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HANOVER here in

SPRING 2015

VOLUME 20, NO. 1

$4.95

and neighboring communities

WELCOME SPRING!

Planting downtown WITH THE Hanover Garden Club

Inviting Interiors by Alice Williams Fire Department’s New Rescue Boat


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CONTENTS

40

page

Features 40

Hanover Fire Department’s New Watercraft Creating an enhanced partnership for safety. by Anne Richter Arnold

48 The Hanover Garden Club

Beauty, service, and sustainability. by Nancy Fontaine

60 Transform Your World

Alice Williams is passionate about interior design. by Dian Parker

Cover photo by Lars Blackmore 12

F I N D H E R E I N H A N OV E R AT W W W. H E R E I N H A N OV E R . C O M

48


22 32 Departments 17 Editor’s Note 18 Contributors 20 Online Exclusives 22 Best Friends

Tips, news, and furry facts.

26 Around & About by Cassie Horner

32 Seasonal Views

78 The Hood & The Hop

68

Arts and entertainment at Dartmouth.

82 Happenings

A calendar of events.

87 Advertisers Index 88 Hanover Talks

Frank Bass, superintendent of Hanover and Norwich public schools. by Mark Dantos

Spring in Hanover. by Lisa Densmore Ballard

68 Henderson’s New Garden Center

Where the beauty of nature meets the artistry of people. by Here in Hanover staff

75 Living Well Stem cell transfer. by Katherine P. Cox

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING S E C T I O N

Soar into Spring Shop, dine, and explore locally!


HANOVER here in

and neighboring communities

Mountain View Publishing, LLC 135 Lyme Road, Hanover, NH 03755 (603) 643-1830

www.hereinhanover.com Publishers

Bob Frisch Cheryl Frisch Executive Editor

Deborah Thompson Associate Editor

Kristy Erickson Copy Editor

Elaine Ambrose Creative Director/Design

Ellen Klempner-BĂŠguin Ad Design

Hutchens Media, LLC Web Design

Locable

Inbound Marketing Manager

Erin Frisch Advertising

Bob Frisch KEEP US POSTED. Here in Hanover wants to hear from readers. Correspondence may be addressed to: Letters to the Editor, Here in Hanover, 135 Lyme Road, Hanover, NH 03755. Or email us at: dthompson@ mountainviewpublishing.com. Advertising inquires may be made by email to rcfrisch1@ comcast.net. Here in Hanover is published quarterly by Mountain View Publishing, LLC Š2015. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part is strictly prohibited. Here in Hanover accepts no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts, artwork, or photographs.

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E D I TO R ’ S N OT E

IAN RAYMOND

A Breath of Spring As I write this note today, I’m having a hard time shifting my thoughts to spring. Our production schedule dictates the magazine’s being at the printer in early February, and there’s currently 18 inches of snow on the ground with 3-foot drifts, and the wind is howling at 40 to 50 miles per hour. I, for one, will not be sad to see the end of winter. Lows tonight will register below zero, and that’s without the wind chill factored in. I anticipate the arrival of spring more than any other season. I love to be outdoors, and every year I can’t wait to dig my hands into the rich, damp soil to plant several varieties of flowers and veggies. If I close my eyes and concentrate for a minute, I can almost smell the intoxicating aroma of the dark loam. To kick off this season of renewal, we’re bringing you a story about the Hanover Garden Club’s many activities, including their hard work to beautify downtown (page 48). Club members and friends plant and maintain 10 garden spots throughout the area, and their beautiful hanging baskets overflowing with colorful annuals welcome residents and visitors alike. We don’t have enough space within our pages to show off all of Lars Blackmore’s wonderful photos, so be sure to go online to www.hereinhanover.com to view many more images of the Club’s primary fundraiser, the annual plant sale, which takes place on May 16 from 9am to noon this year. Member Jane Hanford, whose help was invaluable in putting the story together and arranging our photo shoots, advises not to wait until 9—eager gardeners start lining up early to get in to buy their plants. The good folks at Henderson’s Tree & Garden Services are celebrating their 30th anniversary this year, so be sure to stop by their White River Junction location on June 6 to join the fun (page 68). Don’t be shy about asking questions; the experts there can help with whatever lawn, garden, or tree problems you may have. You’ll also enjoy our visit with the Hanover Fire Department as they take to the water with their new Zodiac rigid inflatable boat (RIB). Chief Martin McMillan is excited about the addition of the boat to the department’s rescue equipment fleet, and he’s very proud of the partnerships his group has established with Dartmouth College’s safety unit, the Hanover Police Department, and New Hampshire Fish and Game (page 40). As the early spring sunshine grows warmer from day to day, head outdoors and breathe in the fragrances of this gorgeous season. Enjoy!•

Deborah Thompson Executive Editor dthompson@mountainviewpublishing.com

LIKE US www.mountainviewpublishing.com/facebook SPRING 2015 • HERE IN HANOVER

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C O N T R I B U TO R S

Anne Richter Arnold

Katherine P. Cox

After graduating from Columbia University, Anne spent most of her career in the business world and only recently followed her lifelong passion for writing. An avid hiker and paddler, she enjoys living in Vermont as well as traveling to explore the outdoors in other parts of the country and world. When she's not writing, she can be found teaching fitness classes, leading hikes, working in her garden, raising chickens, or preparing a meal for her family.

Kathy is a freelance writer and former writer and editor for the Keene Sentinel in Keene, New Hampshire. Her work has also appeared in Vermont’s Local Banquet, So Vermont Arts & Living, Our Local Table Monadnock, and the anthology Beyond the Notches: Stories of Place in New Hampshire’s North Country. She was also a writer and producer for Captured Light Studio, Inc., a video and interactive production company in Keene.

Lynn began her photographic career in Boston, studying at New England School of Photography, assisting commercial photographers, and color printing in photo labs. Originally from West Virginia, she worked her way north, finally landing in the hills of Vermont, where she has a studio in Woodstock. Her current assignments include photographing people, product, and art.

Lynn Bohannon

Writer, editor, and librarian Nancy Fontaine works at Norwich Public Library in Norwich, Vermont. She is also a book blogger and website manager and has been writing articles about the Upper Valley for the last several years. She lives in West Lebanon, New Hampshire, with her husband, and her hobbies include reading, quilting, skiing, and snorkeling.

Nancy Fontaine

Cassie is a writer, editor, and publisher, and author of the historical novel, Lucy E.—Road to Victory. Her roots in Vermont go back almost 200 years and inspire her love of the natural world and history. She lives in Plymouth, Vermont, with her husband and two dogs, an English shepherd and a mini dachshund.

Cassie Horner

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Jim Mauchly

Jim was given his first camera at the age of six. During high school he worked weekends as a photographer’s assistant in his hometown of Norristown, Pennsylvania. While serving in the Navy, he attended photography school and received training in photojournalism, aerial photography, and portraiture. In 2001, he opened Mountain Graphics Photography, a professional studio, photo gallery, and custom frame shop in Fairlee, Vermont.


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HANOVER here in

SPRING 2015

VOLUME 20, NO. 1

$4.95

and neighboring communities

HEREINHANOVER.COM ONLINE EXCLUSIVES Find additional articles online at www.hereinhanover.com. Go to the home page and click on the “In This Issue” button under the calendar.

WELCOME SPRING!

Planting downtown WITH THE Hanover Garden Club

52-Week Savings Challenge Follow our easy plan each week, and you’ll have a nice amount of money by year’s end.

Inviting Interiors by Alice Williams Fire Department’s New Rescue Boat

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CLICK ON OUR ONLINE CALENDAR TO SEE LOCAL EVENTS HAPPENING IN OUR COMMUNITY, AND YOU CAN ADD YOUR OWN EVENT FREE!


ONLINE BUSINESS DIRECTORY Check out these local businesses in our directory.

CLICK ON hereinhanover.com

A.M. PEISCH & COMPANY, LLP

LISTEN COMMUNITY SERVICES

ACTION GARAGE DOOR

LOCABLE

AMBROSE CUSTOM BUILDERS, INC

MARTHA E. DIEBOLD REAL ESTATE

ANNEMARIE SCHMIDT EUROPEAN FACE AND BODY STUDIO

MASCOMA INSURANCE AGENCY

ARTEMIS GLOBAL ART, LLC

MORNINGSIDE ADVENTURE FLIGHT PARK

ARTISTREE/PURPLE CRAYON PRODUCTIONS

NATURE CALLS

BARTON INSURANCE AGENCY BLOOD’S CATERING & PARTY RENTALS

NEW LONDON INN & COACH HOUSE RESTAURANT

BOYNTON CONSTRUCTION, INC.

NEXT STEP CONSULTING SERVICES

BRAESIDE MOTEL

NORTHCAPE DESIGN BUILD

BROWN’S AUTO & MARINE

NORTHERN MOTORSPORT LTD

BROWN’S FLOORMASTERS

NORWICH REGIONAL ANIMAL HOSPITAL

CABINETRY CONCEPTS

PELTZER CAPITAL MANAGEMENT

CARPET KING & TILE

PRANA DESIGN PAINTING

COLDWELL BANKER-REDPATH & CO., REALTORS

QUALITY INN QUECHEE

COURTYARD BY MARRIOTT

RIVER ROAD VETERINARY

COVENTRY CATERING

RIVERLIGHT BUILDERS

CROWN POINT CABINETRY

RODD ROOFING

DARTMOUTH SKIWAY

ROGER A. PHILLIPS, D.M.D.

DATAMANN

SEAN’S LAWN N’ GARDEN SERVICES

DAVID ANDERSON HILL, INC.

SIX LOOSE LADIES YARN & FIBER SHOP

db LANDSCAPING

STONE DENTAL, PLLC

DEAD RIVER COMPANY

SUNAPEE GETAWAYS

DORR MILL STORE

SURFACE SOLUTIONS

DOWDS’ COUNTRY INN

THE GRANITE GROUP, THE ULTIMATE BATH STORE

DOWDS’ INN EVENTS CENTER

MB PRO LANDSCAPE

RESIDENCE INN BY MARRIOTT

ELIXIR RESTAURANT

THE HANOVER INN AT DARTMOUTH COLLEGE

ENGEL & VOELKERS, WOODSTOCK

THE LIGHTING CENTER

EVERGREEN RECYCLING

THE QUECHEE CLUB

EXCEL PLUMBING & HEATING

THE TAYLOR-PALMER AGENCY

GILBERTE INTERIORS

THE WOODSTOCK INN & RESORT

HANOVER COUNTRY CLUB

TWIN STATE DOOR

HANOVER EYECARE

VITT & ASSOCIATES

HOLLOWAY MOTOR CARS OF MANCHESTER

WHEELOCK TRAVEL

INFUSE ME

WHITE RIVER FAMILY EYECARE

JEFF WILMOT PAINTING & WALLPAPERING, INC.

WHITE RIVER YARNS

ELEMENT BY WESTIN HANOVER-LEBANON

JUNCTION FRAME SHOP

WILLIAMSON GROUP SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

KEEPERS A COUNTRY CAFÉ

WISE

L.F. TROTTIER & SONS

WOODSTOCK AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

LAVALLEY BUILDING SUPPLY LEDYARD FINANCIAL ADVISORS LEDYARD NATIONAL BANK

WOODSTOCK INN & RESORT

YOUNG’S DRYWALL

For more information about how your business can get listed on our ONLINE BUSINESS DIRECTORY or for other online advertising opportunities, contact Bob Frisch at (603) 643-1830 or email rcfrisch1@comcast.net. SPRING 2015 • HERE IN HANOVER

21


BEST FRIENDS TIPS, NEWS & FURRY FACTS

WET YOUR WHISKERS!

PETS ARE GOOD FOR YOU Whether your best friend is furry, feathered, or finny—or sports a different look entirely, there’s no denying how important such a friend can be. Consider some of the ways pets can enhance our well-being:

The Upper Valley Humane Society will have a wine tasting at the Norwich Inn hosted by Dan & Whits from 5 to 7pm on Wednesday, March 4. Or take a Walk on the Wildside at the Lebanon Green on Sunday, June 7. This event starts at 11. Learn more at www.uvhs.org.

• Therapy pets are found not only in hospitals and nursing homes these days. Town libraries now offer opportunities for children to read to therapy pets. You’ll find them in schools too, where they serve as devoted listeners for young readers. • Did you know that dogs are better at matchmaking than the Internet? They’re great at starting conversations—and not just with other canines. Dogs ease social situations with soulful stares and wagging tails, bringing the shyest people out of their shells. • Research has demonstrated that people who suffer from dementia or Alzheimer’s disease are calmer and less agitated when an animal is in the home. Pets also ease the burdens of caregivers, particularly cats, which need less care and attention than dogs. • Natural personal coaches, dogs get us outside even in the foulest weather for fresh air and exercise. They’ve even proved their ability to decrease blood pressure, especially in stressful situations. And the side effects are minimal—a little fur on your clothing or drool on your shoe. • Playing with our pets has also been shown to elevate levels of dopamine and serotonin, neurotransmitters known to help improve mood. In addition, research shows that people who live with pets are less likely to suffer from depression.

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A WINNING PAIR

Many kinds of pet birds including parakeets enjoy living in pairs for companionship.


THE CAT’S MEOW Felines appear to have more than 100 different vocal sounds, while individual dogs have about 10.

SUPPORT LOCAL HUMANE ORGANIZATIONS

Totally Natural Pet Shampoo

These ultra-concentrated, totally natural pet shampoos are made with natural essential oils and other good stuff from nature. They don’t contain parabens, harsh soaps, artificial dyes or fragrances, phosphates, or toxins, so you don’t have to worry about what might be left behind on your pet or in the environment. Exceptionally mild, effective, and safe for pets over 6 weeks old. www.earthbath.com

Consider donations of money, time, or material goods for your favorite animal welfare organization. The dedicated and hardworking people who are involved in animal welfare make our communities better places to be not only for animals but also for people. Check their websites to find out how you can assist and support their vital work!

SPRING 2015 • HERE IN HANOVER

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BEST FRIENDS TIPS, NEWS & FURRY FACTS

A NEW LEASH ON LIFE Celebrate the season with a hike. Your dog will delight in all the scents of springtime. For great hikes in Norwich, try the Bill Ballard Trail or the King Arthur Flour Trail. In Hanover, the Balch Hill Trail and Greensboro Ridge or the 24-acre Rinker-Steele Natural Area offer great exercise for friends with two and four feet. Check out these trails and others at Norwich Regional Animal Hospital’s website, www.norwichanimal.com/ dog-trails-and-laws.pml.

Nothing Says Lovin’ Like Pet Treats from Your Oven! Let’s face it. Dogs are generally easy to please when it comes to food. Bake up some homemade treats for your best friend. These recipes are quick, easy, and likely to win you two paws up. DOGGY TREATS ▷ Makes about 20 treats 1 cup wheat germ 1 cup whole-wheat flour 3 jars of beef baby food 1–2 Tbsp water 1. Preheat oven to 325º. 2. Blend together the flour, wheat germ, baby food, and enough of the water to form a dough. 3. Pinch off pieces of dough and roll into 1-inch balls and place on ungreased cookie sheet. 4. Flatten slightly with your hand and bake 40 to 50 minutes until dry and lightly browned. Store in the refrigerator.

KITTY TREATS 6 ounces of flaked tuna in oil, lightly drained K cup cornmeal

PREVENTION BEATS THE CURE

Not only dogs but also cats in all 50 states of the US are at risk for potentially fatal heartworm disease. Ask your veterinarian about testing and prevention for your cats and dogs.

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1 cup flour L cup water 1. Preheat the oven to 350º. 2. Measure all the ingredients into a bowl and mix thoroughly with your hands. 3. Roll out to ¼-inch thickness and cut into treatsized pieces with a sharp knife. Place on a lightly oiled cookie sheet or one lined with parchment paper. Bake for about 20 minutes or until golden. Store in the refrigerator.


Dogs do Dream!

Dogs and humans have the same type of slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM), and during this REM stage dogs can dream. The twitching and paw movements that occur during sleep are signs that your pet is dreaming. Source: Healthy Pet

Pet Insurance

According to the ASPCA, pet guardians in the United States spent over $15 billion on veterinary care in 2014. Advances in medical treatments can keep our best friends healthier and in our lives longer. But those advances translate to larger vet bills in many cases. Ask your vet or your local humane society about pet health insurance to manage the costs of veterinary care and give your best friend the best care possible.

SPRING 2015 • HERE IN HANOVER

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AROUND & ABOUT

BY

Cassie Horner

LOCAL ARTIST

Stephanie Reininger THE PLAYFUL PAINTER

A

ward-winning painter Stephanie Reininger of Lyme, New Hampshire, has made her mark on the art world with beautiful watercolors that use soft, warm colors to create a connection

between the viewer and a bowl of sunny kumquats, a rosy-hued barn, or cows in a golden-hued meadow below acres of sky. Known as The Playful Painter, she shares her talents in classes at AVA Gallery, OSHER at Dartmouth, and her Lyme studio. She also does art demonstrations at Long River Studios in Lyme where she exhibits. “I keep the classes light with no preaching,” Stephanie says. “Mostly I do beginner classes at OSHER, starting people off and trying to get them excited to play and have fun.” She is offering a weekend class, Painting Posies in Watercolor, in May through OSHER at Dartmouth. Stephanie has been drawing since she was a child in Connecticut. This love of art led to her taking as many art classes as she could at what was then Colby Junior College and at Bennington College. She worked at MOMA in New York City in the children’s department scheduling guided tours, then married and moved to the Upper Valley. Living in Hanover in the 1960s with four children, she started batiking but had a bad reaction to the wax and dyes. “I loved the painting part of the batiking process, so I decided to focus on watercolor,” Stephanie recalls. A visit to England, where she was entranced by the sketches and little watercolors of J.M.W. Turner, led her to find a watercolor teacher back home in the US. “Watercolor is washable and won’t set the house on fire,” she laughs, noting that this medium also lent itself to working in short sessions—perfect for a busy mother. Many years and many national awards later, Stephanie retains her love of painting. She will show her work at the AVA Gallery Group Show from June 18 to July 17. For more information about Stephanie Reininger and to view a selection of her watercolors, visit www.theplayfulpainter.com. •

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1 7 Days with Amaryllis. 28 by 15 inches. 2 Peas Please. 28 by 36 inches. 3 First Snow. 16 by 13 inches. 4 Grazing. 12 by 15 inches. 5 Kumquats. 16 by 12 inches.

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“Mostly I do beginner classes at OSHER, starting people off and trying to get them excited to play and have fun.” 4

Stephanie will show her work at the AVA Gallery Group Show from June 18 to July 17. For more information about Stephanie Reininger and to view a selection of her watercolors, visit www.theplayfulpainter.com. SPRING 2015 • HERE IN HANOVER

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A RO U N D & A B O U T

Rowers enjoy a beautiful day on the Connecticut River.

OUTDOOR ADVENTURE

LEARN to ROW DAY

Photos courtesy of UVRF members

I

f you have gazed at the wide, smooth waters of the Connecticut River and thought about how much fun the rowers are having, an opportunity to try it for yourself is at hand. The Upper Valley Rowing Foundation hosts an Open House in conjunction with National Learn to Row Day annually at the Fuller Boat House adjacent to the Ledyard Canoe Club in Hanover. The free event offers instruction on shore and on the water. Beginning on land, newcomers are introduced to the basics of rowing, including terminology, and then, on rowing machines, to the basic stroke. From there, learners go out on the river to experience firsthand for about 20 minutes what it feels like to row. “I had my first rowing experience while taking part

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in this program five and a half years ago,” says UVRF member Eric Brooks. “I came away so excited about the sport that I have been rowing with the club ever since.” Learn to Row Day also provides people with information about the Upper Valley Rowing Foundation, rowing in general, and how to sign up for one of the UVRF’s sweep rowing programs for beginners. The UVRF was established to provide opportunities for people to row on the Connecticut River through a variety of activities including competitive events, programs, and educational forums. The date for the 2015 Learn to Row event had not been announced at press time. For more information, visit www.uppervalleyrowing.org. •


Sculling on the Connecticut in the fog by the Dartmouth boathouse.

The date for the 2015 Learn to Row event had not been announced at press time. For more information, visit www.uppervalleyrowing.org.

SPRING 2015 • HERE IN HANOVER

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A RO U N D & A B O U T

COMMUNITY CRAFTS

Northern Lights QUILT GUILD SHOW

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rtistry in fabric comes to life at the Northern Lights Quilt Guild Show, held this year on April 18 and 19 at the Francis C. Richmond Middle School in Hanover. The show runs from 9am to 4pm on Saturday, April 18, and from 10am to 4pm on Sunday, April 19. More than 100 beautiful quilts crafted by guild members will be on display, ranging from traditional patterns to unique designs created by the quilters. A raffle of a large 96-inch-square quilt will also take place. There will be daily demonstrations, a silent auction each day of mini quilts, and a large display of bags, bowls, and baskets filled with wonderful items that will be raffled. Jan Buskey, the featured quilter, will bring a selection of her work. She has been quilting for more than 20 years after taking an introductory course at the Hartford Recreation Department. She enjoys making block quilts, creating one a month over a period of time, and then taking the pieces to someone to machine quilt. “We are a nonprofit organization open to anyone interested in quilting,” says guild member Tracy Moloney. “The purpose of the NLQG is to assist quilters in the pursuit and development of their craft and to enhance their knowledge and enjoyment of quilting through the sharing process. An important activity of the NLQG is our community service. As a group, we make quilts for people in need because we believe that a quilt is a great comfort when there is hardship. The guild also works with charitable organizations that provide quilts for wounded veterans and people affected by fires and other natural disasters.” The Northern Lights Quilt Guild is open to anyone interested in quilting. The group meets every second Wednesday of the month at the Methodist Church on School Street in Lebanon at 6:30pm. If you have questions about the quilt show or the guild, contact Tracy Moloney at tfmoloney@dartmouth.edu or visit www.nlqg.org. •

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1 Rita Tingle (left) and Madeline Boughter with a quilt pieced by Madeline with fabrics donated by guild members and quilted by Colleen O’Neill. The quilt won a Viewers’ Choice blue ribbon in the “Bed Quilt” category. 2 “My Vermont Girl” by Sue Crate, quilted by Ellie Leach. 3 A lucky raffle winner will be taking home this large quilt. 4 Renie MacArthur mugs for the camera in front of her dramatic “Bright and Beautiful” quilt, which won a yellow ribbon in the “Bed Quilt” category. 5 Nina Klinck’s creation “Turn Me Loose” won a Viewers’ Choice ~ red ribbon in the “Wall Hanging” category. Photos 1, 2, 4 & 5 by Christine Maute.

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The show runs from 9am to 4pm on Saturday, April 18, and from 10am to 4pm on Sunday, April 19. SPRING 2015 • HERE IN HANOVER

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SEASONAL VIEWS BY

Lisa Densmore Ballard

You know it’s spring when . . . Our favorite signs of the season

O

ld Man Winter can be grumpy and stubborn, hanging on despite our weariness with his frosty ways. While the spring equinox is officially March 20, there’s no switch to

suddenly turn on the new season. After a few fair days, we’re tempted to put away our thick mittens and heavy coats, but inevitably an unwanted snow blankets the Upper Valley. Yet each year, spring does come, finally—sometimes boldly after a heavy rain and sometimes shyly, a little at a time, dropping a few hints here and there. You know it’s springtime when Hanover feels somehow more awake and refreshed! >>

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The daffodils and then the tulips planted last fall well up and burst open in vibrant yellows, oranges, and reds.

SPRING 2015 • HERE IN HANOVER

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A robin hops from a tree branch onto a patch of greening grass, confident of finding its next meal.

Grape hyacinths poke their colorful heads above the soil, smiling at the sky.

Baker Tower beyond the tulips. 34

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A squirrel pauses in its frenetic comings and goings to warm itself in the sunshine and watch you pass by.

The flower boxes on Main Street erupt in colorful blooms. SPRING 2015 • HERE IN HANOVER

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Students exchange their jeans for shorts.

The Dartmouth Green squishes underfoot as the frost melts away, then turns its namesake color.

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s.

The Canada geese return to the Connecticut River but quickly disappear again to build their nests. SPRING 2015 • HERE IN HANOVER

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First a howling blizzard woke us, Then the rain came down to soak us, And now before the eye can focus —Crocus.

~ Lilja Rogers

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Members of the Hanover Fire Department with the new Zodiac rigid inflatable boat (RIB).

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PHOTOS BY

BY Anne Richter Arnold Jim Mauchly/mountaingraphics.com

HANOVER FIRE DEPARTMENT’S NEW WATERCRAFT

Creating an enhanced partnership for safety

There’s a new addition to the community on the water, and it’s not another rowing club or Dartmouth College amenity. It’s a boat—not just any boat—one that’s high tech and here with a purpose. The Hanover Fire Department’s new, 21foot Zodiac rigid infl atable boat (RIB) is specifi cally designed for water rescues and is similar to those used by the Coast Guard. The RIB, which can achieve a speed of 50 mph, is on a trailer for easy transport, so it can quickly reach the site of an emergency in Hanover, Lyme, Norwich, or along the 16 miles of river in the primary response area. Its low profile and high stability allow rescuers to pull victims from the water easily and carry up to 18 people to safety. >>

SPRING 2015 • HERE IN HANOVER

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“Twenty years ago, no one went out on the river. Now, it’s a recreational treasure, and

with the development of water sports like rowing, canoeing, and kayaking, and the waterfront at the college, the river’s use has increased exponentially over the last decade. An increase in activity at a beach necessitates a community adding lifeguards, but with a river that’s not possible.”

Top: The rescue unit delivers the boat to be launched. The truck is equipped to resuscitate patients, so once a rescue is made with the boat, the team has what it needs to provide on-the-scene care. Above: The new boat, because of its low profile, is designed for bad weather and can be used year-round. The team is ready for action, dressed in swift-water gear.

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PREPARATION IS KEY While Dartmouth College has maintained a pontoon boat at its facilities for many years for the use of the fire department, the time had come for a change. When Fire Chief Martin McMillan took over the department last May, he assessed his new situation, observed the trends and uses of the river, and recognized the need for a boat to enhance the community’s safety. With donations from Dartmouth College and the Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation, plus some funding left from the previous year, the fire department purchased the Zodiac RIB and had it in the water and operational by the end of August. The increased use of the river for recreational sports is the main reason for the need for enhanced rescue capabilities. Captain Michael Hinsley explains, “Twenty years ago, no one went out on the river. Now, it’s a recreational treasure, and with the development of water sports like rowing, canoeing, and kayaking, and the waterfront at the college, the river’s use has increased exponentially over the last decade. An increase in activity at a beach necessitates a community adding lifeguards, but with a river that’s not possible. Having the two boats enhances safety for the community dramatically. As with an ambulance, you want to have the right equipment to be prepared for emergencies.” TRAINING AND COMMUNITY SAFETY People stranded in boats, canoes, and kayaks who can’t paddle back upstream due to currents are common rescues, and so are swimmers in distress. Over the years, there have been several drownings, the most recent being the relative of a Dartmouth student in 2013. According to the fire department, the number-one cause of accidental death in Hanover has been drowning, with one occurring just about every other year. Until now, there hasn’t really been any quick way to locate a victim in the water. The Zodiac has two types of sophisticated side-scanning sonar, one looking forward and one, similar to a fish finder, searching below. According to Martin McMillan, “Towing a diver in a grid in a current, which is traditionally how you search, is difficult; trees and stumps in the river can injure the diver, and visibility can SPRING 2015 • HERE IN HANOVER

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be very poor, so it isn’t a good option. The electronics will improve safety for those doing the rescue and allow the user to pinpoint [a victim] much more effectively than using divers.� All the members of the fire department have had previous experience with rescue boats, so once the boat was ready to go in the water, each shift was familiarized with trailering and operating the 44

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new Zodiac. The department already had five certified scuba divers, all with special training to cope with cold water, zero visibility, and search and rescue dealing with bodies underwater, and they added another diver last year. The fire department has quickly come up to speed with the new technology as well. Training began immediately with the sophisticated


Above: Team members take part in one of many training exercises. Left: Preparing to put the boat back on the trailer.

The first week they had the boat in the water, they practiced with the electronics and located a missing brand-new motor belonging to one of the local rowing teams.

electronics. The first week they had the boat in the water, they practiced with the electronics and located a missing brand-new motor belonging to one of the local rowing teams. In an exercise to simulate recovery efforts, divers positioned themselves on the river bottom while the Zodiac made passes using the electronics to find them. >> SPRING 2015 • HERE IN HANOVER

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Sharing resources is important: The boat is available to other agencies and regional partners, including New Hampshire Fish and Game and the Hanover Police Department.

The addition of the Zodiac RIB to the emergency services team creates an ideal and complementary situation that will enhance the safety of the community. According to Fire Chief Martin McMillan, “Dartmouth has been a wonderful partner. I want to really stress that. The fire department has used Dartmouth’s pontoon boat at will, and while it’s in a great location for the college, we needed a supplementary waterrescue component. We have that in this new boat.” The Dartmouth Safety and Security unit is also trained to use the pontoon boat, and they often respond to incidents with the Hanover Fire Department. He continues, “The RIB has a lower profile; it’s on a trailer so we can take it anywhere; and its electronics can do what a person can’t. The college’s pontoon boat would serve 46

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as a platform for divers, and this new boat could help with a rescue, as we would be able to find a drowning person more quickly and resuscitate him faster using both boats. To create a situation where you marry the two boats together creates a perfect situation to support the community.” •

ONLINE EXTRA

Check out the video of the new Zodiac RIB on www.hereinhanover.com.

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BY

Nancy Fontaine

PHOTOS BY

Lars Blackmore

GardenClub The Hanover

Beauty, service, and sustainability

Hanover in spring and summer is a glorious place, with bright grass blanketing the Green, leafy trees lining the streets, and flowers bedecking public gardens and hanging from baskets all around town. Unlike the former two, the flowers do not take care of themselves. The Hanover Garden Club plants these. Established in 1936 “to stimulate the knowledge and love of gardening, to participate in civic beautification, and to promote conservation,” the club has more than 200 members, men and women, from towns throughout the Upper Valley. Hanover’s 10 town gardens and the hanging baskets on Main Street are all results of the group’s activities. “It’s a working club,” says member Jane Hanford. “There’s something going on all the time, and I’ve learned so much.” >>

Above: Garden club members and friends plant one of 10 gardens in Hanover. Center: A wide variety of annuals, tomato plants, herbs, and perennials will be available at the plant sale on May 16. Proceeds go toward planting the town gardens. Right, from top: A few of the 40 hanging baskets the club places and the town maintains to beautify Hanover. Customers enjoy the plant sale, rain or shine.

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SERVING THE COMMUNITY The club meets monthly from September to June and offers programs with a wide range of topics related to gardening, all open to the public. “I started coming to the meetings because they are so informative,” says member Larry Litten. “But there is so much service you can do besides adding beauty.” Other activities of the club include providing small arrangements of flowers to patients at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, making donations to public libraries in 10 surrounding towns, and providing Christmas greens for the town hall, Howe Library, Upper Valley Hostel, and the police and fire departments. The Hanover Garden Club frequently collaborates with other groups and municipal offices, and its efforts are greatly appreciated. Hanover Town Manager Julia Griffin says, “This intrepid group of dedicated gardeners fundraise, plan, plant, and oversee many of the town’s flower beds, hanging baskets, and planters, while the Hanover Improvement Society provides funds for a summer gardener to maintain all the plantings. Flowers make such a difference during spring, summer, and fall as we welcome visitors and help our own residents feel at home.” To support its activities, the club holds fundraisers. Each December it sells holiday greens, baked goods, and the club’s trademark boxwood trees at the Black Community Center. Every May, the club’s annual plant sale is a rite of spring. They have a permanent greenhouse behind the town of Hanover’s wastewater treatment plant, just off Route 10 beyond Pine Knolls Cemetery. The greenhouse allows members to raise flowers throughout the winter to sell at the plant sale and to use in private gardens.

“I started coming to the meetings because they are so informative,” says member Larry Litten. “But there is so much service you can do besides adding beauty.”

TURNING CHALLENGES INTO OPPORTUNITIES Things might have continued happily as they had been. However, two years ago, the town informed the club that the treatment plant will need to expand, and there will no longer be room for the greenhouse. Club president Ewa Larson says, “They told us they didn’t know when we would need to move the greenhouse. It could be anywhere from two to ten years.” Losing the greenhouse could have been a big blow to the club, but Larry Litten, who manages

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Club members and friends plant town gardens on Main Street late in May.

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It’s spring inside the greenhouse, even in winter.

the greenhouse, says, “We may have said ‘oh no!’ at first, but we said something after ‘oh no.’” The club’s president-elect, Sandra Johnson, adds, “As a result of the town informing us way in advance, we have had time to plan.” The club wasted no time in getting to work. The town offered another excellent site, but then came the idea of collaborating with Hanover High School. When club members 52

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approached the school, staff there were excited by the idea, welcoming the prospect of providing more activities for the students around sustainability, which has become a focus of the curriculum. Staff there suggested using land directly behind the gym. The light exposure is right for a greenhouse, and wouldn’t it be cool if the greenhouse could be heated by recycling air already heated for the gym? Wouldn’t that


be a more sustainable model for both the greenhouse and the school? With initial interest in the idea, the Garden Club formed a taskforce to look at greenhouse designs. They contacted the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth, which responded favorably to the request for input from students. As a result, “the greenhouse will be state of the art,” says Sandra. “The jewel is that we were the instigators, but it’s not just us; it’s the town and the school SPRING 2015 • HERE IN HANOVER

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too.” Not only could such a structure be useful in teaching; it could also provide greens to the cafeteria. In addition, the town of Hanover will be able to provide garden activities as part of its summer recreation program. THE FUTURE IS BRIGHT With excitement building and multiple entities cooperating, the future looks bright for the Garden Club’s greenhouse. The plan calls for a two-step process. First, build a temporary greenhouse, which should be nearing completion this spring. The temporary greenhouse will serve as a demonstration project to show that a greenhouse attached to the high school gym can work as planned. Then a permanent structure will be built, and the temporary greenhouse can be moved to the middle school or the elementary school to further sustainability and gardening education. What’s in it for the Garden Club to share its greenhouse? “We’re hoping that the greenhouse will allow families to participate and attend programs that will appeal to a new generation, turning it into a community greenhouse rather than just the Garden Club’s,” says Sandra. “The future focus of the club is what’s exciting right now, and the opportunity to draw in the school and community to activities that beautify and purify the air,” adds Ewa Larson. With all its ongoing and future activities, perhaps Larry sums up the philosophy of the club best: “We are here as a resource. We really serve the Upper Valley.” To learn more about the Hanover Garden Club, visit www. hanovergardenclub.org. • Hanover Garden Club Annual Plant Sale Saturday, May 16, 2015 9am–12 noon Enter at Pine Knoll Cemetery and follow signs.

ONLINE EXTRA

View more photos online at www.hereinhanover.com.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Soar into

Killdeer Farm

Spring!

Long River Studios & Gallery Original ~ Local ~ Unique

Proudly offering beautiful, healthy bedding plants, starters, pots, and hanging baskets for the growing season. Killdeer Farm is located on the banks of the Connecticut River off Route 5, just minutes from downtown Hanover and Norwich. Killdeer is also a certifi ed organic vegetable and strawberry farm. Our conveniently located Farm Stand offers a diverse selection of fresh, local edibles from our farm and more in season. 55 Butternut Lane (Farm Greenhouse) 163 Route 5 South (Farm Stand) Norwich, VT (802) 448-2852 www.killdeerfarm.com Greenhouses: Open daily in season from May to mid July. Farm Stand: Open weekends in May; Daily Memorial Day through Thanksgiving.

Shop, Dine & Explore Locally!

Where fine art meets craft. Be local, shop locally, support local artists! Fine art, fine furniture, craft. Pottery, poetry, prints, and paintings. Jewelry, scarves, and socks. Glassware and woodenware, hats and handiwork. Fiber arts, books, and baskets. Photography, toys, and tops. Vermont Ecuadorian chocolate, hand-gathered honey, candlesticks, and crayons. Coffee and tea on tap, and more. Lyme’s hidden gem since 1991. Bring a friend and enjoy our gallery and store! 1 Main Street (On the Common) Lyme, NH (603) 795-4909 www.longriverstudios.net Mon–Sat 10am–6pm Sun by appointment Like us on Facebook

Hanover True Value Consider Us Your Weber Headquarters!

King Arthur Flour

Enjoy grilling at its finest on the Weber Summit Series. Combining all the top features, this dramatic six-burner gas grill proudly boasts everything from a Sear Station smoker box and burner to an infrared rotisserie burner and Tuck-Away motor with separate fork and spit storage, side burner, LED tank scale, and enhanced lighted knobs.

Watch artisan bakers at work in our bakery. Shop for all your baking needs, from top-quality ingredients to tools, mixes, pans, and more. Sign up for a class. Sample treats from our demo kitchen. Enjoy a gourmet coffee and pastry, sandwich, salad, or pizza from our café. Catch the sun on our deck; check your email. Relax and enjoy the return of spring at King Arthur Flour!

Factory Authorized Weber Sales & Service. 7 South Street Hanover, NH (800) 643-2308 www.TrueValue.com Open 7 days

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135 Route 5 South Norwich, VT (802) 649-3361 www.kingarthurflour.com Open daily 7:30am–6pm


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Lemon Tree Gifts Distinctive Gifts, Jewelry & Home Décor for Every Person, Season, and Occasion! Lemon Tree offers unique items for everyone, including babies, men, tweens, and even your pet! Many locally made products, including the only Bourbon barrel-aged maple syrup in Vermont. You’ll discover an array of beautiful things, including accessories, watches, perfume, candles, bath and body, ties, area rugs, home lighting, and much more. We look forward to being part of your Hanover shopping experience! 28 South Main Street Hanover, NH (603) 643-5388 www.LemonTreeGifts.com Open daily

The Chocolate Shop One of downtown Hanover’s treasured destinations, offering the finest selection of chocolates and confections, artisan and classic, single-origin and blended gourmet bars, licorices, gummies, classic candies, and much more. Located inside the Hanover Park Building 3 Lebanon Street Hanover, NH (603) 643-9031 www.chocolatenow.com Mon–Thu 10am–6pm Fri–Sat 10am–8pm Sun 12:30–5pm

White River Yarns Inspiration * Quality * Service A full-service yarn shop next to the Junction Frame Shop, with over 100 brands of yarns and fi bers in every imaginable color and weight. The largest yarn shop in the Upper Valley, featuring a huge variety of notions and accessories. Knit Night on Tuesday and Thursday evenings. Senior discounts every Wednesday (65+). Join the lending library. Classes offered regularly. 49 South Main Street White River Junction, VT (802) 295-9301 whiteriveryarns@gmail.com www.whiteriveryarns.com Mon & Wed 10am–6pm Tue, Thu & Fri 10am–8pm Sat 10am–4pm Closed Sun

The J List Fine Clothing & Exuberant Gifts Smart, stylish, fun, and well-edited, The J List has clothing and gifts for the way we really live. We offer fabulous sweaters, tunics, tops, dresses, skirts, pants, sleepwear, jewelry, bags, scarves, and baby clothing that you won’t see everywhere. Personalized service, phone orders, wrapping, and shipping are our pleasure. Moving to Hanover in April, next to the Nugget Theater! Norwich Square 289 Main Street Norwich, VT (802) 649-9000 www.thejlistonline.com Mon–Sat 10am–5:30pm

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Hanover Haircutters Hanover Haircutters, licensed for both barbering and cosmetology, is a team of dedicated professionals committed to providing our customers with the highest quality service. Our skilled staff is committed to your needs. As a result, a high percentage of our business is from repeat customers and referrals. We welcome the opportunity to provide you service in the comfort of our relaxed, family-friendly environment. 3 Lebanon Street #10 Hanover, NH (603) 643-5777 Mon–Fri 9am–5pm Sat 10am–2pm

The Gilded Edge An award-winning custom picture framing shop offering options for every budget, from ready-made frames and the new “Frugal Framing” line to full custom, hand-finished frames that are works of art themselves. Voted “Best of the Best” picture framers in the Upper Valley five years straight! 35 South Main Street Hanover, NH (603) 643-2884 Tue–Fri 9am–5:30pm Sat 9am–3:30pm Follow us on Facebook

Cabinetry Concepts & Surface Solutions Carpenter and Main Chef/owner Bruce MacLeod has cooked in San Francisco, South Carolina, and Virginia, but his loyalties lie here in Vermont. Carpenter and Main features carefully prepared local ingredients in the French tradition. Two intimate dining rooms provide elegant dining, and a lively bistro features casual offerings and a fully appointed bar. 326 Main Street Norwich, VT (802) 649-2922 www.carpenterandmain.com Dinner is served Wed–Sun evenings Bistro 5:30–10pm Dining Rooms 6–9pm Closed Mon and Tue

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For both residential and commercial projects, Cabinetry Concepts’ design professionals can help create more functional space for any home or commercial project and offer the widest variety of stock or custom cabinetry options, countertop materials, and cabinetry hardware. Surface Solutions showcases the newest materials from VogueBay and Artistic Tile to assist architects, designers, and homeowners to create fresh and innovative looks in porcelain, glass, marble, or natural stone for any surface. A fully stocked contractors’ warehouse offers Mapei setting materials, Wedi Shower Systems, and custom tile-cutting services. Just off I-89, Exit 19 227 Mechanic Street Lebanon, NH (603) 442-6740 www.cabinetryconceptsNH.com (603) 442-6750 www.surfacesolutionsNH.com Mon–Fri 8am–5pm Sat 9am–3pm


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

The Butcher Shop at Jesse’s Jesse’s online store features steakhouse-quality meats for grilling at home. Steaks are house aged and hand cut to order. Seafood is always fresh and inspected for quality by our chef. Prime rib is available raw or roasted and rubbed with Jesse’s blend of spices. Place and pay for your order online through our secured website. Tell us when you want it and we’ll have it ready! The perfect meal starts with quality ingredients. 224 Lebanon Street, Route 120 Hanover, NH (603) 643-4111 www.jesses.com

League of NH Craftsmen Retail Gallery and CraftStudies Program Visit our Gallery offering a stunning collection of unique and one-of-a-kind traditional and contemporary fine crafts by top regional artisans and an extensive CraftStudies Program offering classes and workshops for children and adults. 13 Lebanon Street Hanover, NH (603) 643-5050 (Gallery) (603) 643-5384 (CraftStudies) www.craftstudies.org Mon–Sat 10am–5pm

Lou’s Restaurant and Bakery A tradition since 1947, Lou’s Restaurant and Bakery is proud to be a certified green restaurant with a focus on locally sourced food products. We enjoy serving vegan and vegetarian breakfast and lunch specials that are sure to delight. Breakfast is served all day and you can order special-occasion cakes, cupcakes, and pies online anytime. Care packages and catering available. 30 South Main Street Hanover, NH (603) 643-3321 www.lousrestaurant.net Mon–Fri 6am–3pm Sat–Sun 7am–3pm Bakery open Mon–Sat until 5pm Sun until 3pm

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BY

Dian Parker

Transform your World PASSIONATE ABOUT DESIGN

Alice Williams is a dynamo. She whisks you into her world with a warm welcome and a friendly smile. In the Alice Williams Interiors showroom in Hanover, you get a sense of how she could turn your current, unexciting home into a classy contemporary—or maybe an Old World Tudor. If your taste is rustic farmhouse, Alice might reupholster your couch and chairs with washed linen fabric, garnish your space with a bookcase made of reclaimed wood, and cover your walls with distressed paint ďŹ nishes. She can also help you design an Arts and Crafts kitchen or a Victorian bedroom. Alice Williams is there to usher you into your own unique world, surrounding you with furnishings you have chosen with her expert guidance. >>

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PHOTO BY JOHN HESSION

PHOTO BY JOHN HESSION

Left: Alice chose a fresh green color to enliven this formal parlor, then she added Belgian linen draperies and a simple but elegant chandelier. Top: To enhance the fabulous views from this family ski house, Alice selected a soothing, quiet color palette and soft lighting. Above: An English study is warmed by burled walnut furniture, a cozy chenille couch, and deep leather chairs. Antique brass sconces and lamps add the finishing touch.

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A RANGE OF PROJECTS For the past 12 years, Alice has been helping people realize their dream homes. In 2014, she had more than a dozen active clients. Some of her work involves new construction and entails consulting with her clients from beginning to end. She helps review plans from the interior perspective—tiles, countertops, paint colors, crown molding, cabinetry, door handles, window latches, curtains, rugs, artwork, furniture, and furnishings. Alice Williams Interiors also works on small projects, like finding a new rug for your dining room or the perfect couch in your favorite color and fabric. “One job I had,” says Alice, “included renovating and furnishing a rental condominium on a strict budget, so my client could quickly recoup the costs in order to realize income.” Another job was helping a couple renovate and decorate their home in Quail Hollow as they downsized. Although her work is primarily in residences, Alice has worked with clients to design their offices, business lobbies, and public areas in commercial buildings. In addition, she has furnished and decorated model condominiums and homes for a couple of developers. “This year,” Alice says, “I’ll be working with the owners of a four-bedroom, 1920s-era house that sits nearly on the Dartmouth campus. We’ll update bathrooms, floor coverings, paint and wallpaper, and find the perfect furniture. All this will be done with an eye toward staying true to the decade in which the house was built.” CREATIVITY AND EXPERTISE Alice Williams has no shortage of ideas. Her showroom offers hundreds of samples of upholstery, rugs, furniture, and fabrics that you can take home and try out. She can arrange to have couches, chairs, and other furniture custom built with your choice of frames, woods, and fabrics. “My work is supported by a carefully selected and vetted group of professionals who are all experts in their fields—decorative painters, upholsterers, window-treatment installers, seamstresses, refinishers, carpenters, cabinetmakers, granite and tile installers, plumbers, and electricians,” Alice says. >>

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Left: An entry welcomes guests with a butter-yellow patterned wall covering, chairs with embroidered velvet fabric in a rich chocolate brown, and a marble floor laid in a traditional design. Right: Interior designer Alice Williams pauses for a moment at home.

PHOTO BY JOHN HESSION

Below: Alice’s award-winning master bathroom features customdesigned double vanities, intricate tile work, and silkembroidered linen curtains. “The updated bathtub with rounded edges and bun feet is a piece of sculpture in the room,” Alice remarks.

“My work is supported by a carefully selected and vetted group of professionals who are all experts in their fields—decorative painters, upholsterers,

PHOTO BY JOHN HESSION

window-treatment installers, seamstresses, refinishers, carpenters, cabinetmakers, granite and tile installers, plumbers, and electricians,” Alice says.

PHOTO BY JOHN HESSION

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A crisp, clean kitchen with bright chrome fixtures offers plenty of seating. PHOTO BY JOHN HESSION

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A study in black, white, gray, and silver is made interesting with lots of patterns and textures.

An art major at Bates College, Alice grew into the business of interior design by helping out friends who were having a hard time making decisions in their homes. “I’ve always had an eye for proportion, pattern, color, texture, and detail,” Alice says. “It all started when I was a kid, designing the interiors of my doll houses, right down to the miniature pictures hanging on the walls.” Now she lives in Norwich with her husband. They have a daughter and a son, both grown. Most of Alice’s clients are in New Hampshire and Vermont, including the Upper Valley, Lake Sunapee, Woodstock, Quechee, and the North Country. She spent three and a half years working on a home in Lancaster, New Hampshire, earning the 2014 New Hampshire Home Design Award for Excellence in Bath Design from New Hampshire Home magazine. Alice also won an Honorable Mention in their Interior Design category. >> SPRING 2015 • HERE IN HANOVER

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Lighting is important to Alice as well. “Lamps are jewelry to the room,” she says.

MAKING THE DESIGN WORK FOR YOU When asked what her style is, Alice replies, “My personal style is not relevant to your project because my job is to get to know your style and bring out its best.” If you don’t think you have a style, Alice will look around your home to discover your taste and in your closet to find your favorite colors. A new home is a blank canvas for Alice Williams, and so is a livedin home that’s due for a makeover. Whenever possible, she uses products and materials that are environmentally sustainable and made in the USA. “I strive for that,” Alice says. She even designs furniture that is animal and kid friendly. “One client who wanted a lemon or butter yellow sofa has three tomboy daughters and three dogs. I found just the color she wanted in a fabric that was durable and stain resistant.” Alice also looks for budget-friendly furniture and rugs. “I’ve searched hard to find an uphostery company that 66

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competes in price with online retailers but is of a quality far and away above,” Alice says. “It’s easy to locate high-end furnishings. It’s the budget-friendly ones that won’t end up in a landfill after five years that are hard to find. I want my products to last a lifetime.” Lighting is important to Alice as well. “Lamps are jewelry to the room,” she says. She will also find artwork for your walls, working with Boston representatives to find regional artists as well as prints and posters, framed and reasonably priced. She can even find the best plants for your home using a wholesale flower market in Boston. “I love styling and helping people arrange their existing treasures,” Alice says. “I’m just so fortunate to love my work.” And it’s evident that she does. Her energy, enthusiasm, and dynamic creations attest to that. • Alice Williams Interiors 50 Greensboro Road Hanover, NH (603) 277-9361 www.alicewilliamsinteriors.com SPRING 2015 • HERE IN HANOVER

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G R E AT I D E A S BY

Here in Hanover staff

PHOTOS BY

Lynn Bohannon

Henderson’s New Garden Center

Where the beauty of nature meets the artistry of people

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Local people have seen Henderson’s Tree & Garden Services trucks around the Upper Valley for years and have enjoyed their gardening artistry at private homes, at public places such as the Upper Valley

Aquatics Center, and at events like Hanover’s annual Home Show. Now Henderson’s has a retail garden center located on Route 14, just minutes up river from White River Junction with greenhouses and a full retail nursery. Homeowners and gardeners will find the unexpected, as well as their usual favorite garden plants. The nursery offers edible plants, medicinal plants, fruit trees and nut trees, a beautiful post-and-beam outdoor education room, a picnic area, and a garden gift shop staffed by well-educated garden enthusiasts. >> Top left: Henderson’s trucks are a common sight on Upper Valley roads. Top right: A customer browses flowering perennials. Above: Staff member Karen Ganey working the grounds.

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G R E AT I D E A S On June 6, 2015, the public is invited to join Henderson’s in celebrating 30 years of serving the Upper Valley. Save the date! Plans for the big event include food, music, workshops for adults and children, and a special tree planting, all at their Route 14 facility. CARING FOR THE ENVIRONMENT Jim Henderson, who started the company in 1985, has always espoused organic fertilizers, ecological pest control, and the planting of non-invasive indigenous species in local landscaping. His wife, Sylvia Provost, who was raised on a family farm in the Northeast Kingdom, is a talented educator with extensive training and experience in the fields of horticulture, arboriculture, landscape design, and business development and management. The employees at Henderson’s are well trained and just as ecologically aware. The tree and landscaping teams work with the highest standards of safety and efficiency, utilizing best practices. Sylvia says of their employees, “They are the greatest people. We empower them to make the best decisions.” Karen Ganey, Henderson’s certified permaculture designer, encourages the planting of perennials and edible and medicinal plants. She points out that blueberries provide great fall color; their leaves are a wonderful alternative to the burning bush, an invasive species. Steve Restmeyer, another of Henderson’s nursery specialists, recognizes the dangers of pesticides and lawn fertilizers. “That’s why we offer an ecological land care program for turf as well as trees and garden beds.” He adds, “In a pristine natural setting, there are not many pest infestations. Infestations occur when human activity creates an imbalance. When we install several properly placed birdhouses, it can help restore nature’s balance when wildlife is displaced from landscaped ecosystems. A nesting pair of chickadees will require over 1,200 insects per day to raise their young!” Sylvia says, “For us, it is knowing that we must do what is right for the Earth, the clients, their children, and animals.” This is the driving force behind Henderson’s embracing ecological pest management, or EPM, instead of the use of toxic pesticides that cause ecological harm. >> 70

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Steve Restmeyer, another of Henderson’s nursery specialists, recognizes the dangers of pesticides and lawn fertilizers. “That’s why we offer an ecological land care program for turf as well as trees and garden beds.” Being surrounded by plants and interacting with people energize owners Jim and Sylvia on a daily basis.

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Henderson’s hosts a variety of Saturday workshops throughout the growing season.

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COMMUNITY MATTERS Jim and Sylvia take part in many volunteer services. For example, they provide tree-planting demonstrations for the Hartford Tree Board and presentations for local garden clubs. “There is a specific way to plant a tree,” Sylvia explains. “Many trees are planted too deep. It is important to dig down into the soil to find the flare at the base of the trunk. When planted too deep, they get gnarled, resulting in girdled roots and a tree that is suffocated. Some of it is an art.” Jim adds, “Like pruning . . . Training trees is like training children. Train them when they are young, and they become good adults.”

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Joe Town, an ISA Certified Arborist, has been climbing for Henderson’s for over 15 years and is still going strong.

Sylvia and Jim are dedicated to building a community around their core values of saving the environment. “It’s about relationships,” Sylvia says. She and Jim envision nurturing more ecologically concerned local gardeners and homeowners and are hopeful that their work and their business philosophy for treating the land with love and respect will continue on long after they retire. Currently they are providing two horticulture scholarships and training two students SPRING 2015 • HERE IN HANOVER

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G R E AT I D E A S from Hartford Tech. They also hold workshops for children and families, in addition to advanced training courses on such topics as soil health and species diversity for avid gardeners.

Moss-covered planters in the greenhouse.

REMEMBER TO SAVE THE DATE and visit Henderson’s on June 6. Help them celebrate three decades of serving the Upper Valley. For more information, go to www.Hendersonstreeservice.com.

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CREATIVE CONTAINERS Some of Sylvia’s many passions surrounding plants are the use of innovative planters and containers that are designed for the porch or for hanging vertically on walls. “I love doing designs for containers. They give you something close to nurture,” says Sylvia. She is a fan of “earth boxes” designed with a water reservoir on the bottom. Their innovative design allows them to go up to three weeks without watering once the plants are established. Sylvia and Jim also mold hypertufa troughs made to be lightweight.

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As Jim, Sylvia, Steve, and Karen make plans for the spring and for their 30th anniversary, they joke and laugh together like a family with a meaningful history and shared vision for the future. They are all so dedicated to their mission of protecting the environment, building community, and growing their business in a meaningful way that they finish each other’s sentences and provide the punch lines for each other’s jokes. Their enthusiasm for their work is clear. Some of their future plans include an outdoor kitchen, landscape designs using stone and water, and a new customer resource landscape design center. •

ONLINE EXTRA

Find Sylvia’s 10 Favorite Perennials for Low-Maintenance, Ecologically Friendly Gardens at www.hereinhanover.com.


LIVING WELL BY

Katherine P. Cox

Stem Cell

Transfer Hope or Hype? The hottest topic in medicine today? Stem cell treatment, according to Dr. Andre Berger, medical director and founder of Rejuvalife Vitality Institute in Beverly Hills, California. “Stem cell research and treatment is the number-one, most exciting area of medicine today because it holds huge promise for many conditions for which there are [currently] no treatments,” he says. Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, some cancers—“The list goes on and on,” he adds. “Research is pointing us in the direction of this being a successful new method for anti-aging treatments.” Dr. Berger is quick to explain that the stem cells he is referring to are derived from adult stem cells and not the controversial embryonic stem cells. Stem cell treatment and research are still relatively new, he cautions. “We are early on in this. There’s a lot of hope, and there’s a lot of hype. What is real and what is hype? With

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LIVING WELL “There are many stem cell clinics that are making claims about cures that are not legitimate. Beware of these,” warns Dr. Berger.

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a lot of new approaches, some people will be early adopters before the true benefits and research have been worked out.” Nevertheless, Dr. Berger is excited about the possibilities and says they are important to know about and understand. THE PROMISE OF STEM CELLS In Dr. Berger’s field of cosmetic surgery, stem cell transfer is already in use when patients have fat removed via liposuction from one area of their body and injected into another. These cells are called autologous because they are being transferred within the same individual. “It helps improve cosmetic results, generally. Stem cells can enrich the quality of the fat transfer the way fertilizer nourishes a garden. Stem cells generate a very rich blood tissue supply for the newly transplanted fat tissue and increase its chances of long-term survival.” Fat transfer in cosmetic surgery is used to replace lost fat-tissue volume in the face, hands, breasts, and buttocks. With breast augmentation, it provides natural enhancement and may be superior to silicone implants. When stem cells are included in the procedure, they can accelerate healing and recovery. In fact, stem cells derived from fat tissue via liposuction procedures have proven to be a valuable resource for researchers seeking an alternative to embryonic stem cells. The fat in our bodies holds an abundance of stem cells called mesenchymal stem cells, which can differentiate into new fat, muscle, bone, cartilage, ligaments, and nerve cells, Dr. Berger explains.


“Stem cells are cells designed to be a reservoir for tissue regeneration, repair, and healing,” Dr. Berger says, which is why they hold such promise in orthopedics as well as many other conditions. Stem cell therapy could benefit people suffering from osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, aging joints, and ligament and tendon injuries. It could someday replace surgery, Dr. Berger notes, although some applications are still being studied. DO YOUR HOMEWORK That’s the hope—but some clinics are peddling the hype. “There are many stem cell clinics that are making claims about cures that are not legitimate. Beware of these,” warns Dr. Berger. “Some researchers get around FDA regulations and are not following required protocols,” and consumers must be sure to conduct their own research on facilities. Because of stringent FDA regulations surrounding stem cell therapy in this country, “the rest of the world is ahead of us in stem cell transfer treatment,” he says. Many researchers, including Dr. Berger, have opened clinics in other countries and are conducting their work there. His stem cell research and treatment facility in Jamaica is scheduled to open in May or June. He cites other places where research on this promising therapy and treatment is under way, including Mexico, the Caribbean, the Bahamas, South America, and Asia. Once again, Dr. Berger urges caution. “Do your research because they’re not regulated like they are in the US.” “For many patients, stem cell transfer has great potential benefits,” he says. “It holds more promise for a real medical breakthrough. We’re in the early phases currently. In the next 10 years, we’ll be producing unbelievable treatments.” • SPRING 2015 • HERE IN HANOVER

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THE HOOD & THE HOP

hoodmuseum.dartmouth.edu The Hood Museum of Art is free and open to all. Public programs are free unless otherwise noted. Hours: Tuesday to Saturday, 10am to 5pm; Wednesday, 10am to 9pm; Sunday, 12pm to 5pm. For information, visit www.hoodmuseum.dartmouth.edu or call (603) 646-2808.

SPRING EXHIBITIONS

THE HOOD MUSEUM OF ART @ DARTMOUTH COLLEGE

A Space for Dialogue: Fresh Perspectives on the Permanent Collection from Dartmouth’s Students Ongoing José Clemente Orozco: The Epic of American Civilization Ongoing

Poseidon and the Sea: Myth, Cult, and Daily Life Through March 15 Allan Houser: A Centennial Exhibition Through May 10

About Face: Self-Portraiture in Contemporary Art Through August 30

Auto-Graphics: Works by Victor Ekpuk April 18–August 2 Ukara: Ritual Cloth of the Ekpe Secret Society April 18–August 2

SPRING EVENTS MARCH 3 ∂ Lunchtime Gallery Talk: Poseidon the Earth-Shaker, Feasting, and the Sea: An Archaeologist’s Perspective ▷12:30pm Chuck Close, Self-Portrait Screenprint 2012, 2012, silkscreen in 246 colors. Edition of 80. Published by Pace Editions, Inc. Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College: Purchased through the Mrs. Harvey P. Hood W’18 Fund; 2014.12. © Chuck Close, courtesy Pace Gallery. Photograph courtesy Pace Prints.

7 ∂ Introductory Tour: Poseidon and the Sea: Myth, Cult, and Daily Life ▷2pm

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WINTER EXHIBITIONS

SPRING EVENTS

9 ∂ Member Exclusive: Tour and Lunch with a Professor and a Curator

25 ∂ Family Workshop: Experimenting with Line

15 ∂ Lecture: “(Re)constructing the History of Ekpe Ukara Cloth”

▷12:15pm

▷1–2:30pm

▷4:30pm

10 ∂ Lunchtime Gallery Talk: The Motion of the Ocean: Sensuality and the Sea in Roman Art

29 ∂ Adult Workshop: The Hand-Drawn Line: Works by Victor Ekpuk

16 ∂ Introductory Tour: Auto-Graphics: Works by Victor Ekpuk

▷6–8pm

▷2pm

MAY

20 ∂ Film Screening: Watermark (2013, 92 min.)

▷12:30pm

11 ∂ Adult Workshop: Learning to Look: José Clemente Orozco’s Mural

7 ∂ Panel Discussion: “Self-Portraiture and the Construction of Identity”

▷6:30pm

▷4:30pm

14 ∂ Gallery Talk: Reflections on the Poseidon and the Sea Exhibition

12 ∂ Film Screening: Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry (2012, 91 min., directed by Alison Klayman)

▷2pm

APRIL 8 ∂ The Manton Foundation Annual Orozco Lecture: “A Portable State: Murals, Prefabrication, and Politics in Mexico”

▷4:30pm

21 ∂ Lecture: “What Weaponized Shark Teeth Can Tell Us about Coral Reefs in Pre-Colonial Kiribati” ▷5pm

▷4:30pm

12 ∂ Adult Workshop: Learning to Look at European Art

26 ∂ Lunchtime Gallery Talk: “Marks and Mark-Making in Afro-Diasporic Art”

▷6:30–8pm

▷12:30pm

▷4:30pm

11 ∂ Slow Art Day Slow Art Day is a global event with a simple mission: to help more people discover for themselves the joy of looking at and loving art. Please visit the museum to use self-guiding resources and/or to participate in the following events: • Introductory Tour: About Face: Self-Portraiture in Contemporary Art, 2pm • Gallery Session: Learning to Look This participatory session will empower visitors to observe carefully and think critically about any work of art. 3pm

The Hood & The Hop is sponsored by Hanover Eyecare

21–24 ∂ Special Event: Victor Ekpuk: Drawing Performance 23 ∂ Member Exclusive: Tour and Lunch with Artist Victor Ekpuk ▷12:30pm

24 ∂ Lecture: “Excavating Memories” with Victor Ekpuk ▷4:30pm

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THE HOOD & THE HOP

HOPKINS CENTER EVENTS @ DARTMOUTH COLLEGE hop.dartmouth.edu For information, tickets, or pricing information, call the Hopkins Center Box Office at (603) 646-2422 or visit www.hop.dartmouth.edu. The Hopkins Center Box Office is open Monday through Friday from 10am to 6pm.

April 17 Special Family Matinee: The Nile Project ▷Spaulding Auditorium, 2 & 8pm (see additional performance times and locations)

MARCH 1 ∂ Dartmouth Theater Department: Romeo & Juliet ▷The Moore Theater, 2pm

6 ∂ Dartmouth Idol Finals ▷Spaulding Auditorium, 8pm

7 ∂ Youth Wind Ensemble ▷Spaulding Auditorium, 2pm

21–22 ∂ Met Opera in HD: La Donna del Lago ▷21, Loew Auditorium, 1pm; 22, Spaulding Auditorium, 1pm 80

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28 ∂ HopStop Family Series: Jeh Kulu ▷Alumni Hall, 11am

28 ∂ Claremont HopStop Family Show: Jeh Kulu ▷Claremont Savings Bank Community Center, 3pm

31–April 1 ∂ Kyle Abraham/Abraham. In.Motion ▷The Moore Theater, 7pm

APRIL 7–8 ∂ Hotel Modern: The Great War ▷The Moore Theater, 7pm

9–10 ∂ Figaro! (90210) ▷Spaulding Auditorium, 9, 7pm; 10, 8pm

11 ∂ The Very Hungry Caterpillar and Other Eric Carle Favorites ▷The Moore Theater, 3pm

12, 26 ∂ Chamberworks ▷Rollins Chapel, 1pm

17 ∂ Special Family Matinee: The Nile Project ▷Spaulding Auditorium, 2 & 8pm

18 ∂ HopStop Family Series: The Nile Project ▷Alumni Hall, 11am

18 ∂ Claremont HopStop Family Show: The Nile Project ▷Claremont Savings Bank Community Center, 3pm

19 ∂ Australian Chamber Orchestra with Martin Frost, Clarinet ▷Spaulding Auditorium, 7pm

22 ∂ Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain ▷Spaulding Auditorium, 7pm

24 ∂ Double Bill: Terence Blanchard E-Collective and Ravi Coltrane Quartet ▷Spaulding Auditorium, 8pm

30 ∂ Alvin Lucier with the Callithumpian Consort ▷Rollins Chapel, 7pm SPRING 2015 • HERE IN HANOVER

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UMAN

HAPPENINGS: SPRING 2015 MARCH ∂ APRIL ∂ MAY

March 7 Take Apart Day ▷Montshire Museum of Science

Explore the “guts” of VCRs, toasters, cameras, and toys.

Montshire Museum of Science One Montshire Road Norwich, VT (802) 649-2200 www.montshire.org

Through May 20 Exhibit: The Light Around Us: Colors, Reflections, and Invisible Energy

5 ∂ Helping Students Use Evidence to Make Meaning ▷9am

Through April 5 Exhibit: Farmers, Warriors, Builders: The Hidden Life of Ants

March

March 6, April 10 Montshire Unleashed: An Evening for Adults ▷6pm

1 ∂ Microscopic Investigations ▷11am

7 ∂ Take Apart Day ▷1pm

1 ∂ Mirror, Mirror ▷3pm

9 ∂ Magic Carpet Program: Rwanda ▷11am

Farmers, Warriors, Builders: The Hidden Life of Ants, through April 5.

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March 2, April 6, May 4 Books and Beyond: Science for Preschoolers

12 ∂ Afterschool Adventures—Session 4 Begins

▷10:15 & 11:30am

▷3:30pm

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Howe Library 13 South Street Hanover, NH (603) 643-4120 www.howelibrary.org

17 ∂ Tech Talk: Staying Safe on the Internet Learn how to keep your personal information safe while you’re on the Internet. ▷12–1pm

31 ∂ Northern Stage: Songs for a New World Northern Stage presents a program discussing their production of Songs for a New World. ▷7pm

APRIL

April 18 Egg Drop Challenge ▷Montshire Museum of Science

MARCH 6, 13, 20, 27 Drop-In Technical Help ▷3–5pm

16 ∂ Homeschool Series: Astronomy (ages 6–8) ▷10:30am

16 ∂ Homeschool Series: Astronomy (ages 9–12) ▷1pm

17 ∂ Inventors Afterschool Series Begins

25 ∂ A Walk Back in Time: The Secrets of Cellar Holes In this NH Humanities Council Humanities to Go Program, Adair Mulligan will give a talk about cellar holes, followed by a guided walk elsewhere in town. ▷1:30pm

9 ∂ David Govatski: The Nature of Pondicherry Co-sponsored with the Mascoma Chapter of the New Hampshire Audubon Society, Dave Govatski will talk about the Pondicherry National Wildlife Refuge in Jefferson, New Hampshire. ▷7pm

▷3:30pm

27 ∂ Friday Nights for Teen Tinkerers ▷6:30pm

Happenings is sponsored by St. Johnsbury Academy

APRIL 18 ∂ Egg Drop Challenge ▷12pm

22 ∂ Young Scientist Program (Session 5—morning program begins) ▷9:30am

22 ∂ Young Scientist Program (Session 5—afternoon program begins) ▷1pm S P R I N G 2 0 1 5 • H E R E I N H A N OV E R

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HAPPENINGS Norwich Bookstore Norwich Square 291 Main Street Norwich, VT (802) 649-1114 www.norwichbookstore.com

MARCH 14 ∂ Second Saturday: Celebrate Pi Day, 3.1415 ▷1–3pm

25 ∂ Poetry Reading Two local poets share the podium: Ewa Chrusciel will read from her latest book of poems, Contraband of Hoopoe, and Danny Dover will read a selection from Tasting Precious Metal. Reservations recommended. ▷7pm

APRIL 2 ∂ Poetry Reading Vermont Poet Laureate Sydney Lea will read at the bookstore, followed by a question and answer session. Reservations recommended. ▷7pm

“like” us on

9 ∂ Author Reading

facebook

Jeff rey Lent presents a reading of his latest novel, A Slant of Light. Reservations recommended. ▷7pm

Facebook Contests, Sweepstakes & Giveaways! Like us on Facebook for your chance to win great prizes!

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11 ∂ Second Saturday: Save the Date Find us on Facebook at mountainviewpublishing.com/facebook

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▷1–3pm


15 ∂ Author Reading David Grant reads from his new book, The Social Profit Handbook: The Essential Guide to Setting Goals, Assessing Outcomes, and Achieving Success for Mission-Driven Organizations. ▷7pm

22 ∂ Poetry Reading Two local poets share the podium: Deming Holleran will read from her latest collection, Gypsy Song, and Laura Foley reads a selection of her works from Joy Street. ▷7pm

MAY 8 ∂ Second Saturday: Save the Date ▷1–3pm

13 ∂ Poetry Reading Two poets share the podium: New Hampshire Poet Laureate Alice Fogel presents a reading from her latest book, Interval, and poet Diana Whitney reads selections from Wanting It. ▷7pm

Alice Fogel

Diana Whitney

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HAPPENINGS

Other Noteworthy Events Through Spring 2015 Exhibit: Cycles of Change: Farming in Norwich Norwich Historical Society, norwichvthistoricalsociety.org

MARCH 3 ∂ Hanover Garden Club Presents Kerry Ann Mendez: The Right-Size Flower Garden Howe Library Mayer Room, www.hanovergardenclub.org, ▷1pm

4 ∂ What If Poor Women Ran the World? Labor historian Annelise Orleck tells the story of nine African-American union maids in Las Vegas during the 1970s who challenged welfare cuts and built a longlasting, vibrant anti-poverty program run by poor mothers. Norwich Congregational Church, norwichvthistoricalsociety.org

APRIL 1 ∂ Vermont War Memorials, Statuary, and Cemeteries: From the Revolution to 9/11 In this illustrated talk, Vermont authors Bill Mares and Bill Lipke share Vermont’s commemorative history, from Ethan Allen to the War on Terror Memorial at Camp Johnson in Colchester. Norwich Congregational Church, norwichvthistoricalsociety.org

7 ∂ Hanover Garden Club Presents Kirsten Ward: A Look at the World of Mosses Howe Library Mayer Room, www.hanovergardenclub.org, ▷1pm

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ADVERTISERS INDEX Action Garage Door 81 Amy Tuller, Dietitian 80 Anichini 8 Annemarie Schmidt European Face & Body Studio 65 Artemis Global Art 3 Beans Art Store 84 Belletetes 11 Bentleys 73 Brown’s Floormasters 74 Cabinetry Concepts & Surface Solutions 13 & 58 Candela Tapas Lounge 81 Carpenter and Main 58 Carpet King & Tile 54 Charter Trust Company 17 Cioffredi Associates 35 Clear Choice MD Urgent Care 25 Cota & Cota Oil 85 Courtyard by Marriott 77 Coventry Catering 44 Crossroads Academy 66 Crown Point Cabinetry 7 DRM 67 Dartmouth Coach 72 Designer Gold 21 Donald J. Neely, DMD 31 Dorr Mill Store 84 Dowds’ Inn 19 Dr. Roger Phillips 16 Element by Westin 47 Four Seasons/Sotheby’s Realty 9 G.R. Porter & Sons 53 Gilberte Interiors 38

Hanover Country Club 67 Hanover Eyecare 79 Hanover Haircutters 58 Hanover True Value 56 Henderson’s Tree & Garden Service 29 Hill Opticians 36 JMH Wealth Management 77 Jancewicz & Son 39 Jeff Wilmot Painting 53 Kendal at Hanover 81 Killdeer Farm 56 King Arthur Flour 56 LaValley Building Supply 64 Landshapes 46 League of NH Craftsmen 59 Lemon Tree Gifts of Hanover 57 Long River Studios and Gallery 56 Lou’s Restaurant and Bakery 59 MB Pro Landscape 80 Martha Diebold Real Estate Inside front cover Mascoma Savings Bank 10 Montshire Museum of Science 44 Mountain Meadow Golf Back cover My Brigadeiro 77 NT Ferro Estate & Custom Jewelers 15 Nature Calls Inside back cover Neal Wallace Dental 2 Noodle Station 52 Northcape Design Build 45 Northern Motorsport LTD 76 Norwich Regional Animal Hospital 25 Norwich Wines & Spirits 80 Perry’s Oil Service 46

Procopio Designs 31 Quechee Lakes Listing 55 Rare Essentials 35 River Road Vet Clinic 23 Riverlight Builders 23 Roberts Flowers of Hanover 52 Rodd Roofing Co. 4 Sean’s Lawn N’ Garden Services 38 Simple Energy 6 St. Johnsbury Academy 83 Stebbins Bradley 37 Systems Plus Computers 47 The Butcher Shop at Jesse’s 59 The Chocolate Shop 57 The Gilded Edge 58 The Hanover Inn 37 The J List 57 The PowerHouse Mall 65 The Quechee Club 85 The Quechee Inn at Marshland Farm 54 The Ultimate Bath Showroom 5 The Woodlands 45 Timberpeg 86 Très Jolie 36 Upper Valley Oral Surgery 73 Upper Valley Ride 66 Vermont Facial Aesthetics 85 Vitt & Associates 73 Wells Fargo Advisors 1 We’re Makin’ Waves 16 White River Yarns 57 Woodstock Inn & Resort 86

For more information about print and online advertising opportunities, contact Bob Frisch at (603) 643-1830 or email rcfrisch1@comcast.net.

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Inviting Inte by Alice Wil riors liams Fire Departm New Rescue ent’s Boat

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HANOVER TALKS BY

Mark Dantos

A moment with

Frank Bass Superintendent of Hanover and Norwich Public Schools (SAU 70)

PHOTO BY JIM MAUCHLY/MOUNTAINGRAPHICS.COM

Unsure he even wanted to teach, Frank Bass got the first taste of his future profession as a long-term substitute in 1976. After a few weeks with A Tale of Two Cities, he was hooked. Today, Frank still enjoys opportunities to conduct a class alongside his English and Social Studies Department faculty at Hanover High School. What’s the longest school board meeting you’ve ever attended? Once in Windham, New Hampshire, during my previous superintendent position, the school board meeting went well past midnight; ironically, it was actually a very productive session. In contrast, most board meetings in SAU 70 rarely go past 9pm. I credit board leadership for quality planning and organization. What initiatives within the schools excite you this year? Two that merit special attention are the newly revamped Teacher Evaluation Policy and Procedure, and the Strategic Planning Process. Both of these 88

initiatives have had and will continue to have significant impacts on the growth and direction of our schools. Teacher Evaluation and more specifically “walk-throughs” help to create a tenor and tone building to building that has become a collaboratively based conversation centered around the craft of teaching. Strategic Planning has helped Hanover High School and the SAU in general to rethink, retrace, and rediscover: (1) who are we, what we do, and why; (2) where we are going and to what end; and (3) how we will get there—what are the measures and indicators that lead us to believe we are moving in the right direction?

the communities of Hanover and Norwich along with the tuition towns have provided a solid bedrock of high expectations and accountability along with an extraordinary student body, making my job all the easier! As I have said to colleagues far and wide, SAU 70 is in many ways a Brigadoon; surely such a school system does not exist in New Hampshire or elsewhere. Not that I put great stock in rating scales, but recently Hanover High School was named the number 1 school in the state, while the Dresden School District serving Richmond Middle School and Hanover High School was listed as the number 11 school district in the country.

How have this school system and community helped shape your first few years on the job? I am very fortunate to have such a supportive school board along with a tour de force administrative team and the best faculty and staff I have had the pleasure to work with in all my years of public education. Moreover,

Who encouraged you to pursue a career in education? At 24 years old, I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do. My parents were both mathematics professors and suggested I substitute teach to see if that was something I might like—and nearly 40 years later, it is still something I very much enjoy. •

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Here in Hanover - Spring 2015  

Read about the Hanover Fire Department's new watercraft, the Hanover Garden Club, Alice Williams and more in the Spring 2015 edition of Here...

Here in Hanover - Spring 2015  

Read about the Hanover Fire Department's new watercraft, the Hanover Garden Club, Alice Williams and more in the Spring 2015 edition of Here...