Page 1

VOL. 11 NO. 9

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2006

NEWS HEADLINES

HOME & GARDEN

50 cents

Former mayor is Delmar’s 2006 Citizen of the Year By Mike McClure

Section in This Edition

OFFERING COMFORT - Area woman puts her sewing machine in action to thank those wounded in war. Page 2 SCHOOLS ARE RECOGNIZED Superior, commendable performances on state tests bring awards. Page 5 YEARS-OLD TRADITION OVER - Area service club will no longer deliver hospital equipment. Page 12 CATS VS. DOGS - The Wildcats and Bulldogs will meet on the football field this Friday night in Delmar. Exclusive coverage of last week’s games and a preview of this week’s game begins on page 41. STARS OF THE WEEK - A Laurel football player and a Delmar field hockey player are this week’s Laurel Stars of the Week. Page 43

INSIDE THE STAR © Business . . . . . . . . .6 Bulletin Board . . . .19 Church . . . . . . . . .24 Classifieds . . . . . .32 Entertainment . . . .30 Gourmet . . . . . . . .39 Growing Up . . . . . .18 Health . . . . . . . . . .50 Letters . . . . . . . . . .52 Lynn Parks . . . . . .15 Mike Barton . . . . . .14 Movies . . . . . . . . . . .7 Obituaries . . . . . . .26 Opinion . . . . . . . . .54

Pat Murphy . . . . . .23

Delmar resident John McDonnell, the former Delmar, Del., mayor and a member of the Delmar Lions Club and VFW Post 8276 Men’s Auxiliary, doesn’t take part in the numerous community events his clubs are involved in for the accolades. Even so, on Nov. 2 he’ll be receiving some during the annual Delmar Citizen of the Year banquet when he is saluted as the 2006 Delmar Citizen of the Year. “There’s so many good people in this town that do a whole lot that people don’t realize,” McDonnell said. “It’s basically a who’s who of Delmar. To be from outside of Delmar and to be awarded this honor is beyond me.” In fact, McDonnell says he was stunned when he was told that he was the recipient of the annual award. “I do it because I want to, I don’t do it for any accolades. I was totally stunned,” said McDonnell. “My reaction to Lisa (Ellis) was, ‘You’ve got to be kidding, there’s a lot of people more deserving than me.’” McDonnell and his wife Diana “Dee” moved to Delmar 21 years ago and have been contributing to the community ever since. John, who is a human resources professional, is from Monaca, Pa., which is 30 miles north of Pittsburgh. He had been working in the steel industry for 10 years before the company he was working for went out of business. He answered an ad in a publication and moved to this area to

Delmar’s John McDonnell is shown cooking chicken at a recent VFW Men’s Auxiliary fundraiser. McDonnell, who is a past mayor and current Lions Club member, was recently named Delmar Citizen of the Year. Photo by Mike McClure

work as a payroll supervisor. “We came to Delmar and we like the town. There are a lot of good people here,” McDonnell said. The McDonnells, who each came from small towns in Pennsylvania, have been married for 32 years. They met at Community College in Beaver County when they were both 18; both later transferred to Clarion State College (now University).

“I couldn’t do this without her. She’s a fine lady,” John said of his wife, who is a past recipient of the Delmar Chamber of Commerce’s annual award. McDonnell served as mayor of Delmar, Del., from 1990 to 2004 after being asked to run by last year’s Citizen of the Year, Wayne Bastian, and his wife. He already knew Delmar, Continued on page 9

People . . . . . . . . . .22 Police . . . . . . . . . .10 Snapshots . . . . . . .49 Socials . . . . . . . . .14 Sports . . . . . . . . . .41 Tides/Weather . . . .55 Todd Crofford . . . .25 Tommy Young . . . .44 Tony Windsor . . . .39

Monopole would be unsightly in historic area, residents say By Lynn R. Parks A demonstration to show what a proposed cell telephone transmission tower would look like did nothing to change the mind of Holly Conaway, who is fighting Cingular and its placement of the tower. “In fact, it absolutely confirmed the idea I had,” she said. Cingular wants to put the 170-foot

“monopole” near Woodland Ferry Road at Deer Lane. The site is close to the housing development Patty Cannon Estates and just south of the historic Woodland Ferry. The proposed tower site is owned by Byard Layton, Laurel. Last Wednesday, Cingular put up a 170-foot crane to show residents what the tower would look like. “From time to time, we do simulations such as a

crane test so the community can get a visual picture of the height of a proposed cell site,” said Ellen Webner, spokeswoman for Cingular. For Conaway, who lives near Patty Estates on property that has been in the Conaway family for more than two centuries, that “visual picture” was ugly. “From Patty Cannon Estates, the Continued on page 8


PAGE 2

MORNING STAR

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

Comfort for the wounded Seaford woman sends Quilts of Valor to injured soldiers and Marines By Lynn R. Parks Catherine Roberts isn’t impressed by the number of yellow “Support Our Troops” ribbons she sees on cars. “It’s easy to do something like that,” she said. “Talk is cheap. But what have you done lately to help our soldiers?” Roberts, Seaford, is the founder of the Quilts of Valor Foundation. Through her group, which she started shortly after the United States invaded Iraq in 2003, 6,400 hand-made quilts have been sent to soldiers and Marines who have been wounded in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. “People just don’t get it that we are at war,” she said. “The Department of Defense says that there are 20,000 wounded, but that does not include those with posttraumatic stress disorder. So is the real number 30,000? 35,000? Whatever the number, we have a lot of quilts to make.” “We” is her corps of about 10,000 volunteers throughout the world, who design and piece the quilts tops, and about 200 volunteer “long-armers,” who sew the quilt tops, backs and batting together and then do the actual quilting. In addition to sewing, Roberts coordinates the “toppers” and long-armers, looks over the finished

Catherine Roberts, Seaford, is the founder of the Quilts of Valor Foundation. Through her group, which she started shortly after the United States invaded Iraq in 2003, 6,400 hand-made quilts have been sent to soldiers and Marines who have been wounded in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Photo by Lynn R. Parks. On right is a detail of a quilt that Roberts made.

products — “Service members are out there doing their best and I want them to get the best,” she said — then sends them to Veterans Administration hospitals, service chaplains; anyone she can find who will deliver the quilts to the servicemen and women who need them.

Roberts, 57, started the Quilts of Valor Foundation after her son Nathanael Vinbury, a military policeman in the Army, was sent to Iraq. Vinbury, 29, is now stationed at Ft. Detrick, Frederick, Md., and expects to get out of the Army in February. “He was at lost ends and we just kept

For your information: Details about the Quilts of Valor Foundation are available on the Web site, www.qovf.org. Information is also available through Catherine Roberts, 2360230.


SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 3

telling him, ‘Join the military,’” she said. “His recruiter told him to be an MP, because MPs never get sent to the front line. Then he wound up in Iraq, a gunner on a Humvee. I started quilting to keep myself from going crazy.” At first, she thought she would make quilts for families whose sons and daughters were killed in action. “But that was already being done,” she said. “No one was quilting for the wounded.” Roberts uses her Web site to contact toppers and longarmers, and to get the quilts-in-progress from one to the other. She asks the volunteers to write down their thoughts while they are sewing and to take pictures of the quilt along the way. Both the pictures and the diary are included with the quilt when it is sent to the service member. Roberts has 85 contacts in the military who help her get her quilts to those who have been wounded. She leaves the determination of who needs a quilt up to the chaplains or officers who are distributing them. But as far as she is concerned, anyone who has served in Iraq or Afghanistan deserves recognition. “In Iraq and Afghanistan, there is no demilitarized zone. It’s all the front lines, it’s all down range,” she said. “Anyone who comes back from over there has been affected.” Roberts insists that all the quilts be made of quality

‘This may seem childish, but when I get scared with the memories of war, I curl up in the quilt and everything goes away.’ Wounded soldier who received a Quilt of Valor

‘Since the Revolutionary War, women have been sending their loved ones off to battle with quilts. We need to teach our young ones how to sew. If we don’t, who’s going to make the quilts for our soldiers in the future?’ Catherine Roberts Founder, Quilts of Valor

material. They must also be “big enough to wrap up in and long enough to cover the feet,” she said. “These quilts are presented at a vulnerable time and the service members are going to form an attachment to it.” “I’m in the Army and was injured while serving in Iraq,” starts one of the thank-you letters Roberts has received. “I will spare the details since it is hard for me, but one of the things that makes it easier is the fine quilt you have made for me. I received it while I was in an ICU unit in Germany and it has been with me ever since. It not only keeps me warm when I’m cold, it keeps my heart warm too. “This may seem childish, but when I get scared with the memories of war, I curl up in the quilt and everything goes away.” “There is something about a hand-crafted item,” Roberts said. “It takes time and it shows that someone cares enough for you to spend that time.” “Sometimes we forget that people care,” says another note, this from a soldier who was wounded in 2003. “I feel the love from the quilt.” Roberts does not discuss the politics of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq with her volunteers. At the bottom of every e-mail she sends it the message, “It’s not about politics, it’s about people.” In another e-mail, she wrote, “My place in our country now is to provide comfort against the inevitable war demons.” Whatever her convictions about these wars, she does believe that it is the nature of people and of civilizations to fight. She is especially interested in teaching young people to quilt, so that the art doesn’t die and so that warriors of the future will have something to comfort them. “Since the Revolutionary War, women have been sending their loved ones off to battle with quilts,” she said. “We need to teach our young ones how to sew. If we don’t, who’s going to make the quilts for our soldiers in the future?”


MORNING STAR ✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 4

Delmar passes noise, abandoned car ordinances By Mike McClure The Delmar Joint Council approved the abandoned vehicle ordinance and an amended version of the proposed noise ordinance during its meeting on Monday, September 25. The town’s attorney noted that the noise ordinance had significant changes since the previous public hearing based on comments received from the public and council members. The ordinance prohibits loud noise that is audible within 50 feet of the source between the hours of 10 p.m. and 7 a.m. (with some exemptions). The noise that falls under this ordinance includes the following: anyone with an animal that makes noise continuously during these hours and disturbs neighbors and any motor vehicle with a manufacturers gross weight in excess of 10,000 pounds or any auxiliary equipment attached can not operate for more than 15 minutes in an hour while the vehicle is stationary except if there is traffic congestion or emergency work. Noise from radios, televisions or from yelling, shouting, hooting, whistling, or singing in public streets during these hours also falls under the ordinance. The following are some of the things that are exempt under the ordinance: sound from church bells and chimes being sounded for normal church business and celebration; noise from stationary emer-

gency signaling devices and noise from moving and stationary trains; noise from an alarm system; emergency vehicles, police vehicles, and any alarms sounded for an emergency; and sporting and town approved events. The ordinance carries a fine of $50 for the first offense, $100 for second offense, and $500 for any additional offenses. Applications for a permit for amplification may be submitted to town hall at least 15 working days before use (except in the case of an emergency). The Delmar Council (DE) and the Delmar Commission (MD) each voted to approve the noise ordinance. The two bodies also approved the proposed abandoned vehicle ordinance. The ordinance defines inoperable vehicle as any motor vehicle that remains in one location for 10 days and has one or more of the following conditions: one or more flat tires; one or more broken, cracked or missing windows; missing a door, hood, trunk, fender, engine, or transmission; a substantially dismantled or wrecked vehicle that is inoperable; or an unlicensed or unregistered vehicle (if required by state law). The ordinance does not apply to an inoperable vehicle enclosed in a building or on any private property that is used as a commercial establishment for the storage and repair of inoperable vehicle. When an inoperable vehicle is discovered, written notice will be sent to owner

to remove it within 30 days of receipt of notice. After 30 days the police will take it into custody and move to a storage area for 30 days. If the vehicle is not redeemed by its owner within that time period it will be sold. The abandoned vehicle ordinance also carries a fine of $25 for a single violation and $50 for an additional violation. The ordinance was passed following unanimous votes by the Delmar Council and the Delmar Commission. The Joint Council voted to set Trick or Treat for Tuesday Oct. 31 from 6-8 p.m. for children ages 12 and under. It also voted not to allow mischief night. Delmar (MD) mayor Douglas Niblett reported that the Delmar Police Department is working with the town and the fire department on plans for a new public safety complex. During the fire department report, Joe Morris, Jr. announced that the Delmar Fire Company had responded to 1,129 calls (as of Monday night) including 425 fire calls and 704 ambulance calls. The fire company is holding an open house on Sunday, Oct. 1 during which the dedication of its new command vehicle will be held. There will also be a demonstration of the decontamination trailer and a simulation of a vehicle rescue. The open house will start at 1 p.m. and is slated to last throughout the afternoon.

Town manager Sara Bynum-King announced that the three Delmar Council members up for re-election will run unopposed. Incumbents John Outten (mayor), Mary Lee Pase, and Michael Houlihan were the candidates to file by last Friday’s deadline.

Nanticoke offering flu shots Nanticoke Memorial Hospital will be offering flu shots to the public on Thursday, Oct. 26 (3-7 p.m.) and Friday, Oct. 27 (9 a.m.-1 p.m.) located at the Nanticoke Mears Health Campus (across from Seaford Post Office). The cost of the vaccination will be $10. The vaccine is not recommended for anyone under 18. The influenza vaccine is recommended for elderly and high-risk individuals. Healthy working adults may also benefit from the influenza vaccine. Large outbreaks of influenza usually do not occur before December in the U.S.A. and reach a peak between late December and early March and many continue into the spring. For additional information contact Nanticoke Memorial Hospital at 6296611, ext. 2505. No appointment or pre-registration is required.

Riders for St. Jude’s Bike-a-thon Ron Breeding is calling on Seaford residents to join the St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital Wheels For Life Bike-a thon slated for Sunday, Oct. 8, at 2 p.m. at West Seaford Elementary School. Volunteer workers and riders are needed for this Bike-a-thon to raise funds for the world famous research center in its battle against childhood cancer and other catastrophic childhood diseases. “We’re looking for riders and helpers who will contribute their time and talent to help children live. We really need lots of riders, since they are the ones who can make this bike-a-thon successful,” Breeding said. In the Wheels For Life Bike-a-thon, riders ask sponsors to make donations based on each mile completed. All riders turning in money will receive a certificate.

Laurel Star Published by Morning Star Publications Inc. 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243

The Laurel Star (USPS #016-427) is published weekly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Seaford, DE. Subscriptions are $17 a year in county; $22 a year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharptown and Federalsburg, Maryland; $27 elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address changes to Laurel Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

Those who raise $35 will receive a certificate and a special St. Jude T-shirt. When $75 is raised, the rider receives a backpack as well as the certificate and the Tshirt. Also plans are being made to give a $100 savings bond to the top fund-raiser plus great gifts will be given to the boy or girl in each of the following age groups who collect the most money. The age groups are: high school and above, fourth grade through eighth and third and below. The Seaford Kiwanis Club hosts the event by providing refreshments. Entry forms are available at all school offices, the Department of Parks and Recreation, and City Hall. Anyone wishing to provide a prize, sponsor a rider, or participate in the ride should call Ron Breeding at 629-3964.

Getting Married Soon? Know Someone Who Is? Stop By The STAR Office 628 W. Stein Hwy., Seaford (Next to Medicine Shoppe)

For A

FREE Copy of Our

Bridal Planner

Because they are as valuable and beautiful as ever, we’d like to create new settings for them.

They’ve been removed from several pieces of old jewelry you haven’t worn in years!

A ring, perhaps? A brooch? A pair of earrings?

20 % Savings All Remounts With this ad. Not valid with any other discount or coupon. Exp. 10-4-06

629-9788

“30 Years Building A Heritage Of Quality and Trust” 555 North Hall St. Seaford, DE 19973 629-5698

Visa ~ MasterCard ~ American Express Discover Accepted

HOURS: M-Th 10-5:30 Fri. 10-7; Sat. 10-2


MORNING STAR

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 5

School district submits application to state for funds By Mike McClure The Laurel School Board approved the consolidated grant application for 2007 and received a report on summer school during its meeting last Wednesday. The board also presented plaques to administrators of the district’s commendable and superior schools, ratings which are based on the most recent state tests. Curriculum supervisor Sandra Baker presented the district’s 2007 consolidated grant application information to the board. Each year the district submits an application in order to receive state and federal funding. Baker reported that the funding has already been approved by the state and will hopefully be released to the district soon. According to Baker, Title I funds ($844,864 this year, $860,018 last year) and Title II Technology funds ($16,578 this year, $30,572 last year) are being whittled away by the federal government. Baker added that state grants are about the same as they were last year, but that the addition of two new charter schools in the state means more schools are drawing from the pot. The total consolidated grant increased from $1,768,368 to $1,814,077. The benefits of the grant include additional staff (10 classroom teachers, seven instructional paraprofessionals, five in school suspension paraprofessionals, a school resource officer, 24 teachers and a nurse for summer school, and teachers for after-school reading and math are hired through grant) and an in-

clement weather bus for the middle school and high school. “We have a lot of students that would have to walk 1.9 miles in the snow and bad weather” without the inclement weather bus, Baker said. “These grants bring us an awful lot of benefits.” The board voted unanimously in favor of approving the consolidated grant application. Baker also presented the summer school report. She said Laurel’s summer school program features a low student to teacher ratio with most of the teachers also working as classroom teachers for the district during the school year. Sue Darnell and Susan Whaley were the lead teachers. Children in grades three, five and eight who scored a 1 in reading or math on the state tests were required to attend summer school. Students who had a 2 on the test (also below standard) were invited to attend. A total of 171 students in kindergarten through the eighth grade took part in the program at a cost of $118,147.06, or $691 per pupil. The program saw 80 of the 108 students who were retested showing improvement. Earlier in the meeting, plaques were presented to representatives of North Laurel Elementary School, Laurel Intermediate School and Laurel Middle School, all three of which were rated commendable schools as a result of the recent state test. Laurel High School received a banner for being rated as a superior school. The board’s legislative priorities for the year are: support 100-

Chamber mixer to feature presentation by fire department The Laurel Chamber of Commerce will host a business to business networking mixer on Tuesday, Oct. 10, from 5p.m. to 7:30p.m. at the Laurel Fire Hall. Tables will be set up where businesses can display their products. The mixer will feature a presentation by the Laurel Fire Department on the Knox-Box Rapid Entry System. The system has been assisting firefighters since 1975 and now more than 8,000 fire departments depend on it to access commercial and residential properties when responding to emergencies.

The event is co-sponsored by the Laurel Chamber of Commerce and the Laurel Fire Department. Admission is free to chamber members and $25 for non chamber member (the $25 fee can be applied toward a 2007 membership). Heavy appetizers and refreshments prepared by the Laurel Fire Department auxiliary will be served, are compliments of Bank of Delmarva, Wilmington Trust, County Bank and Delaware National Bank. For reservations, call the chamber, 875-9319, by Oct. 2.

News items may be mailed to the Seaford and Laurel Star, 628 W. Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973. Or they may be faxed to 629-9243.

From left are Laurel superintendent Keith Duda; Jennifer Givens, Laurel Middle School; Christy Greaves, North Laurel Elementary; Rich Gaskill, Laurel Intermediate School; and Dean Ivory, Laurel High School. North Laurel Elementary School, Laurel Middle School, and Laurel Intermediate School were named commendable schools due to their state testing results. Laurel High School was named a superior school. Photo by Mike McClure

percent state funding of all-day kindergarten; support revision of state equalization formula; sup-

port equity of funding between Vocational Technical Districts and the Comprehensive School

Districts; and support full funding for the district’s extra time program.

PNC Bank is the #1 Small Business Lender and #1 SBA Lender. We lent more dollars to small businesses in Delaware than any other bank.* With credit decisions on PNC Bank business loans in one business day or less1 and a wide range of loan solutions, including SBA loans, PNC Bank makes it possible for you to get the capital you need. Having the #1 bank for small business lending serve your business. Easy as PNC.∑ Milford Dana Bijj VP Business Banking 119 South Walnut Street 302-422-1008

Rehoboth Jennifer Joseph VP Business Banking 19745 Sea Air Avenue 302-227-5013

Coming Fall 2006, a new PNC Bank branch in Lewes

All loans are subject to credit approval. *PNC’s Small Business Lending Rankings are based on fiscal year 2004 according to the most recently released government statistics for 2004 for small business loans of $100,000 or less. Rankings based on CRA small business data for Delaware and as obtained from the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC) web site (www.FFIEC.gov). PNC’s SBA rankings are based on dollar volume reported by the SBA for the Delaware District for the period from 10/1/04 to 09/30/05. 1 Credit decisions in one business day or less on loan requests of $100,000 or less. PNC Bank, Delaware. PNC Bank, National Association. Member FDIC. ©2006 The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc.


MORNING STAR ✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 6

Business Business Mix Local agents complete Rural Community Insurance training Jackie King and Nancy King, agents from the King Crop Insurance Agency participated in crop insurance training conducted by the Rural Community Insurance Services (RCIS) on Sept. 14 in Seaford. RCIS conducts training meetings to keep agents informed of changes to the crop insurance program and regulations. RCIS remains the nation’s leading crop insurance company. The King Agency has been servicing farmers on Delmarva since 1967 and understands the need to carefully review any changes to the program impacting their area’s crops. “Keeping our insureds updated on changes to the crop insurance program and regulations is a high priority in our agency,” says Jackie.

Realtors attend convention Realtors from Callaway, Farnell and Moore, Inc., recently attended the Delaware Association of Realtors’ 36th Annual Convention & Trade Show held at the Ruddertowne Complex and Rusty Rudder Restaurant in Dewey Beach. The theme for this year’s three-day event was “Sale Away to Realtor Island.” Featuring speakers from throughout Delaware, this enjoyable and rewarding event was the perfect opportunity for Realtors to join together for education, networking and fun. Joining more than 500 Realtors from throughout the state were CFM Realtors George Farnell, Kathy Farnell, Dee Cross, Chris Dukes, Bev Blades, Ted Blades, Sue Bramhall, Dean Records, Mona Wright, Judy Rhodes, Keri Simpler, Sonia Evans, and Vivian Wheatley. “The DAR Convention was an exciting way for our professionals to take our real estate business to new levels,” stated Kathy Farnell. “It gave us the opportunity to take advantage of all that DAR has to offer in education, innovation, and fun.”

IRS relocating its Georgetown office The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) announces the relocation of its Georgetown office, including the Taxpayer Assistance Center. Effective Sept. 29, the IRS office An Independent Agent

will move from its current location at 319 North Dupont Highway, Georgetown, DE 19947, to its new location at 21309 Berlin Road - Unit 13, Georgetown, DE 19947. “In order to accomplish the move, our Taxpayer Assistance Center office at its current location will be open for its regular Monday and Tuesday business hours from 8:30 a.m .to 4:30 p.m. on Sept. 25 and 26, but will have limited services,” explained IRS spokesperson Gregg Semanick. “The office will be closed on Wednesday and Thursday, Sept. 27 and 28.” Taxpayers requiring immediate assistance from Monday through Thursday are encouraged to visit the IRS offices located in either Dover or Salisbury, Md. The Dover office is located at 300 South New St., Dover, DE 19904 and the Salisbury, Md., office is located at 212 West Main St., Salisbury, MD 21801. Both offices are open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The Georgetown office will reopen to the public at the new location on Friday, Sept. 29, at 8:30 a.m. The office will be open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m .to 4:30 p.m. Although the public may expect minor delays until the new location is completely up and running, individuals who have on-going business will be able to continue their activities. Office telephone numbers will remain the same. Taxpayers should be able to leave voice mail messages and may expect return calls during the move. Additional taxpayer assistance is available by calling the toll-free assistance number at 1-800-829-1040 or by visiting the IRS web site at www.irs.gov.

Rogers earns broker’s license Teresa Rogers of Century 21 Wilgus Associates, Inc. in Georgetown has received her broker’s license. Requirements for your broker’s license are a 99-hour course, 5-active years in the business, a minimum of 30 transactions and successfully passing the state and national exam. Rogers is a member of the National Association of Realtors and a member of the Sussex County Association of Realtors. She is also the treasurer for the Sussex County Association of Realtors. She resides in Georgetown with her husband, Jamie and two children.

CLIFFORD SHORT

INSURANCE

606 E. Market St., Georgetown, DE 19947 Clifford D. Short

Let Us Do Your Insurance Shopping For You!

Let Me Work For You! 302-856-7773

Se Co rv un ing t S 19 y S us i 83 nc se e x

We Sell: • Business Owners Insurance • Auto • Workers Compensation • Homeowners

NEW DENTIST - Dr. J. Robert Carmean P.A. welcomes new dentist Dr. Richard Tananis to Laurel. Dr. Tananis will be taking over Dr. Carmean’s practice and is here for appointments now. Dr. Carmean is a Laurel native and has been a dentist in Laurel for more than 40 years. He will be serving patients until the end of the year to assist Dr. Tananis in the transition. Photo by Pat Murphy.


PAGE 7

MORNING STAR

✳ SEPT. 28- OCT. 4, 2006

■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

MOV I E S ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Visit seafordstar.com or laurelstar.com for descriptions of current movie selections

Diamond State Drive-In Theater US Harrington, Del. 302-284-8307 SCHEDULE FOR FRIDAY, 9/29 & SATURDAY, 9/30 Open Season . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7:15 Grid Iron Gang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Follows 1st Show SUNDAY CLOSED

The Movies At Midway Rt. 1, Midway Shopping Ctr., Rehoboth Beach, 645-0200 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 9/29 THRU THURSDAY, 10/5 Everyone’s Hero . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:20, 3:40 Hollywoodland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7:05, 9:40 The Guardian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:10, 4:05, 6:45, 9:30 Illusionist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:40, 4:20, 7:00, 9:35 Jackass 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:10, 4:40, 7:25, 9:45 Open Season . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:25, 3:40, 6:30, 8:45 Little Miss Sunshine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:50, 4:30, 6:40, 9:00 Fly Boys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 3:50, 6:45, 9:35 School For Scoundrels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:35, 4:35, 7:00, 9:10 Gridiron Gang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:10, 3:50, 6:35, 9:15 Black Dahlia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 3:45, 6:40, 9:25 Invincible . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:05, 4:00, 6:50, 9:05 All The Kings Men . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:20, 4:00, 6:30, 9:15 Fearless . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:00, 4:30, 7:15, 9:30

Regal Salisbury Stadium 16 2322 N. Salisbury Blvd., Salisbury, MD, 410-860-1370 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 9/29 THRU THURSDAY, 10/5 The Guardian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . .Fri-Thu (12:00, 1:00, 3:15, 4:15) 6:45, 7:30, 9:45, 10:30 School For Scoundrels . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (12:15, 2:45, 5:15) 7:45, 10:15 Open Season . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG .Fri-Thu (12:15, 1:30, 2:30, 4:00, 5:00) 6:30, 7:15, 8:45, 9:30 Jackass: Number Two . . . . . . . . .R .Fri-Thu (12:30, 1:45, 3:00, 4:30, 5:30) 7:15, 8:15, 9:45, 10:35 Flyboys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (12:45, 3:45) 7:00, 10:00 Jet Li’s Fearless . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (12:00, 2:30, 5:00) 8:00, 10:25 All The King’s Men . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (1:00, 4:00) 7:05, 10:00 The Last Kiss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (3:45) 9:30 Gridiron Gang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (1:30, 4:30) 7:30, 10:20 The Black Dahlia . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu 10:15 Everyone’s Hero . . . . . . . . . . . . .G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (12:05, 2:15, 4:45) 7:45 The Wicker Man . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (12:45, 3:30) 6:45 Invincible . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu 9:15 The Illusionist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (12:30, 3:00, 5:30) 8:00, 10:30 Accepted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (1:15) 6:30 () Discounted showtimes in Parenthesis * Pass/Discount Restrictions Apply

Clayton Theater Dagsboro, Del. 20 732-3744 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRI. 9/29 - THURS. 10/5 CLOSED MONDAY & TUESDAY. Open Season . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 , Sun. 2:00, 7:30

DELIVERED TO YOUR HOME OR OFFICE *Sussex County Subscriptions CALL FOR OUT-OF-STATE DELIVERY RATES

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN

The Seaford / Laurel Star

Only $17.00* ONE YEAR SUBSCRIPTION Call

302

629-9788 to subscribe today!

BUY ONE LUNCH Menu Items 1-13

or BUY ONE DINNER

CO RE UPO QU N IR ED

Combo Items 1-21

GET SECOND

1/2 PRICE

MEXICAN BEERS DOMESTIC BEERS DAILY DRINK 501 N. Dual Hwy., Seaford, DE - Old English’s Bldg. SPECIALS 302-628-9701 EVERY MONDAY

Cactus Margaritas

$2.50

REG. $4 Lime Only

Open Mon. - Fri. 11 am - 2:30 pm (Siesta) 5 pm - 10 pm, Sat. Noon to 10 pm, Sun. Noon - 9 pm

Ocean City, MD Easton, MD 12534 Ocean Gateway, 7813 Ocean Gateway, 410-213-7324 410-770-8550 Cambridge, MD Salisbury, MD Chestertown, MD 315 Sunburst Hwy. 1045 S. Salisbury Blvd. 715 Washington Ave. 410-228-7808 410-749-4303 410-810-1952

JEFF’S GREENHOUSES & GIFT SHOP

Mum’s the Word! BEAUTIFUL FALL MUMS $ 25 $ 00 3

or 10 for

30

(9” Pot)

Flowering Cabbage And Kale 9” Pot - $3

25

10 for

$

3000

Winter Pansies Jumbo

$200 6-Pk. / $1200 Flat

Fall Decorating Favorites Pumpkins, Indian Corn, Gourds, Corn Shucks and Straw Large Selection Of

ROSES, TREES, SHRUBS, AZALEAS, RHODODENDRONS & GROUND COVERS Plant Now for Spring Tulip, Daffodil, Hyacinth, Crocus Bulbs

MULCH: Pine Bark, Hardwood, Cedar, Cypress, Pine Bark Nuggets, Chips and Red Mulch Visit Our Gift Shop For

Fall Wreaths and Arrangements Large selection of silk and dried arrangements, picks, candles, ribbon by the yard & custom designed wreaths.

REASONABLE PRICES

MAIN STREET, BETHEL, DEL.

875-3420 800 276-3420 Open Mon.-Sat. 8-5; Sunday - 12-4


PAGE 8

MORNING STAR

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

Resident: If tower goes up, property values will go down Continued from page 1

tower is just in your face, big as life,” Conaway said. “And for people driving down River Road, it is right there.” “It’s a monster,” said Jacqueline Henderson, who has lived in Patty Cannon Estates for three years. “If it had been there three years ago, I would not have bought a home in this community. And if it goes up, I will probably move, if I can sell my house.” Henderson believes that if the tower goes up, property values in the development will go down. “It towers over the tree line, and it’s going to have lights,” she said. “It took me six months to find this house. Every other place that I looked at, anything could go up right next to it. Here, we have a historic district on the left and a wildlife preserve across the road. I thought that there was no chance that anything like this would happen here.” George Jacobs, who lives in Patty Cannon Estates, said that there are several other sites that would be more appropriate for the tower. State Sen. Robert Venables (D - Laurel) agrees. Venables obtained permission from the state’s Fish and Wildlife Division for the tower to be put on a 17-acre parcel of state-owned land on Ellis Mill Road, about 1/2 mile from the proposed site in a more rural area and out of view from Woodland. “I thought, for everybody’s sake, that would be a better location,” he said. “Woodland is really a jewel and it is really amazing that we have been able to keep it the way it is for so long.” Jacobs also challenged Cingular’s contention that the tower is needed to provide cell phone service to the area. “We have no problem with reception here,” he said. Webner said that the monopole would hold antennas that would provide Cingular cell phone coverage for a 3-mile radius. She said that plans call for the monopole to be disguised to look like part of the surrounding forest. “The pole will be camouflaged in such a way with branches and leaves at the top to resemble a tree,” she said. Area residents said that they have been told that the branches would start at about 75 feet and go up to the peak. Trees in the area are about 45 feet tall, meaning that branches would start at about 30 feet higher than neighboring trees. The pole would tower more than 130 feet above the rest of the forest. “It would be like a freak show,” said Conaway. “People would come from miles around just to see it.” “If the tower has to be here, I’d rather see just a plain pole,” said Jacobs. He said that a 130-foot tower located on Delaware 12 a couple miles west of Felton and fitted with the tree camouflage is “ridiculous.” “It really looks out of place,” he added. In March, the Sussex County Board of Adjustment voted to table a decision on the tower pending a study of how the monopole would affect the Woodland Ferry and Cannon Hall in Woodland, both of which are part of the National Register of Historic Places. Such a study, which was to be done by Cingular, is required by the federal government whenever proposed construction involving federal funds could impact a site on the register. Tim Slavin is director of the state’s Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs,

which oversees such studies. He said Tuesday that his office had received the study from Cingular, and that the study had found that there would be no adverse effects from erection of the monopole. But the office had several questions for Cingular to answer before the office could make a recommendation to the county, he added. Among the information Slavin’s office requested are details about alternative locations for the tower and whether Cingular considered them. It also directed Cingular to conduct the recent crane test, to determine if the tree disguise is viable, to notify native American tribes of the plans for a tower, to clarify how it notified the public of those plans as well as of the required study on effects on historic areas, and to notify local historical societies. Slavin expected to receive Cingular’s answers sometime next week. He could not predict how soon his office’s recommendation will be made. Dan Costello, vice president for downstate outreach with Preservation Delaware, a state-wide, private, not-for-profit association dedicated to promoting historic preservation in Delaware, agrees with the residents of the area that the site is inappropriate for a cell tower. “Woodland Ferry is a significant historic and cultural resource that has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places,” he said. “Just as Lewes is a most significant physical reminder of Delaware’s maritime history, so Woodland Ferry and its surrounding countryside are significant physical reminders of Delaware’s rural and agricultural past. It is also a significant place for the Nanticoke Indians. The river has been crossed at Woodland since at least the very early 1700s. As a significant historic place, Woodland Ferry deserves to be protected from the visual intrusion of a...cell tower. “Historic preservation is not about erasing man’s foot prints from the earth,” he added. “It’s about protecting and enhancing significant manifestations of man’s activities, and Woodland Ferry needs to be preserved, in as pristine a way as possible, so that it can be appreciated and enjoyed for future generations.” “This is still a pristine area,” said Christine Darby, who lives near Woodland and who opposes the tower. “There are precious few unspoiled areas left and we need to preserve as many of them as we can. We’ve got to keep some open green space where people can breathe.”

Kathryn’s

Convenient Location: Bethel Road, Seaford, DE

FLOWERS

875- 2055 Open 7 Days A Week 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Rely On M u m s Us For All Pa n s i e s Your Fall Fa l l Planting Shr ubs Needs

& Tr e e s M u l ch

Cingular erected a 170-foot crane at the site where the telephone company proposes to put a cell phone monopole. Residents in the area are protesting the tower, saying that it is inappropriate in a residential area and so close to the historic Woodland Ferry.

“Meet Your Realtor...” CHRIS DUKES Office 302-629-4514, Ext. 238 Chris, a native of Seaford, graduated from the Seaford High School Class of 1977 and received her Associate’s Degree after graduating in 1980 from Delaware Technical & Community College, Georgetown Campus. Chris’ familiarization with the real estate industry began in 1975 when she began working part-time as a receptionist/secretary at a local real estate office in Seaford. She worked for Ellis Realty Company until 1996 when she was hired at Callaway, Farnell and Moore, Inc. Altogether, Chris’ real estate career has spanned more than 31 years. The knowledge she gained in her early years as a real estate secretary was of great value to Chris when she obtained her real estate salesman’s license in 1982. She continues to work fulltime in the field as the Real Estate Coordinator and a REALTOR from Callaway, Farnell and Moore’s Stein Highway office. Chris has taken classes toward receiving her professional designations of CRS (Certified Residential Specialist) and GRI (Graduate REALTORs’ Institute). She is a member of the Sussex County, Delaware, and National Associations of REALTORs. Chris has been active in the American Cancer Society’s annual West Sussex Relay for Life. She has been on the “CFM Houses of Hope” team for 7 years and has served as its Team Captain the past 3 years. As an active member of Concord United Methodist Church, Chris wears a variety of hats. She is the Secretary for the church as well as its UMW (United Methodist Women). Serving as its Historian, Chris was instrumental in having the church placed on the State of Delaware’s National Register of Historic Places. She is a member of the church choir and has worked with its youth in Vacation Bible School and other youth activities. She has also served on many of the church’s committees including Communion Steward, Worship Committee, Church Activities Committee, and other special programs. Chris is a past Secretary and current Historian for the Sons, Daughters and Friends of Concord, a local organization known for its fellowship and annual chicken ‘n dumpling dinner each October at the Concord Community House. Chris and her husband Craig Dukes have one daughter, Megan, who is a Junior at Sussex Technical High School. Together they own Miller’s Auto Upholstery of Seaford, Inc., where Craig operates the business on Middleford Road. Her family enjoys free time camping & sight-seeing at various points on Delmarva, as well as spending weekends with friends on the beach at Assateague National Seashore near Ocean City. They are members of AMSA (Atlantic Mobile Sportsfishermen Association) and Rough and Tumble Engineers Historical Association.

500 W. Stein Highway • FAX (302)629-4513 • 22128 Sussex Highway • Seaford, DE 19973 • Fax (302)628-8504 (302)629-4514 • (302)628-8500 • (800)966-4514 • www.cfmnet.com


MORNING STAR

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 9

Top citizen also involved in chamber, Lions, VFW auxiliary Continued from page 1

Md., mayor Doug Niblett through the Delmar Lions Club and says he relied on him to show him what to do in the early years as mayor. “I’m very proud of the 14 years I had as mayor,” said McDonnell. McDonnell said he is proud of the growth of the town, especially the development on the east side of U.S. 13 which was approved while he was mayor. He lost the election in 2004 to current mayor John Outten but says he still keeps up with what’s going on in town and hasn’t ruled out the possibility of running again sometime. McDonnell has been a member of the Delmar Lions Club for 18 years and is a three-time president and past cabinet secretary for District IID. Former neighbor Ed Taylor asked him to attend a Lions Club meeting and he has been a part of the organization ever since. McDonnell was named Lion of the Year

three years ago and Taylor, who since passed away, was the first person he thanked. He likes the organization because it is “very community oriented.” The Lions Club is heavily involved in programs to help the visually-impaired and also helps people in need of hearing aids. McDonnell is also a director with the Delmar Chamber of Commerce. He has been a chamber member for the past 15 years as a representative of the Lions Club and the town. He is also a member of the VFW Post 8276 Men’s Auxiliary, where he is a two time president, and St. Stephen’s United Methodist Church. Whether it’s flipping burgers at the Day in the Park, cooking at the VFW, or taking part in the annual Lions Club Bowl (this Friday in Delmar) festivities, McDonnell likes giving back to his community. “I just enjoy doing what I do,” McDonnell said. “Delmar’s a very, very fine community and I’m glad to be a part of it.”

Former citizens of the year The Delmar Chamber of Commerce started its Citizen of the Year program in 1976. Residents of the town who have been honored with the title are: 1976 - Mora Irene Culver 1977 - J. William Gordy 1978 - A.E. Hantwerker 1979 - Edwin McClaine 1980 - Dr. Ernest Larmore 1982 - Jean S. Ellis 1984 - Joseph C. Morrris 1985 - Ronnie Hastings 1986 - P. Douglas Niblett 1987 - William “Bill” Brittingham 1988 - George Leong 1989 - Al Covington 1990 - Jay G. Green 1991 - Hattie Moore 1992 - Irvin Ayedelotte 1993 - Pete Pederson 1994 - Dee McDonnell 1995 - Percy Elliott 1996 - Anthony Triglia 1997 - Melba Hastings 1998 - Robert Handy

Library program to look at snakes The Laurel Public Library will hold a program, Science at Your Library, Wednesday, Oct. 4, 4:15 to 5 p.m., for children in grades one through six. The program, which will be presented by the Delaware Museum of Natural History, will focus on snakes. Other Science at Your Library programs will be held on Oct. 11, 18 and 25. A Magic Tree House Party for children in grades two through six will be Saturday, Oct. 14, 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Crafts, contests and games will be featured. Pre-registration is required for both programs, and can be done by phone at 875-3184, in person or by email through the library’s Web site www.laurel.lib.de.us.

1999 - Shawn Brittingham 2000 - Mary Lee Pase 2001 - Linda K. Jones 2002 - Charles M. Truitt 2003 - Harry “Bunky” Naugle 2004 - David Hearn and Ron Wilkosz 2005 - Wayne Bastian

CORRECTION IN THE

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL

BUILDINGS

COLORED STEEL - FINANCING AVAILABLE

I have been a building inspector, I know a little about this, after 1st day, 100% confidence in Carlton Whaley & Sons. The knowledge they brought TO THE JOB was amazing! Gene Kane, Laurel

HT G I R D E C d PRI n a T L I U D, B E N G I S E D We are very satisfied with our garage. Carlton B. Whaley & Sons worked with us to give us what we wanted. We are very pleased and proud of our garage. The Willey’s

CARLTON B. B. WHALEY WHALEY && SONS CARLTON SONS LAUREL, DE (4 MILES EAST ON RT. 24)

$

2.29 9

Per Gallon Ad of September 21 the PRICE FOR #2 Fuel Oil WAS INCORRECT It should have been

$2.29.9 per Gallon We apologize for any inconvenience to our valuable customers

(866) 423-0781 1616 NORTHWOOD DR., SALISBURY, MD 21801

#2 Fuel Oil Spot s i h T k C h e c T h u rs d a y E ve r y u r L o w Fo r O l P r i c e Oi Cash Aero reserves the right to change pricing due to sudden or dramatic changes to wholesale oil prices.

302

875-2939

SAVE When You Pay Cash On Delivery Or Pre-Pay For Your Fuel Delivery Call Toll Free

(866) 423-0781

1616 NORTHWOOD DR., SALISBURY, MD 21801

Serving Wicomico, Worcester & Somerset Counties In Maryland & Sussex County Delaware


MORNING STAR ✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 10

Police Journal Teen charged with robbery Delaware State Police have arrested a 17-year-old from Bridgeville who is accused of robbing a Sonic Drive-In Restaurant located on U.S. Rt. 13. The incident occurred Saturday, Sept. 23, at approximately 11:55 p.m. Joshua Lewis, 17, of Rifle Range Road, was apprehended at his home shortly after the incident and charged with robbery 1st degree, possession of a deadly weapon during the commission of a felony, two counts of aggravated menacing, burglary, and wearing a disguise during the commission of a felony. Lewis, who was employed by Sonic at the time of the crime, allegedly entered the restaurant through the drive-thru window. Lewis then used a code to open a cash register and he removed the cash drawer. Lewis then fled the restaurant and entered his blue Mercury Sable that was parked outside. Two female employees confronted Lewis as he was trying to leave, and Lewis allegedly pointed a handgun at them and threatened them. Lewis then fled, and although he was wearing a bandana over his face, one of the employees recognized him and his car. After troopers were informed of the crime, they responded to the Lewis’ home and located him and his vehicle. During a subsequent search, troopers located a pellet gun and the clothing that was allegedly worn during the crime. Lewis was committed to the Stevenson House in lieu of $64,000 secured bond pending further court action.

Aggressive Driving Enforcement Delaware law enforcement officers have issued 211 citations to drivers for aggressive driving behaviors, and another 74 to unlicensed, unbelted, and uninsured motorists for a total of 285 citations during the third week of a statewide initiative to “Stop Aggressive Driving.” Office of Highway Safety officials launched the 2006 “Stop Aggressive Driving” campaign July 5. Already this year, aggressive driving behaviors are responsible for 52 percent (50) of Delaware’s 96 fatal crashes. The following is a breakdown of the number of violations found during the fourth week of aggressive driving enforcement: 14 Aggressive Driving, 154 speed-

ing, 19 unsafe lane changes, three following too closely, 10 running stop signs and stop lights, two failure to yield the right of way, and nine passing on the shoulder. Officers also issued 30 citations to unbelted motorists and 44 citations for additional traffic violations. Anyone who sees an aggressive driver is encouraged to call 9 -1-1 as soon as it’s safe to do so, and provide the following information to dispatchers: make, model and color of the vehicle, direction of travel, and license plate information if possible.

Smyrna Police Sergeant arrested Attorney General Carl C. Danberg announced Sept. 21, that Smyrna Police Sergeant Brian Moore was arrested yesterday on the charge of official misconduct. Moore committed an act which constituted an unauthorized exercise of his official functions, knowing that the act was unauthorized. Sgt. Moore instructed an officer of the Clayton Police Department to release a suspect, who was a personal friend of Moore’s, without charging the suspect, where there was probable cause to make an arrest. In a statement, Danberg said, “It is disappointing when any law enforcement officer fails to live up to the confidence placed in them and violates the trust of the public. I am particularly proud of Smyrna Chief Richard Baldwin for immediately initiating a full and proper investigation, and for engaging this office in the proceeding. This matter is particularly egregious because a person was treated differently based on who he knew as opposed to the facts surrounding his conduct. I was raised to believe that justice is supposed to be blind.”

Home invasion robbery Delaware State Police are investigating a home invasion robbery that occurred Friday, Sept. 22, at a home in the 2000 block of Morgans Choice Road, Camden. At approximately 11:05 p.m. three armed black male suspects, two with shotguns and one with a handgun, entered the home and confronted four adult victims who reside there. The suspects demanded money and forced the four victims into a bedroom where they “pistol whipped” two of them. The suspects then stole one of

Every abused/neglected child needs a Court Appointed Special Advocate to speak up for them in Family Court. Too many children are still waiting. You can help. Become a CASA Volunteer. Call Today. 302-855-7415 or 7410 Sussex Co. 302-672-1114 Kent Co. Apply by October 2, 2006 Training: October 17, 19, 23, 24, 27 CASA is a program of the Family Court of the State of Delaware

the victim’s wallets and left the home. The suspects then possibly fled the area in a silver or gray colored car. All three suspects were wearing masks, dark clothing, and dark sunglasses. The two victims who were assaulted, both males ages 18 and 26, were treated at Kent General Hospital for lacerations to their head and face. Anyone with information about this crime is asked to call Troop 3 at (302) 697-4454 or Crime Stoppers at (800) TIP3333.

Possession of deadly weapon On Thursday, Sept. 21, members of the Laurel Police Department arrested Thomas Whaley, 30, of Laurel, on an active warrant out of the Laurel Police Department. The warrant was issued for Whaley on Sept. 18 after members of the Laurel Police Department identified Whaley as the driver of a vehicle that fled from officers during an investigation in the Hollybrook Apartment complex, nearly hitting one officer. Charges include reckless driving, possession of a deadly weapon during the commission of a felony, criminal impersonation, resisting arrest with violence, driving while suspended and assault 1st degree. He was committed to Sussex Correctional Institution.

Assault and trespassing On Saturday, Sept. 23, members of the

Laurel Police Department responded to 1700 Carvel Gardens for an unknown complaint. Upon arrival officers learned that the suspect entered the apartment of another and assaulted the two tenants. Arrested was Hasana Jackson, 27, of Laurel, on two counts of offensive touching and trespassing.

Driving under the influence On Saturday, Sept.23, members of the Laurel Police Department stopped a 2005 Ford F-250 for a traffic violation. Further investigation by officers revealed that the driver was under the influence of alcohol. Arrested was Paul Daniels, 38, of Laurel.

Pick up attempted On Sunday, Sept. 24, members of the Laurel Police Department responded to the 400 block of Poplar Street for a report of a suspicious person. Upon arrival officers made contact with the female victim who advised that she was walking on Poplar Street when a white male approximately 50 years of age, wearing a pastel colored flannel shirt and a wedding band stopped and attempted to get her into his car. When the victim yelled that she was going to call the police, the suspected fled up west 6th Street. The suspect was last seen driving a white Sonata bearing an unknown Delaware Temp tag. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Laurel Police Department at 875-2244.

PUBLIC NOTICE MEETING AGAIN Wednesday, Oct. 4 at Laurel Fire Hall 7 pm The Laurel Town Planning and Zoning Committee will be holding a public meeting to review a proposed application of 480 acres east of Rt. 13 to be annexed into the town of Laurel.

IF YOU: Live in or out of the town of Laurel and are concerned about more Rt. 13 traffic and live in the areas of Discount Land Rd., Camp Rd., Taylor Mill Rd., Waller Rd., or Colonial Rd. and are concerned about the impact to the area where you live and the effect it will have on your daily life

BE THERE AND BE HEARD! This Notice Brought To You By Concerned Community Members


ELEGANT HOMES SURROUNDED BY ALL THE JOYS OF LFE

Mearfield in Seaford from the mid $200’s Enjoy the wide open spaces, breath taking sunsets and breezes from the shore in Seaford. Included features: Full unfinished basements • 1,500 - 2,700 square feet • Pool, clubhouse, tot lot • Close to schools, shopping, parks • Hardwood foyer • Fireplace with marble surround and mantle • Guardian home technologies hi-tech wiring • 213 homesites • Seaford School District • Convenient to Route 13. Open Mon.-Fri. 10-5, Sat.-Sun. 11-6. 888-632-7343

laxhomes.com DIRECTIONS: From Dover, Rt. 13 South Right Onto Herring Run Road. Community is on the left. Prices subject to change without notice. Sales by Builder’s 1st Choice


PAGE 12

MORNING STAR

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

Lodge no longer going to deliver medical supplies By Pat Murphy Charity Lodge 27, Independent Order of Odd Fellows Lodge in Laurel is wellknown for its hospital equipment loan program, that it started in the early 1960s. Some of the individuals who helped start this program were Sam Records, Tom Powell, George Lowe, Raymond Callaway, Keith Adkins, Charles Gordy, Stan Whitaker, Richard Smith and Jim Fitzgerald. Over the years the lodge has received many thank yous from the people the program has helped. Since the start of the program, the lodge has delivered several thousand beds, wheel chairs, assistance chairs, bed pans, shower equipment, canes and walkers to people in Laurel, Delmar, Seaford and even beyond at times. The beds, many of them motorized, are very heavy and were a source of constant problems for the lodge because of repairs, because they weren’t returned and because of other problems, including people selling the equipment. “The wheelchairs cost about $800 a piece,” said equipment loan committee member Jerry Lynch, adding to the lodge’s problems. The lodge has 14 wheelchairs that have been on loan since 2003; consequently, wheelchairs are in short supply. In addition to Lynch, the equipment loan committee consists of Noble Grand Barry Brumbley, Arnold Hearn, Richard

Hutchinson, Ed Gordon, Olan Matthews, Joe Messick and Calvin Hearn. At the Sept. 9 lodge meeting, on the recommendation of the committee, the lodge voted to accept any changes the committee felt necessary to continue the program. “I applaud Ed Gordon and Olan Matthews for the work they have done, but they are frustrated. They do not want it anymore,” said Lynch. At its Sept. 19 meeting, the committee adopted the following procedures that will go into effect on Oct. 1: • The 90-day loan policy will be enforced. “This is a temporary service. If it is a permanent situation, they need to go through Medicare, Medicaid or a private insurance carrier,” said Gordon. • The loaning of beds will be discontinued. • Equipment will no longer be delivered. • A $50 deposit will be required for all wheel chairs with a proper identification of loanee and a statement as to where the item will be used. Equipment may be picked up or returned to 32031 Hastings Drive, Laurel , adjacent to Odd Fellows Cemetery, from 5 to 6 p.m., on Mondays and Wednesdays. Lodge Noble Grand Barry Brumbley said that the actions of a few have caused changes in a program for all. “I would hate to see this program go down the drain,” said Lynch.

Cordrey case review continued By Lynn R. Parks The case review for Bradley Cordrey, the Georgetown police officer charged in the Aug. 13 death of a Laurel veterinarian, has been continued. A spokeswoman for Superior Court in Georgetown said that the review, during which attorneys present to the judge their agreement regarding any plea negotiation, was first held Monday, Sept. 18. As no agreement had been reached, the review was continued to Oct. 2. If no agreement is reached by that date, a third and final case review will be scheduled, for four to six weeks after the second review. A date for a trial, in case it is needed, will also be set, for a week fol-

lowing the third case review. That means that, if no plea agreement is reached, Cordrey could go to trial before the first of December. Cordrey was charged Aug. 23 with operation of a motor vehicle causing death of another person. According to state police, he was driving his sport utility vehicle on Delaware 20 west of Seaford when he ran off the road and hit Sandra Dykstra, who was jogging near her home. Cordrey was off-duty at the time. Cordrey, 25, surrendered to authorities 10 days later. Dykstra and her husband, John, both veterinarians, operated the Eastern Shore Veterinary Clinic, Laurel. The clinic moved into the new facility on U.S. 13 south of town in February 2004.

PAGEANT WINNERS - Staci Hammerer was crowned Miss Delmar Fire Prevention 2006 and Sierra Payne was crowned Little Miss on Sunday, Sept. 24, at the Delmar Fire Department. The contestants for Little Miss were Cori Jones, Madison Moore, Sierra Payne, Desiree Payne and Sara Griffiths. The contestants for Miss were Debbie Holston and Staci Hammerer. The master of ceremonies for the event was Jolene Cross-Morris. Guests were Little Miss Delmarva Fire Prevention 2005 Hailey Naugle, Miss Delmar Fire Prevention 2005 Roxy Clark, Little Miss Laurel Morgan Brumbley, and Miss Laurel Caitlin Dolby. The winners were: Miss Congeniality - Desiree Payne; second runner-up Little Miss - Cori Jones; first runner-up Little Miss - Sierra Payne; Little Miss Delmar 2006 - Desiree Payne; first runner-up Miss - Debbie Holston, and Miss Delmar 2006 - Staci Hammerer.

Become a Mentor Make a Difference in the Life of a Child

Free Mentor Training Free Program Support for Public Schools

W NE

G! IN T LIS

For fee service for Private Schools

l l a c Bev Blades Exceptional 3-BR, 2-BA home in Hill-N-Dale, near Seaford. It offers apx. 2,800 sq. ft. w/cathedral ceilings, LR fireplace, hardwood flooring, lovely sunroom/den, large FR & more. Extras include all appliances, 2-car att. garage, & beautifully landscaped & irrigated lot. $332,500 (MLS #541110)

629-4514 Ext. 218

500 W. Stein Hwy. Seaford, DE

Creative Mentoring at 302-633-6226 www.creativementoring.org


MORNING STAR

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 13

Outbreak of respiratory disease on chicken farm is called minor By Lynn R. Parks A spokeswoman for Perdue Farms is surprised that people are interested in the outbreak of laryngotracheitis at a Laurelarea chicken farm last week. “Doing a story about this is like doing a story every time a child gets the flu,” said Julie deYoung. “This disease can be serious but in this case, it was mild, we treated for it and it was taken care of.” The respiratory disease was reported in the chicken flock Sept. 20. All the birds in the flock were vaccinated, deYoung said;

the vaccine is given in the birds’ water. None of the birds in the flock died. “A bird gets sick and we treat it; that’s a standard part of flock management,” deYoung said. Laryngotracheitis, commonly known at Lt, occurs in chickens and turkeys. It is spread from one ill bird to another; deYoung said that sometimes, birds in a flock that comes into a chicken house after a flock that was vaccinated can pick up the disease from remnants of the vaccine. When the illness causes death, it is by suffocation.

Teen board to meet at Laurel Library Monday, Oct. 2 at 6 p.m., students in 712th grade are invited to attend the Laurel Public Library’s first Teen Advisory Board meeting of the year to discuss plans for teen events and volunteer opportunities. For details, call the Laurel Public Library at 875-3184, visit the Web site www.lau-

rel.lib.de.us, or stop by the facility at 101 East 4th Street. Teen Read Week is Oct.15-21 and the library has several events planned for teens, including an Anime club meeting, a visit from Lara Zeises, an after-school craft and a teen movie night.

DVFD to hold annual open house Oct. 1 The Delmar Volunteer Fire Department will hold its open house Sunday, Oct. 1, noon to 4 p.m. All members of the community are welcome. Events throughout the day will include: • Tours of the fire house - all day. • Food and drinks - all day. • Dedication of Command 74 - 1 p.m.

• Mock accident with rescue (featuring a demonstration of the Hurst Tool) - 3 p.m. • Smoke detector give away - all day. • Free medical screening - all day. • Demonstration of the decontamination unit - all day. • Fire prevention trailer - all day.

TOWN OF LAUREL PUBLIC HEARING The Laurel Planning & Zoning Commission will be holding a public hearing on Wednesday, October 4, 2006, at 7:00 p.m. to review the application for a proposed Large Parcel Development Overlay District (LPD), located off of U.S. Route 13 North, Camp Road, Discount Land Road, and Colonial Road, now or formerly know as Discovery Group, LLC, tax map #’s 2-32/6.00/40, 41, 1-32/12.00/109, 109.01, 118, 119, & 123, Laurel, Delaware. The site contains approximately 480 acres more or less and is proposed for 1,283,900 square feet of commercial, retail, restaurants, hotels, office space, and recreation fields, and 1,400 residential dwelling units. The hearing will take place in the Laurel Fire Hall, located at 205 Tenth Street, Laurel, Delaware. Copies of the proposed LPD are available at town hall for review, Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. All interested parties should appear at the hearing to present their concerns, comments, etc.

THE TOWN OF LAUREL PLANNING & ZONING COMMISSION

COMMUNITY AWARENESS DAY - A family enjoys the activities at Laurel’s Community Awareness Day Saturday in Laurel River Park. The event was designed to give citizens information about services available to them. Photo by Pat Murphy

Orientation for volunteers set for Sept. 30 There will be a Girl Power Delaware Leadership Center mentor orientation and information breakfast Saturday, Sept. 30, 9 to 11:30 a.m. at the Flight Deck, Sussex County Airport, Georgetown. Professional women, student teachers and retirees inter-

ested in volunteering are welcome. The first meeting for protégés is Saturday, Oct. 21, 9 a.m. at Delaware Technical & Community College, Georgetown. For details, call 249-8145 or email rtuman@girlpowerdelaware.org

This-N-That Country Store 32450 Bi-State Blvd.Laurel, DE

302-875-2154

Door Prizes

(Just South of School Adm. Bldg.) Tuesday - Saturday 10:00 - 5:00

OUR 5TH YEAR

Door Prizes

ANNUAL FALL OPEN HOUSE WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 27 TH THRU SATURDAY, SEPT. 30 TH

Baskets, Accessories, Purses, Wrought Iron, Country Curtains, Wallpaper Borders, Jewelry, Apples, Roosters, Folk Art, Americana, Candles, Flags, Relishes, Dips & Beautiful All Occasion Cards

50% Off

SALE ITEMS

Bargains throughout the Store

“Bring In The Fall” Refreshments


MORNING STAR

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 13

Outbreak of respiratory disease on chicken farm is called minor By Lynn R. Parks A spokeswoman for Perdue Farms is surprised that people are interested in the outbreak of laryngotracheitis at a Laurelarea chicken farm last week. “Doing a story about this is like doing a story every time a child gets the flu,” said Julie deYoung. “This disease can be serious but in this case, it was mild, we treated for it and it was taken care of.” The respiratory disease was reported in the chicken flock Sept. 20. All the birds in the flock were vaccinated, deYoung said;

the vaccine is given in the birds’ water. None of the birds in the flock died. “A bird gets sick and we treat it; that’s a standard part of flock management,” deYoung said. Laryngotracheitis, commonly known at Lt, occurs in chickens and turkeys. It is spread from one ill bird to another; deYoung said that sometimes, birds in a flock that comes into a chicken house after a flock that was vaccinated can pick up the disease from remnants of the vaccine. When the illness causes death, it is by suffocation.

Teen board to meet at Laurel Library Monday, Oct. 2 at 6 p.m., students in 712th grade are invited to attend the Laurel Public Library’s first Teen Advisory Board meeting of the year to discuss plans for teen events and volunteer opportunities. For details, call the Laurel Public Library at 875-3184, visit the Web site www.lau-

rel.lib.de.us, or stop by the facility at 101 East 4th Street. Teen Read Week is Oct.15-21 and the library has several events planned for teens, including an Anime club meeting, a visit from Lara Zeises, an after-school craft and a teen movie night.

DVFD to hold annual open house Oct. 1 The Delmar Volunteer Fire Department will hold its open house Sunday, Oct. 1, noon to 4 p.m. All members of the community are welcome. Events throughout the day will include: • Tours of the fire house - all day. • Food and drinks - all day. • Dedication of Command 74 - 1 p.m.

• Mock accident with rescue (featuring a demonstration of the Hurst Tool) - 3 p.m. • Smoke detector give away - all day. • Free medical screening - all day. • Demonstration of the decontamination unit - all day. • Fire prevention trailer - all day.

TOWN OF LAUREL PUBLIC HEARING The Laurel Planning & Zoning Commission will be holding a public hearing on Wednesday, October 4, 2006, at 7:00 p.m. to review the application for a proposed Large Parcel Development Overlay District (LPD), located off of U.S. Route 13 North, Camp Road, Discount Land Road, and Colonial Road, now or formerly know as Discovery Group, LLC, tax map #’s 2-32/6.00/40, 41, 1-32/12.00/109, 109.01, 118, 119, & 123, Laurel, Delaware. The site contains approximately 480 acres more or less and is proposed for 1,283,900 square feet of commercial, retail, restaurants, hotels, office space, and recreation fields, and 1,400 residential dwelling units. The hearing will take place in the Laurel Fire Hall, located at 205 Tenth Street, Laurel, Delaware. Copies of the proposed LPD are available at town hall for review, Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. All interested parties should appear at the hearing to present their concerns, comments, etc.

THE TOWN OF LAUREL PLANNING & ZONING COMMISSION

COMMUNITY AWARENESS DAY - A family enjoys the activities at Laurel’s Community Awareness Day Saturday in Laurel River Park. The event was designed to give citizens information about services available to them. Photo by Pat Murphy

Orientation for volunteers set for Sept. 30 There will be a Girl Power Delaware Leadership Center mentor orientation and information breakfast Saturday, Sept. 30, 9 to 11:30 a.m. at the Flight Deck, Sussex County Airport, Georgetown. Professional women, student teachers and retirees inter-

ested in volunteering are welcome. The first meeting for protégés is Saturday, Oct. 21, 9 a.m. at Delaware Technical & Community College, Georgetown. For details, call 249-8145 or email rtuman@girlpowerdelaware.org

This-N-That Country Store 32450 Bi-State Blvd.Laurel, DE

302-875-2154

Door Prizes

(Just South of School Adm. Bldg.) Tuesday - Saturday 10:00 - 5:00

OUR 5TH YEAR

Door Prizes

ANNUAL FALL OPEN HOUSE WEDNESDAY 27TH THUR SATURDAY 30TH

Baskets, Accessories, Purses, Wrought Iron, Country Curtains, Wallpaper Borders, Jewelry, Apples, Roosters, Fold Art, Americana, Candles, Flags, Relishes ,Dips & Beautiful All Occasion Cards

50% SALE ITEMS Off Bargains thru out the Store

“Bring In The Fall” Refreshments


PAGE 14

MORNING STAR

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

Preparing a meal is much Doing the Towns Together simpler than it used to be LAUREL AND DELMAR SOCIALS Sarah Marie Trivits . 875-3672

Even with the amazing variety of foods available to the everyday housewife, there are times when we stand in the middle of the grocery store and ponder the thought, “What’s for dinner tonight?” There are those people who enjoy going to the grocery store every day or three or four times each week. I would much rather mentally plan a week of dinner menus and shop once each week, with an occasional trip for an item either forgotten or absolutely needed. This last week was a week of frustration as I stood between two huge freezers in a large chain store. My frustration mounted as I diligently searched for a particular bag of frozen fruits, and found not a single red strawberry. Later I thought of how very much times have changed. It seems no time at all, yet it is years and years ago that oleo-margarine hit the grocery stores as the latest substitute for real butter. The margarine was white and inside every box was a small pellet that when broken into the white soft margarine would color the entire glob with yellow, making it more pleasing to the eye while not affecting the taste. Housewives snapped up this cheaper substitute for butter and everyone in the average household had their chance to mix the pellet into the soft white oleo, as many people referred to the new table spread. At that time, I was a teenager and can well remember the frustration at our home as each of us would get a turn to make the white glob become an eye-appealing dish. More often than not the margarine turned out with small streaks of yellow and resembled an impressionistic painting. Margarine manufacturers soon changed their procedure and added the yellow to the glob of white, thus uniform color became a real thing. Housewives were delighted. Frozen vegetables hit the freezer areas of the grocery store after World War II, when the world began to change many, many things. Before long, instant mashed potatoes came onto the cooking scene. Here again was another challenge. To get the proper consistency of creamy mashed potatoes (without lumps), and to eliminate the cardboard taste of the flakes was something

Moments with Mike Virginia ‘Mike’ Barton every cook strived to achieve. Too much milk or water meant potatoes that were runny, too many flakes in the pan meant potatoes so thick a fork would stand alone when jabbed in the middle of the serving. As more and more American women entered the workforce, frozen foods and packaged quick-mix foods became more available and acceptable in the average American home. Today’s bride need not worry about owning a really good paring knife. She can cook a great meal and serve it with pride without ever peeling a single potato, and there are women who have been married for a considerable amount of time who have never peeled a potato. Today’s housewife can serve a really delicious meal by just using the microwave and a kettle of boiling water. Or one saucepan. She can put the frozen, pre-packaged entree on the microwave shelf, press the proper button and in a few minutes the roast or poultry is ready. She adds boiling water to the potato flakes or cooks macaroni and cheese in the microwave while the meat is cooking. She opens a pre-packaged plastic bag of greens of some type, rinses the leaves with fresh, cool water, drains the leaves and has an acceptable salad. In a few seconds she can serve either frozen or prepackaged rolls that are piping hot from being in the microwave for less than a minute. She can put a lovely place mat on the table, sparkling clean silverware fresh from the dishwasher, perhaps even light a candle which gives the meal ambiance, fill the dinner plate with the prepared food and the family is impressed with her skills. Cooking has nothing to do with it. It is the ability to do all that and appear unfrazzled that makes the meal a success. Times have definitely changed since the margarine pellet hit the American home!

I begin this week with a correction from one of last week’s items. The class of ’57 will have its 50th-year reunion in 2007 to coincide with graduation exercises at the high school rather than with the alumni banquet, as reported.

put from other members of the Friends, who can and should attend these open meetings on the third Tuesday of each month at 3 p.m. in the community room at the library. We really need your help and support.

On Sept. 12, members of the Laurel High School class of ’37 were hosted at a luncheon at the home of fellow classmates, Henry Lee and Mary Anna Bohm. Attending were : Lillian Hedges Wootten, Pauline Webster Parker, Sara Wright Ellis and Walter Dorman. Unable to attend were Charles Hayes and Herman Cubbage.

Happy Anniversary to Ted and Denice Cordrey on Oct. 1.

Returning last week from a trip to Alaska, Nellie Sucek reported much about beautiful weather and scenery in that state. She was accompanied by her friend, Dawn Santo of Sewell, N.J. Annabel Cordrey celebrated her 80th birthday with her family and friends at the Nanticoke Yacht Club in Seaford on Saturday, Sept. 23. An outstanding dinner was catered by Jerry Fletcher of Delmar. A tribute from the House of Representatives of the state of Delaware was read by Bill Outten. Pastor Don Murray of St. Paul’s Church entertained with his guitar and singing. It was a very special evening for Annabel and family. The ladies at St. Philip’s Church in Laurel have been very busy compiling and having printed a most attractive and mouth watering array of recipes in their new book, “Heavenly Delights.” For a modest sum of $10 this hard back edition can be ordered from Leigh Clark (call 875-9480) or any of the church ladies if you call them. Alan and Sug Whaley spent a quiet, rush-free week in Assateague enjoying balmy weather and blue skies the entire time, and returned last week ready to pick up where they left off at home again. Friends of the Laurel Library held their monthly meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 19. Suggestions and ideas for their upcoming tea in late October were presented and will be finalized in the very near future. More complete information in this column next week. We would like to see more in-

The Henrys of California, Robert and Eleanor, will no longer be visiting Laurel periodically as they will now be the Henrys of Delaware. Coming back to familiar territory and roots in the very, very near future, they will be residing in a “cottage” at the Methodist Manor House in Seaford. I’m sure they’ll be warmly welcomed by their many relatives and family here. Happy belated birthday wishes and lots of love to Shalyn Shubert as she celebrated her 4th birthday on Sept. 18 at her home with family and friends. She is the daughter of Monica and Scott Shubert, the granddaughter of Sharon and Mike Cordrey and the great granddaughter of Annabel Cordrey. To a very special cousin, Ruth A. Moore, birthday greetings on Sept. 27. Also on the same date happy birthday to Danny Dukes. To Donald Layton Sr., happy birthday, with much love from his wife, who will help him celebrate on Oct. 29. On Oct. 5, Nicole Kelley will celebrate another year — best wishes to her for many more celebrations. There are a profusion of best wishes to M.L. Elliott from her family and friends for her birthday on Sept. 30. We end September birthday greetings to these folks in town: Eschol Mariner, Robert (Bob) Rogers, Sept. 29; and Richard Mariner, Sept. 30. We express our deepest sympathy to the family and friends of Naomi P. Brown, Joan C. Freeman, Colin Carios Cain, Oliver H. Hastings, Kenneth Jones, Hattie Ann Gravenor and Roland Oliphant. We continue with prayers for those who are ill: Terry Layton, Agnes Robinson, Frances Hastings, Ralph Baker, Richard Cordrey and Hattie Puckham. See you in the Stars.

LAUREL REALTY

SAVE

BIG

on home insurance NATIONWIDE IS ON YOUR SIDE FOR PRICE, SERVICE, AND CONVENIENCE ®

Save Big! Call for a free, no obligation quote. Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company and Affiliated Companies. Home Office: Columbus, OH 43215-2220. Nationwide, the Nationwide framemark, Nationwide is On Your Side and On Your Side are federally registered service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company.

LAUREL

Richard Small

Small Insurance and Financial Services

1130 South Central Ave. Laurel

875-3333

Need 4 bedrooms? This remodeled Cape Cod has them. It has a dining room, living room, sun porch, 2 baths, and a 32’x10’ patio off the back. In addition to the large lot it has ceramic tile and hardwood floors. $202,500 MLS #536471

“Making a Difference in Our Community”

1128 S. Central Ave., Laurel, Delaware Directly Across from the Laurel Senior High School

302-875-3000 • www.laurelrealty.com


MORNING STAR

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 15

Long hair, even as a mark of protest, is too much trouble I thought I would let my hair grow long. Not necessarily under YNN ARKS the impression that long hair would make me beautiful — ”You’re alWhat better way for a ready beautiful,” my husband would say here, barely looking up from his sudoko — but rather out child of the 1960s and of frustration. “If you’re not outraged, you’re ’70s to make a statement not paying attention,” according to one T-shirt I saw recently. I agreed than with a mop of hair? — I almost went up and shook the hand of the man who was wearing the shirt — and I thought growing my hair proud. President Bush was still in office, our long might help me express my outrage at soldiers were still in Iraq. The fist of rage the current state of affairs. still woke me in the morning and now, it What better way for a child of the was coupled with sadness over my hair. It 1960s and ’70s to make a statement than was time to get a haircut. with a mop of hair? At one time, not too “I want it back the way it was,” I told long ago, I knew the lyrics to all of the my ever-agreeable hair stylist. And within songs from “Hair,” the rock musical that a few minutes, there it was: that familiar played on Broadway from 1968 to 1972. cut that I have sported for years. And I can still stumble through its theme I will have to find a different way of song: protest. Of course, I have this space in “Give me a head with hair, long, beauwhich to ramble every week. tiful hair; Shining, gleaming, steaming, And, as reassurance that as bad as flaxen, waxen; Give me down to there, things get, the world still seems to go on, I hair! can take to humming the tunes from the “Let it fly in the breeze and get caught 40-year-old “Hair,” muttering the lyrics in the trees; Give a home to the fleas in my hair; A home for fleas, a hive for bees; under my breath: “When the moon is in the seventh A nest for birds, there ain’t no words; For the beauty, the splendor, the wonder of my house, and Jupiter aligns with Mars; Then peace will guide the planets, And love will hair!” steer the stars.” OK, so at this time in my life I wasn’t interested in either steaming tresses or in creating habitat on my head for fleas and birds. I just thought that when I woke up in the morning and that fist of rage rocked me in my stomach, I could think, “At least I’m growing out my hair” and the fist would relax somewhat. Wilgus Associates, Inc. The first several weeks in going from 210 W. Market St., P.O. Box 750, short to long are the hardest. But I made it through, styling my hair in the same way I Georgetown, DE 19947 • had when it was short, sealing it in place www.century21.com with hairspray and a stern lecture and then 302-855-0500 trying not to look at it again until the next morning. Finally, it was long enough that COUNTRY: PURE & SIMPLE! my hair stylist said she could fashion it into a different style, one that could grow Near Route 20 South of out more gracefully. Millsboro 4.48 Acres wooded I liked it. So at my next visit to the hair salon, I asked her to retain the new style, $160,000 #539422 only a bit longer. I was finally on the path to long hair, I thought, and to protest. Greenbriar Way, Seaford But I have never been very handy with Cleared acre backs up to woods. a hair brush. While the woman who cuts Permit for Gravity fed system my hair could make it look nice — she is 1.08 ac., $118,900 #539422 a marvel with a hair brush — I couldn’t imitate her work. I came to call my new Pie lane, Georgetown 1.15 ac., style the Bozo look: flat on top and stickwooded. $100,000 #539356 ing out on the sides to form a triangle. People who saw me weren’t inspired to Seashore Highway, think about the Bush administration and appropriateness of its policies. Instead, Georgetown 4.25 acres w/ 321’ they stared and snickered. road frontage $215,000 The situation came to a head (ha ha) #538259 late this summer. Pictures taken of me during the last weeks of August show a do City Rd. 471, West of of which Pythagoras himself would be

L

News items may be mailed to the Seaford and Laurel Star, 628 W. Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973. Or they may be faxed to 629-9243.

P

Georgetown 11.07 acres, wooded $425,000 #536399

Wilson Hill Rd., Georgetown Horses permitted on cleared parcel 150’ road frontage. $99,900 #538928


MORNING STAR ✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 16

Local homebuilders make Blitz Build a success During the week of September 18 – 22, six local homebuilders partnered with Sussex County Habitat for Humanity to build three homes in one week. By Friday afternoon, the sounds changed from air nailers and electric saws to vacuum cleaners and shovels as cleaning crews and landscapers put the final touches on three new homes in Sussex County Habitat for Humanity’s (SCHFH) first subdivision called Concord Village. Five days earlier, work crews arrived on site where three foundations with sub-floors awaited their arrival. Work commenced immediately, and by the end of the day one, three homes were under roof. As the week progressed, the builders and their contractors worked together on a highly coordinated schedule to meet their goal of building three homes in a week. “This type of event helps Habitat raise awareness about our program while engaging the community in providing affordable housing solutions. By partnering with the homebuilders, we were able to build three homes in record time, reduce our cash costs of construction, and get more people involved in Habitat,” says Kevin Gilmore, Executive Director of SCHFH. Senator Tom Carper attended the closing celebration to congratulate all those involved in the special project. The build was made successful by the work of nearly 350 volunteers and over 100 individual companies which supplied labor and material to the project. Habitat volunteer Ned Butera who coordinated the event adds, “By partnering with the Home

The Home Builders Blitz Leadership Team appears Friday with Senator Tom Carper in front of a newly built Habitat house. From left are Doug Brown, John Marschall, Mark Fitzgerald, Myron Edwards, Ned Butera, Senator Carper, Thomas Marston, Brain McManus, Kevin Gilmore, Tom Hudecheck and Andy Cannon.

Builders Association of Delaware and Carl M. Freeman Communities, Pulte Homes, Ryan Homes, Klabe Homes, Atlantic Homes, and Schell Brothers we were able to engage members of the building industry in our mission.” About Sussex Habitat for Humanity The mission of Sussex County Habitat

Fuqua and Yori, P.A. Attorneys at Law

A Sussex County Law Firm on the Circle in Georgetown

for Humanity is to build simple, decent and affordable houses in partnership with lowincome families in Sussex County. The estimated number of families living in substandard housing in Sussex County is 4,324, according to the Delaware Housing Authority. The philosophy is simple: Habitat provides a "hand-up, not a hand-out." Families are selected on the basis of need

and ability to pay monthly mortgages. Homeowner candidates invest sweat equity, make down payments, and pay for their homes through an interest-free mortgage. Mortgage payments then go into Habitat’s "Fund for Humanity" that allows building more houses with more families in the future. For more information, visit www.sussexcountyhabitat.org.

Robinson Real Estate

605 N. HALL ST., SEAFORD, DE 19973 • 302-629-4574 E-mail:robinsonrealestate@verizon.net

N EW L ISTING

For legal representation in cases involving:

AUTO ACCIDENT INJURIES, INSURANCE CLAIMS, DIVORCE, CUSTODY, ADOPTION, CRIMINAL AND TRAFFIC CHARGES We can help, Call:

Timothy G. Willard, Esq. Tasha Marie Stevens, Esq. Margaret R. Cooper, Esq.

302-856-7777 www.fuquaandyori.com 28 The Circle Georgetown, Delaware 19947

Delmar, DE - Charming 1991 Class “C” ranch home offering 3 BR, 2 BA, FR w/FP, kit/DR combo w/all appl’s, deck, plus det. 32’x24 in-law suite with rear deck, loft, workshop & carport & new 10’x16’ shed bldg. All on spacious lot. A must see & priced right at $179,900 (541135)

Shore Dr., near Hearn’s Pond, Seaford - Starting out or slowing down see this perfect turn-key ranch home on lg. lot offering 3 BRs, new kit. cabinets, new tile floors in kit. & bath, new w/w carpet, new CA, & new windows. It’s a must to see. Make your appt. today! $199,900 (539934) Crossgate Village, Seaford Customized end unit townhouse features 1st floor master bedroom, enclosed sunroom, custom kitchen, 2 1/2 baths, central air, 2nd floor bedroom, bath & loft, plus 1 car garage. $230,000 (539933)


MORNING STAR ✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 17

WALKER’S MARINE INC. Visit Our

Open House Saturday, Sept. 30 10 am - 2 pm

Decoys by: Bigfoot, Green Head, G&H and Mojo Beretta Clothing Blinds, Ammo & More

Kevin J. Gilmore, executive director of Sussex County Habitat for Humanity, thanks Sen. Tom Carper for helping with Friday’s dedication. Photo by Phil Livingston Seaford -Woodland Rd. P.O. Box 247 Seaford, DE 19973

302-629-8666

www.walkersmarine.us

Marine Sales & Service Evinrude - Johnson Mercury Mud Buddy

Jon Boats -- Hunting Supplies

Bess’ Buds LANDSCAPE DESIGN & MAINTENANCE Homegrown Plants for Every Season OPEN MONDAY - SATURDAY CLOSED SUNDAY New homeowners Alicia and Henry Mazzaerro and children, Oksana and Olivia, stand in front of their new home. Photo by Phil Livingston

Annual

Open House

Saturday, October 7th 8:30 - 5:00

s s m n i u k lks Kale p s a M Pum e t i s S n n a P Cor Door Prizes • Free Sodas & Hot Dogs

The Lord will indeed give what is good, and our land will yield its harvest. Psalms 85:12 Hands were joined and placed on the homes as Rector Laurence Miller said a blessing over the homes. Photo by Phil Livingston


PAGE 18

MORNING STAR ✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

What’s Behind the Obesity Epidemic? by John Hollis Director, Community Relations Nemours Health and Prevention Services

GROWING UP HEALTHY

In this column I’ll discuss the At 150 calories, one societal trends contributing to the obesity epidemic. 12-ounce can of soda Too many high-calorie meals per day can add up to and snacks - The availability and consumption of high-calorie conan extra 15 pounds venience foods, particularly fast food, is at an all-time high. per year. This is occurring while most kids are not eating enough fruits About 60% of Delaware high school and vegetables, which are important for students reported not attending physical growth, development and promoting education classes during the school week healthy weight and immune function. Eighty percent of Delaware high school and 43 percent reported engaging in no vigorous physical activity at all. students reported eating fewer than five Too many sugar-sweetened beverages fruits and vegetables per day. Between 1965 and 1995, studies show, Too much “screen time” - The average soft drink consumption tripled for boys American child/adolescent watches three and doubled for girls. hours of television per day. A number of At 150 calories, one 12-ounce can of studies have shown a relationship between soda per day can add up to an extra 15 “screen time” and overweight. pounds per year. Children often consume Not only are these activities sedentary, soda, sports drinks, and fruit drinks, which taking time away from physical activity, have little or no nutritional value, at the but children tend to snack more while expense of better choices, such as low-fat watching TV and playing games. What’s milk, water, and 100 percent fruit juice. worse, TV exposes children to a lot of If we are to make children’s health a food marketing directed squarely at them. priority, we must push for changes that are Too little physical activity - Regular physical activity is important for maintain- needed now to combat these societal trends and help kids make good, healthy ing good health, fitness, and a healthy choices, no matter where they spend their weight. Studies have shown that physical time. activity declines sharply in adolescence. The obesity epidemic is a multi-faceted

problem, one for which there is obviously no “silver bullet” solution. But to the extent that there is a solution, we suggest these changes as steps towards a healthier climate in Delaware. In child care settings, get the little ones moving. Provide healthier meals and snacks. Turn off the TV and use it only for special occasions. Model the behavior and choices you want the children to copy. In schools, make sure all students not only have physical education as part of their curriculum, but also have opportunities to be physically active throughout the school day. Make education about nutrition and healthy food choices standard. Offer healthy vending machine options and limit the sale of junk food. In communities and neighborhoods, de-

mand more sidewalks, trails and parks, more farmers’ markets and fresh produce vendors. Ask local restaurants and chains to publish nutritional information. In the workplace, create opportunities for regular physical activity during the workday. Ensure healthy food options are available. Establish worksite exercise facilities or create incentives for employees to join local fitness centers. Require weight management and physical activity counseling as a member benefit in health insurance contracts. It’s up to all of us to make our state the first state in good health. We can do it, especially if we set our sights on a common set of goals and if the brass ring we’re reaching for is the legacy of healthier generations to come.

AARP tax-aide seeks volunteers to help with free counseling,preparation AARP tax-aide, the nation’s largest, free, volunteer-run tax counseling and preparation service is looking for volunteers to help senior and low income taxpayers complete their 2006 federal and state income tax returns. This is a free community service sponsored by AARP in cooperation with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Sites are equipped with computer hardware and software to prepare and file returns electronically. We need volunteers for assignments in Western Sussex County (Delmar to Greenwood). Computer literate volunteers will prepare income tax returns. Other volunteers are needed to greet clients and to check accuracy of results. Volunteers will receive free tax training and are asked to give a commitment of four hours per week over the 10 week tax preparation period. For more information contact Bill Watt 629-7309, or Melvin Koster 628-3849.

Fall Harvest & Halloween Decorations Have Arrived

NE FA W FL LL AG S

HOME YANKEE SWEET CANDLE HOME

FRAGRANCE OF THE MONTH TH SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30 TH

P la n T o Attend!

FUN!

2 ND Annual

Fu n & Ga me s fo r al l ki ds !

Fun On The Farm Day Antique Tractors • Pumpkins Pony Rides 12-4 • Face Painting

MUMS $3.95 - 5 large for $19.00 A Little Bit of Countr yJust Down the Road 11465 Sycamore Rd. Laurel, DE (1/2 mile from Rt. 13) MON. THRU SAT. 10-5:30 SUNDAY 12-4

302-875-6922


MORNING STAR

 SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 19

Community Bulletin Board EVENTS Annual Fishing Tournament Laurel American Legion Post 19 will be holding their annual Fishing Tournament on Saturday, Sept. 30, from 9 a.m. till noon. Ages 4-7, 8-11, and 12-15 years old. Under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. Once again the Benson family is awarding savings bonds to prize-wining fishermen. Gifts for all participants and grab bags of fishing gear. Entry forms are at A&K Enterprises at Central Avenue and Broad Creek location. Further information call 875-5513.

Evening for Dinner & Jazz An Evening for Dinner & Jazz, Gerald Veasley and His Band in concert, Saturday, Oct. 14, at 8:30 p.m., with special guest Kim Waters, Delaware Technical & Community College, Rt. 18, Georgetown. Tickets $48, call 1-800-296-8742. Proceeds benefit Owens Campus students. Enjoy themed four-course dinner before concert at Lighthouse Cove dining room on campus for $32, all inclusive. Call 8565400, ext. 2180.

Seaford Presbyterian Yard Sale Because of flood damage during the storm on June 25, the Seaford Presbyterian Church has lost its kitchen, fellowship hall and Sunday School rooms. We are planning to rebuild and replace lost and damaged items. The church is going to hold a yard sale on Oct. 7 from 8 a.m. to noon (rain date Oct. 14). A variety of fund raising activities are being considered for the next year to cover the costs of rebuilding.

Autumn Craft Show The Autumn Craft Show at the Delaware State Fairgrounds features autumn crafts such as stain glass, framed artwork, clothing, gourmet food items, jewelry, pottery and ceramics, flowers, rod iron, and many more. The dates are Saturday, Sept. 30, from 9 to 5 and Sunday, Oct. 1, from 10 to 4. The craft show is inside the enclosed Schibinger Pavilion which is handicap and stroller accessible. Handcraft Unlimited accepts all major credit cards at every stand.

15th Apple-Scrapple Festival The 15th annual Bridgeville AppleScrapple Festival will be held on Oct. 13 and 14. Live entertainment hourly, scrapple carving contest, Lego contest, three craft show areas, health fair, carnival, kids games, huge Town and Country Car Show, antique tractor pull, including a kiddie tractor pull, pony rides, and trade show. Foods include: apple dumplings, apple pies, oyster sandwiches, pig roast, scrapple sandwiches, boardwalk fries, barbequed chicken, blooming onions, pit cheeseburgers, hot dogs, fish sandwiches, kettle corn, pizza, crab cake sandwiches, candies, cakes, and drinks of any kind. Enjoy live entertainment beginning at 10 a.m. on Saturday, including the “Gong Show” sponsored by Froggy 99; street dance on Friday night with the band, “Sticky Situation,” and a street dance on Saturday night, featuring the famous “Mike Hines and the Look” band. Also new this year will be the Dynomite profes-

BINGO Nanticoke Health

leaders and committee members. The cost is $10. As usual, Jeanette Davis and her committee will serve a chicken salad luncheon from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Cost will be $6 including dessert and beverage. The House Tour Boutique, with Janet Hackett as chairman, will also be in Fellowship Hall. Doors will be open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Members of St. John’s are encouraged to donate crafts, used items in excellent condition, baked goods, plants, white elephants, etc. At the same time there will be an addition this year — a silent auction featuring quality items. Two quilts have already been donated. Jean Dunham and Nancy Brown are chairladies of the silent auction.

Nanticoke Health Services will hold a Longaberger Basket Bingo on Thursday, Oct. 5, starting at 7 p.m., at the Seaford Moose, located on Rt. 13A in Seaford. Proceeds from the event will benefit the American Heart Association Heart Walk 2006. The evening will consist of 20 games and will feature several baskets including the Horizon of Hope sets, Medium Wall Pocket, Beverage Toe and several regular line baskets as prizes. Advance tickets are $20 per person, $25 at the door. Advance ticket includes a chance to win the Large Hamper and the Large Autumn Treats Set with Wrought Iron Legs or one of the several door prizes. Nearly 30 chances to win. Refreshments will be available. For information contact the EAC at 302-629-6611, ext. 2404 or MorrisR@nanticoke.org.

Seaford Kiwanis Auction

Beta Sigma Phi

Punkin Chunkin anniversary

Laureate Epsilon Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi Sorority will be sponsoring a Basket Bingo on Thursday, Sept. 28, at the Seaford Moose Lodge. Doors open at 6 p.m.; games start at 7 p.m. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door. Refreshments will be available. For tickets call Debbie at 6298633. Lots of baskets - several combos and filled baskets. We are a non-profit organization. This is the main fundraiser that supports our local service projects in the community each year. The proceeds from this event will go to the “Hospice Festival of Trees.”

EAC of NHS Basket Bingo The Employee Activity Committee of Nanticoke Health Services will hold a Longaberger Basket Bingo on Thursday, Oct. 26, starting at 7 p.m. at the Seaford Moose, located on Rt 13A in Seaford. The evening will consist of 20 games and will feature several baskets including the Christmas Basket sets, Foyer, Journal and Beverage Tote as prizes. Advance tickets are $20 per person, $25 at the door. Advance ticket includes a chance to win the Large Hamper and the Library basket or one of the several door prizes. Nearly 30 chances to win. Refreshments will be available. For ticket information contact the EAC at 302-629-6611, ext. 2417. sional wrestling group located at the corner of Laws Street and Delaware Avenue. For more information call 337-7275 or 629-9582 or www.applescrapple.com.

St. John’s House Tour schedule St. John’s House Tour will be Oct. 5 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., with 10 homes open. Tickets are available from circle

The Kiwanis Club of Seaford will be holding its 52nd annual Auction on Saturday, Oct. 7, at the Seaford Middle School. More than 400 businesses contribute to this event. Items include furniture from Johnny Janosik and cars from Frederick Ford, Hertrich Pontiac Buick and Preston Ford. Other big-ticket items on consignment are auctioned. Preview is at 9 a.m. Auction starts at 9:30 a.m. Free admission. Refreshments available. The Kiwanis provide youth activities and scholarships. The Punkin Chunkin Association is anticipating raising thousands of dollars for local and national charities during the 21st

How to submit items Submit Bulletin Board items by Thursday at noon. Send to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, email morningstarpub @ddmg.net or drop off at 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford. Items appear in both the Seaford and Laurel Stars. annual world championships scheduled for Nov. 3-5. The first day of competition will culminate with a Marshall Tucker Band concert. Opening for the Marshall Tucker Band will be country artist Danielle Peck. The Marshall Tucker Band is known for hits such as “Can’t You See,” “Fire on the Mountain” and “Heard it in a Love Song.” Peck is a newcomer to the country music scene, making a name for herself with the song, “Findin’ a Good Man.” She was ranked No. 18 on CMT’s top20 list during the third week of August 2006. Concert tickets are $25 and will go on sale Sept. 18. They will be available at Mugs & Stitches in Lewes, the Cape Gazette office in Nassau Commons, west of Lewes, by contacting Frank Shade at 854-5382, or at the Punkin Chunkin office at 684-8196. For more information about the 2006 event, visit the website www.punk-

Basket Bingo EXTRAVAGANZA

DOUBLE SESSION SUPER BASKET BINGO BENEFIT: Delmar VFW Bldg. Fund

Delmar VFW 200 W. State St., Delmar, MD (on the left before the Old Mill Restaurant)

Sunday, Oct. 15 Doors open at 11:30 am Session One Begins 1 pm Session two begins after dinner (Intermission) Limited number of tickets will be sold - RESERVE NOW! Price: $55 Pre-Paid includes: 1 book of 20 reg. games for each of 2 sessions A Free Catered Dinner at Intermission! Special Books, Jackpot Game & Extra avail. to purchase King Tutt (pull tabs) for baskets will be played! Come Early!!

all VFW Tickets c 2

-372 4 1 0 - 8 9 6 rner Dawn Tu -2184 410-726

cGinnis Nancy M 463

-4 443-235

Over $10,000 worth of Baskets & Products to be given away!! LARGE baskets & filled!!* Featuring products from the summer and fall/winter Wish List & the 2006 Holiday Campaign!

TOO MANY PRIZES TO LIST!!! This bingo event is a fundraiser for the Delmar VFW Building Fund, and is in no way affiliated with the Longaberger® company.

REMINDER

SUPER BINGO EVERY TUESDAY!


PAGE 20

MORNING STAR

 SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

Community Bulletin Board inchunkin.com. The gourd-hurtling competition will be in the same location as in the last several years: the intersection of Sussex 305 and Sussex 306 - Hollyville Road and Harmony Cemetery Road in Millsboro. This is the last year the event will be in Millsboro. The association recently contracted with Bridgeville officials and the Dale Wheatley family to use a nearly 1,000-acre farm site for future chunks, beginning in the fall of 2007.

Tractor Show at Yoder’s Farms First State Antique Club of Delaware’s Tractor Show, Hit and Miss Engines, Oct. 6 and 7, Yoder Farms, Greenwood. Live auction, Friday, 6 p.m., flea market both days, youth safety program, Saturday, 9 a.m., tractor games, refreshments and entertainment. Call 875-3040.

MEETINGS Sussex County Airport The next regular meeting of the Sussex County Airport Committee will be held on Wednesday, Oct. 4, at the Sussex County Administrative Offices building, 22215 DuPont Highway (West Complex Building, Rt. 113), Georgetown, at 6 p.m. If there are any questions call 855-7770.

Weight loss support group A weight loss support group, The TOPS DE 19 club meets every Tuesday evening at 6 p.m. We meet on the ground floor at the Methodist Manor House. Come join us. For more information call 629-7355.

Marine Corps League The Marine Corps League meets the first Thursday of each month, at 7:30 p.m. at the Log Cabin in Seaford. This month will be Oct. 5.

SHS Alumni Association The Seaford High School Alumni Association will have a meeting on Thursday, Oct. 5, beginning at 7 p.m., at the Seaford Boys & Girls Club. All interested alumni are invited to attend. Call Donna Angell at 629-8077 for additional information.

Acorn Club of Seaford The G.F.W.C.-Acorn Club of Seaford will hold a business meeting at the Seaford Library at 7:30 p.m. on Oct. 12. The hostess will be Sandy Orbison and her committee.

Energy conservation The Georgetown Public Library presents an Energy Conservation Program with Joe Green of the Delaware Electric Co-op on Oct. 17, at 2 p.m. in the Library Conference Room. For details call 856-7958.

Laurel Chamber Membership You are invited to the General Membership meeting of the Laurel Chamber of Commerce at 7:30 a.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 9, at the Chamber of Commerce office on Poplar Street in Laurel. Guest speaker will be Col. McLeash of the Delaware State Police.

FOOD VFW 4961 Breakfast Cafe VFW 4961 Breakfast Cafe, open Monday-Friday, 8-10 a.m., Seaford VFW, Middleford Road, to benefit Veterans Relief Fund. All are welcome.

All-you-can-eat breakfast All-you-can-eat breakfast at the Blades Fire Hall, 5th & Cannon Streets. Adults $7, children $3. Sunday, Oct. 1, 8 - 11 a.m. Sponsored by the Auxiliary and Firemen of the Blades Fire Company.

Friendly’s Night for Mission Friendly’s Night - On Thursday, Sept. 28, from 5 to 8 p.m., 10 percent of all sales will be donated to the Seaford Mission.

All-you-can-eat breakfast Blades Firemen and Ladies Auxiliary all-you-can-eat breakfast, Sunday, Oct. 1, 8-11 a.m., at the fire hall, on the corner of 5th and Cannon streets in Blades. Adults $7, children 10 years and under, $3. All breakfast foods, coffee, milk. The breakfast takes place the first Sunday of each month. at the Blades Volunteer Fire Company Hall.

Lions Club benefit buffet The second Salisbury Metro Lions Club Benefit Buffet at Brew River, East Main Street, Salisbury. Steamship round roast beef, oysters - fried, raw, steamed and Casino and sides; with entertainment and silent auction, on Thursday, Oct. 5, 5 to 9 p.m.Tickets are $25 at the door or in advance. For advance tickets, call 410-219-5476 o 410-651-4998. All proceeds go directly to charitable sight, hearing and youth projects of the Salisbury Metro Lions Club.

New TOPS Group Forms TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), a non-profit weight loss support group, meets Tuesdays from 12:30 to 2 p.m. at Grace Baptist Church, Atlanta Road, Seaford. For more information, contact Jean Davis at 410-883-3407.

REUNIONS Laurel Class of 1976 To the Class of 1976, Laurel High School classmates, there will be a reunion on October 20 and 21. October 20 is dinner and dancing at 59 Lake, Rehoboth Beach. Contact Lisa for more information and reservations at 302-462-0818. On Oct. 21, a dinner and dance to be held at the Laurel American Legion at 6:30 p.m. to midnight. Dinner and dance are at no cost to classmates. Cash bar. The Class of ‘76 is searching for classmates: Diana Calhoun, Kenny Carroll, Be-

linda Hill Carmean, Ida Mae Horsey, Diane O’Neal, Robert Ryan, Rickey Smart, George Sorrow, Jeff Walters, Debbie Winder and Paul Joyner. If you know how we can contact these missing classmates call Ellen at 846-0636 or Carol at 846-9726.Also call for reservations.

Woodbridge Class of ’96 Woodbridge Class of ’96 is having its 10 year class reunion on Oct. 21, at 6 p.m. The event will be held at the Lighthouse Restaurant at Fisherman’s Wharf in Lewes. Contact Mandy Passwaters Forbes at 919-361-1452, or via email at forbesfamof3@nc.rr.com. Thank you and we’re looking forward to seeing everyone from ’96.

Baker Family The 43rd Baker Family Reunion will be Sunday, Oct. 8, at 2 p.m., at Asbury Community Hall, 26161 Asbury Road, off of Rt. 9 (between Laurel and Georgetown), with entertainment by “The Jones Boys.” Descendants of John Slathel Baker and Nancy Esham Baker and guests are invited

to attend. Dinner reservations at $10.95 each. Call 629-6815 for additional information.

Bridgeville Class of 1949 The Bridgeville Class of 1949 will hold a class reunion on Saturday, Nov. 4, 2006, at the Sailloft Restaurant on Rt. 113, north of Milford. We are searching for classmates, Jean Tucker McQuaide and Stanley Dickerson. If you know how we can contact them, call Tom at 337-7494.

TRIPS Seaford Historical Society The Seaford Historical Society will visit numerous sites in the Dover area. The trip, scheduled for Wednesday, Oct. 4, will include the John Dickinson Mansion, the Delaware National Estuarine Center, the Air Mobility Command Museum and Barratt’s Chapel. Each site will broaden our understanding. The bus will leave the Seaford Village Shopping Center at 9 a.m. and return at 6 p.m. The cost is $35 for members and $50 for nonmembers. The $50 fee will include an individual membership.

GOODFELLAS PIZZA & SUBS 1 Bi-State Blvd., Delmar, MD

410

896-9606

Come Enjoy Our

Brand New Dining Room

Sundays and Mondays Buy One Large Pizza Get A Small FREE

Hand Tossed Pizza Baked In Brick Ovens Fresh Dough Never Frozen

TOPPINGS EXTRA

Tuesdays

Wednesdays

$1 Off Day Buy One Spaghetti & Meat Ball Dinner Large Subs, Dinners or Large Pizza Get One FREE TOPPINGS EXTRA Daily Lunch & Dinner Specials FRIDAYs Full Menu - Subs, Sandwiches, Dinners, Pizzas & Calzones

2 Large

Dine In or Carry Out Italian Subs SUN-THURS 11 AM-10 PM FRI & SAT 11 AM-11 PM

$

9

00 + tax

GROUPS & LARGE PARTIES WELCOME Ad specials subject to change without notice.


MORNING STAR

 SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 21

Community Bulletin Board The Dickinson plantation was the home of John Dickinson, who wrote many papers and articles on the Revolutionary War era. We will visit the home and extensive grounds and out-buildings. A box lunch will be enjoyed on the grounds. The Estuarine Center sits on 910 acres near the St. Jones River and Blackbird Creek. This habitat is reserved for study and research. Wild life is abundant. Dover Air Force Base is the site of the Air Mobility Command Museum. Among the exhibits of vintage aircrafts, there is an exhibit showing the evolution of military rations, hardtack to MRE’s. Barratt’s Chapel, built in 1780, is considered the cradle of Methodism in America. There are many historic and interesting sites in our area and they will broaden our view of Delaware and the important part it has played in the growth of our country. For more information or reservations, call John Farquhar at 629-2336.

Delmar Alumni Association The Delmar Alumni Association is sponsoring a bus trip on Nov. 10, 11 and 12, to Oglebay Resort in Wheeling, W.Va. This is a pre-holiday retreat. Attractions include the Festival of Lights, Festival of Trees, Christmas at the Mansion, Train Exhibit and lots of time for shopping and relaxing in the pool, etc. The cost is $310, which includes two nights lodging, one holiday dinner buffet, two mountaineers breakfast buffets and tours. For further information call Jo at 302-846-0698.

SDPR trip planned Radio City Music Hall The Seaford Department of Parks and Recreation will take its annual trip to a Radio City Music Hall Christmas show on Dec. 3. The cost is $115 and the departure time from the back parking lot of Seaford High School is 7 a.m. Call 629-6809 for more information.

HOLIDAYS Victorian Christmas Seaford Historical Society announces that the boutique at the Victorian Christmas at the Ross Mansion is back. After an absence of several years Shirley Skinner, chairperson of the society gift shop committee, announces the return of this specialty. All members are asked to donate one

item, large or small. Items may be placed in the gray box on the front porch of the Ross Mansion at any time before Dec. 1. For details call Skinner at 629-9378.

Christmas Show Trip Laurel Senior Center Christmas Show trip, Dutch Apple Theater, Lancaster, Pa., Dec. 20. Cost $63, includes transportation, luncheon and show. Shopping after the show if time permits. Call 875-2536 to reserve a seat with deposit.

The Women’s Holiday Mart The Women’s Holiday Mart will be held in the Exhibit Hall at the Delaware State Fairgrounds on Saturday, Nov. 4, from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Features holiday shopping, demonstrations and activities for kids. Free and open to the public. Sponsored by Harrington Business & Professional Women. For information, call Dawn Elliott at 302-398-8544, email holidaymart@bpwharrington.org, or visit the website at bpwharrington.org.

ETC. Babies & Toddlers Stay and Play Parents and children from birth to age four are invited to play together, listen to a story, learn new songs and finger plays, and network with other families. Free. From September 2006-May 2007. Closed on school holidays. No registration required. Call Anna Scovel at 856-5239 for more information. Seaford Parks & Recreation (SDPR), 320 Virginia Ave., Seaford, Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m.-noon.

History of 19th Century Laurel Have you gotten your copy of this most informative book on early Laurel? The book would make a wonderful and valued gift for the holidays. The 430+ page book is a reprint written by the late Harold Hancock in the 1980s and is selling for $45 or it can be mailed for an additional $5. To obtain a copy contact any board member or call Linda Justice at 875-4217.

Shiloh House of Hope Raffle Raffle tickets for a Royal Carribbean cruise to benefit the Shiloh House of Hope, a residential program for teens. Tickets are $10 or three for $25. Phone

GOLF Kent-Sussex Industries KSI’s 17th annual 3 Club Tournament has been re-scheduled for Wednesday, Oct. 11. The excessive heat advisory in the first week of August prompted the re-scheduling of the tournament, normally held the first Wednesday in August. This is one of the most unique golf tournaments in Delaware. Not only are golfers limited to three clubs, but the highest scoring team is recognized among tournament winners with the first-, second-, and third-place low net and low gross. Golfers also take part in an unusual driving range contest sponsored by Delmarva Wholesale Bakery, “How Far Can You Drive A Carl Roll.” For more information about SKI’s 17th annual 3 Club Golf Tournament, or for a personal tour of KSI, call Alicia Hollis at 422-4014 ext. 3015.

‘Raise the Roof’ Golf Tournament “Raise the Roof” Golf Tournament to benefit Shiloh House of Hope, a residential program for hurting teens. Through Christ-centered education and counseling, teens find a hope and a future and both the teens and their families receive healing and restoration. The golf tournament will be Monday, Oct. 16, at The Rookery. Shotgun begins at 9 a.m. Teams of four can play for $375, single players for $100. Sponsor a hole, for $150. For more information on Shiloh House of Hope visit www.shilohhouseofhope.org or to register for the golf tournament, call 629-5331.

Day Committee has a new website up and running where you can get up-to-date information about events and schedules on Return Day as well as the Wednesday night Ox Roast activities. Applications are being accepted for parade entrants and vendors. The application forms are available on the website at www.returnday.org, by e-mailing info@returnday.org or by calling 855-0722.

Stories of Old-Time Laurel The Laurel Historical Society’s Kendal Jones will be presenting a three-part slide show on “Places, Faces and Stories of Old-Time Laurel” at the Laurel Public Library in the new community meeting room. This meeting is open to the public. Members are encouraged to invite a nonmember to join them for this interesting presentation. Dates are Wednesday, Sept. 27; Wednesday, Oct. 25, and Wednesday, Nov. 29. All programs will start at 7 p.m. Light refreshments will be offered.

Dinner Ride Harley-Davidson of Ocean City has weekly dinner rides Wednesdays at 6 p.m. open to all riders and their passengers and to all brands of motorcycles. For more information, contact Harley-Davidson of Ocean City at 410-629-1599 or hdoceancit@ aol.com. Arrive 15 minutes early with a full tank.

Wilgus Associates, Inc. Lewes Office - P.O. Box 208 Lewes, DE 19958 www.century21.com

302-645-9215 Cell 302-542-7651

629-5331 or email shilohhouseofhope@ msn.com. The drawing will be October 16.

Return Day right around the corner Return Day 2006 is coming up Thursday, Nov. 9. and the Sussex County Return

Bruce Wright, Realtor

SPECIALS SEPTEMBER 28-29-30

Provolone Cheese...............$3.69 lb. Deli Roast Beef...................$3.99 lb. Fruit Salad..........................$1.49 lb. Fresh Meats, Cheeses & Salads, Bulk Candy, Honey, Jams, Cakes, Pies, Cookies, Breads & More. Fall Clearance Lawn Fur niture 20% Off Wooden, 10% Off Vinyl

Dutch Country Market Hrs: Thurs. & Fri. 9-6, Sat. 9-5 A Pennsylvania Dutch 302 Market in Laurel Across from Johnny Janosiks, Rd. 462

875-1678

4 BR 2 1/2 BA, Colonial style home newly renovated colonial with marble floored bathrooms, hardwood floors, new carpet and HVAC, all new kitchen appliances and counter tops and painted throughout. Also has finished basement and 2 car attached garage. Call Bruce Wright.


PAGE 22

MORNING STAR

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

People Wright and Brewington plan to be wed in October

Ashley L. and William J. Somers

Quillen, Somers are married Ashley L. Quillen of Bridgeville and William J. Somers of Laurel were married July 22, 2006, at Calvary Baptist Tabernacle in Salisbury, Md. The bride is the daughter of Luke E. Quillen Sr. of Berlin, Md., and Patricia A. Riebel of Bridgeville. The bridegroom is the son of Donald Farrelly and Kay McCrea. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Phil Timmons. Music was performed by Mark Quillen, and Phil and Bonnie McCarey. The bride wore a white summer gown by Sweetheart Gowns with a 5-foot train. Her maid of honor was Stacy White of Berlin, a cousin of the bride. Bridesmaids were Gwen LeCates of Seaford, the bride’s aunt; Gale Bradley of Mardela Springs, Md., the bride’s aunt; and Jamie Riebel of Bridgeville, sister of the bride.

The junior bridesmaid was Hannah Hossier of Seaford, cousin of the bride, and the flower girl was Sarah Beth LeCates of Seaford, cousin of the bride. Best man for his son was Donald Farrelly, father of the groom. Groomsmen were Donnie Farrelly, brother of the groom; Mike McCrea, step-father of the groom; and John Riebel, step-father of the bride. Junior usher was Christopher Kellam, a cousin of the bride. A reception was held in the reception hall at the church. The bride is a 2004 graduate of Sussex Tech. She is employed as a pharmacy technician in Bridgeville. The bridegroom is a 2002 Laurel High School graduate. He is employed as an electrician in Bridgeville. Since their return from a honeymoon in Ocean City, they are living in Seaford.

Herbert and Kathleen Wright of Delmar, Del., announce the engagement of their daughter, Dawn Wright, to Roy Brewington Jr., son of Kathy Gravenor and Roy Brewington Sr. of Snow Hill, Md. The bride-to-be is the granddaughter of Jeanne Dredge of Delmar and the late Albert Dredge, and the late Warner Lee and Isabel Wright. Her fiance is the grandson of Buddy and Mary Age of Snow Hill, Md., and the late Charles and Elizabeth Brewington. The bride-to-be is a 1998 graduate of Delmar High School and a 2002 and 2004 graduate of the University of Delaware in Newark. She is employed as a registered nurse at Christiana Hospital in Newark, and is pursuing a master’s degree in nursing from the University of Delaware. Her fiance is a 1996 graduate of Snow Hill High School and a 2000 graduate of Salisbury University. He is employed as an insurance investigator for the State of Maryland Insurance Administration in Baltimore, Md. The wedding is being planned for

Mr. Pepper’s Pumpkin Patch

ANTIQUE SHOW

A Family Activity

Visit The Amazing Maze and The Tower Indian Corn • Gourds Corn Shocks • Straw

AT

HUDSON’S GENERAL STORE

Irons Lane, Clarksville, DE Rain or Shine Under The Big Top

Oct. 7, 2006  9- 5 pm 

Short family welcomes baby boy Parker Robert Short was born at 6:25 p.m. on Friday, July 28, 2006, in Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, Seaford. He weighed 7 pounds 8 ounces and was 21 inches long. He is the son of Blaine and Tiffany Short of Bridgeville. He was welcomed home by his sister, Madison. His maternal grandparents are Bob and Bonnie Carey of Bridgeville. His paternal grandparents are Robin and Carol Short of Bridgeville. His great-grandparents are Jean and Bobby Short, Fred and Peg Truitt, and the late Robert and Mary Carey, all of Bridgeville, and Grace and Bill Nichols of Federalsburg, Md.

Dawn Wright and Roy Brewington Jr.

Oct. 21, 2006, at Central Worship Center in Laurel. Formal wedding invitations have been issued.

Antique Dealers from all over the East Coast

Schools & Large Groups Welcome! 3 Miles East of Laurel On RT 24 Mon.-Sat. 10 am - Dark; Sunday noon - Dark Parker Robert Short

302-875-3939

Also: Folk Art Demonstrations During The Day

302-539-8709 FOOD BOOTH • MUSIC FREE PARKING Join us for our October show too!


MORNING STAR

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 23

Long-time dentist is retiring at the end of the year As the years go by we have to adjust to much change in our lives. AT URPHY Trust me, young folks — I heard it, now I am telling you. One constant My first trip along with wife in my life has been my dentist Dr. Robert (Bobby) Carmean, who Kay was on Feb. 3, 1967. started his practice in Laurel in NoHow well I remember Bobvember 1966. Before Bobby I had been to them all it seemed: Dr. Pret- by explaining things in tyman and Dr. Quillen and Dr. great detail before he went Dunn and Dr. Moore in Seaford. I to work on my teeth. could tell several stories on these dentists and my trips there, but tosports minded with a love of motorcycles day I would like to concentrate on my fa— all this and much more make up the vorite, Dr. Carmean, a very private person who I feel always gave me good advice and character of Bob and I could probably write several pages. But now as he, at the end of took care of me nicely. Some of Bobby’s the year, hangs up that dental mirror, I feel first customers to his West Street office many of us should say to Bob, “A job well were the Boyce family, Dale and Mini, done.” Just one request: How about a list of Blair, Jana and Brenda. Elaine Lynch was the questions you are going to ask before also among Bobby’s early patients, as well we come in next time! as Marsha Chubb, Carol Elliott, Joyce Bobby has announced that Dr. Richard Purper and the Haddock family. Perhaps Tananis will be taking over his practice. you were too. My first trip along with wife Bobby must have been looking out for me Kay was on Feb. 3, 1967. How well I reto the end as Dr. Tananis and wife Linda member Bobby explaining things in great are from Philadelphia and are very big detail before he went to work on my teeth. “Let me know if I hurt you, I can numb you Phillies fans! A-h-h-h-h. Thanks, Bobby. up some more,” said Bobby. That was Ted and Bev Blades of Seaford are, I am something he said right up to my final visit sure, back from their sailing excursion on with him. the Edwin and Maude or “The Victory If dentists love to ask you questions when you have a mouth full of cotton, Bob- Chimes,” as we know it. They went somewhere in New England to board on the next by was the kingpin at it and a pat on the to last sailing ever for the historic old ship shoulder and a reassuring manner made Bobby a dentist you could put your trust in. that was built in Bethel. I guess there were a lot of things going on in Bethel in 1900. He is a 1955 graduate of Laurel High That was the year that the Bethel Store was School. Soon after, he headed to Capitol built too. It is my understanding that the Heights Military School in Tennessee then Victory Chimes is to become a restaurant. I to the University of Wyoming, where he graduated. After that it was dental school at hope Ted and Bev have some last great pictures of this ship that represents a very speTemple University in Philadelphia, where cial time in the history of Bethel. By the he graduated in 1963. Poor fellow — the way, I was in the Bethel Store the other day Phillies baseball team was right up the and there was poor ol’ Elmo Stoakley sitstreet but because of his studies he did not ting on the bench in the front of the store all get to go too often, I imagine. by himself, with a very sad look on his Dr. Bob entered military service, rising to rank of captain while in Germany, where face. Upon further investigation I learned he spent much of his three years of military that his buddy Harvey Cordrey was getting over an eye operation, Jim Moore was time. After the service there was a whole big world for Dr. Bob to select from, but he home recovering from a heart operation and Joe Plummer was nowhere to be seen. came back to Laurel. Those four are as much a part of that store Friends such as Clay Davis, Dr. Ben as those beautiful boat pillars that hold up Horner, Pete Phillips and Eddie Davis, the walls. Hope you guys are on the mend among others, and his love of his homefor Elmo’s sake! town kept him right here. A lot can be said of this, but I leave it to you to realize the fiWell now let me offer my congratulanancial opportunities Bobby probably tions on Delmar’s newest Citizen of the passed up to be here, with friends. Year. John McDonnell was selected by the A great hunter, opinionated on issues,

P

M

Serving Our Community for Over 100 Years!

It’s all about choices!

Laurel 450 N.Central Ave., Laurel (302) 875-7591

Georgetown 419 N. DuPont Hwy., Georgetown (302) 856-2513

Millsboro 1 Chelsea Square, Millsboro, DE 19966 (302) 934-9006

Rehoboth Beach 19606 Coastal Hwy., Suite 203 Rehoboth Beach, DE 19971 (302) 227-4726

www.insurancechoices.com

Chamber of Commerce in Delmar. John is just a big part of Delmar. It is as simple as that. At any function in Delmar, you are bound to run into him. John is a former mayor of Delmar and to his credit, after he lost the last election, John just stepped his community involvement up a little more. One thing John does fall short on, though, is his ability to spit these annual 4th of July watermelon seeds. I urge you the citizens of Delmar to attend the Chamber’s banquet on Nov. 2 honoring John for a job well done! Congratulations to Jeff Evans of Laurel who after 15 years of service at Family Court in Georgetown has accepted a teaching job at Mariner Middle School in Milton. For those of you who do not know it, Jeff is a devoted Minnesota Vikings fan. Sam and Glenda Petersheim, owners of Dutch Country Market in Laurel are going to expand their business by adding another building and additional parking at their location beside Hickman Park and across from Johnny Janosik’s World of Furniture. Soon Johnny’s store will be just in front of them as the new store must be getting close to being ready. With the new Day’s Inn Motel going up on Rt. 13 in Seaford there will be five motels there: Holiday Inn, Best Western, Hampton Inn, Comfort Inn and the new Day’s Inn. Is Seaford growing or what? The new Subway store in the Food Lion Shopping Center appears to be about ready

to open and I understand there will be a new meat market across the road. More soon. Fall of the year and there are many things you can expect. Among them are the Saturday crowds at the Pop Warner football games and fall festivals everywhere like the great one Saturday at King’s Church. Some of the local stores are hosting fall open houses. Jay Davis of Southern States will hold his first open house on Sept. 30 . Jay bought the Southern States business in Laurel last year in addition to his lawn and garden part of it. This and That Country Store will hold its fifth annual open house complete with refreshments that weekend and Marlene Givens will hold her second annual Fun on the Farm Day at her business, “The Hen House” on Sycamore Road on Saturday, Sept. 30. By the way, the Hen House, O’Neal’s Antiques and Estate Jewelry and Culver’s Antiques all on Sycamore Road have formed a marketing alliance and we will be hearing much from them soon. Wasn’t it fun being a kid? I think so and I enjoy being around people who still have some of the kid in them. The other day while riding down Stein Highway in Seaford, I saw a youngster frantically putting his arm in the air as a very long tractor trailer went by. Well, of course, the driver obliged him with that unmistakable sound, making one youngster very happy. Now, let’s enjoy those little things this week as this youngster did. Have a good fall everyone.

Laurel American Legion Post #19

Youth Fishing Tournament Sat., Sept. 30 THTH , 2006 9 am-12 noon Register at

A &K Tackle N. Central Avenue, Laurel

Benson Family give $50 Savings Bond

Free Gifts to all Grab bags full of fishing gear

Free Sodas & Snacks

Prizes To Be Awarded: 4 to 7 years old 8 to 11 years old 12 to 15 years old

Any Child Under 12 Must Be Accompanied By An Adult

NO TACKLE PROVIDED

NO ENTRY FEE CATCH & RELEASE

Fishing Areas: Records Pond & Broad Creek

American Legion & A&K Tackle not responsible for any accidents.


MORNING STAR ✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 24

CHURCH BULLETINS Church on Saturday, Oct. 21, with a 2 p.m. Business Meeting & Memorial Service and a 4 p.m. Chicken and Dumpling Dinner at Concord Community House.

Pursuing the Dream Harvest Theater will present “Pursuing the Dream: In the Creative Arts” on Saturday, Oct. 21. This seminar will be held at Harvest Christian Church in Seaford and its focus is to reach young artists who are looking to develop their artistic skills in the fields of visual art, dance, creative writing and music. The goal of this conference is to provide examples of artists who are successfully pursuing their artistic dreams. The featured speakers will provide practical tips in a small workshop setting to help budding artists in their areas of expertise. There will also be an opportunity to ask the speaker’s questions. The featured speakers at the 2006 conference are: Dance: Theara Ward, Alvin Ailey Dance Kids Teaching Artist. Writing: John Riddle, director, Delaware Christian Writers Conference. Photography: Constance Lewes, Visual Arts and Communication specialist. Music: Corey Franklin, Recording Artist and Worship Leader. We ask that you encourage artists in these genres to participate in this amazing opportunity. Tickets are $30 per person and are available by calling the Church office at 628-7771.

Centenary UMC Dinner Centenary United Methodist Church, Poplar and Market streets, Laurel, will host an all-you-can eat chicken/dumpling dinner on Saturday, Oct. 7, 4-7 p.m. Adults $8, children $4 (under six years of age are free). The dinner is sponsored by the United Methodist Women.

Bethel UMC 227th Anniversary Bethel United Methodist Church is celebrating its 227th Anniversary, west of Seaford, 2381 Neal’s School and Oak Grove roads, on Oct. 8. Dr. Rev. Sandra Steiner Ball will speak at 2 p.m.

Wacaster Family performs The Wacaster Family, southern gospel with a Christian country flavor, will perform at: United Methodist Church, Seaford, Sunday, Oct. 1, at 10:30 a.m.; Laurel Baptist Church, Laurel, Sunday, Oct. 1, at 6 p.m.; Bethel Worship Center, Seaford, Sunday, Oct. 8, 10 a.m.; and Seaford Wesleyan Church (The Ark), Seaford, Oct. 8, 6 p.m.

Silent Auction added to St. John’s Church House Tour Members of St. John’s Church are donating items and services to the Silent Auction from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Oct. 5. Pictured is Tom Wimbrow who is donating five handcrafted items. He is pictured with a handcrafted Advent centerpiece and a Christmas centerpiece. Carol Lynch has donated eight weeks of her Fitness Program to the Silent Auction. Carol is an AFAA Certified Fitness Professional. The Silent Auction will be held in St. John’s Fellowship Hall along with the Boutique. Luncheon will be served in Fellowship Hall from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The cost will be $6, including dessert and beverage. St. John’s House Tour will be Oct. 5, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., with 10 houses open for tour. Tickets will be available from circle leaders and committee members. Cost will be $10.

Homecoming Service Chaplain’s Chapel, Deer Forest Road near Bridgeville will hold its Homecoming Service on Sunday, Oct. 8, at 2 p.m. Former Pastor Kevin Gillespie will be the speaker. Special dedication of historical marker by Russell McCabe of the

Delaware Archives and special music by Crossroads vocal group. Dinner to follow.

Concord UMC 85th Reunion The 85th annual Reunion of the Sons, Daughters and Friends of Concord will take place at Concord United Methodist

Blessing of the animals On Oct. 1, St. Phillip’s Episcopal Church will be holding their Sunday Service at Old Christ Church in Laurel at 10 a.m. During the service the Rev. Rita will be Blessing the Animals. Mark your calendars and plan to attend with your family pet. For all who came last year your pet’s blessing wears off Sept. 30. Light refreshments will be served following the service in the churchyard.

God’s ‘Souper’ Bowl God’s “Souper” Bowl, Saturday, Oct. 7, from noon to 1 p.m. Stein Highway Church of God, Arch Street, Seaford will Continued on page 25

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship TRINITY UNITED METHODIST Trap Pond, CHURCH NearLaurel, Del. 875-7715 Sun. School 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pastor Tina Whaley

“A caring church, a giving church, a sharing church; showing love, warmth and friendship to all.”

St. John’s United Methodist Church Pine & Poplar Sts., Seaford 302-629-9466 Web site: http://home.dmv.com/-stjohns/ E-mail: stjohns@dmv.com NURSERY & HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

SUNDAY WORSHIP 8:30 & 11:15 am Traditional 9:45 Sunday School 9:50 am Contemporary Come as you are… and be transformed in the love of Christ!

Centenary United Methodist Church “Making Disciples of Jesus Christ for Over 200 Years” “NEW SONG!” - Contemporary Celebration, 8:45 a.m. Sunday School, Classes for ALL ages, 9:45 a.m. Every Sunday Traditional Family Worship, 11:00 a.m.

Rev. John W. Van Tine, Pastor, 875-3983 200 W. Market St., Laurel, Del.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

1010 S. Central Ave., Laurel Phone: 875-7748 Donny Weimar, Minister Worship Services: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. Bible Study: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m.

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching Youth Group Sunday Night 7 pm

In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

Worship 11 a.m. • Sun. School 10:00 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Bethel Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

HARVEST CHRISTIAN CHURCH

510 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE Rev. Fred Duncan Church: 875-4233 Parsonage: 875-3398 Sunday Services: 8:30am Praise 9:30am Sunday School,11am Worship

DIAL DAILY DEVOTIONS: 875-4309

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church & Old Christ Church 600 S. Central Ave., P.O. Box 293 Laurel, DE 19956 ~ (302) 875-3644 Rev. Rita B. Nelson, Rector Holy Eucharist & Morning Prayer Sunday @ 9:30 am

“Heart Felt Praise” Relevant Bible Teaching Children’s Ministry Midweek Bible Study Tom Birowski, Pastor Seaford, Del. • 628-7771 94 Walnut St. Laurel, DE 19956

875-7873 “A Place to Belong” SUNDAY WEDNESDAY Underground Family Worship (7-12 grade) 6:15 p.m. 10:45 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Prayer Team ‘The Table’ God’s Big Back Yard (last Wed. of mo) 7:00 p.m. 9:30 a.m.

Centrally located at 14511 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE 19956 Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. FasTrak Children’s Ministry - 10:30 a.m.; E318 Youth - 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Services - 7 p.m.

For info, call 875.7995 or visit www.centralworshipcenter.org

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road 68, South of Laurel Laurel, Del. Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m. www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

Christian Church of Seaford Dual 13N., Seaford, DE • 629-6298 Minister: John Herbst SCHEDULE OF SERVICES Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Morning Worship 10:30 Wed. Night Service & (Nursery & Jr. Church) Youth Groups 7:00 p.m. A Firm Foundation • A Sure Hope • An Unending Love


MORNING STAR ✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 25

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

Free speech dilemma By the Rev. Todd K. Crofford Laurel Wesleyan Church

PASTOR’S PERSPECTIVE

Free speech gives me a headache lately. Hugo Chavez, a third rate Either tell Chavez to be despot from a depressed nation can come to the United States, travel quiet and go home, or around and call the President the tell the Pope to not devil to uproarious applause. But when the Pope speaks, he gets back down. It can’t be blamed for deadly riots propagated both ways. by Muslims. Now this may have me popping the Tylenol, but it must have the to God’s nature.” ACLU fighting migraines and nursing If you simply take the time to read the nosebleeds. Why? Because logically they comments, you discover the Pope’s point is can either defend the actions of both not that Islam brought nothing good, but Chavez and the Pope or reject them both. that conversion by the sword is ludicrous In actuality, the Pope’s actions are de- and wrong. Yet, immediately the Middle fensible and Chavez’s are ridiculous. Let Eastern Muslim response is violence and me explain. threats. First of all, let me clarify that I am a How does our media respond? They Protestant. Theologically I am not required question whether the Pope should have said to believe that when the Pope speaks, these things. They don’t question the reaceverything he says is gospel. Furthermore, tion, or the illogical conclusions of the riotI am under no compulsion to have to de- ers. They primarily question the Pope fend him. (I do want to be clear that I have Where does this leave us? With only a great respect for the Pope.) So, I write to- few choices, none of which are very good. day as a reader who heard the Pope’s words First, we could simply say that in-depth diand realize they make sense and are rea- alogue is not a possibility with Middle sonable. Eastern Muslims. If we say that, then we Let me share, word for word, the trans- agree to simply avoid ever saying anything lation of key paragraphs that form the crux that could be wrongly interpreted, even of Pope Benedict’s recent speech that has things that clearly should not be. We are brought about murderous threats and ac- left avoiding any discussions in life that retions. He said the following, beginning by late to faith or the Islamic religion. referencing a 14th century emperor: “...he It naturally follows that if we cannot exaddresses his interlocutor with a startling pect a reasoned and well thought-out rebrusqueness, a brusqueness which leaves sponse from such Middle Eastern radicals us astounded, on the central question about that diplomacy with these nations is also a the relationship between religion and vio- lost cause. Ultimately whatever we attempt lence in general, saying: ‘Show me just will be met with accusations of our desire what Mohammed brought that was new, for world domination, or worse yet, reliand there you will find things only evil and gious dominion. inhuman, such as his command to spread So, that knocks out talking about most by the sword the faith he preached.’ ” Arab countries and talking to most Arab The emperor, after having expressed countries. Seems we are running short on himself so forcefully, goes on to explain in options. detail the reasons why spreading the faith Meanwhile, Hugo Chavez refers to the through violence is something unreason- President as the devil, a comment I would able. Violence is incompatible with the na- assume everyone would sight as inflammature of God and the nature of the soul. tory, and we give him an international and “God,” he says, “is not pleased by blood a national stage to do so. and not acting reasonably is contrary to So, I ask you, why is it wrong for the God’s nature. Faith is born of the soul, not Pope to make a reasonable argument the body. against conversion through violence, but “Whoever would lead someone to faith acceptable for a communist dictator to fill needs the ability to speak well and to rea- our airwaves with offensive speech? son properly, without violence and threats. So, ACLU, we need you to pick or To convince a reasonable soul, one does choose here. Either tell Chavez to be quiet not need a strong arm, or weapons of any and go home, or tell the Pope to not back kind, or any other means of threatening a down. It can’t be both ways. person with death... The Rev. Crofford is Senior Pastor at Laurel Wesleyan “The decisive statement in this arguHis views do not necessarily represent the views of ment against violent conversion is this: not Church. the congregation or Wesleyan Church International. You to act in accordance with reason is contrary may email pastortodd@laurelwesleyan.org

543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor SUNDAY WEDNESDAY Sunday School ..... 9:45 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Worship...............11:00 a.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Youth Group 6:00 - 8 p.m.

be opening a soup kitchen for the community on a the first and third Saturday of every month. Anyone wanting to stop by for some food and fellowship is invited to attend.

Fall Revival Services Fall Revival Services will be held at Trinity United Methodist Church (near Trap Pond) from Oct. 8 through 11. Ser-

vice will begin Sunday morning at 10 and nightly from Sunday through Wednesday at 7 p.m. On Sunday evening, there will be a fellowship dinner at 5:30. Music and ministry will be provided by Kenny and Kim Davis of Rocky Mount, N.C. Kenny has sung gospel music with his family since he was a small boy. He has served as a pastor in North Carolina and as an evangelist across the East Coast.

PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org

MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30-5 p.m.; Sun. 8-8:25 a.m.

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

LAUREL-MT. PLEASANT CHARGE 27225 Kaye Road, Laurel, DE 19956 Ph: (302) 875-7814

www.livingwaterworship.com Pastor: Rev. Timothy P. Jones

Sunday Morning Wed. Bible Study & Worship & Children’s Children’s Discovery Club 7:00 PM Ministries 10:00 AM “Flowing in Power and Love to a Parched and Thirsty World”

YOU ARE INVITED! Come into This Church and Gather in Christ’s Name to Worship Him! Psalm 95:6 Sun. School 9:45 a.m. • Worship 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. Bible Study 7:30 p.m. Pastor, Stacey Johnson

VICTORY TABERNACLE CHURCH OF GOD

“A Growing Church For All Ages”

2 miles N. of Laurel, DE on Alt. 13

302-877-0443 410-957-4696

The Atlanta Road Alliance Church 22625 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE (302) 629-5600 • www.atlantaroadcma.org Rev. Edward Laremore • Rev. Andrew Kerr SUNDAY WEDNESDAY 8:30 Worship 6:45 Pioneer Clubs (age 3 9:45 Sunday School thru grade 6) & Divorce Care® 11:00 Worship/Kids Church 7:00 Prayer Service & Youth 7:00 Evening Service Group (grades 7-12)

ome! Revelatio e To C n 22 Tim : 17 The Ark s ' t I Seaford Wesleyan Church

Passing on God’s Love and Grace in Laurel, Delmar & Surrounding Area United Methodist Churches

King’s St. George’s Mt. Pleasant

Worship Sun. Sch.

Gordy Rd. .......... 8:50....10:00 St. George Rd. .... 10:10..... 9:00

Mt. Pleasant Rd. 9:30,11:30..10:15 Pastor Barbara Auer

River of Life Christian Center 17 W. Market St., Greenwood, DE 302349-9420 Pastors Joseph & Yvonne Dixon WORSHIP SERVICE: SUN. 11 AM BIBLE STUDY: WED. 7:30 PM

Proclaiming Faith 4 pm Sunday on WKDI 840 AM Radio

Food Outreach Emergency Food

www.river-oflife.org

Sailor’s Bethel United Methodist Church Bethel, DE Pastor Arthur Smith III Sunday School - 10 am Worship - 11:15 am Nursery Provided office 875-3628 parsonage 875-2996

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby, Rector

Sunday School - all ages 9 a.m. Worship 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Rainbow Day Care / Pre-School Rt. 13 South, Seaford, DE 302-628-1020

Mount Olivet United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School Pastor: Rev. Thomas Gross • 302-629-4458 PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

Continued from page 16

Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel 302-875-4646

Dr. Carl G Vincent, Senior Minister Pastor Barry B. Dukes, Music Minister Sunday 9:30 am Wednesday 7:00 pm Children’s Church • Nursery

315 High St. • Seaford, DE

CHURCH BULLETINS

Messiah’s Vineyard Church

Laurel Wesleyan Church Rt. 13A, Just North of Laurel Sunday School - 9:30 Worship - 9:00 & 11:00 Sunday Evening Worship and Children’s Ministries 6 p.m. Wednesday Youth Ministries 6:30 p.m. Church 875-5380 • Sr. Pastor Todd Crofford Assistant Pastor Ken Deusa Asst. Pastor/Youth: Sue Boyce Children’s Pastor: Marilyn Searcey

Holy Eucharist: 9:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Forum: 10:30 a.m. Thurs. Eve. Service: 6 p.m. Front & King St., Seaford, DE 629-7979

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - Anthony Melakian - 629-3633 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

Connecting People with Christ since 1804

CONCORD

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 25322 Church Road, Concord Seaford, DE 19973 Sunday Worship - 9 am Sunday School (all ages) - 10:30 am For More Information call 302-628-8114 Rev. Diane E. Melson, Pastor


MORNING STAR ✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 26

OBITUARIES

Richard Wayne Fitchett, 52 Obituaries are run without charge thanks to the support of area churches.

Joan C. Freeman, 61

Susan E. Pryor, 55

Joan C. Freeman of Laurel died Sunday, Sept. 17, 2006 at Beebe Medical Center in Lewes. She was formerly from the Federalsburg and Hurlock, Md. area. She was born in Baltimore, Md., a daughter of Jessie R. Eskridge and Evelyn M. Gordy of Salisbury, Md. She worked as a bartender at Suicide Bridge Restaurant in Hurlock, Md. Predeceased by her father, she is survived by her mother. Also surviving her are her companion of 21 years, Gary R. Groy, Sr. of Laurel; her son, Major William K. Freeman of Kansas; her daughter, Karen R. Freeman of Delmar; her brother, Jessie R. Eskridge, Jr. of Georgetown; her sister, Joyce D. Jennette of Delmar, Md.; and four grandchildren, Jessie Morgan, Matthew Harding, Bryianna Freeman and Corey F. Freeman. A memorial service was on Sept. 25, at the Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Laurel. Contributions may be made in her honor to the American Cancer Association, 1138 Parsons Road, Salisbury, MD 21803.

Susan E. Pryor of Salisbury, Md., died Thursday, Sept. 14, 2006, at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury. Born in Salisbury, Mrs. Pryor was the daughter of William Carl and Katherine Leonard Smith. Mrs. Pryor graduated from Wicomico High School in 1969. She attended Salisbury University and graduated in 1973 with a bachelors degree, she then went on to receive her masters degree from Wilmington College. She taught in the Laurel School District for 20 years and in the Seaford School District for 13 years. She was a member of the Easton Choral Society, the Salisbury Chamber Singers and was a director for TSA in Delaware. Susan Pryor She was a member of the Choir at St. Stephens United Methodist Church, she also attended Mt. Olive United Methodist Church and was a choir member and member of Bethesda United Methodist Church. Mrs. Pryor loved music and it was a very important part of her life. She was preceded in death by her husband William T. Pryor, Jr. in 1999. She is survived by two sons, Michael Pryor and his wife Tracy of Eden, Md., and Matthew Pryor of Salisbury; a brother, Carl I. Smith and his wife Bonnie of Salisbury; grandchildren, Hunter Pryor and Stephen Parks; her mother-in-law, Hilda Lynch of Salisbury; and several nieces and nephews. A funeral service was held on Tuesday, Sept. 19, at St. Stephen’s United Methodist Church. Interment was in Wicomico Memorial Park in Salisbury. The family requests memorial donations be made in her memory to, The Grand Piano Fund, St. Stephen´s United Methodist Church, 101 East State St., Delmar, DE 19940. Arrangements were handled by Holloway Funeral Home, visit www.hollowayfh.com to send condolences to the family.

Jackie Louise Robinson, 80 Jackie Louise Robinson of Blades passed away on Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2006 in her home. Mrs. Robinson was a homemaker and enjoyed doing crafts, country music, watching soap operas, and her cat, Lady. Mrs. Robinson was predeceased by her parents, her husband Ralph Robinson; a daughter, Karen Lee Robinson; a brother, Richard Bigler, and a sister, Ruth Seifert. She is survived by a son and daughterin-law, Ronald E. and Madeline McBeth of Shippensburg, Pa.; and a daughter Jamie Barth of Rome, Ga.; five grandchildren, Eden N. Strohm, Candy Bigler, Tracy Lyn Pointer, Gerald Edward Pointer and Matthew Shane Pointer. Services and burial will be at the convenience of the family. Arrangements were by Short Funeral Services in Georgetown.

Gary Raymond Pyle, Sr., 62 Gary Raymond Pyle, Sr. of Bridgeville went to be with his Lord and Savior Jesus Christ on Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2006 at his home. Mr. Pyle attended the KJV Bible Church in Harrington. He was preceded in death by a daughter, Lauren, and his father, Raymond H. Pyle. He is survived by his wife, Barbara Spinelli Pyle; two sons, Gary R. Pyle, Jr., of Bradenton, Fla. and Adam C. Pyle, Bensalem, Pa.; a daughter, Valerie S. Pyle, of Philadelphia, Pa. his mother, Vivian A. Pyle and a brother, Kenneth R. Pyle, both of Bear. Mr. Pyle made the decision to donate his body to the Humanities Gifts Registry in Philadelphia for medical and instructional research. The family will hold a private memorial service at a later date. Arrangements were handled by Short Funeral Services, Georgetown.

What must I do to be saved? Acknowledge your sin and place your trust in Christ. All who place their trust in Christ in this way are adopted as God’s children. All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. — Romans 3:23 The wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. — Romans 6:23 God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us. — Romans 5:8 If you confess with your mouth the Lord Jesus and believe in your heart that God has raised him from the dead, you will be saved. — Romans 10:9

Richard Wayne Fitchett of Georgetown died Monday, Sept. 18, 2006 at his residence. Mr. Fitchett was a devoted husband, father, & grandfather. He loved fishing and going out to eat. He is survived by his wife of 31 years, Lynn Simpson Fitchett; his parents, James and Norma Lee Justis Fitchett of Willis Wharf, Va.; a son, Jason Fitchett and wife, Toni of Millsboro; a daughter, Tracey Fitchett of Georgetown; two sisters: Norma Jean Bew of Salisbury, Md. and Florence Armentrout of Exmore, Va., and two grandchildren, Jaidyn and Gage Fitchett. His funeral service was on Sept. 21, at Watson Funeral Home, Millsboro, with Pastor Kenny Dodd officiating. Interment was private. The family request contributions be made to help offset medical and funeral expenses. Contributions may be mailed to Lynne Fitchett, c/o Watson Funeral Home, PO Box 125, Millsboro, DE 19966 Letters of condolence may be emailed to: Watson Funeral Home Delmarvaobits. com

James Clarence Hilyard Jr., 78 James Clarence Hilyard Jr. of Georgetown died Thursday, Sept. 21, 2006 at Seaford Center, Seaford. Mr. Hilyard was a World War II Army Veteran and also served as an Allied Guard at the Nuremburg War Crimes Trial. He had been a plumber and pipe fitter,

Union United Methodist Church 2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 Handicap Friendly WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.)

Welcome…

William Lewis Littleton, 62 William Lewis Littleton of Lewes died Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2006, at Heartland Hospice House in Wilmington. Mr. Littleton was born in Lewes, on Feb. 20, 1944. He had been employed by the Delaware Department of Transportation in the Traffic Division for more than 18 years, retiring on disability in 2000. Mr. Littleton was an artist who enjoyed oil painting, and he was also a freelance sign maker. He loved to play the guitar and the harmonica, and enjoyed singing. He also

BETHEL WORSHIP CENTER 9431 Ginger Lane, Seaford (2.4 mi. north of Wal-Mart on US 13) 628-4240 Recorded Info 628-4241 Church Office

Pastor Joseph Lecates - 875-2059 Adult Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:30 am Nursery 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Youth Meeting Sun. 7 pm Promise Keepers Tues. 7 pm Wed. Night Bible Study 7 pm “We’re not building a church, we’re building God’s Kingdom!”

Christ Lutheran Church

SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday School 9 am Morning Worship 10 am

and welder for the Local 690 pipe fighters Union. He was predeceased by his father and mother, James Clarence and Mary Lavelle Hilyard Sr.; a brother, Jack Hilyard; one son, Gerald Hilyard and four sisters, Veronica, Margarite, Marion and Regina. He is survived by his wife of 24 years, Deborah Ryan Hilyard; one son, James C. Hilyard III; two sisters, Kathryn Bradley of Williamstown, N.J., and Ann Nancy Laird of Drexel Hill, Pa. Mr. Hilyard’s memorial service was held Wednesday, Sept. 27, at the Delaware Veterans Memorial Cemetery, Millsboro. Interment was in Delaware Veterans Memorial Cemetery, Millsboro. The family request contributions to be made to the American Stroke Association, Southeastern PA Region, Memorial Processing Center, 777 Penn Ct. Blvd., Pittsburgh, PA 15235-5927

701 Bridgeville Road 629-9077

Corner of Shipley & Spruce Sts.

A Family Friendly Church Home for You Sunday Worship: 8:30 & 11 am Phone: 629-9755 www.ChristLC.net Bible School for the Mentally Challenged Saturday at 10 am

FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH

Senior Pastor

Located halfway between Seaford & Bridgeville, turn off Rt. 13 East at Cannon Rd. light, 4th place on left.

Mark Landon 7046 Seashore Hwy. Bridgeville, DE 19933

1611 KJV, Independent, Fundamental, Soul Winning

SUNDAY WEDNESDAY 10:00 Sunday School 7:00 Prayer Service 11:00 Worship Service 6:00 Evening Worship Nursery Provided Rev. William Goslee - Ph. 349-0190

“Welcome Home!”

Wesley United Methodist Church 22025 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE Pastor Ed Kuhling Contemporary Worship 9 am Sunday School & Bible Education 10 am Traditional Worship 11 am Wednesday Worship 6:45 pm 302-629-3029 * Info Line 302-628-0112

302-337-3044

Church of God

Fax 302-337-8769

Worship Services: Seeker Service 8:30 am • Sunday School 9:30 Morning Worship 10:45 am • Wed. Night 7 pm

A Gathering Of Faith Come together under Christ’s roof and share together in his love. Attend Church this Sunday


MORNING STAR ✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006 enjoyed taking scenic rides. Many years ago he had served with the Merchant Marines. Mr. Littleton is survived by his beloved daughter, BillieLynn Littleton of Harrington; five sisters, Ann E. Carter and Sylvia Cash, both of Georgetown, Norma L. Lynch of Gumboro, Patricia M. Short and Barbara Yingling, both of Lewes; four brothers, Kenneth Littleton of Georgetown, Darrell Littleton of Milford, Charles Littleton of Harrington, and Robert Hitchens of Virginia; a granddaughter, Laura J. Littleton; a grandson, Michael J. Passwaters; a great-granddaughter, Kaylie Lynn Littleton; a very close neighbor Julia Morris of Lewes; and a very close friend Charlie Stuchlick of Georgetown. His funeral service was on Sept. 24, at Parsell Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Atkins-Lodge Chapel, Lewes, Pastor Duane A. Smith officiated. Burial was in Bethel Methodist Cemetery, Savannah Road, Lewes. Memorial contributions are suggested to the Delaware Lung Association, 1021 Gilpin Ave., Wilmington, DE 19801. A gathering for family and friends will be held at the American Legion Post 17, American Legion Road, Lewes, following the interment. On-line condolences may be sent to: condolences@parsellfuneralhomes.com.

Roland Oliphant, 87 Roland Oliphant of Laurel, formerly of Delmar, died Saturday, Sept. 3, 2006 at Salisbury Center in Salisbury. Born in Delmar, he was a son of Calvin and Minnie Smith Oliphant. He graduated from Delmar High School, class of 1937. He retired from the former E.I. DuPont Company of Seaford, after 28 years of service. Besides his parents, he was preceded in death by his wife Rachel Hastings Oliphant and his brother Russell Oliphant. He is survived by two sons, Wayne Oliphant and his wife Brenda of Salisbury, Md. and Bruce Oliphant, of Salisbury; two grandchildren, Amy Angell and her husband Terry of Laurel and Zachary Oliphant of Sharptown, Md.; a great granddaughter, Abigail Angell of Laurel; sisters-in-law, Helen Hearn of Laurel and Mae Oliphant of Delmar. Several nieces and nephews also survive him. A graveside service was held at Odd Fellows Cemetery, in Laurel, on Sept. 26. There was a viewing prior to the service at the Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Laurel.

Martha Elizabeth Oliphant, 87 Martha Elizabeth Oliphant of Laurel died Monday, Sept. 25, 2006 as a resident of Seaford Center in Seaford. She as born in Brooklyn, Md., to the late Elijah Wilkerson and Lucy Brisow Hickman. She had been employed by Matthews Poultry in Laurel. She was preceded in death by her husband, Norman Oliphant and a daughter, Patrician Ann Billings. She is survived by her daughters, Emma Jean Adkins and Martha May King, both of Seaford; her brothers, John Robert Wilkerson and Thomas A. Wilkerson of Florida, William Henry Wilkerson of Alabama, and Elijah Wilkerson of Gaithers-

PAGE 27

burg, Md.; a stepbrother, Donald L. Hickman of Laurel; sisters, Naomie Hogge of Virginia and Edna Marie Allison of Laurel; 12 grandchildren and several great and great-great-grandchildren; several nieces and nephews. A funeral service will be held at the Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, 700 West St., Laurel, on Thursday, Sept. 28, at 11 a.m. Friends may call one hour prior to the funeral service. The Rev. Todd Crawford will officiate. Interment will follow at Carey’s cemetery in Millsboro.

FEEL LIKE A FISH OUT OF WATER? NEW IN TOWN? Get acquainted with your community and all it has to offer by ordering a subscription to the

Peter A. Mollahan, 85 Peter A. Mollahan, retired Public School Administrator in the Seaford and A.I. DuPont school districts, passed away on Friday, Sept. 22, 2006, surrounded by his loving family. A native of Wilkes-Barre, Pa., he served with distinction in the famed 77th Army “Statue of Liberty” Division in World War II. He was a combat veteran with the invasion forces that secured the island of Guam, the first American territory recaptured from the enemy in WWII. The Division also landed in Leyte, Ie Shima, and Okinowa. WWII saw many heroes and our memories of those great persons who lead the battle for freedom will live on in their memories and stories of their triumphs. Mr. Mollahan was a graduate of Mansfield University with graduate degrees from New York University. He was a grantee of the U.S. State Department to the Institute of Asian Studies at the University of Hawaii. He was a member of numerous veterans’ organizations and a former Grand Knight of the St. Molua Council. He is survived by his beloved wife, Anne; step-children, Melanie and Monty; granddaughter, Anne; and brother, Edward. A service was on Sept. 27 at St. Cornelius Church, Chadds Ford, Pa. Contributions may be made in his name to the VFW, 406 West 34th St., Kansas City, MO 64111.

Gloria Breeding Read, 83 Gloria Ann Breeding Read of Wilmington died Sunday, Sept. 10, 2006, at her residence. Born June 20, 1923 in Seaford, the daughter of Jane Donoho and William Ford Breeding, she was a high-school English and Math teacher in Delaware and Florida before retiring. She was a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She was a member of St; Lukes Episcopal Church in Seaford where she was baptized, confirmed and married to her husband John Hanford Read who preceeded her in death in 1971. She was also preceeded in death by her son John H. Read, Jr. in 2001. She is survived by her grandson James William Read and daughter-in-law Mary A. Read of Smyrna,. She is also survived by her dear friends Agnes Tyndal of Seaford, Cathy Koller of Saline, MI, and Brandi Watson and Gloria Carlton of Wilmington. Services were Tuesday, Sep. 19, in St. Lukes Episcopal Church, Seaford, with burial in St. Lukes Church yard. Arrangements were by Watson-Yates Funeral Home, Seaford.

Seaford Star OR Laurel Star Community Bulletin Board! Church Bulletin! Local Sports! Health and Business News! Where To Dine and Shop! ....And more!

52 Weekly Issues ONLY $17.00 * Delivered to your home by the US postal service. Please send

 Laurel Star  Seaford Star

Name _________________________________________ Address: _______________________________________ _______________________________________________ City __________________State _______ Zip __________ Phone __________________

 MY CHECK FOR $17 IS ENCLOSED. Mail to: Morning Star Circulation PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973 or call 302-629-9788 with credit card payment *Sussex County $17, Kent & New Castle Counties $22 Delmar & Federalsburg, MD $22, Out of State $27


MORNING STAR ✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 28

Lockup raises $75,000 100 Sussex County citizens accused of having a big heart for kids

John Elliott of Gardner Asphalt in Seaford is incarcerated during the MS lockup at Blades Marina. He raised $1,500 during the fundraiser. Photos by David Elliott

Warrants for the arrest of over 100 Sussex County citizens accused of having a big heart for “Jerry’s kids” were issued last week. All citizens arrested Wednesday, Sept. 20, served time in the Muscular Dystrophy Association’s mock jail at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club. While serving an hour of time the jailbirds called friends and family for contributions toward their bail. Serving the ‘fun warrants’ was Legacy Limousine. They picked up the jailbirds up at their places of business and took them to the maximum security prison at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club. Proceeds from the event go directly toward MDA’s lifesaving programs for people with neuromuscular diseases in the Southern Maryland/Delaware area. The lockup was a tremendous success thanks to the generous friendly citizens of Sussex County, according to Stephanie Goldklang, district director, Muscular Dystrophy Association. “We are so grateful and thankful for what your community has done for those living with neuromuscular diseases in Delaware. The event raised $75,000. These funds will help to send children to MDA camp, fund clinic visits at local hospitals, provide medical equipment such as wheelchairs and leg braces, and most importantly fund research for a cure,” she said.

Ben Lowe serves his time behind bars.

The top jailbirds were: Joe Antonelli, Lennar Corporation $6,435. Karen Bradley, Child Craft Company $3,101. Pam Smith, Georgetown DMV $3,000. MDA is a voluntary health agency working to defeat 43 neuromuscular diseases through worldwide research, comprehensive services and far-reaching professional and public health education.

Stop by our Laurel Location To Test Drive Your New Vehicle Today

28959 Sussex Highway • Laurel, DE 19956

(302) 875-8751 Toll Free: 1-866-875-8751 2516 N. Salisbury Blvd., Salisbury, MD 21801 (410) 860-5559

www.thecarstoredelmarva.com

‘03 FORD F150 XLT

‘06 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S

‘06 NISSAN ALTIMA

‘01 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER

‘04 HONDA CIVIC

‘04 DODGE STRATUS SE

‘03 PONTIAC GRAND AM

‘98 CHEVROLET CAMARO

‘02 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE

‘02 PONTIAC SUNFIRE

2000 FORD WINDSTAR

‘03 FORD TAURUS

‘05 CHEVROLET MALIBU

‘02 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER

‘01 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER

#21 OUT OF TOP 50 INDEPENDENT DEALERSHIPS IN U.S. FOR 2006


TORE THE CARy S 19956 wa • Laurel, DE

igh 28959 Sussex H 1-866-875-8751 : e re F ll o T 1 5 7 (302) 875-8 , 2006

D 21801 lvd., Salisbury, M B ry bu lis Sa . N 2516 9 (410) 860-555

September 28

azine

mag ly, a national th n o M r le a e Auto D ips in I tell you that t a th e d ri dent dealersh p n e s p u e o d d n In e 0 m 5 e p ut of To It is with tr ons so ar Store #21 o C e h T over 90 locati d e e v m a a h n t s a a h th s n o alership publicati r us. udes some de cl in is h T . t honor it is fo 6 a 0 0 re g a t a h w U.S. for 2 reciate , can also app re su m a I , u o y th and ok at our grow lo I r a e y th is 5 te our es we have. It e y lo p As we celebra m e d te f dedica future great group o a t a h w ok forward to lo ze li n a ca re e w t a r dedication th ed this because of you we have receiv n so a re e th u are growth and yo ward. tremendous a thank you. A very sincere es,

Dear Employe

son Greg N. John President

s Edward Wilgu t Vice Presiden


TORE THE CARy S 19956 wa • Laurel, DE

igh 28959 Sussex H 1-866-875-8751 : e re F ll o T 1 5 7 (302) 875-8 , 2006

D 21801 lvd., Salisbury, M B ry bu lis Sa . N 2516 9 (410) 860-555

September 28

azine

mag ly, a national th n o M r le a e Auto D ips in I tell you that t a th e d ri dent dealersh p n e s p u e o d d n In e 0 m 5 e p ut of To It is with tr ons so ar Store #21 o C e h T over 90 locati d e e v m a a h n t s a a h th s n o alership publicati r us. udes some de cl in is h T . t honor it is fo 6 a 0 0 re g a t a h w U.S. for 2 reciate , can also app re su m a I , u o y th and ok at our grow lo I r a e y th is 5 te our es we have. It e y lo p As we celebra m e d te f dedica future great group o a t a h w ok forward to lo ze li n a ca re e w t a r dedication th ed this because of you we have receiv n so a re e th u are growth and yo ward. tremendous a thank you. A very sincere es,

Dear Employe

s

son

Greg N. John

Edward Wilgu


PAGE 30

MORNING STAR

 SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

Entertainment

Rhythms of Jazz coming to Delaware Tech Jazz, complete with its syncopated rhythms and improvisations, is coming to Delaware Technical & Community College. The Rehoboth Beach Autumn Jazz Festival, now in its 17th year, has included the college in its venues. The Owens Campus will host “Gerald Veasley” “and His Band” with special guest Kim Waters on Saturday, Oct. 14, at 8:30 p.m., in the theatre in the Arts & Science Center. Concert tickets are $48 each and may be purchased by calling 1-800296-8742. The proceeds will benefit the Delaware Technical & Community College Educational Foundation in support of Owens Campus students. In 1999 bassist Gerald Veasley was named “Best Electric Bassist” by Jazziz magazine’s annual readers’ poll and “Best Jazz Band” by Philadelphia Magazine. He has garnered numerous other accolades and is becoming one of the most popular and respected bassist/composers and instrumental recording artists of our time. A native of Philadelphia, Veasley began playing bass at age 12. An outstanding high school graduate, he earned a full four-year academic scholarship to the University of Penn-

sylvania. After Veasley’s father died during his third year of studies, he immersed himself in music to cope with the loss. Understanding the therapeutic and healing effect music had on him, he does the same for others by creating music “from the inside out.” In the 1980s Veasley spent years as a versatile and reputable sideman and session player. He accompanied such distinctive musicians as Teddy Pendergrass, McCoy Tyner, Special EFX, Nnenna Freelon, and Pat Marino. With the release of the album “Look Ahead” in 1992, Veasley’s solo career took off. The successive albums included recordings by an “A” list of contemporary jazz artists, including Grover Washington Jr. Veasley’s newest release, “Velvet,” is a “richly textured recording that evokes the sound and spirit of his formative years combined with the edgy sensibilities of contemporary urban music.” This album highlights Veasley’s distinctive instrumental prowess and reaffirms his dedication to authenticity and the soulful, healing power of music.

1947 Christmas Special auditions October 1 & 3 “The WPPP 1947 Christmas Special, starring the WPPP Players in a reading of ‘It’s A Wonderful Life’ and featuring the WPPP Singers,” is the laborious title of the Possum Point Players Christmas show for which auditions will take place on Oct.1 and 3. Director, George Spillane and Musical Director, Peggy Naylor, are calling for a cast of children and adults of all ages to audition for solos, chorus and some small speaking parts. The Players are interested in letting those trying out know that the rehearsal schedule will be minimum due to the nature of the show. “Since the performance of It’s a Wonderful Life will be a radio reading and will be supplemented with choral numbers, we are hoping to minimize the disruption to the hectic Christmas schedules of our cast,” says Artistic Board Chair Jim Hartzell. “We are hoping that will lead to a great turnout,” he adds. Audition dates are set for Sunday, Oct. 1, at 2 p.m., and Tuesday, Oct. 3, at 7 p.m. Those auditioning should bring a prepared vocal selection (CD, tape or sheet music accompaniment - a pianist will be available). The WPPP 1947 Christmas Special will be performed on Dec. 1, 2, 8, and 9, at 8 p.m. and December 3 and 10, at 2 p.m. For further information, if you can’t attend these auditions, or to help out in a back-stage capacity, call George Spillane at 302-945-4603. Possum Point Players is sponsored in part by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Delaware Division of the Arts.

Concert attendees can make the evening extra special with a fourcourse dinner in the Lighthouse Cove dining room on campus, beginning at 6 p.m. Prepared by the Cove’s professional staff, the menu includes bayou topless quesadilla, po’ boy cobb salad, pork tenderloin with red beans & rice, seafood imperial, roasted trio of spuds, vegetable medley, calabash caramel bread pudding, beverage. Dinner cost is $32 per guest inclusive. Reservations are required by Friday, October 6. Call the Lighthouse Cove at 302-856-5400, Ext. 2180; ask for the jazzy dinner reservation. And for another special touch to the evening, visit the Treasures of the Sea Exhibit in the library building. Open from 5-8:30 p.m., exhibit visitors will experience the excitement of treasure hunting in the waters of the Atlantic Ocean through the story of the ill-fated Spanish galleon, Nuestra Senora de Atocha. On display are precious gems, silver and gold coins and bars, cannons and artifacts that were part of the magnificent treasure lost in 1622 off the Florida Keys.

The Owens Campus will host “Gerald Veasley” “and His Band” with special guest Kim Waters on Saturday, Oct. 14, at 8:30 p.m., in the theatre in the Arts & Science Center.


MORNING STAR

 SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 31

Possum Point Players musical ‘Chicago’ in October Possum Point Players in Georgetown are offering a musical this fall, the popular production “Chicago.” The show will open on Oct. 13, and run for two weekends at Possum Hall in Georgetown. The cast is set, and they’re Jazz-Tapping their way across the stage. Audiences who have seen the Broadway production or the movie understand the popularity of the singing, dancing murderesses Velma Kelly — played by Donna deKuyper of Lewes, and Roxie Hart — played by Becky Gaffney of Milford. Other major roles include John Hulse of Rehoboth Beach as Amos Hart, David Button of Rehoboth as Billy Flynn, Lorraine Steinhoff of Dover as Matron Mom-

ma Morton and Linda Killion of Lewes as Mary Sunshine. The cast is completed with Lauren Baker of Georgetown, Erika and Schyler Conaway of Seaford, Bob Frazier of Dover, Susannah Griffin of Lewes, Destiny Kerstetter of Felton, Peyton Lynch of Georgetown, Zach Lynch of Selbyville, Brook Marlowe of Dover, Nancy Micciulla of Milton, Dan String of Seaford, and John Stubbs of Rehoboth Beach. Kenney Workman of Milford, who was in “Into The Woods” at 2nd Street Players last year, and who directed “Noises Off” at Possum Point Players the year before that, is taking the directorial lead for “Chicago.”

Workman will be assisted by vocal director Bob Frazier, choreographer Aimee Voshell String, and music director Rebecca Wineinger. Performances of “Chicago” Tickets are on sale now by calling the Possum Ticketline at 302/856-4560. Possum Point Players are excited to bring this popular musical to their audiences. Full of vibrant dancing and hum-able tunes, it is sure to be a crowd-pleaser. Reservations are being taken now. “We always welcome walk-ins,” said executive administrator Mary Cahill, “But people should be advised that our musicals frequently sell-out,” adding, “I would defi-

nitely recommend reserving seats in advance.” Anyone with questions should contact the Possum Point Players office at 302/856-4560. Tickets are now on sale by calling the Possum Ticketline at 302-856-4560. Performances begin on October 13, at 8 p.m., with shows following on the 14th at 8 p.m., the 15th at 2 p.m., and the following weekend on the 20th and 21st at 8, and the 22nd at 2 p.m. Tickets are $15, or $14 for Senior Citizens and students with valid ID. Possum Point Players is sponsored in part by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Delaware Division of the Arts.

Mid-Atlantic Symphony celebrates 10th Season on the Eastern Shore The Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra, celebrating 10 years on the Eastern Shore, will add two new performances to an exciting season. The orchestra, led by celebrated conductor Julien Benichou, returns to area venues with performances on Oct. 6, 7 and 8, Dec. 1, 2 and 3, March 23, 24 and 25 and April 20, 21 and 22. The season opener is entitled “Two Classics and a Neo-Classic,” featuring works by the classical composers Beethoven and Mozart and by Stravinsky representing the “neo-classical.” Performances will be at Delaware Technical & Community College in Georgetown and in Ocean Pines and Easton, Md. In December “Holiday Joy” - always a sold-out performance - will include musical favorites with guest soloist Robert Cantrell. Performances will be at the Mariner’s Bethel Church in Ocean View, the new St. Peter and St. Paul Catholic Church in Easton, and the Community Church in Berlin. “The Soldiers Tale,” the mid-season fare, is Stravinsky’s narrated work for solo violin. Two other works, including an original composition, also will feature the violin. Venues for this concert are Epworth Church in Rehoboth Beach, Easton, Ocean Pines, and also The Prince Theatre in Chestertown, Md. on March 22.

Angie Zebley Cell: 228-7653 Office: 629-7711 Fax: 628-7747 Email: angie@4htr.com

The season finale, “Magic Flute and Harp” in April, features music by Mozart and Ravel, bringing harpist Nicolas Tuillez to the MSO stage. Work by Beethoven also will be included. Mariner’s Bethel Church in Ocean View, Easton, and Ocean Pines are the concert venues. New this year are two chamber music recitals. “Brass & Ivory,” Nov. 3, 4 and 5 at Ocean View Presbyterian Church and in Easton and Ocean Pines. Guest artist Andrew Balio, a renowned trumpet player who gave a brilliant performance with the MSO last season, will be accompanied by pianist Michael Shappard. On Feb. 9, 10 and 11, “Singing Strings” will feature the virtuosity of Nicholas Currie, MSO concertmaster and principal violinist. Currie will be accompanied by pianist Ernest Barretta, winner of several competitions, including a top prize in both the Pittsburgh Concert Society for Young Artists and Pittsburgh Musicians Club. Recitals will be at the Ocean View Presbyterian Church and in Easton and Ocean Pines. Subscriptions are recommended for this 10th anniversary season. For information or tickets phone 1-888-846-8600 or visit the MSO Web site at www.midatlanticsymphony.org.

This 3 BR, 2 BA Home is perfect for the new home buyer! Home features an open floor plan w/Kitchen-DR Combo, floored attic for extra storage, and an attached one-car garage. Don’t miss out on this great deal! #536371

CONCERT KICKING OFF SEASON - The Seaford Community Concert Association is proud to kick off it’s 58th season with the first of its five concert series, the group “4-Score.” This group of four talented singers, backed by a trio of exceptional musicians, features the best vocal classics from Broadway to the Beatles, and from Hollywood to Harry Connick, Jr., ending with a grand patriotic finale. The concert is on Thursday, Oct. 5, at 8 p.m., at the Seaford High School. Admission is by membership only. For further information call publicity chairwoman, Mary Ann Torkelson at 629-5456.

SEAFORD DANCE & FITNESS STUDIO FALL REGISTRATION NOW IN PROGRESS CLASSES BEGIN OCT. 5

• Preschool • Ballet • Jazz • Tap • Adult Classes • Pilates Mat

Established Business Since 1987

Karen Baker Artistic Director

Masters Degree, Dance Education, Temple University Bachelor of Fine Arts, Dance University of the Arts

Metropolitan Regional Council Building, Alt. 13, Seaford, DE Office Telephone

(302) 628-1664

dancefitness@ce.net


MORNING STAR

PAGE 32

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

Classifieds (For Personal Use Only) *Some exceptions such as homes for rent or sale

Deadline: Monday, 3 p.m. Businesses: $4.50 per inch ($9.00 minimum)

Boxed (Display) Ads: $6.30/inch Legals: $6.30 per inch LOST LOST DOG & 2 PUPPIES, terriers, black, around 5th St., Seaford. 344-3441. 8/31 LOST DOG! Tan & Wh. Pitbull/Terrier Mix. Lost in Laurel area. Usually wear pink collar, answers to Lady. Reward! Call Rhonda 8754109 or 818-274-9620. 8/24

GIVE-AWAY

HELP WANTED Immediate openings for cosmetologists, spa techs and part-time spa receptionists. Call 855-1128 or fax resume to 855-1135

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

FREE HORSE MANURE, great for gardens & shrubbery. 337-3840. 9/7

LOVE TO DECORATE? Earn $30-$50 per hour for part time fun. Call Debbie at 629-0402. tnnc

BEAGLE/GOLDEN RETRIEVER MIX, free to a good home. Outside dog, had all shots. Moving, must give away. 629-9879. 8/31

BEAUTY CONSULTANTS: If you have tried other cosmetic companies, only to be let down, we need to talk. 1800-211-1202 x 16387.

2006-2007 LONG-TERM SUBSTITUTE TEACHING VACANCY Long-term substitute teacher for Delmar Middle School; Candidate must be licensed/certified in Language Arts/Reading by Delaware Department of Education; Conditions of employment include satisfactory criminal background check & positive child protection registry, participation in direct deposit of pay, & Mantoux skin test/PPD documentation. Salary based upon FY ‘07 State & Local Salary Guidelines; Completed DISTRICT application due October 6, 2006, to Dr. David C. Ring, Jr., Superintendent, Delmar School District, 200 N. Eighth St., Delmar, DE 19940. EOE

Town of Greenwood Certified Police Officers Accepting applications for Delaware Certified Officers. The Town offers competitive wage and excellent benefit package including take home car, dental, life insurance, paid vacation, 9 paid holidays, employer 100% paid medical, and employer paid pension. Applications are available 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. at 100 West Market St., Greenwood, DE 19950.

LEAVES & GUTTER CLEAN UP - Ask for Terry, 629-7056. 9/28/2t

NOTICE

Reconditioned appliances with 30 day guarantee. Call 628-5396 or 443-880-3538 Kelly Appliance Service, Inc. CAN’T LOSE WEIGHT? THEN DON’T WAIT! Get the Training & Help you need! Finally, a system that works! Call 875-3099 http://healthieryou. transitionslife.com

FUNDRAISER Are you looking to raise money for a school, church, sports team, scout troops, clubs, day care centers, civic organizations, Relay for Life, or any other worthy cause? (Ask me more details about worthy causes). I can help you have fun while raising money. Call Debbie at 629-0402. 5/4/4tnc

YARD SALE LG. YARD/GARAGE SALE, Sat., 9/30, 7 am-?, rain or shine. 3 Spd. Dahon bike, portable satellite dish, crarft items, curtains, clothes, lots more household, outside items. 11236 Taylor Mill Rd., 1 mi. E on Rt. 9, left, .25 mi. Laurel. 9/28 YARD SALE: Heritage Shores, Bridgeville, Sat., 9/30, 8 am - noon. Downsizing households, 100+ families. No rain date. 9/28

Design Career of Your Dreams

SAT., 9/30, 7 am - 3 pm, Rain or shine. All kinds of items incl. furniture. 10268 Fawn Rd., Greenwood, off Rt. 13 Northbound. 9/28 MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE, Sat., 9/30, 7 am until. Road 74, by Sandy Fork Store, before Shiloh Farms, yellow Cape Cod. NEIGHBORHOOD YARD SALE, Sat., 9/30, 7 am - 3 pm, Rain date 10/7. Chris Ave., off St. George’s Rd., Laurel. 875-2028. 9/21

WANTED! FRENCH HORN or SAXOPHONE, good cond. 4224103 or 875-4604. 8/31

AUTOMOTIVE PAYING MORE THAN $35 / Month for AUTO INSURANCE? 1-877-621-1030 Credit Cards accepted. tnc

DRIVER/DELIVERY PERSON FOR BULK LUBRICANTS ALLEN LUBES, the Shell lubricants distributor in Seaford, DE, has position open for tank truck driver. Applicant must have Class B CDL with tanker and air brakes endorsements, and a good driving record. Full time position includes good company benefits. For an employment application, contact Allen Petroleum Corporation at 303 Nanticoke Ave., Seaford, DE, 302-629-7978.

Town of Laurel Public Works Superintendent

Imagine meeting and socializing with family and friends, staying up on the latest decorating trends and getting paid to do something you really love to do. What could be better than that? Are you ready to take advantage of a great opportunity. Give me a call today.

Denice Hill 302-542-7431

SchagrinGAS Company A family owned propane business established in 1932, is accepting applications for the following positions at our Georgetown plant. INSTALLER Seeking a qualified person who knows how to diagnose problems, repair gas appliances and heating systems and deliver outstanding customer service everyday! Will be required to obtain CDL within 6 months. This position is full time. Environment is inside and outside.

CDL DRIVER Provide prompt and courteous propane deliveries to our customer and enjoy driving a state-of-the-art vehicle! This position is full time and requires a class B, CDL with X endorsement. We offer competitive wages, friendly working environment and great medical benefits plus 401K & Profit Sharing. We provide short and long term disability insurance and life insurance. Clean MVR, drug & background a must. Please apply in person at any of our locations. 35 Midway Shopping Center or Sussex County Airpark. 9/Ø6

FREE CLASSIFIEDS*

EMPLOYMENT WANTED

The Town of Laurel is seeking to hire a Public Works Superintendent, with a minimum of five years public works experience. The ideal candidate will have strong leadership and organization skills. The position requires at least three years of managerial experience in public works and a working knowledge of water and wastewater infrastructure maintenance and repair. This position requires a Delaware Water License within one year of hire. This position requires a high school diploma or equivalent. This position reports directly to the Public Works Director. Must be willing to work weekends and holidays when necessary. Salary DOQ, plus town benefit package. Send resume and Town application to: The Town of Laurel, ATT: Public Works Superintendent Position, 201 Mechanic Street, Laurel, Delaware 19956. Deadline date is Oct. 6, 2006.

Town of Laurel Wastewater Superintendent The Town of Laurel is seeking to hire a Wastewater Superintendent, with a minimum of five years wastewater treatment experience. The ideal candidate will have strong leadership and organization skills. The position requires at least three years of managerial experience in the wastewater treatment field. This position will be responsible for the management and operation of the wastewater treatment facility, lift stations, and wastewater laboratory. This position requires a Delaware Water License within one year of hire. This position requires a high school diploma or equivalent. This position reports directly to the Public Works Director. Must be willing to work weekends and holidays when necessary. Salary DOQ, plus town benefit package. Send resume and town application to : The Town of Laurel, ATT: Wastewater Superintendent Position, 201 Mechanic Street, Laurel, Delaware 19956. Deadline date is October 6, 2006.


BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY A/C & HEATING

ATTORNEYS

AUTOMOTIVE

SUSSEX HEATING & A/C

AUTO ACCIDENT AND PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS

ALLEN BODY WORKS, INC.

302-745-0735

Service within 4 Hours Lowest Price in Sussex County Sales, Service, Installation

Initial Consultation Free No Fee Unless You Recover Evening and Weekend Appointments

FUQUA and YORI, P.A.

413 NORTH CENTRAL AVE. LAUREL, DE 19956

Heat Pumps - A/C - Furnaces Over 20 Yrs. Experience Licensed & Insured

The Circle • Georgetown • 856-7777

302-875-3208

*Listing areas of practice does not represent official certification as a specialist in those areas.

FAX 302-875-3229

BRIDAL See Us For Your Announcements, Napkins, Etc.

CONSTRUCTION

CONSTRUCTION

Factory Specialist on Carrier, York, Bryant, Trane, Rheem & Goodman

The Star 628 W. Stein Hwy. Seaford - 629-9788

EMPLOYMENT

ATTORNEYS AT LAW

Build Your Home To Accommodate Your Needs!

CANNON Construction 12922 Laurel Rd. Laurel, DE 19956 302

875-7747

Cell Phones: 249-7247 Robert 381-6617 Maria

FARM & HOME

Dukes Builders INCORPORATED 55 Years Experience

Our Reputation Is Building In House Draftsman 28385 Dukes Lumber Road, Laurel, DE 19956 Barry Dukes Bo Dukes Fax (H) 875-2625 542-5149 875-7640 (C) 542-9106

FITNESS

1004 W. Stein Hwy.Nylon Capital Shopping Ctr., Seaford, DE

Donald L. Short, Owner/Sales 328 N. DuPont Hwy., Millsboro, DE 19966

302-934-9450

IRRIGATION R & L Irrigation Services Finish Site Work Complete Irrigation Systems Sod Laying & Seeding Exterior Lighting Ponds, Mulching, Concrete Pavers

• Ponds • Mulch • Shrubs • Stones • Trees • Lawn & Gdn. Supplies Full Service Store: • Pet Food • Livestock Equip. • Flags • Wild Bird Seed & Feeders • Giftware • Rowe Pottery • Candles • Clothing

U.S. 13 N., Seaford 302-629-9645 • 800-564-5050

MATERIAL HANDLING EASTERN LIFT TRUCK CO., INC. Materials Handling Equipment

Industrial Trucks New - Used - Rental

Parts & Service

The power to amaze yourself.™

216 LAURELTOWNE LAUREL, DEL. 302-875-4541

PHOTO COPIES Self Service

Photo Copies 10¢ per pg

302-530-3376

Morning Star Publications 628 West Stein Highway Behind County Bank 302-629-9788

REAL ESTATE

REMODELING

SALES

LAUREL REALTY

“Making A Difference” 1128 S. Central Ave. Laurel, Delaware

Directly Across from the Laurel enior High School

302-875-3000 800-887-3001

TAX SERVICE

New Homes Additions • Remodeling Trim • Repairs • Roofing Siding • Framing JOHN DIXON SR., President 9940 Birch St., Laurel, DE 19956

302-877-0250 • 302-228-4520

Over 15 years experience.

TREE SERVICE

Increase Your Sales Call Rick, George, Pat or Carol To ADVERTISE!



629-9788 WATER TREATMENT

All Work Guaranteed

J oh n’s

Donald L. Short, Owner 1004 W. Stein Hwy.Nylon Capital Shopping Ctr., Seaford, DE

TREE & LANDSCAPE SERVICE

Independently Owned & Operated

Commercial • Industrial • Residential John Liammayty - Licensed & Insured

Fax: 302-628-0798 - www.jacksonhewitt.com 328 N. DuPont Hwy. Millsboro, DE 19966

302-934-9450

301 Bay St., Suite 308 Easton, MD 21601

410-819-6990

628-0139 Emergency Number 875-5776

• Personal Property • Real Estate • Antiques • Farm (302)

Have Gavel Will Travel

(302)

875-2970 236-0344 Cell

Laurel, Delaware

CONSTRUCTION

Healthy Hair Clinique

Healthy Hair with a Healthy Glow Men - Women - Children Call For Appt. Open Tuesday thru Sunday

302-629-4281 Seaford, Delaware

COSMETICS

800-385-2062 • 302-628-2600 MUSSER & ASSOCIATES, INC. t/a Dick Anderson 9308 Middleford Rd., Seaford, DE

Fax: 302-628-9525 Serving DE, MD & VA

SALES “The Pole Building Specialists”

Pole Buildings - Residential Garages Horse Barns - & Other Complete Celebrating Buildings www.fettervillesales.com 25 Years

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Roofing, Siding, Decks, Window Replacement, New Homes, Home Improvements & Customizing Over 25 Years Experience

A complete line of salon quality cosmetics individually selected just for you. Ask about our custom blended foundations. Call for a FREE consultation

Jay Reaser

875-3099

http://elegantyou.motivescosmetics.com

INTERNET

Delmarva’s #1 Water Treatment Dealer Also Offering Premium Spring Water

410.742.3333 800.439.3853 sharpwater.com

Access, Design & Services

17792 Line Church Rd., Delmar, DE 19940 (302) 846-0372 (302) 236-2839 cell

888-432-7965 / www.ce.net

POWER WASHING

PRINTING For Your Business Needs Business Cards Letterheads, Etc. Call The Star

“Dependable” Power Washing Services

Residential & Commercial Free Estimates

302-841-3511

Owned & Operated by: Doug Lambert, USN Ret.

Licensed & Insured

SEAFOOD

FREE ESTIMATES 302-629-4548

AUCTIONEER

MICHAEL A. LOWE, SR.

Propane, Elec., Gas, Diesel 10254-1 Stone Creek Dr. Laurel, DE 19956 302-875-8961 • Fax 302-875-8966 www.easternlifttruck.com

RICHARD E. WILLIAMS

Lee Collins

BARBER/BEAUTY

All work guaranteed Free Estimates

M-F 8-5; Sat. 8-4 Full Service Nursery:

302-628-0767

AUCTIONEER

28 Old Rudnick Lane, Dover, DE

628 W. Stein Hwy.

629-9788

SEPTIC SERVICE

GOO MAN

OF DELMAR

Septic Care Services 302

629-0444

800-492-0444 Fax 302-629-0745 504 Bridgeville Rd., Seaford, DE Mon-Thurs. 10-6, Fri & Sat 10-7

George M. Bennett

302-846-0593 Cell: 302-236-5327

4676 White Deer Rd., Delmar, DE 19940 Licensed & Bonded

WEDDINGS See Us For Your Announcements, Napkins, Etc.

WEIGHT LOSS

The Star

Make the Transitions Today! You owe it to yourself to check out this program! Call 302-875-3099 for Info HealthierYou.TransitionsLifestyle.com

628 W. Stein Hwy. Seaford - 629-9788

Are you ready to commit to a Lifestyle change?

Why Weight?


PAGE 34

MORNING STAR

Cheap • Cheap • Cheap AUTO INSURANCE? 1-877-621-1030 Credit Cards accepted. tnc ‘90 CHEV. CAPRI S/W. Family owned only. All power, 112K, runs & looks good. $1500. 875-9304 after 5 pm. 9/28 ‘98 DODGE DAKOTA Spt. Truck, AT, AC, V6, 128K mi., orig. owner, $3200 OBO. 628-3694. 9/21

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES ANT. RUG BEATER, $25. Ant. Corn Shredder, $25. 2 Ronnie Milsap Guitar Picks, $25 for both. 337-0271 before 9 pm. 9/21 JEFF GORDON XL Nylon Jacket & liner w/inside pocket, $50. 236-1398. RINGLING BROS. 1970 100th Anniv. Porgram Guide & poster, great cond., $25. 398-0309. 9/21

‘02 SATURN LSI, good cond., $5500. 846-2469. 9/21

ASST. BASEBALL & BASKETBALL Unopened wax packs, also non-sport cards. 398-0309. 9/21

‘01 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE Loredo, runs good, clean, 2 new tires, $7500. 337-8977. 9/14

WOOD ANTIQUE FILING CABINET, $250. 629-4348. 9/14

‘86 MERC. GRAND MARQUIS, P/W, air, good cond., $1200. 628-8555. 9/14

BOATS ‘92 16’ SEA NYMPH Bass Boat, 40 hp Evanrude motor, 56 lb. Elec. TM, LW, DF, ‘01 Loadrite trailer, like new. $2995. 875-8677. 14’ FLAT BOTTOM fiberglass, w/trailer, Mercury motor, minor work, $1200 628-3694. 9/21

BOAT, 30 hp needs OBO.

DE LIC. PLATE, PC3428, active. 875-5796. 9/14 2 WOODEN SCHOOL DESKS, Ant., swivel chairs, ink wells, orig. finish w/children’s carvings. Asst. porcelain bldgs., 6-8” high, w/lights. 629-6068. 9/14 5-DIGIT DE TAG plus the black porcelain, Digit 80211, still active, $1000 OBO. 629-2226. 9/7

Free Classifieds for Personal Use 629-9788

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

FOR SALE QUEEN ANN WING-BACK Chair, blue velvet, exc.. cond., $40. 629-8636. 9/28 ELIPTICAL GAZELLE Exercise Machine, good cond., $50. 398-0309. 9/21 OIL PAINTING, Ocean waves, 3’x2’ by Taylar. Beautiful frame, $50. 2361398. 9/21 FAMOUS TRAIL METAL DETECTOR, new, $50. 236-1398. 9/21 LG. SIZE RECLINER w/ high back, med. brown, exc. cond. Country style love seat, tufted back & seat, med. brown, very good cond, $60. Night stad, white w/blue trim, $20. 9346868. 9/21 MAPLE KIT. TABLE & 4 chairs, $75 OBO. Lg. China Cabinet, 2 pieces, $75 OBO. 874-4114. 9/21 LAWN HOSE KEEPER (never used) $10. Texas Inst. T134 calculator (never used) $15. 628-2166. 9/21 12’x16’ PLUS CARPET, pumpkin color, $200 OBO. 629-3652 after 5 pm. 9/21 PHILLIPS COLOR TV, good cond., $35. 877-0741. 9/21

BRASS TABLE LAMPS, $10 ea. Sheet sets w/pillowcases, dbl. $5, Queen $8. Quilts $10. Bedspreads $8. 628-2166. ENTERTAINMENT CTR., black, cottage style, solid wood, 54H x 61 W x 23D, $75. Rectangular coffee table, oak, cottage style, solid wood, 21H x 48W x 28D, $45. 628-3694. 9/21 ORION 6” TELESCOPE, reflecting, dobsonian mount. Lenses, moon filter, exc. cond. $200. 629-3953. 9/14 WOODWORKER’S SPECIAL - solid mahogany table top fr. Flagship remodel in early 90s. 6296068. 9/14 APX. 2 CORDS FIRE WOOD, split & seaoned, cleaning up yard, must go. 245-2278. 9/14 WHITE DRESSER w/mirror, twin beds, desk, upholstered chair, lamp, all good cond., $125 for all. 6298624. 9/14 WHAT NOTS, DISHES & Pictures, lg. box, $20. Walker, 2 wheels, $10. 8770741. 9/14 KIT. SINK, stainless steel,, double drain, faucets, spray & pipe, 22” x 33”, $25. 8755086. 9/14

PATIO SET, Redwood w/ cushions, 6 pcs., $45. 6296337. 9/14 LESTER SPINET PIANO w/lift top bench, beautiful mahogany finish, plays great, you move, $325. 846-9975. 9/14 BOOKCASE/CURIO/Entertainment Ctr: 5 shelves, 1 drawer, med. br. wood, bought at J. Janosiks, looks beautiful, $125. 846-9975. WINCESTER PUMP model 1300, 4 barrel, scope, choke, $500. CVA Muzzle Loader, Hawkis, 50 caliber, side hammer, $100. Ask for Tony, 875-2454. 9/14 PEARL SNARE DRUM with case. 629-4072. 9/14 MORTISE MACHINE. Shop Fox mortise machine on stand. 1/4”, 8/8” & 1/2” mortise bits, owners manual, like new, $175. 8770231. 9/7 KIMBALL CONSOLE PIANO, $500. 744-9208. APPLE MACINTOSH PERFORMA 637CD computer. For info call Noell, 6294925. 9/7 WHIRLPOOL REFRIGERATOR, designer style, good cond. $50. GE 4-burner range, good cond., $35. Both cream color. 8770741. 9/7

Advertisement

A Gold Mine in Bedroom Drawers

Newswire: People are selling their old scrap gold that is gathering dust for its cash value because gold prices are so high. With the price of gold at a 25 year high (over $650.00 per ounce), it makes sense. ScrapGold.com, a gold recycler, offers free insured recycle kits so people may cash in their scrap with 24 hour service and guarantee satisfaction. They accept

broken and outdated items like chains, charms, rings and more. "Everyone has bits of gold just lying around which can be turned into cash" says Richard Zakroff, VP of marketing. "Even old dental gold has value." ScrapGold.com processes over 10,000 recycle Kits per month. People can get a free GoldKit at 1-800-283-4700 or ScrapGold.com.

NYS LAND SALE LIMITED TIME OFFER

5 Acres with Base Camp......................................$19,900 20 Acres — Adirondacks.....................................$12,900 175 Acres — Former Hunt Club.........................$125,900 64 Acres with Camp — Steuben County..............$29,900

Call Christmas & Associates for details

800-229-7843 or www.landandcamps.com

for college students are available at newspapers in MD, DE & DC through the Reese Cleghorn MDDC Internship Program of the Maryland-Delaware-DC Press Foundation. ¾ News reporting ¾ Copy editing ¾ Photojournalism

application Deadline: November 15.

FREE 2-NIGHT VACATION! Donate Car • Boat • RV • Motorcycle 1-800-Car-Angel

www.carangel.com

Visit www.mddcpress.com for info & applications.



WET BASEMENTS STINK !!

Mold, mildew and water leaking into your basement causes health and foundation damage. What can be done to fix the problem? Allstate American Waterproofing is an honest, hardworking local company. We will give you a FREE evaluation and estimate and a fair price. We have repaired thousands of basements in the area; we can provide local references. When your neighbors needed waterproofing they called Allstate American. Why don’t you? Call now to receive a 20% discount with your FREE ESTIMATE.

CALL 1 800 420 7783 NOW!

Sugar Free Food, Snacks, Diabetic Health & More

At Bargain Bill’s in Laurel 302-875-1805 MAYTAG WASHER & DRYER, almond, heavy duty, VG cond., $325 OBO. 629-6159. 9/7 48 ASST. EXERCISE VIDEO tapes, $50. 410-5464335. 9/7 48 ASST. RICHARD SIMMONS exercise videos, $50. 410-546-4335. 9/7 Interested In Sprucing Up Your Home Decor… With fresh new ideas? Call Debbie today for your personal appt. at 629-0402. tnnc DAYTON GENERATOR, 8 hp Briggs, 4,000 Watt, approx. 20 hrs., 110-220, $400 firm. 629-4348. 8/31 HOOSER CABINET, $500 OBO. PA House sofa, $250 OBO. 628-8754. 8/31 FIREWOOD, $75 P/U load. 628-8754. 8/31 JOHN DEERE RIDING MOWER, new $400 bagger, new battery. 629-8218. COFFEE TABLE, lg. glass top, $25. DR Table, cherry, $25. 628-4585. 8/24 KAROKE MACHINE, CD & graphic, new, 1/2 price, $80. 875-2781. 8/24 OAK DESK w/hutch $85. 2 Bookcases, 5 shelves, $10 ea. 4 Drawer file $10. 8752781. 8/24 MASSAGE CHAIR & case, almost new, folding, $125. 3 Text books, $85. Gel, 1 gal., $25. Or All for $225. 875-2781. 8/24

Journalism student? Paid Summer internships

K&C Sugar Free Store, LLC

DONATIONS NEEDED! Boats, Cars, RVs, Equipment, Real Estate, Forklifts & Wheelchair Access Vans

IRS Forms and All Paperwork Done for You.

KOOL MATE IGLOO COOLER, 40 qt., new $85. Had 6 mos., good cond., $50. 875-9610. 8/24 PROF. OIL BURNER, new $900; good cond., $150. 875-9610. 8/24 PFALTZGRAFF Yorktown 20” high Lamp, blue pleated shade, $25. 629-2298. 8/24 LEATHER ROCKER/RECLINER, $25. 628-4585.

ANIMALS, ETC.

Associated Charities represents numerous non-profits in need of your property.

MARKET LAMBS & BRED EWES, great kids project. 629-3964. 9/14

Call Toll Free: 866-639-8724 or 410-603-3468 E-mail: bob3416@mchsi.com

CHIHUAHUA TERRIER MIX, female, 12 wks., last of the litter, $25. 875-0964.


Thursday Sept. 28th, 2006 at 6:18 PM – Auction held onsite! Nicely maintained 3 BR, 2 BA home & buildable lot on the head waters of the Nanticoke River. At the intersection of Rt. 13 ant Middleford Rd., in Seaford, turn East onto Middleford & follow for 1.9 miles to Old Furnace Rd. Turn right onto Old Furnace Rd. & follow for 0.3 miles to Old Meadow Rd. Turn right onto Old Meadow Rd. & follow 1.3 miles to home & lot on right. Signs Posted.

Nicely maintained waterfront 3 BR, 2 BA, split level home situated on a breathtaking high lot overlooking the Headwaters of the Nanticoke River. Referred to as Sussex Co. Dist. 2-31, Map 12.00, Parcel 72.00. Home features a large basement, 22x22 master bedroom, 19x20 living room, 12x29 family room, 9x29 kitchen, 2 car garage, 2 balcony’s, porch and water view from virtually every room. The home owners are relocating to Florida and the home will be sold to the highest bidder. Please make plans to attend. The home is situated on a large 0.75 Acre +/- lot located on a high bluff overlooking the head waters of the Nanticoke River. Lg. 0.75 Acre +/- waterfront lot next to the above mentioned home overlooking the Nanticoke River. Referred to as Sussex Co. Dist. 2-31, Map 12.00, Parcel 72.01. This buildable lot has been perced & is ready to build. Don’t miss the opportunity to own this beautiful waterfront lot. The owners are relocating and the lot will be sold to the highest bidder regardless of price. $10,000.00 down on the home and $5,000.00 down on the lot on the day of auction in cash, certified check or check acceptable by undersigned. Balance to be paid in 45 days. 2.5 % Buyer premium. Property being sold “as is”. Prospective Buyer responsible for inspection, including lead paint, prior to the auction, Auction Company makes no representation or warranties of . Brokers must have clients registered 48 hours prior to the auction. Contact Auction Co. for Complete Details any kind.

Selling from several local estates! Including the Living Estates of Kathy Whittington, Bonnie Brantley & Bob Maddox of Salisbury, Betty Worth of Fruitland, Bertha Shockley of Stockton, James Nichols of Cambridge, Carol Jones of Newark, MD and several other local estates!

At the intersection of Rt. 50 & Forest Grove Rd., in Parsonsburg, turn North onto Forest Grove Rd. and follow for .5 miles to Old Ocean City Rd. Right onto Old O.C. Rd., and follow for 1.2 miles to Esham Rd. Left onto Esham Rd. and follow for 1.2miles to Burgundy/Tan building on left. Click on the link below for a map! Signs Posted. Sessions banjo clock, cranberry stemware, Fostoria stems, Northwood carnival, Wedgwood, Lenox, Royal Doulton , tobacco tins, pr brass lamps, converted oil lamps, brass student lamp, pink & green depression glass, pattern glass, cut & etched stems, stoneware (butter churn, canning jar, pitcher), Pennsylvania Railroad coal scuttle, mirrored brass sconces, Waterbury kitchen clock, mince meat bucket, cast iron door stop, wooden water pump, Budweiser clock, antique hand planes, and much, much more. Victorian love seat, oak bow front china cabinet, maple hutch, hall table, oak sofa table, antique butchers block, walnut étagère, mahogany table, Morganton Mah sideboard, serpentine drop front writing desk, primitive pie safe original tins, 3 cedar chests, washstand w/ gallery, 3 pc Mah BRS, set of Hitchcock chairs, set of lyre back chairs, cobblers bench table, inlaid sofa table, antique spinning wheel, corner chairs, wingback chairs, dome top trunk, oak dining room table and 4 chairs, round oak table, teak bar, wicker chairs, leather ottomans, misc. end tables, several Broyhill sofas, Broyhill wingbacks, coffee table, dark pine table and 4 chairs, antique sleds, maple rocker, gold framed mirror and much more. : Nicely maintained 1996 Wellcraft 1950S 19’ bow rider with 350 Mercruiser and very low hours. A single axle Load Rite boat trailer is included. The boat is being sold as part of a settlement from a divorce and will be sold to the highest bidder! Large Weatherby Gun Safe, Harpers Ferry/Navy arms 58 Cal. Flintlock (Repro), Knight 54 cal. Inline BP rifle, Austin Halleck 50 cal. inline BP rifle w/octagonal & round barrel, Thomson Center fire New England 54 cal. cap lock BP rifle, Marlin Model 60 .22 cal semi auto rifle, misc. black powder supplies, 2 craftsman radial arm saws (1 newer, 1 older), delta table saw, porch railing columns, 8 ft garage door, two 36”pre hung doors, huffy ironman aluminum frame bike, & more! to be sold immediately following the glassware and china : Cash Or Approved Check Day of sale. Visa/MC/Amex/Discover. 8% Buyer Premium. 3% Discount for cash or check. Everything Sold “As Is” with no warranties of any kind. Vehicle titles held 10 days unless paid by cash/credit card. Auction conducted inside & outside or 9,000 Sq. Ft. facility. Two Auctioneers. Some seating provided. Food served by Millie’s. 2 Hours prior to the Auction!

Owner relocation. Lots must be sold. Lots to be sold separately! Holly Oak Dr., Laurel, DE – Sussex Co. Dist. 4-32 Map 8.00, Parcels 62.07, 62.08 & 62.09 Incredible Investment Opportunity! 3 Perced lots that are ready to build! At the intersection of Rt. 13 ant Rt. 24 (in Laurel DE) turn West onto Rt. 24 and follow for 1 mile to Central Ave. Cross Central Ave and continue on Rt. 24 (West St) for 1.3 miles to Meadow Branch Drive and turn left. Follow to Holly Oak Dr. (2nd on right) and turn onto Holly Oak. Follow to lots on the left. Signs Posted. Incredible Investment Opportunity. We are selling 3 Building lots in lower Sussex County, DE. These lots are located in the highly desirable Hollywood Park Sub-Division. The owner has relocated to the Western Shore of Maryland and the lots must be sold! Lot 5E (62.07) was perced in 1986 (Valid until March 2007) and approved for an LPP system. This is a corner lot with frontage on Holly Oak Drive and Pine Grove Road. The lot is 23,028 Sq. Ft. +/- (0.52 Acre) in size and is mainly wooded. Lot 6E (62.08) was perced in Sept. 2006 and was approved for an LPP system. This large lot is mainly wooded and consists of 33,082 +/- Sq. Ft. (0.76 Acre) of land. Lot 7E (62.09) was perced in Sept. 2006 and was approved for an Elevated Sand Mound treatment and disposal or DNREC approved alternative design. This lot is also mainly wooded and consist of 21,022 Sq. Ft. +/- (0.48 Acre) of land. $5,000.00 down on each lot on the day of auction in cash, certified check or check acceptable by undersigned. Balance to be paid in 45 days. 2.5 % Buyer premium. Property being sold “as is”. Prospective Buyer responsible for inspection, prior to the auction, Auction Company makes no representation or warranties of any kind. . Brokers must have clients registered 48 hours prior to the auction. Contact Auction Co. for Complete Details.

Five Generations of Combined Auction Experience Doug Marshall, Jr., CAI, Christal Marshall, Auctioneers Phone: 888-986-SOLD(7653) 410-835-0383

www.marshallauctions.com

View Website for Additional Information, Terms, Description & Pictures!


Thursday Sept. 28th, 2006 at 6:18 PM – Auction held onsite! Nicely maintained 3 BR, 2 BA home & buildable lot on the head waters of the Nanticoke River. At the intersection of Rt. 13 ant Middleford Rd., in Seaford, turn East onto Middleford & follow for 1.9 miles to Old Furnace Rd. Turn right onto Old Furnace Rd. & follow for 0.3 miles to Old Meadow Rd. Turn right onto Old Meadow Rd. & follow 1.3 miles to home & lot on right. Signs Posted.

Nicely maintained waterfront 3 BR, 2 BA, split level home situated on a breathtaking high lot overlooking the Headwaters of the Nanticoke River. Referred to as Sussex Co. Dist. 2-31, Map 12.00, Parcel 72.00. Home features a large basement, 22x22 master bedroom, 19x20 living room, 12x29 family room, 9x29 kitchen, 2 car garage, 2 balcony’s, porch and water view from virtually every room. The home owners are relocating to Florida and the home will be sold to the highest bidder. Please make plans to attend. The home is situated on a large 0.75 Acre +/- lot located on a high bluff overlooking the head waters of the Nanticoke River. Lg. 0.75 Acre +/- waterfront lot next to the above mentioned home overlooking the Nanticoke River. Referred to as Sussex Co. Dist. 2-31, Map 12.00, Parcel 72.01. This buildable lot has been perced & is ready to build. Don’t miss the opportunity to own this beautiful waterfront lot. The owners are relocating and the lot will be sold to the highest bidder regardless of price. $10,000.00 down on the home and $5,000.00 down on the lot on the day of auction in cash, certified check or check acceptable by undersigned. Balance to be paid in 45 days. 2.5 % Buyer premium. Property being sold “as is”. Prospective Buyer responsible for inspection, including lead paint, prior to the auction, Auction Company makes no representation or warranties of . Brokers must have clients registered 48 hours prior to the auction. Contact Auction Co. for Complete Details any kind.

Selling from several local estates! Including the Living Estates of Kathy Whittington, Bonnie Brantley & Bob Maddox of Salisbury, Betty Worth of Fruitland, Bertha Shockley of Stockton, James Nichols of Cambridge, Carol Jones of Newark, MD and several other local estates!

At the intersection of Rt. 50 & Forest Grove Rd., in Parsonsburg, turn North onto Forest Grove Rd. and follow for .5 miles to Old Ocean City Rd. Right onto Old O.C. Rd., and follow for 1.2 miles to Esham Rd. Left onto Esham Rd. and follow for 1.2miles to Burgundy/Tan building on left. Click on the link below for a map! Signs Posted. Sessions banjo clock, cranberry stemware, Fostoria stems, Northwood carnival, Wedgwood, Lenox, Royal Doulton , tobacco tins, pr brass lamps, converted oil lamps, brass student lamp, pink & green depression glass, pattern glass, cut & etched stems, stoneware (butter churn, canning jar, pitcher), Pennsylvania Railroad coal scuttle, mirrored brass sconces, Waterbury kitchen clock, mince meat bucket, cast iron door stop, wooden water pump, Budweiser clock, antique hand planes, and much, much more. Victorian love seat, oak bow front china cabinet, maple hutch, hall table, oak sofa table, antique butchers block, walnut étagère, mahogany table, Morganton Mah sideboard, serpentine drop front writing desk, primitive pie safe original tins, 3 cedar chests, washstand w/ gallery, 3 pc Mah BRS, set of Hitchcock chairs, set of lyre back chairs, cobblers bench table, inlaid sofa table, antique spinning wheel, corner chairs, wingback chairs, dome top trunk, oak dining room table and 4 chairs, round oak table, teak bar, wicker chairs, leather ottomans, misc. end tables, several Broyhill sofas, Broyhill wingbacks, coffee table, dark pine table and 4 chairs, antique sleds, maple rocker, gold framed mirror and much more. : Nicely maintained 1996 Wellcraft 1950S 19’ bow rider with 350 Mercruiser and very low hours. A single axle Load Rite boat trailer is included. The boat is being sold as part of a settlement from a divorce and will be sold to the highest bidder! Large Weatherby Gun Safe, Harpers Ferry/Navy arms 58 Cal. Flintlock (Repro), Knight 54 cal. Inline BP rifle, Austin Halleck 50 cal. inline BP rifle w/octagonal & round barrel, Thomson Center fire New England 54 cal. cap lock BP rifle, Marlin Model 60 .22 cal semi auto rifle, misc. black powder supplies, 2 craftsman radial arm saws (1 newer, 1 older), delta table saw, porch railing columns, 8 ft garage door, two 36”pre hung doors, huffy ironman aluminum frame bike, & more! to be sold immediately following the glassware and china : Cash Or Approved Check Day of sale. Visa/MC/Amex/Discover. 8% Buyer Premium. 3% Discount for cash or check. Everything Sold “As Is” with no warranties of any kind. Vehicle titles held 10 days unless paid by cash/credit card. Auction conducted inside & outside or 9,000 Sq. Ft. facility. Two Auctioneers. Some seating provided. Food served by Millie’s. 2 Hours prior to the Auction!

Owner relocation. Lots must be sold. Lots to be sold separately! Holly Oak Dr., Laurel, DE – Sussex Co. Dist. 4-32 Map 8.00, Parcels 62.07, 62.08 & 62.09 Incredible Investment Opportunity! 3 Perced lots that are ready to build! At the intersection of Rt. 13 ant Rt. 24 (in Laurel DE) turn West onto Rt. 24 and follow for 1 mile to Central Ave. Cross Central Ave and continue on Rt. 24 (West St) for 1.3 miles to Meadow Branch Drive and turn left. Follow to Holly Oak Dr. (2nd on right) and turn onto Holly Oak. Follow to lots on the left. Signs Posted. Incredible Investment Opportunity. We are selling 3 Building lots in lower Sussex County, DE. These lots are located in the highly desirable Hollywood Park Sub-Division. The owner has relocated to the Western Shore of Maryland and the lots must be sold! Lot 5E (62.07) was perced in 1986 (Valid until March 2007) and approved for an LPP system. This is a corner lot with frontage on Holly Oak Drive and Pine Grove Road. The lot is 23,028 Sq. Ft. +/- (0.52 Acre) in size and is mainly wooded. Lot 6E (62.08) was perced in Sept. 2006 and was approved for an LPP system. This large lot is mainly wooded and consists of 33,082 +/- Sq. Ft. (0.76 Acre) of land. Lot 7E (62.09) was perced in Sept. 2006 and was approved for an Elevated Sand Mound treatment and disposal or DNREC approved alternative design. This lot is also mainly wooded and consist of 21,022 Sq. Ft. +/- (0.48 Acre) of land. $5,000.00 down on each lot on the day of auction in cash, certified check or check acceptable by undersigned. Balance to be paid in 45 days. 2.5 % Buyer premium. Property being sold “as is”. Prospective Buyer responsible for inspection, prior to the auction, Auction Company makes no representation or warranties of any kind. . Brokers must have clients registered 48 hours prior to the auction. Contact Auction Co. for Complete Details.

Five Generations of Combined Auction Experience Doug Marshall, Jr., CAI, Christal Marshall, Auctioneers Phone: 888-986-SOLD(7653) 410-835-0383

www.marshallauctions.com

View Website for Additional Information, Terms, Description & Pictures!


PAGE 36

MORNING STAR

SPECIAL REGIONAL ADS Adoption PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring people specializing in matching birth mothers with families nationwide. EXPENSES PAID. Toll free 24/7 Abby's One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6292 Auctions AUCTION - Construction Equipment & Truck, Friday, September 29, 8AM, Richmond, VA, Huge 600+ Lots, Excavators, Dozers, Loaders, Trailers, Dumps & More, Motley's Auction & Realty Group, 804-2323300, VAAL #16, www.Motleys.com

candy route. Includes 30 machines and candy. All for $9,995. 888-753-3452 VENDING ROUTE: All Snacks / Candies, Drinks. Energy Drinks Too! All Brand, All Sizes. Great Equipment. Great Locations. Financing Available w/ $7,500 Down. 1-877-843-8726 Employment Information NOW HIRING FOR 2006 POSTAL JOBS. $18/hour Starting, Avg Pay $57K/year Federal Benefits, Paid Training and Vacations. No Experience Needed! 1-800584-1775 Ref # P1021. Fee Required General Merchandise

Automotive Donate Your Vehicle To UNITED BREAST CANCERFOUNDATION. A Woman is Diagnosed Every Two Minutes! Please Call Today #1-888-468-5964. Fast/Free Towing, NonRunners Acceptable

ABSOLUTELY NO COST TO YOU!! ALL BRAND NEW POWER WHEELCHAIRS, HOSPITAL BEDS AND SCOOTERS. IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-9984111 TO QUALIFY

Business Opportunity

Help Wanted Insurance

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE. Do you earn $800 in a day? Your own local

Sales Professionals Wanted $75,000+ Pre-qualified Leads helping Seniors Full Benefits, Retirement, Vacations, Stock Options + Management Opportunities Call Mr. Holland 443-394-3830 or toll free 1-866-229-8447

DISCLAIMER: be aware that Morning Star Publications has no control over the Regional ads. Some employment ads and business opportunity ads may not be what they seem to be.

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

Home Improvement

Land For Sale

Land/Acreage

Real Estate

HAS YOUR BUILDING SHIFTED? Structural repairs of barns, houses and garages. Call Woodford Bros., Inc. for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs. 1-800OLD-BARN. www.1-800OLD-BARN.COM MHIC# 05-121561

ATTENTION HUNTERS!! 2 acres near Dolly Sods, West Virginia. Only $29,990. Loaded w/game. Monongahela National Forest Access. Power, Perk, All-Weather Roads. Call Today: 866-403-8037.

Got Land? 2 acres $19,900 3 acres $29,900 6 acres $79,900 subdividable Minutes from Deep Creek Lake. Free Closing Costs. 800-524-3064 www.americanacreage.com Marc Lorson, Broker

EASTERN SHORE, VACHESAPEAKE BAY: Extraordinary new community "Underhill Creek Landing". Spectacular sunset views, deep waterfront and water access homesites from $79,900. Toni Trepanier, Agent 888-824-0009 or 757-894-8909 Email: tellam1227@msn.com

Hot Tub / Spa Buy Your Hot Tub Direct From The Wholesaler With Free Shipping. *Save Thousands* www.spawholesalers.net or 1-866-7948872 Land For Sale BAY COUNTRY VIRGINIA 4.64 Acres Waterfront $299,900 Rare opportunity to acquire large acreage homesite with mature hardwoods and dramatic sunsets. Won't last, call today! 1-804-687-6217

CANAAN VALLEY, WV A SKIER'S PARADISE New! 1.22 acres +/- with beautiful valley views and deeded access to Blackwater Falls State Park. 10 min to Timberline & Canaan Valley skiing. $99,990. Call for appt. 866-342-8635. LAKEFRONT PARCELS LAKE CUMBERLAND, KY From $98,900. Awesome _ acres, 136 ft of lakefront. Outstanding resort-style amenities: clubhouse, pool, driving range, tennis courts, & more! Be among the first to see this property Call owner now 866-481-4837.

20+ Acres with Private River Access. Perfect for a vacation getaway and retirement. Very usable with long range mtn views. www.landneardc.com

PRIVATE RIVER ACCESS 20+ ACRES- $139,900 CLOSE TO D.C Be the first! Rolling mtn. views & huge hardwood trees! Exc. Financing! Only one so call now 1-800-888-1262

ASHEVILLE, NC AREA Breathtaking mountain view & river parcels. 1 to 8 acres from the $80's. Nature trails, custom lodge, river walk & much more. 5 min. from town. 866-292-5760.

VA MOUNTAIN LOG CABIN unfinished inside, view, trees, private, large creek and river nearby, $139,500 owner 866-789-8535 VA94.com

PUBLIC AUCTION OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE & HOME IN LAUREL, DELAWARE

SATURDAY, SEPT. 30, 2006 • 1:00 P.M. From the Estate of Donna Larrimore Elliott

Mountain Property 2 Acres $24,900 5 Acres $49,900 9.5 Acres $84,900 Bruceton Mills Area Wooded, Perked Underground Electric, Wildlife Galore! Financing Available Owner: 301-616-8655 Miscellaneous

NORTH CAROLINA MOUNTAINS- Gated community with spectacular views, public water including fire hydrants, DSL accessibility, paved roads, nearby lakes; preselling phase IV $35,000+ 800463-9980 www.theridgeatsouthmountain.com

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical *Business *Paralegal *Computers, *Criminal Justice. Job Placement assistance. Computer Provided. Financial aid if qualified. Call 866-858-2121 www.OnlineTidewaterTech.com

New, Pre- Construction Golf Community- Coastal Georgia. Large lots w/deepwater, marsh, golf, nature views. Gated, Golf, Fitness Center, Tennis, Trails. Oak Park, Docks. $70k's - $300K 1877-266-7376 www.cooperspoint.com

Pools

Real Estate Rentals

SWIMMING POOLS - Pool Clearance. HURRY! Limited quantities available. For example: 19x31 oval pool with deck, fence and filter for only $1,180.00. Installation extra. 100% Financing Available. Call now for free backyard survey! Crown Pools 888-590-6466.

NO RENT- $0 DOWN HOMES Gov't & Bank foreclosures! No Credit O.K. $0 to low Down! For Listings, (800)860-0573 Real Estate Wanted DON'T LIST - Sell to me. NO COMMISSION OR

AUCTION

VALUABLE REAL ESTATE

Saturday, Sept. 30th • 10 a.m. Held On-Site, Rain Or Shine

Location: 9667 Camp Road, Laurel, Delaware. From U.S. Rt. 13 just north of Laurel, travel west on Camp Road for approx. 0.6 mile to Rt. 13A (Seaford Road). Property will be on right (Signs Posted). Inspection : To arrange a private showing, please contact our office at 1.866.866.8756. The property is identified on the Sussex County Tax Map in District 1-32 Map 12.00 Parcel 66.00 and consists of 6.38+/- Acres of land improved with a two-story farmhouse. The property has approx. 760 ft. of frontage along Seaford Road along its westerly boundary and approx. 308 ft. of frontage along Camp Road at its southerly boundary. Terms: $15,000.00 non-refundable down payment on day of sale in the form of Cash, Cashier’s, or Certified Check made payable to Jos. C. O’Neal & Sons with the balance to be paid in 45 days when a good & marketable deed will be given. Buyer & Seller will equally share all State & County transfer taxes. State and County and municipal taxes and assessments to be adjusted as of the date of sale. Buyer will be required to pay all costs of preparing and recording the deed. The property is being sold in “AS-IS” condition. Failure to comply with these Terms of Sale will cause the down payment paid on day of sale to be forfeited and the property will be resold at the buyer’s expense. A 5% buyer’s premium will be added to the final selling price. Seller(s) have the right to accept or reject any or all bids, but it is their intent to sell said property to settle the Estate.

Jos. C. O’Neal & Sons AUCTIONEERS & APPRAISERS, INC. 11112 Laurel Road, Laurel, DE 19956

302.875.5261 - 1.866.866.8758 www.onealsauction.com

Recently restored, 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath Victorian Perfect For Home, Business or Both 126 & 128 West Pine Street in Seaford, DE Terms: Subject to Prior Sale and Seller’s confirmation of final bid. Buyer’s must register for sale at auction or prior to day of sale with auctioneer.

Open House on Sunday Sept. Sept. 24th from 2-4 pm. Contact Auctioneer for other inspections. Property to be sold “As-Is”.

Auction Services • 302-628-7711


MORNING STAR COSTS - FAST CLOSE: Residential, Comm'l, Waterfront, Farm, lots, non-conforming, any location/condition, fair price, family business 866-474-7000. www.charlesparrish.com Real Estate/Acreage Drum Up Business. Advertise in 121 newspapers across Maryland, Delaware, and DC, reach over 2.3 Million households for only $430. For more information contact this Newspaper or call Gay Fraustro, MDDC Classified Networks, 410721-4000, ext.17 or visit www.mddcpress.com. Tax Services IRS TAX DEBT KEEPING YOU AWAKE? Local CPA firm resolves all Federal and State tax problems for individuals and businesses. US Tax Resolutions, P.A. 877-477-1108. Waterfront Properties Spectacular Virginia Waterfront CORBIN HALL Gated, private community on Atlantic side of Virginia's Eastern Shore. 3+ acre lots available from $130K to $650K with immediate, deepwater access to Chincoteague Bay. Amenities include community pier, boat launch & beautiful community center w/guest suites, pool, spa & fitness room. PORT SCARBURGH Gated, private community on Virginia's Chesapeake Bay. 1 to 12 acre waterfront lots available with pier access. Priced from $370K to $599K. Location ideal for boating & fishing. Privacy close to quaint villages, shopping & water activities. Both properties feature spectacular views, mild climate, low taxes, abundant wildlife. 757-709-9525 or visit www.corbinhall.com.

Enjoy the Star? Subscribe Today!

Call 629-9788

LEGALS PUBLIC HEARING LAUREL MAYOR AND COUNCIL The Laurel Mayor and Council will be holding a public hearing on Monday, November 6, 2006 beginning at 7 p.m. or as soon thereafter, to consider amending Laurel’s 2004 Comprehensive Plan Future Land Use Map. The public hearing will be held in the Mayor and Council Chambers, located at 201 Mechanic Street. For more information, please contact Assistant Town Administrator Jamie Smith at 8752277. 9/28/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BROAD CREEK HUNDRED Subd. #2005-75 Notice is hereby given that the County Planning and Zoning Commission of Sussex County will hold a public hearing on Thursday evening, OCTOBER 26, 2006, in the County Council Chambers, Sussex County Administrative Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on the application of TOP DRAWER, L.L.C. to consider the Subdivision of land in an AR-1 Agricultural Residential District in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, by dividing 108.63 acres into 72 lots, located south of Road 78, across from Road 487. Planning and Zoning public hearings will begin at 6:00 P.M. Text and maps of this application may be examined by interested parties in the County Planning and Zoning Office, Sussex County Administrative Building, Georgetown, Delaware. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to the public hearing. For additional informa-

Notices Effective Oct. 1 Charity Lodge #27 I.O.O.F. will no longer be delivering hospital equipment. Hospital beds will be discontinued permanently. The lodge will keep the wheel chair and sick equipment program active. Items may be picked up and returned on Monday and Wednesday of each week from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. at their Hastings Drive location, adjacent to Odd Fellows Cemetery.

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

tion contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 9/28/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING SEAFORD HUNDRED Subd. #2005-77 Notice is hereby given that the County Planning and Zoning Commission of Sussex County will hold a public hearing on Thursday evening, OCTOBER 26, 2006, in the County Council Chambers, Sussex County Administrative Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on the application of CHESAPEAKE CONSTRUCTION to consider the Subdivision of land in an AR-1 Agricultural Residential District in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, by dividing 13.01 acres into 13 lots, and a variance from the maximum allowed cul-de-sac length of 1,000 feet, located west of Road 535, and as an extension to Foxtail Drive in Clearbrooke Acres. Planning and Zoning public hearings will begin at 6:00 P.M. Text and maps of this application may be examined by interested parties in the County Planning and Zoning Office, Sussex County Administrative Building, Georgetown, Delaware. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to the public hearing. For additional information contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 9/28/1tc

NOTICE Estate of Emily G. Turkington, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Emily G. Turkington who departed this life on the 11th day of August, A.D. 2006 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Annie Becker on the 14th day of September, A.D. 2006, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 11th day of April, A.D. 2007 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Annie Becker 205 North Hall Street, Seaford, DE 19973 Attorney: David W. Baker, Esq. P.O. Box 551

Georgetown, DE 19947 Howard Clendaniel Register of Wills 9/28/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Joseph Leon Johnson, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of Joseph Leon Johnson who departed this life on the 5th day of June, A.D. 2006 late of Bridgeville, DE were duly granted unto Mary J. Dennis on the 12th day of September, A.D. 2006, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administratix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administratix on or before the 5th day of February, A.D. 2007 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administratix: Mary J. Dennis 24751 Nichols Street, Seaford, DE 19973 Attorney: Michele Procino-Wells 123 Pennsylvania Ave. Seaford, DE 19973 Howard Clendaniel Register of Wills 9/21/3tc

PAGE 37 NOTICE Estate of William R. Walter, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of William R. Walter who departed this life on the 4th day of August, A.D. 2006 late of Delmar, DE were duly granted unto James Brian Walter on the 5th day of September, A.D. 2006, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 4th day of April, A.D. 2007 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: James Brian Walter 11013 Trappe Creek Dr., Berlin, MD 21811 Howard Clendaniel Register of Wills 9/21/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Margaret W. Chatwin, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Margaret W. Chatwin who departed this life on the 7th day of August, A.D. 2006

late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Barbara C. Short on the 7th day of September, A.D. 2006, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 7th day of April, A.D. 2007 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Barbara C. Short 108 Washington Ave. Bridgeville, DE 19933 Attorney: James A. Yori, Esq. Fuqua & Yori P.O. Box 250 Georgetown, DE 19947 Howard Clendaniel Register of Wills 9/21/3tc

Enjoy the Star? Don’t Miss A Single Issue! Subscribe Today!

Call 629-9788

Today I Will Marry My Friend Wedding Stationary Morning Star Publications invites you to see our entire ensemble of wedding invitations and announcements to fit your wedding theme. We offer a large selection of wedding stationary at reasonable prices. Stop by the Star office, located next to Medicine Shop in Seaford.

Morning Star Publications, Inc. • 629-9788 628 W. Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE


MORNING STAR ✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 38

D ELMARVA A UTO A LLEY It all comes down to points in the end By Bonnie Nibblett It all comes down to points in the end? The Delaware Motorsports Complex will be winding down with the racing season soon ending. The Delaware International Speedway will host the last point’s races this coming Saturday, September 30, which was added to the fall schedule. The U. S. 13 Kart Club Track has three races left with points added before the end on Friday, September 29, and Fridays, October 6, and October 21, 2006 which will be make up races from Mother Natures curse through out the season. The U. S. 13 Dragway will be wrapping up the points soon as well. What are points? Points in racing are given to drivers that race at facilities or in a series. Such as NASCAR, BUSCH, World of Outlaws Late Models, WoO, MACS, NRHA, WKA, different divisions of racing and so on. Most divisions have there own points system in play. Some drivers could care less about points in the end or beginning for that fact. But there are some that do care very much. So why strive to get points? Bragging rights for the most part and the money. Most drivers or teams, owners, crews get recognition for that year as the Track Champion, or Champ of 2006 Nextel Cup and what ever the track or series they race, to be awarded

for. Being able to gloat about the title the entire year or season as the CHAMP is also very much a big part of it. Just as some race titles hold more value than other races. Such as the Daytona 500, Camp Barnes, or Delaware State Dirt Track Champion. Not all points systems are scored the same, or the prizes for that title the same as others. Either way those with the highest scores get the best monies, gifts, trophies, and that bragging rights over the others. Most have banquets to acknowledge the top ten, but it still comes down to one winning with the highest points. Well, with a good season, consistency to be in the top 5 each race, or as high as finish you can get, good crew, great driver, quality equipment, a little luck on the side all contribute to the hard work that goes into winning the track title. Sometimes the class may not be close among the drivers or one sweeps it away, but then it might come down to mere digits in the end and few only. As it stands now at the DIS speedway, one more race will determine the victory with only few points between them to claim the title. The Modified Lite may well be locked in with Tim White having 130 points advantage over Steve A. White. Joe Warren also has 130 points ahead of Ross Robinson; both of the later share rookie status as this is their first year in the TSS Late Model, formerly Street Modified class.

CHAMBERS MOTORS INC. 24 HOUR TOWING & RECOVERY TRUCK REPAIRS EQUIPMENT HAULING 20610 Sussex Hwy., Seaford, DE

302

629-3553

The other three classes may be a little different. In big block action, H. J. Bunting III, just took the lead back last Saturday night from Beau Wilkins. Only 24 points differ between Wilkins & Bunting, who started the night off with the lead. During the heats, Wilkins car was totaled when he went sailing high in the air end over end before coming to a stop. The right front tire broke when going into turn 3, sending Wilkins in his first racing flip; he suffered no injuries. Wilkins forced to use his back up car had to start dead last but rose to a 5th place finish out of 21. Bunting is the 2005 defending champ. Way to go! Late Model action has Donald Lingo, Jr. in the lead with 72 points over rookie Gary Simpson. It will be Lingo’s first title. This is the first year in a super late model for Simpson and he has been consistent. Jack Mullins, Jr. has only 35 points over Brad Trice in the AC Delco TSS Modified class, so that can go either way. As it always goes, “it ain’t over til it’s over.” The weekend will determine the champs for sure, make a note, you don’t want to miss this action on Saturday night. Track opens at 5 PM and cars on the track at 7 PM. The URC Sprints made their last appearance to DIS last weekend determining who will hold the Taylor & Messick Delaware Sprint title. The URC Bar's Leaks/Advance Auto Parts Sprint Series Points leader is Curt Michael in the Palladino number 99 with 160 advantage over Kevin Welsh. Michael is the 2005 Defending champion. After this Saturday the speedway will not run until the November 4-5 for the Delaware State Track Championships. A rain date would be the following weekend of November 11-12. For information on the events connect to www.delawareracing.com or call the office at 302-875-1911. Next month the end results for sure will be made along with special notices of teams. The dragway action continues this weekend with Sunday, October 1, with the Foot Brake Nationals. The dragway will continue activity all through October. Point’s leaders will be announced next month. Gates open 10:00 AM, time trials start 11:00 AM. Lastly, the U. S. 13 Kart Club Track has three more races scheduled, Friday, September 29, October 6, & 22nd. Both Oct. dates

A Properly Installed Windshield Could

25 OFF

$

will be make up races for cancels due to rain. The points for a few of those classes are pretty close going too. It all hangs in getting those points finalized. The Delaware Dirt Divisional Series (WKA Sanction) at the kart track ended the season back on Saturday, September 2. Although the event was canceled with Ernesto blowing through; the way WKA points system works if a race is canceled due to weather, is the drivers still have to come to the track and register, if they do, they will receive first place points. So the totals have just been posted as who are the champions. Junior I Lite – Buddy Bloom, IV # 40 Junior I Heavy - Dylan Evans # 80 Junior II Lite - Clint Chalabala # 44 Junior II Heavy - Clint Chalabala # 44 Junior III Lite - Brandon White # 09 Junior III Heavy - Brandon White # 09 Stock Lite – Shane Forrest # 01 Stock Medium – Buddy Sload, Jr. #53 Stock Heavy - Buddy Sload Jr. # 53 Stock Xtra Heavy – Josh Williams # 3 Senior Stock – Ralph Moore # 5 Limited – Bryant Renfro # 3 Animal Medium – Mike Ellerbush # 4 Animal Heavy – Brandon Morris # 55 Open - Brandon Morris # 55 The Kart track will take to the track this Friday, September 29, 2006, gates open 5:00 PM, karts on the track at 7:00 PM. Last week the outlaw runners were invited to race, and have been invited to revisit this Friday. For rules and updates visit the tracks web at www.dekarting.net. Redbud69racing.com even gets in on the awards with AutoWorld of Delmar sponsoring the Redbud69racing.com Rookie of the Year. Each division that has a rookie or any drivers first year in a new class count as Rookie according the guidelines set by the presenters’ web owner. The top rookie in points receives an 8 X 10 plague and the title of the Redbud69racing.com Rookie of the Year in each division. Big Block Modifieds - Matt Jester # 62 Super Late Models - Gary Simpson # 12K TSS Modified - Ryan Walls $ 14W TSS Late Models - Joe Warren # 11 Modified Lite - Jody Cahall # 77 The remaining rookies in each class will receive a certificate with their ending place in points.

SAVE YOUR LIFE!

Mr.Go-Glass Has Been Accredited By The Automotive Glass Replacement Safety Standard Council

Windshield Replacement In-Shop Only INSURANCE CLAIM? We’ll Handle The Paper Work With Coupon Only. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 10/31//06

Complete Glass and Mirror Service for Home, Auto and Business

Mr. Go - Glass Visit our Seaford Location in The Seaford Village Shopping Center.

Airbags can ONLY protect you properly if the windshield stays in place during a crash? If not installed properly, your windshield can pop out on impact leaving you unprotected. Nationwide, only 30% of all windshield replacements have been installed properly! At Mr Go-Glass, 100% have been installed properly. Give us a call if you have a concern.

FREE ESTIMATES

www.go.glass.com

302-629-4947 • 1-800-7-GO-GLASS (1-800-746-4527)

MHIC 74210


MORNING STAR

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 39

Dad was unforgiving when it came to curfew breakers What was I thinking? How could I possibly expect to get from ONY INDSOR Salisbury to Marion Station in fewer than 15 minutes? Even on a mild I think the only blessing of traffic day it took at least a half an hour or more. Yet I had allowed that evening came from myself to continue gallivanting around with my friends right up to curfew. the fact that I don’t recall It was the fall of 1973 and riding around the back roads of Sommuch more of it. erset County in my buddy Dennis’ 1964 yellow Rambler was usually as much as I would get involved with on a during the 1967 Cambridge, Md., riots, pulling double-duty as a peacekeeper in school night. There was no sense in exthe streets. After retiring from the state popanding our night patrols into neighboring lice, Dad also served as sheriff of SomerWicomico County because Dad’s rule was set County and chief of police in Crisfield, that I be home by 9:30 on school nights Md. and this would be too far a trek for me to So, suffice it to say, there was no way get back home on time. that my punk attitude was going to cause Dad was unbendable when it came to my dad to loosen curfew policy. If Dad curfew. Actually he was unbendable when said it, it stuck like cow crap on a boot it came to anything dealing with discisole. pline. His military background laid a firm I can recall the sinking feeling that fall foundation for a tight ship at home with evening as Dennis drove his Rambler his three heathen younguns. Dad was a down US 13 past the English Grill. Learnsergeant in the Army stationed in Korea ing it was 9:15 p.m. immediately sent me and took shrapnel from a grenade explointo panic. But, then Dennis came up with sion and a bullet wound to the knee. He the perfect rationalization. If I was going was a captain in the National Guard and a to be late anyway, why not go ahead and trooper with the Maryland State Police

T

W

have a good time? It would be no worse to be two hours late than to be 15 minutes late. I mean, late was late when it came to Dad’s way of thinking. Looking back on what I now see was a monumental decision, I wish I had given a little more clear thought to that assumption. Dennis and I headed south all the way to Pocomoke, Md., where a hangout called Transmedia was jumping with music from a local band. We partied hearty until about 11:30 p.m. As we drove home I maintained an unafraid facade for the sake of my pride, but the closer I got to home the more nervous I got. I started hoping that Dad would be working the midnight shift and would be gone by the time I got home. Not! Normally, when I was late for curfew, usually no more than a half-hour, Dad would be in bed. He would get up the next morning and announce that I was confined to home for two weeks because I couldn’t seem to make it home on time. This time I walked into the house, trying to be as quite as possible. I looked up and there it was. It was my biggest fear. It was the glow of Dad’s lit cigarette in the dark of the living room. There was nowhere to run, nowhere to hide. I would have rather wrestled a crack-in-

duced Big Foot than to have to face my dad. I can say with every ounce of certainty that Dad was a Ninja. I recall walking into that dark living room using that glowing cigarette as my comfort zone. As long as it was glowing in the dark, Dad remained somewhere under it, I thought. But I was wrong. As I stared at that glow, Dad came from behind me and grabbed me tighter than a rusty lid on a five-year-old jar of grape jelly. We commenced to roll and tumble — let me rephrase that: I commenced to roll and tumble, from the living room, through the dining room and into the kitchen. The only reason we stopped in the kitchen was because Dad couldn’t roll me through the backdoor. I think the only blessing of that evening came from the fact that I don’t recall much more of it. Let me put it to you this way: George W. Bush is not the first leader to commit to assuring that evil people face justice. My Dad invented that philosophy and was extremely successful in getting results. But, you know what? I certainly learned the limits of patience and goodwill! Reprinted from October 2001

Ease the bite of fall with fresh apple pastry This is the time of year that I call “limbo” — not summer and just barely fall; not light clothing but not dark. The flower garden looks peaked and the vegetables don’t want to ripen. Halloween decorations have been in the stores for weeks already and if that’s not aggravating enough, days are getting much shorter and the crickets and fruit flies have checked in for another season of psychological torment. Thank the stars that apples are coming into season and that we live in an area where we have access to their just-picked goodness. We can eat them out of hand, or use them in salads, main dishes and desserts. What a delicious antidote to the end-of-summer blues. This is one of my all-time favorite apple desserts that I can always rely on. This free form tart is a snap to make and never disappoints. Apple Crostata Serves 6. Dough is enough for two tart crusts. You can freeze one to make another crostata later. Crust: 2 cups all-purpose flour 1/4 cup sugar 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 pound (2 sticks) very cold unsalted butter, diced 1/2 cup ice water Filling: 1 and 1/2 pounds apples, e.g.,

The Practical Gourmet Macintosh, Empire 1/4 teaspoon grated orange zest 1/4 cup all-purpose flour 1/4 cup granulated sugar 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon 1/8 teaspoon allspice (optional) 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, diced Put flour, sugar and salt in a food processor and pulse a few minutes to combine. Add butter and toss with fingers to coat butter cubes with flour. Pulse 12 to 15 times until butter looks like small peas. With motor running, add 1/4 cup ice water all at once. Pulse to combine and stop just before dough comes together. Turn out onto a well-floured board and form 2 disks. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 1 hour. Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Roll the dough into an 11-inch circle on a lightly floured surface. Transfer to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Peel, core and quarter apples. Cut each into three chunks. Toss chunks with orange zest. Cover tart dough with the apples, leaving a 1 and 1/2-inch border. Combine flour, sugar, salt, cinnamon and allspice in processor. Add butter. Pulse until crumbly.

Pour into a bowl and rub with fingers until the mixture starts to hold together. Sprinkle mixture over apples. Gently fold the border over the sides of the apple mound, pleating to make a circle. (No need to fuss trying to make a perfect circle). Bake crostata 20 to 25 minutes until crust is golden and apples are tender. Cool 5 minutes and then remove to a wire rack or serving dish to cool completely. Adapted from “The Barefoot Contessa” by Ina Garten I like to serve this crostata

with good vanilla ice cream and when I’m feeling a bit more ambitious, I make a delicious homemade caramel sauce to accompany it. Homemade Caramel Sauce Makes about 1 and 1/3 cups 3/4 cup sugar 1/2 cup water 1/4 cup light corn syrup 3/4 cup whipping cream Combine sugar, 1/2 cup water, and corn syrup in heavy medium saucepan. Stir over medium heat until sugar dissolves. Increase

heat and boil without stirring until mixture turns a deep amber color, occasionally brushing down sides of pan with wet pastry brush and swirling pan, about 10 minutes. Remove from heat. Carefully add cream (you may want to stand back as the mixture will bubble vigorously). Stir sauce over low heat until any caramel bits dissolve and sauce is smooth. (Can be prepared one day ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Rewarm over medium-low heat just until pourable, then let caramel sauce cool to room temperature.) Bon Appétit

Different Place Same Great Service! Come visit our new office! 2 Margaret St. Georgetown, DE or CALL US!

302-856-7839 (L-R): JoAnn Taylor, Latrinda Murray, Brice Smart, Bill Taylor, June Taylor, Donald Taylor


JUNE 25, 2006 The Day The Rains Came


MORNING STAR

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 41

Laurel Star Sports Wildcats defeat Dover, 30-14, in home opener By Mike McClure

Laurel senior running back Antwon Trimball is wrapped up by Sussex Tech’s Jamar Beckett on a run during last Friday’s game in Laurel. Trimball ran for 163 yards and a touchdown in the Bulldogs’ 24-0 win. Photo by Mike McClure

Bulldogs shut out Ravens, 24-0, at home sweet home By Pat Murphy The Laurel Bulldogs shut out the visiting Sussex Tech Ravens, 24-0, in their first home game of the season on Friday, September 22. It was the Bulldogs’ first win after losses to upstate powerhouses Glasgow and Caravel in away games. Laurel senior running back Antwon Trimball gained 163 yards on 29 carries for the Bulldogs with a 39-yard touchdown run. Ben Lloyd gained 53 yards on 13 carries and also scored on a 21-yard run. The key play of the game however may have been junior linebacker Cody Bristow’s 80-yard touchdown run down the home sideline late in the first quarter that provided the spark the Bulldogs needed to get their attack going. The Bulldogs drew first blood as the sure footed Kyle Brown kicked a field goal to make it 3-0 at the 7:01 mark of the first quarter. The Bulldogs had to settle for this after their drive stalled on the Raven 13 yard line. Key tackles by Matt Peabody and Jason Palmer stopped the Bulldogs. The Ravens’ offense got going on their next possession, gaining four first downs to reach the Bulldog nine yard line, but on the next play a jarring hit by Scott Hall and Taylor Jones sent the ball flying from the grip of George Godwin. Bristow picked the ball up on one bounce and outran several Raven tacklers for an 80-yard touchdown run. Jones made the hit and Hall knocked the ball loose on the play. Brown’s extra point attempt was good making it a sudden 10-0 Laurel lead. “Yes I thought this was a big play, it did turn the game around. Cody (Bristow) is starting to mature. He’s a good football player and he works hard,” coach Ed Manlove said of his team’s leading tackler after three weeks.

The Delmar varsity football team advanced to 3-0 with its third straight nonconference win with a 30-14 victory over Dover last Friday in Delmar. The Wildcats took a 21-0 lead into half-time and held off a rally by the Senators, scoring the last nine points of the game to clinch the win. Delmar senior Jenson Dennard scored a pair of touchdowns in the first quarter to help the Wildcats to a 14-0 lead. Dennard scored from four yards out with 6:24 left in the quarter and later scampered into the end zone from five yards out with 1:05 remaining in the first quarter. Quarterback Alan Preston found Donald Poole for two points to make the score 14-0. The duo entered the game having connected for three touchdowns in two games. Preston completed a two-yard touchdown pass to Kerry King for the final touchdown of the first half. Seth Benson booted the extra point to make it 21-0. Delmar moved the ball downfield on the opening possession of the second half. On second down and eight from the Dover 16, Preston fumbled the ball after being hit by a Dover defender and the Senators’ Jamil Heath picked up the ball and ran it back 78 yards for a touchdown. Cameron Lucas added the extra point to make the score 21-7 with 9:55 left in the third quarter. The Wildcats started their next drive on their own 20 yard line. Dennard gained four yards and a first down on

Delmar’s Kerry King, shown lining up as a wide receiver, had a two-yard touchdown reception in the first half and an 18-yard reception in the second half during his team’s win last Friday. Photo by Mike McClure

third and three from the 27. Preston completed a 31-yard pass to Matt Campbell on third and 11. Dennard rushed for 10 yards, but a holding penalty negated Campbell’s gain on a third down run. Preston was sacked on third and 14 from the Continued on page 45

Tickets for Delmar-Laurel football game will be on sale in advance Tickets for Friday night’s battle between the Laurel and Delmar varsity football teams, which will take place in Delmar, will be sale in advance in the Delmar School District Office this week. Fans may purchase tickets during office hours to help avoid long lines on game night.

Laurel’s Cody Bristow is all smiles after recovering a fumble and running it back 80 yards for a touchdown. Bristow had seven tackles and two fumble recoveries in the Bulldogs’ 24-0 win over Sussex Tech last Friday. Photo by Mike McClure

The Ravens just couldn’t get a grip on the ball as Zack Adkins fumbled on their next possession and Laurel’s Jerry Henry recovered it just as the second quarter started. The Bulldog drive failed, however, as an incomplete pass and a penalty forced the Bulldogs to punt. The Ravens’ Zach Rickards caught Adkins’ pass and a roughing the passer penalty almost proved to be costly for the Bulldogs, but Danny Snyder, Josh Kosiorowski, and Henry made big defensive plays before Bristow stopped Rickards for a loss on a fourth and nine on the Laurel 43 yard line. Continued on page 45

SHOOTING FOR THE KILL- Delmar’s Kaitlyn Elliott looks for the kill as she hits the ball over the net during her team’s home loss last Thursday. See story on page 44. Photo by Mike McClure


PAGE 42

MORNING STAR

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

EYES ON THE RECEIVER- Laurel Pee Wee quarterback Bryce Bristow prepares to fire a pass downfield to Colby Daye during his team’s 19-6 win over Milford last weekend. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel’s Trent Hearn (32) sacks the Milford quarterback during last Saturday’s Mitey Mite football game. Photo by Mike McClure

Join us for a free Homebuyers Seminar Mortgage lender First Horizon® wants to help you get home with less stress® … that’s why we’re pleased to invite you to a free Homebuyers Seminar: Venue: Seaford Boys and Girls Club Date: October 4th, 2006, 7:00 p.m. RSVP: Danielle White at (800) 238-6662 • Call for directions to the event! First Horizon’s Treg Adams and Trina Ruark of Callaway, Farnell and Moore will take you through the entire process step-by-step, and answer any questions you may have.

(302) 858-1332

(302) 629-4514

First Horizon and Callaway, Farnell and Moore are not affiliated companies. All loans subject to approval. Certain restrictions may apply. © 2006 First Horizon Home Loan Corporation.


MORNING STAR

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 43

Laurel Stars of the Week

Brandon Scott runs behind his blockers during the Laurel Pop Warner Pee Wee football team’s home win last Saturday. Laurel moved to 4-0 with the win over previously unbeaten Milford. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel Pop Warner Pee Wee team hands Milford its first loss

Male Athlete of the WeekAntwon Trimball- Laurel

Female Athlete of the WeekShannon Wilson- Delmar

Delmar goalie Shannon Wilson recorded a total of 10 saves in a pair of shutout wins last week. Wilson and the Wildcat defense have allowed one goal or less in four of their five games entering this week’s games. The team is 5-0 overall this season. Honorable mention- Kate Downes- Laurel; Brittany Joseph- Sussex Tech; Jayme West- Delmar; Brooke Boothe- Delmar; Katie McMahon- Delmar; Jerry Henry- Laurel; Cody Bristow- Laurel; Kyle Brown- Laurel; Matt Campbell- Delmar; Jenson Dennard- Delmar; Delmar offensive line; Corey Basch- Delmar; Trey Webster- Delmar; Jared Rittenhouse- Delmar; Lineker Valladares- Laurel; David Ricksecker- Sussex Tech

Laurel senior running back Antwon Trimball rumbled for 163 yards on 29 carries in the Bulldogs’ win last Friday night. Trimball had a 39-yard touchdown run to help pace Laurel over Sussex Tech.

CONGRATULATES

THE ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

SEAFORD 629-6003 LAUREL 875-4477

HOURS: SEAFORD 5:30 AM - 11 PM LAUREL 10 AM - 10 PM

The Bulldogs’ Johnny McGinnis runs up the middle during his team’s home game against Milford in Pop Warner Mitey Mite football last week. Photo by Mike McClure

Delmar field hockey team earns a pair of shutouts, remain unbeaten The Delmar varsity field hockey team improved to 2-0 in Henlopen Conference play and 5-0 overall with a 3-0 win over Milford on Wednesday and a 2-0 victory over Holly Grove on Thursday. On Wednesday, Katie McMahon, Erin Tingle, and Haley Ramey each had a goal in the second half to pace the Wildcats in a road win over Milford. Delmar goalie Shannon Wilson had two saves as the Wildcats held a 13-2 advantage in shots. Delmar blanked Holly Grove, 2-0, behind a first half goal by Alison Bloodsworth and a second half goal by McMahon on a feed from Lindsay Lloyd. Wilson recorded eight saves in the shutout win.

The Laurel Pop Warner Pee Wee football team won a battle of undefeated teams with a 19-6 home win over Milford last Saturday. The Bulldogs improved to 4-0 while Milford fell to 3-1. Laurel took a 6-0 lead in the first quarter on a six-yard touchdown run by Kegan Yossick. Shawn Miller added a 21-yard touchdown run and an extra point run in the second quarter for a 13-0 Bulldog lead at the half. Zach Whaley caught a 45-yard touchdown pass from Bryce Bristow as Laurel held a 19-0 advantage after three quarters of play. Milford got on the board in the final quarter on a 71-yard touchdown run, but Laurel went on to win, 19-6. Miller had 10 carries for 56 yards, Brandon Scott gained 27 yards on six carries, and Yossick ran five times for 24 yards. Bristow completed two of four passes for 77 yards and Miller completed one of two passes for 48 yards. Colby Daye caught two passes for 69 yards and Whaley had one catch. The Laurel defense held Milford to 129 yards of total offense including 11 plays for negative yards. Yossick led the way with 10 tackles, Miller had nine tackles including a sack, Whaley had six tackles (one sack), Jeremy Eure added six stops, Dylan Bunner had five tackles and a fumble recovery, and Jeron Tull and Scott each had five tackles. Daylin McCausland and Tarez White each chipped in with four tackles, Jacob Carney had two tackles, and Jordan Bailey made one stop. The Laurel Pop Warner teams visit Lower Sussex next Saturday.


PAGE 44

MORNING STAR

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

Delmar girls’ volleyball Delmar Sports Scene By Tommy Young team falls to Smyrna, 3-0 By Mike McClure The Delmar varsity girls’ volleyball team saved its best for last, falling to Smyrna by a narrow margin in the third and final game of last Thursday’s contest in Delmar. Smyrna won the first two games by the score of 25-15 and 25-9 before edging the Wildcats, 25-23, in the final game. In game three, Gabrielle Andrade served up an ace on the opening serve and Delmar went on to take a 2-0 lead. Smyrna took a 7-4 lead before the Wildcats’ Kelsey Murrell spiked the ball to make it 7-5. With Delmar’s Brooke Boothe serving, the Wildcats scored four straight points to take a 10-7 lead. Delmar held a 13-10 advantage before the Eagles scored eight straight points for a 19-13 lead. Delmar rallied from a 20-16 deficit, scoring four straight points with Brandy Foskey serving. Foskey’s set and Jayme West’s kill and an ace by Foskey put Delmar up, 22-20. Smyrna knotted the score at 22-22 and broke up a 23-23 tie, scoring the final two points of the game for the 25-23 win. West had 26 kills, Boothe added 13

Delmar senior Brooke Boothe picks up one of her 13 digs during last Thursday’s home volleyball game. Photo by Mike McClure

digs, and Melinda Quillen contributed five aces for Delmar.

Flag Football regional qualifier tournament to be held in Delmar A seven-on-seven, double elimination flag football tournament for ages 18 and older will be held at the Mason Dixon Sports Complex in Delmar, Maryland (across the street from the Delmar Elementary School) November 4-5. The tournament, which will feature open hand blocking on the line, is a regional qualifier for the World Cup of Flag Football. The cost is $150 per team. Team members are asked to try to wear the same color shirts. Belts and flags will be provided, but you can bring your own. For more information or if you are ready to play, contact Jonathan Layton (302-249-1958) or e-mail him at jonlayton1419956@yahoo.com.

A lot of the local football fans got their first look at the 2006 Delmar High School football team last Friday night as the Wildcats’ first two games were on the road, and I don’t think any of them were disappointed as the “Cats” defeated the Dover Senators 30-14, and it was not as close as the score might indicate because the visitors’ two scores came on a recovered fumble and a “Hail Mary Pass” as Delmar’s defense came up big just as they have all year holding their opposition in check and giving the offense good field position. Meanwhile, Jenson Dennard scored two touchdowns on runs of four and five yards, and Alan Preston’s pass to Kerry King in the end zone gave Delmar three touchdowns in the first half. Seth Benson had his first extra point try blocked, but Preston took care of the missed extra point by tossing a two-pointer to Donald Poole after the third touchdown making the score Delmar 21, Dover 0 at halftime. While the defense was keeping the Dover offense in check, during the second half some of the “Delmar Faithful” got a little nervous when the Wildcats’ nemesis, the fumble, occurred, and Dover scored twice on the fumble and the pass play bringing the visitors to within a single score of tying or going ahead, but Seth Benson calmed them down when he booted a 28-yard field goal to give Delmar a 10-point lead. Then, with only three minutes to play, Matt Campbell returned a Dover punt 63 yards with the help of a couple of nice blocks for the final score of the evening to give the Wildcats their third straight win. This Friday night the Wildcats play their first conference game as Laurel comes to town in a 7:30 contest, so if you want a good seat, come early because both of these towns support their teams. One of the largest crowds of the season is expected. Coach Linda Budd’s undefeated field hockey team added two more wins to their 2006 record last week as they shutout Milford 3-0 on Wednesday and Holly Grove 2-0 on Thursday. In the Milford game, the Delmar goals were recorded by Hali Ramey, Erin Tingle, and Katie McMahon. And on Thursday, Ali Bloodsworth scored an unassisted goal, and Katie McMahon scored the other goal with assist from Lindsey Lloyd. Shannon Wilson had six saves in goal.

Then on Thursday the soccer team won its second game of the season as they defeated Polytech 4-3. Corey Basch led the scoring with two goals, followed by Brent Murrell and Trey Webster with one goal each. Jared Rittenhouse made 14 saves in goal. Also on Thursday, the girls’ volleyball team lost their third match of the season as they were shut out by Smyrna 3-0. Brooke Booth and Melinda Quillen shared honors for their outstanding play in the Delmar loss. ASSISTS AND ERRORS- The only bad news to come out of the Friday night football game was an injury to one of Coach Hearn’s outstanding running backs, Jenson Dennard. Jenson left the game in the second half with an arm injury, and I found out Saturday he has a broken bone in his arm, and his return to action before the end of the season is doubtful. It’s really a shame because this is his senior year, and he has just really turned into an outstanding football player. If he cannot come back, he will leave a big hole in the Wildcat’s offense. The Delmar fall sports program is usually one of the best put out by any school on the Eastern Shore, but this year it’s not up to par mainly because of the photographs of the players, coaches, etc. So, I guess I had better list the coaches of the various teams that have just been approved by the school board. FOOTBALL: Varsity Head Coach David Hearn; Assistant Coaches Mike Dorsey, Bobby Ellis, Mark Quillin, Jonathan Layton, and David Hudson; Varsity, JV, and Middle School Odell Jones; Volunteer Ed Vickers; Middle School Tommy Elliott and Daniel Hudson; Volunteers C.J. Preston, Andy Harris, Neil Carrier, Chad Jones, Harry Neill, and Jeff Melvin. FIELD HOCKEY: Varsity Head Coach Linda Budd; JV Head Coach Stephanie Moore; Assistant Varsity/JV Susan Elliott, Michelle Niblett, and Glenda Evans; Middle School Leslie Lambrose and Mary Gilman. SOCCER: Varsity Head Coach Tim Phillips; Middle School Head Coach Ronald Knight; JV Paul Scovell; Volunteer Chris Elliott and Kelly Dorman; Middle School Volunteer Mark VanGessel. VOLLEYBALL: Head Varsity Coach Chuck Adams; Assistant Varsity/JV Nicole Atkinson; JV Stephanie Fowler; Volunteer Lauren Witzke. CHEERLEADING: April Ennis, Debbie Elliott, and Heather Boothe. WILDCAT VOLLEYBALL-

LAUREL SOCCER- Laurel’s Kyle Brown, left, looks to move the ball during last Tuesday’s soccer game against Cape Henlopen. Laurel’s Lineker Valladares scored his team’s lone goal in a home loss to Cape Henlopen last week. The Bulldogs also fell to Caesar Rodney, 10-0, on Thursday. Photos by Mike McClure

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy! Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to publisher@laurelstar.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

Delmar’s Brandy Foskey sets the ball as teammate Jayme West, right, moves in during the Wildcats’ loss to Lake Forest last week. Photo by Mike McClure


MORNING STAR

Laurel’s Jerry Henry is shown on the sideline following a fumble recovery during the Bulldogs’ home win last week. Henry also had five tackles in Laurel’s home opening win. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel football continued Several plays later, “the Cannon” Ben Lloyd bowled his way through the Raven defense almost untouched for a 21-yard touchdown. Brown’s extra point was good making it 17-0 at the 5:37 mark of the second quarter. The young Ravens again were unable to move the ball against an equally young Bulldog team. Jason Palmer of the Ravens made a tackle of Trimball to help keep the Bulldogs off the scoreboard on their next drive and a booming punt by Taylor Jones had the same effect on the Raven offense as the teams closed out the first half. On the kickoff to the Ravens to open the second half, Laurel’s Alex Hawes stole the ball in the ensuing pile up on the Ravens’ 40 yard line. Sussex Tech’s Zach Rickards stopped Trimball but it was not enough as Trimball gained a first down on the 30 on the next play before Laurel quarterback Lance Kelley was dropped for a nine-yard loss. On the next play, Trimball found himself trapped but he cut across the field for

a 39-yard touchdown run at the 9:25 mark of the third quarter. Brown’s kick again was good, making it a final of 24-0. The Bulldogs tried to dent the scoreboard again but Jamar Beckett blocked Brown’s 32-yard field goal attempt late in the third quarter. The fourth quarter was scoreless but the Bulldogs’ defense did record three sacks in a row led again by Jerry Henry. Laurel’s defense was led by Cody Bristow for the third week in a row. He had seven tackles, two fumble recoveries, and a touchdown. Danny Snyder had seven tackles, Josh Kosiorowski had six followed by Alex Hawes and Henry with five each. Bulldog Notes- Senior Trent Passwaters paced the sideline for the second week in a row awaiting doctor’s orders to allow him to play. “We run ragged don’t we. They want to be in there every play,” Manlove said of Lloyd and Trimball. “Our passing is going to take some time.” As for Laurel’s next opponent, the 3-0 Delmar Wildcats, Manlove would only say, “they are for real... definitely.”

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006 Delmar football continued 30 and Preston’s fourth down pass fell incomplete, ending Delmar’s threat. Dover took over on its own 31 and quickly moved the ball with quarterback Tony Gatto completing a 57-yard pass to Joseph Simmons, Jr. Marquis Leatherbury made a saving tackle for the Wildcats, but Gatto later completed a 15-yard touchdown strike to Jonathan Haith. Lucas added the extra point to make it 21-14 with 1:45 left in the quarter. Delmar started its next possession on its own 20 yard line. Dennard ran for seven yards but he injured his arm on the play and had to leave the game. Sophomore Tevin Jackson ran for 24 yards on third and one to move the ball into Senator territory. Jackson gained 12 more yards behind senior Darren Collins and the offensive line. Jackson picked up seven yards on third and three from the 28 and Preston completed an 18-yard pass to King. Benson knocked in a 28-yard field goal on fourth and goal from the 12 to make it 24-14 with 7:18 to go in the game. Delmar’s Justin Thomas picked up a sack on second and eight from the 37. The Senators were eventually forced to punt and Campbell put the game away with a 63-yard punt return for a touchdown for a 30-14 Wildcat advantage. Jordan Johnson sealed the win with a fumble recovery with 2:26 left in the game. “I couldn’t be more pleased. It was just a good all around team effort. That’s a good football team there,” Delmar head coach David Hearn said of the Senators. Hearn said the strategy early on was to drive the ball up field and take time off

PAGE 45

Delmar’s Matt Campbell celebrates after running a punt for a touchdown to seal the Wildcats’ win over Dover last Friday. Photo by Mike McClure

the clock. “The longer we kept the ball the better it was for us,” Hearn added. “The coaches did a fantastic job of preparing. Everything we tried to do worked tonight,” said Hearn. “The kids did everything the coaches asked them to do.” Hearn was pleased with the job his young running back (Jackson) did in place of the injured Dennard. Special teams, defense, and the blocking of the offensive line also drew raves from Hearn. As for this Friday’s showdown against rival Laurel in the first conference and division game for the two teams, Hearn says his team will enter the game as if it has an 0-0 record. “I don’t care what the records are,” Hearn said. “I’m sure they’ll (Laurel) feel good coming in.”

Wildcats vs. Bulldogs: the last 20 years of this local rivalry 2006200520042003200220012000199919981997-

Hike

????????? Laurel 19, Delmar Laurel 35, Delmar Laurel 21, Delmar Delmar 31, Laurel Delmar 43, Laurel Delmar 40, Laurel Laurel 41, Delmar Delmar 32, Laurel Delmar 14, Laurel

1996199519941993199219911990198919881987-

0 15 6 0 6 8 32 24 12

Bike

Delmar 25, Laurel 8 Delmar 21, Laurel 20 Laurel 21, Delmar 13 Laurel 26, Delmar 7 Laurel 51, Delmar 7 Laurel 24, Delmar 5 Laurel 6, Delmar 6 Laurel 34, Delmar 20 Laurel 34, Delmar 14 Laurel 36, Delmar 0

Ride...

with our latest map Delmarva - National Geographic announces their new Trails Illustrated recreation map. Perfect for hiking, biking, and experiencing the Peninsula. These waterproof, tear-resistant maps provide unique coverage to all eco-tourists at $14.95.

Delmar’s Jenson Dennard, left, looks to get past a Dover defender during his team’s 30-14 win last Friday night. Dennard, who ran for a pair of first half touchdowns, had to leave the game in the second half with an arm injury. Taylor Jones has kicked a number of booming punts for the Bulldogs in their first three games. The two teams meet Friday night in Delmar. Photos by Mike McClure

Laurel and Delmar’s source for local sports coverage- the Laurel Star.

To obtain your map, send a check for $14.95, payable to the Cape Gazette, P.O. Box 203, Lewes, DE 19958 Name___________________________________________ Address _________________________________________ City _______________________ State _____ Zip________

Thank You!

MSP

In cooperation with Morningstar Publications


PAGE 46

MORNING STAR

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

Brent Sutton, Jr., of Bridgeville is shown, left in the 3 car with Milford’s “Nitro” Nick Sapp in the 29 car. Sutton earned his first feature win in the 600 Micro Sprint Class on September 8.

Sutton scores first feature win in 600 Micro Sprint Class Brent Sutton Jr., 15, scored his first feature win in the 600 Micro Sprint Class, the premier national division of Micro Sprint car racing, on Friday, Sept. 8. Sutton, who started on the pole after winning the first heat race, received pressure early in the 25 lap race from Milford’s “Nitro” Nick Sapp. Sapp took the lead but his car failed to far on the restart. Sutton later out dueled Newark’s Scotty Smith, who pulled even with him on the backstretch on two consecutive laps, to earn his first win in the 600 Micro Sprint Class. Sutton, a junior at Sussex Tech, is currently the only high school student competing in this class locally. Most drivers’ ages range from 18 to 40 years old. Brent Jr. is currently in his sixth full season of competitive dire track racing on Delmar-

va.

Ravens’ quarterback Taylor Baynum passes the ball during an SDPR 9-11 year old flag football game last weekend. Photo by David Elliott

The Ravens’ Zion Reed looks to run past Cowboy defenders during a 6-8 year old SDPR flag football game. Photo by David Elliott

The Bridgeville native started racing dirt bikes at age five and later began racing World Karting Association go-karts at age nine. He placed in the top five in points in all World Karting Association classes from 2000-02 and was third in points in Slingshot Dirt Modified Adult Class in 2003. Sutton, Jr. placed sixth in points in 250cc Micro Junior Class in 2004 and was fourth in points in 250 cc in the Stock Airport Adult Class in 2005. Sutton thanks the following sponsors for their support: Advanced Post Frame Systems, Tower Signs, Jan-O-Grams, Kaser Construction, Adkins and Son, M-T Trash, Golf Car Customizers, and Perdue Agri-recycle.

Sussex Tech’s Brittany Joseph, left, and Laurel’s Kate Downes wait for a play to come their way during last week’s game in Laurel. Also shown is Laurel’s Samantha Oliphant. Photo by Mike McClure

Raven Roundup- Tech soccer team edged by Indian River, 1-0 By Mike McClure The Sussex Tech varsity soccer team was edged by Henlopen Conference foe Indian River, 2-1, last Thursday bringing the Ravens’ overall record to 3-3. Ariel Espinoza netted a first half goal for Tech’s only scored of the game. Goalie Geoffrey Morton recorded 10 saves in goal for the Ravens, who fell to 1-3 in conference play. Sussex Tech also blanked Campus Community, 2-0, in a game last Monday. Sebastian Borror and Rob Lehman each scored a first half goal to pace the Ravens in their third win. Goalie Geoffrey Morton had two saves for Sussex Tech. Boys split meet, place third in Middletown Invitational- The Sussex Tech boys’ cross country team topped Milford and fell to Dover in a meet in Dover last week. The team also placed second in the Middletown Invitational last Friday. The Ravens were edged by Dover, 26-29, and were 15-47 winners over Milford. David Ricksecker (18:15) and Tom Ford (18:47) placed second and third overall in Wednesday’s dual meet. Derek Kitchen (19:01) was sixth, Brian Singh (19:14) placed eighth, Ryelan Pavlik (19:49) came in 10th, and Steven Spera (20:06) finished 11th. Ricksecker (17:40) placed fourth in the Middletown Invitational and Ford (17:58) came in eighth. The girls fell to Dover, 18-45, and Milford, 19-39, on Wednesday as Nicole Mahoney (22:24) placed fourth overall. Mahoney also finished 10th in the Middletown Invitational with a time of 21:36. Lady Ravens blanked by Wilmington Friends- The Sussex Tech varsity field hockey team fell to Wilmington Friends, 3-0, last Thursday. Angela Massino had nine saves in goal for the Ravens.

Sussex Tech’s George Godwin is tripped up by a teammate as Laurel’s Gaven Parker (63) and Sussex Tech’s Jake Mitchell (44) look on during last week’s game. Photo by Mike McClure


MORNING STAR

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 47

Seaford Bowling Lanes Friday Trios High games and series Tony Johnson 253 Jody Garber 670 Dot Cannon 239 Tina Rawls 629

Friday Night Mix Ups High games and series Dwayne Perry 280, 739 Darlene Beauchamp 261, 690

Young Adults High games and series Mike Bireley 241 Eric Scott 640 Courtney Sherman 261 Cassie Wooters 609

Baby Blue Jays

High games and series Zachary Carey 164, 321 Lindsey Sullivan 187, 331

High games and series Brian Warrell 285, 807

Thurs. Nite Mixers

High games and series Bruce Downs 271, 743 Brenda Montgomery 278 Jamie Wagoner 729

High games and series Scott Causey 284, 773 Martha Cahall 296, 723

Nite Owl High games and series Robert Trice 320, 816

Tues. Early Mixed High games and series David sirman, St. 255 Bill Wagner 707 Annette Ruths 275 Carole Hubbard 731

Club 50 High games and series Edgar Wilson 276 Fred Phillips 760 Shirley Bramble 285 Jane Wilson 736

Sunday Special

Senior Express High games and series Joe Walker 328, 883 Dorothy Strozier 292 Dot Cannon 812

Weds. AM Mixed High games and series Russ “Mac” MacKenzie 305 Myron Hayes 818 Patty Hoffman 290 Diane Patchett 786

High games and series Jery Wooters 280 Steve Cardillo 801

High games and series Ben Hearn 225 Trey Milligan 616 Diane Hartman 234 Nicole Marciano 617

High games and series Ryan Mulvaney 252, 711 Karen Jerread 230 Wendy Lowe 652

Tues. AM Mixed

Swingin Doubles

Seaford City

Star

Christian Fellowship

Mardel ABC

High games and series Donald Moore 215, 598 Pam Good 228, 624

High games and series Donny Kennedy 293 Nick Wheatley 791 Michelle DeShields 254 Brook DeShields 699

Woodbridge Little League Fall baseball results JBS Construction Phillies 10, T.G. Adams Tigers 7- Sean Leary, Ryan Adams and Tim Petrone combined to allow just one hit and struck out 9 batters. Leary also scored a run. Adams had an RBI double and scored twice, while Petrone added an RBI triple andscored twice. Adding to the offensive attack was Philip Petrone who was 2-3 with three RBI’s and a RS. Joshua Vazquez singled and scored twice and Kani Kane had an RBI single and a RS. Nick Rosado also scored a run for the Phillies. For the Tigers, Dale Breeding had an RBI double and two RS. Tanner King scored twice and Cody Little, Dustin Reeder and Alex Bennington added a run each. Warren Salvage Phillies 10, Millsboro Auto Mart Orioles 0Vinny Gamba and Justin Hignutt fired a one-hitter and struck out 10. Gamba scored a run and Hignutt had an RBI single and two RS. Kasey Jones was 2-3 with a two-run double and a RS. Josh Retzlaff homered, had two RBI’s and a RS. John Keefe was 2-2 with a double a RS and two RBI’s. Zane Garand had an RBI double and scored a run. Justin Warren had an RBI double and a RS and Bradley Brown singled and scored a run. For the Orioles, Trey Tyndall tripled. Schrock’s Plumbing Yankees 5, Millsboro Auto Mart Orioles 0CJ Pleasants and Tyler Schrock combined for a one-hitter. Randall Blades and Skylar Murray both doubled and singled and scored a run. Eddy Boyer singled and doubled and Trevor Schrock singled and scored. For the Orioles, Jordan Stanley singled. Schrock’s Plumbing Yankees 5, Warren Salvage Phillies 0Tyler Schrock and Randall Blades pitched a combined three-hitter. Blades also singled, doubled and scored a run and Schrock added a hit. CJ Pleasants doubled, singled and scored a run, while Eddy Boyer and Trevor Schrock also added hits. For the Phillies, Kasey Jones had two hits and Zane Garand had a hit. Art Collins Trucking Orioles 8, JBS Construction Phillies 7Eric Wharton and Anthony Jefferson combined to strike out nine. Wharton scored twice and Jefferson homered and scored twice. Joshua Keefe was 2-3 with two RS. Jacob Carney singled and Caine Collins and Hunter Rogers scored for the Orioles. For the Phillies, Bruce Wardwell was 2-3 with two RS. Tim and Philip Petrone both singled and scored a run. Kani Kane, Nick Rosado & Sean Leary each scored a run for the Phillies.

STORM 14U PLACE FIRST- The Delaware Storm 14U travel baseball team placed first at the Riptide Rumble at Sports at the Beach. Shown left to right are: first rowKody Bradford, Mike Baglieri Jr., Evan Urgo, Justin Allen; second row-Mike Baglieri Sr., James Smith, Addie Urgo, Josh Tyndall, Coby Royston, Ethan Coffey, Drew Pianka; third row- Jon Coffey, Marshall Betts, Dan Urgo, and Dave Fischer.

NYSA youth soccer results for the week of September 18 Lions 6, Bulls 2- Austin Tanner netted four goals and Shai Mears and Matt Dickerson each had one goal for the Lions in Saturday’s game. NYSA results may be sent tot 302-629-9243 (f) or publisher@seafordstar.com. Please include scores for both teams and first and last names for goal scorers for each team.

Mortgage late?

Speak up quickly or risk losing your home. Too many people in financial trouble wait too long to ask for help— especially if they fall behind on their house payments. The sooner you ask for help, the more options you will have to save your home. If you need assistance, call the confidential hotline to speak to a HUD-certified counselor 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Delaware Storm 15U baseball team golf tournament fundraiser is this Friday at Sussex Pines Country Club The Delaware Storm baseball team will hold a golf tournament on Sept. 29 at the Sussex Pines Country Club in Georgetown. Registration will begin at 8 a.m. The cost is $400 for a four player team and includes golf, cart, lunch and a gift bag. There will also be a silent auction, prizes, and raffles. Any questions or to register, please call Alan at (302)875-3174, Guy at (302)856-9058 or Dean at (410)352-5688. Please help support the 2006 USSSA World Series Champions in their upcoming 2007

Remember, every minute counts.

1-888-995-HOPE

Made possible in part by the Office of the State Bank Commissioner, the Office of the Attorney General, the Delaware State Housing Authority, NeighborWorks ®, the Homeownership Preservation Foundation and the Federation of State Housing Counselors.


PAGE 48

MORNING STAR

Seaford/Laurel Star Tuesday high school scoreboard Field hockey- Seaford 3, Polytech 0- Kelsey Riggleman paced the Jays with two goals and Ali Dunn had one goal in the Blue Jay win. Laurel 1, Sussex Central 1- Samantha Oliphant netted the Bulldogs’ lone goal in the tie. Goalie Dametra Hammond recorded 17 saves. Caesar Rodney 3, Delmar 2 (OT)- Katie McMahon had a goal and an assist, Alison Bloodsworth netted a goal, and Brittani Scott dished out an assist in the loss. Shannon Wilson made 12 saves in the Wildcat loss. Milford 5, Woodbridge 0- Kelli Warner recorded 16 saves in the loss. Soccer- Sussex Tech 4, Woodbridge 0- Sebastian Borror had one goal and two assists; Dan Ash, Peyo Picazzo, and Evan Lee netted one goal each; and Ariel Espinoza dished out two assists for the Ravens. Woodbridge goalie Gilberto Villalobos had 14 saves while Sussex Tech’s Geoffrey Morton had six saves. Greenwood Mennonite 4, Salisbury Christian 3- Josh Muncy paced the Flames with one goal and two assists, Kendall Landis had two goals and an assist, and Matt Borders added one goal. Seaford 6, Polytech 3- Trevor Lee scored three goals to help lead the way for the Blue Jays. Delmar 5, Smyrna 3- Delmar scored a pair of second half goals to break a 3-3 tie. Denny Murray and Trey Webster each had two goals and an assist, Corey Basch scored a goal, and Russell Lecates added an assist for the Wildcats. Jarred Rittenhouse also had 16 saves in the win. Coaches- Send your scores and results to the Star at 302-629-9243 (f) or publisher@seafordstar.com or call 302-629-9788 to be included in this section.

Seaford’s Trevor Lee scores a goal against the Lake Forest goalie last Thursday. Lee had three goals in his team’s 6-3 win over Polytech on Tuesday. Photo by Gene Bleile

Check out the Tuesday page each week in the Star.

One of the leading names in mortgages is right in your own backyard. CHASE PERSONALIZED MORTGAGES • An experienced mortgage specialist will work with you from application through closing—beginning with helping you select the right mortgage. • A variety of mortgage programs are available to meet your needs—fixed- or adjustable-rate, jumbo and government.

Becky Willey Becky Willey Mortgage Specialist Mortgage Specialist

Call for a free consultation today.

BeckyWilley Willey Becky Tel:302-226-8182, 302-226-8182,ext. ext. Tel: 11 11 Toll:866-299-4582 866-299-4582 Toll: Email:rebecca.f.willey@chase.com rebecca.f.willey@chase.com Email:

2A-7615 10/05

Eric EricC. C. Phillips Phillips Tel: ext.13 13 Tel:302-226-8182, 302-226-8182, ext. Toll: Toll:800-780-6962 800-780-6962 Web: Web: www.ericcphillips.com www.ericcphillips.com

All loans are subject to credit and property approval. Program terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. Not all products are available in all states or for all loan amounts. Other restrictions and limitations apply. © 2005 JPMorgan Chase & Co. All Rights Reserved.

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

Henlopen Conference football leading scorers (week three) Name 1. Jordan Wescott 2. Elijah Barlow 3. Jeremy Milner 4. Jenson Dennard Darshon Adkins Jimmy Brittingham Hugo Johnson 8. Donald Poole 9. My’keal Purnell Antwon Trimball Brandon Klein

School Woodbridge Lake Forest Caesar Rodney Delmar Sussex Central Caesar Rodney Smyrna Delmar Seaford Laurel Milford

TD

FG

6 6 6 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

extra pt 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2-pt

Points

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

38 36 36 24 24 24 24 20 18 18 18

Delmar Pop Warner Pee Wee football team tops Cape Sharks, 13-7 The Delmar Pop Warner PeeWee football team beat the previously undefeated Cape Sharks by a score of 13 - 7 last Saturday. James Collins and Terontae Fisher both had great runs to score the touchdowns for the Wildcats, while Caleb Hunter caught a pass in the end zone for the extra point. The Cats had an awesome defensive game led by Josh Wells, Cory Mattox, and Ryan Larney. Cody Shupe also had a fumble recovery. Kevin Trader had an awesome day both offensively and defensively. Fisher, Collins and Willis Dickerson led the Wildcats on the ground. Khalif Connally stopped the Sharks on a last ditch effort for the end zone by pushing his man out of bounds to prevent what would have been the game-tying score.


MORNING STAR

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 49

Snapshots

It’s not the Sharptown Carnival oyster line but it’s close, as seafood lovers line-up for King’s oyster sandwiches. KING’S CHURCH FESTIVAL - Six-year-old Lauren Miller of Laurel (above) exits Delmar’s historic old Mack fire engine Saturday at King’s Church fall festival. Below, Tyler Thompson, Rob Thompson, Jacob Booth, John Lilly and Ken Moore of the Delmar Fire Department have a full engine-load of riders. Photos by Pat Murphy

Eddie McGee, Haroldine Shaner and Lib Fisher enjoy a great day and each others company at King’s Festival.

YARD SALE - Delmar’s annual Fall Yard Sale in the Park drew people from all over the shore. Here are Martin Koerner II, Marianne Koerner and Jeanie Malve from Marion Station, Md. Photo by Pat Murphy.

COMMUNITY AWARENESS DAY - Citizens and canines enjoyed Laurel’s Community Awareness Day held Saturday at Laurel River Park. Photo by Pat Murphy


PAGE 50

MORNING STAR ✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

Health Some medical problems are over emphasized By Dr. Anthony Policastro I frequently write about medical problems that have been over emphasized. One such problem is infection with head lice. There are lots of rumors about head lice. Many of them are just rumors. One of those rumors is that head lice are related to poor hygiene. Some groups like homeless children do have an increased incidence. However, about 1% of children get head lice regardless of hygiene. The condition is usually transmitted by contact. Thus, contact with an infected individual has a lot more to do with getting it than hygiene. Another rumor is that a child needs to have no evidence of lice to come back to school. Children should be allowed in school if they do not have an active infection. Once they receive treatment, their infection is not immediately contagious. The eggs that remain are usually empty. Therefore, they do not spread the infection. The real problem with lice is their growth pattern. Adult lice travel from child to child. They live for 1 – 2 months. During that time they lay about 300 eggs. The eggs attach to hair shafts. They hatch in

To keep (an infected child) away from other children during that period is overkill. It is much more useful to ensure that they get the second treatment 7 – 10 days later. That will break the cycle. about 7 – 10 days. Once they hatch, they are called nymphs. The nymphs feed on the scalp. Within 1 – 2 weeks, they grow into adults. They then can lay more eggs. This life cycle is what causes most of the problems. When adults are found, they are treated with a variety of poisons. The treatment kills the adults. The treatment kills the nymphs. However, it does not always kill all the eggs. The eggs that survive will hatch in 7 – 10 days. They will then remain as nymphs for 1 – 2 weeks. For that reason, it is a good idea to repeat the treatment at about 10 days. There will be no new eggs in that

time because all the adults were killed with the first treatment. All of the eggs that survived will be hatched by that time. None of the new nymphs will be able to lay eggs yet. The result is that the first treatment means the child will not be contagious for the three weeks or so that it takes the eggs to hatch and the nymphs to grow. To keep them away from other children during that period is overkill. It is much more useful to ensure that they get the second treatment 7 – 10 days later. That will break the cycle. Another misconception is that the treatment should be used after hair washing. Water allows the lice to go into a dormant stage. During that time, they are resistant to the treatments. For that reason, the treatment should be applied to dry hair. After treatment the hair can be washed. At that point a fine toothcomb can be used to clean out eggs that are found. They are usually found close to the scalp. Some people treat everyone in the family. However, if individuals are carefully examined and found to have no evidence of infection, that is not necessary.

The spread of infection is almost always from person to person. Some families feel more comfortable cleaning things around the house. This is not usually necessary. However, if someone wants to do this, they can use hot water above 128 degrees. Many household water heaters are set safely at 120 degrees. Washing of clothing, bed linen and hair implements is usually all that is necessary. The good news is that the infection is more of an annoyance than it is a cause of serious symptoms. It can cause scalp itching. It can cause scalp excoriation. It can cause local scalp infection of the open skin with bacteria. It can result in swollen glands in the back of the head or neck due to the scalp infection. However, those are unusual and tend to be minor. The biggest problem with lice is the number of days in school absences throughout the country. If you figure that 1% of all children get it, that is a lot of days missed for a minor problem. Dr. Anthony Policastro is medical director at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital.

Nanticoke announces Healthcare Leadership honorees Nanticoke Health Services announces the recipients of the 2nd Annual Nanticoke Tributes for Healthcare Leadership. The Nanticoke Tributes honor individuals who have made significant contributions to the provision and improvement of healthcare in the communities of western Sussex County. The awards will be presented at a dinner and reception on Nov. 2 at the Baywood Greens.

The Founders Award will be presented to Karl Brown, Sr. for his role in the establishment of Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in 1952. This award will be presented posthumously to his family. The Charles C. Allen, Jr. Philanthropy Award is being awarded to The Auxiliary of Nanticoke Health Services. This award is to recognize individuals or groups who have furthered the spirit of philanthropy in our community by leader-

Coca Cola Bear to visit Nanticoke Memorial Hospital on October 6 Healing Hugs, a community outreach program co-sponsored by Sodexho Health Care Services and Coca Cola, will be held at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital on Friday, Oct. 6. The highlight of the program is a visit from the Healing Hugs Polar Bear, who will make an appearance at the hospital main lobby from 12:30 to 2 p.m. The public is invited to attend this special event and meet the Bear and his Bear Buddy, who will be taking a break from their busy schedule of visiting pediatric patients for this special occasion. The Bear will be passing out high-fives, smiles, and, of course, hugs, as he poses for pictures with guests and entertains the crowd. Healing Hugs is a joint effort on the part of Sodexho Health Care Services and Coca Cola® to brighten the day of pediatric patients in health care facilities. The Bear travels around the country spreading wishes for a speedy recovery with his special brand of comfort and cheer - a great big healing bear hug. He also likes to make surprise visits in the hospital’s cafeteria during lunchtime - to brighten the days of staff and visitors with his fun-loving ways. For more information on Healing Hugs and Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, contact Lori Jones at 629-6611, ext. 2045.

ship and example. The Auxiliary is being recognized for the support they have generated throughout the last 55 years to enhance the provision of healthcare. The Nanticoke Tributes will also recognize the two new inductees into the Nanticoke Physicians Hall of Fame. This award recognizes and honors physicians who have served their communities with dedication and distinction. This year, Judith Tobin, MD and John

Lynch, MD will be presented with the Hall of Fame Award. The Nanticoke Tributes dinner on Nov. 2 will be from 6 to 9 p.m. Mitzi Perdue will be the guest speaker. Cocktail sponsor for the event is Professional Leasing, LLC. Dinner sponsor is Handy Realty. The event will be held at Baywood Greens in Long Neck. Tickets are $75 and may be purchased by calling 629-6611, ext. 2404.

PAIN MANAGEMENT & REHABILITATION

GANESH BALU, M.D. • KARTIK SWAMINATHAN, M.D. • MANO ANTONY, M.D. • ALFREDO ROMERO, M.D.

Worker’s Comp. Injuries Auto Accidents Chronic Neck & Back Pain Medications X-Ray Guided Injections EMG Testing Massage Therapy New Location 34446 King Street Row Unit 2 Old Towne Office Park Lewes, DE 19958 (302) 645-9066

D g in o, M om r lc ome e W oR d fre Al

742 S. Governor’s Ave. Opp. Kent General Hosp. Dover, DE 19904 (302) 734-7246

Ne Acc w ept Pa i n tie g nt s

8957 Middleford Road Near Nanticoke Hosp. Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 628-9100

Sleep Through Your Pain Management Injections


MORNING STAR ✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

Health Bulletins PSA screenings at NMH Nanticoke Health Services will provide PSA screenings on Thursday, Sept. 28. The blood tests will be offered at the Nanticoke’s Cancer Care Center * 1st Floor, adjacent to the hospital from 8 a.m. till 5 p.m. The fee for the test will be $5. Results will be mailed approximately two weeks after the event. Prostate cancer is the most frequently occurring cancer in men. Between 1980 and 1990, prostate cancer incidence increased 65 percent. It is believed that this increase was the result of improved early detection. There is expected to be a further increase related to the use of the prostate specific antigen blood test. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) is a substance that is produced by the prostate gland. Men normally have a small amount of this substance in the blood. PSA levels differ according to age and tend to rise after the age of 60. PSA can be affected by several conditions in the prostate such as the normal enlargement in the prostate, which occurs with aging. Infection or inflammation and surgery to the prostate can also cause increased levels. There is no specific level of PSA that tells whether prostate cancer is present; however the higher the level, the more likely it is that cancer may be developing. Nanticoke Memorial Hospital encourages men over the age of 50 to take advantage of this service. If you are 40years-old and at high risk of developing this cancer you are also encouraged to participate. African-American men are at

high risk for developing prostate cancer, as are men who have a family history of the disease. For additional information on the PSA screening contact the Cancer Care Center at 302-629-6611, ext. 2588.

2006 Memory Basket The LifeCare at Lofland Park Memory Walk Team is now selling the Longaberger Pen Pal Memory Basket. The basket is trimmed in purple around the top with ribbon tacks and has a special engraved tag. The cost is $48 which also includes the basket protector. All proceeds benefit the Alzheimer’s Association Delaware Valley Chapter. For more information contact Tawnya at 302-628-3000 ext., 8452; or dennist@nanticoke.org.

PAGE 51

the Seaford Moose, located on Rt. 13A in Seaford. The evening will consist of 20 exciting games and will feature several baskets Longaberger products as prizes. Advance tickets are $20 per person, $25 at the door. Advance ticket includes a chance to win the Large Hamper and the Autumn Treats set with Wrought Iron legs or one of the several door prizes. Nearly 30 chances to win. Refreshments will be available. For ticket information contact the hospital at 302-629-6611, ext. 2404 or via email at MorrisR®nanticoke.org. All pro-

ceeds for the two events will be donated the American Heart Association Heart Walk 2006.

Memory Walk Saturday, Sept. 30 The Alzhemier’s Association, Delaware Valley Chapter, will be hosting the 2006 Memory Walk on Saturday, Sept. 30, in Rehoboth Beach. The walk will begin at 10 a.m. from Grove Park, with registration starting at 8:30 a.m. To support the Memory Walk 2006 register online at www.alzdelawarevalley. org, or for more information call 854-9788.

Nanticoke hosting benefits Nanticoke Memorial Hospital will be hosting two fundraising events to benefit the American Heart Association Heart Walk. On Saturday, Sept. 30 “Pumping Up The Volume” concert will be held at the Seaford Middle School auditorium. The vocal talents of Nanticoke employees and their families are sure to entertain the crowd with sounds of Country, Rock ’N Roll, Contemporary Christian and Classical music. There will be music for everyone. Emcee for the evening will be WBOC’s Jimmy Hoppa. Cost is $20 for admission. Tickets are available by calling the hospital at 302-629-6611, ext. 2550 or via email at Millerl@nanticoke.org. The second fundraiser will be a Bingo on Thursday, Oct. 5, starting at 7 p.m. at

CHIROPRACTIC “Your Health Is A Valuable Resource”

Dr. James Hummel Advanced Chiropractic Massage Therapy • Physical Therapy AUTO & WORK INJURY Medicare & Most Insurance Accepted

Nanticoke Chiropractic Center 415 W. Stein Hwy.

(302) 628-8706

SENIOR CITIZENS Seaford Center Genesis ElderCare® Network • Retirement • Assisted Living • Skilled Nursing Care 1100 Norman Eskridge Highway, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-3575 • Fax 302-629-0561

HOME CARE “The best care, by the best people, in the best place … HOME” Compassionate, Medicare-certified care in the comfort of your home • Skilled nursing services • Physical & occupational therapy • Medical social worker services • Home health aide services

PHYSICAL THERAPY Southern Delaware Sports Care & Rehab Providing EXCELLENT OUTCOMES with a PERSONAL TOUCH Manual Therapy & Exercise Programs • Fibromyalgia & Arthritis • Auto and Work Injuries • Spinal Injury • Orthopedic Sports Injuries Park Professional Center, Suite 203 1320 Middleford Rd. 302-629-5700

ORTHOPAEDICS Richard J. Sternberg, M.D. Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon Specializing in Orthopaedic Surgery, Sports Medicine, Adult Reconstruction, Arthritis, Fractures & Injuries, Bone & Joint Disease, Occupational Orthopaedics ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS

SUSSEX ORTHOPAEDIC & REHABILITATION CENTER

1200 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford, DE 19973 302629-7900

OBSTETRICS/GYNECOLOGY ORTHOPAEDICS Women’s Medical Center, PA Welcomes

DR. ABHA GUPTA NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS

302-629-4914

Adolescent Gynecology High Risk Pregnancy Laproscopy Surgery • Hysterscopy

800-990-3909 toll free 302-629-6542 fax

302-629-5409 • Fax 302-629-8072

PHARMACY

URGENT CARE

DELIVERY SERVICE OUR SPECIALTY

Sussex Medical Center

Call us anytime. We’ll be happy to deliver your low-priced prescriptions and drug needs at no extra charge.

BI-STATE PHARMACY

Edward M. Asare, Pharmacist 5 East State St., Delmar, DE 19940

302-846-9101

Hrs: 9 am-7 pm Mon.-Fri.; 9-3 Sat.

1301 Middleford Rd., Seaford, DE

H. PAUL AGUILLON, MD

GENERAL & FAMILY PRACTICE INTERNAL MEDICINE • WALK-INS

X-Ray and Lab on Premises Minor Emergencies • Lacerations Office Gynecology - Pap Smears Executive, Sports & Insurance Physicals Orthopedics • Minor Surgery Cardiology • Stress Testing

Se habla español 401 Concord Road, Blades, DE 19973

629-6664


PAGE 52

MORNING STAR

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

Letters Residents should have say in annexation and development Congratulations to the Hearn’s Pond residents who recently launched a successful campaign to stop the pending annexations by the city of Seaford. Their valiant efforts encouraged the voters to cast a ballot against annexing those parcels containing approximately 559 acres. It goes to show that people are not ready to have their peaceful way of life destroyed by developers. Unfortunately, things work differently in the town of Laurel when it comes to annexations. The townspeople do not have the opportunity to cast a ballot. That decision rests solely with the six members of the town council and the mayor. When it comes to major annexations, like the upcoming Discovery Group project, shouldn’t the townspeople of Laurel be able to cast a ballot either for or against it? If this project goes through, it is going to have a major impact on all of our lives. Should that decision be left in the hands of seven people? These seven individuals do not represent the people who are going to be affected the most. I am speaking of the families who currently reside on Camp Road, Discountland Road, Taylor Mill Road, Colonial Road and Edgewood Avenue. Families, who up until now have enjoyed a peaceful country lifestyle. If the town of Laurel and developers have their way, we can all kiss that goodbye. How can it be appropriate for them to take that away from us? I have no problem with the town of Laurel wanting to grow. If handled properly, growth can be a good thing. However, rapid growth handled improperly can be as detrimental as no growth at all. Commercial growth should be limited to the Rt. 13 corridor and not placed in an existing residential neighborhood. Annexing 480 plus acres at one time is quite an undertaking. Keep in mind that approximately 460 acres of this parcel is currently farmland and is zoned agricultural/residential. If this parcel is annexed that will change. By the time the developers are finished, our side of the county will resemble the coastal areas. The proposed 1.3 million square feet of retail space, three motels, ball fields, sports stadiums, and 1,400 residential units will impact our area in several ways. One of the major impacts to our area will be traffic. In the most recent edition of the Laurel Star, the developer proudly touts the fact that twice each year, 25,000 people will converge on the little town of Laurel. They act as though that is a good thing. What they do not take into account is how this will affect the roadways. When you add the 7,000 to 10,000 jobs this will bring to the area (I suspect this number is highly inflated) and the 2,500 to 3,000 people living in the development, we are looking at possibly more than 20,000 vehicles added to the congestion we have now. Does that sound like a good thing to you? If you think traffic on Rt. 13 and Rt. 9 is terrible now, especially during the summer months, guess what? It will only get worse. No matter what improvements DelDOT makes, even if they make Route 13 a six-lane highway, there will still be major

gridlock. Driving on Rt. 13 will be like driving on Rt. 1 in the beach areas. How can this be a good thing? With all those additional people coming to the area, there will be an increase in air pollution, trash, noise, crime and traffic accidents. Of that you can be certain. What isn’t certain is if this is what the citizens of Laurel want or if it is a way for a small group of politicians and developers to make a name for themselves. The developers can say that they are doing this for the town of Laurel, but when it comes right down to it, developers will not venture into a project unless it is a moneymaker. The developers are telling Laurel’s governmental officials what they want to hear because they know there are many infrastructure issues that have not been dealt with appropriately over the years. Have you ever heard of a case where a developer spent millions of dollars out of the goodness of their heart to revitalize a town? I haven’t. Developers will only agree to a project if they can reap major financial benefits. That is the bottom line. This brings me to the upcoming Planning and Zoning hearing scheduled for Wednesday, Oct. 4, at 7 p.m. in the Laurel Fire Hall. For those of you who feel as I do, this meeting will be your opportunity to voice your opposition to this project. Please come out and let your voice be heard. Rick Culver Laurel

If development allowed, small town lifestyle will be gone The small town way of life many of us have come to enjoy will be the stuff of memories if the Discovery Group LLC and the town council prevail with their plans to annex and develop 480-plus acres of land between Camp Road, Discountland Road and Colonial Road. I am not against growth and development as long as it is proactive, properly planned and includes input from the public — especially from those who will be living next door to it. It shouldn’t matter if the “line in the sand” puts the residents in the county and the development in the city. It has been said that this proposed development will take 10 to 15 years to build. That is how big it is. It will have 1.3 million square feet of retail space, six parking garages (2 to 4 stories high), three motels (one of which is projected to be 10 to 15 stories in height), a movie theater, nine baseball/softball fields, one major baseball stadium, one major sports complex for soccer and track events, seven soccer fields, tennis courts, several basketball courts and an equestrian center complete with RV parking. Also in the plans are a water tower and a new “town center” for office buildings. Does this mean the town of Laurel is moving from west to east? It could happen. And let’s not forget about the 1,400 residential units scattered throughout the development. An article in the most recent edition of the Laurel Star also hints that an amusement park will be “within walking distance” of this development. Could it be that the fields off of Taylor Mill are next to go?

It has been said that Camp Road and Taylor Mill Road will need to be improved in order to accommodate the traffic. I’m sure commuters will enjoy taking roads less traveled while that is being done. For some reason, they left out Discountland Road even though it runs right past the development and is well used. Interesting. The logistics of this development boggle the mind. Will the new water tower be connected to city water, or will it be filled via its own well? I wonder what will happen to the wells of the residents in the area if the tower is supplied from its own well. What about supplying electricity to this development? Can something as large as this be added to the existing power grid without upgrades? A moral question would be what is the justification for using the precious resources of electricity for this project when oil is costing upwards of $90 per barrel? Of major concern is the need for city water and sewer services to the development. Per Mayor Shwed in the Sept. 7 issue of the Laurel Star, “We will not be expecting our existing taxpayers to foot the bill for a wastewater plant upgrade brought on by new demands. The Discovery Group has told us it will fund any necessary enhancements needed to handle the wastewater treatment needs brought on by this project.” The key words are “we will not be expecting…”. Those words are not reassuring by any stretch of the imagination. Local or not, the Discovery Group LLC is a corporation just like any other corporation. Will they stay the course when working on this project or abandon it (or parts of it) when its costs exceed their project budget? Money is a finite resource. The reported number of jobs this project will generate grows with each article that is published. Note the number is between 7,000 and 10,000. OK. What kind of jobs? Jobs with good companies that offer longevity, great salaries and wonderful benefits so people can prosper, or the kind of jobs that pay minimum wage and rely on part-time workers so they don’t have to pay for benefits such as health insurance? If the planners of this development are expecting upwards of 25,000 tourists to visit twice each year, the town of Laurel had better have some serious security measures in place to protect the people here from the people coming in and vice versa. In the Sept. 21-27, 2006, edition of the Laurel Star, there were four reports of crimes being committed on Discountland Road — assaults, personal injury/accident, drugs/resisting arrest, and one suspect who aimed a gun at an officer. Those are the ones we know about because they were reported in the paper. Not every crime is reported to the police. Even if the 25,000 tourists do not materialize, the town of Laurel will have to contend with an increase in crime that happens when you have approximately 10,000 more people living and working in the area. It is difficult to comprehend the scope and magnitude of this project. As of the date of this letter, the local residents living within 200 feet of the proposed development have had 25 days to do just that even though the public record shows this proposal was introduced many months ago. It seems it wasn’t publicized well. I wonder

why. This project will destroy an ecosystem as the land to be developed is farmland, complete with low spots (also known as wetlands) that never dry up. It has been a resting stop for thousands of migrating waterfowl for many years. It is an incredible sight when thousands of birds take flight simultaneously after stopping to rest on their way to, or from, their nesting grounds. The deer traverse the field on their way to 100-year-old trails in the wooded areas and feed on vegetation in and around the field. This field is also home to many of God’s smaller creatures that are the food source for hawks, owls and red foxes. It distresses me deeply to think that the quiet and respectful way of life the residents have come to enjoy, and the valuable habitat right outside my door, will be destroyed so Laurel can become a “destination” spot like Orlando, Virginia Beach and Myrtle Beach (Laurel Star, Sept. 2127, 2006, edition). If you also believe that this proposed development is out of character for the way of life in Laurel, I encourage you to attend the Planning and Zoning meeting scheduled for Wednesday, Oct. 4, at 7 p.m. in the Laurel Fire Hall. This will be your chance to speak out in opposition and to preserve our small town way of life. Felicia Culver Laurel

Resounding annexation defeat generates a warm feeling I wanted to add my comments to those that I am sure you are getting concerning the recent annexation vote. What a warm feeling it gave me, and most of my neighbors, to learn of the resounding defeat that this proposal received. It would have been easy for the voting public to be deceived by the lack of information, double meaning answers and just plain subterfuge surrounding this issue. If is had not been for the organization formed by the residents of Hearn’s Pond this vote possibly would have passed. As far as I am concerned not one person from city hall ever mentioned the fact that every item in the budget of senior citizens would eventually be increased. Additional money would be required for sewer, water, electricity, road additions and repairs, school requirements and other expenses. The fact that the designation for the new additions would, in all probability, be changed to allow more than the current maximum allowable housing per acre would surely compound the problem. I am extremely happy that the residents of Seaford have made known their wishes, even if it upsets some members of the city administration. Robert L. Pellow Seaford

Town abandoning its town center to move to the east For reasons unknown to me, the town of Laurel (council and planning and zoning) seems to be abandoning its current lo-


MORNING STAR cation and moving across Rt. 13 to the east side. At least, that looks like the big picture. If you haven’t made up your mind about how much growth is good for your town, consider the following: The proposed site by the Ocean Atlantic Associates and the David G. Horsey family is marked as “Highest Value Agriculture” and “Working Forests” according to the 2002 Preliminary Land Use Survey Map produced by the Delaware Office of State Planning Coordination. Both of these terms are self explanatory and in the wake of their loss, as is happening across the state, our quality of life actually decreases. To the residents of Laurel and the greater Laurel area, I ask are you ready for an influx of perhaps 25,000 people, twice a year, congesting the area roads, while at on any given day it’s a challenge just to cross to the other side? Are you ready for the population? With the proposed 1,400 homes on the Horsey site on Discount Land, Camp and Colonial Roads, given 2.5 people per household, the 3,500 new residents will bring the town population to well over the projected figures for the year 2024 according to the town’s Web site (see page 21, 2004 Greater Laurel Comprehensive Plan under Population Growth and Land Absorption Projection). This does not include two other housing (and one retail) developments that may already be in the planning stages. Remember, Discount Land Road didn’t even qualify for a traffic light two years ago, but I bet it will now. Are you ready for this? Yes, town growth should be exciting and we should embrace changes that would bring in new businesses and residents. But what about the existing town of Laurel? Aren’t there town homes on 10th Street that sit empty and about 5,000 homes on the unsold market in Sussex County? I’m for growth, but not at the expense of seemingly forsaking the town in its current state or trampling out-of-townlimits residents. If you live on the west side of town, you may want to look at the town’s Comprehensive Growth Plan on the Web site and see that you too will be facing new development challenges in the future. With the estimated jobs of 6,000 to 10,000 the Discovery Group has offered up with this project, I am curious if those employment opportunities will be minimum wage or slightly higher, and if they will offer full-time benefits such as insurance necessary for the families they are asking to move to the project. And will the higher paying management positions be

✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

filled by the retailers’ corporate offices, as is usually the case? We must consider why we live here. If you live out of town, it’s probably because you enjoy your home in a quiet country setting, close to amenities, but not too close. And if you live in town, its because you love the charm and history of your home and perhaps the friendships of neighbors. I do not feel comfortable with the relocation of Sharp Energy’s Propane Tank Farm just feet from my doorstep. What inconsiderate planner decided it was better there than near their proposed homes? Must have something to do with safety and property value. The Horsey project figures given to us are huge; the benefits we’re being told are great. So why are all the people I’ve talked to upset to have such a wondrous conglomeration of retail stores, restaurants, parking garages, RV park, stadiums, sports fields, homes and an amusement park shoved down their throats? Maybe because it tastes bad and residents are being blindsided and we have no napkin big enough to keep it down. And actually, residents of Laurel, you have no vote either. Check your town charter. There are seven people in charge who hold your daily way of life in their hands. Leslie Carter Laurel

Defeat of annexation means that town will lose tax revenue I am afraid a lot of Seaford voters listened to a small group of people and may not have gotten all the information they needed regarding the vote on the annexation of the property. If they voted against annexation thinking that would stop the development of new houses, they may be disappointed. I don’t know at this writing what the developers have decided, but they can still build the developments. Only now Seaford will not get any of the tax money the new residents will pay; nor will the city have any control over the developments. It will all be done through the county. The houses may still be built, and the traffic may still become congested. All last week’s vote amounted to was depriving the city of more tax money. Elaine Watson Seaford

Take care of town first before annexing more land The failed annexation request of six

PAGE 53

parcels into town was no surprise. Although the people of Seaford want the town to progress, most people think the problems in town should be corrected first. Nylon Capital Shopping Center is rapidly deteriorating, and sits idle. The people in West Seaford, many elderly, are without proper transportation, and desperately need a grocery store nearby. Instead of utilizing an additional hundreds of acres of prime farmland, let us extend our efforts to utilize the property already in town. Wilton Porter Seaford

Presbyterian church, flooded in June rains, will be rebuilt On June 25, “the day the rains came,” the Seaford Presbyterian Church was flooded with 42 inches of water on its lower level. As a result its kitchen, fellowship hall and Sunday school rooms were inundated and destroyed. Historically, the church’s lower level has flooded before and always it has been salvaged and up and running again as soon as things dried out. This time, however, the kitchen had to be gutted, partitions removed, etc. Lost were the appliances, large and small, all the chairs and tables and lots of supplies for Sunday school and other functions. The congregation has been struggling to reach an agreement of what should be done and in a great leap of faith has decided to rebuild. The earth around the church on Bridgeville Road will be regraded, berms heightened, walkways re-engineered and the kitchen and fellowship hall and Sunday schoolrooms restored. Like most other facilities and homes in the area that suffered loss due to the storm in June, the insurance for this type of damage was not applicable. A variety of fund raising activities are being considered for the next year to cover the costs of rebuilding. The first will be an outdoor yard sale to be held on Saturday, Oct. 7, from 8 a.m. to noon. The church is well known in the community for its yard sales and this one will be no exception. Lots of items from the kitchen that are no longer being used will be for sale including dishes and silverware. Members and friends will contribute other items and there will also be a refreshment stand for shoppers. The rain date of the sale will be the following Saturday, Oct. 14.

Donn’s Hair Alternative.

Call me for an appointment at 118 N. Pine St. Seaford, DE 19973

302-629-4172.

In a letter that appeared in last week’s Seaford and Laurel Stars, I failed to qualify that when I said the town does nothing, I was speaking of the political members who either justify the Laurel Redevelopment Corporation, or stand back in fear, and have been the cause of the death of Laurel. The Public Works Department, the police with what force they are allowed to have, and the code enforcement officer do tremendous jobs! I hope that you are all aware that when Laurel had no power, Community Awareness Day in the Park happened anyway. Woody Vickers brought a generator to the park so that the band could play. It was wondrous! When I have had a property problem, each one has been solved quickly and appropriately. These people should be congratulated on a daily basis. They are the reason why there are pretty, pretty flowers. Mel Baron Laurel

Drug activity going on in Sussex County, despite denials It is apparent to me that the State Police Administration and a couple of local police chiefs want to deny that there is any gang activity in Sussex County, claiming they have no such intelligence on this issue. This is blatantly inaccurate. The National Drug Intelligence Center in March 2002 reported that Delaware has street gangs such as the Latin Kings, Bloods and Crips with drug related arrests for juveniles increased by 30 percent in 19981999? Sussex County leads in statistics on drug related offenses. Some of the information from the report discusses that many of the local independent Caucasian and African American dealers are dominant transporters and wholesale and retail distributors of drugs in the state who maintain relationships with Dominican and Jamaican criminal groups based in Baltimore, Los Angeles, Miami, New York City, Philadelphia and Washington DC. For more information on the Drug Intelligence Report, please read the article on the Web at: www.usdoj.gov/DC/pubs07/796/overview. htm Judson Bennett

Beverly Hutton

Coastal Conservative Network Lewes

Seaford

Erin Calloway formerly of TNT Trenz Family Salon is now at

Writer adds postscript to a previous letter to the editor

ROOFING SALE       

The New Wave In Roofing

Fast, easy installation Goes directly over old roof Won’t rust or corrode Reduces noise Provide added insulation Lifetime Limited Warranty Visit us at www.ondura.com

*White *Brown *Red *Gray *Green *Tan

Sale

1449*

*Black *Blue

$

*IN STOCK COLORS

Per 48”x79”Sheet

Hwy. 13 & Delaware Ave. Laurel, DE 19956 LUMBER & HOME CENTER 302-875-7588


MORNING STAR ✳ SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 54

Opinion Don’t miss this special event

Guest Opinion Hedge Fund Study Act needs action By Congressman Mike Castle Investing one’s savings is one of the most important financial decisions a person can make and it is absolutely critical that everyone goes into these decisions with their eyes wide open about the potential benefits and risks. This most certainly applies to people investing large amounts of money into hedge funds, which have a substantial impact on the U.S. economy. In fact, hedge funds are now a $1.2 trillion industry and can be high-risk, high stake investments. While usually targeted to wealthy investors, hedge funds are seeing an increase in ties to pension plans and consequently, the financial earnings of millions of Americans. For that purpose, I think it is necessary that regulators explore hedge funds and the potential risks they pose to financial markets and investors. Recently, I introduced the “Hedge Fund Study Act” which would require the President’s Working Group on Financial Markets to conduct a study on the hedge fund industry and examine the changing nature of hedge funds. I believe this is a good first step towards determining what type of disclosure hedge funds should provide to regulators and will provide the needed transparency in our financial system that is important for market discipline and investor confidence. As part of the study, regulators would be required to look at: • The changing nature of hedge funds and what characterizes a hedge fund; • The growth of hedge funds within financial markets; • The growth of pension funds investing in hedge funds; • Whether hedge fund investors are able to protect themselves adequately from risk associated with their investments; • Whether hedge fund leverage is effectively constrained; • The potential risks hedge funds pose to financial markets or to investors; • Legislation relating to appropriate disclosure requirements for hedge funds; • The type of information hedge funds should disclose to regulators and the public; • The type of oversight members of the President’s Working Group should have over the hedge fund industry. This study will come at a good time, as there is much recent discussion over the Securities and Exchange Commission’s ruling that required hedge fund advisors to register with the SEC and undergo routine inspections. This ruling was rejected by the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia and thrown out partly because the court called hedge funds “notoriously difficult to define.” If we can’t even decide on a definition of hedge funds, how can we regulate them? It is time to take a closer look and my legislation will provide the needed answers. I am sure that this issue will continue to be prevalent in the news and in the minds of investors throughout the country. For that reason, I will work hard to see that this study is carried through and consequently, the recommendations that will ensure greater transparency and disclosure in this high-stakes investment tool.

Morning Star Publications Inc. P.O. Box 1000 • 628 West Stein Highway Seaford, DE 19973 629-9788 • 629-9243 (fax) morningstarpub@ddmg.net Subscriptions - $17 a year in-county, $22 a year in Kent and New Castle, Del., and Federalsburg, Sharptown and Delmar, Md.; $27 elsewhere out of state.

One of the most publicized events in western Sussex County will take place next Thursday. Those who organize and promote the St. John’s House Tour have always done an exceptional job and this year they have added features to make the event more exciting. Starting in July the promoters announce the event, the committee, and the House Tour hosts. They follow with photos and write ups of all the homes on tour. This year they have added photos and write ups about the silent auction. They are to be admired for their efforts to promote the event. We have run many of their releases and in this edition we have information on pages 24 and 19. For those too busy to turn to those pages, the details follow: The 33rd St. John’s House Tour in Seaford will be held on Thursday, Oct. 5, from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost is $10 per person. Tickets may be bought at the church on October 5. A luncheon will be available in St. John’s Church hall, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., $6. A boutique and silent auction will be held in the church hall from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Next Thursday all the hard work of the members of the committee will be rewarded. Let’s pray for good weather to make this a day to remember. By the way, the regular editorial cartoon this week is being replaced by a description of St. Luke’s church, which is also on the tour.

the fire. The victim saturated the debris RYANT ICHARDSON with gasoline and attempted to ignite the Starting in July the debris. The gasoline vapors ignited and promoters announce created a flash fire inthe event, the commitjuring the victim. “Judy Bodner, 49, tee, and the House sustained 2nd and 3rd Tour hosts. degree burns to both arms and hands along with 2nd degree burns Real headlines to her face. She was transported by I like to end my column on a ambulance to the Kent General light note. Here are some more Hospital in Dover.” headlines that appeared in print. I have heard about too many Drunk gets nine months in violin case people being burned when they use Talk about prison overcrowding. gasoline for this purpose. Do not take a chance with gasoline. Minors refuse to work after death It should never be used to start a Who could blame them? fire. It is too volatile.

B

R

Beware of gasoline The following news release came to our office Tuesday: “The Delaware State Fire Marshal’s office has ruled that an outdoor fire that injured a Magnolia woman was an accident. “The fire occurred shortly before 4:30 pm in the 200 block of Lambert Drive, Meadowbrook Acres. State Fire Marshal deputies were alerted and conducted the investigation. “The homeowner was attempting to burn tree debris in her yard when she used gasoline to initiate

President Bryant Richardson Vice President Pat Murphy Secretary Tina Reaser Treasurer Carol Wright Richardson Managing Editor Mike McClure

Editorial Lynn Parks Tony Windsor Gene Bleile Kay Wennberg Cindy Lyons Taylor Circulation Karen Cherrix Composition Rita Brex Carol James

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 202 North St., Seaford The origin of this parish can be traced to 1704, when a log chapel known as St. Mary’s was constructed on Chapel Branch in Northwest Fork Hundred. In 1835, the Rev. Corry Chambers was sent to the Seaford area by the Diocese of Delaware. Finding St. Mary’s in ruins, he organized St. Luke’s from the remnants of the former congregation. Services were held for a time in Union Meeting House at High and Church Streets. This site was donated by Dr. John Gibbons, and construction of the present church was begun in 1838. On May 28, 1843, St. Luke’s was formally consecrated by Bishop Alfred Lee. The church was remodeled and enlarged in 1886. Facilities were expanded with the completion of a Parish House in 1931. Prominent citizens interred in the adjoining cemetery include William H. Ross, Governor of Delaware (18511855); and Edward L. Martin, member of the United States House of Representatives (1879-1883). St. Luke’s Episcopal Church was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1977.

Sales Beverly Arciuolo George Beauchamp Barbara Conn Rick Cullen Carole Kauffman Jimmy McWilliams Debbie Bell

Laurel Star Advisory Board Dale Boyce Sandy Davis Toni Gootee H. Robert Hickman Jane Hudson Linda Justice Albert Jones Kendal Jones Mike Lambert

Janet Lee Don Phillips Cora Selby Richard Small Debbie Waller Seaford Star Advisory Board Shirley Baynum Beverly Blades Tommy Cooper

Edward Cranston Mike Hall Nancy Harper John Hollis Karen Johnston Jan Lundquist Ron Marvel John Rittenhouse Bill Royal Steve Theis Layton Wheeler

Publishers of the Seaford Star and Laurel Star community newspapers, (Salisbury, Md.) Business Journal and the Morning Star Business Report


MORNING STAR

âœł SEPT. 28 - OCT. 4, 2006

PAGE 55

Seven-Day forecast for Western Sussex County Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Tides Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Sun, then clouds

Not as warm

Partly sunny

An afternoon shower possible

Mostly sunny

Mostly sunny

Partly sunny

77/57

67/45

66/46

71/52

72/50

73/53

74/53

Almanac Statistics through Tuesday Sept. 26 at Georgetown, Delaware

Temperatures

Precipitation

High for the week . . . . . . . . . . . Low for the week . . . . . . . . . . . Normal high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Normal low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Average temperature . . . . . . . .

. 84° . 45° . 77° . 55° 66.7°

Total for the week . . . . . . . . . . 0.31� Total for the month . . . . . . . . . . 6.98� Normal for the month . . . . . . . . 3.43� Total for the year . . . . . . . . . . 34.06�

Smyrna 75/57 Dover 76/57

Vienna, MD

The moon, and its relative distance to the Earth, affects tides on a monthly basis. When the moon is farthest from the Earth (apogee), tides of decreased range or currents of decreased speed occur. When the moon is closest to the Earth (perigee), the occurrence of increased range or currents of speed is more prevalent.

Date October 6 October 19 November 3 November 15

Time 10:08 a.m. 5:36 a.m. 6:52 p.m. 6:21 p.m.

Date December 1 December 13 December 27 January 10

Perigee Apogee Perigee Apogee

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

Rise .6:55 a.m. .6:56 a.m. .6:57 a.m. .6:58 a.m. .6:59 a.m. .7:00 a.m. .7:01 a.m.

First Sep 30

Harrington 76/57

Time 7:07 p.m. 1:57 p.m. 8:49 p.m. 11:27 a.m.

Milford 76/57 Greenwood 77/57

Lewes 79/59

Bridgeville 77/57

Sun and Moon Sun Thursday . Friday . . . . Saturday . . Sunday . . . Monday . . Tuesday . . Wednesday

. . . . . . .

Set .6:50 p.m. .6:49 p.m. .6:47 p.m. .6:46 p.m. .6:44 p.m. .6:43 p.m. .6:41 p.m.

Full Oct 6

Day High Low High Low Thurs. 6:01 a 12:42 a 6:28 p 12:32 p Fri. 6:47 a 1:31 a 7:20 p 1:22 p Sat. 7:44 a 2:29 a 8:21 p 2:23 p Sun. 8:50 a 3:34 a 9:29 p 3:32 p Mon. 10:02 a 4:40 a 10:37 p 4:44 p Tues. 11:12 a 5:40 a 11:41 p 5:51 p Wed. 12:13 p 6:34 a —- 6:53 p

Sharptown, MD Shown is Thursday’s weather. High Low High Low Temperatures are Thursday’s highs Day and Thursday night’s lows. Thurs. 9:20 a 3:35 a 9:47 p 3:25 p Fri. 10:06 a 4:24 a 10:39 p 4:15 p Sat. 11:03 a 5:22 a 11:40 p 5:16 p Sun. 12:09 p 6:27 a —- 6:25 p Mon. 12:48 a 7:33 a 1:21 p 7:37 p Tues. 1:56 a 8:33 a 2:31 p 8:44 p Wed. 3:00 a 9:27 a 3:32 p 9:46 p

Apogee and Perigee

Perigee Apogee Perigee Apogee

Nanticoke River Roaring Point, MD

Moon Thursday . Friday . . . . Saturday . . Sunday . . . Monday . . Tuesday . . Wednesday

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

Rise .1:02 p.m. .2:03 p.m. .2:57 p.m. .3:44 p.m. .4:23 p.m. .4:57 p.m. .5:26 p.m.

Last Oct 13

Set .10:00 p.m. .10:54 p.m. .11:59 p.m. . . . . . .none . .1:10 a.m. . .2:25 a.m. . .3:42 a.m.

SEAFORD 77/57 Blades 77/57

Rehoboth Beach 76/59 Georgetown 79/57 Concord 77/57 Laurel 77/57 Delmar 77/56

Millsboro 80/57

Bethany Beach 74/60 Fenwick Island 76/59

New Oct 22

Day High Thurs. 8:42 a Fri. 9:28 a Sat. 10:25 a Sun. 11:31 a Mon. 12:10 a Tues. 1:18 a Wed. 2:22 a

Low High Low 2:57 a 9:09 p 2:47 p 3:46 a 10:01 p 3:37 p 4:44 a 11:02 p 4:38 p 5:49 a —- 5:47 p 6:55 a 12:43 p 6:59 p 7:55 a 1:53 p 8:06 p 8:49 a 2:54 p 9:08 p

Rehoboth Beach Day High Low High Low Thurs. 11:12 a 4:37 a 11:28 p 5:40 p Fri. 12:06 p 5:28 a —- 6:39 p Sat. 12:24 a 6:27 a 1:08 p 7:41 p Sun. 1:31 a 7:32 a 2:15 p 8:43 p Mon. 2:40 a 8:38 a 3:20 p 9:42 p Tues. 3:45 a 9:43 a 4:18 p 10:36 p Wed. 4:42 a 10:46 a 5:12 p 11:26 p

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Š2006

* *DOOHU\3RLQWH

3 7KH$UWRI)LQH/LYLQJ $FWLYH$GXOW&RPPXQLW\ $W*DOOHU\3RLQWH 6HDIRUG¡VQHZHVWFRPPXQLW\ZH VWULYHWRPDNH\RXUQHZKRPHDZRUN RIDUW:KHWKHU\RXDUHDQGROGHU RUMXVWVWDUWLQJ\RXUIDPLO\ZHSXW DOOWKHOX[XULHVRIOLIHULJKWDW\RXU /RW3ULFHV6WDUWLQJDW /RW3ULFHV6WDUWLQJDW ILQJHUWLSV 6LQJOH)DPLO\+RPHV

+RPH3ULFHV6WDUWLQJDW

'XSOH[3ULFHV6WDUWLQJDW

&DOOIRUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQRUYLVLWXVRQWKHZHEDWZZZJDOOHU\SRLQWHFRP


500 W. Stein Highway • FAX (302)629-4513 • 22128 Sussex Highway • Seaford, DE 19973 • Fax (302)628-8504 (302)629-4514 • (302)628-8500 • (800)966-4514 • www.cfmnet.com

This 3BR 2BA house located north of Greenwood may be just what you are looking for. It has a lovely kitchen. Centrally located between Dover and Salisbury MD. (535715)

Discover this nearly new Cape Cod in exclusive Woodland Station, Seaford, with 2600 sq. ft. It’s nestled on a 1+ acre wooded lot with an oversized 2 car garage (28’X24’). Features 3BR, 2.5BA, (42’x14’) Great Room, LR, Sitting Room, a Bonus Room, and a heated Sun Room. This is a “Must See”. $365,000 (537710)

Location, Location, Location This 3BR/2BA nicely decorated and updated house is located on a corner lot in Seaford. It offers a large deck off the dining area and a wooden fenced back yard $195,000 (539157)

This New 3BR/2BA offers a Neat country location with LOW taxes, a WONDERFUL Kitchen with CHEERY cherry Cabinets, a Greatroom, Large walk up 36 x 10 floored attic and a good floor plan. Seller is offering A.R.M. at 5% fixed interest rate for 7 years. $249,900 (539403)

This 3BR “Dream House” in Rivers End is for the discerning buyer who wants the best and a lot of it! A new addition consists of fantastic master suite w/cherry cabinets & skylights w/elec. Shades. Wood & ceramic tile floors, top of the line lighting fixtures & window treatments, a heated & cooled 4-car garage w/wash bay, +2 outbldgs & much more! $475,000 (534016)

Present owner chose this house because it was like Grandmom’s house. Now it’s even better with a new roof, siding and windows. The inside has been redone too and it’s priced to sell at $165,000 (537087)

Located in Laurel outside city limits this 3BR, 1BA home sits on a quiet country acre. Home has been updated w/central air, new roof, new windows, water softener system all in the last 2 years. Priced at $169,900 (539118)

Discover this 4-5BR 3.5BA house in Seaford on Old Meadow Rd. It rests on a 1 acre wooded, irrigated and landscaped lot with huge bonus room and a deck. Invision yourself sitting in this sunroom enjoying all 4 seasons. It’s lovely to look at and will be lovely to own. $379,900 (540071)

Nearly new ranch in Clearbrook Estates with custom drapes, whirlpool, and open floor plan. A real people pleasing house. (541181) $249,900

September 28, 2006  

“I couldn’t do this without her. She’s a fine lady,” John said of his wife, who is a past recipient of the Delmar Chamber of Commerce’s annu...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you