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VOL. 13 NO. 6

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2008

NEWS HEADLINES PRIMARY ELECTION - Democrats and Republicans will take to the polls next week, to choose their candidates for state office. See pages 50 through 55 for profiles of the candidates.

50 cents

Senior center employees give up a day of work to save staff Voluntary pay cuts mean that all will be able to keep their jobs By Lynn R. Parks

SCHOOL UNIFORMS - Delmar students Bianca Johnson, left, and Shytayzia Parker are shown in their uniforms prior to the start of school. See page 56 for more photos. Photo by Mike McClure FOOTBALL SEASON - The Delmar and Laurel football teams open the season on the road this Saturday. See the Delmar football preview story on page 43. LADY BULLDOGS - The Laurel varsity field hockey team opens the season in Salisbury on Saturday. See preview story on the Lady Bulldogs on page 43.

INSIDE THE STAR BUSINESS BULLETIN BOARD CHURCH CLASSIFIEDS EDUCATION ELECTION ‘08 ENTERTAINMENT FINAL WORD FRANK CALIO GOURMET HEALTH LYNN PARKS MIKE BARTON

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Employees at the Laurel Senior Center have completed the first of two eight-week periods of shortened work weeks. Center director Penny Duncan said that the shortened work weeks for eight of the center’s 17 employees were made necessary by cuts in state funding. The state’s Grants-in-Aid spending was down this fiscal year, which started July 1, by 5.2 percent. This year’s state funding for senior centers was $6.7 million. The Laurel center received about $22,000 less in its state Grants-in-Aid funding this year than it got last year. That was about a nine-percent cut, Duncan said. As a result, the employees whose salaries are paid by the state funding, including Duncan, agreed to work only four days a week, and take the consequent pay cuts, for 16 weeks. The 16 weeks were divided into two periods, the first of which started the first week in July. The second eight-week period will be some time after Christmas. “That will come very close to making up” the funds that the center lost, Duncan said. When she learned about the funding cut, Duncan and the affected employees held a meeting. “We talked about it, and we all agreed that we didn’t want to see anyone laid off,” she said. “We have two part-time people and laying them off would have helped us a lot. But we all agreed that we didn’t want to do that.”

Above are five of the eight employees of the Laurel Senior Center who just finished an eight-week period of reduced work weeks. The employees agreed to the work reduction and pay cut so that no one would be laid off in the wake of a state funding cut. From left: Shirley Johnson, Penny Duncan, Jimmy Johnson, Carol Montague and Harriet Joyce. The other three employees are Fay Johnson, Mildred Price and Adele Morris. Photo by Pat Murphy

She added that the employees unanimously endorsed the plan for shortened work weeks. “They all agreed to take one day off a week without pay,” she said. Duncan said that this was not an insubstantial sacrifice. For her, losing a day’s worth of pay meant about $150 less in her weekly paycheck.

“A lot of the employees could not afford to take a pay cut,” she said. “It was a struggle. But we all agreed that we did not want to see our co-workers without a job.” Employees also did not want to see services that the center offers cut in Continued on page five

Head of Nanticoke Memorial resigns Mark Rappaport will stay at the hospital through Dec. 19 By Lynn R. Parks After less than a year in office, Nanticoke Health Services CEO Mark Rappaport has resigned. He will leave his office effective Dec. 19. Rappaport has accepted a job as senior vice president of operations at the Robert Wood Johnson University

Hospital in New Brunswick, N.J. He grew up in Philadelphia, about 50 miles from New Brunswick, and worked in hospitals in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, as well as the Lewis County General Hospital, Lowville, N.Y., before coming to Seaford. “Professional and personal reasons draw me to New Jersey,” Rappaport

said in a press release. “It is truly that simple.” “This is a great opportunity for him,” hospital spokesman Tom Brown said. “We are very disappointed, because he did a great job here, but when opportunity presents itself, you Continued on page five


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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

Above, representatives from Georgetown and Bridgeville area teams join fund founders Pat and David Horsey at the grants presentation. On right, the Horseys are joined by representatives from Laurel area teams.

Horsey Foundation Fund hands out $49,000 to area sports groups Up to 4,000 youngsters will benefit from $49,024 in grants made by the Horsey Family Youth Foundation to support organized sports programs in Kent and Sussex counties. The 12 organizations receiving the grants were recognized by Horsey Family Youth Foundation Fund founders David and Pat Horsey at the fourth annual grants presentation held Tuesday, Aug. 19, at the Shore Thunder Starz Building in Laurel. The Horsey Family Youth Foundation Fund is a charitable fund of the Delaware

Community Foundation. “We see the Horsey Family Youth Foundation as a hands up, not a hands out organization,” said David Horsey. “All of the organizations we support work hard to provide opportunities for youngsters to learn from the experience of playing competitive team sports. It’s very rewarding for us to help with everything from purchasing ball bats to helping pay for travel and operating expenses.” In Laurel, the organizations receiving grants included Delaware Storm, Delaware

Swoop, Laurel Little League, Laurel Pop Warner, Laurel Wrestling Boosters, Shore Thunder Starz and Sussex Storm. Other awardees include the Georgetown Little League and Sussex Central Pop Warner in Georgetown, Harrington Pop Warner in Felton, the Woodbridge track team in Bridgeville and Caesar Rodney/Dover Raiders Pop Warner. The Horseys created the Horsey Family Youth Foundation Fund at the Delaware Community Foundation (DCF) to support programs for youth in Southern Delaware.

Their goal is to try to keep children off drugs and the streets by encouraging them to become involved in education and sports programs. An estimated 3,500 to 4,000 youngsters will benefit from the grants that provide organized league sports including baseball, softball, cheerleading, football and wrestling. To learn how you can start a fund through the Delaware Community Foundation, call (302) 571-8004 or visit the Web site www.delcf.org.

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STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

HURRY IN FOR BEST SELECTION!

MILLION$ IN NEW REDUCTIONS JUST TAKEN! From left, Gerry Mitchell, Linda Hollis and Arsie Burton are members of one of two Nemours Health & Prevention Services teams playing in Nanticoke's golf tournament.

Nemours is sponsor of golf tournament With the help of community partner Nemours Health & Prevention Services and other community sponsors, Nanticoke Health Services hopes to raise over $35,000 from their 22nd annual golf tournament on Friday, Sept. 5. Proceeds will benefit the hospital's charity endowment prescription fund, a special indigent fund for patients in need of assistance with the cost of their prescriptions. The Nanticoke Health Services Golf Tournament will be held at the Seaford Golf and Country Club. The day includes practice, lunch, 18-holes of golf, dinner and door prizes. A full field of participants is expected with a noon shotgun start and scramble format. A Nemours 5-2-1 Red Ball Competition will be held that involves each team keeping a designed red ball in play for all shots from tee to cup for each hole. The red ball rotates among players with each member playing the ball for the entire hole. Upon completion of 18 holes, the team who still has the red ball in play is the winner. Teams of four players will compete for various prizes. Golfers will test their skills in contests for Longest Drive, Closest-To-The-Pin, Hit-The-Green and a Hole-In-One. All participants will have the opportunity to putt through a three-step qualifying round. After dinner, three people will putt for $2,500 each. Entry fees are $150 per player and $600 for a foursome. Sponsorships packages are available. For individual reservations or sponsorship opportunities, contact the Nanticoke Health Services Development office at 302-629-6611, ext. 2404 or email MorrisR@nanticoke.org.

Sussex County government to recognize 9/11

The public is invited to attend a brief ceremony commemorating the seventh anniversary of the September 11 terror attacks, on Tuesday, Sept. 9, at 6 p.m. in the County Council chambers, 2 The Circle, in Georgetown. The event will commence with the Sussex County EMS Honor Guard presentation of the colors. Patriotic music will follow, with selections including the ‘Star-Spangled Banner,’ ‘Amazing Grace,’ ‘Taps,’ and ‘God Bless America,’ played by “A Touch of Brass” and a member of the Delaware State Police Bagpipe and Drum Corps. John Smith, Sussex County EMS Chaplain and retired New York City police officer, will deliver a few remarks about the significance of 9/11 and those who serve. Terry Jester, from the Delaware Volunteer Firemen’s Association and chief of Memorial Fire Company in Slaughter Beach, will sound the bells to honor those who were lost on Sept. 11, 2001. The event is open to the public and parking will be available on local streets.

Gift Shoppe to host ‘Books are Fun’

Shop early for the holidays in the lobby at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital on Thursday, Sept. 18, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Friday, Sept. 19, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Look-In Glass Gift Shoppe at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital is hosting a “Books Are Fun” fair featuring quality books and unique gifts at great savings. All proceeds from The Look-In Glass Gift Shoppe benefit Nanticoke Health Services.

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PAGE 4

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

Laurel Council discussion about grass ordinance gets a little testy By Tony E. Windsor Members of Laurel’s Town Council seemed to become somewhat frustrated as the issue of the town’s system for notifying property owners about the need to cut grass was discussed. During the Tuesday, Aug. 2, meeting of Mayor and Council, Councilman Chris Calio expressed his concerns to Town Code Enforcement Officer, Paul Frick, about the need for the grass to be cut on the property of the proposed Village Brook West development near Discount Land Road. “The grass on the property at Village Brook West is so high you could lose a small child in it,” Calio said. “I think the [town] ordinance says we notify property owners when the grass gets six-inches high.” Frick responded that he had called the property owner and was promised that the grass would be cut. However, thus far the property owner has not taken care of the grass, so he will be sending out a certified letter making him aware that if the grass is not cut, the town will do it and charge him. Calio asked if the town made phone calls to all residents regarding grass needing to be cut. Frick told Calio that he has

done it in previous cases, but not necessarily all cases. Calio said he feels this is an issue of fairness. “We need a policy that is cut and dried,” he said. Town Manager Bill Fasano said that when the town has easy access to a property owner calling them is “the courteous thing to do” rather than sending a letter. Calio told Fasano that if the town is going to call one property owner it should call every property owner. Fasano reacted to Calio’s comment stating, “This is a small community. We don’t have 50,000 residents.” Calio said the size of the town was not the issue. “If we are not going to give everyone the opportunity of a phone call, then where is the fairness?” Fasano said that there is a difference between the law and policy. “Part of enforcing the law is the administration of policy,” he said. “When we are able to make a phone call, we do. That is part of administering policy.” Calio then questioned Fasano about the meaning of his statement. “Are we now saying that town codes are not law,” he asked? Frick said in the past he has used phone calls as a way of helping to “foster good working relationships” with property own-

Laurel to discuss repayment of $2.5 million loan to Delaware By Tony E. Windsor The Town of Laurel is poised to borrow $2.5 million from the state to improve its municipal water distribution system. During the Tuesday, Sept. 2, meeting of Laurel Mayor and Council, Town Manager Bill Fasano said that the town has been offered a 25-year loan with no interest. “We are the only municipality in the state who has been offered this type of no interest loan, so we should take advantage of this opportunity,” he said. “We need to find a way to pay it back in a way that is fair to the community.” Fasano said the Laurel Finance Committee will be meeting to discuss how the loan should be paid back and it is anticipated that full recommendations should come before council by the Monday, Sept. 15, meeting of Mayor and Council. The water improvements include enhancing the water pressure throughout the town by installing larger water pipes. This, according to Fasano, is not only an outstanding opportunity for Laurel residents, but also an answer to a safety concern involving the Laurel Volunteer Fire Department. “These improvements are a matter of public safety. We want to make sure we have sufficient water pressure for adequate fires service, as well as for our residents,” he said. Public Works Supervisor, Woody Vickers, said there are water pipes in the town that have pipes that are four inches in diameter, but over the year build up in the pipes have narrowed them to a width of 2 and a half inches. He said the plan is to replace the 4-inch pipes with at least 8inch pipes, or 10-inch pipes in some cases. Councilman Donald Phillips, chairman of the Finance Committee, said he agrees with Fasano that the town is fortunate to have gotten the opportunity for a no-interest loan from the Delaware Office of

Drinking Water. “If you consider a zero interest loan in comparison to a loan that has four percent interest, it is like getting the work done for half the money. Having a traditional four percent interest would mean an additional $1.5 million we would have to repay,” he said. Fasano added that the loan runs for five years without the town having to make any payments. In the sixth year the town will start paying back the state at a flat $100,000 per year. “Over the course of the 25-year life of the loan we will see a difference in the value of the dollar, so eventually this $100,000 payment will gradually become more affordable,” he said. Along with having meetings with the Finance Committee to determine the proper path forward for repaying the $2.5 million loan, the town will also be meeting with representatives of the State Office of Drinking Water. The issue will most likely come back before the Mayor and Council during the Sept. 15 meeting.

Laurel Star Published by Morning Star Publications Inc. 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243

The Laurel Star (USPS #016-427) is published weekly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Seaford, DE. Subscriptions are $19 a year in county; $24 a year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharptown and Federalsburg, Maryland; $29 elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address changes to Laurel Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

ers, especially contractors who are working for developers. He said, however, he wants to make it clear that everyone gets the certified letter when the grass needs to be cut. Fasano said by making phone calls the issue of the grass can be addressed before a letter is needed. “It costs five dollars to send out a letter. If we can get the problem taken care of with a phone call, we are actually being good stewards of the tax payers’ money,” he said. Fasano then told Calio that he needed direction on how to proceed with notifying residents about high grass. “If you want to dictate policy, then you need to give some direction. I will be happy to do whatever it is you want,” he said. Calio said he does not care how the town addresses the grass issue, he just wants it to be done in a uniform manner to assure fairness. “It is unfair for anyone who gets a notice without the benefit of a phone call,” he said. “Whether it is a call or letter, I really don’t care how you do it. I just want it done in a fair way. That’s all I am getting at.” Mayor John Shwed said he understands where Calio is coming from. “I get phone calls from residents who have received a certified letter about cutting their grass and the want to know why they did not get a phone call. I think Mr. Calio is sincere about his concern. It is possible that the town staff could get distracted by other responsibilities and not be able to make a phone call. All I am trying to say is let’s do whatever we can to make sure everyone gets treated fairly,” he said.

Frick said in the past, the town has knocked on the door of a resident who is not in compliance with the grass cutting ordinance. If no one is home they would leave a notice on the door knob. However, the notice most generally would be ignored and the town would wind up sending out a certified letter. “Like I said I am only trying to foster good working relationships by given the courtesy of a phone call when I can,” Frick said. “I assure you that from now on I will follow the code to the letter, regardless of what it costs the town. From now on we will not waste time making phone calls.” Councilman Don Phillips said he agrees that Laurel is still a small town and he sees no reason why when it is available, a phone call cannot be made to discuss the need for compliance to the town’s codes. “I think we can call a property owner, but also send the letter,” he said. “I think the phone call will soften the impact of the certified letter. These people will understand you are simply following procedure.” Council President Terry Wright said he would like to see the phone calls remain part of the process of notifying residents about being in compliance with town codes. “I think we need the phone calls,” she said. “I would like us to try and not become that big machine that has no personality.” The discussion of the issue ended without any action being taken outside of Frick’s comments about not making phone calls in the future.

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

PAGE 5

Rappaport leaves behind a ‘solid Library to host meetings foundation,’ board president says of Sussex County ‘cousins’ Continued from page one

have to take it.” The Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital is a 600-bed facility. In this year’s U.S. News and World Report’s ranking of America’s best hospitals, it was among the top 50 for heart surgery and treatment of respiratory disorders. The American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer rated the hospital as among the nation’s best comprehensive cancer centers. Rappaport took over the reins at Nanticoke Oct. 29. In an interview shortly after his arrival in Seaford, he said that financial difficulties at the hospital, and the opportunity to right them, were part of what attracted him to the job. In the last three years, including the fiscal year that ended June 30, the hospital has lost money, $1.1 million in 2006 and $1.8 million in 2007. Brown was unable to say what the loss was in 2008. “We have not received our final audited statements so I cannot release a number,” he said. This year, the hospital is on track to end with a surplus of about $1 million, Brown said. “Mark’s leadership has been important in placing Nanticoke on a solid foundation on which we can build,” said Robert Boyd, president of the hospital board. “We are in a much better position today as a

The Laurel Public Library and the Sussex County Genealogy Society are forming a new roundtable group to address connections between Sussex County families. The group, called Sussex County Cousins, will meet to share their genealogical research, compare notes on families and help each other unravel the puzzles of our ancestors and how they are related to each other. This informal group is not intended to be a how-to instruction for beginning genealogy, but rather a means of discovering other people who are researching branches of the same family trees. However, “cousins” new to genealogy research are welcome to join.

The first meeting will be held at the Laurel Public Library at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 24, in the Carpenter Community Room. After participants introduce themselves and the families they are researching, library staff will give an overview of the Delaware and Family History Collections at Laurel Library and how they, along with the available electronic databases, can be best used in Sussex County genealogy research. The meeting will last approximately one hour but the library remains open until 8 p.m. for those wishing to do more research. For details, email Norma Jean Fowler at normajean.fowler@lib.de.us or call 875-3184.

Center still waiting on federal funds Continued from page one

Mark Rappaport

result of his efforts.” Brown said that a search committee has already been formed to look for Rappaport’s replacement.

any way. Duncan designed a schedule so that all services continued uninterrupted. “It was a struggle to fill everything in,” she said. “But it was worth it. We weren’t looking at the little picture. We were looking at the big picture. There are people who need what we do five days a week, and we didn’t want to see them suffer.” But the senior center isn’t out of the

woods yet. Some of its funding, for its transportation and for its adult day-care program, comes from the federal government. That budget is due to be finalized by Oct. 1. “We have requested our federal funding, and we are waiting for that to come back, to see what it is,” Duncan said. The center has about 500 members. It serves up to 100 people a day, including its homebound meal program.


PAGE 6

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

Business Schedule set for wind power contracts throughout Delmarva

Mr. and Mrs. Paul W. Coffin accept the Bronze Director Award at the 2008 United Check Cashing Annual Convention.

Local check cashing center wins IFA franchisee of the year award Paul W. Coffin, franchisee of the United Check Cashing Center located in Salisbury, Md., was awarded the title of 2008 Franchisee of the Year by the International Franchise Association (IFA) and United Financial Services Group. Coffin will be recognized by the IFA and United at the Franchise Appreciation Day Leadership Dinner on Monday, Sept. 15, in Washington, D.C. Coffin opened his United Check Cashing service center in May 1999. He has re-

ceived several honorable awards for maintaining a high level of operational excellence, high sales volume and superior customer service. United Check Cashing serves the unbanked and under-banked segments of the population by providing check cashing, money order, wire transfer, bill payment, and other complimentary financial services. Coffin’s United Check Cashing service center is open Monday through Saturday.

Breeding chosen as delegate

must provide top-level client service and marketing support for my activities,” said Melinda Tingle, local financial advisor for the firm. Edward Jones provides financial services for individual investors in the United States and, through its affiliates, in Canada and the United Kingdom. For more information, visit www.edwardjones.com.

Chris Breeding of Greenwood has been elected as a delegate to the 125th Annual American Angus Association Convention of Delegates, which takes place Nov. 17 in Louisville, Ky. Breeding, a member of the American Angus Association with headquarters in Saint Joseph, Mo., is one of 402 Angus breeders who have been elected by fellow members in their state to serve as a representative at the annual meeting. The delegates will participate in the business meeting and elect new officers and five directors to the American Angus Association board. The American Angus Association has more than 34,000 active members and is the largest beef breed organization in the world.

Lowe joins Edward Jones

Amanda L. Lowe recently joined the Laurel office of Edward Jones as a branch office administrator (BOA). Lowe has lived in Laurel for 27 years. “A BOA is not only responsible for the daily operation of the branch, but also

Edward Jones hosts broadcast

Edward Jones Financial Advisor Melinda Tingle of Laurel will host a free satellite broadcast entitled, “Know Your Retirement Number,” at 11:30 a.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 9 at 204 Laureltowne in Laurel. During the video presentation, experts will discuss Social Security and Medicare, share common mistakes that may impact one’s retirement strategy and provide tips on how to help make one’s retirement money last. In addition, Edward Jones chief market strategist, Alan Skrainka, will give viewers an economic update. To reserve a seat or for more information about the program, call Amanda Lowe at 302-875-0355. For those unable to attend, additional viewing opportunities are available.

An aggressive schedule for reviewing three, long-term wind power contracts was set recently by the Delaware Public Service Commission. The contracts are critical to Delmarva Power meeting its ambitious clean energy goals for Delaware. “Our portfolio of offshore and landbased contracts makes Delmarva Power a leading utility in the nation for securing clean energy to meet Delaware’s goals,” said Delmarva Power Region President Gary Stockbridge. “I hope we’ll continue to see strong support from both regional and national environmental groups for these wind projects.” Highlights of the land-based wind power contracts, recently filed with the Commission, include: • Two, 20-year contracts with Annapolis, Md.-based Synergics Wind Energy for up to 100 megawatts of wind energy and renewable energy credits. The wind farms would be built on land in western Maryland, with one scheduled for 2009 and the other for 2010. • A 15-year contract with Arlington,

Va.-based energy supplier AES Corporation for up to 70 megawatts of wind energy and renewable energy credits. The wind farm would be built on land in Pennsylvania, and is projected to be built by 2010. Combined, the three, land-based wind contracts would generate up to 170 megawatts of wind energy and renewable energy credits for serving Delmarva Power’s customers who do not receive their energy from another supplier, most of whom are residential and small business customers. The total monthly impact to the typical residential customer for all three landbased wind contracts would be about $0.24. The long-term contracts, combined with an already-approved 25-year contract for offshore wind power, are part of a green energy portfolio designed to meet Delaware’s clean energy goals for 20 percent of the utility’s energy supply to come from renewable sources by 2019.

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PAGE 7

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

Visit seafordstar.com or laurelstar.com for descriptions of current movie selections

MO V I E S

Diamond State Drive-In Theater US Harrington, Del. 302-284-8307 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRI. 9/5 Babylon AD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:45 The Happening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:45 CLOSED SATURDAY AND SUNDAY

The Movies At Midway Rt. 1, Midway Shopping Ctr., Rehoboth Beach, 645-0200 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY 9/5 THRU THURSDAY 9/11 The Dark Knight . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:50, 3:50, 6:50, 9:50 Mamma Mia! The Sing-Along Edition . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:50, 4:20, 6:40, 9:00 Features the lyrics to every musical number. College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7:15, 9:20 Disaster Movie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:35, 3:45, 6:45, 9:05 The Longshots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:25, 4:05, 6:35, 8:50 Hamlet 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:10, 4:45, 7:25, 9:40 Tropic Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:20, 4:00, 7:10, 9:30 Death Race . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:40, 4:50, 7:25, 9:45 The House Bunny . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:05, 4:40, 7:20, 9:35 Star Wars: The Clone Wars . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:10, 3:30 Traitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 4:15, 7:00, 9:30 Pineapple Express . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:00, 4:30, 7:15, 9:40 Babylon AD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:45, 4:30, 7:05, 9:20 WALL-E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:05 Bangkok Dangerous . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:00, 4:35, 7:00, 9:15 Art House Theater Vicky Christina Barcelona . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:30, 4:10, 650, 9:10 all shows subject to change and availability

Clayton Theater Dagsboro, Del. 20 732-3744 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY 9/5 THRU SUNDAY, 9/7 - CLOSED MON. & TUES. Mamma Mia! . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nightly 5:00 Batman: The Dark Knight . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nightly 8:00

Regal Salisbury Stadium 16 2322 N. Salisbury Blvd., Salisbury, MD, 410-860-1370 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY 8/29 THRU THURSDAY, 9/4

CURRENT SCHEDULE WAS UNAVAILABLE AS OF PRESS TIME. Babylon AD . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(12:30, 2:45, 5:00) 7:30, 10:00 College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(12:20, 2:45, 5:15) 8:00, 10:30 Disaster Movie . . . . . . . . . . .(PG13) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(12:45, 3:00, 5:30) 8:15, 10:45 Hamlet 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(12:40, 3:00, 5:30) 8:15, 10:45 Traitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:30, 4:45) 7:45, 10:30 Death Race . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5:00, 7:45, 10:15 (Call for additional daily times) House Bunny . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(12:25, 2:50, 5:15) 8:00, 10:20 The Longshots . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:30, 4:30) 7:00, 9:40 The Rocker . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(2:15, 4:45) 7:30, 10:30 Mirrors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:45, 4:45) 7:30, 10:05 Star Wars: The Clone Wars . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:10, 3:30, 6:15 Tropic Thunder* . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:15, 4:15) 7:15, 9:50 Pineapple Express . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6:45, 9:40 Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants II . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:00, 3:45) The Mummy: Tomb of Dragon Emperor . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(3:30) 6:30, 9:15 Step Brothers . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10:00 Mama Mia . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:45, 4:30) 7:15 The Dark Knight . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(12:30, 3:45) 7:00, 10:15 WALL-E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(12:45)

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PAGE 8

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

Flyover at surrender was unforgettable experience By James Diehl E. Newt Tyndall flew 25 combat missions against the Empire of Japan during World War II. But his final mission was not one of combat, it was not one riddled with danger, nor was it one that involved gaining any sort of strategic advantage – it was one of complete and utter victory. One of the first navigators to serve on the United States’ new B-29 bombers, also known as the “super fortress,” in 1943, Tyndall was chosen to serve a very special mission on Sept. 2, 1945 – he and the rest of his crew led a group of 500 B-29s on a flight across Tokyo Bay. Below them, surrounded by destroyers and battleships and multiple other naval vessels sat the U.S.S. Missouri – on board, the official surrender of the Japanese was being carried out, ending the Second World War. “When we went over the Missouri, the deck was just covered with people who were in the ceremony. To me, it was a very sobering moment,” says Tyndall, who grew up on a farm just west of Georgetown. “Flying over, I can still remember the thought I had. I just realized that it was all over. We were all done.” The day was a long time coming for the 1936 graduate of Georgetown High School, a man who enlisted in the United States Army a week after the Emperor of Japan attacked the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on Dec. 7, 1941. “Things had been gradually worsening before Pearl Harbor; the country was already taking steps to prepare the military [for the possibility of war],” says Tyndall, who was 23 years old when he enlisted. “After Pearl Harbor, I just wanted to get in. So, I went back to the recruiting office in Wilmington and they signed me up. “Everybody was affected by Pearl Harbor. All of us young people were just ready to go and do something about it.” Tyndall underwent basic training at Randolph Field in San Antonio, Texas, before receiving navigator training at nearby Hondo Army Air Field in Hondo, Texas. After completing his training and commissioning as a second lieutenant, he was assigned to a navigation school at San Marcos, Texas, as an instructor. Toward the end of his 18-month tenure in San Marcos, Tyndall welcomed a new student to his classroom – to this day,

“Riker” is the only student whose name he still remembers. Not for good reasons, but for tragic, even ironic, ones. “When I was teaching the course on navigating, each of the instructors had six students at a time for about four months,” Tyndall recalls. “Riker had been a navigator for Pan American Airlines. He was perfectly capable of serving on a [B-29] already, but the Army required that he go through the navigation training.” So he did. Toward the end of the four-month course, navigation students were taken out on a night mission. They were to fly from their base in San Marcos, north to Dodge City, Kan., a distance of about 650 miles. Only three student navigators could fit in each plane, so each class had two aircraft – Tyndall was with a group of his students on one plane, while Riker was on the group’s other plane. “We were flying this night mission and, when we got up into Oklahoma, we could see a severe weather front up ahead of us,” Tyndall recalls. “It got so rough that I eventually told the three cadets I was with to close out their logs. We were turning back to go to Oklahoma City, but just as we were making the turn, I saw a tremendous fire up ahead and to the left a bit. “I thought at the time that lightning had struck an oil well, but the next day when we got back to San Marcos, I learned that two of our planes had crashed [there were 13 planes in the group]. One of the planes had my students on it.” A search party was immediately set up and the wreckage spotted pretty quickly, thanks to Tyndall’s recollection of the fire burst from the night before. “The crash was a terrible, terrible thing. There really wasn’t much left to identify,” Tyndall remembers. Not much – but one thing Tyndall found in the rubble remains with him to this day, more than 65 years later. “I found Riker’s college class ring in the wreckage,” he says somberly, obviously still affected by the crash all those years ago. Soon after the fatal accident, Tyndall decided it was time to do something different, so he volunteered for the Army’s new B-29 program. Assigned to the 58th Bombardment Wing, his unit was the first to take what was then the world’s largest aircraft into combat.

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Col. E. Newt Tyndall flew 25 combat missions against Japan during World War II, serving as a navigator aboard a B-29 bomber. He retired from the United States Air Force in 1972 after 30 years of military service.

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008 Stationed first in India and later at Tinian, in the Northern Mariana Islands, Tyndall flew 25 missions over Japanese-held territories in the Pacific. Each mission held its own dangers and had its own unique characteristics, but the young Sussex County native will never forget the very first one. “It was down over the Malay Peninsula, which is now Malaysia. We were going in and bombing the railroads of Kuala Lumpur,” remembers Tyndall, whose base was 60 miles west of Calcutta, India. “That was a 16hour mission and all except the first hour and the last hour were over enemy territory. And the whole mission was either over water or over jungle.” Packing 20 500-pound bombs, the men of the Robert J. Wilson – Tyndall’s aircraft – encountered much resistance along the way. Tyndall estimates around 40 Japanese fighter planes attempted to prevent them from completing that first mission. “We had intense fighter opposition, but very little ground fire,” he recalls. “We hit a lot of the fighters and a lot of them were going down. But their airfield was right there in Kuala Lumpur, so they didn’t have very far to go to make it back.” The Robert J. Wilson was equipped with 12 50-caliber guns, strategically located around the plane. It took many a hit during its 25 missions, but its crew was never shot down. Tyndall still thanks his lucky stars today that he never had to endure the horrors of a Japanese prison camp. “That was the thing I dreaded most – I did not want to have to bail out over Japan because of all the stories we heard about the treatment B-29 crews received from the Japanese,” he says. In May of 1945, as Japanese forces were on their heels and the war in the Pacific was beginning to wind down, Tyndall and the other 10 men of the Robert J. Wilson embarked on two missions that, to this day, are the most memorable of his days in

Asia. Both involved the bombing of Tokyo – one they very nearly didn’t return from. “They were both 15-hour missions and we had aiming points over Tokyo,” he remembers. “On the second mission, our aiming point was near the emperor’s palace. But, we were instructed not to bomb the palace because the emperor was a religious figure in Japan.” They flew over Tokyo, dropped their bombs and set out on the return trip to Tinian. It was anything but easy – it was a return flight that had the men of the Robert J. Wilson prepared to bail out at any time, hopefully not over Japan. “We took a bad hit from antiaircraft fire. It tore holes in the airplane and severed some of the contact cables,” Tyndall remembers. “We went back seven-anda-half hours, all the way to our base, wearing our parachutes and ready to bail out.” But they made it to Tinian and continued to fly missions against Emperor Hirohito until Aug. 14, 1945, the date of the final mission Tyndall would fly during World War II. “On August 14, we led the entire 58th Bomb Group on a mission over the naval arsenal at Hikari,” he says. “On the way back to Tinian, we heard on the short wave radio that the Japanese had surrendered. That was August 14 – August 15 in the United States.” As for U.S. President Harry S. Truman’s decision to drop atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, which effectively ended the war in the Pacific, Tyndall has a short and to-the-point response. “We were all in favor of them,” he says matter-of-factly. After making his victory run over Tokyo Bay on September 2, Tyndall volunteered to remain in the service. He was assigned to one of five special B-29 crews that participated in the Bikini Atomic Bomb Tests held the summer of 1946 in the Pacific. His crew dropped 27 inert “Fat Man” bombs, the type

DSWA recycles old analog TVs In preparation for the Feb. 2009 switch to digital television, the Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) is encouraging Delawareans who no longer want their old analog television to recycle them through DSWA’s Electronic Goods Recycling Program. DSWA's Electronic Goods Recycling Program allows residents to drop off their unwanted electronic items for free. DSWA has 24 locations throughout the state for residents to recycle their old electronic goods. The drop-off program is de-

signed to accept electronic goods, telecommunications equipment, toys, radios, televisions, and electroacoustic equipment such as calculators, computers and their parts, keyboards, printers, copiers, cables, phones, fax machines, answering machines and VCRs. Since the inception of the recycling program in 2002, almost eighteen million pounds of electronic goods have been kept out of landfills. For more information, call the Citizens’ Response Line at 800-404-7080 or visit www.dswa. com.

used in Japan the year prior. During the mission, he had a chance to work with nine crew members of the Enola Gay, the B-29 that dropped the first atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945. “Believe it or not, we never really talked about anything we had done. They were just a normal crew,” he says. Tyndall turned his nearly four years of experience during World War II into a full-fledged career, retiring from the United States Air Force as a colonel in 1972 af-

PAGE 9

ter 30 years of military service. As for World War II, he recognizes it was something that had to be done. “I have absolutely no animosity toward the Japanese now. But, on the other hand, neither do I offer any apologies for the missions I flew during the war. That was the situation then, this is the situation now,” he says. A father of five girls and one boy, he and his wife Thelma lived in Clemson, S.C. for 40 years before returning to Georgetown in 2007. While in Clemson,

Tyndall served as head of the Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corp (ROTC), and later as assistant to the president of Clemson University for eight years. For his service during World War II, Tyndall was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal, among other citations.

Attention Readers

We welcome suggestions for interviews of veterans who served during World War II. Contact Bryant Richardson at 629-9788.

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PAGE 10

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

Education Dover teacher nominates Biden for VP

BEARD EARNS MBA - Shane F. Beard, shown with his wife, Kimberly, recently completed the12-month MBA program at the Wilmington University School of Business in Georgetown, where he graduated summa cum laude. Beard, a graduate of Seaford High School, has a bachelor of science degree from Salisbury University in chemistry and economics. He is employed by Invista in Seaford and is an entrepreneur and business owner. He is the son of Carroll and Dot Beard. He and his wife, who have been married for almost 20 years, have two daughters, Sydney and Jenna.

Wilmington University fall classes set Wilmington University in Rehoboth Beach is offering a variety of fall courses and adult enrichment workshops, including: Introduction to Computers, Sept. 8 - Sept. 11, Sept. 29 – Oct. 2, and Sept. 26 – Oct. 17 Windows Operating System, Sept. 15 - Sept. 18 Introduction to Internet & email, Sept. 22 - Sept. 25 Selling on e-bay, Sept. 6 Sept. 27 Learning the Basics of Your Digital Camera, Sept. 15 - Sept. 18 Introduction to MAC, Sept. 8 Sept. 29 Basics of Spanish, Sept. 24 – Oct. 29 Basics of French, Sept. 24 – Oct. 29 Italian I, Sept. 22 – Oct. 27 Italian II, Sept. 22 – Oct. 27 Genealogy, Sept. 27 – Oct. 18

Short Fiction Writing, Concept and Completion, Sept. 22 – Sept. 25 The History of the Nanticoke Indian in Sussex County, Sept. 27 – Oct. 18 Water Miscible Oils, Sept. 8 – Sept. 29 Introduction to Acrylics, Sept. 9 – Sept. 30 Studio, Sept. 12 – Oct. 3 Getting to Know Your Digital Camera, Saturday, Sept. 13, 1 to 4 p.m. Italian Immersion, Saturday, Sept. 20, 9 a.m. to noon Vista Basics, Saturday, Sept. 20, 1 to 4 p.m. Troubleshooting for Your Home Computer, Saturday, Sept. 6, 1 to 4 p.m. For more information or to register, call 227-6295 or visit www.wilmu.edu/rehoboth.

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1-800-404-7080 or visit www.dswa.com

Quincy Lucas is a Delaware teacher, a supporter of victim’s rights and a doctoral student at Wilmington University. Recently, while sitting in her home in Dover, she received a phone call that would push her into the spotlight and bring some of the issues for which she has been fighting to light. Lucas was asked to give a speech at the Democratic National Convention to officially nominate Joe Biden for vice president of the United States of America. She accepted the invitation and in fewer than 24 hours she was flown out to Denver, Colo., to speak to a crowd of thousands and a TV audience of millions. Lucas teaches fourth grade at Silver Lake Elementary in the Appoquinimink School District. She is also taking classes at Wilmington University in Dover to complete her doctor of education degree. She is new to the program and had to ask to skip class on Wednesday night because she would be making a speech to the nation. Lucas became an advocate for

Quincy Lucas, a teacher at Silver Lake Elementary in the Appoquinimink School District, gave a speech at the Democratic National Convention to officially nominate Joe Biden for vice president.

victim’s rights and domestic violence awareness after her sister was brutally murdered by her exboyfriend. “Violence against women often happens in the shadows, out of public view. Since that time I have devoted my life to bring it to light,” said Lucas in her official nominating speech. “But I realize sometimes to change lives

you have to change the law.” Lucas went on to commend Biden for writing and supporting the Violence Against Women Act in 1994. “In memory of my sister and in the name of women all across this country, I am proud to place into nomination the name of Joe Biden to be our next vice president,” she said.


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

PAGE 11

Education Briefs Corporate and Community Programs at 302-854-6966.

Woodbridge grad teaching at Lake Rebecca Warrington, a graduate of Woodbridge High School, Bridgeville, was recently selected to teach integrated algebra and geometry to ninth- and 10th-grade students at Lake Forest High School, Felton.

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Adult Plus+ offering art classes

The Adult Plus+ program at Delaware Technical & Community College, Georgetown, is offering art classes this fall. Basic Drawing Skills will be held Aug. 27. Participants will learn how to draw what they see. The basics of watercolor and informal portrait drawing instruction will be held from Aug. 28 to Oct. 2. A woodcarving course will get underway Sept. 4. The Adult Plus+ Woodcarvers Club meets on Mondays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. For more information about these or other activities, contact Delaware Tech’s Adult Plus+ Program at 302-856-5618.

Fitness classes at Delaware Tech

Delaware Technical & Community College, Georgetown, is planning several fitness classes this fall. Beginning Sept. 2, a class in the basics of safety, stable management and equestrian skills will be held at Singletree Stables in Seaford. Also starting that day is a class in Tai Chi and an aerobics class for senior citizens, held at the YMCA in Rehoboth Beach. A class in belly dancing will start on Sept. 18. Ballroom dancing will be taught on Tuesdays beginning Sept. 23. The focus from 7 to 8 p.m. will be swing, fox trot and rumba; from 8 to 9 p.m., the cha cha, waltz and tango . For more information on these or other fitness activities, contact Delaware Tech’s

PNC Wealth Management announces the 2008-2009 recipients of several scholarships that it manages. Evelyn E. Stricklin Scholarships were awarded to Ryan Budke and Antonio Fascelli, both 2008 Seaford Senior High School graduates. The late Mrs. Stricklin, a lifelong resident of Wilmington, wished to provide a means for qualifying students who have financial need to attend the University of Delaware. Dr. Wilbur E. Postles Scholarships were awarded to Trevor Lee, a Seaford High School graduate who is enrolled at Messiah College; Kacie Pinnock, a Woodbridge High School graduate who is enrolled at York College; and Brittany Whittington, a Delmarva Christian High School graduate who is enrolled at Liberty University. To be eligible for the Postles scholarship, students must live in Delaware for at least four years prior to submitting an application. Consideration is given to the student’s academic merit and financial need. Ryan Budke and Andrew Halter, both graduates of Seaford High School, are recipients of the A. Katharine Richards Scholarship. To be eligible for the Richards scholarships, students must be residents of a Sussex County area school district and plan to attend the University of Delaware. Consideration is given to the student’s academic merit and financial need.

Sign up for SHS e-newsletter

Parents can sign up to receive the Seaford High School’s electronic newsletter, the Jay’s Eye, by e-mailing associate principal Doug Brown at dbrown@ seaford.k12.de.us. The e-mail should include "Sign Me Up” in the subject line. The Jay’s Eye can also be read online at www.seaford.k12.de.us/shs.

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(302) 628-1664

dancefitness@comcast.net

Emily Ritchie (left) and Jose Oyola, both of whom work with the Even Start Program in the Laverty Lane Housing Development in Bridgeville, show off a check that the program recently received from the Carl F. Freeman Foundation.

Literacy program receives grant The Sussex Tech Adult Division’s Even Start Family Literacy Program recently received a $5,000 grant from the Carl F. Freeman Foundation. The money will be used for classroom books for adults who are learning to speak English and for books for participating children. In Even Start, parents study English two nights per week while their children work with elementary teachers on their

reading and other literacy skills. The program also provides home visits. The program is a partnership between the Sussex Tech Adult Division, Woodbridge School District and the Delaware State Housing Authority. Classes are held at the Laverty Lane Housing Development in Bridgeville and Phyllis Wheatley Middle School in Bridgeville. For more information, call 856-9035.

ENT and Allergy Center, P.A. Claude J. DiMarco, D. O., F.A.O.C.O. Beth A. Rossi, PA-C Kathleen Gallion, Au.D., CCC-A 8468 Herring Run Rd., Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-3400

Dr. Claude DiMarco is pleased to announce that Kathleen Gallion, Au.D.,CCC-A, Clinical Audiologist, has joined his practice. Kathleen Gallion, Au.D. graduated from Edinboro State University, and received her Master’s degree from State University of New York with a 4.0 GPA. She earned a Doctorate in Audiology from the Arizona School of Health Sciences. Dr. Gallion has previously worked in an ENT practice, the Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center in Baltimore, the Veterans Administration and in the U.S. Navy teaching didactic and clinical phases of training in the otolaryngology technician school. Fluent in sign language, she worked as a program manager at the Deaf Independent Living Association and served on their board of directors. In addition to providing hearing aid services, she has extensive experience providing diagnostics, including auditory brainstem studies and vestibular system evaluation. Counseling and fitting computer-programmable hearing instruments is her special expertise. She also has significant experience evaluating pre-school children with a variety of diagnostic tools. We are now offering full Audiologic services which include, hearing aids, pediatric audiology, tympanometry, auditory evaluations, otoacoustics emissions, ABR’s and ENG’s. Please feel free to call the office today to set up an appointment with Dr. Gallion.


PAGE 12

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

Police Journal A 22-year-old employee of Anderson Recycling, Delmar, lost his leg last week when his pants got caught in a grinding machine and he was pulled into the machine. Police said that the Salisbury, Md., man was working by himself at the tire recycling center on Old Race Track Road at approximately 2:20 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 27, when he began repairs on a grinding apparatus. After the incident, the man took off his belt and tied it around his wound to reduce the bleeding, police said. The State Police helicopter responded to the scene and flew the man to Christiana Hospital near Wilmington, where he was last listed in critical condition. Because of the serious nature of this employee’s injuries, police are withholding his name. No foul play is suspected, police said.

Neighbors say that man beat dog with a metal pole

Delaware State Police have arrested a 46-year-old Greenwood man for animal cruelty and disorderly conduct charges after he allegedly severely beat a stray husky dog. On Wednesday, Aug. 27, at approximately 8 p.m., troopers and Animal Control officers responded to a residence in the 7000 block of Hickman Road, Greenwood, after a person called 911 to report that a man was

beating a dog with a metal pole. Witnesses said that Ronald L. Smith, 46, of Greenwood, was seen in the front yard of his home hitting a husky dog with his fists. The witnesses also told police that Smith was grabbing the dog by its throat and collar very aggressively. A short time later, Smith was seen striking the dog with a metal pole multiple times, police said. Witnesses reported that he struck the dog until it collapsed. Afterward, Smith was seen putting a rope around the neck of the dog and dragging the animal behind his residence, police said. After interviewing the witnesses, police responded to Smith’s residence, where they reportedly found a metal pole with blood on it and what appeared to be animal hair. They also observed blood smeared on the floor of the porch and on the side of the house, police said. Troopers contacted Smith, who appeared to be under the influence of alcohol. Smith acknowledged that he had taken in a stray husky dog recently, but said that he had given it away. Troopers began to check the area around Smith’s residence for the injured dog. While checking they reportedly observed an area beside the residence with footprints and what appeared to be drag marks. After following the drag marks, they found several spots of blood on the ground behind the residence leading to a wooded area, police said. Troopers searched this area but were unable to locate a dog.

State will install 10 traffic cameras Eight new live traffic cameras will be added to the statewide traffic monitoring system by the end of September. These cameras provide real-time video information to the public at the Web site www.deldot.gov. Contractor Byers Electric Construction LLC of Wilmington will complete installations in the following locations: • Route 1 and Wrangle Hill Road south of Red Lion • Route 896 and Red Lion Road near Lums Pond • Route 896 and Bethel Church Road south of Lums Pond • Route 1 and Middletown Odessa Road in Middletown • Route 1 at Exit 104 in north Dover • Route 1 at Exit 97 in Dover • Route 1 and Bowers Beach Road in Frederica • Route 13 and Herring Run Road in Seaford. The Route 13 and Herring Run Road camera is required to be installed by the de-

veloper, Lowe’s Home Improvement Store. All of the Route 1 cameras are being installed using funds from the DelTrac program, which is DelDOT’s integrated transportation management system. The estimated cost for the five cameras on Route 1 and two cameras on Route 896 is $626,000. Cameras will also be added at Route 141 and Faulkand Road west of Elsmere and I-95, just north of the I-495 split south of Newport. These are being installed as part of DelDOT road improvement projects and are expected to be operational by the end of this year. DelDOT staff monitor approximately 100 cameras 24 hours per day, seven days a week to control traffic flow, adjust signal timings and handle emergencies. The traffic cameras are also useful when traffic is congested and to police and fire communication centers.

During the investigation, troopers recovered clothing from Smith that had what appeared to be animal hair with blood on it. Troopers also observed gray mud on the clothing. As a result of the investigation, Smith was charged with cruelly or unnecessarily killing or injuring an animal, a felony, and disorderly conduct, a misdemeanor. He was released after posting a $1,250 secured bond.

Suspects in attempted robberies on the loose

The Laurel Police Department is asking for the public’s help in identifying two suspects in separate attempted robberies that occurred on Aug. 31. The first robbery attempt occurred at approximately 5:45

p.m. at the Rite Aid on North Central Avenue in Laurel. Police said that the suspect entered the store and told the clerk to open the cash drawer. The clerk yelled to another employee who was in the store and the suspect fled on foot. The suspect is described as a brown-haired white male in his early 20s, approximately 5 feet 6 inches and weighing between 145 and 155 pounds. He was last seen wearing blue jeans and a striped shirt. The suspect also had some type of bandage material wrapped around his face to cover it, police said. The second robbery attempt occurred at approximately 10:20 p.m. at the Shore Stop in Laurel. Police said that the suspect entered the store and demanded

money from the register. When the clerk refused, the suspect fled on foot, police said. The suspect in this robbery is described as a white male, approximately 5 feet 6 tall and weighing about 150 pounds. He has brown hair. The suspect was last seen wearing a black hooded sweatshirt with large bleach stains and red shorts. The suspect also used a napkin to cover his face. In both robberies, the suspect acted as if he had a gun, but it was never displayed, police said. Anyone with information is asked to contact Det. Sgt. Derrick Calloway at the Laurel Police Department, 875-2244, or Delaware Crime Stoppers at 1800-TIP-3333.

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Employee loses leg when pants get caught in grinder


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

PAGE 13

Zero energy homes focus on conservation Final in our Fuel Series By Donna Dukes-Huston More and more Americans are “going green” as a way to conserve our natural resources. While some green methods can be a bit more costly, other methods end up paying the consumer back over time. One way that homeowners can get more out of their houses is to put more into them, either at the time of construction or years later. In fact, it is now possible to build a new home that produces its own energy, giving the homeowner a zero or near zero energy bill each month. Lance Manlove is president and project manager of Zero Energy LLC, a division of Echelon Custom Homes in Lewes, that was formed last year. Manlove believes they have found a niche market in these zero energy homes as fuel costs have risen at a rapid rate. Manlove said that the criteria for building green includes water conservation, energy conservation, building materials, site design, indoor air quality and landscaping. Zero Energy Homes focuses on the energy conservation aspect. “We asked ourselves how we could design a house that is super efficient and get it down to zero energy,” Manlove said. “We started with the structure.” The company has its first house under construction now, a 3,600 square foot home slated for completion in March 2009. Three other homes are currently in the design phase. Zero energy homes can be built any size and don't look any different on the inside or outside from any other home, Manlove said. Zero Energy is using Insulated Concrete Forms (ICF) to create a building envelope which will decrease energy loads. These forms are used to create the exterior walls made from two styrofoam panels that are placed six inches apart and filled with concrete. These panels are connected with heavy duty plastic ties. Siding attaches to the ties from the outside of the exterior panel and drywall attaches from the inside. “A typical house has a 2” by 6” wall with plywood outside, insulation and drywall,” Manlove said. “By using ICFs, the insulation is already inside and out which is very strong and super energy efficient.” This type of construction can reduce heating and cooling costs by 50 percent, Manlove said. “Heat travels through the exterior wall stud in a regular house,” Manlove said. “With Styrofoam inside and out, you remove the conductive heat transfer mechanism, therefore creating a very efficient building envelope.” In addition, this type of construction does not allow any air leaks in the house because there are no gaps in the framing. It also greatly reduces outside noise from entering the house, he added. The building envelope is Zero Energy’s biggest focus, but does not allow the home to achieve zero energy alone. “In order to get to zero energy, you have to marry together the design with many other factors,” Manlove said. One of these factors is an on demand tankless hot water system. A standard water heater constantly runs to keep the water hot, which affects the homeowner’s electric bill. A tankless system is on demand, producing hot water immediately and uses much less energy, according to Manlove. By installing this type of system, homeowners could see a 30-50 percent savings on water heating costs, he said. Zero energy homes also utilize a Polyethylene Cross-Linked (PEX) plumbing system. This is controlled through a central manifold system in which each line has a control valve that can be shut off during maintenance without shutting down the water supply to the entire house. Manlove feels that one of the biggest advan-

tages a zero energy home offers is its utilization of solar panels. Manlove was first introduced to this concept as a mechanical engineering student at the University of Delaware. Manlove conducted an internship with Astro Power, a company which designed and manufactured solar panels. Solar panels can generate electricity to be

used by a house rather than relying solely upon the electrical grid to do so. According to Manlove, a solar PV system can be designed to provide all of the power needs for the house or a certain percentage of the power demand. For example, a house requires approximately 500 kilowatts to effectively run all the necessary electrical devices inside and a solar PV system

installed on that house produces 400 kilowatts. In this situation, the remaining 100 kilowatts needed would be provided from the grid. The savings do not end there. Manlove continued the scenario. “When everyone in a house is at work, less Continued to page 42

Sometimes improving your house takes more than duct tape. Fixed rate as low as

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At PNC, we understand your situation. That’s why we work with you to show you the best options to fit your life. Right now, qualifying homeowners get a low fixed rate on select Home Equity Installment Loans, which lasts the life of your loan. To qualify, a portion of your loan must be used for Home Improvement, your requested amount must range from $1,000 to $15,000 and you must meet the income guidelines listed above. Offer only good September 1–October 31, so act now.

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Annual Percentage Rates (APRs) shown are for loans up to 85% Loan to value (LTV) and were accurate as of 7/29/08. Property insurance is required. Offer may be modified or discontinued without prior notice and may vary by market. Loans are subject to credit approval. Minimum loan amount for 5.99% APR is $1,000 up to an 84-month term and $10,001 up to a 180-month term with an automatic payment from a PNC Checking account. APRs may range from 5.99% APR to 7.74% APR with an automatic payment from a PNC Checking account; your actual APR will be based on a review of your credit application. Other APRs available for loans with different repayment terms and conditions. The monthly payment on $ 1,000 borrowed at a rate range of 5.99% APR–7.74% APR for 84 months may range from $14.60–$15.46 and $8.43–$9.41 for 180 months based on 30 days to first payment. Prepayment. A prepayment fee of $350 applies to all loans in excess of $50,000 that close within 36 months of account opening. You will be required to pay the prepayment fee if you sell your home or refinance your loan during the first three years. Offer good from 9/1/08 through 10/31/08. Portion of loan proceeds must be used for home improvement. Income guidelines subject to change. ©2008 The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. All rights reserved. PNC Bank Member FDIC.


Page 14

MORNING STAR â&#x20AC;˘ SepTeMbeR 4 - 10, 2008

Health Medicare rules may need revision By Dr. Anthony Policastro Nothing is ever very simple. There are always rules and requirements governing everything. For example, Medicare provides payments for some stays at extended care facilities (nursing homes). However, it is only under certain circumstances. There is a clause in the Medicare requirements called the 3-day rule. This is the rule that provides guidance to paying for admissions to extended care facilities. What the rule basically says is that Medicare will only pay for an extended care facility visit if a patient has been admitted to a hospital for three days prior to the stay at the extended care facility. Thus you cannot go directly from home to an extended care facility and expect Medicare to help pay for it. You cannot be in the hospital one day and then expect Medicare to pay for a transfer to an extended care facility. You must have an illness serious enough to require at least three full days in a hospital before Medicare will consider paying for the extended care stay. Medicare also wants to make sure the admission is real. For that reason, they

review three-day admissions to hospitals that lead to stays at an extended care facility. If they do a review and they find that the patient was really not sick enough to be in the hospital for a full three days, they will then charge the hospital with Medicare fraud.

Medicare has gotten a lot stricter about what makes a patient sick enough to be in a hospital. For that reason less patients are admitted. Therefore, hospitals cannot simply admit patients to keep them for three days before a transfer. The interesting thing about this particular rule was that it was written many years ago. Medicare had looked at patients going to extended care facilities from hospitals. They found that the average patient stayed three days before going to the

extended care facility. So they wrote the rule based on that. Unfortunately, medical care has changed greatly since then. The first thing that has happened is that Medicare has gotten a lot stricter about what makes a patient sick enough to be in a hospital. For that reason less patients are admitted. In addition, it means patients are ready to go home sooner because they are no longer sick enough to stay in the hospital. The second change is that we do medical care much more efficiently now. If Medicare were to do a new study, they would find that the average stay is now less than the three days that it was when they originally looked at it. The logical thing would be to shorten the time period. However, it does not look like that will happen. Therefore, a rule written a long time ago when medical care was different has not changed. The result is that it is harder than it once was to get approval for an extended care facility stay. The rule requires someone to be sick enough to be in the hospital for three days. We need to follow the rules even though that is sometimes hard to do.

Nanticoke plans golf tournament The twenty-second annual Nanticoke Health Services Golf Tournament is Friday, Sept. 5 at the Seaford Golf and Country Club. The day will consist of practice, lunch, 18-holes of golf, dinner and door prizes. A full field of participants is expected with a 12pm shotgun start and scramble format. Teams of four players will compete for various prizes that have been donated. Contests for Longest Drive, Closest-To-The-Pin, Hit-The-Green and a Hole-In-One will be held. All participants will have the opportunity to putt through a three-step qualifying round. After dinner, three people will be putting for $2,500 each. Entry fees are $150 per player and $600 for a foursome. Sponsorships packages are available. Presenting sponsor is Wilmington Trust. Nanticoke Health Services hopes to raise over $35,000 from the tournament to help the hospital's charity endowment prescription fund, a special indigent fund for patients in need of assistance with the cost of their prescriptions. For reservations or sponsorship opportunities, contact the Nanticoke Health Services Development office at 302-629-6611, ext. 2404.


MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 4 - 10, 2008

Page 15

Health Briefs Low-cost mammograms

Bayhealth Medical Center offers lowcost mammograms every month. The low-cost mammograms are offered on the third Wednesday from 1 to 3 p.m. Local screenings are held at Bayhealth Women’s Center at Milford Memorial, 200 Kings Hwy., Suite 3, Milford. Pre-registration is required. For appointments and more information, contact Breast Care Coordinator Trisha Bentley at 302-744-6773.

Osteoporosis screenings offered

Bayhealth Medical Center will offer free osteoporosis screenings from 9 to 11 a.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 17 at Milford Memorial Hospital Women’s Wellness Center. Pre-registration is required. To register, call Bayhealth’s Education Department at 302-744-7135 or toll-free at 1-877-453-7101.

Caregiver support group

Join our monthly support group at the Cheer Community Center, the second Monday of each month at 11 a.m., 8549500. This support group is for you, whether you are a new caregiver or have been taking care of a loved one for years. We are turning the “Fearless caregiver” book into a guide for our support group. Each month a chapter will be discussed, concerns shared and support given.

Depression support

The Mental Health Association in Delaware will be sponsoring a Depression Support Group in Laurel on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month. The meetings begin at 7 p.m. The MHA encourages anyone dealing with a depressive disorder to attend. Register in advance by calling 1-800-287-6423. Peer support groups sponsored by Mental Health Association of Delaware are not intended to replace professional mental health treatment. MHA does not publish support group locations; locations are provided with registration.

Stroke support group

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital will offer free monthly Stroke Support Group meetings designed for individuals who have survived a stroke as well as their families and caregivers. Meetings are held the third Thursday of each month at

Nanticoke Cancer Care Center from 1:30 - 3:30 p.m. Sheila Brant and Joan Burditt, occupational therapists at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, will facilitate the support group meetings. Pre-registration not required. For more information, call 629-6611, ext. 5121.

Bayhealth offers aging clinics

Bayhealth Medical Center will offer the Steps to Healthy Aging Clinics as an opportunity for you to meet one-on-one with a registered nurse from Bayhealth’s Education Department to confidentially monitor your blood pressure, pulse and weight, and to discuss any health topic of concern to you. Clinics will be held in Milford every Thursday from 9 to 11 a.m. in Room 206 on the second floor of the Grier Building adjacent to Milford Memorial Hospital. For more information, call Bayhealth’s Education Department at 302-744-7135 or toll-free at 1-877-453-7107.

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Wine tasting to benefit Red Cross Community Bank Delaware and Irish Eyes Restaurants will hold the 20th Annual Nouveau Beaujolais Wine Tasting event to benefit the Delmarva Chapter of the American Red Cross on Tuesday, Dec. 2 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. at the Lewes Irish Eyes restaurant on the canal. The event features food, wine, music and live and silent auction items. The Nouveau Beaujolais wine is provided by Atlantic Liquors. Jim and Veronica Kiernan of Irish Eyes, along with the assistance of Caroline Short, have been organizers and

sponsors of the event for the past 20 years. Last year, the Delmarva Chapter of the American Red Cross responded to over 200 house fires in Delaware alone, providing assistance to almost 900 individuals. The local chapter also provided life saving training to over 17,000 individuals. Tickets for the event are available at both the Lewes and Rehoboth offices of Community Bank Delaware, or by calling 302-226-3333.

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PAGE 16

MORNING STAR â&#x20AC;˘ SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

Chris Binkoski, left, and Mary Bennett were winners in the fishing tournament. Both received $50 savings bonds.

Winners in the 4 to 7 age group were Derrick Atwood, left, and Joseph Whaley.

Dot Banks presents the Dick Banks Award to Chris Binkoski for catching the biggest bass in the American Legion Post 19 annual Youth Fishing Tournament.

Winners in the 8 to 11 age category were, from left, Jared Gabriel, Jenna Slacum and Marry Bennett.

Dozens of children participate in annual Legion fishing tourney The Laurel American Legion post 19 held its annual Youth Fishing Tournament Saturday, Aug. 23. About 50 children participated in the tournament and, organizers said, had a great day. Catfish was the most popular fish caught. The largest fish weighed 3.1 pounds and was caught by Mary Bennett, 10, from Laurel. The first-place winners, as well as the participant who caught the big bass, all got $50 savings bonds donated by the John F. Benson family, along with their trophies and prizes. Everyone who fished

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Winners in the 12 to 15 age category were, from left, Chris Binkoski, Cameron Wilson and Josh Davis.

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PAGE 17

Seaford artist designs logo for historic hotel, set to open Nov. 5 On target for its grand opening on the day before Return Day, the restoration of the Brick Hotel on The Circle in Georgetown is progressing as planned, said owner Lynn Lester. “My vision for this historic structure is really taking shape, and it’s extremely exciting to see it all finally coming together,” Lester said. The Brick Hotel will open its doors as the “new” Brick Hotel On The Circle on Nov. 5. Guests will enjoy a gala reception celebrating the opening of this restored National Historic Registry property. The first guests will be invited to sign a guest registry that will be preserved for historical records. Ten out of 14 rooms are already reserved for the first night and the first paid guests are Bob and Diana Lawson of Harbeson, close friends of Lester and her husband, Ed. On Thursday, during the Return Day parade, townspeople will once again — much like the old postcards depict — see inn guests enjoying the scene from the second floor veranda, overlooking The Circle. “The hotel will be closed to the public for Return Day,” Lester said. “We will cater exclusively to our guests that day, including those businesses that have chosen to use our facility for their Return Day open houses. Our doors will open to the general public on Friday, Nov. 7, with a separate grand opening celebration soon after.” Lester had hoped that the logo for the

Laura Pritchett’s winning logo for The Brick Hotel on the Circle in Georgetown.

new hotel would be designed by someone with local roots. This wish came true with logo design contest winner Laura Pritchett, who was born and raised in Seaford, Lester’s hometown. Pritchett is the daughter of Mark and Anne Allen of Seaford and is the granddaughter of Floydie Sabo and the late Jim Sabo. Pritchett lives in Seaford with her husband, Nicholas. “Her ideas were original, well thought out and kept the history of this building in the forefront,” Lester said. “The first logo she submitted for the hotel blew me away, but wasn’t conducive to my needs. I purchased the sketch from her and will be making prints of it available to the general public — it’s truly special and won’t be revealed until our gala grand opening.”

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The winning logo for the hotel is a simplified map of The Circle, with the center filled with a mariner’s compass. The Lester’s signature hospitality pineapple is placed over the compass, and a fleur-de-lis arrow on the compass points directly toward the location of the hotel. As the logo contest winner, Pritchett and her husband will enjoy a night’s stay at The Brick Hotel On The Circle and a three-course dinner for two at the hotel’s restaurant, the Tavern On The Circle. They

will also be VIP guests at the gala grand opening reception on Nov. 5. For reservations for the historical grand opening of The Brick Hotel On The Circle, visit www.thebrickhotel.com or call Lester at 855-5800 or toll free at 877-88BRICK. Two guest rooms are available in the historic (front) section of the building and two other rooms are available in the new section. Special event space may also be available for corporate groups and private parties.

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PAGE 18

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

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MARRIED 51 YEARS - Louise Musser Crosby and John W. Crosby, Seaford, were married on July 11, 1957, at St. John’s United Methodist Church. To celebrate their 51st anniversary, they were treated to dinner at Ruth’s Cris Steakhouse at the Glen Riddle Golf Course in Berlin, Md.

Smith family welcomes daughter Scott W. Smith and Brandi L. Hammen-Smith of Hebron, Md., announce the birth of their daughter, Temperance Haven, on July 24, 2008, at 5:40 p.m., at Peninsula Regional Medical Center, Salisbury, Md. She weighed 8 pounds 6 ounces and was 20 and 1/2 inches long. She was welcomed home by her siblings, Joel Solomon Reynolds and Gabriel Isaiah Hammen-Smith. Her maternal grandmother is Darlene Mills of Mardela Springs, Md. Her paternal grandparents are Thomas and Carolyn Ann Smith of Delmar, Md.

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Her godparents are Kim Eckert of Delmar, Md., and Michael Elliott of Salisbury, Md.

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ALL HOMES REDUCED

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557375 $92,500 3 BR, 1 BA roomy home on large lot in Blades has lots of parking, city conveniences & a 1st floor bedroom. Call Brenda Rambo’s cell 302-2362660

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559185 $320,000 4 BR, 2 1/2 BA Beautiful Colonial at Clearbrooke Est. w/fireplace, formal living & dining rooms, cathedral ceilings & deck. Call Brenda Rambo’s cell 302-236-2660

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561313 4 BR, 3 BA 2341 sq ft home on 1.2 acres outside Seaford has in-law suite, new roof & heat pump in 2007, all appliances & more. Call Brenda Rambo’s cell 302-236-2660

LOTS OF LOTS ALL SHAPES, SIZES, TYPES, LOCATIONS 547894 $475,000 4 BR, 3 BA 2656 sq ft recently remodeled home in Delmar has 1.98 ac, 60x42 heated workshop, open garage & a home business. Call John Williamson’s cell 302-542-0289.

556797 $234,900 3 BR, 2 BA New Rancher conveniently located outside Laurel has tile floors & much more. Pick out your colors to customize. Call Angie Zebley’s cell 302-228-7653

Call John Williamson’s cell 302-542-0289.

562652 $289,000 3 BR, 2 1/2 BA Homey split level in a pretty setting at Devonshire Woods has rec room, office, deck, all appliances & more. Call Angie Zebley’s cell 302-228-7653

562428 $159,000 3 BR, 2 BA in-town Laurel New home has lots of closet space, deck & master suite has walk-in shower. Own your new home now! Call Angie Zebley’s cell 302-228-7653

561072 $160,000 3 BR, 1 BA Rancher on double corner lot in Blades is great for 1st time buyers. All appliances, deck & yard for children. Call Mike Wallace’s cell 302-228-5285.

561324 $124,900 3 BR, 1 1/2 BA Large in-town Blades home is ready for its new owner. Spacious rooms & all town amenities. Call Mike Wallace’s cell 302-228-5285.

562202 $275,000 4 BR, 2 1/2 BA Colonial on 3.88 ac outside Seaford has a deck, full basement, garage, sheds, fenced rear yard & pool. Call Mike Wallace’s cell 302-228-5285.

562718 $399,900 4 BR, 2 1/2 BA 4-yr-old Colonial on 12.85 acres outside Greenwood is perfect for horse lovers and has a kennel permit. Call Conrad Boisvert’s cell 302-381-5184.

562693 $219,900 3 BR, 2 1/2 BA New Contemporary in Yorkshire Est, Delmar is a must see. Pick your carpet & appliances. Call Conrad Boisvert’s cell 302-3815184.

562696 $229,900 3 BR, 2 1/2 BA Cambridge Model also in Yorkshire Est has been drastically reduced. Delmar School District Call Conrad Boisver’ts cell 302-381-5184.

=

562702 $225,000 4 BR, 3 BA 2300 sq ft Colonial has a full basement, family room, hardwood floors, Italian ceramic & a screened porch. Call Mike Wallace’s cell 302-228-5285.


PAGE 20

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

Home scene of hard work and fun, both then and now Our back porch is gone. The old room, whose rafters were held to YNN ARKS the rest of the house with large, square-cut nails, has been disasWhen my husband sembled piece by piece and exists ripped out the back porch now only in our memories. Hooray! While I admit to some floor, he discovered a sadness in seeing the old structure brick- and cement-lined being torn down, its absence is room, sunken about 2 feet largely a relief. Its replacement, with insulated windows and a pasinto the earth. sive solar heating system, will be a huge improvement. My husband and I made several discov- for the farm family that lived here, a family that we understand included nine chileries during the demolition, which started dren. I’m sure that when that snug dairy in earnest last weekend and ended, approwas put in, the homeowners were as proud priately, on Labor Day, when my husband of it as we will be of our new room. pulled the last rafter from the main house. And then, when we pulled the asbestos First was those huge, square-cut nails, residing off the south-facing side of the back ally spikes, that were holding up the rafters. We have found these spikes in oth- porch, we saw that the original siding, clapboard everyplace else, was verticallyer parts of the house, a building that we aligned tongue-and-groove boards in the think predates the Civil War, but we were triangular section between the ceiling surprised to learn that the back porch was beam and the roof line. This on a house that old. We had thought that perhaps it that had always appeared to be just about was newer construction. business, all function and no fancy. With the back porch gone, we can see It wasn’t elaborate gingerbread, it wasthat the framing of the main house is held n’t even painted a different color. It was together through a series of mortises and simply a small statement that here, even tenons, notches and tabs cut into the where mortise and tenon were daily havboards so that they all fit snugly together. ing to put shoulder to the grindstone, there In one spot, where my husband thinks the could be some fun. original carpenter made a mistake and cut I wonder what people, tearing out our a mortise where it didn’t belong, the gap construction for new a hundred years from is filled with three solid wooden pegs, now, will think about what we have done. each about an inch and a half in diameter. I hope that they marvel at our innovative My husband found, nestled in a corner technology, just as we have marveled at where framing and floor beam meet, a the earlier dairy. And I hope they apprecinest. What kind of animal once lived ate, in addition to the work that went into there, I don’t like to think about. But my the construction, the fun that went into it, fondness for the mother, even if she did too. There was the time that my shorts, a have whiskers and a long tail, grew when I saw that she had used a baby’s sock, still little bit too big and with the elastic worn white, and a pair of little boy’s underwear, out, slipped down around my knees. The time that my husband, trying to hold up a size 4, to cushion her nest. rafter that proved to be too much for him, Our two most interesting finds, I think, tumbled to the ground. And the several speak to the people who once lived here. times that, even though there were no When my husband ripped out the back porch floor, he discovered a brick- and ce- more walls to inhibit our conversation, my husband walked to the back door and ment-lined room, sunken about 2 feet into stuck his head out before talking to me. the earth. We had known that there was So far, it has truly been a grand experisomething back there that previous owners ence. That is the message that we will be called a dairy, but we thought that it was sending all who go by when we put up, nothing more than a hole in the ground. somewhere, in contrast to the sedate clapNow we know that keeping their food, inboard, some fancy, vertically-laid, tonguecluding milk, cool was serious business and-groove siding.

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BECOME A NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION SPONSOR Each school year Morning Star Publications places almost 1,000 copies of the Seaford and Laurel Star newspapers every week in Sussex County classrooms. Teachers welcome the newspaper and use them for classroom assignments. The students enjoy reading about local events. d the do n ate u g li ke to o y t t of t h in n d I u l tha lo f k a n r a o h f t nd a em I a m so u se d t h ds a n d my f r ie I . e s r e p ur nam wo r n ewspa se e if o p e ll in g o s t h e ll e it a s b w to se h e lp u s ys f u n t th e ba is a lw a t h e re a use it o ll in a ls k a r o I e lo n it y. u t ov u B m . e m r e o c is in t h n in o u r c a b. to. g o in g o vo y m w h at’s d lp b u il e h atin g o t fo r do n them THE u o y k han SE A g a in t ap e rs . p s w e AA the n ly, Sin c e re Ch ase

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

PAGE 21

Community Bulletin Board ple, sausage, fruit and other goodies. Cost is $6 for adults and $3 for children under 10. That same day there will be a Schwann’s truckload sale in our parking lot. You may call 629-4458 mornings for information.

Seaford Community Concert Assn. membership drive

The volunteer workers of the Seaford Community Concert Association are preparing for their 2008-09 season membership drive, beginning Sept. 6. To celebrate 60 years of bringing top-notch professional concerts to the Seaford area, there will be six concerts. They are: Pavlo, guitarist and singer on Oct. 14; Tribute to Benny Goodman, Oct. 28; Dale Gonyea, pianist and humorist, Jan. 17, 2009; Bronn and Katherine Journey, Harpist and vocalist, March 12, 2009; Side Street Strutters, a jazz ensemble, April 3, 2009; and the Mantini Sisters, vocalists, April 20, 2009. All concerts are held at the Seaford High School. There will be a kick-off brunch on Saturday, Sept. 6 at Grace Baptist Church for the workers and anyone else who is interested in volunteering for the association. The membership campaign will end on Sept. 27. For further information, call Allan Kittila at 629-6184, or Mary Ann Torkelson at 228-6097.

Nanticoke Senior Center Basket Bingo

The Nanticoke Senior Center will hold a Longaberger Basket Bingo on Thursday, Sept. 25, starting at 7 p.m. at the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club (310 Virginia Avenue). Proceeds to benefit the new Nanticoke Senior Center. Advance tickets are $20 per person, $25 at the door. Advance ticket includes a chance to win the Large Hamper and the American Celebrations Oval Market Basket or one of the several door prizes. Refreshments will be available. For ticket information contact 6294939 or 628-2828.

Read Aloud Delaware

Read Aloud Delaware volunteer training session will be held Wednesday, Sept. 24, at 1 p.m. in the Seaford Public Library, 402 North Porter St., Seaford. Call 8562527 to sign up for training or for further information. Volunteer readers are needed at various reading sites in Sussex County.

Republican Women’s Club luncheon

The Seaford Republican Women’s Club will host a luncheon, on Wednesday, Sept. 24, at 11:30 a.m. at the Seaford Golf and Country Club. The cost is $13 per person. The public is cordially invited. Special guest speakers will be candidate for governor, Bill Lee, and candidate for lieutenant governor, Charlie Copeland. Reservations are required and may be made by calling Ann Nesbitt, at 628-7788. The deadline for reservations is Thursday, Sept. 18.

Breakfast benefit

Mt. Olivet Church in downtown Seaford will be holding a breakfast on Saturday, Sept. 13, from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. in our Fellowship Hall. This will be a fundraiser to support our preschool program to help keep costs affordable for families. All are welcome to enjoy a delicious breakfast of pancakes, eggs, scrap-

Vera Bradley & Longaberger Bingo

The Ritual Team of Seaford Moose Lodge # 1728 will host a bingo featuring Vera Bradley Bags and Longaberger Baskets on Monday, Sept. 8, at 7 p.m. Door prizes featuring the Vera Bradley Garment Bag and the Longaberger Crock Bundle will be given at the end of the night. The doors will open at 6 p.m. at the Seaford Moose Lodge located at 22759 Bridgeville Hwy, Seaford. Tickets are $20 in advance, $25 at the door. Food and refreshments available. Call David or Travis Sirman at 875-3792; or Seaford Moose Lodge, 6298408 to reserve yours tickets or for information.

AARP offers driver safety program

An AARP Driver Safety Course for people 50 and over will be given 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Monday and Tuesday, Sept. 8 and 9, at the Methodist Manor House, 1001 Middleford Road, Seaford. Upon completion of the program, participants receive a certificate entitling them to a reduction in their auto insurance. For information and registration, call 629-8081, Monday to Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. only. The cost is $10 per person.

held on Tuesday, Oct. 21. Sign up at the Seaford Library front desk before Oct. 14.

Fitness Classes start Sept. 15 & 16

Come join us in Fitness Classes Monday-Wednesday-Friday 9 a.m., TuesdayThursday 5:30 p.m. We start a six week session the week of Sept. 15 and 16, and meet in St. John’s UMC Fellowship Hall in Seaford (sponsored by St. John’s but open to the public). Beginners to intermediate participants welcome in this fun, faith-filled, co-ed, non-competitive muscle-toning, stretching, high/low aerobic class. Get your Dr.’s OK and come try a free one to see if it meets your needs. Only a 6-8 week commitment at a time required. For more information or to register call 24-year AFAA certified fitness professional Carol Lynch at 629-7539

Art Show at the Seaford Library

The Seaford District Library is proud to announce it will be hosting it’s 2nd annual art show on Sept. 5 & 6 from 12-4 p.m. This will be a multi-medium art show with many different forms of art, from oils to wood. For more information contact Amber Motta at 629-2524.

Blades Fire Hall breakfast

There will be an all-you-can-eat breakfast, at the Blades Fire Hall, located at the corner of Cannon and Fifth streets in Blades, Sept. 7, from 8 till 11 a.m. Cost is

adults $7, children $3. Sponsored by the Auxiliary and Firemen of the Fire Company. For more information call Jewell Chaffinch at 629-6904 or Crystal French at 629-4481.

Yard sale

Nanticoke Yacht Club in Blades will hold a yard sale on Saturday, Sept. 13, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tables are $10 each. Rain date is Sept. 20. Call 875-7143.

Seaford class of ‘88 reunion

The Seaford High School class of ‘88 20th year reunion will be held Saturday, Nov. 29, at the banquet center next to Jimmy’s Grill Restaurant in Bridgeville. The reunion will be held from 6-10 p.m., with a cocktail hour from 6-7 p.m., and dinner will be served at 7. The cost for the event is $75 a couple and $37.50 for a single ticket; this includes dinner and entertainment. Contact Cathy Hastings (Maas) at dcat5186@hotmail.-com, Lexie Ketterman (Kingree) at lexketterman@gmail.com or Angie Zebley (Mitchell) at angie@tullramey.com with contact information.

Basket Bingo Sept. 18

Blades Volunteer Fire Company will hold a Longaberger Basket Bingo on Thursday, Sept. 18, starting at 7 p.m. at the Blades Fire Company. The evening will consist of 20 exciting games featuring Longaberger basket as prizes. Advance tickets are $20 per person, $25 at the door.

Seaford District Library events

• There will be a Seaford District Library board meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 9, starting at 6 p.m. • The “Science and Religion” book discussion will meet on Monday, Sept. 15, at 6 p.m. The book being discussed is Reason For God by Tim Keller. • “What is Constitution Day?” will be presented at the Seaford District Library by Madeline Dunn, Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs, Curator of Education. Join us at 4 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 16, on the eve of Constitution Day. This program is geared towards elementary students. For more information contact Cindi Smith at 629-2524. • “Lights, Camera, Action!” The Seaford District Library is having “Movie Night” on Thursday, Sept. 18, starting at 5:30 p.m. For more information contact Amber Motta at 629-2524. • The “Vines and Vessels” Christian writing group will meet on Saturday, Sept. 27, at 9 a.m. • “Unlacing the Victorian Woman” will be presented by Barbara Darlin at the Seaford District Library on Tuesday, Sept. 30, starting at 5:30 p.m. This is a delightful performance that educates while it entertains. • Eat it up at your library! Health snacks, stories and juggler Carlos Mir will introduce a three-program family story hour series starting Thursday, Oct. 2, at 6:30 p.m. Bring the kids and your appetite for a fun-filled time at Seaford District Library. The series will continue on Oct. 16 and 30, at 6:30. • The Seaford District Library is currently looking for people who are interested in representing a foreign country for our “Annual International Festival” to be

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PAGE 22 Advance ticket includes a chance to win the Large Hamper and the American Celebrations Oval Market Basket or one of the several door prizes. Nearly 30 chances to win. Refreshments will be available. For ticket information contact 628-0503 or 629-4481.

Church seeks craft vendors

Christ Lutheran Church need craft vendors for its Christmas bazaar to be held on Sept. 27, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. - $20 per space. Contact Joan at 628-3601. The church is located at 315 N. Shipley St., Seaford.

Breakfast cafe

VFW 4961 breakfast cafe, open Monday-Friday, 7-10 a.m., Seaford VFW, Middleford Road, to benefit Veterans Relief Fund.

Biff Lee Pig Pickin’

40th District Rep. Clifford “Biff” Lee will be holding his 21st annual “PigPickin” at the Laurel Fire Hall on Saturday, Sept. 13. The event is from 4 until 7 p.m. Plenty to eat and a good time for all with door prizes. Tickets are $15 in advance by calling 875-5448, or at Small Insurance, South Central Avenue. They are also available at the door.

LHS former grads dinner

The annual fall get-together of former athletes, band members and interested Laurel High School graduates is on Sept. 12 at the Georgia House with a 4 p.m. social hour and dinner, followed by the Laurel football game. Remember the stories from previous years and bring some new ones. Tickets call Craig Littleton at 302875-7445 or 302-462-7450

Barb Hudson offers My Turn to Cook

Barb Hudson, candidate for 40th District State Legislature, is holding a takeout dinner from My Turn to Cook in Laurel on Wednesday, Sept. 10, from 3 to 6 p.m. Take the break from cooking you deserve and meet Barb when you pick up your meal. Tickets are $10 by calling Rachel Hill at 875-8183.

Laurel Library upcoming events

September is National Library Card Sign-up Month and the Laurel Public Library will join libraries across the nation in encouraging everyone to apply for the one card that can open up the world, a library card. Throughout the month of September, adults 18 years of age and over, who sign up for a first-time library card, will have their name entered into a drawing for a $50 gift card from Laurel’s Georgia House Restaurant. Participants must be first-time card applicants, and will need to present current proof of Delaware residency. The fee to replace lost cards will also be waived during September if all associated fees and fines have been paid. Readers invited to Form Book Clubs The Laurel Public Library will host two exploratory meetings on Sept. 17 and 18, to determine if there is community interest in forming a library book club for adult readers. The Sept. 17 meeting is at

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008 10:30 in the morning and the meeting on the Sept.18 is scheduled for 7 p.m. These organizational meetings will determine future book club dates and times for meeting, and the nature of the books to be read and discussed. Library staff will be available to review current trends in book clubs nationwide, and to offer other materials on forming book discussion groups. For further information email normajean.fowler@lib.de.us or call 8753184.

LHS class of ‘88 reunion planned

POW-MIA observance

Golf Tournament

Greenwood town-wide yard sale

Laurel class of ‘88, 20 year class reunion is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 20, at the Beach House & Tiki Bar at Bargain Bill’s in Laurel at 5 p.m. Featuring a DJ, tropical buffet and cash bar. Tickets are $36 in advance. Invitations and reply cards have been mailed. If you did not receive one or need more information, contact committee at 302-280-6655; or reunioninfo2008@yahoo.com.

Whaley Family Reunion Sept. 21

The Whaley Family Reunion will be held Sunday, Sept. 21, at 1:30 p.m., at the Rev. Lee Elliott Memorial Hall, Trinity UMC, Laurel. Bring a covered dish and a beverage. An offering will be taken to offset expenses of chicken, hot dogs, and supplies. During the business meeting, games will be available for the children. For more information, contact one of the following officers: Christina Wilson, 410251-0413; Edna Mae Marvil, 875-9427; Ruth Ann Savage, 410-546-5818; Phyllis Johnson, 875-0463. Bring a family recipe. We hope to do a Whaley Family cookbook in the future.

AARP Driving Course

Laurel Senior Center will host an AARP Driving Course, Sept. 22-23 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cost is $10. To register for the course call 875-2536.

Networking Expo

The Laurel Chamber of Commerce will host a Business to Business Expo on Tuesday, Sept. 23, at the Laurel Fire Hall. Businesses will have an opportunity to introduce their business and services to one another from 5-5:45 p.m., and doors will open to the public from 6-7:30 p.m. For more information, contact the Laurel Chamber Office at 875-9319.

Free community luncheon

Laurel Baptist Church will be hosting a free community luncheon (chicken & dumplings) on Sept. 20, noon to 2 p.m. The church is located at 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, approximately two miles south of town. For any further information, call Shirley at 875-2314.

LHS Class of ‘63 plans reunion

Laurel High School’s Class of ‘63, 45th reunion is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 20, at the Lakeside Community Center in Long Neck. We are in need of upto-date addresses. If you have not received your letter contact Janet Lynch LeCates 875-3955, or Sandra Kellam Russell 875-5985, or e-mail russellsk@dmv.com.

LHS Class of ‘78 plans reunion

LHS Class of ‘78, 30-year-class-reunion is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 27 at the Beach House “Tiki Bar” at Bargain Bill’s in Laurel. Light finger food will be served, cash bar $15 per person from 7 p.m. until 11 p.m. DJ will be provided. Dress is casual. For more information contact Jan Conaway Allen at 443-6140338, Gale Hall Daugherty at 410-6263214, Tammy Hastings Whaley at 302228-7267, Tammy Myers Wharton at 302258-7371 or Sue Pressley at 302-8753968. Send checks to Jan Allen, 110 Tracey Circle, Laurel, DE 19956.

LHS class of ‘98 reunion planned

Laurel High School class of ‘98 is planning a class reunion. Contact Megan Jones by email megj22@comcast.net or phone 841-5835 with contact information.

Greenwood Mennonite School announces their 6th annual benefit golf tournament to be held on Friday, Sept. 26, at the Heritage Shores Golf Club in Bridgeville. This is a scramble tournament open to groups and individuals. Registration is from 7-8 a.m. with a continental breakfast. A shotgun start is at 8:30 a.m. Lunch will be served and prizes awarded at 12:30 p.m. The $100 entry fee per golfer includes the continental breakfast, golf, lunch and prizes. The non-refundable deadline for entries is Sept. 12. For more information and to register for the tournament contact Dwayne Landis at 302-236-6822. Entries and payment can be mailed to: GMS Golf Tournament, Attn: Dwayne Landis, P.O. Box 309, Greenwood, DE 19950.

The Ladies Auxiliary of Greenwood Memorial VFW Post 7478 of Greenwood, will sponsor a joint observance of POWMIA Day on Sunday, Sept. 21, at 4 p.m. at the Post on Governors Avenue in Greenwood. Mt. Moriah Church of Greenwood, which meets in the Post for weekly worship service, will share in this patriotic program. Mt. Moriah Church will provide musical selections under the leadership of Mrs. Glenda Houston. Thoughts on the day will be given by Jerome Houston, Jr., a 13 year veteran of the U. S. Army and a native of Greenwood and Shawn Byers from Camden, who is on active duty with the U. S. Air Force. For more information call Pres. Michaele Russell at 302-3494220. Big Saturday Town-wide yard sale and flea market in Greenwood on Saturday, Sept. 6, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Musical entertainment from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., all kinds of activities for children, such as face painting, clowns, pony rides and more. Bring your pet for the pet fashion show at 1 p.m. Start off with breakfast at the Greenwood United Methodist Church, enjoy a hot dog later at the library, followed up by a pit-barbecue sandwich at the VFW. A variety of vendors will be located throughout the area around the library and the VFW as will many yard sale and flea market bargains all around town.

The Glass Castle discusion at the Greenwood Public Library

Greenwood Library’s book discussion group, “Bound by Books,” will hold a discussion session on Tuesday, Sept. 9, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in the meeting room at the library. The work to be discussed will be The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls. We invite you to come enjoy an evening of stimulating discussion and pleasant socializing. To obtain a copy of the book, drop by the Greenwood Public Library or call Robin Miller at 302-3495309.

Autumn Craft Night Sept. 18

On Thursday, Sept. 18, from 6:30 to 8 p.m., the Greenwood Public Library will be holding a family Autumn Craft Night. We will be decorating canvas tote bags with your choice of a variety of materials including ribbon, paints, iron-ons, and more. There is no cost and all materials will be provided. The activity is open to all; however, children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. Pre-registration is required by Sept. 12; stop by the front desk or call 349-5309. The library is located at 100 Mill St. in Greenwood.

Patriot Day observance

The Ladies Auxiliary of Greenwood Memorial VFW Post 7478 has planned an observance on Patriot Day, Sept. 11, to remember the nearly 3,000 who died in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The program is scheduled for 7 p.m. at the Post on Governors Avenue in Greenwood. There will be special music and a keynote speaker, Pastor Dave Kiser of the Seaford Wesleyan Church in Seaford, who is both a theologian and a patriot. For more information contact Pres. Michaele S. Russell at 302-349-4220.

Bridgeville hosts Clean-Up Day

Bridgeville will hold a Neighborhood Clean-Up Day on Saturday, Sept. 27. All items must be curbside by 6 a.m., as M.T. Trash will only go down each street once. Allowable items for pick-up include: furniture, household trash, stoves, and limbs bundled in 4-ft. lengths. Items that will not be picked up include tires, batteries, oil, construction materials, dirt, rocks, bricks, etc. M-T Trash will have a truck available to pick-up refrigerators, freezers and air conditioners, as long as the Freon has been removed. M-T Trash will also have a truck to pick up paint, stain, etc. Note: These items must be kep in a separate area from the rest of the trash. Large tree limbs can be delivered to the town’s wastewater treatment plant. Residents will be directed to an area for placement of limbs. A scrap metal container will be placed at the Town Hall parking lot for the disposal of such items as aluminum siding, window frames, barbecue grills, tire rims, bicycles and stainless steel. Residents are asked not to place any other types of trash in this container. Questions may be directed to Town Manager Bonnie Walls at 337-7135.

Bridgeville’s community yard sale

The Town of Bridgeville hosts a communitywide yard sale on Saturday, Sept. 20, from 7 a.m. till ? Find great bargains at many homes throughout the town. Be sure to put Bridgeville on your list of yard sale stops on Sept. 20.


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

Bridgeville Fall Festival

There will be a Fall Festival and Car, Truck and Motorcycle Show on Saturday, Sept. 20, from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. at Phillis Wheatley Middle School, Church Street, Bridgeville. Sponsored by the Trustees of Mt. Calvary United Methodist Church, Bridgeville. Dash plates given to the first 50 vehicles registered. Top 30 cars registered will receive trophies. Registration fee for vehicles and motorcycles is $10 per vehicle. Registration for vehicles will be from 9 a.m until 12 p.m. There will be plenty of food available for sale, choirs will be singing, there will be a health fair, voter registration, and many more activities for the children, youth and adults. There will also be a yard sale from 7 a.m. until 12 p.m. Tables for the yard sale are $10 per table. Choirs will be performing from 12 p.m. until 2 p.m. If you have a choir or praise team that would like to participate, please contact Sis. Ginger Speight at 629-9799 or email at mtcalvarybville@aol.com. For more information, please call Hollis Smack at 302-337-3430. Leroy Tingle at 302-3494962 or Ginger Speight at 302-629-9799

Brideville Democrats host dinner

The 35th District Democratic Committee will be having its annual chicken and dumplin’ dinner on Saturday, Sept. 6, at the Bridgeville Fire Hall, Bridgeville, at 5:30 p.m. Doors will open at 4:30 p.m. As this is an election year, and three days before the Sept. 9 Primary, many Democrat officials and candidates are slated to be on hand for this big event. After introductions of guests, Richard Lindale, auctioneer, will be ready to liven up your evening with our auction. Reservations for seatings have been brisk, and to get your seat at the table, call Pat Ewing at 628-4563, for reservations.

35th annual family reunion

Minos & Edith Littleton Family Reunion on Sunday, Sept. 21, 3-7 p.m., at the John West Park in Ocean View. Raindate; Sept. 28. For info contact: Tommy Wilson at 302-629-2153, or Nancy Smith at 302-539-3278.

Geneology class

The Sussex County Genealogical Society will be teaching a class of four sessions on beginning genealogy at Wilmington College, 41 Rehoboth Avenue, Rehoboth Beach. The sessions are on Saturdays from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. beginning Sept. 27 and ending on Oct. 18. Each session is taught by an experienced genealogist and should be of interest to anyone interested in beginning a family history. For more information on tuition and details or to get the Wilmington Collage Fall brochure call 302-227-6295.

Rotary Collecting School Supplies

The Harrington-Greenwood-Felton Centennial Rotary Club will set up a booth to collect school supplies at Greenwood’s upcoming “Big Saturday” celebration on Sept. 6. The club will also have a flea market sale at the booth with proceeds to be donated to the elementary school. Items needed include pencils, pens, paper, notebooks, rulers, crayons, markers and backpacks. Cash donations will also be accepted to be used toward the purchase of uniforms required by the Woodbridge School District. People may bring their donations to the Rotary tent at the event or drop them off at Chick’s, U.S. 13, Harrington, where supplies are also being collected for Lake Forest students. The Harrington-Greenwood-Felton Rotary Club meets every Thursday morning from 7:45 to 8:45 a.m. at Peoples Too Restaurant in Harrington. For more information, call 398-3898.

Adult Plus+ activities

Searching for ancestors

Are you searching for your ancestors? Do you need guidance to begin your family tree? Are you stuck or do you need help organizing your research? The Bridgeville Public Library will provide genealogy consultations facilitated by Alice duBois Min on the last Saturday of each month, Sept. 27 and Oct. 25 - from 10 a.m. to noon. Sign-up is required. Call the library at 337-7401, or e-mail Alice at famgen88@comcast.net. For special needs contact Karen Johnson 302-337-740

BBQ chicken dinner

There will be a BBQ chicken dinner on Saturday, Sept. 6, from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. at St. Stephen’s Church, 101 E. State Street, Delmar. Includes: 1/2 chicken, with baked beans, cole slaw, roll & dessert for $7. Benefit Relay for Life. Advanced tickets only. Call church office at 846-9501.

Spaghetti and meatball dinner

An “all-you-can-eat” spaghetti and meatball dinner with salad, beverage, bread and dessert, will be held Saturday, Sept. 13, at Bethel Community House, Oak Grove, 4-6 p.m. Donation $8. Eat in or carry out. Call 629-7117 or 337-8836 for tickets or information.

Seniors can take advantage of a variety of fun activities offered by the Adult Plus+ program at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus, Georgetown. Anyone interested in playing bridge can attend open bridge sessions from Sept. 9 to Jan. 20. Starting Sept. 11, learn or improve your bridge skills with beginner and intermediate bridge lessons. Challenge yourself by playing the Hand and Foot Card Game, beginning Sept. 15. Socialize and make new friends by attending the Adult Plus+ Couples Club on Sept. 11 or the Adult Plus+ Mixed Singles Club on Sept. 17. Examine the Bible in “Surprises in the Old Testament.” Become computer savvy in “On the Internet! Get Started” on Sept. 10 and learn how “You can Design your own Web Page” on Sept. 23. Learn to use a firearm properly and proficiently in “Firearms: Protection and Training” beginning Sept. 18, with an FBI-certified instructor. For more information about these activities, contact Delaware Tech’s Adult Plus+ Program at 302-856-5618.

Georgetown Library events

• The Georgetown Public Library will hold Story Time at 10:30 a.m. every Tuesday morning with Miss Sherri. • The Friends of the Georgetown Public Library will its monthly book discussion on Wednesday, Sept. 10, at 10 a.m. This month discussion will be on “The Language of the Threads” by Gail Tsukiyama. • “Do You Know What to Do If a Disaster Strikes” will be presented by the

Sussex County Citizen Corp on Sept. 9, at 6 p.m. This informative program will address how to prepare yourself and your family on what to do if a natural or terrorist-related disaster happens. Pre-registration is required to attend. • The Delaware Department of Agriculture , the Division of Libraries, and the American Egg Board are calling all ages, crafters, painters, and artists to participate in the 2009 Delaware Decorated Egg Contest. The Egg Decorating contest is open to any Delaware resident interested in pursuing the art of egg decorating. The winning egg decorator will receive $100 and an invitation from the American Egg Board to see their state egg on national display with eggs from the other 49 states. The registration deadline to enter the decorated egg contest is Sept. 15. For registration forms and other information, contact Sheree Nichols at 1-800-282-8685 (DE only) or 302-698-4521, or via email delawareeggcontest@gmail.com.

PAGE 23 topics including the status of past annexations and an update of highway construction projects. Community organizations have been invited to share information with the residents on their upcoming fall/winter events and the Library Trustees have also been encouraged to share plans for the new library.

Genealogical Society officers

Sussex County Genealogical Society announces the installation of its officers for the 2008-2009 year: President-Jeanne Davis; Vice President-Ralph Nelson; Treasurer-Jim Blakelee; Secretary-Diann Sherwin.

SCWDC meeting

The Sussex County Women’s Democrat Club will hold its regular monthly meeting at 5:30 p.m. on Sept. 18, at Sussex Pines Country Club, Georgetown. The guest speaker will be Richard S. Cordrey, Secretary of Finance. Dinner will cost $13 per person. For details and reservations, call Catherine King 628-4812.

Knitting Guild meets

Trap Pond Partners meets

Trap Pond Partners (a volunteer nonprofit organization) meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Bald Cypress Nature Center at Trap Pond State Park, Laurel. We are always looking for new members and ideas to improve our state park. To learn more, visit www.trappondpartners.com.

H.A.P.P.E.N. meets Sept. 11

The members of H.A.P.P.E.N., Hearn’s Pond Association for its protection, preservation, enhancement and naturalization will meet on Thursday, Sept. 11, at 7 p.m. at the Seaford Museum. Among the topics to be discussed are traffic, the Hearn’s Pond Dam, and annexation. As always, H.A.P.P.E.N. members welcome any group or individual who is interested in attending the meeting.

All Knitters: The “Sea Purls” Chapter of The Knitting Guild Association meets on the first Wednesday of each month from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at The CHEER Center in Georgetown on the corner of Rt. 9 and Sand Hill Road. Call Joyce Smirk, secretary, 302-732-6495.

Confederates meet Sept. 8

The Delaware Grays, Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp # 2068, invites interested persons to attend their regular monthly meeting on Monday, Sept. 8, at 7 p.m. in the Seaford Public Library ConferenceRoom, on Porter Street. For more in-

Planning a Fall Event

Acorn Club meeting Sept. 11

The G.F.W.C.-Acorn Club of Seaford will have a business meeting on Thursday, Sept. 11, at the Seaford Library at 7:30 p.m. Hostesses will be Carolyn Griffith and Kay Johnson and their committee.

AARP membership meeting

AARP Seaford Area Chapter #1084 of western Sussex County will meet Thursday, Sept. 11, at the Methodist Manor House Fellowship Hall, in Seaford at 1:30 p.m. to greet guest speaker Connie Matthews, of First State Community Action Agency. Members present will have the opportunity to voice their approval of Candidate for 2009-2010 chapter president. Guests age 50 and older, are welcome and invited to join in conversation and refreshments after the meeting. Anyone interested in joining the state chapter need not be retired to be a member. Chapter dues are $5 per year. Members have access to the wide variety of AARP programs and benefits. Call Helen at 8755086 for more information.

Bridgeville town meeting

The Commissioners of Bridgeville will host a town meeting on Thursday, Sept. 11, 7 p.m. at the Bridgeville Fire Hall. The meeting will include a wide range of

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PAGE 24

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

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Equine Council meets

A meeting of the Delaware Equine Council will be held Monday, Sept 15, at 7 p.m. in the Exhibitors' Hall Board Room. A short business meeting followed by 2008 Awarding of Scholarships (four) supporting Agriculture Education, Dr. David Marshall, DVM will be our Guest Speaker. For more info call Stan 302-684-3966 or Peggy 6295233.

NARFE planning meeting

The Georgetown Chapter of the National Association of Active and Retired Federal Employees will hold an organizational and planning meeting for 2008/2009 activities on Monday, Sept. 15 at noon, with lunch at the Pizza King Restaurant on Stein Highway in Seaford. For more information, or to become a member, contact Chapter president, Charles Singman, at 3370337.

Widowed Persons meet

The Seaford Chapter of the Widowed Persons Service will have its next meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 16, at 12:15 p.m. at the Golden Corral. The planned guest speaker will be Rosalee Walls speaking about the Marvel Museum and Return Day. All widowed persons of all ages are invited to attend.

Marine Corps meeting

The Marine Corps League meets the first Thursday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at the Log Cabin in Seaford.

Cancer support group

The Wellness CommunityDelaware is offering a support group for people affected by cancer and their loved ones at the Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. The group meets at the Cancer Care Center on the second Monday of the month from 4:30 to 6 p.m. For more information call Kaye or Lori at 6459150.

Coast Guard Auxiliary

Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 12-04 meets the second Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club in Blades. Call Wayne Hickman at 629-6337 for details.

land, Grand Olé Opry, and Memphis Rock ‘n’ Soul Museum. For information call 629-4939.

Del Tech’s September trips

Embark on exciting day trips or a three-day trip with Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus, Georgetown. Sports fans, don’t miss the chance to see the Phillies vs. Marlins baseball game on Sept. 10 in Philadelphia. Join Detective McDevitt and frantic witnesses on Sept. 19 for “History on Foot,” a firsthand look at the investigation into Lincoln’s assassination in Washington, D.C. On Sept. 20, listen to country music veterans, Crystal Gayle, Ray Clark, and Ray Price at the American Music Theatre in Lancaster, Pa. View the natural scenic beauty of Pine Creek Gorge, also known as Pennsylvania’s Grand Canyon, from Sept. 22 to 24. Visit Occoquan, a historic riverfront mill town in Virginia, on Sept. 27 for their annual fall craft show. For more information about these or other trips, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate and Community Programs at 302856-5618. On Sept. 18, attend a one-night-only concert event with American folk singer Arlo Guthrie and the NSO Pops as part of the Kennedy Center’s “Arts Across America” celebration. On Sept. 25, enjoy Judy Garland’s captivating and timeless songs performed by Broadway veteran Linda Eder with the NSO Pops led by Principal Pops Conductor Marvin Hamlisch. Tickets are now available for trips to two National Symphony Orchestra (NSO) Pops shows at the Kennedy Center in September, sponsored by the Adult Plus+ program at Delaware Technical & Community College. For more information about these or other trips, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate and Community Programs at 302-856-5618.

Bus trip to Nashville

Seaford will host a trip to Nashville, Tenn., Nov. 13-17. Cost of $799 per person/double occupancy includes lodging at the Opryland Hotel, performance of Radio City’s “Christmas Spectacular” featuring world-famous Rockettes, Fantasy in Ice, holiday dinner show featuring Louise Mandrell, most meals, motorcoach transportation and much more. For more information call Frances Horner at 629-4416.

Bus Trip to N.Y. City

Senior Center trips

Nanticoke Senior Center’s Nashville and Memphis trip will take place on Sunday, Sept. 14 to Saturday Sept. 20. Cost is $850 double occupancy. Some of the sights you will see are Grace-

Bus trip to N.Y. City, Saturday, Oct 25, to the American Museum of Natural History to visit “The Horse” exhibit. Fee is $65/person includes bus fare and admission to the Exhibit. Reservations must be paid and received by Monday, Sept 1. Bus will board approx 7 a.m. in the Sears parking lot at the Dover Mall. Call Mary Everhart 302659-0460, or Paula Barto 6295233, or visit website www.delawarequinecouncil.org

Delmar Alumni sponsors trip

Delmar Alumni sponsors a trip to Rainbow Dinner Theatre, Lancaster, Pa. on Saturday, Nov. 1. Bus departs from Delmar High School at 2:30 p.m., dinner at 6:30 p.m., and show “Barefoot in the Park,” at 8 p.m. Cost is $80 per person. RSVP: Kay Carrier, 10843 Dorthy Road, Laurel, 8757877; or Dorothy Wolfgang, 36360 BiState Boulevard, Delmar, 846-2366.

Seaford AARP trips

Money has to be paid in time to make reservations for all trips. • Oct. 13-16 - New Hampshire White Mountains for 4 days. Stay in Laconia, N.H. at the Margate Resort Hotel with seven meals included. Cost is $650 per person, double occupancy. Visit Franconia Notch State Park, Chutter’s Store, Sugar Hill Sampler, Harman’s Cheese & Country Store, Hampton Pewter, and more. Have a five course dinner served aboard the Café Lafayette Dinner Train during your two hour ride! Then ride the Lake Winnipesaukee Scenic Railroad before taking a cruise on a 230’ ship across Lake Winnipesaukee. • Nov. 19 - Rainbow Dinner Theater in Pennsylvania to see the comedy: “Deck The Halls And Clean The Kitchen.” Cost: $65. Bus leaves Seaford Peebles parking lot at 7:30 a.m. • Dec. 5 - The American Music Theater to see “Christmas Show.” Cost is $65. Enjoy holiday songs and comedy sketches. Also an appearance of Santa. We will also have time to Christmas shop at the Rockvale Outlets and have lunch on your own before going to the theater. Must sign up now. Contact Rose Wheaton at 629-7180 for more information on these trips.

AARP Chapter #915 trips

• Branson, Mo - Sept. 13-20, cost is $875 per person. Call 410-822-2314. • New England/Vermont, NH, Boston and Salem, Oct. 13-19, cost is $1085 double, and $1335 single. Call 410-673-7856. • Myrtle Beach - Nov. 10-13, cost $430 per person. Call 410754-8588.

Trip to Radio City

Seaford Recreation’s 17th annual Radio City Christmas Spectacular is set for Sunday, Dec. 7, and is now taking registrations. The cost is $145 and the seats are in the orchestra section. The cost includes a charter bus and there will be a few hours after the show to shop and tour NYC. Call 629-6809 for more information or to sign up. Submit Bulletin Board items by noon, Thursday. Send to Morning Star Publications - PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, email to editor@mspublications. com or drop off at 628 West Stein Hwy., Seaford.

SUDOKU Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

See Answers Page 47


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

PAGE 25

Women — and a man — make weekly trips to Dutch Inn It was the sticky buns that drew Louise Warrington, Marlene AT URPHY Collins, Connie Whaley, Annabelle Cordrey and the late Gladys HastWhy can’t I be a part of ings to the Dutch Inn after doing their shopping on Thursdays at this group? I like to tell Safeway or the Acme store. For 30 years these ladies, and anywhere funny stories, I drink from 12 to 15 or more, have faithfully gathered every Thursday at coffee and really enjoy the Laurel Dutch Inn to swap stories and just enjoy each other’s others. company. It used to be when they celebratBennett said, “We are just a bunch of old ed a birthday they, in a traditional ceremo- women and a man.” Carolyn Brittingham nial atmosphere, divided up a single bun said that Chuck Swift attends “because he that had one candle on it. Adding it up, is so special and other men have attended there have been roughly 1,560 trips to the to.” Dutch Inn for this very happy group. Actually, Chuck attends with his wife, The group has no club name. The faCindy. “Dead or alive, Chuck likes peomous sticky buns that the Dutch Inn was ple,” she told me when I called her to known for all over the east coast disaparrange to meet with the group. Chuck and peared several years ago. And Britt’s several others are writing the history of the Dutch Inn is now called the Laurel Dutch local cemeteries. They are more than Inn. halfway done on this project and we hope But it’s still the Dutch Inn to them. And to have an update for the Star soon. they are still there, every Thursday. Well, back to the Dutch Inn group. In Connie Whaley recalls that during a attendance this week were Eleanor Henry, bad snow storm years ago, two group Floudine Otwell, Connie Whaley, Louise members showed up to keep their record Warrington, Chuck Swift, Irene Outten, going. who came down from Harrington, Cindy “We seldom ever miss,” said Connie. Swift, Carolyn Brittingham, Ann Lee and Someone else chimed in — I believe it her granddaughter Taylor Lowe, Mollie was Molly Collins: “We don’t plan on Collins, Annabelle Cordrey, Betty Elliott, anything else; if you don’t show up, you Helen Mae Bennett and me. Sure, why get talked about.” can’t I be a part of this group? I like to tell To the delight of the rest, Helen Mae funny stories, I drink coffee and really en-

P

M

joy others. You know I think this group has found the main ingredient to happiness — friendship. I’m glad I made this scheduled visit. I was stopped cold at the front door of Delmarva Power Wash. There was this small zip-lock bag, full of water, attached to the left of the door of the building. After talking to Treg Burris a few minutes, my curiosity got the best of me. “Just what is that water bag at your front door for?” I asked. Treg explained to me it was an ancient Chinese trick to keep flies away. The sun glistens off the water and flies do not like it. “Does it work?” I asked. “You don’t see any flies, do you?” he laughed. There is a very interesting new newsletter put out by the Laurel School District and its new superintendent, Dr. John McCoy. New to the Laurel district staff are: Lisa Langley, Bethany Boyd, Margret Wallace, Erin Brennan, Allison Hastings, Karen Aliff, Suzane Boyce, Chrystal Ellison, Cathy Reddish and John LaLave. In case you don’t see the newsletter, I would like to run part of Dr. McCoy’s remarks: “I am thrilled to be your superintendent and want to thank all of you who have made my wife and me feel so welcome to your community — now our community.” I think we should be proud that our

children and grandchildren attend Laurel schools. The future looks bright! The Laurel Chamber of Commerce is going to sponsor a Business to Business Expo on Sept. 23. It is being held in the Laurel Fire Hall Banquet Room. Cost to participate is only $10. The first expo the chamber held a couple of years ago was a tremendous success. For information, call the Chamber of Commerce at 875-9319. I know I have not talked about the softball league yet — don’t give up on me. And by the way, what happened to the 90-year-old gentleman who wanted to talk baseball with me, particularly the Phillies? I’m ready — and willing. Dale Hill, Charlie Brittingham and Ken Brown — I haven’t heard from you in some time either. Now, I must be the only person in Sussex County with pen in hand who does not have an opinion or two on the political races. My party affiliation is Whig, or at least I should be wearing one, but here is my little bit of information not yet shared. I really think one of the candidates for high office should have been Sen. Jim Bunning from Kentucky. After all, he is a former Phillies player, raised a family of nine, is a quiet, no-nonsense person and does not like the spotlight. Well, so goes my candidate. Have a great early fall week, everyone.

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

Church Bulletins St. John’s multicultural services

Siempre Verde, a multicultural, bilingual service is being led by Pastor Luis Almandoz on Sunday afternoons at 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall at St. John’s United Methodist Church at Pine and Poplar streets, Seaford. Praise music, powerful preaching and a small meal unite this fellowship of persons of both Hispanic and Anglo origins. Alberto Mendez leads worship on the keyboard.

Ladies’ bible study

There is a ladies’ bible study, held every Tuesday starting at 10 a.m., at Laurel Baptist Church, Bi-State Boulevard in Laurel. This bible study is a non-denominational study, only God’s word is studied, making us to be more like Christ. Should you have any questions regarding the study, feel free to call Gertrude R. Smith at 875-5300.

The Lighthouse

Rising gas prices, wars and rumors of wars, rising food prices, it’s all so frightening. Come join Rebecca Jones as she presents “God’s Deliverance and Provision,” Wednesdays at 7 p.m., at The Lighthouse Church, 27225 Kaye Road, Laurel. Find out how the Bible can show you how to live and face hardships today. Pastor Timothy Jones provides kid’s church for grades K-6, and a nursery is available. Call 875-7814.

Celebrate Recovery

Celebrate Recovery, a step program which claims Jesus Christ as its higher power, is meeting at St. John’s United Methodist Church, Pine and Poplar streets,

on Tuesday evenings from 7-9 p.m. This program is open to persons who wish to turn over their hurts, habits, and hang-ups to God such that they may be healed. For more information, call Rev. Constance Hastings, 629-9466, or Robert Spadaccini, 841-1720.

Old Christ Church schedule

Sept. 7 - 9:30 a.m., Holy Eucharist Sept. 14, 21, 28 - 9:30 a.m., morning prayer Oct. 7 - 10 a.m., blessing of the animals, morning prayer

Ninety & Nine meets

The Ninety & Nine extends an invitation to all women to join them for their quarterly dinner meeting at The Cannon Mennonite Church in Bridgeville, on Monday evening, Sept. 8, at 6:30 p.m. The Ninety & Nine is a ministry, which was formed in 1984 by a group of women who care about the needs of others. If you would like a night out full of fun, food, fellowship and lots of encouragement, then The Ninety & Nine is the place for you. The special speaker for the evening is Diana Weber. She will be sharing her testimony of freedom through deliverance from fear, and insights from the book of Revelation to encourage our audience to be on fire for Jesus. Register now to hear Diana’s inspiring message. The Cannon Mennonite Church is located on Route 18 West. Going north on Rt. 13, go to the next stop light past Wal-Mart in Seaford, which is only a few miles. Turn left at I.G. Burton (formerly Chambers Motors) and Cannon Mennonite Church is located on the left approximately one mile. Enter church by side door.

Gospel music at Georgetown Circle Family and Friends Day Jerry and Jeannie Jones invite you to join them at the Circle in Georgetown, on Friday, Sept. 5, at 7:30 p.m., for an evening of Gospel Music in the Circle. There will be no charge or love offering for this concert. Bring a lawn chair and enjoy the evening. For further info call 302-2284813.

Free community luncheon

Laurel Baptist Church will be hosting a free community luncheon (chicken / dumplings), on Sept. 20, noon to 2 p.m. The church is located at 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, approximately 2 miles south of town. For any further information, call Shirley at 875-2314.

Delaware Right to Life banquet

Delaware Right to Life annual banquet will be held on Thursday, Sept. 25, and will feature Operation Rescue founder, Randall Terry. Randall is a dynamic speaker and has devoted his life to the pro-life cause. He has been arrested over 40 times for his peaceful, pro-life activities. In 2003, he founded the Society for Truth and Justice and he conducted a program called Operation Witness. Most recently Randall published the book, A Humble Plea, written primarily to Catholic bishops and clergy on how to end the abortion holocaust. The banquet will take place at the Christiana Hilton in Newark. Tickets are $50 per person. Cocktails begin at 6 p.m., dinner begins at 7 p.m., followed by the keynote speaker. Contact prolifedela-ware@juno.com or call 302-478-5469 for tickets.

St. John A.M.E. Zion Church (Ross Point) in Laurel, will celebrate their second annual Family and Friends Day on Sept. 7. Morning worship preacher at 11 a.m. will be Pastor Shirley M. Caldwell. Afternoon service starts at 4 p.m. featuring the Sussex County Mass Choir and a special preacher will be bringing the Word of God. Dinner will served prior to afternoon service. For more information contact Sister Doris Winder and Sister Karen Evans at 349-5722 or 629-9440, or church 8754042, or visit our website at www.stjohnurosspoint.com. The Rev. Shirley M. Caldwell is pastor.

United Faith Women’s Conference

United Faith Believers Ministries, 10771 N. Plaza Road Laurel, Pastor Esther M. Henry will host its 2008 Women’s Conference on Sept. 12-14. Guest speakers nightly: • Friday, Sept. 12, at 7:30 p.m. - Evangelist Ella Purnell of Victory Temple, Bridgeville. • Saturday, Sept. 13, at 6 p.m- Co-Pastor Lynn Mifflin of Power & Love Ministries, Dagsboro. • Sunday, Sept. 14, at 4 p.m.- Pastor Helena M. Bailey of Kingdom Life Family Ministries, Millsboro. For more information you may contact the church office at 875-4285. All are welcome.

Mary and Martha Tea Room

The Mary and Martha Tea Room, a women’s ministry sponsored by Take My Hand Ministry, Inc., will meet on Wednesday, Sept. 17 from 2 - 4 p.m. at 102 Mary-

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship TRINITY UNITED METHODIST Trap Pond, CHURCH NearLaurel, D el. 875-7715 Sun. School 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pastor Julie A. Lewis

“A caring church, a giving church, a sharing church; showing love, warmth and friendship to all.”

St. John’s United Methodist Church

Pine & Poplar Sts., Seaford 302-629-9466 E-mail: st_johns@verizon.net NURSERY & HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

SUNDAY WORSHIP 8:30 & 11:15 am Traditional 9:45 Sunday School 10:00 am Hearts Afire (Contemporary) Come as you are… and be transformed in the love of Christ!

Centenary United Methodist Church “Where Caring is Sharing” “NEW SONG!” - Contemporary Celebration, 8:45 a.m. Sunday School, Classes for ALL ages, 9:45 a.m. Traditional Family Worship, 11:00 a.m.

Rev. K. Wayne Grier, Pastor, 875-3983 200 W. Market St., Laurel, Del.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

1010S .C entral Ave., Laurel Ph: 875-7748 Minister: Ian J. Drucker WorshipS ervices: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. BibleS tudy: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m. In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 510 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE Rev. Donna Hinkle, Pastor Church: 875-4233 Sunday Services: 8:30 am Praise 9:30 am Sunday School,10:45 am Worship

DIAL DAILY DEVOTIONS: 875-4309

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching

Youth Group Wednesday 7:00 pm

Worship 10:45 a.m. • Sun. School 9:45 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Camp Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

Christian Church of Seaford Dual 13N., Seaford, DE • 629-6298

SCHEDULE OF SERVICES Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Morning Worship 10:30 Wed. Night Service & (Nursery & Jr. Church) Youth Groups 7:00 p.m. A Firm Foundation • A Sure Hope • An Unending Love

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church & Old Christ Church

“A Place to Belong”

600 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE 19956 (302) 875-3644 The Rev. Dr. Howard G. Backus, Pastor www.dioceseofdelaware.net/churches/stphlps.html Holy Eucharist with Healing and Church School ~ Sunday @ 9:30 am

SUNDAY WEDNESDAY Underground Family Worship (7-12 grade) 6:15 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Sunday School 9:00 a.m. Prayer Team ‘The Table’ God’s Big Back Yard (last Wed. of mo) 7:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m.

94 Walnut St. Laurel, DE 19956

875-7873

Centrally located at 14511 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE 19956 Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. FasTrak Children’s Ministry - 10:30 a.m.; E318 Youth - 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Services - 7 p.m.

For info, call 875.7995 or visit www.centralworshipcenter.org

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road6 8, South of Laurel Laurel,D el.

Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m. www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

Thank You to the churches that sponsor these pages. Your contribution makes it possible for the “Good News” to be published each week.


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008 land Avenue in Greenwood. Featured is a time of worship, ministry, and a light lunch. A freewill offering will be taken for the speaker, First Lady Tyvonnia Bull, from the Seaford area. For more information contact Dr. Michaele Russell at 302349-4220.

Life’s hard questions

St. George’s UMC gospel concert

A gospel concert is being held at St. George’s United Methodist Church in Laurel on Sunday, Sept. 7, at 6 p.m. Music will be presented by “Olé Time Gospel Singers” of the Laurel Area. Refreshments will be served after the service. Come out and be blessed. Directions: Alt. 13 south from Laurel to Delmar, turn right on St. George’ Road and follow to church on right. For more information call 875-2273.

New Zion UMC Homecoming

New Zion United Methodist Church in Laurel will celebrate its “Annual Homecoming” on Sunday, Sept. 14 at 10 a.m. morning worship with messenger the Rev. Timothy A. Duffield Sr.; 2 p.m. dinner; 3 p.m. memorial Service; 3:30 p.m., Guest Pastor, the Rev. Thomas Johnson of Rehoboth/Lewes circuit, along with choir and congregation. Host Pastor is Timothy A. Duffield Sr.

Conley’s UMC Gospel Sing

PAGE 27

On Sunday, Sept. 21, at 3 p.m., Conley’s United Methodist Church will hold their third annual Gospel Sing. It will be an afternoon of praise and worship music, rejoicing and relaxing in the setting of the 19th century Conley’s Chapel. The event is organized by Pat Short and John Dickson of Conley’s Membership Committee. Pat grew up in Keyser, W.Va., and the idea for the event was inspired by her memory of the all night Gospel Sings held at her small town church. John has lived in Sussex County for more than 20 years and has been instrumental in lining up the local talent.The performers include Conley’s own Pastor Mike Hurley and his wife Ann, Rebecca Rollins, Charlie Marshall and daughter Jackie, Conley’s Choir, and Conley’s Praise Band. Other singers will be Lori Jones, John O’Day, the Rev. Jim McBride, Flo White, Maurice Daniels, Sierra Spicer, Lori (nee Miller) Lee and husband Robert, Paul and Marianne Hayes, and the Lighthouse Christian Praise Band. After the music you are invited to stop by the Fellowship Hall to meet and greet the performers and your neighbors. For more information you can contact Pat Short at 302-226-4221, or call the church office at 302-945-1881. The office is open Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to noon. Conley’s Chapel and Fellowship Hall is located at 22150 Robinsonville Road, Lewes, DE 19958.

Come and join us as we explore some of the difficult questions of life and death, and how we live to the best of who we are and how we are made! “Living Fully, Dying Well” is an eight-week course for anyone, of any faith, who wants to explore how we live the best life we can, even in the faith of mortality. This course will be offered on Thursday afternoons, 1-2 p.m., and on Sunday mornings, 8:45 a.m. If you are busy on Sunday mornings, sign up for the Thursday afternoon. Call Seaford Presbyterian Church 629-9077, to register before Sept 15. $10 for materials.

St. John’s UMC House Tour

The annual St. John’s house tour will be held on Thursday, Oct. 2, from 10 a.m.4 p.m. The cost for a ticket is $10. Seven homes and St. John’s Church will open their doors for the day. The ladies of the church will serve a chicken salad luncheon from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. for an additional fee. There will also be a boutique opened in Fellowship Hall with handmade items and goodies of all kinds.

Spirituality of Nanticoke Indians

The Nanticoke Indians have lived on Delmarva for more than 400 years, originally along the waterways of the peninsula. Today, the area in which they live has changed significantly, but they are still connected to the land and strive to preserve their native traditions. The Nanticoke Tribe remains a vital part of our region. Seekers, Spiritual Treasures at St. Peter’s Square, is pleased to present Odette Wright on September 13, 2008, in St. Peter’s Parish Hall, 211 Mulberry St., Lewes, from 10 a.m. until noon. Wright will discuss the history and spirituality of the Nanticoke Tribe. Wright was born into the Nanticoke Indian Tribe in Delaware, but spent much of her youth in the west. She returned to Delaware with a burning desire to help her people. Wright is a well respected healer within her tribe and a tireless advocate for the Nanticoke people. She has been involved with the Nanticoke Indian Museum, near Oak Orchard, since 1984. She also has traveled; serving as a Methodist missionary for three years in Arizona, New Mexico and North Korea. Currently, Wright continues her work at the museum, in addition to sharing her heritage and culture with the community through speaking engagements. This spirituality topic is sponsored by Seekers, Spiritual Treasures at St. Peter’s Square a spiritual resource and gift shop located at the St. Peter’s parish hall. For more information on this topic and others, visit www.seekerslewes.com, or call 645-9916.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor WEDNESDAY SUNDAY Sunday School......9:45 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Worship...............11:00 a.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Youth Group 6:00-8 p.m.

Tony Windsor’s brand new Gospel CD compilation is on sale now. Tony sings songs of faith and inspiration including “The Angels Cried,” “Everlasting Arms,” “I Saw the Light” and much more. Get your copy at the Star office for only $6.00 [includes $1.00 donation to NIE (Newspapers in Education) program].

Call: 302-236-9886

Besid e the StillW aters

PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Youth Minister: James Hollis Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

27225 Kaye Road Laurel, DE 19956 Ph: (302) 875-7814

www.thelighthouselaurel.org Timothy P. Jones, Pastor Sunday Family Worship - 10:00 a.m. Wednesday Family Ministries - 7:00 p.m.

“Shining His Light”

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591 MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30 p.m.

“The Pickle Church” CHRIST THE CORNERSTONE COMMUNITY CHURCH PICKLE MINISTRIES OUTREACH & CORNERSTONE NOTE MUSIC MINISTRY Corner of Bethel Rd. & Alt. 13 • 302-875-8150 Church School -All Ages - 9:15 a.m. Worship Service - 10:00 a.m. Rev. Rick Elzey Wings of Prayer - Tues. 7:00 p.m. Come Join Our Family

VICTORY TABERNACLE CHURCH OF GOD

SUNDAY WORSHIP 11 AM and 6 PM ~ Sunday School 9:45 AM

WEDNESDAY NIGHT Ministry for the wholef amily 7 PM

Pastor Stacey Johnson 28261 Seaford Rd., Laurel, 2 miles N. of Laurel on Alt. 13

302-877-0443

The Atlanta Road Alliance Church 22625 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE (302) 629-5600 • www.atlantaroadcma.org Rev. Edward J. Laremore, Sr. Pastor David A. Krilov, Associate Pastor

CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH

315 N. Shipley St., Seaford, DE 19973 • 302-629-9755 Pastor: Rev. Andrew C. Watkins www.christlutheranseaford.com

Praise Worship 8:30 AM • Sunday School 9:30 AM • Traditional Worship 11 AM

ROCK CHURCH

SUNDAY WEDNESDAY 8:30 Worship 6:45 Pioneer Clubs (age 3 9:45 Sunday School thru grade 6) & Divorce Care® 11:00 Worship/Kids Church 7:00 Prayer Service & Youth 7:00 Evening Service Group (grades 7-12)

30320 Seaford Road, Laurel, Del. Ph: 875-7275 • Pastor Bill Konkel Sunday School: 9a .m. Worship: 10:30 a.m. & 1st & 3rd Sunday Evening: 5 p.m. Thurs Evening Prayer: 7p .m.

COKESBURY CHURCH

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church

All Welcome Where Love Abides -- John 3:16

The Church by the Side of the Road 15092 Cokesbury Rd, Georgetown, DE (302) 629-5222 • www.cokesburywc.org Pastor Harold Carmean & Congregation Sunday School 9 am Contemporary Church Service 10 am

United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School

Pastor: Rev. Jim Sipes • 302-629-4458 PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

T on y W in d sor

Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel 302- 875-4646

Dr. Carl G Vincent, Senior Minister Pastor Barry B. Dukes, Music Minister Sunday 9:30 am Wednesday 7:00 pm Children’s Church • Nursery

Mount Olivet

New Gospel CD: ‘Beside the Still Waters’

Messiah’sV ineyard Church

Laurel Wesleyan Church Rt. 13A, Just North of Laurel Sunday School - 9:30 Worship - 9:00 & 10:45 Sunday Evening Worship Wed. Youth Ministries 6:30 p.m. Thurs.W KID, The Zone Children’s Ministries6:30 Church 875-5380 • Sr. Pastor Ken Deusa Asst. Pastor: Rev. Rick Green; Youth: Kyle Horton Children’sP astor:M arilyn Searcey

629-7979 Holy Eucharist: 9:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Forum: 10:30 a.m. Thurs. Eve. Service: 6 p.m. Front & King St., Seaford, DE

The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby-Coladonato, Rector

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - G. W. Cliver - 629-6206 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10 a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

A Gathering Of Faith Come together under Christ’s roof and share together in his love. Attend Church this Sunday


PAGE 28

Obituaries Dr. James Robert Carmean, 71 Dr. James Robert Carmean, “Doc” of Laurel, passed away on Friday Aug. 29, 2008 at his home. He was born in Millsboro, a son of James W. and Margaret K. Carmean. Dr. Carmean was a retired Dentist serving the surrounding communities for over 43 years. He also proudly served his country in the United States Army 82nd Airborne Division. He attended Laurel High School class of 1955 and Castle Heights Military Academy in Lebanon, TN. He was a graduate of the University of Wyoming in Laramie, WY., were he completed his four year degree in three years. He was also a graduate of Temple Dental School of Philadelphia, PA in 1963. He loved hunting, fishing, was an avid racquetball player and enjoyed riding his Harley Davidson. Dr. Carmean was active in his community as a board member and committee member for many civic groups. He also served on many national Dentistry boards through out his career. His family and friends will remember him as a very caring family man and his unique fun loving spirit. Dr. Carmean is survived by his sons, Theron Carmean of Ocean City, Md., Sean Carmean of Wilmington. A daughter, Suzanne Carmean of Mardela Springs, Md. Also surviving him is longtime companion Shari Lubiniecki and his sisters, Carolyn Calio and June Smith both of Laurel. Four grandchildren and three great grandchildren along with several nieces and nephews also survive him. At his request Dr. Carmean will be laid to rest near Imnaha River in Imnaha, Oregon. A local memorial service will be announced in the near future. Memorial contributions can be made in Dr. Carmean’s memory to: Delaware Hospice, 100 Patriots Way, Milford, DE 19963 or the American Cancer Society PO Box 22718, Oklahoma City, OK 731231718. Arrangements by the Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home 700 West St. Laurel, DE 19956. Online condolences may be sent by visiting www.delmarvaobits.com

Joanne L. Carter, 55 Joanne L. Carter, of Delmar, died Friday, August 29, 2008 at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury. She was born in Norfolk, Virginia, a daughter of Raymond Jack Cunningham and Doris Peters Cunningham. Joanne was a great and wonderful Mom-Mom to many. She loved her job as a daycare provider in her home for over 20 years. She was extremely proud of her family and cherished spending quality time with them, especially her grandchildren.

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

Obituaries are run without charge thanks to the support of area churches

She enjoyed camping and hunting for good deals at yard sales. She is survived by her two children, James “Jimmy” Carter, and his wife Courtney of Hebron and Crystal Ritter and her husband Charles Joanne L. Carter “Chuck” Grubbs, III of Delmar; 5 grandchildren, Anne Ritter, Morgan Ritter, Gabriel Carter, Brooke Grubbs and Zekiah Grubbs; a good friend and neighbor, Debbie Core; her stepmother, Pearl Cunningham of Parsonsburg; 3 brothers, Michael Cunningham, Larry Cunningham of Florida and David Cunningham and 4 sisters, Nancy Reynolds, Sherry McBee of Florida, Linda Massey and Annette Walker. She is also survived by many nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles and cousins. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, James Morgan Carter, who passed in 1993 and a mother-in-law, Isabelle Helgeson. A memorial service was held on Wednesday, Sept. 3, at 7 p.m. at Short Funeral Home, Delmar. Interment will be private.

Memorial contributions may be made in her memory to The Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at John’s Hopkins by visiting www.hopkinskimmelcancercenter.org. Online condolences may be sent to the family by visiting www.shortfh.com.

Ronald L. McDowell, 54 Ronald L. McDowell of Laurel, passed on Friday, August 29, 2008 at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury. He was born July 15, 1954 in Council Bluffs, Iowa, a son of Larry and Velma Harvey McDowell. Since the age Ronald L. McDowell of 16 Ron has enjoyed his work in installation and sales in the carpet and flooring industry. He was an active member of the Seaford Church of Christ. Life for Ron was all about his family and extended family, for whom he showed unconditional love. He is survived by his wife of 30 years, Dorothea E. Vickers McDowell; a daughter, Rhonda L. McDowell of Laurel and her boyfriend, Dominic Cipolla of Harbeson; three brothers, Bill McDowell and his wife, Lorraine of Rapid City, South Dakota, Bob McDowell and his wife, Sali of Laurel and Poker McDowell and his wife, Sheila of Delmar, Del.; two sisters, Connie Coodey and her husband, Barney and Kay Smith and her husband, Paul, all of Shenandoah, Iowa; two special people who were like a second set of parents, Dee and Glen Lindgren of Council Bluffs, Iowa; a mother-in-law, Alma Vickers of Salisbury; and two brothers-in-law, Leland Vickers and his wife, Jackie of Shawnee, Kansas and Sonny Smack of Dover.

Union United Methodist Church 2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 HandicapF riendly WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.)

He is also survived by many nieces and nephews. He now is reunited in Heaven with his beloved son, Ryan, who passed in 2004, his parents, his father-in-law, Edgar, a niece Heidi and a nephew Jason. A funeral service was held on Wednesday, Sept. 3, 2008 at 2 p.m. at Laurel Church of Christ in Laurel, where family and friends called. Chip Hartzell and Wayne Mathis will officiate. Interment followed the services at Odd Fellows Cemetery in Laurel. Memorial contributions may be made in his memory to: Salisbury Foundation, Ryan McDowell Memorial Fund, Hot Glass Studio, PO Box 2655, Salisbury, MD, 21801 or to Delaware Valley Christian Camp, Camp Manatawny, 33 Camp Road, Douglassville, PA 19518. Funeral arrangements are being handled by Short Funeral Home of Delmar. Online condolences may be sent to the family by visiting www.shortfh.com.

Etta Mae Richardson, 93 Etta Mae Richardson a resident of Harrison Senior Living in Georgetown died on Sunday, August 31, 2008. Etta Mae was born September 10, 1914, the daughter of Estella and Walter Tyndall. She was a proud and faithful member of Asbury United Methodist Church. Her husband Howard D. Richardson died in 1976. She is survived by her son, Calvert Richardson and his wife, Ann, a grandson, Howard Richardson and his wife Stephanie and a great-grandson, Will. A sister, Iva Thompson and several nieces and nephews also survive Etta Mae. Gravesides services are on Thursday Sept. 4 at 11 a.m. at Asbury United Methodist Church Cemetery, County Seat Hwy, Georgetown. Donations may be made to Asbury

BETHEL WORSHIP CENTER 9431 Ginger Lane, Seaford (2.4 mi. north of Wal-Mart on US 13) 628-4240 Recorded Info 628-4241 Church Office

Pastor Joseph Lecates - 875-2059 Adult Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:30 am Nursery 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Youth Meeting Sun. 7 pm Promise Keepers Tues. 7 pm Wed. Night Bible Study 7 pm “We’re not building a church, we’re building God’s Kingdom!”

Welcome… SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday School 9 am Morning Worship 10 am

701B ridgeville Road 629-9077

“Welcome Home!”

Wesley United Methodist Church 22025 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE Pastor James Bongard Contemporary Worship 9 am Sunday School & Bible Education 10 am Traditional Worship 11 am Wednesday Worship 6:45 pm 302-629-3029 * Info Line 302-628-0112

743 E. Clarence St., Seaford, Del. Carlton L. Cannon, Sr. Paster

629-9443, Cell: 448-0852 • cogclarence@verizon.net Sunday: Midweek Activities: Church School........9:45 am Call for Details Morning Worship......11 am Children’s Church & Youth Explosion ........6 pm Nursery Provided Evening Worship.........7 pm *Counseling by appt. only Tuesday: Thursday: Bible Study & Family Corporate Prayer.........7 pm ‘Come and Grow with Us!’ Training Hour...........7 pm

Laurel Baptist Church, SBC Where everybody is somebody & Jesus Christ is Lord 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, Laurel, DE 19956 LBC Sunday School ~ 10:00 Morning Worship ~ 11:00 Wednesday Bible Study ~ 7:00 P.M. NurseryP rovided Pastor: Rev. Steven Booth Music Director: Linda Lewis

302-875-7998


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008 United Methodist Church Cemetery, c/o Calvert Richardson, 15117 County Seat Hwy, Seaford, DE 19973. Arrangements by the Cranston Funeral Home, Seaford.

Edward William Boyce, 42 Edward William Boyce, of Hallam, PA, formerly of Seaford died on Saturday, August 23, 2008 at York Hospital in York, PA. Mr. Boyce was a supervisor for the Harley Davidson Motorcycle Manufacturing Plant in York, PA, prior to that he had worked for the Kellogg’s plant in PA and the Edward Boyce Pillsbury Plant of Federalsburg, MD. He had been in marshal arts since age nine and was a 6th degree black belt in karate and had, for a while, a marshal arts school in Dover. He is the son of Jacqueline Boyce and the late Edward Boyce. He is survived by a son, Edward M. Boyce of Seaford, a sister, Anita Boyce and her husband Joe of Seaford, his aunts and uncles, Ruth Goehring, Jake & Ruth Boyce, Gary and Debbie Flood and William Gayston, niece, Jessica Jefferson and her fiancée, Jason Garcia, nephews, Jade and Dylan Harris, Gage Trice and Richard Clark III.

Memorial Services will be on Saturday, Sept. 6 at 2 p.m. at the Cranston Funeral Home, 300 N. Shipley St. Seaford.

Raymond William Matthews, 61 Raymond William Matthews of Seaford, passed away on Friday, Aug. 29, 2008 at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. He was born Jan. 2, 1947 in Easton, the son of Grace Eleanor Wright Matthews of Federalsburg, MD and the late Russell Woodrow Matthews. He was a graduate of Colonel Richardson High School class of 1968. He worked in food services and in building maintenance. He was a former member of the Easton Church of God where he worked in the school cafeteria. He was a member of the Church of God in Seaford and served as an usher, worked at the church’s Food Pantry and served on the Benevolence Ministry for several years. Besides his mother, Grace Matthews, he is survived by two sisters, Eileen Turbitt and her husband Bryan and Peggy Hill and her husband Richard, both of Federalsburg, five brothers, Edward Matthews of Federalsbusrg, Richard Matthews and his wife Sally of Camden-Wyoming, DE, Charles Matthews and his wife Jane and Teddy Matthews and his wife Diana, both of Federalsburg, and Terry Matthews and his wife Evelyn of St. Michaels, Md, and many nieces and nephews. Besides his father he was preceded in

PAGE 29

death by a sister, Linda Sue Schech. Funeral services were held on Wed. Sept. 3, at 2 p.m. at the Framptom Funeral Home in Federalsburg, Md with Rev. Kerry Clagg officiating, assisted by Rev. Robert Clagg. Interment followed in Hill Crest Cemetery in Federalsburg. Friends called on Wednesday at the funeral home. To share memories with the family please visit www.framptom.com.

Geneva Walls Stickley, 87 Geneva Walls Stickley of Seaford, died Friday, August 29, 2008 at Genesis Elder Care, Seaford. She was born on August 7, 1921 in Seaford, the daughter of Nora Hill Walls and Charles Walls. She was preceeded in death by her husband, Don Stickley, her son Daniel Stick-

ley and her brother Charles Walls. She is survived by her children, Donna Gwozdz and her husband Larry of Takoma Park, Md; Sharon Chandler of Roanoke, Va; Rebercca Norton and her husband Steve Norton of Laurel. She is also survived by two grandsons, Dan Shortridge and his wife Stefine Fitzer of Lewes, Del.; Tom Shortridge and his fiancee Anna Bowers of Hampton, Va; one great-granddaughter, Hadassah ShortridgePitzer of Lewes; and her brother, Dallas Walls of Seaford and his friend Goldie Weldon of Laurel and her sister-in-law Doris Walls of Seaford. She will be buried in Marietta, Ohio where she lived for many years. Arrangements by Watson-Yates Funeral Home, Seaford.

Gardeners encourage donations of surplus crops to soup kitchens This summer marks the start of the Delaware Master Gardeners association with Plant a Row for the Hungry. Sponsored nationally by the Garden Writers Association, Plant a Row for the Hungry encourages home gardeners to donate surplus vegetables to local food banks and soup kitchens. “In future growing seasons, we’ll be encouraging Delaware gardeners to set aside an extra garden row specifically to feed the needy,” says Carrie Murphy, horticultural agent for New Castle County Cooperative Extension. “But this year, we’re just asking gardeners to donate extra produce now, at harvest time.” The Master Gardeners practice what they preach. Murphy says that the Master Gardener demonstration plot at Bellevue State Park will soon have excess produce to donate. And the Master Gardener demonstration garden in Georgetown already has donated a considerable amount, says Master Gardener Linda Peters. Master Gardener Barbara Busch, who lives outside of Millsboro, was instrumental in getting the Master Gardeners and Cooperative Extension involved in the

Plant a Row program. In October, she relocated from Maine, where she was active in the York County Master Gardeners. Each year, this group donates some 60,000 pounds of produce to the needy. Thus far, the Delaware effort can be measured in hundreds of pounds, not thousands. “But every little bit helps,” says Busch. “So far this summer, I’ve brought 60 pounds of produce to the Christian Storehouse food bank in Millsboro.” Busch’s backyard garden only measures 6 feet by 10 feet and is mostly planted in heritage tomatoes. Although she has given away some of these tomatoes, the whopping share of that 60 pounds of produce was donated by area farmers. Steven Smith, director of operations for the Christian Storehouse, says that the Master Gardeners’ efforts are appreciated, especially in light of the current economy. “The number of people we help has doubled in the last six to eight months,” says Smith. For more information, call the Sussex County Cooperative Extension office at 302-856-7303.

The Family of Mimi Boyce wishes to express our gratitude to all of our family, church family, and friends for all of your visits, phone calls, food, cards and your love and prayers during this difficult time. A special thanks goes to Rev. Wayne Grier for all of his visits to the hospital and his prayers with our family. The overwhelming support of the community is deeply appreciated.

Love

Dale, Brenda, Bob, Jana, Mike, Blair, Kelley and Families


PAGE 30

MORNING STAR â&#x20AC;˘ SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

Entertainment 31st annual powwow Workers needed as Community planned this weekend Concert Association begins season The Nanticoke Indian Tribe has been hard at work to make sure that their 31st annual powwow is the best yet. The tribal chief, tribal council, program directors, committee chairpersons and volunteers invite everyone to the powwow where they will learn about the last 400 years of Nanticoke history and culture. The celebration will be held on Saturday, Sept. 6 and Sunday, Sept. 7, in the Longneck/Millsboro area with ample parking for visitors including school and tour buses and motorcycles. Tribal trams will be used to transport visitors from the parking area to the powwow site. About 40 tribal American Indian vendors will be on site with a variety of items for sale such as arts and crafts, clothing, jewelry, paintings, pottery, videos, DVDs, CDs, and much more. Food vendors will provide chicken, hotdogs, fries, fish, hamburgers, succotash, Indian tacos, Indian frybread and Pepsi products to drink. All day parking including the cost of admission is $8 per car; walk-in admission is $2 for adults and $1 for children; $5 for motorcycles; and $25 for buses plus $2 per person on the bus. Highway signs on Route 24,

John J. Williams Highway, between Route 1 in Rehoboth Beach and Route 113 in Millsboro will guide you to the parking area/powwow site. Attendees who are wheelchair bound or have motorized wheelchairs will enter the powwow grounds on Mount Joy Road and will be directed to the identified parking area where unloading and access to seating is convenient. Special seating for handicapped individuals will be available and monitored by powwow staff. The Grand Entry of flag bearers and American Indian dancers is Saturday at noon followed by a second dance session at 4 p.m. Sunday begins with an outdoor Worship Service at 10 a.m. and Grand Entry and dancing at 1:30 p.m. Except during Sunday Worship Service, seating is provided for powwow participants, dancers and handicapped individuals only. Bring your lawn chair and a friend. This event is family oriented so bring the children to enjoy native face painting and storytelling. For more information, call the Nanticoke Indian Center at 302-945-3400, the Nanticoke Museum at 302-945-7022, or email nanticok@verizon.net.

Seaford Community Concert Association members are gearing up for the 2008-2009 annual membership drive, beginning Sept. 6. Members are busy getting ready to send out their membership fliers to past members, hoping to again sell out memberships, which was accomplished in the 2007-08 season. Six excellent concerts have been chosen to celebrate the associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 60th year: guitarist Pavlo on Oct. 14; a big band Tribute to Benny Goodman and Peggy Lee on Oct. 28; pianist/cmedian Dale Gonyea on Jan. 17, 2009; Harpist Bronn and vocalist Katherine Journey on March 12, the Side Street Strutters jazz band on April 3; and vocal

FREE GED TESTING All Delaware residents age 18 and over are eligible. TESTING will be completed in 3 (three) phases.

Phase 1:

September 15 or 18, 2008 5:15 PM to 9:30 PM

Phase 2:

October 4, 2008 8:45 AM to 3:00 PM

Bike Tour set for this weekend Motorists are asked to be on the look-out while driving on more than 200 miles of town and country roads in Kent County on Saturday, Sept. 6 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. during the 22nd Annual Amish Country Bike Tour. Cyclist supporters will be manning the routes to provide assistance to cyclists. Bike Werx and Dunbar Cyclery will assist with bike repair, and the ABATE motorcycle club and Dover Air Force Base personnel will also provide assistance. Motorists should be able to note the five routes, which are marked on the roadways with a stencil. There are five bike tour routes, all of which start and end at Legislative Mall in Dover.

trio The Mantini Sisters on April 20. Kick-off for association members assisting with the membership drive will be held on Saturday, Sept. 6, at 10 a.m. at Grace Baptist Church on Atlanta Road. Anyone interested in becoming a worker for this membership drive is cordially invited to attend this important meeting to receive membership supplies. Call Allan Kittila, Community Concert Association president, at 629-6184, or Mary Ann Torkelson, Community Concert Association secretary, at 536-1384 if you plan to attend this meeting.

Phase 3:

October 25, 2008 8:15 AM to 5:00 PM

All testing will be held in Dover. Pre-enrollment is required. Seating is limited. Enrollment closes September 5, 2008 at 12 noon or when seats are filled. The loops take cyclists west of Dover through Amish country and as far south as the town of Harrington. Cyclists may register the day of the event between 7 and 10 a.m. at Legislative Mall in Dover. Cost is $30 for adults and $15 for cyclists under 16. For more information, call 302-734-4888 or visit www.visitdover.com.

Enroll by calling 302-739-5558 Only pre-enrolled examinees will be allowed to enter the testing facility. Official State of Delaware photo identification is required. All doors will lock promptly at the posted start time. All examinees must qualify from Phases 1 & 2 to take the GED Test. Sponsored by the Delaware Department of Education and Delaware Center for Distance Adult Learning, Inc.


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

PAGE 31

Kids are back in school and want only the best foods for lunch As you can imagine, my inORETTA NORR box is loaded with food related stuff. E-mails from food magazines and Web sites and sales promotions from cookware companies and cookbook publishers arrive at a pace that necessitates Nutritional analysis per sandmaking judicious use of the old wich: 307 calories, 13g fat (2.5 “delete” button. At this time of saturated), 40g carbohydrates, 5g year, there’s a unifying theme to fiber, 11g protein the hundreds of featured recipes — how to fix nutritious lunches California-Style Tuna Salad for school kids that they’ll actualRolls ly eat and not trade off for someThese roll-ups are great for thing unhealthy or, worse, toss in school and burst with tuna and the trash. veggies. If your child likes In their book, Real Food for wasabi’s heat, add an extra 1/4 Healthy Kids, Tanya Steel and teaspoon to the tuna mixture. If co-author Tracey Seaman offer wasabi is too spicy, use black lots of tips and kid-tested, trashpepper instead. Makes 4 servings proof, trade-proof recipes. A few of my favorite tips are: 1 can (6 ounces) light tuna fish, Looks Count: The way food preferably packed in water, is presented affects how flavor is drained and flaked perceived. Try to make the food 3 tablespoons mayonnaise look attractive and package in 1/4 teaspoon wasabi paste or “cool” containers that reflect the freshly ground black pepper, personality of your child. to taste Tap into Kid Power: Ask Two 10-inch flour tortillas your children to identify five 2 medium leaves Boston lettuce items that they would like to see 1 Kirby cucumber, peeled and in the lunchbox. Allow them to coarsely shredded lengthwise plan, help fix and package the (without seeds) meals. That will improve chances 1 medium carrot, peeled and that they’ll actually get eaten. coarsely shredded Never Too Cool for School: 1/2 of a ripe avocado, peeled, No matter how old, include a pitted and sliced 1/2-inch funny or encouraging note, a thick photo or even a silly drawing to be reminded of just how much Combine the tuna, 2 tableyou love them. spoons mayonnaise and wasabi Kids are indeed the toughest paste in a small bowl and mix critics but even the pickiest will until blended. find the following foods worthy Lay the tortillas on a work of their approval. surface. Spread 1/2 tablespoon mayonnaise on each tortilla and Peanut Butter Berry-Wich arrange the lettuce on top of Peanut butter goes well with both; arrange cucumber, carrot, more than just jam, and this inand avocado lengthwise in rows teresting combination proves it. near one edge. Spoon the tuna in This is delicious with whatever a line next to the vegetables fruit is in season. Serves 1 (away from the edge). Roll each tortilla up snugly into a cylinder. 2 slices whole-wheat bread or ba- Cut crosswise in half. nana bread Nutritional analysis per serv1 tablespoon natural peanut buting: 247 calories, 10g fat, (2g ter saturated), 24g carbs, 3g fiber, 1 tablespoon softened Neufchâ15g protein tel (reduced-fat) cream cheese 2 medium strawberries, hulled Turkey Pinwheels and sliced All the other kids at school will 1 teaspoon honey be jealous when they get a look at these delicious, colorful, Lay the bread slices on a work healthful wraps. Serves 2 surface. Spread the peanut butter on one slice and the cream 1 large whole-wheat wrap (11 to cheese on the other. 12 inches), or 2 smaller wraps Arrange strawberry slices in (8 inches), or a 12-by 9-inch an even single layer on top of the rectangular lavosh (a soft, peanut butter. Drizzle the honey thin Armenian flatbread) on the berries and then place the 1 tablespoon mayonnaise other slice of bread with the 1 lightly packed handful rinsed cream cheese on top. Cut into baby spinach leaves halves or quarters. 1 tablespoon dried cranberries

L

K

The Practical Gourmet

2 medium carrots, ends cut off, peeled and coarsely shredded 2 slices Swiss cheese, such as Jarlsburg (2 ounces) 2 thin slices store-bought roasted turkey breast (2 ounces) If necessary, warm the wrap in a 350°F oven for 2 minutes to soften before filling. Lay the wrap on a work surface and spread the mayonnaise all over. Sprinkle the spinach leaves, cranberries and carrots evenly on top. Arrange the Swiss cheese and turkey in even layers over the vegetable layer. Fold in the side edges and then roll up snugly from the bottom. Cut crosswise into four even pieces and wrap tightly in plastic. Nutritional analysis per piece (1/2 of wrap): 350 calories, 15g fat (5g saturated), 36g carbohydrates, 4.5g fiber, 15.5g protein

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Extreme Granola Makes about 7 cups 3/4 cups pecans 1/2 cup natural almonds 4 cups old-fashioned rolled oats 1/4 cup sesame seeds (optional) 1 stick (8 tablespoons) unsalted butter 1/3 cup maple syrup, cane syrup or honey, at room temperature 1/4 teaspoon fine salt 3/4 cup chopped dates 1/2 cup dried blueberries or raisins Preheat the oven to 375°F. Line a large shallow baking sheet with foil. Spread the pecans and almonds on the sheet and roast for 8 to 10 minutes, until lightly toasted. Transfer the nuts to a board, let cool and chop. Reduce the oven temperature to 300°F. Pour the oats and

sesame seeds, if using, in a mound on the same baking sheet. Melt the butter in a small bowl in the microwave; stir in the maple syrup and salt and drizzle on top of the oats. Stir well with a rubber spatula and then spread out the oats in an even layer. Bake the oats for 30 minutes, stirring once with the spatula halfway through, until the oats are lightly colored. Let cool; the mixture will crisp as it cools. Add the dates, blueberries, and reserved nuts and toss. Nutritional analysis per 1/2 cup: 298 calories, 16g fat (4.5g saturated), 34g carbohydrates, 4.5g fiber, 6.5g protein Note: The United States Department of Agriculture created a food pyramid of daily guidelines for kids. It’s available online at mypyramid.gov.

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PAGE 32

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

On the Record Marriages Sussex County Clerk of the Peace George Parish joyfully announces the following couples have obtained marriage licenses: • Marcel Joseph Georges, Laurel to Marie Y. Delva, Laurel • David B. Nicholas, Seaford to Deborah Ann Twilley, Seaford • Antonio L. Polk, Bridgeville to Amanda L. Blake, Greenwood • Michael Roy LeCates, Seaford to Julie Marie Porter, Seaford • Kenneth H. Bennett, Jr., Laurel to Leigh Anne Murtagh, Laurel • Rodney A. Wyatt, Bridgeville to Rhonda Roshell Street, Bridgeville • Kent Martin Chase, Dover to Bethany Danelle Howell, Greenwood • Burton Joseph Givens II, Laurel to Brandi Lynn Manning, Laurel • Paul S. Davis, Laurel to Debra Ann Frontera, Laurel • Bradley Leonard Kearse, Seaford to Keiyana La Von Turner, Harrington • Kim S. Short, Bridgeville to Brenda K. Hill, Bridgeville • David Michael Jones, Bridgeville to Jennifer Hope Taylor, Bridgeville • Andrew Joseph Keim, Seaford to Christa Nicole Ellis, Seaford • Andrew William Parlier, Seaford to Heather Newton, Laurel • Daniel M. Weimer, Seaford to Jessica L. Marine, Seaford • Michael Paul Oliver, Laurel to Megan Michelle Dorsey, Laurel • Donald Wayne West, Jr., Seaford to Jennifer Lynn Ojeda, Seaford • James Tarun Thompson, Seaford to Wanda Faye Reynolds, Seaford • Justin Ledque, Seaford to Catherine Regina Myers, Seaford • Justin Charles Porter, Laurel to Maria Antonia Zinszer, Laurel

Deeds 03/04/08 Phyllis F. Downs to Matthew Layton, parcel, Nanticoke Hundred, $143,000 03/04/08 Lot No. 25B, Florence E. Johnson, subdivision, Broad Creek Hundred, $15,000 03/06/08 Lewis Dean Adkins and Cheryl Adkins Yarema to Ryan M. and Christie A. Larmore, Lot Nos. I-II, Lands for Lewis J. and Margaret Ann Adkins, subdivision, Little Creek Hundred, $102,000 02/15/08 Sandy Ridge Enterprises, Inc. to Charles W. Jr. and Betty J. Phillips, Lot No. 59, Sandy Ridge, subdivision, Little Creek Hundred, $69,900 02/13/08 Bank of New York, Trustee to Marie S. Marcelin, parcel, City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, $157,500 02/28/08 AAM, L.L.C. to The NeMours Foundation, Lot No. 41, Section II, Mullen Commercial Park, Town of Seaford, subdivision, Seaford Hundred, $500,000 02/26/08 Passwaters Farm, LLC to

U.S. Home Corporation, Lot No. 334, Phase II, Heritage Shores, Town of Bridgeville, subdivision, Northwest Fork Hundred, $107,000 03/07/08 Robert C. and Barbara S. Warwick to Lewis Dean and Dorothy K. Adkins, Lot No. 15, Little Acres, subdivision, Little Creek Hundred, $225,000 03/04/08 Phyllis F. Downs to Matthew Layton, parcel, Nanticoke Hundred, $143,000 03/04/08 Lot No. 25B, Florence E. Johnson, subdivision, Broad Creek Hundred, $15,000 03/06/08 Lewis Dean Adkins and Cheryl Adkins Yarema to Ryan M. and Christie A. Larmore, Lot Nos. I-II, Lands for Lewis J. and Margaret Ann Adkins, subdivision, Little Creek Hundred, $102,000 02/15/08 Sandy Ridge Enterprises, Inc. to Charles W. Jr. and Betty J. Phillips, Lot No. 59, Sandy Ridge, subdivision, Little Creek Hundred, $69,900 02/13/08 Bank of New York, Trustee to Marie S. Marcelin, parcel, City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, $157,500 02/28/08 AAM, L.L.C. to The NeMours Foundation, Lot No. 41, Section II, Mullen Commercial Park, Town of Seaford, subdivision, Seaford Hundred, $500,000 02/26/08 Passwaters Farm, LLC to U.S. Home Corporation, Lot No. 334, Phase II, Heritage Shores, Town of Bridgeville, subdivision, Northwest Fork Hundred, $107,000 03/07/08 Robert C. and Barbara S. Warwick to Lewis Dean and Dorothy K. Adkins, Lot No. 15, Little Acres, subdivision, Little Creek Hundred, $225,000

Building Permits David Milliken, 422 SW, Road 549, Seaford Hundred, Dwelling w/Addition, $84, 184.

Divorces 03/07/08, Robert C. and Barbara S. Warwick to Lewis Dean and Dorothy K. Adkins, Lot No. 15, Little Acres, subdivision, Little Creek Hundred, $225,000 07/03/08 Thomas A. Weaver from Tami L. Weaver - Final Decree of Divorce entered by Wilson, C. 07/07/08 Andrea M. Sullenberger from Rodney E. Bell - Final Decree of Divorce entered by Holloway, C. 07/15/08 Audra McDorman from John C. McDorman – Final Decree of Divorce entered by Southmayd, C. 07/07/08 Dawn R. Wheway from John T. Wheway, Jr. – Final Decree of Divorce entered by Holloway, C. 07/02/08 Richard L. Pounsberry Jr. from Diane C. Pounsberry – Final Decree of Divorce entered by Holloway, C. 07/14/08 Barbara A. Burdette from Steven W. Burdette – Final Decree of Divorce entered by Williams. 07/11/08Willie J. Davis from Selina Davis – Final Decree of Divorce entered by Holloway, C.

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MORNING STAR

• SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

PAGE 33

Classifieds FREE CLASSIFIEDS* (For Personal Use Only) *Some exceptions such as homes for rent or sale

Deadline: Monday, 2 p.m. Businesses: $4.50 per inch Line ads ($9.00 minimum)

Boxed (Display) Ads: $6.50/inch Legals: $6.50 per inch

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES STATE QUARTERS, 25 rolls, misc. quarters, $275. 628-8761. 9/4 AMERICAN GIRL Biddy Baby Doll, $50. 536-7287.

FOR SALE WASHER $120; DRYER $120. 628-1320. 11/29/tnc

Not responsible for typographical errors after first insertion

629-9788

Call: Or E-mail: ads@mspublications.com FOUND

WANTED

PERFECT ATTENDANCE PATCH, at Laurel LL Park. 875-4604. 8/14

GOOD USED KAYAK & paddle, reasonably priced. 398-0309. 9/4

GIVE-AWAY

AUTOMOTIVE

FREE WOOD from lg. maple tree. Sm. & lg. pcs., u-haul. 875-2657. 8/21 FREE KITTENS to good home. 3 black, 1 gray & white. 875-4604. 8/14

SERVICES FREE PICK UP of Appliances, bikes, BBQ grills, etc. Mike, 245-2278.

NOTICE FOOD & CRAFT VENDORS NEEDED For 1st annual Wings & Wheels Fall Festival in Georgetown, Oct. 25, 10 am - 8 pm. Craft spaces, $40-$50; Food spaces $10$115. 856-1544 or visit www.wings-wheels.com for more info. 9/4

‘96 EXPLORER, 4 DR., dark gr., 4 whl. dr., power door locks & windows, V6, 135k mi. Very nice SUV, $3000. 629-4348. 9/4 ‘86 CHEV. 350 MOTOR, just rebuilt, 30 over w/new carburator. 875-7281. 8/14 EAGLE TALON Tsiawd rear bumper & tail lights. Honda S 2000 short eng. block. 629-8022. 8/7 ‘04 F150 XLT Super Cab PU. 5.4L engine, low miles, $16,000 OBO. 629-3794.

MOTORCYCLES/ REC VEHICLES MINI RACING GO-CART, Quaker State, fiberglass body, 3.5 hp Briggs; 6’ long, $200. 628-0102. 8/28

YARD SALE LG. YARD SALE on Sept. 6, 7:30 am, 26358 Seaford Rd., Seaford. 9/4 YARD SALE, 9/6 - 7 a.m. - ? 31573 White St., Laurel. 0.2 mi. west of Rt. 13, off Rt. 24. Bikes, power wheels motorcycle, kids clothes, books, toys & more! 9/4 4th Annual X-Lg Yard Sale & BBQ, 9/20, 7 am, Messiah’s Vineyard Church, Rt. 13 & Discount Land Rd., Laurel. BBQ chicken, scrapple sandwiches, mums, pumpkins, crafts, & more. 9/4 NANTICOKE YACHT CLUB Yard Sale, Sat., 9/13, 8 am 1 pm. Tables $10 ea. Call 875-7143 or 629-0687 to reserve or for info. Rain date Sept. 20. 8/21

CAMPERS/ TRAILERS

ELEC. GRILL, stainless steel, optional w/portable top, $75. 875-5889. 9/4 CRAFTS: Pieces of glass collected from beaches of N.C. to use in crafts. Lg. quantity, $5. 629-5238. 9/4 LEISURE FITNESS Incumbent exercise bike, computerized w/options. $1200 new, asking $400 neg. 6292135. 9/4 ‘70 BOLENS HUSKY 1476 Yard Tractor. Rebuilt motor runs great. 2 blades, belly mower, 3 pt. hitch & chains, $1100 OBO. 628-8761. 9/4 SLEEP SOFA, Hamilton Hill, floral patern, exc. cond., $75. 875-5667. 8/28 SOFA & LOVE SEAT, sage color, exc. cond., $250. Pine Bunk Beds, $50. Dishwasher, good cond., $50. 629-5465. 8/28 AIR RIFLE, GAMO pt. 177 cal., like new, $75. Chain Saw, 16”, 36cc, like new, $75. 337-7494. 8/28 SPINDLE CRIB, white, w/ mattress & access., $50. 245-7999. 8/28 15 CRAB TRAPS, $4 ea. or $40 for all. 337-3370. 8/28 GE WASHER, extra lg cap., very good cond., white, $110 OBO. 245-2278. 8/28

23’ SHASTA TRAVEL TRAILER, sleeps 4, $1000. 875-4485. 8/21

BIKE - NEXT ALUMINUM, Tiara DS24. 21 spd. Shimano, new cond., $85. 536-1884. 8/21

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BOATS 18’ KAYAK ‘Perception Sea Lion’ has everything - for the quality-oriented person. A must see. $1600 OBO. 875-9775. 9/4 LIVE WELL PORTABLE, includes pump, $85. 3377359, 559-8061 cell. 7/24

LEAD SAILORS, COWBOYS & AMISH Figurines. $35 for set. Asst. Del. advertisements. Craftsman miter saw. 398-0309. 8/21 GE Washer/Dryer, good cond., $150 ea. 877-0519. TVs: 19” Mont. Ward set, $20. 27” RCA, good cond., $30. 877-0519. 8/21

COUCH & Oversized Recliner, camel color, microfiber, exc. cond., $500. 8753463. 8/21 BEDROOM SET: Full size headboard, dresser & mirror, $85. 2 maple end tables, $20 ea. Glider rocker, $35. TV tray set, $15. 6298745. 8/21 OIL DRUM, 250 gal., on legs, good cond., $50. Cast Iron Drag, good cond., $50. Storm Door w/glass & screen, $20. 875-4485. TREADMILL, like new, Cadance 70E. 875-3084. 8/21 2 WOOD SPLITTING MAULS, 16” 5 lb.; 32” 10 lb., rubberized handles, both for $10. 628-5388. IONIC PRO Air Purifier, 28” high, woks perfectly, new was $100, asking $45. 6285388. 8/21 EXPRESS-IT Beach Chair, Folding, fits carrying case 27” x 7” x 4”, $10. Hedge Trimmer, antique, 2 handle type, $10. 628-5388. 8/21 WOMEN’S 10 SPD. BIKE, Vintage Fuji, 20.5”, super conditon, updated parts, $60. 629-3628. 8/21 CANON EOS CAMERA 35mm Model 3000 (body only, no lens) w/instructions, $50. Minalta 35mm camera, 3000 I w/35-70 AF lens, $75. Minalta 35mm camera 550 SI w/AF35-70 lens, $50. 875-1877. 8/14 4-WHL. FUNNEL WAGON, exc., $750. Seed Rye, $13.50/bushel. 349-4874. 8/14 LADIES’ WHIRLWIND 10 spd. Bike; 1 Exercise Bike. Make offer. 875-5396 before 9:30 pm. 8/14 REFRIGERATOR: Amana, side-by-side, icemaker & water dispenser, cream w/blk. trim 25 cu. ft., $275. 875-2115. 8/14 LITTLE TYKES KITCHEN SET with access., $60. 877-0644 Eves. after 7 pm. TOOLS: Craftsman CompuCarve Computer-Controlled Compact Woodworking Machine, new in box, $1500 (pd. $1900). HomeLite Ranger Chain Saw in case 33cc $100. Craftsman router table mount, $130. Delta Shopmaster miter saw on 10" Black & Decker bench, $120. 2 Craftsman 11 1/2” w. roller support stands w/ edge guides, $40. 632-1980, lv. msg. 8/14

MATTHEWS LEGACY 28” BOW, 70 lb. pull, hard case, arrows, release, all equipped, ready to hunt, $500. 875-4009. 8/14 BIKES – 2 Roadmaster 18 speed sport SX 26L brand new with tags $60 each. 632-1980, lv. msg. 8/14 TOOLS: Dremel 16" 2-spd scroll saw $165. RotoZip in case $100. Detail Biscuit Joiner 3.5 amp motor 19,000 BTM $65. 2 plastic sawhorses, $35. Sears routers, belt sanders, planer, $50. 632-1980, lv. msg. FREEZER, Welbuilt, $70. 632-1980, lv. msg. 8/14 PIER 1 ‘PAPASAN’ RATTAN Chair w/green cushion, exc. cond., $80. 629-3628. LEATHER WHITE CHAIR & Ottoman, $100. 875-8677. NOMAD GOLF CLUBS & bags. 1 man’s, 1 woman’s. 13 clubs ea. set, like new, must see, $400 ea. set. 628-5388. 7/31 LOWERY PIANO & Bench, exc. cond., needs tuning. heavy, you move. 2’ deep, 3’ 4” high, 4’10” long. $600. 628-5388. 7/31 PLANTS FOR HANGING BASKETS, very reasonable. Petunias, English ivy, vinca, 4 o’clocks, summer hyacinth, lilacs, day lilies, sm. holly trees & flowering purple basil & more. $2 & up. 875-5217, ac. from Trap Pond St. Park. 7/31 LIFESTYLE 1000 TREADMILL, $100. 875-8677. 7/31 AIR CONDITIONER: Whirlpool, 10,20 BTU window unit, exc. cond., $99. 302519-1568. 7/31 DISHWASHER: Whirlpool 24” portable, exc. cond., $249. 302-519-1568. 7/31

CATNIPPER LIFT CHAIR, good cond., $400. Hugo Walker w/seat, $50. 3379647. 7/24 UPRIGHT FREEZER, exc. cond., white, $125. 5361216. 7/24 BAND SAW, Black & Decker, 12”, variable speeds, incl. extra blades, $65. Delta Scroll Saw, 16”, variable speed, $85. 337-7359 or 559-8061. 7/24 TOTAL GYM XL EQUIPMENT, new, never used, assembled, w/extra access., Pd. $1600. 410-896-3857.

ANIMALS, ETC. 2 LEATHER SADDLES, brown, great shape, 15” & 16”, $150 ea. 875-8620. 4 BROWN EGG LAYERS, 4 mo. old hens, Austrolorps. Vaccinated & tested for pollurum, $10 ea. 875-8620. 8/14 PR. OF BLUE INDIA PEAFOWL, plus whie peahen, 1 yr. Also 3 4-mo.-old Silkie Polish Chicks. $12.50 for all 3 or $5 ea. 410-8733036. 8/14 BOAR/NUBIAN GOAT MIX, “Little Girl,” 4 mos. old, makes a wonderful pet. Very friendly & sm size. We raise meat goats & she’s too small for breeding. Great pet! 410-873-3036.

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MORNING STAR

PAGE 34

• SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

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MORNING STAR

LEGALS LEGAL NOTICE OF BID The Mayor and Council of the Town of Laurel is accepting sealed bids for the following surplus parcel of land. A vacant lot on Center Street located at the corner of Thompson Street, tax map # 4-32/8.06/229.12 which is a R-2 residential neighborhood. The lot in question is large enough to be subdivided (at expense of buyer) into two (2) separate building lots. The minimum bid price is $75,300. Bid forms may be picked up at the Laurel Town Hall Office or the Code Enforcement Office, 201 Mechanic Street, Laurel, DE 19956 Monday thru Friday from 9 AM to 4:30 PM. Deadline for accepting bids will be Friday, October 10, 2008 by 5:00 PM. Bids will be opened and made public at the regularly scheduled Mayor and Council meeting on Monday, October 20, 2008 beginning at 7 PM. Settlement is at the expense of the buyer and must occur within 30 days of bid acceptance. 9/4/1tc

PUBLIC HEARING The Commissioners of Bridgeville will hold a Public Hearing and present an Ordinance to amend Bridgeville Code Chapter 210, Taxation, Subchapter II, Real Property Transfer Tax, relating to definitions by adding the term “Construction Contract,” for a second and final reading at their monthly meeting scheduled for September 16, 2008, beginning at 7:00 P.M. in the Town Hall, 101 N. Main Street, Bridgeville, Delaware. COMMISSIONERS OF BRIDGEVILLE JOSEPH T. CONAWAY, COMMISSION PRESIDENT 9/4/1tc

PUBLIC NOTICE You are hereby notified the below application will be before: The City of Seaford Housing Board of Appeals for their determination on Monday, September 29, 2008, at 7:00 P.M., in the Council Chambers of City Hall, 414 High Street, Seaford, Delaware: HBOA-02-08: Richard Ashby, property owner of 223 N. Arch Street/405 E. Poplar Street, (Tax Map and Parcel 431 5.00 173) is appealing the decision of the Building Official to Condemn the aforementioned property under Sec. 4-23-

23 (d) of the Housing Code as unfit for human habitation because the dwelling units lack maintenance and lack essential equipment required by the Housing Code. HBOA-03-08: Richard Ashby, property owner of 222 N. Pine Street, (Tax Map and Parcel 431 5.00 153) is appealing the decision of the Building Official to Condemn the aforementioned property under Sec. 4-23-23 (d) of the Housing Code as unfit for human habitation because the dwelling unit lacks maintenance and lacks essential equipment required by the Housing Code. If this application is of concern to you and you wish to present your position or evidence, please attend this meeting. You may have counsel attend on your behalf. Issued this 4th day of September 2008 pursuant to the Rules heretofore adopted by the City of Seaford. THE CITY OF SEAFORD Dolores J. Slatcher City Manager 9/4/1tc

• SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

agency will be assessed a thirty ($30.00) dollar administration fee as well as a collection fee equal to 20% of the outstanding bill. Amended 8/26/2008 Dolores J. Slatcher City Manager 9/4/1tc

PUBLIC NOTICE BE IT ORDAINED BY THE MAYOR AND COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SEAFORD, an ordinance to amend the City of Seaford Municipal Code, Chapter 11 Sewers, by adding the following to Section 11-23 User Charge System. b) Any account that remains unpaid one hundred and twenty days past due will be written off and turned over to a collection agency. c) All accounts that are written off and turned over to the courts or a collection agency will be assessed a thirty ($30.00) dollar administration fee as well as a collection fee equal to 20% of the outstanding bill. Amended 8/26/2008 Dolores J. Slatcher City Manager 9/4/1tc

PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC NOTICE

BE IT ORDAINED BY THE MAYOR AND COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SEAFORD, An ordinance to amend the City of Seaford Municipal Code Chapter 14. Water By adding a new title “Article 3. Water User Charge System.” Sec. 14-36 was deleted and replaced with new wording. This ordinance was adopted at the Regular Council Meeting of August 26, 2008. A copy of the amendment may be obtained at the City of Seaford City Hall, 414 High Street, Seaford, Delaware or by calling the City Office at (302) 629-9173 and requesting a copy. Dolores J. Slatcher City Manager OR-13-08 9/4/1tc

BE IT ORDAINED BY THE MAYOR AND COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SEAFORD, an ordinance to amend the City of Seaford Municipal Code, Chapter 6, by adding the following to Section 6, Credit and Collection Procedures, Letter f) Collections. 4) All accounts that are written off and turned over to the courts or a collection agency will be assessed a thirty ($30.00) dollar administration fee as well as a collection fee equal to 20% of the outstanding bill. Amended 8/26/2008 Dolores J. Slatcher City Manager 9/4/1tc

PUBLIC NOTICE BE IT ORDAINED BY THE MAYOR AND COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SEAFORD, an ordinance to amend the City of Seaford Municipal Code, Chapter 14 Water, by adding the following to Section 14-14 Water Rates; Billing; Exception; Delinquent Accounts. d) Any account that remains unpaid one hundred and twenty days past due will be written off and turned over to a collection agency. e) All accounts that are written off and turned over to the courts or a collection

PUBLIC NOTICE BE IT ORDAINED BY THE MAYOR AND COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SEAFORD, an ordinance to amend the City of Seaford Municipal Code, Chapter 10 Refuse, by adding the following to Section 10-32 Financial: d) Any charge authorized to be collected under this article and remains unpaid after 120 days can be sent to an outside collection agency. e) Any account that is turned over to an outside collection agency will be assessed a thirty ($30.00) dollar administration fee as well as a collection fee equal to 20% of the outstanding bill. Amended 8/26/2008

Dolores J. Slatcher City Manager 9/4/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Broad Creek Hundred Case No. 10261 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on request for a special use exception and a variance as provided by: Chapter 115, Article XI, Subsection 115-181, Item A (2) of said ordinance of FIRST STATE SIGNS, INC. who are seeking a special use exception to replace a billboard and a variance from the maximum square footage requirement for a sign, to be located east of U.S. Route 13, 1,050 feet south of Road 482. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, OCTOBER 6, 2008, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing,

PAGE 35 written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 9/4/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Seaford Hundred Case No. 10263 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on request for a variance as provided by: Chapter 115, Article XI, Subsection 115-82, Item B of said ordinance of SEAFORD MACHINE WORKS, INC. who are seeking a variance from the front yard setback requirement for a through lot, to be located northeast of Middleford Road, west of Victoria Avenue, being Lots 65, 66 and 67, Block J within The Island Development. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, OCTOBER 6, 2008, at 7:00 P.M.

or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 9/4/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Northwest Fork Hundred Case No. 10267 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on request for a special use exception as provided by: Chapter 115, Article XI, Subsection 11580, Item C of said ordinance of FLEXERA, INC. who is seeking a special use exception to place a windmill, to be located west of U.S. Route 13, 250 feet north of Road 583. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County AdminSee LEGALS—page 37

SECTION 00100 NOTICE TO BIDDERS SEALED BIDS WANTED Sealed bids for the interior rehabilitation of the Laurel Railway Station will be received at the Town Hall in the Town of Laurel, DE. Bids must be received no later than 2:00 PM EDT on September 30, 2008 at Town Hall, in the Town of Laurel, DE. Bids will be publicly opened and read aloud immediately following the 2:00 P.M. EDT the bid submission deadline on September 30, 2008 at the Town Hall, in the Town of Laurel, DE. Copies of the plans and specifications are on file and open to the public inspection and may be obtained at the Town Hall, located at 201 Mechanic Street, Laurel, DE 19956 during normal business hours 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM, Monday through Friday. A non-refundable check for $70.00 made payable to Town of Laurel shall be submitted as payment for each set of bidding documents requested. A bid bond by acceptable surety or a certified check made payable to the Town of Laurel in the amount of five percent (5%) of the maximum bid must be deposited by each bidder with his bid. A pre-bid conference will be held at 2:00 P.M. EDT September 15, 2008 at the Town Hall in the Town of Laurel, located at 201 Mechanic Street, Laurel, DE 19956. Attendance is mandatory. The Laurel Railway Station is located behind the Town Hall. Notice is hereby given to bidders that this project is subject to the provisions of the Delaware Prevailing Wage Act and the U.S. Dept. of Labor, Davis-Bacon Act and wage rates for both acts are included in the Contract Documents. Laurel, DE, in accordance with Title VI of the U.S. Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Parts 21 and 23 of 49 C.F.R., notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that DBE will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and that no person will be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, sex, or national origin in consideration for an award. There is no minimum DBE percentage target required for this project. A construction period of six months (183 days) from issuance of a Notice to Proceed (NTP) has been budgeted for this project. A proposed construction schedule shall be included with the Bid package submission. It is expected that responsible bidders shall have a minimum of five (5) years of previous contract experience similar to those that are to be faced on this project. Completion of the statement of qualifications must be included with the submission of the bid form. The contractor and subcontractor qualifications, the proposed construction schedule, and the bid price will be taken into consideration in determining the best value to the Town of Laurel. Low bid is not intended to be the sole determining criteria for selection: Experience of both the prime and sub contractors along with the proposed schedule will also be important criteria in the selection process. The Town of Laurel reserves the right to accept or reject any and all bids. William Fasano, Town Manager The Town of Laurel, Delaware


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MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 35 istrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, OCTOBER 6, 2008, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 9/4/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Seaford Hundred Case No. 10271 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on request for a special use exception as provided by: Chapter 115, Article IV, Subsection 11523, Item C(14) of said ordinance of BRIAN AND PATRICIA SHANNON who are seeking a special use exception for a pond on less than five (5) acres, to be located south of Route 18, 1,035 feet west of Road 46. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, OCTOBER 6, 2008, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 9/4/1tc

NOTICE Estate of Janet C. Hastings, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Janet C. Hastings who departed this life on the 27th day of July, A.D. 2008 late of Delmar, DE were duly granted unto Janet T. Pritchett on the 13th day of August, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the

same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 27th day of March, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Janet T. Pritchett 25418 Alexander Lane Seaford, DE 19973 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/28/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Lucile C. McCoy, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of Lucile C. McCoy who departed this life on the 22nd day of June, A.D. 2008 late of Bethel, DE were duly granted unto Thomas McCoy on the 13th day of August, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administrator without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administrator on or before the 22nd day of February, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administrator: Thomas McCoy 911 West Street Bethel, DE 19931 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/28/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Pauline V. Williams, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Pauline V. Williams who departed this life on the 26th day of May, A.D. 2008 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Diana E. Mims on the 8th day of August, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 26th day of January, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Diane E. Mims 2127 Harbour Dr. Palmyra, NJ 08065 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/21/3tc

NOTICE Estate of S. Layton Ayers, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of S.

PAGE 37

• SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

Layton Ayers who departed this life on the 15th day of July, A.D. 2008 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Elizabeth Star Ayers, Mark G. Ayers on the 11th day of August, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Co-Executors without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Co-Executors on or before the 15th day of March, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Co-Executors: Elizabeth Star Ayers 6263 Boyce Road Seaford, DE 19973 Mark G. Ayers 9844 Nanticoke Circle Seaford, DE 19973 Attorney: Stephen P. Ellis, Esq. Ellis & Szabo LLP P.O. Box 574 Georgetown, DE 19947 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/21/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Pearl H. Reynolds, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Pearl H. Reynolds who departed this life on the 30th day of July, A.D. 2008 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Linford L. Reynolds on the 7th day of August, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 30th day of March, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Linford L. Reynolds 16790 Hardscrabble Rd. Laurel, DE 19956 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/21/3tc

NOTICE Estate of George N. Walston, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of George N. Walston who departed this life on the 2nd day of August, A.D. 2008 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Dennis Walston on the 7th day of August, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without

delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 2nd day of April, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Dennis Walston 28825 Cannon Drive Seaford, DE 19973 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/21/3tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that lot, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware beginning at a point on the northerly right of way of Delaware Route 24 (60 feet wide) said point being located westerly from the westerly right of way of County Route No. 497, a distance of 388 feet plus or minus; thence, continuing with the northerly right of way of Delaware Route 24, South 67 degrees 50 minutes 00 seconds West 120.00 feet to a concrete monument; thence with lands now or formerly of James Hastings North 22 degrees 13 minutes 30 seconds West 199.85 feet to a concrete monument; thence continuing with lands of James Hastings North 01 degrees 29 minutes 32 seconds West, 717.93 feet to a concrete monument, the center of a 20 foot wide right of way dirt road; thence with the center of the 20 foot right of way South 69 degrees 43 minutes 00 seconds East, 155.20 feet to a pipe set; thence with lands now or formerly of Alton White South 01 degrees 27 minutes 30 seconds West 618.81 feet to a rebar rod set near broken monument; thence with lands now or formerly of Scott Wingate South 22 degrees 13 minutes 30 seconds East 199.85 feet to a concrete monument, the point and place of beginning, with improvements thereon, being more particularly described on a plant of survey prepared by Gene R. Littleton & Associates dated March 1986. AND BEING the same lands and premises which

William Daniel Alvarez, Heir and Chad Michael Alvarez, Heir of the Estate of Belva C. Alvarez by deed dated August 23, 2003, recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Record 2885, Page 51 did grant and convey unto RYAN WALLS AND JESSICA L. WALLS all in fee. Tax Parcel: 4-32-11.0040.06 Property Address: 6859 Sharptown Road, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of RYAN & JESSICA L. WALLS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit:

BEGINNING at a cement marker set on the southern edge of East Market Street, a fifty foot right of way, a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of Robert A. Reynolds; thence with said East Market Street South 73 degrees 30 minutes and 00 seconds East 62.00 feet to a point; thence South 25 degrees 28 minutes 24 seconds East 13.38 feet to a point on the Western Edge of the South line of U.S. Route 13; thence with the said south land of US Route 13 South 22 degrees 33 minutes 12 seconds West 150.00 feet to a nail, a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly or Robert A. Reynolds; thence with lands now or formerly of Robert A. Reynolds North 15 degrees 24 minutes 00 seconds East 150.89 feet to the point and place of beginning. BEING the same lands and premises which Education Awareness Trust and David Chvata, Trustee did by deed dated December 12, 2005 and recorded in the office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 3253 Page55 did grant and convey unto Melinda Hughes and Brent Ricketts. Tax Parcel: 5-30-10.1384.00 Property Address: 414 E. Market Street, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms See LEGALS—page 38


PAGE 38 LEGALS - from Page 37 the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of BRENT RICKETTS & MELINDA R. HUGHES and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain lot, piece or parcel of land being known and designated as Lot number 15 as shown on the Plot entitled AUTUMN ACRES PHASE II which plot is filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds Sussex Delaware Plot Book 50 Page 54. AND BEING the same lands and premises conveyed unto Michael Smith Spinella, by deed of RJJ. INC., dated December 6, 2005 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware in Deed Book 3241, Page 001. Tax Parcel: 4-30-9.0040.11 Property Address: 13251 Hunters Cove Road, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further

MORNING STAR Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MICHAEL SMITH SPINELLA and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in the Town of Laurel, Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, bounded and described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument found, said concrete monument being located 250 feet, more or less, from the intersection of County Road #468 (50 feet ROW) and Delaware Route 13A (60 feet ROW); thence from the point and place of beginning and running along Delaware Route 13A North 15 degrees 28 minutes 05 seconds West, 124.64 feet to an iron pipe set; thence turning and running by and with the line of this lot and lands now or formerly of Hollis S. & Mary Marie Wright, North 74 degrees 31 minutes 55 seconds East, 327.16 feet to a concrete monument found, said concrete monument being located on the Westerly side of County Road #468; thence turning and running by and with County Road #468, South 26 degrees 16 minutes 31 seconds West, 166.93 feet to an iron pipe set; thence turning and running by and with these lands and lands now or formerly of Daily Markets, Inc., South 74 degrees 31 minutes 55 seconds West, 216.02 feet back to the point and place of beginning, with improvements, as surveyed by

• SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

Miller-Lewis, Inc., said survey dated January 6, 2004. AND BEING the same lands and premises which Phillip A. Dechene, Executor of the Estate of Elsie D. Truitt a/k/a Elsie E. Truitt and Phillip A. Dechene, Individually, by deed dated February 2, 2004 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Record 2947, Page 215 did grant and convey unto ERNEST W. SNYDER, in fee. Tax Parcel: 2-32-12.1433.00 Property Address: 30419 Seaford Road, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ERNEST W. SNYDER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Com-

plex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece and parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the Town of Seaford, County of Sussex and State of Delaware and being more particularly described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at an iron stob at the intersection of Shipley Street and Juniper Street in said town; thence by and with Juniper Street, South 79 degrees 33 minutes West, 185 feet to an iron spike at the curb base on Juniper Street, a comer for this lot and lands of W.R. Breasure; thence by and with these lands and lands of said W.R. Breasure, South 12 degrees 00 minutes East, 95 feet to a pipe, a corner for this lot and lands of Albert E. Rosenbauer thence by and with these lands and lands of said Rosenbauer, North 79 degrees 30 minutes East 175 feet to an iron stob on the southwesterly side of Shipley Street; thence by and with the sidewalk of Shipley Street, North 12 degrees 00 minutes West, 49.80 feet to the iron spike, the place of beginning. Be the contents thereof what they may. Tax Parcel: 5-31-13.1025.00 Property Address: 218 North Shipley Street, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented

to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JOANNE WESCOTT and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred. Sussex County and State of Delaware, more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron pipe found on the West side of US. Road #13 (200' right of way) a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of Sussex Trust Company, said beginning point being 110 feet more or less South of County Road #534; thence, by and with U.S. Road #13, South 12 degrees 42 minutes 25 seconds West 155.73 feet to an iron pipe found, a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of Star East, Inc.; thence, turning and running by and with lands now or formerly of Star East, Inc. North 77 degrees 18 minutes 05 seconds West 192.00 feet to an iron rod found, a corner for this lot; thence, turning and running by and with lands now or formerly of Seaford Properties, LLC, North 20 degrees 48 minutes 52 seconds East 157.19 feet to an iron rod found, a corner for this lot: thence, turning and running by and with lands now or formerly of Sussex Trust Company, South 77 degrees 20 minutes 20 seconds East 169.83 feet to the place of beginning. Containing therein 28,162 square feet of land, more or less as surveyed by Miller-Lewis, Inc. dated May 14, 1998. Tax Parcel: 3-31-5.0050.17 Property Address: Lot 3, Seaford Village Shopping Center, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash

or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ISLAND DEVELOPERS SEAFORD, LLC and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, and State of Delaware, being Lot No. 804 in "Northridge" (a subdivision of Woodside Manor") (Ref. PB 6-17) and being more particularly described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at an iron stob (found) on the West right of way line of Lantana Drive at a corner for this Lot and Lot No. 806; thence with the West right of way See LEGALS—page 39


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 38 line of Lantana Drive South 05 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds East 088.00 feet to an iron spike (found) on the West right of way line of Lantana Drive at a comer for this Lot No. 302; thence with Lot No. 302, South 80 degrees 39 minutes 00 seconds West - 148.70 feet to a point at a corner for this Lot, Lot No. 4 and in line of Lot No. 3 02; thence with Lots No. 4 and 6 North 07 degrees 04 minutes 19 seconds West - for this Lot, Lot No. 806 and in line of Lot No. 6; thence with Lot No. 806 North 80 degrees 48 minutes 25 seconds East 151.10 feet to an iron stob (found) on the West right of Way line of Lantana Drive being located at the point and place of beginning, containing 13,192 square feet of land be the same more or less as shown on a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr. Del. P.L.S. No 242, Dated June 23, 2003. BEING the same land and premises which Carole H. Tripple by deed dated June 26, 2003 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2857, Page 169, did grant and convey unto Janet S. Willey, in fee. Tax Parcel: 5-31-10.1878.00 Property Address: 804 Lantana Drive, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to

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the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JANET S. WILLEY and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain Lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, and State of Delaware, lying on the Southeastern right-ofway of County Road #516 (50 R/W), being more particularly described as follows, to-wit; Beginning at a point of beginning, said point of beginning being 229' t/- from the intersection of County Road #516 and County Road #525, and also being a corner for these lands and lands now or formerly of Cherell S. Carter; thence from the said point of beginning by and along the common boundary line of these lands now or formerly of Cherell S. Carter South 58 deg. 27' 40" East 165.18 feet to an iron pipe found; thence turning and running by and along a common boundary line of these lands and lands now or formerly of Ronald E. Hastings, North 70 deg. 49' 12" West 169.10 feet to an iron pipe found; thence turning and running by and along the Southeastern right-of-way of County Road #516 North 31 deg. 32' 20" East 150.00 feet, home to the place of Beginning, said to contain 0.5002 acres of land, be the same more or less, as surveyed by Miller-Lewis, Inc., Registered Surveyors, on 9/22/97. Being the same lands and premises which David B. Webb, Jr. did grant and convey unto Elva M Williams by deed dated 10/16/1997 and recorded 10/20/1997 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK02239PG246. Tax Parcel: 2-31-12.00162.03

• SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

Property Address: 24433 Concord Pond Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ELVA M. WILLIAMS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece and parcel of land, together with the improvements thereon, lying and being on the Easterly side of County Road #594, Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware and more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron pipe set on the Easterly right of way line of County Road #594, said pipe being

630.00 feet, more or less, to the centerline of County Road #603; thence from said point and place of beginning, running in an Easterly direction, South 77 degrees 19 minutes 31 seconds East 657.00 feet to a point lying on the centerline of Gum Branch Ditch; thence turning and running along the center line of Gun Branch Ditch, South 42 degrees 56 minutes 50 seconds West 150.00 feet to a point lying on the aforesaid centerline; thence turning and running in a Westerly direction, North 78 degrees 51 minutes 15 seconds West 616.06 feet to an iron pipe set on the Easterly right of way line of the aforesaid County Road #594; thence turning and running along the aforesaid right of way line in a Northerly direction along a curve having a radius of 3,113.45 feet an arc distance of 150.00 feet to the point and place of beginning, said to contain 2.003 acres, more or less, said parcel is designated as Parcel "A" on a survey of "Newberg Lots" prepared by Coast Survey, Inc., dated August 6, 1992. The lands herein described are subject to an existing 50' wide Ingress and Egress Easement per Plot Book 46, Page 204. Being the same lands and premises which Troy U. Hazzard did grant and convey unto Christopher McNeil by deed dated 11/20/2006 and recorded 2/6/2006 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record 03268PG151. Tax Parcel: 4-30-10.0022.00 Property Address: 14429 Oak Road, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any

PAGE 39 further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of CHRISTOPHER McNEIL and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land with the improvements thereon erected, situated in Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being all of lot #4, Phase II, of the Deer Trails Subdivision as shown on the plot of said subdivision recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Plot Book 25, Page 148. Being the same lands and premises which Robert G. Nelson and Yvonne C. Nelson did grant and convey unto Dennis B. Buckley, Jr. and Lisa C. Buckley by deed dated 1/21/2005 and recorded 1/27/2005 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK03094PG123. Tax Parcel: 5-30-13.0089.00 Property Address: 14010 Mile Stretch Road, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or be-

fore October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LISA C. & DENNIS B. BUCKLEY, JR. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: Beginning at a pipe found at the Northwesterly right of way County Road 62, the corner of this lot and lands now or formerly of Donald L. Marine, thence, by and with the said right of way, South 50 deg. 53' 03" West 170.00 feet to a point, the corner of this lot and land now or formerly of Eugene H. Moore, thence by and with the said Moore land, North 58 deg. 05' 00" West 957.81 feet to a point, a corner of this lot and lands now or formerly of Leon S. Johnson, thence, by and with the said Johnson land, North 50 deg. 45' 18" East 170.58 feet to a point, a corner of this lot and lands now or formerly of Donald L. Marine, thence, by and with the said Marine land, South 58 deg. 57' 56" East 258.30 feet to the point and place of Beginning, containing 1.009 acres, more or less, and the improvements thereon. Being the same lands and premises which Peter B. Weidlein and Virginia See LEGALS—page 40


PAGE 40 LEGALS - from Page 39 Glanville did grant and convey unto Raymond Charles Coppage by deed dated 3/19/2001 and recorded 3/20/2001 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK02573PG203. Tax Parcel: 2-32-15.0024.00 Property Address: 30284 E. Trappe Pond Road, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of RAYMOND CHARLES COPPAGE and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate

MORNING STAR to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being more particularly described as follows, to wit: Beginning at a pipe located on the easterly side of a 6 foot sidewalk on the easterly side of Front Street, 24.3 feet from the centerline thereof and 61.85 feet from the inside line of the sidewalk on Poplar Street, said pipe also being a corner for lands of William T. Marvel, III, etux,; thence with the easterly line of said sidewalk, North 01 degrees 45 minutes West 60.00 feet to a pipe located on the Easterly side of said sidewalk at a corner for lands of Albert Girardi, etux; thence with the line of lands of said Girardi, North 88 degrees 06 minutes East 130.00 feet to a pipe located in the line of lands of lands of Clarence I. Roberts, etux; thence with line of lands of the said Roberts and with the line of Frederica V. Roberts, South 01 degrees 45 minutes East 60.00 feet to a pipe in the line of lands of said Roberts at a corner for lands of said Marvel; thence with line of lands of said Marvel, South 86 degrees 06 minutes West 130.00 feet to the point and place of Beginning, containing 7,800 square feet of land, more or less, as will more fully and at large appear upon reference to a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr., dated June 30, 1984, and incorporated herein. Being the same lands and premises which Seaford Federal Credit Union, a credit union chartered by the United States Government, did grant and convey unto Robert M. Thomason deed dated 4/7/1988 and recorded 4/8/1988 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK1558PG166. Tax Parcel: 4-31-5.00100.00 Property Address: 229 Front Street, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on Octo-

• SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

ber 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ROBERT M. THOMASON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: FOR ALL THAT CERTAIN PIECE, PARCEL, LOT, OR TRACT OF LAND DESIGNATED COUNTY DISTRICT PARCEL 5-3010.00-77.00, ADDRESSED AND KNOWN 63 DUCK CREEK LANE, BEING LOT 63 AS SHOWN ON A RECORD MAJOR LAND DEVELOPMENT PLAN: RECORDED IN AND FOR SUSSEX COUNTY IN RECORD PLOT BOOK 59 PAGE 209 FOR THE SUBDIVISION LOTS OF THE COVE, PHASE I, SITUATED NORTH WEST FORK HUNDRED, SUSSEX COUNTY, THE FIRST STATE: DELAWARE, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY LOCATED AND ASCERTAINED BY THE FOLLOWING METES AND BOUNDS DESCRIPTION, WRITTEN BY THE P.E.L.S.A. COMPANY, INC., LAND CONSULTANTS AND SURVEYORS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE LOCATION GIVEN FOR LOT 63, AS SHOWN ON SAID RECORD PLAN ABOVE, THUS. BOUNDED AND DESCRIBED, TO WIT: BEGINNING AT A POINT

AND PLACE SITUATE IN THE WESTERLY SIDE DUCK CREEK LANE (50.00 FEET WIDE R.O.W.) LOCATED AT A COMMON CORNER IN THE DIVISION LINE FOR LOTS 63 AND 64, BEING FOUND THE FOLLOWING SINGLE (1) LINE AND COURSE FROM THE EASTERLY END OF A 25.00 FEET RADIUS JUNCTION CURVE JOINING AT ITS WESTERLY END WITH THE SOUTHEASTERLY SIDE CART BRANCH CIRCLE (50.00 FEET WIDE R.O.W.): ALONG AN ARC OF CURVE TURNING RIGHT ON A RADIUS OF 495.00 FEET: DELTA 06 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 00 SECONDS - ARC LENGTH 60.18 FEET TO THE POINT AND PLACE OF BEGINNING; THENCE, COMMENCING FROM AND LEAVING SAID PLACE OF BEGINNING AND RUNNING ALONG SAID WESTERLY SIDE DUCK CREEK LANE ALONG AN ARC OF CURVE TURNING RIGHT ON A RADIUS OF 495.00 FEET: DELTA 09 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 09 SECONDS - ARC LENGTH 83.83 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE, ALONG THE DIVISION LINE FOR LOTS 63 AND 62 SOUTH 57 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 100.00 FEET TO A POINT: THENCE, ALONG THE DIVISION LINE FOR LOTS 63 AND 54 ALONG AN ARC OF CURVE TURNING LEFT ON A RADIUS OF 395.00 FEET: DELTA 09 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 09 SECONDS - ARC LENGTH 66.89 FEET TO A POINT: THENCE, ALONG AFORESAID DIVISION LINE FOR LOTS 63 AND 64 NORTH 47 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 100.00 FEET TO AFORESAID WESTERLY SIDE DUCK CREEK LANE TO THE FIRST MENTIONED POINT AND PLACE OF BEGINNING. THE AREA CONTAINED HEREIN BEING 0.173 ACRES OF LAND, BE THEY THE SAME, MORE OR LESS. Being the same lands and premises which Debbie L. May and Robert L. May, Jr., did grant and convey unto Michael B. Workman and Lisa Marie Workman by deed dated 12/16/2005 and recorded 2/3/2006 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK03267PG175. Tax Parcel: 5-30-10.0077.00 Property Address: 63 Duck Creek Lane, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale.

A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MICHAEL B. & LISA MARIE WORKMAN and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain tract, piece or parcel of land situated, lying and being in the Town of Laurel, Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, on the northern side of Tenth Street, more particularly described as follows to wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument located on the Northerly right of way line of Tenth Street, said monument being a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of Tracy L. Kefauver; thence running along the right of way line of Tenth

Street, North 81 degrees 21 minutes 44 seconds West 80.61 feet to a fence post; said post being a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of Conrad Steven Boisvert; thence turning and running along the line of lands of Boisvert North 15 degrees 02 minutes 21 seconds East 49.19 feet to a pipe, said pipe being a point for this lot and lands now or formerly of Roland G. & Amanda K. Ruth; thence running North 11 degrees 14 minutes 39 seconds East 63.34 feet to a rebar found, said rebar being a point for this lot and a corner for lands now or formerly of Craig L. & Christina L. Smith; thence running North 09 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds East 14.67 feet to a point in maple tree; said tree being a corner for this lot and lands of Smith; thence turning and running along the line of lands of Smith South 80 degrees 35 minutes 37 seconds East 29.60 feet to a concrete monument, said monument being a point for this lot and corner for lands now or formerly of JPJ Development, LLC; thence running North 80 degrees 46 minutes 23 seconds West 40.40 feet to a concrete monument, said monument being a corner for this lot and lands of Tracy L. Kefauver; thence turning and running along the lands of Kefauver, South 10 degrees 39 minutes 00 seconds West 124.95 feet to a concrete monument, said monument being a corner for this lot located along the right of way line of Tenth Street and being the point and place of BEGINNING. Being the same lands and premises which Harry W. Seymore, Jr., did grant and convey unto Michael R. Chorman and Jenna O. Shaffer by deed dated 9/28/2005 and recorded 12/16/2005 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK03246PG182. Tax Parcel: 4-32-8.1067.00 Property Address: 235 West 10th Street, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or beSee LEGALS—page 41


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 40 fore October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MICHAEL R. CHORMAN & JENNA O. SHAFFER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece, parcel and lot of land lying and being in the Town of Bridgeville, Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, more particularly described in accordance with a plat prepared by Miller-Lewis, Inc. dated June 1, 2007, and recorded in Plot Book 113, Page 271, as follows: BEGINNING at a iron pipe (found) on the northwesterly right-of-way of Cannon Street at 40 feet in width; thence with said Cannon Street South 47 degrees 19' 56" West 113.61 feet to an iron pipe (found); thence with the right-of-way of First Street at 40 feet in width North 43 degrees 56' 03" West 56.63 feet to an iron pipe (found); thence with lands now or formerly of Freddie E. and Gail L. Williams North 46 degrees 46' 04" East 115.30 feet to an iron pipe (found); thence with other lands of Gerry D.

Royal South 42 degrees 13' 46" East 57.75 feet to the point of beginning; containing 6,545 square feet of land, be the same more or less. Being the same lands and premises which Gerry D. Royal did grant and convey unto Andre Boggerty and Kimberly Boggerty by deed dated 8/31/2007 and recorded 9/27/2007 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK03503P00200. Tax Parcel: 1-31-10.1285.00 Property Address: 219 First Street, Bridgeville Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ANDRE & KIMBERLY BOGGERTY and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boule-

• SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

vard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being known and designated as Lot No. Twenty-Four (24) on a Plat of Shiloh Woods II, prepared by Miller-Lewis, Inc., January 15, 2000, and filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Plot Book 70, Page 153, and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: Being the same lands and premises which Blue Ribbon Properties, L.L.C., a Delaware Limited Liability Company did grant and convey unto Harold L. Wingate, Jr., by deed dated 4/28/2004 and recorded 5/14/2004 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK02978PG279. Tax Parcel: 2-32-14.00166.00 Property Address: 14450 Megan Way, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in

execution the property of HAROLD L. WINGATE, JR. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being designated and distinguished as Lot No. 35, Phase II as shown on the plat of Meadow Stream Farms, prepared by Lowenstein, Soule and Associates, Inc., and filed in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds at Georgetown, Delaware in Plat Book No. 39, Page 335 and Plat Book No. 54 Page 204 as reference thereto being had will more fully and at large appear. It being the same land described in a Deed from James M. Taylor, Jr. to Robert L. Hall and Lindy J. Hall, his wife, dated February 13, 1998 and recorded in Book 2266, page 193 of the Land Records of Sussex County, Delaware. Being the same land conveyed from Robert L. Hall and Lindy J. Hall, his wife to M. Renee Jones, sole owner, bearing even date and recorded simultaneously herewith. Being the same lands and premises which Robert L. Hall and Lindy J. Hall did grant and convey unto M. Renee Jones deed dated 10/19/2000 and recorded 10/27/2000 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK02533PG202. Tax Parcel: 5-32-19.0098.00 Property Address: 51235 Line Road, Delmar Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's

PAGE 41 Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MILLIE RENEE JONES, A/K/A M. RENEE JONES (07L-06-005) and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being designated and distinguished as Lot No. 35, Phase II as shown on the plat of MEADOW STREAM FARMS, prepared by Loewenstein, Soule and Associates, Inc. and filed in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds at Georgetown, Delaware in Plat Book No. 39, Page 335 and Plat Book 54, Page 204, as reference thereto being had will more fully and at large appear. It being the same land described in a Deed from James M. Taylor, Jr. to Robert L. Hall and Lindy J. Hall, his wife, dated February 13, 1998 and recorded in Book 2266, page 183 of the Land Records of Sussex County, Delaware. Being the same lands and premises which Robert

L. Hall and Lindy J. HalI did grant and convey unto M. Renee Jones by deed dated 10/19/2000 and recorded 10/27/2000 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record BK02533PG202. Tax Parcel: 5-32-19.0098.00 Property Address: 51235 Line Road, Delmar Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 6, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MILLIE JONES (08L-03-037) and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc See LEGALS—page 42

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

LEGALS - from Page 41

TAX SALE By virtue of a writ of Venditioni Exponas Monition, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the Town of Delmar, Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County,

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Delaware, lying on the north side of and binding on Jewell Street, adjoining lands now or formerly of Paul T. Kinikin and Anna L. Kinikin, his wife, on the east, lands now or formerly of Carl C. West on the north, being known as 103 Jewell Street, be the contents what they may. SUBJECT to any and all restrictions, reservations, conditions, easements and agreements of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware. BEING the same lands conveyed to Michael D. McCane and Kimberly McCane by deed from Donald T. Ellis and Bonnie L. Ellis, dated April 30, 2001, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County in Deed Book 2587 page 70. Tax Parcel: 5-32-20.14123.00 Property Address: 103 E. Jewell Street, Delmar Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s li-

cense or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 100 percent of the purchase money will be demanded at the time of sale. Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 10, 2008 and also subject to the owner’s right of redemption pursuant to 9 Del. C. § 8728. Also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser and subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MICHAEL D. & KIMBERLY McCANE and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/4/2tc

PUBLIC AUCTION VALUABLE REAL ESTATE SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2008 • 1:00 PM Location: 30942 Manchester Lane, Laurel, Delaware: Traveling on US-13 South in Laurel, Delaware, turn left onto Sycamore Road. Proceed 1/10 mile and turn first right onto Chipman’s Pond Road. Continue approximately 1 mile and turn left into Manchester Manor. Signs will be posted. Sussex County Tax Map Parcel # 2-32-13-198: This attractive lot is approximately 95’ x 262’ and contains .57 acres +/- of land. It is improved with an attractive Cape Cod/Salt Box home containing approximately 1895 sq. ft. of living space with 3 Bedrooms, 2 baths, Living room, Dining room, Kitchen w/breakfast nook, Utility room, Covered Front Porch and an attached 2 Car Garage. Amenities include stainless steel appliances, carpet, tile & hardwood floors, walk in closets and ceiling fans. Less than 2 years new, this home is equipped with a heat pump, central air, electric hot water heater, vinyl siding, asphalt shingle roof, 4” well w/submersible pump and an LPP septic system. Call our office today for more information or to schedule your private showing. Real Estate Terms: Purchaser shall pay $35,000 down payment day of sale with cash or certified check made payable to Wilson’s Auction Sales, the balance to be paid within 60 days. Purchaser to pay all cost of examination, preparing and transferring deed. Purchaser shall pay the Delaware 1 1/2% State Realty Transfer Tax and the 1 1/2% Sussex County Realty Transfer Tax. Purchaser shall pay any and all other property tax, transfer tax and fees. If the above terms are not complied with, the down payment shall be forfeited. Seller reserves the right to accept or reject any and all bids, but it is their intent to sell the property. This property is being sold “as is and where is” with no expressed or implied warranty. Announcements made the day of sale take precedence over any previous statements or advertisements. Auctioneer’s Note: Visit our web site for a complete deed description. This is an excellent opportunity you do not want to miss.

We Don’t Talk Service... We Give It. Dave Wilson, Auctioneer & Sales Manager K. Wade Wilson, Auctioneer & Customer Service Representative (302) 422-3454 Fax (302) 422-0462 www.wilsonsauction.com

Zero energy homes Continued from page 13

electricity is used within the house during those hours. The demand could go down to 200 kilowatts, but the solar panels are still producing 400 kilowatts. The house uses 200 kilowatts produced by the panels, and the extra 200 kilowatts are routed back into the grid which causes the meter to spin backwards. This is called net metering which means you are actually getting a credit for the electricity you are putting back into the grid. At the end of the month, the homeowner could end up with a very minimal electric bill.” Solar panels can also assist in helping a homeowner “go green” in another way. Readers may recall that the first article in this series featured Dick Livingston, a retired mechanical engineer, who sang the praises of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles. Manlove said that homeowners could use their solar panels to recharge the batteries for their electric car, which would make the electricity used totally clean. By the way, Livingston is Manlove’s grandfather. A geothermal HVAC system is another component of a zero energy home. A geothermal heat pump uses the earth’s constant soil and water temperature to heat and cool a house. Although this system is more costly up front, it provides significant savings in just three to five years, according to Manlove. Solar panels pay for themselves within seven years. Home builders are currently able to receive some assistance with these upfront costs from state and federal programs. Manlove said that it costs around $32,000 to install a 4KW solar PV system. The federal government is offering a $2,000 tax credit, and the state of Delaware is currently reimbursing applicants half of the installation cost depending on your power provider. Other incentive programs are available that offer renewable energy certificates (RECs) for houses with solar panels. A standard four-kilowatt system could earn six credits per year. “At a going rate of $200 per REC, this means that a homeowner could receive a check from the state for $1,200 per year just for having solar panels,” Manlove said. He cautions that some of these incentives may only be

available until the technology becomes more mainstream. Manlove said that home builders do not have to buy all of the energy saving options that Zero Energy offers, but the more they sign on for, the more efficiency they will gain. If you are not in the market for a new home, there are steps you can take to make your current home more energy efficient. Manlove recommends homeowners obtain an energy audit, which costs between $300 and $400. This is a diagnostic test which shows the areas that a home is losing energy. Auditors will advise measures which do not require construction or tearing down walls. These include better air sealing, installing higher performance windows, better insulating in crawl and attic spaces, finding duct leaks and possibly installing a tankless hot water system - all components of a zero energy home. Replacing older appliances with new Energy Star appliances will also help homeowners conserve energy. Manlove recently received an older model stand-up freezer which he plugged in and began to use. A short time later he noticed an increase in his electric bill. He performed a simple test and learned that this freezer was going to cost him up to $300 per year in electricity. How did he do this? He used a kill-a-watt meter, a small device which can be purchased at www.amazon.com for around $20. You plug an appliance into this device and then plug the meter into an electrical outlet and it will register how much electricity that appliance is using. To calculate annual cost, you should run the meter for 24 hours. This will tell you how many kilowatts per day the appliance is using. You then multiply this by 365 to determine the annual consumption. Lastly, multiply this by the utility rate charged by your electric provider to find out how much this appliance costs to run in a given year. Manlove is excited to share information on energy efficiency and conservation with both home builders and homeowners. He may be reached at lance@zeroenergybuilt.com. Visit www.dsireusa.org for a database for state incentives for renewable energy.

SECRETARY - SEAFORD MIDDLE SCHOOL Please see our vacancy announcement on:

www.seaford.k12.de.us <http://www.seaford.k12.de.us> Closing date for completed application: 9/9/08 SPECIAL CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENT: All new state employees will be required to participate in the State of Delaware’s Direct Deposit system. With direct deposit, wage and salary payments are deposited in the employee’s bank account via electronic funds transfer. All final candidates for employment must have a satisfactory criminal background check before being placed on contract/payroll as per State of Delaware regulations. Candidates must call the Delaware State Police at (800) 464-4357 to make an appointment. The cost of the criminal background check is $69.00 (expense borne by the prospective employee). Final candidates must also receive a satisfactory child protection registry check. Final candidates must also produce documentation of Mantoux skin test results for entrance to school system. The State of Delaware has initiated a lag pay policy which means that new employees will receive the first paycheck at the end of the second pay period of work. The Seaford School District reserves the right to extend or shorten the application and/ or interview period, to fill or not fill a position, to modify the job requirements within one’s primary area of certification, and to reject any or all applications for just cause. The State of Delaware does not discriminate against qualified persons with disabilities in its programs or services. Persons with disabilities are encouraged to contact the Human Resource and Public Information Office, at (302) 629-4587, as soon as possible to request an auxiliary aid or service. The Seaford School District is committed to a policy of nondiscrimination against any employee or applicant because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, ethnicity, age, marital or handicapped status in accordance with state and federal laws. This policy shall apply to recruitment, employment, and subsequent placement, training, promotion, compensation, tenure and probation, and other terms and conditions of employment over which the district has jurisdiction. Inquiries should be directed to: Director of Personnel, 390 North Market Street Ext., Seaford, DE 19973. Phone: (302) 629-4587.


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

PAGE 43

Delmar High football team looks to compete in strong Henlopen South By Mike McClure

Shown (l to r) are the Laurel field hockey team’s seniors: Keisha Knight, Ashley Brittingham, Tykia Briddell, Twila McCrea, Diane Paul, and Tiffany Fogel. Laurel opens the regular season at Parkside High on Saturday. Photo by Mike McClure

Lady Bulldogs look to take pre-season momentum into the regular season By Mike McClure Last season the Laurel field hockey team made history, but not in a good way. For the first time ever the Bulldogs (0-112, 0-14-2) went without a winning during the 2007 season. This year’s squad, once again under the leadership of head coach Margo Morris and assistant coach Jamie Reynolds, is looking to build on a strong pre-season which saw the team score three times as many goals than it did during the regular season last year. “I’m very happy with this team. They seem to have gotten off on the right foot,” said Morris. “We’ve not had this much talent in 12 or 13 years. We have athletes. If they allow their athletic talent to always come through in games I think they’ll be very competitive.” Gone from a year ago are graduates Kelsy Gordy (first team all-conference for two consecutive seasons) and Chelsea Espenlaub (honorable mention all-conference). The returning players include seniors Twila McCrea (F), Kirsti Knight (F), Diane Paul (M), and Ashley Brittingham (M); juniors Mariah Dickerson (B), Jenna Cahall (B), Kelsey Oliphant (M), Alexis Oliphant (M), Taylor Oliphant (G), Ashley Zarello (G); and sophomore Katie Es-

penlaub (F). Knight, Cahall, the Oliphant triplets, and Espenlaub have been with the varsity team since they were freshmen; McCrea and Paul are in their third year with the varsity squad; and Brittingham is in her second season as a varsity player. The team, which will have rotating captains, features the following newcomers: seniors Tykia Briddell (M) and Tiffany Fogel; juniors Taylor Littleton (F), Lauren Hitch (F), and Tomorrow Briddell (F); and sophomores Courtney Evans (F/B), Desiree Williams (F), and Kayla Miller (F). Tykia and Tomorrow Briddell, who each have one year of varsity experience, are back with the team after a year off. Evans is back at Laurel after transferring from Sussex Tech and Williams is up from the JV team. The large number of returning players and team speed are among the Bulldogs’ team strengths. A lack of pre and post season competition (indoor and summer league play and summer camps) is one of the team’s concerns entering the season. “The teams that play those games have competitive and winning seasons,” Morris said. Morris would like to see her team have a winning record. She believes the strong

The Delmar varsity football team is looking to repeat as the Henlopen South champs despite the loss of a large number of players to graduation. The Wildcats went 10-0 in the regular season for the second straight season last year. This year’s team is a lot younger than the two previous Delmar teams. “We have a real young team. It’s a little slower, we’re not where we might have been a year or two ago,” said Delmar head coach David Hearn, who is in his 19th season as the Wildcats’ coach (29th season overall). “This week we made a lot of progress. We were sharper in the second scrimmage.” Gone from last year’s team are 16 seniors including Matt Campbell (QB/LB) and Justin Thomas (RB/LB). Seniors Kevin Forse, Tevin Jackson, David Bradshaw, Cody Thompson, and Bobby Disharoon are among the Wildcats’ returning players.

Delmar head coach David Hearn looks on during a recent practice. The Wildcats lost a large number of players to graduation. They travel to Baltimore to face St. Frances this Saturday in the regular season opener. Photo by Mike McClure

Forse replaces Campbell under center this season. Like Matt Campbell, he steps in as the starting quarterback as a senior. “Kevin Forse has looked very good in our practices and scrimmages. He’s made a lot Kevin Forse of good decisions,” Hearn said. “Both (Campbell and Forse) are athletic and quick. You don’t know until their proven in the field of battle.” According to Hearn, of the 22 positions played in the team’s scrimmage, 17 of them had new starters. Some of those players saw time with the varsity squad last year but did not start. “We replace some good people, especially skilled people,” said Hearn, who noted that running back Tevin Jackson is the only starting skilled player back from a year ago. “Everybody that played us is going to know him (Jackson), so he’s going to be a target.” Hearn is looking for other skilled players to take the ball so the Wildcats can have a balanced offense. Paving the way for the skilled players will be senior linemen Jamel Jones David Bradshaw (all-conference on defense), Cody Thompson, and Bobby Disharoon. Juniors Jose Flores, Spencer Fothergill, and Cameron Mattox; senior Jamel Jones; and sophomore Durante DeShields saw Continued on page 46

Continued on page 45

Laurel Youth Sports field hockey registration is Sept. 6 Laurel Youth Sports field hockey is open to players ages 7-12 years old at a cost of $30 which includes a shirt. For an additional $35 players can order stick packages with a stick, ball, mouth guard, and shin guards. A registration and short practice will take place 8-9 a.m. on the fields behind Laurel High School. Regular instructional practices will run on Wednesdays from 6-7:30 p.m. starting Sept. 10. For more information, call Amy at 302-875-8620.

BULLDOGS- The Laurel offensive line takes part in a drill during a recent practice. The Bulldogs visit Hodgson this Saturday in the regular season opener. Photo by Mike McClure


PAGE 44

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

Ravens look to return to states after playing in 2007 soccer tournament By Mike McClure Last year’s experience, going 11-4-1 in the regular season and falling to Indian River on penalty kicks in the first round of the state tournament, left the Sussex Tech boys’ soccer team wanting more. The Ravens, with a large number of players returning from last year’s team, are looking to make a return trip to the state tournament this season. “Our expectations are pretty high,” said head coach Carlos Villa, who is in his ninth year of coaching. “We’re looking to get into the state tournament again.” Villa is joined by three new assistant coaches: Andrew Betts, an all-state player at Sussex Tech, and JV coaches Matt Jones (Sussex Central) and Brett Cordrey (all-state at Sussex Central). “They’re rubbing off on me and getting me excited about the new year,” Villa said. The Ravens are coming off their best season in the program’s history. Villa has been pleased with what he has seen in the pre-season. The team face a pair of tough teams in scrimmages, falling to Caravel (10) and tying Middletown (22) last Thursday. Gone from last year’s team Sebastian Borror is goalkeeper Geoffrey Morton. The Ravens’ returning players include: seniors Nathan Zanks (defense), Evan Lee (midfield), Sebastian Borror (forward), Mike O’Bier (defense), Ryan Hill (defense), Billy Seuss (midfield), and Wyatt Spellman (defense). Also back are Ariel Espinoza (defense),

Aris Reynoso (forward), Daniel Ash (midfield), and Christian Espinoza. Zanks, Lee, and Borror have been with the team since they were Nathan Zanks freshmen. They are looking to go out on a winning note. “They’ve been through it all. They’ve built this program,” Villa said. “They want to see that win in the state tournament.” Among the team’s newcomers are goalie James Smith, up from the JV team, and midfielder Dylan Pepper. Villa is looking for Ash, Pepper, and Seuss to step up and take on a more assertive role from their midfield position while Smith James Smith has been impressive in the net so far. “He’s (Smith) done well in the scrimmages,” said Villa. “He’s a great athlete. He’s coming along well.” The Ravens feature a great deal of experience, especially on offense. Villa hopes that will translate into wins and a berth in the state tournament. He expects perennial powers Caesar Rodney and Indian River to be tough along with conference foes Seaford, Milford, and Cape Henlopen. “We have to play tough against every team. You never know what can happen,” Villa added.

Winning the Zebra Flight in the SGCC Nine Hole Ladies Club Championship are: Val Jefferson, first; Marian Kesler, second; and Patty Dale, third.


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

PAGE 45

Delmar volleyball team features several returning players Head coach- Karen Lewis Years coaching- first Last season- 3-9, 6-11 Returning players- seniors Gabby Andrade (libero/middle hitter), Elise Breda (middle hitter), Meghan Gordy (outside hitter), Kelsey Murrell (setter/outside hitter), Annika Nichols (setter/middle hitter), Brittani Scott (setter/outside hitter), Jayme West (middle hitter), and Carolyn Zimmerman (middle hitter) and junior Sarah Smith (outside hitter) Newcomers- Juniors Kayla Haney (outside hitter/setter), Shanna Hearn (middle hitter), and Abby Tingle (outside hitter) Team strengths- the return of nine skillful and experienced players and the talent of the newcomers Outlook for season- “Our team motto is: the impossible is possible. Our goal is to win.”

Delmar varsity field hockey team looks to contend in South

Laurel varsity field hockey coach Margo Morris, right, looks on during one of her team’s Seaford Play Day games. Morrs has been pleased with her team’s play in the pre-season. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel field hockey continued pre-season and her players’ experiences with the softball and basketball programs, both coming off winning seasons, will help her team reach this goal. “Everything after that (an above .500 record) we’re just going to celebrate it and we’re going to enjoy it,” said Morris, whose team topped Wicomico High, 5-0, in a scrimmage last Thursday. “We know now that we’re probably better than the average team but we don’t know where

we stands with the best teams.” Morris knows the road to a winning season will not be an easy one given that he team plays in the always tough Henlopen Conference. She sees Indian River, Milford, Delmar, Cape Henlopen, Smyrna, Sussex Tech, and an improved Polytech team as some of the teams to beat in the conference. “It’s just going to be tough all the way through. The Henlopen Conference, it’s tough,” said Morris.

Seaford High field hockey

Woodbridge High field hockey

Head coach- Robin Verdery Years coaching- 16 Last season- 5-9-3, 6-9-3 Returning players- Anna Duryea, Hilary Cooper, Jamie Swain, Taylor Swain, Courtney Torbert, Haley Quillen, Erin Wootten, Kelsey Hoch, and Paige Venables Newcomers- Alexis Carey, Elizabeth Perciful, Jenna Wills, Whitney Wright, Molly Cain, Ania Sypek, Maria DeMott, Alison Schwinn Team strengths- team works well together Concerns- defense Key losses- Kelsey Riggleman and Erin Taylor Outlook for season- “Look to win every game and make it to states.”

Head coach- Connie Bean Years coaching- second Last season- 2-10-3 overall Players lost- five or six graduates Returning players- seniors Heather Solomon, Sam Smith, Grace Reardon (co-captain), Liz Walk, and Lindsey Cook; sophomores Kelli Warner (cocaptain, goalie), Rachel Doyon (inner), and Kelsey Johnson (wing) Newcomers- freshman Taylor VanVorst Goals- look to beat last year’s record Outlook- “It’s a good start. They’ve had a much better start than last year.”

See next week’s Star for more Fall sports previews.

Delmar Mitey Mite schedule

Delmar Jr. Pee Wee schedule

9/6- at Harrington, 5 p.m. 9/13- home vs. Milford, 10 a.m. 9/20- home vs. Lower Sussex, 10 a.m. 9/27- at Wicomico (Salisbury), 9 a.m. 10/11- at Smyrna, 9 a.m. 10/19- home vs. Woodbridge, 10 a.m. 11/1- at Seaford, 9 a.m.

9/6- home vs. Seaford in Berlin, 1 p.m. 9/13- home vs. Milford, noon 9/20- home vs. Lower Sussex, noon 9/27- at Wicomico (Salisbury), 11 a.m. 10/11- at Smyrna, 11 a.m. 10/19- home vs. Woodbridge, 10 a.m.

laurelstar.com

Head coach- Susan Elliott Years coaching- 1 Last season- 12-0-1, 17-0-1 Returning players- Seniors Lindsay Lloyd (midfield) and Shannon Wilson (GK); juniors Alyssa Martin (midfield) and Amanda Campbell (attack); sophomore Lauren Massey (back) Newcomers- Junior Lauren Ruark (attack) and freshmen Carlee Budd (midfield) and Taylor Elliott (attack) Team strengths- team unity, great attitude, and speed on the line Concerns- lack of varsity experience Key losses- Mallory Elliott (out for season with ACL injury); Alison Bloodsworth (Salisbury University) and Katie McMahon (leading scorers last year); Maribeth Beach (key defensive player) Outlook for season- “We look to contend for the Henlopen South title.”

Ricky Elliott posts back to back victories in Delaware Late Models By Charlie Brown Ricky “the Rocket” Elliott was back at Delaware International for the second week in a row on Saturday, Aug. 23 and posted his second consecutive win in the 20-lap Super Late Model main. It was far from a cakewalk for Elliott as he narrowly avoided a couple of tangles to take the lead at the white flag. Rick Whaley took the green and immediately moved to the high groove with Staci Warrington chasing in second. Warrington got out of shape on lap two and dropped to fifth as the caution came out for Bryan Driver and Kerry King in the second turn. Defending point champion, Donald Lingo, Jr. was now running in second with Ross Robinson holding down third. Elliott had been struggling through the field from his eighth starting spot and was up to fourth before David Hill and Jon Callaway momentarily dropped him out of the top five. Elliott fought back and was running third behind Whaley and Lingo by the halfway sign. With five to go, Lingo lost power and Elliott had to dive to the infield to avoid the tangle. The caution was out but both Callaway and Ray Davis, Jr. had gotten by Elliott for second and third. Callaway challenged Whaley for the lead on the restart but quickly found himself being challenged as Elliott made a

charge with time running out. Elliott took second with three to go and then edged by Whaley to take the lead at the white flag. Elliott, in the Seaside Builders/Rocket took his fifth win of the season with Whaley second. In a photo finish for third, Callaway barely edged Davis, Jr. and Hal Browning closed strong to finish in fifth. Heats were won by Warrington and Lingo, Jr. “I seemed to be in the wrong place at the right time all night long until right at the end,” laughed Elliott. Eric Vent was glad that he started on the pole in the in the 15-lap Crate Model feature. By the end of lap one, 13 of the 22 started had been involved in two separate pileups. When things finally settled down, Kelly Putz would chase Vent the rest of the distance. Barry Beauchamp made it a good battle as he kept the pressure on Putz. Vent crossed the line first for his third win in the Clark ’s Pool/Lazer. Putz finished in second with Beauchamp third. Chris Hitchens put on a good run to finish in the fourth spot and Joe Warren survived being in one of the crashes to finish in fifth. Fast time was set by Vent in qualifying.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy! Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.


PAGE 46 Delmar football continued time with the varsity team last season and will be looked to for key contributions this year. Flores and Fothergill each saw their playing time increase as the season went along last year. Fothergill started on defense and saw some time on offense and will play both ways this year. Mattox (LB/FB) played mainly JV last year but will play both ways for the varsity team this year. DeShields (FB/LB/DE) saw a little time with the varsity while Jamel Jones started against Indian River. “We don’t have a veteran team but they’ve got some experience,” Hearn said. The team’s seniors include: Disharoon, Cody Thompson, Jackson, Seth Benson, Scott Wroten, Ethan Daugherty, Michael McIntyre, Forse, Bradshaw, Tyler Bobby Disharoon Thompson,

MORNING STAR Jameson Jones, and Jamel Jones. Hearn sees Milford, Indian River, and Laurel to be among the teams to be in the Henlopen South, but believes there is a lot of balance in the division with Woodbridge, Seaford, and Lake Forest added to the mix. “We’ve got our hands full being competitive in the South,” said Hearn. “I think it’s a good group this year, very balanced.” Due to an out of state team backing out of a non-conference game, the Wildcats will only have four home games during the regular season. Instead of opening the season at home, Delmar has to travel to Baltimore to face St. Frances on Saturday. “That’s (four home games) kind of a downer for us because we play well at home,” Hearn said. “That’s tough to open up with three away games (St. Frances, Cape Henlopen, and St. Elizabeth). We’ll see how well we travel.” Hearn calls the opener against St. Frances a “curiosity” because the 100 year old Baltimore school is fielding a football program for the first time this year. He expects the opposing team to be young and athletic.

Woodbridge football team returns several key players Head coach- John Parker Years coaching- 11th at Woodbridge Team strengths- The 2008 team had nearly 50 players out for the team which includes 10 committed seniors and 14 juniors. In addition, several key players return with varsity game experience. Concerns- Although there is an excellent turnout for the team this year, depth and game time experience and injuries are a concern. In turn lack of experience leads to many team members playing 48 minutes and having to learn several positions. Returning starters: seniors R.C. Jefferson (OT/DT), Jorge Young (FB/LB), Doug Coppock (RB/DB), Dustin Lones (OT/DT), Zach Lonergan (OG/LB); juniors Jeremy Messick (OC/DT), Josh Quinones (RB/DB), Morgan Weaver (TE/LB), Austin Perry (QB/DB), T.J. Jefferson (OG/LB), Greg Seay (WR/DB), Dashawn Collins (WR/DB); sophomore Justin Benson (OC/DT) Key newcomers- seniors RaShawn Felder (WR/DE), Marcus Nock (WR/LB), Slivestre Villalobos; juniors Trevor Westcott (WR/DB) and Kevora Brown (OT/DT); sophomore Alex Matos (FB/DT); and freshman Jobias Blockson (WR/DB) Key losses-Woodbridge lost seniors Kevin Moss, Doug Washington, and Danny Cabrera to graduation. In addition, sophomore and two way starter Trez Kane is out with a knee injury.

Seaford soccer soccer team looks to make state tourney

• SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

Jester wins Delaware Modifieds at Delaware International Speedway By Charlie Brown Matt “the Joker” Jester took the lead just before the halfway sign and took advantage of the caution free 25-lap NAPA Big Block Modified feature to record his second win of the season at the Delaware International Speedway on Saturday, Aug. 23. Adam Jarrell led wire to wire and ended a 10-year drought to post his first career victory in the 15-lap AC Delco Modified main. H.J. Bunting and Joseph Watson collected the heat wins in the Big Block Modifieds. Rookie Chad Clark was in perfect form as he set the pace from the drop of the green in the feature. Howard O’Neal held the second spot until lap six when Jester, who had started in fifth, moved by to take up the chase. Jester had caught Clark by lap 10 but Clark was not willing to give up without a fight. On lap 11, Jester used the low groove in turn one to pull even then take the lead going down the back straight. With Jester in front and Clark solidly in second a battle shaped up for third between O’Neal, Jordan Watson, Joseph Watson and H.J. Bunting. Jordan climbed to fourth by lap 15 with Bunting following into fifth. The final laps would go quickly with the race staying green. Jester had a comfortable lead in the top groove with O’Neal for third and Bunting staying in tow to take fourth. Robert Dutton got by Watson with three to go to hold down fifth. Jester, in the Clearview Farms/Teo stopped the clocks at 8:35.185 for his second win of the season. Clark made no mistakes to finish in the second spot with O’Neal third. Fourth went to Bunting and Dutton rounded out the top five. “I was definitely glad to see it go caution free,” said Jester. “We kind of hit on something for the feature. We’ve been tearing up quite a bit of stuff here lately so hopefully the money will help us out.” The 15-lap AC Delco Modified feature

may not have been caution free but it was perfect in the eyes of drive Adam Jarrell. Jarrell started on the pole with teammate John Curtis in second. Tim Trimble took advantage of a lap three restart to get by Curtis for second. Joseph Tracy climbed to the third spot but not for long as Michael White dropped him to fourth just before halfway and Westley Smith was turning in his personal best running in fifth. Curtis’s drive ended on the final lap as he made a bid to regain fourth from Smith and spun in the second turn. Jarrell didn’t let his opportunity for his first career win escape him as he held off Trimble on the final lap to take the win in the Taylor & Messick/Bicknell. Trimble finished in second with point leader White in third. Fourth went to Smith for a personal best and Tracy, who set fast time in qualifying, rounded out the top five. Tim White made it three in a row in the 10-lap Mod Lite feature. Cody Belote and pole sitter James McKinney tangled before the first lap was in the books. Alan Passwaters inherited the lead and held the top spot until lap four when Tim White moved on top. The race was caution free after the first lap tangle and White was able to build up enough of a lead to keep the hard charging Ricky Wheatley at bay to win in the CLC Cabling/Lightning. Wheatley finished in second with Curt Miles, Jr. third. Fourth went to Brandon Dennis with Passwaters rounding out the top five. Fast time in qualifying was set by White. The 10-lap Vintage Stock Car feature went right down to the wire. C.J. Schirmer took the lead from Mel Joseph, Jr. on the first lap but could never shake him. Coming to the checkered in lapped traffic, Joseph, Jr. went low and Schirmer went high around a lapped car with Joseph’s Ritter Farms coupe getting the victory by about a foot. Schirmer finished in second with Morris Tucker, Rick Loveland, Jr. and Dave Schamp rounding out the top five. First sportsman was John Irwin.

Head coach- Tim Lee Years coaching- 19 Last season- 8-3-2, 9-5-2 Returning players- Seniors Abraham Cruz (For.) and Daniel DeMott (Mid.); juniors Tim Halter (Def.), Philip DeMott (Def.), and Oscar Castrejon (Mid.) Team strengths- unity Concerns- replacing graduated seniors Key losses- Trevor Lee (Messiah College) Outlook for season- “We will compete for the conference and enter the state tournament.”

Preview forms still needed from varsity sports coaches Preview forms still have not been received for the following varsity sports teams (as of Tuesday, Sept. 2): Seaford cross country and Laurel boys’ soccer. Please send completed preview forms to the Star at sports@mspublications.com or 302-629-9243 (f).

Delmar Sports Scene column to return in next week’s Star Tommy Young’s Delmar Sports Scene column will return in next week’s edition of the Laurel Star. Subscribe to the Star today for weekly coverage of the Delmar varsity sports teams.

See next week’s Laurel Star for the final Fall Sports preview stories as well as high school football results.

Delmar Pop Warner Pee Wee football 2008 schedule 9/6- at Harrington, 7 p.m. 9/13- home vs. Milford, 2 p.m. 9/20- home vs. Lower Sussex, 2 p.m. 9/27- at Wicomico, 3 p.m. 10/11- at Smyrna, 3 p.m. 10/19- home vs. Woodbridge, 2 p.m. 11/1 at Seaford, 11 a.m.


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

At sunrise on Saturday, Aug. 23 the temperature was a crisp 55 degrees, but it turned into a beautiful day as 24 teams played 72 head to head games in the last big event prior to the beginning of the fall 2008 field hockey season. Teams from throughout Delaware and Maryland made the Fifth Annual Seaford Hockey Play Day an overwhelming success. Action photos will be found at www.yourwinningshot.com . Our event would not have been possible without the support of the coaches, referees, parents and players of the Seaford High School hockey team, which began working on this event almost nine months ago. Each hockey team member not only played in the event but was a volunteer in making the event enjoyable to the other participants. Extra special thanks should be given to our committee chairs: Event Chairs (Jack and Susan Riddle); Registration (Melissa Cooper and Melissa Wills); T-Shirts (Debi Quillen); First Aid (Pat Wheedleton and Diane Hrabien); Concession (Lisa Tobin and Colleen Demott); Grills (Jim Cooper, Brian Demott, Clarke Tobin and Dave Quillen); Referees (Robin Verdery and Chris Minner), Field Marshals (Mike Procino); Fields (Ford Verdery, Kris Swain, Lori Hoch, and Jeff Wooten), Vitale’s (Cindy Schwinn); Administration (Tracy Wooten); Finance (Kim Swain), City Liaison (Tammi Bergh) and “Iceman” Paul Bradham. Also thanks to the staff of Seaford Department of Parks and Recreation who are a great partner as they provide year round programming for hockey players of all ages. We are also very grateful to Nanticoke Health Services, Dover Electric Supply, Seaford Parks and Recreation, Delaware Electric Co-op, Soroptomist International of Seaford, and Community Bank Delaware who served as corporate sponsors for our event. Play Day was hosted by the Seaford High School Field Hockey Boosters. All proceeds from this event will be used to support Seaford girls’ field hockey. In kind support was provided by: Seaford Ice, Towers Signs, Robin’s Nest, Nanticoke Little League, Seaford Machine, M. L. Joseph Construction Company, Inc., Johnny’s Powerwash, Ray of Elegance Catering, Delaware National Guard (Kelly Carey), Harley Davidson of Seaford and EMT personnel. Also thanks to the Seaford District staff (Jim VanSciver, Artie Uhlich, Freddie Murphy, Steve Henry, Daryl Downs, Ron Hurst, Art Stakes, Robert Young and Roy Whitaker). For more information on how to be involved in field hockey, contact the Booster CoPresidents Paul Bradham and Tracy Wooten or Seaford hockey head coach Robin Verdery (302-628-9187). We hope to see all the teams, parents and fans at the Sixth Annual Seaford Hockey Play Day in August 2009! Seaford Hockey Boosters Play Day Committee

Jamie Mills pads point lead with Delaware Big Block win By Charlie Brown Jamie Mills seems to be hitting his stride as he posted his sixth win of the season Saturday night at the Delaware International Speedway in the 25-lap NAPA Big Block Modified feature. Mills started in the ninth starting spot and took the lead from Jeff Brown just before the halfway sign. Brown started on the pole and was strong in the early laps. Howard O’Neal gave chase in second with Tim Millman running in third. Mills, driving is own No. 30, was hooked up in the high groove and was running in the top five by lap two. On the next circuit he dropped Jordan Watson to fifth. H.J. Bunting, who only trailed Mills by 39 points going into the night’s racing, pulled to the infield with mechanical problems on lap seven placing him 14th in the final results. Mills battled his way past both Millman and O’Neal to take second on lap nine. Brown gave Mills a good fight for the lead as the two ran wheel to wheel for three laps before Mills took the top spot on lap 12. At the halfway sign Mills was followed by Brown, O’Neal, Jordan Watson, and Millman in the top five. Ricky Johnson entered the top five just as the first and only yellow flew on lap 18 for Brown as he slowed to a stop at the end of the back straight. Robert Dutton was now running in fifth. O’Neal slipped high and Millman grabbed second with Johnson following into third. Mills opened a comfortable margin to the checkered in his I.G. Burton Chevrolet/Bicknell as he collected his sixth checkered of the season. Millman finished in the second spot with Dutton coming on strong in the closing laps to finish in third. Fourth went to O’Neal and Chad Clark notched the fifth spot. Heats were won by Bunting and Mills. “We got this motor back on Thursday night and the guys behind me came down and worked all night long,” said Mills. “We’ve got a lot of time in the car and this thing was on a rail tonight.” The AC Delco 15-lap feature was a caution filled affair starting with a tangle between the second and third place cars of Tim Trimble and Brad Trice before the first lap could be completed. Both restarted at the rear of the field but would be heard from later in the race. Herman Powell set the pace with Joseph Tracy running in second. By lap five Trimble was back in the top five in fifth as Michael White got by Tracy for second. Trimble took fourth from Jason Bishop on lap seven with Trice following into fifth. At the halfway sign the top five were Powell, White, Tracy, Trimble and Trice. By five to go, Trimble was third. White took the lead from Powell on lap 12 and one lap later, Trimble followed into second. The yellow was out with one lap to go for Casey Lynch who came to a stop in turn three. On the restart a lapped car came to a stop

A view from the cheap seats By Mike McClure, Star Sports Editor New coaches- There are a number of new varsity coaches at the Western Sussex schools this Fall. Art Doakes, a track and field coach at Seaford last spring, is the Blue Jays’ new cross country coach while Darnell Savage looks to turn things around as the head football coach at Seaford. Savage is the team’s third coach in the past five years. Savage and Doakes join veteran coaches Tim Lee (19 years) and Robin Verdery (16 years). Delmar teacher Karen Lewis takes over as the Delmar volleyball team’s third coach in as many seasons. She has a number of returning players from last year’s team. Susan Elliott, a long time assistant coach for her sister (Linda Budd) takes the helm this year. They join Greg Cathell, in his third year of coaching boys’ soccer at his alma mater, and long time football coach David Hearn. Sussex Tech’s new cross country coach is a familiar face, recent graduate David Demarest. Demarest takes over for long time coach Lou Nicoletti who recently retired. The rest of the Ravens’ coaches return: football coach Bill Collick (eight years at Tech), field hockey coach Nancy Tribbitt (17 years at Sussex Tech and 19 overall), and boys’ soccer coach Carlos Villa (nine years). There are no first year coaches at Laurel or Woodbridge on the varsity level. Tony Matthews is in his second year as the Laurel boys’ soccer coach. Matthews joins Ed Manlove, in his seventh year as the Bulldog football team’s head coach, and veteran field hockey coach Margo Morris. Connie (Pleasanton) Bean is in her second year as the Woodbridge field

hockey coach. She is a recent Woodbridge grad and former Lady Raider field hockey player. Bean joins long time coaches John Parker (11th year as head football coach at Woodbridge) and Scott Bleile (boys’ soccer). College ball- I’m still waiting on a few preview forms from local varsity coaches but here is a partial list of the local graduates who are playing Fall sports in college. Please send me an email or fax or give me a call if there’s someone I’m missing. Football- Tyler Downes (Delmar), West Chester; Brandon Hudson (Sussex Tech), Delaware State; Anthony West (Laurel), Wesley; Ryan Hubble (Laurel), Wesley; Tykie Hill (Laurel), Wesley; Antwon Trimball (Laurel), Wesley; Cody Bristow (Laurel), University of Delaware Field hockey- Alison Bloodsworth (Delmar), Salisbury; Lauren Correll (Sussex Tech), Salisbury; Candace Gaull (Laurel), Washington; Kelsy Gordy (Laurel) Cross country- David Ricksecker (Sussex Tech), Biola; Rebekah Ricksecker (Sussex Tech), Liberty; Claire Rekitzke (Seaford), York Soccer- Andrew Williamson (Sussex Tech), Del Tech; Trevor Lee (Seaford), Messiah; Joshua Scotton (Delmar), Salisbury; Jerilyn Idler, Virginia Wesleyan; Katie McMahon, Virginia Wesleyan Quick hits- The Laurel, Delmar, and Woodbridge football teams hit the road this Saturday for the regular season opener. Delmar fans will be riding on three chartered busses which will take them to their team’s game in Baltimore. On Friday, Sussex Tech is home against Milford and Seaford travels to Snow Hill to face the Eagles.

setting up yet another try to get the final lap in the books. On the third restart, White went high in the second turn and tagged the outside wall. He then slid across the track in front of the pack collecting Scott Calhoun and the yellow was out for a third time on the last lap. Trimble now found himself out front and he held off Powell on the final lap to take his fourth win in the Courtland Manor/Covey’s Car Care/Troyer. Powell ended a good drive in second with Trice salvaging a fine third. Fourth went to Tracy and Westley Smith rounded out the top five. Fast time in qualifying was set by Trimble. Cody Belote led the first two laps of the Mod Lite 10-lap feature before Brandon Dennis took the point. Running the high groove, Dennis maintained a comfortable margin over Curt Miles, Jr. in second with Belote holding on to third. Tim White climbed to the fourth spot but Dennis was smooth and error free in the high line as he drove to his fourth win of the season in the Simpson Construction/Pro. Miles, Jr. finished in the second spot with White third. Fourth went to Alan Passwaters and Rick Wheatley came back from an early spin to finish in fifth. Fast time in qualifying was set by Chad Passwaters. This Saturday night will be R.C. Holloway Night and will included the URC Sprints along with the five weekly divisions. It will also be Queen Anne, Md., fan appreciation night. Gates open at 4:30 p.m. with hot laps at 7 p.m.

SUDOKU ANSWERS:

Seaford Play Day features beautiful weather, outstanding athletes, fantastic field hockey

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

Sussex Tech football team needs young players to mature

Shown (l to r) are the top finishers in the first flight of the Seaford Golf and Country Club’s Ladies Club Championship: Denise Dickerson, first place; Kathy Boyd, second place; Sue Manlove, third place; and Carol Schreffler, not pictured, fourth place.

Head coach- Bill Collick Years coaching- eight Assistant coaches- Marty Cross, Jay Maull, Joe Powers, Marc Dickerson, Wes Townsend, G.L. Jefferson, Ron Dickerson, Rick Stevens, Don Golacinski, Chad Herr, Scott Layfield, Ethan Long Last season- 7-3 Returning players- seniors Seth Hastings (RB/LB), Zach Adkins (QB), Jon Davis (OT/DE), Tyler Justice (OL/DL); juniors Joe Casullo and Andrew Hitchens (TE/LB); sophomore Desmond Sivels (RB/DB) Newcomers- seniors David Bunch (RB/LB) and Joe Cooper (C/DE); juniors Justin Allen (DB/WR), Brad Ellingsworth (OL/LB), Wendall Cannon (RB/DB); sophomores Lavaar Showell (RB/LB), Jeff Schaffer (RB/LB), Orlando Thiess (TE/LB), Jonathan Hitchens (WR/DB); freshmen Shane Marvel (RB/LB) and Deshawn Sheppard (RB/DB) Team strengths- starting quarterback Zach Adkins returns from injury in 2007 along with three offensive linemen and running backs Desmond Sivels and Seth Hastings Concerns- lack of depth and number of seniors (five) Key losses- Jamar Beckett, George Godwin, Tyrone Hickman, and Darius Sivels (rushed for over 3,000 yards last season) and lineman Corey Wyatt and linebacker Marcus Dukes led a group that posted five shutouts last year

Demarest leads Sussex Tech cross country teams in ‘08 Head coach- Dave Demarest Years coaching- first as head coach, one year as assistant coach Last year- Boys- 8-1, 9-1; girls- 4-5, 5-5 Returning athletes- boys- seniors Anil Chandaradat and Mike Metzler, junior Brian Singh, sophomore Jamie Price Girls- seniors Emma Mancuso and Dee Carrillo; juniors Monica Patel and Liva Berg; sophomores Paige Collins, Brittany Chesser, and Rachel Crum Newcomers- girls- seniors Tiffani Savage and Ashley Nicholson; juniors Daisy Wharton, Margo Carey, Danae Evans, and Heidi Perez; sophomore Emily Ritter; freshmen Lexie Pusey, Rebekah Hufford, and Megan Thompson Boys- seniors Chad McMaster, Ryan Faucett, and Andrew Townsend; juniors Brian Donahue and Sam Crowther; sophomore Conor Small; freshmen Peter Ottley, Nathan Showell, Zachary Veasey, and Ryan Fitzgerald Team strengths- unity, heart, team depth, attitude Concern- injuries Key losses- David Ricksecker, Derek Kitchen, and Steve Spera Outlook for season- “For everyone to improve all the way to states on and off the course.” Shown (l to r) are the top finishers in the second flight of the Seaford Golf an Country Club’s Ladies Club Championship: Mellie Kinnamon, first place; Rajani Purandare, second place; and Shirley Ellis, third place.

Shown above (l to r) are the top finishers in the third flight of the Seaford Golf an Country Club’s Ladies Club Championship: Peggy Allen, first place and Delores Slatcher, second place. Not pictured is Joyce Allen, third place. Shown, left, is Jenny Davis who was the champion in the Seaford Golf an Country Club’s Ladies Club Championship. Denise Dickerson was the medalist.

Shown (from left) are the special prize winners in the SGCC Nine Hole Ladies Club Championship are: Renee Morris, long drive; Val Jefferson, closest to pin hole 7; and Rene Arnett, straight drive.

Delaware Demolition 13U travel team is looking for players The Delaware Demolition 13u youth travel baseball team from Milford is looking for a few more players for the 2008-2009 season. All participants must be 13 or under on May 1, 2009. Participants should be dedicated and able to pitch. For more team information please visit the team’s website at www.leaguelineup.com/delawaredemolition. The 2009 season will run from Sept. 1, 2008 thru August 31, 2009. For more information you can contact Jeff Poore at 302-422-7796 or Dave Brown at 302-424-1501.

See next week’s Star for more pre-season previews.


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

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Laurel/Seaford Star sports predictions: week 1 High school football- Milford at Sussex Tech- Tech 21-20 Seaford at Snow Hill- Seaford 21-17 Delmar at St. Frances- Delmar 28-20 Laurel at Hodgson- Laurel 21-20- With last year’s seniors moving on in life, it is tough to say who will do good this year. I am going to stick with the local teams, for this week at least. Woodbridge at Wilmington Friends- Woodbridge 17-13 High school field hockey- Seaford at Sussex Tech- Seaford 4-2 NFL- Washington Redskins at New York Giants- Giants 21-20 Cincinnati at Baltimore- Cincinnati 31-14- Neither one of these Daniel Richardson teams had great seasons last year, but I think Cincy is more probable to bounce back this year. St. Louis at Philadelphia- Philadelphia 28-14- I think we are starting this season off with a win. High school football- Milford at Sussex Tech-Sussex Tech 24STAR TEAM OF THE WEEK- Shown (l to r) are the 14U Delaware Roadrunners who recently placed second in the Challenge of Champions Tournament in Georgetown: back row- manager Ed Zitvogel II, Bridgeville, Tyler Absher, Delmar, Jordan Stanley, Seaford, Paul Elliott, Laurel, Trey Tyndall, Laurel, Chris Conaway, Georgetown, Connor Cooper, Seaford, Sammy Walls, Federalsburg, and Brooks Cahall, Seaford; front row- Edward Zitvogel, Bridgeville, Brent Cooper, Laurel, Josh Gorney, Milford, Jacob Williams, Greenwood, Casey Zitvogel, Bridgeville, Hunter Absher, Seaford, and Tim Affayroux, Frederica.

Delaware Roadrunners place second in Challenge of Champions The 14U Delaware Roadrunners placed second in the Challenge of Champions Tournament at Sports at the Beach in Georgetown Aug. 24. The Roadrunners won five games with two losses in the tournament, falling in the championship game 5-2 against a very talented Team New Era Gold based out of Buffalo, NY. On the way to the championship, the Roadrunners beat three other teams from New York and a team from Pennsylvania to complete their 14U season. The Delaware Roadrunners are looking for experienced travel baseball players. If you are interested in becoming a Delaware Roadrunner, please call (302) 249-7957.

Send your team photo to the Seaford/Laurel Star at sports@mspublications.com to be a Star team of the week. Sussex County Sports Foundation looking for Fall ball players The Sussex County Sports Foundation is looking for players for its Fall ball baseball and softball leagues. The leagues will play from Sept. 21 through Oct. 26 at Clifford Lee Memorial Park in Laurel. For further information, visit the league’s website at www.sussexcountysportsfoundation.com.

SCSF benefit tourney to be held at Heritage Shores A four-man scramble will be held at Heritage Shores Golf Club on Saturday, Sept. 20 (rain date TBA). The cost is $500 per team (includes golf, cart, dinner, and gift). Registration for the tournament, which will benefit the Sussex County Sports Foundation, will take place at 12:30 p.m. with a shotgun start at 2 p.m. Contests include closest to the pin on all par threes and a hole in one car hole. There will also be a 50/50 drawing and free range balls. The following are the prizes (based on a full field): first- $500, second- $400; third- $300; fourth- $250; fifth- $225; sixth$200; seventh- $175; eighth- $150; ninth- $125; tenth- $100. Prizes to be awarded as pro shop merchandise. For more information, contact Mike Payne at 302-542-1373 or 302-542-7813.

10 Seaford at Snow Hill- Seaford 21-7- I’m picking Seaford just because I hope Seaford has a good start. Delmar at St. Frances- Delmar 28-3- Delmar’s record last year was 10-1-0 overall. Delmar graduated Matt Campbell but returning players should fill role nicely. Laurel at Hodgson- Hodgson 41-6- Hodgson is ranked #1 in the state and is the defending state champion. Although the Silver Eagles graduated some key seniors the team remains strong with reLynn Schofer turning all-state players. Woodbridge at Wilmington Friends- Wilmington Friends 28-7 High school field hockey- Seaford at Sussex Tech- Sussex Tech 4-3 NFL- Washington Redskins at New York Giants- New York Giants 21-17 Cincinnati at Baltimore- Cincinnati 26-21 St. Louis at Philadelphia- Philadelphia 28-10- I always choose the Eagles. High school football- Milford at Sussex Tech- Milford 28-21 Seaford at Snow Hill- Seaford 20-12- Look for the Jays to pick up their first win under first year head coach Darnell Savage. Delmar at St. Frances- Delmar 35-21 Delmar has to travel to Baltimore against an athletic but inexperienced team. Look for a close game early on. Laurel at Hodgson- Hodgson 28-24- Even a close loss would be a good sign for the Bulldogs against this upstate power. Woodbridge at Wilmington Friends- Woodbridge 21-17 High school field hockey- Seaford at Sussex Tech- Tech 3-2 Mike McClure NFL- Washington Redskins at New York Giants- New York Giants 28-17- The defending Super Bowl champs have an easy one in the opener, but don’t expect a repeat this year. Cincinnati at Baltimore- Cincinnati 35-20 St. Louis at Philadelphia- Philadelphia 24-21- The Eagles have the home field advantage, but don’t look for it to be an easy win.

Western Sussex varsity sports schedules for Sept. 5-10

The Seaford Bowling Lanes’ Fall bowling leagues begin play this week. The results will be back in the Star starting next week (Sept. 11). Only the Star features weekly Seaford Bowling Lanes results.

Friday, Sept. 5- Seaford field hockey at Holly Grove, 4 p.m.; Seaford soccer at St. Andrew’s, 4 p.m.; Seaford football at Snow Hill, 7 p.m.; Sussex Tech soccer at Worcester Prep, 3:45 p.m.; Sussex Tech football home vs. Milford, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 6- Seaford cross country at Powell Invitational (Smyrna), 10 a.m.; Woodbridge field hockey at Delcastle, 11 a.m.; Woodbridge football at Wilmington Friends, 2 p.m.; Laurel football at Hodgson, 1 p.m.; Laurel field hockey at Parkside, 10 a.m.; Delmar football at St. Frances, 7 p.m.; Delmar field hockey at Pocomoke, 1 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 9- Seafordhockey at Sussex Tech, 4 p.m.; Seaford soccer home vs. Sussex Central, 7 p.m.; Sussex Tech soccer at Woodbridge, 4 p.m.; Woodbridge hockey at Polytech, 4 p.m.; Laurel soccer home vs. Polytech, 4 p.m.; Delmar field hockey at Cape Henlopen, 4 p.m.; Delmar soccer home vs. Caesar Rodney, 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 10- Sussex Tech cross country at St. Thomas More, 4 p.m.; Laurel field hockey home vs. Milford, 4 p.m.

Seaford Department of Parks tackle football holds signups

FA LL S P O R TS P R ED IC TIO N S

The Seaford Department of Parks is holding tackle football signups prior to the tryouts and draft on September 6. The league is looking for kids ages 7-13 as well as a few more coaches in the junior league.

We invite you to send in your predictions as well.

Seaford Bowling Lanes to begin Fall leagues this week

Martial arts coming to Laurel Boys and Girls Club The Del Tang Soo Do Academy will be holding martial arts classes at the Laurel Boys and Girls Club. Tang Soo Do is a Korean martial art with Okinawa and Chinese roots. It is a disciplined and structured style of martial arts. Students will not only learn how to defend themselves but will gain confidence and discipline that will transfer throughout every aspect of their lives. This class will be taught by Kyo Sa Nim Eric Johnson. Mr. Johnson who has 10 years teaching experience has been studying martial arts for 20 years under Master Lee Clarkson who opened Del Tang Soo Do in 1988. Classes will be held Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. For class information, you can contact Mr. Johnson at 302-245-4831.

The Star’s “Experts” are making predictions again this year.

Fill in this form, circling the teams you think will win & pick a score for the tie-breaker. Make sure you include your info so we can contact you if you win. WEEK 2 (Sept. 11): Turn in your predictions by Wed., Sept. 10, 5 p.m.

High School Football: Woodbridge home vs. Polytech Delmar at Cape Henlopen Sussex Tech home vs. A.I. DuPont Laurel home vs. Delcastle Seaford home vs. Friends HighS chool Soccer: Seaford at Sussex Tech CollegeF ootball: West Chester at University of Delaware NFL: New Orleans at Washington Baltimore at Houston Tiebreaker: Philadelphia at Dallas ___________________ Name:___________________________________ Daytime Phone #_____________________ The Star is offering prizes such as Free Movie Tickets to the winner each week.


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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

Primary Election ‘08 Issues and Answers

Candidates on the ballot for this Primary Election were given an opportunity to respond to our survey. Their responses are reprinted here verbatim to help voters learn more about them and their ideas. We encourage readers to take time to learn all they can about the candidates for office and to vote on Tuesday, September 9.

United States Representative Jerry Northington (D) Why are you interested in holding this office? The nation needs a new direction. Too many with long political experience let us fall into situations we must correct. I represent a new way of thinking without ties to lobbying groups or big corporate interests. My parents and vari- Northington ous teachers through life taught me to look to the benefit of those around me. “Treat others the way you wish to be treated.” To that end all my life I aimed to leave the world a better place for my having lived. This campaign is the latest step in my life course. Why should voters elect you over your opponents? My success and experience as a small businessman and veterinarian stand me in good stead for a political office. I face tough economic questions every day. My job on a daily basis sees me helping people find solutions to difficult problems and to seek answers to tough questions. As a Vietnam veteran I know firsthand the effects of war on people, on the troops on both sides and on the nation affected. Voters today need a person they can trust to represent their best interests. What do you feel is the top issue facing the office you are seeking? How will you address this issue? Today the economy of the nation is in deep trouble. We must find a new direction that allows people to earn a living wage. We must find ways to support job creation. As a small businessman I know the issues facing business owners. We must both encourage small and medium business growth and development and level the field to insure fair treatment of all businesses, small, medium and large. Fair and equal competition at all levels insures ongoing job creation. Small businesses have long been the largest creators of new jobs. We must insure that situation is encouraged into the future for the economic health of our nation. Name one or two things the nation should do now to reduce our dependency on foreign oil. Government policies need to change to insure more and rapid deployment of alternative energy sources. Wind, solar, and

geothermal technologies are available and dependable. We need various programs to aid all persons wishing to install these energy producers. Lease to own in addition to direct subsidies to consumers are necessary. We should aim to have solar energy devices on every available rooftop as soon as possible. Increased expenditures for research and development are necessary. We must refine current technologies and find new ways to produce energy if we are to end our oil addiction. Mass transit must be developed and supported. At the same time those transportation devices and automobiles must be held to higher mileage standards. Alternative fuels such as hydrogen and electricity must be developed and put in place as soon as possible. We need to take a close look at ethanol as a fuel source but we must find cellulose supplies outside the food chain. We cannot afford to use corn as a primary ethanol source. Nor may we allow deforestation in order to supply the ingredients for ethanol. New directions in energy production are a necessity for the future of our nation. Our oil dependence cannot be allowed to continue far into the future. Should the federal government provide a national health care plan? Universal, single-payer health care is a necessity for our nation. We are one of only two developed nations in the world without this system. A healthy nation is a strong nation. We need a system based on preventive medicine in which every person in the nation has ready access to the best of health care without worrying about how to pay the bill. Should we keep a military presence in Iraq? In a word, no. We may keep a small contingent for a diplomatic guard force, but permanent military bases serve no good purpose and irritate the locals. Resistance to the occupation will not end until full withdrawal is accomplished. Top ranking military officials may direct the withdrawal to insure a rapid and safe transition. America needs a strong peacetime military able to protect our national interests. We have no need of a global presence in nations where our troops are seen as any threat to the local population. For far too long America has used military force to push our thoughts on other nations around the world. We must find a new direction in international relations. Our future must de-

DELAWARE 2008 PRIMARY ELECTION COMPOSITE BALLOT - SUSSEX COUNTY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2008 POLLS OPEN FROM 7:00 AM - POLLS CLOSE 8:00 PM

Sussex County Dept. of Elections 119 North Race Street Georgetown, DE 19947 302-856-5367 FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS (VOTE FOR ONE (1)

GOVERNOR (VOTE FOR ONE (1)

INSURANCE COMMISSIONER (VOTE FOR ONE (1)

DEMOCRATIC PARTY

REPUBLICAN PARTY

KAREN HARTLEY-NAGLE MICHEAL MILLER JERRY W. NORTHINGTON JOHN CARNEY

WILLIAM SWAIN LEE

JACK MARKELL

MICHAEL D. PROTACK

GENE REED TOM SAVAGE KAREN WELDIN STEWART

FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT #41 (VOTE FOR ONE (1)

FOR COUNTY COUNCIL DIST. #2 (VOTE FOR ONE (1)

JOHN C. ATKINS BARBARA B. LIFFLANDER ROBERT L. REED ROBERT W. RICKER SAMUEL R. WILSON, JR.

FOR COUNTY COUNCIL DIST. #3 (VOTE FOR ONE (1)

MARK W. BAKER A. JUDSON BENNETT

Only registered Democrats may vote in the Democratic Primary and only registered Republicans may vote in the Republican Primary. REGISTERED VOTER POLLING PLACE LOCATOR: http://pollingplace.delaware.gov

ABSENTEE VOTING AVAILABLE IN THE OFFICE OR BY MAIL Monday - Friday 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM EXTENDED HOURS FOR VOTING ABSENTEE BALLOTS IN THE OFFICE Tuesday, Sept. 2; Wed., Sept. 3; & Thurs., Sept. 4 -- 8:00 AM - 6 PM Friday, Sept. 5 & Saturday, Sept. 6 -- 8AM - 4:30 PM 12 NOON, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2008 - Deadline to vote an absentee ballot in person in the office of the Department of Elections


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008 pend on diplomatic and peaceful relations as a primary course, not on military intervention. Continued militaristic activity is not in the best interest of either America or our world.

Karen Hartley-Nagle (D) Why are you interested in holding this office? I was raised with the belief that if you live in this great country of ours, you have an obligation to serve it. A direct descendent of George Clymer, an original signer of the Declaration of Independence and Bill of Hartley-Nagle Rights, I have a deep seated belief that we all have a responsibility to those who have sacrificed to protect our rights, freedoms and liberties. Since my 2006 campaign, I’ve continued traveling across the state talking with Delaware families and listening to your concerns. I want to take real solutions and common sense ideas straight from the people of Delaware to the halls of Congress. I’m running to offer the voters of Delaware a choice, and an opportunity. An opportunity to rethink our leadership, reclaim our government and reach our goals. Why should voters elect you over your opponents? I am the candidate with vision, forward thinking ideas, and experience necessary to lead. My drive to bring a voice to all citizens can be seen in my advocacy on behalf of children, work to pass familyfriendly legislation, work with others to bring the offshore wind park and jobs to Delaware, landmark child predator legislation, healthcare for Delaware’s Native Americans, extended bus service and my commitment to open and accountable government – all successful. My efforts have earned me the reputation of a strong vocal leader who puts the interests of children, families and community above that of special interests and partisan bickering. I bring that same unwavering spirit and common sense leadership to Congress. I will continue to work tirelessly to stand up for what truly matters to the people of Delaware, not just offering a lot of grandiose talk and political posturing. Additionally, I have received numerous endorsements; Democratic committees, labor, elected officials, organizations and community leaders – Why? They know I am the only candidate that can win against Mike Castle. What do you feel is the top issue facing the office you are seeking? How will you address this issue? President Bush and Congressman Castle sold us a trickle down economy and as a result, we have watched jobs trickle out of Delaware and the U.S., with China recently surpassing us for the first time in manufacturing. We have a trillion dollar national dept burden our children and grandchildren will have to repay. Federal budget surpluses have turned into unprecedented deficits and cheapened the value of the dollar. We can start by fighting for fair trade and amending NAFTA, pioneer the first wave of green technologies that will be in high demand throughout the world, be proactive in and support the Employees

PAGE 51

Free Choice Act. Mike Castle voted against it last March when he had the chance. I am sure that investing in America and good education, training and jobs for working men and women right here in Delaware can save the standard of living for us all and once again stabilize our nation’s finances. Furthermore, I support Federal funding for a rail system running the length of Delaware that will provide jobs, affordable public transportation, emergency evacuation, limit traffic congestion, and open up our tourist trade. Name one or two things the nation should do now to reduce our dependency on foreign oil. My interest is in making sure we have a comprehensive energy policy that can bring down gas prices. I support the position of Senator Obama and Speaker Pelosi requiring oil companies to use existing drilling leases. The 68 million acres of stockpiled leases can produce an additional 4.8 million barrels of oil each day, nearly doubling the U.S. oil production. I support legislation forcing oil companies to either produce or pay a fee on unused federal onshore and offshore leases they are stockpiling, opening portions of the (offshore) Outer Continental Shelf for drilling — with appropriate safeguards, without taxpayer subsidies to Big Oil and releasing supplies from the U.S. emergency oil stockpile to help lower gasoline prices. I support requiring utilities to generate a portion of their electricity from renewable sources like solar, wind and wave energy and rein in excessive energy market speculation that has run up crude oil and gasoline prices. This comprehensive approach will ensure energy independence essential to our national security, create millions of good paying jobs here at home in a new green economy, and will take major steps forward in addressing the global climate crisis. Should the federal government provide a national health care plan? The United States is the only wealthy, industrialized nation that does not provide universal health care and we are seeing jobs going overseas as a result. Moreover, as you put your children through school and college, do you want to face the prospect that one of your children happens to get a job with an employer which offers a good health care plan and your other child works somewhere that doesn’t? Why should the life and health of one of your children be “worth more” than the other one? Human dignity in America requires that we assign value to every American because they’re American not to only certain Americans because they “lucked out.” Should we keep a military presence in Iraq? We can begin a safe, phased withdrawal from Iraq, move toward diplomacy in the Middle East, and stop the massive hemorrhaging of lives and dollars which comes from patrolling other people’s streets. Mike Castle is joined at the hip with George Bush and John McCain on the war and, in fact, has voted with President Bush 93% of the time. He’s a bad Bush enabler. In nearly five-and-a-half years in Iraq we’ve spent too much money and way too many lives and it’s time to go now. Instead of our spending more of our money building their schools in Anbar Province,

POLLING LOCATIONS REGISTERED VOTER POLLING PLACE LOCATOR: http://pollingplace.delaware.gov PRIMARY ELECTION: TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2008 ED RD SN CC POLLING PLACE

ADDRESS

01 02 03 04 05 06 07

Lewes Fire Hall Rehoboth Fire Co. - Sta. No. 2 Rehoboth Fire Hall Rehoboth Elementary School Beacon Middle School Indian River Fire Co. Sub Station Cape Henlopen High School

347 Savannah Rd., Lewes 4407 Coastal Hwy., Rehoboth 219 Rehoboth Ave., Rehoboth 500 Stockley St. Extd., Rehoboth 19483 John J. Williams Hwy., Lewes 25375 Banks Rd., Long Neck 1250 Kings Hwy., Lewes

14 14 14 14 14 14 14

18 18 20 18 18 18 18

03 04 04 04 04 04 03

08 30

16 02

Milford Middle School

612 Lakeview Ave., Milford

09 33 10 33

18 02 16 02

Milford Middle School Milford Middle School

612 Lakeview Ave., Milford 612 Lakeview Ave., Milford

01 02 03 04 05 06 07

35 35 35 35 35 35 35

19 19 19 19 21 19 19

02 02 01 02 01 02 03

Greenwood Fire Hall Bridgeville Fire Hall Woodbridge High School Del Tech Higher Ed Bldg. Sussex Tech High School Redden Community Hall Ellendale Fire Hall

12611 Sussex Hwy., Greenwood 315 Market St., Bridgeville 308 Laws St., Bridgeville Seashore Hwy., Georgetown 17099 County Seat Hwy., Georgetown 18192 Redden Rd., Georgetown 302 Main St., Ellendale

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08

36 36 36 36 36 36 36 36

18 18 18 19 19 19 18 19

02 03 03 03 03 03 03 03

Lulu Ross Elem School Lulu Ross Elem School Slaughter Neck Comm Center Morris Early Learning Center Del Tech - Jason Bldg Mariner Middle School H.O. Brittingham School Ellendale Fire Hall

310 Loverʼs Lane, Milford 310 Loverʼs Lane, Milford 22942 Slaughter Neck Rd., Lincoln 8609 Third St., Lincoln Seashore Hwy., Georgetown 16391 Harbeson Rd., Milton 400 Mulberry St., Milton 302 Main St., Ellendale

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08

37 37 37 37 37 37 37 37

18 18 18 19 19 19 21 19

03 03 03 03 02 02 02 05

Ninth Grade Campus Shields Elementary School Zoar Church Hall Harbeson Church Hall Georgetown Elementary School N. Georgetown Elementary Georgetown Middle School DOT Transportation Bldg.

820 Savannah Rd., Lewes 910 Shields Ave., Lewes 24463 Gravel Hill Rd., Millsboro 18636 Harbeson Rd., Harbeson 301-A W. Market St., Georgetown 664 N. Bedford St. Extd., Georgetown 301-A W. Market St., Georgetown 23697 Dupont Hwy., Georgetown

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08

38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38

20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20

04 04 04 04 05 05 05 05

New Indian River High School Millville Fire Hall Lord Baltimore Elementary Bethany Beach Fire Hall Fenwick Island Town Hall Roxana Fire Sub Station Roxana Fire Hall Selbyville Fire Hall

29772 Armory Rd., Dagsboro 316 Atlantic Ave., Millville 120 Atlantic Ave., Ocean View 215 Hollywood St., Bethany Beach 800 Coastal Hwy., Fenwick Island Lt. House Rd., Selbyville Zion Church Rd., Roxana-Frankford 30 N. Main St., Selbyville

01 02 03 04 05 06 07

39 39 39 39 39 39 39

19 21 19 21 21 21 21

01 01 01 01 01 01 01

Seaford Middle School Seaford Senior High School Seaford Senior High School Seaford City Hall West Seaford Elementary Blades Fire Hall Blades Elementary

500 E. Stein Hwy., Seaford 399 N. Market St., Seaford 399 N. Market St., Seaford 414 High St., Seaford 511 Sussex Ave., Seaford 200 E. Fifth St., Blades-Seaford 900 S. Arch St., Blades-Seaford

01 02 03 04 05 06 07

40 40 40 40 40 40 40

21 21 21 21 21 21 21

01 01 01 05 05 05 05

North Laurel Elementary Laurel Ctrl Mid Sch Fieldhse Laurel Fire Hall Laurel High School Laurel High School Delmar Fire Hall Delmar High School

499 Wilson St., Laurel 801 Central Ave., Laurel 205 W. 10th St., Laurel 1133 S. Central Ave., Laurel 1133 S. Central Ave., Laurel Grove & Bi-State Blvd., Delmar 200 N. 8th St., Delmar

37030 Millsboro Hwy.,Gumboro-Millsboro 01 41 21 05 Gumboro Fire Hall 02 41 20 05 E. Millsboro Elementary 29346 Iron Branch Rd., Millsboro 03 41 20 05 Frankford Fire Hall 7 Main St., Frankford 04 41 20 05 Dagsboro Fire Hall 200 Waples St., Dagsboro 05 41 20 05 Millsboro Fire Hall 109 E. State St., Millsboro 06 41 20 04 Millsboro Civic Center 322 Wilson Hwy., Millsboro 07 41 20 04 Indian River Fire Hall 32628 Oak Orchard Rd., Millsboro 08 41 20 04 Long Neck Elementary Sch. School Rd., Long Neck 09 41 18 04 Mid Sussex Rescue Squad 31378 Indian Mission Rd., Long Neck ABSENTEE BALLOT DEADLINE: MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2008, 12 NOON POLLS ARE OPEN 7 AM - POLLS CLOSE 8 PM DEPARTMENT OF ELECTIONS FOR SUSSEX COUNTY 119 North Race Street, Georgetown, DE 19947 • Phone: 302-856-5367


PAGE 52 we should spend our money building our schools in Delaware. And let’s build and repair some bridges and other infrastructure items while we’re at it.

Micheal Miller (D) Why are you interested in holding this office? In this day and time this system of government is failing to serve every citizen and Congressman Mike Castle has lost touch with families and the working man and woman in Delaware. Social Security is going broke, Mike Miller senior citizens are choosing between food and medications, No Child Left Behind is not working in our public schools, energy, gas and food costs are at record highs and it is only going to get worst this winter. We are spending record amounts of money on a war that we did not have to be in. The money we are spending in the war could be going toward a health care system for the uninsured (50 million nationwide) and our seniors. Congressman Castle has not introduced or sponsored legislation to improve the well being of the citizens in Delaware. We can do better and will do better with me as your Congressman. Why should voters elect you over your opponents? On September 9, voters have an amazing opportunity to vote not for a name, but for a change. I come from a working family and understand those basic values and what we need in Delaware. I know what it’s like to live with no healthcare insurance, to live off the minimum wage, and be a part of the working poor. I, too, understand what it means to put my child on the school bus, pay child care, and save for college tuition. I share the same experience many working families have in our state, and I ask you one question: Who best can represent you in Congress, someone who has been there and understands life’s challenges, or someone who has never been there and never will? As your Congressman I want to see everyone have those essential tools to succeed in life, to have an opportunity to live to their Godly given potential. What do you feel is the top issue facing the office you are seeking? How will you address this issue? As a Tax Accountant I see every day how complex our tax system can be. This is why I will introduce legislation to repeal the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT), repeal the Capital Gains Tax, and propose an across the board tax of 25% at all levels of income, keeping the earned income tax credit, child tax credit, college tuition credits all in place. A family of four at an income level of $40,000 will still not owe any taxes (even at 25%) with the tax credits staying in place. We should repeal the No Child Left Behind act, which Congressman Castle sponsored. We are teaching our children how to be a great test taker instead of learning the materials. Our children are learning how to text, email, and use the computer to spell check instead of learning how to spell. We as a country need to set a new direction, a new goal — to return to the basics of learning how to read, write (to have true penmanship and typing

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008 on a computer) and arithmetic. We should set benchmarks to be passed at each grade level and continue testing on a monthly schedule to meet those benchmarks, instead of one big test at the end of the year. Our teachers need to be paid more and given all the tools to teach our children. I will fight for more money to the states to hire more teachers so class sizes will be reduced to a 20 to 1 ratio. Name one or two things the nation should do now to reduce our dependency on foreign oil. I support increased offshore drilling for oil. I support drilling for oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, and opening our strategic oil reserve. But let me be perfectly clear, if we in the United States, the greatest country in the world, can put a man on the moon, put a Range Rover on mars and send back pictures, and use an unmanned spy plane in the war, then surely we have enough great scientists and engineers to create an alternative fuel to run our automobiles and be less dependent upon the oil companies and break their stronghold over the American citizens. As your congressman I will push for legislation to allow this alternative fuel to come forward and fight against the lobbyists for these big oil companies. We as a country need to invest into our future and alternative energy, invest in more solar power, wind power (on and off shore), and I would like to see our country invest in nuclear energy, because it’s clean and safe. Between 70 and 80 percent of France is powered by nuclear energy. We also need to find better ways to extract coal from the mountains, because it could be a stronger source for energy. And, finally, yes the government should give tax breaks and incentives to companies and set mandatory clean power goals. Should the federal government provide a national health care plan? Yes, the federal government should provide a national healthcare system. It is totally unacceptable that nearly 140,000 Delawareans have no healthcare insurance and another 50,000 are underinsured. Delaware ranks fifth in infant mortality rates. I believe we can do better. This is one of those essential tools we all need to succeed in life Should we keep a military presence in Iraq? In 2002, while running for Congress, I spoke against us going to war in Iraq. Congressman Castle voted for the war in Iraq. I still to this day believe we made a mistake in going to war in Iraq. We have lost too many great men and women in our military forces (over 4,000). We should begin now to hand over the reigns to the Iraqi government and start bringing our troops home in a staged withdrawal. While our troops are in Iraq, I will continue to fully fund their safety. The Iraqi government needs to use their own resources, selling their own oil to pay for the rebuilding of roads and buildings, to rebuild their country’s infrastructure. We need to work with each country’s government to try and defeat terrorism. We cannot go in as a one-man army. We must work together and solve this problem. Terrorism is not just in one country, it is global. We need one strong N.A.T.O. Peacekeeping force working together to fight these cells of violence.

Governor Jack Markell (D) Why are you interested in holding this office? I am running for governor for a simple reason — I believe Delaware can do better. Honestly, I believe we must. Delaware has a bright future, but that future is far from assured. The issue in this campaign is whether Jack Markell we are going to continue along the path set by the Minner-Carney administration, or whether we are going to take bold steps toward a stronger, healthier Delaware. As governor, I will take Delaware in a bold new direction toward a brighter future with world-class schools, a booming economy, universal health care and a cleaner environment. Why should voters elect you over your opponent? I have made a career of challenging the status quo and have made a difference in the lives of tens of thousands of Delawareans during my three terms as state treasurer. As a candidate for governor, I have laid out bold, Democratic solutions to the problems facing our state. I am the only Democrat running for governor with a plan to guarantee all Delawareans have quality, affordable health care – now – and a detailed plan to grow our economy by creating 25,000 high-wage jobs. I have laid out my plans for the

change Delaware needs in unprecedented detail in my “Blueprint for a Better Delaware.” We need a new direction where every Delawarean has the skills they need to find a job, available affordable housing, quality health care and can send their children to safe and successful schools. I, for one, think we need a bold new direction, not more of the same. What do you feel is the top issue facing the office you are seeking? How will you address this issue? We clearly need to take our economy in a new direction. Last year, Delaware was one of three states where the economy actually shrank. My “TIME” (Turning Ideas into Meaningful Employment) proposal combines the resources of Delaware’s schools, businesses, banks, agricultural community and government to build new businesses that will flourish here at home and create 25,000 new jobs during my first term. The number of uninsured is rising faster in Delaware than in the rest of the country. My universal healthcare plan takes us in a new direction. I am the only Democrat running for governor who is committed to the bold step of making sure every one of today’s Delaware families will have access to affordable quality healthcare while containing costs. The detailed plan is available at www.markell.org. Nothing is more important than education, and I will be committed to establishing a world-class education system that prepares our kids for the global economy. I will focus on early childhood education,

ELECT BOB RICKER CHANGEI NITIATIVES: • Work with farmers to insure agriculture remains our number one industry. • Work with DelDOT and state legislators to ease transportation problems and increase transportation funding for Sussex County • Research transportation alternatives • Demand infrastructure is built first, and that the developers fund the infrastructurep rojects. • Insure closer oversight of county spending • Mandate fiscal responsibility in county government • Demand accountability for law enforcements pending • Attract quality employers by enhancing economic development

Proven Leadership, Lifetime of Experience “I promise I will work diligently for the citizens of the 2nd Councilmatic District to maintain the quality of life we enjoy in Sussex County.”

COUNTY COUNCIL 2ND DISTRICT

Paid for by the Friends to Elect Bob Ricker


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008 scrap the Delaware Student Testing Program, make our funding system more responsive to the needs of students in each school, recruit and retain quality teachers and make college more affordable. You can also read the details of my education plans at www.markell.org. Would you support a school voucher system? No. Vouchers drain money from public schools at a time when we must increase our investment in public schools. I believe Delaware parents and students have a full range of choices available to them in the public sector through local community public schools, magnet schools, charter schools and inter-district and intra-district choice options. Should the state set limits on the amount that can be awarded in malpractice lawsuits? No, because Delawareans deserve to be fairly compensated if they are harmed. I understand there is still a serious problem with affordable medical liability insurance. Preventing frivolous lawsuits has helped, but physicians still pay too much. We must attract the most-talented doctors and design a system that places a heavy emphasis on reducing medical errors. Do you favor parental notification for teens seeking an abortion? Yes. I would want every child to notify their parents, but for some children that’s just not possible. In those cases, the child should be allowed to notify a judge or another adult. Do you support the death penalty? Yes. Should Delaware have tougher penalties for those convicted of crimes against children? Yes. The state government’s biggest responsibility is to protect the health and safety of Delawareans, especially our youngest residents who cannot defend themselves.

John Carney (D) Why are you interested in holding this office? I want to be Governor because I have the vision and experience we need to make change a reality in Delaware. We face some real challenges, but we have great opportunities as well. We need to change the way John Carney we do business in Dover to create high-paying jobs and a 21st century economy, build world-class schools, and make healthcare more affordable for everyone. All this will take leadership from a strong governor, and I have the vision and record of working hard to make these changes a reality. Why should voters elect you over your opponent? Changing the way we do business requires more than political promises or a glossy book. At the end of the day, real change means bringing people together and achieving what is best for Delawareans. I have a track record of doing just that throughout my career in public service, and I continue to do it today. In just the

last six months, I worked with legislators to pass the Cancer Right to Know Law and worked with Sen. DeLuca to bring Bluewater Wind and Delmarva to negotiate a deal to build the nation’s first offshore wind farm. That’s the type of leadership we need to change Delaware, and as Governor, I will continue working hard to make the changes we need a reality. What do you feel is the top issue facing the office you are seeking? Economic development and job creation How will you address this issue? Creating jobs and strengthening Delaware’s economy will be my top priority as Governor. I will work every day to find new opportunities, and will never be satisfied with the state of our economy, even when it is healthy and robust. My approach to economic development will be a hands-on one that brings together people from Delaware’s business, labor, and higher education communities. I will create the Delaware Business-Labor Council to bring leaders from business and the labor communities together to solve problems and identify opportunities to make our economy stronger. This is a new way of doing business in Delaware, and it allows us to use our experience and expertise to create opportunities for all our citizens. I will also help turn Delaware into a leader in science and technology industries. As Chair of the Delaware Science and Technology Council, I’ve worked hard to expand opportunities in emerging new industries, such as renewable energy, and I will continue to bring state government, Delaware’s businesses, colleges, and universities together to accomplish this goal. My record on jobs and the economy is unmatched in the race for Governor. As Tom Carper’s Secretary of Finance, thanks to sound fiscal management and an aggressive economic development policy, we earned the state’s first AAA bond rating and cut taxes every year. I will bring that same energy, vision, and leadership to economic development as Governor. Would you support a school voucher system? No. Parents deserve the opportunity to choose the school that best fits their child’s needs and interests, and I think that our “school choice” and charter school systems give parents this important opportunity. Should the state set limits on the amount that can be awarded in malpractice lawsuits? I served on the Medical Liability Task Force, and at that time, we didn’t see any evidence of excessive punitive damages being awarded in Delaware. However, this is an issue that certainly needs to be monitored by the Insurance Commissioner, and we recommended stronger accounting and reporting requirements to do this effectively.

PAGE 53

mined on a case by case basis. I have the utmost confidence in Delaware’s judiciary and its criminal protections and procedures. As Governor, it is very unlikely I would seek to overturn a death penalty sentence. Should Delaware have tougher penalties for those convicted of crimes against children? Yes.

William Swain Lee (R) Why are you interested in holding this office? I don’t seek the Governorship for personal gain or a career in politics. I seek the Governorship because I love this state. It pains me to see Delawareans suffering because their government is broken and their leaders are out of Bill Lee touch. I believe I have the experience to solve many of the problems we face. Why should voters elect you over your opponent? If I earn your vote and am elected to the office of Governor I will put nothing before the welfare of Delawareans. I will change course by doing things differently than they have been done before. We can do better. As your Governor, I will do better for Delaware’s families. I am uniquely qualified to do this job because of my legal, judicial and public service background.

What do you feel is the top issue facing the office you are seeking? How will you address this issue? All issues are interconnected so it is impossible to choose just one. My focus will be on the following: • Special interests and growth of government I will take on the special interest and sacred cows that cost taxpayers money and cause government to be inefficient. I will reverse the growth of government with performance audits that allow us to target what is not working. I will hold the line on taxes that drive business away and cost us jobs. I will create the most open, honest, and accountable administration in state history, restoring the faith of the Delaware people in their government following years of scandal and incompetence. • Education I will fix our educational system by empowering teachers and principals, and by devoting 20% more of the money we spend on education in the classroom for instruction. • Economy I will reverse the course of our economy by investing in retraining Delawareans who are looking for a better life, creating a next-generation workforce prepared for the high-paying jobs of tomorrow. • Environment I will commit to cleaner air and water. I will hold polluters accountable and I will level with the people about cancer clusters. Would you support a school voucher system? Philosophically I support the idea, but, I

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Do you favor parental notification for teens seeking an abortion? I oppose efforts to expand the parental notice requirement to include 16 and 17 year olds.

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Do you support the death penalty? Death penalty cases are a very serious matter, and I believe they should be deter-

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PAGE 54 don’t see it happening in the near future simply because of the cost associated with the initiative. Should the state set limits on the amount that can be awarded in malpractice lawsuits? Yes, I would sign into a bill into law if it were passed. Do you favor parental notification for teens seeking an abortion? Yes. Do you support the death penalty? I believe there must be an ultimate penalty for our most vicious crimes. I believe that the death penalty is both a deterrent to future crime and just retribution for the families of victims and for society. I strongly support the death penalty. Should Delaware have tougher penalties for those convicted of crimes against children? Yes.

Michael Protack (R) Michael Protack did not return the survey.

Insurance Commissioner Karen Weldin Stewart (D) Why are you interested in holding this office? I am running for Delaware Insurance Commissioner to set a higher standard – a higher standard in ethics and a higher standard in performance. Let me explain. The primary responsibility of the Insurance Commissioner is to make sure that the claims of policyholders are paid in full and on time. Therefore, I do not accept campaign contributions from executives of insurance companies, insurance company PACs and from companies that have contracts with the insurance department. To do so would be a conflict of interest and, more important, a conflict of interest with all Delawareans. I have authored proposed legislation that, when elected, I will work to enact. It is called the Insurance Consumer Protection Act. Why should voters elect you over your opponents? I have two opponents but the most well funded opponent of the two has extremely limited experience. His funding has come from executives and their spouses of the very organizations he would regulate should he be elected and from a company that has a $20 million annual contract with the department. From the day he graduated college until now he has worked in the insurance department as a mid-level manager, a job he received courtesy of his father who was then New Castle County Chair and an employee of the insurance department. He has never had to meet a payroll, earn a profit, fend for himself or enjoyed the breadth of experience of striking out on his own. When I joined the Insurance Department, I came in as a Deputy Receiver, handled 20 insolvencies as a virtual CEO. I have also owned my own successful businesses, one in retail, the other in insurance regulation, worked for a Fortune 500

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008 company (a subsidiary of Marsh McLennan), managed divisions for major American retailers, founded an international organization (International Association of Insurance Receivers). What do you feel is the top issue facing the office you are seeking? How will you address this issue? The biggest issue facing the Commissioner’s office is the state of health insurance in our state. I feel it is very important that the Insurance Commissioner obtain the authority to review the rates of health insurance companies. Also, by adding a payment process to Delaware’s Health Information Network, our state will benefit from a positive impact in cutting the costs of health care administration while reducing the time in handling a claim. In addition, It is my intention, when elected, to raise the bar to set and meet a higher standard for the quality, the coverage, the technology, the administration and the remuneration for providers of our state health care system. The Uninsured. One in eight Delawareans have no health insurance. I prepared SB 177, the Single Payer Health Care Program for Delaware. I will continue to work for its passage. I will be an advocate, as I have since 1990, for Delaware’s citizens who do not qualify for Delaware’s Medicaid System and do not earn enough income to buy insurance to buy into Delaware’s Medicaid system. It is my intention to develop and implement a “High Risk Pool” in the State of Delaware. I want to increase the age of children eligible to be covered by their parents’ policy from 24 to 29. What do you feel is the second most important issue facing the office you are seeking? How will you address this issue? The second issue involves returning to the Department of Insurance those responsibilities that were once there but then moved elsewhere and increasing the authority of those responsibilities that were returned. These include: The Insurance Department needs more teeth in its authority to enhance its ability to protect the citizens of Delaware. Therefore, the arbitration process, currently regulated by the Insurance Department, needs to be binding and the policyholder’s attorney needs to be paid separately from the policyholder’s award (what is called a lost adjustment expense) as was once done. Stop the transfer of the States insurance program by taking the epilog language out of the budget and leave it in the Insurance Department.

Tom Savage (D) Why are you interested in holding this office? I am interested in holding the office because I believe the office should be a stronger advocate for the consumer. The office should be super diligent in monitoring the insurance industry and spotlighting wrong- Tom Savage doing. The office needs to improve its relationship with the legislature. It should work closely with both Republicans and Democrats.

I believe the Insurance Commissioner’s Office should be more innovative and not wait around until others make decisions and then just agree to carry them out. And I strongly believe the Insurance Commissioner’s Office should be fiercely independent and beholden to no one. Why should voters elect you over your opponents? I think my broad experience in business and public service gives me a strong empathy for the consumer. Those who have worked so long in one office tend to become comfortable and complacent. The status quo is appealing and the attitude of “that’s the way we’ve always done it” becomes pervasive. I am also concerned about the likelihood of favoritism or worse when a candidate has accepted thousands of dollars in campaign contributions from people with strong ties to the insurance industry. One of the other candidates has broken the precedent set by his predecessor who refused such contributions. I am beholden to no one. Because of my broad background and experience, I will bring strong management skills and an innovative perspective to the office. What do you feel is the top issue facing the office you are seeking? How will you address this issue? One of the most important challenges for the next Delaware Insurance Commissioner will be to help reduce the soaring cost of health insurance. I would work hard to implement a Single Payer health plan based on income. Under that plan an individual would pay no more than 2 percent of his gross income and a family’s premiums would be 2-1/2 percent. Businesses would pay no more than 9 percent of their gross income. My plan would cover all Delawareans and all their medical expenses including doctors, hospitals, prescriptions, dental and eye care. The program would be run by an independent board, not the insurance industry. So doctors, not insurance companies, would determine the best health care treatment. I believe I would be effective in getting such a plan approved by the state legislature. First, because it’s a good, reasonable, cost saving plan, and second, because I have been working with the legislators, both Democrats and Republicans, as an unpaid lobbyist for the Police and Fire Fighter’s Pension Task Force for the last 20 years. I know how to get things done. What do you feel is the second most important issue facing the office you are seeking? How will you address this issue? The Indian River Bridge fiasco is likely to cost taxpayers additional millions of dollars if the state is not insured against such incompetence. The Insurance Commissioner’s Office has to strengthen its oversight responsibilities in monitoring bonding companies’ contracts on state projects. It appears the contract with the bonding company failed to specify adequate foundation requirements for the footers and compression of the roadway materials. That has now cost the state an estimated $20 million to dismantle much of the completed road construction. Was the omission an error clause so loosely written that the state has no claim against the Bonding Company? These and other matters necessitate closer administrative oversight.

Gene Reed (D) Why are you interested in holding this office? There is no time for on-the-job training. I know firsthand that Delawareans need someone who will listen, take action and get results. Having served the citizens of Delaware with distinction and chairing numerous committees for the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, I want to take that experience, commitment and dedication of public service to the next level. The outcome of this election matters. It matters to me as a husband concerned with the overall insurance costs on the family budget and as a father of two teenage drivers. Delaware deserves an insurance commissioner who will fight for them. Why should voters elect you over your opponents? Delawareans need health insurance today. I am qualified to serve on day one. My 23 years of experience in the Delaware Insurance Department and distinguished public service record, by example of receiving the “Regulator of the Year” award from the National Securities and Insurance Licensing Association, uniquely puts me in the leadership position above the other candidates. As the director of Insurance Consumer Protection and Enforcement, I understand the complexities of our insurance issues. Over 30 elected officials in Delaware have endorsed me. They believe in my experience and integrity, knowing I will continue the progress made under Commissioner Matthew Denn. What do you feel is the top issue facing the office you are seeking? How will you address this issue? Our major concern is the inability of consumers to obtain health insurance. As Insurance Commissioner I will work to enact legislation to create a universal health care plan, making health care available and affordable to all Delawareans. Part of an approved health care system can and must focus upon preventative treatments. Chronic illness has also been an issue adversely affecting the cost and denial of health care for years. As your next Insurance Commissioner, I will work as a team with the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, legislators on both sides of the aisle, the Health Care Commission and the Chronic Illness Task Force on a comprehensive plan to lower costs and address these issues so that a viable universal health care system is accessible to all Delawareans. My mission as Delaware’s next Insurance Commissioner will be to immediately propose legislation to create a statewide health insurance purchasing pool. I will fight for legislation to allow the Department of Insurance to regulate health insurance rates, expand SCHIP regardless of family income, expand access to coverage for dependent children and young adults up to the age of 28, establish a Medicaid Buy-In Program, and reimbursement for mental health care services. What do you feel is the second most important issue facing the office you are seeking? How will you address this issue? There are many challenging issues that


PAGE 54 don’t see it happening in the near future simply because of the cost associated with the initiative. Should the state set limits on the amount that can be awarded in malpractice lawsuits? Yes, I would sign into a bill into law if it were passed. Do you favor parental notification for teens seeking an abortion? Yes. Do you support the death penalty? I believe there must be an ultimate penalty for our most vicious crimes. I believe that the death penalty is both a deterrent to future crime and just retribution for the families of victims and for society. I strongly support the death penalty. Should Delaware have tougher penalties for those convicted of crimes against children? Yes.

Michael Protack (R) Michael Protack did not return the survey.

Insurance Commissioner Karen Weldin Stewart (D) Why are you interested in holding this office? I am running for Delaware Insurance Commissioner to set a higher standard – a higher standard in ethics and a higher standard in performance. Let me explain. The primary responsibility of the Insurance Commissioner is to make sure that the claims of policyholders are paid in full and on time. Therefore, I do not accept campaign contributions from executives of insurance companies, insurance company PACs and from companies that have contracts with the insurance department. To do so would be a conflict of interest and, more important, a conflict of interest with all Delawareans. I have authored proposed legislation that, when elected, I will work to enact. It is called the Insurance Consumer Protection Act. Why should voters elect you over your opponents? I have two opponents but the most well funded opponent of the two has extremely limited experience. His funding has come from executives and their spouses of the very organizations he would regulate should he be elected and from a company that has a $20 million annual contract with the department. From the day he graduated college until now he has worked in the insurance department as a mid-level manager, a job he received courtesy of his father who was then New Castle County Chair and an employee of the insurance department. He has never had to meet a payroll, earn a profit, fend for himself or enjoyed the breadth of experience of striking out on his own. When I joined the Insurance Department, I came in as a Deputy Receiver, handled 20 insolvencies as a virtual CEO. I have also owned my own successful businesses, one in retail, the other in insurance regulation, worked for a Fortune 500

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008 company (a subsidiary of Marsh McLennan), managed divisions for major American retailers, founded an international organization (International Association of Insurance Receivers). What do you feel is the top issue facing the office you are seeking? How will you address this issue? The biggest issue facing the Commissioner’s office is the state of health insurance in our state. I feel it is very important that the Insurance Commissioner obtain the authority to review the rates of health insurance companies. Also, by adding a payment process to Delaware’s Health Information Network, our state will benefit from a positive impact in cutting the costs of health care administration while reducing the time in handling a claim. In addition, it is my intention, when elected, to raise the bar to set and meet a higher standard for the quality, the coverage, the technology, the administration and the remuneration for providers of our state health care system. The Uninsured. One in eight Delawareans have no health insurance. I prepared SB 177, the Single Payer Health Care Program for Delaware. I will continue to work for its passage. I will be an advocate, as I have since 1990, for Delaware’s citizens who do not qualify for Delaware’s Medicaid System and do not earn enough income to buy insurance to buy into Delaware’s Medicaid system. It is my intention to develop and implement a “High Risk Pool” in the State of Delaware. I want to increase the age of children eligible to be covered by their parents’ policy from 24 to 29. What do you feel is the second most important issue facing the office you are seeking? How will you address this issue? The second issue involves returning to the Department of Insurance those responsibilities that were once there but then moved elsewhere and increasing the authority of those responsibilities that were returned. These include: The Insurance Department needs more teeth in its authority to enhance its ability to protect the citizens of Delaware. Therefore, the arbitration process, currently regulated by the Insurance Department, needs to be binding and the policyholder’s attorney needs to be paid separately from the policyholder’s award (what is called a lost adjustment expense) as was once done. Stop the transfer of the States insurance program by taking the epilog language out of the budget and leave it in the Insurance Department.

Tom Savage (D) Why are you interested in holding this office? I am interested in holding the office because I believe the office should be a stronger advocate for the consumer. The office should be super diligent in monitoring the insurance industry and spotlighting wrong- Tom Savage doing. The office needs to improve its relationship with the legislature. It should work closely with both Republicans and Democrats.

I believe the Insurance Commissioner’s Office should be more innovative and not wait around until others make decisions and then just agree to carry them out. And I strongly believe the Insurance Commissioner’s Office should be fiercely independent and beholden to no one. Why should voters elect you over your opponents? I think my broad experience in business and public service gives me a strong empathy for the consumer. Those who have worked so long in one office tend to become comfortable and complacent. The status quo is appealing and the attitude of “that’s the way we’ve always done it” becomes pervasive. I am also concerned about the likelihood of favoritism or worse when a candidate has accepted thousands of dollars in campaign contributions from people with strong ties to the insurance industry. One of the other candidates has broken the precedent set by his predecessor who refused such contributions. I am beholden to no one. Because of my broad background and experience, I will bring strong management skills and an innovative perspective to the office. What do you feel is the top issue facing the office you are seeking? How will you address this issue? One of the most important challenges for the next Delaware Insurance Commissioner will be to help reduce the soaring cost of health insurance. I would work hard to implement a Single Payer health plan based on income. Under that plan an individual would pay no more than 2 percent of his gross income and a family’s premiums would be 2-1/2 percent. Businesses would pay no more than 9 percent of their gross income. My plan would cover all Delawareans and all their medical expenses including doctors, hospitals, prescriptions, dental and eye care. The program would be run by an independent board, not the insurance industry. So doctors, not insurance companies, would determine the best health care treatment. I believe I would be effective in getting such a plan approved by the state legislature. First, because it’s a good, reasonable, cost saving plan, and second, because I have been working with the legislators, both Democrats and Republicans, as an unpaid lobbyist for the Police and Fire Fighter’s Pension Task Force for the last 20 years. I know how to get things done. What do you feel is the second most important issue facing the office you are seeking? How will you address this issue? The Indian River Bridge fiasco is likely to cost taxpayers additional millions of dollars if the state is not insured against such incompetence. The Insurance Commissioner’s Office has to strengthen its oversight responsibilities in monitoring bonding companies’ contracts on state projects. It appears the contract with the bonding company failed to specify adequate foundation requirements for the footers and compression of the roadway materials. That has now cost the state an estimated $20 million to dismantle much of the completed road construction. Was the omission an error clause so loosely written that the state has no claim against the Bonding Company? These and other matters necessitate closer administrative oversight.

Gene Reed (D) Why are you interested in holding this office? There is no time for on-the-job training. I know firsthand that Delawareans need someone who will listen, take action and get results. Having served the citizens of Delaware with distinction and chairing numerous committees for the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, I want to take that experience, commitment and dedication of public service to the next level. The outcome of this election matters. It matters to me as a husband concerned with the overall insurance costs on the family budget and as a father of two teenage drivers. Delaware deserves an insurance commissioner who will fight for them. Why should voters elect you over your opponents? Delawareans need health insurance today. I am qualified to serve on day one. My 23 years of experience in the Delaware Insurance Department and distinguished public service record, by example of receiving the “Regulator of the Year” award from the National Securities and Insurance Licensing Association, uniquely puts me in the leadership position above the other candidates. As the director of Insurance Consumer Protection and Enforcement, I understand the complexities of our insurance issues. Over 30 elected officials in Delaware have endorsed me. They believe in my experience and integrity, knowing I will continue the progress made under Commissioner Matthew Denn. What do you feel is the top issue facing the office you are seeking? How will you address this issue? Our major concern is the inability of consumers to obtain health insurance. As Insurance Commissioner I will work to enact legislation to create a universal health care plan, making health care available and affordable to all Delawareans. Part of an approved health care system can and must focus upon preventative treatments. Chronic illness has also been an issue adversely affecting the cost and denial of health care for years. As your next Insurance Commissioner, I will work as a team with the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, legislators on both sides of the aisle, the Health Care Commission and the Chronic Illness Task Force on a comprehensive plan to lower costs and address these issues so that a viable universal health care system is accessible to all Delawareans. My mission as Delaware’s next Insurance Commissioner will be to immediately propose legislation to create a statewide health insurance purchasing pool. I will fight for legislation to allow the Department of Insurance to regulate health insurance rates, expand SCHIP regardless of family income, expand access to coverage for dependent children and young adults up to the age of 28, establish a Medicaid Buy-In Program, and reimbursement for mental health care services. What do you feel is the second most important issue facing the office you are seeking? How will you address this issue? There are many challenging issues that


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008 we will face, including the availability of homeowners insurance coverage. Homeowners coverage must also be more accessible in coastal areas. I would advocate to improve building structural codes for withstanding the effects of natural disasters. I would enforce laws concerning insurance companies canceling homeowners’ policies because of reasonable claims. I would expand outreach efforts to educate the public on flood insurance. This will attract and retain insurers for availability and affordability of homeowners insurance. We must continue our progress lowering workers compensation premiums for employers aimed to get injured workers back on the job.

Sussex Council District 2 Robert Reed (R) Why are you interested in holding this office? I am concerned about the lack of infrastructure, which has occurred in areas of our county where there has been a surge of growth. Now that new construction has slowed and the real estate market has significantly stalled, the Robert Reed county has had a budget deficit for the past two years. Now taxpayers are at risk for higher taxes. I do not want to see that happen at a time when families are struggling to purchase the necessities of life. I am running because of my experience in fiscal leadership and will work to trim spending and make common sense decisions. Why should voters elect you over your opponents? I have a proven record, with a commitment to community, serving as a leader in the US Air Force, as your former Sussex County Sheriff and as a current Chief of Police. As Sheriff, I gained a revenue surplus of a quarter of a million dollars, saving taxpayer dollars in my first six years. My commitment to community was demonstrated by starting many new programs for seniors and children at no cost to taxpayers. I participated in these programs, frequently on my own time, without compensation. As a Chief of Police, I have developed a new department while staying within budget. What do you feel is the top issue facing the office you are seeking? How will you address this issue? 1. Risk of high taxes. The budget needs to be balanced by reviewing all expense lines and finding creative ways to do more with less. 2. County’s Comprehensive Land Use Plan does not ensure balancing infrastructure as we grow and State leaders have not adapted their plan. I will work with other council members and state agencies to ensure we have a plan that as we grow, we balance infrastructure and look for the best technology for waste systems at the lowest cost. It is time for out-of-the-box thinking and planning. 3. Out of control spending. This is the time to say no to special interest projects and prioritize spending projects to avoid taxpayer burdens.

4. Lack of high paying jobs. I will seek budgetary allocation be made to the Economic Development Department so that they have the resources to recruit non-pollution markets to our industrial park areas with business commitment to hire our own people, instead of markets previously recruited, where business brought their own people from other states. Should Route 404 from the Maryland State Line to Route 1 at Lewes be dualized? Road construction is funded by the state, not the county. This is a better question for our state legislature. However, I think the entire county road system should be reviewed and road improvements should be prioritized based upon traffic accident data, road congestion and areas where critical repairs are needed. County Council needs to work closely with the state making sure we address priority issues in our county. What would you do to encourage quality job growth in Sussex County? I would seek to shift budget allocations to Economic Development so they have the funds to advertise and recruit new high paying job markets. We need a collaborate effort with our schools and the curriculum they offer, which center around the job markets we want to attract that fit our culture, environment and work force. Ensuring markets have the infrastructure in our industrial park areas will be paramount for our success. Since we are only two hours away from any major distribution center, we have many advantages for job markets to locate in our county. What can the county do to help provide quality housing for average wage earners? By removing so many restrictive ordinances so that residents do not have to endure government intrusive restrictions and financial burdens. Attracting higher paying job markets so our residents can afford better housing and a better standard of living in the county.

Robert William Ricker (R) Why are you interested in holding this office? I love Sussex County, and want to see her continue to be a strong rural/agricultural lifestyle. We need growth to sustain us but the growth must be well thought out and high quality projects must be required. I joined the George- Robert Ricker town Fire Company in February 1975 and have served as fire chief, deputy chief, assistant chief, vice-president and director, was Fireman of the Year in 2001 and president of the Sussex County Fire Chief’s Association. I served two terms as mayor of Georgetown, currently serving as vicemayor, and three years on the Planning Commission. I am past president of the Sussex County Association of Towns and was appointed in October 2002 by Governor Minner as State Fire Commissioner and serve as an instructor for the Delaware State Fire School. I am the owner of Baker’s True Value Hardware in Millsboro and Long Neck.

Why should voters elect you over your opponents? I have more Planning & Zoning experience than the other candidates, this coupled with 25 years business experience as a retail business owner, 10 years in Local government as Mayor, Planning & Zoning and Councilman, 6 years in State government as a State Fire Commissioner and finally 33 years in service to my community as a Volunteer Firefighter and Fire Chief makes me uniquely qualified for the position of County Council. Should Route 404 from the Maryland State Line to Route 1 at Lewes be dualized? NO. You can’t put 20 pounds of seed in a 10 pound bag. What would you do to encourage quality job growth in Sussex County? Actively seek out an Agriculture Research company to locate in Sussex County. Enhance our Economic Development Department. What can the county do to help provide quality housing for average wage earners? Bring in higher paying jobs and raise the standard of living, don’t drop the quality of housing, raise the standard of living.

Samuel R. Wilson (R) Why are you interested I holding this office? My family has lived in Sussex County for many generations and I want to maintain the quality of life for my children, grandchildren and the future generations. Why should voters elect you over your opponents? I am a strong proponent of property rights and do not want to see the rights given to us by our founding fathers taken away. Being a self employed businessman, farmer, I understand that government should be run like a business and the county government must operate within its means. I want to maintain the low county taxes for the residents and fight against any tax

PAGE 55 increases on their behalf. What do you feel is the top issue facing the office you are seeking? How will you address this issue? With the County operating at a projected deficit of close to $4 million this year, I feel meeting the county financial obligations will be the greatest challenge that this council will face. This can be addressed by doing a top to bottom review of all the County expenditures to identify areas where funds can be better utilized. With a fresh perspective coming on Council this will allow for new innovative ideas. Should Route 404 from the Maryland State Line to Route 1 at Lewes be dualized? No. Route 1 is already over congested in the busy season, this would only compound the problem. This is a problem that Delaware D.O.T. should have addressed long ago by adding turn lanes and acceleration and deceleration lanes instead of mismanaging and wasting hundreds of millions of dollars on studies by outside consultants and engineers. Dualizing Route 404 through Sussex County could have adverse affects on many residents of this district. It might not seem so until it is coming through your home. I do not feel the residents of Sussex County should be displaced and encumbered to get out-of-staters to the beaches five minutes sooner. What would you do to encourage quality job growth in Sussex County? I would make Sussex County more business friendly by providing tax incentives to businesses to bring good paying jobs to the County. What can the county do to help provide quality housing for average wage earners? Attract good paying jobs to the County to give people the opportunity to be able to afford quality housing and continue to keep the tax rates low.

Vote Tuesday September 9

We encourage readers to take time to learn all they can about the candidates and to vote on Tuesday, September 9.


PAGE 56

MORNING STAR â&#x20AC;˘ SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

Snapshots

TOPS IN HER CLASS - Megan Elizabeth Kiser was the valedictorian in the Seaford Christian Academy class of 2008. She is the daughter of Dave and Debbie Kiser of Laurel. Megan will be attending Delaware Technical Community College in the fall.

LONG-TIME BREAKFAST BUDDIES - Pictured are some of the members of the Thursday morning breakfast club at the Laurel Dutch Inn. Many of the group have been attending for more than 30 years. Back, from left: Louise Warrington, Connie Whaley, Flaudine Otwell, Eleanor Henry, Chuck Swift and Irene Outten. Seated: Cindy Swift, Carolyn Brittingham, Anne Lee and her granddaughter Taylor Lowe, Mollie Collins, Annabelle Cordrey, Betty Elliott and Helen Mae Bennett. See details in Around the Town, page 25. Photo by Pat Murphy.

ALL ARE UNIFORM - Above, Seth Benson and Doug Causey are shown in their uniforms as they make their way to Delmar Senior High School on Tuesday. The school instituted a school uniform policy which started this school year. Below, Melanie Twilley, Tyler Thompson and Kevin Forse wear their uniforms. Photos by Mike McClure

WATERMELON FOR MDA - This mammoth watermelon, grown by Laurel farmer Jeff Gordy, is on display at Movie Gallery in the Food Lion Shopping Center, Laurel, where Gordyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wife, Marie, is manager. A guess the weight contest benefits the Muscular Dystrophy Association. With the melon are Movie Gallery assistant-manager Ashley Workman, left, and Marie Gordy. Photo by Tony Windsor R E T I R I N G TEACHER - At the Tuesday, Aug. 19, meeting of the Delmar School Board, officials recognized agriculture teacher Garland Hayward, who is retiring from teaching this year. From left: principal Cathy Townsend, board president Joanne Gum, Hayward, superintendent David Ring and assistant superintendent Charity Phillips. Photo by Daniel Richardson


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

PAGE 57

Doing the Towns Together Politicians’ claims irrelevant in wake of storms, high gas prices

LAUREL AND DELMAR SOCIALS SARAH MARIE TRIVITS • 875-3672 Karla and Luis Gomez, with daughters, Nikki and Sami, from Indianapolis, Ind., spent an enjoyable two- and a-half-week summer vacation here with Karla’s parents, Janet and Derby Walker. They took trips to the beach and visited Sesame Street and, of course, the Sharptown Carnival. Recently the Walkers had another visitor, Carsten Stybalkowski, who graduated as an AFS exchange student from Laurel High School in 1990. The year he was here he lived with the Walkers and the Richard Smith family. Returning this summer, he brought his wife and two children to renew memories of those times here. While here they spent some time at a cottage in Oak Orchard, enjoying the sun and sea breezes. Golda and Harry Williamson have recently returned from a trip west to Oklahoma where they attended Golda’s Sellars family reunion. They then visited her father, Vernon, and his wife, Jo, in Texarcana, Texas. They came home by way of Branson, Mo., to soak in some of that town’s famous music. In total, they traveled about 3,900 miles and Golda had the wheel all the way out and back again. Take note! Class of ‘52 members, you will meet for lunch at the Georgia House, noon, Sept. 10. Don’t forget — it’s a date! The Basket Bingo party on Aug. 25, sponsored by the Laurel Historical Society, was a huge success. The fire hall was full of avid players and refreshment tables were full of fruits, cheeses and delicious desserts. The society expresses deep and sincere appreciation to those who played, donated, or contributed in any way. On Aug. 26, at the Georgia House, the annual luncheon was held for the past presidents of the Laurel New Century Club. Those attending were: Ruth Hickman, Anne Tracey, Addie Haddock, Eleanor Paradee, Juanita Stone and Dianne Thompson. Those unable to attend were: Sharron Shulder, June Benson Powell and Lillian Wootten. Adrian Selby LeBlanc and daughter, Jayden, spent three weeks in the area. They divided their time between in-laws in Pennsylvania and immediate family in Dover and Sussex County. Adrian’s oldest daughter, Miranda, resides in Dover and teaches in Bear. Adrian is an elementary teacher in Anchorage, Alaska. Her husband, Roger, begins at a different school this fall as principal. He still has a position with the Air Force. Adrian will be remembered as a graduate from the Laurel High School. She later taught home economics until she married and moved to Anchorage in 1982. She is the daughter of Cora Norwood Selby and the late Paul M. Selby Sr. Steven Meade and Matthew Trivits left last Sunday to spend the coming school year in N. Troy, Vt. They will live with Matt’s aunt and uncle, Anne and Irving

Fellows. The boys are eagerly anticipating snow boarding and skiing, plan to visit relatives in Cape Cod and, since the Fellows live only three miles from the Canadian border, they will have numerous trips into that area. They have passports in hand and “just can’t wait.” Their families hosted the two at a farewell dinner, on Aug. 27, at the Imperial Gallery in Salisbury. Use your math to figure out the age of this trio of birthday celebrants in Delmar — Lisa Conley, Aug. 24, Beth Pope, Sept. 4, and Carol Porter, Sept. 16. Now if I tell you that they all were born in ‘58, could you figure it out? Clifford and Phyllis Beach of Delmar recently entertained their three grandchildren, Peyton, Gabby and Cambell, from Graysonville, Md. We express our deepest sympathy to the family and friends of: Amy H. Windsor, Vivian Shute Lombardo, Mary Virginia Truitt and Niyam A. Mano. We continue with prayers for all of our servicemen and servicewomen and for our friends who are ill: Rosalie Mutchler, June Williams, Patrick Starr, Ted Clark, Eliza Davis, Philip Lowe, David Phillips, Martha Windsor, Harriett MacVeigh, LeRoy Messick, Robert D. Whaley, Herman Cubbage, Hattie Puckham, Donald Layton Sr., Pete Henry, Alvin Lutz and Steve Trivits. Get well wishes from their Delmar friends are sent to: Lib Figgs, Louise Foxwell, Gloria Adkins, Joyce Lord, Bob Christian, Darryl Haggar and Bob Horn. A very special happy birthday wish with love, from Donna Cecil, to grandson Ethan Elliott as he celebrates five big years on Sept. 5. Happy September birthday wishes to: Denise Frye on Sept. 5; Mattie Duncan, Sept. 6; Jean Conaway and Etta Morris, Sept. 7; Charles Gordy, Sept. 9; Edward Dubinski and Nola Hearn, Sept. 10; Anna Hall and Barbara Simon, Sept. 11. “Be happy. It’s one way of being wise.” See you in the Stars.

Kathryn’s FLOWERS

This has been a summer of high gasoline prices. Anyone who drives any type of vehicle fully understands that even filling the gas tank to the half-full mark means emptying one’s wallet. The high dollar gasoline has meant that lots of folks could not afford a trip to some of the most interesting places in our nation this past summer. Places very close to home but places that play an important role in our daily life. Between the high prices of gasoline, increasing costs of electricity and the unbelievable soaring prices of food, Mr. Average Citizen has definitely not had a good summer. In the past few weeks the price of gasoline has begun to drop, a fact that made all of us happy. But, now the heavy hurricane season is upon us and the threat of these severe storms approaching our shores has made for increased pressure as oil rigs out in the ocean are hard hit by the fierce winds, bringing increased pressure to the mainland areas in the path of the storm. People in some areas who have only just begun to live a somewhat decent life once again after months of shelter living are now faced with going through the same frustrating and heartbreaking days once again. These poor souls could not care less who is running for president or vice president of our nation in the upcoming elections. Those who survived the hurricane damage in New Orleans and other places suffering severe damages are not the least bit concerned about whether the candidates for the top offices in our nation are male or female, black or white, protestant or Catholic, or graduated from a community college or one of the top 10 universities in the country. Those who are just beginning to enjoy a bit of a decent life are not the least bit interested in reading about or listening to someone blow their own horn as they tell us how important they have been in a candidate’s life, all the while inflating their own super ego. Those who still live in shelters after witnessing their homes being totally destroyed by winds, rain and flooding face daily living conditions most of us cannot

875- 2055

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

Opinion Editorial What to do when it is either ‘pay the utility bills or eat’ According to the “Hunger in America” report researched by “Feeding America,” formerly known as “America’s Second Harvest,” there are an estimated 90,000 people in the state of Delaware who are at risk of hunger each year. In the latest statistics identifying the clients served annually through the efforts of such food-based charity groups as Food Bank of Delaware, of these 90,000 people, 29 percent or over 26,000 are children, eight percent, or over 7,000 recipients of help are elderly and five percent or about 4,500 are homeless. With the start of a new school year, it is important to recognize that along with providing our children with academic development, our schools also address the nutritional needs of our children. Each year about 85,000 children in public schools participate in the federal National School Lunch Program and over 27,000 take advantage of the School Breakfast Program. About 60,000 of the children participating in the lunch and breakfast receive the meals at free or reduced pricing. During the summer months, when schools traditionally close, the need for helping to fill the void and assure that children still have access to nutritious meals is paramount. Area community-based groups like Boys & Girls Clubs of Delaware, which has program sites throughout the state, including Seaford, Laurel, Greenwood, Georgetown, Millsboro, Dagsboro, Selbyville and Milford, join with the Delaware Department of Education to help feed young people. According to the Department of Education, sponsors located at over 230 sites feed an average of almost 9,000 children each day in Delaware through the Summer Food Service program. Contracted vendors including Food Bank of Delaware and Aramark Food Services make the daily deliveries. In the case of Boys & Girls Clubs of Delaware, last year alone, each day over 1,000 children received free lunches and afternoon snacks for a combined three-month total of about 148,000 meals provided through the Summer Food Service Program. It is important to consider that agencies including Food Bank of Delaware and local food closets, dedicate their services to help feed those in need. Hunger and what is known as the “food insecurity rate” is an issue that needs to be promoted and awareness made available. It is tragic to realize that according to “Hunger in America” data, 41 percent of the estimated 90,000 people in Delaware who receive food and other charity assistance, are forced to choose between food and paying the household utilities. We encourage everyone to support in whatever way possible, our local food closets and other charity organizations who have committed their resources to provide for those who have to make these unfortunate and tragic life decisions.

Morning Star Publications Inc. P.O. Box 1000 • 628 West Stein Highway Seaford, DE 19973 629-9788 • 629-9243 (fax) editor@mspublications.com

Please pardon our (temporary) messes Last week the Fall Sports Preview forced RYANT ICHARDSON us to arrange the Stars a little differently. This The responses to the week the Primary Election has resulted Star’s ‘Issues and Anin the same. swers’ were good with I had estimated four pages were only one candidate failenough for the Primaing to respond. ry Election “Issues & Answers,” but needed six pages instead. That’s why you see only one candidate failing to reFrank Calio’s column on this page. spond. The candidates were called And that’s why the columns for and emailed and most responded the Tony Windsor and Todd Crofford first time. are missing, but for this week only. Unfortunately, some of the canCalio’s comments on the Primary didates did not follow the instrucElection obviously could not wait tions and limit their responses to a until next week. The responses to the Star’s “Iscertain number of words. In one sues and Answers” were good with case, when I asked for 200 words, I

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got 861 instead. I labored over cutting down the words while keeping the key points. Every effort was made to be fair to all candidates. The responses appear in the order they were received. First come, first served. Take time to read the candidates’ responses. Some of the answers surprised me. One on the issue of offshore drilling was quite a surprise. Next week all will return to normal in the Stars. We will catch up on our Letters to the Editor, which can back up when you devote six pages to the Issues and Answers. The Final Word feature also has a backlog of good material. Don’t be discouraged if your letter or Final Word comment isn’t in this week. We’ll give extra space for comments next week.

September 9 is important day for voters Tuesday, September 9, is an important RANK ALIO day in Delaware for registered Democrats Lee's hoping the race and Republicans: it's Primary Day and a chance for those regis- between the two tered voters to choose Democrats will be close their candidate for enough to cause a split Governor and other statewide and local in the party. races where there is more than one candidate vying for an ofThomas J. Capano, and Mike Profice. tack, an airline pilot. Many are saying the winner for The Republicans, because of the the Democrat race for governor will popularity of the two Democratic be the next governor citing the candidates, had problems filling the weakness of the Republican ticket top spot on their ticket until they firegardless of the outcome of the nally drafted Lee. Republican race for governor. Former drug store magnet Alan The Democrats have two well Levine was the Republican front known candidates, both young and runner and would have made a very aggressive with a wide range of formidable candidate, but bailed at proposed new programs: John Carthe last minute. Several other ney who has served two terms as names were mentioned, but also Governor Ruth Ann Minner’s Lt. bailed. Governor, and Jack Markell, who is Protack, who has sought office in his third term as State Treasurer. before, has never been a favorite of The Republicans have highly rethe Republican organization, more spected and as well known former so known as a thorn and spoiler beDelaware Superior Court Judge Bill cause of the number of primaries he Lee, best known as the presiding has been in challenging the party judge in the 1998 murder trial of

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President Bryant L. Richardson

Editor Daniel Wright Richardson

Vice President Pat Murphy

Managing Editor Mike McClure

Secretary Tina Reaser

Editorial Lynn Parks Tony Windsor Cathy Shufelt Frank Calio

Donna Huston Carol Kinsley James Diehl Elaine Schneider Kay Wennberg Ann Wilmer

favorites. Lee served from 1973-77 as Sussex County chairman for his party, the same time I served as chairman for the Democrats. We struck up a friendship that has lasted to this day. We reminisced over those good days recently at a local business function in Laurel. Shortly after his stint as chairman, Governor Tribbitt appointed him to his judicial post in Family Court. He resigned that position in 1999 to seek the Republican nomination for governor, in a bitter contest with John Burris, who was anointed by party leaders, upsetting the party faithful enough that Lee almost pulled an upset losing the primary by fewer than 50 votes. Gaining his party's nomination in 2004 Lee was a heavy underdog against incumbent Ruth Ann Minner by as much as 30 points, but because of problems in the state's prison system he was able to run a very competitive campaign, but lost in a very close race. He's hoping the race between the two Democrats will be close enough to cause a split in the party, hoping that split would cause DemContinued to page 59

Circulation Karen Cherrix Sales George Beauchamp Rick Cullen Emily Rantz Laura Rogers Doris Shenton Jimmy McWilliams

Composition Cassie Richardson Subscriptions - $19 a year in-county, $24 a year in Treasurer Rita Brex Kent and New Castle, Del., and Federalsburg, SharpCarol Wright Richardson Carol James town and Delmar, Md.; $29 elsewhere out of state. Publishers of the Seaford Star and Laurel Star community newspapers, (Salisbury, Md.) Business Journal and the Morning Star Business Report


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 4 - 10, 2008

PAGE 59

Madonna’s moral code and a different perspective Madonna’s moral code, Part II

This isn’t the first time Madonna has compared world leaders that are more conservative than she is (which is almost everyone) to deplorable people. To kick off her world tour in 2006 Madonna displayed pictures of George W. Bush and Tony Blair next to both Hitler and Osama bin Laden. For added flair, she decided it would be fun to enter the stage mounted on a crucifix. I’m sure she thought that wouldn’t offend anyone. Madonna and her publicist argued that the crucifixion was used as a metaphor to make a point about the way celebs are treated in the media.

Frank Calio Continued from page 58

ocrats to stay home election day or jump on his band wagon. Carney has served as Deputy Chief Administrative Officer of New Castle County and Deputy Chief of Staff for Governor Tom Carper, and later Delaware’s State Secretary of Finance. He has long been an advocate for wellness issues in the state, sponsoring “Be Healthy Delaware” and “The Lt. Governor’s Challenge” to encourage Delawareans to be more active. Markell served as vice president for Corporate Development at Nextel, where he was responsible for coming up with the name “Nextel,” and helping to lead the movement to wireless technology as well as working in a senior management position with Comcast Corporation and as a banker at First Chicago Corporation. He was first elected State Treasurer of Delaware in 1998. There are other statewide races: for the Democrats, Insurance Commissioner, and U.S. Congress and some local races. No other statewide races for the Republicans. Polls open from 7 a.m till 8 p.m. Primaries usually have a small turnout (about 25% of the eligible voters), but expect a larger turnout for Democrats because of the governor’s race.

Ewing supports Ricker candidacy

It is with great pleasure and tremendous pride I write this endorsement of Bob Ricker for County Council. As an elected official I have seen Bob Ricker firsthand in Legislative Hall working diligently for his constituents, the people of Georgetown. He stays on top of the many legislative issues that arise each year and handles himself as a true statesman. I also have witnessed Bob working in Legislative Hall as a State Fire Commissioner representing all the people of Delaware by initiating legislation to protect the health and safety of all Delawareans. His experience in Dover has gained him the respect and admiration of me and many of my colleagues up and down the state. I urge all the citizens of the 2nd Councilmanic District to vote for a man who stands up for his principles and fights for what is right and fair. I wholeheartedly support Bob Ricker for County Council. State Rep. Ben Ewing

Bridgeville

Final Word If that’s the way people in the spotlight show their frustration of being unfairly characterized by the media, I’m pretty sure George W. Bush, Karl Rove and Dick Cheney should have been nailed to a cross for the last eight years. I could have been persuaded that she was using the crucifixion performance as a metaphor if she hadn’t said afterwards, “Crucifixes are sexy because there’s a naked man (Jesus) on them.” She lost me there. I think the more interesting part of this story is the side left uncovered by the media. Everyone is talking about John McCain being compared to Hitler while no one is discussing the utter absurdity that Barack Obama was compared to Ghandi. Just as John McCain has not murdered six million people, Barack Obama has not dedicated his life, at the expense of his own happiness, comfort and pleasure, to securing peace and civil rights for millions of people that have no voice of their own. I am going to go out on a limb and say that Barack Obama is not willing to live in third world conditions to secure peace in Iraq. Madonna can say whatever she wants because she is Madonna and because she is a liberal. If Tom Selleck, one of the few conservatives in Hollywood, compared Barack Obama to a psychopathic dictator, he would be black listed and he would never find work in show business again. Sure, he could still do infomercials for NRA membership, but I’m sure his movie/TV career would be on permanent hiatus. I guess what really makes me angry is that, in today’s media, liberals can say whatever they want regardless of its validity or foundation in reality. Not only are liberals celebrated as enlightened, they are touted as crusaders for free speech. It is not enlightened to compare the President of the United States or a U.S. Senator with Adolf Hitler. Sure, it’s allowed under the Constitution, but it isn’t accurate, it isn’t necessary and it isn’t beneficial to anyone. If I wasn’t so disgusted by him, I would feel sorry for Barack Obama. I’m sure he doesn’t want Madonna as his head cheerleader any more than I want Dr. Kevorkian as my primary care physician. Laura Rogers Star Staff

Madonna’s tour video perspective

First I must correct Laura Rogers: “Get Stupid” is not one of Madonna’s latest songs. Those words are, however, a portion of the lyrics to one of her latest songs titled “Give It 2 Me.” The Video Montage This video is really nothing new. It’s just that the media decided to bring it to

your attention (which, by the way, is probably exactly what Madonna wants). It is nothing new because on her last tour, in 2006, she showed a similar video montage with images of George W. Bush along with Condoleeza Rice, Richard Nixon, Saddam Hussein, Osama bin Laden, Adolf Hitler, war, global warming, and world hunger, among others, while a song containing these lyrics was played: “I’ve listened to your lies and all your stories and I can’t take it anymore, don’t say you’re sorry, don’t say forgive me, don’t talk, don’t speak.” The song was a recording and during this video Madonna herself was not even on the stage (it was during a costume change) and she did not speak to the audience about her personal political views. The point of the video was to wake people up, provoke thought and allow them to draw their own conclusions. It is my assumption that the video montage portion of her show on the current tour serves the same purpose. I am able to come to this conclusion because I attended a show on her 2006 tour and I will be attending a show on her current tour. The Morals Madonna may be provocative and controversial, but that does not mean she is immoral or does not have a firm grip on reality. I think many, many people worldwide could take a few lessons from

Madonna and here is why: Madonna is a woman with extreme discipline, who has never had a problem with drugs or alcohol. She is a woman who embraces, supports and stands up for the gay community. She is a woman who advocates safe sex practices. She is a woman who brings awareness to HIV/AIDS. She is a woman who donated proceeds from her 2001 tour to the families and victims of September 11. She is a woman who saved a child’s life by adopting him from Malawi (yet for some reason was crucified in the media for doing so). She is a woman who is saving many other children’s lives in Malawi with her foundation named Raising Malawi. She is a mother who does not allow her children to regularly watch television. Madonna is one of the most famous women in the world and because she is intelligent, she uses her fame and money to do much good. Rachel Cherrix Seaford

Send us your ‘Final Words’

If you have a pet peeve or word of encouragement you can express in a few words, email the item to us at editor@mspublications.com or mail it to Star, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973. Sign it and include your hometown and a daytime phone number.


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