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HANOVER here in

FALL 2014

VOLUME 19, NO. 3

$4.95

and neighboring communities

Host a Fall Party mix it up with seasonal spirits

Meet Hanover’s New Police Chief Norwich Bookstore Celebrates 20 Years On the Appalachian Trail with Local Volunteers


CONTENTS

28

page

Features 28

The 10th Annual Norwich Antiques Show With a local take on Antiques Roadshow. by Nancy Fontaine

40 Appalachian Trail Volunteers Creating the experience. by Anne Richter Arnold

Hampshire Cooperative 54 Nursery School Celebrating 50 years of learning. by Mark Aiken 12

F I N D H E R E I N H A N OV E R AT W W W. M O U N TA I N V I E W P U B L I S H I N G. C O M

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61

66

72

Departments 17 Editor’s Note 18 Contributors 20 Online Exclusives 22 Around & About by Cassie Horner

35 Good Neighbors

87 Living Well

The cellulite breakthrough. by Katherine P. Cox

91 Money Matters

College tuition anxiety? by Brian Doyle

Hail to the Chief. by Tom Brandes

94 The Hood & The Hop

61 Good Ideas

98 Happenings

66 Community

103 Advertisers Index 104 Hanover Talks

Lifelong learning in Hanover. by Mark Dantos The Norwich Bookstore celebrates 20 years. by KarenWahrenberger

72 Travel Time

Arts and entertainment at Dartmouth. A calendar of events.

David Goudy, Executive Director of the Montshire Museum of Science. by Mark Dantos

The tarpon temptation. by Lisa Densmore Ballard

81 Smart Entertaining

Mix it up with fabulous cocktails. by Susan Nye

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F I N D H E R E I N H A N OV E R AT W W W. M O U N TA I N V I E W P U B L I S H I N G. C O M

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HANOVER here in

and neighboring communities

Mountain View Publishing, LLC 135 Lyme Road, Hanover, NH 03755 (603) 643-1830

www.mountainviewpublishing.com

Publishers

Bob Frisch Cheryl Frisch Executive Editor

Deborah Thompson Associate Editor

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Locable

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Bob Frisch

KEEP US POSTED. Here in Hanover wants to hear from readers. Correspondence may be addressed to: Letters to the Editor, Here in Hanover, 135 Lyme Road, Hanover, NH 03755. Or email us at: dthompson@ mountainviewpublishing.com. Advertising inquires may be made by email to rcfrisch1@ comcast.net. Here in Hanover is published quarterly by Mountain View Publishing, LLC Š2014. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part is strictly prohibited. Here in Hanover accepts no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts, artwork, or photographs.

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F I N D H E R E I N H A N O V E R AT W W W. M O U N TA I N V I E W P U B L I S H I N G .CO M


E D I TO R ’ S N OT E

Fall Frenzy

IAN RAYMOND

Another autumn has arrived, and with it comes getting ready to send the kids back to school, lawn cleanup and fertilizing before the first frost, and replenishing the woodpile. My favorite thing about fall is the return of football. I’m a Patriots fanatic! Let’s hope Gronk and Wilfork are back in form and stay 100 percent healthy throughout the season, and keep your fingers crossed that Brady and Edelman are up to their usual perfection on the field. I’m eager to see what cornerback Darrelle Revis, landlord of Revis Island and former Jets defender we loved to hate, brings to the mix. It’ll be a bit bizarre to be rooting for him instead of against him! Go Pats! Let’s get another Super Bowl win before Tom Terrific retires! For fall, we’ve assembled a fantastic array of articles for you, but I admit it wasn’t easy. It seems that every single person I contacted about stories for this issue—writers, photographers, business owners, and organizations—were all on vacation. Some of the replies to phone calls and emails I received were “We’re at the Cape this week,” “We’re at Martha’s Vineyard for the next two weeks,” “We’re in Maine until the 25th,” and so on. I think it’s great! Everyone I talk to works so hard, I’m delighted that they get to enjoy some downtime with their families. But at one point, I was feeling like while the staff and I were glued to our computers, everyone else in the world was on vacation! (I did manage to sneak away for a few days to visit my new grandson in Virginia, which was a wonderful experience!) If my dedicated, hard-working staff does anything well, it’s overcoming obstacles. Despite the lateness of interviews, information, and photography, we managed to put this issue together with style and grace, and we actually beat our looming deadline. In publishing, there’s nothing worse than the dreaded “D” word! We hope you enjoy this issue, and have a fabulous fall! •

Deborah Thompson Executive Editor dthompson@mountainviewpublishing.com

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C O N T R I B U TO R S

Mark is a freelance writer from Richmond, Vermont. He and his wife are skiers and marathoners who recently got involved in a new (to them) endurance sport— parenting.

Mark Aiken

Anne Richter Arnold

Lars grew up in Denmark and has worked as a photojournalist since the early 1990s, covering everything from concerts to conflicts on assignment for the Associated Press, Save the Children, and others. Now based in Norwich, Vermont, with his wife and two kids, he combines photography and writing assignments with graduate work at Dartmouth College.

Lars Blackmore

Jim Mauchly

18

After graduating from Columbia University, Anne spent most of her career in the business world and only recently followed her lifelong passion for writing. An avid hiker and paddler, she enjoys living in Vermont as well as traveling to explore the outdoors in other parts of the country and world. When she's not writing, she can be found teaching fitness classes, leading hikes, working in her garden, raising chickens, or preparing a meal for her family.

Mark is a Hanover native and a former Washington, DC, journalist with McGraw-Hill. A graduate of Colby College in Maine, Mark is now a development professional with the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and Dartmouth-Hitchcock. He enjoys mountain biking, soccer, reading, and writing. Mark splits his time between the Upper Valley and Boston, where he lives with his wife Lavinia.

Mark Dantos

Jim has been a full-time photographer since 1990 and is a member of the Professional Photographers of America. In 2001, he opened Mountain Graphics Photography, a professional studio, photo gallery, and custom frame shop in Fairlee, Vermont. His areas of expertise include commercial photography, portraits, and events. He has taught photography and Photoshop classes at River Bend and at New Hampshire Community Technical College, as well as in his own studio.

F I N D H E R E I N H A N O V E R AT W W W. M O U N TA I N V I E W P U B L I S H I N G .CO M

Karen Wahrenberger

Karen lives in Hanover and teaches English at Hanover High School. She has four children—her oldest is an OB resident, and her youngest is in middle school. Karen has published her first novel on Kindle, The Stroller Club, which is about a group of Upper Valley women who meet at a birthing class. A vegetarian for 30 years, Karen enjoys cooking and keeping a vegetable garden. When not reading students’ papers, Karen finds time for regular Bikram yoga practice.


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F I N D H E R E I N H A N O V E R AT W W W. M O U N TA I N V I E W P U B L I S H I N G .CO M


A RO U N D & A B O U T

BY

Cassie Horner

E V E N T S I N T HE HANOVER AREA

COMMUNITY EVENT

Hanover Fallfest

APPRECIATION DAY

M

ark your calendar

tendees. Given the tremendous

for the second

turnout, it guarantees Fallfest

annual Hanover

will become a Hanover fall

Fallfest Appreciation Day on Friday, October 3, at Storrs

Fallfest is a free outdoor

Pond. The afternoon brings

community event offered to

together fun family activities,

the townspeople of Hanover.

live entertainment, and won-

It’s a chance to celebrate fall in

derful food.

New Hampshire. The Hanover

“Fallfest was developed as a

Parks and Rec department

way to celebrate the changing

worked with town staff and

of the seasons and to provide

local community groups such

an opportunity for town de-

as the Hanover Improvement

partments to give back to the

Society and Hanover Rotary to

community,” says Liz Burdette,

make the first Hanover Fallfest

assistant director of Hanover

Appreciation Day an amazing

Parks and Rec. “It was great to

success. A sampling of activi-

see kids and adults interact-

ties ranges from the kid-popu-

ing with the police, fire, public

lar Touch a Truck from the de-

works, recreation, libraries,

partment of public works, the

and town hall staff through

fire department, and the police

various activities that each

department to games and an

department planned. We were

inflatable obstacle course.

hoping for a few hundred

22

tradition.”

This year’s event is sched-

people to attend the first year

uled for 4pm to 6:30pm, but

and were pleasantly surprised

for more information and to

to have an estimated 500 at-

confirm, call (603) 643-5315. •

F I N D H E R E I N H A N O V E R AT W W W. M O U N TA I N V I E W P U B L I S H I N G .CO M


Clockwise from top, far left: Last year participants enjoyed making ice cream with local Girl Scouts, exploring heavy machinery with the Department of Public Works, trying on fire safety equipment with the Fire Department, relay games led by the 8th Grade Student Council, live music by the Upper Valley Community Band, making cider with Town Hall staff, and painting pumpkins with the Recreation Board, just to name a few of the activities the festival has to offer.

This year’s event is scheduled for 4pm to 6:30pm, Friday, October 3, but for more information and to confirm, call (603) 643-5315.

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A RO U N D & A B O U T HEALING ARTS

Recovering Your Life THROUGH CRAFT

Kerstin Nichols, co-founder RTC.

Jere Nelson, co-founder RTC.

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F I N D H E R E I N H A N O V E R AT W W W. M O U N TA I N V I E W P U B L I S H I N G .CO M

A

special program dedicated to helping people who are suffering from life’s speed bumps and those caring for them is growing in popularity at the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen on Lebanon Street in Hanover. Recovering Your Life Through Craft (RTC) invites people dealing with the impact of serious illness to take classes or workshops at one of the studios. The program evolved out of conversations in about 2005 between current programming coordinator and metals artist Kerstin Nichols and potter Jere Nelson (since deceased) about how making art could help people in need of support. Both women were patients at Norris Cotton Cancer Center and were seeking connections to help find balance in their lives. “People can find peace and contemplation,” Nichols says. “You don’t push a button to make something, so in the process of the making, you have time to think. We all share difficulties in life. What the League provides is the empowerment when we really need it of transforming mud and metal.” Nichols emphasizes that Recovering Your Life Through Craft is open to anyone interested in making art, not just people who are trained. A class may find a mechanic seated next to a neurosurgeon, with everyone sharing the language of being present to create something. Participants have the opportunity to work in pottery or metal with trained artists. “It is therapeutic but not therapy,” Nichols says. “The instructors are all trained craftspeople. That’s our experience as teachers.” The schedule for Recovering Your Life Through Craft classes and workshops can be found at www.craftstudies.org. In addition to the regular offerings, there are preview classes available so people can check out the format before signing up. •


Clockwise from left: Two students enjoy their work. Running Bird by metals instructor Kerstin Nichols. Young student in the metals program. Metals instructor Maria Gross's art. Jill Koppers, clay instructor. RTC student with turtle. Student Anne Webster Grant.

The schedule for Recovering Your Life Through Craft classes and workshops can be found at www.craftstudies.org. FA L L 2 0 1 4 • H E R E I N H A N O V E R

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A RO U N D & A B O U T

OUTDOOR ADVENTURE

Hawk Watch IN HANOVER

F

all is the season when hawks migrate, making for an impressive display overhead. A great place to go is the Annual

Hawk Watch at Balch Hill Summit in Hanover on Saturday, September 20, from 11am to 1pm. You can observe hawks on their southern migration from this beautiful spot that has wonderful views. Bring your binoculars. Families are welcome. (The rain date is Sunday, September 21.) The Balch Hill Natural Area comprises 85 acres that include the 947-foot-high summit. Owned by the Hanover Conservancy, the Town of Hanover, and Dartmouth College, this preserved land, with its high meadow and orchard, harkens back to the past, when the agricultural use of land was common in Hanover. It is named for Adna Perkins Balch (1817–1889), who owned six large farms in the area. The Annual Hawk Watch is sponsored by the Hanover Conservancy, a private nonprofit dedicated to the conservation of land and water in the community. To reach the site from the Dartmouth College Green, proceed 1.6 miles on East Wheelock Street to parking at the junction of Grasse and Trescott Roads. The trail to the summit starts opposite the parking area. The Hanover Conservancy is also holding a program, “The Great Hurricane of 1938,” on Tuesday, September 23, at 7pm at Howe Library in Hanover. The 1938 hurricane, the strongest storm to hit our region in the past century, completely changed the face of New England. Historian Jay Barrett will share scenes and insights into how this event affected the Upper Valley. For more information about the Hanover Conservancy, visit www.hanoverconservancy.org. •

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F I N D H E R E I N H A N O V E R AT W W W. M O U N TA I N V I E W P U B L I S H I N G .CO M

Annual Hawk Watch at Balch Hill Summit in Hanover on Saturday, September 20, from 11am to 1pm.


The Annual Hawk Watch on Balch Hill in Hanover is sponsored by the Hanover Conservancy, a private nonprofit dedicated to the conservation of land and water in the community.

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Antiques of every description can be found under the tent.

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F I N D H E R E I N H A N O V E R AT W W W. M O U N TA I N V I E W P U B L I S H I N G .CO M


BY

THE

Nancy Fontaine

10th

PHOTOS BY

Jane Ackerman AND Steve Lajoie

Annual

Norwich Antiques Show With a local take on Antiques Roadshow

The weather at the start of September is often glorious. If you’re looking for a family-friendly

event that’s a little different from the usual late-summer activities, look no farther than downtown Norwich, Vermont, on September 6. There, under a big, white tent on the grounds of the Norwich Historical Society, you will find the 10th Annual Norwich Antiques Show. >>

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Two dozen dealers from around New England and New York will be offering period furniture, fine art, vintage textiles, and rare books from 10am to 4pm. No matter what you seek—from a stuffed bear to a stately grandfather clock, a familiar pattern of fine china, or even a hutch for a country kitchen—it’s likely to be found here. 10 YEARS OLD, STILL GOING STRONG People young and old visit the show; often several generations of one family come together. Attendees can purchase tasty goodies from Bakewell Catering, listen to the acoustic music of Dan Freihofer, and—perhaps most fun of all— participate in a local version of Antiques Roadshow. Bill Smith of William A. Smith, Inc. Auctioneers and Appraisers, Plainfield, New Hampshire, will offer informal appraisals from 2 to 4pm. (Since the first show in 2004, Smith has donated the large tent for this rainor-shine event.) Local residents are also invited to donate antiques to the Norwich Historical Society for their own booth. The show is the brainchild of Gail Torkelson and Liz Julian-Tuggle, owners of Spencer-Julian Antiques of Norwich. “There used to be an antiques show in Thetford, and when it ended, there was a void,” Gail says. “It occurred to me that we could have an antiques show in Norwich. And what better way to benefit the historical society?” That was a decade ago, and the show is still going strong. Gail and Liz plan a special treat to mark the anniversary. The proceeds will benefit the Norwich Historical Society and are earmarked specifically for the upkeep of Lewis House, the historic building on Main Street that houses the historical society. “It means a lot to us because we 30

put the proceeds from the show right back into the house,” says Nancy Hoggson, historical society board of trustees president. “We raise the amount we need for our annual budget every year.” Current work includes continuing the restoration of the historic windows, painting one side of the house every year, and keeping grounds and trees tended. Aside from maintaining Lewis House, the Norwich Historical Society holds an extensive collection of artifacts, photos, and archives relating to the town’s history; it mounts annual exhibits at Lewis House; and it runs educational programs with the Marion Cross School. It also hosts the annual House and Garden Tour every June and the popular Vermont Council on the Humanities lecture series, First Wednesdays, with the Norwich Public Library. “We’re very appreciative of Gail and Liz for doing all the work of putting on the show,” adds Nancy with a smile. “It is a lot of work,” admits Gail, “but it’s also very rewarding. After nine years, it’s starting to run itself,” she adds. HORSES AND HISTORY Gail and Liz met not because of antiques but because of horses. Liz owns Waterman Hill Farm in Norwich and teaches dressage. Gail’s daughters took lessons from Liz, and the two women discovered their mutual love of antiques. “My grandparents settled here in the Upper Valley. My grandfather scoured the countryside for antiques, and that’s how I got into it,” explains Liz. Starting an antiques show to benefit the Norwich Historical Society, she says, “just fit. For me, it’s about the history.” Although they have a booth at the Antiques Collaborative in Quechee, the two do not have a storefront, instead preferring to attend shows

F I N D H E R E I N H A N O V E R AT W W W. M O U N TA I N V I E W P U B L I S H I N G .CO M


Shoppers delight in the wide variety of quality antiques to be found each year from some of New England’s finest dealers, such as the pantry boxes and hardware-store string holder pictured at left. Center: Gail Torkelson and Liz Julian-Tuggle, the show’s organizers, tend to their own booth at the show.

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Treasures ranging from paintings, pitchers, chairs, and fine china are all on display at the show. Bottom left: Bill Smith, William A. Smith Auctioneers and Appraisers of Plainfield, New Hampshire, has generously lent his marquee tent for the event each year. Bill is also the “starring attraction” at the Antiques Roadshow in the Society’s barn, providing informal appraisals from 2 to 4pm.

themselves. They have built up a core group of antiques dealers who come to the event. “Most of the dealers have been exhibiting since the show’s inception,” says Gail. “We treat the dealers well, serving them coffee in the morning and a delicious lunch, and it makes it more fun for them. They’re happy to come back each year.” Happy dealers no doubt contribute to the festive feel of the event. The low entrance fee ($5 for adults; age 12 and under free) keeps it accessible and draws attendees from as far away as Burlington, Vermont. Liz says, “The show is so enjoyable because it’s lively. It’s a good thing for families, antiques aficionados, everyone.” Nancy 32

F I N D H E R E I N H A N O V E R AT W W W. M O U N TA I N V I E W P U B L I S H I N G .CO M


adds, “For the Norwich Historical Society, it’s another way of bringing another crowd of people in here, and the more people we can interest in us, the better. It’s a win–win.” Founded in 1951, the Norwich Historical Society partners with the Norwich Historic Preservation Commission on annual projects to promote historic preservation. The last two of Norwich’s one-room schoolhouses were successfully listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2012, and a Historic Walking Tour brochure was published in 2011. The Norwich Historical Society welcomes visitors Wednesdays and Thursdays, from 10am to 4pm year-round, and on Saturdays, 10am to noon, from June through October. •

Norwich Historical Society 277 Main Street Norwich, VT (802) 649-0124 www.norwichhistory.org FA L L 2 0 1 4 • H E R E I N H A N O V E R

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GOOD NEIGHBORS PHOTOS BY

BY Tom Brandes Mountain Graphics

Hail to the Chief Hanover welcomes its first new chief of police in 19 years

On June 6, Charlie Dennis was sworn in as Hanover’s new police chief. The Texas native has 27 years of experience in law enforcement, including six as a police chief, most recently in North Carolina. He didn’t always want to become a police officer—the idea didn’t dawn on him until he was seven or eight years old, but he showed an aptitude for police work early on. >>

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GOOD NEIGHBORS

Chief Dennis stops to talk with Sam Tefft in downtown Hanover.

Chief Dennis strongly believes in the value of community policing, a strategy that focuses on problem solving and building relationships and community trust while addressing quality-of-life issues. Living in the Dallas suburb of Garland, young Charlie and a friend were playing in the backyard when they saw two young men who appeared to be breaking into a neighbor’s house. “We told my parents and they quickly called the police,” he recalls. “Peering through the slats in the fence, we watched the police come and arrest the suspects as they came out of the house. They marched them down the alley to their police car, and it made a big impression on me. Both of us eventually became police officers in Garland.” 36

F I N D H E R E I N H A N O V E R AT W W W. M O U N TA I N V I E W P U B L I S H I N G .CO M

A PENCHANT FOR HELPING PEOPLE Charlie has always enjoyed helping people, and he’s excited to lead Hanover’s 20 sworn officers. While crime in the city is low, it does exist. The police department responds to many alcohol-related calls and minor thefts. He believes balancing the challenges facing Dartmouth College and the city of Hanover, from underage drinking to keeping students and other citizens safe, will be among his biggest challenges.


He strongly believes in the value of community policing, a strategy that focuses on problem solving and building relationships and community trust while addressing qualityof-life issues. Charlie also believes his job includes providing excellent customer service. “Before making any changes to the department, I’m taking time to talk to each officer and staff member to better understand the challenges they face,” he says. “I also want to talk to community members and FA L L 2 0 1 4 • H E R E I N H A N O V E R

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GOOD NEIGHBORS

learn how they perceive the police. I want to ensure that we’re efficient, effective, and following best practices in all areas, and I’m looking forward to developing a strategic plan for the department.” Among the many things he likes about police work, Charlie enjoys the variety and excitement of never knowing what the day will bring. His first job, delivering the Dallas Times Herald, taught him perseverance—especially delivering the huge Sunday morning edition with a little help from his dad. His worst job? Working as a drill press operator in a plant that manufactured drill bits for oil wells. That job made him realize he didn’t want to toil in manufacturing where the work was the same every day. 38

F I N D H E R E I N H A N O V E R AT W W W. M O U N TA I N V I E W P U B L I S H I N G .CO M

MAKING A DIFFERENCE MAKES HIS DAY Since beginning his law enforcement career in 1984, Charlie Dennis has seen a lot of technological changes, such as moving from handwritten reports, filing cabinets, and radio-only communication to using tablets, cloud storage, and smartphones. But while technology has done a lot to help police officers communicate and solve crimes, it also makes some crimes, like identity theft, easier to commit. “As technology changes, I think we need to be careful not to lose the faceto-face contact with other officers and members of the community,” says Chief Dennis. “I want to be visible as the chief, and I also do a lot of listening. I think it’s important for staff


“The best thing about being chief is making a difference in the lives of department staff and members of the community. Residents are happy to see the chief out and about; it puts a face on the department.”

members and citizens to see the chief being a part of committees and civic organizations, and being involved in the community.” In his first few weeks in the city, Charlie has found Hanover to be a beautiful place and a welcoming community. He and his wife Barbara have four children and three grandchildren in Idaho and Utah. Growing up, Barbara spent a lot of time in Maine and is a huge Red Sox fan. During the next year, the couple and their 16-year-old son will get to know the area and decide where they’d like to live. They hope to buy a house in the area next summer. Outside of work, Charlie enjoys traveling, golf, running, and winter sports. Although he’s just getting started, he plans to finish his career as the chief of police in Hanover and would like to get his master’s degree in criminal justice or a similar field. But for now, he’s focused on getting to know his staff and the larger community, and helping others—just like he did that day long ago in Garland. “The best thing about being chief is making a difference in the lives of department staff and members of the community. Residents are happy to see the chief out and about; it puts a face on the department,” says Charlie. “Communicating directly with citizens, listening, solving problems— they make me feel successful knowing I made a difference.” • FA L L 2 0 1 4 • H E R E I N H A N O V E R

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Anne Richter Arnold Dartmouth Outing Club TAKEN BY Nichole Hastings ADDITIONAL PHOTOS BY Lars Blackmore STORY BY

PHOTOS COURTESY OF

KM OR E LA RS BL AC

Appalachian Trail CREATING THE EXPERIENCE

VOLUNTEERS Meandering along the East Coast of the United States for 2,184 miles from Georgia to Maine, the Appalachian National Scenic Trail (AT) is more than just a footpath for those seeking to get away from it all or connect with nature. The trail belongs to every American, and the extent of that ownership goes beyond nominal for many Upper Valley volunteers. Not just stewards of this strip of land that runs through Norwich and Hanover, they are a caring community dedicated to creating the AT experience for others, whether they are through hikers trekking the whole length, section hikers tackling a segment of the trail, or day hikers out for recreation. The AT was conceptualized by Benton MacKaye in October 1921 and became a reality in 1937, when about 2,000 miles of trail from Mount Oglethorpe, Georgia, to Baxter Peak on Mount Katahdin in Maine were opened. Today it’s maintained by more than 6,000 volunteers throughout the country and countless more “trail angels,” who assist hikers in ways as simple as offering a ride to providing overnight lodging. For the thousands of people who hike the AT, the efforts of these volunteers are invaluable. >>

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Top left: Sign in Hanover. Above: Volunteers Nichole, Irena, and Harry blaze trees, and Dominica (taking the photo) monitors and leads the way with the maps. Photo by Dominica Plummer. Right: Sign marking the trail. Far right: When the AT boundary line goes through swampy marsh, volunteers walk through swampy marsh.


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MANY WAYS TO GET INVOLVED Nichole Hastings, AT Monitor Coordinator at the Dartmouth Outing Club (DOC), the group responsible for about 50 miles of the AT in our area of New Hampshire, is an example of a hiker turned volunteer. After hiking parts of the trail in 2010, she returned to the Upper Valley, where she grew up, wanting to get involved—especially important after learning on the trail that Hanover was considered “the unfriendliest town on the entire AT.” She went on a bushwhacking hike with Matt Stevens, Conservation Resources Manager with the Appalachian Trail Conservancy, and wanted to do more. Her timing was perfect; the DOC Corridor Monitoring had lost its coordinator, and she took over the volunteer position that summer. Corridor monitoring entails maintaining over 100 miles of exterior boundary lines between federal land and private property along the AT. In the spring and fall, the DOC organizes crews of four to six volunteers for daylong treks to work on anything from painting blazes and putting up signs to bushwhacking and using heavy equipment. Volunteers also monitor for encroachment and take field notes. Nichole believes, “It’s important to maintain these trails for future generations and to try to get younger people involved in stewardship. This land belongs to all of us, and we need to keep these trails and nature available to everyone to enjoy.” She is quick to mention that volunteers don’t have to labor out in the woods. “There are so many ways to get involved: Do administrative paperwork, help with educational hikes, or share your knowledge of things like invasive plant species, tracking animals, or plants that live along the AT.” For Sam Brakeley, Volunteer Trail Adopter Coordinator, the AT holds a special place in his heart, a high honor considering he builds trails professionally. After he hiked the whole AT in 2008, he wanted to give back to the trail he holds so dear, so he became involved in preserving it for others to enjoy. Now in his third year as coordinator, he works with individuals and groups to maintain the trail that hikers experience. >> LARS BLACKMORE

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Betsy (left) and Bill Maislen (right) welcome AT hikers to their home in Norwich.

WHEN PAYING IT FORWARD COMES FULL CIRCLE

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LARS BLACKMORE

Clockwise from top left: Volunteers Daniela, Karston, Luke, and Mathew. Trail signs. A hiker from Georgia going by the trail name Gambit had just completed a leisurely two-week traverse of the Vermont chunk of the AT with his girlfriend. They were hanging out in Hanover before heading home. Map of Segment 197. Trail signs in Norwich.

Betsy Maislen became a trail angel because of her son, Karl Schultz. When Karl took a gap year in 2007 and hiked the AT, he developed an infected blister on his heel three weeks into his hike. He was incapacitated in the Smoky Mountains in a shelter, where his hiking partner had unsuccessfully lanced it for the third time, when a day hiker and his son offered to bring him out for medical attention. The young men went with them, met up with the man’s sister and family, the Tingles, and went to a clinic. Had he not received medical treatment at the time, the infection would have spread into his Achilles tendon, ending his hike. Karl and his hiking partner went home with the Tingles and stayed for six days while Karl healed, and were made to feel like part of the family. Betsy, relieved that her son was getting such good care, put a package of goodies in the mail for Karl to give to the Tingles and sent flowers to thank them for extending such kindness to strangers. When Karl and his hiking partner were back on the trail, Betsy was surprised to receive a thank you note from the Tingles, telling her they felt lucky to have met the young men and asking her to pay their kindness forward. Betsy tells the story to every hiker she hosts at her home and asks them to pay it forward along

their journey or somewhere off the trail in the future. She believes that “if you extend another person some kindness and ask them to pay it forward as well, little by little you will change the world.” Tonight, seven hikers are staying at Betsy’s home just off the AT, experiencing the promised paying forward of trail magic. Hospitality includes a hot shower, an inflatable mattress in the finished basement, and access to a basket of clothing from her son or yard sales to wear while their laundry gets done. Hundreds of hikers have stayed since they started opening their home in 2007. Last year, the Maislens hosted 171 hikers. Besides keeping their word about paying it forward, they have met people from all over the country and the world. Betsy and Bill Maislen have experienced some trail magic of their own, having segment hiked over half of the AT. Rides, home-cooked dinners, nights in borrowed cabins and even hotels have all been part of the hospitality they’ve enjoyed on their AT journeys. The best part of their experiences, says Betsy, “was hiking to Knoxville to have the opportunity to thank the Tingles in person and let them know how thousands of hikers have benefited from their one kindness. We’re continuing to pay it forward. It’s all coming full circle.”

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“Volunteers are the heart of trail maintenance in Vermont. Whether clearing water bars or stuffing envelopes at GMC headquarters, volunteers keep the trail in top shape for each season’s hikers.”

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INTERESTED IN BECOMING A VOLUNTEER? Here are ways to start: Visit www.appalachiantrail.org/ get-involved/volunteer and search your area. To become a DOC volunteer or corridor monitor, or to join a work crew, contact Nichole Hastings at doc.at.corridormonitors@gmail. com. To adopt or maintain an AT segment in New Hampshire, contact Sam Brakeley at sambrakeley@gmail.com. For the AT in Vermont, visit www.greenmountainclub.org and click on volunteer opportunities. To become a “trail angel,” contact Betsy Maislen at elizabeth. maislen@hitchcock.org.

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Clockwise from top: Bob, Ellen, Joan, and Powers perform volunteer boundary monitoring. Ben, Mathew, and Aleen investigate a road between Monument 198-NH-37A and Monument 198-NH38. Volunteer James feels around for the monument, which is in this puddle somewhere. Trail sign.

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While most of the heavy work on the AT is done by paid students over the summer, volunteers are crucial to the upkeep throughout the year. Volunteers “adopt” a segment and are in charge of basic maintenance, which includes marking blazes, clipping brush and branches, and clearing blowdowns. Brakeley emphasizes the importance of adopters—“they are the eyes of the AT, notifying us in case of erosion, unauthorized ATV use, or any bigger issue that needs to be addressed.” In Vermont, the Green Mountain Club (GMC) is responsible for the AT from the Connecticut River west and south to the Massachusetts border. GMC trail and


shelter adopters do trail maintenance and report on site conditions at least three times a year. GMC also has work crews comprised of people from all over the US and the world who spend five days in the woods at a time maintaining the trail, including building puncheon (bog bridges), laying stepping stones, and creating water bars to prevent erosion. “Volunteers are the heart of trail maintenance in Vermont. Whether clearing water bars or stuffing envelopes at GMC headquarters, volunteers keep the trail in top shape for each season’s hikers,” says Joe Sikowitz, Membership and Volunteer Coordinator for the GMC.

MEET A TRAIL ANGEL Betsy Maislen is petite and cheerful, living up to her trail name (a nickname given to an AT hiker) of “Short-nSweet.” She heads the Hanover–Norwich Friends of the AT “trail angels,” providing “trail magic,” as the kindness extended to hikers is known, and an alternative to sleeping in a shelter or hostel. She and her husband Bill open their home to scores of hikers each season, providing shelter, showers, laundry facilities, and camaraderie. She’s also the person responsible for getting Norwich designated an official AT community, as is Hanover, and one of the reasons through hikers can’t wait to get to the area and experience its legendary hospitality. “Anyone can be a trail angel, even if you have no interest in ever hiking the AT yourself. People are having a great time with it and love having hikers stay,” says Betsy. The trail angels meet each spring and fall to discuss the logistics of trail magic, which are essentially up to the hosts. For some, it’s a stay in a spare bed; for others, a sleeping bag in a dry, sheltered area serves as lodging. Betsy reminds them that it should be fun and not a burden and recalls starting the network in 2007 with just a handful of trail angels. “Over time we started inviting other people and it kept growing. In 2012 we had 10 FA L L 2 0 1 4 • H E R E I N H A N O V E R

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From top: The lamp post outside Molly’s has the two double dashes that indicate a sharp turn on the AT; this is where South Street/Lebanon Street meets Main Street, and in addition to the post office, it’s a key corner on the stretch from the trailhead behind the Co-op and onwards to Elm Street on the Vermont side (or vice versa). Volunteer Quintas Jett salvages and resets a washer and nail in a witness tree. This tree helps workers locate monuments.

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people, and now we have 25.” Trail angels generally do not take money for their kindnesses, although repaying a stay with work such as stacking firewood or gardening is customary along the AT. Some hikers insist, so she pays it forward with a donation to the Vermont Food Bank in the name of the hiker. “I know of no other town on the whole AT with a list of trail angels that help out for free,” says Betsy proudly. After volunteer Larry Litten hiked from Williamstown, Massachusetts, to Hanover with his stepson, it became apparent to him “that it took a lot of work to put the trail in place and have it there when I wanted to hike it, so I should shoulder part of the burden so that others who decided to hike the AT could have an experience like mine.”

Trail plaque.

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Larry became a monitor of a section of the AT to do his part. He was inspired by a sign on a house in Saint Jean Pied de Port, France, that read “Friends of the Pilgrims of Saint James,” part of a volunteer network aiding pilgrims hiking across France and Spain to Santiago de Compostela, Spain. On the trail, he learned of Hanover’s less-than-stellar reputation, and he wanted to bring the same hospitality he saw in France to his community. He helped establish and chaired the Hanover Area Friends of the AT in 2009, a group that assists hikers and educates the community about the AT. With the help of Julia Griffin, Hanover’s town manager; Janet Rebman, director of the Hanover Area Chamber of Commerce; and other community members, the group initiated such amenities as a shower and laundry in the Black Center and a comprehensive guide to Hanover for hikers. “Although very self-reliant, hikers need information on the services they seek and greatly appreciate an extra kindness,” says Larry. “In addition to a shower and clean clothes, a friendly look and a greeting have gone a long way toward giving Hanover an improved reputation as a welcoming place.” Larry’s efforts helped create the 180-degree turnaround in perception, which he modestly acknowledges. “I just saw a way to improve my town and help it better serve visitors by observing a model program in a community I visited.” The AT is not just a trail but an interaction of people at various levels to create the experience for others. Without the volunteers that give of their time and themselves, the AT would not be what it is. AT volunteers range from repeat through hikers to those who’ve never set foot on the trail, yet each has been called to stewardship in one way or another, and each is a valuable piece of the fabric that makes up the community of the AT. • FA L L 2 0 1 4 • H E R E I N H A N O V E R

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Amazing Autumn

Shop, Dine & Explore Locally!

League of NH Craftsmen Retail Gallery and CraftStudies Program Visit our Gallery offering a stunning collection of unique and one-of-a-kind traditional and contemporary fine crafts by top regional artisans and an extensive CraftStudies Program offering classes and workshops for children and adults. 13 Lebanon Street Hanover, NH (603) 643-5050 (Gallery) (603) 643-5384 (CraftStudies) www.craftstudies.org

King Arthur Flour

Join us this fall at our King Arthur Flour store, bakery, café, and school. Browse the wonderful array of baking merchandise in our store. Check out the engaging classes at our school. Sip coffee, savor fresh-baked pastries, and enjoy salads, sandwiches, soups, and more in our bakery/café. Welcome! 135 Route 5 South Norwich, VT (802) 649-3361 www.kingarthurflour.com Open daily 7:30am–6pm

Mon–Thu 10am–5pm Fri 10am–5:30pm Sun 11am–3pm Oct–Dec

The Chocolate Shop One of downtown Hanover’s treasured destinations, offering the finest selection of chocolates and confections, artisan and classic, single-origin and blended gourmet bars, licorices, gummies, classic candies, and much more. Located inside the Hanover Park Building 3 Lebanon Street Hanover, NH (603) 643-9031 www.chocolatenow.com Mon–Thu 10am–6pm Fri–Sat 10am–8pm Sun 12:30–5pm

Ferro Jewelers Nicholas Ferro Jr. has owned and operated NT Ferro Jewelers in Woodstock, Vermont for over 33 years. He is a registered Jeweler with the American Gem Society. In 1995, he won first prize for a diamond ring in the DeBeers Design Contest held in New York City. In the late 1990s, the store was awarded the AGTA Spectrum prize twice for custom designs. For a truly unique engagement ring set with the finest Ideal cut diamonds, make an appointment with Nick Ferro today. 11 Central St Woodstock VT 05091 (802) 457-1901 www.ferrojewelers.com Mon–Sat 10am-5pm Sun 11am-4pm

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The J List Fine & Exuberant Clothing & Gifts Smart, stylish, fun, and well-edited, THE J LIST has clothing and gifts for the way we really live. We offer fabulous sweaters, tunics, tops, dresses, skirts, pants, sleepwear, jewelry, bags, scarves, and baby clothing that you won’t see everywhere. Personalized service, phone orders, wrapping, and shipping are our pleasure. Norwich Square 289 Main Street Norwich, VT (802) 649-9000 www.thejlistonline.com Mon–Sat 10am–5:30pm

Killdeer Farm Visit our Norwich farm stand for a taste of the best fall edibles Vermont has to offer. Featuring a wide array of organic vegetables from our fields complemented by a unique selection of local fruits (including heirloom apples), meats, preserves, maple products, and more. Located just south of King Arthur Flour. 163 Route 5 South Norwich, VT (802) 449-2852 www.killdeerfarm.com Open daily until Thanksgiving

Cabinetry Concepts & Surface Solutions For both residential and commercial projects, Cabinetry Concepts’ design professionals can help create more functional space for any home or commercial project, and they offer the widest variety of stock or custom cabinetry options, countertop materials, and cabinetry hardware. Surface Solutions showcases the newest materials from VogueBay and Artistic Tile to assist architects, designers, and homeowners to create fresh and innovative looks in porcelain, glass, marble, or natural stone for any surface. A fully stocked contractors’ warehouse offers Mapei setting materials, Wedi Shower Systems, and custom tile-cutting services. Just off I-89, Exit 19 227 Mechanic Street Lebanon, NH (603) 442-6740 (603) 442-6750 www.cabinetryconceptsNH.com www.surfacesolutionsNH.com Mon–Fri 8am–5pm; Sat 9am–3pm

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Just Paradise Color Specialist Salon & Tanning

At Just Paradise, our friendly, caring, and listening team strives to enhance your personal beauty and wellness. We choose products that are gentle for you and the environment while giving exceptional results. Our services reflect our passion, continual education, skill, and creativity. At Just Paradise YOU are our focus and you are our special guest each and every time you visit. 443 Miracle Mile Lebanon, NH (603) 448-1244 www.justparadisesalon.com Open Mon–Sat

Lemon Tree Gifts of Hanover Distinctive Gifts, Jewelry & Home Décor for Every Person, Season, and Occasion! You will discover unique items for everyone, including babies, men, tweens, and even your pet! Locally made products include snow globes, maple syrup, and vintage cutlery jewelry. Scarves, watches, jewelry, bath & body, candles, ties, home lighting, and much, much more are among the treasures awaiting you at Lemon Tree. We look forward to being part of your Hanover shopping experience! 44 South Main Street (Under Starbucks-Lebanon St. entry) Hanover, NH (603) 643-5388 www.LemonTreeGifts.com Open daily

Lou’s Restaurant & Bakery A tradition since 1947, Lou’s Restaurant and Bakery is proud to be a certified green restaurant with a focus on locally sourced food products. Autumn brings Oktoberfest, cider donuts, and authentic Austrian plum cake to Lou’s. Indulge in a thick, creamy milkshake, and for a retro treat, try it malted. Breakfast all day, and you can order our bakery products online. Care packages and catering available. 30 South Main Street Hanover, NH (603) 643-3321 www.lousrestaurant.net Mon–Fri 6am–3pm Sat & Sun 7am–3pm

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Carpenter and Main Chef/owner Bruce MacLeod has cooked in San Francisco, South Carolina, and Virginia, but his loyalties lie here in Vermont. Carpenter and Main features carefully prepared local ingredients in the French tradition. Two intimate dining rooms provide elegant dining, and a lively bistro features casual offerings and a fully appointed bar. 326 Main Street Norwich, VT (802) 649-2922 www.carpenterandmain.com Dinner is served Wed–Sun evenings. Bistro 5:30–10pm Dining Rooms 6–9pm. Closed Mon and Tue.

The Gilded Edge A custom picture framing shop offering options for every budget. From ready-made frames and the new “Frugal Framing” line to full custom, hand-finished frames that are works of art themselves. Voted “Best of the Best” Picture Framers in the Upper Valley five years straight! 35 S. Main Street Hanover, NH (603) 643-2884 Tue–Fri 9am–5:30pm Sat 9am–3:30pm

Long River Studios Since 1991, Long River Studios has been a hidden gem of the Upper Valley for fine art, crafts, gifts, photography, felted items, jewelry, accessories, woodenware, pottery, sculpture, artist cards, basketry, books, children’s toys, glassware, fine furniture, folk art, and more. We showcase unique works by local and indigenous artists. Bring a friend for a relaxing cup of coffee on our outdoor patio! 1 Main Street Lyme, NH (603) 795-4909 www.longriverstudios.net Mon–Sat 10am–5pm or by appointment

Men’s Top Choice At Mens’ Top Choice, you’re the man! This upscale, full-service salon caters to a man’s every need. Whether it’s a quick stop for the basic service, or a full-service visit for some extra pampering, we offer a relaxed atmosphere in a space that’s intimate and masculine. Kickback with a complimentary glass of wine, spring water, or gourmet coffee. Our comfy leather chairs and flat-screen TV will occupy your senses while you wait. Located in the heart of Hanover, in the Nugget Arcade building. For your convenience we offer 24/7 online booking at Vagaro.com/menstopchoice. 53 South Main Street Hanover, NH (603) 653-0055 Open Tue–Sat FA L L 2 0 1 4 • H E R E I N H A N O V E R

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White River Yarns Inspiration • Quality • Service A full-service yarn shop next to the Junction Frame Shop, with over 100 brands of yarns and fibers in every imaginable color and weight. The largest yarn shop in the Upper Valley, featuring a huge variety of notions and accessories. Knit Night on Tuesday and Thursday evenings. Senior discounts every Wednesday (65+). Join the lending library. Classes offered regularly. 49 South Main Street White River Junction, VT (802) 295-9301 whiteriveryarns@gmail.com www.whiteriveryarns.com

Essentials for Men Suits, jackets, sportswear, shoes, and accessories for the discriminating man—simply the best in New Hampshire and Vermont. We work hard to make and keep it that way! 3 Lebanon Street Hanover, NH (603) 643-6367

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Norwich Bookstore Bringing writers and readers together… For 20 years, a friendly haven that celebrates community. Our thoughtfully selected books are complemented by an eclectic collection of note cards, toys, and gifts. Stop by the bookstore or visit our website for updates on author readings and children’s events, plus bookseller recommendations and more! 291 Main Street Norwich, VT (802) 649-1114 www.norwichbookstore.com Mon–Sat 9am–6pm Thu 9am–8pm

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From top: HCNS students enjoy exploring nature in and outside the classroom—pressing cider, watching frog eggs develop into tadpoles with teacher Meg O’Leary, and going on a scavenger hunt. Right: Claire Halter proudly shares her latest artistic creation.

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BY Mark Aiken Akiko Ujiie-Huston ADDITIONAL PHOTOS BY Mountain Graphics

PHOTOS BY HCNS PARENT

Hampshire Cooperative Nursery School Celebrating 50 years of learning

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n a corner of Meg O’Leary’s classroom for four- and five-year-olds at the Hampshire Cooperative Nursery School in Hanover, there is an office space underneath a loft. The space is outfitted with an old, disconnected phone, keypads, and a nonfunctioning adding machine.

“I have seen the space used as a doctor’s office, the air traffic control tower at an airport, and the cockpit of a spaceship,” Meg says. “Sometimes it amazes me to sit back and watch what they do with what’s there.” The staff at HCNS and the parents who enroll their children there believe that children at this age learn through exploration and play. They believe that parent involvement strengthens a nursery school program and children’s educations. And they believe that the process is as important as the outcome. >>

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Clockwise from left: Max Renock is overjoyed with his delicious underground discovery. Students enjoy a story on the hilltop. Director Linda Shemanske has been part of HCNS for 30 years. Taking a break from yoga class. Fun at the pumpkin patch. An exuberant game of ring-around-the-rosy. Sawyer Duncan and Charlie Madonia focus on their artwork.

Every parent brings something to offer. In

some cases, it’s a unique skill (woodworking or cooking, for example). Other times, the parent is a helping hand for preparing projects, serving snacks, or tidying up.

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Does the philosophy work? HCNS celebrated its 50th anniversary in March with a party where parents of alumni gathered. “The event gave me a renewed boost,” says Meg. “It reaffirmed that what we are doing is very important.”

A School Evolves

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Hampshire Cooperative Nursery School has been around so long that none of the current parents, students, or staff remembers who the founders were. “They were neighbors in Norwich,” says Linda Shemanske, director at the school since 1995. She served as an HCNS classroom teacher for nine years before that, and as a parent when her daughter attended. “The neighbors formed a playgroup in 1962, but a year later, they decided they wanted something more formal,” Linda explains. They drew up a few rules and decided against running the school five days a week. “The cooperative nature of the school was borne from both a financial burden and from their willingness to be involved,” she says. All these components of the school are still in play today. The school has had several homes: a parent’s garage, a church basement, and the current site on Lyme Road in Hanover next to the Dartmouth Organic Farm. The rural setting next to the farm and within walking distance of the Connecticut River significantly benefits the programming, learning, and identity of the school. Whether they encounter a Dartmouth student in the fields who explains what she is doing or frog eggs on the way to the river, students at HCNS experience the natural world around them.

Parents in the Classroom

What exactly does “cooperative” mean? In the case of HCNS, it is a requirement that parents be involved. They serve as board members, participate on committees, or help maintain the school. And every parent in the program signs up to serve a few days as a parent volunteer in the classroom. “It’s wonderful for many reasons,” says Meg about parents joining the class. Every parent brings something to offer. In some cases, it’s a unique skill (woodworking or cooking, for example). Other times, the parent is a helping hand for preparing projects, serving snacks, or tidying up. In addition, being present in the classroom gives parents a look at what goes on in their children’s education. Have you ever seen a parent ask a child how the day at school went and what he or she did? The answers are usually brief—“good” and “I don’t know.” At HCNS, parents know what their children do at school because several times a year they are required to be there. >>

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Above: Teacher Sandy Bailey and the three-day class are fascinated as they watch seeds grow in the sand table. Below: Parent and board member Michelle Schembri stands at the entrance that welcomes HCNS families every day. Wintertime means lots of sledding—just outside the HCNS door. Giavanna Schembri, Brooke Nigriny, and teacher Sandy Bailey enjoy the thrill of the hill!

“There is so much opportunity to grow and explore through art and play,” says parent Michelle

Schembri. “For now, I want my kids to learn to love learning.”

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Another benefit is that, when a parent comes to the classroom, it gives the teacher insights about students. Parents and teachers can observe each other and learn effective cues that work for specific children. Finally, the day when a child’s mom or dad comes to class is a special day for that child; he or she becomes the classroom helper for that day. The child comes to class a little excited, serves as the presenter for “show and share,” and guides his or her parent through the day. “Having parents in the classroom strengthens the program tremendously,” says Meg.

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A Focus on the Process

“I appreciate the way the teachers interact with children,” says Michelle Schembri, HCNS parent and board member whose daughter graduated from HCNS and whose son is about to start. “They guide the kids in a way that encourages independence.” For example, it’s no surprise that art projects are a big focus in a nursery school program. “We never show a finished model,” explains Linda Shemanske. There are 13 kids in each HCNS class, and you might wind up with 13 completely different finished products. “That’s because we are more concerned about the process than we are about the product,” Linda says. According to Michelle Schembri, her kids will have plenty of opportunities in school (and later in life) to be graded, judged, and marked on finished products. “There is so much opportunity to grow and explore through art and play,” she says. “For now, I want my kids to learn to love learning.” She is confident that her daughter’s experience at HCNS has set the tone for her to be successful as she continues her education. >>

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This is not to say that children aren’t exposed to numbers, letters, and other important age-appropriate curricula at HCNS. But rather than introduce numbers on a board, HCNS students visit a pumpkin patch, bring one back to the classroom, guess how many seeds it has, and then count them. “Learning this way can be messy,” says Linda. “We tell our visiting parents, ‘Don’t dress up!’ ” HCNS offers several different programs including two-, three-, and four-day programs; an after-school program for children whose parents work; a summer camp program; and a music program with a music teacher who visits once a week. The families who are involved with the school become close-knit because of its cooperative nature. “It feels like you’ve entered a community— a family,” says Michelle. Hampshire Cooperative Nursery School is only a part of a child’s life for two or three years, yet it has operated for 50. Many siblings and even multigenerational students have benefited from the program, which has helped to achieve this longevity. “Fifty years,” says Meg. “It shows that parents, directors, and teachers believe in what’s happening here. I just try to take their interests and questions and provide a setting where they can explore and learn.” •

Hampshire Cooperative Nursery School 104 Lyme Road Hanover, NH (603) 643-4640 www.hampshirecooperative.org

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G R E AT I D E A S BY

Mark Dantos

Lifelong Learning

in

Hanover

ILEAD joins OSHER'S network

Above: Intermission in the courtyard area of Hopkins Center for folks attending OSHER@Dartmouth’s Summer Lecture Series “Crisis in the Middle East" in Spaulding Auditorium. Right: Emily and Gerry Jones enjoy an early-morning camel ride near the pyramids outside Cairo, Egypt, during a Study Travel trip in 2009.

While the phrase “silver tsunami” suggests an element of surprise, we knew the wave was coming. Baby boomers are

reaching retirement age, and one-fifth of the US population will be over 65 by 2030. But this is a demographic famous for its drive to live life to the fullest. As they age, baby boomers aren’t content to retreat and wind down. In their quest to enjoy fulfilling lives throughout their later years, our aging citizens have a profound desire to share new ideas through teaching and learning. It’s fueled the increasing popularOne-fifth of the US population ity of lifelong learning programs at the national here in Hanover too at what was will be over 65 by 2030. This is level—and formerly the Institute for Lifelong Education at a demographic famous for its Dartmouth (ILEAD). drive to live life to the fullest. From its inception 24 years ago, the program is now more than 1,700 members strong. Reflecting demographic trends, it’s grown significantly in the past several years. And Hanover, consistently rated among the best retirement towns in the country, will continue to attract intellectually curious retirees to the greater Upper Valley. The demand, along with ILEAD’s proven track record and its status as a self-supporting entity within Dartmouth College, made it a natural recipient for a grant from the Bernard Osher Foundation, the San Francisco-based supporter of arts and higher education. >>

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G R E AT I D E A S

Clockwise from top left: Members enjoy social time next to Lake Morey in Fairlee, Vermont, at the Annual Meeting 2014. Photo by Emily Jones. Class participants enjoy Ikebana: Japanese Flower Arranging class. Bob Hargraves (playing guitar) with Lynn Peterson on the Nile River near Luxor in Egypt. John Ferries with two Chinese students, Xiaoxiao Lu '16 and Ge Huang '15, who participated in his "Transformation of Modern China" course at ILEAD, giving their personal perspectives on current challenges and opportunities in their country. Both loved interacting with the audience. Xiaoxiao's comment: "I observed that learning really doesn't stop with age. It stops only with an aged, apathetic heart." Tom and Joan Wilson on the Nile, 2009. Field trip part of a course on Celestial Navigation. Joe & Dorothy Tofel at the Annual Meeting 2014 on Lake Morey. Photo by Emily Jones. Market Square in Basel, Switzerland. Photo by Jo Tate.

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ILEAD JOINS OSHER'S NETWORK In May, ILEAD joined the Osher Institute’s national network of 117 programs, which offer an array of non-credit courses and activities specifically developed for adults age 50 or older. In turn, ILEAD received a $2 million endowment grant from the Osher Foundation to enhance its initiatives and changed its name to the “Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Dartmouth”—or OSHER@Dartmouth. The endowment grant will help address the challenges associated with a rapidly expanding demand. For instance, OSHER@Dartmouth needs additional staff and has outgrown its office space at the Dartmouth Outing Club, says Lisa King, program manager. In addition, endowment distributions will be used to train the volunteer study leaders, to further incorporate technology into the classroom, and to develop better programming overall, she explains. Membership in the Osher network also means benefits through collaboration, according to Stew Wood, president of OSHER@Dartmouth. For instance, at a recent finance committee meeting, members discussed how other affiliates spread business overhead costs across all programmatic units. With the partnership, Stew explains, “We have the chance to turn to 117 partners and ask ‘how do you do this?’” “We’ll begin to treasure the association with 117 other

[entities], each of which is engaged in lifelong learning,” Stew states. “But no two of us does it the same way.” A LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE EVOLVES ILEAD was established in 1990 by 38 members of the Upper Valley intrigued with the “idea of continued learning.” The concept was rooted in a movement that began in the early 1960s at the New School for Social Research in New York City and spread across college and university towns around the country, according to Hank Buermeyer’s written history of ILEAD over the first 20 years. Buermeyer wrote that the project took shape as more and more retirees sought permission to audit Dartmouth undergraduate courses. While many had a prior connection with Dartmouth, ILEAD was designed for all local residents, regardless of educational background. Early founders visited existing “institutes for learning in retirement” at the Five Colleges consortium and Harvard, according to Buermeyer. But Harvard’s more-selective enrollment model was dismissed in favor of ILEAD’s egalitarian approach. The democratic vibe of the volunteer-driven organization continues today. That means engagement through learning, teaching, and serving on committees is welcomed and encouraged, says Lisa King. It’s all about charting new ground and challenging oneself. >>

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G R E AT I D E A S

Dartmouth Outing Club house serves as the headquarters and offices for OSHER@ Dartmouth.

While former professors and experts in a particular field often answer the call for volunteer instructors, they regularly take the opportunity to deviate from their area of expertise, learn new subject material, and share it in their group classroom discussions, Stew Wood explains. Others have never taught in a classroom but find now is the time and receive basic training in house. Regardless of where they start, study leaders often remark that “the biggest reward is having students who are eager to learn and want to be in the classroom,” notes Lisa. THE WAVE ROLLS ON This fall, OSHER@Dartmouth will offer 88 courses, ranging from colonialism in Africa to the basics of innkeeping, and from Sherlock Homes to negotiating with Iran, kayaking, and estate planning. Classes begin September 15, and most meet once a week for two hours. The cost of a full five-to-eight-week course remains around $55. Outside the academic term selections, OSHER@Dartmouth features summer lectures, mini courses, and a variety of special events. Then there are the renowned study–travel trips to which cadres of locals flock to cruise the ancient waterways of Europe or experience African national parks and game reserves. 64

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“There’s nothing quite like being engaged with others in a learning environment to make a positive impact on how one is enjoying life,” says Stew Wood.

Meanwhile, as grandparents strive to keep up with technology and stay connected to family, OSHER@ Dartmouth has responded with an increasing number of traditional iPad and technology training courses. This year it also initiated the iPad Café, an informal but regularly scheduled workshop available at Kendal at Hanover and the Hanover Senior/ Community Center. As technology continues to change our world, “we’re reminded that we’re never too old to learn,” Lisa King notes. But on a broader level, this community-based teaching and learning enterprise serves to enrich life and boost mental health, Stew Wood adds. “There’s nothing quite like being engaged with others in a learning environment to make a positive impact on how one is enjoying life,” he says. “Not only studying from our catalog but also sharing ideas with 20 to 25 of our neighbors weekly is a benefit to all of us in our senior years.” •

For more information, visit the office or website, or send an email. OSHER@Dartmouth office hours: Monday through Thursday 8:30am to 4:30pm Friday 8:30am to 1:30pm (603) 646-0154 Email: osher@dartmouth.edu www.osher.dartmouth.edu FA L L 2 0 1 4 • H E R E I N H A N O V E R

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A young customer tries out an ostrich hand puppet by the Where’s Waldo? book display, part of a community-wide children’s event held throughout Norwich each summer. Below: A young customer enjoys a book on one of the Yogibos, soft, beanbag-like cushions available for purchase at the bookstore. Far right: Bookstore co-founders and owners Penny McConnel (seated) and Liza Bernard.

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COMMUNITY BY

Karen Wahrenberger Lars Blackmore

PHOTOS BY

Something Magical Happens Here The Norwich Bookstore celebrates 20 years

On August 1, 1994, Liza Bernard and Penny McConnel opened the doors of the Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont, for the first time.

“We know people who came in as children when the store opened who are now bringing in their children,” says Penny. She and Liza believe that getting to know their customers is what makes their store special. Today, in these unsettled times for the print book industry, this independent bookstore is actually expanding, taking down a wall and adding square feet from the space next door. Clearly, something magical is happening here. >>

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Located across from the Marion Cross Elementary School playground and next to the post office in Norwich Square, the Norwich Bookstore doesn’t feel like a typical shop; it feels more like a community center for dedicated readers. From the street, the building looks like a traditional New England home surrounded by established trees. Inside, every square foot is neatly labeled and organized to hold books whose selection is driven by customer feedback. Up the wooden steps to the second floor, the children’s section feels like a tree house with windows looking out over the surrounding maples. This part of the store is packed with a lively variety of children’s classic and contemporary titles, from The Giving Tree to Inside Outside by Norwich author and illustrator Lizi Boyd. Classic and contemporary young adult fiction titles, such as Eleanor & Park and The Age of Miracles, are displayed in special sections dedicated to middle school readers and young adult readers. A selection of unique games, like the dice game Tenzi, toys, and puzzles, including eye-catching 3D puzzles, are on display. Book-themed tee shirts with such classic titles as Blueberries for Sal are fun gifts for young readers, while enough stuffed animals grace the shelves to fill a well-stocked bedroom reading nook. Soft chairs and cushions invite children to stay for some reading time, with the sweet complaint coming from one customer that she has “a difficult time” getting her children to leave. A PERSONAL SELECTION PROCESS The book selection at this independent bookstore is one reason the store is so popular with local readers. Penny and Liza “curate” their collection of books based on customer requests. “We have to look at a book and open it to really see what it is all about. We don’t necessarily buy the bestsellers. We know what our customers like,” Liza says. “We also buy books that we like and books from our customers’ favorite authors. It’s a very personal process.” Liza and Penny also credit changing with the times for the growth of their store. Their informative website keeps up-to-date lists of “books we are currently 68

excited about,” with reviews of each book recommended by the booksellers working at the shop. The website allows customers who are traveling to check up on what the booksellers are recommending and then purchase eBooks for their iPads or Nooks. Customers can also order books after hours from the website, and the store will inform them via email when their books are ready for pickup. “We want to be able to provide customers with books however they want to read them,” Liza says. “We can’t stock everything, but we can get a book within 24 hours.” WELL-READ BOOKSELLERS In addition to the homey atmosphere and wonderful selection of books, audiobooks, greeting cards, Scrabble letter mugs, reading glasses, and wrapping paper, the Norwich Bookstore’s most valuable assets are its well-read booksellers. When they hire a new employee, Liza and Penny look for someone who is great with people and an avid book lover. “You can always teach someone to run a cash register,” Liza says. Penny adds, “We are looking for a ‘bookseller,’ not a cashier, and we have been incredibly fortunate to have the people we have had working here over the years.” Norwich resident Terry Samwick praises the literary expertise of the booksellers at the store. “When I am browsing for a book,” Terry says, “I can pick something up, and one of the booksellers will have read it. They get to know you as a reader, and you feel really supported if you are a book lover or a family of book lovers.” Beth Reynolds, one of the part-time booksellers, is also the children’s librarian in Norwich. “Beth knows what every child in Norwich likes to read. If you are looking for a birthday present, she knows the child’s interests, and what he or she has already read,” Terry says. SUPPORTING A COMMUNITY OF READERS The store also partners with the Norwich Public Library, taking turns hosting monthly children’s events every second Saturday, such as a visit by naturalist Mary

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THE BOOK JAM The Book Jam is a blog created by Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie, who have both worked as booksellers at the Norwich Bookstore. The mission of the blog is to rescue readers when they have a “book jam” and don’t know what to read next. The bookstore provides both women with advance readers’ copies, and the blog links to the Norwich Bookstore website. The Book Jam partners with the bookstore for twice yearly “Pages in the Pub” events, held in the wine cellar of the Norwich Inn. For a $10 donation, readers enjoy a glass of wine while hearing about the best new books. Proceeds from the events go to the Norwich Public Library. Visit the blog at www.thebookjam blog.com.

Left: Boys amble through the book displays on the first floor. From top: A sampling of sale books outside the bookstore’s front door allows for some fresh air bargain browsing. Local author and naturalist Mary Holland reads from two of her children’s books in July. The second floor of the bookstore houses coffee table books, cookbooks, gardening guides, psychology and parenting books, the children’s section, and much more.

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A customer looks through a book selected from the Staff Picks wall, a display of newly published books that come with personal recommendations from booksellers.

Holland this past summer. The bookstore also partners with Dartmouth’s Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, the Canaan Meetinghouse, and the Town House in Strafford to champion and arrange events for local writers and readers. Most author events are free and open to the public, although space is limited and reservations are recommended. Occasionally events are held in a larger venue, and a few events require ticket purchases. This fall, on October 14, local author Jodi Picoult will launch her newest novel, and mystery writer Archer Mayor will be doing a reading on October 15. Many other famous local writers have done readings at the Norwich Bookstore; Jon and Pamela Voelkel even mentioned the bookstore in the first book of their Jaguar Stones Trilogy. An ongoing mission of the bookstore is to host authors—local and otherwise—for readings, discussions, and book signings. This fosters an important connection between readers and writers. The bookstore’s weekly newsletter and website include the calendar of author events. This newsletter is emailed to all Rewards Program members and anyone who signs up on the store’s website. The bookstore will celebrate 20 years of serving the community on September 20 during the Norwich Square Fall Fest with sales, entertain70

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ment, and refreshments. Also, on the first Thursday of every December, Norwich Square holds a holiday evening event. Free giftwrapping is another personal touch offered by the store. “Books are very cooperative to wrap,” jokes Liza. For the holidays, the Norwich Bookstore partners with local nonprofits to provide books for local children who can benefit from the Book Angels Program. A large wreath hangs in the stairwell with paper angels inscribed with a child’s book requests or a child’s special interests, age, and gender. Customers can select a book or donate cash. The shop returns the community’s love by giving regular donations to other local organizations and charities, including advertisements and endorsements for local programs and events. “So many people believe that in this technology-dominated world, bookstores will soon be obsolete,” says Penny. “However, a well-run bookstore will be bringing books and authors and community together for a long, long time. People don’t discover books online—they discover them in a store.” •

The Norwich Bookstore Norwich Square 291 Main Street Norwich, VT (802) 649-1114 www.norwichbookstore.com FA L L 2 0 1 4 • H E R E I N H A N O V E R

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T R AV E L T I M E STORY BY

Lisa Densmore Ballard

PHOTOS BY

Lisa Densmore Ballard AND Jack Ballard

TARPON TEMPTATION THE

Saltwater fishing in the Florida Keys

Jack’s cry jarred me from my sun-drunk slumber. I grabbed a camera as he played the fish, a tenacious tarpon that flung itself skyward, landed with a resounding kerr-splash, and then sprinted across the endless acres of seagrass. Jack leaned away from the powerful piscine with all his weight, not only to tire the fish but also to stay balanced on the bow of the boat. The 17-foot poling skiff had borne us to a mangrove clump on the fringe of Everglades National Park from a marina in Islamorada in the Florida Keys. Judging by the acute bend in his 8-weight fly rod and the substantial amount of line and then backing that had unspooled from his reel, the fish he wrestled was a big one. >>

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Opposite: Tarpon are among the prized gamefish that fin the waters of the Florida Keys. Center: The author hooks a fish assisted by her guide. Right, from top: The author shows off her first redfish. A baby barracuda, one of the many species an angler might hook in the Keys. The author shows off a sizable Lane Snapper before letting it go.

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Clockwise from top left: The edge of the mangroves are the hot spots for tarpon and other fish. Bud n' Mary's Marina, where anglers meet to buy supplies, talk fishing, and hire guides. Releasing a redfish over seagrass. Feeding the tarpons at Robbie's Marina.

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I watched the action intently, hoping the tarpon would jump again. Jack cranked a few feet of line back onto his reel when the fish turned toward the boat, but like a playground bully offering a piece of candy only to grab it back, the tarpon changed its mind and bolted away, uncoiling even more of the line. Jack jammed the butt of his rod into his abdomen, keeping steady pressure on the fish. He cranked it toward the boat again, then the reel whirred wildly. And so it went for 40 minutes, a battle between man and aquatic beast, one above and one below the expansive bay’s vivid aqua surface.

TARPON TECHNIQUE Hooking a sizeable Atlantic tarpon (Megalops atlanticus) was the reason we had come to the Florida Keys. This silver-green iridescent fish, with its large eyes and jutting lower jaw, fins the coastlines of the Atlantic Ocean, the Caribbean, and the Gulf of Mexico from Virginia to Brazil, but the Keys are a mecca for tarpon anglers. Prized saltwater game fish because of their fight and spectacular leaps into the air, tarpon can grow bigger than the anglers who seek them, more than 250 pounds. The large ones migrate through the Keys during the spring, but smaller ones, up to 50 pounds, can be hooked year-

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round. For two Northerners who consider a five-pound trout a leviathan, the idea of catching even a 50-pound fish made us tingle with anticipation. Tarpon weren’t the only fish we sought. The average snook sneaking around Florida’s mangroves can tip the scale at 30 pounds. Redfish often exceed 15 pounds. One can also hook red drum, snapper, tuna, marlin, permit, bonefish, shark, cobia, or sea trout—one of the most intriguing aspects of saltwater angling is the vast assortment of fish that can be pulled from the water. You never know what might take the bait, or in our case on this clear calm morning, the fly. >>


Top: Anglers fishing from kayaks near historic Indian Key reel in a range of colorful reef fish such as this bluestriped grunt. Center: The author shows off a small snapper. A brown pelican patrols the docks at Robbie's Marina waiting for a handout or an abandoned bucket of fish. Releasing a blue-striped grunt. Bottom: Lizard fish. Blue runner.

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FLORIDA KEYS TRAVEL PLANNER WHEN TO GO: Year-round. The big tarpon typically migrate through the Keys in the spring. Hurricane season runs June through November. LODGING: Post Card Inn: Centrally located with on-site boat, snorkel, and scuba rentals, www.holidayisle.com. Hilton Key Largo Resort: Watch manatees or sample a myriad of water sports from the resort’s sandy beach, www.keylargoresort.com. FISHING: Marinas Bud n’ Mary’s Florida Keys Fishing Marina, www.budnmarys.com. Robbie’s Marina, www.robbies.com. Guides Captain Mark Hlis: Flats, backcountry fishing with fly or light tackle, tarpon@bellsouth.net. Jason van Marter: Kayak fishing, eyeguideit@gmail.com.

Clockwise from above: The author takes a break from fishing to see the sea turtle museum at the local rehab center. Wrestling the big one, a 50-pound tarpon! Seashells and coconut monkeys for sale at the daily market at Robbie's Marina.

EXCELLENT EATERIES: Bob’s Bunz Islamorada Restaurant & Bakery: Full breakfast or quick grabs (pastries, giant blueberry muffins, etc.) before fishing, www.bobsbunz.com. Hungry Tarpon: Dockside lunch spot serving local conch chowder and tasty fish sandwiches. A small adjacent market sells local arts and crafts, www.hungrytarpon.com. Lorelei Restaurant & Cabana: Good food, great sunsets, and live music, www.loreleicabanabar.com. The Sundowner: Another sunset spot serving excellent crab cakes, conch, and local beer, www.sundownerskeylargo.com. OFF THE WATER: Crane Point Hammock Museum and Nature Preserve: Natural history museum, nature trails, and wild bird rehab center on a historic property, www.cranepoint.net. The Turtle Hospital: Guided tour through a sea turtle rescue and rehab center, www.turtlehospital.org. MORE INFO: Visit Florida, www.visitflorida.org. The Florida Keys & Key West (Monroe County) Tourist Development Council, www.fla-keys.com. 76

At first light, we departed from Bud and Mary’s Marina with our guide Mark Hlis, a Miami native who has fished in the Florida Keys since age six. We motored into the “backcountry,” the local term for the Everglades, and began to look for fish. Mark cut the outboard, then climbed atop a small platform several feet above the stern of the boat. Using a long pole, he slowly maneuvered the skiff parallel to a mangrove outcropping. The trees looked like a densely foliaged island from afar, but from 75 feet, there was no evidence of solid ground. A tangle of leggy roots formed an intricate web of passages through the grove. In theory, game fish fin the edge of the labyrinth, waiting for small baitfish to wander

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too far from its protective cover. “Ladies first,” called Mark quietly from his perch, motioning for me to pick up a rod. I released the fourinch black streamer from the eyelet around which it was hooked, then got into position on the bow; however, I didn’t cast it right away. Anglers in the Florida Keys sight-fish rather than casting blindly toward fishylooking spots. I held the rod at the ready in my right hand, the fly in my left. The three of us scanned the water looking for a tarpon on patrol or a muddy cloud where a redfish might be rooting around. “Shark! Two o’clock! 30 feet!” shouted Mark from his lookout. I flung the fly off the right side of the boat with one strong cast, then


retrieved it in quick jerks. The woolly bugger passed just in front of the shark’s nose, but the shark ignored it. “Look for nervous water,” instructed Mark, as he peered intently toward the mangroves, “There! See if he comes out.” Mark motioned with his eyes as he leaned on his pole, steering the bow of the boat slightly to the right. A wary snook cruised slowly under an overhanging branch. I cast toward it, but it flashed out of sight, spooked by the line as the fly touched the water. “ ’Cuda! Three o-clock! 20 feet!” shouted Mark a few minutes later. No luck. I found it challenging to put out 60 feet of line in one cast without the aid of at least one false cast, and I was inexperienced at double-hauling, a technique in which a fly fisher sends FA L L 2 0 1 4 • H E R E I N H A N O V E R

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out much more line by giving it a tug on both the backward and forward motions of the cast. After an hour, I finally landed a redfish, and then handed the rod to Jack. Mark switched the fly to a Clouser minnow with a long chartreuse tail hoping to mimic a pilchard, a common baitfish in the area. By now, the sun had climbed high into the morning sky. The tide was in, and the water had become slightly murky. Mark steered us a little closer to the mangroves on the theory that snook could be lurking in the shadows of the intertwined trees, but we found neither hint of a sneaky snook nor any other fish. After holding the streamer for a half hour, Jack’s freshwater angling instincts niggled at him. He chanced a blind cast toward the mangroves, as if looking for a rainbow trout by a timbered shoreline in the mountains. “You can’t catch anything if you don’t have your fly in the water,” mumbled Jack. Mark shrugged in resigned disagreement. I nodded off by his second cast but for only a minute. When Jack flung the fly a third time, the beast found his fly. It breached the surface in an acrobatic arch, and then tore away from us. LANDING THE FISH After a long battle, the tarpon finally tired. Jack guided it deliberately toward the boat, reeling in quickly whenever the fish threatened to slacken the line. He stopped when a foot of line separated the leader from the tip of the rod. Mark bounded off his platform to help. “Nice 40-pounder!” exclaimed Mark, as the fish came alongside the boat. Jack expected him to lift it out of the water for a photo before releasing it. (Tarpon are boney and not usually eaten.) Instead, he grabbed the leader. The fish was gone instantly. Jack and I gaped at the spot in the water where his prize had momentarily rested. We thought Mark had blundered landing the fish, but he quickly explained that touching the leader counts as a landed tarpon in the 78

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Jason van Marter, a local kayak-fishing guide, watches the water for clues to where the fish are.

Everglades. It puts less stress on the fish than pulling it out of the water. Though we appreciated the rationale, we couldn’t help feeling disappointed at losing the chance for a momentary look at the tenacious tarpon. ANOTHER CHANCE Later, while eating lunch by the docks at Robbie’s Marina, another marina on Islamorada where we planned to fish from kayaks in the afternoon, I watched several boys feeding small tarpon in an empty boat slot. The tarpon burst out of the water, grabbing oversized minnows from the hands of the giggling boys while a cocky pelican waited impatiently for one of them to leave a bait bucket unguarded. I wondered if these tarpon ever swam beyond the marina into the area around Indian Key where we would be fishing in an hour. After lunch, we paddled around Indian Key, casting toward its rocky shore and along a nearby reef. We pulled in baby barracuda, grunts, blue runners, snappers, and a prehistoriclooking lizard fish. It was immensely entertaining, but we never saw another fish even remotely close in size to Jack’s 40-pounder. We immediately made plans to return to this subtropical archipelago. Jack may have hooked a large tarpon, but the fish had hooked us too. • FA L L 2 0 1 4 • H E R E I N H A N O V E R

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S M A RT E N T E RTA I N I N G BY

Susan Nye

MIX IT UP

Fabulous Cocktails with

Add a touch of elegance to your next gathering

Should you need one, fall provides plenty of reasons to party. Fall foliage, the harvest moon, and football games come to mind, as well as Halloween, Guy Fawkes Day, and of course Thanksgiving. After a lazy summer filled with last-minute get-togethers, why not take your next party to another level? No, you needn’t insist on black tie—or any tie, for that matter. It’s the Upper Valley! By all means, keep it casual; just add a touch of elegance to the mix. At cocktail time, instead of chips and dip straight from the supermarket shelf, whip up one of your favorite hors d’oeuvres to pass around. And what could be more elegant than a special cocktail for

Three Fabulous Fall Cocktails

your autumn celebration? >>

Apple Cider Sidecar Plum & Stormy Cranberry Bellini

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S M A RT E N T E RTA I N I N G

Apple Cider Sidecar Nothing says elegance like a cocktail invented at the Ritz Hotel in Paris. This version transforms a continental classic into a New England fall favorite. Celebrate the harvest moon or a football victory with a pitcher of Apple Cider Sidecars. ▷ SERVES 1

2

1 oz Calvados or applejack 1 oz Cointreau or Grand Marnier

To serve, stir or shake the Sidecars again, pour into martini glasses, add a splash of sparkling water or club soda, and garnish each one with an apple slice.

1 Tbsp Apple Cider Syrup, or to taste (recipe follows) 1 Tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice Chilled sparkling water or club soda (optional) Garnish: apple slice Combine the Calvados, Cointreau, Apple Cider Syrup, and lemon juice in an ice-filled cocktail shaker. Shake vigorously and strain into a martini glass. Add a splash of sparkling water or club soda, garnish with an apple slice, and serve.

Apple Cider Sidecars for a Crowd ▷ SERVES 10

Apple Cider Syrup ▷ MAKES ABOUT 2 CUPS 1 gallon fresh, preservative-free apple cider 2–3 cinnamon sticks

1

Pour the cider into a large, heavy-bottomed nonreactive stockpot and bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer uncovered, stirring occasionally, about 4 hours or until the cider has been reduced to about 2 cups.

2

In the final 30 to 45 minutes of simmering, add 2 to 3 cinnamon sticks and continue to stir frequently; watch the syrup closely to keep it from scorching.

3

Remove the syrup from the heat and cool to room temperature, stirring occasionally. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve, cover, and store in the refrigerator.

10 oz Calvados or applejack 10 oz Cointreau or Grand Marnier 5 oz Apple Cider Syrup 5 oz freshly squeezed lemon juice Sparkling water or club soda, chilled (optional) Garnish: apple slices

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Combine the Calvados, Cointreau, Apple Cider Syrup, and lemon juice in a quart pitcher or Mason jar, and stir or shake to combine. Cover and refrigerate for several hours.

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You might want to double the recipe, as Apple Cider Syrup may very well become a favorite fall staple. Also called apple molasses, it’s sweet and tart—and delicious on pancakes or ice cream. It also makes a wonderful glaze for roasted winter squash and a nice addition to a vinaigrette or barbecue sauce.


PLUM & STORMY When the autumn sky turns cold and stormy, turn to a drink that hails from sunny Bermuda. This fruity version of a Dark & Stormy is the perfect way to enjoy the last of the plum harvest. ▷ SERVES 6 12 ripe plums, halved, pitted, and chopped 1–2 Tbsp brown sugar, or to taste 1 cup dark rum K cup freshly squeezed lime juice Ginger beer, very cold Garnish: lime wedges

1 2 3 4

Put the plums and brown sugar in a bowl, toss to combine, and let sit for 20 to 30 minutes to release the plums’ juices. Put plums and their juices in a blender, add a little water if necessary, and process until smooth. Strain the plum juice through a fine-mesh sieve. Using a rubber spatula, press down on the remains in the sieve to extract as much juice as possible, and then discard what’s left in the sieve. Add the rum and lime juice to the plum juice. Cover and refrigerate until very cold. To serve, fill old-fashioned glasses with ice, add the rum and juice mixture, top with ginger beer, and garnish with a lime wedge.

When the last of the plums are gone, try a Stormy Orchard. Substitute apple cider for plum juice, skip the lime juice, and garnish with a cinnamon stick.

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Cranberry Bellini Another continental classic, the first Bellini was sipped at Harry’s Bar in Venice, a favorite haunt of Ernest Hemingway, Sinclair Lewis, and Orson Welles. There’s nothing like a few bubbles to create a festive mood. This New England version is the perfect cocktail to serve before your Thanksgiving Day feast! ▷ SERVES 6–8 1½ cups cranberry juice ¾ cup cognac 1 (750-ml) bottle chilled dry Prosecco, champagne, or sparkling wine Garnish: frozen cranberries

1 2

Combine the cranberry juice and cognac and refrigerate until very cold. To serve, put 5 or 6 frozen cranberries into each of 6 to 8 champagne flutes. Add about ¼ cup cranberry-cognac mix, and slowly top with Prosecco.

Writer and chef Susan Nye lives in New Hampshire and writes for magazines throughout New England. She shares many of her favorite recipes and stories about family, friendship, and food on her blog at www.susannye.wordpress.com.

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GET CONNECTED

Get listed on the mountainviewpublishing.com BUSINESS DIRECTORY and you will also be included on our printed list in every issue of Here In Hanover (see page 20).

GET CONNECTED NOW!

Call Bob Frisch at (603) 643-1830 or email rcfrisch1@comcast.net. Find out how you can connect with our readers. It’s easy, inexpensive, and another way to reach an affluent and educated audience.

SUBSCRIBE Share the wonder of our beautiful area and the latest news

all year long with an Here In Hanover gift subscription. Friends and family who have moved away from the area will be especially appreciative. Be sure to order a subscription for yourself, too! Send a check for $19.95 for one year (4 issues) to Here In Hanover, 135 Lyme Road, Hanover, NH, 03755. Or conveniently pay online using PayPal at www.mountainviewpublishing.com.

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On the App alac with Local hian Trail Volunteers Meet Hanove New Police r’s Chief Norwich Boo Celebrates kstore 20 Years & much MO RE

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LIVING WELL BY

Katherine P. Cox

The cellulite

Breakthrough Getting to the core of the problem The bane of a woman’s existence, cellulite plagues women of all sizes and shapes, regardless of how much they diet and exercise. And until now, there hasn’t been much to do about it. In some cases, creams and massages have provided slight, temporary improvements, but a relatively new procedure is finally getting to the core of the stubborn problem and offering long-lasting results. “Cellulaze, approved by the FDA in 2012, is a breakthrough treatment that eliminates the unsightly dimpling of the thighs and buttocks,” says Dr. Andre Berger, medical director and founder of Rejuvalife Vitality Institute in Beverly Hills, California. >>

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“Cellulaze is a breakthrough. It’s a game-changer and lasts many years,” says Dr. Berger.

“Most women, 80 percent, have it, and the other 20 percent think they have it,” Dr. Berger says. “It’s a natural condition, not a disease, that’s manifested by changes in the appearance of the skin.” In early stages, the skin has an orange-peel look, which can progress to the familiar “cottage cheese” dimpling to more advanced forms of “hills and valleys.” A COMPLEX CONDITION Fat is not the cause of cellulite, Dr. Berger says. Cellulite is a complex condition that is caused by several factors, including the number of estrogen receptors a person has, estrogen itself, and the condition of the microcirculation and the extracellular matrix in the fat tissue. That’s why cellulite is rare in men. “Estrogen padding,” he says, “around the lower abdomen, hips, and thighs is evolutionary. It has to do with protection of the womb.” In addition, men’s and women’s fat tissue is different, he notes. Fibrous bands trap that fat, and the connective tissue under the skin changes over time, creating that distinctive cellulite appearance. 88

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Because of the complexity of the condition, says Dr. Berger, successful treatment has been elusive. “Until now, there’s been no real definitive treatment, only temporary treatments that offered improvement for days to maybe months, and then had to be continued.” Endermologie (lipomassage), mesotherapy (injections), and carboxytherapy (infusion of carbon dioxide into fat tissue) “were good, but not long term,” Dr. Berger says. “It’s a lot of work and expense for no significant improvement.” A BREAKTHROUGH TREATMENT Cellulaze is a breakthrough, Dr. Berger says, calling it a laser-like procedure that goes underneath the skin to the source of the problem and provides long-lasting results. Is it a permanent solution? Because it’s a relatively new treatment, it’s still too soon to tell, but it’s promising. “It’s a game-changer and lasts many years,” says Dr. Berger. Cellulaze melts the fat in the bulges of the skin, breaks up the fibers that are trapping the fat, and thickens the skin. “It gives you long-lasting structural improvement and the disappearance of


the look of cellulite,” he explains. The procedure is similar to liposuction, but without suctioning out the fat. Minimally invasive, the time it takes depends on the size of the area to be treated. “The back of the legs takes about two hours,” Dr. Berger says. Additional areas—“saddlebags,” buttocks— will take longer. “There’s no need for sedation or general anesthesia,” he adds. A local numbing agent is injected and tiny incisions are made at the area to be treated. A laser fiber inserted through a small cannula evens out the fat, releases the fibrous bands trapping the fat, and stimulates collagen production to smooth the skin. Recovery time is minimal. “You will have some initial swelling, perhaps some bruising, but it will dissipate in one to three weeks. Most women will be back at the gym when the bruising fades. You do need to wear a compression garment for three days, and then a lighter garment for a few weeks,” he explains. Dr. Berger cautions that women have to be patient in their expectations, as it can take three months or more for the permanent results to show. “It’s not FA L L 2 0 1 4 • H E R E I N H A N O V E R

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LIVING WELL

instant gratification,” he says, but it should be good for at least four years. “There’s nothing remotely close to that [on the market],” he adds. Those with moderate cellulite will have the best results. It’s “not like an iron that’s going to iron everything away, but it will improve the appearance,” Dr. Berger says. The quality of the skin and age are factors in the effectiveness of the procedure, with younger women up to their 50s the best candidates. As always, Dr. Berger stresses the importance of good health habits in maintaining good skin conditions. “Good hormone balance, proper nutrition and diet, and exercise are important,” he notes. “Although you’re not going to cure cellulite, you can significantly reduce or eliminate its undesirable appearance and delay its recurrence for many years [after treatment], but you won’t cure the deep underlying cause of what is observed on the surface.” •

Dr. Berger’s New Book Published The Beverly Hills Anti-Aging Prescription by Dr. Andre Berger has been released. Dr. Berger shares years of expertise to reveal how to maintain a youthful appearance and mental clarity, along with physical health and vigor, by integrating a balanced approach to diet, exercise, quality sleep, and stress management. The hardcopy book is currently available on Amazon and Infinity Publishing. The eBook is available on Amazon, BN.com, Sony, Kobo, iTunes, and Overdrive.

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M O N E Y M AT T E R S BY

COLLEGE TUITION

Brian Doyle

Anxiety?

Get schooled on financial aid, whatever your income level Did you know that in the 2012–2013 academic year, more than $238.5 billion in financial aid (grants, federal loans, federal work–study, and federal tax credits and deductions) was awarded to undergraduate and graduate students? And that those students came from households Assume you are eligible for spanning a wide range aid until you’re told other- of household incomes? During that same period, wise. There are no specific the average amount of guidelines and no rules of aid for a full-time college thumb that can accurately or university student was predict the aid you and your $13,730, including $7,190 in grants (which don’t student may be offered. have to be repaid) and $4,900 in federal loans. Once you realize how many resources may be available to your student and begin your research on financial assistance, you might be on your way toward easing some of the anxiety associated with

paying for higher education. Here are five tips you need to know about seeking financial help for your student’s tuition costs. Start planning for aid during your student’s high-school years. Pay particular attention to your child’s junior year of high school, and reposition assets or adjust income before that year begins. When financial-aid officers review a family’s need, they analyze the family’s income in the calendar year that begins in January of the student’s junior year of high school. Assume you are eligible for aid until you’re told otherwise. There are no specific guidelines and no rules of thumb that can accurately predict the aid you and your student may be offered. Because each family’s circumstances are different, you’ll want to keep an open mind as you consider various financial-aid alternatives. A number of factors, such as having several children in school at the same time, could increase your eligibility. >> FA L L 2 0 1 4 • H E R E I N H A N O V E R

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Reassess assets held by your children. Federal institutions expect children to contribute 20 percent of their savings toward the costs of their education, while parents are expected to contribute up to 5.64 percent of their savings. That’s why assets held in custodial accounts may reduce the aid for which the family qualifies. Assets held in Coverdell Education Savings Accounts (ESAs) and 529 plans will be factored into the parent’s formula, having less effect on the aid for which the family qualifies. Steer grandparents’ gifts in the right direction. Grandparents’ hearts often lead them toward gifting directly to grandchildren or paying the student’s tuition expenses. Even though payments made directly to the institution avoid gift taxes, institutions generally count these payments as an additional resource the family has for college expenses. Distributions from grandparentowned 529 plans are also considered as additional resources and assessed as a student’s income, which reduces the amount of aid he or she is eligible for. A better idea for grandparents may be to consider gifting to a 529 plan owned by the parent or student. The financial-aid treatment of gifts to a 529 plan is generally more favorable than that for gifts made directly to the student, and grandparents may realize estate tax and gifting benefits by using this alternative. 92

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The financial-aid treatment of gifts to a 529 plan is generally more favorable than that for gifts made directly to the student.

Assess your family’s financial situation to determine the amount of funding your student will need. Gather records and begin researching available financial aid, grants, loans, and scholarships. Two forms will be key to your aid application process: the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and the College Scholarship Service Financial Aid Profile (PROFILE). The FAFSA form helps you apply for federal aid, and many states also use it to determine a resident student’s eligibility for state aid. You can find this form in high-school guidance offices and college financial-aid offices or online at fafsa.ed.gov. Please consider the investment objectives, risks, charges, and expenses carefully before investing in a 529 savings plan. The official statement, which contains this and other information, can be obtained by calling your financial advisor. Read it carefully before you invest. •

Investments in securities and insurance products are: NOT FDIC-INSURED/NOT BANK-GUARANTEED/MAY LOSE VALUE. Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC, Member SIPC, is a registered broker-dealer and a separate non-bank affiliate of Wells Fargo & Company. Brian Doyle is a Senior Financial Advisor and Assistant Branch Manager with Wells Fargo Advisors. Brian lives with his wife and three children right here in Hanover. FA L L 2 0 1 4 • H E R E I N H A N O V E R

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THE HOOD & THE HOP hoodmuseum.dartmouth.edu The Hood Museum of Art is free and open to all. Public programs are free unless otherwise noted. Hours: Tuesday to Saturday, 10am to 5pm; Wednesday, 10am to 9pm; Sunday, 12pm to 5pm. For information, visit www.hoodmuseum.dartmouth.edu or call (603) 646-2808.

FA L L E X H I B I T I O N S

THE HOOD MUSEUM OF ART @ DARTMOUTH COLLEGE

A Space for Dialogue: Fresh Perspectives on the Permanent Collection from Dartmouth’s Students Ongoing

José Clemente Orozco: The Epic of American Civilization Ongoing

The Art of Weapons: Selections from the African Collection Through December 20

Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties Through December 21

Allan Houser: A Centennial Exhibition Through May 10, 2015

SEPTEMBER 25 ∂ Film Screening: Wodaabe: Herdsmen of the Sun (1989, 52 min.) ▷Hood Museum of Art Auditorium, 6pm

26 ∂ Gallery Talk: Understanding Michaux ▷Kim Gallery, 7pm

27 ∂ Exhibition Tour: Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties ▷2pm

Allan Houser, Watercarrier, 1986, bronxe, edition of 8. © Chiinde LLC, exhibition loan courtesy of Allan Houser, Inc. Photo by Alison Palizzolo.

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29 ∂ Lecture: To the Spirit! The Art of William Christopher and the Civil Rights Movement ▷Hood Museum of Art Auditorium, 5:30pm

NOVEMBER 1 ∂ Family Workshop: Let’s Go to Africa: Exploring The Art of Weapons ▷1–2:30pm

4 ∂ Lunchtime Gallery Talk ▷12:30pm Allan Houser, Options, 1992, bronze, edition of 6. © Chiinde LLC, exhibition loan courtesy of Allan Houser, Inc. Photo by Alison Palizzolo.

5 ∂ Lecture: Continuity and Transformation in Eastern Arctic Art ▷Hood Museum of Art Auditorium, 4:30pm

OCTOBER

24 ∂ Lecture: Civil / Rights / Act: Art and Activism in the 1960s

11 ∂ Lunchtime Gallery Talk: Black / Rights / Concrete Abstract

▷Hood Museum of Art Auditorium, 5pm

▷12:30pm

▷Hood Museum of Art Auditorium, 4:30pm

25 ∂ Special Tour: Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties

12 ∂ Adult Workshop: Learning to Look: José Clemente Orozco’s Mural

10 ∂ The Dr. Allen W. Root Contemporary Art Distinguished Lecture: Apaches Forever: Allan Houser, 100 Years, 100 Drawings

▷Second-floor galleries, 2pm

▷6:30–8:30pm

7 ∂ The Kenneth and Harle Montgomery Endowment Lecture: A Life in Photography

The Hood & The Hop is sponsored by Hanover Eyecare

▷Hood Museum of Art Auditorium, 5pm

14 ∂ Lunchtime Gallery Talk: Black Power’s Global Vision: Decolonization Movements in Latin America and the Caribbean ▷Second-floor galleries, 12:30pm

15 ∂ Artist Talk: Jae Jarrell and Wadsworth Jarrell ▷Hood Museum of Art Auditorium, 5pm

16 ∂ Special Performance: Reading of A Raisin in the Sun ▷Second-floor galleries, 7pm

18 ∂ Special Tour: Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties ▷2pm

22 ∂ Adult Workshop: Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties ▷6:30–8:30pm

24–25 ∂ Exhibition Celebration Events: Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties FA L L 2 0 1 4 • H E R E I N H A N O V E R

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HOPKINS CENTER EVENTS

@ DARTMOUTH COLLEGE

hop.dartmouth.edu For information, tickets, or pricing information, call the Hopkins Center Box Office at (603) 646-2422 or visit www.hop. dartmouth.edu. The Hopkins Center Box Office is open Monday through Friday from 10am to 6pm.

September 28 ∂ The Adventures of Robin Hood

SEPTEMBER 17–18 ∂ An Iliad ▷The Moore Theater, 7pm

8 ∂ Richard Goode, Piano 27 ∂ HopStop Family Series: Tanglewood Marionettes, Cinderella

▷Spaulding Auditorium, 7pm

▷Alumni Hall, 11am

10 ∂ Miwa Matreyek, This World Made Itself

27 ∂ The Clayton Brothers Quintet

▷Warner Bentley Theater, 7 & 9pm

▷Spaulding Auditorium, 8pm

OCTOBER

12 ∂ Chamberworks ▷Rollins Chapel, 1pm

2 ∂ W. Kamau Bell ▷Spaulding Auditorium, 7pm

13 ∂ Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis

4 ∂ HopStop Family Series: Revels North, The Mysteries of Haddon Hall

▷Spaulding Auditorium, 7pm

▷Top of the Hop, 11am

18 ∂ Dartmouth College Gospel Choir ▷Spaulding Auditorium, 7:30pm

5 ∂ Theatreworks USA, The Lightning Thief

21 ∂ Emerson String Quartet

▷Spaulding Auditorium, 3pm

▷Spaulding Auditorium, 7pm

September 26–27 Compagnie Marie Chouinard ▷The Moore Theater, 8pm

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25 ∂ Barbary Coast Jazz Ensemble ▷Spaulding Auditorium, 8pm

NOVEMBER 1 ∂ Dartmouth College Wind Ensemble ▷Spaulding Auditorium, 8pm

2 ∂ Chamberworks ▷Rollins Chapel, 1pm

5 ∂ World Music Percussion Ensemble ▷Spaulding Auditorium, 7pm

7–9 & 13–16 ∂ Dartmouth Theater Department, In the Next Room (or the Vibrator Play) ▷The Moore Theater, Thu–Sat 8pm, Sun 2pm

9 ∂ Dartmouth College Glee Club ▷Rollins Chapel, 2pm

11 ∂ Sally Pinkas with Julian Milkis & Alexandre Brussilovsky ▷Spaulding Auditorium, 7pm

15 ∂ Pat Metheny Unity Group ▷Spaulding Auditorium, 8pm

November 12 Diego El Cigala ▷Spaulding Auditorium, 8pm

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UMAN

HAPPENINGS: Fall 2014 SEPTEMBER ∂ OCTOBER ∂ NOVEMBER

Through September 7 Exhibit: A T. Rex Named Sue ▷Montshire Museum of Science

Montshire Museum of Science One Montshire Road Norwich, VT (802) 649-2200 www.montshire.org

SEPTEMBER

September 15, 22, 29 & October 16, 23, 30 Afterschool Adventures Program for K–2

1 ∂ Rocks & Volcanoes

▷Drop off 3:15–3:30pm, pick up at 5:15

Through September 7 Exhibit: A T. Rex Named Sue

▷11am

1 ∂ Lab Coat Investigations

17 ∂ Young Scientist Program (Session 1)

▷3pm

▷9:30am & 1pm

September 12–November 15 Montshire First LEGO League Team

September 26, October 24 & November 21 Fridays for Teen Tinkerers

▷Tuesdays and Fridays, 3:30–5pm

▷6:30–8pm

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15 ∂ Books and Beyond! Science for Preschoolers

27 ∂ Archeology Day

▷10:15 & 11:30am

▷10:30am–4pm

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September 18 & November 20 “True” Thursdays Howe Library’s nonfiction book discussion group meets every other month on the third Thursday. Copies of each month’s book are available for checkout to everyone, regardless of whether they are library cardholders. Contact the library for our selections. ▷6:30pm

SEPTEMBER 22 ∂ Bill Mares on Beekeeping ▷7pm

September 12 Exhibit: Only Owls ▷Montshire Museum of Science

Howe Library

OCTOBER

13 South Street Hanover, NH (603) 643-4120 www.howelibrary.org

October 3 & November 14 Montshire Unleashed: An Evening for Adults ▷6–9pm

5 ∂ Mushroom Walk

September 9, October 7 & November 4 Books and Lunch on Tuesdays

▷1–4pm

Bring a bag lunch and an appetite for good discussion! Copies of each month’s book are available for checkout to everyone, regardless of whether they are library cardholders. Contact the library for information on our monthly selections. ▷12pm

6 ∂ Magic Carpet Program: Thailand ▷11am

13 ∂ Owl Pellet Dissection ▷11:30am & 2:20pm

29 ∂ Young Scientist Program (Session 2) ▷9:30am & 1pm

OCTOBER 1 ∂ The Universe of Sherlock Holmes ▷7pm

8 ∂ Nicoletta Gullace on Societal Changes in WWI ▷7pm

22 ∂ A Study in Scarlet – 2014 ▷7pm

Happenings is sponsored by St. Johnsbury Academy

NOVEMBER 3 ∂ Magic Carpet Program: Alaska ▷11am

November 3, 10 & 17 Afterschool Adventures Program: Inventor’s Workshop ▷Drop off 3:15–3:30pm, pick up at 5:15

22 ∂ Machine Madness ▷1–3pm >> FA L L 2 0 1 4 • H E R E I N H A N OV E R

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HAPPENINGS

Norwich Bookstore Norwich Square 291 Main Street Norwich, VT (802) 649-1114 www.norwichbookstore.com

October 14 ∂ Book Launch: Jodi Picoult, Leaving Time ▷Norwich Bookstore, 9am

SEPTEMBER 10 ∂ Ann Hood: An Italian Wife ▷7pm

13 ∂ Second Saturday: S.S. Taylor: The Expeditioners and the Secret of King Triton’s Lair ▷1–3pm

17 ∂ Garret Keizer: Getting Schooled: The Re-education of an American Teacher ▷7pm

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20 ∂ Norwich Square Fall Fest & Norwich Bookstore’s 20th Birthday Celebration ▷10am–4pm

OCTOBER 11 ∂ Second Saturday: Save the Date! ▷1–3pm

15 ∂ Archer Mayor: Proof Positive ▷7pm

22 ∂ James Gustave Speth: Angels By the River: A Memoir ▷7pm

29 ∂ Deirdre Heekin: An Unlikely Vineyard: The Education of a Farmer and Her Quest for Terroir ▷7pm

NOVEMBER 11 ∂ Second Saturday: Save the Date! ▷3pm

Other Noteworthy Events Through September 27 Exhibit: Spotlight on North Family Cooperage Enfield Shaker Museum, www.shakermuseum.org

» FA L L 2 0 1 4 • H E R E I N H A N OV E R

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HAPPENINGS

October 12 ∂ 12th Annual Pumpkin Festival Cedar Circle Farm cedarcirclefarm.org ▷10am–3pm

“like” us on

facebook

SEPTEMBER 6 ∂ 10th Annual Norwich Antiques Show

Facebook Contests, Sweepstakes & Giveaways! Like us on Facebook for your chance to win great prizes!

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Norwich Historical Society norwichvthistoricalsociety.org

6 ∂ Community Cannery Days Find us on Facebook at mountainviewpublishing.com/facebook

F I N D H E R E I N H A N OV E R AT W W W. M O U N TA I N V I E W P U B L I S H I N G. C O M

Cedar Circle Farm cedarcirclefarm.org ▷11am–3pm


ADVERTISERS INDEX

PHOTO BY RORI KELLEHER

OCTOBER 1 ∂ Performance Lecture: An Evening of George Gershwin Norwich Congregational Church norwichvthistoricalsociety.org

25 ∂ Fantastic Fall Fermentation Cedar Circle Farm cedarcirclefarm.org ▷11am–2pm

NOVEMBER 5 ∂ NPR’s Susan Stamberg Norwich Congregational Church norwichvthistoricalsociety.org

Action Garage Door 97 Alice Peck Day Hospital 78 All Kitchens of NH 65 America’s Mattress 10 Amy Tuller, Dietitian 79 Annemarie Schmidt European Face & Body Studio 60 Barton Group 71 Beans Art Store 97 Belletetes 4 Blood’s Catering 60 Brown’s Floormasters 80 Cabinetry Concepts & Surface Solutions 13 & 49 Candela Tapas Lounge 92 Carpenter & Main 51 Carpet King & Tile 102 Charter Trust Company 17 Cioffredi Associates 89 Co-Operative Insurance 8 Cota & Cota Oil 39 Courtyard by Marriott 90 Coventry Catering 83 Crossroads Academy 93 Crown Point Cabinetry 3 DRM 37 Dartmouth Bookstore 96 Dartmouth Coach 80 Designer Gold 88 Dorr Mill Store 65 Dowds’ Inn 19 Dr. Roger Phillips 101 Drummond Custom Cycles 89 Elements Hotel 79 Elevation Clothing 33 Essentials for Men 52 Estes & Gallup 83 Ferro Jewelers 48 Four Seasons/Sotheby’s Realty 53 G.R. Porter & Sons 100 Gilberte Interiors 78 Green Mountain Railroad 96 Hanover Country Club 84 Hanover Eyecare 95 Hanover Road Dental Health 77 Hanover True Value 52 Henderson’s Tree & Garden Service 63 Hilde’s Salon Vienna 58 Hill Opticians 88 Hubert’s 15 JMH Wealth Management 70 Jancewicz & Son 9 Jasmin Auto Body 92 Jeff Wilmot Painting 70 Just Paradise 50 K & M Frank Real Estate 64 Kendal at Hanover 97 Killdeer Farm 49 King Arthur Flour 48 Landshapes 37 LaValley Building Supply 53 League of NH Craftsmen 48

Ledyard National Bank 34 Lemon Tree Gifts of Hanover 50 Listen Community Services 36 Long River Studios 51 Lou’s Restaurant 50 MB Pro Landscape 59 Martha Diebold Real Estate Inside front cover Mascoma Savings Bank 21 McLane Law Firm 85 Men’s Top Choice 51 Mountain Meadow Golf Lounge Back cover NH March of Dimes 59 Nature Calls Inside back cover Neal Wallace Dental 2 Nefertiti Nails 93 Noodle Station 90 Northcape Design 89 Northern Motorsports 86 Norwich Antiques Show 92 Norwich Bookstore 52 Norwich Regional Animal Hospital 47 Norwich Wines 100 Perry’s Oil Co. 16 Peter French Fine Woodworking 71 Randall Mudge Architect 101 Rare Essentials 27 Ratliff Fine Properties 84 River Road Vet Clinic 90 River Stones Tavern 27 Riverlight Builders 93 Rodd Roofing Co. 5 Schell Noble 38 Sean’s Lawn & Garden 47 Six South Street Hotel 6 St. Johnsbury Academy 99 Summer Court Dental 64 Systems Plus Computers 71 Thai Orchid 70 The Chocolate Shop 48 The Gilded Edge 51 The Hanover Inn 11 The Hood Museum of Art 33 The J List 49 The Lyme Inn 85 The PowerHouse Mall 45 The Quechee Club 38 The Quechee Inn at Marshland Farm 64 The Ultimate Bath Showroom 7 The Woodlands 39 Timberpeg 77 Tuckerbox 79 Upper Valley Haven 46 Vermont Facial Aesthetics 100 Visiting Nurse & Hospice of VT & NH 84 Vitt, Brannen, Loftus 101 Wells Fargo Advisors 1 We’re Makin’ Waves 16 White River Yarns 52 Woodstock Inn 45 YMCA Camp Coniston 102

For more information about print and online advertising opportunities, contact Bob Frisch at (603) 643-1830 or email rcfrisch1@comcast.net. FA L L 2 0 1 4 • H E R E I N H A N OV E R

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H A N OV E R TA L K S BY

Mark Dantos

A Chat with

David Goudy

Thirty-four years ago, David Goudy left Missouri to become the executive director of the Montshire Museum of Science. He reimagined the science center—from its crowded roots in a Hanover bowling alley to the spacious Norwich complex that has inspired generations of children and families. “We will have over 1,000 visitors today,” David recently reported from his office. “The sounds of laughter and pleasure as these families enjoy learning and sharing are a source of great satisfaction for me.” In March, David will retire. But like the Montshire Museum itself, he plans to keep exploring the natural world through hands-on experiences and outdoor adventures. Why did you once decide to canoe the entire length of the Connecticut River? The Connecticut is a central feature to our Upper Valley, and every day the water quietly comes to us from the north and continues on toward the south. I was curious about the nature of 104

PHOTO BY JON FOX

Executive Director of the Montshire Museum

the river above and below us, where it starts and where it ends, and what are its changing characteristics along the way. I was also intrigued by the many examples of rivers, literally or metaphorically, as a central structure in literature—for example, Huckleberry Finn, The Wind in the Willows, Thoreau’s journals from the Concord and Merrimack Rivers. Two weeks of paddling seemed a good time to read and reflect on rivers. How did you become the avid gardener you are today? To be clear, avid does not necessarily mean skilled. Every season’s garden is a humbling experience in how much is not understood. Prior to Montshire, I worked at the Missouri Botanical Garden and learned many organic gardening techniques from one staff horticulturist. I particularly remember his demonstration that a properly constructed compost pile should generate enough heat to cook dinner. We ate well in that workshop.

F I N D H E R E I N H A N O V E R AT W W W. M O U N TA I N V I E W P U B L I S H I N G .CO M

What are your earliest driving memories? I grew up on a farm, so I was driving at an early age—about 11, as I remember. I raked hay and pulled grain wagons with an old John Deere with a single cylinder engine and large flywheel. What was the first record album you ever purchased? We had few records in our home, but my parents had just upgraded to a record player that handled LP records. Having heard Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue” on the radio, I was excited to actually own it and probably wore the grooves out with repeated playing. How has the Montshire experience influenced the region’s young people? It is not unusual to hear from young adults whose childhood experiences at the Montshire led them into the sciences or into science education. It’s so rewarding to be in one place long enough to hear these stories from our “alums” and know that we are making an impact that may take many years to surface. •


Profile for Mountain View Publishing

Here in Hanover - Fall 2014  

Read about the 10th Annual Norwich Antiques Show, Appalachian Trail Volunteers, the Hampshire Cooperative Nursery School and more in the Fal...

Here in Hanover - Fall 2014  

Read about the 10th Annual Norwich Antiques Show, Appalachian Trail Volunteers, the Hampshire Cooperative Nursery School and more in the Fal...