Page 1

Natural Amenities

Governance, Leadership and Learning Environments

Economy and Prosperity

Growth-Oriented and Sustainable Infrastructure

Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036 Cornerstone to Capstone “Story County has built a solid foundation – the Cornerstone – with planning dating back to the 1950s. Now we are designing our blueprint – the Capstone – for how we grow and develop over the coming 20 years. The C2C Plan is a coordinated long range plan that is intended to be physical and policy-based.”

ADOPTED ON JUNE 7, 2016 STORY COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS


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Acknowledgements Board of Supervisors

Wayne Clinton Rick Sanders Paul Toot Marty Chitty

Planning and Zoning Commission Members

Aaron Steele Ruth Hulstrom Carla Barnwell Linda Murken Nancy Miller Marvin Smith

Jerry Cable Nancy Couser David Struthers Scott Wendt Susan Donaldson

C2C Citizens Task Force

Barb McBreen Marchelle Soe Jennifer Heithoff Wally Loney John Hall Sonia Arellano Dodd Tim Gartin Lynn Lathrop Steve Gray Marvin Smith Lynn Scarlett Margaret Jaynes

Penny Brown Huber Steve Lekwa Drew Kamp LaVon Schiltz Adam Gibson Chuck Winkleblack Nate Easter Ray Reynolds Brad Heemstra Al Bradish Mike Clayton Ottie Maxey

Amy Kohlwes Jerry Balmer Marc Soderstrum Ted Tedesco Jennifer Davies Cathy Brown Jody Gast Michelle Soupir Jason Ellingson Deb Schildroth Steve Goodhue Tyler Holck

Story County Conservation Board

Craig Meyers Dr. Nancy Franz Allen Weber

Dr. James Pease Ted Tedesco Wayne Clinton

C2C Project Team

Charlie Dissell Aaron Steele Darren R. Moon Debra A. Schildroth Drew Kamp Kelly Diekmann

Leanne Lawrie Harter Jerry Moore Matt Boeck Michael Cox Phil Mescher Ryan Newstrom

C2C Consultant Team MSA Professional Services, Inc.

Confluence | Landscape Architecture & Urban Design Design Workshop, Inc.

In Memory of

Paul Douglas Toot 1959-2016 It is not the honor that you take with you, but the heritage you leave behind. -Branch Rickey


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Table of Contents Chapter 1: Introduction 1.1 The Plan as a “Living Guide� 1.2 Planning Process and Area 1.3 Key Community Indicators

1-2

Chapter 2: Public Input 2.1 Public Engagement Overview 2.2 Public Open Houses 2.3 Community Workshops 2.4 Citizen Survey 2.5 Youth and ISU Surveys

2-2

Chapter 3: The Foundation 3.1 Vision and Goals 3.2 Goals, Objectives, and Strategies 3.3 Agricultural Resources 3.4 Community Facilities and Services 3.5 Housing 3.6 Communications and Public Safety 3.7 Emergency Preparedness 3.8 Cultural Resources 3.9 Infrastructure and Utilities 3.10 Intergovernmental Coordination Chapter 4: Conservation of Natural Resources and Recreation 4.1 Goals, Objectives and Strategies 4.2 Story County Strategic Plan 4.3 South Skunk River Water Trail 4.4 Inventory and Analysis 4.5 Conditions and Needs

3-2

Chapter 5: Land Use 5.1 Goals, Objectives, and Strategies 5.2 Future Land Use Designations 5.3 Existing and Future Land Use Maps

5-2

Chapter 6: Economic Prosperity 6.1: Background and Economic Information 6.2: Goals, Objectives, and Strategies

6-2

Chapter 7: Transportation 7.1 Goals, Objectives and Strategies 7.2 Existing Transportation Networks 7.3 Existing Planned and Proposed Efforts

7-2

Appendix A: Community Indicators Report A.1 Demographics A.2 Housing A.3 Transportation and Mobility A.4 Economic Prosperity A.5 Community Facilities and Services A.6 Community Character and Culture A.7 Collaboration and Partnerships A.8 Land Use

A-2

Appendix B: Surveys B.1 Citizen Survey Results B.2 Youth Survey Results Appendix C: Municipal and Surrounding County Comprehensive Plan Summaries C.1 Municipal Comprehensive Plan Summaries C.2 County Comprehensive Plan Summaries Appendix D: Plan Area Maps

B-2

4-2

C-2

D-2


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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

1 Introduction 2 This Chapter provides the foundation for the Comprehensive Plan, outlining why and how it was 3 developed. 4 Page The Plan as a “Living Guide� 1-2 5 1.1 1.2 Planning Process and Area 1-6 6 1.3 Key Community Indicators 1-8 7 Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C Appendix D


1.1

THE PLAN AS A “LIVING” GUIDE

Why Develop a Comprehensive Plan?

Iowa Smart Planning

It is difficult to know what the future may bring for Story County, or for any county. As residents and businesses come and go, and economic trends rise and fall, changes will occur. The purpose of the Cornerstone to Capstone (C2C) Comprehensive Plan is to establish a shared vision for Story County to guide future actions and decisions. This guidance provides predictability and consistency over time, which encourages investment. We plan so that we can act and react in a changing world with a confident understanding of our common values and goals.

The Iowa Smart Planning Act (State Code Chapter 18B), signed into law on April 26, 2010, includes three primary components:

Initiating the C2C Planning Process

The Iowa Smart Planning Act dictates the Ten Iowa Smart Planning Principles must be considered and may be applied when local governments and state agencies deliberate all appropriate planning, zoning, development and resource management decisions.

The C2C Plan was launched after it was decided there was a need for a truly comprehensive plan. The need was documented by the American Planning Association during a Planning Assistance Team visit and further developed through an internal Comprehensive Plan Audit. A Project Team was established to help guide the planning process and develop the C2C Plan.

C2C Plan Maintenance This planning document is a “living” guide for growth and change in Story County. The C2C Plan represents the County’s best effort to address current issues and anticipate future needs; however, it can and should be amended from time to time if conditions warrant reconsideration of strategies in the C2C Plan. If decisions are being made that are not consistent with the C2C Plan, then the Plan has lost its relevance and should be amended. The process of amending the C2C Plan should not be onerous, but it should trigger a brief pause to consider again the long term vision for the county. This C2C Plan’s value is dependent upon frequent use and occasional updates. The C2C Plan’s Implementation Matrix will be adopted in the Fall 2016.

1-2

1. Ten Iowa Smart Planning Principles; 2. Comprehensive Planning Guidance and 13 plan elements; and 3. Establishment of the Iowa Smart Planning Task Force.

The development of the C2C Plan, as well as its ongoing maintenance, considers these elements and incorporates, as applicable, the Ten Smart Planning principles of the Iowa Smart Planning Act.

The Ten Smart Planning Principles 1. Collaboration 2. Efficiency, Transparency, and Consistency 3. Clean, Renewable and Efficient Energy 4. Occupational Diversity 5. Revitalization 6. Housing Diversity 7. Community Character 8. Natural Resources and Agricultural Protection 9. Sustainable Design 10. Transportation Diversity

Comprehensive Planning Guidance The Iowa Smart Planning Act outlines 13 elements that may be included in a city or county’s comprehensive plan. 1. Public Participation 2. Issues and Opportunities 3. Land Use 4. Housing 5. Public Infrastructure and Utilities 6. Transportation 7. Economic Development 8. Agriculture and Natural Resources 9. Community Facilities 10. Community Character 11. Hazards 12. Intergovernmental Collaboration 13. Implementation


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Plan Organization The organization of the C2C Plan is based both on the planning process and the guidance provided by the Iowa Smart Planning Act. The C2C Plan is divided into seven chapters plus several important appendices, as described below: Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 1 discusses the role of this Plan, the planning process, the planning area, and key community indicators. Chapter 2: Public Input Chapter 2 describes the public participation methods and feedback. Chapter 3: The Foundation Chapter 3 defines a vision for the future of Story County, and the general guiding goals, objectives and strategies for elements of the Plan, including:

»» »» »» »»

»» Communications and Public Safety Agricultural Resources »» Infrastructure and Utilities Community Facilities »» Intergovernmental Coordination Housing »» Cultural Resources Emergency Preparedness

Chapter 4: Conservation of Natural Resources and Recreation Chapter 4 establishes the goals, objectives and strategies for preserving, protecting, and restoring our natural resources and recreation. Chapter 5: Land Use Plan Chapter 5 establishes the goals, objectives and strategies pertaining to land use decisions, describes current land use characteristics, defines future land use categories (and strategies), and presents the future land use map. Chapter 6: Economic Prosperity Chapter 6 establishes the goals, objectives and strategies pertaining to economic development decisions. Chapter 7: Transportation Chapter 7 establishes the goals, objectives and strategies pertaining to transportation planning and improvements. Appendix A: Community Indicators Appendix A is a compilation of data that describes the existing conditions, trends, and projections for Story County. This data informs the planning process and should be updated from time to time to track progress and change in Story County. Appendix B: Survey Results Appendix B includes the complete results from the public surveys conducted as a part of this planning process. Appendix C: Municipal and Surrounding County Comprehensive Plan Summaries Appendix C provides a condensed summary of the comprehensive plans and future land use plans for those communities within the county that previously adopted a comprehensive plan. Appendix D: Plan Area Maps

The Plan as a "Living" Guide | 1-3


1.2

THE PLANNING PROCESS AND AREA

Planning Process The Cornerstone to Capstone (C2C) Plan is all about looking forward to 2036. Story County has built a solid foundation - the Cornerstone - with planning dating back to the 1950s. This planning process designs our blueprint - the Capstone - for how we grow and develop over the coming 20 years. The C2C Plan is a coordinated long range plan that is intended to be physical and policy-based. A transparent public participation process is the foundation to a successful plan. The involvement of residents, business owners, and other stakeholders is essential to the creation and implementation of the plan. This Plan was discussed and developed through a series of working session meetings between March 2015 to March 2016 (see side bar for the project milestones). All meetings were public meetings and noticed as such. Meetings were advertised via public flyers, Story County and city websites and through social media.

Project Milestones C2C Project Team Meetings (meeting twice a month) March 2015 - March 2016

C2C Citizen Task Force Meeting #1 April 2015

Planning & Zoning Commission Workshop May 2015

Community Input Meetings

June 18 - June 30, 2015 (five locations)

C2C Citizen Task Force Meeting #2 June 2015

C2C Citizen Task Force Meeting #3 July 2015

C2C Citizen Task Force Meeting #4 and Partial Draft Presentations to P&Z and Board of Supervisors August 2015

C2C Citizen Task Force Meeting #5 September 2015

C2C Citizen Task Force Meeting #6 October 2015

Draft Presentations to P&Z and Board of Supervisors December 2015

Plan Review Open Houses

January - February 2016 (five locations and an online open house)

C2C Citizen Task Force Meeting #7 February 2016

Planning & Zoning Commission Workshop April 2016

Planning & Zoning Commission Recommendation May 2016

County Board Workshop May 2016

County Board Adoption June 2016

1-4


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Planning Area

Key Community Indicators

The study area for this Plan includes all lands in which the County has both a short and long-term interest in planning and development activity; therefore, the Planning Area includes all unincorporated lands within the County (see Figure 1.2 below). In total, the County covers approximately 367,360 acres (576 square miles).

The subsequent pages analyze the overarching population and demographic trends for Story County. Examination of these trends provides a foundation for the planning process and implementation of the C2C Plan. See Appendix A for a full report on the Story County’s Community Indicators.

STORY COUNTY BASE M

Figure 1.2: Planning Area Map

Legend Rivers and Streams Public Parks and Green Space Roads City Boundaries Railroad

STORY CITY ROLAND

MCCALLSBURG

ZEARING

This map provides essential base information about the coun the location of: rivers and streams, public parks and green sp railroads, and incorporated cities. In order to successfully plan it is essential to first understand and analyze the current cond relationships, and opportunities for improvement.

GILBERT

NEVADA

AMES

COLO

KELLEY

HUXLEY

COLLINS

CAMBRIDGE MAXWELL

SLATER SHELDAHL

0 0.5 1

2

3

4 Miles

´

GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)

The Planning Process and Area | 1-5


1.3

KEY COMMUNITY INDICATORS

Population 89,542 residents in 2010 Unincorporated Areas 10% Ames 66% Cambridge 1% Collins 1% Colo 1% Gilbert 1% Huxley 4% Kelley < 1% Maxwell 1% McCallsburg < 1% Nevada 8% Roland 1% Sheldahl < 1% Slater 2% Story City 4% Zearing 1%

Population Breakdown By Municipality There are fifteen municipalities within Story County, with the majority of the county’s population in the City of Ames. This area is home to Iowa State University (ISU) which had a record enrollment of 36,001 students in September 2015. The population of Ames’ permanent residents, which includes many ISU students, makes up roughly 66% of the county’s population. About 10% of the county’s population is in the unincorporated areas with the remaining 24% in the other 14 municipalities.

54

5 Zearing:

84 Roland: 1,2 y: 3,431 Story Cit 1,082 Gilbert:

urg: McCallsb

333

8,965

5 Ames:

Colo: 876

Nevada: 09 Kelley: 3 : 3,317 Huxley

Slater: 1,489

6,798

20

Maxwell: 9 29

8 Cambridge:

Collins: 495

Sheldahl: 319

Page data source: US Census Bureau 2010 Census

1-6


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

21% 17.8%

51.8%

14.3%14.3% 14.6% 10%

<18

20 - 25 24 34

35 49

50 64

48.2%

65+

Gender According to the US Census Bureau’s 2010 Census, the breakdown between female and male residents in the county is in line with the state’s percentages (49.5% male and 50.5% female for the state of Iowa).

Age In 2010, the median age in the county was 26.7, which is lower than the state’s median age of 36.6. Notably, the county has a significantly lower ratio of persons over the age of 50 as compared to the state (24.6%, compared to 34.5% statewide).

% Zearing:-9.8

.1% Roland:24

rg:14.0%

6.0%

McCallsbu

Story City:1

.9%

Gilbert: 35

20 Year Population Change

%

4.9 Ames: 2

From 1990 to 2010, Story County’s population increased by 23.8%. Much of this substantial growth can be attributed to increases in both students and staff at Iowa State University (ISU). During this same period, only one of the municipalities within the county saw a decrease in population, which was the City of Zearing (-9.8%). In general there was also a decrease in unincorporated population (-2.3%) or a migration out of the rural county.

Colo:13.6% .1% Nevada:13

Kelley:25.6% % uxley: 62.0

6.8%

Maxwell:1

H

Slater:17.4% Sheldahl:1.3%

dge:16.1%

Cambri

Collins:8.8%

Page data source: US Census Bureau 2010 Census

Key Community Indicators | 1-7


1.3

Housing 4.8%

Vacant Renter-Occupied

42.8% 52.4%

Average Median Value

Owner-Occupied

2010 Occupancy The majority of county residents live in owner-occupied housing. However, owner occupancy percentages have declined from 1990 to 2010 possibly due in part to the increase in multi-family housing units, higher home values and the student population in Ames.

Households: Persons Per:

The county’s median home value increased 43% from 2000 to 2015 (current year). Median value of $115,800 to current estimates of $165,800, which is significantly higher than the state’s median value of $134,700.

0

198

23,665 2.54

0

199

2015

Avg. Median Value

$165,800

000

2

25,941 2.45

29,383 2.39

0

201

35,196 2.34

1980-2010 Household Counts From 1980-2010, Story County showed a 48.7% increase in the number of households. This includes slow growth in households from the 1980s to the 1990s (6.7%) or less than 1% per year. During the same period, the state as whole increased by 10.9% or averaging just over 1% growth per year. The county’s “persons per household” count, also known as household size, dropped from 2.39 in 2000 to 2.34 in 2010, which is a reduction of 2.1%. During this same period, the state’s “persons per household” declined by 2.5% to 2.40. This trend is consistent with national trends over the past several decades and can be attributed to smaller family sizes, increases in life expectancy, and increases in single parent households. To be conservative in the projection of future housing demand, this analysis assumes a continued decline in household size of 1% per decade to forecast total households for years 2015, 2020, 2025 and 2030. As projected by the US Census, the county will see an increase of approximately 12,680 households between 2010 to 2030. This equates to an addition of approximately 13,254 housing units over the coming 20 years, an increase of 36%. The breakdown of which means an average of 660 housing units per year, or approximately 346 single-family dwellings and 314 multi-family dwellings per year for the next twenty years. The projected need of an average of 660 housing units per year is above the average housing starts per year recorded over the past 30 years in Story County. Page data source: US Census Bureau ACS Estimates

1-8


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Transportation <10 Minutes 23.2%

45 + 8.2%

10 to 14 25.5%

Commuting Time To Work 35 to 44 3.9% 30 to 34 6.6%

25 to 29 3.4%

Commuting Time to Work (2009-2013) Approximately 48.7% of the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commuters age 16 or older work within 14 minutes of their place of employment. Most of the workers are employed within Story County.

15 to 19 17.6% 20 to 24 11.6%

Single Occupancy

72.2%

Carpooled

8.9%

Walked

7.4%

Public Transportation

5.9%

Worked at Home

2.9%

Bicycle

1.9%

Other Means

0.8%

Commuting Method to Work (2009-2013) Commuting in Story County is mostly done by car and primarily in a single occupant vehicle (72.2%). This number is much lower than the state as whole, which is at 89.2%. Those who carpooled to work is slightly higher in Story County at 8.9%, as compared to 8.8% for the state. Workers who used public transit was substantially higher in the Story County as compared to the state as whole (5.9% to 1.1%, respectively). Those that biked and walked to work is substantially higher in the county compared to the state as well. The remainder of the means of travel were quite similar between Story County and the state as a whole.

Page data source: US Census Bureau ACS Estimates

Key Community Indicators | 1-9


1.3

Economic Prosperity Educational Attainment (2009-2013) High School 19.0% Educational attainment data can provide insight into the quality of the existing labor force, including the

Some College 19.5% availability of skilled and professional workers and Associate’s Degree 9.4% Bachelor’s Degree 28.7%

the need for training opportunities. Data from the American Community Survey (2009-2013) shows that the percentage of county residents 25 years or older having at least a high school diploma was slightly higher than the state as whole (95.5% vs 91.0%).

Graduate / Professional Degree 19.0% Those residents with bachelor’s and graduate degrees, High School or Higher

95.5%

Overall, Story County is very highly educated as compared to Iowa’s average. This is due to the presence of Iowa State University in Story County and the fact that education is highly valued by county residents.

Iowa

Story County

Income Trends

Per Capita Median Family Median Household Below Poverty Per Capita Median Family Median Household Below Poverty Souce: ACS, Census Bureau

however, were substantially higher in the county than the state (47.7% vs 25.7%). The comparison of high school graduates to associate’s degrees were substantially lower in the county versus the state (47.9% vs 65.2%).

Avg. 2009-2013 $25,986 $76,860 $50,516 6.2% $27,027 $65,802 $51,843 8.1%

US Census Definitions: Median Family - A family consists of two or more people (one of whom is the householder) related by birth, marriage, or adoption residing in the same housing unit. Median Household - A household consists of all people who occupy a housing unit regardless of relationship. A household may consist of a person living alone or multiple unrelated individuals or families living together.

Income Indicators (2009-2013) The above table reinforces the typical correlation between education and income. The median family income for the county is substantially higher than the state as a whole. However, the per capita and median household income is lower in the county than the state. Despite these lower incomes, the county has a lower rate of poverty than the state as a whole, reflecting the fact that people living below the federal poverty line tend to live in larger cities with more social services and transportation options.

1-10

Page data source: US Census Bureau ACS Estimates


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Management, Professional and Related

44.4%

Sales and Office

21.3%

Production, Transportation and Material Moving

10.3%

Service

16.6%

Natural Resources and Construction

7.4%

Occupations (2007-2011) Based on the American Community Survey (2007-2011), nearly 65.8% of workers in Story County earn a private wage and salary. This compares to 79.0% statewide. Residents in Story County as well as residents across the state, are primarily employed in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Management, Professional and Relatedâ&#x20AC;? sectors, over 44% for Story County and 34% for the state.

Page data source: US Census Bureau ACS Estimates

Key Community Indicators | 1-11


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1 2 Public Input Chapter summarizes the public input activities that 3 This helped to improve this Plan. These activities include 4 citizen surveys, community input meetings, and public informational meetings. It is important to note that the 5 information and opinions summarized in this Chapter the development of strategies in other parts of this 6 informed Plan, but there is no policy content in this Chapter. 7 Page Public Engagement Overview 2-2 Appendix A 2.1 2.2 Public Open Houses 2-4 Community Workshops 2-10 Appendix B 2.3 2.4 Citizen Survey 2-18 Appendix C 2.5 Youth and ISU Surveys 2-32 Appendix D


2.1

PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT OVERVIEW

Public Engagement Overview A transparent public participation process is the foundation to a successful plan process. Given the demographics of Story County, both traditional and non - traditional methods were used to engage residents and stakeholders. Along with the C2C Project Team, a C2C Citizen Task Force was created. The group was comprised of representatives invited from each school district and community in Story County as well as individuals from the following stakeholder groups: transportation, development community, health care, economic development, natural resources, human resources, social services, and Iowa State University.

Beyond the input from the C2C Project Team and C2C Citizen Task Force, there were many other methods to engage residents and stakeholders and receive feedback.

Project Website A project website was developed where posts and feedback were shared such as the project schedule and draft documents. It also provided an avenue to share draft materials and solicit comments throughout the planning process. This aspect of the communication and participation strategy is important for transparency, and for sharing information with stakeholders who are unable to attend meetings. Social Media Social media outlets were used to make residents aware of the process and direct them to the project and/or County website for more information. Story County engaged citizens with social media updates on Facebook and Twitter. Branding and Promotion To improve general public awareness and participation in the process, several strategies included:

• Brand the process – Creation of a simple image and tag line to accompany all materials related to the planning process. • Local media promotion – Utilization of local media, radio programing and newspaper venues to promote the C2C planning process and public meetings.

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

â&#x20AC;˘ Newsletters and leafleting â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Insert notifications in local newsletters and public notice boards distributed across the county promoting the public meetings, for distribution to residents and businesses by team and C2C members.

County - Wide Survey The development of a county - wide survey served as an essential tool to reach those that could not make the Community Vision and Identity Workshops and to give individuals an anonymous platform to voice opinions and concerns. The survey was primarily online, distributed via Survey Monkey. There were also paper copies available at all city halls and libraries throughout Story County for those who preferred to complete a printed survey. Community Vision and Identity Workshops A platform was provided for residents to get involved in the planning process through a series of meetings held across Story County. These meetings were conducted in four locations: Ames, Colo, Huxley and Story City. At each meeting citizens were asked about strengths and weaknesses in various categories. The input received helped to form the goals and objectives of this Plan. More information on this process is located in Section 2.2. Public Open Houses In January and February of 2016, towards the end the planning process, the County hosted five open houses at different locations across the County to present a near final draft of the C2C Plan to the citizens and stakeholders of Story County. The goal was to solicit feedback for further review by the C2C Project Team, C2C Citizen Task Force, and the Planning and Zoning Commission. An online virtual open house was also available during the two - month open house period. The online open house allowed people to view recorded presentations and review the same materials presented at the public open houses.

CO

M Tak MUN IT eT he Y INP U Sur vey T SUR No VEY w! Tak e

STO CO RY C O OR DIN UNT ATE Y CO DL R ON NERS GR T AN ONE GE T PLA O CA PST N ON

E

Vis it

M

LA

CP

W

.C2 WW

CO N.

a1

0m

an in wa d tel ute nt l us br t o in y se wha eak ou e im t yo r co p u mm rove un d ity !

The con surve tac y sh t St o ory uld t Cou ake nty abo Pla ut 1 nnin 0 m g & inut Dev es to elo pm comp le ent at 5 te. If y o 15382 u hav e -72 45 any q or b u y em estio ail ns ab at p o zwe ut this b@ sto surve ryc y oun plea ty.c se om .

Public Engagement Overview | 2-3


2.2

PUBLIC OPEN HOUSES

Presentations to School Boards, City Councils and Civic Groups • 2/23/15 – Nevada City Council • 2/26/15 – Nevada School Board • 3/2/15 – Gilbert City Council • 3/4/15 – Roland City Council • 3/24/15 – Huxley City Council • 3/30/15 – Ames School Board • 4/2/15 – Collins City Council • 4/6/15 – Maxwell City Council

Public Open Houses - Draft Review In January and February of 2016 the planning team held Public Open Houses at five locations across Story County to unveil the draft plan to get feedback and critiques from the citizens. An online open house was also available, allowing people to view an open house presentation and review the same materials presented at the public open houses. Comments collected from participants are included below and on the boards shown on the following pages. Open House Feedback from Questionnaires and Online Comments

• 4/6/15 – Cambridge City Council

Which goals of the C2C Plan are most important to you? • Land Use

• 5/18/15 – Collins - Maxwell School Board

• Conservation

• 6/1/15 – Colo City Council

• Bike paths

• 6/8/15 – Slater City Council

• Sustainable/smart growth

• 6/8/15 – Ballard School Board

• Watershed improvement/protection

• 6/9/15 – Kelley City Council

• Historic preservation

• 7/6/15 – McCallsburg City Council

• Greenway/trail protection and development

• 7/13/15 – Zearing City Council

• Emergency preparedness

• 7/13/15 – Roland/Story School Board

• Clean water in rivers and streams

• 7/20/15 – Gilbert School Board

• Primary/secondary road improvements

• 7/20/15 – Story City City Council

• Land Use Goals 2, 3 and 7; Natural Resources Goals 1, 3 and 4; Emergency Preparedness Goal 5; and Cultural Resources Goal 2

• 9/17/15 – League of Women Voters • 2/17/16 – Nevada Rotary Club • 2/25/16 – Ames Golden K Club

• Good communication municipalities

• 3/26/16 – Nevada Golden K Club

• Infrastructure

between

county

and

• Improve small town economic development • Preserving Lincoln Highway and Ag. land Do you feel there is anything missing from the draft C2C Plan and/or the C2C planning process? • Helping to keep buildings out of floodplains • An operational plan to move from planning to implementation

2-4

• Well thought out as to passing information and scheduling meetings to gather input


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Open House Boards and Input

Public Open Houses | 2-5


2.2 Open House Boards and Input

2-6


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Open House Boards and Input

Public Open Houses | 2-7


2.2 Open House Boards and Input

2-8


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Open House Boards and Input

Public Open Houses | 2-9


2.3 COMMUNITY WORKSHOPS Community Workshops

SWOT Analysis

Four Community Vision and Identity Workshops were part of this C2C planning process. The workshops were held in Huxley (June 18, 2015), Colo (June 23, 2015), Ames (June 25, 2015), and Story City (June 30, 2015). Citizens from nearby municipalities and rural areas participated in these workshops and gave valuable input through a SWOT Analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats). The SWOT analysis covered four areas including: Natural Amenities, Governance Leadership and Learning Environments, Economy and Prosperity, and Growth - Oriented and Sustainable Infrastructure. These four areas are further explained along with the Vision for Story County’s C2C Plan in Chapter 3: The Foundation.

This Plan is grounded in a set of issues about which the residents and individual municipalities of Story County are concerned, and opportunities for positive change. The Plan seeks to address perceived deficiencies and capitalize on opportunities. This section is a compilation of key issues and opportunities. A SWOT analysis exercise was used to gather this information from the Planning and Zoning Commission, C2C Project Team, C2C Citizen Task Force as well as from the general public at four Community Vision and Identity Workshops.

COMMUNITY

06.23.2015

INPUT MEETIN

G

STORY COUN TY CORNERST ONE TO CAPS COORDINATED TONE LONG RANGE PLAN

TIME 6PM to 7PM LOCATION Colo Community Cent er 309 Main

St

We are looking forw about. Story Cou ard to 2036. That’s what the From Cornerston nty has built a solid foundation e to Capstone the 1950s. Now (C2C) Plan is all - that Cornerston we are design ing our bluepr e - with plannin the coming 20 int - the Capston years. The C2C g dating back e - for how we Plan and policy-bas is a coordinated grow and develop to ed. long range plan over that is intende The C2C Plan will d to be physica l help guide Sto ry County with aspects, and inco a clear vision and rporate the follo goals, identify wing areas: • Housing; quality of life • Economic Dev elopment; • Transportation; • Service, Commu nity • Environment and Facilities, and Infrastructure ; Natural Resour • ces; Land Use (Existin g and Future); • Fringe Area Plan nin • Intergovernmen g; and tal Cooperatio n. Please join us at one of four regional Commu as we go forth! nity Input Mee Your input will tings on Tuesda help us clearly y June 23, 201 paint what Sto 5 in Colo ry County will erations to com be now and for e. the genFor more informa tion on this proc ess and to sign up for project upd ates please visit the C2C Plan web www.c2cplan site:

.com

Strengths - characteristics that give the community an advantage over others. Weaknesses - characteristics that place the community at a disadvantage relative to others. Opportunities - elements the community could exploit to advantage the community. Threats - elements in the environment that could cause trouble for the community in the future.

2-10


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Weaknesses and Threats Natural Amenities • Flood mitigation • Losing prime farm ground to urban development • Water quality • Wastewater treatment issues • Development encroaching on floodways • Lack of connectivity in greenbelt areas • Lack of funding for improvements • Farm chemicals • Identifying critical areas • Illegal dumping • Recycling/reuse issues • Loss of natural habitat • Nitrogen runoff • Overuse of aquifer • Threat – transforming • Need for publicizing rural Story County outdoor sites– rural and small towns don’t get the attention like Ames does • Threat – water quality protection • Agricultural threats to natural resources • Factory farms • Water quality lakes and streams • Not connected hiking and biking trail system

• Ensuring sustainability and quality of river • Public transportation • Destruction of wetlands, native prairie, wood lands • Bike trails, bike lanes on county highways are dangerous • Need more people to actively volunteer • Water quality improvements needed • Need to continue adding and connecting trails • Need to increase public park properties and infrastructure (Iowa is 49th in percent of public lands) • Supervisors put cost before quality, this creates mediocrity • Issues with flooding • Emerald Ash Borer • Limited areas for hunting access • Too many bugs • Poor water quality in Skunk River • Skunk River water level is not stable either too high or too low • Agriculture stormwater runoff issues • Libraries – stretched with providing more services • Rural/smaller towns have less access to AP and Advanced Classes • County Board should have more rural representation

Community Workshops | 2-11


2.3 Weaknesses and Threats Governance, Leadership and Learning Environments • Need for non - athletic youth facilities • Small school districts • Declining enrollment • Lack of long term fiscal planning • Need for more cooperation/coordination between Ames and county • Need more involvement in government and leadership • Need for more community cooperation • Cynicism about political involvement–need to pass onto someone! • Too much analysis/paralysis by analysis • ISU Extension has lost offices and leadership • Threat of partisanship at local government scale • Understanding local government and civics, how county and city governments work is being lost • Getting people involved • Housing availability and a lack of services in town • Unavailable land, cost to build and low turn - over for housing • Communication or lack thereof • Lack of services in small communities

2-12

• Youth opportunities/outside areas (outside of Ames) • Work together with county • Inadequate addressing of flooding/preserving floodplain • Continue to provide/increase resources to educational opportunities • Affordable housing – throughout the county • Unwilling to invest in green infrastructure and transportation opportunities • Mental health • Uncontrolled growth due to ISU • Supervisors put businesses more important than residents • Supervisors are timid, avoid controversy • Immediate profit before long term planning/welfare • Need sustainable environmental and agricultural collaboration education • Leadership resistant to change • Continued support for county government excellence • Need a wider variety of citizens involved in government and leadership • Lack of affordable housing


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Weaknesses and Threats Economic Prosperity • Small businesses can’t afford Ames or Story County • Concerns about bond measures for schools and public buildings - long term financial planning for infrastructure bonds • Ever increasing direct taxes that threaten economic prosperity • Need more manufacturing jobs • Need skilled employees • Educated and skilled people tend to move away - not enough jobs • More economically challenged families than we realize • Lack of economic diversification • Insufficient housing for workforce • Small - town businesses struggling • More retail/retail competition w/web - based businesses • Need more low - cost housing, especially in Ames • County leadership, young professionals program needed • Impossible to build affordable housing with current regulations, impossible without subsidies • Local regulations more of a threat to development than federal strings • Communities need to review and update codes and regulations to assist growth, not impede growth • Some cities in county struggling • Not enough affordable housing • What is the next TIF project? What is the process? Need more input from development community • Small businesses growing • Property maintenance

• Commerce too concentrated in Ames (little towns need it too) • Loss of downtowns • Rich farm corporations prosper at expense of neighbors • Affordable housing • Suburban and exurban sprawl = loss of habitat • Employees can’t afford to live in Ames = long commute • Preparing for aging population • Lots of low/moderate wage jobs • Lacking opportunities for non - knowledge economy– need entry level jobs • Growth shouldn’t be only goal, other goals should be maintenance and improvement of existing facilities • Econ vision is Ames - centric • Excluding Ames, rest of county does not have high paying jobs (need a balance county - wide) • Poor/limited public transportation • Story City outlet mall is mostly vacant and in disrepair • Limited services available for them • Concentration in specialty retail (antiques) • High cost of limited and housing options • Lack of senior housing options • Long wait in Story County for housing vouchers • Rental housing maintenance (absentee landlords) • Student housing demand impacts rental rates • Small towns have little to no businesses and less tax base

Community Workshops | 2-13


2.3 Weaknesses and Threats Growth - Oriented and Sustainable Infrastructure • Hard to strike a balance between growth and sustainability and protecting good farmland • Road and bridges in some areas have size limit issues • Need to attract new businesses • Wind expansion, needed • Threat of individual septic system failures and impact on water quality • Drainage districts…how will they deal with water quality? • Growth unbalance and taking prime farmland • DNR and impact on small communities • Need broadband in rural areas • Lack of bike paths on public roads • Affordable housing • Conflict of preserve farm ground vs. developing rural residential pockets/housing need • Lack of landfill - need effective way to recycle • Rural/city water rights issues • Wastewater regulations causing major improvements • Small cities need infrastructure $ help • Main street death • Need long term solutions for sewer systems • Lack of funding for water/sewer infrastructure • Community pooling resources for needs transportation, clothing for needy, lunches for needy • Rural population • Bigger isn’t always better, growth can mean improvement of existing infrastructure • Increase in impervious surfaces and inadequate storm water management • Alliant prices for solar is a disincentive to make residential investment

2-14

• Need to develop a county - wide network of services • Ames needs to annex more land • Bike/pedestrian conflicts on bike lanes • Safe bicycling infrastructure for commuting • Need more low income health and dental care opportunities • Not enough emphasis on green and renewable infrastructure for example power, water, transport, soil • Street infrastructure and highway congested - no room for growth • Need a balanced approach to growth • Bikes on County highways are dangerous, need land on shoulders • Growth along I35 • Gravel road maintenance • Bridge maintenance • Road closures for repair • Traffic • Agriculture/urban growth conflicts • Rural State Revolving Fund (SRF) Developments • Erosion from new construction and development • Gilbert growth pressures - impact from school district • Limited EMS/Fire Volunteer poor • Limited pool of medical services - not spread evenly through county • Need for communications infrastructure expansion • Poor wired and wireless communications services • Many commute to work • Impact of increased crime from Ames growth • Community resistant to change and new ideas


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Strengths and Opportunities Natural Amenities • Camping and recreational areas, scout camps • Bike paths • Greenbelt and river valley recreation • Broader interest in ag. and new interests and perspective on the importance of agriculture • Ada Hayden park • Southern quarry, potential recreational opportunity • Zearing Park • Hickory Grove • Ag. Related businesses • Build on natural amenities • Great County parks • County is assisting long term planning • Ag community • Stakeholder engagement • Parks and green areas • Streams/rivers (stormwater management) • Green belts • More interest in preservation of natural resources • Ada Hayden • Hallet’s Pit • Plan for recharging aquifer • Water resources • Natural areas • Strong economic development • Growing respect and use of natural resources • Trails plan • Watershed planning and lake cleanup • Park upgrades • Bike/walking trails to most places

• Trail planning • Recreation • Support for existing and developing natural environments – parks, leasing centers, open spaces • Educating the public about wind farming - adults and youth • Water policy that fits 2036 • Great volunteer opportunities • Air quality except near factory farms • Start on a great trail system • Community supported agriculture and local food systems • Active county conservation program • Soil increase sustainability treat it like an organism • Park maintenance • Great County park system • Ada Hayden Park • Community gardens • Citizens aware of environment and challenges • Good river and several good creeks • Greenbelts, Ada Hayden, McFarland Parks • Great soil for agriculture • Trees Forever (new Story City grant) • Personal pride in property maintenance (city and county - wide) • Skunk River • Lots of volunteers for community improvements • Good canoe and river access to Skunk River • Natural prairie area “Prairie Park” • Story City and surrounding area has nice parks

Community Workshops | 2-15


2.3 Strengths and Opportunities Governance, Leadership and Learning Environments • Good Board of Supervisors • ISU and ISU Extension • Better utilize RC and D ideas and promote work • Public has opportunity to be engaged at many levels, transparency • Service to county citizens is an opportunity to serve public • Willing engagement and opportunity • County is fiscally well • Economic viability of communities within the county • ISU • Location I35 and Hwy 30 • High valuation of education • High level of community engagement and involvement • County - wide leadership and development • Strong K - 12 schools systems • Proximity to ISU • Good formal and informal education • Communities have good idea of where they want to go • Story County has been the formula other counties have copied • Location (central Iowa) and location to Ames

2-16

• Family community (keep/maintain small towns and schools • “Others” learning experience to connect people to nature • ISU • Story County Conservation classes and awareness • Story school system • Transportation and effective county government • EMS collaboration • Story County Conservation collaborating w/school district (could be improved) • Great opportunities for citizen involvement in government and leadership • High quality education across the county • Modern methods for communicating w/citizens • Boy Scouts - educational • Libraries • Great schools • County Conservation and educational programs • Zearing Threshold Learning Center • Story City has a strong city council (they care) • Story City Chamber


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Strengths and Opportunities Economy and Prosperity • Smart management of economic growth, protect farmland and preserve farms with future development • Board using TIF of wind turbines • Rural expansion of home businesses would foster innovation and overall economic growth • Well - educated and diverse workforce • Attitudes of staff • Population growing • Midwest/central Iowa economic stability • Current economic growth in Ames, Story City, Huxley • Marketing ourselves and communities • Strong agricultural system and research - well positioned for growth • Transportation strong - roads and rail • Niche agriculture • High - tech development drawn to area • Local school trade of skill development with youth • Facebook presence • Small town survival education and economy • HIRTA • Enlarged Dakins Lake Growth - Oriented and Sustainable Infrastructure • Hwy 30, I35–great asset • Potential workforce with good work ethic • Resource Recovery Plant • Hwy 65 Corridor • Drew Kamp • Bridges being addressed • Wind energy facilities and more solar • Research park big for new industry • Develop buffer strips and associated education of public • Could develop county - wide compost system • More companies moving in • Lincoln Highway Corridor Plan • Transportation systems; highway, rail, and air • Heart of Iowa Trail is part of the American Discovery Trail • Health care • Location • Rural setting - close knit, help each other out ex: snow blowing for the elderly

• Threshold Learning Center - school programs, hikes, barn dormitory, venue for celebrations, after school programs, mini golf, new Dakins Lake • Hickory Grove – fishing, camping, swimming • Need more small manufacturers and small businesses • Micro - economics outside of Ames (i.e. Huxley) • Tiny house movement • Lots of business growth in Ames and surrounding area • Local foods support and sustainability • Strong knowledge economy • Lots of students available for low wage jobs • Diverse small businesses • Research Park • Need support of the micro - economies and rural areas • Ease of commuting (if you have a car) • Business mobility • Story City industrial • Availability of Bethany Life • Story City Main Street • Care is taken with public money (responsible)

• Connected educational opportunities • Some attention to green growth and smart growth • Opportunities needed for county incentives for small scale solar • Story County leader in green building, make sure to keep it up • Increase affordable high density redevelopment • Good services • Need agricultural soil infrastructure, demand cover cropping • Many transportation resources available, more education needed • Long - range infrastructure planning (proactive and funding) • County trail planning - bike trails connecting cities • Public safety response • Growth along I35

Community Workshops | 2-17


In June 2015, Story County residents were surveyed on a variety of subjects pertaining to the creation of the C2C Plan. Surveys were distributed both online and hard copies were available at local city halls and libraries. The survey was completed by 674 respondents in total. This report summarizes the results of the survey and attempts to synthesize the input from Story County citizens. Each section includes a small sample of written comments from respondents that exemplify and reinforce the majority viewpoints. The entire results from the surveys are found in Appendix B.

2-18


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Quality of Life Highlights Quality of Life Highlights Highlights



Increase employment opportunities Improve post-secondary educational opportunities

Expand retail shopping options Improve recreational facilities

 

Small - Town/Rural Atmosphere

 

Increase diversity of housing types Improve quality of housing

Increase affordability of housing



 

Improve bike and pedestrian facilities

Improve utility services

Citizen Survey | 2-19


Transportation Transportation Highlights Highlights

Improve highways by widening / adding lanes to existing facilities Improve highways by adding new bypass routes

Improve bicycling opportunities by adding bike lanes to existing roads Improve bicycling opportunities by developing off-street trails

Maintenance to existing roadways

Maintenance/replacement of existing bridges Closing County bridges on low traveled roadways Investments in public transportation services

Improve airport facilities and usage

Establish passenger rail service

Improve rail infrastructure to increase local freight capacity Improvements to controlled access/ on-off ramps on I35 and HWY 30

2-20

Improve by ha  Improvehighways

  

 MaintenanceMaintena to existin  Maintenance/replacem  Maintena Closing Co

Improve Improve bicycling oppb

County bridges  Closing Improve facilitia  Improveairport


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Natural Resources Highlights

Surface water (rivers, lakes, streams)

   

Citizen Survey | 2-21


2.4

Agricultural Resources Highlights

Yes, in the unincorporated area

Increased regulations on the use of pesticides and fertilizers Increased regulations on the use of pesticides and fertilizers

More regulations to protect prime farmland from development

2-22


Hazards Highlights Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Hazards Highlights

Lightning

Cold Severe Tempera- Thunderture storms

Citizen Survey | 2-23


2.4

Housing Highlights

sing, Single-Family, Starter Homes Affordable housing is needed Focus on improving existing housing quality

Affordable, Im

Single-family housing is needed Starter (first time buyer) homes are needed Senior condominiums and apartments are needed Assisted living facilities for seniors are needed Duplexes (2 units) are needed

Townhomes and condominiums are needed Apartments (1-2 bedrooms) are needed

??

Apartments (studio/efficiency) are needed Apartments (3+ bedrooms) are needed

ents, Mobile Homes

Accessory dwellings/”granny flats”

Mobile home parks are needed

Executive (high-end) homes are needed

2-24

  High End, 3 


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Anywhere there is a suitable site for development

An co

On individual residential lots scattered throughout the countryside Within or adjacent to existing rural subdivisions

Away from active farm operations

In o Within or adjacent to a city

Citizen Survey | 2-25


Economic Economic Development Development Highlights Highlights 2.4 Economic Development Highlights

ghts

High-technology manufacturing

Light manufacturing (product assembly, product fabrication, etc.)

Non-intensive agricultural related businesses (implement dealer, etc.) Transport industrial (warehousing, distribution centers, etc.)

Heavy manufacturing (primary manufacturing such as foundries, etc.) Intensive agricultural operations (e.g. â&#x20AC;&#x153;factoryâ&#x20AC;? farms or egg processing plants, etc.)

2-26


Economic Development Highlights

Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

ď&#x192;ź

Citizen Survey | 2-27


2.4

Community Facilities and Services

 Park and Recreation Facilities

   Yard Waste Disposal Options Street and Road Maintenance Cable / Telecommunications Internet (Cable/ DSL/Satellite/ Other)

2-28

 


Land Use Highlights Land Use HighlightsPlan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone Story County Comprehensive

Land Use Highlights

Be LESS restrictive; allow MORE flexibility for where and how land may be used and developed

Be MORE restrictive; allow LESS flexibility for where and how land may be used and developed

Current policies are okay

Preserving rural character and scenery Attracting industry and potential jobs

Preserving agricultural land and production Increased renewable energy production Protecting existing residential areas Protecting natural resources, including air and water quality

Citizen Survey | 2-29


2.4

Respondents Respondents

Respondents

2-30


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone Where in Story County do you live? Answered: 528 Answer Choices

Where is your place of employment? Answered: 535

Skipped: 156 Responses

Answer Choices

#

Skipped: 149 Responses

Ames

52.15%

279

In Ames

49.24%

260

In Nevada

11.36%

60

Not Employed

14.58%

78

In Story City

7.95%

42

Nevada

10.65%

57

7.39%

39

Other (please specify)

8.22%

44

Near Ames

4.36%

23

Des Moines Metro

3.93%

21

In Roland

2.84%

15

Story City

3.36%

18

In Huxley

1.31%

7

2.65%

14

Huxley

Near Nevada

1.31%

7

1.70%

9

Roland

In Maxwell

1.12%

6

1.70%

9

Maxwell

In Gilbert

Elsewhere within Story County

0.93%

5

In Colo

1.52%

8 Gilbert

0.75%

4

In Slater

1.33%

7

Colo

0.56%

3

Near Gilbert

1.33%

7

Cambridge

0.37%

2

Near Story City

1.14%

6

Collins

0.37%

2

Near Maxwell

0.95%

5

Slater

0.19%

1

Near Colo

0.76%

4

Zearing

0.19%

1

In Cambridge

0.57%

3

Kelley

0.00%

0

In Collins

0.57%

3

McCallsburg

0.00%

0

Near Huxley

0.38%

2

Sheldahl

0.00%

0

Other rural area outside Story County

0.38%

2

Total

Near McCallsburg

0.38%

2

Near Roland

0.19%

1

In Zearing

0.19%

1

Near Zearing

0.19%

1

Other rural area in Story County

0.19%

1

Near Cambridge

0.19%

1

In Kelley

0.19%

1

Near Kelley

0.19%

1

Near Collins

0.19%

1

In Sheldahl

0.00%

0

Near Sheldahl

0.00%

0

Near Slater

0.00%

0

In McCallsburg

0.00%

0

Total

535

528

Citizen Survey | 2-31


2.5

YOUTH AND ISU SURVEYS Youth Survey Results

Youth and ISU Surveys In July 2015, a survey that focused on Story County youth was released on a variety of subjects pertaining to the creation of the C2C Plan but catering more to the interests of the youth in the county. There were 110 respondents in total primarily from ages 14 to 18 years of age. This report summarizes the results of the survey and attempts to synthesize the input. Each section includes a small sample of written comments from respondents that exemplify and reinforce the majority viewpoints. In October 2015, a survey that focused on Iowa State University students, staff and faculty was released. The survey was available from October 2015 through November 2015. The survey contained a variety of subjects pertaining to the creation of the C2C Plan but catering more to the interests of ISU students, staff and faculty in the county. The response rate was very low.

The survey responses below are word clouds based on the most common responses given to the questions.

How do you describe Story County and the city you live in to people you know or meet that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t live here?

What do you like about living and going to school in Story County?

VEY

SUR NPUT

w! o N y Surve

ITY I

UN OMM

C

The Take

TONE

PS TO CA TONE NERS E PLAN R O C NTY NG RANG Y COU O STOR INATED L D R O CO

break inute t you

s wha a 10 m Take and tell uee improved!

WW

W.C 2C

Visit

PLA N.CO

M

nity to s want ur commu o y in

ase ey ple is surv ty.com. un bout th ions a b@storyco st e u ny q il at pzwe a have a If you 5 or by em plete. 24 to com 515-382-7 s te u t min nt a 0 e 1 m t p u ke abo Develo ould ta Planning & ty rvey sh The su Story Coun ct ta con

2-32

Has Story County been a good place to grow up and why?


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

What would you like to change about Story County and your city?

Do you think you will stay in Story County after graduating from High School? If not, do you think you will you move back some day? Why or why not?

Anything else youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to add that will help the Story County create a great comprehensive plan?

Ballard Community School District

I am currently not a student

Youth and ISU Surveys | 2-33


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1 2 3 The Foundation 4 This Chapter presents a vision for the future of Story County and describes goals, objectives, and strategies 5 to achieve that vision. Agricultural Resources, Facilities, Housing, Communications 6 Community and Public Safety, Emergency Preparedness, Resources, Infrastructure and Utilities, and 7 Cultural Intergovernmental Coordination are all addressed. Appendix A See Chapter 4 for Conservation of Natural Resources and Recreation, Chapter 5 for Land Use, Chapter Appendix B 6 for Economic Prosperity and Chapter 7 for Appendix C Transportation. Page Vision and Goals 3-2 Appendix D 3.1 3.2 Goals, Objectives, and Strategies 3-6 3.3 Agricultural Resources 3-8 3.4 Community Facilities and Services 3-10 3.5 Housing 3-12 3.6 Communications and Public Safety 3-14 3.7 Emergency Preparedness 3-16 3.8 Cultural Resources 3-28 3.9 Infrastructure and Utilities 3-20 3.10 Intergovernmental Coordination 3-22


3.1

VISION AND GOALS

Story County Cornerstone to Capstone Vision The vision and goals section of the C2C Plan establishes the framework for how future efforts will be achieved. Goals refine the vision into an achievable endpoint and often objectives are incorporated to help provide more specificity as to the means needed to achieve the goal. The shared values and vision were developed through a deliberative process that built on recommendations defined in the 2011 Community Planning Assistance Team (CPAT) Report. In 2013, Story County engaged the Institute for Decision Making from the University of Northern Iowa to design and facilitate sessions resulting in a county-wide, shared vision statement and set of values to serve as the basis of the Cornerstone to Capstone Plan. Through this process, the following value statements were derived. These six shared values lead to the four “foundational stones” used throughout the public engagement process of the C2C Plan to assist in framing the Goals, Objectives and Strategies in this Chapter. • Natural Amenities • Governance, Leadership, and Learning Environments • Economy and Prosperity • Growth-Oriented and Sustainable Infrastructure

In Story County, We value ...

3-2

Sense of our community, volunteering individual philanthropy, dedication to family, a safe environment and social gatherings/connections.

Our excellent educational opportunities, and cultural, social, outdoor recreational and entertainment opportunities for all ages.

Our natural environment, protecting our resources and recreational opportunities, and the ongoing contributions of agriculture to our heritage and future, self-reliance, partnerships, strong work ethic and economy.

Wide-open and honest government, fiscal responsibility, the recognition of individual rights, taking responsibility through participation, self reliance, involvement, and participation in decision making and action.

Planned growth with policies, infrastructure, and other resources that strengthen our other strong shared values for the future.

Economic opportunities for businesses, innovation, agribusiness and technology.


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Four Foundational Stones

d n a d te e n r e i u r t c O u r h t t s w a Gro ble Infr a n i a t Sus

Economy and Prosperity

Governance, Leadership and Learning Environments

Natural Amenities

| 3-3


3.1 Natural Amenities In 2036, Story Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s natural environment and agriculture remain an inherited cornerstone of our quality of life and our economy. Our soil, water and clean air are recognized as a primary catalyst for sustaining and transforming the County as a recognized and respected place to live and work. Residents and visitors enjoy a wide variety of outdoor recreational opportunities including our parks, open spaces and trail system. Improvements made to our environmentally sensitive and/or impaired areas enhance our enjoyment of nature and preserve resources for the next generation. Story County honors the need to encourage conserving the natural environment by supporting land development, agriculture, wellness, healthy food/water consumption and other uses in ways which promote healthy lifestyle.

and nted cture e i r O thstru Grow ble Infra a n i Susta

Economy and Prosperity

Governance, Leadership and Learning Environments

Natural Amenities

Economy and Prosperity In 2036, Story County is recognized nationally as having an abundance of sustainable and high paying jobs, as well as a trained and dedicated workforce to support them. A variety of industries continue to invest in the County, demonstrating their long-term commitment to the area. Story Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ag economy, small business activity, partnership(s) with ISU and entrepreneurial spirit are growing and diversifying our economic base, creating synergies, attracting and engaging younger residents and expanding global connections. This economic growth continues to spur the development of new housing for all income levels and quality of life amenities (e.g. service based businesses and entertainment offerings) throughout all of our communities.

3-4

nd ted a ture n e i r th-O struc Grow ble Infra a in Susta

Economy and Prosperity

Natural Amenities

Governance, Leadership and Learning Environments


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Governance, Leadership and Learning Environments In 2036, the people of Story County have a strong and renewed sense and appreciation for family and community. Commitment to our shared vision directs our efforts and determines our effectiveness. Story County relies on its experienced leadership, while continually cultivating and training emerging leaders across the County, including youth. This approach generates many active and flexible leaders, open to different ideas and eager to be inclusive and to inspire strong, effective and mutually supportive relationships. These individuals stay focused, communicate honestly, work collaboratively, implement purposeful planning and wisely/strategically spend public dollars on priority projects.

and nted cture e i r O thstru Grow ble Infra a n i Susta

Economy and Prosperity

Governance, Leadership and Learning Environments

Natural Amenities

Now more than ever, innovative educational opportunities through ISU, DMACC, area schools and others provide a framework for Story County to develop and retain a future workforce, attracting young individuals and families, and connecting all ages to life-long learning experiences.

Growth-Oriented and Sustainable Infrastructure In 2036, Story County remains an ag-based community which boasts international research and development facilities, exceptional healthcare centers, technology related infrastructure and innovative educational facilities. In twenty years, we have increased our population to over 100,000 and invested in growth-oriented resources and approaches which maximize existing infrastructure and utilize deliberate, planned growth in targeted areas. This is creating a sustainable infrastructure which preserves our â&#x20AC;&#x153;close-knitâ&#x20AC;? communities, protects our cherished bonds to both urban and rural settings and ensures that Story County communities are safe places to live and work.

nd ted a ture n e i r th-O struc Grow ble Infra a in Susta

Economy and Prosperity

Governance, Leadership and Learning Environments

Natural Amenities

| 3-5


3.2 Goals, Objectives and Strategies Each element of the comprehensive plan contains goals, objectives, and strategies established during the planning process based on public input and the information contained in Appendix A: Community Indicators.* This section defines goals, objectives and strategies, as follows: Goal: A goal is a long-term target that states what the community wants to accomplish. Written in general terms, the statement offers a desired condition. Objective: An objective is a statement that identifies a course of action to achieve a goal. They are more specific than goals and are usually attainable through planning and implementation activities. Strategy: A strategy is a specific rule of conduct or course of action intended to help the County achieve the goals and objectives of the Plan. All future actions and decisions made by the County should be consistent with these strategies, unless unforeseen reasons arise which make following a strategy impractical. Such occasions should be rare and probably indicate a need to amend this Plan. *Goals, objectives and strategies pertaining to Conservation of Natural Resources and Recreation are in Chapter 4, Land Use in Chapter 5, Economic Prosperity in Chapter 6, and Transportation in Chapter 7.

3-6


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Goals Summary The goals listed below build the foundation for Story County to meet our shared values and vision outlined on page 3-2. Subsequent pages of this Chapter identify objectives and strategies that help achieve these goals.

Agricultural Resources

Communications and Public Safety

AR1: Protect agricultural practices in areas with prime soils and viable agricultural interests.

CPS1: Encourage and provide open communication between residents and Story County.

AR2: Minimize conflicts between agricultural and non-agricultural land uses.

CPS2: Ensure safe communities by protecting health, welfare and property in Story County.

AR3: Preserve farmland and the rural landscape as a viable foundation for a strong and growing agricultural economy.

CPS3: Support and maintain high-quality County facilities and services to meet the needs of residents.

Community Facilities and Services

Emergency Preparedness

CFS1: Ensure the County’s community public facilities are of high quality and protect public health, as well as the county’s natural resources and rural character.

EP1: Mitigate the risk of impacts before a disaster.

CFS2: Provide adequate access to quality educational and recreational facilities for all county residents in Story County.

EP2: Protect Story County’s residents and property during a disaster. EP3: Successfully recover from disasters.

Housing

Cultural Resources

H1: Plan for safe, attractive and affordable housing to meet existing needs and forecasted housing demands of all residents of the county.

CR1: New development in the unincorporated areas of Story County respects and enhances the area’s rural character.

H2: Plan for housing types and densities that reinforce the predominately rural character of the unincorporated areas of the county.

CR2: Seek to protect historical and cultural resources from negative impacts of development.

H3: Housing is planned for, designed, and built in a way that responds to residents’ needs and reflects their voices and experiences.

Infrastructure and Utilities

Intergovernmental Coordination

IU1: Ensure utility infrastructure protects public health, as well as the county’s natural and agricultural resources and rural character.

IC1: Maintain mutually-beneficial relationships and partnerships with neighboring jurisdictions and other governmental agencies.

| 3-7


3.3

AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES The abundance and health of our agricultural are vital to the well being of our county, the prosperity of our economy and the health of our regional ecological systems. This section features goals, objectives and strategies for preserving, protecting, and restoring our agricultural resources.

Agricultural Resources Goal 1 Protect agricultural practices in areas with prime soils and viable agricultural interests. Objective AR1.1: Prime farmland in Story County is an important resource and continues to be a consideration in review of development proposals for unincorporated areas. Objective AR1.2: Agriculture is a prominent industry in Iowa and Story County. Through the development review processes, work to protect agriculture practices and land from the negative impacts of surrounding uses. Strategies • Continue using the Land Evaluation Site Assessment (LESA) system to evaluate soil and site suitability for agricultural land, in order to protect the most valuable soils and agricultural areas. • Support programs that encourage practices that reduce pollution to waterways via stormwater runoff, addressing topics such as lawn care, fall leaf management, winter salt use, and other best management practices.

Agricultural Resources Goal 2 Minimize conflicts between agricultural and nonagricultural land uses. Objective AR2.1: Through the County’s development review processes, for unincorporated land, evaluate the potential impacts of nonagricultural uses on nearby agricultural uses.

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Strategies • Encourage the placement of new development in areas away from productive agricultural land. Discourage non-agricultural development in areas of prime farmland through continued use of the LESA system, zoning regulations, and subdivision regulations. • Support the development and use of a density-based zoning program that allows for the clustering of future residential development on smaller parcels to provide farmers a viable alternative to converting large parcels of productive agricultural land to a non-agricultural use.

Agricultural Resources Goal 3 Preserve prime farmland and the rural landscape as a viable foundation for a strong and growing agricultural economy. Objective AR3.1: Support sustainable farming practices. Objective AR3.2: Consideration for the preservation of the rural character of the county and its agricultural heritage will be an important part of the County’s decision making processes. Strategies • Discourage fragmentation of prime agricultural land in order to protect the continuity of prime farmland areas for future use. • Work with regional tourism groups (such as Silos and Smoke Stacks National Heritage Area) to support agri-tourism in Story County by identifying, encouraging, and promoting the existence of farms that invite visitors for tours, training, self pick sales, seasonal events, and similar items. This will be an ongoing effort.

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3.4

COMMUNITY FACILITIES AND SERVICES The quality, efficacy and efficiency of community facilities and services have a direct relationship to quality of life for residents. The investment and maintenance of community facilities and services serves the overall vision for the County.

Community Facilities and Services Goal 1 Ensure the County’s community facilities are of high quality and protect public health, as well as the county’s natural resources and rural character. Objective CFS1.1: Ensure that public facilities and services continue to meet the need of residents and businesses, especially as new development increases demand for those facilities and services. Objective CFS1.2: Support and maintain high-quality County facilities and services to meet the needs of residents.

Strategies • Work with municipalities within Story County to identify needs for and improve access to special needs facilities (e.g. health care, childcare) for current and future county residents; and actively participate in the planning and siting of any new special needs facility. • Continue to meet with librarians on an annual basis. • Work with municipalities to ensure access to public/mental health facilities and services. • Promote sustainable design practices for County facilities.

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Community Facilities and Services Goal 2 Provide adequate access to quality educational and recreational facilities for all residents in Story County. Objective CFS2.1: Continue to promote and maintain existing parks, public open spaces and educational facilities. Strategies â&#x20AC;˘ Continue to facilitate and improve park and recreation facilities, programs, and amenities. â&#x20AC;˘ Support and collaborate as needed with the local school districts in regards to the educational programming and facilities to ensure the needs are met and high quality schools are maintained. â&#x20AC;˘ Meet with superintendents and school district representatives annually to discuss school expansion plans.

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3.5

HOUSING As Story County grows and changes, housing must change to meet the needs of the population. Housing is included in a comprehensive plan to provide guidance for decision-makers and developers when considering additions to and renovations of the housing stock throughout Story County.

Housing Goal 1 Plan for safe, attractive and affordable housing to meet existing needs and forecasted housing demands of all residents of the county. Objective H1.1: Throughout Story County, plan for a range of housing that meets the needs of residents of various income, age, and health status. Objective H1.2: Encourage homes to be built and maintained to levels deemed safe by applicable building, zoning or property codes. Objective H1.3: Encourage that new homes or retrofits include safe and healthy building materials, clean indoor air, pest-free environments, energy and water efficiency, and design that prevents injuries and promotes universal access for people of all abilities. Objective H1.4: Encourage that all housing has healthy indoor air that is free from pollutants such as mold, carbon monoxide, and radon, and is constructed from materials that do not contain hazardous elements, such as lead or asbestos. Objective H1.5: Maximize the impact of available funding sources that lead to better housing and health outcomes through a coordinated and integrated approach among housing, environmental health, and public health agencies. Strategies â&#x20AC;˘ Encourage municipalities to include affordable, senior, and special needs housing in any future discussions with developers regarding new residential growth. Explore opportunities to provide incentives funded by State or Federal grants for developers and home builders that create these housing units, especially within and near urbanized areas. â&#x20AC;˘ Encourage consideration of the creation of a local housing trust address affordable housing needs that would involve input from local officials, residents, developers, builders, banking institutions, and housing advocates. â&#x20AC;˘ Encourage communication and collaboration among housing authorities, advocate organizations, local leaders and planning staff at County and local levels to address the housing needs of elderly, special needs and low-income citizens in Story County.

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone • Encourage municipalities to reuse and redevelop properties within their jurisdictions for residential uses that could provide opportunities for affordable, senior, and special needs housing. • Focus housing growth in Story County primarily within existing municipal boundaries or in newly annexed areas and/or certain housing types in unincorporated areas where practical. •

Take a leadership role in regional efforts to increase affordable housing preservation and production.

Support compliance with all State and Federal regulations relating to housing opportunities and discrimination prevention.

Work across jurisdictions and departments to align housing development and economic development strategies to ensure housing is affordable to people working in planned jobs or industries.

Continue participation in the HUD Lead Hazard Control Program and encourage more communities to be involved with future opportunities.

Continue to offer a simple radon test kit at low cost for county residents through the Story County Environmental Health Department.

Housing Goal 2 Plan for housing types and densities that reinforce the predominately rural character of the unincorporated areas of the county.

Housing Goal 3 Housing is planned for, designed, and built in a way that responds to residents’ needs and reflects their voices and experiences. Objective H3.1: Proactively and meaningfully engage residents in planning decisions that impact their housing and neighborhoods. Strategies • Encourage residents and other stakeholders to participate in development plans and proposals through appropriate public outreach efforts. • Support creativity in the construction of new housing by proactively developing zoning and healthy design guidelines. Solicit broad public input during drafting. • In order to understand and address public health implications of housing strategies and projects, consider conducting health impact assessments when approving new or undertaking policy making with regard to public infrastructure and development.

Objective H2.1: Manage residential development to prevent conflicts between incompatible land uses and to minimize the environmental impact of residential growth. Strategies • Support programs that maintain or rehabilitate the local housing stock. • Encourage voluntary efforts by private homeowners to maintain, rehabilitate, update or otherwise make improvements to their homes. • Encourage the development and incorporation of sustainable design, construction practices, material sourcing, and high quality energy efficiency in current and future housing whenever possible.

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3.6

COMMUNICATIONS AND PUBLIC SAFETY The County is committed to protecting people and maintaining a high level of communication to ensure County residents remain safe and informed. Safety and communication are vital to the welfare of the Story County residents.

Communications and Public Safety Goal 1 Encourage and provide open communication between residents and Story County. Objective CPS1.1: Provide access to relevant public safety and information through various sources to County residents and businesses. Strategies • Ensure the supply of information (interpretive signage, websites, online forms, and maps) at and for community facilities are easily accessed by Story County residents, business owners, and visitors.

Communications and Public Safety Goal 2 Ensure safe communities by protecting health, welfare and property in Story County. Objective CPS2.1: Monitor satisfaction with County emergency services and seek adjustments as necessary to maintain adequate service levels. Strategies • Work with residents served by the Story County Sheriff ’s Department to ensure that their law enforcement needs are maintained, and collaborate with police departments in cities to improve efficiencies in law enforcement activities and ensure the safety of County residents.

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Communications and Public Safety Goal 3 Support and maintain high-quality County facilities and services to meet the needs of residents. Objective CPS3.1: Ensure that public facilities and services continue to meet the needs of residents and businesses, especially as new development increases demand for those facilities and services. Strategies â&#x20AC;˘ Work with area emergency care providers and fire departments to maintain adequate provision of emergency services for county residents and businesses, and review service provision levels with appropriate agencies annually.

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3.7

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS Story County is committed to protecting people and property from natural and man-made hazards and disasters. This involves first identifying potential hazards and mitigating the risks of impacts pre-disaster, then responding efficiently during a disaster, and finally, planning for post-disaster comprehensive recovery. The goals below are intended to complement and be in concert with ongoing efforts by the Story County Emergency Management Commission.

Emergency Preparedness Goal 1 Mitigate the risk of impacts before a disaster. Objective EP1.1: Prepare residents and businesses in Story County for potential disasters. Objective EP1.2: Through the Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s use of smart development practices, effectively limit disaster impacts to new development due to flooding. Objective EP1.3: Continue to prepare readiness plans to address procedures for responding to natural disasters. Strategies â&#x20AC;˘ Collaborate with local agencies and organizations to inform Story County about disaster preparedness, especially including evacuation procedures in flood-prone areas and the location of public shelters. â&#x20AC;˘ Actively participate in Flood Awareness Month and National Preparedness Month.

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Emergency Preparedness Goal 2 Protect Story County’s residents and property during a disaster. Objective EP2.1: Meet the basic human needs of Story County residents during a disaster. Objective EP2.2: Protects assets and infrastructure during a disaster. Strategies • Encourage private disaster preparedness, including resilient building practices and materials, establishment of disaster response and recovery plans by families and businesses, and maintenance of emergency kits and supplies as recommended by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). • Continue to build on the use of social media to push out and receive on-the-ground information (photos and accounts) on storm paths and storm damages from nearby residents.

Emergency Preparedness Goal 3 Successfully recover from disasters. Objective EP3.1: Aim to provide prompt access to recovery resources to disaster vicims throughout the recovery process. Objective EP3.2: Reconstruction and recovery will be quick, safe, and collaborative. Strategies • Advocate for quick and equitable disbursement of individual and business assistance funds. • Work with recovery partners to create a “one-stop shop” for individual and business recovery assistance. • Implement temporary regulations when necessary to facilitate safe and expedited recovery.

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3.8

CULTURAL RESOURCES Cultural resources are at the core of the identity and characteristics that define Story County in the minds of residents and visitors. Story County has been long known for its natural resources and rich agricultural roots.

Cultural Resources 1 New development in the unincorporated areas of Story County respects and enhances the area’s rural character. Objective CR1.1: Positively reinforce the county’s rural character with residential, commercial and industrial development proposals. Objective CR1.2: Value and protect sites that are important to the history and culture of Story County. Strategies • Encourage utilities to be sited and designed to minimize impacts on adjacent uses and to minimize the amount of easements. Encourage underground placement and co-location (or “corridor sharing”) for new public and private utility facilities. • When improvements are made to farmsteads, encourage site designs that minimize disruptions to agricultural land and productive soils. • Encourage environmentally - sustainable residential development that preserves existing woodlands and mature trees during and after development to the greatest extent possible. • Encourage parking to be located on the sides and rear of buildings rather than in the front yard (whenever possible), and connect parking lots and driveways to facilitate on-site access to adjacent developments. • Require large parking lots to provide perimeter and interior landscaping. • Encourage illumination from outdoor lighting to be kept on site through use of cut-off fixtures and sources that meet dark sky recommendation. • Require adequate soils be present to allow for design and construction of septic systems, including permitted, and a back up (secondary) site.

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Cultural Resources 2 Seek to protect historical and cultural resources from negative impacts of development. Objective CR2.1: Evaluate the impact of development on Story County’s cultural and historic resources, including the Historic Lincoln Highway and Jefferson Highway corridors. Strategies • Promote “heritage tourism” (e.g. local festivals, fairs, farm tours and farmers markets) that celebrate the county’s heritage and rural setting. • Encourage maintenance and adaptive reuse of historic areas and buildings, including barns and silos. • Ensure that any known cemeteries, human burials, or archaeological sites are protected from encroachment by roads or other development activities. Cease construction on development sites when archaeological artifacts are uncovered during either land preparation or construction and notify the appropriate jurisdiction of such potential discovery. • Support the efforts and applicable strategies of the Lincoln Highway Corridor Management Plan.

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3.9

INFRASTRUCTURE AND UTILITIES Local government is responsible for a broad array of essential services, from sewer and water service to park and recreation facilities, fire and police protection and public schools. The quality, capacity and efficiency of these services have a direct relationship to quality of life for residents.

Infrastructure and Utilities Goal 1 Support practices that ensure utility infrastructure protects public health, as well as the county’s natural and agricultural resources and rural character. Objective IU1.1: Ensure that public and private utilities are constructed and maintained according to professional governmental standards. Objective IU1.2: Protect Story County’s high quality land and water features through careful consideration of the effects of development and associated utilities. Objective IU1.3: Support and maintain high-quality infrastructure and services to meet the needs of residents. Strategies • Ensure that existing public and private septic systems are adequately maintained and inspected on a regular basis, and that new private, shared or public septic systems are designed, sited, constructed and inspected according to State and County regulations. • Encourage municipalities to perform regular maintenance of their wastewater treatment facilities and associated utilities to protect the public and environmental health of the area. • Encourage landowners with private wells to properly maintain and monitor their wells through inspection and water testing as necessary or required by IDNR regulations. • Ensure that solid waste collection and disposal services protect public health and the natural environment. Maintain awareness regarding local solid waste disposal services, and prepare to intervene if necessary. • Require landowners with private wells that are no longer in use to properly close and abandon wells according to IDNR and County regulations. • Encourage communities and individuals to practice water conservation in order to protect groundwater as a long-term resource. • Support the efforts of energy providers, government agencies

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

and programs, and others to inform residents about energy conservation measures. • Require that the property owner, or their agent, fund the preparation of a groundwater impact analysis from an independent soil scientist or other related professional prior to approving new developments in areas where groundwater quality or quantity is a concern. • Work with IDNR and local developers to minimize stormwater quality and quantity impacts from development. • Preserve and protect (whenever possible) natural drainage patterns, including existing drainage corridors, streams, floodplains and wetlands, to take advantage of natural stormwater management facilities. • Encourage long-range sanitary sewer system planning with cities to accommodate projected county-wide growth and development, and encourage community/group wastewater treatment options where there are concentrations of existing or planned development located some distance from public services and/or where there are particular problems with the siting or maintenance of on-site systems. • Consider the addition of stormwater infiltration methods, such as rain gardens and pervious pavement, to any new County construction project, even if not required by law. • Maintain and manage density and minimum lot sizes to allow adequate space for replacement of private on-site sewage systems. • Support the expansion of all broadband/internet access service options to residents and businesses throughout the county. • Continue to support and work with State and local agencies to provide renewable energy opportunities.

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3.10 INTERGOVERNMENTAL COORDINATION Successful and vibrant communities rely upon collaborative efforts among businesses and organizations and benefit from partnerships with regional organizations and State and Federal agencies. The County has a strong history of intergovernmental collaboration and multi-partner projects. This section defines the County’s strategies on collaboration and provides guidance on reaching out to new partners and maintaining existing relationships.

Intergovernmental Coordination Goal 1 Maintain mutually-beneficial relationships and partnerships with neighboring jurisdictions and other governmental agencies. Objective IC1.1: Collaborate plan boundary areas and coordinate longterm growth plans with the C2C Plan, Ames Urban Fringe Plan and other multi-jurisdictional planning efforts. Objective IC1.2: Seek to reduce costs and improve quality of service for County operations, partner municipalities and organizations through sound partnerships. Objective IC1.3: Identify existing and potential conflicts, especially regarding land use planning, and establish procedures to address them. Strategies • Encourage an efficient and compatible land use pattern that minimizes conflicts between land uses across municipal boundaries and preserves farming and natural resources in mutually agreed areas. • To the extent possible, coordinate the C2C Plan with the municipalities within the county. • As the C2C Plan is updated request comments from area school district officials and municipalities within the county. • Encourage the adoption of common planning regulations and standards among jurisdictions in the county whenever possible in order to reduce confusion for area residents and developers. • Consider the recommendations of municipal Comprehensive Plans when amending and updating other, more detailed County plans. These more detailed county-level land use plans shall be consistent with the C2C Plan, or adopted as a component of the C2C Plan clearly indicating if conflicts exist between the two plans which plan has priority.

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

• Work with area municipalities to identify opportunities for shared services or other cooperative planning efforts, and pursue funding from State and Federal agencies to implement projects that address shared goals and objectives. • Collaborate with local non-profits and social service agencies to ensure there are adequate resources for all residents and that service is fair and equitable. • Request that school district officials and State and Federal agencies keep Story County apprised of any plans for new facilities or other land use activities that could affect future land use within the county. • Coordinate County planning efforts with local school districts as necessary to allow those districts to properly plan for facility needs. • Coordinate planning with State and Federal plans and agencies as much as possible.

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1 2 3 Conservation of Natural 4 Resources and Recreation 5 The abundance and health of our natural resources and recreation are vital to the well-being of our communities, 6 the prosperity of our economy and the health of our ecological systems. This Chapter outlines the 7 regional goals, objectives, and strategies for preserving, protecting, and enhancing our natural and recreation Appendix A restoring, resources. Because all systems are interconnected, these Appendix B goals address water, land, wildlife, air, vegetation, soil, geology, and the welfare of our citizens. Appendix C Appendix D Page 4.1 Goals, Objectives and Strategies 4-2 4.2 Story County Strategic Plan 4.3 South Skunk River Water Trail 4.4 Inventory and Analysis 4.5 Conditions and Needs

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4.1

GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIES

Goals, Objectives and Strategies As population, development, and land values increase, the need for strategic natural resource and recreation planning and management becomes more important. Preserving, protecting, restoring, and enhancing our natural resources will help improve the quality of life for those currently living in Story County and help ensure a legacy for future generations. The goals, objectives, and strategies for this Chapter are generally intended to be implemented by the Story County Conservation Board and incorporated into the Conservation Board’s strategic plan. Both the Conservation Board and the Board of Supervisors should periodically review this Chapter and evaluate its progress and priorities. Partnerships with local schools, cities, conservation groups and other organizations should be sought to support these efforts. To establish a shared vision for Story County that will guide future actions and decisions, the following natural resource and recreation goals have been developed. The goals often build upon one another. For example, installing vegetated buffer strips along waterways protects ground and surface water, protect adjacent land from erosion, attracts wildlife and pollinators, and increases plant diversity. Buffer strips also provide space for trails that promote active lifestyles. This one effort helps accomplish seven of the eight goals listed below.

Natural Resource and Recreation Goal 1 Preserve, protect, restore, and enhance the quality of Story County’s ground water and surface water. Objective NRR1.1: Provide leadership for limiting the loss or degradation of Story County’s riparian zones, wetlands, and other water bodies. Objective NRR1.2: Preserve, enhance, and where possible restore the natural and beneficial functions of wetlands, streams, rivers, creeks and lakes. Objective NRR1.3: Implement and/or encourage the implementation of stormwater Best Management Practices to reduce the speed and impact of stormwater runoff.

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Objective NRR1.4: Educate the public to lessen the negative human impact on water quality and quantity. Objective NRR1.5: Encourage the use of conservation practices for agricultural land. Strategies • Recommend the use of Best Management Practices (i.e. bioretention cells, permeable paving, vegetated swales, etc.) on County approved projects and promote their use and requirement. • Identify and map impaired water bodies to raise water quality awareness in Story County. • Provide citizens with educational resources and activities on improving water quality at the watershed level. • Consider establishing a city-county “Ground Water Task Force” to analyze existing underground water and aquifer usage and capacity and develop a long-term strategy to manage water usage to ensure adequate future capacity and access. • Encourage water quality improvement strategies such as bioretention cells in drainage districts. • Encourage landowners along open drainage ditches to adopt water quality improvement strategies such as buffer strips or vegetated swales. • Work with the Natural Resource Conservation Service to incentivize the agricultural community to adopt additional water quality and quantity best practices. • Encourage buffer strips along priority stream beds. • Investigate creating a “Waterway Reserve Program” similar to the Iowa “Forest Reserve Program” that preserves native Iowa timber while allowing the land owner to hold the land tax free. Consider developing a similar reserve program for buffer strips. • Encourage greenway development along surface waters. • Develop a program to promote sustainable agriculture techniques and practices.

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4.1

GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIES

Natural Resource and Recreation Goal 2 Preserve, protect, restore, and enhance Story County’s land, soil, and geological resources. Objective NRR2.1: Protect the native soils and geologic resources (processes and features) as integral components of natural systems. Objective NRR2.2: Prevent the unnatural erosion, physical removal, or contamination of native soils, as they support diverse biotic communities and serve as the foundation for all terrestrial ecosystems. Objective NRR2.3: Maintain and restore the integrity of existing geologic resources. Strategies • Research, map, and inventory the existing below-surface resources of Story County to identify particularly significant and sensitive areas and develop practices and strategies to protect them. • Develop educational resources and activities to promote positive behavior changes that improve Story County’s soil and geologic resources.

Natural Resource and Recreation Goal 3 Restore the natural diversity, dynamics, distributions, habitats, and behaviors of Story County’s native plant and animal populations. Objective NRR3.1: Preserve and protect the existing native plants and animals, as well as re-establishing them where they historically occurred. Objective NRR3.2: Restore native plant and animal populations in parks where they have been eliminated due to natural processes or human activity, given adequate space and habitat for their re-establishment. Objective NRR3.3: Promote the return of native Iowa vegetation, to enhance the ecosystem’s ability to handle human and natural impacts and for natural beauty. Objective NRR3.4: Re-populate historic native plant types where possible, and initiate and maintain the processes that sustain them (i.e. prescribed prairie burns).

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone Objective NRR3.5: Establish and maintain healthy habitats that meet the needs of native animal populations and their migratory patterns. Objective NRR3.6: Minimize human impacts on native plant and animal populations, the ecosystem they comprise, and processes that sustain them. Objective NRR3.7: Restrict development within environmentally sensitive areas including floodplains, steep slopes, wooded areas, and wetlands. Objective NRR3.8: Establish native vegetation communities along roadways and drainage ditches. Strategies • Inventory the County’s sensitive areas, prairies, habitats, and other natural resources and seek protection for those areas. • Continue to review and follow the County’s floodplain regulations to restrict and regulate development. • Promote and encourage the planting of ‘pollinator plots’ in strategic areas, through education programs. • Encourage development that limits impact on existing wooded areas and preserves and restores natural prairie and wetlands. • Promote educational programs to protect and restore Story County’s native plants and animals. • Advocate for restoration of ‘prairie potholes’ within Story County. • Continue to implement the roadside vegetation program and identify roadsides eligible for roadside vegetation to be included as part of the roadside vegetation program. • Protect the quality of natural resources in County managed areas - water, habitat, soil, and prairie. • Recognize the significance of drainage corridors in serving important ecological functions.

Natural Resource and Recreation Goal 4 Maintain, improve, and expand recreational features (parks, trails, and open space) and their services for current and future safe access and use. Objective NRR4.1: Ensure all public parks, green spaces, and services within Story County are safe and easy to access. Objective NRR4.2: Provide accessibility for all individuals through the use of accessible parking spaces, play equipment, and paved trails.

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4.1

GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIES

Objective NRR4.3: Provide connected networks of pedestrian and bike friendly pathways that link public parks and communities, area attractions and destinations. Objective NRR4.4: Maximize the use of current parks by researching, introducing, implementing, and evaluating state-of-the-art equipment and activities. Objective NRR4.5: Provide safe biking, hiking, watercraft, fishing, hunting, camping, swimming, and equestrian opportunities within the county. Objective NRR4.6: Connect existing and future trails and routes across cities and adjoining counties. Objective NRR4.7: Meet the varied recreational needs of our residents while protecting and enhancing the natural environment. Objective NRR4.8: Construct park improvements which provide safe recreation and meet needs of park visitors. Strategies • Encourage citizen participation in the planning, development, and maintenance of recreational trails and facilities through public hearings, surveys, and activities to ensure community needs and desires are met. • Periodically review the existing trail network and the proposed trails and greenway plan to identify gaps, determine trail improvements, and set greenway priorities. • Develop and fund a future trails network to increase connectivity, and ensure safe access to all public parks and recreation areas. • Partner with local school districts, conservation groups, and organizations to support and promote recreation and natural resource protection programs. • Work with land owners adjacent to trails and parks to develop a conservation strategy. • Work with the NRCS and similar entities to develop, implement, and evaluate a plan that provides public access to and/or through developed buffer strips and pollinator planting zones. • Provide natural resource areas with very limited development for wildlife observation, resource protection, bird watching, and hunting. • Invest in park infrastructure to maintain safe and enjoyable experiences for visitors.

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone • •

Develop park amenities which increase usage of parks and add to the economic, social, and health benefits of parks. Invest in equipment and staff training to provide safe recreational opportunities.

Natural Resource and Recreation Goal 5 Foster air quality improvement to preserve natural resources and sustain community health and enjoyment. Objective NRR5.1: Provide safe, easy, and affordable options for sustainable transportation. Objective NRR5.2: Promote the use of sustainable forms of transportation to decrease the amount of harmful small particulates entering and jeopardizing the quality of the air. Objective NRR5.3: Increase the amount of tree canopy in select areas to enhance clean air and reduce summer temperatures throughout Story County. Objective NRR5.4: Promote increased walkability and bikability within Story County and incorporate the use of complete streets designs. Strategies • Continue to review the existing trails network, as well as the proposed trails and greenway plan to identify and provide needed connectivity. • Promote the use of bicycle travel and increased walkability with an improved trail network and increase in safely designed bike and pedestrian lanes. • Provide educational resources and activities that relate air quality to health and advocate residents to improve air quality and lower their carbon footprint. • Implement tree planting programs to re-establish natural tree cover within the county. • Promote the creation of greenways that include native vegetation.

Natural Resource and Recreation Goal 6 Promote and conduct environmental education to create awareness and behavior change for improved natural resources. Objective NRR6.1: Educate the public on the significance of preserving, protecting, restoring, and enhancing Story County’s natural resources.

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4.1

GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIES

Objective NRR6.2: Work with individuals and organizations to improve the quality of the water, air, soil, geology, vegetation, and wildlife of Story County. Objective NRR6.3: Reach an increasingly diverse group of residents with environmental education opportunities. Strategies • Promote natural resource protection programs that are easy to implement and understand to allow people of all ages to become involved. • Establish opportunities for community members to connect with nature to gain a sense of environmental awareness and responsibility. • Promote experiential and place-based educational programs to encourage active participation and develop a sense of community ownership. • Provide opportunities for volunteers to educate as well as learn. • Provide interactive and technology-based learning opportunities.

Natural Resource and Recreation Goal 7 Focus resources on high-priority areas identified within Story County. Objective NRR7.1: Identify and improve high-priority areas within Story County as environmentally sensitive, habitat for endangered species, or lacking safe trails and recreational opportunities. Objective NRR7.2: Ensure that areas in need remain a high priority, and are able to improve over time. Objective NRR7.3: Provide increased ecosystem services for residents and visitors of Story County. Ecosystem services are benefits for humans that arise from healthily functioning ecosystems. (i.e. production of air, food and fiber, and fresh water). Objective NRR7.4: Work with the agricultural community to establish support for preserving, protecting, restoring, and enhancing natural and recreation resources. Strategies: • Work with the NRCS office and State of Iowa Department of Agriculture to develop a large scale sustainable agriculture plan.

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone •

• • • • • •

Consider development of a test site or streambed area with the agricultural community, DNR, and the NRCS office to document soil and water quality and the impact on agricultural business. Explore and prioritize areas around existing Story County parks for potential future expansion. Work with the City of Ames to explore and prioritize the Hallet materials extraction site located SW of I-35/US 30 interchange for potential reuse and revitalization. Identify and improve steep slopes that need erosion control or riparian restoration. Identify potential future trail, park, and natural resource conservation locations and pursue land acquisition and/or easements. Focus resources on land acquisition of high-priority areas. Provide opportunities for volunteers to help improve highpriority areas.

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4.2

STORY COUNTY STRATEGIC PLAN

Story County 2015 Strategic Plan Story County’s 3-year Strategic Plan (2015-2018) serves as a roadmap to guide priorities, strategic directions, and concrete goals and objectives for the Board of Supervisors and County departments. Through the strategic planning process, a series of conditions and needs have been identified in the County’s 2015 Strategic Plan that relate to parks and trails, water quality, greenways, and habitat. Parks and Trails Story County aims to ensure sustainable funding for conservation, parks and recreation, trails, natural resources, and outdoor recreation to sufficiently enact priorities, and continue to monitor development in the Legislature regarding funding initiatives and proposed changes. These steps will assist as the County works with the ISU Research Park on their green space planning and works to create a Comprehensive Conservation and Recreation Plan for the entire County. Additionally, recreational facility infrastructure improvements will be a priority. Water Quality Story County hopes to work with partner agencies to address known water quality improvement needs and assess county-wide water quality on a watershed basis. Address critical water quality issues, such as the County passing regulations at the State and Federal level to ensure the County accounts and plans for any and all regulatory standards regarding water, wastewater, floodplains, and management. Greenways Greenways link natural areas, parks, cultural sites or historic sites with each other and in some cases with populated areas. Greenways can protect environmentally sensitive lands and wildlife, and also can provide people with access to outdoor recreation and enjoyment close to home. In 2000, a “Creating a Central Iowa Greenways System” plan was established. Story County aims to build upon this greenway system to create safe greenway areas within the cities and connect to adjoining counties. 4-10


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Habitat Preserving habitat, as well as establishing and enhancing habitat areas is a key goal of the Story County Conservation Board. As part of this plan, Story County aims to preserve and protect the existing native plants and animals within the county, as well as seek to reestablish them where they historically occurred.

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4.3

SOUTH SKUNK RIVER WATER TRAIL PLAN

South Skunk River Water Trail Plan Story County Conservation, and the Skunk River Paddlers have been working to designate the South Skunk River in Story County as a State Water Trail since the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) began the water trail program in 2008. The status of â&#x20AC;&#x153;state-designatedâ&#x20AC;? is reserved for water trails that represent the best paddling experiences in each region of the state. Not every county in Iowa will have a state-designated water trail. The IDNR sponsored a comprehensive Water Trail Plan in 2013. Story County Conservation Board (SCCB) emerged as the water trail sponsor as a result of that planning and a steering group of residents and stakeholders is also in place to guide development and management. The South Skunk River is a non-meandered stream beginning in Hamilton County. The South and North Skunk rivers join in Keokuk County, becoming the Skunk River. The Skunk enters into the Mississippi River in the far southeast part of the state. The Story County portion of the South Skunk River is 38 miles in length. The watershed area draining into the Story County portion of the river is approximately 651 square miles. The South Skunk River has always been used by the people living in the area. The Phase IA Study conducted by the Iowa Office of State Archeology for the water trail plan concluded there are 131 known archaeological sites recorded from bluff top to bluff top on either side of the South Skunk in Story County and 87 within 400m of the streambanks of the South Skunk (OSA 2014). Some of these sites are located on public property and others are privately-owned. Of the 131 sites, 95 sites include prehistoric components, 19 with historic components and 18 contained both historical and prehistoric components. Recorded prehistoric sites included isolated finds, camps, scatters, lithic scatters, open habitations, and kill/butchering. In recent times, the South Skunk River in Story County has been used for recreation by anglers, canoeists, kayakers, and tubers. The thirty-eight miles of river is divided into eleven segments by river access points. 4-12

Source: Iowa Department of Natural Resources


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

The water trail passes through three communities (Story City, Ames, and Cambridge). Two low-head and one sheet pile dams are located on the South Skunk River in Story County. Story City Park has a sheet pile dam that is impassable to paddlers during most water conditions. Several attempts to modify the structure for fish and paddler passage have been unsuccessful. The General Filter/Hannum’s Mill Dam is located slightly upstream of Sleepy Hollow Access. The 13th Street dam is located in North River Valley Park and owned by the City of Ames. Paddler hazard warning signs exist for all three obstructions. A portage route was constructed around the General Filter/Hannum’s Mill and the 13th Street dam in 2013 by Conservation Corps volunteers and Iowa DNR staff. Water Trail Experience Types A set of Iowa criteria established in 2010 is applied to guide classification of state designated segments. This experience classification system allows paddlers to match water trail routes with their ability level. These criteria also help water trail managers, sponsors and trail volunteers select a classification assignment for each segment based on their management resources and abilities. Statedesignated water trails in Iowa are designed to provide four basic types of experiences: Gateway, Recreational, Challenge, and Wilderness. • Gateway Experience Segments: At normal flow conditions, these segments provide the most predictable experience for paddlers. • Recreational Experience Segments: Recreational experiences generally require more skill and experience compared to Gateway segments. • Challenge Experience Segments: These segments are not for beginners. At normal flow conditions, paddlers will experience a moderate to high number of hazards including logjams, rapids, the potential for high waves, or limited egress. • Wilderness Experience Segments: The goal of this classification is to provide users with all that is possible in the state in terms of wilderness experience with minimal human-made distractions and amenities. Goals,Skunk Objectives and Strategies South River Water Trail Plan | 4-13


4.3

SOUTH SKUNK RIVER WATER TRAIL PLAN

According to the Water Trail Plan, the entire length of the South Skunk River in Story County can remain in its current classification as a Recreational use classification with one exception. The rapids created at the North River Valley Park dam modification site will likely create Challenge experience classification conditions. Additionally, with enhancement, one segment has the potential to be converted to a Gateway classification. The Sleepy Hollow to North River Valley segment is an ideal length for a Gateway classification but requires enhancement. The 2.9 mile length of the segment makes it an ideal shorter distance for beginners and novices. Its juxtaposition in Ames relates well to the urban context, interpretation and service expectations of this experience classification. Upgrades would be necessary to both accesses as well as channel conditions. The water trail for the South Skunk River spells out improvements of many kinds including larger parking lots and better accesses to the river. It also talks at length about the natural resources of the river.

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone From the Draft Water Trail Plan to be completed in 2016: â&#x20AC;&#x153;As much as further developing recreation potential, the water trail sponsor (SCC) shares the values of resource protection held by the state program. They see one of the primary purposes of the water trail as a means to further conservation on and near the river and to communicate this to users. Conditions will be protected for the already high diversity of bird and mussel species. Greater attention on natural channel restoration to reduce mass channel wasting and mid-channel deposition will occur. And the expansion of diverse riparian plantings will create a continuous perennial buffer on the water trail route. In the long term, previously channelized segments of the river can serve as candidates for stream mitigation. Eventually, trail and greenspace connections between Ames and the Story - Polk county line along the South Skunk are desired. Additional goals include diverse resource enhancement of the river corridor including permanent protection of critical cultural and historic resources, river edge riparian forests, is to make gains in water quality enhancement in Story County. Bacteria and biologically impaired reaches of the river in Story County impact river users and have the potential to influence the quality of aquatic habitat.â&#x20AC;? Source: Wagner, M., L. Buscher, J. Wilson. 2016. For the love of a river: South Skunk Water Trail Plan. Des Moines: Iowa Department of Natural Resources.

Goals,Skunk Objectives and Strategies South River Water Trail Plan | 4-15


4.4

INVENTORY AND ANALYSIS

Natural Resource and Recreation Inventory Substantial information pertaining to Story County’s geology, vegetation, soil, and wildlife has been gathered and analyzed to better understand the natural resources found under, on, and above the land surface. Recreation resources have also been mapped. To portray this information, a series of maps have been created, and will be elaborated upon further throughout the Chapter. Use of the Inventory With the use of inventory data from the Story County GIS Department, as well as the Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS), patterns of geographic significance become clear, and help aid in determining natural resource goals and opportunities as well as locations for future growth in Story County. Utilizing this inventory data, the following maps were created: • City Annexation and Land Area Map • Story County Base Map • Existing Trails Map • Surface Geology Map • Bedrock Geology • Slope Analysis Map • Soil Types Map • Soil Categories Map • Soil-Based Corn Yield Map • Soil-Based Soybean Yield Map • Hydric Soils Map • HUC 8 Watersheds Map • HUC 10 Watersheds Map • HUC 12 Watersheds Map • Floodplains, Wind Turbines, and Quarries Map • Greenways Map • Historic Vegetation Types Map • Current Land Cover Map • Prairie Land Map • Vegetation Type Map • Aquifer Map • Habitat Map • Wildlife Corridors Map • Drainage Districts Map • Landscape Types Map • Existing Land Use Map 4-16

The selection of resources for this study was based primarily on the availability of data and the significance of these resources in land planning. Each of the maps in Appendix D is accompanied by a brief description, as well as a legend. This information is presented to help resource users gain a basic understanding of Story County’s natural and recreation resources. This is one of the first steps in the process of future land use decision-making.

Story County Historic Vegetation (Full Map and Description in Appendix D)

Story County Geology (Full Map and Description in Appendix D)


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Natural Resource Analysis Information for this Chapter was gleaned from the August 1975 Natural Resource Analysis conducted for the county by the Land Use Analysis Laboratory. Findings presented in this analysis provided substantial base information and analysis for this inventory. Through more recent exploration and analysis, new findings have been discovered through this review process and are discussed below. Land Cover Through land cover analysis mapping, the historic land cover of Story County (1873) was much different than it is today. In 1873, as much as 332,505 acres of prairie existed, which encompasses over 90% of the Story Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s land. Today, the majority of the land that was historically prairie has been converted into cropland. Additionally, Story County historically had as much as 3,307 acres of marsh/wetland. Similar to the loss of prairie land, the majority of these wetlands were drained and converted into agricultural land. Therefore, one of the key conservation of natural resources goals of Story County is to protect and enhance the diversity, dynamics, distributions, habitats, and behaviors of Story Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s native plant and animal populations.

1975 Story County Natural Resource Analysis

Water Quality Another key finding has been the poor conditions of some of our countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water bodies. Impaired streams and rivers can be found on the Story County watershed maps, as well as on the Story County aquifer map. To improve these conditions and prevent other water bodies from further degradation, Story County strives to preserve, protect, restore, and enhance the ground water and surface waters through best management practices and conservation practices for agriculture. Environmentally Sensitive Areas Analysis maps helped identify environmentally sensitive areas within the County. This includes areas located within the floodplain, areas with particularly steep slopes, habitat areas, and areas with hydric soils. A thorough flora and fauna inventory of sensitive and potentially sensitive Goals, Objectives andand Strategies Inventory Analysis | 4-17


4.4

INVENTORY AND ANALYSIS

areas, which was not possible through GIS analysis, should be done. Story County will work to preserve, protect, and limit development within these identified areas. Trails and Greenways Through mapping the existing Story County trails and greenways, it has become evident that gaps within the trail system exist, and that certain areas of the County are not fully served. As a result, a proposed trails and greenways expansion plan and map have been created based upon the input from community members, Conservation Board members, and various interest groups. Residential and Commercial Development The inventory reveals the amount and patterns of growth and development that have occurred over time. As seen in the land cover and land use maps, a large amount of residential and commercial development has been established within municipalities. These developments often increase the amount of impervious surfaces in the county, increasing runoff and decreasing the quality of the natural environment. Therefore, Story County strives for future development to be well-planned and aligned with smart growth principles and practices to preserve sensitive and agriculturally valuable land. Soil The analysis of county soils illustrates locations of valuable, nutrient rich soils that exist in much of Story County. The types and locations of these soils help determine where future growth and development should or should not occur. The analysis reveals areas of high potential for soil loss. Soil conservation practices should focus on these areas.

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Goals, Objectives andand Strategies Inventory Analysis | 4-19


4.5

CONDITIONS AND NEEDS

Conditions and Needs The August 1975 Natural Resource Analysis served as the foundation for this Chapter, building upon the data and study assembled by its authors. Of particular note, the landscape type map was created based on the landscape types information and map from the 1975 analysis. The following section contains key findings and points that were made in the 1975 analysis. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Land use planning at any level - local, multi-county, or statewide - must begin with a realistic inventory of natural resources to be matched against the needs and goals of the people. With data on kinds and amounts of land and water resources, on their suitability for different uses, and on their spatial relationships, it is possible to meet human and economic needs and at the same time maintain or improve the quality of the environment.â&#x20AC;? (Upper Explorerland Resource Conservation and Development Project, Land Use Committee, 1973) The following analysis of individual resources identified in areas of Story County may be important environmentally or economically; may contain either unique or non-renewable resources; or may impose development limitations. Floodplains Areas of greatest concern are primarily floodplains, with geologic and soil limitations; and valley walls, with geologic, soil, vegetation, and wildlife limitations. On the uplands, areas of greatest concern are the smaller and more discontinuous pothole, peat, and mulch areas, and the areas of tree cover, marsh, or prairie remnants. Geologic Resources The study of geologic resources is a necessary part of a natural resources assessment. The protection and use of Story Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s geologic resources depends not only on wise resource management, but also on the planning and location of future land uses.

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Habitat Existing woodland, marsh, and early successional areas are extremely important habitat types. These areas of low human use contain the greatest diversity of vegetation species and forms, and offer a variety of needed food and cover. Consequently, these areas which support the greatest wildlife populations and have the greatest species diversity should be protected. Slopes Development on steep slopes should be restricted because of erosion and slippage problems. Geologic, water, soil, vegetation, and wildlife resources provide the residents of Story County with the necessities of food and water, as well as scenic enjoyment and recreation opportunities. Soil Soil characteristics can often indicate potential hazards and costs associated with a particular development. Costs of land development could be minimized through proper use of soils information. Construction in areas of low bearing capacity may be more costly over time because buildings and roads may crack due to uneven settling. Low areas on the uplands are subject to shortterm flooding, and the flood hazard on stream bottoms is even more severe.

The objectives and strategies for preserving, protecting, and restoring Story County’s natural resources strive to be similar to those declared in the California Environmental Quality Act: “Take all action necessary to protect, rehabilitate and enhance the environmental quality of the state... Take all action necessary to provide the people of this state with clean air and water, enjoyment of aesthetic, natural, scenic, and historic environmental qualities, and freedom from excessive noise... Prevent the elimination of fish or wildlife species due to man’s activities, ensure that fish and wildlife populations do not drop below selfperpetuating levels, and preserve for future generations representations of all plant and animal communities and examples of the major periods of California history... Ensure that long term protection of the environment shall be the guiding criterion in public decisions.” (California Environmental Quality Act - Section 21000). Together, the inventoried data, analysis, and studies can assist in planning for resource utilization, conservation, or preservation. As new land use issues and needs arise, the application of this system will help ensure a high quality natural environment and high quality of life for the people of Story County.

Vegetation In all vegetation planning and management decisions, the effects on soil and water resources should be of prime consideration. Vegetation is important as permanent cover, which protects soil and water resources by decreasing soil erosion and water runoff and by increasing infiltration. Invasive vegetation has a detrimental effect on native plant and wildlife communities. Invasive species should be removed or minimized. Water Potable water availability and quality are important considerations in resource planning. Because alluvial and buried channel aquifers provide approximately onehalf of the public water supply in Story County, they are primary factors in directing future growth and ensuring that water remains a sustainable resource.

Conditions and Needs | 4-21 Goals, Objectives and Strategies


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1 2 3 4 5 Land Use 6 This Chapter outlines land use goals, objectives, and strategies, defines land use designations, and 7 describes the desired future land uses for Story Appendix A County. Page Goals, Objectives, and Strategies 5-2 Appendix B 5.1 5.2 Future Land Use Designations 5-6 Agricultural Conservation 5-8 Appendix C - Natural Resource Area 5-10 - Rural Residential 5-12 Appendix D - Rural Village Area 5-14 - Commercial - Industrial Area - Urban Expansion Area - Ames Urban Fringe Area 5.3 Existing and Future Land Use Maps

5-16 5-18 5-20 5-22


5.1

GOALS, OBJECTIVES, AND STRATEGIES

Land Use Planning Planning for future land uses allows Story County to determine the best locations for future growth and development within the county. Good land use planning involves community engagement, wise natural resource management, and accurate projections in relation to where and how growth will and should occur. Furthermore, it is important to establish unique characteristics of the area, themes to implement, and types of land use strategies to help build upon that character. The following goals and strategies help guide the decision-making process as Story County continues to grow and prosper. The Legal Authority for Zoning Story County, Iowa, is authorized to regulate land use and development through its right to zone in accordance with a comprehensive plan under the Code of Iowa Chapter 335.5 Additionally, there is authority granted to counties to conduct land use planning under Chapter 352 of the Code addressing agricultural preservation and the right to farm. Within the context of this authority, the Story County Board of Supervisors and Planning and Zoning Commission created the Cornerstone to Capstone Plan to guide land use and development activities in unincorporated Story County.

Goals and Strategies Land Use Goal 1 Identify and map areas to guide future development in unincorporated Story County. Strategies • Classify the following designations on the Future Land Use Map: Agricultural Conservation Area, Natural Resource Area, Rural Residential Area, Rural Village Area, Urban Expansion Area, and Commercial-Industrial Area. • Through ongoing communications with Story County’s communities, annually review the Future Land Use Map to ensure designations remain relevant and serve to guide growth and development. • Adopt or amend implementation measures necessary to fully implement the goals and strategies of the Future Land Use Map and the Cornerstone to Capstone (C2C) Plan.

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Land Use Goal 2 Preserve, protect, and plan around the physical characteristics of the land, including floodplains, steep slopes, wetlands, rich soils, and rare geologic or environmental characteristics. Strategies • Designate natural resources, including inventoried Sensitive Areas as Natural Resource Areas on the Future Land Use Map. As new areas are inventoried, amend the Future Land Use Map accordingly. • Establish strategies to ensure preservation and protection of the aggregate resources and deposits such as gravel and sand located in Story County from encroachment by incompatible uses. • Continue to implement a strong floodplain management program that incorporates regulations, mapping, permitting requirements, and participation in the Community Rating System to accommodate flood water and mitigate risks achieving the following: • Educates residents about flood hazards. • Provides information about flood insurance. • Implements policies and measures that protect people and property from flood hazards. • Requires responsible building practices. • Protects the natural floodplain functions.

Land Use Goal 3 Consider the availability and capacity of local services and infrastructure when determining future land uses. Strategies • Encourage new urban density development within city boundaries or within appropriately planned locations as designated on the Future Land Use Map. • Locate commercial and industrial uses in urban areas except where uses have specific requirements which justify a potential location in rural areas. • Establish Minimum Levels of Service (MLS) requirements to ensure that adequate public facilities and services are available, or can be provided, to new development. • Encourage future land uses that efficiently match the capacity of the existing transportation system.

Goals, Objectives, and Strategies | 5-3


5.1

GOALS, OBJECTIVES, AND STRATEGIES

Land Use Goal 4 Evaluate short and long-term financial impacts to the County budget when considering development proposals. Strategies • Review proposed subdivisions in Rural Residential Areas on a case-by-case basis. • Establish location guidelines for Story County to follow in the review process for new subdivisions within Rural Residential Area or Urban Expansion Area.

Land Use Goal 5 Establish open space buffers or greenways that provide connectivity from one city to the next. Strategies • When adjacent to agricultural areas or natural resources, minimize development impacts through transitional uses, edge treatments, and other appropriate measures. • As part of ongoing communications with communities, define appropriate community separation strategies that help the community to sustain its identity. • To create linkages within Story County, coordinate trails and transportation improvements identified through the C2C Plan with development proposals located in close proximity to communities.

Land Use Goal 6 Continue to protect and preserve Story County’s agricultural resources for current and future generations. Strategies • Promote the use of conservation practices to protect agricultural land and water quality. • Promote the long term value of agriculture through voluntary, incentive-based programs and strategies, and identify partners to facilitate the creation and use of such programs. • Conduct best management practice test studies and experiments on water quality improvement projects.

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Minimum Level of Service (MLS) Story County residents rely on facilities and services to define and maintain their quality of life, health, and well-being. Public facilities and services are often taken for granted. Yet, without coordination and conscientious planning for future growth, facilities and services may be interrupted or inadequate. Existing facilities and services must be able to support new development or provisions for improvements must be made where deficiencies exist. Minimum levels of service (MLS) requirements regarding public facilities and services will help ensure that Story County strives to maintain the quality of life for existing and future development. Levels of service standards are usually quantifiable measures of the amount of provided public facilities or services and measure the quality of some public facilities. Levels of service standards are measures of the quality of life of Story County. The standards should be based on the vision for our future and our values. Following adoption of the C2C Plan, as part of the Plan’s implementation strategies, minimum levels of service requirements will be identified and adopted as a component of Story County’s development review process.


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone • •

Continue to foster land strategies and regulations that conserve the productivity and availability of high value agricultural lands for the production of food and fiber. Seek to reduce conflicts that may arise between development and agricultural practices.

Land Use Goal 7 Identify and preserve areas of historical and cultural significance. Strategies • Develop a preservation plan that includes an inventory of potentially culturally and/or historically-significant properties and establishes strategies for their use and preservation. • Encourage the preservation and renovation of existing structures, neighborhoods, or districts that may qualify as designated historic landmarks.

Land Use Goal 8 Ensure that land use transitions are gradual or designed to reduce potential incompatibilities among land uses. Strategies • Establish design and development standards to enhance collaboration between development, agriculture, and natural and recreation resources. • Design new residential development to maintain the rural character and protect sensitive environmental features and agricultural uses. • Ensure new development is setback an adequate distance from existing and proposed major utility transmission lines and pipelines.

Goals, Objectives, and Strategies | 5-5


5.2

FUTURE LAND USE DESIGNATIONS

Future Land Use Map and Designations To facilitate the orderly development, use, and preservation of land in unincorporated Story County, the County established a Future Land Use Map with a set of land use designations and strategies specific to each designation. These designations relate to certain zoning districts. The definition and identification of future land use designations shown on the Future Land Use Map are: Agricultural Conservation Area: These areas encompass large areas of highly valuable farmland, with farming and agricultural production as the primary activity. Natural Resource Area: Natural areas, floodplains, green spaces, and parks help create open space linkages between the countryside and communities and make up this designation. The Future Land Use Map identifies certain natural features in the county in order to preserve unique habitats, natural or sensitive areas, as well as open and recreational spaces. Rural Residential Area: The Rural Residential Area designation offers the rural housing market segment choices in the unincorporated areas of the county. They are characterized by residential land uses adapted for a rural or agricultural setting at low, non-urban densities. Urban level services are not provided in these areas, and these are not priority areas for infrastructure development. Rural Village Area: Existing areas characterized by a variety of land uses in one location are designated as Rural Village Area. These areas have unique land use patterns that provide valued and established services for citizens in Story County. Roads in these areas are generally platted as right-of-way and maintained by Story County. The uses are served by private wastewater treatment systems (septic) and private water sources â&#x20AC;&#x201C; wells and rural water systems. As shown on the Future Land Use Map, these areas contain the rural villages of Iowa Center, Shipley, and Fernald. Commercial-Industrial Area: The Commercial-Industrial Area designation supports the long-term planning objective of accommodating future demand for types of commercial and industrial growth

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that may be best located in a rural setting outside of an urbanized area. Urban Expansion Area: The Urban Expansion Area designation reflects those areas identified by certain communities as future growth areas. Development proposed in these areas should be encouraged to be annexed into the neighboring city in order for an urban level of service to be provided. Proposed land use and regulations should comply with that cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plans and standards as appropriate.

Ames Urban Fringe Area: The Ames Urban Fringe Area designation is the planning area defined in the Ames Urban Fringe Plan that lies within two miles of the official boundary of the cities of Ames, as it existed in 2006. The Ames Urban Fringe Plan is implemented through a 28E agreement between Ames, Gilbert, and Story County. The Plan addresses proposed future land uses within the planning area. The process for proposed development proposals and changes occurring therein. The Future Land Use Map incorporates by reference all land uses shown on the Ames Urban Fringe Plan â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Land Use Framework Map.


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Zoning Compatibility Matrix (ZONING DISTRICTS FOR UNINCORPORATED AREAS)

FUTURE LAND USE DESIGNATIONS

A-1

A-2

A-R

R-1

R-2

RMH

C-LI

HI

GB-C

R-M

R-C

AGRICULTURAL CONSERVATION AREA NATURAL RESOURCE AREA RURAL RESIDENTIAL AREA RURAL VILLAGE AREA COMMERCIAL-INDUSTRIAL AREA URBAN EXPANSION AREA

Establishment of Zoning Districts

1. In order to carry out the purpose and intent of the Ordinance, the unincorporated area of Story County, Iowa, is hereby divided into the following base district classifications: A-1 A-2 A-R R-1 R-2 RMH C-LI HI GB-C

Agricutlural District Argibusiness District Agricultural Residential District Transitional Residential District Urban Residential District Residential Manufactured Housing District Commercial/Light Industrial District Heavy Industrial Greenbelt-Conservation District

2.

In addition to the base districts identified above, the following overlay districts are established.

R-M Residential/Mixed-Use (Overlay) District R-C Residential/Conservation Design (Overlay) District Excerpted from the Story County, Iowa Code of Ordinances, Chapter 86.

Future Land Use Designations | 5-7


AGRICULTURAL CONSERVATION AREA Agricultural Conservation Area

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Agricultural Conservation Area Farming and agricultural production is the primary component of the Agricultural Conservation Area. More than 90% of the unincorporated land area of Story County is used for agricultural purposes. Nearly 80% of the land is classified as â&#x20AC;&#x153;high valueâ&#x20AC;? agricultural land, according to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) definitions. In regard to soil productivity, topography, rural character, availability of agricultural support services, and isolation from incompatible land uses, the majority of unincorporated Story County is prime land for agricultural activities.

Principle 4: Design areas identified for development to limit conflicts between agricultural uses and rural residences and other types of land uses. Through development practices preserve and protect prime agricultural lands and the ability to engage in agricultural activities. Principle 5: Promote the continued health of agriculture through an ongoing planning process to identify partnerships and develop voluntary, incentive-based programs and strategies.

Preservation and enhancement of valuable agricultural land has continually remained a top priority in Story County. Existing State and Federal policies recognize that prime agricultural land is a resource to be protected. Farms are significant historic and economic elements in Story County and play a large role in the quality of life to many county residents. The following principles help guide future land use decisions regarding the Agricultural Conservation Area: Principle 1: Conserving agricultural land, as well as agricultural practices, is a fundamental principle in Story County. Areas are identified, conserved, and enhanced within the county for farming practices and agricultural production. Principle 2: Continue to work towards strategies that promote alternative agricultural methods that work in harmony with conventional operations. A variety of farm types is a good thing. Principle 3: Encourage high-value agricultural lands to remain as agricultural and discourage non-agricultural development of such lands. Direct future non-agricultural development toward the designated Urban Expansion, Rural Residential, Rural Village, and CommercialIndustrial Area designations on the Future Land Use Map. Agricultural Conservation Area | 5-9


NATURAL RESOURCE AREA

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Natural Resource Area Certain aspects of the county, including clean air, water, open spaces, native prairie, mature trees and fertile soil all contribute to the quality of life in Story County. Areas designated as Natural Resource Area illustrate natural resource elements which present limitations to development and/or contain sensitive environmental conditions requiring special design and development standards when development is proposed. Chapter Four of this Plan defines goals and objectives to guide Story County with the identification and enhancement of natural resources and recreational opportunities within the county. As natural resources are identified as defined through Chapter 4, Story County will take steps necessary to amend the Natural Resource Area designation on the Future Land Use Map accordingly. To help preserve Story Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s natural resources, the following principles have been developed for the Natural Resource Area designation: Principle 1: Generally discourage development within these areas. In unique circumstances where appropriate development types may enhance the area, recognize and encourage such approaches. Principle 2: Mitigate impacts of proposed development contiguous to areas identified as Natural Resource Area. Principle 3: Consider areas identified as Natural Resource Area for inclusion in the Greenbelt-Conservation District of the Land Development Regulations and/or take necessary steps to ensure resource conservation through other mechanisms. Principle 4: Develop site planning and performance standards to apply to properties designated as Natural Resource Area not included in the Greenbelt-Conservation District and in which limited development may occur.

Natural Resource Area | 5-11


RURAL RESIDENTIAL AREA

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Rural Residential Area The Rural Residential Area offers rural housing market choices in unincorporated areas of Story County, typically with larger lot sizes than available within city limits. The existing residential land uses that are found in rural Story County provide a desirable housing market worthy of both protection and cultivation. In certain circumstances, some rural residential developments will not have full range of public utilities or may be limited such as lacking public sector sewer, natural gas and paved roads. Types of services such as water, wastewater, roads, utilities and others normally provided for development when it occurs inside a city are likely not available or, at the minimum, not available at â&#x20AC;&#x153;urbanâ&#x20AC;? levels in the Rural Residential Area. Story County does not identify these areas for infrastructure development and/or improvement.

Principle 5: Locate proposed subdivisions on a case-by-case basis. Establish and use location guidelines in the review process for new rural subdivisions. Principle 6: Encourage proposed development to take access off existing paved roads unless it can be demonstrated that Minimum Levels of Service requirements may be met or development can mitigate impacts. Principle 7: Mitigate and manage stormwater run-off, soil erosion, and wastewater discharge according to IDNR and Story County standards.

The following principles have been developed for the Rural Residential Area designation: Principle 1: Ensure that new development is sensitive to the predominantly rural nature of the areas. Principle 2: Encourage clustering of residential sites to limit the shortterm and long-term costs associated with infrastructure improvements and the distribution of public services. Principle 3: Review design and development standards to ensure that conflicts between proposed development and agricultural and natural resources are minimized. Design new residential development to maintain the open character of rural areas and to protect and maintain agricultural uses and sensitive environmental features. Principle 4: When development is adjacent to agricultural uses, provide adequate buffers to minimize conflicts.

Rural Residential Area | 5-13


RURAL VILLAGE AREA

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Rural Village Area Rural Village Areas are existing developed areas within unincorporated Story County characterized by a variety of land uses existing in one location. At the time Story County was platted, these areas were platted at urbanlevel densities, similar to incorporated towns with blocks and lots. These areas have some existing residential platted lots, some lots with homes from older housing stock, while other lots are vacant and appropriate for future development. The opportunity exists for Rural Village Areas to become vital places that serve many of the social, economic, and cultural needs of the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rural residents.

Principle 5: Encourage proposed development to take access off existing paved roads unless it can be demonstrated that Minimum Levels of Service requirements may be met or development can mitigate impacts. Principle 6: Mitigate and manage stormwater run-off, soil erosion, and wastewater discharge according to IDNR and Story County standards.

With this mix of uses, these areas provide valued services for adjacent areas. Future development, infrastructure, and services in these areas focus on minimizing impacts outside of these areas and enhancing the support that they provide to nearby residents and businesses. The following principles have been developed for the Rural Village Area Designation: Principle 1: Continue to promote improvements and re-investments. Principle 2: Support private efforts to seek grants and other sources of funding for the redevelopment and revitalization. Principle 3: Review design and development standards to ensure that conflicts between proposed development and agricultural and natural resources are minimized. Design new residential development to maintain the open character of rural areas and to protect and maintain agricultural uses and sensitive environmental features. Principle 4: When development is located adjacent to agricultural uses, provide adequate buffers to minimize conflicts with agricultural practices.

Rural Village Area | 5-15


COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL AREA

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Commercial and Industrial Areas The Commercial-Industrial Area designation supports the long term planning objective of accommodating future demand for types of commercial and industrial growth that may be best located in a rural setting outside of an urbanized area.

Principle 7: Encourage proposed development to take access off existing paved roads unless it can be demonstrated that Minimum Levels of Service requirements may be met or development can mitigate impacts.

The following principles have been developed for the Commercial and Industrial Area designation: Principle 1: Give preference to clustering uses to limit short-term and long-term costs associated with infrastructure improvements and the distribution of public services. Principle 2: Support new commercial and industrial development within incorporated areas and areas where infrastructure exists and extensions are logical. Priniple 3: Where appropriate, support expansion of existing and/or new industrial or commercial development when it can be demonstrated that agricultural and natural resources can be preserved and protected. Principle 4: Provide adequate buffers to agricultural uses with new development to minimize conflicts. Principle 5: Review design and development standards to ensure that conflicts between proposed development and agricultural and natural resources are minimized. Design new development to maintain the open character of rural areas and to protect and maintain agricultural uses and sensitive environmental features. Principle 6: Mitigate and manage stormwater run-off, soil erosion, and wastewater discharge according to IDNR and Story County standards.

Commercial and Industrial Area | 5-17


URBAN EXPANSION AREA

5-18


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Urban Expansion Area Story County and all the communities share similar concerns about issues and impacts from development that occurs in areas surrounding the cities, such as: • Overlapping regulations of different local jurisdictions; • Inconsistencies among different land use strategies; and • Impacts of development on rural/agricultural activities. The Urban Expansion Area helps address issues that may arise in these areas of joint planning and coordination. The Urban Expansion Area designation reflects those areas identified by individual communities through the planning process as future growth areas and/or are mapped by the community with future land uses. Areas outside the Urban Expansion Area, however still within two miles of a community (and their two-mile statutory subdivision review authority pursuant to the Code of Iowa), represent areas that communities do not foresee growing into within the planning horizon of this Plan. As such, these areas are designated on the Future Land Use Map as a designation other than Urban Expansion Area. Principle 1: Development in the Urban Expansion Area occurs in accordance with the applicable city’s future land use plans and goals. Principle 2: Encourage annexation when development is proposed.

Principle 4: Review design and development standards to ensure that conflicts between proposed development and agricultural and natural resources are minimized. Design new residential development to maintain the open character of rural areas and to protect and maintain agricultural uses and sensitive environmental features. Principle 5: When development is located adjacent to agricultural uses, provide adequate buffers to minimize conflicts. Principle 6: Encourage proposed development to take access off existing paved roads unless it can be demonstrated that Minimum Levels of Service requirements may be met or development can mitigate impacts. Principle 7: Mitigate and manage stormwater run-off, soil erosion, and wastewater discharge according to IDNR and Story County standards. Principle 8: Encourage clustering of residential sites with Urban Expansion Area designation to limit the short-term and long-term costs associated with infrastructure improvements and the distribution of public services.

Principle 3: Where annexation is not appropriate at that time of a development proposal, coordinate a cooperative review/ approval between Story County and the city according to the following standards: 1. Development occurs at an urban density/scale using city development standards where applicable. 2. Use conditional rezoning agreements and annexation agreements to ensure development is built so as to facilitate a seamless transition into the city when the area is annexed.

Urban Expansion Area | 5-19


AMES URBAN FRINGE AREA

LAND USE FRAMEWORK MAP

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5-20

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Ames Urban Fringe Area The planning area defined in the Ames Urban Fringe Plan lies within two miles of the official boundary of the City of Ames, as it existed in 2006. The Ames Urban Fringe Plan is an agreement between Ames, Gilbert, and Story County addressing proposed future land uses within this planning area and addresses the process for proposed development proposals and changes. There are many different stakeholders in the identified planning area, each with unique purposes, positions, plans, and priorities for development. Inconsistencies, potential for conflict, and increased public costs spurred the need for a shared vision and planning practices within this fringe area. The Future Land Use Map incorporates this Ames Urban Fringe Plan herein by reference and it is intended to be the guide for any zoning or development proposed within its boundary. The latest adopted version of the Fringe Plan should be examined when necessary.

Ames Urban Fringe Area | 5-21


5.3

EXISTING AND FUTURE LAND USE MAPS

Existing Land Use

A full sized version of this map is included in Appendix D

5-22


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Future Land Use

A full sized version of this map is included in Appendix D

Existing and Future Land Use Maps | 5-23


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1 2 3 4 5 6 Economic Prosperity 7 This Chapter outlines economic prosperity goals, objectives and strategies for the County. Appendix A Pages Appendix B 6.1: Background and Economic Information 6-2 and Commuter Patterns 6-5 Appendix C -- Workforce Potential Industry Clusters 6-8 - Key Geographic Areas for Growth Appendix D - Existing Economic Development Programs 6-9 6-9 6.2: Goals, Objectives, and Strategies

6-12


6.1

BACKGROUND ECONOMIC INFORMATION

The economy plays a central role in maintaining the vitality and quality of life within Story County. A healthy economy creates good paying jobs, providing economic opportunities to all citizens. The economy also supports the tax base, providing for schools, public safety, fire protection, parks, roads and many other facilities and services. The economic development component of the C2C Plan identifies the economic development strategies that the various communities in the county, as well as the County as a whole, may pursue in the future to facilitate economic development. The purpose of the Economic Prosperity Chapter is to present goals, objectives, and strategies that support and encourage a strong, vibrant economy. While this Chapter focuses on economic development topics, it is important to recognize that the entire C2C Plan can be considered as an economic development tool.

Demographic Background Story County has demonstrated steady growth over the last few decades, and projections from the State of Iowa indicate that this growth should continue over the next 25 years. As outlined in Table 1, below, the population of Story County should expand from an estimate of around 94,000 in 2015 to a total of around 114,000 residents in 2040. The City of Ames has traditionally represented around two-thirds of the population total for the county, overall, over the last few decades and this trend is expected to continue.

Table 1: Population Data Story County 1980 1990 2000 2010 2015 (Estimate) 2020 (Projected) 2025 (Projected) 2030 (Projected) 2035 (Projected) 2040 (Projected)

72,326 74,252 79,981 89,542 93,614 97,007 100,403 103,690 106,621 109,099

Ames 45,775 47,198 50,731 58,965 62,277 64,410 N/A N/A N/A N/A

Ames, % of Total 63.3% 63.6% 63.4% 65.9% 66.5% 66.4% N/A N/A N/A N/A

Remainder of County 26,551 27,054 29,250 30,577 31,337 32,597 N/A N/A N/A N/A

Remainder of County, % of Total 36.7% 36.4% 36.6% 34.1% 33.5% 33.6% N/A N/A N/A N/A

Source: U.S. Census, ESRI, State of Iowa Data Center Population projections for individual cities (including Ames) are not available from the State of Iowa Data Center.

6-2


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone Given the presence of a large number of college-aged students in the Ames area, attending Iowa State University, the median age of the population (26.9 years, as of the 2010 U.S. Census) is younger than the median age for most counties in Iowa. The following table outlines the present (as of 2015) and projected distribution of the population in Story County in 2020. In line with state and national trends, the percentage of the population age 65 and older will continue to increase, from around 11 percent in 2015 to around 13 percent in 2020, as members of the Baby Boomer generation continue to retire.

Table 2: Population by Age, Story County Population by Age, Story County

20% 15% 10% 5% 5.0%

21.2%

19.8% 14.7% 15.0%

11.0% 11.0%

8.9% 9.5% 9.2% 8.4% 9.8% 9.4% 5.9%

5.0% 4.7% 4.6% 4.6% 4.7%

0-4 2015

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Source: ESRI Household incomes, and the breakdown of household incomes, for Story County largely resemble that for the state, overall.

Background and Economic Information | 6-3


6.1

BACKGROUND ECONOMIC INFORMATION

Table 3: Households by Income, Story County 2020 (Projected)

2015 Less than $15,000 $15,000 - $24,999 $25,000 - $34,999 $35,000 - $49,999 $50,000 - $74,999 $75,000 - $99,999 $100,000 - $149,999 $150,000 - $199,999 $200,000 + Median Household Income Average Household Income

17.2% 8.0% 9.8% 13.9% 17.8% 15.7% 10.2% 4.5% 2.9%

16.2% 5.8% 7.7% 12.1% 16.4% 18.6% 14.8% 5.2% 3.2%

$51,092 $65,640

$60,219 $75,271

Source: ESRI The median household income for Story County at around $51,000 in 2015 is fairly close to the median household income for Iowa of $53,000. The average household income in Iowa in 2015 is around $68,000 and the per capita income for the state in 2015 is around $26,700.

6-4


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Context of Story County Workforce and Commuter Patterns The Story County Laborshed Analysis, released in July 2013, measured the availability and characteristics of workers within the Story County area by conducting telephone surveys with participants. The data aids Story County officials in facilitating industry expansion and recruitment and servicing existing industries in the area. Given the location of Story County in the center of the state, a portion of the “laborshed” for Story County falls within 50 miles of the following labor markets: Des Moines, Waterloo-Cedar Falls, Boone, Carroll, Fort Dodge, Indianola, Marshalltown, Newton, and Pella. Therefore, the dynamics of these nearby labor markets affect the availability and preferences of people to work in the Story County labor market. The laborshed analysis determined that the total population of adults, age 18 to 64, in the Story County labor market, totaled around 543,000. Of these, around 444,000 are in the labor force. The report also documented commuter patterns, both into and out of Story County, for employment. The report in particular focused on commuter trends to and from the “node” community of Ames (given its size and concentrations of employment). The report found that around 16 percent of Ames residents who work, commute to another community. Most of those who are “out commuting” from Ames are working in Nevada, Gilbert, Boone, or Des Moines, as indicated in the figure on the following page.

Background and Economic Information | 6-5


6.1

BACKGROUND ECONOMIC INFORMATION

Out Commuters (from Ames) by Place of Employment

Source: Story County Laborshed Analysis, July 2013. The maps on these pages indicate the concentrations of commuters (into, and from Ames) by place of residence. The map demonstrates that most commuters into Ames come from Story County, but many commuters are traveling from the greater Des Moines area, Boone, and Marshalltown as well.

6-6


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone In-Commuters (to Ames) by Place of Residence

Source: Story County Laborshed Analysis, July 2013.

Background and Economic Information | 6-7


6.1

BACKGROUND ECONOMIC INFORMATION

Potential Industry Clusters Story County should refine and continue to target its economic development activities to attract companies and employees associated with key industry “clusters” as identified by various organizations involved in business development in the local area, including the Ames Economic Development Commission (AEDC) and the Cultivation Corridor and Capital Crossroads initiatives. The following is a list of key industry clusters that Story County should pursue over the life of the C2C Plan: • Animal Health: This industry cluster pertains to the development of medicines, processes, and technology related to animal health, as it relates to agri-business. • Food Processing: This industry cluster involves the transformation of raw materials, by physical or chemical means, into food, or of food into other items. Food processing combines raw food ingredients to produce marketable food products that can be easily prepared and served by the consumer. • Information Solutions and Technology: Information technology (IT) is the application of computers and telecommunications equipment to store, retrieve, transmit and manipulate data, often in the context of a business or other enterprise. • Plant Biotechnology: Plant biotechnology involves the introduction of desirable traits into plants through genetic modification. • Agricultural Biosciences: This cluster pertains to the development of new or improved crops and crop production systems through molecular biology, genetics, plant breeding, and crop management. • Biorenewables: Biorenewable resources, sometimes referred to as biomass, are organic materials of recent biological origin. Biorenewables typically originate from either waste byproducts or from the production of dedicated energy crops grown specifically to produce energy, as opposed to food or feed. 6-8

• Biotechnology: Biotechnology refers to the use of living organisms or other biological systems in the manufacture of drugs or other products, or for environmental management, as in waste recycling. • Health and Wellness: This industry cluster refers to the overall movement to promote more healthy lifestyles and behaviors, through the promotion of activities or products designed to foster more healthy lifestyles. • Advanced Manufacturing: This cluster involves the use of technology to improve products and processes, with the relevant technology being described as “advanced”, “innovative”, or “cutting edge”. • Logistics: This cluster involves the transportation and warehousing of goods for business. • Financial Services: This cluster involves the economic services provided by the finance industry, which encompasses a broad range of businesses that manage money, including credit unions, banks, credit card companies, insurance companies, accountancy companies, consumer finance companies, stock brokerages, investment funds, and some government-sponsored enterprises. Communities in Story County are already making great strides in pursuing and developing companies and ventures in these various industry clusters. For example, the City of Nevada has attracted significant biotech and bio-processing investments from Lincolnway Energy and DuPont. DuPont alone has invested more than $225 million in their Nevada facility, and both companies provide additional markets for farmers in the Story County area. Nevada currently has access to an additional 225 acres next to the facilities for DuPont and Lincolnway Energy (to the east) to accommodate up to four additional bio-processing facilities and is working with other potential bio-processing ventures in the local area. In addition, the Iowa State University Research


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Park continues to expand and add companies over time. The most recent Phase 3 expansion plans add more than 100 acres to the facilities, including mixed-use facilities, community areas, green spaces, trails, and more. The expansion incorporates the construction of a new economic development core facility that will contain all of ISU’s economic development service units as well as the Iowa SBDC and Cultivation Corridor.

Key Geographic Areas for Growth While the C2C Plan does not incorporate a formal market analysis, a review of development trends and economic patterns in Story County indicates that the following areas in the county are more likely to face development pressure (for residential and commercial uses) over the next few decades. Ames Fringe Area Given the high quality of life in Ames, the amenities of Iowa State University, and the access from Ames to the I-35 and US 30 corridors, the overall fringe areas around Ames should continue to see growth (in terms of population and business activity) over the next twenty years. Area Between Ames and Nevada Areas in the US Highway 30 corridor from Ames east through Nevada enjoy access to both US 30 and I-35. Areas closer to Nevada, in particular, may be able to market their connectivity to this corridor, and at the same time offer less expensive housing and real estate options to potential suitors, compared to offerings in Ames. The Nevada area, as changes are made to US 30 and I-35, may become more attractive for growth and successful in attracting companies and individuals who enjoy access to the rest of the state while enjoying the quality of life aspects offered in smaller communities.

Huxley - Cambridge area As growth has continued to move north through Polk County, through Ankeny and beyond, in recent years, these small communities in far southern Story County, with good access to the I-35 corridor and US Highway 69, have experienced increased growth and this trend is likely to continue over the next few decades. The overall growth of the Des Moines metro area, coupled with the growth of Ames and the location of these communities halfway between the two metro areas, should make them particularly attractive for residential development. In addition, the presence of the High Trestle Trail and other recreational opportunities enhance the potential for growth in the Huxley-Cambridge area.

Existing Economic Development Programs Story County has developed and/or participates in a range of existing programs and initiatives available to help facilitate economic prosperity. The following outlines and summarizes some of the key programs. Façade Improvement Grant Program Story County provides financial assistance through this program, to the city governments (with populations of fewer than 3,000 persons), working with private commercial businesses within their city limits, to complete façade improvements. The purpose of the program is to support the revitalization of business districts in small towns by stimulating private investments that enhance the appearance of buildings and properties. Urban Renewal Area Applications (TIF) The State of Iowa authorizes counties to establish areas within their boundaries known as “urban renewal areas” and to exercise special powers within these areas, including financing projects using property taxes generated from incremental property tax valuations. These areas are intended to include Background and Economic Information | 6-9


6.1

BACKGROUND ECONOMIC INFORMATION

areas of the county appropriate for commercial or industrial enterprises in which the county seeks to encourage further development. After a county board of supervisors designates an urban renewal area, a formal urban renewal plan is created. In November 2011, the Story County Board of Supervisors adopted the first Urban Renewal Plan – Story County Urban Renewal Area, and identified three initial projects to be financed using incremental property taxes collected from commercial wind turbines and commercial properties located throughout Story County: • Improvements to Dakins Lake County Park, including acquisition of adjacent property • Construction of bike trail on Country Club Road from the Nevada city limits south to 260th Street • Paving one-quarter mile of 590th Avenue north of its intersection with Highway 30. In addition to adopting the Urban Renewal Plan, the Board of Supervisors formally approved the Story County, Iowa Economic Development Process and Policies in October 2012 to establish structure and objectivity to the standard operating procedures for evaluating economic development projects. Annually the Board considers projects to be included in an Urban Renewal Area funded with incremental tax revenues. Requests funded by Story County in 2013, 2014, and 2015 include the following: • City of Collins – Proposed improvements to Collins Wellness Center for purchase and implementation of new scanner entry system; expansion of programs and services; and additional equipment purchases. • Colo-Nesco Community School District – Proposed construction of a community playground and park on three vacant lots located on the corner of N. Center Street and E. Cleveland Street. • City of Kelley – Construct enclosure around post office boxes. • City of McCallsburg – Water looping project 6-10

• • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • •

throughout the community to help improve water quality for residents near existing dead ends, helps increase the flow of water, such as in cases of need for fire suppression, and also help create a secondary supply of water in cases where a water main line needs to be shut down in a certain area (such as a water main line break). City of Roland – Removal and disposal of asbestos containing materials on property located at 218 North Main Street. City of Zearing – Building purchase and remodel and rehabilitation. City of Collins - Work on water lines as a result of US Hwy 65 re-grade. Colo-Nesco Community School District – Proposed Phase II of playground construction. City of Huxley – Proposed hard surfacing of onemile of Heart of Iowa Trail from US Highway 69 to Trailridge Park. City of Kelley – Construction of new six-inch water main on Hubbel Street. City of Maxwell – Installation of curb and gutter along Trotter Blvd. City of Nevada – Construction of Clock Tower Center. City of Slater – Main Street improvements from Story to Tama Streets. City of Zearing – Building renovations at 107 West Main Street. Colo-Nesco Community School District – Phase III construction of a community playground and park on three vacant lots located on the corner of N. Center Street and E. Cleveland Street. City of Huxley – Centennial Park playground expansion. City of Cambridge - Construction of new multifunctional municipal building. City of Slater – Main Street improvements to corner of Main Street and Marshall. City of Slater – Acquisition and renovation of 404/406 Main Street. City of Story City – South Park project. Praeri Rail Trail Extension Planning and Construction.


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Through this funding process, the Story County Board of Supervisors has approved over $640,000 in funding towards projects throughout Story County communities. Cultivation Corridor This consortium of economic development and business partners in Central Iowa, encompassing both the Ames and Des Moines metro areas, is working with institutions of higher learning to cultivate innovation and accelerate growth in the key industries of agbioscience, biorenewables, biotech, and advanced manufacturing industries. The group works to attract companies, talent, and capital from around the world. The following outlines some of the key activities of the Cultivation Corridor organization: • Development of the state’s first agribusiness and biotechnology asset inventory database. • Establishing partnerships with the Greater Des Moines Partnership and the Iowa Innovation Corporation to commission and implement the recommendations of the Iowa Biotechnology Incubator Assessment as it relates to accelerating agribusiness start-up activity in Central Iowa. • Supporting and advocating for public policies important to agribusiness. • Representing Iowa agribusiness companies and partners to international audiences. • Completion of a single, multi-disciplinary and collaborative branding and marketing message to take to the marketplace, to define Central Iowa as a global center of agbioscience investment, talent, and research excellence. • Assisting with economic development and business attraction activities in Central Iowa, including regional promotion, sharing leads with local partners, and helping the local partners to land top prospects. Story County Local Food Initiative In 2010, Story County adopted the “Local Food and Farms Strategic Plan”, to facilitate and strengthen the local food system. The purpose of the effort was to address food system issues in the county, including but not limited to the development of educational programs, data gathering, research projects, and policies, and

outlining specific policy changes and implementation measures to be considered by the Story County Board of Supervisors. The overall local food effort, initially developed by the Grow Story County Committee, focuses on the following issues: • Public education of local food issues; • Institutional purchasing of local foods; • Regional collaboration on food system issues and policies; • Recruiting and retaining more local food growers; • Niche farming opportunities; • Feasibility for a regional food processing facility; • Allowing for small acreage farming; and • Fostering more equitable access to healthy foods. Economic Development Planning and Workforce Development Services Story County entered into annual contractual agreements with the Ames Economic Development Commission (AEDC) to provide a suite of services to the county and various municipalities, rather than hiring new County employees to perform these services. Applicable activities provided by the AEDC to Story County include: • Identifying target workforces for the county; • Identifying workforce education and training initiatives; • Constructing linkages with the private sector, including those businesses and companies located in unincorporated Story County; • Designing and implementing a relevant workforce education and training strategy; • Conducting ongoing monitoring and evaluation of economic development activities; • Maintaining database of inquiries into the Home Base Iowa Initiative; and • Designing marketing materials for the Home Base Iowa Initiative and actively marketing the program through a variety of ways, including written campaigns, social media and print media.

Background and Economic Information | 6-11


6.2

GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIES

Home Base Iowa This initiative started by the State of Iowa helps Veterans and transitioning military service members to find positions at Iowa companies, pursue continued education, continue their service through the National Guard or Reserves, or any combination of these. The program provides incentives to Veterans and transitioning service members when they locate in specific communities in Iowa. The State offers incentives statewide as well as additional incentives when participants select Home Base Iowa communities. Story County became an official Home Base Iowa Community in 2015 by meeting a set of qualifications, including one that ten percent of the businesses in Story County commit to hiring Veterans. Story County also created an incentive package to attract Veterans to the area. The County offers a $2,500 incentive for Veterans who qualify for the program to relocate in Story County. Over 70 businesses in Story County have signed on to the program, and a total of 578 jobs have been pledged by 2018. Connect Iowa In early 2015, Governor Terry Branstad recognized Story County as a Certified Connected Community, presenting the certification to the Story County Board of Supervisors. At the award ceremony hosted by Connect Iowa and Story County, the County also released the Technology Action Plan. The Connected Community Engagement Program is designed to grow the local economy and improve the quality of life in Story County. The Connected Assessment culminated in defined projects designed to Story County to accelerate broadband access, adoption, and use.

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The following five projects are identified in the Technology Action Plan adopted by Story County. 1. Develop or identify a broadband training and awareness program for small and medium businesses 2. Establish a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Community Technology Academyâ&#x20AC;? 3. Facilitate a technology summit 4. Complete a vertical assets inventory 5. Perform an analysis of local Policies and Ordinances

Goals, Objectives, and Strategies This section provides goals, objectives and strategies that support cooperation and coordination at a county-wide level to ensure sustainable economic development. There are a number of established organizations in the region that are engaged in economic development activities, including the Story County Economic Development Group, Ames Economic Development Commission, Huxley Development Corporation, Colo Development Group, Roland Area Development Corporation, Nevada Economic Development Council, Story City Economic Development Corporation, Iowa State Research Park, Cultivation Corridor, and many others. It is in the best interests of Story County to continue to support and collaborate with these regional organizations.


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Economic Prosperity Goal 1 Cooperate regionally to focus on common goals and allocate resources accordingly to maximize successful business start-up, retention, expansion and recruitment efforts. Objective EP1.1: Promote a sustainable, strong, diverse and healthy economy. Strategies • Promote the retention and expansion of existing businesses. • Foster the startup and development of new businesses of all sizes. • Encourage the location of environmentally-responsible businesses in the region. • Promote income levels that are higher than the national average. Continue to work with the Iowa Economic Development Authority (IEDA) to promote the High Quality Jobs Program, as a key tool to create higher quality (and higher paying) jobs in Story County. • Ensure the sustainable economic use of agricultural resources and agricultural lands. • Foster county-wide communication and strengthen collaborative efforts.

Economic Prosperity Goal 2 Create a healthy and sustainable regional economy by the retention, expansion and recruitment of business. Objective EP2.1: Develop and maintain a roster of businesses in Story County that will help the County sustain economic cycles. Objective EP2.2: Support amenities and resources that will assist the communities in Story County in the recruitment and retention of businesses. Strategies • Continue to work with regional partners and organizations to recruit companies from target clusters identified in the Battelle Report on Iowa Economic Development. • Provide additional entrepreneurial services through Innovation Iowa (an arm of the Iowa Economic Development Authority) to include mentoring services and provide access to business routes. • Reassess and calibrate public-private research partnerships to promote strategic collaboration among academia, government and industry. • Work with the Iowa Department of Transportation (IDOT) to target high value transportation improvements in the Story County area in order to advance the freight transportation capacity of the transportation system that crosses Story County. • Continue to advance workplace learning through colleges, continuing education and retraining involving small and mid-sized employers. • Work with regional partners to create incentives for recent graduates, Veterans and high-skilled workers to take positions in Story County in specific industry clusters that have worker shortages.

Goals, Objectives and Strategies | 6-13


6.2

GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIES • Support recreational amenities to improve business retention and expansion • Continue support of the Iowa State Research Park expansion.

Economic Prosperity Goal 3 In recent years, there has been a greater recognition that economic development should not come at the expense of environmental quality, which itself is recognized as an important component of Story County. A balanced approach to environmental sustainability advocates a balance between the utilization of area resources and economic growth. Economic growth should not exceed the ability of the natural or built environment to sustain growth over the long term. Objective EP3.1: Recognize the importance of environmental quality and acknowledge that protection of the environment will contribute to economic vitality. Strategies • Actively recruit “clean industries” to locate in Story County. These may include industries such as wind and solar farms that have limited negative impacts on water quality, soil quality, and air quality and tie with potential industry clusters such as biorenewables. • Communicate community standards (for streamways, water quality, etc) as they are developed. • Demonstrate mutual environment, social and economic benefits possible with development. • Promote environmentally-responsible development practices.

Economic Prosperity Goal 4 Create and encourage a regulatory environment that offers flexibility, consistency, predictability, clear direction and enhances economic development opportunities. .

Objective EP4.1: Provide consistent, fair and timely regulations that are flexible, responsive and effective. Strategies • Conduct regular reviews of regulations to ensure they are up to date. Encourage citites to adopt a similar practice. • Develop a Business Development Toolkit tailored for Story County agencies and organizations, to provide a guide for those starting new ventures in Story County, and to access information and help navigate government agencies.

6-14


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone • Continue to use the 28E agreement between Ames, Gilbert, and Story County to manage development in the urban/rural interface areas between communities. • Review the potential to partner with the City of Ames and AEDC to leverage the resources provided by the Business Development Coordinator position, to help enterpreneurs as they navigate through the various County, State, and Federal approval processes and to advise entrepreneurs concerning the services available to them.

Economic Prosperity Goal 5 Promote public/private partnerships that encourage innovation and creativity in the economic expansion of our region. Objective EP5.1: Leverage partnerships to expand the economy of Story County. Strategies • Continue collaboration with Capital Crossroads, the Cultivation Corridor, Iowa State Research Park and other local, State, and Federal organizations.

Economic Prosperity Goal 6 One of the primary reasons to pursue economic development is to increase the standard of living for the citizens of Story County. One of the primary goals of this economic development element is to create more living-wage jobs. A strategic approach in the pursuit of new jobs is to recruit, retain and expand the types of industries that provide quality, good-paying jobs. Story County should continue to pursue the industry clusters identified earlier in this Chapter. Objective EP6.1: Encourage the creation of jobs that provide annual incomes for all persons in Story County to be above the Iowa and national average annual income. Strategies • Analyze potential wages of new companies when considering economic development programs/ incentives. Encourage city governments to adopt similar practices. • Encourage economic development organizations to target industries with higher than average annual wages.

Economic Prosperity Goal 7 Qualified labor is essential to retain and recruit business. The basic cornerstone in the development of a qualified labor force is the educational community. Located within Story County is a diverse group of higher-education facilities, including community colleges, universities, and private technical and business schools.

Goals, Objectives and Strategies | 6-15


These schools, as well as the K-12 public and private schools, should be encouraged to constantly evaluate their programs to be responsive to the changing job market. Partnerships between business and the educational community should be nurtured to further this process. Story County should continue to promote and leverage partnerships with the Ames Economic Development Commission, Home Base Iowa, and the AEDC’s Workforce Development Initiative. Business should be encouraged to partner with labor unions and other organizations to develop specialized training programs to meet the needs of employers. These partnerships may include the Des Moines Area Community College (Hunziker Career Academy in the Ames area), and Iowa State University. Objective EP7.1: Promote a qualified labor force that is globally competitive and responds to the changing needs of the workplace. Strategies • Support ongoing labor force training initiatives of local trade schools, community colleges, and universities. • Economic development groups will regularly update the skills and proficiencies that potential industries and employers will require.

Economic Prosperity Goal 8 In order to provide the foundation for economic development and expansion, the County and the various municipalities must ensure that businesses and organizations have sufficient resources in terms of infrastructure and available land for expansion. The Land Use chapter outlines the areas of the county designated for various future land uses. Specific to economic development, the various communities must both work individually and together to ensure that adequate space is available for expansion of business, including land for new buildings and facilities, as well as a sufficient base of buildings ready for business expansion and operations. Objective EP8.1: Annually, Story County will conduct regular reviews to determine whether adequate land and space is available for business expansion in unincorporated Story County. Story County encourages each community to also conduct such regular reviews (on an annual basis) to ensure that adequate land and space is available for business expansion. Strategies • Conduct regular analyses to ensure that the County has sufficient land and space available for projected growth. • As requested, assist each community in the completion of regular reviews of its land inventory.

6-16


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Economic Prosperity Goal 9 Ensure that Story County and the communities have the information necessary to identify infrastructure upgrades and improvements that could be necessary to serve new development in particular areas of the county. Objective EP9.1: Ensure that Story County and each community has sufficient infrastructure capacity available to serve economic expansion. Strategies • Communities are encouraged to complete infrastructure analysis (at least an overview) as part of any comprehensive plan process undertaken. This analysis should incorporate the role and the resources of rural water providers in Story County (that serve areas adjacent and near to municipalities) in addition to the resources of municipalities. Story County should assist the local communities with these analyses where feasible. • Communities should tie infrastructure needs back to economic development strategy for the county overall. Story County should assist local communities in completing this process where feasible. Story County can particularly assist communities in ensuring that infrastructure resources in place are in line with regulations of the Iowa Department of Natural Resources at the State level pertaining to water, wastewater, stormwater, floodplains, and drainage.

Economic Prosperity Goal 10 Support historic preservation efforts in the county through the Certified Local Government program. Objective EP10.1: Be recognized as a certified local government to promote historic preservation efforts as a way to rehabilitate properties around the county and to leverage historic preservation as a way to promote economic development in the county. Strategies • Develop and adopt a historic preservation plan. • Encourage historic preservation at the local level through local government sponsorship of historic preservation efforts. • Ensure that historic preservation efforts in Story County follow the guidelines of the Department of the Interior. • Encourage County staff to complete training and obtain technical assistance through the State’s Historic Preservation Office. • Pursue grants for rehabilitating County-owned properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places. • Qualify for matching funds for historic preservation from the State of Iowa through the Certified Local Government grant program. These grants can be used to underwrite all historic preservation activities, except for rehabilitation.

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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Transportation Appendix A This Chapter outlines the transportation goals, objectives and strategies based on public input from Appendix B the C2C planning process. The Chapter also briefly existing networks, planned transportation Appendix C covers improvements, and known proposed improvements Appendix D within Story County. 7.1 Goals, Objectives and Strategies 7.2 Existing Transportation Networks 7.3 Existing Planned and Proposed Efforts and Improvements (Iowa DOT, Story County, Ames MPO, Municipalities)

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7.1

GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIES

Goals, Objectives and Strategies A vibrant transportation system is a very important part of economic development. Transportation decisions should be made with that in mind. To facilitate orderly and efficient growth, an effective and safe transportation network is needed. The transportation network should encourage a variety of modes of transportation to make possible the movement of goods and people. The goals, objectives and strategies of the Transportation Chapter of the C2C Plan must be coordinated with municipal, regional and state planning efforts.

Transportation is an essential aspect of life. It is about the ability to readily and safely gain access to work, school, shopping, recreation, medical care and social gatherings. It is also an essential component of most economic activity.

Transportation Goal 1

Provide a safe, efficient, multi-modal, and well-maintained transportation network for all residents, farmers, commercial and This Chapter primarily addresses roadways, rail emergency vehicles. and airports in Story County. Significant attention to trails, both existing and future trail planning is addressed in Chapter 4: Conservation of Natural Resources and Recreation. This Chapter represents the Transportation Element of the C2C Plan with goals, objectives, and strategies established during the planning process based on public input and the information contained in Appendix A: Community Indicators.

Objective T1.1 : Maintain Story County’s transportation network at a level of service desired by residents and non-residential users. Strategies • Support the use of the existing road network to the greatest extent possible before creating additional roads to accommodate future development, minimizing land disturbance and efficiently use tax dollars. • Build new roads according to County or local standards and inspect before accepting for dedication. • In unincorporated areas, maintain access, site and design requirements for new roads and driveways that aim to reinforce the rural character of Story County and safe transportation facilities. • Coordinate rural addressing, road naming, and driveway siting to ensure safe and adequate emergency response services. • Continue to support alternative modes of travel for Story County residents, particularly for people with limited access to the automobile system such as the elderly and disabled. • Continue to develop a plan for inspecting, improving, replacing, and/or closing when necessary the County’s bridges.

7-2


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Objective T1.2: Enhance multi-modal opportunities for regional travel for Story County citizens and visitors. Strategies • Review proposed highway and road projects for opportunities to provide striped shoulders safe for bicycling or extra right-of-way for bicycle lanes or paths in areas planned for such facilities as outlined in Chapter 4. • Encourage development of more multi-use trails to connect to regional trails as outlined in Chapter 4. • Encourage municipalities to require that new developments address the necessity of adequate pedestrian and trail routes in residential and commercial areas. Bicycle and pedestrian trails within developments should be designed to connect to adjacent developments and existing or planned pedestrian or bicycle facilities.

Objective T1.3 : Manage access and design of the transportation network in order to effectively maintain the safe and functional integrity of roads and bridges within the County’s jurisdiction. Strategies • Support intergovernmental and land development agreements that define the responsibilities of the developer and municipalities regarding any required improvements and ongoing maintenance to roadways and funding of such improvements. • Require that the property owner, or their agent, fund the preparation of a traffic impact analysis by an independent professional prior to approving new development in unincorporated Story County. • Where appropriate, designate weight restrictions and truck routes to protect local roads and bridges.

Goals, Objectives and Strategies | 7-3


7.1

Objective T1.4 : Coordinate transportation projects with Story County’s municipalities, adjoining counties, Ames Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (AAMPO), and the Iowa Department of Transportation (IDOT). Strategies • Develop a county-wide transportation plan in cooperation with each community to identify county-wide priorities. • Continue to support regional planning efforts by Cy-Ride and Heart of Iowa Transportation Agency to expand or improve services to all residents. • Stay apprised of IDOT’s efforts to maintain and improve State transportation facilities, particularly improvements to US Highway 30 and Interstate 35. • Provide leadership and coordination to plan

7-4

improvements to County and local roads whenever feasible. • Work with local communities, as well as adjacent counties, to plan, construct and maintain those roadways that affect jurisdictions, and consider cost sharing where appropriate. • Continue to serve on the Ames Transportation Policy Committee and coordinate with the AAMPO’s Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) when considering transportation improvements within the LRTP planning area (see AAMPO maps aside). • Transportation nodes, where major intersections of transportation systems intersect, should continue to serve as locations for potential transportation investments and increased land use development.


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Goals, Objectives and Strategies | 7-5


7.2

Existing Transportation Networks

Story County Transportation Network Map

7-6


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County Transportation Network Map - NW Quadrant

Existing Transportation Networks | 7-7


Story County Transportation Network Map - NE Quadrant

7-8


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County Transportation Network Map - SW Quadrant

Existing Transportation Networks | 7-9


Story County Transportation Network Map - SE Quadrant

7-10


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

The major motorized transportation networks in Story County include: US Interstate 35, State Highway 210, Iowa State Highway 330, US Highway 30, US Highway 65 and US Highway 69. Story County’s traffic network allows for no more than an 11-mile drive from any fourlane highway to any one of its communities via a hard surfaced US, State, or County highway. Story County also contains major routes of the Union Pacific Railroad, the Ames Municipal Airport and a number of water and multi-use trails outlined in Chapter 4. Interstate 35, US Highways 30, 65 and 69 and State Highways 210 and 330 are all under the jurisdiction of IDOT. IDOT was involved in the Citizens Task Force of the C2C Plan process. All other roadways in Story County, commonly referred to as “Secondary Roads” are overseen by the Story County Engineer and Secondary Roads Department based in Nevada. Additional County department facilities are located in Ames, Collins, Colo, McCallsburg, Roland and Story City. This department manages 202 miles of paved road, 706 miles of gravel roads, 24 miles of earthen roadways and 284 bridges across Story County.

Courtesy: www.iowahighwayends.net US Highway 69

US Highway 30

Existing Transportation Networks | 7-11


The Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway The Lincoln Highway was created in 1913 as the first improved transcontinental road in the United States, traveling from Times Square to San Francisco. It was the idea of Carl Fisher and he gained support of Detroit auto makers, the concrete industry, and others interested in good roads. The Lincoln Highway Association (LHA) was created to “establish a continuous improved highway from the Atlantic to the Pacific, open to lawful traffic of all descriptions without toll charges…in memory of Abraham Lincoln.” The LHA helped promote the road and encouraged paving and signage across the nation. In Iowa, the route travels through 13 counties, from Clinton to Council Bluffs, and was designated with the number 30. Today, in Iowa, a newer 4-lane road has been built to bypass the community centers that the Lincoln Highway was designed to connect. That is the case in Story County, where the Lincoln Highway still connects Colo, Nevada, and Ames and the newer 4-lane road was constructed about a mile to the south. Parts of these three communities have now grown around the new route. The Lincoln Highway travels west from Marshall County through Story County via the north side of Colo, through Nevada to the west side of the Iowa State University’s main campus at Sheldon Avenue. Sheldon Avenue has a slight jog to the west and turns into Hyland, then at Ontario Street, the route turns west again, heading to Boone County. The original Lincoln Highway was designated as a Heritage Byway by the State of Iowa through IDOT’s Byway program in 2006. It is one of nine State Byways recognized by Iowa. It is the only Heritage Byway as it is a road with a story to tell, is a little off the beaten path, and rich with the history and culture that defines it. In addition, there are two National Byways, Loess Hills and Great River Road. The Lincoln Highway has the potential to qualify as a National Byway in the 13 states it travels through, when a call is made by the US Department of Transportation for national nominations.

7-12

The Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway is developing a new corridor management plan in 2016 to serve as a guide for preserving and enhancing the Byway. The Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway, in Story County values the urban roadside buildings and agricultural landscape from west of Ames, around the Iowa State campus, through Nevada and to the interchange of the Jefferson Highway (US 65) at the Reed/Niland corner in Colo. As a Historic Byway, the road itself, as well as the corridor it travels through, is a main priority. As future industrialized and commercial development occurs along the route and changes to the route are considered to meet transportation needs, the Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway corridor management plan should be consulted. Preservation efforts should include the Union Pacific underpass between Nevada and Colo, and the Reed/Niland corner in Colo.


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Existing Transportation Networks | 7-13


7.2 Story County Annual Average Daily Traffic Count Map - Iowa DOT 2011

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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Ames Municipal Airport

There are two major 4-lane divided roadways in Story County: US Highway 30 and Interstate 35. Highway 30â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s highest Annual Average Daily Traffic in 2011, between Ames and Nevada was 14,500 automobiles. Interstate 35â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s highest Annual Average Daily Traffic in 2011, south of Iowa Highway 210 was 42,600 automobiles. These two roadways are well maintained and will see additional improvements to increase safety and level of service in the coming years. Major planned improvements by the IDOT, to the intersection of these highways, just southeast of Ames in Story County, are discussed later in this Chapter.

Story County is home to the Ames Municipal Airport, which is located on the south side of Ames, just south of US Highway 30. The airport can be accessed off Airport Road from Highway 69/South Duff Avenue. The 700 acre airport has two runways and can facilitate jet aircraft on the 5,700 foot asphalt paved runway. Improvements to the airport are underway including construction of a terminal building and hanger. Scheduled commercial air travel is available at the Des Moines International Airport, 40 miles south.

Existing Transportation Networks | 7-15


7.2 Union Pacific Railroad

I OWA

STATE RAILROAD MAP Prepared by

Phone (515) 239 - 1664 In Cooperation with United States Department of Transportation July 1, 2015 0

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Amtrak_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _AMTK Appanoose County Community R.R. Co._ _ _ _ APNC Boone Scenic Valley R.R._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ BSV Burlington Junction Ry. Co._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ BJRY BNSF Railway Co._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ BNSF Cedar Rapids and Iowa City Ry. Co._ _ _ _ _ _ CIC Cedar River Railroad Co._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _CEDR Chicago, Central & Pacific Railroad_ _ _ _ _ _ CC D & I Railroad Co._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ DAIR Dakota, Minnesota and Eastern R.R. Co._ _ _ _ DME Iowa Interstate R.R. Ltd._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ IAIS Iowa Northern Ry. Co._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ IANR Iowa River Railroad Co._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ IARR Iowa Traction R.R. Co._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ IATR Keokuk Junction Ry._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ KJRY Norfolk and Southern Railway Co._ _ _ _ _ _ _ NS Soo Line_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _SOO Union Pacific Railroad_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ UP Private Track – Cargill Alliance_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ CGAQ

Railroad Owners Non-Operators

Canadian National Railway Co._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Canadian Pacific Railroad_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ CBEC Railway Co._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ D & W Railroad Inc._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ North Central Iowa Rail Corridor_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Pioneer Rail Corp._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Progressive Rail_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ State of South Dakota_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

CN CP CBRX DWRV NCIRC PNRC PGR SD

Trackage Rights Only_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ( ) Primary Operator_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ( <>

) 8 - 19 -2015

The Union Pacific (UP) Railroad controls three major rail lines running through and within Story County and permitting 143 tons gross weight cars and unit trains. The first and busiest line, commonly referred to by UP as the “Overland Route”, runs east to west through Story County on the route from Chicago, Illinois to Oakland, California. The Overland Route passes through the Story County communities of Colo, Nevada, and Ames. There are 11 crossings in Story County along the Overland Route: • 9-at grade crossings • 2-above/below grade crossings • 7-crossings with gates The second line, commonly referred to by UP as the “Spine Line”, runs north to south through Story County on the route from Minneapolis, Minnesota to Kansas 7-16

City, Missouri. The Spine Line passes through the Story County communities of McCallsburg, Nevada and Cambridge. The third line in Story County, whose origin is in Ames, passes through the Story County communities of Gilbert and Story City.


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Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

DULUTH

G R E Y F OX R D.

CyRide

Heart of Iowa Regional Transit Agency

CyRide is the mass transit bus system serving the Ames community. The system is funded by the City of Ames, Iowa State University (ISU) and ISU’s Government of the Student Body. The system has twelve fixed routes and also provides Dial-A-Ride service all within existing city boundaries of Ames.

The Heart of Iowa Regional Transit Agency (HIRTA) provides door-to-door transit services through a 28E agreement with the IDOT to areas included in IDOT Region 11. The region includes Boone, Dallas, Jasper, Madison, Marion, Story and Warren counties. All rides are open to the general public, including persons with disabilities.

Existing Transportation Networks | 7-17


7.3

Existing Planned and Proposed Efforts and Improvements

Story County Engineer and Secondary Roads Department The Story County 5-Year Transportation Plan is updated annually by the County Engineer and Secondary Roads Department and outlines road and bridge improvement/ replacement needs for the County. This plan is updated by adoption in April of every year by the Story County Board of Supervisors and is incorporated by reference as a component of the C2C Plan.

Story County Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 2016 - 2018 In August 2015, the Board of Supervisors adopted a strategic plan for 2016-2018. One of the categories outlined in the strategic plan included under the Projects section was “Infrastructure”. This section states that Story County will: Continue to build on the 5-year road plan, CIP, and Cornerstone to Capstone efforts and define long-term financing strategies. These plans will help Story County as we plan for and finance roads, bridges, transportation, and related infrastructure mindful of the extreme needs and gaps in funding for these projects and capacities. The Projects sections goes on to describe the following actions related to transportation improvements: • Decrease the number of posted and functionally obsolete bridges by 5% each year; • Resurface/reconstruct 1/30th of our paved road system each year; and • New rock/ gravel on 1/4 of the gravel roads (706 total miles) each year.

7-18


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County Secondary Road Construction Program The Story County Secondary Road Construction Program is updated each year at the same time the budget is approved by the Board of Supervisors.

Existing Planned and Proposed Efforts and Improvements | 7-19


7.3 Ames Urban Fringe Plan The Ames Urban Fringe Plan focuses on additional transportation elements. Additionally, the Ames Urban Fringe Plan focuses on the Ames Airport, setting up a protection area around its boundary. It also calls for the protection of the major transportation gateways into the city of Ames, and identifies key transportation nodes for commercial development. This plan is periodically updated based on future land use needs for the planning area.

Ames Mobility 2040 - Ames Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) 2015-2040 Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) The Ames Mobility 2040 Plan is a long-range transportation plan recently adopted by the Ames Transportation Policy Committee, of which Story County is a voting member. The plan outlines the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vision for transportation over the next 25 years. The plan includes in-depth analysis, goals and a project list for transportation related improvements. Proposed projects in the MPO planning area include intersection improvements, traffic signal adjustments, trail connections, pedestrian improvements, mass transit infrastructure improvements. The majority of the LRTP proposed projects, if completed, will be done within municipal boundaries but could have unforeseen impacts on Secondary Roads in Story County. At the time the C2C Plan was developed, the AAMPO finalized the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) for Fiscal Years 2016-2019. The map on the following page represents the MPO Planning Area projects that were included in the finalized TIP.

7-20


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Existing Planned and Proposed Efforts and Improvements | 7-21


7.3 Iowa Department of Transportation Planned Improvements An interactive map of the State Transportation Improvement Program projects is available online. This live map includes a number of projects in Story County sponsored by IDOT, Story County, and municipalities across the County. Currently IDOT has a proposal to replace bridges on I-35 over the Skunk River, 2.6 miles south of US 30, in Story County. The proposed project would include widening approximately 1.5 miles of I-35 to six lanes and replacing the bridge of I-35 at Story County Road E-57. Story County Road E-57 would be closed to thru traffic during construction. A detour route will be established by the County closer to the time of construction. See corresponding maps for site details. Construction of I-35 at South Skunk River is to begin in 2016 and continue through 2018. Construction of US 30 at I-35 to the West Bound Flyover Ramp is to begin in 2017 and continue through 2018.

7-22


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Planned Transportation Improvements | 7-23


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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Community Indicators Report Appendix A The Community Indicators Report is a summary of current conditions and recent trends in Story County, Appendix B based on the best available data. The purpose of these is to enable informed choices about the Appendix C indicators future of the county. This report is included as an Appendix D appendix to the C2C Plan so that it may be updated

from time to time as new data becomes available. It is not a policy document. Page A.1 Demographics A-2 A.2 Housing A-4 A.3 Transportation and Mobility A-8 A.4 Economic Prosperity A-14 A.5 Community Facilities and Services A-16 A.6 Community Character and Culture A-20 A.7 Collaboration and Partnerships A-22 A.8 Land Use A-24


A.1

DEMOGRAPHICS

County History

About the Data These indicators utilize a mixture of local, County, State, and Federal data sources. The U.S. Census has historically been a key source of data for many community indicators. Much of the information previously collected by the decennial U.S. Census is now collected only by the American Community Survey (ACS). The ACS is an ongoing survey that collects sample data every year and reports estimates of population and housing characteristics. For communities smaller than 20,000 people, the best available estimates are reported as rolling averages over 5-year periods â&#x20AC;&#x201C; they indicate average conditions over the reporting period rather than a snapshot of a single point of time.

The land that today is known as Story County was originally prairie, with the exception of some groves along the larger streams in the area. In 1846, the boundaries of Story County were established. The county has an area of 576 square miles. The county was named after Joseph Story, a pre-eminent United States Supreme Court Justice, in 1853. The first settlers in Story County came mainly from Indiana, New York, and Pennsylvania. Later, many Norwegians, Germans, and Danes came directly from overseas and inhabited the area. The first large population influx occurred during the 1850s.

Because the ACS estimates are based on a sample of the population, they include some error. The margin of error is reported for each estimate, and is an indication of how reliable the estimate is. As a general rule, the ACS data is quite reliable at the state level, generally reliable at the county level, and less reliable at the municipal level. The margin of error makes the data much more difficult to interpret. To simplify tables in this Plan, the reliability of each value is indicated simply by the formatting of the text. For each ACS estimate, the margin of error is divided by the estimate. The second important note when using ACS estimates is that they cannot be compared to decennial census data because they are measured in different ways. While some of the tables in this report show both decennial census data and ACS data, caution should be used when trying to draw conclusions about trends by comparing the two sets of numbers.

Story County was not mentioned in the Federal Census in 1850, but figures from the State of Iowa put the population at 214 in 1852. By 1860, the population had increased to 4,501. Three commissioners appointed by the Iowa Legislature selected the location of county seat on June 27, 1853. The location was Nevada. (Source: Story County, Iowa website)

A-2

This report is a summary of current conditions and recent trends in Story County, based on the best available data. The purpose of these indicators is to enable informed choices about the future of the county.


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Population and Age Trends POPULATION TRENDS AND PROJECTIONS

From 1990 to 2010, Story County’s population increased by 23.8%, while the state grew by 4.5% during the same period. During this same period, only one of the municipalities within the county also saw a decrease in population (City of Zearing (-9.8%)) and a general decrease in townships (-2.3%).

Source: 2010 Census, Iowa Dept. of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, and MSA Professional Services

Story County 72,326 74,252 79,981 81,852 89,542 92,300 96,451 100,689 104,962 109,258

1980 Actual 1990 Actual 2000 Actual 2005 Proj. 2010 Actual 2015 Proj. 2020 Proj. 2025 Proj. 2030 Proj. 2035 Proj.

Based on Woods and Poole Economics, Inc. data, the county’s 2035 population is projected to be 109,258 (an increase of 22% from 2010). For comparison, the state population is projected to grow by 11.8% over the next twenty years to 3,407,575.

Source: Woods & Poole Economics, Inc. & Census

SEX and AGE, 2010 Source: 2010 Census

In 2010, the median age in the county was 26.7, which is lower than the median age for the state (36.6). Based on this data (shown in the table on the right), the county has a significantly lower ratio of persons over the age of 50, as compared to the state (24.6%, compared to 34.5% statewide).

Story County 0.118574493 Number 28,715 29,783

Male Female

Under 18 15,953 18 & over 73,589 20 - 24 18,846 25 - 34 12,769 35 - 49 12,845 50 - 64 13,066 65 & over 8,945 Population Change by Decade MUNICIPAL POPULATION TRENDS, 1990-2010 Totals 89,542 Story County Source: US Census 1980 72326 Population by 1990 % Change 74252 Municipality 1990 2000 2010 2000(1990-2010) 79981 2010 24.9% 89542 Ames 47198 50,731 58,965 Source: US Census Bureau

Cambridge Collins Colo Gilbert Huxley Kelley Maxwell McCallsburg Nevada

714 455 771 796 2047 246 788 292 6009

819 499 868 987 2,316 300 807 318 6,658

829 495 876 1,082 3,317 309 920 333 6,798 Iowa

Roland Sheldahl Slater Story City Zearing Townships (rural) COUNTY TOTAL

1035 315 1268 2959 614 8,745

1,324 336 1,306 3,228 617 8,867

1,284 319 1,489 3,431 554 8,541

Urban Area Population Urban Share Percent

74,252 65,507 88%

79,981 71,114 89%

Iowa 2,913,808 2,776,755 2,926,324 2,951,775 3,046,355 3,097,663 3,172,237 3,249,751 3,328,308 3,407,575

43.3

16.1% 8.8% 13.6% 35.9% 62.0% 25.6% 16.8% 14.0%

31.2

Iowa

Percent 49.1% 50.9%

Number 1,508,319 1,538,036

Percent 49.5% 50.5%

17.8% 82.2% 21.0% 14.3% 14.3% 14.6% 10.0%

727,993 2,318,362 878,964 382,583 581,030 595,994 452,888

23.9% 76.1% 6.9% 12.6% 19.1% 19.6% 14.9%

100% 2.7% 7.7% 12.0%

3,046,355

100% Iowa 2,913,808 2,776,755 2,926,324 3,046,355

12.1

13.1% 24.1%

-4.70% 1.3% 5.4% 17.4% 4.1%

89,542 81,001 90%

16.0% -9.8% -2.3% 20.6% 24% 3%

Demographics | A-3


A.2

HOUSING

Household Counts

Story TRENDS AND PROJECTIONS From 1980-2010, Story County showed a 48.7% HOUSING UNITS Iowa HOUSING UNITS County Source: U.S. Census Bureau and MSA projections increase in the number of households. This includes Change by Decade 1980 25,154 1,131,299 slow growth in households from the 1980s to the -6.0% 1990 1,143,669 Story 26,847 Iowa 2000 County30,630 1,232,511 1990s (6.7%) or less than 1% per year. During the -2.4% 36,789 1,341,001 Change by Decade 25,154 1,131,299 same period, the state as whole increased by 10.9% -2.4% 1980 2010 2015 -3.6% 41,437 1,430,579 1990 26,847 1,143,669 or averaging just over 1% growth per year. -6.0% 2020

-2.4% -2.4%also count,

2000 2010

The county’s “persons per household” known as household size, dropped from -3.6% 2.39 in 2000 to 2.34 in 2010, which is a reduction of 2.1%. During this same period, the state’s “persons per household” declined by 2.5% to 2.40. This trend is consistent with national trends over the past several decades and can be attributed to smaller family sizes, increases in life expectancy, and increases in single parent households. To be conservative in the projection of future housing demand, this analysis assumes a continued decline in household size of 1% per decade to forecast total households for years 2015, 2020, 2025 and 2030. As projected, the county will see an increase of approximately 12,680 households between 2010 to 2030. This equates to an addition of approximately 13,254 housing units, an increase of 36%.

2015

43,518

2025 2030 2035

2020 2025 2030 2035 2000

1,472,381

30,630 45,658 36,789 47,835

1,232,511 1,515,938 1,341,001 1,597,548

41,437 50,043

1,430,579 1,605,576

43,518 45,658

1,472,381 1,515,938

Story County 47,835

1,597,548

30.0%

19.1%

30.0%

19.1%

30,630 50,043 1,605,576 2010 36,789 2015 41,437 2020 43,518 2025 45,658 2030Bureau 47,835 Source: US Census and MSA projections Story County 2035 50,043

HOUSING UNITS PROJECTIONS, 2000-2030 2000 2010

2015 2020 52,000 2025 47,0002030 2035 42,000

30,630 36,789 41,437 43,518 45,658 47,835 50,043

Story County

37,000

52,000 47,000

Story County

32,000 27,000 22,000 2000

42,000

2010

2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

HOUSEHOLD TRENDS AND PROJECTIONS 37,000 Source: U.S. Census Bureau and MSA projections

HOUSEHOLDS

32,000

Story County

y Decade

---

HOUSING UNITS

1980 9.6% 1990 13.3% 2000 19.8% 2010 2015 2020 2025

Iowa

27,000

Persons Per *

Persons Per *

Number

23,665 25,941

2.54 2.45

1,053,003 1,064,325

29,383 35,196

2.39 2.34

1,149,276 1,215,954

2.46 2.4

-2.4% -2.1%

39,643 41,634

2.33 2.32

1,297,179 1,335,083

2.39 2.38

-2.7%

22,000

2.68 2000 2.52

43,681

2.31

1,374,579

2.36

2030

45,764

2.29

1,448,578

2.35

2035

47,876

2.28

1,455,857

2.34

48.7% 1980-2010

15.5%

inois 10,568 total gain 2010-2035

A-4

Households refer to the people living in a household, while housing units refer to the structures which people Change by Decadein2020 2010 2015 2025 could 2030live, vacant or not. -3.5%

Number

0.058017395

2035


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Occupancy and Housing Stock UNIT TYPE, 2007-2011 AVG

Story Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s housing stock is predominantly single family homes, at 58.5% of total housing units. Multi-family housing in the county is variable in number of units per dwelling with 8.1% having two to four units, 6.5% with five to nine units, and 22.6% having more than ten units.

Source: American Community Survey

4.2% 14.2%

Single Family

8.4%

A thin majority of county residents (52.4%) live in owner-occupied housing. Owner occupancy percentages have shown a decline over the past decade due in part to the increase in multi-family using units, university students and a more mobile workforce. The homeowner vacancy rate increased in the 2000 Census to 1.5% and has stayed there for the last Census, compared to 1.2% in 1990. The increase is consistent with the effects of the Great Recession seen around the country, though the effect on home vacancy was more subdued here. Nationwide, vacancy rates increased from 1.6% to 2.6% over that same period. 1.5% to 2% is a healthy range.

2 to 4 units

6.5%

5 to 9 units

58.5%

10 to 19 units

8.1%

20 or more Mobile home

YEAR STRUCTURE BUILT, 2007-2011 AVG* Source: American Community Survey Built 1939 or earlier Built 1940 to 1949 Built 1950 to 1959 Built 1960 to 1969

The housing stock in Story County has 15.2% of residential structures built prior to 1940. The county has seen a relatively consistent increase in housing stock, with 63.2% of houses built between 19702010, though there was a large drop off in 2010 most likely do to the effects of the Great Recession.

Built 1970 to 1979 Built 1980 to 1989 Built 1990 to 1999 Built 2000 to 2009 Built 2010 or later 0.0%

OCCUPANCY

5.0%

10.0%

15.0%

20.0%

25.0%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

1990

2000

2010

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Owner Occupied

14,515

56.0%

17,125

58.3%

19,372

52.4%

Renter Occupied Vacant

11,426 906

44.0% 5.3%

12,258 1,247

41.7% 4.3%

15,824 1,780

42.8% 4.8%

Homeowners Vacancy Rate

---

1.2%

---

1.5%

---

1.5%

Rental Vacancy Rate

---

2.7%

---

4.1%

---

2.2%

TOTAL

Select Monthly Owner Costs as a Percent of Less than 20.0 percent 20.0 to 24.9 percent 25.0 to 29.9 percent 30.0 to 34.9 percent 35.0 percent or more 40.0 to 49.9 percent

26,847

30,630

36,976

Percent 31.3% 13.4% 7.4% 4.7% 2.7% 2.7%

6071 2601 1430 911 525 519

Housing | A-5 19372


A.2 Affordability and Value Affordable housing opportunities are often provided through the sale of older housing units. Housing is generally considered “affordable” when the owner or renter’s monthly housing costs do not 617 exceed 30% of their gross monthly income. Based 4524 on the rolling average between 2007-2011, roughly 352 53.7% of county renters and approximately 13.4% of 33 homeowners exceeded the “affordable” threshold. 41 While these numbers are important indicators of affordability, it is also important to note0 that some residents may be paying more than 271 30% of their income on housing by choice, rather5838 than by necessity. The median rent in the county ($738) is substantially higher than the state median ($670). The county’s median home value increased 43% from 2000 ($115,800) to the most recent ACS data (rolling average from 2009-2013) at $165,800 which is significantly higher than the state’s median value of $134,700.

GROSS RENT

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey

1990 Less than $200

0

Avg. 2009 2013

2000

7.7%

3.6%

0.6%

$200 to $499

68.7%

30.5%

11.4%

$500 to $749 $750 to $999

18.9% 1.7%

43.6% 15.0%

40.4% 27.9%

$1000 to $1499

0.8%

4.2%

14.7%

$1500 or more* No Cash Rent

0.0% 2.2%

0.4% 2.8%

5.0% 2.6%

Median Rent

$392

$575

$738

Total Number

11081

12131

15410

* In 1990, the highest bracket was "$1,000 or more", so all rental units within this category were placed in the $1,000-$1,499 bracket

VALUE (FOR HOMES WITH MORTGAGES) Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey

Value (For Homes with Mortgages)

2009 - 2013 Avg.

Less than $50,000

3.0%

$50,000 to $99,999

11.4%

1990

$100,000 to $149,999

Number

Percent

Number

Owner Occupied

14,515

56.0%

17,125

Renter Occupied Vacant

11,426 906

44.0% 9.7% 5.3%

12,258 1,247

$500,000 or more Vacancy Rate Homeowners

---

2.7% 1.2%

---

Median (dollars) Rental Vacancy Rate

---

165,800 2.7%

---

$150,000 to $199,999

GROSS RENT AS PERCENTAGE OF INCOME, AVG 2009-2013

$200,000 to $299,999 $300,000 to $499,999

Source: American Community Survey

Gross Rent as Percentage of Income Less than 10.0 percent

Percent 2.4%

TOTAL

9.3%

383 Source: ACS 2009-2013 SELECTED MONTHLY 1465

15.0 to 19.9 percent

10.6%

Source: 1675 American Community Survey

20.0 to 24.9 percent

10.4%

Monthly Owner Costs as a 1653

25.0 to 29.9 percent

8.7%

30.0 to 34.9 percent

6.6%

35.0 to 39.9 percent

6.4%

40.0 to 49.9 percent

9.5%

50.0 percent or more

31.2%

Not computed

4.9%

10.0 to 14.9 percent

Source: ACS

Story County

A-6

30.0%

19.1%

2000

26.1%

AVG 2009-2013

% of Income Less than 20.0 percent 1050 to 24.9 percent 20.0 25.0 1005 to 29.9 percent 30.0 to 34.9 percent 1503 35.0 percent or more 4,936to 49.9 percent 40.0 50.0 774 percent or more Not computed ACS 2009-2013 1380

15824

26,847

26.2% 20.8%

OWNER COSTS,

Percent 31.3% 13.4% 7.4% 4.7% 2.7% 2.7% 3.3% 0.1%

30,630


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Housing: A Place to Call Home Story County, City of Ames, and Iowa State University sponsored a housing conference in March 2016. The event, organized by A Mid-Iowa Organizing Strategy (AMOS) and called "A Place to Call Home: Options for Housing Stability in Ames and Story County," focused on identifying and building support for long-term solutions to low-cost housing in the Ames area. The agenda included the following topic areas: “The Effects of Housing Instability on Ames and Story County” Presentation of data for Ames/Story County on current situation Summary: brief presentation based on recent data gathered and analyzed regarding Story County and its cities. It clearly points to issues facing the private sector, local governments, and renters and homebuyers with limited means, as they seek that a diversity of housing be available so people can live in their preferred community. Best Practices of Local Housing Trust Funds: Why they are needed, what have they accomplished in Iowa? Summary: an overview of trust funds and their impact on housing in Iowa and information regarding experiences with developing and implementing a local housing trust fund. Tools and Resources in the Development of Affordable Housing: The Role of Developers. Summary: tools and resources used to successfully build low-cost units across the state. Housing Resources for Non-Profits Summary: How can non-profit organizations leverage external financial resources to strengthen their ability to maintain or increase housing-related services for low-income persons and families?

Innovative Solutions to Affordable Housing, Jobs, and Transportation in Urban and Rural Areas. Summary: How can unique solutions be provided in both Ames and rural areas of Story County? What policies might allow low-income workers in particular to live closer to their work place? Are there reliable and inexpensive public or collective transport options that will complement private autos? The identified goals for the conference included: • Bring together housing stakeholders (builders and developers, realtors, not-for-profits, local governments, neighborhood associations, transportation entities serving Ames and Story County, community school districts, the Iowa State University community, and residents living this issue day-to-day) so that they may understand on another’s concerns and allow all to take a more realistic approach to the question of housing instability in Story County. • Educate people about housing instability in Ames and Story County and ways in which those working in a specific Story County community could acquire quality affordable housing there. This includes drawing on experiences with other localities, and assessing resources and circumstances. • Catalyze actions that wide housing options for lowincome workers and other disadvantaged members in Story County communities. The concept of a local Housing Trust Fund as an initial step toward dealing more broadly with local housing instability was proposed.

Housing | A-7


A.3

TRANSPORTATION AND MOBILITY

Commuting Approximately 48.6% of the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commuters age 16 or older work within 14 minutes of their place of employment. Most of the workers are employed within Story County. The percentage of those who work out of state is low at 0.9%. Commuters, on average, have a travel time to work in the county (17.8 minutes) and state as a whole (18.8 minutes). A large percentage of Story County workers have a commute that is less than 15 minutes. Commuting in Story County is mostly done by car and primarily in a single occupant vehicle (81.1%). This number is lower than the state as whole, which is at 89.3%. Those who carpooled to work Commuting Work, - 2013 Avg. was lower Methods than the to state with2009 8.2%, as compared to Car, truck, vanstate. On the other hand, those who 9.0% fororthe Drove usedalone public transit was substantially higher in the Carpooled county as compared to the state as whole (6.2% to In 1.1%, 2-person carpool respectively). Those that biked and walked to In work 3-person carpool is substantially higher in the county compared In to 4-or-more person carpool the state. The remainder of the means of travel Workers per car, truck, or van were quite similar between Story County and the Public transportation (excluding taxicab) state as a whole.

PERCENTAGE OF RESIDENTS COMMUTING Source: American Community Survey

Place of Work, 2009 - 2013 Avg. Worked in state of residence: Commuting Time to Work, 2009 - 2013 Avg. Worked in county of residence Less than 10 minutes Worked outside county of residence 10 to 14 minutes Worked outside state of residence 15 to 19 minutes Source: ACS 20 to 24 minutes 25 to 29 minutes 30 to 34 minutes 35 to 44 minutes 45 to 59 minutes 60 or more minutes Mean treal time to work (minutes) Source: ACS 2009-2013

COMMUTING TIME TO WORK, 2009-2013 AVG Source: American Community Survey 60 or more minutes

Story County Iowa 80.4% 45 to89.2% 59 minutes 72.4% 80.4% 35 to 44 minutes 8.0% 8.8% 30 to6.9% 34 minutes 7.0% 0.3% 25 to1.1% 29 minutes 0.7% 0.8% 20 to 24 minutes 1.1% 1.1% 6.2% 15 to1.1% 19 minutes 7.3% 3.6% 10 to 14 minutes 2.4% 0.5% Less than1.1% 10 minutes 0.6% 3.1% 4.5% 0.0%

Iowa Story County

Walked Bicycle Taxicab, motorcycle, or other means Worked at home COMMUTING METHODS TO WORK, 2009-2013 AVG Source:ACS American Source: 2009Community - 2013 Survey

10.0%

Worked at home Taxicab, motorcycle, or other means

Iowa

Bicycle

Story County

Walked Public transportation (excludingâ&#x20AC;Ś Workers per car, truck, or van In 4-or-more person carpool In 3person carpool In 2-person carpool Carpooled Drove alone Car, truck, or van 0.0%

A-8

20.0%

47528 99.1% Iowa Story Co 38458 80.2% 25.1% 23.2% 9070 18.9% 18.9% 25.4% 420 0.9% 17.6% 16.5% 11.6% 13.8% 47948 3.4% 5.7% 6.6% 8.7% 3.9% 4.0% 5.9% 3.8% 2.3% 3.5% 17.8 18.8

40.0%

60.0%

80.0%

100.0%

20.0%

30.0%


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County Transportation Map

Transportation and Mobility | A-9


A.3 Major Modes of Travel

Hwy

County

Location

Miles

Year

Type of Work

US 30

Story

AIRPORT RD INTERCHANGE IN NEVADA

0.1

2018-2020

Right of way, bridge new, grade, grade and pave, lighting, traffic signs

US 30

Story

WEST BRANCH INDIAN CREEK, 0.7 MI E OF CO RD S14

-

2016

Bridge deck overlay

I 35

Story

SOUTH SKUNK RIVER, 2.6 MI S OF US 30 (NB & SB)

1.6

2016-2019

Bridge replacement, culvert new, grade and pave, right of way, erosion control

Roadway Improvement CO RD E57 OVER I-35, 2.0 MI Projects S OF I 35 Story 2017

Bridge replacement

30 Iowa’s Five Year USHighway Improvement Program identifies Right of way, bridge new, grade, lighting, I 35 Story US 30 INTERCHANGE IN AMES 0.5 2016-2019 control to projects by county and project limits. Belowpave, is atraffic listsigns, oferosion projects Road Classifications CO RD E41 TO 0.75 MI N OF CO RD during the 2016-2020 period within Story County. Story 4.4 2018 Pavement rehab All federal, state, county, and local roads are classified beI 35completed E29 (NB) into categories under the “Roadway Functional US 65 Story CO RD E41, 1.0 MI N OF US 30 2020 Bridge replacement ROAD IMPROVEMENTS Classification System” based upon the type of service PLANNED Source: Iowa Department of Transportation KEIGLEY BRANCH, 1.1 MI S OF CO US 69 Story 2016 Bridge replacement, right of way RD E18 they provide. In general, roadways with a higher Hwy County Location Miles Year Type of Work AIRPORT RD INTERCHANGE IN Right of way, bridge new, grade, grade and functional classification should be designed with Hwy 0.1 2018-2020 US 30 210 Story I-35 2017 Bridge deck overlay NEVADA pave, lighting, traffic signs limited access (ie. fewer driveways) and higher speed WEST BRANCH INDIAN CREEK, 0.7 2016 Bridge deck overlay US 30 Story MI E OF CO RD S14 traffic.

Lincoln Highway

I 35

Story

SOUTH SKUNK RIVER, 2.6 MI S OF US 30 (NB & SB)

1.6

2016-2019

Bridge replacement, culvert new, grade and pave, right of way, erosion control

I 35

Story

CO RD E57 OVER I-35, 2.0 MI S OF US 30

-

2017

Bridge replacement

Right of way, bridge new, grade, lighting, The Lincoln Highway was once the most famous road I 35 Story US 30 INTERCHANGE IN AMES 0.5 2016-2019 pave, traffic signs, erosion control in America. It was the first successful transcontinental CO RD E41 TO 0.75 MI N OF CO RD I 35 Story 4.4 2018 Pavement rehab E29 (NB) highway and served as the catalyst for the driving US 65 Story CO RD E41, 1.0 MI N OF US 30 2020 Bridge replacement improvements then demanded by an increasingly mobile public. The Lincoln Highway was the first KEIGLEY BRANCH, 1.1 MI S OF CO 2016 Bridge replacement, right of way US 69 Story RD E18 successful, all-weather, coast-to-coast, automobile I-35 2017 Bridge deck overlay highway. The Lincoln Highway bisects Story County Hwy 210 Story Railroad Service and runs parallel to the north of Highway 30. Passenger rail is not directly available in Story County. The closest Amtrak station is located in Osceola, Iowa around 80 Jefferson Highway miles south of Story County. Three rail lines pass through Story The Jefferson Highway was organized in 1915, running County all controlled by the Union Pacific Railroad Company. in a north-south direction between New Orleans and The line commonly referred to by Union Pacific as the Overland Winnipeg. Colo is the location of the intersection of Route runs east to west through Story County on its route from the Lincoln and Jefferson Highways where the L&J Chicago, Illinois to Oakland, California. The Overland Route Service station is named in honor of the two highways. passes through the Story County communities of Colo, Nevada, and Ames. The line commonly referred to by Union Pacific as Aviation Service the Spine Line runs north to south through Story County on its Ames Municipal Airport is a City-owned public use route from Minneapolis, Minnesota, and Kansas City, Missouri. airport. The airport has two paved runways (01/19 and The Spine Line passes through the Story County communities 13/31) which are 5,701 and 3,491 feet long, respectively. of McCallsburg, Nevada and Cambridge. The third line in Story It is a high quality facility that currently sees light County, whose origin is in Ames, passes through the Story County use, including recreational flights, flight training, communities of Gilbert and Story City. refueling stopovers and some executive travel by large corporations with local facilities and ISU. Transit Service

Truck Routes

Story County has six major roads: • Interstate 35 • US Highway 30 • US Highway 65 • US Highway 69 • Iowa Highway 210 • Iowa Highway 330

A-10

HIRTA (Heart of Iowa Regional Transit Agency) provides door to - door transit services in the counties of Boone, Dallas, Jasper, Madison, Marion, Story and Warren. All rides are open to the general public, including persons with disabilities. There are two intercity bus services Jefferson Lines and Burlington Trailways in Story County. Des Moines Area Regional Transit (DART) offers a Rideshare carpool/vanpool commuter database.


Story County Comprehensive South Skunk River Water Trail - Story CountyPlan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

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A part of the state’s 4th largest drainage basin, the South Skunk travels 193 miles from Northeast Hamilton County to the confluence with the North Skunk in Southeast Keokuk County. From the confluence, the Skunk River flows another 70 miles to the Mississippi River South of Burlington. Story County Skunk River access points are located at: • Story City Park #246 • Lekwa Access #242 • Anderson Access #239 • Soper’s Mill #235 • West Peterson Park #233 • Sleepy Hollow #230 • River Valley Park #227 • South 16th Street #224 M ss hh aa ll ll265th Street #220 M aa rr • • Askew Bridge #217 • C.J. Shreck Access #212

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The National Water Trails System is a distinctive national network of exemplary water trails of local and regional significance that are cooperatively supported and sustained. The trail system has been established to protect and restore America’s rivers, shorelines and waterways and to increase access to outdoor recreation on shorelines and waterways.

Collins

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Transportation and Mobility | A-11


A.3 Pedestrian and Bike Network Pedestrians and bicyclists use a combination of roadways, sidewalks, and off-street trails. Sidewalks are prevalent within the county’s municipalities, but they are not found everywhere. In unincorporated areas sidewalks are rare. The Skunk River Greenbelt Trail System Map (shown on the next page) displays the bicycle “level of service” for the major roadways within the planning area. The levels of service are: • • •

“Developed” (dark green), “Undeveloped” (dark green dashed), “On Road” (brown)

There are several local and regional trails within Story County. The High Trestle Trail and Heart of Iowa Nature Trail are the two regional trails in Story County. The High Trestle Trail is a 25-mile trail that runs between Ankeny, on the outskirts of Des Moines, and Woodward. You can pick up the paved corridor in several places, but a great staging point is Slater. It is the trail’s hinge, where you can swing south 12.2 miles toward Ankeny or aim west 12.7 miles to Woodward (or travel nearly 30 miles east on the Heart of Iowa Nature Trail). The Heart of Iowa Nature Trail offers expansive views plus significant prairie remnants east of Slater, a pioneer cemetery and historical museum in Maxwell, heavily wooded tracts near Cambridge and Maxwell and two wetland areas west of Cambridge. A double track allows room for horses. Between Collins and Rhodes, trail users cross the Hoy Bridge, which is 212 feet long and 60 feet tall. This unique, massive concrete arch bridge was built in 1912 to accommodate a double railroad over Clear Creek.

A-12


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Skunk River Greenbelt Trail System Map

Transportation and Mobility | A-13


A.4

ECONOMIC PROSPERITY

Education and Income

The typical correlation between education and income is somewhat reinforced here - the median family income for the county is substantially higher then the state as a whole. However, the per capita and median household income is lower in the county than the state. Despite these lower incomes, iowa the county has less poverty than the state as a whole, reflecting the fact that people living below the federal poverty line tend to live in larger cities with more social services and transportation options. Note: The Census Bureau uses a set of income thresholds that vary by family size and composition to identify poverty levels. If the total income for a family or unrelated individual falls below the relevant poverty threshold, then the family or unrelated individual is classified as being “below the poverty level”.

Income Trends EducationalTRENDS Attainment INCOME

Story Co.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey

Iowa

Education attainment data can provide insight into the quality of the existing labor force, including the availability of skilled and professional workers and the need for training opportunities. Data from the American Community Survey (2009-2013) shows that the percentage of county residents 25 years or older had at least a high school diploma was slightly higher than the state as whole (95.5% vs 91.0%), however bachelor’s and graduate degrees were substantially higher in the county than the state (47.7% vs 25.7%). However, high school graduates to associates degrees were substantially lower in the county versus the state (47.9% vs 65.2%).

Per Capita Median Family Median Household Below Poverty Per Capita Median Family Median Household Below Poverty Souce: ACS, Census Bureau

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey

Educational Attainment*, 2009 Story County - 2013 Avg. HS Graduate 19.0% Some College 19.5% Associate's Degree 9.4% 28.7% Bachelor's Degree Graduate/Prof. Degree HS or Higher Source: ACS, *Population 25 and over

A-14

Avg. 2009-2013 $25,986 $76,860 $50,516 6.2% $27,027 $65,802 $51,843 8.1%

19.0% 95.5%

Iowa 32.9% 21.7% 10.6% 17.7% 8.0% 91.0%


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Existing Labor Force Based on the tables and graphs on the right the following can be said regarding the county’s existing labor force: •

While the state labor force grew by 6.0% between 2000 to 2013 avg., the county labor force grew by more than 11.9% for the same time period.

Unemployment rates increased at a similar rate for both the state and Story County between 2000 and 2013 avg. by 1.6% and 1.8%. These higher unemployment rates are attributable to the “Great Recession” that began in 2007.

Based on the American Community Survey (2007-2011), nearly 65.8% of workers in Story County earn a private sector wage and salary. This compares to 79.0% statewide.

Residents in Story County and the state are primarily employed in “Management, Business, Science, and Arts Occupations,” over 44% for Story County and 34% for the state.

The largest industries in the county include Educational, Health and Social Services (36.5%), Manufacturing (10.2%), and Retail Trade (9.5%).

Note: A community’s labor force includes all people over the age of 16 classified as employed or unemployed as well as members of the U.S. Armed Forces. Those not included in the labor force statistics include students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers not currently looking for work, institutionalized people, and those doing only incidental unpaid family work.

EMPLOYMENT STATUS

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey Employment Status Story County 46,694 In Labor Force (2000) 4.4% Rate Story County EmploymentUnemployment Status 52,274 In Labor Labor Force Force (2000) (ACS 2009-2013) 46,694 In Unemployment Rate Rate 6.2% 4.4% Unemployment Source: Census Data 52,274 In Labor Force (ACS 2009-2013) Unemployment Rate 6.2% Source: Census Data of Worker Story County CLASS OFClass WORKER Private U.S. wage and salary workers 65.8% Source: Census Bureau, American Community Survey Government workers 30.2% Class of Worker Story County Self-employed in own not incorporated business workers 4.0% Private salary workers 65.8% Unpaid wage familyand workers 0.1% Government workers 30.2% Source: American Community Survey 2009-2013 Self-employed in own not incorporated business workers 4.0% Unpaid family workers 0.1% Source: American Community Survey 2009-2013

Iowa 1,556,581 Iowa 4.2% 1,650,140 1,556,581 5.8% 4.2%

1,650,140 5.8% Iowa 79.0% 14.0% Iowa 6.8% 79.0% 0.2% 14.0% 6.8% 0.2%

Industry, 2009 - 2013 Avg Story County Iowa 50.0% 45.0% Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, and Story County 3.0% 4.0% 40.0% OCCUPATIONS, 2009-2013 AVG Iowa mining 35.0% American Community Survey Source: 30.0% Construction Industry, 2009 - 2013 Avg Story County4.8% Iowa 6.1% 25.0% Manufacturing 10.2% 14.7% Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, and 20.0% 50.0% 3.0% 4.0% Wholesale trade 1.3% 3.0% 15.0% mining 45.0% Story County 10.0% Retail trade 9.5% 11.7% 40.0% 4.8% 6.1% Construction Iowa 5.0% 35.0% Transportation and warehousing, and utilities 0.0% Manufacturing 10.2% 14.7% 2.6% 4.6% 30.0% Management, Service occupations Sales and office Natural resources, Production, Wholesale trade 1.3% and 3.0% business, science, occupations construction, and transportation, 25.0% and arts maintenance material moving 2.1% 1.9% Information 20.0% Retail trade 9.5% 11.7% occupations occupations occupations 15.0% and insurance, and real estate and Finance Transportation and warehousing, and utilities 4.8% 7.6% 10.0% 2.6% 4.6% rental and leasing 5.0% 7.4% 7.0% Professional, scientific, and management, and 0.0% Occupations, 2009 - 2013 Avg 2.1% 1.9% Information Story County Iowa Story Iowa occupations Sales and office Natural resources, 36.5% Production, 24.1% EducationalManagement, services, andService health care and social Financebusiness, and insurance, andoccupations real estate and occupations construction,34.0% and transportation, and business, science, Management, science, and arts 44.4% 8.9% material moving 21725 Arts, entertainment, 4.8% 7.6% 527821 and arts and recreation, and maintenance rental and leasing Service occupations 16.6% 16.7% occupations occupations 4.1% occupations 8124 4.4% 259384 Other services, except public administration 10451 371505 Sales and office occupations 21.3% 23.9% 7.4% 7.0% Professional, scientific, and management, and 4.7% 3.3% 146452 Public administration 3602 Natural resources, construction, and maintenance occupations 7.4% 9.4% 36.5% 24.1% Educational services, and health care and social 5052 247868 Production, transportation, and material moving occupations 10.3% 16.0% Source: ACS 8.9% 7.6% Arts, entertainment, and recreation, and Source: American Community Survey 48954 1553030 Occupations, 2009 - 2013 Avg Story County Iowa Story Iow INDUSTRY, 2009-2013 AVG 4.1% 4.4% Other services, except public administration Source: American Community Survey Management, business, science, and arts occupations 44.4% 34.0% 4.7% 3.3% Public administration 21725 8124 Service occupations 16.6% 16.7% Source: ACS Public administration Sales and office occupations Other services, except public administration Natural resources, construction, and maintenance occupations Production, transportation, and material moving occupations Arts, entertainment, and recreation, and accommodation…

21.3% 7.4% 10.3%

10451 3602 5052

23.9% 9.4% 16.0%

Educational services, and health Survey care and social assistance Source: American Community

48954

Professional, scientific, and management, and… Finance and insurance, and real estate and rental and leasing Iowa

Information

Story County

Transportation and warehousing, and utilities

Public administration Retail trade

Other services, except public administration Wholesale trade

Arts, entertainment, and recreation, and accommodation… Manufacturing

Educational services, and health careConstruction and social assistance Professional, and management, and… Agriculture, forestry, fishing scientific, and hunting, and mining Occupations Finance and insurance, and real estate and rental and leasing 0.0%

10.0%

20.0%

30.0%

40.0%

Iowa

Information

Subject

Transportation and warehousing, and utilities

Occupations Median earnings (dollars) for female Estimate

Total

MaleStory Co

Retail trade

Wholesale trade

Estimate

Margin of Error

Manufacturing Margin of Error Construction

Subject Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, and mining

Total

0.0%

Estimate

Male 10.0%

20.0%

30.0%

Margin of Error

Economic Prosperity | A-15 Median earnings (dollars) for female

Estimate

40

Estimate


A.5

COMMUNITY FACILITIES AND SERVICES

General Facilities Health Care Facilities The county’s leading medical facility is Mary Greeley Medical Center, located in Ames. Mary Greeley is a 220-bed regional hospital that provides healthcare to the residents of a 13-county area in central Iowa, including Story, Boone, Marshall, Greene, Hamilton, Hardin, Sac, Calhoun, Wright, Carroll, Tama, Dallas and Polk. The hospital is home to inpatient and outpatient services that support a continuum of care for patients, including surgery, cancer care, cardiac care, diabetes and nutrition care, orthopedics, obstetrics and gynecology, gastroenterology, mental health services, palliative care, home health care, hospice care, rehabilitation and more. The county is also home to Story City Municipal Hospital, which has 36 beds, located in Story City, and the Story County Hospital, which has 122 beds, located in Nevada. Police and Emergency Facilities Law enforcement in the county is provided by the Story County Sheriff and municipal police departments. Four municipalities have their own police department (Ames, Story City, Huxley and Nevada). Huxley’s police department provides services for the City of Cambridge. The Story County Sheriff ’s Department, located in Nevada, provides law enforcement for the remaining communities and unincorporated areas. Fire protection and emergency services are provided by twelve local fire departments: Ames, Cambridge, Colo, Huxley, Kelley, Maxwell, McCallsburg, Nevada, Roland, Story City, Gilbert, and Zearing. Public Cemeteries All fifteen municipalities have public cemetery facilities in Story County, as listed below: • • • • •

Ames Story City McCallsburg Nevada Colo

• • • • •

Kelley Slater Huxley Cambridge Zearing

• • • • •

Gilbert Sheldahl Collins Maxwell Roland

There are a number of other cemeteries located in unincorporated Story County managed by township trustees.

A-16

Library Facilities Story County is home to twelve public libraries, located in Ames, Collins, Huxley, Maxwell, Roland, Story City, Cambridge, Colo, Nevada, Slater, and Zearing. Parks Library (ISU) and Ames Public Library are both located within Ames. School Facilities The county is served by 10 school districts (Ames Community School District, Ballard Community School District, Collins-Maxwell Community School District, Colo-Nesco Community School District, Gilbert Community School District, Nevada Community School District, United Community School District, West Marshall Community School District, North Polk Community School District and Roland-Story Community School District). In total, the county is home to 27 schools, that provide services to nearly 11,000 students. Nearby Higher Education Facilities In addition to four area trade, technical, and community schools, there are four higher education facilities with traditional four-year programs located within forty-five miles, as listed below. • • • • • • • •

Iowa State University (Ames) University of Iowa Des Moines Campus (Des Moines) DMACC (Ankeny) Des Moines University (Des Moines) Drake University (Des Moines) Grandview University (Des Moines) Mercy College of Health Sciences (Des Moines) Faith Baptist Bible College and Theological Seminary (Ankeny)


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º ¹

º ¹

º ¹ ¹ º

º ¹ ¹ º º º ×Ñ ¹ ¹ a c º ¹ º ²¸u"²¸d ¹ ¸ ² º ¹

Nevada Colo

a ×Ñ c

º¹ ¹ º º¹ " u

Ñ ×

b c

Ñ ×

º ¹

Ñ ×

¹ º

º ¹

Kelley Ñ ×

Huxley

a c º ¹

Slater

Ñ ×

Ѳ × ¸

Cambridge Ñ ×

º ¹

Collins Maxwell

Ñ ×

Ñ ×

¹ º

º ¹

Sheldahl

Ñ ×

Fire Department

a c

Local Police

b c

Story County Sheriff

" u

Story County hospitals

¹ º d

Story County k12 schools

¸ ²

Story County museum

Story County utilities electric Story County cemeteries Parks

Community Facilities and Services | A-17


A.5 Parks and Recreation There are 1,500+ acres of parkland throughout Story county controlled by various entities. Hickory Grove Park is the largest and most popular of Story County’s parks. This 445-acre multiple-use recreational area southwest of Colo contains a 98acre lake stocked with largemouth bass, bluegill, crappie, channel catfish, and grass carp. Ada Hayden Heritage Park in Ames is an other notable park, which is comprised of over 430 acres.

PARKLAND NEEDS FORECAST, 2010-2030 Source: 2010 Census, MSA Predictions

Population Demand (6 acres / 1,000) Demand (12 acres / 1,000) Total Supply Surplus Deficit (6 acres / 1,000)

2010 89,542 537 1075 1523.59 986.59

2020 96,451 579 1157

2030 104,962 630 1260

944.59

893.59

Hickory Grove Park Source: www.traveliowa.com

The National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) recommends 6-12 total acres of parks or recreation space per 1,000 people within a community. NRPA also defines park and open space types, including desirable size, service area, and total acres needed to service a community. • • • •

Mini Parks - 2 acres or less in size, servicing 1/8 mile radius (0.25-0.5 acres / 1,000 residents) Neighborhood Playgrounds - 2-4 acres in size, servicing 1/4 mile radius (0.5-1.5 acres / 1,000) Neighborhood Parks - 2-10 acres in size, servicing 1/4 mile radius (1.0-2.0 acres/ 1,000) Community Play fields/Parks - 5 acres or more, servicing 1.0 mile radius (5-8 acres / 1,000)

Utilities and Services Wastewater Treatment

Wastewater is typically managed by municipal collection and treatment systems in each of the municipalities, and by private septic systems in the rest of the county.

Stormwater Management

Stormwater management typically includes the collection and controlled release of storm runoff to natural receiving systems, typically through detention and/or retention facilities. Story County has two watershed management plans, the Squaw Creek Watershed Plan and the Hickory Grove Lake Action Plan. These plans are available at the Story County website. Story County is a founding member of the Squaw Creek Watershed Management Authority.

A-18

Solid Waste and Recycling Facilities

Solid waste, yard waste, and recycling services are provided by differing contractors according to each municipality. The Arnold O. Chantland Resource Recovery Plant (RRP) located in Ames was the first municipally operated waste-to-energy facility in the nation and was built in 1975. The plant receives garbage/refuse from Ames and the surrounding communities in Story County through existing intergovernmental agreements.

Water Supply

Water supply for municipal county residents is provided through municipal well and distribution systems. Rural residents and businesses are served by private wells and rural water associations.


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone PARKS WITHIN THE COUNTY Source: Story County GIS

Park Name Hutchison Park Duff Park Old Town Park Bandshell Park Emma McCarthy Lee Memorial Park Christopher Gartner Park Franklin Park O'Neil Park Squaw Creek Park Greenbriar Park Country Gables Park Teagarden Park Moore Park Gateway Park Carr Park McDonald/Gunder/Nutty Woods Lloyd Kurtz Park Hans Peter Christofferson Park Stuart Smith Park Inis Grove Park River Valley Park South River Valley Park Moore Memorial Park Hunziker Youth Sports Complex Ann Munn Heritage Woods Daley Park and Greenbelt Ada Hayden Heritage Park Parkview Park Brookside Park Charles and June Calhoun Park Patio Homes West Park Hunziker Youth Sports Complex Tom Evans Plaza Richard W. Pohl Memorial Preserve Cambridge City Park Cambridge Recreation Learning Area Collins City Park Collins Trailside Park Central Park Carmody Park Banford Park Lions Park Upstill Park Railway Park Berhow Park Nord-Kalsem Park

Acres 0.70 0.50 0.26 2.56 34.83 2.48 4.05 2.90 12.65 8.34 7.12 0.50 2.00 38.68 8.87 20.18 4.45 7.01 54.92 40.08 174.35 23.47 74.81 63.56 43.63 15.49 430.48 3.35 141.86 1.86 1.90 63.56 0.20 22.00 1.10 8.39 8.03 3.49 1.46 1.69 4.01 1.23 14.38 1.40 6.00 5.34

Location Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Cambridge Cambridge Collins Collins Colo Colo Gilbert Gilbert Gilbert Huxley Huxley Huxley

Memorial Park Centennial Park Trailridge Park Larson Family Sports Fields Kelley City Park Legion Park Maxwell City Park Scout Park McCallsburg City Park Walker-Hattery Park 4-H Park Harrington Park SCORE Recreation Athletic Complex Mardean Park Kiwanis Park Krupp Park Erickson Park Pool Park Jacobson Bear Creek Park Britson Park and Athletic Complex Sheldahl City Park Heart of Iowa Trailhead and Arboretum Nelson Park Ed Grimm Park Southside Park Story City Park Water Tower Park Jacobsen Playground Park Jacobsen Park Prairie Park Story City Soccer Fields Zearing City Park

Telecommunications Facilities

1.00 32.00 1.00 7.00 6.36 10.97 42.35 1.59 1.06 2.51 18.35 32.64 58.00 3.00 7.00 0.60 5.00 2.30 3.70 7.00 2.26 1.60 2.09 13.73 7.24 29.75 0.10 0.50 32.20 7.00 10.00 4.38 1523.59

Huxley Huxley Huxley Huxley Kelley Maxwell Maxwell Maxwell McCallsburg Nevada Nevada Nevada Nevada Nevada Nevada Nevada Roland Roland Roland Roland Sheldahl Slater Slater Slater Slater Story City Story City Story City Story City Story City Story City Zearing

There are several telecommunication providers for the Story County area. CenturyLink provides telecommunications and internet, Mediacom provides telecommunications, Nextiva provides cloud based VoIP for business phone service and Windstream Communications provides telephone service. Huxcom, Colotel, and Minerva Valley also provide more localized services. According to the Story County Technology Action Plan the County scored a 40 out of 40 for broadband access and an overall technology community assessment score of 116 out of a possible 120. The chart on the next page details service providers and their areas of service.

Community Facilities and Services | A-19


A.6

COMMUNITY CHARACTER AND CULTURE

The following providers have a service footprint in Story County.

The Farm House, Iowa State University

National Register of Historic Places

The National Register is the official national list of historic properties in American worthy of preservation, maintained by the National Park Service. As of 2015, Story County has thirtyfour national registered historic places.

Historic Resources

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

National Historic Landmarks on the National Register

Site Agriculture Hall Alumni Hall Ames High School Bandshell Park Historic District Budd, Prof, J.L., Sarah M., and Etta Budd, House Christian Petersen Courtyard Sculptures, and Dairy Industry Bldg Colonials Club House Delta Upsilon Chapter House Engineering Hall Iowa Beta Chapter of Sigma Phi Epsilon Knapp-Wilson House MacDonald, Gilmour B. and Edith Craig, House Marston Water Tower Morrill Hall Municipal Building Old Town Historic District Pleasant Grove Community Church and Cemetery Roosevelt School Sigma Sigma-Delta Chi Fraternity House Skunk River Bridge Mulcahy Barn Keigley Branch Bridge Octagon Round Barn, Indian Creek Township Wood, William Kennison, House Calamus Creek Bridge Briggs Terrace East Indian Creek Bridge Edwards-Swayze House Nevada Downtown Historic District Sheldahl First Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Church Grand Auditorium and Hotel Block Henryson, Henry T. and Emilie (Wiese), House Herschel--Spillman Two-Row Portable Menagerie Carousel Lincoln Township Mausoleum

Story County has one landmark on the National Historic Register. The Knapp-Wilson house is located on the Iowa State University campus in Ames. The Farm House, as it has always been known in Iowa, was built as the main building of the model farm which began in the middle of 648 acres about 30 miles north of Des Moines, and became Iowa State University. Work was started on the house a year after a bill for the organization of a state agricultural college was passed in 1858. The kitchen wing was begun first, in 1860, and the main portion of the house in 1861. The house was substantially completed in the spring of 1864, the verandah and several outbuildings were built in 1865 and the annual report of the college that year described the building as â&#x20AC;&#x153;finished except for painting the inside work.â&#x20AC;?

A-20

Source: National Park Service

Location Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Ames Colo Gilbert Iowa Center Iowa Center Maxwell Nevada Nevada Nevada Nevada Sheldahl Story City Story City Story City Zearing


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Historic Lincoln Highway Banner - Ames Mulcahy Barn - Colo

Edwards-Swazye House - Nevada

Old Story County Courthouse and construction of existing Administration Building - Nevada

Marston Water Tower - Ames

Community Character and Culture | A-21


A.7

COLLABORATION AND PARTNERSHIPS

Existing Areas of Collaboration Local Units of Governments

Existing Cooperation Efforts

County and municipal governments

Law enforcement services and support by the Story County Sheriff's Department

Various combinations of municipal governments throughout the county

Fire, EMS services and animal control agreements

Story County, Gilbert, and Ames

Ames Urban Fringe Plan and 28E Agreement

Story County and municipalities

TIF Funded Urban Renewal Projects and Facade Grants

Various counties and municipalities (see below)

Squaw Creek Watershed Management Plan

Story County, municipalities and schools

Multi - Jurisdictional Multi - Hazard Mitigation Plan

The Squaw Creek Watershed Management Authority partners are: Story County, Boone County, Webster County, Hamilton County, City of Ames, City of Gilbert, City of Stanhope, City of Stratford, Story County Soil and Water Conservation District, Boone County Soil and Water Conservation District, Hamilton County Soil and Water Conservation District, and Webster County Soil and Water Conservation District.

Story County ASSET The Story County ASSET (Analysis of Social Service Team) has existed in Story County since 1985. ASSET brings together five major funders of human services programs in a collaborative, volunteer-led effort to coordinate local planning, assess needs, evaluate the capabilities of agencies to provide programs, and recommend funding for programs. Members include: • City of Ames • Iowa Department of Human Services • Iowa State University Government of the Student Body • Story County • United Way of Story County

A-22


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Potential Areas of Collaboration •

Voluntary Assistance: Communities can voluntarily agree to provide a service to neighbors because doing so makes economic sense and improves service levels. Trading Services: Communities could agree to exchange services, such as the use of different pieces of equipment, equipment for labor, or labor for labor. Renting Equipment: Communities could rent equipment to, or from, neighboring communities and other governmental units. Renting equipment can make sense for both communities – the community renting gets the use of equipment without having to buy it, and the community renting out the equipment earns income from the equipment rather than having it sit idle. Contracting: Communities can contract with another community or jurisdiction to provide a service. Sharing Staff: Communities can share staff with neighboring communities and other jurisdictions – both municipal employees and independently contracted professionals. They can share a building inspector, planner, engineer, zoning administrator, clerk, etc. Consolidating Services: Communities can agree

with one or more other communities or the County to provide a service together. Joint Use of a Facility: Communities can share a public facility along with other jurisdictions. The facility could be jointly owned or one jurisdiction could rent space from another. Special Purpose Districts: Special purpose districts, such as park districts, are created to provide a particular service, unlike municipalities that provide many different types of services. Like municipalities, special purpose districts are separate and legally independent entities. Joint Purchase and Ownership of Equipment: Communities could agree with other jurisdictions to jointly purchase and own equipment such as pothole patching machines, mowers, rollers, snowplows, street sweepers, etc. Cooperative Purchasing: Cooperative purchasing, or procurement, is where jurisdictions purchase supplies and equipment together to gain more favorable prices. Intergovernmental Agreements: These can be proactive or reactive. There are three types of intergovernmental agreements that can be formed including general agreements, cooperative boundary agreements, and stipulations and orders. Source: WIDOA Intergovernmental Cooperation Element Guide

Collaboration and Partnerships | A-23


A.8

LAND USE

Existing Land Uses

A-24


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Land Use | A-25


This page intentionally left blank.


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Appendix A Survey Results Appendix B Between May and October of 2015, residents of Story County were asked to assist the Cornerstone Appendix C to Capstone (C2C) Comprehensive Planning Process completing two surveys utilizing Survey Monkey, Appendix D by an online survey tool. The first survey was the Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey. The second survey was the Story County C2C Youth Survey. This appendix includes the raw results of these surveys . Hard copies of the surveys were available and those that returned were entered as survey responses and are represented in these results. A summary of these surveys is included in Chapter 2 of the Cornerstone to Capstone Comprehensive Plan.

B.1 Citizen Survey Results B.2 Youth Survey Results

Page B-2 B-98


B.1

County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Citizen SurveyStory Results

Q1 What are the three most important reasons you and your family choose to live and/or work in Story County? Answered: 677

Skipped: 7

Agriculture

Near Job

Appearance of Homes Property Tax Rates Quality of Public Services Quality Neighborhood

Cost of Home

Quality Schools

Raised Here

Recreational Opportunities

Low Crime Rate

Small Town / Rural...

Natural Beauty

Other (please specify) 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

Answer Choices

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Responses 31

Agriculture

4.58%

Near Job

62.33%

Appearance of Homes

2.36%

16

Property Tax Rates

3.10%

21

Quality of Public Services

12.85%

87

1 / 95

B-2

50%

422


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Quality Neighborhood

28.51%

193

Cost of Home

10.78%

73

Quality Schools

37.81%

256

Raised Here

23.34%

158

Recreational Opportunities

14.48%

98

Low Crime Rate

24.82%

168

Small Town / Rural Atmosphere

45.35%

307

Natural Beauty

11.67%

79

Other (please specify)

13.74%

93

Total Respondents: 677

#

Other (please specify)

Date

1

Iowa State

7/28/2015 4:00 PM

2

Husband's hometown

7/28/2015 2:52 PM

3

family and friends nearby

7/27/2015 3:48 PM

4

The ISU community is wonderful

7/26/2015 3:18 PM

5

Diversity in the population

7/13/2015 3:27 PM

6

x

7/10/2015 1:07 PM

7

Own rural land here

7/9/2015 10:49 PM

My wife and I have family that live in Ames and throughout Iowa, which is a big reason we returned to the state after

7/8/2015 8:01 AM

8

living away for 6 years. 9

I likie the association with ISU

6/30/2015 12:50 PM

10

Ability to buy a home without big, housing-dense developments nearby.

6/25/2015 7:29 PM

11

Student at Iowa State Univ.

6/25/2015 12:09 PM

12

church

6/24/2015 5:46 PM

13

There is a large population of young professionals in the area, like me

6/24/2015 4:04 PM

14

Great place to raise a young family (Reach Out and Read, Raising Readers in Story County, human services)

6/22/2015 7:14 PM

15

Too lazy to move.

6/19/2015 5:29 PM

16

Iowa State University

6/18/2015 2:14 PM

17

Near Hometown

6/17/2015 10:51 AM

18

Overall breadth of opportunities

6/16/2015 11:01 AM

19

proximity to university

6/15/2015 11:43 AM

20

been our home for 36 years

6/15/2015 10:23 AM

21

University related resources from lectures to arts

6/15/2015 9:01 AM

22

over all quality of life.. rec, schools relatively affordable houyseing low crime rate

6/13/2015 11:50 AM

23

perception as progressive and welcoming to LGBT citizens

6/12/2015 4:15 PM

24

Near Friends/Family

6/12/2015 1:31 PM

25

close to family

6/11/2015 8:58 PM

26

Graduate School

6/10/2015 12:35 PM

27

Availability of Cultural and Athletic Activities

6/10/2015 10:18 AM

2 / 95

| B-3


B.1

Citizen SurveyStoryResults County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

28

good water - no pollution

6/10/2015 12:16 AM

29

University

6/9/2015 6:57 PM

30

Near ISU community, events, etc

6/9/2015 12:43 PM

31

University town/opportunities

6/9/2015 6:38 AM

32

Went to University and never left

6/8/2015 2:11 PM

33

University

6/8/2015 9:49 AM

34

Cornerstone Church; Iowa State

6/8/2015 8:30 AM

35

Iowa State University

6/7/2015 5:57 PM

36

Two positions at ISU

6/6/2015 2:03 AM

37

thought the rest applied

6/5/2015 8:17 PM

38

Simply landed here after attending ISU as we both obtained jobs in Story county after graduation.

6/5/2015 3:17 PM

39

Near Family

6/5/2015 2:58 PM

40

GOOD PLACE TO DO BUSINESS

6/5/2015 1:13 PM

41

Intelligent / educated people make for interesting conversations.

6/4/2015 7:06 PM

42

balance of small town and international/cultural diversity

6/4/2015 12:27 PM

43

We actually live in neighboring Boone County (R-S school district), but enjoy shopping & recreation in Story County

6/3/2015 10:14 PM

44

Jobs for both of us were available when we moved from North Central Iowa, mine in education, spouse at ISU.

6/3/2015 9:14 PM

45

Cultutal opportunities

6/3/2015 12:41 PM

46

Aging parents live here and we want to be close

6/3/2015 7:28 AM

47

NEAR ELDERLY FAMILY MEMBERS

6/2/2015 7:53 PM

48

University Community

6/2/2015 12:36 PM

49

Iowa State University, College of Veterinary Medicine

6/1/2015 4:37 PM

50

university

6/1/2015 2:26 PM

51

available land

6/1/2015 1:50 PM

52

The university

6/1/2015 12:40 PM

53

Close to family

6/1/2015 11:54 AM

54

ISU cultural activities

6/1/2015 8:16 AM

55

medical care

5/31/2015 8:37 PM

56

Love ISU

5/31/2015 5:43 AM

57

College town

5/30/2015 9:19 AM

58

This has always been home.

5/30/2015 7:20 AM

59

Family

5/29/2015 11:17 PM

60

Arts and sporting events

5/29/2015 9:44 PM

61

Family reside in Story City

5/29/2015 8:21 PM

62

good live music!

5/29/2015 6:02 PM

63

Church and shopping opportunities close to home

5/29/2015 4:37 PM

64

NEAR A COLLEGE TOWN

5/29/2015 4:18 PM

65

Near college town with added activities

5/29/2015 2:52 PM

66

close to Ames and DM

5/29/2015 2:35 PM

67

It was tough to identify just three reasons. Many other choices on list are also significant.

5/29/2015 2:35 PM

68

family and friends nearby

5/29/2015 2:29 PM

3 / 95

B-4


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey 69

I own four natural areas in this county, and protecting them now and into the future is my most important life goal.

5/29/2015 2:08 PM

70

Diversity

5/29/2015 1:44 PM

71

Moved here to attend ISU and stayed after completion

5/29/2015 12:31 PM

72

quality of medical services nearby

5/29/2015 11:34 AM

73

Came to ISU, never left!

5/29/2015 9:22 AM

74

activities such as ISU athletics, friends

5/29/2015 9:12 AM

75

Many opportunities associated with ISU

5/29/2015 8:29 AM

76

I am required by my employer

5/28/2015 9:30 PM

77

near job - I can commute by bike, bus, & walking. Other: clean air and relatively clean environment with good % of green areas where I live

5/28/2015 8:17 PM

78

ISU

5/28/2015 5:58 PM

79

Raised in Iowa/relatives

5/28/2015 3:40 PM

80

University education

5/28/2015 3:29 PM

81

Small town feel with international diversity due to the university

5/28/2015 3:23 PM

82

Married and moved here.

5/28/2015 1:37 PM

83

Availability of amenities and services typically only available in larger metros

5/28/2015 11:44 AM

84

I don't live in Story County, but have an interest in my Alma Mater.

5/28/2015 11:12 AM

85

Cultural opportunities

5/28/2015 11:02 AM

86

ISU

5/28/2015 9:30 AM

87

ISU

5/28/2015 9:00 AM

88

Good Jobs

5/28/2015 8:57 AM

89

government reflects progressive thinking, multicultural area, cultural events

5/27/2015 7:58 PM

90

Entertainment opportunities (not just recreation)

5/27/2015 5:56 PM

91

cost of living

5/27/2015 5:56 PM

92

Friendly people culture

5/27/2015 5:35 PM

93

I do not live in Story County

5/26/2015 1:29 PM

Q2 Overall, how would you rate the quality of life in Story County? Answered: 673

Skipped: 11

4 / 95

| B-5


B.1

Citizen SurveyStoryResults County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Excellent

Good

Fair

Poor

Not Sure

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

Answer Choices

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Responses

Excellent

30.01%

202

Good

63.74%

429

Fair

5.50%

37

Poor

0.59%

4

Not Sure

0.15%

1

Total

673

#

Comments

Date

1

I'm retired. There are many activities, volunteer opportunities, and services available to me.

7/27/2015 3:48 PM

2

x

7/10/2015 1:07 PM

3

For Iowa, I wouldn't want to live anywhere else. Property taxes are high in the Nevada district.

6/30/2015 12:50 PM

4

JUDGEMENTAL & GREEDY! CLAIM TO BE HELPFUL - BUT DON'T!

6/30/2015 12:20 AM

5

too many subdivisions outside towns

6/26/2015 6:20 PM

6

Enjoy quality of life in summer after the undergrads have left.

6/25/2015 12:09 PM

7

We are blessed with a continuum of services from "cradle to grave." We have citizens who care to volunteer.

6/22/2015 7:14 PM

8

Lack of housing maintenance in some of the communities is starting to affect quality of life.

6/16/2015 3:23 PM

9

Need to bring industry to rural Story County or we may see a ghost town or two in 20 years.

6/16/2015 1:24 PM

10

Property taxes are prohibitive to people considering moving here.

6/13/2015 6:35 PM

11

I live in a small town outside of Ames. The number of children on free/reduced lunches, or working poor is alarming to me.

6/12/2015 2:00 PM

12

Many cultural, social activities due to ISU and big businesses, good restaurants. Access to DM provides more.

6/12/2015 11:34 AM

13

"High Culture" is lacking but getting better

6/9/2015 3:07 PM

14

I really like the clear rivers and mountains in Iowa

6/6/2015 2:03 AM

15

ISU and Government dominates making the middle class really "in the middle".

6/5/2015 8:17 PM

16

The city of Ames is often difficult to work with

6/5/2015 1:13 PM

5 / 95

B-6


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey 17

I would say "excellent" but it is not so good for people in poverty.

6/4/2015 7:06 PM

18

could use more senior services - specifically, reliable, affordable transportation and non profit health care advocacy

6/4/2015 9:44 AM

and informational center 19

We would not want to live anywhere else in Iowa but we can see that there are improvements to be made.

6/3/2015 9:14 PM

20

The only reason that it is not excellent is because Ames is starting to go downhill because of section 8 housing.

6/2/2015 10:53 AM

21

We enjoy living here

6/1/2015 11:54 AM

22

It is closing up, and we no longer are surrounded by woods and pasture as people have moved in and built houses and some like to shoot firearms, destroying the peacefulness.

5/31/2015 3:10 PM

23

my opinion may be skewed by my good luck in heath and friendship

5/31/2015 5:43 AM

24

However the roads have become difficult to travel at times as traffic has exceeded infrastructure.

5/30/2015 7:20 AM

25

need more bike routes, jogging trails.

5/30/2015 12:19 AM

26

Crime has increased and the overcrowding at ISU has impacted many areas.

5/29/2015 8:58 PM

27

Taxes are too high for the conditions of roads, especially in rural area.

5/29/2015 6:21 PM

28

I would like to see more outdoor recrational activities. A paved trail that connects town to the greenbelt trail would be amazing!

5/29/2015 6:10 PM

29

wish we had more outdoor recreational options

5/29/2015 4:10 PM

30

Wish organizations worked together more to improve the quality of life here.

5/29/2015 2:32 PM

31

We are not doing a good enough job here of protecting the environment.

5/29/2015 2:08 PM

32

We seem to be staying stagnant with retail growth.

5/29/2015 1:44 PM

33

need more public transportation options outside Ames

5/29/2015 11:34 AM

34

Less bullying

5/28/2015 10:32 PM

35

Great place to raise kids

5/28/2015 3:23 PM

36

More outdoor recreation activities/opportunities/trails/parks are needed

5/28/2015 9:40 AM

37

I am concerned the rush for new and modern is going to shift attention from established areas of town.

5/27/2015 9:36 PM

Q3 During the next five years, I expect that the quality of life in the county will: Answered: 672

Skipped: 12

Improve

Stay the Same

Worsen

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

Answer Choices

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Responses

6 / 95

| B-7


B.1

Citizen SurveyStoryResults County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

Improve

29.91%

201

Stay the Same

57.29%

385

Worsen

12.80%

86

Total

672

#

Comments

Date

1

I feel strongly that while Ames makes strides to be progressive--most opportunities that would allow the city to truly grow and adjust to the needs of it's citizens will be voted down by a small (but mighty) group who show up to the polls.

7/28/2015 3:50 PM

2

New sewer and H2O pipes - new school

7/28/2015 3:10 PM

3

I worry about the development of more low-rent housing on vacant land near my home.

7/27/2015 3:48 PM

4

concern about urban sprawl ino the rural areas

7/23/2015 7:55 AM

5

The continued pressure on the environment, and the

7/16/2015 12:59 PM

6

x

7/10/2015 1:07 PM

7

Hard to predict

7/9/2015 10:49 PM

8

SAME OLD MUKETY MUCKS

6/30/2015 12:20 AM

9

Urban Sprawl is becoming a problem

6/27/2015 9:28 AM

10

Sorry, I'm not an optimist.

6/25/2015 9:41 AM

11

need more low income housing a lot of people struggle just to put a roof over their head

6/18/2015 6:37 PM

12

Worsen because of the urban expansion in the Ames/Gilbert area.

6/16/2015 1:24 PM

13

The natural environment keeps getting plowed up for housing. The traffic is growing quickly. We aren't doing much to deal with climate change locally.

6/16/2015 11:01 AM

14

population increases, loss of natural areas, loss of dark sky, reduced air, water quality, continued soil erosion,and short sighted ethanol production

6/15/2015 10:23 AM

15

Older residents dying, younger tax payers going to Polk county.

6/13/2015 6:35 PM

16

we don't need Chicago criminals here

6/13/2015 11:50 AM

17

concerned about hog farms and increased building of apartment buildings in Ames

6/12/2015 11:34 AM

18

depends on our Federal Government.

6/11/2015 8:38 PM

19

over building on the north end - too much business piled on duff

6/10/2015 12:16 AM

20

Leaning towards worsen - but it's taken 20+ years to slowly worsen

6/5/2015 8:17 PM

21

Stay the same and expect to improve

6/5/2015 11:25 AM

22

It is worsening everywhere. America is on the decline and ideology prevents people from seeing clearly. Less and fewer services for the 99 percent, more for the multimillionaire.

6/4/2015 7:06 PM

23

Many persons both in and out of government are looking to implement improvements in the county.

6/3/2015 9:14 PM

24

I'm concerned about rampant development, eminent domain (including the potential of the Bakken pipeline), more clearing of the already scant native habitat that is left (though, to be fair, I DO appreciate that as an Ames resident, I have access to more recreational and open-space areas than in some other parts of Iowa); thoughtless urban development in floodplain areas; and general population increase. It seems that development of more suburban-area homes, additional clearing of open spaces and a rush to "upgrade" urban infrastructure is being done haphazardly, and without equal regard for improving or expanding on trails, bike lanes, expanding natural areas or county parks or other outdoor recreational and wildlife habitat considerations.

6/2/2015 11:21 AM

25

I believe there are plans in place to improve things

6/1/2015 11:54 AM

26

too much growth in population, urban sprawl

5/31/2015 10:01 PM

27

I'm afraid it will lose its small town atmosphere.

5/31/2015 9:28 AM

28

over populatin, global warming, pollution, coruption will decrease the quality of life everwhere

5/31/2015 5:43 AM

7 / 95

B-8


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey 29

And also get worse in some aspects but I'm sure I'll still enjoy it here!

5/30/2015 10:59 PM

30

Taxes in our small town will be rising. Due to multi million dollar sewer work to correct an I/I that was routed to our sanitary sewer. ROLAND, IA

5/30/2015 4:53 PM

31

Not progressive toward development. Especially ames area. We are missing opportunities

5/30/2015 8:56 AM

Mostly because more and more people are NOT working they are dependent on the welfare system. If hard work is

5/30/2015 7:20 AM

32

not rewarded then who will do it? 33

Affordability of housing and cost of living compared to income makes me chose that it will worsen for many.

5/29/2015 11:06 PM

34

Too many drugs in the community and the costs of home ownership and upkeep are too high too many homes just

5/29/2015 10:08 PM

falling apart. 35

Not enough state taxes to keep from increasing city taxes, so services might be cut

5/29/2015 8:58 PM

36

it won't change without more affordable, accessible rental housing

5/29/2015 7:26 PM

37

Police need to worry more about the drug issues in the county and less on window tint and other minor offenses.

5/29/2015 6:21 PM

38

some of the homes and yards are getting pretty seedy. Town needs to have something on the books on keeping property up. several homes wrapped with insulation paper now for several yearII feel for the neighbors that have to look at those homes.

5/29/2015 6:09 PM

39

planning doesn't seem to be keeping up with population, so a pretty standard set of quality of life issues are headed our way

5/29/2015 6:02 PM

40

Traffic Congestion is getting bad

5/29/2015 3:46 PM

41

Actually my answer is between "Stay the Same" and "Worsen." The development of more farmland and natural areas is not "improvement" to me.

5/29/2015 2:08 PM

42

Too many communities are opposing new growth.

5/29/2015 1:44 PM

43

The basis for this rating is my fear that the influx of new people will occur faster than the city/county will respond with infrastructure improvements.

5/29/2015 1:43 PM

44

Hopefully they won't raise taxes to high

5/29/2015 8:57 AM

45

Hopefully Improve

5/29/2015 8:28 AM

46

it all depends on the development of the county and how the cities grow.

5/29/2015 8:28 AM

47

concerned about "sprawl" type growth of town around the edges

5/28/2015 8:17 PM

48

Adding more public natural areas/parks and outdoor recreation opportunities, improving trails

5/28/2015 5:08 PM

49

hopefully, water quality and stream sedimentation continues to be an issue and detracts from the environmental quality. that and the lack of a BIKE PATH system!!

5/28/2015 4:27 PM

50

There seems to be a desire to adopt new energy technologies and conservation programs, but we need more communal organizing.

5/28/2015 3:29 PM

51

In ames, smaller towns may struggle

5/28/2015 3:05 PM

52

Research Park Expansion is huge!

5/28/2015 11:12 AM

53

Global warming, soil loss, flooding, and accompanying political upheaval will affect this plan unless measures are taken to rein in industrial agriculture.

5/28/2015 11:05 AM

54

More parks and trails are being added, but connectivity needs work

5/28/2015 9:40 AM

55

I have seen more vandalism and people taking less care of their homes and businesses around the area.

5/28/2015 9:04 AM

56

If we don't conserve our natural resources, the quality of life will deteriorate.

5/27/2015 9:34 PM

57

If our environment degrades, the quality of life here will also degreade.

5/27/2015 8:38 PM

58

But only IF we continue to invest in the amenities that make for a continuing high quality of life.

5/27/2015 4:01 PM

Q4 Please indicate changes you think would improve the quality of life in Story County (please check up to four). 8 / 95

| B-9


B.1

Citizen Survey Results Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Answered: 674

Skipped: 10

Improve K-12 education

Increase employment... Improve post-seconda...

Expand retail shopping... Improve recreational...

Improve public services Increase diversity of...

Improve quality of... Increase affordabilit...

Decrease crime rate Decrease taxes and fees

Improve bike and pedestri... Improve road infrastructure

Improve public transit Improve utility serv...

Improve water quality 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

Answer Choices

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

Responses

Improve K-12 education

23.29%

157

Increase employment opportunities

37.24%

251

5.79% Improve post-secondary education opportunities

9 / 95

B-10

100%

39


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Expand retail shopping options

42.28%

285

Improve recreational facilities

43.92%

296

Improve public services

13.50%

91

Increase diversity of housing types

16.32%

110

Improve quality of housing

9.05%

Increase affordability of housing

37.69%

Decrease crime rate

7.27%

Decrease taxes and fees

26.11%

176

Improve bike and pedestrian facilities

40.21%

271

Improve road infrastructure

28.78%

194

Improve public transit

16.77%

113

Improve utility service (including telecommunications)

19.58%

132

Improve water quality

21.96%

148

61 254 49

Total Respondents: 674

#

Comments

Date

1

A better indoor food court and a larger mall for rotten winter days and horrible humid days in summer

7/26/2015 3:18 PM

2

In order to protect natural resources and prepare for increased population pressures, story county needs to improve the transportation options checked above.

7/16/2015 12:59 PM

3

HIRTA is a joke now, need some real public transit in the county, like CyRide

7/11/2015 7:48 PM

4

x

7/10/2015 1:07 PM

5

Make the agriculture here more sustainable and put more land not suitable for rowcrops into permanent conservation uses

7/9/2015 10:49 PM

6

More open space to hike, run, bike would be lovely

7/8/2015 4:15 PM

7

I would like the county to focus on preserving natural spaces and outdoor recreation. I think the County Conservation Board already does a great job, but I'd like to see even more funding for these issues.

7/8/2015 8:01 AM

8

Encourage or require geothermal energy on newly-constructed homes and business-buildings to keep the costs of energy generation lower for all.

7/7/2015 10:55 PM

9

Quit trying to turn Ames into an Ankeny. If the "city leaders" like Ankeny and their expanding population then please_relocate to Ankeny. Many of us like Ames as it was years ago, not like what you are trying to do to it today.

7/3/2015 11:15 PM

10

don't allow any more CAFOs, limit building in rural areas

6/26/2015 6:20 PM

11

I think they need more trails in Ames, where i live. The current bike paths are too short and unconnected to be enjoyable in Ames. I would enjoy a long connected trail across the town, and especially more dirt trails mountain biking or trail running.

6/25/2015 12:09 PM

12

Cycling here is near horrible. Bike lanes in a place like this are necessary. I come from the twin cities where there is far more traffic but people are at least friendly towards bikers on the roads. Here, not so much. Cyclists here need bike lanes to feel safe. Also, I would love to see more single track (dirt) trails for runners and mountain bikers. I am an ultra runner and training on 2-mile sections of trail can become...boring (though the trails here- greenbelt, McFarlandare amazing beautiful!).

6/25/2015 9:41 AM

13

The one area I dislike about living in this city is the traffic congestion. Trains running through downtown area, traffic lights, lack of driving rules enforcement.

6/24/2015 5:46 PM

14

Higher paying jobs

6/24/2015 8:25 AM

10 / 95

| B-11


B.1

Citizen Survey Results Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

15

Improve development of all children in their first 2,000 days; Ensure no child drops through the cracks. Develop

6/22/2015 7:14 PM

relationships with families with babies, toddlers and preschoolers 0-5; Prevention: Help parents be their children's first teachers. Interventions: provide community-based support for struggling readers (Reading Buddies). 16

Need another dog park. The present location is too far for us.

6/22/2015 4:31 PM

17

4 - protect natural resources

6/22/2015 7:45 AM

18

Provide more free or low cost activities for seniors. Swimming or excersise resources.

6/18/2015 7:34 PM

19

Provide more free or low cost activities for seniors. Things to stay in shape.

6/18/2015 7:22 PM

20

Encourage housing development (single family) in areas OTHER than Ames

6/18/2015 2:14 PM

21

Light Rail. Rural Broadband.

6/17/2015 12:53 PM

22

Balance development between the smaller towns and Ames.

6/17/2015 9:26 AM

23

Worthwhile volunteer opportunities for retirees

6/16/2015 6:33 PM

24

Fees are just another name for taxation in some cases. People in Iowa (probably across the nation) are being strangled by fees.

6/16/2015 1:24 PM

25

Indoor recreational facilities for children are desperately needed more than just for a couple hours in the mornings. Affordable housing and a greatly expanded amount of Section 8 housing is a huge need.

6/16/2015 11:01 AM

26

I think we have an amazing county!

6/15/2015 4:43 PM

27

schools are always a draw maintain CyRide, add regular transit to Des Moines

6/15/2015 11:43 AM

28

local moratorium on CAFOs and increase natural areas

6/15/2015 10:23 AM

29

High property taxes aren't used for overall good of residents paying them.

6/13/2015 6:35 PM

30

What is your definition of affordable housing. Do you want all of Story county to look like Hubbard? Zearing, Nevada?

6/13/2015 11:50 AM

31

Improve infrastructure

6/12/2015 8:43 PM

32

Increasing opportunities for responsible outdoor recreation close to home would be personal and economic benefit to Story. Definitely do not mean ATV use, or other loud and severely degrading uses of resources.

6/12/2015 11:34 AM

33

More Senior housing/condos/asst. living.

6/11/2015 8:06 PM

34

Faster internet outside of town; pave South B Ave in Nevada.

6/9/2015 10:01 PM

35

I'd love to see green/ natural space listed here. More green space! Prairie and savannah and forest. Especially after the loss of all the ash trees I really like to see more trees...

6/9/2015 8:30 AM

36

Need more townhomes/condos for those downsizing like Ankeny has.

6/9/2015 6:24 AM

37

Homes in Story County are very high priced. There isn't a lot in the middle price range ($130-$150k). The same amount of money buys a lot more house in some surrounding counties.

6/8/2015 3:48 PM

38

Decrease class sizes of K-12 public schools.

6/6/2015 7:28 PM

39

bike options between Gilbert and Ames is critical

6/6/2015 5:38 PM

40

We have so few public lands in Iowa and that is not likely to change. I've never lived anywhere else where alerts are listed to wash your dog after it has been in the water.

6/6/2015 2:03 AM

41

Transit and water quality I threw in - the other two are the only two things that a long term plan by a government agency should have.

6/5/2015 8:17 PM

42

Improve community based mental health services

6/5/2015 3:12 PM

43

Shopping downtown Ames is awesome. Finding a parking spot during events or busy season is often difficult.

6/5/2015 1:13 PM

11 / 95

B-12


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey 44

As Ames/Story County contines to grow, it is hard not to feel the impact of ISU. That isn't a bad thing necessarily.

6/5/2015 11:25 AM

However, as a resident, it's extremely frustrating that there seems to be a lack of agressive expansion/upgrades when compared to other cities with regard to infrastructure and telecommunications. I find it South Duff more than highly frustrating to drive down 9 of the 12 months of the year when school is in session but that is where most of the big box retailers are located. It would be fantastic if not everything could be crammed on South Duff. As for telecommunications...fiber optics would be nice. My parents that live on a gravel road in the middle of nowhere in Marshall County, Iowa have it thanks to their business neighbor. The great thing for them is that it costs a fraction of the price of what Mediacom would ever charge an Ames customer and I know 50% of what I currently pay for DirecTV. So, that does frustrate me that the town where the first computer was invented and does all of these amazing things can't work together to bring fiber optics to Ames. 45

public high speed/capacity internet

6/4/2015 4:58 PM

46

Other: Improve native ecosystems and serve the other-than-human world better (i.e., replace that biotic desert we call a lawn with more tallgrass prairie!)

6/4/2015 11:39 AM

47

by improve water quality, I mean rivers, streams and lakes

6/4/2015 9:44 AM

48

Improvement in all four of those that I checked will aid in assisting life to get better in Story County. I am very concerned about the quality of water in our rivers and streams for health and also recreational purposes.

6/3/2015 9:14 PM

49

Reduce urban sprawl, particularly the giant beige neighborhoods, and the cheap apartments that match them in the Ames area.

6/3/2015 11:08 AM

50

IMPROVED QUALITY OF HOUSING IN MY ANSWER MEANS RESIDENTS HAVE ALLOWED THEIR HOMES TO DEGRADE AND TO COLLECT JUNK ON THEIR PROPERTY AND THE CITY DOES NOTHING TO GET THE RESIDENTS AND ALSO STORE/SHOP OWNERS TO MAINTAIN THEM. JUST LOOK AT 224 WASHINGTON AVENUE IN AMES AS AN ONGOING EXAMPLE OF THE DEGRADATION OF THE QUALITY OF LIFE IN STORY COUNTY.

6/2/2015 7:53 PM

51

By "recreational facilities," I am referring to parks, natural areas, county parks, trails, bike lanes (it's truly shocking how backwards this area is in regards to bicycle infrastructure, planning and general awareness. This is NOT a particularly safe place to be out with bikes! For guidance, look to how our neighbors in Wisconsin are doing things... ). Water quality is a HUGE issue. We were shocked at how, in the post-2010 floods, city planners in Ames started building rampantly in the flood zone with short-term vision. Runoff from some farms in the county -- both soil erosion and nitrates -- flows into the creeks and into Skunk River; and too many people use our waterways to dump their trash and litter. The waterways have been damaged and altered over the years so that some massive streambank erosion is happening, and development encroaching near waterways also puts these waters at risk. Please factor in water quality as you plan for the county's future! I am concerned about the affordability of housing (and the quality of the housing available). As an Ames resident, my husband and I can't really afford a decent house -- even with both of us having good jobs. Our rent goes up every year, seemingly needlessly, and we wonder when people will simply be priced out of decent apartments and homes. When we've looked at housing opportunities in the county more generally, we've been chagrined at what's been available in our price range -- usually, housing that needs work.

6/2/2015 11:21 AM

52

I moved here from the eastern side of the U.S. and find the people friendly and Ames a nice community. However, I miss more diverse landscaping and more outdoor recreation opportunities. Story county has some nice, small wooded

6/1/2015 3:13 PM

places to escape, but I prefer more trees. Also, we've been less impressed with the school system, now that our kids are in elementary school. 53

It would be nice to see more housing in the mid-range for homeowners. The lower-priced houses seem to get snapped up for the rental market, which does not always make for the best neighborhood relations. And then homeowners are stuck in the low price market, or having to make a significant jump up to get quality housing.

6/1/2015 1:09 PM

54

Please keep things affordable!

6/1/2015 11:54 AM

55

Please improve the bike system and connect Ames to the central Iowa trails! A "bike lane" on the side of a busy road does not equal a bike trail! It's dangerous and there are TONS of bike riders in Ames!!! And, please widen Duff or encourage development elsewhere in Ames. Everything is on Duff and the traffic is terrible.

6/1/2015 10:27 AM

56

This sounds mostly urban. We live in the country.

5/31/2015 3:10 PM

57

I strongly hope to see an end to fluoridated water.

5/31/2015 9:28 AM

58

Schools: truly improve them to produce better people. I am not sure how to do this but there are many school changes that are not improvements. Make the traffic flow better. It seems that helping businesses is higher priority than reducing traffic congestion. Provide free public transit and get the funding from the reduced road and street costs. Also find ways to reduce the desire and need to travel. The Ames water is too hard. Soften it more and reduce plumbing maintenance for all. Soft water may increase the health Ames water drinkers.

5/31/2015 5:43 AM

59

Get more deputies out doing proactive patrolling instead of building a fiefdom in Nevada.

5/30/2015 2:39 PM

12 / 95

| B-13


B.1

Citizen SurveyStoryResults County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

60

Bike trails

5/30/2015 2:38 PM

61

There needs to be some type of public transit system available from the smaller towns to Ames. It's also very difficult to find repair services that are available in the area.

5/30/2015 8:38 AM

62

Why wouldn't we say 'increase PK-12 and post secondary options' to cover preschool options for families and post secondary training to offer more options for citizens and increase the skills of the Story County workforce?

5/30/2015 6:08 AM

63

Remove nearby hog confinement facilities.

5/30/2015 12:19 AM

64

Increase opportunities for very young families to connect and grow

5/29/2015 9:44 PM

65

Higher quality, higher paying positions needed

5/29/2015 8:58 PM

66

Handicap accessible rental housing, more opportunities for kids after school and after high school

5/29/2015 7:26 PM

67

Development of community spaces to foster creativity, connection, and the sharing of ideas.

5/29/2015 5:46 PM

68

Again, tough to choose just four.

5/29/2015 2:35 PM

69

Nevada City needs more moderate to higher housing opportunities. The City of Nevada needs to develop housing subdivisions for single family building opportunities.

5/29/2015 2:34 PM

70

it would be nice to see a city bus connecting Nevada to Ames daily or several times a week

5/29/2015 2:30 PM

71

Heart of Iowa Trail needs to be paved to be up to date with other area trails. New Dakins Lake a great addition, but now Hickory Grove Park needs water quality and infrastructure upgrades.

5/29/2015 2:29 PM

72

Reduce the number of apartments being built and increase the number of single family homes

5/29/2015 2:19 PM

73

As too often happens, water quality is at the bottom of this list. But it's at the top of my list. And more protected public conservation land would also help. I did not check "Improve recreational facilities" because I specifically want more protected conservation land. Iowa has lost more of its original landscape than any other state, and we aren't doing enough to protect and restore what's left. But what we really need in Story County is a dedicated fund for natural resources and outdoor recreation. Johnson County has one, Polk County has one, and it's embarrassing that we aren't even talking about getting one.

5/29/2015 2:08 PM

74

Need more indoor things for children to have access too. Story county is great during the few warm summer months but have nothing much to chose from during cold winter months.

5/29/2015 1:12 PM

75

Ames has very little for people who are middle to low income forcing many to live in smaller towns yet work in Ames. This causes additional financial stress on these families due to the cost of transportation.

5/29/2015 12:31 PM

76

increase availability of various affordable housing types for seniors. emphasize affordable, not subsidized

5/29/2015 11:34 AM

77

decrease number of apartment complexes going up in Ames - it is unsightly and ruining sense of neighborhoods in Ames

5/29/2015 11:18 AM

78

increase public land

5/29/2015 10:26 AM

79

More business in surrounding Ames communities (Gilbert)

5/28/2015 11:03 PM

80

Have internships for teens 14 and up

5/28/2015 10:32 PM

81

water quality: commit to green spaces and managing water where it falls; Other: commit to significant carbon and

5/28/2015 8:17 PM

energy footprint reduction goals. 82

Need more malls

5/28/2015 6:59 PM

83

improve retail, more restaurants, etc.

5/28/2015 5:34 PM

84

All of these are worthy topics that are important for Story County quality of life and should be considered. Bike paths that connect major towns such as Colo, Nevada and Ames on east-west axis and Story City, Gilbert, Ames and Huxley on a north-south axis - off road bike paths would be a huge improvement for real bike commuting. Surface water ie. stream water quality seriously detracts from the environmental quality of Story County.

5/28/2015 4:27 PM

85

more diversity training for public employees

5/28/2015 3:53 PM

86

We should invest in more local manufacturing and retail, and adopt progressive resource management techniques with a focus on the areas FUTURE quality of life. We have the knowledge and desire, but this is not well reflected in our practices. We should develop the Duff Ave district to be more conducive to bike and foot traffic. Currently, it is very difficult to navigate that part of town without a car, and even with a car, there is too much going on there. Rent rates need to be controlled; it is ridiculous that rent increases by 10% a year. The garbage problem also needs to be addressed; the migrant nature of half of our population lends itself to this ignorant behavior. We should have a plan to promote environmental ethicacy.

5/28/2015 3:29 PM

13 / 95

B-14


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey 87

Increase training of law enforcement on methodology as well as knowledge of the laws and regulations in the area, notably at state, county, and community levels.

5/28/2015 3:25 PM

88

ADU are the big thing on the west coast. The benefit to ADU'S is HUGE as a 2nd home on the same will "INCREASE" the Property Value which in turn SHOULD.... "DECREASE" overall taxes and fees to ALL citizens living there. Common Sense IMO! Unfortunately, Iowa never takes the lead on these type of ideas so nothing of significance will change (probably). The rest of that "garbage" (eg. shopping, bikes, shopping, recreation, transit, etc.), we'd HAVE MORE MONEY FOR THAT.....if we had more revenue from Property Tax Valuations. Proper order is extremely important too!!

5/28/2015 1:37 PM

89

Rent in Ames is ridiculous right now. I would love to see this be more affordable, especially for non-students.

5/28/2015 1:30 PM

90

Property taxes are too high. My property taxes have increased 30% in the last three years.

5/28/2015 12:12 PM

91

Rural Broadband is a hot topic right now.

5/28/2015 11:12 AM

92

Few of these items pertain to seniors and retirees. This county has a high number of retirees and the county should be addressing their needs and make this an attractive area for retirement. Most important, no mention is made of the our most important crisis: global warming. What does the county plan to do about reducing carbon dioxide emissions? What does the county plan to do about soil conservation and tillage? What does the county plan to do to encourage renewable energy?

5/28/2015 11:05 AM

93

Too bad I can only check four, I'd like to check them all.

5/28/2015 9:56 AM

94

River quality needs to be improved, buffer strips along rivers and lakes, and more connectivity between existing bike trails, more on-road bicycle facilities

5/28/2015 9:40 AM

95

protect rural areas from development, keep CAFOs out

5/28/2015 9:00 AM

96

by water quality, I mean rivers, ponds, lakes, streams.....

5/27/2015 8:38 PM

97

Improve mental health services access and budgets

5/27/2015 5:35 PM

98

Continue to expand park and trail system. Invest in natural resources like parks and wild, natural areas.

5/27/2015 4:01 PM

Q5 Rate the following in Story County: Answered: 635

Skipped: 49

State Highways

Paved County Roads Gravel/Unpaved County Roads

Bike Trails

Public Transportati...

Bridges

Parks and Recreational...

0%

10%

Excellent

20%

Good

30%

40%

Fair

50%

Poor

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Not Sure

14 / 95

| B-15


B.1

Citizen SurveyStoryResults County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Excellent

State Highways

Paved County Roads

Gravel/Unpaved County Roads

Bike Trails

Public Transportation Services

Bridges

Parks and Recreational Facilities

Good

Fair

Poor

Not Sure

Total

14.87%

71.68%

11.71%

1.27%

0.47%

94

453

74

8

3

632

6.80% 43

61.87% 391

26.42% 167

2.69% 17

2.22% 14

632

3.02% 19

35.56% 224

37.62% 237

12.38% 78

11.43% 72

630

6.87% 43

40.10% 251

28.75% 180

11.18% 70

13.10% 82

626

10.99% 69

36.46% 229

24.68% 155

12.90% 81

14.97% 94

628

3.19% 20

36.36% 228

36.68% 230

10.53% 66

13.24% 83

627

11.40% 71

63.40% 395

21.51% 134

2.41% 15

1.28% 8

623

#

Other (please specify)

Date

1

No long paved trails except for high tressel trail by s dakota which is great

7/26/2015 3:20 PM

2

need to expand bike trails/lanes, and can always use more green spaces

7/16/2015 1:01 PM

3

Need more paved county roads

7/12/2015 11:20 AM

4

Not enough non-crop green space

7/9/2015 10:52 PM

5

No body uses the bike trails

7/9/2015 6:30 PM

6

I would like (and would use) more bike trails and routes

6/30/2015 12:53 PM

7

THERE IS NOTHING HERE & OUR ROADS, BRIDGES, ETC. ARE HORRIBLE!

6/30/2015 12:22 AM

8

Please extend bike trails out to Cameron school road and Y ave

6/27/2015 9:30 AM

9

County Road Signs (Blue Shields) needed in Southwestern Story County.

6/17/2015 11:25 AM

10

More public transportation is needed everywhere so people will stop driving their personal vehicales. The gravel roads I use are fine. Not too many bridges where I travel.

6/16/2015 1:27 PM

11

Bike trails - too often, they are non-existent in many places in town without utilizing sidewalks. Parks really could use some more interesting options for kids that allow them to use their imagination, like the old structure at Roosevelt School once did.

6/16/2015 11:05 AM

12

Need Trails improved/available in Huxley

6/15/2015 12:26 PM

13

watershed/soil conservation-poor

6/15/2015 10:27 AM

14

Trails and pub transportation refer to Ames

6/12/2015 11:40 AM

15

Need bus services in Nevada & eastern Story Co. Black top all gravel roads, like Polk Co.

6/11/2015 8:13 PM

16

high school pool needs replacing

6/10/2015 12:18 AM

17

Need more park shelters

6/9/2015 6:26 AM

18

need to pave Hyde/Gretten between Ames/Gilbert - unsafe for students!

6/6/2015 5:41 PM

19

Former rail line bike trails are great but all others are horrid. Where else are bicycles put on sidewalks with pedestrians? No where else.

6/6/2015 2:07 AM

20

Need to expand biking paths north ames

6/5/2015 1:16 PM

21

Ames is great for bike trails, expand to surrounding communities

6/3/2015 10:12 PM

22

Would like to see improved camping...more privacy between campsites.

6/2/2015 3:07 PM

15 / 95

B-16


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey 23

I was sad to see the beautiful steel-arch span bridge near Petersen Park torn down for a cheap concrete pad crossing.

6/2/2015 11:39 AM

I realize that bridge needed to be repaired or upgraded, but couldn't it have been done with sensitivity for the aesthetics of the bridge and its history? As to park facilities ... Story County does have a few good parks, but I don't feel like there's been much investment (if any) in keeping them well maintained, and in expanding them. For instance, one must zigzag across roads to follow the Greenbelt Trail if one starts at McFarland. Why can't the county work to make the trail contiguous? I am also very concerned that hunting is permitted in some of these areas AT THE SAME TIME that pedestrians might be walking on the trails. It seems extremely dangerous to me! This, along with the fact that some of our parks (e.g. Robison Wildlife Acres, East Riverside) are situated right next to shooting ranges. Not only do I feel concerned for the safety of pedestrians in the parks, but the serenity of being in the parks is entirely destroyed if someone happens to be using the shooting range at the same time. As someone not native to Iowa, my impression is that the county doesn't prioritize the parks. In many of the parks, it seems like trees have taken major hits over the past few years from storms and other stressors, and the parks seems to be thinning out ... Is there a replanting initiative? What about plans to purchase more land to expand the parks? For my husband and me, having access to wild spaces is a huge criterion for our quality of life. I realize this is challenging in Iowa, since so much land was erstwhile converted to other uses. But this makes it even more imperative to prioritize carefully stewarding and expanding these areas. 24

more kids playgrounds at state and county parks

6/1/2015 10:26 PM

25

There needs to be more indoor rec opportunities for kids in the winter: indoor waterpark, indoor playground, etc.

6/1/2015 3:17 PM

26

Would LOVE to see a mult-use/bicycle trail connecting Ada Hayden to McFarland Park (perhaps via Riverside and Dayton)

6/1/2015 11:46 AM

27

Please see previous comment about BIKE TRAILS!

6/1/2015 10:29 AM

28

Too much raodside mowing, wasting resources and destroying habitat.

5/31/2015 3:14 PM

29

The bike trails we have are good. Need bike trails outside Ames, especially in northern story county. Heart of Iow trail needs paving

5/29/2015 9:51 PM

30

The bike trails we have are great but they are VERY limited (north of Ames) forcing people to ride on the road where it much more dangerous

5/29/2015 6:14 PM

31

need more connected bike trails

5/29/2015 4:14 PM

32

Cyride has been fantastic, but is challenged by loss of federal funding and rapid population growth. We also need to provide more transportation options to small communities.

5/29/2015 2:35 PM

33

The parks we have are good but there is not enough public conservation land here.

5/29/2015 2:09 PM

34

please put mileage markers and trail maps on running and biking trails

5/29/2015 11:20 AM

35

we have enough public transport frankly

5/29/2015 9:15 AM

36

keep people & housing close and easily accessible to services

5/28/2015 8:22 PM

37

We should have a labranth

5/28/2015 7:26 PM

38

Shopping poor

5/28/2015 7:00 PM

39

bike trails are better and more available than many areas but many lack some maintenance and there are many oportunities for more!

5/28/2015 3:08 PM

40

Indoor swimming pool for the public, indoor pickle ball courts for public.

5/28/2015 12:00 PM

41

More hiking/biking, primitive camping, river camping

5/28/2015 11:05 AM

42

Parks are showing their age, need both repair and new.

5/27/2015 9:39 PM

43

Parks--good to excellent

5/27/2015 4:01 PM

Q6 During the next ten years, which of the following transportation investments do you support in Story County? Answered: 638

Skipped: 46

16 / 95

| B-17


B.1

Citizen Survey Results Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Improve highways by...

Improve highways by... Improve bicycling...

Improve bicycling... Maintenance to existing...

Maintenance/rep lacement of... Closing County bridges on l... Investments in public... Improve airport...

Establish passenger ra... Improve rail infrastructu...

Improvements to controlle... 0%

10%

20%

Strongly Support

30%

Support

Improve highways by widening / adding lanes to existing facilities

Improve highways by adding new bypass routes

Improve bicycling opportunities by adding bike lanes to existing roads

Improve bicycling opportunities by developing off-street trails

Maintenance to existing roadways

Maintenance/replacement of existing bridges

40%

50%

Oppose

70%

Strongly Oppose

80%

90%

100%

Not Sure

Strongly Support

Support

Oppose

Strongly Oppose

Not Sure

Total

16.89% 103

40.49% 247

17.87% 109

6.23% 38

18.52% 113

610

11.51% 70

33.06% 201

24.84% 151

6.25% 38

24.34% 148

608

27.85% 171

37.30% 229

15.31% 94

8.31% 51

11.24% 69

614

44.03% 273

42.90% 266

3.71% 23

2.26% 14

7.10% 44

620

50.24% 314

47.52% 297

0.80% 5

0.32% 2

1.12% 7

625

42.58% 264

48.55% 301

2.26% 14

0.48% 3

6.13% 38

620

6.53% 40

17.78% 109

35.73% 219

13.38% 82

26.59% 163

613

Closing County bridges on low traveled roadways

B-18

60%

17 / 95


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Investments in public transportation services

23.08%

45.83%

11.46%

2.62%

17.02%

141

280

70

16

104

7.91%

28.01%

21.58%

7.91%

34.60%

48

170

131

48

210

23.29%

34.53%

13.52%

8.79%

19.87%

143

212

83

54

122

7.17%

27.00%

21.50%

6.67%

37.67%

43

162

129

40

226

600

37.08% 231

39.33% 245

8.19% 51

2.25% 14

13.16% 82

623

Improve airport facilities and usage

Establish passenger rail service

Improve rail infrastructure to increase local freight capacity

Improvements to controlled access/on-off ramps on I35 and HWY 30

#

Comments

Date

1

I want story county to focus more on public, mass, and bicycle transportation

7/16/2015 1:01 PM

2

Please add more bike lanes on county highways - especially along GW Carver!

7/13/2015 3:29 PM

3

more paved roads

7/12/2015 11:20 AM

4

not entirely sure what some of these ideas would mean

7/9/2015 10:52 PM

5

ANYTHING WOULD BE AN IMPROVEMENT

6/30/2015 12:22 AM

6

The bus service in Ames (CyRide) should be augmented with a rapid transit tramway; perhaps one line running EastWest between campus and downtown and another running from North Grand to South Duff, you could call it CyTrolley.

6/17/2015 2:46 PM

7

Redesign on I-35 Highway 30 Interchange is urgently needed.

6/17/2015 11:25 AM

8

Commuter rail (in contrast to passenger rail) to Ankeny and Des Moines would be worth serious consideration

6/15/2015 9:07 AM

9

We can't be everything to everyone. Identify largest base of taxpayers and work towards their needs.

6/13/2015 6:42 PM

10

let the bikers pay for it not me...

6/13/2015 11:53 AM

11

Bike trails should be paved and unpaved.

6/12/2015 11:40 AM

12

the I35/Highway 30 intercahnge is extremely dangerous.

6/10/2015 10:22 AM

13

More opportunities to pass between Ames and Story City on HWy 69. It's a busy road and at times hard to pass slow traffic

6/8/2015 3:50 PM

14

Public Transportation in rural areas is a problem

6/8/2015 3:01 PM

15

An underpass by Duff would make a world of difference; As well as a relief road for Duff. Getting to Lowes from North Ames is tougher than it should be.

6/8/2015 8:33 AM

16

Iowa has the worst on- and off-ramps in the U.S. Hire engineers from out of state.

6/6/2015 2:07 AM

17

It would also be wise to investigate alternative paving materials that are permeable

6/4/2015 11:42 AM

18

Northbound 35/30 intersection is dangerous!!

6/3/2015 10:12 PM

19

I hope the increased gas tax will bring money into Story County so that a number of bridges can be made safer.

6/3/2015 9:19 PM

20

In terms of railway infrastructure, I feel there are too many trains passing through Ames and the surrounding area as it is -- and the safety of these crossings is questionable in many areas. If investments were made to improve the SAFETY of rail crossings, and if increasing freight capacity would LOWER the number of trains crossing back and forth, then I would support efforts. However, I do not support increasing the number or frequency of trains passing

6/2/2015 11:39 AM

611

607

614

through the county, or adding new tracks (there are far too many already!!). I am also concerned that much of what's transported is coal (source of future air pollution in its destination), and other hazardous chemicals. I do strongly support safer access to U.S. 30 from I-35. I'm flabbergasted that a town the size of Ames has such a dangerous dual on- / off-ramp... As for bicycling opportunities: a resounding YES on this one. We need dedicated, safe bike lanes on roads, as well as a strong network of bicycle-only routes. For inspiration, look to what Columbia, MO has done ... it has a big land-grant school and has a fantastic off-road bike trail network. 21

I agree with closing bridges on low traveled roadways, other than it would affect emergency services.

6/2/2015 10:57 AM

22

13th & Grand Ave intersection

6/1/2015 9:07 PM

23

I would like to see more land/more management for wildlife conservation

6/1/2015 4:39 PM

18 / 95

| B-19


B.1 24

Citizen SurveyStoryResults County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Need to add secondary access to Hunziker Sports Complex to alleviate some of the congestion that occurs daily on S

6/1/2015 11:46 AM

Duff Ave and for improving safety of quick exit when needed (e.g severe weather) during events at HYSC. Can the bridge that was previously used on S 16th Street (which now sits in the field to N of new S 16th St Skunk River bridge) be used to create access to South Dayton Ave from HYSC? 25

Extend Grand Ave. to Airport road. Extend south third street to Dayton road. Extend 24th street to countyline road. Bike lanes are accidents waiting to happen. Public transportion is the key. Passenger rail is just something that I would

5/31/2015 5:53 AM

enjoy. It may not be all that viable. Use rail roads for freight. 26

Don't spend money on elective projects to keep taxes down

5/30/2015 4:57 PM

27

I think bike lanes on existing rural roads are dangerous. I want no money spent on passenger rail. It is a subsidy for rich white people.

5/30/2015 2:43 PM

28

Daily deal with access ramps at I35/Hwy 30 and have witnessed too many close-calls accidents.

5/29/2015 11:10 PM

29

Bike lanes should be added to existing roads, bike lanes off streets, or sidewalks, are very dangerous

5/29/2015 10:02 PM

30

Need for bike trails in north story county

5/29/2015 9:51 PM

31

Repair the circle of death 1-35 exit to 30 West

5/29/2015 9:01 PM

32

WOULD LIKE MORE OVERPASSES/UNDERPASSES FOR EAST WEST RAIL LINE IN AMES

5/29/2015 4:22 PM

33

protected bike lanes on existing roads would be great

5/29/2015 4:14 PM

34

The I35 & hwy 30 clover leaf needs to be redesigned.

5/29/2015 4:11 PM

35

South Duff Roadwork needed. Too congested.

5/29/2015 3:49 PM

36

Do not let the state block gravel and other interchanges on hwy 30 between Nevada and Ames

5/29/2015 2:34 PM

37

We need better maintenance of the pavement we have, not lots of new pavement, yet "Lots and lots of new pavement

5/29/2015 2:09 PM

in lots of new places!" seems to be the motto of the DOT. 38

We don't need 6 lanes to Ankeny, seems like a waster of resourses to accomidate ISU football/basketball games

5/29/2015 1:53 PM

39

Grand AVe in Ames extended to S. 16th street to decrease S. Duff congestion.

5/29/2015 12:33 PM

40

the city of Ames gets an F for long term traffic planning which is having a very negative impact on getting around Ames

5/29/2015 9:15 AM

and thus the County needs a by pass to the north much like HWY 30 and I-35 serve to the east and south 41

Strongly support CyRide, Ames to Des Moines airport transport, and bike trails. Not sure bike lanes on roads/streets are safe although I bike commute every day.

5/29/2015 8:55 AM

42

The on-off ramp at I35 and hwy 30 is seiously unsafe. It should be fixed by a competent engineer/planner. Better bike

5/28/2015 4:31 PM

paths could alleviate some hwy traffic and presents opportunities for citizens of all ages - if you'd like documentation check out the high trestle trail. 43

It is difficult to get out of Ames on a bike. People drive across town because it is easier. If bike travel were safer, with infrastucture design that promotes this form of travel, more people would choose a non-automobile form of transport. Eliminating county bridges will increase the length of natural corridors, which benefits the wildlife and environment in that area. The clover-leaf at Hwy 30 and 135 is terribly dangerous, especially in winter.

5/28/2015 3:35 PM

44

A "rail service".....WTH? Anything above and beyond the basics is un-necessary.

5/28/2015 1:41 PM

45

Prepare for huge changes in the use of renewable energy, local food production, and the loss of fossil fuels.

5/28/2015 11:07 AM

46

improve gravel roads!!

5/28/2015 10:21 AM

47

on-road bicycle facilities should be added to most road repair/reconstruction projects

5/28/2015 9:42 AM

48

Highway 69/South Duff is an absolute nightmare.

5/27/2015 7:34 PM

49

The I35 and 30 intersection is SCARY!

5/27/2015 5:37 PM

50

Adding bike lanes to roads is just too dangerous for bikers.

5/27/2015 4:01 PM

Q7 Please share your opinion on how important it is to protect each of the following natural resources in Story County. 19 / 95

B-20


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Answered: 608

Skipped: 76

Air quality

Prairies

Wetlands

Wildlife habitat Forests / woodlands

River shorelines

Groundwater

Cultural / historic sit...

Water Quality

0%

10%

20%

Very Important

30%

Somewhat Important

Very Important Air quality

40%

50%

60%

Not Important

Somewhat Important

70%

80%

90%

100%

Not Sure

Not Important

Not Sure

Total

84.11% 508

14.57% 88

0.83% 5

0.50% 3

604

57.96% 244

34.92% 147

5.46% 23

1.66% 7

421

Wetlands

60.70% 366

33.33% 201

4.31% 26

1.66% 10

603

Wildlife habitat

66.89% 404

29.30% 177

2.65% 16

1.16% 7

604

65.22% 392

30.62% 184

3.33% 20

0.83% 5

601

64.00% 384

31.83% 191

2.33% 14

1.83% 11

600

85.90% 518

12.60% 76

1.00% 6

0.50% 3

603

46.09% 277

44.76% 269

8.82% 53

0.33% 2

601

92.41% 560

6.60% 40

0.66% 4

0.33% 2

606

Prairies

Forests / woodlands

River shorelines

Groundwater

Cultural / historic sites & buildings

Water Quality

20 / 95

| B-21


B.1

Citizen SurveyStoryResults County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

#

Comments

Date

1

We must protect and IMPROVE the natural resources- it's no longer going to happen voluntarily

7/16/2015 1:08 PM

2

there is also need to protect pastures -- many have native plants

7/9/2015 10:57 PM

3

These are all criticial to preserving what is great about Story County. Without these, we would live in just another rural area. Please preserve and protect these resources as a high priority so that all other resources remain meaningful to those who live here.

6/26/2015 7:48 AM

4

These are all the best things!

6/25/2015 9:44 AM

5

Stewardship or natural and cultural resources should be a top priority

6/23/2015 8:38 AM

6

I am a fisherman, canoer, and hiker so this is very important to me.

6/17/2015 2:49 PM

7

It's hard for me to see how anyone would not find these to be vital.

6/16/2015 11:12 AM

8

I think all of the above are important, but if priorities have to be chosen...

6/8/2015 3:03 PM

9

Natural prairie? Revegged prairie perhaps but there is not any natural pairie left in Iowa. Prairie management in UA seems poor also, no fire and little or no grazing. Still, it is worthwhile to keep trying to develop more revegged prairie

6/6/2015 2:14 AM

10

important how? for improvement?

6/5/2015 8:23 PM

11

and I usually vote republican! :)

6/5/2015 1:18 PM

12

None of our development should come at the cost of our natural resources.

6/5/2015 12:07 PM

13

what forests and woodlands?

6/4/2015 9:52 AM

14

I believe an increase in wetlands will help very much in improving the water quality in our rivers and streams and slow the run-off of nitrates.

6/3/2015 9:32 PM

15

families will want to live here if we protect what we have.

6/2/2015 3:10 PM

16

Throughout Iowa, these are critical issues. I strongly support efforts to improve natural resources across the board.

6/2/2015 11:45 AM

Historic and cultural sites are important, but Iowa's (and the county's) natural heritage is in desperate need of a strong long-range stewardship and improvement plan. 17

fix the dregde ditches, even if the land owners throw a fit. They have not been maintaned as neccessary, but it needs to be done!

6/2/2015 11:01 AM

18

These are the quality of life amenities that make people want to live here. If we sacrifice them, no amount of infrastructral improvement will offset their loss/degradation.

6/1/2015 1:13 PM

19

End water fluoridation.

5/31/2015 9:32 AM

20

air quality is not athreat in Ames. Praires, wetlands, wildlife habitat, forest, river shorelines are nice but providing for people should have priority. Don't prevent improvements in the name of historic preservation. Soften the water more

5/31/2015 6:03 AM

21

I think the phrasing of this question is poor. Who could be against good water quality? How it is carried out is what should be asked.

5/30/2015 2:45 PM

22

D

5/29/2015 6:35 PM

23

Ecological balance and enhancing tree growth and a balanced ecosystem will assist with air quality and water quality.

5/29/2015 5:53 PM

24

Iowa is lacking in natural areas. We need to protect and enhance what we have.

5/29/2015 4:17 PM

25

I am not a classic environmentalist. I just believe that these resources are irreplaceable, and should have priority over expanding our housing demands. Also, agricultural and industrial practices should protect these resources.

5/29/2015 2:35 PM

26

Natural resources should be the priority!!!

5/29/2015 2:32 PM

27

Where are prairies and grasslands????!!! Prairies used to cover most of Story County, our few remaining prairies contain species on Iowa's state endangered/threatened/special concern list, original prairies and restored prairies are essential for many kinds of wildlife, conservationists put very special value on original prairies, prairies, original and restored, are now recognized as being uniquely important to soil conservation and water quality, prairie plantings are

5/29/2015 2:20 PM

happening in many Story County rural and urban areas (CRP, rain gardens, roadsides, etc. etc.), but they aren't on this list????? 28

Water quality, soil health, and natural systems and habitats must be protected.

5/29/2015 10:52 AM

29

people forget how much better the air, water, and other environmental qualities are compared to say 40 or even 20 years ago.

5/29/2015 9:18 AM

21 / 95

B-22


StoryC2C County Story County PlanComprehensive Citizen Survey Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone 30

I sometime think historical building preservation goes overboard. The Ames library, which I love, was really

5/29/2015 9:03 AM

comprimised in my opinion by trying to preserve the old part. 31

Water quality and wetlands probably most important

5/28/2015 4:34 PM

32

We should promote wetland development, instead of increased tile drainage. New markets for native plants can

5/28/2015 3:41 PM

promote such spaces. 33

Government is over regulating everything already.

5/28/2015 1:46 PM

34

All are very important and over lap each other.

5/28/2015 12:02 PM

35

our environment is priority, can't do much with out air and water

5/27/2015 9:04 PM

Q8 In your opinion, current environmental policies and regulations in Story County adequately protect the following environmental areas from damage or disruption: Answered: 598

Skipped: 86

Forests & woodlands

Wetlands

Prairies

Groundwater

Surface water (rivers, lak...

Highly erodible soils

Floodplains

0%

10%

20%

Strongly Agree

30%

Agree

Strongly Agree Forests & woodlands

40%

50%

Disagree

Agree

60%

70%

Strongly Disagree

Disagree

80%

90%

100%

Not Sure

Strongly Disagree

Not Sure

Total

7.23% 43

34.79% 207

18.15% 108

4.87% 29

34.96% 208

595

Wetlands

8.21% 49

33.17% 198

20.27% 121

7.04% 42

31.32% 187

597

Prairies

9.13% 38

39.42% 164

15.63% 65

4.33% 18

31.49% 131

416

7.61% 45

27.41% 162

24.87% 147

9.48% 56

30.63% 181

591

Groundwater

22 / 95

| B-23


B.1

Citizen Survey Results Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

Surface water (rivers, lakes, stream)

Highly erodible soils

Floodplains

7.38%

26.17%

24.33%

13.26%

28.86%

44

156

145

79

172

6.37%

24.62%

25.13%

10.89%

33.00%

38

147

150

65

197

7.08%

22.60%

24.62%

17.88%

27.82%

42

134

146

106

165

#

Comments

Date

1

Not sure

7/28/2015 2:20 PM

2

Ames continues to fill in their Skunk R. floodplain

7/27/2015 3:55 PM

3

Limiting sprawl is vital. If like Ankeny, Ames could just keep expanding. Setting tight limits improves property values.

7/26/2015 3:23 PM

4

There are problems with farmers not using best practices to avoid soil erosion and the pollution of groundwater.

7/19/2015 11:13 PM

5

It can no longer be "voluntary" for farmers and businesses to make the improvements necessary to protect our water and soil. My children and I have a right to live in an area without the fear of chemical exposure in our air and/or water.

7/16/2015 1:08 PM

I am so frustrated with the elected officials' lack of backbone to implement policies that protect the general public- not just persons who are making money at the cost of the environment! 6

I don't know enough to have an opinion

7/13/2015 3:30 PM

7

Most of the limited protection that exists does not come from the county

7/9/2015 10:57 PM

8

not sure about this

6/24/2015 8:28 AM

There's been far to much damage and disruption already, and the laws should be proactively improving environmental

6/17/2015 2:49 PM

9

quality rather than reactively defending the current (kinda disgusting) situation. 10

The level of perceived environmental damage can vary based on location.

6/17/2015 11:28 AM

11

The Ames City Council needs to stop approving building along south Duff because the river will flood and that water will go somewhere.

6/16/2015 1:29 PM

12

strengthen limitations on flood plain development

6/15/2015 11:51 AM

13

Regs weaker than must be. Enforcement weaker than needs, Agricultural practices and Agribusiness and Farm Bureau run this place. They advertise that they are good stewards but all you have to do is look outside to see their

6/15/2015 10:41 AM

poor record for the environment 14

no more government is need...

6/13/2015 11:56 AM

15

Clarify protect floodplains from development?

6/10/2015 11:17 AM

16

we can do so much more!

6/9/2015 8:33 AM

17

So. Duff will be a mess in the next flood.

6/9/2015 6:28 AM

18

Incredibly productive farmland, biggest best soils in tainted area on the planet, and we continue to run it downhill

6/6/2015 2:14 AM

19

maybe they "aggressively over protect?"

6/5/2015 8:23 PM

20

Too much development on flood plains

6/5/2015 6:24 AM

21

In fairness, the sorts of policies I'd consider adequate are very unlikely to pass or be implemented, as many would consider them draconian or too expensive (i.e., *requiring* installation of prairie strips along rural streams to reduce erosion/runoff)

6/4/2015 11:47 AM

22

All of these areas will require constant vigilance in order to just barely maintain the quality of each so steps must be implemented to really work for improvement in all.

6/3/2015 9:32 PM

23

Too much tiling in agricultural fields. Need more wetlands.

6/2/2015 3:10 PM

24

Education in this area may be needed (is for me)

6/2/2015 12:40 PM

25

I am unfamiliar with these policies.

6/1/2015 10:31 AM

26

As long as there is factory farming our air quality and groundwater will be threatened!

5/31/2015 3:20 PM

27

Our current regulations are fine.

5/30/2015 2:45 PM

28

Not sure of current policies

5/30/2015 6:44 AM

23 / 95

B-24

596

597

593


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey 29

unaware of any regulations

5/29/2015 11:09 PM

30

Stop allowing building on flood plains

5/29/2015 9:03 PM

31

Not familiar with policy

5/29/2015 6:35 PM

32

Farm runoff is not policed enough

5/29/2015 4:56 PM

33

Place a moratorium on building on South Duff!!

5/29/2015 3:52 PM

34

I do not know the current policies and regulations for these.

5/29/2015 2:32 PM

35

Ames demonstrates very negative floodplain development

5/29/2015 2:29 PM

36

Where are prairies???!! See my rant under Question Seven!

5/29/2015 2:20 PM

37

INRS is inadequate and additional measures must be taken to improve soil health and water quality, It's time to invest

5/29/2015 10:52 AM

in our natural resource infrastructure. 38

I would assume that in a lot of cases, agriculture and old school farming methods come before environmental issues.

5/29/2015 9:26 AM

39

We are doing enough and often ignore common sense. The construction of businesses like Walmart in the floodplain in Ames is an example. It floods right before they build there and then the building gets some water damage from

5/29/2015 9:03 AM

flooding soon after they open. Why was that ever approved? The new car dealership is another example. Too close to the river. Ag land also not adequately protected. Too much tillage, too much drainage, and no cover crops. 40

All we do is fill in the floodplains, there is no protection at all

5/29/2015 7:03 AM

41

Farmers seem to not have any economic reason for keeping green material on their land, or incentive to discharge clean water from their tiled fields. I strongly disagree with the Ames method of building up the land in low-lying areas for retail and economic development; just don't build in these areas, keep then natural.

5/28/2015 3:41 PM

42

Building higher doesn't really solve the problem of building in a flood plain to begin with

5/28/2015 3:35 PM

43

we're just fine as is as the STATE has more than enough regulations that the Counties do NOT need to "trump" the State.

5/28/2015 1:46 PM

44

Do not know what they are but too much herbicide use in residential areas

5/28/2015 12:02 PM

45

Stop building major commercial projects in the floodplain, buffer strips needed along rivers

5/28/2015 9:44 AM

46

The County does a good job with floodplain. Ames does not.

5/28/2015 9:10 AM

47

Ames seems to pay no attention to their floodplain.

5/28/2015 8:48 AM

48

don't know what the regs are

5/27/2015 8:00 PM

49

follow the money (developers)

5/27/2015 5:39 PM

50

Ames keeps building even more in the floodplain and I can't understand why they don't learn.

5/27/2015 4:01 PM

Q9 Initiatives to protect and improve the natural environment sometimes include increased monitoring and regulation efforts. Would you support or oppose the following efforts? Answered: 606

Skipped: 78

24 / 95

| B-25


B.1

Citizen Survey Results Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Increased regulations ...

Increased regulations...

Closer monitoring o...

More regulations ...

Better enforcement ...

Development of greenbelts t... 0%

10%

Support

20%

30%

Oppose

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Not Sure

Support

Oppose

Not Sure

Total

70.60% 425

14.78% 89

14.62% 88

602

80.97% 485

9.35% 56

9.68% 58

599

Closer monitoring of private septic systems

59.57% 358

14.48% 87

25.96% 156

601

More regulations to protect agricultural lands

52.69% 313

18.69% 111

28.62% 170

594

75.29% 451

5.34% 32

19.37% 116

599

89.95% 537

4.69% 28

5.36% 32

597

Increased regulations on the use of pesticides and fertilizers

Increased regulations regarding the development near streams and rivers

Better enforcement of existing laws and regulations

Development of greenbelts that will control erosion, lessen the impact of storm water, and preserve wildlife habitat

#

Comments

Date

1

depends on scope

7/28/2015 2:55 PM

2

Limiting sprawl

7/26/2015 3:23 PM

3

Story County needs a dedicated natural resource fund like Polk County has

7/9/2015 10:57 PM

4

There is significant bias in the phrasing of the questions.You have not provided comparative costs of these as well.

7/7/2015 10:59 PM

5

regulations to protect ag land is a curious question

6/24/2015 8:28 AM

6

If the greenbelts are on county land, I support that effort.

6/18/2015 8:36 AM

7

Quit letting jerks build crap in the flood plain. I'm tired of sandbagging for their poor planning.

6/17/2015 2:49 PM

8

Urban sprawl is a serious problem.

6/17/2015 10:29 AM

9

Agree need better Regs to protect Ag lands from further destruction by reaI-estate developers but not at expense of natural areas

6/15/2015 10:41 AM

25 / 95

B-26


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey 10

government for the sake of government is not good

6/13/2015 11:56 AM

11

If you had strongly support I would have chosen that.

6/12/2015 11:42 AM

12

The questions are poorly phrased and can be interpreted variously. Simply put, there is little environmental ethos in

6/6/2015 2:14 AM

Iowa. That is the real problem. Education matters. 13

Too many ambiguous and questionable statements

6/5/2015 8:23 PM

14

Very important to monitor septic tanks on a regular basis.

6/4/2015 5:05 PM

15

Greenbelts? Yes, yes, yes!

6/4/2015 11:47 AM

16

Regulation seems to be necessary to change problems as it seems that while many voluntarily work to increase the

6/3/2015 9:32 PM

environment, for a number of persons seem to not care very much about it. They need to be reminded with regulations why taking care of air, water and soil makes life better for everyone. 17

We need clean water.

6/2/2015 3:10 PM

18

We have a sea of purple rockets blooming and our whole pasture is fragrant with white clover, but we found only ONE

5/31/2015 3:20 PM

honeybee in all of this! SILENT SPRING!! 19

green belt don't need to be developed they need to be undisturbed

5/31/2015 6:03 AM

20

in Roland a retaining pond could help deal with flooding

5/30/2015 5:01 PM

21

Eliminate hog confinements

5/30/2015 12:22 AM

22

Is the protection of agricultural lands a protection of the current agricultural practice on those lands or the integrity of land regardless?

5/29/2015 5:53 PM

23

ALSO NEED LIMITS ON URBAN FERTILIZER USE

5/29/2015 4:26 PM

24

We must protect our natural environment!!!

5/29/2015 2:32 PM

25

Can a county even try to regulate pesticide or fertilizers?

5/29/2015 2:29 PM

26

I support better regulation of pesticide drift because I and others I know have suffered from it. But this question doesn't

5/29/2015 2:20 PM

even mention Story County's biggest water problem, which is the lack of adequate conservation (buffer strips, cover crops, wetlands, bioreactors, etc.) on rowcropped land. As long as requiring better conservation on farmland can't even be listed as a possible initiative on this kind of survey (and I suspect I know all too well why it's not listed), let alone become a reality, our water quality will remain, to be blunt, awful. 27

There should not be anymore delevlopment in the Slunk river Squaw creek flood plains, need manitory buffer zones along all creeksm rivers, ponds and lakes

5/29/2015 1:54 PM

28

beware of taking others property without just compensation

5/29/2015 9:18 AM

29

Seems like little regulation or enforcement now. No evidence that farmers are doing much of anything, voluntary or

5/29/2015 9:03 AM

forced. 30

if you add bike trails to your greenbelts I'm all for it

5/28/2015 4:34 PM

31

Increased regulations on the use of pesticides and fertilizers inside city limits and developments.

5/28/2015 2:09 PM

32

People are already OVER "monitored" as it is. Let's try something different and let's get government's nose OUT of people's business?

5/28/2015 1:46 PM

33

It's important to note that opposition to additional government regulation on these issues does not necessarily mean opposition to the end goal of hypothetical regulation. One can support improved water quality, for example, without supporting increased regulation on the use of pesticides and fertilizers.

5/28/2015 11:54 AM

34

Greenbelts and buffer strips

5/28/2015 9:44 AM

35

I am generally against any new regulations. Just educate and enforce existing regulations ONLY if they make sense. I would hope individuals understand the impacts that they make on the environment and use good judgement... I suppose that is not true for evryone though.

5/27/2015 9:14 PM

36

"More regulation to protect agric. lands" from what? Urban development? Support. Regulation of drainage? Oppose.

5/27/2015 4:01 PM

Q10 Current park and recreational facilities in the county meet your needs: Answered: 605

Skipped: 79

26 / 95

| B-27


B.1

Citizen SurveyStoryResults County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Strongly Agree

Agree

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

Not Sure

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

Answer Choices

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Responses

Strongly Agree

12.23%

74

Agree

64.96%

393

Disagree

15.70%

95

Strongly Disagree

3.47%

21

Not Sure

3.64%

22

Total

605

#

Comments

Date

1

Heart of Iowa Trail should eventually be paved

7/27/2015 3:55 PM

2

A better indoor swim complex like the University of Minnesota Nanatorium would be good for the county and state. Build in concert with ISU. A 20 mile rail to trail bike asphalt trail would be great but I don't know where we could do that.

7/26/2015 3:23 PM

3

Ames has a nice park, but Roland's parks are outdated.

7/19/2015 11:13 PM

4

We need gravel trails for the runners. Gravel works for bikes too. Trails and bikeways need to link up parks, schools, downtown, etc. Compared to western states, we have very little recreational opportunity, so we need to enhance what we have.

7/15/2015 1:31 PM

5

Need more protected conservation land

7/9/2015 10:57 PM

6

Would like to see rental cabins/yurts at county parks

7/8/2015 11:14 PM

7

I would like to see more public lands and trails of various types available

6/30/2015 12:55 PM

8

very few places for horseback riding. Everything other than a park is private for profit.

6/26/2015 6:24 PM

9

More thought about people that like to go fishing.

6/26/2015 3:00 PM

10

Mostly, they do. I would just like a road-independent bike path connecting Nevada to Ames.

6/25/2015 6:21 PM

11

The park is a little...old

6/25/2015 3:57 PM

12

Need additional trails so that Ames is CONNECTED.

6/25/2015 9:55 AM

13

More dirt trails! ...would be awesome

6/25/2015 9:44 AM

27 / 95

B-28


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey 14

The parks here are nice, but could still be much better.

6/22/2015 7:48 AM

15

poor water quality need better soil protection, lack of natural areas with minimal development but in last 5 years county

6/15/2015 10:41 AM

conservation seems to be improving here I know funds and Board of Supervisors are limiting factors. 16

Polk county is too close, offering so much, plus six percent sales tax

6/13/2015 6:47 PM

17

But there is always room for improvement, like more unpaved trails.

6/12/2015 11:42 AM

18

Make all Lakes & Rivers cleaner for recreation

6/11/2015 8:17 PM

19

Programs for younger children (2-3 year olds) are drastically needed in Nevada

6/9/2015 10:06 PM

20

$3 million for a lake? Build facilities for other outdoor sporting activities (shooting, archery)

6/9/2015 3:36 PM

21

would like to see more areas for hiking

6/9/2015 8:33 AM

22

Warm indoor swimming pool.

6/6/2015 7:34 PM

23

bike trails

6/4/2015 7:12 PM

24

I must confess that I am not aware of all these facilities in the county other than Hickory Grove Park. I plan to get up to Zearing to have a tour of Dalkins Lake when it opens officially in June.

6/3/2015 9:32 PM

25

I wish there was a place I could go swimming with my dog without getting into trouble.

6/3/2015 11:11 AM

26

Would like to see less partying at campgrounds and more quiet space and privacy in between campsites.

6/2/2015 3:10 PM

27

I've commented on this in earlier questions already, but feel that county parks could benefit from expansion and better stewardship. Perhaps developing more trails to entice more people who might be less strongly inclined than me to visit or support parks. I also feel there should be more areas where hunting is off-limits. It almost seems unethical to me to allow hunting so widely, given how fragmentary wildlife habitat is. Where can those animals really go to escape the hunter's gun or bow...?

6/2/2015 11:45 AM

28

I live on an acreage, so it don't utilize campgrounds. If I lived in town, I would want more campgrounds. Dakin's Lake is a nice improvement, but needs shade trees in the camping area.

6/2/2015 11:01 AM

29

more playgrounds at city and county parks.

6/1/2015 10:28 PM

30

There are a lot of parks, though unfortunately there is a lack of natural beauty among the corn and soy fields. We travel to other places for indoor activities during the winter.

6/1/2015 3:21 PM

31

Pave Heart of Iowa, Connect more trails to Ames

6/1/2015 3:15 PM

32

I can't access any story county trail systems from Ames

6/1/2015 1:45 PM

33

There are numerous short sections of trails but more sections of longer continuous trails need to be developed such as a connection between Ada Hayden and McFarland Park or along the Skunk River between HYSC and Ada Hayden

6/1/2015 11:52 AM

34

Bike trails. Please connect Ames to other trails with trails, not "bike lanes."

6/1/2015 10:31 AM

35

I'm old and arthritic, so my recreation needs are small.

5/31/2015 3:20 PM

36

I like the parks

5/31/2015 6:03 AM

37

Hickory grove needs some work but we love it there! We spend a lot of money here all summer!

5/29/2015 10:05 PM

38

always need more, especially wild areas

5/29/2015 6:31 PM

39

Would like longer mileage for hiking and biking

5/29/2015 6:18 PM

40

I want more hiking and biking trails.

5/29/2015 4:17 PM

41

Story County needs more camping.

5/29/2015 4:14 PM

42

it would be nice to have a local YMCA facility

5/29/2015 2:30 PM

43

Water quality issues a problem at times

5/29/2015 2:29 PM

44

Story County Conservation does its very best but does not have enough funding.

5/29/2015 2:20 PM

45

My only caveat here would be that Ames needs a quality indoor pool facility geared towards families and not monopolized by the high school.

5/29/2015 11:07 AM

46

recreational facilities are overstressed. Trail network must be expanded, current parks must be maintained, new public lands must be acquired. The county needs a comprehensive trail plan.

5/29/2015 10:52 AM

28 / 95

| B-29


B.1 47

Citizen Survey Results Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey I see a need for more camping spots at hickory Grove. there is pleny of room with in the park to double the size. plus

5/29/2015 10:06 AM

add speptic for the adition. 48

I like our parks but they could be vastly improved and expanded. More managed natural areas needed.

5/29/2015 9:03 AM

49

Need more camping spaces. Need a camp ground closer to Ames

5/29/2015 8:29 AM

50

pave HOINT and I wont spend as much out of county

5/29/2015 7:45 AM

51

We have facilities, but they are in disrepair. The water quality in our lakes and ponds is abhorrent, and nothing is done in the watershed to protect them.

5/29/2015 7:03 AM

52

we need more connectivity between green places, not just separate facilities and parks

5/28/2015 8:25 PM

53

I would like larger tracts of land and more forested tracts

5/28/2015 5:10 PM

54

BIKE TRAILS.

5/28/2015 4:34 PM

55

Need online reservations for camping.

5/28/2015 4:10 PM

56

There are amazing parks in Story County, but as always there could be more and there are always improvements to be made.

5/28/2015 3:42 PM

57

Having trash receptacles seems to promote the leaving of trash, and implies that someone collects the garbage, which therefore implies that they pick up the trash surrounding that area. Removing trash cans can promote reduced garbage creation, and instills the habit of taking out whatever you bring in.

5/28/2015 3:41 PM

58

need more camping areas.

5/28/2015 10:22 AM

59

Would like to see heart of Iowa bike trail paved everywhere

5/28/2015 10:02 AM

60

Need more hiking/walking trails, connected greenbelt, bicycle facilities (trail and on-road)

5/28/2015 9:44 AM

61

would be nice to have some horseback riding trails

5/28/2015 9:03 AM

62

We need more financial support for conservation and parks

5/27/2015 9:43 PM

63

NICE addition to Dakins Lake. Kudos to Story County Conservation on the work they did.

5/27/2015 9:14 PM

64

not enough campgrounds

5/27/2015 8:05 PM

65

We have a strong county and city (Ames) park system but we need to continue to have more and protect more sensitve areas and create more parks. It is one of the important amenities for young and old and will keep young people here.

5/27/2015 4:01 PM

66

Need more paved trails

5/26/2015 1:32 PM

Q11 1. How important is agri-tourism to you? Answered: 582

Skipped: 102

29 / 95

B-30


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

Very Important

Somewhat Important

Not Important

Not Sure

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

Answer Choices

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Responses 50

Very Important

8.59%

Somewhat Important

36.94%

215

Not Important

33.68%

196

Not Sure

20.79%

121

Total

582

#

Other (please specify)

Date

1

don't know what this is?????

7/8/2015 11:17 PM

2

depends on what this exactly implies....

6/30/2015 12:57 PM

3

Not sure what that is (city kid here)

6/25/2015 9:45 AM

4

I would be interested in more support for small farms growing crops and raising animals sustainably for human consumption

6/24/2015 9:13 AM

5

What did you have in mind?

6/16/2015 1:33 PM

6

seems a natural fit for this area

6/15/2015 11:53 AM

7

Because not sure how you are defining this term

6/15/2015 10:52 AM

8

Seriously?!

6/13/2015 6:55 PM

9

Defination is unclear

6/10/2015 11:19 AM

10

It may not be important to me, personally, but it sure is neat!

6/4/2015 11:52 AM

11

All persons need to see the uses of the land to get an idea as to how it can be saved for future generations and how the quality of the soils can be improved and preserved.

6/3/2015 9:41 PM

12

lets watch the corn grow? This survey is taking too long now.

5/31/2015 6:11 AM

13

I've never heard that term before.

5/30/2015 4:39 PM

14

If it's sustainable-ag tourism, yay, it's important to me. If it's spin-tourism intended to prettify industrial agriculture, fuhgeddaboudit.

5/29/2015 2:26 PM

15

This could increase awareness of agricultural issues, not otherwise a concern for the non-farmer.

5/28/2015 3:46 PM

30 / 95

| B-31


B.1

Citizen SurveyStoryResults County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

16

Probably more important to the eonomy than i realize.

5/28/2015 12:04 PM

17

I think it's an opportunity but how does that work in a corn & soybeans ag environment

5/28/2015 9:06 AM

Q12 Should Story County provide more opportunities for agricultural businesses? Answered: 577

Skipped: 107

Yes, in the unincorporat...

Yes, inside cities

No

Not Sure

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

Answer Choices

70%

80%

90%

100%

Responses

Yes, in the unincorporated area

34.84%

201

Yes, inside cities

17.68%

102

No

12.65%

73

Not Sure

34.84%

201

Total

577

#

Other (please specify)

Date

1

The devil is in the details -- what does opportunity mean in this context?

7/9/2015 11:01 PM

2

Both on unincorporated area and inside cities.

7/7/2015 11:02 PM

3

Yes, where it makes sense to do so.

7/7/2015 4:36 PM

4

also in cities. But protect waterways and watch amount of water use

6/26/2015 6:26 PM

5

If you mean more small farms that grow more fruits and vegetables then yes more agri-business

6/25/2015 5:23 AM

6

Yes - as long as business opportunity is NOT at the expense of natural resources, and as long as these opportunities include assistance to local communities for infrastructure improvements (roads, transportation, utilities)

6/23/2015 8:41 AM

7

Either city or unincorporated.

6/18/2015 10:05 PM

8

Iowa (including story county) is already over-optimized for this.

6/17/2015 2:53 PM

9

Encourage in rural communities.

6/16/2015 1:33 PM

10

Yes, I cringe when housing covers excellent agricultural land

6/15/2015 3:00 PM

31 / 95

B-32


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey 11

Nothing left in the rural areas except the postage stamp sized natural areas They have essentially exhausted all of the

6/15/2015 10:52 AM

arable land, physically and nutritionally. 12

YES, everywhere

6/13/2015 6:55 PM

13

not agri-business. would support more opportunities for small farmers raising crops other than corn or soybeans

6/13/2015 12:34 PM

14

I think opportunities both in cities and unincorporated areas are appropriate for agri-business

6/11/2015 3:58 PM

15

Support both Yes responses

6/10/2015 11:19 AM

16

I vote for 1 and 2 here but the poll won't let me.it also depends on what types of businesses are being considered, swine facilities in Ames or businesses that use and provide brain power, better management, etc.

6/6/2015 2:22 AM

17

depends what you mean! it would be great if we could develop businesses like canneries to diversify crops. Not so great to continue with the corn / bean treadmill and continue degrading our environment.

6/4/2015 7:17 PM

18

No, for traditional industrial agriculture (they've got plenty already, from what I've observed), but yes for old-school agriculture and especially within cities (urban veggie gardens anyone?)

6/4/2015 11:52 AM

19

The businesses should be carefully regulated and controlled locally such a CAFOs to preserve air quality. Working for local control of these facilities needs to be granted by the Iowa General Assembly to all counties.

6/3/2015 9:41 PM

20

Not if they will require a lot of water or will pollute the area.

6/2/2015 3:14 PM

21

This depends on what is meant by "agricultural businesses." Are you talking about tax breaks for a big corporation to come in, develop land and build an ugly concrete bunker? Then no. Do you mean expanded opportunities for urban farming opportunities? Then yes. Do you mean encouraging local, existing farmers to provide some agritourism on their land? Sure ... but what I'm opposed to is gobbling up more open land for a big ag corporation to build on. If that's what you mean, then I'd prefer to see limits set and have those businesses constrained to working within existing city limits (not annexing land either).

6/2/2015 11:50 AM

22

Not Animal Feeding Operations

6/1/2015 1:47 PM

23

The real oppertunities are here now

5/31/2015 6:11 AM

24

Yes wherever feasible

5/30/2015 8:49 PM

25

Yes, if it involves getting government out of the way. No if it involves another county agency.

5/30/2015 2:48 PM

26

Not sure what 'opportunities ' means in this context. I do not support using tax dollars to attract business, nor tax breaks to attract or keep businesses.

5/29/2015 2:35 PM

27

Does "agricultural businesses" mean hoglots? If so, UGH!!!! I need more information to answer this.

5/29/2015 2:26 PM

28

Not sure what that means. Agriculture is important but I don't want CAFOs or fertilizer plants.

5/29/2015 9:09 AM

29

Not if commercial environmentally destructive practices are to be continues.

5/28/2015 3:46 PM

30

NO MORE HOGS

5/28/2015 12:57 PM

31

In cities and unincorporated areas

5/28/2015 9:00 AM

Q13 3. Since 1977, Story County has used a 35-acre minimum lot size requirement in the A-1, Agricultural Zoning District for the construction of a new non-farm single family dwelling with the goal of preserving farm ground from development. Is this regulation achieving its goal, and/or does it need to be altered. Answered: 575

Skipped: 109

32 / 95

| B-33


B.1

Citizen Survey Results Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Yes

Yes, but could be altered

No, it should be altered

Not Sure

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

Answer Choices

70%

80%

90%

100%

Responses

Yes

14.09%

81

Yes, but could be altered

21.57%

124

No, it should be altered

17.04%

98

Not Sure

47.30%

272

Total

575

#

Other (please specify)

Date

1

It would be nice to have some additional background on some of these questions.

7/13/2015 3:32 PM

2

yields have increased so much since 1977, land can be opened to development and will not affect total county yield

7/11/2015 7:53 PM

3

It should not be altered in a way that makes sprawling easier. It's too easy now.

7/9/2015 11:01 PM

4

Please keep the requirement, to preserve rural areas and the integrity of agricultural land and natural resources, both of which are the cornerstone to what's great about Story County.

6/26/2015 7:52 AM

5

Please do not ever lower that minium!

6/25/2015 7:33 PM

6

Housing is difficult to find in Story Co, it might be good to look at this requirement and see if there is a connection to house cost and availability

6/17/2015 9:37 AM

7

Unfamiliar with A-a, Agricultural Zoning but we need to preserve farm ground.

6/16/2015 1:33 PM

8

IF we want to grow stop acting as if agriculture is the backbone of our county

6/16/2015 7:58 AM

9

Within Reason allow the County P&Z Board to review

6/15/2015 12:30 PM

10

important to preserve prime farm ground

6/15/2015 11:53 AM

11

Supply & demand. Story county is already overregulated

6/13/2015 6:55 PM

12

If it were taken down to 20A, could provide opportunities for smaller farmers

6/13/2015 12:34 PM

13

where do you want people to live? moving from small town iowa to the cities which opens up ag ground when they move off the old farm acreages...

6/13/2015 11:59 AM

14

Too many exceptions made in the existing law - either have the law and enforce it, or get rid of it

6/12/2015 6:44 PM

15

Not enough info to form opinion. Expand on this with link to more info.

6/12/2015 11:44 AM

33 / 95

B-34


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey 16

you can get by with asking to split ground as it is now, so why change this regulation

6/9/2015 11:23 AM

17

Why not support small homesteads?

6/9/2015 11:02 AM

18

Iowa is crowded with many towns and too many counties. Very inefficient government

6/6/2015 2:22 AM

19

I think it is important to preserve farmland, just not sure if the regulation is achieving this goal or not currently.

6/5/2015 3:25 PM

20

How obtainable is this for anyone based on the current price of farmland for anyone to manage unless they inherit the land? Real estate developers realistically seem to be the only ones with the financial backing to be able to purchase land based on that type of requirement and then have it rezoned - if it's desirable for rezoning.

6/5/2015 11:38 AM

21

I checked yes but I do not have any knowledge about specific examples needing alteration. The size seems about right to me for a homestead in the country.

6/3/2015 9:41 PM

22

Our rural areas are losing population. Why make it harder for families to live in the country?

6/2/2015 3:14 PM

23

I don't think it's preventing subdivisions from taking over farm ground

6/1/2015 10:30 PM

24

5 acre minimum is better

6/1/2015 11:33 AM

25

I know that we now have neighbors instead of nice, quiet, open pasture land.

5/31/2015 3:28 PM

26

The true goals are never met. You may be preventing some small farm opperations

5/31/2015 6:11 AM

27

I can' t believe the amount of farmland I've seen turned into strip malls and housing developments in rural Ames.

5/30/2015 4:39 PM

28

Why 35 acres? Some family-owned land should be able to piece out an acre at a time of land to family members land w

5/30/2015 8:52 AM

29

Reduce the acre minimum lot size requirement.

5/29/2015 11:12 PM

30

I think Ames and other towns should stop expanding onto surrounding farmland

5/29/2015 10:09 PM

31

require less land so more people can move out in the county without paying so much for land.

5/29/2015 7:40 PM

32

Smaller size to build

5/29/2015 7:13 PM

33

Protects ag at the expense of housing.

5/29/2015 5:34 PM

34

I strongly disagree that it should be altered. It's working and that's a good thing.

5/29/2015 4:18 PM

35

Housing around Ames needs to expand. There are very few houses on the market and they are all old and small.

5/29/2015 3:55 PM

36

I agree with the goal. I am. Or familiar with the details of how well current regulations are working.

5/29/2015 2:35 PM

37

hasn't stopped anexation and sprawl

5/29/2015 2:29 PM

38

I strongly, strongly, strongly, strongly oppose any weakening/lowering of this requirement. Rural sprawl in this county is bad enough as it is!!!

5/29/2015 2:26 PM

39

Stroy county is missing out on Rural development into residntal areas to accomidate big money agriculture and corprate farms.farmers.

5/29/2015 1:54 PM

40

this may drive people out of the county.

5/29/2015 10:09 AM

41

this goal is causing scattered housing, split farms amongst two or three owners to build rural houses. it needs to be altered in some way

5/29/2015 9:20 AM

42

Too many houses and housing developments in rural areas. This is causing a lot of problems. Ag land and natural areas should be protected. Houses outside of cities and towns cost county in extending services to these people.

5/29/2015 9:09 AM

43

It's already been ignored over and over again. Don't have a law on the books that you're not going to enforce. Just let people build anywhere they want and we will sooon be living in Houston.

5/29/2015 7:43 AM

44

This rule is preventing growth in the county. The average family cannot afford to purchase 35+ acres and then build a house on it. Let people purchase 1 acre minimums and build where they want. It is not the governments role to tell people where they can live or build. That is between the landowner and buyer. My wife and I tried to buy ground from our own family in Story County but were prevented by this rule. So we built in Boone County.

5/29/2015 7:26 AM

45

we still seem to be happily building over farm ground in all directions around Ames

5/28/2015 8:29 PM

46

Get ride of the min lot size, but also have a grandfather clause that people can't sue because of ag smells and dust.

5/28/2015 4:12 PM

47

35 acres costs a lot of money, and is large portion of land; it may be a difficult choice for a farmer to split a property at that level. I should be able to get a 5 acre parcel and promote an operation that serves just a small number of people.

5/28/2015 3:46 PM

34 / 95

| B-35


B.1

Citizen Survey Story Results County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

48

Artificially inflates prices in cities. Seems to make sure only wealthy farmers can purchase county land.

5/28/2015 3:37 PM

49

Developments spring up outside city limits like mushrooms. There should be a 160 Acre minimum lot size for any new house outside of the city limits and city services. .

5/28/2015 2:16 PM

50

With todays price per acre of A-1 land (@35 ac.), it leaves out opportunity for folks that might want to build new on less acres and "farm" mainly for their own use.

5/28/2015 1:57 PM

51

Seeng big houses in the middle of nowhere. WHY

5/28/2015 12:04 PM

52

Specific alternatives for specific goals should be considered

5/28/2015 11:07 AM

53

should be reviewed on 5 yr basis with adjustments as needed

5/28/2015 10:53 AM

54

Prime farmland shouldn't be taken out of production but I don't know what the solution is.

5/28/2015 9:06 AM

55

Discourage rural subdivisions

5/28/2015 8:36 AM

56

I think a review of trend data would shed light on this.

5/27/2015 9:41 PM

57

It seems easily overcome by developers.

5/27/2015 4:02 PM

Q14 Please share your opinion on how important it is to protect each of the following agricultural resources in Story County. Answered: 581

Skipped: 103

Pastureland

Prime Farmland

Water Supply/Irrig...

35 / 95

B-36


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

Century Farms

Soil Quality

Agricultural Processing &...

0%

10%

Very Important

20%

30%

40%

Somewhat Important

Very Important Pastureland

50%

60%

70%

Not Important

Somewhat Important

80%

90%

100%

Not Sure

Not Important

Not Sure

Total

45.16% 261

39.97% 231

5.71% 33

9.17% 53

578

61.53% 355

26.34% 152

4.85% 28

7.28% 42

577

69.78% 404

18.48% 107

4.49% 26

7.25% 42

579

Century Farms

40.07% 230

37.98% 218

12.02% 69

9.93% 57

574

Soil Quality

78.45% 455

14.83% 86

1.03% 6

5.69% 33

580

32.24% 186

35.18% 203

15.60% 90

16.98% 98

577

Prime Farmland

Water Supply/Irrigation

Agricultural Processing & Handling Facilities

36 / 95

| B-37


B.1

Citizen Survey Results Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

#

Comments

Date

1

We need a mix of prairie, wetlands, woods, and farmland.

7/15/2015 1:35 PM

2

small scale lockers OK, large slaughter factories, NO

7/11/2015 7:53 PM

3

Whether Century Farms deserve special protection depends on how sustainably they are operated

7/9/2015 11:01 PM

4

1 & 2 are not the role of government; 4, especially not.

7/7/2015 11:02 PM

5

This is difficult to answer without a definition of each category, and without a definition of what it means to "protect" these resources - what are costs/benefits?

6/23/2015 8:41 AM

6

Not entirely clear what you mean by "protecting" Ag Processing & Handling Facilities.

6/16/2015 11:17 AM

7

Soil depletion and water quality need major work cover crops and wider waterway/stream bank buffers should be requires moratorium on pattern tiling

6/15/2015 10:52 AM

8

I believe in highest and best use of land! not governmnet! deciding what is best for the people, let the people decide, last I knew this was America??

6/13/2015 11:59 AM

9

wondering how builders were allowed to buy property to build and then haul off all the good soil? digging up the foundation and placing that "dirt" in yards...and slapping down sod

6/10/2015 12:23 AM

10

As long as hog lots do not count as "agricultural processing" facilities.

6/4/2015 7:17 PM

11

Jobs are vital for all counties in Iowa, especially ag-based ones.

6/3/2015 9:41 PM

12

Do not support anything that supports slaughtering of living creatures

6/1/2015 1:47 PM

13

The famers and support industies will take care of themselves

5/31/2015 6:11 AM

14

NOT SURE WHAT IS MEANT BY PROTECTING IRRIGATION RESOURCE?

5/29/2015 4:28 PM

15

I don't know what is really meant by the "Agricultural Processing and Handling Facilities."

5/29/2015 2:26 PM

16

Urban expansion and single houses in rural areas should be restricted more than they are now.

5/29/2015 9:09 AM

17

The farmers will be good stewarts of the land. The government needs to stay out of peoples lives.

5/29/2015 7:26 AM

18

since agricultural processing and handling are commercial enterprises, I don't see the need for protecting them.

5/28/2015 4:36 PM

19

county policies seem to serve the wealthy landowner over everyone else

5/28/2015 3:37 PM

20

let the "land-owner" decide what is best to protect their own pasture, farm ground, soil quality, and etc.

5/28/2015 1:57 PM

21

Prime farmland can, and probably should, cycle in and out of managed pasture use over time. This would be a more valuable form of "protection" of prime farmland and soil quality than limiting scattered rural residential development.

5/28/2015 12:06 PM

22

We need processing, handling, and distribution for locally grown food (food hub). Also, need an incubator farm to provide experience for young farmers wanting to grown fruit and vegetables.

5/28/2015 11:13 AM

23

These mean revenue to the area!

5/28/2015 10:53 AM

24

anything to prevent erosion and farm chemicals in the rivers

5/28/2015 9:45 AM

25

We need to continue to improve opportunities for ag entrepreneurs--like in the ISU Research Park.

5/27/2015 4:02 PM

Q15 Initiatives to protect and improve agricultural resources sometimes include increased monitoring and regulation efforts. Would you support or oppose the following efforts? Answered: 583

Skipped: 101

37 / 95

B-38


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Increased regulations ...

Increased regulations...

More regulations ...

0%

10%

Support

20%

30%

Oppose

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Not Sure

Support Increased regulations on the use of pesticides and fertilizers

Increased regulations regarding the agricultural operations near streams and rivers

More regulations to protect prime farmland from development

Oppose

Not Sure

Total

69.76% 406

16.49% 96

13.75% 80

582

79.86% 464

10.67% 62

9.47% 55

581

64.60% 376

14.09% 82

21.31% 124

582

#

Comments

Date

1

Being in a highly regulated line of work, I'm not sure having more regulations is always the best answer. More regulations can often inhibit growth opportunities for businesses.

7/13/2015 3:32 PM

2

Drainage outlets should be regulated as point-source pollution

7/9/2015 11:01 PM

3

These are both biased and redundant from previous questions.

7/7/2015 11:02 PM

4

These are critical to keeping Story County great. Unchecked development and agricultural hazards will ruin our county and it can never be reclaimed after that.

6/26/2015 7:52 AM

5

Owners of agricultural operations that pollute streams and rivers should be heavily fined, repeat offenders should be jailed without bail.

6/17/2015 2:53 PM

6

Development must be stopped or there won't be farmland left in central Iowa.

6/16/2015 1:33 PM

7

again we do you think people are going to live? High rises?

6/13/2015 11:59 AM

8

We have relatively strong laws on pesticide use and misuse. Fertilizer N is not the primary water quality issue: it is too many soybeans, too much tillage (particularly fall tillage) and too little permanent crops or pastures. How will other crop (s) ever compete with soybean? It is the large issue. Soybean is a good crop but soil is always unprotected after harvest even in no-till.

6/6/2015 2:22 AM

9

Our natural water sources are in great need of more pollution controls both ag and industrial and residential.

6/5/2015 1:21 PM

10

keep the 24d out of the water, all land drains to the river in the end so no need for special regulatin near rivers,Let the landowners decide how to get the most value from there property.

5/31/2015 6:11 AM

11

Further details needed on what constitutes "development".

5/29/2015 5:57 PM

12

Water quality is important.

5/29/2015 2:35 PM

13

All good, but again, the requirement for better farm conservation is conspicuously absent.

5/29/2015 2:26 PM

14

Cover crops, soil conservation, residue cover are probably more important than restrictions on fertilizers.

5/29/2015 9:09 AM

38 / 95

| B-39


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Citizen SurveyStoryResults County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

15

The governemnt does not need to be a watchdog.

5/29/2015 7:26 AM

16

Very anti factory farms

5/28/2015 5:48 PM

17

"Regulations" do not have to imply negative results, in fact, they can promote positive results.

5/28/2015 3:46 PM

18

We're "OVER REGULATED" enough.

5/28/2015 1:57 PM

19

The increase in overall acres in row crop production over the last decade shows that ag preservation is not necessarily about prohibiting all types of development all the time. If grain prices are high enough, buildings, woods, pastures, grasslands, etc. can all be removed and have been. In some ways we need to consider options for protecting other resources from thoughtless expansion of row crop farmland.

5/28/2015 12:06 PM

20

We have enough regulations now!!!!!!!!

5/28/2015 10:53 AM

21

Buffer strips and green belt

5/28/2015 9:45 AM

22

again... not a fan of extra regulations...

5/27/2015 9:16 PM

23

More regulations on tile drainage and what happens to it after it leaves the field. Nearly all, presently, go directly into streams and rivers. That water needs to be processed in wetlands, saturated buffers, bioreactors, etc. BEFORE it goes into the streams and rivers.

5/27/2015 4:02 PM

Q16 Have you or your family experienced damages in Story County as a result of severe weather? Answered: 583

Skipped: 101

Not Sure 0.34% (2)

Yes 44.94% (262) No 54.72% (319)

Answer Choices

Responses

Yes

44.94%

262

No

54.72%

319

Not Sure

0.34%

Total

583

Q17 If yes, indicate what kind of severe weather caused the damage. (Check all that apply) 39 / 95

B-40

2


StoryC2C County Story County Plan Comprehensive Citizen Survey Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone Answered: 262

Skipped: 422

Flood

Tornado

High Winds

Lightning

Hail

Ice

Snow

Heat

Cold Temperature

Severe Thunderstorms 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

Answer Choices

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Responses 136

Flood

51.91%

Tornado

4.20%

High Winds

72.90%

191

Lightning

11.83%

31

Hail

36.26%

95

Ice

19.47%

51

Snow

6.49%

17

Heat

1.53%

4

Cold Temperature

11.07%

29

Severe Thunderstorms

30.53%

80

11

Total Respondents: 262

#

Other (please specify)

Date

1

sewage backup

7/27/2015 4:21 PM

40 / 95

| B-41


B.1

Citizen SurveyStory Results County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

2

These occur but I'm not sure you can do anything about these

7/26/2015 3:25 PM

3

Damaged the car

7/15/2015 1:36 PM

4

derecho; also, not really flooding, but groundwater issues as a result of high water events

6/23/2015 8:42 AM

5

drought wind blown soil from surrounding fields

6/15/2015 10:53 AM

6

slight basement flooding - more the builders ineptness more than anything else...

6/10/2015 12:24 AM

7

Water in the basement

6/6/2015 2:23 AM

8

The sewer backed up during heavy, flooding rain, and flooded my parents' basement. My entire childhood was destroyed. ):

6/3/2015 11:14 AM

9

dents in cars

5/28/2015 3:47 PM

10

all a part of living in IA.....

5/28/2015 1:58 PM

Q18 Please share your opinions about the types of new housing and housing improvements needed in Story County. Answered: 569

Skipped: 115

41 / 95

B-42


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Single-family housing is...

Focus on improving... Starter (first time buyer)...

Affordable housing is... Assisted living...

Senior condominiums... Accessory dwellings/"g...

Duplexes (2 units) are... Townhomes and condominiums... Apartments (1-2 bedroom... Apartments (studio/effi... Apartments (3+ bedrooms) ar... Mobile home parks are...

Executive (high-end)... 0%

10%

Agree

20%

Disagree

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Not Sure

Agree Single-family housing is needed

Focus on improving existing housing quality

Starter (first time buyer) homes are needed

Affordable housing is needed

Disagree

Not Sure

Total

81.26% 451

5.95% 33

12.79% 71

82.91%

6.12%

10.97%

461

34

61

556

80.32% 449

8.05% 45

11.63% 65

559

83.16% 469

9.22% 52

7.62% 43

564

555

42 / 95

| B-43


B.1

Citizen SurveyStoryResults County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

Assisted living facilities for seniors are needed

64.39%

10.79%

24.82%

358

60

138

65.53%

11.13%

23.34%

365

62

130

32.49%

15.70%

51.81%

180

87

287

55.72%

23.59%

20.69%

307

130

114

52.54%

25.54%

21.92%

290

141

121

552

41.91% 233

38.13% 212

19.96% 111

556

40.04% 223

39.86% 222

20.11% 112

557

Apartments (3+ bedrooms) are needed

35.95% 197

41.24% 226

22.81% 125

548

Mobile home parks are needed

20.61% 114

58.77% 325

20.61% 114

553

19.86% 111

62.97% 352

17.17% 96

559

Senior condominiums and apartments are needed

Accessory dwellings/"granny flats"

Duplexes (2 units) are needed

Townhomes and condominiums are needed

Apartments (1-2 bedrooms) are needed

Apartments (studio/efficiency) are needed

Executive (high-end) homes are needed

#

Comments

Date

1

Student housing seems abundant; family housing is needed

7/26/2015 3:33 PM

2

We need more housing to accomodate employment growth, so workers are not moving South.

7/13/2015 3:34 PM

3

No strong opinions on most of this

7/9/2015 11:03 PM

4

I think there is a good supply of starter/1st time buyer homes in this town but believe that many are purchsed and then

7/8/2015 11:26 PM

turned into rental properties - be nice if they could be starter homes instead - I also think that ISU needs to step up to creating more dorms to hold their influx of students and /or put a cap on enrollment. It's crazy all these apts being built and the high rent that is being charged. I have student employees moving 45 minutes away and driving to class/work because it is cheaper. Rent is ging up $200-$300 over last year. Totally nuts! This trend can't keep up and when enrollment tapers off - there will probably be empty apts. 5

I have no ideas. Ask the realtors.

7/7/2015 11:05 PM

6

Difficult to generalize for the entire county - seems to depend upon local conditions/populations, though clearly there should be more resources and options for seniors.

6/23/2015 8:44 AM

7

Never heard of the term accessory dwellings. Story County and central Iowa need affordable housing options for families making under $50K. Working adults over 50 (empty nesters) need affordable housing without stairs.

6/16/2015 1:45 PM

8

Affordable housing is the # one need, folllowed by low-cost housing for families with muliples children

6/16/2015 11:20 AM

9

looks like senior housing is developing faster than other types

6/15/2015 11:58 AM

10

More emphasis on the Tiny Home movement all cases most energy efficient design should be required with conservation practices in mind

6/15/2015 11:02 AM

11

Seems apartments are currently being over built

6/13/2015 5:08 PM

12

We need more affordable options for seniors that also accept Medicaid.

6/13/2015 12:39 PM

13

I think this survey is slanted to get the answers you want?

6/13/2015 12:11 PM

14

I don't know what kind of dwellings are needed, but I do know there is not enough affordable housing in town. I work full time at YSS and struggle to pay my rent. For families with low incomes, I don't know how they live here...

6/11/2015 9:06 PM

15

Support urban condos like Roosevelt development

6/10/2015 11:24 AM

16

Ames needs more affordable apartment ans single family housing.

6/9/2015 7:07 PM

43 / 95

B-44

556

557

554

551


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey 17

Housing seems to be focused on the university students. It is difficult for families to afford to live at the same cost per

6/9/2015 8:35 AM

month. 18

This is Ames' biggest issue I believe with the students. Low income housing for the marginalized is incredibly

6/8/2015 8:38 AM

important issue with all the students. 19

apartments are needed outside of Ames as long as they are affordable, and as long as transportation and employment

6/8/2015 2:46 AM

can also match the placement of new housing outside of Ames. 20

Is ISU going to hit 40,000 students? When we moved to Ames a range of homes was available

6/6/2015 2:27 AM

21

The market should dictate this. Not a Survey

6/5/2015 8:28 PM

22

Many of the apartments in Ames are for ISU students only; If someone could not afford a house but is not an ISU student there is limited housing available.

6/5/2015 3:28 PM

23

A community of modern small/tiny houses or change regulations to allow for new small houses in existing

6/5/2015 3:13 PM

neighorhoods 24

Ames especially has a shortage of moderately priced/starter homes

6/4/2015 12:33 PM

25

As a recent first-time home buyer, it was very hard to find something affordable in Ames, specifically

6/4/2015 11:57 AM

26

Too much housing in Ames.

6/2/2015 4:35 PM

27

We need smaller, beautiful (not cookie-cutter) homes in wooded areas with thoughtful communities.

6/1/2015 3:34 PM

28

Story City needs new homes and delelopments of all kinds

6/1/2015 9:50 AM

29

we have all the things listed. I have not been in the market for any of them. Surely the markets will drive developement. I don't think that the government should try to promote unnatural trends

5/31/2015 6:19 AM

30

This is a dumb question. The market will answer it. I know that is a difficult concept for those of you with masters degrees in planning

5/30/2015 2:52 PM

31

4-plexes with trees and flowers needed

5/29/2015 6:37 PM

32

Not sure Ames needs more rentals but the other cities in Story County cannot meet demand

5/29/2015 2:38 PM

33

I see real need for housing adapted for older citizens. Also, housing for non-college student population with limited incomes.

5/29/2015 2:35 PM

34

I don't know enough to answer intelligently. I do know that Story County does NOT need rural sprawl like Polk County's rural sprawl (e.g.more one-house-per-two-acres type areas.)

5/29/2015 2:31 PM

35

there are too many apartment buildings around Ames both current and being built

5/29/2015 2:30 PM

36

housing for low income residents including Section 8 vouchers

5/29/2015 12:40 PM

37

More homes affordable for young professionals

5/29/2015 10:57 AM

38

who is going to pay for "affordable housing"? it is easy to say we need more of it but who is going to write the check?

5/29/2015 9:22 AM

39

Multiple occupancy by unrelated people of rented houses are a problem in some neighborhood

5/29/2015 9:14 AM

40

tiny home community like a "mobile home" park

5/29/2015 7:50 AM

41

This would be achieved by the county getting out of the way of developers and builders. Regulation is what is preventing growth. We have awesome schools, low crime, and close proximity to jobs near Ames. This is the perfect place to live.

5/29/2015 7:32 AM

42

"Affordable" housing brings us back to the fact that we should take advantage of what allowing ADU's could bring to us Story County Residents.

5/28/2015 2:08 PM

43

Need more housing for ISU students

5/28/2015 2:02 PM

44

Lots of apartments in Ames (obviously), so no need there. Not sure of the demand in other areas. Mobile home parks are good, but the ones that are eye-sores need to be cleaned up or removed.

5/28/2015 11:19 AM

45

Seems like university area is over built with apts!!!

5/28/2015 10:56 AM

46

More apartments are needed in small towns

5/28/2015 10:07 AM

47

tax incentives for conversion of rental houses to owner-occupied, intensification along major roads with transit

5/28/2015 9:48 AM

48

in surrounding communities... Not Ames as much...

5/27/2015 9:18 PM

44 / 95

| B-45


B.1

Citizen SurveyStoryResults County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

49

Accessible housing for non-seniors is needed

5/27/2015 5:42 PM

Q19 Please indicate your level of agreement with the following statement; "Development of homes or businesses should be limited by law in floodplains and other areas where natural events are likely to cause frequent property damage." Answered: 566

Skipped: 118

Strongly Agree

Agree

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

Not Sure

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

Answer Choices

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Responses

Strongly Agree

59.01%

334

Agree

30.74%

174

Disagree

6.01%

34

Strongly Disagree

1.41%

8

Not Sure

2.83%

16

Total

566

#

Comments

Date

1

This shouldn't even be a question after all the flooding we've had!

7/9/2015 11:03 PM

2

Freedom of choice but we should not fund losses due to floods

7/8/2015 7:59 AM

3

In addition, city residents may lose the opportunity to purchase federal flood insurance if there is more development allowed in floodplains.

7/7/2015 11:05 PM

4

This might be the single most important question on this survey. No more bailouts for big boxes on the skunk and squaw - they shouldn't be there in the first place.

6/17/2015 2:56 PM

5

Level of development in floodplains is highly inappropriate. Moreover that it continues. Impermeable surfaces in floodplains cause larger floods, which hurt everyone.

6/15/2015 11:32 AM

45 / 95

B-46


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey 6

Regs against further Flood plain developments flood plains should not be altered as they help lessen down stream problems, existing developments should be uninsurable and bought out.

6/15/2015 11:02 AM

7

Well if they buidt them up out of the flood plain what are the damages ? If you ra referring to south duff than you need to take away the damn nothing more nothing less ... let the water go where it would naturally go? the duff flood pain is a reservoir, whether it is full of water or full of dirt it is full and the water needs to go down stream like it would naturally if man did not damn it up?? once it is full, it is full needs over emergency overflow...

6/13/2015 12:11 PM

8

And the definition of floodplain needs to be expanded to include more land.

6/12/2015 11:49 AM

9

Teh flood plain is part of the river.

6/9/2015 6:31 AM

10

Business YES, homes it should be up to the homeowner. I don't want to have to pay because a business was dumb enough to build in a flood plain.

6/8/2015 3:56 PM

11

However, if people wish to build or buy in flood plains the poor sap tax payers should not pay for any damages what so ever. You build a home in an avalanche chute that's your problem, don't come to me for a bailout.

6/6/2015 2:27 AM

12

Law should mandate disclosure - not limit ideals.

6/5/2015 8:28 PM

13

I'd be nice to do less facepalming as I watch the City of Ames continue to build in floodplains

6/4/2015 11:57 AM

14

It's ridiculous to continue allowing development in these areas and then deal with the aftermath of recurring natural events (such as floods). Building the property higher only pushes the problem downstream. We can be better to ourselves and our neighbors than that.

6/1/2015 1:18 PM

15

Common sense.

5/31/2015 3:31 PM

16

Ames is not doing enough, and as a result taxpayers are forced to subsidize bad decision making

5/31/2015 11:52 AM

17

Either limited by law, or if development takes place, public funding denied for incurred damages.

5/31/2015 9:37 AM

18

They should be limited by the government not paying for damage to the unsound development.

5/31/2015 6:19 AM

19

Can't believe Ames developed South Duff

5/29/2015 2:38 PM

20

It's kind of pathetic that this question even needs to be asked in 2015, but obviously it does.

5/29/2015 2:31 PM

21

The development of flood plains is not a problem. However no taxpayer aid should be provided to businesses who knowingly develop in flood plains as any damages should be covered by the businesses disaster recovery plan including savings and insurance. Additionally, regulations SHOULD be enacted to prevent xevelopment within a flood

5/29/2015 11:14 AM

plain from altering the path of said flood plain. 22

If people decide they want to build in a floodplain it is between their bank and their insurance company. Government does not need to play a role in this.

5/29/2015 7:32 AM

23

one should be allowed to build where they would like, but insurance/govt should not pay money for damages caused by said natural events.

5/28/2015 9:15 PM

24

Duh

5/28/2015 7:04 PM

25

Duh. And a developer should not be allowed to raise the level of their land to put their facility out of harms way; this

5/28/2015 3:52 PM

just increases the risk for everyone else who established a facility before them. Flooding can be mitigated with increased soil capacity and buffer zones to slow the wash-out from recent rains. 26

Don't just build a mound for the businesses on South Duff. Stop them from building there altogether.

5/28/2015 3:38 PM

27

Planning and Zoning current rubber stamps development in the flood plains and flood plain modifications. They may as well be abandoned and the resources allocated elsewhere.

5/28/2015 2:22 PM

28

Buyer Beware is all I got to say. Either that or a good insurance company.

5/28/2015 2:08 PM

29

They already are

5/27/2015 9:49 PM

30

I don't know if businesses in the flood plain are required to have flood insurance our not, but fema is phasing out subsidies for flood insurance and significantly jacking up rates. this will create new blighted areas.

5/27/2015 8:14 PM

Q20 In Story County, new residential development should be located: Answered: 566

Skipped: 118

46 / 95

| B-47


B.1

Citizen SurveyStory Results County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Anywhere there is a suitabl...

On individual residential...

Within or adjacent to...

Away from active farm...

Within or adjacent to ...

0%

10%

Agree

20%

Disagree

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

90%

100%

Not Sure

Agree Anywhere there is a suitable site for development

On individual residential lots scattered throughout the countryside

Within or adjacent to existing rural subdivisions

47 / 95

B-48

80%

Disagree

Not Sure

Total

33.15% 185

55.38% 309

11.47% 64

558

34.00% 188

49.37% 273

16.64% 92

553

62.86% 347

26.09% 144

11.05% 61

552


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Away from active farm operations

Within or adjacent to a city

71.94%

14.21%

13.85%

400

79

77

87.12%

6.44%

6.44%

487

36

36

#

Comments

Date

1

City should be city and country should be farm. If city boundaries are made, then property is valued and taken care of.

7/26/2015 3:33 PM

556

559

Like in Europe or in a peninsula like San Francisco or in cities borders by oceans or mountains. Above all, please avoid building along I-35 and making Des Moines, Ankeny and Ames I35 route be one big street. This is ugly between athens Georgia and Atlanta and getting ugly between Ft. Collins CO and Denver CO. 2

The last thing we need is countywide sprawl -- Polk County has some of that and it's horrible

7/9/2015 11:03 PM

3

The county and cities within it must manage development in order to preserve the rural character of the county and its

6/26/2015 7:55 AM

natural resources. Please don't allow developers to eat up farm land, woods, and other resources for random development. This spoils the land and also leads to many problems with infrastructure, including long-term maintenance. 4

Ames and other cities should quit pushing out into rural areas.

6/24/2015 7:17 PM

5

Development seems to mean a developer purchases land to create a housing development. We need to stop cookie cutter development. They are unsightly. The purchase prices are too expensive for the family making less than $100k.

6/16/2015 1:45 PM

6

By suitable site, I mean not on prime farmland. Suitable sites would be land that is less suitable for farming.

6/15/2015 3:10 PM

7

The farm operator and owner should have to live next to the facility; preferably within 100 yards and down wind from

6/15/2015 11:02 AM

said facility 8

Focus on infilling and using existing services, not building new

6/12/2015 11:49 AM

9

I don't think we need new developments- suburban sprawl is not good for a town. Let's live closer together so public transportation is more feasible.

6/11/2015 9:06 PM

10

Final item depends on the area (e.g., near a park or former landfill)

6/10/2015 11:24 AM

11

Develop South Ames

6/8/2015 8:38 AM

12

let the market and owners decide.

6/5/2015 8:28 PM

13

People should be able to live in throughout the countryside, however they need to realize that they will have to deal with nearby farming and smells. They also need to be aware that by being outside of town and not paying town taxes, they are not going to be entitled to all of the luxeries of town.

6/2/2015 11:07 AM

14

Let the buyer decide and be aware

5/31/2015 6:19 AM

15

Will the residential development decrease the need for transportation costs/output? Will the development be located near basic needs (grocery, health care, entertainment)?

5/29/2015 6:02 PM

16

Stop putting Ag first.

5/29/2015 5:36 PM

17

As much as possible, restrict building to land area that has already been built on.

5/29/2015 2:35 PM

18

There's a big difference between "within" and "adjacent to" existing rural subdivisions!

5/29/2015 2:31 PM

19

Not in flood plains

5/29/2015 1:54 PM

20

I would want to explore the definition of "suitable site for development" much closer. There is lots of room for interpretation and poor planning.

5/29/2015 9:29 AM

21

Too much development outside town and cities is using up farmland

5/29/2015 9:14 AM

22

Government should not decide this. The market will.

5/29/2015 7:32 AM

23

There are already several new developments to be filled, do we need more

5/29/2015 6:54 AM

24

what are you trying to really ask with this series of questions?

5/28/2015 9:15 PM

25

The health of an area and the impact a development may have should be considered.

5/28/2015 3:52 PM

26

would prefer limiting sprawl

5/28/2015 3:38 PM

48 / 95

| B-49


B.1

Citizen SurveyStoryResults County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

27

Well and Septic Laws and "costs" will scare away most new development. That and the odors, dust, and so forth that comes from active farming operations. I think that if the people don't mind their vehicles trashed by rock chips and dust (etc.) then let them live across the countryside.

5/28/2015 2:08 PM

28

Better future land use maps are needed from County and Cities (cooperative effort?).

5/28/2015 11:19 AM

29

Understand and promote smart growth principles. Stop allowing rural developments.

5/28/2015 11:18 AM

30

Need 'green housing' developments in suitable rural areas. With garden/orchard space adjacent.

5/28/2015 11:10 AM

31

It is important to build affordable single family housing with access to transit, trails

5/28/2015 9:48 AM

32

I am sick of the entitlement of people who want to live in the "country" but insist on all the amenities of town. They live

5/28/2015 9:11 AM

in a fantasy world and expect the rest of us to foot the bill.

Q21 In your opinion, how would you describe the availability of employment opportunities in Story County? Answered: 560

Skipped: 124

Plentiful

Adequate

Lacking

Not Sure

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

Answer Choices

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Responses 51

Plentiful

9.11%

Adequate

53.39%

299

Lacking

30.18%

169

Not Sure

7.32%

41

Total

560

#

Comments

Date

1

We are in a digital revolution. What may be adequate today, will lag in future years.

7/7/2015 11:10 PM

2

Story County is improving in its offering of white collar and green collar oriented jobs but lacks diversity when it comes

6/17/2015 12:51 PM

to providing skilled blue collar type positions. 3

Seriously lacking jobs that don't require a BS, MS or PhD.

6/16/2015 2:01 PM

49 / 95

B-50


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey 4

that is strongly dependent on the field a person is in

6/9/2015 8:41 AM

5

We need greater access to training/certification programs that help our most vulnerable populations secure livingwage positions.

6/9/2015 6:52 AM

6

Adequate for low-paying jobs.

6/9/2015 6:33 AM

7

Seems that 100 pct of our undergrads in my dept are employed at graduations as are all grad students. For people

6/6/2015 2:40 AM

without skills...it's an issue bigger than Story County. 8

Depends on what sector you are looking for, of course

6/4/2015 12:03 PM

9

lots of low wage jobs

6/4/2015 10:47 AM

10

I want a lot of the recent grads from ISU to marry and settle down in Story County to raise families and have jobs.

6/3/2015 9:57 PM

11

I haven't looked

5/31/2015 6:28 AM

12

need different levels of employment

5/30/2015 9:51 AM

13

Adequate in ames, smaller towns are lacking some.

5/29/2015 10:12 PM

14

Lacking for high paying professional positions

5/29/2015 9:10 PM

15

too many low paying jobs and parttime jobs

5/29/2015 6:48 PM

16

I really don't know.

5/29/2015 2:36 PM

17

the opportunities are barely adequate. there needs to be more places for companies to build, Ames is so restrictive of building

5/29/2015 9:26 AM

18

There is a definite lack of full time jobs with reasonable pay and benefits.

5/28/2015 2:35 PM

19

Again....who will invest in S.C. if the regulation and taxes are the SAME or WORSE than any other County that they check into investing/building in. We want jobs......make it worth relocating here first!

5/28/2015 2:19 PM

20

oportunities for good paying jobs are limited

5/28/2015 1:03 PM

21

Renewable energy development, infrastructure repair, and local food development could increase employment opportunities.

5/28/2015 11:24 AM

22

in Ames, help wanted signs everywhere

5/28/2015 10:28 AM

23

There are too many jobs that do not pay enough to pay all your bills

5/28/2015 10:12 AM

Q22 How secure do you believe your employment to be over the next 3-5 years? Answered: 564

Skipped: 120

50 / 95

| B-51


B.1

Citizen SurveyStoryResults County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Secure

Somewhat secure

Insecure

Don't know

Unemployed

Retired

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

Answer Choices

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Responses

Secure

43.97%

248

Somewhat secure

29.96%

169

Insecure

6.74%

38

Don't know

3.90%

22

Unemployed

1.77%

10

Retired

13.65%

77

Total

564

#

Comments

Date

1

grad student on RA

6/25/2015 12:19 PM

2

Terry Branstad, Debi Durham and Dan Culhane do everything for those with advanced degrees and nothing visible for anyone else.

6/16/2015 2:01 PM

3

At ISU

6/12/2015 11:59 AM

4

Only because I landed a salaried job; for a couple years it was something awful

6/4/2015 12:03 PM

5

I have too much to do.

5/31/2015 6:28 AM

6

but I commute to Des Moines

5/29/2015 2:30 PM

7

Iowa state keeps getting bigger and there are more jobs being created in Polk and Dallas Counties

5/29/2015 1:54 PM

Q23 Do you believe Story County should commit additional tax dollars to attract and retain private sector jobs in the county? Answered: 556

Skipped: 128

51 / 95

B-52


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

Yes

No

No opinion

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

Answer Choices

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Responses

Yes

44.42%

247

No

34.17%

190

No opinion

21.40%

119

Total

556

#

Comments

Date

1

Business is vital

7/26/2015 3:37 PM

2

YES!!!!!

7/13/2015 3:37 PM

3

Devil is in the details -- would need to know specifics

7/9/2015 11:06 PM

4

It would depend on how they are applied.

7/7/2015 11:10 PM

5

Everyone else does it, if we want quality high paying jobs we need to compete.

6/25/2015 10:30 AM

6

Higher paying positions

6/24/2015 8:32 AM

7

Whatever happened to business saving money to pay for improvements? Does anyone else remember when business didn't get a handout?

6/16/2015 2:01 PM

8

spend your own money not mine

6/13/2015 12:13 PM

9

There are pros and cons that would need to be weighed heavily by the board of supervisors on an individual case basis.

6/12/2015 2:10 PM

10

use tax dollars to improve infrastructure and services for current residents

6/12/2015 11:59 AM

11

We have so many graduating ISU students who would like to stay here, but we lose.

6/8/2015 8:40 AM

12

Why? Does ISU hamper the tax base? Granted, there don't seem to be a lot of spinoffs from ISU research (vetmed diagnostics a large exception) in Story County but Iowa/ISU is behind the times in this aspect. We got a late start. Look at ISU impacts in Ankeny and Johnston: HUGE, and very positive. Fighting with other entities to give away tax dollars is a very poor strategy. Everyone will be fighting for the crumbs.

6/6/2015 2:40 AM

13

Get government out of private business.

6/5/2015 8:36 PM

14

What kinds of private sector industries? It makes a difference for the answer.

6/4/2015 12:03 PM

15

After careful study I believe that more jobs are needed and one way is to give start-up dollars or tax abatements to new businesses which Story County needs to stay financially solvent.

6/3/2015 9:57 PM

16

As long as there are tangible commitments from recipients that they won't just leave after tax subsidies run out

6/1/2015 3:40 PM

17

No additional taxes, but reformed regulations.

5/31/2015 9:40 AM

52 / 95

| B-53


B.1

Citizen SurveyStoryResults County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

18

The jobs are here

5/31/2015 6:28 AM

19

don't spend tax money where it's not absolutely necessary

5/30/2015 5:12 PM

20

Only if companies are held accountable

5/29/2015 9:10 PM

21

It's not that I really have no opinion, but it really, really depends on what kinds of "private sector jobs" are involved.

5/29/2015 2:36 PM

22

they have enough dollars available now

5/29/2015 9:26 AM

23

Needed more in the smaller towns

5/29/2015 8:37 AM

24

for things like trail connections, light rail to DM yes, as "loans" to companies and tax abatements, no

5/29/2015 7:55 AM

25

more bike trails and amenities that attract workers that will then attract companies

5/28/2015 5:43 PM

26

I do not believe in attracting employers by giving tax breaks, this just allows them to take advantage of the people of that area, especially when the business is a resource intense endeavor that may put the people or resources of that community at risk.

5/28/2015 4:00 PM

27

No more race-to-the-bottom by using tax dollars to lure businesses. if they want to come here they'll come here anyway.

5/28/2015 3:39 PM

28

In other words......do "I" want to INVEST MORE to bring more private sector jobs here? No, jack back the tax valuation and loosen up the regulations and ADVERTISE (on SC Website) all our advantages vs. other neighboring Counties disadvantages.

5/28/2015 2:19 PM

29

Tax incentives have not worked.

5/28/2015 11:24 AM

30

With conditions, yes

5/28/2015 11:13 AM

31

Corporate welfare is a slippery slope--once you give an incentive, everyone's got his hand out. These are the same people that gleefully belittle the public sector, loudly proclaiming the virtues of a free market and boasting of being selfmade entrepeneurs. We should concentrate on good infrastructure, clean air and water, public amenities (libraries, parks) and quality schools.

5/28/2015 9:23 AM

32

Not at the expense of good existing projects, or if additional tax dollars need to be raised from community members.

5/27/2015 9:24 PM

Q24 Do you own or operate a business in the county? Answered: 560

Skipped: 124

Yes

No

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

Answer Choices

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Responses

Yes

18.21%

102

No

81.79%

458

Total

560

53 / 95

B-54

50%


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

Q25 Please indicate your level of agreement with the following statement: "Story County is a good place to start a business." Answered: 564

Skipped: 120

Strongly Agree

Agree

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

Not Sure

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

Answer Choices

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Responses

Strongly Agree

10.28%

58

Agree

46.45%

262

Disagree

8.33%

47

Strongly Disagree

1.24%

7

Not Sure

33.69%

190

Total

564

#

Please comment

Date

1

Depends on business. Seasonal ISU populations. Rural areas diminishing daytime population. Internet shopping allows people to purchase online.

7/28/2015 3:06 PM

2

St. Co. is relatively affluent. People should be willing to buy if the product/service is desirable.

7/27/2015 4:05 PM

3

Ames is a different story

7/23/2015 8:02 AM

4

City of Ames government over-regulation can often make starting a business very difficult.

7/13/2015 3:37 PM

5

Neither disagree or agree. On balance, it seems to be an average place to start a business.

7/8/2015 8:11 AM

6

Depends...probably not a good place to open a kosher deli... :(

6/25/2015 9:50 AM

7

Ames and Story County have too many regulations and property taxes are too high. Other counties are less expensive for a start-up.

6/24/2015 7:22 PM

8

Ames is anti-business, anti-growth. It is truly becoming the city of "NO".

6/20/2015 11:32 AM

9

It could be and should be given it's location and the number of rural communities.

6/16/2015 2:01 PM

10

There are no incentives for starting an online business that I'm aware of.

6/16/2015 11:23 AM

54 / 95

| B-55


B.1

Citizen SurveyStoryResults County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

11

With zoning changes, I am not certain I can sell my agricultural business as an agricultural business. I fear zoning changes would prohibit the business to continue under new ownership.

6/15/2015 3:25 PM

12

No personal experience here but from "the outside" it looks promising

6/15/2015 12:03 PM

13

Seven % sales tax,

6/13/2015 7:08 PM

14

Of course it depends on what type of business. But the county is growing, and many people seem to have disposable income for dining out, and other non-essential purposes.

6/13/2015 12:44 PM

15

now Ames is a different story...

6/13/2015 12:13 PM

16

I have not tried, nor have I known someone on a personal level that has done so in order to have an informed opinion.

6/12/2015 2:10 PM

17

seems like a good market with many potential customers making more than average, at least in Ames.

6/12/2015 11:59 AM

18

More grants and incentives needed for small businesses.

6/12/2015 8:22 AM

19

The community is very supportive to new businesses.

6/9/2015 8:53 AM

20

Certainly lots of well trained graduates from ISU available, a real positive.

6/6/2015 2:40 AM

21

It seems as if a few have the mighiest voices in determining what will or will not start in Story County and where it will be located. I find it unfortunate in some regards. It's hard to ignore the growth levels in the surrounding counties when the communities are supportive.

6/5/2015 3:50 PM

22

Really depends on the type of business.

6/5/2015 1:36 PM

23

That we have so many locally-owned businesses is fantastic and helps make this area unique; it's one of the major things I love about this place!

6/4/2015 12:03 PM

24

There certainly seems to be a lot of businesses closing in Ames.

6/1/2015 3:40 PM

25

There is enough people to make any business successful.

5/31/2015 6:28 AM

26

City Council is the biggest hurdle. I so wish we had a Menards!!!

5/30/2015 4:00 PM

27

Depends on the business. Small business retail - strongly disagree. Service businesses - Agree

5/29/2015 11:21 PM

28

Agree in larger cities.

5/29/2015 10:12 PM

29

There are a lot of dollars leaving the county to towns like Ankeny

5/29/2015 6:36 PM

30

Taxes are high and Iowa State has everyone convinced they should be paid a lot of money. We have made it too easy for people to collect welfare and not work.

5/29/2015 6:36 PM

31

It has been good for us because of the demographic, but we had no assistance at the county level. City and Federal

5/29/2015 4:33 PM

assistance aided us. 32

I really don't know.

5/29/2015 2:36 PM

33

I often hear from "others" that the statement is not necessarily true, but I see a lot of chains having success here. Perhaps more committment should be given to local businesses that are NOT part of chains. I also see the success of places like Workiva, so I think we have some good success stories.

5/29/2015 9:38 AM

34

Story County is a good place, Ames is a rat hole of rules, regulations, restrictions, poorly designed roads that do not connect well to move you around the city, and more rules all the time. ugh!

5/29/2015 9:26 AM

35

Depends on the business.

5/29/2015 8:39 AM

36

Depends on the business

5/29/2015 8:39 AM

37

Especially with THIS planning commission. NO planning at all

5/28/2015 7:07 PM

I've looked in to starting a business, but did not recieve the help advertised from the ISU business development center

5/28/2015 4:00 PM

38

when I went to visit with an advisor; she was too busy working on some kind of personal software project to pay much attention to me. 39

Good professional support and a surplus of cheap labor that will work part time at minimum wages without benefits.

5/28/2015 2:35 PM

40

SC isn't currently any better than any other IA County (IMO)

5/28/2015 2:19 PM

41

Depends on the business. There is room for expansion in the areas I have identified above.

5/28/2015 11:24 AM

42

I am not sure about North of Ames but Huxley is the last place I would start a business.

5/28/2015 10:06 AM

55 / 95

B-56


StoryC2C County Story County Plan Comprehensive Citizen Survey Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone 43

I think it is very expensive to start a business in Ames but I see a lot of innovation in smaller communities where commercial rent is much more affordable

5/28/2015 9:51 AM

44

I think it depends on the location within Story County.

5/28/2015 9:23 AM

Q26 Do you support or oppose the development of the following types of industrial establishments in the county? Answered: 560

Skipped: 124

56 / 95

| B-57


B.1

Citizen SurveyStoryResults County C2C Plan Citizen Survey High-technology manufacturing

Light manufacturin...

Non-intensive agricultural...

Transport industrial...

Heavy manufacturin...

Intensive agricultural...

0%

Support

10%

20%

Oppose

30%

40%

Not Sure

57 / 95

B-58

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

Support High-technology manufacturing

Light manufacturing (product assembly, product fabrication, etc.)

Non-intensive agricultural related businesses (implement dealer, etc.)

Transport industrial (warehousing, distribution centers, etc.)

Heavy manufacturing (primary manufacturing such as foundries, etc.)

Intensive agricultural operations (e.g. â&#x20AC;&#x153;factoryâ&#x20AC;? farms or egg processing plants, etc.)

Oppose

Not Sure

Total

89.55%

2.70%

7.75%

497

15

43

88.37%

2.86%

8.77%

494

16

49

81.83%

4.50%

13.67%

455

25

76

74.05%

9.91%

16.04%

411

55

89

555

41.98% 233

34.95% 194

23.06% 128

555

22.44% 125

61.04% 340

16.52% 92

557

#

Other (please specify)

Date

1

Factory farms will destroy Story County as they have destroyed Hamilton and Wright counties. Avoid them completely

7/11/2015 7:56 PM

2

Heavy manufacturing is highly unlikely here, anyway.

7/7/2015 11:10 PM

3

If a small community wants a business to generate jobs, they should decide.

7/7/2015 4:49 PM

4

As long as these are properly located, they are fine in Ames, it is time to shed the whole aversion to growth that is in the manufacturing space here. We are losing the headquarters to these companies to places like Ankeny because we snub the $12/hour jobs/opportunities that come with the high dollar jobs

6/25/2015 10:30 AM

5

Factory farms depend on the location in the county.

6/24/2015 7:22 PM

6

No factory farms. Strongly oppose.

6/18/2015 10:12 PM

7

Factory Farms are the single worst thing about Iowa and they've been encroaching on Ames for years; it's absolutely infuriating.

6/17/2015 2:59 PM

8

So long as taxes, pollution and truck traffic don't increase signficantly.

6/16/2015 2:01 PM

9

"clean industries" much easier to deal with

6/15/2015 12:03 PM

10

We have enough non intensive ag businesses

6/15/2015 11:05 AM

11

This is assuming all adequate public infrastructure is provided to the sites.

6/12/2015 1:43 PM

12

Cannot oppose factory farming enough, it is detestable.

6/12/2015 11:59 AM

13

Light manufacturing depends on the industry regarding support or opposing

6/10/2015 11:28 AM

14

Intensive ag OK if away from residential/recreational uses

6/4/2015 5:15 PM

15

Innovative businesses such as New Link and others in the ISU Research Park will be the life blood of the county. But the county also needs businesses for those persons who have good skills but are not highly degreed.

6/3/2015 9:57 PM

16

I support intensive ag operations, however I don't like traveling through places like Hamilton County were there are, in my opinion, too many hog confinement buildings. I don't think that they are inviting to make you want to live in the county, however I understand the need for them.

6/2/2015 11:12 AM

17

No animal feeding operations or slaugher houses

6/1/2015 1:51 PM

18

These preferences are just greed on my part.

5/31/2015 6:28 AM

19

Property Values drop due to Factory Farms

5/29/2015 6:36 PM

20

Are there other creative opportunities for business currently left unconnected? New entrepreneurs? Etc?

5/29/2015 6:07 PM

21

We need to stay away from major food and farming factories

5/29/2015 5:05 PM

22

Except for CAFOs (UGH UGH), it really depends on what and where.

5/29/2015 2:36 PM

23

My feelings depend on environmental impact of whatever type of activity. High volume water use would be a problem, for example.

5/29/2015 2:35 PM

24

I would support he,pin small family owned bussiness expansion

5/29/2015 1:54 PM

555

559

556

58 / 95

| B-59


B.1

Citizen Survey Results

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

25

ag operations if they are monitored and law abiding

5/29/2015 12:43 PM

26

I would not like to see factory farms or processing plants in my town (Ames), so I assume no one else would either.

5/29/2015 9:38 AM

27

Agroforestry and native species development and proliferation.

5/28/2015 4:00 PM

28

I support them but ONLY if I'm not going to be expected to "support them" with more taxation.

5/28/2015 2:19 PM

29

CAFOs reduce property values for entire neighborhoods

5/28/2015 11:13 AM

30

The term factory farm is offensive and should be removed from this survey since such operations do not exist!

5/28/2015 11:10 AM

31

factory farms ruin air and water

5/27/2015 9:09 PM

32

I am unsure if "transport industrial" brings many jobs, but it takes up a lot of land.

5/27/2015 4:04 PM

Q27 In your opinion, how would you describe the availability of places to shop or dine in Story County? Answered: 556

Skipped: 128

Plentiful

Adequate

Lacking

Not Sure

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

Answer Choices

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Responses

Plentiful

14.93%

83

Adequate

44.06%

245

Lacking

40.83%

227

Not Sure

0.18%

1

Total

556

#

Comments

Date

1

Lacking in rural areas and outside Ames. Ames is fine - many more opportunities than 5 years ago

7/28/2015 3:06 PM

2

Shopping (outside of the Ames Main Street area) could be a lot better

7/13/2015 3:37 PM

3

Need retail development

7/8/2015 8:01 AM

59 / 95

B-60


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey 4

Kosher and vegan options lacking

6/25/2015 9:50 AM

5

dining plentiful----shopping lacking. rejuvenate Story City mall

6/23/2015 11:18 PM

6

dinning isn't a problem, shopping can be. Downtown is too expensive for my tastes and I don't go there. Plus parking is an issue down there.

6/22/2015 4:39 PM

7

We have plentyof places to dine in Ames but shopping for clothing and other goods is severely limited. Smaller communities could probably use more of both.

6/22/2015 11:42 AM

8

There is a dearth of decent restuarants, the Ames mall is bankrupt, it's a mess.

6/22/2015 7:52 AM

9

Dining is adequate, shopping is not

6/18/2015 3:51 PM

10

Dining is adequate, shopping is pitiful

6/18/2015 8:41 AM

11

Shopping

6/17/2015 1:38 PM

12

Rural Story County is lacking in both. Ames has too much of the same thing so it's lacking in variety in dining options. Very little shopping available in Story County.

6/16/2015 2:01 PM

13

Plentiful dining but lacking in healthy options overall.

6/16/2015 11:23 AM

14

for the size of the county/city of Ames, good choices

6/15/2015 12:03 PM

15

If there was a category between adequate and lacking, I would have selected it. Variety of shops/restaurants could be expanded - little choice.

6/12/2015 1:43 PM

16

Always room for some improvement for ethnic cuisine. Do not need more "American" food.

6/12/2015 11:59 AM

17

Just look at what Ankeny has! I shop there.

6/9/2015 6:33 AM

18

A few nice restaurants but comparatively few given Ames is a U town.

6/6/2015 2:40 AM

19

For a college town you would think there would be more attractions; many go to Des Moines to shop; dining is decent, but could still improve; but not too many shopping options.

6/5/2015 3:34 PM

20

lots of restaurants but have to go to Ankeny to shop

6/4/2015 10:47 AM

21

My husband I often go to Polk County to shop and eat. Story County has some decent spots to shop and eat, but overall, it feels limited in scope. We also don't support bringing in big franchises, but would rather support local businesses.

6/2/2015 11:59 AM

22

Dining is great. Shopping not the best - Ames Main Street is great, but the mall is terrible (and yet, I'm not disappointed we didn't allow the Bucky mall to be built near the marsh. Glad to skip a poorly-sited mall to save a marsh.)

6/1/2015 1:20 PM

23

I miss Hastings. Want IHOP.

5/31/2015 3:38 PM

24

There are many resturants and 2 walmarts and the internet with UPS

5/31/2015 6:28 AM

25

The Ames City Council screwed the pooch on this over the years. See Ankeny.

5/30/2015 2:54 PM

26

imagination is lacking

5/30/2015 12:29 AM

27

Places to dine plentiful, to shop lacking

5/29/2015 10:09 PM

28

there are only places in ames

5/29/2015 8:03 PM

29

Would like additional high end or ethnic dining choices

5/29/2015 6:36 PM

30

Somewhere between plentiful and adequate, really.

5/29/2015 2:36 PM

31

Shopping ok. Dining options are heavily tilted to college student tastes.

5/29/2015 2:35 PM

32

Need a furniture store

5/29/2015 12:43 PM

33

I find there to be an overabundance of dining options, which is great. I also find the shopping to suit about 90% of my needs, but the rest can be met by trips to other places like Des Moines, Omaha, or the Twin Cities. For example, IKEA is a great store, but there's no way (I don't think) that Ames could support a place like that. But shopping for clothes, gifts for holidays, home supplies, etc. is almost completely satisfied here.

5/29/2015 9:38 AM

34

barely adquate

5/29/2015 9:26 AM

35

Market will dictate growth in this area.

5/29/2015 7:34 AM

36

Shopping is limited in variety, and the balance of fast-food/chain to local/unique restaurants is skewed.

5/28/2015 9:51 PM

60 / 95

| B-61


B.1

Citizen SurveyStory Results County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

37

Dining excellent, shopping adequate

5/28/2015 9:06 PM

38

It's all fast or medium fast food. How many pizza shops and bar/food chain stores do we need; more local food shops, not chains.

5/28/2015 4:00 PM

39

A check mark by Lacking could have been a check mark by Plentiful if the Mall on I-35 would have been approved.

5/28/2015 2:35 PM

40

Need more restaurant choices

5/28/2015 1:35 PM

41

Many tax payers shop in Ankeny or Des Moines.

5/28/2015 1:03 PM

42

Ames is out biggest city in Story county. Why are all the stores so small - for example, Younkers and Kohls - why is that so small? (I'd rather go to Ankeny) North Grand Mall is just too small, I'd rather go to Des Moines.

5/28/2015 10:12 AM

43

Southern Story County is lacking in dining and shopping opportunities

5/28/2015 10:06 AM

44

more affordable commercial rent could make smaller restaurants an easier venture

5/28/2015 9:51 AM

45

Somewhere between adequate and lacking.

5/28/2015 9:23 AM

46

but could be better...

5/27/2015 9:24 PM

47

not enough big box stores or locally owned restaurants. no steakhouses.

5/27/2015 8:21 PM

Q28 How often do you leave the Story County area to shop? Answered: 558

Skipped: 126

Never

Daily

Weekly

Monthly

At least once per year

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

Answer Choices

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Responses

Never

4.66%

26

Daily

1.79%

10

Weekly

23.12%

129

48.57%

271

21.86%

122

Monthly At least once per year Total

B-62

50%

558

61 / 95


StoryC2C County Story County PlanComprehensive Citizen Survey Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone #

Comments

Date

1

If you can't find it in St. Co., you probably don't need it!

7/27/2015 4:05 PM

2

A better mall with a better food court and perhaps skating or such would be great for all of the students in the winter and humid days.

7/26/2015 3:37 PM

3

Mostly due to Ankeny being close.

7/17/2015 12:23 PM

4

We only go to Des Moines 1-2x/year for specialty items, like very specific running shoes or a ukulele, and we combine the trip with something else, like airport, a restaurant, or biking on DSM trail system.

7/15/2015 1:42 PM

5

Especially for clothing

7/13/2015 3:37 PM

6

We live a quarter mile from Polk County, so sometimes Ankeny is more convenient than Ames

7/9/2015 6:41 PM

7

I'm doing more and more on shopping by computer. How does that fit your question?

7/7/2015 11:10 PM

8

online if not here, usually

6/25/2015 12:19 PM

9

online for recreational gear

6/25/2015 9:50 AM

10

I shop on the Internet for what I cannot get in ames

6/25/2015 5:28 AM

11

It's at least monthly but I'd say it's closer to every other week depending on what we need.

6/22/2015 11:42 AM

12

Would leave more often if Des Moines was closer or had more hours in a day

6/17/2015 11:04 AM

13

I prefer to shop locally owned businesses and head out of Story County to rural Iowa.

6/16/2015 2:01 PM

14

2 to 4 times per week.

6/13/2015 7:08 PM

15

Sometimes ankeny and DM have what I need.

6/12/2015 11:59 AM

16

I don't leave Story County to shop because I can't find something here. Sometimes I am just in other places and I shop there.

6/11/2015 9:09 PM

17

Really, we go south probably twice a month to buy items not available in Ames.

6/6/2015 2:40 AM

18

Several times a week.

6/5/2015 8:36 PM

19

If I had the money I would be shopping out of town more, but it isn't worth it for me to drive to Des Moines so I go without for a while until I take a trip to Des Moines.

6/5/2015 3:34 PM

20

Ankeny is the nearest, best place to shop. Ames defaulted opportunities to Ankeny.

6/4/2015 7:03 PM

21

I try to shop within the county especially in Ames but from time to time, I need to go elsewhere to find specific gifts for Christmas or birthdays.

6/3/2015 9:57 PM

22

I shop more and more online because I find the variety of goods in stores now is dwindling and I have to go searching elsewhere.

5/31/2015 3:38 PM

23

rely on internet

5/31/2015 9:20 AM

24

The out of town shoping not my idea but it keeps the peace at home. I order many things over the internet. When the letter is followed by the letter n it looks llike the letter m

5/31/2015 6:28 AM

25

more shopping in other cities besides ames

5/30/2015 10:43 PM

26

It seems as though fewer goods and fewer unique items are available, and when they are, access is limited (for exam

5/30/2015 8:56 PM

27

2-3 times per year

5/30/2015 11:16 AM

28

Online shopping is used monthly

5/30/2015 10:55 AM

29

I usually shop outside Story County about 3 times a year

5/29/2015 6:36 PM

30

menards in ames is needed

5/29/2015 5:31 PM

31

ABOUT once per year. I try to shop locally.

5/29/2015 2:36 PM

32

Rarely would be more accurate. Shopping is not a priority. More disappointed by lack of dining variety.

5/29/2015 2:35 PM

33

Since I live in Ames, I do not often have to leave town, let alone Story County. However, that might differ for folks in Nevada.

5/29/2015 9:38 AM

34

i remember when the NO Growth, err smart growth folks worked to stop the new mall by the interstate so they could save Northgrand. How did that work out for them (mall files for BK)

5/29/2015 9:26 AM

62 / 95

| B-63


B.1

Citizen SurveyStoryResults County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

35

Malls in Des Moines and Minneapolis are benefitting with my purchases

5/28/2015 7:07 PM

36

We have one outdoor store (Jax), one hardware store (Ace), half a music store between the two, and a ton of clothing and household merchandise stores, the majority of which are box and chain stores.

5/28/2015 4:00 PM

37

Ames is the supplier of last resort for many items. Places to shop and dine are limited and the prices in Ames are unreasonable high.

5/28/2015 2:35 PM

38

I live in Polk County...

5/28/2015 11:24 AM

39

I do a fair bit of internet shopping.

5/28/2015 9:23 AM

40

I can get anything I want on the internet.

5/27/2015 11:25 PM

41

We rarely find ourselves needing to leave the county to get something we need.

5/27/2015 9:45 PM

Q29 Please share your opinions about the supply of various retail and service businesses in the county. Answered: 563

Skipped: 121

Boutique/specia lty retail...

Convenience retail/services

Department and general...

Apparel and

63 / 95

B-64


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Apparel and shoe stores

Hardware and building sup...

Fast-food restaurants

Sit-down restaurants

Other

0%

10%

Need More

20%

30%

Have Enough

40%

50%

Have too much

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Not Sure

64 / 95

| B-65


B.1

Citizen Survey StoryResults County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Need More

Boutique/specialty retail shopping/services

Apparel and shoe stores

Hardware and building supply stores

Other

Not Sure

Total

48.66%

3.03%

9.27%

219

273

17

52

9.50%

76.16%

9.32%

5.02%

53

425

52

28

44.11%

50.18%

1.96%

3.75%

247

281

11

21

47.32%

45.18%

2.86%

4.64%

265

253

16

26

44.17%

50.81%

0.72%

4.31%

246

283

4

24

8.20%

59.71%

29.41%

2.67%

46

335

165

15

561

55.64% 311

40.07% 224

1.61% 9

2.68% 15

559

31.11% 42

9.63% 13

0.74% 1

58.52% 79

135

Fast-food restaurants

Sit-down restaurants

Have too much

39.04%

Convenience retail/services

Department and general merchandise stores

Have Enough

#

If "Other", please specify or enter comments

Date

1

West Ames needs restaurants. Not necessarily fast food (except for Popeyes chicken; that would be a plus). Lowe's needs competition from Menards or Lowes

7/26/2015 3:37 PM

2

See previous answer.

7/7/2015 11:10 PM

3

Need better stores in the Mall with better selections.

7/7/2015 4:49 PM

4

Amusement recreational

6/25/2015 4:07 PM

5

Our mall is an absolute embarrassment to Ames. Traditional malls are dying anyway, why not knock the thing down and start over with an innovative concept that would set Ames apart (outside spaces connecting stores, etc)

6/25/2015 10:30 AM

6

Too many retail stores and restaurants cater to students. Need services for adults too.

6/24/2015 7:22 PM

7

Bookstores

6/22/2015 11:42 AM

8

Department stores are poorly stocked and inconveniently located. Not worth the trip to not find what you are looking for.

6/18/2015 10:12 PM

9

So many auto body shops; need more furniture/housing stores

6/17/2015 11:04 AM

10

Rural Story County needs more locally owned and operated businesses to bring people to these communities.

6/16/2015 2:01 PM

11

The west side of Ames could use a small hardware store like Ace Hardware. Especially if it contained a postal station.

6/15/2015 3:25 PM

12

favor independent stores and restaurants, have plenty of franchised restaurants

6/15/2015 12:03 PM

13

Know your customer, don't try to be everything to everyone.

6/13/2015 7:08 PM

14

Name dept stores like Dillard's and Macy's. Missing quality restaurants for Italian, Chinese, seafood

6/13/2015 5:12 PM

15

new breweries are welcome, more sit down food in downtown Ames would be nice.

6/12/2015 11:59 AM

16

speciality grocers - trader joes, costco - likely don;t have population for such entities

6/10/2015 12:30 AM

17

We need a menards

6/9/2015 11:32 AM

18

More diversity in what businesses offer

6/9/2015 11:06 AM

19

Miss having K-mart. Afraid that Wal-mart will run Target out.

6/9/2015 8:53 AM

20

would appreciate more places that are locally owned, not chain

6/9/2015 8:41 AM

21

If we had a Scheels and a Tasty Taco, I'd never have to leave Ames.

6/8/2015 8:40 AM

22

Need more attractions - things to do.

6/5/2015 8:36 PM

23

We need another big box store option other than Lowes for hardware. Menards would be nice.

6/5/2015 3:34 PM

65 / 95

B-66

561

558

560

560

557


Story County Comprehensive Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone 24

second hand and consignment furniture and household

6/4/2015 10:07 AM

25

I am not a happy shopper anywhere as I do not like to shop but when I need to I can usually find what I need in Central Iowa and I try to find it in Ames first.

6/3/2015 9:57 PM

26

By "sit-down" restaurants, I'm referring to local, independent businesses -- not the big chains and franchises (there are

6/2/2015 11:59 AM

TOO MANY of those). I support adding local businesses, and possibly expanding the mall in Ames (I never even bother to go there, because it's so small and limited). It would be nice for the county to provide incentive for entrepreneurs and local businesses to flourish, rather than enticing big-box stores or franchises. 27

I think that the county should try to help Ames get a Menards store in Ames. That would help keep me in Story County

6/2/2015 11:12 AM

a lot more. I go to Ankeny to go to Menards, then just do my shopping in Polk County to save a penny on taxes. If Menards were in Ames I would probably just stay in Story County to shop. 28

I really wish there were a Menards in Ames

6/1/2015 3:40 PM

29

restaurants featuring local foods; patios

6/1/2015 3:31 PM

30

Lowes is not centrally located, need another competetor to the northwest

6/1/2015 12:24 PM

31

Need more restaurants in Ames, but away from Duff. Campustown, Main St, Sommerset, west Ames.

6/1/2015 10:36 AM

32

cell phone stores and auto parts stores. too many

5/31/2015 10:52 PM

33

Hastings bookstore, which offered new and used books, movies and music!

5/31/2015 3:38 PM

34

More tecknology buying oppertunities

5/31/2015 6:28 AM

35

Culturally unique goods and services are lacking

5/30/2015 8:56 PM

36

quiet restaurants, NOT sports bars

5/30/2015 4:43 PM

37

Menards would be a great fit for Ames and Story County

5/30/2015 4:00 PM

38

VARIETY needed

5/30/2015 3:11 PM

39

it is not so much how many we have, but their quality.

5/30/2015 12:29 AM

40

need more variety in Nevada

5/29/2015 8:03 PM

41

Locally owned restaurants that are unique with homey feel

5/29/2015 7:10 PM

42

sears, fleet farm, toy store, paper products store, used furniture store, bakeries needed

5/29/2015 6:48 PM

43

Take advantage of the numerous artists in county such as an Artist Mall with studios and retail area (Spanish Artist Village like in San Diego)

5/29/2015 6:36 PM

44

Each of the retail shops have a smaller selection (naturally due to the smaller population) than competing stores 15 minutes away. If I need a better selection, Ankeny will be the place, unfortunately. If I need a quick fix, Ames locations will meet the need (unless later in the evenings).

5/29/2015 6:07 PM

45

BOOK STORES NEEDED, REAL ICE CREAM SHOP OPEN LATE AT NIGHT

5/29/2015 4:34 PM

46

No more auto parts stores

5/29/2015 2:35 PM

47

we need a new movie theater

5/29/2015 2:30 PM

48

Need a furniture store; need additional hardware/building supply store so Lowes has competition

5/29/2015 12:43 PM

49

beauty salon, psychiatric services

5/29/2015 11:49 AM

50

I always enjoy boutique and specialty retail options just because I feel there's more customer service, but I also like the ease of shopping at places like Target. I would also really love to see a really hip plant nursery. Earl May and Lowes just don't cut it for the really good stuff!

5/29/2015 9:38 AM

51

I am satisfied with the retail shopping here.

5/29/2015 9:16 AM

52

furniture, non mattress

5/29/2015 7:55 AM

53

Need more retail businesses that carry a larger variety of quality houseware goods.

5/29/2015 7:01 AM

54

All of above needed in communities other than Ames.

5/29/2015 12:06 AM

55

Coffee in North Ames or Gilbert

5/28/2015 11:13 PM

56

Macys

5/28/2015 7:07 PM

57

Music Venues\Taverns

5/28/2015 4:14 PM

66 / 95

| B-67


B.1

Citizen SurveyStory Results County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

58

I'm fine with what's here

5/28/2015 3:30 PM

59

Lacking craftsman quality businesses that charge a reasonable price.

5/28/2015 2:35 PM

60

I am FOR any business coming to SC......as long as I'm not going to pay for or finance it.

5/28/2015 2:19 PM

61

Too close ro Ankeny and DSM for these needed areas to succeed.

5/28/2015 12:10 PM

62

Bookstores, movie theaters, cultural amenities

5/28/2015 11:13 AM

63

Smaller restaurants that aren't chains

5/28/2015 9:51 AM

64

Ames has a lot of things but this is about the only town.

5/28/2015 9:37 AM

65

There are sit-down restaurants and there are sit-down restaurants that are worth patronizing. I don't know why we

5/28/2015 9:23 AM

don't have better restaurants. We have plenty of mediocre ones. 66

entertainment/music venues

5/28/2015 9:10 AM

67

Other is a stupid question

5/27/2015 9:53 PM

68

need to support these types of businesses outside of Ames, Nevade, Gilbert and Huxley more. You know, where the

5/27/2015 9:24 PM

smaller populations are:-) Seriously, they need help growing... Like Colo, McCallsburg, and Zearing. 69

Sporting/Outdoors

5/27/2015 9:14 PM

70

need more outdoor retailers, like REI, Columbia, or Cabela.

5/27/2015 8:21 PM

71

NOT chain restaurants.

5/27/2015 7:41 PM

72

need more options for high-tech, computer sales and service

5/27/2015 5:04 PM

73

I'm not a big shopper, but I would hate to lose J.C. Penney--then we'd need more alternatives.

5/27/2015 4:04 PM

Q30 From your experience, please rate the following services in your community. Answered: 556

Skipped: 128

Ambulance Service

Fire Protection

67 / 95

B-68


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

Garbage Collection

Park and Recreation...

Law Enforcement

Public Library

68 / 95

| B-69


B.1

Citizen Survey Results Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

Public School System

Recycling Program

Snow Removal

Storm Water Management

69 / 95

B-70


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

Yard Waste Disposal...

Street and Road...

Cable / Telecommunic...

Internet (Cable/DSL/S...

0%

10%

Excellent

20%

Good

30%

40%

Fair

50%

Poor

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Not Sure

70 / 95

| B-71


B.1

Citizen Survey Results Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Excellent

Ambulance Service

Good

Fair

Poor

Not Sure

Total

33.09%

34.73%

3.64%

1.82%

26.73%

182

191

20

10

147

42.99%

34.61%

2.37%

0.73%

19.31%

236

190

13

4

106

51.18%

39.20%

4.90%

1.63%

3.09%

282

216

27

9

17

551

28.65% 159

53.87% 299

14.23% 79

1.62% 9

1.62% 9

555

36.96%

42.21%

11.78%

3.44%

5.62%

204

233

65

19

31

552

61.12% 338

30.02% 166

5.06% 28

0.72% 4

3.07% 17

553

39.75% 219

41.38% 228

8.35% 46

1.27% 7

9.26% 51

551

13.38% 74

19.71% 109

21.70% 120

34.18% 189

11.03% 61

553

17.66% 98

47.03% 261

23.24% 129

8.29% 46

3.78% 21

555

11.50%

39.42%

23.54%

7.66%

17.88%

63

216

129

42

98

548

11.98% 66

29.40% 162

28.13% 155

18.87% 104

11.62% 64

551

Street and Road Maintenance

8.45% 47

44.60% 248

34.71% 193

10.07% 56

2.16% 12

556

Cable / Telecommunications

8.59%

29.80%

29.80%

21.21%

10.60%

47

163

163

116

58

547

9.51% 52

30.16% 165

30.35% 166

25.41% 139

4.57% 25

547

Fire Protection

Garbage Collection

Park and Recreation Facilities

Law Enforcement

Public Library

Public School System

Recycling Program

Snow Removal

Storm Water Management

Yard Waste Disposal Options

Internet (Cable/DSL/Satellite/Other)

#

Comments

Date

1

Yard Waste Disposal is great in Story City

7/29/2015 10:22 AM

2

What is "my community"? I live in a rural area

7/9/2015 11:07 PM

3

Fiber optic internet should be available in every town.

7/9/2015 6:43 PM

4

Would love to have a recycling business back intown - so miss the one on east lincoln

7/8/2015 11:32 PM

5

Compared with what - in most cases?

7/7/2015 11:12 PM

6

There are too many monopolies when it comes to services, in particular, internet.

6/25/2015 10:32 AM

7

Would like to see community owned Internet/wifi

6/25/2015 5:30 AM

8

Need better access to high speed internet in rural areas.

6/24/2015 7:23 PM

9

Ames needs another fire house, and burning recycleable materials in Ames is beyond stupidity.

6/22/2015 7:54 AM

10

The murder of Tyler Comstock by Ames PD was heinous. I thought we had a better community than that.

6/17/2015 3:00 PM

11

Not enough people know about how Ames utilizes trash for energy. Lots of people "recycle" and shouldn't (except for glass)

6/17/2015 11:05 AM

12

We cannot get CenturyLink internet. Television services are limited in our location

6/15/2015 3:29 PM

13

our snow removal private

6/15/2015 12:32 PM

14

We live in a rural area - internet is costly and slow. Should be a public utility.

6/13/2015 12:47 PM

71 / 95

B-72

550

549


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey 15

Street and road repair needs a bigger budget

6/12/2015 4:26 PM

16

Colo is monopolized for cable/internet, poor quality for hig prices

6/12/2015 2:11 PM

17

Would be nice to have one stream recycling in rural Ames

6/12/2015 12:00 PM

18

We have a recycling program here?

6/11/2015 9:10 PM

19

need more high speed in rural areas via local phone company

6/11/2015 12:25 PM

20

street plows pushing snow onto the front of driveways is a horrendous thing to discover upon returning from work or first thing in the morning. One can not move that kind of snow by oneself - specially when it turns into an ice berm! lights are out often all over town - along streets. no one pays mind any longer to impediments to sidewalks - tree/bush overhangs - lack of property snow removal especially along trails/walks to buses.

6/10/2015 12:33 AM

21

We need a recycling center in Ames - the city needs to subsidize that!!

6/9/2015 6:35 AM

22

Street Maintenance starting a job and then being gone for a good portion of the summer when the street is torn up is annoying.

6/6/2015 7:57 PM

23

Ames has third-world quality internet off campus. I'm filling out this survey from Africa, much better net than CenturyLink in Ames Iowa.tree branch disposal is a big issue. We've planted a lot of trees but sometimes they lose branches. Disposal is difficult in Ames. Our neighbors solution: don't plant trees, a really poor solution.

6/6/2015 2:43 AM

24

Our cable company needs to carry more Chicago Cubs games and more cultural networks. I am a sports fan but I also like opera, symphonies and theatre productions.

6/3/2015 10:01 PM

25

Need more high speed Internet service

6/3/2015 12:49 PM

26

Garbage and recycling are not city provided services in Ames.

6/2/2015 10:05 PM

27

There is no place in Nevada to take yard waste

6/2/2015 3:20 PM

28

internet competition should be encouraged

6/2/2015 12:51 PM

29

In our apartment, internet is terrible ... We don't like that Mediacom has the monopoly here, and it also seems like there are constantly issues with the fiber optic lines... Our internet becomes very spotty and unreliable in the evenings when everyone is home and (we assume) streaming movies or games ...

6/2/2015 12:02 PM

30

These comments are for service in Roland. If it weren't for CCS out of Stratford, the cable and internet would be marked lower. It is sad that the can redemption center in Ames closed.

6/2/2015 11:15 AM

31

Overall, stormwater management is good, though I and my neighbors have been trying to get the city of Ames to help with a stormwater easement and not gotten much response.

6/1/2015 3:45 PM

32

We need better internet service!!!

5/31/2015 3:40 PM

33

Few competitive options for cable/internet.

5/31/2015 9:41 AM

34

Sheriff's Dept is bloated. I'm amazed at how well our rural gravel roads are maintained. Our county road system is very good.

5/30/2015 2:57 PM

35

we need fiber-optic internet access

5/30/2015 1:51 PM

36

we need a narrow park all through Ames- would make us unique!

5/30/2015 12:31 AM

37

Internet options poor in rural areas

5/29/2015 10:39 PM

38

Need more high speed internet options

5/29/2015 9:11 PM

39

I don't fell safe walking the trail between South 4th and South 16th. Homeless men catcalling.

5/29/2015 6:39 PM

40

I live in a rural area, and either don't get some of these services or accept (as in the case of Internet) that they will be worse where I live -- living in the country means compromises.

5/29/2015 2:39 PM

41

We are frustrated by monopoly status of Mediacom.

5/29/2015 2:35 PM

42

I would LOVE to have Google Fiber. Ames is a college town and a science and technology school--we've got to be their target market!

5/29/2015 9:39 AM

43

fortunately have not needed ambulance service or fire protection. parks and rec are only fair because of the lack of a bike path system. internet is extemely poor.

5/28/2015 4:42 PM

44

Need more competition with Cable\Internet

5/28/2015 4:15 PM

72 / 95

| B-73


B.1

Citizen SurveyStory Results County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

45

We have too much garbage; we have a culture of consume and throw away. We should have a local recycling option; many of us are stuck with what a landlord provides. The loss of the recycling center was a major blow to our culture. Sidewalk maintenance is horrible, especially on Duff Ave; this is a very hazardous and dangerous area for the sidewalk pedestrian.

5/28/2015 4:03 PM

46

Need a curbside recycling program in Ames

5/28/2015 1:37 PM

47

Story County needs a warm water physical therapy, year-round pool facility.

5/28/2015 11:28 AM

48

Bike trail needs paved. Library is too small. Need a new school to compete with surrounding communities - but people won't pass bond for reasons I don't understand. There is no recycling program. Only choices for cable are Dish & Direct. Internet through Windstream not the best. I live in Maxwell.

5/28/2015 10:16 AM

49

The Garbage collectors leave a lot of trash around. It's neater now that I take my own. Ames doesn't begin to have enough swimming facilities. We need a reliable internet provider in Ames. None of them have reliable service.

5/27/2015 11:28 PM

50

Mediacom needs competition

5/27/2015 7:30 PM

51

Getting DSL in parts of Ames and in rural areas is expensive at best, and often difficult.

5/27/2015 4:06 PM

Q31 Over the past five years, how much growth do you think Story County has experienced? Answered: 545

Skipped: 139

A great deal of growth

Some growth, but not a lot

Almost no growth at all

Not sure

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

Answer Choices

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Responses

A great deal of growth

43.49%

237

Some growth, but not a lot

50.46%

275

Almost no growth at all

2.94%

16

Not sure

3.12%

17

Total

545

#

Comments

Date

1

mostly near Ames

7/11/2015 7:58 PM

73 / 95

B-74


Story County Comprehensive Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone 2

Somewhere between some and a great deal

7/9/2015 11:10 PM

3

assuming this include the influx of ISU students in AMes

7/8/2015 11:33 PM

4

Many more students

7/7/2015 4:54 PM

5

Mostly in Ames I think

6/17/2015 11:09 AM

6

Seems to be geographically the same size. Maybe we should overtake Hamilton county with our militarized sheriff's department

6/16/2015 8:07 AM

7

Not much growth in eastern story county

6/11/2015 8:34 PM

8

way too much on north side -

6/10/2015 12:35 AM

9

Mostly college students

6/8/2015 8:43 AM

10

but primarily in Ames in my view

6/8/2015 2:51 AM

11

Growth is relative, perhaps Ames has had a lot of growth compared with other Iowa towns. Growth here is not 'fast' like truly fast growing areas on the west coast.

6/6/2015 2:49 AM

12

growth is not necessarily good, e.g. growth of ISU student population without growth in housing to go with it.

6/4/2015 7:27 PM

13

University related

6/1/2015 12:48 PM

14

Look at all the new building in ames

5/31/2015 6:33 AM

15

ugly growth

5/30/2015 12:32 AM

16

Thanks to ISU

5/29/2015 11:26 PM

17

It depends on the town

5/29/2015 6:42 PM

18

The Ames area has experienced a lot of growth, and that's what I see most.

5/29/2015 2:44 PM

19

i define growth by the realestate properties i see popping up everywhere

5/28/2015 8:43 PM

20

Mostly just Ames and the surrounding area.

5/28/2015 4:07 PM

21

We should stop talking about growth as desireable. Let's start planning for a no-growth policy.

5/28/2015 11:34 AM

22

ONly in Ames

5/28/2015 10:18 AM

23

Bondurant, NP anbd Ballard have grown a lot. I think it will start entering Southern Story County near Maxwell

5/28/2015 9:40 AM

24

At least in relation to ISU students

5/28/2015 9:26 AM

25

Cancer grows very fast. Cancer is not healthy. We need a sustainable community.

5/27/2015 11:31 PM

26

that needs advertised better...

5/27/2015 9:28 PM

27

Excluding ISU students

5/27/2015 8:37 PM

Q32 How would you direct County civic leaders and planners with regard to land use policies and regulations? Answered: 516

Skipped: 168

74 / 95

| B-75


B.1

Citizen Survey Results Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Be LESS restrictive;...

Be MORE restrictive;...

Current policies are...

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Answer Choices

Responses

Be LESS restrictive; allow MORE flexibility for where and how land may be used and developed

28.29%

146

Be MORE restrictive; allow LESS flexibility for where and how land may be used and developed

40.89%

211

Current policies are okay

30.81%

159

Total

516

#

Comments

Date

1

There are too many exceptions made to existing policies

7/9/2015 11:10 PM

2

I will be moving out of the county due to overdevelopment surrounding me in rural area.

6/26/2015 6:32 PM

3

The best cities in the U.S. implement carefully managed development plans and do not allow random, unrestricted development. Such development pays no heed to the character of the region, historical significance, preservation of natural resources, etc. Infrastructure needed to support random development is more costly and less reliable. This has to be managed for long-term sustainability of all that we have now.

6/26/2015 8:01 AM

4

Needs to case by case basis.

6/25/2015 6:30 PM

5

The county gave away too much control to the City of Ames. Rural residents are being restricted too much.

6/24/2015 7:27 PM

6

Cannot answer this in a general way; depends upon specifics of each proposal.

6/23/2015 8:49 AM

7

balanced approach

6/20/2015 11:16 AM

8

development or new construction should not be allowed in a floodplain.

6/18/2015 10:16 PM

9

Use more common sense when dealing with pre-existing land use conditions!

6/18/2015 2:38 PM

10

There's been a lot of goofy sprawl - stop trying to be Ankeny!

6/17/2015 3:04 PM

11

I am not up to date on these policies as they don't seem to affect me much

6/17/2015 11:09 AM

12

Building on prime farmland & in flood plains should be reconsidered.

6/15/2015 3:36 PM

13

'quit allowing developers to strip topsoil from subdivisions!

6/15/2015 12:39 PM

14

Eliminate the use of "Home Owners Associations" and similar restrictive covenants

6/15/2015 11:38 AM

15

protect soil, water, open areas we have enough people here lets concentrate on quality not quantity

6/15/2015 11:09 AM

16

Require higher development standards, but streamline the development process.

6/12/2015 1:47 PM

17

keep development OUT of floodplain, no exceptions

6/12/2015 12:03 PM

18

Nevada is land locked & needs more growth, like Ames.

6/11/2015 8:34 PM

19

Not overly restrictive but evaluate track apartment development policies and cloned housing

6/10/2015 11:33 AM

75 / 95

B-76


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey 20

Ames rental regulations are nuts!!

6/9/2015 11:37 AM

21

Find balance between preserving flood plain areas and developing new affordable housing that doesn't cater

6/9/2015 6:57 AM

exclusively to students. 22

Less hassles for businesses trying to come in - signage, etc.

6/9/2015 6:37 AM

23

Ames seems to have a plan more or less. The expansion of the Tech Park is great for the future.

6/6/2015 2:49 AM

24

don't take away farm land; stop making apartments with businesses underneath, they are all the same-coffee shops and fitness facilities that cater to ISU students, what about the rest of the citizens that are here year round?

6/5/2015 3:39 PM

25

be intentional about community planning and development

6/5/2015 3:17 PM

26

flood plains specifically need more restrictions

6/4/2015 8:33 PM

27

not sure

6/4/2015 7:27 PM

28

During times of greater growth, it is more important to use sound planning and avoid a free-for-all that will bite us later

6/4/2015 12:06 PM

29

protect our water and air quality

6/2/2015 3:22 PM

30

Not sure, depends on each situation

6/1/2015 8:20 PM

31

not sure

6/1/2015 9:54 AM

32

It would be nice to have more acreage dwellings available, but it's good/important to protect the farmland.

5/31/2015 3:03 PM

33

Of couse they should allow only what I want withing sight of my property

5/31/2015 6:33 AM

34

eminant domain should only be utilized if there is no other option. Example: If a proposed project has another route that doesn't require the use of eminant domain. That option that doesn't require the use of eminant domain should be used.

5/30/2015 5:21 PM

35

depends on the situation

5/30/2015 9:56 AM

36

No comment as I'm not up to date on current policy

5/30/2015 9:06 AM

37

I am not aware of current policies

5/29/2015 10:37 PM

38

Don't allow so many apartments to be built, enrollment will fall

5/29/2015 9:15 PM

39

don't build on farm land

5/29/2015 6:51 PM

40

more restrictive on flood plain building.

5/29/2015 6:29 PM

41

Balancing the health needs of the citizens (water quality, air quality, allergies, etc.) With the current culture, this may seem like getting my cake and eating it too.

5/29/2015 6:13 PM

42

Be SMARTLY restrictive. Continued development in flood plains, for example, is crazy.

5/29/2015 2:44 PM

43

each case is different and looked at

5/29/2015 2:32 PM

44

no more apartments

5/29/2015 2:30 PM

45

state laws restrict county options where most needed - factory farms

5/29/2015 2:29 PM

46

Keep buildings/bussinesses and residencial out of 500 yr flood palins

5/29/2015 1:57 PM

47

but the city of Ames planning office is not easy to work wtih, won't return calls, do not follow up on things; growth on S Duff is ridiculous as this area will flood again and those businesses who have been in place prior to 2008 will see catastrophic damage when we have major flooding again

5/29/2015 12:47 PM

48

more restrictive when it affects water air quality otherwise current level ok.

5/29/2015 11:54 AM

49

I don't think that any of these really fit as the subject is too broad. in some areas we neex more restrictions, in others, fewer.

5/29/2015 11:22 AM

50

Natural areas need greater protection

5/29/2015 10:52 AM

51

We really just need the right types of restrictions. Environmentally hazardous operations should not be located near sensitive environments; like hog lots next to a water way.

5/28/2015 4:07 PM

52

Again - 35 acre minimum keeps out people from building or buying in the county. So you allow a cheap mobile home on 50 acres but not a new house on 1 acre? That doesn't make sense.

5/28/2015 3:42 PM

53

not sure

5/28/2015 3:33 PM

76 / 95

| B-77


B.1

Citizen Survey Results Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

54

Planning and Zoning needs to act like they exist.

5/28/2015 2:43 PM

55

Policies should not necessarily be opened wide, but should be more nuanced. Regulations should be more thoughtful and customized to Story County's needs, and not assumed to be necessary just because they are standard practice elsewhere.

5/28/2015 12:19 PM

56

Iowa has the most fertile land in the world. Stop covering it with roads and buildings. Our soils are need to grow food (not feed and fuel).

5/28/2015 11:34 AM

57

More restrictive in some ways, less in others. Update goals with public participation

5/28/2015 11:15 AM

58

Rural areas and farms need to be protected

5/28/2015 11:14 AM

59

Overall just less development on the flood plain, less agricultural land directly bordering lakes and streams

5/28/2015 9:53 AM

60

Be hardasses.

5/28/2015 9:26 AM

61

We need a park in the natural wetlands, not SuperWalMart and Target.

5/27/2015 11:31 PM

62

It shouldn't be about strictness. Set goals and be flexible in regard to achieving them.

5/27/2015 9:49 PM

63

If it makes sense... Don't trash the enviroment, but be open to discussion so all parties know what is expected.

5/27/2015 9:28 PM

64

Stop building in the flood plain

5/27/2015 9:17 PM

65

not familiar with county land use policy, only Ames.

5/27/2015 8:27 PM

66

Except no more development in flood plains!

5/27/2015 7:44 PM

67

Big developers seem to have much sway with city councils--more, I think, than they should.

5/27/2015 4:10 PM

Q33 Whenever a development project is proposed, be it new homes, new commercial or manufacturing uses, or mining or energy uses, County leaders must balance competing interests. Please indicate the importance of each of the following to you: Answered: 546

Skipped: 138

100%

80%

60%

40%

20%

0% Preserving rural character and scenery

Very Important Unimportant

Attracting industry and potentia...

Preserving agricultura l land and production

Important

Somewhat Important

Not Applicable

77 / 95

B-78

Increased renewable energy production

Protecting existing residential areas

Protecting natural resources, includin...

Somewhat Unimportant


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Very Important

Important

Preserving rural character and scenery

39.08% 213

34.31% 187

19.63% 107

Attracting industry and potential jobs

21.59% 117

43.91% 238

Preserving agricultural land and production

29.83% 162

Increased renewable energy production Protecting existing residential areas

Protecting natural resources, including air and water quality

Somewhat Important

Somewhat Unimportant

Unimportant

Not Applicable

Total

Weighted Average

4.22% 23

1.83% 10

0.92% 5

545

1.98

27.68% 150

3.87% 21

1.48% 8

1.48% 8

542

2.24

37.94% 206

22.47% 122

5.89% 32

2.21% 12

1.66% 9

543

2.18

39.34% 214

33.82% 184

17.10% 93

4.78% 26

3.13% 17

1.84% 10

544

2.04

36.04% 195

44.55% 241

13.31% 72

3.70% 20

1.29% 7

1.11% 6

541

1.93

70.17% 381

22.84% 124

5.52% 30

0.55% 3

0.00% 0

0.92% 5

543

1.40

Q34 The planning process will include regional public workshops in June 2015 to address topics of particular concern to residents. Please indicate your interest in attending a workshop to discuss each of the following issues. Answered: 531

Skipped: 153

78 / 95

| B-79


B.1

Citizen Survey Results Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Roads and Highways

Transportation Services

Housing

Education

Land Development ...

Wind Farms

Wind Farms

Floodplain Regulation Economic Development

Farmland Preservation Recreation, Park and Trails

Natural Resource... 0

Very Interested Roads and Highways

1

Interested

2

3

4

Somewhat Interested

5

6

Somewhat Uninterested

7

8

9

Uninterested

Very Uninterested

10

Total

Weighted Average

11.22% 58

18.57% 96

29.21% 151

14.31% 74

19.73% 102

6.96% 36

517

3.34

10.83% 56

14.31% 74

29.98% 155

17.60% 91

20.70% 107

6.58% 34

517

3.43

14.86% 77

21.24% 110

29.15% 151

13.32% 69

15.83% 82

5.60% 29

518

3.11

14.20% 73

23.74% 122

27.82% 143

14.20% 73

14.40% 74

5.64% 29

514

3.08

Land Development and Growth

17.32% 89

27.43% 141

28.02% 144

10.12% 52

11.67% 60

5.45% 28

514

2.88

Wind Farms

11.63% 5

23.26% 10

27.91% 12

16.28% 7

13.95% 6

6.98% 3

43

3.19

9.67% 50

24.95% 129

29.59% 153

14.89% 77

14.31% 74

6.58% 34

517

3.19

Transportation Services

Housing

Education

Wind Farms

79 / 95

B-80


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Floodplain Regulation

Economic Development

Farmland Preservation

Recreation, Park and Trails Natural Resource Protection

15.44%

23.55%

25.87%

13.51%

15.06%

6.56%

80

122

134

70

78

34

12.48%

26.12%

28.27%

15.01%

13.45%

4.68%

64

134

145

77

69

24

9.68%

17.39%

28.26%

18.97%

19.37%

6.32%

49

88

143

96

98

32

27.78%

26.63%

26.25%

9.20%

6.70%

3.45%

145

139

137

48

35

28.54% 147

25.83% 133

24.66% 127

9.13% 47

7.57% 39

518

3.09

513

3.05

506

3.40

18

522

2.51

4.27% 22

515

2.54

#

Comments

Date

1

Isn't June over now? I'm confused

7/9/2015 11:10 PM

2

County TIF uses and options

6/18/2015 2:38 PM

3

So long as these things are in Ames (aka where most of the population and economy of Story County is).

6/17/2015 3:04 PM

4

Workshops are ineffective

6/16/2015 8:07 AM

5

Protecting what natural resources? Mostly already gone in Iowa. It is too late at this late date. That train left the station

6/6/2015 2:49 AM

6

I distrust public workshops

6/4/2015 10:12 AM

7

I forgot to mention regarding transportation: increasing public transportation strategically would be beneficial. In Ames, at least, it seems all the public buses travel virtually the same over-trodden routes, leaving sections of the city with just one bus line. I live 3.5 miles from my workplace, but it would take me over an hour to commute by bus to my workplace, because there is one single bus that travels near my apartment complex, and I'd have to take a transfer.

6/2/2015 12:07 PM

What about buses to visit areas outside the city? I'd support efforts to encourage less car use and more public transport if the efforts would increase access to places that people can generally only get to by car or getting a ride with someone else, such as county parks, or transport from Ames to Story City (for instance). Similarly, passenger rail service between some of the county's towns and cities could help promote more public transport and bring more visitors to some of these smaller towns that might benefit economically from more people being able to visit them. 8

This survey goes on and on.

5/31/2015 6:33 AM

9

no meetings

5/30/2015 3:13 PM

10

Hey, this is kind of short notice and a lot of us have already made plans and will be gone in June! Is this the only chance we'll have?????????

5/29/2015 2:44 PM

11

Need workshop on local foods, all renewable energy (not just wind farms). I don't consider biofuel plants as renewable energy.

5/28/2015 11:34 AM

12

Sorry, but these sessions come across as a formality. For example, do you really think a workshop on education will truly change practice?

5/27/2015 9:49 PM

13

You have "Wind Farms" twice. Is solar an alternative? Not farms but supporting solar installations on homes and businesses?

5/27/2015 4:10 PM

Q35 Your age (person filling out the survey) Answered: 542

Skipped: 142

80 / 95

| B-81


B.1

Citizen Survey Results Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Under 18 yrs old

18 - 34 yrs

35 - 49 yrs

50 - 64 yrs

65 and older

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

Answer Choices

60%

70%

90%

100%

Responses 3

Under 18 yrs old

0.55%

18 - 34 yrs

19.56%

106

35 - 49 yrs

33.03%

179

50 - 64 yrs

32.84%

178

65 and older

14.02%

76

Total

542

Q36 How many people in each of the following age groups live in your household, including yourself? Answered: 543

Skipped: 141

81 / 95

B-82

80%


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey 0 - 5 yrs

6 - 17 yrs

18 - 34 yrs

35 - 49 yrs

50 - 64 yrs

65 and older

0%

10%

1

1 0 - 5 yrs

6 - 17 yrs

18 - 34 yrs

35 - 49 yrs

50 - 64 yrs

65 and older

20%

2

30%

3

40%

4

2

50%

5

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

6 or more

3

4

5

6 or more

Total

59.49% 47

32.91% 26

7.59% 6

0.00% 0

0.00% 0

0.00% 0

79

43.51% 67

37.66% 58

15.58% 24

3.25% 5

0.00% 0

0.00% 0

154

55.43% 97

41.14% 72

1.71% 3

1.14% 2

0.57% 1

0.00% 0

175

36.49% 77

63.03% 133

0.00% 0

0.00% 0

0.00% 0

0.47% 1

211

46.60% 96

52.91% 109

0.49% 1

0.00% 0

0.00% 0

0.00% 0

206

48.42% 46

50.53% 48

1.05% 1

0.00% 0

0.00% 0

0.00% 0

95

Q37 What is your occupation? Answered: 479

Skipped: 205

82 / 95

| B-83


B.1

Citizen Survey Results Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Farming

Education Instructor &...

Student

Manufacturing

Sales

Health Care Industry

Government

Management

Homemaker

Retired

Service

Unemployed

Transportation

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

Answer Choices

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Responses

Farming

1.46%

7

Education - Instructor & Admin

20.04%

96

Student

3.34%

16

Manufacturing

2.71%

13

Sales

5.64%

27

Health Care Industry

7.72%

37

Government

16.28%

78

7.93%

38

5.22%

25

Management Homemaker

83 / 95

B-84


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Retired

16.28%

78

Service

11.27%

54

Unemployed

1.04%

5

Transportation

1.04%

5

Total

479

#

Other (please specify)

Date

1

AGRICULTURAL SUPPLY

7/31/2015 2:09 PM

2

University

7/26/2015 3:39 PM

3

Financial Services

7/13/2015 3:39 PM

4

Attorney

7/8/2015 8:14 AM

5

and light manufacturing, self employed

6/26/2015 6:33 PM

6

engineer

6/26/2015 1:49 PM

7

technology

6/26/2015 9:42 AM

8

Ministry

6/25/2015 7:40 PM

9

graphics technologist

6/25/2015 6:32 PM

10

Communications

6/25/2015 10:58 AM

11

Research assistant

6/25/2015 9:53 AM

12

retired nurse

6/23/2015 11:26 PM

13

Professional

6/23/2015 8:49 AM

14

Human Services

6/22/2015 11:48 AM

15

Accountant

6/17/2015 9:22 PM

16

design

6/17/2015 5:31 PM

17

ISU

6/17/2015 11:10 AM

18

Nonprofit - professional

6/16/2015 11:26 AM

19

Why won't this let me pick more than one option? I have multiple occupations

6/16/2015 8:09 AM

20

Childcare provider

6/15/2015 5:25 PM

21

Horse stable boarding

6/15/2015 3:39 PM

22

Landscape Architect

6/15/2015 12:40 PM

23

Scientist, educator, land manager, farmer, naturalist, handyman, photographer,volunteer

6/15/2015 11:14 AM

24

Self-employed, landscaping

6/15/2015 9:30 AM

25

Engineering

6/12/2015 5:02 PM

26

Real Estate

6/12/2015 12:07 PM

27

Own business

6/12/2015 9:56 AM

28

Small Business Owner

6/12/2015 8:28 AM

29

non-profit

6/11/2015 9:13 PM

30

Non-Profit

6/11/2015 4:04 PM

31

Retired teacher; currently consult and adjunct teach

6/10/2015 11:35 AM

32

nonprofit

6/9/2015 7:14 PM

33

Natural resources

6/9/2015 8:45 AM

84 / 95

| B-85


B.1

Citizen Survey Results Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

34

Religious

6/8/2015 8:44 AM

35

Research and education

6/6/2015 2:51 AM

36

noyb

6/5/2015 8:46 PM

37

I work at non-profit, my husband is a public servant in the county

6/5/2015 3:40 PM

38

Self-employed, publishing

6/4/2015 7:29 PM

39

homemaker & freelance artist

6/3/2015 10:31 PM

40

I am a retired High School Guidance Counselor and Community College Instructor.

6/3/2015 10:07 PM

41

Construction & Church Ministry

6/3/2015 8:03 PM

42

Software developer! Why is that not on this list?! There's TONS of IT workers in Ames!

6/3/2015 11:24 AM

43

Construction

6/3/2015 7:44 AM

44

Non-profit communications

6/2/2015 12:09 PM

45

Ag Business

6/1/2015 10:40 PM

46

Engineer

6/1/2015 10:40 AM

47

Retail

5/31/2015 6:28 AM

48

Recptionist at RV center in town.

5/30/2015 11:11 PM

49

TECHNOLOGY

5/30/2015 10:22 PM

50

Butcher

5/30/2015 5:23 PM

51

Technology (computer/software)

5/30/2015 11:00 AM

52

It

5/30/2015 9:33 AM

53

Real estate photographer

5/30/2015 7:41 AM

54

nontraditional student - returned to college for better job opps

5/29/2015 11:28 PM

55

Recreation

5/29/2015 11:23 PM

56

volunteer

5/29/2015 11:18 PM

57

Recreation

5/29/2015 7:15 PM

58

Admin at a church

5/29/2015 6:53 PM

59

realtor

5/29/2015 6:31 PM

60

Sales

5/29/2015 5:42 PM

61

Finance

5/29/2015 5:21 PM

62

small meat processor

5/29/2015 4:41 PM

63

Tech (Software Training/Support for a local software company)

5/29/2015 4:08 PM

64

I don't know how to specify what I do, sorry.

5/29/2015 2:47 PM

65

Freelance court reporter

5/29/2015 12:16 PM

66

Human Services

5/29/2015 11:03 AM

67

Church Administration

5/29/2015 10:24 AM

68

Agricultural teaching

5/29/2015 9:46 AM

69

Tourism

5/29/2015 9:41 AM

70

businessman

5/29/2015 9:30 AM

71

Mother/Marketing Assistant

5/29/2015 8:48 AM

72

electrician

5/29/2015 8:43 AM

73

Utilities

5/29/2015 7:38 AM

74

Babysit occasionally

5/28/2015 11:26 PM

85 / 95

B-86


Story County Comprehensive Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone 75

non-profit admin

5/28/2015 8:45 PM

76

Technology/Software

5/28/2015 5:47 PM

77

Engineer

5/28/2015 3:28 PM

78

Admin Assist

5/28/2015 3:25 PM

79

Marketing/Technology

5/28/2015 1:38 PM

80

human services

5/28/2015 11:57 AM

81

marketing

5/28/2015 11:25 AM

82

Agricultural Research

5/28/2015 11:15 AM

83

Laboratory

5/28/2015 9:36 AM

84

Professional

5/27/2015 9:29 PM

85

Teach part-time (college)

5/27/2015 6:06 PM

Q38 Where is your place of employment? Answered: 535

Skipped: 149

86 / 95

| B-87


B.1

Citizen Survey Results Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Not Employed

Ames

Cambridge

Colo

Gilbert

Huxley

Kelley

Maxwell

McCallsburg

Nevada

Roland

Sheldahl

Slater

Story City

Zearing

Elsewhere within Story... Des Moines Metro

Collins

Other (please specify) 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

Answer Choices

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Responses 14.58%

Not Employed

87 / 95

B-88

50%

78


Story County Comprehensive Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone 279

Ames

52.15%

Cambridge

0.37%

2

Colo

0.56%

3

Gilbert

0.75%

4

Huxley

1.31%

7

Kelley

0.00%

0

Maxwell

1.12%

6

McCallsburg

0.00%

0

Nevada

10.65%

57

Roland

1.31%

7

Sheldahl

0.00%

0

Slater

0.19%

1

Story City

3.36%

18

Zearing

0.19%

1

Elsewhere within Story County

0.93%

5

Des Moines Metro

3.93%

21

Collins

0.37%

2

Other (please specify)

8.22%

44

Total

535

#

Other (please specify)

Date

1

outside county; other counties

6/30/2015 1:05 PM

2

rural outside of Ames

6/26/2015 6:33 PM

3

Central Iowa region

6/26/2015 10:32 AM

4

Boone county but have an Ames address

6/25/2015 6:51 PM

5

Boone County

6/24/2015 7:29 PM

6

full time Ames, part time Story City prior to retirement

6/23/2015 11:26 PM

7

ankeny

6/19/2015 5:07 AM

8

Franklin township

6/17/2015 9:22 PM

9

rural, various communities, natural areas depending on task at the time

6/15/2015 11:14 AM

10

ISU

6/13/2015 5:17 PM

11

Retired

6/12/2015 4:56 PM

12

Live in Huxley but work in Ankeny.

6/12/2015 1:48 PM

13

Nevada

6/12/2015 8:28 AM

14

Home based

6/10/2015 11:35 AM

15

Des Moines

6/9/2015 7:14 PM

16

Marshalltown

6/5/2015 10:38 AM

17

at my home

6/4/2015 7:29 PM

88 / 95

| B-89


B.1

Citizen Survey Results

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

18

self-employed

6/3/2015 10:31 PM

19

Before retirement I was most recently employed at North Polk H.S in Alleman,Iowa, and then worked partime at DMACC at the Boone Campus for 5 years.

6/3/2015 10:07 PM

20

Part-time (retired from full-time employment)

6/3/2015 12:51 PM

21

rural Ames

6/1/2015 3:35 PM

22

Ankeny

6/1/2015 2:07 PM

23

ellsworth

5/31/2015 9:53 PM

24

urbandale, boone

5/31/2015 8:57 PM

25

I work in service all over story and Boone county

5/31/2015 6:35 AM

26

Ankeny

5/30/2015 9:00 PM

27

prev. 15 yrs ames

5/30/2015 3:14 PM

28

retired

5/30/2015 9:57 AM

29

Work remotely.

5/30/2015 9:21 AM

30

I drive where ever i am needed

5/30/2015 7:41 AM

31

daycare provider in home

5/29/2015 10:16 PM

32

Telecommute from Ames for Chicago company

5/29/2015 9:17 PM

33

Sales territory withing the state of Iowa.

5/29/2015 5:42 PM

34

Don't think I have one in the sense you mean.

5/29/2015 2:47 PM

35

Story county plus travel to other areas in Iowa

5/29/2015 12:16 PM

36

Retired from isu

5/29/2015 9:46 AM

37

I do online marketing for a business that works in Iowa/NE Nebraska also work at a local business in Ames

5/29/2015 8:48 AM

38

Boone

5/29/2015 7:13 AM

39

Varies on where the kid lives

5/28/2015 11:26 PM

40

retired but was in Ames

5/28/2015 12:13 PM

41

A Commission

5/28/2015 9:32 AM

42

Retired

5/27/2015 9:59 PM

43

Traveling nurse

5/27/2015 9:12 PM

44

self-employed in a variety of locations

5/27/2015 4:13 PM

Q39 What type of dwelling do you live in? Answered: 542

Skipped: 142

89 / 95

B-90


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Farmstead

Single-Family Home

Mobile Home

Condominium

Unit in a duplex Unit in an apartment... Unit in assisted liv... Other (please specify) 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

Answer Choices

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Responses 34

Farmstead

6.27%

Single-Family Home

77.31%

Mobile Home

1.48%

8

Condominium

2.58%

14

Unit in a duplex

4.24%

23

Unit in an apartment facility

5.72%

31

Unit in assisted living facility

0.00%

0

Other (please specify)

2.40%

13

419

Total

542

#

Other (please specify)

Date

1

Commercial building with residential

7/26/2015 6:07 PM

2

Very large rural acreage

7/9/2015 11:11 PM

3

Own a town-home that is part of a duplex.

7/7/2015 11:14 PM

4

acreage

6/24/2015 7:29 PM

5

single family rural home

6/15/2015 11:14 AM

6

Duplex on acrerage that is farmed.

6/13/2015 7:19 PM

7

retirement commmunity

6/7/2015 2:22 PM

8

acreage

6/4/2015 10:50 AM

9

Townhouse

5/30/2015 2:48 PM

10

Acreage

5/29/2015 11:24 PM

11

townhouse

5/29/2015 10:32 AM

90 / 95

| B-91


B.1

Citizen Survey Results

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

12

acerage, but not a farm

5/29/2015 9:30 AM

13

Townhouse

5/27/2015 9:59 PM

Q40 Do you rent or own your home? Answered: 538

Skipped: 146

I own my home

I rent or lease my home

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

Answer Choices

70%

80%

90%

100%

Responses

I own my home

88.10%

474

I rent or lease my home

11.90%

64

Total

538

Q41 Do you live in unincorporated Story County or within a City in Story County? Answered: 540

Skipped: 144

Unincorporated Story County

Within a City in Story County

Unsure if in City or in...

Not Applicable - Live Outsi...

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

91 / 95

B-92

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Answer Choices

Responses

Unincorporated Story County

13.33%

72

Within a City in Story County

82.04%

443

Unsure if in City or in unincorporated area

1.30%

7

Not Applicable - Live Outside Story County

3.33%

18

Total

540

Q42 Where in Story County do you live? Answered: 528

Skipped: 156

92 / 95

| B-93


B.1

Citizen SurveyStoryResults County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

In Maxwell Near Roland In Story City

In Nevada In Sheldahl Near Story City

Other rural area in Story County Near Cambridge Near Huxley In Collins

In Colo In Kelley Near Collins

Near Nevada Near Sheldahl In Zearing In Ames Near Colo Near Kelley In McCallsburg

Answer Choices

Near Maxwell

In Roland

In Slater

Near Slater

Near Zearing Near Ames In Gilbert

In Cambridge Near Gilbert

In Huxley

Other rural area outside Story County Near McCallsburg

Responses

In Maxwell

1.70%

9

In Nevada

11.36%

60

Near Nevada

2.65%

14

0.95%

5

4.36%

23

Near Maxwell

In Roland

93 / 95

B-94


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Plan Citizen Survey Near Roland

0.19%

1

In Sheldahl

0.00%

0

Near Sheldahl

0.00%

0

In Slater

1.33%

7

Near Slater

0.00%

0

In Story City

7.95%

42

Near Story City

1.14%

6

In Zearing

0.19%

1

Near Zearing

0.19%

1

Other rural area in Story County

0.19%

1

In Ames

49.24%

Near Ames

7.39%

39

In Cambridge

0.57%

3

Near Cambridge

0.19%

1

In Colo

1.52%

8

Near Colo

0.76%

4

In Gilbert

1.70%

9

Near Gilbert

1.33%

7

In Huxley

2.84%

15

Near Huxley

0.38%

2

In Kelley

0.19%

1

Near Kelley

0.19%

1

Other rural area outside Story County

0.38%

2

In Collins

0.57%

3

Near Collins

0.19%

1

In McCallsburg

0.00%

0

Near McCallsburg

0.38%

2

260

Total

528

#

Outside Story County; Please indicate

Date

1

Granger, IA

6/10/2015 9:01 AM

2

Polk County

6/6/2015 5:23 PM

3

noyb

6/5/2015 8:46 PM

4

Hardin County

6/5/2015 3:23 PM

5

Boone county - both work in Ames

6/4/2015 10:50 AM

6

we have Story City address in Hamilton Co.

6/4/2015 10:15 AM

94 / 95

| B-95


B.1

Citizen SurveyStoryResults County C2C Plan Citizen Survey

7

Boone County

6/3/2015 10:31 PM

8

Hamilton County

6/3/2015 10:26 PM

9

Polk County

5/28/2015 11:29 AM

10

Des Moines, Polk County

5/28/2015 9:05 AM

95 / 95

B-96


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

This page intentionally left blank

| B-97


B.2

Youth Survey Results Story County C2C Youth Survey Q1 How do you describe Story County and the city you live in to people you know or meet that don't live here? Answered: 103

Skipped: 7

#

Responses

Date

1

Story County is a good place to live. The people here are generally kind, more so in the smaller communities such as Gilbert, Slater, and Roland. Ames provides a mixture of suburban living with a more rural style of neighborhoods perfect for starting a family. Ames has plenty to offer from its large corporations, such as Fareway, Hyvee, Casey's, and Walmart, just to name a few; however, I think it is the smaller businesses that give Ames its distinctive feel. Those in and around campus town receive an abundance of college students.

9/27/2015 8:47 PM

2

I describe Story County as a remotely rural area with parts of higher activity from a population standpoint such as Ames. The overall attitude is a positive one as many people in the county have wonderful characteristics to them.

9/23/2015 9:02 PM

3

A lot of farmers live here. There are a lot of things to do and be apart of to help the community.

9/20/2015 5:56 PM

4

I describe it as a place (Ames) that has a lot of diversity so there are many activities to do, and there is plenty of open space for outdoor activities

9/20/2015 3:33 PM

5

good, I mean everyone is nice and friendly

9/20/2015 1:15 PM

6

I would describe it as a place where everyone knows each other and its just a very welcoming community.

9/20/2015 11:40 AM

7

Rural or suburban communities with regularly caring citizens.

9/20/2015 10:38 AM

8

Story County is a good place. I live in Ames, and I love it here. It consists of a lot of polite people.

9/18/2015 3:02 PM

9

A nice place to live and grow with lots of opportunities

9/18/2015 2:18 PM

10

Gilbert is a very small town and does not have a lot of things to do.

9/18/2015 2:11 PM

11

Small, Friendly, Easy to get around.

9/18/2015 1:25 PM

12

I live in ames and go to school in Gilbert. I describe my school as horrible but Ames is cool and I have enjoyed my 17 years there.

9/18/2015 12:33 PM

13

Small enough to still have a nice community feeling but big enough to offer good oppurtunities

9/17/2015 4:58 PM

14

A good place to live.

9/17/2015 4:09 PM

15

.

9/17/2015 3:09 PM

16

A nice quiet town, safe, good places to go and an awesome college.

9/17/2015 1:28 PM

17

I would describe it as a place where everyone knows everyone. When you go the the grocery store you will surely see someone you know, and I love that aspect of it.

9/17/2015 12:44 PM

18

If I was to describe Story County, I would say something along the lines of, "It's nice if you like more rural places or are planning into joing ISU, but if you're looking for a place like San Fransisco or NYC, steer clear."

9/17/2015 12:35 PM

19

it's a great place to be

9/17/2015 12:24 PM

20

I would say that it's a great community and has lots of services.

9/17/2015 12:17 PM

21

I think that people here are nice.

9/17/2015 11:30 AM

22

It's a great community but the school rivalry can sometimes escalate farther than it should.

9/17/2015 11:18 AM

23

A place to feel safe and meet a lot of inspiring people.

9/17/2015 11:13 AM

24

It is a nice community that is helpful to peopl

9/17/2015 11:11 AM

25

Good place to have a family.

9/17/2015 11:07 AM

26

It is wonderful and freindly

9/17/2015 10:57 AM

27

I like Gilbert and how its a smaller town and most of the people are very friendly. I live in the part of Gilbert where the roundabout just got installed so trying to get to school is sort of a hassle but its manageable.

9/17/2015 10:48 AM

1 / 20

B-98


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Youth Survey 28

Story County is fun. I live in a small town so everyone knows everybody and we all support eachother unless its Rhonda Applegate

9/17/2015 10:46 AM

29

Small, everyone knows everyone

9/17/2015 10:44 AM

30

It is a friendly town and a perfect size for any type of family

9/17/2015 10:44 AM

31

boring

9/17/2015 10:23 AM

32

Very very white.

9/17/2015 10:06 AM

33

It is a rural county where everyone knows each other.

9/17/2015 9:40 AM

34

It is a very friendly city and the people are helpful.

9/17/2015 9:09 AM

35

The people that live in story county are very polite. We always wave at everyone when we drive past them. And they always wave back!

9/17/2015 9:06 AM

36

Story County is small and tight knit.

9/17/2015 9:01 AM

37

Small... based on location of Ames and E-18

9/17/2015 8:59 AM

38

Gilbert and Story County is calm and most everyone is nice.

9/17/2015 8:52 AM

39

Corn

9/17/2015 8:48 AM

40

I say that I live north of Des Moines.

9/17/2015 8:42 AM

41

A nice city with Iowa State University.

9/17/2015 8:40 AM

42

Story County is a great starter place but there are better places to live once you look at the future.

9/17/2015 8:39 AM

43

IT is a nice place to live full of nice people. Everyone is kind and welcoming.

9/17/2015 8:39 AM

44

Story County is a nice enough place. Great to live in but not visit. But that can be said for all of Iowa. Ames, however, attracts tons of people due to its sports. We have a very successful basketball team, a popular football team, and more.

9/17/2015 8:36 AM

45

A county in the middle of Iowa that is home to some small towns that have almost nothing around, If you want to do anything go down to Des Moines unless you want to eat at Hickory park.

9/17/2015 8:30 AM

46

We're more humble, friendly, and polite. However, a lot of farmers are less able for others to relate to.

9/17/2015 8:25 AM

47

It's a good community that's small and friendly

9/17/2015 8:21 AM

48

Its pretty small, and is a good community.

9/17/2015 8:20 AM

49

mix of college campus and family residents, fin atmosphere

9/17/2015 8:09 AM

50

It is a small city where most people know each other. I consider it to be a very safe place.

9/16/2015 11:16 PM

51

Story county is well taken care of. If someone is doing something wrong, Story county tries their hardest to fix it and make it better. Most people are polite, it is nice we all live in small towns.

9/16/2015 11:14 PM

52

I would say that Story County is a clean, friendly community with competitive kids in sports and 4-H.

9/16/2015 10:52 PM

53

Large school in a small town

9/16/2015 9:41 PM

54

It's a small county in the center of Iowa.

9/16/2015 9:38 PM

55

amazing

9/16/2015 9:38 PM

56

Nice and friendly city.

9/16/2015 8:58 PM

57

Cyclone country baby!!! Small town atmosphere but you can meet new people all the time

9/16/2015 8:55 PM

58

I live in a small town environment with lots of support and people from the ames territory. It is small but strong! We have great involvement within the commuity

9/16/2015 8:44 PM

59

a safe and enjoyable city full of caring and helping people

9/16/2015 8:41 PM

60

Lots of corn fields and beautiful trees.

9/16/2015 8:26 PM

61

A very nice little county! Very home like. Everyone is for the most part peaceful and treated like family whether you

9/16/2015 8:09 PM

know them or not. 62

flat with no trees and TONS of windmills

9/16/2015 6:37 PM

63

Its smaller but we are really close to one of the greatest colleges in all the midwest.

9/16/2015 5:49 PM

2 / 20

| B-99


B.2

Youth Survey Results Story County C2C Youth Survey

64

It is a nice and welcoming county.

9/16/2015 4:41 PM

65

Good place to live. Nice people.

9/8/2015 4:44 PM

66

A safe and friendly place to grow up in.

9/8/2015 11:12 AM

67

Its a good place to grow up in

8/11/2015 9:57 AM

68

It's a nice small town county.

8/9/2015 12:42 PM

69

People are very friendly and help you with your needs

8/8/2015 9:50 PM

70

Nevada is have great schools

8/7/2015 3:50 PM

71

It's a small town about 15 minutes north of Ames

8/7/2015 3:37 PM

72

Safe and peaceful

8/7/2015 1:29 PM

73

It is a small county and town, and I love living here because everybody is really nice.

8/5/2015 3:39 PM

74

Everybody is very kind and helpful.

8/5/2015 9:37 AM

75

Kind, Respectful, Safe

8/4/2015 12:11 PM

76

It's a small town that you can get along with most people

8/3/2015 11:43 PM

77

A really small town near Ames with lots of corn. Our county in my experienve is actually very nice and providing. We have many opportunities to provide food for children in the summer and backpacks and other schools supplies during the winter. And of course we are state champions for basketball.

8/2/2015 11:26 AM

78

"Story county is a small, yet decent, community. There isn't a lot of inter town interaction, but each town (to my knowledge) has it's own festivities.

7/30/2015 9:48 PM

79

A nice quite town.

7/29/2015 7:38 AM

80

It's a small town where everyone knows you. Lots of things to do.

7/28/2015 10:33 PM

81

I like Story County and I think it is a great place to grow up

7/28/2015 5:05 PM

82

The towns in Story County are nice to live in.

7/28/2015 5:04 PM

83

Lots of countryside and great views

7/28/2015 4:50 PM

84

Slater is fun cause we have a resturante a baseball team and the bike trail

7/28/2015 4:45 PM

85

Small yet still able to accommodate all my needs

7/28/2015 11:24 AM

86

The agriculture industry provides a multitude of jobs and economic importance. The impact of the ag industry provides

7/28/2015 11:23 AM

residents with a high quality of life. 87

Quiet, small farming town close to Ames for good shopping and work opportunities.

7/28/2015 10:40 AM

88

I tell them that Nevada (where I live) is a very nice little town, but there isn't very much for a kid my age as a teenager to do.

7/28/2015 10:11 AM

89

The people seem to be mostly much nicer and pretty friendly.

7/25/2015 6:47 PM

90

The home of Iowa State. It's small, but it is a nice small.

7/25/2015 9:25 AM

91

A good place to live. Nice schools and friendly people. Although there isn't a lot to do.

7/24/2015 5:13 PM

92

For the most part, it is a lot of small towns and schools close together which make for good rivalries. Ames is the place to go if you want to hang out and do things you can't other places. Iowa State makes it fun since it's close by and you can go to college games relatively easy.

7/24/2015 1:52 PM

93

A great county/city that is very safe.

7/23/2015 11:55 PM

94

Nice community with good Schools and active kids.

7/23/2015 10:54 PM

95

It is a horrible place that I hate

7/23/2015 10:16 PM

96

Story county your typical friendly county in Iowa.

7/23/2015 10:07 PM

97

boring

7/23/2015 9:57 PM

98

It's an aight place to live

7/23/2015 7:10 PM

99

It's really friendly and inviting.

7/23/2015 5:00 PM

3 / 20

B-100


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Youth Survey 100

Small towns that are pretty close together. Everyone knows everyone, supportive of others in the community.

7/23/2015 4:55 PM

101

Nice place to live, not a ton to do.

7/23/2015 4:50 PM

102

Great county with better people

7/23/2015 4:45 PM

103

Wide open land with friendly people

7/23/2015 4:45 PM

Q2 What do you like about living and going to school in Story County? Answered: 102

Skipped: 8

#

Responses

Date

1

I like the rural feeling while having all of the comforts a large city has to offer.

9/27/2015 8:47 PM

2

The amount of added classes and benefits it adds to the school districts of the area. This is both from adding

9/23/2015 9:02 PM

Agricultural classes as well as provide space and resources to expand learning inside schools. 3

It has welcoming communities, many events, and fun activities for all ages

9/22/2015 7:05 PM

4

I do like living in story county because because it is mostly country and peaceful. Going to school in story county is great because there aren't as much kids in the district as some places so we have teachers that can actually get to know and connect with each student and care about how they do.

9/20/2015 5:56 PM

5

It isn't very big, and it is easy to know a lot of people in my community. My school is also close to my house.

9/20/2015 3:33 PM

6

what I most like about living and going to school in story county is that everyone is friendly and peaceful also that it is

9/20/2015 1:15 PM

simple to live around other people 7

I like the fact that I don't terribly far away from school but I live far enough away.

9/20/2015 11:40 AM

8

I like the size of the town and community and the type of people you meet.

9/20/2015 10:38 AM

9

My school consists of a tight-knit community of caring people - for the most part.

9/18/2015 3:02 PM

10

The schools are great and everyone lives close so that makes it easier to hang out after school.

9/18/2015 2:18 PM

11

I like how close the school is. I also like the small town to an extent.

9/18/2015 2:11 PM

I like going to school in Story County, because it is small and it's easy to get around. I like how I know everyone/most

9/18/2015 1:25 PM

12

people in my school district and county. 13

It is quite pleasant. Very little to no crime, although my ipod got stolen at school and the principal did very little to help and was pretty horrible at handling a bullying situation last year.

9/18/2015 12:33 PM

14

I have lots of friends and I go to a great school.

9/17/2015 4:58 PM

15

There are good school systems and there are lots of people around.

9/17/2015 4:09 PM

16

.

9/17/2015 3:09 PM

17

People care about others, not just themselves. I have been all around the country and would never live anywhere else.

9/17/2015 1:28 PM

18

I absolutely love living and going to school in story country. I love all the festivals and activities that are always taking place, because it keeps me busy. I also love the school I attend, they make sure that I know how to succeed and make sure that I will reach the goals that I have put out for myself.

9/17/2015 12:44 PM

19

I like that everybody for the most part is friendly at school and no one's been too creepy to me outside of school.

9/17/2015 12:35 PM

20

the people

9/17/2015 12:24 PM

21

It's got a little bit of everything and has great programs for everyone.

9/17/2015 12:17 PM

22

It's a nice, clean, and friendly environment that is easy to live in.

9/17/2015 11:30 AM

23

I love going to school in story county because it's like everyone is your friend and you can ask anyone a question.

9/17/2015 11:18 AM

24

I like it because it's close and has good respectful teachers.

9/17/2015 11:13 AM

25

It allows me to see my friends more often

9/17/2015 11:11 AM

4 / 20

| B-101


B.2

Youth Survey Results Story County C2C Youth Survey

26

Not much to worry about.

9/17/2015 11:07 AM

27

There is endless possibilites.

9/17/2015 10:57 AM

28

The people are very nice and the Gilbert district is a wonderful place to call home.

9/17/2015 10:48 AM

29

It's a small school and I know everyone in my class. The athletics are super fun because all of the surronding schools are competitive.

9/17/2015 10:46 AM

30

Not huge schools more one on one attention

9/17/2015 10:44 AM

31

I like the size and that there are things to do around town

9/17/2015 10:44 AM

32

I know everybody

9/17/2015 10:23 AM

33

It's a seemingly safe environment, but can be too safe at times.

9/17/2015 10:06 AM

34

I like that the school districts are small and in town everyone is friendly.

9/17/2015 9:40 AM

35

The educational system is superior to many other schools in other cities and states. The teachers are awesome at Gilbert!

9/17/2015 9:09 AM

36

I like that it is smaller. Especially where I go it is smaller, so everyone knows everyone.

9/17/2015 9:06 AM

37

I like that Ipretty much know everyone.

9/17/2015 9:01 AM

38

It's small

9/17/2015 8:59 AM

39

It is nearby many homes.

9/17/2015 8:52 AM

40

People are nice.

9/17/2015 8:48 AM

41

Gilbert is an amazing school and it is nice to be in a large town with a small town feel.

9/17/2015 8:42 AM

42

It is small enough to get around easily, but big enough to have lots of fun stuff.

9/17/2015 8:40 AM

43

I know a lot of people in Story county and my school is okay I know a lot of people that go to my school.

9/17/2015 8:39 AM

44

Teachers are nice, have lots of good friends

9/17/2015 8:39 AM

45

I go to Gilbert, which is a great community. What it lacks in size, its academic success makes up for.

9/17/2015 8:36 AM

46

I feel safe to go down the street at night to get a gallon of milk or something like that.

9/17/2015 8:30 AM

47

I go to one of the best schools in the nation, which is why I enjoy it so much. We have a fantastic educational system.

9/17/2015 8:25 AM

48

There's not a lot of people which makes going to school here less intimidating and more friendly

9/17/2015 8:21 AM

49

I like that there isn't a crap-load of people so that's good. Then everyone is super nice.

9/17/2015 8:20 AM

50

I like going to a smaller school and getting to know everyone.

9/16/2015 11:16 PM

51

I like how small some of the communities are. I enjoy having a small school where you know everything about someone.

9/16/2015 11:14 PM

52

I like the amount of parks available to run at for cross country, the clean communities, and the open spaces of prairie in several locations.

9/16/2015 10:52 PM

53

I enjoy living here because it's a small, quaint town. It's just a simple town.

9/16/2015 9:41 PM

54

How nice every single student is.

9/16/2015 9:38 PM

55

small town

9/16/2015 9:38 PM

56

Lots of caring people.

9/16/2015 8:58 PM

57

Small town school feeling but still big enough to meet new people all the time

9/16/2015 8:55 PM

58

I like the fact that I can feel safe and secure in the school that I go to. I also like the supprot from the town for the

9/16/2015 8:44 PM

school system 59

fits our family needs and has everything we need to be successful

9/16/2015 8:41 PM

60

I feel safe.

9/16/2015 8:26 PM

61

I like how small it is and we get the chance to be apart of everything we want to do, in and outside of school.

9/16/2015 8:09 PM

62

Most schools are small and there are many oportunities to get involved with people

9/16/2015 6:37 PM

5 / 20

B-102


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Youth Survey 63

Its small and individualized. Lots of help.

9/16/2015 5:49 PM

64

I like going to Colo-NESCO because I can say I know mostly everyone.

9/16/2015 4:41 PM

65

Smaller schools

9/8/2015 4:44 PM

66

It's competitive but also a big family.

9/8/2015 11:12 AM

67

its nice

8/11/2015 9:57 AM

68

We have a good school and community.

8/9/2015 12:42 PM

69

Everything is close

8/8/2015 9:50 PM

70

people are nice

8/7/2015 3:50 PM

71

I love that I am able to be involved in everything at Roland-Story because of our size. I can be in sports, arts, and

8/7/2015 3:37 PM

clubs. 72

It is safe and you know a lot of people

8/7/2015 1:29 PM

73

I love the teachers at Nevada. Also, the food is really good.

8/5/2015 3:39 PM

74

I like all the people and sports.

8/5/2015 9:37 AM

75

It's small

8/3/2015 11:43 PM

76

I like the small towns in and around story county. Very quaint.

8/2/2015 11:26 AM

77

I live in the country, so I will consider myself exempt from the living in Story County section. As to the school section, I enjoy the various activities that happen. Nevada High School has a rather disappointing reputation involving sex, drugs, and overall "sketchiness.", according to a previous resident of Ames.

7/30/2015 9:48 PM

78

Nice school system with a lot to offer can get a good education.

7/29/2015 7:38 AM

79

The weather and sports.

7/28/2015 10:33 PM

80

I think that story county has a great school and great teacher and staff

7/28/2015 5:05 PM

81

Good community

7/28/2015 5:04 PM

82

the vast forests

7/28/2015 4:50 PM

83

Seeing my friends

7/28/2015 4:45 PM

84

My school isn't big yet it is still a very good education.

7/28/2015 11:24 AM

85

The Nevada High School has one of the best Ag Ed Program & the FFA Chapter is absolutely incredible what it offers for our young people.

7/28/2015 11:23 AM

86

Nevada school's teachers and curriculum challenges me to be the best I can be.

7/28/2015 10:40 AM

87

The schools are just the right size, the classes are very helpful for our future, and teachers are very nice.

7/28/2015 10:11 AM

88

everyone knows each other and includes mostly everyone.

7/25/2015 6:47 PM

89

It's not very far of a commute for me. The school is very good as well.

7/25/2015 9:25 AM

90

The Gilbert school district is a great school to go to. Gilbert is a small, clean town with many friendly people.

7/24/2015 5:13 PM

91

I like how Gilbert is a small school where no matter what sport or performing arts you go out for, you are able to participate and learn from them. I feel safe in story county as well compared to what you see on the news about bigger cities in Iowa and other surrounding states.

7/24/2015 1:52 PM

92

Extremely low crime rates, one of every store/restaurant in the community.

7/23/2015 11:55 PM

93

I like getting evolved, running at parks and participating in the fair.

7/23/2015 10:54 PM

94

I like my family and a few people I call friends and my coworkers

7/23/2015 10:16 PM

95

I like that I feel safe.

7/23/2015 10:07 PM

96

the outdoor opportunities

7/23/2015 9:57 PM

97

I like that the school is nice and the people are okay

7/23/2015 7:10 PM

98

It has nice schools and good friends.

7/23/2015 5:00 PM

99

Driving to and from school is a safe route. I feel safe. I like the small town feel in the whole county.

7/23/2015 4:55 PM

6 / 20

| B-103


B.2

Youth Survey Results Story County C2C Youth Survey

100

School is a fun place to be. Generally a great community.

7/23/2015 4:50 PM

101

The small town enviornment

7/23/2015 4:45 PM

102

Small towns and open land

7/23/2015 4:45 PM

Q3 Has Story County been a good place to grow up and why? Answered: 104

Skipped: 6

#

Responses

Date

1

Yes, by living in Ames and going to a small school, I was in contact with a wide range of people. This helped me learn

9/27/2015 8:47 PM

many things and adopt good habits I may not have today if I had grown up somewhere else. 2

Story County has been a great place to grow up as it has a close feel with only a few major areas however, it also

9/23/2015 9:02 PM

provides an opportunity to meet new people with the wide range of smaller areas. 3

Yes because it has welcoming communities, many events, and fun activities for all ages.

9/22/2015 7:05 PM

4

I think that story county is one of the best places to grow up because there are just small towns within the county and you can grow up knowing your neighbors and who you go to school with.

9/20/2015 5:56 PM

5

Yes, because it was small enough not to overwhelm me

9/20/2015 3:33 PM

6

yes because I feel good living in a place where everything is nice and peaceful

9/20/2015 1:15 PM

7

Yes because everyone is nice and welcoming.

9/20/2015 11:40 AM

8

Yes it has because there are plenty of good role models both at home and in school.

9/20/2015 10:38 AM

9

I have always felt safe here.

9/18/2015 3:02 PM

10

Yes, because people are very nice and the schools are great and it is a great place to live

9/18/2015 2:18 PM

11

yes. There is low crime were I live and there is some stuff of do in Ames.

9/18/2015 2:11 PM

12

Story County has been a good place to grow up because, I know where each school district is/how to get around easily, I like the people, and I have grown up here most of my life.

9/18/2015 1:25 PM

13

I guess, because nothing super horrible has happened here.

9/18/2015 12:33 PM

14

Yes because it has a good education system and it's safe compared to lots of other places.

9/17/2015 4:58 PM

15

Yes, because there are great people who are caring and willing to help.

9/17/2015 4:09 PM

16

Yes, most likely because I live in the country and because of the way I was raised

9/17/2015 3:09 PM

17

Yes, it showed me how to care for others.

9/17/2015 1:28 PM

18

I have loved growing up with Story County because it is filled with good people. Everywhere I go there is someone that surprises me with their sense of courtesy.

9/17/2015 12:44 PM

19

For most people, it is a great place. Although I prefer bustling, loud cities to quiet places like Iowa, it has been

9/17/2015 12:35 PM

enjoyable for the most part. 20

yes because of all the great people

9/17/2015 12:24 PM

21

Yes because it's a very agricultural and safe community.

9/17/2015 12:17 PM

22

I think that Story County has been a good place to grow up in because of its nice environment but at the same time it is boring.

9/17/2015 11:30 AM

23

I think story county has been a good place to grow up in because it is rare to have people that are left out so everyone will fell included and wanted.

9/17/2015 11:18 AM

24

Yes, because story county makes me feel safe, and has good schools for education that will challenge us.

9/17/2015 11:13 AM

25

Yes it has because I have always felt safe and at home

9/17/2015 11:11 AM

26

Yes, because I have a good school and lots of people are nice,

9/17/2015 11:07 AM

7 / 20

B-104


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Youth Survey 27

Yes people have been friendly

9/17/2015 10:57 AM

28

Yes. I have many memories here, good and bad and I love my city and the people in it and the fun things Gilbert has

9/17/2015 10:48 AM

to offer. 29

Yes it had been, there is so much to offer and places to go and people to see.

9/17/2015 10:46 AM

30

Yes because its a small county that has good people that live in it

9/17/2015 10:44 AM

31

Yes, it has always offered me a lot of opportunities

9/17/2015 10:44 AM

32

Yes. Its a nice place

9/17/2015 10:23 AM

33

It has been good because of the safety feeling, but it's too much at times.

9/17/2015 10:06 AM

34

Story County is a good place to grow up because I feel safe. Small schools give a lot of opportunities.

9/17/2015 9:40 AM

35

Yes for the most part because a lot of the kids are nice and fun to be around.

9/17/2015 9:09 AM

36

I think it has. I've always lived here and it is a very safe county.

9/17/2015 9:06 AM

37

I tink Story County has been a good place to be raised because I feel safe.

9/17/2015 9:01 AM

38

Yes, I like it...

9/17/2015 8:59 AM

39

Yes because it is a small town with enough stuff to do that everything is cool.

9/17/2015 8:52 AM

40

I didn't grow up in story county.

9/17/2015 8:48 AM

41

It has been a good place to grow up because I have so many opportunities to improve myself.

9/17/2015 8:42 AM

42

Yes because there are lots of things to do close by.

9/17/2015 8:40 AM

43

It has been a good place to grow up but the school district that I go to has not treated me the best when in comes to a sports stand point.

9/17/2015 8:39 AM

44

Yes, because it is safe and there are lots of things to do

9/17/2015 8:39 AM

45

Yes! It's a peaceful county. Enough things for a child to do, and very safe.

9/17/2015 8:36 AM

46

It's been ok but there are little to none things around here to do and I feel I have to go to Des Moines most of the time to do anything.

9/17/2015 8:30 AM

47

Yes and no. I've had neighbors who have done horrible things to me and my family, but other neighbors have become my best friends.

9/17/2015 8:25 AM

48

I didn't grow up here but it's been good since I've been here

9/17/2015 8:21 AM

49

Story county has been a good place to grow up because everyone is nice and my friends are always close

9/17/2015 8:20 AM

50

yes, not too big

9/17/2015 8:09 AM

51

Yes, I have loved the life I have had and all the neighbors and people I have met.

9/16/2015 11:16 PM

52

Yes, it doesn't have to many crimes, but the ones that happen teach me a lesson on what not to do.

9/16/2015 11:14 PM

53

Story County has been a good place for me to grow up because there are lots of places for me to go and meet new people and things for me to do in this county. I loved going to Peterson Pits, McFarland and Ada Hayden as a kid

9/16/2015 10:52 PM

because it was somewhere new to explore. 54

I think so, then again I've never lived anywhere else so I have no experience of other places. I've enjoyed growing up here because the community is so welcoming, and living close to the school has mainly been beneficial.

9/16/2015 9:41 PM

55

It's been an amazing place to grow up because it's safe, everyone is nice, and there's a lot to do.

9/16/2015 9:38 PM

56

yes it was because it is small everyone knows everybody

9/16/2015 9:38 PM

57

Yes because its lots of open space for you to live and explore.

9/16/2015 8:58 PM

58

Yes, It feels safe, and you really get that small town feeling

9/16/2015 8:55 PM

59

Yes, because I feel like I grew in a controlled safe environment, though sometimes I wish there was more to do

9/16/2015 8:44 PM

60

yes, I grew up here all my life, left the area, and our family failed... so turned out that story county is the only place that our family can be successful

9/16/2015 8:41 PM

61

A very good place to grow up. Almost everyone is very nice and willing to help you out.

9/16/2015 8:26 PM

8 / 20

| B-105


B.2

Youth Survey Results Story County C2C Youth Survey

62

I believe so yes because you get to grow up around a little bit of everything. You have the farms, little towns with little family owned businesses, and bigger towns with more options of shopping stores.

9/16/2015 8:09 PM

63

Yes because there are many nice people around here

9/16/2015 6:37 PM

64

Yes. Very. You have a lot to do and have a lot of time ny yourself to think about stuff.

9/16/2015 5:49 PM

65

Yes, I feel safe here.

9/16/2015 4:41 PM

66

Yes because everybody is friendly and there is plenty of space unlike the city.

9/8/2015 4:44 PM

67

Yes, it's safe.

9/8/2015 11:12 AM

68

yes. its a good place to live and its nice

8/11/2015 9:57 AM

69

It's safe and the people are nice.

8/9/2015 12:42 PM

70

Very good. Small town values are great. Working hard and working together

8/8/2015 9:50 PM

71

because my family live around here

8/7/2015 3:50 PM

72

Yes, I know that my community is safe and I can trust most people here.

8/7/2015 3:37 PM

73

Yes because never have to really worry about much

8/7/2015 1:29 PM

74

I like small towns, so this place is just right for me. :)

8/5/2015 3:39 PM

75

Yes, it is a very nurturing environment.

8/5/2015 9:37 AM

76

Yes, I feel that I am surrounded by people that care about me and other people

8/4/2015 12:11 PM

77

Yes

8/3/2015 11:43 PM

78

Yes because I have had many opportunities to do anything I wanted.

8/2/2015 11:26 AM

79

Please see question 2.

7/30/2015 9:48 PM

80

Yes, its a nice town not a lot happens.

7/29/2015 7:38 AM

81

I think it is a good place to grow up because it's not too big to get lost and it gives kids opportunities.

7/28/2015 10:33 PM

82

yes it has and i like how it has a fun pool and stuff like that

7/28/2015 5:05 PM

83

Yes because I like the people and places

7/28/2015 5:04 PM

84

Yes. I don't have a reason I just like my home

7/28/2015 4:50 PM

85

Yes Iowa state is close we have a pool In town and a can bike around. We have a great Fourth of July celebration

7/28/2015 4:45 PM

86

Yes, there are a lot of opportunities in the area and it's an extremely safe area

7/28/2015 11:24 AM

87

Yes, good schools, and good economic activity.

7/28/2015 11:23 AM

88

For the most part yes. Clean, friendly,quiet place.

7/28/2015 10:40 AM

89

In my opinion Story County is a great place to grow up because the people are great and the places to go are fun.

7/28/2015 10:11 AM

90

its a family friendly environment

7/25/2015 6:47 PM

91

Yes, it's a safe place with opportunities to learn and grow.

7/25/2015 9:25 AM

92

I think it has been a good place to grow up in. The school district is one of the best in Iowa.

7/24/2015 5:13 PM

93

Yes because as I mentioned before, I am able to get involved in basically anything I want to. Also you get to experience college life in a way being so close to Iowa State and seeing the students around so much,

7/24/2015 1:52 PM

94

Yes. I have had very good experiences with education, youth recreation programs, etc.

7/23/2015 11:55 PM

95

Yes, it has lots of opportunities for me.

7/23/2015 10:54 PM

96

Eh. The school I go to Gilbert is my least favorite place in the world

7/23/2015 10:16 PM

97

Yes, because it is safe, and a good size. People care about things and eachother. On the flip side, there's not much to

7/23/2015 10:07 PM

do in story county. 98

yes. it is a very friendly place

7/23/2015 9:57 PM

99

It has been a good place to live, but it needs to get rid of religion to truly move forward

7/23/2015 7:10 PM

100

Yes because I love my friends at Gilbert.

7/23/2015 5:00 PM

9 / 20

B-106


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Youth Survey 101

Yes. Many opportunities as a little kid to try new things. As I got older there are still many opportunities. Very safe place to grow up.

7/23/2015 4:55 PM

102

Yes, it's a safe place. There are bad parts of town, but no one is worried about walking down main street or hanging

7/23/2015 4:50 PM

out at the park. 103

Yes, it has taught me to work hard for the things I want

7/23/2015 4:45 PM

104

Yes because I haven't had to deal with crazy people on the roads or streets that could potentially harm me or my family

7/23/2015 4:45 PM

Q4 What would you like to change about Story County and your city? Answered: 99

Skipped: 11

#

Responses

Date

1

I would like to see more focus on retaining farmland and wildlife areas. Our cities should grow up more than they should grow out.

9/27/2015 8:47 PM

2

The only thing I would change about Story County as a whole is perhaps offer more connection from school to school in certain activities such as whole county conventions for high school students or interactions in which students from each school can bond with one another on any topic.

9/23/2015 9:02 PM

3

none

9/22/2015 7:05 PM

4

Nothing.

9/20/2015 5:56 PM

5

Better roads, and also less time to fix the roads, there always seems to be construction that lasts too long.

9/20/2015 3:33 PM

6

Maybe, start a cleaning process because I seen lots of trash around the streets

9/20/2015 1:15 PM

7

I would change the way we do early out Wednesdays because even though they help a little, they aren't helping a whole lot for the students.

9/20/2015 11:40 AM

8

Diminish the difference between the "have" and "have-nots".

9/20/2015 10:38 AM

9

Nothing.

9/18/2015 3:02 PM

10

I think that they should add more soccer fields and parks.

9/18/2015 2:18 PM

11

I would like to see more fun things to do in Story County. I would like to see a sky zone or something that is fun for older kids. I would also like to see more buisnesses near gilbert.

9/18/2015 2:11 PM

12

Get people more involved. Make people more aware of things they can do to help/ improve our county.

9/18/2015 1:25 PM

13

I would enjoy it if my principal at gilbert high school was fired and we had better teachers.

9/18/2015 12:33 PM

14

I would want to offer more work opportunities in Gilbert besides just working at Casey's or the few little shops and the Open Flame.

9/17/2015 4:58 PM

15

I'm not sure. To me it seems like a nice place already.

9/17/2015 4:09 PM

16

Better maintenance of gravel roads.

9/17/2015 3:09 PM

17

Nothing.

9/17/2015 1:28 PM

18

If I could change one thing about Story county I would put up inspirational quotes up all around the county, this way it reminds us to strive for what we want and to remind us of how grateful we should be with everything we have.

9/17/2015 12:44 PM

19

I really just want more sidewalks for walking and biking. To be honest, it's quite a hindrance to be biking with young children and having the sidewalk end and begin at random. If you're looking for changes people-wise, Republicans can get quite rude around here, especially the Jesus freaks... It's not something changeable, but if people were better

9/17/2015 12:35 PM

educated about political issues and current events, it may change many people's views. 20

Nothing

9/17/2015 12:24 PM

21

I honestly don't know what I would change.

9/17/2015 12:17 PM

22

I would like there to be more recreational facilities. There are several restaurants and stores where I live, but not

9/17/2015 11:30 AM

many places to go specifically for fun.

10 / 20

| B-107


B.2

Youth Survey Results Story County C2C Youth Survey

23

I would like to change how the school rivalry can be taken to far by going on the internet and saying rude things about the other school. I don't think that is right and people should know better.

9/17/2015 11:18 AM

24

Nothing

9/17/2015 11:13 AM

25

More variety of stores.

9/17/2015 11:07 AM

26

Nothing

9/17/2015 10:57 AM

27

Nothing

9/17/2015 10:48 AM

28

Nothing.

9/17/2015 10:46 AM

29

Better schools

9/17/2015 10:44 AM

30

There is nothing major I would like to change about Story County

9/17/2015 10:44 AM

31

I dont know

9/17/2015 10:23 AM

32

Less division between schools, and to have people be more open to relationships; seems like there's a predetermined thought that not many people date here.

9/17/2015 10:06 AM

33

I would not change it.

9/17/2015 9:40 AM

34

I would add entertainment and restaurants.

9/17/2015 9:09 AM

35

I wouldn't really change anything.

9/17/2015 9:01 AM

36

I would rather have my city have a gas station or something...

9/17/2015 8:59 AM

37

I would like to see Gilbert expand

9/17/2015 8:52 AM

38

More places to eat.

9/17/2015 8:48 AM

39

I would like to see more drinking fountains.

9/17/2015 8:42 AM

40

I would like to get better stores put in Ames because it is annoying to have to go to Des Moines for things that Ames doesn't have.

9/17/2015 8:40 AM

41

In Gilbert there needs to be more production like new businesses and stuff because right now there is not much.

9/17/2015 8:39 AM

42

nothing

9/17/2015 8:39 AM

43

Not much. More tennis and better clothing shops.

9/17/2015 8:36 AM

44

Please add a Hardees.

9/17/2015 8:30 AM

45

I would like for it to be more community involving.

9/17/2015 8:25 AM

46

Nothing I'm perfectly fine with how it is

9/17/2015 8:21 AM

47

nothing its pretty awesome, but I would like to get rid of the pot heads that hang around lions park.

9/17/2015 8:20 AM

48

better shopping mall olive garden tropical smoothie cafe

9/17/2015 8:09 AM

49

If I could change one thing it would be the division between Gilbert and Ames. We are divided as schools and we don't get along well.

9/16/2015 11:16 PM

50

I wish that there were more opportunities for community service in Story County that I would be aware of or even County wide projects to improve our county and communities.

9/16/2015 10:52 PM

51

If I could change my city, I would place more like eventful buildings in town. For example, a more popular restaurant and something for entertainment (arcade or bowling). That way the people in Gilbert specifically won't have to drive a far distance just for something to do outside of their home.

9/16/2015 9:41 PM

52

I would take away main street and replace it with an outlet mall. I would also make the town more republican.

9/16/2015 9:38 PM

53

not a single thing

9/16/2015 9:38 PM

54

A restaurant!

9/16/2015 8:58 PM

55

Better restaurants/ just things to do on a daily basis

9/16/2015 8:55 PM

56

I would like there to be more activity in the county with different events. I would like a better fair many times we lose attendants and participants form story county to boone,

9/16/2015 8:44 PM

57

-

9/16/2015 8:41 PM

58

I would like there to be more supermarkets in small towns.

9/16/2015 8:26 PM

11 / 20

B-108


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone Story County C2C Youth Survey 59

I kind of wish it was more laid back with rules and laws. I realize some of that stuff would have to be kept, but when I talk to people who grew up here and hear about how much things have changed, I find it kind of sad.

9/16/2015 8:09 PM

60

I would like to change how many trees are in the area especially because its too empty

9/16/2015 6:37 PM

61

The amount of activities.

9/16/2015 5:49 PM

62

Nothing, really.

9/16/2015 4:41 PM

63

Nothing

9/8/2015 4:44 PM

64

Um, I think there are some schools in Story County that don't have the technological privileges as Gilbert. Maybe a community center.

9/8/2015 11:12 AM

65

i dont know

8/11/2015 9:57 AM

66

I can't think of anything.

8/9/2015 12:42 PM

67

Nothing

8/8/2015 9:50 PM

68

if there a movie theater in town

8/7/2015 3:50 PM

69

More options for after school activities

8/7/2015 1:29 PM

70

Maybe another gym somewhere

8/5/2015 9:37 AM

71

Nothing

8/4/2015 12:11 PM

72

Nothing

8/3/2015 11:43 PM

73

I don't know. There is always more we could be doing but we are doing a bang up job right now. (But some of the roads in story county could be fixed).

8/2/2015 11:26 AM

74

I would enjoy seeing certain gravel roads paved, such as 19th street in Nevada.However, I assume that some roads are under consideration for paving.

7/30/2015 9:48 PM

75

I wish the place I live in Nevada, had a town square instead of a a main street.

7/29/2015 7:38 AM

76

Nothing

7/28/2015 10:33 PM

77

i would change how people smoke a lot and get drunk a lot

7/28/2015 5:05 PM

78

Nothing

7/28/2015 5:04 PM

79

Nothing

7/28/2015 4:50 PM

80

Nothing

7/28/2015 4:45 PM

81

Story County- Stop having farmland sold off for Eminent Domain or for housing development. Would also like the Cornerstone Church Compound in Ames be under surveillance. Also, Ames is a mess in the summer with all of the road construction which is extremely inconvenient. Along with the 69 construction. Cambridge-Nothing. Best town in Story County

7/28/2015 11:24 AM

82

none

7/28/2015 11:23 AM

83

Make it easier to do get permits for starting own bussiness or even building some much needed storage. Currently it is very hard to pass anything that requires getting permisson from Story County zoneing.

7/28/2015 10:40 AM

84

I wouldn't want to change anything about Story County I would want to change how some things go in Nevada. Only, because I think that there isn't very much anything for a teenager to do in Nevada. I think we should get like a roller skating rink our a dance hall for the whole community just so there is another thing besides the bowling alley for us kids. I would also want to change how the Lincoln Highway days are only because I think everyone wants it to be back at the 4h grounds in Nevada, but that might not be in my power.

7/28/2015 10:11 AM

85

more activities

7/25/2015 6:47 PM

86

Adding more things to do for fun. Attractions or businesses that up the excitement level of being here.

7/25/2015 9:25 AM

87

I would like to see more places to go to have fun.

7/24/2015 5:13 PM

88

I get very irritated with the amount of road construction I always see but nobody out working on it. They block off the streets and then don't even work on the project for another two weeks. I also think we should be able to swim in Ada Hayden Lake because I know a lot of people who would really like being able to do that.

7/24/2015 1:52 PM

89

Possibly an amusement park or larger water park would be fun to have.

7/23/2015 11:55 PM

90

Not sure- never lived anywhere better

7/23/2015 10:54 PM

12 / 20

| B-109


B.2

Youth Survey Results Story County C2C Youth Survey

91

You probably won't give a crap anyway

7/23/2015 10:16 PM

92

I would like to see more things to do and see. Someone needs to create some attractions so others will come to story county.

7/23/2015 10:07 PM

93

more things to do

7/23/2015 9:57 PM

94

I would get rid of churches and religion so people would stop wasting their time with it

7/23/2015 7:10 PM

95

I want a lifetime fitness and an Olive Garden.

7/23/2015 5:00 PM

96

Nothing

7/23/2015 4:55 PM

97

More activities to do would be nice. Restaurants are also very crowded on weekends during the school year, and

7/23/2015 4:50 PM

specifically the football season, which can be a limiting factor. 98

Paved road in between gilbert and north ames

7/23/2015 4:45 PM

99

More attractions and restaurants

7/23/2015 4:45 PM

Q5 Do you think you will stay in Story County after graduating from High School? If not, do you think you will you move back some day? Why or why not? Answered: 103

Skipped: 7

#

Responses

Date

1

Yes, I am beginning to truly understand what a great place Story County is. I will come back for the location, living on the edge of a growing city while getting a feel for what living in the country is like.

9/27/2015 8:47 PM

I do not believe I will stay in Story County after graduating from High School and I have no idea if I will come back

9/23/2015 9:02 PM

2

someday. Part of growing up is exploring new places and I would like to be able to travel to somewhere different and be able to experience how life is in a different area besides Story County Iowa, even as wonderful as the area is at times. 3

I hope to stay in Story County after high school. If I moved elsewhere to attend college I would definitely try to come back because it is a great place to raise a family

9/22/2015 7:05 PM

4

I don't know yet. It will depend on where I go to college and then what I get for a job after that.

9/20/2015 5:56 PM

5

I am staying in Story County after highschool, and I may stay even after college

9/20/2015 3:33 PM

6

yes I'll stay because I'll probably going to study In Iowa state University

9/20/2015 1:15 PM

7

I think I wouldn't stay here after high school because I want to explore other places but I would come back to visit once in a while.

9/20/2015 11:40 AM

8

If I go to Iowa State University, which is very likely, I will stay in Story County, but I may want to see other parts of the country. I really do like it here, so I might live here for the rest of my life.

9/20/2015 10:38 AM

9

I plan on living in Iowa my entire life, if not Ames. I really enjoy the environment. I feel safe here.

9/18/2015 3:02 PM

10

No, but I will put in my mind coming back here to raise a family because it is a great place to grow up in

9/18/2015 2:18 PM

11

I will stay in story county for collage, but after I will not stay. I want to go somewere more technology inclined.

9/18/2015 2:11 PM

12

No I don' think I will stay in story county after I graduate, I think I will move somewhere else farther away, so I can experience new things/places. I have grown up here. I won't always live her but my family will.

9/18/2015 1:25 PM

13

No, and No, because i would like to experience something different

9/18/2015 12:33 PM

14

I want to travel after high school but once I'm ready to settle down I think I would definitely like to move either back to story county or to a county similar to it.

9/17/2015 4:58 PM

15

Probably. I have a feeling that I'll be going to ISU

9/17/2015 4:09 PM

16

I will leave one day for some better opportunities or something but I think I shall visit my roots every now and then.

9/17/2015 3:09 PM

17

Yes.

9/17/2015 1:28 PM

13 / 20

B-110


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Youth Survey 18

I'm not really sure what I will do after high school, I would surely love to stay here, and trust me this place will be

9/17/2015 12:44 PM

greatly visited by me no matter my age, but i'm not sure it has the education im going to need for after high school. 19

I will stay for Iowa State to get my doctorate in Veterinary Medicine, but I'll probably move to a large city like Chicago,

9/17/2015 12:35 PM

Albany, etc. the second school's finished so that I get the maximum amount of business possible and because I don't like quiet places. 20

I don't plan on going to school her so no and depends on my job

9/17/2015 12:24 PM

21

I am not sure. For what I want to do for my career in the future is not well known in story county. I plan to visit though if I do end up moving away.

9/17/2015 12:17 PM

22

I am not for sure if I will move from Story County, but if I do, I would probably come back. I would like to experience new places, but I know that Story County is a good place to live.

9/17/2015 11:30 AM

23

I think I will stay close to where I'm graduating from High School but I also have an urge to explore the world and that might end me up in another place.

9/17/2015 11:18 AM

24

no

9/17/2015 11:17 AM

25

I'm not sure, but I feel story county is a safe place to live.

9/17/2015 11:13 AM

26

I think I will be very close by after graduating and if I'm not in Story County, I may move back

9/17/2015 11:11 AM

27

I will not stay most likely due to college, but I am uncertain on return.

9/17/2015 11:07 AM

28

Yes it is a great place

9/17/2015 10:57 AM

29

Yes. I think there is a possibility of me staying in Story county after high school if I go to Iowa State. If i move out of the state I think I will move back here after college.

9/17/2015 10:48 AM

30

Yes, because I would want my children growing up in a good school district which Story County has to offer.

9/17/2015 10:46 AM

31

No because I want to live in montana. I might move back because of family

9/17/2015 10:44 AM

32

I will not stay in Story County but I may move back one day

9/17/2015 10:44 AM

33

Probably. Its where my friends and family are

9/17/2015 10:23 AM

34

I will not be staying in story county after high school, and I don't have any plans of moving back yet. I'd prefer to go somewhere with a different mindset about jobs, relationships, and other things.

9/17/2015 10:06 AM

35

I think after High School I will leave Story County to experience other places around the country/world. I see myself moving back one day.

9/17/2015 9:40 AM

36

No, I will probably not live in Story County after High School because I want to experience a different type of environment.

9/17/2015 9:09 AM

37

Most of my family on my dads side are still in story county. The ones that aren't around here anymore are either way out west or live in another country now. After college, I wouldn't be surprised if I decided to move back here. It is a very likable area to live in.

9/17/2015 9:06 AM

38

I do kind of want to stay in story county after graduation because I would like to work here.

9/17/2015 9:01 AM

39

No, I might move back because I like it here, but I want to get away for a while...

9/17/2015 8:59 AM

40

Yes I like the place.

9/17/2015 8:52 AM

41

No, I'm going to move somewhere cold. I might visit later.

9/17/2015 8:48 AM

42

I will not stay in Story County because I want to see new things.

9/17/2015 8:42 AM

43

I don't know. I will probably move for college but maybe come back later.

9/17/2015 8:40 AM

44

I think I will live in the area for a while but I don't like the area very well.

9/17/2015 8:39 AM

45

I don't know at this point.... I might go to Iowa State for college

9/17/2015 8:39 AM

46

No. I would like to travel more. I might go to the local college after high school, but I'd don't see me living here.

9/17/2015 8:36 AM

47

No and I don't think I will move back because I want to move to New Jersey.

9/17/2015 8:30 AM

48

No, I will move far away. I'm not originally from here, and I hate the landscape. I miss the mountains of the desert where my family lives.

9/17/2015 8:25 AM

49

Ya, because it's a really kind community and I would like to stay in it

9/17/2015 8:21 AM

14 / 20

| B-111


B.2

Youth Survey Results

Story County C2C Youth Survey

50

yes

9/17/2015 8:20 AM

51

no because going to college somewhere ekse

9/17/2015 8:09 AM

52

Yes, I think I will go to Iowa state and then move to Iowa City. I think I may move back because its a great place to

9/16/2015 11:16 PM

raise kids, but still have some fun. 53

I do not plan on staying. I am going to go to college out side of Story County and hopefully get a job and start my own

9/16/2015 11:14 PM

family near my job. I would consider moving back, because it is a small community. 54

I would like to stay in Story County because it is a nice, safe place to live and my family lives here. However I would

9/16/2015 10:52 PM

like to live next to a lake and work in a hospital someday so I may end up living in a neighboring county or another county in Iowa depending on where my life takes me. 55

No, I will not be living in Gilbert or Ames after graduating High School. And no, I do not think I will move back some day, if not for a brief amount of time. Why not? Exactly that in a way: why not? There is so much in this world to experience, why spend the rest of my life in this one place? Yeah, sure it's wonderful but I haven't seen anywhere else

9/16/2015 9:41 PM

to compare it to. 56

I don't think I'll stay in story county after graduating. I might move back some day to take over my dads business.

9/16/2015 9:38 PM

57

i think i would move back someday because i don't know why you would leave everything and everyone you know

9/16/2015 9:38 PM

58

I probably won't stay in story county because this has been the only place I lived and I want to explore new options.

9/16/2015 8:58 PM

59

No, I want to get a scenery change during college but there is a good chance I would move back to start a family

9/16/2015 8:55 PM

60

I might...it depends what college I end up going to but I would like to raise my children here

9/16/2015 8:44 PM

61

I think that I will move somewhere warm to peruse my dreams. I think that most of my family will move as well, but

9/16/2015 8:41 PM

visiting story county will be on our yearly to-do list, because our families past is important to us 62

I think I will stay in story county. I like growing up here and I think if I have kids they will too.

9/16/2015 8:26 PM

63

I would like to explore Iowa or maybe even another state some more. If I did move away, I would defiantly be back a

9/16/2015 8:09 PM

lot, or even eventually move back! I love this county and town I live in now! 64

No I don't think I will. Theres not many colleges in the area and it's not where i'd like to live every day because I'd like to go somewhere else instead of staying in the same spot all my life.

9/16/2015 6:37 PM

65

I might stay and go to Iowa State for college but then Im probably moving. And Im not sure I will move back but mayve when Im really old I will.

9/16/2015 5:49 PM

66

Yes I will most likely attend ISU.

9/16/2015 4:41 PM

67

Yes because I like the smaller atmosphere.

9/8/2015 4:44 PM

68

Um, yes. I'm just going to ames.

9/8/2015 11:12 AM

69

No. I dont know. Because I want to play soccer in the MLS and slowly make my way up.

8/11/2015 9:57 AM

70

I don't think I will stay here because I think my career would require me to live elsewhere.

8/9/2015 12:42 PM

71

I want to live north somewhere but i will come back sometimes

8/8/2015 9:50 PM

72

yeah I want to work like west hyvee in Ames and get my own car

8/7/2015 3:50 PM

73

Yes, I loved growing up here and I wouldn't want anything different for my family some day.

8/7/2015 3:37 PM

74

No because I would like to live in a bigger town

8/7/2015 1:29 PM

75

I don't know if I will stay or move, but I love living here. The community is great.

8/5/2015 3:39 PM

76

Yes, I like it here

8/4/2015 12:11 PM

77

Probably

8/3/2015 11:43 PM

78

No but I might come back. I will leave because I want to experience a big city. And that will impact my decision to come back.

8/2/2015 11:26 AM

79

I would love to move to Milford, Michigan at some point. The scenery is excellent, and the town has a certain "The land is hilly, but the town works around it" feel. Although there is absolutely nothing the county can do about it without spending an incredibly low estimate of $1,500,770,000 (Yes, I actually did the math), I found Story County to be very flat.

7/30/2015 9:48 PM

80

No, I think that I will get a job not in Story County and live there.

7/29/2015 7:38 AM

15 / 20

B-112


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Youth Survey 81

I would, it's a good place to grow up.

7/28/2015 10:33 PM

82

I think i will stay in story county when i graduate

7/28/2015 5:05 PM

83

I think I will stay after high school but if I go to a college outside of SC then I might move back when older

7/28/2015 5:04 PM

84

I might be somewhere warmer but I will definetly come back to visit any friends and family still living there

7/28/2015 4:50 PM

85

Maybe

7/28/2015 4:45 PM

86

Yup. My family roots are here and I don't know anything different

7/28/2015 11:24 AM

87

yes

7/28/2015 11:23 AM

88

Yes. My family is in this area and I don't plan on leaving them anytime soon.

7/28/2015 10:40 AM

89

I have already decided that I will be moving away from Story County, but I do plan on coming back and visiting my

7/28/2015 10:11 AM

hometown (Nevada) as much as possible because I love it. 90

not really. It's not because of anything that's wrong it's just not really an area that I feel matches me.

7/25/2015 6:47 PM

91

No, I want to go to a bigger school in another area. After college I would like to comeback because it is a good place to raise a family.

7/25/2015 9:25 AM

92

I think I will stay here. It has great living conditions.

7/24/2015 5:13 PM

93

I do not think that I am going to go to college at ISU just because I have been here for so long and feel that I want a little change. However, I do believe I will move back to somewhere near here eventually because I really enjoy lowa weather and believe I am safe when around here.

7/24/2015 1:52 PM

94

I will probably stay to attend Iowa State University.

7/23/2015 11:55 PM

95

Yes I do because it is a good place to live and my family lives here.

7/23/2015 10:54 PM

96

God no. Only to visit family because I love them

7/23/2015 10:16 PM

97

Yes, possibly to go to Iowa State. After college I'd like to go somewhere like Des Moines where there's actually things

7/23/2015 10:07 PM

to do and places to shop. 98

yes. college and people are nice here

7/23/2015 9:57 PM

99

Probably not but we'll see

7/23/2015 7:10 PM

100

No, I am going to college in a different state.

7/23/2015 5:00 PM

101

No, I want to travel while I am young. But I might move back to raise a family because it is so safe.

7/23/2015 4:55 PM

102

I'll probably stay because I can't afford out of state tuition for college, but I'll probably leave afterwards to experience

7/23/2015 4:50 PM

living in other places. 103

Yes same reason above In question 3

7/23/2015 4:45 PM

Q6 Anything else you'd like to add that will help the Story County create a great comprehensive plan? Answered: 61

Skipped: 49

#

Responses

Date

1

no

9/22/2015 7:05 PM

2

no.

9/20/2015 5:56 PM

3

not that I can think of right now

9/20/2015 1:15 PM

4

Nope.

9/20/2015 11:40 AM

5

No

9/18/2015 3:02 PM

6

Nope

9/18/2015 2:18 PM

7

I would like to see more technology put into the county. Lets become a big tech county

9/18/2015 2:11 PM

16 / 20

| B-113


B.2

Youth Survey Results

Story County C2C Youth Survey

8

No not really

9/18/2015 12:33 PM

9

Nope.

9/17/2015 4:58 PM

10

I don't think so.

9/17/2015 4:09 PM

11

I would just like to say that I am so grateful for what Story County has given me, I cannot imagine living anywhere else right know, its my hometown, and its what I love.

9/17/2015 12:44 PM

12

Not really...

9/17/2015 12:35 PM

13

Nope.

9/17/2015 12:17 PM

If the community was more open and wasn't always worrying about our rivals I think everyone from all the different

9/17/2015 11:18 AM

14

schools would get along a lot better then they do now. 15

No

9/17/2015 11:13 AM

16

None

9/17/2015 11:11 AM

17

Not that I can think of.

9/17/2015 11:07 AM

18

No

9/17/2015 10:57 AM

19

Nope!

9/17/2015 10:46 AM

20

No

9/17/2015 10:44 AM

21

no

9/17/2015 10:23 AM

22

Meh

9/17/2015 10:06 AM

23

I want to add an Olive Garden, Krispie Kreme, and better health club.

9/17/2015 9:09 AM

24

More restaurants to attract people.

9/17/2015 8:52 AM

25

No, I have no more ideas.

9/17/2015 8:48 AM

26

No

9/17/2015 8:42 AM

27

No

9/17/2015 8:39 AM

28

no

9/17/2015 8:39 AM

29

No.

9/17/2015 8:36 AM

30

Hardees

9/17/2015 8:30 AM

31

Be more community involved and actually help the people who live here that are in need.

9/17/2015 8:25 AM

32

no

9/17/2015 8:21 AM

33

no

9/17/2015 8:20 AM

34

N/A

9/16/2015 11:16 PM

35

Fill in the potholes in gilbert right before the train tracks, build a nike store in ames and we need something like cedar point in ames.

9/16/2015 9:38 PM

36

There is nothing I would change.

9/16/2015 8:58 PM

37

N/A

9/16/2015 8:55 PM

38

no

9/16/2015 8:44 PM

39

-

9/16/2015 8:41 PM

40

Give more money to schools so they can do what they need to for students to be happier and more comfortable

9/16/2015 6:37 PM

41

No.

9/16/2015 5:49 PM

42

No.

9/8/2015 11:12 AM

43

no

8/11/2015 9:57 AM

44

No

8/8/2015 9:50 PM

45

Have more kids at the high school

8/7/2015 3:50 PM

46

No

8/4/2015 12:11 PM

17 / 20

B-114


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

Story County C2C Youth Survey 47

No

8/3/2015 11:43 PM

48

The housing in Nevada seems to range from "excellent" condition to "poor" condition. I would enjoy seeing a lot of houses to be recondition to at least an "acceptable" condition.

7/30/2015 9:48 PM

49

Get more businesses that people can benefit from.

7/29/2015 7:38 AM

50

No

7/28/2015 4:50 PM

51

Stop Eminent Domain and Urban Sprawl.

7/28/2015 11:24 AM

52

no

7/28/2015 11:23 AM

53

I think what this is going to do is going to be a very good thing for the communities of Story County and I am excited to

7/28/2015 10:11 AM

see what this brings in the future years. 54

just have more city activities.

7/25/2015 6:47 PM

55

Not of my knowledge.

7/24/2015 1:52 PM

56

Low crime+ good education= great city/county

7/23/2015 11:55 PM

57

I still feel you won't really take action because you care because you don't seem to care about us

7/23/2015 10:16 PM

58

Add more attractions, especially in Ames. It's a college town, there should be more places to go especially for kids

7/23/2015 10:07 PM

and teens. All we have is perfect games, which is not enough. 59

Sand volleyball with low nets and lights

7/23/2015 7:10 PM

60

Nothing

7/23/2015 4:55 PM

61

No

7/23/2015 4:45 PM

Q7 What is your age? Answered: 109

Skipped: 1

Under 10 years old

10 to 14

14 to 18

18 to 22

22 years or older

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

Answer Choices

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Responses

Under 10 years old

1.83%

2

10 to 14

10.09%

11

14 to 18

86.24%

94

18 to 22

0.92%

1

18 / 20

| B-115


B.2

Youth Survey Results

Story County C2C Youth Survey 1

0.92%

22 years or older Total

109

Q8 Which school district do you attend in Story County? Answered: 110

Skipped: 0

Ames Community School District Ballard Community... Collins-Maxwell School District Colo-Nesco School District Gilbert School District Nevada School District Roland-Story School District

Private School

Home-schooled

I am not currently a... Other (please specify) 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

Answer Choices

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Responses

Ames Community School District

0.91%

1

Ballard Community School District

1.82%

2

Collins-Maxwell School District

0.00%

0

Colo-Nesco School District

9.09%

10

Gilbert School District

65.45%

72

Nevada School District

18.18%

20

Roland-Story School District

3.64%

4

Private School

0.00%

0

Home-schooled

0.00%

0

19 / 20

B-116

50%


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone Story County C2C Youth Survey I am not currently a student

0.00%

0

Other (please specify)

0.91%

1

Total

110

#

Other (please specify)

Date

1

Hi, I am way too old for your survey, but I would like to thank you, not only for doing a survey but for supporting it as

7/29/2015 12:47 PM

well. Asking young people about the value of their hometown and schooling is long overdue. Our leaders can only benefit from young people's candid responses.

20 / 20

| B-117


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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C Appendix D

Municipal and Surrounding County Comprehensive Plan Summaries The first part of Appendix C provides summaries of comprehensive plans for those communities within Story County that have previously adopted a comprehensive plan. The second part of Appendix C includes summaries of the comprehensive plans of surrounding counties that have previously adopted comprehensive plans. Page C.1 Municipal Comprehensive Plan Summaries C-2 C.2 County Comprehensive Plan Summaries C-14


C.1

MUNICIPAL COMPREHENSIVE PLANS

Municipal Comprehensive Plans Eleven of the fifteen communities in Story County have an adopted comprehensive plan. Five of the six counties that share a border with Story County have adopted comprehensive plans. This chapter gives a brief summary of the available comprehensive planâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future land use and growth plans. Story City Story City Story City

McCallsburg

Roland

Zearing

Gilbert

Ames Colo

Nevada

Kelley

Huxley

Collins

Cambridge Maxwell

Slater Sheldahl Esri, HERE, DeLorme, MapmyIndia, Š OpenStreetMap contributors, and the GIS user

Hamilton

Boone

Hardin

Story

Marshall

Counties and municipalities in green have a Comprehensive Plan Polk

C-2

Jasper


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone CITY OF AMES LAND USE POLICY PLAN Adopted: August 29, 1997 Last Updated: November 22, 2011

The City of Amesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Land Use Policy Plan, completed in 1997 and updated in 2011, includes six chapters and three appendices and focuses in future land use, mobility, environmental constraints, parks, recreation, open space and implementation. The future land use plan guides land use for the development of the city within the area of anticipated growth that is also identified in the Ames Urban Fringe Plan, adopted in 2006. This boundary extends into the unincorporated area of Story County generally within two miles of the City limits. The plan shows significant growth through 2030, up to 2,500 acres, and will ultimately reduce unincorporated lands currently under the jurisdiction of Story County. For more information see City of Ames Land Use Policy Plan

Municipal Comprehensive Plans | C-3


C.1 CITY OF AMES, STORY COUNTY, BOONE COUNTY AND CITY OF GILBERT AMES URBAN FRINGE PLAN Adopted: July 2006 - Currently Under Revision

The Ames Urban Fringe Plan (AUFP) is a shared land use plan that was developed cooperatively between Boone County, Story County, the City of Ames and the City of Gilbert. The AUFP provides guidelines for development and future land uses within the Urban Fringe Boundary. The AUFP provides policy statements to be used in conjunction with the Land Use Framework Map to help guide development of the fringe area. The fringe area boundary includes areas of unincorporated Story County within two miles of the City of Ames. The plan was recently reopened by the participating entities for updates and revisions based on projected growth and planned infrastructure improvements. For more information see Ames Urban Fringe Plan

C-4


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone CITY OF CAMBRIDGE FUTURE GROWTH PLANNING Adopted: 2007

In September of 2015 members of the C2C Project Team met with a representative for the City of Cambridge to discuss the City’s future land use, development and annexation goals, objectives and policies. The City does not anticipate growth outside the existing limits but would support limited, slow growth. The ideal growth areas are to the west, towards and along West 4th Street towards Interstate 35/Huxley and to the South towards Hwy 210. Ballard Creek and the South Skunk River floodplain limit growth to the east and north of the city. The City opposed the City of Huxley’s annexation east of I-35 as they thought I-35 was the logical barrier between the two cities. The high price of productive agricultural ground, which surrounds the city, is a major barrier to new development across and adjacent to the city. According to the City’s comprehensive plan adopted in 2007, I-35 and Highway 210 is a logical location for future commercial and industrial growth with the interchange, potentially drawing interest from Des Moines and Ames. Due to treatment enhancements, the City’s sanitary sewer system has remaining capacity to serve 329 new people beyond the current population of 820 persons. Additionally, a new well and the water tower (built 2007) provide necessary fire flow for fire protection for approximately double the existing population. However, many of the surrounding areas are on Central Iowa Rural Water and the high cost of buyout to switch to the municipal water supply is also a barrier to growth. Overall, the growth of Cambridge and Huxley around the intersection of County Hwy 210 and I-35 could have substantial impact on the unincorporated areas of Story County surrounding Cambridge. Growth pressure in these areas will continue to test the barriers of growth for Cambridge.

Municipal Comprehensive Plans | C-5


C.1 CITY OF COLLINS COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Adopted 2009 The City of Collins Comprehensive Plan was completed in 2009 with assistance from the Iowa State University Community and Regional Planning Department. The plan provides an analysis of existing conditions, a future land use map, public input summary and goals and objectives for implementing the plan. The planâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future land use map showed very little new growth and none of it was shown outside of the existing city limits. Growth plans for Collins should have very little impact on the surrounding unincorporated areas of Story County.

C-6


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone CITY OF GILBERT - COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Adopted: December 2003

The Gilbert Comprehensive Plan; Growing Gracefully includes six chapters covering the following: an Introduction to the Gilbert Plan; an overview of The Planning Process; History and General Conditions; Public Facility/ Infrastructure Inventory and Analysis; Future Growth Concepts; Growth Policies and Implementation Strategies; and appendices addressing prior efforts and a glossary of terms. The Proposed Future Land Use Map shows a great deal of industrial, commercial and residential growth to the south and east of the existing city limits and is based on a 3% annual residential growth rate. The goals of the plan include 1) Enhance the Quality of Life, 2) Manage Community Growth, 3)Define Community Character, 4) Provide Community Services and Infrastructure and 5) Foster Economic Development. The Ames Urban Fringe Plan, to which Gilbert is a partner, coincides with the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Proposed Future Land Use Map. In October of 2015, members of the C2C Project Team met with City representatives to discuss future land use planning. The plan is in need of an update due to increased growth and the new high school west of the city. The City is currently studying its sewer and water capacity and the ability of the systems to provide for future growth. The City anticipates a majority of its growth will occur to the south of the existing city limits. The City is currently reassessing it future land use plans in conjunction with the update to the Ames Urban Fringe Plan.

Municipal Comprehensive Plans | C-7


C.1

560TH AVE

CITY OF HUXLEY - COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Adopted: December 2013

305TH LN

CARIBOU

R E CI DO

Area #8 400 Ac

CIR

DEER DR

69 £ ¤

550TH AVE

306TH LN

310TH ST

CENTENNIAL DR

H

R

D R

YP

R

ES

S

D

CEDAR LN

R

O D R Y ST W RAILWA

N 2ND AVE

N MAIN AVE

PRESTON DR N 1ST AVE

N CIRCLE DR

S 2ND AVE

W 1ST ST

S MAIN AVE

N 5TH AVE

N 4TH AVE

N 3RD AVE S 5TH AVE

320TH ST

W 3RD ST

TIMBERLANE DR

D

MAPLE DR

O

Area #1 184 Ac

E 5TH ST

W 5TH ST

PARKRIDGE AVE

TW

OAK BLVD

LYNWOOD DR

E 5TH ST

OAK BLVD

MEA DOW

315TH ST

LN

Legend

Area #2 254 Ac

E 5TH ST

31

E 4TH ST

E 3RD ST

SA

69 £ ¤

ES

C

ASHWOOD DR

D

Y

L

R

A

O

N

K

R

IO AT

IC

C

N

GROWTH MANAGEMENT PLAN

PARKWOOD CIR

ND

E CH

5T

Y RR

H

Incorporated High Priority Growth Area

ST

Low Priority Growth Area LN

Sanitary Sewer Planning Boundary

E 1ST ST

320TH LN

Area #7 89 Ac

CAMPUS DR

Area #6 37 Ac

Corporate Boundary

570TH AVE

SYCAMORE BLVD

LARSON DR

NORTHPARK BLVD

MEADOW CIR

PARK CIR

2015 Ac

560TH AVE

CENTENNIAL CIR

RIDGETOP DR

RIDGEWOOD DR

I 35

69 £ ¤

Area #3 226 Ac

MP

CU

RV

NW

RV

RA

CU SE

MP

RA

RA

MP

SW

Area #5 16 Ac

CU RV

Area #9 147 Ac

³

MP

CU

RA

RV

NE

Area #4 19 Ac

I 35

0

750

1,500

3,000 Feet

In September 2015 members of the C2C Project Team met with City representatives to discuss the City’s future growth plans. The Future Land Use Map shows some proposed land use changes outside the current corporate limits primarily to the south, east and west. There are no current active annexation petitions, however the Growth Management Plan identifies a Medium and Low Density Residential area on the west side of the city as the #1 growth area, a Low Density Residential area to the east as #2 and a Light Industrial area shown as #3 on the south side of the city. While no plans have been submitted to the City for some of the commercial and industrial planned areas, City staff has had discussions with businesses regarding potential development, however, land owners have not been willing to sell their properties. Growth is expected to occur outside the current plans to the north.

C-8


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone CITY OF KELLEY - COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Adopted: March 2003

Kelley expects to grow within the current city limits for the foreseeable future. Currently, there are no areas of town designated for larger estate - sized residential lots and the future land use map addresses that. The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Comprehensive Plan anticipates commercial use to grow from 2.8 acres to 20.9 acres and industrial use to grow from 8.2 acres to 11.7 acres. Any future commercial expansion is likely at the highway intersection of R38/E57. Future industrial use is projected to remain in the existing industrial areas.

Municipal Comprehensive Plans | C-9


C.1 CITY OF MAXWELL - COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Adopted: March 2003

City of Maxwell Future Land Use Map

Legend Future Parcels

660TH AVE

653RD AVE

Unincorporated 312TH LN

New Mulit-Family Roads Lot Lines

315TH ST

315TH ST

Parcels

TENTH ST

Classification Agriculture NORTH ST

ROCK CREEK DR

HIGHWAY 210

Mixed-Use

MYERS ST

WEBB CT

METCALF ST

ASHFORD ST

SECOND ST

WOODLAWN ST

MAIN ST

THIRD ST

Multi-Family FIFTH ST

Commercial Industrial Public

FIRST ST

663RD AVE

BROAD ST

JENNINGS ST

RD OS T MY P AR

MAXWELL ST

FOURTH ST

TROTTER BLVD

BALDWIN ST

SIXTH ST

322ND ST

Single Family Residential

SEVENTH ST

SEVENTH ST

SHORT ST SOUTH ST

325TH ST

Parks/Recreation

[ 0

475

Vacant

950

Feet 1,900

The City of Maxwell comprehensive plan addressed future growth and land use change and the above map is the result of that planning document. This map was created to show where possible growth could be directed. With the annexation of the Rolling Hills Mobile Home Park, Maxwell could increase its tax base without drastically raising taxes for the city as a whole. This would also provide the residents of the mobile home park upkeep and improvements provided by the City. This is represented on the map in orange (multi-family) with black crosshatching. The next area that could receive growth is west on North Street where nine multi-family lots could be built. This area could be developed with town-home style housing. The addition of these nine future lots would accommodate 18 new families. This number is higher than the predicted growth for Maxwell, which is calculated to be 852 in 20 years.

C-10


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone CITY OF NEVADA - COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Adopted: June 2003 General growth direction for Nevada is westerly and southwesterly primarily for industrial development. In the west area from 590th Street east there are no plans for residential growth along the area from Lincoln Hwy to US 30. According to City officials the city has enough land area to develop residential uses if needed. Commercial use is shown in the southwest area near the current corporate limits and US 30.

S-14

Rural residential development has occurred to the south of the current city limits (Myerwood, Krupp County Addition, Timber Ridge, Country Club Estates, Indian Creek Hills, and Indian Creek Country Club). Development to the east is difficult due to the drainage district, limited by too much up - front costs to address drainage. Development to the north is also difficult. In September 2015 the Project Team met with City representatives and the City is planning for extensive commercial and industrial growth west of Airport Road to 590th.

7 T Ave.

8

R Ave.

6 9 12

15th St.

10th St.

2nd St.

1st St.

Lincolnway Ave.

5 19th St.

10

11th St.

11

6th St.

I Ave.

3

E Ave.

11 1

13 3

2

4

U.S. Hwy 30

U.S. Hwy 30

Airport Rd.

South

ve. GA

NORTH

Development Concept

Nevada, Iowa RDG Crose Gardner Shukert Omaha and Des Moines

1 Sports Complex 2 Nevada Business Park 3 Nevada Greenway 4 South Park Village 5 Drainage District 17 Greenway 6 New 19th Street Overpass 7 Northeast Community Park 8 Northeast Community Park 9 Airport Road Overpass 10 Indian Ridge Planned Development 11 Indian Ridge Parkway 12 Lincoln Way Mixed Use Area 13 Airport Road Industrial Park

Single-Family Low Density Residential Moderate / Mixed Density Residential High Density Residential Mobile Home Residential Village Residential Neighborhood Commercial Commercial Downtown Mixed Use Business Park Industrial

V

Existing Parks / Open Spaces Proposed Parks / Open Spaces Public / Semi-Public Facilities Drainage District 17 Industrial Arterial Streets Proposed Arterial Streets Collector Streets Proposed Collector Streets Proposed Links Civic Street Corridors

Municipal Comprehensive Plans | C-11


C.1 CITY OF ROLAND - COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Adopted: March 2003

According to the Rolandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Comprehensive Plan, the community will grow from 1,234 people to an estimated 1,674 people in 2023. Based upon these estimates approximately an additional 130 housing units will be necessary to accommodate this population increase. Given the current development guidelines contained within the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s zoning code, each residential lot will require a minimum of 8,000 square feet of land. Thus, depending on the development patterns followed, between 25 to 30 acres of land will be needed to accommodate these additional 130 housing units. Fortunately, there currently exists approximately 320 acres of land undeveloped already within its city limits, so there will be no need to annex any new land into the city.

C-12


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone CITY OF STORY CITY - COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Adopted: March 2003 - Currently Updating

In September 2015, members of the C2C Project Team met City representatives. The City is currently working on an update to their comprehensive plan that will be completed in the summer of 2016. The City indicated the primary locations for potential growth is north of the current city limits between 550th Avenue to 560th Avenue for future residential use; and east of the city limits on the east side of I-35 on both sides of Broad Street (115th Street) and from 110th Street and 120th Street to 580th Avenue for industrial use. Residential growth could occur easterly, but is not ideal. Another area that may experience growth is southwest of the current corporate limits, east of the railroad right-of-way and south to 130th Street for industrial use. There are no current annexation petitions, however its anticipated that within a year there may be interest to annex land north of the city. The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water treatment plant is two years old and their other utility systems are in good condition with no capacity issues. Lastly, the City would want to discuss and review any proposed residential developments that would be located north of 130th Street and east of US Highway 69.

Municipal Comprehensive Plans | C-13


C.2

COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLANS

COUNTY OF BOONE - COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Adopted: 2007 4

3

9

10

24

28

27

26

25

19

140th

Pilot Mound

22

23

24

26

25

18

140th

30

150th

21

28

27

14 4th

Maya

35

36

31

32

160th

L

F

12

7

8

9

13

18

17

16

10

11

12

13

23

24

19

27

26

25

30

34

35

36

3

2

9

10

11

12

16

15

14

13

35 218th

5

4

2nd

223rd

222nd

3

2

6

8

9

10

11

23

24

19

17

7

16

15

14

21

22

23

33

4

Marshall

223rd

9

17

18

13

20

24

200th

26

25

35

36

29

28

27

25

30

32

33

34

35

36

31

4

3

2

1

11

US Hwy 30

3

2

1

10

11

12

16

15

14

21

22

23

33

34

6

5

4

3

12

7

8

13

18

7

8

9

10

14

13

18

17

16

15

24

Commercial/Industrial

30

29

28

27

26

25

Conservation

31

32

33

34

35

6

5

4

3

8

9

10

17

16

20

21

12

Opa l

Magnolia

205th

200th

h 219t

18

19

24

25

J

30

29

32

11

12

14

19

20

30

29

330th

335th

31

32 340th

33

34 120th

35

335th

36 335th

Ash

36

21

22

304th

31

32 way h

te Sta

23 322nd

28

27

Hig

21

0

33

34

Y 212th

Park/Recreation

36

228th 2

Public/Quasi-Public

1 Lincoln

11

12

15

14

13

22

23

Corporate Limits

24 258th

28

27

26

33

34

35

0

25

1.25

2.5

5

270th

Miles

36

13

5

4

3

2

8

9

10

11

12

17

16

15

14

13

7 18

300th

Unicorn

315th

24

25

19

20

30

29

21st

35

Madrid 36

340th

1 290th

310th

21 320th

26 Qf

330th

325th

210th

260th

U

23

26

210th

250th

31

S

22

27

Village Residential

200th

230th

7

25

1

Qw

28

Magnolia

29

315th

195th

220th

36

2

Ql

Olive

15

r

21

30

M

20

Rural Residential

280th

10

16

O

25

9th

35

9

17

N

32

Elk

Deri

34 Duck

State Highway 144

23

Luther

Pear

C

22

Qm

D

320th

26

19

K

24 G

320th

27

14

Pine

33

21

280th

310th

Eagle

Clover

E

23

26

35

Peach

12

M

11

L

5

I

6

4th

32

20

6

1

33

330th 335th

28

32

l Ow

28

13

e

325th

14

ng

ple Ap

29

27

29

274th

280th

2

Iris

C

305th

24

Rose

15

319th

30

d 263r

270th

Nec ta

10

22

21

11

19

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R

Deer

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10

15

240th

Peach

26

300th

20

9

16

180th

Ora

19

8

210th

Q

30

31

26 7th

25

36 280th

Berkley Deer

B

B

26

Agriculture

1

17

230th

P

19

35

300th

31

24

255th

20

Kiwi

27

34

305th

2

Transitional Agriculture

27

34

260th

16

3

7 S

8th

Boone

5

8

7th

23

Lark

18

H

E

D

13

12

240th

22

252nd

17

4

18

Quill

14

d 233r 238th

5th 28

14th 11th

R

7

K

F

12

Nature

4th

32

31

h 224t

1

P

10th 9th

29

30

Park 217th

36

216th

250th

310th

5

Y

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N Mink

25

16th 13th 21

20

12th

Legend

190th

Oriole

22

18

36

160th

Xl

34

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21

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32

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1

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240th

20

8

33

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33

24

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31

US Hwy 30

11

10

19

7

32

V

26

260th

5

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Figure 26: FUTURE LAND USE MAP

W

27

8th 19

Moing ona

9

290th

25

150th

W

28

193rd

Key

29 210th

36

2

3

15

280th

26

140th

27

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State Highway 210

31

32

22

23

24

26

25

Violet

23

Laurel

4

16

6

13

24

U

22

berry

United States Highway 30

28

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23

U

35

33

22

T

34

21

24th 21st 17th18th

22nd

S

33

20 200th

188th

188th

17

S

30

29

15

21

28

6

State Highway 17

25

32

29

31

1

State Hwy 17

26

270th

16

170th

R

27

17

31

17

W

Quartz

28

18

30

18

172nd

8 182nd

18

®

12

120th

160th

Argo

19

8

4

155th

Peony

24

240th

14

22

173rd

Division

23

230th

7

33

5

Ringold Main Marion

22

5

28

32

166th

7

13

Maize

14

June

Beaver 6

155th

Montana

15

192nd

210th

32

15

140th

29

Le af

188th

15

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31

11

10

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11

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29

168th

23

30

6

L

21

31

1

Lamb

20

36

2

Macaw

19

35

3

21

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190th

34

Fraser

4

10

United States Highway 169

16

5

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6

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8

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33 160th

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Lily

7

18

US Hwy 169

C

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Marigold

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4

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32 160th

6

20

Mission

150th

I

31

9

20

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150th

16 130th

19

County Highway R21

H

29

17

8 120th

27

State Hwy 210 33 166th

34

35

36

County Highway E63

23

7

Prepared By: JEO Consulting Group, Inc. Source: IDNR GIS Process: ArcView 9.0

Y

22

12

V

E

21

11

BOONE COUNTY, IOWA

1

X

13

2 110th

W

14

20 3rd

3 V

L

15

4

W

16

5

U

17

6

State Hwy 17

18

1

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S

13

2

S

5

8

M

14

J

C

118th

6

7

Linn

29

105th

12

Story

30

1

115th

Oriole

20

2

11

122nd

Boxholm 15

19

3

10

Nature

17

9

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18

4

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S

8

G

5

7

Q

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11

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County Highway R27

1

Nature

2 110th

N

3

Lilac

4

I

105th

5

Juniper

100th

6

CREATED BY: S.E.H., NOVEMBER 2005 REVISED BY: J.D.M, SEPTEMBER 19, 2006

County

THIS MAP PREPARED USING INFORMATION FROM RECORD DRAWINGS SUPPLIED BY JEO AND/OR OTHER APPLICABLE CITY, COUNTY, STATE, FEDERAL OR PUBLIC OR PRIVATE ENTITIES. JEO DOES NOT GUARANTEE THE ACCURACY OF THIS MAP OR THE INFORMATION USED TO PREPARE THIS MAP.

The Boone County Comprehensive Plan was adopted in 2007 and was a two year process to get input from stakeholders throughout the county. Some of the key points in this plan related to land use are to preserve the rural character of the county, preserve agricultural land, and maintains a balance between development and the natural environment. Better litter control, alternative energy use and the preservation of the Des Moines River greenbelt were some of the top priorities for environmental concerns. Investment in infrastructure and improvement of parks and recreation throughout the county were also among top priorities.

C-14


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

M A P OF 1: F U T U R- E L A N D U S E PLAN COUNTY HARDIN COMPREHENSIVE HARD I N C2012 OUNTY, IOWA Adopted: October £ ¤

! (

! (

65

57

57

ACKLEY

£ ¤

! ( 57

65

IOWA FALLS

ALDEN

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£ ¤ 20

£ ¤ 65

£ ¤

£ ¤

20

20

OWASA

£ ¤

£ ¤

20

20

BUCKEYE

STEAMBOAT ROCK

£ ¤ 65

ELDORA

! ( 175

! ( 175

! ( 175

£ ¤ 65

RADCLIFFE

! (

! (

175

175

HUBBARD NEW PROVIDENCE WHITTEN

£ ¤ 65

UNION

PLEASE NOTE: This map is for general reference only. More detailed information and maps are available at county offices.

I

Legend Future Land Use

Flood Boundary Overlay District

Residential

Township Line

Mobile Home Park

Federal or State Highway

Industrial

Agricultural

1

2

4 Miles

Corporate Limits

Commercial

Conservation

0

Railroad

" Z

Airport Water

Hardi n Count y, Iowa

The Data is provided "as is" without warranty or any representation of accuracy, timeliness or completeness. The burden for determining accuracy, completeness, timeliness, merchantability and fitness for or the appropriateness for use rests solely on the requester. Hardin County makes no warranties, express or implied, as to the use of the Data. There are no implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. The requester acknowledges and accepts the limitations of the Data, including the fact that the Data is dynamic and is in a constant state of maintenance, correction and update. Prepared by the Hardin County GIS Department in October 2012.

The County Comprehensive Plan was adopted in October 2012. The plan projects a 15% decrease in the county population over the next 20 to 25 years. The biggest issues discovered during the planning process were: commercial development/new jobs, availability of medical services, K - 12 school programs and facilities, elimination of dilapidated structures/elimination of junk and blight, and property taxes.

County Comprehensive Plans | C-15


MARSHALL COUNTY, IOWA LAND USE PLAN COUNTY OF MARSHALLCOMPREHENSIVE - COMPREHENSIVE PLAN EE

K

1000

EEK

8

CR

S62

R CR

MU D

R-17W

R-18W

R-19Win 2004 Adopted: R-20W December 1995 and Revised

LITT LE

ASHE

S75

IN M

LISCOMB

ER VA

BANGOR

K EE

CR

EE

E18

E18

IOWA RIVER

CR

MU D

K

LISCOMB

96

T-85N

S62

CREEK YC

CHICKEN

HO NE S52

RE EK

14

MIN

ER

VA

CR

ASHER CREE

K

22,000 Feet

K EE

SU G

1500 AR

CR

EE K

1600

Temporary Transportation Reserve Area

ALBION

MINERVA

1400

Critical Resource Area

Residential Reserve

TAYLOR

1700

CLEMONS

Incorporated Communities

S52

GREEN MOUNTAIN

T29 330

of propsed land usage, see the Marshall M I N E R V A County describes and outlines the proposed land usage, able in the background report which compliments

14

1800

E27

S62

T37 BURNETT CREEK

T-84N

1300

Industrial

IOWA

ST. ANTHONY

1200

EEK

T29

E23

E23

CR

VIENNA Commercial Expansion

E18

S57

11,000

LS DEVI

Ag/Residential

BANGOR

LIBERTY

1100

Land Use Legend

E29

E29

MARIETTA

1900

MARION

W IO

RO CK

ER

CR

RIV

EE K

A

2000

BRADD

N

CR

2100

E35

E35

330

CR LINN

S70 LIN

MELCHER CREEK

Y CREEK

Copyright © 2004 by Marshall County Iowa, its affiliates and licensors. All Rights Reserved.

E35 S52

EEK

2200

MARSHALLTOWN EE

K

LAMOILLE LINN

CR

E41

EEK

2300

330 TIM

CREEK

S75 R BE

E41

CR EE K

STATE CENTER

T-83N

30

30

30

TIM BER

E41

30

2400

30

LEGRAND

WOLF LAKE

WASHINGTON

2500

LEGRAND

TIMBER CREEK

STATE CENTER

2600

E49 S62

S52

DILLON

SKUNK RIVE

R

T31

MIDDLE

TIM BER

14

CREEK

2700

330

146

2800

E63

MELBOURNE

DUNBAR

HAVERHILL

E63

FERGUSON

S52

RHODES

RA VE

E63

SNIPE

S52

CLEAR CREEK

CREE

TIM

R BE

CR

EE

K

N

CR

EE

K

3000

K

GREEN CASTLE

JEFFERSON

3100

CR K EE

LUTES CREEK

LOGAN

K CLEAR CREE

OW ILL W

T-82N

2900

E63

VAN CLEVE

E63

EDEN IP SN

E

CR

EE

K

3200

330 S52 E67

S62

LAUREL E67

EE

ALLOWAY CREEK

CR IPE SN LITT LE

ER

1300

1400

1500

1600

1700

1800

1900

2000

2100

2200

2300

T38

EEK

RIV

1200

2500

H CR

NK

1100

BRUS

U SK

1000

2400

3300

146

GILMAN

K

E67

E67

2600

2700

2800

2900

3000

3100

3400 3200

3300

3400

Certain findings and assumptions have been made from which this plan was developed. First, growth trends and projections indicate that the county will continue to face a limited amount of pressure for new development. For the unincorporated area, that development will be primarily residential. Second, it is recognized that a certain MARSHALL COUNTY, amount of growth has previously occurred in areas that would be identified today as unsuitable for development IOWA because of environmental, location or other factors. development patterns cannot be altered, exCOMPREHENSIVEWhile LANDexisting USE PLAN pansion of certain developed areas can be discouraged as appropriate. Third, it has been assumed that agriculture will continue to be a major factor in the land use and economy of the county and that Federal, State and local policies for the preservation of high quality agricultural land will remain. Finally, the plan is based on the premise that protection of the area’s natural environmental systems is of critical importance, and the location and sensitivity of certain natural resources should dictate the location of growth areas and the policy basis for managing growth.

8

0

5,500

11,000

Land Use Legend Ag/Residential

Commercial Expansion Critical Resource Area Industrial

22,000 Feet

Residential Reserve

Temporary Transportation Reserve Area

Incorporated Communities

NOTE: For Detailed Description of propsed land usage, see the Marshall County Development Plan which further describes and outlines the proposed land usage, also, further information is available in the background report which compliments all three documents.

C-16

Marshall County GIS: Scale 1:55,450

RESOLUTION - MARSHALL COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE DEVELOPMENT PLAN Whereas, the Marshall County Comprehensive Land Use Planning Committee under direction of the Marshall County Board of Supervisors, and the assistance of the Marshall County Zoning Administrator, and Region Six Planning, have developed a Comprehensive Land Use Plan for Marshall County; Whereas, this plan meets the goals and values of Marshall County in its development planning pursuant to Chapter 352.5, 1995 Code of Iowa; Whereas, the Marshall County Board of Supervisors has reviewed the proposed County Comprehensive Land Use Development Plan. Now, Therefore, Be It Resolved that the Marshall County Board of Supervisors approve and adopt the Marshall County Comprehensive Land Use Development Plan. A copy is on file in the office of the County Zoning Administrator and the County Auditor. Dated at Marshalltown, Iowa this 27th Day of October, 1997. Motion by Roll call vote:

__________________________ Gordie Johnson Board of Superviors, Chairman

Copyright © 2004 by Marshall County Iowa, its affiliates and licensors. All Rights Reserved.

__________________________ Leland Searle Marshall County Auditor

July 2004


C.2

Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036: Cornerstone to Capstone

COUNTY OF POLK- COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Adopted: May 2006

Land Use Issues, Chapter 3 of the Polk County Comprehensive Plan states: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The greater Des Moines region is a mosaic of growing cities and unincorporated land within counties. Cities are typically driven to expand outwards, annexing land at their edges, while county residents tend to oppose this expansion, in the interest of preserving their farms or rural lifestyle. Coordination among city and county plans, or between the plans of adjoining cities, is often lacking. The tension between urban/suburban expansion and rural preservation is a major issue this plan must address. This issue plays out in each of the four planning areas in different ways, but remains a common theme.â&#x20AC;? This urban verses suburban verses rural pressure is very prevalent throughout Polk County.

County Comprehensive Plans | C-17


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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C Appendix D

Plan Area Maps This appendix is a compilation of maps for the C2C Plan. Boundaries and Land Area Map Base Map Existing Trails Map Surface Geology Map Bedrock Geology Map Slope Analysis Map Soil Types Map Soil Categories Map Soil-Based Corn Yield Map Soil-Based Soybean Yield Map Hydric Soils Map HUC 8 Watersheds Map HUC 10 Watersheds Map HUC 12 Watersheds Map Floodplains, Wind Turbines, and Quarries Map Greenways Map Historic Vegetation Types Map Current Land Cover Map Prairie Land Map Aquifer Map Habitat Map Wildlife Travel Corridors Map Drainage Districts Map Landscape Types Map Story County School Districts Map Existing Land Use Map Ames Urban Fringe Land Use Framework Map Future Land Use Map Proposed Trails and Greenways Map

Map 1 Map 2 Map 3 Map 4 Map 5 Map 6 Map 7 Map 8 Map 9 Map 10 Map 11 Map 12 Map 13 Map 14 Map 15 Map 16 Map 17 Map 18 Map 19 Map 20 Map 21 Map 22 Map 23 Map 24 Map 25 Map 26 Map 27 Map 28 Map 29


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STORY COUNTY CITY BOUNDARIES AND LAND AREA MAP | MAP 1 Legend City Boundaries Roads Aerial Image Background

STORY CITY ROLAND

MCCALLSBURG

The key purpose of this map is to provide a general overview of Story County as a whole. The aerial image serves as a backdrop, while illustrating fundamental geographic features. For context, the street grid has been overlayed on the aerial image, with each of the incorporated cities of Story County highlighted and labeled.

ZEARING

GILBERT

AMES NEVADA

COLO

KELLEY

HUXLEY

COLLINS

CAMBRIDGE MAXWELL

SLATER SHELDAHL

0 0.5 1

2

3

´

4 Miles

GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY BASE MAP | MAP 2 Legend Rivers and Streams Public Parks and Green Space Roads City Boundaries Railroad

STORY CITY ROLAND

MCCALLSBURG

ZEARING

This map provides essential base information about the county, including the location of: rivers and streams, public parks and green space, roadways, railroads, and incorporated cities. In order to successfully plan for the future, it is essential to first understand and analyze the current conditions, spatial relationships, and opportunities for improvement.

GILBERT

NEVADA

AMES

COLO

KELLEY

HUXLEY

COLLINS

CAMBRIDGE MAXWELL

SLATER SHELDAHL

0 0.5 1

2

3

4 Miles

´

GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY EXISTING TRAILS MAP | MAP 3 Legend Soft-Surfaced Trial Hard-Surfaced Trail Dedicated Bike Facility (bike lane) South Skunk River Water Trail Roads Public Parks and Green Space City Limits

STORY CITY ROLAND

MCCALLSBURG

ZEARING

Shown to the left are the existing trail networks within Story County. This map illustrates which trails are considered soft-surfaced trails, hard-surfaced trails, dedicated bike lanes, and roads. The location of public parks and green spaces, as well as the South Skunk water trail has been provided for user convenience as well.

GILBERT

Through the analysis of this map and the input of community members, gaps within the trail system can be recognized, and a plan for future trails can be formulated.

NEVADA COLO AMES

KELLEY

HUXLEY

COLLINS

CAMBRIDGE MAXWELL

SLATER SHELDAHL

0 0.5 1

2

3

´

4 Miles

GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY SURFACE GEOLOGY MAP | MAP 4 Legend Rivers and Streams Depressions Alluvium Eolian Sand Fill High Terrace Lake Plain Outwash Outwash/Bedrock Pits and Quarries Thick Alluvium Till Plain Till Plain with aligned-elongated ridge forms Till Plain with elongated ridge forms Till Ridge Water City Boundaries

STORY CITY ROLAND

MCCALLSBURG

ZEARING

GILBERT

This map illustrates the location and types of surficial geology within Story County. This provides the basic information needed for the assessment and distribution of available mineral resources, location of geologic hazards, availability of water resources, and the suitability of land for various uses.

AMES

NEVADA

COLO

KELLEY

HUXLEY

COLLINS

CAMBRIDGE MAXWELL

SLATER SHELDAHL

0 0.5 1

2

3

´

4 Miles

GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY BEDROCK GEOLOGY MAP | MAP 5 Legend Rivers and Streams Augustana Group Gilmore City Formation Kinderhookian Pella and St. Louis Formation Lower Cherokee Group Upper Cherokee Group City Boundaries

STORY CITY ROLAND

MCCALLSBURG

ZEARING

The map shown here illustrates the location and types of bedrock geology that exist within Story County. A bedrock map portrays the type of sediment and rock that will be encountered below the earth’s surface. The information provided on bedrock geology maps can be used in many ways, and should be reviewed prior to any significant subsurface activity, such as excavating for building foundations, installing bridge footings or power poles, quarry gravel, or drilling water wells.

GILBERT

AMES

NEVADA

COLO

KELLEY

HUXLEY

COLLINS

CAMBRIDGE MAXWELL

SLATER SHELDAHL

0 0.5 1

2

3

´

4 Miles

GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY SLOPE ANALYSIS MAP | MAP 6 Legend Rivers and Streams City Boundaries Low Slope (0-5%) Moderate Slope (6-14%) Steep Slope - Highly Erodible (15% and over)

STORY CITY ROLAND

MCCALLSBURG

ZEARING

This map serves as a slope analysis for Story County, showing the areas that have a relatively low slope (0-5%) in green, moderate slope (6-14%) in yellow, and very steep slope (15% and over) in red. Areas that have steep slopes are particularly sensitive, and are highly prone to erosion. It is imperative to consider the slope when selecting locations for development, as well as the type of development to occur.

GILBERT

AMES

NEVADA

COLO

KELLEY

HUXLEY

COLLINS

CAMBRIDGE MAXWELL

SLATER SHELDAHL

0 0.5 1

2

3

4 Miles

´

GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY SOIL TYPES MAP | MAP 7 Legend of Soil Types City Boundaries Ankeny Biscay Bode Canisteo Clarion Clarion-Storden Coland Coland-Terril Cordova Cylinder 24-32” Cylinder 33-40” Dam Dickinson Estherville Farrar Flagler Hanlon Hanlon-Spillville Harps Harps-Okoboji Hayden Hayden-Storden Kossuth Lester Lindley Nicollet Okoboji Orthents Loamy Orthents Sandy

STORY CITY ROLAND

MCCALLSBURG

ZEARING

GILBERT

AMES

NEVADA

COLO

The map shown here illustrates the types and locations of all of the soils that exist within Story County. There are a plethora of soil types that exist, and each has their own distinctive characteristics. However, due to the complexity of an all-inclusive soils map at this scale, the following soil maps have been developed.

KELLEY

HUXLEY

COLLINS

CAMBRIDGE MAXWELL

SLATER SHELDAHL

Ottosen Palms Pits Clay Pits Gravel Pits Quarry River Rolfe Sparta Spillville Spillville-Coland Storden Talcot Terril Urban Land Wacousta Wadena Waukee Webster Zenor Zook

0 0.5 1

2

3

4 Miles

´

GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY SOIL CATEGORIES MAP | MAP 8 Legend City Boundaries Aquic Cumulic Entic Mollic Typic

STORY CITY ROLAND

MCCALLSBURG

ZEARING

This map works to simplify the soil information shown in the previous map to sort the soil types into smaller categories. This map illustrates the soil taxonomic classifications: Order > Suborder > Greatgroup > Subgroup. Within the Subgroup, the following exist and are portrayed on the map: Aquic, Cumlic, Entic, Mollic, and Typic.

GILBERT

Much of the county has typic soil, a fine-loamy soil that provides a good basis for many plants, as well as aquic soil, which retains a level of moisture that is sufficient in most years to meet plant requirements. Cumulic soils are very thick and often found within the floodplain. Entic soils are excessively drained soils, generally formed in sandy outwashes. Mollic soils are common in grasslands and have high organic matter, and nutrient-enriched surface soil.

AMES

NEVADA

COLO

KELLEY

HUXLEY

COLLINS

CAMBRIDGE MAXWELL

SLATER SHELDAHL

0 0.5 1

2

3

4 Miles

´

GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY SOIL-BASED CORN YIELD MAP | MAP 9 Legend City Boundaries Low Corn Yield Potential Moderate Corn Yield Potential High Corn Yield Potential

STORY CITY ROLAND

MCCALLSBURG

ZEARING

This map utilizes the soil information to determine which areas of the county have a low, moderate, or high corn yield potential. Areas with the lowest corn yield potential are shown in blue, moderate corn yield potential areas are shown in green, and high corn yield potential areas are shown in yellow.

GILBERT

AMES

NEVADA

COLO

KELLEY

HUXLEY

COLLINS

CAMBRIDGE MAXWELL

SLATER SHELDAHL

0 0.5 1

2

3

4 Miles

´

GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY SOIL-BASED SOYBEAN YIELD MAP | MAP 10 Legend City Boundaries Low Soybean Yield Potential Moderate Soybean Yield Potential High Soybean Yield Potential

STORY CITY ROLAND

MCCALLSBURG

ZEARING

This map is very similar to the last, however uses the soil information to determine which areas of the county have a low, moderate, or high soybean yield potential. Areas with the lowest soybean yield potential are shown in red, moderate soybean yield potential areas are shown in yellow, and high corn yield potential areas are shown in green.

GILBERT

AMES

NEVADA

COLO

KELLEY

HUXLEY

COLLINS

CAMBRIDGE MAXWELL

SLATER SHELDAHL

0 0.5 1

2

3

4 Miles

´

GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY HYDRIC SOILS MAP | MAP 11 Legend City Boundaries Areas with Hydric Soils

STORY CITY ROLAND

MCCALLSBURG

This map further analyzes the soil data to illustrate where hydric soils exist within the county. Hydric soils do not drain well, and therefore are not well suited for many forms of development. This is important to consider as cities and populations continue to grow.

ZEARING

GILBERT

AMES

NEVADA

COLO

KELLEY

HUXLEY

COLLINS

CAMBRIDGE MAXWELL

SLATER SHELDAHL

0 0.5 1

2

3

4 Miles

´

GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY HUC 8 WATERSHEDS MAP | MAP 12 Legend Rivers and Streams Parks and Green Space City Boundaries HUC 8 Watershed Boundaries Impaired Rivers and Streams Impaired Lakes

Minerva Creek Watershed

STORY CITY ROLAND

MCCALLSBURG

ZEARING

This is the first of three watershed maps. To provide a bit of background information, “a watershed is the area of land where all of the water that falls in it and drains off of it goes into the same place.” (USGS). Watersheds come in many different shapes and sizes, and in the large scheme of things, Iowa is part of the Mississippi River watershed. Each watershed is given a Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC) based upon its size. This first map Illustrates the HUC 8 watershed boundaries of Story County.

GILBERT

Nested within the HUC 8 watersheds are the HUC 10 and HUC 12 watersheds. As watersheds become smaller and more defined, it then becomes easier to recognize how and where our water bodies are negatively impacted.

Linn Creek Watershed

AMES NEVADA

Upper Mississippi Region Watershed

COLO

Skunk River

Hickory Grove Lake

KELLEY

HUXLEY SLATER Fourmile Creek Watershed

SHELDAHL SHELDAHL

COLLINS

CAMBRIDGE MAXWELL

0 0.5 1

2

3

4 Miles

´

GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY HUC 10 WATERSHEDS MAP | MAP 13 Legend Rivers and Streams Parks and Green Space City Boundaries HUC 10 Watershed Boundaries Impaired Rivers and Streams Impaired Lakes

STORY CITY ROLAND

MCCALLSBURG

ZEARING

Minerva Creek

This map illustrates the HUC 10 watershed boundaries, which are subwatersheds that exist within those shown in the previous map. At this scale, the relationship between the impaired waters (shown in red) and watershed boundaries begins to become more evident.

Keigley Branch-South Skunk River

Iowa’s water quality has been progressively declining, and a major factor in this is non-point source pollution. With a better understanding of watersheds, we can better understand where and how our water is being negatively impacted.

GILBERT

Squaw Creek

East Indian Creek

West Indian Creek

Linn Creek

AMES NEVADA

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Hickory Grove Lake

KELLEY

Clear Creek Sugar Creek-South Skunk River

HUXLEY Fourmile Creek SLATER Big Creek SHELDAHL

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Indian Creek

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GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY HUC 12 WATERSHEDS MAP | MAP 14 Headwaters Minerva Creek Miller Creek-South Skunk River

Long Dick Creek

STORY CITY

Hardin Story Drainage Ditch No 1 Headwaters East Indian Creek

ROLAND

Keigley Branch

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Middle Minerva Creek

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Bear Creek

Legend Rivers and Streams Parks and Green Space City Boundaries HUC 12 Watershed Boundaries Impaired Rivers and Streams Impaired Lakes This final watershed map illustrates the HUC 12 watershed boundaries, which are sub-watersheds of those shown in the previous map. At this scale it is important to understand the impact (both positive and negative) that we can have on the watershed in which we live.

Lundys Creek-Squaw Creek Drainage Ditch 81-East Indian Creek

GILBERT South Minerva Creek

City of Ames-South Skunk River

West Indian Creek

Onion Creek

Dye Creek Headwaters Linn Creek

AMES NEVADA

Worrell Creek-Squaw Creek

A major contributor the degrading quality of water in Iowa is non-point source pollution. To provide an example, during every rain event, water washes across our roads, sidewalks, agricultural fields and more, picking up chemicals, pesticides, and other contaminants before reaching our streams, rivers, and lakes. Excessive amounts of nitrogen, phosphorous, and other contaminants can be incredibly harmful, threatening our drinking water as well as our water for recreational purposes. To lessen the impact and improve the water quality, best stormwater management practices should be adopted, and changes should be made at the watershed level to lessen the amount of harmful chemicals that can be picked up by the stormwater and deposited into our water.

COLO

Headwaters North Skunk River

Drainage Ditch 5 East Indian Creek

Drainage Ditch 13-South Skunk River

Hickory Grove Lake

Headwaters Clear Creek Walnut Creek

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Ballard Creek

HUXLEY Upper Fourmile Creek SLATER

Big Creek SHELDAHL

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CAMBRIDGE Coon Creek-South Skunk River

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Mud Creek-Clear Creek

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GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY FLOODPLAINS, WIND TURBINES, & QUARRIES| MAP 15 !

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Legend City Boundaries Floodway Designation 100-year Floodplain Open Quarries Closed Quarries Wind Turbines

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This map illustrates the 100-year floodplain, the floodway designation boundary, the location of wind turbines, and the location of quarries - both opened and closed. Understanding where flooding is likely to occur is vital to determining where development should or should not occur. Much of Iowa is located in the “wind belt” making it a prime location for wind energy. As illustrated on the map, there is a significant number of wind turbines in Story County, as well as space to further invest in wind energy.

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Furthermore, there are a number of quarries within Story County that have closed, providing opportunities for other future uses.

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GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY GREENWAYS MAP| MAP 16 Legend City Boundaries Central Iowa Greenway Special Places

Illinois Grove Story City Park

Pella Corporation Prairie

STORY CITY River Bluff Cemetary ROLAND

MCCALLSBURG

Town of Summit

ZEARING

East Indian Greenway

Minerva Greenbelt Old Cemetery

Railroad Corridor Sheffield Cemetery Prairie Overlook

In March of 2000, the Central Iowa Greenways Committee developed a report to the citizens of central Iowa entitled “Creating a Central Iowa Greenways System”. The map to the left Illustrates the resulting greenway system as well as the location of notable places within Story County. These include DNR areas, parks, and public lands.

Bear Creek Greenbelt Indian Hill Moraine

GILBERT

East Highlands Private Overlook

Old Cemetery

Raymond Prairie Remnant Arrasmith Cemetery

Pioneer Cemetery Curtiss Farm Onion Creek Area

Ames Izaak Walton League

Moore Memorial Park Clear Creek Area Munn Woods

Worrell Creek Area

Private Golf Course

Brookside Park

Arboreteum

College Creek Area

Holub's Prairie Remnant

River Valley Park

YMCA Cabin

Squaw Creek Corridor

AMES

Limestone Bridge

NEVADA

Smith Park

COLO

Dye Creek Area

Hallet's Quarry

Former Wetland Pitt's Quarry Railroad Corridor Prairie Stream Valley

Private Savanna Creek Bottoms

Black's Prairie

Maddox Prairie Remnant

KELLEY Izaak Walton League

Former Wetland

Prairie Wetland

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Wetland

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Clear Creek Greenbelt

Town of Elwell

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GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY HISTORIC VEGETATION TYPES MAP | MAP 17 Legend Prairie (332,505 acres) Marsh (3,307 acres) Pond (35.6 acres) Savanna (114.3 acres) Swamp (84.3 acres) Forest (20,185.4 acres) Grove (10,635 acres) Historically Surveyed River Channel City Boundaries

STORY CITY ROLAND

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This map shows the historic vegetation (1832) of Story County. It utilizes the GLO vegetation (what surveyors reported seeing in the 1800’s and the soils GIS layer showing which types were derived from prairie, forest, and savanna (transition) vegetation.) At this time, Story County had as much as 332,505 acres of prairie (over 90% of the land). This map also indicates that Story County had approximately 3,307 acres of marsh/wetlands. With the invention of the steel plow in 1837, the majority of the prairie lands were plowed, and wetlands drained so that the land could be used for agricultural purposes.

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GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY CURRENT LAND COVER MAP | MAP 18 Legend Rivers and Streams Wetlands Deciduous Forest Row Crop Grassland Barren Residential Land Commercial Land City Boundaries

STORY CITY ROLAND

MCCALLSBURG

ZEARING

This map, comparatively from the last, shows the current land cover of Story County. The data is derived from the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) which provides spatial reference and descriptive data for characteristics of the land surface. NLCD products are created by the Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium, a partnership of Federal agencies led by the U.S. Geological Survey.

GILBERT

AMES

NEVADA

A drastic shift can be seen between the historic vegetation map and the current land cover map. Much of the County that was classified as “prairie” is now classified as “row crop”. Additionally, many of the original marshes/ wetlands have disappeared, and the amount of forested areas is much slimmer. Lastly, within the city boundaries vast amounts of commercial and residential land exist. Although growth and development can be a good thing, it can also be harmful to the environment, so must be done in a smart and environmentally responsible manner.

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GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY PRAIRIE LAND MAP | MAP 19 Legend City Boundaries Prairie Grazed Grassland Planted Grassland Ungrazed Grassland

STORY CITY ROLAND

MCCALLSBURG

ZEARING

Although land specifically defined as “prairie” was not shown in the National Land Cover Database in the previous map, there are areas of prairie within Story County which are shown in this map. Some of these areas are remnant prairie, but many are prairie restoration sites. Prairies shown are in private and public ownership.

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AMES

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GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY AQUIFER MAP | MAP 20 Legend City Boundaries All Wells Mississippian Water Quality Testing Wells Jordan Water Quality Testing Wells Silurian-Devonian Water Quality Testing Wells Impaired Rivers and Streams Impaired Lakes

STORY CITY ROLAND

MCCALLSBURG $

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The map to the left illustrates the locations of all of the wells within Story County that are known to the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. Additionally, this map identifies wells used for water quality testing for the Mississippian, Jordan, and Silurian-Devonian aquifers. The location of impaired water bodies are shown for reference as well.

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Hickory Grove Lake

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GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY HABITAT MAP | MAP 21 Legend Rivers and Streams City Boundaries Barren Prairie Wetlands Deciduous Forest Grassland

STORY CITY MCCALLSBURG

ROLAND

ZEARING

This map analyzes the previously shown land cover map to highlight key habitat areas. While commercial, residential, and row crop land has been removed from the map, prairie has been added. These are the areas where conservation and preservation should be focused.

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GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY WILDLIFE TRAVEL CORRIDORS MAP | MAP 22 Legend City Boundaries Roads Public Right-of-Way Rivers and Streams Railroads Open Ditches Forest Grove Grassland Prairie Wetlands Public Parks and Green Space

STORY CITY ROLAND

MCCALLSBURG

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This map attempts to identify current and potential wildlife corridors as well as the location of other existing or potential wildlife habitat. The map includes parks and green space, areas historically defined as forest, grove, grassland and other areas such as open ditches along roadways in the public right-ofway.

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GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY DRAINAGE DISTRICTS MAP | MAP 23 Legend Rivers and Streams Parks and Green Space City Boundaries Drainage District Boundaries Impaired Rivers and Streams Impaired Lakes

STORY CITY ROLAND

MCCALLSBURG

ZEARING

The map on this page indicates in purple the boundaries of the various drainage districts within Story County. These are primarily used for agricultural purposes to drain excess water from fields after major rain events. This process however brings water into streams and rivers much quicker than would happen naturally, which can cause erosion and increased sediment in the water, reducing its clarity.

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AMES

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GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY LANDSCAPE TYPES MAP | MAP 24 Legend Landscape Type 1: Nearly level floodplains and low terraces along Skunk River and the larger streams.

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Landscape Type 2: Nearly level terraces, areas of wind-blown sand, and slope-wash deposits. Landscape Type 3: Nearly level upland plain. Large rectangular fields of row crops occupy nearly all of the land area.

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Landscape Type 4: Steeply sloping valley walls, narrow terraces, and bottomlands adjacent to Squaw Creek and Skunk River. Landscape Type 5: Gently sloping uplands adjacent to the principal streams. These areas are deeply dissected by a network of tributary streams which have steep gradients. Landscape Type 6: Gently rolling upland areas with a general slope in the direction of the principal adjacent stream. Landscape Type 7: Nearly level to undulating uplands. Large fields of row crops create the dominant pattern on the land. Landscape Type 8: Rolling ridges and swales oriented in north to south lines. Large fields of row crops are the dominant pattern. Landscape Type 9: Sharply sloping ridges alternating with broad low swales. A few widely spaced streams and many small enclosed basins which are (or once were) marshy occur in these areas. Landscape Type 10: Loess capped ridges within steep, rolling topography. Adjacent counties to the south and east have topographic features similar to those of this area. City Boundaries Rivers and Streams

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GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY LANDSCAPE TYPES INTRODUCTION: Patterns on the surface of the land are created by the interaction of natural processes and by manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s use and management of the land. The landscape of Story County displays many visual patterns of geologic formations, soils, streams, valleys, woodlands, fields, farmsteads, roads, and towns.

Ten landscape types in Story County were identified by grouping soil mapping units according to similarities of slope, drainage, geomorphic form, texture, and pre-settlement vegetation. Each landscape type is comprised of the areas with similar visual patterns. The outline map of the ten landscape types (page 24) is a generalization from the tones and patterns of the soil characteristics displayed on the computer output map (page 24). Landscape Types 1 and 2 are floodplains, terraces, and foot-slope areas. Landscape Type 3 is a low, flat upland area. Landscape Types 4, 5, and 6 are valley and valley wall landscapes of soils formed in glacial till. Types 7, 8, and 9, which differ from each other primarily in slope and drainage character, are upland landscapes of soils formed in glacial till. Landscape Type 10, a rolling stream-dissected area, is unique because it contains the only loessderived soils in Story County. Each of the following photographs of the landscape types delineated on the outline map is accompanied by a brief description of the distinguishing characteristics of the landscape type it illustrates.

LANDSCAPE TYPE 1 Nearly level floodplains and low terraces along Skunk River and the larger streams. Skunk River south of Ames and segments of other streams have been straightened. Small streams from the uplands are conveyed across the floodplain in ditches. Woody vegetation is usually restricted to the vicinity of stream banks, to roadsides, and to the few farmsteads located on the floodplain. The very level land is well suited for row crops in large fields. Necessary supplementary soil drainage is accomplished by tile lines and by drainage ditches. The areas included in this landscape type are occasionally flooded.

LANDSCAPE TYPE 2 Nearly level terraces, areas of wind-blown sand, and slope-wash deposits. Small alluvial fans may occur where small streams from the uplands enter the floodplain. Trees and shrubby vegetation occur on the steep slopes, along some watercourses, near farmsteads, and in plantations. Level areas adjacent to the bottomlands are used for row crops, though these areas may be droughty and may have low fertility due to their coarse texture. Sloping areas which may be subject to wind and water erosion are often used for hay and pasture.

LANDSCAPE TYPE 3 Nearly level upland plain. This area, which is at a slightly lower elevation than adjacent uplands, is bounded on the eastern edge by Skunk River and on the western edge by Kegley Creek. The land is drained by one large drainage ditch and by several smaller ditch and tile systems. Small potholes throughout the area often contain marsh plants. There are few trees, except for those near farmsteads. Large rectangular fields of row crops occupy nearly all of the land area.

LANDSCAPE TYPE 4 Steeply sloping valley walls, narrow terraces, and bottomlands adjacent to Squaw Creek and Skunk River. Because of the shallow depth to bedrock and their moderately steep gradient, streams are fairly straight in these areas. Many areas are heavily wooded, with upland tree species on the slopes and in the steep-walled ravines, and riparian woodland along the streams. This landscape type probably has the lowest percentage of row crops of any landscape type in the county because of steep erosive slopes, draughty soils, or flooding from the streams. Fields are small and irregularly shaped. Much of the land is in hay and pasture.

LANDSCAPE TYPE 5 Gently sloping uplands adjacent to the principal streams. These areas are deeply dissected by a network of tributary streams which have steep gradients. Most of the stream banks and valley walls are thickly wooded. Occasional farmstead windbreaks occur within the large fields of row crops on the level uplands. Crop rotation, terracing, contouring, and the use of pasture are common erosion control practices on the rolling areas, where many fields are small and irregularly shaped. Compared with roads in the other landscape types, the roads in this landscape type have the least conformity to the grid pattern of section lines.

LANDSCAPE TYPE 6 Gently rolling upland areas with a general slope in the direction of the principal adjacent stream. These areas are dissected by a well developed network of smaller streams and drainage ways. Most of these streams flow intermittently. There are few trees, except for those near farmsteads. Row crops are grown in large rectangular fields. Crop rotation, contouring, or terracing may be used on more steeply sloping areas where erosion is a hazard.


STORY COUNTY LANDSCAPE TYPES (CONTINUED)

These ten landscape types derive from the 1975 Natural Resource Analysis of Story County, Iowa, which was prepared for the Story County Board of Supervisors in cooperation with the Iowa Agriculture and Home Experiment Station. An updated map on page 24, as well as updated imagery have been provided here.

LANDSCAPE TYPE 7 Nearly level to undulating uplands. Low ridges form southwest to northeast lines across these areas. Small streams and intermittent drainage ways are widely spaced. Most trees are in the immediate vicinity of farmsteads. Large fields of row crops create the dominant pattern on the land. Extensive tiling of low areas allows the planting of crops across drainage ways. In very wet years some crop damage may occur due to flooding of the many pothole areas.

LANDSCAPE TYPE 8 Rolling ridges and swales oriented in north to south lines. Much of the drainage of this land is underground, and streams are widely spaced. There are relatively few potholes in this area. Trees generally occur only near farmsteads. A few pastures are located in steep areas and along streams. Large fields of row crops are the dominant pattern. There are small areas of erosive soils and small areas of wet soils.

LANDSCAPE TYPE 9 Sharply sloping ridges alternating with broad low swales. A few widely spaced streams and many small enclosed basins which are (or once were) marshy occur in these areas. Many of the enclosed basins have been drained for agriculture, but a few of the original marshy areas remain. Trees are located principally near farmsteads. Fields form large rectangular patterns except where interrupted by undrained potholes. Low areas are occasionally flooded, even though extensive tile lines and ditches are used to drain these areas.

LANDSCAPE TYPE 10 Loess capped ridges within steep, rolling topography. Adjacent counties to the south and east have topographic features similar to those of this area. This landscape is deeply dissected by streams which form a feather-like drainage pattern. Woodlands and pasture occupy most of the steep erosive slopes. Relatively small irregularly shaped fields of row crops are located on the more gently sloping land. Some of the particularly erosive soils in this area are protected by permanent pasture and other erosion control practices.


STORY COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICTS | MAP 25 Legend City Boundaries Roads Gilbert Community School District Ames Community School District Nevada Community School District Roland-Story Community School District Colo-Nesco Community School District (1) Colo-Nesco Community School District (2) West Marshall Community School District Collins Maxwell Director District (1) Collins Maxwell Director District (2) Collins Maxwell Director District (3) Collins Maxwell Director District (4) Ballard Community School District (1) Ballard Community School District (2) Ballard Community School District (3) United Community School District

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GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


STORY COUNTY EXISTING LAND USE MAP | MAP 26 STORY COUNTY CURRENT LAND USE MAP

This map illustrates the type and location of the following land uses in Story County: agricultural, agricultural dwelling, commercial, industrial, parks and open space, residential, railroad, university, civic, and government owned. This map provides context for the current state of Story County, and will serve as a base to be further analyzed in creating the Future Land Use Map and Plan for Story County.

Legend PropertyClass AGRICULTURAL AGRICULTURAL DWELLING COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL PARKS/OPEN SPACE RESIDENTIAL RAILROAD UNIVERSITY CIVIC GOVERNMENT OWNED

­ DISCLAIMER: Story County's digital cadastral data is a representation of recorded plats and surveys for use within the Geograpical Information System for the purpose of data access and analysis. These and other digital data do not replace or modify land surveys, deeds, and/or other legal instruments defining land ownership or use.

Map created on 7/16/2015 by the Story County Planning and Development Department.

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AMES URBAN FRINGE LAND USE FRAMEWORK MAP | MAP 27

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Agriculture and Farm Service – Farming and agricultural production; industry and commerce that need to be close to agriculture; farmsteads, farmstead sites and pre-existing homes.

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Highway-Oriented Commercial – Commercial uses most compatible with rural areas, located on hightraffic roads and preferably in clusters; urban services; in some cases, rural services and decentralized systems with assessment waivers, other agreements on future costs and annexation.

Industrial Reserve/Research Park – Agricultural uses; future expansion of ISU Research Park with innovative technology companies supported by proximity to ISU; before development, change to Planned Industrial land use designation.

Agriculture/Subsurface Mining – Farming and agricultural production; farmsteads, farmstead sites and pre-existing homes; with limestone resources suitable for subsurface mining.

Agriculture/Long-Term Industrial Reserve -Farming and agricultural production; farmsteads, farmstead sites and pre-existing homes; future large-scale industrial uses; before development, change to Planned Industrial land use designation.

General Industrial – Surface portion of existing subsurface mining operation.

Natural Areas – Environmentally sensitive areas; significant natural habitat; public parks and open space; future parks; greenways; farmsteads, farmstead sites and pre-existing homes.

Gateway Protection – Land uses and design that defines, accentuates and enhances entrance areas to community.

Watershed Protection Area – Watersheds for wetlands and with vegetation that protects or improves water quality; mitigation facilities; Best Management Practices.

Airport Protection Area – Land close to airport; development characteristic that protects life and maintains integrity of aviation operations.

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Land Use Designations for Urban Service Area Urban Residential – Village residential developments at densities above 8 units per acre; suburban/single-family residential developments at densities above 3.75 units per acre; suburban/medium density residential development at densities above 10 units per acre; annexation; urban services: development agreements. Planned Industrial – Large-scale industrial uses clustered in industrial parks; annexation; urban services: development agreements.

Community Commercial Node – Clustered commercial uses up to 800,000 square feet per cluster; annexation; urban services: development agreements. Convenience Commercial Node -- Clustered commercial uses that serve convenience and localized neighborhood needs; up to 100,000 square feet per cluster; annexation; urban services: development agreements.

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Boone County Future Land Use Ames Urban Fringe Area located in Boone County. Future Land Use to be determined following completion of Boone County's Comprehensive Plan Update and discussion with other governments.

Story County Study Area Ames Urban Fringe Area located in 'Story County Study Area'. Future Land Use to be determined following the completion of Story County's study and discussion with other governments.

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· Map up to date through Resolution 14-541, adopted October 14, 2014. Map prepared by Department of Planning and Housing City of Ames, Iowa January 7, 2015

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GEORGE W CARVER AVE

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

re ek

! ! ! ! ! !

le ar C

(Ames Urban Fringe Plan)

! ! ! ! ! !

DAYTON AVE

! ! ! ! ! !

es at rural rotect

n that rance

LA FRAM

Gilbert Gilbert

C

LAND USE FRAMEWORK MAP

Ames City Boundary

Kelley Kelley

Ames Urban Fringe Boundary Iowa State University Property ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

Government Owned land Refer to Ames Future Land Use Map for detailed Land Use classifications within Ames.

0

0.2

Miles 0.4 0.6

* The Ames Urban Fringe Plan is an existing plan that has been adopted by the City of Ames, the City of Gilbert, and Story County. Over the next 2 years this plan is anticipated to be reviewed andMap up to date through R adopted October updated. Map prepare

·

Department of Plannin City of Ames January 7,

A component Ames Land Use P


FUTURE LAND USE MAP | MAP 28 Legend City Boundaries 2 Mile Buffer Ames Urban Fringe Area Roadways Government Owned

STORY CITY ROLAND

35

69

MCCALLSBURG

ZEARING

Narrative: This map identifies the County’s preferred land uses by major land use categories and is used as a basis for determining the proper zoning for all properties located within the unincorporated area of the County. Most of the land uses are consistent with how individual properties are currently being used and zoned; however, certain properties may not be consistent with the identified land use category or categories.

65

GILBERT

Future Land Use Designations Natural Resource Area Agricultural Conservation Area Rural Residential Area Rural Village Area Commercial-Industrial Area Urban Expansion Area

FUTURE LAND USE DEFINITIONS

35

Natural Resource Area: Natural areas, floodplains, green spaces, and parks help create open space linkages between the countryside and communities and make up this designation. The Future Land Use Map identifies certain natural features in the county in order to preserve unique habitats, natural or sensitive areas, as well as open and recreational spaces. Agricultural Conservation Area: These areas encompass large areas of highly valuable farmland, with farming and agricultural production as the primary activity. Rural Residential Area: The Rural Residential Area designation offers the rural housing market segment choices in the unincorporated areas of the county. They are characterized by residential land uses adapted for a rural or agricultural setting at low, nonurban densities. Urban level services are not provided in these areas, and these are not priority areas for infrastructure development.

AMES 30

NEVADA

30

COLO

Rural Village Area: Existing areas characterized by a variety of land uses in one location are designated as Rural Village Area. These areas have unique land use patterns that provide valued and established services for citizens in Story County. Roads in these areas are generally platted as right-of-way and maintained by Story County. The uses are served by private wastewater treatment systems (septic) and private water sources – wells and rural water systems. As shown on the Future Land Use Map, these areas contain the rural villages of Iowa Center, Shipley, and Fernald.

30

Commercial-Industrial Area: The Commercial-Industrial Area designation supports the long term planning objective of accommodating future demand for types of commercial and industrial growth that may be best located in a rural setting outside of an urbanized area.

69

KELLEY

Urban Expansion Area: The Urban Expansion Area designation reflects those areas identified by individual communities as future growth areas. Development proposed in these areas are encouraged to be annexed into the neighboring city in order for an urban level of service to be provided. Proposed land use and regulations should comply with that city’s plans and standards as appropriate.

65

Ames Urban Fringe Area: The Ames Urban Fringe Area designation is the planning area defined in the Ames Urban Fringe Plan that lies within two miles of the official boundary of the City of Ames, as it existed in 2006. The Ames Urban Fringe Plan is implemented through a 28E agreement between the City of Ames, Gilbert, and Story County. The Plan addresses proposed future land uses within the planning area and the process for proposed development proposals and changes occurring therein. The Future Land Use Map incorporates by reference all land uses shown on the Ames Urban Fringe Plan – Land Use Framework Map.

35

HUXLEY SLATER SHEDAHL

COLLINS

CAMBRIDGE MAXWELL

0 0.5 1

2

3

´

4 Miles

GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


PROPOSED TRAILS AND GREENWAYS MAP| MAP 29 Legend Existing Hard-surfaced Trail (concrete or asphalt) Existing Soft-surfaced Trail (gravel or dirt) Dedicated Bike Facility (bike lane) South Skunk River Water Trail Roads Proposed Hard-surfaced Trail (concrete or asphalt) Proposed Soft-surfaced Trail (gravel or dirt) Consider Paved Shoulders Proposed Central Iowa Greenways Existing Parks and Natural Areas

STORY CITY ROLAND

MCCALLSBURG

ZEARING

CONTEXT MAP: HAMILTON

GILBERT

HARDIN STORY COUNTY PROPOSED TRAILS AND GREENWAYS MAP Legend Existing Hard-surfaced Trail (concrete or asphalt) Existing Soft-surfaced Trail (gravel or dirt) Dedicated Bike Facility (bike lane) South Skunk River Water Trail Roads Proposed Hard-surfaced Trail (concrete or asphalt) Proposed Soft-surfaced Trail (gravel or dirt) Consider Paved Shoulders Proposed Central Iowa Greenways Existing Parks and Natural Areas

STORY CITY MCCALLSBURG

ROLAND

ZEARING

CONTEXT MAP: HARDIN

MARSHALL

BOONE

HAMILTON

BOONE

STORY NEVADA

COLO AMES

MARSHALL

GILBERT

STORY STORY

POLK

JASPER

KELLEY

AMES

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AEX, Getmapping, Aerogrid, IGN, IGP, swisstopo, and the GIS User Community

NEVADA

HUXLEY

COLO

DRAFT: 11.18.2015

COLLINS

CAMBRIDGE MAXWELL

SLATER 0 0.5 1

SHELDAHL

POLK

2

3

´

4 Miles

*PROPOSED TRAIL LOCATIONS ARE VERY GENERAL. NO SPECIFIC TRAIL ALIGNMENTS OR LOCATIONS HAVE BEEN DETERMINED OR ESTABLISHED BY THIS MAP. GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)

JASPER

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AEX, Getmapping, Aerogrid, IGN, IGP, swisstopo, and the GIS User Community

KELLEY

HUXLEY SLATER SHEDAHL

COLLINS

CAMBRIDGE Heart

of Iow

MAXWELL a Natu

re Tra

an Americ

il

ery Tra

Discov

il

0 0.5 1

2

3

´

4 Miles

GIS Data Sources: Story County GIS Department Iowa Department of Natural Resources GIS Library (NRGIS)


Story County Comprehensive Plan 2036  

Cornerstone to Capstone Plan

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