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THURSDAY, mARcH 5, 2009

VOL. 13 NO. 46

50 cents

News ELECTION - The deadline to sign up for the school board elections is approaching. Page 2 MOrE arrEsTs - The parents of a driver charged in the February 24 fatal accident are also arrested. Page 3 drEaM bIg - At 12 years old, Briana Hall is making waves and has a dream of going to the Olympics. Page 4 spECIaL guEsT - Fifth graders sat captivated as a visitor described her childhood journey out of Ethiopia. Page 10 VIVa Las VEgas - Nanticoke’s annual dinner and auction receives special donations. Page 11 fINaL Okay - The Villages at Stoneybrook, a housing development near Beaver Dam Heights, gets final approval. Page 12 pOsITIVE ChaNgE - He took over a leadership role during tough times. No, this is not who you think. See Editorial, page 50.

Sports ChaMpIONshIp - The Woodbridge varsity boys’ basketball team took on caesar Rodney in the Henlopen conference championship game. Page 39 WrEsTLINg - Western Sussex wrestlers competed in the state tournament. Page 39 sTars Of ThE WEEk - Two Sussex Tech swimmers, a ST wrestler, and a Woodbridge girls’ basketball player are this week’s Stars. Page 41

Dick Collison honored for 50 years of service By Lynn R. Parks

Index Business Bulletin Board church classifieds Education Entertainment Final Word Frank calio Gas Lines Gourmet Health Letters

IN LIkE a LION - These two residents of Shipley Street in Seaford may be the only ones enjoying the snowfall monday morning. Around eight inches of snow fell on the area. march comes in like a lion. Will it go out like a lamb, as the promise goes? Story on page 2

6 16-18 20 28-35 36 26 51 46 24 27 8 47

Lynn Parks movies Obituaries Opinion Pat murphy People Police Puzzles Snapshots Sports Tides Tony Windsor

13 7 21 50 19 14 25 45 48 39-45 7 46

Dick Collison is as dependable as the Seaford Volunteer Fire Department itself. No matter the weather, said state Rep. Dan Short during a tribute to Collison last week, the owner of Dick’s Barbershop in downtown Seaford can be counted on to direct traffic at the corner of High and Cannon streets when the fire siren blows. “At the sound of the whistle, he is out the door,” added Seaford Mayor Ed Butler. “It doesn’t matter who’s sitting in the barber chair, Dick leaves him there.” The tribute was held Wednesday evening at the start of the monthly meeting of the fire company membership. It marked 50 years since Collison started directing traffic for the fire department. Company president R. Wayne Truitt presented Collison with a

framed piece of old carpet salvaged during the recent renovation of the department’s recreation room. Collison was instrumental in the original design of the rec room, Truitt said. Truitt and Chief Tom LeCates presented Collison with a plaque certifying that he is a fire policeman emeritus. “A milestone was reaching this month,” Truitt said. “Even before Dick was a member of the fire department, he was directing traffic at High and Cannon. Members of the department were worried that he could get hurt, so they invited him to join the fire company.” Collison started directing traffic for the fire company in March 1959 and joined the department in 1965. He was fireman of the year in 1980 and is now a lifetime member of the department. “He is a dedicated and outstanding continued to page five

Blades election is rescheduled

Vikki Prettyman, Blades Town Administrator, said the town election that was scheduled for March 2, has been rescheduled for Monday, April 6, in Hardin Hall from 2 to 6 p.m. The mayor’s position as well as two council seats will be chosen from a slate of candidates. The snow storm made it dangerous for voters to get to the polls this past Monday. Prettyman said the Attorney General’s office said that the town must re-advertise the election, a process that takes at least 20 days. Current Mayor David Ruff and Councilman Michael Smith are vying for the mayor’s seat on the council, and Russell Joseph, Earl Chaffinch Sr., Donald Trice, and Martin Evans seek the two open council seats. Joseph and Chaffinch are currently council members in good standing. Trice and Evans are both former council members. Chaffinch replaced Trice as police commissioner on the council after Trice resigned in protest over disagreements


PAGE 2

MORNING STAR • MARch10 5 -- 16, 11, 2008 2009 MORNING STAR • JANUARY

PAGE 17

Late-winter Law sought tosnow protect homeowners and insurance blankets the area Insurance Commissioner Matt Denn and members of the Senate By Bryant Richardson and House Insurance Committees will pursue a new law in the Upoftoaeight inchescourt of snow fell wake Delaware ruling on western Sussexinsurance County early that would allow comin the week, closing schools, panies to refuse to renew some businesses and state homeand owner insurance for policyholdcounty offices. ers The whoprecipitation make claimsstarted againston their policies, or even ask but quesSunday afternoon as rain, tions about doing so. Recently, changed over to snow in the eve-a Delaware Superior Court judge ning. More than 100 accidents were ruled in favor of two insurance investigated by police in Sussex industry groups in a lawsuit County on Monday, aincluding seeking to overturn 2005 Defour that resulted in injuries. partment of Insurance regulation State Police also reported at banning the practice of non-releast 73 vehicles became disabled newing homeowners insurance in Sussexaswhen theyofgot stuck in policies a result making the snow. claims. Road crews worked to clear regulation prohibited theThe snow, but somealso of the back insurers from roads were nottreating scrapedsimple until questions policyholders as overnight from Monday. claims. The County insurersState had argued In Kent Police in court that at theleast Insurance Deinvestigated 56 accidents on Monday, partment didtwo not resulting have the in au-injuries. to take such actions by thority On Monday at about 9:41 a.m. regulation. Commissioner Denn State Police investigated a single vehicle crash on Route 1, south of Bayview Road. This crash involved a Brinks

stated that he would appeal the Superior Court’s decision to the Armored Car whichCourt. was operated Delaware Supreme by While James the McNally, of Philaappeal52, is pending, delphia. The truck was traveling Commissioner Denn and legislasouthleaders in the will rightseek lane to when the tive enact operator lost control due to the legislation to provide the same poor road conditions. protection afforded byof thethedisThe truck went off east puted regulation. edge of the roadway and over“We The will operator fight on was everynot availturned. able frontA to protect homeowninjured. passenger sustained a ers from threatening abusive practices by the non-life injury and was transported to Christiana insurance industry,” CommisHospital. Mr.said. McNally was cited sioner Denn forState Careless Sen.Driving. David Sokola, a A matching record low member of the Senate Insurance temperature will Tuesday morning Committee, be the chief (10 degrees) a record low sponsor of theand legislation to be Wednesdayon morning introduced Jan. 8. temperature (3 degrees) kept the roads icy and “It is closed completely unfair for schools through midweek.. insurance companies to punish Power failures were few in homeowners making routine Delaware, butfor DP&L reported claims against their homeowners about 1,600 residents lost power insurance,” in Maryland.Sen. Sokola said. “I am Police disappointed thatmothe State said some toristshas took to the highways on court prevented the InsurMonday “as though it was sunny ance Department from prohibitandthis 85 degrees.” ing practice, and I hope the Their lack of good judgment resulted in police going from one accident scene to another throughout the day, they said.

In 2008, at a time when state and federal grants have leveled off or even decreased, Chesapeake Utilities announces that the By Lynn R. Parks grant levels of the Sharing Fund have for those Asincreased of Tuesday, no onewho had have assistance. filed qualified to run forfor seats on the LauUtilities rel Chesapeake School Board and thecreated Seaford the Sharing Fund with donations School Board. Deadline to file as provided by iscustomers, a candidate Friday byemploy4:30 p.m. ees,Inthe community andboard ChesaSeaford, current peake Utilities Corporation to enmember Richard Kingree said sure that that the elderly, those Monday he was ill notand going to facing financial hardshipfive-year are not file to run for a second forgotten during the cold winter term. months when energy bills are at “It was a very interesting their peak. said Kingree, who experience,” “Now not from the time be Deretired in is 1999 the to state cutting back on grants for those partment of Labor’s Division of in need,” stated Shane Breakie, Vocational Rehabilitation and just president of the Chesapeake this year stopped working with Emergency Recipient the division Energy as a temporary employee. “But it is a big time commitment. I don’t feel like I can do it for another five years.” All termsCounty on the Council, Seaford at Sussex School Board are for years. its January 8 meeting,five elected Similarly, all members of the its officers for 2008, selecting Laurel and Woodbridge school as president Councilman board serve for five years.Finley Seats B. Jones Jr. of Greenwood, on the Delmar School Boardand are as vice president Councilman divided among five-year terms Lynn J. Rogersterms. of Milton. and three-year Councilman R. Dukes Like Kingree,Dale Laurel board of LaurelEdward held theJestice council member haspresinot filed for Jestice did not dency forreelection. the past year, while respond to several requests for Jones served as vice president. comment. As president Jones will preof Tuesday, Woodbridge sideAsover all council meetings in Schoolwith Board incumbent Edith 2008, Rogers substituting Vincent had not filed to run for if Jones is unable to attend. another term. Two for Bridgeville It is customary the counresidents, Alice Jeanne Matsinger cil, at the first meeting each and Willie Lee Savage, of have filed new year, to elect its officers as candidates. (Vincent was un-

Program (CHEERP), which manages the Sharing Fund. “Chesapeake Utilities is proud to be able to increasefor ourcomment.) efforts to help available customers this two year.” In Delmar, incumbents Forfiled 2008, Utilihave to Chesapeake keep their seats. ties will Smith, nearly double contriCharles who is its completing bution to theterm, Sharing Fund. in a five-year is opposed addition to increasing grant hisInbid for another term by Jason levels, grants are being Robertadditional Coco. Jeffrey Fleetwood, offered to thoseupwho are recently now finishing a three-year unemployed struggling by with term, is beingorchallenged mortgage-related issues.Gregory two Delmar residents, Sharing grants are available Cathell, Phillip Thompson and for all eligible Wayne Moore.customers of Chesapeake Utilities living on Kingree expressed disappointDelmarva. ment that so far, no one has filed grants are to Applications fill his seat onfor thethe Seaford available through Catholic Chariboard. While he said that serving ties Delaware on ainschool board(302-674-1782) is “a good way and Shore-Up in community,” Maryland (410to help out your he 749-1142). acknowledged that doing so is also a “substantial commitment.” “You have frequent meetings and school functions to attend,” he said. and He appoint legal that staff.instituting The suggested five-member council unanishorter terms might encourage mously approved Jones and “I more people to run for seats. Rogers for their posts. have heard people say that our Council also unanimously educational system is so comapproved James Griffin plicated, it takesD. five years to to becomeone-year familiar appointment with it,” he said. another on theAttorney. other hand, “our will state asBut County Griffin legislators only two terms, serve as theserve elected body’s chief and certainly state government is counsel. asVincent complicated as what we G. Robertson anddeal with. I believe that shorter terms Richard E.helpful.” Berl Jr. also were sewould be lected for one-year re-appointments as assistant county attorSpring neys, withAhead! Robertson to serve Daylight Time begins the Planning Savings & Zoning Comthis Sunday, March 8, at 2 a.m. mission andahead Berl to Set clocks oneserve hourthe before Board of Adjustment. retiring.

General Assembly will work with Commissioner Denn to pass this legislation promptly so homeowners can once again be protected.” State Rep. Valerie Longhurst, a member of the House Economic Development, Banking and Insurance Committee and the chief House sponsor of the new

legislation, pointed out that the regulation in question was implemented only after the House of Representatives failed to address the issue in 2005. “The last time the House of Representatives was given a bill to address this problem, it did not act,” she said. “Now that the legislature may

be the only body that can protect homeowners from these unfair practices, I hope the House will take this issue more seriously.” The case is C.A. No. 05C-10309 SCD, American Insurance Association and Property and Casualty Insurers Association of America vs. Delaware Department of Insurance.

The trees at the Seaford Golf & Country Club bend under the weight of the weekend snowfall. Photo by Carol Richardson

Chesapeake Utilities have doubled assistance program School Board candidate filing deadline is Friday

Sussex Council has new leadership

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MORNING STAR • MARch 5 - 11, 2009

PAGE 3

Police say car involved in fatal accident was not stolen

Van from which girls were thrown had seatbelts, but rear seat passengers were not buckled in, police say

The parents of a driver charged in a fatal accident were also arrested the day following the crash. Delaware State Police arrested the parents of Reagan M. Ogden for their participation in reporting the vehicle driven by their son in the fatal crash as stolen. On Wednesday, Feb. 25, investigators arrested Regan M. Ogden and Mary E. Ogden, both 53 of Greenwood, for Hindering Prosecution, Conspiracy 2nd Degree and Falsely Reporting an Incident. The first two charges are felonies. In addition, Mary Ogden was also charged with Knowingly Permitting an Unlicensed Driver to Operate a Vehicle. Police said these charges stem from the fact that both persons allegedly had falsified the report of the stolen vehicle and hindered the police investigation by providing false information to police as to their son’s involvement. Investigators said they were able to determine that these persons were aware of what their son was involved in and knowingly attempted to defraud investigators in 10903_HighVis_Slick 1/22/09 3:18 PM Page 1 their efforts to obtain the truth.

Mary Ogden

Regan Ogden

Investigators also learned that Mary Ogden knew her son did not possess a valid driver’s license and allowed him to drive the vehicle. Both were arrested after they voluntarily surrendered to police at Troop 5 in Bridgeville. Regan Ogden was released on a $1,250 unsecured bond and Mary Ogden was released on a $1,350 unsecured bond. The other passengers in the van include: a 27-year-old Bridgeville woman, a 23-year-old Laurel woman, a 17-year-old Lewes male, a 14-year-old Seaford male, a 13-year-old Laurel female, a 13-year-old Laurel female, a 10-year-old Seaford male, a 9-year-old Laurel male, a 9-year-old Bridgeville male, a 7-year-old Lewes female and a 3-year-old Laurel female. State Police charged Reagan M. Ogden, 33, of Greenwood with two counts of Vehicular Homicide, Leaving the Scene of an Accident Resulting in Death and Driving after Judgment Prohibited after an investi-

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the rear of the van causing the van to enter the center grass median. The van overturned and slid into the northbound lanes of US 13 on its passenger side. Witnesses told investigators they observed a single male subject exit the Dodge and run westbound from the crash site into a wooded area. Tonekia Townsend, 26, of Lewes was the operator of the van, which was registered to the Grace-N-Mercy Ministries in Georgetown. She and an additional front seat passenger were the only occupants wearing seatbelts. The 12-year-old was partially ejected and the 10-year-old was fully ejected. Kayla Tate, 12, of Lewes and Tashaun Mallory, 10, of Laurel were the two persons killed in the crash. They were not wearing seatbelts. In addition to the two fatalities, 10 other persons were injured and taken to area hospitals for injuries sustained in the crash. The crash occurred in the area of US 13 and Laverty Lane near Bridgeville at approximately 8:46 p.m. As a result of the crash US 13 was closed in both directions until after midnight. Members of the Collision Reconstruction Unit have completed their examination of the van involved in the crash. They have confirmed that the van had three rear bench seats that were equipped with functioning seatbelts to accommodate three persons in each row.

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gation revealed he was the operator driving the Dodge Neon involved in the crash. Investigators questioned that the Neon was stolen. The report was made at 9:06 p.m. and the crash occurred at approximately 8:46 p.m. Investigators learned the person reporting the vehicle stolen to police was the mother of Reagan Ogden. Police learned she had a son who resided at the home with her and suspected that the stolen vehicle report may be fictitious and potentially he was the operator. At approximately 12:30 a.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 25, troopers contacted Ogden at the Gray Stone Lane residence and noticed an abrasion to his nose. Initially, Ogden informed police the vehicle was stolen and he was not the operator. After additional questioning he admitted to police he was involved in the crash and that he had fled the scene. Investigators said Ogden ran to a convenience store in Bridgeville and called a person who picked him up and gave him a ride to his mother’s residence. On the night of Tuesday, Feb. 24, Reagan Ogden was driving the Dodge Neon south on US 13 in the left lane at a high rate of speed, police said. Ogden’s car approached a 1997 Ford van that was also in the left lane. The van was occupied by 13 persons. Police said Ogden attempted to swerve to the right just prior to impact, but struck

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MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

Briana Hall dreams of being an Olympic swimmer By Tony E. Windsor

At 12 years old, Briana Hall is making waves. She is a track and cross-country runner at Seaford Middle School, but she is most at home when gaining laps in a local swimming pool. A member of the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club’s swim team “The Barracudas,” Briana is quickly becoming as her coach aptly puts it, “a big fish in a small pond.” In both team and individual competition Briana is gaining speed that has her a strong contender for high school and college swimming; but that is just part of the plan for this pre-teenager. “I have a dream of going to the Olympics,” she said. A diehard Michael Phelps fan, Briana was disappointed about recent photos showing Phelps allegedly using a drug pipe. “Michael Phelps and I share strengths in the same types of [swimming] strokes. He has passion in the pool and that is why I like him so much. I just wish I had never seen the picture of him using marijuana.” Todd Drace and his wife, Rachael, are swim coaches at the Boys & Girls Club on Virginia Avenue in Seaford. Todd originally started the swim team at the club in 1998 when he was the aquatics director. At the time he had 12 swim team members and they competed in US sanctioned swim meets. Currently, the Western Sussex Boys & Girls Club swim team is part of the local “Two-Bay League.” Most of the swimming competitions, both individual and team, are based on half the swim lengths of US swim meets. Drace sees Briana as having strong potential in the swimming pool. “Before I came back to coach at the Boys & Girls Club I had heard about Briana and was interested in seeing just how good she was,” he said. “When I got here at the club and saw her in the pool I realized she is better than I had even heard. She has that ‘wow factor’ when you see her swim.” Drace knows what he is talking about when it comes to evaluating team swimmers. He is no stranger to the swimming pool having competed since he was a child. He is now a certified U.S. Swimming and Distance Coach and a member of the American Swimming Coaches Association. He says that being able to offer his team the opportunity to swim competitively in U.S. sanctioned meets would

Seaford Star

Published by Morning Star Publications Inc.

951 Norman Eskridge Highway Seaford, DE 19973 (302) 629-9788 • Fax (302) 629-9243 The Seaford Star (USPS #016-428) is published weekly by Morning Star Publications Inc., 951 Norman Eskridge Highway, Seaford, DE 19973. Periodicals postage paid at Seaford, DE. Subscriptions are $19 a year in county; $24 a year in Kent and New Castle Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharptown, and Federalsburg, Maryland; $29 elsewhere. Postmaster: Send address changes to Seaford Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000.

be a great opportunity for swimmers like Briana. He is hoping there may be an opportunity in the future to bring U.S. swimming to the Boys & Girls Club. “A swimmer like Briana needs to be challenged,” Drace said. “She is a big fish in a small pond and could benefit from swimming in a larger arena. We recently had the opportunity to swim in non-competition, invitational meets at the YMCA in Salisbury which swims in USA style meets. Briana took four gold medals, one bronze medal and scored high point for her age group (11-12).” Drace says should the Boys & Girls Club offer USA style swimming, it could be offered as an option to those swimmers who are interested in being a part of it. “We would still have swimming in the Two Bay League, but of parents wanted their children to swim in USA styles meets they could also do that,” he said. The meets, according to Drace are usually held in Pennsylvania, Maryland and New Jersey. “I think swimmers like Briana would benefit from USA style swimming because it enables them to see what swimming in high school and college will be like and prepares them for the challenges they will face,” he said. Drace said there is no doubt that Briana is serious about her swimming. “She is committed to swimming. When she is in the water she is the water to swim. She loves it,” he said. “When I challenge her she works to the level I demand. I try to get more from her because I know she can do it. She has great speed and control on the water. I usually send her out first in the team relays because she sets the pace and makes sure that the other teams are spending all their time trying to catch up with her.” Briana says she feels fortunate to have parents who are both very serious about physical fitness and health. Her mother, Toni, is a certified aerobics instructor and has been teaching “Toni-Bo” aerobics classes throughout the area over the past several years, including currently at the Powerhouse Gym in Seaford. Briana’s father is local weight lifting legend, Mike Hall, who is a five-time world and 10-time national power lifting champion. Mike is also a certified Olympic trained nutritionist and is currently fitness trainer specialist at the Health and Wellness Center of the University of

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published weekly by Morning Star Seaford Publications Inc., 951 Norman Eskridge 302 629.9788Seaford, DE 19973. Highway, Periodicals postage paid at Seaford, DE. Pick Up Subscriptions are $19 a year in county; $24 a year in Kent and New Castle A FREE Counties, Delaware, Delmar, Sharpcopyand of Federalsburg, Maryland; $29 town the Stars’Postmaster: Send address elsewhere. changes to Laurel Star, P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973-1000. RIDAL LANNER

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Maryland Eastern Shore, in Princess Anne, Md. Briana said along with running track and cross-country at Seaford Middle School, she does cardio-vascular training with her mother and strength training with her father. Her mother and father are her biggest fans and have no doubt that if their daughter says she is going to the Olympics, she is going. “We are so proud of her,” Mike Hall said. “I think she has all the potential in the world to be an Olympic champion one day. She has strong faith in God and knows he has given her gift. She gives all the glory to God.” Mike says his daughter “amazes” him when he watches her in the swimming pool. He said as a little girl it was gymnastics that was her special talent. “I remember before she could even walk, she was doing somersaults and tumbling through the house,” he said. Mike said he loves to see his daughter win; something she does quite often. However, he also knows how important it is for her to lose sometimes as well. “It is a double-edged sword and a lesson that Briana needed to learn,” he said. “It is wonderful to win, but if you just keep winning you can become complacent. Through losing you are able to gain the drive necessary to do better and keep challenging yourself.” In a January swimming competition, Briana broke the team record in the 100yard Individual Medley, swimming a

Briana Hall

combination of Backstroke, Breaststroke, Butterfly and Freestyle. Drace says there is no doubt that Briana will be a natural for high school swimming and a great prospect for a top notch college team. As far as the Olympics go, he says he will reserve that prediction for later, but adds that getting her out into the larger, more competitive swimming environment offered by the USA swimming style is a step in the right direction.

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MORNING STAR • MARch 5 - 11, 2009

Mayor says citizens should ignore letter about water pipe insurance By Lynn R. Parks

Seaford Mayor Ed Butler is advising citizens of the city to ignore letters that they received from a company advertising insurance in case of a break in water pipes. “I want people to know that if they got one of these letters, they should disregard it,” he said during last week’s city council meeting. The letters are from Home Service, with offices in Miami and Stamford, Conn., and are signed by director of customer service Michael Backus. “This is not a service that the city has solicited,” city manager Dolores Slatcher added. The company is not licensed to perform plumbing work in the city, she said. On Monday, Butler said that water supply pipes rarely break. “This is selling insurance for something people probably will not need,” he said. But Myles Meehan, senior vice president of Home Service, said Monday that last year, 20,000 people took advantage of water line coverage that they had bought from his company. “This is a service that we provide around the country and there are literally hundreds of thousands of people who buy it every year,” Meehan said. “Broken water pipes is something that does happen, not all the time, but when it does happen customers who have this service through us are glad that they do.”

As far as licenses, Meehan said, his company would contract with plumbers who are licensed in the city. “Homeowners make one call to us and we get a fully vetted, licensed and fully qualified plumber out to the home,” he said. Butler said that the proper procedure, in case of a water pipe break, is to call the city first. “The city will tell you where to go from there,” he said. At Tuesday night’s meeting, Butler had a letter that he had received at his home on Porter Street. “If you are [a] homeowner, you are responsible for the repair and maintenance of your water service line, from the curb up to where it enters your home,” his letter reads. “Have you considered what you would do if you were to suffer a burst or break in your water service line?” it continues. “These emergencies can be complicated and expensive to fix, often requiring digging equipment and a team of specialist technicians, and may leave you without a water supply in the meantime.” Cost for the water service line coverage is $4.99 a month. The insurance pays up to $3,000 of a service call. “I’m afraid that people will send them money and not realize what they are paying for,” Butler said. Meehan said that Home Service has been operating in the United States for five years. It is part of HomeServe, a company based in the United Kingdom.

PAGE 5

Seaford city councilman Rhea Shannon, left, tells a story about Dick Collison to the fire company membership. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

Collison honored by firemen Continued from page one

citizen of this town,” Butler said. Short, who is also a member of the department, said that stopping traffic to allow fire engines to turn from Cannon onto High Street is not always an easy job. “Dick has become kind of a dodge ball expert, because he has to dodge the equipment that sometimes flies off the trucks when they go around that corner,” he said. That equipment includes helmets, ladders

and hoses, Short added. Short read a tribute to Collison from the state House of Representatives. Because county Councilman Mike Vincent could not be there, Donald Tull, a member of the fire company, read a tribute from the Sussex County Council. It declared that Feb. 11 was a “day for all Sussex Countians to honor Dick Collison and a lifetime of achievement.”


PAGE 6

MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

Business Weights & Measures inspectors make sure we get what we buy March 1-7 is Weights & Measures Week across the nation – a time when we recognize the outstanding efforts and professionalism of our Delaware Department of Agriculture (DDA) Weights and Measures (W&M) inspectors. These men and women help ensure that consumers get what they pay for and businesses do not give product away as a result of inaccurate measuring equipment. The officials also make sure that individuals who sell products and services by weight or measure follow federal, state and local laws. Inspectors are out in the market place every business day making sure you get what you paid for. Look at your household budget. How much do you spend on consumer goods each month? Do you shop for groceries? Do you drive a car or truck? Do you heat your home? In Delaware, if you drive a car, heat your home, buy packaged meat, weigh fresh produce at the grocery store, etc., a Delaware Department of Agriculture (DDA) Weights and Measures employee has served you. On any given day, you can find DDA’s inspectors out in the field helping to insure that transactions based on weight or measure are accurate. Their day-to-day activities include: • Testing scales in supermarkets, pet shops, hardware stores, and other retail outlets

• Inspecting all types of packages to insure proper weighing and labeling • Making sure prices on items are accurate • Inspecting the meters of home fuel delivery vehicles and their delivery tickets to insure consumer protection • Inspecting store price scanning equipment • Testing and inspecting gasoline, diesel and kerosene pumps • Testing large capacity scales used for: asphalt, moving, feed, poultry, grain, recycling, logging, vegetables and other items. Do you realize how even the smallest inaccuracies in transactions can harm you? For example, if every gas pump in the country were inaccurate by slightly more than a tablespoon per 5 gallons, it would seem harmless in the individual transaction. Yet it would amount to a cumulative error of about $125 million annually. If every pound of meat were incorrectly weighed by 0.1 lb, it would amount to 500 million pounds annually. The tradition of Weights and Measures began on March 2, 1799 when John Quincy Adams signed the law in the United States. For more information on weights and measures, or if you have a marketplace complaint, call 800-282-8685 (DE only) or 302-698-4500 and ask to speak to the DDA Weights & Measures Section.

Chicken industry provides both economic and ecological benefits

New data compiled by Delmarva Poultry Industry, Inc. (DPI), the trade association for the Delmarva Peninsula’s broiler chicken industry, shows the continued strength and economic importance of the chicken industry. In 2008, Delmarva’s four poultry companies and nearly 1,800 poultry growers produced 571,263,000 broiler chickens, roasters and Cornish hens. To produce those chickens, Delmarva’s poultry industry used nearly 80 million bushels of corn and the equivalent of 27 million bushels of soybeans. The feed bill in 2008 was nearly $927 million, up 35 percent from 2007. This is on top of a 33 percent increase in feed costs from 2006 to 2007. This unprecedented increase in feed costs, the largest expense in producing chickens, accounts for much of the financial stress in the chicken industry. The good news for Delmarva is that most of the corn and soybeans are grown locally, which means chicken industry dollars are flowing throughout the local economy. This income increase for farmers is significant because these dollars help keep local farmers in farming, an economic and ecological benefit to Delmarva. Data shows that farmland produces less

pollution per acre than developed land, so a strong poultry industry buying local feed ingredients is good for the environment. More than 14,000 poultry company employees on Delmarva earned more than $414 million in salaries while nearly 1,800 poultry growers were paid more than $178 million. These are substantial dollars being circulated in a relatively small geographic area. One important indicator of the strength and potential longevity of the chicken industry is the amount of money spent by growers and poultry companies on capital improvements, such as new facilities, renovations and new equipment. Delmarva’s four chicken companies spent more than $76 million last year while growers spent $45 million. This construction also positively affects many other businesses on Delmarva such as builders, material suppliers and financial institutions. The wholesale value of the broiler chickens raised on Delmarva last year reached a record high, exceeding two billion dollars for the first time. Delmarva produces about seven percent of America’s broiler chickens. Individually, Delaware is ranked #8; Maryland #9; and Virginia is #11 based on pounds of meat produced.

ANNIVERSARY DRAWING - MCM Jewelers recently had a drawing for their 20th anniversary. The winner of a beautiful jewelry box was Madeline Dunn, shown here with her grandson Michael. In the back row is June Ruggiero and owner Çindy Matthews. Submitted photo

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WE SELL COLORED METAL & TRIM We were very pleased with our new garage. Everything was completed on time and professionally done from start to finish! Mike Cherrix Happy with everything. A very nice job, reasonable price, what more can you say! Joe Pyles

FINANCING AVAILABLE


PAGE 7

MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

MO V I E S

Visit seafordstar.com or laurelstar.com for descriptions of current movie selections

The Movies At Midway Rt. 1, Midway Shopping Ctr., Rehoboth Beach, 645-0200 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 3/6 THRU THURSDAY, 3/12 Watchmen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:35, 2:30, 4:45, 6:05, 8:00, Gran Torino . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:40, 4:15, 7:00, Street Fighter: The Legend of Chun-Li . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:05, 3:10, 5:15, 7:25, Slumdog Millionaire . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:05, 4:50, 7:20, The International . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:25, 4:10, 6:45, Slumdog Millionaire . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:05, 4:35, 7:20, Taken . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:40, 4:35, 7:10, The Reader . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:20, 4:15, 6:50, Fired Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:10, 3:15, 5:10, 7:10, Paul Blart: Mall Cop . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:30, 4:05, 6:50, He’s Just Not That Into You . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 3:50, 6:35, Pink Panther II . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:50, 4:20, 6:40, Tyler Perry’s Madea Goest To Jail . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:45, 4:40, 7:05, Art House Theater Waltz with Bashir . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:05, 3:45, 6:30, all shows subject to change and availability

9:10 9:30 9:35 9:45 9:20 9:45 9:30 9:20 9:10 9:10 9:15 8:50 9:15 9:00

Regal Salisbury Stadium 16 2322 N. Salisbury Blvd., Salisbury, MD, 410-860-1370 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY, 3/6 Watchmen . . . . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00, 12:00, 12:30, 1:00, 2:30, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:00, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 9:30, 10:30, 11:00 Jonas Brothers: The 3D Concert Experience . . . . G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00, 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 9:00, 11:00 Street Fighter: The Legend of Chun-Li . . . . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11:45, 2:20, 5:10, 8:05, 10:35 Fired Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5:20, 7:50, 10:25 Tyler Perry’s Madea Goes To Jail . . . . PG13 . . . 11:30, 1:15, 2:05, 3:45, 4:40, 6:30, 7:15, 9:15, 10:00 Confessions of a Shopaholic . . . . . . . . . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3:55, 6:50, 9:40 Friday the 13th . . . . . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:35, 10:20 Caroline . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11:15, 1:50, 4:35, 7:10, 9:55 He’s Just Not That Into You . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:50, 4:10, 7:05, 10:15 Pink Panther 2 . . . . . . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:20, 2:40 Push . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:10 Taken . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:40, 3:00, 5:30, 8:15, 10:35 Hotel for Dogs . . . . . . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:10, 2:35, 5:05 Paul Blart: Mall Cop . . . . PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:20, 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:20 Slumdog Millionaire . . . . R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:00, 4:45, 7:45, 10:40 Showtimes for additional dates can be viewed on line at www .fandango .com/21804_movietheatershowtimes

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MORNING STAR • MARch 5 - 11, 2009

Health

What you should know about using ‘if, then’ statements By Anthony Policastro, M.D

Children are often smarter than we think. I often will have parents tell me about a child who behaves for one parent but not for the other. Parents often think this is strange. It is not. Children very quickly learn when a parent means what they say and when they do not. They are more likely to disobey the one that they think is not serious. I often hear parents use what I call the “If … then” statement in the office. Sometimes, it takes the form of “If you do not do something, then I will…” At other times it takes the form of “If you do something, then I will…” There are several problems with using this statement.

The first is that children very quickly is what will happen immediately. Children learn whether you mean it or not. If you have short memories. carry out the threat You cannot promevery time, they will ise a reward or a pay attention to it in punishment later. It What I tell parents the future. has to be right now. is that they should If you someTherefore, every times do what you only use the “If…then” “If…then” statement threaten and someneeds to have a constatement when they know times do not, they sequence that can be for sure they are going to will learn to ignore carried out immediit. They can’t be ately. do what they threaten. sure when it is real That means it and when it is not. should be something Therefore, they always simple. It means it should assume it is not real. They continue doing be something easy to do. whatever they please. A second piece of Any “If…then” statement that talks this is making sure what you tell the child about things like TV or video games later in the day will have no effect on the child. They figure that by the time that this happens, they can negotiate a lesser punishment. It is not real because it is not there at the time. Children will very quickly learn when result from cancer therapy. to pay attention to parents who say “If… Cancer Care Center at Nanticoke Methen” because they mean it and when parmorial Hospital will host the program on ents are just saying it and have no intenMonday, March 16 from 5 to 7 p.m. in tion of carrying it out. the Cancer Care Center’s 2nd floor conWhat I tell parents is that they should ference room. only use the “If…then” statement when The program is free to all patients in they know for sure they are going to do active cancer treatment. Registration is required and space is limited. To register, contact Nanticoke Memorial Hospital’s Cancer Care Center at 629-6611, ext. 2588.

Cancer Center hosts program

Women undergoing chemotherapy or radiation treatment for cancer can now receive free professional help to cosmetically disguise the appearance-related side effects of treatment. Look Good...Feel Better, a program developed by the Cosmetic, Toiletry, and Fragrance Association Foundation, the American Cancer Society, and the National Cosmetology Association, trains volunteer cosmetologists to help women with cancer conceal loss of hair, skin problems, and other side effects that can

Buffet benefits at LifeCare LifeCare at Lofland Park will host a buffet dinner at the Georgia House Restaurant in Laurel on Monday, March 30 from 5 to 7 p.m. Dinner includes an all-you-can-eat buffet consisting of Mississippi Cajun catfish, Yankee pot roast, buttermilk fried chicken, pasta marinara, salad, rolls, various sides, assorted desserts and non-alcoholic beverage. Carryout is available. Adults are

Dinner

$16.99 each, ages 4 to 12 cost $8.99, and ages 3 and under eat free with a paying adult. All money raised will be used for entertainment costs for residents at LifeCare at Lofland Park. For more information or to purchase tickets, contact LifeCare at Lofland Park at 628-3000, ext. 8300 or via email at sockritm@nanticoke.org.

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what they threaten. It is a lot better to not say it to begin with, then to not be able to carry it out. In most cases, “If…then” statements are somewhat automatic. We do not think about what we are saying ahead of time. Therefore, we say something that we have no plan of enforcing. Children learn that and take advantage of it. The bottom line is that there are several important issues about “If…then” statements to remember. The first is to not use it in the first place if you can avoid it. The second is to not use it unless you mean it. The third is that if you use it, you must be planning to follow it through 100% of the time. The fourth is that the planned action must be immediate. The fifth is that the planned action should be relatively simple to carry out. That leads me to my own “If…then” statements. If you use them correctly, you will find they are very effective. If you use them incorrectly, they will just make a child ignore you and make his/her behavior even worse.


MORNING STAR • MARch 5 - 11, 2009

PAGE 9

Health Briefs Safe Sitter class offered

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital is offering a Safe Sitter class for girls and boys ages 11 to 13 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, March 7. The Safe Sitter program is a medically accurate instructional series that teaches youngsters how to handle emergencies when caring for younger children. Cost is $35 and participants are to bring a bagged lunch. All medical information will be taught by a certified professional. Instructors provide tips to make sitters more confident caregivers. They teach safety and security precautions, such as what to do if a stranger comes to the door and when and how to call for help. They give information on child development and suggest age-appropriate activities. Participants will also learn about the business aspects of babysitting. To register or for more information, contact Nanticoke Memorial Hospital at 629-6611, ext. 2540.

Autism Ball & Auction is planned

The Lower Delaware Autism Foundation’s Autism Ball & Auction for Hope is Saturday, March 7 at the Bay Center in Dewey Beach. The cocktail attire event kicks off at 6

p.m. with a silent auction followed by dinner, live auction and dancing to the live sounds of Big City Band. There will be an open bar during the silent auction from 6 to 8 p.m. and a cash bar from 8 p.m. to midnight. Tickets are on sale for $125. i.g. Burton of Milford is the lead sponsor. “This year’s theme for the Autism Ball is Dream,” said Melissa Tice Martin, LDAF Executive Director. “I.G. Burton’s support means LDAF can continue to provide quality programs and services to individuals with autism. Their support means more than they know especially in this economy.” For more information or to purchase tickets, call 302-644-3410 or visit ldaf. com.

Lee promoted to ICU director Nanticoke Health Services has promoted Lori Lee, RN, BSN, to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) director. As ICU director, Lee is accountable for the delivery of medical-surgical and specialty surgical care services in collaboration with

physicians and other health care providers at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. Lee is a graduate of Tidewater Community College in Virginia and Wilmington College and has over 15 years of nursing experience. She started at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital as an ICU nurse in 1997, transitioned to the Education Department, then back to ICU as interim director and now director.

Cancer Networking Support Group

The Wellness Community of Delaware offers a “General Cancer Networking” support group the third Monday of each month from 4:30- 6:30 p.m. held at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital’s Cancer Care Center second-floor library, Seaford. Professionally led cancer support programs offer hope, education, and emotional support for adults with cancer and their

loved ones who want to fight for recovery and the quality of their lives. Learn how to feel less isolated and more in control. All programs offered through The Wellness Community of Delaware are free of charge to people affected by cancer. For further information, or to register, call 645-9150.

CHEER plans healthy living expo

On Tuesday, April 21 the CHEER Community Center in Georgetown will host a free Healthy Living Expo from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Healthy Living Expo, which is open to the public, has room for more vendors to set up a table at the expo. The fee is $75 or $50 if you offer a health screening. For registration or more information, call 302-854-9500.

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PAGE 10

MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

Students learn about woman’s journey from Ethiopia By Carol Kinsley

Fifth graders at Frederick Douglass Elementary in Seaford sat captivated recently as First Lt. Lida A. Iyassu, who is stationed at Dover Air Force Base, described her childhood journey out of Ethiopia which eventually brought her to the United States. Teacher Kim Marqius invited Iyassu, who was her husband’s lieutenant last year, to speak to her class and those of fellow teachers Wendy Mears, Lila Meckley, Jen Covington and Christina Walsh, as part of a unit on heritage. In 1975, Iyassu told kids gathered in the cafeteria, Ethiopia’s king was killed by his former “good friend” who then became a military dictator. Iyassu’s father was in the military, but their family was from a different ethnic group, or tribe, and the dictator did not trust him. Her father was sent to a prisoner of war camp for six years. Even after he was released from prison, he couldn’t get out of the military. He and his family were watched all the time. In 1989, he escaped to Sudan. He did not even tell his family where he was going. “We were outcasts in school because my father left,” Iyassu continued. “The teachers did not like us.” She and her brother and three sisters would take a different route to school each day. The military came daily to their house at all hours, looking for her father and making sure they did not leave. “It was like being stalked,” she said. Two years later, her father called and asked her mother to come to Kenya. Iyassu punctuated her talk with questions to see how much the students knew about her homeland and how well they were listening. A correct answer was rewarded with candy. “My mother started selling the furniture to get money for the trip. She kept the trip a secret from us kids so we would not get excited and tell anyone we were leaving,” she said. Then one day, pretending to go to a resort park for a vacation, they left for Kenya. They traveled at night, but they were caught and taken to a police station. “Imagine having a gun pointed at you,”

she told her audience. She was just their age at the time. “The police chief was sad; we kids were nervous and crying. My mother explained we had not seen our father for three years. The chief sent us to a refuge camp. A refuge camp is almost like a jail for people running away from their country. But there is a little bit of freedom and some help,” she explained. “But we were safe. We would not get killed.” Her family was there for one year. “We had the same food every day,” she said, recalling how her little sister was sent every day to get the bottle of milk they would all share. This sister really liked milk, and she would drink more than her share along the way home. The Lutheran Embassy offered help and located her father in Sudan. The family was sent to the United States in 1991. They had no choice in where they landed — Jacksonville, Fla. — but they did not care. They lived in a church attic for two years. “I slept on the floor,” she said, comparing it to going to bed at night in Ethiopia hearing the sounds of hyenas in the distance. There were also giraffes, elephants, hippos and lions, she said. She was entered in third grade, speaking no English except “cat” and “dog” which she learned from Sesame Street. Her mother did not permit her to wear jeans until two years later. Iyassu’s audience was more impressed by that restriction than the guns or wild animals. In high school she joined the Junior ROTC. She wanted to join the Air Force, but a teacher said she should go to college first. She went to the University of West Florida and after graduation was commissioned as a second lieutenant. She became a naturalized citizen in 2001. “I love the military,” she said. “I wanted to follow in my dad’s footsteps. I wanted to serve a country willing to open its doors to my family.” After questions, Iyassu taught them a few words in her native Amharic language, then invited them to taste some food she brought, a spicy beef dish served on flat bread. She admitted, “I don’t cook. I had to call my mom to ask her how to make it.”

As their teachers serve a spicy Ethiopian beef at the back of the room, students pepper Lt. Lidia Iyassu with questions about her heritage. Photos by Carol Kinsley

Lt. Lidia Iyassu, a first lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force, shared her heritage and her long journey from Ethiopia with fifth graders at Frederick Douglas Elementary School.

Lt. Lidia Iyassu, who entered third grade in Florida knowing only two words in English, compares notes with fifth grader Denise Mondestin, who came to Frederick Douglas Elementary from Haiti.

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MORNING STAR • MARch 5 - 11, 2009

PAGE 11

Donations rolling in for Viva Las Vegas fundraiser hotel stays, and lawn service packages. Winnings from the evening will be used to benefit Women’s Health/Digital Mammography Services at Nanticoke Memorial. Last year’s annual auction event drew a record crowd and raised over $94,000. Presenting sponsor for the April 4th Nanticoke Dinner/Auc-

This double unit, 2-bedroom, 2-bath timeshare in Williamsburg could be owned by the winning bidder at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital’s Dinner/ Auction.

also nearby. There are many other items available from gift certificates

donated by local businesses, executive assistant services, furniture, microdermabrasion sessions,

Pastor Brown new House of Hope executive director

The Board of Directors of the House of Hope Delaware (HOHDE), an affiliate of National House of Hope, announces their new executive director, Pastor Rob Brown. Pastor Brown comes to HOHDE from Central Worship Center (CWC) in Laurel where he served as youth and family pastor for over five years. He and his wife Sharon have two children, Kyle and Paige, and reside in Laurel. Brown was also involved in outreach and counseling and service and mission projects at Delmarva Christian High School (DCHS). CWC will continue to be Pastor Rob’s home church and he will also maintain his relationship with DCHS. “P Rob,” as he is affectionately known, views his new position as an opportunity to greater serve and reach area youth and their

Sharon and Rob Brown

families who are in need. Working with area churches, schools and organizations, Pastor Rob plans to execute a threefold model - bring them in, heal them up and send them out. Along with individual and family counseling, the model involves leadership, discipleship and ministry training. Pastor Rob is no stranger to House of Hope Delaware. He has served as a counselor and teacher in the non-residential program helping teens and their parents. Pastor Rob’s wife and children will serve alongside him. Rob and Sharon have already attended a House of Hope annual conference in Florida and are making plans to return in the spring for more training. For more information on the House of Hope Delaware, call 302-337-9330 or visit www.houseofhopedelaware.org.

Get Life Coaching founder visiting Delaware Tech Help manage the challenges in your life or start a new career with help from Get Life Coaching founder Joe White at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. White, the winner of the 2008 New Castle County Chamber of Commerce’s Entrepreneurial Advocate of the Year award, started Get Life Coaching in his basement with one client in 1999. Today, the company has offices in Wilmington and Delaware City and works with individuals and businesses in Delaware, Pennsylvania and New Jersey. White has personally coached

hundreds of individuals and businesses and thousands have attended his seminars and speaking engagements. White will be offering four workshops in March and April. The first is a free, 90-minute mini-version of the “Breaking through the Barrier” course that will have an immediate impact on your life. An emphasis will be placed on learning how to break limiting patterns and move past negative emotional states. This workshop takes place on Tuesday, March 10, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. The “Life’s Challenges” semi-

nar on Wednesday, March 11 from 9 to 10:30 a.m., will teach participants how to manage life’s challenges, not stress. On Saturday, March 21, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., experience the interactive 10-hour workshop, “Breaking through the Barrier,” which helps limit the beliefs, self talk and fears holding you back. Looking for a new career? Gain the tools, resources and training necessary to be a successful life coach in “Coach’s Camp,” beginning Friday, April 24 at 7 p.m. For more information or to register, call 856-5618.

tion is Delaware National Bank, and the Community Partner is Nemours Health and Prevention Services. Tickets are available for $75 per person. Sponsorship packages are available. For further information contact the Corporate Development office of Nanticoke Memorial Hospital at 629-6611, extension 2404.

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Nanticoke Health Services is holding their Annual Dinner/ Auction Saturday, April 4, 2009 at Heritage Shores Club, Bridgeville. With the theme of “Viva Las Vegas”, donations are rolling in to make this year’s auction a winning night for the hospital and the community. Galen & Joanne Brosius of Seaford have donated a deeded timeshare in the heart of Colonial America, Fairfield Williamsburg Patriots’ Place. Discover the culture of the past amid the luxuries of modern resort living. The high bidder will OWN this double unit 2-bedroom, 2-bath that was recently renovated with all new furnishings. Comfortably accommodates up to 6 guests. Resort amenities include an outdoor swimming pool, tennis courts, children’s program, restaurant, playground, and game room. Patriots’ Place is just minutes from Colonial Williamsburg, The Historic Triangle, Busch Gardens, and Water Country USA. Golf, lakes, and boating are

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PAGE 12

MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

Mall Tires must clean up his site before he can occupy new shed By Lynn R. Parks

The owner of a tire business on U.S. 13 in Seaford has been granted permission to put a new building on his property. But that permission came with several stipulations. Qamer Mall, owner of Mall Tires, was told by the city council that before he can occupy the new building, he has to clean up the site. That includes paving the parking lot and improving the buildings cur-

rently on the lot. Those buildings include the former Mail Room. “I went by and looked at your property today,” Councilwoman Grace Peterson told Mall. “I’m really glad that I’m not your neighbor. Your property is not in good condition.” The tire business is sandwiched between Days Inn and Comfort Suites. Mall promised that the property will be cleaned up this summer. He also indicated that a Quonset hut on the property will be

torn down within two or three years. Mall has owned the property since 2003. In September, the city’s Board of Adjustment granted a one-year variance to allow Mall to park a storage trailer on the property. The 30- by 30-foot building that he plans to build will replace the storage trailer. Plans call for the new building to be put up just 1 foot away from an existing building. Under the city permit granted

Tuesday night, the buildings have to be 3 feet apart, to allow for grass cutting equipment. “Make sure that your contractor understands that the buildings have to be 3 feet apart,” Councilman Rhea Shannon told Mall. “If they are 2 feet apart, you’re going to have to tear everything down. It’s as simple as that.” The city also stipulated that the existing building be renovated so that its facade matches the new building.

Developer focuses on apartments Hearing on new complex tabled By Lynn R. Parks

The Villages at Stoneybrook, a housing development planned for 36 acres just west of Beaver Dam Heights, got final approval from the city nearly two years ago. On Tuesday, the developer received permission from the city council to do the project in five phases instead of four. Rick Banning, representing the Tharp Road Acquisition Company, told the council that the company plans to start work “as soon as the weather breaks.” In phases one, two and three, it will build the development’s apartment buildings, with 200 units. That will take from two to two and a half years, he said. Timeframe of construction of the planned 150 condominiums, phases four

and five, will be “driven by economic conditions,” Banning said. “We will get the apartments done, then assess from there,” he added. Josh Littleton, the city’s building official, told the council that the final design of the Village at Stoneybrook has not changed. What changed was the sequence of construction, to allow the apartments to open before work on the condos begins. Councilman Rhea Shannon told Banning that he is looking forward to the city having a new apartment complex. “I drive down past Delmar and there on U.S. 13 are all these new apartments,” he said. “And they all seem to be occupied. I would really like to see that in our city.” “So would I,” Banning replied.

Reflective address markers

Blades Volunteer Fire Company is also offering reflective address markers to help rescuers identify locations quicker in the event of an emergency. Those in the Blades fire district may purchase the markers for $15 or have them installed for $20. A post must be in place for the installation. New town and county ordinances require address markers on properties, not across the road. The markers are 6 inches by 18 inch-

es with three-inch reflective numbers. Call 629-4896 to place an order.

Blades VFC anniversary basket

Blades Volunteer Fire Company is offering a 75th Anniversary collector basket featuring a special laser engraved lid. The American Traditions Basket Company in Canal Fulton, Ohio makes the hard maple handmade baskets. Celebrate the 75th Anniversary of the Blades Volunteer Fire Department by buying a commemorative basket. The “Buckeye” Basket features a special laser engraved wood lid, commemo-

By Lynn R. Parks A hearing on the final plans to transform former commercial property in Seaford into a residential complex was tabled last Tuesday night. City building official Josh Littleton told the city council that the owner of the property, J. D. Butler Custom Homes, had failed to comply with the city’s new financial good standing policy, which requires that all outstanding bills be paid by anyone desiring to do business with the city. The good financial standing law went into effect April 7. At a public hearing in September, J. D. Butler, who owns the construction rative brass tag, bicentennial weave, and plastic protector. The basket measures 6.50” x 3.75” and sells for $45 each. The American Traditions Basket Company has been a family owned business for 15 years, specializing in making hand woven American hard maple baskets, customizing each basket order for fundraisers and corporations around the country. For more information or to preorder baskets contact James Bratten at 629-4896. Cash or checks are accepted for payment. You will be notified when your order arrives.

firm, told the council that he planned to remodel a house and a one-story block building for six apartments. The buildings, at Stein Highway and Bradford Street, were once home to Miller’s Upholstery. According to Butler’s plans, the house would be made over into a duplex, with one apartment upstairs and another downstairs. The block building would be four, two-bedroom apartments, each 600 square feet to 700 square feet. The proposal has received a variance from the city’s Board of Adjustment, to allow residential development in an area that is zoned for commercial development.

Seaford City Council

Two city council seats will be decided in city of Seaford elections set for April 18. The seats are currently held by Grace Peterson and William Bennett. Both have filed for reelection. Terms are for three years. Deadline to file as a candidate is March 20 at 5 p.m. Deadline to register to vote in the election is also March 20 at 5 p.m. Residents of the city have to be registered with city hall in order to cast a ballot. For more information, call city hall, 629-9173.

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PAGE 13

Her name isn’t Fannie, and she isn’t married to Mr. Farmer. But ynn arks my daughter is hard at work on her second cookbook. Cranberry Greens Her premier publishing, creatively entitled “Our First Year of evolved when all she Marriage Cookbook” and featuring had in the refrigera34 recipes and photographs of a few of her dishes by her husband, tor were a container of was released just before Christmas. cranberries and a bag It had a limited first printing — just of kale. 10, for close friends and members of her family. “shamelessly copied” from the “Joy of Already, she has sent me for Cooking” cookbook. proofing five recipes for her sequel, due But most of the recipes are either her for release in Christmas 2009. Whether own adaptations of recipes — add kale to it will have a larger printing, she has not split pea soup, for example, or put fish and said. broccoli in macaroni and cheese — or toFor the sequel, my duties will extend beyond proofreading. She has asked me to tally her own creations. Cranberry Greens evolved when all she prepare the dishes in my kitchen accordhad in the refrigerator were a container of ing to her instructions and report back to cranberries and a bag of kale. her how they are. For my efforts, she has I’m certain that she wouldn’t want me promised to autograph my 2009 cookbook. to divulge all that her upcoming cookbook I have to admit that I have prepared will contain. But I will tell you that one only one dish from “Our First Year of of the five recipes that she has asked me Marriage Cookbook” — Greek Giant to test is for Potato Lasagna, which she Beans, based on the beans that our daughdesigned when, in the middle of preparing ter ate when she spent several weeks in a lasagna, she realized that she didn’t have Greece. (Actually, I have prepared them several any noodles. Another is for White Lumpy Casserole. times because they are delicious. There’s “One day — I remember distinctly that it something about adding olive oil to the was 10 below outside — I sat in a coffee mixture that transforms it from the boring shop and read Martha Stewart Living,” old baked limas that I used to make to a wrote our daughter, a resident of St. Paul. more exotic food.) “The issue had an article on casseroles, But I have read the book several times and although the following one was not and, like I have so many times since beincluded, it was inspired by bits and pieces coming a mother, marveled at the adults of ones that were. It sounds delicious, and my babies have become. ends up being so, but during the middle The cookbook opens with an explanastage (after assembly and before cooking) tion of the value of buying local, organic it just looks like a bunch of white lumps.” and sustainably-produced foods. The casserole is assembled from on“Not only does this help trim down our ions, mushrooms, potatoes, chicken and carbon footprint, but it means the food we bread crusts, held together by a white eat is fresh and was raised with the primary focus on being eaten, not on surviving a sauce. Potatoes, mushrooms and onions — three of my favorite foods. Despite its trip across the country,” the author wrote. name, I can’t wait to try that recipe. “No amount of production will make In her first cookbook, published in Kraft cheese and winter tomatoes shipped 1896, Fannie Farmer has 1,849 recipes. from California into a dish that’s more My daughter has a ways to go before she than mediocre.” has accumulated that many. But she is Some of the recipes are copied from well on her way. other cookbooks: two, for example, for And with my autographed copy for biscuits and for strawberry shortcake that her sequel cookbook, I will be one proud I copied out of my own Fannie Farmer mother. I’m sure that Mrs. Farmer, Fancookbook and sent to her shortly after her nie’s mom, felt the same way. marriage. Lightning Cake, she admits, is

Everyone’s Irish Party • Tuesday, March 17, 2009 • 2 to 4 pm

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MORNING STAR • MARch 5 - 11, 2009


PAGE 14

MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

People

Smith-Cell wed at Gethsemane Stephanie Ann Smith and Timothy Eugene Cell were married on June 7, 2008, at Gethsemane United Methodist Church in Seaford. The bride is the daughter of Susan and Christopher Pressley of Laurel, and the late Timothy E. Smith of Seaford. The groom is the son of Brenda and Ronald Johnson of Seaford, and Paul Milton Cell of Seaford. The maid of honor was Jasmine Walter, and the bridesmaids were Fran Johnson and Alyssa Smith. The best man was Ron Johnson, and groomsmen were Matthew Cell and Justin Murphy. The ring bearer was Vinny Murphy. The bride wore a white spaghettistrap gown, embellished with tiny pearls, and a satin band around the top and bottom of the gown, with a long Chapel train.

The bridesmaids wore floor-length light pink gowns with a white satin band around the waist. The groom and his attendants wore white tuxedos with light pink vests and ties. The reception was held at Suicide Bridge Restaurant in Hurlock. The white cake accented with pink flowers was made by Cindy Long of Massachussetts, the aunt of the bride. The music was provided by the uncle of the bride, David P. Smith, also known as Karaoke kid. Photography was provided by Hilltop Studio of Seaford. Flowers were provided by John’s Four Seasons of Seaford. After a honeymoon in Cocoa Beach, Fla., the bride and groom have returned to their home that they just purchased in Seaford.

King, Steele welcome a daughter Timothy and Stephanie Cell

Truitt, Woods to be married Mr. and Mrs. Keith W. Truitt of Seaford are proud to announce the engagement of their daughter, Kristin Ashley to Aaron Douglas Woods, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernie Snyder of Laurel. The bride-to-be is employed at Seaford Pizza King and Texas Roadhouse in Seaford. Her fiancé is employed at Allutech in Selbyville. The wedding is planned for March 2010. Formal wedding invitations will be sent.

Kristin Truitt and Aaron Woods

Cosgrove-Kurtz to wed in June Mrs. Noriss L. Cosgrove of Wilmington and Dr. Martin J. Cosgrove of Seaford announce the engagement of their daughter, Noriss “Norkie” Ennis Cosgrove, to Mark Alan Kurtz, son of Dr. Robert and Ellen Kurtz of Kennett Square, Pa. The bride-to-be attended high school at Worcester Country School in Berlin, Md. and graduated from James M. Bennett in Salisbury, Md. She earned a bachelor of arts in international relations from the University of Delaware and a juris doctorate from Widener University School of Law. She is a litigation associate with McCarter & English LLP in Wilmington. Her fiance attended high school at Wilmington Friends School in Wilmington and graduated from Middlesex School in Concord, Mass. He earned a bachelor of arts in economics from Colgate University and a master of business administration and juris doctorate from Washington University in St. Louis, Mo. He is an associate in the business de-

Thomas King and Denise Steele of Laurel announce the birth of their daughter, Ashlyn Ellen King. Ashlyn was born on Dec. 28, 2008 at 6:40 p.m. at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury, Md. She weighed 9 pounds 1 ounce and was 20” long. Maternal grandparents are Elmer and Sandy Steele of Seaford. Paternal grandparents are Harry and Liz King of Laurel.

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partment at Richards, Layton & Finger in Wilmington. The wedding will be held in June in Rehoboth Beach. The couple will reside in Wilmington.

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MORNING STAR • MARch 5 - 11, 2009

PAGE 15

DSWA celebrates its 41,000th customer in recycling programs

The Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) is proud to have reached another milestone within its Curbside Recycling and Yard Waste Collection Program. On Feb. 19, DSWA signed-up its 41,000th customer within its Curbside Recycling and Yard Waste Collection program. DSWA’s Curbside Recycling Program began in 2003, and since then DSWA has seen the program grow not only in the number of residents who participate but in the service it has been able to provide to its customers. Since the start of the program, DSWA has also worked with several towns and cities, including the City of Dover, the Town of Fenwick Island, the Town of Millville and the City of Milford to bring curbside pick-up to its residents. In early 2008 DSWA began using a single-stream recycling system, which means that residents no longer have to sort their recyclables into separate containers.

When participants sign-up for the program, they receive a 65-gallon cart on wheels, which residents can use to collect narrow-neck plastic bottles, plastic grocery bags, aluminum, steel and empty aerosol cans, newspapers, junk mail, corrugated cardboard, paperboard, and clear, brown, and green glass containers. The program currently costs $3 per pick-up for residents with pick-ups occurring on a bi-weekly schedule. In 2008 DSWA also unveiled its payas-you-throw yard waste collection program. This program allows customers to purchase stickers, which are placed on bags or bundles of yard waste, placed at the curb and collected by DSWA. Stickers cost $1 each and are bought in increments of ten. To sign up for DSWA’s Curbside Recycling or Yard Waste Collection Program, call the Citizens’ Response Line at 1-800-404-7080 or visit www.dswa.com.

The League of Women Voters of Sussex County extends an invitation to all interested citizens to the upcoming monthly meeting, Wednesday, March 11, at 1 p.m. at the Rehoboth Beach Public Library. Vance C. Phillips, president of Sussex County Council, will speak and answer questions from the audience. A member of County Council since 1998, Phillips represents Council District 5, which is comprised of the southern portion of the county. “Sussex County’s low taxes and resort climate have made it a destination for a generation of new residents and recent retirees. But Sussex County, like our nation, is at a crossroads. Uncertain economics and greater demands on our working families require government to exercise prudent fiscal management and conservative spending practices, now more than ever. Keeping money in the taxpayers’ pockets fosters new job creation, pays off home loans and sends children to college. That’s the American dream, and it’s my goal to see that Sussex County continues to be a place for that dream to thrive,” said Phillips.

The meeting is free and open to the public and reservations are not required. The Rehoboth Beach Public Library is located at 226 Rehoboth Ave., Rehoboth Beach. For LWV meeting and membership information or directions, visit www.sussexlwv.org. or call 302-6447650. The League of Women Voters, a nonpartisan political organization, encourages informed and active participation in government, works to increase understanding of major public policy issue, and influences public policy through education and advocacy. Membership in the League is open to men and women of all ages.

LWV to host President Phillips

Liberty Tax offers tax special

During the week of March 2-8, Liberty Tax Service is offering 50% off tax preparation for all emergency medical technicians and hospital employees. The company will offer this service at their Dover, Smyrna, Middletown, Bear, Rodney Village, and Seaford offices for firsttime customers. For more information, call Liberty Tax Service at 302-734-1850.

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PAGE 16

MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

Community Bulletin Board Look-In Shoppe hosts event

Gold Coast will buy your broken, old or unwanted gold jewelry. The Look-In Glass Shoppe at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital is hosting a Gold Coast event on Wednesday, March 11 from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the hospital’s lobby. Gold Coast will purchase your yellow or white gold at current market price. Items are required to have a karat stamp to indicate the gold content. All proceeds from The Look-In Glass Shoppe benefit Nanticoke Health Services. For more information, call 6296611, ext. 4955.

First time home buyer seminar

Century 21 Tull Ramey Real Estate is holding a First Time Home Buyer Seminar on Thursday, March 12, at 6 p.m. at Century 21 Tull Ramey Real Estate, 22350 Sussex Ave., Seaford. Take advantage of the new first time buyer tax credit of $8,000. Mortgage officers will be on hand to answer questions.

Victorian Tea

Saturday, April 4, at 2 p.m., the annual spring Victorian Tea will be held at the Ross Mansion on Ross Station Road, formerly North Pine Stret Extended.

Seaford Library

• Love a good murder mystery? Who  is Sam Spade? Find out this and much  more with your free copy of “The Maltese Falcon” written by Dashiell Hammett. Get your copy at the Seaford District Library while supplies last. • Baby Bookworms, an infant story  time, Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m.; Toddler tales, Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m.; 3-5 Storytime, Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. • Delaware EITC Campaign offers 2008  tax preparations on Fridays starting at 10 a.m. • Adults, here is your chance to win  some great prizes! Registration has begun for the Adult Winter Reading Program “Winter Sizzlers.” • The Seaford District Library has  joined IHOP in an effort to raise money for the Library. Eat a meal at the Seaford, Dover, Rehoboth or Salisbury, Md. IHOP locations and return an itemized receipt along with a comment card to the Seaford District Library. We must have the comment cards with itemized receipts in order to receive the reimbursement. The Seaford Library will receive 10% of the total receipt. • The Seaford District will have a “Science and Religion” book discussion on Monday, March 16 at 6 p.m. • There will be a Seaford Library Board  meeting on Tuesday, March 17 at 5 p.m. • “Lights, Camera, Action!” The Seaford District Library hosts “Movie Night” on Thursday, March 19 at 5:30 p.m. For more information, contact Amber Motta at 629-2524.

• Registration for the Adult winter  reading program ends March 20 and all reading logs are due March 24, with the “Grand Finale” celebration on March 28 at 3 p.m. • The Celiac Support Group will meet  at the Seaford District Library on Monday, March 23 at 5:30 p.m. • There will be a Seaford Library Board  meeting on Tuesday, March 31 at 5 p.m.

Mt. Olivet Preschool

Mt. Olivet Preschool is now starting registration for three and four year olds for fall of 2009. We encourage families to come and visit our school during classroom hours 9 to 11:30 a.m., Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday mornings. Call the church office for an appointment 6294458.

Eastern Star soup sale

Homemade vegetable beef soup sale, $8 a quart. Order by March 9; pick up March 14, between 10 a.m.-noon. Eastern Star building, corner of Stein Highway and North Pine Street Ext. Call 629-0506, 6296925, or 629-2292 to order.

‘Ready, Set, Go!’

Free program for parents and caregivers of young children. Families will learn about transitioning their child into daycare, preschool, and kindergarten. Learn what area schools expect of incoming students and how to best prepare your child for success. Friday, March 13, 6:30 p.m., at the Seaford District Library, Community Meeting Room, 402 N. Porter St. Sponsored by Sussex Parents As Teachers. For more information call 856-5239, or Cris Henderson 875-2781.

SHS Family Night

Seaford Senior High School’s 2nd Annual Family Awareness & Appreciation Night will be held Friday, March 13, at Seaford Senior High School from 6 - 8:30 p.m. Presentations: “Life after high school - final key steps”; “Making financial planning count”; “Delaware School Law What you may not know.” From 6 to 7 p.m.: Making Financial Planning Court will be held in the auditorium. Delaware School Law, in room 109; arts & crafts show in the lobby; “Life after high school” in room 107; 7 - 8:30 p.m. - faculty vs. student basketball, and three point contest in the gymnasium. Snacks and drinks in the cafeteria.

Italian ice giveaway

For the 17th year, Rita’s Italian Ice has “Spring FREEver” - and on March 20, from noon to 10 p.m., Rita’s will offer every guest a free, 10 oz. cup of Italian ice to celebrate the beginning of spring. This giveaway will take place at all Rita’s locations. Visit www.ritasice.com to find your neighborhood Rita’s by zip code.

Lenten fish dinners available

The Knights of Columbus, St. Molua Council #4075 is offering their Lenten fish dinners at Our Lady of Lourdes Church Hall, which is located at the rear of the church, 535 East Stein Highway, Seaford. The dinners will be held every Friday during Lent (March 6, 13, 20, 27, and April 3). Serving times are from 4:30 to 7 p.m. The menu includes baked breaded flounder, homemade cole slaw scalloped pota-

toes or baked macaroni and cheese, glazed carrots, cut green beans, rolls and butter, assorted deserts, and coffee and iced tea. Adults are $8, children are $4. Eat in or take out is available. All proceeds benefit the St. Molua Council #4075 College Scholarship Fund.

to the public.) Beginners to intermediate participants are welcome in this fun, faithfilled, co-ed, non-competitive, resistance training, stretching, high/low aerobic class. For more information call Carol Lynch at 629-7539.

SCA plans dinner auction

Seaford Christian Academy will hold its 7th Annual Dinner Auction on Saturday, March 7 at Seaford Christian Academy’s Gym on Holly Street in Seaford. Come dressed in your Hawaiian shirts and flipflops for a fun-filled Hawaiian evening. Dinner is from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Silent auction tables open at 5 p.m. with the live auction beginning at 7 p.m. For more information, call 629-7161 or visit www. seafordchristian.org.

Cemetery lot owners

Seaford Odd Fellows Cemetery lot owners are reminded if they desire to keep any grave decorations, have them removed by March 15, during which time the cemetery will be cleaned for the Easter season.

Giant basement sale

Giant basement sale - clothes, shoes, TV’s, computer parts - something for everyone on March 14, 7 a.m.-noon, at Seaford Presbyterian Church, 701 Bridgeville Higway, 629-9077.

Miss/Little Miss Seaford

The Lioness Club presents its annual Miss/Little Miss Seaford pageant on Friday, March 27, at the Seaford Senior High School. Contestants for Miss Seaford must be 14 years of age prior to the pageant date but cannot turn 19 during the pageant year. They must be a freshman, sophomore, or junior. Contestants must live within the Seaford School District, but do not have to attend Seaford School. Miss Seaford will be awarded a small scholarship and $100 cash prize. For more information or to pick up an application, contact Bonny Hastings at Cut-n-Up Family Salon, or call Bonny at 841-4884 or 628-8150.

Fitness classes

Come join us in fitness classes: Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, at 9 a.m.; Tuesdays, Thursdays, 5:30 p.m. We meet in St. John’s UMC Fellowship Hall in Seaford. (Sponsored by St. John’s but open

CPR course

Lighthouse Church, located at 27225 Kaye Road in Laurel, will hold a CPR course on Saturday, March 28, from 9 a.m. to noon. The $40 fee covers the cost of the class which will be administered by a registered instructor from the Delaware Fire School. You will receive a certification card which will be valid for two years. A free luncheon will be held directly after the three-hour course. Space is limited and the deadline to register is March 8. To register, call the church at 875-7814 and leave a message, or call Rebecca Jones, pastor’s wife, at 628-8172.

Laurel election

The Laurel General Municipal Election will be held on Thursday, March 26, from 1 to 8 p.m., at the Laurel Fire Hall, located at 205 Tenth Street. Registered voters must show proof of identification. There is a contest for the seat of mayor, between Joshua S. Duryea and John Shwed. The following uncontested candidates are: Robin Fisher, councilwoman ward two; William Trujillo, councilman ward three; and H. Donovan Phillips, Jr., councilman at large.

The Beatles

The Laurel Lions Club will put on their show, “Let’s take a look at the 60s,” at the Laurel High School auditorium on March 27, 28, 29 (Sunday matinee at 2 p.m.)

Easter Egg Hunt

The Boys & Girls Club at Laurel will host an Easter Egg Hunt on Saturday, April 4. The event starts at 11 a.m. and various age groups will be hunting for eggs up until 4 p.m.

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MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009 Up to three years old will hunt at 11 a.m.; ages 4 and 5 will start at 11:45 a.m.; ages 6 and 7 will start at 12:30 p.m.; ages 8 and 9 at 1:15 p.m. and ages 10 to 12 at 2 p.m. The egg hunt will take place in the open field next to the Insurance Market along Central Avenue. There will also be a variety of food, games and other things being held at the Boys & Girls Club building. For more information, call 875-1200.

The Laurel Alumni Scholarship Foundation also administers the Helen Kirk Deputy Ellis Scholarship and the Class of 1956 Scholarship. Graduating seniors of Laurel High School are eligible for these scholarships. The application forms are available from the guidance office or by calling 8752503. All completed applications are due back to the foundation by April 1. The annual meeting is March 10, at the high school. Time is 7 p.m. All are invited.

St. George’s U.M.C. luncheon

AARP Driving Course

A luncheon will be held Saturday, March 7 from 11 a.m.-3 p.m., at St. George’s United Methodist Church on St. George’s Road between Delmar and Laurel. Menu will include oyster, chicken salad and hot dog sandwiches; crab soup and vegetable soup; peas and dumplings; desserts, baked goods.

Laurel Senior Center will be holding an AARP Driving Course on March 2324, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cost is $12 for AARP members; $14 for non members. To register for the course call the Laurel Senior Center at 875-2536.

Donations accepted

Delaware National Bank is accepting donations for the house fire that happened in Laurel, that caused $100,000 in damage. If you have any questions feel free to contact Wende Niblett at 875-2137.

‘High School Musical’

The Laurel High School Drama Club will present its Winter Musical, Disney’s “High School Musical,” on March 6 at 7:30 p.m. and matinee performances on March 7, and 8 at 2 p.m. Performances will be held in the Laurel High School Auditorium. Contact Brian Cass at bcass@laurel. k12.de.us, for advance tickets or reserve by phone 875-6120, ext. 273, or purchase in the high school office. Tickets price: adults $8, students/senior citizens $5.

AARP driver safety

Attention Active Duty Veterans

The AARP Driver Safety Course will be held at the Greenwood CHEER Activity Center, 41 Schulze Road, Greenwood, on Thursday, March 12 from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Cost is $12 per AARP member and $14 for non-members. Checks should be made payable to AARP. You must register in advance and have had the AARP Driver Safety Course within the last three years to take the refresher course. Participants will receive a deduction on the liability portion of their automobile insurance. For more information or to register, call Susan Welch at 349-5237.

The American Legion Post 19 of Laurel is actively recruiting new members for the post. Membership eligibility dates: WWI, April 6, 1917-Nov. 11, 1918; WWII, Dec. 2, 1941-Dec. 31, 1948; Korean War, June 25, 1950-Jan. 31, 1955; Vietnam War, Feb. 28, 1961-May 7, 1975; Lebanon/ Grenada, Aug. 24, 1982-July 31, 1984; Panama, Dec. 29, 1989-Jan. 31, 1990; Gulf War, Aug. 2, 1990-Cessation of hostilities as determined by the U.S. Government. Any member serving today is eligible if they are on active duty. Proof of service (DD-214) is required. Call Bettylou Evans, membership chairperson at 875-0167 for more information or fax 875-1943 or send a note of interest with your name, address and phone number to P.O. Box 329, Laurel, DE 19956.

All-you-can-eat spaghetti dinner

Greenwood Mennonite School Music Boosters hosts their annual “All-You-CanEat Spaghetti Dinner” on Saturday, March 7 from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Adults are $8, children ages 4 to 12 are $6 and families are $30. Children 3 and under eat free. Takeouts are available. For more information, call GMS at 349-4131.

Laurel Alumni Scholarship

The Laurel Alumni Scholarship Foundation announces that the scholarship forms for 2009 are now available. An applicant for the Laurel Alumni Scholarship, must be a graduating son or daughter of a member of the Laurel Alumni Association for at least three years prior to June 2009.

St. Patrick’s Day events

The Greenwood CHEER Activity Center has a full day of St. Patrick’s Day 800 S. Market St., Blades, Del.

Cafe Milano

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Greenwood library events

• Come join the folks in Greenwood as they read and celebrate the granddaddy of them all, “The Maltese Falcon“ by Dashiell Hammett, during The Big Read taking place in the month of March. The Big Read, an initiative of the National Endowment for the Arts, is a program which encourages communities to come together to read, discuss, and celebrate a single book. The Greenwood Library will host a viewing of the movie “The Maltese Falcon” on Friday, March 20 at 6 p.m. In addition, there will be a discussion of the book on Tuesday, March 24, at 6:30 p.m. Copies of the book are available at the circulation desk of the library. Both programs are free and open to all teens and adults. The Greenwood Library is located at Rt. 16 in Greenwood, just east of the railroad tracks. For further information, contact Robin Miller at 349-5309. • In honor of Red Cross Month, the

American Red Cross of the Delmarva Peninsula will be offering a free Community Disaster Education presentation at the Greenwood Library on Monday, March 16, at 3 p.m. Come learn about the three-step action plan and make sure that you are Red Cross Ready for an emergency in your home, neighborhood, or region. The program is free and open to all. Registration is helpful, but not required. • Learn the basics of a mouse and keyboard in a relaxed environment at the Greenwood Public Library every Wednesday afternoon from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. Registration is required, so call 349-5309 or come in to the library sign up. • AARP Tax-Aide tax preparers will be available at the library from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. on the following Wednesdays: March 11, March 25 and April 8 to conduct free tax preparation and e-filing for all taxpayers of all ages. Call the library to schedule an appointment.

Reception honors Conaway

The Town of Bridgeville will host a reception to honor outgoing Commission President Joseph T. Conaway at the close of the March 9 Commission meeting. The reception will begin immediately following the meeting, at approximately 8:15 p.m. at Bridgeville Town Hall, 101 N. Main St. Conaway has served the town

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events planned. A St. Patrick’s Day Party will be held from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Jimmy Passwaters will sing country and gospel music at 10:15 a.m. and a ham & cabbage luncheon will be served at 11:45 a.m. There will be a 50/50 raffle with drawing after lunch. Don’t forget to wear something green! A St. Patrick’s Evening Dinner will be held from 5 to 7:30 p.m. at the CHEER Activity Center. Cost for members is $7 and $10 for non-members. Enjoy a chicken cordon bleu dinner from 5 to 6 p.m then listen to musical entertainment by CaroLen from 6 to 7 p.m. For more information, call Susan Welch at 349-5237.

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Serving Breakfast 6 to 10 am, TURKEY SHOOT Every Sunday at Noon Behind VFW Mon. - Sat. at “The Round Table”


PAGE 18

MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

for eight years and did not seek re-election this year. Residents and friends are invited to join us for tis special recognition.

Longaberger bus trip

Dinner & show

Woodbridge High School Class of 2011 will host a buffet style dinner on Friday, March 13 and Saturday, March, 14 in the high school cafeteria from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The dinner is open to the public and will include ham, oven fried chicken, macaroni and cheese, green beans, cole slaw, peas and carrots, baked pineapple, rolls and assorted desserts. Cost is $10 for adults and $5 for kids 10 and under. Tickets are on sale now and available at the door. For more information, call 349-5195 or 349-4678. The Bridgeville Lions Club will also be holding their annual Variety Show at the same time beginning at 7:30 p.m. in the high school auditorium.

Beef and dumpling dinner

The Delmar New Century Club will have a beef and dumpling dinner on Sunday, March 22 at the Delmar VFW from 1 to 4 p.m. Proceeds benefit community projects. Cost is $10 and carry-outs are available. There will also be a Chinese Auction. For more information, call 302-8469880.

Dinner with Miss Delaware 2008

The Miss Delaware Organization invites you to join Miss Delaware 2008, Galen Giaccone, and the Miss Delaware 2009 contestants for a fundraiser dinner on Monday, March 16, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Georgia House Restaurant on Walnut Street in Milford. Tickets are $16.99 for adults, $8.99 for children 4-12, and free for children under 3. Proceeds benefit the Miss Delaware Scholarship Organization. Advance tickets are preferred but not required. For tickets and more information, contact Melanie Hatter at 302-393-9021 or MBHatter311@comcast.net.

Delaware Horse Expo

The Delaware Horse Expo is Saturday, April 25 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Delaware State Fairgrounds in Harrington. Event includes a parade of breeds, clinics, riding horse sale, Breyer horse show, vendors. Admission is $5, children 12 and under free. For more information, call 302-3984630 ext. 110 or visit www.Delaware HorseExpo.com.

Ruritan Club

All-you-can-eat Sunday breakfast buffet served by the Galestown Ruritan Club, on the fourth Sunday of each month October to June, from 7-10 a.m. Cost is $7 for adults, $4 children 6-12 years, at The Galestown (Md) Community Hall, 5833 School House Road. Buffet features blueberry pancakes, eggs, scrapple, sausage, creamed chipped beef, biscuits, potato casserole, hominy, fruit cup, and sticky buns.

Seaford AARP trips

Wednesday, March 18 - Toby’s Dinner Theater, Columbia, Md. to see “My Way,” $65. Enjoy a buffet lunch with music from the Frank Sinatra era. Friday, May 22 - Gettysburg, Pa. Visit the Eisenhower Farm, $79. This is a revised price. Visit the galleries in the museum at the Visitor’s Center and enjoy lunch at General Pickett’s Buffet. Wednesday, July 1 - Dutch Apple Dinner Theatre, Lancaster, Pa., $79. After lunch, enjoy a classic musical. Wednesday, Sept. 2 - Rainbow Dinner Theatre, “Uncle Chick’s Last Wish,” $70. Saturday, Sept. 12-18 - Mackinac Island, Michigan, $790 pp double. Trip includes six hot breakfasts, five dinners and one lunch at the Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island. In Frankenmuth, take a bus tour around the city; ride a hyro-jet across Lake Huron and Lake Superior; take a guided tour by horse and carriage and more! Friday, Oct. 16 - Strasburg Railroad with lunch on the train, $69. Nov. 16-20 - Christmas At The Biltmore Estate, $589 pp double. Wednesday, Dec. 2 - American Music Theatre, Christmas show, $92. Contact Rose Wheaton at 629-7180 to make your reservations.

Del Tech offers trips

Enjoy a time to explore the Washington National Cathedral and tea served in the Cathedral Tower overlooking the city on Tuesday, March 10. Come have a day of fun on your own at the Baltimore Inner Harbor on Wednesday, March 11. Experience a swinging good time and enjoy Duke Ellington classics with the “Sophisticated Ladies” at Toby’s Dinner Theater on Thursday, March 12. See the “Stars on Ice” production at the Wachovia Center in Philadelphia, which features Olympic, world, and national champions on Friday, March 13. Don’t miss the six-time Grammy Award-winning ensemble The Chieftains, whose music brings alive the life of Ireland on Sunday, March 15, at the Kimmel Center in Philadelphia. Continue the fun on Monday, March 16 with a “St. Paddy’s Progressive Luncheon,” featuring surprise stops at three different restaurants in the beach area. Experience “Behold the Lamb,” a powerful presentation of the timeless message of the Savior, at the Sight & Sound Theater in Lancaster, Pa. on Thursday, March 19. Continue the inspiration with C.S. Lewis’ timeless classic “The Chronicles of Narnia” exhibit at the Franklin Institute on Saturday, March 21. Have fun shopping, sightseeing or dining in New York on Wednesday, March 25. On Saturday, March 28, at the DuPont Theater, enjoy the 2005 Tony Awardwinner, “Spamalot,” which tells the tale of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table as they embark on their quest for the Holy Grail. Experience unforgettable history with a trip to the Newseum in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, March 31. For complete trip information, or to register, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate and Community Programs at 302-8546966.

Renee’ S. Morris, an Independent Longaberger branch leader, is hosting a tour to The Longaberger Company in Ohio. The tour is March 26-28 and includes a Longaberger filled basket, transportation and lodging. The bus leaves the Seaford Village Shopping Center (Roses parking lot) on Thursday, March 26 at 10 p.m. and returns on Saturday, March 28 at 11:59 p.m. The chartered tour will include visits to Longaberger’s seven-story, basket-shaped Home Office in Newark, Ohio, its Manufacturing Campus to see baskets being handcrafted by thousands of artisans, and Longaberger Homestead, the company’s shopping, dining and entertainment destination. For more information or to make reservations, contact Morris at 302-245-8842 or RGMorris93@comcast.net.

Bus trip to English Town

On Saturday, April 4, at 6 a.m., a bus trip to English Town, N.J. Flea Market will leave from Mt. Olivet Baptist Church (trip sponsor), 108 First St., Bridgeville. Cost is: adults $30 each, children under 12 years, $15.

Garden trips

Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus, and the East Coast Garden Center in Millsboro are offering a bus trip to Winterthur on Sunday, March 22 to hear guest lectures on spring plants and view the blooming spring bulbs. The second trip will be on Tuesday, April 7 to the Rawlings Conservatory, the Baltimore Botanic Gardens and the Baltimore Museum of Art. For more information or to register, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate and Community Programs at 302-855-1617.

Nemours Mansion

On Tuesday, May 19, the Seaford Historical Society will sponsor a bus trip to the luxurious Nemours Mansion and Gardens in Wilmington. This 300-acre country estate of the late indusrialist and philanthropist Alfred I. DuPont has recently completed a 3-1/2 year, $39 million restoration. The trip is open to the public. This is an exceptional opportunity to see an amazing piece of restored grandeur. The cost of the trip is $68. This includes transportation, admission to the Mansion and lunch at the DuPont Country Club. The bus will leave from the Sears parking lot in the Seaford Village Shopping Center at 7 a.m. and leave Wilmington for return trip at 2:30 p.m. It is important to call the Seaford Historical Society office at 628-9828 immediately for reservations since many were left on a waiting list from this trip last year. There is one addition this year. The gardens will be in bloom.

Embroiders’ Guild

The Sussex Chapter of Embroiders’ Guild meets on the second Monday of the month at the CHEER Center in Georgetown. All levels of stitchers from beginner to advanced are welcome to attend. For details call 302-539-9717.

GOP to meet

The Sussex County Republican Committee will meet on Monday, March 9 at 7:30 p.m. in the Arts and Science Center on the Delaware Tech campus in Georgetown. All registered Republicans in Sussex County are welcome to attend. For more information, call the Sussex County GOP office at 302-856-6323.

Democrat Club

The Western Sussex Democrat Club will meet at 6:30 p.m. in Laurel at Dukes’ Pool House on Sycamore Road. The covered dish supper will be followed by the business meeting. Speaker for the evening will be Sussex County Sheriff Eric Swanson or Deputies from his office. The meeting is open to the public.

Knitting group

The “Sea Purls” Chapter of the Knitting Guild Association meets the first Wednesday of each month from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Cheer Community Center in Georgetown on the corner of Route 9 and Sand Hill Road. New members are always welcome. For details, call Roseanne Jahnke at 302-854-6776.

AARP board meeting

AARP Seaford Area Chapter 108 of Wesern Sussex County board meeting will be on Friday, March 6, at the Methodist Manor House game room at 1:30 p.m. Main topic of discussion will pertain to the newly appointed treasurer. For more information call Gladys Bonowicz, chapter president, at 875-1519.

G.F.W.C. Acorn Club

The G.F.W.C.-Acorn Club of Seaford is having a meeting on March 12 at 7:30 p.m. at the Seaford District Library on conservation. The hostess for the meeting is Eleanor Hickey and her committee.

Seaford AARP

AARP Seaford Area Chapter 1084 of western Sussex County membership meeting will be held Thursday, March 12, at the Methodist Manor House Fellowship Hall in Seaford, at 12:30 p.m. Charles Paparella, WBOC-TV, Travels with Charlie, will be guest speaker. Area residents, age 50+, who are interested in learning more about Chapter 1084, are welcome to join in conversation and refreshments after the meeting.

Widowed Persons Service

The Seaford Chapter of the Widowed Persons Service will have its next meeting on Tuesday, March 17, at 12:15 p.m. at Pizza King, Seaford. All widowed persons of all ages are invited to attend. Come join us — we all enjoy the trips, lunches/dinners, etc. that we do.

Georgetown AARP

Join Georgetown AARP Chapter 5340 at their monthly luncheon meetings held on the first Monday of each month at 11:30 a.m. at the Sussex Pines Country Club. Make new friends, enjoy great fellowship and low cost travel to points of interest. For further information contact: Dee Richards at 302-841-5066 or Bettie Comer at 302-265-5606. Submit Bulletin Board items by noon, Thursday. Send to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, email to editor@mspublications.com or drop off at 951 Norman Eskridge Hwy., Seaford (Home Team Bldg.).


MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

PAGE 19

It’s show time in school and for the Lions Clubs The Laurel High School Drama Club opened its show, “High AT URPHY School Musical On Stage,� Friday evening, February 27. Senior Alexis Musser On the entrance door there was a sign that said “Sold Out� and that brought things into perjust about tells the story, as there spective in dedicating her also appeared to be a large audience for Saturday evening’s and performance to Brittany Sunday afternoon’s shows. Thompson. The Drama Club has set quite an ambitious schedule this year new student at Laurel, transferring from as there are performances Friday, Wicomico High School where there is no March 6, and two matinees to finish it up drama program and it appears she has enMarch 7 and March 8. I strongly recomjoyed herself tremendously. mend you go. This tells me what a great program Senior Alexis Musser, who portrayed Brian Cass has created with the drama Gabriella, a main character in the play, department in Laurel and it is just a great brought things into perspective in dedicatthing for Laurel schools. One of these days ing her performance to Brittany Thompthey will have a nice theatre to develop son, who was killed in a tragic accident their skills and can accommodate more of last year. She was one of Alexis’ best us comfortably, too, I might add. friends. Now, as usual I’d like to end up with a Three “veteran� players in the play, few favorites from the show and that’s not Sierra Spicer, Alexis Musser and Christian to say I didn’t enjoy everyone, because I Auer, not only played major parts, but did. were student directors (Auer), choreogAlexis Musser and Adam Bennett’s raphy and costumes (Musser) and stage singing, however, was so sincere and the direction (Spicer). All are seniors and have song, “We’re all in this together,� featurcreated many memories for themselves as ing Dominic Queen, Diana Paul, Ashley well as others for years to come. Cheesman and the Jocks and Brianiars, as Broke Brittingham (Ms. Penny) is a well as the same song by the cast at the

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Now, the Bridgeville Lions Club is getting ready for its show in March. The Seaford Show follows and then the Laurel show takes place. Yes, March is truly show time. Ron Hatfield of the Bridgeville Lions, when asked if the show was funny, said, “Well it’s starting off that way at least.� Ronnie is a veteran showman for the Bridgeville Club. I’m sure you are going to think this is a little silly, but I’m going to share it anyway, now that the month of February is over. February was “Adopt a Rescued Rabbit� month and you can look it up. You probably know where I am going with this. Our friend ole “Sure Shot� Dick Whaley did not even know this, as I am sure he would have liked to get his hands on a few rabbits before another disappointing season draws to a close. Oh, yes, the 28th of February was also “Read in the Tub Day.� Ah, these great holidays. Apparently the state plans to change up the dam at Broad Creek and Records Pond. This has the people in Laurel a little

concerned that their view of the pond that they have enjoyed for so many years will be changed. Time will tell. It appears there was a nice turnout for the Laurel Library’s beef & dumpling dinner Sunday at the Delmar VFW. Delmar must be “dumpling town,� as the Delmar Fire Department had a beef & dumpling dinner on Saturday. I finally have talked to someone who remembered the old ice rink at the ice house in Seaford. Billy Hastings told me he remembers it and gave me some names that may have more information about it. We woke up Monday morning to a major snowstorm. It seems most of our snows are in March in recent years. How many of you DuPonters remember the storm of 1979 when many of us made it into work but that was as far as we got for several days? Cots were set up, the cafeteria ran 24 hours a day and for many of us it was a joy to get home after living in the plant for several days. The National Guard was called out and it was quite a time for all of us. With this snow storm I imagine there were but a few in the entire building. My how times change, but some of us haven’t and I’m glad of it, aren’t you? Don’t get hit by a snowball everyone!

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PAGE 20

MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

Church Bulletins Macedonia AME gala

Macedonia AME Church of 431 North St., Seaford, is sponsoring an “Evening of Elegance� Gala on Saturday, March 14, at the Seaford Fire Hall, from 6 to 10 p.m. There will be Gospel Jazz, and Liturgical Dance. Recording artists, Tony Smith & Band of Hewitt, N.J.; and Darryl Anderson of Bronx, N.Y., will be there. Cost is a donation of $35. For more information call Tanya Ricketts, 629-5144; Edwina Barnes, 249-4390; or Rose Poole 629-9322.

St. Luke’s holds Bible study

Janet Hubbard of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church will be coordinating a Bible study of the book of Esther. The group will meet in St. Luke’s Parish House. Additional information can be obtained by calling Janet at 628-0417.

Gospel concert

A gospel concert is being held at St. George’s United Methodist Church in Laurel on Sunday, March, 8 at 6:30 p.m. Music will be presented by “Reunion� group from Princess Ann area. Directions: Alt. 13 south Laurel towards Delmar. Turn right on St. George’s Road or Bacon Road, follow to church. For details call 875-2273.

St. George’s U.M.C. luncheon

A luncheon will be held Saturday, March 7 from 11 a.m.-3 p.m., at St. George’s United Methodist Church on St. George’s Road between Delmar and Laurel on St. George’s Road. Menu includes: oyster, chicken salad and hot dog sandwiches; crab soup and vegetable soup; peas and dumplings; desserts and baked goods.

Lenten services

The Greater Seaford Ministerium announces the following schedule for Lenten services. March 11 - Our Lady of Lourdes R.C. Church, 532 Stein Hwy, 629-3591 March 18 - Christ Lutheran Church, 315 North Shipley St., 629-9755 March 25 - Atlanta Road Alliance Church, 22625 Atlanta Rd., 629-7693 April 1 - St Luke’s Episcopal Church, Front St., 629-7979 All services start at noon, and are 25 minutes in length, followed by a light luncheon at the host church.

Ash Wednesday

The Ash Wednesday services at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church will be at 10:30 a.m. Holy Eucharist service with imposition of ashes will be held at the Manor House on Middleford Road. At 7 p.m. there will be a Holy Eucharist service with imposition of ashes at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church on Front Street. The Rev. Jeanne Kirby-Colodonato, rector of St. Luke’s, will be the celebrant at both services.

Free Clothes Ministries

On March 15, The Church of God and Saints of Christ will be giving clothes away from noon until 3 p.m,, at 10016 Concord Road, Seaford. For details call Sister Brown, 302-536-7348.

Missionary Evangelists

Missionary Evangelists, Jonathan and Marcia Garlock will be ministering at The Delmar Church of God of Prophecy on March 5-8 at 7 p.m. and also March

8 at 11 a.m. The Garlocks have traveled in Missionary/Evangelist work for 13 of those years. The team has a camp-meeting style of preaching including a music ministry — both vocal and instrumental. Come and enjoy the music and preaching of this dynamic team.

Handbell Concert at Grace Baptist

Hear the Seaford Christian Academy Sound Waves Handbell Choir perform on Sunday, March 8 at 7 p.m. at Grace Baptist Church, 510 N. Main St., Hurlock, Md. Admission is free. For more information, contact Pastor David Talley at 410-943-3701 or visit www.gracebaptistofhurlock.org.

Beef and dumpling dinner

Mt. Zion Methodist Church will be hosting a beef and dumpling dinner on Saturday, March 14 at 5 p.m. The church is located on Alt. 13 between Seaford and Laurel. Eat-in or carry-out.

Soup supper, Lenten study

The Rev. Dr. Howard Backus, rector of St. Philip’s Episcopal Church, Laurel, is the leader of a Lenten Journey DayBy-Day, held each Wednesday during the special season until Easter. Study begins at 7 p.m. with a soup and bread meal at 6 p.m. St Philip’s extends a welcome to both members and the community to attend. The church is located at 600 S. Central Ave., Laurel.

Homemade Easter eggs

Homemade Easter Eggs from Christ Lutheran Church, finest ever and still the best on the shore. $3.50 each. We use Jiff

Peanut Butter, Selection is: peanut butter, coconut cream and butter cream. To order call 629-9751 or 629-9755.

Yard and bake sale

A yard and bake sale will be held at the Seaford Presbyterian Church on March 14 from 7 a.m. until noon. This indoor basement sale will include miscellaneous personal and household items, clothes for the entire family, puzzles, toys, and books with a special collection of military ones. The church is located at 701 Bridgeville Road, just north of the Seaford Army Reserve Center.

Blades UMC hosts O’Day Family

The O’Day Family of Georgetown will be in concert at Blades United Methodist Church, (Market and Fourth streets), on Sunday, March 15, at 2 p.m. Light fare will follow.

Free Community luncheon

Laurel Baptist Church will be hosting a Free Community luncheon on Saturday, March 21, from noon to 2 p.m. The church is located at 33056 Bi-State Boulevard (West side of 13A), approximately 2 miles south of town. Any questions, call Shirley, at 875-2314.

Hymn sing

A hymn sing will be held at Concord United Methodist Church on Sunday, March 15, at 2:00 pm. Singers are Joe Dawson and Amanda Jones. Concord UM Church is located at 25322 Church Rd., east of Seaford (from Rt. 13, take Rt. 20 East apx. 2 mi. & turn left onto Church Rd. 20A). For details call 628-8114.

          CHURCH OF CHRIST

A church you can relate to $( *$$ *$!"$, ,,$  $$ (%$%!% $ (! $$ $ !""$!$  $&,'###&$$$$ $)))  (! + ! !

St. John’s United Methodist Church

Pine & Poplar Sts., Seaford 302-629-9466 E-mail: st_johns@verizon.net NURSERY & HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

SUNDAY WORSHIP 8:30 & 11:15 am Traditional 9:45 Sunday School 10:00 am Hearts Afire (Contemporary)           

Centenary United Methodist Church “Where Caring is Sharing� >' # ?65:-4768)8=-3-*8):165 )4 #;5,)=#+06633)99-9.68)/-9 )4 $8),1:165)3)413='689017

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Rev. K. Wayne Grier, Pastor, 875-3983 200 W. Market St., Laurel, Del.

$,1/ *3$  2/$*  '   (,(01$/ ,/2")$/  Worship Services: 2,# 4 + .+ BibleS tudy:  2,  +$# .+ In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 510 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE #(# ## !$ #Church: 875-4233 Sunday Services: 8:30 am Praise 9:30 am Sunday School,10:45 am Worship

DIAL DAILY DEVOTIONS: 875-4309

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church " ''" "# "%" $ ""

(302) 875-3644 " " %""& "" $"  # "&&&  & #! $ !## Holy Eucharist with Healing Sunday ~ 8:30 & 10:30 am Church School ~ 9:30 am

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching Youth Group Wednesday 7:00 pm

Worship 10:45 a.m. 1 Sun. School 9:45 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. 1 Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Camp Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

Christian Church of Seaford Dual 13N., %"&.0$7  

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St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road68, South of Laurel Laurel,D el.

# ;5,)=#+0663 )4 <-515/'689017 74 68515/'689017   '-,1/0:#-8<1+- ;89-8=80;8+0 (6;:086;79 74          

.( $))&'1Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m.

Thank You to the churches that sponsor these pages. Your contribution makes it possible for the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Good Newsâ&#x20AC;? to be published each week.

     

www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

800 East Street Delmar, MD 21875 â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Church That Caresâ&#x20AC;? 410-896-3600 Pastor James C. Hitch

Sunday: Sunday School 10 M Worship 11 AM & 6 PM

Wednesday: BibleS tudy 7P M


MORNING STAR â&#x20AC;˘ MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

PAGE 21

Obituaries Dale Hill, 76 Dale Hill of Gambrills, Md. passed away on Wednesday, Feb. 18, 2009. Dale was a native of Laurel and graduated from Laurel High School in 1950. He attended Vanderbilt University and subsequently earned his undergraduate degree from the University of Delaware in 1955. From 1955 to 1958, he served honorably in the United States Army where he achieved the rank of major. He earned a law degree from the Maryland School of Law in 1962. A devoted husband, loving father, dedicated grandfather and fiercely loyal friend, Dale was an avid enthusiast of military history, aviation and U.S. Naval Academy athletics. He was a voracious reader, a great fan of the Big Band era and treasured all of his many travel adventures. Dale is survived by his wife, Dianne of Gambrills; and his daughters, Ashleigh Walker and son-in-law, Mike of Huntsville, Ala. and Jennifer Schultz and son-inlaw, Dave of Gambrills. He was preceded in death by his parents, Oscar and Mary Hill of Laurel and stepdaughter, Emily Mathis. The pride of Daleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life was his three grandchildren, Emily Ward-Schultz, Christian Walker and Ava Schultz. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, March 7 at 1 p.m. at Christ United Methodist Church in Laurel. Visitation will be held after the service in the church hall. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to the Laurel Alumni Association.

George J. Westcott, 71 George J. Westcott of Seaford died Sunday, Feb. 22, 2009 at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. Mr. Westcott was born in Philadelphia, Penn. on May 30, 1937, the son of George E. and Eleanor Smith Westcott. Raised in Penns Grove, N.J., he was a graduate of Penns Grove Regional High School and was president of the Class of 1955. Mr. Westcott, a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps, graduated from the University of Delaware in 1963. He worked in quality control management, marketing and technical marketing for the DuPont Company for 34 years, retiring in 1996. He then worked eight years for Milliken and Co. as well as owning his own consulting firm. He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Lorraine; and two daughters, Kimberly Ann Westcott of Lewes and Kristen Mitchell and her husband, Benjamin of Lewes. He is also survived by one grandson, Benjamin Richard Mitchell III â&#x20AC;&#x153;Treyâ&#x20AC;? of Lewes; a sister, Patricia Green and her husband, Tomway of Bridgeton, N.J.; brothers-in-law, Charles W. Back Sr. and his wife, Charlotte of Albuquerque, N.M., Walter R. Back of Lakeland, Fla. and Calvin L. Back Sr. and his wife, Marguerite of Cape May Courthouse, N.J.; and many

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH    #!#$%$!#B  

#-<1+0*-3672159"*9:68 ( $)  & ) $ $=7.+@$-2885 +6 ":+@/:":+3;/ 96  +<-25=,43.; 96 '8:;239

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nephews, nieces and great-nephews and nieces. The funeral was held Thursday, Feb. 26 at Mt. Olivet United Methodist Church in Seaford. Interment followed at the Veteranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cemetery in Millsboro. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in honor of George to the American Heart Association, Pennsylvania/Delaware Affiliate, 625 W. Ridge Pike, Suite A-100, Conshohocken, PA 19428-0860 or the American Cancer Society, Mid-Atlantic Division, 1138 Parsons Road, Salisbury, MD 21801. Arrangements were by Watson-Yates Funeral Home, Seaford.

Samuel Moore, 82 Samuel â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jimâ&#x20AC;? Moore of Bethel passed away at his home surrounded by his loving family on the evening of Thursday, Feb. 26, 2009. He was born in Bethel, a son of Rueben and Mildred Wright Moore. Mr. Moore retired from E.I. DuPont Company in Seaford after 36 years of service. He also proudly served his country in the United States Army as a Military Police officer in the 1262nd area service unit during W.W.II. He had also worked in the family business as a well driver and for many years he owned and operated numerous rental properties. Mr. Moore was a member of Laurel American Legion Post #19 and Sailors Bethel United Methodist Church. He will be remembered by many family members and friends for his generosity and great heart to the needy. He was an avid camper, radio operator and great gardener, especially his tomatoes. His memory will be honored every day by his many friends whom joined him daily at the Bethel Store â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pretty Women Bench.â&#x20AC;? He is survived by his daughters, Deborah Hall and husband, Thomas of Laurel and Tina Thomas and husband, Gary of Seaford; a sister-in-law, Betty Moore of Rehoboth Beach; and grandchildren, PR1AW USN Blair Hall and wife, Georgi of California, Md. and Anthony Leonard of Seaford. Mr. Moore is preceded in death by his wife of 58 years, Mary Cookie Moore, who passed in 2008. A brother and two sisters also preceded him. The funeral was held at Sailors Bethel United Methodist Church on Monday, March 2. Interment followed in Bethel Community Cemetery. The Rev. Art Smith and Charles Campbell officiated. Arrangements are in the care of Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home in Laurel.

James Darrell Foskey Sr., 72 James Darrell Foskey Sr. of Seaford died Friday, Feb. 27, 2009, at his residence. Born in Seaford, the son of Laura Parker and Silas Foskey, he was a mail carrier

Messiahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sV ineyard Church Located at Tyndallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel 302- 875-4646 PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

"# $",,/)+   !8'0/7;$5'*/7/32'0*8)'7/32#/2)+  Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

Dr. Carl G Vincent, Senior Minister Pastor Barry B. Dukes, Music Minister Sunday 9:30 am Wednesday 7:00 pm 013,8-590;8+0@ ;89-8>

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 "+*+14735/67'7.+56=  

    @===/8*+-9-*.68,68/

MASSES: SUNDAY: #'79+%/-/0  41#4'2/6. 41 #82*';'1 '1 '1 DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. &+*'1 41/567#'7'1 HOLY DAYS:9+ 41'1 41 NOVENA DEVOTIONS: &+*'1 41 CONFESSION: #'7  41

$;5,*>$+0663 *4(689017 *4  74 013,8-590;8+0 *4 $" $(689017 *4 Wednesday Activities 7 pm "*9:6864-8+-1:0*5 )6;:01519:-8*4-963319;91+14;82-: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Cross Is Grounded In Graceâ&#x20AC;?

VICTORY TABERNACLE CHURCH OF GOD

SUNDAY WORSHIP 11 AM and 6 PM ~ Sunday School 9:45 AM

WEDNESDAY NIGHT Ministry for the wholef amily 7 PM

Pastor Stacey Johnson 28261 Seaford Rd., Laurel, 2 miles N. of Laurel on Alt. 13

302-877-0443

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Pickle Churchâ&#x20AC;? #$%%!# #$%!  !& %)&# PICKLE MINISTRIES OUTREACH & CORNERSTONE NOTE MUSIC MINISTRY  8:7/:80/<2/5#.5<

B    0;8+0$+066333/-9 *4 (689017$-8<1+-*4 #-<#1+23?-> '371;80":+@/:%=/; 96 Come Join Our Family

22625 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE (302) 629-5600 - www.atlantaroadcma.org Sunday

Wednesday Evening

9:00 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. $&' !% )&'&+ "''' $& !')"(' 7:00 p.m. *#!# &*!

6:45 ("+'( $)( &'   !*$&& 7:00 &+& (!# #,' &$)% !()   !'  ( !& %&#('  & 

COKESBURY CHURCH All Welcome Where Love Abides -- John 3:16

The Church by the Side of the Road 15092 Cokesbury Rd, Georgetown, DE    &### "$# '6735'530*'51+'232-5+-'7/32 Sunday Schoo0 9 am Contemporary Church Service 1 am

6;5:!31<-: &51:-,-:06,19:0;8+0 Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 

312$<B$/+08:.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shining His Lightâ&#x20AC;?

Laurel Wesleyan Church Rt. 13A, Just North of Laurel $=7.+@$-2885  8:;239    ' $=7.+@>/7371'8:;239  /. 96)8=<2373;<:3/; ' WKID, The Zone, Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ministries  0;8+0 

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Laurel Baptist Church, SBC Where everybody is somebody & Jesus Christ is Lord 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, Laurel, DE 19956 #82*';#).330<  352/2-&356./4<  &+*2+6*';/(0+#78*;<  NurseryP rovided Pastor: Rev. Steven Booth Music Director: Linda Lewis

302-875-7998

St. Lukeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Episcopal Church 629-7979 Holy Eucharist: 9:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Forum: 10:30 a.m. Thurs. Eve. Service: 6 p.m. Front & King St., Seaford, DE

The Revâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d. Jeanne W. Kirby-Coladonato, Rector

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

#6  

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 9'2-+0/67&0/9+5   0*+532/5).   0*+5"32"866+00  Sunday School 10 a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

"!! " !!   !   "!"!  ! ! %  # '! " #


PAGE 22 for the USPS with 30 years of service. After retiring, he drove a school bus for 15 years. He attended St. Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s United Methodist Church in Laurel. He is survived by his wife, Esther Walton Foskey of Seaford; a son, James D. Foskey Jr. of Seaford; a daughter, Lisa A. Parker of Seaford; a sister, Joyce Gootee of Seaford; grandchildren, Jordan Boone and wife, Nicole; Joshua Boone and Jodi Hope; a great-grandchild, Ayden Boone; a special niece who was like a sister, Inarae Ruark of Salisbury, Md.; and special pets, BoBo and Bandit. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by a sister, Lavina Baum. The funeral was held Wednesday, March 4 at Watson-Yates Funeral Home, Seaford. Burial was in Blades Cemetery.

James W. Ward, 89 James W. Ward of Seaford passed away on Friday, Feb. 27, 2009, at the Seaford Center. Mr. Ward was born in Laurel, a son of Wesley and Lena Ward. Mr. Ward retired from E. I. DuPont Company in Seaford as a supervisor with 43 years of service. He was a 50-year member of Hope Masonic Lodge #4 of Laurel and a lifelong member of the Bridgeville Lions Club. His family will remember him as a good wood worker and a man who could fix anything; his friends will cherish the Wednesday morning coffee visits. He also proudly served his country in the United States Navy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pops,â&#x20AC;? as he is known by his family, is survived by his wife, Kathryn Ward of Seaford; his son, Donald Dykes and the daughter he never had, Josie Dykes of Laurel; his grandchildren, Kathy Nichols and Cindy Burritt; and great-grandchildren, Lily Burritt, J.W. Hitch, Brittney Hitch and Diana Hitch. A Masonic Service was held on Monday, March 2 at Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, Laurel. The funeral was held at Union United Methodist Church in Bridgeville on Tuesday, March 3. The Rev. Dale L. Brown officiated. Interment followed in Odd Fellows Cemetery in Laurel. Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home is serving the Ward Family.

Pearl M. Spanish, 85 Pearl M. Spanish of Ellendale died Friday, Feb. 27, 2009, at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury, Md. She was born Feb. 8, 1924, in Milford to Alonzo and Mary Jones Hammond. Mrs. Spanish enjoyed the outdoors, especially the woods. This past year she went deer hunting and got two deer. She always had a huge garden every year. She loved people, and looked forward to going to the Greenwood CHEER Center where she was a member. She was also a member of the Greenwood Vol. Fire Co. Ladies Auxiliary and attended Oakley Community Church in Ellendale. Besides her parents she was preceded in death by her husband, Ralph. She is survived by special friends who she lived with the past three years, Roberta and Wayne Smith of Ellendale;

MORNING STAR â&#x20AC;˘ MARCH 5 - 11, 2009 a niece, Nancy Lyons and her husband, Gene of Seaford; and extended family and friends. Services will be private. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Delaware Hospice, 100 Patriots Way, Milford, DE 19963. Arrangements were by Fleischauer Funeral Home, Greenwood.

Arizona Newberry Allen, 70 Arizona Newberry Allen, 70, of Seaford, died Thursday, Feb. 26, 2009, at Peninsula Regional Medical Center, Salisbury, Md. Born in Raven, Va., the daughter of Rosaley and Andrew Newberry, she was a bookkeeper/receptionist at S.C. Cummings in Seaford. She was also the former manager for the Lewes Dairy Markets in Seaford. She was a $UL]RQD$OOHQ member of Mt. Olivet United Methodist Church in Seaford, the Elks and Curves. She is survived by two sons, Darrell L. Morgan of Laurel and Gary A. Morgan of Seaford; three sisters, Arbutus McGhee, Richland, Va., Leona Campbell, Louisville, Ky., and Ellen Harman, Raven, Va.; two grandchildren; and one stepgrandchild. In addition to her parents, she was also preceded in death by her husband, Leroy Manning Allen, in 2005; a brother,

In Loving Memory of My Husband

Steve Spearin

When we met each other in 1972; I never thought I would fall in love with you, But my heart you did win, And our wonderful journey was about to begin. We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t marry until March 2, 1976; There were no obstacles we could not fix. Our love for each other was meant to be, I knew for sure there was no other for me. You were my husband, my love, my very best friend We were dedicated to each other until the end. God felt it was time for you to take his hand, And join him in the peaceful land, He knew you were hurting, and where you belong, He knew the love we had would help me be strong, You took with you a piece of my heart, Always and forever, We are never apart.

All My Love On Our Anniversary,

Your Loving Wife, Gail

Dennis Newberry; and a sister, Bertha Newberry. The funeral was held Monday, March 2 at Watson-Yates Funeral Home, Seaford. Burial was in Odd Fellows Cemetery, Seaford.

side service was held at Our Ladies of Lourdes Catholic Cemetery in Blades on Monday, March 2. Father John McKenna officiated. Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home is serving the Ruggiero family.

Anthony Daniel Ruggiero, 93

Margaret J. Towers Carmean, 70

Anthony Daniel Ruggiero of Laurel passed away on Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2009, at Delaware Veterans Hospital in Wilmington. He is survived by his wife of 58 years, June Marianne Ruggiero; a son, Anthony Michael Ruggiero and his wife, Robin; a daughter, Marsha Alice Bjornson and her husband, Sig; and two grandchildren, Roniece Grace Twilley and Georgia Leith Ruggiero. Mr. Ruggiero came to Delaware with his family in 1930 and bought a farm in Portsville. He served three years in the Civilian Conservation Corp., was an enlisted member of the Delaware Army National Guard from 1936 to 1939 and was inducted into the United States Army, where he served from 1942 until his discharge at the end of the war in Europe in 1945. He was a TEC5 sergeant in the HQ 54th Ord.Gp. 7th Army. He served with General George S. Patton in Africa, Sicily, Italy and Europe. He participated in the Normandy Invasion and the Battle of the Bulge. Later, Mr. Ruggiero was a poultry farmer most of his life in Delaware. He was a member of Our Ladies of Lourdes Catholic Church in Seaford. His father and mother emigrated to the United States from Cicci, Italy, around the turn of the century through Ellis Island with his brother and four sisters, Charlie, Rose, Mary, Edith and Eleanor, and then from Bleeker St. in the Bronx Borough of New York City. He made a good run at it for 93 years and lived a full life like he wanted. May God rest his soul. A memorial grave-

Margaret Jeanette Towers Carmean of Seaford, died Thursday, February 26, 2009, at Delaware Hospice Center, Milford. Born in Wilmington, the daughter of Grace Hubbard and Preston Towers, she was a certified nursing assistant at Methodist Manor House in Seaford. She is survived by sons, Michael Towers of Pennsylvania; Todd J. Carmean and wife, Brenda of Laurel; Eric Carmean of Seaford; and Martin Fairchild and wife, Tammy of Milton; a daughter, Patty of Maryland; a sister, Joann Cleves of Wilmington; a grandson, Austin J. Carmean; two stepgrandsons, Matthew McCrea and wife, Megan and Robbie Fairchild; a stepgranddaughter, Lauren McCrea; and many close friends and coworkers at the Manor House. A memorial service was held Wednesday, March 4 at Watson-Yates Funeral Home, Seaford. Burial was private. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests contributions in Margaretâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s memory to Delaware Hospice Center, 100 Patriots Way, Milford, DE 19963.

Death Notice Herman Levater West Jr., 60 Herman Levater West Jr. of Seaford died Tuesday, Feb. 24. Services were Sat., Feb. 28 at Mt. Olive Baptist Church. Arrangements were handled by Robert W. Miller Funeral Services.

Union United Methodist Church  024+$73 42,'*(6,--(

Across from Bank 

 HandicapF riendly WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.)

  

         

      

701 Bridgeville Road 629-9077

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Welcome Home!â&#x20AC;?

Wesley United Methodist Church   4-$/4$0$' ($)02' Pastor James Bongard 0/4(.102$29"023+,1$.  5/'$9 &+00-,%-('5&$4,0/$. !2$',4,0/$-"023+,1$. "('/(3'$9"023+,1  1.      /)0,/(   

 -$2(/&( 4 ($)02'(- Carlton L. Cannon, Sr. Paster

  (--  ;&0*&-$2(/&(6(2,:0//(4 Sunday: Midweek Activities: +52&+ &+00- $. Call for Details  02/,/* "023+,1$.  +,-'2(/<3+52&+ #054+ 81-03,0/ 1. 523(29206,'(' 6(/,/*"023+,11.   05/3(-,/*%9$1140/-9 Tuesday: Thursday:  ,%-( 45'9$.,-9  02102$4(2$9(21. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Come and Grow with Us!â&#x20AC;&#x2122; !2$,/,/*0521.

The Gift of His Love                 To advertise in this directory,c all

629-9788


MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

PAGE 23

Lewes labs offer glimpse into world of marine science The University of Delaware College of Marine and Earth Studies (CMES) offers free guided tours of its Hugh R. Sharp Campus in Lewes to schools throughout the region. At this world-class research institution, middle and high school students can get a firsthand look at science in action and learn about potential careers in marine science. Tours typically begin with a 15-minute video that showcases some of the ways CMES researchers and students explore the coastal environment. The video highlights projects in which scientists study topics such as wind energy, invasive species, the use of marsh plants for biodiesel fuel and emissions

from oceangoing ships. Guides then take students on a walking tour of the facilities where the majority of the research in the college’s marine biosciences and oceanography programs is conducted. Students will find many exhibits showing how UD scientists study extreme marine environments such as the frigid, ice-covered seas of the Antarctic and the super-heated hydrothermal vents found more than a mile below the sea surface. Students will also see how scientists are working to address local issues, such as the impacts of land development on Delaware water quality and wildlife. A favorite stop on the tour is a tropical reef tank, which

introduces students to one of the most diverse communities on Earth. With the rapid deterioration of coral reefs worldwide, the tank provides a springboard for discussions about the causes and solutions to this global crisis. The free tours may be scheduled for middle- and high-school classes of five or more people, Monday through Friday, between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Requests should be made at least one week in advance by calling CMES at 302-645-4346 or by e-mailing Linda Milligan at lam@udel.edu. To learn more about the Delaware Sea Grant College Program, visit www.deseagrant. org.

The University of Delaware College of Marine and Earth Studies (CMES) offers free guided tours of its Hugh R. Sharp Campus in Lewes to middle and high school classes. Tours may be customized to fit your program of study.

TIDE Camp teaches kids about the bay Applications are being accepted for TIDE Camp Summer 2009, which is an instructional program designed to give high school students exposure to the scientific processes at work in Delaware Bay. TIDE, or Taking Interest in Delaware’s Estuary, is hosted by the University of Delaware’s College of Marine and Earth Studies. Students will spend 13 days living at the UD campuses in Newark and Lewes. They will learn about marine animals, tides, habitat loss, species adaptation, wind power, autonomous underwater vehicles and climate change. Sure to be popular is this year’s addition of a research cruise aboard UD’s 146-foot R/V Hugh R. Sharp. Campers will participate in activities that include visiting oceanographic and atmospheric laboratories, going on field excursions and taking part in discussions and lectures. They will have opportunities to interact with faculty, design and complete experiments and learn about UD program offerings. “This camp is designed for any high school student who loves science, enjoys the coast, and wants to explore the world of marine and earth studies,” said Assistant Dean for Student Services Frank Newton. The camp, now in its second year, earned rave reviews from campers attending the 2008 edition. Applications, which include completing a form available on

FREE GED TESTING STATEWIDE

All Delaware residents age 18 or older are eligible. TESTING will be completed in 3 (three) phases.

PHASE 1: March 30th or April 2nd 5:15 PM to 9:30 PM

PHASE 2: April 25th

8:45 PM to 3:00 PM

PHASE 3: May 16th

8:15 PM to 5:00 PM

TIDE Camp is perfect for high school students with strong math and science skills and an interest in the marine environment.

the program’s website, are due Friday, April 17. Applicants must submit a grade transcript and a letter of recommendation. Any high schooler with solid math and science skills and an interest in the marine environment may apply. The residential camp is Monday, July 6 through Saturday, July 18. Students will spend the first

week at UD’s Newark campus and the second week at UD’s Hugh R. Sharp Campus in Lewes. Tuition is $1,300 and covers room, board, lab and class materials, the research cruise, and scheduled out-of-class activities. For more details about the camp, including application information, visit www.ocean. udel.edu/TIDE or contact Frank Newton at 302-831-2841.

All testing will be held in Dover. Pre-enrollment is required. Seating is limited. Enrollment closes Wednesday, March 25th, 2009 at Noon or when seats are filled.

Enroll by calling 302-739-5558 Only pre-enrolled examinees will be allowed to enter the testing facility. Official State of Delaware photo identification is required. All doors will lock promptly at the posted start time. All examinees must qualify from Phases 1 & 2 to take the GED Test.

Sponsored by the Delaware Department of Education and Delaware Center for Distance Adult Learning, Inc.


PAGE 24

MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

Despite a drop revenues, County receives clean report Despite a continued slide in various revenues, a deficit for the second year in a row and the prospect of continued budget reductions in the months ahead, Sussex County’s financial numbers are accurate and meet generally accepted accounting standards, a new independent audit report shows. Sussex County Council, at its Tuesday, Feb. 24 meeting, accepted the audited financial statements for fiscal year 2008 from Jefferson, Urian, Doane & Sterner, P.A., Certified Public Accountants. The auditors released an unqualified report noting that the financial statements “present fairly, in all material respects, the respective financial position” of Sussex County as of June 30, 2008. The audit report is presented each year to show how County government’s finances fared in the previous fiscal year. During Fiscal Year 2008, Sussex County’s general fund expenditures, for the second year in a row, outpaced revenue by approximately $3.3 million. The largest source of revenue for the County’s general fund, the realty transfer tax, netted $20.6 million, a decrease of $6.5 million, or 24 percent, from Fiscal 2007. The decrease was no surprise, though, as the County conservatively budgeted

$22.4 million in realty transfer tax for Fiscal 2008. Other related revenues, including fees collected through the Recorder of Deeds office, building permits and building inspections, also declined by a total of about $2 million, or 19 percent, from the previous year. Officials expect revenues to continue to decline, and in the short term, the County has implemented some $7 million in various cost-saving measures to ease the burden on the current year’s budget. “This report shows that we have a strong financial foundation to work from, despite the revenue decreases, and together with the cooperation of the departments, we will use our resources wisely as we approach the 2010 budget,” said Finance Director Susan M. Webb. “But we don’t really know where the bottom is of this economic crisis, therefore we must govern the County’s finances cautiously and realistically.” County Administrator David B. Baker said the report was in line with County expectations. “County finances are a major concern given the further reductions in housing related revenues this year,” Baker said. “I thank our staff for making reductions in the current budget, and we will evalu-

Gas Lines Price increases are expected

For only the second time in the last eight weeks, the national average price for regular grade gasoline fell this past week according to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The national average gas price dropped 6 cents from Friday, Feb. 20, to $1.88 a gallon Friday, Feb. 27. This is the largest oneweek decline since December 8. The national average price has been below $2 for 14 consecutive weeks, the first time since November 2004 to March 2005 that prices have been this low. Crude oil moved in the other direction this past week, jumping more than 10 percent this week to close at $44.76 per barrel last Friday, compared to $102 per barrel a year ago. Analysts believe the recent increase in crude oil prices is based on expectations that OPEC will continue to cut output again in the coming weeks, as well as a rebound in gasoline demand in the United States. According to the Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) weekly report, total U.S. gasoline demand over the past 4 weeks was 8.99 million bpd, up 1.7 percent from a year ago. The EIA data

also showed gasoline supplies fell 3.4 million barrels to 215.3 million barrels, dwarfing an expected 100,000-barrel decline. Refinery output was up by 172,000 barrels per day at 8.94 million bpd. Local pricing Locally, one station in Seaford was selling regular gasoline for $1.799 a gallon on Tuesday, five cents a gallon more than a week ago. In fact, the price had fallen to $1.729 a gallon last week, so the price jump was seven cents a gallon.

Price comparison average for Regular Unleaded Gasoline National

Delaware

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Week Ago

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ate all expenditures in developing next year’s budget.” Council President Vance C. Phillips said a possible $11 million drop in revenue in the coming year, coupled with pending reductions in State money, such as $1.3 million in paramedic funding, will further complicate the County’s financial picture. Sussex County will submit the audit report to the Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada for consideration of its Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting award. The County has received the award the past six years. Webb said she is optimistic the County will receive the same recognition for the Fiscal 2008 audit report. The complete report and other information will be available online at www. sussexcountyde.gov. Fiscal 2008 financial highlights • Sussex County maintains its AA bond rating by Standard & Poor’s, “reflecting consistently strong financial performance and management continuity;” • County continues its funding of nonsewer projects on a pay-as-you-go basis and avoids issuing debt; • County continued with $9.5 million in capital projects that included: land

purchases; library expansions; Airport & Industrial Park improvements; • County contributed a total of $9.6 million toward the County’s pension fund and its post-retirement employee benefit trust fund; • County funded 36 additional state troopers in addition to the normal State allotment; • County sewer projects progressed, including: 1. Completion of the project to expand the South Coastal Regional Wastewater Facility near Ocean View. This $20 million construction project expanded the treatment facility’s capacity by 3 million gallons per day, and provided a new administration building; 2. Phasing-in operations of the new Miller Creek and South Ocean View sewer districts; 3. Sewer and water hook-ups increased by approximately 5 percent, to 59,774 equivalent dwelling units (EDUs). Meantime: $8 million in developer infrastructure contributions were received for sewer expansion; construction moved forward for the Millville sewer project; and planning and design moved forward on four new sewer districts, including Angola Neck, Johnson’s Corner, Oak Orchard expansion and the Golf Village areas.


MORNING STAR • MARch 5 - 11, 2009

Police Journal

Pedestrian killed in crash

Delaware State Police Collision Reconstruction Unit is investigating a crash involving a hit and run driver who struck and killed a 90-year-old Milford man on Thursday, Feb. 26. Troopers responded to the crash at 9:08 p.m. in the area of S. Rehoboth Blvd - approximately .1 tenth of a mile south of the corporate limits of Milford - after a passing motorist discovered a person lying on the southbound shoulder of the roadway. Paris M. Sharp, 90, of Milford was walking across S. Rehoboth Blvd. when an unknown vehicle struck him. After the collision, the striking vehicle fled the scene. Sharp was taken to Milford Memorial Hospital where he died of injuries sustained in the crash. Sharp was wearing dark colored clothing, had no light in his possession and was not crossing at a designated crosswalk. The investigation is continuing and investigators have no suspect vehicle description. The DSP is asking for anyone who may have information on this crash to contact investigators at 302-697-4455 ext. 213 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP3333. The crash remains under investigation.

Police conduct ‘LSD’ sting

The Delaware State Police Sussex County Drug Unit has arrested a 46-year-old Baltimore, Md. man for several drug related offenses after completing an ongoing undercover operation into the delivery and distribution of LSD and marijuana hashish. Detectives received information that Robert A. Ewers, 46, of Baltimore, would be delivering

a quantity of LSD and marijuana hashish to the parking lot of a business on S. Main Street in Bridgeville on Thursday, Feb. 26. At 3 p.m. the Sussex Drug Unit, Sussex County GoverEwers nors Task Force, and Troop 5 patrol units established surveillance of the parking lot and observed Robert A. Ewers arrive in the parking lot in a black Dodge Caliber. Detectives then contacted Ewers. A search of Ewers jacket resulted in the seizure of 220 individual dosage units of LSD and 29 grams of marijuana hashish. Inside the vehicle, detectives located a digital scale. Ewers was arrested for trafficking LSD, possession with intent to deliver LSD, delivery of marijuana hashish, maintaining a vehicle for keeping controlled substances and two counts of possession of drug paraphernalia. Ewers was committed to SCI in default of $40,000 cash bond. Detectives also contacted a passenger, Richard V. Rorke, 56, of Baltimore. Rorke, who was intoxicated, refused to cooperate with the investigation by not revealing his hands to police. Investigating officers, concerned for their safety, continued to direct verbal commands at Rorke to reveal his hands. After refusing to do so, troopers approached him at which point he physically resisted detention. After a brief struggle, he was

For more information please call

1-800-404-7080 or visit www.dswa.com

apprehended without further incident. Rorke was arrested for resisting arrest and committed to SCI on $1,000 secured bond.

Man arrested for drugs

Delaware State Police have arrested a 46-year old Blades man on drug and weapons offenses after troopers caught him with unauthorized prescription drugs. The investigation began after detectives received information from an individual who said that William E. Smith was in possession of stolen weapons and was involved in the illegal distribution of prescription pills. On Thursday, Feb. 26, as detectives continued the investigation additional information was provided that Smith would be in possession of illegal prescription pills on that date while operating a vehicle on River Road. At 3:10 p.m., detectives encountered Smith driving a green Chevy pick-up on River Road and conducted a traffic stop. Smith was found to be in possession of 30 Endocet pills packaged in a plastic cigarette box wrapper. He had no valid prescription for

them. He was taken into custody without incident. Detectives learned that Smith had two handguns at his shop at Poorman’s Auto. Police recovered a stolen Highpoint 9MM handgun that was taken during a residential burglary on Woodland Road, Seaford in May 2008. Troopers also recovered a puppy .22 caliber revolver that was not reported stolen and does not belong to Smith. Police continue to investigate the origin of that weapon. A search of his home yielded drug paraphernalia. Smith was arrested for two counts of possession of a firearm by person prohibited, receiving a stolen firearm, possession with intent to deliver a narcotic schedule II controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia and driving with a suspended or revoked driver’s license. He was released after posting $13,000 secured bail.

Millsboro home invasion

Delaware State Police are investigating a home invasion robbery that occurred on Sunday, March 1 at a residence in the

PAGE 25

28000 block of Cannon Street, located in the Oak Orchard area near Millsboro. Troopers responded to a 911 call at 2:30 a.m. after it was reported two large black male subjects who were armed with guns forced entry into the home. The home was occupied by three residents - a 29-year old male, 24-year old female and a 14-month old girl. The suspects kicked in the locked front door wearing all black clothing - jackets, masks and gloves. They confronted the male and demanded money while pointing the guns at all the victims. They assaulted the male victim and discharged one round from a handgun into the floor of the home. After receiving an undisclosed amount of money, they fled on foot in an unknown direction. Detectives have recovered ballistic evidence from the scene and are continuing the investigation. Anyone with information about this crime should call detectives at Troop 4 at 302-8565850 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800TIP-3333.


PAGE 26

MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

Entertainment PPP to perform “Guys and Dolls”

From left are Choreographer Aimee Voshell String, Seaford; and Hot Box Girls Rebecca Burns, Lewes; Lauren Henry, Laurel; Mary Boucher, Millsboro; Cat Baker, Georgetown; Judy Venturini, Lewes; Tara Jones, Georgetown; Meghan Howlett, Millsboro and Chelsea Megee of Georgetown working on a dance number from the Possum Point Players presentation of Guys and Dolls, set to open April 17.

State Fair announces ‘09 line-up Big names will perform in the Wilmington Trust Grandstand at the 90th Annual Delaware State Fair from July 23-Aug. 1. With a different set of performers, fair officials are also announcing and selling tickets much earlier this year. There will be two Demolition Derbies. The first is Thursday, July 23 at 7 p.m. with the finals taking place on Friday, July 31. Tickets for both derbies go on sale Saturday, March 28 with ticket prices ranging from $10-$12. On Saturday, July 25 at 8 p.m. fans will experience a “Spark of Insanity” with comedian ventriloquist Jeff Dunham. Ticket prices for Dunham are $40 and $45. Tickets go on sale Saturday, March 7. Brad Paisley will be making a stop in Harrington on his American Saturday Night Tour along with Dierks Bentley and Jimmy Wayne on Sunday, July 26 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets go on sale Saturday, March 21. Prices are $50 and $55. David Cook

Smith leads Shakespeare group

Beverly Smith of Seaford has recently taken over the leadership of New Faces of Shakespeare (NFS), a subgroup of the Possum Point Players. NFS is a reading group which meets every second Monday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Possum Point Players building in Georgetown. The group has nearly 20 members and is looking for more. In preparation for their readings, Bever-

will perform on Monday, July 27 at 7 p.m. with the Gin Blossoms. Tickets are $30 and $35 and go on sale Saturday, March 21. Demi Lovato will perform on Tuesday, July 28 at 7 p.m. on Nemours Health and Prevention Service’s Healthy Kids Day at the Fair. Tickets go on sale Saturday, March 28. Prices range from $28 to $32. Performing on Wednesday, July 29 at 7 p.m. is Darius Rucker with Chuck Wicks and Julianne Hough. Ticket prices range from $28 to $32 and go on sale Saturday, March 14. Katy Perry will perform on Thursday, July 30 at 7 p.m. Tickets go on sale Saturday, March 14 and can be purchased for $28 and $33. Kelly Clarkson will perform the last night of the fair on Saturday, Aug. 1 at 7 p.m. Ticket prices are $40 and $45 and go on sale Saturday, March 7. Online buyers can purchase their tickets at www.DelawareStateFair. com. ly mails parts a few weeks before the day of the reading to give the potential cast a chance to research the characters and Shakespeare’s meaning. To join NFS, contact Beverly at bevsmith2@ peoplepc.com or call the Possum Point Players at 856-3460.

Guaranteed affordable! Portions of proceeds will benefit the Newspapers in Education program.

by John Marino of Lewes as Arvide Abernathy and Mary Ann La Lave as General Cartwright. Lt. Brannigan will be played by Pat Erhardt. Adelaide’s fellow dancers, the “Hot Box Girls” are Cat Baker of Georgetown, Rebecca Burns of Lewes, Maddie Crimmins of Millsboro, Cat Getz of Millsboro, Lauren Henry of Laurel, Meghan Howlett of Millsboro, Tara Jones of Georgetown, Chelsea Megee of Georgetown, Amelia Mitchell of Ocean View, Deni Robinson of Lewes, Shanice Smiley of Georgetown, Rhiannon Smith of Laurel, Sierra Spicer of Laurel, and Judy Venturini of Lewes. The Save-a-Soul Mission ladies are Cheryl Graves of Rehoboth, Wendy Koch of Georgetown, EJ Panico of Seaford and Kathleen Richter of Millsboro. And the cast is rounded out by roles played by Rosa Barnes, Jay Collier and Fred Dean of Georgetown. Tickets are expected to sell quickly. Performances are April 17, 18, 24 and 25 at 8 p.m. and April 19 and 26 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $20 ($19 for seniors or students) and are available by calling the Possum Ticketline at 302-856-4560. Directions to Possum Hall are also available online at www.possumpointplayers.org.

Bridgeville Lions Club

56th Annual Variety Show Smith

Let Tony Windsor perform for your event Tony Windsor

Kenney Workman of Milford will direct the popular “Guys and Dolls” production by Frank Loesser at Possum Point Players in April. Tickets are now on sale. Guys and Dolls is the quintessential musical comedy. The story takes place in a New York City that doesn’t exist. The brilliant, memorable characters are an unlikely combination. Adelaide, the singer/dancer with a chronic cold will be played by Mary Boucher of Millsboro. Nathan Detroit, her gambling fiancé, is being played by Don Megee of Georgetown, with Orville Nichols of Laurel taking the part of high-rolling Sky Masterson. Lorraine Steinhoff of Dover has taken the role of Sarah Brown, the “upright but uptight” doll wooed by Sky. The cast is full of musical talent from across Delmarva. Many of the names are well-known to theatre-goers in the area. The gamblers include John Hulse of Rehoboth as Nicely Nicely Johnson, Jim Hartzell of Georgetown as Benny Southstreet, Dan String of Seaford as Harry The Horse, Claudius Bowden of Georgetown as Big Jule, and Peyton Lynch of Georgetown as Angie the Ox. The “Save-a-Soul” mission is populated

Tony Windsor is accepting bookings for entertaining any size event, from the living room to the great outdoors! Singing classic country and rock, with special 50s, 60s and 70s hits! Also, gospel and holiday music available. Booking now for Christmas parties and beyond. Call: 302-236-9886 for info.

Lions in

MargaritaviLLe

March 13 & 14 7:30 pm

Woodbridge High School Auditorium

Tickets $6.00 at the door or see any Lions Club member SOPHMORE CLASS BUFFET DINNER SAME NIGHT! SAME PLACE! 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm Adults $10 Children 10 & Under $5


MORNING STAR • MARch 5 - 11, 2009

PAGE 27

Tame the blustery winds of March with hot soup “The March wind roars Like a lion in the sky, And makes us shiver As he passes by. When winds are soft, And the days are warm and clear, Just like a gentle lamb, Then spring is here.” - Author unknown

Loretta Knorr

That gentle lamb of spring can’t frolic in too soon for me. Although the daylight hours are becoming blessedly longer, February has had more than its share of cold, and windy days. I’m hoping that February borrowed a few days from March and that some of the blustery weather of this month will become the soft, warm and clear climate the unknown author describes. It never fails that soup recipes boil up to the surface in March. There’s just nothing like a hot bowl of nourishing soup to warm our bodies and souls. Here Martha Stewart puts her distinctive touch on three satisfying classics - Black Bean Soup, Classic Tomato Soup and Sausage and Kale Soup. Black Bean Soup - serves 4 1 cup thawed Garlic-Pepper Sauce (see below) 1 can (14 1/2 ounces) reduced-sodium chicken broth 2 cans (15 1/2 ounces each) black beans, drained and rinsed Coarse salt and ground pepper 2 to 3 teaspoons fresh lime juice Sour cream (optional)

The Practical Gourmet 1. In a medium saucepan, heat Garlic-Pepper Sauce over medium heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, 2 minutes. 2. Stir in black beans, chicken broth, and 1/2 cup water. Bring to a boil; reduce to a simmer. Cook 5 minutes. 3. Puree with an immersion blender or regular blender (work in batches, filling container halfway each time). Season with salt and pepper. 4. Reheat if necessary. Stir in lime juice; serve with sour cream, if desired. Garlic-Pepper Sauce - This mixture, called sofrito, is used in many Latin American recipes as a seasoning base; it can even replace salsa as a dip for chips. Before using it in recipes, thaw completely in the refrigerator or microwave. Makes 5 cups. 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 large onions, coarsely chopped (4 cups) 2 green bell peppers, ribs and seeds removed, coarsely chopped (2 1/4 cups) 2 red bell peppers, ribs and seeds removed, coarsely chopped (2 1/4 cups) 5 garlic cloves, minced 1 teaspoon dried oregano

1 teaspoon ground cumin 1 large tomato, cored and coarsely chopped (2 cups) 3 cups mixed cilantro leaves and tender stems Coarse salt and ground pepper In a 5-quart Dutch oven or pot, heat oil over medium heat. Add onion; cook, stirring often, until starting to soften, about 5 minutes. Add bell peppers, garlic, oregano, and cumin; cook, stirring often, until peppers are crisp-tender, about 10 minutes. Add tomato; cook, stirring occasionally, 5 minutes more. Transfer to a food processor. Add cilantro and puree until slightly chunky. Season with salt and pepper. If not using immediately, transfer sauce, in 1-cup quantities, to airtight containers. Freeze until ready to use, up to 3 months.

Classic Tomato Soup - serves 6 Half of this rich and creamy soup is pureed, leaving some delicious chunks of tomato. 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) butter 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 medium onion, chopped Coarse salt and ground pepper 1/4 cup all-purpose flour 3 tablespoons tomato paste 2 sprigs fresh thyme (or 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme) 2 cans (14 1/2 ounces each) reduced-sodium chicken broth 2 cans (28 ounces each) whole peeled tomatoes in juice (with basil if available) In a 5-quart saucepan or Dutch oven, melt butter over medium heat; add oil and onion, and season with salt and pepper. Cook until onion is translucent, about 5 minutes. Stir in

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Sausage and Kale Soup - serves 4 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 onion, diced 2 garlic cloves, minced 1/4 teaspoon crushed red-pepper flakes 5 waxy potatoes (1 1/2 pounds), peeled and cut into 1/2-inch chunks 3 cans (14 1/2 ounces each) reduced-sodium chicken broth 1 bunch kale (12 ounces), stemmed and shredded 12 ounces smoked chicken sausage, cut into 1/2-inch half moons In a large pot (6 to 8 quarts), heat oil over medium. Add onion and cook until soft, stirring, 2 to 3 minutes. Add garlic and red-pepper flakes; cook unti fragrant, 1 minute. Add potatoes and broth; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer until potatoes are tender, 10 to 15 minutes. In a blender, puree half the soup. Return to pot; add kale and sausage. Simmer until kale is wilted, 10 to 15 minutes.

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flour and tomato paste; cook 1 minute. To saucepan, add thyme, broth, and tomatoes, breaking up tomatoes with your fingers. Bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer, 30 minutes. (Remove thyme sprigs before blending.) Using an immersion blender, puree soup in pot, leaving a fair amount of the tomatoes in chunks. Or, working in several batches, puree half (5 cups) of the soup in a conventional blender until smooth; return to pot. Season with salt and pepper. Serve immediately, or let cool to room temperature before dividing among airtight containers (leaving 1 inch of space at the top) and freezing.

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PAGE 28

MORNING STAR

• MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

Classifieds

FREE CLASSIFIEDS*

(For Subscribers - Personal Use Only) *Some exceptions such as homes for rent or sale

Deadline: Monday, 2 p.m. Businesses: $4.50 per inch Line ads ($9.00 minimum)

Boxed (Display) Ads: $6.50/inch Legals: $6.50 per inch Not responsible for typographical errors after first insertion

629-9788

Call: Or E-mail: ads@mspublications.com LOST ‘61 PURDUE UNIV. COLLEGE RING with citrane/ topaz center stone, BS & 61 on ea side, EDG initials inside. Generous reward! Call 629-9285. 2/19 BLACK LAB MIXED, male, choker collar, answers to Buddy. Lost near Camp Road, Seaford. Reward offered. 629-5432. 1/29

GIVE-AWAY FREE HORSE MANURE, great for gardens. 3373840. 2/5

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

Would you like to earn extra money? Join my

AVON team. Barbara, AVON rep., for info: Call

858-6799 NOTICE

TOWN OF BLADES COUNCIL MEETING Scheduled for March 9 has been rescheduled for March 16, 2009 at 7 p.m. at Hardin Hall.

ANGEL FOOD MINISTRIES

Balanced nutrition & variety with enough food to feed a family of four for a week for $30. March Order Dates: Laurel Nazarene 875-7873, 3/11, 5-8 p.m. Our Lady of Lourdes 629-4691 3/16 & Lifeway Church of God, Bville, 337-3044, 3/16 Distribution Day: Sat., March 28, 10-noon. For more info see www. angelfoodministries.com

SERVICES

Need Sewing Done? Call Linda!

302-875-1041

Experienced ~ Reasonable Large and Small Jobs Repairs and Alterations Pick up & delivery No Extra Charge

WANTED ‘91 GEO METRO for Parts. 875-0964, before 9 pm. Ask for Virgil. 2/5

AUTOMOTIVE ‘00 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE Laredo, V8, champaign, 6 CD player/cass., well maintained, runs great, 225K mi., records avail. $2850 OBO. 280-6033. 2/ ‘02 TOYOTA CAMRY SE, 1 owner, garage kept, sun roof, power seat, 6 disc player radio, 107K mi., $6250. 629-2622. 2/26 MAZDA MIATA FACTORY CAR COVER, like new, rarely used, cost $179, asking $90. 629-8081. 2/26 INFINITY CAR SPEAKERS, 6x9, $25 pr. 8757775. 2/26 ‘02 VW CABRIO Conv., red, exc. cond., 45k mi, AT, AC, Kenwood sound system, $10,600. 280-6354. 2/12 ‘03 MERC. MARAUDER, blk, 41k mi., immac. cond., $16,500. 628-8877. 2/12 ‘80 CHEVY TRUCK, 4 wh. dr., rough body, $1500. 875-0964 before 9 pm, ask for Vigil. 2/5 ‘85 BRONCO II, V6, 4 wh. dr., Asking $800 OBO. 8757348. 1/22

NEW CUSTOM CAMSHAFT for Mustang GT. Anderson Ford Motor Sports N-21, $175. 8752423. 1/22

MOTORCYCLES/ REC VEHICLES ‘06 SUN-L 4 WHEELER, 200 cc, yellow, $500 OBO. 245-6856. 2/5

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES RICHARD PETTY & Dover Racing Soda Btls., $5 per 6 pk. Children’s metal mechanical Spinning Top from 60’s, $7. 398-0309. 3/5 ‘BOZO GOES to the Dog Show’ Book & Record set Beautiful illustrations, w/7” record. $25 set. 398-0309. 5-DIGIT BLACK TAG, #49265, $1200 OBO. Call Marco at Brother’s Pizza, 875-4718. 2/12

FOR SALE BANJO, new Washburn, with case. $250. 875-4570. 3/5 METAL FRAME for Portable Garage, 20’L x 10’W, $65. 875-8197. 3/5 RAINBOW VACUUM Sweeper, $95. 2 Old wooden cabinets, $60 both. 21x27 gold frame painting by Robert Wood $125. Exercise bike, $75. 875-5277. 3/5 2 ELEC. HEATERS, OIL filled, 1 Honeywell, 1 DeLonghi. Like new, used sparingly, $25 ea. or both for $45. 628-0502. 2/26 BABY CRIB MATTRESS, standard, Kolcraft, white w/splashes of color, exc. cond. 629-4225. 2/26 24” WOODEN SHIP WHEEL, $30. 3 bundles Architectural roof shingles, 30 yr. warranty, $40 for all 3. 875-7775. 2/26

TOOLS, Rockwell table saw, Skil battery drill, elec. drill, gas weed wacker, gas sm. tiller, 875-0393, lv. msg. 2/26 32” SONY TRINITRON TV, $60. HP PhotoSmart 8400 Series, $20. 337-3161. PORTER CABLE, new 18V Charger & lithium battery, $55. 4 new 18V Batteries for Porter Cable, $10 ea. Bosch new 18V charger & 2 lithium batteries, $65. 2368133. 2/26 36” COLOR TV, cable ready w/DVD & VCR (separate units), $150 for all OBO. 628-5300. 2/26 COUNTER-ROTATING 5 hp TILLER, like new, $275. 629-4026. 2/26 ELECTROLUX VACUUM, canister style, $30. Goose down XL jacket, $50. 6294026. 2/26 CHAIN SAW CHAINS, variety (approx. 5), $10 for all. 629-4026. 2/26 2 MAGNOVOX CONVERTER Boxes, $30 ea. Never opened. 337-9647. 2/26 CRAFTSMAN TRIPLE HARD BAGGER, 9 bushels for 42/48 deck, cost $375, Asking $150. 629-8081. 2/26 WURLITZER SPINET PIANO $500, Lazy Boy sleep sofa $100; Lazy Boy recliner $50; maple coffee table & 3 end tables $100; oak dining table & 6 chairs $100; side-by-side almond refrig. $100; elec. stove, almond $75; 27” TV w/stand $100; antique secretary desk $100; set of 4 wooden TV tables $10; 4 table lamps $10 ea. 629-3652 after 5pm. 2/26 PENN HOUSE DR HUTCH, 3 yrs old, solid wood. Top: 3 panel beveled glass; on bottom: 3 drawers/cabinets. Exc. cond. $200. 875-2129. ANT. LOVE SEAT w/beautifully carved wood, must see, $275. 875-5277. 2/19

DELMAR SCHOOL DISTRICT

CUSTODIAN VACANCY

Delmar School District is seeking a full-time c ustodian with benefits [salary based upon experience & State/Local salary schedules]. Date of Employment: April 1, 2009. Contact Human Resources @ 302/846-9544 x111 for a District paper application. Closing Date for c ompleted application: March 11, 2009. EOE

2 TOILETS, like new, white, $100 both. (replaced with handicap toilets). 875-5277. 2/19 LADIES’ SILVER FOX FUR Jacket, exc. cond., $350 OBO. 262-0481. 2/19 BASEBALL GLOVE CHAIR, indoor/outdoor molded polymer, brand new, $400. 410673-2161. 2/19 FIREWOOD, 1/2 cord, seasoned, $55. 846-9788. 2/12 ‘THE WORLD AT WAR,’ the complete set, VHS tapes, $20. 628-1880. 2/12 ISLAND RATTAN 48” glass table w/4 chairs, exc. cond., $585. Etagere, exc. cond. $455. 280-6354. 2/12 OCTAGON TABLE, solid oak, inset tile top, white wash color w/4 upholstered matching chairs on casters, $300. 337-8654. 2/12 BROYHILL ENT. CENTER, solid oak, like new, $400. Broyhill loveseat, blue plaid, good cond., $100. 2 bar stools, wcker, like new, $75. 629-5313. 2/5 CONN PRELUDE ORGAN w/ bench, 45” x 23”, double keyboard, very good cond. & nice looking, seldom used. $400 , OBO. 302629-4444. 2/5 MAPLE DINING TABLE w/ 2 extensions, 6 chairs. 6298357. 2/5 ROCKWELL 10” BAND SAW, $125. Sears 12” Band Saw, $140. Black & Decker Workmate, $35. 745-5659. 1/29 LEATHER WORKBOOTS, brown, sz. 10. $10. Felt lined rubber boots, sz. 10, $10. Misc. hunting/construction clothing, $10. 6294026. 1/29 5x8 100% WOOL RUG, dusty rose, VG cond., 80

OBO. Call Kathy, 875-7169. 1/22 ODD FELLOWS CEMETERY Lot, 10x12, $1500. 875-9053. 1/22 SONY BOOM BOX, $100. 536-1009. 1/22 MINOLTA MAXXUM 400SI w/Minalta AF zoom lens, 28-80 exc. cond., $75. Cannon EOS Rebel w/Cannon AF zoom lens, 80-200, perf. cond., $175. Minalta QTSI Maxxum w/AF zoom lens, 35-70, like new, $75. 8751877. 1/22

ANIMALS, ETC. CAT HOUSE, looks like dog house, standard size, $10. 262-0481. 2/19

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NOTICE: Town of Blades Cemetery

Please remove all Christmas and other Holiday Flowers & Decorations from the gravesites and stones at the Town Cemetery on Market Street by March 9, 2009, or the Town will remove and dispose of them. The Town will not be held liable for any holding frames removed, damaged, or disposed of. TOWN OF BLADES Vikki Prettyman, Town Administrator


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PAGE 30 Tax Services IRS TAX DEBT KEEPING YOU AWAKE? Local CPA firm resolves all Federal and State tax problems for individuals and businesses. US Tax Resolutions, P.A. 877-477-1108. Vacation Rentals Ski Free/Stay Free! Deep Creek Lake, MD. - Long & Foster Resort Rentals 3rd night stay & 3rd lift ticket free with 2 nights & purchase of multi-day lift ticket! Ski-in/ski-out, ski access homes, townhomes & condos. 800.336.7303. www. DeepCreekResort.com OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND. Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/partial weeks. Call for free brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2101. Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com

LEGALS

rel, Delaware, from 1:00 p.m. prevailing time, to 8:00 p.m. prevailing time. Voting machines will be used. At the General Election for Municipal Officers of the Town of Laurel, the following officers shall be filled: Mayor: Joshua S. Duryea John Shwed The following persons have filed for Mayor and COuncil seats and pursuant to The Town of Laurel’s Charter, Section 8(H), “In the event that only one person files or is nominated for office for which an election is to be held, the person who files or who is nominated shall be deemed to be elected for full term and it shall not be necessary to have an election.” Council Person Second Ward: Robin Fisher Council Person Third Ward: William Trujillo Councilman At Large: H. Donovan Phillips, Jr. 3/5/1tc

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: This is to advise that Craig A. Dickerson of Bridgeville, Sussex County, Delaware, will be filing with the Prothonotary in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, an application for License to Carry a Concealed Deadly Weapon, according to the Laws of the State of Delaware. 3/5/1tp

NOTICE OF GENERAL ELECTION FOR MUNICIPAL OFFICERS OF THE TOWN OF LAUREL TO BE HELD ON THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2009

Please Take Notice the General Election for Municipal Officers of the Town of Laurel shall be held on Thursday, March 26, 2009, at the Laurel Fire Hall located at 205 Tenth Street, Lau-

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In accordance with the United States Environmental Protection Agency National Pretreatment Program, Code of Federal Register (CFR) Part 403.8 (D)(viii), and 40 CFR Part 25, the City of Seaford is giving public notification: Orient Corporation of America, 111 Park Avenue, Seaford, DE 19973, was in Significant Noncompliance (SNC) of their City of Seaford Industrial Wastewater Discharge Permit (IWDP) for violation of their Part 403.8(D) (viii)(B) for the constituent and reporting period listed below. This SNC is a Technical Review Criteria (TRC) violation in which thirty-three percent or more of the measurements of the same pollutant taken during a six-month period exceed the numeric Pretreatment Standards or Requirements. TRC Chlorobenzene: monthly average concentration and monthly average mass loading for the July-December reporting period of 2008. Orient Corporation of America, after reporting noncompliance, has retested the above constituent and as of this date is in compliance with all parameters of their Industrial Discharge Permit. Persons with questions concerning this matter should contact Bill Wennberg, Pretreatment Coordintor, at the Seaford Wastewater Treatment Facility (302) 629-8340. The City of Seaford Dolores J. Slatcher City Manager 3/5/1tc

MORNING STAR BID NOTICE

The Town of Blades will be accepting bids on the following surplus vehicle: 1985 Chevy Pick-Up D-30. All bids are due to the Town Administrator by Friday March 13, 2009. The vehicle is located at Town Hall and can be inspected between 8:30am and 4:30pm, Mon.-Fri. Payment must be made in cash or certified/cashiers check. The bids will be sealed until opened by the Town Council at the April 13th, 2009 Council Meeting. The terms of the sale shall be designated final when the bid has been awarded and the vehicle is sold “AS IS”. The Town Council has the right to refuse any bids and has final say. The successful bidder has seven (7) business days from the date of notification of award to pay for and pick up vehicle. Any questions please call 302629-7366. 2/12/4tc

NOTICE

Estate of Robert L. Nibblett, Sr., Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Robert L. Nibblett, Sr. who departed this life on the 20th day of January, A.D. 2009 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Robert Lester Nibblett, Jr., Richard Alan Nibblett on the 18th day of February, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Co-Executors without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Co-Executors on or before the 20th day of September, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Co-Executors: Robert Lester Nibblett, Jr. 8170 Gum Branch Road Seaford, DE 19973 Richard Alan Nibblett 26075 Bethel-Concord Road Seaford, DE 19973 Attorney: Shannon . Owens, Esq. Procino Wells, LLC 225 High St. Seaford, DE 19973 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 3/5/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of William K. Rayfield, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of William K. Rayfield who departed this life on the 21st day of January, A.D. 2009 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Sherry L. Ray-

• MARCH 5 - 11, 2009 field Hastings on the 23rd day of February, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executrix on or before the 21st day of September, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executrix: Sherry L. Rayfield Hastings 27654 Layton Rd. Laurel, DE 19956 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 3/5/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Phyllis Snyder Gardner, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration WWA upon the estate of Phyllis Snyder Gardner who departed this life on the 12th day of December, A.D. 2008 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Mary G. Bohmke, Nannette G. Hathaway on the 12th day of February, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Co-Administratrices without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Co-Administratrices on or before the 12th day of August, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Co-Administratrices: Mary G. Bohmke 416 Collinwood Dr. Fredericksburg, VA 22405 Nannette G. Hathaway 61 N. Main St. Woodstown, NJ 08098 Attorney: Michele Procino-Wells, Esq. Procino Wells, LLC 225 High St. Seaford, DE 19973 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 2/26/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Earl Caesar Radding, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Earl Caesar Radding who departed this life on the 1st day of February, A.D. 2009 late of Greenwood, DE were duly granted unto Peter Radding on the 13th day of February, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required

to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 1st day of October, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Peter Radding 4290 Club Course Drive N. Charleston, SC 29420 Attorney: Stephen P. Ellis P.O. Box 574 Georgetown, DE 19947 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 2/26/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Howard S. Nichols, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Howard S. Nichols who departed this life on the 21st day of January, A.D. 2009 late of Delmar, DE were duly granted unto Francis A. Nichols on the 4th day of February, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 21st day of September, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Francis A. Nichols 6229 Phillips Landing Rd. Laurel, DE 19956 Attorney: Michele Procino Wells, Esq. Procino Wells, LLC 225 High St. Seaford, DE 19973 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 2/19/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Naomi L. Dickerson, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Naomi L. Dickerson who departed this life on the 23rd day of January, A.D. 2009 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Peter B. Fisher on the 5th day of February, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 23rd day of September, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Peter B. Fisher 4040 Autumn Ct.

Fairfax VA 22030 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 2/19/3tc

NOTICE

Estate of Margaret E. Messick, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of Margaret E. Messick who departed this life on the 28th day of January, A.D. 2009 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Robert Messick on the 9th day of February, A.D. 2009, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Administrator without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administrator on or before the 28th day of September, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administrator: Robert Messick 30348 Firetower Road Laurel, DE 19956 Gregory Fuller Sr. Register of Wills 2/19/3tc SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, March 17, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN BROAD CREEK HUNDRED, SUSSEX COUNTY AND STATE OF DELAWARE, AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS TO WIT; BEGINNING AT A PIPE LOCATED ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF ROUTE NO. 13A, SAID PIPE BEING 30 FEET FROM THE CENTERLINE OF THE SAID ROUTE NO. 13A AND BEING 518.0 FEET FROM THE CENTERLINE OF ROAD NO. 493 AND ALSO BEING A CORNER FOR THIS LAND AND LANDS NOW OR FORMERLY OF J.B. CROPPER; THENCE ALONG CROPPER LANDS, SOUTH 78 DEGREES 55 MINUTES WEST, 332.00 FEET TO A PIPE; THENCE TURNING AND RUNNING SOUTH 19 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST, 74.62 FEET TO A PIPE, BEING See LEGALS—page 32


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PAGE 32 LEGALS - from Page 30 A CORNER FOR LANDS NOW OR FORMERLY OF FRANKLIN M. LECATES; THENCE ALONG LECASTES LANDS, NORTH 79 DEGREES 00 MINUTES EAST, 326.45 FEET TO A PIPE LOCATED ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF THE AFORESAID ROUTE NO. 13A; THENCE ALONG THE RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF THE SAID ROUTE NO. 13A; NORTH 15 DEGREES 09 MINUTES WEST, 74.50 FEET BACK TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING, SAID TO CONTAIN 24,384 SQUARE FEET OF LAND, BE THE SAME MORE OR LESS, AS SURVEYED BY THOMAS A. TEMPLE, JR. REGISTERED -SURVEYOR, ON MAY 22, 1972. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO LISA E. LEMON AND MERVIN W. LEMON, JR. BY DEED OF LISA E. LEMON F/K/A LISA E. MARINER RECORDED 2/3/06 IN BOOK 3267, PAGE 156, SUSSEX COUNTY RECORDS, DELAWARE. Tax Parcel: 2-32-6.0011.00 Property Address: 28782 Seaford Road, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before April 6, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on April 10, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County.

MORNING STAR Seized and taken in execution the property of LISA E. & MERVIN W. LEMON, JR. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 3/5/2tc SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, March 17, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being known and designated as Lot No. 52 of Green Acres, facing on Garden Lane, which street leads off the West side of U.S. 13, about 1 1/2 miles North of the City of Seaford as shown on a plot known as GREEN ACRES, prepared by John B. Carson, Registered Surveyor, dated April 1947, and now of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 310, Page 540, and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a found iron pin lying on the Northerly right of way line of Garden Lane, said iron pin being a common boundary line for this lot and Lot 53: thence by and with aforesaid Lot 53, North 22 degrees 19 minutes 47 seconds East 150.00 feet to an iron pin found; thence turning and running by and with a common boundary line for this lot and lands now or formerly of Ray S. Mears and Sons, Inc., South 67 degrees 43 minutes 26 seconds East 49.93 feet to a pipe found; thence turning and running by and with a common boundary line for this lot and Lot 51, South 22 degrees 18 minutes 50 seconds West 150.05 feet to a pipe found; thence turning and running by and with the Northerly right of way of Garden Lane, North 67 degrees 40 minutes 00 seconds West 50.00 feet home to the place of beginning. Said to contain 7.496 square feet of land, more or less with improvements thereon, as shown on a survey prepared by TempleSellers. Inc., dated February 4, 2000. BEING the same lands and premises which Dexter M. Cannon, by Deed dated November 13, 2006 and recorded in the Office

of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3382, Page 342, did grant and convey unto James D. McCreary and Katie A. McCreary, his wife. Tax Parcel: 3-31-3.00226.00 Property Address: 8559 Garden Lane, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before April 6, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on April 10, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JAMES D. & KATIE A. McCREARY and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 3/5/2tc SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, March 17, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece and parcel of land, situate” lying and being in the Development known as WHITE RIVER ESTATES,

• MARCH 5 - 11, 2009 Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being known and designated as LOT 1, SECTION D, as shown on a plot of record at the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, Georgetown, Delaware, and more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument situate on the Southerly side of Broad Creek Drive, being a corner for this lot and Lot #2; thence South 12 degrees 05 minutes 51 seconds West a distance of 200.00 feet to a concrete monument; thence North 54 degrees 03 minutes 09 seconds West a distance of 150.00 feet to a concrete monument situate at the edge of River Road; thence North 12 degrees 05 minutes 51 seconds East a distance of 161.61 feet to a pipe; thence with a curve whose bearings are North 69 degrees 01 minute 21 seconds East a chord distance of 41.90 feet to a pipe; thence along Broad Creek Drive, South 54 degrees 03 minutes 09 seconds East a distance of 111.61 feet home to the place of Beginning, said to contain 27,099 square feet of land, be the same more or less, as shown on a plot prepared from a survey made by Miller-Lewis, Inc. and of record at the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, Georgetown, Delaware in Deed Book 926, Page 102. BEING the same lands and premises which Robert Edward Dickerson, by Deed dated September 30, 2005 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3211, Page 250, did grant and convey unto Alvin R. Martin, Jr. and Stephanie L. Martin. Tax Parcel: 4-32-2.0015.06 Property Address: 30625 River Road, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before April 6, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on April 10, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1

1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of STEPHAINE L. & ALVIN R. MARTIN, JR. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 3/5/2tc SHERIFF SALE By virtue of an Alias writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, March 17, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN tract, piece or parcel of land lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at a concrete monument on the north side of County Road 516 said marker being 428.82’ with the right of way line of County Road 516 to the extension of right of way line of road 525; thence North 41° 45’ West 154.70 feet to a concrete monument set on the South side of County Road 525; thence along said County Road North 25° 39’ East for an arc distance of 166.25’ to a concrete monument; thence South 41° 45’ East 218.52 feet to a concrete monument set on the northern side of County Road 516; thence along said road South 48° 15’ West 153.33 feet to the point and place of beginning containing 28,363 square feet of land more or less. BEING the same lands conveyed to Arletha D. Brown by deed of Morris Millwork Company, Inc. dated June 16, 1982, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Deed Book 1120, Page 334. Tax Parcel: 2-31-13.00-

24.03 Property Address: 24330 Concord Pond Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before April 6, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on April 10, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ARLETHA D. BROWN and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 3/5/2tc SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Venditioni Exponas, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, March 17, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, lying and being situate in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, and more particularly described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a stake at the Northwest intersection of State Highway Number 501, leading to Laurel, with State Highway Number See LEGALS—page 33


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 32 502, leading from Delmar to Mardella; thence along the Northerly right-of-way line of State Highway Number 502, North 75 1/4° West 210 feet to a stake; thence for a new division line in these lands the following two (2) courses: (a) North 22° East 210 feet to a stake; (b) South 75 1/4° East 210 feet to a stake in the Westerly right-of-way line of State Highway Number 501; thence along the Westerly right-of-way line of State Highway Number 501, South 22° West 210 feet, home to the place of beginning, containing one (1) acre of land, be the same more or less. BEING the same land conveyed by Marvin R. Smith and Betty C. Smith by deed dated October 3, 1973 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 719, Page 258, to Marvin Lee Smith and Shirley M. Smith, n/k/a Shirley Ryall, his wife, in fee. Marvin Lee Smith departed this life on July 18, 1976. Tax Parcel: 5-32-19.0024.00 & 24.01 Property Address: Rt. 2, Box 261A, Delmar Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before April 6, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on April 10, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks pay-

able to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of SHIRLEY SMITH RYALL A/K/A SHIRLEY M. SMITH, AMERICAN PIONEER TITLE INSURANCE CO. & MID-ATLANTIC SETTLEMENT SERVICES, INC. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 3/5/2tc SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, March 17, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, pierce or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, and State of Delaware, being more particularly described as follows to wit: BEGINNING at an iron rod found on the westerly right of way line of Arch Street, said iron rod being 7.2 feet southerly from the face of the curb of Fifth Street; thence along said westerly right of way line of Arch Street South 18 degrees 34 minutes 30 seconds East a distance of 59.63 feet to an iron rod found, being a corner for these lands and land now or formerly of John C. and Katherine Botdorf; thence along said Botdorf lands South 71 degrees 58 minutes 25 seconds West a distance of 56.87 feet to a mark on a concrete block and lands now or formerly of Janice Burbage; thence along said Burbage lands North 18 degrees 35 minutes 06 seconds West a distance of 59.16 feet to an iron pipe found on the southerly right of way line of Fifth Street; thence along the Southerly right of way line of Fifth Street North 71 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds East a distance of 56.88 feet, home to the point and place of beginning, said to contain 3,378 square feet of land more or less, according to a survey prepared by Miller-Lewis, Inc. dated February 13, 2007. BEING the same lands conveyed to Christine Roundtree by Deed from James W. Clagg and Karen M. Clagg, dated February 13, 2007, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex

County in Deed Book 3419, page 83. Tax Parcel: 4-31-2.002.00 Property Address: 424 North Arch Street, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before April 6, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on April 10, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of CHRISTINE ROUNDTREE and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 3/5/2tc SHERIFF SALE By virtue of an Alias writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, March 17, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT, PIECE AND PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN NORTHWEST FORK HUNDRED. SUSSEX COUNTY, DELAWARE, BEING BOUNDED ON THE NORTH BY COUNTY ROAD 612, ON THE EAST BY LANDS NOW OR FORMERLY OF YODER ON THE SOUTH BY LANDS

• MARCH 5 - 11, 2009 NOW OR FORMERLY OF GREEN, AND ON THE WEST BY LANDS NOW OR FORMERLY OF TITUS AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY MICHAEL D. SWAIN, PLS # 529, ON AUGUST 16, 1995. AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT IN THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF COUNTY ROAD 612 (25 FEET FROM THE CENTERLINE) IN THE CENTERLINE OF WHITE MARSH DITCH AT A CORNER FOR LANDS NOW OR FORMERLY OF YODER, THENCE FROM THE PLACE OF BEGINNING AND WITH YODER LANDS AND THE CENTERLINE OF SAID DITCH, SOUTH 05 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 221.3 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 06 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST 425.1 FEET TO A POINT IN THE CENTERLINE OF A SMALLER DITCH AT A CORNER FOR LANDS NOW OR FORMERLY OF GREEN, THENCE WITH THE SAME AND THE CENTERLINE OF SAID SMALLER DITCH NORTH 46 DEGREES 23 MINTUES 46 SECONDS WEST 169.9 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH 54 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 491.6 FEET TO A POINT AT A CORNER FOR LANDS NOW OR FORMERLY OF WILLOUGHBY AND LANDS NOW OR FORMERLY OF TITUS, THENCE WITH THE LATTER NORTH 53 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST 248.0 FEET TO A POINT. THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST 150.0 FEET TO A POINT ON THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF COUNTY ROAD 612. THENCE WITH THE SAME SOUTH 81 DEGREES 20 MINUTES EAST 315.6 FEET HOME TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 5.0 ACRES OF LAND MORE OR LESS. AND BEING THE SAME LANDS AND PREMISES AS WERE CONVEYED UNTO THE BEACON MISSION, INC., BY DEED BY ELMER A. TITUS AND PATRICIA A. TITUS, DATED SEPTEMBER 23, 2004, AND RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE RECORDER OF DEEDS, IN AND FOR SUSSEX COUNTY, STATE OF DELAWARE, IN DEED BOOK 3040, PAGE 78. BEING THE SAME LANDS AND PREMISES WHICH ,THE BEACON MISSION, INC., A DELAWARE NON-PROFIT CORPORATION, CONVEYED UNTO ELMER A. TITUS AND PATRICIA A. TITUS,

PAGE 33 HUSBAND AND WIFE, BY DEED DATED THE 1ST DAY Of JULY, 2005 AND RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE RECORDER OF DEEDS IN AND FOR SUSSEX COUNTY IN DEED BOOK 3170, PAGE 315. Tax Parcel: 5-30-5.0024.00 Property Address: 9762 Woodyard Road, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before April 6, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on April 10, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ELMER A. & PATRICIA A. TITUS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 3/5/2tc SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, March 17, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece and parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the City

of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, lying on the North side of East Street, now known as High Street, and being Lot NO. 70 on the old plot of Seaford containing 7,200 square feet of land, more or less. Being the same property conveyed to Seaford Medical Officers, L.L.C. a/k/a Seaford Medical Offices, L. L. C. from Jerry Warren Elliott a/k/a Warren Elliott, by Deed dated February 27, 1995, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 2038, page 239. The true and correct name of the party of the first part as stated on its certificate of formation as filed with the Secretary of State of the State of Delaware is Seaford Medical Officers, L.L.C. Being the same property conveyed from Seaford Medical Officers, L.L.C. a/k/a Seaford Medical Offices, L.L.C. by deed dated September 28, 2007 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County in Deed Book 3505, page 302 to Soudani Alexis and Leontes Charles, in fee. Tax Parcel: 4-31-5.00203.00 Property Address: 614 High Street, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before April 6, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on April 10, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these See LEGALS—page 34


PAGE 34 LEGALS - from Page 33 terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be for­ feited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sus­ sex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of SOUDANI ALEXIS & LEONTES CHARLES and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 3/5/2tc SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a First Pluries writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, March 17, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Com­ plex, 22215 DuPont Bou­ levard, Georgetown, Dela­ ware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following de­ scribed real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, more particularly described as follows to wit: BEGINNING at an iron stob located on the inside edge of 5.5 foot sidewalk, which is 4.5 feet from the face of the curb on the west­ erly side of Pine Street (said face of curb being 14.0 feet from the centerline there­ of) at the intersection with the southerly side of Polar Street thence with a line located on the inside edge of a 4.6 foot sidewalk, which is 3.9 feet from the face of the curb on the southerly side of Popular Street (said face of curb being 11.0 feet from the centerline there­ of), South 70 degrees 06 minutes West 92.23 feet to an iron stob located on the inside edge of the last described sidewalk at the intersection with the east­ erly side of Cannon Street; thence with a line located on the inside edge of a 4.9 foot sidewalk, which is located 6.4 feet from the dace of the curb on the southerly side of Cannon Street (said face of curb being 18.1 feet from the centerline thereof), South 18 degrees 37 min­ utes East 59.86 feet to a point on the inside edge of the last described sidewalk at corner for lands of Lyman H. Jamison, etux; thence with the line of lands of said Jamison, North 69 degrees 30 minutes East 108.33 feet to a pipe located on the in­ side edge of said sidewalk on the westerly side on Pine Street, thence with the in­ side edge of said sidewalk, North 34 degrees 00 min­ utes West 60.53 feet to the point and place of beginning, containing 5,947 square feet of land, more or less, as

MORNING STAR will more fully and at large appear upon reference to a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr., date April 9, 1988, and filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, Georgetown, Dela­ ware, in Deed Book 1562, page 278. SUBJECT to any and all restrictions, reservations, conditions, easements and agreements of record in the Office ofthe Recorder of Deeds n and for Sussex County, Delaware. BEING the same lands and premises which were conveyed unto Ian G. French and Patricia A. French, hus­ band and wife, by Deed of Paul S. McCreary and Juliet G. McCreary, dated May 16, 1996 in the Office of the Re­ corder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 2124, Page 265. BEING the same lands and premises which were conveyed unto Richard A. Ashby, party of the sec­ ond part, by Deed of Ian G. French and Patricia A. French, husband and wife, dated March 29, 2004 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 2960, Page 248. Tax Parcel: 4­31­5.00­ 153.00 Property Address: 222 Pine Street, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Reg­ istration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before April 6, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on April 10, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Dela­ ware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty­Five days of confirmation. If the Pur­ chaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make

checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of RICHARD A. ASHBY and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 3/5/2tc SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Le­ vari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, March 17, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Com­ plex, 22215 DuPont Bou­ levard, Georgetown, Dela­ ware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following de­ scribed real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, and being known as Lot 4 of “Star Partners, Inc.” (Plot Book 51, Page 350) and being more particularly de­ scribed as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron pipe found on the north­ erly right of way of Route 15 and being a corner for this lot and Lot #5; thence with Route 16 North 75 degrees 58 minutes 44 seconds West, 12.90 feet to a point; thence with Route 16 North 74 degrees 01 minutes 00 seconds West 139.87 feet to a rebar set at Lot 3, thence with Lot 3 North 02 degrees 01 minutes 28 seconds East 216.17 feet to a rebar set at lands of Carlisle Bros. Inc.; thence with Carlisle Lands South 75 degrees 41 minutes 09 seconds East 151.83 feet to a rebar found; thence with Lot #5 South 02 degrees 01 minute 28 seconds West 220.28 feet to the point and place of beginning and con­ taining 32,404 square feet more or less with all im­ provements thereon as sur­ veyed by Temple­Sellers, Inc. Request surveyors on September 17th, 1999. Being a part of the same lands conveyed to Merle L. Embleton by Deed of Star Partners, a Delaware Gen­ eral Partnership, said Deed dated September 28th, 1999, and of record in the Recorder of Deed in Sussex County in Deed Book 2426 at Page 256 Being the same lot and piece of land conveyed by Merle L. Embleton, by Deed dated September 28, 1999, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds for Sussex County, Delaware at Deed Book 2426, page 259, to Adrianne L. Palmer, in fee. Tax Parcel: 4­30­5.00­ 17.03 Property Address: Lot 4, Route 16, Greenwood

• MARCH 5 - 11, 2009 Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Reg­ istration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before April 6, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on April 10, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Dela­ ware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty­Five days of confirmation. If the Pur­ chaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ADRIANNE L. PALMER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 3/5/2tc SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Le­ vari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, March 17, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Com­ plex, 22215 DuPont Bou­ levard, Georgetown, Dela­ ware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following de­ scribed real estate to wit: All That Certain Property Situated In The Hundred Of Nanticoke In The County Of Sussex And State Of Delaware, Being Described As Follows: Described As Lot No. 10 In The Subdivi­ sion Known As Sweetbriar. Being More Fully Described In A Fee Simple Deed Dated 05/16/2005 And Re­ corded 05/17/2005, Among The Land Records Of The County And State Set Forth Above, In Volume 03143 Pages 303. Being the same lands and premises which Dream Builders Construction Inc.

did grant and convey unto Jamie L. Zepp by deed dated May 16, 2005 and recorded on May 18, 2005 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3143 Page 303 Tax Parcel: 4­30­9.00­ 40.14 Property Address: 13252 Hunters Cove Road, Green­ wood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Reg­ istration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before April 6, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on April 10, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Dela­ ware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty­Five days of confirmation. If the Pur­ chaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JAMIE L. ZEPP and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 3/5/2tc SHERIFF SALE By virtue of an Alias writ of Levari Facias, to me di­ rected, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, March 17, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Com­ plex, 22215 DuPont Bou­ levard, Georgetown, Dela­ ware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following de­ scribed real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND,SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN THE TOWN OF LAUREL, LITTLE

CREEK HUNDRED, SUS­ SEX COUNTY AND STATE OF DELAWARE, DESIG­ NATED AS LOT THREE (3) OF CENTER STREET SUBDIVISION IN WEST LAUREL, MORE PARTIC­ ULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, TO WIT; BEGINNING AT AN “X” IN THE CONCRETE OF A SIDEWALK ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF WEST SEVENTH STREET, A CORNER FOR THIS LOT AND LOT 4; THENCE, TURNING AND RUNNING BY AND WITH LOT 4, SOUTH 21 DEG 30’ 40” WEST 88.48 FEET TO A FOUND CONCRETE MONUMENT, A COM­ MON CORNER FOR THIS LOT, LOTS 4, 11 AND 12; THENCE, TURNING AND RUNNING BY AND WITH LOT 12, NORTH 69 DEG. 38’ 00” WEST 85.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONU­ MENT FOUND; THENCE BY AND WITH LOT 13, NORTH 69DEG. 38’ 00” WEST 10.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOUND, A CORNER FOR THIS LOT AND LOT 2; THENCE, TURNING AND RUNNING BY AND WITH LOT 2, NORTH 30 DEG 56’ 00” EAST 96.55 FEET TO AN “X” IN THE CON­ CRETE OF A SIDEWALK ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF WEST SEVENTH STREET, A CORNER FOR THIS LOT AND LOT 2; THENCE, TURNING AND RUNNING BY AND WITH WEST SEV­ ENTH STREET, SOUTH 50 DEG 46’ 00” EAST 20.00 FEET TO A NAIL; THENCE, CONTINUING WITH WEST SEVENTH STREET SOUTH 69 DEG 41’ 20” EAST 60.10 FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING THEREIN 7,814.6 SQUARE FEET OF LAND, MORE OR LESS AS SURVEYED BY BRAD A. TEMPLE, DATED APRIL 14, 1997. Being the same lands and premises which Lavon­ da E Cromwell, administra­ tor of the Estate of Quen­ tin L Cromwell, did grant and convey unto Lavonda E Cromwell, by deed dated June 28, 2000 and recorded on July 6, 2000 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 02501, Page 098. Tax Parcel: 4­32­8.06­ 228.00 Property Address: 530 West Seventh Street, Lau­ rel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be See LEGALS—page 35


MORNING STAR • MARch 5 - 11, 2009 LEGALS - from Page 34 demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before April 6, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on April 10, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LAVONDA CROMWELL and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 3/5/2tc SHERIFF SALE By virtue of an Alias writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, March 17, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being In Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being all of Lot 43 In Nanticoke Acres Annex, as the same now appears of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds at Georgetown, Delaware, in Plot Record 2, page 23 and being more particularly bounded and described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron stab located on the southerly right of way line of Route No. 20, said stab being 29 feet from the centerline of the paying of the wald Route No. 20 and being 475.0 feet from the centerline of the entrance road to Nanticoke Circle and also being a corner for this land and Lot 42;

thence by and with the right of way line of the said Route No. 20 South 77 degrees 50 minutes East 80 feet to a concrete monument, and Lot 34; thence along Lot 34 North 76 degrees 24 minutes West 80.02 feet to a concrete monument being a corner for the aforesaid Lot 42; thence along Lot 42 North 12 degrees 13 minutes East 161 feet back to the place of beginning, be the contents thereof what they may. Being the same lands and premises which Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation did grant and convey unto Terry Wayne Johnson by deed dated February 1, 1999 and recorded on February 9, 1999 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2361 Page 001. Tax Parcel: 1-32-2.00236.00 Property Address: 1421 Concord Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before April 6, 2009. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on April 10, 2009 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of TERRY W. (WAYNE) JOHNSON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 3/5/2tc

TAX SALE By virtue of a writ of Venditioni Exponas Monition, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, March 17, 2009 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL those certain parcels of land situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, known and designated as Parcel “A” and Parcel “C” as shown on a plot titled “Addition to Lands of Leslie J. Brown, Trustee”, prepared by Donald K. Miller, PLS, dated April 6, 2004 and attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference. BEING the same lands conveyed to Purnell Properties, LLC by Deed from Connie M. Truitt, Trustee, dated April 7, 2004, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County in Deed Book 2987, page 233. Tax Parcel: 2-32-12.00105.00 Property Address: 10912 County Seat Highway, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 100 percent of the purchase money will be demanded at the time of sale. Cash, Certified Check or Cashier’s Check, is required. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on April 10, 2009 and also subject to the owner’s right of redemption pursuant to 9 Del. C. § 8728. Also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser and subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of PURNELL PROPERTIES, LLC and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 3/5/2tc

PAGE 35

FREE New electronic voter registration CLASSIFIEDS launched to streamline process Personal Items for Sale. NoLieutenant Vendors Please. Governor Matt Denn, along

with Department of Elections (Elections) Call 629-9788, Commissioner Elaine or send to Manlove, Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV) Director JenniP.O. Box 1000, of Technology fer Cohan, and Department Seaford, DE 19973. (DTI) Chief Information Officer Jim Sills, recently celebrated the launching of the new Electronic Voter Registration System. The goal of the “eSignature” collaboration was to provide Delaware citizens with a streamlined method of registering and maintaining voter registration. Through this process, citizens can initiate and update their voter registration information at the same time they obtain or make changes to their Delaware driver’s Personal Items for Sale. license or identification No Vendors Please.card. With the newly automated system, data

FREE CLASSIFIEDS Call 629-9788,

is instantly transmitted to Elections from the DMV. More than ever before, Delaware’s state agencies are answering our residents’ desire to conduct business with government interactively and online. This new system is estimated to save state government hundreds of thousands of dollars annually. During an election year, over 1,000 printed pages are utilized per day, at each of the four DMV offices in the state. On non-election years, printing averages about 300 pages per day. This savings is in addition to the manpower costs represented. For more information on the Department of Transportation’s latest projects, visit www.deldot.gov.

Schools begin recycling program or send to P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973.

The Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) is helping two school districts in Sussex County ‘go green.’ The Woodbridge School District and the Laurel School District have been working with DSWA to bring recycling to some schools in their districts. The Woodbridge School District had a Recycling Drop-off Center placed at Greenwood Elementary School and Woodbridge Middle School. In the Laurel School District, a Recycling Drop-off Center was placed at Laurel High School. The Recycling Drop-off Centers will provide each school with the ability to start a recycling program within their buildings. Woodbridge School District Superin-

tendent, Kevin Carson said, “We are very excited about the partnership with DSWA, we believe the volume of material coming out of the schools will be significant.” The Single Stream Drop-Off Centers are set up to accept items such as narrowneck plastic bottles, paperboard, aluminum, steal and empty aerosol cans, junk mail, newspaper, plastic grocery bags, and brown, green, and clear glass. A container is also set up to collect corrugated cardboard. DSWA has over 160 Recycling Dropoff Centers throughout the state, placed through voluntary sponsorships by schools, businesses, and shopping centers. For more information, call 1-800-4047080 or visit www.dswa.com.

In an effort to give his constituents an easy way to speak with him, State Rep. Dave Wilson (R-Bridgeville) says he’ll hold monthly coffee meetings at Jimmy’s Grille. The Cup of Coffee with Dave meetings will give residents of the 35th District a regular chance to speak with their state representative over a free cup of coffee and pastry. The meetings will be held the second Wednesday of each month, from 7:30 to

8:30 a.m. at Jimmy’s Grille. “I see this as being a very informal gathering,” Rep. Wilson said. “Folks can stop in and join the discussion, or they can just grab a cup of coffee and listen.” The first meeting is Wednesday, March 11 at Jimmy’s Grille in Bridgeville. Rep. Wilson added that he’s also considering holding additional coffee meetings in other parts of his district periodically to make it as easy as possible for his constituents to speak to him face-to-face.

Wilson starts monthly meetings

Liberty offers online stimulus calculator for taxpayers

Now that the $787 billion economic stimulus package is a reality, tax relief and tax changes are taking effect for 95% of the U.S. population. Yet, an online poll conducted by Liberty Tax Service has determined that 75% of the respondents are not sure how the new economic stimulus plan will affect them. In response to these findings, Liberty Tax has created an online calculator to help taxpayers determine how the plan will impact their taxes. The calculator can be found online at www.libertytax.com. There are tax breaks targeted to help the unemployed, retirees and families. First-time home buyers may benefit, as well as people buying new vehicles or motorcycles and those pursuing higher education.

Sussex Tech Adult Education offers food service course

The Sussex Tech Adult Division is offering a class to help prepare workers for employment in the food service profession. Specific emphasis will be on earning ServeSafe certification. The 60-hour class will start Tuesday, March 24, and meet two nights a week at the Georgetown campus of the Sussex Technical School District. Students will learn about nutrition and food service in a restaurant environment and institutional settings. Students will learn how to provide healthy, safe and nutritious food. To register, contact the Sussex Tech Adult Division at 856-9035, or visit www. SussexTechTraining.net.

See LEGALS—page 40


PAGE 36

MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

Education

Students at Fred Douglass and West Seaford participated in the annual Daughters of the American Revolution essay contest. This year's theme was The Ideals of the Gettysburg Address. Students were required to answer the question “What message did the Gettysburg Address communicate to our war-torn nation in 1863? How are the ideals articulated in the speech still relevant for our country today?” Nathan Hannenfeld of Fred Douglass won this year’s contest for the Mary Vining chapter of DAR and his essay will go on to compete nationally. Above, Fred Douglass - From left are (first row), Kiara Kilgo, Travis Shockley, Kelsey Ketterman, Abby Adams, Ian Carlisle, (second row) Maddeline Morris, Nicolas Coulbourn, Brennan Stark, Nathan Hanenfeld, Alex Kimpton, Christyn Geniesse, Erika Smith and DAR representative Pamela Broussard. Above left, West Seaford - Teacher Reneè Clark, Ludjina Edouard, Eliezer Shalid, James Moore, Michael Yelverton, Ross Jarvie, Rachel King, Shianne Sparrow and DAR representative Pamela Broussard. Photos by Daniel Richardson

Free advanced preview classes

From left, Dana Abbot-Painter, site director of Wilmington University’s Georgetown site, speaks to first-year nursing students Tatiana Grekhova and Anna Boateng and secondyear Radiologic Technology student Jeffery Davenport as they fill out an information request form.

Learn about connected degrees Students received information about transferring from Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus to Delaware Tech’s four-year partner universities at Connected Degree Day on Wednesday, Feb. 11. Representatives from Delaware State University, Wilmington University and the University of Delaware answered ques-

tions from Delaware Tech students about pursuing a bachelor’s degree in Sussex County. Connected degrees allow students to move seamlessly from a two-year degree at Delaware Tech into a four-year program of study and beyond. For more information, visit http://www. dtcc.edu/connecteddegree.

Thanks to an Advanced Placement Incentive Program grant, students in grades five through ten in the Seaford School District have the opportunity to participate in free preview classes this summer enabling them to access the school system’s most rigorous English and mathematics classes next fall. Four mathematics classes, Pre-Algebra, Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry, as well as Honors English Grade Eight, will be offered at Seaford High School, June 22-26 and June 29-30, and July 1-2, 6-10, 13-17. Classes will run from 8 a.m. to noon. Transportation will be provided for all students who participate. Only students who will attend Seaford School District in the fall are eligible to participate. The registration deadline is Monday, April 6. “The goal of this program is to have students take the exact same classes they will take in the fall,” explained Seaford Director of Secondary Education Dr. James H. VanSciver. “That way, when they take that same class in the fall, their confidence, experience and ability will be at the highest point.” Through this initiative, Seaford School District now has an Honors Algebra II class filled with eighth graders. To register, call Mrs. Pat Tifft at 6294587, ext. 267 with the student’s name, grade, parents’ names, address and telephone number.

Come Celebrate 30 years of red, White and epWorth Blue

open house thursday, March 12, ‘09 6:00 p.M. - 8:00 p.M. at our

there will be Classroom tours, information on eduCational programs (pre-K - 8th grade) refreshments, entertainments, giveaways and more!

CLIP THIS AD AND BRING FOR SPECIAL DRAWING

for more information, ContaCt the sChool at

302.875.4488

exCellenCe without

Compromise!

14511 syCamore road laurel, de 19956


MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009 and nurturing environment for 30 years. ECS is a Pre-K through grade 8 institution whose mission is to partner with parents to equip students both academically and spiritually to fulfill God’s call in their lives. Instruction at ECS is Christ-centered, standards-based and student-focused. Included in course offerings are computer, art, music, physical education, sports programs and more. ECS offers both halfday and full-day preschool programs.The school offers a biblically-integrated and academically-aggressive curriculum which prepares students for high school. ECS is the only Christian school in the area to offer a differentiated learning program staffed with trained and certified Educational Therapists by the National Institute of Learning Development (NILD). Extended care is also available. For an application package and curriculum map, contact the school office at 302-875-4488.

Customer service class offered

The Sussex Tech Adult Division is offering a six-hour customer service, communication skills class on Tuesday, March 17 and Thursday, March 19 from 6 to 9 p.m. on the Sussex Tech campus, west of Georgetown. The class will focus on teaching effective communication skills, telephone skills and establishing positive relationships with customers. Instruction will include discussion of best practices and role-play simulations. Cost is $79. To register, contact the Sussex Tech Adult Division at 302-856-9035.

Creative workshops at Del Tech

New workshops at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus will tap into your creative energies. In “Art Sketch & Journal Workshop,” learn how to sketch or make your sketchbook more interesting and personalize your journal with creative descriptions. All levels are welcome to this workshop designed for artists, writers, gardeners, travelers, and nature lovers on March 19 from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. “Freelance Writing: Break into Print and Stay There” introduces the skills and tools needed to break into print and make editors and publishers come back for more. This one-session workshop will be held at the Creative Writing Center of Delaware in Lewes on March 21 from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. For more information, or to register, contact Delaware Tech’s Adult Plus+ programs at 302-856-5618.

Fitness classes at Delaware Tech

Get in shape this spring with classes offered at Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus. Beginning Tuesday, March 10, get a great workout in the Cardio Combo Class. Beginning Tuesday, March 17, combine the use of the mind, body and spirit into graceful and slow movements in Tai Chi, level 1 or Tai Chi, level 2 for experienced students. Release tension and stress in yoga courses, beginning Monday, March 16 and Wednesday, 18. Build core strength without excess bulk in Pilates, beginning Monday, March 23. Horseback riding classes begin Wednesday, March 25 at an indoor riding ring in Seaford. Want to exercise at your own pace? Become a member of the Dela-

Epworth celebrates 30 years

Epworth Christian School (ECS) has been providing quality education in a safe

Call Carolyn Fox today! Cell 302 228-0555 500 W. Stein Highway • Fax (302)629-4513 • (302)629-4514 22128 Sussex Highway • Fax (302)628-8504 • (302)628-8500 • (800)966-4514

cally i t s a r D uced! Red

PAGE 37

ware Tech Fitness Center by signing up for the monthly or 16-week program. Personal training sessions also are available for individual help reaching fitness goals. For more information on these or other fitness activities, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate and Community Programs at 302-854-6966.

Headmaster’s List released

The following local students have been named to the Headmaster’s List for the second term. Grade 6 - Amanda Gabriel, Laurel; Jenny Rosales, Laurel; Mark Wilson, Seaford; Grade 7 - Ariella Anthony, Seaford; Alexa Conaway, Seaford; Lorenzo deJesus, Seaford; James Hemmen, Seaford; Grade 8 - Brad Mullen, Seaford; James Willey, Bridgeville; Grade 9 - Cole Phillips, Seaford; Grade 10 - Matthew Carey, Seaford; Ali Schwartz, Seaford; Grade 11 - Lauren Price, Seaford; Megan Rosales, Laurel; Grade 12 - Molly Simons, Seaford Honorable Mention List Grade 6 - Gabrielle Alicea, Seaford; Raphael deJesus, Seaford; Grade 9 - Alyssa Alicea, Seaford; Grade 10 - Erin Cook, Seaford; Grade 12 - Colton Bradley, Seaford

SCS announces honor roll

The following area students have been named to the honor roll at Salisbury Christian School. Summa Cum Laude Grade 7 - Nathaniel Laremore, Seaford; Grade 8 - Tyler Smith, Seaford; Grade 10 - Shelby Dukes, Laurel; Micah Laremore, Seaford; Kristen McTernan, Delmar; Grade 11 - Jenna Kirk, Laurel; Grade 12 Ike Lewis, Laurel.

Magna Cum Laude Grade 6 - Aaron Black, Laurel; Katelin Whaley, Laurel; Grade 7 - Katyanna Kerr, Laurel; Katie Minton, Laurel; Grade 8 Nathan Katzaman, Delmar; Allison Lowe, Laurel; Grade 9 - Megan James, Delmar; Grade 10 - Arielle Champagne, Laurel; Grade 11 - Stephanie James, Delmar; Ben Katzaman, Delmar; Grade 12 - Amanda Avens, Laurel; Cotter Johnston, Seaford; Zack Pinette, Seaford

DCHS releases honor roll

Delmarva Christian High School recently completed the first trimester. The following students, who earned a grade point average of 93.0 or above, made the honor roll for the first trimester: Freshmen - Sarah Bryan, Haley Embleton, Olivia Esposito, Sarah Hinkle, Abigail Mitchell, James Mohr, Mitchell Oppel, Rob Van Pelt, Logan Rogers, Geoffrey Shepard, Lindsay Townsend, Ashtyn Troyer and Maggie Winterling. Sophomores - Aubrey Birowski, Liz Bivens, Maegan Bourne, Rebecca Bryan, Rachel Gooss, Sylvana Gorgui, Jordyn Gum, Mallary Gum, Tempestt Hall, Anita Mall, Taylor Morgan, Mallorie Parsons, Emily Rae, Travis Tirrell, Lauren Townsend, Tyler Troyer, Tiffany Vaughn and Allison Workman. Juniors - Stephanie Barry, Sarah Betts, Philip Gordon, Rachel Grant, John Hale and Lauren Henry. Seniors - Caleb Craig, Kolby Dukes, Peter Gorgui, Lindsey Headley, Keri Hudson, Chloe Johnson, Luke Mathews, Jeffrey Mohr, Kattie Parsons, Mason Small, Adam Troyer and Meghan Whittington.

NOTICE OF CANDIDATE FILING DEADLINE BOARDS OF EDUCATION IN SUSSEX COUNTY A qualified person seeking to become a candidate for the Board of Education for a public school district shall submit a Candidate Filing For m to the Department of Elections for Sussex County no later than 4:30 p.m. local time on Friday, March 6, 2009, for Sussex County School Districts.

School Board Election Date: Tuesday, May 12, 2009 Delmar School District

One Member-At-Large - Term Ends June 30, 2012 One Member-At-Large - Term Ends June 30, 2014

Laurel School District

One Member-At-Large - Term Ends June 30, 2014 Commercial Package: Large stately dwelling, duplex, large det garage/shop, & 3 unimproved lots, all located within the City of Seaford. Magnificent dwelling could be a restaurant, tea room, day spa, or professional offices w/ plenty of off-street parking. Duplex is income producing. Call for more info. $599,000 (MLS 562844)

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Woodbridge School District

One Member-At-Large - Term Ends June 30, 2014 School Board Member Candidate Filing Forms may be obtained from the Department of Elections for Sussex County in person in the office of the department, by mail or by fax. Completed candidate filing forms must be returned back to the department with original (live) signature. Candidate Filing Forms are available at: http:// electionssc.delaware.gov

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All terms begin July 1, 2009 Department of Elections for Sussex County 119 N. Race Street, Georgetown, DE 19947 Phone: 856-5367


PAGE 38

MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

Parents play critical role when teaching kids how to drive

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for teenagers in the United States. Yet the majority of people killed in teen driver crashes continue to be people other than teen drivers themselves, according to an updated analysis of 10 years of crash data by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. The analysis shows that about one-third of people killed in crashes involving drivers ages 15 to 17 are teen drivers themselves. Nearly two-thirds are passengers, occupants of other vehicles, pedestrians, cyclists and other road users. In Delaware, between 1998 and 2007, crashes involving 15-, 16- and 17-yearold drivers killed 112 people, of whom 47 (42%) were the teen drivers themselves. The remaining 65 (58%) included 38 passengers of the 15- to 17-year-old drivers, 18 occupants of other vehicles operated by adult drivers and nine non-motorists. A previous analysis in 2006 found that between 1995 and 2004, crashes involving

15-, 16- and 17-year-old drivers in Delaware claimed the lives of 116 people of whom, 41% were the teen drivers and 59% were others. AAA points to the drop in both teen driver deaths and the larger drop in deaths of others during the last decade as evidence that improving teen driver safety benefits all road users. “Teen driver crashes put everyone at risk, and we all benefit from traffic safety improvements designed to reduce these crashes,” said Ela Voluck, Public Affairs specialist for AAA Mid-Atlantic. AAA continues to call for comprehensive graduated driver licensing (GDL) systems that let new teen drivers gain experience under less-risky conditions. States with comprehensive GDL systems have been shown to reduce deaths among 16-year-old drivers by 38%. While all 50 states and the District of Columbia have established GDL laws, 49 state GDL systems fall short of AAA guidelines. Dela-

ware is the only state that meets all AAA guidelines. AAA recommends that all GDL systems include three core elements: • Passenger limits: No more than one  peer passenger (under age 20) during the first six months of solo driving; • Night restrictions: No driving between  10 p.m. and 5 a.m.; • Mandatory practice: At least 50 hours  of certified practice driving and a learner’s permit stage that lasts at least six months. In addition to stronger state GDL systems, AAA encourages parents to play a critical role in developing their teen’s driving skills through regular dialogue, selecting a quality driving school, using a parent-teen driving agreement, extensive practice driving and choosing a safe vehicle for their teen. Parents in states with weak passenger restrictions should not allow their teen to ride with other teen drivers and should not allow them to transport other teens in the first year of driving.

DOC holds graduation

The Delaware Department of Correction (DOC) graduated and assigned 31 cadets to serve as correctional officers and two cadets to serve as correctional officer/food service specialists during a ceremony at the Department’s administrative headquarters in Dover. Cadets took the oath of office and reEley ceived their assignments before family, friends and DOC officials. Local graduates include Jarrell Eley of Laurel and Harold McTeer IV who have been assigned to JTVCC (James T. Vaughn Correctional Center) as correctional officers.

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Food Bank announces coalition The Food Bank of Delaware has announced the creation of a statewide AntiHunger Coalition funded by the Delaware Community Foundation. “Few of us have ever been truly hungry or have had to make the painful decisions that growing numbers of working people are being forced to make every day,” said Food Bank of Delaware President & CEO, Patricia Beebe. “They’re choosing between food and other essentials, such as housing, health care and utility bills.” The Delaware Community Foundation’s grant of $117,000 will support the Coalition’s work to identify goals, objectives and measurements and make significant contributions towards alleviating and in many cases eliminating hunger in the state of Delaware. With the ranks of domestic hunger growing every day (Food Bank of Dela-

ware agencies report an increase in food assistance demands by 25-50 percent), the Anti-Hunger Coalition will work to develop an action plan to feed more Delawareans. These strategies include full implementation of federal feeding programs to maximize their impact and distribution of more food through the Food Bank’s network of 350-plus member agencies. Among the Coalition’s priorities are implementation of Federal Food Entitlement programs such as the USDA Senior Farmer’s Market Program, USDA WIC (Woman, Infants and Children) Farmer’s Market and improvements to the Federal School Breakfast program and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly Food Stamp Program). For more information about the Food Bank of Delaware, visit www.fbd.org or call 302-292-1305.

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MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

Sussex Tech senior Alex Thomas, a three-time Henlopen Conference champion, took home his first state title with a pin in the 189 pound championship match last Saturday at St. Mark’s High School. Photo by Mike McClure

PAGE 39

The Ravens’ Wendell Cannon placed first in the state with a 10-3 win in the 125 pound championship match last weekend. Photo by Mike McClure

Sussex Tech’s Cannon, Thomas place first in the state Five other Western Sussex wrestlers finish in tournament’s top five Sussex Tech senior Alex Thomas (189) and junior Wendell Cannon (125), both of Seaford, each won state titles last weekend. Five other Western Sussex wrestlers placed in the top five during the state tournament which was held at St. Mark’s. Thomas pinned Cape Henlopen’s Jason Flannery (1:42) in the championship match after earned a 9-1 win by major decision in the semifinals. Thomas recorded a pair of pins in his opening matches. Cannon defeated Caesar Rodney’s Alex Paladino, 10-3, in his championship match. He advanced to the finals with a 5-0 win in the semifinals and a pin and a win by technical fall in the first two matches. Sussex Tech’s Ryelan Pavlik (152), Laurel’s Josh Kosiorowski, Seaford’s Yvens St. Phard (171), and Sussex Tech’s Shane Marvel (215) each placed fourth in the state after losses in their third place matches. Pavlik fell, 4-0; Kosiorowski was edged, 2-1, St. Phard lost, 6-1; and Marvel lost by decision, 9-2. Seaford’s Kirk Neal earned a 7-3 win in the 130 pound fifth place match.

The crowd was not happy when Woodbridge’s Marc Nock was called for an offensive foul on this play as he takes the ball to the hoop against CR’s Benard Carter. Photo by Lynn Schofer

Woodbridge falls to Caesar Rodney, 41-35, in conference championship By Lynn Schofer The Henlopen Conference High School boys basketball championship was decided on Saturday afternoon at Cape Henlopen High School as the Henlopen South champion Woodbridge Raiders faced the Henlopen North champion Caesar Rodney Riders. Caesar Rodney won the title, 41-35, in a game that was definitely not textbook basketball. In the first quarter it was defense that dominated play and at 3:27 the score was a mere 4-2 Woodbridge advantage. The Blue Raiders forced turnovers and with good outlet passes took a seven point lead. Caesar Rodney’s Jeff Hill took the ball to the lane and drew a foul with 19 seconds left in the quarter. The quarter ended with Woodbridge in the lead 11-6. As well as Woodbridge played in the

first quarter, that is how much they fell apart the second quarter. Coach Damon Ayers said after the game,”The second quarter we lost focus on the game plan. We made mistakes that you can’t make against a team like CR because they definitely will put it to you.” The score remained 11-6 until 5:49 in the second. Caesar Rodney found its rhythm when CR’s Carter Bell sank a two point basket immediately followed by a three pointer. At the other end of the court, Woodbridge trapped themselves at the top of the key unable to penetrate and move the ball toward the basket. CR forced turnovers and continued to capitalize on the fast breaks. The Riders outscored the Blue Raiders 15-0 taking a 2111 lead into the locker room at half-time. Defense and missed shots kept the third quarter of the game at the same Continued on page 43

Jevonte Dale penetrates the center of the key against Caesar Rodney’s defense in Saturday’s conference title game played at Cape Henlopen High School. Photo by Lynn Schofer


PAGE 40

     MORNING STAR  • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

SPRING TRAININGSeaford High graduate Derrik Gibson throws to first during a professional baseball game last summer. Gibson, who was drafted by the Boston Red Sox out of high school last year, is entering his second season of pro ball. See story on page 44.

ADMINISTRATOR OF THE YEARLaurel High graduate Julie Dayton was recently named Independent School Athletic Administrator of the Year by the Virginia Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association.

Laurel High graduate Julie Dayton named 2008-09 Athletic Administrator of Year Laurel native Julie Dayton was named the 2008-09 Independent School Athletic Administrator of the Year by the Virginia Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association (VIAAA).Dayton will be honored at the VIAAA State Conference on March 27 in Roanoke. Dayton, who graduated from Laurel High School, is the Athletic Director at St. Catherine’s School in Richmond, Va. “I am of course, very honored to be recognized,” Dayton said. “I see the award as a tribute to the many, many great people I have been fortunate to work with throughout my career,” In addition to the opening of the 72,000 square feet Kenny Center, since Dayton arrived in 2000 the St. Catherine’s athletic program has grown from 32 teams to 45 teams. Student-athlete participation has grown from 53 percent to 70 percent in the Upper School. Under Dayton’s guidance, the Saints have won 27 LIS and 15 state titles. She has served as president of LIS since 2003 and is currently on the Board of Directors of the VIAAA. Janet Rice, Athletic Director at The Steward School in Richmond, nominated Dayton for the award. “Since taking over the role of athletic director at St. Catherine’s in 2000, Julie has transformed the athletic department,” Rice wrote in her nomination letter. “Her tireless work ethic, leadership and professionalism combined with her sense of humor make Julie a perfect candidate.” Dayton is a member of the inaugural Hall of Fame class at Longwood University, the Delaware Sports Hall of Fame and the Virginia Lacrosse Hall of Fame.

See next week’s Star for the rest of the 2009 high school spring sports schedules.

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MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

Seaford Stars of the Week

Male Athlete of the WeekWendell Cannon- Sussex Tech Sussex Tech junior Wendell Cannon, who placed first in the Henlopen Conference tournament, took home a state title in the 125 pound weight class last weekend. Cannon earned a 10-3 win in the championship, joining fellow Raven Alex Thomas as a state champion.

Female Athlete of the WeekTaylor West- Woodbridge High Woodbridge guard Taylor West netted 19 points in her team’s final game of the season last Tuesday. West paced the Raiders in a 43-39 win over Milford.

CONGRATULATES

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PAGE 41

Female Athlete of the Week- Female Athlete of the WeekCasey Thomas- Sussex Tech Payton Shirey- Sussex Tech Sussex Tech swimmer Casey Thomas placed in the top 10 in two events at the state meet last weekend. The Seaford native finished seventh in the 50 yard freestyle and 10th in the 100 yard freestyle.

The Ravens’ Payton Shirey finished 10th in the 50 yard freestyle and ninth in the 100 yard freestyle during the state meet last weekend. Shirey and teammate Casey Thomas helped lead Sussex Tech to a 16th place finish.

Honorable mention- Alex Thomas- Sussex Tech; Kirk Neal- Seaford; Yvens St. Phard- Seaford; Corey Darden- Seaford, Daniel DeMott- Seaford, Spencer NoelSeaford, Lee Mayer- Seaford, Dustin Venables- Seaford, Tim Halter- Seaford; Andre Dickerson- Woodbridge; Jorge Young- Woodbridge; Ryelan Pavlik- Sussex Tech; Shane Marvel- Sussex Tech; Brandon Lewis- Sussex Tech; Troy DeShields- Sussex Tech; Anitra Hughes- Seaford; Dee Farlow- Seaford; Sierra Laws- Sussex Tech; Paige Morris- Sussex Tech

2008-09 Henlopen Conference Winter All-Conference teams

The following Western Sussex athletes were named to the Henlopen Conference winter sports all-conference teams: Indoor track- Girls- First team- Cassy Galon, Sussex Tech, 4X400 relay; Crystal Wilson, Sussex Tech, 4X400 relay; Whitney Handy, Sussex Tech, 4X400 relay; Shanay Snead, Sussex Tech, 4X400 relay Second team- Heather Solomon, Woodbridge, 55 meter hurdles; Emily Ritter, Sussex Tech, 1600 and 3200 Boys- First team- Earl Batten, Sussex Tech, shot put; Emir LaRoya, Sussex Tech, long jump and triple jump Second team- Aaron Betts, Sussex Tech, 4X800 relay; Chad McMasters, Sussex Tech, 4X800 relay; Jamie Price, Sussex Tech, 4X800 relay; Brian Singh, Sussex Tech, 4X800 relay; Betts, Sussex Tech, 800 meter run and high jump; Chris Wilkerson, Seaford, 3200 meter run; R.C. Jefferson, Woodbridge, shot put Coach of the Year- Charlie Gibbs, Woodbridge Swimming- Boys- First team- Cory Darden, Seaford; Philip DeMott, Seaford; Tim Halter, Seaford; Lee Mayer, Seaford; Dustin Venables, Seaford Second team- Daniel DeMott, Seaford; Spencer Noel, Seaford; Ryan Stewart, Seaford Honorable mention- Terry Wooters, Seaford; Andrew Mackler, Seaford Girls- First team- Jamie Swain, Seaford Second team- Shanice Cannon, Seaford; Kelly Kimpton, Seaford; Alex Smith, Seaford; Ania Sypek, Seaford; Paige Venables, Seaford Honorable mention- Maria DeMott, Seaford; Blondera DuPont, Seaford; Emily Hubbard, Seaford; Taylor Swain, Seaford

See next week’s Star for the rest of the winter sports all-conference list.

Seaford’s Zoe Laws is fouled as she goes up for a shot during her team’s home win over Lake Forest last Tuesday on Senior Night. Photo by Mike McClure

Nanticoke Little League needs sponsors for 2009 season Nanticoke Little League is looking for sponsors for the 2009 Season. Once again, your business can support the 700 players in the league and purchase a sign to be displayed on one of the fields at Williams Pond Park. A new sign is still $225 and is only $175 to renew. This year, the league is also giving your business or organization a chance to sponsor a team with your name on a team’s jersey. Team sponsors start at $250. Please contact a NLL Board Member or call 629-9209 for more information.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy!

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@ mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

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PAGE 42

MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

Western Sussex swimmers place in the top 10 at states

The Seaford and Sussex Tech varsity swim teams took part in the state meet last week. The following are the top 10 results for the Blue Jays and Ravens: Girls- 50 yard freestyle- 7. Casey Thomas, Sussex Tech, 35.49, 10. Payton Shirey, Sussex Tech, 25.43; 100 yard freestyle- 9. Shirey, Sussex Tech, 55.63, 10. Thomas, Sussex Tech, 55.71 Boys- 200 yard freestyle relay- 10. Seaford (Corey Darden, Daniel DeMott, Spencer Noel, Lee Mayer), 1:33.58; 400 yard freestyle relay- 10. Seaford (Mayer, Darden, Dustin Venables, and Tim Halter), 328.31

SENIOR NIGHT- Shown (l to r) are the Seaford High School wrestling team’s seniors on senior night: Marcus Wright, Yvens St. Phard, C.J. Martinez, Spencer Colbourne, Brian Wright, Kirk Neal, Clayon Lester, and Joshua Smith. Photo by Lynn Schofer

FAST BREAK- Seaford senior Dee Farlow dribbles to the hoop on a fast break during her team’s 45-29 win over Lake Forest last Tuesday. Farlow and teammate Whitley Maddox were honored along with the senior cheerleaders at half-time of Tuesday’s game. Photo by Mike McClure

Seaford senior Yvens St. Phard, left, came in fourth in the 171 pound weight class at the state tournament last weekend. Above is Seaford senior Kirk Neal who placed fifth in the state with a 7-3 win in the 130 pound fifth place match. The state tournament took place upstate last Friday and Saturday. Photos by Mike McClure

JUNIOR NBA- J’aire Moore shoots over Troy Sinclair in an 11-13 year old Junior NBA league game played at Seaford Middle School and sponsored by Seaford Parks and Recreation. Photo by Lynn Schofer

FOURTH IN THE STATE- Sussex Tech’s Shane Marvel of Seaford, left, came in fourth in the state in the 215 pound weight class. Teammate Ryelan Pavlik also finished fourth in the 152 pound division. The state tournament took place last weekend at St. Mark’s High School. Photos by Mike McClure


MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

PAGE 43

Seaford Christian Academy baseball, softball schedules The following are the Seaford Christian Academy baseball and softball schedules for the 2009 season: 3/24- Seaford Christian at Greenwood Mennonite, 4 p.m. (baseball and softball) 3/27- Seaford Christian home vs. Holly Grove, 4 p.m. (baseball and softball) 3/31- Seaford Christian at Wesleyan Christian, 4 p.m. (baseball and softball) 4/2- Seaford Christian home vs. Epworth Christian, 3:30 p.m. (middle school sb, bb) 4/3- Seaford Christian home vs. Salisbury Christian, 3:30 p.m. (baseball, softball) 4/6- Seaford Christian at Salisbury Christian, 4 p.m. (middle school sb, bb) 4/7- Seaford Christian at Faith Baptist, 4 p.m. (baseball) 4/7- Seaford Christian at Sts. Peter and Paul, 4 p.m. (softball) 4/21- Seaford Christian home vs. Greenwood Mennonite, 3:30 p.m. (sb, bb) 4/24- Seaford Christian at Holly Grove, 4 p.m. (softball and baseball) 4/27- Seaford Christian home vs. Most Blessed Sacrement, 3:30 p.m. (middle school baseball) 4/28- Seaford Christian home vs. Wesleyan Christian, 3:30 p.m. (softball, baseball) 5/1- Seaford Christian at Salisbury Christian, 4 p.m. (softball, baseball) 5/4- Seaford Christian at Epworth Christian, 4 p.m. (middle school baseball, softball) 5/5- Seaford Christian home vs. Faith Baptist, 3:30 p.m. (baseball) 5/5- Seaford Christian home vs. Sts. Peter and Paul, 3:30 p.m. (softball) 5/7- Seaford Christian at Most Blessed Sacrement, 4 p.m. (softball) 5/11- Seaford Christian home vs. Salisbury Christian, 3:30 p.m. (middle school softball, baseball)

Woodbridge senior Jorge Young shoots over Caesar Rodney’s Sam Sanders early in the first quarter of play of the Henlopen Conference boys’ basketball title game last Saturday. Photo by Lynn Schofer

Woodbridge basketball continued third quarter of the game at the same score until 4:24 when CR scored the first basket of the quarter. Woodbridge defense closed the lanes forcing the Riders to take some uncomfortable outside shots. After a time out, the Riders put their offense together using the baseline area and taking the score to 24-13. Woodbridge used the final minutes of the third quarter to add some points and the quarter ended 29-18 in favor of Caesar Rodney. Woodbridge started the fourth quarter with the full court press and had the determination that they had in the first quarter. The Blue Raiders trapped and forced turnovers and took the score to within 10 on Javon Kilgoe’s three-point basket. Woodbridge senior Jorge Young pounded the offensive boards creating numerous opportunities for follow up baskets. Teammates Andre Dickerson and Demond Anderson exploded with energy making the passes in a crowded lane. With a total team effort the Raiders came to within six points with 2:47 remaining in the game. Woodbridge had several opportunities to close the gap even more but fate was not on their side of the court. Then at

1:13 Andre Dickerson fouled out of the game. Woodbridge would fight until the last seconds of play with Anderson hitting a two pointer and Young putting it up for three points. The Blue Raiders ran out of time and the game ended with the score 41-35. After the game Coach Ayers said he is very proud of his players, their spirit and determination showed tremendously in this game. “I am disappointed, but I can’t be anything but proud of these young men,” Ayers said. Woodbridge outscored the Riders 11-6 in the first quarter, and 17-12 in the fourth quarter. The third quarter was evenly matched at 7-6 in favor of Woodbridge. The second quarter is the difference with CR scoring 15 to Woodbridge’s 0. The Blue Raiders will get ready for the state tournament and work to put all four quarters together for a win. For Woodbridge, Jorge Young had 12 points and 10 rebounds; Andre Dickerson scored eight points and pulled down 12 rebounds; and Demond Anderson netted six points. Caesar Rodney’s Tyshawn Bell led the way with 16 points and nine rebounds; Phil Lewis had eight points and Sam Sanders added seven points.

Woodbridge to host Sanford in first round of state tourney The Woodbridge varsity boys’ basketball team will host Sanford in the first round of the state tournament on Thursday. The 14th seeded Raiders face 19th seeded Sanford with the winner advancing to Saturday’s second round at third seeded Tatnall.

Woodbridge winter athletic banquet to take place March 19 The Woodbridge winter athletic banquet will be held March 19 at 6:30 p.m. in the high school cafeteria/auditorium. Tickets can be purchased from Coach Lofland or Mrs. Little at a cost of $1 for athletes and $10 for all others. No tickets will be sold after March 11. The school dress code applies and will be strictly enforced.

Woodbridge’s Demond Anderson puts the ball out of the reach of CR’s Lawrence Livingston in Saturday’s conference title game. The Riders won the game, 41-35. Photo by Lynn Schofer

Pair of Seaford swimming siblings left out of Star story In last week’s article on the DeMott family and the Seaford Swimming Team a pair of sibling swimmers, Zack and Molly Cain, were not mentioned. The Star apologizes for this oversight.

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PAGE 44

MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

Derrik Gibson reports to Florida for Spring Training mini-camp By Lynn Schofer Spring is right around the corner and baseball fans are gearing up for a new season of America’s favorite past time. It also means the professional ball players report to spring training camp to prepare for new season. Seaford High graduate and Red Sox prospect Derrik Gibson packed his bags and on February 23 joined 25-30 other prospects the Red Sox organization in the Minor League Spring Training Minicamp. A week later, 100 more young men will join them all hoping for a spot on a roster. A couple of days before Derrik left for camp he talked about his upcoming year. He wants to take the first part of camp to get his timing and feel of things back. He trained all winter but he said “not seeing a ball 60 feet six inches with a real life pitcher will throw your timing off.” To compete at the big league level Derrik said he must get stronger and maintain his health to go through the long schedule. He hopes he will leave camp based with the Greenville Drive (South Carolina), a Single A team in the South Atlantic League. Gibson does not regret the choice he made to go pro when he was drafted in the second round in June 2008 after graduating from high school. “I think I definitely went the right way. I love UNC (Derrik was offered a scholarship to the University of North Carolina) and it was a difficult decision to delay my dream or go for it,” said Gibson, who added that he can focus on baseball all the time as a professional player. “I have a lot to learn and I am receiving instruction at the professional level. I can’t get any better than that.” Derrik said he is very ready to get his feet wet and begin his training in hopes to make it to the big leagues some day. He couldn’t be any happier to be part of the Boston Red Sox organization. “The tradition, the fans, and so many historical players. I am so overwhelmed at times with excitement to think I am in the same organization as Josh Beckett and David Ortiz.” As Derrik leaves for camp he said he would like to stay mentally tough, physically stable, and enjoy the opportunity that most people would love to be in. Gibson takes the job as role model very seriously. He wants the kids of Seaford to know, “its tough sometimes waking up early, going to school, then working out. Sometimes it didn’t seem like I was getting better, or faster. You must have the desire and motivation to keep going.“ Derrik is also a humble person, “You can never get too full of yourself. Remember there is someone that is doing

Sussex Tech’s Kyle Kunzler, left, and Seaford’s C.R. Wilkin are locked up during their seventh place match at the Henlopen Conference tournament which was held at Caesar Rodney High School recently. Photo by Mike McClure

Seaford graduate Derrik Gibson, shown playing for the Lowell Spinners last season, recently reported to Florida for spring training. Gibson is a member of the Boston Red Sox organization.

the same thing as you, but better. I have to stand out and through hard work, determination, heart, and never enough good luck, dreams do come true.” He also said, “When they scout you they don’t just look at you physically, they look at how you handle yourself off the field. You must be a gentleman on and off the field.” Gibson signed with Razor Entertainment for his Rookie baseball card. “I am only 19 years old and this kid that is six years younger wants my autograph on a baseball card. It hasn’t hit me yet that I am a minor league baseball player and the kids look up to me,” Gibson said. Derrik said he wants to continue to be himself. He remains grounded in good values; a tribute to his mother, Sharon Parker, and stepfather, Ben Parker. “I will miss my family the most, my mom’s cooking, hanging out with Ben, and I like to watch over my little sister, Madison. I will miss her,” said Gibson. Derrik said he will also miss his friends a lot. ”My off season is their time in school and their off time is when I’m doing my thing.” Gibson knew he wanted to play professional baseball since he was a little boy. He is now in Ft. Myers, Fla., in an organization that likes to develop its own players. It seems Derrik is just where he needs to be. The Star will continue follow Gibson throughout the year and will keep everyone up to date on his professional career.

Seaford Department of Parks to hold spring program, trip The Seaford Department of Parks is currently holding signups for the following programs: Spring co-ed youth basketball- The league is open to ages 8-18 at a cost of $20. Sign up at the office or call 629-6809. The leagues will start the end of March and all games are played at Seaford Middle School. Orioles vs Yankees at Camden Yards- SDR will take a trip to see the Baltimore Orioles host the New York Yankees on Friday, May 8. The cost is $55 which includes the game ticket and charter bus. The bus leaves from Seaford High School at 4 p.m. Call the office to reserve your seat early. There are only 46 tickets available.

Seaford’s Ross Clagg, left, and Sussex Tech’s A.J. Workman stare each other down during the Henlopen Conference tournament’s seventh place match. Workman went on to win the match, 5-3. Photo by Mike McClure

Sussex Tech’s Joe Casullo, top, is shown during the 285 pound division’s fifth place match at the Henlopen Conference tournament. Casullo won the match and competed in the state tournament last weekend. Photo by Mike McClure

Seaford Pop Warner signups to be held March 24 Seaford Pop Warner is celebrating it’s fifth year. Pop Warner sign ups will be held on March 24 from 6-8 p.m. at the Western Sussex Boys and Girls Club in Seaford. Sign ups are on a first come, first serve basis. The following ages are eligible: cheerleaders (5-15) and football players (7-15). Weight and age requirements along with scholastics and mandatory play rules are all part of Pop Warner. Cheerleading squads participate in cheer competitions in October/November. Football squads travel to play other local teams which include: Laurel, Berlin, Wicomico, and Sussex Central. Coaches and volunteers are also needed. Please call the club at 628-3789 for more information.


MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

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Winners of the 2008-09 Winter Varsity Sports Awards at Worcester Prep are: (l-r, seated) Rachel Sharp, Snow Hill, Most Spirited, Cheerleading; Katie Marshall, Salisbury, Most Improved, Cheerleading; Kelly Chandler, Salisbury, Most Valuable Player, Varsity Girls’ Basketball; Alyssa Alicia, Seaford, Coach’s Award, Cheerleading; back- Justin Butler, Ocean City, Coach’s Award, Varsity Boys’ Basketball; Michelle Wangel, Berlin; Most Improved, Varsity Girls’ Basketball; Parker McIntosh, Berlin, Most Valuable Player, Varsity Boys’ Basketball; Meghan Jayne Smith, Ocean City, Coach’s Award, Varsity Girls’ Basketball; and Alex Ternahan, Bethany Beach, Most Improved, Varsity Boys’ Basketball.

Easter Break programs to be held at Boys and Girls Club The following programs will be held at the Western Sussex Boys and Girls Club Monday-Thursday during Easter break: Tumbling- Participants will learn the basics of tumbling. Tumbling will take place on a mat. The program will take place 2-3 p.m. for ages 4-5 and 3-4 p.m. for ages 6-8. Bitty Indoor Soccer- This mini league is co-ed and is for 3 -5 year olds. The league, which will take place 5:30-6:30 p.m., will feature practices and games. The cost to participate is $8. Shin guards and sneakers must be worn. Cheer Camp- Girls will learn basics of cheer and older girls will learn stunts with cheers. The cost is $20. The program will take place 9-10 a.m. for ages 4-5, 10 a.m. to noon for ages 6-8, and noon to 2 p.m. for ages 9-12.

Western Sussex Boys and Girls Club offers lacrosse program Join the fastest game on two feet, lacrosse. This sport is made up of speed, skill, and endurance and is a combination of football and soccer. This is a great way to get in shape for football or any sport. Protective equipment is provided. The league is for beginners to advanced. The program runs from March 23 to April 30 on Tuesday evenings from 6-7 p.m. All ages are encouraged. The cost is $20 per player.

Western Sussex Boys and Girls Club to host bitty programs Throughout the year, the sports, fitness and recreation programs at the Western Sussex Boys and Girls Club will be hosting “bitty” programs. These programs are designed for the bitty players ages 3-5 years old. These smaller players will be able to participate in cheerleading, basketball, soccer, tumbling and many others. Bitty programs are scheduled for 30 minutes in length. Bitty Basketball- Bitty basketball will take place June 15-July 9 at a cost of $15. The league features shortened basketball nets along with smaller basketballs. Players will participate in skills and will join in on games each week. Sneakers must be worn during these sessions. Bitty Soccer- Bitty soccer will be held July 13-30 at a cost of $10. The indoor soccer program is for those who wish to learn the game of soccer. Shin guards and sneakers must be worn. Practices and games are held weekly. Volunteers are needed. Bitty Cheerleading- The Bitty Cheerleading program will take place June 8-25 at a cost of $15. The cheerleading program will teach the girls the fundamentals of cheer along with learning new cheers. Uniforms will not be used, however, girls must wear shorts, sneakers and t-shirts nightly. A short routine will also be taught.

Boys and Girls Club offers adult basketball sessions The Boys and Girls Club is beginning an adult basketball league. Create your own team and play pick up style games with the honor system for foul calls. Games and practices are held on Monday evenings from 7-9 p.m. Schedules will be given on the first evening. The cost is $30 per person which includes a shirt. Players must be 18 and over to participate. The league runs from March 16 to May 18. House teams can be formed.

The Star’s bowling results will return in next week’s edition.

SUDOKU Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

See Answers Page 47.


PAGE 46

MORNING STAR • MARch 5 - 11, 2009

More is shrinking than just your paycheck Your paycheck is not the only thing shrinking these days. You rank alio are getting less in the packaging of food, even your newspapers. I went to purchase my favorite When I went to school, brand of ice cream last week and supply and demand I noticed the half gallon I use to meant that the more you purchase was lighter and smaller, now 1.5 qt, but the price had not sold of a product, the less shrunk, only the container. the cost to manufacture. Since I don’t do the shopping very often and I couldn’t face a month or more without ice cream, many separate sections into one section, I made the purchase. I mentioned and cut out some of the more popular the discovery to my bride who wanted to comics for reasons less known. know what planet I had been living on. I can now whip through the morning ‘Welcome to the real world,” she told me. paper in less than 15 minutes, most which After a short lecture I found from her I have either read on the internet or seen just about everything that use to say boon TV that morning. nus is only giving you the same amount Months earlier the paper pulled its you use to get before companies went to Crossroads section and began mailing it to smaller packages. homes with hopes of selling more adverI also thought my eyes were deceivtising. That failed and now is only printed ing me when I recently read the two daily newspapers. They had shrunk and are now in New Castle County. Maybe if they had put more stories in the width of this weekly paper and many the section instead of concentrating on adweekly papers are also shrinking their vertising the idea may have gone over. width as are the Sunday magazines. Weekly newspapers, although strugPerhaps I can have more sympathy for gling, are having better success because the newspapers, which are going through they concentrate on local stories, are nontough revenue producing times because union and have lower overhead. Dailies you can get the news on the internet, TV have cut back on downstate coverage, news networks and advertising revenue which has hurt circulation. has fallen because of the economy. After all is said and done, if you give For the first time in my lifetime newsme less, don’t raise the price on me. All papers in this state are laying off employthe nonsense about American companies ees. The large daily not only reduced the going overseas to cut costs is hog wash. I width of its paper, but it has condensed

haven’t seen a famous brand name company that moved overseas cut the price of their products. Their profits have gone in the pockets of the CEOs, their management and the stockholders. I realize stockholders depend on dividends from their investments, and companies depend upon stockholders to purchase stocks to help boost their bottom line, a catch-22, but what’s wrong with giving the consumer their money’s worth so they will come back and purchase your product again and again instead of buying from your competitor? When I went to school, supply and demand meant that the more you sold of a product, the less the cost to manufacture. Some expenses are fixed: insurance, utilities and labor. High demand helps keep prices down. Today, supply and demand means the more product you sell, the more you can charge. Examples are the hot video games, designer clothing, (remember the doll) and petroleum products. When automobiles were selling faster than they could be made, the price went up. Shouldn’t they have stabilized, since all they did was speed up the assembly line? Now they aren’t selling and the prices have dropped dramatically. Think we were getting gouged? And what happens to that thick mouth watering sandwich from the time we see it advertised on TV and on circulars packed with meats and thick tomatoes to the time it arrives on my tray at the store when it looks like it was flattened by a sledge

hammer? “Give me liberty or give me death,” said Patrick Henry. “Give me my money’s worth,” said Frank Calio.

As the snow fell over Delmarva this past weekend, I was reminded ony indsor about how fortunate I am to have a home. I could not imagine how horrific it must be for those people who ...in the kitchen, the are sleeping in cars or rummaging heat would melt the through alleyways trying to find a skin off your face, but place to sleep. I went out to put gas in my truck the upstairs bedroom and the wind was whipping the was like the Yukon. freezing rain and snow so hard it actually cut my face. When I got back in the house I was greeted by for any length of time. warmth and the cold, harsh eleI talk to people who will tell me that ments were relegated to a view from my they could not imagine young people havliving room window. ing to go without a cell phone, multiple While I was considering how thankful channels on the television or access to the I was to be in warm and secure surroundInternet, as we did when we were growings, I also thought about how different ing up. I agree, but then quickly question things are now than they used to be. whether I could myself go back to such a I can only go back about 50 years, time. while others I am sure can relate to even Again, we knew no better, so we had more challenging times and less comforts what we had and lived with it. Growing up at home. The interesting thing about the in my childhood home we had two heat“old days” is that when living them we ers, a small oil stove in the kitchen and a knew no better, so we did not have anylarger unit in the living room. The kitchen thing more comfortable to compare it to. stove would run oil into the base and Mom Each generation has enhanced convewould chuck a match in to light the flame. niences and comforts, so on the downside Oftentimes it would flare up and Mom I fear we cannot help but gradually bewould run us young’uns outside to wait for come a less resilient and “softer” society. the fire to “burn down.” We would stand So called “hard times,” such as the loss outside the house huddled together watchof power during a storm, or temporary ing flames shoot out of the chimney. television reception interruption is met The stove in the living room was browith great frustration and little patience. ken down so often that Dad kept the front And please don’t let us find ourselves in panel off and leaning against the side of the position of being without a cell phone

the stove to save time when he had to twist on knobs or beat the insides with a hammer. I knew the stove didn’t work too often because I remember literally sitting on top of it like a high-rise chair most of the winter. But, there was my grandmother and grandfather whose house had one wood stove in the kitchen to heat the entire 200-year-old rattletrap they called home. Wood had to be cut and stacked and then hauled to the house to keep heat going. If you were sitting in the kitchen, the heat would melt the skin off your face, but in the upstairs bedroom it was like sleeping in the Yukon. I think in days past heat was relative. If you had a stove, that was great, but heat was actually anywhere you could tote a blanket. All homes back then had at minimum two stories and enough rooms on each floor to start a furniture store. But, having heat upstairs was not considered necessary. Heat rises, so any heat we had downstairs would automatically move upwards. Still I went to bed during the winter being unable to see the ceiling for the fog coming from my breath. I am convinced there were times Dad hung fresh deer meat in our doorway. I do recall that my grandmother’s false teeth would freeze in her Polident denture bowl overnight. But, I believe that having less made us more resilient to colds and the flu and enabled us to handle adversity a little better as we got older.

While I fear that modern day conveniences are contributing to a less hardy people and a feeling of entitlement and impatience among our new generation, I have to admit I have also become entangled in the convenience of it all.

F

C

Vincent picking up where Dukes left off Laurel has had a Democrat Councilman for 40 plus years with the former Oliver Hill and Dale Dukes. Although both represented Seaford equally, some thought with the election of Republican Mike Vincent Laurel would be short changed. But Vincent has picked up where Dukes left off attending meetings with various Laurel groups including giving a helping hand with the Laurel Boys and Girls Club. Ain’t over until the fat lady sings If you think you dodged the bullet by having Comcast Cable for the digital switchover that was recently postponed until June, and not having to purchase a converter box, think again. Comcast will not fully switch over all their channels for another 6-18 months, according to a Comcast spokesman at a recent meeting held in Laurel. When they fully convert, whether you are on cable or have a TV with a built in tuner, you will have to purchase a cable box from Comcast for each TV in your house. They believe they may give four free ones to each home, but charge $4 a box per month for extra TVs. More on this later and nearer the conversion date.

Modern conveniences are making us softer and dependent T

W

EAC of Nanticoke Basket Bingo

The Employee Activity Committee of Nanticoke Health Services will hold a Longaberger Basket Bingo on Thursday, March 12, starting at 7 p.m. at the Seaford Moose, located on Route 13A in Seaford. The filled basket bingo will consist of 20 exciting games and will feature several Longaberger baskets as prizes. Advance tickets are $20 per person, $25 at the door. Advance ticket includes a chance to win the Hostess Sort & Store Hamper, the Multi-Colored Cake basket or the Beverage Tub basket as door prizes. There will be nearly 30 chances to win. Refreshments will be available. For ticket information contact the EAC at 629-6611, ext. 2404 or MorrisR@nanticoke.org.

Dinner dance benefits Easter Seals

Century 21 Tull Ramey is sponsoring a Dinner Dance at the Laurel Fire Hall to benefit Easter Seals Saturday, March 7, from 6 p.m. to midnight. Well known band ‘Power Play’ from Virginia Beach will be playing. Tickets are available for $40 each. There will also be a silent auction. Easter Seals has been serving people with disabilities in Sussex since 1961.


MORNING STAR • MARch 5 - 11, 2009

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Letters to the Editor

All letters should include the writer’s name, address and phone number for verification purposes. Names will be published. No unsigned letters will be published. No letters which the management deems to be libelous will be published. The Star reserves the right to edit or reject any letters. Send your letters to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, or you may email editor@mspublications.com

Lastly, I could only wince at the front page story regarding the Woodland Ferry’s sad plight. It isn’t rocket science to build a simple ferry. Why, oh why, has the Woodland Ferry’s history been plagued with these outages, and now, most embarrassingly, with a brand new ferry? It might be possible to fix the ferry dirt cheap if one simply went aboard her and whispered the word “bridge”... Richard Eger

Seaford

Thank you for your support!

Seaford Blades Associated Charity volunteers thank the public for their help at Christmas and throughout the year. This was our 68th consecutive year that the organization has organized and distributed Christmas boxes for those in the Seaford Blades school district. What a start this year was! It was one of those years when everything was very slow. It was the last week of November and we had no place to pack! In just a few short days, we were able to collect, pack and prepare for delivery. This was all done through the efforts of churches, organizations, clubs and those in the community, all giving and working together. Please remember to check expiration dates on canned goods. Some of the donated items, which we had to discard, were outdated to as far back as 1999. Please check your dates when giving something to any organization or food pantry, it 4x12.45 would be greatly appreciated. S.B.A.C. does not stop helping WEEKat 1 Christmas. We give help with emergen03/05/09 cies all year. Soroptimist members and volunteers have the Curiosity Shop located at 1100 Middleford Road, adjunct to the Soroptimist Park. This is a place that turns good things into something even better for others. They give scholarships, make donations to other organizations and make a better community and town through the donation of your gently used items. We would like to offer our appreciation to the following individuals and groups. 100%

Thanks to Rob Harman, and Tony and Laura Taghipour (Power House Gym) a place was given to us to use. Our sincere thanks to all of you! Our thanks to Susan and Sammy Hastings, Jeff Bradley, Bill Wright, Jim Marine and three others who wanted to be anonymous for sorting the canned goods and toys. Thanks also to Janet English’s and Preston Frallic’s small groups from Gethsemane Church for their help. Thank you to the State Line 4-H club for all their help. Within a few days, about 12, canned goods were sorted and packed, toys were placed by gender and age and the Lions members walked out the door for delivery. We thank those at the Western Sussex Boys and Girls Club and Karen Schreiber for once again heading up a food drive, our thanks to all who took part. Those schools that participated included Frederick Douglass, Central Elementary, Blades and Seaford Christian Academy. To the school personnel, parents, organizations and clubs, we thank you all. Our thanks also to those at the local newspapers for their coverage before and during our Christmas drive. Thank you Carousel Resort Hotel, O.C., Teresa Andrews, David D. Horsey Foundation, Pizza King, Hungry Howie’s Pizza and Subway for their donations. Without the help of Chas Engel with the Salvation Army I know very little would have been available in canned goods. He supplied canned goods, canned fruit for all the boxes as well as some games and toys for the children. Our thanks to Food Lion for the bicycle through the Salvation Army. This was a bad year and people were hurting, not only those receiving but those who also gave. Thank you Delmarva Chapter of A.A.C.N., the nurses from area hospitals, for their most generous donation, which was used to purchase items to complete the food boxes. Thank you Lorie Lee, a chapter member, and her husband, Robert, who took the time to go to the stores and get these things. That helped us so much. Our appreciation also to those at Hungry Howie’s for the canned goods. To the Soroptimist Service Foundation of SIS, Inc., our sincere thank you for your collection of toys and canned goods. This organization not only gave toys, they also paid for all of the chickens that went into the boxes and made a donation that will enable our organization to help more persons who are on or in need of a life threatening medication throughout the year. Thank you to all the members of the Seaford Kiwanis who coordinated a toy

and canned goods drive. Thanks to Ron Breeding and Rick Williams for helping. Special thanks go to all the men of the Poor Ol’ Irv’s Work Shoppe Div. Mason Dixon Woodworkers, who give freely of their time, to make items with a lot of thought and ingenuity. Everything was great. Thank you Bob Kripaitis for picking the items up. Thank you so much to the HarleyDavidson group of Seaford for collecting toys, Sylvester Bunting for the dolls, books and toys, Ben Culver for the bicycles, John and Kitty Botdorf for a Christmas tree, Bill Windley for toys and WalMart for the gift card. Our thanks also to the American Legion, Nanticoke Post 6 for their generous monetary gift. To St. Luke’s Episcopal church members, we thank you for your toys. Our thanks also to Mt. Olivet United Methodist Women for their monetary gift and to the congregation for the toys and gifts. A thank you to the congregation at Gethsemane Church, in Reliance, for canned goods and to the United Methodist Women for their most generous monetary donation. To the Sussex County Association of Realtors, a grateful thank you for your most generous donation. Thank you Heather Byrd and those at the Delaware National Bank for trimming a tree and participating in the Annual Parade of Trees at Grotto Pizza and giving our organization the donation. A special thank you to the Seaford Volunteer Fire Dept. for toys and money and the Ladies Auxiliary members for toys; and to the Blades Volunteer Fire Dept. for all their toys and games. We appreciate the toys, games, wrapping paper and canned goods from the P.O.E. Chapter J. and from the Widows and Widowers Persons for their donations. Thank you Kaye Donaway for your donation of Avon. To Edie O’Day and Mark at Seaford Cycling and Fitness for fixing and putting together the bicycles - we appreciate every thing you did. Our thanks once again to Grandmother Teena Diehl who took her grandchildren to the store and let the children decide the gift a boy and a girl would like to receive. Whatever is picked is then given to Associated Charities to be given out. This is the fourth generation that is continuing this tradition. For drop-off of items, our thanks to those at Burton Brothers Hardware, The Continued on page 50

SUDOKU ANSWERS:

Congratulations on a much improved paper. I found it much more positive than it has been in the last year. Thank you for publishing excerpts from President Obama’s speech as he signed the Recovery Act. Even Frank Calio’s column was upbeat and, while it had at least one inaccuracy, it was a somewhat toned down commentary regarding his feelings about Republicans. At least he left the door open for reasoned response rather than hateful retaliation. Still, I feel, he needs to push toward an even more conciliatory column. Wasn’t it Lincoln who said “Hold your friends close and your enemies closer?” I even enjoyed Bruce Rogers’ comments presenting the opposition view. And, after reading the Obama summary, I can see why Bruce thought that the bill contained too much social engineering, something about which Democrats and Republicans apparently fundamentally disagree. And, maybe $50,000,000 for a San Francisco mouse project or millions for grass on the National Mall may sound like frivolous expenditures, but are they the exception to the rule of an otherwise well reasoned bill? Nor do we know why that $50,000,000 may be in there. If I had to guess, San Francisco might be having a nasty problem with mice and rats that requires a huge expenditure of money to overcome that piecemeal expenditure, which would otherwise be a waste of money, considering how rapidly rodents reproduce. Obviously, there would be health implications in such a program. As for improving the grass on the National Mall, it may be one of the most heavily trafficked grassy areas in the U.S. and possibly in desperate need of attention. It’s not as glamorous to re-sod the National Mall as it is to build a new highway, so it may simply always end up as low man on the priority pole. Still, in tight times, are these the best uses of limited capital, which is Bruce’s point in the first place? So, I can empathize with his objections. Yet, it is almost impossible to write such a comprehensive bill where someone will not find something about which to object. Based on your summary of Obama’s speech, it does sound like a fairly balanced bill that is intended to help. It could, though, have been more jobs oriented and less social engineering, perhaps the issue that finally drew Representative Castle’s negative vote. One issue I was quite happy to see in the bill was a start on the national electric grid renewal. I just wish more monies had been put toward this end. In a Friday coffee session held by Representative Danny Short, we discussed the possibility of utilizing Delaware’s excess production capacity from lost auto production toward producing windmills, a key part of the effort toward reducing the U.S. dependence on foreign oil. If windmills are actually to help achieve this goal, they will need to be mass produced. If nothing else, this is Detroit’s forte. Towers for the required transmission lines will also be needed, something else that requires mass production. If the auto industry could be retooled to produce B-24 bombers in W.W. II, it can be retooled again.

Stars’ Letters Policy

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

Could factories make windmills?


PAGE 48

MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

Snapshots

FERRY GETS NEW RIBS - First State Fabrication LC of Laurel welds additional ribs to the underside of the Bethel-side ramp of the Woodland Ferry. Welders are Steve Coleman and Marty Heesch. The contractor, Chesapeake Ship Builders of Salisbury, is paying for this construction correction. Photo by Phil Livingston

WEBELOS VISIT COVEY’S - On Jan. 22 the Webelos 1 Den from Pack 249 visited Covey’s Car Care where Mike Covey showed them how to change a tire, check tire pressure, check the oil and change a taillight so they could earn their Handyman Badge. Pictured with Mike Covey are Justin Gray, Nick Smart, Rosure Smith, Shemar Deputy, Brenton Thomas, Brad Morgan, Dante King, David King, David Simpler and Ryan Mordes. Not pictured are Javier Gomez, Jared Reiger and troop leader Paula Smith.

STUDENT AMBASSADORS - Fifth grade students at West Seaford Elementary School have been nominated and accepted to participate in the people to people Student Ambassador Exchange in Washington D.C. in early September 2009. Selected students from left are Rachel King, J.D. Moore and Eliezer Shahid. The objective of the program is to promote international understanding while building leadership skills among America’s youth. The seven-day experience includes meetings with government officials, interaction with other students of the same age, educational activities at government facilities. The students need financial sponsors because the program is costly. Any contribution is greatly appreciated. Sponsorships can be sent to individual students at WS School, 511 Sussex Ave., Seaford, DE 19973.

CEMETERY WREATHS - Seaford Republican Women’s Club members, from left, Marilee Bradley, Patricia Tucker, Sharlana Edgell and Anne Nesbitt are shown as they participated in the Wreaths Across America program at the Veteran’s Cemetery in Millsboro.

STUDENTS MAKE HATS - Dublin Hill 4-H’ers met recently to make more than 30 fleece hats for patients at A.I. DuPont Children’s Hospital. Those participating were: (seated) Shawn Mitchell, Laurie Beth Wroten, Taylor Wroten and Kelsey Johnson; (standing) Hunter Baynard, Hunter Murray, Bethany Killmon and Emily Passwaters; and (absent) Jenna Hitchens.

SNOW DAY - Local kids took advantage of the snow day and enjoyed some sledding in downtown Seaford.


MORNING STAR • MARCH 5 - 11, 2009

PAGE 49

Fish and Wildlife stocks Newton Pond in Greenwood for first time The Delaware Division of Fish and Wildlife has announced that its spring 2009 trout season will begin Saturday, March 7, with the opening of two downstate ponds stocked with rainbow trout. Tidbury Pond near Dover in Kent County and Newton Pond outside of Greenwood will be open for trout fishing beginning at 7 a.m. “This represents a few new twists for pond trout fishing in Delaware. In the past the season started earlier in the week, but this year we are delaying the opening until Saturday morning,” said Program Manager Craig Shirey. Kent County Parks and Recreation requested the change to give the fish an opportunity to spread out in the pond and to give everyone a chance at opening day, Shirey explained. The second change in trout stocking tradition is the first-time stocking of Newton Pond, a restored barrow pit, in Sussex County. The 10-acre site was renovated using federal aid in Sportfish Restoration funds and features a boat ramp for car top boats

Seaford Historical Society raffle

The Seaford Historical Society is offering an exciting raffle featuring a day on the Nanticoke River in the Spring of 2010. This all-day excursion accommodates a party of six people on a boat ride that leaves from the Marina at Nanticoke River Marine Park in Blades, Seaford. Seeing the beauty of the pristine Nanticoke River from the water is an experience unlike any other. The crew aboard the shallop that reenacted the Captain John Smith voyage up the Nanticoke River was amazed at the natural beauty still in existence along this river. Other festivities included with this trip are mid-morning snacks on-board ship, lunch in Vienna, Md., a self-guided walking tour of historic Vienna, a visit to the Vienna Heritage Museum and refreshments on the ride back to Seaford in the afternoon. A raffle ticket to win this trip costs

Inc.

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MEN • WOMEN • CHILDREN Cuts • Perms • Color • Highlighting Foiling • Facial Waxing Ear Piercing Day & Evening Hours Appts. & Walk-Ins Welcome

and canoes (no gasoline motors allowed), a fishing pier and plenty of shoreline access to allow anglers to spread out, as well as freshly seeded banks and new plantings. “This new pond is presently open for catch and release fishing until the recently stocked population of bass and bluegill become more established, but the trout are fair game and we encourage fishermen to keep them up to the limit of six,” Shirey said, noting that trout are a cold water species and can only survive while water temperatures in the pond remain cool. “We appreciate the Town of Lewes allowing us to stock Blockhouse Pond for the past several years while the Newton Pond project was underway,” Shirey added. Each pond will be stocked with approximately 550 rainbow trout. Stocking will be repeated Thursday, March 19 with the same number of fish in each pond. Anglers are reminded that in addition to the normal fishing license requirements, they also must purchase a trout

stamp, which costs $4.20 for ages 16 and older, or a youth stamp, which costs $2.10 for boys and girls ages 12 to 15. A resident annual fishing license, which now covers fresh and tidal waters as well as crabbing and clamming, costs $8.50 for ages 16 to 65; persons under the age of 16 and residents over the age of 65 are not required to purchase fishing licenses in Delaware. Higher stamp and license prices apply to non-resident anglers. All proceeds from trout stamps are used to purchase next year’s fish. Since the price of trout is not expected to decrease in the immediate future, the Fisheries Section is hoping plenty of anglers will come out this season to help support the program, Shirey added. To purchase a fishing license or stamps or for more information about the trout stocking schedule, visit www. fw.delaware.gov, consult the new 2009 Fishing Guide, or call the Fisheries section at 302-739-9914. Trout stocking schedules will be posted at all license dealer locations.

only $5 or five tickets may be purchased for $20. Tickets are available at the Seaford Museum which is open Thursdays through Sundays from 1 to 4 p.m., or at the Ross Mansion which is open Saturdays and Sundays from 1 to 4 p.m. At other times call the Seaford Historical Society office at 628-9828 for tickets. The drawing will take place at the Victorian Christmas at the Ross Mansion on Dec. 13, 2009. The income from this raffle helps with the maintenance of the Seaford Museum and the Ross Mansion.

Delaware’s 2009 Homecoming Queen will receive a cash scholarship plus an expense paid trip to the national finals to compete with queens from the other states for America’s Homecoming Queen. America’s Homecoming Queen, Inc. is a non-profit organization promoting education, educational travel, and community service in all 50 states.

America’s Homecoming Queen

Miss Sara Adams, daughter of Karen and Jon Hearn and Todd and Joanna Adams of Seaford, has been selected finalist for Delaware’s 29th Annual Homecoming Queen Selection to be held March 21 and 22, 2009, at the Lancaster Host Resort and Conference Center in Lancaster, Pa. She is Sussex Tech High School’s homecoming Queen.

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Victorian Tea at Ross Mansion

On Saturday, April 4, at 2 p.m. the annual spring Victorian Tea will be held at the Ross Mansion on Ross Station Road, formerly North Pine Street Extended. This festive activity offers an opportunity for gracious entertaining in the ambiance of the historic mansion. Jeanne Conner, chairperson for the Victorian Teas, continuously researches Victorian era recipes in order to have a unique and different menu at each tea. A team of volunteer cooks prepares the traditional sweets and savories in accordance with her findings. Hostesses and servers are in period

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gowns adding to the aura of the historic setting. Margaret Alexander oversees the serving. At this event John Kisela will travel from room to room adding a unique touch with his performance on the dulcimer. The Dulcimer is a string instrument dating back to the 1700s which re-creates the musical sounds of centuries ago. Guests may tour the 13-room mansion which is fully furnished with antiques of the period, many of which formerly belonged to the Governor Ross family. Charge for the tea is $10 per person. Reservations are required and may be made in multiples of two by calling Ruthe Wainwright at 629-8765. Seating is arranged at tables for four people. Persons who wish to sit together should so indicate when making reservations. Only 40 people can be accommodated. If reservations are filled, a waiting list is available for the next tea in the fall.

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PAGE 50

MORNING STAR • MARch 5 - 11, 2009

Opinion Editorial A tribute to a job well done

In February, Joe Conaway presided over his final Bridgeville Commission meeting as president. Conaway will be honored at the March Commission meeting for eight years of service to his town. When Conaway and his running mates ran for office eight years ago, the town was undergoing dire financial difficulties. By controlling spending, the Commission was able to get the town’s finances back on track within a year. Conaway and the Commission also helped bring growth to Bridgeville with the addition of the Heritage Shores golf course and development and other residential and commercial projects. But while the town’s population and square footage increased, steps were also taken to make sure that the new development would help pay for the added use of the town’s services, such as fire, police, and the town library. Thanks to the efforts of the Commission, under Conaway’s leadership, the town was able to contribute money and land for the town’s new library. These are just some of the ways Conaway, who has spent his life working in public service, has helped to revive the town of Bridgeville. Here are some other highlights that took place under his leadership: Bridgeville has grown from a town of 1,500 acres to 4,054 acres. From a town of 612 homes, Bridgeville has become a community of 5,236 prospective houses. At three occupants average per home, the town could grow to more than 15,000 persons. Bridgeville is about to open a state of the art Wastewater facility on Apple Tree Road just east of town. Deciding in 2001 that those who cause the expense should pay for it, Bridgeville developed Delaware’s first Special Tax District. Through this program the town was able to pay for the cost of growth and provide $700,000 for a new Bridgeville Library. The town has passed a number of Ordinances that give residents the toughest sexual predator law in Delaware, protection against, if not complete elimination of any adult entertainment facilities in town limits, absentee voting law and much more. The Bridgeville Charity Open Golf Tournament was created resulting in a total thus far of $52,500 raised for the Bridgeville Lions Club, the Bridgeville Kiwanis Foundation and the Bridgeville Senior Center. Congratulations, Joe, on a job well done and the best wishes for continued success in whatever you decide to do in the future.

Letters to the Editor Continued from page 47

Leader and State Register, Peninsula Chiropractic Center and Harley- Davidson. Once again, we also give a very special thank you to the Lions Club members for the delivery to 122 families (382 people). Those delivering did a fantastic delivery in a few hours. Our thanks also to Rex Mears and David Parker for that extra help. Others also making a monetary gift are: Ben and Darl Culver; Jerry and Barbara Marvel; Maria Heyssel; Boyd and Connie Mitchell; Richard and Shirley Livingston; John and Jane Watson; Mary Louise Higgins; Gloria Burton; Julie Rigby; Irvin and Katherine King; Jeanette Davis; Douglas and Deborah Prillhart; Freddie and Irene Foxwell; Harvey and Wilma Kimbrough; Lorraine Miller; Michelle Lynch; Eunice Wheatley; Marie Bowden; Ruth Wainwright; Bessie Foskey; Jim and Betty Young; Saad Saliman; and anonymous donations from the Christmas Parade. We thank each and every one of you. Ginny Short

Seaford Blades Associated Charities

For the love of books

On Friday, Feb. 20, the people of Bridgeville clearly showed their commitment to the love of books and lifelong learning. The Bridgeville Banquet Center (donated for the evening by Jimmy’s Grille) was the venue for the sold out Bridgeville Library fundraiser sponsored by the Friends of the Bridgeville Library, “For the Love of Books.” The evening had two very clear purposes: one was to raise money for the new Bridgeville Library and two to honor Norman Reynolds. The love of books was intrinsic to both purposes. As co-chairs of the event, we want to thank the many people and businesses that made the evening so successful. Joanne Jones, the Alumni chair, reached out to the many students that Mr. Reynolds had taught. They responded generously and came from as far as Florida, New York and Tennessee. Judy Kendall, auction chair, and her committee worked tirelessly collecting, recording, displaying and selling the many items donated for the three auctions, Live, Silent and Chinese. Major General John Custer, a

former student, eloquently paid tribute to Mr. Reynolds. More than $25,000 was raised for the new library. Our goal is to open a new debt-free library this summer. Your donation will benefit the current residents of all ages as well as generations to come. As evidenced by “For the Love of Books,” the library serves as a dynamic resource for lifetime learners as well as a cultural center for the community. Thank you all for your enthusiastic support. Ruth and Larry Skala

Co-Chairs “For the Love of Books”

My presidential experience

I recently got the opportunity to march at the inauguration of our 44th president, and many people have asked me what it was like. Well, I think anyone who saw any part of it on TV or the web could tell it was downright cold. Very few times in my life have I been that cold for that long, and in fact, it took three days for me to get warm again. In doing something like this, you try to prepare as much as possible, but if you’ve marched in a parade in a uniform you can understand that we all had to “look” the same; basically. You must adhere to the uniform code. Consequently, some things went wrong for me. First, the shoe strings on our parade shoes are very thin and, with us wearing gloves, almost impossible to tie, especially while walking. There comes a time in every parade that stopping is not possible and of course my left shoe decided to come untied for the third time. I must note at this point that all of the horses in the parade were Republican. Ever march behind a horse? We’ll leave it at that. It had been a while since I had worn my parade uniform and somewhere along the line the pants shrunk! So I did what any patriotic person would do, tightened the belt to the point of suffocation. That, however, did not stop the zipper from wanting to wander down. This had to happen just before the “big” part of the parade. I also had with me a pair of foldable ear-muffs, not part of the uniform, so they could not be seen during our march by the President. I folded them up and placed them in my breast pocket where they decided to unfold giving me a very distinct right breast. So if you want to know what it was like on that day, here it is: I

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Editor Daniel Wright Richardson

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marched by the President of the United States with one shoe untied and covered with horse poo, my zipper down and one breast. I’m only glad I didn’t wave and cause national attention to myself! Rick Stewart

Seaford Vol. Fire Dept.

Account was wrong

The Commissioners of Bridgeville would like to take issue with some of the content in an article written by Seaford Star contributor Lynn R. Parks. In the recently distributed 2009 Morning Star Publications’ Progress & Discovery Guide, Lynn Parks wrote an article on the status of development in the Town of Greenwood. Within that article, Ms. Parks mentions that Greenwood had to “pay a penalty of $8,000” to the Town of Bridgeville for excessive sewage discharge. This is absolutely incorrect. Yes, per the Town of Bridgeville Code, all industrial, commercial and non-Bridgeville users who discharge wastewater in amounts beyond their allocation are charged a penalty. In June of 2007, Greenwood was charged a penalty of $8,000 for their May 2007 sewage discharge. This was the first time that Greenwood was assessed a penalty. However, it was not the first time that Greenwood was in excess of their agreed upon allocation of 80,000 gallons per day. In fact, Greenwood was above allocation on 32 separate occasions between the period of February 2002 and May of 2007 by an average of 18,500 gallons per day. Ms. Parks’ article is misleading in the fact that the article makes it seem as though Greenwood actually paid the $8,000 invoice. However, in an effort to show good faith, the Town of Bridgeville rescinded the invoice and Greenwood did not have to pay a dime in penalties, even though we believe that they continue to collect higher fees based on the supposed fine. This is not the first time that Ms. Parks has written misleading statements regarding this matter. We chose not to act on those previous instances. However, should Ms. Parks wish to write another article that mentions the Town of Bridgeville, we would respectfully request she contact us to ensure she has correct information.

The Commissioners of Bridgeville Sales Rick Cullen Emily Rantz Laura Rogers Doris Shenton Jimmy McWilliams Brandon Miller

Morning Star Publications Inc. Subscriptions - $19 a year in-county, $24 a year in Treasurer Circulation has been serving the Delmarva Kent and New Castle, Del., and Federalsburg, SharpCarol Wright Richardson Karen Cherrix Peninsula since 1996. town and Delmar, Md.; $29 elsewhere out of state. Publishers of the Seaford Star and Laurel Star community newspapers, (Salisbury, Md.) Business Journal and the Morning Star Business Report


MORNING STAR • MARch 5 - 11, 2009

PAGE 51

US Supreme Court justices say town has a right to be ‘selective’ On February 25, United States Supreme Court justices ruled 9-0 in favor of Pleasant Grove City, Utah, which refused to display Summum’s Seven Aphorisms in its public park. Pleasant Grove City has 11 displays and monuments donated by local people or organizations over a period of more than 80 years which depict the history of the city. In 1971, the city accepted a donated monument of the Ten Commandments from the Fraternal Order of Eagles. The city owns, maintains and controls the displays and monuments. Summum is a religion and philosophy that began in 1975, as a result of its founder’s alleged encounter with certain “beings” he describes as “Summum Individuals.” The Supreme Court ruled that by accepting donated displays and transferring ownership to the city, the city did not open a forum for everyone wishing to display a monument in the public park. The Court noted that the city “is entitled to say what the city wishes.” The Court found that the park was not a public forum for private speech, noting that permanent displays typically represent government property. The majority opinion, written by Justice Samuel Alito Jr,, states: “Just as government-commissioned and government-financed monuments speak for the government, so do privately financed and donated monuments that the government accepts and displays to the public on government land. “Throughout our Nation’s history, the general government practice with respect to donated monuments has been one of selective receptivity.” Mathew D. Staver, Founder of Liberty Counsel and Dean of Liberty University School of Law, commented on the case: “If the government were required to accept any conflicting message anytime it spoke through a donated display, then the Statue of Liberty would need to make room for

Correction

A story about Greenwood in the annual Progress edition published by the Seaford and Laurel Stars said that Greenwood was required to pay a penalty in May 2007 for going over the amount of wastewater that it was allowed to send to the treatment plant in Bridgeville. That is incorrect. The penalty was assessed by the town of Bridgeville but was subsequently erased under a memorandum of understanding that the towns signed in March 2008.

Final Word the Statue of Tyranny or perhaps a statue of Stalin or Adolf Hitler. It would make no sense to force the government to include a display devoted to atheism every time it displays a Nativity scene. It would make no sense to require the government to display a message promoting smoking every time it expressed an antismoking message. The ruling by the Supreme Court comports with common sense.”

What would John Wayne do?

I like Westerns. You know, movies with larger than life heroes like Tom Mix, Hop-along Cassidy and, of course, John Wayne! John was a straight shooter and stood for doing things the right way (A-HA), forever righting the wrongs done to the poor intrepid townspeople around him. In John’s day thieves and robbers were more easily identified. They wore black hats, dirty clothes, bandanas to cover their face and hung out in saloons. They were a scruffy, unsophisticated, smelly bunch and their horses were ugly. After a robbery, the thieves would break out of the bank with guns blazing and high-tail it out of town! Townspeople would gather and plead with straight shooting John to go after the robbers and get their money back. John would form a posse, deputize any Pilgrim willing to ride, let them know who the boss was and ride off into the sunrise to catch the villains. The plan was simple - track ‘em down, catch or kill ‘em and bring any surviving villains back to face justice and, of course, return the money. All’s well that ends well, at least until the next robbery! That was then, this is now! ‘Ol John would have a hard time tracking down the bad guys now. No more black hats and dirty clothes have been replaced with pin striped suits. They smell of cologne and the horses are now limos and jets. In John’s day, the robbers would bust their way into the bank. Now the robbers are already in the bank and running it! So now John faces a quandary - how does he form a posse and who could he

trust to deputize? Bankers have already lost billions and, given the chance, would take their bonuses, saddle up their jets and fly off into the sunset! Okay, how about the institutional watchdogs? You know, those who were supposed to ride herd on our financial systems? “Well Pilgrim,” John says with a draw, “I’m here ta tell ya, when the fox is in charge of the hen house he (the fox) can’t ride tall in the saddle.” Not very savvy! John has taken the bull by the horns in the past so he takes off at a full gallop to the Congressional Ranch to rope in some buckaroos for a posse. On the way he passes more limos and corporate jets all saddled up and ready to go! It is here John realizes the robbers have beaten him to the Ranch and they came armed! In one hand is a six shooter with a hair trigger firing heavy rounds of blame aimed at others in their industry. The other hand is wielding a long sinuous whip whose cracking takes the spine out of the Rancheros. John trots his horse to the center of the corral where the Rancheros have been serving up a pig roast and the robber’s plates are full! Stampeding to the Big House on the Hill John seeks The Great Overseer, “I come ta tell ya there’s an uneasiness about the land,” says John. “The villagers and natives are restless - robbers are taking their adobes and not lending wampum for teepee repairs. Nor can they buy horses to hunt buffalo - bad times ahead. Can we get a posse, catch the robbers and save the day?” Reading from his teleprompter The Great Overseer proclaimed, “Yes we can

and I have a plan! We need to make these lenders more responsible for their actions! We shall send more wampum to the robbers to spread across the land but they will not be able to saddle up their jets!” John climbs down from his saddle and proceeds to scratch in the sand. “Ya know I passed a big empty wagon train on the way here. The wagon master told me the wagons had delivered gold and silver to the great institutions. But robbers emptied the wagons before he could get agreements signed to ease the burden on the townspeople,” said John. Looking The Great Overseer straight in the eye John scornfully asked, “How could this happen?” The Great Overseer, seeing nothing on his teleprompter, replied “Ah-um, the Chief in Charge was having back tax problems to correct so that he could have a job but it won’t happen again! Because the best way to catch a thief is to use a thief! So I have decided to only accept Commancheros on my staff who have back taxes or relationships with other bandits who are still at large!” John’s jaw drops to his gun belt. He thinks, “These Rancheros inside the great wagon trail around the ranch (the Beltway) have forgotten how to read the smoke signals of disapproval or may be smoking loco weed in their peace pipes.” Disappointed, dismayed and discouraged, John, untypical to form, packs his saddle bags, climbs into his saddle and heads back to the townspeople to tell them they will have to do more than form a posse. A-ha. LF Dill Seaford

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