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MORNING STAR

Business Report

AUGUST 2018

COMPLIMENTARY

YOUNG PROFESSIONALS & SPOTLIGHT ON DOVER


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By Mike McClure

Young professionals help provide a fresh perspective to a company as well as offer hope for continuing its legacy. This month we feature some young professional profiles as well Dover business profile stories. Exit Central Realty services all three counties in Delaware from its offices, including the Dover location. The city of Dover itself has a rich history and is culturally diverse. It is also home to NASCAR racing, the Firefly Festival, the Dover Air Force base, and much more. Check out the photo of a look down Loockerman Street in Dover (on the right). Atlantic Finance and Pawn, with a location in Dover, provides financial services that financial institutions such as banks are unable to provide. In addition to our Dover spotlight, this month’s Business Report offered some local young profes-

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sionals a chance to be spotlighted. Check out the profiles of these young professionals from the John Rowley team and Lyons Companies. McClure The September edition will feature the theme At Your Service. Think about all of the services that we do not have time to do ourselves, so we hire someone else to do them, at least I do. If you have such a business, this is the perfect opportunity to toot your horn and attract some new customers. We continue our town/city spotlights with a look at Georgetown businesses. If you have a Georgetown business, what are you waiting for? Give us a call and see how we can help you with an article and an ad.

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Pictured from top to bottom, from left: Steven Kreimendahl, Travel to Blank; John Noonan, USS Witek Reunion Group; Karen Hardeman, Julian Tours; Linda Barrett, Viva Tysons Magazine; Greg Gude, Julian Tours; Jason Morrison, Fed_Comm International; Karen Cossar, Caerus; Barbara Curran, Chic Luxuries; Sandi Schmidt, Naval Reserve Recruiters Association; Terry Schmidt, Naval Reserve Recruiters Association; Natalie Dixon, A Turtle’s Life For Me; Fadra Nally, All Things Fadra; Jeffrey Banks, Phi Beta Sigma; Mikkel Mihlrad, Sometimes Home; Shirley Noonan, USS Witek Reunion Group; Danielle Jonigan, Kent County Tourism Corporation; John Doerfler, Kent County Tourism Corporation.

AUGUST 2018 CALENDAR August 1 - 12 Noon - Economic Development Luncheon to be held at Georgetown Wesleyan Church. Guest speaker Amy Wood, CEO of Sun Behavioral Health Delaware. Lunch is complimentary. August 15- 4:30 - 6:00 PM - Chamber Mixer - at the CHEER Community Center. August 22 - 12 Noon: Monthly Membership Luncheon, held at CHEER Community Center in Georgetown with guest speaker James DeChene, Senior Vice President of Government Relations for the Delaware State Chamber of Commerce. $15 per person. RSVP’s are preferred. Call the chamber office.

Call Us If You Want to Grow Your Business

302-856-1544 302-856-1577 Fax 827 East Market St.,

P.O. Box 1, Georgetown, DE 19947

info@georgetowncoc.com www.georgetowncoc.com

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Kent County Tourism Corporation hosted a travel familiarization (FAM) tour of Delaware’s Quaint Villages recently. The touring group involved travel writers and professional group tour planners from all over the MidAtlantic and as far as Illinois, Boston and North Carolina. The three-day FAM Tour kicked off with an opening reception at Dover Downs Hotel & Casino with track tours of the Dover International Speedway. On the second day, the group spent the day visiting Delaware’s Quaint Villages’ museums such as Air Mobility Command Museum, Johnson Victrola Museum, Harrington’s Railroad Museum, and Historic Belmont Hall to name a few. One of the highlights from the tour involved a one-of-kind farm to table dinner experience with samples of Delaware’s cuisines using locally fresh ingredients prepared by Chef Ludovic from La Baguette Bakery at Fifer Orchards. The tour wrapped up in the Village of Milford with a special welcome from Milford’s City Manager, Eric Norenberg where the group took in boutique shops and kayaked along the Mispillion River. Many local tourism businesses Dover Downs Hotel & Casino, First State Heritage Park, Home2 Suites, Hilton Garden Inn, Holiday Inn Dover Downtown and Hampton Inn - partnered with the CVB to provide lunches and accommodations for the tour. FAM Tours are one of the many marketing tools that Kent County Tourism uses to sell the destination to potential visitors with the ultimate goal to increase tour bus business into the area.


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September Theme: Young Professionals and Dover area business profiles

Features 4 - Tourism 6 - Business Digest 8 - Personnel 10 - Health 18 - Financial Column 22 - Business Licenses 24 - Marketing Column 26 - Business Directory

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SOUTHERN DELAWARE TOURISM BOARD- hown l o a o h n lawa o i m c iv i c o co homa o going oa chai on ani a o o lo an incoming chai n amin a . mo on ag .

an a n lan ic inanc awn in. ho o www. i i ho og a h .

12 - Exit Realty 13 - City of Dover 16 - The John Rowley Team 17 - Lyons Companies

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BUSINESS DIGEST Tidemark FCU welcomes members

Tidemark Federal Credit Union welcomed over 900 members from the Milford Memorial Federal Credit Union following a merger between the two credit unions which was successfully completed on July 1. Milford Memorial Federal Credit Union opened in 1969 and has been serving its members from the Milford Memorial Hospital, in Milford, for almost 50 years. The merger with Tidemark Federal Credit Union will result in combined assets of over $265 million.

Morris James opens new office

Morris James LLP is pleased to announce the relocation of its two Rehoboth Beach offices to a newly designed office space at 19339 Coastal Hwy., Rehoboth Beach, in the Lingo Building. The firm renovated the new 4,000 square foot space to include six offices, enhanced staff facilities and two large conference centers. According to managing partner Keith Donovan, “This is the right time for us to relocate due to the rapid growth of our services in Sussex County. In addition to offering a more modern and efficient office for our full-time Rehoboth Beach attorneys and staff, the new space will allow attorneys located in Georgetown, Dover, Newark and Wilmington to meet and better serve clients in Sussex County.” The office offers a comprehensive range of legal services.

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Readers are invited to send any news that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to mmcclure@mspublications. com.

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RIBBON CUTTING h ham o omm c o a il o n a iv ha l o l i o il o a o chi am ll i l chanic i n a wan i an a ingh ic i n ohan ingh n al anag ani l an i n an amil h l a i on c ing c n l o i l chanic loca a il o a ing on w . il o . i h ini ial o . an . ingh h chil n c hi o h an ian. ic om l on ow . an wi h chil n oo l n an vo ani l an g n al manag ohan ingh vic i n a wan i an a ingh i n i o il o a o am ll n a iv ha l o l v al i n an amil m m .


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Dover International Speedway is named Large Employer of the Year. Roma Italian Restaurant/Sul Tempo Cocktail Lounge is named Small Business of the Year.

More than 250 Central Delaware Chamber of Commerce members and their guests attended the CDCC’s Annual Awards for Excellence Dinner, hosted at Dover Downs Hotel and Casino® recently. Winners are: Small Business of the Year - Roma Italian Restaurant/Sul Tempo Cocktail Lounge Large Employer of the Year - Dover International Speedway Young Professional of the Year Danielle Hufford, ShureLine Electrical marketing director Nominees for each category included: Small Business of the Year: CNU Fit, LLC; R&R Commercial Realty; Roma Italian Restaurant/Sul Tempo Cocktail Lounge; Large Employer of the Year: Caesar

Connell, Carey and Associates – Merrill Lynch Dover; Danielle Hufford, ShureLine Electrical; Robert Jones, Bright Side Roofing and Siding.

Rodney School District; Del-One Federal Credit Union; Dover International Speedway; Young Professional of the Year: Nicholas Alexander,

Danielle Hufford of ShureLine Electrical is named Young Professional of the Year.

EQUAL HOUSING

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PERSONNEL FILE Becker Morgan welcomes staff

Becker Morgan Group welcomes two new staff members to support increased project demands and add to a growing staff. Harlan Elliott Jr. joins the Becker Morgan team with 17 years of experience as a strucElliott tural designer. Harlan holds an associates degree of applied science in architectural engineering from Delaware Technical Community College in addition to a bachelor of science in computer networks and security from the University of Maryland University King College. James (Jim) King Jr. joins Becker Morgan Group in the Dover office as a survey technician. Jim is a retired veteran of the Pennsylvania Army National Guard and the Delaware Air National Guard where he was a combat engineer and transportation specialist before becoming a C-130 pilot. He recently completed his associates degree in surveying and geomatics engineering technology from Delaware Technical Community College.

Galdi joins Beebe practice

Beebe Healthcare and Beebe Medical Group are proud to welcome OB/GYN Luisa Galdi, DO, to its Women’s Health - Plantations practice in Rehoboth Beach. The all-female practice now includes six OB/GYNs and one certified nurse midwife. Dr. Galdi received her doctor of osteopathic medicine from Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in

Philadelphia. She completed her residency in obstetrics and gynecology at Reading Hospital in West Reading. She will also see patients at Beebe’s Georgetown location.

Galdi

Baron named CFO

Del-One Federal Credit Union welcomes Ronald E. Baron as chief financial officer. Prior to joining Del-One, Baron served as senior vice president and chief financial officer for Azura Credit Union in Topeka, Kan. Previous experience also includes chief financial officer for two publiclytraded community banks in Virginia; senior vice president and treasurer at Benjamin Franklin Bancorp, Inc. in Franklin, Mass.; financial management positions at Bay Loan and Investment Bank and Bank of New England-Old Colony, N.A.; and as a credit officer for the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Baron and his wife Beth reside in Dover.

Hospice welcomes new hires

Delaware Hospice is pleased to announce the addition of the following individuals to its staff: Elaine F. Abbott, BSN, RN; Maria Armsheimer, CNA; Theresa Baer, RN, CMSRN; Nichole Barnett-Baker, RN; Shirlronia Batista, RN; Aimy Nicole Bogan, CNA; Karen Cessna, RN; Anna Cohee, RN; Katrina Cooper, BSN; April Dillon, ADN; Bernette Dorremie, CNA; Ashley Groff, CNA; Chris Henion, RN; Kimberly Klingman, payroll administrator; Kelly Longo, RN; Robin Luco, RN; Roseann

Millins, RN; Melissa Parker, CNA; Virginia Serrano, RN, case manager; Elizabeth L. Scheer, MSW, New Hope counselor; Amber Skeen, RN; Shawn Marie Simpson, CNA; Jakeysia Snead, CNA; Amy Swain, RN; Jena Wilkins, RN-ADN, case manager; Dawn Baker Young, CNA.

Nanticoke welcomes new staff

The Nanticoke Physician Network is proud to welcome Dana Baker, APRN, and Rachael Daniel, APRN, to its Nanticoke Immediate Care staff. Daniel Baker received her bachelor of science in nursing from Wilmington University in Newark, and her master of science in nursing from the University of Delaware in Newark. She is a certified Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) and has prior professional experience as an APRN and nurse in several medical facilities and a hospice facility. Her professional affiliations include the American Association of Nurse Practitioners and Sigma Theta Tau International. Daniel received her bachelor of science in nursing from Salisbury University in Salisbury, Md., and her master of science in nursing from Chamberlain College of Nursing in Downers Grove, Ill. She is a certified family nurse practitioner and has prior professional experience as a family nurse practitioner at a primary care facility, and ER and PACU nursing experience at various hospitals. Her professional affiliations include the American Association of Nurse Practitioners and the International Nurses Association.

Gardner named director Mon.-Sat. 9 am - 9 pm • Sunday 10 am - 6 pm

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Nanticoke Health Services is proud to announce that Rachel Gardner, RN, BSN, has been promoted to director of Cancer Care Services. Gardner has been an employee with Nanticoke Health Services for the past 35 years. During her time at Nanticoke, she has touched almost every nursing area throughout the organization either providing direct care or leadership. She has served in multiple disciplines including


charge nurse, mentor, manager, and director. Gardner received her associate’s degree in nursing from Delaware Technical Community College in 1982 and her bachelor of science in nursing from Chamberlain School of Nursing in 2015. She is a member Gardner of numerous infection prevention, quality and safety committees within the organization. Among these several committees, she has served as chair of the hospital’s fall and clinical alarms committees and is an active member of the leadership coordinating committee.

Ricca named chief lending officer

John Ricca has joined Del One Federal Credit Union as chief lending officer. John brings more than 30 years of experience, having served in senior management positions at Sovereign Bank, a 600 branch super-regional bank, Freedom Mortgage, a top five national mortgage company, as well as a number of community banks.

(NPN) leadership team and interacting with senior leadership at the hospital. He will also supervise all NPN employed physicians and advanced practice clinicians while maintaining a relationship with the hospital’s medical staff. Anthony Dr. Anthony received his doctor of medicine from the Stony Brook University School of Medicine in Stony Brook, N.Y., and completed his residency at South Nassau Communities Hospital in Oceanside, N.Y. He has practiced family medicine for 21 years and sees patients at Nanticoke Primary Care in Georgetown. Dr. Anthony serves on the eBright Health ACO Board of Directors and has previously served as medical director of the Nanticoke Physician Network. He played a crucial role as clinical lead for Nanticoke’s new Electronic Medical Record (EMR) and is a member of the American Association of Family Practitioners.

Milford location. Sylvester joins Shore United Bank with over 30 years of banking experience in the community and a bachelor’s degree in banking and finance from Wilmington University. She resides in Houston with her daughter, Emily and her son, Conor.

Tunnell named board member

Easterseals Delaware & Maryland’s Eastern Shore recently welcomed Mindi Moore Tunnell, of Lewes, to its board of directors. Tunnell is an attorney with Tunnell & Raysor, P.A. focusing on real estate settlements and land use matters. She also serves on the Beebe Medical Foundation board of directors. She received her bachelor’s degree in English from Salisbury University and her law degree from Widener University School of Law.

Anthony named chief medical officer

Nanticoke Health Services is proud to announce that Harry C. Anthony Jr., MD, has been named chief medical officer at Nanticoke. In this role, Dr. Anthony will be responsible for heading the Nanticoke Physician Network

Clowser receives promotion

County Bank is pleased to announce that Pamela S. Clowser has been promoted to assistant vice president and branch manager of their Georgetown branch location. “Pam started with County Bank 14 Clowser years ago. She is well known to our clients for her exceptional customer service,” said Tarrie Miller, senior vice president retail banking of County Bank. Clowser’s financial experience began 30 years ago with Baltimore Trust and Mercantile Peninsula Bank. A lifelong resident of Sussex County, she grew up in Millsboro and attended Sussex Central High School.

Sylvester named manager

Kelly Sylvester has joined Shore United Bank as branch manager of its

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Beebe receives AHA award

Beebe Healthcare has received the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines® – Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award. The award recognizes Beebe’s commitment to ensuring stroke patients receive the most appropriate treatment according to nationally recognized, research-based guidelines based on the latest scientific evidence. Beebe earned this award by meeting specific quality achievement measures for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke patients at a set level for a designated period. These measures include evaluation of the proper use of medications and other stroke treatments aligned with the most up-to-date, evidence-based guidelines with the goal of speeding recovery and reducing death and disability for stroke patients. Before discharge, patients should also receive education on managing their health and schedule a follow-up visit, as well as other care transition measures.

FOUNDATION DONATION al hca am m m ho a a how al an o ical o n a ion. n ai ical o n a ion go o vic ovi al hca . ic om l li o i n ical o n a ion i iggin al hca a ol on iao i i n al hca o an iao om o ac vic i n o v lo m n ical o n a ion an hi l manag iao vic . ai o

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Attorneys at Law

John A. Sergovic, Jr. Shannon Carmean Burton David J. Weidman Deirdre A. McCartney Shannon R. Owens Elizabeth L. Soucek Rachel Bleshman Harold W.T. Purnell, II George B. Smith, of Counsel Real Estate / Civil Litigation / Family Law / Wills & Estates / Probate / Guardianships Construction Litigation / Land Use Regulation / Zoning / Business Law & Formation Commercial & Residential / Landlord/Tenant

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BEEBE USES WATCHMAN DEVICE o h a wo a m l i i ci lina am which incl in v n ional ca iolog l c o h iolog an ca i olog h ician an ca ovi ha n wo ing o c a il an ain on h vic v lo o on ci n i ic. h i im lan o h ial n ag lo wa cc l in la a . h vic i an al na iv o h li long o wa a in o o l wi h ial i illa ion no ca a h a valv o l m al o nown a non valv la . h vic ha n im lan in mo han a i n wo l wi an i on in a on im oc . a man n vic ha o n hav o lac an can n o i h o . h oc i on n g n al an h ia an a a o an ho . a i n commonl a in h ho i al ov nigh an l av h n a . n a i ion o cing i o o o ai n wi h a ial i illa ion h al o allow h m o v n l ing inci n ing a l o o a ing wa a in o o h loo hinn ai . alic lam m ical i c o o ca iac l c o h iolog a an oa ii ca iologi an l c o h iologi wi h lawa a iova c la ocia . ic om l avin avi on a iac a h gi ch m a haw a iac a h gi ch . alic lam . og ah . o hana ih on an i a .


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The Nanticoke Health Foundation is seeking nominations for its 14th annual Tributes for Healthcare Leadership Recognition Dinner scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 15, at the Heritage Shores Club in Bridgeville. Awards will be presented in three categories: The Founders Award, the Leadership in Philanthropy Award, and the Physicians Hall of Fame. The Founders Award will be presented to an individual who has made significant contributions in furthering the mission of Nanticoke Health Services to improve the health status of our community. This award will recognize a person who has contributed their time and talent to Nanticoke Health Services and the community in a leadership role. Nominees will demonstrate a concern for the well-being of the citizens of our community and have had an impact in the provision of healthcare services to the community. Current employees of Nanticoke Health Services and active medical staff are not eligible. The Charles C. Allen, Jr. Leadership in Philanthropy Award is presented to an individual or a group that has supported and made both Nanticoke Health Services and the community’s health philanthropic priorities in their lives. Through example and advocacy, nominees will have inspired others to participate in philanthropic activities of Nanticoke Health Services. The Physicians Hall of Fame will recognize physician(s) who have served Nanticoke Memorial Hospital and the community with distinction and selflessness. Nominees for this award must be physicians who have retired from Nanticoke Memorial Hospital’s medical staff or have served at least 10 years on the medical staff. Nominees should demonstrate professionalism, service to the community, and leadership at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. The deadline for submission of nominees is Friday, Aug. 17. Nominations in each category can be made by calling 302-536-5391, by emailing MorrisR@nanticoke.org, or by writing to the Nanticoke Health Foundation at 613 High St., Seaford, DE 19973. The name of each nominee should be accompanied by a few words about his/her qualifications or a personal anecdote.

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Readers are invited to send any news that they would like to see featured in the Business Report. Items can be e-mailed to mmcclure@mspublications.com.

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EXIT Central Realty has been doing business in Delaware since 2002, servicing all three counties from offices in Dover and Milford. EXIT prides itself on the use of the latest technology, such as its GEO Location services, called Smart Sign Technology. When you see a sign on a property listed by an EXIT agent, you can text “EXIT” to 85377 while standing outside of the house or driving nearby. Technology similar to a GPS system connects your mobile device to the destination, and you will receive listing information right in the palm of your hand. It also lets the listing agent know you are interested, and he or she will be able to help you schedule a visit to the property. Smart Sign Technology is especially good for the seller, since in this world of instant gratification, the potential buyer and agent are connected in a timely fashion, moving the sale

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along more quickly. Note that this process only works if the sign out front is a Smart Sign installed by a listing agent from EXIT Realty! EXIT Central Realty is part of EXIT Realty, an international firm with offices across the United States and Canada, including 41 offices and 1,200-plus agents in the Mid-Atlantic region. “Our agents live in communities from the top of the state to the bottom, which allows them to service the entire state easily,” said Andrea Wisniewski, marketing director and office administrator. “They are well versed in community happenings of their towns and the surrounding areas, which makes it easy for them to help buyers find just the right new home. “We specialize in residential sales,” she continued, “whether new construction, resale, bank owned and more. “All of our agents work with both buy-

Your Home, Next EXIT

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ers and sellers, along with people looking to rent. We have many agents with all specialties and experiences equipped to help all clients have the best real estate experience.” EXIT agents are not only dedicated, capable, knowledgeable and experienced, but will to go the extra mile. One happy client wrote of an EXIT agent: “You are the perfect agent! You have taken your time to work with us, put together a listing that was very inviting, and produced more showings in the first couple of weeks than any other agent had produced in months. When the first contract was presented you were there to represent my mother as if she were your own. You have been there every step of the way and rode every bump with us.” EXIT Realty listings and photos are uploaded to the local MLS, increasing exposure to potential buyers. From the website, www.delawarelisted.com, you can conduct a search within the parameters you enter, specifying property type, size, age, amenities, location and even price. You’ll also find advice for first-time home buyers. EXIT Central Realty offices are located at 598 N. DuPont Hwy in Dover, telephone 302-674-2900 and at 615 N. DuPont Blvd. in Milford, telephone 302-424-8221. For more information, email Info@ DelawareListed.com.

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598 N DuPont Hwy, Dover, DE 19901

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MILFORD OFFICE: www.DelawareListed.com 12

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615 N DuPont Hwy, Milford, DE 19963

302-424-8221


ov ha a ich hi o c l all iv

Our nation began in Dover when a group of courageous patriots gathered at the Golden Fleece on the Green to declare that Delaware would become the first state to ratify the U.S. Constitution. Founded in 1683, Dover reflects the values of a rich historic and culturally diverse small town with the public services and quality of life usually found in much larger cities. Dover is a great place to live, work and play and is located halfway between New York and Washington, within a few hours of one third of the nation’s population. Dover offers low property taxes; tax abatement and permit incentives to qualifying businesses; and a state designation as a Downtown Development District. World class health care, four institutions of higher education, great public schools, reliable public utilities, and tax free shopping make Dover even more appealing. Dover is also the home of NASCAR’s Monster Mile, the annual Firefly Music Festival (the largest campaign music festival in the U.S.), and proudly hosts one of our

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Shown is a building on Delaware State University’s campus in Dover. Photo courtesy of the City of Dover

nation’s largest military freight terminals in the world. As the Capital of the First State, Dover houses the state capital legislative offices and enjoys a flurry of activity during legislative session. Come share your business with us. Assistance in locating your business in Dover is readily

available by contacting one of the following organizations: City of Dover, Office of the Mayor - www.cityofdover.com; Downtown Dover Partnership - www.downtowndoverpartnership.com; Central Delaware Chamber of Commerce - www.cdcc.net.

- Dover We are in business to do business! Big enough to be a city but small enough to call home! For information regarding Economic Development and the incentives offered by the City of Dover Please call the City Manager’s/Mayor’s Office at 302-736-7005 13

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lan ic awn ovi an m o inancial vic o h comm ni a ol in l

“Dad, if we don’t change, this business is going to die.” That’s the advice Allan Austin Gardner-Bowler, now 24, gave his father, Dan Gardner, about Atlantic Finance & Pawn. Dan listened to his son, consolidated three pawn shops to one “brick and mortar” location in Dover, and launched an online business that grossed $75,000 in less than a year. After careers in portrait photography, insurance, university lending and as a financial advisor at Morgan Stanley, Dan became a partner in Atlantic Finance, which now has seven offices serving Kent and Sussex counties. Always open to opportunities, he and his partners opened three pawn shops beginning in 2006 as another community service and lender. “The pawn shops are a great opportunity to provide services to the community. People often find themselves short of cash, and this is a nice alternative to a payday lender,” Dan said. “We offer a lot of services that a bank offers, but a bank won’t do a loan for less than $500. It’s too expensive.” The process isn’t inexpensive for a pawn shop, either. Someone brings in an item, which has to be looked over and evaluated. The price is agreed upon, then the real work begins. Delaware state law requires the shop owner get a state-issued photo identification from anyone who presents an item for sale or pawn. “I’m required to take a complete description of the item and hold it for 18 days, because the information is uploaded to a police website so authorities can search for stolen property,” Dan said. “I process about 2,000 transactions a month, and less than three or four items are found to be stolen. I’ve heard policemen say you have a better chance of buying stolen items at a yard sale than a pawn shop because of the regulations.” The item is tagged and put in storage. Whether selling or pawning, the customer signs a paper declaring he is the owner, and leaves with cash. After 18 days, the item can be sold, unless the agreement was to hold it for a longer period. Atlantic Pawn does larger loans also. “I do a lot of loans for small businesses. 14

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Dan Gardner, owner of Atlantic Finance and Pawn, has a wide assortment of jewelry at his Dover location. Photos by www.FireLifePhotography.com

Everybody has cash flow problems — I provide cash flow loans,” Dan said. As an example, he cited a construction contractor who doesn’t get paid for a job or gets a check that bounces. “He still has to make payroll,” Dan said. “He might need $2,000 to $5,000 for a couple or weeks or a month.” Dan accepts tools, electronics, motorcycles, jewelry collections, even large construction equipment that he keeps off-site in a secure location until it can be redeemed. Legally, items that are not redeemed on time could be sold immediately, but that’s not the way Atlantic Pawn operates. Employees send a text message reminding the borrower that payment was due. “I don’t want their stuff,” Dan said. “I’ve got plenty of stuff. I give them all two weeks. I encourage them to call me and make arrangements, or with our new app, they can pay by phone.

The app was part of Austin’s idea to take the business online. Dan was reluctant at first. He has had problems in the past with online sales or purchases. “Forget it,” he told Austin. “I just want to be part of the community here.” But Austin persisted. “He showed me I really needed to look into this, and when I did, I decided to jump in with both feet,” Dan said. While developers have been promising software for years to facilitate online sales, always saying a new product is “just around the corner,” Austin was able to find a company that really delivered. Austin explained the company has an app for phones through which people can apply for a loan, buy items or make payments. “Some people are embarrassed to be seen in a pawn shop,” Austin observed. “Dad has tried to change that image. Our male employees wear shirts and ties; the ladies are profes-


sionally dressed… “But people today like to shop at home. Just like all the other retail businesses in Delaware, we have to compete with Amazon, eBay and other online marketers. I told Dad if we didn’t change, we’d be just another empty storefront.” Now, a customer can go online to Shop. FirstStateExchange.com or use the app to inquire about a loan. If someone has a gold necklace, for example, he can send a photo through the app and is able to get the loan started. At least he can get an idea whether Atlantic Pawn can help him. “Customers tell me using Let Go or Marketplace is a dead end, because people low-ball, don’t show up for meetings or worse, want to come to your house.” Austin said. Right now, loans are limited to items that can be held in the store in Dover. The borrower still has to come in to complete the transaction. Sales, however, are nationwide. Austin said, “We are the only business in Delaware to have an app like this on the phone where people can start a loan, make payments, buy things, put something on layaway and even haggle!” At noon on July 18, Shop. FirstStateExchange.com offered 1,614 items for sale, and the website changes constantly as items are added or sold. Shoppers can click on an item, see a description, several pictures and an asking price. From the website — or the app — they can make an offer, then buy the item. “It’s just like a showroom. Every day we have new items for sale. As soon as it is brought to the showroom floor, we take pictures and post it on the web,” Austin said. One iPod didn’t even make it to the floor before selling online. The buyer just hap-

The Atlantic Finance and Pawn store in Dover is located in the Rodney Village Shopping Center and has 10,000 square feet of space, half of which serves as its showroom.

pened to be browsing and snapped it up as soon as the photo was posted. Once sold on Austin’s idea, Dan and his partners sold two of the pawn shops, deciding to concentrate on the Dover store at Rodney Village Shopping Center as they moved strongly to an online presence. The store there has 10,000 square feet of space, half of which is showroom. “Our professional showroom is divided into a jewelry section with hundreds of gold, platinum, silver, diamonds and other precious stones of estate jewelry. In other sections we have two dozen TV’s, sound systems and thousands of DVD’s and Blurays; dozens of tools, laptops, motorcycles, ATV’s, bicycles, tablets, camping equip-

ment, musical instruments and lots more. Everything is cleaned, refurbished and guaranteed to work,” Dan said. “And, we are leveraging technology to do more business in one location than three, because now we are selling all over the United States,” Dan said. Atlantic Pawn also sells through eBay and uses other forms of social media such as Facebook and Instagram. The online ventures account for about 10 percent of business now, and even Dan anticipates it growing faster and larger. He admits, “You can be scared of the Internet or embrace it. I decided to listen to my son.” Stop by Atlantic Finance & Pawn at 1650 South Governor’s Ave. in Dover for terrific deals on tested, reliable and late model items in every category. Get cash for stuff that’s lying around the house without standing in the sun all day at a yard sale or taking a chance with strangers coming to your home. Transactions at Atlantic Pawn are handled with complete discretion and security. Getting the app, “Mobile Pawn,” is easy, Austin said. “Customers and visitors who come to our location can sign up for the app in the store. We simply text a link that leads them to the appropriate app store, where they download and insert their special code. Now all the services are available 24 hours a day. People outside the area can call our office at (302) 672-PAWN (7296) and sign up over the phone. It’s really easy. We believe that the future of customer service will be defined by convenience and we are working hard to meet that goal in our store and online.” 15

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Name: Johnny Rowley Name of business: Business Broker, Angle Financial and Business Services; Agent, R&R Commercial Realty Key responsibilities: Assist business owners with a clear plan of action to sell their business and property confidentially. Education: Business Rowley Management, West Virginia University Family: Younger brother, Jared and threeyear-old lab, Jeter Interests & hobbies: Surf fishing, powerlifting competitions, sport events Community involvement: Networking and local charitable events Professional goals: In five years, I would like to be an established business professional - grow my network throughout the state and increase my career responsibilities that add value to the company.

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Personal goals: Buy a house. A lot of planning involved but this is the year. Name and residence: Megan M. Murphy; Lewes Name of business: Lyons Companies Key responsibilities: Discover and deliver employee benefit solutions aligned with my client’s business objectives and employee reward philosophies. Guide business development, strategic financial planning, and holistic risk management. Develop Murphy multi-year strategic plan for client companies centered on achieving target goals while maximizing the company’s investment in employee benefits. Design, implement and monitor group

health insurance programs. Support clients by providing unique solutions to their needs and exceeding their service expectations. Education: Bachelor of Science, Business Management, University of Phoenix Family: Looking forward to marrying long-time partner, Shane Durham. Interests & hobbies: Spending time with family and friends, boating, fishing, traveling, and enjoying art and music. Community involvement: Volunteer at the Delaware SPCA. Personal and professional goals: I am looking to serve our community by supporting local businesses and providing personalized, proactive, and accessible insurance solutions. Name and residence: Timothy J. Lyons, Rehoboth Beach Name of business: Lyons Companies Key responsibilities: Vice President Professional risk advisor in the fields of property casualty insurance, alternative risk financing (captives) and employee benefits. Education: Risk Management and

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Insurance Major; University of Mississippi 2012 Family: Catharine N. Lyons (mother) David F. Lyons Jr (brother) Anne Lyons (sister-in-law) Logan (nephew) Interests and hobbies: Hunting, Long Distance Running, Lyons History Community involvement: Ronald McDonald House Development Committee and Red Shoe Society Town of Henlopen Acres Planning Committee Wilmington Rotary New Castle County Chapter of Ducks Unlimited The Saint Patrick’s Day Society of Wilmington Personal and professional goals: Completing the NYC Marathon, November 2018 Grow and develop family business and build on family legacy of service in the State of Delaware

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Business owners planning to exit their businesses in the next decade, voluntarily or not, may be in for a rude awakening. A successful transfer is the result of careful preparation. Plan for the worst but pray for the best. Mark Dawson (not real names) started his ag-consulting firm after A&M, the Navy and 10 years with Monsanto’s ag division. After 10 years he had 11 employees and was billing over $6,000,000. Then the firm of two of his fraternity brothers joined. By year 15, they covered most of the US mid and southwest, keeping in touch electronically (computers, text, Skype, etc.). Systems recorded all client data and communications. Fees had passed $12,000,000 when the company plane Mark was piloting crashed in 2014. Two weeks after Mark’s death, Cathy, Marion and Jack, Mark’s family, were receiving his salary along with checks to buy the company and fund trusts for each of them. Emotionally, their lives were wrecked; financially, they saw little change due to Mark’s foresight and diligence. Mark was 52. Chad*, Jackson’s father, was a master carpenter who taught at Vo-Tech and built houses each summer with Chad. Instead of college, Chad spent four years in the Marines before starting Jackson Builders, Inc. He did well. After 30 years he had three companies: construction, paving, and a development partnership. In 2011, at 55, a heart attack almost killed him. His doctor gave him five years unless he retired. After a heated argument and another heart attack, he reluctantly agreed to sell his businesses. His plight was no secret. Builders were not in great demand, especially dying ones. Rather than disband, Chad offered the company to his three sharpest foremen in return for a balloon note (interest only for eight years), a salary and, as needed, his guidance. It amounted to only 60 percent of what he could have received had he been at the helm, but time was of the essence as his trusted crews were already finding work elsewhere. Six months’ further delay might have limited a sale to used equipment. The paving company was ignored by potential suiters. Too many pavers were chasing too few jobs. Chad was forced to auction the equipment for half its value. The development business depended largely on Chad’s 18

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empire, so he remained an investor in the one active development and was limited to passive investment in the future. In short, it ended. Obviously, Chad and his family suffered significant losses. In retrospect, there are many things he could and should have done to prevent a 50 percent discount on all he had built. At least he survived and was able to take the actions needed to salvage that small percentage. He now lives comfortably in a retirement community where he watches his health and limits his spending. In the next eight years, approximately half of over 29 million small companies (500 employees or less) employing 57 million people will change ownership or disappear. Called “The Great Wealth Transfer” by economists, it reflects the exit of the baby boomers. It prompts us to ask: will your business (or employer) survive? Published studies estimate that less than 30 percent of companies at risk have a succession plan in place and, of them, fewer than a half are viable and less than a third are funded. Conclusion? At least 12 million practices and companies, mostly private and closely-held, are in dire need of formal exit planning. That large a supply could make it a buyer’s market. An ideal exit plan transfers a going concern to competent new owners for fair value. The seller’s desired result is often as much about income as it is about assets. The owner of a business or practice enjoys many perks (vehicles, vacations, reimbursements, expense accounts) often tax-free, above salary and pension. A sale must also be funded so as to not handicap the successful continuing enterprise after turnover, usually involving a combination of debt and salary requiring the seller to remain in some helpful capacity for a specified period, often one or two years. There are no fixed rules. Each agreement is unique. Is your business or practice one of these? The owners are about 60, have no obvious heirs working in the business and most of the com-

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pany contacts are personal to the owners. The majority of operations and decisions are made by the owners and may or may not be traceable or systematically recorded. In short, much of the business resides in the head of the owner(s). Would this company likely collapse at the loss of the owner? There are other giveaways, but these are the main ones. If the company you own/work for fits the above profile, ask the following questions: 1. How long could the business survive at the loss of the/an owner? The loss of one or two key employees? 2. Can/does the owner take long vacations away from the business without managing from afar? 3. Is there a natural successor/buyer of the business who would keep it growing successfully? 4. Would the owner’s families suffer financial hardship if the business was allowed to fail or shut down? Are most of the owner’s financial and personal interests tied to the practice/business? 5. In the event of a business reversal or the loss of key personnel, how long would it take to recover? How much capital would be needed to weather the storm? Is there enough? 6. Is there any impediment to negotiating a future delayed buyout today based on an agreed formula and benchmarks subject to periodic review? 7. Is there a signed, funded agreement in place to transfer the practice/business at a specific date or event? If so, it simply needs periodic review and you are golden. If you can answer these questions, you know whether you have an adequate/inadequate/nonexistent plan in place. If you can’t answer them, who can? Find that person and ask until you know the answers. Your next

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BUSINESSES FOR BETTER BAGS nvi onm n n a o c i i ion o h ag ma om c cl in in h i o ic w in a a ici a ing in . ic om l m m an a ici a ing in own oll g o a h c an an nvi onm n nni a on an am w

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step is to ask yourself, “What is the ideal ! exit plan outcome for myself and my fam ily as well as my employees? When would ! I like that to happen?” These two steps are TM! With!your!Virtual!Keypad!App you!can!manage!and!control!your!system!from!anywhere!using!   half the process. Write down your answer, TM either!an!Apple!or!Android!mobile!device.!As!an!added!benefit!you!will!also!have!the!ability!to!     in detail. If you are an employee, alert your manage!your!system!through!MyVirtualKeypad.com!our!web!browser!based!management!system.! boss.   Next, pick your exit plan team. Include   Standard'Features'Include:' your CPA, estate/business attorney, financial   planner/exit planner and your business co• Check!the!status!of!your!system! owners (who must also address the above   • Arm!or!disarm!! questions independently). Later, you may • Add,!delete,!and!manage!user!codes! include specialists in valuations or certain   • Receive!event!notifications!! strategies.   • Check!history!! Do not expect the process to be quick   • SetCup!favorites!! or easy. However, once in place, plans can ! be easily tweaked to reflect changing cirTM! MyVirtualKeypad.com,!Just!like!your!Virtual!Keypad!App provides!you!with!a!clean,!elegant,!easy!t cumstances. Time and money spent today ü Manage multiple areas and systems can provide benefits worth 40, 50, even use!interface.!Controls!are!logically!arranged!with!a!simple!tab!system,!with!all!functions!just!a!click! ü Arm/disarm all, by area, or by schedule. 100 times their effort in the future. Further,away;!it!also!includes!a!handy!twoCday!weather!report!as!part!of!the!display.' ü Add, delete, and manage users with these concerns under control, having Additional'features'available'include:'' ü Receive notifications of system events reduced a major source of stress, it is often ü Manage lights, locks, and HVAC TM! easier to expand a business, and knowing With!your!Virtual!Keypad!App! and!the!addition!of!a!ZCwave!interface,! Apple, Android smart phone or tablet and browser ü Track customer traffic count history growth and risk will be rewarded. associated!equipment,!and!activation!of!the!ZCwave!features,!you!can!also!! I will try to address exit plan strategies !   in more detail in a later article. Meanwhile, • Control!lights!! questions or article ideas? Please contact me.

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TOURISM BOARD ELECTIONS i l m ing o h n lawa o i m oa o i co l c n amin a o a wo a m a oa chai on. a i h g n al manag o h llmoo nn a in ho o h ach. l c o v a co chai on wa onni all o h an ico n ian ocia ion who n h a ill o o ham o omm c on h oa . going chai on ani a o o lo co own o lma va oa o v n an lma va i cov o c iv a i om ov no ohn a n o h vic o h o h n lawa o i m oa . ic a ac ow om l co homa o h n lawa o i m oa m m am o a hall a a n amin a o chm i on n w l hi a an ma ing man ag ana olla n. on ow ani a o o lo a ol v ha a n av nn a man onni all la ia i i o l a l on an vin hom on.

RIBBON CUTTING h n ham o omm c w lcom o h a n l h i n w m m . ham m m an h comm ni oin anch anag hi alm own ohn an v oo an h a o h ao o o c l a h i i on c ing an g an o ning a h i n w loca ion loca on ighwa in ao .

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Readers are invited to send any news that they would like to see featured in the Business Report. Items can be e-mailed to mmcclure@ mspublications.com. 20

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This year’s 32nd Annual Amish Country Bike Tour on Saturday, Sept. 8 will include some changes. This year, the tour will have a new launching and ending location at the Delaware Agricultural Museum and Village in Dover. The new setting promotes the agricultural history of Dover and helps tie in the theme of Kent County’s picturesque Amish farming countryside. In previous years, the tour started and ended at Legislative Mall in Downtown Dover. The location change to Delaware Agricultural Museum and Village, allows more parking availability where cyclists will have a shorter walk to the start of the tour. In addition to the new location, there will be new routes. Riders will continue to enjoy riding through the Amish countryside with newly layout routes for the 15, 25, 50, 64 and 100-mile options. “As we continue to grow the partnership with Bike Delaware throughout the years, one of the major goals is to include more of Kent County with the various route options,” said Wendie Vestfall, president of Kent County Tourism Corporation. “We’re really excited to include the Village of Smyrna with the 64 and 100-mile option, the new routes help showcase more of Delaware’s quaint villages.” Following the tour, there will be a catered picnic at the Villages of the Delaware Agricultural Museum. “Riders will be happy to see beer and wine options available for the first time, yet another addition to this year’s tour,” said Katie Kazimir, director of communications for Bike Delaware. For more information or to register, visit www. AmishCountryBikeTour.com.


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Southern Delaware Tourism (SDT) and Sussex County history and heritage tourism partners have created “Fall for our History,” a three month long celebration of Sussex County heritage to take place this September, October and November. This promotion is a follow up to last year’s successful “See You In September” promotion and is aimed at encouraging visitors to extend their fall weekend stays in order to take advantage of the many history focused events, tours, and attractions occurring during the autumn months. Southern Delaware museums, attractions, events, and tours spotlight Native American history, agricultural history, maritime and military history, natural history, industrial history, architectural history, social history, aviation history, railroad history, and more. Sussex County’s charming towns each have their own fascinating tales - war stories, tales of political intrigue, stories of pirates and shipwrecks and buried booty, and even some tales that listeners might prefer not to hear after dark. “Our area has a rich history dating back to well before the colonial period that visitors and even many locals are not aware of,” says Scott Thomas, Southern Delaware Tourism’s executive director. “This promotion gives us the opportunity to work with our partners, including hotels, chambers of commerce, museums, attractions, tour operators, state parks, and event and festival organizers, to highlight this history and all of the heritage assets that we’re so fortunate to enjoy throughout Sussex County.” In conjunction with tourism partners, SDT has consolidated history-related events scheduled for the fall months into a Fall for Our History webpage where history buffs can mix and match events, tours, and venues to plan visits based on their specific interests. The site also includes museum listings and a link to antiques shopping itineraries. The webpage can be found at www.visitsoutherndelaware.com/ fall-for-history.

EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR cogni o i mi h o ov m lo o h con a a m lo o h a ing i h nn al wa inn . ov g a n awa inn oc l a h m lo o h a . ach on wa o gh on ag wh h w n a la om a a o lawa na i on o na o a im on an a o o n a iv i co on o n a iv ha l o l av n on av il on an o n. h m lo o h a o i mi h al o c iv a gi ca om h ov al i nion. ic ic i n a on o ch a l an . aig o ch a igh cong a la o an ing m lo o h a ing nn al wa inn . ach m lo o h a o a i on am ohn on an o i mi h c iv h i own la along wi h na an o i . mi h wa nam m lo o h a .

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BETHANY BEACH Sandy Pony Donuts ATC LLC, Wangs World; 33230 Coastal Hwy.; retailer-restaurant Ropewalk Bethany; 107 Garfield Pkwy.; retailer-restaurant BRIDGEVILLE Vision Stays 1st Entertainment, VS1 Entertainment; 19400 Deer Field Rd.; professional and/or personal services-unclassified Saunders, Marlene A.; 5 Oak St.; professional and/or personal services Holden, Diana C., Simply Charming Pet Bowtique; 4847 Hartzell Rd.; retailer-various products SWABB LLC; 17412 Apple Tree Rd.; professional and/or personal services-unclassified URYS Transportation LLC; 11429 Liden St.; drayperson/mover Bailey Compassionate Care; 20483 Coverdale Rd.; direct care worker Cannon Acres LLC; 18868 Sussex Hwy.; lessee of tangible property/lessor of tangible personal property DELMAR JS Enterprise Electrical Service; 18061 Whitesville Rd., Delmar; contractor-residential Snyder, Tammy N., Petals; 36552 Smith Mill Church Rd.; Delmar; professional and/or personal services DOVER Pioneer Elite Care; 8 The Grn., Ste. A; direct care worker Kahlow Properties; 8 The Grn., Ste. B; wholesaler-any products Luxelabs Nutrition LLC, Luxelabs; 8 The Grn; retailer-various products/wholesaler-any products Fenco IT Consultants; 8 The Grn., Ste. A; professional and/or personal services Torpacks LLC; 8 The Grn., Ste. B; personal services-distributor Royalty Boutique; 150 Lakeview Dr., Apt. 107; wholesaler-any products Cosgrove, Kirsten M., Sacrament Coffee; 8 Acacia Pl.; retailer-food (except restaurant) Laine Chiropractic PC; 94 Laurel Dr.; professional services-chiropractor West Lamar; 320 Billy Mitchell Ln., Apt. G102; professional and/or personal servicesunclassified Premier Village 2018 LLC; 2030 Generals Way, Apt. B108; lessee of tangible property/ lessor of tangible personal property Fab Facials LLC; 250 Gateway South Blvd., Ste. 100; professional and/or personal 22

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services Hacker, Courtney L., Auburn Grace Hair Studio; 250 Gateway South Blvd.; personal services-beautician BNC Realtors 1000 LLC; 564 Brookfield Dr.; construction transportation contractor Jewell Robinson Insurance & Financial Services; 1087 Macadamia Way; professional and/or personal services C&A Partners; 2045 Sycamore Ct. Unit 3; residential contractor/developer Pimentel Plumbing LLC; 29 Kentwood Dr.; contractor-residential Ascent Academics; 575 Fox Pointe Dr.; professional and/or personal services Woodbanks Enterprises, Caribe Kitchen; 407 Boggs Run; retailer-restaurant D&C Delivery LLC; 3 Waterfall Dr.; drayperson/mover Ruth Robinson-Nelson PhD LLC; 841 Woodcrest Dr.; professional services-pyschology office Bella Armario Boutique; 6 Dover Hall; wholesaler-any products CLB Consultation Services; 1318 Afton Ct.; professional and/or personal services Smith, Cohen & Rosenberg; 838 Walker Rd., Ste. 2B; mercantile or collection agency Emily Wilson Realty; 625 Lakewood Pl.; reconciliation purpose code Ad Professional Tree Service LLC; 1226 N. Farmview Dr.; contractor-residential ZD Distribution LLC; 241 Ryhill Dr.; retailer-food (except restaurant) Poet’s Masonry & Concrete; 550 W. Denney’s Rd.; contractor-residential Tomeka’s Homestyle Eatery; 105 Derbyshire Ave.; retailer-restaurant McPoyle, William J. III, Momentum Moto; 131 Sparky Ln.; retailer-various products Peachy Clean Cleaning Company; 73 Village Dr.; professional and/or personal services Foster, Donald L., Foster Enterprises; 905 Westview Terrace; wholesaler-any products Vanderven, Rachel J.; 1058 S. Governors Ave., Ste. 102; professional and/or personalcounselor Creative Vision Consulting; 114 Thames Dr.; professional and/or personal services GEORGETOWN Las Vegas Mini Market LLC; 101 Cedar St.; retailer-various products Felipe, Veronica Chavez; 105 Linden Ave.; professional and/or personal servicesunclassified Barry Ingram LLC; 25166 Mary Rd.; per-

sonal services-general repairperson New Directions Consulting Group LLC; 21305 Berlin Rd., Unit 2; professional and/or personal services-unclassified Noswal Designs LLC; 16756 Redden Rd.; contractor-residential Bryant, Cedric, Complete Handyman Services; 23175 Wood Branch Rd.; contractorresidential Mills, Jami, The Pennywillow Cafe; 24755 Mill Pond Ln.; manufacturer-food HARRINGTON Ringler, Maria P.; PO Box 363, Harrington; retailer-transient Epic Sports Group; 19 W. Mispillion St.; professional and/or personal services Hog Slat Inc., Eastern Shore Poultry Services; 515 Smith Ave.; retailer-farm machinery dealer Kratsas, Gina M., Amber Kay’s Thrift Store; 41 Commerce St.; retailer-various products Scents By Me Bath & Body Care; 505 Gun and Rod Club Rd.; manufacturer-various products/retailer-various products Moore, Rebecca, Steele Wool Farm; 329 Sandbox Rd.; professional and/or personal services LAUREL Coulbourne, Phycillia M., Marya’s Gifted Hands; 511 W. 8th St.; retailer-various products BD Home Improvement; Dillards Rd.; contractor-residential LEWES R&J Brittingham’s Grilling; 32489 Lewes Georgetown Hwy.; retailer-food (except restaurant) Feldman, Marilyn; 34834 Capstan Ln.; professional and/or personal services Nik Trading LLC; 16192 Coastal Hwy.; retailer-various products Axis Advisory LLC; 16192 Coastal Hy.; professional and/or personal services Milanessa LLC; 16192 Coastal Hwy.; retailer-various products Cambria Construction Services; 16826 Forest Dr.; contractor-residential Louden, Brooke A., Classical Conversations; 35448 Peregrine Rd.; professional and/or personal services Love is in the Hair; 25 Tradewinds Ln.; personal services-beautician


MILFORD Ames Custom Guitars; 400 NW Front St.; manufacturer-various products Delaware Barber Company; 119 Causey Ave.; personal services-barber Maroney, Erin; 5 Causey Ave., Apt. 6; professional services-counselor Brothers in Arms Lawn Service; 10 E. Saratoga Rd.; professional and/or personal services Vintage Loft USA; 7 Concord Dr.; wholesaler-any products Cannon, Alicia L., Skipping Fox Creations; 806 S. Walnut St.; retailer-dry goods & apparel Top Five; 18547 Eleanor Ln.; retailerfood (except restaurant) Meritt Home Services; 269 Frontage Rd.; residential contractor/developer Waters, Michelle, Aabbra Cadaabra Cleaning; 123 Milford Neck Rd.; professional and/or personal services MILLSBORO Condit, Jason P., Coastal Tile & Hardwood Floors; 28509 Okwaw Ave.; contractor-residential Saunders, Carla, Love Cili; 33 Baltimore Ave.; retailer-dry goods & apparel Jr Contractors LLC; 28367 Nanticoke Ave.; contractor-residential Bay Marine Construction; 23661 Godwin School Rd.; contactor-residential JEN Construction LLC; 31433 Karen St.; contractor-residential L&J East Coast Painting LLC; 2201 Caitlins Way; contractor-residential Beauty Ink LLC; 29786 John J. Williams Hwy., Unit 3; professional services-unclassified Allison’s Cleaner LLC; 27028 Merchantman Dr.; contractor-residential Eye Worx LLC; 28544 Dupont Blvd., Unit 1; professional services-optometrical office CTS Surgical Associates LLC; 32711 Long Neck Rd.; professional servicesmedical office CTM Medical Associates LLC; 32711 Long Neck Rd.; professional servicesmedical office Boombox Party Bus; 32783 Long Neck Rd., Unit 2; professional and/or personal services Marshall, Anthony, Sunset Cove; 25979 Redwing Ln.; retailer-various products

SEAFORD Leggs Tile & Stone; 26670 Canal Ln.; contractor-residential Lindsey Michelle Smith, Mrs. Lindsey’s Clubhouse; 520 N. Delaware Ave.; professional and/or personal services Delgados Diligent Inc.; 117 High St., Unit 202; wholesaler-electrical goods S Brock Transportation Inc.; 103 E. 7th St.; drayperson/mover LKC Services LLC; 26749 Lonesome Rd.; contractor-residential Falisha Willis; 23000 Sussex Hwy. #227; professional and/or personal services Flippin’ Crazy; 4708 Woodpecker Rd.; contractor-residential SMYRNA Made to Maintain; 798 Cranford Station Rd.; professional and/or personal services Living Well Health & Beauty; 74 E. Glenwood Ave.; retailer-dry goods & apparel Battaglia, Jeffrey, Battaglia’s Lawn Service; 307 Kent Way; professional and/or

personal services Focus Pharmacy; 117 E. Glenwood Ave.; retailer-chemicals, paints & drugs R&A Funeral LLC, Faries Funeral Home; 29 S. Main St.; professional services-funeral home Royal Tees; 71 Harkins Dr.; retailer-dry goods & apparel Berman, Maxwell, Management to the Max; 438 Fletcher Dr.; personal servicesgeneral repairperson Lemon Lilies Boutique; 13 Borealis Ct.; retailer-dry goods & apparel Clean Home is a Happy Home; 84 Laks Ct.; professional and/or personal services New Blaze; 228 Hoffeckers Mill Dr.; wholesaler-any products Cho Jang I, Advance TV Service; 288 Hoffeckers Mill Dr.; personal service-television repairperson Inspiring Young Mindz; 53 Malvern Ln., Apt. 3; retailer-various products Smith, Irvin B. III, Arise Firearm Training; 1112 Smyrna Landing Rd.; professional and/or personal services

RIBBON CUTTING h ho o h w ach ham o omm c c l a a a om mov o own own ho o h ach wi h a i on c ing c n l . a a om ha l a ac a a v . a ha ac wi h ni al a . whol oc i i n. o m ch mo involv in h il wh n o il wi h a a ai ih a m who man ag con c ion o a a. ic om l ghan c all i ch nic o hia awic i co ail o n l i no a ol v ha ni n ail an c an . 23

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All websites are not created equal. Some websites show how organizations can help and what problems they can solve. They are compelling, beautiful, and so engaging that viewers are drawn in at first glance. Other websites are so poorly done that viewers quickly do another Google search for the information they seek. Does your website help or hurt your bottom line? Use these six questions to review your website. 1. Does your website clearly state who you are, what you do, and why you are unique? Your unique brand story should be so clearly understood within 10 seconds of perusing your site. Visitors should have a vibrant picture of your business and what benefits they will receive if they choose you. Your website should use powerful imagery to tell your story. Client benefits should be easily described with the use of concise content and icons. 2. Does your content generate inter-

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Tidemark Federal Credit Union had its 59th Annual Meeting on May 10 at the Seaford Fire Hall. The Tidemark FCU Foundation was pleased and proud to award two scholarships to two outstanding Sussex County senior high school students, Grace Lee and Noah Garlick. Lee is currently a senior at Sussex Technical High School and will be attending Newberry College in South Carolina where she plans to study Teaching. Her dream is to return to Sussex County and teach at the same elementary school she attended as a child. As a senior, she is a varsity lacrosse and varsity field hockey player, ending her year as a captain. She has been part of the National Honor Society for three years and passed her Dental Assisting National Board exam in radiology which certifies her to take dental images. Garlick is currently a senior at Milford High School where he holds a 4.0 plus GPA. He ranks seventh in his graduating class of 206 and has been accepted to West Virginia University. He plans to study Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering and graduate 24

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est and inspire action? If your website only talks about you, you, you, then it is not inspiring your viewers to any action. Strong content includes the clients’ needs. After reading your website content, viewers should be ready to take the Rivera next step. 3. Does your website have a natural flow that allows visitors to find the information they need quickly and easily? Attention spans are getting shorter by the day. Most website visitors will not take the time to hunt for information. Make sure that your website is easily navigable. The most important content on each page should be “above the fold” or viewable without visitors having to scroll down to see it. 4. Does your website reflect your company’s most current branding? A cohesive branding strategy includes a current logo that is reflective of a company’s story and consistent use of colors and

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fonts in all marketing materials. Your website should match all of your other marketing materials so that potential customers can identify your company. 5. Is your website mobile-friendly? Check your website on a variety of mobile devices to ensure that visitors to your site have no issues when using their devices to visit your site. Studies are showing that more and more web viewing is taking place on mobile devices. Make sure your website is ready to meet this challenge. 6. When was your website designed and how often is it updated? Websites should be fresh and have a current feel and look to them. Your website is sadly out of date if it still uses Flash, old, poor-quality images, a high text-to-image ratio, or poor navigation techniques. Older websites that are not refreshed often and are slow to load are often demoted by Google in search rankings. If your website is not serving as an aggressive part of your overall marketing strategy, Hook PR & Marketing can help. Patricia V. Rivera is a marketing consultant and founder of Hook PR & Marketing in Lewes (www.hookpr. com).

chola hi

n Shown is Noah Garlick receiving his scholarship from Charles Gleason, Jr., Vice Chair of the Tidemark FCU board. Standing next to him (l to r) are: Ashley Tyre, VP of Human Resources, Pam Fleuette, CEO, and Sherry Shockley, Chief Financial Officer.

with a dual degree. His ultimate dream is to work for NASA. Like Lee, Noah has been inducted into the National Honor Society but also the Spanish Honor Society; he’s proudly been a Boy Scout for the past 12 years and in 2016, became an Eagle Scout. Over the past four years, he has logged over 200 community service hours and worked for the State of Delaware over the past two summers at the State Parks helping with maintenance. Both seniors received $1,500 scholarships for their remarkable achievements. Tide-

mark FCU and its Foundation would also like to thank Board member Charlie Gleason, Jr., Vice Chair, for helping to make these scholarships possible with his generous contributions. Tidemark Federal Credit Union will continue the tradition of helping neighbors build brighter futures with banking that keeps pace; bringing stability to our members’ lives-and saving them money along the way; providing the strong, reliable banking they need and expect.


Vol. 21 No. 11 PRESIDENT

Bryant Richardson TREASURER

Carol Wright Richardson PUBLISHER

Mike McClure

COMPOSITION

Elaine Schneider Tina Reaser Karen Cherrix Kimberly Beard

RIBBON CUTTING i l ol an o n l c l a h g an o ning o i n w ac ic acili an hol n m wi h a i on c ing c mon which incl cl m m a an han nwic a ham o omm c a . i a on h n ian iv a i l ol an o n l i loca a i l . ag o o.

VP OF MARKETING

Chris Redman

SEPTEMBER

Business Report

SALES

Greg English Tede Griffith C O N TA C T

AT YOUR SERVICE

Morning Star Publications 302-629-9788 951 Norman Eskridge Hwy. Seaford, DE 19973

Does your business offer a service that can make life and work easier?

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Along with a half page ad, we will include a 500 word article about your business. With a third page ad,

Focusing on the ambition and innovation that make Delaware businesses unique.

there will be a 250 word article.

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Contact Chris Redman

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302.629.9788

email credman@mspublications.com 25

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BUSINESS DIRECTORY Horty & Horty, P.A. o g hilli . 302-730-4560 c ain o@ho .com . on w . ov

Morning Star Business Report i c l 302-629-9788 a www.m in o .com al @m lica ion .com o man i g w . ao

Davis Bowen & Friedel, Inc. icha l h l on acha . o ch . . 302-424-1441 a www. finc.com mil o @ finc.com . aln . il o

Bethany-Fenwick Area Chamber of Commerce a n av 302-539-2100 a www. h i o .com in o@ han nwic .o g oa al ighwa nwic lan Central Delaware Chamber of Commerce iogo 302-734-7513 a www.c cc.n iogo@c cc.n . on w . ov

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Chamber of Commerce for Greater Milford o chm i 302-422-3344 a www.mil o cham .com mil o @mil o cham .com on il o Georgetown Chamber of Commerce vin hom on 302-856-1544 a www.g o g owncoc.com in o@g o g owncoc.com . a . o o g own Laurel Chamber of Commerce ann a g 302-875-9319 a www.la lcham in o@la lcham chanic o a l

.com .com

Lewes Chamber of Commerce am 302-645-8073 Toll Free 877-465-3937 a www.l w cham .com in i @l w cham .com ing w . . . o w Greater Millsboro Chamber of Commerce vin n 302-934-6777 a www.mill o ocham .com in o@mill o ocham .com a hing on . i . . o ill o o Milton Chamber of Commerce i o 302-684-1101

www.hi o icmil on.com cham @hi o icmil on.com . . o il on Rehoboth Beach - Dewey Beach Chamber of Commerce & Visitor Center a ol v ha 302-227-6446 302-227-2233 ext. 13 a www. ach n.com ca ol@ ach n.com ho o h v i io n ho o h v min i a iv fic o min. fic ho o h ach Western Sussex Chamber of Commerce nn a man 302-629-9690 a www.w n coc.com l nn@w n coc.com ighwa . . o ao

EASTERN SHORE CLEANING, LLC h i an onic (302) 752-8856 www. a n ho cl aning. com a n ho cl aning@ comca .n Delaware Technical Community College Workforce Development and Community Education hi o h . oo i co (302) 259-6330 a www. cc. con in ing ca ion cmoo @ cc. a a n hi n oll g iv o g own

Bank of Delmarva co owic 302-875-5901 a www. an o lma va.com owic @ an o lma va. com a a . a l County Bank o n 302-226-9800

a www. o n an h l . ain fic ho o h ach

oca ion l.com

Del One Federal Credit Union a wi oca ion m h 302-672-1492 a www. l n .o g am . h@ l on .o g i lv . ov Delaware State Police Federal Credit Union na . i ch 302-856-3501 ext. 140 a www. c .com ifi ch@ c .com . . o o g own Dover Federal Credit Union Seven Statewide Locations w ll 302-678-8000 www. ov c .com ilv a lv . ov w ll@ ov c .com Watson Yates Funeral Home m m o h a ll n al amil 302-629-8561 wa on a n alhom . com


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Bayhealth Kent Campus Milford Memorial am a c i 302-744-7013 a www. a h al h.o g am ma c i@ a h al h.o g . a . ov Beebe Healthcare h i ina i h im 302-645-3220 a www. h al hca .o g c i h im @ h al hca .o g avannah . w Nanticoke Health Services ha on a ing on 302-629-6611 a www.nan ico .o g ha ing on @nan ico .o g i l o . ao DeSanctis Ins. Agency LLC AllState Insurance Co. on anc i 302-629-8841 a www.all a .com on anc i a anc i @all a .com igh ao Farnell & Gast Insurance o a 302-629-4514 a www.av hall.com ga @av hall.com cwilliam w o n@av hall. com . in ighwa ao

Lyons Companies avi . on . avi . on . w a ing on imo h on ohn i on 302-227-7100 www.l on in anc .com in o@l on in anc .com l i an ni ho o h ach World Trade Center Delaware a la n on 302-656-7905 w c .com . . ilming on

Delmarva Digital im mi h 302-875-7700 a www. mg.n mg.n al @ mg.n a l own a l

Mohr Investigative Services, Inc. am . oh mann 866-370-1004 www.moh inv iga ion .com moh mann@moh inv iga ion .com a ooc man i ov Holland Jewelers 302-947-1200 Excellence since 1990! ohn . illiam w . l illag w www.hollan w l inc@ ahoo.com Sergovic, Carmean & Weidman, P.A

Attorneys At Law ohn . govic . hannon . a m an h . hom on i . c a h li a h o c avi . i man hannon . w n 302-855-1260 a www. c law.com . o i o o g own

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Print Shack Inc. 302-629-4430 a www. in hac .com ic a oa ao Callaway, Farnell and Moore, Inc. Office: 302-629-4514 Toll Free: 800-966-4514 www.c m al a .com a min@c mn .com . in w . ao

Law Offices of Karen Y. Vicks, LLC 302-674-1100 888-598-8890 vic @vic law.com . ooc man . i ov The Smith Firm icha l . mi h . ha . ing l . la . a . 302-875-5595 a iv i iv ao a ho o h v . ho o h ach

Hook PR Group a icia . iv a 302-858-5055 www.hoo .com a icia@hoo .com n n loo w Rogers Graphics a ll a in 302-856-0028 mv in ing.com in @ og g a hic .com w o g own w a on

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Coldwell Banker Resort Realty i a 302-227-5000 office 302-745-8764 cell a www. i a .com i @ i a .com oa al w . ho o h ach The Real Estate Market an ill o . n al v . a l 302-877-8100 office a al a ma . o an @ al a ma . o Quality Staffing Services cilia man anch anag 302-990-5623 office a vaila l o a n ho o .com l in on . in ighwa ao c cilia @ o .com YOUR BUSINESS Include your business in this directory. Rates are low; the potential to reach thousands of business-minded customers is great. Contact credman@ mspublications.com.

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Morning Star Business Report 0818  
Morning Star Business Report 0818