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VOL. 11 NO. 15

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2006

NEWS HEADLINES ELECTION NEWS - See page 2 for the results from Tuesday’s elections. DON’T KNOW HOW TO TACKLE THE APPROACHING SHOPPING SEASON? - See inside for Morning Star’s annual holiday gift guide.

50 cents

All in the family John McDonnell and his

VETERANS HONORED - Area groups plan to honor veterans on Nov. 11. And a film about Delaware during World War II shows the camaraderie and courage of soldiers. Page 52

wife Dee share a laugh during

HEALTHCARE TRIBUTES - For second year, Nanticoke Health Services honors doctors, volunteers. Page 10.

Delmar Citizen of the Year

LAST GAME - The Laurel and Delmar varsity football teams will play their last regular season games this Friday. Page 41

Mike McClure. See story page

POP WARNER - The Laurel Pop Warner Mitey Mite team host Delmar in a bowl game while the Laurel Pee Wee and Midget teams win in Eastern Regional play. Coverage begins on page 41.

Citizen’s group gets professional help in fight against annexation

PLAYOFFS - The Delmar and Sussex Tech varsity field hockey teams will begin state tournament play this week. Page 45

$500 HOLIDAY GIVEAWAY See page 30 for details 45 Shopping Days until Christmas

INSIDE THE STAR © Business . . . . . . . . .6 Bulletin Board . . . .22 Church . . . . . . . . .26 Classifieds . . . . . .32 Education . . . . . . . .8 Entertainment . . . .30 Gourmet . . . . . . . .25 Health . . . . . . . . . .12 Letters . . . . . . . . . .56 Lynn Parks . . . . . .21 Mike Barton . . . . . .51 Movies . . . . . . . . . . .7 Obituaries . . . . . . .28 Opinion . . . . . . . . .58

Pat Murphy . . . . . .57 People . . . . . . . . . .20 Police . . . . . . . . . .17 Snapshots . . . . . . .50 Socials . . . . . . . . .51 Sports . . . . . . . . . .41 Tides . . . . . . . . . . .59 Todd Crofford . . . .27 Tommy Young . . . .44 Weather . . . . . . . . .59

the Delmar Citizen of the Year banquet last Thursday. John was honored as the 2006 while Dee is a past recipient of the annual award. Photo by 5, additional pictures page 50

By Lynn R. Parks A group formed to fight the proposed annexation of about 500 acres into Laurel for development of a sports and entertainment complex is getting help in that fight from a national organization. W. D. Whaley, spokesman for the Sussex County Organization to Limit Development Mistakes (SCOLDM), said Monday that people attending a meeting held Friday night donated enough money for the group to hire Community and Environmental Defense Services, based in Owings Mills, Md. "We want them to help us develop a strategy in stopping this annexation," said Whaley. "This proposed development does not fit with our neighborhood." The Discovery project, what Whaley called "a junkyard of ideas," is being proposed by Ocean Atlantic Associates, Rehoboth Beach, and the David Horsey family, Laurel. As proposed, the complex would include two stadiums, one with 12,000 seats, the other with 6,000 seats, 240 stores, 1,400 homes, hotels, parking garages, an amusement park and an Imax theater. The property being considered for the development is currently largely rural. About 40 people attended Friday night's meeting, a "good turnout for

our first meeting," Whaley said. "This meeting was to determine if there is support for what we are trying to do, and there is definitely support." Those present at the meeting were willing to put their money where their hopes are, he added. When the collection plate was passed, they donated more than the $750 required to put Community and Environmental Defense Services on retainer. "This was money that they donated knowing that they would get absolutely for it, no T-shirts or anything," Whaley said. "They donated knowing that it would go to the consultant and that we are going to work to stop this annexation." Whaley said that the group is not against growth in western Sussex County. "But this project, anybody who looks at it can easily see that it's not for Laurel," he said. Whaley points to the town's comprehensive plan to substantiate his statement. "The comprehensive plan says that the town is supposed to promote the historic nature of Laurel, particularly along Broad Creek," he said. "Roller coasters and soccer fields just don't fit in with that." Community and Environmental Defense Services has been in existence since 1987. Richard Klein, its founder and president, said that virtually all of Continued on page 4

Public hearing set The town of Laurel will hold two public hearings dealing with the Discovery project Monday, Nov. 20. Both hearings will be held in the Laurel Fire Hall. The first hearing, which will start at 7 p.m., will deal with the annexation of the property. The second hearing, on the developer's request to have the property zoned for large parcel development, will start at 8 p.m. The large parcel development (LPD) zoning allows for a mix of residential, including high-density housing, and commercial building. Since the town of Laurel approved the LPD zone as part of its code, one project, Village Brook planned for 80 acres on Discountland Road, has received an OK to use it. That zoning was approved in May; construction on the project has not started yet. Mayor John Shwed said that, while the council could vote on the Discovery project following the public hearings, he will delay voting until at least the next council meeting, set for Dec. 4. A first reading of the annexation proposal and the zoning proposal could be heard at that time. A second reading and final vote can not be held until 30 days after the first reading.


MORNING STAR ✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PAGE 2

ELECTION ’06 Tom Carper

Phillips

Castle

Wilson

Swanson

Adams

Short

Biff Lee

Ewing

Short, Phillips win, two incumbents defeated By Bryant L. Richardson While there were no surprises this Election Day in statewide races, two Sussex County incumbents were defeated. U.S. Sen. Tom Carper (D) won with 170,544 votes (70.2%) over Jan Ting (R). U.S. Rep. Mike Castle (R) won with 143,982 votes (57.2%) over Dennis Spivack (D). The contest for Attorney General was the closest of the statewide races. Joseph R. Biden III (D) defeated Ferris Wharton by a vote of 133,142 to 120,056. State Treasurer Jack Markell (D) drew the highest number of votes with 174,382 (70.5%) to win reelection.

Auditor Tom Wagner (R) won reelection with 131,590 votes (53.7%). In the race for State Senate, Thurman Adams (D) won with 7,278 votes (78.3%) over Independent Party candidate Matthew Opaliski. In the 39th Representative District Daniel B. Short (R) won over Dr. Richard J. Sternberg (D). Short received 3,370 votes (68.6%) to win the seat held for more than two decades by state Rep. Tina Fallon, who announced earlier this year she was retiring. Two State Representatives from western Sussex County were unchallenged this year. Ben Ewing (R) of Bridgeville and Biff Lee (R) of Laurel will return to the

House this coming year where the Republicans enjoy a 23 to 18 majority. The Democrats enjoy a 13 to 8 majority in the State Senate. Two incumbents were upset in Sussex County. Sheriff Robert Reed (R) lost to Eric D. Swanson (D) by a vote of 29,182 to 25,784. Register of Wills Howard Clendaniel (D) lost to David L. Wilson (R) by a vote of 28,371 to 26,458. Vance Phillips (R) of Laurel held onto his County Council seat by defeating Harvey W. Hyland Jr. Phillips received 5,943 votes (56.9%) Recorder of Deeds John Brady (R) was unchallenged. He received a vote total of 41,942.

This year there was one active candidate for the write in vote for U.S. Senate. The number of votes Christine O’Donnell received will not be announced until noon during Return Day in Georgetown. The highest combined statewide vote count was 253,198 in the race for Attorney General. There were 242,947 votes counted for the U.S. Senate race. The difference is 10,251, so there is a possibility that O’Donnell picked up a few thousand votes. The statewide voter turnout was around 45 percent. There are 557,703 registered voters in the state. Registered Democrats total 246,141, Republicans 178,635 and other 132,927.

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NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006 PAGE 3

Holiday mail going overseas should be sent by Nov. 13 Postal service officials are reminding military families and friends sending holiday packages and letters to service men and women overseas, including Iraq and Afghanistan, that the deadline for the most economical shipping is Monday, Nov. 13, using parcel post to all Air/Army Post Office (APO) or Fleet Post Office (FPO) zip codes. The U.S. Postal Service is encouraging early deadlines to make sure that packages reach their destination in time for the holidays. There are more than 80 military installations worldwide. This holiday season, the Postal Service is able to make Delivery Confirmation, which provides the date, zip code and time the package was delivered, available for almost all APO/FPO destinations. This information can be accessed online at usps.com. The U.S. Postal Service military care kit, “Mili-kit,” is also available free of charge. Each kit contains four Priority Mail boxes, six Priority Mail Flat Rate boxes, 10 Priority Mail labels, one roll of Priority Mail tape and 10 customs forms with envelopes. To order a kit, call 1-800-610-8734. The Postal Service places APO/FPO mail on special charter flights, commercial airlines and military service aircraft to reach armed services members overseas as quickly as possible. For details on tracking and military mail, visit the military postal service’s Web site http://hqdainet.army.mil/mpsa/.

Nominees wanted for Hall of Fame of Del. Women The Delaware Commission for Women is accepting nominations for inauguration into the Hall of Fame of Delaware Women. Held during March, which is women’s history month in March, the induction ceremony will honor women for their distinguished contributions and achievements toward improving the lives of others. To date, 92 women have been inducted into the Hall of Fame of Delaware. A selection committee will review the nominations for women who are pioneers in their fields; have a positive reputation among their peers or co-workers; have demonstrated leadership in her community or profession; and whose contributions have had a lasting impact. Nominees must be native-born Delawareans or have resided in the state for at least ten years. Nominees may be deceased. Nominations must be received by Dec. 15 and must be submitted on a form provided by the Delaware Commission for Women. For a nomination form, call 302-761-8005 or visit the Web site www.delawareworks.com/ dcw/welcome.shtml.


PAGE 4

MORNING STAR

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

Committee recommends that annexation more forward By Tony E. Windsor The public will get one more chance to share thoughts about the annexation of the 500 acres of land for a planned development known as the Discovery Project, when an annexation public hearing is held at the Laurel Fire Hall later this month. During the Monday, Nov. 6, meeting of the Laurel Town Council, the council approved a resolution calling for a public hearing on the annexation to be held Nov. 20, 7 p.m., at the Laurel Fire Hall. A second public hearing will be held the same night, starting at 8 p.m., to discuss whether the parcel can be developed under the town’s Large Parcel Development Overlay District. (See related story, page 1.) The town’s annexation committee presented two formal annexation reports Monday night. The reports were regarding its review of the annexation of both the Discovery Project property and the property that houses the Car Store on US 13. The committee recommended that both proper-

ties be approved for annexation. Councilman Chris Calio, chairman of the annexation committee, read his committee’s report, which called both properties “lynchpins to allow for further annexations along the northeast side of US 13.” In reporting on the Car Store property, Calio said its annexation would generate $1,524.18 a year in real estate property taxes. He said the property has room for additional development, which would increase the town’s real estate property tax and building permit fees; based on two equivalency dwelling units, that increase could be as much as $4,800. “The property owner has expressed the possibility for paying for his share of infrastructure costs, which is recommended by the annexation committee,” Calio said. In its report, the committee also noted the negative side to the proposed annexation of the Car Store property. “The negative to annexations is that current water and wastewater lines are

About three-quarters of firm’s disputes are resolved amicably Continued from page 1

its cases involve communities that are concerned about development on their edges. At any given time, he said, this firm is handling "a couple of dozen cases from throughout the country." Klein, who would not comment on the Laurel situation, said that in about 75 percent of its cases, Community and Environmental Defense Services is able to resolve the dispute in a way that satisfies the community. In about two-thirds of those cases, his firm is able to find ways to mitigate the impact of the development on the community so that residents are satisfied and the development can continue. The company helps to find solutions to issues such as traffic, noise, light and environmental impacts. In the remaining third of the cases, however, the development ends up being scratched. "That happens when the developer just can't find a way to negotiate in good faith," he said. Klein said that he has seen cases in which a proposed development just could not be made to fit in with a neighboring

Laurel Star Published by Morning Star Publications Inc. 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243

The Laurel Star (USPS #016-427) is published weekly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Seaford, DE. Subscriptions are $17 a year in county; $22 a year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharptown and Federalsburg, Maryland; $27 elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address changes to Laurel Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

community. "Sometimes a project is so poorly conceived that you just can't design the impacts out of it," he said. No one affiliated with the Horsey family or with Ocean Atlantic spoke at the SCOLDM meeting. But a letter from the parties was given to Whaley, who moderated the meeting, by Jeff Evans, a longtime friend of the Horsey family. "The gist of the letter just was that they are trying to be a good neighbor and are willing to address any concerns anyone might have," said Evans, Laurel. Evans said that his request to be allowed to read the letter out loud was refused. "I was rebuked, not in a nasty way, but in a cordial way. They said that they've heard everything the Horseys have to say. But they did accept a copy of the letter." Whaley defended the group's decision not to allow the letter to be read aloud. "We were trying to hold an opposition meeting," he said. "We wanted to get a group together to decide what we can do about this. This was not a public hearing. We wanted to hear ideas in opposition to the development."

several hundred feet from the property,” Calio said. “The annexation committee would recommend that the town require the property owner to pay any and all expenses connected with running water and sewer services to the property. The town will also not generate any additional municipal street aid funds.” In the report on its review of the Discovery Project property, the annexation committee said that once the property is developed it could bring into the town as much as $5.7 million in impact and connection fees. As it stands, the property would generate $6,411.87 a year in real estate property taxes. Calio said that the developers of the property, Bobby Horsey, Laurel, and Ocean-Atlantic Associates, of Rehoboth Beach, have said they would be willing to pay all costs associated with necessary water and sewer lines to the property and necessary upgrades to the town’s wastewater treatment plant. Also during the meeting, the council OK’d a first reading to a change to its Comprehensive Land-Use Plan. That change would allow the property proposed for the Discovery project, once annexed, to be zoned for mixed use. The property is already included in the town’s comprehensive plan, and is labeled as being for future commercial development. The town’s Comprehensive Land-Use Plan was adopted and certified by the state in 2004. Later, the town was approached by the Discovery developers, who were interested in developing the 500-acre

The annexation committee said that once the property is developed it could bring into the town as much as $5.7 million in impact and connection fees. Horsey property northeast of the town corporate limits. But the State Office of Planning was not willing to increase the acreage included in the town’s comprehensive plan. To allow the Horsey property to be included in the plan, the town surrendered a comparable amount of land southeast of town. Given the type of development planned by the Discovery project, which is calling for the construction of as many as 1,400 residential units, over 1 million square-feet of retail space, three hotels, two stadiums, athletic fields, and an equestrian center, the town asked that the property be zoned for mixed use. The state OK’d that request. The council still has to have a second reading and a final vote on the proposed change. The Laurel Planning and Zoning Committee, chaired by Brent Boyce, recommended that the town approve the annexation of the Discovery Project property and zone it for Large Parcel Development.

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MORNING STAR

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PAGE 5

McDonnell is honored as Delmar’s citizen of the year By Pat Murphy Former Delmar, Del., Mayor John McDonnell was honored at a dinner at the Delmar VFW Post 8276 Home on Thursday, Nov. 2, as the 2006 Delmar Citizen of the Year. The event is sponsored by the Delmar Chamber of Commerce. McDonnell, a 14-year mayor of the town, is involved with the VFW, Chamber of Commerce and St. Stephen’s United Methodist Church, as well as being one of the most active Lions Club members in Delaware. McDonnell is an 18-year member of the club, a three-time president, past cabinet secretary and a former Lion of the Year. Many of the guest speakers, including Delmar (Md.) Mayor Doug Niblett, said, “I am very privileged to call John a friend.” McDonnell and his wife, Dee, moved to Delmar 21 years ago from small towns in western Pennsylvania. They have been married 32 years. Both John and Dee can be seen at most community events and are described by many in their town as the epitome of what Delmar is all about. Chamber of commerce president John Johnson said he walked into Delmar 15 years ago and “John was my help every step of the way.”

Johnson, who later made Delmar his home, said that he thought then, “If he represents what kind of town Delmar is I want to live there.” Tributes were read by Patrick Wood, representing state Sen. Robert Venables, state Rep. “Biff” Lee, county Councilman Vance Phillips, Sen. Tom Carper, Niblett, Delmar (Del.) Mayor John Outten and councilman Mike Houlahan. Doug Carey, representing the Lions as district governor, said that he was very proud of John. “He is the fifth Lion to win this award, and I am very proud of that,” he said. “John is my friend, and is a true Lion from top to bottom.” In conjunction with the ceremony, $250 was donated to the Lions Foundation in McDonnell’s name. In accepting the award, McDonnell pointed to his wife and said, “I can’t do what I do without this lady right here.” He remembered the late Ed Taylor, a neighbor who encouraged him to become a Lions Club member, as well as current members of the Delmar Lions Club, who he described as “my second family.” “I did what I did because I wanted to… nobody held a gun to my head. I just hope to live up to the name Citizen of The Year,” finished McDonnell.

Doug Carey, left, hugs fellow Delmar Lion John McDonnell following a presentation at the Delmar Citizen of the Year banquet last week. McDonnell became the fifth Lion to win the award.

In an interview after the banquet, Niblett talked about of their many trips together. “We solved all the world’s problems,” he said. Niblett also talked about their many

enjoyable moments together, adjusting to the “Sussex slang.” “He is very conscientious, willing to serve,” Niblett said. And, “he is a top notch friend.”

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Delmar mayors John Outten and Doug Niblett make a presentation to former Delmar mayor and 2006 Delmar Citizen of the Year John McDonnell during last week’s citizen of the year banquet. Photos by Mike McClure

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MORNING STAR ✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PAGE 6

Business Construction Underway for Four-Story Comfort Suites By Cindy Lyons Taylor For those who have noticed the familiar signs of new construction in progress, next to the Eagle Diner on Route 13, and wonder what’s coming next—it’s the beginning of a new Comfort Suites hotel. The Comfort Suites will be a four-story hotel featuring 69 rooms with full amenities, located at 550 N. Dual Highway. Architect Greg Gill designed the brick and stucco facility, which will include an indoor pool, exercise room, meeting room, and Jacuzzi for the pleasure of hotel guests. A construction crew of about 40 workers is building the project. Choice Hotels International is the worldwide franchisor of the Comfort Suites and the chain of hotels that includes Comfort Inn, Quality Inn, Clarion, and Sleep Inn. The Comfort Suites is the fifth in line of Seaford’s newest hotels, and the fourth of those that have been built within the last decade. In 1988, the three-story Best Western Inn was built on North Dual Hwy, followed by the four-story Holiday Inn Express hotel, which was built in 1999. In 2001, the three-story Hampton Inn was constructed further north on Route 13. At the end of 2006, in mid-December, a new two-story Days Inn is scheduled to open, just in time for holiday travelers. Completion of the Comfort Suites hotel is expected by late April, according to an associate at the site.

Horsey family contributes to Beach House auction

The Horsey Companies of Laurel have contributed $10,000 to The Children’s Beach House 17th annual Art Sale and Silent Auction. David G. Horsey, founder and president of the Horsey Companies, and his wife Pat, have been longtime supporters of charitable causes in Delaware, especially children’s needs. To channel their efforts, they founded the Horsey Family Youth Foundation (HFYF) in 2004, whose mission is to support the youth of Sussex and Kent counties. The purpose of HFYF is to help keep children off drugs and the streets through

the involvement of education and various sports programs. “When we learned about the Children’s Beach House and the educational programs and assistance they offer to so many children, we felt that providing support to them was a good partnership for our foundation,” says Mr. Horsey. “We’re interested in helping to provide constructive opportunities to children in Delaware that are in need – that’s what we try to do at HFYF and that’s what the Beach House does as well.” This year’s show and silent auction is scheduled for December 1-3. The funds raised during the event will be divided among the many programs offered by the Children’s Beach House where the mission is to help children with special needs reach their highest potential as functioning members of their families and communities. To learn more about the Children’s Beach House and the 17th annual Art Sale & Silent Auction or to be placed on the opening reception invitation list call 302645-9184

Royal Farms announces Lighter Fare The Royal Farms stores, based in Hamden, MD, announces a healthy choice menu in its convenience stores. The Baltimore-based company, known best for its fried chicken, western cut fries and flaky croissant breakfast sandwiches, has added freshly prepared salads, fresh fruit, vegetables and health juices to its food line. “We’re responding to the needs of our customers,” said Mike Jackson, Merchandising Manager. “People want healthy choices, made fresh daily, in a grab and go setting. We’re a convenience store and we want to fill the needs of all our customers.” Entre salads like Caesar, Chicken Caesar, Garden, Garden with Chicken and Chef top the list of healthy favorites now made daily in the stores. The menu also includes mixed fruit, melon, and pineapple cups, and fresh cut carrot and celery sticks with no preservatives added. “We centered the cold case with the healthy choices in the center of the stores,” Jackson said. “We want people to know that the salads, vegetable and health juices are there ready to go. We cater to busy people, who want good food served fresh. We responded to the trends in consumer taste and health by adding these choices. They’re very popular.” The lighter fare menu has been added

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to 40 of the company’s stores and with the goal of offering the menu in all stores in 2007. Royal Farms was founded in 1959 and has more than 112 stores in Delaware , Maryland and Virginia. Royal Farms continues to open new stores in the Maryland, Delaware, Virginia and South Central, Pennsylvania.

CFM celebrates Awareness month Callaway, Farnell and Moore, Inc. and the National Association of Realtors (NAR) are celebrating Realtor Designation Awareness Month. Annually, NAR recognizes November as an important month in which to encourage its members to start, complete, or continue an official NAR-endorsed designation program through NAR or one of its affiliates. Broker/Manager Kathy Farnell stresses the importance for successful agents to keep abreast of current issues, evolving technology, changing legalities, and other key components of the business. Today's real estate market expects the highest level of expertise from each Realtor. It is clear that Realtors who pursue professional designations have a distinctive competitive edge. To help Realtors remain up-to-date in such a dynamic environment, NAR and its nine Institutes, Societies and Councils offers 20 advanced education designation and certification programs, all of which are tailored to virtually every real estate

specialty. Beyond building skills, knowledge and productivity, these prestigious programs enhance Realtors’ professional images, marketability, and productivity. Among those designations held by agents at Callaway, Farnell and Moore are the Accredited Buyer Representative (ABR); Certified International Property Specialist (CIPS); Certified Real Estate Brokerage Manager (CRB); Certified Residential Specialist (CRS); Graduate REALTOR Institute (GRI); and e-PRO. Many Realtors in the firm are licensed in both Delaware and Maryland. Several hold the Senior Real Estate Specialist (SRES) certification. One is also a Certified Residential Appraiser in both Delaware and Maryland.

Fulton declares cash dividend Fulton Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: FULT) will pay a quarterly cash dividend of 14.75 cents per share on its common stock on January 15, 2007 to shareholders of record as of December 21, 2006. Fulton Financial Corporation, a $14.9 billion Lancaster, Pa.-based financial holding company, has more than 4,400 employees and operates more than 250 branches in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey and Virginia through fifteen affiliate banks. Additional information on Fulton Financial Corporation can be found at www.fult.com.


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MORNING STAR

✳ NOV. 9 - 15, 2006

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Diamond State Drive-In Theater US Harrington, Del. 302-284-8307 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 11/10 SATURDAY 11/11, SUNDAY 11/12 The Santa Claus 3: The Escape Claus . . . . .G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri. 7:00, Sat. 5:30, Sun. 5:30 Flushed Away . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri. 8:40, Sat. 7:25, Sun. 7:25

Regal Salisbury Stadium 16 2322 N. Salisbury Blvd., Salisbury, MD, 410-860-1370 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 11/10 THRU THURSDAY 11/16 Stranger Than Fiction . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (1:30, 4:15) 7:20, 10:15 Harsh Times . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (1:45, 4:30) 7:30, 10:30 A Good Year . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (1:45, 4:30) 7:30, 10:25 Babel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-thu (12:30, 3:40) 7:00, 10:05 Marie Antoinette . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (12:50, 3:45) 6:45, 9:35 One Night With The King . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (12:45) 6:45 Running With Scissors . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (3:45) 9:45 Borat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (1:00, 3:10, 5:25) 7:40, 10:00 Santa Claus 3 The Escape Claus . . . . . . . .G . . . . . .Fri-Sun (12:00, 1:15, 2:20, 4:00, 4:50) 6:30, 7:15, 9:00, 9:45 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mon-Thu (12:00, 1:15, 2:20, 4:00, 4:50) 6:30, 7:15, 9:00, 9:45 Flushed Away . . . . . . . . . . .R Fri-Sun (12:05, 1:00, 2:15, 3:15, 4:45, 5:30) 7:15, 8:00, 9:30, 10:20 Saw III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (12:00, 2:30, 5:00) 7:50, 10:30 The Prestige . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (1:15, 4:1 ) 7:10, 10:00 Flags of Our Fathers . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (12:45, 4:00) 7:05, 10:10 Departed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (12:15, 3:30) 7:00, 10:15 The Guardian . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (12:30, 3:30) 6:30, 9:30 Deck The Halls . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Advance Tickets On Sale Now Casino Royale . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Advance Tickets On Sale Now Deja Vu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Advance Tickets On Sale Now Happy Feet . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Advance Tickets On Sale Now The Nativity Story . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Advance Tickets On Sale Now () Discounted showtimes in Parenthesis * Pass/Discount Restrictions Apply

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PAGE 8

MORNING STAR

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

Education Woodbridge student joins in national speaking competition

HOMECOMING QUEEN - Sussex Tech’s Tiamia Black, left, was named 2006 Homecoming queen during the ceremony at half-time of last Friday’s football game. Black is shown with her mother, Cristina Williams. Not pictured is Homecoming king Jason Palmer, who is on the football team. Photo by David Elliott

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José Oyola of the Woodbridge FFA Chapter was one of 49 individuals participating in the 2006 National FFA Creed Speaking Career Development Event (CDE). The competition was held Oct. 25-28, during the 79th National FFA Convention. His agricultural teacher and FFA advisor is Karen Breeding from Greenwood. The creed Speaking CDE is designed to recognize outstanding FFA members for their ability to present the FFA Creed and respond to a series of questions related to the creed. The CDE is just one way FFA members can develop their ability to communicate in an organized and professional manner. The National FFA Creed Speaking CDE is sponsored by

CHS as a special project of the National FFA Foundation. It is one of 23 different national events that use the fun of competition to connect classroom learning and careers. FFA is a national youth organization of 495,046 student members preparing for leadership and careers in the science, business and technology of agriculture with 7,242 local chapters in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. FFA strives to make a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. Visit the Web site www.ffa.org for more information.

José Oyola

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MORNING STAR

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

Sussex Tech students Michael Metzler and Jacob Moore sit in Legislative Hall to report Sussex Tech’s mock election results during the statewide mock convention.

PAGE 9

SMOKEY AND KIDS - On Thursday, Oct. 26, first grade and pre-kindergarten students at Woodbridge Elementary School attended an assembly with Smokey Bear. Above, from left, are first-grade students Aisli Torres-Landeros, Cassie Brannan, Tyler DeFord and Jazmin Rodriguez. Pre-kindergarten students who met the bear are, below: Zhaila Gray; Clay Norman, Cassidy Soderback, Nate Trammell and Joshua Jerez.

Tech students participate in state’s mock election Sophomore Michael Metzler (Seaford) and junior Jacob Moore (Greenwood) served as Sussex Technical High School’s delegates to the statewide mock convention held at Legislative Hall in Dover on Friday, Nov. 3. As delegates, they reported Sussex Tech’s mock election results, which were then tallied in with the other school districts’ results across the state. Sussex Tech students selected the following candidates: • U.S. Senate – Thomas Carper

Education briefs Preschool accepts applications The Raider Preschool is now accepting applications for the 2007 session, which runs from Jan. 23 through May 25, meeting Tuesdays and Fridays. There is both a morning and afternoon class. The preschool is a laboratory school in the Early Childhood Education department at Woodbridge High School. The cost for the 17-week program is $175 and space is limited. For more information or to request an application call Rita Hovermale at 337-8289.

Del Tech to show ‘Estamos Aqui’ A 90-minute documentary entitled, “Estamos Aqui - We are Here,” will be shown on Monday, Nov. 13 from 6 to 8 p.m. in the theatre of the Arts & Science Center at Delaware Technical & Community College. Admission is free. The documentary focuses on the influx of an estimated 10,000 Guatemalans in Georgetown over the past 10 years. Produced by award-winning TELEDUCTION Inc. and Serviam Media over a period of four years, the film provides an intimate portrait of the struggles of the Latin American people as well as the faith, endurance and hope that unites them. Sharon Baker, director, will be present to introduce the film.

• U.S. Rep. Michael Castle • Attorney general – Joseph “Beau” Biden • State treasurer – Estelde Parker-Selby • State auditor – Thomas Wagner. After the convention adjourned, Michael and Jacob toured the Delaware Public Archives building. The delegates were accompanied by Lisa Swan, Sussex Tech’s mock election coordinator, and shared approach teacher Mark Abbott.

Messiah’s Vineyard Church Rt. 13 & Discountland Rd., PO Box 60, Laurel • 875-4646 www.messiahsvineyard.org Sr. Minister - Dr. Carl G. Vincent Sr. Pastor - Barry B. Dukes Sunday, Nov. 12

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Men’s Meeting at 7:30 a.m. Brother Ken Sumrall, founder & apostle of Christian Foundation Network. Sunday, Nov. 19

Pastor Barry Dukes ministering a “Praise & Worship Spectacular” along with Vineyard Choir and Vineyard Worship Team at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 25

Ladies Tea Party at 1:00 p.m. Special Speaker - Lisa Paynter, Special Music by Sandy Holloway & Rhonda Brumbley.. Crazy Homemade Hat Contest. Sunday, Nov. 26

Pastor Cami Dukes will minister the message “You Can Shout Now” along with Vineyard Worship Team at 9:30 a.m. Friday, December 8th

Dr. Ruth Chamberlain-Our Special Guest Speaker at our Christmas Banquet at 6:00 p.m. We invite all who would like to attend to be apart of this “Elegant Night of Dining”. We will be having a catered dinner & special music. Tickets will be $20.00 each. Please call our church office to purchase tickets.

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PAGE 10

MORNING STAR

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

Hospital recognizes doctors, auxiliary By Lynn R. Parks When Melissa Lynch applied to medical school, she had to write an essay describing why she wanted to become a doctor. In her essay, she talked about her grandfather, John C. Lynch, who was a general practitioner in Seaford. "I've spent my whole life being Dr. Lynch's granddaughter, and receiving the love of the community through him," she wrote. "I want to be a doctor so that when I am an old woman, my grandchildren will be hearing from the community about what a wonderful doctor I am." Melissa Lynch, now Melissa Moses, is a doctor in California. Her mother, Carol, Seaford, read her application essay at a ceremony last Thursday during which the late John Lynch was inducted into the Nanticoke Memorial Hospital's Physicians Hall of Fame. "In March, my brother Jack and I will have been without our father for 30 years," John Lynch's daughter, Norma Jean Fowler, told the 260 people at the ceremony, which was held in the club house at Baywood Greens Golf Course, Long Neck. "To have him remembered after such a long time is very gratifying." The second annual Tributes for Healthcare Leadership ceremony also included the induction of Dr. Judith Tobin, who came to Nanticoke in 1960 as an associate pathologist and is still an assistant state medical examiner, into the Physicians Hall of Fame. The Auxiliary of Nanticoke

Health Services received the Charles C. Allen Jr. Leadership in Philanthropy Award and the late Karl K. Brown Sr. was honored with a Founders Award. "Pop was a city father," said Brown's son, Karl Jr., who was among Brown's family members who accepted the award. "He served on the school board and on the town council. He knew that he was doing his job, and that was to help the community. It was about being a citizen. He was an absolutely effective citizen, in the deepest, finest meaning of the word. And he was a wonderful guy." According to the hospital, the Nanticoke Tributes ceremony honors individuals who have "made significant contributions to the provision and improvement of healthcare in the communities of western Sussex County." Induction into the physicians hall of fame "recognizes and honors physicians who have served their communities with dedication and distinction," it said. The Charles C. Allen, Jr. Philanthropy Award "recognizes individuals or groups who have furthered the spirit of philanthropy in our community by leadership and example." John Lynch, born in 1908 in Georgetown, graduated from the University of Virginia and attended Harvard Medical School. He graduated from the Long Island College of Medicine (now part of New York University) in 1934 and, after serving an internship at Wilmington General Hospital, came to Seaford in 1936 to work with the practice of Dr. Annie Ship-

At the annual Tributes for Healthcare Leadership ceremony, Nanticoke Health Services gave a Founders Award to the late Karl K. Brown Sr. and inducted two doctors, Judith Tobin and the late John Lynch, into its Physicians Hall of Fame. Seated, from left: Tobin and Janet Hubbard, president of the hospital auxiliary. Standing: Rex Mears, chairman of the board; Karl K. Brown Jr.; Lynch’s daughter, Norma Jean Fowler, and his son, Dr. Jack Lynch; and president and CEO Dan Werner.

ley. He was married two years later, to Ruth Cooper, Seaford. During World War II, while serving with the Army during the invasion of Normandy, he was injured as he carried

Biff Lee From my heart, I sincerely thank each and every one of you for returning me to a job I deeply respect, that of serving my constituents. May we continue to work together for another term, and together we will make a difference. Thanks,

Continued on page 11

JOHN BRADY

Your Representative in the 40th District Once again it is my joy to serve you as your representative of the 40th District. As a part of your community who comes from a family that has a deep love and respect for it and the people, it is easy to once again, offer my commitment to you the people of the 40th District.

wounded men from the battlefield. "To restore his shell-torn leg, he subjected himself to post-war experimental surgical techniques and skin grafts for two years at

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MORNING STAR

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PAGE 11

Founders Award goes to banker Karl K. Brown Sr. ate pathologist and later served as chairwoman of the hospital's department of pathology. She has served a deputy medical examiner for the board of PostMortem Examiners of Sussex County and has been an assistant state medical examiner since 1964. She is the only woman to serve as president of the Nanticoke medical staff, a position she held twice (1971 to 1974 and 1976 to 1978). Mother of six, she was named Delaware's Mother of the Year in 1984. The Auxiliary of Nanticoke Health Services has served the hospital for 56 years. Its volunteers' initial duties included making baby clothes and formula, rolling bandages and stocking the hospital's kitchen. At the celebration of its 50th birthday, it was credited with providing more than $1 million worth of supplies to the hospital. Those supplies include air conditioning, fans, oxygen, linen, silverware, dishes, furniture, in-house satellite television and medical equipment. Today, the auxiliary operates the hospital's gift shop and provides television and phone service to patients. It holds two fund-raisers a year, the winter gala and a dinner auction. In 2006, it helped fund three medical scholarships for area students, the NHS indigent drug care program and updates to the kitchen at LifeCare at Lofland Park nursing home. Seaford native Karl Brown Sr. graduated from Seaford High School around 1914 and went to work for the First National Bank of Seaford. "He started at the bottom and learned banking from the furnace up,"

Continued from page 10

White Sulphur springs in Georgia," according to a biography supplied by the hospital. When he returned to Seaford, he returned to work as a general practitioner. He served as the hospital's second chief of staff. "Well-known for his excellent memory of birth dates of the children he delivered as well as his legendary sense of humor, Dr. Lynch set a high standard for conduct of the Nanticoke medical staff as both professional and personable," according to the hospital. Lynch suffered a stroke in 1967 at the age of 59 and had to give up his practice shortly after that. He died in 1977 at the age of 69. "Daddy's career was kind of nipped in the bud," Fowler said. "He didn't get to live to be one of the grand old men. That he is remembered 30 years after his death is very special to me." Tobin is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Mount Holyoke college in South Hadley, Mass., and a 1952 graduate of the medical school at Columbia University. After graduating from Columbia, she moved to Seaford with her husband, surgeon Richard Tobin, who joined the practice of surgeon Bill Cooper. Because she was trained in pathology, Dr. Kendrick McCullough, head of pathology at Peninsula General Hospital, Salisbury, asked her to prepare specimens and give opinions on medical legal issues on a part-time basis. She joined Nanticoke in 1960 as associ-

Bridge on Trap Pond Road closed until spring The bridge on Trap Pond Road between Goose Neck Road and Hitch Pond Road is closed for repairs. The bridge was closed Monday and, according to the Delaware Department of Transportation, will remained closed until sometime in the spring. Mumford and Miller Concrete will be doing the repair work. The company’s bid for the project was just over $412,000. The contractor will replace the existing

concrete bridge deck, clean and paint the steel beams, install timber guard rails and reconstruct the roadway approaches. Detour signs are set up. The state suggests that motorists go from Laurel Road to Hitch Pond road and then back to Trap Pond Road. For more information, visit the Web site www.deldot.gov or tune to WTMCAM, 1380.

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Nanticoke Health Services gave its Charles C. Allen Leadership in Philanthropy Award to its auxiliary. Representing the auxiliary are, standing, from left: past presidents June Rawlins and Nancy Brown, president Janet Hubbard and past presidents Pat Olekszyk and Virginia Barton. Front: past presidents Nancy Cook-Marsh and Lois Ewing.

said his son. "He rose to the top," becoming the bank's executive officer. "Brown was in a pivotal position to rally business leaders in Seaford, Laurel, Delmar, Bridgeville and Sharptown to develop firm plans for a hospital to serve the needs of the area," according to the hospital. Brown secured the hospital's charter in 1945 and spearheaded fund-raising that led to groundbreaking in 1950 and the grand opening in 1952. He also supported expan-

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sions in 1959 and 1968. Brown's wife, Anna Mae, died in 1955 and a wing of the hospital that was completed in 1959 was named after her. "Both their hearts were in this community and its hospital," said their son. Brown died in 1984 at the age of 88. "Pop would be 110 now," Karl Jr. added. "He was always very much a gentleman, always very courtly. "He belongs to the ages now."

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MORNING STAR ✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PAGE 12

Health New Medical discoveries are often found by accident By Dr. Anthony Policastro

Male cell phone users might want to limit their daily cell phone use Many medical discoveries are accidental. The best-known one is the discovery of penicillin. A plate of bacteria grew a fungus. The area around the fungus showed no bacterial growth. The fungus was producing penicillin. Another example is how we treat jaundiced babies. We use fluorescent lights to act like sunlight. This was based upon a nursery that noted the babies on the sunny

Health Bulletins Public Health flu vaccination Delaware’s Division of Public Health announces its influenza vaccination schedule for Delawareans without a healthcare provider or whose insurance does not cover flu shots. While many DPH adult clin-

side of the room did not get jaundiced. Babies on the dark side of the room did get jaundiced. A similar kind of discovery was made recently. It was reported at a medical meeting in New Orleans. The meeting was the annual meeting of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. A group of researchers at a fertility clinic in Cleveland were studying men who had decreased fertility. They looked at a variety of factors. They looked at 361 men from their clinic. The average age was 31 years. They divided them into four groups. Forty of the men did not use a cell phone. Another 107 used a cell phone for less than two hours a day. An additional 100

ics accept walk in clients, DPH will vaccinate children by appointment only on scheduled days. Medicare Part B and donations are accepted. Sussex County adult clinics Nov. 14, Tuesday, Laurel Fire Hall, 205 West 10th St., Laurel, 4-7 p.m. Walk In Nov. 16, Thursday, Laurel Fire Hall, 205 West 10th St., Laurel, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Walk In

Nov. 28, Tuesday Blades Fire Hall, 200 East 5th St., Blades, 4-7 p.m. Walk In Dec. 7, Thursday, Blades Fire Hall, 200 East 5th St., Blades, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Walk In Children under the age of 18 will be seen by appointment only at the DPH Clinics and State Service Centers. Parents or guardians interested in making appointments for flu shots may

Healing wounds in a place you trust. We’ve built a complete wound center just for you, offering the first hyperbaric oxygen treatment chamber in Delaware. A center dedicated to healing chronic non-healing wounds. Conveniently located on the hospital campus. Nanticoke Memorial is excited to be able to provide the finest advanced wound care right here at home.

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used a cell phone for 2-4 hours per day. The remaining 114 used a cell phone for more than four hours a day. They compared the no use group with the greater than four hour group. They looked at total sperm counts. The no use group showed 72 percent higher counts. They looked at movement. The no use group had 50 percent higher movement. They looked at life span. The no use group had 70 percent better life span. They looked at normal appearance. The no use group had twice the number with normal appearance. It was not clear as to what caused the differences. It could have been the electromagnetic waves. There is good evidence that electromagnetic waves affect male an-

A renewed spirit of caring. 801 Middleford Road – Seaford, DE 19973 www.nanticoke.org To find a Nanticoke physician, call 1-877-NHS-4-DOCS.

imals in this way. It could have been related to increase heat. It could have been related to other factors. The group has decided to look at these other factors. They will look at the type of cell phone. They will look at where it is carried in the body. There might be a difference between carrying it in the shirt pocket or on the waist or in the pants pocket. There will be more information on this to come. In the meantime, male cell phone users might want to limit their daily cell phone use. You never know where the next scientific finding is going to come from. Dr. Anthony Policastro is medical director at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital.

call one of these DPH clinics. • Sussex County, Georgetown State Service Center, 856-5213 • Sussex County, Shipley State Service Center, 628-2006 For more about flu clinic locations and dates, go to www.flucliniclocator.org

Reversing aging Biomarkers A health seminar will be held on November 9, from 7 p.m. to

8:30 p.m. at St. John’s United Methodist Church, Seaford. Participant’s will learn how to slow down the aging process and delay the “disability zone” at the end of life using scientifically validated health principles. Question & answer time will follow. For more information call 302-875-1292.


MORNING STAR ✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PAGE 13

Easter Seals names facility in honor of Tunnell family Easter Seals recently officially christened the new Georgetown facility the Easter Seals Tunnell Center in honor of Robert W. Tunnell, Jr. and the Tunnell family. Robert Tunnell, Jr. contributed a gift of $1 million toward the Easter Seals “Creating the Future: Dignity Through Independence” Capital campaign. Principal of Tunnell Companies and board member of Wilmington Trust, Robert W. Tunnell, Jr. helped develop the Long Neck Peninsula with the creation of Baywood Greens golf course and resort, and Pot-Nets waterfront communities.

With this gift, Tunnell continues his family’s long-standing tradition of philanthropy and community support. Impressed by Easter Seals’ steadfast determination to build the new facility to meet the growing needs of the community, Tunnell wished to support Easter Seals and bring the organization closer to winning a $600,000 challenge grant issued by the

Easter Seals recently officially christened the new Georgetown facility the Easter Seals Tunnell Center.

David L. Crooks, M.D . will be leaving the practice of Nanticoke Surgical Associates December 1, 2006

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Dr Vibha Sanwal, MD, FAAP starting December 21, 2006 and announces the opening of a second location on December 1st at

16391 Savannah Road, Lewes. Dr. Vibha Sanwal, Board Certified Pediatrician currently with Nemours Pediatrics in Georgetown (an affiliate of DuPont Children’s Hospital), will be welcoming new patients, Dr. Vibha Sanwal will be seeing patients at both locations, Lewes and Georgetown. All major medical Insurance’s, including Medicaid, welcome.

Evening, weekend appointments available. Please call for an appointment 21141 Sterling Ave., unit 1 Georgetown, DE 856-6967, Fax 855-0744

Kresge Foundation. Easter Seals provides services to ensure that all people with disabilities or special needs and their families have equal opportunities to live, learn, work and play in their communities. For more information about Easter Seals, call 1-800-677-3800 or visit the following website: www.de.easterseals.com.

16391 Savannah Road Lewes, DE 856-6967, Fax 645-6457

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ORTHOPAEDICS Richard J. Sternberg, M.D. Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon Specializing in Orthopaedic Surgery, Sports Medicine, Adult Reconstruction, Arthritis, Fractures & Injuries, Bone & Joint Disease, Occupational Orthopaedics ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS

SUSSEX ORTHOPAEDIC & REHABILITATION CENTER 1200 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford, DE 19973 302629-7900

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PAGE 14

MORNING STAR ✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

New southern office of chief medical examiner building named in honor of Dr. Judith G. Tobin On Saturday, Nov. 4, the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner held a special naming dedication ceremony for the new southern office of the Chief Medical Examiner Building in honor of a woman to whom the state of Delaware is truly grateful for her lifetime of service — Dr. Judith G. Tobin. Dr. Richard T. Callery, chief medical examiner and Vincent P. Meconi, secretary, Delaware Health and Social Services, along with many others revealed the news to an unsuspecting Dr. Tobin, whose family flew in from all over the country to join her for the honor. “After 42 years of serving the Medical Examiner’s Office, Dr. Tobin may not be a household word to fellow Delawareans. But we hope to change that today by naming this structure after her,” said Sercrtary Meconi. “Congratulations again, Dr. Tobin.” In 1960, Dr. Tobin was approached to serve as deputy medical examiner for the Board of Post Mortem Examiners of Sussex County. Dr. Tobin’s career

began at the Stockley Center. In 1964, Dr. Tobin became the state’s assistant medical examiner for Kent and Sussex counties, a position she has held ever since. For those of you who have forgotten, back in 1964 Lyndon Johnson was president, the Beatles were America’s favorite musical group, Jeopardy aired its first episode on TV, and the Baltimore Colts narrowly lost the NFL championship. Lyndon Johnson, the Beatles, and the Baltimore Colts are now long gone, but Jeopardy and Dr. Tobin are still going strong! During her tenure, Dr. Tobin has been involved in many high profile cases. In 1970, her beloved husband died, leaving Dr. Tobin with a life that became very demanding. She was a single parent with a professional career and the responsibility for raising six children. But she succeeded beyond all measure, and in 1984 Dr. Tobin was recognized as the “Mother of the Year” for the State of Delaware, an honor she truly deserved. Over the course of her career,

Dr. Tobin has held numerous health related positions at the Delaware Division of the American Cancer Society, the Delaware Institute of Medical Education and Research and the Blood Bank of Delaware. Dr. Tobin is

the only woman ever to be named president of the medical staff at the Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, holding this position on two separate occasions: from 1971-1974 and 1976-1978. Dr. Tobin has been recognized on

many occasions for her generous service to the public and private sectors. “Delaware’s Medical Examiner’s Office and the forensic drug Continued on next page

Donald T. Laurion, D.O., F.A.C.C. Cardiologist

Alvaro Buenano, M.D., F.A.C.C. Cardiologist

Angel E. Alicea, M.D., F.A.C.C. Cardiologist

Richard P. Simons, D.O., F.A.C.C. Cardiologist

“we’re proud

that Nanticoke was named best in the state for response to emergency heart cases.”

In the September 28, 2006, edition of the News Journal, Nanticoke was cited for our excellence in emergency response to heart attacks. The rankings were the result of an analysis performed by the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. We credit our physicians, technicians, nurses, support staff, volunteers, auxiliary and board members for delivering on our

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL

A renewed spirit of caring. 801 Middleford Road • Seaford, DE 19973 www.nanticoke.org

promise to provide a higher quality of care. Because of them, our renewed spirit of caring is touching more lives and helping more people than ever before. Dr. Judith G. Tobin watches as the new southern office of the Chief Medical Examiner Building is dedicated in her honor.

To read the article in its entirety, visit www.nanticoke.org or call us at 1-877-NHS-4DOCS for a reprint.


MORNING STAR ✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PAGE 15

Dr. Tobin honored for a lifetime of service Continued from page 14

testing laboratory is a national leader when it comes to excellence in state-of-the art forensic drug testing procedures and services,” said Vincent P. Meconi, Secretary, Delaware Health and Social Services. “The professional, detailed and comprehensive forensic reports prepared by the medical and support staff assigned to the statewide drug testing laboratory provide police and prosecutors with precise pathology information crucial to solving crime and assisting victims’ families to obtain closure. I am extremely proud of the work spearheaded by Dr. Richard T. Callery and the entire staff of the Medical

Examiner’s Office and encourage the public will join us as we name the new office in honor of one of Delaware greatest public servants.” The Medical examiner’s office is one of just 52 other medicolegal death investigation systems/jurisdictions in the country that holds national accreditation the National Association of State Medical Examiners. The accreditation recognizes the high standards and results accomplished by the State Medical Examiner’s Office and the forensic laboratory in determining cause and manner of death in complex investigations involving forensic, toxicological and pathology test procedures.

Public reminded of penalties for hunting violations Hunting season is upon us and the Delaware Division of Fish and Wildlife Enforcement would like to remind hunters to hunt safely and legally. “If you’re hunting on private land, make sure you have permission from the property owner. Without permission, the owner is within his rights to report you, and you can be charged with trespassing to hunt, and you could face possible loss of your hunting license,” said enforcement chief James Graybeal. “And if you’re hunting on public land, make sure you know the rules and follow them,” Graybeal added, noting the hunter’s checklist should include reviewing wildlife area maps showing where hunting is permitted. Hunters also need to be properly licensed and follow limits, times, dates and locations for different game seasons. For more information on licenses and seasons, please visit www.fw.delaware.gov/Wildlife.htm or call the division of fish and wildlife at 302-739-9913. To report concerns or possible violations, please call fish and wildlife enforcement at 302-739-4580 or contact Sgt. Greg Rhodes at 302-542-6102.

The cover is removed from the sign recognizing the new Southern Office of the Chief Medical Examiner as the Judith G. Tobin, M.D. building.

Fall Into a New Beginning at Lifecare at Lofland Park * R. N. * L. P. N. * C. N. A. * Sign On Bonus * Per Diem Positions * Premium Pay Contracts * 8 and 12 hour shifts available

We are skilled nursing facility looking for the right people to join our team as we provide person centered care to our residents in our three distinct units. Visit our Booth at the Nanticoke Health Services Job Fair November 11th

Call for more information 302-828-3000 ext 8158

Fax your resume 302-628-3714


PAGE 16

MORNING STAR ✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

Higher energy bills increase risk from alternative heaters The Delaware State fire marshal’s office is urging citizens to exercise caution when using alternative heating sources during this year’s winter season. The increase cost of electric, home heating oil and natural gas are likely to cause an increase in the use of portable or alternative heating devices this winter. With the increase in use, comes the increase in fires involving these appliances. Fire marshals are asking everyone to review their fire prevention plan to insure that everyone has a safe winter season. All homes should be equipped with working smoke detectors, carbon monoxide detectors, and have a fire escape plan. Having these three items drastically increases the ability to survive a fire.

Winter Fire Safety Tips All appliances should only be used in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions and specifications. For wood or coal stoves or fireplaces, have a professional inspect the chimney, chimney connector and other related equipment every year, and have them cleaned as often as the inspections indicate. Home heating appliances should be inspected annually to check for leaks and to improve efficiency. Space heaters should be at

least three feet away from anything that can burn such as curtains, furniture, and bedding. Fuel portable kerosene heaters in a well-ventilated area away from flames or other heat sources, and only when the device has cooled completely. Use only the type of kerosene specified by the manufacturer, and never use gasoline. Portable space heaters should be turned OFF every time you leave the room or go to bed. Allow ashes to cool before disposing. Dispose ashes in a metal container. Keep the metal container outside away from the house. Never refuel a kerosene heater inside the home. Never use a gasoline fueled portable electric generator inside the home. Test your smoke detectors once a month. Install carbon monoxide detectors in your home. Develop and implement a fire escape plan and include children and holiday visitors into the escape plan. Consult organizations such as the Consumer Product Safety Commission to keep current with recent recalls and safety bulletins. Contact your local fire department or fire marshal’s office, if you have a question regarding home fire safety.

PAIN MANAGEMENT & REHABILITATION GANESH BALU, M.D. • KARTIK SWAMINATHAN, M.D. • MANO ANTONY, M.D. • ALFREDO ROMERO, M.D.

Worker’s Comp. Injuries Auto Accidents Chronic Neck & Back Pain Medications X-Ray Guided Injections EMG Testing Massage Therapy

Ne Acc w ept Pa i n tie g nt s

New Location 34446 King Street Row Unit 2 Old Towne Office Park Lewes, DE 19958 (302) 645-9066

742 S. Governor’s Ave. Opp. Kent General Hosp. Dover, DE 19904 (302) 734-7246

8957 Middleford Road Near Nanticoke Hosp. Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 628-9100

Sleep Through Your Pain Management Injections

Mortgage late? Speak up quickly or risk losing your home. Too many people in financial trouble wait too long to ask for help— especially if they fall behind on their house payments. The sooner you ask for help, the more options you will have to save your home. If you need assistance, call the confidential hotline to talk to an independent housing counselor.

Annual Herring Memorial Shoot November 18 The Annual Christopher Scott Herring Memorial Shoot will take place on Nov. 18, at Owens Station, Greenwood, between the hours of 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. The shoot provides continuous funding to the Doctor Christopher Scott Herring Memorial Scholarship Fund which each year awards a scholarship to a student from the Delmarva Peninsula who is attending Palmer Chiropractic College in Davenport, Iowa. Doctor “Chris,” who was killed in a single car crash in December of 2001, was a local man who strongly believed in the value of education and in holistic type medicines particularly chiropractic. Graduating from Palmer in 2000, Dr. Herring in partnership with his brother Doctor Garrett Herring owned and operated chiropractic clinics in Lewes and Milford until his untimely death. Some may remember Dr. Chris as Captain Chris who ran head boats out of Indian River Inlet, Ocean City, and Bowers Beach. This annual event is a tribute to his memory by providing a qualifying student with the means to continue his education. The shoot is not only for “shooters” but also provides an entertaining day for the whole family by serving a hot lunch for a nominal fee, a Chinese auction and various raffles on articles donated by local businesses and artists. Non-shooters can participate in the day’s activities and enjoy the beautiful Owens Station’s facilities day while contributing to a worthy cause. For more information about the shoot, including directions, call Owens Station Range at 302-349-4334.

do D fre o, M l A er m Ro

Attend a FREE mortgage workshop: Monday, November 13 7 PM to 8:30 PM First State Community Action Agency 308 N. Railroad Ave. Georgetown, DE 19947 302-856-7761

Thursday, November 16 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM (lunch included) Office of the State Bank Commissioner 555 E. Loockerman Street Dover, DE 19901 302-739-4235

Remember, every minute counts.

1-888-995-HOPE

Made possible in part by the Office of the State Bank Commissioner, the Office of the Attorney General, the Delaware State Housing Authority, NeighborWorks ®, the Homeownership Preservation Foundation and the Federation of State Housing Counselors.


MORNING STAR ✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PAGE 17

Police Journal Seaford Police report that the Nylon Package Store, 730 Sussex Avenue, Seaford, was robbed Monday, Nov. 6. Police said a black male in his early 20s, 5’ 6” to 5’ 8” and weighing between 150 and 160 pounds approached the clerk and demanded money. The robber said he had a gun. The clerk complied and gave the robber an undisclosed amount of cash. The robber then fled in a southwest direction. Police said the robber was wearing a white hockey mask, He was dressed in a dark blue zippered hooded sweatshirt. Seaford Police Dept. Criminal Investigations Division is asking anyone with information about this crime to contact them at 629-6644 or the Delaware Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP-3333. Delaware Crime Stoppers is offering a reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the robber.

unit block of N. Draper Circle. Upon arrival at the scene, troopers learned that four adults and an infant at the home were the victims of a home invasion robbery. Four to six black male suspects, several of whom were armed with handguns, forced their way into the home and subsequently assaulted the male homeowner. During the assault, the male homeowner was shot one time and the suspects fled after removing items from the home. The male homeowner, Jay A. Stratton, 43, was transported to Kent General Hospital, where he later succumbed to his injuries. The other victims in the home - his wife, two friends and their child - were not injured during the incident. This investigation is ongoing and anyone with information regarding it, is urged to call Troop 3 at (302) 697-4454, The State Police Homicide Unit at (302) 7395939, or Crime Stoppers at (800) TIP3333.

Home invasion, homicide

Fatal crash in Georgetown

Robbery at Nylon Package Store

The Delaware State Police Homicide Unit is investigating a homicide that occurred Tuesday, Oct. 31, at a home on N. Draper Circle in Meadowbrook Acres, Magnolia. At approximately 8:40 p.m., troopers were dispatched to a shooting that took place at the home, which is located in the

The Delaware State Police Collision Reconstruction Unit is investigating a three vehicle crash that occurred on Friday, Nov. 3 and took the life of a 66-year old Townsend woman. Troopers responded to County Route 18, Coastal Highway approximately 3 miles west of Georgetown for reports of a

three vehicle crash at 6:06 p.m. Investigators report that a 2000 Ford F150 pick up was traveling westbound on Coastal Highway when it stopped with intentions of turning left into a private drive. The vehicle traveling directly behind the Ford passed it on the right; however the next vehicle traveling westbound, a 2000 Hyundai Elantra, struck the Ford F150 in the rear. The Hyundai was then struck in the rear by the vehicle traveling directly behind it, a 2000 Ford Windstar. The driver of the Ford F150, identified as Carlos Velasquez Nunez, 33 of Riverdale, Maryland was not injured. The driver of the Hyundai, identified as Linda A. Adamson, 45 of Georgetown, was admitted to Nanticoke Hospital with an ankle fracture. The right front passenger, identified as Harriet H. Wyatt, 66 of Townsend was pronounced dead at the scene as a result of her injuries. The right rear passenger, identified as a 62-year old Delaware City woman, was flown to Baltimore Shock Trauma and is in critical condition. The driver of the Ford Windstar, identified as Sheila M. Young, 42 of Bridgeville, was treated and released from Milford Memorial Hospital for contusions. County Route 18 was closed for in both directions in the area of the crash for 2 hours while the investigation was being

conducted. The investigation remains ongoing. Alcohol is not believed to be a factor in this crash. All parties involved in this crash were seat belted.

Delmar woman in critical condition The Delaware State Police Collision Reconstruction Unit is investigating a crash that occurred Friday, Nov. 3 and left a 26-year old Delmar woman in critical condition. Troopers responded to US Route 13 at West Snake Road for reports of a two vehicle crash. Investigators report that a 2002 Honda Civic was stopped at a stop sign on West Snake Road with intentions of crossing US Route 13. The Honda pulled out from the stop sign into the path of a 2001 Chevy S10 pick up truck, which was traveling northbound on US Route 13. The front of the Chevy struck the driver's door of the Honda. The driver of the Honda, identified as Brenna Meixner, 26, of Delmar, was flown to Peninsula Regional Medical Center with multiple head and chest injuries. The driver of the Chevy, identified as Clifton Parrish, Jr. 79 of Kingston, North Carolina, was not injured. He was seat belted. Continued on page 18


MORNING STAR ✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PAGE 18

Laurel Police participate in missing children’s alert The Laurel Police Department has joined forces with “ A Child Is Missing” program. Every 40 seconds a child is reported missing in the United States. A Child Is Missing is a rapid response telephone system that alerts residents in a targeted area about a missing child, elderly person (suffering from Alzheimer’s), college student, and mentally challenged or disabled person. An officer calls A Child Is Missing and

provides the pertinent information about the missing person, including their description, clothes worn, and time and place last seen. A technician records an individual alert message, which is phoned out to the area where the child was last seen. A Child Is Missing can place up to 1,000 calls in 60 seconds and has a 98% listen rate by residents or businesses answering the phone. Whoever answers the phone is given

the information and asked to check outside for the missing person and, if located, contact the police department. The “A Child is Missing” program can also be used by law enforcement to notify residents about a sex offender moving into a community. A Child is Missing works in concert with “Amber Alert,” which is designed for stranger abductions, when the child is geographically removed from the immediate area of abduction.

A Child is Missing has very few restrictions and can be activated by law enforcement with one simple phone call. A Child is Missing can not send alerts to unlisted phone numbers. If your number is unlisted or you would like to use your cell phone number, please visit www.achildismissing.org to add either number. Anyone with questions about the program are asked to contact the Laurel Police Department at 302-875-2244.

Police Journal Northbound US Route 13 was restricted to 1 lane for approximately 2 hours while the crash was being investigated. The investigation remains ongoing.

mately 2 hours while the crash was being investigated. Alcohol is not believed to be a factor in this crash. Both drivers were seat belted. The investigation remains ongoing.

Rehoboth man dies in crash

LAUREL POLICE REPORTS

Continued from page 17

The Delaware State Police Collision Reconstruction Unit is investigating a fatal crash that occurred Sunday, Nov. 5 took the life of a 30-year old Rehoboth Beach man. Troopers responded to State Route 16 at 1:45 a.m., approximately .2 miles east of State Route 36 for reports of a two vehicle crash. Investigators report that a 2000 Ford Focus was traveling westbound on State Route 16 while a 2004 Ford Mustang was traveling eastbound on State Route 16. The Ford Focus crossed the centerline and traveled into the eastbound lane. The vehicle traveling eastbound directly in front of the Mustang swerved to the shoulder to avoid a collision with the Focus, and the Focus then traveled head-on into the Mustang. The driver of the Focus, identified as Antonio M. Cundafe, 30 of Rehoboth Beach, was transported to Nanticoke Hospital where he was pronounced dead as a result of his injuries. The driver of the Mustang, identified as Jennifer S. Boyde, 21 of Felton, was treated and released from Milford Hospital with a fractured right collar bone. The roadway was closed for approxi-

Visit with Santa 2-4 pm

On Nov. 3 at 2:36 p.m., members of the Laurel Police Department responded to 1200 Hollybrook Apartments for a report of a disturbance. Upon arrival, officers learned from the victim that the suspect attacked her because the suspect thought that the victim was talking about her child. The victim sustained a minor injury to the right hand and refused medical treatment. Jessica Ortiz, 27, of Laurel, was arrested and charged with offensive touching. She was released on criminal summons. On Nov. 2 at 3:20 p.m. members of the Laurel Police Department responded to 302 Hollybrook Apartments for report of stolen motor vehicle. Upon arrival, officers made contact with the victim who advised that she let a friend use her car and the friend had failed to return it. The vehicle was recovered a short time later in Seaford. Tierra Smith, 19, of Seaford, was arrested and charged with unauthorized use of a motor vehicle, theft, driving while suspended, unregistered motor vehicle, and no proof of insurance. Smith was released on $3,200 unsecured bond. On Oct. 31, at 4:45 p.m. members of

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the Laurel Police Department responded to 500 Carvel Gardens after they received information that a wanted subject was there. Upon arrival, officers made contact with Alonzo Fletcher, who was hiding in the residence. Fletcher was found to have two active warrants, one out of the Laurel Police Department for an incident that happened in the same location on Aug. 22 and the second was out of Caroline County, Md., Sheriffs Office for failure to register as a sex offender. Alonzo Fletcher, 28, of Federalsburg, Md., was arrested and charged with failure to register as a sex offender, resisting arrest, criminal mischief, malicious interference with an emergency phone call, and

offensive touching. Fletcher was committed to SCI on $2,500 secured bond. On Oct. 30, members of the Laurel Police Department arrested Timothy Wells on an active warrant out of the Laurel Police Department. The warrant was issued on Oct. 11 after an officer responded to the Shore Stop in Laurel for an internal theft. The manager advised that when the suspect was working the cash register was coming up short. They reviewed the security tape, which showed the suspect allegedly removing cash. Timothy Wells, 22, of Laurel, was charged with theft, pled guilty, and was ordered to pay fines.

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PAGE 20

MORNING STAR

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

People Bennett, Rubino plan to be married John and Linda Bennett, Laurel, and Mark and Brenda Rubino, also of Laurel, announce the engagement of their children, Kristi Lynn Bennett and Matthew Scott Rubino. Maternal grandparents of the bride-to-be are Robert and Connie Justis, Laurel. Paternal grandparents are Jerry and Mary Francis Smith, Seaford, and the late Hollis R. Bennett Sr.. Paternal great-grandparents are Grace E. Litchford, Seaford, and the late J. Hebert Litchford Sr. Maternal grandparents of the groom-to-be are Angelo and Dot Dulis, Laurel. Paternal grandparents are Martin and Loretta Rubino, also of Laurel. The bride-to-be is a 2002 graduate of Laurel Senior High School. She is also a 2006 graduate of Shenandoah University in Winchester, Va., with a bachelor of science degree in respiratory care. She is employed as a certified respiratory therapist at Bryn Mawr Hospital in Bryn Mawr, Pa. The groom-to-be is a 1999

ALL ABOUT ROCKS - Third graders at Woodbridge Elementary School, who are studying rocks and minerals in science class, went on a field trip to Delmarva Natural Stone recently. They learned how rocks and minerals are used as building products. Photo by Lexie Ketterman, science specialist,Woodbridge School District. Kristi Lynn Bennett and Matthew Scott Rubino

graduate of Laurel Senior High School. He is also a 2003 graduate of Pennsylvania State University in State College, Pa., with a bachelor of science degree. He is currently a fourthyear medical student at Thomas Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, Pa. He will graduate in June with a degree in medicine. A May 12 wedding is planned for The Fountains, Wedding and Conference Center in Salisbury, Md. Formal wedding invitations will be issued.

L I M I T E D

T I M E

O F F E R

*

Program to help kids expands to Adopt-a-Family for the holidays The Adopt-a-Student program distributed more than 3,080 backpacks with school supplies to students around Delaware during August and September of this year. This marks a 20-percent growth over last year for giving school supplies to less fortunate children. The Adopt-a-Student program is administered by Delaware Health and Social Services’ Division of State Service Centers’ Office of Family Support. Last year, the program helped more than 2,200 children in New Castle county and more than 350 children in Kent and Sussex counties. In just five years, the program has grown more than 450 percent, from helping 550 students statewide in 2002 to 3,089 this school year. Many private individuals and corporations donated to the program, helping Adopt-A-Student

reach more than 2,680 students in New Castle county and more than 404 students in Kent and Sussex counties. Program organizers are now focusing on the holiday drive for Adopt-A-Family. Individuals and companies interested in adopting a family of children, a nursing home resident or a foster child for the holidays are asked to contact the program. Those interested in volunteering or supporting Adopt-A-Family should call 302792-9538 in New Castle County; 302-739-3145 in Kent County; and 302-424-2780 in Sussex County. To make monetary donations, mail checks to Adopt-A-Family of New Castle County, 3301 Green St., Claymont, DE 19703; or Adopt-A-Family of Kent/Sussex Counties, 13 SW Front St., Suite 103, Milford, DE 19963. All donations are tax deductible.

News items may be mailed to the Seaford and Laurel Star, 628 W. Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973. Or they may be faxed to 6299243.

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MORNING STAR

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PAGE 21

“Your Satisfaction is Our Goal”

Neglected living room inspires cleaning spree I think that the turning point came several weeks ago, when I YNN ARKS walked into the living room on a Saturday and found the previous Cat hair colored Sunday’s paper still spread out on the couch. A laundry basket filled everything, turning rich with clothes that I had started foldblue to aquamarine and ing that long-ago Sunday was sitdeep green to celery. And ting in front of a chair and on a table was a plate bearing the remwas that a hair ball lying nants of tortilla chips and salsa. in front of the couch? “How long has it been since I’ve been in this room?” I wonneed swept of cat hair and then washed, dered aloud. The room, though silent, then it’s on to the upstairs. I have a new spoke plainly enough: I had not visited it can of paint, blue, for one bedroom and for nearly a week. another can of paint, rich brown, for the Well, I am very busy, I defended mypine floor in the hallway. In my yellow self. Editors need stories, other editors phase that came several years ago and that need still more stories, and there is no lasted two days, I painted the floor the time to linger in the living room. There is color of corn. also precious little time for housework, Remarkably for someone who is housesomething that the room, subject to even the briefest examination, was testament to. cleaning-inept, I haven’t experienced any catastrophes during this project. The bottle The tortilla chip crumbs were covered of furniture polish hasn’t spilled, the buckwith a fine layer of dust. Cat hair colored et of dirty floor-washing water made it everything, turning rich blue to aquamasafely down the drain. Even when I stood rine and deep green to celery. And was that a hair ball lying in front of the couch? on the kitchen rocker to dust off the cabinet tops, my luck held. There, standing in the squalor, I had an Only one problem surfaced, when epiphany. I was going to have to arrange halfway through sweeping the living room some time in my schedule for house carpet I realized that that strong smell of cleaning. cat urine was coming from the vacuum It took several weeks, but I finally cleaner. The warmer the vacuum motor managed to find a few days that I could devote to straightening and scrubbing our got, the stronger the smell was. But when home. I need to find a few more days to it is not in use, the vacuum is parked in do some of the same thing and then the the back bathroom, next to the litter pan. job, a total fall cleaning, will be complete. What did I expect? I started my work on the back porch, in Note to the misters Arm and Hammer: the corner farthest away from the kitchen. If you are thinking about Cologne de le From there, I worked my way into the chat as a potential room freshener, you kitchen and then to the dining room and might want to think again. living room, scraping, scrubbing and polOf course, the knowledge that a clean ishing as I went. house lasts only until a cat sheds a hair, While I was at it, I tossed into garbage until a dirty shoe steps on the rug, dangles bags objects that I hadn’t used in years. It over me like the sword of Damocles — isn’t easy throwing things away, but sucwho left that thing hanging around anyceeding in doing so is very empowering. way? But such is the torment of the I also rearranged, putting this chair housekeeper. And maybe, with the inspirathere and that chair here. I found two tion that comes with sparkling windows, I small painted trays that I had forgotten will find the wherewithal to keep the about and that fit in nicely with the new house in order: to pick up newspapers kitchen arrangement and I finally hung in when I am done with them and carry disha sunny window two colored glass balls es to the sink as soon as they are empty of that my brother and his wife got us two food. years ago for Christmas. So now, the downstairs is finished. If this inspiration comes, I hope that it Next step, ironically, is the steps, which lasts longer than my yellow phase did.

L

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Laurel library plans events The Laurel Public Library is celebrating Children’s Book Week Nov. 12 through 18. On Monday, Nov. 13, 4:15 p.m., the library will hold a program, Pioneers at the Library, for children in kindergarten through the sixth grade. The program will feature a “travel trunk” from the Delaware Agricultural Museum for hands-on experiences with artifacts from days gone by, activities, crafts and a chance to sample real “pioneer food.” Pre-registration is required for this program. On Wednesday, Nov. 15, 6:30 p.m., the

P.O. Box 598-US 13 Seaford, DE 19973 Fax: 302-629-5573

First State Children’s Theater featuring Michael Boudewywns will perform “Treasure Island” at the library. On Saturday, Nov. 18, 12:30 p.m., the library will host a program based on the “Little House on the Prairie” book series. The program is for children in kindergarten through the sixth grade. Children are invited to come in costume. Gingerbread and cider will be served. For more information about any of these events, or to pre-registration for the Pioneer program, stop by the library, call u 875-3184 or visit the Web site www.laurel.lib.de.us.

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MORNING STAR ✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PAGE 22

Community Bulletin Board EVENTS

BINGO

Craft show at Delaware Tech 23rd Annual Craft Fair on Friday, Nov. 10, and Saturday, Nov. 11, at Delaware Technical & Community College in Georgetown. Admission is free. There will be door prizes and refreshments. On Friday from 3-7 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. in the William A. Carter Partnership Center, more than 100 crafters from several states will offer everything from floral arrangements, country gifts, woodwork, and ceramics to needlework, jewelry, dolls, clothing, and more. There also will be art work for sale by members of the Georgetown/Adult Plus+ Art League. For more information, call the Adult Plus+ program at 856-5618.

Free carwash and hot dogs A Free carwash and free hot dogs on Saturday, Nov. 11, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., at Gethsemane United Methodist Church Parking Lot, 2701 Woodland Ferry road, Seaford (Reliance). A donation of canned goods for our community food drive would be appreciated. Questions contact Linda Pevey at 302629-9189, or the church office at 302-6292862.

SHS Alumni Assn. Fall Social The SHS Alumni Association is hosting their annual fall social at the Seaford Golf & Country Club on Friday, Nov. 24, from 6 to 9 p.m. Any SHS graduate, has attended Seaford Schools or has an interest in the Alumni Association is invited to attend. You do not have to be a member of the SHS Alumni Association to attend. There will be light snacks and a cash bar available. Come out to revel in fond memories of good ‘ole SHS. For additional information call Donna Hastings Angell 302-629-8077, or Mary Lee DeLuca at 629-8429.

Eastern Star of Maryland Banquet A banquet honoring the charter members of Roelma Chapter 113, Order of the Eastern Star of Maryland, on Saturday, Nov. 25 at 6 p.m., at Fireman’s Memorial Building, Sharptown, Md. Cost is $21 per person. Entertainment will follow a ham/roast beef dinner. For reservations call Susan Calloway, 875-5911. Make checks payable to Susan Calloway, 32556 Holly Oak Drive, Laurel, DE 19956. Deadline for reservations is Wednesday, Nov. 15. The charter members are from Sharptown and Delmar.

Basket Bingo Longaberger Basket Bingo on Tuesday, Nov. 14, at Seaford Boys & Girls Club. Doors open at 6 p.m.; Bingo begins at 7 p.m. Tickets are $20, $25 at the door. Door prize drawing: American Crafts Traditions Market Basket. Raffles; Library Basket, Large Hamper Basket. Refreshments available. For more information call Karen at 629-8740; Sherry at 245-8549 or Rhonda at 628-5137. Benefits the Seaford Pop Warner. County Republican Women’s club will be held on Wednesday, Nov. 15, at 10:45 in the Sussex Pines Country Club. Dave Burris from the County Republican Office will discuss the election results. Lunch will be served at a cost of $13. Visitors are welcome. For reservations call Nancy Gunn at 302-537-4355 or e-mail at NancyGunn@aol.com preferably by Nov. 9. For more information see the club web site at: www.scrwc.net.

Seaford Republican Women’s Club The Seaford Republican Women’s Club will meet on Thursday, Nov. 16, at 10:30 a.m. at the Pizza King restaurant. This is a departure from the usual date and place because of the Thanksgiving holiday. Tom Brown, Nanticoke Health Services vice president in charge of marketing and development, will be the speaker. He will talk about efforts being made to recruit new physicians for this area and about the current practice of having patients in the hospital being cared for by hospitalists. Lunch is optional and will be ordered from the menu. The public is invited. For further information call Anne Nesbitt at 628-7788.

NARFE meets November 20 Chapter 1992 (Georgetown) of the National Association of Active and Retired Federal Employees (NARFE) will hold their November meeting on Monday, Nov. 20, at noon at the Flight Deck Restaurant located at the Georgetown Airport. This month’s program will be presented by Mrs. Melinda Tingle from the Edward Jones Investment firm.

Widowed Persons meeting

MEETINGS Women’s Democratic Club The November meeting of the Sussex County Women’s Democrat Club will be Thursday, Nov. 16, at 11:30 a.m. at the Sussex Pines Country Club, Georgetown. The speaker is Insurance Commissioner, Matt Denn. Call Thelma Monroe, 9349716, for reservations.

Sussex County Republican Women The November meeting of the Sussex

The Seaford Chapter of the Widowed Persons Service will have its next meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 21, at 12:15 p.m. at the Golden Corral. All widowed persons of all ages are invited to attend. Come join us — we all enjoy the trips, lunches/dinners, etc. that we do.

H.A.P.P.E.N. members meeting The members of H.A.P.P.E.N., Hearns Pond Association for its Protection, Preservation, Enhancement and Naturalization, will meet on Thursday, Nov. 9, at 7 p.m.,

at the Seaford Museum on High Street. Among other issues, the group will concentrate its efforts on locating resources to enable the Hearns Pond Dam to be brought up to new state standards. Anyone interested in attending the meeting is welcome.

AARP Chapter 5340 Board AARP Chapter 5340 will hold a Board Meeting 10 a.m., Nov. 27, at the Sussex County Airport Conference Room, Georgetown. All members are encouraged to attend. For details call Melissa Richardson, president, 945-1288.

How to submit items Submit Bulletin Board items by Thursday at noon. Send to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, email morningstarpub @ddmg.net or drop off at 628 West Stein Highway, Seaford. Items appear in both the Seaford and Laurel Stars. Harrington Public Library in Harrington. An election will be held. For more information, contact Nyle at 422-4094 or Peggy at 629-5233.

AARP Chapter 5340 meeting Georgetown’s AARP Chapter 5340 will have their Christmas luncheon Dec. 4, at Sussex Pines Country Club in Georgetown beginning at noon. Donald Murray will provide the entertainment. Cost of the lunch is $13.50 per person. Call Cathey Betts (302) 856-3441 for reservations that are needed by Nov. 27. New members are welcome.

FOOD

Marine Corps League

Soup and Sandwich Sale on Saturday, Nov. 11, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Bethel Community House, North Oak Grove Road, west of Seaford. A variety of soups available for eating in Community House or “take out” quarts. Sandwiches and desserts also available. Phone Lucy Slacum 629-7117 for details.

The Marine Corps League meets the first Thursday of each month, at 7:30 p.m., at the Log Cabin in Seaford.

Delaware Equine Council to meet The Delaware Equine Council will meet on November 20 at 7 p.m. at the

Breakfast Cafe VFW 4961 Breakfast Cafe, open Monday-Friday, 8-10 a.m., Seaford VFW, Middleford Road, to benefit Veterans Relief Fund. All are welcome.

Soup & Sandwich Sale

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MORNING STAR ✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

VFW All-You-Can-Eat Breakfast The Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Post 4961 on Middleford Road in Seaford is having an All-YouCan-Eat Breakfast on Sunday, Nov. 19, at the post. The breakfast, held from 8 a.m. until 11 a.m., includes meats, eggs cooked to order, pancakes, toast, coffee and juice. The cost is $6 for adults. This event is now smoke free so come enjoy the breakfast and show your support for our organization.

SHOP & EAT Bazaar and Bake Sale Nanticoke Senior Center will be having their annual Bazaar & Bake Sale, Nov. 14, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. There will be handmade crafts, yard sale items, delicious baked goods. Tables for rent $5 members, $10 for non-members. Help support our center.

Covered dish dinner and auction Union United Methodist Church will be holding their annual Covered Dish Dinner and Auction on Friday evening, Nov. 10. Dinner begins at 5:30 p.m. and the auction will immediately follow at 6:30 p.m. Tickets, available at the door, are $5 for adults and $2.50 for children ages 4 through 10 years of age… plus a large, well-filled covered dish per family. Meat and beverage will be provided. Mr. Richard Lindale, our guest auctioneer, will keep you well entertained and laughing as you make some wonderful purchases. Everyone is cordially invited for great food, fun and fellowship.

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ETC. Creative Mentoring November 13 You can make a significant difference in a child’s life by becoming a mentor. Mentors are needed in schools in Seaford and Laurel districts. All it takes is one hour a week to make that difference. Free mentor training is available for both elementary and middle school mentors; registration is required. In Sussex County, Georgetown State Service Center, Monday, Nov. 13 - 9 a.m.12:30 p.m. - Middle school training; and 1-4:30 p.m. - Elementary school training. Help create a better future - one child at a time, become a mentor. To register for training or for more information on mentoring call Creative Mentoring, toll free, at 877-202-9050.

Babies & Toddlers Stay and Play Parents and children from birth to age four are invited to play together, listen to a story, learn new songs and finger plays, and network with other families. Free. Now thru-May 2007. Closed on school holidays. No registration required. Call Anna Scovel at 856-5239 for more information.Seaford Parks & Recreation (SDPR), 320 Virginia Ave., Seaford, Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m.-noon.

Read Aloud training Read Aloud Delaware volunteer training session will be held Tuesday, Nov. 28, at 1 p.m. in the Seaford Public Library, 402 North Porter St., Seaford. Call 8562527 to sign up for training or for further information. Volunteer readers are needed at various reading sites in Sussex County.

The Seaford Class of 1976 will hold its 30-year class reunion on Saturday, Nov. 25, at the Seaford Fire Hall from 6 p.m. until midnight. Light fare will be served, cash bar and music provided by Tranzfusion. For more information, contact David Smith at 410749-5776 or Dee (Christopher) Palmer at 629-9410. You can also go to the class website at www.seafordhigh1976.com.

LHS Class of 1956 luncheon The Laurel High School Class of 1956 will hold their quarterly luncheon meeting at the Laurel Dutch Inn, Friday, Nov. 10, at 11:30 a.m. Call Frank Calio at 8753770, or Trenny Elliott at 645-5071 for reservations.

Bridgeville Class of 1949 The Bridgeville Class of 1949 will hold a class reunion on Saturday, Nov. 4, at the Sailloft Restaurant on Rt. 113, north of Milford. We are searching for classmates, Jean Tucker McQuaide and Stanley Dickerson. If you know how to contact them, call Tom at 337-7494.

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REUNIONS The Seaford High School Class of 1996 will be holding its 10-year reunion on Saturday, Nov. 25. The event will be held at the Sussex Pines Country Club in Georgetown. We are searching for missing classmates. Contact Susan at 302-344-0741, or susanargo@hotmail.com.

As our Armed Forces fight to protect our freedom abroad, we’re reminded of the sacrifice made by so many brave soldiers before them. On Veterans Day, Saturday, Nov. 11, we pause to recognize and thank all of the veterans who have served our country. We are eternally grateful for their dedication and service.

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Nanticoke Auxiliary Winter Dance ‘Puttin’ on the Glitz’ Nanticoke Health Services Auxiliary Winter Gala committee has begun preparations for the annual dinner dance event to be held January 27, 2007 at the Seaford Golf and Country Club. This year’s 1930s theme, “Puttin’ on the Glitz,” will feature Art Deco decorations in a Grand Ballroom. Those attending will enjoy elegant food followed by the music of Encore while they whirl across the dance floor. Dust off your spats and top hats and put on your pearls and enjoy this memorable evening. Linda Robertson is the chairperson for the annual gala event. She is assisted by Bonnie Allen, Patty Burk, Sharon Mears, Janet Hubbard, Judi Thoroughgood and Jenny Werner. Proceeds from the event will be part of the auxiliary’s annual donation to Nanticoke Health Services. More details about “Puttin’ on the Glitz” can be obtained by calling the Nanticoke Health Services Volunteer Office at 629-6611, ext. 2301.

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PAGE 24

MORNING STAR ✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

Community Bulletin Board Seaford Christmas Parade

HOLIDAYS

The theme for this year’s Seaford Christmas Parade is “The Sounds and Lights of Christmas.” The date is Saturday, Dec. 2, at 7 p.m. The parade begins at the intersection of Pennsylvania Avenue and Nylon Boulevard. It proceeds down Pennsylvania Avenue to High Street. The judges stand is at the parking lot of Mt. Olivet Church. The parade continues down High Street, and turns at Market Street. The Parade goes up Market and ends at the Seaford Middle School. So far, seven school bands, non-profit groups, and businesses are planning to be in the parade.

Christmas Bazaar November 11 Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church is having its annual Christmas Bazaar. Crafts, baked goods, and more. Have your picture taken with Santa or win some of the nearly $1,000 to be given away. The church hall is located next to the Seaford Middle School. Hours are 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. Find a gift, buy some baked goods, or even stay for lunch. Find an attic treasure. (Sponsored by the Knights of Columbus.)

Victorian Christmas The Tenth Annual Victorian Christmas at the Ross Mansion, 1101 North Pine St. Extended, Seaford, will be held Dec. 8 through 10. Thirteen rooms in the historic restored Italian Villa Style mansion will be elaborately decorated by local florists and decorators. The Victorian Christmas at the Ross Mansion starts with a new activity this year. On Friday, Dec. 8, there will be featured a Christmas Tea and Tour. The tour will start at 1 p.m. Tea will be served at 2 p.m. Servers will be in costume complimenting the gracious atmosphere of the elaborately decorated 13 rooms of the restored historic mansion. The charge is $10 per person and must be paid in advance. Reservations are required and may be made by calling Ruthe Wainwright at 629-8765. Seating is prearranged with four people at a table. Parties who would like to sit together should make their reservations accordingly. Only 40 people can be accommodated. For further information call Anne Nesbitt at 628-7788. On Saturday, Dec. 9, from 1-4 p.m., there will be house tours and craft demonstrations; and from 5-9 p.m., there will be house tours by candlelight; $7 per adult, $1 per child under 12 years. Sunday, Dec. 10, is Family Day. There will be House Tours from 1-4 p.m., with Gov. and Mrs. Ross Receiving. Carriage rides from 2 to 3 p.m. Children’s activities in the Honeymoon Cottage (Star and Necklace making, Readings, Santa Clause). At 3 p.m., a raffle drawing for a Steve Theis Portrait. Cost is $7 per adult, $1 per child under 12 years of age. Sponsored by the Seaford Historical Society, Proceeds benefit the Ross Plantation and Seaford Museum.

Carolling in the Park The Gateway Park Committee and the City of Seaford will be hosting the 13th Annual Carolling in the Park Celebration and Tree Dedication Ceremony on Monday, Nov. 27, at 7 p.m., in Gateway Park. This year’s Carolling in the Park will include the dedication ceremony for a new Community Christmas Tree. Individuals interested in supporting the holiday decorations in the park or the Carolling in the Park event can make donations to the Gateway Park Committee, through the City of Seaford, at PO Box 1100, Seaford, DE 19973. Any donation over $300 will be recognized with an engraved brick in the park.

Christmas Show Trip

For individuals who would like to support the tree with a smaller contribution, “silver bell” ornament sponsorships are available for $5, $10 and $15, depending on size. A sponsorship will place a name of your choice on the ornament before it goes onto the tree. For more information contact Amy Walls at 629-9173.

Sounds of the Season Holiday music, performed by “Vital Signs” and others, will be on Sunday, Dec. 3, 2 p.m., at Delmar High School auditorium. Cost is $15 each or $25 for two, in Dr. Wolfgang’s office, 629-2366, or 629-2131. Join us for an afternoon performance of singing, dancing, and instrumentals. There will also be a Chinese auction and raffles on site. Concert to benefit The Western Sussex County Relay for Life.

Lioness Christmas House The Seaford Lioness and The Shiloh House Of Hope present the 16th annual Christmas House Tour on Saturday, Dec. 9, from 1-8 p.m. There will be eight homes on this tour and they are located in Laurel, Seaford and Bridgeville. Refreshments will be served at the Shiloh House Of Hope which is also on the tour. Tickets can be purchased at Cutn’ Up Family Salon or by calling Bonny Hastings at 302629-9596 or Sharyn Dukes at 302-2367754.

Christmas yard sale November 18 Christ United methodist Church, 510 South Central Ave. in Laurel, will be having a yard sale Nov. 18, beginning at 7:30 a.m. till noon. A wide variety of Christmas Items and toys will be for sale. Refreshments will be served.

Bethel House Tour Sunday, Dec. 10, there will be a House Tour in Bethel, consisting of several homes. The choir at Sailor’s Bethel United Methodist Church will be performing a Christmas Cantata at 4:30 p.m. prior to the tour. Tickets can be purchased in advance for $10 per person. Any questions call 302-875-3971 or 875-3733. Bethel Historical Society will be sponsoring a Bethel Maritime Autumn Festival on Saturday, Oct. 20, 2007. Anyone interested in participating in this event can call 875-3971 and leave message.

Laurel Senior Center Christmas Show trip, Dutch Apple Theater, Lancaster, Pa., Dec. 20. Cost $63, includes transportation, luncheon and show. Shopping after the show if time permits. Call 875-2536 to reserve a seat with deposit.

Model Railroad Club open house The 21st Delmarva Model Railroad Club open house Dec. 2 and 3, and Jan. 13, 14, 20 and 21, Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sundays noon to 4 p.m. Free ad-

mission and parking, 103 East State St., Delmar. Six operating layouts in four different scales. One of the largest club displays in the United States. Refreshments available. White elephant and consignment tables, train set raffle.

Historical Society’s Gift Shop The Seaford Historical Society’s Gift Shop is pleased to announce that they will be selling jewelry made by Cindy Cole. All of her jewelry is made with sterling silver and semi-precious stones. Stop in the Seaford Museum Gift Shop on High Street to see this unique collection of hand-made jewelry.

Delmar Alumni Association The Delmar Alumni Association is sponsoring a bus trip on Nov. 10, 11 and 12, to Oglebay Resort in Wheeling, W.Va. This is a pre-holiday retreat. Attractions include the Festival of Lights, Festival of Trees, Christmas at the Mansion, Train Exhibit and lots of time for shopping and relaxing in the pool, etc. The cost is $310, which includes two nights lodging, one holiday dinner buffet, two mountaineers breakfast buffets and tours. Call Jo at 846-0698.

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MORNING STAR

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PAGE 25

Treats made with chocolate-hazelnut spread are addictive If you’re a Food Network junkie as I am, you’re well acquainted with the many food luminaries who host its various shows. One of the most popular, perhaps because she’s quite a looker besides being an accomplished chef and cookbook author, is Giada Di Laurentiis. I’ve written about Giada in the past and shared some of her recipes. But anyone who watches her regularly knows that Giada is gaga about Nutella. I became acquainted with Nutella many years ago on my first trip to Italy. It’s been wildly popular there since its introduction in the 1940s. It was developed by Pietro Ferrero to stretch war-rationed chocolate with hazelnuts that were very plentiful in his region of the Piedmont. Originally made in loaves and wrapped in foil, Nutella was sliced and placed on bread. When Italian mothers began complaining that their children were eating the Nutella and throwing away the bread, the creamy, spreadable version was introduced. At one time stores offered a service called “The Smearing,” allowing children to come in with a slice of bread that would be given a free Nutella smear. Here in the US, the popularity of the chocolate-hazelnut spread has increased enough to warrant opening a New Jersey plant in 1983. If you haven’t ever tried Nutella, you should give it a chance. Spread a thin layer

The Practical Gourmet on a slice of toast or an English muffin. Try it on waffles or pancakes instead of syrup. Have it with some fresh fruit for dessert. But be warned — it is addictive. Here are some other suggested uses for Nutella. You can find more at recipe goldmine.com. Baked French Toast With Nutella Serves 4-6. Make-ahead trick: Fill the French toast and make up the custard in advance. In the morning, about 40 minutes before eating, dip toast in custard and bake. Toast 4 ounces cream cheese or Neufchatel cheese at room temperature 6 tablespoons Nutella, at room temperature 8 slices white bread Custard 4 eggs 1 cup milk

2 tablespoons granulated sugar 1 teaspoon granulated sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg Confectioners’ sugar Maple syrup (optional) To make sandwich: Mix cream cheese and Nutella until combined. Spoon mixture on 4 bread slices and spread all the way to outside edges, then top with remaining slices to makes sandwiches. Place in resealable plastic bag and refrigerate until ready to bake. To make custard: In flat container with an airtight lid large enough to hold a bread slice, beat together eggs, milk, sugar, vanilla extract and nutmeg. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use. To assemble: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mist a 9- by 13-inch baking pan with sides with nonstick cooking spray. Dip sandwiches into custard, turning once, for 2 minutes on the first side and 1 on the second to soak up as much of the custard as possible. Lay drained slices on pan and bake for 15 minutes then turn them over and bake for 20 minutes more, or until toast is golden brown on both sides. Sprinkle lightly with sifted confectioners’ sugar and serve with syrup, if desired. Recipe can easily be doubled.

Decadent Dip Yields 1 1/4 cups. Despite its name, a 1/4 cup serving is only 131 calories 1 (10.5 ounce) package silken tofu 6 tablespoons Nutella Whirl the silken tofu and Nutella together in a blender, scraping down sides as needed. Put into a serving dish and serve with fresh fruit, or banana bread dippers. Knuckle Sandwich Makes 4 2 tablespoons butter 2 pears, sliced into 3/16-inch slices, core removed 4 slices store-bought pound cake (sliced like conventional sandwich bread) 4 tablespoons Nutella 1/3 cup whole hazelnuts, toasted with skins off In a sauté pan over medium heat, melt butter and sauté pear slices for approximately 3 minutes per slice, or until they begin to brown. In a toaster, toast 4 pound cake slices. Take 2 toasted pound cake slices, smear with Nutella, sprinkle generously with hazelnuts. Top with pear slices and cover with second slice of pound cake. Cut each knuckle sandwich into 4 pieces on the diagonal and crunch away. From The Surreal Gourmet


MORNING STAR ✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

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CHURCH BULLETINS November guest singers are: Nov. 11: Bill Primrose, Bob and Cheryl Jones and Todd McMasters. Nov. 18: Joe Dawson. Nov. 25: Hannah Smith, Abundant Joy. Everyone is invited to attend. Come as you are. For more information, contact the church office at 875-3983, or Bruce Willey at 875-5539.

Woodland UMC Homecoming The Woodland United Methodist Church will hold its annual Homecoming service on Sunday, Nov. 12, at 2:30 p.m. The Rev. Barbara Wilson will be the guest speaker and The Sounds of Joy will provide special music. A covered dish dinner will follow in the fellowship hall. There will be no morning worship service. All members and friends are invited.

Thanksgiving Eve service St. Johnstown Homecoming St. Johnstown United Methodist Church Homecoming, St. Johnstown Road, Greenwood, Sunday, Nov. 12, at 2 p.m. Church Pastor is the Rev. James Bongard; guest speaker, will be the Rev. Michaele Russell. Special music will be a highlight of the program. Refreshment and fellowship will follow the service.

Watoto Children’s Choir in Concert The Watoto Children’s Choir will be in concert at the Atlanta Road Alliance Church, Seaford, on Sunday, Nov. 12. They will perform at both the 8:30 and 11 a.m. worship services. The African drums resound and one by one the children come dancing down the aisles in their brilliant Ugandan costumes with radiant smiles on their faces. Throughout Watoto’s “Concert of Hope,” you will experience the energy and sense the joy and hope that these beautiful Ugandan orphans have found.

The Sounds of Joy

The concert is free; a love offering will be received. The Atlanta Road Alliance Church is located at 22625 Atlanta Road, 1-1/2 miles north of the intersection of Stein Highway and Atlanta Road. For more information, call 629-5600 or visit www.atlantaroadcma.org.

Centenary Church Gospel Café Centenary United Methodist Church, Poplar and Market streets, Laurel, is hosting a Christian music hour each Saturday, 6-7:30 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of the church. Bruce and Nancy Willey are presenting live Christian music, fellowship, and refreshments. Each week Mary Ann Young sings your Gospel favorites.

A Thanksgiving Eve service sponsored by the Greater Seaford Ministerium will be held at St. John’s United Methodist Church, Pine and Poplar Streets, Seaford, at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 22. The Rev. Ed Laremore of Atlanta Road Alliance Church will be bringing the message, and St. John’s Sanctuary Choir will present a ministry of music. The community is invited to bring their “first fruits” in the form of canned goods for the Seaford Community Food Closet and/or side dishes, breads, or desserts in disposable dishes for the community Thanksgiving Day dinner sponsored by Evergreen United Methodist Church. An offering will be taken to benefit the Seaford Mission.

Free Community dinner A free, community Thanksgiving dinner sponsored by Evergreen United Methodist Church will be Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 23, 1 p.m., at St. John’s United Methodist Church, Pine and Poplar streets, Seaford.

Turkey, ham, stuffing and mashed potatoes will be provided, and the community is invited to bring their “First fruits” by donating side dishes, breads and desserts in disposable dishes. Donated food can be delivered to St. John’s Church during the Thanksgiving Eve service, or on Thanksgiving Day from 10 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. Volunteers are also invited to help cook, set-up, serve, and clean up from 1-4 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 22, and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Thanksgiving day. Call the Rev. Sharon Graves, 629-7472, or the Rev. Constance Hastings, 629-9466, for more information or to volunteer.

Em-ing’s dinner with O’Day Family Trinity United Methodist Church, 17249 Phillips Hill Road, Laurel, will host an Em-ing’s dinner on Friday, Nov. 10, 4-7 p.m. The O’Day family, from Georgetown, will be in concert during the dinner from 5-7 p.m. All dinner tickets are $8.50. Eatin or take out. Tickets should be purchased in advance by calling 875-3582 or 8752078.

Mt. Pleasant UMC 225th Anniversary On Sunday, Nov. 12, at 2 p.m., Mt. Pleasant United Methodist Church, Laurel, will be celebrating their 225th Anniversary at their Homecoming Service. The Rev. Sandra Steiner-Ball, Dover District Superintendent, will be our guest Continued on page 27

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship TRINITY UNITED METHODIST Trap Pond, CHURCH NearLaurel, Del. 875-7715 Sun. School 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pastor Tina Whaley

“A caring church, a giving church, a sharing church; showing love, warmth and friendship to all.”

St. John’s United Methodist Church Pine & Poplar Sts., Seaford 302-629-9466 Web site: http://home.dmv.com/-stjohns/ E-mail: stjohns@dmv.com NURSERY & HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

SUNDAY WORSHIP 8:30 & 11:15 am Traditional 9:45 Sunday School 9:50 am Contemporary Come as you are… and be transformed in the love of Christ!

Centenary United Methodist Church “Making Disciples of Jesus Christ for Over 200 Years” “NEW SONG!” - Contemporary Celebration, 8:45 a.m. Sunday School, Classes for ALL ages, 9:45 a.m. Every Sunday Traditional Family Worship, 11:00 a.m.

Rev. John W. Van Tine, Pastor, 875-3983 200 W. Market St., Laurel, Del.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

1010 S. Central Ave., Laurel Phone: 875-7748 Donny Weimar, Minister Worship Services: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. Bible Study: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m.

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching Youth Group Sunday Night 7 pm

In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

Worship 11 a.m. • Sun. School 10:00 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Bethel Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

HARVEST CHRISTIAN CHURCH

510 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE Rev. Fred Duncan Church: 875-4233 Parsonage: 875-3398 Sunday Services: 8:30am Praise 9:30am Sunday School,11am Worship

DIAL DAILY DEVOTIONS: 875-4309

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church & Old Christ Church 600 S. Central Ave., P.O. Box 293 Laurel, DE 19956 ~ (302) 875-3644 Rev. Rita B. Nelson, Rector Holy Eucharist with Healing and Church School ~ Sunday @ 9:30 am

“Heart Felt Praise” Relevant Bible Teaching Children’s Ministry Midweek Bible Study Tom Birowski, Pastor Seaford, Del. • 628-7771 94 Walnut St. Laurel, DE 19956

875-7873 “A Place to Belong” SUNDAY WEDNESDAY Underground Family Worship (7-12 grade) 6:15 p.m. 10:45 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Prayer Team ‘The Table’ God’s Big Back Yard (last Wed. of mo) 7:00 p.m. 9:30 a.m.

Centrally located at 14511 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE 19956 Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. FasTrak Children’s Ministry - 10:30 a.m.; E318 Youth - 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Services - 7 p.m.

For info, call 875.7995 or visit www.centralworshipcenter.org

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road 68, South of Laurel Laurel, Del. Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m. www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

Christian Church of Seaford Dual 13N., Seaford, DE • 629-6298 Minister: John Herbst SCHEDULE OF SERVICES Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Morning Worship 10:30 Wed. Night Service & (Nursery & Jr. Church) Youth Groups 7:00 p.m. A Firm Foundation • A Sure Hope • An Unending Love


MORNING STAR ✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PAGE 27

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

When someone lets you down By the Rev. Todd K. Crofford Laurel Wesleyan Church

PASTOR’S PERSPECTIVE

What do you do when someone To marry is to risk, to give lets you down? This is a question birth to and raise a child is many good Christians are dealing with this week in light of the scanto risk, to trust a friend is dalous actions of Christian leader a risk, but within those Ted Haggard. risks are unlocked the poActually, it is a question for us tential for greatest joy. all. Every one of us has been let down by someone we counted on. My second recommendation is to go In fact, probably every one of us has been back to trusting in people. Now I know guilty of letting someone down in some way, small or large, sometime in our lives. that we are to learn through hurt and I don’t know of any pain so deep as the sometimes we discover we have misplaced trust in someone who doesn’t depain of being betrayed, deserted, conned, serve it. Nonetheless, we cannot afford to or just plain disappointed by someone we give in to the temptation to never trust believed in. At least child birth and kidney stones pass, but human emotional pain again. There is a word for that, it is called paranoia, and it’s a terrible way to live. leaves wounds that are ever so slow to Once a paranoid person is burned by a heal. friend, then they believe they can never So what do you do when someone lets have a trustworthy friendship again. If a you down? Our natural inclination after being betrayed is to say, “I will never trust paranoid person is cheated by a dishonest company, suddenly all companies are rotagain!” Yet, I think there are better reten. A paranoid person sees the foibles of sponses to disappointment than that. Let a local church and stops attending, sees me suggest a few. the troubles in our political system and First, remember there is a God who is stops voting, meets a dishonest police officompletely trustworthy. Best friends fall cer and believes the whole force is corshort, pastors get exhausted, our spouse might be checking out when we most need rupt. It is a shallow, depressing, and caustic them to engage, but then there is God! way to live. We are far better to learn to Perfectly holy…perfectly trustworthy… trust wisely than to refuse to trust in puralways just in time with just enough. suit of protecting our hearts. The greatest At times it doesn’t seem like he cares joys in life include the greatest risks. or is coming through in the clutch, but he To marry is to risk, to give birth to and has shown himself time and time again to raise a child is to risk, to trust a friend is a be the dependable lover of your soul. It is a mistaken assumption that just be- risk, but within those risks are unlocked cause God’s followers fumble at times that the potential for greatest joy. So, if like so many you are licking your God himself is not trustworthy. We cannot commute onto a limitless God the trouble- wounds while sitting in a puddle of disappointment, then learn, grow, and find a some traits of his limited creation. Today, way to trust again. if everyone and everything else you have counted on has let you down, you can still “cast your anxiety on Jesus, for he cares The Rev. Crofford is Senior Pastor at Laurel Wesleyan Church. His views do not necessarily represent the views of for you.” –I Peter 5:7 the congregation or Wesleyan Church International. You

543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor SUNDAY WEDNESDAY Sunday School ..... 9:45 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Worship...............11:00 a.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Youth Group 6:00 - 8 p.m.

Continued from page 26

speaker. “Precious Memories Gospel Band,” a group from the Milford area, will offer special music. The church is located at 33038 Mt. Pleasant Road approximately 4 miles west of Laurel just off of Rt. 24. Come and join with us in our celebration.”

Church of God Concert Jerry Jones will present a Christmas Concert at Stein Highway Church of God, 500 Arch St., Seaford, Friday evening, Dec. 8, at 7 p.m. He will share in word and song with Traditional Christmas music, Country Gospel Music, and Contemporary Gospel Music. All are invited. A love offering will be accepted. For more

information call 302-629-9689 or 302629-8583.

Gospel Concert and Dinner Jerry Jones, The Lights of Home, and Hannah Smith will be at Concord United Methodist Church on Sunday, Nov. 19, 2 p.m. There will be a spaghetti dinner at the Community Hall following the concert at 4 p.m. Cost is $8 each.

Community Thanksgiving dinner Centenary United Methodist Church, Laurel, will be serving a community Thanksgiving dinner on Sunday, Nov. 19, starting at 4 p.m. All are welcome to come join us.

Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel 302-875-4646 PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

Dr. Carl G Vincent, Senior Minister Pastor Barry B. Dukes, Music Minister Sunday 9:30 am Wednesday 7:00 pm Children’s Church • Nursery

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org

MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 4:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30-5 p.m.; Sun. 8-8:25 a.m.

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

LAUREL-MT. PLEASANT CHARGE 27225 Kaye Road, Laurel, DE 19956 Ph: (302) 875-7814

www.livingwaterworship.com Pastor: Rev. Timothy P. Jones

Sunday Morning Wed. Bible Study & Worship & Children’s Children’s Discovery Club 7:00 PM Ministries 10:00 AM “Flowing in Power and Love to a Parched and Thirsty World”

YOU ARE INVITED! Come into This Church and Gather in Christ’s Name to Worship Him! Psalm 95:6 Sun. School 9:45 a.m. • Worship 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. Bible Study 7:30 p.m. Pastor, Stacey Johnson

VICTORY TABERNACLE CHURCH OF GOD

“A Growing Church For All Ages”

2 miles N. of Laurel, DE on Alt. 13

302-877-0443 410-957-4696

The Atlanta Road Alliance Church 22625 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE (302) 629-5600 • www.atlantaroadcma.org Rev. Edward Laremore • Rev. Andrew Kerr SUNDAY WEDNESDAY 8:30 Worship 6:45 Pioneer Clubs (age 3 9:45 Sunday School thru grade 6) & Divorce Care® 11:00 Worship/Kids Church 7:00 Prayer Service & Youth 7:00 Evening Service Group (grades 7-12)

ome! Revelatio e To C n 22 Tim : 17 The Ark s ' t I Seaford Wesleyan Church

Passing on God’s Love and Grace in Laurel, Delmar & Surrounding Area United Methodist Churches

King’s St. George’s Mt. Pleasant

Worship Sun. Sch.

Gordy Rd. .......... 8:50....10:00 St. George Rd. .... 10:10..... 9:00

Mt. Pleasant Rd. 9:30,11:30..10:15 Pastor Barbara Auer

River of Life Christian Center 17 W. Market St., Greenwood, DE 302349-9420 Pastors Joseph & Yvonne Dixon WORSHIP SERVICE: SUN. 11 AM BIBLE STUDY: WED. 7:30 PM

Proclaiming Faith 4 pm Sunday on WKDI 840 AM Radio

Food Outreach Emergency Food

www.river-oflife.org

Sailor’s Bethel United Methodist Church Bethel, DE Pastor Arthur Smith III Sunday School - 10 am Worship - 11:15 am Nursery Provided office 875-3628 parsonage 875-2996

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby, Rector

may email pastortodd@laurelwesleyan.org

CHURCH BULLETINS

Messiah’s Vineyard Church

Sunday School - all ages 9 a.m. Worship 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Rainbow Day Care / Pre-School Rt. 13 South, Seaford, DE 302-628-1020

Mount Olivet United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830

Holy Eucharist: 9:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Forum: 10:30 a.m. Thurs. Eve. Service: 6 p.m. Front & King St., Seaford, DE 629-7979

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - Anthony Melakian - 629-3633 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

Laurel Wesleyan Church

The Gift of His Love

315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School Pastor: Rev. Thomas Gross • 302-629-4458

Rt. 13A, Just North of Laurel Sunday School - 9:30 Worship - 9:00 & 11:00 Sunday Evening Worship and Children’s Ministries 6 p.m. Wednesday Youth Ministries 6:30 p.m. Church 875-5380 • Sr. Pastor Todd Crofford Assistant Pastor Ken Deusa Asst. Pastor/Youth: Sue Boyce Children’s Pastor: Marilyn Searcey

Let others know where you are and when you meet. To advertise in this directory, call

629-9788


MORNING STAR ✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PAGE 28

OBITUARIES Jack L. Morris, Sr., 70 Jack L. “Jackie” Morris, Sr. died at his home in Bridgeville on Sunday, Oct. 29, 2006. He was born in Wilmington, on June 11, 1936 the son of John A. Morris and Dorothy I. Sharpe Morris. He worked in Federalsburg for many years, working as a mechanic for both Maryland Plastics, Inc. and for Eastern Trailer Repair. He was a member of the Federalsburg V. F. W. Post 5246. Besides his parents, he was preceded in death by his wife, Mary Jane Walls Morris; a daughter, Mary Virginia Williams; and a brother, James E. Morris. He is survived by seven children, William G. Walls of Michigan, Jacqueline M. Arney of Laurel, Jack Lee Morris, Jr. of Federalsburg, Debra Irene Simmons of Clayton, Denise L. Martin of Churchville, Md., James F. Morris of Seaford, Janet E. Wheeler of Bridgeville; a grandson whom he raised, Sgt. Robert T. Short of Camp Pendelton, Calif; 18 grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren; four sisters, Dorothy Williams, Nannie Hill, and Nancy Wyatt all of Seaford, and June Adkins of Bridgeville; and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held Friday, Nov., 3, at Framptom Funeral Home, P.A. in Federalsburg, Md. with the Rev. Denzil Cheek officiating. Interment was in Bloomery Cemetery near Smithville.

Elizabeth Anne Smith, 54 Elizabeth Anne “Betsy” (Ask) Smith of Georgetown died Friday, Oct. 27, 2006, at her residence. “Betsy” was born in Wilmington, the daughter of Gilbert and Dorothy (Whidden) Ask. She had been employed as a legal secretary in the law offices of Wilson, Halbrook & Bayard in Georgetown, for 34 years up until her illness. She was an active member of Wesley United Methodist Church in Georgetown, where she participated in Bible study groups, the Altar Guild, the Hand Bell Choir and sang in the church choir. She was also very active in her community where she was a member of the Georgetown Historical Society and had served as the secretary of the organization for many years. She was an avid reader and gardner, and was a collector of antiques. She was devoted to her dog “Max.” She was predeceased by her parents, she is survived by her daughter, Jennifer (Smith) Skowronski of Mount Royal, N.J.; and one brother, Oliver Henry of Boulder, Colo. Her funeral service was on Monday, Oct. 30, at Wesley United Methodist Church, Georgetown, with the Rev. Anne Pruett-Barnett officiating. Interment was in St. Paul’s Episcopal Cemetery, Georgetown. Memorial contributions are suggested to the Wesley United Methodist Church, 10 East Laurel St., Georgetown, DE 19947.

Cpl. Antonio DiAlessandro Colonel Thomas F. Mac Leish, Superintendent of the Delaware State Police announces, with a feeling of deep regret and the realization of great loss, the death of Senior Corporal Antonio DiAlessandro, Badge #855, of Delaware State Police Troop 3. He was surrounded by his loving

Obituaries are run without charge thanks to the support of area churches.

family and friends at the time of his death on Saturday, Oct. 28, 2006. Cpl. DiAlessandro died at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Md., after a two-year courageous battle with advanced lung disease. He was a member of the 62nd DSP Academy class and enlisted in the Division on Nov. 12, 1993. On Nov. 12, 2004, he was promoted to the rank of senior corporal. During his career, Sr. Cpl. DiAlessandro was recognized for outstanding service to the citizenry and was honored as the Troop 3 Trooper of the Year in 2000. Additionally, he was awarded the Delaware State Police Valor Award in 2001; the Exceptional Performance Award in 2002; and the Life Saving Award in 2005. His service as a Delaware Trooper was always characterized by loyalty, fearless performance of duty, and faithful and honorable devotion to the principles of the Delaware State Police. Cpl. DiAlessandro is survived by his wife Angela and his sons, Mario and Angelo. He is also survived by his parents Marcello and Barbara; his sisters, Angela, Lisa and Roseanne; and a brother, Michael. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated at St. Peter the Apostle Roman Catholic Church, New Castle, on Thursday, Nov. 2.

Reba W. Salmons, 80 Reba W. Salmons of Federalsburg, Md. died on Monday, Oct. 30, 2006 at the Caroline Nursing Home in Denton, Md. She was born Jan. 23, 1926 near Federalsburg, the daughter of Joseph and Minnie Scott Waldis. Her first husband, Lawrence Claude Howard, Jr., preceded her in death on Nov. 15, 1961. She was a graduate of Federalsburg High School class of 1943. She worked for 10 years as a beautician at the former O’Neals Beauty Shop on Academy, and had worked for the former Service Trucking as well as for the former Long Lumber company. She was a member of the Order of Eastern Star #64. Reba Salmons Besides her parents, she was preceded in death by two sisters and two brothers, Virginia Nichols, Kathleen DeGran, Frank Waldis and Russell Waldis. She is survived by her husband of 42 years, Jack Salmons, Sr., three daughters, Connie Blanchfield and her husband, William, of Federalsburg, Patricia Glessner and her husband Ray, Jr., of Easton, and Melinda Hagadorn and her friend, Dennis Payne, of Federalsburg; three stepsons, Jack Salmons, II and his wife, Bonnie, of Federalsburg, Dr. Charles Salmons and his wife, Linda, and Jimmy Salmons and his wife, Bea, all of Newbern, N.C.; five grandchildren, Mark Blanchfield, Cindi Link, Dean Glessner, Emilee Hagadorn, and Mallory Hagadorn; five greatgrandchildren, John C. Davis, Jr., Johanna Davis, Jared Davis, Zachary and Cassidy Blanchfield; six siblings, Ruth Dodd of Seaford, Gertrude Lord, Louise Massey, and Margaret Wheatley, all of Federalsburg, Elizabeth Orem of Hayword, Calif. and William Waldis of Cambridge, Md.,

and many nieces and nephews. Her funeral service was held on Saturday, Nov. 4, at the Framptom Funeral Home, P.A. in Federalsburg with Dr. Charles Salmons and the Rev. David Heistand officiating. An Eastern Star Service was also held at the funeral home. Interment followed in Hillcrest Cemetery in Federalsburg.

Sylvia Ann Wilkinson, 55 Sylvia Ann Wilkinson passed away Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2006 at Salisbury Rehabilitation and Nursing Center. She was born in Salisbury, a daughter of James N. Phippin and Doris M. Phippin. Mrs. Wilkinson graduated from Wicomico Senior High School in 1968. She was a retired telephone operator of 25 years for C & P, Bell Atlantic and Verizon. She was a member of the local telephone pioneers union and past Pocahontas of the Degree of Pocahontas Council 61, of the Red Men’s Tribe 149 in Fruitland, Md. She was an avid NASCAR racing fan of number 20 Tony Stewart for many years, as well as a Baltimore Ravens fan. She was a big lover of her cats and dogs. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her first husband; Ernest Leroy Melvin, II and her second husband; Troy David Wilkinson. She is survived by one son; Ernest Leroy Melvin, III and his girlfriend, Katie Perry, both of Delmar; a step-daughter, Mia Wilkinson of Salisbury; two stepgrandchildren, Angela and Willie of Salisbury; two sisters; Cora L. Webster and Janice M. Byrd, both of Salisbury; a brother; Jack N. Phippin of Salisbury; and several nieces and nephews and great

Union United Methodist Church 2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 Handicap Friendly WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.)

Welcome…

Richard Lee Williamson, 50 Richard Lee Williamson of Salisbury, died Thursday, Oct. 26, 2006, at the home of his brother in Salisbury, Md. Born in Salisbury, he was a son of Charlie and Helen Williamson. Richard worked for many years as a car salesman at various dealerships, most notably Freedom Ford, Porter Chevrolet and Murphy Ford. He won many awards for his sales performance and was always one of the top salesmen. He loved country music, boating, fishing, NASCAR and anything to do with cars. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by two stepbrothers, Charles and James O’Neil and a stepsister, Patricia Wooten. He is survived by his wife, Heide; a son, Daniel; and a stepson, Ryan. He is also survived by stepbrothers William O’Neil and his wife Barbara, and Robert O’Neil. Services will be held at a later date. Arrangements are being handled by Short Funeral Home, Delmar.

BETHEL WORSHIP CENTER 9431 Ginger Lane, Seaford (2.4 mi. north of Wal-Mart on US 13) 628-4240 Recorded Info 628-4241 Church Office

Pastor Joseph Lecates - 875-2059 Adult Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:30 am Nursery 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Youth Meeting Sun. 7 pm Promise Keepers Tues. 7 pm Wed. Night Bible Study 7 pm “We’re not building a church, we’re building God’s Kingdom!”

Christ Lutheran Church

SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday School 9 am Morning Worship 10 am

nieces and great nephews and many cousins and brothers and sisters-in-law. A funeral service was on Wednesday, Nov. 8, at Short Funeral Home, Delmar, where family and friends called. The Reverends Barry Devine and Carl Leto officiated. Interment followed the services at St. Stephen’s Cemetery in Delmar. Memorial contributions may be made in her memory to: Coastal Hospice, P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, MD 21802. Online condolences may be sent to the family by visiting www.delmarvaobits. com.

701 Bridgeville Road 629-9077

Corner of Shipley & Spruce Sts.

A Family Friendly Church Home for You Sunday Worship: 8:30 & 11 am Phone: 629-9755 www.ChristLC.net Bible School for the Mentally Challenged Saturday at 10 am

FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH

Senior Pastor

Located halfway between Seaford & Bridgeville, turn off Rt. 13 East at Cannon Rd. light, 4th place on left.

Mark Landon 7046 Seashore Hwy. Bridgeville, DE 19933

1611 KJV, Independent, Fundamental, Soul Winning

SUNDAY WEDNESDAY 10:00 Sunday School 7:00 Prayer Service 11:00 Worship Service 6:00 Evening Worship Nursery Provided Rev. William Goslee - Ph. 349-0190

“Welcome Home!”

Wesley United Methodist Church 22025 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE Pastor Ed Kuhling Contemporary Worship 9 am Sunday School & Bible Education 10 am Traditional Worship 11 am Wednesday Worship 6:45 pm 302-629-3029 * Info Line 302-628-0112

302-337-3044

Church of God

Fax 302-337-8769

Worship Services: Seeker Service 8:30 am • Sunday School 9:30 Morning Worship 10:45 am • Wed. Night 7 pm

A Gathering Of Faith Come together under Christ’s roof and share together in his love. Attend Church this Sunday


MORNING STAR ✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006 Online condolences may be sent to the family by visiting www.delmarvaobits. com.

Franklin E. Melson, Sr. 84 Franklin Elmer Melson, Sr. of Bridgeville, passed away Tuesday, Oct. 31, 2006 at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. Born in Bridgeville on June 11, 1922, a son of S. Elmer and Helen Benson Melson. He was a graduate of the Bridgeville High School Class of 1940 and worked for E.I. DuPont Co. of Seaford, retiring after 42 years of dedicated service. He was a life member of the Historical Vintage Car Club of Delaware, a member of the Trinity United Methodist Church of Dublin Hill. He was a former 4-H leader and a member of the WPS Seaford Chapter. Besides his parents, he was preceded in death by his wife, the former Beatrice Closson, who passed away Nov. 13, 1994. He is survived by three sons, Franklin E. Melson, Jr. and his wife the Rev. Diane E. Melson of Bridgeville, Richard C. Melson and his wife Janice of Wilmington, and S. Mark Melson and his wife Fannie of Bridgeville. He is also survived by one sister, Betty Lou Swain and her husband George of New Castle, and by seven grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. His funeral service was on Saturday, Nov. 4, at Williamson Funeral Home, Federalsburg, Md., with the Rev. Diane E. Melson officiating. Interment was in Bloomery Cemetery in Federalsburg, Md. The family requests that donations be made to the Del. 4-H Foundation, 113 Townsend Hall, 531 South College Avenue, Newark, DE 19716-2210; or to the Trinity United Methodist Church of Dublin Hill, 4385 Dublin Hill Road, Bridgeville, DE 19933.

Herman Harrison, 81 Herman “Jack” Harrison of Millsboro, died Friday, Oct. 13, 2006 at Green Valley Terrace Nursing Home in Millsboro. He was preceded in death by his parents, William H. Harrison and Hattie E. Harrison. Mr. Harrison was a retired mechanic for Delmarva Power and Light. He was a member of Bethany United Methodist Church near Millsboro. He was a past member of Station #81, Laurel, Station #79, Gumboro, and New Castle fire companies. He was also a member of Masonic Hope Lodge #4 of Laurel and The Scottish Rite of Wilmington. A graduate of Laurel High School Class of 1943. He is survived by his wife, Betty G. Harrison of Millsboro; three daughters, Donna F. Saunders of Pennsylvania, Dori Cummings of Seaford and Rita Leath of Denver, Pa.; grandchildren, Cathie Tyler, Marcie Hassett, Kyle, Phillip and Mallory Leath. Great grandchildren, Hunter and Logan Tyler and Lanie Hassett. His funeral service and Masonic Service was on Oct. 17 at the Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Laurel. The pastor Joe Roszin officiated. Internment was in Union Cemetery in Georgetown. Contributions may be sent to Bethany U.M. Church, c/o Janice Vickers, 19930 Lowes Crossing Road, Millsboro, DE 19966

Arnold A. Sanders, Sr., 80 Arnold A. Sanders, Sr. of Laurel, died Oct. 29, 2006 at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. Mr. Sanders was born in Wilmington, a

son of Theodore and Helen Sanders, who predeceased him. He retired from the DuPont Company in Kentucky in the Human Resources department. He was a Navy Veteran. He is survived by his wife Helga Sanders of Laurel; a son Arnold A. Sanders, Jr. of Elliott City, Md.; a brother, Donald Sanders of Wilmington; four sisters, Iona Boyer of Wilmington, Loretta Bowden of New Castle, Winifred MacCari of Bear, Mildred Pladinetti of New Castle; and several nieces and nephews also survive him. All services were private. Arrangements are in the care of the Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Laurel.

Mary Catherine Hudson, 87 Mary Catherine Hudson of Georgetown died Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2006, at Beebe Medical Center in Lewes. Mrs. Hudson was born in Georgetown, a daughter of George W. and Leatie Belle (Rogers) Mitchell. She was a personal secretary for Tunnell & Raysor in Georgetown for 35 years. She was a member of Wesley United Methodist Church in Georgetown, Wesley United Methodist Women, Sunshine Class and AARP. She also volunteered many hours for Milford Memorial Hospital and the Robin Hood Thrift Shop in Georgetown. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, Harold W. Hudson in May 15, 2006; and a sister, Tillie Hastings. She is survived by a daughter, Georgeann H. White and her husband, Thomas V. White of Millsboro; two grandchildren, Alison C. White and Kyle V. White; a brother-in-law, Donald L. Hudson and his wife Lois of Frankford; a niece, Gail Hudson; a great niece, Brittany Hudson; a nephew, Guy R. Hudson and his wife, Lauren; a great niece, Morgan Hudson and a great nephew, Taylor Hudson. Her service was on Saturday, Nov. 4, in the Chapel of Short Funeral Services, Georgetown. Interment was in Union Cemetery, Georgetown.

Jon Jennings Spicer, 51 Jon J. Spicer passed away on Sunday, Nov. 5, 2006 in West Chester, Pa. Mr. Spicer was born Sept. 7, 1955, the son of Jennings and Ann Spicer. He is survived by his parents and a sister, Anne E. Spicer of Groton, Conn. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, Nov. 11, at St. John’s United Methodist Church, Pine and Poplar streets, Seaford. Memorial contributions may be made to “The Melanoma Research Foundation, c/o Dr. Lynn Schuchter, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce St., Philadelphia, PA 19104.

Harry Lester Collins, 86 Harry Lester Collins formerly of Parsonsburg, Md., died Thursday, Nov. 2, 2006 at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. He was born Aug. 30, 1920, near Federalsburg, the son of Harry Jefferson Collins and Myrtle Ida Fluharty Collins. He loved to work and was working as a machinist at Perdue Farms in his 80s. He visited local jails and the homeless. He donated supplies to area shelters. Besides his parents, he was preceded in death by two brothers and two sisters, Charles Woodrow Collins, Roland Collins, Lillie White, and Hazel Murphy. A special friend, Helen Hopkins, preceded him in death. He is survived by a sister, Alice R.

Bennett of Seaford, and many nieces and nephews. His funeral service was held on Nov. 4, at the Framptom Funeral Home in Federalsburg with the Rev. Dale Evans officiating. Interment followed in Hillcrest Cemetery in Federalsburg.

I. Jane Garner, 89 I. Jane Garner of Laurel, formally of Hecla Park, Pa., passed away on Nov. 2, 2006 at Nanticoke Hospital in Seaford. Born on Nov. 27, 1916, in Walker Township, she was the daughter of William L. and Iantha E. Dietrich Clevenstine. On Aug. 28, 1938 in State College, Pa., she married William H. Garner who passed away on Aug. 16, 2001. Mrs. Garner was a 1936 graduate of Hublersburg High School. She was employed as a Loan Officer at Wilmington Trust in Laurel, retiring in 1981. Mrs. Garner was of the protestant faith. She was a member of the New York Chapter of the Eastern Star. Along with her parents and husband, she was preceded in death by four brothers, W. Fred Clevenstine, Harold Clevenstine, Malcolm Clevenstine, Emory Clevenstine; and one sister, Henrietta Shreckengast. She is survived by; one daughter, Iantha J. Steiman and her husband Richard of Lewes; one son, William H. Garner, Jr. of Laurel; one grandson, Marc A. Steiman and his wife Barbara of Lewes; and one great-grandson, Nathaniel Garner Steiman of Lewes. Mrs. Garner funeral services were on Nov. 7, at Wetzler Funeral Service Inc., in Bellefonte with the Rev. Douglas Elder officiating. Burial followed at Centre County Memorial Park, College Township. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Heart Association, at 501 Howard Ave, Bldg D, Suite 101, Altoona, PA 16601; or to the Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, 801 Middleford Road, Seaford, DE 19973.

William Thomas Leonard, 68 William Thomas Leonard of Millsboro died Thursday, Nov. 2, 2006. He was a son of Milton and Agnes Mumford Leonard, who predeceased him. Mr. Leonard enjoyed building, counseling, kids, westerns, teasing and William Leonard playing jokes. He was retired from Mountaire Farms in the sanitation department. Mr. Leonard is survived by his children, William Stokes and wife Dale of Texas, Juan C. Leonard and wife Gloria of Millsboro, Derrick Powell of Millsboro, Sabrina Shelton and husband Charles of Frankford, Princella Waples and husband John of Georgetown, Alica Leonard of Selbyville; brothers and sisters, Harrison Mumford of Chester, Pa., Milton Leonard of Berlin, Md., Carl Leonard of Slaughter Neck, Mae Hopkins of Laurel, Ester Hudson of Millsboro; and 12 grandchildren. His service was on Nov. 8, at the Millsboro Seventh Day Adventist Church, Millsboro, with Pastor Cory Matlock officiating. Interment was in Millsboro Seventh Day Adventist Church Cemetery, Cordrey Road, Millsboro. Arrangement were by Watson Funeral Home, Millsboro.

PAGE 29 Letters of condolence may be emailed to: Watson Funeral Home Delmarvaobits. com or Watsonfh.com

Christopher Patchett III, 1 month Christopher Eric Patchett III of Bridgeville, died Friday, Nov. 3, 2006, at Christiana Medical Center in Newark. Christopher was loved very much for the short time he was here. He was the son of Christopher Eric Patchett II and Krista (Young) Patchett. He is also survived by many relatives and friends. Funeral services will be held on Friday, Nov. 10, at 2 p.m., at Parsell Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Hardesty Chapel, 202 Laws St., Bridgeville, where friends may call from 1 to 2 p.m. prior to the services. Interment will be at bridgeville Cemetery, Bridgeville. Memorial contributions are suggested to the March of Dimes, Eastern Shore Chapter, 917-A Snow Hill Road, Salisbury, MD 21801.

Frederick N. Truitt, Sr., 81 Frederick N. Truitt, Sr. of Bridgeville died peacefully at home on Sunday, Nov. 5, 2006. He was born Aug. 19, 1925 in Bridgeville, a son of Fred A. Truitt and Helen Newton Truitt Webb, who predeceased him. Mr. Truitt enjoyed traveling with his wife of 61 years, Anna Ash Truitt, playing golf and fishing. Mr. Truitt had a long career as a sales representative with the Hardware Supply Company retiring in 1990. In addition to his wife, he is survived by four children, Mary Eskridge and her husband Micki of Milford, Shirley Downes of Greenwood, Rick Truitt of Bridgeville, and Carol Short and her husband Robin of Bridgeville; nine grandchildren; and 17 great-grandchildren. A graveside service was held on Nov. 8, at Bridgeville Cemetery, with the Rev. William K. Thomas officiating. Friends called prior to the service at Parsell Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Bridgeville. The family suggests memorial contributions be made to the Bridgeville Ambulance, P.O. Box 727, Bridgeville, DE 19933.

Paul H. Jestice, 93 Paul H. Jestice of Laurel, died Monday, Nov. 6, 2006 at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. Born in Laurel, he was the son of Isaac and Arrie Jestice. He loved farming, and was a farmer his whole life. His favorite pass time was riding around the beautiful country side. He was a member of the Old School Primitive Baptist Church. Besides his parents, he was preceded in death by his wife, Olive Whaley Jestice; a son, Dale Jestice; a brother, Raymond Jestice; a sister, Mattie Krouch, a granddaughter, Hope Brittingham. He is survived by two daughters, Doris Larrimore and her husband Charles of Laurel, and Deena Hitchens and her husband, Randall of Georgetown; a daughterin-law, Evelyn Jestice of Laurel; four grandchildren, Jason Jestice, Sarah Prettyman, Joshua Hitchens, Megan Hitchens; one great-grandson, Coleman Jestice; and several nieces and nephews. His funeral service will be held Thursday, Nov. 9, at 1 p.m., at Hannigan-ShortDisharoon Funeral Home, 700 West St., Laurel, with Elder Elbert Robbins officiating. Interment will be in Laurel Hill Cemetry, Laurel. Friends may call one hour prior to the funeral service here at the funeral home.


MORNING STAR ✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PAGE 30

Entertainment John Beauchamp, owner of John’s Four Seasons Florist and Gift Shop is holding the plaque presented to him by FTD for being in the top 1,000 florists for the second year. John will decorate the Governor’s bedroom suite. He loves gardening and garden styles, but at the Mansion his work will be more traditional using natural materials available at Christmas time. John’s shop is located at the corner of Maryland 577 and Stein Highway (Reliance). 302-629-2644, www.johnsfourseasons.net.

Wendy Wheatley, coowner of Seaford Florist along with Linda Corcoran, will be decorating the kitchen, office, back staircase and the back hallway. They say that the natural Holiday greens such as holly, ornate wreaths, fruit and the Christmas tree would have been the main decorations for the season in Victorian times. Seaford Florist is located on Market Street in Blades. 302-629-6661, seaforddeflorist.com.

Karen Johnson of Tull’s The Shoppes at Dairy Lane will be decorating the Family Parlor. She will be using décor from the Victorian era to reflect the style of the times — natural greenery, toys and other items of that period. Tull’s is a family owner and operated business dating back to the 1930s. It is located at 24960 Dairy Lane. 302-629-3071, www.tulls.net.

Victorian Christmas at the Ross Mansion The 10th annual Victorian Christmas at the Ross Mansion sponsored by the Seaford Historical Society will be Dec. 8 through 10. During the three days of activities, the Society has planned a number of special events. On Friday, Dec. 8, you can listen to the wonderful violin music performed by Ruth Mulford and Emma Scott while enjoying a Christmas Tea and a tour of the Mansion. The cost for the tea and tour will be $10 and reservations will be taken.

On Saturday the Mansion will be open from 1-4 p.m. for tours and craft demonstrations by local residents: Eleanor Jamison - quilting; Betty Veasey - tatting; Betty Tull - needlepoint; Mike Barton - quilting; and Becky Waller - jewelry making. House tours by candlelight will be given from 5-8 p.m. Throughout the day you will be entertained with music provided by Ruth Mulford, The Rainy Day Four and John Kiscella. The cost for events on Saturday will be $7 per adult and $1 per child

under 12 years of age. Sunday is Family Day. From 1-4 p.m., Governor and Mrs. Ross will be receiving guests, carriage rides around the Mansion will be offered and children will be entertained at the Honeymoon Cottage with crafts and a holiday story. Again the cost is $7 for adults and $1 for children under 12. The rooms in the historic, restored Italian Villa Mansion will be decorated by local florists and interior decorators. Those

Enter Morning Star’s

$500 Holiday Giveaway Enter today! Entry forms from all of the participating stores will be combined for a random drawing. One $250 cash prize and five $50 gift certificates will be given away. No purchase necessary. Deadline to enter is Friday, Dec. 15. Drawing will take place Monday, Dec. 18. Winners will be announced in the Star’s Thursday, Dec. 21, edition. Enter today!

participating this year are Tull’s The Shoppes at Dairy Lane, Seaford Florist, John’s Four Seasons Florist, Act II Florist Lucy’s Florist, Bess Buds Greenhouses and Landscaping, Flowers By Hearn and Décor And You. The Seaford Spade and Trowel Club will also add their talents. Proceeds from these events will benefit the Ross Mansion and the Seaford Museum. For additional information call 6287788 or 629-6417.

Enter the Star’s $500 Holiday Giveaway at any of these locations: Bethel • Jeff’s Greenhouse Delmar • Mike’s Clearance Laurel • A&K Enterprises • Dennis N. O’Neal, Jeweler • The Hen House • W.C. Littleton Seaford • Barton’s Southern States • Burton Bros. Hardware • Heritage Jewelers • Lo-Mar • Plaza Tapatia • Tull’s Shoppes at Dairy Lane


MORNING STAR ✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PAGE 31

First State Ballet Theatre, SPARX perform Saturday First State Ballet Theatre and SPARX, Delmarva’s acclaimed flute and harp duo, will present an all new program on Saturday, Nov. 11, 7 p.m. in the theatre of the Arts & Science Center at Delaware Technical & Community College in Georgetown. This classical and contemporary ballet and chamber music repertoire features musicians and dancers “conversing” onstage through their respective art forms. SPARX will perform compositions by Bizet, Lauber, Piazzolla, and Bondon; dance performances will include one choreographed by Matthew Neenan of Pennsylvania Ballet and two new contemporary pieces by Viktor Plotnikov, who was honored as best choreographer at the Helsinki International Ballet Competition and the Youth America Grand Prix. General admission tickets are $20 for adults, $15 for students and senior citizens and may be purchased by calling Delaware Technical & Community College in Georgetown at 858-5475. First State Ballet Theatre, headquar-

Players holiday production Possum Point Players’ holiday production, “The WPPP 1947 Christmas Special” will incorporate an old-style radio version of It’s A Wonderful Life mixed with seasonal solos, duets, and choral music at Possum Hall in Georgetown during the first two weekends of December. Performances are December 1, 2, 8 & 9 at 8 p.m., and December 3 & 10 at 2 p.m. in Georgetown. Tickets are $15, or $14 for seniors or students. For reservations, call the Possum Point Players ticketline at 302-856-4560.

Three-day dog show The Salisbury Maryland Kennel Club along with the Mispillion Kennel Club will be hold a three day Dog Show at the Wicomico Youth and Civic Center in Salisbury, Md. on Nov. 10, 11 and 12. The shows open each day at 8 a.m. and best in Show will be around 4:30 p.m., each day. Donation at the door is $5 for

tered in the Grand Opera House in Wilmington, was co-founded in 2000 by Pasha and Kristina Kambalov. First State Ballet Theatre’s mission is to present professional quality ballet performances to audiences throughout Delaware and beyond, to provide performing opportunities to aspiring dancers, and to educate the Delaware dance audience of the future. As two-time winners of the National Flute Association’s Chamber Music Competition, SPARX (Joan Sparks, flute and Anne Sullivan, harp) has been honored with many regional and national awards, including the American Composers Forum Performance Incentive Grant. The prestigious Chamber Music America Ensemble Residency Grant aided the duo in their ground-breaking development of a combined residency between the Tatnall School in Wilmington, and a regional retirement community corporation. The grant allowed SPARX to develop and pursue their cherished goal of creating “life-long listeners.” adults, students $1, with children under five-years-old free. No strollers allowed in the arena for safety reasons. There are approximately 1,400 dogs entered each day with dogs coming from several different states. There are 129 different breeds being judged each day and more than 200 entered in Obedience and Rally Classes. This year we boast the greatest amount of vendors selling every item you can imagine depicting your special breed. There will be everything from antique dog art, vases, etc. to yard flags and clothing to name only a few of the more than 35 booths. There will also be those “hard to find” items for your very special pet at home. This is a great opportunity to come and see and talk to breeders about the dog you might be looking for as your next companion. bring a friend and spend the day. Only entered dogs allowed at the show.

Wilgus Associates, Inc. Lewes Office - P.O. Box 208 Lewes, DE 19958 www.century21.com

302-645-9215 Cell 302-542-7651

Bruce Wright, Realtor

HERE’S A WINNER! 4 BR, 2 1/2 BA, Colonial Style home. Newly renovated with marble floored bathrooms, hdwd. floors, new carpet & HVAC. All new kitchen appliances & counter tops & paint throughout. Also, has a finished basement & a 2-car garage. 719 Nylon Blvd., Seaford. $389,900.


MORNING STAR

PAGE 32

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

Classifieds FREE CLASSIFIEDS*

LOOKING FOR A SCOOP for tractor, size 3. 4226381, ask for Jerry.

(For Personal Use Only) *Some exceptions such as homes for rent or sale

Deadline: Monday, 3 p.m. Businesses: $4.50 per inch Boxed (Display) Ads: $6.30/inch Legals: $6.30 per inch LOST LOST KITTEN, white except tail & spot on left ear, had blue collar. Dublin Hill Rd., Bridgeville area. 3377244 or 448-9930. 10/5

GIVE-AWAY HARDWOOD FIREWOOD, you cut & haul. 855-5878. 10/12 KITTENS! Various colors, 5 mos. old, mostly males, free to good home. 8750964. 10/5

COMPUTER SERVICES THE COMPUTER GURU Computer Repair & Upgrades, Website Design & Web Hosting, DATA Recovery, Remove Virus & Spyware. ONE CALL DOES IT ALL

(302) 727-4122

SERVICES

HOME INTERIORS Featuring Home Decor • In Home Party Demonstrations • Variety of Decor/Styles to Choose From • Fundraisers w/50% Profits to Organizations • Start Your Own Business for $200 Order • Earn $30 to $50/hour. Call or email Debbie at: 302-629-0402 or spike212@comcast.net tnnc CAN’T LOSE WEIGHT? THEN DON’T WAIT! Get the Training & Help you need! Finally, a system that really works! Call today! 302-875-3099 http://healthieryou. transitionslife.com

New Christian Home Day Care has openings for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. Call Miss Marci at 875-4307. YARD SALE YARD SALE at Christ United Methodist Church, 510 S. Central Ave., Laurel, 7:30 am till noon, Nov. 18. A variety of Christmas items & toys. Refreshments. 11/2/3t

22 CAL. RIFLE for 12 yr. old. Will pay up to $100 for a good one, pump preferred. Bill 877-0667. 11.2

HELP WANTED

‘79 HOLIDAY CAMPER, approx. 29’ long, $1000 OBO. 875-9401. 10/5

302-875-7098

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES

40 Yrs Framing Experience

LENOX ENDANGERED Baby Animal Series. Wallaby Joey (kangaroo) & Panther cub, $35 ea. 628-5484. 10/26

GAS MINI CHOPPER, holds up to 300 lbs., $350. Gas Scooter, holds up to 300 lbs., $250, like new. 875-9437. 11/9

‘70 & ‘71 LAUREL YEAR BOOKS, $50 ea. 682-7111.

UTILITY TRAILER, 2 axle, 5’x10’, enclosed. 1 yr. old, full of yard & garden tools, some antique. 875-9383. 11/9

FOUTON, very good cond., $125. 875-9437. 11/9

FOR SALE

1424810

302-856-4970

WICKER SET, 4 pc., mint green, $75. 875-8840 before 8 pm. 11/2 CEMENT STEPS, 4 high $50. 629-2226. 11/2 DINING ROOM TABLE, birch, 44L, 42W, 2 end leaves, 44L, 42W, 2 end leaves, 6 chairs (2 captain), exc. cond.) $1200. 6295469. 11/2

NEW HARLEY HELMET, #1 logo, $75 firm. Harley Wedding Rings, $100 firm. 858-7492. 11/9

‘82 ELCAMINO SS P/U, 422-6381, ask for Jerry. 10/19

SOFA & CHAIR, blue & tan, very good cond., $300. Matching coffee & end table, exc. cond., $80. (will sell separately). 410-8833462. 11/9

OIL DRUM & STAND, 275 gal., $25 for both. Solid wood microwave stand, shaped like a home comfort wood stove, $125. 8759610. 11/2

‘92 TOYOTA 2WD P/UP, 1 owner, 4 cyl., 5 spd. stick, good tires, runs & looks good, 116K mi., $2200. Call 875-0171 & let ring. 10/5

4-PC. LR SUITE, sofa, rocker, chair & coffee table, wood trim, blue floral, $75. Phillips color TV, 12”, $25. 877.0741. 11/9

BRICKS, GLEN-GREY. “Olde Detroiit” pattern. 1500+ at 24¢ ea. 628-0596. 10/26/3t

BOATS

THOMPSON 50 CAL. blk. powder Hawkins style, $150 OBO. 337-3370. 11/9

DVD MOVIES, horror, adventure, comedy, $3 ea. 628-1880. 10/26

PINK PET STROLLER, new in box, $60. Wicker peacock chair, $10. Bamboo rocking chair w/offwhite cushion, $25. Kneeling computer chair for bad backs, $20. 846-2681. 11/2

HUNTING COAT, brand new, sz. 42. Pd. $50, will take $30. 846-3839. 10/26

KAYAK 18’ w/Rudder, Kelvar Const., beautiful cond. w/all access. & more. Must see. Sacrifice $1600. 8759775. 10/12

CAMPERS/ TRAILERS

PIANO, $150 OBO. 8587492. 11/9

TROYBILT YARD VACUUM, walk behind, chipper, shredder, 5.5 hp. $250. 629-3315. 11/2

1856(6

CNAs

(Sussex County)

F u l l Ti m e O p p o r t u n i t i e s

Requirements include a HS/GED diploma and certification within the state of Delaware. Two years experience in hospital, extended care facility, home care or hospice preferred. Send your resume to:

Please fax resume to Dr. Sprague

“You name it we frame it”

KITCHEN TABLE, 40” round, 2 folding leaves, wood top & white wood legs, $30. Southwestern style Headboard, wood & wrought iron, $35. 8753099. 11/2

At Delaware Hospice, our consistent commitment to excellence & service to our community speaks for itself. Join us and help us meet the needs of those people who need it most while enjoying rewarding work.

Busy optometric practice seeking full time receptionist. Experience is helpful but not required, we will train the right person. Some traveling between offices is required. Competitive salary with benefits.

20% Off thru Christmas

Cheap • Cheap • Cheap AUTO INSURANCE? 1-877-621-1030 Credit Cards accepted. tnc

20’ AWNING $275. 6292226. 11/2

WANTED!

Hitchens Frame Shop Discount Land Rd., Laurel

‘94 HONDA PRELUDE SI, doesn’t run, needs engine work, otherwise nice cond. BO. 410-754-5985 or email thorwor82@aol.com (photos on request). 11/2

CHILDCARE SOLUTIONS

NOTICE

AUTOMOTIVE PAYING MORE THAN $35 / Month for AUTO INSURANCE? 1-877-621-1030 Credit Cards accepted. tnc

($9.00 minimum)

REESE CAMPER, 12,000 lb. weight distribution, hitch w/spring bars & friction sway control. $125. 3378962. 10/26

blenzin@delawarehospice.org Fax: 302-478-1351 For more information visit us at www.delawarehospice.org

MR. & MRS. SANTA CLAUS handmade figures, 13” - 15” tall, $5 ea. 8753935. 10/26 CROMCRAFT OAK KIT. TABLE w/leaf, 4 beige fabric chairs on wheels, exc. cond., $595. 628-5484. 10/26 DOUBLE STROLLER, Stadium style (side by side), good shape, $50. 875-3099 after 1 pm. 10/19. MICROWAVE, SUNBEAM, small, white, $20. 875-3099 after 1 pm. 10/19. WINCESTER PUMP model 1300, 4 interchangeable barrels, scope, choke, $350. CVA Muzzle Loader, Hawkis, 50 caliber, side hammer, $100 OBO. Ask for Tony, 875-2454. 10/19

Large Selection of

VHS MOVIES WHY RENT WHEN YOU CAN BUY FOR LESS? SANDY FORK GENERAL STORE NEXT TO LAUREL AMERICAN LEGION

302-875-9545 COLOR TV, 27” Zenith, remote, cable ready, exc. cond., $100 firm. 682-7111. 10/12 ATTIC ROOF VENT, 24” dia., thermostate controlled, $65. Lg. Corona Kerosene Heater, exc. cond., $65. 682-7111. 10/12 SOFA, 3 cushion, like new, quality const., lt. grn. & tan plaid, sarifice, $250. 8759775. 10/12 KELVINATOR WASHER & DRYER, $100. 875-9610. 10/5 MAPLE KIT. TABLE & 4 chairs, $75 OBO. Lg. China Cabinet, 2 pieces, $75 OBO. 875-4114. 10/5 ALTO SAXOPHONE, good cond. 875-3589 or 8755513. 10/5 LR CHAIR, Soft Blue Plaid, Cothran brand from Scott’s, exc. cond., paid $800, asking $150 OBO. 875-7412. 10/5 DVD MOVIES $3 ea. VHS movies, 75¢ ea. 628-1880. 10/5

ANIMALS, ETC. PEACOCKS, 1 Pr. for sale, $50/pair. 875-4952. 10/19 BORDER COLLIE PUPS, farm raised, registered, ready to go Oct. 15. $400 ea. 629-3964. 10/5

FREE CLASSIFIEDS Personal Items for Sale. No Vendors Please.

Call 629-9788, or send to P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973.


BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY A/C & HEATING

ATTORNEYS

AUTOMOTIVE

SUSSEX HEATING & A/C

AUTO ACCIDENT AND PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS

ALLEN BODY WORKS, INC.

302-745-0735

Service within 4 Hours Lowest Price in Sussex County Sales, Service, Installation Factory Specialist on Carrier, York, Bryant, Trane, Rheem & Goodman

Heat Pumps - A/C - Furnaces Over 20 Yrs. Experience Licensed & Insured

BRIDAL See Us For Your Announcements, Napkins, Etc.

Initial Consultation Free No Fee Unless You Recover Evening and Weekend Appointments

FUQUA and YORI, P.A.

413 NORTH CENTRAL AVE. LAUREL, DE 19956

The Circle • Georgetown • 856-7777

302-875-3208

*Listing areas of practice does not represent official certification as a specialist in those areas.

FAX 302-875-3229

CONCRETE

CONSTRUCTION

ATTORNEYS AT LAW

• DRIVEWAYS • GARAGES • SIDEWALKS • PATIOS

MR. CONCRETE 410-742-0134 Mark Donophan

The Star 628 W. Stein Hwy. Seaford - 629-9788

EMPLOYMENT

Licensed & Insured

Free Estimates

FARM & HOME

Dukes Builders INCORPORATED 55 Years Experience

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PAGE 34

MORNING STAR

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

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cessibility, paved roads, nearby lakes; preselling phase IV $35,000+ 800463-9980 www.theridgeatsouthmountain.com Real Estate Coastal Georgia- New, PreConstruction Golf Community. Large lots & condos w/ deepwater, marsh, golf, nature views. Gated, Golf, Fitness Center, tennis, Trails, Docks. $70k's- $300K. 1877-266-7376 www.cooperspoint.com Real Estate Rentals NO RENT- $0 DOWN HOMES Gov't & Bank foreclosures! No Credit O.K. $0 to low Down! For Listings, (800)860-0573 Real Estate/Acreage Want to get your Business Booming?? Advertise in 121 newspapers across Maryland, Delaware, and DC, reach over 2.3 Million households for only $430. For more information contact this Newspaper or call Gay Fraustro, MDDC Classified Networks, 410-7214000, ext.17 or visit: www.mddcpress.com. Tax Services

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LEGALS NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Little Creek Hundred Case No. 9688 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a variance as provided by: Chapter 115, Article IV, Subsection 115-20, Item H of said ordinance of ADRIAN CANNON who is seeking a variance from the maximum age requirement for placement of a manufactured home, to be located east of Road 497, 400 feet south of Route 24, being Lot A. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, DECEMBER 11, 2006, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 11/09/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Little Creek Hundred Case No. 9698 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Advertisement

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Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a special use exception as provided by: Chapter 115, Article XI, Subsection 11580, Item A of said ordinance of HALE TRAILER BRAKE & WHEEL, INC. who are seeking a special use exception to place a manufactured home type structure as a sales office, to be located east of U.S. Route 13, 2,572 feet south of Road 64. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, DECEMBER 11, 2006, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 11/09/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT HEARING Broad Creek Hundred Case No. 9697 In accordance with Chapter 115, of the Code of Sussex County, a hearing will be held on a request for a special use exception as provided by: Chapter 115, Article IV, Subsection 11523, Item A of said ordinance of CHARLES AND DIANA COLUMNA who are seeking a special use exception to place a manufactured home on a medical hardship basis, to be located south of Road 74, 4,200 feet northwest of Route 447, being Lot 4 within Pine Woods development. The hearing will be held in the County Council Chambers, County Administrative Office Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on Monday evening, DECEMBER 11, 2006, at 7:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as may be heard. All interested parties should attend and present their views. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to public hearing. For additional information, contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 11/09/1tc

See LEGALS—page 35


2 Real Estate Auctions in Sussex County, DE www.marshallauctions.com Public Real Estate Auction – 7.5 Ac +/- Lot in Seaford Thursday November 9 th at 5:30 PM – Auction held onsite! Ockels Rd. & Rt. 13 in Seaford, DE - Sussex County Dist 1-32, Map 2.00 Parcel 275 Incredible 7.5 Acre +/- lot with 2,500+ feet of frontage on the Southbound Lanes of Rt. 13 Directions: The lot is located on the Southbound lanes of Rt. 13 approx. 2.2 miles South of Rt. 20 West in Seaford, DE and 3.8 miles North of Rt. 9 East in Laurel, DE. The property is located on the North of the intersection at Ockels Rd. Signs Posted. Description: INCREDIBLE INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY Approx. 7.5 Acre +/lot with an incredible 2665’ +/- of frontage on the Southbound lanes of Rt. 13 just south of Seaford. Lot currently has one billboard that is leased. The lot is conveniently located in between Seaford & Laurel, DE. The property offers prime frontage on Rt. 13 for Billboard Advertising. Real Estate Terms: $5,000.00 down day of auction in cash, certified check or check acceptable by undersigned. Balance to be paid in 45 days. 2.5 % Buyer premium. Property being sold “as is”. Prospective Buyer responsible for inspection, including lead paint, prior to the auction, Auction Company makes no representation or warranties of any kind. BROKER PARTICIPATION. Brokers must have clients registered 48 hours prior to the auction. Contact Auction Co. for Complete Details.

Absolute Real Estate Auction – Incredible Commercial Building in Laurel, DE Marshall Auctions is honored to sell the old Laurel Post Office. The property will be sold to the highest bidder without reserve and regardless of price.

Thursday November, 16th at 5:27 PM – 400 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE Real Estate Preview: Sunday, Nov. 12th 1-2 PM Directions: At the intersection of Rt. 13 ant Rt. 24 (in Laurel DE) turn West onto Rt. 24 and follow for 1 mile to Central Ave. Turn left onto S. Central Ave. and follow to the building. Signs Posted. Description: The Landmark Building was originally constructed as the local post office in 1935 and was renovated to state historical standards in 2002 as an office building suitable for professional businesses. The building is all brick and poured concrete, very solid. The facility offers Handicap compliant access and complete compliance throughout. Included is a keyless entry security system, smoke detectors, and double cat 5 phone and internet lines to all offices and reception area. Optimal for use as a doctor, dentist, attorney, insurance, real estate, town, county, state, office building.Especially attractive for use by any business desiring to move out of an in home location to a professional setting with the option of developing income from space available to other tenants. The systems in place allow for unlimited “virtual offices”. Currently receiving income from office leases and virtual offices. Real Estate Terms: $15,000.00 down day of auction in cash, certified check or check acceptable by undersigned. Balance to be paid in 45 days. 2.5 % Buyer premium. Property being sold “as is”. Prospective Buyer responsible for inspection, including lead paint, prior to the auction, Auction Company makes no representation or warranties of any kind. BROKER PARTICIPATION. Brokers must have clients registered 48 hours prior to the auction. Contact Auction Co. for Complete Details.

View Our Website for Additional Information, Descriptions, Terms, Directions & Pictures!

MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 34

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE You are hereby notified the below matters will be before: The City of Seaford Mayor and Council for their determination on Tuesday, November 28 2006, at 7:05 P.M., in the City Hall, 414 High Street, Seaford, Delaware; 1) Case No. R-53-06, Leon R. Ellis, property owner of Tax Map and Parcel 5-31 10.18 101 & 101.08, located on Cypress Drive, is seeking a rezoning of these parcels from R-3 High Density Residential to R-2 Medium Density Residential. 2) Case No. S-52-06, Leon R. Ellis, property owner of Tax Map and Parcel 5-31 10.18 101 & 101.08,Cypress Drive, is seeking a subdivision of these parcels into eight (8) R-2 single family residential lots. 3) Case No. S-45-06, Robino Belle Ayre L.L.C., property owners of Tax Map and Parcel 5-31 10.00 223.01, located off Atlanta Road is seeking a subdivi-

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006 sion of this parcel into 115 town house lots as per R-3, Sec. 15-26 (15) Area and bulk Regulations. 4) “Request to be tabled” Home Team Properties, LLC, property owners of Tax Map and Parcel 331 5.00 80.02 & 80.08, Norman Eskridge Highway, are requesting a final site approval for two new office buildings at this location. The property is in front of Williams Pond Park. 5) “Request to be tabled” Penco Corporation, property owner of 1415 W. Stein Highway, is seeking a final site plan review for a 3,700 square foot retail showroom at this location. The existing farm house will be torn down and the showroom will be built on the front of the existing 1,600 square foot office building. 6) Case No. S-58-06, Circle J Community Developers, property owners of Tax Map and Parcel 3-31 6.00 1.00 & 444, are seeking a subdivision for three commercial lots, located on Sussex Highway approximately 1444 feet north of Tharp Road. 7) Circle J Community Developers, property own-

PAGE 35

ers of Tax Map and Parcel 3-31 6.000 1 & 444, is seeking a preliminary site plan approvals for three buildings on the proposed subdivided lots; Lot 1 - for a proposed 27,958 square foot building; Lot 2 - for a proposed 1,000 square foot retail store, and; Lot 3 - for a proposed 7,500 square foot two story office building. 8)Morris and Ritchie Associates, Inc., on behalf of the property owners, Cecil B. Tull, Mary Tull and Virginia Thawley, are requesting a final site plan review for Tull Gardens, Tax Map and Parcel 531 12.00 38, located on Atlanta Road. Should you wish to present your position or evidence, please attend. You may have counsel attend on your behalf. Issued this 9th day of November 2006 pursuant to the Rules heretofore adopted by the City of Seaford. THE CITY OF SEAFORD Dolores J. Slatcher City Manager 11/09/1tc See LEGALS—page 36

PUBLIC AUCTION

OF MOBILE HOME & CONTENTS IN SEAFORD, DEL.

THURSDAY, NOV. 16, 2006 - 2:00 P.M. Location: 480 Long Branch Road, Seaford, DE 19973. (Cool Branch Mobile Home Park) Inspection: Thursday, Nov. 9 from 4:00 to 5:00 p.m. 2000 Redmond (approx. 28’ x 58’) 3 BR/2 BA double-wide mobile home with living room, kitchen, utility room, and dinette area. The home has ample closets and storage space. The kitchen features a Frigidaire dish washer, GE stove, Frigidaire microwave, & GE refrigerator. The utility room features a Hotpoint washer & dryer (All appliances are in likenew condition). The home features a spacious master bedroom with bathroom and walk-in closet and has wall-to-wall carpet in several rooms. The exterior of the home has vinyl siding, asphalt shingle roof, a 10’ x 30’ salt-treated deck at front and a 10’ x 12’ salt-treated deck at back. The home is heated with forced air heat and cool with central air conditioning. The home is in excellent condition with no major updates or repairs needed. The mobile home is situated on a rented lot (approx. $360/month) in the village of Cool Branch. Bidders interested in keeping the home in Cool Branch should contact Carol at the Cool Branch office at 302.628.4375 to start the application process. Otherwise, the mobile home must be removed. Personal property to be sold will include a chest of drawers, like-new bedding, sofa, coffee table & end tables, lamps, 5 pc. dinette set, 3 pc. bedroom suite. Terms (Mobile Home): $5,000.00 non-refundable down payment on day of sale in the form of Cash, Cashier’s, or Certified Check made payable to Jos. C. O’Neal & Sons with the balance to be paid within 10 days when a good and marketable title will be given. The mobile home is being sold in “AS-IS” condition. Failure to comply with these Terms of Sale will cause the down payment paid on day of sale to be forfeited and the mobile home will be resold at the buyer’s expense. A 10% buyer’s premium will be added to the final selling price. Seller(s) have the right to accept or reject any or all bids, but it is their intent to sell said mobile home. Terms (Personal Property): Cash or Approved Check on day of sale. All items are sold “ASIS” with no warranties of any kind. A 10% buyer’s premium will be charged on all purchases. Selling For: Estate of Roger A. Smith

Five Generations of Combined Auction Experience Doug Marshall, Jr., CAI, Christal Marshall, Auctioneers Phone: 888-986-SOLD(7653) 410-835-0383

www.marshallauctions.com

Jos. C. O’Neal & Sons AUCTIONEERS & APPRAISERS, INC. 11112 Laurel Road, Laurel, DE 19956

302.875.5261 - 1.866.866.8758 www.onealsauction.com


PAGE 36 LEGALS - from Page 35

PUBLIC NOTICE A SPECIAL WORKSHOP will be conducted at the CITY OF SEAFORD MAYOR AND COUNCIL for the purpose of discussing a proposed new Ordinance for Business and Rental Licenses. The workshop will be held on Monday, November 13, 2006 at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers of City Hall, 414 High Street, Seaford, Delaware. Should you wish to present your position please attend this workshop. If you are unable to attend the meeting, you may view the presentation online at seafordde.com/notices.cfm. The record will remain open for ten calendar days. You are encouraged to submit your comments in writing prior to the workshop for them to be read into the record or within the ten calendar day period so they are made a part of the record. Dolores J. Slatcher City Manager 11/09/1tc

NOTICE Estate of Mildred Lee Esther Sanabria, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Mil-

MORNING STAR dred Lee Esther Sanabria who departed this life on the 14th day of February, A.D. 2006 late of Laurel, DE, were duly granted unto Queen Sanabria-Allen on the 30th day of October, A.D. 2006, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 14th day of October, A.D. 2006 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Queen Sanabria-Allen 321 Gregory Ave., West Orange, NJ 07052 Attorney: Cindy L. Szabo Sergovic & Ellis, P.A. P.O. Box 875 Georgetown, DE 19947 Howard Clendaniel Register of Wills 11/09/3tc

NOTICE Estate of John A. Williams, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration WWA upon the estate of John A. Williams who departed this life on the 26th day of September, A.D. 2006 late of Laurel, DE, were duly granted unto Mil-

DELMAR SCHOOL DISTRICT SCHEDULES REFERENDUM The Delmar School District will hold a referendum on Tuesday, December 5, 2006 to seek voter approval to float bonds through the State of Delaware to continue the previously approved construction of six [6] additional middle school classrooms and two-thousand [2,000] additional square feet of cafeteria space. The additional monies appropriated and approved by the Delaware Legislature in June 2006 will be 80% funded by the State of Delaware. The 20% local share of $560,000 will be funded through bond sales for the school construction. THIS REFERENDUM DOES NOT INCREASE THE SCHOOL TAX RATE. In the six years since the construction of the 20 million dollar Delmar School District/Delmar Middle and Senior High School, the enrollment has climbed from under 700 students to 1070 in 2006, with increases anticipated in coming years. The additional space will greatly improve services and class enrollments. The election will be held in the Delmar District Board of Education Room with polls open from 12:00 noon until 9:00 p.m. If approved, planning will begin immediately, and construction is expected to start the following year. Voters may obtain absentee ballots by contacting the Department of Elections for Sussex County, 114 N. Race Street, Georgetown, DE 19947 [302]856-5367. Any resident of the Delmar, DE School District, eighteen years of age or older with proof of residency, may vote in the referendum. Voters, however, need not be registered to vote. Any questions concerning the referendum should be directed to the District Office. Informational meetings will be held at 7:00 pm in the auditorium of the Delmar Middle and Senior High School on Wednesday, November 15, 2006, and again, Wednesday, November 29, 2006.

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

ton M. Disharoon on the 17th day of October, A.D. 2006, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administration WWA without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administration WWA on or before the 26th day of May, A.D. 2007 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administration WWA: Milton M. Disharoon 12850 Baker Mill Rd., Seaford, DE 19973 Howard Clendaniel Register of Wills 10/26/3tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of An Alias writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 21, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain lot, or parcel of land, situate in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING for the outlines of the same at a cement post located on the south line of Parcel 2 as shown at the letter A on the plat filed for record in Deed Book 399, page 169, said cement post being located North 88 degrees 0 minutes West 40 feet from the southwest corner of said Parcel 2 and the southeast corner for Parcel 1, and ash shown on said plat; thence

turning North 88 degrees 0 minute West 40.00 feet to the Southwest corner o Parcel 2 and the southeast corner of parcel 1 aforesaid, and thence continuing said course at the letter B on said Plat; thence turning North 0 degrees 43 minute West 40 feet to another cement post as shown on the Letter C on said plat; thence running South 88 degrees 0 minutes East 207.3 feet to intersect the boundary lien between Parcel 1 and Parcel 2 intersect the boundary line between Parcel 1 and Parcel 2 aforesaid and thence continuing said course North 88 degrees 0 minutes East 42.7 feet to the right of way of County Road to the lot hereby described at a cement post as shown at the letter D on said plat and thence running South 0 degrees and 43 minutes East 150 feet, by and with the westerly side of said right of way, to the place of Beginning, be the contents thereof what they may. AND BEING the same lands and premises conveyed unto Kathryn T. Edwards and Edwin L. Thompson by deed of Mary K. Edwards, Executrix of the Estate of Kathryn T. Edwards recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware at Deed Book 1900, page 208. Tax Parcel: 5-32-20.0010.00 Property Address: 38002 Brick Manor Road, Delmar Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be

demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 4, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 8, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of EDWIN L. THOMPSON & KATHRYN T. THOMPSON F/K/A KATHRYN T. EDWARDS and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 11/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 21, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Com-

plex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain tract, piece or lot of land lying and being in the City of Seaford, Sussex County, Delaware, and situated on the western side of Conwell Street, and more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at a point on Conwell Street which forms a corner of this lot, piece or parcel of land, and the lot now or formerly of Joseph Ruark; thence with the said Ruark land westerly sixty four (64) feet to the lands now or formerly of Margaret M. Martin; thence northerly with the said Martin lands seven (7) feet; thence westerly with the Martin lands eleven (11) feet to the lands of Margaret M. Martin; thence northerly with the Martin land thirty seven (37) feet to other lands of Margaret M. Martin; thence with the Martin lands and parallel with the first line easterly seventy five (75) feet to Conwell Street; thence with Conwell Street southerly forty four (44) feet to the place of beginning containing what there may be within these metes and bounds, improved by a two story dwelling. AND BEING the same lands and premises conveyed unto Judy E. Brunswick by deed of James K. Gullett and Lisa A. Gullett, dated July 3, 2002 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware in Deed Book 2726, Page 282. Tax Parcel: 4-31-5.00283.00 Property Address: 110 North Conwell Street, See LEGALS—page 37

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING The Seaford School District Board of Education will hold a public meeting for the purpose of consideration of a waiver to the provisions of 14 Delaware Code, §1704(4). This subsection of the law requires all public school buildings to have allocated to them 98% of the Division 1 units generated by the actual unit count in that building by the last school day of October of the current school year. A local school board may waive this subsection after voting to waive it at a public meeting noticed for that purpose. Any local school board seeking such a waiver shall do so on or before December 1st of each year. The meeting will be held on Monday, 13 November 2006 at 7:00 p.m. in the Ashok Champaneria Board Room, 390 North Market Street Extended, Seaford, DE 19973. Citizens may present written or oral comments on the matter under consideration by the Board of Education. Procedures related to the public forum portion of this meeting include: 1) Citizens who wish to address the Board should complete the “Public Participation Form for School Board Meetings” (available at the Seaford School District Office at 390 North Market Street Extended during regular business hours or at the time of the meeting) and present it to the presiding officer prior to the start of the meeting; 2) Citizens may address the Board of Education by seeking recognition from the presiding officer. When recognized, citizens shall first state their names and the topic upon which they would like to speak; 3) The presiding officer may limit the time for comments. WHAT: WHEN: WHERE: WHY:

A public meeting of the Seaford Board of Education 7:00 p.m. on Monday, 13 November 2006 Ashok Champaneria Board Room, 390 N. Market Street Extended Consideration of a waiver of the provisions of 14 Delaware Code, §1704(4)


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 36 Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 4, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 8, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JUDY E. BRUNSWICK and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 11/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 21, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece, parcel and tract of land lying on the westerly side of U.S. Route 13-A and situate in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, described more particularly as follows, towit: BEGINNING at a point located 2 feet from a pipe found on the westerly right of way line of U.S. Route 13-A said point being a corner of these lands and those of Amy F. Lewis; thence with Lewis lands North 77 degrees 40 minutes 42 seconds West a distance of 300.51 feet to a concrete monument found; thence turning and with lands of Melvin Forney North 11 degrees 29 minutes 52 seconds East a distance of 68.78 feet to a concrete monument found; thence turning and with lands of Brian F. Kunkowski, South 78 degrees 56 minutes 00 seconds East a distance of 299.89 feet to a railroad spike set on the westerly right of way line of U.S. Route 13A; thence with said right of way line South 11 degrees 02 minutes 46 seconds West a distance of 75.36 feet home to the point and place of beginning, said to contain

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING The Woodbridge School District Board of Education as a part of its regular November public meeting will consider a waiver to the provisions of 14 Delaware Code § 1704(4) and § 1705(A)(a). Subsection 1704(4) of the law requires all public school buildings to have allocated to them 98% of the Division 1 units generated by the actual unit count in that building by the last school day of October of the current school year. Subsection 1705(A)(a) requires any kindergarten or grades 1-3 public school classes to have no higher ratio of teacher to students than 1:22 by the last school day in October of the current school year. This ratio is only to apply to a class where students are instructed in core academic subjects of English/Language Arts, mathematics, science, and social studies. The meeting will be held in the library of the Phillis Wheatley Middle School. Citizens may present written or oral comments on the matter under consideration by the Board of Education, under the public commentary portion of the meeting. WHAT: A public meeting of the Woodbridge Board of Education WHEN: Tuesday, November 21, 2006 WHERE: Phillis Wheatley Middle School Library WHY: Consideration of a waiver of the provisions of 14 Delaware Code, § 1704(4) and § 1705(A)(a) 11/9/2tc

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

21,633 square feet of land, more or less, as shown on a plot by Temple-Sellers, Inc., dated December 22, 1999, and attached hereto. BEING the same lands conveyed to William W. Ellsworth and Sharon Lynn Ellsworth, his wife, by deed dated December 30, 1999 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 2453, Page 27. Tax Parcel: 3-32-3.005.00 Property Address: 32696 Bi State Boulevard, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 4, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 8, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within

Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of WILLIAM W. & SHARON LYNN ELLSWORTH and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 11/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 21, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being situate in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being known and designated as Lot Five (5) of OWEN'S ACRES, as shown on a plot of record in Plot Book 44, Page 15, and more particularly described in accordance with a recent survey prepared by Simpler Surveying & Associate dated February 24, 2000, as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument found on the northwesterly side of County Road #594, a corner for this lot and Lot 4, said beginning point being 1,682 feet more or less from the right of way line of Route 16; thence, by and with County Road #594, South 27 degrees 51 min-

TOWN OF LAUREL NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Please take notice that a public hearing will be held on: Monday, November 20, 2006 at 8:00 p.m. (or later following the preceding public hearing) Laurel Fire Department 205 Tenth Street Town of Laurel Laurel, DE The public hearing will be conducted by the Mayor and Council of the Town of Laurel, with respect to the application of Discovery Group, LLC, for a Large Parcel Development Overlay District (LPD-OD) on certain property northeast of the Town’s present boundaries proposed to be annexed into the Town of Laurel (Tax Parcel Nos. 1-31 12.00-109, 109.01, 118, 119, 123; 2-32 6.00-40 & 41), known as the Horsey Discovery Project. All interested persons are invited to attend said public hearing and present their views. Additional information, including copies of the Master Plan submission, and other pertinent documents, may be obtained at Town Hall during regular business hours. Mayor and Council of Laurel, Delaware

PAGE 37 utes 36 seconds West 180.53 feet to a concrete monument found, a corner for this lot and Lot 6; thence, turning and running by and with Lot 6, North 70 degrees 36 minutes 51 seconds West 1,044.04 feet to a 3/4 inch pipe found, a corner for this lot and lands of the State of Delaware; thence, turning and running North 31 degrees 51 minutes 57 seconds East 126.30 feet to a point in the center of West Branch; thence, continuing with West Branch, North 21 degrees 04 minutes 39 seconds East 129.17 feet to a point, in the center of West Branch; thence, turning and running by and with Lot 4, South 66 degrees 32 minutes 58 seconds East 1,042.16 feet (passing over a 3/4 inch pipe found at 10 feet) to the place of beginning, containing therein 5.1432 acres of land, more or less as surveyed by Simpler Surveying & Associate dated February 24, 2000. BEING the same lands and premises conveyed to Sherry L. Breeding, by Deed from Ron's Mobile Home Sales, Inc., dated March 28, 2000, and recorded April 6, 2000, in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2474, Page 168. Tax Parcel: 4-30-7.005.16 Property Address: 12892 Oak Road, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash,

Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 4, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 8, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of SHERRY L. BREEDING and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 11/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 21, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land lying and See LEGALS—page 38

TOWN OF LAUREL NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Please take notice that a public hearing will be held on: Monday, November 20, 2006 at 7:00 p.m. (or following the preceding public hearing) Laurel Fire Department 205 Tenth Street Town of Laurel Laurel, DE The public hearing will be conducted by the Mayor and Council of the Town of Laurel, to consider the requests of Discovery Group, LLC, and The Car Store for the Town of Laurel to annex certain properties contiguous to the northeasterly limits of the Town of Laurel (Tax Parcel Nos. 1-31-12.00-109, 109.01, 118, 119, 123; 2-32 6.00-40 & 41; 2-32-6.00-37 & 38). All interested persons are invited to attend said public hearing and present their views. Additional information, including copies of the annexation requests and other pertinent documents, may be obtained at Town Hall during regular business hours. Mayor and Council of Laurel, Delaware


PAGE 38 LEGALS - from Page 37 being situate in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a 1/2 inch pipe found on the Southwesterly right-of-way line of County Road No. 40, (60' R/W) said pipe being .41 miles plus or minus in a Northwesterly direction from County Road No. 593, said pipe also being a common· property corner for these lands and. Lands of Jay Richardson; thence running with said common property line for these lands and Lands of Jay Richardson, S 50 deg. 41' 50" W - 425.00 feet to a 1/2 inch pipe found, said pipe being a common property corner for these lands, Lands of Jay Richardson & Lands of B. Darrow McLaughlin; thence turning and running with said common property line for these lands and lands of B. Darrow McLaughlin the following two courses and distances, N 13 deg. 07' 43" E 164.01 feet to a concrete monument found; thence N 50 deg. 41' 50" E - 295.00 feet to a 3/4 inch pipe found on said right-of-way line of County Road No. 40, said pipe being a common property corner for these lands and Lands of B. Darrow McLaughlin; thence turning and running with said rightof-way line of County Road No. 40, S 39 deg. 18' 14" E - 100.00 feet home to the point and place of beginning, containing 36,000 square feet of land, be the same, more or less, as surveyed and shown on a plot prepared by Theodore B. Simpler, P.L.S. 289, June 15, 1999. BEING part of the same lands and premises conveyed unto Lesbartus J. Tucker and Mildred E. Tucker, his wife, by deed of Fred Slabaugh and Barbara H. Slabaugh, his wife, said Deed dated July 15, 1999 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 2406 at Page 327. Tax Parcel: 4-30-17.0034.06 Property Address: 14974 Redden Road, Bridgeville Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The bal-

MORNING STAR ance is to be paid on or before December 4, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 8, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LESBARTUS J. TUCKER, A/K/A JOSEPH TUCKER & MILDRED TUCKER and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 11/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a Second Pluries writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 21, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece, parcel and tract of land being known as Lot No 14, “Virginia Commons” (Plot Book 70, Page 173), situate in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being more particularly described as follows, towit: BEGINNING at a pipe found on the Southerly right-of-way line of Robinson Circle (50 foot right-ofway) said point also being a common corner for Lot No. 13; thence with said right-ofway line and a curve to the left having a radius of 75.00 feet, the central angle being 29 degrees 47 minutes 05 seconds, the arc distance being 38.99 feet, the chord bearing South 81 degrees 13 minutes 28 seconds East a distance of 38.55 feet to a pipe found at a common corner of Lot No. 15; thence turning and leav-

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

ing said right-of-way line and with said Lot No. 15 South 06 degrees 07 minutes 14 seconds East a distance of 158.14 feet to a concrete monument found in the line of lands now or formerly of David R. LaPrad, Jr.; thence turning and with said LaPrad, Jr. lands North 51 degrees 10 minutes 11 seconds West a distance of 96.79 feet to a pipe found in the line of said LaPrad, Jr. lands and a common corner for Lot No. 13; thence turning and with said Lot No. 13 North 11 degrees 17 minutes 06 seconds East a distance of 104.45 feet home to the point and place of beginning said to contain 7,363 square feet of land, be the same more or less, as shown on a survey prepared by Temple-Sellers, Inc. dated May 10, 2004. SUBJECT to the Restrictions filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Deed Book 1981, Page 288. BEING the same lands and premises which Mary O. Hatcher, be Deed dated May 25, 2004, and recorded in the Office of the Recording of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 2983, Page 329, did grant and convey unto Derek M. Sheets and Monica N. Sheets, in fee. Tax Parcel: 3-31-5.1547.00 Property Address: 28 Robinson Circle, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 4, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 8, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if

a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DEREK M. & MONICA N. SHEETS and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 11/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 21, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain tract, piece or parcel of land, situate in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, and State of Delaware, bounded and described as follows: BEGINNING at a point in the Northerly right-of-way line of Delaware Road #77 (50' right-of-way), said point lying in the centerline of a ditch, and being 108 feet more or less to Ext. of County Road #540 and being a common boundary line for this land and for lands now or formerly of Sheldon J. Vandermark; thence turning and running by and with the centerline of said ditch and lands now or formerly of Vandermark the following three courses and distances: 1) North 04 degrees 07 minutes 34 seconds West 163.32 feet to a point; 2) North 37 degrees 32 minutes 54 seconds East 73.91 feet to a point; 3) North 19 degrees 29 minutes 15 seconds East 31.22 feet to a point; thence turning and running by and with a common boundary line for this land and for lands now or formerly of Alice V. Allen South 81 degrees 13 minutes 28 seconds East 220.10 feet to an iron pipe found; thence turning and running by and with a common boundary line for this land and for lands now or formerly of Alice V. Allen South 08 degrees 46 minutes 32 seconds West 282.80 feet to an iron pipe found; thence turning and running by and with the Northerly right-of-way line of Delaware Road #77 (50' right-of-way) North 79 degrees 20 minutes 33 seconds West 20.00 feet to a

point marking the beginning of a curve; thence continuing on by and with said right-of-way, said curve having a radius of 969.00 feet, a delta of 12 degrees 01 minutes 35 seconds, a length of 207.59 feet, a chord of 207.21 feet with a bearing of North 73 degrees 19 minutes 46 seconds West home to the place of beginning said to contain 1.50 acres more or less as shown on a survey prepared by Miller-Lewis, Inc. dated October 15, 2003. SUBJECT to any and all restrictions, reservations, conditions, easements and agreements of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware. Being the same lands and premises which Eric J. Goslee did grant and convey unto Mark C. Smith and Tiffany V. Smith by deed dated October 30, 2003 and recorded on November 12, 2003 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 02908 Page 045. Tax Parcel: 5-31-17.001.00 Property Address: 2977 Matts Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 4, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on

December 8, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MARK C. & TIFFANY V. SMITH and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 11/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of an Alias writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 21, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, and See LEGALS—page 39


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 38 being more particularly described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a nail found located on the Northerly side of a Right-ofWay of County Road No. 569 and being a corner for this parcel and lands now or formerly of David B. Chamberlain, etux; thence by and with said right-of-way and said Chamberlain lands North 34 degrees 15' 40” West 509.90 feet to a point; thence turning and running by and with a common boundary line for this parcel and lands now or formerly of Daniel W. Vanderwende, etux. North 37 degrees 50' 24” East 125.00 feet to a point; thence turning and running by and with a common boundary line for this parcel and lands now or formerly of Larry P. Green, etux. South 34 degrees 50' 46” East 537.45 feet to a nail found; thence turning and running by and with the curving northerly right-ofway line of County Road NO. 567; thence with the curve of said line having a radius of 487.43 feet, a delta of South 52 degrees 24' 04” West; and arc distance of 81.88 feet; and a chord distance of 81.78 feet to a point; thence continuing on South 47 degrees 35' 20” West 43.22 feet home to the place of beginning said to contain 1.4589 acres more or less with improvements thereon as shown on a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr. dated August 23, 1995, a copy of which is attached hereto. Being the same lands and premises which William J. Fedorcsak and Heather A. Fedorcsak did grant and convey unto Ronald A. Robison and Patricia L. Robison by deed dated August 25, 1995 and recorded on August 28, 1995 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 02071 Page 159. Tax Parcel: 5-30-11.008.02 Property Address: County Road 569, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 4, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation

by the Superior Court on December 8, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of RONALD A. & PATRICIA L. ROBISON and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 11/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 21, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land together with the improvements thereon situate, lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, and State of Delaware, and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: Beginning at a concrete monument on the northwesterly right of way line of Road No. 538, said monument being 25 feet from the centerline of said Road No. 538 and being 1641.69 feet from the centerline of Road No. 540 and also being a corner for this land and lands now or formerly of John Bullock; thence with a curve, whose arc is 153.15 feet, along the northwesterly right of way line of said Road No. 538, a chord bearing of North 63 degrees 10 minutes East 153.08 feet to a concrete monument, being a corner for lands now or formerly of the Heirs of Claude D. Ellis; thence along lands now or formerly of The Ellis Heirs the following two courses and distances; North 25 degrees 00 minutes West 290.10

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

feet to a concrete monument; thence South 65 degrees 00 minutes West 153.00 feet to a pipe, being a corner for lands now or formerly of the aforesaid John Bullock: Thence along lands now or Formerly of John Bullock South 25 degrees 00 minutes East 295.00 feet back to the place of beginning, said to contain 1.0275 acres of land, be the same more or less, as shown on a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr., Registered Surveyor, dated August 1, 1987. Being the same lands and premises which Richard S. Stafford did grant and convey unto Terri L. Stafford by deed dated September 26, 1994 and recorded on September 29, 1994 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware in Deed Book 0200 Page 015. Tax Parcel: 5-31-17.0017.17 Property Address: 28554 Ellis Mill Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 4, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 8, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of TERRI L. STAFFORD and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 11/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 21, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, located on the southerly right of way line of County Road No. 548 designated as Parcel No.9 Irvin E. Handy Property, and being more particularly described according to a survey prepared by Theodore B. Simpler, dated March 19, 1997, as follows, to wit: Beginning at a 3/4" pipe found marking a common corner for this parcel and Parcel No. 10; thence, by and with Parcel No. 10, South 17 degrees 57 minutes 55 seconds West, 352.01 feet to a 3/4" pipe found marking a common corner for this parcel, Parcel No. 10, and on line of Parcel No. 11; thence, by and with Parcel No. 11, South 88 degrees 44 minutes 14 seconds West, 109.24 feet to a 3/4" pipe found marking a common corner for this parcel and Parcel No.8; thence, by and with Parcel No. 8, North 09 degrees 53 minutes 14 seconds East, 303.93 feet to a 5/8" re-bar found on the southerly right of way line of County Road No. 548, and marking a common corner for this parcel and Parcel No.8; thence, by and with the southerly right of way of County Road No. 548, North 77 degrees 07 minutes 35 seconds East, 169.87 feet, home to the point and place of beginning, containing 41,958 square feet of land, more or less, with all improvements thereon. Being the same lands and premises which James A. Willey and Greta F. Willey did grant and convey unto Wanda L Glenn by deed dated June 25, 1997 and recorded on June 26, 1997 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book· 2211 Page 3310. Tax Parcel: 5-31-9.00146.00 Property Address: 4258 Horseshoe Drive, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex

PAGE 39 County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 4, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 8, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of WANDA L. GLENN, N/K/A WANDA L. RICE and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 11/9/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, November 21, 2006 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain tract, piece or parcel of land situated, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware bounded and described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a stake on the South side of the highway leading from Blades to Concord at the division line between this land and lands of Muifield Barkley thence running about North 600 feet to the center of the said above mentioned road, thence running about West with said road, 120 feet to Palmer Fitchie line. Thence running about South with

said Fitchie line 600 feet to the other land of these grantors, thence running about East 120 feet to the place of beginning. SUBJECT to all covenants, conditions, easements reservation, and restrictions of record BEING THE SAME LANDS and premises which Anthony Murray, by certain dated September 23, 1997 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 2259, Page 294 did grant and convey to Marguerite P. White in fee. Tax Parcel: 1-32-2.00124.00 & 124.01 Property Address: 2207 Concord Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver's license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before December 4, 2006. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on December 8, 2006 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff's Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MARGUERITE V. WHITE and will be sold by Robert L. Reed, Sheriff 11/9/2tc

FREE CLASSIFIEDS Personal Items for Sale. No Vendors Please.

Call 629-9788


PAGE 40

MORNING STAR

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

Michigan machine keeps the Punkin’ Chunkin’ title The pumpkin hurling machine Second Amendment of Howell, Mich., earned a year's worth of bragging rights and a funny-looking wooden trophy when it retained its title at the 2006 World Punkin Chunkin championship on Sunday, Nov. 5. The Second Amendment air cannon shot a pumpkin 3,870.58 feet through the skies at the chunking site near Millsboro, plopping the pumpkin down at the back end of the Hurdle family corn field for a less than glorious demise. Second Amendment won last year's title with a shot that went 4331.72 feet, first in 2003 with 4,434.28 feet and first in 2002 with 3,881.54 feet. The following are the results from this year's competition: Adult Air, first - Second Amendment, Howell, Mich., 3,870.58; second - Fire & Ice, Preston, Md., 3,646.20; third - Old Glory, Georgetown, 3,632.59 Adult Centrifugal, first - Bad to the Bone, Milton, 2,737.69; second - DeTerminator, Lewes, 1,097.68; third - J.D. Lazarus, Milton, 935.17 Adult Catapult, first - Fibonacci Unlimited II, Weymouth, Mass., 2,020.43; second - Sir Chunks-A-Lot, Berlin, N.J., 1,948.27; third - Hypertension, Prince Frederick, Md., 1,727.44 Adult Trebuchet, first - Yankee Siege, Greenfield, N.H., 1,476.52; second - King Arthur, Leesburg, Va., 1,116.52; third -

Morgana, Frankford, 757.96 Adult Human Powered, first - Gene's Machine, Newark, 1,466.82; second Pumpkin Slayer, Durham, N.C., 1,273.24; third - Mischief Knights, Maine, 1,271.13 Adult Torsion, first - Chucky II, Washington Township, N.J., 2.020.76; second Onager, Durham, N.C., 1,302.17; third Mista Ballista, Farmingham, Mass., 670.18 Youth Air, first - Ozone Blaster, Georgetown, 3,718.51; second - Snot Rocket, Federalsburg, Md., 2,933.93; third - Little Blasters, Ellendale, 2,653.11 Youth Catapult, first - Tremors, Harbeson, 794.62; second - Punkin Pi, New Egypt, N.J., 232.68; third - Agent Orange, Virginia Beach, Va. Youth Trebuchet, first - Punkin Whipper, New Fairfield, Conn., 729.18; second - Troop 6, Brick, N.J., 589.62; third - Arbiter, Hockessin, 587.92 Youth Human Powered, first - Failed Negotiations, Gurney, Ill., 853.46; second - Jack-O-Splatter, Islip, N.Y., 691.75; third - Bob's Your Uncle, Crozet, Va., 512.66 10 and Under Catapult, first - Jersey Devil, Wall, N.J., 248.54; second - Little Liberty, Milford, 218.47 10 and Under Trebuchet, first - Sister Slinger, Thetford, Vt., 459.14

In addition to the time-honored tradition of hurling gourds in Sussex County skies, the 2006 World Championship Punkin Chunkin offered food, entertainment and activities for families. Pictured here are The Hat Guys/Hat Artists Gary Cooper, left, and Andy Cooper of Eden, Md., displaying their wares. They designed these hats specifically for Punkin Chunkin.

Solid Waste has yard waste program The Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) has increased the size of its curbside recycling yard waste bags and implemented a “pay as you throw” yard waste program for its premium curbside recycling customers for yard trimmings each spring and fall. Premium curbside customers currently pay $9 per month for weekly pick up of recyclables and up to four bags of yard waste. Customers may purchase stickers to place on additional bags of yard waste that

exceed the four bag per week maximum, allowing for pick up of these additional bags. Stickers cost $1 each and may be purchased through the DSWA administrative offices. Current premium curbside customers can expect to receive two complimentary stickers by mail. To sign up for curbside recycling, purchase stickers, or to get more information about any of DSWA’s programs, call the citizens’ response line at 800-404-7080.

Mondays - KIDS EAT FREE Tuesdays - ALL YOU CAN EAT SPAGHETTI Certain restrictions apply. See store for details.

pizza, pasta, salads, subs, appetizers

BUY ANY ENTREE GET SECOND

1/2 OFF

Limit 1 per order. Not valid with other offers. Expires 11/30/06.

Walmart Shopping Center Rt. 13, Seaford, DE

302

628-5336

DINE-IN CARRY OUT


MORNING STAR

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PAGE 41

Laurel Star Sports

CATS AND DOGS- Delmar’s Lindsay Lloyd hits the ball on the run as Kristina Ward, Alison Bloodsworth, Twila McCrea, and Mallory Elliott look on during last week’s game in Delmar. More pictures on page 44. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel’s Elijah DeShields carries the ball as Delmar’s Isaac Austin looks to make the tackle during last Wednesday’s Mitey Mite bowl game. Photo by Mike McClure

LAUREL SENIORS- Shown (l to r) are the Laurel varsity football team’s seniors: front- Jeremy Bagwell, Ben Lloyd, Antwon Trimball; back- head coach Ed Manlove, John Ray, Scott Hall, Trent Passwaters, and Taylor Jones. Not pictured is senior Danny Snyder. The Bulldogs will play their final game of the season this Friday night against rival Seaford. Laurel is 4-5 going into the game after last week’s win by forfeit over Lake Forest. Photo by Pat Murphy

Wildcats advance to 9-0 with 48-12 home win over Smyrna

Delmar’s Konner Dykes is shown looking to turn the corner as Delmar’s Alex Moore (53) and Laurel’s Colin Bergh (31) and Anthony Ash (63) look on during last Wednesday night’s Mitey Mite bowl game. Photo by Mike McClure

Laurel, Delmar Pop Warner Mitey Mite teams meet in annual bowl game Last Wednesday the Laurel Mitey Mites defeated the Delmar Mitey Mites by the score 13-6 in the third annual bowl game under the lights at Bulldog stadium. Laurel’s offense was led by Johnny McGinnis who had 14 rushes for 122 yards, Trent Hearn had six rushes for 66 yards, and Elijah DeShields, who had seven rushes for 21 yards. Laurel touchdowns were scored by Trent Hearn and Johnny McGinnis and the PAT was by McGinnis as well. Laurel’s defense was led by Johnny McGinnis who had 12 tackles and two assists, Alyzjah Kellam who had 10 tackles and four assists, Ethan Cahall with three tackles and five assists, and Alan Lubinecki who recorded three tackles and two assists. Christian Murphy and Colin Bergh both had three tackles. Delmar’s Isaac Austin scored his team’s touchdown in the third quarter. Logan Thomas recovered a fumble in the final quarter for the Wildcats.

The Delmar varsity football team won its final home game of the regular season in convincing fashion with a 48-12 victory over Smyrna last Friday night. Delmar (9-0) will travel to Bridgeville for the annual Kiwanis Bowl game with Woodbridge (6-3) this Friday night (kickoff at 7:30 p.m.). The Wildcats scored the first two touchdowns of Friday’s game as senior Marquis Leatherbury (98 yards rushing) had a 60-yard touchdown run and an 18-yard return on a fumble recovery. Seth Benson added a pair of extra points to make it 14-0 with 8:37 left in the first quarter. Smyrna came back with a touchdown on an 18-yard pass play from David Brower to B.J. Prince, but Delmar ended the first quarter with a touchdown on a 78-yard pass from senior quarterback Alan Preston (two completions for 96 yards) to Kerry King to make it 21-6 following Benson’s PAT. Senior speedster Jenson Dennard had a 91-yard touchdown run with 11:35 to go in the half in his first game back after injuring his arm against Dover in a week three win. Justin Thomas scored on a two-yard run and King added a 77-yard punt return for a touchdown. Benson added two more extra points as the Wildcats led, 41-6, at the half. Tevin Jackson capped Delmar’s scoring with a 16-yard touchdown run in the third quarter. Benson’s sixth PAT gave the ‘Cats a 48-6 lead before the Eagles added a fourth quarter touchdown with 40 seconds left to make it 48-12. Taylor Ballard had six carries for 28 yards and one reception for 18 yards. The Cats had 22 carries for 282 yards and four touchdowns. Jackson added an interception and Benson booted six extra points.


MORNING STAR

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

Laurel Stars of the Week

PAGE 43

Laurel Pop Warner Pee Wee team continues quest for Super Bowl berth With a very boisterous crowd of red and white clad fans from Laurel, the Laurel Pop Warner Pee Wee program continued in its quest for the program’s first Super Bowl appearance ever with a convincing 28-0 victory over the St. Mary’s Titans from Mechanicsville, Md., last Sunday at Wesley College in Dover. Laurel scored first with Bryce Bristow completing a four-yard pass to Kegan Yossick for the touchdown. After St. Mary’s went three and out the Bulldogs scored three plays later with Kegan Yossick scoring from five yards out for his second touchdown of the day and Colby Daye made an outstanding catch for the extra point. Shawn Miller scored from one yard out in the third quarter with Bryce Bristow throwing the extra point pass to Brandon Scott. Zach Whaley scored from two yards out for the Bulldogs’ final score with Colby Daye kicking the extra point (two points). The Bulldog defense also played an outstanding game allowing the Titans a stunning minus seven yards of total offense. Miller had 10 carries for 101 yards, Yossick gained 42 yards rushing on six carries, Christian Ellsworth had seven carries for 32 yards, and Whaley had two carries for nine yards. Bristow completed four of eight passes for 22 yards with Whaley hauling in two passes for 21 yards. Yossick had five tackles and a sack, Jeremy Eure recorded four tackles, Jerron Tull added three tackles and an interception, Dylan Bunner made three stops, and Daylin McCausland had two tackles and a fumble recovery. Devin Collins, Whaley, Scott, Ellsworth, and Derek Eskridge added two tackles each. Shawn Miller, Tarez White, Devin Burke, Jacob Carney, Kenneth Hearn, Bobby Townley, Ryan Koesters, and Shawn O’Neal had one tackle apiece. Laurel will play the Southeast Titans (D.C.) in the next round of the Eastern Regionals. The place, time, and date is to be determined.

Delmar Youth Basketball League signups are this Saturday Male Athlete of the WeekMarquis Leatherbury- Delmar

Female Athlete of the WeekNicole Mahoney- Sussex Tech

Delmar senior Marquis Leatherbury scampered for 98 yards and a touchdown on just four carries in the Wildcats’ win last week. Leatherbury, a transfer from James M. Bennett, also had a fumble recovery and an 18-yard return for a touchdown.

Sussex Tech senior Nicole Mahoney placed first in the Sussex County meet last Tuesday. She followed that performance up with a second place finish in the Henlopen Conference meet last Saturday.

Honorable mention- Haley Keenan- Delmar; Maribeth Beach- Delmar; Tia Black- Sussex Tech; Ellen Rowe- Sussex Tech; Brittany Joseph- Sussex Tech; Jared Rittenhouse- Delmar; Alan Preston- Delmar; Kerry King- Delmar; David Ricksecker- Sussex Tech; Tom Ford- Sussex Tech

CONGRATULATES

THE ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

SEAFORD 629-6003 LAUREL 875-4477

HOURS: SEAFORD 5:30 AM - 11 PM LAUREL 10 AM - 10 PM

Laurel Pop Warner Midget football team opens Regionals with win The Laurel Pop Warner Midget Bulldogs opened up the Division 2 Eastern Regional tournament with in impressive 35-6 victory over the St. Mary’s Raiders from Lexington Park. Md., last weekend. The Laurel fans came out in full force as they packed the stands for the young Bulldogs. Laurel drove the ball 70 yards downfield on four plays to start the scoring in the first quarter. Michael Taylor took a sweep around the right end and went 46 yards untouched for the touchdown. Chris Cutsail completed a 19-yard touchdown pass to Jonathan Hitchens as Laurel drove 46 yards on three plays for a 16-0 advantage. Brandon Collins ran five yards around the right end for the Bulldogs’ third touchdown of the first quarter. Laurel’s Ryan Hearn capped a six play, 55-yard drive with a five-yard touchdown run in the second quarter as the Bulldogs took a 30-0 lead into half-time. Nick Munoz added a 17-yard touchdown run off left tackle in the fourth quarter to cap the scoring for Laurel in the 35-6 win. Billy Yossick had four carries for 56 yards, Munoz ran for 54 yards on four carries, Collins had four rushes for 53 yards, and Tyler Robertson added five carries for 38 yards. Frank Braham contributed three carries for 20 yards, Hearn had three carries for 10 yards, and Cutsail completed one of two passes for 19 yards. With the win the Bulldogs extended the unbeaten streak to 33 games and will travel this weekend to somewhere in Maryland to play in the second round of the regional tournament. The Bulldogs will play the Westport Patriots from Washington, D.C. Game time and site TBA. Check the Laurel Pop Warner website for details at www.leagueuplineup.com/laurelpopwarner .

laurelstar.com

The Delmar Youth Basketball League will hold signups on Saturday, Nov. 11 from 10 a.m. to noon at the entrance of Delmar High School. The league is open to boys ages 7-12 and girls ages 7-13. The cost is $20 per child or $30 for a family. You must bring a copy of the child’s birth certificate. Any questions, please call Odell Jones at 846-9544 ext. 141.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy! Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to publisher@laurelstar.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

SIGN UP NOW!

Every child plays Every child learns Every child is a winner An Exciting Basketball League For Boys and Girls Ages 6-11

January ~ February ’07 Season You Get Cool Basketball Gear  Upward Basketball T-shirt  Upward Basketball Jersey  End of season awards & celebration  1 year membership to Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club  Every child gets equal playing time every game

Early registration is $50. Partial scholarships & multi child discounts available Forms can be picked up at Laurel Wesleyan Church Office 875-5380 Monday-Thursday 10:00am-4:00pm & Sunday mornings

Forms also available at the Boys & Girls Clubs in Seaford & Laurel

Deadline for registration is Nov. 20th


PAGE 44

MORNING STAR

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

Delmar Sports Scene By Tommy Young When the Delmar field hockey team shut out Laurel 5-0 last Saturday in their final game of the 2006 season, it gave Coach Linda Budd and this Wildcat team their 13th win of the season against only two defeats and the Division II conference championship again. The Delmar girls scored four times in the first half on goals by Hali Ramey, Katie McMahon, Haley Keenan, and Mallory Elliott. Maribeth Beach scored the only goal of the second half as Coach Budd cleared her bench, and all the girls got a chance to participate in this victory. Now they have to wait to see who they will be playing in the first round of the playoffs. The soccer team came on strong at the end of the season and wound up with a 7-8 record which was not good enough to make the playoffs, but as I said, they did improve as the season progressed; so maybe next year. I saved the football news for last, not because it wasn’t much of a game as far as the score was concerned, Delmar 48- Smyrna 12, but it had some very exciting and interesting things happen during the contest that I would like to make mention of. For instance, it was good to see Jenson Dennard, the Wildcat running back who was having a great season before he was injured early in the season, and it was not sure if he would be back at all. Dennard returned for one play Friday night and made the most of it as he ran 91 yards for a touchdown. Then, there was the longest pass and run play of the season as quarterback Alan Preston hit Kerry King on the dead run, and Kerry scored on the play that covered 78 yards. Marquis Leatherbury also had a good night running for 98 yards and scoring two touchdowns, one on a fumble that he recovered and ran in making the score 41-6 at half-time. Then, it was reserve time; however, they got cheated as for

as playing time was concerned because with the score 41-6, they ran a “fast clock”; in other words, the clock ran all the time except for time outs, injuries, etc. However, they played very well as they only allowed one touchdown and moved the ball very well on offense. In fact, several of the reserves were in the game when the Wildcats scored their final touchdown. This Friday night in their final game of the regular season, the ‘Cats’ will be up against tougher opposition as they travel up to Woodbridge who always gives Delmar a lot of trouble up there, and I don’t expect it to be any different this year. ASSISTS AND ERRORS- The Eastern Shore Baseball Hall of Fame held their annual dinner and induction ceremony at the Delmar VFW banquet hall where a crowd in excess of 230 baseball fans, friends, and relatives of the inductees feasted on beef, chicken, and all the fixings prepared by Percy, other VFW members, and the Ladies Auxiliary of the Post who did a great job as usual. The eight inductees were Pat Morse, Horace Willey, Charles “Buster” Bozman, Bob Lord, Chris Smoot, Neil Helgeson, Sr., Alton Scott, and Freddie Sutton, Jr. Their resumes appeared in last week’s paper, so I am not going to repeat them in this column; however, I will say they all were worthy of the honor bestowed upon them, and their speeches showed how much this honor meant to them. Then Tom Brown, former professional baseball and football player, who has been working with “kids” for the past 30 years and who was our guest speaker, expressed his views regarding athletes of today from childhood to the professional ranks. He was very outspoken regarding what is happening in sports today, and I thought he did a very good job.

Delmar’s Mallory Elliott, left, looks to move the ball against Laurel’s Kelsey Gordy during the Wildcats’ 5-0 win in the final regular season game last week. Photo by Mike McClure

CATS VS. DOGS- Shown above, Delmar senior Caitlyn Twilley, left, and Laurel’s Chelsea Espenlaub go for ball during last week’s game in Delmar. Laurel senior Kate Downes hits the ball as teammate Kristina Ward looks on during the Bulldogs’ final game of the season. Photos by Mike McClure

Shown (l to r) are the 2006 Eastern Shore Hall of Fame Inductees who were honored last Saturday in Delmar: front- Horace Willey, Freddie Sutton, Jr., Neil Helgeson, Sr., Linwood Scott for Alton Scott, Mary Ellen Larrimore for Bob Lord; back- Charles “Buster” Bozman, Chris Smoot, Pat Morse, and Thomas Lord for Bob Lord. Photo by Pat Murphy


MORNING STAR

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PAGE 45

Sussex Tech field hockey team opens state tournament on the road The Sussex Tech varsity field hockey opens the state tournament on the road with a possible quarterfinal showdown with Delmar. The Ravens’ stats and schedule follows: Sussex Tech- 9-4 conference, 2-1 non-conference, 11-5 overall Vs. playoff teams- 1-5 Home- 5-3, Away- 6-2 Most wins in a row- 7 Goals- Tia Black 15, Brittany Joseph 12, Ellen Rowe 5, Sara Adams 3, Lindsay Danz 2, Rebecca McMillan 1 Playoff schedule- Wednesday, Nov. 8- Sussex Tech (#12) at William Penn (#5); Saturday, Nov. 11- winner vs. winner of Tatnall (#13) and Delmar (#4) in quarterfinals (at higher seed); Wednesday, Nov. 15 semifinals at Rullo Stadium

Delmar’s Maribeth Beach prepares to take a shot on goal as teammate Lindsay Lloyd and Laurel’s Dametra Hammond and Jenna Cahall look on. Beach scored her first goal of the season on the play to help the Wildcats to a 5-0 win last Tuesday. Photo by Mike McClure

Delmar field hockey team set to host first round game as fourth seed The Delmar varsity field hockey team hosts a first round state playoff game this week. The team’s 2006 stats and info on the tourney follows: Delmar- 11-2 conference, 3-0 non-conference, 14-2 overall Vs. playoff teams- 3-2 Home- 6-1, Away- 8-1 Most wins in a row- 7 Goals- Katie McMahon 22, Alison Bloodsworth 17, Hali Ramey 8, Mallory Elliott 5, Erin Tingle 3, Emily Lietzan 2, Lindsay Lloyd 2, Brittani Scott 1, Maribeth Beach 1 Playoff schedule- Wednesday, Nov. 8- Tatnall (#13) at Delmar (#4); Saturday, Nov. 11- winner vs. winner of Sussex Tech (#12) and William Penn (#5) (at higher seed); Wednesday, Nov. 15 semifinals at Rullo Stadium

Delmar’s Craig Miller is brought down by Laurel’s Alyzjah Kellam during last week’s Mitey Mite game between the two teams. Photo by Mike McClure

Registration being held for Upwards Basketball league Sign up now for the Upwards basketball 2007 season which will take place in January and February. Upwards basketball league is open to boys and girls ages 6-11. Early registration is available at a cost of $50. Forms can be picked up at the Laurel Wesleyan church office (8755380) Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday mornings. Forms are also available at the Boys and Girls clubs in Seaford and Laurel. After Nov. 7 add $10 to the registration cost. Deadline to register is Nov. 20.

Delmar soccer falls to Sussex Central in final game The Delmar varsity soccer team fell to 7-6 in Henlopen Conference play and 7-8 overall with a 2-0 loss to Sussex Central last Wednesday. Jared Rittenhouse made 11 saves in goal for the Wildcats in their final game of the season.

1316120

Sussex Tech’s Tiamia Black, left, goes for the ball during her team’s game against Polytech earlier this season. Black and fellow senior Brittany Joseph of Laurel led the Ravens in scoring during the regular season. Sussex Tech opens the state tournament on the road this week. Photo by Mike McClure


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MORNING STAR

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PACKERS- Shown (l to r) is the SDPR 9-12 year-old Flag Football champion Packers which went undefeated in regular season games: back row- Coach Terry Handy, Kate Schroeder, Tynetta Washington, Joshua Rump, Zach Hill, Matt Rosas, Wesley Wooten, and Coach Aubrey Jernigan; front row- Taylor Ewing, Nathan Justice, Aubrey Jernigan, Hamilton Schlabach, and Tawn Beard Jr.

RAVENS’ FOOTBALL- Sussex Tech assistant coach Ron Dickerson talks things over with Raven quarterback Zach Adkins during last Friday’s home contest with Milford. See Sussex Tech story on page 47. Photo by David Elliott

SDPR Cardinals move to 3-0 with 37-19 win over Rams Four different Cardinals’ running backs scored touchdowns Saturday as the Cards moved to 3-0 with a 37-19 win over the Rams in Seaford Department of Parks and Recreation football. Quarterback Dominique Horsey scored three touchdowns on runs of 19, 29, and 65 yards. He now has six touchdowns on the year. Horsey rushed for a total of 125 yards and was 1-for-4 passing for three yards. Dajon Copes scored his third touchdown of the season with a 57-yard run in the first quarter. Hassan Mitchell scored his first touchdown of the season on a 70-yard run in the first quarter. Eric Peterson scored his first touchdown on a 54-yard scamper to put the game out of reach in the third quarter. Justin Sockriter also caught his third pass of the season.

C & D Plumbing, LLC RAIDERS AND RAVENS- Woodbridge’s Sarah Judy, left, and Sussex Tech’s Rebecca McMillan chase the ball as Woodbridge’s Liz Walk and Sussex Tech’s Jara Pugh look on during last Wednesday’s game in Bridgeville. Photo by Mike McClure

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FLAG FOOTBALLShown (l to r) is the Woodbridge Seniors/Sophomores powder puff football team: top rowAndreah Smith, H e a t h e r Solomon, Ashley Nichols, Erika Knox, Tiandra Felix, Coach Preston Grace, Cierra Williams, Jessica Evans, Grace Reardon, Morgan Willey; bottom rowLindsey Cook, Kameesha C h a n d l e r, Vykeia Briddell, B r i t t a n y Cephas, Sarah Swain, and Tiara Massey.

Seniors, sophomores win first annual Woodbridge powder puff game in overtime The seniors/sophomores (red team) emerged victorious over the juniors/freshman (yellow team) in the first annual Woodbridge powder puff football game, 12-6 in overtime. The seniors/sophomores took the lead 6-0 on a touchdown by Tiandra Felix, which was the only score in regulation until the last seven seconds. As time expired in the fourth quarter, Ayonna Maddox scored a dramatic touchdown to tie the game at 6-6. Both conversions were no good. In overtime, the game would be decided by each team receiving four plays from the 10 yard line. The juniors/freshman were denied on the opening series. Then on the first play of overtime for the seniors/sophomores, Grace Reardon scored the winning touchdown, making the final score 12-6.

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MORNING STAR

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PAGE 47

Raven Roundup- Ravens fall in final football conference game By Mike McClure

Sussex Tech’s Jara Pugh has the ball as Woodbridge’s Heather Solomon, right, defends during last week’s game. Photo by Mike McClure

See late breaking sports news on page 48, only in the Star.

Woodbridge’s Chelsea Collison has the ball on a break during her team’s home loss to Sussex Tech last Wednesday. Photo by Mike McClure

Sussex Tech’s Kelsey Harmon dribbles the ball during last week’s game in Bridgeville which was won by the Ravens, 5-0. Photo by Mike McClure

The Sussex Tech varsity football team lost to Milford, 24-14, in the team’s final Henlopen Conference game last Friday night. The Ravens spotted Milford a 10-0 lead on a safety and a touchdown and two-point conversion in Sussex Tech’s Homecoming game. Tyrone Hickman scored on a 70-yard touchdown run as the Ravens moved within three (107) going into half-time. The Bucs scored a pair of touchdowns in the third quarter for a 24-7 advantage. The Ravens bounced back with a one-yard touchdown run by Jamar Beckett late in the game, but Milford won, 24-14. Sussex Tech hosts Polytech this Thursday in the final game of the season. Mahoney places second in conference- Sussex Tech’s Nicole Mahoney (19:48) placed second in the Henlopen Conference cross country meet last Saturday as the Lady Ravens placed sixth. David Ricksecker (17:37) came in eighth and Tom Ford (17:41) placed ninth for the Ravens, who placed third in the boys’ race. The state meet will take place this Saturday at Killens Pond.

Sussex Tech’s Tyrone Hickman busts loose on a run against Milford last Friday night. Hickman had a 70-yard touchdown run in the Ravens’ Homecoming loss. Photo by David Elliott


PAGE 48

MORNING STAR

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

The Sussex Tech varsity football team takes the field during its Homecoming game against Milford last Friday. Photo by David Elliott F I N A L GAME-

Woodbridge running backs Jordan Wescott, left, and Josh Quinones enter the final game of the season leading in the Henlopen Conference in scoring. The Raiders host Delmar this Friday. Photo by Mike McClure

The Seaford varsity field hockey team does a final cheer and shares a hug following its final game last week, a narrow loss to top seeded Cape Henlopen.

Duo leads conference in scoring, help pace Raiders Senior laden line paves the way for Wescott, Quinones By Mike McClure The Woodbridge Raiders haven’t throw the ball very often this season, but the inside-out combination of Jordan Wescott and Josh Quinones has been able to stretch opposing defenses. That combined with the efforts of an experienced group of blockers has led to the dynamic duo leading the Henlopen Conference in scoring going into the final game (at home against the Henlopen South leading Delmar Wildcats) this Friday night. “Jordan powers it and gives me an opportunity to run outside,” freshman back Josh Quinones said. “Without a line you don’t do anything,” added the senior Wescott. Senior offensive lineman Mike Mullett credited the aggressive running of Wescott for the offense’s success. Junior lineman Keyondre Crump added that Wescott bounces off tackles, while senior end Vondel Foreman said the speedy Quinones is able to hit the edge. Through the first eight games Wescott had 199 carries for 1,401 yards (7.1) and 14 touchdowns. He added one reception for nine yards and five kickoff returns for 173 yards (34.6) for a total of 1,583 allpurpose yards. Quinones entered last Friday’s game against Polytech with 54 carries for 935 yards (17.3) and 13 touchdowns. He also had 12 kickoff returns for 398 yards (34.0) and two touchdowns with 1,341 all-purpose yards. “It’s just a matter of hard work. We have some talented players, but talent doesn’t work if you don’t have people who are willing to work hard,” Woodbridge head coach John Parker said. “It’s (the one-two combination) something we haven’t had in the past. With our speed this year we’ve been able the stretch them (opposing defenses).” Parker called Wescott “a stud up the middle”, adding that senior Kegan Miller had added almost 500 yards rushing to Wescott and Quinones’ efforts. Miller plays all over the field for the Raiders and is the team’s punter. While the Raider runner “stats speak for themselves”, Parker also gives credit to his senior laden offensive line which includes seniors Mullett, Tyler Smack,

Photo by Gene Bleile

Delmar, Sussex Tech field hockey games postponed until Thursday The Delmar and Sussex Tech field hockey playoff games scheduled for Wednesday, Nov. 8 have been postponed due to rain. Delmar hosts Tatnall on Thursday, Nov. 9 at 2:30 p.m. while Sussex Tech visits William Penn (time TBA) on Thursday.

Laurel Pop Warner Pee Wee, Midget football teams play Saturday The Laurel Pop Warner Pee Wee and Midget football teams continue Eastern Regional play this Saturday at Friendly High School in Fort Washington, Maryland. The Pee Wee team faces the Southeast Titans at 9 a.m. with the Midget team taking on the Westport Patriots at 11 a.m.

Henlopen Conference football leading scorers (week nine) Name

Woodbridge senior offensive lineman Mike Mullett looks to make a block during the Raiders’ game against Polytech last week. Mullett is part of a senior laden offensive line which has helped pave the way for the Raider running game. Photo by Mike McClure

Bryan Melvin, Foreman, and James Jones; junior Crump; and sophomore Jorge Young. “They’ve done a nice job. They’ve become more physical as the season’s gone along, said Parker. The seniors said their final season has gone by fast and has included some adversity. The team lost close games to Colonel Richardson (now a win by forfeit) and Milford early in the season before bouncing back to record a 6-3 record going into the season finale. “Coach helped us out a lot getting our minds focussed,” Melvin said. “After that first win we found out what we could do,” added Wescott. The seniors entered the season knowing they had to step up and be leaders for the younger players.

1. Jordan Wescott 2. Josh Quinones 3. Darshon Adkins Isaiah Brisco 5. Perry Townsend 6. Jeremy Milner 7. Alan Hill 8. Isiah Phillips 9. C.J. Bell 10. My’keal Purnell

School

TD

FG

extra pt

2-pt

Points

14 15 13 11 12 11 10 9 0 8

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 25 0

2 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0

92 90 78 78 72 66 60 54 49 48

Woodbridge Woodbridge Sussex Central Cape Henlopen Indian River Caesar Rodney Milford Indian River Sussex Central Seaford

“The seniors know what it’s like to have a losing season. We didn’t want to go out on a losing note,” Melvin said. “They (seniors) helped me out with the way I play and my attitude,” said Quinones. “They taught me how to grow up and go out there and play football,” Young added. Like most varsity programs at small schools, the Raiders have to play many players on both sides of the ball, something that can be tiring for the athletes. “That’s when you just have to learn how to suck it up,” Wescott said. Wescott leads to Raider defense with 66 solo tackles, 52 assists, two interceptions, two fumbles caused, and three fumble recoveries (through eight games). As for the offensive line, while the lineman rarely get a chance to run the ball in the end zone themselves, they take

Jordan Wescott career stats 2006- 199 carries for 1,401 yards and 14 touchdowns, five kickoff returns for 173 yards, two interceptons, three fumble recoveries (through eight games) 2005- 155 carries for 921 yards and nine touchdowns, eight kickoff returns for 170 yards and a touchdown 2004- 211 carries for 1252 yards and nine touchdowns, four interceptions 2003- 80 carries for 336 yards career- 645 carries for 3,910 yards and 32 rushing TDs, 381 total tackles great pride when the backs score after running through a hole they created. “When you know your block was the key block and you look back and see them score, that’s all the glory you need,” said Wescott, a sentiment echoed by the rest of the Raider offensive line.


MORNING STAR

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PAGE 49

Seaford Bowling Lanes Friday Trios High games and series Stan Howell 268, 648 Evelyn Gilbert 234, 626

Friday Night Mix Ups High games and series Russ Lebernight 305 Lee Willey 740 Darlene Beachamp 274 Ronell Brown 712

Baby Blue Jays High games and series Shane Hallbrook 172 Brandon Hallbrook 331 Becca Ingraham 161 Karina Darling 161, 321

Thurs. Nite Mixers High games and series Derek Bowman 282 John Crouch 770 Audrey Roberts 244

Roxanne Covington 672

Doris Barron George Bramble

Nite Owl

Mardel ABC

High games and series Steve Martin 271, 719

High games and series Steve Wroten 320 Richard Truitt 818

Christian Fellowship

281, 772 293, 811

Tues. AM Mixed

High games and series Wendy Lowe 242 Lori Armes 639 Adam Pusey 256 Mark Melson 700

High games and series Shirley Bennett 226 Ginger Saxton 616 Mike Baker 246, 614

Seaford City

High games and series C.J. Ellis 236, 670 Jenna Cottet 225, 594

High games and series Gene Damen 325 J.R. Bennett 773

Sunday Special High games and series Eric Wagoner 293 Gary Smith 715 Lori Dean 263 Aimee Bennett 694

Senior Express High games and series Jean Hendrickson 276 June Long 774 Patrick Curran 312 Eddie Greene 789

Weds. AM Mixed High games and series

Star

Eastern Shore Men High games and series Brian Atkins 295 David Spicer 764

Club 50 High games and series Alma Musser 272, 750 Les Elliott 306, 812

Young Adults High games and series Keith Parlier 241 Aaron Robinson 635 Katelyn Cottet 250, 656

Sunday Nite Mixed High games and series Maurice Duncan 301 Glen Littleton 778 Heather French 258, 732

Woodbridge grad Jerilyn Idler is shown in the ODACchampionship game in Greensboro, North Carolina. Idler’s Virginia Wesleyan team defeated Guilford College, 2-0. Idler had a goal against Roanoake in the quarterfinals and an assist in her team’s win over previously unbeaten Washington and Lee. The NCAA championships begin this weekend with Virginia Wesleyan facing Newport News.

Shown above is Lexi Ullman, daughter of Ron and Tina Ullman of Laurel, after winning first place in the local, district, and state Elks Soccer Shoot contests. Lexi will be representing the Seaford Elk Lodge in the Elk Regional contest in Hagerstown, MD in March. If she wins there she will go to the nationals. Lexi won her awards in the U-8 division.

Woodbridge’s Dan Cabrera recorded a pair of sacks and blocked a kick during the Raiders’ non-conference loss to Polytech last Friday in Bridgeville. Woodbridge hosts Delmar in the final regular season game of the season. Photo by Mike McClure

SDPR to hold registration for youth winter sports programs The Seaford Department of Parks Recreation is holding signups for the following winter sports programs: Little Wrestlers- The Little Wrestlers program for ages 6-12 will run form mid November through March. Wrestlers can register at the SDPR office. The cost is $20 and the deadline to sign up is Nov. 16. Junior Jordan Basketball Clinic- The Junior Jordan Basketball Clinic is open to boys and girls in grades K-3. The clinic will take place Saturday mornings in January at Fred Douglas with the basic fundamentals being stressed. The cost is $5 and the deadline to register is Dec. 29.

Gethsemane Church sponsors Second Annual Race for Faith on November 18

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The Gethsemane United Methodist Church near Reliancewill be sponsoring their Second Annual “Race for Faith” on Saturday, Nov. 18 at 9:00 am at the Woodland Ferry, near Seaford. The certified 5K race proceeds will go towards the ‘40 days of Community,” which is also sponsored by the church. Pre-registration fee will be $15 for adults and $10 for students. If you register the day of the event, the cost will be $20. The first 100 registered runners will receive a free tee shirt. The day of the race, registration will begin at 8:00 am and will be run regardless of bad weather. Highlights of the event day will include: drawings, door prizes and refreshments, a one mile contemplative prayer walk, which is free to all participants, a certified 5K Course and of course fun and fellowship. Prizes will be awarded to the following groups: an award to the top overall male and female winners and master’s winners; age group awards to the top three finishers in 11 and below, 12-14,15-19,20-29,3039, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69 and 70 and above.The race coordinators will be Kelly and Rachael Carey. For additional information on how to pre-register, please call 302-629-5588 or e-mail at rcarey03@comcast.com

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MITEY MITE BOWL- Members of the Laurel and Delmar Pop Warner Mitey Mite football teams pose for a picture during the annual bowl game between the two teams. Photo by Mike McClure

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PAGE 50

MORNING STAR

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

Snapshots

FOOD FOR THE HUNGRY - Jerry Lynch, Jim Masten and Noble Grand Arnold Hearn of Charity Lodge #27 IOOF load up the canned goods that were collected during the haunted house the lodge sponsored. The food will go to the Good Samaritan Shop in Laurel.

GETTING THE BABY VOTE - Doug and Hope Larson leave North Laurel Elementary School after voting in Tuesday’s election. With them is their 2-week-old daughter, Holly, who made her first trip to the polls. Photo by Pat Murphy

BUSINESS PERSON OF THE YEAR - Debbie Mitchell, a member of the Laurel Chamber of Commerce board, gives Laurel Business Person of the Year John Theofiles a plaque during the Nov. 6 dinner honoring him. See next week’s paper for a story about the ceremony. Photo by Pat Murphy

CITIZEN OF THE YEAR - Sussex County Councilman Vance Phillips, left, was one of several local politicians to pay homage to Delmar Citizen of the Year John McDonnell during last week’s banquet in Delmar. See story, page 5. Photo by Mike McClure


PAGE 50

MORNING STAR âœł NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

Snapshots

Jude Dean, 20 months old Photos by David Elliott

Halloween Party costume winners Following are the winners and runners up for the Seaford Halloween Parade: Age 0-3: Most original - Landon Shockley and Kendrick Pickin Paugh. Funniest - Miranoa Moore, Sadie

Phoenix Dean, three years old

Jeffrey Twilley with dog Teddy

Christhile. Scariest - Trisian Ruarb, Jonathan Berdon. Age 4-7 Most original - Colden Fees, Brian Pimento. Funniest - Dayton Grove, Jordon Kintey. Scariest - Mathen Guy, Kevin Berdo.

Age 8-12 Most original - Martissa Gramum, Darien Shockley. Funniest - Kimberly Leller, Zack Wample. Scariest - Kelsee Moore, Linsey Downing. Age 13 and up -

BRIDGEVILLE LIONS CLUB ANNUAL HALLOWEEN PARTY - The Bridgeville Lions Club, with the assistance of the Bridgeville Lioness club, held its annual Halloween Party for the neighborhood children in Bridgeville Park. The Lions Club provided treats and apple

Seaford Bluejays 4-H Club starting a busy, new year The Seaford Bluejays 4-H Club were excited to start off another great year. We elected new officers for 20062007; they are: Zachary Cannon, president; Nathan Bradley, vice president; Shannon Bradley, secretary; Maggie Durig, treasurer; Madelyn Gilbert, reporter. Achievement night was a great success.

Nathan Bradley received awards for Dog, Food and Nutrition, Judging, and a $10 coupon for camp. Shannon Bradley received awards in Exploring 4-H, Fashion Revue, Judging, Demonstration, Top Award Trophy for Exploring 4-H, alternate for younger member weekend scholarship and a $10 coupon for camp. Zachary Cannon received awards in Exploring 4-H and Demonstration and a $10 coupon for camp. Maggie Durig received a $10 coupon for camp.

Autumn Kessler, 14 years old

Most original - Autumn Kessler, Humphy Guy. Funniest - Mathow Zollon, Pruea Zollon. Scariest - Bradley Mackler, Joyce Mackler. Overall Prettiest - Carolyn Burket. Best appearing group - Nathan Austin, Tamtum Austin, Auros Austin.

cider for the kids and their parents and held a contest for the "Best Costume." Three winners were chosen. Over 200 children attended the festivities.

Madelyn Gilbert received an award for Clothing & Textiles. Katyanna Kerr received an award for Exploring 4-H and a $10 coupon for camp. Jacalyn Bradley and Janelle Koski received their 5-year leader pin. Our club won the County Horse Show Award sponsored by the Taylor family for having the largest percentage of members sell a Horse Show ad. The award sponsors a Horse Show trophy for the club the next year. We also won a $25 gift certificate to

the National 4-H Supply Catalog for having 100 percent of its members hand in County Record Books sponsored by the Taylor family. Our club sponsored a scholarship to Junior Leader Weekend in memory of Steve Cooper, a former Bluejay member. Our club earned a Blue Seal for its charter. 4-H is a community of young people across America who are learning leadership, citizenship and life skills. If you are interested call 856-7303.


MORNING STAR

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PAGE 51

Giants of the community Doing the Towns Together are honored by Nanticoke LAUREL AND DELMAR SOCIALS Sarah Marie Trivits . 875-3672

Every community in this nation has certain things in common. There is always a house of worship, some just one room wile others are huge complexes with many rooms, large dining areas, a fully outfitted kitchen, and educational centers. Communities large or small have a town center, a grocery store that might be as small as a few shelves and a refrigerator in a small building to a huge supercenter. Schools range from one large room to huge complexes that are almost as large as a college campus. And, every community, no matter how large or small, has giants. Not the huge, fierce giants of fables or fairy tales. But, the real, honest-to-goodness people who are our neighbors, our family members, or the man-next-door. Three giants of the Laurel-Seaford area and surrounding communities were recognized for their endeavors and contributions to their fellowman at the second annual Tributes for Health-care Leadership banquet last week. Nanticoke Health Services, once known simply as Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, paid tribute to the late John W. Lynch M.D., the late Karl Kinder Brown Sr., Dr. Judith G. Tobin M.D., and the Auxiliary of Nanticoke Health Services. Each of those honored played a major role in the development of Nanticoke Hospital and all of its tributaries. Dr. Jack Lynch, Seaford dentist, and his sister, Norma Jean Fowler, librarian and wife of Ned of Laurel, were on hand to receive the presentation to their late father. Dr. Lynch, a native of Georgetown, was one of the founders of the original 32bed Nanticoke Hospital in 1952. He served as the second chief of staff and was well-known for his “legendary sense of humor.” It was my great privilege to be a patient of his for a brief period years ago during a particularly stressful time in my life. I have never forgotten his kindness and caring concern. Karl Kinder Brown Sr., was born and raised in Seaford. In accepting the tribute to his dad, Karl Jr. told of how his father began his life in the every simplest of circumstances, worked hard and became president of the First National Bank of Seaford. Brown Sr. was one of the leaders who rallied businessmen to develop firm

Moments with Mike Virginia ‘Mike’ Barton plans for a hospital to serve the needs of the communities in this area. Karl Brown was a gentle man, a gentleman, and a giant in the life of this area of Sussex. It was my distinct pleasure to have known him, and I say that with great pride. Dr. Judith G. Tobin, 80, is like the Energizer bunny. She keeps on going and going and going. Dr. Judy, as she is known, entered the field of medicine in the days when very few women were admitted to medical school. She has held numerous health-related board positions, and her dedication is well-known, as is her humor. She has received numerous awards in her professional life and for public service. In 1984, this mother of six was named Delaware’s “Mother of the Year.” Widowed early in her married life, and with her young brood, she chose to remain in Seaford. She and her family are well-known in the community. Her wonderful sense of humor could get her a job as a master of ceremonies at any time. Nanticoke Auxiliary has been in action for more than 56 years and was organized and active before the hospital opened its doors. The 153 members provide an unbelievable amount of volunteer hours every year to Nanticoke, along with more than $2 million since its inception. I am very proud to be not only a member of this organization but also a past president — twice. All of our communities have giants as residents. Some are quiet giants, some more visible. But, many are friends and neighbors just like you and me. These people, who give hours and hours of their time to help others, are a major force in the growth of our communities and the life of each of us. There is always a need for giants. You can be a giant, too.

Let’s begin our column this week with something really new. Doug and Hope Messick Larson announce the arrival of their new little girl, Holly Marie, born Friday, Oct. 20, weighing 8 pounds, 9 ounces and measuring 21 inches. When she arrived at her home on Brooklyn Avenue, she was welcomed by her two older brothers, Jacob and Jason. Holly’s maternal grandparents are Joe and Phyllis Messick of Laurel and her paternal grandparents are Dennis and Leone Larson from Minnesota. Not so new but still going strong, the Red Hat group “The Lunch Bunch,” headed by chief hatter (not wearing feathers) Karen Hitch, will have their monthly breakfast at the Dutch Inn on Saturday, Nov. 11. On Nov. 13 to Grotto’s Pizza for lunch then on to a tea at 2 p.m. held by the Seaford library. Birthday celebrants for November are Janet Lee, Barbara Melvin, Karen Hitch and Janet Windsor. The gals would also like to take this opportunity to wish Janet Lee a speedy recovery and return home. Sug and Alan Whaley recently sped up to Alleghany College in Meadeville, Pa., to visit their grandson, Danny Hamilton. While there they attended the homecoming football game and sat in snow and sleet wrapped in the warmth of winter things which they thought to pack “just in case.” The homecoming team played Ohio Wesleyan and emerged victorious. Evelyn Hearn called and asked us to make everyone aware of the Melson’s United Methodist Church Bazaar on Saturday, Nov.11, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. There will be a light breakfast and foods available, plus a bake and craft sale. For the crowd’s enjoyment there will be old tractor and old car displays as well as an authentic blacksmith demonstration. At noon there will be an auction of a homemade quilt and other items. Lisa Alvarez visited recently from Greenwood, S.C., to enjoy time with her parents, Frank and Carolyn Calio, her siblings here and of course, some of Mom’s home cooking, maybe even some to go back to S.C. with her. The Laurel Garden Club members will

meet at St. Philip’s on Sunday Nov. 12. They encourage all members, guests and those who may wish to join this group to be there at 2 p.m. on Sunday. Marie Johnson Waller was hosted at a dinner, given by her children, at Brew River in Salisbury on Oct. 29. The celebration was to honor Marie on her 95th birthday. It was attended by many family members and friends. Another successful night for Suzanne Layton and her Tri-State Chorus was Friday, Oct. 27, at the Dover Senior Center. Suzanne, with her very professional productions, and the chorus may now rest on their laurels — ‘til more future shows. I received, this week, a special request from a young lady to put on a prayer list Michael Betts, who is serving his country in Iraq. Indeed, I think it most important for all of us to constantly pray for all of our young men and women serving in that field of duty and to pray for those who are injured and for a save and speedy return home. Special happy birthday wishes from his family and neighbors to Matthew Adams, celebrating his 19th year on Nov.11 at Full Sail College in Winter Park, Fla. Knowing Matt, he’ll probably be surfing all day to observe this big occasion. Belated happy birthday wishes to Janet LeCates who observed hers on Nov. 3 Happy birthday wishes to: Ed Melvin on Nov. 9; Howard Vizthum, Nov. 10; Freddy Elliott and Bonita Wilmer, Nov. 12; Nancy Lowe and Ernest Tubbs, Nov. 13; Delores Todd, Nov. 14; Robert Allen and Wayne Price, Nov. 15; Mollie Collins and Emma Jean Hickey, Nov. 16. We express our deepest sympathy to the family and friends of Arnold A. Saunders Sr., Brooks Hearn, I. Jane Garner, and Dorothy Beatrice Ellis. We continue with prayers for those who are ill: Richard Cordrey, Ralph Baker, Blanche Elliott. Ray Lynch, Agnes Robinson, Kelly Griffith, Hattie Puckham and Terry Layton. “It’s funny how a few square meals will round out a figure.” See you in the Stars.

‘A Few F Old Friends’ in time for Christmas Tony Windsor

Tony Windsor’s new 20-song CD captures country music in its traditional style. Songs from such classic artists as George Jones, Merle Haggard, Gene Watson, Marty Robbins, Doug ‘A Few Old Stone, Conway Twitty, Elvis Friends’ Presley and more! Get it today at the Seaford Star office, Stein Highway, Seaford. Or call 302-236-9886. Only $10.00

500 W. Stein Highway • FAX (302)629-4513 • 22128 Sussex Highway • Seaford, DE 19973 • Fax (302)628-8504 (302)629-4514 • (302)628-8500 • (800)966-4514 • www.cfmnet.com REDUCE

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Randy Hill REALTOR

629-4514 Extension: 247


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MORNING STAR

✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

HONORING VETERANS Film captures camaraderie, courage of WWII vets By Lynn R. Parks Vaughn Russell, Seaford, was a Marine rifleman who took part in the battle for Iwo Jima. “I’ve got nearly total recall,” he said. “That can be a bad thing or a good thing. In the case of war, it’s a bad thing.” Lee Riggin, Laurel, took part in the capture of Hitler’s home in Germany on May 6, 1945. And Richard Drummond, Seaford, spent two and a half years in the Army Air Corps, serving in Corsica, Africa and Italy. He was on his way to the Philippines and additional training as an airplane mechanic when he and the other 2,000 men aboard his ship got the news that World War II was over. “The captain came over the loudspeaker and announced that we were changing course to Boston, Mass.,” said Drummond. “He said that the war was over. About 2,000 of us all let out a loud roar.” Recollections from all three men are part of a film produced by Nenagh Films and the Black Sheep Production Co., both in Wilmington, about Delawareans who served in World War II. “Project Delaware WWII’s Voices of War” was produced in conjunction with Lt. Gov. John Carney, Secretary of State Harriet Smith Windsor

and the Delaware Commission of Veteran’s Affairs. The film, for which about 70 veterans were interviewed, is being shown around the state and will be available on DVD to residents in December. Copies will also be given to all Delaware high schools and public libraries. “All the stories that we heard are amazing,” said Alison MacKenzie, manager of the film project. “I am proud that we have taken the time to interview these people.” Film director T. J. Healy, 51, Wilmington, said that he grew up around men who had fought in the war. “I thought I knew all about it,” he said. “But I learned something new in every interview.” Healy said that while the film’s focus is World War II, “it is actually about the guys” who are telling the stories. “It’s all about their experiences, and told in their own words.” Healy said that many of the men cried during their interviews. “But they never cried about anything about themselves,” he said. “They cried about the heroic actions of other people. They cried when they talked about their fellow soldiers.” And the men’s emotions are likely to affect those who watch the film, Healy said. “I still can’t get through the whole thing without running off to a corner and

Richard Drummond, Seaford, is one of about 70 veterans whose stories are featured in a film about Delawareans during World War II.

crying,” he added. In addition to the soldiers and Marines, the film crew interviewed people who served on the home front. “We talked to anyone who was involved in the war effort,” said MacKenzie. “We talked with women, Rosie the Riveter types who worked in the shipyards. We talked to telephone operators,

Waves To m o d day ee r F

Th

ank

s n a r

e s to Our Vet A Time to Remember, Honor and Respect Our Veterans

Seaford Auxiliary Units American Legion Auxiliary Unit #6 Veterans of Foreign Wars Auxiliary Unit #4961 American Veterans Auxiliary Unit # 1694

plane spotters and teachers.” Drummond, who was drafted in February 1943 just four months after turning 18, was interviewed about his time in service as well as about Seaford’s DuPont nylon plant, in which he started working in May 1941. “The plant was going full-tilt back Continued on page 53

VETERANS DAY November 11, 2006 Disabled American Veterans, Chapter #9 Disabled American Veterans, Auxiliary Unit #9

We can never repay the debt of gratitude owed to our nation’s veterans. Thanks for your service and a job well done!


MORNING STAR

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Woman takes basket of goodies to home for vets Tracey Beachboard, a junior member of the American Legion Auxiliary Unit #6 of Seaford, took time out on Saturday, Oct. 28 — Make A Difference Day — to deliver a basket of goodies to the “Home of the Brave,” a homeless veterans’ shelter. Her goal was to help veterans in need by providing them with various toiletry items while residing at the shelter. The day is the largest community service effort in the nation, rallying corporations, government leaders, service organizations like The American Legion Auxiliary and everyday Americans into one day of action. On the last Make A Difference Day, millions of volunteers nationwide participated and millions of people-in-need benefited. USA WEEKEND Magazine sponsors the day, held on the fourth Saturday of each October, in partnership with The Points of Light Foundation. The Points of Light Foundation is a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization dedicated to engaging more people and service organizations to volunteer in community service projects. The American Legion Auxiliary, the largest patriotic women’s service organization in the world, sponsors several volun-

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Film offers first-hand accounts of war Continued from page 52

Tracey Beachboard, a junior member of the American Legion Auxiliary Unit #6 of Seaford, takes time out on Saturday, Oct. 28 — Make A Difference Day — to deliver a basket of goodies to the “Home of the Brave,” a homeless veterans’ shelter.

teer programs annually on the national and local levels, focusing on three major areas: veterans, young people and the community. Grandmothers, mothers, wives, daughters, sisters, and granddaughters of members of the American Legion (men and women who served in the Armed Forces during eligibility periods) are eligible to join, including step-relatives. For more information on joining and participating in the auxiliary programs either as a Senior or Junior member (those under the age of 18), call the Post Home at 629-9915.

HONOR OUR VETERANS!

then,” Drummond said. “We were making thread for fabric for clothing used by the military. We were even making tire cords for airplanes.” Drummond remembers that security at the plant was tightened after the start of the war. “They did a little bit more checking about things, and war bond drives were always going on,” he said. Drummond said that he enjoyed being interviewed for the film. “It gave me the opportunity to reflect on some things that I had put in the background,” he said. That included the six days and five nights that he spent in a box car, traveling across Africa from Casablanca to Tunis. “That was quite an experience,” he said. A similar box car, a “40 et 8,” is parked in front of the American Legion post in Seaford. Russell, 82, Seaford, carried with him for years memories of months spent on the front line. To mark the 50th anniversary of the battle for Iwo Jima, he visited the Pacific island in 1995 and “put to rest a lot of skeletons,” he said. “I’ve been at peace since then.” He said that it was easy for him to talk for the moviemakers. “Someday, my great-great-great-great grandchild might learn that his grandfather was at Iwo Jima,” he said. “He will be able to go look this movie up and hear first-hand what it was like there. This is first-hand information, the way it happened.” “World War II veterans are dying at about 5,000 a day,” said Riggin. “If we don’t get these first-hand accounts in the

For your information: Project Delaware World War II’s Voices of War will be shown at the Dover Air Force Base Thursday, Nov. 16, at 6 p.m. Admission is free, but reservations must be made by Nov. 13. For information, or to reserve a copy of the film, call Alison MacKenzie, (302) 658-7294. In addition, the movie of Vaughn Russell’s full interview will be shown at the Seaford American Legion post Saturday, Nov. 11, as part of the post’s Veteran’s Day celebration. The post will hold an open house starting at noon; the screening of the interview will start at 2 p.m. Russell will be there. Both events are open to the public. next few years, all the guys are going to be gone.” MacKenzie said that she was interested to see how the country drew together during the war. “Everybody was involved in the war effort in some way,” she said. “Everybody had an overwhelming sense of pride in the soldiers who were serving and in the country. There was a real sense of bonding together to do the right thing.” “This was a time of total dedication to the saving of the world for democracy,” Riggin said. “It was a total effort and everybody was involved, in the military and on the home front too.” All of the people in the film were convinced that they were doing the right thing, Healy said. “We asked everyone if they would do it all again,” he added. “To a man, they all said absolutely.”

Seaford Veterans Organizations American Legion Post #6 American Legion Post #37 Marine Corp. League Det. #780 Veterans of Foreign Wars Post #4961 American Veterans Post #1694

Veterans Day Program Kiwanis Park Saturday, Nov. 11, 2006 11:00 a.m. DEDICATION OF MEMORIAL BRICKS to follow

Remember Those Who Sacrificed Their Lives For Our Freedom!

OPEN HOUSE Following Ceremony at American Legion and VFW


MORNING STAR ✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

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Local Veterans Day activities Seaford Veterans Day Service On Nov. 11, at 11 a.m., the Seaford Veterans Committee will host a Veterans Day Service at the Kiwanis Park, Stein Highway, Seaford. The Seaford Veterans Committee, consisting of the American Legion Posts 6 and 37, AM VETS Post 1694, DAV Chapter 9, MCL Detachment 780, and the VFW Post 4961, will have a dedication of Memorial and Survivor bricks immediately following the Veterans Day Service. The committee extends an invitation to the public on this honorable day as the community salutes our veterans. The guest speaker will be Chief Warrant Officer Peter N. Bohn, II who served in Vietnam and Iraq. While serving Bohn was with the National Guard Medical Evacuation Team. Bohn, a helicopter pilot, received two distinguished flying crosses and other combat decorations. Currently Lt. Bohn is em-

ployed with the Seaford Police Department. Others in attendance will be the American Legion Firing Squad, Gold Star Mothers, and the Seaford School bands. Tent shelters will be provided in case of inclement weather. Immediately following the ceremonies open houses will be provided at the American legion Post 6 located on Front Street and the VFW Post 4961, located on Middleford Road, Seaford. Everyone is welcome.

Blades Veterans Day Ceremony The Town of Blades will hold their annual Veterans Day Ceremony at the Blades Park, East 7th St., Blades, on Friday, Nov. 10, at 11 a.m. Following the ceremony, the public is invited to stay for refreshments at the Blades Park Pavilion.

Delmar Veterans Day Program The Delmar VFW, Post 8276 will be having their annual Veterans Day Pro-

gram/Memorial Service on Saturday, Nov. 11. Dinner is a covered dish and begins at 7 p.m. There will be a social hour beginning at 6 p.m. The Memorial Service/Program will begin at 8 p.m. All are welcome to any part of the program or we would love to have you for the entire evening. Come show your support for our veterans and their families.

CHEER ‘Salute to Veterans’ The CHEER 2006 “Salute to Veterans” Dinner Dance will be held Friday, Nov. 10, at the CHEER Community Center, located at 20520 Sand Hill Road, Georgetown. Veterans are free, spouses, family and friends will be asked to make a donation of $10 per person.The evening’s event will begin at 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. For more information call your local CHEER Center or Florence Mason at 856-5187.

First State Heritage Park events This Veterans Day holiday, Friday, Nov. 10, all of the First State Heritage Park partner sites will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. — including Legislative Hall, which will offer special half-hour tours at noon and 3 p.m. The tour, entitled “Military Heroes of Delaware,” will focus on the Capitol

Building’s Gallery of Military Heroes, giving visitors a chance to learn who these men were and remember their sacrifices. Other park sites open on Veterans Day include the Delaware Public Archives with its 17th Century Delaware exhibit, the Delaware Visitor Center and Galleries and its new “Fighting the Dragon” firefighting

exhibit, the Biggs Museum of American Art, the Delaware Archaeology Museum, the Museum of Small Town Life, and the Johnson Victrola Museum. All museums are open to the public free of charge. On The Green, special programs will be offered for both young and old and will be

Veterans Day Our military serves our nation with honor, commitment and courage. Sadly, we have lost our most courageous soldiers on battlefields throughout the history of our nation. Honor the memory of our fallen heroes and their families this November 11, Veterans Day.

SALUTE TO VETERANS SATURDAY 11:00 A.M. FREE COFFEE & DONUTS November 11 is the day set aside nationally to honor all U. S. Veterans. We at Callaway, Farnell and Moore are observing this day by remembering the sacrifices of all those who serve our country through the armed services. Join us for the community’s Veterans Day service at Kiwanis Park on Stein Hwy. in Seaford. We will provide free coffee and donuts to all those attending.

They sacrificed and suffered so that we might know freedom from want and fear.

VETERAN’S DAY A Time to Remember, Honor and Respect Our Veterans

Finley B. Jones 500 W. Stein Highway • FAX (302)629-4513 • 22128 Sussex Highway • Seaford, DE 19973 • Fax (302)628-8504 (302)629-4514 • (302)628-8500 • (800)966-4514 • www.cfmnet.com

Sussex County Council


MORNING STAR ✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006 led by the Spirits of the Green, costumed interpreters who take visitors back through Dover’s past. From 11 a.m. to noon, children are invited to learn games and songs that were popular during the colonial period. Geared to ages 6 to 10, the program is open to all children at no cost and with no reservations needed. For the adults, and to honor our Revolutionary War veterans, at 1 p.m. a guided walking tour will embark from the Delaware Visitor Center. “Revolutionary Dover” will highlight the stories of those who lived in Dover and fought for our independence. Or you may choose to rent an audio wand to explore The Green on your own. Audio wands and discount coupons are available from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Delaware Visitor Center. Veterans Day events continue on Saturday, Nov. 11, with a World War II Veterans Tour of Lakeside Cemetery in Dover from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Conceived as a way to honor Dover’s military heroes of WWII and presented by researcher Danny Waite, who works to ensure that their memories and contributions will not be forgotten, this special tour traces the lives of those heroic Delawareans who served both at home and abroad to ensure the freedom we have today. Call 302-739-9194 for directions or for more information. For more information about First State Heritage Park programs, call 302-7399194 or visit www.destateparks.com/heritagepark. Established by Governor Ruth Ann Minner in 2004, The First State Heritage

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Park at Dover is a partnership of state agencies, under the leadership of Delaware State Parks, working in collaboration with city and county government, nonprofit organizations and the private sector to create Delaware’s first urban “park without boundaries” linking historic and cultural sites in the city that has been the seat of state government since 1777.

The origin of Veterans Day 1918 World War I, then normally referred to simply as The Great War (no one could imagine any war being greater!), ended with the implementation of an armistice [temporary cessation of hostilities—in this case until the final peace treaty, the infamous Treaty of Versailles, was signed in 1919] between the Allies and Germany at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of November, 1918. 1919 November 11: President Wilson proclaims the first Armistice Day with the following words: "To us in America, the reflections of armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…" The original concept for the celebration was for the suspension of business for a two-minute period beginning at 11 a.m. with the day also marked by parades and public mettings.

Safe & Secure From the Revolutionary War to Desert Storm to Operation Iraq Freedom, our nation has survived and thrived, thanks to our veterans. Remember their service and dedication.

AMERICAN LEGION

Laurel Post 19, Laurel, Del. Legion Post 19 Reminds Everyone to

Thank All Our Veterans On This Special Day of Remembrance

With Honor and Respect to Our Veterans They are our family, friends and neighbors; everyday citizens, yet so much more. They are the brave men and women who have put their lives at risk to protect and serve our country in war. Time and again, our country’s veterans have been on the front lines in defense of our freedom. On Veterans Day, we take this opportunity to say thank you to the brave souls who have served in battle for our Armed Forces.

Pride. Dedication. Honor. These are the ideals displayed by the fine men and women of our armed forces through the generations. On November 11th let us honor those who fought by reflecting on the values, rights and dreams which they served to protect. It is with great appreciation that we salute them.

Biff Lee

Your Representative in the 40th District

DELMAR MEMORIAL POST #8276 VFW 200 W. State St., Delmar, MD Please join us for our Veterans Day Service & Dinner Nov. 11th 6 -8 pm


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Mileage of hybrid vehicles varies depending on their use By Richard D. Livingston Guest editorial

There is a ground swell of public opinion in support of vehicle fuel economy. It is driven partly by the recent spurt in the cost of gasoline, partly by the fact that we are financing terror with our petroleum payments to (mostly) Muslim governments and partly by damage to our environment from polluting exhaust gases. One solution, the hybrid drive train, is already moving forward on a commercial scale with sales in the hundred thousands and growing exponentially. A well designed hybrid drive train will reduce fuel consumption about 30 percent. The saving results straightforwardly from replacing the present, overpowered gasoline engine with a smaller, more efficient gasoline engine coupled to an electric motor and battery pack to help with peak loads. Additional, supplementary efficiencies result from regenerative braking and the elimination of gas engine idling. A refinement to the hybrid solution is the PHEV (Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle), essentially a hybrid with a higher capacity battery pack capable of extended operation solely on battery power. The battery would be re-charged overnight off of house current at off-peak electric rates. Gasoline consumption could be close to zero for the many operators who drive 30/40 miles per day or less. Longer trips would revert to the economies of straight hybrid operation. Straight hybrid operation is a proven winner to eventually replace all 230 million gas-guzzling sedans; SUV’s and light trucks now on U.S. highways. We will have cut oil imports from the bad guys (now 6.2 million barrels per day) about in half. The PHEV has the potential to at least double the hybrid savings, at least for city

dwellers and those who drive limited distances daily. With respect to Bad Guy petroleum offerings, the US could take them or leave them-what a powerful bargaining chip! We know that not every PHEV owner will enjoy 100+ miles per gallon performance. Some will drive so many miles per day that the PHEV will offer little benefit over the straight hybrid. I have attempted to examine the PHEV benefits and penalties in the operating zone between essentially 100 percent electric and straight hybrid. I asked a number of friends to note down their car’s odometer reading once per day for a period of about 30 days. Twenty-two responded. Their experience is the basis for this study. Note that my friends represent a number of different states and a wide range of daily mileage. This is the real world and it includes an occasional trip well beyond the normal average. I am not concerned with their actual gas consumption in this study, only with their patterns of day-to-day vehicle usage. I will try to evaluate the benefits or penalties assuming they would follow their current vehicle usage patterns while driving a PHEV. The PHEV is assumed to have an all-electric range of 30 miles (after an overnight recharge from house current while in the garage). Operation beyond 30 miles would be largely on the smaller gasoline engine at the already established hybrid efficiencies of 50 miles per gallon of gasoline. Even though half of my sample averaged less than 30 miles per day, almost all of them had some daily excursions of more than 30 miles sometime during the month. They would not be 100 percent electric even though the average daily mileage was less than 30. What would be the performance result

Table of Reported Data plus Miles/Gallon Calculation Contributor Peggy, Iowa Dick, Delaware Joyce, Delaware Fred, Delaware Bob, Delaware Hartland, Vermont Cathy, Maine Harold, Delaware Ram, Delaware Ron, Iowa Francis 1, Virginia Jana, Mississippi Francis 2, Virginia Glenn, Delaware Sally, Vermont Jody, Virginia Chad, Mississippi Wendell, Delaware Sue, Delaware David, Delaware Dan, New Hampshire Earle, Delaware

Avg. Daily Miles 6.72 7.3 9.5 11.6 21.1 21.2 21.6 25.6 27.1 27.7 29.9 37.7 41.5 43 46.1 50.6 51.4 52.3 52.9 90.5 102.2 102.5

% Daily Mileage < 30 74.9 80.1 91.7 100 61.3 79.5 89.2 71.7 56.4 52.1 77.7 71.2 59.0 59.0 59.7 53.4 58.0 48.3 46.1 28.1 24.9 24.5

Miles/ Gal 199.2 251.3 602.4 no gallons 129.1 243.4 463.4 176.7 114.7 104.4 224.2 173.8 122.1 122.0 124.0 107.4 119.2 96.7 92.8 69.5 66.6 66.2

Miles per gallon calculation: Total miles per month = 30 x “Average Daily Miles” Gasoline miles per month = “Total miles per month” x (1 – “% Daily mileage < 30”/100) Gallons gasoline per month = “Gasoline miles per month” / 50 Miles per 1 gallon of gasoline = “Total miles per month” / “Gallons gasoline per month”

if they substituted a PHEV for their present vehicle, but followed their previous driving pattern? The assumed PHEV has an all-electric range of 30 miles and its hybrid drive train is capable of 50 miles per gallon when in the gasoline engine mode. The table below lists the key data provided; the Average of Daily Miles Driven and Percent of Daily mileage under 30 (i.e. all-electric). Also listed is the calcu-

lated performance in terms of miles per gallon of gasoline. CONCLUSION: This assumed PHEV will be attractive in terms of gasoline consumption and emission control for operators driving up to, say, 55 miles per day. At or above 90 miles per day, the operator may find a straight hybrid more attractive than a PHEV.

Letters Historic Sussex home is no more It is with great sadness and regret that I write you this letter. Actually, it is an obituary of a historic home in Sussex County that was torn down this year by a new owner. This was the 253-year-old Ricards home located east of Bridgeville on the northeast corner of US Rt. 13 and County Road 600. This was my ancestral home. My father grew up there. His sister was the first telephone operator in Bridgeville. My father’s aunt Margaret Ricards Cannon was the founder of the Bridgeville library. Many of the older readers will remember the northbound roadside sign “Ricards Vineyards.” My grandfather’s youngest brother, Robert Ricards, inherited the farm and homestead. He was famous for his grapes and peaches sold at his roadside stand. He was born in the home in 1873 and operated the farm with his mother starting in 1905. He continued the operation until 1962 when he was age 89. The place was then sold and passed from the Ricards family after 230 continuous years. The Ricards family moved up the peninsula from Virginia to that area of Maryland on the Little Choptank (now in

Dorchester County) and thereafter in the early 1700s to the area around Bridgeville, which then was part of Maryland. The home now destroyed was one of their homes on the many land grants and purchases they made in the area. Recognizing its historic and architectural significance, the home was placed on the US Parks Department “National Register of Historic Places” as Property # 82002360 under heading “Ricards House.” This was the result of research by former loving owners Joseph and Joanne Conaway. (Joseph Conaway is the current mayor of Bridgeville). The brick portion of the house was built in 1733, long before the Revolutionary War. Ox blood was used in the mortar to give a distinctive coloring. The brick portion was one of about 12 such surviving structures in Delaware. The wood frame section was added later with a major revision in 1850 by John Robert Ricards after he returned from the California gold rush. The front of the house had the only surviving two-tiered verandah in Delaware, a unique architectural feature. At one time such porches were relatively common on wealthier farm houses and hotel fronts. In the basement long ago was a busy still that established John Robert Ri-

cards as a large brandy supplier in Delaware. While within his legal rights, it is truly a great shame that the present owner razed the property. Overtures were made by the Bridgeville Historical Society in an effort to save the property. Sadly, economic values tend to displace historic values. If any Ricards currently lived in Delaware we would have bought the property to preserve it.

As I finalize this obituary, I would say that Sussex County lost something irreplaceable. In turn, I and the few remaining members of this branch of the Ricards family, particularly those who lived there as children, have sad hearts as we think of our personal family history and that the Icon of our long past is now gone forever. Harold Ricards Houston, Texas


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✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

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Felton veteran is part of the Greatest Generation Saturday, Nov. 11, is Veterans Day and perhaps on that day more AT URPHY than any other I remember my dad, Tom. His struggles after World War II were like those of many veterans In January 1945, after befrom all the conflicts and wars we ing surrounded by Gerhave been involved in. mans for six days with In a story in last week’s Star, Francis Nero described his story only one day’s rations, his for writer Lynn Parks. “The Greatest Generation,” a book by Tom unit was captured. Brokaw has been the subject of much discussion about the people himself, running Felton Hardware, starting who grew up in the pre World War II era. on Jan. 1, 1946. Soon after this, Richard Raised in the toughest of times (the Degot his life’s calling, you might say, when pression) and sent off to war right after, he went into sales at the Latex Plant in we came out of it. This group of AmeriDover making trips to cities all over the cans’ contribution to their country is eastern U.S.A. To further test Richard’s tremendous. toughness he was outsourced at Latex I find everyone’s life interesting and twice before he decided to take a job as this gentleman, who is also in the video manager of Agway in Dover for three about Delaware veterans, is certainly no years before taking his last career job in exception. He’s a lodge brother in Felton 1967 with I.L.C. out of Dover in sales as a Lodge #30 I.O.O.F. and is known by all the Odd Fellows throughout Delaware and buyer of parts for space suits and was responsible for the quality of the parts. many others, as he was in sales for much Richard is proud of the fact that during of his life. this time he met and got to know 27 of the Richard Adams is a 1942 graduate of Apollo astronauts including John Young Felton High School, number three in a and Frank Borman. Richard always, and I class of 19, a classmate of Marion Conmean always, is laughing. He says Frank stantino of Laurel. Richard grew up in the Borman was called “Big Head” and they great Depression and worked all his free had to make a special helmet for him. time on the family farm and after getting Richard and his wife Rose are the parthe farming done for his elderly father it ents of three children, Richard Jr., Cathy was off to war in October 1943. and Keith. Keith has followed his dad’s Richard’s only brother Loran was a footsteps and has traveled the world as a medic and lost his life in the war. Soon salesman. Cathy lives nearby and son Richard found himself in Europe and Richard Jr. is a resident of the state hospiplaces such as Anzio with the 45th Intal at Stockley. Richard remains proud of fantry Division where he spent 10 months him to this day. on the front lines. During this time In 1967 the Adams had another “little Richard was wounded twice. In January twist in the road” as a tornado went 1945, after being surrounded by Germans through Felton and they lost their home. for six days with only one day’s rations, They just built another right on the site his unit was captured. To Richard’s good about 500 yards from the high school fortune, if you could call it that, the war where Richard graduated. ended in Europe six months later. At 82, Richard is still an avid golfer He was discharged on Nov. 9, 1945, and, oh yes, a diehard Eagles and Phillies married on Dec. 1, and in business for

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fan. Yes, there is a lot to like about this jovial story-telling good-will ambassador. Richard says it simply, “No regrets. I’ve led a complete full life.” He has certainly made many friends along the way and the Odd Fellows of Delaware are very proud of him. This proud WW II vet is one reason it’s called “The Greatest Generation.” The Maryland Kennel Club and the Mispillion Kennel Club will hold a threeday show at the Wicomico Youth and Civic Center in Salisbury Nov. 10, 11, 12. There are more than 1,400 dogs entered in the show each day, from all over the U.S. Alice Sturgis of Laurel is a devoted member of this organization and its publicity ambassador for many, many years. Each year she faithfully calls and asks if I will please put something in about this tremendous event for dog enthusiasts and after explaining to her that really it is out of our area, and she talks about it some more, I do it. Alice, I would love to have you as my press agent. Have a great event! The newly formed Sussex County Organization to Limit Development Mistakes held its first meeting at the Laurel Grange Hall on Friday evening, Nov. 3, with about 40 people attending. It is my sincere desire that this the biggest issue to ever hit Laurel does not divide our community. One thing being said is, “We kept DuPont out and now this.” From all the photos I have seen of the DuPont site when it started out, there were no houses within site of the construction. Many of those who were involved have passed on, but the pictures still exist at the Seaford Historical Museum for all to see. I attended the meeting of three small businesses the other evening who are organizing the “Shop Hop” on Nov. 16, 17, 18. They are the Hen House, Culver’s Antiques and O’Neal’s Antiques and Estate Jewelry. There was laughter and refresh-

ments, but also a serious tone as each business presented their part in this event that they are partnering together and hoping for a big weekend. What is a “Shop Hop”? It’s getting a ticket stamped from a visit to all three stores, to put you in the drawing for some nice prizes including a beautiful stamped local crock, a diamond necklace and other door prizes. Louis and Shirley O’Neal got the idea on a trip to Five Points, N.C. They are going to have great refreshments including sticky buns. Let’s make the Sycamore Road “Shop Hop” a success. Front Street in front of the Pierce Ellis Medical Center is definitely under construction. Some of the people at the Medical Center say it could be like this for 100 days or more. Questions to director of public works Woody Vickers were directed to the mayor and back to Woody later. John Shwed did say they had gotten into some problems with old pipes to be removed but did not anticipate it taking that long. So, there you are. This Friday, Nov. 10, before the Seaford game a group of Laurel graduates spanning many years will enjoy dinner at RJ Riverside restaurant. Featured speaker, although he does not know it yet, is Butch Schollenberger, son of legendary coach George Schollenberger, then it’s on to the Laurel-Seaford game where they will all sit together and root for their Bulldogs, no Blue Jays allowed. Sorry. Oh, I’m just kidding, please welcome back any out of towners. See ya!

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MORNING STAR ✳ NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PAGE 58

Opinion The Mission is worthy of support

Guest Column Seaford Mission needs help “Grass may wither and flowers may fade but the Word of God will endure forever.” Isaiah 40:8 I am convinced, whether the Seaford Mission continues to stay open or closes, that the Word of God has changed the lives of many, many people. Volunteer teachers, mentors, builders, business people, city citizens, service organizations, church members, donors and Mission residents have improved lives today because the Word of God has touched their lives. The Mission is ranked in the top 5 percent of all missions nationwide because of the programs we have implemented and are working. Just to mention a few of the programs: faith-based seven-week study; alcohol and drug rehab; faith-based “skills for life;” GED; medical needs assessment and prescription drug distribution; prison release; employment transportation; mentoring; employment assistance; on site shelter; food assistance; energy assistance; daily meals. The Mission has an unusually high success rate (75 percent) because it is faith-based. The praise for the success of our programs goes to God. I am reminded of what the Lord said to the people of Jerusalem. “Wise men should not boast of their wisdom, nor strong men of their strength, nor rich men of their wealth. If anyone wants to boast, he should boast that he knows and understands me, because my love is constant, and I do what is just and right. These are the things that please me. I, the Lord, have spoken.” Jeremiah 9:23-24. Since 2002, 138 men have successfully completed the 2-6 month program offered and the Lord has spoken to each and every one of them. I thank you all for many years of support. The Mission desperately needs a person, or persons, who can take the many pages of information we have and create weekly articles for the local papers. I am convinced there is someone out there who can write Mission articles that may just prevent the Mission from closing. The Mission depends 100 percent on donations. We need our story told to the public. We have received very few grants or state assistance, even though we save the state an estimated $37,000 a year when an inmate becomes a successful member of society. The silent, unrealized blessings the Seaford Mission has given our city and state will go unnoticed until we no longer exist. Don’t let that happen. Please, someone step up and offer your gift/talent of journalism. Contact me at 629-6461 or the Mission at 6298824. God bless.

The Seaford Mission is in need. Please take time to read the Guest Column from Larry Manlove and then make a pledge to help. I have heard it stated repeatedly in reference to other causes, “If we can save just one person, touch one life, then our cause is worthwhile.” Well, the Seaford Mission has touched many lives and is helping to bring a source of hope and some positive direction to an area of Seaford that once was so bad that it attracted the attention of the Wall Street Journal where an article appeared on the front page. Manlove is asking for help. I would like someone (not me, if you know my schedule) to come forward and tell the stories of some of the lives that were changed because the Mission exists. I will give the space in this newspaper to tell the stories of the changed lives and as a business we will contribute again. Which brings me to another matter, the Seaford Prayer Breakfast. For the past few years I have coordinated this effort, but I am no longer able to continue, because of

my horrendously busy schedule. RYANT ICHARDSON I need someone or a group of someones Pay special attention to to step forward and take over the responsi- Manlove’s comments about how much the Misbilities for the breakfast. sion saves the state. I’m My hope was that sure this amount is underthe breakfast would stated... provide a source of fundraising for the Mission. Election note: Voter turnout was Since its beginning a couple of under 50 percent. That means that thousand has been raised, but the less than half of the people who total could be much more. could have visited the polls TuesI would like to see each church day decided it wasn’t worth the efhave a Mission Sunday and then bring the collection to the breakfast. fort. Remember this, “In a democracy you have the type of governThis would require a lot of work, ment you deserve.” This is espebut a few churches or organizations cially true if you don’t vote. could pull it together. Call me at 629-9788 and I’ll pass along any Final note: Instead of ending on information I have about the breaka lighter note this week, I would fast to you. like to draw reader’s attention to Pay special attention to Manpages 52 to 55 where we honor our love’s comments about how much veterans. Remember, we enjoy our the Mission saves the state. I’m freedoms because of the efforts and sure this amount is understated sacrifices of our men and women in when you consider the resulting rethe armed forces. duction in crime in the area.

B

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Larry Manlove, treasurer Seaford Mission Seaford

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MORNING STAR

â&#x153;ł NOVEMBER 9 - 15, 2006

PAGE 59

Seven-Day forecast for Western Sussex County Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Tides Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Warm with periods of sun

Fog in the morning; mostly sunny

Mild with sun mixing with clouds

Chance for rain or drizzle

More clouds than sunshine

Clouds and breaks of sun

Rain

71/45

68/44

69/49

68/47

61/46

67/48

67/46

Almanac Statistics through Tuesday Nov. 7 at Georgetown, Delaware

Temperatures

Precipitation

High for the week . . . . . . . . . . . Low for the week . . . . . . . . . . . Normal high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Normal low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Average temperature . . . . . . . .

. 74° . 27° . 62° . 40° 47.7°

Total for the week . . . . . . . . . . 0.05â&#x20AC;? Total for the month . . . . . . . . . . 0.05â&#x20AC;? Normal for the month . . . . . . . . 0.66â&#x20AC;? Total for the year . . . . . . . . . . 40.31â&#x20AC;?

Smyrna 70/47 Dover 68/48

Time 6:21 p.m. 7:07 p.m. 1:57 p.m. 8:49 p.m.

Date January 10 January 22 February 7 February 19

Apogee Perigee Apogee Perigee

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

Rise .6:38 a.m. .6:39 a.m. .6:40 a.m. .6:41 a.m. .6:42 a.m. .6:43 a.m. .6:44 a.m.

Last Nov 12

Harrington 70/48

Time 11:27 a.m. 7:25 a.m. 7:40 a.m. 4:35 a.m.

Milford 70/47 Greenwood 71/47

Lewes 68/51

Bridgeville 71/46

Sun and Moon Sun Thursday . Friday . . . . Saturday . . Sunday . . . Monday . . Tuesday . . Wednesday

. . . . . . .

Set .4:54 p.m. .4:53 p.m. .4:53 p.m. .4:52 p.m. .4:51 p.m. .4:50 p.m. .4:49 p.m.

New Nov 20

Low 11:52 p â&#x20AC;&#x201D;12:41 p 1:46 p 2:54 p 3:57 p 4:53 p

Vienna, MD

The moon, and its relative distance to the Earth, affects tides on a monthly basis. When the moon is farthest from the Earth (apogee), tides of decreased range or currents of decreased speed occur. When the moon is closest to the Earth (perigee), the occurrence of increased range or currents of speed is more prevalent.

Date November 15 December 1 December 13 December 27

Day High Low High Thurs. 4:18 a 10:47 a 4:45 p Fri. 5:10 a 11:41 a 5:38 p Sat. 6:06 a 12:49 a 6:34 p Sun. 7:08 a 1:48 a 7:34 p Mon. 8:13 a 2:45 a 8:34 p Tues. 9:16 a 3:37 a 9:30 p Wed. 10:09 a 4:22 a 10:19 p

Sharptown, MD Shown is Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weather. High Low High Low Temperatures are Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s highs Day and Thursday nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lows. Thurs. 7:37 a 1:52 a 8:04 p 1:40 p Fri. 8:29 a 2:45 a 8:57 p 2:34 p Sat. 9:25 a 3:42 a 9:53 p 3:34 p Sun. 10:27 a 4:41 a 10:53 p 4:39 p Mon. 11:32 a 5:38 a 11:53 p 5:47 p Tues. 12:35 p 6:30 a â&#x20AC;&#x201D;- 6:50 p Wed. 12:49 a 7:15 a 1:28 p 7:46 p

Apogee and Perigee

Apogee Perigee Apogee Perigee

Nanticoke River Roaring Point, MD

Moon Rise Thursday . . . .8:24 p.m. Friday . . . . . . .9:30 p.m. Saturday . . . .10:36 p.m. Sunday . . . . .11:39 p.m. Monday . . . . . . . . .none Tuesday . . . .12:39 a.m. Wednesday . . .1:38 a.m.

First Nov 28

Set .11:18 a.m. .12:03 p.m. .12:39 p.m. . .1:07 p.m. . .1:32 p.m. . .1:53 p.m. . .2:13 p.m.

SEAFORD 71/45 Blades 71/45

Rehoboth Beach 67/50 Georgetown 71/45 Concord 71/45 Laurel 72/45 Delmar 72/44

Millsboro 71/45

Bethany Beach 64/52 Fenwick Island 66/51

Full Dec 4

Day High Thurs. 6:59 a Fri. 7:51 a Sat. 8:47 a Sun. 9:49 a Mon. 10:54 a Tues. 11:57 a Wed. 12:11 a

Low High Low 1:14 a 7:26 p 1:02 p 2:07 a 8:19 p 1:56 p 3:04 a 9:15 p 2:56 p 4:03 a 10:15 p 4:01 p 5:00 a 11:15 p 5:09 p 5:52 a â&#x20AC;&#x201D;- 6:12 p 6:37 a 12:50 p 7:08 p

Rehoboth Beach Day Thurs. Fri. Sat. Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed.

High 10:17 a 11:09 a 12:04 p 12:27 a 1:31 a 2:36 a 3:31 a

Low High Low 3:39 a 10:35 p 4:48 p 4:32 a 11:29 p 5:45 p 5:29 a â&#x20AC;&#x201D;- 6:44 p 6:30 a 1:02 p 7:40 p 7:31 a 2:02 p 8:30 p 8:32 a 2:59 p 9:15 p 9:30 a 3:48 p 9:56 p

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Š2006

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November 9, 2006