__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

May 2020

Help for farmers, ranchers Horace McQueen See page 3

Team Ropiong Handicap Baxter Black See page 5

Game Warden Field Notes Texas Parks & Wildlife See page 8

Athens Farmers Market opens By Shelli Parker

T

Athens Review

he Athens Farmers Market officially opened in May. A total of 15 vendors bravely set up during the beginning phases of reopening local businesses and it is only expected to grow from there. Many more vendors will be joining as the restrictions for social distancing are lightened. “It was a great turnout,” said DJ Warren, AFM director. “Many vendors experienced record sales and all farmers sold out by 10:30 a.m.” He said local vendors practiced appropriate social distancing whenever possible and were mindful of one another. Some chose to wear masks while others did not, but all had them on hand to respect the community members who preferred them. Despite less vendors and visitors on opening weekend, Warren said they were not discouraged. “We are adding new vendors daily,” he said. “Those who came were there to purchase. It was a beautiful day and everyone was pleased with the turnout.” Warren said the market was a success and the Ben Wheeler market sold out as well. “Overall our market weekend was amazing,” he said. “Just like the community who turned up to support us. We couldn’t do it without them.” The importance of shopping local and small is even more apparent and amplified by the recent COVID-19 pandemic. Please also view our current series on local See more photos from Athens Farmers Market on Page 10 farmers and ranchers at www.athensreview.com.

Apiculture

A hobby that becomes a lifestyle By Jo Anne Embleton Jacksonville Progress

What began as a hobby quickly became a lifestyle that today supports Isaac and Meagan Elzner, owners and operators of Elzner Farms, a honey farm located in Jacksonville. “Isaac was working as an oil and gas landman and I was working as a visual merchandiser for Macy’s when we began keeping bees,” Meagan said, recalling how the family was residing in Houston several years ago, and driving up to Cherokee County to care for their bees when they visited family on weekends. “It quickly spiraled out of control,” she laughed, describing how their career “happened by accident.” But, she added, it’s something that “tends to happen once you begin keeping bees, they are just so fascinating.” The couple asked Isaac’s father if they could place two hives on his property, and “after just a few months with the bees, we knew we wanted more, and made a plan to purchase more hives the following spring,” she said “We did our best to learn all we could, and somewhere along the line after a few years we made this natural

progression to wanting to do this full time. We decided to move from the city. Isaac’s botany degree (from Texas State University) has helped us understand the connection between the bees and nature and the positive impact that they have on each other,” Elzner said. Apiculture – the technical term for beekeeping – has also made a positive impact on the Elzners as a family unit. In fact, it’s not uncommon to see four-year-old Douglas or his three-year-old sister Willow, helping with operations as they are able. “Even at their young ages, they still show great pride in helping us with our work, whether it is putting frames into boxes or helping make honey deliveries to stores,” she said. “We love that we are able to spend all day every day with them, and hope it is creating a strong foundation for them to grow off of.” As with traditional farming endeavors, families who raise and keep bees invest heart and soul into their work. “It requires a lot of hives to make a living – many only think of eating honey or getting stung when they think of bees, but there’s so much more that is included in beekeeping,” Elzner said. “Our bees are here year round, so they are out pollinating local native plants and increasing habitats and food supplies for so many See Apiculture on Page 3

USDA to provide $16 billion for COVID losses Staff Reports

A

Palestine Herald-Press

gricultural producers can now apply for USDA’s Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP). The program provides direct payments to offset losses from the coronavirus pandemic. Applications and a payment calculator are now available online. USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) staff members are available by phone, fax, and online tools to help producers complete applications. The agency set up a call center to simplify how they serve new customers across the nation. “We know Texas producers are facing a tough time now, and we are making every effort to provide much needed support as quickly as possible,” said Gary Six, state executive director for FSA in Texas. Applications will be accepted through Aug. 28. Through CFAP, USDA is making available $16 billion to assist agriculture producers who have suffered a fivepercent-or-greater price decline due to COVID-19, and face additional significant marketing costs due to low demand and shipping disruptions. “We also want to remind producers that the program is structured to ensure the availability of funding for all eligible producers who apply,” Six said. To do this, producers will receive 80 percent of their maximum total payment upon approval of the application. The remaining portion of the payment, not to exceed the payment limit, will be paid at a later date nationwide, as funds remain available. Producers can download the CFAP application and other eligibility forms from farmers.gov/cfap. Also, on that webpage, producers can find a payment calculator to help identify sales and inventory records needed to apply and calculate potential payments. Additionally, producers in search of one-on-one support with the CFAP application process can call 877-508-8364 to speak directly with a USDA employee ready to offer assistance. This is a good first step before a producer engages the team at the FSA county office at their local USDA Service Center.

Applying for Assistance Producers of all eligible commodities will apply through their local FSA office. Those who use the online See USDA on Page 3


2

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

Back with a splash

May 2020

Texas Freshwater Fisheries Center partially reopens By Shelli Parker

W

Athens Review

ith Texas gradually re-opening, The Texas Freshwater Fisheries Center in Athens and Sea Center Texas in Lake Jackson partially reopened to public visitation Wednesday, May 27. Both facilities have enhanced safety measures that comply with Center for Disease Control guidelines and Governor Greg Abbott’s executive orders. “We look forward to providing a safe, free option for children and families to explore and learn more about saltwater environments,” said Robin Riechers, Coastal Fisheries Division Director. The Texas Freshwater Fisheries Center will be open 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. WednesdaySaturday and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday with the following safety procedures in place: • Guests are encouraged to wear masks, maintain appropriate social distances from others outside their party, and use hand sanitizer and wash their hands regularly. • No groups larger than five people are allowed, except for families or people living in the same household. • To avoid crowding, there will not be any tram or hatchery tours offered. • The indoor portion of the visitor center, including the dive theater, gift

shop, and Game Warden museum will remain closed. • Water fountains and vending machines will not be operational, but visitors are permitted to bring drinks. Bottled water will be available for purchase.

TFFC will be operating at approximately 25% visitor capacity per the state’s executive order. This will allow up to 100 people at the facility at any time. “We are so happy to be open even the alligator garr are smiling,” said Tom Lang, TFFC director. One family drove from Fort Worth in order to celebrate their son Kolton’s 10th birthday. He caught 18 fish while he was there. Kolton said he is a huge TFFC fan. Lang wanted to remind people that the center is currently unable to provide rods and reels. “We prefer when all people have to show up with is a desire to fish, but for now they will need to bring their own gear” Lang said. Unfortunately, due to COVID-19 and safety requirements they are only able to provide bait for now. The center has been busy preparing for guests with a lot of remodeling and hard work. The Angler center has a new floor and the alligators have even made a nest. To be informed on when TFFC is nearing visitor capacity and entrance will require waiting, please follow the

TFFC Facebook page and front entrance signage. Admission is temporarily reduced to the group rate of $2.50 per guest. During this partial reopening phase, visitors to TFFC can still enjoy all outside aquaria, recreational fishing (fishing poles will not be available for loan, but tackle and bait will be available), the Angler’s Pavilion, antique lure and fishing equipment exhibit, and wetland trail. For additional information about the re-openings and to plan your visit, visit the TFFC websites.


May 2020

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

3

Some help for farmers-ranchers coming

P

roducing crops is easier than getting them sold at a profit. For the last several months, prices for cattle and hogs have devastated the bank accounts for many farmers. Now with packing houses shut down due to the Corona Virus, marketing of fed cattle has slowed considerably. Some days, fed steers and heifers found no buyers. And if a buyer was present, the offering prices meant a loss to the cattle owner of up to $300 a head. As for hogs, some farmers aborted their sows that were going to produce another set of piglets, due to packing houses taking none of their ready-to-harvest hogs. Many

dairymen dumped good milk when restaurant and school closings created an over- supply. Now the Federal Government has got into the act—offering up to $19 BILLION to provide some relief for the dis- tressed agricultural industry. It’s not just a help for the livestock folks—it’s for grain and fruit and vegetable farmers also. Those farmers who get the payments may not be made whole again, but every little bit helps when bills have to be paid. Signup for the program is planned to start this week at the local USDA Farm Service Agency office. Give the local office a call and arrange a time for a visit. Due to

the virus situation, that visit may be by telephone in order for the FSA to complete the paperwork for each farmer. Based on what is known now about the program, livestock and dairy farmers who sold their cattle, hogs and milk on a down-market from January 15 to April 15, 2020 will be eligible for the higher direct payments. Cattle sold out of the feedlot during that time frame will be eligible for a $214 a head payment and $92 to $139 a head for other classes of cattle. Payment for cattle in farmer-inventory from April 16th to May 14, 2020 will be eligible for $33 a head, regardless of size or age. Farmer-ranchers must provide tally sheets show- ing the

number of head of livestock sold from January 15 to April 15, 2020. Also cattle numbers in inventory from April 16th to May 14, 2020 must be counted for payment. Basically, those cattle folks who sold cattle earlier in the year will reap the biggest payments, with those who still have the livestock on the farm, or sold earlier, get the far lesser payments. The payment pro- gram will be called unfair in many respects—especially by cattle producers who sold cattle in 2020, but before January 15th or after April 15th. But that is the way it is planned to work. That’s – 30— horace7338@live.com

Apiculture, continued from page 1 species. We also raise bees for others who want to begin beekeeping, we rear queens for anyone that has an existing hive and needs a new queen and we’re very active in multiple local bee clubs doing our best to help others raise happy healthy bees.” The Elzners invest a lot of time educating themselves about their flying herd, staying current on information about bees and the honey industry by perusing publications dedicated to the topic, and Meagan is in the second of a five-year Master Beekeeping Program offered through Texas A&M University. “I like that it digs deeper into the behavior of the bees and the reading really stays with me when I’m evaluating my own hives. I take a step back and look at how they interact with one another during different points of the year,” she said. “For example, all pollen has varying degrees of nutritional value, and you notice the bees collecting the pollen that will benefit their hive the most. They don’t go out collecting pine tree pollen unless there’s nothing else available to them, as it has a minimal nutritional value to them.” An upcoming segment is of particular interest to her: “I’m very interested in bumble bees, and living in the Tomato Republic where bumblebees would be very beneficial to our tomato plants, I’d like to learn as much as I can about them.” Probably the greatest challenge, Meagan said, is competition created by adulterated honey that is marketed as the real thing. “It’s sold in stores, and at a very low price,” she said, noting that “there’s a mass amount of imported honey that is not real honey, but because it is very difficult (and costly) to test for this adulteration, it is sold as the real

DID YOU KNOW? • One in every 3 bites of food we eat comes as a result from a pollinator. “As honeybees live in large colonies, they are the main resource used for large scale pollination – pollinating more than 90 different crops each year,” Meagan said. • Bees “contribute nearly $20 billion to U.S. crop production – everything from almonds to apples to canola, the couple said. “Doing what we can to protect all of our pollinators ensures a healthy future for all of us.” • Did you know that every flower produces different nectar? “This is why honey tastes different from year to year and can vary between beekeepers based on what the dominant flower is in the radius around their hive,” she said. • Bees like to forage in a one-mile radius around their hive, but have been known to fly more than five miles in search of a good nectar source.

USDA, continued from page 1 thing. Most is rice syrup or beet syrup and comes from China, (and the adulterated “honey”) has even been shown to have harmful chemicals and antibiotics in it. This is why I always tell people to know your beekeeper and where your honey comes from,” she said. Another challenge comes in the form of the varroa mite – which, according to Entomology Today, “feeds on honey bees (and) is the greatest single driver of the global honey bee health decline.” “It’s proven to be a difficult parasite but many are working on genetics to create a mite resistant bee. With a little bit of diligent studying anyone can keep bees, so long as they aren’t discouraged if there are setbacks,” Meagan said. Learn more about Elzner Farms by visiting www. elznerfarms.com. On social media at “Elzner Farms” on Facebook, and Instagram @ElznerFarms  or www. instagram.com/elznerfarms/

calculator tool will be able to print off a pre-filled CFAP application, sign, and submit to your local FSA office either electronically or via hand delivery. Please contact your local office to determine the preferred method. Find contact information for your local office at farmers.gov/cfap. Documentation to support the producer’s application and certification may be requested after the application is filed. FSA has streamlined the signup, eliminating a requirement to provide an acreage report when applying. A USDA farm number may not be immediately needed. More information about this process is available on farmers.gov/cfap. or call 877-508-8364. USDA Service Centers are open for business by phone appointment only; field work will continue with appropriate social distancing. More information can be found at farmers.gov/coronavirus.


4

May 2020

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

Dandelion Thoughts D

andelions are a hot topic these days. Lawn folks want to kill them, and bee folks want to keep them, while foragers are looking to eat them. All of this is well and good, as there are plenty to go around, which

is also good news for the whimsical among us who can’t resist making a wish and blowing on the fluffy seed heads. Our most common ‘dandelion’ here in East Texas is Pyrrhopappus carolinianus and bears the common

name of Carolina desert chicory. In some areas of Texas, you can also find Pyrrhopappus pauciflorus, the Texas Dandelion. These two have a very close resemblance to each other and are recognizable by the bright lemon-yellow blooms. When you look closely at those eye-catching blooms, dark stamens show up well against the bright background of the yellow petals. Those dark stamens are a great way to tell the difference between these lookalikes and the true dandelion. The true dandelion, Taraxacum officinale, has a lovely golden yellow bloom. They occur less frequently than their wilder cousins, but they are definitely here. They tend to have markedly barb shaped lobes on the leaves, which can be another way to distinguish them. All of these cousins are edible, as are cat’s ear (looks a lot like a dandelion but has hairy leaves), chicory (the flowers are blue), and Japanese Hawk-

weed (the flowers occur in a cluster instead of on a single stem.) Look for some common identifiers: The leaves will grow in a rosette formation and the flower stalk rises from the rosette; the stalks are hollow; the stalks produce a milky sap when broken; they all have a strong, carrot-shaped taproot. There are many conversations to be had about dandelions – How bitter is bitter? Bees love that early pollen! This needs more salad dressing. Did you know that the long taproot helps bring minerals up

from lower levels of the soil? And of course, many more. Research from numerous foragers shows that the leaves, roots and flowers contain vitamins and minerals and that the plant can be thoroughly eaten – tea from flowers, greens eaten raw or cooked, and roots roasted. For those of you looking at natural greens, make absolutely certain that you know what you are harvesting before you give it a taste. Do not assume that just because it has a fluffy seed head, that it is a dandelion. Make sure you see the bloom or know well the growth patterns of the foliage. Groudsel can look similar to dandelion if it isn’t blooming – the seed heads and the spent blooms can look like the edible dandelion group – but should not be consumed in the same way. Here are some additional notes regarding eating dandelions and their lookalike cousins. The greens are

Kim Benton

Cherokee County Horticulturist tenderest and best tasting before the flower stalks start forming. When using the flowers to make tea, be sure to remove the green parts from the flower, because they are extremely bitter and can make the tea very unpleasant. Also, consider timing when digging the root – it is said to be sweeter in the fall. And finally, be sure to use the flower stalks as bubble wands because life is short, and we should all seek joy in the small and unexpected places.

Citizen Scientist Project needs input from Texas residents By Adam Russell Texas A&M AgriLife Communications

T

he purpose of this project is to utilize volunteer “citizenscientists” to determine the attractiveness of different commercially available annual and perennial ornamental plants to various pollinator groups in Texas and Oklahoma. The project started as a collaboration between research and extension personnel at Texas A&M University, Tarleton State University, Texas Tech University and Oklahoma State University. Erfan Vafaie, AgriLife Extension entomologist, Overton, said creators of the project hope to answer a long-popular question among ornamental and pollinator lovers: Which common flowers in Texas and Oklahoma do pollinators find most attractive? “We are looking for master gardeners, master naturalists, landscapers, home garden enthusiasts and the like to participate in a citizen-science pollinator project,” Vafaie said. “Citizen scientists need to have access to outdoor flowering plants, whether it be in their own gardens or a nearby park or botanical garden, and make regular observations throughout the flowering season, at least once a week, to track pollinator visits.”

Join the Citizen Scientist Project

The project is mainly focused on southern states, but because data can be filtered by region, citizenscientists report from anywhere in the U.S. It is also focused on introduced plant cultivars rather than native species. Vafaie said the project

asks volunteers to determine the plant species observed down to the binomial Latin name and to classify pollinators into one of many categories including honey bees, bumble bees, other bees, non-bee wasps, non-bee flies, butterflies and moths, and beetles. Other information collected include the location, temperature and time of the observation, he said. “These observations can be made in a backyard garden or at a botanical garden,” he said. “We want the observations to be from the same location throughout the season so we have a range of data relating to conditions and flowering, but we also want people to know they can do this at home.” The Citizen Scientist project will provide online training modules focused on how to perform observations, identifying different pollinator groups, selecting a patch of flowering plants, and how to fill out the citizenscience survey. “The training modules will take volunteers through the steps needed to report accurately,” he said. “It’s just as important to get reports that are consistent and accurate, whether they’re observing certain pollinators on specific plants or not seeing anything. We want the positive and negative because they both contribute to an accurate portrayal of what plants may attract pollinators and potentially why.” The project receives no direct funding and operates through researchers’ existing programs and volunteers, Vafaie said.

Project results so far As of April 1, there were 282 official citizen-scientist

Texas AgriLife Extension photo

Gardens can be managed so as to attract butterflies such as this monarch on indigo spires sage. The Pollinator Citizen Science Project is designed to help entomologists to determine what ornamental plants are most attractive to pollinators like butterflies and bees. volunteers, including 172 master naturalists and 76 master gardeners, Vafaie said. But anyone who is interested in gardening, ornamental plants or pollinators and willing to commit time to the project is welcome to join. In 2019, volunteers provided almost 8,000 contributions to the project. Volunteer observations represented 215 plant species from 57 plant families. Some most commonly observed plant families included tickseed, purple coneflower, yarrow, black-eyed Susan, spearmint, oregano, salvia and lantana, mock verbena, frog fruit and verbena. The 2020 observation surveys will be accepting observations through October. Vafaie said researchers hope to continue the project and collect data on pollinators into the future. Vafaie said the Citizen Scientist project is a great

opportunity for the public to participate in a scientific survey program dedicated to pollinators. “Pollinators are getting more attention these days, and people are becoming more aware of their

importance to humans and the world around us,” he said. “In the end, we hope this project helps pollinator populations.” Anyone interested in participating in the Pollinator Project should

go to the project page and complete the three-step process to become a volunteer. Volunteers will be asked to view an hourlong webinar on the project and pass a short quiz before signing up.

2805 South Loop 256 • Palestine • 903-723-3164 shelbysavingsbank.com

BROKER

Top Producer

Agent of the Month

Jennifer Hutcherson

James Chambers

Ty Cobble

324 E. Palestine Ave Palestine, TX 75801

903-729-6232 goldawardrealty.com #Relentlessagents Each office is independently owned and operated.


May 2020

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

5

Team Roping Handicap T

he sport (passion, or affliction) of team roping experienced a terrific boom in popularity years ago with the creation of an association called United States Team Roping Championships (USTRC). It established a classification system based on the roper’s skill. It is comparable to the handicapping system used in golf. The result is that ropers are able to compete with others of ‘equal ability’ therefore increasing their chances of winning. As a roper improves, his USTRC number increases. Classifications begin at #1 which is defined as True Beginner. These ropers have trouble controlling the rope and their horse at the same time. Inexperienced riders with little or no roping experience. And it runs up to #9 which is defined as National Finals Rodeo quality ropers.

I joined USTRC and applied for a number. After reading the classification description, I realized they didn’t go far enough. There are some handicaps, quirks and flaws that deserve special numbers. I suggested these additions: #3/8 – One who can rope the dummy standing on a barrel, behind his back, between his legs, from the front seat and blindfolded, but couldn’t rope a live elk in an eight foot stock tank if his life depended on it. #.0025 – Ropers who have been at it several years yet seem to have no aptitude for the sport. Still don’t grasp basic concepts like nodding for the steer. #.5 – Those cowboys condemned to always ride green, spooky, maladjusted “in training” horses. Although they might be fairly good ropers, it never shows between

the pitching, squeals and cheers from the crowd. #2 ¾ - Consistently poor ropers but so creative at inventing excuses that they deserve some credit. “Did you see how close that was? I had ‘em both, I saw. Then the loop must have snagged on a gum wrapper and it broke my concentration just as my horse switched leads, and in this humidity…blah…blah…blah…” #1/4 – Left-handers who rope righthanded. Easily spotted by the slight hesitations, looks of confusion and facial tics. #1/8 – Left-handers who rope lefthanded. Heelers who spend their life trying to get in position. #4F – Usually mature ropers who suffer rotor cuff injuries, bursitis, tennis elbow, carpal tunnel syndrome or other maladies

that result in unusual roping styles. Such as one swing, wince and toss it like they’re trying to get a booger off their finger. # 10+ - Poorly dressed cowboys, ridin’ scruffy horses needin’ a mane roachin’ and tail pullin’, carrying a rope that looks like it spent the winter holdin’ down tarps, bummin’ Copenhagen and wanting to sleep in yer trailer, who can use a rope better than most of us can write our name.

Female farmer holds her own

Chandler Family Farm grows produce, pasture raised protein by Shelli Parker

T

Athens Review

he United States of America is a land of opportunity for both men and women. Boys and girls have the chance here to grow up and be whatever they want to be. Some boys and girls are choosing time-tested careers that generations before them recognized as necessary and honest work. Recently there has been a swing toward corporate agriculture that has earned a some bad publicity for its health dangers. Factory-style meat producers with terrible animal living conditions and genetically modified food, outlawed by some overseas countries, have taken the lead. However, the local family farm is still holding on and finding there is a strong need for them and desire among the people to know where their food comes from. Chandler Family Farm is one of the local farms meeting needs in the community and instilling wholesome values through hard work and dedication. Born and raised in Mabank to a local farming family, Jennifer Chandler grew up on a farm. “My dad has only and always been a farmer — he has done many different things: hay, cattle, grains, but since I was 8 he was a dairyman,” she said. “My mom of course helped on the farm as most farmer wives do. That and raise us girls.” At its prime the farm milked around 150 cows. Chandler and her two sisters helped in the garden and were around various other family members who were farmers and ranchers including her great grandmother who was a cattle rancher. “I think it’s defiantly in my blood and was my calling,” she said. After graduating high school, Chandler lived in a few other places such as Oregon and Missouri, which helped solidify her desire to come home and be a farmer as well. “I came back to Texas in the summer of 2011 with a goal to farm,” she said. “I wasn’t sure what that looked like or really what I wanted. I just wanted to grow food and be outside with the earth.” Finding herself pregnant at 30, Chandler decided to settle in on some property her father had on her grandmothers land where she started a small garden around 30 foot by 400 foot and had a few chickens and Chandler Family Farm was born. The first year she harvested and preserved nearly all of it for baby food. “I was just learning how to garden really,” she said. “In 2013, I started attending the Athens Farmers Market selling mostly onions, potatoes, squash, zucchini and tomatoes. Each year since then we have grown in a slow manner.” In order to be a good steward of the earth, new fields are added and others retired each year. There is currently four to five acres of land in production. Chandler’s father also gave her the bull calves to bottle feed and some older dairy cows to start her own herd. “I have roughly 50 head of cattle that we raise as a

cow/calf operation and slaughter a few each year for beef to sell and for our family,” she said. “I also raise hogs for pork and have about 200 laying hens. We sell the beef, pork and eggs at our farmers markets and to local customers throughout the year. As a single mother, Chandler has to be a jack of all trades. “I am the planter, harvester, packer, social media marketer, tractor driver, cattle/hog and chicken feeder, basically I wear all the hats,” she said. Living on a farm with three generations with her father, son and self, the three farm together. During the busiest part of the year through August the list of to-do’s never gets shorter but it is a life she loves and an honest living. Chandler said that her father Brant is the reason she is able to do this and that his knowledge of farming is the backbone of the farm. Chandler said she loves farming because it it good honest and hard work. She feels privileged to be out in the sunshine working in the dirt and with animals. It is a miraculous experience to see a tiny seed turn into a multitude of tomatoes or greens, and said “the harvest is just amazing.” Thankfully, her father had all of the equipment she could ever need access to and when he has some spare time helps his daughter with some of the tractor work like plowing and planting. “I love farming because it is good honest hard work,” she said. “I get to be outside in the sunshine, in the dirt and with the animals. Seeing a plant start from an incredibly tiny seed to producing pounds of tomatoes or an abundance of greens to harvest is just amazing. I wanted Thomas, to grow up on a farm just the way I did. Playing in the mud, being a friend of animals, knowing how food is grown what that looks like.” Chandler buys things when needed but the knowledge of how to provide for herself is priceless and she hopes that her son will retain these skills. Chandler Family Farm has a simple mission, Growing food for themselves and the community. “We want everyone to have access to great quality, nutrient dense and locally grown vegetables and fruit,” she said. “We raise our meat in a way that I feel good about. On pasture, treated like pets, out in the sunshine, living their best life. I want to feed my family quality food

We accept all Medicare Part D, WellCare & Humana. Stop by and we’ll guide you every step of the way!

Palestine

Hometown Pharmacy

City-Wide Delivery & Drive-thru 903-729-3100 101 Medical Dr.

and therefore, I want to feed your family quality food as well.” A difference Chandler says you can taste. Fresh is the name of the game. “Our vegetables are being harvested and sold within 24 to 48 hours in most cases,” Chandler said. “Hyper fresh, hyper local. There are farmers in your communities, you just have to find them. Supporting these people means, better community, better quality food and knowing in a time of need (like now) that you will have access to food, if we only support farmers when we cant get it at the grocery store, they wont be around for long,” She stressed the importance of remembering that it is a business though and that having regular customers is vital. “If we only support farmers when we cant get it at the grocery store, they wont be around for long,” she said. “we cant afford to farm and just wait. It takes people buying from us to keep us in business.” One way you can support Chandler Family Farm is through their Community Supported Agriculture organization, which is a model for a relationship between farmers and people who enjoy eating fresh locally grown produce. CSA members buy a share in the farm’s production at the beginning of the season, and then each week receive a portion of vegetables. “We have a local CSA with Highway 19 Produce called Deep Roots CSA. Its website is www.deeprootscsa.net” “During the peak season, I have farm stand wagon that is loaded up daily with freshly harvested goods and put out front at the end of our driveway. We run this as an “honor system” farm stand. I have price board and a money box. People pay for what they take.” she said. The farm is located on old Hwy 175 in Mabank. CFF also sells at two Dallas area farmers markets which are part of the www.goodlocalmarkets.org Follow Chandler Family Farm on Facebook and Instagram.


6

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

May 2020

Professional Rodeo Cowboys going back to work

P

rofessional Rodeo Cowboys Association athletes are in the process of going back to work. The world’s top pro rodeo circuit has been shut down since mid-March because of coronavirus concerns. But the PRCA has targeted the May 22-24 Cave Creek Rodeo Days in Cave Creek, Arizona (in the Phoenix area), for a return to competition. The rodeo, which is a closedfor-TV-only competition, will be broadcasted on the Cowboy Channel beginning at 9:30 p.m. (CT) each night. The Cave Creek Rodeo has drawn numerous world

class competitors such as defending PRCA world all-around champion Stetson Wright and fourtime world champion Tuf Cooper. PRCA chief executive officer George Taylor said organizers are focused on creating safe working environments at rodeo sites. “We all recognize while we’re all eager to return pro rodeo to our arenas, we also recognize that we have a substantial responsibility that comes with returning to competition,” Taylor said. “From a production standpoint, you will see a great rodeo, obviously, and we’re going to broadcast

that on the Cowboy Channel. “But you’re also going to see more people wearing masks and more disinfecting of the environment than we would historically, more sanitation stations, those types of things that just allow for both the production personnel and the athletes to compete safely. We are also going to screen participants beforehand. It’s those types of those things that will make it feel differently than a traditional rodeo.” The Cave Creek Rodeo is the only PRCA show that’s scheduled for this weekend. Some of the world’s

larger summer rodeos have been cancelled or rescheduled because of the coronavirus concerns. For example, the Reno (Nevada) Rodeo in late June, which traditionally is the first major summer pro rodeo, has been cancelled. The iconic Calgary Stampede Rodeo in Alberta also has opted to cancel this year. But the Greeley (Colorado) Stampede, which is a larger traditional July 4 week rodeo, has been rescheduled for Sept. 11-13. The higher paying California Rodeo Salinas, which was scheduled for July 16-19 in Salinas, California, has been

rescheduled for Oct. 8-11.

PBR update During this challenging time of the coronavirus worldwide pandemic, the Professional Bull Riders has conducted closed-for-TVonly events at the Lazy E Arena near Oklahoma City that have been broadcasted on CBS Sports Network on three weekends in April and May. The massive venue is in a quieter remote area near Guthrie, Oklahoma. Fabiano Vieira, a Brazilian who lives in Decatur, clinched the title at the April 25-26 tour stop at the Lazy E Arena and earned $11,000. Jose Vitor

Brett Hoffman, a Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame member, has reported on rodeos for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram for more than three decades. Email him at bchoffman777@earthlink.net.

Leme, another Brazilian who lives in the Decatur area, clinched the title at the May 9-10 tour stop and pocketed $21,875. At the PBR tour stop on May 16-17, Lucas Divino, a Brazilian, clinched the title and earned $18,250. He turned in scores of 84.25, 82.25 and 90.75. In the PBR’s 2020 world standings, Leme is ranked No. 1 with 778.5 points. Two-time PBR world champion Jess Lockwood is in second place with 543.5. Joao Ricardo Vieira, another Brazilian who lives in the Decatur area, is in third place 522.25. Dalton Kasel, a Muleshoe cowboy who finished third at the May 9-10 PBR tour stop at the Lazy E Arena and pocketed $10,250, said it was a very different environment for competitors. “It really felt like a practice pen in the sense that there were just a few people there and they’re the ones cheering you on,” Kasel said. “I really miss fans. The fans bring a different kind of level of intensity to everything. It was really quiet. You could hear absolutely everything.” The PBR also has announced a new 40-hour televised team competition. The first part is a series of closed-for-TV-only competitions on the CBS Sports Network that will run on weekends from June 5-28 at the South Point Arena in Las Vegas. The competition will culminate with a championship weekend that will welcome fans to ticketed events at the Denny Sanford PREMIER Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, on July 10-12.


May 2020

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

7

Hands Off

Human intervention not always the best policy with young wildlife By Matt Williams

I

Outdoors Writer

t’s domino time for white-tailed deer across Texas. Does that were successfully bred last fall and winter usually give birth to their little ones in late spring or early summer, unless something bad happens to spoil the pregnancy. The gestation period for deer is 7 months. Statewide, most Texas fawns hit the ground between mid-May and midJuly, depending on the geographic area. In eastern Texas, mid-May through mid-June is the peak fawning time. “It’s already happening,” said Sean Willis, a Texas Parks and Wildlife Department wildlife biologist based in Lufkin. “I have already seen some pictures of does with fawns, some as early as the first part of May.” Most does will have a single fawn on their first pregnancy, which usually happens at 1 1/2 years old. Twins are always a possibility after that, so long as the landscape is in good shape and the doe is physically fit. Motherhood is beautiful thing in the deer woods. With no daddy around to rock the cradle, momma takes full charge. Does are all about kids. Their maternal instincts are extremely clever. When not nursing the fawn, the doe will bed down the youngster in a safe spot so she can venture off and find forage for herself before returning later. It’s not uncommon for a doe to leave her fawn unattended for several hours at a time while she seeks the nutrition essential for survival and continued milk production. Though it might be perceived as a recipe for disaster for a mother to leave a newborn alone in the woods, in reality it’s not. Fawns come into the world with built-in protection. They are born scent-free with tan-colored coats mottled with dozens of white spots to help them blend with the landscape. Mother Nature’s camo makes it difficult for predators to detect them. The fawn’s natural instinct to lay low and still with its ears pinned back while curled up beneath a bush or in tall grass helps it hide and stay safe until mom comes back.

Leave them Be Unfortunately, not everyone is aware of how things work in the wild. Humans occasionally cross paths with bedded fawns and can’t resist the urge to intervene. Each spring, many young deer are picked up and removed from their natural

TPWD Photo /Chase Fountain

Just because a fawn appears be abandoned or alone in the woods doesn’t mean it is. People who cross paths with the newborns should leave them alone and watch from afar. environment because they are believed to be abandoned, when in reality the mother isn’t far away. It’s a well-meaning gesture that often results in a sad ending. For starters, it pretty much spoils any chance of the fawn being reunited with its mother. Plus, the now-orphaned fawn becomes totally dependent on humans to survive and will never learn the valuable lessons of the wild its mom would have passed on. A healthy fawn that is wrongly plucked from the wild is almost certain to wind up on shaky ground. That’s baby deer demand special care that most people have no idea how to give.

At best, the deer will end up in the hands of a licensed wildlife rehabilitator whose facility may already be bustling with other animals. At worst, the fawn will get sick and die. Bottomline is folks that scoop up fawns and take them home thinking they are doing the animal a favor usually aren’t doing the animal any good at all. That’s not to say fawns can’t get into trouble out there. A fawn that is covered in fire ants or visibly wounded is likely in need of help. If you do find a fawn in serious distress and want to do something to help it, contact a game warden or wildlife

Bantamweight Bonanza

rehabilitator in your area immediately. It’s never a good a good idea to take the deer home attempt to care for it yourself. It’s illegal to do so. Plus, a newborn requires a special diet, and store-bought milk is not part of it. The same program applies to grounded fledglings, baby squirrels, raccoons, rabbits and other young critters. There are times when human intervention can help, but more often than not the best policy is to back off and allow nature to run its course. TPWD maintains a list of licensed wildlife habilitators by county on its website, tpwd.texas.gov/huntwild/wild/ rehab/list/.

Pint-size sunfish are big on fun, fast on action by Matt Williams Outdoors Writer

F

ishing is supposed to be enjoyable, not an endurance contest or a lesson in exercising patience. In my book, nothing rings the bell any louder in the fun-fishing arena than bluegillin’ does. Bluegillin’ is a moniker my good friend Lonnie

Stanley coined years ago in a discussion about fishing for a variety of bantamweight sunfish. The pint-size brawlers — redear, bluegill, redbreast and longear — are frequently referred to as “bream.” Stanley is a wellknown lure maker from Huntington whose bass baits have caught some

of the biggest fish ever reported from lakes across Texas and beyond. He loves the signature “thump” of a lunker eating a jig. Admittedly, Stanley may love the sight of a tiny cork disappearing under the hard tug of of a thickshouldered redear even more. “There’s nothing like it,” he says.

Photo by Matt Williams

Hand-size bluegills and sunfish are extremely aggressive and fun to catch on light tackle.

No argument from this corner. Ounce for ounce, small sunfish may be the hardest fighting panfish finning around in Texas freshwaters. They also are among the most prolific and cooperative when it comes to biting a hook, making them a great choice when there are children involved. Kids like action, and bream bring the goods like no other. Bream will bite yearround. One of the best times to catch big ones in large number is when they gather in big groups to spawn, usually in late spring and early summer. But the best fishing doesn’t necessarily end there. Bream will spawn throughout July and into August. Even after the spawn is complete, the fish can be found hanging around in shallow water, usually in relation to boat docks, weed beds, brush and other cover. Bream spawn in “colonies” — tight little groups of nests than may number upwards of 100 in areas the size of pick-up truck. The beds resemble small pie plates in the sand. They are often found in water ranging 2-3 feet deep, although larger redear have been known to nest significantly deeper.

Anglers can sometimes use side-imaging electronics to locate offshore colonies of big fish that are frequently unmolested. Good places to look for beds are points with hard bottoms, isolated pockets, underwater ridges, humps and along channel swings. Places with shell, gravel, sand, stumps or scattered weed beds hold lots of potential. Catching sunfish isn’t complicated. The fish are competitive and very territorial, especially when spawning. At times they may be so aggressive they will hit lures intended to catch much larger fish. As a rule, you’ll get the best results — and have the most fun — going after them with lightweight tackle. One of the best ways to locate active spawning colonies is to fan cast a small crappie jig with an ultra-light spinning outfit. You can pair the jig with a small cork to improve casting distance and help detect strikes. My favorite way to go bluegillin’ is with a 13-14 foot telescoping rod tipped with an equally long strand of 4 pound test line, a tiny hook and Thill Shy Bite float. The super sensitive float is made from balsa

wood. It detects strikes quickly and cuts down on aggressive fish swallowing the hook. One of the best bluegill rods around is the B’n’M Black Widow. The rods come in varied lengths, 10 to 16 1/2 feet. They are lightweight and fairly inexpensive. The 13 footer sells for $16.99 at bnmpoles.com. As baits go, bluegills and other sunfish will pounce on just about anything put in front of them. Live bait can be especially productive. Small pieces of earthworm work great, as do crickets and wax worms. Artificial baits like Berkley PowerBait Power Wigglers, Gulp! Alive! Waxies or Fish Fry also are good choices. The baits are small, infused with a patented fish-attracting scent and available in multiple colors. They come in resealable containers filled with dozens of baits, require no refrigeration and cost less than a 6-pack of beer. Bluegillin’ may lack the glamour and prestige of other freshwater venues, but none rank any higher when it comes to fun. The action can be nonstop when the the big ones are on spawning beds.


8

May 2020

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

Game Warden Field Notes The following items are compiled from recent Texas Parks and Wildlife Department law enforcement reports.

Texas Game Wardens Put Wraps on Busy Memorial Day Weekend Boating Safety Effort AUSTIN – Thousands of Texans headed out to lakes, rivers and coastal bays to celebrate Memorial Day weekend, and Texas Game Wardens were out in force to ensure everyone stayed safe on the water. Game wardens conducted safety checks on more than 9,000 vessels across the state between Friday and Monday. In addition to issuing 1,196 citations and 1,212 warnings for various boating safety law violations, wardens arrested 38 individuals for Boating While Intoxicated and filed another five charges for Driving While Intoxicated. Additionally, another 31 people were arrested for various other crimes. By far, the biggest cause for concern game wardens observed during the busy weekend involved severe weather, according to game warden Cody Jones, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Assistant Commander for Marine Enforcement. Inclement weather, including strong storms, 60 mile per hour wind gusts and a slow-moving tornado on the ground about 10 miles from Lake Alan Henry set game wardens into action to assist in escorting boaters off the lake when storms were spotted. Wardens also rescued two teenage swimmers at Lake Mackenzie and helped with multiple boat rescues across the state due to severe weather. Additionally, game wardens investigated 16 boating accidents across the state, one boating related fatality that occurred on Stillhouse Hollow Lake and 10 open water drownings “The dedicated efforts of the game wardens while working these tragic events is second to none and we keep the families in our thoughts and prayers,” said Assistant Commander Jones.

Right Place, Right Time A Hardin County game warden was patrolling Village Creek by boat when he came across a woman in distress at just the right time. Two ladies had been paddling in two separate canoes when one of the women flipped over in deep water with a strong current and couldn’t get loose from the trees or get her belongings out of the canoe. The warden gave her his life jacket and instructed her to swim away from the canoe and move downstream to a sandbar. He then grabbed the canoe and pulled it in his patrol boat and met both ladies downstream at the sandbar to make sure they were ok. He retrieved the lifejacket that she lost and gave it back to her and they were on their way again.

Pinocchio and Pinocchietta A Hardin County game warden wrapped an investigation that began when the warden was looking for information on social media about a possible stolen boat. It turned out that the boat wasn’t stolen, but one of the individuals he was investigating had posted a photo last November of his fiancé posing with a white-tailed doe she had harvested. The warden checked his records and saw that the woman had purchased her hunting license at a store near her home the same day as the post, but at 7 p.m. which was later than the social media post. Further investigation revealed that the deer was killed on a ranch in Real County and the warden enlisted the help of a Real County game warden to check the logbooks at the ranch. When the Hardin County game warden interviewed the couple, they were adamant that they had purchased the hunting license before they had gone on their week-long trip to the Hill Country and denied buying when they returned. The warden explained to the couple that he had time and date stamped information about when the license had been purchased and they had posted the picture of a harvested deer in Real County the same day she purchased a license in Hardin County. The couple still wasn’t convinced, so the warden went to the store where the license was purchased, and the loss prevention manager looked up the transaction. As expected, the video showed the couple together at the store at 7 p.m. purchasing the hunting license. After showing them the pictures of themselves from the video, they admitted to buying the license when they returned from their trip. Citations for taking a white-tailed deer without a hunting license and restitution are being filed. Case pending.

Losing all my Cool A Polk County game warden was checking fisherman on a nearby shoreline for freshwater fishing compliance when he spotted a man emerging from under a

bridge with a pole and tackle box. When the warden asked if he had a fishing license, the man said he didn’t need one because he

wasn’t fishing. The warden showed the man the fresh bait and water dripping off the hook and asked if he would like to start over. The man then confessed to fishing, not having a license and being on probation. When asked if he had any weapons or illegal narcotics, the man said he didn’t want to go to jail and admitted to having marijuana in his car. The warden started to do a pat down search when the man turned and tried to distract the warden, then confessed to possibly having cocaine in his possession. The warden found multiple folded dollar bills containing a white powdery substance. A Polk County Sheriff ’s Office Narcotics and Probation Officer was contacted and took over the case. Charges pending.

Guided by Gobbledygook Around 11 p.m., Schleicher County dispatch contacted a local game warden about a 911 call from two lost turkey hunters who stayed out too late and couldn’t find their vehicle. The warden called the hunter’s cell phone trying to find their location, but they were in a ranch they didn’t know the name or location of and were shown where to park by an out of town guide that was paid in cash and whose first name was all they knew. Due to poor cell service, the call was dropped so the warden texted them asking them to drop a pin of their location and call him back. The warden and two Schleicher County Deputies responded to the location where the 911 call was made, but the hunters had left. They turned on their emergency lights and sirens hoping to reach the hunters through the PA speakers. At 12:45 a.m., the hunters found cell service and called back. Their guide sent the pair a pin of his location and told them to walk to him. This pin was in the opposite direction of law enforcement and four miles away through three additional ranches. The warden confirmed that the hunters could hear the sirens and told them to walk to his location. Around 2 a.m., two very tired and dehydrated turkey hunters emerged from the woods and were given water. The hunters described the road they drove to the ranch they were hunting on and found out the ranch they were currently on was not where the hunt started. The hunters went through the unlocked, shared neighboring gate thinking it was a pasture gate. The hunters finally contacted their guide who was driving every county road and highway in the area and not at the location of his dropped pin. The warden coordinated with the guide to pick an intersection for them to meet and the hunters were dropped off with the guide around 3 a.m. One citation for no hunting license was issued and strong encouragement to learn the full names of guides and precise locations of any future hunt.

FIN-ito Two Harris County game wardens were searching the web when they saw a restaurant advertising shark’s fin and shredded chicken soup on their menu. The wardens visited the location and inspected the restaurant’s aquatic resources and invoices. During the inspection, the wardens found what appeared to be frozen shark fins inside one of the freezers. One of the wardens asked the owner about the item in the freezer and they confirmed it was shark fin and showed the warden to a near-by stove where sharks fin soup was being cooked for personal consumption. Shortly after, the second warden found another piece of shark’s fin wrapped in cellophane in a near-by freezer. The owner again insisted that it was for personal consumption. The warden then picked up a menu off a nearby table and pointed to the soup section which listed sharks fin soup for sale. All sharks fin was seized, and charges are being filed with the Harris County District Attorney’s Office.

Oy(ster) Vey Three Harris County game wardens were inspecting commercial oyster on Galveston Bay when they came across a boat that had a sack of oysters with 15.29% undersized- three times the allowed limit. When asked about what they were using to measure the oysters, the captain said “Nothing.” This was the captain’s second

time being cited for possessing undersized oysters. Approximately 1,100 pounds of oyster were returned to the reef.

Road Hunting is Not OK

failing a field sobriety test, he was placed under arrest for Driving While Intoxicated and transported to the Limestone County Jail for booking.

Acting Squirrelly

A Red River County game warden received a report about possible road hunting that had just occurred. According to a witness, the vehicle had an Oklahoma license plate. After receiving information about where the road hunting had happened, the warden set up and waited at the intersection with the only routes back to Oklahoma. A short time later, a vehicle matching the witnesses description approached the intersection and the warden conducted a traffic stop. The passenger admitted to shooting feral hogs from the road on a private property and was taken to the Red River County Jail where the appropriate road hunting charges were filed. The rifle, equipped with night vision and an attached spotlight, was seized. Cases pending.

Blinded by the Lights Two Limestone County game wardens responded to a vehicle accident east of Mexia involving a vehicle overturned in a creek bed with a man trapped inside. Local authorities were able to safely remove the driver from the vehicle and wardens were assisting with traffic control on the road. While traffic was being safely guided, the wardens saw an SUV trying to go around their patrol vehicle, ignoring the emergency lights and roadblock. The wardens signaled the man to stop and when they approached the vehicle, saw that the driver had bloodshot eyes and was slurring his speech. There were also several alcoholic beverages in the vehicle. The driver was detained and admitted to drinking several alcoholic beverages. After

An Angelina County game warden was approaching a boat ramp on the Angelina River just before dark when he saw someone driving in his direction. A man quickly laid a gun on the bow of the boat and walked away. When the warden approached the two people aboard the vessel, one decided to change out of wet socks while the other kept talking on their cell phone. The warden unloaded the .22 rifle left on the bow and inspected the cooler in the boat which contained a squirrel that was dressed and put on ice. Since the man started squirrel season six days early, he was issued a citation for hunting squirrels during a closed season. Case is pending.

That’s a Twist; That’s Very Twisty A Williamson County game warden was contacted by a Travis County Sheriff ’s Deputy about a boat the deputy had stopped on Lake Travis that had the boat hull identification number visibly removed. The operator of the boat said he bought the vessel a short time ago and showed the officers a title and bill of sale. The deputy and warden investigated the paperwork of the vessel and found out the title was legitimately signed, but the bill of sale was falsified. Upon further inspection, the officers determined that the vessel didn’t match the paperwork the operator of the boat had presented. The registration number on the paperwork belonged to a Wellcraft, and the validation number belonged to the operator but for a Kayot boat. Additionally, the engine horsepower, serial number and sterndrive number returned to a Baja vessel. The Baja was listed as stolen out of Travis County in January, along with the trailer. The owner of the Baja was contacted, and the boat was verified as the stolen vessel. The vessel and trailer were returned to the original owner and the operator of the vessel was charged with possession of stolen property.

Spring Is Here... Are You Ready? Z231KH-48

new

• 21 Gross HP,† Air-Cooled V-Twin Engine E i e • 48” Welded Mower Deck • Ultrascaper Z Rear Tires • Sliding High-Back Seat • Standard LED Headlights

L2501

$0 DOWN,

• 24.8 Gross HP, P † 3-Cylinder Kubota Diesel Engine g • Choice of Transmission • Suspension S Susspension pension p on System o S Sysstem and Contoured Seat • Performance-Matched Implements Available

0% A.P.R.

FINANCING

60 FOR UP TO

M MONTHS

*

ON SELECT NEW KUBOTAS

1604 S. LOOP 304 CROCKETT, TX 936-544-4596 houstoncountyeq.com Voted

“Best Farm Equipment Dealer” in 2019 Reader’s Choice Awards

* 0% Down, 0% A.P.R. financing for up to 60 months on purchases of select new Kubota BX, B, L, MX, M60 and M4 (Except M5, M5N, M5L, M6, M6S, M6H and M6L) equipment from participating dealers’ in-stock inventory is available to qualified purchasers through Kubota Credit Corporation, U.S.A.; subject to credit approval. Some exceptions apply. Example:60 monthly payments of $16.67 per $1,000 financed. Offer expires 6/30/20. Terms subject to change. This material is for descriptive purposes only. Kubota disclaims all representations and warranties, express or implied, or any liability from the use of this material. For complete warranty, disclaimer, safety, incentive offer and product information, consult your local Dealer or go to KubotaUSA.com.† For complete warranty, safety and product information, consult your local Kubota dealer and the product operator’s manual. Power (HP/KW) and other specifications are based on various standards or recommended practices. K1231-01-Texas Farm & Ranch-1


May 2020

9

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

East Texas Stock Prices HUNTS LIVESTOCK EXCHANGE

ATHENS COMMISSION COMPANY

Updated: 5/18/2020 Head Count: 678

STEERS

Updated: 5/22/2020 Head Count: 600 Sellers: 123

STEERS

200lb - 299lb

1.00 1.90

300-DOWN

1.00 2.25

300lb - 399lb

1.00 1.77

300lb - 400lb

1.00 1.75

400lb - 499lb

1.00 1.63

400lb - 500lb

1.00 1.55

500lb - 599lb

1.00 1.49

500lb - UP

0.80 1.45

600lb - 699lb

1.00 1.31

HEIFERS

700lb - 899lb

1.00 1.21

300-DOWN

1.00 2.00

300lb - 400lb

1.00 1.55

HEIFERS 200lb - 299lb

1.00 1.35

400lb - 500lb

1.00 1.40

300lb - 399lb

1.00 1.45

500lb - UP

0.70 1.30

400lb - 499lb

1.00 1.34

SLAUGHTER

500lb - 599lb

1.00 1.30

Cows

0.20 0.73

600lb - 699lb

1.00 1.16

Heavy Bulls

0.70 1.04

700lb - 899lb

1.00 1.08

PAIRS

SLAUGHTER

Top Low-Middle

$750 $1000

Bulls

$77 $100

STOCKER COWS

0.60lb 1.05lb

GOATS

$45hd $380hd

$340 $1,550 $290hd $1300hd

GOATS

NA NA

BABY CALVES HORSES

TRI-COUNTY LIVESTOCK MARKET

UNDER 300lb

1.25 1.85

300lb - 400lb

1.20 1.70

400lb - 500lb

1.15 1.65

500lb - 600lb

1.10 1.54

600lb - 700lb

1.05 1.30

700lb - 800lb

$150hd $350hd NA NA

300lb - 400lb

1.30 1.55

400lb - 500lb

1.35 1.71

500lb - 600lb

0.97 1.25

0.95 1.15

600lb - 700lb

1.07 1.26

700lb - 800lb

0.90 1.12

UNDER 300lb

1.20 1.60

HEIFERS

300lb - 400lb

1.10 1.40

400lb - 500lb

Under 300lb

0.91 1.83

1.05 1.30

300lb - 400lb

1.00 1.45

500lb - 600lb

1.00 1.25

400lb - 500lb

1.00 1.39

600lb - 700lb

0.95 1.15

500lb - 600lb

1.15 1.20

700lb - 800lb

0.80 1.05

600lb - 700lb

0.73 1.16

SLAUGHTER

700lb - 800lb

0.85 1.00

Cows

0.40 0.72

PACKER

Heavy Bulls

0.85 0.97

Cows

0.59 0.89

$1175 $1475

Bulls

0.93 1.10

PAIRS

$730 $1200

BABY CALVES STOCKER COWS LOW-MIDDLE

NA NA $675/hd $1500/hd NA NA

EAST TEXAS LIVESTOCK INC.

Updated: 5/26/2020 Head Count: 1529 Buyers: 53 Total Sellers: 139 Feeder Calf Order Buyers: 21 STEERS

OW

truegritremodel@gmail.com

NED

STEERS 1.45 1.65

PAIRS

VETER

Updated: 5/27/2020 Head Count: 190 Buyers: 25 Sellers: 22

Under 300lb

HEIFERS

OVER 34 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE

Neil Martin 903.391.2782 Brandon Martin 903.391.1391

ANDERSON COUNTY LIVESTOCK

Updated: 5/23/2020 Head Count: 567

STEERS

Quality work is not expensive, it’s priceless

AN

$32 $70

STOCKER COWS

Remodeling

$1000 $1575

Cows PAIRS

True Grit

www.5starrbuilders.com

Sales

of Waskom, Texas

METAL BUILDINGS OF ALL SIZES

Shops • Garages • Barns • Equipment Sheds GALVANIZED BUILDINGS ALSO AVAILABLE

BRED COWS GOATS

$710hd $1475hd $90hd $160hd

24x30x10 - 30x30x10 - 30x40x10 - 30x50x10

WE BUILD ANY SIZE

Includes all labor, tractor work and concrete slab with moisture barrier and electric stub. Standard doors (1) 10x10 roll up or 20x7 garage door and (1) steel walk-in door. (Pad dirt may be extra). We use all the best materials starting with 6x6 ground contact poles with a lifetime warranty and a 40 year warranty on our painted metal. We offer a 4 inch 3000 psi concrete slab reinforced with 3/8” rebar.

NACOGDOCHES LIVESTOCK EXCHANGE Updated: 4/23/2020 Head Count: 1160 Buyers: 99 Sellers: 91

STEERS

300-DOWN

1.56 2.24

UNDER 300lb

1.30 2.16

305lb - 400lb

1.46 1.88

300lb - 400lb

1.30 1.76

405lb - 500lb

1.35 1.67

400lb - 500lb

1.20 1.64

505lb - 600lb

1.21 1.64

500lb - UP

1.20 1.44

605lb - 800lb

1.14 1.36

600lb - 700lb

N/A N/A

HEIFERS HEIFERS

UNDER 300lb

1.30 2.22

300-DOWN

1.27 1.85

300lb - 400lb

1.20 1.66

305lb - 400lb

1.20 1.43

400lb - 500lb

1.10 1.61

405lb - 500lb

1.12 1.43

500lb - UP

1.00 1.32

505lb - 600lb

1.09 1.38

600lb - 700lb

N/A N/A

605lb - 800lb

1.00 1.30

SLAUGHTER Cows

0.35 0.74

Bulls

0.65 0.98

0.53 0.77

PAIRS

$900 $2200

0.91 1.07

STOCKER COWS

SLAUGHTER Cows Bulls PAIRS

p u p S orte d u o r r s P $850 $1375

BRED COWS

$600/hd $1050/hd

GOATS

$600hd $1625hd $45hd $220hd

BABY CALVES

$125hd $270hd

OPEN COWS

$500hd $950hd

WE ARE OPEN!

903-723-6764 222 Oakland Dr• Palestine, TX 75801

Our Services Include:

S Corporations • Individuals • Partnerships • Farms/Ranches • Rental Property Managers • Truck Drivers • Clergy

903-407-7627

Back Taxes? No Problem! Owe the IRS? No Problem! Need Help? No Problem!


10

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

A family affair

Highway 19 Produce offers clean, local food By Shelli Parker

F

Athens Review

amily and legacy are two words that Emerson and Whittyn Bever are learning first-hand at Highway 19 Produce and Berries. They will grow up on a farm, surrounded by love and family because their father came home from college with a dream. Bobby Bever earned his degree in horticulture in 2010 and told his family his life’s goal was to produce clean, local food for his neighbors. “I want to grow food,” he said. That marked the beginning of Highway 19 Produce and what

would become three growing areas on North 19, South 19 and one on county road 1119. The name fit and the family committed to growing nonGMO, chemical free produce and berries. Prior to this, Bobby said he spent his teen years working at Calloway’s nursery where he “fell in love with tending to the plants.” “Our farm is Bobby’s dream, he prides himself on providing local, organic produce.” mother Pam said. Using only organic fertilizers, including fish emulsion, pasteurized chicken manure and compost teas the results may not

always be picture perfect but are of excellent nutritional quality. “We may not always have the prettiest product, but an educated shopper knows the difference in local, vine- ripe organically grown produce.” Pam said. The family consisting of parents Mark and Pam, sister Lindsey and Bobby got to work making the dream happen and it wasn’t long before the family had a line waiting for their amazing berries at local farmers markets. Bobby met his wife Halie at a wedding where city and country came together and it wasn’t long before she was working alongside the rest of the family at the farmers market. Soon two little girls Emersyn and Whittyn joined in the family legacy.. Slowly but surely, the Bever’s pushed through trials and tribulations to turn the dream into a reality. The farm produces a wide variety of produce including mouth watering strawberries. “The 2018 strawberry season was a hit, probably our best season of strawberries ever!” Pam said. Harvesting over 10,000 pounds of sweet strawberries made customers happy as they came to pick their own. Unfortunately, as is the nature of farming, rain hit hard in 2019 and ruined the crop. Lucky to produce 1,000, the little sponge- like strawberries were ruined. Highway 19 Produce could have possibly saved the crop by spraying them, but that would have violated Bobby’s strict standards and his commitment to clean food. Organic produce including berries, carrots, onions, broccoli, zucchini, squash and more can be purchased through the Athens Farmers Market, Good Local Farmers Market in Dallas, the

Coppell Farmers market and also sells to several local restaurants including Railway Cafe, The Forge and others. Chandler Family Farms of Mabank and Highway 19 Produce have teamed up to offer a Community Supported Agriculture group allowing the community to purchase local seasonal food directly from the farmers. Customers purchase a share each week. Information on this may be found at http://www. deeprootscsa.net/ If you would like more information please visit www. hwy19produce.com

Athens Farmers Market opens continued from page 1

May 2020

Profile for Herald Press

Farm and Ranch Living May 2020  

A special publication of the Palestine Herald-Press focusing on Farm & Ranch Living in East Texas.

Farm and Ranch Living May 2020  

A special publication of the Palestine Herald-Press focusing on Farm & Ranch Living in East Texas.

Profile for mrtnfam
Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded