Gifted Education Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter A 3 Tiered Comprehensive Approach to Providing Online Training and Certification to Gifted Teachers Grand Salon 24 tZoom-A Perspective of Gifted Education in the Classroom tUsing data to design differentiated professional development: A fidelity approach Grand Salon 18

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

23.2 Passion - The Fuel of Achievement Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter CONNECTIONS: Preparing for the Next 25 Years in Gifted Education Grand Salon 13 Teachers Reflect: How Does Interaction with Exemplary Curriculum Change Teachers Perceptions of Planning and Teaching? Grand Salon 3 Teacher Training: Effective Methods for Confronting Bullying and Keeping Gifted Students Safe Oak Alley

Sunday, November 6 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

Using the 2010 NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Programming Standards in Professional Development Marlborough A Teacher instructional quality in a university-based enrichment program: Lessons learned from the observers perspective Marlborough A

Research & Evaluation Friday, November 4 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

".".

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:3 0 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

".1.

24.2 Profiles of Mathematics Giftedness: An Examination of Content Mastery, Metacognition, and Accelerated Course Success Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter tTest Speededness - An overlooked threat to reliability and validity tPredictors of attitudes toward gifted programs: Support vs. Perceptions of elitism among pre-service teachers Grand Salon 19 26.3 A Pilot Study of Total School Cluster Grouping in Urban Schools Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 24.3 Acceleration Policies & Possibilities in Canada Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter t$PNCJOJOHTDPSFTJONVMUJQMFDSJUFSJBBTTFTTNFOU"QTZDIPNFUSJDJOWFTUJHBUJPO tNormalizing Data for Gifted Identification Grand Salon 18 A National Study of the Perceptions & Attitudes of High School Principals Toward Gifted Education Eglinton and Winton Serving the Gifted: A National Survey of School Psychologists Cambridge 26.2 The Relationship between Differentiated Instruction and Teacher Control in Gifted Clustered Classrooms Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter tHow Well Do Teachers and Parents Understand Underachieving Studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Motivation Beliefs? tAchievement Goal Orientations and Teacher-Rated Engagement in Gifted Elementary School Students Newberry

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Strand Index 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 2:50 PM - 3:50 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Writing The Lit Review and Discussion in an Empirical Journal Article Oak Alley Elementary Teacher Perceptions and Concerns About Science Teaching and Learning Belle Chasse 24.4 EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE IN ADOLESCENTS WITH AND WITHOUT TALENT Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Comparing Skills and Competencies for Artistically Gifted High School, Undergraduate, and Graduate Alumni Chequers t,PSFBO.JEEMF4DIPPM4UVEFOUT4QBUJBM"CJMJUZ*OWFTUJHBUJPOPG*UT3FMBUJPOTIJQXJUI Mathematics and Science Talent tThe Identification of Gifted Children in Science and Mathematics: Outcomes from Three Contexts in India Grand Salon 18 31.2 Myths at Work: Exploring Teachers Perceptions of the Construct of a Child Who is Gifted Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter The Role of Teacher Mathematical Content Knowledge in Developing Talented Math Students Grand Salon 7 Research and Evaluation Business Meeting Durham Causal Research in Gifted and Talented Education: Regression Discontinuity Design Grand Salon 18 25.1 Parental Satisfaction with a Gifted Education Program Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Discoveries from the National Twice-Exceptional Needs Assessment Grand Salon 21 Effect of teacher characteristics on student outcomes in two reading curricular units for gifted students Grand Salon 22 25.4 Formative Assessment: Teacher Perceptions and Practices Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Research Crackerbarrel and Research Gala River

Saturday, November 5 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

214

24.1 Building Thoughts and Ideas: Learning with LEGO Serious Play Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Davidson Fellows: Case Studies in Science Talent Development Grand Salon 24 The Use of Single-Subject Experimental Design with Gifted Children: Results from a preliminary study Chequers Effects of Differentiated Reading Instruction on Middle School Student Achievement Windsor Academic Effects of Cluster Grouping on Gifted and General Students from Diverse Cultural Groups Fountain 25.2 Cognitive Abilities and Learning Styles: A Correlation Analysis Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


".".

11:45 AM - 12:30 PM

11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1.1.

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

t  Needs of Parents of Gifted Children: Step One in the Development of a Research Tool t*T5JHFS.PUIFS1BSFOUJOHUIF#FTU *OWFTUJHBUJPOPG4PDJBM$BQJUBM3PMFJO4VQQPSUJOH Educational Aspirations Grand Salon 22 High-Achieving African American Male College Students: Reasons for Their Academic and Career Choices in STEM Grand Salon 3 What Works in Gifted Education: Integrated Reading Curricular Models for Gifted Students Grand Salon 6 The DNA of Moral Compass in Careers of Gifted Grand Salon 4 Action Research: Becoming a Teacher Researcher Magnolia The Nature of Leadership Practices on Teacher Implementation of a Newly Introduced Gifted Curriculum Eglinton and Winton The Effects of a STEM Project on Teachersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Science Process Skills and Science Content Knowledge Grand Salon 21 R&E 2011 Dissertation Award winners present their research Marlborough A On Becoming Themselves: The 1964-1968 Presidential Scholars 45 Years Later Jasperwood Does Birthdate Affect Recognition of Giftedness? Eglinton and Winton Introduction and Application of Program Evaluation in the Gifted Education Context Grand Salon 24 tAn External Evaluation of the Schoolwide Enrichment Model: What do Students and Teachers Think? t"TTFTTNFOUPGBO0OMJOF("5&DFSUJmDBUJPOQSPHSBN4VDDFTTFTBOE"SFBTPG*NQSPWFNFOU Magnolia Magnolia Assessing the Creative Process: Development and Evaluation of the Creative Process Questionnaire Eglinton and Winton (JGUFE4UVEFOUT.PTU1PTJUJWF&YQFSJFODFT"QQMZJOHB$PSF7JSUVFT'SBNFXPSLGSPN1PTJUJWF Psychology Grand Salon 21 25.3 Gender differences in cognitive abilities among the intellectually talented for the last 30 years Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Schizophrenia and Creativity: A Meta-analytic Review Grand Salon 6

Sunday, November 6 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

Is giftedness a qualitative or quantitative construct? Elmwood The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gâ&#x20AC;? Word: Defining or Dubunking Giftedness Elmwood

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Strand Index Special Populations Friday, November 4 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM

12:45 PM - 1:30 PM

12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

216

I Do Belong Here: Increasing Minority Student Retention and Success in AP Courses Chequers Successful Transition and Integration of Underrepresented Populations into a Gifted Learning Environment: One Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Approach Grand Salon 6 27.4 Helping Gifted Minorities Enhance Creative Abilities through Exposure to Different Cultures Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Promise fulfilled or promises broken? Exceptionally Gifted Children grown up. Grand Salon 12 1SPmDJFODZ7JFXTPG/BUJWF4QFBLFSTPG4QBOJTI*EFOUJGZJOH $IBMMFOHJOH BOE%JWFSTJGZJOHXJUI AP and IB Grand Salon 6 Using Academics to Enhance Social Skills Among Twice-Exceptional Learners Grand Salon 9 29.4 Where do I fit in? : Struggle of African American Males in Gifted Education Programs Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Developing Leadership in Special Populations in Middle School Trafalgar Up a Creek Without a Paddle? 2-E Survival Strategies for Stressed-out Parents, Teachers, & Students Grand Salon 9 Building Black Gifted Studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Self-Esteem & Cultural Legacy through Culturally Relevant Materials Grand Salon 9 Engineering Design for Elementary Students Windsor Emancipate Asian American students from stereotypes and misunderstandings Grand Salon 16 Stuck in the Middle Melrose

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Gifted on the Autism Spectrum Grand Salon 12 28.1 Gifted Students with Emotional Disabilities: The Neglected Population of TwiceExceptional Students Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 29.3 The Malleable Mind, the Gifted Learner: Reducing stereotype threat through experimental interventions Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 28.2 Growing Up with Gifts and Learning Disabilities Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter RtI & Twice Exceptional: A Promising Fit Oak Alley 2.3 Every Day, Every Child, High Expectations Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Gifted, Black, and Female: Blacked-Out, Whited-Out, and Cast Out Belle Chasse Celebrating Trailblazers for Special Populations: Past, Present, and Future Compass

Saturday, November 5 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

To find and to serve: Experiences identifying and serving talented students in a low-income school Eglinton and Winton 28.3 Extracurricular Interests of Gifted Minority Students: Opportunities for Student Engagement and Development Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 27.3 Promising Practices for Gifted ELLs and High-Potential Students from Low-Income Families Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Systematic Child Find Strategies That Work - Increasing the Identification of Minority Gifted Students Jasperwood Help Build the NAGC Gay-Lesbian-Bisexual-Transgender-Questioning (GLBTQ) Special Interest Group! Grand Salon 12 Using the NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Gifted Programming Standards in Identifying Students from Diverse Backgrounds Versailles Ballroom 28.4 Linking Rampage Shootings to GT with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders: A Discussion Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 27.2 New ways of identifying potential gifted students without any tests Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

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| Strand Index 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM

12:45 PM - 1:30 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Honoring Alexinia Baldwin and Mary Frasier: An Anthology of Multicultural Gifted Education Grand Salon 9 Teach Writing Processes to Build Academic Success Grand Salon 10 Establishing Equity - One School at a Time Marlborough B Scaffolding for Maximum Output for the English Language Learner and Student of Poverty Grand Salon 10 Programming for Gifted, Talented and Diverse Learners: Rigor and the Culturally Responsive Classroom Chequers Double the Label; Double the Need: Strategies for Twice Exceptional Children Every Educator Should Know Grand Salon 12 27.1 Blurred Boundaries: Exploring the Expectations and Aspirations of Gifted Asian Indian Females Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 29.1 Partnerships between Foundations and Summer Programs: Advancing the Potential of Underserved Gifted Students Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Creating Positive Personal Growth for Diverse Gifted Learners Grand Salon 4 Moving Beyond Budget: Implementing & Supporting Diverse Programs/Services with Limited Resources. Or Why Leadership Matters! Grand Salon 9 26.4 Cinematherapy, Aspergers, and Meeting Social and Emotional Needs for Students and Parents Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter From Assessment to Instruction: Application of the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Tests Grand Salon 12 The Twice-Exceptional Learner: What Have We Learned and What is Next Jefferson Ballroom 0OF7BMFEJDUPSJBOT'SFTINBO:FBSJO&OHJOFFSJOH4DIPPM Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter

Sunday, November 6 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

218

The Schoolwide Cluster Grouping Model: Restructuring Gifted Education Services for the Twenty-First Century Grand Salon 3 U-STARS~PLUS Using Science, Talents and Abilities, Promoting Learning for UnderRepresented Students: A Framwork for K-3 Programming Grand Salon 3

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


Special Schools & Programs Friday, November 4 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM

12:45 PM - 1:30 PM

12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

30.2 Teaching social skills, anger management, and problem solving techniques Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 31.3 Still just regular teens : The lived experiences of eight early-entrance college students Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter *U5BLFTB7JMMBHFUP)FMQ5XJDF&YDFQUJPOBM$IJMESFO5ISJWFJO4DIPPM Napoleon Ballroom 34.1 Discover GEMS and Go beyond the books - connecting 21st century skills for the Gifted Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Chart(er)ing a Course to the Future: The Palmetto Scholars Academy Marlborough A 30.1 Gifted Science Studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Interpersonal Abilities and Their Home Environment: Comparisons Between Korean and American Students Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 31.4 Conventional Resources; Unconventional Results Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 5IF%B7JODJ"DBEFNZ"5XFOUZ'JSTU$FOUVSZ0OF3PPN4DIPPMIPVTF Grand Salon 10 33.4 Jazz Up Your Enrichment Program: Easy Steps for Enrichment Cluster Implementation Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Bridges Academy for Twice Exceptional Students:Programming for Success Grand Salon 15 Introducing and Exploring the Davidson Academy of Nevada: A Public School for Profoundly Gifted Pupils Trafalgar Ethics for 21st Century Leadership: Preparing Gifted Students through the Global Learning Program Elmwood Developing Gifted Services to Address the Whole Child: Lessons from a Rural School District Napoleon Ballroom 32.1 The Integration of Faith and Learning within Gifted Education Programs Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 33.3 The Identification and Placement of Gifted Students in Korea: In Case of SNUE Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 32.2 Connecting Rural Schools for AP Achievement Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Homeschooling: A unique option and opportunity for Gifted and Talented Students Cambridge 33.2 How does Super Summer serve gifted students under the framework of My Class Activities? Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter

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| Strand Index Saturday, November 5 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

31.2 Radical acceleration: The academic and social effects of grade skipping and early college entrance Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Building an Academic Future on the Pedagogy of a Successful Arts Conservatory Oak Alley 32.3 Career Internships That Change Studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Lives--How to Start an Internship Program in Your District Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter If You Build It, They Will Come: How We Started a School for Gifted Children Magnolia 31.1 Hidden Gifts: The Power of Social Context at Residential High Schools for the Gifted Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Quest for Knowledge and Competition Experience: Quiz Bowl for 4th and 5th graders Grand Salon 3 Action-Based Learning to Develop Your Brain Prince of Wales Preparing gifted students to succeed in specialized STEM high schools Trafalgar Three New Rs: Research, Rubrics, and Realities in Saturday, Weekend and Summer Programs Grand Salon 12 Igniting 21st Century Skills with Highly Engaging Real-World Projects Cambridge Radical Programming for the Highly Gifted Cambridge 30.4 Ways that Gifted Schools Support Social and Emotional Needs Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 36.4 The model of Research & Education: The specialized mentoring system in Korean science magnet schools Profoundly gifted students benefit from specialized schools and specialized learning opportunities Grand Salon 12 32.4 The State of Gifted Education in 21st Century Independent Schools Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Gifted: Eliminating an Imposed Ceiling Grand Salon 22 30.3 Summer Enrichment for Gifted Learners Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter GT@UT: A Summer Program Kickin It Up a Notch Grand Salon 7 33.1 The Mentoring Program for Mathematically Gifted Students Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter

Sunday, November 6 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

220

The Renzulli Academy: Creation Of A School From The Bottom Up And The Outside In Prince of Wales Schoolwide Enrichment Model: Getting Enrichment Clusters to Work for You Prince of Wales

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


STEM Friday, November 4 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 10:30 AM - 1130 AM

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 11:45 AM - 12:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Crashing Through the Glass Ceiling of Middle School Math Grand Salon 22 36.2 Managing Math Contests in the Regular Classroom Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter t#VJMEJOH&MFNFOUBSZ5FBDIFST$BQBDJUZUP5FBDI45&.$POUFOUUISPVHI1SPCMFNCBTFE Curricula tSpanky, the Three-Toed Slothematician: Exploring the Common Core Math Standards Through Characters in Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Literature Jasperwood 36.1 Teaching Computer Science to Gifted Middle School Students with Scratch Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Advancing Potential in Gifted Through STEM Integration ...and All That Jazz!! Grand Salon 16 Science Olympiad is STEMtastic! Jefferson Ballroom Exploring Shapes through Games: Geometry for Talented Primary Students Grand Salon 24 Three Challenges in Science: Why We Dont Know What We Think We Know Melrose Strategies for Teaching and Assessing Conceptual Understanding in Science Newberry Raising the Bar: Challenging Math-Talented Students Grand Salon 19 Middle Grades Mathematics: Plateau, Peak or Passion Jasperwood 35.4 Solving the Equation: Fostering Mathematics Talent among Diverse Populations Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 34.2 Identifying Tomorrows Math Superstars -- Testing Math Creativity -- 8 to 12 year olds Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Creative Thinking through Classroom Science Grand Salon 16 Future Engineers, Mathematicians, and Scientists: Nurturing Children with Spatial Strengths Chequers Using Dynamic Geometry Software to Discover Key Math Concepts Grand Salon 6 Mathematical Modeling in the Elementary and Middle Grades Jasperwood

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| Strand Index Saturday, November 5 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

11:45 AM - 12:30 PM

12:45 PM - 1:10:00 PM

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

34.3 Jump Rope Geometry Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter STEM Starters Toolbox: Nuts, Bolts, and Tools for Elementary Gifted Teachers Jefferson Ballroom Jazzed about Javits -- GEMS Data Showing Impact on Student Learning in Math and Science Melrose 40 Years after the Founding of SMPY: What do we Know about Developing Mathematical Talent? Chequers STEAM: Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math in the Design of a Miniature Golf Course Eglinton and Winton t%FMWJOHJOUP%BUB/VSUVSJOH0VS5BMFOUFE&MFNFOUBSZ.BUIFNBUJDJBOT t(PJOH(SFFOXJUI.BUI.BOJQVMBUJWFT Newberry 36.3 Ocean Explorations: Hands-on science in the classroom and beyond! Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter Fractions Arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Trains - They Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Run On A Schedule, They Happen All Year Long Grand Salon 19 35.1 How the parents of Promising ELL students respond to their low math achievement? Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter 35.2 Networked Learning for the Net Generation Poster Session/NAGC Learning Quarter

Sunday, November 6 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

222

Without Geometry, Life Is Pointless Or Paper Folding and Mathematically Talented Students Rosedown Snapshots of Gifted Science Programs Inspiring and Engaging Elementary Students and Driven by Best Practices Rosedown

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


| Speaker index Index A

Abeel, Laurie ............................... 133 Acar, Selcuk................................. 176 Adams, Cheryll ...... 9, 43, 78, 93, 110 Albert, Liz............................... 22, 174 Alencar, Eunice.............................. 71 Alimin, Mona Mohammad ....... 36, 79 Allen, Celita ................................... 70 Allen, Cindy ................................... 89 Allen, Kim .............................. 30, 102 Almarode, John ........................... 150 Alspach, Brian ............................. 129 Alvarez, Charles .......................... 159 Ambrose, Don ..................... 182, 186 Amend, Edward ............................ 79 Anderson-Miller, Gae ... 158, 167, 184 An, Dong Gun ......................... 21, 72 Anthony, Colleen ................... 59, 158 Arabie, Claire ................................. 97 Aronson, Joshua ..................... 31, 67 Asher, Randy ............................... 127 Assouline, Susan.... 81, 94, 139, 162, 172 Atkinson, F. Margret .................... 187 Augustyn, Katie ........................... 122 Austin, Kathy ................................. 56 Azano, Amy 110, 120, 137, 146, 159, 174

B

Bacsal, Rhoda Myra ................ 20, 85 Bailey, Brenda ............................. 107 Baldwin, Lois ................... 10, 95, 177 Balsamo, Kathy ........................... 188 Banbury, Mary ............................. 107 Baska, Ariel ................................... 60 Baskin, Heather ............................. 33 Basu, Ajith ..................................... 78 Batenburg, Ann ........................... 111 Baum, Susan ......................... 57, 177 Baxter, David ................................. 87 Bayless, Pam............................... 167 Beam, DeAnna .............................. 22 Beasley, Jennifer ........................... 61 Beck, Diana ................... 23, 161, 186 Behrens, Wendy .................... 92, 157 Beisner, Marjorie.................. 137, 143 Beltchenko, Laura ............... 155, 187 Benbow, Camilla ..................... 31, 83 Bendelman, Karen ........................ 86 Berman, Kimberly ........................ 178

Besnoy, Kevin ...................... 102, 144 Betts, George .................... 4, 10, 174 Bieh, Katie ..................................... 45 Bilby, Brooke ............................... 112 Binder, Rima ................................ 160 Blair, Randee ................................. 61 #MBOBT 7JDLZ ................................. 33 Bland, Lori ............................. 66, 182 Blando, Catherine ....................... 123 Blankenship, Mindy ....................... 95 Blauvelt, Darcy ............................ 142 Blecker, Norma .............................. 22 Bone, Eric ................................ 24, 75 Bonin, Sally.................................... 50 Borland, James ........................... 188 Boswell, Cecelia .................... 92, 110 Boudreaux, Jackie....................... 189 Bridges, Circe...................... 169, 189 Briggs, Candyce ........................... 43 Briggs, Christine ............ 22, 123, 168 Brighton, Catherine ......... 47, 79, 106 Britt, Glenda ................................ 140 Broaddus, Jill ................................ 51 Brody, Linda ................................ 129 Brooks, Jennifer ............................ 69 Brown, Elissa ......................... 76, 100 Brown, Katherine ................... 40, 175 Brownlee, Joan.................... 121, 171 Bruce-Davis, Micah ....................... 65 Brulles, Dina .... 11, 74, 124, 176, 185 Brunner, Marguerite ......... 80, 94, 120 Bryant, Carla.................................. 42 Bryant, Lorna ......................... 77, 103 Buchner, Rick ................................ 66 Bunch, Ardene .............................. 52 Buras, Suzanne ........................... 135 #VSOFZ 7JSHJOJB........................ 15, 67

C

Cacchio, Megan .......................... 176 Caffrey, Janine ............................. 174 Callahan, Carolyn ..... 28, 56, 80, 100, 120, 137, 139, 153 Campbell, Liza ............................ 122 Campbell, Will ............................. 132 Cannaday, Jessica ................ 80, 175 Carey, Robin ............................ 10, 59 Carney, Tracey ......................... 40, 53 Carter, Carol .......................... 62, 177 Casa, Tutita ............ 65, 135, 148, 168 Cash, Richard M. ..... 4, 51, 100, 143, 165 Castellano, Jaime........ 3, 11, 83, 162 Cayirdag, Nur .............................. 176 Cesarano, Melissa ...................... 162 Chae, Yoojung ..................... 109, 163 Chamberlin, Scott ........................... 9

Chancey, Jaclyn .................. 131, 153 Chandler, Jean .............................. 90 Chandler, Kimberley 9, 11, 39, 57, 81, 105, 182 Check, Heather ........................... 103 Cherry, Shawn ......... 11, 17, 113, 152 Chichekian, Tanya ............. 23, 35, 88 Cho, Cynthia............................ 61, 86 Chodakiewicz, Shirley ................... 51 Cho, Seokhee.............................. 164 Christensen, Paula ................ 20, 170 Clarenbach, Jane .................... 34, 67 Clelland, Debbie .................... 41, 125 Clinkenbeard, Pam ...................... 100 Clinkenbeard, Pamela ................. 170 Cockroft, Barbara ........................ 169 Cohen, LeoNora .................... 71, 145 Cohen, Nancy ............................. 156 Coil, Carolyn .................. 37, 166, 188 Colangelo, Nick ..... 94, 112, 162, 172 Cole, Shelbi ................................... 47 Coleman, April ................... 18, 48, 63 Coleman, Laurence ....... 15, 165, 186 Coleman, Mary Ruth ............. 15, 189 Collins, Linda ................................. 56 Collins, William .............................. 56 Coltrane, Geoff ............................ 100 Comallie-Caplan, Lori.......... 122, 152 Comeaux, Germaine ..................... 50 Compton, Laura .......................... 169 Connell, Elizabeth ....................... 123 Cooper-Schroeder, Lyndi ............ 114 Corbiere, Dotty .............................. 60 Corwith, Susan .............................. 69 Cotabish, Alicia ....... 26, 77, 128, 159 Cote, Richard .............................. 142 Couillard, Katie ............................ 136 Couvillon, Kay ............................. 123 Coxon, Steve ................. 37, 112, 117 Cramond, Bonnie .......................... 72 Croft, Laurie ................... 19, 123, 136 Cross, Jennifer ............................ 182 Cross, Tracy ................ 101, 184, 186 Crowder, Isabelle......................... 175 Crumley, Erika ............................. 167

D

Dack, Hilary ................................... 38 Dai, David .................................... 184 Dailey, Deborah ....... 26, 77, 128, 159 Dale, Jo ......................................... 37 Dalrymple, Odesma ...................... 13 Dalton, Arcelia ............................... 45 Danielian, Jeff .............................. 139 Daniels, Elizabeth ........................ 127 Daspit, Toby................................... 48 Davis, Joy Lawson .................. 64, 73

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| Speaker index Dechau, Pamela .......................... 130 DeGennaro, April............. 53, 77, 134 Deitz, Christine ............................ 110 DeJean, Lisa ................................. 68 Delcourt, Marcia .................... 78, 183 Delisle, James ....................... 73, 117 Demahy, Beth ................................ 50 DeRosier, Christina ...................... 140 DeRouen, Karen ............................ 50 %F7SJFT "SMFOF .............................. 25 Deyamport, Elvira .......................... 58 Dixon, Felicia ............. 33, 51, 90, 139 Dobyns, Sally ...................... 123, 168 Dole, Sharon ............................... 124 Donaghey, Richard...................... 138 Donaldson, Julie ........................... 24 Doobay, Alissa............................... 94 Douglas, Deborah ......................... 40 Drapeau, Patti.................. 74, 91, 142 DuBois, Denise.............................. 51 Dullaghan, Barbara ............. 9, 23, 51 Duncan, Daphne ................. 9, 64, 97 Dunn, Emalie ................................. 28 Duys, David ................................. 112

E

Ecke, Laurie................................... 44 Eckert, Rebecca ...................... 25, 34 Eggleston, Marilyn......................... 56 Elms, Kimberly .............................. 90 Esperat, Andrea .................. 118, 162 Estes, Fred .................................... 52 &XJOH 7BOFTTB ............................. 61

F

Fairweather, Elizabeth ......... 131, 175 Fairweather, Thomas ................... 131 Farrell, Shirley .......................... 17, 93 Feierabend, Heather ..................... 68 Ferguson, Stephanie ................... 138 Fiedler, Ellen ................ 118, 156, 188 Fink, Beverly ................................ 103 Firmender, Janine .......... 65, 135, 168 Fisher, Robert ................................ 68 Fitzsimmons, Magdalena .............. 85 Fleith, Denise................................. 71 Flick, Anne ................................... 106 Flint, Lori ........................................ 91 Flowers, Lamont .......................... 137 Fogarty, Elizabeth .............. 4, 59, 116 Follin, Melissa .............................. 136 Ford, Becky ................................. 128 Ford, Donna .... 79, 95, 126, 134, 171 Foreman, Connie......................... 104 Foster, Joanne ............................... 89 Foster, Lisa .......................... 110, 146 Fox, David ..................................... 73

224

France, Bethany A. ...................... 115 Franklin-Rohr, Cheryl ................... 149 Frazier, Kathy ............................... 132 Fredrickson, Jenny ........................ 88 Freeman, Melissa ........................ 175 Friedman-Nimz, Reva ................. 141 Friedrichs, Terence .............. 113, 118 Fuchs, Howard ............................ 167 Fulton, Deirdre ............................... 51

G

Gaa, John .......................... 16, 68, 88 Gallagher, James ........ 165, 186, 188 Gallagher, Rebecca ..................... 169 Gallagher, Rosina ........................ 152 Gallagher, Shelagh ................ 30, 106 Ganus, Laura................................. 61 Garcia, Lisa ................................. 149 Gates, Jillian ................................ 131 Gauthier, Aleice ............................. 44 Gavin, Katherine ........ 9, 65, 148, 168 Gelbar, Nicholas ............................ 94 Gelgi, Fatih .................................... 46 (FNFSU -JTB7BO ......................... 168 Gentry, Marcia ......... 28, 96, 124, 188 George, Betty .............................. 163 Georgiades, Stephanie ............... 163 Germundson, Amy ................ 54, 159 Giampaolo, Alessa ................ 88, 154 Giap, Nga ...................................... 18 Gibson, Kay................................... 65 Gifford, Cindy ................................ 59 Gilbert, Boyd ................................. 13 Gilliam, Karen .............................. 138 Giraldo, Leslie ............................... 60 Gold, Robert ................................ 114 Goldsmith, SaDohl ........................ 43 Gold, Susan ................................ 114 Gong, Xiaopeng ...................... 43, 93 Gonzalez, Julie .............................. 67 Goodgame, Steve ....................... 149 Gottschalk, Jennifer .................... 158 Graham, Carol ............................. 177 Graham, Karen ............................ 133 Grantham, Tarek .......................... 126 Green, Christy ............................... 32 Green, Nancy .................................. 8 Greenspon, Thomas ............. 70, 172 Griffith, Allyson .............................. 45 Gross, Miraca ........................ 43, 104 Gyarmathy, Amy ............................ 33 Gyles, Petra ................. 23, 35, 77, 88

H

Haas, Steven ......................... 30, 125 Hahn, Edna Hernandez de ......... 130 Hahn, Elizabeth ........................... 157

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz

Hailey, Emily .......................... 27, 137 Haj-Broussard, Michelle .............. 115 Hall, Denise ................................. 153 Hall, Linda ..................................... 52 Hammack, Merla ........................... 52 Hanson, Faye .............................. 133 Harmon, Deborah ........... 79, 95, 126 Harms, Megan .............................. 68 Harner, William E. .................... 31, 93 Haroutounian, Joanne................... 48 Harrison, Gregory ........................ 142 Harvey, Sue ........................... 38, 121 Hawk, Glenda.............................. 104 Hayes, Cynthia ............................ 140 Haymore, Teresa ........................... 45 Hazelton, Deborah ................ 39, 145 Heacox, Diane ....................... 91, 187 HĂŠbert, Tom ............... 2, 71, 115, 172 Hedrick, Kelly A. .................... 31, 105 Heilbronner, Nancy .................. 17, 65 Heine, Carl............................. 69, 178 Helbling, Joe ....................... 108, 135 Helfer, Jason.................. 37, 182, 186 Henderson, Christine .................. 189 Henfield, Malik ............... 79, 112, 126 Herman, Gail ............................... 139 Hermann, Katherine ...................... 71 Hernandez, Norma ........................ 83 Hertberg-Davis, Holly ...... 28, 56, 159 Hertzog, Nancy B. ........... 50, 62, 135 Higgins, L. Dennis ................. 44, 136 Hines, Meg Easom........................ 45 Hingle, Carolyn ............................ 124 Hipp, Jamie ................................... 58 His, Olha........................................ 96 Hitt, Cindy ...................................... 60 Hoctor, Marge........................ 39, 145 Hoffman, Jennifer .......................... 31 Hollingsworth, Patricia ........... 29, 162 Holt, Deborah .............................. 171 Honeck, Ellen ................ 53, 162, 183 Housand, Angela .................. 12, 102 Housand, Brian . 10, 12, 59, 102, 182 Howard, Lynn .............................. 113 Hubbard, Gail ...................... 105, 171 Hudson, Patrice........................... 124 Huey, Lynn ..................................... 46 Hughes, Claire .... 9, 34, 79, 130, 147 Hughes, Gail ......................... 77, 159 Hunsaker, Scott ....................... 15, 34 Hurley, Erica .................................. 78 Hutchinson, Linda ......................... 47 Hutton, Barbara ............................. 36 Hwang, Yun-Jae .......................... 150 HyeYu, Ji ...................................... 150


I

Imbeau, Marcia ..................... 50, 119 Ingalls, Wendy ............................. 170 Inman, Tracy ............ 25, 92, 128, 139 Izzo, Robert ............................. 36, 80

J

Jackson, P. Susan ....................... 149 Jackson, Sue ............................... 186 Jacobs, Joan ................... 25, 38, 121 Jang, Shin Ho ........................ 80, 177 Jechura, Jeanine ......................... 107 Jen, Enyi .............................. 155, 188 Jeong, Taekhil................................ 24 Johnsen, Susan...... 2, 3, 15, 67, 126, 184 Johnston, Jennifer ....................... 156 Jolly, Jennifer ............... 108, 119, 139 Jones, Kathee ............................... 18 Jones, Kathy................ 109, 157, 186 Jones, Shannon .................... 53, 143 Jung, Hyun-chul .................. 109, 163 Jung, Hyun-Chul ......................... 126 Jung, Jae Yup................................ 27

K

Kane, Michele........ 39, 103, 156, 188 Kanevsky, Lannie .................. 41, 116 Kang, Jinju .................................. 135 Kang, Wan ............................. 80, 177 Kaplan, Sandra ............... 39, 73, 145 Kapushion, Blanche .................... 174 Karnes, Frances .......................... 106 Kaufeldt, Martha .......................... 141 Kauffman, John ............... 21, 37, 167 Kaufmann, Felice ........................ 160 Kearney, Kathi ......................... 20, 36 Keilty, Bill ....................................... 64 Kelly-Young, Kimberly .................. 164 Kendrick, Tiombe-Bisa .......... 70, 152 Kerr, Barbara ................... 50, 59, 125 Kettler, Todd........................... 26, 184 Kimball, Karen ..................... 137, 143 Kim, Daehyun .......................... 28, 40 Kim, Jae-Young ..................... 80, 177 Kim, Jungsun ........................ 86, 166 Kim, Kapsu ............................ 80, 177 Kim, Moo-kwang ......................... 170 Kim, Nikki ...................................... 86 Kirk, Joy ......................................... 29 Kirsch, Lauri ...................... 8, 67, 173 Kirschman, Nicholas ............. 58, 155 Klein-Ezell, Colleen...................... 107 Knapp, Stuart ................................ 91 Kogan, Robyn ............................... 86 Kolar, Christopher........................ 127

Kolloff, Penny................................. 90 Kopelman, Clark.......................... 162 Kotzubei, Deborah Beckmann ...... 13 Krisel, Sally ........................ 11, 45, 67 Kuo, Yi-Lung .......................... 92, 141 Kurup, Anitha................................. 78 Kwon, Chi-Soon .................... 80, 177

L

Laing, Peter ................................. 162 Lambert, Amber ............................ 77 Lam, Patrick Hak-Chung ............. 120 Landrum, Kimberly ...................... 120 Landwehr-Brown, Marjorie ............ 65 Lane, Mary Anne ........................... 81 Lanfair, Jordan ............... 23, 161, 186 Langley, Susan Dulong ................. 12 Lansdowne, Kimberly............ 90, 176 Latz, Amanda .......................... 78, 93 Laurent, Donna............................ 116 Lawrence, Christopher .................. 71 Leader, Wendy ...................... 59, 174 Leahy, Brendan ............................. 71 LeBoeuf, Josetta ........................... 63 Lee, Ji Ae ..................................... 170 Lee, Kelly ................................. 16, 88 Lee, Sarah ............................. 30, 102 Lee, Seon-Young ................... 44, 150 Lee, Seung-Yun ............................. 72 Lee, Woo-kyung .......................... 170 Lefort, Debbie.............................. 116 Lemoine, Jennifer .......................... 32 Lentz, Leah .................................... 89 Leppien, Jann................ 50, 119, 134 Lerwick, Patry .............................. 146 Lewandowski, Pam ....................... 44 Lewis, Gina ............................ 41, 127 Lewis, Michelle ............................ 132 Lewman, Ginger .......................... 186 Lim, Zeb .............................. 125, 132 Lindbergh, Stacey ................. 30, 169 Lindebrekke, Karen ..................... 146 Little, Catherine ..................... 31, 112 Little, Cindy.................................. 110 Little, Derek ................................... 87 Little, Remeka................................ 37 Lloyd-Zannini, Lou ......... 68, 139, 158 Lohman, David .............. 32, 165, 184 Lord, Wayne ................................ 184 Lubinski, David ........................ 31, 83 Lupkowski-Shoplik, Ann ................ 81 Lyle, Marcy .................................... 51 Lyons, Ruth ......................... 108, 185

M

MacDougall, Jamie ............... 25, 162 MacFarlane, Bronwyn ........... 32, 152

Makel, Matthew ................... 160, 176 Malek, Rosanne .................... 15, 123 Mall, Kristy ..................................... 32 Malueg, Carol .............................. 158 Mammarella, Donna .................... 108 Mangum, Jennifer ......................... 28 Mann, Eric L. ............................... 168 Mann, Rebecca ..................... 97, 155 Manzella, Teresa.......................... 113 Manzone, Jessica ................. 39, 145 Marino, Ellen................................ 135 Marks, Kathy ................................. 26 Marron, Maureen ................. 162, 172 Martin, Ellice ................................ 159 Marty, Melanie ............................... 85 Mashburn, Carole........................ 183 Massicotte, Cindy.......................... 51 Mathews, F. Neil ............................ 70 Matschiner, Ann ............................. 24 Matthews, Michael .. 36, 93, 108, 160 McAnallen, Rachel .............. 163, 185 McBee, Matthew ........................... 42 McBride, Kerri.............................. 151 McCoach, D. Betsy 55, 112, 115, 184 McCormick, Kimberly .................... 39 McDonald, Julie Lenner ................ 26 McGee, Christy............................ 130 McHardy, Robbie ........................ 114 McIntosh, Jason .......................... 171 McIntyre, Judy ............................. 144 McPherson, Suzanne .................. 166 Mendaglio, Sal ............................ 182 Merritt, Dodie ................. 52, 107, 143 Messer, Patty ................................. 72 Meszaros, Melinda ...................... 104 Meulemans, Leah ........................ 113 Meyer, Katharine............................ 80 Mihan, David ................................. 93 Miller, Amber.................................. 20 Miller, Angie ................................... 77 Miller, Janice .................................. 46 Miller, Rachelle ...................... 28, 113 Mintz, Chelsey ............................... 96 Miro-Mejias, Ana ........................... 41 Missett, Tracy ........................ 80, 153 Mitchell, Melissa .............. 36, 63, 153 Molbak, Heidi .............................. 152 Moon, Geoffrey ................... 138, 148 Moon, Sidney ........................ 56, 139 Moon, Tonya .................... 47, 79, 106 Moore III, James .......................... 137 Moss, Andrew ............................. 174 Muratori, Michelle ................ 136, 152 Myers, Debra ............................... 170

N

Naglieri, Jack............................... 176 Nail, Krystal ................................... 26

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| Speaker index Nester, Jonathan ......................... 108 Neumeister, Kristie Speirs ........... 165 Newell, Sara ........................ 130, 156 Newman, Jane ........................ 48, 63 Newsom, Theresa ......................... 56 Nicpon, Megan Foley .............. 79, 94 Nielsen, Elizabeth .................. 44, 136 Nobbe, Christine ................... 58, 155 Noyce, Pendred ............................ 60

O

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien, Rebecca .......................... 72 Odoardi, Rebecca ......................... 76 Ogea, Amy .................................. 128 Oh, ChangHo ...................... 126, 163 Oh, Sarah ........................ 79, 94, 137 Olenchak, Richard..... 16, 68, 88, 152 Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula .... 8, 9, 44, 139, 150, 165 Olthouse, Jill .................. 33, 160, 168 Omdal, Stuart .................. 35, 95, 145 Omdal, Stuart N. ........................... 10 Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Meara, Jodi .......................... 41, 60 Owens, Robin ................................ 29

P

Pagnani, Alexander ............... 29, 113 Palka, Jackie ................................. 63 Pan, Yi ........................................... 42 Paris, Kim ............................ 105, 119 Parker, Evalee ................................ 66 Park, Mangoo ........................ 80, 177 Paul, Kathy .................................... 54 Paul, Kristina................................ 182 Pearcy, Patty ................................ 129 Pearis, Kristen ............................. 160 Peine, Marie................................... 19 Pennington, Leighann .. 36, 121, 154, 176 Pereira, Nielsen ............... 13, 96, 113 Pereles, Daphne ...................... 10, 95 Periathiruvadi, Sita................... 17, 58 Perrault, Lisa.................... 29, 62, 177 Peters, Dan .................................. 115 Peterson, Francisca .................... 109 Peterson, Jean Sunde ... 11, 115, 175 Peters, Scott .................... 42, 93, 124 Pfeiffer, Linda ................................. 92 Pfeiffer, Steven ............................... 42 Phelps, Connie .................. 4, 20, 116 Pierce, Rebecca ................ 43, 78, 93 Piirto, Jane..................................... 89 Pitts, Jennifer ............................... 127 Plucker, Jonathan ........................ 119 Plybon, Sheri ............................... 122 Prevatte, Mary Ann ...................... 140 Price, Debra .................................. 41 Price, Kelly ..................................... 57

226

Puri, Sabina ................................. 155 Putallaz, Martha........................... 176

Q

Quatrano-Hatzidimitriou, Cheryl.... 84

R

Rakow, Susan............ 3, 54, 117, 150 Rawlins, Suzanne .......................... 41 Ray, Kathy ........................... 157, 186 Reed, Meg ..................................... 90 Reese, Derek ................................. 63 Reffel, James................................. 21 Reinert, Lindsey............................. 88 Reis, Sally ...................... 12, 112, 134 Renzulli, Joseph .............. 12, 69, 188 Renzulli, Sara................................. 94 Reupert, Dana ............................... 74 Reynolds, Linda .......................... 156 Ricci, Mary Cay ........................... 121 Richard, Laurie .............................. 89 Richards, Susannah .............. 72, 156 Riggs, Michele............................... 76 Rimm, Sylvia ............ 40, 55, 115, 117 Rinn, Anne ....................... 17, 58, 139 Risberg, Cathy............................. 157 Roberts, Julia Link ... 3, 4, 25, 92, 128 Robertson, Janice ............... 141, 160 Robertson, Stephanie ................... 42 Robinson, Ann .... 12, 15, 42, 77, 100, 159 Robinson, Nancy . 100, 170, 182, 188 Roche, Bill ........................... 138, 149 Rogers, Cyd .................................. 53 Rogers, Karen ......... 2, 4, 29, 76, 116 Romey, Barbara ............ 48, 131, 172 Romey, Elizabeth........... 48, 131, 172 Rosenberg, Daniel ...................... 114 Rosen, Rhoda ............................. 133 3PTF 7BMJKB .................................. 152 Ross, David ................................. 142 Ross, Kathleen .............................. 86 Rubenstein, Lisa.............. 55, 77, 140 Ruf, Deborah ............................... 183 Ryan, Sharon ................................. 42 Ryder, Karren............................... 115 Ryu, Chun-Ryol ................... 109, 163 Ryu, Jiyoung........................ 126, 163

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Sabatini, Ellen................................ 45 Salsedo, Cynthia ......................... 133 Salyers, Meghan ......................... 126 Samson, Douglas........................ 124 Sanderson, Elfi ............................ 130 Sauder, Adrienne ......................... 131 Sauret, Belinda .............................. 44

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz

Sayler, Michael .............................. 19 Scheibel, Susan .......................... 145 Schmidt, Pamela ......................... 136 Schock, Pat ........................... 38, 121 Schollaert, Kelly ............................. 45 Schroth, Stephen ... 23, 37, 161, 182, 186 Schuler, Patricia ............................. 79 Schultz, Chris ................................ 13 Schultz, Robert ................ 49, 64, 178 Scott, Michelle Frazier Trotman .... 79, 126 Sealey, Angie ............................... 140 Seidel, Jane ................................. 146 Seney, Bob ............................ 62, 184 Seymour, Dana ...... 35, 127, 157, 173 Shade, Patti ............................. 21, 75 Shade, Rick ............................. 21, 75 Shah-Coltrane, Sneha ........... 76, 189 Sharma, Jyoti ................................ 78 Shaunessy, Elizabeth .................. 163 Sheets, Cindy ................ 10, 109, 140 Sheffield, Linda........................ 13, 82 Sheldon, Ann ................................. 67 Shepherd, Paul .............................. 34 Shinneman, Sara ......................... 144 Shore, Bruce ................... 23, 35, 116 Siegle, Del ..... 8, 18, 55, 67, 115, 165 4JFSSB .BSBEFMPT%PMPSFT7BMBEF[ ... 77 Simon, Margaret............................ 50 Sisk, Dorothy ......................... 63, 103 Skyba, Olha ................................... 69 Slade, Mary ........................... 26, 154 Smeets, Stijn ............................... 145 Smith, Brandon ........................... 144 Smith, Fiona ................................ 123 Smith, Jennifer............................... 87 Smith, Kenneth ...................... 54, 138 Smith, Wanda .................. 29, 62, 177 Smutny, Joan........................... 37, 85 Snyder, Kate .................................. 55 Solomon, Marianne ......... 21, 53, 102 Sondel, Heather .......................... 127 Sornik, Melissa ............................ 117 Southern, Thomas ......................... 15 Speer, Roxanne ........................... 119 Spielhagen, Frances ............... 60, 82 Sricharoen, Noparat .................... 176 Stambaugh, Tamra ........ 31, 127, 145 Stein, Mary Kathryn ....................... 95 4UFJO 7JDLJ ................................... 102 Stephens, Kristen R................. 8, 106 Stephenson, Sally ....................... 139 Stewart, Sheri Nowak .................. 141 Stobaugh, Rebecca ...................... 75 Stockton, Melissa ........................ 103 Stockton, Richard .................. 22, 168


Stonequist, Susan ....................... 138 Strang, Tara ................................. 113 Subotnik, Rena ............ 100, 139, 150 Summers, Amy ............................ 138 Sumner, Cynthia ............................ 95 Susewind, Catherine ............... 24, 75 Sutcliffe, Pamela.................. 138, 148 Swarzman, Joyce ........................ 163 Swicord, Barbara......................... 161

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Tamsberg, Merle............................ 96 Tassell, Brad ................................ 109 Tassell, Janet ..................... 9, 75, 128 Taylor, Melvin ............................... 186 Taylor, Stacia.................................. 88 Thomas, Linor ............................... 95 Thompson, Michael Clay .. 23, 38, 61 Thompson, Taylor .......................... 96 Tieso, Carol L. ............................... 10 Tipple, Caleb ................................. 93 Tolan, Stephanie ............................ 34 Tomlinson, Carol.................... 38, 154 Toney, Jennifer ............................... 74 Toth, Rena ................................... 108 Toy, Royal .............................. 35, 157 Trail, Beverly .................. 3, 9, 52, 147 Treffinger, Don ............................... 87 Trinter, Christine ............... 47, 79, 106 Troester, Jennifer ........................... 12 Truckey, Jacquelynn .................... 158 Turner, Betty ................................. 128

7BO5BTTFM#BTLB +PZDF. 2, 4, 13, 31, 67, 186 WBO7MJFU )FMFO............................ 123 7FESPT 5SBDJ ................................ 189 7FJMMPO #FMJOEB .............................. 39 7PMFUJ 1SJZB .................................. 161 7VZL ."MFYBOESB.............. 116, 132

Wagner, Kristy ............................. 124 Wai, Jonathan.............................. 176 Waite, Susan ................................. 19 Walker, Cheryl.............. 23, 35, 77, 88 Walker, Deborah .......................... 132 Wall, Lindsey ................................... 9 Wallace, Carla ............................... 51 Wallace, Patricia ............................ 17 Walsh, Rosalind..................... 62, 111 Walsh, Thomas............................ 108 Washington, Anthony .................. 153 Watson, Jay ................................. 127 Webb, James ...................... 118, 165 Weber, Christine .............. 41, 92, 173 Wedberg, Kyle ............................. 115 Weimholt, Katrina ............................ 9 Wenzel, Linda .............................. 163 Westberg, Karen ......................... 119 West, Christy ............................... 166 West, John Thomas .................... 149 Westphal, Laurie............................ 57

Whitaker, Gyimah .......................... 70 White, Cindy .................................. 45 Whiteman, Claire ........................... 94 Whitney, Carol ............................. 169 Whitney, Richard ......................... 169 Widhalm, Pat ............................... 115 Wilkerson, Tammy ....................... 140 Williams, Carol Ann ............... 22, 168 Williams, David ............................ 120 Williams, Julia ................................ 97 Williams, Karen.............................. 90 Wilson, Suzanne.......................... 108 Wiltshire, Jay ............................... 132 Winfield, Caroline ........................ 167 Wininger, Steven.......................... 128 Winkler, Daniel ............................. 119 Winton, Beth ................................ 132 Wood, Betty ......................... 122, 148 Woodel, Billie ............................... 183 Wood, Larry ......................... 122, 148 Wood, Patti ............................ 10, 137 Wood, Tammy ............................. 189 Wu, Jiaxi ........................ 96, 155, 188 Wynn, Susan ................................... 8

Y

Yang, Jenny ................................. 164 Yang, Yang........................... 113, 188 Yoon, So Yoon ............................... 78 Yoruk, Sureyya ............................. 104 Young, Adena ................................ 27 Young, Kerry ................................ 133

The Conceptual Foundations Network of the National Association for Gifted Children presents

Portraits in Gifted Education: The Legacy Series NEW!

An Afternoon with Alexinia Y. Baldwin This fourth DVD in the series honors Alexinia Baldwin, distinguished scholar, professor, and theorist in the field of gifted education, and champion of underserved populations.

Please Join Us

for the videotaping for the next DVD in the Series featuring Donald Treffinger on Friday, November 4, 4:00 - 5:30 pm, Versailles Ballroom

Also Available:

Dialogue with Jim Gallagher A Conversation with Joe Renzulli An Evening with Annemarie Roeper Get Your DVDs Today NAGC Central (booth 809) in the Exhibit Hall Or order online at www.nagc.org


Exhibit Hall Floor Plan

| Convention Maps

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Bus Departures

NAGC Central

Registration

4 5 6

1 2 3

15

24 12

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General 8 11 Sessions 14 17 20 Concurrent Sessions

13 16

22 10

19 7

NAGC Exhibit Hall

GRAND BALLROOM


| Convention Maps

What is the Hilton Riverside Conference Center? The Hilton Riverside Conference Center is in the Riverside Building. It is accessible from two guest room corridors, as well as a crosswalk to the main lobby area of the hotel. Look for signs with arrows helping you navigate your way.

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


second

floor

The NAGC Learning Quarter

POOL

Windsor

Newber r y

Ascot

Third Floor

FOUNTAIN ROOM

JEFFERSON BALLROOM

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NAGC Learning Quarter, Second Floor

| Convention Maps

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| Exhibitor Workshop Listing FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4th

Navigator Study Guides

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Kimberley Chandler, Center for Gifted Education, College of William and Mary

Publish Hardcover Books in Your Classroom… In Minutes! Janice Miller, Lintor Make-A-Book Learn how to create hardcover books right in your classroom! Come see a myriad of publishing ideas for your K-12 students showcasing the Lintor Make-A-Book process for easy and affordable classroom publishing. See how much fun it is to integrate technology and literacy while meeting national/state standards. NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area A

Building a Learning Community with Talents Unlimited

Developed by the Center for Gifted Education at the College of William & Mary as a language arts resource for teachers and students, each Navigator is a collection of questions and activities intended to support group or independent study of a selected novel or picture book. Novel studies should encourage advanced readers to develop their skills at analyzing and interpreting literature through structured questions and activities that highlight themes and concepts, literary elements, and real world connections contained within the books. In addition, novel studies are opportunities for students to develop their own vocabulary and writing skills by exploring and emulating the language and style used by authors. NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area B

Lynn Huey, Talents Unlimited

12:45 PM - 1:30 PM

The Talents Unlimited model provides a structure for teaching students how to solve problems and use information they have learned in new ways. By incorporating the Talents critical/creative thinking skills model into the current instructional program, the school leaders can create an effective learning community that enhances creativity, innovation, and collaboration.

Notebook Foldables®: Interactive Notebooking + 3D Notetaking

NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area B

Evalee Parker, Dinah Might Adventures Come learn how Notebook Foldables can bring interactive notebooks to a whole new level. Cut, fold and glue to “advance potential” and interests in any content. Participants will leave with an example and Foldable ideas that are brain-friendly.

11:45 AM - 12:30 PM NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area A

Differentiating Instructions with Menus in the Multiple-Ability Classroom Albert’s Insomnia: All your Answers for K-8 math! Laurie Westphal, Prufrock Press

Rick Buchner, RJB3 Games Through the use of choice menus, teachers meet the needs of all students, especially their gifted. This session introduces menus, their various uses from compacting to extension and the basic considerations when implementing them in the classroom. Templates will be shared! NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area A

Albert’s Insomnia comes fully equipped for the educator to easily differentiate the level of play based on the student’s abilities and skill levels. With this affordable tool, educators can add to their curriculum to solidify math facts, teach order of operations, and develop critical and creative skills. It is a great mental “warm-up” to prepare and focus the mind for learning any subject. NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area B

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| Exhibitor Workshop Listing 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

Research-Based Teaching Models That Engage Gifted Students Kimberley Chandler, Kendall-Hunt Publishing For nearly 25 years the Center for Gifted Education at the College of William & Mary has documented the value of teaching and learning models and created curricula based upon that research. Learn about practice models for language arts, science, and social studies that promote high-level thinking and engage advanced learners. NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area A

Demystifying the Learning of Algebra Mary Anne Lane, Borenson & Associates Hands-On Equations® demystifies the learning of algebra. Learn about the visual and kinesthetic system for

The NAGC Advocacy Power Pack for Parents and Other GT Supporters

Leap Tall Buildings! Stop Speeding Locomotives! Harness the Power Within!

introducing algebraic concepts to young students. See how it applies to verbal problems. NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area B

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5th 10:30AM - 11:30AM

Using Play to Build the 7 C’s of Resiliency Patty Pearcy, SimplyFun Children have abilities and strengths that help them cope with everyday life. An importance life skill to have is strong resiliency and is build upon through the 7 C’s: Competence, Confidence, Connection, Character, Contribution, Coping and Control. What better way to strengthen this skill than through the power of PLAY! NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area A

Leveling Up From Player to Designer Brian Alspach, Gamestar Mechanic Explore the power of video game design to educate, engage, and empower students, develop critical 21st Century skills and build a motivation for STEM learning and careers. NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area B

You don’t have to be a super hero or even strap on a cape to stand up for high-ability learners! It just takes the right tools and information. Once again, NAGC comes to YOUR rescue!

Hungry?

Check out the grab and go food carts in the Hotel.

Your NAGC Advocacy Power Pack contains: Â 10 Myths About Gifted Education (great to hang in classroom!) Â Set of Three Brochures designed to use with Administrators: Â Gifted Children’s Bill of Rights (put one in your wallet and on your desk -- we’ll give you 5) Pick up yours today -- and buy one for a friend!

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National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


11:45AM - 12:30PM

12:45PM - 1:30PM

Radical Acceleration and Gifted Girls

Developing and Administering a School for the Highly Gifted

Stephanie Ferguson, Program for the Exceptionally Gifted, Mary Baldwin College Proper educational placement can mean the difference between gifted girls reaching their potential or simply biding their time in school. This presentation will discuss the research surrounding radical acceleration and how the Program for Exceptionally Gifted at Mary Baldwin College utilizes it effectively.

John Thomas West, Mirman School for Gifted Children The Mirman School for Gifted Children serves highly gifted elementary and middle school students ranging from ages 5-15 and grades 1-9. This workshop presents aspects of the governance, mission, program, and sustainability of this independent non-profit school. NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area A

NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area A

Build and Experiment with a BYO-Bot - An Academic Achievement is Only the Beginning… affordable behavior based robot Karen Gilliam/Amy Summers, The National Beta Club

Steve Goodgame, KISS Institute for Practical Robotics

Academic achievement is the foremost requirement for membership in The National Beta Club but that is only the beginning. Join us to learn how National Beta Club members are putting their achievement into action by serving their local and global communities.

A BYO-bot is a mechanically reprogrammable robot that responds to light. It is a great introduction to the world of robots. They have been used as an introduction to transistor electronics, demonstrating feedback and closed-loop control. Easily assembled by children in grade three and above. Attend and build one.

NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area B NAGC Learning Quarter, Workshop Area B

Ready? Set? Learn!

Those who registered to attend the full Convention will have access to recorded sessions FREE. Now you really can be two places at once! You will have access to the sessions (audio synced to PowerPoint slides) and handouts through June 2012. The new NAGC Live Learning Center will launch in mid December. It gives you “just-in-time”, 24/7 access to content by topic, all at YOUR convenience. You’re just a click away.

Visit today.

Live Learning Center™

The NAGC Live Learning Center is also “home” to the NAGC Webinars on Wednesdays.

www.nagc.org

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| Exhibitor Listing ALEKS Corporation 15641 Red Hill #150 Tustin, CA 92780 (714) 245-7191 x 152 (714) 245-7190 (fax) www.aleks.com info@aleks.com BOOTH: 413

Alpha + Excel

600 Blank Honors Center Iowa City, IA 52245 (319) 335-6127 (319) 335-5151 (fax) www.education.uiowa.edu/belinblank Emily Ladendorf emily-ladendorf@uiowa.edu BOOTH: 312

Museo De Ciencias No. 133 Tlalne Pantla, Mexico 54054 00-52-55-53986401 www.alphaexcel.com Ivana Turekova info@alphaexcel.com BOOTH: 703

Bia-Maranatha

American Mensa

1719 W. Nickerson Seattle, WA 98119 (800) 488-5068 (206) 284-3660 (fax) www.bbks.com Keith Johnson keith@bbks.com BOOTH: 602

1229 Corporate Dr. W Arlington, TX 76006 (817) 607-0060 (817) 649-5232 (fax) www.us.mensa.org info@americanmensa.org BOOTH: 215

Asia Pacific Conference on Giftedness 2012 PO Box 10161 Dubai, United Arab Emirates 00-971-4-2829299 00-971-4-2828767 (fax) www.giftedness2012.com Walid A. Farghal walid@giftedness2012.com BOOTH: 706

Ball State Center for Gifted BU 109 Ball State University Muncie, IN 47306 (765) 285-5390 (765) 285-3783 (fax) www.bsu.edu/gifted Cheryll Adams cadams@bsu.edu BOOTH: 412

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Belin-Blank Center

/PSUI7JFX$U Laurel, MD 20707 (301) 326-9223 Bridget Anyaji BOOTH: 214

Bilingual Books

BizWorld

444 DeHaro Street #203 San Francisco, CA 94107 (415) 503-5880 (415) 863-2072 (fax) www.bizworld.org April Bond april.bond@bizworld.org BOOTH: 313

Borenson and Associates P.O Box 3328 Allentown, PA 18106 (800) 993-6284 (610) 398-7863 (fax) www.borenson.com Mary Geschel info@borenson.com BOOTH: 516

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz

Botball Educational Robotics 1818 W. Lindsey Street Building D, Suite 100 Norman, OK 73069 (405) 579-4609 (405) 329-4664 (fax) www.botball.org Steve Goodgame sgoodgame@kipr.org BOOTH: 701

Bright Ideas/A.W. Peller 344 Wagaraw Rd Hawthorne, NJ 07507 (800) 451-7450 (973) 423-5569 (fax) www.brightideascatalog.com Neil Peller nlpeller@optonline.net BOOTH: 301

Camp Invention

3701 Highland Park NW North Canton, OH 44720 (800) 968-4332 x1987 www.campinvention.org Dawn Hosni dhosni@invent.org BOOTH: 402

Center for Bright Kids Regional Talent Center 9975 Wadsworth Pkwy K2 #504 Westminster, CO 80021 (303) 428-2634 (303) 428-2638 (fax) www.centerforbrightkids.org Amy Rushneck cbk@centerforbrightkids.org BOOTH: 505

Center for Gifted Education College of William and Mary P.O. Box 8795 8JMMJBNTCVSH 7" (757) 221-2166 (757) 221-2184 (fax) www.cfge.wm.edu Kimberley Chandler cfge@wm.edu BOOTH: 309


Center for Gifted Education Concordia Language Villages University of Arkansas at Little 901 8th Street South Rock Moorhead, MN 56562 2801 S. University Ave, SUARM101 Little Rock, AR 72204 501-569-3410 501-569-3438 (fax) www.ualr.edu/gifted Paulette Edison pmedison@ualr.edu BOOTH: 315

Center for Gifted Studies Western Kentucky University 1906 College Heights Boulevard, #71031 Bowling Green, KY 42101 (270) 745-5991 (270) 745-6279 (fax) www.wku.edu/gifted Julia Roberts julia.roberts@wku.edu BOOTH: 108

Center for Talent Development at Northwestern University 617 Dartmouth Place Evanston, IL 60208 (847) 491-3782 (847) 467-4283 (fax) www.ctd.northwestern.edu Lisa Gail Elkuss l-elkuss@northwestern.edu BOOTH: 507

Center for Talented Youth Johns Hopkins University 5801 Smith Ave., McAuley Hall Suite 400 Baltimore, MD 21209 (410) 735-6278 (410) 735-6220 (fax) www.cty.jhu.edu Stacy Johnson ctyinfo@jhu.edu BOOTH: 504

Dinah Might Adventures

(218) 299-4496 (218) 299-3700 www.concordialanguagevillages.org Alissa Maier amaier@cord.edu BOOTH: 615

PO Box 690328 San Antonio, TX 78269 (830) 995-3800 (830) 995-5205 (fax) www.dinah.com Sara Potter sara@dinah.com BOOTH: 414

Creative Learning Press

Discovery Student Adventures

CTB/McGraw Hill

Discovery Toys

The Daimon Institute for the Highly Gifted and PowerPlay Strategies Inc.

Disney Youth Group Programs

P.O. Box 320 Mansfield Center, CT 06250 (888) 518-8004 (860) 429-7783 (fax) www.creativelearningpress.com customerservice@ creativelearningpress.com BOOTH: 109

107 Springtree Drive Brandon, MS 39042 (601) 591-1080 (601) 591-1081 (fax) www.ctb.com Susan Magee susan_magee@ctb.com BOOTH: 707

P.O. Box 45034 Ocean Park RPO 4VSSFZ #$$BOBEB7"-* (604) 538-0816 (604) 538-5602 (fax) www.powerplay4success.com Bill Roche bill@powerplay4success.com BOOTH: 513

The DBQ Project

425 Lee St. Evanston, IL 60202 (847) 475-4007 (847) 475-4007 (fax) www.dbqproject.com Chip Brady chip@dbqproject.com BOOTH: 705

1956 Ambassadors Way Spokane, WA 99224 (509) 568-7935 www.discoverystudentadventures.com Anson Lee anson.lee@ discoverystudentadventures.com BOOTH: 713

6749 Allsa Dr. Slidell, LA 70460 (985)649-1078 (985)643-5180 (fax) www.ruthtoys.com Ruth Snyder ruthsnyder@bellsouth.net BOOTH: 407

PO Box 10,111 -BLF#VFOB7JTUB '- (407) 566-6530 (407) 566-7689 (fax) Dahlia Sanchez dahlia.m.sanchez@disney.com BOOTH: 114

Drake University School of Education 3206 University Ave. Des Moines, IA 50311 (515) 271-3906 (515) 271-4812 (fax) www.drake.edu/soe Jean Hansen jean.hansen@drake.edu BOOTH: 415

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| Exhibitor Listing Duke Talent Identification Program 1121 West Main Street Durham, NC 27701 (919) 668-9100 (919) 668-9139 (fax) www.tip.duke.edu Emily Swartzlander eswartzlander@tip.duke.edu BOOTH: 506

EAI Education

118 Bauer Dr. Oakland, NJ 7436 (201) 891-9466 x7600 (201) 891-05689 (fax) www.eaieducation.com Barbara Tuzzeo btuzzeo@eaiusa.com BOOTH: 704

Early College At Mary Baldwin Mary Baldwin College Box 1500 4UBVOUPO 7" (540) 887-7203 (540) 887-7187 (fax) www.mbc.edu/earlycollege Stephanie Ferguson sferguson@mbc.edu BOOTH: 106

East Baton Rouge Parish School System 1050 South Foster Drive Baton Rouge, LA 70806 (225)922-5481 (225) 218-8324 (fax) www.ebrschools.org Daphne Donaldson ddonaldson@ebrschools.org BOOTH: 712

Equal Exchange

50 United Dr. West Bridgewater, MA 2379 (774) 776-7372 www.equalexchange.coop 7JSHJOJB#FSNBO vberman@equalexchange.coop BOOTH: 603

Florida Institute of Technology 150 W. University Blvd. Melbourne, FL 32901 (321) 674-8382 (321) 674-7050 (fax) http://aba.fit.edu Student Coordinator abareg@fit.edu BOOTH: 512

Fox Imaging, LLC

98 High St. P.O. Box 541 Tilton, NH 3276 (603) 266-1053 (603) 286-2113 (fax) www.foximaging.com Dave Fox dave@foximaging.com BOOTH: 601

Free Spirit Publishing 217 Fifth Ave North Suite 200 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 338-2068 (612) 337-5050 (fax) www.freespirit.com Emily Allen allen@freespirit.com BOOTH: 207

Engine-Uity

PO Box 9610 Phoenix, AZ 85068 (602) 997-7144 (602) 997-0974 (fax) www.engine-uity.com Mary Cole engine-uity@qwestoffice.net BOOTH: 100

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Frog Publications

11820 Uradco Place Suite 105 San Antonio, FL 33576 (800) 777-3764 x 206 (352) 588-0863 (fax) www.frog.com Wendy Alli conferences@frog.com BOOTH: 409

Future Problem Solving Program International 2015 Grant Place Melbourne, FL 32901 (800) 256-1499 (321) 768-0097 (fax) www.fpsi.org Marianne Solomon marianne@fpspi.org BOOTH: 500

Gamestar Mechanic 363 7th Ave 20th Floor New York, NY 10001 (212) 534-3275 (781) 240-0062 (fax) www.elinemedia.com Brian Alspach brian@elinemedia.com BOOTH: 607

Gary K. Herberger Young Scholars Academy

ASU West, PO Box 37100 MC1252 Phoenix, AZ 85069-7100 (602) 543-8274 (602) 543-6900 (fax) herbergeracademny.asu.edu Kimberly Landsdowne kimberly.landsdowne@asu.edu BOOTH: 510


Gifted Education Resource Institute - Purdue University 100 N. University St. BRNG 5108A West LaFayette, IN 47907 (765) 494-7243 (765) 496-2706 (fax) www.purdue.edu/geri geri@purdue.edu BOOTH: 112

Great Books Foundation

35 East Wacker Drive Suite 400 Chicago, IL 60601 (800) 222-5870 x 255 (312) 407-0334 (fax) www.greatbooks.org Tom Kershner tom.kerschner@greatbooks.org BOOTH: 208

Great Potential Press 7025 E. 1st Ave. Suite 5 Scottsdale, AZ 85251 (888) 946-2314 (480) 946-2307 (fax) www.giftedbooks.com Laura Royal laura@giftedbooks.com BOOTH: 107

Hickory Grove Press

3151 Treeco Lane Bellevue, IA 52031 (563) 583-4767 (563) 583-4767 (fax) www.challengemath.com Ed and Sara Zaccaro challengemath@aol.com BOOTH: 113

Interact

10200 Jefferson Lane Culver City, CA 90232 (800) 421-4246 (800) 944-5432 (fax) www.socialstudies.com Aaron Willis aaron@socialstudies.com BOOTH: 115

Jack Kent Cooke Foundation

LEGO Education

Kendall-Hunt Publishing

Lintor Make-A-Book, Inc.

1121 W. Main St. Durham, NC 27701 919-668-0248 919-668-9141 (fax) www.jkcf.org Bomi Roberson broberson@tip.duke.edu BOOTH: 508

4050 Westmark Drive Dubuque, IA 52002 (563) 589-1075 (563) 589-1163 (fax) www.kendallhunt.com Lynn Steines lsteines@kendallhunt.com BOOTH: 611

Kiwi Kids

PO Box 310251 Miami, FL 33231 (305) 256-7880 (305) 256-7816 (fax) www.parkwestpubs.com Brian Squire mail@parkwestpubs.com BOOTH: 710

Knowsys Educational Services

PO Box 1707 Pittsburg, KS 66762 (866) 420-5346 (620) 231-4767 (fax) www.legoeducation.com Brandy Pryor brpyor@legoeducation.us BOOTH: 217

6249 Presidential Court Suite A Ft. Meyers, FL 33919 (866) 286-3992 (239) 939-3381 (fax) www.lintorpublishing.com Janice Miller info@lintorpublishing.com BOOTH: 511

Math Olympiads

2154 Bellmore Avenue Bellmore, NY 11710 (516) 781-2400 (516) 785-6640 (fax) www.moems.org Dorothy Hess info@moems.org BOOTH: 411

9300 S IH 35 Ste A500-453 Austin, TX 78748 (512) 961-8522 877-794-1186 (fax) www.ktprep.com Kevin Griffith kgriffith@ktprep.com BOOTH: 308

MathTwister, LLC

Laurel Springs School

Mind Vine Press

1615 West Chester Pike West Chester, PA 19382 (484) 947-2056 (484) 947-2004 (fax) www.laurelsprings.com Caroline Colantuno caroline.colantuno@nlcinc BOOTH: 708

7090 N. Oracle Road Suite 178, MB#197 Tuscon, AZ 85704 www.mathtwister.com Benjamin Bosley benjaminbosley@gmail.com BOOTH: 517

70727 Copper Blvd. Lawton, MI 49065 (269) 978-7227 (269) 978-6871 (fax) www.mindvinepress.com Melanie Bondy melanie@mindvinepress.com BOOTH: 702

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| Exhibitor Listing Mirman School for Gifted Children 16180 Mulholland Dr. Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 775-8418 (310) 471-1532 (fax) www.mirman.org Jocelyn Balaban jbalaban@mirman.org BOOTH: 317

Nathan Levy Books/Elite Educational Resources

18 Moorland Blvd Monroe Twp, NJ 8831 (609) 968-6450 www.eliteeducationalresources.net Scott Hobson eliteeducationalresources@yahoo.com BOOTH: 303

National Beta Club

151 Beta Club Way Spartanburg, SC 29306 (800) 845-8281 (864) 542-9300 (fax) www.betaclub.org Karen Gilliam kgilliam@betaclub.org BOOTH: 610

Pearson

(SFFO7BMMFZ%SJWF Bloomington, MN 55437 (952) 681-3514 (952) 681-3298 (fax) www.psychcorp.com Wendy Jewell wendy.jewell@pearson.com BOOTH: 501

Pieces of Learning

1990 Market Rd Marion, IL 62959 (618) 964-9426 (800) 844-0455 (fax) www.piecesoflearning.com Kathy Balsamo info@piecesoflearning.com BOOTH: 401

240

Pitsco Education

Riverside Publishing

Prufrock Press

RJB3/Albert’s Insomnia

Renzulli Learning, A Division of Compass Learning

Royal Fireworks Press

915 E. Jefferson Pittsburg, KS 66762 (800) 835-0686 (800) 533-8104 (fax) www.pitsco.com Ashlei Bockover bockovera@pitsco.com BOOTH: 216

P.O. Box 8813 Waco, TX 76701 (254) 756-3337 (254) 756-3339 (fax) www.prufrock.com Ginny Bates gbates@prufrock.com BOOTH: 101

203 Colorado St. Austin, TX 78901 (877) 4290-1955 (888) 833-5044 (fax) www.renzullilearning.com Diana Britton dbritton@compasslearning.com BOOTH: 606

Ricks Center for Gifted Children - Institute for the Development of Gifted Education 2040 S. York St Denver, CO 80208 (303) 871-2982 (303) 871-3197 (fax) www.du.edu/ricks Ellen Honeck ehoneck@du.edu BOOTH: 311

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz

3800 Golf Rd Suite 100 Rolling Meadows, IL 60008 (630) 467-6029 www.riversidepublishing.com Kristin Nemerow kristin.nemerow@hmhpub.com BOOTH: 212

P.O. Box 390222 Snellville, GA 30039 (678) 787-4524 (770) 465-5149 (fax) www.rjb3games.com Rick Buchner rick@rjb3games.com BOOTH: 609

P.O. Box 399 Unionville, NY 10988 (845) 726-4444 (845) 726-3824 (fax) www.rfwp.com TM Kemnitz mail@rfwp.com BOOTH: 201

Saint Joseph’s University Online Degree Programs 5600 City Avenue Philadelphia, PA 19131 (866) 758-7670 www.sju-online.com Becky Rice online@sju.edu BOOTH: 711

Scholastic Testing Service 480 Meyer Rd Bensenville, IL 60106 (630) 766-7150 (866) 766-8054 (fax) www.ststesting.com Scott Rich srich@ststesting.com BOOTH: 502


School Technology Resources 4DPUUT7BMMFZ%S 4DPUUT7BMMFZ $" (877) 395-1001 (831) 430-9806 (fax) www.strscopes.com Mark Hoffman ealden@strscopes.com BOOTH: 700

School Tours of America

P.O. Box 550379 Houston, TX 77255 (866) 543-8687 (713) 722-8320 (fax) www.schooltoursofamerica.com Frank Harvey frank@sta-mail.com BOOTH: 605

Seacamp

1300 Big Pine Ave Big Pine Key, FL 33043 (305) 872-2331 (305) 875-2555 (fax) www.nhmi.org Chuck Brand info@nhmi.org BOOTH: 417

SENG

P.O. Box 488 Poughquag, NY 12570 (845) 226-4660 (845) 226-4660 (fax) www.senggifted.org Amy Price amy.price@sengifted.org BOOTH: 110

Set Enterprises

16537 E Laser Drive Suite 6 Fountain Hills, AZ 85268 (480) 837-3628 (480) 837-5644 (fax) www.setgame.com Bree Popp bpopp@setgame.com BOOTH: 410

SimplyFun

BOOTH: 316

11711 SE 8th Street #110 Bellevue, WA 98005 (425) 289-0858 x 311 (425) 289-0868 (fax) www.simplyfun.com Marian Ellestad marian@simplyfun.com BOOTH: 800

Space Camp and Aviation Challenge One Tranquility Base Huntsville, AL 35805 (800) 637-7223 (256) 890-3373 (fax) www.spacecamp.com Tom White tomw@SPACECAMP.COM BOOTH: 604

Summer Institute for the Gifted 9 West Broad St. Stamford, CT 06902 (203) 399-5504 (203) 399-5455 (fax) www.giftedstudy.org Barbara Swicord bswicord@giftedstudy.org BOOTH: 209

Super Duper Publications

PO Box 24997 Greenville, SC 29616 (800) 277-8737 (800) 978-7379 (fax) www.superduperinc.com customerhelp@superduperinc.com BOOTH: 803

Talents Unlimited 1 Magnum Pass PO Box 180069 Mobile, AL 36618 (251) 221-5178 (251) 221-5179 (fax) Lynn Huey lhuey@mcpss.com

Texas Instruments P.O. Box 650311 Dallas, TX 75265 1-800-TI-CARES www.education.ti.com ti-cares@ti.com BOOTH: 801

Tin Man Press

PO Box 11409 Eugene, OR 97440 (800) 676-0459 (888) 515-1764 (fax) www.tinmanpress.com Matt Rasmussen tinman@tinmanpress.com BOOTH: 213

Tomorrowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dream

281 Heritage Hills Dr. Spartanburg, SC 29307 (864) 431-0244 Paula Wiggs scqnpw1@bellsouth.net BOOTH: 806

University of Cincinnati P.O. Box 210002 410 Teachers College Cincinnati, OH 45221 (513) 556-2496 (513) 556-2483 (fax) http://cech.uc.edu Shelby Ellis ellissy@uc.edu BOOTH: 804

University of Connecticut NEAG Center for Gifted and Talented Development

2131 Hillside Road, Unit 3007 Storrs, CT 06269-3007 (860) 486-4826 (860) 486-2900 (fax) www.gifted.uconn.edu Heather Spottiswode heather.spottiswoode@uconn.edu BOOTH: 307

58th Annual Convention | November 3-6, 2011 | New Orleans

241


| Exhibitor Listing University of Missouri High School 136 Clark Hall University of Missouri Columbia, MO 65211 (800) 609-3727 (573) 882-6808 (fax) www.cdis.missouri.edu Bev Fox cdis@missouri.edu BOOTH: 408

Usborne Books

5PXFS7JFX%SJWF Taylor Mill, KY 41015 (859) 431-6269 (859) 431-6405 (fax) www.usborneusa.com Nancy Ann Wartman nawartman@aol.com BOOTH: 104

Wisconsin Center for Academically Talented Youth Univeristy of Wisconsin, Madison Suite 264 Education, BLDG 2250N. Mills St. Madison, WI 53706 www.wcaty.org (608) 890-3260 (608) 265-4309 (fax) Olha Skyba skyba@wisc.edu BOOTH: 709

Whittakerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

345 S. 100 E. Circleville, UT 84723 (435) 577-2587 (435) 577-2587 (fax) Daniel Whittaker fugarwee@gmail.com BOOTH: 716

Wholemovement

4606 N. Elston #3 Chicago, IL 60630 (773) 794-9764 www.wholemovement.com Bradford Hansen-Smith brad@wholemovement.com BOOTH: 314

World Council for Gifted and Talented WKU, Ransdell Hall, Room 2007 1906 College Heights Blvd. #11030 Bowling Green, KY 42101 (270) 745-4123 (270) 745-4124 (fax) www.world-gifted.org Tracy Harkins tracy.harkins@wku.edu BOOTH: 503

Thanks for joining us in New Orleans! Mark Your Calendar for these Upcoming NAGC Conventions 2012 59th Annual NAGC Convention & Exhibition Denver, Colorado November 15-18, 2012 2013 60th Annual NAGC Convention & Exhibition Indianapolis, Indiana November 6-10, 2013 2014 61st Annual NAGC Convention & Exhibition Baltimore, Maryland November 13-16, 2014 The session proposal submission process begins in December. Registration details are available in late March.

www.nagc.org/nagcconvention.aspx 242

National Association for Gifted Children | Advancing Potential and All That Jazz


Center for Gifted Education The College of William & Mary Williamsburg, Virginia

Graduate Programs The M.A.Ed. program in gifted education in Curriculum and Instruction is designed for teachers or administrators who already hold certification in early, middle, or secondary education, or endorsement in at least one area of special education. The Ph.D. Degree or Ed.D. Degree in Gifted Education Administration concentration in Educational Policy, Planning, and Leadership is designed for holders of masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degrees who wish to prepare themselves with the knowledge and skills required to assume leadership roles in gifted education at local, state, and national levels.

Research Opportunities The Center for Gifted Education at the College of William & Mary is interested in pursuing research in all areas related to gifted studies. Postdoctoral researchers are welcome to apply to the Center to engage in investigations of interest to them.

2012 Professional Development Conferences 17th National Curriculum Networking Conference March 8-9, 2012 Professional Summer Institute June 21-22, 2012 AP & Pre-AP Summer Institutes Pre-AP, July 23-27, 2012 AP, July 30-August 3, 2012

Programs for Children and Their Families Focusing on the Future Who: High-Ability Students in Grade 6-12 and their Parents When: January 28, 2011 (9:00 am - 3:00 pm) Summer Enrichment Program Who: Eligible Rising Kâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Rising 9th Grade Students When: Session I: July 9-13, 2012 Session II: July 16-20, 2012 For more information contact: or visit

757-221-2362 or cfge@wm.edu http://cfge.wm.edu


Center for Gifted Education The College of William and Mary Williamsburg, Virginia

William & Mary Research-based Curriculum for Gifted Students Winner of 13 NAGC Curriculum Studies Network Awards

Curriculum units available in language arts, science, social studies, and mathematics. Curriculum units available for purchase through: Prufrock Press (www.prufrock.com) Kendall Hunt Publishing (www.kendallhunt.com) Other curriculum products available for purchase through the Center for Gifted Education at the College of William and Mary For more information contact: 757-221-2362 or cfge@wm.edu or visit http://www.cfge.wm.edu/Curr_listing.html COME VISIT US AT BOOTH 309 IN THE EXHIBIT HALL!


                                     


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The Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth identifies and develops the talents of the most promising K-12 students worldwide. As part of Johns Hopkins, CTY helps fulfill the university’s mission of preparing students to make significant future contributions to our world.

Welcome NAGC Conference Members! Say Hello! Stop by Exhibit Hall Booth 504 Meet Elaine Hansen, CTY’s new executive director, during the CTYhosted refreshment break on Saturday November 5, from 11:45 to 12:30 in the NAGC Learning Quarter.

Elaine is the former President of Bates College, Maine, and former Provost at Haverford College.

www.cty.jhu.edu


CHALLENGE, INSPIRE, ENGAGE. Looking for lifelong opportunities for your gifted and talented student? The Duke University Talent Identification Program, a nonprofit organization dedicated to serving academically talented youth, works with students, parents, and educators to identify, recognize, and engage students to help them reach their highest potential. Our programs include s s s s

talent searches to identify and support gifted youth, dynamic educational experiences on the Duke University campus, throughout the United States, and abroad, independent and distance learning opportunities, and resources for parents and educators.

LEARN MORE. Visit us at booth 506, go to www.tip.duke.edu, or call (919) 668-9100.


Early College at Mary Baldwin

It’s one thing when you expect more from her. It’s another when she expects more from herself. Program for the Exceptionally Gifted The only residential program of its kind in the nation, PEG offers gifted young women as young as 13 the chance to begin their college careers early.

Early College Academy Students 16 or 17 years of age can choose to complete high school degree requirements in tandem with college courses. Mary Baldwin believes in excellence for every woman, every day. Come discover how women who are ready for college instead of high school are exceeding their own expectations at MBC.

To learn more call 540-887-7324 or e-mail EarlyCollege@mbc.edu www.mbc.edu/EarlyCollege

Mary Baldwin College The confidence to lead… the compassion to serve… the courage to change the world.


Center for Creative Learning Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Your Guide with 21st Century skills for 21st Century challenges In a Complex World n! at CCL o D s n io t ends a i l r F u t d a n gr sa

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Visit us at: http://creativelearning.com Phone: 941 . 342 . 9928 Email: info@creativelearning.com


The Center for Gifted Studies Offering Programming for Gifted Children and Young People, Educators, and Parents

Opportunities for Educators

Opportunities for Gifted Children and Young People

Leadership Institute XVI December 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2, 2011

Super Saturdays Fall â&#x20AC;&#x201C; October 29, November 5, 12 & 19, 2011 Winter â&#x20AC;&#x201C; January 28, February 4, 11, & 18, 2012

Advanced Placement Institute June 24â&#x20AC;&#x201C;29, 2012 Gifted Endorsement (online, except for a two-week practicum)

Dr. Julia Link Roberts Executive Director The Center for Gifted Studies Western Kentucky University 1906 College Heights Blvd. #71031 Bowling Green, KY 42101-1031

Travel to France May 28 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; June 6, 2012 The Summer Camp for Academically Talented Middle School Students (SCATS) June 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;22, 2012 The Summer Program for Verbally and Mathematically Precocious Youth (VAMPY) June 24 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 14, 2012

WEBXXXXLVFEVHJGUFEtEMAILHJGUFE!XLVFEVtPHONE: 270.745.6323


The Newest Form of the Abilities Test More Educators Choose The Cognitive Abilities TestTM (CogATÂŽ), Form 7 measures studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; verbal, quantitative, and nonverbal reasoning abilities, providing a valid data point for determining gifted and talented placement decisions as well as instructional strategies. Authored by Dr. David F. Lohman of the University of Iowa, CogAT builds on its core strengths and now: :"*.4"*.36&./2&"*2.&33'/2.(,*3)".(5"(&&"2.&23 :&"352&3"2/"%".(&/'45%&.4&2'/2-".$& :''&23"&7$2&&.*.(/2In addition, CogAT features: :80".%&%2/'&33*/.",&6&,/0-&.4".%500/24 :,&8*#*,*49*.%-*.*342"4*/. :&7442"$4*6&&3*(. :&7&0/24*.(04*/.3

Visit Riverside at Booth #212 to learn more!

Register now for a pre-convention workshop presented by Dr. David F. Lohman, winner of NAGCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Paper of the Decade award in 2010. Thursday, November 3, 2011â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30 A.M. to 1:30 P.M. at the Marriott New Orleans at the Convention Center 859 Convention Center Boulevard The workshop fee is $50 and includes materials and lunch. Visit www.riversidepublishing.com/NAGC to register.

riversidepublishing.com/cogat7 800.323.9540


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Summer Institute for the Gifted Let your gifted child explore, learn and have fun this summer â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SIG Residential and Commuter Programs

For more than a quarter century, the Summer Institute for the Gifted (SIG) has offered 3-week residential, commuter and day programs for gifted students ages 4 to 17. SIG is designed to challenge students and provide a diverse curriculum blended with creative and fun summer camp recreation.

Students gain independence while taking a wide variety of exciting classes at prominent universities nationwide.

At SIG you haveâ&#x20AC;Ś 3 Diverse academics â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SIG has had a unique curriculum for gifted students for more than 27 years. 3 A connection with peers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SIG creates a community of like-minded students from all over the world who share common interests, abilities and goals. 3 A safe and secure, learning environment â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Student safety, security and health are the top priorities at SIG.

Ages 9 - 17, ages vary by location

Amherst College Dartmouth College* Princeton University* UCLA Vassar College

Bryn Mawr College Emory University UC Berkeley UT Austin Yale University*

*Ages 13 - 17 only

SIG Day Programs Ages 4-12, ages vary by location

Young academically gifted students can participate in captivating courses created to enhance existing talents while remaining close to the local community. Adelphi Academy Boston Academy University Bryn Mawr College Emory University Fairfield University The Hudson School Manhattanville College

Out of Door Academy Overlake School Sarah Lawrence College Sandy Spring School Stuart Country Day School Sierra Canyon School UT Austin

The SIG program is independent of any existing higher education program, separately administered and operated by SIG at all campuses listed above.

Contact us today!



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Join. Share. Learn. World Council for Gifted and Talented Children

Worldwide Advocacy for Our Gifted Children WCGTC is a worldwide non-profit organization that provides advocacy and support for gifted children. The WCGTC is a diverse organization networking the globe with an active membership of educators, scholars, researchers, parents and others interested in the development and education of gifted and talented children of all ages. The WCGTC consists of its Members, Executive Council, Delegates from member countries, and a Headquarters which recently relocated to Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green, Kentucky. For membership and other information about joining the World Council see www.world-gifted.org .

Meet us at the next WCGTC World Conference August 5-9, 2013 in Auckland, New Zealand. The 20th biennial conference is the official international event of the WCGTC. The conference coincides with the first International Year of Giftedness and Creativity. For registration and other information see www.worldgifted2013.com .


([SORUHOHDUQDQGKDYHIXQZLWK ([SORUHOHDUQDQGKDYHIXQZLWK Summer Institute for the

Gifted Gifted programs for students ages 4 for to 17! the Gifted Summer Institute Gifted programs for students ages 4 to 17! For more than a quarter century, the Summer Institute for the Gifted (SIG) has offered a variety of residential, commuter and day programs for gifted students. SIG is designed to For more than a quarter century,athe Summer Institute for thewith Gifted (SIG) and has offered a challenge students and provide diverse curriculum blended creative fun sumvariety of residential, commuter and day programs for gifted students. SIG is designed to mer camp recreation. challenge students and provide a diverse curriculum blended with creative and fun summer camp recreation.

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,0(-#. 2 &$+ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SIG has created unique curricula for gifted students for over 3 $. *+  27 years. $. *+  &$+ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SIG has created unique curricula for gifted students for over ('' ,$('/$,#) *+ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SIG creates a community of like-minded students from 27 years. all over the world who share common interests, abilities and goals. 3 ('' ,$('/$,#) *+ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SIG creates a community of like-minded students from 3 +! -* % '.$*('& interests, ', â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Student safety, all over'+ the world who*'$'" share common abilities andsecurity goals. and health are the top priorities at SIG. 3 +! '+ -* % *'$'" '.$*('& ', â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Student safety, security and health are the top priorities at SIG.  +$ ',$%'(&&-, **("*&+ Ages 9- 17, ages vary by campus Students gain independence while taking a wide variety of exciting classes at prominent  +$ ',$%'(&&-, **("*&+ Ages 9- 17, ages vary by campus universities nationwide. Students gain independence while taking a wide variety of exciting classes at prominent &(*0'$. *+$,0 Atlanta, GA Ages 9 - 17 June 24 - July 14, 2012 universities nationwide. -+,$' Austin, TX Ages 9 - 17 July 8 - July 28, 2012 &(*0'$. *+$,0 Atlanta, GA Ages 9 - 17 June 24 - July 14, 2012 -+,$' TX Ages 9 - 17 July 8 - College July 28, 2012 Amherst College Austin,Princeton University Vassar 3 3

Bryn Mawr College UC Berkeley Yale University Amherst College Princeton University Vassar College Dartmouth College UCLA Bryn Mawr College UC Berkeley Yale University Dartmouth College UCLA 0*("*&+ Ages 4-12, ages vary by site Young academically gifted students can participate in captivating courses 0*("*&+ Ages 4-12, ages vary remaining by site created to enhance existing talents while close to the local community. Young academically gifted students can participate in captivating courses &(*0'$. *+$,0 Atlanta, GA whileAges 5 - 8 close June 25 -local Julycommunity. 13, 2012 created to enhance existing talents remaining to the -+,$' Austin, TX Ages 5 - 8 July 9 - July 27, 2012 &(*0'$. *+$,0 Atlanta, GA Ages 5 - 8 June 25 - July 13, 2012 -+,$' Austin, TX Ages 5 - 8 July 9 - July 27, 2012  0('Ages 6-12, ages vary by site Gifted study programs beyond theages summer!  0('Ages 6-12, vary by site

Afterschool Programs | Weekend Workshops | Saturday Programs Gifted study programs beyond the summer! Afterschool Programs | Weekend Workshops | Saturday Programs

For a list of all SIG Day and SIG Beyond programs, please visit ///"$!, +,-0(*" For a list of all SIG Day and SIG Beyond programs, please visit ///"$!, +,-0(*"

The SIG program is independent of any existing education program, separately administered and operated by SIG at all campuses listed above. The SIG program is independent of any existing education program, separately administered and operated by SIG at all campuses listed above.

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H BOOT #702

INDEPENDENT PROJECTS AT THEIR BEST! Real-world exciting projects. Project guides that allow student choice. Resource cards that guide student work. Turn-key teacher manual and supplies. Extremely affordable. View materials, student portfolios, and speak with the author.

70727 Copper Blvd., Lawton, MI 49065 P: 269.978.7227 F: 269.978.6871 mindvinepress.com

Shattuck-St. Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

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A residential academic program for the gifted child whose passion is science and whose calling is medicine. Begin your pursuit nowâ&#x20AC;Śat Shattuck-St. Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Visit www.ssmbioscience.org or call (507) 333-1618

BioScience Program Director, Dr. Maren LaLiberty examines brain tissue with a BioScience Scholar.

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Bring the Camp Invention program to your school! Be among the thousands of schools that have partnered with the nonprofit Invent Now organization to provide summer enrichment in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) to promote critical-thinking skills essential to success in the 21st century. · Turn-key! All curricula, materials, training, and support included (staff stipends included in some models) · Designed for children entering grades one through six · An affordable means of professional development For further information visit www.campinvention.org, call 800.968.4332 x1987, or email campatmyschool@invent.org.

“The impact of programming of this caliber is threefold... children have fun learning 21st century life skills through STEM activities, educators receive quality professional development, and the district as a whole is invigorated – from parent accolades to a shared enthusiasm in the classroom.” – Tim James, Superintendent, Orange Elementary Schools Fourth-year Camp Invention host district

In partnership with: United States Patent and Trademark Office © 2011 Invent Now, Inc. All rights reserved. Photography: © PhotoAlto/Odilon/GettyImages


CREATIVE LEARNING PRESS Resources for High-End Learning

The Mentors-in-Print Series

Our How-To Books Help Students Become Active, First-Hand Investigators Instead of Passive Lesson Learners.

Visit our website or call for a catalog!

Creative Learning Press, Inc.    c    www.creativelearningpress.com


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Center for Talent Development Northwestern University

Assessment

Tools To Guide Advanced Students

NUMATS above grade-level testing provides valid assessment of gifted students in grades 3 through 9. We interpret scores and provide a wealth of information and resources. Teachers, students and parents can use NUMATS tools to chart an effective academic plan in the classroom and beyond.

Programs

t(JGUFE-FBSOJOH-JOLToffers rigorous online courses designed for academically talented students in K thru grade 12. Selections include enrichment, Honors and APÂŽ classes that may not be available in all schools. t*OEFQUIBDBEFNJDBOEMFBEFSTIJQQSPHSBNTare offered outside of school hours throughout the year.

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Celebrating 30 Years of Excellence! 1982 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2012 SCHOOL OF EDUCATION & SOCIAL POLICY


NAGC 58th Annual Convention Program  

Convention guide for NAGC Annual Convention & Exhibition, November 3-6, 2011, New Orleans, LA

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