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VOL. 14 NO. 5

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2009

50 cents

News New School - Organizers of the proposed Montessori School in Laurel were on hand at a recent town Mayor and Council meeting to share information on the status of the project. Page 4 wIlDFIReS - Local firefighter tours western U.S. as part of Wildlands Firefighting Crew. Page 24 heARING - Delmar sets date for hearing on casino plans. Page 3 coMPeTITIoN - Robot competitions are coming to the Laurel School District. Page 26 PARAMeDIcS - County must pay more to build Laurel paramedic station. Page 10 celeBRATIoN - Delmar plans week-long celebration for 150th anniversary. Page 3 heAlTh - Nanticoke Memorial Hospital finishes fiscal year in the black. Page 2

Sports GIleS Laurel varsity football coach Clarence Giles, in his first season as head coach, is shown during a recent fundraiser. See the Star’s Fall sports section, starting on page 43, for more on the Laurel, Delmar, and Sussex Tech varsity sports teams.

INSIDE THE STAR Business Bulletin Board ChurCh Classifieds eduCation entertainment final Word Gas lines Gourmet health letters

6 18 20 34 40 32 63 59 59 14 62

lynn Parks mike Barton movies oBituaries PeoPle Puzzles soCials sPorts tides tony Windsor

58 61 7 30 23 21 61 41 7 58

Trace Theofiles of Laurel hands Cal Ripken Jr. a few birthday presents. Through the Make-A-Wish Foundation, Trace got to spend the afternoon with his hero. Story on page 25.

BuS - Students get off the bus at P.L. Dunbar Elementary School on the first day of school last Thursday. See additional first day pictures on page 60. Photo by Mike McClure

Controversial Laurel nuisance ordinance may be delayed By Tony E. Windsor

As of Monday afternoon, Laurel Town Manager Bill Fasano felt comfortable that the controversial proposed ordinance dealing with assessing fees to properties in the town where police receive excessive nuisance complaints, may not move forward for a planned Second Reading next Monday night, Sept. 8. He would not speak on behalf of the Mayor and Council, but felt the Second Reading may be delayed in lieu of more discussions about the legislation. “The Mayor and I were invited to a meeting of the Laurel Landlords’ Association last week and they asked some pretty good questions about the ordinance. This may show the need for

another discussion session,” he said. Known officially as Ordinance 2009-10, the proposed regulation was initially developed to seek financial support from local apartment complexes that had an inordinate number of calls to the police for nuisance type complaints, such as loud music and large crowds gathered. Penalties were considered for rental property owners who have complaints resulting in more than three police responses for “nuisance” calls at their properties. After working with Laurel town management, a group of landlords and property managers were successful in convincing the town that the ordinance should not be exclusive to rental hous-

ing, but if enacted, should include all properties in the town. A surprise first reading of the ordinance took place during the most recent Laurel Mayor and Council meeting, leaving some people, including the newly formed Laurel Landlords’ Association (LLA) taken by surprise. It was felt that discussions were on-going and the town would not do anything formal during negotiations. Laurel Mayor John Shwed and Councilman Don Phillips expressed their feeling that there had been “enough talk” and it was “time for action.” The First Reading of Ordinance 2009-10 was approved unanimously. continued on page 5


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MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 - 9, 2009

Nanticoke Hospital finishes fiscal year in the black Surplus at the end of fiscal year 2009 was $1.1 million By Lynn R. Parks

Nanticoke Health Services has seen a “significant change” in its financial picture, according to CEO Steve Rose. While the organization, which includes Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, ended fiscal year 2008 with an $8.1 million loss, its third losing year in a row, it concluded the most recent fiscal year with a surplus. “We are in the black,” said Rose, who came on board as CEO in November. The surplus at the end of fiscal year 2009, which went from July 1, 2008, through June 30, 2009, was $1.1 million. He anticipates at least as large a surplus this year. Rose said that Nanticoke reversed its financial decline by investing in growth and by controlling expenses. Investing in growth meant bringing 13 new physicians to the community, including three new pediatricians, interventionist cardiologists and gastroenterologists, and purchasing new equipment. Nanticoke recently opened a stroke center, to focus on patients suffering from “brain attacks,” or strokes, and has upgraded its MRI equipment and its CAT

scan equipment. In January, a pad site at the Mears campus was installed so that a mobile PET scan machine, used to monitor tumors in cancer patients, can make regular visits. As for controlling expenses, “we really kept a lid on what we were spending,” Rose said. That included eliminating interim employees, “rent-a-nurses” provided by an outside company, and replacing them with full-time staff. Interim employees can cost one and a half to two times what fulltime employees cost. Eleven positions in the emergency department, as well as several top administrative positions, had been filled with interim staff, as were several top administrative positions. “Now our entire administration, our whole senior leadership team, are all permanent employees, people who live in the community,” Rose said. “And it’s not just about the money. People who are permanent employees bring dedication and loyalty to their positions. They really feel like they are a part of the hospital.” Nanticoke is working to improve employee satisfaction. That means increased communication with doctors and nurses. “We are meeting regularly with staff and talking with our physicians,” Rose said. “The staff at Nanticoke Health Services was very good, but they just needed a little bit of a lift. They needed to know that people care about what

they have to say. Now, we have a much happier staff, much more engaged.” Happy employees mean happy patients, Rose said. “It is our philosophy that we are never going to see patient satisfaction improve until employee satisfaction improves.” And happy patients mean

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aware Black Awards website (www.delawareblackawards. com). The top five nominees in each category will be contacted to confirm their participation as a finalist. All finalists will receive community exposure and be honored at the Delaware Black Awards 2009 Gala at the Delaware Theatre Company on Saturday, Nov. 14. Tickets for the gala are available online for $30 per person or two for $55. For information regarding sponsorship opportunities, visit www.delawareblackwawards. com, call 888-494-4334 or email info@whatsyourinspirationinc.com.

numbers, but we will. “We still have work to do to change the community’s perception,” Rose added. “I go out to anybody who will listen to tell them about the good things we are doing, to let people know who we are and that we are on the right track. I am so proud of what we have achieved here.”

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that people are going out into the community with a positive message about the hospital. That boosts the number of people who choose Nanticoke when they need treatment, something that is already happening. “Our outpatient volume is growing,” Rose said. “We aren’t seeing that with our inpatient

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MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 - 9, 2009

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Delmar sets date for casino public hearing Approves bank property purchase By Mike McClure

The Delmar Joint Council agreed to take the issue of the proposed casino to the people. The Council set a town meeting for Sept. 16 at 7 p.m. at the fire hall to allow residents to express their views on a proposal to have a casino on Route 13, across from the Delaware International Speedway. Also on Monday, the Council held a public hearing on the town’s proposed purchase of the former Bank of Delmarva building, located at 12 East State Street. The purchase price of $375,000 includes a generator located at the property. Resident Bill Brittingham questioned why the town would purchase the building, taking it off of the tax roll. The Council and town manager cited future growth of the town as the reason for the purchase of the building, which will be used as a public office/municipal building. “Currently this facility has outgrown itself in terms of staffing,” Bynum-King said of the current town hall building. According to Bynum-King, the town hall is being used for an office during the day and also hosts meetings three to four

nights a week. Once the town moves into the bank building, the current facility may continue to be used to host civic organizations’ meetings. Part of the purchase price is the stipulation that allows the bank to continue to use the drive thru for a number of years. The Delmar Commission (Md.) voted 5-0 to approve the acquisition. The town is looking to finalize the purchase by Sept. 10. The Council also held the first reading of an ordinance authorizing the town to borrow $500,000 from the Bank of Delmarva for the purchase of the building. The Commission will hold a special meeting on Sept. 9 to hold a public hearing on this issue. Bynum-King also reported that she receive a letter from state of Delaware about the Lecates building, the rundown building located on the corner of State Street and Pennsylvania Avenue. The state said that the property behind building is not public land and that it has no claim on it, allowing the owner to proceed with plans to renovate the property.

Delmar to celebrate 150th anniversary

Town plans week-long celebration By Mike McClure

The Delmar Joint Council approved a resolution and a pair of fireworks permits in preparation for the week-long sesquicentennial (150th) celebration to take place Sept. 20-26. The Council also discussed the activities planned for the celebration during Monday’s meeting. The Council approved a sesquicentennial resolution imposing Brothers of the Brush/Ladies fines for failure to have facial hair (men) or for wearing makeup (women) during the celebration. The $10 fines can be avoided with the purchase of $5 button which will be available at town hall. Proceeds from this activity will go to the committee to pay for the various activities planned. The Delmar Commission (MD) approved a fireworks permit for Sept. 20 from 9-10:30 p.m. The fireworks will open the week-long celebration and will take place at the Mason-Dixon complex. The Delmar Council (DE) also approved a permit for closing fireworks to take place Sept. 26 from 9-10:30 p.m. at the Delmar Middle and Senior High School. Delmar (Md.) Mayor Doug Niblett an-

nounced that the following activities will take place in town Sept. 20-26: Sunday, Sept. 20- opening parade from high school to Mason/Dixon complex, Little Miss and Miss/sesquicentennial pageant, parade trophies, softball games, chamber of commerce games, inflatable games, fireworks Monday, Sept. 21- opening of doctor’s museum, VFW will host demonstrations of dances through the eras Tuesday, Sept. 22- rededication of high ball and caboose and dedication of streetscape, ice cream social and walking history tour, Delmar library open house Wednesday- dinner theater at high school Thursday, Sept. 24- tour of high school and chorus sing Friday, Sept. 25- high school football game Saturday, Sept. 26- yard sale in park at 6 a.m., car show 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., 5-2-1 walk at high school, school band will perform, fireworks at high school There will also be Delmar Fire Company open houses at the fire hall during week with a rolling video and the Delmar model railroad club will be open the night of the walking tour.

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

Montessori School hopes to open in 2011-12 in Laurel By Tony E. Windsor Organizers of a new school in Laurel were on hand at a recent town Mayor and Council meeting to share information on the status of the project. Jennifer Whitcomb, president of the Natural Discovery Montessori Charter School, slated to be built in or around Laurel, said the application process with the state Department of Education is in process. Whitcomb explained that the Montessori Charter School will start its first year with grades K through 3. She said at present, there is no definitive location for the school being released publicly because it has been recommended that during the application phase, the project be able to demonstrate it has the funding to start the project. The closest Montessoribased education curriculum is a private school in Dover. “I live in Delmar and that is too far to drive for my child to attend school,” she said. “There are no Montessori schools located on the Eastern Shore or in Maryland,” she said. Whitcomb explained that the Montessori learning style is based on the whole child and allows each child to learn at their own pace. “Not all children learn in the same way,” she said. “Children need to have educational choices. The Montessori school curriculum allows children to explore and be creative in their learning experience.” The Montessori Method of classroom instruction is based on the scientific observation of Dr. Maria Montessori the first female physician to graduate from the University of Rome. In 1907 she opened

a child-care center for the children of poor families who lived in the slums of San Lorenzo, Rome. Called “Casa del Bambini” (Children’s House) Dr. Montessori observed the learning habits of the children and discovered how the younger children seemed to learn best in a homelike setting with resources that promoted self-motivation and independent learning. Whitcomb said paramount to the method is self-respect, respect of others and a respect for the environment. “Children learn to be self-sufficient and develop socially,” she said. “The child develops socially and learns to be a part of the community, accepting responsibility and ownership. Most importantly, the child masters his or her education at their own pace.”

Rather than “teachers,” Whitcomb said the Montessori school curriculum has “facilitators,” who she said act more as guides, role models, demonstrator, observer of the child’s progress and someone who records the child’s behavior and progress. At the council meeting, the Montessori Charter School representatives handed out surveys and a petition, seeking support of the school. Whitcomb asked that the Mayor and Council consider any support it could give the school, including a letter from the Mayor and Council, which she said would “strengthen the application” and help garner support for approval. She also said that in the Montessori school parents are extraordinarily important part of the process.

“We offer parenting classes and understand what it means to have a Montessori School in the community,” she said. “We believe in the importance of outreach to the parents and if they embrace the learning process they will see the benefits.” Whitcomb said anyone interested in getting involved in the project for the Montessori Charter School is welcome. ”We welcome anyone who wants to help launch this school, whether it is financially or if they would like to support by writing a letter.” Anyone interested in helping with the Natural Discovery Montessori Charter School or seeks more information can call 410-742-5052 or e-mail at director@ admschool.org. Whitcomb said the new Montessori Charter School is hoping to open in the school year of 2011-2012.

Suspect charged in police officer’s death Delaware State Police Homicide Unit has formally charged one of the two suspects in the murder of Georgetown officer Chad Spicer. Delaware State Police have charged Derrick J. Powell, 22, of Cumberland, Md., with murder 1st degree and other related charges. Delaware State Police Homicide also obtained an arrest warrant for Christopher L. Reeves, 20, of Lincoln. Reeves was the driver of the Chrysler Sebring involved in this investigation. At presstime Wedneday Reeves was still a fugitive and should be considered armed and dangerous. Powell was charged with burglary 2nd

because after fleeing from the Chrysler Sebring he entered a residence on the unit block of Savannah Road Georgetown in an attempt to evade police apprehension. The 2nd suspect apprehended during this investigation has not been charged. A preliminary investigation suggests he was not directly involved with the killing of Spicer. However, it must be noted that even though Powell has been apprehended, this investigation and collection of information is still ongoing. It should also be noted Cpl. Shawn Brittingham was struck in the neck by a projectile fragment. Cpl. Brittingham is

listed to be in stable condition. Anyone having contact with Reeves is asked to call Troop 4 at 856-5850, and Crime Stoppers at1-800-TIP-3333 or for immediate assistance dial 911. Gov. Jack Markell ordered flags be flown at half-staff in honor of Spicer. The flags will fly at half-staff until the morning after his funeral.

Christopher Reeves

CAMP FOR KIDS - On July 24-25, the Dagsboro American Legion Post 24 assisted by the Laurel American Legion and other area Legion Posts hosted a camp at Trap Pond State Park for children of members of National Guard Unit 262 of Dagsboro that are on active status overseas. Campers participated in campfires, fishing, pontoon boat rides and hiking. The Laurel Fire Dept. provided EMS and fire coverage for the weekend. The Houston Vol. Fire Co., graciously donated the use of this ATV for the weekend for quick access around the State Park. Shown here are campers with Laurel Deputy Chief Mike Lowe.

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951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243 The Seaford Star (USPS #016-428) is published weekly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 951 Norman Eskridge Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Dover, DE. Subscriptions are $19 a year in county; $24 a year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharptown, and Federalsburg, Maryland; $29 elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address changes to Seaford Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243 The Laurel Star (USPS #016-427) is published weekly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 951 Norman Eskridge Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Dover, DE. Subscriptions are $19 a year in county; $24 a year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharptown and Federalsburg, Maryland; $29 elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address changes to Laurel Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

PAGE 5

Nuisance ordinance may not be Council’s September 8 meeting Continued from page 1

The LLA is moving forward with cautious optimism as discussion continues with the town’s Mayor and management. Laurel Landlords’ Association President Calvin Musser says he feels that the ongoing discussions with the town have shown the town Mayor and management to be “receptive” to their concerns about the proposed 2009-10 ordinance.

Musser said on Monday afternoon that he understands that the town is considering tabling the Second Reading of Ordinance 2009-10, but said he cannot be absolutely sure until the night of the meeting. “I’m not sure what might happen at the meeting,” he said. “I was told prior to the start of the last meeting that the Ordinance would not be going forward and look what happened,” he said, referring to the surprise approval of a First Reading.

Musser said he feels the town is being receptive to the concerns of the landlords and dong the proper research to get questions answered. “We want to keep working together in a manner that will bring us together so we can have an ordinance that is good for all concerned,” he said. Musser said he thinks the one thing that seems to be getting less attention is the fact that Ordinance 2009-10 is no longer exclusively a landlord and rental property

issue. “This ordinance encompasses everybody, rentals and private property owners alike,” he said. “It is no longer just the rentals and landlords who have an interest in this ordinance. Everybody should be interested in how it is written.” It is expected that Ordinance 200910 will not be a part of the agenda for the Monday, Sept. 8, Laurel Mayor and Council meeting.

Delmar school board gets update on Nemours partnership, district ranking By Cathy Shufelt Ms. Terri Addlesberger, director of Food Services for the Delmar School District, reported to the Delmar Board of Education on the progress of the district’s partnership with Nemours Health Prevention Services during the board’s Aug. 18 meeting. Addlesberger told board members that the grant monies given to the district from Nemours have paid for a variety of programs and activities such as healthy food tastings, athletic clinics, gym memberships, after prom party activities, and the Wellness Center’s “Lunch and Learn” programs, among others. The grant has also paid for the purchase of supplies such as blood pressure cuffs, scales, and the supplies used to build a homecoming float.

To date, the district has received approximately $10,500 with another $3,000 yet to be dispersed. Projects for the upcoming school year include a walking trail on campus as well as a community walk. In addition to the grant, Addlesberger is working with Nemours to create an updated wellness policy for the district. Delmar’s food services department has also created a “Farm to School” program that brings in fresh local fruits and vegetables with the help of local farmers. “We spend over $2 per child for lunch and it then costs the students $1.50,” said Addlesberger. “We are able to provide a la carte choices and a minimum of seven or eight main food choices each day.” This variety is due, in part, to the ability of most of the district’s children to purchase their meals themselves without

relying on the free or reduced cost lunch program. “We are pleased to be able to offer quality food and such a variety of choices to all of our students,” commented Addlesberger. Jan Steele, director of finances, gave board members the preliminary budget breakdown for the 2009-2010 school year that has just been sent to the Delaware Department of Education (DOE). The $12.5 million budget will be reviewed by DOE and returned to the district. For fiscal year 2010, the State of Delaware had to reduce the state budget funding for the Department of Education. However, Federal Stabilization Funds will be used to replace the budget cuts, and these funds will be used at the district’s discretion. Steele told board members that this is a preliminary budget only, and that more will be known about the district’s

financial status in September. Assistant Superintendent, Charity Phillips, reviewed the district’s Department of Education ranking as compared with other schools in the state. To see how Delmar fared in the ranking, visit the Department of Education’s website at: www.doe.k12. de.us/. The district will be audited by the State Department of Education this November. Twenty-three different areas will be reviewed including Human Resources, Guidance, Special Education, Science, Title IX adherance, and Health Services, among others. After all reports were in and discussed by the board, Dr. David Ring, superintendent of the Delmar School District, assured board members that “…we are off to a great start, we’re ready, and we’re prepared for a new school year….”


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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

Business Free job workshops offered

Three free workshops are available to help people find new jobs. These workshops will be held at the Sussex County Administrative Office West Complex, 22215 DuPont Blvd., Georgetown, on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 1-4 p.m.; Tuesday, Sept. 15, 1-4 p.m.; and Wednesday, Sept. 23, 1-4 p.m. Topics for the first workshop will be “Overcome the Trauma of Job Loss” and “Maximizing Resources for Your Job Search.” The second workshop will cover “Resume Writing” and “Understanding the Interview Process.” The final workshop will consist of one on one consultations and mock interviews. Registration is limited to 20 participants per workshop. Call RSVP at 856-5815 to register. The workshops are sponsored by DelMarVa SHRM, Delaware Innovation at Work and the Sussex County Retired and Senior Volunteer Program.

In the Executive Assistant Certificate Program participants will gain a working knowledge of executive and administrative duties and the ability to train and supervise lower level clerical staff. Students learn business communication and writing skills, supervisory skills and how to effectively listen and schedule appointments; the 12-session course begins Oct. 15. Funding through the Department of Labor is available for these courses. For more information, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate & Community Programs at 302-854-6966.

CFM names top producers

Kathy Farnell, vice president of Callaway, Farnell and Moore Real Estate has announced that realtors Tina Moore and Randy Hill were the firm’s Top Producers for July. Tina was the top selling agent for the month, and Randy ranked first in property listings. To reach Moore and Hill, call 302-629-4514.

New certificate programs offered

Prepare for new employment opportunities or update skills by enrolling in new certificate programs offered by Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. Certificate programs, offered this fall, include general office receptionist, medical office receptionist, administrative assistant and executive assistant; all classes meet Thursdays from 6 to 9 p.m. Acquire the necessary skills to be a general office receptionist such as greeting visitors, handling incoming calls, scheduling appointments as well as performing general administrative duties in this eightsession program beginning Oct. 1. In addition to general office receptionist skills, prospective medical office receptionists will master tasks specific to the medical industry such as interacting with physicians and processing Medicare, Medicaid and insurance claims in an eightsession program beginning Oct. 1. Participants also must complete a 16-hour online medical terminology course. Students in the Administrative Assistant Certificate Program learn to prepare statistical reports, conduct research as well as perform clerical functions such as receiving visitors, arranging conference calls and scheduling meetings; the 10-session program begins Oct. 1.

RIBBON CUTTING - The Laurel Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon cutting at Kitty’s Flowers of Laurel on Wednesday, Aug. 19. In the front row, from left, are Carol Scarfi of County Bank; Al Turchan of Delaware National Bank; Robin Gravenor, manager of Kitty’s Flowers; Don Dykes, Laurel Chamber president; Margaret Foxwell; Wendy Roberts; Joyce Ramsey, office manager, Laurel Chamber of Commerce; and Dave Kordich of Johnny Janosik. Photo by Brandon Miller

will be awarded to individuals who complete the course and receive a passing grade on the exam. Cost is $145 and covers the training, textbook, lunch and certification examination. A reduced course fee of $125 is available for three or more registrants from one establishment. Delaware Dine Safe - a three hour short course session - is designed to focus on the basic principles of food safety and hanHill

Moore

Extension offers food safety classes

The University of Delaware Cooperative Extension is offering ServSafe and Delaware Dine Safe courses this fall. Dr. Anne Camasso, family and consumer science educator for Sussex Cooperative Extension teaches the two courses at the Elbert N. & Ann V. Carvel Research and Education Center in Georgetown. ServSafe will be taught on Tuesday, Sept. 22 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Georgetown. Dine Safe is offered on Thursday, Sept. 10 from 6 to 9 p.m. The ServSafe program is the premiere food safety certification offered by the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF). A ServSafe certificate from the NRAEF

dling. Each participant receives a training guide and a certificate of participation. The Dine Safe short course is $25 and can be scheduled at a business location provided there are at least 10 employees enrolled. Registration forms for both classes are available online at www.rec.udel.edu (select either program for the full brochure). For more information, call 302-856-2585, ext. 544.


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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

MO V I E S

Visit seafordstar.com or laurelstar.com for descriptions of current movie selections

The Movies At Midway Rt. 1, Midway Shopping Ctr., Rehoboth Beach, 645-0200 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 9/4 THRU THURSDAY, 9/8 All About Steve . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:15, 4:20, 6:50, 9:05 Extract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:50, 3:05, 5:10, 7:20, 9:50 Gamer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:45, 3:00, 5:05, 7:10, 9:35 The Final Destination 3D . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:10, 3:15, 5:20, 7:25, 9:50 Halloween II . . . . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:45, 4:30, 7:05, 9:30 Taking Woodstock . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 4:10, 6:50, 9:30 Post Grad . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:05, 9:15 Shorts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:50, 2:50, 4:50 Inglourious Bastards . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:40, 3:40, 6:40, 9:40 Ponyo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:25, 3:45 The Time Travelers Wife . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:40, 4:35, 7:00, 9:20 District 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:50, 4:40, 7:15, 9:45 G-Force Disney Digital 3D PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:05, 3:50, 6:20, 8:35 Julie & Julia . . . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:30, 4:00, 6:35, 9:10 (500) Days of Summer . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:10, 9:20 G .I . Joe: Rise of Cobra . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:35, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 The Hangover . . . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30, 9:40 Thursday Evening “Midnight Movies” is now over for this summer season . Look for Art House Theater to return next week . All shows subject to change and availability

Regal Salisbury Stadium 16 2322 N. Salisbury Blvd., Salisbury, MD, 410-860-1370 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 9/4 All About Steve . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:50, 4:35, 7:30, 10:05 Extract . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 3:25, 5:40, 8:05, 10:25 Gamer . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:30, 3:00, 5:20, 7:45, 10:15 Final Destination 3D . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:40, 3:50, 6:00, 8:10, 10:20 The Final Destination R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:50, 2:55, 5:00, 7:25, 9:40 Halloween II . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . 1:45, 2:45, 4:30, 5:30, 7:10, 8:00, 9:55, 10:30 Taking Woodstock . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:15, 4:00, 7:00, 9:50 Inglorious Bastards . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:30, 3:45, 4:50, 8:15, 9:25 Post Grad . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:10, 7:05 Shorts . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:25, 2:35, 4:45 District 9 . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4:10, 7:15, 10:00 The Time Traveler’s Wife . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:55, 3:35, 6:40, 9:20 G .I . Joe: The Rise of Cobra . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:10, 4:05, 6:50, 9:30 Julie & Julia . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:45, 3:40, 6:45, 9:45 G-Force . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:35, 2:50, 5:05, 7:20, 9:35 Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:55, 10:10 OC = Open Captioned For additional dates and showtimes go to www .fandango .com/21804_movietheatershowtimes

Clayton Theater Dagsboro, Del. 20 732-3744

CURRENT SCHEDULE WAS UNAVAILABLE AS OF PRESS TIME SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 8/28 THRU THURSDAY, 9/3 Julie & Julia . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nightly 7:30, Sunday 2:30 & 7:30

TIDE CHART

09/04 09/05 09/06 09/07

SHARPTOWN

H-5:41A L-12:10A L-12:48A L-1:26A

L-11:54A H-6:15A H-6:49A H-7:23A

09/08 L-2:07A H-7:59A 09/09 L-2:51A H-8:39A 09/10 L-3:39A H-9:24A

H-6:03P L-12:26P H-6:37P L-12:58P H-7:12P L-1:32P H-7:48P L-2:09P L-2:50P L-3:37P

H-8:26P H-9:09P H-9:58P


pAGe 8

MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 - 9, 2009

County Airport’s newest runway is ready for take off County officials, joined by local and state dignitaries, officially opened a new crosswind landing strip, known as Runway 10-28, during a ceremonial landing and ribbon cutting on Tuesday, Aug. 25, at Sussex County Airport near Georgetown. Construction of the nearly $5.5 million project ended recently after almost three years of work to demolish an abandoned runway and rebuild it for use. The rebuilt runway will serve as a secondary airstrip at the airport. The new runway replaces a smaller alternate strip that is now part of the airport’s taxiway system. “This new, longer crosswind runway gives us an increased level of safety, as well as increased capability for the airport,” Airport Manager Jim Hickin said. “This makes Sussex County Airport more attractive as a general aviation field because the added runway offers pilots another choice and it means that we can now accommodate larger, private aircraft that may not have been able to use our former crosswind runway. Last used by aircraft in the 1970’s,

Learn more about Boy Scouts

Cub Scout Pack 381 in Seaford invites boys, in grades 1 through 5, and their families, to an evening of fun on Thursday, Sept. 10, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., at Grace Baptist Church on Atlanta Road in Seaford. Come play games and learn more about scouting, which is designed to help boys in sports, school, religion, friendship and self achievement. Leaders will be on hand to answer questions. For more information, call Paula Zoller at 302-628-9350.

Fall plant sale

Get everything you need for your fall gardening at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital’s Look-In Glass Shoppe from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 18 at the “East Coast Perennials” plant sale. Join us for savings on mums, bulbs, pansies, pumpkins, Halloween items, gifts, birding supplies and more. The sale will be held rain or shine in the picnic area behind the hospital. All proceeds from benefit Nanticoke Health Services.

County officials, joined by local and state dignitaries, officially opened a new crosswind landing strip, known as Runway 10-28, during a ceremonial landing and ribbon cutting on Tuesday, Aug. 25, at Sussex County Airport near Georgetown.

Runway 10-28 was one of three originally built at the airport in 1943. Of the three original runways, all 5,000 feet long, one remains today as the airport’s main runway; another was converted decades ago into the County’s industrial park. Runway 10-28 was most recently used as a parking lot for former military cargo planes. Construction on the project began in late 2006 with the demolition of the old Runway 10-28. Its concrete surface was recycled and used as the foundation layer for the new crosswind runway. Crews then laid a 3 inch thick asphalt surface to complete the airstrip, which officially measures at 3,109 feet long and 75 feet wide. Also included in the project was the construction of adjoining taxiways, including the conversion of the former crosswind runway nearby, to connect the airstrip to the airport’s 5,000 foot long main runway and other parts of the complex. More than 90% of funding for the project is coming through the Federal Aviation Administration, with the Sussex County Council contributing $379,406 and the State of Delaware funding the rest.

“This airport is a gateway to commerce, to business, and to recreation in Sussex County,” County Council President Vance C. Phillips said. “Without improvements such as this, Sussex County runs the risk of being passed over by countless visitors and new business opportunities.”

The Sussex County Airport, owned and managed by the Sussex County government, is a general aviation field that records nearly 50,000 landings and takeoffs annually, and is popular with a mix of small private and large commercial-type aircraft.


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PAGE 10

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

County must pay more to build Laurel paramedic station By Ronald MacArthur The cost of building the new Laurel paramedic station has increased, and not one more item has been purchased. Even though construction is taking place, Sussex County officials must pay an additional $56,000 in wages because of the state’s prevailing wage regulations. The added cost drives the price of the project to more than $200,000. Forty-percent of the cost is covered by the state with state emergency medical services funds. County administrator David Baker said prevailing wages, which must be paid if state funds are used in a project, are double the wages normally paid by contractors in the county. Council approved the change order by a 3-1 vote so work could continue on the project. Council President Vance Phillips of

Laurel voted against the request and Councilman Sam Wilson of Georgetown did not vote. Councilwoman Joan Deaver of Rehoboth Beach, and councilmen Mike Vincent of Seaford and George Cole of Ocean View voted in favor of the change order. “We were not aware this was a requirement when this was bid,” Baker said. Mike Izzo, county engineer, said his office was under the impression the project was to be advertised without prevailing wages dialed in. The prevailing wage law, passed in 1992, establishes regulations and guidelines for state-funded construction job wages. For example, prevailing wages for state projects in Sussex County include $54 an hour for electricians; $42 an hour for bricklayers; $39 an hour for painters; and $36 an hour for carpen-

ters. County attorney Everett Moore said the discrepancy was found by the Delaware Department of Labor during a routine audit of a subcontractor’s contract. Work had already begun on Medic Station 102 located off Route 13 outside Laurel. “There are very severe penalties by not complying,” Moore said. “We are contractually obligated to pay the wages. It is the law.” “It’s not a good law,” Cole responded. “This is what happens when you take federal and state money. There are always strings attached.” Vincent said he wanted the county administrator to send a letter to Gov. Jack Markell to voice the county’s extreme displeasure. “Everyone was happy with the contract. This is a waste of Sussex County taxpayers’ money,” he said.

For more information on the state’s prevailing wage law, go to delawareworks.com and click on prevailing wage on the left-hand column.

Learn more about Girl Scouts

The Girl Scouts of the Chesapeake Bay Council invites girls and adults interested in learning more about Girl Scouts to the following events: • Saturday, Sept. 19 - 10 a.m. to  1 p.m. - Skate World, 28393 Seaford Road, Laurel; Cost: $7.50 (includes skating, pizza and soft drink, $2.50 additional skate rental) • Saturday, Sept. 26 - noon to 4 p.m.  - Lake Forest Aquatics Center, 5407 Killens Pond Road, Felton; Cost: $5 (includes admission, snack and patch) To learn more about Girl Scouts of the Chesapeake Bay Council, visit www.GSCB.org or call 1-800-374-9811 or 410-742-5107.

New legislation expands state’s LABOR DAY victims compensation program Delaware crime victims are now eligible to receive state compensation for mental health counseling, costs of attending criminal proceedings, and other expenses through legislation signed into law by Governor Markell recently. House Bill 133 expands the newly revamped Delaware’s Victims’ Compensation Assistance Program (VCAP), formerly called the Violent Crimes Compensation Board. Through House Bill 133, innocent victims may request compensation when a “cold case” is reopened or the offender seeks release through the Board of Parole or appears in court for purposes of post-conviction relief or appeal of the conviction. Victims are now also eligible to apply for compensation in the event of a retrial of the offender on the original charges involving the victim, including penalty hearings, or upon the execution of the offender. Compensation is available for one year

before, or two years after, the offender’s release from prison or the date of the retrial, parole hearing, or other court-related events involving the offender. Signing of House Bill 133 follows the recent enactment of House Bill 253, which transferred the Victims’ Compensation Assistance Program to the Delaware Department of Justice, streamlined the compensation process for innocent victims of crime, and provided Delawareans statewide with local access to victim compensation services. VCAP is funded through penalties paid by individuals convicted of a criminal act or adjudicated as a delinquent. In an effort to expand access to victim services, VCAP help desks will be staffed throughout the state. In Sussex County, a help desk will be staffed at the Department of Justice, Georgetown office, 114 E. Market St., every Monday between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m., beginning Sept. 14.

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PAGE 12

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

Teen Challenge benefits from Phillips’ crab feast

Sussex County Councilman Vance Phillips enjoys the day with some crab pickers. Left to right are Ernestin Oney, Lavonda Cromwell and Arlene Holmes, all of Laurel. This is the 14th year Phillips has hosted the crab feast.

Sussex County Councilman Vance Phillips, right, poses with Bob Carey, executive director of Teen Challenge, the beneficiary of a crab feast hosted by Phillips Saturday, Aug. 29, at Trap Pond State Park. Several hundred attended the event. Based on strong Christian principles, the Seaford-based program is part of a five-phase process to help young men break the cycle of addiction. Photos by Ronald MacArthur.

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State Rep. Dan Short of Seaford, left, talks with Ron Sams, chairman of the Sussex County Republican Party, during the Delaware Teen Challenge Crab Feast and Watermelon Extravaganza at Trap Pond State Park.

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FEEL LIKE A FISH Brothers file suit alleging OUT OF WATER? MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 - 9, 2009

pAGe 13

sexual assault 37 years ago

NEW IN TOWN?

Former Seaford High School teacher named in lawsuit By Tony E. Windsor The Seaford School District and a former middle school teacher are being named in a civil lawsuit alleging the sexual assault of a former student in the 1970s. The suit filed by the Neuberger Firm, Wilmington, names both the current school district Board of Education and those board members who served in 1972. Former Seaford District Superintendent, William Long and current superintendant Russell Knorr are also named as plaintiffs in the suit. The teacher who is at the center of the allegations is former French teacher Kenneth Bryson, Spruce Street, Seaford. The allegations in the lawsuit are being brought against the district and Bryson by two brothers who are former Seaford School District students, Frank and David Eldridge. It is alleged in the lawsuit that Bryson became close to Frank, the older of the two brothers, when he was a student in Bryson’s middle school French class. According to court papers, Frank was experiencing a problem at home and medical issues caused his father to be absent from the household. The lawsuit alleges that Bryson became close to Frank Eldridge and began spending time with him both in and out of the school setting. Eldridge alleges that during this time, Bryson took him on bike trips around Delaware and Maryland and had him as a guest in his home. While with Bryson, Eldridge alleges that the teacher “raped and sexually assaulted” him at least 11 times during the year of 1972, one incident is alleged to have occurred in the back of Bryson’s school classroom. Eldridge contends in the lawsuit that Bryson took him on a trip to Maine to visit with another teacher. While on the trip, Eldridge alleges that Bryson raped him on one occasion. Shortly after returning from the trip, Eldridge said he was sent to live with an uncle and did not return to Seaford until he was 18-years-old. The lawsuit alleges that when Frank Eldridge left Seaford, Bryson visited his mother’s home, where his 10-year-old brother, a fifth-grade Seaford School District student also lived. The lawsuit states that Frank and David Eldridge’s mother was “comfortable and familiar with Bryson” because she felt he had taken an interest in Frank Eldridge’s well-being. The lawsuit alleges that Bryson requested the younger Eldridge sibling, David, have dinner with him and then spend

the night at his home. The mother approved the visit and it is alleged that while at Bryson’s home the 10-year-old was sexually abused by the teacher. In filing the lawsuit, the Eldridge brothers are alleging that the school district board of education and superintendent had “actual or constructive knowledge and actual notice of prior misconduct by Bryson which endangered students and subjected them to sexual abuse.” The suit also alleges that the school officials also had “actual or constructive knowledge of childhood sexual abuse, solicitation, and harassment” which was being committed against the Eldridge brothers and other students by Bryson. When contacting the Seaford School District, Superintendent Dr. Russell Knorr said the lawsuit is an issue of confidentiality and he had no comment about it. Raeann Warner, of the Neuberger Firm and attorney for the Eldridge brothers, said it is believed that the district knew about Bryson and his alleged inappropriate activities with students, including allegations that he had students “coming to and from [his] home, where he plied them with alcohol and cigarettes.” Warner said there are other people who are willing to corroborate the allegations in the lawsuit, but she will not release any names at this time. Warner said the civil lawsuit has been filed in keeping with the July 10, 2007 enactment of the “Delaware Child Victim’s Act of 2007” and Delaware common law regarding childhood sexual abuse by a public school teacher. The suit is civil in nature because Delaware does not pursue criminal allegations of sexual abuse prior to July 1987. Warner said Eldridge is hoping that by filing the lawsuit and identifying him and his brother as victims of sexual abuse, there may be others who will contact authorities and disclose possible incidents involving Bryson, some that may have occurred after the July, 2009 cutoff for criminal prosecution. Seaford School District attorney, Roger Akin, Wilmington, is representing the district and all of those defendants named in the lawsuit. He said he has been meeting with a variety of past and present Seaford School District staff to discuss the allegations. Akin said at this time he has no comment regarding the lawsuit; however, he will be issuing a formal response in the next few weeks to the Kent County Superior Court where the lawsuit was filed. Calls and messages left at Kenneth Bryson’s home have not been returned.

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pAGe 14

MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 -9, 2009

Health Three join NMH staff

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital welcomes Meredith Arthur (formally LeQuear), DO; Dayana Duguerre, CPNP; and Patricia Donovan, MD to the staff of Nanticoke Pediatrics located at 613 High St. in Seaford. Dr. Arthur has been providing pediatric care to the community since 2007. She is board Duguerre certified by the American Board of Pediatrics and the American Osteopathic Board of Pediatrics. She is a graduate of the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine and completed her residency in a combined program at Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center and WinArthur throp University Hospital on Long Island. Duguerre joins Nanticoke Health Services as a certified pediatric nurse practitioner in pediatric inpatient hospital care. Duguerre is certified by the Board of Nursing and the Pediatric Nursing Donovan Certification Board. She completed her master’s of science in nursing from MGH Institute of Health Professions in Boston, Mass. and her bachelor of arts in biochemistry from Regis College in Weston, Mass. She is fluent in French and Creole. Dr. Donovan is a specialist in pediatric inpatient hospital care. She completed her residency in pediatrics at Metropolitan Hospital Center/New York College of Medicine in New York and her medical degree at Universidad Latina of Panama. To schedule an appointment at Nanticoke Pediatrics, call 302-629-6525.

Lawson joins Delaware Hospice

Lydia Ruth Lawson, M.D., of Milford, has joined the medical staff of Delaware Hospice as a regional medical director with primary responsibility for the new Delaware Hospice Center. Dr. Lawson will provide medical expertise to Delaware Hospice’s care teams and will consult and collaborate with physicians. She will conduct educational seminars to health care profesLawson sionals to gain a better understanding of hospice care. Dr. Lawson earned her medical degree from Columbia University College of Phy-

sicians and Surgeons in New York, and completed her Family Practice Residency at the University of New Mexico’s Department of Family and Community Medicine. She holds professional certifications in Hospice and Palliative Medicine and Family Practice. Dr. Lawson has served for more than 15 years in the roles of both physician and administrator for the University of New Mexico Hospital, Lovelace Health Systems, and Presbyterian Hospice in Albuquerque, N.M.

Committee to meet

Sussex County’s Advisory Committee for the Aging & Adults with Physical Disabilities will take its September meeting on the road, hosting a session in which the public is encouraged to attend to ask questions and learn more about the issues facing today’s seniors citizens and residents with physical challenges. The Advisory Committee invites the public to attend the committee’s next meeting at 10 a.m. Monday, Sept. 21, at the Greenwood CHEER Center. The forum will be an open session to discuss a variety of topics, including transportation, health, state and non-profit services, and more. The Sussex County Advisory Committee for the Aging & Adults with Physical Disabilities is an 11-member panel established by the Sussex County Council to be an advocate for programs and policies that benefit older and disabled residents. The committee meets on the third Monday of January, March, May, July, September and November. All meetings are open to the public.

MS offers videoconference

Thanks to live videoconferencing technology, members of the Delaware Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society can stay close to home and still take part in the chapter’s annual meeting on Saturday, Oct. 24, at the Ammon Medical Education Center on the campus at Christiana Hospital in Newark. For the first time, the videoconference will include participants at a satellite location at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. Like the participants in Newark, Sussex County residents who attend the satellite location will also receive lunch, take part in the chapter’s annual meeting and recognition awards ceremony, and enjoy a client-focused discussion about MS research. Cost is $5 per person, and anyone who wants to attend must register by Friday, Oct. 9 either online at www.MSdelaware. org or by calling 302-655-5610.

Prostate screenings offered

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month and the Cancer Care Center staff at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital will provide prostate screenings on Friday, Sept. 18 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the first floor of the Nanticoke Cancer Care Center (located next to the hospital). There is a $5 screening fee and pre-registration is not required. Nanticoke Memorial Hospital encourages men over the age of 50 to take advantage of this service. Also men 40-years-old and at high risk of developing prostate cancer are also encouraged to participate. African-American men have a higher risk for developing prostate cancer, as are men who have a family history of the disease.

For more information, call Nanticoke at 629-6611, ext. 3765.

ticoke Memorial Hospital’s Diabetes Education department at 629-6611, ext. 2446.

duPont Hospital holds raffle

Depression Support Group

Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children is holding a raffle for a HarleyDavidson motorcycle. The motorcycle, a Soft-Tail Fat Boy in Black Denim that includes a riding gear safety package, was donated by Concordville Nissan-Subaru. Tickets are $25 each or five for $100 and proceeds benefit the hospital. The drawing will take place in the hospital lobby on Sept. 11 at 2 p.m. For ticket information, contact Kate Handling at 302651-4383 or khandlin@nemours.org.

NMH holds diabetes classes

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, Seaford, will hold a four-session diabetes educational program beginning Sept. 9 and continuing Sept. 16, 23, and 30 from 5 to 7 p.m. at the hospital. Registration for this class is required. The cost of the foursession program may be reimbursable by insurance. This four-session program includes weekly education sessions and individualized meal planning for diabetes self-management. Our goal is to give you the self-management skills to control your diabetes. Family members/significant others are welcome to attend the weekly sessions. To register and obtain additional information regarding the course, contact Nan-

There will be a free bimonthly Depression Support Group meeting in Laurel on the second and fourth Wednesday evenings from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Any person who has signs and symptoms of depression and is under the care of a professional counselor/MD is welcome to attend. To register, call Life Matters Counseling and Consulting at 302-465-6612.

Living with a chronic disease

Have you been affected by a medical condition that has caused suffering and loss of physical abilities over a period of years? Some examples of chronic disease include cancer, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, arthritis and lung diseases. If so, join Delaware Hospice and The Wellness Community-DE, as they collaborate to offer “Living a Healthy Life with a Chronic Condition”. This free 6-week program begins on Monday, Sept. 14 at 9:30 a.m. and will be held at the Wellness Community’s Sussex facility, which is located at 18947 John J. Williams Hwy, Suite 312, Rehoboth. This chronic disease self-management workshop is open to any persons who have one or more chronic conditions and to their caregiver or family member. To register or receive more information, call 645-9150.


MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 -9, 2009

Groups reach agreement

The National Association of Chain Drug Stores (NACDS) and the National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA) have reached a favorable agreement with the Delaware State Department of Health and Social Services that will restore much of the funding that would have been lost due to rate cuts in Medicaid reimbursement to pharmacists. The associations joined together in filing a lawsuit challenging Delaware’s April 1 rate cuts for Medicaid reimbursement for brand name drugs, which results in reimbursement for many drugs at a level below a pharmacy’s break-even cost. The state has agreed to set reimbursement for brand name drugs at average whole price (AWP) minus 14.5 – an increase of 1.5 percent from the original re-

imbursement structure that led to the filing of the lawsuit. Delaware plans to reduce reimbursement for certain generic drugs, but pharmacies will have an opportunity to petition for increased reimbursement if the new rates are below pharmacy acquisition costs.

Arthritis Exercise program

Nanticoke Senior Center will offer an Arthritis Exercise Class beginning Tuesday, Sept. 8, at 1 p.m. This six-week class will meet every Tuesday and Thursday. Certified Instructor, Kathy Cordrey, will teach the four fundamentals of the Arthritis program: exercise, health education, movement activities and relaxation exercise. Cost is $40 for members, $50 for non-members. Call 629-4939 for more information.

Are we focusing on our patients? By Dr. Anthony Policastro Recently I have been writing about things that add to the cost of medicine in this country. Some of those things add to both cost and patient inconvenience. Jaundice is very common in newborns. We follow the level of a chemical, bilirubin, in the bloodstream in jaundiced infants. In adults the level of bilirubin is usually about one. In newborns the average number on the third day of life is eight. A level of 25 in a newborn is dangerous. For that reason, we do not want the level to go above 20. Therefore, we watch it carefully between 15 and 20. We usually begin treating it with fluorescent lights at 17 or 18 in infants over 72 hours of age. The treatment level is lower in younger infants. Many infants reach the level of eight since it is the average. A significant number of them reach 12. Relatively few reach 15 and even fewer get above 17. At one time all children who were jaundiced had to have blood tests done. Now we can do a skin test to check the level which means many less children have to get their blood drawn. That has led to less suffering from the blood test for the infant and less cost by needing less lab tests done. However, most babies are discharged before the 72 hour point. That means that their bilirubin keeps going up after they leave the nursery. The logical thing to do would be to check their skin level of bilirubin after they leave the hospital. If an infant’s bili-

rubin is less than 12 at discharge, it usually does not need to be repeated. Most children will never get above 15 after discharge. For that reason, the great majority of patients who are followed after discharge have levels between 12 and 15. Logically, we would not have to do blood tests on those infants unless the skin test results rose above 15. However, the Joint Commission that does hospital accreditation requires hospitals to follow manufacturer’s recommendations for lab tests. The manufacturers of the skin test machine have a package insert which was reviewed by their lawyers who want to be very careful about the company getting sued. For that reason, they pick a very low number to be sure. They recommend that any infant that has a skin test above 12 needs to have a blood test drawn. Since all the patients that we follow after discharge have skin tests over 12, they need a blood test done. The reason for the blood test is related to over-cautious lawyers. In order for us to compare blood test to blood test, we need to do one before the infant leaves the hospital. Thus each infant has to get one test before discharge and a second one the next day. This causes pain for the infant and adds to the treatment expense. The overall expense to the medical care system of something like this is relatively low. However, these kinds of things add up. We have to do what is best for the patient and that usually translates to less cost to the system.

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PAGE 16

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

Mentors support area school kids

The Laurel Kids Connection Mentoring Program (LKCMP), a partnership with the Laurel School District, Laurel Public Library and Creative Mentoring, recently completed its second year. The group is looking forward to another great year. The program is supported by the community through donations and grants and an advisory committee. The mayors of both Laurel and Seaford have declared January as National Mentoring Month. LKCMP is designed to produce the following outcomes: • improve academic achievement  through the combined efforts of four Mentoring Project partners; • present schools as a positive place and  thus link that positive school experience more closely to the student’s family; • provide job training and career planning concepts at critical times in the student’s life; and • promote parent & community involvement via the Laurel Kids Connection Advisory Committee This past year, Laurel Intermediate School provided additional support with a Resource Room that was utilized after school, particularly on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

This provided a safe place for mentees to meet even if their mentors were unavailable. Small groups were able to utilize the computer lab, go outside, or work on projects with LKCMP staff. LKCMP reports that 44% of mentees with adult mentors reported a positive increase in their GPA. Students feel that having an adult mentor helps with their grades, even if they are not actually being tutored. Many students shared that they would rather stay longer on mentoring days or meet more often, than go home. The program focuses on job options, careers and higher education with mentees. In the past year, students interacted with members of the First State Force Band, healthcare professionals and individuals who work at state parks. Some mentees also enjoyed a tour of the University of Delaware. This year, the program will focus on strengthening peer mentoring by working with Laurel High School to form a new group of student mentors. The program is also implementing “team mentoring” where students will meet with their mentors one on one in a group setting. Small group activities and Discover Delaware Trips will continue this year as they are very effective.

CLASS OF ‘67 CRUISE - On July 25, members of Laurel High School’s Class of 1967 enjoyed a dinner cruise at Suicide Bridge aboard the River Queen paddle boat. This event was a reunion celebration of members turning 60 this year with 58 members and spouses in attendance. Nearly $400 was raised for the Class of ‘67 Scholarship Fund. The class is approaching its goal of $6,700 to be given out in 2017, the group’s 50th reunion year. The scholarship will be awarded to a student graduating that year in conjunction with Laurel Alumni Association’s annual banquet. In the front row from left are Gary Marine, Scott Phillips, Sara Taylor, Vicki Lynn Mitchell Feist, Dan Alvarez, Steve Golf, Sue Tyndall Phillips, Drew Koster, Warren Benson, Dennis Williams, Edna Purnell Millman and Bob Carey. In the back row are Tom Bradley, Nancy Mitchell Geiger, Jesse White, Sue Warrington-Doud, Burton Brittingham, Steve Brasure, Richard Carmine, Jane Cooper McBride, Cathy Allen Parker, Judy Wharton Baker, Larry Torbert, Dr. Joyce Mutchler Stout-Cosgrove, Doug Calhoun, Brenda McAllister Bramble, Jeff Mitchell, John Rogers and Bob Bethards. Not pictured are Ramona Corbett Austin, Cindy Gordy Mullins and Ron Hastings.

SCHOOL SUPPLIES - Kids at the Boys & Girls Club of Laurel recently received school supplies from the American Legion Auxiliary #19. The Auxiliary donated book bags full of pencils, pens and other school supplies that the kids need to start the new school year. ATLANTA ESTATES, SEAFORD - Act Now! An affordable home w/plenty of living space! 4 BRs & LR, FR, office, sunroom & screen porch! Upgraded kitchen w/all new appliances! Tile flrs & Corian countertops! Ready to move in! Newly painted, oversized 2-car garage & too many other features to list! $239,900. RANDALL ST., LAUREL - Massive 5 BR water- LEE JOHNSON Realtor front home just outside Associate Broker Laurel town limits at the 302-245-2145 302-258-5467 end of a quiet secluded leefarris@remax.net leejohnson1@ dead end street. Living The FARRIS DEAL remax.net space galore with LR, in real estate! Guaranteed Results, formal DR, lg custom kit, office & full bsmt! Selling below apPERIOD. The FR, praised value, so it will not be on the market long! $279,900.

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PAGE 18

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

Community Bulletin Board Class of ’59 seeks teacher

The Class of 1959 is looking for information on one of their teachers, Betty Reynolds. She taught in the Seaford School District. Her son, William Danz Reynolds graduated with the class of 1959. If you have any information, contact Delores Hitch Lloyd at 629-8177 or 6294531.

Flapjack Fundraiser

First State Community Action Agency invites you to enjoy a Flapjack Fundraiser on Saturday, Sept. 12, from 8 to 10 a.m., Applebee’s, Seaford (in the Wal-Mart Shopping Center). Pancakes, sausage, juice and coffee. Come and bring a friend, cost is $5 per person. For tickets or information, call 302-856-7761. Proceeds benefit our programs to help low-income families and communities.

Seaford Library

• Creative Mentoring Volunteer Training at the Seaford Library on Thursday, Sept. 3 at 5 p.m. This is a three hour workshop preparing school mentors for their volunteer experience. Register at www. creativementoring.org. • Do you have health concerns? Confusing lab reports? Questions you should ask your doctor? Visit the Seaford Library on Thursday, Sept. 10 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and meet with our Consumer Health librarian for Sussex County. All services are free and confidential. • Baby Bookworms, a story time for infants, Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m. • Toddler Tales, a story time for walkers, Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m. • Story Time for ages 3-5, Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. • The Seaford District Library has formed a partnership with IHOP to raise money for the library. Eat a meal at the Seaford, Dover, Rehoboth, or Salisbury, Md. IHOP locations and return an itemized receipt along with a comment card to the Seaford District Library. We must have the comment cards with itemized receipts in order to receive the reimbursement. The Seaford Library will receive 10% of the total receipt. • “Lights, Camera, Action!” the Seaford Library hosts “Movie Night” on Thursday, Sept. 17 at 5:30 p.m. We provide the refreshments; all you need to do is enjoy the show. • Join us at the Seaford Library to celebrate Hispanic Family and Culture on Friday, Sept. 11 at 3 p.m. Bring your children for crafts and story time that will enrich their cultural understanding of the Hispanic community. Refreshments will be served. For more information, call Amber Motta at 629-2524 or visit www. seaford.lib.de.us. • Seaford Library Board Meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 15 at 6 p.m.

Underground Railroad

On Tuesday, Sept. 8, at 7 p.m. at the Methodist Manor House, Dr. David L. Ames, director of the Center for Historic

Architecture and Design at the University of Delaware, will offer a Power Point presentation on the Underground Railroad. Dr. Ames will tell how the Harriet Tubman route through Maryland connects with Delaware. His photographs will show specific sites and locations that harbored the slaves as they were escaping. This program is open to the public and there is no charge. For further information call the Seaford Historical Society office at 6289828.

DuPont 25-year dinner

The annual 25-year dinner for DuPont employees will be held Friday, Sept. 11, at the Firemens Memorial Building, Sharptown, Md. Anyone who has not received a letter and who wishes to attend, call Ray Whaley at 537-6113 or Connie Keene at 629-3377.

SHS Class of 1974 reunion

Seaford High School class of 1974 will celebrate their 35th class reunion on Saturday, Oct. 10, at the Seaford Fire Hall. Contact Jan at gjmej@yahoo.com for more information.

Farmers and Artisans Market

Seaford’s Farmers and Artisans Market will be open for the 2009 season until Saturday, Sept. 26 in Kiwanis Park on Saturday mornings from 8:30 a.m. to noon. We encourage local growers to join us by bringing your locally grown and/or organic fruits, vegetables, cut herbs, plants and cut flowers. For registration information, visit www.seafordmarket.vpweb.com or email or call the Market Master, Sonja Mehaffey at 2cats-sonja@comcast.net or 302-245-9494.

Seaford Historical Society raffle

The Seaford Historical Society is offering a raffle featuring a day on the Nanticoke River in the spring of 2010. This allday excursion accommodates a party of six people on a boat ride that leaves from the Marina at Nanticoke River Marine Park in Blades, Seaford. Other festivities included with this trip are mid-morning snacks onboard ship, lunch in Vienna, Md., a selfguided walking tour of historic Vienna, a visit to the Vienna Heritage Museum and refreshments on the ride back to Seaford in the afternoon. A raffle ticket costs only $5 or five tickets may be purchased for $20. Tickets are available at the Seaford Museum which is open Thursdays through Sundays from 1 to 4 p.m., or at the Ross Mansion which is open Saturdays and Sundays from 1 to 4 p.m. At other times call the Seaford Historical Society office at 628-9828 for tickets. The drawing will take place at the Victorian Christmas at the Ross Mansion on Dec. 13, 2009.

Community mentors needed

The Laurel Kids Connection Mentoring Program seeks adult volunteers to mentor a middle school-aged child. Mentors can meet during school lunch time or after

school. Mentors and students meet at the Laurel Public Library and enjoy the benefits of scheduled field trips and events. Mentors are asked for a one hour per week commitment for 12 months. For details contact Shawn Phillips at 629-7790, ext. 17.

Laurel Lioness bingo

Laurel Lioness will host a Vera Bradley Bingo on Oct. 20, at the Laurel Fire Department, at 7 p.m.. Doors open at 6 p.m. Tickets in advance are $20, at the door $25. Tickets also available from any Lioness member or call Cathy, 875-2128, or Erma 875-3055.

Dutch Country’s 20th Anniversary

Plan to attend Dutch Country Market’s 20th Anniversary celebration on Saturday, Sept. 26, at 11233 Trussum Pond Road in Laurel. Special events from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Chainsaw carving, buggy rides, moon bounce, apple butter cooking and more. Call Glenda Petersheim at 302-846-0644 for more information.

Fall Festival

King’s United Methodist Church is hosting a Fall Festival on Saturday, Sept. 26, rain or shine, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Gordy Road, Laurel. There will be homemade ice cream, homemade soup, oyster sandwiches, a bake sale and a yard sale. Gospel music all day with special guest, Kings Ambassadors. Family fun: barrel train rides, fire engine rides, horse drawn carriage rides. For information call 846-7131.

fer. To purchase tickets, you may do so at the Post or call Ann Foskey at 875-0714 or 236-8558.

Ruritan Club BBQ

The Laurel Ruritan Club will hold a chicken bbq on Saturday, Sept. 5, from 10 a.m. till 2 p.m. at O’Neal’s Antiques, Rt. 13, Laurel. Cost is $7 per dinner. Proceeds will benefit local charities.

Laurel Chamber Mixer

The Laurel Chamber of Commerce Mixer hosted by Trap Pond Partners will be held on Thursday, Sept. 10, at 5 p.m., at Trap Pond State Park (screened pavilion). Join us for grilled hot dogs and more. Learn about Trap Pond’s exciting new nature center from DNREC architect Greg Kindig. Come early for a complimentary pontoon ride starting at 3 p.m.

Count on Me Club of Bethel

Count on Me Club of Bethel will sponsor a bazaar on Saturday, Sept. 19, starting at 9 a.m. Serving lunch from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Community House in Bethel. Vendors welcome. Table rent is $10. Space limited. Call Janet 875-3971.

Bethel Historical Society

From 5 to 9 p.m., on the second Wednesday of each month through December, the Laurel Pizzaria is generously helping the Bethel Historical Society with an on-going fundraiser. You can pick up a coupon at the restaurant and when you pay the society will receive 10 percent.

AARP Driving Course

Laurel Senior Center, 113 N. Central Ave., will be holding an AARP Driving Course, Sept. 21 & 22, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cost is $12 for AARP members and $14 for non-members. To register call 8752536.

Dinner/Auction Benefit

The Laurel American Legion and Auxiliary will hold a chicken and dumpling/stuffed shells dinner, dance, auction benefit for Linda and Jack Chambers on Sunday, Sept. 13, from 2 to 6 p.m. at the Laurel American Legion Post #19. Tickets are $18 per person or $35 per couple. Jack Chambers has been diagnosed with cancer and, as a result, Linda has had to leave her job. These are two of the most caring and giving people Laurel has to of-

Young Writer’s Workshop

Candy Abbott, author of Gavin Goodfellow: The Lure of Burnt Swamp will share some of her techniques for writing stories that will be sure to have your readers wanting more at a Young Writer’s Workshop on Thursday, Sept. 10, at 6:30 p.m. at the Delmar Public Library. Pre-registration is not mandatory, but appreciated as there will be refreshments served at the Meet and Greet Book Sign-

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009 ing which will follow the workshop. For more information, call Kathy at 302-846-2478.

Sandwich Sale

Delmar Church of God of Prophecy, Rt. 13 North and Dorothy Road, (3 miles north of MD/DE State line), on Sept. 5, from 9 a.m. until…, will be selling oyster sandwiches, crab cakes, soft crabs, chicken salad, cheese steak subs, hamburgers and hot dogs. There will also be baked goods, a yard sale and car wash. Church phone is 875-7824.

Card & Game Night

The Greenwood Cheer Activity Center will hold a Card & Game Night on Thursday evenings in September and October from 6 to 9 p.m. Join us for rook, dominoes and uno or bring your friends to setup a table of games of your choosing. Beverages and refreshments will be available or you can come early for dinner. For table set-up or more information, call Susan Welch at 302-349-5237.

Greenwood Cheer Dinner Club

The Greenwood Cheer Activity Center will host the Greenwood Dinner Club on Thursdays from 5 to 7 p.m. in September and October. It will be an evening of fellowship and a delicious dinner entrée, dessert and beverage. Cost for members is $5 and non-members is $6. For menus or more information, call Susan Welch at 302-349-5237.

Library Card Sign-up month

September is Library Card Sign-up Month, and the Greenwood Public Library wants to make sure that all residents in Greenwood and surrounding areas have a library card. During the month of September at the Greenwood Library, persons of all ages signing up for their very first card will be given a bag of goodies and a chance to enter a drawing for gift certificates from area restaurants. The drawing will be held Oct. 1. If a current patron has no fines on their account and their old library card is lost, cracked or just plain ugly, the Greenwood Library will replace it for free with a keychain card. For more information, contact the Greenwood Library at 302-349-5309 or visit www.greenwood.lib.de.us.

Face and hand massage workshop

On Friday, Sept. 11, at 6:30 p.m., the Greenwood Library will host a free Face and Hand Massage Workshop. Licensed massage therapist Diana Carey will demonstrate the proper techniques for face and hand massage and then give an opportunity for participants to practice the techniques with their partner. Space is limited and pre-registration is required. Participants must bring a partner plus a towel or pillow. To register, or for more information, call the library at 349-5309.

credit reports, creditors, budgeting, banking, taxes and predatory lenders and other money questions or concerns. The public is welcome to attend. For more information, call Susan Welch at 302-349-5237.

GMS Golf Tournament

Greenwood Mennonite School announces their 7th annual benefit Golf Tournament on Friday, Sept. 25, at Heritage Shores Golf Club in Bridgeville. This is a scramble tournament open to groups and individuals. Registration is from 7 to 8 a.m. with a continental breakfast followed by a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Lunch will be served and prizes awarded at 12:30 p.m. The $100 entry fee per golfer includes the continental breakfast, golf, lunch and prizes. The non-refundable deadline for entries is Sept. 12. Sponsorships for businesses, individuals and churches are available: Eagle - $500, Birdie - $300 and Par - $100. Sponsorships are tax deductible and need to be registered by Sept. 5. For more information and to register, contact Dwayne Landis at 302236-6822.

Friends fundraiser

The Friends of the Bridgeville Library have another delicious fundraiser to promote. All you have to do is enjoy a meal at the Seaford, Dover, Rehoboth, or Salisbury IHOP locations, any day, any meal. Fill out the comment card, staple your reciept to it and drop it off at The Bridgeville Library, Bridgeville Town Hall, or The Providence Sales Cottage at Heritage Shores.

Festival on Saturday, Sept. 12. Craft and flea market spaces are available to rent for the day at $25 for a 10x10’ space and $40 for a 10x20’ space. For more information and forms, call Donna Angell at 629-8077 or email woodlandangell@hotmail.com.

September Adult Plus+ activities

Take advantage of a variety of activities offered in September by the Adult Plus+ program at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. Swim laps at Independence in Millsboro on Mondays and Wednesdays beginning Sept. 9. Share laughs, challenges and fun beginning Wednesday, Sept. 9 while playing bingo or dominoes at the Cheer Community Center in Georgetown. Beginning Wednesday, Sept. 9 learn tips and techniques to capture the moment in a drawing in Basic Drawing Skills. Beginning Thursday, Sept. 10 receive informal instruction in Portrait Workshop or learn the keys to successful watercolor painting in a relaxed environment. Sign up for an entire art course or drop-in for a session when it suits your schedule. Woodcarvers will delight in the handson learning, camaraderie, techniques and demonstrations beginning Thursday, Sept. 10 in the Woodcarvers Club. On Thursday, Sept. 10, the Couples Club will meet to enjoy food and company. The Mixed Singles Club offers the opportunity to share a meal, meet new people and plan social outings on Wednesday, Sept. 16. On Mondays and Wednesdays, Sept. 14 to 30, adults ages 50 and up will receive instruction on the rules and etiquette of golf from 5-6 p.m. at Midway Par 3 in Lewes. Women, ages 50 and up, will have

fun and get exercise while playing volleyball beginning Monday, Sept. 14. Learn basic beginner quilting techniques and patterns, including snowball and the nine patch, and create a lap quilt in a seven-session course beginning Saturday, Sept. 26. For more information, or to register, contact Delaware Tech’s Adult Plus+ program at 302-856-5618.

Millsboro Kiwanis Basket Bingo

The Kiwanis Club of Greater Millsboro will host a Basket Bingo on Saturday, Sept. 26 at the Millsboro Fire Hall on State Street in downtown Millsboro. Proceeds will benefit local youth. Doors open at 6 p.m. and games start at 7 p.m. The Basket Bingo features a selection of Longaberger products, including holiday and retired items. Raffles, 50/50 drawing, door prizes and refreshments will also be offered. Basket Bingo tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door. For ticket reservations or information, call Millsboro Kiwanis at 934-8424 or e-mail gmillsborokiwanis@ mchsi.com.

Relay for Life cruise

Dr. Marie Wolfgang is at this time accepting enrollments for her annual Relay for Life cruise, scheduled for Jan.

People’s Place Fundraiser

The Red Hat Lady Bugs of Bridgeville are sponsoring a fashion show fundraiser for the People’s Place, an abused women’s shelter. The event, which will take place on Thursday, Oct. 29, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Heritage Shores Clubhouse, includes a fashion show (clothing courtesy of Peebles), lunch, Chinese auction, 50/50 and door prizes. Tickets are $20 per person. For ticket information, call 337-9733.

Library holds two events

• An evening with Kevin Fleming, Wednesday, Sept. 16, at 7 p.m. • Premier Carving and Wildlife Show, Friday, Oct. 9, 3-7 p.m.; Saturday, Oct. 10, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, call the library at 302-337-7401.

Democratic Committee dinner

The 35th RD Democratic Committee will hold their annual dinner and auction on Saturday, Sept. 12, at 5:30 p.m. at the Bridgeville Fire Hall. For more information, contact Justin Bailey at 302-2457882 for tickets.

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‘Money Matters’

Jessica Mallamace, Delaware Community Re-investment Action Council, presents “Money Matters!” at the Greenwood Cheer Activity Center on Tuesday, Sept. 15 at 1 p.m. This is a free financial education workshop that covers topics such as

PAGE 19

410

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PAGE 20 24, 2010. This is a 10-night cruise out of New York City (bus transportation to the dock included), visiting San Juan, St. Thomas, Antigua, St. Maarten and Tortola. Call 629-4471 for brochure.

See ‘Jersey Boys’ with Del Tech

The Adult Plus+ program at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus, is taking reservations for a fall trip to see the musical “Jersey Boys.” Witness the rise of four of the most famous blue-collar kids in pop music history, The Four Seasons, in the Tony-award winning Best Musical “Jersey Boys” on Thursday, Oct. 8, at the National Theatre in Washington, D.C. A special discount rate is available for Adult Plus+ members. For more information or to reserve orchestra seats, contact Delaware Tech’s Adult Plus+ program at 302-856-5618.

Smoky Mountain show trip

AARP 915 presents Smoky Mountain show trip & Historic Gatlinburg for the price of $595, for 7 days and 6 nights, Oct. 18-24. Includes: motorcoach transportation; 6 nights lodging including 4 consecutive nights in the Smokies; 10 meals: 6 breakfasts and 4 dinners; guided tour of the Smoky Mountains; four evening shows: Country Tonite, Comedy Barn Variety Show, Magic Beyond Belief, and Black Bear Jamboree; one morning show: Patty Waszak Morning Show; non-stop fun and Southern charm at famous Dollywood. Free time in Historic Downtown Gatlinburg and much more. Departure: Federalsburg, Md. at 8 a.m. then, Rose’s parking lot, Rt 404, Denton, Md. Price: $75 due upon signing. Price per person, based on double occupancy $595. Add $180 for single occupancy. For information and reservations contact 410-754-8189.

AARP offers trips

The following trips are available through AARP of Seaford: Oct. 16 - Strasburg, Pa. Lunch served on the train and then visit the railroad museum. Cost: $69. Four seats left. Nov. 16-20 - Christmas at The Biltmore Estates in Asheville, N.C. A candlelight dinner at Deerpark restaurant and two Christmas shows at two different dinner theaters. Tour the grounds, the Farm Village and the winery. Visit Chimney Rock Park, the Folk Arts Center and the Smith McDowell House with a tour of Asheville. Also a stop at the Farmers Market to see the famous Moose Cafe. Two hot meals per day. Cost: $589 pp double. Dec. 2 - American Music Theater to see a Christmas show. Cost: $92. Three seats left. For more information, contact Jane Dusenbury at 629-4138 or Rose Wheaton at 629-7180.

AARP Chapter 5340 trip

AARP Georgetown Chapter 5340 has planned a trip to Peddlers Village, New Hope, Pa. Crafts & Scarecrow Festival on Saturday, Sept. 9. Leave Georgetown Square, E. Market Street at 7:45 a.m. Price is $35 per person.

Bermuda cruise

A seven-night Bermuda cruise on the elegant cruise ship Celebrity Summit on April 25, 2010 is being offered for under $1,000. Price includes bus transportation

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009 from Seaford to Cape Liberty in New York Harbor, New Jersey, and return. The ship docks for three days in Bermuda. Optional tours and activities on the island are available. A deposit of $300 per person is due Oct. 1, 2009. The cruise benefits the Seaford Library and Cultural Center. For more information call 628-3300 or email barb@misty-travel.com

Vacation with Del Tech

Take a vacation this fall or winter with the Adult Plus+ program at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. View the fall foliage in New York during a four-day motorcoach tour from Oct. 6-9. Highlights include sightseeing in Cooperstown with a stop at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and the Fenimore Art Museum, a voyage on the Catskill Mountain Railroad, and a guided tour of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Explore Egypt in the 12-day “Splendors of the Nile” trip from Oct. 22 through Nov. 2. The group will travel on a luxurious three-night cruise including visits to ancient temples at Aswan, Kom-Ombo, Edfu and Luxor. Take an 18-day trip “down under” to Australia, New Zealand, and Fiji from Oct. 21 through Nov. 7. Experience the joy of the season during the nine-day “Christmas Cruise on the Danube” trip to Germany and Austria from Nov. 30 through Dec. 8. Travelers will explore cathedrals and several Christmas markets including Germany’s oldest and most famous, Nuremburg’s Christmas Market, which began in 1628. Celebrate the Christmas season during the seven-day “Nashville Country Christmas at the Opryland Hotel” from Dec. 2-8. Experience the joy of Christmas during the four-day “Christmas Extravaganza” trip to Washington, D.C. and the Homestead Resort in Hot Springs, Va. Take a Christmas tour of Washington, guided by author/historian Antony Pitch. To sign up for a trip call 302-856-5618.

Symphony Orchestra with epic film scores from the silver screen. Art lovers will enjoy a guided tour of the “Henri Matisse and Modern Art on the French Riviera” exhibit at the Philadelphia Museum of Art on Thursday, Oct. 15. Bask in the splendor of fall during a narrated 2 ½ hour train ride through Red Clay Creek Valley on the Wilmington & Western Railroad on Saturday, Oct. 17. Spend two nights, Oct. 20 and 21, at the Hotel Edison in the middle of New York City’s theatre district within walking distance of a Broadway show, Times Square, or Rockefeller Center. On Saturday, Oct. 24, follow the yellow brick road to the “The Wizard of Oz” at the Dupont Theatre. Enjoy a day shopping, sightseeing or watching a show in New York on Wednesday, Oct. 28. Don’t miss the international blockbuster exhibit “Diana: A Celebration” at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia on Thursday, Oct. 29. Visit the National Aquarium, Maryland Science Center, or Port of Discovery during a day on your own at the inner harbor in Baltimore on Saturday, Oct. 31. For more information or to sign up for these trips, contact Delaware Tech’s Adult Plus+ program at 302-856-5618.

Branson trip

Nanticoke Senior Center and Curran Travel are providing a trip to Branson on Tuesday, Oct. 13, to Wednesday, Oct. 21. The trip includes: round trip motorcoach transportation, eight nights accommodations, great sightseeing tours, admission to nine great shows including Mickey Gilley, Lee Greenwood & the

Bellamy Brothers and Shoji Tabuci. Cost is $1,075 per person-double occupancy, $1,355 single occupancy. A $200 deposit is required. Call 6294939 for details.

Knitting Guild Association

The “Sea Purls” chapter of the Knitting Guild Association meets on the first Wednesday of each month from 10-2 p.m. at the Cheer Community Center in Georgetown on the corner of Route 9 and Sand Hill Road. For details, call 302-854-6776.

AARP membership meeting

AARP Seaford Area Chapter 1084 of Western Sussex County membership meeting Thursday, Sept. 10, at Methodist Manor House Fellowship Hall in Seaford, at 1:30 p.m. Leslie Gale, representative of Easter Seals Georgetown, will be guest speaker. This chapter is open for membership to persons 50+ and better, and are welcome at the hospitality table for refreshments and conversation after meeting. Call Gladys Bonowicz, chapter president, at 875-1519 for more information about this chapter.

Open the Door to Your Dreams…

Day trips

Enjoy day trips in September and October sponsored by the Adult Plus+ program at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. Tour the U.S. Naval Academy and learn about naval history at the Academy’s Museum on Wednesday, Sept. 16. Enjoy high tea at the Officers’ and Faculty Club and lunch in downtown Annapolis. On Saturday, Sept. 19 tour the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island. Monument passes will be provided for entry to the base of the statue. Delight in live entertainment and food while enjoying the work of over 350 artists and vendors at the Annual Fall Craft Show in Occoquan, Va. on Saturday, Sept. 26. Spend the day strolling through the eight Smithsonian museums located on the national mall between the Washington Monument and the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. on Saturday, Oct. 3. Don’t miss “Broadways Best” featuring 40 songs from 33 shows at the American Music Theatre in Lancaster, Pa. on Wednesday, Oct. 7. Celebrate the legends of tap in “Thank You Gregory: A Tribute to the Legends of Tap” seated in excellent orchestra seats on Saturday, Oct. 10, at the Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts in Philadelphia, Pa. On Sunday, Oct. 11, be transported by the uplifting voices of the Baltimore Choral Arts Society and the Baltimore

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PAGE 21

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

invited to attend. Come join us – we all enjoy the trips, lunches/dinners, etc. that we do.

Georgetown AARP

Join Georgetown AARP Chapter 5340 at their monthly luncheon meetings held on the first Monday of each month at 11:30 a.m. at the Sussex Pines Country Club. For details contact Dee Richards at 302-8415066.

ford. New members are always welcome. For information, call Maggie Callaway at 6294846.

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Widowed Persons Service

4x12.45 The Seaford Chapter of the Widowed Persons Service will WEEK 1 have its next meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 15, at 12:15 p.m., at the Golden Corral in 09-03-09 Salisbury. All widowed persons of all ages are

The members of H.A.P.P.E.N., Hearn’s Pond Association for its protection, preservation, enhancement and naturalization will not meet in September. The next scheduled H.A.P.P.E.N. meeting will take place on Thursday, Oct. 8, at 7 p.m. at the Seaford Museum. Anyone interested in attending the meeting is welcome.

Genealogical Society meetings

The Sussex County Genealogical Society, which was established to assist and educate residents of Sussex County on how to research their family hisThe Seaford High School Alumni Association ANSWERS_5x2.25 tory, meets the third Saturday of each month from will hold its first meeting of the new school year on September through May at 10:30 a.m. at the Re84% Week1 Thursday, Sept. 10, at 7 p.m.55% Any alumni, teacher hoboth Beach Public Library. The first meeting of or former student of SHS is invited to attend the the new season is Saturday, Sept. 19. Ed Wright of Executive Committee Meeting held at the Seaford Colonial Roots Book Store will discuss the imporMuseum. For more information, call Donna Angell tance of church records in the research process. On at 629-8077 or email woodlandangell@hotmail. Oct. 6, the Society will begin a Fall Discussion Secom. ries, named the Research Process. Sessions will be held at 2 p.m. on Tuesday afternoons through Nov. Delaware Equine Council 17 at the Rehoboth Beach Public Library. Members The next meeting of the Delaware Equine Coun- and guests are welcome. cil is 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 21, at the State FairThe Society also conducts special interest grounds Exhibitors Hall boardroom. Guest speaker groups on genealogy. One of these groups, Genealis Dr. Heather Hirst, DVM, DE state veterinarian, ogy Bytes, focuses on computer-based computer who will talk about “Euthanasia.” resources. This group meets at the Milton Public Scholarships will be awarded, refreshments and Library on the first Thursday of each month at 2 fellowship to follow. For more information, call p.m. Stan at 302-684-3966 or Peggy at 629-5233. A Speakers Bureau is available to Sussex County organizations and conducts special interest group 39th District Democrats meetings on selected genealogical topics. For more The 39th District Democrats will hold their information, visit www.scgsdelaware.org or call monthly meeting on Sept. 17, at Pizza King in Sea- 302-875-5418.

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PAGE 22

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

Delmar School District makes administrative changes By Cathy Shufelt

Exciting changes are taking place in the Delmar School District. Students, parents and community residents will see a few new faces along with familiar ones in new positions within the district’s administration for the new school year. Shawn Larrimore, formerly assistant principal for Delmar High School has been appointed principal, and Becky Neubert, formerly assistant principal for Delmar Middle School, has been appointed principal at that school. Stepping into the vacated assistant principal positions are Mark Quillen at the middle school and Ashley Giska at the high school. Both Giska and Quillen have extensive backgrounds in teaching and are eager to take on the new responsibilities that come with administrative positions. Superintendent for the district, Dr. David Ring, explained that the “timing was appropriate” to create these new positions given the expansion and growth in the district. Previously, one principal oversaw both schools, and this was becoming cumbersome due to increased enrollment along with the long hours essential to administrative positions. Commenting on what he has been calling the district’s “Shared Leadership Model,” Dr. Ring stated, “We are sharing in the process and business of raising children, and we want to do our part and do the best job possible for our students and their

Delmar High School Principal, Shawn Larrimore (right front), Delmar High School Assistant Principal Ashley Giska (left front), Delmar Middle School Principal Becky Neubert (right rear), and Delmar Middle School Assistant Principal Mark Quillen are ready to begin the school year in their newly appointed positions. Photo by Cathy Shufelt

families as the hub of the community.” Quillen added, “...our (educational) philosophies are the same and this makes students’ transition through school easier, and helps them be more academically and socially successful…” Since being hired for their new posi-

Administrators and principals of the Delmar School District look forward to another great school year. Pictured are: (from left, standing) Ashley Giska, high school assistant principal; Shawn Larrimore, high school principal; Dr. David Ring, district superintendent; Charity Phillips, assistant superintendent; and Jan Steele, finance director. From left are Mark Quillen, Delmar Middle School assistant principal, and Becky Neubert, Delmar Middle School principal. Photo by Cathy Shufelt

tions, all four have been working hard to get to know each other as well as other administrators and teachers in the district, and participating in professional development opportunities in order to create a “leadership network” as Giska enthusiastically named it. “We’re thrilled to have our assistant

principals move up to principal…” said Charity Phillips, assistant superintendent for the district, “…and since Mr. Giska and Mr. Quillen have been here we have all been working together brainstorming and coming up with a lot of new ideas for the district, and are very excited to start the school year.”

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PAGE 23

People Regina Leonhartt, David Vernier wed

Regina Leonhartt and David Vernier

Morris family welcome baby

Natalie Marie Morris

Natalie Marie Morris was born on Aug. 9, 2009 at 12:01 p.m. at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury, Md. She weighed 6 lbs. and was 19 inches long. Natalie was welcomed by her parents Jacob and Candice Morris and her big brother, Nathan of Delmar.

Prostate Screening Friday, September 18th 8:00 am to 5:00 pm Screening to be held at the

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Regina Leonhartt and David Vernier were united in marriage on De. 31, 2008 at St. Elizabeth of Hungary Church in Baltimore. Parents of the couple are Mariellen and Frank Leonhartt of Seaford and Sharon Vernier of Las Vegas, Nev., and Rufus Vernier of Dallastown, Pa. The Rev. Robert Sisk, T.O.R. officiated at the candlelit ceremony. Amy Lucas and Kathryn Vranek, sisters of the bride, were matrons of honor. Bridesmaids were Katherine Miller, Monica Salterelli, Jennifer Sprungle, all formerly of Seaford, and Nancy Leonhartt and Maureen Leonhartt, sisters-inlaw of the bride. The best man was Brian Layman. Larry Mongno, Gary Novello, Edward Leonhartt and Frank Leonhartt, brothers of the bride, and Jon Vranek and Matthew Lucas, brothers-in-law of the bride, were groomsmen. Addy Leonhartt, Julia and Isabelle Lucas and Mia Leonhartt, nieces of the

bride, were flower girls. Jacob Lucas and Mack Leonhartt, nephews of the bride, were ring bearers. The reception was held at the Marriott Waterfront Hotel in Baltimore. The bride graduated from Seaford High School and the University of Delaware with a degree in elementary education and special education. She also received a master’s degree in school counseling from Loyola College of Maryland and is the school counselor at Halethorpe Elementary School in Halethorpe, Md. The groom graduated from Quince Orchard High School in Gaithersburg, Md. and the University of Maryland. He is the Senior Operations Manager for Advantage Services in Glen Burnie, Md. The couple honeymooned in the Dominican Republic. They reside in Baltimore.


PAGE 24

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

Williams tours western U.S. as part of DE Wildlands Firefighting Crew By Lynn R. Parks

Justin Williams is in the second year of a three-year course of study, at the end of which he will be trained as a machinist. But he’s not sure that that’s the career that, after he graduates, he will pursue. “I think I’m going to go with firefighting,” said Williams, 20, a five-year member of the Laurel Volunteer Fire Department. “With that, you’re not doing the same thing every day. Every call is different and challenging.” Williams is just back from a two-week tour in the western United States, where he helped fight fires in Utah and California with the Delaware Wildlands Firefighting Crew. He was one of 20 volunteers selected for the crew, which left Delaware Aug. 7 and returned Aug. 23. “I hope that I get to go back and help out again,” he said. “I had a great time. And I got to go help my country out. It’s important to do as much as you can.” In Utah, the Delaware crew joined up with volunteers from Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia and Ohio. The volunteers walked through land near Salt Lake City that was recently burned, checking for any hot spots that might flare up again. After two days, the group was sent to

Santa Maria, California, on the coast about 150 miles north of Los Angeles, where they did the same thing at the site of a recent 12,000-acre fire. Williams joined the Laurel Volunteer Fire Department at the age of 15. He is also a volunteer with the Middletown Fire Company in Media, Pa., where he is a student at the Williamson Free School of Mechanical Trades. He qualified for the Delaware Wildlands Firefighting Crew after completing a course at the Delaware Fire School, at the end of which he had to walk 3 miles in 45 minutes, carrying a 45-pound pack on his back. “You weren’t allowed to run,” he said. Williams, a 2008 graduate of Sussex Tech, is the son of Gloria Ellis, Laurel, and the late Rodney Williams, who lived in Baltimore and who died while Justin was out west. Williams said that he is happy that he was part of the state’s firefighting crew. “It was very interesting seeing that part of the country,” he said. “And I learned a lot. Fighting wildfires is a lot different from fighting structural fires. “I love being a firefighter,” he added. “I like the feel of helping people in need. It is always good to know that you were there when people needed help the most.”

Williams toured the western United States, helping fight fires in Utah and California.

Messiah’s Vineyard Church

Dawn Collins, REALTOR® Cell: 302-841-5682 Office: 302-629-7711 Fax: 302-628-7747 Email: Dawn@4htr.com

Rt. 13 & Discountland Rd., Laurel, DE 19956 • 302-875-4646

Dr. Carl G. Vincent- Senior Minister Pastor Barry B. Dukes – Senior Pastor

www.messiahsvineyard.org

LAUREL

SEAFORD

Justin Williams of Laurel and fellow members of the Delaware Wildlife Firefighting Crew, check for hot spots in recently burned land near Salt Lake City, Utah.

g n i m o Upc

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Service Times: Sunday Morning 9:30 a.m. Youth Group 7:00 p.m. Children’s Church: During Sunday’s Service

Pioneer’s Club - Kickoff Night – Wednesday Night, Sept. 16 - 6:30 – 8:00p.m. At Chickberry Farms. You do not have to attend our church to be apart of this great kids program. Builds Faith, Explores Nature, Enhances Creativity. No Cost. If you would like to register your child, please call our church office at 875-4646. Charming 3 bdrm, 2 ba home on a corner lot. Home offers eat-in kitchen, landscaped yard and appliances. Great location, close to school, shopping and country club. MLS# 571553 $158,900

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Yard Sale - Saturday, September 19th at 7:00 a.m. - Extra Large Church Yard Sale, Delicious BBQ Chicken, Chili and T.J.’s famous Ice Tea, Delicious Bake Sale Booth, Fall Mums and Pumpkins w/ harvest yard signs, Kids Moon Bounce, and much more. Please come and be apart of this day. If your business would like to order BBQ chicken platters early, call our office at 875-4646. If you have any yard sale items you would like to donate, please call our office and we will pick it up.

The Journey Class - “The Life and Ministry of the Lord Jesus Christ” taught by Dr. Carl Vincent. This course begins Sunday Night, Sept. 20, 6:30 – 9:30 p.m. and Monday Night, Sept. 21, 6:30-9:30 p.m. You do not have to attend our church to be apart of this class. Please call our office if you are interested in more information. Steve Gambrill "The Balloon Man" from Extreme Family Ministries

will be ministering on Sunday, Sept. 27 at 9:30 a.m. His ministry will be fascinating for Adults and Children. Please plan to bring your children and youth group to this special service. We welcome everyone. For more information you can visit his website at www.evangellusions.com


MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 - 9, 2009

pAGe 25

Wish comes true for young baseball fan By Lynn R. Parks When Trace Theofiles of Laurel was told by the Make-A-Wish Foundation that he could do anything he wanted, he didn’t hesitate. “I want to meet Cal Ripken Jr.,” former shortstop and third baseman for the Orioles, he told foundation organizers who interviewed him. “The organizers were kind of surprised,” said Trace’s mother, Melanie. They asked Trace if he was sure about his wish, and reminded him of other wishes he could have granted. Celebrity visits are often hard to arrange, they said, and usually last only five or 10 minutes. “You don’t understand,” Trace, 8, replied. “He’s my hero. My mom tells me that he is one of the greatest baseball players ever.” On Aug. 19, Trace, his mom, his dad, Nick, and his 6-year-old brother, Walker, traveled to Ripken Stadium in Aberdeen, Md., where they sat in the Ripken family skybox and watched a game in the Cal Ripken World Series, a Little League world championship series for boys 11 and 12 years old. The next day, Aug. 20, they met the Iron Man himself. They spent two hours with Ripken in his hotel suite at the Little League complex, eating breakfast and talking baseball. “It was just like we’d known him for-

ever,” Melanie said. “He is a very humble man and adores children. We really thought that Trace would be tongue-tied, but he wasn’t at all. The whole thing was just really cool.” Trace presented Ripken, whose birthday is Aug. 24, with presents — a framed report that he wrote last year on Ripken’s life and an Orioles cap, embroidered with “Happy Birthday Cal” and “You are my hero” — and asked Ripken if he should work on learning how to switch hit. Try it and if it feels comfortable, continue practicing, Cal said, but if it doesn’t, give it up. Ripken also gave Trace words of baseball wisdom. “He told Trace that playing baseball is not about winning,” Melanie said. “He told him that he’s not always going to hit a homerun, that he will strike out and will have errors. There is failure in baseball, he said. But you get up, brush yourself off and keep going.” Maybe Trace, who is in the second year of a two-year course of chemotherapy and steroid treatment, already knows about endurance. In March 2008, he was diagnosed with T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma after doctors found a large tumor in his chest cavity in front of his heart. His parents had taken him to the doctor after he began suffering from shortness of breath and discomfort when lying down. Doctors at the A.I. duPont Hospital for

Trace Theofiles of Laurel through the Make-A-Wish Foundation spends time with his hero, Cal Ripken Jr. Submitted photo

Children near Wilmington, where Trace is being treated, expect a full recovery, Melanie said. Now, except for some pain immediately after monthly chemotherapy injections, Trace “feels fantastic,” she added. This summer, he played baseball with Laurel Little League, where he made

the all-star team, and with the Tom Brown Rookie League. And he recently learned that he was picked for the Diamond Dreams, a traveling baseball team based in Delmar. Continued to page 26

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947-7300 424-2500

Milford

Seaford

Millville

628-4400 537-0900

Georgetown

Laurel

Lewes

Milton

855-2000 877-5000 645-8880 684-2300


PAGE 26

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

Meeting with Cal Ripken Jr. lives up to expectations Continued from page 25

Like Cal Ripken Jr. in the later years of his career, Trace plays third base. But he is learning all positions, his mother said. In particular, she added, he wants to learn to pitch. Trace comes by his love of baseball naturally. His mother, a native of Baltimore, started going to the old Memorial Stadium when she was just 3, taken there by her dad, Harvey Little, who now lives in Millsboro. Little and his wife, Georgiann, still take Trace to Camden Yards, as do Trace’s paternal grandparents, John and Lois Theofiles, Laurel. “I didn’t say anything to Trace about wanting to meet Cal Ripken,” Melanie said. “The Make-A-Wish Foundation wants all the requests to come right from the children. But I don’t know who was more excited before our meeting, Trace

At left Trace Theofiles of Laurel and his brother, Walker, present birthday gifts to Cal Ripken Jr. Above, Ripken teaches Trace some stretching techniques. Submitted photos

or me.” Trace, who is starting the fourth grade at Salisbury Christian School in Salisbury, Md.,

hopes to meet Ripken at least once more, when he goes back to the Aberdeen complex next summer for Cal’s Rookie Camp.

Ripken and his brother, Billy, are coaches for the camp. “Cal Ripken has a passion for baseball and a passion for chil-

dren,” Melanie said. “When we started out, I knew that we were going to meet a great man. We weren’t disappointed.”

K-3. We have signed up for all three levels and will be recruiting student members within the next couple of weeks. We are also recruiting volunteers and mentors, members of our community who are former or current teachers, engineers, or scientists, or parents who want more challenges for their children, to help our students participate in the program. Each fall, the “challenge” is announced and teams will begin working on solving this challenge. On September 3, the JFLL and FLL challenges will be announced and on September 12th, the FTC challenge will be revealed. During the fall, robotics teams will be working on the challenges and preparing for competitions that culminate at the University of Delaware in January. Winners from the Delaware tournament may participate in the

World Championship in Atlanta, Georgia, where students compete for college scholarships worth close to $7 million. We have three teams (JFLL,

FLL, FTC) that need adult mentors. If you are interested, contact Chantel Janiszewski at 302-8756100, Laurel School District’s STEM contact.

Look for announcements for the local competitions in the near future. You will undoubtedly be awed by the work our students will be doing.

Robot competitions are coming to the Laurel School District The following item was submitted by the Laurel School District office

The excitement is building as we begin this new school year with a strong emphasis on science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). We are starting out with our robotics program with FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology), an organization that sponsors annual robot competitions to “generate an interest in science and engineering among today’s youth.” That is exactly what we want to do here in Laurel Schools, from Kindergarten to grade 12. There are three levels of participation, FIRST Tech Challenge (FTC) for grades 9-12, FIRST Lego League (FLL) for grades 4-8, and Junior FIRST Lego League (JFLL) for grades

For more information please call

1-800-404-7080 or visit www.dswa.com


MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 - 9, 2009

pAGe 27

Seaford Historical Society’s fall Victorian Tea at Ross Mansion By Anne Nesbitt

LaureL CLass of 1964 reunion - The Laurel High School Class of 1964 held its 45th reunion on Aug. 7, 8, and 9, 2009. On Friday evening, a crab feast was enjoyed at Chef Fred’s Steakhouse in Salisbury, Md. A tour of the Laurel Intermediate/Middle School was held on Saturday morning, followed by a golf outing. The Saturday evening event was a dinner party at the Seaford Golf and Country Club. On Sunday morning, class members attended the service at Old Christ Church, followed by a bunch at the Country Club in Seaford. The attached photo was taken prior to the dinner party on Saturday evening. Pictured left to right: First row: Donald Wright, Nancy Farrelly Allen, Ron Williams, Judy Whaley Hastings, Sue Adkins Hart, Arlene Seifert Littleton, Jane Ann German Smith, Donna Gordy Huston, Susan Rowe Lloyd, Roger Whaley. Second row: Judy Roslyn West Hutchison, Jack West, Pat Marvil, Donald McGee, Yancey Graves Hillegas, Karen Rider Ray, Charlene Dukes Layton, Ellen Carey Hudson, Grace White Venables, Beverly Benson Sisson, Sue Horsey Hager, Kenneth Callaway. Third row: Robert Smith, Greg Stone, David Goff, Willard Russell, Gary Collins, Joyce Conaway Hickman, Sam Phillips, Shirley Collins Gray, Mike Ellis, Walter Littleton, Bob Haddock, Gary Smith, Gary Brittingham.

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PAGE 28

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

Church Bulletins Family Fun Day

First Baptist Church on Bi-State Blvd. in Delmar, Md. will hold a Family Fun Day on Labor Day, Sept. 7. Activities include a water slide, bouncy house, games, fire truck rides, live country and gospel music, parachute jump, antique car and truck show. Food will be available at reasonable prices. Bring your family and enjoy the fun. For more information, call 410-8963284.

Smith to perform in Salisbury

Grammy winning Michael W. Smith is bringing his “New Hallelujah World Tour” to the Wicomico Youth & Civic Center stage on Thursday, Oct. 29, at 7 p.m. Joining Smith onstage will be musical missionary, Matt Maher, American Idol season six Top 5 finalist, Phil Stacey and Meredith Andrews who was recently named Christian music’s most promising new artist by Billboard magazine. Tickets, which range from $20-$30 plus fees, are available online at www. WicomicoCivicCenter.org, by phone at 410-548-4911, or in person at the Civic Center Box Office.

United Holy Ghost Gospel Jubilee

United Holy Ghost Gospel Jubilee will be held Sept. 11, at 6 p.m., at Clarence St. Church of God, 744 Clarence St., Seaford, in support of the youth,

featuring Minister Frank Gibbs as MC of the hour. Also featuring: The Sussex Community Mass Choir, Rosemary Martin/ Charlotte, Michelle and Company, Maria West, The Abbott Family, Fontaine Nichols, Psalm 149, Cynthia Foreman, The Joshua Crew and Alberta Smith. Contact 302-858-8265, or 302-519-8771, for more information.

St. Luke’s new Bible Study

At St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, Janet Hubbard will be leading a new Bible Study beginning Tuesday, Sept. 15, at 9:30 a.m. The study will be from the book, “Her Name is Woman” by Glen Karsen. For further information contact Janet at 628-0417.

Dr. Michael Scott visits Mt. Olive

On Saturday, Sept. 19, at 7 p.m., Dr. Michael Scott of Jerusalem Baptist Church, Temperville, Va., will be at Mt. Olive Baptist Church, 108 First St., Bridgeville. Pastor is Woodrow Evans. For more information, contact Sister Paris Twyman, 410-754-9135; or the church at 302-337-7593.

Usher Day Service

There will be a joint Usher Day Service at Mt. Calvary United Methodist Church, Bridgeville, on Sunday, Sept. 13, sponsored by Bethel and Mt. Calvary U. M. Churches.

Service will start at 3:30 p.m. Guest preacher will be the Rev. Gregory Nelson of Bethel A.M.E. Church, Milford. Contact the Rev. Baron Hopking, pastor, at 337-8975.

Fall back into fitness

Come join “The Fit and Fun Friends” in fitness Mon., Wed., Fri., at 9 a.m., Tues. and Thurs. at 5:30 p.m. Six-week session begins the week of Sept. 14, and meets in St. John’s UMC Fellowship Hall in Seaford (sponsored by St. John’s but open to the public). Beginners to intermediate participants are welcome in this fun, faith-filled, coed, non-competitive, resistance training, stretching, high/low aerobic class. Get your Dr.’s okay and come try a free one to see if it meets your needs. Only a 6-8 week commitment at a time required. For more information or to register call 24 year AFAA certified fitness professional, Carol Lynch, 629-7539.

Bethel Church fundraiser

On Saturday, Sept. 19, a spaghetti and meatball fundraiser dinner will be held at Bethel Church Community House – west of Seaford, north Oak Grove Road, from 4-6 p.m. Dinner includes salad, bread, drink and dessert. Donation is $8 – tickets only. Call 410-479-3205 or 629-7117. Eat in or carry out.

Church flower sale

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church is selling fall mums again this year. The flowers come from Lakeside Nursery in Laurel and the mums are in 9 inch pots. The price is $4.50 each and they will be very healthy. The colors are pink, bronze, red, burgundy, a daisy mum white and a daisy mum yellow. The church is also selling 6-inch pots of pansies in yellow and blue and the price is $3.75 each. Pick up is Saturday, Sept. 19, between 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. at Jackson-Hewitt Office, Nylon Capital Shopping Center. Vouchers for nursery pickup at Lakeside are available at the church office, 6297979. Call 629-7272 or email wwharp13@ comcast.net with orders.

Living Free

Another “Lifestyle Matters” Seminar, on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 6 p.m. Six evening sessions, Sept. 22, 24, 29, Oct. 1, 6, 8. Living Free, the latest Lifestyle Matters seminar, will help participants understand how the brain works. Nightly DVD presentations examine how addictions are formed and provide practical tools for building a better brain, better habits and a better life for good. Topics covered • Obesity and food addictions •Substance and prescription drug

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship Sunday Family Worship 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. 94 Walnut Street, Laurel, DE (across from GameZone) 302-875-7873 www.laurelnazarene.org

A church you can relate to

CHURCH OF CHRIST

1010S.C entral Ave., Laurel Ph: 875-7748 Minister: Ian J. Drucker Worship Services: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. BibleS tudy: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m. In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

510 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE Rev. Donna Hinkle, Pastor Church: 875-4233 Sunday Services: 8:30 am Praise 9:30 am Sunday School,10:45 am Worship

Centenary United Methodist Church

“Where Caring is Sharing” “NEW SONG!” - Contemporary Celebration, 8:45 a.m. Sunday School, Classes for ALL ages, 9:45 a.m. Traditional Family Worship, 11:00 a.m.

Rev. K. Wayne Grier, Pastor, 875-3983 200 W. Market St., Laurel, Del.

DIAL DAILY DEVOTIONS: 875-4309

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church

600 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE 19956

(302) 875-3644

The Rev. Dr. Howard G. Backus, Rector www.dioceseofdelaware.net/churches/stphlps.html Holy Eucharist with Healing Sunday ~ 8:30 & 10:30 am Church School ~ 9:30 am

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching

Youth Group Wednesday 7:00 pm

Worship 10:45 a.m. • Sun. School 9:45 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Camp Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

Christian Church of Seaford

Dual 13N., Seaford, DE • 629-6298

SCHEDULE OF SERVICES

Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Morning Worship 10:30 Wed. Night Service & (Nursery & Jr. Church) Youth Groups 7:00 p.m. A Firm Foundation • A Sure Hope • An Unending Love

Centrally located at 14511 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE 19956

Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. FasTrak Children’s Ministry - 10:30 a.m.; E318 Youth - 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Services - 7 p.m.

For info, call 875.7995 or visit www.centralworshipcenter.org

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road68, South of Laurel Laurel,D el.

Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m.

Delmar Wesleyan Church www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

800 East Street Delmar, MD 21875 “The Church That Cares” 410-896-3600 Pastor James C. Hitch

Sunday: Sunday School 10 M Worship 11 AM & 6 PM

Wednesday: BibleS tudy 7P M


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

addictions • Smoking and alcohol addictions • Entertainment and internet addictions • Behavioral addictions such as gambling and pornography Seminar is free – held at the Seaford Seventh-day Adventist Church, 26295 Sussex Highway, Seaford (on the Dual Highway, ½ mile south of Brickyard Road.) For reservations call Delta at 8753743. Seminar book and other materials will be available for sale.

Gospel Café

Laurel Baptist Church will hold its Gospel Café on Sept. 5, at 6 p.m. From North Carolina: Nashville recording artists, Greg and Teresa Watson singing Blue Grass Gospel; also singers, Kali Clucas and Milton Foskey. Food catered by the Georgia House. Come early for seating. Any questions, call Bruce of Nancy Willey at 875-5539.

Laurel Baptist Church

Laurel Baptist Church will be hosting a free community luncheon (spaghetti, salad and dessert) on Saturday, Sept. 19, from noon to 2 p.m. The church is located at 33056 BiState Boulevard. Any questions, Call Shirley at 875-2314.

Kidstuf 103 at Alliance Church

Atlanta Road Alliance Church in Seaford is offering Kidstuf 103 on Wednesday evenings. Kidstuf is a program designed for children and parents to attend together. Each month features a different Biblical virtue using music, drama, a storyteller and games. The virtue for September is wisdom. A light supper is served at 6:15 p.m., followed by the program at 6:45 p.m. The next session is Sept. 16. Kidstuf is designed for kindergarten through 6th grade; however, parents are welcome to bring their preschoolers with them. Registration is free. No drop-offs. For more information, call 302-6295600 or visit www.atlantaroadcma.org

PAGE 29

Alliance Church offers classes

Several adult Sunday school classes are being offered at Atlanta Road Alliance Church in Seaford beginning Sunday, Sept. 6. Financial Freedom, taught by Steve Atlas, will meet at 9 a.m. Crown Financial Ministries’ Journey to Financial Freedom will serve as the basis for this biblically-based study of finances and budgeting. Pre-registration is necessary (302-6295600). Adventures in Bible Study, taught by Rob Shaw, will meet at 9 a.m. This class will take a look at how the Bible came to us, the story of the Bible and the world, how to use study resources and techniques that will make truth come alive, and encourage participants to grow in Christ-like maturity through the study of the Bible. The Book of Acts, taught by Marc Teffeau, will meet at 10:30 a.m. The class will take a fresh and comprehensive look at the spread of the Gospel around the Roman Empire and the leaders of the infant Christian Church, Peter, James and Paul. Whether familiar with this book or not, it will help you grow in your faith and obedience to Jesus. For more information, call 302-6295600 or visit www.atlantaroadcma.org.

Old Christ Church

Old Christ Church services will continue through the first Sunday in October. All services begin at 9:30 a.m. All services will be led by the Rev. Blanche Powell and Ken Athey. Music will be provided by Janet Jones. Old Christ Church is 237 years old and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The church is unique in that it’s never been altered from its original condition. For information or directions, call 228-6097. Any donations given to the Old Christ Church League are now tax deductible as the League was recently successful in becoming a 501C3 (nonprofit) organization.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor

WEDNESDAY SUNDAY Sunday School......9:45 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Worship...............11:00 a.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Youth Group 6:00-8 p.m.

SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday School 9 am Morning Worship 10 am

701 Bridgeville Road 629-9077

Seaford Seventh-day Adventist Church

26295 Sussex Highway (south on 13), Seaford, DE

Saturday Services Sabbath School 9:30 a.m. Worship Service 11:00 a.m. Pastor - O. Kenneth Scheller 302-875-0140

All are welcome to worship here every Sabbath.

Union

United Methodist Church 2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 Handicap Friendly WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.)

22606 Sussex Hwy. Seaford, DE

302-359-6331 Weekly Services: Sunday: 10 am Tuesday: Prayer 7-8 pm Thursday: Bible Study 7 pm

Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel

302- 875-4646

PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

Sun. 9:30 am Wed. 7:00 pm

Children’s Church • Nursery

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

Senior Minister: Dr. Carl G Vincent Senior Pastor: Pastor Barry B. Dukes wwwmessiahsvineyard.org

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

VICTORY TABERNACLE

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591

MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 4:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD

SUNDAY WORSHIP

11 AM and 6 PM ~ Sunday School 9:45 AM

WEDNESDAY NIGHT

Ministry for the wholef amily 7 PM

Pastor Stacey Johnson

28261 Seaford Rd., Laurel, 2 miles N. of Laurel on Alt. 13

302-877-0443

22625 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE (302) 629-5600 - www.atlantaroadcma.org Sunday

Wednesday Evening

9:00 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Worship, Nursery, Classes for Kids-Adults 7:00 p.m. Evening Service

6:45 Catalyst Youth (grades 7-12), DivorceCare 7:00 Prayer Meeting, Men’s Group, KidStuf 103 (K-6 Kids & their parents, 1 & 3rd Wed.)

COKESBURY CHURCH All Welcome Where Love Abides -- John 3:16

The Church by the Side of the Road 15092 Cokesbury Rd, Georgetown, DE (302) 629-5222 • www.cokesburywc.org Pastor Harold Carmean & Congregation Sunday School 9 am Contemporary Church Service 10 am

Mount Olivet

United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School

Pastor: Rev. Jim Sipes • 302-629-4458

Welcome…

Messiah’s Vineyard Church

PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

27225 Kaye Road Laurel, DE 19956 Ph: (302) 875-7814

www.thelighthouselaurel.org Timothy P. Jones, Pastor Sunday Family Worship - 10:00 a.m. Wednesday Family Ministries - 7:00 p.m.

“Shining His Light”

Laurel Wesleyan Church Rt. 13A, Just North of Laurel

Sunday School - 9:30 Worship - 9:00 & 10:45 Sunday Evening Worship Wed. 6:30 p.m. - Youth Ministries & WKID, The Zone, Children’s Ministries

Church 875-5380 • Sr. Pastor Ken Deusa Asst. Pastor: Rev. Rick Green; Youth: Kyle Horton Children’s Pastor: Marilyn Searcey

CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH

315 N. Shipley St., Seaford, DE 19973 • 302-629-9755

Pastor: Rev. Andrew C. Watkins www.christlutheranseaford.com

Praise Worship 8:15 AM • Sunday School 9:45 AM • Traditional Worship 11:15 AM

Laurel Baptist Church, SBC Where everybody is somebody & Jesus Christ is Lord 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, Laurel, DE 19956 LBC Sunday School ~ 10:00 Morning Worship ~ 11:00 Wednesday Bible Study ~ 7:00 P.M. NurseryP rovided Pastor: Rev. Steven Booth Music Director: Linda Lewis

302-875-7998

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church

Front & King St., Seaford, DE 629-7979 Holy Eucharist: 9:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Forum: 10:30 a.m. Thurs. Eve. Service: 6 p.m. The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby-Coladonato, Rector

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - G. W. Cliver - 629-6206 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10 a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

743 E. Clarence St., Seaford, Del. Carlton L. Cannon, Sr. Paster

629-9443, Cell: 448-0852 • cogclarence@verizon.net

Sunday: Midweek Activities: Church School........9:45 am Call for Details Morning Worship......11 am Children’s Church & Youth Explosion ........6 pm Nursery Provided Evening Worship.........7 pm *Counseling by appt. only Tuesday: Thursday: Bible Study & Family Corporate Prayer.........7 pm ‘Come and Grow with Us!’ Training Hour...........7 pm

Thank You to the churches that sponsor these pages. Your contribution makes it possible for the “Good News” to be published each week.


PAGE 30

MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

Obituaries Claude Love Austell III, 71

Claude Love Austell III, “Reuben” to his family and friends, “Chuck” to his colleagues, passed away from complications of pancreatic cancer on Saturday, Aug. 22, 2009. He lived in Bridgeville, and previously in Plant City, Fla. and Bowie, Md. Mr. Austell was born on June 20, 1938, in Shelby, N.C., to C.L. Austell Jr. and Crowelyn Austell. He was employed by the Department of Defense after serving in the Army, giving more than 38 years of service to his country. He enjoyed golfing, discussing politics, visiting friends, and mostly, playing with his grandchildren. In addition to his parents, he is preceded in death by his first wife, Patricia Ann Austell. He is survived by his wife, Elgi; two sons Christopher and Mark; three stepsons, William, Mark and John Kaarid; four daughters-in-law: five grandchildren; and seven stepgrandchildren. A memorial service was held at Cecil Burton Funeral Home in Shelby on Aug. 30. An additional service will be held at All Saints Lutheran Church in Bowie on Saturday, Sept. 5. In lieu of flowers, Mr. Austell’s family requests donations be made to Delaware Hospice Center, 100 Patriots Way, Milford, DE 19963; www.dehospice.org. Arrangements are in the care of Parsell Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Bridgeville; www.parsellfuneralhomes. com.

Ray J. Elzey Sr., 86

Ray J. Elzey Sr. of Laurel died at Delaware Hospice in Milford, on Sunday, Aug. 23, 2009. He was born at Concord near Seaford on March 5, 1923, the son of Ray Elzey and Grace Elzey. His wife, Connie Crockett Elzey, died in 1993. He was a veteran of World War II serving in the United States Army in Cassablanca, France, and his unit helped to destroy the Siegfried Line and was in Germany prior to D-Day. He served from March 19, 1943 to May 21, 1946. He was a Lt. Commander of Roger W. Gunby American Legion Post 16 in Laurel and also was a life member of V.F.W. Post 10159 in Salisbury. He is survived by four daughters, Constance S. Black of Colorado Springs, Colo., Myra G. Elzey of Laurel, Linda R. Mitchell of Easton, Md., and Lt. Colonel Michelle D. Mitchell stationed with the U.S. Army in Phoenix, Ariz.; a son, Charles R. Sneed of Wilmington; six grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; and two sisters, Almeda Gillespie of Laurel and Betty Hadley of Delmar; an aunt, Linda Polk of Concord; and many nieces

and nephews. A son, Ray J. Elzey Jr.; a sister, Rosie Foster; and four brothers, Henry Cooper, Tom Foster, Oscar Elzey and Richard Ford, preceded him in death. The funeral was held on Saturday, Aug. 29, at United Deliverance Bible Center in Laurel. The Rev. Timothy Duffield and Pastor Carol Sessoms Hopkins officiated. Interment followed at New Zion Cemetery in Laurel. To share memories with the family, visit www.framptom.com.

Death Notices Charles A. Lusby Jr., 67

Charles A. Lusby Jr. of Laurel, and formerly of Baltimore, Md., died Saturday, Aug. 22, 2009, at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. A memorial service was held at Christ Evangelistic Church in Laurel on Friday, Aug. 28. Interment was in Delaware Veterans Memorial Cemetery. Arrangements are by Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home in Laurel.

What Must I Do to Be Saved? Acknowledge your sin and place your trust in Christ. All who place their trust in Christ in this way are adopted as God’s children. All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. ~ Romans 3:23 The wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. ~ Romans 6:23 God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us. ~ Romans 5:8 If you confess with your mouth the Lord Jesus and believe in your heart that God has raised him from the dead, you will be saved. ~ Romans 10:9

In Memory of Our Son, Brother and Uncle

Mark C. Hare “Chick”

February 7, 1959September 2, 2004

Thinking of you Today and Every Day Much Loved and Missed Mom and Dad, Frankie, Tracy, Blake and Families

We thought of you with love today, but that is nothing new. We thought about you yesterday, and days before that too. We think of you in silence, we often speak your name, now all we have is memories and your picture in frame, Your memory is our keepsake, of which we will never part, God has you in His keeping, we have you in our heart. In loving Memory of

Howard T. McCrea on his birthday, September 9th Loved and Missed Dearly By All His Family


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

PAGE 31

Reward your kids with kind words and affection By Doug Tynan, PhD As parents, we often leap to reward our children with things – toys, gifts, favorite foods. But the rewards that kids seem to value most are social in nature. Smiles, hugs, kisses and positive comments are what they need and want. You’ll find children will work hard for their parents’ attention and that a kind word and a pat on the back are sometimes more than enough. That is not to say that tangible rewards aren’t valuable. One of the best ways to approach rewards for your children is to set up a reward menu. You might have three categories, such as social rewards, banked rewards and things. Then make a list under each heading. For example, under “social,” list the people your child enjoys spending time with (invite

a friend for a sleepover, for example). “Banked” rewards are those that can be earned gradually and may include the use of a chart to help the child mark progress towards a goal. For instance, number of consecutive days he’s made his bed and picked up his room results in a visit to the batting cages. Under “things,” list items which may include toys or treats as long as the food is in the range of things the child would normally eat. The key is in knowing what interests and appeals to your kids. In any case, make sure verbal praise is part of the equation: a child who has finished some yard work gets a snack and a drink, along with your thanks for completing the job. This shows the child that work and effort are appreciated.

Markell signs legislative package that expand alternative energy

Gov. Jack Markell recently signed three pieces of legislation into law that encourage homeowners to install solar panels and wind turbines on their property. The measures, all part of the Governor’s legislative agenda this year, remove obstacles that prevented homeowners from taking advantage of solar and wind power. The legislative package also rewards homeowners and farmers who make that investment by allowing them to sell excess power they generate but do not use. “These new laws, along with a few additional pieces of legislation that I will sign in the near future, will result in new jobs, money saved and a cleaner

environment,” said Governor Markell. Specifically, the bills the Governor signed include: • Senate Bill 49 prohibits deed restrictions that prevent homeowners from installing solar panels on their homes. • House Bill 70 forbids deed restrictions that prevent homeowners from installing wind turbines on their property. • Senate Bill 85 guarantees that families, businesses or farms that generate more renewable energy than they need will be able to sell back the excess power for a profit. Previously, excess power went back into the grid without the system owner being compensated at all.

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has awarded $1.8 million to the Delaware Veterans Memorial Cemetery in Sussex to expand its facility. As governor, Sen. Carper worked with the Delaware Veterans Commission and Veterans organizations to secure funding to build the Veterans cemetery in southern Delaware, and was on hand to break ground at the site

and dedicate it upon its opening in October 1999. According to the VA, “the grant to the state-run facility will fund the construction of a columbarium, pre-placed crypts and full-casket burial sites. The project will include 400 standard burial plots, 1,140 preplaced crypts, 200 in-ground remains, and 1,280 columbarium niches.”

Veterans Cemetery will expand

It’s important not to offer food rewards when kids are having issues with eating. If a child is picking at the salad on his plate, you’ll want to avoid the “no dessert till you finish your greens” ultimatum. Instead, offer a social reward for trying. You might say, “When you’ve eaten most of your dinner, we can go to the park.” You definitely don’t want to offer children bribes. Bribes are inducements to stop unwanted behaviors: “If you stop whining, you can have some pizza.” Rewards, on the other hand, are positive reinforcements for behavior you want to encourage and grow in your child. “You’ve been a big help with your sister today. Let’s bake some brownies together.” Many parents offer rewards for achieving something difficult – such as good grades in school – which can be entirely

appropriate. If a child says a trip to a fast food restaurant is what he would like for a good report card, you as the parent have to decide whether that’s fitting. As adults, we like to treat ourselves – sparingly – and it makes sense to do the same with our kids. Children learn preferences for the foods made available to them, so it’s wise to limit choices that are less healthy. Teachers using candy to reward students for good classroom behavior or performance had been common practice until recently. Today, schools have curtailed the practice in favor of activity rewards. Many teachers have the class work collectively toward an activity reward, maybe a dance party, question and answer game, or holding a class outdoors. This encourages teamwork

and the whole class reaps the reward. Teachers tell us that accomplishing the goal – the earning part – is often just as important as the payoff itself. A final thought: kids who are rewarded for every little thing come to expect a payoff for all effort. In many cases, a smile, a hug, and a “thank you” will do quite nicely. Simply being recognized and thanked is often the greatest motivator, no matter what your age! About the author Doug Tynan, PhD, is chief psychologist for Nemours Health and Prevention Services, Newark, and on the staff of the Alfred I. DuPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington. He is an associate professor of Pediatrics at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia.

Tobacco Prevention & Control Mini-Grants Available Community-based organizations and nonprofit organizations in Delaware are eligible to apply for funding for programs that address at least one of the following goals of A Plan for a Tobacco-Free Delaware: • Prevent tobacco use among young Delawareans through age 24 • Increase tobacco cessation among Delawareans • Reduce routine exposure to environmental tobacco smoke • Decrease the social acceptability of tobacco use • Maintain leadership position to sustain progress of tobacco prevention

September 16, 2009—Deadline for submission of application/proposal Additional information and grant applications are available on the American Lung Association website, www.lunginfo.org, or by calling them at (302) 655-7258.

DELAWARE HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES Division of Public Health Tobacco Prevention and Control Program

These grants are made possible by tobacco settlement money from the Delaware Health Fund.


pAGe 32

MORNING STAR • SepTeMBeR 3 - 9, 2009

Entertainment Ballroom dancing at Del Tech

Opening ceremonies for the Woodland Ferry Festival begin at 9 a.m. on Sept. 12.

16th annual Woodland Ferry Festival to be held Sept. 12 The 16th annual Woodland Ferry Festival, celebrating the Nanticoke River and the historic ferry, is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 12. An “all you can eat” country breakfast, served by the Galestown Ruritan Club, will start off the day at 7 a.m. and will be serving until 10 a.m. This hearty breakfast includes scrambled eggs, pancakes, home fries, sausage gravy, scrapple, the Ruritan’s famous sticky buns, biscuits, orange juice and coffee, all for $7. Opening ceremonies begin at 9 a.m. with the combined Seaford and Laurel High School Bands, and raising of the flags by the Marine Corp League. There will be demonstrations and displays throughout the village, including chair caning, artwork, an animal rescue group, Orrell’s Famous Maryland Beaten

Biscuits from Wye Mills and much more. Entertainment will begin with dulcimer player John Kisela, followed by gospel singer Jerry Jones performing from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and ending with Tony Windsor singing his country/western and pop hits. Jack & Carolyn Knowles will have their “Days Gone By” museum open showcasing memorabilia from Woodland and Seaford. The new ferry, (the “Tina Fallon”), will be closed to vehicle traffic, but will provide free rides across the river to pedestrians during the day. Craft and flea market spaces are available to rent for the day at $25 for a 10’ by 10’ space and $40 for a 10’ by 20’ space. Please call Donna Angell at 629-8077 for additional information or to have forms mailed to you. You may also email woodlandangell@hotmail.com.

JOIN THE SCCA - The Seaford Community Concert Association membership drive is coming to an end. To join, call 302629-6184. You must be a member to attend any performance. Thank you to those who have already joined or renewed their membership. Membership cards, which is all you need to attend performances, will be mailed this month. The first performance is Wednesday, Sept. 16 featuring tenor Daniel Rodriguez (shown here). Other performances include the Russian Seasons Dance Company on Nov. 13 and in 2010, Rudolf Buginas, the Hunt Family Fiddlers and the Canadian Tenors.

Acquire or improve your ballroom dancing skills at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. Learn how to navigate the dance floor at weddings, proms, cruises and parties. All swing, foxtrot and rhumba classes are held from 7-8 p.m.; cha cha, waltz and tango classes are held from 8-9 p.m. Discover how easy it can be to learn ballroom dancing when the steps are broken down using a fun and easy method. Beginners can master the basic steps by participating in twelve-session level one courses which begin on Tuesday, Sept. 22. Intermediate dancers who have completed a level one course can attend level two courses to further improve dance skills beginning Thursday, Sept. 24. Not sure ballroom dancing is for you? Beginners can attend a free session on Tuesday, Sept. 15; a free session for intermediate ballroom dancers is offered on Thursday, Sept. 17. For more information or to register for a ballroom dancing course or free class, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate and Community Programs at 302854-6966.

Jazz Funeral to benefit Habitat

The fourth annual Bethany Beach Jazz Funeral Silent Auction is Friday, Sept. 4, from 3 to 5 p.m. at Bethany Blues Restaurant in Bethany Beach. All funds raised will benefit Habitat for Humanity of Sussex County. The Silent Auction also features three New Orleans-style Dixieland Bands Dixie Cats, the Downtown Dixieland Band and the Jazz Funeral Irregulars. Kelly Cofransico, who originally set up the Silent Auction in 2006, will be honored with the “Friends of Summer” award. The 24th annual Jazz Funeral is scheduled for Labor Day, Monday, Sept. 7, at 5 p.m. at the north end of the Boardwalk. Both the auction and funeral are free to the public. At the Jazz Funeral, spectators join in a funeral procession of mourners, along with the three Dixieland jazz bands, that carry a casket with a mannequin representing “Summer of 2009” to its final resting place at the Boardwalk Bandstand. To make a donation to the Silent Auction (gift certificates for goods or services would be greatly appreciated) or to volunteer, email jazzfuneral@mchsi.com or leave a message at 302-537-1585.

Powwow to be held

The Nanticoke Indian Association will hold their 32nd Annual Powwow on Saturday, Sept. 12 and Sunday, Sept. 13, on the powwow grounds located off Route 24 in Millsboro. On Saturday, powwow grounds open at 10 a.m., grand entry is at noon followed by the second dance session at 4

p.m. Sunday morning begins with a worship service at 10 a.m. and grand entry is at 1:30 p.m. Forty Native American crafts and food vendors open at 10 a.m. on Saturday and noon on Sunday. All day parking including admission is $8 per car, walk-in admission is $2 for adults and $1 for children, $5 for motorcycles and $25 for buses plus $2 per person on the bus (driver will have to collect fee for each bus). For more information, call 945-3400.

Delaware Hospice benefit

Methodist Manor House in Seaford will hold a Chicken Barbecue and Antique Car Show to benefit Delaware Hospice on Saturday, Sept. 12 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tickets are $7 per person. Proceeds will support Delaware Hospice’s programs and services, including the free community outreach programs such as New Hope, support for children who have lost loved ones, and Transitions, support for seriously ill individuals who are not appropriate for hospice. For more information about this event or the Methodist Manor House, call Erin Steele, 629-4593.

CHEER Trap Pond Fall Festival

The Annual CHEER Trap Pond Fall Festival will be held on Friday, Sept. 4, from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., at Trap Pond State Park in Laurel. The day will be filled with games, contests, tournaments and live entertainment. There will be a Horse Shoe Tournament and a Wii Bowling Tournament with trophies awarded to the top three players. Other contests include a Slam Dunk contest, and a Hula Hoop Contest. The event also offers free prize Bingo and a White Elephant Sale. DJ Sky Brady will provide entertainment. The CHEER American Idol Contest will be held with a top prize of $100. Contestants must represent an organizational group or a senior center and be registered to participate by Wednesday, Sept. 2. To register, call 302-856-5187 and ask for Florence Mason. Lunch will be served at noon. The menu includes fried chicken, potato salad, green beans, ice cream, watermelon and iced tea. The meal is included in the price of the ticket. Tickets are $6 for seniors age 60 and older and $8 for non-seniors under 60 years of age and can be obtained at any CHEER Center. Reservations may be made by calling 302-856-5187 and asking for Florence Mason or Don Wood. Tickets will also be on sale at the event. There will be free admission into the park that day and the public is invited to attend.


MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

PAGE 33

NHS Golf Tournament goes pink

The 2009 Nanticoke Health Services Ladies Day planning committee is tickled pink about the inaugural tournament. From left are committee members Pat Shannon, Arsie Burton, Christina Darby, Jenny Davis and Janet Hubbard. Additional committee members include Kathy Boyd, Ursula Gardner, Sharon Mears, Joanie Phipps and Cathy Vanscriver.

Nanticoke Health Services is excited to announce the inaugural Ladies Day Golf Tournament on Thursday, Sept. 24. The tournament is open to all lady golfers as they take to the course for Women’s Health Services/Digital Mammography at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. Participants will enjoy 18-holes of golf at the Seaford Golf and Country Club, several specialty opportunities during the round of play, food, awards and door prizes. A full field of participants is expected. Throughout the course, players will have numerous chances to test their skills by competing in contests for Longest Drive, Closest-To-The-Pink Ribbon, the Pursuit of the Perfect Drive and a HoleIn-One. All participants will have the opportunity to putt through a three-step qualifying round, and one individual will putt for $1,000 each. BNY Mellon is the presenting sponsor for the inaugural tournament. The Ladies Day tournament will benefit Women’s Health/Digital Mammography at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. With the enhancement of technology, women will benefit from reduced testing times. Digital mammography also offers a number of other advantages including clearer images, reduced radiation exposure, higher sensitivity to abnormalities, and transmission of images by phone

25thAnnual Annual SHORT’S SHORT’S MARINE DAY 25th MARINELABOR LABOR DAY

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or Internet for remote consultation with other physicians. The Ladies Day golf committee has been busy planning a great day for participants. This year’s tournament will feature the PINK Links program, which the community can support by making a $25 donation to honor or memorialize a loved one. Their contribution will be displayed on a golf ball shaped sign on the course. A pink ball competition will be held that involves each team keeping a designed pink ball in play for all shots, from tee to cup, for each hole. The pink ball rotates among players with each member playing the ball for the entire hole. If the pink ball is lost, enters a hazard, or goes out of bounds, the team is eliminated from the pink ball competition. Upon completion of 18 holes, the team who still has the pink ball in play is the winner. Entry fees are $65 per player and $260 for a foursome. Sponsorships packages are available. On Friday, Sept. 25, the hospital will host the 23rd Annual Open Golf tournament. For more information on either tournament, if you would like to join as a sponsor, or as a player, call 302-629-6611, ext. 2404, visit www.nanticoke.org/golf, or email MorrisR@nanticoke.org. Registration forms are available online.

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PAGE 34

MORNING STAR

• SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

Classifieds

FREE CLASSIFIEDS* (For Personal Use Only)

*Some exceptions such as homes for rent or sale

EARLY DEADLINE FOR LABOR DAY: FRIDAY, SEPT. 4, 2 p.m.

Businesses: $4.50/inch (Liners, $9 min.) Boxed (Display) Ads: $6.50/inch Legals: $6.50 per inch Not responsible for typographical errors after first insertion

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Call: Or E-mail: ads@mspublications.com LOST COMPUTERS TIE PIN w/6 birthstones in it Lost near IHOP. Reward! 629-6985, 7/30

2 KITTENS, 1 yr. old, neutered & spayed, shots, declawed, litter box trained but prefer outside. Free to good home, must go together. Lots of goodies included. Will bring to your home 875-0747. 8/13

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MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE, Fri. 9/4, 9 am-1 pm; & Sat., 9/5, 8 am - 1 pm. No early birds!! Clothes, furniture & more. 25418 Alexander Lane, approx. 2 mi. west of Seaford off Stein Hwy.

‘06 BAYLINER 18’, 135hp Mercruiser I/O, full canvas w/Bimini top, trailer, less than 0 hrs., $9500. 3370229. 9/3

WANTED LR CURTAINS, 106x72, 70x72, heavy and lined. Kit. Curtains, 60x40. 875-3744.

AUTOMOTIVE 8” DROP HITCH w/ 2” ball, Class III, $50. 536-1653.

BRUNO VSL-670 Curbside Super XL Power Lift. Scooter or power wheel chair lift. Fits in minivan or PU truck. Like new cond., $1000. 337-8654. 7/30

GIRL’S HOODED SWEATSHIRT, lightweight, blue & white, left at Bethel Charge VBS. 875-2713. 8/13

FREE KITTENS. 876-8677. 9/3

BOATS

4 TIRES, 185-65R14, exc. cond., $150. 262-0481.

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NOTICE

IMPROVE THE LOOK of your car with a white duck design 5-digit Del. tag #57920. $250. 629-2796. 7/30

ANGEL FOOD MINISTRIES

Laurel Nazarene Church, 875-7873 Lifeway Church of God, 337-3044 Our Lady of Lourdes, 629-3591 September Order Dates: Evening of Sept. 9 Distribution & Order Day: Sat. morning, Sept. 26 For more info or to order on line, see www. angelfoodministries.com

CAMPERS/ TRAILERS ‘05 COACHMAN 27’6” & 07 Dodge Ram 4x4 Hemi, 16k mi., 2 yr. factory warranty, call for info. Will split. Must sell or take over payments. 875-3115. 8/13 UTILITY TRAILER, 18’x83” wide 2 yrs old, $2000 OBO. 245-2278. 8/6

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIANS Automotive Technicians ready to move to the next level!

FREDERICK FORD MERCURY is LOOKING for YOU! If you take PRIDE in YOUR WORK. Have a STRONG WORK ETHIC, And are WILLING to LEARN,

WE WANT YOU!

Excellent Pay and Benefits to the Right Candidate

APPLY IN PERSON TO Chris Hertrich or Dave Muse, Route 13 in Seaford, Delaware Or FAX your resume to 302-629-8428 Or EMAIL your resume to internetdept@frederickford.com Or Apply at www.hertrichcareers.com EOE

PRINCECRAFT 20’ Sport Fishing Pontoon Boat w/a Johnson motor 70-2st. w/ trailer & many extras. 6294246, if no ans., lv. msg. 8/13 MOHAWK CANOE, 16’, fiberglass, $100. 236-8133. 8/6 18’ KAYAK BARGAIN, top of the line, comes with everything, a must see Easily a $2000 value. Asking $1100. 875-9775. 7/30 ‘03 BASS TRACKER 17’, 40hp Outboard and Trailer, $4000. 443-845-9770. 7/30

SOFA SLEEPER, twin, tan $30. RCA VHS Travel TV $20. Dog Cage for large dog 42x30 $30. Cot w/mattress $20. 875-7312. 9/3 COMPUTER DESK, good cond., $20. 2 Storage shelves, $15 ea. 628-0852. ATLAS 12” BAND SAW on coaster stand, extra blades, $150. 846-9788. 93 INT’L. FARMALL Trip 2 bottom plow on tires, new paint, great shape, $250. 846-9788. 9/3 ELIPTICAL EXERCISE BIKE. Wooden swivel TV stand, $20. 875-4641 or 519-2853. 9/3 5-DIGIT #49265, Marco at 875-2090.

BLACK TAG, $900. Contact Brothers Pizza, 8/27

CENT. AIR CONDITIONER, $400. Day or night, 6283878. 8/27

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES LADY’S ANT. WRITING DESK, $400. Misc. crocks. 875-4740. 9/3

FOR SALE TRANSPORT CHAIR, red, w/swing away & removable leg support, padded seat & back rest, folds down for storage, 8” front wheels. Only used 6 or 7 times, asking $175. If interested call 629-4246 eves. 9/3 KITCHEN TABLE, Heavy pine wood, X-type legs, 2 10” leaves, overall 86” x 44”, $200. 875-4740. 9/3

CLOTHES DRYERS, $75 ea. Refrigerator, $75. 6299809. 8/27 26” GIRL’S SWHINN BIKE, 32 spds., like new, new tires & tubes, $75 OBO. 6280617. 8/27 CAMERAS: Minalta 35mm mod QTSI film camera w/ A/F 35-70 Z, exc. cond. $50. Minalta 35mm mod., Maxx 400 SI film, w A/F 2880Z lens, exc. cond., $100. 875-1877. 8/27 CAMCORDER: Sony late model high 8,mod CCD 318 w/cable, strap, battery & flip out viewer, exc. cond., $125. 875-1877. 8/27

Office Staff

62” HDTV, bought in 2005 for $4700. Asking $1700 OBO. S.S. Countertop Microwave $100. 4 Computer Monitors $30 ea. OBO. 5361653. 8/27 BLACK SUEDE CHAPS w/ Fringe $50 OBO. 536-1653. 8/27 GAS FURNACE, Coleman, for mobile home. 3 yrs. old, 6500 BTU $500. 875-4570. LG SHIP MODEL, made in Spain, 21.5” L x 24” H, cost $150, selling $50. 6281880. 8/20 2 POTTERY LAMPS, ship’s captain. 42” high, $100 for both. 629-8524. 8/20 LOST IN SPACE Talking Robot w/alien in orig. box, $25. 628-1880. 8/20 ACCORDIAN, Full size, exc. cond., $250. 629-4768, no Sunday calls. 8/20 KIT. TABLE & 6 Chairs, pine/white, $70. Pine/white hutch, $70. 2 dk. wood 2-drawer bedside cabinets $25 ea. or 2 for $45. 6280690. 8/20 SINGER SEWING M/C & cabinet $60. Black 4.6 cubic compact fridge/freezer (as new) $80. Humidifier $25. 628-0690. 8/20 TRANSPORT COMPANION Wheelchair, $50. 6280690. 8/20 BR SET, Pennsylvania House triple dresser w/mirror, chest-on-chest, night stand, mattress & box springs, sheets & access., $2500. 628-8546. 8/13

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MORNING STAR SEASONED FIREWOOD, mixed hardwood, delivery avail., satisfaction guaranteed. Cords $150; 1/2 cords $75. 853-5095 or 875-3543. 8/13 NIGHT STAND, 13.5” x 17.5”, $10. Air Cond., 110 KW, $25. 875-5366. 8/6 TOOLS: DeWalt 12.5” thickness planer, new, $350. New Craftsman 1 1/2 hp Router & table w/set of 5 carbine bits, $120. New Porter Cable combo set in carrying case, drill, rotary & sabre saws, light & charger & 2 batteries, $115. 2368133. 8/6 TWO 5200 BTU AIR COND., 110V, like new, slightly used, $60 ea. 8758677. 7/30

ANIMALS, ETC. DOG CAGE for large dog 42x30 $30. 875-7312. 9/3 LG. DOG HOUSE, made w/ T1-11 Siding, like new. Great for lg. dogs, very heavy, $50. 875-0747. 8/27 HORSE SADDLE, Blue Ridge Western, 15”, stand, 2 blankets, 2 bridles, helmets, exc. cond., $225. 629-4864. 8/20 DOG KENNELS: Stqandard, 10’x10’, $75. Heavy duty, 6’x16’, $100. Dog house, $20. 629-4864. 8/20 3 WESTERN SADDLES, Leather, 16” & 15”, $125 ea. Great shape, nice leather, call for pictures. Laurel. 462-7250. 8/13 RHODE ISLAND REDS, 4 mo. old, Americauna (easter egg chickens) & Buff Orpingtons for sale, $10 ea., hens & roosters, Laurel. 462-7250. 8/13 BRED REGISTERED NUBIAN nanny with a registered nubian buck, $200. Laurel 462-7250. 8/13 STUD SERVICE Available: A 1 1/2 - yr - old, long-haired Bluepoint Siamese (3/4) male cat (Doesn’t spray). $100. 302-430-2040. 8/6 BARNYARD CHICKENS, full grown. 875-2893. 7/30

HOME FOR RENT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSE for rent in MILLSBORO, Available Oct. 1st. $900/mo. + $900 Sec. Dep. required. Call 302-841-0251 for details. 8/27/4tp

LEGALS LEGAL NOTICE

ON OCTOBER 6, 2009 at 11:00 a.m., Laurel Storage Center, Road 468, Laurel, DE will conduct a sale pursuant to Title 25, DEL. C. ANN. 4904-4905. The contents of the following bins will be sold: Bin(s): #1 Larrimore, Woodrow; #5 Trice, Kenneth; #10 Delrosario, Zina; #16 Melson III, Charles; #17 Chelsey Kibler; #24 Quayshetta Hopkins; #34 Ambriah Palmer; #56 Blenda Lawson; #105 Jessica Badman; #115 Jamie Frisby; #122 Tashina Fowler; #141 Nadine Sparks. BIDDERS: Call office on day of sale to confirm, (302) 875-5931. 9/3/2tc

CITY OF SEAFORD VIOLATION NOTICE

The City issued a Refuse Ordinance Violation for the following property: Property Owner: Phyllis Harmon Location: Tax Map and Parcel 531-13.09-26.00 315A Elm Drive Seaford, DE 19973 The Notification to Owner listed above was dated August 24, 2009 pursuant to Section 10-33 “Notice Procedure” of the City of Seaford Refuse Ordinance. Remedies: All rubbish, as described in the Notice and as defined in the City Refuse Ordinance, must be removed from the property immediately. Joshua E. Littleton Building Official 9/3/3tc

PUBLIC NOTICE

TAKE NOTICE: On Thursday, September 17, 2009, at 4:30 p.m. local time or as soon as possible thereafter, the Board of Adjustment of Laurel will sit in the Conference Room of the Mayor and Council of Laurel, 201 Mechanic Street, Laurel, Delaware to publicly hear and determine the matter of: GRANTING A VARIANCE UNTO THE MARTIN K. FELDMAN FOUNDATION, CONCERNING PROPERTY LOCATED AT 716 WEST SEVENTH STREET, SUSSEX COUNTY AND TOWN OF LAUREL TAX ACCOUNT NUMBER #4-32/8.06/194, FOR THE PURPOSE OF CONSTRUCTING A DWELLING ON THE PARCEL, WHICH DOES NOT MEET THE TOWN OF LAUREL SETBACK REQUIREMENTS SET FORTH IN THE TOWN OF LAUREL ZONING ORDINANCE, SECTION 5.1, DENSITY

• SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

CONTROL TABLE. THIS PROPERTY IS LOCATED IN A MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL (R-2) DISTRICT. You are hereby notified to be present with your witnesses, other evidence nd counsel, if you have any, and to attend the determination of the Board upon such variance. Such hearing may be adjourned from time to time by said Board without further written notice. Issued this 2nd day of September 2009. BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT THE TOWN OF LAUREL 9/3/1tc

PUBLIC NOTICE

The Laurel Mayor and Council will be holding a public hearing on Monday, September 21, 2009, beginning at 7:00 p.m. or as soon as possible thereafter. The purpose of the public hearing is for the consideration for the proposed amendments to the Town’s Zoning Ordinance, Chapter 175, Signage, Sections 8.0.4 and 8.0.10. The public hearing will be held in Mayor and Council Chambers, 201 Mechanic Street, Laurel, Delaware. 9/3/1tc

CITY OF SEAFORD NOTICE OF DEMOLITION

Name of Property Owner: Diane Drayton Address: 720 Clarence Street (last known address), PO Box 1395, Seaford, DE 19973 The City of Seaford has issued the below said structure, to be demolished as per the Notification of Owner dated May 20, 2009 pursuant to Section 4-2329 of the City of Seaford Housing Code. The structure is found to be unsafe because it is all or part thereof found to be dangerous to life, health, property, or the safety of the public because it is dilapidated, lacks maintenance, is in disrepair, lacks sanitary and heating facilities, illumination, or other essential equipment. Description of structure: Tax Map and Parcel 431 5.00 341 227 N. North Street Seaford, DE 19973 Remedies: Such condemned structure shall not be reoccupied without completion of specific corrections of violations. Joshua E. Littleton Building Official 06 18 09 8/20/3tc Subscribe Today!

629-9788

NOTICE

Estate of Joyce E. LeCates, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of Joyce E. LeCates who departed this life on the 20th day of July, A.D. 2009 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Ann W. LeCates on the 19th day of August, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administratrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administratrix on or before the 20th day of March, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administratrix: Ann W. LeCates 213 W. 6th St. Laurel, DE 19956 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 9/3/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Lillie D. Campbell, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Lillie D. Campbell who departed this life on the 2nd day of August, A.D. 2009 late of Delmar, DE were duly granted unto Dean A. Campbell, Esq. on the 18th day of August, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 2nd day of April, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Dean A. Campbell, Esq. 105 Apollo Ln. Milton, DE 19968 Attorney: Dean A. Campbell, Esq. PO Box 568 Georgetown, DE 9947 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 8/27/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Charlotte V. Cassell, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Charlotte V. Cassell who departed this life on the 20th day of July, A.D. 2009 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Cynthia French, Susan Graybeal on the 6th day of August, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the

PAGE 35 said Co-Executrices without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Co-Executrices on or before the 20th day of March, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Co-Executrices: Cynthia French 512 Kings Highway Milford, DE 19963 Susan Graybeal 17289 Queen Ann Way Lewes, DE 19958 Attorney: David N. Rutt, Esq. Moore & Rutt, P.A. P.O. Box 554 Georgetown, DE 19947 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 8/27/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Christine M. Hudson, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Christine M. Hudson who departed this life on the 2nd day of August, A.D. 2009 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Suzanne H. Morrow, Sheree H. Draucker on the 12th day of August, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Co-Executrices without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Co-Executrices on or before the 2nd day of April, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Co-Executrices: Suzanne H. Morrow 20 N. Horseshoe Dr. Ocean View, DE 19970 Sheree H. Draucker 6430 Governors Sq. Salisbury, MD 21801 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 8/27/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Avery Thomas Taylor, Jr., Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Avery Thomas Taylor, Jr. who departed this life on the 17th day of July, A.D. 2009 late of Millsboro, DE were duly granted unto A. Thomas Taylor, III, Michelle L. Whitlock on the 11th day of August, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Co-Executors without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Co-Executors on

or before the 17th day of March, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Co-Executors: A. Thomas Taylor, III 4903 White Dove Lane Seaford, DE 19973 Michelle L. Whitlock 105 Rose Landing Dr. Goldsboro, NC 27530 201 Chestnut Street Attorney: Shannon R. Owens Esq. Procino Wells, LLC 225 High St. Seaford, DE 19973 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 8/27/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of James S. Travers, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of James S. Travers who departed this life on the 19th day of June, A.D. 2009 late of Delmar, DE were duly granted unto Janet C. Travers on the 14th day of August, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 19th day of February, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Janet C. Travers 34817 St. Georges Rd. Delmar, DE 19940 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 8/27/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Bernard R. Reinhold, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Bermard R. Reinold who departed this life on the 25th day of June, A.D. 2009 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Susan Paradine on the 7th day of August, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 25th day of February, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Susan Paradine 89 W. 15th St. Bayonne, NJ 07002 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 8/20/3tc See LEGALS—page 36


PAGE 36 LEGALS - from Page 35

NOTICE

Estate of Sarah E. Salisbury, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Sarah E. Salisbury who departed this life on the 13th day of July, A.D. 2009 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Wendy E. Salisbury, Sherilyn S. Elliott on the 7th day of August, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Co-Executrices without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Co-Executrices on or before the 13th day of March, A.D. 2010 or abide by the law in this behalf. Co-Executrices: Wendy E. Salisbury 513 Oak Rd. Seaford, DE 19973 Sherilyn S. Elliott 16051 Sycamore Rd. Laurel, DE 19956 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 8/20/3tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 15, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain lot, or parcel of land, situate in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING for the outlines of the same at a cement post located on the south line of Parcel 2 as shown at the letter A on the plat filed for record in Deed Book 399, page 169, said cement post being located North 88 degrees 0 minutes West 40 feet from the southwest corner of said Parcel 2 and the southeast corner for Parcel 1, and as shown on said plat; thence running North 88 degrees 0 minutes West 40.00 feet to the Southwest corner of Parcel 2 and the southeast corner of Parcel 1 aforesaid, and thence continuing said course at the letter B on said Plat; thence running North 0 degrees 43 minutes West 50 feet to another cement post as shown on the Letter C on said plat; thence running South 88 degrees 0 minutes East 207.3 feet to intersect the boundary line

between Parcel 1 and Parcel 2 aforesaid and thence continuing said course North 88 degrees 0 minutes east 42.7 feet to the right of way of County Road to the lot hereby described at a cement post as shown at the letter D on said plat and thence running South 0 degrees and 43 minutes East 150 feet, by and with the westerly side of said right of way, to the place of Beginning, be the contents thereof what they may. AND BEING the same lands and premises conveyed unto Kathryn T. Edwards and Edwin L. Thompson by deed of Mary K. Edwards, Executrix of the Estate of Kathryn T. Edwards recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware at Deed Book 1900, Page 208 Tax Parcel: 5-32-20.0010.00 Property Address: 38002 Brick Manor Road, Delmar Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 19, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 23, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of EDWIN L. THOMPSON & KATHRYN T. THOMPSON F/K/A KATHRYN T. EDWARDS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/3/2tc

MORNING STAR SHERIFF SALE

• SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 15, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain tract, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the Town of Delmar, Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at a cut in the Northerly edge of a five foot sidewalk bordering the North side of Jewell Street, said point of beginning being 104.83 feet in a Westerly direction from North Fourth Street; thence with the Northerly right-ofway line of Jewell Street, North 79 degrees 95 minutes West, a distance of 52.83 feet to a cut in the sidewalk; thence with the centerline of a mutual and common driveway and in part through a two party garage, North 10 degrees 30 minutes East, a distance of 133.60 feet to an iron pipe; thence with an old fence, South 79 degrees 05 minutes East, a distance of 52.83 feet to an iron pipe; thence South 20 degrees 30 minutes West, a distance of 133.60 feet to a cut in the sidewalk, the place of beginning, together with the improvements thereon, be the same more or less as surveyed June 30, 1967 by Harold W. Hampshire, Surveyor and being known as 305 Jewell Street, Delmar, Sussex County, Delaware. AND BEING the same lands and premises which John H. Hazel ill and Gertrude A. Hazel, his wife by deed dated May 24, 1997 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware did grant and convey unto Dwayne A. Ringgold and Teresa A. Ringgold, his wife, in fee. Tax Parcel: 5-32-20.14143.00 Property Address: 305 E. Jewel Street, Delmar Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash,

Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 19, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 23, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DWAYNE A. & TERESA A. RINGGOLD and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 15, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, with the improvements erected thereon, situate in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware; being all of LOT NO. 14 of a Subdivision of Lands of Wheatley Farms, Inc. as shown on a plan recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, in Plat Book 47, Page 258; being bounded on the South by Rifle Range Road (50 feet wide), on the West by Lot No. 15, on the North by Lot No. 28 of Morningside Village II (Plot Book 68, Page 103), on the East by Lot No. 13. BEING the same lands and premises which Randy Wothers, by Deed dated May 20,2004 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2981, Page 207, did grant

and convey unto Nicholas B. Flowers, Sr. and Karin M. Flowers. Tax Parcel: 4-30-19.00156.00 Property Address: 10795 Rifle Range Road, Bridgeville Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 19, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 23, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of NICHOLAS B. FLOWERS A/K/A NICHOLAS B. FLOWERS, SR & KARIN M. FLOWERS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 15, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece and parcel of land lying and being situated in the Town of Laurel, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being designated as Lot 3, “Sub-

division Survey Plan prepared for Trice Appraisal”, prepared by Adams-Kemp Associates, Inc. Professional Land Surveyors, as recorded in Plot Book 76, Page 328 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County in the County Administration Building in Georgetown, Delaware. BEING the same lands and premises which Colby Wolfensberger by Deed dated October 31,2002, of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware under Book 2795, Page number 50, did grant and convey unto Desiree Fitchett. Tax Parcel: 4-32-8.1075.01 Property Address: 232 West Tenth St., Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 19, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 23, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DESIREE FITCHETT and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/3/2tc See LEGALS—page 38

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PAGE 38 LEGALS - from Page 36

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 15, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being located in the CITY OF SEAFORD, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron pipe found on the Easterly right of way line of North Front Street, said point being located 231.68 feet to Third Street, at a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of Anna Mae Buchert; thence with the Easterly right of way line of North Front Street North 09 degrees 31 minutes 47 seconds East 31.84 feet to an iron bolt found at a corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of Peggy J. Geradi; thence turning and running with lands now or formerly of Peggy J. Geradi South 80 degrees 58 minutes 05 seconds East 132.17 feet to an iron rod found at a corner for this lot, lands now or formerly of Peggy J. Geradi and in line of lands now or formerly of William Shockley, Heirs; thence turning and running with lands now or formerly of William Shockley, Heirs South 09 degrees 04 minutes 50 seconds West 32.23 feet to an iron pipe found at a corner for this lot, lands now or formerly of Anna Mae Buchert and in line of lands now or formerly of William Shockley, Heirs; thence turning and running with lands now or formerly of Anna Mae Buchert North 80 degrees 53 minutes 52 seconds West 132.45 feet to the point and place of beginning said to contain 4,239 square feet of land, be the same more or less, together with improvements, as shown on a survey prepared by MillerLewis, Inc., dated October 18, 2006. BEING the same lands and premises which Kevin L. Jefferson, by Deed dated October 19, 2007 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3512, Page 206, did grant and convey unto Antwaneshia Blake. Tax Parcel: 4-31-5.00-

MORNING STAR 77.00 Property Address: 319 Front St., Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 19, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 23, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ANTWANESHIA BLAKE and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 15, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All those lots of land situate in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, known and designated as Lots 3 and 4, Block D, on the plot or lots of Sussex Investment Company of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds at Georgetown, in Deed Book Volume 254, Page 155, and being bounded and described according to survey prepared by Temple-Sellers, Inc.

• SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

Being all of the same property conveyed unto Charles R. Alsentzer from EMC Mortgage Company by Deed dated October 9, 2000 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book No. 2537, Page 142. Tax Parcel: 3-31-5.142.00 Property Address: 81 North Pine St., Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 19, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 23, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of CHARLES R. ALSENTZER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 15, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate,

lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, shown and designated as Lot #3, on a plot of MINOR SUBDIVISION PLAN FOR MARK S. HARDESTY, as prepared by Temple-Sellers, Inc., July 20, 2005, and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Plot Book 97, Book 16, and shown to contain 4.9 acres of land, more or less. AND BEING the same lands conveyed to James W. Cave and August L. Cave by Deed from Mark S. Hardesty, dated May 4, 2007, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County in Deed Book 3446, Page 235. Tax Parcel: 5-31-12.00116.04 Property Address: 4954 Woodpecker Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 19, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 23, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JAMES W. & AUGUST L. CAVE and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/3/2tc

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SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 15, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, and State of Delaware. BEING the same property conveyed to Michael B. Waller and Sandra L. Waller from Michael B. Waller by deed dated May 27, 1999 and recorded on June 4, 1999 in Deed Book 2393, Page 148, aforesaid records. Tax Parcel: 2-31-15.0016.01 Property Address: 24633 Waller Road, Georgetown Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 19, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 23, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MICHAEL B. & SANDRA WALLER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 15, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece or parcel of land, together with the improvements thereon, situate, lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, fronting on County Road No. 638 and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: Being the same lands and premises which Ralph A. Reagan and Norma L. Reagan, did grant and convey unto Jonathan M. Kondash and Brooke L. Kondash, by deed dated February 18, 2005 and recorded on February 28, 2005 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3105 at Page 205. Tax Parcel: 4-30-17.0015.07 Property Address: 17182 Cedar Corners Road, Bridgeville Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 19, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 23, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these See LEGALS—page 39


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 38 terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JONATHAN M. & BROOKE L. KONDASH and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 15, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN TRACT, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the Town of Blades, Broad Creek Hundred. Sussex County, Delaware, more particularly bounded and described as follows: Being the same lands and premises which Wayne E. Gray, Jr. and Tammy K Gray did grant and convey unto Luther M. Jennings by deed dated 6/30/1998 and recorded 7/7/1998 Office of the Recorder Of Deeds. in and for Sussex; County. State of Delaware, in Deed Record 0230l PG l95. Tax Parcel: 1-32-1.1549.01 Property Address: 11 W. Third Street, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 19, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 23, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be re-

quired to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LUTHER M. JENNINGS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 15, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL certain lot, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in the Town of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, and known as Lot No. Twelve, (12), of Wright’s Second Addition to the Town of Seaford, being more particularly described as follows, to wit: Being the same lands and premises which Dennis E. Wagaman, did grant and convey unto Felix V. Castrejon, by deed dated November 26, 2003 and recorded on December 4, 2003 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2917 at Page 144. Tax Parcel: 4-31-5.006.00 Property Address: 314 4th Street, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 19, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 23, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 per-

• SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

cent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of FELIX V. CASTREJON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 15, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN TRACT, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being known and designated as LOT 9, OF LANDS OF DONALD & SHARON LEA SMACK, as shown on a plot prepared by TempleSellers, Inc., dated May 14,2003, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Plot Book 80, Page 29, and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: Being the same lands and premises which Donald Smack, Sr., did grant and convey unto Sharon Lea Smack, by deed dated April 7, 2006 and recorded on April 10, 2006 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 8615 at Page 108. Tax Parcel: 3-31-2.0014.00 Property Address: 20760 Camp Road, Bridgeville Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register.

TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 19, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 23, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of SHARON LEA SMACK and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 15, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece, parcel and tract of land being situate in the CITY OF SEAFORD, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware described more particularly as follows, to wit: Being the same lands and premises which Delmar Homes, Inc., did grant and convey unto Elizabeth C. Robel, by deed dated May 31, 2005 and recorded on June 8, 2005 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3154 at Page 35. Tax Parcel: 4-31-4.0033.00 Property Address: 131 Fourth Street, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale.

PAGE 39 A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 19, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 23, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ELIZABETH C. ROBEL and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 15, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that piece and parcel of land being known as Lot 7 of “Forest Knoll Estates” (plot Book 48 - 116) situated in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware and as shown on a survey by TempleSellers, Inc. dated August 21, 2007, and more particularly described as follows, to wit: Being the same lands and premises which S & L Contractors, Inc., did grant and convey unto Bryon C. Friend, by deed dated August 31, 2007 and recorded on September 6,2007 in the

Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3495 at Page 248. Tax Parcel: 4-32-9.0021.00 Property Address: 33177 Forest Knoll Drive, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 19, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 23, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of BYRON C. FRIEND and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE

By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, September 15, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, and being more particularly deSee LEGALS—page 40


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MORNING STAR • SepTeMBeR 3 - 9, 2009

Education Briefs Saturday camps at Delaware Tech

Children will have fun while learning through interactive Day of Discovery camps on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to noon at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. Artistically-inclined students, ages 9-11, will enjoy creating and designing their own movie by creating a background, choosing their characters and more in Computer Animation and Design on Sept. 12. Hands-on exploration will delight future scientists, ages 6-11, in Science Mysteries on Sept. 12. Activities include collecting water samples and examining plants and organisms under a microscope; students will then discuss how they can have a positive effect on our ponds, streams, and oceans. Children, ages 6-11, will explore the “FUN”damentals of architecture through educational games and fun projects in Arc-Kid-Tects on Oct. 17. Students will enjoy discovering their natural ability to shape the environment through design. Future architects, ages 12-14, will put their imagination and creativity to the test in the highly interactive Arc-Kid-Tecture: Challenge on Nov. 7. Participants will work independently

and in teams to explore hands on approaches to design. For more information, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate & Community Programs at 302-854-6966.

Personal development courses

Take advantage of special interest courses offered in September at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. Become comfortable and confident using a computer in Computer/Windows Familiarization on Tuesday, Sept. 8 and 15. Beginning Sept. 9, discover how to capture that perfect picture and learn everything that your camera can do in Photography, level 1. Divorcing parents may take the Divorcing Parent Education Program on Saturday, Sept. 12 or Tuesday, Sept. 22 and 29 to satisfy Delaware’s legal requirement for parent education. Enrich your life with self-discovery and empowerment in Finding Your Vision: Manifest your Purpose beginning Sept. 14. On Sept. 17, begin to develop practical conversational skills in Spanish 1 or learn to use a firearm properly in Firearms: Protection & Training.

New drivers will learn the basics to keep them safe on the road in What Every New Driver Needs to Know on Sept. 17. Acquire simple driving strategies to help avoid collisions in basic defensive driving on Saturday, Sept. 19 and earn a 10% reduction on the liability portion of your automobile insurance for three years. Individuals who passed the basic defensive driving course three years ago can take advanced defensive driving for additional road safety strategies and to earn a 15% reduction on liability insurance on Monday, Sept. 14. Learn about Internet browsers and security programs as well as how to pay bills online and shop safely in Browsing the Internet & Internet Security beginning Sept. 22. Discover how to recollect and record life moments and weave them into stories in Creative Writing beginning Sept. 23. Explore the use of mental imaging in Mediation: Invent Your Own Reality beginning Sept. 29. For more information or to register, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate and Community Programs at 302-854-6966.

Visit museum exhibit for free

Visitors may view the Treasures of the Sea Exhibit at Delaware Technical & Community College on Saturday, Sept. 26, free of charge with a special admission card as the college celebrates Museum Day, sponsored by Smithsonian magazine. The Treasures of the Sea Exhibit features artifacts including gold and silver coins, bronze canons, emeralds and jewelry that were lost at sea in 1622 when the ill-fated Spanish galleon Nuestra Senora de Atocha sunk off the coast of Florida. The exhibit will be open on Sept. 26 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Attendees must present Smithsonian magazine’s Museum Day Admission Card which is available online at www.smithsonian.com/museumday. LEGALS - from Page 39

From Farming to Finance

We’re all business. msbusinessreport.com | 302.629.9788 | sales@mspublications.com

scribed as follows, to wit: Being the same lands and premises which Craig D. Willey and Jamie L. Willey, did grant and convey unto Benjamin G. Simmers, by deed dated December 20, 2005 and recorded on December 21, 2005 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3248 at Page 246. Tax Parcel: 2-32-7.0047.00 Property Address: 11404 County Seat Highway, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check

Each card provides museum access for two people, and one admission card is permitted per household. The exhibit is located in the Stephen J. Betze Library at Delaware Tech on Seashore Highway in Georgetown. For more information, call 302-8565700.

Colin Powell to speak at UD

Former Secretary of State Gen. Colin Powell will give a public lecture at the University of Delaware’s Newark campus on Tuesday, Nov. 3. Powell’s speech “Diplomacy: Persuasion, Trust and Values,” is part of the UD Speaks series, which is dedicated to bringing world-class leaders to the Delaware campus. The event begins at 8:30 p.m. at the Bob Carpenter Center. The speech will be followed by a question and answer session.

Fitness classes at Delaware Tech

Get in shape in September with classes offered at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. Beginning Sept. 15 acquire basic horseback riding skills at Singletree Stables in Seaford or combine the use of the mind, body, and spirit into graceful and slow movements in Tai Chi, level 1 or 2. Beginning Sept. 17 learn fun steps to great music in Line Dancing; discover basic and fun belly dancing moves in Belly Dance Aerobics; or explore the culture of the Middle East through dance techniques and music in Belly Dance Choreography. Build strength without excess bulk to create a sleek, toned body in Pilates on Mondays and Wednesdays beginning Sept. 21. Maximize your workout by combining high and low intensity cardio routines in Cardio Combo Class beginning Sept. 22. Men, ages 16 and up, will have fun playing basketball beginning Sept. 30. For more information on these or other fitness activities, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate and Community Programs at 302-854-6966.

payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before October 19, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on October 23, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by

the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of BENJAMIN G. SIMMERS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 9/3/2tc


MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 - 9, 2009

pAGe 41

Delmar varsity football team looks for younger players to step up, fill holes By Mike McClure

The Laurel Pop Warner Junior Pee Wee team takes the field during its season opener against Cape Henlopen last weekend in Laurel. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel Pop Warner program looks for continued success, community’s help By Mike McClure

Each year the Laurel Pop Warner program has added expenses caused by its football and cheerleading teams advancing to regional play. It’s a nice problem to have, but the league is looking for help from the community to help offset these expenses. This year the league has 212 participants on the football and cheerleading teams. According to Laurel Pop Warner president Glenn Phillips, Jr., the league incurs over $8,000 in costs (busses, etc.) before any equipment is purchased. The non-profit organization holds three fundraisers during the season (and bus driver Billy Otwell donates his services for in state playoff games), but it is sometimes not enough when the teams compete in regional games and competitions. The league added a Junior Pee Wee program last year. Three of the four football teams (all but the Mitey Mite team) are eligible to compete in regional play. The Laurel Pee Wee team has represented the region the past six years while the Midget team has been the regional representative for seven straight years. Last year the Junior Pee Wee and Midget cheerleading teams also competed in the regional competition. The added expense of regional competitions is something a lot of Pop Warner programs don’t have to deal with.

Over the past 26 years the Laurel Midget and Pee Wee football teams have won a total of 19 conference titles. The Midget team has won eight straight conference championships and 78 regular season contests in a row. The Pee Wee team has a 36 game winning streak along with five conference titles. “We look for big things to come throughout the organization,” Phillips said. “Without the parents we wouldn’t have the organization that we have.” The league also has a large number of coaches who are not coaching their children. Of the 21 football coaches, 12 do not have a child in the program and none of the coaches have children in the age bracket they are coaching. The Pop Warner program is the Laurel varsity football team’s primary feeder program. This year nine of the 11 projected offensive starters played Laurel Pop Warner football. “It’s all going to pay dividends this Fall with the high school football team. Our Pop Warner program is out feeder program here at Laurel,” said Phillips, who is also a varsity assistant coach. Anyone interested in donating to the organization can contact Phillips at 302236-1249 or wcbaseball63@yahoo.com. Sponsors will receive a tax ID number and recognition at the league’s year end banquet. Advertising can also be put on the Pop Warner web page.

Laurel Junior Pee Wee team tops Cape Henlopen, 25-0 The Laurel Pop Warner Junior Pee Wee football team opened the season with a 25-0 win over Cape Henlopen last Saturday in Laurel. Trent Hearn, Timaun Williams, Elijah DeShields, and Justin Hill had touchdown and Mitchell Moyer added a two points conversion. The Laurel offense had 197 yards of total offense while the defense allowed just 34 yards. Cole Collins recorded eight tackles and Donnell Briddell had seven tackles.

Laurel Little League to hold crab and shrimp fundraiser The Laurel Little League is having a Crab & Shrimp dinner fundraiser on Saturday, September 5th at O’Neal Farms. Serving begins at 4:00 with a live auction to follow. Tickets are $50 and limited. Call 302-542-0362 for details.

The Delmar varsity football team will look to reload once again this season after going 4-2 in the conference and 8-2 overall. The Wildcats lost a number of key players to graduation, but the team’s returning players and newcomers will be looking to fill the voids and help Delmar win the competitive Henlopen South. Delmar head coach David Hearn, in his 19th year at the helm in Delmar and 29th year of coaching, has had more time to work with his team due to the late Labor Day, but the hot weather has put a little bit of a damper on the pre-season. “It’s been a different kind of summer because of the weather,” said Hearn, who called it the hottest summer he can remember. The team, like other area football teams, has had pad time restrictions due to the heat. Jeff Fleetwood While the Delmar team has a young group, a number of key players are back from a year ago including seniors Casey Bellamy (K), Doug Causey (RB/LB), Tyler Cornish (RB/LB), Bryan Daniels (RB/DB), Jeff Fleetwood (OT/

DE), Jose Flores (E/DB), Spencer Fothergill (G/DE), Scott Kunkowski (OT/DT), Cameron Mattox (RB/ LB), James Lee (E/DE), Ryan Thomas (G/LB), Dante Tingle (E/ DT), and Noah Vincent (G/DE) and junior DaronJames Lee te DeShields (RB/ LB). The team’s key losses include: Kevin Forse (QB/DB), Tevin Jackson (RB/ DB), David Bradshaw (TE/DE, Salisbury University), Seth Benson (P/K), Cody Thompson (G/DT), and Bobby Disharoon (C/DT). With the loss of Forse and Jackson to graduation, the quarterback and tailback positions are currently up for grabs. “We lost some key people, we have some big shoes to fill,” said Hearn, who also said he has a nice nucleus of returning players. “We’ve got a lot of young guys with experience.” The Wildcats’ newcomers include: seniors Calvin Esham (G/DT), Jake Klaverweiden (T/DT), Cody Salerno (QB/DB), Brad Sensenig (E/LB), Dylan Shupe (QB/ LB); juniors Alex Ellis (QB/DB), Spencer Continued on page 49 TWO POINT CONVERSIONLaurel Junior Pee Wee quarterback Mitchell Moyer, right, follows his blockers for an extra point conversion during last Saturday’s home and season opener. Laurel topped Cape Henlopen, 25-0. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel Pop Warner Pee Wee football team blanks Cape, 19-0

The 2009 season has begun and the Laurel Pee Wee team picked up right where they left off by beating the Cape Sharks 19-0 to go 1-0 on the 2009 season. Alonzo Cannon rushed for 112 yards and two touchdowns and Johnny McGinnis rushed for 62 yards and one touchdown. McGinnis scored on a 34-yard run in the first quarter. Cannon scored on a 11 yard run in the second quarter and a one yard run in the fourth quarter with McGinnis running in the extra point to make the final score 19-0. Laurel’s defense allowed just 34 total yards. Amari Cannon recorded seven tackles and one assist, Alonzo Cannon and Leon West each had four tackles and one assist, and Bragg Davis added one tackle and two assists. Skyler Chaffinch, McGinnis, Gary Warren, and Tyler Whitby each had one tackle and Coleman Cook recorded a sack for the Bulldogs. The team’s next game is against Lower Sussex on Saturday, Sept. 5 at 1 p.m. at Selbyville Middle School.


pAGe 42

MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 - 9, 2009

Vincent Wade is ‘king’ at U.S. 13 Dragway By Charlie Brown Pro winner Vincent Wade of Eden, Md. defeated Street Eliminator winner, Joshua Dunn to win the “King of the Track” final Sunday at the U.S. 13 Dragway. Other winners on the day included: Dale Crouch of Elkton, Md. in Super Pro; Eddie Savage, Jr. of Wallops Island, Va. in Pro Bike; Tommy Thornes of Sanford, Va. in Bike Trophy; Dustin Lecates of Quantico, Md. in High School Eliminator; Paul Riddle, Jr. in Jr. Dragster 1 and Shelby Bireley of Salisbury in Jr. Dragster 2. Wade faced Ernie Fisher of Laurel in the Pro final. The pair were even at the start but Wade was almost dead-on his dial-in with a 9.574/135.11 on a 9.57 for the win. Fisher ran a solid 10.157/131.55 on a 10.12 dial. Semi-finalist was Phillip Truitt of Parsonsburg. Wade then advanced into the King of the Track final against Street winner Joshua Dunn. Again the two were even at the starting line but Wade had the better run and took the win with a 9.588/133.55 on a 9.56 dial. Dunn had a 16.429/83.53 on a 16.36 dial. Crouch, the only repeat winner in Super Pro this season, returned after a long absence to face Dover’s Vernon Russell. Russell had the better reaction but broke out with an 8.590 on an 8.61 dial. Crouch recorded his third win of the year with a 7.570/174.01 on a 7.56 dial. Semi-finalist was Mark Palmer of Snow Hill. Savage rode up against Marquise Blake of Bishopville, Md. in the Pro Bike final. Blake had a red light foul and Savage coasted to the win with a 10.802/96.30 on a 10.00 dial. Semi-finalist was Rob Kenney of Salisbury. Dunn was paired against defending Street champion, Crystal Hudson of Millsboro in the Street Eliminator final. Dunn had the hole shot and took the win with a16.371/81.77 on a 16.34 dial. Hudson ran a 12.439/106.63 on a 12.41 dial. Thornes rode into the Bike Trophy final against Anthony Bockson of Smyrna. Thornes picked up his first win with an 11.343/118.96 on an 11.30 dial. Bockson had an 11.572/110.82 on an 11.41 dial. In High School Eliminator it was Lecates in his Mustang against the Camaro of Lindsay Walston of Crisfield. Lecates had the better reaction and took the win with a 14.970/92.38 on a 14.96 dial. Walston had a 13.351/100.20 on a 13.30 dial. Riddle was back in the Jr. Dragster 1 final against Alexis Truitt of Parsonsburg. Riddle recorded his third win of the season with an 8.540/72.58 on an 8.50 dial. Truitt had a red light foul. Bireley appears to be headed for the Jr. Dragster 2 championship as she picked up her fifth win as she defeated Jordan Dill of Ellendale. Bireley had a 7.944/80.87 on a 7.90 dial to Dill’s 8.234 break out on an 8.24 dial.

Callaway, Walls, Hill, and Brittingham take support division wins

RESULTS: 15-Lap AC Delco Modified Feature: 1. JON CALLAWAY; 2. Matt Hawkins; 3. Kyle Fuller; 4. Shawn Ward; 5. Westley Smith; 6. Michael White; 7. Joseph Tracy; 8. John Curtis; 9. Scott Calhoun; 10. Mark Williams; 11. Herman Powell; 12. Mark Byram; 13. Scott Baker; 14. Danny Smack; 15. Brandon Sturgis; 16. Tony Bowers; 17. Garrie Bostwick; 18. Herbie Hempel; 19. Brandon Blades; 20. Corey Cohee; DNS: Ted Reynolds. 15-Lap Crate Model Feature: 1. RYAN WALLS; 2. Clint Chalabala; 3. Chris Hitchens; 4. Darin Henderson; 5. Joe Warren; 6. John Imler; 7. Tyler Reed; 8. Nick Davis; 9. Roy Hassler; 10. Amanda Whaley; 11. Mike Wilson; 12. Matt Hill; 13. Skip Syester; 14. Randy Given; 15. Richard Harden; 16. Justin Breeding; 17. Nick Sarvino; 18. Colby Steele. 15-Lap Mod Lite Feature: 1. JAMES HILL; 2. Alan Passwaters; 3. Tyler Reed; 4. Brandon Dennis; 5. Curt Miles Jr; 6. Curt Miles Sr; 7. Chad Passwaters; 8. TJ Williams; 9. Matt Glanden; 10. Billy Thompson; 11. Shawn Weber; 12. Cody Belote; 13. Brandon Keim; 14. Tim White; 15. Stacy Roberts; 16. Jason Musser; 17. Kevin McKinney; 18. Ty Short; 10. Scott Tessman. 10-Lap Little Lincoln Feature: 1. BILL BRITTINGHAM; 2. Jamie Wagner; 3. Brian Brasure; 4. John Stevenson; 5. Steve Baker; 6. Matt Johnson; 7. Donald Robinson, Jr.; 8. Brian Nailor; 9. Mark Cashdan; 10. Mel Joseph, Jr.; 11. Ryan Walsen; 12. Virgil Bradford; 13. Jeff Marker; DNS: Richard Zack; Wayne Wilkerson.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy!

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@ mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

Thunder Dawgs to have travel baseball tryouts Sept. 13 The Thunder Dawgs 9U, 10U, and 11U travel baseball teams will hold tryouy at the Laurel Little League park on Sunday, Sept. 13 at 1 p.m.If you have any questions please call or e-mail Glenn Phillips, Jr 302-236-1249 or wcbaseball63@yahoo.com

Henlopen Conference players meet again- Seaford High graduate Derrik Gibson takes a lead off first base at a recent Lowell Spinners’ game played at Aberdeen. The first baseman is Tyler Townsend, a Cape Henlopen graduate who was drafted by Baltimore in the 2009 draft. Photo by Lynn Schofer

Star update: Derrik Gibson’s Lowell Spinners stats

The following are Seaford grad Derrik Gibson’s stats with the Lowell Spinners of the New York Penn League: 61 G, 65-234, .278, 14 2B, 3 3B, 23 RBI, 49 R, 36 BB, 27 SB, 5 CS

Browning celebrates five decades of racing with late model win By Charlie Brown

Hal Browning bore witness to the saying that “age is just a number” as he drove to his 48th career win in the “Run What You Brung” open competition Super Late Model feature at the Delaware International Speedway. Browning began his racing career in 1959 and will celebrate his 73rd birthday on September 18. The open competition cars were lightning fast in the qualifying heats. Kerry King won the first heat with David Pettyjohn turning the fast lap of the night at 17.404 seconds and an average speed of 103.425 miles per hour. Staci Warrington captured the second heat with Browning turning the fast lap at 17.422/103.318. In comparison, Steve Francis’ fast time in World of Outlaw qualifying earlier in the year was an 18.98. In the 20-lap main, Warrington jumped out to the early lead hoping to repeat her open competition win earlier in the season. Browning chased using a different line in second with King in third. Things started to unravel for Warrington when she clipped one of the infield tires and damaged the side board on the car. Warrington narrowly missed contact with a lapped car on lap five. Richard Jarvis took the fourth spot on lap six from Donald Lingo, Jr. after a good battle. Coming to the halfway sign, Browning closed quickly on Warrington. Browning shot to the outside and narrowly missed collecting the outside wall as Warrington held on to the lead. King remained in third as Lingo, Jr. regained fourth and Jarvis ran in fifth. Warrington’s handling problems increase as part of her side board ripped from her car. Browning moved into the lead with King following into second and Jarvis jumped to third. The one and only caution in the event came with three laps to go for debris on the speedway. Browning showed his veteran savvy as he had a great restart and nailed the final three laps for his first win in years driving the Art Collins Trucking/Racetrack Auto/ Rocket. King had his best finish of the season in second with Lingo, Jr. taking third on the final lap. Fourth went to Jarvis and Ray Davis, Jr. rounded out the top five. “All I want to say is that was is good to win. It has been a lot of years. I needed one,” said Browning. When it was pointed out that his win came in the wake of another veteran, Eddie Pettyjohn’s victory Browning quipped, “Yea I told him when I went over there this week that I was going to rub up against him and rub a little luck on me.” Bunting goes the distance for his sixth NAPA Big Block win- H.J. Bunting shook off the mechanical woes of his two previous runs to post his sixth win of the season in the NAPA Big Block Modified 25-lap main. Scott Van Gorder led the first three laps of the feature before Dana Walker moved on top. Walker’s lead was short lived as Bunting came rocketing from ninth to lead lap six. On out front Bunting quickly opened an advantage over the rest of the field. Bobby Watkins climbed to the second spot followed by Jamie Mills in third. On lap nine, Mills got over the front of Watkins in the third turn and nearly flipped but was able to continue. Watkins came to a grinding halt collecting Matt Jester and Robert Dutton. All three cars were done for the night. Mills restarted behind Bunting but once again Bunting quickly opened a sizable lead of almost two seconds. That was erased when Howard O’Neal, who was running in third lost an engine and slowed to a stop with ten to go. The rest of the race was all green with Bunting again opening a two second advantage as he drove the Jake Marine/J&M Roofing/Teo to the win. Mills finished in the second spot with Jordan Watson coming on strong in the latter laps to take third. Fourth went to Joseph Watson with Van Gorder rounding out the top five. Heats were won by Bunting and Mills.

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MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 - 9, 2009

pAGe 43

Laurel Fall Sports Schedules 9/11 9/18 9/25 10/2 10/9 10/16 10/23 10/31 11/6 11/13

The Laurel varsity football defenders hit the bags during a recent practice. The Bulldogs open the season at home against Christiana on Sept. 11. See next week’s Laurel Star for a story on the team. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel varsity football looks to improve with each week

Head coach- Clarence Giles Years coaching- 12 years as assistant, first year as head coach Last season- 5-2 conference, 9-3 overall Returning players- Seniors Luke Hare (TE/DE), Zachary Exume (WR/DB), Chris Cutsail (QB/DB), and Zachary Lynch (OL/DL); junior Justin Rife (OL/LB); and sophomore Chris Jones (RB/LB) Newcomers- Juniors Joe McGinnis (DB/QB), Dexter Taylor (RB/DB), Cody Dalton (OL/LB); sophomores Arnold Mann (WR/DB) and Tyler Robinson (RB/DB); and freshman David Cornish (OL/DL) Team strengths- solid core of players returning following last season’s appearance in the Division II finals Concerns- youth and offensive and defensive lines Key losses- Brooks Hearne, Derek Babinski, Anthony Rubino, William Nazelrod, Gaven Parker, Mike Heck, Kline Valentin, Brandon Hearne, Tyler West, David Albert, Kyle Brown, Josh Kosiorowski, and Jordan Brown Outlook for the season- “Our main goal is to improve each week. We need our young players to progress rapidly.”

G o Bu LLDe uso GS ! C ome se af te r th e g ame!

9/11 9/12 9/15 9/17 9/23 9/25 9/29 10/1 10/6 10/8 10/10 10/13 10/15

VARSITY FOOTBALL home vs. Christiana 7:30 at St. Elizabeth 7:00 at Sussex Tech 7:30 home vs. Lake Forest 7:30 home vs. Polytech 7:30 home vs. Cape Henlopen 7:30 at Woodbridge 7:30 at Indian River 7:30 home vs. Delmar 7:30 at Seaford 7:30 VARSITY FIELD HOCKEY vs. Pocomoke at Delmar 4:30 vs. Washington at Delmar 1:00 home vs.Polytech 4:00 at Lake Forest 4:00 at Milford 4:00 vs. Seaford at UD 8:00 home vs. Caesar Rodney 4:00 at Woodbridge 4:00 at Sussex Tech 4:00 home vs. Indian River 4:00 home vs. Delmar 12:00 home vs. Sussex Central 4:00 home vs. Smyrna 4:00

10/21 10/27 9/14 9/15 9/17 9/22 9/24 9/29 10/1 10/6 10/8 10/13 10/15 10/20 10/22 10/27

at Cape Henlopen 4:00 home vs. Dover 4:00 VARSITY BOYS SOCCER at St, George’s 4:00 home vs. Smyrna 4:00 at Sussex Central 7:00 home vs. Sussex Tech 4:00 at Caesar Rodney 7:00 home vs. Cape Henlopen 4:00 at Dover 7:00 at Milford 7:00 home vs. Polytech 4:00 at Seaford 6:00 at Woodbridge 4:00 home vs. Delmar 4:00 home vs. Indian River 4:00 at Lake Forest 6:00 DEFENSEThe Bulldogs’ linebackers and defensive backs work on pass coverage during a recent practice. Longtime assistant coach Clarence Giles in his first season as the team’s coach. Photo by Mike McClure

As you begin another sports season, the Laurel School District and community wish all of their sports teams the very best. Have a successful season!

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pAGe 44

MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 - 9, 2009

Shown (clockwise from top left) are scenes from a recent Laurel varsity football practice: Laurel assistant coach Joey Deiter demonstates the proper blocking techniques, Laurel players take part in a drill, and a pair of Bulldogs hit the sleds. Photos by Mike McClure

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MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 - 9, 2009

pAGe 45

Donna Ward takes over as new Laurel varsity field hockey coach By Mike McClure

seniors have stepped up to help the team’s younger players. Laurel’s newcomers include sophomores Bree Venables and Breada Boyce and freshman midfielder Madi Chaffinch. Sophomore goalie Alyssa Miller has also displayed a Kelsey Oliphant solid work ethic in the pre-season. “The younger players have got to get their confidence up,” Ward said. She coached many of the current varsity players when they were seventh graders. Ward sees the team’s speed, team work, heart, good leadership, and defense as its strengths. The Bulldogs’ defense is made up of almost all seniors. “Our defense is looking good, they’re tough,” said Ward. “We’ve got to work on our offense.” Depth and lack of scoring over the last few years are concerns for the team entering the regular season. Ward is looking for her team to improve on last year’s record and compete for the Henlopen South title. “I think they’re going to be contenders for the South,” Ward said.

Laurel’s new varsity field hockey coach is not new to the program or the players. Donna Ward, who replaces longtime coach Margo Morris, has coached field hockey at the middle school and JV level in Laurel. “It’s a good bunch of girls, they’re working hard,” said Ward. “They need to keep working hard to develop the skills they need to take them to a higher level of play.” Laurel went 3-15 last season and are without key players Tykia Briddell and Diane Paul who graduated last spring. But the Bulldogs have a number of returning players from last year’s Jenna Cahall squad. Among the returning players are seniors Mariah Dickerson, Jenna Cahall, Tomorrow Briddell, Alexis Oliphant, Kelsey Oliphant, Taylor Oliphant, Ashley Zarello, and Lauren Hitch and juniors Katie Espenlaub and Courtney Evans. “The seniors have had a lot of leadership,” said Ward, who added that her

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Wishing a Great Season for All the Local High School Teams. Most of All, Let Sportsmanship Prevail!


pAGe 46

MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 - 9, 2009

Shown (clockwise from top left) are scenes from a recent Laurel varsity field hockey practice: Laurel goalie Taylor Oliphant, left, looks to keep the ball out of the goal, senior Tomorrow Briddell dribbles toward the cage, and the Laurel offense works on moving the ball upfield. New coach Donna Ward is looking for her offense to score more goals this season. Photos by Mike McClure

Laurel’s source for local sports, the Laurel Star.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy!

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@ mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

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MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 - 9, 2009

pAGe 47 LAUREL SOCCERShown (clockwise from left) are scenes from a recent Laurel varsity boys’ soccer practice: new Laurel head coach Donovan Howard watches his players do conditioning drills; Roosevelt Joinville, left, looks to get a shot past Fritz Ullyses; and a Laurel goalie comes out to meet the ball during a drill. See next week’s Star for more on the Laurel soccer team. Photos by Mike McClure

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pAGe 48

 MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 - 9, 2009

Delmar Fall Sports Schedules VARSITY FOOTBALL at C. Milton Wright 7:00 home vs. Hodgson 7:30 home vs. St. Elizabeth 7:3 at Archmere 1:00 at Indian River 7:30 home vs. Lake Forest 7:30 home vs. Seaford 1:30 at Polytech 7:30 at Laurel 7:30 home vs. Woodbridge 7:30 VARSITY FIELD HOCKEY 9/11-12 Delmar tournament TBA 9/15 home vs. Sussex Central 4:00 9/17 at Smyrna 4:00 9/22 home vs. Cape Henlopen 4:00 9/26 at Indian River 4:00 9/30 at Sussex Tech 4:00 10/7 home vs. Milford 4:00 10/10 at Laurel 12:00 10/13 at Caesar Rodney 4:00 10/15 home vs. Woodbridge 4:00 10/20 home vs. Dover 4:00 10/22 at Seaford 4:00 10/27 home vs. Polytech 4:00 10/29 home vs. Lake Forest 4:00 VARSITY BOYS SOCCER 9/15 home vs. Cape Henlopen 5:30 9/17 at Dover 7:00 9/22 home vs. Milford 5:30 9/24 at Smyrna 7:00 9/29 home vs. Sussex Central 5:30 9/30 home vs. Worcester Prep 5:30 10/1 at Sussex Tech 5:30 10/6 at Caesar Rodney 7:00 10/13 at Indian River 7:00 9/11 9/18 9/25 10/3 10/9 10/16 10/24 10/30 11/6 11/13

A pair of Laurel varsity football players lock up during a defensive drill during a recent practice. With the graduation of many players from last year’s team, which advanced to the state finals, first year head coach Clarence Giles is looking for his younger players to step up and fill the voids. Photo by Mike McClure

Coaches- The following Fall sports preview forms have not been received: Laurel boys’ soccer and Delmar volleyball. Please submit forms ASAP. Call Mike McClure at 262-9134 if you need a form.

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MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 - 9, 2009 Delmar football continued

(QB/LB); juniors Alex Ellis (QB/DB), Spencer Geniesse (C/DE), Ryan McCulley (E/LB), De’Vaughn Trader (RB/DB); and sophomores Dakota Harmon (E/LB), Tavon Smiley (RB/DB), Devene Spence (RB/DB), and Keandre Whaley (RB/LB). Spence, Smiley, and DeShields saw playing time as freshmen and sophomores last year. The Wildcats are looking for the new players to improve as the season goes along. Hearn sees overall team quickness as one of his team’s strengths. He also likes the nucleus of linebackers, interior defenders, and secondary on his defense. Lack of size and experience are concerns for the team entering the season. Like most Henlopen South teams, the Wildcats need to be in good shape and avoid injuries. As for the conference, Hearn expects another four team race in the South. Last year Delmar, Milford, Laurel and Indian River were in the hunt for the division title down to the wire.

pAGe 49 “I think it’s a nice, balanced group. Nobody’s overpowering,” Hearn said. The Wildcats will look to prepare for the conference schedule and strengthen its playoff chances Tyler Cornish by playing a tough non-conference schedule which includes back to back games against Hodgson and St. Elizabeth’s as well as contests against Archmere and C.M. Wright of Bel Air, Md. Delmar added a third scrimmage to its schedule, a home contest against Red Lion on Thursday. This will give the team’s coaches another look at the players in game situations. “Now they just want to play,” said Hearn. “I’m excited about it and I think they are too.”

Delmar quarterback Alex Ellis pitches to a running back during a drill at a recent practice. On the right, Delmar head coach David Hearn talks to his team. Hearn is looking for his team to be competitve in the always tough Henlopen South. Photos by Mike McClure

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pAGe 50

MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 - 9, 2009

New coach looks to build on Delmar field hockey team’s solid ‘08 season By Mike McClure

Last year the Delmar varsity field hockey team went 9-3-1 in the conference and 13-5-1 overall and went deep into the state tournament with just two seniors on the team. This year the team, under the leadership of new coach Jodi Hollamon, will look to build on that success. “It’s exciting to be here and work with a group of girls that love field hockey,” Hollamon said of the opportunity to coach the Lady Wildcats. The Pocomoke native coached the Parkside High field hockey team for eight years and was familiar with the Delmar players prior to being hired. She is assisted by long time Wildcat coaches Susan Elliott, Michelle Niblett, and Linda Budd. While the team lost senior leaders Shannon Wilson and Lindsay Lloyd to graduation, nine starters return from last year’s team. Senior Mallory Elliott, who missed last season with a knee injury, is also back. The Wildcats’ returning players are: seniors Amanda Campbell, Mallory Elliott, Amanda Fields (GK), Kelsey Lambrose, Alyssa Martin, Christina Parsons, and LauMallory Elliott ren Ruark; juniors

Casie Brinck, Mackenzie Martin, Lauren Massey, and Chelsea Ralph; sophomores Carlee Budd, Hunter Causey, Taylor Elliott, Samantha Johnson, Caroline Phillips, and Bethaney Wheatley; and freshman Bethany Parsons. Hollamon is looking for leadership from seniors Elliott, Martin and Massey. Eighth grader Sara Ellis is the team’s newcomer. Hollamon said the players that work hard in practice will see time in the games. Lack of experience in goal is a concern entering the season, The defenders and midfielders will be looked to take pressure off of the new goalkeeper (Fields). Delmar went 5-0-1 at the Seaford Play Day despite only four days of practice prior to the day long event. Now Hollamon and the coaches are looking to get the players in shape in preparation for the season opening tournament in Delmar. “They’ve been working hard. The team that can run at the end of the game will have the advantage,” said Hollamon. While she expects Cape Henlopen and Sussex Tech to once again be strong in the Henlopen North, Hollamon is not sure what to expect from the conference’s opponents. “It’s kind of nice not being familiar with the different teams in the conference,” the Delmar head coach said. Hollamon did know what she was getting when she took over as the head field hockey coach at Delmar. “It’s rich in tradition and I hope to continue that tradition,” Hollamon said.

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New Delmar varsity field hockey coach Jodi Hollamon gives instruction to her team during a recent practice. Below, the Lady Wildcats take part in a conditioning drill. Delmar is looking to build on last year’s solid season with just two seniors gone from the 2008 squad. Photos by Mike McClure

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MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 - 9, 2009

DELMAR SOCCER- Above, the Delmar varsity soccer team takes aim at the goal as head coach Tim Phillips looks on. Below, the Wildcats battle each other at a recent practice. Photos by Mike McClure

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pAGe 51

VOLLEYBALL- The Delmar varsity volleyball team looks for a block during a recent scrimmage. Below, head coach Karen Lewis talks to her team following the game. See next week’s Star for more on the volleyball and soccer teams. Photos by Mike McClure

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pAGe 52

MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 - 9, 2009

Sussex Tech field hockey team shoots for sixth straight state tourney berth By Mike McClure

The Sussex Tech varsity field hockey team is looking to build on last year’s success after going 12-1 in the conference and 13-4 overall. Key losses from 2008 include Sara Adams (offense) and Jenna Allen (defense), but the Ravens have a number of players back from a year ago. The team’s returning players are seniors Caitlin Stone (G), Courtenay Caitlin Stone Rickards (B), Abby Adkins (F), Amanda Ritter (F), Tori Seuss (F), Melissa Trout (S); juniors Abby Atkins (F), Kelsey Doherty (L), Maxine Fluharty (F), Taylor Kieffer (L), Logan Pavlik (L), Lindsay Rickards (B). Stone has been in goal for Sussex Tech since her sophomore year. Among the Ravens’ newcomers are: juniors Betsy Coulbourn (S) and Mel Moore (S); sophomores Megan Cannon (G), Kayla Krause (L), Taylor Quillen (F), Hannah Small (L); and freshmen Izzy Delario, Brie Pavlik, and Taylor Hatfield. Also new this year is the team’s new Bermuda field.

Head coach Nancy Tribbitt, in her 19th year of coaching, has a pretty young squad with a large number of sophomores and juniors on the squad in 2009. Speed is the team’s top strength while youth is a conMaxine Fluharty cern entering regular season play. The Ravens are looking to contend for the Henlopen North title and earn a berth in the state tournament for the sixth straight year. Tribbitt expects Milford, Cape Henlopen, Dover, and Delmar to be among the strong teams in the conference. While her team wants to win the division, making states is its ultimate goal. “It goes without saying that’s where they want to be,” said Tribbitt. “They also know they’ve got to do it one game at a time.” Tribbitt was pleased with her team’s play in the Seaford Play Day. The team worked to correct mistakes from the tournament prior to the start of the regular season. “They’re excited as players, I’m excited as a coach,” Tribbitt said.

Go Ravens!

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VARSITY FOOTBALL at Spring-Ford 7:00 at Milford 7:30 home vs. Laurel 7:30 home vs. Cape Henlopen 7:30 at Sussex Central 7:30 home vs. Dover 7:30 home vs. Smyrna 7:30 at Caesar Rodney 7:30 at Tatnall 2:00 at Polytech 7:30 VARSITY FIELD HOCKEY home vs. Woodbridge 4:00 home vs. Sussex Central 4:00 home vs. St. Andrews 1:00 at Seaford 4:00 at Cape Henlopen 7:00 vs. Charter School at UD 10:00 home vs. Delmar 4:00 home vs. Laurel 4:00 home vs. Milford 4:00 at Indian River 4:00 at Caesar Rodney 4:00 home vs. Lake Forest 4:00 at Dover 1:00 at Smyrna 4:00 at Polytech 4:00 VARSITY BOYS SOCCER at St. Thomas More 4:00 at Seaford 6:00 home vs. Polytech 5:30 at Laurel 4:00 home vs. Lake Forest 5:30 at Indian River 7:00 home vs. Delmar 5:30 home vs. Woodbridge 4:00 home vs. Concord 1:00 at Sussex Central 7:00 home v. Smyrna 5:30 at Milford 7:00 at Dover 7:00

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MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 - 9, 2009

pAGe 53

Sussex Tech boys’ soccer team has several returning players Head coach- Carlos Villa Years coaching- 10 Last season- 12-2 conference, 13-3-2 overall Returning players- Seniors Dylan Pepper (midfield), Christian Espinoza (forward), Ariel Espinoza (midfield); juniors Ryan Moore (midfield), Aris Reynoso (midfield), James Smith (goalie) Newcomers- Junior Michael Rhone (midfield) and sophomore Dustyn Beebe (forward) Team strengths- offense, goal scoring Concerns- defense Key losses- Nate Zanks

CROSS COUNTRY-

The Sussex Tech varsity football team takes the practice field during a practice earlier this week. While the Ravens are still deciding on a quarterback to replace graduate Zach Adkins, they have a strong backfield returning in Shane Marvel and Desmond Sivels. Photo by Mike McClure

The Sussex Tech boys’ and girls’ cross country runners take a lap around the sports complex during practice on Monday. Lou Nicoletti returns as the team’s coach after a one year absence with alum David Demarest serving as his assistant coach.

Sussex Tech football team returns a strong backfield

Head coach- Bill Collick Years coaching- nine Last season- 2-4 conference, 4-6 overall Returning players- Seniors Justin Allen (WR), Evan Gillespie (DB), Brad Ellingworth (OL/LB), Joey Casullo (OL/DL), Antonio Rodriguez (OL/DL), Drew Hitchens (DL/TE), Aikeem Brewer (OT/DT); juniors Orlando Theiss (TE/DE), Jonathan Hitchens (WR/DB), Desmond Sivels (FB/DB); and sophomore Shane Marvel (RB/LB) Newcomers- Seniors Jeff Schaeffer (RB/DB) and Dylan Fox (OL/DL/LB); juniors John Powell (QB), Jessie Swanson (QB), Trevon Custis (RB/LB); sophomores Jake Redefer (QB), Brandon Lewis (RB/DB), Darrin Beckett (RB/DE) Team strengths- The return of Shane Marvel and Desmond Sivels and the addition of Brandon Lewis provides strength in the backfield Concerns- “The major concern is how quickly we are able to settle in on a quarterback who can lead our team.” Key losses- Zach Adkins (QB) and Seth Hastings (P) Outlook for season- “Competing in the always tough Henlopen North Conference will no doubt be an outstanding challenge. It will be very important for our upperclassmen to provide great leadership as our team matures.”

Subscribe to the Star for weekly Sussex Tech coverage.

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pAGe 54

MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 - 9, 2009

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Western Sussex Boys and Girls Club holding Fall sports registration

The Western Sussex Boys and Girls Club is holding registration for the following Fall sports: Bitty Soccer (ages 3-6)- The cost is $15 per player. Bitty soccer is designed for the 3-6 year olds to keep them active and learn the skills and rules of soccer. This is an introduction to soccer. The league will take place on Wednesdays and Fridays Sept. 9-30 from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Bitty Flag Football (ages 3-6 )- The cost $10 per player. Bitty Football is for those siblings who are not old enough for league play. Players will learn the basics of football and play games. The league will take place Wednesdays and Fridays Oct. 7-30 from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Seaford Pop Warner (ages 5-15)- Seaford Pop Warner has been going five years strong. This is a traveling team. Cheerleaders and football players will travel to compete with other local towns. For more info, call Rhonda at the club. Indoor Soccer League (ages 5-18)- The cost is $25 for this co-ed indoor soccer league. Keep them moving this winter with this league. League will begin Nov. 9. For detailed info, please call Karen at 302-628-3789. U6 to U19 leagues are available. A membership fee of $15 is required for all sports held at the WSBGC. Times and dates of leagues are subject to changed based on enrollment. All registration fees along with completed membership forms are due prior to league. Sneakers are required for all athletic events. If you have any questions, please call Karen at 302-628-3789.

Woodbridge Little League to offer Junior, Senior League Fall Ball

Attention all Junior/Senior League age baseball players: Woodbridge Little League will be offering Fall Baseball for all boys, from any league, who played as a Junior or Senior League player this past season. Even if you are now 17, you are still eligible to play. Games will be played on Saturday and Sunday afternoons at the Woodbridge Little League field in Bridgeville. Each team will have two games per week. The season will run from approximately Sept. 12 through Oct. 18. Registration is $40 per child, $70 for two children and $95 for three or more children from the same household. All players will receive a jersey, hat and trophy to keep. Please call Jose Vazquez at (302)381-3572 or send e-mails to newagedjs@msn.com for more information or to register. Sponsors, coaches, umpires and other volunteers are needed.

Pat Horsey presents a check to Don Dubinski president of Laurel Little League during a Horsey Family Youth Foundation meeting last week. Photo by Mike McClure

Horsey Family Youth Foundation presents grants to 14 organizations

Up to 4,000 youngsters will benefit from $40,021 in grants made by the Horsey Family Youth Foundation to support organized sports programs in Delaware. The 14 organizations receiving grants were recognized by founders David and Pat Horsey at the fifth annual grant presentation last Wednesday at the Shore Thunder Starz building in Laurel. The Horsey Family Youth Foundation fund is a charitable fund of the Delaware Community Foundation. “All of the organizations we support work hard to provide opportunities for youngsters to learn from the experience of playing competitive team sports,” David Horsey said. “It’s very rewarding to see that in spite of the challenges with the economy this year, participation in ticket sales and support for all of our teams remained strong.” The local organizations receiving grants included: Delaware Storm, Diamond State Swoop, Laurel Little League, Laurel Pop Warner, Shore Thunder Starz, Woodbridge track and Delaware Technical and Community College. The Horseys created the fund to support programs for youth in Southern Delaware. Their goal is to try to keep children off drugs and off the streets by encouraging them to become involved in education and sports programs. An estimated 3,500 to 4,000 youngsters will benefit from the grants awarded to the 14 organizations.

Sixth Annual Putt for Life Golf Tournament raises funds

The Sixth Annual Putt For Life Golf Tournament was scheduled to take place at Heritage Shores in Bridgeville on Aug. 22. Heavy rains prohibited the tournament from commencing, leaving the course too soaked to play. Despite the rain out, the event succeeded in raising over $22,000 as a charity event for the Trinity Foundation, a non-profit organization founded in 2005 by the employees of Trinity Transport of Seaford. Golfers were given gift bags, door prizes, and vouchers for the course and restaurant to play and dine at their convenience. There were 116 golfers and 79 sponsors this year. Host sponsors included Discover Bank and Trinity Transport. The lunch sponsor Aljex Software and the other top level sponsors included Nanticoke Memorial, Management and Training Corporation, Trinity Distribution Services, and Trinity Transport’s Agent Division. For more information on the tournament visit www.puttforlife.org.

David and Pat Horsey are shown presenting a check to Woodbridge track and field coach Charlie Gibbs from the Horsey Family Youth Foundation. Eighty percent of the raffle ticket sales go back to the local organizations while the other 20 percent is used for prizes. Photo by Mike McClure

Silcotts named as Eastern Shore Baseball Museum curators

Charlie Silcott has a passion for baseball. The retired Seaford resident and his wife, Debbie, can now unleash that fervor as co-curators of the Eastern Shore Baseball Foundation’s Baseball Museum at Arthur W. Perdue Stadium in Salisbury. “There is a lot of interest in baseball around here,” Silcott said. “We are going to do some things to try to catch people’s attention as they attend games.” His duties include completing an inventory and taking pictures of that inventory for insurance purposes. “We have a lot of inventory here,” he said. “We will rotate exhibits so displays will change regularly. Also, we will have themes for the exhibits so people can see the connections.” Silcott and his wife will be at the museum every Monday and Thursday from 10 a.m. through 4 p.m. year round. In addition, if people would like tours outside of those hours, they can contact him at (410) 546-4444. “We have so much that we could change our exhibits every month if we wanted. I’m very excited about this opportunity,” said Silcott.

David and Pat Horsey, founders of the Horsey Family Youth Foundation, present a check to Sussex Tech superintendent Patrick Savini last week. Photo by Mike McClure


MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 - 9, 2009

pAGe 55

Halpern Hosts mixer - A Business After Hours Mixer was held recently at Halpern Eye Associates, Bridgeville Highway, Seaford. Members of the Halpern staff are (front row) Shannon Finkbiner, Jessica Shropshire (office manager), Roberta Jean-Louis, Amber Caredio and Tammy Shockley (back row) Dr. Timothy Westgate, Jamie Willey, Dr. Jessica Vanek and Coleen Beyer. Below, Brad Gillis of SVN Commercial Real Estate speaks with Steve Theis of Theis Photography

New guidelines for hunting set Beginning with the 2009-2010 hunting season, the Delaware Division of Fish & Wildlife is requiring all harvested deer to be registered via the Division’s toll free phone line, 1-866-511-DEER (3337) or Internet at www.dehip.com. Hunters must still register their deer within 24 hours of harvest. However, hunters will not be able to take deer to a check station or butcher shop and have it registered. Deer must be registered by phone or online before butcher shop processing. With both Delaware’s deer population and harvest numbers increasing, nearly 14,000 deer are being harvested annually and nearly half of those were being registered at check stations. The time required to enter the paper forms used at check stations had become overwhelming in both time and expense. The new electronic system will allow the Division to receive its annual harvest information within days of the season ending rather than five or more months later. The change will also provide additional cost savings because the Division will no longer have to print thousands of deer harvest record forms, possession tags and hide tags each year. Even though hunters will not be able to take their deer to a check station to be registered, the change in the registration system will not impact the Division’s har-

vest data collection efforts. The Division will continue to collect chronic wasting disease (CWD) and biological harvest data, including antler measurements, weights, and ages. During the peak deer seasons, Division personnel will be stationed at deer processors around the state collecting this information. Depending on the data collection goals for the year the Division will still be collecting as many samples, if not more, than it has in the past. When registering a deer, hunters will need to know their hunting license numbers as well as the deer management zone in which the deer was harvested. Zone information can be found on pages 19 to 22 in the 2009-2010 Delaware Hunting & Trapping Guide. After registering a deer, hunters will be given a 6-digit registration number to record and keep as proof of registration. Hunters having their deer processed by a butcher will need to give this number when dropping off the animal. For more information on the Automated Deer Checking System and the questions you will be asked to answer, refer to pages 3 and 24 in the hunting guide. For more information about the deer registration change or any other deer related issue, contact Wildlife Biologist Joe Rogerson at 302-735-3600.

Alan Levin to speak at breakfast

Chambers of Commerce in Seaford, Laurel and Delmar have joined together for a “Rise ‘N’ Shine Breakfast, on Monday, Sept. 14, at Johnny Janosik’s Conference Room, Laurel, from 7:30-8:30 a.m. Cost is $10 per person, including gratuity. Continental breakfast will be provided by the Georgia House. Alan Levin, secretary, Delaware Economic Development Office, will be presenting details about what’s happening in Delaware’s business community. Call the Seaford Chamber at 629-9690 to sign up.

Seaford market offering fresh produce through September By Tony E. Windsor

As summer winds down, there is still an opportunity to get fresh, locally grown produce in an open-market atmosphere. Organizers of Seaford’s Farmers and Artisans Market are hoping to make the final few weeks of the market a great opportunity for households in the area. The market is open Saturday mornings from 8:30 a.m. until noon in the Kiwanis Park, corner of Norman Eskridge Highway (Del 20) and Atlanta Road, Seaford. Lynne Betts, a representative of the Farmers and Artisans Market, said the produce available at the market is “as fresh as it gets.” She said vendors actually pick the produce the night before and the morning of the market. Even though the market is moving into its last few weeks, Betts said there are opportunities to get some of the important ingredients for many home cooked meals. “There are still some corn and tomatoes available and the pumpkins and winter squash will be coming in soon,” she said. “In the last two weeks of September there will be an opportunity for people to order their fall and Christmas greens, as well.” Betts said visitors to the market are able to enjoy “the atmosphere of a small town, Saturday morning gathering place,” while learning about agriculture and art. The market will be held every Saturday morning, rain or shine, 8:30 a.m. to 12 Noon, through September 26, 2009. For more information contact Faith Robinson at 629-2686.

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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

Governor promotes riding a bike to work, for play Delaware Governor Jack Markell and Congressman Mike Castle recently joined a group of AstraZeneca employees on a morning bike commute to work to stress the need to ease traffic, create less pollution and promote healthy exercise. When the cyclists arrived at AstraZeneca’s US headquarters, they were greeted by Delaware Department of Transportation (DelDOT) Secretary Carolann Wicks and AstraZeneca US President Rich Fante who spoke to AstraZeneca employees about the many merits of commuting by bicycle. Governor Jack Markell, who often commutes by bike to his office and each year bicycles the length of the state, noted that in 2009, the League of American Bicyclists ranked Delaware ninth in the nation for bike accessibility. DelDOT Secretary Carolann Wicks offered support and safety tips to the bike commuters, explaining how the Department is creating more bikeways to encourage safe cycling. “Myself and the rest of the team at DelDOT are designing a transportation system that is needed now and in the future. “For example, we’re building many roads with wider, safer shoulders for cyclists. In the spring of this year, the Governor signed an executive order that made

Complete Streets the law. Essentially, the executive order says that whenever we design a new road or improve an existing route, we either add facilities for pedestrians and bicyclists, or there must be a good reason why we cannot.” DelDOT publishes bike maps with route information for all three of Delaware’s counties. This information can be found online at www.deldot.gov. Additionally, DelDOT operates the Delaware Bicycle Council, which is tasked with improving bicycling throughout Delaware. According to the Environmental Defense Fund, if everyone who lives within five miles from work biked to work just one day a week, it would be the equivalent of taking one million cars off the road and reduce air pollution by 5 million tons each year. When it comes to commuting, over 20 percent of AstraZeneca’s employees at its major US facilities in Wilmington and Waltham, Mass. reduce their carbon footprint by commuting in high-occupancy vehicles. The company is also replacing its older sales fleet vehicles with new fuel efficient cars, which eliminated an estimated 355 tons of carbon monoxide emissions in 2008.

Delaware Governor Jack Markell and Congressman Mike Castle recently joined a group of AstraZeneca employees on a morning bike commute to work.

Recently, the British Medical Association found cycling just 20 miles a week can reduce the risk of coronary heart disease by 50%. A major study of 10,000 civil servants suggested that those who cycled 20 miles over the period of a week were half as likely to suffer heart disease as their noncycling colleagues.

In addition to disease prevention and cardiovascular health, among the many benefits of cycling are increased stamina, improved coordination and reduced stress. For more information on bike safety, contact the Delaware Department of Transportation at 800-652-5600 or visit the Delaware Bicycle Council website at www.deldot.gov.

Kids hold outdoor garden party The Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club, Seaford, held a special “Garden Party and Outdoor Classroom” event recently featuring fruits and vegetables grown by the members of the club in a special garden outside of the club. As part of an “outdoor classroom” club members learned how to prepare the soil, plant and care for the growing produce.

The youth planted corn, cucumbers, lima beans, cabbage, collard greens, watermelons, tomatoes and squash. The program is funded through the Sussex Child Health Promotion Coalition (SCHPC), of Nemours Health and Prevention Services, and taught by Dean Purnell of Delaware State University, 4-H Youth Development program.

Shown in the foreground are Geosha Harmon, 8, and Johanna Henson, 8, both of Seaford. In the backgournd are Peggy Geisler, SCHPC executive director; Dean Purnell of DSU; and Toni Devincentis, B&G Club staff member. Photo by Tony Windsor

Sleeping Bag campaign begins

Boys & Girls Club members serve watermelon, strawberries and punch to other members and club staff during the Garden Party event. From left are Sandra Massey, 11, Seaford; Corey Ross, 10, Seaford; and Alissa Mercie, Seaford, 7. Photo by Tony Windsor

In Delaware, more than 2,000 children were homeless last year. In a collaborative effort to give our homeless children a warm sleeping bag that they can take with them wherever they go at the end of the day, a statewide Sleeping Bag Campaign seeks to gather new sleeping bags for homeless children ages 3-21. The campaign runs from Sept. 15 through Dec. 20 with several drop-off locations throughout Delaware. The following agencies are working together on this campaign: the Governor’s Advisory Council for Exceptional Citizens, the Developmental Disabilities Council, the Council for Exceptional Chil-

dren, the Shepherds Place, Kent County Tourism, the Department of Education, Caesar Rodney School District, New Castle County Vo-Tech School District, Lake Forest School District, Food Bank of Delaware, the Oral Health Coalition, Delaware PTA, Kids Caucus, and the Lower Delaware Autism Foundation. These agencies will all bring sleeping bags to homeless children across Delaware by the end of the year. For more information about how you can help the campaign, contact Susan Hayes with the Governor’s Advisory Council for Exceptional Citizens at 302739-4553 or shayes@gacec.k12.de.us.


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Sussex County to begin issuing fines for improper 911 addresses Fines begin at $50 and increase to $100 a day for non compliance Beginning Oct. 1, Sussex County will begin fining property owners who fail to post their 911 addresses outside their homes and businesses. Violators, who would be identified upon complaint, would first receive warning letters; after 45 days, fines would begin at $50 and eventually increase to as much as $100 a day until the address is properly posted. “Sussex County has been patient long enough. This is a matter of life and death, and some people just aren’t getting the message, for whatever reason,” County Councilman Michael Vincent said. “I’m no fan of fines, certainly not as a means to generate revenue. But those who refuse to follow the law have left us no choice.” The fines are the last step in a yearslong effort to educate and encourage Sussex residents to properly display their addresses, a combination of a unit number and street name that replaced the more-

vague rural route post office addresses used before that. The 911 addressing project began more than a decade ago to give homes and businesses easier-to-find addresses that firefighters, medics and police could find when minutes count. Since then, Sussex County has issued more than 120,000 new addresses countywide. The County adopted an ordinance in October 2005 that set rules for the proper display of 911 addresses and established fines for those who did not comply. However, the County elected to not impose fines, for the time being, instead relying on public service announcements, mailers and advertisements as a means to improve compliance. Now, the clock has run out on that grace period. The County’s 911 addressing ordinance requirements are simple: • Residences and businesses shall have  reflective numbers displayed on a contrast-

ing background, in plain sight of the street to which the property is addressed, for emergency workers to see. • For numbers displayed on a sign or  mailbox, numbers must be at least 3-inches in height, and must be located on both sides of the mailbox, for instance; • For numbers displayed on the structure itself, numbers must be a minimum of 4 inches in height, and face the street; • The standards for other types of  properties can be found online at www. sussexcountyde.gov/docs/ordinances/AddressingOrdinance.pdf. Addressing Director Megan Nehrbas said installing the required numbers on a home or mail box is easy to do, with lettering and numbers available at hardware stores and large retailers. “A relatively inexpensive investment of $10 and a few minutes of time now can prevent a costly fine later on,” Nehrbas said. For more information, contact the  Addressing Office at 855-1176.

‘Litter-Free’ Clean Up Day is scheduled in Delaware The Delaware Department of Transportation will host the 5th annual “Imagine A Litter-Free Delaware” Clean Up Day on  Saturday, Sept. 26. DelDOT has designated this as a statewide cleanup day when everyone is invited to come out to clean Delaware’s roads, highways and community areas. It’s the perfect day for Adopt-A-Highway volunteers and/or Adopt-A-Bike Path volunteers to do one of their annual clean ups. Businesses, citizens and homeowners are also being asked to ensure that trash is

well contained, to pick up debris blowing around their property and to step outside to sweep a sidewalk, pick up sticks or rake up some leaves. DelDOT maintenance forces will pay special attention to cleaning Delaware’s roadsides during the week of September 28 to October 2. To participate in this free event on Sept. 26, register online at www.deldot.gov, under Hot Topics. The deadline for registration is Sept. 18. Rain date is Sunday,  Sept. 27.

Anyone cleaning roadways should visit the nearest DelDOT district office to obtain safety information, safety vests and trash bags during the week of Sept. 21-25. After the cleanup, participants should either dispose of the trash themselves or place it near a highway sign for DelDOT to pick up. If you need DelDOT to remove the trash bags, call the nearest DelDOT district office to request DelDOT remove them as soon as possible.

Police Journal State Police are looking for a Millsboro man who allegedly shot a man after an argument at a Laurel apartment complex. Warrants have been issued for 26-yearold Alonzo Payne, charging him with attempted murder, reckless endangering and weapons offenses. Police said two men were arguing with a 42-year-old man in front of his Laurel home Saturday evening, then left. The men returned an hour later with several other men, including Payne. Payne allegedly shot the man in the left hip and right foot. He was treated at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford.

The Laurel Fire Department, assisted by  the Seaford Fire Department,  responded to  the scene.  Upon arrival they encountered  smoke showing. At the time of the fire the home was occupied by five adults and two children. Three of the adults were taken to Nanticoke Memorial Hospital where they were treated for smoke inhalation and released. All others escaped without injury. The home was equipped with working smoke detectors. Delaware State Fire Marshal’s Office  Investigators have determined that the fire originated in the kitchen and was caused by unattended cooking. Damages have been estimated at approximately $15,000.

Laurel fire started in kitchen

Seat belt enforcement results

Man wanted in Laurel shooting

The Delaware State Fire Marshal’s Office investigated a house fire that occurred on August 31 at 6:56 p.m. in the 10000 block of Redwood Road in Laurel.

Officers participating in a stepped up enforcement effort to save lives by getting more Delawareans to buckle up have is-

THE SEAFORD & LAUREL STAR MAKE LEARNING FUN

Newspapers are living textbooks, filled with information to broaden kids’ minds and their horizons. You can have a positive impact on the quality of local education by providing the newspaper for classroom use through our Newspapers in Education program. It’s an easy and powerful way to invest in the future of today’s young students.

Thank

We would like to the following businesses, individuals and organizations for supporting our 2009-2010 NIE program

Our MOst recent suppOrters

Kiwanis Club of Bridgeville

Won’t you join these NIE Sponsors? Call Karen at 302-629-9788 to participate in the Stars’ NIE Program

Barbara Hudson Laurel Cora Norwood Selby Laurel

First State Fabrication LLC Laurel Friends for Lee Laurel Integra Administrative Group, Inc. Seaford Kiwanis Club of Delmar

sued 239 citations for seat belt violations in the first month of the campaign. The enforcement and awareness mobilization, which launched August 1, is part of a four-month-long safety initiative created after results from observational seat belt surveys conducted by the Office of Highway Safety in June revealed that the state’s 2009 statewide use rate declined from 91% last year to 88% this year. Also, 64% of drivers and passengers killed since January 1 of this year have not been buckled up. In addition to the seat belt citations issued during the first month, officers have also issued 9 citations for violations of Delaware’s child restraint law, cited 70 for speeding, arrested one for DUI and cited  another 198 for other traffic violations. Participating agencies include: Bridgeville Police, Harrington Police, Laurel Police, Milford Police, Millsboro Police, New Castle County Police, Ocean View Police, and Seaford Police.

Laurel Lioness Club Maria Heyssel Seaford Nanticoke Gastroenterolgy Seaford O’Neal’s Antiques Laurel Pizza King Seaford & Laurel Soil Service Seaford Southern Del. Foot & Ankle, Bradley T. Lemon Seaford

Wal-Mart Seaford


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Third time painting the kitchen is a charm I painted our kitchen this weekend. ynn arks Two and a half times. Not that it really needed paintThe morning sun ing even once. The coats of color that I applied about six years ago — Sand showed that Sienna, more on two walls, Olive on the reRose than Brick, wasn’t maining two — were perfectly fine, with just a scratch here and the right color at all. chip there that needed repaired. Something I could have easily done, as remnants of the Sand “It won’t hurt just to look,” I conand Olive paint still remain, safely soled my conscience. stored in their original cans in our baseI didn’t have to dig very deeply into ment. the rug and carpet selection. But I recently bought a rug. For there, right on the main aisle And that rug sent me on an adventure leading past the department, was a rack of paint and color that resulted in three of discounted area rugs. subsequent trips to a local hardware And on the rack was the perfect rug, store and two days of brushing and roll5 by 9 feet and in the shades of brick ing. and sand that I so love. It all started two weeks ago, when “It’s even on sale,” I exclaimed to my husband and I visited an area home anyone who was listening. improvement store. The rug, I told my husband, who had While he was discussing with a clerk given up on getting the right shingles, the availability of a certain kind of shinwas perfect, the right size and colors gle, I wandered on to the paint departfor our kitchen, which has a 30-year old ment, one of my favorite places. vinyl floor that could use some sprucing There, I picked up several paint up. samples, small squares of color and of He agreed and when we walked out imagination. to the car a few minutes later, he was While studying the various shades carrying a rolled up piece of carpet. of brick that are available, I suddenly Allowing him to tote it out of the remembered — it’s amazing how these store was the least I could do. things happen, isn’t it? — that the store, We brought the rug home and put it in addition to paint, also carries rugs.

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on the kitchen floor. I turned it this way, then that way, and finally declared that it was perfect. But the next morning, I realized that a new rug demands freshened paint. Something in the red department, I thought, to blend with the rug as well as with the nearby dining room, which is painted Brick. Of the several paint chips that I brought home later that week, I decided on Burning Bush, not as violent as it sounds but still unmistakably red. On Saturday morning, I bought a gallon, semi-gloss, brought it home and got right to work. Boy, was it red. Too red, I realized immediately after putting the first coat below the chair railing on one wall. It made the Brick in the dining room look gray. Back to the store. This time I came home with a gallon of Sienna, more Bricky, according to the paint chip, than Burning Bush. But still not timid. I worked all afternoon and by the end of the day, all of the kitchen walls were Sienna below the chair railing and the original Sand above. This was a day well-spent, I thought as I drifted off to sleep. What was I thinking? The morning sun showed that Sienna, more Rose than Brick, wasn’t the right color at all.

During breakfast, I sat in the kitchen and stared at the rug. While my husband worked outside in the shed, making room to work on those hard-to-find shingles, I contemplated its colors and pattern, even lying on it with the cats to more fully understand it. And finally, by lunchtime, I decided that the rug, something I had convinced my husband to buy because it was perfect for the kitchen, was much better suited for the dining room. “I’m off to the store again,” I called to my husband across the back yard. “I’ve got another idea.” Finally, I made a right choice. On my third try, I painted the kitchen walls Sand 3 above the chair railing and Sand 5 below. The railing too is Sand 5. My husband, inside from the shed, declared it perfect. Perfect, maybe. But at what cost? A whole weekend shot and two nearly-full gallons of red paint that will languish away in the dark and damp basement. Memories of Burning Bush and Sienna will keep me out of the paint department for a while. Maybe I’ll turn my attention to helping my husband find those shingles he so wants. I certainly have experience navigating the complexities of home improvement shopping.

TV selection was simple when I was a child The black and white television in my childhood living room ony indsor received a grand total of one station. By the time a movie WBOC Channel 16 was only got to Crisfield’s Arcade one of two sources of entertainment for the Windsor family. Movie Theater, most of The other source of entertainthe actors had died and ment was watching Dad adjust the manually controlled TV it had become a classic. antenna in an attempt to view a Baltimore or Philadelphia TV station. Following the report she would do Sometimes Dad would even go up on a fashion show promoting Benjamin’s the roof and push the antenna while one clothing lines. of us younguns hollered out the window But, there was more to Channel 16 telling him when the TV picture was the then simply the local fare. most clear. Sunday nights brought us Mister Ed, But, we could pretty much count on Lassie, the Wonderful World of Disney, Channel 16 to come through. Bonanza and the Sunday Night Movie. So, we were entertained with nightly I would never have believed there news from John B. Greenberger, weath- would be a day when you could bring er from Nancy Pigman and the nightly a movie home and watch it on a round, Curly Cues trivia question hosted by silver disc. Ralph Pennewell and sponsored by CurBy the time a movie got to Crley’s clothing store. isfield’s Arcade Movie Theater, most of Benjamin’s, another popular Salisthe actors had died and it had become a bury clothing store also outfitted Nancy classic. Pigman in the latest styles as she did There were those special times of the nightly weather report. the year when we would gather around

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the television to watch such annual favorites as The Wizard of Oz, The Robe and of course the one commercial that made us aware that Christmas was truly close….Santa Claus sliding down the hill on the Remington Electric Razor. But, everything we watched was on black and white. This was frustrating because some of my friends were starting to get color televisions. I recall the night they announced that The Wizard of Oz would be telecast with the first half of the movie in black and white and the last half in color. I could only imagine what those horrible little flying monkeys might have looked like in color. One day I was shopping in McCrory’s 10-cent Store and I spotted something that literally took my breath away. It was a slim, rectangular piece of plastic that promised to allow me to watch television in color even though I had a black and white television set. It promised “blue skies and green grass.” I had to have it. I think I recall it cost about $1.99. I ran all the way home from the store that day and could not wait to let Dad know that because he had been so slow

getting his family a color television set, I had decided to take the bull by the horns and deal with the problem myself. No longer would my family be subjected to drab, colorless figures on the family boob tube. I think it was at least two days before my father stopped laughing after I scotch taped the magical piece of plastic on the television screen. The top one-third was tinted blue, the middle portion was tinted a shade of red and the bottom third of the plastic was tinted green. An outdoor shot of Bonanza or Gunsmoke was the only time this screen covering made the remotest of sense. As Matt Dillon raced across the screen on horseback in the desert there was certainly blue sky and green grass. But, when he went into the Long Branch Saloon, the ceiling was blue and the floor was green. So much for revolutionizing my family’s viewing pleasure. It was only a year or so later that my dad bought us a color television set. I am not sure if that was the soonest he could afford it, or if that was when he finally stopped laughing.


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Celebrate the end of summer with a great barbeque Fire up those grills! It’s that time once again when we toast the oretta norr end to an all-too-brief summer. This is a season that sometimes acts like a fickle friend – she can’t make up her mind whether she likes us or not, giving presents of perfect days and then asking for them back in snits of rain or tantrums of high temperatures. Nevertheless, we’re always reluctant to let her go and eager to welcome her when she returns. grill another 2 minutes or until the shrimp There’s no better way to celebrate than turn pink and are slightly firm to the touch. to spend as much time as we can outside, Sprinkle with salt and serve. hoping all the while that in her leave-takCook’s Note: Shrimp cooked in the ing, Summer is in a good mood. shells are more intensely flavorful. LeavThe chefs at Food Network have come ing the shells on provides a buffer against up with recipes for entire meals that can be overcooking, a misfortune many shrimp cooked and enjoyed outdoors. Here are a suffer. few of my favorites. Shrimp, even these jumbos, continue to cook once removed from the grill. It’s Jumbo Shrimp Stuffed with Cilantro always best to cook them just until opaque and Chiles and let the delicate shellfish finish cooking Yield: 4 servings off the heat. 8 jumbo shrimp, in the shell (about 1 Jumbo shrimp in the shell can be a 1/4 pounds) knife and fork sort of deal unless you’re 3 sprigs fresh thyme, leaves stripped outside and it’s summer and you are feelJuice of 2 limes (about 1/4 cup) ing very relaxed. Serve these with lots of 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil napkins if your crowd is the peel-and-eat 1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus additional type. for seasoning Freshly ground black pepper Moroccan Grilled Salmon 1 clove garlic, chopped I’m always on the lookout for new 1/2 large jalapeno, with seeds salmon recipes. This one is a keeper! 2 scallions (white and green parts) Yield: 4 servings 1 cup coarsely chopped fresh cilantro 1/2 cup plain yogurt leaves Juice of 1 lemon, plus lemon wedges Prepare an outdoor grill with a medium- for garnish high fire. Without removing the shells, slit 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, plus about 3/4 of the way through the shrimp more for the grill down the ridged back and remove the vein 2 to 3 cloves garlic, smashed that runs down the center. 1 1/2 teaspoons ground coriander Rinse and pat the shrimp dry. Whisk 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin thyme leaves, lime juice, 1 tablespoon of Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper the olive oil, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 4 6-ounce skinless center-cut salmon black pepper, to taste, in a shallow nonfillets reactive bowl or dish. Lay the shrimp cut 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro or parsside down in the lime mixture and refriger- ley, for garnish ate for 30 minutes. Stir together the yogurt, lemon juice, In a food processor, pulse the garlic, olive oil, garlic, coriander, cumin, 1/4 teajalapeno, scallions, remaining 1 tablespoon spoon salt, and pepper to taste in a small olive oil and remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt to bowl. Pour half of the sauce into a large make a coarse paste. Add the cilantro and resealable plastic bag; cover and refrigerpulse just enough to incorporate into the ate the remaining sauce. Add the salmon to mixture. Spoon the mixture into the openthe bag and turn to coat with the marinade. ing in the shrimp and close the shrimp. Refrigerate for 20 to 30 minutes, turning Grill the shrimp shell side down (to keep the bag over once. filling from falling out) for 3 minutes. Preheat a grill to medium-high. Remove Turn to the other shell side, cover, and the salmon from the marinade and blot off

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The Practical Gourmet

excess yogurt with paper towels. Lightly oil the grill and add the salmon; cook, turning once, until browned on the outside and opaque in the center, 4 to 6 minutes per side, depending on the thickness. Serve with the reserved yogurt sauce and garnish with the herbs and lemon wedges.

Garlic Grilled Tomatoes Recipe courtesy of Paula Deen With apologies to Paula, I simply sprinkle the tomatoes with a little salt, pepper and granulated garlic (not powdered) rather than mix up a large batch of her House Seasoning. Yield: 4 servings 4 ripe red tomatoes House Seasoning (recipe follows) 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 5 cloves garlic, minced 2 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves 1/4 cup Parmigiano-Reggiano Cut the tomatoes in half crosswise, season with House Seasoning. Heat the oil in a small frying pan over medium heat. Add the garlic, and cook until just starting to turn golden brown, 1 to 2 minutes. Pour the garlic and oil into a heatproof bowl. Oil the grill and set for high heat. Place the tomatoes cut side down and grill for 3 to 5 minutes. Turn over, top with the garlic oil mix-

Gas Lines

Prices drop slightly

As the summer driving season winds down, so are prices at the pump. The average U.S. retail price for regular gasoline dropped 2 cents for the second consecutive week to $2.61 a gallon Friday. The current price is $1.05 below year-ago prices and $1.50 below the record price of $4.11 set last July. Throughout most of the summer, gasoline prices have remained between $2.40 a gallon (Memorial Day weekend) and about $2.70 a gallon. Crude oil had its ups and downs this past week. After beginning the week close to $75 a barrel, oil prices dipped as low as $69.83 on Wednesday before rebounding later in the week to settle at $72.74 on Friday. Prices were boosted by better-than-expected U.S. GDP and jobs data that signal economic recovery is on track. As evident this week, analysts expect crude oil prices to hold in the $70 to $75 range for some time to come. The weekly Energy Information Administration (EIA) report showed

ture and continue to cook for another 3 minutes. Remove from grill and top with thyme, House Seasoning and Parmigiano-Reggiano. Serve immediately. House Seasoning: 1 cup salt 1/4 cup black pepper 1/4 cup garlic powder Mix ingredients together and store in an airtight container for up to 6 months. Brown Sugar Grilled Plums with Lemon Sorbet Yield: 4 servings Cooking spray 2 tablespoons butter, melted 2 teaspoons brown sugar 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 4 large or 8 small plums, halved and pitted 2 cups lemon sorbet Candied peanuts and fresh mint for garnish, optional Coat an outdoor grill or stove-top grill pan with cooking spray and preheat to medium-high. In a small bowl, whisk together melted butter, brown sugar and cinnamon. Brush mixture all over flesh side of plums. Grill plums, flesh side down, 5 minutes, until soft. Serve plums with lemon sorbet. Garnish with candied peanuts and mint, if desired. U.S. crude inventories rose 200,000 barrels to 343.8 million barrels, against a forecast for a 1.1 million barrel drop. U.S. gasoline supplies fell 1.7 million barrels to 208.1 million barrels, above the forecast for a 1.0 million barrel drop. Travel forecast “Although many Americans are looking ahead to the upcoming Labor Day holiday weekend for their last leisure trips of the summer, AAA is projecting a 13% decrease in Labor Day weekend travel this year due to the weakened economy and a late holiday,” said Catherine L. Rossi, manager of Public and Government Affairs for AAA Mid-Atlantic. “Yet despite the projected drop in travel, motorists looking to get away one last time this summer should enjoy stability at the gas pumps through the holiday weekend.” Local pricing On Tuesday a few local gas stations were selling regular gasoline for $2.499 a gallon, down five cents from a week ago. Local prices ranged from the low of $2.499 to a high of $2.649 or a difference of 15 cents per gallon.

Price comparison average for Regular Unleaded Gasoline National

Delaware

8/30/09

Week Ago

Year Ago

$2.61

$2.63

$3.68

$2.58

$2.58

$3.47


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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

Community Snapshots BACK TO SCHOOL

Photos from left to right. A PL Dunbar student walks to the school during the first day of school last week in Laurel. Delmar Middle School students are shown outside of the school last Friday on the first day for all students. Students at Laurel High School wait outside of the school prior to the district’s first day of school for students last Thursday. Delmar High School students await their first day of school last Friday morning. The school is in its second year of school uniforms. Photos by Mike McClure. The Laurel varsity football cheerleaders do a cheer at the Laurel Football Boosters fundraiser last Tuesday at Laurel Pizzeria. Photo at right: New Laurel varsity head football coach Clarence Giles talks to the crowd at Laurel Pizzeria during the Laurel Football Boosters fundraiser. Photo below: Shown (l to r) at the Laurel Football Boosters fundraiser are Duke Parker, David Brown, and Laurel Superintendent Dr. John McCoy. Photos by Mike McClure.

David and Pat Horsey present Laurel Pop Warner representative Tiffany Hart with a check from the Horsey Family Youth Foundation during a meeting last week.

Submit photos for the snapshots page to Mmcclure@mspublications.com


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MORNING STAR • SEPTEMBER 3 - 9, 2009

Today’s styles and prices make Doing the Towns Together me grateful I’m a senior citizen LAUREL AND DELMAR SOCIALS It hardly seems possible that the summer of 2009 is drawing to a close. For years and years summer ended with the celebration of the Labor Day weekend. Then within a day or two school sessions began for another year. But, all of that has changed. Year-round public school sessions have held classes most of the summer, with an extended vacation of three or four weeks. The remainder of the public school sessions began classroom activity with scattered return to the classroom beginning just past mid-August. The staggered returns and early sessions have created greater problems for beach shop owners, what with college and high school students leaving earlier than ever to return to their homes and school. Labor Day is sandwiched in between and will be with us this weekend. Parents have been frantically trying to get their son or daughter outfitted for the return to school. While many schools have switched to uniforms, the majority in this area still have basic clothing choices for students. Parents have been shopping summer sales for student clothing for several weeks now, looking for sale items that will suit their son or daughter. Therein lies a major problem. More often than not the clothing choice of the student is at the opposite end of the spectrum from what the parent would choose for the wearer. Several articles in area newspapers have reported the spending amounts of parents as they have outfitted their offspring for the coming season of classroom activity. Five-hundred dollars per student has been reported by many parents. To many of us, that figure sounds astounding! Fivehundred dollars? That is more than many of us remember paying for our entire brood to return to the classroom. Many of us remember when namebrands were almost unheard of in the clothing area. As Depression Era students, we can easily recall that one new shirt and pants or one new dress our mothers made on their trusty Singer sewing machines (treadletype), and new pair of shoes with Buster Brown ankle socks were something to be overjoyed with. Large, complex stores were something that were almost unheard of for many of us. Our parents would shop Woolworth’s, Kresge’s or Grant’s Five and Dime stores. We would go to Buster Brown’s Shoe Store and get a pair of serviceable oxfords, tennis shoes were restricted to wear only during gym class. Sears Roebuck and Montgomery Ward were the large stores in Salisbury and it was a real treat to go there for some of the new back-to-school wear. In Laurel and other Eastern Shore towns, the local Ben Franklin

Moments With Mike Virginia ‘Mike’ Barton Five-And-Ten-Cent Store offered practically everything that was needed for the returning student. Many from this area made a special trip to Wilmington to Wilmington Dry Goods where the entire family could be outfitted at reasonable prices. Of course, designer clothing was unheard of during the days of many. The label on our clothing read Fruit of the Loom or Health-Tex. School clothing has come a long, long way since those days of the Depression. Uniforms are becoming more and more popular in public schools, where once they were restricted to private or Catholic schools. Actually uniforms make clothing a student much simpler. Jeans that hang at the hip or a tad below, or tiny-string tops that expose mountainous amounts of flesh were totally unheard of. Designer labels have taken hold of the shopping choices made by many of the returning students nowadays. It really doesn’t seem to matter so much how well the clothes fit or how appropriate they are for the wearer, as long as the label is proper! Sometimes when I look at some of today’s youth, I am amazed at how grungy they look. Fabric choices, attractive clothing, hair styles that compliment, and all of the accessories needed to make one attractive are within a hands reach at a reasonable price. Yet, far too many of today’s young people prefer choosing to look more like what some of would describe as a “ragamuffin.” It is at times like this that I realize that my generation and many others are looped into the “old-fashioned” generation category. Well, perhaps we are old-fashioned. But, one must admit, we had far fewer psychological problems. Many of us were definitely a “breed apart.” But, we were happy and carefree and as teenagers and young adults were far more appreciative and happy with our lifestyles. Times change, but some of us are truly very, very happy that we are a part of the older generation … our hair is white or graying, our clothing does not have a designer label, our elastic-banded waist means comfort. Being a part of the senior-citizen generation really isn’t all bad!

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Sarah Marie TriviTS • 875-3672 Labor Day holiday fast coming up - this weekend, so get your holiday plans in gear. You can pick-up a nice pre-holiday dinner - BBQ chicken and sides from the Ruritan group as they cook up their annual Labor Day fare and serve it from their stand at O’Neal’s parking lot on Rt.13 and Sycamore Road on Saturday, Sept. 5, from 10 o’clock until - it’s usually about 2 when they sell out, or whenever the goodies are gone. For that same day, Sept. 5, our local ladies of the Martha Rebekah Lodge #21 are having a really big yard sale from 7 a.m. until noon at the Poplar Street location across from the police station. Set up is $15, $20 table included. Proceeds benefit this organization and the Charity Lodge will be serving oyster sandwiches, hamburgers and hot dogs. Homemade ice cream will also be available. So, these two events can get you motivated for a good weekend. At a recent two week’s stay by the ocean - Fenwick Island - in fact, Homer and Verna Disharoon held a mini family reunion, entertaining daughter Judy Gibson and her husband, Mike and their son, Sam, from Corvallis, Ore.; their daughter Jan and Charlie O’Neill from Wilmington, and their granddaughter Megan and her husband, Ben Farver from Portland, Ore. Bruce and Euneta Farrelly have had the pleasure of the company of their granddaughter, Sharon Farrelly, this past week. Sharon is from Chattanooga, Tenn. and enjoyed visiting with relatives and friends in this area plus having a few days at one of our seaside resorts.

Neck on Tuesday, Aug. 25. There were 22 members enjoying the luncheon with hostesses Ginny Metzler and Dottie Borek. We express our deepest sympathy to the family and friends of: Janet Chambers, Barry G. Hastings, Charles A. Lusby, Jr., Margaret Darby Mitchell and Delores Todd. We continue with prayers for our service men and women and for friends who are ill: John Kolbe, Tom Wright, Joe Hitchens, Kara Adams, Gene Littleton, Conner Niblett, Matthew Littleton, Joe Messick, Calvin Hearn, Harriett MacVeigh, Molly Boodie, Mary Wilson, Hattie Puckham, Jean Henry, Steve Trivits, Alvin Lutz, Walt Dorman, Jean Foskey, “Bobbi” Shwed, Dot Murphy, Kelly McCrea, Susan Levredge, Patrick Starr, Jay Green, Bob Christian, Robert Truitt, Martha Windsor, Cliff Reaser, and Donald Layton, Sr. Happy birthday wishes to September celebrants: David Seichepine and Michael Sullivan on Sept. 3; Denise Frye, Sept. 5; Mattie Duncan, Sept. 6; Jean Conaway, Sept. 7; Charles Gordy, Sept. 9; Edward Dubinski and Nola Hearn, Sept. 10. The remains of summer are just around the corner -- so enjoy ! See you in the stars.

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The Laurel New Century Club held a past presidents luncheon at Laurel’s Georgia House on Tuesday, Aug. 25. Those attending were: Ruth Hickman, Eleanor Paradee, Addie Haddock, Lillian Wootten, Sharron Shulder, (a past state president) Dot Hickman, Terry Wright and Dianne Thompson. Absent were Anne Tracey and June Benson Powell. On Sept. 10, the Laurel Garden Club will have an outing at the East Coast Garden Center and following a one-hour class on Landscape Design, a tour and shopping. They will lunch at the Baywood Greens Restaurant. On Sept. 5, Mom-mom Donna Cecil will help grandson, Ethan Elliott, blow out six candles on his luscious birthday cake as she does this with lots of love, too. The Laurel Historical Society expresses appreciation for those who participated in any way in making the Odd Fellows “book launch” such a great success. Thanks, too, to Doug Breen and Chuck Swift, for their narrations concerning the book and how it came to be printed. The evening was an interesting one with many books finding a new home with families of relatives who now rest in Odd Fellows Cemetery. It is a most interesting and complete publication and there are more on hand for those who wish to purchase one. Contact any member if you wish to obtain one of these books. The Laurel Red Hats “Bonnets and Boas” lunched at The Oceanside Cafe in Long

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MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 - 9, 2009

Kid’s Fishing Derby

The Kid’s Fishing Derby held on Aug. 8 was a rousing success. The event hosted more than 80 participants and multiple fish were caught. The fish population saw no decrease as they were counted and returned to their habitat. Thanks to the hard work of chairman Bernie Warshow and the generous support of our local merchants, newspapers and Yacht Club members, especially Dr. Tom and Renee Benz for their generosity and hard work, everyone went home with multiple prizes, including special prizes for the parents. Special thank you to Benz Urology, Heritage Jewelers, McDonald’s, Rita’s, Tastee Freeze, Subway, Dunkin Donuts, Hobby Shop, Plaza Tapatia, Nanticoke

Letters to the Editor

Automotive, Café Milano, Peninsula Oil, Herr’s Snack Foods, Mike’s Boat &Tackle, Sturgis Marine, Pizza King, Joe Ben’s Automotive, Harley Davidson of Seaford, and the Star. Sandy Blackwell

Seaford

Are we pawns in a chess match?

I read with interest the letter from Leann H. Ferguson in the Aug. 27th edition of the Seaford Star and, for the most part, had to agree with her sentiments on being hard balled by the Service Employees International Union to call Sen. Carper’s office to support the healthcare options. I received three glossy cardboard mail-

Guest Column The importance of job training With Labor Day approaching, the importance of a good education seems like an appropriate topic for those entering the job market for the first time or changing jobs. By Congressman Mike Castle Americans are facing serious economic challenges. In just one year, the number of unemployed workers across the nation has increased by about 5.3 million people, leaving high school and college graduates to face the toughest job market in decades. While unemployment rates continue to rise, the recession has provided several industries with real opportunities for growth. To obtain the skills needed for these expanding fields, recent graduates, unemployed and under-employed workers are turning to the classroom. Changes in consumer demand, technology and many other factors have contributed to the employment structure in the U.S. economy. The sectors projected to be the fastest growing over the next several decades are education and health services. Employment of teachers is expected to grow by 12 percent between 2006 and 2016, creating about 479,000 new positions in the education field. Healthcare and social assistance, including public and private hospitals, nursing and residential care facilities, and individual and family services, is expected to grow by 25.4 percent, which would add approximately 4 million new jobs. These are bright spots in the economy that we can cultivate. Now, more than ever, job training programs must be utilized

ings from this organization urging me to do the same thing. I wondered as to their connection to the whole health care debate and why they had singled out Sen. Carper. There was a certain smell to the whole thing and, rather than call, as Leann did, I elected simply to ignore it. I’m not exactly sure what the key is that will get me to support this or that. I do support liberal causes but, unfortunately, they tend to share their phone and mailing lists and I get solicitations all the time from organizations I never heard of and elect, in the main, not to support them, in part for fear of even further opening up the flood gates of solicitations. And, of course, there is just so much I am willing to hand out, so I select my causes with care. Like Leann, I didn’t like being strong armed, especially by an organization I’d

to provide workers with the skills and training they will need during these challenging economic times. As many industries continue to shift and grow, we can encourage community and business leaders to include job training and postsecondary education programs as a bridge for job-seekers. In Congress, I am hopeful that we will advance employment opportunities by revising and reauthorizing the Workforce Investment Act (WIA). WIA currently works to give job seekers access to job training services, counseling and labor market information to help them get back on their feet. Although the legislation has been successful, more work is needed to strengthen and improve America’s job training system to encourage states, communities and educational institutions to give workers the training they need to find good jobs. Additionally, we must promote the community colleges and other educational institutions that have seen increased numbers of student applications and enrollment since the downturn in the economy. They are the key to bridging the employment gap. In these trying times, many students have made more practical decisions to go to a local or community college instead of moving away for college. In fact, community college enrollment last year rose about 10% from the previous school year. As a co-chair of the Congressional Community College Caucus, I have seen their potential for working with local government and industry leaders to grow a regional economy through education and practical job training curriculum. As we consider higher education and job training, I hope that we on the House Education and Labor Committee’s Subcommittee on Higher Education, Lifelong Learning, and Competitiveness, continue to examine what is driving college costs and expand access for students, regardless of their income. With the enactment of the Higher Education Opportunity Act, Congress took many steps toward making college more accessible and affordable through federal grants and access to student loans. As the economy continues to change, job training programs and educational opportunities must also transform to ensure Americans have the tools they need to be adequately trained to face the job market.

Morning Star Publications Inc.

President Bryant L. Richardson

Editor Daniel Wright Richardson

Seaford, DE 19973

Vice President Pat Murphy

Managing Editor Mike McClure

P.O. Box 1000 • 951 Norman Eskridge Highway 629-9788 • 629-9243 (fax) editor@mspublications.com

Secretary Tina Reaser

Editorial Lynn Parks

never heard of before. During last year’s election, being a Democrat, I was inundated by campaign e-mails from headline Democrats with the most outrageous stories. It appears that we Democrats are just as capable of petty politics and political lies as our Republican brethren. Frankly, I was disgusted by much of what I read. For instance, I recall being asked for money so that a billboard could be posted in a Republican’s district. We should be better than this. I am, though, concerned that, because of these annoying tactics, we may end up throwing out the baby with the bathwater, much as Leann followed through and called Sen. Carper’s office to have him vote “no” on the issue, rather than “yes” as the call had urged. I do believe that health care reform is a must and thus chose to take no action, a combination resulting from being for the measure but against the tactic taken to get me there. Why not have both sides elevate the dialog to what are truly the issues rather than create rumors that raise people’s ire irresponsibly? Are we all pawns in a large chess match pitting vested interests against each other, rather than our own best interests at heart? Richard Eger

Seaford

Stars’ Letters Policy

All letters should include the writer’s name, address and phone number for verification purposes. Names will be published. No unsigned letters will be published. No letters which the management deems to be libelous will be published. The Star reserves the right to edit or reject any letters. Send your letters to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, or you may email editor@ mspublications.com

Carol Kinsley Elaine Schneider Kay Wennberg Composition Cassie Richardson Rita Brex

Sales Rick Cullen Emily Rantz Laura Rogers Doris Shenton Brandon Miller

Morning Star Publications Inc. Subscriptions - $19 a year in-county, $24 a year in Tony Windsor has been serving the Delmarva Circulation Treasurer Kent and New Castle, Del., and Federalsburg, SharpCarol Wright Richardson Cathy Shufelt Karen Cherrix Peninsula since 1996. town and Delmar, Md.; $29 elsewhere out of state. Publishers of the Seaford Star and Laurel Star community newspapers, (Salisbury, Md.) Business Journal and the Morning Star Business Report


MORNING STAR • SepTeMbeR 3 - 9, 2009

pAGe 63

Final Word

Health care facts & fallacies To a government bureaucrat, we are all nothing more than ‘expenses’ that get larger over time. Given that our politicians are actually debating a government takeover of our healthcare system, 1/7th of the entire US economy, I think it would be good to interject some facts into the discussion. The proponents of this healthcare takeover use Orwellian terms like stating that they are fighting for a “Single Payer System.” Let’s look at examples of some of the problems that plague other countries using what our politicians are calling a “Single Payer System.” First and foremost we have to ask ourselves: how are we going to pay for this “Free” health care? Canadians pay a “Harmonized Sales Tax” of up to 15.5% on every purchase. It’s important to note that their sky-high “Harmonized Sales Tax” is only on money that they have already paid Income Taxes on. Their combined (Federal and Provincial) tax rate can be as high as 47% on their Income Taxes, and then they have to pay their Sales Taxes when they want to spend what little hard earned money they have left! So what do Canadians get for their oppressive and burdensome taxes? Canadians get long waiting lines for what are common medical procedures and treatment in the US! Needed items like bone marrow transplants, long term heart care, imaging tests, and bariatric operations can have as much as a five-year waiting list in Canada. Because of this, medical tourism has become a virtual boom industry in the United States. The gaping holes in Canada’s “Single Payer System” are being filled by private American hospitals motivated by profit. Canadians that require vital medical procedures are forced to look elsewhere for treatment, because their “Single Payer System” simply cannot provide for them adequately. We can also look to Western Europe, which is often touted as an example by the proponents of this government takeover of health care.

Where is Frank now?

Where is Frank Calio’s column? I read that he was taking the summer off. Well, summer is over now. I can hardly wait to hear what he is going to say about President Obama now. Will he still be singing his praises? Does he agree with all the bailouts with our tax money? Is he in favor of the government running our healthcare as well as it does our postal system or MVA’s or even the “Cash for Clunkers” program? Has he thought about how he is going to explain to his grandchildren why he supported a President and Congress who have run up trillions of dollars in debt that

Western Europeans get to experience medical horror stories almost every day, like the recent case of the young lady who was forced to give birth to her baby girl, literally on the sidewalk outside of the Royal Infirmary in London. This pregnant young mother-to-be was told, while she was in the throes of labor, that scheduled ambulance services were already booked up for the next nine months! We should also delve a little deeper into one of the most prevalent Orwellian phrases: “millions of uninsured.” Although it may be advantageous for some politicians to use this phrase, I think the public would be better served if we were a bit more specific. There are quite literally millions of people (most of them young) all across America that can afford health insurance, but they simply choose to spend their money elsewhere. Should the rest of our hard-working Americans be forced to pay these people’s way, when these people are not willing to pay for it themselves? There are also many millions of illegal aliens that do not have health insurance. I certainly cannot comprehend any pressing need to burden tax-paying citizens with having to pay for someone who is in this country illegally in the first place.

The bottom line in this health care discussion is that private insurance companies make more money the longer people live. They are motivated by profit, and as long as we pay their monthly fees they will continue to make a profit. Since government programs are subsidized by the taxpayers, government programs are not concerned with ever actually turning a profit. To a government bureaucrat, we are all nothing more than “expenses” that get larger over time. Do you really wish to put your children and grandchildren’s health in the bungling hands of an organization with DelDOT’s efficiency skills and the “heart” of the IRS? Speaking for myself, I sincerely hope that Blue Cross continues to make a profit off of me for a very long time to come. Christian Hudson

Lewes

they will be responsible for paying? Can he explain why President Obama has placed Czars in charge of various government agencies instead of nominating them and getting congressional approval? As Ricky Ricardo would say to Lucy, “You got some ‘splainin’ to do!” Susan Morrison Hollywood, MD

Final Thoughts

Is it true that cannibals don’t eat clowns because they taste funny? Whose cruel idea was it for the word lisp to have an “s” in it?

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September 3, 2009_L  

GIleS - Laurel varsity football coach Clarence Giles, in his first sea- son as head coach, is shown during a recent fundraiser. See the Star...

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