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December 2020

Praying for a Good 2021 Horace McQueen See page 3

An Embarrassing Column Baxter Black See page 5

Close Calls Luke Clayton See page 8

Area girl racing to rodeo stardom By Shelli Parker

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Athens Daily Review

s the National Finals Rodeo makes its way to Texas for the first time since 1985, the rodeo buzz is hopping. However, we have so much local Rodeo talent around here, with many being under 18 years old, it is common to get a great show in our own backyard. One up and coming starlet in the rodeo kingdom is Dallie Caite Scott. At a whopping three feet tall and 5 years old, she is quickly racing her way up the barrel racing sector as a force to be reckoned with. She eats, sleeps and breathes barrel racing. The faster she goes the bigger she smiles. Dallie Cate and her Brothers Hunter and Atlee were raised by Taylae and Austin Scott. They grew up in rodeo themselves and decided that was the life they wanted for their own children if they chose it. So they made the country and rodeo lifestyle available to them. “She has been in a saddle since she could sit up,” Taylae said. “We knew what life we wanted for our children and then gave them the choice. It is our way of life.” Hunter, her older brother has been riding mini bulls for years and she has been around the events since birth. She started in lead line on her horse Hope, a twenty year old blue Roan, at age 4, and won her first See RODEO on Page 3

AgriLife Extension offers Health Literacy Program Staff Reports

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ach Wednesday of February 2021, a team of Bosque, Leon, and Johnson County Extension Agents will be presenting the “Health Literacy for Older Adults” program. It will be open to the surrounding region and will be hosted online via the Zoom platform at 10:30 a.m. each week. The program includes four sessions, which cover topics such as making healthy lifestyle choices, understanding Medicare benefits, communicating well with your doctor, managing medications, and finding reliable information on the internet. Adults over age 65, family members and caregivers of older adults, and health care professionals are encouraged to attend. The ability to obtain, understand, and act upon health information, health literacy, is key to making the right health decisions. Evidence shows that people with higher health literacy are more likely to seek preventive care, follow treatment plans, and experience decreased rates of hospitalization and emergency services, along with shorter hospital stays.

Dawson FFA

Students, teachers work hard for success By Megan Hempel

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Corsicana Daily Sun

hroughout the state, students competed in Texas FFA’s State Leadership Career Development Dec. 1 through 5. Dawson FFA’s Public Relations Team qualified for the state competition by finishing first in one of the state’s 66 district competitions and first in one of 12 area competitions. The team placed 10th in the Public Relations Contest out of 297 teams statewide. Team members included Bodey Martinez, Jaedyn Stapleton, Alison Vizcarra, and Ty Williams. Dawson FFA’s all-senior team had its share of successes this year, placing in the top three at three invitational contests prior to district, after overcoming numerous obstacles. According to Michelle Sammon, Ag. Science

Teacher, all four students are heavily involved in other extracurricular activities from sports to other student organizations and dual credit coursework. Committed to success, they spent whatever free time available after practices, part-time jobs, and weekends preparing for this competition. One member even had surgery the day before a contest and spent the weekend preparing a younger sibling to fill in for her. Despite the last minute substitution, the team finished third out of 16 teams. “In a year where it would be easy to lessen their efforts with everything going on around them, this team only pushed harder to succeed and it was truly inspiring to me as a teacher” Sammon stated. Aside from the Public Relations team, Dawson FFA had 10 other leadership teams compete at the district level in various events. See FFA on Page 3

There is now an emphasis on patient-clinician collaboration and shared responsibility, said Andy Crocker, Senior Extension Program Specialist. “An older adult’s health literacy can vary depending on changes in one’s medical issues, provider, or system providing the care,” he said. “No matter the context, we all want to feel confident about our decisions and understand that we’re getting cost-effective, safe, high quality health care.” Paula Butler, AgriLife Extension Regional Program Leader, says that the benefits of health literacy in older adults extends beyond their own improved health care decisions and improved health status. “Ultimately, health literacy should result in cost savings to the health care system and improved patient-provider satisfaction,” Butler said. “We want to help empower older adults to take an active role in their health care, which will not only benefit them personally, but the larger community too.” If interested, you can easily register for the class by going to the following website: https://tinyurl.com/healthliteracytamu. Through the application of science-based knowledge, AgriLife Extension creates high-quality, relevant continuing education that encourages lasting and effective change.

Courtesy Photo

Dawson FFA placed 10th in the Public Relations Contest out of 297 teams statewide. Team members included Bodey Martinez, Jaedyn Stapleton, Alison Vizcarra, and Ty Williams.


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December 2020

Mountain Lion Mania

Confirmed cat sightings in northeast Texas and Mexico ’coons for a feast By Matt Williams Outdoors Writer

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ountain lions have been in the news a lot this fall and winter. The media blitz got started back in mid-October, when a YouTube video surfaced depicting the bizarre encounter of a Utah man who crossed paths with a female cat with cubs on what looked to be a remote mountain road. Nobody got hurt in the deal, but the meeting was far from friendly as the cougar escorted the man, Kyle Burgess, back down the trail — away from her young ones — with intimidating fits of rage. Burgess played it smart throughout the ordeal. He backed away slowly, all the while making loud noises and attempting to make himself look bigger to discourage the cat’s threatening advances. At one point, he picked up a rock and hurled it at the cat, which ultimately sent the animal packing. Somehow, Burgess managed the composure to record the close encounter using his cellphone. The 6-minute video went viral in short order, generating a viewing frenzy that at last count had climbed to nearly 6.5 million. If you haven’t seen it, you can view it here: youtube.com/ watch?v=9Pg2CDCm34w&feature=emb_ title.

Urban Kitty: Cougar goes walkabout in Dallas, Collin counties The concrete jungles of Dallas and Collin counties are a long way from Utah, but photographs and video of a mountain lion collected on trail cameras between Nov. 22 and Dec. 7 by two residents in Rowlett and Princeton generated a media buzz over wildlife unlike any the northeast

Photos courtesy of Randy Dearman

Texas deer hunter Randy Dearman recently discovered several images on his game cameras at his hunting lease in Coahuila, Mexico depicting nature at work in raw form. The photos depict at least two mountain lions having their way with raccoons that gathered around the hunter’s corn feeder during the dark of night. Dearman thinks the big cats have learned to hunt around feeders because the goodies frequently lure in their favorite meal, white-tailed deer. Texas region has ever seen. The footage, supported by confirmed tracks and other sign, lends credence to the theory that mountain lions are extremely mobile and sometimes know no boundaries when they decide to go walkabout, despite their recluse nature. While there is no way to sure, experts with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department believe the cat sighted in Dallas and Collin counties — roughly 25 miles apart — is the same one that was shot on Dec. 12 by a Hunt County deer hunter, about 25 miles northeast of

Princeton. Texas has its share of mountain lions with the largest numbers found in the remote Trans-Pecos region of West Texas. The cats have also been documented in portions of the South Texas Plains, the Hill Country and the rugged canyons around the Panhandle, according to TPWD. Sightings are occasionally reported in parts of eastern Texas, but only a handful have been confirmed over the years. Trevor Tanner of Fate was among the TPWD wildlife experts left scratching their heads after trail camera footage and tracks confirmed the Rowlett sighting near Lake Ray Hubbard was indeed the real deal — a first for Dallas County in modern times. Tanner was involved in the investigation near Dalrock Rd., where a couple’s game camera captured what looked to be a large cat strolling by under the cover of darkness. “I’ve worked for TPWD for nearly 18 years and I can’t tell you how many calls about mountain lion sightings I’ve had where none of them have turned up any kind of positive proof,” he said. “To get the first positive proof from along edge of Lake Ray Hubbard in Rowlett kind of left us all wondering `how in the heck did a cat wind up there?’” The veteran wildlife biologist also evaluated the site near Princeton roughly two weeks later, where a game camera placed in a wooded area east of town by a private landowner captured a photograph of a mountain lion. Tanner said it wasn’t long after he arrived to inspect the site that he located possible evidence to support the photograph as the first confirmed sighting of a mountain lion in Collin County in decades.  “We hadn’t gone 30 yards from the truck when I started seeing deer fur on the ground, right on top of the grass,” he said. “I knew right then that we needed to start looking around for a deer carcass that had been stashed.”  The search eventually led to several carcass parts strewn about. There is no way to be certain, but the biologist believes the cat may have killed and dined on the white-tailed deer buck before coyotes helped themselves to the remains. He said they located a devoured deer shoulder, spine, rib cage and part of a hind leg. “It was all really fresh,” Tanner said. “Initially, I was little concerned that we were standing around a freshly eaten deer and that the cat might be hiding in the cedars.”

Big cat shot in Hunt County The biologist said Hunt County fell into the mix the following weekend, when a deer hunter on private property near Celeste encountered a mountain lion

while manning a deer blind. Tanner said the hunter shot the cat, a 160-pound male, at around 4:30 p.m. The cat was aged at 6-8 years old, Tanner said. It didn’t sit well with some folks when word circulated that the mountain lion had been killed, but it doesn’t change the fact the licensed hunter was legal in pulling the trigger. In Texas, mountain lions are classified as nongame animals with no closed season or laws that protect them. They are on the same nongame list as armadillos, bobcats, coyotes, flying squirrels, frogs, ground squirrels, porcupines, prairie dogs, rabbits and freshwater turtles, but considerably more mysterious. If the trio of sightings in the three adjoining counties were indeed the same animal, it’s only natural to wonder where a cat that had become somewhat of an urban legend may have come from. And where it may have been headed when it was shot. Those are questions that will ever be answered. Nor will anyone ever know what all the big male may have had for dinner during its walkabout journey, but Tanner has a pretty good idea. It’s doubtful there were any horses or cattle on the menu, the biologist said.  “Mountain lions are opportunistic, but they typically don’t want to risk getting hurt going after a meal,” Tanner said. “They have got to make a major kill every 7-10 days. Their primary diet is whitetailed deer and smaller animals like rabbits or young pigs. They typically aren’t going to attack an adult horse or cow. A fowl or calf, maybe. Smaller livestock like goats and sheep, most definitely. Bobcats do as well.”

Mexico Thanksgiving: ’Coons for breakfast Raccoons are on the hit list for mountain lions, as well. My good friend Randy Dearman of Onalaska can vouch for that. Dearman is former bass pro who spends much of the fall and winter hunting for big bucks in Coahuila, Mexico. His 12,000-acre lease runs for miles along the Rio Grande River. Dearman made an interesting discovery on one of his game cameras when he visited the property just after Thanksgiving. The SD card contained more than a dozen images of a pair of mountain lions having their way with several raccoons that had gathered beneath one of his corn feeders. The time stamps on the photos indicate the Thanksgiving morning feast lasted for more than three hours. “I think the cats have learned to hunt around the feeders, mainly for the deer,” Dearman said. “But they were after the coons that night. It looked like it was really bad night to be a coon.”

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Praying For A Good 2021

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or many folks, worldwide, 2020 was a bust in more ways than one. The coronavirus, loss of jobs, closure of many businesses and having to cope with mouthy politicians has been a trial. Now that the New Year is upon us, we need leaders that are true and sincere—not just hypocrites spouting their rehearsed lines. On the home front, cattle prices are still not what most cattlemen need to survive and pay their bills. A good thing is that there is plenty of hay available—and in a couple months, ryegrass should be coming on strong. Lots of us have trouble with trespassers on

our properties. Even a fence does not always stop the intruders from making our land their play pretty. In most of our counties, law enforcement can help put a stop to the problem. Between the local police, the sheriffs’ office and the Texas Game Wardens there are plenty of professionals that can offer some relief. Unfortunately, in a few counties local law enforcement doesn’t show a lot of interest in helping corral law-breaking trespassers. One legal opportunity is using purple paint on trees and fence posts. Back some years ago, the state came up with the purple paint program to mark timber

properties to slow trespass intrusions. Basically, the law calls for a stripe of purple paint applied at least eight inches vertically and at least an inch or more wide. The stripe should be three to five feet above ground level and applied every one hundred feet apart on the property line. A trespasser who disregards the purple paint property can be arrested and charged with unlawful entry. This darn virus has really put the stop on many renewals of vehicle registrations. Also, titling requirements for vehicles has been a headache. Plus those Texans who have handicapped

license plates—or the blue cards—that have expired, all have one less worry. From now through April 14th motorists are home free. The State of Texas has adopted rules and regulations that give our citizens that several month reprieve to get those vehicle transactions done. For those millions of Texans who prefer to stay at home and do little traveling this new program can be helpful. Texas Aggies basketball games—male and female—will no longer include the playing of our national anthem with the teams on the sidelines in the arena. Coaches at Texas A & M

That’s –30—horace@valornet.com have decided the teams will be cloistered in their locker rooms until the anthem has been played. Another case of the inmates running the system! What a crock!

RODEO, continued from page 1 buckle. Hope looks after Dallie with the love of a mother, the kids can walk under her, around her, brush her tail and feed her treats, but it is obvious, Hope is the one babysitting. When they get in the arena though, Hope let’s Dallie take the reigns. After training with Talia Magallan and Dedee Crawford, Dallie on how to ride her confidence grew to independence. “These two women helped so much with her confidence,” Taylae said. “Lone Star High School Rodeo Caitlyn Sweeney rode with her that entire season on the back.” Jacey Spivey David entered the arena and started working with her on barrels and it quickly became obvious that the faster she went the happier she was. “Jasey looked at me one day and said It is time to let her fly, she is ready,” Taylae said. Mama wasn’t, but Dallie was and she ran by herself for the first time in August of 2020. “She started running and running, and winning,” Taylae said. “Her motto is a winner is a dreamer that never gave up.” She has been winning buckles and prize money ever since. She ran in the Canton Poor Boy Rodeo two nights in September where she won in the 8 and under division. She won fastest time for 6 and under in October and entered the Youth Rodeo in Canton November 14 winning All around grand champion in her age group. This is just to name a few of the numerous events she has entered and the girl gets faster and faster.

“Dallie looked at her daddy and said she wanted to quit Kindergarten and homeschool,” Taylae said. “She wanted to homeschool so she could practice more and get faster. Of course we told her no, that education is too important, but she is still practicing.” Dallie wants to beat her hero Charmayne James Day who won the NFR at age 14. Day is known for her amazing barrel run at 16 when her horse scamper completed the barrels with a broken bit. Upon leaving the gate, his bridal caught the rail and pulled a pin. He spit it out around the third barrel. Dallie hopes to be younger when she enters. Dallie has already bought her step up

horse Money with her own winnings and is sending her off to train. She also bought Hope herself. If you would like to see Dallie compete, you can see her at the Henderson County Fair Complex for any LSHSR event through May of 2021. Her sponsors include Hilltop Welding, R&E Hay services, and Elder Dodge Athens. This is fun for Dallie, it is her passion and her way of life. “She will tell you it is her way of life, she can’t function without her horse and a barrel,” Taylae said. “She is practicing or racing every night of the week. She eats sleeps and breathes riding.”

FFA, continued from page 1 Dawson being among the smallest chapters in the area, managed to clinch the District Sweepstakes award with eight teams finishing in the top three and seven advancing to the area contest. At the area level, four teams received top five plaques and the Dawson FFA placed third in overall sweepstakes for Area VIII. “This has been our most successful Leadership season thus far and we could not be more proud of the 26 students who competed in each of these events,” Sammon stated. “I have been blessed with hard-working and dedicated students, a supportive administration and school board, experienced, talented, and valued teaching partners in Mike Littrell and now, Kevin Leerskov, and amazing parents who are willing to share their children with us in order to receive the success our

chapter has enjoyed in my 15 years as one of the Ag. Science Teachers in Dawson.” Some of Dawson FFA’s recent successes include five state qualifying Leadership Development teams, three placing in the top ten; nine students qualifying for the state contest in prepared public speaking; seven state winners, three National Finalists, and two National Winners in Proficiency Award categories; three Star Award state finalists and one state Star American Award winner; nine district officers, three area officers, and two state officer candidates; one Ford Leadership Scholar; numerous major and county stock show awards; and several state and national scholarship and degree recipients. Sammon said none of this would be possible without each of these parts

of the equation working harmoniously together. As the members of the Public Relations team said in their presentation, “There is a story behind every plaque and banner, and as all FFA members and advisors will tell you, none come easily and without effort.” “I hope they will also tell you, however, that their efforts have contributed to their personal, leadership, and career success as is the mission of the FFA organization and the greatest reward for all teachers,” Sammon stated. “Though we will lose some very successful seniors this year, Alison Vizcarra, a three-time state qualifier in the Public Relations contest, Ty Williams, a state finalist in Public Speaking, and Jaedyn Stapleton, a previous state qualifier in the FFA Broadcasting

event, we are encouraged by the legacy they will leave behind as their success is sure to serve as encouragement for younger students.” While Sammon has high praise for her students, she is humble about her own contributions to the program. “We have success year after year with her leadership,” Principal Robert Bray stated. “She is such an asset to Dawson Junior and Senior High. She truly is amazing and gives 110% to her students.” The members of Dawson FFA’s Public Relations team expressed their gratitude for her guidance and dedication to their current and future success. “Ms. Sammon has greatly impacted my life,” Alison Vizcarra stated. “She is an outstanding

teacher who is very dedicated to her school and students.” “Ms. Sammon values the life of all of her students and has personally set me up for success in and outside the classroom,” Ty Williams stated. “Ms. Sammon is a huge asset to Dawson ISD,” Jaedyn Stapleton stated. “I personally am very

thankful for her dedication and how she always pushes us to be the best.” “Ms. Sammon is an amazing teacher who knows how to set every kid up for a successful path,” Bodey Martinez stated. Bray also shared that Sammon was recently elected to the State Ag Teachers board of directors.


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December 2020

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The Humble Cabbage T

his hardy winter companion, common in so many fall and early spring gardens, has a very unassuming reputation. Many a cool night, cabbage showed up on the table at home – as a side, in stir fry, and in soup – especially on New Year’s Day, when traditionally these were the greens that brought ‘luck’ in my family. Cabbage, along with the other cole crop brothers and sisters like broccoli and cauliflower, is a staple in many cool season gardens. Even the Romans loved cabbage, and words for cabbage in many languages have origins in the Celtic words cap or kap, meaning “head,” or caul, meaning

“stem,” according to Victor R. Boswell. The secret to growing a good head of cabbage is a simple recipe: fertile soil and regular irrigation. They grow best in cool seasons and easily withstand a freeze. Cabbage is hardy to at least 20°F.Easy growth, coupled with a strong nutritious content, has historically made this vegetable essential in many households. The large lavish leaves are quick to show any problems as the cabbage heads mature. Most noticeable are the holes that appear in those leaves – usually caused by the larvae of the cabbage white butterfly,

which we commonly call the cabbage looper. Loopers are relatively easy to control utilizing the biological insecticide Bacillus thuringiensis. Bt gives excellent control of worms and caterpillars and is organic. It helps to use 1 to 2 teaspoons of a liquid detergent per gallon of spray mixed in order to insure the Bt clings to the waxy leaf surface. Another problem that can occur as the heads reach maturity is a noticeable cracking or splitting of the head. This one can be a visual heartbreaker, as you see the large head you were waiting until the best possible moment to harvest split open and lose the

signature tight roundness of a cabbage head. The leaves are still edible however, so your cookpot will still be happy. This splitting usually occurs for one of two reasons – inconsistent irrigation, or heavy fertilizer application too close to harvest. One way to avoid splitting would be to trim the roots of the plants that are almost ready to harvest (cultivating near the base of the plant.) Splitting is not usually a problem in cool temperatures, but can be more severe in warm, dry situations. Once the primary head has been harvested, the plant will continue to grow, and will produce secondary heads on the sides of the stem, resembling brussels sprouts. These small additional harvests are delicious and can be a surprise if you aren’t expecting them. If your cabbages have been healthy and without disease or insect infestations, let the stems continue to grow and try this secondary harvest. Old-fashioned open pollinated cabbages (and hybrids as well) can have beautiful form and color – many shades of green and purple – which makes this veggie a great source of winter color in your flower beds. An excellent opportunity to create some edible landscape. Frequently I am asked if ornamental cabbages are edible, and technically they are, however this brings to mind something

my mama frequently says. Just because you can, doesn’t mean you should. Ornamental cabbages usually have an unpleasant texture and taste. Consider growing some of the unusual edible varieties so you can have your color and eat it too. Cabbage is a rich source of vitamin C, calcium, fiber, vitamin K and folate, along with many other vitamins and minerals, and on New Year’s Day, for some it also has an extra helping of luck. Bring this humble vegetable into your garden and kitchen this year.

Kim Benton

Cherokee County Horticulturist For additional growth information, please contact your local extension office, or find the Texas A&M Easy Gardening publication on cole crops.

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An Embarrassing Column E

mbarrassing moments. Nobody likes to talk about them. Oh, they’ll talk about slipping on the ice on their first date or getting bucked off a gentle horse. Other folks empathize and usually they laugh. But it makes people uneasy when it’s really embarrassing. They might titter nervously but if it’s really awful it makes us uncomfortable. It could happen to me! Like the time I leaned into a car window and asked a new acquaintance to dance and she didn’t have any legs. It was shattering to a high school boy, not to mention the girl. Or introducing an old friend and his wife to my family and calling his wife by his ex wife’s name. Faux pas are always exaggerated when

you are in the company of someone other than your family. Cocktail or diner parties with guests are fertile ground for embarrassment: Halfway through dinner you glance in the mirror and discover you should have blown your nose an hour ago: finding gravy (dried, of course) on your black dress; sneaking off to powder your nose, quietly closing the door, gently running the water – then you flush and it sounds like a dump truck unloading nine yards of gravel into an empty grain bin. In veterinary work there is an association of vets who have spayed tomcats. Cowboys take a great delight in runnin a rangy ol’ steer in with a bunch of cows at cow workin’ time. I’ve pregchecked a thousand steers – but at least

I’ve never called one bred. Then there was poor ol’ Fred (an alias) who was worried about climbing on his roof to shovel off the snow. So he took his rope and tied it to the back bumper of his pickup in the front yard. Looping it around his waist he went up on the roof and over the peak. His wife left for town… in his pickup. Broke both his legs, his pelvis and one wrist. During recovery he was sitting around the house in a cumbersome body cast. His wife had the habit of filling her cigarette lighter with fluid over the commode. Later that afternoon ol’ Fred creaked his way into the bathroom like a NASA moonwalker. He maneuvered himself into position and lowered himself, cast and all,

down on the seat. Exhausted, but smugly satisfied with his achievement, he lit a cigarette and dropped the match into the lurking lighter fluid. It blew him into the tub and broke his other wrist! We’re talkin’ hot cross buns! If you ever wondered where the word “embarrass” came from…

Things To Do During Covid: Go on a Tree Hunt By Lydia Holley

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ith the holidays behind us and Covid still making an impact on gatherings, why not go on a little tree-hunting safari? Take a picnic lunch and make a day of it. It will get you out of the house, into nature, and can make a great photo opportunity as well as a memorable outing. Trees are important to our health. Studies have shown that people are happier when they connect with nature, childhood asthma may be reduced with additional trees in their environment, and summer temperatures can be reduced up to 30 degrees if shade trees cover just onethird of the area. Trees are abundant in East Texas, so it should come as no surprise that Texas is home to a number of State Champion Trees as well as some National Champion Trees. In Henderson County, a State Champion blackjack oak towers 65 ft in height. Anderson County has a State Champion red buckeye. Cherokee County is home to a National CoChampion rusty blackhaw. A 66 ft tall National Champion gum bully resides in Freestone County. All four of those, however, are on private property, so you might not be able to see them on your hunt. Smith County is the home of several Champion Trees. There is an 81 ft. State Champion American holly, and a 108 ft National Champion southleaf pine. These are also on land owned by individuals. However, do not despair. Not all Champion Trees are on private property.

Photo courtesy of Metro Creative

Your tree-hunting safari can include the 74 ft State Champion Southern magnolia off CR 431 in Hopewell Cemetery and the 54 ft National CoChampion bluejack oak

in Lindsey Park. You will have to spread your arms wide to hug these trees as the bluejack oak has a circumference of almost 13 ft while the magnolia’s is over 20 ft. Consider taking a

tripod with you so you can take a picture from beyond selfie-stick length. If you like to geocache or just want to make certain you have found the correct

trees, you can find the latitude and longitudes of these trees on Texas A&M Forest Service Big Tree Registry’s website. Happy hunting.

For more information, call 903-675-6130, email // hendersonCMGA@gmail. com/, or visit //txmg.org/ hendersonmg/.


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December 2020

Pro rodeo has been searching for its next superstar

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he search began when icon Trevor Brazile of Decatur semi-retired after competing in the 2018 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo. But the sport may have found the answer in Stetson Wright, a 21-yearold bucking stock riding sensation from Milford, Utah. Wright snared two Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association championships at the 62nd National Finals, which concluded its 10-day run Saturday, Dec. 12, at Globe Life Field. During the 10-day Wrangler NFR, Wright clinched his second consecutive world allaround title and locked up his first PRCA bull riding championship. “I just want to be looked at as one of the greatest cowboys who ever lived,” Wright said. “I want to be remembered as a champion, someone who treated people good and always wished the best on everybody and just worked hard to try to be the best.” Wright also competed in saddle bronc riding, proving his versatility in an age of specialization

in the sport. He was the only PRCA competitor who qualified for the 2020 National Finals in more than one event. Stetson’s brother, Ryder Wright, who clinched the 2020 world saddle bronc riding title at the NFR, praised Stetson for his ability in multiple events. “To be that good in two

events is awesome,” Ryder Wright said. “A lot of people struggle to be that good in one.” Cody Wright, their father who won world saddle bronc titles in 2008 and 2010, said Stetson has the potential to continue to win big. “I think the sky’s the limit,” Cody said. “I think

it’s just a matter of how much time and energy and work he wants to put into things. He’s definitely got the talent.” Kaycee Feild, a Utah cowboy who clinched the 2020 world bareback riding title, said Stetson Wright has a bright future. “Stetson, he’s a champion inside and outside of the

arena,” Feild said. “He’s a tough, tough competitor. I think this is the start of his career. He’s just now just getting going. He’s really going to start to take off and start a legacy.” Feild has carved out a legacy of his own. During the NFR’s Dec. 12 performance, he clinched a record-tying fifth world title. Feild won his other four gold buckles in 201114. Feild is tied for the most PRCA bareback riding titles with Joe Alexander, who was the wild spurring event’s kingpin in 1971-75, and Bruce Ford, who won world championships in 1979-80, 1982-83 and 1987. In saddle bronc riding, Ryder Wright earned his second world title. The Utah cowboy also clinched the gold buckle in 2017. Shad Mayfield of Clovis, New Mexico, clinched the tie-down roping gold buckle. Jacob Edler, an Iowa cowboy, earned the steer wrestling world title. In team roping, Colby Lovell, a former Sam Houston State competitor who is from Madisonville, snared the heading world title. Paul Eaves, who has homes in Lonedell, Missouri, and Millsap, lassoed the heeling gold buckle. Lovell and Eaves were team roping partners at the NFR. Jacob Edler, an Iowa cowboy, earned the steer wrestling world title. Shad Mayfield of Clovis, New Mexico, clinched the tiedown roping gold buckle. In barrel racing, Hailey Kinsel of Cotulla clinched her third consecutive Women’s Professional Rodeo Association world title. She also won the Wrangler NFR’s Top Gun Award, which means she had the highest earnings throughout the National Finals in a single event. Her 2020 NFR earnings were $270,615. Shelley Morgan, a former Eustace resident who is from Canton, finished ninth in the 2020 barrel racing world title race. She earned $63,307 throughout the National Finals. She competed in the NFR for the second time. Jeff Askey, who lives in the Eustace and Athens Photo courtesy of Metro Creative

HUDSON

Brett Hoffman, a Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame member, has reported on rodeos for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram for more than three decades. Email him at bchoffman777@earthlink.net.

area, finished seventh in the PRCA’s 2020 bull riding title race. He earned $102,160 at the NFR. He competed in his fourth National Finals. Dustin Boquet (who is a native of Bourg, Louisiana, and claims that city as his hometown in the PRCA standings, but currently lives in the Athens area), finished eighth in the PRCA’s bull riding title race. He earned $43,211 during the National Finals. He competed in the National Finals for the second time.

Cutting horse update

For the past two years, Adan Banuelos of Granbury finished as the reserve champion rider at the National Cutting Horse Association’s most prestigious show. But with the open division title at stake at the 2020 NCHA World Championship Futurity on Sunday, Dec. 13, Banuelos and a filly named All Spice clinched it with a score of 224 at Will Rogers Memorial Coliseum in Fort Worth. The victory earned All Spice’s owners, the Holmes/ Hill Partnership of Glen Rose, the coveted $246,880 prize. Brandon Westfall of Granbury and a stallion named Fiddle And Steel clinched the Futurity non-pro title with a 227 on Friday, Dec. 11. The horse’s owners, Russ and Janet Westfall, received $74,605.

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December 2020

7

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

East Texas Stock Prices HUNTS LIVESTOCK EXCHANGE Updated: 12/14/2020 Head Count: 607

STEERS

ATHENS COMMISSION COMPANY Updated: 12/18/2020 Head Count: 876 Sellers: 149

www.5starrbuilders.com

STEERS

200lb - 299lb

1.00 2.05

300-DOWN

0.85 2.00

300lb - 399lb

1.00 1.71

300lb - 400lb

0.80 1.70

400lb - 499lb

1.00 1.55

400lb - 500lb

0.80 1.65

500lb - 599lb

1.00 1.37

500lb - UP

0.70 1.50

600lb - 699lb

1.00 1.33

HEIFERS

700lb - 899lb

1.00 1.21

300-DOWN

0.80 1.75

300lb - 400lb

0.75 1.65

HEIFERS 200lb - 299lb

1.00 1.53

400lb - 500lb

0.70 1.45

300lb - 399lb

1.00 1.50

500lb - UP

0.60 1.35

400lb - 499lb

1.00 1.50

SLAUGHTER

500lb - 599lb

1.00 1.20

Cows

0.20 0.59

600lb - 699lb

1.00 1.23

Heavy Bulls

0.55 0.82

700lb - 899lb

1.00 1.03

PAIRS

SLAUGHTER

Top

NA NA

Cows

0.23 0.52

Low-Middle

$400 $1000

Bulls

0.60 0.89

PAIRS

$870 $1,530

STOCKER COWS

0.40lb 1.05lb

GOATS

$35hd $250hd

STOCKER COWS

$200hd $1,120hd

BABY CALVES

$50hd $250hd

GOATS

$150hd $200hd

HORSES

$40hd $500hd

TRI-COUNTY LIVESTOCK MARKET Updated: 12/19/2020 Head Count: 1287

STEERS UNDER 300lb

1.40 2.15

300lb - 400lb

1.35 2.05

400lb - 500lb

1.30 1.72

500lb - 600lb

1.25 1.55

600lb - 700lb

1.15 1.34

700lb - 800lb

1.05 1.24

HEIFERS UNDER 300lb

1.20 1.65

300lb - 400lb

1.10 1.65

400lb - 500lb

1.10 1.50

500lb - 600lb

1.05 1.30

600lb - 700lb

1.05 1.19

700lb - 800lb

1.00 1.10

SLAUGHTER Cows

0.15 0.50

Heavy Bulls

0.70 0.82

PAIRS

$1350 $1900

BABY CALVES STOCKER COWS LOW-MIDDLE

NA NA

Sales

of Waskom, Texas

903-407-7627

METAL BUILDINGS OF ALL SIZES

Shops • Garages • Barns • Equipment Sheds GALVANIZED BUILDINGS ALSO AVAILABLE

24x30x10 - 30x30x10 - 30x40x10 - 30x50x10

WE BUILD ANY SIZE

Includes all labor, tractor work and concrete slab with moisture barrier and electric stub. Standard doors (1) 10x10 roll up or 20x7 garage door and (1) steel walk-in door. (Pad dirt may be extra). We use all the best materials starting with 6x6 ground contact poles with a lifetime warranty and a 40 year warranty on our painted metal. We offer a 4 inch 3000 psi concrete slab reinforced with 3/8” rebar.

ANDERSON COUNTY LIVESTOCK Updated: 12/16/2020 Head Count: 280 Buyers: 55 Sellers: 38

STEERS Under 300lb

1.28 1.63

300lb - 400lb

1.10 1.78

400lb - 500lb

1.19 1.65

500lb - 600lb

1.10 1.60

600lb - 700lb

1.05 1.37

700lb - 800lb

0.85 1.20

HEIFERS Under 300lb

0.96 1.40

300lb - 400lb

1.10 1.40

400lb - 500lb

1.18 1.37

500lb - 600lb

1.05 1.37

600lb - 700lb

1.00 1.30

700lb - 800lb

0.95 1.10

PACKER Cows

0.44 0.60

Bulls

0.62 0.93

PAIRS

$900 $1150

BRED COWS

$625hd $850hd

$575/hd $1950/hd

GOAT/SHEEP

$130hd $200hd

NA NA

BABY CALVES

$150hd $200hd

EAST TEXAS LIVESTOCK INC.

Updated: 12/15/2020 Head Count: 2652 Buyers: 41 Total Sellers: 206 Feeder Calf Order Buyers: 21 STEERS 300-DOWN

1.47 2.10

305lb - 400lb

1.33 1.92

405lb - 500lb

1.23 1.82

505lb - 600lb

1.18 1.61

605lb - 800lb

1.10 1.43

HEIFERS 300-DOWN

1.28 2.00

305lb - 400lb

1.24 1.88

405lb - 500lb

1.21 1.75

505lb - 600lb

1.16 1.45

605lb - 800lb

1.09 1.38

SLAUGHTER Cows

0.32 0.54

Bulls

0.73 0.88

PAIRS

$810 $1275

BRED COWS

$640/hd $1250/hd

We Buy and Sell Bullion Investments Everyday

Call Jackie @ 903~904~5048 Monday through Friday 10 am to 5:30 pm 909 East Tyler Street Athens Texas 75751 www.itsreigningjewels.com


8

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

December 2020

Close Calls

Up close and personal with a big mama bear by Luke Clayton Outdoors Writer

I

bet most of you that have spent a lifetime in the outdoors can recall some ‘close calls’, times in the woods or on the water that cause you to shutter when reminiscing about the past events. I certainly can! One would think that most of these events were caused by wild animals, ie. cougars, bear, wild boar. Some were but some of the scariest things that happened to me had nothing to do with critters with fangs and claws. A few years ago I was up in Canada, just a few miles for the Northwest Territories on a fly-in fishing trip. A group of friends and I drove 5 hours north of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan and boarded a float plane and went ‘way north’ to a distant fishing camp. There was one way in and one way out and that was via float plane that was scheduled weeks in advance. Before leaving home, I noticed a little red bump on my forearm but gave it little thought. A few days into the trip, up in the remote wilds of Canada, that bump turned into a full fledged infection. A shot of antibiotic would have taken care of my problem but that would require a flight out of the wilderness back to civilization. I kept fishing and decided to wait until I got back home to go to the doctor. A bad decision! I managed to fish every day but by the time I got back home and to my doctor, the infection was causing me some serious problems. The doctor’s best guess was that a tiny recluse spider had caused my problem. The outdoors is full of things that can cause harm and not all of them down walk on four legs and have big teeth! For several years, I guided archery elk and bear hunting in the mountains of northern Colorado. Coming in close contact with bear was pretty common and you never knew when a bear would show up, often at very close range. One sunny morning after guiding for a couple of weeks, I decided to take a little siesta while my client set over an elk wallow waiting for a bow shot at an elk. I pulled my cap down over my eyes and ‘rested’ for a few minutes. I was in a grove of oak trees and I was awakened by the rustling of leaves. There, about 10 feet from we was a little cub bear and a few yards to my right was his twin! NOT GOOD! Where was mamma? Then, from behind me, I heard

a loud huffing I twisted my head around to look and there she was. I was between her and her babies, a very bad place to be! I can still remember those barred teeth and the evil look she was giving me. She was leaning forward and I just knew at any moment she was about to pounce on me. I do remember the width of those front legs. They were as wide at the elbow as they were at the claws! I don’t understand bear talk but she made a series of short, guttural grunts and both those cubs galloped past me and left the scene behind Mamma. Another year, I had a full grown male mountain lion stalking my hunter at an elk wallow. It would take this entire column to describe this event but Photo by Luke Clayton I’ll just say that nothing Luke has had his share of ‘close calls’ in his years spent in the outdoors but an up close and personal I have encountered in encounter with a big Momma bear is near the top of the list. the outdoors comes close to the sight of a crusty trap and every move I made caused ground. About an hour before dark, we lion that has no fear me to sink deeper! I was wearing chest of man and refuses to leave his hunting watched a fast approaching storm move in waders (I have never worn chest waders grounds. My client and I backed out of over the mountain. In a matter of minutes, since) and it was impossible to drag the that situation with the lion glaring. I still the wind was blowing a gale and aspen boots out of the mud. I had a brand new feel very fortunate as to the outcome of trees were popping and falling all around Browning pump shotgun that I was very this too close encounter. us. Lightening was flashing and thunder proud of and instinctively I pushed it booming. I reluctantly made the call to get And then there was the time I found the heck out of there before an aspen fell myself waist deep in quicksand. I was duck forward, slapped it down into the mud to no avail. I unbuckled the chest waders and on us. That drive down that slick mountain hunting in some old gravel pits close to continued to pull myself the few feet to my house, early in the duck season. It was road back to camp ranks right up there the bank and solid ground. I was truly as a very dry year and the water level had with close calls. I had the option to stay scared as I’ve ever been during this fluke receded on the pit I was hunting. There put and possible get us hammered by a situation. I finally managed to use my new was just a little water on the deep end that falling aspen of head down a treacherously shotgun to drag myself to safety. As far as was attracting ducks like a magnet. The steep, very slick road in a downpour with I know, those chest waders are still there, majority of the pit was covered with a lightening popping. I did thank the good four feet deep in that old gravel pit! dry, crusty mud that appeared to be very Lord for watching over us when we safely I was once guiding a couple of elk solid. I shot a brace of mallards and both arrived at camp! hunter and we were up on top of a fell on the shore across the crusted mud. Make plans to join Luke and friends I grabbed my shotgun in case more ducks mountain in some heavy aspen timber about 3 miles from camp. I used an electric in Greenville at the Winter Outdoor might fly by while I was retrieving these Ron De Voux in Greenville March 6. For two and then took a couple steps out on hunting buggy (converted golf cart) to more information, contact Randy Koon what I thought was dry ground. I instantly travel the steep road from camp to the 903-456-3048. Contact Luke via www. sank to my knees and then my waist. What area we were hunting. The buggy had looked like dry ground was actually a mechanical brakes that worked well on dry catfishradio.org.

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Farm and Ranch Living December 2020  

A special supplement to the Palestine Herald-Press focusing on Farm and Ranch Living in East Texas.

Farm and Ranch Living December 2020  

A special supplement to the Palestine Herald-Press focusing on Farm and Ranch Living in East Texas.

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