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THURSDAY, JULY 10, 2008

VOL. 13 NO. 12

Riverfest opens tonight and runs through Saturday

NEWS HEADLINES NEW CONCERN - More than two years after the spillway and roadway were washed out at Galestown, the process of refilling the pond is proceeding. What are residents concerned about now? Page 2 STATE FUNDS - Library supporters in western Sussex County breathed a sigh of relief last week. We’ll tell you why. Page 3 VETERANS - Ironically, if not for a change of the rules, he never would have been in the air the day his plane was shot down over Germany. Page 8 POLICE JOURNAL - What do you do when someone you think is a police officer robs you? Police give tips to help you prevent problems. Page 10 FOURTH - Why would anyone want to keep a photo of Joe Conaway on their desk for a year? The answer and other Fourth of July glimpses are on pages 12 and 13. HEART & SOUL - How do you put in words what is special about Sussex County? One man is determined to find the answer. Page 28 SOFTBALL - The District III Major League all-star softball tournament began play this week with winner’s bracket games being played in Greenwood. Page 41 LEGION BALL - The Post 6 Patriots squared off against their foes from across the county when Sussex West hosted Sussex East. Page 47 EDITORIAL - Higher petroleum prices could turn into a good thing. Why would anyone say such a thing. See editorial on page 54.

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OBITUARIES 24 ON THE RECORD 26 OPINION 54 21 PAT MURPHY 14 PEOPLE POLICE JOURNAL 10 PUZZLES 26 SNAPSHOTS 52 SPORTS 41-47 TIDES 7 TODD CROFFORD 51 48 TONY WINDSOR VETERANS OF WWII 8

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State Rep. J. Benjamin Ewing sits in one of the two offices he has at his home near Bridgeville. Behind him is part of his extensive political button collection, something he started before he entered politics. Ewing, 77, is retiring this year because of illness. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

‘Gentle Ben’ Ewing is retiring after 21 years in the House By Lynn R. Parks Gentle Ben is leaving the House. After more than 21 years as a state representative, J. Benjamin Ewing, a Bridgeville Republican, is retiring. He announced his retirement shortly before the end of the 144th General Assembly, June 30. Gentle Ben was a tame bear in a children’s book and on a 1960s television show. Ewing, 77, said that he is proud of the nickname his fellow legislators gave him, “because of my size,” he said — Ewing is a tall man — and because of the gentle demeanor he has. “That name stuck the whole time I was in the House,” he said. “I always thought it was a nice compliment.” True to his nickname, Ewing

keeps stacks of “Free Hug Coupons” and is quick to hand out the small yellow cards. He likes to tell women how pretty they are — “If I have said to any lady staffer or lady representative that she is the prettiest woman I have ever seen, I want you to know that I really meant it,” he said in the House in his farewell speech. Legislatively, he has always supported the right of citizens to carry guns. Before his final day in the House, he was presented with the Defender of Freedom award from the National Rifle Association, and the Delaware Patriot award from the Delaware Sportsmen’s Club. He is also adamantly pro-life, or “not pro-death,” as he calls his stand. He voted against this year’s state Continued on page four

Riverfest, Seaford’s annual celebration of the Nanticoke River, will take place this weekend, July 10 through July 12. The theme for the 14th annual event is “Survivor Nanticoke.” All events take place in downtown Seaford. For the first time, Riverfest will get underway on Thursday night with entertainment. The Seaford Ministerial Association will play at 5:30 p.m. and the Chesapeake Silver Cornet Brass Band will play beginning at 7:30 p.m. Both bands will be in Gateway Park. Thursday evening, the carnival will be in full swing and an art show provided by Nanticoke River Arts will be set up in Gateway Park. On Friday, July 11, teams will compete in a series of challenges imitating television’s “Survivor” show (without the starvation and deadly jungle animals). The team with the quickest time completing the mini obstacle course, maze race, three squares, puzzle race and rock/slide will be crowned this year’s “Nanticoke Survivor.” Team registration is $30. Teams of five or six people are welcome from local businesses or just groups of friends who want to have some fun. The event will begin at 7 p.m. in the Seaford City Hall parking lot. At 6 p.m. Friday, the Little and Junior Miss Riverfest Pageant will be held on the main stage in the Mt. Olivet parking lot. The band “Petting Hendrix” will perform on the stage at 9 p.m. Saturday will start with the Vince Morris Memorial 5K run at Chapel Branch west of Seaford. Race registration will start at 7:30 a.m. Saturday’s events will include a car show, arts and crafts vendors, a dunking booth, children’s games and obstacle course. A youth fishing tournament will start at 11 a.m. The annual Nanticoke River Float-In will start at 2 p.m. Registration for the Float-In will start at 1:15 p.m. at Benz Urology on U.S. 13. “Barren Creek” will perform starting at 6:30 p.m. At 9 p.m., “Mike Hines and the Look” will take the stage. For additional information, visit the Web site www.nanticokeriverfest.com.

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MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

Crack in Galestown Pond spillway concerns residents By Ann Wilmer As the water began to refill the Galestown Pond, cracks appeared in the concrete weir wall, part of the spillway construction, and local residents became concerned. Photos taken by site engineers indicated some water seepage. A consultant from John D. Hynes & Associates who looked at the first crack, said that the crack appeared temperature- or shrinkage-related and recommended the crack be injected with epoxy. He predicted that the extent of the damage was likely to be spalling, unsightly but not serious. He further noted that since the crack was wet, that they wrap surface with a waterproof membrane and apply a surface coat of material with similar thermal properties (grout). He recommended continued inspection and maintenance as necessary. Bruce Harrington signed off on the safety of the project after his July 1 inspection. He said that the cracks were .006 inches wide, or about the width of a thick pencil line. “Sometimes, surface cracks appear but these are often self-healing.” However, since the work was done, additional cracks have appeared. Harrington said that he was not alarmed and explained that the floor of the spillway is a minimum of 2-feet thick. He also pointed out that additional concrete was poured and shaped to enhance drainage so the overall thickness was greater than originally planned. He also said that the 12-inch weir wall

was more than adequate. Dave and Judy Brewer have watched construction daily from their sun porch, eager to see the pond restored. Mrs. Brewer said that they were alarmed when the cracks first appeared and sought reassurance that the construction was safe. “Looks very sloppy, like a bad patch job. But I don’t know what it’s supposed to look like,” she said. But, after talking to Harrington, she said she and her husband felt reassured. “We trust his experience.” Galestown Millpond Association sent a

Above is the spillway at Galestown. To the left is a closeup of one of the cracks.

letter to the Dorchester County Council expressing concern and asking that the council investigate to alleviate residents’ concern. Councilwoman Effie M. Elzey who represents district 5, said that Mike Moulds, an engineer with the Dorchester County Board of Public Works was scheduled to inspect the site on Monday morning and meet with council members in the afternoon. After Moulds made a site visit he discussed his findings with representa-

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tives of Maryland Department of the Environment. He said there was no structural concern and that he reported that back to the council. Now all that remains is a formal written response to allay the concerns of Galestown residents. Linda Walls, president of the Galestown Millpond Association said that the community just wants to be reassured that the installation, particularly the weir, is adequate short of a disaster like they faced in 2006.

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STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

Library supporters breathe a sigh of relief over funding By Lynn R. Parks Library supporters in western Sussex County breathed a sigh of relief last week, when funding for their projects was included in the state’s budget. The Bridgeville Public Library received a $1 million matching grant that will enable it to continue plans toward construction of a $2.3 million facility. And after the Seaford District Library was notified in May that a $2 million matching grant that had been promised it would have to be eliminated from the budget due to an income shortfall, the funding came through. It will be used for construction of a new $4.8 million facility. Planners for the new Bridgeville library plan to break ground in August, librarian Karen Johnson said. The 13,500-square foot library will be built on South Cannon Street, where the old town and the new Heritage Shores golf community meet. In Seaford, workers will break ground for the 18,000-square foot facility in late September or early October, according to Barb Allen, co-chair of the fundraising campaign. That facility will be built on about four acres that the library bought from the city in 2003 in the Ross Business Park, next to the Ross Plantation. Both Johnson and Allen expressed gratitude that funding for their projects was included in the $3.384 billion state budget. “We are very appreciative of all of the hard work that Sen. Bob Venables and Rep. Danny Short put in to get us this money,” Allen said. “We are extremely pleased,” added Johnson. “We needed this money to move forward.” Both projects are awaiting final plan approvals. Johnson said that the Bridgeville library will be finalizing its building plans within the next 30 days and submitting them to the town of Bridgeville for approval. Preliminary site plans for the Seaford library were ap-

Hospitals, too, are relieved by outcome. Page 49

proved by the city of Seaford in September; the city will still have to approve final site plans. In Bridgeville, state funding was especially critical as $700,000 earmarked for the library construction, as well as land donated for the new facility, have to be used by Dec. 31. (Johnson said that town commission president Joseph Conaway was successful in getting the original deadline of June 30 extended six months.) The money is part of the commissioners’ development fund, money that is raised through a special tax assessment on residents of Heritage Shores. Johnson said that the library still has to raise between $300,000 and $500,000 for its construction project. The library recently received its first large private grant, for $30,000 from the Marmot Foundation. Ruth Skala, treasurer of the Friends of the Bridgeville Library, said that the group will meet soon to plan fundraisers for the upcoming year. “We were working so hard, hoping that the state legislature would back us,” Skala said. “Now that state funding is sure, that will help us.” In Seaford, fundraising is still in its quiet phase, Allen said. That phase is “going quite well,” she added. She expects that the community phase of the fundraising will start after the first of the year. In addition to the $2.4 million to match state money for construction, the committee also hopes to raise $200,000 for furniture and equipment, $600,000 for operations and $1 million for an endowment fund to pay for future operations in the library. Funding for the library construction projects was included in the state’s bond bill. The $601.7 million bill includes $268.6 million for transportation projects and $207 million for school construction.

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MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

Representative Ewing says farewell to the House Continued from page one

budget because it contained funding for Planned Parenthood. “If the budget had needed my vote to pass, I would have voted for it, because there are people who need to be paid,” he said. But giving money to Planned Parenthood “is not the correct thing to do and not the right thing to do.” When Randy Richardson, whose daughter, Lauren, is in a persistent vegetative state after taking an overdose of heroin in 2006, needed someone in the House to sponsor a resolution affirming the state’s desire to protect brain-damaged people, Richardson turned to Ewing. Richardson, Newark, is in a court battle to keep his daughter’s feeding tube in place. House Resolution 75, sponsored by Ewing and passed June 30 on a voice vote, declares that “it is against the public policy of this State and this State’s interest in life, health and safety, for hydration and nutrition that is not harming a patient to be involuntarily removed from a non-terminal, apparently brain-incapacitated patient if doing so will cause the individual’s death.” “I guess he came to me because he realized my compassion toward these things,” Ewing said. A thank-you note that Ewing received from a Richardson supporter said, “We knew that you were the only one who could [get the resolution through].” When asked what failures he encountered in his two decades as a legislator, Ewing could come up with only one: his inability in 2005 to get a House resolution passed in support of the effort to keep Terry Schiavo, a Florida woman who was in a persistent vegetative state, alive.

“I wanted us to say that we supported her not being taken off life support,” Ewing said. “It did not pass the House. That was a disappointment.” And his triumphs? “The bill for the establishment of the state’s 911 centers, and the bill for our enhanced 911 system,” he said. “They have saved a lot of lives in Delaware already.” A history of service

Ewing, a native of Rehoboth Beach and a 1950 graduate of Rehoboth High School, came into politics after a 20-year career as a state policeman. He retired from the Delaware State Police in 1978 as a lieutenant colonel and deputy superintendent of the force. After his good friend and neighbor, Brad Barnes, a member of the House from Bridgeville, died suddenly in 1987, Ewing was asked by the Republican Party to run in an emergency election to fill the seat. “They asked me two times and I said no two times,” Ewing said. He told his wife, Pat, that, like Gideon did in the Bible, he would set a test to determine if he should run. In the Old Testament, Gideon put a fleece outside and told God that if it was wet one morning and dry the next, he would accept the charge to lead Israel’s army. “I told Pat that if they asked me to run a third time, I would say yes,” Ewing said. “It would be a new experience, and we would make new friends.” Sure enough, when representatives of then Gov. Mike Castle’s office called a third time, Ewing agreed to enter the race. He won, defeating Democrat Ken McDowell, Bridgeville, and since then has

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won all 10 races he has been in, four of them with no opponent. Ewing has endorsed Dave Wilson, a Republican from Milford, as his successor. But, he said, even if Democrat Aaron Chaffinch, Greenwood, like Ewing a retired state policeman, wins the race, he will not be disappointed. “Whoever wins, Delaware and Sussex County will be served well,” he said. Leaving with mixed emotions

Ewing said that he is leaving the House with mixed emotions. He will officially no longer be the 35th District representative after Election Day, and he is worried about how he will fill his days. “I don’t know what I am going to do with my time,” he said. “I don’t just want to sit around the house, watching TV and reading.” Ewing is retiring because of illness. He was recently diagnosed with cancer in his kidney that has spread to his lung. On July 30, he will undergo surgery in Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore. From there, doctors will evaluate what’s next, he said. “We’ll see what the Lord has in mind for me,” Ewing said. In his farewell speech to the House, Ewing, in addition to reminding all the women there that they are pretty, quoted one of his favorite American heroes, Gen. Douglas MacArthur. MacArthur, a World War II general, led U.S. forces in the Korean War in 1950 and 1951. Ewing, who served in the Marine

Corps from 1950 to 1953, was in Korea for 14 months during that war. Ewing reminded the members of the House of MacArthur’s farewell speech to the U.S. Congress, in which MacArthur said, “Old soldiers never die; they just fade away. And like the old soldier of that ballad, I now close my military career and just fade away — an old soldier who tried to do his duty as God gave him the light to see that duty.” “I am like MacArthur,” Ewing told his fellow Delaware state representatives. “I will now start fading away.” Biography

J. Benjamin Ewing 77 Family: three children, Benjamin B., Georgetown, Rick, Seaford, and Penny Pritchett, Bridgeville, and nine grandchildren. His wife, Pat, died in 2007. Education: Rehoboth High School, 1950, and “every course the state police ever offered,” including enough credits, he said, to have a bachelor’s degree. Career: Delaware State Police, 1958 to 1978, and instructor at the State Police Academy for 13 years; director of the Methodist Manor House, Seaford, 1979 – 1983; salesman with Adams Feed, Bridgeville, 1983 to 1987; Delaware state representative, 1987 through the present. Since his start in the House, he has served as chairman of the Public Safety Committee. He is also a member of the Homeland Security Committee.

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MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

Seaford Library receives $12,500 grant Dr. Edith Villasenor, President Seaford District Library, announces that the library is the recipient of a grant for $12,500 from the Delaware Community Foundation (DCF). This is one of 32 capital grants totaling $343,900 awarded to Delaware nonprofit organizations; the largest amount the Foundation has allocated for capital projects and equipment since the grant making program began in 1990. Designed to support projects that have a lasting, positive impact on the population or region served by the organization, capital grants may be used to fund construc-

tion, major renovation or repair of buildings and/or the purchase of land as well as to a limited degree the purchase of needed equipment. “Seaford District Library will use the funds for the construction of our new library facility,” according to Dr. Villasenor. “We are very happy to be one of this year’s recipients.” The Delaware Community Foundation is a nonprofit community organization that connects people who care with causes that matter. Since 1986, the Foundation has managed charitable funds for individuals, families, businesses and organizations and

distributed the income from the funds as grants to many of the humanitarian, educational, health and cultural organizations in Delaware. The DCF also works with other nonprofit organizations to assess and meet community needs. Funding for the capital grants comes from the State of Delaware Fund created in 1989 with a $2 million grant from the State, and unrestricted endowment and field-of-interest funds. For more about the Delaware Community Foundation’s grant making programs, planned giving services and other ways to support Delawareans, call 302.571.8004 or visit www.delcf.org.

Sussex County Council adopts groundwater ordinance Sussex County leaders are taking new steps to protect the county’s drinking water supply. County Council, at its Tuesday, June 24 meeting, approved an ordinance that will establish various land use rules for properties within areas identified by Delaware environmental officials as integral to the local water supply. Known as the Source Water Protection Ordinance, the Statemandated measure is aimed at protecting public drinking water supplies within the unincorporated portions of Sussex County. The purpose of the ordinance is to reduce the risk of contamination on lands identified as excellent groundwater recharge areas or as wellhead protection

areas, which cover the underground sources containing the millions of gallons of public drinking water used throughout the county each day. “This is an important step in protecting not just the public’s health, but also in guaranteeing the safety of one of our most important natural resources,” County Administrator David B. Baker said. “This works to protect Sussex County’s drinking water supply for our residents today, and for future Sussex Countians to come, while balancing private property rights, too.” The ordinance, for instance, establishes limits on structures within safe zones that range in size from a 20-foot radius to a

100-foot radius around wells that supply public drinking water. Within wellhead protection and excellent recharge areas, meantime, there would be restrictions on how much impervious surface could cover the ground. The measure also calls for land developers to take certain mitigating steps, such as installing systems to recapture rainwater, on projects with a high degree of impervious cover. The ordinance takes effect in 90 days, and will apply only to new properties and new construction. It does not impose any new requirements or restrictions on residential wells serving individual households or wells used for agricultural purposes.

PAGE 5

Seaford Museum and Better Homes given some funds By Lynn R. Parks As part of its annual budget-writing process, the Delaware Legislature last week approved the Grants-In-Aid bill, which provides operating funding for hundreds of non-profit groups. The fiscal 2009 Grants-In-Aid bill totals $45.23 million, down 5.2 percent from last year’s bill. The 2009 Grants-In-Aid spending includes $6.7 million for senior centers, $1.76 million for museums and other cultural and tourist attractions, and $3.75 million to help agencies that provide services to children and families. It also includes $6.63 million for the state’s volunteer fire companies. Among the agencies named in the bill is the Seaford Historical Society, which received $9,100 for its Seaford Museum. Society executive director Sharlana Edgell said that the society board "will decide how best to spend the money to benefit the museum." "We are thrilled to receive this money," she added. Better Homes of Seaford, which operates several apartment complexes in the city for low-income people and senior citizens, received $27,400.

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MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

Business New budget increases crop American Soybean Association insurance cost share funding seeks applicants for program Delaware’s recently passed FY 2009 budget includes a $150,000 funding increase for the Delaware Crop Insurance Cost Share Program that brings the total appropriation to $750,000. The bill also removes the appropriation from “one-time funding status” and makes it a part of the Department of Agriculture’s base budget. The Delaware Crop Insurance Cost Share Program, administered by the Delaware Department of Agriculture (DDA), gives assistance to insure Delaware’s farmers against crop damage and loss, and shores up Delaware’s agricultural industry. It will help farmers better manage their risk at reasonable costs. Since its inception, starting with the 2004 crop year, the program has provided $1,957,589 in crop insurance cost share to Delaware farmers. The program provides up to 30% of the farmer paid premium for crop insurance, not to exceed $3 per acre. If total calculated benefits for all Delaware farmers exceed the available funding, benefits are prorated equally among all participants. For the 2007 crop year, calculated benefits exceeded the

$600,000 available. To bring the program expenditures within the available funding, DDA had to prorate benefits at about 91 percent. Michael Scuse, secretary of agriculture and a farmer, said, “I feel that this program is making a significant contribution to the stability of Delaware agriculture during some pretty risky times. Last year, we had a severe drought; this year we have seen flooding accompanied by salt water intrusion in to our planted fields. Many more weather emergencies could affect us between now and harvest of many of our crops. Although we are seeing higher prices for our crops in many instances, input costs are increasing nearly as fast or faster. Sound risk management is essential today. With the help of the Delaware Crop Insurance Cost Share Program, our farmers are significantly enhancing their coverage levels. So much so that even though we experienced a drought disaster last year, Delaware farmers received over $17.5 million in crop insurance loss payments, more than double any previous year. And for 2008 about 8.5 percent more Delaware crop insurance policies were purchased than in 2007."

The American Soybean Association (ASA) and Pioneer Hi-Bred, a DuPont business, are seeking applicants for the 2009 Young Leader Program. The Young Leader Program is recognized throughout agriculture for its longstanding tradition of identifying and cultivating the producer leaders who are shaping the U.S. soybean industry. "The Young Leader Program is an exceptional leadership training program," said John Hoffman, ASA president. "The instructors and program content are of the highest quality. This program provides information that the participant can start using immediately, not only in business, but personally as well." The 2009 class of Young Leaders and their spouses will participate in a leadership experience Dec. 1-4 at Pioneer headquarters in Johnston, Iowa, and then complete training Feb. 24-28, 2009, in Grapevine, Tex., in conjunction with the annual Commodity Classic. This seminar offers the opportunity to enhance

leadership skills, as well as meet and learn from other Young Leaders around the United States and Canada. Application forms have been mailed to all ASA members. Forms may also be obtained by calling 800-688-7692, ext. 1328, or on the web at www.SoyGrowers.com/dyl. Soybean producers are encouraged to apply or nominate another producer who would be an excellent candidate for the program. Information on guidelines to participate is available at ASA’s website or by calling the ASA program manager. All applications and nominations should be returned to ASA by Sept. 1. One Young Leader couple will be selected from each of ASA’s state affiliates for the all-expense paid program. Soybean growers in Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania and New Jersey are invited to join ASA through the MidAtlantic Soybean Association. For information on membership, call 410-924-3582.

Soybean growers to attend forum The American Soybean Association will hold a Legislative Forum in Washington, D.C., July 15 through 17 where soybean grower/leaders will have the opportunity to participate in presentations by key legislators on issues affecting them, such as global climate change and the status of the U.S. trade agenda. Growers will visit senators and congressmen representing their states to discuss policy issues affecting soybean growers. Growers will also have the chance to participate in the annual Congressional Reception scheduled July 16 on Capitol Hill. Monsanto is the sponsor of the Legislative Forum, and companies of the National

Oilseed Processors Association will sponsor growers from specific states to attend the program. Richard Wilkins, president of the MidAtlantic Soybean Association, will attend, thanks to funding from Perdue Farms, which joins ADM, Bunge, Cargill, Owensboro Grain and Zeeland Farm Soya as sponsors of individual attendees. Members of the Mid-Atlantic Soybean Association will travel to Capitol Hill for the day on July 16 to join forum attendees in legislative visits. Soybean growers in Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania and New Jersey who would like to join the delegation may call Executive Director Carol Kinsley at 410-924-3582 for details.

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MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

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Diamond State Drive-In Theater US Harrington, Del. 302-284-8307 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY 7/11, SATURDAY 7/12 & SUNDAY 7/13 Hellboy II . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:45 Wanted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:45 The Movies At Midway Rt. 1, Midway Shopping Ctr., Rehoboth Beach, 645-0200 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY 7/11 THRU THURSDAY 7/17 Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:40, 4:25, 7:00, 9:35 Sex and the City . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:50, 3:40, 6:35, 9:35 WALL-E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:05, 1:45, 3:35, 4:20, 6:20, 8:40 Meet Dave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:00, 4:35, 7:05, 9:05 Journey To The Center of The Earth . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:40, 4:10, 6:40, 8:50 Wanted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:20, 4:00, 7:10, 9:30 Hancock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:05, 1:50, 3:15, 4:40, 5:25, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7:00, 7:35, 9:10, 9:45 Kit Kittredge: American Girl . .G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:30, 4:15, 6:30, 9:00 Iron Man . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6:40, 9:15 Get Smart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:10, 3:50, 6:25, 8:45 The Incredible Hulk . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:35, 4:10, 6:50, 9:20 Hellboy II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 3:45, 6:50, 9:20 Kung Fu Panda . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:25, 4:05, 6:45 The Love Guru . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:50 all shows subject to change and availability

Regal Salisbury Stadium 16 2322 N. Salisbury Blvd., Salisbury, MD, 410-860-1370 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY 7/11 THRU THURSDAY, 7/17 Hellboy II* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . .(11:45, 1:30, 2:30, 4:15, 5:15) 7:00, 8:00, 9:45, 10:45 Journey To The Center of The Earth* . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Mon (11:45, 2:15, 5:00) 7:30, 10:00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tues-Wed (2:15, 5:00) 7:30, 10:00 Thu (11:45, 2:15, 5:00) 7:30, 10:00 Meet Dave . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(12:15, 3:00, 5:30) 8:15, 10:30 Hancock* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . .Fri-Sun (12:00, 12:30, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 4:00, 4:30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5:00, 5:30) 6:30, 7:15, 7:45, 8:15, 9:00, 9:30, 10:15, 10:30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mon-Thu (12:00, 12:30, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 4:00, 4:30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5:00, 5:30) 6:30, 7:15, 7:45, 8:15, 9:00, 9:30, 10:15, 10:30 Kit Kittredge: Ameican. Girl .G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(1:15, 3:45) 6:45, 9:15 WALL-E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Mon (12:15, 1:15, 3:15, 4:15) 6:15, 7:00, 8:45 Wanted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . .Fri (4:45) 7:45, 9:45, 10:45 Sat (1:45) 7:45, 9:45, 10:45 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sun (4:45) 7:45, 9:45, Mon (4:45) 9:45, 10:45 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tues-Wed (1:45, 4:45) 7:45, 9:45, 10:45 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thu (1:45, 4:45) 7:45, 10:45 Get Smart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (1:00, 4:00) 7:15, 10:00 Love Guru . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu 9:15 The Incredible Hulk . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (1:45, 4:45) 7:30, 10:15 Kung Fu Panda . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (10:00, 3:45) 6:45 Indiana Jones: The Kingdom of The Crystal . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Thu (12:45, 3:30) 6:30, 9:30 * Pass Restrictions Apply Discounted Show Times in Parenthesis () Advance Tickets on Sale : The Dark Knight PG13, X-Files: I Want To Believe (PG13) Dark Knight . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thursday Midnight 12:01 Mamma Mia . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thursday Midnight 12:01 Space Chimps . . . . . . . . . . .G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:01

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PAGE 8

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

Joseph Wheatley captured after plane takes hit By James Diehl Bridgeville resident Joseph Wheatley has books, photo albums, scrapbooks – anything related to World War II or the Eighth Air Force, chances are he’s got reference material on it. But there’s one item in his collection that stands out above all the rest – one moment captured in time that brings back all the memories of what happened on the afternoon of Aug. 24, 1944. It's a photo of an American B-17 bomber on fire – an aircraft Wheatley was still on when the picture was taken. The photograph was shot from a German jet that suddenly appeared out of nowhere and blew Wheatley and his crew out of the sky just after noon that August day. “He was sneaking in and out of vapor trails that we were all making in the sky,” says Wheatley, a lifelong resident of the Bridgeville area. “It was just like flying in a fog and none of us saw him back there.” The men of Wheatley’s plane – identification number 42-97571H – were about to make a bombing run over a suspected munitions warehouse about five miles west of the German city of Weimar, with a nearby barracks of the German secret police, or Gestapo, serving as a secondary target. But the B-17 never dropped its bombs as the crew’s mission quickly turned from one of destruction to one of survival. “After we were hit, we were still in the plane and I never did hear a bail out command. But the radio operator came out of his position and tapped on my turret and gave me the motion to come up,” remembers Wheatley. “My parachute was still up in the plane. I had my harness on but not my chute. When I finally stood up, the radio operator saw me, threw up his hand and bailed out.” The attack by the German aircraft had totally destroyed the plane’s left wing – it was no longer attached to the plane, which was dropping at an alarming rate toward the German countryside below. “I knew we were getting close to the ground because we could breathe without our oxygen masks on,” Wheatley recalls. Wheatley and the plane’s waste gunner were finally able to get out of the plane, open their chutes and begin drifting to the earth. But if they thought the worst part of their ordeal was over, they quickly learned otherwise. “After we got out, the plane exploded

again (historical records show Wheatley’s plane went into a spin and exploded at about 10,000 above ground) and I kept hearing this noise,” says Wheatley, who was just a few yards above and to the side of his waste gunner floating to the earth below. “Well, here comes the other wing of the plane and it came down right between me and him.” They were constantly under fire from German civilians on the ground, but the four survivors of the American aircraft eventually made it safely to land. They were the lucky ones. “Only four of us survived. I was later told that our bombardier opened his chute too soon and it got caught on the side of the plane,” Wheatley says. “And our co-pilot, he never could stand to wear his leg straps fastened between his legs. In his haste to get down and out of the nose hatch, we think he just slipped out of his harness. “The tail gunner and the engineer never got out of the plane. They were found later in some of the wreckage.” The ninth member of the crew – the radio operator who was the first to bail out – was shot by German policemen as he parachuted to earth. Wheatley later saw his dead crewmen one last time, passing by on a bus after being captured by German authorities on what had been his 27th bombing run in the skies over western Europe. Ironically, if not for a change of the rules, he never would have been in the air that fateful day. “You were supposed to fly a 25-mission duty, but a lot of the boys were shot down after just a few missions,” Wheatley recalls. “It turned out I had 27 missions before I was shot down because they changed our tour of duty to 30. “You just never knew when you got in that airplane and took off if you were going to get shot down that day.” Growing up in the Bridgeville area, Wheatley received his draft notice in 1943 and reported for service in the Army Air Corps. At the time he didn’t want to be a gunner and he certainly had no aspirations of becoming a pilot – his desire was to be a mechanic or possibly a radio operator. “But, most of the time, the Army gives you just the opposite of what you ask for,” he says with a chuckle. “So, I wound up in gunnery school dealing with bombs and machine guns.” After basic training in Miami Beach

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MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008 and gunnery training at Buckley Field in Denver, Wheatley decided he wanted to become a pilot after all and asked a few people back home to write letters of recommendation on his behalf. Among them was Warren C. Newton of O.A. Newton & Sons. “I believe that [Wheatley] will be found intelligent, industrious and can be relied upon,” reads Newton’s letter dated Oct. 6, 1943, which Wheatley still keeps in an old scrapbook. “I can unhesitatingly recommend him for your consideration and hope that he may have an opportunity to undergo training to become an air cadet.” While waiting for the letters to arrive from Sussex County, Wheatley was sent to Kingman, Ariz., for a few weeks of target practice. After completing the course, he moved on to southern Texas, which is where crews were being formed for overseas service. Wheatley’s aspirations of being a pilot were soon set aside. “In Texas is where our crew was formed and these were the guys we stayed with from then until the war was over,” he recalls. “I got so attached to these guys and we became just like brothers. When it came time to work toward the pilot’s license that I wanted, I decided to give it up because I liked these guys so much and I wanted to stay with them. “I never regretted that decision.” After a couple of months in Tennessee and a few weeks looking for submarines off the coast of Virginia, Wheatley and the rest of his crew finally got their orders to ship out. While some of the men went over on a new plane, five of them, Wheatley among them, sailed the waters of the Atlantic Ocean aboard the famed Aquitania. She was the sister ship of the Lusitania, which was torpedoed by a German submarine during World War I, killing 1,198 of the people on board, including nearly 100 children. It was a rough night as the young man from rural Sussex County set sail for western Europe. “We left out of New York City and, when we went by the Statue of Liberty, I kind of thought it might be the last time I would ever see it,” Wheatley recalls. As it turned out, he nearly saw it again a few days later as the Aquitania, targeted by a German submarine, had to make a quick U-turn and head due west. “We weren’t being protected by any other ships and when they spotted the submarine waiting for us, they turned around and went back toward New York,” Wheatley says. “We turned back for one day be-

fore turning back around.” After unloading in Scotland, Wheatley and his crew were transferred to Glatton Air Base, about 60 miles north of London. Soon after, he got orders to fly his first mission – but it was far from anything he expected or could have planned for. “They woke me up at 3 o’clock one morning and said ‘Come on Wheatley, you’re flying,’ ” he recalls. “So, I got up and starting waking up the guys in my crew but I came to find out that they weren’t going.” And they didn’t – Wheatley’s first mission turned out to be with a crew he had never met before, a crew who had already flown more than 20 missions over enemy territory. Wheatley, who had recently arrived in the European Theater of Operations, had flown none. “I didn’t know any of these guys and I just kept thinking that if we got shot down, I was probably going to be a loner,” says Wheatley, who wisely didn’t ask what had happened to the man he was replacing until arriving back on base later that day. Not only was Wheatley’s first mission with a crew he didn’t know, but it was also to the center of Nazi Germany, the very hub of Adolph Hitler’s empire. The crew was to fly over Berlin and bomb a railroad yard. “We went to Berlin, dropped our bombs and made it back where we were greeted [warmly] by the rest of my crew. They were all out there making sure I got back all right,” says Wheatley. “That was when I asked somebody what happened to the crew member I had replaced. “They said that the last mission they were on, he got a bullet right through the head and, when they got back, the ball turret was completely red with blood. That sure didn’t make me feel too good, but I was glad I didn’t ask them before [we left].” Wheatley and his crew became like family over the course of the next several months as they flew more than 25 missions over German-held territories in western Europe. But that all changed the afternoon of Aug. 24, 1944. That’s when their family of nine became a family of four, a close knit group determined to survive the prison camps of Nazi Germany. “When they captured us, they put us on this bus and they wouldn’t let us talk to each other or even sit together. They finally got us to Frankfurt, which is where the interrogation began,” Wheatley remembers. “We were each put in solitary confinement for one day and then we got out.

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PAGE 9

Wheatley is the last surviving member of the crew that got shot down that fateful day in the summer of 1944. Howard Martin, the crew’s waste gunner, passed away about five years ago. All they got from us was our name, our rank and our serial number. Then they put us on a train and sent us to the southern part of Germany.” With the Americans closing in, however, they were quickly turned around and transported all the way through Berlin and north into East Prussia. Finally, after hours on a train and more hours marching through the woods, they arrived at Stalag Luft IV, a German prison camp near the town of Tychowo, Poland. They remained in the camp until Feb. 6, 1945, when they had to march out of its gates and into the great unknown. It was the beginning of the so-called “Black March” – a march that lasted for 86 excruciating days. “They marched us in the sleet, the rain, the snow, whatever. And they did that to keep us from being liberated by the Russians who were coming across [the border], Wheatley remembers. “The only thing we had was one Red Cross parcel that was passed out to us when we left the camp. “Along the way, we traded things with people who would take a little pity on us. And we ate a lot of raw potatoes,” Wheatley continues. “I think that was the coldest winter in the history of Germany.” According to historical records, men on the “Black March” often marched all day with little or no food, water or rest. It was also one of Germany’s coldest winters ever with snow piled knee-deep at times, and temperatures plunging well below zero. Nearly all prisoners grew weak under the conditions. Virtually every marcher became infected with lice during the march and many more acquired dysentery, often caused by drinking contaminated water. The Soviets finally caught up to the marchers in late April 1945 near the city of Annaburg, Germany. Wheatley and his

mates – the other three members of his crew had been separated along the way – were liberated. Well, sort of. “The Russians liberated us but the war wasn’t over. So they put us in this German garrison,” Wheatley recalls. “We were walking around Germany when the Germans still had their guns, the Russians still had their guns and the Americans still had their guns.” The Soviets eventually asked Wheatley and the small group of liberated prisoners what they wanted to eat – asking them what they didn’t want to eat may have been easier. “We listed a hell of a lot of things, but they killed a hog for us and they put me and these other five guys in charge of the dining room. Well, I didn’t know a thing about cooking,” Wheatley recalls. “But we had some pork meat and some other things they got together for us. We fixed it somehow, but truthfully anything would have tasted good right then, even if it was raw.” Finally, after a mad dash across the Mulda River and back to American lines – the Soviets didn’t want to turn the men over until after the war was over – Wheatley finally began the process of returning to the United States, and to his beloved small town of Bridgeville. A veteran of the 457th bomb group and a current member of the American ExPOW’s, Wheatley earned three oak leaf clusters for sustained combat bombing missions over Germany. But the relief he felt after being liberated is summed up in the final words of a letter he sent home to his parents on May 24, 1945. “Boy, oh boy, it sure is good to be out of the barbed wire,” he wrote. Wheatley is the last surviving member of the crew that got shot down that fateful day in the summer of 1944. Howard Martin, the crew’s waste gunner, passed away about five years ago. “I’m proud of what I did during the war and, if I had it all to do over again, I would,” Wheatley says. “But I was lucky to have made it all the way through.” Wheatley had three children with his late wife, Marilda, who passed away in 1994. His second wife, Lillian, passed away in January of this year. He left active service on Sept. 9, 1945.

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MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

Police Journal Police announce food drive

In late June, two truck trailers containing approximately 57,000 pounds of frozen donated chicken were stolen from the Food Bank of Delaware. This food was destined for the needy in our area. When these trailers were recovered several days later, officials hoped the food could be salvaged. But all of the food had spoiled. In reaction to this theft, the Delaware State Police, which investigated the theft, is holding its own statewide food drive. This initiative began on Monday and continues through Monday, July 21. Citizens can donate food at any State Police Troop, at State Police Headquarters in Dover or at the Sussex County Emergency Operations Center at the Georgetown Airport. Troop addresses can be found online at www.dsp.delaware.gov/locations.shtml. Donated items must be non-perishable. People who want to donate perishable food can do so by calling the Food Bank.

Georgetown church vandalized

Delaware State Police are investigating vandalism at the Unity Church of God, Hollyville Road, Georgetown. Police said that when church members went to the church the morning of Saturday, July 5, they found that four windows had been broken. Police do not know whether anyone used the broken windows to get inside the building. They also don’t know exactly when the windows were broken; no one had been at the church since Wednesday, July 3. According to police, church members said that the church has been at this location for quite some time and has not been vandalized in the past. Anyone with information pertaining to this case is asked to call Delaware State Police Troop 4 at 856-5851.

Developer charged with fraud

Delaware State Police have arrested a 45-year-old Rehoboth resident for new construction home fraud. Curtis M. Ricketts, 45, of Rehoboth Beach, who is the owner of Oasis Property Development L.L.C., is accused of defrauding a home buyer of more than $62,000. Police said that a 53-year-old West-

mont, N.J., resident entered into a contract with Ricketts on Jan. 8, 2006, to build a 2,913-square foot home at Bay View Road. Even though he was paid $62,251.38, Ricketts failed to pay subcontractors for their services and/or failed to complete the work, police said. The home buyer contacted police in April. Ricketts Ricketts was indicted June 13 in Sussex County Superior Court for one count of new home construction fraud, less than $100,000 (felony) and 10 counts of improper retention of contractor funds (misdemeanor). He turned himself in to detectives at Troop 4 on July 7 and was released on an $11,000 unsecured bond. Anyone else who may have been a victim of Ricketts may contact Detective Scott Gray at 856-5850 ext. 227.

Search underway for police poser

Delaware State Police are investigating a robbery that occurred June 30 at approximately 10:15 p.m. after a person posing as a police officer stopped a motorist and took the victim’s wallet, police said. Police said that the incident occurred when a 20-year-old female West Chester, Pa., resident was traveling northbound on Coastal Highway between the Indian River Inlet Bridge and Dewey Beach and pulled over in response to a vehicle with three flashing blue lights on top of the roof. The victim, thinking the car was being driven by a police officer, stopped along the shoulder. Police said that a white male with dark hair walked up to her car, pointed a handgun at the victim and demanded her driver’s license and registration. The suspect then reportedly demanded the entire wallet from her. After the victim complied, the suspect walked back to his vehicle, got inside and drove away. The victim, who was not injured, told police that the vehicle looked like a police car and could have been a Ford Crown Victoria. The blue lights were “rotating” lights and not strobe lights, she said. In addition, police said that the victim saw two other males seated inside the sus-

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pect's car when she looked in the rear view mirror. Anyone with information on this crime is asked to call investigators at Troop 4 at 302-856-5850 or Crime Stoppers at 800TIP-3333. Police remind motorists that people who are unsure whether they are being stopped by a real police officer can let the police know they see them by waving, turning on the car’s interior lights and putting on a turn signal. Then the motorists can look for a welllit area where there are other people and pull over. Motorists who are still not comfortable can use a cell phone to call 911 to check whether an officer is trying to make an actual traffic stop at their location. If the officer is not in uniform, motorists should ask for some sort of official identification.

Driver, rider switched seats

On Saturday, July 5, at approximately 9:10 a.m. the Sussex County Dispatch center received a report of a possibly impaired driver on Route 1 in the Rehoboth/Lewes area. A Delaware State Police Troop 7 patrol officer was in the area in which the vehicle, a Ford Explorer, was last seen and Eley located it on Route 1 approaching Lewes. The trooper noted the driver was a female and also noted the Explorer was weaving back and forth, from lane to lane. Additionally, police said, the SUV did not have a registration plate displayed. Police said that as Hack the Explorer continued north, it veered right onto Kings Highway. When the officer activated his emergency equipment, the operator, later identified as Shelly R. Hack, 28, of DuPont Highway in Georgetown, failed to stop and continued toward Lewes, police said.

While in pursuit of the Explorer, the trooper saw Hack and a male passenger, later identified as Leonard D. Eley, 30, of Morris Avenue in Milton, switch seats, police said. Leonard reportedly took control of the Explorer and in so doing nearly caused a head-on collision with oncoming westbound traffic. Leonard, still driving on Kings Highway, then sped up to more than 80 miles per hour, police said. After Leonard turned onto Dartmouth Road, he lost control of the Explorer. The vehicle struck a curb and flipped in the air before coming to rest, police said. When the trooper pulled up to the Explorer, Leonard reportedly exited the vehicle and fled on foot. Leonard was chased down in a brief foot pursuit and taken into custody on Theodore C. Freeman Highway. The trooper injured his knee during the scuffle. Backup units apprehended Hack after the crash. Hack was charged with disregarding a police officer’s signal (felony), reckless driving, driving while suspended and several other traffic violations. She was committed to Sussex Correctional Institute in lieu of $2,002 secured bail. Eley was charged with DUI, reckless driving, second degree assault on a police officer (felony), resisting arrest (misdemeanor), disregarding a police officer’s signal (felony) and several other traffic violations. He was committed to Sussex Correctional Institute in lieu of $11,800 secured bail.

Two charged with theft

Delmar police say that they located about $26,000 worth of stolen property in a residence in the 300 block of E. Elizabeth Street. In response, two Delmar, Md., residents, Dustin Lovely, 19, and Joseph Waltemeyer, 19, were arrested and charged with theft over $500 and possession of stolen property. Police searched the house July 1 as part of an ongoing burglary investigation. They said that the items that they found were reported stolen from properties in Delmar and surrounding areas. Waltemeyer and Lovely were transported to the Central Booking Unit at the Wicomico County Detention Center where they were both processed. They are being held on $25,000 bond each.

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

PAGE 11

Education

Julie Ann Linek

Julie Ann Linek, a 2002 graduate of Seaford Senior High School, received a doctorate in medicine from Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia on May 30, 2008. She graduated from Seaford at age 16 to attend Pennsylvania State University through the six-year combined B.S./M.D. premedical-medical program. Linek will begin a three-year residency in internal medicine at Montefiore Medical Center, the University Hospital for the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, in New York on June 23. She plans to pursue a fellowship in pulmonary and critical care medicine following completion of her residency training. Linek resides in New York City and is the daughter of Robert and Kimiko Linek of Seaford.

Area church helps to make sure that children have school supplies With poverty levels at 60 percent and up, there are many children in need of the basics for the start of the school year. St. John’s United Methodist Church, Seaford, started the Sussex County School Supply Campaign in 2001 to address this need. This is the eighth year for this project and donations have more than tripled since its inception. Organizers say that the need is greater this year than ever before. With many communities participating, however, and everyone working together, they feel sure that the need can be met. St. John’s has worked together with seven or more churches the past few years to collect school supplies. In 2007, it collected $3,500 worth of supplies for eight schools in the Seaford School District and the Mission of Hope classes. Supplies were brought to St. John’s by participating churches by the closing date of the campaign, to be divided and boxed for the schools to be served. School personnel then picked up the supplies to be distributed to qualified students by their guidance counselors. This method should work for any community.

This year, school supplies that are needed in the Seaford district include: Crayons (16 to 24 count), markers, ballpoint pens (black, blue and red), rubber erasers, glue sticks, blunt scissors, #2 pencils, colored pencils, highlighters, spiral notebooks (single), composition books, zippered pencil cases and pencil boxes, binders (1 and 1/2-inch in red, blue, black and green), notebook dividers, notebook binder paper, reinforcements for paper repair, three-prong pocket folders with fasteners, 12-inch wooden rulers, inexpensive calculators, tissues (large boxes for classrooms), paper towels, plastic bags (quart, sandwich and snack), protractors, pocket tissues and large bags of cough drops (to go to the school nurse of each school). The method that St. John’s uses to get school supplies to children should work for any community. Supplies that are collected for one community can stay in that community. For help in setting up a School Supply Campaign, call Ruth Rhoades at 6290789, or write to her in care of St. John’s U.M. Church, P.O. Box 299, Seaford, DE 19973.

Courses can keep kids busy this summer Delaware Technical & Community College, Georgetown, is offering camps and courses for children this summer. The All Day All Stars program, for ages 6 to 12, focuses on a different theme each week and features a mixture of academics, activities and a field trip. Sports camps starting on July 14 are: baseball for ages 7 to 12, basketball for girls ages 11 to 14, cheerleading I for ages 7 to 12, tennis for ages 7 to 17, and youth football for ages 7 to 12. Camps starting July 21 are: basketball for boys ages 7 to 10, soccer for ages 7 to 12, and tennis for

ages 7 to 12. Basketball for girls ages 7 to 10, baton II for ages 7 to 15, tennis for ages 7 to 17, and youth football for ages 7 to 12 are offered the week of July 28. Art camp is offered July 14 to 18 for ages 9 to 11. A week-long science camp will begin July 14 and July 28 for ages 9 to 11 and July 21 for ages 6 to 8. In Wonders of Web Design, for ages 9 to 11, students will learn the fundamentals of basic web page design from July 28 to Aug. 1. To find out more about the Kids on Campus program, call 854-6966.

Education Briefs Laurel man on dean’s list

Nathan Mayercsik of Laurel has been named to the University of Delaware’s spring 2008 dean’s list. He is enrolled in the honors program for civil engineering. He will enter his junior year in the fall.

Seaford grad recognized for grades

York College of Pennsylvania has named Jeremy Halter of Seaford to its dean's list for the spring semester 2008. To receive this distinction, students must carry at least 12 academic credit hours and attain a semester grade point average of 3.5 or higher. Halter, a graduate of Seaford High School, is pursuing a degree in finance with a minor in accounting. He is the son of Stephen and Connie Halter.

Area students make SU dean’s list

More than 25 Sussex County area students were named to the dean’s list at Salisbury University for the spring 2008 semester. They include: Bridgeville - Lauren Correll and Sarah Pritchett Delmar - Caitlyn Twilley Frankford - Devin Hudson Georgetown - Jennifer Sweeten Laurel - Christopher Boyce, Kyle

Boyce, Frances Lawrence, Ashley Mocella and Jessica Morgan Lewes - Elizabeth Macintire Lincoln - Hunter Emory and Joshua Morris Milford - Jaime Bahder and Megan Maloney Millsboro - Deziree Hitchens, Jessica Purkey and Zena Tunnell Seaford - Jill Baker, Ashley Harris, Stephanie Hitchens, Miranda O'Neal, Patrick Pinette and Sylvia Shields Selbyville - Jeffrey Collins and Shannon Tylor.

Enrichment courses offered

Delaware Technical & Community College, Georgetown, is offering enrichment courses. A class in tai chi will start July 22. From July 23 to Aug. 13, adults and adolescents age 15 and up can practice horseback riding at an indoor riding ring in Seaford. Courses in yoga and pilates will get underway July 28. The college is also offering special interest courses. On July 19, divorcing parents can take the Divorcing Parent Education Program. An Advanced Defensive Driving course will start July 14. For details, call 854-6966.

St. Paul’s U.M. Church Saturday, July 19 Hot Dogs, Hamburgers Homemade Ice Cream will be on sale. Food served starting at 5 pm.

1s

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MUSIC BEGINS 5:30 PM All proceeds benefit the with Don Murray and St. Paul’s Youth Program. Friends. Also singing : Amanda Jones, St. Paul’s Youth & Junior Church, Sounds of Joy, Don Murray Family and Lights of Home. Bring your appetite and your lawn chair. PROGRAM IS OUTSIDE. RAIN DATE JULY 26. Church Located On Old Stage Rd., Laurel, Del.

PAGE 12

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

Laurel Independence Day Talent Show winners ✩

Andrea Kessel, first in 21 and over

Billy Propes, second in 21 and over

Jillian Queen, third in 21 and over

Amanda Jones, first in 13 to 20

Maddie Crimmins, second in 13 to 20

Courtney Hastings, third in 13 to 20

Griffin Dunn, first in under 12

McKenzie Steele, second in under 12

July 4 features hot dogs and pie eating and baking competitions

Food competitions were a part of the Laurel Independence Day celebration. Winners were: Sharon Donlin of Seaford for best cake (Pina Coloda Crunch Cake), Milton Lions Club for best pie (funnel cake with strawberry toppings), Matt Joseph, 15, of Seaford in the hot dog eating contest (five and one-half hot dogs in one minute) and Vicky Higgins of Laurel, in bottom right photo, first place in the pie eating contest (half a pie in one minute). Bonnie Gallion of Hyattsville, Md., placed second and Dave Abbott of Laurel, third, in the pie eating contest. The above photo looks at some of the contestants in the hot dog eating contest and at top right is a contestant in the pie eating contest. Photos by Bryant Richardson.

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

PAGE 13

At July 4th celebration, watermelon is king for the day By Lynn R. Parks Morgan Peterson was headed to the carnival. “I’m going to the rides!” announced the the 4-year-old Delmar girl, attending Laurel’s July 4th celebration with her grandmother, Lori Schadler. But first, there was the matter of a slice of watermelon to take care of. Morgan, dressed in Independence Day red, white and blue, ate the sweet, red fruit that her grandmother had given her until the juice ran down her chin and onto her dress. Watermelon was a big part of Friday’s 14th annual July 4th celebration in Laurel, sponsored by the Laurel Chamber of Commerce. Sussex County councilman Vance Phillips, a Laurel-area farmer, was giving away slices of the fruit at a stand near Janosik Park. And in Janosik Park, six leaders of western Sussex County towns put their expectorating skills on the line in the mayor’s challenge watermelon seed spitting competition. Joseph Conaway, president of the Bridgeville Town Commission, claimed the top prize with a spit of 33 feet 6 inches. Because this was the third time that he had won, he will get to keep the mayor’s challenge cup permanently. Phillips, organizer of the contest, announced that the cup would be retired. John Outten, mayor of Delmar, Del., came in second with a distance of 32 feet. Eddie Lambden, newly-elected mayor of Georgetown, claimed third place with a distance of 31 feet 6 inches. This was Lambden’s first time competing. Laurel Mayor John Shwed, after sending his watermelon seed just 12 feet, walked away with the loser’s prize, a framed picture of Conaway at a previous seed-spitting contest. Shwed promised to abide by contest rules that require that he keep the photo on his desk for a year. After the contest, Shwed said that the old adage, “Practice makes perfect,” does not apply to seedspitting. “I can practice and practice, but I never can get the seed to go anywhere,” he said. But Shwed wasn’t complaining about any other part of the day. The annual celebration is a wonderful time, he said, for people to join with their neighbors in showing their patriotism. It is also an opportunity, he added, for Laurel to show off a bit. “I’ve had a number of visitors tell me that they didn’t know we had this nice park,” he said, waving his hand toward

Above, Morgan Peterson, 4, enjoys a slice of watermelon during Laurel’s July 4th celebration. Photos by Lynn R. Parks

Janosik Park. “A lot of people visiting our community for the first time are finding out how nice Laurel is.” Connie Lewis, treasurer of the Laurel Chamber of Commerce, said on Monday that this year’s festival went well. She was unable to estimate how many people were in town Thursday night for the Red, White and Blue Parade or Friday for the festival, but said that sales of tickets for carnival rides “went extremely well.” Similarly, Laurel Police Chief Jamie Wilson could not say how many people attended the festival. Based on the amount of trash that visitors left behind, he said that the crowd Friday was as big as it has been in previous years. Thursday evening, “we had one of the biggest crowds we’ve ever had for the parade,” he said. Wilson added that the department was not called on to handle any major problems during the celebration. Lewis said that new attractions like the hot dog eating contest and the cake and pie baking contests will probably return next year. “These are the kind of things that get local people involved,” she said. “Things went very well,” Lewis added. She gave a lot of the credit for a successful celebration to Wilson’s police force and to the town’s public works department, headed by Woody Vickers. “We just can’t thank the police department and the town enough for all that they did to make this work,” she said.

Sussex County Councilman Vance Phillips, left, holds Bridgeville Town Commission president Joseph Conaway’s arm in triumph after Conaway won the watermelon seed spitting contest. Conaway is a three-time contest winner.

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Georgetown Mayor Eddie Lambden makes his debut at Laurel’s watermelon seed spitting contest. Watching how he does are, from left, Seaford Mayor Ed Butler, Blades Mayor David Ruff and Laurel Mayor John Shwed.

PAGE 14

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

People Sydney Beard wins pageant title

Local racers allowed campers to get a close look at their race cars and also gave out autographed cards at the Wheel 2 Wheel Show, which benefited Camp Barnes.

Radio show benefits Camp Barnes On Tuesday, July 1, the “Wheel 2 Wheel Show” marked its 50th radio broadcast by attending Camp Barnes in South Bethany. The show raised awareness for the camp and promoted the Camp Barnes Benefit Stock Car Race that was held at the Delaware International Speedway on July 9. Camp Barnes, which has been in operation for 61 years, is open to children 10 to 13 at no cost to the camper or family. The

camp accommodates 60 campers per week for six weeks and is operated by the Delaware State Police. The Wheel 2 Wheel Show is hosted by Wade Perdue along with his brother Brandon; Kelly Putz; and meteorologist Harlan Williams. The show airs live every Tuesday night from 8 to 9 p.m. on 97.5 and 105.9 Cat Country Radio. For more information or to make a donation, email wheel2wheelshow@yahoo.com.

MEDICAL TECHS GRADUATE - Sussex Tech Adult Education Division recently graduated students from the Medical Office Administration Technician certificate program, which prepares students for entry-level employment in a physician’s office or hospital. From left, seated, Bethany Adkins, Millsboro; Heather Drane, Bridgeville; Roclyn Hall, Frankford; and Jessica LaVare, Millsboro. Standing: Latoya Myers, Milton; and Nakisha Wayman, Hurlock, Md.

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On June 28, Sydney Beard competed in the Young Miss Greater Delaware Pageant and won her third title in four years. Sydney is a former 2004 Little Miss Riverfest and last year’s 2007 Little Miss Seaford. She is the daughter of Shane and Kimberly Beard and the granddaughter of Carroll and Dot Beard of Seaford, Clem and Kristie LeGates of Milton and Carol and Paul Strencejewski of Port St. Lucie, Fla. The Greater Delaware Pageant was open to any girl, age 4 to 18, living in Delaware. The Young Miss category was for ages 7 to 10 and at 8 years old Sydney not only won the title but also was named the overall talent winner for the 4 to 10 age group. For her talent, Sydney performed a ballet and vocal piece to “A Part of the Heart of the Sky.” The ballet was choreographed by Liz Wallace of Extreme Dance Studio in Seaford, where Sydney was a jazz student last year. Previous dance instruction was from Karen Baker of Seaford Dance Studio. Scoring included scholastics; Sydney has been an A honor roll student since kindergarten. She previously attended Seaford Christian Academy and was home-schooled by her mother for the second grade. Sydney’s required essay was “Celebrating the All-American Girl.” For the patriotic presentation, she dressed in navy shorts with a red, white and blue shirt and did a flag twirling routine with two American flags. Along with the title, Sydney received four other awards which included the talent award, the overall personality award,

Sydney Beard

the Lady Liberty Horizon Award, and the Newcomers Award for the most outstanding first year performer in the Greater Delaware Pageant. Overall, she won five trophies and a medal. Sydney swims on the Seaford Golf and Country Club Gators swim team, does gymnastics as a level 4 gymnast with DGA in Fruitland, Md., and attends the Atlanta Road Alliance Church. Sydney’s younger sister is Jenna Beard, who is the 2008 Little Miss Seaford and Little Miss Sussex County.

THOMAS FAMILY WELCOMES DAUGHTER - Alyssa Ruth Thomas was born on May 26, 2008, to Mark and Christine (O’Day) Thomas of Great Mills, Md. She weighed 8 pounds 12 ounces and was 21 and 1/2 inches long. Her grandparents are Jim and Carol O’Day of Seaford and Bob and Debbie Thomas of New York. Her maternal great-grandparents are Peggy Hasenei and Ralph and Peggy O’Day, all of Seaford. AUTHENTIC MEXICAN

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PAGE 15

Proposals would weaken our Clean Air and Clean Water acts Many of us in this country, and most of the rest of the world, are YNN ARKS breathlessly awaiting the end of the Bush Administration, hoping against waste from being dumped within 100 feet of hope that in the few months it has left it them. Not much, but at least something. can’t do any more harm. From the grossly But now, the Office of Surface Mining, misguided and even more grossly mismanunder the Bush Administration, wants to reaged war in Iraq, runaway national debt and peal the buffer zone rule. Mining companies a stifling of honest scientific debate to diwould be allowed to mine next to or even minished effectiveness of government prothrough streams and would be permitted to grams and sadly missed opportunities to fix create permanent spoil fills and sludge lahorrible environmental problems, there is goons. Streams in Appalachia have already nothing, it seems, that the administration suffered under mountaintop removal practouched that our country will not have to tices. This weakening of existing law would spend decades fixing. But instead of hiding in shame, instead of harm them even more. What difference does it make? Streams begging the people’s forgiveness, George provide drinking water for people as well as Bush seems determined to plow on until the very last day of his second term as president. animals. They are important to anyone who likes to go hiking or fishing. And streams A hint of how the final months of his reign will go came last week, with a series of pro- are where water that ends up in the Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean starts. The posals that would weaken our Clean Water health at the beginnings of a watershed preand Clean Air acts. dicts the health at the end of that watershed. The administration intends to put in place Additional Bush Administration proposa new rule that would change the way air als would permit more hazardous waste in pollution is measured in our national parks. the recycling stream and would exempt facNational parks are supposed to have the tory farms from provisions of the Clean Air cleanest air in the country; their air quality and Clean Water acts. receives special protection by federal law. All of these proposals would make things The Bush Administration’s new rule, set to easier for big business, it is true. Polluters go into effect in October, would allow air wouldn’t have to spend some of their profits over the parks to be dirtier, opening the way for more pollution from existing utility plants to find cleaner ways to do things. They could continue to hide behind that un-Amerand even allowing more coal-fired power ican whine — “We can’t!” — until forced to plants to be constructed near the parks. We shouldn’t be building filthy coal-fired do better by a subsequent administration. And meanwhile, our country, the leader power plants anywhere, near parks or not. of the world, will remain stuck in the old Burning coal is a huge contributor to greenand filthy ways of doing things. house gas emissions. And we should be deThe Bush Administration is making a manding that existing power plants to burn mockery of the idea that this is our country. fuel in the cleanest ways that they can. Under its guidance, the United States is on We should be looking forward to clean its way to becoming their country — owned days ahead, not taking giant steps backward and run by big business regardless of the as though we can’t do any better. harm the practices of those business do to The Bush Administration is also pushing a new rule that would allow mountaintop re- the people who live here. Maybe this final push will be too much. moval mining nearer to streams than is curMaybe enough people will clog the telerently allowed. Mountaintop removal minphones and e-mailboxes at the White House, ing is exactly what it sounds like: Tops of furious at the idea that our national parks mountains are blown off and dumped into will be even more polluted or that that valleys below, to enable coal companies to mountain stream where we used to fish will access veins of coal deep in the mountain. While the coal lasts only until it is burnt, the be gone, that even the Bush Administration will have to reconsider what it is doing. mountain is gone forever. And the valley, The telephone number for the White where the spoils end up, is killed too. House is (202) 456-1111. The e-mail address A 1983 law creates a buffer zone around is comments@whitehouse.gov. We the peomountain streams by forbidding mining ple can put them to good use.

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MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

PAGE 17

Community Bulletin Board Rabies & distemper clinic

Homeless Cat Helpers, Inc. holds its eighth semi-annual Rabies & Distemper Vaccination Clinic for cats and dogs on July 19 from 8 - 10 a.m. Cost is $10 for each rabies shot and $10 for each Distemper/Parvo shot, cash only. Leashes and carriers are required. Blades Fire Station, Cannon Street, between 4th and 5th streets. Dr. Mike Metzler, DVM, attending veterinarian, Four Paws Animal Hospital. Puppies must be at least 16-weeks old to receive rabies vaccine and at least 6 weeks old to receive distemper vaccine. Kittens must be at least 12 weeks old to receive Rabies Vaccine and be at least six weeks old to receive Distemper Vaccine. Each dog/puppy must be on a leash. Each cat/kitten must be in its own carrier.

Farmers and Artisans Market

For quite some time now, old-timers and new-comers alike have been asking for a market in the Seaford area. A citizens’ group is making it happen. A steering committee has laid the foundation, with the help of Kelli Steele. Debuting on Saturday mornings in August, from 8:30 a.m. to noon, residents and friends will be able to purchase locally grown and locally hand-crafted items at “Seaford’s Farmers & Artisans Market.” The location will be at the Kiwanis Park on Stein Highway in Seaford. Growers and artisans from the surrounding area are encouraged to contact either Lynne Betts at 629-3949 or Sonja Mehaffey at 245-9494 to sign up for the five Saturday mornings in August.

Church seeks craft vendors

Christ Lutheran Church need craft vendors for its Christmas bazaar to be held on Sept. 27, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. - $20 per space. Contact Joan at 628-3601. The church is located at 315 N. Shipley St., Seaford.

SSA welcomes new members

The Seaford Swimming Association, located west of Seaford on Craigs Mill Pond Road, is now accepting applications for membership for the 2008 summer season. Children’s swimming lessons are offered throughout the summer along with family activities for both children and adults. A new member discount is in effect. Contact Board president Steve Halter at 628-0554 for further information.

Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival

The Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival at Nutter Park in Seaford, will be held Friday and Saturday, Aug. 8 and 9. This year's event will include a Pre-AFRAM Festival basketball competition and fish fry on Thursday, Aug. 7. Nutter Park is located on Collins Avenue next to Chandler Heights Apartments in Seaford. This annual festival celebrates the African-American heritage with entertainment, food, a parade, cultural vendors, contests, fun for kids and adults,

and information booths. This year’s theme is “Conserving Our Future by Preserving Our Family.” Register today for pageants, vending booths, parade, basketball challenge, Amateur Night, and entertainment by calling 628-1908. Registration forms are also available on the AFRAM Web site:easternshoreafram.org. For questions or information please contact Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival Executive Director: Councilwoman Pat A. Jones at 628-1908 or pj@easternshoreafram.org.

Seaford District Library events

• “Fun with Filmmaking” is a free three-day series offered by the Rehoboth Film Society at the Seaford District Library on Monday, July 14 and Tuesday, July 15 from 1 to 3 p.m. Registration at the library is required and the program is recommended for elementary aged students. • Apiarist John Isenhower will present “Buzzing Bees” at the Seaford District Library on Wednesday, July 16, at 10:30 a.m. This event is part of the Seaford District Library’s Children’s Summer Reading Program “Catch the Reading Bug” • Storyteller Clem Bowen will be reading “Bugs and Creepy Creatures of the Okefenokee Swamp” at the Seaford District Library on Thursday, July 17, 2008 at 1 p.m. This event is part of the Seaford District Library’s Children’s Summer Reading Program “Catch the Reading Bug” • The Teen Summer Reading Program “Metamorphosis” will be having a “Gaming Tournament” on Thursday, July 17, starting at 4 p.m. Sign up for this program at the library’s front desk. This program is for those participants who have completed grades 6th-12th. For more information contact Kenda Kile at 6292524.

Breakfast cafe

VFW 4961 breakfast cafe, open Monday-Friday, 7-10 a.m., Seaford VFW, Middleford Road, to benefit Veterans Relief Fund.

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Parents, caregivers and children ages two to five are invited to enjoy stories, songs, poetry, art, science, math, music and fun at the Laurel Public Library’s preschool story time. Story time is held every Tuesday morning at 10:30 a.m. For more information, call the library at 8753184.

LHS Class of 93 reunion planned

Laurel High School’s class of 1993 is scheduled to celebrate their 15th reunion. The reunion will be held on Saturday, Aug. 30, at 2 p.m. It will be held at Trap Pond State Park’s screened pavilion. We

For more information, call

302-628-4349

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PAGE 18 are in need of contact information for the following classmates: Gary Anderson, Eric Bailey, Jennifer Belong, Greg Bernal, Shawn Crites, Dangelle Dixon, Allery Elder, Brandy Gilchrist, Michael Greene, Sam Hastings, Gail Hearn, Michelle Hindt, Nick Horsey, Jeff Howard, Patrick Johnson, Robyn Justice, Aaron Kellam, Kenneth LeCates, Martin LeCates, Tracy Matthews, Misty McKinstry, Carlos Mitchell, Christina Morris, Bodny Olivince, Jason Pfeilmeier, Traymane Savage, Karen Short Townsend, Twana Stanley, John Stevens, Sean Vincent, Mark Walsh, Chris Walston, Nikki Webb, Antonio West, Albert Wooters, Jason Young, and Ami Zimmerman. If you have contact information for any of these classmates, contact Michelle Rogers Moyer at 875-2563 or mmoyer19956@yahoo.com.

LHS Class of 1988 plans reunion

LHS Class of 1988 twenty year class reunion dinner is set for Saturday, Sept. 20, starting at 5 p.m. at The Beach House in Laurel. We are also planning other events around that weekend. We need your help. Contact the committee with your address information at Reunioninfo2008@yahoo.com, call the reunion hotline 302-280-6655, or register on Classmates.com to help us connect to everyone.

Fashion Show benefit

The Fun Friday Fashion Show benefitting the Good Samaritan will be held on Aug. 8, starting at 6 p.m., at The Lighthouse Church, 27225 Kaye Road, Laurel. Members of the Lighthouse - in addition to other members of the community - will model clothing from The Good Samaritan Thrift Store. A free-will donation will be taken, with all of the proceeds going directly to The Good Samaritan - a nonprofit organization that helps those in need in Laurel. Refreshments will be served. For more information, phone 8757814.

Historical Society opens

The Laurel Historical Society is pleased to announce that their headquarter museum, the Cook House, will be open for visits on Sunday afternoons from 1-4 p.m. during the summer and early fall seasons. While the Cook House has been open for public viewing at times in the past, this will be the first time that regular public hours have been available. There is no charge for admittance during this trial period, but monetary donations from visitors will help insure the continuation of the venture and are encouraged. Located at 502 E. Fourth St., the Cook House is where many of the society’s holdings are stored and displayed. New this season is a representation of a 1930 style, depression era bedroom with a suite of furniture that was purchased and thought to have been originally owned by Lou Elliott. For more information or to volunteer to serve as a host, call 875-2820 or email laurelhistoricalsociety@hotmail.com

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008 rel Public Library at 101 East 4th Street, call us at 875-3184, or find us on the web at www.laurel.lib.de.us. You can also email Becky Norton, Youth Services Librarian, at Rebecca.Norton@lib.de.us for more information.

Adult Summer Reading Club

The Greenwood Public Library’s adult summer reading club, “Basking in Books,” continues through Aug. 25. It is open to all 18 years and older or those who have graduated from high school. To participate, please register at the Greenwood Library and start reading or listening to your favorite books. Entry slips are filled out for each book enjoyed; these entry slips enter you in weekly drawings for prizes as well as for a grand prize to be awarded on Aug. 25. For further information, contact the Greenwood Library at 349-5309. The Greenwood Public Library is located at 100 Mill St., just east of the railroad tracks, in Greenwood.

IHOP Family Night every night

The Friends of the Bridgeville Library have another delicious fundraiser to promote. All you have to do is enjoy a meal at the Seaford, Dover, Rehoboth, or Salisbury IHOP locations, any day, any meal. Take and fill out the comment card; staple your receipt to the comment card and drop it off at the Bridgeville Library, Bridgeville Town Hall, or the Providence Sales Cottage in Heritage Shores. For more information, call Pat McDonald at 337-7192.

Trinity Golf Tournament

The 5th Annual Trinity Foundation Golf Tournament will be held Sept. 6 at Heritage Shores Golf Club in Bridgeville. The tournament is a charity event to raise money for the Trinity Foundation, a nonprofit organization founded in 2005 by the employees of Trinity Transport, Inc. In 2007 the tournament succeeding in raising over $20,000. Special thanks go out to our top sponsors so far for 2008, including Trinity Transport, Inc. and Discover Bank, with more expected to follow.

day morning with Miss Sherri. • The Georgetown Library will hold Wellness Wednesday on July 16 from 2-4 p.m. • The Georgetown Public Library will have a movie matinee every Friday at 2 p.m. starting the week of June 13 to Aug. 22.

Benefit nights

The Roadhouse Steak Joint is taking reservations for non-profit organizations benefit nights for the 2008-2009 season. Call 645-8273, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., 18693 Coastal Highway, Rehoboth Beach, www.roadhousesteakjoint.com

Lions Club Longaberger sale

The Delmar Lions Club is holding a Longaberger basket sale with all proceeds from the sale going to the local community and the visually impaired. Baskets, with blue and orange trim and Wildcat paws, cost $49 apiece. The price of the lid, with a Delmar and Wildcat logo, is $30. Liners and dividers are available upon request. For more information or to order a basket please contact King Lion Mildred Riley at 846-3846 or kragera@verizon.net.

Wii Bowling Tournament schedule

The Greenwood CHEER Center Wii™ Bowling Team, located at 12713 Sussex Hwy, in Greenwood, will be participating in a Wii™ Bowling tournament to be held at the Slaughter Neck CHEER Center located at 22942 Slaughter Neck Road, Lincoln on Friday, July 11. The games will begin at 10 a.m. These tournaments are practice tournaments for the centers leading up to a CHEER, Agency wide Wii™ Bowling Tournament that will be held in September. The center has open Wii™ bowling in the Greenwood CHEER Center from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. each day. Anyone over age 50 is welcome to come in and try the many games available and sign-up to participate in center competition. For more information or to register call Susan Welch at 302-349-5237.

Trap Pond Partners meets Georgetown Public Library events

The Georgetown Public Library will hold Story Time at 10:30 a.m. every Tues-

Trap Pond Partners (a volunteer nonprofit organization) meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Bald Cypress Nature Center at Trap Pond State Park, Laurel.

Sisterhood seminar

A Sisterhood seminar offered by Take My Hand Ministry, Inc. of Greenwood, will be held on Saturday, July 19, from 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. at VFW Post 7478 on Governors Avenue in Greenwood. Professor Darlene Spitzer-Antezana, a history professor at Prince George’s Community College in Maryland, will speak on the topic, “Impertinent Hussies and Ungrateful Wenches,” enslaved women’s resistance. Registration for the seminar will be $10 and will include the speaker’s honorarium, coffee and pastries and a continuing education certificate. There will be a lunch break at any of the Greenwood restaurants. Contact Dr. Michaele Russell for more information at 302-349-4220.

Eastern Shore

AFRAM FESTIVAL 2008

Friday & Saturday, August 8 & 9

Laurel Public Library events

• Wednesday, July 16, 6:30 p.m. - Storyteller Michael Forestieri presents “Crawly Things and Beetle Wings” • Wednesday, July 23, 6:30 p.m. “Magic & Wit & Bugs!” performed by Magician Mike Rose! • Wednesday, July 30, 2 p.m. - “Buggy about Sign Language” presented by signing storyteller Kathy McMillan For more information, drop by the Lau-

October from 1 p.m - 4 p.m. The museum is located at 102 William Street, Bridgeville.

Morning Star Publications will publish a schedule of events with advertising space for sponsors in the Thursday, August 7 issue of the Seaford/Laurel Star. Historical Society’s Museum

The Bridgeville Historical Society Museum will be open to the public on the first Sunday of each month from June to

CALL 302-629-9788 FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO RESERVE YOUR SPACE

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008 We are always looking for new members and ideas to improve our state park. To learn more, visit www.trappondpartners.com.

Democrats to meet

The 37th democrat district will meet Wednesday, July 31, 6 p.m., at the home of Tom Savage, 30821 Edgewater Drive, Edgewater Acres, Lewes. Meet the candidate for the 37th District, Helen Truitt and Mr. Savage, a candidate for Delaware Insurance Commissioner. Reservations are required (for food count) call Becky Breasure at 856-2173. Call candidate Savage for directions at 644-0563. To get information about being active in the 37th district contact District Chairman Tim Willard at 856-7777, or by email at Dem37District@aol.com

The group meets at the Cancer Care Center on the second Monday of the month from 4:30 to 6 p.m. For more information call Kaye or Lori at 645-9150. All programs at The Wellness Community are free of charge for people affected by cancer and their loved ones.

Coast Guard Auxiliary

Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 12-04 meets the second Thursday of each month at Nanticoke Yacht Club in Blades. Call Wayne Hickman at 629-6337 for details.

Laurel Senior Center Day trips

July 18 - Choptank Riverboat Luncheon Cruise at Suicide Bridge in East New Market. If interested you must have reservations, call 875-2536 for further information.

Senior Center trips

The next meeting of the Delaware Equine Council will be Monday, July 14, 7 p.m. at the Harrington Public library, Harrington. For more information, contact Stan 302-684-3966.

Nanticoke Senior Center’s Nashville and Memphis trip will take place on Sunday, Sept. 14 to Saturday Sept. 20. Cost is $850 double occupancy. Some of the sights you will see are Graceland, Grand Olé Opry, and Memphis Rock ‘n’ Soul Museum. For information call 629-4939. Trip includes motor coach transportation, tip for bus driver, snacks from center and dinner theatre.

Widowed Persons Meeting

Longaberger bus trip

Equine Council meets

The Seaford Chapter of the Widowed Persons Service will have its next meeting on Tuesday, July 15, at 12:15 p.m. at the Golden Corral. The planned guest speaker will be Sgt. Derrick Calloway of the Laurel Police Department. All widowed persons of all ages are invited to attend.

SCWDC meeting

The Sussex County Women's Democrat Club will hold its regular monthly meeting at 5:30 p.m. on July 17, at Sussex Pines Country Club, Georgetown. Guest Speaker Dr. Harriet Windsor, Delaware Secretary of State, will give an overview of the duties and responsibilities of the Secretary of State and the services that the Department of State provides. Members are asked to bring a friend and newcomers are always welcome. Dinner will cost $13 per person. For reservations, call Catherine King 628-4812 or e-mail Ladycdk@comcast.net.

Knitting Guild meets

All Knitters: The “Sea Purls” Chapter of The Knitting Guild Association meets on the first Wednesday of each month from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at The Cheer Center in Georgetown on the corner of Rt. 9 and Sand Hill Road. For more details call Joyce Smirk, Secretary, 302-732-6495. Lunch available.

Marine Corps meeting

The Marine Corps League meets the first Thursday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at the Log Cabin in Seaford.

Cancer support group

The Wellness Community-Delaware is offering a support group for people affected by cancer and their loved ones at the Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford.

New York, 5 p.m. Price $50, flat rate. For information contact Sister Paris Twyman, at 410-754-9135.

AARP Chapter #915 trips

• Branson, Mo - Sept. 13-20, cost is $875 per person. Call 410-822-2314. • New England/Vermont, NH, Boston and Salem, Oct. 13-19, cost is $1085 double, and $1335 single. Call 410-673-7856. • Myrtle Beach - Nov. 10-13, cost $430 per person. Call 410-754-8588.

Bus trip and cruise

Smith Island Cruise on Saturday, Aug. 23, includes: Bus transportation, Boat ride, and deluxe family-style dinner. The bus will be leaving from Roses parking lot in Denton, Md. Cost is $69 per person. Call ASAP for reservations, 410-822-2314

Seaford AARP Chapter 1084 trips

Democrat Club Picnic

The Western Sussex Democrat Club will hold its annual picnic Monday, July 14, at 6:30 p.m., at Dukes’ pool house, Sycamore Road, Laurel. There will be homemade ice cream and fried chicken, plus covered dishes provided by the club members. Elected officials and democrat candidates for office have been invited to attend.Newcomers to the area and guests are welcome. There might be a need for extra seating, so bring a folding chair. For further information call Joyce Schaefer at 629-2107 or Lynn Betts at 529-3949.

PAGE 19

Longaberger collectors will want to step aboard a bus trip to Boyd’s Bear Country in Gettysburg, Pa., for the Boyd’s Bear Country Basket Fest. Join Longaberger, America’s premier maker of handcrafted baskets, pottery and wrought iron at the World’s Most Humongous Teddy Bear Store for a fun-filled event that takes place Aug. 23. The bus will leave from the Seaford Village Shopping Center at 6 a.m. and return at 8 p.m. • A unique opportunity to weave your own Longaberger basket (not included in price of registration). • The Longaberger Factory Store with close to 10,000 square feet of retired and revered Longaberger baskets, pottery and wrought iron products available for purchase. • Longaberger Basket giveaways will take place every hour and much more! $59 per person (includes motor coach transportation, snack filled Longaberger Tote and door prizes). For more information and reservations call Renee Morris at 245-8842 or email at RGMorris93@comcast.net.

Bus trip to Nashville

Seaford will host a trip to Nashville, Tenn., Nov. 13-17. Cost of $799 per person/double occupancy includes lodging at the Opryland Hotel, performance of Radio City’s “Christmas Spectacular” featuring world-famous Rockettes, Fantasy in Ice, holiday dinner show featuring Louise Mandrell, most meals, motor-coach transportation and much more. For more information call Frances Horner at 629-4416

Bus trip to Jamaica, Queens

A bus trip to Jamaica, Queens, N.Y., on Saturday, Aug. 16, from Big Lots, Seaford. Bus will leave at 5 a.m. Departure from

These trips are all open to the public.… Sept. 24 - Wednesday. A day trip to Norfolk to cruise the water and have lunch (included) on board the “Spirit Of Norfolk.” Return to shore and next door you can tour the Nauticus, The National Maritime Center, The Battleship Wisconsin and the Hampton Roads Naval Museum. The cost is $78 and the bus leaves Peebles parking lot in Seaford at 7:30 a.m. Oct. 13-16 – New Hampshire White Mountains for four days. Stay in Laconia, N.H. at the Margate Resort Hotel with seven meals included. Cost: $650 per person, double occupancy. Visit Franconia Notch State Park, Chutter’s Store, Sugar Hill Sampler, Harman’s Cheese & Country Store, Hampton Pewter, and more. Have lunch (included) aboard The Café Lafayette Dinner Train during your to hour ride! Then ride the Lake Winnipesaukee Scenic Railroad before taking a cruise on a

230 foot, ship across Lake Winnipesaukee. You will also have time to shop and browse along Main Street in Wolfeboro village, America’s oldest Summer Resort. Contact Rose Wheaton at 6297180 for more information about these trips.

Adult Plus+ trips and activities

Get out and have some fun this summer by participating in one or more exciting trips and activities offered by the Adult Plus+ Program at Delaware Technical and Community College, Georgetown. Watch the unforgettable musical smash hit “Mamma Mia” on July 12 at the National Theater in Washington, D.C. On July 16, view the high energy musical “Footloose” at the Dutch Apple Dinner Theatre in Lancaster, Pa. Enjoy a day on your own in New York on July 23. Watch “Oklahoma” at Longwood Gardens on July 31 in Kennett Square, Pa. Bring out your artistic side by participating in art classes. Discover how easy using a digital camera can be in a one-session class on July 22 or July 29. From July 28 to Nov. 3, learn water exercises to help with symptoms associated with arthritis pain. Beginning July 28, take yoga to release tension and stress through meditation, breathing, and stretching exercises. For more information about these and other trips and activities, contact Delaware Tech’s Adult Plus+ Program at 856-5618. Submit Bulletin Board items by noon, Thursday. Send to Morning Star Publications - PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, email to editor@mspublications. com or drop off at 628 West Stein Hwy., Seaford.

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PAGE 20

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

Education Area students excel in SmartDrive For the second year, Sussex Technical High School was the winner of the South Contest in the online driver enhancement teenage driver program called SmartDrive, sponsored by Delmarva Broadcasting Company. To win the honor, Sussex Tech had the highest percentage of performance of schools signed up for the contest in Kent and Sussex counties. For their commitment, Sussex Tech received $1,500 that was used for the school’s prom. Three Sussex Tech students also received top individual awards in the contest. Brian Saunders of Delmar and Dustin Hitchens of Laurel tied for second place

among all the students in the South Contest, just missing the top spot by one point. Besides a trophy, each received theme park tickets. Named Sussex Tech’s SmartDrive Student of the Year was Tyler Justice of Seaford. He received four tickets to the concert of his choice. SmartDrive is a free-online program designed especially for students who already have their driver’s license. The program’s road rally series is a set of online modules which challenges young driver’s experience with road rules, judging and general common sense.

Harley Davidson of Ocean City and Seaford, along with the Delmarva Shorebirds, present Bike Night at the Shorebirds on Saturday, July 12. Players and coachers will wear the above jersey, which will be a part of a silent auction to benefit the Spuck and Lib Bennett Scholarship Fund.

Auction during Shorebirds game will benefit Bennett scholarship Delmarva Shorebirds fans, motorcycle enthusiasts and memorabilia collectors will come together for a common goal — education — at Arthur W. Perdue Stadium on Saturday, July 12. Delmarva Shorebirds players and coaches will wear unique Harley-Davidson of Ocean City jerseys during their game with the Augusta Greenjackets. During the contest, which begins at 7:05 p.m., everyone is welcome to view a sample jersey and participate in a silent auction of a limited-edition jersey. Around the sixth inning, people who are entered in the silent auction will be able to participate in a live auction for the final moments of the event. Proceeds benefit the Spuck and Lib Bennett Scholarship Fund, which is awarded to a student entering the field of education. Special VIP tickets will be on

sale until Thursday, July 10, or until they are sold out. The jersey auction is part of Bike Night at the Shorebirds. Riders are encouraged to purchase tickets from Harley-Davidson of Ocean City and Seaford that entitles the holder to VIP motorcycle parking at the stadium, the best seat in the house in the Hardball Café behind home plate including the two hour buffet, and a special pregame parade around the warning track with your motorcycle. After the game, there will be fireworks sponsored by Froggy 99.9 and CloseCall America. While special Bike Night tickets are available at the two Harley-Davidson dealerships in advance, regular game tickets will be available at the gate. For more information, visit www.theshorebirds.com or www.hdoceancity.com.

SmartDrive program coordinator Karen Busby (far left), presents awards to Sussex Tech students for their accomplishments in the annual contest. They are: Tyler Justice of Seaford, in-school winner; Dustin Hitchens of Laurel who tied with Brian Saunders of Delmar (not shown) for second place in the South contest; and Assistant Principal Robin Andrus who accepted the top school award.

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PHYSICAL THERAPY AIDES - Physical Therapy Aide students who recently graduated from the Sussex Tech Adult Division Certificate Program completed 156 hours of instruction in anatomy, medical terminology, ethics, confidentiality laws, and more. Graduates can work closely with a physical therapist. Graduates include, from left, seated, Lorraine Smallwood, Milford; Orelie Dice, Seaford; Amanda Sizemore, Bridgeville; and Martha Ross, Berlin, Md.; standing – Bryant Miller, Harbeson; and Henry Glowiak, Lewes. Not pictured is Karly Bolon, Pittsville, Md., and Jennifer Norwood, Seaford.

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

PAGE 21

Picking a new superintendent was an in-depth process After a process that started back in the winter, the Laurel School District has hired a superintendent, Dr. John McCoy. This was a very in-depth process as the district, through the board, went through a long interviewing process to arrive at a candidate that will be part of Laurel’s schools for a long time. I will say no more at this time, but the story is there for you to read on page one.

PAT MURPHY The district went through a long interviewing process to arrive at a candidate that will be part of Laurel’s schools for a long time.

The Harvesters, a well-known gospel group, will be at Sailors Path United Methodist Church in Bethel on Friday, July 11, at 7:30 p.m. Charlotte Givens has asked me if I would say something about this, as it is a great event for their church. Only problem, it is on such short notice as the group is traveling through. I think I can assure you that Charlotte will not be singing with them, which should encourage you to go. Also on Saturday evening there will be a commissioning service for apostle-elect Catherine A. Camper at the Bible Center Complex on Rt. 9. For more information call Pastor Carla Wongus at 875-9721. All are invited!

Laurel’s 14th annual 4th of July celebration is now history and for the first time ever the fireworks got rained out as a storm came in just before the 9 p.m. starting time. No matter — it was held the next night and judging from the cars around town the spectators were close to as many as usual. Tom Temple, Jerry and Maxine Lynch, Michael Lynch, and several others were gathered around Tom seated in his lawn chair before the parade, Thursday, trading barbs back and forth as only Tom can do. “What time are you going to get this parade started?” said a caustic Tom. “As soon as Santa Claus gets here,” I answered.

DNREC sinks tugboats to help reef With the deployment of the three tugboats last week, the total of eight tugboats and barges now reside there. In addition, the site holds 86 retired tanks and armored personnel carriers and 3,000 tons of ballasted truck tires. Two more vessels are scheduled to be sunk on “Redbird Reef” later this summer. Reef construction is especially important in the Mid-Atlantic region, where the ocean bottom is usually featureless sand or mud. Recycled materials, including concrete pipe and other concrete products, ballasted tire units, subway cars and decommissioned military vehicles and vessels, have been sunk off the Delaware coast. Using these materials saves landfill space and allows them to serve in a productive capacity for hundreds of years past their originally intended use. For more information, contact Jeff Tinsman, environmental scientist, at 302739-4782.

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summer away from school. I’m talking to the older generation now. What did we have? Come to think of it, we did have these “Tiny Transistor Radio’s,” as the song goes. Let’s see — we played ball, stayed in the shade, rode our bicycles and most afternoons we played one of the most expensive games around. Kids from my East Sixth Street neighborhood, including Bobby Carmean, Chuckie Lewis, Jerry Murphy, Jim Dorman, Ronnie Williams, Mark King (who came down from Wilmington to stay with his grandparents), Randy Wiley, Artie Register, Vance Carmean, Barry Harding and probably several more played the great game of Kick The Can. Any old can would do, but I clearly remember lofting that Campbell’s Soup can far enough that several of us made it to the back of the hatchery before being found. Many a time it was dark or close to it before we got that call to “get in this house right away, it’s almost dark.” Yes, life changes for each generation and I hope we can continue to provide nice things for future generations, if not – there’s always “kick the can.” And an old used soup can is very inexpensive.

I see all these kids of today with handheld video games, phones, I-Pods and more to keep them occupied during their

Have a great week and enjoy the local produce. It’s part of the gift of living on the eastern shore.

Remember, the block opens for the 68th year today, Thursday, the 10, according to block manager, Tom Wright.

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Three retired tugboats were sunk last week 16 nautical miles off the coast to enhance Delaware’s most popular and heavily fished artificial reef sites. The sinkings on Redbird Reef added recycled materials to the ocean floor that will ultimately improve fisheries habitat, increase marine biodiversity and provide fishing and diving opportunities for decades. “Our survey shows that Redbird Reef has as many as 13,000 angler-trips each year,” said Jeffrey Tinsman, reef program manager with DNREC’s Fisheries Section. “The reef has proven to be a favorite of many recreational anglers, providing excellent fishing for black sea bass and summer flounder.” Redbird Reef is Delaware’s only named reef site, because 714 New York City Redbird subway cars were sunk there since 2001. Development of the site has been on-going since 1995 and now covers 1.3 square nautical miles of ocean bottom.

“Figures,” said Tom, ”that’s the way they do things in Laurel. “ About ten minutes into the parade here comes Santa Claus walking past us. Tom’s mouth and eyes got real big as he exclaimed, “I’m not going to mess with you Laurel folks anymore!” Ninety-five entries were in the parade and there was a great turnout. Everyone seems to like the evening parade idea. The winners are posted elsewhere in the paper, but I do want to mention Carey’s, who won for the best-decorated vehicle. They put in such a great effort each and every year — not to win a trophy or necessarily to be seen — but to be a part of the success of the event. They do that year after year. Also, my hat is off to my great friend, Mr. Joe Conaway. He is the three-time winner of the Seed Spitting Contest. What can I say? He is full of hot air, he’s the man, ol’ seedy himself. Just having a little fun with you, Joe. You beat a worthy opponent in John Outten, a two-time winner. I’m still not sure if there was not a west wind at your back when you sent the seeds sailing. The parade went off without a problem and first, Mike Lowe, Gerald Brown and now “Bo” Brittingham has handled this thankless job like a professional. Good job by “Bo” and his crew!

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Mail to the Seaford/Laurel Star Circulation, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE or call Karen at 302-629-9788

The Insurance Market Inc. Financial Service Center PO Box 637, 400 South Central Ave., Laurel, DE 19956 Securities and Investment Advisory Services offered through Woodbury Financial Services, Inc., Member FINRA, SPIC, and Registered Investment Adviser. Woodbury Financial Services, Inc. and IM Financial Services are not affiliated entities.

PAGE 22

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

Church Bulletins St. John’s multicultural services

Old Christ Church schedule

LRAC seeks help for food crisis

Laurel Baptist Church VBS

Siempre Verde, a multicultural, bilingual service is being led by Pastor Luis Almandoz on Sunday afternoons at 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall at St. John’s United Methodist Church at Pine and Poplar streets, Seaford. Praise music, powerful preaching and a small meal unite this fellowship of persons of both Hispanic and Anglo origins. Alberto Mendez leads worship on the keyboard.

July 13, 20, 27 - 9:30 a.m., morning prayer Aug. 3 - 9:30 a.m., Holy Euch Aug. 10, 17, 24, 31 - 9:30 a.m., morning prayer Sept. 7 - 9:30 a.m., Holy Eucharist Sept. 14, 21, 28 - 9:30 a.m., morning prayer Oct. 7 - 10 a.m., blessing of the animals, morning prayer

Laurel Baptist Church will be having their “Outriggers Island” Vacation Bible School from July 13-18 (ages three years to Grade 6). Kickoff Sunday will be at 6 p.m., Monday-Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Finalé will be on Friday, 7 p.m. For further information call Shirley at 875-2314.

Ladies’ bible study

Celebrate Recovery

There is a ladies’ bible study, held every Tuesday starting at 10 a.m., at Laurel Baptist Church, Bi-State Boulevard in Laurel. This bible study is a non-denominational study, only God’s Word is studied, making us to be more like Christ. Should you have any questions regarding the study, feel free to call Gertrude R. Smith at 875-5300.

Celebrate Recovery, a step program which claims Jesus Christ as its Higher Power, is meeting at St. John’s United Methodist Church, Pine and Poplar streets, on Tuesday evenings from 7-9 p.m. This program is open to persons who wish to turn over their hurts, habits, and hang-ups to God such that they may be healed. For more information, call Rev. Constance Hastings, 629-9466, or Robert Spadaccini, 841-1720.

The Lewes-Rehoboth Association of Churches is asking the community to consider a short-term need at the Cape Henlopen Food Basket. The recent theft of trucks from the Delaware Food Bank will affect the availability of chicken for the Food Basket for the next month. Since the association will probably have to buy from local supermarkets, the costs will go up. The Lewes-Rehoboth Association of Churches would appreciate any financial donations community members can make to help cover this crisis. Donations can be mailed to Cape Henlopen Food Basket, P.O. Box 567, Nassau, DE 19969. All donations are tax exempt.

The Lighthouse Rising gas prices, wars and rumors of wars, rising food prices, it’s all so frightening. Come join Rebecca Jones as she presents “God’s Deliverance and Provision,” Wednesdays at 7 p.m., at The Lighthouse Church, 27225 Kaye Road, Laurel. Find out how the Bible can show you how to live and face hardships today. Pastor Timothy Jones provides kid’s church for grades K-6, and a nursery is available. Call 875-7814.

Commissioning service A commissioning service for ApostleElect Catherine A. Camper will be held Saturday, July 12, at 4 p.m. The Rev. Doctor Catherine A. Camper is bishop and founder of United Deliverance Bible Center. Join us in the celebration at the Bible Center Complex, Catherine A. Camper Auditorium, Rt. 9, 1208 County Seat Highway, Laurel. For more information or to place an ad, contact: Apostle Keith Wongus, 258-4639 or Pastor Carla Wongus, 875-9721.

Grace Baptist Power Lab We’ve got the solution to Summertime Boredom….Send your kids to Power Lab where they’ll discover Jesus’ miraculous power at Grace Baptist Church, 805 Atlanta Rd, Seaford. Each night kids will take part in fun Bible learning they can see, hear, touch, and even taste. Bible point crafts, teambuilding games, lively Bible songs, and super supper are just a few of the Power Lab activities that help faith flow into real life. Every night kids choose a daily challenge, an exciting way to live out what they’ve learned. Power Lab is great fun for children ages 3 through 5th grade, so mark July 13-17, 6-8:15 p.m. Registration begins July 13 at 5:30 p.m.

‘Dining to Donate’ Booker Street Church of God, Georgetown, will sponsor a “Dining to Donate” event at Applebee’s Restaurant in Rehoboth Beach, from Monday, July 14, to Thursday, July 17, in support of its “Realizing The Vision” building campaign. You are invited to come and enjoy a delicious meal (special flyers are to be presented at checkout) and 10 percent of the proceeds will benefit the building fund. Members will greet you on Monday, July 14 from 6 to 9 p.m. Call Peggy at 856-3404 or 8569097 to receive special flyers or to donate.

God’s Big Backyard VBS This year, Christ United Methodist Church and Centenary United Methodist Church will team up and give Vacation Bible School children, ages 3 through grade 6, an opportunity to serve in “God’s Big Backyard.” This joint Vacation Bible School will be held July 14-18, from 68:15 p.m. at Centenary Church, at the corner of Poplar and Market streets in Laurel. Pre-registration is required, and can be accomplished by calling Jill Todd at 8758829, or the church office at 875-4233 or 875-3983.

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship TRINITY UNITED METHODIST Trap Pond, CHURCH NearLaurel, Del. 875-7715 Sun. School 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pastor Julie A. Lewis

“A caring church, a giving church, a sharing church; showing love, warmth and friendship to all.”

St. John’s United Methodist Church Pine & Poplar Sts., Seaford 302-629-9466 E-mail: st_johns@verizon.net NURSERY & HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

SUNDAY WORSHIP 8:30 & 11:15 am Traditional 9:45 Sunday School 10:00 am Hearts Afire (Contemporary) Come as you are… and be transformed in the love of Christ!

Centenary United Methodist Church “Where Caring is Sharing” “NEW SONG!” - Contemporary Celebration, 8:45 a.m. Sunday School, Classes for ALL ages, 9:45 a.m. Traditional Family Worship, 11:00 a.m.

Rev. K. Wayne Grier, Pastor, 875-3983 200 W. Market St., Laurel, Del.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

1010 S. Central Ave., Laurel Ph: 875-7748 Worship Services: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. Bible Study: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m. In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 510 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE Rev. Donna Hinkle, Pastor Church: 875-4233 Sunday Services: 8:30am Praise 9:30am Sunday School,11am Worship

DIAL DAILY DEVOTIONS: 875-4309

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching

Youth Group Wednesday 7:00 pm

Worship 10:45 a.m. • Sun. School 9:45 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Camp Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

Christian Church of Seaford Dual 13N., Seaford, DE • 629-6298 Minister: John Herbst SCHEDULE OF SERVICES Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Morning Worship 10:30 Wed. Night Service & (Nursery & Jr. Church) Youth Groups 7:00 p.m. A Firm Foundation • A Sure Hope • An Unending Love

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church & Old Christ Church

“A Place to Belong”

600 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE 19956 (302) 875-3644 Rev. Rita B. Nelson, Rector www.dioceseofdelaware.net/churches/stphlps.html Holy Eucharist with Healing and Church School ~ Sunday @ 9:30 am

SUNDAY WEDNESDAY Underground Family Worship (7-12 grade) 6:15 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Sunday School 9:00 a.m. Prayer Team ‘The Table’ God’s Big Back Yard (last Wed. of mo) 7:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m.

94 Walnut St. Laurel, DE 19956

875-7873

Centrally located at 14511 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE 19956 Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. FasTrak Children’s Ministry - 10:30 a.m.; E318 Youth - 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Services - 7 p.m.

For info, call 875.7995 or visit www.centralworshipcenter.org

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road 68, South of Laurel Laurel, Del.

Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m. www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

Thank You to the churches that sponsor these pages. Your contribution makes it possible for the “Good News” to be published each week.

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

Laurel Church of Christ VBS Laurel Church of Christ announces its Vacation Bible School. “The Pirates Who Don’t Do Anything” - A Veggie Tales VBS, will set sail at Laurel Church of Christ July 14-18 from 6 to 8:45 p.m. Kids from age five through those entering fifth grade next fall are invited for a funfilled week exploring what it means to be a true hero for God. For more information, call 875-7748.

John O’Day in Concert John O’Day of Georgetown will be in concert at Blades United Methodist Church, Market and Fourth Streets, on Sunday, July 13, at 11 a.m. Join us for this special service. Light fare will follow.

Mary & Martha Tea Room The Mary & Martha Tea Room will meet on July 16, from 2-4 p.m. at 102 Maryland Ave. in Greenwood. The guest speaker will be the Rev. Maleia Rust who serves the UMC in Trappe, Md. She is a native of Greenwood. There will be a light lunch served, ministry time, and a free will offering for the guest speaker. The Mary & Martha Tea Room is a women’s ministry. For more information contact Dr. Michaele Russell at 302-349-4220.

Gospel Music Festival St. Paul’s United Methodist Church in Laurel, will host its first annual Gospel Music Festival on July 19. There will be plenty of music beginning at 5:30 p.m., with Don Murray and friends. Also, singing at the festival will be Amanda Jones, St. Paul’s youth and junior church, Sounds of Joy, Don Murray Family, and the Lights of Home. Food will be available starting at 5 p.m. - hot dogs, hamburgers and homemade ice cream will be on sale. All proceeds will go to benefit the St. Paul’s Youth Program. Bring your appetite and your lawn-chair, as the program will be outside. Rain date is July 26.

Spiritual walk or bike ride The second annual walk or bike ride sponsored by Y.P.D. at Mt. Pisgah A.M.E. Church, Townsend Street, Laurel, will be held on Saturday, July 19, from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. For bikers, a round trip from Mt. Pisgah Church to Trap Pond State Park; for walkers, laps in the Laurel Park. Water stops and refreshment provided. All monies raised will benefit the U.P.D.

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For more information, contact Suzette Carter at 302-280-6526 or Gloria Gillespie 875-5799.

Alliance Church VBS “Amazon Expedition” is the theme of this year’s Vacation Bible School at the Atlanta Road Alliance Church, July 21-25, from 9 a.m. to noon. Children age 4 through those that have completed the sixth grade are invited to attend an exciting week of exploring the 7C’s of history: Creation, Corruption, Catastrophe, Confusion, Christ, Cross and Consummation. Pre-registration of children is requested. Registration forms may be picked up from the church foyer or obtained online by visiting www.atlantaroadcma.org. For more information, call the church at 629-5600. The Atlanta Road Alliance Church is a Christian & Missionary Alliance church located at 22625 Atlanta Road in Seaford, approximately 1-1/2 miles north of the intersection of Stein Highway and Atlanta Road.

Mount Pisgah AME Church benefit On Saturday, July 26, at 4 p.m., Mount Pisgah A.M.E. Church, on Townsend Street, Laurel, will host a Fashion Extravaganza show to benefit the Usher Board. Clothing will be modeled by members of the church, as well as other members of the community. All money from a good-will offering will go to support the ushers of Mt. Pisgah. Tickets are $5 for ages 12 and under and $10 for adults. If you would like to know more about the Fashion Extravaganza or interested in modeling in the show, contact Mrs. Jackie Chasse at 875-6526.

Bethel Charge VBS Bethel Charge will hold their Vacation Bible School Aug. 4 through Aug. 8. It will be held at Mt. Zion United Methodist Church located on Seaford Laurel Highway from 9-11:30 a.m. The theme this year is God’s Big Back Yard. Bethel charge consists of three churches which are Portsville, Mt. Zion and Sailor’s Bethel. If interested and first time visitor, preregister by calling 875-2713. We are blessed to have National storyteller Michael Forestieri as our guest. If you like, visit him at www.tellitlikeitis.com.

Mary & Martha Tea Room There is a change for the Mary & Martha Tea Room for the month of Au-

New Release ‘A Box of Memories’ on Sale Tony Windsor

A Box of Memories

Tony Windsor’s brand new CD compilation, “A Box of Memories” is on sale now. This 17-song CD features performances of songs including, “Only Make Believe,” “He Stopped Loving Her Today,” and the gospel classic, “In the Garden.” Get your copy at the Seaford Star office for only $5.00. Call: 302-236-9886

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor WEDNESDAY SUNDAY Sunday School......9:45 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Worship...............11:00 a.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Youth Group 6:00-8 p.m.

Messiah’s Vineyard Church Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel 302-875-4646 PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

Dr. Carl G Vincent, Senior Minister Pastor Barry B. Dukes, Music Minister Sunday 9:30 am Wednesday 7:00 pm Children’s Church • Nursery

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Youth Minister: James Hollis Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

27225 Kaye Road Laurel, DE 19956 Ph: (302) 875-7814

www.thelighthouselaurel.org Timothy P. Jones, Pastor Sunday Family Worship - 10:00 a.m. Wednesday Family Ministries - 7:00 p.m.

“Shining His Light”

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591 MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30 p.m.

“The Pickle Church” CHRIST THE CORNERSTONE COMMUNITY CHURCH PICKLE MINISTRIES OUTREACH & CORNERSTONE NOTE MUSIC MINISTRY Corner of Bethel Rd. & Alt. 13 • 302-875-8150 Church School -All Ages - 9:15 a.m. Worship Service - 10:00 a.m. Rev. Rick Elzey • Pastor Doris Whaley Wings of Prayer - Tues. 7:00 p.m. Come Join Our Family

VICTORY TABERNACLE CHURCH OF GOD

SUNDAY WORSHIP 11 AM and 6 PM ~ Sunday School 9:45 AM

WEDNESDAY NIGHT Ministry for the whole family 7 PM

Pastor Stacey Johnson 28261 Seaford Rd., Laurel, 2 miles N. of Laurel on Alt. 13

302-877-0443

The Atlanta Road Alliance Church 22625 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE (302) 629-5600 • www.atlantaroadcma.org Rev. Edward J. Laremore, Sr. Pastor David A. Krilov, Associate Pastor

CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH

315 N. Shipley St., Seaford, DE 19973 • 302-629-9755 Pastor: Rev. Andrew C. Watkins www.christlutheranseaford.com

Praise Worship 8:30 AM • Sunday School 9:30 AM • Traditional Worship 11 AM

ROCK CHURCH

SUNDAY WEDNESDAY 8:30 Worship 6:45 Pioneer Clubs (age 3 9:45 Sunday School thru grade 6) & Divorce Care® 11:00 Worship/Kids Church 7:00 Prayer Service & Youth 7:00 Evening Service Group (grades 7-12)

30320 Seaford Road, Laurel, Del. Ph: 875-7275 • Pastor Bill Konkel Sunday School: 9 a.m. Worship: 10:30 a.m. & 1st & 3rd Sunday Evening: 5 p.m. Thurs Evening Prayer: 7 p.m.

COKESBURY CHURCH

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church

All Welcome Where Love Abides -- John 3:16

The Church by the Side of the Road 15092 Cokesbury Rd, Georgetown, DE (302) 629-5222 • www.cokesburywc.org Pastor Harold Carmean & Congregation Sunday School 9 am Contemporary Church Service 10 am

Mount Olivet United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School

Pastor: Rev. Jim Sipes • 302-629-4458 PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

Laurel Wesleyan Church Rt. 13A, Just North of Laurel Sunday School - 9:30 Worship - 9:00 & 10:45 Sunday Evening Worship Wed. Youth Ministries 6:30 p.m. Thurs. WKID, The Zone Children’s Ministries 6:30 Church 875-5380 • Sr. Pastor Ken Deusa Asst. Pastor/Youth: Sue Boyce Children’s Pastor: Marilyn Searcey

629-7979 Holy Eucharist: 9:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Forum: 10:30 a.m. Thurs. Eve. Service: 6 p.m. Front & King St., Seaford, DE

The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby-Coladonato, Rector

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - Anthony Melakian - 629-3633 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

A Gathering Of Faith Come together under Christ’s roof and share together in his love. Attend Church this Sunday

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MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

gust, only. Due to Dr. Michaele Russell having a scheduling conflict in August, the Tea Room will convene on the first Wednesday of August, the 6th, from 2-4 p.m., at 102 Maryland Ave., Greenwood. A light lunch will be served, a freewill offering will be taken for the guest speaker, and a time of prayer and ministry will follow. The guest speaker will be Pastor Joyce Mizzelle of Grace-N-Mercy in Greenwood. For more information contact Dr. Michaele Russell at 302-349-4220.

Fifteenth Annual Tent Services Everlasting Hope Ministries is pleased to announce the schedule for this year's 15th Annual Tent Services. The services will be held Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, August 12, 13 and 14; Saturday, Aug. 16; and Sunday, Aug. 17. All services will be held under the big tent on the grounds of the Booker Street Church of God. Services will begin 7 p.m. nightly. There will be two services on Sunday at 11:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. The purpose of these meetings is to encourage individuals whose lives have been adversely affected by drugs and /or alcohol. The guest speaker each night will present a timely message to inspire and challenge those in attendance not only to resist

Obituaries Brittany D. Thompson, 18 Brittany “Bee Bee” D. Thompson of Seaford was lifted safely into the arms of Jesus on Friday, June 20, 2008, at Peninsula Regional Medical Center, in Salisbury, Md. Brittany or “Bee Bee,” as she was affectionately called was a young lady who loved family and life. She attended the Brittany Thompson Dagsboro Church of God, in Millsboro. Bee Bee would have entered into the 12th grade in August, but instead she entered into “Heaven’s Graduate School.” As a student at Laurel High School, prior THE FAMILY OF

G. Lee Hastings wishes to express our sincere gratitude to everyone who sent cards, came to visit, for their phone calls, sent flowers to our house, an abundance of food, spoke words of understanding and expressions of sympathy during this very difficult time. Your kindnesses and support will always be remembered. With Love And Appreciation To All Of You. Irene P. Hastings

drugs/alcohol but also to strive for individual excellence through a personal relationship with Christ. The speakers are as follows: Tuesday, Aug. 12 - Pastor Jesse Abbott from New Dimension Family Worship Center, Salisbury, Md.; Wednesday, Aug. 13 - Bishop Jamie Hazzard from Welcome Full Gospel Holiness Church, Slaughter Neck; Thursday, Aug. 14, Pastor Levin Bailey from Pilgrim’s Ministry of Deliverance, Georgetown; Saturday, Aug. 16, Evangelist Frank Gibbs from Calvary Pentecostal Church, Bishopville, Md.; and Sunday, Aug. 17, Morning Service (11:30 a.m.), Bishop Marvin Morris, Host Pastor, Booker Street Church of God, Georgetown, and Evening Service (5 p.m.), Pastor Arlene Taylor, Chosen Generation Ministries, Grasonville, Md. Everyone is welcome to attend. For more information, contact Minister Anthony Neal at 302-854-6692 or call the Booker Street Church of God at 302-856-9097.

Community Anti-Drug Rally March and Fun Day to be The Fourteenth Annual Community Anti-Drug Rally and March will be held Saturday, Aug. 16. The march will begin at 11 a.m. from the grounds of the Booker Street Church of God, located on Booker Street near the Richard Allen School.

Obituaries are run without charge thanks to the support of area churches

to going to Seaford, and at Seaford High School, she was involved in the following school activities: chorus, drama club, a player on the intramural basketball team, in the production of the high school’s musical “Grease” (where she played Marty), and she was a member of the step team. Bee Bee enjoyed doing hair, creating new hair-styles, singing, drawing, talking on the telephone with friends, and she dearly loved babies. Everyone who met her, loved her. To know her was to love her, and no one was a stranger to her. Our Brittany was predeceased by her beautiful three-month-old baby niece, Klista. She leaves to cherish her earthly memories, and to constantly reflect on memories of her in heaven the following: her loving mother with whom she resided, Nina

THE HARVESTERS QUARTET - The Harvesters Quartet, from Sanford, N.C., will be making a one-night appearance at Sailors Path United Methodist Church in Bethel, on Friday, July 11, at 7:30 p.m. No admission is charged, but a love offering will be taken. Although the members have changed this well-known Gospel group continues with their singing, something they have done since 1953. The singers consist of bass Jim Collins, baritone Allan Hunter, lead singer Danny Parker and first tenor Howard Chandler. The group has always worked to maintain the sincerity and dedication handed down to them, never forgetting their responsibility to their God and their friends. You are invited to come and hear this fine group on July 11, at the church.

The purpose of the rally and march is to send a positive message to the entire community, especially to youth, that says yes to life and no to drugs. Participants will be carrying signs and spreading their anti-drug message through the streets of Georgetown. The march will return to the church grounds, where Fun Day activities will be held from noon until 4 p.m.

There will be games, food, dunking booth, moon bounce, train rides, drill teams, creative dance teams, and so much more. Free T-shirts will be provided by Everlasting Hope Ministries. For more information, contact Minister Anthony Neal at 302-854-6692 or call the Booker Street Church of God at 302-8569097.

Thompson Pullum of Seaford; her father, Le’mmon Pitts of Milford; and her stepfather, Richard Pullum of Seaford; one brother, Branden Thompson of Seaford; three sisters: Danielle and Meghan Thompson of Seaford, and Mabia Thompson of Laurel; her maternal grandmother, Adalee James Gumby of Seaford; paternal grandmother, Pearl Pitts of Milford; a special niece, Saniyah; and a special nephew, Jayden Thompson, whom she devoted much time and love to; her maternal aunt, Stephanie and husband Robert Parker; maternal uncles, Joseph and wife Katie

Thompson and Rick Murray; paternal aunts, Sallie, Joann, Pearl, and Rosalee Pitts; paternal uncles, Norman, Howard, Brooks, Linwood, Josh, Michael, and Chester Pitts; as well as a host of other loving and dedicated relatives and friends. Funeral services were held Tuesday at Citadel of Hope Church, Seaford, where the Rev. Gwendolyn Fountain delivered the eulogy. Friends called Monday at the church, prior to the funeral. Interment was in the Macedonia Cemetery in Seaford. Donations may be made c/o Nina T.

Union United Methodist Church 2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 Handicap Friendly WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.)

BETHEL WORSHIP CENTER 9431 Ginger Lane, Seaford (2.4 mi. north of Wal-Mart on US 13) 628-4240 Recorded Info 628-4241 Church Office

Pastor Joseph Lecates - 875-2059 Adult Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:30 am Nursery 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Youth Meeting Sun. 7 pm Promise Keepers Tues. 7 pm Wed. Night Bible Study 7 pm “We’re not building a church, we’re building God’s Kingdom!”

Welcome… The Family of Teresa Littleton would like to express our appreciation to all those who loved and supported Teresa throughout her illness. Also, thank you for the cards, flowers, food and expressions of sympathy during our recent loss. Teresa’s Family

SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday School 9 am Morning Worship 10 am

701 Bridgeville Road 629-9077

“Welcome Home!”

Wesley United Methodist Church 22025 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE Pastor James Bongard Contemporary Worship 9 am Sunday School & Bible Education 10 am Traditional Worship 11 am Wednesday Worship 6:45 pm 302-629-3029 * Info Line 302-628-0112

743 E. Clarence St., Seaford, Del. Carlton L. Cannon, Sr. Paster

629-9443, Cell: 448-0852 • cogclarence@verizon.net Sunday: Midweek Activities: Church School........9:45 am Call for Details Morning Worship......11 am Children’s Church & Youth Explosion ........6 pm Nursery Provided Evening Worship.........7 pm *Counseling by appt. only Tuesday: Thursday: Bible Study & Family Corporate Prayer.........7 pm ‘Come and Grow with Us!’ Training Hour...........7 pm

Laurel Baptist Church, SBC Where everybody is somebody & Jesus Christ is Lord 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, Laurel, DE 19956 LBC Sunday School ~ 10:00 Morning Worship ~ 11:00 Wednesday Bible Study ~ 7:00 P.M. Nursery Provided Pastor: Rev. Steven Booth Music Director: Linda Lewis

302-875-7998

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008 Pullum to the headstone Fund of Brittany Thompson. All of her friends were asked to wear something with “Sponge Bob Squarepants” on it, as this was Brittany’s favorite character. Professional services were handled by: Deborah E. Harris-Nock Funeral Services, Greenwood.

Olen Cleveland Givens, 86 Olen Cleveland Givens of Westminster Village, Dover; formerly of Frederica, went home to be with the Lord on Wednesday, July 2, 2008, at Bay Health, Kent General Hospital in Dover. Born in Laurel, he was a son of Nellie Mae Hitchens and Orian Cleveland Givens, who predeceased him. He was a master carpenter for the State of Delaware, retiring in 1983. He was a World War II Army veteran, and a member of American Legion Post 7, Harrington. He received an award from the State of Delaware for Delaware Historical Preservation and he also received an award from the Dagsboro Delaware Historical Society for the restoration of Prince George’s Church, which was originally built in the 1700s and is now a national historical site. In addition to his parents, he was also preceded in death by his wife, Mary Ann Johnson Givens in 2005; a son, Lloyd C. Givens in 1991; a brother, Melvin Givens and three sisters; Evelyn Smallacome, Elsie Bruisewitz and Georgia Timmons. He is survived by two sons, Robert O. Givens and wife Sharon L. of Felton, and Floyd M. Givens and wife Jeanine of Dover; three daughters, Rita Mae Overton and husband Dennis of Georgetown, Nancy Ann Hurley and husband Bill of Seaford, and Joan S. Jones and husband Douglas of Bridgeville; one brother, Monroe Givens and wife Frances, of Concord; eight grandchildren, Cindy Van Vorst, Vicki Givens, Denise Hurley, Christine Overton, Dawn Overton, Andrew Givens, Brian Givens and Jamie Jones; and 10 greatgrandchildren. Funeral services were on Sunday, July 6, in Watson-Yates Funeral Home, where friends called prior to the service. The Rev. Roland E. Tice officiated. Burial was in Bethel Cemetery, Oak Grove.

Alice Marie Phillips, 93 Alice Marie Phillips of Seaford died Sunday, June 29, 2008, at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury, Md. She was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., a daughter of Louis A. and Emma A. Benson on Nov. 2, 1914. At the age of 45, after her husband died, she went back to school with a high school diploma and graduated from SUNY at Stonybrook with a masters degree in liberal arts and from the University of Adelphi with a masters degree in library science. She was then employed in Selden, Long Island, N.Y., as a librarian for 14 years at the Middle County School District and by the Seldon Public Library for five years. For many years, she traveled the world on sabbatical leaves with her best friend, Edna Hayes, of Long Island, N.Y., enjoying life to its fullest. She loved her family, people, and politics; and always put others before herself. Her greatest love of all was reading to groups of children.

Though her 90s, Mrs. Phillips most recently enjoyed surfing the web and sending and receiving emails. Mrs. Phillips is survived by her daughter, Janet Phillips of Port Jefferson, N.Y.; a son, Roy E. Phillips of Seaford; and a brother, Bill Benson of Valley Stream, N.Y. She is also survived by three grandchildren; Nicholas Phillips, Forest Phillips, and Lynn Fannin; and a great-grandson, Austin Joseph Fannin. There are no services. Arrangements were handled by Parsell Funeral Enterprises, Inc., Bridgeville.

Pauline P. Wright, 90 Pauline P. Wright of Seaford died on Wednesday, July 02, 2008 at home. Mrs. Wright was a homemaker and attended St. John’s United Methodist Church and Mt. Olivet United Methodist Church. Her husband Walter M. Wright died in 1992. She is survived by two daughters, Paulette Harding and her husband Raymond of Seaford and Renee Smith of Bridgeville; three sons, Walter “Mickey” Wright and his wife Bonnie of Easton, Md., William “Henry” Wright and his wife Diane of Federalsburg, Md., and Phillip R. Wright of Federalsburg. Six grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren also survive her. Friends called at the Cranston Funeral Home, Seaford, on Sunday evening, July 6. Funeral Services and Burial were private. The family suggests donations may be made to Delaware Hospice Inc., 100 Patriots Way, Milford, DE 19963.

Nancie R. Wyman, 69 Nancie R. Wyman of Blades died on Monday, June 23, 2008, at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. Mrs. Wyman was a nurse. She is survived by a son Rodney Cawley of Charoltte, N.C.; a daughter, Zarine Kashatus of Hazelton, Pa.; two sisters, Mary Burrows of Harrisonburg, Va. and Jean McCarthy of Dunmar, Pa.; two brothers, Tom McCarthy of Dunmar and Bill McCarthy of Nicholson, Pa.; and six grandchildren. A son, Jack McCarthy preceded her in death. Funeral services and burial will be private. Arrangements were handled by the Cranston Funeral Home, Seaford.

Stehman Harrison Brubaker, 96 Stehman “Slim” Harrison Brubaker of Laurel passed away on July 2, 2008, at Peninsula Regional Medical Center. He was born in Bryn Mawr, Pa., a son of Stehman, Jr. and Eleanor Brubaker. After serving his country in the U.S. Navy, Slim retired in 1974 from the Leigh Valley Dairy Company. He also had worked as a police officer many years ago in Ardmore, Pa. He was a member of St. Philip’s Episcopal Church in Laurel and a member of the American Legion Post #19, Laurel. His family and friends will remember him for his outgoing personality and love of grass cutting. In his youth, he also golf caddied for many celebrities. He is survived by his companion of 28 years, Ida Mae Davis, and a close friend Nancy Morgan.

In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his wife, Helen Brubaker and his brothers, Robert and Babe Brubaker. A funeral service was held at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church on Central Ave., Laurel, on Monday, July 7, where a viewing was held prior to the service. Interment followed in St. Stephen’s Park Cemetery in Delmar. The Rev. Rita Nelson officiated. Contributions can be made in his memory to St. Philip’s Episcopal Church, 600 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE. 19956. Arrangements were handled by the Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, 700 West St. Laurel, DE 19956.

Marjorie Mae Ritter, 89 Marjorie Mae Ritter of Lewes passed away on Friday, July 4, 2008, at Harbor Healthcare Center in Lewes. Mrs. Ritter worked with her husband as a secretary for the Howard Ritter & Sons Sand and Gravel Company. She was a member of St. Georges Episcopal Chapel. She was an avid reader, Marjorie Mae Ritter liked working crossword puzzels, loved playing bingo and scrabble and especially enjoyed cooking and gardening. Her ability to remember names and special birthdates was her special talent. She was a member of Pocohantas Club, enjoyed playing the piano and loved

PAGE 25 country music. Traveling and going to stock car races was of great enjoyment to her. She was born on May 30, 1919, a daughter of Manaen B. Marvel and Adah Rae Steele Marvel. She was predeceased by her husband, Howard Louis Ritter in 1992, and a son, Frederick Ritter in 2003. She is survived by two daughters, Carole Gibson and Joyce Steele, both of Lewes; two sons, Ronald Ritter and wife Katherine of Lewes, and Robert Ritter and wife Genevieve of Smyrna; two sisters, Elvira Wilkins of Georgetown, Letty Hurley of Lewes; one brother, Manaen Marvel, Jr. of Milford, daughter-in-law, Linda Ritter; eight grandchildren; eight greatgrandchildren, two step-grandsons and many nieces and nephews. A funeral service was at St. George’s Episcopal Church, Rt. 23 at Angola, on Wednesday, July 9, with the Rev. Max Wolf officiating. Interment was in the adjoining churchyard. Friends called on Tuesday evening at the Parsell Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Atkins-Lodge Chapel, Lewes. Contributions are suggested to Delaware Hospice, 100 Patriot's Way, Milford, DE 19963.

Josephine M. Santerre, 79 Josephine M. Santerre of Bridgeville died on Saturday, July 5, 2008 at PRMC. Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated on Wednesday, July 9, at Our Lady of Lourdes Church. Visitation was at Cranston Funeral Home, Seaford, Tuesday evening. Burial was in Delaware Veterans Cemetery, Millsboro.

THANK YOU The Baker Family would like to thank the many people, family, friends, even strangers for helping us during our time of need. On June 24, 2008, the old pecan tree in back of Frank’s Automotive on West St. in Laurel, DE. ripped out of the ground during one of our strongest storms and landed on the garage. Needless to say, the destruction has put us out of business. If it wasn’t for the many helping hands that came through, we could not have made it. Everyone of you made a difference, from finding boxes and removing items, bringing us food, etc. as we worked continuously that day and the next. Everyday, one of you have called us to inquire about our situation and wanting your vehicles repaired. Keep checking with us on that and we will do what we can to help you. We would have been in business twenty seven years next January. We want our loyal customers to know that we miss you and that you have blessed us all these years by bringing us your automotive work. This whole experience has been a humbling one for us, just knowing that God’s people are still full of loving kindness to help those in need. Again, many thanks and may God bless each and every one of you. Sincerely, Frank and Bonnie Baker

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

PAGE 26

On the Record Marriage Licenses

The Sussex County Clerk of the Peace George Parish joyfully announces the following couples have obtained marriage licenses: Elmer Oswald Young, Jr., Laurel to Viletta D. Pinder, Laurel Conrad Allen Taylor, Harrington to Kristin Elizabeth Black, Harrington Cory Lee Ballinger, Frederica to Cara Marie Massaro, Seaford John Damian Hill, Jr., Seaford to Naydean Cornish, Seaford George Henry Roth, III, Federalsburg, Md. to Amanda Kay Davis, Bridgeville Timothy Eugene Cell, Laurel to Stephanie Ann Smith, Laurel Larry S. DeShields, Seaford to Jerry Ann Smith, Seaford Roger Lee Hassier, Laurel to Kristina Ann Bixby, Harbeson Edward Lee Stevens, Delmar to Carla Denise Moore, Delmar Marc A. Decker, Seaford to Kathryn Ann Greenwood, Seaford Theodore Clinton Johnson, Seaford to Carrie Christina Fox, Seaford Jeffrey Mitchell Maxwell, Delmar to Wendy Beth Hearn, Delmar Alonzo DeVon Black, Laurel to Susan Carol Coombs, Lincoln Daniel Gerard Petrucci, Bridgeville to Amy M. Antion, Bridgeville Lemuel Joseph Yutzy, Milford to Jessica Lauren Lee, Greenwood Justin A. Veazie, Seaford to Anita L. Herbert, Seaford Trent L. Chisenhall, Greenwood to Kara B. Schlabach, Greenwood Jeffrey L. Dulis, Seaford to Marlene Olivia Tiritilli, Seaford Marcus Lapedro Bailey, Seaford to Ineishia M. Mitchell, Georgetown Donato Rodriguez, Seaford to Irma Hernandez Alcantara, Seaford Frederick M. Applegate, Jr., Laurel to Christine B. Adkins, Laurel Eddie Orlando Davila, Seaford to Mayory Torres, Seaford Raymond Alan Jones, Bridgeville to Amy Marie Young, Bridgeville Frederick Nathaniel Pegelow, Seaford to Sherri L. Bocchino, Seaford Kimm Steven Nureck, Millsboro to Debra J. Kondash, Laurel Bryan Clark Bennett, Laurel to Jamie L. Chambers, Laurel Christopher Allan Collins, Laurel to Jennifer Mae Snyder, Laurel Shane Scott Phillips, Laurel to Jamie Renee Tubbs, Laurel James Andrew Herbst, Pittsburgh, Pa. to Jenny Lynn Thornton, Seaford Pedro Garcia Juarez, Seaford to Sofia Alcantara Rodriguez, Seaford

SUDOKU Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

Deeds

Answers on page 45.

12/27/07, Wachovia Bank National Association to Frank Cusmano, parcel, Little Creek Hundred, $121,000 01/11/08, West Auto Repair and Salvage, LLC to Delmar Industries, LLC, parcel, Little Creek Hundred, $375,000 01/09/08, Echelon Custom Homes LLC to Paul G. and Barbara W. Collins, Lot No. 124, Phase 5A, Marina Bay, The Peninsula on the Indian River Bay, subdivision, Indian River Hundred, $1,160,000 01/11/08, Estate of Howard Mulvaney, Jr. to David E. Jr. and Tasha Hall, Lot No. 8, Nanticoke Acres Annex, subdivision, Broad Creek Hundred, $135,000 01/15/08, Delmar Feed Mills, Inc. to Auril and Rosemarie Hall, Lot No. 24, Malihorn Crest II, subdivision, Seaford Hundred, $89,900

12/28/07, 01/15/08, Deerfield Meadows, LLC to Blake Allan and Robin Lee Chaffinch, parcel, Broad Creek Hundred, $70,000 01/15/08, Daniel M. and Marie Freeman to Doyle and Rose Minda Horsley, parcel, Town of Greenwood, Northwest Fork Hundred, $148,000 12/11/07, Belinda Joyner, f/k/a Belinda I. Colburn Wroy to Juan Casas, Lot No. 4, Lands of William E. Dines, Town of Bridgeville, subdivision, Northwest Fork Hundred, $58,512.7512/20/07, Robino Walls-Fairway, LLC to Scott McEwen, Lot No. 53, Fairway Oaks, subdivision, Dagsboro Hundred, $40,500 01/18/08, Sussex Ventures, Inc. to Bryan E. Feiler, Lot No. 11, Asbury Meadows, subdivision, Nanticoke Hundred, $79,900 01/10/08, Rick LaFond, Trustee of Alexander L. Barakat Trust, Rick LaFond, Trustee of Andrew L. Barakat Trust, Nancy Barakat and Mary Ann Funk and Rachel Meikle to Francis P. and JoAnne G. Lavin, Lot No. 6, Phase I, Seabreak, subdivision, Baltimore Hundred, $4,400,000 01/16/08, Nicholas and Gelsa A. Pelick to Windswept One, L.L.C., Lot No. 2, Ocean Breezes, subdivision, Baltimore Hundred, $6,315,000

Building Permits

Aaron & Cindy Blair, NE/Rd 595 Lot 5, Nanticoke Hundred, dwelling w/additions, $117,460 R & B Investments, Ross Meadow Lot 14, Little Creek Hundred, dwelling w/additions, $71,068 Eagle 2 Holdings LLC, NE/Rd 589A, Northwest Fork Hundred, warehouse, $720,000 John #. & Karen L. Rogers, 1/03 acres w/imp, Broad Creek Hundred, interior remodel rm, $10,000 John Truitt, N/Rt 20, Corner E/Rd 484, Nanticoke Hundred, manure shed, $17,280 6/5/08 Cato Incorporated, Middleford Road, Seaford Hundred, Popeye’s Restaurant, $400,000 Barry & Terry Bensel, N/Rt 54, 12619 Line Road, Little Creek Hundred, pole barn, $22,464 Elizabeth Thoman, Quillen’s Point, Lot 43, Baltimore Hundred, windows, $25,304 Wilbert Adams & Elva Marie, N/O’Neal School Road, Broad Creek Hundred, dwelling w/additions, $127,576 Tejpartap & Drupatie Ramnath, E/Rd 603 915’ S/Rd 611, Nanticoke Hundred, dwelling w/additions, $133,499 Phyllis A Williams, Saddlebrook Lot 45, Seaford Hundred, fence, $10,835 David S Curry, Nanticoke Est Lot 3, Broad Creek Hundred, Inground pool/fence, $29,780 James & Mary Jones, W/Delaware Ave Lot W/Imp, Little Creek Hundred, package store, $600,000 Ronald J & Diane S Kahler, SE/Rd 569 Lot 4, Northwest Fork Hundred, dwelling w/additions, $87,051 Steve D & Kathy A Drummond, Deerbrook Lot 3, Broad Creek Hundred, pole barn, $15,600 John E Jr & Janet E Fazebaker, SW/Rd 572 1237’ SE/Rd 569 Lot1, Northwest Fork Hundred, pole barn/open deck, $12,072 6/11/08 Robert J & Bernadette Kowalski, Lot 3, Little Creek Hundred, pole building, $17,280 06/19/08, Heather and Corey Taylor, N/Rd. No. 563, 2936’, S/Rd. No. 404, Lot No. 1, Northwest Fork Hundred, Dwelling w/Additions, $140,895 Douglas P. and Laura J. Corey, S/Rd. No. 545, 3700’, E/Rt. No. 13, Northwest Fork Hundred, Dwelling w/Additions, $181,904 06/20/08, Cherryl A. Peterson, Bridgeville Chase, Lot No. 53, Nanticoke Hundred, Pole Barn, $14,560 Stephen T. and Bonnie B. Hornung, Country Grove, Lot No. 8, Little Creek Hundred, Screen Porch/Deck, $10,236 06/23/08, Delmar Commons LLC, E/Rt. No. 13, N/Rt. No. 54, W/Old Stage Road, Little Creek Hundred, McDonalds, $475,000

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

PAGE 27

Entertainment Riverfront presents Odd Couple

Kimberly Zoller will help raise money for the Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation by selling lemonade at the Nanticoke Riverfest this weekend.

Lemonade stand to raise money This summer at the Nanticoke Riverfest in Seaford on July 11 and 12, make sure you stop by Alex's Lemonade Stand hosted by Kimberly Zoller and Boy Scout Troop 381. For a third year in a row, Kimberly and these scouts will try to raise money for a worthy cause. Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation started out in 2000 as a lemonade stand. Since then, it has grown nationwide and raised more than $6 million for childhood cancers. Monies donated to the Alex's Stand Foundation help fund children's cancer research at children's hospitals across the nation. A little girl named Alexandra "Alex" Scott, had a vision to stop childhood cancers by donating money to her doctors to defeat cancers in children. Kimberly Zoller and Boy Scout Troop 381 share in this vision to defeat childhood cancer. The lemonade is donated by Grotto's Pizza in Seaford. In the tent directly next to Alex's Lemonade Stand will be Kimberly's brother Matthew Zoller who is trying to raise funds to attend a Marine Biology camp. Odyssey Expeditions has Tropical Marine Biology Voyages where they integrate marine science discoveries into an adventure of a lifetime. Matthew will be selling homemade baked goods, handmade jewelry, and have games for the kids to play to raise money to attend the camp.

“Oscar and Felix: A New Look at the Odd Couple” opens at Second Street Players’ Riverfront Theatre in downtown Milford on Friday, July 11. Felix has mastered the Internet, cell phones are evident and minding his caloric intake, Oscar has turned to light beer. The sandwiches might still be from last month, but Neil Simon’s dialogue is fresh and smart as ever. Oscar is played by Steve Twilley, Ed Teti is Felix and Joe McCann plays Murray the cop. Joining McCann in the crowd around the poker table are Bill Chamberlain, Ben Lonski and George Mason. New characters, Ynez and Julia Costazuela, are played by Stephanie Duarte and Judy Venturini. Tyler Twilley is the director. The comedy still features a distraught Felix who has been thrown out by his wife and a blustery, slovenly Oscar who wants to offer his friend a roof over his head without having to give up his comfortable bachelor lifestyle.

For Oscar, it’s all about poker games with friends and scheming to snag one of the hot babes in an upstairs apartment. Felix fanaticizes about luau themed poker games complete with leis while Oscar dreams of a romantic dinner with the Costazuela sisters. Show dates are July 11, 12, 13, 18, 19 and 20. All Friday and Saturday performances are at 8 p.m.; Sunday matinees are at 3 p.m. All seats in the air conditioned Riverfront Theatre are reserved. Tickets are $15, senior citizens, students and military families pay a discount price of $14 for Sunday matinees only. For reservations, call Second Street Players ticket line, 422-0220, ext. 1, or reserve online at secondstreetplayers.com. Second Street Players Riverfront Theatre is located at 2 S. Walnut St., downtown Milford. The theatre is accessible to persons with special needs; call for seating preferences or audio assistance.

PJs present Charlie Brown hit “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown,” opens at Possum Point Players on Wednesday, July 16. The play is being produced and performed by the Possum Juniors (PJs), Possum Point Players’ youth organization. Peyton Lynch of Georgetown, playing the title role, just finished a role in the PPP mainstage production of “The Little Foxes,” by Lillian Hellman. Suzy Messick of Laurel plays Sally, and she has also been in several shows on the Possum stage. Scott Waller and Luke Warrington – Linus and Snoopy, respectively – are veterans of numerous PJ shows. Annie Hudson and James Davis are making their debuts as Lucy and Schroeder. Performances are July 16, 17, 18 and 19 at 7 p.m. and on July 20 at 2 p.m. Tickets are now available for $8 ($7 for seniors or students) by calling the Possum Ticketline at 856-4560.

SAFE HAVEN AUCTION SAMPLER Shown here is a sampling of the items that are available at 'Cause 4 Paws,' Safe Haven No Kill Animal Sanctuary's Live and Silent Auction, presented by the Jetty Group-Realtors, on Saturday July 12 at the Rehoboth Convention Center. Some of the items in the auction include fine wine, a private pet portrait by local artist Laura Hickman, original oil paintings by local artists and gift baskets. For more information, visit www.safehavensanctuary.com or call 302-856-6460.

PAGE 28

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

Group gathers to define ‘Heart & Soul’ of county By Carol Kinsley How do you put in words what is special about Sussex County? Is it the open space of farm fields and sandy beaches? The quiet places where you can hear frogs croak and birds chirp? The quaint towns full of history, architecture, character and characters that make community? The rivers, ponds and bays? The people — sincere, downto-earth, resourceful, "take-careof-our-own" folks who were born here and those who have chosen this place to live? A varied group of Sussex County residents gathered in the "Grove" next door to the Elbert N. And Ann V. Carvel Research and Education Center outside of Georgetown on June 25 for a barbecue and meeting that turned out to be a work session, with a goal of refining the definition of the "Heart and Soul of Sussex County." A "mature and wiser group," (most were 40 or older), they were about equally divided between those born here, brought here by work or "came here and liked it." For months now, Cooperative Extension agent Bill McGowan and others who are part of the Coastal Community Enhancement Initiative of the University of Delaware have been collecting people's thoughts on what Sussex County is. Melding some 1,000 written responses and photographs into a Powerpoint presentation, McGowan shared the draft at the meeting. There were several definitions. Among them, Sussex County is: • "An ever-changing landscape of working agriculture, planting, growing harvesting. Poultry houses and horse pastures, a patchwork quilt from the air, sights, sounds and smells of a thriving industry back-dropped by a big sky and forest. • "Quaint 'beach' (not 'shore') communities where the architecture still speaks to the roots of church camps and family gatherings. Where you can be as busy as you want or as quiet as you'd like, fine dining, rich music countered with the quiet of a house in the 'pines.' • "A community caught in time between the deep, rich roots of a hardscrabble economy and local families to a destination for many who recognize the value in such a lifestyle." McGowan then asked, "Did

we get it right?" and provided electronic devices to the audience for registering their responses. First impression from a majority of the 69 voters in the audience was "getting there." Then McGowan put them to work. "What's missing?" he asked. "What would you change?" The answers were recorded by one person at each table and dropped into a box. Among the suggestions were the depth and breadth of the county's history; Native Americans and migrant workers; wildlife and farm animals; schools; people caring for people (medical, emergency workers); people doing hard physical labor. A second vote on "Did we get it right?" registered fewer votes for "nailed it" and more for "needs work." The group went through a series of statements and voted on how strongly they agreed or disagreed. They chose as special elements of the county they'd be least willing to lose: "small towns," "special places" and "agriculture." McGowan said the group would go back to the drawing board on the project, which he called "an autobiography." Audience members agreed could it be used for such purposes as land use planning, economic development and small town revitalization. McGowan invited the public to log onto the Web site, www.heartandsoulofsussex.org in order to view comments and add thoughts or photos.

Avoid theft at the pump Paying $50 or $100 to fill up a gas tank is painful enough, and drivers now have to worry about thieves stealing credit card information by “skimming” credit card numbers off gas station pumps. “Skimming” is a practice where thieves attach a device to card readers such as those found at gas pumps. Encoded information from a card’s magnetic strip is transferred to a computer allowing thieves access to all the information on a credit or debit card. Tips to avoid “skimming” • Go inside to pay • Use cash. • If the card reader looks suspicious don’t use it. • Watch out for suspicious activity or persons around the pumps.

Gladys M. Wilkins, left, Sue Fox, and John Potocki, all from Milton, discuss the joys of living in "Lower, Slower Delaware" with Bill McGowan, a University of Delaware Cooperative Extension agent who is working through the Coastal Community Enhancement Initiative to discover what defines the "Heart and Soul" of Sussex County. Photo by Carol Kinsley

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MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

PAGE 29

Eat like the Greeks to maintain a healthy heart The cuisine of the MediterORETTA NORR ranean is bold, flavorful and colorful. Factor in other adjectives like delicious and healthy and you have food that’s the perfect fit for summer. The Greek Mediterranean spoons of olive oil and season diet holds its own with its Italian with salt and pepper. Grill the and French counterparts. In his squash and zucchini, turning Fifty Ways to a Healthy Heart, renowned heart surgeon Christian once, until tender and slightly Barnard dedicated an entire chap- charred, about 3 minutes . Transfer to a platter and keep warm. ter to the Greek diet, noting that Season the chicken breasts the Greek isle of Crete has the with salt and pepper and grill lowest rate of cardiac disease in over moderately high heat, turnthe world as a result of a diet of ing once, until cooked through, olives and olive oil, fresh fish about 10 minutes. Transfer the and vegetables, grains and pasta. chicken to the platter and sprinBy happy coincidence, one of kle with the feta cheese. Drizzle Food and Wine’s recently-named with the remaining vinaigrette top-10 chefs for 2008 is Michael and serve. Psilakis, who the magazine commends for ingeniously redefining Crab and Artichoke Orzo Greek food in America. Food and Salad Wine has proven that they know Serves 4 to 6 whereof they speak. Twenty years ago, their first awards were 1 pound orzo given to two unknowns who have One 6-ounce jar marinated artichoke-heart quarters, drained, since become culinary superstars 4 reserved and the rest coarse— Daniel Boulud and Thomas ly chopped Keller. Psilakis is setting out to 2 garlic cloves prove that he belongs in their 1 shallot, chopped company. Try these healthy and 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard flavorful summertime salads he 1 teaspoon dried Greek oregano features in his cookbook, My Big 2 large basil leaves Fresh Greek Flavors. 1/2 cup white wine vinegar 3/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil Chicken with Zucchini Salad Salt and freshly ground pepper Serves 4 10 oil-packed sun-dried tomato 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice halves, drained and sliced into 1 large garlic clove 1/4-inch strips 1 small shallot, chopped 5 scallions, thinly sliced cross1 and 1/2 teaspoons chopped dill wise 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1 pound jumbo lump crabmeat 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons chopped flat-leaf 2 tablespoons chopped mint parsley Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper In a pot of boiling salted wa4 boneless chicken breast halves, ter, cook the orzo until al dente. with skin (2 pounds) Drain and rinse under cold water, 2 medium yellow squash (1 then drain; transfer to a bowl. pound), sliced crosswise on Meanwhile, in a blender, the diagonal 1/3 inch thick puree the 4 reserved artichoke 2 medium zucchini (1 pound), quarters with the garlic, shallot, sliced crosswise on the diagomustard, oregano, basil and vinenal 1/3 inch thick gar. With the machine on, pour in 1/4 pound feta cheese, crumbled oil; season with salt and pepper. (1 cup) Stir 1 cup of the vinaigrette into the orzo. Add the chopped In a blender, combine the artichokes, sun-dried tomatoes, lemon juice with the garlic, shalscallions, crabmeat and parsley; lot, dill and mustard and puree season with salt and pepper. until smooth. With the machine Spoon the orzo into shallow on, slowly pour in 6 tablespoons bowls and serve, passing the reof the olive oil. Stir in the mint maining vinaigrette at the table. and season the vinaigrette with salt and pepper. Chopped Greek Salad Light a grill or preheat a grill Serves 4. While greek Oregano pan. In a shallow bowl, coat the chicken with 1/2 cup of the vinai- may be ideal, it may also be hard to find. Use dried Italian oregano grette. Let stand for 5 minutes. instead but make sure it hasn’t Meanwhile, in a large bowl, been on your shelf too long. toss the yellow squash and zuc1/2 pound green beans, halved chini with the remaining 2 tablecrosswise

L

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The Practical Gourmet

3 tablespoons red wine vinegar 1 garlic clove 1/2 small shallot, chopped 1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1/2 teaspoon dried Greek oregano 1/2 teaspoon fresh thyme 1 large basil leaf 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper 1 pound grape tomatoes, halved

1/2 small red onion, halved lengthwise and very thinly sliced crosswise 1/4 pound Greek feta cheese, crumbled (1 cup) In a medium pot of boiling salted water, cook the green beans until just tender, about 4 minutes. Drain and rinse under cold water; pat the beans dry.

In a blender, combine the red wine vinegar with garlic clove, shallot, mustard, oregano, thyme and basil and puree until smooth. With the machine on, slowly add the olive oil. Season the vinaigrette with salt and pepper. In a large bowl, combine green beans, tomato halves, onion and cheese. Toss with vinaigrette and serve immediately.

PAGE 30

MORNING STAR

• JULY 10 - 16, 2008

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GIVE-AWAY FREE KITTENS to a good home. Hardscrabble. 8752551. 5/22

HELP WANTED FASHION DESIGN INSTRUCTOR Qualified instructor needed to teach introductory course in fashion design at Delaware Technical & Community College. Required experience to include sketching, pattern-making, samples, manufacturing. Contact Paula Perez at pperez@dtcc.edu or send resume to Delaware Tech, Attn: Paula Perez, P.O. Box 610, Georgetown, DE 19947. 7/3/2tc

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY REPRESENTATIVE/ ACCTS. RECEIVABLE Honest, trustworthy & responsible individual wanted urgently to take up the post of representative in accounting without affecting your present job. You must have at least one year working experience to qualify you for this post. Contact Alexander via excellentoffer @aol.com for more information. 6/26/3tc

AUTOMOTIVE ‘96 GM BOX TRUCK Pwr tailgate, rebiult eng., $3500. 629-7920. 7/10 LEER TRUCK CAP, 8’, fits Ford or Dodge. 258-6553. 7/10 ‘04 FORD F-150 XLT Super Cab, 5.4L, tow pkg., 42k mi., $18,000 OBO. 6293794. 6/19 ‘02 KIA SEDONIA mini van, less than 70k mi., seats 7, AC, very clean, no longer needed, reasonably priced. 875-0964 before 8 pm. 6/12 2 TIRES, brand new, never placed on vehicle., P175 X65R14, $150 OBO. 8759401. 6/12 ‘96 FORD EXPLORER, 4 dr., 4WD 2nd owner, VG Cond. in & out. Solid car, 135k mi., $4500. 629-4348. ‘01 DODGE P/U, new starter battery, 4 new tires & new rear end. As-is, $2300. 628-6953. 6/5 '02 CHRYSLER SEBRING LXi, 4 dr., V6, 87K mi., loaded, sunroof, leather int., new tires & battery. Orig. owner, great cond., must see! $5000. 8755792. 5/29

CAMPERS/ TRAILERS ‘91 PALM AIR CAMPER, 12x34. 875-4387. 7/10

BOATS KAYAK AQUATERRA, 10’ w/double paddle & skirt, $225. 337-7359 or cell 5598061. 7/3 12’ BASS BOAT w/Trailer, elec. motor, fish finder, ready to go, $850. 6284159. 7/3 ‘96 PONTOON BOAT TRAILER, $700. 80 hp Mercury 2-storke outboard motor, $800. ‘89 Hurricane 19’ (Fun Deck) Boat, Free. 875-5106. 6/19

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES 2 LIONEL TOY TRAIN SETS, standard gauge. Black 400E locomotive (restored) and six freight cars (unrestored); two-tone 408E elec. locomotive w/ State Set (orig. cond. w/3 cars 7 boxes) $3500. 6293794. 7/10

FOR SALE WASHER $120; DRYER $120. 628-1320. 11/29/tnc CHAIR/LOUNGER, Oversized, light green, exc. cond., $175. 629-7920. 7/10 BERKLINE WALL HUGGER love seat-recliner, very good cond., no stains or tears. Lifetime warranty on mechanism $50 OBO. 6295238. 7/10 SOFA SLEEPER, like new. Breakfront, china & cut glass. 846-2288. 7/10 2 TICKETS for BROOKS & DUNN Concert on July 18. Located on track, sect. B row 20. Can’t go now, selling for $120. 629-9586. 7/3 KENMORE SMOOTH TOP RANGE w/hidden element w/warming zone, exc. cond. $250. 875-0810. 7/3

REPRESENTATIVE/ACCTS. RECEIVABLE Honest, trustworthy & responsible individuals wanted urgently to take up the post of representatives and accounts receivable agents without affecting your present job. You must have at least one year working experience to qualify you for this post. Contact Alexander via excellentoffer@aol.com for more information.

ROUND OAK PEDESTAL TABLE w/4 chairs, $90. 629-8745. 7/3 2 CRAB POTS, like new, $50. 875-5517. 7/3 WHITE OAK KIT. CUPBOARD w/butcher top, 4 shelves, door in front, exc. cond., $25. New Toaster Oven, $20. Knotty Pine Corner Cupboard, 3 top shelves, glass front dr., bottom door w/2 shelves, $25. 629-4649. 7/3 JACOBSEN LAWN MOWER, super rear bagger, 4 hp, self-propelled, $60. Rotary Lawn Spreader, Scotts Speedy Green 1000, $20. 337-7359 or 559-8061 cell. 7/3 2 GIRL’S TWIN BEDS & Mattresses. Headboards have bookshelf & recessed lights, $50 ea. or 2 for $90. 628-0690. 7/3 TV’S: SHARP 52” LCD, Panasonic 50” Plasma. Top of the line units, other sizes avail. 629-9083. 6/26 BIKES: 1 Men’s, 1 Ladies’, like new, $50 ea., 875-4387. 6/26

BRAND NEW DELMAR H.S. YEAR BOOKS, Class of ‘66, ‘68, ‘73, ‘75, ‘79, ‘80, ‘83, ‘85, ‘87, ‘88, ‘91. Limited editions, $35 ea. 2368133. 6/26 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER, black metallic, 6 glass shelves (3 on ea. side), adjustable for lg. TV. $400 negotiable. 875-9401. 6/26 SINGLE FOLDING BED, like new, $35. 85 Pc. Set Majesty Black Fantasy dinnerware, $40. Car Vac, new, $10. Small B&W TV, $15. Some misc. items. 6298429. 6/26 LEGAL FILE CABINET, 4 drawer, exc. cond., $40. 875-0915. 6/26 GARAGE DOOR OPENER, 1 pc., 1 metal track & chain. Radio transmiter. Push mutton, manual, removed in renovation. $35. 875-3176. 100’s of VHS Movies, 50¢ ea. Disney movies, $1.00. 628-1880. 6/26 AIR COND: Whirlpool 10,200 BTU window unit, $99. Computer Monitor, Color SVGA, $24. 5191568. 6/19

DINETTE KITCHEN TABLE w/5 chairs, solid wood, exc. cond., $50. 875-5667. 6/12 JENNY-LYNN CRIB, converts to youth bed and Pack N Play, $150 for both, or will separate. 6/12 LAPTOP DELL INSPIRON 1520, bought in ‘08, monitor slightly cracked. $100. 8757312. 6/12 KARAOKE MACHINE, new, never used, was $160, now $60. 875-2781. 6/12 2 WINDOW AC Units for sale. Call Mike for details, 245-2278. 6/12 GE WASHER & DRYER, white, 1 yr. old, exc. work. cond., $400 for both. 2286202, 629-6575. 6/12 KITCHEN TABLE, off white oak top, 60” round, pedestal base, pop-up butterly leaf, 4 chairs/cushions, 3 yrs. old, $200. 956-0290. 6/12 KAYAK 18’ Kevlar Const., beautiful cond. w/all access., nothing else to buy. A must see, $1600. 875-9775. 6/12

PUBLIC AUCTION OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE WITH 3 BR/2 BA NEW CONSTRUCTION HOME IN MANCHESTER MANOR IN LAUREL, DELAWARE Location: 30937 Manchester Lane, Manchester Manor, Laurel, Delaware 19956. From the intersection of U.S. Rt. 13 and Sycamore Road in Laurel, travel east on Sycamore Road and immediately turn right onto Chipman Pond Road. Travel for approx. 1 mile and turn left into Manchester Manor (Signs Posted).

SATURDAY, JULY 19, 2008 12:00 Noon Preview: Sunday, July 13 - 2:00 to 3:30 P.M. View our website at www.onealsauction.com for additional information & photos Energy Star Certified 3BR/2BA 1,820 sq. ft. new construction home situated in the community of Manchester Manor in Laurel. The home sits on a 0.75+/- Acre lot and features an open floor plan, a beautiful kitchen with a raised bar-top island, new GE appliances, & ample cabinet space, a master bedroom with walk-in closet and bathroom with whirlpool tub, stand-up shower, & tile flooring, as well as a huge living room with cathedral ceiling and gas fireplace. The home also features hardwood floors in the foyer & dining room, a rear deck, central air, high efficiency gas heat, flash water heater, attached two-car garage, paved driveway, and is wired for phone, cable, & internet. A beautiful quality constructed home that is ready to be moved into! The property is identified on the Sussex County Tax Map in District 2-32 on Map 13.00 as Parcel 190.00. The home is nestled in the community of Manchester Manor, just off the Rt. 13 corridor in Laurel. If you’ve been looking for a new construction home built by a quality local builder, do not miss this auction! Terms: $12,500.00 down payment in the form of Cash, Certified Check, or Cashier’s Check made payable to Jos. C. O’Neal, Inc. Balance to be paid within 45 days when a good and marketable deed will be given. The property is being sold in “AS IS” con dition. A 2.5% Buyer’s Premium will be charged on the final selling price. Seller reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids, but it is their intent to sell said property. Broker Participation invited. Brokers must have clients registered 24 hours prior to auction. Contact our office for complete details. View complete terms at www.onealsauction.com.

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MORNING STAR (2) 35mm CAMERAS & 1 CAMCORDER. Cannon ES970 mid-size camcorder, battery charger & instructions, $60. Minolta 35mm Model 5x1 w/auto zoom lens, 28-105 w/flash, exc. cond. $100. Minolta 35mm 400-SI w/auto focus lens 20-80 & flash, $95. 8751877. 6/12 16 DBL. POLE ELEC. Panel circuit breakers, $50. 846-9788. 6/12 WEDDING GOWN, Sz. 10, white/beaded w/trim, exc. cond., $30. 629-6575. 6/5 LANDSCAPE TRAILER, new 5x8, lg. tires, 2M lb. gross has fold-down ramp, exc. cond., tagged till 2/11, $950 OBO. 875-0747. 6/5 PIANO FOR SALE. Harrison/Kimball upright piano, $400. 875-1045. 6/5 YOUTH POOL TABLE, 3x6, $100 OBO. 542-6316. 6/5

SAMSUNG 50� DLP HD TV with oak crorner base cabinet, $1200. 628-9880. 6/5 SOLID MAPLE TABLE w/ 2 slide out/underneath leafs. $45. 846-9788. 6/5

PART SHITSHU-TERRIOR MIX, ready June 23, $75 ea. 2 male, 1 female, won’t get any bigger than 15 lbs. 536-1057, as for Tam. 6/5

ROOMMATE WANTED

ANIMALS, ETC. 55 GAL. AQUARIUM, wooden stand, light & 3 filters, ready to go, $225. 337-3046. 7/3 GOLD FISH, all sizes, $1.50 - $3. Cell 542-6316. 6/26 DOG BOX - Fits full size truck. Houndsman Delux. Good cond. $250 OBO. 443-496-2418. 6/26

63 YR. OLD., single male, seeks roommate. No drugs, no alcohol. $60/ week & 1/2 utilities. Delmar, Del. 4631808. 7/3

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PAGE 31

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PAGE 32 Vacation Rentals MYRTLE BEACH Oceanfront 1-3 bedroom condos and penthouses. Health Spas, Tennis, Jacuzzi's, More! Discount rates $49 $89/nite and up. Free brochure. 1-800-777-9411 www.smithrental.com $75 Gas Allowance! Deep Creek Lake, MD - Long & Foster Resort Rentals Call & mention Fuel Up on Savings get $75* off your stay at a resort rental property! *Some restrictions apply. Exp. 8/31/08 800-336-7303 www.DeepCreekResort. com OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND. Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2102. Online reservations: www. holidayoc.com Waterfront Properties 5 Acres James River! Only $183,000 Wooded park-like setting & deep dockable frontage! Boat to Chesapeake Bay. Ready to build. Lowest financing in 25+ yrs. Call Patty 866-764-5238, x 1918 Deepwater Creekfront! 3.9 AC- $95,000 170' frontage. Short drive to Smithfield. Close to Williamsburg ferry. Priced way below mkt to sell. Free Kayak or Canoe with Purchase. Call Patty 866-764-5238. x1918

LEGALS PUBLIC NOTICE The following ordinance was approved by the Sussex County Council on May 13, 2008: ORDINANCE NO. 1969 AN ORDINANCE TO GRANT A CONDITIONAL USE OF LAND IN AN AR-1 AGRICULTURAL RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT FOR A RAILROAD LOOP FOR AGRICULTURAL USE TO BE LOCATED ON A CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND LYING AND BEING IN SEAFORD HUNDRED, SUSSEX COUNTY, CONTAINING 68.6 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, (land located lying 3/4 mile north of Road 544 and west of and adjacent to Norfolk Southern Railroad Line; application filed on behalf of ALLEN’S HATCHERY, INC.; C/U #1783). 7/10/1tc

NOTICE Estate of Clarence E. Harris, Sr., Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Clarence E. Harris, Sr. who

MORNING STAR departed this life on the 19th day of June, A.D. 2008 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Malcolm G. Harris on the 30th day of June, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 19th day of February, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Malcolm G. Harris 1810 Third St. West Deptford, NJ 08086 Attorney: David J. Ferry, Jr., Esq. Ferry, Joseph & Pearce, P.A. P.O. Box 1351 Wilmington, DE 19899 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 7/10/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Joseph H.. Bauer, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Joseph H. Bauer who departed this life on the 24th day of June, A.D. 2008 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Joseph H. Bauer, Jr. on the 2nd day of July, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 24th day of February, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Joseph H. Bauer, Jr. 7084 Broad Neck Rd., Chestertown, MD 21620 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 7/10/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Kathryn Culver Russell, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Kathryn Culver Russell who departed this life on the 18th day of May, A.D. 2008 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto Richard L. Russell on the 11th day of June, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the

• JULY 10 - 16, 2008

same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 18th day of January, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Richard L. Russell 201 Chestnut Street Laurel, DE 19956 Attorney: Michele Procino Wells Procino Wells, LLC 225 High St. Seaford, DE 19973 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 6/26/3tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a First Pluries writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate lying and being in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware designated as Lot 902 in WOODSIDE MANOR, and being more particularly described according to a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr., dated January 31, 2001 as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument found located on the westerly right of way line of Arbutus Avenue, Said concrete monument found marking a common corner for this lot and Lot No. 904; thence running with Lot No. 904 South 80 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West 120.00 feet to a Utility Pole, said Utility Pole marking a common corner for this lot and Lot No. 904 and on line of Lot No. 52; thence turning and running by and with Lot No. 52 North 09 degrees 45 minutes 00 seconds West 86.17 feet to a concrete monument found, said concrete monument found located on the southerly right of way line of Arbutus Avenue marking a common corner for this lot and lot No. 52; thence turning and running by and with the Southerly right of way line of Arbutus Avenue North 80 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds East 95.00 feet to a point, said point located on the southerly right of way line of Arbutus Avenue and marking the beginning of a curve; thence by and with said curve having a radius of 25.00 feet, a delta angle of 90 degrees 15 minutes 00 seconds and an arc distance of 39.38 feet to a point located on the West-

erly right of way line of Arbutus Avenue; thence turning and running by and with the westerly right of way line of Arbutus Avenue South 09 degrees 45 minutes 00 seconds East 61.17 feet home to the point and place of Beginning, be the contents thereof what they may. BEING the same lands and premises conveyed unto Michele L. JesterPalmer and Edward Jester, as guardian for Elsie L. Jester by deed of Federal National Mortgage Association dated February 16, 2001 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware in Deed Book 2566, Page 177. Tax Parcel: 5 - 3 1 10.14-2.00 Property Address: 902 East Ivy Drive, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 4, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 8, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MICHELE L. JESTER-PALMER, EDWARD JESTER, AS GUARDIAN OF MINOR CHILD ELSIE L. JESTER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a Sixth Pluries writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain tract, place or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the Town of Delmar, Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being more particularly described as follows: COMMENCING at a cut in the Northerly edge of a five foot sidewalk bordering the North side of Jewell Street, said point of beginning being 104.83 feet in a Westerly direction from North Fourth Street; thence with the Northerly right-ofway line of Jewell Street, North 79 degrees 95 minutes West a distance of 52.83 feet to a cut in the sidewalk; thence with the centerline of a mutual and common driveway and in part through a two party garage, North 10 degrees 30 minutes East a distance of 133.60 feet to an iron pipe; thence with an old fence, South 79 degrees 05 minutes East a distance of 52.83 feet to an iron pipe; thence South 20 degrees 30 minutes West a distance of 133.60 feet to a cut in the sidewalk, the place of beginning, together with the improvements thereon, containing 7,050 square feet of land, be the same more or less, as surveyed June 30, 1967, by Harold W. Hampshire, Surveyor, and being known as 305 Jewell Street, Delmar, Sussex County, Delaware. BEING THE SAME lands and premises which Gertrude A. Hazel and John H. Hazel, III, by Deed dated May 24, 1997 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, did grant and convey unto Dwayne A. Ringgold and Teresa A. Ringgold, in fee. Tax Parcel: 5-32-20.14143.00 Property Address: 305 E. Jewell Street, Delmar Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be

credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 4, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 8, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DWAYNE A. & TERESA A. RINGGOLD and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land lying and being situate in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County State of Delaware being known as designated as Lot No. 49 in the subdivision know as "Nero's Acres" and being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at an iron rebar set, a corner for this lot and Lot 48; thence running by and with Lot 48 South 75 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds East 275.01 feet to an iron rebar set; thence; turning and running by and with lands now or formerly of Antonio V. Nero South 12 degrees 41 minutes 00 seconds West 137 .60 feet to an iron rebar set; thence, turning and continuing with said Nero lands North 74 degrees 42 minutes 30 secSee LEGALS—page 34

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PAGE 34 LEGALS - from Page 32 onds West 275.60 feet to an iron rebar set on the cul de sac at the end of Danny's Drive; thence turning and running, North 20 degrees 04 minutes 43 seconds East a chord distance of 78.44 feet an arc distance of 90.17 feet on a 50 foot radius to a point on said cul de sac; thence North 12 degrees 17 minutes 57 seconds East a chord distance of 23.12 feet an arc distance of 23.56 feet on a 35 foot radius to a point on the right of way of Danny's Drive; thence, North 12 degrees 52 minutes 30 seconds East 35.00 feet home to the place of Beginning. Being the same lands and premises which Benjamin L. Parkinson did by deed dated February 10, 2006 and recorded in the office of the Recorder of Deeds, Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 3270 page 337 did grant and convey unto Steven Prato. Tax Parcel: 5-32-7.0027.31 Property Address: 35467 Danny’s Drive, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 4, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 8, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in

MORNING STAR execution the property of STEVEN PRATO and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Venditioni Exponas, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain tract, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, located on the northerly side of County Road No. 46 and being more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at a concrete monument in the northerly right of way line of County Road No: 46, which monument is located 0.63 miles westerly along said County Road No. 46 from County Road No. 517-A and marks a corner for these lands and lands now or formerly of Jerry C. Dukes; thence running by and with the northerly right of way line of County Road No. 46, North 77 degrees 48 minutes 00 seconds West 686.09 feet, to a concrete monument, corner for these lands and lands of James R. and Donna J. Towers; thence by and with said Towers lands the following five courses and distances: (1) North 06 degrees 24 minutes 50 seconds West, 1179.79 feet to a coordinate point; (2) North 77 degrees 48 minutes 30 seconds East, 56.71 feet to a point; (3) North 27 degrees 53 minutes 08 seconds East, 59.72 feet to a point; (4) North 71 degrees 56 minutes 26 seconds East, 362.70 feet to a point; and (5) North 59 degrees 36 minutes 18 seconds East, 234.06 feet to a point in line of lands now or formerly of Jerry C. Dukes; thence by and with said Dukes lands, South 06 degrees 05 minutes 50 seconds East, 1622.20 feet to a concrete monument at point and place of Beginning, said to contain 21.00 acres of land, more or less, as surveyed by Miller-Lewis, Inc., Registered land Surveyors, in June of 1988. BEING the same lands conveyed unto DENNIS + DENNIS, INC., a corporation of the State of Delaware, by Deed of JAMES R. TOWERS and DONNA J. TOWERS, dated

September 5, 1990, and recorded on September 5, 1990 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, at Deed Record Book 1736, page 203. Tax Parcel: 2-31-14.0024.00 Property Address: 23567 Dennis and Dennis Farm Lane, Georgetown Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 4, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 8, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DENNIS & DENNIS, INC. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a Second Pluries writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the Town of Laurel, Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County

• JULY 10 - 16, 2008 and State of Delaware, more particularly described in accordance with a survey prepared by Peninsula Surveying & Site Design, Inc. dated June 27, 2000 and revised July 10, 2000, as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron pin set at the inner edge of a 4' wide concrete sidewalk on the South side of East 4th Street at the intersection of East 4th Street and Iona Avenue, a corner for this land; thence, by and with the inner edge of the sidewalk and the South side of East 4th Street and the curve thereof having a radius of 794.96 feet, a length of 242.33 feet and a chord of North 85 degrees 07 minutes 06 seconds East 241.39 feet to an iron pipe found; thence, continuing with the inner edge of the sidewalk on the South side of East 4th Street and the curve thereof having a radius of 794.96 feet, a length of 44.69 feet and a chord of South 84 degrees 32 minutes 19 seconds East 44.68 feet to an iron pipe found, a corner for this land and lands now or formerly of George W. Collins and Janice B. Whaley; thence, turning and running by and with lands now or formerly of George W. Collins and Janice B. Whaley, South 22 degrees 30 minutes 32 seconds West 130.60 feet to an iron pipe found; thence, turning and running by and with lands now or formerly of George W. Collins and Janice B. Whaley, South 67 degrees 33 minutes 47 seconds East 9.03 feet to an iron pipe found, a corner for this land; thence, turning and running with said Whaley lands, South 21 degrees 26 minutes 01 seconds West 145.54 feet to a concrete monument on the North side of Orange Street, a corner for this land; thence, turning and running by and with Orange Street, North 68 degrees 50 minutes 00 seconds West 261.47 feet to an iron pin set, a corner for this land; thence, turning and running by and with Iona Avenue North 23 degrees 05 minutes 00 seconds East 142.48 feet to a concrete monument; thence, North 07 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West 18.00 feet to the place of beginning, containing therein 1.35 acres of land, more or less. Tax Parcel: 3 - 3 2 1.07-320.00 & 320.01 Property Address: Not Available Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D.

are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 4, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 8, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of FAMILY ENRICHMENT & DELIVERANCE CENTER, INC. & FAMILY ENRICHMENT DAYCARE CENTER, INC. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain tract, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being designated as Lot #594-E4, shown on the plot at "Newberg Lots", prepared for Paul Wilson, as surveyed by Coast Survey, Inc" Land Surveying and Planning, dated November 8, 1992, divided March 16,1994, filed for record in the Office of the Recorder at Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Plot Book 52, page 50, and being more particularly described as

follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a pipe found on the southeasterly right-at-way line of County Road #594 (50 feet wide), a corner for this lot and Lot #594-E-5; thence continuing with said right-of-way north 33 degrees 07 minutes 08 seconds East 300.00 feet to a pipe; thence turning and running by and with a common boundary line for this lot and Lot E-3 South 56 degrees 52 minutes 52 seconds East 525.30 feet (passing over a pipe at 195.00 feet) to a point in the center of Gum Branch Ditch; thence with said Ditch South 29 degrees 23 minutes 05 seconds West 204.20 feet to a point and continuing South 27 degrees 31 minutes 00 seconds West 385.07 feet to a point; thence turning and running by and with Lot E-5 North 22 degrees 55 minutes 28 seconds West 513.82 feet to a pipe; thence continuing on North 22 degrees 55 minutes 28 second West 106.59 feet to a pipe; thence continuing on North 56 degrees 52 minutes 52 second West 150.00 feet to the place of beginning said to contain 5.000 acres more or less. Tax Parcel: 4-30-9.0042.04 Property Address: 14499 Oak Road, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 4, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 8, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the See LEGALS—page 35

MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 34 Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of REBECCA R. & CHARLES A. HOLLINGSWORTH, II (08L-02-62) and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being known as Lot NO. 3 in Deer Meadows (Ref. Plot Book 54, page 83), being more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron rebar on the North right of way line of Road No. 587 A at a corner for this lot and Lot No.4; thence with the North right of way of Road No. 587 A, North 80 degrees 37 minutes 24 seconds West 150.00 feet to an iron rebar located on the North right of way line of Road No. 587 A at a corner for this lot and Lot No.2; thence with Lot No. 2 the following two (2) courses and distances; North 09 degrees 22 minutes 36 seconds East – 600.00 feet to a Point; thence North 43 degrees 39 minutes 39 seconds East ¬517.69 feet to a pipe located at a corner for this lot, lot NO. 2 and in line of lands of Grace Lynn Gross; thence with said Gross lands, South 50 degrees 30 minutes 47 seconds East ¬- 234.85 feet to an iron rebar located at a corner for this lot, Lands of Edward Hall and in line of lands of Grace Lynn Gross; thence with said hall lands South 35 degrees 15 minutes 00 seconds West 212.85 feet to an iron rebar located at a corner for this lot and lands of Edward Hall; thence with said Hall lands South 65 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds East¬ 8.74 feet to a point in the centerline of a ditch at a corner for this lot, Lot No. 15 and in line of lands of

Edward hall; thence with the centerline of said ditch and Lots 15, 14 and 4 in the following four (4) courses and distances; South 32 degrees 58 minutes 41 seconds West ¬- 44.10 feet to a point; thence South 45 degrees 31 minutes 41 seconds West - 124.74 feet to a point; thence South 63 degrees 07 minutes 46 seconds West - 124.74 feet to a point; thence South 63 degrees. 07 minutes 46 seconds West - 203.97 feet to a point; thence South 84 degrees 22 minutes 56 seconds West - 4.30 feet to a point in the centerline of said ditch located at a corner for this lot and Lot No. 4; thence with Lot NO. 4 South 09 degrees 22 minutes 36 seconds West 453.38 feet to an iron rebar located on the North right of way line of Road No. 587A to the point and place of beginning, containing 5.05 acres of land be the same more or less as shown on a survey of Deer Meadow as prepared by Brad A. Temple, De., P.L.S. No. 552 dated March 22, 1995. Tax Parcel: 5-30-8.0015.02 Property Address: Parcel 1502, Lot 3, Deer Meadows, Haunted House Lane, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 4, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 8, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited.

Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of REBECCA R. & CHARLES A. HOLLINGSWORTH, II (08L-03-011) and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain tract, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, and State of Delaware, lying on the westerly side of the County Road #62, and being more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at an iron pipe in the westerly right-ofway line of County Road #62, corner for these lands, and lands to be conveyed to John R. Knox; thence by and with the said Westerly right-of-way of County Road #62, South 12 degrees 09 minutes East 136.65 feet to a concrete post, corner for these lands and for the other lands of John R. Knox; thence three courses with the same: (1) South 71 degrees 16 minutes West 63.20 feet to a concrete post; and (2) South 70 degrees 48 minutes 30 seconds West 203.75 feet to a concrete post; and (3) South 12 degrees 12 minutes 30 seconds East 148.57 feet to a concrete post in line of the lands now or formerly of Richard W. Hill; thence by and with the said Hill lands south 78 degrees 15 minutes West 231.56 feet to a concrete post in line of the lands of Doris C. Larrimore; thence turning and running with the same North 11 degrees 40 minutes 30 seconds West 235 feet to an iron pipe, corner for these lands and lands to be conveyed to John R. Knox, et ux.; thence a new line dividing these lands North 68 degrees 33 minutes 30 seconds East 500.85 feet to a pipe in the westerly right-ofway line of County Road #62, the point and place of beginning, said to contain 2.14 acres of land, more or less, as surveyed on June 16, 1984, by Walter R.

• JULY 10 - 16, 2008 Todd, Registered Land Surveyor. Tax Parcel: 2-32-20.0013.01 Property Address: Not Available Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 4, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 8, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of BARTLEY W. & TERRI L. KNOX and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: Tract 1: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land shown as Lot No. 1 on the minor subdivision plan of lands of P.A. F. LLC which plot was prepared by John L. Connor, Jr., professional land sur-

PAGE 35 veyor and recorded September 10, 2002 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Georgetown, Delaware in Plot Book 76, Page 191. Tract 2: All of that certain lot, piece and parcel of land as described in the attached survey prepared by John L. Connor, Jr., professional surveyor, dated April 21, 2005 and attached hereto. AND BEING the same property conveyed to the grantor(s) by deed recorded in deed book 3133, page 256, dated April 22, 2005, recorded April 27, 2005, among the aforesaid land records. BEING the same lands conveyed unto Dante Bockhorn and Amanda Bockhorn by Deed of Dante Bockhorn, Amanda Bockhorn and Robert DeHaven, dated July 6, 2006 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, in Georgetown, Delaware in Deed Book 3133, Page 256. Tax Parcel: 2-31-14.008.13 Property Address: 22873 Rum Ridge Road, Georgetown Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 4, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 8, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of

sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DANTE & AMANDA BOCKHORN and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of an Alias writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the City of Seaford, Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, more particularly described as follows, to¬ wit: BEGINNING at an iron stob located on the inside edge of 5.5 foot sidewalk, which is 4.5 feet from the face of the curb on the westerly side of Pine Street (said face of curb being 14.0 feet from the centerline thereof) at the intersection with the southerly side of Polar Street; thence with a line located on the inside of edge of a 4.6 foot sidewalk, which is 3.9 feet from the face of the curb on the southerly side of Popular Street (said face of curb being 11.0 feet from the centerline thereof), South 70 degrees 06 minutes West 92.23 feet to an iron stob located on the inside edge of the last described sidewalk at the intersection with the easterly side of Cannon Street; thence with a line located on the inside edge of a 4.9 foot sidewalk, which is located 6.4 feet from the face of the curb on the southerly side of Cannon Street said face of curb being 18.1 feet from the centerline thereof), South 18 degrees 37 minutes East 59.86 feet to a point on the inside edge of the last described sidewalk at corner for lands of Lyman H. Jamison, et ux; thence with the line of lands of said Jamison, North 69 degrees 30 minutes East 108.33 feet to a pipe located on the inside edge of the first described sidewalk on the westerly side on Pine Street, thence with the inside edge of said sidewalk, North 34 degrees 00 minutes West 60.53 feet to the point and place of beginSee LEGALS—page 36

PAGE 36 LEGALS - from Page 35 ning, containing 5,947 square feet of land, more or less, as will more fully and at large appear upon reference to a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr., dated April 9, 1988, and filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, Georgetown, Delaware, in Deed Book 1562, page 278. BEING the same lands and premises which Pierre R. Chevalier, Jersey Chevalier and Henorck Lamur did grant and convey unto Richard A. Ashby by deed dated May 3, 2004, and recorded May 6, 2004, in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Deed Book 2974, Page 315. Tax Parcel: 4-31-5.00173.00 Property Address: 223 Arch Street, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 4, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 8, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of RICHARD A. ASHBY and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/3/2tc

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MORNING STAR SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain piece, parcel and tract of land lying and being situate in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being known as LOT NO. 18 of "Bridgeville Chase" Subdivision and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron pipe found on the Westerly right of way line of Gum Branch Court (50 foot right of way) at a corner for this lot and Lot No. 17, said pipe being situate East 135 feet, more or less, from Meadow Drive; thence with Gum Branch Court South 89 degrees 27 minutes 04 seconds East 150.00 feet to an iron pipe found at a corner for this lot and Lot No. 19; thence turning and running with Lot No. 19 South 00 degrees 13 minutes 08 seconds West 418.75 feet to an iron pipe found at a corner for this lot, Lot 19 and in line of lands now or formerly of Morris L. Tatman; thence turning and running with lands now or formerly of Morris L. Tatman North 65 degrees 55 minutes 00 seconds West 164.02 feet to an iron pipe found at a corner for this lot, Lot No. 17 and in line of lands now or formerly of Morris L. Tatman; thence turning and running with Lot No. 17 North 00 degrees 13 minutes 08 seconds East a distance of 353.25 feet home to the point of beginning, said to contain 1.3292 acres of land, more or less, together with improvements, as shown on a survey prepared by MillerLewis, Inc., dated September 12, 2006. Being the same lands and premises which Monica Leblance as attorney-in-fact for Dennis R. Amatuzio and Monica Leblance as attorney-in fact did grant and convey unto Mark A. Scheper by deed dated September 21, 2006 and recorded on September 25, 2006 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 03364 Page 189. Tax Parcel: 4-30-16.0071.00 Property Address: 12126 Gum Branch Court, Bridgeville Registration is required

for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 4, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 8, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MARK A. SCHEPER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, and the State of Delaware, more particularly described as follows to wit: BEGINNING at a concrete monument (found) lying on the Northerly rightof-way line of Sussex County Road No. 544 (40' rightof-way), said concrete monument (found) being a common boundary line for this land and for lands now or formerly of Lawrence G. & Linda M. Meyers and being

• JULY 10 - 16, 2008 418 feet more or less to U.S. No. 13A; thence (1) North 63 degrees 34 minutes 51 seconds West 122.93 feet to a concrete monument, thence (2) North 21 degrees 38 minutes 01 seconds East 66.80 feet to a bold in a bulkhead (found), thence (3) South 69 degrees 26 minutes 10 seconds East 131.11 feet to a bold in bulkhead (found), thence (4) thence South 27 degrees 47 minutes 36 seconds West 79.97 feet home to the place of beginning. Being known as 8565 Hearns Pond Road Being the same lands and premises which Dane Martin did grant and convey Danny Martin by deed dated March 24, 2006 and recorded on April 6, 2006 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3292 Page 333. Tax Parcel: 3-31-3.0090.00 Property Address: 8565 Hearns Pond Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 4, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 8, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of DANNY MARTIN and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain tract, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being more particularly described as follows: commencing at a concrete monument set in the southwesterly right of way land of Pit Road, said point of beginning being 688.5 feet in a southeasterly direction from Delaware Road No. 530; thence with the line of Lot 18, South 46 degrees 30 minutes west a distance of 187.8 feet to a concrete monument; thence with lands now or formerly of Samuel Dickerson, South 43 degrees 36 minutes East a distance of 120 feet to a concrete monument; thence with the line of Lot 16, North 46 degrees 30 minutes East a distance of 188 feet to a concrete monument; thence, with the southwestern right of way line of Pitt Road and 25 feet distance from the centerline thereof, North 43 degrees 42 minutes West a distance of 120 feet to the point and place of beginning, together with the improvements thereon, containing 22,548 square feet of land, be the same more or less, and being all of Lot 17 as shown upon a plat of Pit Road Lots as the same appears of Record in deed Book 524, Page 402. Being the same lands and premises which Stephen Bruce Benfield did grant and convey Norris L. Chafin, Jr. by deed dated June 17, 1991 and recorded on June 19, 1991 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 1788 Page 41. Tax Parcel: 2-31-12.00117.00 Property Address: 10918 Pit Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's

Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 4, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 8, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of NORRIS L. CHAFIN, JR. and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situated in Beaver Dam Heights in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, known and designated as Lot No. 13 on the revised plot of Beaver Dam Heights dated March 3, 1955, as recorded in the office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County aforesaid, in Plot Book Vol. 2, page 75, and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a stake set in the high water mark or line of Williams Pond; thence running with the mutual boundary line between this lot and Lot No. 14 and along the center of a twenty foot wide road laid out as a private driveway for use in common by the owners of said Lot No. 13 and Lot No. 14 for ingress, egress and passage to and from Beaver Dam Drive, North 40 degrees 3 minutes West 139 feet to the southerly side of Beaver Dam Drive; thence See LEGALS—page 37

MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 36

SHERIFF SALE

with the same North 53 degrees East 118 feet to a stake; thence with the mutual boundary line between this lot and Lot No. 12 South 37 degrees 17 minutes East 160 feet to a stake set in the high water line of Williams Pond; thence running with the high water mark or line of said pond in a southwesterly direction to the place of beginning, containing 17,641 square feet of land, be the same more or less. BEING the same lands and premises which Margaret C. Ellis, did grant and convey unto Cherie L. Marvel, by deed dated May 2, 2000 and recorded on May 10, 2000 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 02482, Page 336. Tax Parcel: 3-31-6.00261.00 Property Address: 13 Beaver Dam Drive, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 4, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 8, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of CHERIE MARVEL, A/K/A CHERIE L. MARVEL and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/3/2tc

By virtue of an Alias writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece, parcel, tract or lot of land, lying and being situate in the Town of Laurel, Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, and being more particularly described to a recent survey performed by Gene R. Littleton & Associates, Inc., PLS dated May 1997 as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a PK nail set at the back of the curb on the South side of East Fourth Street at the intersection of Fourth and King Street, said nail being 22.5 feet West of the center line of King Street, thence running along King Street South 27 degrees 03 minutes 45 seconds West 154.86 feet to an iron stub found, a corner for this lot and lands of George W. Collins; thence turning and running by and with the Collins land the following two courses: 1.) North 67 degrees 10 minutes 45 seconds West 49.91 feet to an iron stub found in the curb at Fourth Street; thence turning and running along Fourth Street South 65 degrees 45 minutes 43 seconds East 49.93 feet home to the place of beginning and containing 7,746.7213 square feet, more or less. Being the same lands and premises which Kathryn S. Moore and Paul M. Beach, II did grant and convey unto Michelle R. Casselbury by deed dated December 22, 2005 and recorded or January 6, 2006 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3256, Page 180. Tax Parcel: 3-32-1.07322.00 Property Address: 542 East 4th Street, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check,

is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 4, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 8, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MICHELLE CASSELBURY and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: Beginning at a concrete monument located on the southeasterly right of way boundary line of Jamore Drive and said point being situate 425.29 feet South of the centerline of Sussex Street; thence running along a line forming the common boundary between this subject parcel and adjoining Lot 53, South 42 degrees 06 minutes 40 seconds West 85.09 feet to a concrete monument found; thence turning and running along a line forming the common boundary between this subject parcel and adjoining Lot 52A, initially, and Lot 88, subsequently, North 6L degrees, 20 minutes 55 seconds West 203.56 feet to a concrete monument found on the aforesaid southeasterly, right of way boundary line of Jamore Drive; thence turning and running by and with said same right of way boundary line, North 38 degrees 30 minutes 00 sec-

• JULY 10 - 16, 2008 onds East 99.91 feet back to the place of beginning, said parcel of land containing 18,641 square feet of land, more or less as shown on a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr., Registered Surveyor, dated October 17, 1997. Being the same lands and premises which Jean Robert Augustin did grant and convey unto Emane Edouard by deed dated January 3, 2002 and recorded on January 15, 2002 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2665 Page 228. Tax Parcel: 3-31-6.00236.00 Property Address: 89 Jamore Drive, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 4, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 8, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of EMANE EDOUARDO and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/3/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter

PAGE 37 At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain tract, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being known and designated as LOT NOS. 3 and 4 as shown on a subdivision plot prepared by J. J. McCann, Inc., Surveyors, dated February, 1987, as filed for record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Plot Book 36, Page 325 and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a found iron pipe on the aforementioned easterly right-of-way line of Sussex Highway (US Route 13, right-of-way varies) and at a corner for lands now or formerly of James and Joyce Cantiello, said point being distant 1,240 feet more or less from the right-of-way intersection of Woodyard Road; thence running along the aforementioned right-ofway line North 20 degrees 24 minutes 39 seconds East 400.00 feet to a found iron pipe at a corner for lands now or formerly of Jeffery R. and Linda C. Kurtz; thence following said Kurtz lands South 69 degrees 34 minutes 33 seconds East passing over a found iron pipe at 689.77 feet a total distance of 706.94 feet to a point on line of lands now or formerly of John J. and Dorothy Yoder and in the center line of White Marsh Tax Ditch; thence following said Yoder lands and the centerline of said ditch the following two (2) courses and distances: 1) South 01 degree 18 minutes 28 seconds West 20.29 feet and 2) South 12 degrees 45 minutes 30 seconds East 455.55 feet to a corner for lands now or formerly of James and Joyce Cantiello; thence finally running with Cantiello lands North 69 degrees 33 minutes 00 seconds West passing over a found iron pipe at 22.52 feet a total distance of 962.81 feet to the place of beginning containing 7.64 acres of land, more or less, together with all of the improvements located thereon., as surveyed by Charles D. Murphy Associates, Inc., dated August 6, 2006. Being the same lands and premises which John M. Mervine. Jr. and Jan Lynn Mervine did grant and convey unto Jose D. Villeda by deed dated August 10, 2006 and recorded on Au-

gust 11, 2006 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3347 Page 237. Tax Parcel: 5-30-5.003.08 Property Address: 11339 Sussex County Highway, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before August 4, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on August 8, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JOSE D. VILLEDA & MARLIN Y. VILLEDA and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 7/3/2tc

PUBLIC HEARING The Commissioners of Bridgeville will hold a Public Hearing and present an Ordinance related to swimming pools, for a second and final reading at their monthly meeting scheduled for July 14, 2008, beginning at 7:00 P.M. in the Town Hall, 101 N. Main Street, Bridgeville, Delaware. COMMISSIONERS OF BRIDGEVILLE JOSEPH T. CONAWAY, COMMISSION PRESIDENT 7/10/1tc

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Page 38

MORNING STAR • July 10 - 16, 2008

Health

Keep kids cool this summer

Governor Ruth Ann Minner will join members of the board of directors and staff of Delaware Guidance Services for Children & Youth, Inc. on Wednesday, July 30, at 11:30 a.m., as they celebrate the opening of a new mental health clinic in Seaford. Last August, Gillis, Gilkerson Inc. broke ground on the new 6,900 square foot building, located at 900 Health Services Dr. in the new Herring Run Professional Center on Alternate Route 13 North. At the building’s opening, DGS board and staff members will celebrate more than just the end of construction — they will also celebrate the culmination of three years of planning, deliberation, fine-tuning and fundraising. The facility will give Delaware Guidance Services enough space to triple its caseload in western Sussex County from 500 to 1,500 children and their families. Programs being offered through this new facility include outpatient clinical

services, intensive outpatient clinical services, school-based counseling, and 24-hour mobile crisis intervention. Says DGS Executive Director Bruce Kelsey, “We are very excited by the opportunities this new facility provides to expand our services in western Sussex County. This new building is a testament to our commitment to the community and to providing quality mental health services to children and their families, regardless of their ability to pay.” For more information, contact Cathy Rose, Sussex County Clinical director, at 302-262-3505. Delaware Guidance Services for Children & Youth, Inc. has been serving Delaware’s families for 55 years and is the largest provider of mental health services for children and youth in the state. DGS serves over 10,000 children and their families annually with a continuum of mental health programs offered through clinics in Wilmington, Newark, Dover, Lewes and Seaford. CHILD DONATES HAIR - On May 9, 9-year-old Bridget Johnson of Felton donated 10 inches of hair to Locks of Love at the Western Sussex Relay for Life. When asked if she was sure she wanted to donate her hair, as it has been long all of her life, she replied, "My hair will grow back, but I would like to give some to someone who can't grow any."

Nanticoke Memorial's Cancer Screening Nurse Navigator Melinda Huffman stands next to the national winning poster "One Small State's Dedication is the Power to Make a Difference in Colon Cancer."

Huffman speaks at conference Ms. Melinda Huffman, Cancer Screening Nurse Navigator for Nanticoke Memorial Hospital's Cancer Care Center and Delaware Health and Social Services, recently traveled to Salt Lake City, Utah for a Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates (SGNA) annual national education conference. This was the fifth annual conference that Melinda attended and the third consecutive year that she has been a national speaker. This year, in addition to speaking about the Delaware Cancer Nurse Navigation Program, she submitted a poster abstract showing the Delaware Cancer Nurse Screening Navigator program's colon cancer results. The poster entitled

"One Small State's Dedication is the Power to Make a Difference in Colon Cancer" received a first place ribbon. Melinda currently serves as the President of the Delaware SGNA-Region 10 and has worked with members to bring this small region into the age of technology. The idea of advancing the region through technology was submitted by Karen Bell (DSU/Endo manager at Bayhealth, Milford) and Melinda Huffman as a poster abstract. That poster entitled "Delaware SGNA + Technology = The Power to Make a Difference" received a second place award. For more information on cancer screening, contact Huffman at 302-629-6615, ext. 3765.

MORNING STAR • July 10 - July 16, 2008

Page 39

Health There is a lot we can do for children in Delaware By Dr. Anthony Policastro

Delaware does a fine job of providing health care coverage to children. The Medicaid program and the CHIPS program provide large safety nets for the children of our State. However, both of these programs are supported by our tax dollars. For that reason, we all have a role in making sure that our children stay as healthy as possible. We certainly do that for our own children. We need to think about how we can do that for the children that our tax dollars support. Two areas in particular offer us that opportunity. One has to do with accidents. Accidents remain the largest cause of childhood injury and death. For that reason, we spend a lot of money taking care of children who have been in accidents. There are many things we can do to encourage our friends and neighbors to keep their children safe.

One of those is locking up firearms. About 20% of families with firearms keep them loaded and unlocked. Children are injured because of playing with these firearms. Another is to avoid trampolines. These account for over 50,000 ER visits per year. Most of those visits are for broken arms and legs. Some of them are for broken necks with paralysis. Making sure that bicycle riders wear helmets is another easy thing to encourage. I see a lot of patients in the office that do not wear helmets. I see a lot of bicycle riders on the street that do not wear helmets. Head trauma is a costly injury to treat. Automobile accidents remain the number one killer of children. They also cause serious injuries to many others. Those injuries are often very costly to treat. We need to make sure we encourage car seat and seat belt use in all children that we know. That is especially true when children other than our own ride in our cars. The other area that we can perhaps make an impact is in premature birth. While we do not know enough about premature births to stop them all, we are a lot smarter than we used to be. There are things that we can do to decrease the risk of premature birth. Unfortunately, in many cases, women who deliver prematurely have not had any prenatal care. The typical costs of a sick premature infant run into the hundreds of thousands of dollars. Ultimately, we all pay for that care. We need to do our best to encourage pregnant women to get early prenatal care. That is especially true if they have already had one premature infant. Those women are at risk for another premature delivery. However, we also know that there are hormone shots that we can give to prevent that second premature delivery. We just cannot give

The typical costs of a sick premature infant run into the hundreds of thousands of dollars. Ultimately, we all pay for that care.

Healthcare tribute nominations Nanticoke Memorial Hospital is seeking nominations for its fourth annual Tributes For Healthcare Leadership Recognition Dinner, scheduled for November 13 at Heritage Shores Clubhouse in Bridgeville. Awards will be presented in three categories. The Founders award will be presented to an individual who has made significant contributions in furthering the mission of the hospital to improve the health status of our communities. Current employees of NanticokeHealth Services and active Medical Staff are not eligible. The Leadership in Philanthropy Award is presented to an individual or a group who has made support of Nanticoke Memorial Hospital and community health a philanthropic priority in their lives. The Physicians Hall of Fame will recognize physicians who have served Nanticoke Memorial and the community with distinction and selflessness. Nominees for this award must be physicians who have retired from the Nanticoke Medical Staff or have served at least 10 years on the Medical Staff. Nominations in each category can be made by calling 629-6611, extension 2405, or in writing to Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, Corporate Development, 801 Middleford Road, Seaford, DE 19973, or by sending an email to BrownT@nanticoke.org. The name of the nominee should be accompanied by a few words about their qualifications or a personal anecdote. Deadline is August 1.

Mouhammed A. Habra, M.D. will no longer be seeing patients effective July 13, 2008. Patients should contact the office to make arrangements for their medical records.

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improve the safety of or children. In the process we might just save ourselves some tax dollars.

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Page 40

MORNING STAR • July 10 - 16, 2008

Health Briefs Alzheimer’s holds training

The Alzheimer’s Association Delaware Valley Chapter sponsors The Family Caregiver Education Series four times a year in each of Delaware’s three counties. Milford Center Genesis Healthcare at 700 Marvel Road in Milford will host the training on Aug. 1 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. This program includes a medical overview, legal and financial issues, challenging symptoms, daily care issues and information on getting the help you need. This training for family caregivers is free and lunch will be provided by Milford Center, therefore pre-registration is required by July 23. For more information or to register, call Jamie Magee, branch office coordinator, at 302-854-9788.

Kids health fair

Kids can learn how to live healthy lives on Tuesday, July 22 at the Nemours Health and Prevention Services’ Healthy Kids Day Health Fair from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the fairgrounds in Harrington, in the Delaware Electric Cooperative’s free entertainment tent located near the Midway entrance. With 23 vendors, this event covers physical activity, nutrition, disease prevention, immunizations, cancer prevention and early detection, and injury prevention. Original members of the Titans football team (they inspired Disney’s “Remember the Titans” movie) will visit at 9:30 a.m. and offer a 10 a.m. autograph session; Miss Delaware follows at noon, and Grover from Sesame Street will appear at 1:30 p.m. There will also be cup stacking demonstrations at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Nemours Health and Prevention Services is promoting its “5-2-1 and Almost None” campaign. Visitors will receive giveaways and complimentary information about immunizations, safe drinking water, preventing lead exposure, healthy homes and the necessity of safe food and beverages. Kids can play musical chairs or enjoy the speed cup stacking demonstration. For information about the Delaware State Fair’s other events, visit www.delawarestatefair.com.

Stroke support group

Nanticoke Memorial Hospital will offer free monthly Stroke Support Group meetings designed for individuals who have survived a stroke and their families and caregivers. Meetings are held the third Thursday of each month at Nanticoke Cancer Care Center, from 1:30 - 3:30 p.m.

The meetings will consist of guest speakers and breakaway sessions, in which caregivers and survivors will meet in two groups to discuss concerns, provide support and networking. Refreshments will be provided. Sheila Brant and Joan Burditt, occupational therapists at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital, will facilitate the support group meetings. Pre-registration not required. For more information, call 629-6611, ext. 5121.

Oncology symposium

The Sixth Annual Seaside Oncology Symposium will take place Saturday, Oct. 11, at the Boardwalk Plaza Hotel in Rehoboth Beach. The Tunnell Cancer Center and the Medical Society of Delaware sponsor this annual, half-day symposium to update participants on the diagnosis and management of cancer. It is designed for physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals. The conference, which begins at 7:30 a.m. and ends with lunch at 1 p.m., is planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and Policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint-sponsorship of the Medical Society of Delaware and Beebe Medical Center. The Seaside Oncology Symposium is supported by unrestricted educational grants from various pharmaceutical companies and programs. Details regarding this year’s topics and speakers will be available soon. Hotel reservations may be made directly with the Boardwalk Plaza at 800-332-3224.

Depression support

The Mental health Association in Delaware will be sponsoring a Depression Support Group in Laurel on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month. The meetings begin at 7 p.m. The MHA encourages anyone dealing with a depressive disorder to attend. Register in advance by calling 1-800-287-6423. Peer support groups sponsored by Mental Health Association of Delaware are not intended to replace professional mental health treatment. MHA does not publish support group locations; locations are provided with registration.

Caregiver support group

Join our monthly support group at the Cheer community center, the second Mon-

day of each month at 11 a.m., 854-9500.This support group is for you, whether you are a new caregiver or have been taking care of a loved one for years. We are turning the “Fearless caregiver” book into a guide for our support group. Each month a chapter will be discussed, concerns shared and support given.

Weight Loss Surgery Support The Western New Life WLS Support Group will be having its monthly meeting on July 17. We meet at Trinity United Methodist Church, 17249 Phillips Hill Road, Laurel. We meet each third Thursday of the month. Everyone who

has had, or is thinking about, having weight loss surgery is welcome. The theme of the July 17 meeting is craft night - we’ll be making new bracelets for our medical IDs. Group Leaders: Jennifer Rosen (jrosen87@comcast.net) and Heather O’Connor (meannevil2@yahoo.com)

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“If you’ve had years of heartburn symptoms, you may be a candidate for laparoscopic surgery.” —Dr. Nyen Chong Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgeon If you frequently suffer from heartburn, you could be experiencing a condition called GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). GERD occurs when destructive stomach acid backs up into the esophagus and may affect between five and seven percent of adults in our country.

GERD can have other effects: • Bad breath • Inflammation of the gums, and erosion of tooth enamel • Hoarseness, esophagitis (inflammation of the esophagus) and dysphagia (difficulty swallowing) • Barrett’s Esophagus (precancerous changes that could lead to esophageal cancer) Common treatments for GERD include diet change, medication and waiting at least two hours after eating before sleeping. If these methods are still not effective, surgery may be right for you. Through a minimally invasive procedure known as laparoscopy, acid can be prevented from entering the esophagus, alleviating heartburn and allowing the esophagus to heal.

For more information or to make an appointment, please call 302-629-0452 or 1-877-NHS4DOCS.

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MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

PAGE 41

SEAFORD SOFTBALL- Shown (l to r) is the Nanticoke Major League all-star softball team: back- Coach Frank Passwaters, Manager Arlie Wooters, and Coach Ken Kessler; middle- Michaela Trice, Erya Quillen, Tynetta Washington, Alijae Cannon, Alyssa Passwaters, Brianna Kessler, Erin Marine, Kristen Green; front- Chrstal Loudon, Hailey Passwaters, Monshea Murry, Andrey Grant, and Mackenzie Wooters. Photo by Lynn Schofer Woodbridge’s Nicole Widen delivers a pitch during her team’s District III Major League softball win last Monday in Greenwood. Widen earned the win, striking out 13 in the tournament opener. Photo by Mike McClure

Woodbridge Major League softball team opens tourney with 12-4 win By Mike McClure The Woodbridge Major League all-star baseball team opened the District III tournament with a 12-4 win over Lower Sussex on Monday, July 7 in Greenwood. The Woodbridge bats produced four runs in the first and sixth innings and pitcher Nicole Widen and the defense held Lower Sussex to four runs. In the top of the first, Caitlin Slater walked and stole second and Devon Bitler put down a bunt single to put runners on the corners. Tiarra Maddox’s infield single plated the first run and Bitler came home on a single by Hailey Andrews after stealing third base. Widen (fielder’s choice) stole second and Maddox came home on the play to make it 3-0. Widen later scored on an error for the team’s fourth run. In the bottom of the inning, Lower Sussex’s Jenna Stevens walked, Sarah Hickman reached on a single, and the runners moved up on a ground out by Ashley Banks. Stevens beat the throw home as Amber Wharton reached on a fielder’s choice (4-1). Wharton later stole second, but Hickman was thrown out at the plate following a wild pitch. Despite a pair of leadoff walks in the bottom of the second, Woodbridge got out of the inning without any damage. Widen struck out a pair of batters for two of the three outs, stranding the two base runners. In the top of the third, Widen helped her own cause as she singled and scored on an error. Wharton singled and came home on a wild pitch to make the score 5-

WOODBRIDGE SOFTBALL- Shown (l to r) is the Woodbridge Major League all-star softball team: back- Coach Bobby Bitler, Jessica Brauner, Hailey Andrews, Nicole Widen, Danielle Glenn, Daisjah Williams, Manager Chris Andrews; middle- Emily Chisenahll, Kaitlyn Slater, Kate Schroeder, Darian Scott, Castaysha Lewis; front- Devon Bitler and Tiarra Maddox. Photo by Lynn Schofer MODIFIED SOFTBALL-

Woodbridge shortstop Devon Bitler fires home during a District III Major League softball contest on Monday. Photo by Mike McClure

2 through three innings of play. Bitler walked and scored on a wild pitch and Maddox doubled and scored on a ground out in the top of the fourth. Widen then struck out the side in the bottom of the inning. Woodbridge’s Castaysha Lewis reached on a fielder’s choice and scored Continued on page 44

G a t o r s ’ pitcher Chris Martinez delivers a pitch during a recent Seaford Department of Recreation modified softball game. Troy Morris of Daisey’s looks to make contact during the same game. Photos by David Elliott

PAGE 42

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

Lingo Jr. repeats in late models, Callaway earns first win

BEFORE THE RUN - Pete Rosembert, clustred in the middle with Rob Perciful and Lizzie Perciful, listen to instructions before the start of the 5K race at Laurel’s July 4th celebration. Rosembert, a 1999 graduate of Seaford High School, finished second in the run with a time of 17:28. Rob Perciful is a track coach at Seaford High and Lizzie, his daughter, is on the track team there. Photo by Lynn R. Parks.

AND THEY’RE OFF- More than 80 runners and walkers take off at the start of the 5K run July 4th in Laurel. David Ricksecker, Laurel, won the race with a time of 17:27. His sister, Rebekah, was the first woman to finish. Her time was 19:07. Above, David Ricksecker, 18, Laurel, approaches the finish line of the July 4th 5K run in Laurel Friday, with Pete Rosembert, 26, Seaford, close behind. Rosembert’s time was 17:28. Photos by Lynn R.

Donald Lingo, Jr. may have learned something when he posted his first win of the season last week in the 20-lap Super Late Model feature at the Delaware International Speedway as last Saturday night he took the lead on the second lap and never looked back for his second straight victory. Jon Callaway moved into the Super Late Model division this season driving for Gary Simpson. He didn’t seem to mind the three week wait from the rain delayed main from June 14 as he posted his first career win in the division. The evening started on lap four of the postponed 20-lap Super Late Model feature. When the rains came three weeks ago the youth squad of Kevin Scott, Jr., Ross Robinson and Staci Warrington were locked in a torrid battle. When the race restarted, Callaway moved by Warrington for third behind the lead Scott, Jr. and Robinson. By the halfway sign the top three were still Scott, Robinson, and Callaway with Norman Short climbing to fourth and Warrington holding on to fifth. Callaway locked into a battle with Robinson for second and took the spot with four laps left to go. Callaway continued his drive to the front taking the lead at the white flag and holding off Scott, Jr. by a mere .82 seconds at the checkered for his first win in the Simpson Construction/Kelly’s Transport No. 12K. Robinson held off a fast closing Ray Davis, Jr. for third was Davis maintained his point lead by finishing in fourth. Veteran Hal Browning turned in a solid run, finishing in fifth. In the regular 20-lap Super Late Model feature, Rob Massey led the first lap before Donald Lingo, Jr., who had started on the outside of the second row, took the lead. Once out front, Lingo, Jr. would never be headed. Hal Browning took over the second spot on lap three with Staci Warrington running in third. Ricky Elliott was on the move from his eighth starting spot jumping into fourth and taking third from Warrington on lap five. Elliott took second behind Lingo, Jr. at the halfway sign with Browning holding on in third. Callaway held the fourth spot at this point with Kenny Pettyjohn, driving for Alex Beaumont, running in fifth. Lingo turned the quickest lap of the night with a 19.036 and was able to stave off the challenge of Elliott for the win. Lingo crossed the checkered .941 seconds ahead driving the Lingo Marine/Atkins Masonry/Parker Farm/Rocket. Elliott finished in second with Callaway topping off a great night taking third from Browning on the final lap. Ross Robinson also finished out a good evening by rounding out the top five. In the 15-lap Crate Model feature, Justin Breeding held the lead from his pole starting position for the first three circuits. Mike Wilson, who started in second, took the point on lap three and at the halfway sign the top five were Wilson, Breeding, Tyler Reed, Kelly Putz, and Joe Warren. Wilson would make no mistakes as he drove his Sundance Pool Supplies No. 12 to his first win of the season and the third of his career. Breeding finished out an outstanding run in second Reed nailing down third. Herb Tunis made a late race charge to finish in the fourth spot with Putz finishing in fifth.

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MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

SAFE AT THE PLATE- Woodbridge pitcher Kelsey Eckert covers the plate as Laurel’s Savannah Brown slides in safely during a 9-10 year-old all-star softball game held recently. Photo by Mike McClure

PAGE 43

Shortstop Brad Reynolds throws a runner out at first during a modified softball game last week in Seaford. Photo by David Elliott

Seaford Star Little League scoreboard for the week of 6/30 Woodbridge- baseball- Senior League- Woodbridge 11, Nanticoke Braves 4Tyler Dickson scattered seven hits and struck out three as he pitched a complete game in Woodbridge’s win. At the plate, Dickson and Trevor Wescott both went 2-3 with a double, an RBI and two runs. Jordan Lewis and David Walls both had a two-run single and a run. Jordan Vazquez had an RBI single and two runs; Brock Little singled and scored a run; and Robbie Miller and Jeremy Messick each had a run scored. For Nanticoke, Dustin Taylor, Jamil Moore and Keith Parker each singled and scored a run. Anthony Johnston went 2-3; Frankie Messick and Garrett DeWolf each singled; and Scott Donovan added a run. Woodbridge 16, Millsboro/Georgetown Orioles 8- David Walls and Jordan Lewis scattered six hits struck out two. Walls picked up the win on the mound. At the plate, Walls went 4-5 with an RBI and three runs; Lewis went 2-2 with three RBIs and three runs; Dustin Jones was 3-5 with three runs; Trevor Wescott went 2-4 with a two-run double and three runs; Brock Little batted 2-3 with a run; and Tyler Dickson went 2-4 w/ an RBI and a RS. Tom Jefferson singled and scored a run; John Boyer had two RBIs; Jeremy Messick added an RBI; and Taylor Hashman scored a run. For the Orioles, Ethan Jones hit a two-run home run; Michael Schlitter went 3-4 with a double and a run; and Shawn Mears and Dan Urgo each scored a run. Woodbridge 18, Nanticoke Braves 4- Dustin Jones, Jeremy Messick and Tom Jefferson scattered four hits, struck out nine and allowed just two earned runs as the Woodbridge Senior League baseball team ended their regular season with an 11-1 record. At the plate, Jones had two RBIs and a run; Messick singled and walked; and Jefferson went 3-5 with a double, a three-run home run off the left field scoreboard, and three runs. Robbie Miller went 3-3 with a three-run home run, four RBIs and three runs; Tyler Dickson went 2-3 with a double, three RBIs and a run; Jordan Vazquez had a double and three runs; and David Walls had a two-run triple and three runs. Brock Little doubled twice and had an RBI and three runs; Trevor Wescott had an RBI double and a run; and John Boyer added an RBI. For Nanticoke, Frankie Messick went 2-3 with a double and a run; Lance Marvel doubled and scored; Scott Donovan singled; and Dustin Taylor and Anthony Johnston each scored a run.

Shown are the winners from last Wednesday’s Ladies Day at Heritage Shores are: Muriel Waite (right), first; Kathy Harrigan, second; and Kay Mooney (standing), third.

Seaford Golf and Country Club dual meet schedule July 10 at Ocean Pines July 14 home vs Sea Colony July 17 home vs. Elks July 21 at Cecil July 22 at Seaford Swim Association July 24 at Lewes

Seaford Swim Association dual meet schedule July 10 at Sho’Men July 14 at Kent July 17 home vs. Lewes July 21 home vs. Sussex YMCA July 22 home vs. SGCC July 24 at Lake Forest

SGCC 9 Hole Ladies to hold fashion show, auction, and tourney

District III Little League Major League all-star schedules

On Wednesday, July 16 the 9 Hole Ladies will hold a fashion show along with silent and Chinese auctions at the Seaford Golf and Country Club. Doors open at 5 p.m. to view the items up for auction. A large cheese, ham spread and fresh fruits display will be available at that time. From 6 to 7 p.m., hot hors d’houvres will be served and the fashion show will begin at 7 p.m. with Mikki Madden as M.C. of the show. The price for the entertainment and food is $15 per person and tickets can be purchased from the main office or from any of the 9 Hole Ladies. You can also call Nancy Harper at 745-1998 and she will hold tickets for you at the door. On Thursday, July 17 the Ladies 9 Hole Member/Guest Tournament will take place with all proceeds going towards the fight against cancer.

Baseball- Major League- 7/10- Woodbridge vs. Georgetown, 6 p.m. at Georgetown; 7/11- Laurel vs. Milton, 8 p.m. at Lower Sussex, Nanticoke vs. Lewes, 6 p.m. at Georgetown, Woodbridge-Georgetown winner vs. Rehoboth, 8 p.m. at Georgetown; 7/13 and 7/15- winner’s bracket at Lower Sussex; 7/12-7/16- loser’s bracket at Georgetown; 7/17- championship, 6 p.m. at Lower Sussex; 7/18- championship 2 (if necessary), 6 p.m. at Lower Sussex Softball- Major League- 7/10- championship 6 p.m. at Woodbridge; 7/11- championship 2 (if necessary) 6 p.m. at Woodbridge

Seaford Star sports section has its own e-mail address Got sports? Send your sports scores, photos, and press releases to the Star’s sports e-mail address: sports@mspublications.com. You can also send info by fax to 302-6299243. Call sports editor Mike McClure at 302-629-9788 with any questions.

Covering all the local sports teams, the Seaford Star.

Sports items that appeared only in the Seaford Star (7/3) The following items appeared exclusively in last week’s Seaford Star sports section: District III 9-10 year old softball game coverage; Senior League baseball photos and scores; Seaford Golf and Country Club swimming photos; District III 9-10 year old baseball coverage and photos; Heritage Shores Ladies 18 Hole Golf Association photo; District III all-star schedules; Post 6 American Legion baseball photos; Star Team of the Week photo; Star Sports Calendar; Pat Knight schedules; Seaford Bowling Lanes results; A View from the Cheap Seats column

PAGE 44

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

Man Up basketball is changing the game of health among minorities

Woodbridge’s Kate Schroeder is tagged out at the plate by Lower Sussex catcher Sarah Hickman during Monday’s game in Greenwood. Woodbridge won the game, 12-4. Photo by Mike McClure

Major softball continued on a passed ball (8-2) before Lower Sussex answered with a pair of runs in the bottom of the fifth. Wharton doubled in Stevens and scored on an error. Woodbridge plated four more runs in the final inning as Slater walked, stole second, and scored on a bunt single by Bitler. Bitler went to second on the throw and eventually scored on a single by

Maddox; Maddox scored on an error; and Hailey Andrews reached first on an error and scored on a passed ball. Widen struck out the side (13 strikeouts) to preserve the 12-4 win. Maddox went 3-for-4 with two runs and two RBIs; Bitler was 2-for-3 with three runs; and Andrews batted 2-for-4 with a run and an RBI. Slater drew three walks and scored two runs and Widen had a hit, two runs, and an RBI.

Since mid March a group of adolescent young men have been using the game of basketball to advocate and spread the word about the health gaps among African American teens and families in western Sussex County. The Change Da Game Project: Health First is a new initiative sponsored by SPEAAK, Supporting Parents for the Education of African American Kids. SPEAAK is a local parent based group that focuses on parental involvement in education and community. Natasha Mullen, program parent/community coordinator organized this particular project. Coached by Staff Sgt. Jerry Lee, Bruce Mosley, and Dr. Julius Mullen, the MAN UP travel basketball program embraces social issues in the community, which provides these young men with great leadership and citizenship skills. The program is comprised of two teams, one 13/14 year old team and one 15/16 year old team. Thanks to the Division of Public Health and Sussex Child Health Promotion Coalition, the program had the opportunity to utilize resources to adequately implement and incorporate health awareness. Coach Mullen says, “it is no secret that are evident health gaps targeting many minority populations, perhaps none more than African Americans.” Many researchers agree that African Americans suffer most from serious health illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and other notable health issues. “We have an obligation to help our community become better, helping people become physically fit and eating healthy is our focus this summer,” Staff Sgt. Lee explains. Both teams have used participation in basketball tournaments, leagues and practices as a way to engage in physical fitness and eat lots of fruit, vegetables, and water. They also did a workshop for their parents as a way to educate and encourage their own families to be more active, eat

tasty fruits and vegetables. “I think the most important part about the workshop was the disturbing information shared about African American health statistics, I am glad to see these young men learning about the importance of living healthier early in their lives instead of later, stated by Ms. Arnita GibsonThomas, parent of three young boys. The players also prepared strawberry-banana fruit smoothies for their parents during the presentation. “It was fun for us, my mom wanted me to put sugar in her smoothie but I didn’t and she could not believe it tasted so good,” eighth grader Andre Washington said. In addition to their community servicing, both MAN UP teams showed their will and skill on the basketball court. With stingy defense, the older team won the Maryland Cardinal Tournament championship as they beat a very tough Crisfield team in the tournament’s championship game. The 13/14 year old team placed second as they fought back and played three back to back games to qualify to play in the championship game. Seaford Parks and Recreation hosted a spring high school and a middle school league. Both teams played in the championship game. The older team lost to a very tough Woodbridge team which included all seniors from last year’s Henlopen Conference championship team. “I was so proud of the boys as they showed no fear and played and incredible game of mental toughness,” says Coach Mullen. Despite being short manned, the younger team sent their championship game to overtime against Easton. They lost the game by two points, 63-61. On a larger circuit with approximately 50 teams from the east coast, both MAN UP teams placed third in the Ocean City Beach Bound Tournament, held in Ocean City, Md.

DISTRICT CHAMPS- The Laurel 9-10 year old baseball team celebrates after winning the District III championship last Tuesday in Lewes. Photo by Mike McClure

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy! Woodbridge catcher Caitlin Slater throws to first after fielding a bunt during last week’s game against Lower Sussex. Photo by Mike McClure

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

PAGE 45

A view from the cheap seats By Mike McClure, Star Sports Editor

Daisey’s pitcher Brent Jackson comes home with a pitch during a Seaford Department of Recreation modified softball game last week in Seaford. Photo by David Elliott

Kennedy Keenan was recently featured in an article in the spring edition of “The Mason Spirit”, the newsletter for George Mason University. Keenan, the daughter of Donna Keenan of Delmar and Tim and Debbie Keenan of Laurel, recently completed her junior year at the Fairfax, Va., school. She was recognized for her community service, which included helping the homeless and a leukemia patient. Kennedy was a key member of the Wildcat field hockey, soccer, and basketball team’s during her years at Delmar High. Seaford grad Bailey Noel , currently a lifeguard at Fenwick Island, was recently pictured in an out of state paper running practice drills with the beach patrol in preparation for rescues and competitions. Quick hits- The District III Major League softball tournament was delayed by a couple days due to last weekend’s rain. The tournament continues this week in Greenwood (winner’s bracket) and Rehoboth (loser’s bracket). The championship is slated to take place Saturday and Sunday (if necessary). The Major League baseball tournament will begin on Thursday in Georgetown with winner’s bracket games at Lower Sussex. The Junior and Senior League baseball and softball tournaments begin this weekend but the schedules have yet to be determined. Nothing like waiting till the last minute, something I can relate to. The Pat Knight tournaments also begin this weekend at a ballpark near you. Go out and support the local players. The meet between the Seaford Golf and Country Club and Seaford Swim Association swim teams is scheduled to be made up on Tuesday, July 22.

Laurel’s Cade Pusey collects a single during his team’s 7-2 win over Rehoboth in District III 9-10 year old baseball tournament play. Photo by Mike McClure

The Gators’ Scott Morris takes an inside pitch during a SDR modified softball game last week. Photo by David Elliott

District III Pat Knight Invitational tournaments are set The Delaware District III Pat Knight Invitational tournaments will take place on the following dates (Western Sussex games only): Minor League softball (at Rehoboth)- July 12- Millsboro vs. Laurel, 6 p.m. Nanticoke vs. Rehoboth, 8 p.m.; July 14- Laurel vs. Rehoboth, 6 p.m., Millsboro vs. Nanticoke, 8 p.m.; July 15- Laurel vs. Nanticoke, 8 p.m.; July 17- second place at first place, doubleheader if necessary Minor League baseball (at Seaford)- July 12- Laurel vs. Lewes, 6 p.m., Nanticoke vs. Rehoboth, 6 p.m., Woodbridge vs. Georgetown, 8 p.m.; July 14- Laurel vs. Millsboro, 8 p.m., Rehoboth vs. Woodbridge, 6 p.m., Nanticoke vs. Georgetown, 8 p.m.; July 15- Laurel vs. Georgetown, 8 p.m., Woodbridge vs. Lewes, 6 p.m., Nanticoke vs. Millsboro, 8 p.m.; July 16- Laurel vs. Rehoboth, 6 p.m., Nanticoke vs. Lewes, 6 p.m., Woodbridge vs. Millsboro, 8 p.m.; July 17- Laurel vs. Lower Sussex, 6 p.m.; Nanticoke vs. Woodbridge, 8 p.m.; July 18- Nanticoke vs. Lower Sussex, 6 p.m., Laurel vs. Woodbridge, 8 p.m.; July 21- Laurel vs. Nanticoke, 6 p.m., Woodbridge vs. Lower Sussex, 6 p.m.; July 22- championship, 6 p.m. Major League softball (at Georgetown)- July 12- Nanticoke vs. Millsboro/Georgetown, 6 p.m.; July 14- Nanticoke vs. Millsboro/Georgetown, 6 p.m.; July 15- Nanticoke vs. Georgetown/Millsboro (if necessary), 6 p.m. Major League baseball (at Millsboro)- July 12- Nanticoke vs. Rehoboth, 6 p.m., Laurel vs. Georgetown, 6 p.m.; July 14- Laurel vs. Millsboro, 8 p.m., Woodbridge vs. Rehoboth, 6 p.m.; July 15- Woodbridge vs. Georgetown, 6 p.m., Nanticoke vs. Millsboro, 6 p.m.; July 16- Woodbridge vs. Millsboro, 6 p.m., Nanticoke vs. Georgetown, 8 p.m., Laurel vs. Rehoboth, 6 p.m.; July 17- Laurel vs. Georgetown, 6 p.m., Nanticoke vs. Woodbridge, 8 p.m.; July 18- Laurel vs. Woodbridge, 8 p.m., Nanticoke vs. Lower Sussex, 6 p.m.; July 19- Laurel vs. Nanticoke, 6 p.m., Woodbridge vs. Lower Sussex, 6 p.m.; July 21- championship, 6 p.m. Junior League baseball (at Georgetown)- July 14- Nanticoke vs. Cape, 6 p.m.; July 15- Nanticoke vs. Millsboro/Georgetown, 6 p.m.; July 16- second place at first place (doubleheader if necessary), 6 p.m.

SUDOKU ANSWERS:

Badges of honor- Sports injuries are never a fun thing, especially when they happen to you. But when we get older we kind of look at the scars, etc. as badges of honor from our past conquests on the athletic fields. Of course, the older you get the bigger the accomplishment becomes. One home run eventually turns into two or three, 20 points becomes 30 or 40 points, and a 20-yard touchdown run morphs into an 80-yard run. But that’s the fun thing about sports. Whether you’re recalling your own accomplishments or somebody else’s, those events blend in with other events in your life. I’ll never forget where I was the day Cal Ripken broke Lou Gehrig’s consecutive games played streak. I was in a radio studio working the board for the Orioles game, listening intently as Jon Miller, Fred Manfra, and Chuck Thompson described each detail of the historic event. The only bad part about getting older is that you tend to play sports less and less, so the bruises and bumps you sport usually come from something other than a great athletic accomplishment. I can look at my swollen ankles and recall with great pleasure my times playing basketball, even when I broke and sprained my ankles on a somewhat regular basis. But from now on when I look at my left index finger, which hopefully won’t remain as mangled and deformed as it is right now, I’ll remember the night I opened a window on it. We don’t like to remember the stupid things we do. After all “stupid is as stupid does”. Then again, I’ll pay attention to what I’m doing the next time I open that window. Local grads- Delmar graduate

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MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

Seaford Bowling Lanes Michelle Campbell 278 Ashley James 755

Wednesday AM No Tap Tuesday Nascar High games and series Josh James 326, 811

High games and series Doug Avery 338, 115 Judi Uccello 329, 1,249

Summer Senior Express High games and series Dania Griffin 278, 769 Cora Hartman 300, 791

Weds. Summer Adult Youth High games and series David King 281, 795

Dawn Carey Kim Marine Michael Cherrix Brittany Hastings

272 774 282, 775 263, 758

Thurs. Summer Mixed High games and series Matt Wheatley 298 Jay Lewis 751

Star Sports Calendar STAR TEAM OF THE WEEK- Shown (l to r) are the 10U Thunder Dawgs: back row: Cade Pusey (Laurel), Colin Bergh (Seaford), Hunter Parsons (Millsboro), Tim Wooten (Laurel), Justin Revel (Millsboro), Tim Kelley (Laurel); front row: Justin Hill (Laurel), Trent Hearn (Laurel), batboy Alex Hearn (Laurel), RJ Horsey (Laurel), Morgan Mears (Georgetown). The manager is Glenn Phillips, Jr., and coaches are Bobby Horsey, Randy Hill, Buck Pusey, and Joey Deiter.

10U Thunder Dawgs compete in travel baseball tourney The 10U Thunder Dawgs travel baseball team has competed in six tournaments over the course of the last three months. Their overall record is 22-4. They have claimed the championships in three of the tournaments. The Thunder Dawgs competed in an ECTB qualifier tournament the weekend of June 28-29. They placed fifth out of 15 teams and qualified for the ECTB National Championship July 25-27 in Allentown, Pa. The championship game will be televised.

Send your team photo to the Seaford/Laurel Star at sports@mspublications.com to be a Star team of the week. Delmar’s Ricky Johnson gets win in NAPA Big Blocks Ricky Johnson of Delmar, Del. may have the shortest tow of any of the drivers that race in the NAPA Big Block Modified division but for the second time this season he proved that he is far from short on horsepower as he took the lead from rookie Chad Clark late in the race then held of defending point champion H.J. Bunting to take the 25-lap main. John Curtis of Harrington led flag to flag for his second win of the season in the 15-lap AC Delco Modified feature. Rick Wheatley of Seaford notched his third win of the year in the 10-lap Modified Lite main and Wayne Willing of Delmar won the Vintage Car feature. Chad Clark looked strong from his pole starting position as he took early control in the 25-lap NAPA Big Block main. The caution was out on lap three eliminating Craig Ott and Howard O’Neal. Jordan Watson grabbed second from Matt Jester but Jester fought back into the spot two laps later. Johnson was on the climb from sixth taking third from Watson on lap eight and one lap later he moved by Jester for second. At the crossed flags, Clark maintained the top spot with Johnson in second and Jester in third. H.J. Bunting, who started in seventh, was running in fourth and Chad James, making his first start of the season ran in fifth. With nine to go, Johnson pulled on top as Bunting got by Jester for third. Three laps later, Bunting powered into the second spot and the chase was on. Johnson would never falter as he drove his Johnson’s Exhaust Center/Teo across the finish with Bunting just .373 seconds behind in second. James put on a good late race charge to take third on the final lap with Jordan Watson fourth and Clark fifth. In the 15-lap AC Delco Modified John Curtis started on the pole and for the second time this season led wire-to-wire for the win. Defending point champion Brad Trice worked by last week’s winner Tim Trimble to grab second on the first lap. At the halfway sign the top five were Curtis, Trice, Trimble, Michael White, and Wade Perdue. Curtis, in the Taylor and Messick/Curtis Farms/Teo opened up a 1.092 second lead at the checkered for the win. Trice finished in the second spot with Perdue getting by both White and Trimble late in the race to finish in third. White followed into fourth and Trimble held on to finish in fifth. Cody Belote led the first lap of the 10-lap Modified Lite feature before Rick Wheatley moved on top. Brandon Dennis followed into the second spot and at the halfway sign the duo were followed by Alan Passwaters, Belote and Curt Miles, Jr. in the top five. Wheatley would open up a comfortable lead as he drove to his third win of the year in the Tink’s Fab Shop No. 14. Dennis finished in the second spot with Tim White coming on strong in the second half to finish in third. Fourth went to Miles, Jr. and Passwaters turned in one of his best performances finishing in fifth. The Sportsman Vintage Stock Cars were on hand. Hometown driver Wayne Willing took the win over New York’s Bill Manzo. John Irwin of Laurel finished in the third spot and Jimmy Lapant, also of Laurel, rounded out the field.

July- Soccer Sessions Camp to take place July 14-18- The 17th Annual Soccer Sessions Camp will be held at Seaford High School July 14-18. The camp is open to players ages six through 14 and runs daily from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. The camp’s directors are Tim Lee (Seaford High varsity coach) and Gerry DiBartolo (Salisbury University men’s coach). They will be assisted by current college players to provide excellent technical training in a positive and fun atmosphere. To find out more about the camp, go to www.soccersessionscamps.com or call Coach Lee at 302-629-5465. Seaford Department of Recreation to hold a football clinic- The Seaford Department of Recreation will hold a football clinic July 31- August 2 from 5-8 p.m. The clinic is open to children ages 7-13 at a cost of $20. This is a non-contact clinic that will focus on the fundamentals and basic skills of football. It will be instructed by Darnell Savage and other recreation football coaches. Sussex basketball camp promotes healthy lifestyles- The Sussex County Youth and Sports Camp will sponsor a week long “Back to the Basics” basketball camp for ages 714 July 21-25. The camp will take place from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Sussex Tech High School. The cost is $90 per camper for the week. The camp philosophy is to teach the fundamentals of basketball in a fun way. In addition, the camp will provide workshops on nutrition, fitness, teen education, 5-2-1 almost none healthy lifestyles, and self esteem. Campers will be given two camp t-shirts, a morning snack and noon lunch, and an individual onsite assessment provided by their camp coach. After having 46 campers last year, this year’s camp expects to expand to 65 campers. The camp will again utilize local high school stars as camp coaches and counselors as well as Woodbridge head coach Damon Ayers. The Sussex County Youth and Sports Camp program is a collaboration between Nemours Health and Prevention Services, Sussex County AIDS Council, First State Community Action, and Delaware Physicians Care. To register for the camp contact Sandi Hagans at 302-856-7761, ext. 115. Fall- NYSA Fall signups- NYSA Fall soccer signups will take place at the NYSA shed. The cost is $35 for the first child, $20 for the second, and $10 for each additional child. Please make sure to come to at least one of the signups. Signups will take place on July 12 from 10 a.m. to noon and July 17 from 6 to 8 p.m. The Fall season starts September 7. If you have any questions call 629-3530 Sussex County Sports Foundation fall ball program registrations open- The Sussex County Sports Foundation will be hosting its second annual ball ball baseball and softball program in Laurel. The league will accept teams such as Little League and travel ball teams. Players must be associated with a team and teams can be formed for this purpose. Double header games will be played every Sunday. Each team will get 10 games and championship games will be played. Games will be played at the Laurel Little League complex. All registrations and payments must be submitted by August 15. Please note you will be playing the ‘09 season age. For more information please visit the league’s website at www.sussexcountysportsfoundation.com or call 302-644-7777. Upward Soccer League Fall signups- Sign up now for the Upward Soccer Sept.Oct. 2008 season. The league, is open to boys and girls ages 6-11, and allows every child to play, learn, and be a winner. The cost for early registration (by Aug. 5) is $50 with family discounts available. Players receive the following: Upward reversible jersey, Upward water bottle, Upward soccer socks, and end of season award and celebration, and equal playing time every game. Forms can be picked up at the Laurel Wesleyan church office at 30186 Seaford Road in Laurel Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Sunday mornings. All practices and games will be at Laurel Wesleyan church. For more information call 302-8755380.

Thunder Dawgs to hold travel baseball tryouts Aug. 24, 31 The Thunder Dawgs will hold tryouts on Aug. 24 and Aug. 31 at 11 a.m. at the Laurel Little League park. Visit www.leaguelineup.com/thunderdawgbaseball for more information.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy! Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

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Woodbridge, Nanticoke earn wins in Major League softball By Lynn Schofer The Woodbridge and Nanticoke Major League all-star softball teams each won Tuesday night to set up a showdown between the two teams on Thursday in Greenwood. In game one, Woodbridge gained control in the first inning and never let go against Milton. Woodbridge scored six runs on three hits, four walks, and two errors. Woodbridge added four more runs in the second on hits by Nicole Widen, Jessica Brauner, Danelle Glenn, and Darian Scott. Woodbridge’s Devon Bitler was throwing a no hitter until Milton’s Makiya Trip hit a single in the fourth and later scored. Woodbridge went on to win, 15-1. In game two, Nanticoke scored four runs in the first inning against Laurel. That is all the Seaford team would need to win the game. However, they continued to score on hits by Chrystal Loudon, Erya Quillen, Alijae Cannon, Kristen Green, and Audrey Grant. Pitcher Erya Quillen held Laurel to two hits and one run. She finished the game with five strikeouts. Laurel’s Brittany Woods took over the mound in the third inning. She did not give up any hits but Nanticoke scored three more runs on wild pitches. Nanticoke won the game, 11-1.

Delmar District 8 Little League scoreboard for July 7-8 11 year old baseball- Delmar 10, East Wicomico 2- Chad Wien tossed a complete game no-hitter for the win while teammate Shelton Gray slugged a pair of home runs. Shelton Gray also collected two hits including a double for Delmar.

Send us your sports scores - it’s easy! Post 6 catcher Chad Sturgeon throws to first after fielding a bunt during Tuesday’s American Legion game. The game was delayed due to weather and later stopped because of darkness with the Patriots ahead 1-0. Photo by Mike McClure

Battle of Sussex County teams delayed by rain, darkness By Mike McClure The battle between the two Sussex County American Legion baseball teams, the Post 6 Patriots of Western Sussex and the Post 28 Warriors of Eastern Sussex, was halted by a 50 minute delay then stopped after six innings of play due to darkness. In the top of the first, the Warriors’ C.J. Bell hit a two-out double but Patriots’ pitcher Zach Adkins notched his second strikeout of the inning to strand Bell on second. In the bottom of the second, the Patriots’ Steve Sharff was hit by a pitch to lead off the inning. Matt Parker singled to put runners on first and second with two away, however, both runners were left on base. Sussex East’s Sean Lecates singled and went to second on an error. Adkins got his third strikeout and forced Bell to fly out for the final out of the third inning. In the top of the fourth, Post 28 starting pitcher Josh Lee led off with a single before giving way to courtesy runner Shane Sockriter. Trevor Abbott reached first on a fielder’s Sussex West first baseman Trent Passwaters catches a pop out during choice as the Patriots nearly turned a double his team’s home contest against play. Abbott was caught stealing by Sussex West catcher Chad Sturgeon to end the threat. Sussex East on Tuesday night. Photo by Mike McClure Sussex West scored the first and only run of the game in the bottom of the fourth when Steve Sharff drew a one-out walk, Eric Sharff was hit by a pitch, and Trent Passwaters reached on a fielder’s choice with Eric Sharff moving to second on an error. Matt Parker delivered a sac fly to plate Steve Sharff for the 1-0 Patriot lead. In the top of the fifth, Mike Casale led off with a single, Sockriter reached on a bunt single with one away, and Lecates moved the runners up with a sac bunt. The Patriots kept the Warriors off the board as third baseman Steve Sharff fielded a ground ball and threw to first baseman Trent Passwaters who made a nice scoop for the final out. In the bottom of the inning, Seth Hastings hit a one out single and was later caught attempting to steal second even though he appeared to beat the tag. James Smith singled and Lance Kelley was hit by a pitch before Casale came on for Lee and got a strikeout to keep Sussex West from adding to its lead. After six innings of play the game was stopped due to darkness even though Sussex West could win with a scoreless top of the seventh. The game will be picked up at the next game between the two teams (next Tuesday at Indian River High).

Coaches and parents are invited to send any team scores that they would like to see featured in the Star. Items can be e-mailed to sports@mspublications.com or faxed to 302-629-9243.

Late breaking sports can be found each week in the Star.

Every child plays Every child learns Every child is a winner

Soccer Sept-Oct ‘08 at Laurel Wesleyan Church for boys and girls ages 6-11 (by Aug 31st) Every Child receives : Upward Soccer Reversible Jersey Upward Soccer Water Bottle Upward Soccer Socks & More Registration is $50 per Child ~ Deadline is Aug. 5th Multiple child discounts available Pick up registration forms at Laurel Wesleyan Church 30186 Seaford Hwy, Laurel, De 19956

For more information call 302-875-5380 All practices and games will be at Laurel Wesleyan Church

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MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

Supreme Court decision a blow against average guy The rich man’s Supreme Court scored another victory for big busiRANK ALIO ness last week, rendering a verdict more than 20 years after the Exxon A disgrace to the court, massive Valdez oil spill ruling in the American people, a favor of Exxon and giving the vicsham. Selling out America tims nothing. in the Gore-Bush Florida The ruling, after two appeals election issue was bad from the original award of $5 billion, later reduced to $2.5 billion in enough, but this decision damages by the 9th U.S. Circuit takes the cake. Court, was settled by the Supreme Court to only $500 million, giving the victims who lost their fishing business- what they were worth, stating that in mares and their livelihoods only $15,000 each. itime cases punitive damages should be no more than the actual damages. About Yet when a lady spilled a hot cup of 32,000 Alaskan plaintiffs have been waitcoffee at a McDonald’s drive-in she was ing for their compensation since 1994. awarded $1 million some years ago. Go The Supreme Court’s action reduces the figure. average original award from $75,000 to a A disgrace to the court, the American people, a sham. Selling out America in the pitiful $15,000. That won’t even pay their legal fees; they’ll probably owe their attorGore-Bush Florida election issue was bad ney. enough, but this decision takes the cake. In March 1989 the Exxon Valdez struck That award is a fraction of what the plaina reef off the coast of Alaska. The captain, tiffs, including thousands of fishermen, Joseph Hazelwood, had been drinking and had hoped for. the supertanker spilled nearly 11 million I guess when you are appointed for life gallons of oil. It was the worst spill on to a job and don’t have to answer to anyrecord in North America. one you can play God. According to sources, last year Exxon It was a major victory for corporate Mobile made just over $40 billion in profAmerica with the sharply reduced amount its, not sales but net after expenses. This for the massive oil spill in Alaska. The spill was described as the worst en- means the oil company will be able to pay the punitive damages in about four days. vironmental calamity in U.S. history, acAnd the oil companies and our presicording to published reports, as 11 million dent think they need a tax break, courtesy gallons of crude oil spilled into the fishing of the American taxpayers? Don’t say the waters of Prince William Sound, polluting Democrats control Congress, because they about 1,200 miles of Alaska’s shoreline. presented the bill to take away the tax The Supreme Justices sitting on a credit and use it for energy research, but $217,400 yearly salary decided the little 60 votes in the Senate are needed to pass a fishermen had been awarded more than

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bill and override the president’s veto — not just a majority; not enough Republicans voted to support taking away the tax give-away. Exxon attorneys cried poor mouth, saying Exxon has already paid more than $3 billion in penalties, cleanup and compensation costs and that the oil spill took a toll on its public image. Give me a break; the poor stiffs at the fuel pump have more than paid back that $3 billion over the past 20 years. No way the little guy in America stands a chance against big business. A big opponent like Exxon Mobile can stall your lawsuit for years, driving up your costs; they could drag you out for decades, like in the Valdez suit, almost 20 years. And to add insult to injury to the Alaskans, our president and his Republicans in Congress want to drill for more oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Northeast Alaska. The argument against that is that the available oil supply is not sufficient enough to justify the potential environmental damage. I would think the natives would be a little gun shy after the Valdez incident, especially when a great number of the natives live off the land there. Instead of trying to reduce the use of energy by finding alternative ways to create energy, the administration’s answer is to drill more holes so their buddies can make more money. There is no shortage of oil, as indicated last week when the Arabs announced they were releasing more oil. The shortage is a myth to drive up the price. Look at the tankers sitting in the Delaware Bay, the Chesapeake Bay, and

by the Bay Bridge Tunnel at Virginia Beach waiting for the price of oil to go up a few cents before they bring their barges into port. And now the Iraq oil minister is allowing 35 international oil companies to bid on long-term contracts for redeveloping that country’s six oil fields as well as two natural gas fields. But the oil ministry continues to negotiate short-term no-bid contracts with several U.S. and European oil companies, similar to Cheney’s former company Halliburton, which has non-competitive contracts for everything in Iraq and is putting the shaft to us. But wait — this war was not about oil. Hmmm. Now we’re hearing of $7 gas prices and heating fuels going to new highs this winter; the average American can’t take more. You will see more bankruptcies, mortgage failures and loss of jobs than his country has ever seen. The Great Depression will be a bump on a log. Several of the Supreme Court justices are in their 70s and a few in their 80s. Hopefully with a new president there will be openings on the bench. Maybe new judges will be appointed who will have some compassion for the working class. And people are telling me they will take four more years of these insults, loss of manufacturing jobs, the poorest stock market since Eisenhower was president, and rising prices with George Bush’s clone John McCain as president because they can’t vote for a black man? Give me a break!

A mother locked out in the cold is a dangerous woman If I live to be a thousand I will never forget the day I awoke to a ONY INDSOR grotesque, blood-red, raging face, hovering only inches from me. She apparently beat on Though at first glance it appeared to be a demon or some other horrif- the door and hollered, tryic monster, I learned within secing to get my attention, onds that it was, in fact, my mothbut my radio and deep er. I recall as a young boy there sleep kept me from rewere a couple of unwritten rules sponding. that I used to guide me through daily life in my household. Number boars, was hearing her say several times a one — avoid making Mom mad when she day, “Just wait, he will be home soon.” was holding a cooking utensil. And numThis may sound minor; however, to us it ber two — avoid making Dad mad. Periwas as if she was talking about God. All I od. could envision was Dad barreling through As I have often written in my columns, the front door with a belt in each hand. it was never a mystery about how Dad Occasionally Mom would actually dole would react to heathen actions from his out the discipline. But in her case it had to children. He spoke loudly and carried a be spontaneous. belt. It was like watching a pot of water boil. We knew Dad’s style left no room for error on our part. Though he was strict, we She would put up with us acting like hyenas for a short while and then, hitting the could always count on Dad being consisbreaking point, she would strike. The tent and he was fair. I can honestly say that I never encountered Dad’s wrath with- problem for us young’uns was we never knew what activity she may be undertakout it being deserved. ing when she finally reached her breaking Mom was less predictable. She left the point. lion’s share of the discipline issues up to If she was combing her hair we would Dad. The only thing we could really count get struck with a long, black, hard-plastic on as being truly predictable in Mom’s comb. If she was getting dressed we could case whenever we were acting like wild expect a shoe or slipper to fly by, hopeful-

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ly missing tender parts. However, this one day it was not so much a fear of what utensil Mom may have at her ready, but more the simple rage that blanketed her face. As a teenager I would sometimes spend Saturday mornings in and out of bed, often sleeping until noon. It was a winter morning, especially cold, and a bitter, cutting wind made it feel even colder. I got up out of bed long enough to eat a Pop-Tart and notice that Mom was not home. At the time I was the only soul in the house. Feeling the urge to gain a few more precious moments in my warm bed upstairs, I finished off my Pop-Tart and headed back upstairs. However, before making the trek, I did something that carried neither rhyme nor reason, and proved to be a fatal mistake. I suppose out of habit, I locked the back door before heading back to bed. It was customary for the front door to stay pretty much always locked, because we always used the back door as our entrance and exit. So, off to bed I went. I was not long drifting off into a soothing, much needed sleep. I cannot even guess how long after falling asleep that I was ripped out of my state of slumber like a wrapper from my brother’s fudgesicle. It was at that precise moment that I

found myself staring into the flaming eyes of what at first appeared to be a demon straight from the dark abyss. But, I was not long recognizing this as none other than Mom. Her face was blood red and her eyes seemed to be literally popping out of their sockets. Her hands were rigid and her fingernails were grabbing at me, attempting to pull me out of the bed by my face. She was screaming at a pitch so high it sounded more like dolphins. It seems that Mom had gone to the grocery store and upon arriving home had found herself standing at a locked backdoor. This after she climbed the tall, steep back steps with multiple bags of groceries in her arms, battling the below freezing temperatures and the Arctic winds. She apparently beat on the door and hollered, trying to get my attention, but my radio and deep sleep kept me from responding. To this day I cannot recall how she actually was able to make entrance into the house. But, it would not have surprised me if she had torn through the kitchen and up the steps to me bedroom without even opening a door. I do think, however, that after that wintry morning I gained a whole new respect for my mother.

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

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Hospitals won’t have to collect 2 percent tax on revenues By Lynn R. Parks Workers and volunteers with the Bridgeville Public Library and the Seaford District Library were not the only people in western Sussex who breathed a sigh of relief with the passage of the state’s 2009 budget. Representatives of Nanticoke Memorial Hospital were pleased that a threatened tax on hospital re-

ceipts did not materialize. As it was finally written, House Bill 512 would have levied a nearly 2 percent tax on net patient revenue in the state’s hospitals. After hospital representatives protested the tax, the bill was dropped, never even coming to the floor for a vote. “We are glad that the legislature did not pursue it,” said Nan-

ticoke spokesman Tom Brown. Nanticoke’s net patient revenue totals about $100 million a year. A two-percent tax would have meant that the hospital would have to pay $2 million a year to the state. The last two years, the hospital has lost money. Its projected surplus for this year is $1 million, a surplus that would have been

eaten up by the tax. Representatives of Delaware’s hospitals doubted the state’s claim that the money that they would spend on the tax would be recouped through the federal government’s Medicaid reimbursement program. They cited an opinion written by attorney Kathleen McGuan, who said that the state’s tax scheme would not

be approved by the federal government. McGuan is former federal Medicaid chief counsel. Brown said that he and other representatives of Nanticoke are willing to work with the state throughout the coming year, in order to find a way to increase federal Medicaid reimbursement. “We are willing to look for any possible solutions,” he said.

Sussex County Council adopts Comprehensive Plan Update Sussex County will further protect agriculture, better define what qualifies as open space, encourage more affordable housing and entice developers to build projects that are more environmentally friendly. Those are just some of the many goals laid out in Sussex County’s newly adopted Comprehensive Plan Update. After more than 18 months of accepting public and state input, and writing and revising several drafts, Sussex Council on Tuesday, June 24, approved the 2007 Comprehensive Plan Update. “Today we reach a milestone in this very complicated, but nonetheless important, process,” County Administrator David B. Baker said. “Sussex County has taken a major step forward in planning for its future.” Numerous public meetings were held and input taken to craft the document. Delaware law mandates that all counties and municipalities have a comprehensive plan in place to guide their future. During the past 10 months, the draft document moved through the Delaware Preliminary Land Use Service review process for comments from state agencies. County planners, staff and consultant Urban Research & Development Corp. worked with the state to incorporate various recommended revisions. In part the 2007 Plan Update calls for Sussex County to: Encourage the County’s future growth to occur in defined developing areas. Tools to achieve this

include: • A transfer of development rights (TDR) program; • Providing incentives in the way of expedited review and bonus densities for qualified projects in growth zones. Such projects include those that are: ENERGY STAR certified; LEED certified; and ‘Super Green’ certified; • Sub-area planning, which will require the County, in partnership with various local and State agencies, to evaluate existing and needed infrastructure in highly localized areas. Further protect open space and strengthen agriculture by: • Creating a new agri-business zone, which would limit residential development and add more agriculture uses by right; • Expanding the County’s density bonus program, allowing landowners and developers to pay set dollar amounts for additional land-use densities. In exchange, the money would be used to buy open space; • Continuing the purchase of development rights easements and open space. • Implement added environmental protections, such as: • Providing incentives for projects with larger, vegetated buffers around waterways and wetlands; • A wellhead protection ordinance to ensure safe public drinking water; • Clarifying the County’s forested buffer ordinance; • Allowing green storm water management techniques not currently permitted.

• Encourage affordable housing by expanding the County’s Moderately Priced Housing Unit program to include rentals; • Promote traditional neighborhood designs; • Establish clear definitions for open space and superior design within developments. While the document has now

been adopted, the process is far from complete. In the next 18 months, Sussex County government will draft and consider approximately two dozen ordinances necessary to implement the concepts and ideas outlined in the comprehensive plan. County Council President Finley B. Jones Jr. said he was

pleased the County has adopted the plan and can now focus on the task ahead. He also thanked the hundreds of residents, property owners and others who participated in the process. The plan is available on the County’s website, at www.sussexcountyde.gov/compplan.

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PAGE 50

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

Letters to the Editor Kids Connection receives overwhelming support The Laurel Kids Connection (LKC) Mentoring Program staff would like to thank the community for their overwhelming support during the 2007-2008 school year. In addition to working on improving academics (10% increase in GPA), 11 of the students have attended an initial Leadership training. An exciting component of the mentoring program is “Discovering Delaware.” On a quest to ‘Discover Delaware’ students in the mentoring program have visited the Biggs Museum, The State House, and John Dickinson’s Plantation. A recent trip to Trap Pond State Park was co-sponsored by the generous Trap Pond Partners. A day trip to the Biden Center at Cape Henlopen is planned; and all of the mentors, students, and their families are welcomed to meet the LKC staff at the Nanticoke Indian Pow-Wow on Saturday, Sept. 6. Wonderful staff at the DE Dept. of Natural Resources have created a customized map for the students to use over the next few years, that indicates our natural areas. Additional maps were created by county staff. Students will use the maps to track trips and for research. An important part of any youth event is the food. Thank you to our local businesses who have responded generously to support our special events! Mentoring comes in all forms, and mentors really do make a difference. To learn more about the Laurel Kids Connection or the Delaware Adolescent Program, Inc. please visit us at www.dapi.org. To be a mentor, you can register at www.creativementoring.org. You may also contact Kim Trivits, program coordinator, at 856-7331 x16. Again, thank you for making your community mentoring program such a success in it’s first year! Lynne Betts

Program Assistant

Disappointed by lack of vote

Senator Adams' failure to vote for the Override of SB 245, the bill which defined specifically allowed uses of Eminent Domain, after he already voted for it in the first place shows where his true loyalties lie. This bill, which would have removed the possibility of having a town or county government from taking our property solely for the purpose of economic development, was important to those of us who believe that our government should interfere as little as possible with our lives. His refusal to vote for this bill shows that he does not represent the people of his district, but rather the corporate interests that have influenced our Legislative Hall. He should be ashamed of himself for being part of the group of Senators who refused to vote for this bill, because interests want to develop land by force if the property owner is unwilling to sell. I hope the people of Bridgeville remember this when

Stars’ Letters Policy All letters should include the writer’s name, address and phone number for verification purposes. Names will be published. No unsigned letters will be published. No letters which the management deems to be libelous will be published. The Star reserves the right to edit or reject any letters. Send your letters to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, or email morningstarpub @ddmg.net he comes up for re-election. I would like to thank Senator Venables for bringing the bill to the floor for a veto override. At least one Democratic Senator in our area knows when to do the right thing. Brian Shields

Seaford

Accident victim needs our help

John Benson, a 20-year-old lifelong resident of Laurel, was involved in a diving accident on June 22, 2008. John is in intensive rehabilitation at MaGee Rehabilitation Hospital in Philadelphia. John needs our prayers, cards, visits and monetary assistance to help with family expenses. As account has been set up under “Friends of John Benson” at Delaware National Bank. Donations may be mailed to Delaware National Bank at PO Box 602, Seaford, DE 19973, or contact me at 8757834 with any questions. Dawn Marvil

Laurel

Response to Longo’s response

Obviously my June 19th letter struck a raw nerve of Mr. Longo who denies that he is an irritated (sore) Republican but the tone of his letters indicates otherwise. Mr. Longo sees our country going down the tube and questions why one would invest in U.S. companies. As one who has experienced the “boom and bust” of several small rural one-major-industry towns, I understand his pessimism. However, things are not that depressing. On several occasions, I have had the opportunity to view the United States from the other side. One can be assured that foreigners, like Mercedes, Toyota, and others, are not investing in the United States nor

lending millions of dollars because of their management’s benevolence. Their investment is in spite of Mr. Longo’s allegation of a U.S. anti-business attitude and doom and gloom. It is indeed unfortunate that Mr. Longo does not watch live TV of our Representatives and Senators speaking on the floor of Congress as well as the live hearings. The sterile reported accounts do not portray the nuances and body language, which tell much more than the words. In addition, the political maneuvering is missing. Conclusions may be drawn from first-hand discussions, not filtered sounds or one’s provincial experience. Mr. Long does not dispute Econ 101 but complains about Democrats and persons who do not agree with him. Many persons believe that if “Mr./Mrs. Noneof D’Above” was on the ballot for president, he/she would get numerous votes. There are numerous unanswered administration policy questions regarding the demise of Enron, Bear Stearns, the credit crunch, foreclosures, the big deficit, the low dollar (value), high oil prices, the War, secrecy. Surely from his insight Mr. Longo must have the answers and not just complaints. As the World War II radio reporter would intone, “Things are mighty dark tonight.” David F. Edwards, Jr.

Laurel

Thank you Citizens of Laurel

Laurel Lions’ first “Fish‘n for Sight” was a great success. The event was held in Laurel New Town area at Janosik Park, with nearly 100 fishermen — toddlers to senior citizens — reeling in fish. It was a great opportunity for families, grand parents and young people to be together, to have fun and join in with Lions members to help the blind. Leo the Lion and Officer McGruff were on hand to make the occasion something the young and old could remember, having their picture taken with the WBOC Chopper 16, and Captain Willie did a fly over Saturday to kick the event off. WBOC and Laurel Star were strong media supporters of the event. Another partner in the event was the Delaware Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, which helped start the event. Laurel is lucky to have such a wonderful benefit as Broad Creek and people like Johnny Janosik to help with the community. We want to thank A & K Enterprizes Tournament Headquarters and the Town of Laurel. We will be “Fish’n for Sight” next year. See you there. Fred Disharoon

Laurel

Laurel Parade is a winner

I extends a big thank you to the Laurel Chamber of Commerce for sponsoring the annual July 4th parade. This Independence Day celebration provided an excellent opportunity for everybody to celebrate the birthday of our great

Nation. The parade was well planned, organized and coordinated for all the entries in the parade. It appeared that all the participants in the parade were having an enjoyable time. I was pleased to walk in the parade, delighted to shake the hands of many nice individuals and to talk to my fellow Sussex Countians. The Laurel Chamber of Commerce should be commended for embracing the theme of "Born Free" for this year's celebration. It is truly wonderful to be "Born Free" and to be an American, Delawarean and a Sussex Countian. George Parish

Sussex County Clerk of the Peace, Long Neck

Likes John Carney for governor

As we all know, energy and fuel sources are a major problem for our generation. That’s why I was pleased to read that John Carney is pushing hard to make the Bluewater Wind project a reality. In fact, Carney secured a commitment from Bluewater Wind to make Delaware its regional hub for offshore wind. Urban and suburban sprawl also contribute to our carbon footprint, and once again, John Carney is doing the work needed to address this issue. As Chair of the Livable Delaware Commission, Carney is using his experience to advocate for better land use decisions. It is very important to me that my children and grandchildren will enjoy the same environment and quality of life that I’ve known in Delaware. John Carney’s working to ensure that happens, and in my mind, there’s no more important qualification to be Governor. Wm. Mark Prettyman,

Greenwood

Archivist seeking articles

I am seeking Officers, Enlisted Men, WACs, Cadets, Britons, civilians and/or their families and friends who were stationed at Cochran Field, or lived in Macon, Ga., during World War II, who would be willing to contribute artifacts, photos, articles and stories pertaining to their experience with the man and women working there. If so, please contact: Mike Rowland, Archivist WR-LC/MU 1942 Heritage Boulevard Robins AFB, GA 31098-2442 Ed Wolak

Moreland, GA

Paper or plastic? Say neither!

With the high price of oil, and therefore gas, perhaps everyone should consider decreasing demand by taking re-usable bags when shopping. Why? Because Americans use more than 12 million barrels of oil each year just to produce plastic bags. Rachel Cherrix

Seaford

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

PAGE 51

African American fund launched

Sylvia Banks and Fred Sears at the launch of the African American Empowerment Fund of Delaware.

Send Middle Class Joe to Washington OK, I’ve got an idea for the EV ODD ROFFORD new best question for those My concern is that for running for Congress. those who move far beSomeone needs yond middle class, it is to stand at a town hall meeteasy to forget how to ing and ask, “Can you please think like a middle class define middle person. class?” Recent regot there via politicians who ports indicate over half of our made decisions that bolstered senators are multi-millionaires, short-term popularity and re-elecand many others are close. tability over long term solutions. I am fully aware that many Is some of that because of the lupeople become wealthy because crative nature of being a “serthey are intelligent, industrious, vant” at the national level? disciplined, and/or good decision I am unable to judge motivamakers. (I am also aware people tions, but my concern remains become wealthy via other paths, that millionaire senators need to but that is a conversation for anfind ways to be in touch with us other article.) I am not suggesting that being not-so-millionaire constituents. If we trust all the economic deciwealthy makes you a bad leader. sions of our land to millionaires, My concern is that for those who what assurance do we have that move far beyond middle class, it is easy to forget how to think like anyone with less money is being considered in the equation? a middle class person. This is why I am in favor of How many of our senators term limits. Since money seems personally feel the pinch of $4.00 gas? How many of our represen- to overwhelmingly assure reelection, we need an artificial equaltatives are standing at the cooler izer that encourages our national at Food Lion trying to decide if leaders to make decisions without they can afford the full gallon of re-election in mind. milk instead of the half gallon? We all have seen the signs of a Is there anyone watching out severely tightening economy that for us in Washington who underis tightening middle class belts. stands what it means to choose Perhaps we could hasten the end between this month’s medicine of this recession is we send a few and this month’s electric bill? Recently, the national debt ex- more middle class Nancys and Joes to Congress this year. ceeded nine trillion dollars. We

R .T

K. C

Send us your news items Send items to editor@mspublications. com. Send photos as attachments in the jpg format. Items may also be mailed to Morning Star Publications, Inc., P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973. Deadline is one week before preferred publication date. Items are used on a first-come basis.

More than 100 of Delaware’s black community leaders turned out on the evening of June 24 to launch the African American Empowerment Fund of Delaware, a new philanthropic initiative of the Delaware Community Foundation to establish a permanent source of funding for causes important to African Americans throughout Delaware. “Our mission is to establish a legacy of leadership in promoting philanthropy to fund causes important to the education, social and economic empowerment of African American Delawareans,” cited Sylvia S. Banks, interim chairperson and manager of Corporate Contributions and Mem-

berships for DuPont. The initial goal of the 30 organizers of the African American Empowerment Fund of Delaware is to obtain 100 “founders” to contribute $1,000 or more to begin to build a lasting endowment. “Many in this room have been talking about doing something like this for a long time,” noted Tony Allen, Bank of America’s Communications executive who serves as the fund’s treasurer. “Now the opportunity is here. We have a successful model to follow. This fund will provide a way for members and friends of Delaware’s African American community to leave a long-term legacy.”

The new African American Empowerment Fund of Delaware will be one of more than 800 funds established by families, individuals or organizations managed by the Delaware Community Foundation. The Foundation has total assets of nearly $240 million and gave 1,311 grants and scholarships worth $13.3 million last year. The Delaware Community Foundation is a nonprofit organization that connects people who care with causes that matter by managing charitable funds and awarding grants to nonprofits to benefit Delawareans. For more information, call 302-571-8004 or visit www.delcf.org.

USDA grants will help protect the Chesapeake Bay watershed U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Chief Arlen Lancaster has announced that $5 million will be used to fund 11 innovative conservation projects to protect water quality, recycle nutrients and improve wildlife habitat in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Three of the Conservation Innovation Grants (CIG) projects, receiving $1.5 million in federal

funding, will help farmers in Delaware and Maryland jointly sustain natural resources and maintain agricultural viability to improve their operation within the watershed. Grant recipients provided matching funds totaling $2.9 million for the three CIGs combined. Projects in the Chesapeake Bay watershed will also address emerging natural resource issues including energy conservation

and market-based approaches to conservation. The 64,000 squaremile Chesapeake Bay watershed covers parts of Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia and the District of Columbia. A list of all projects and funding is available online along with information about the Conservation Innovation Grants at www.nrcs.usda.gov/programs/ cig.

A lifetime of feel feeling her children’s pain means she shouldn’t shou have to feel any of her own. You so much as sniffl sniffled and she was there. Through every bruise and bump, each headache and h ea heartache, she held you close and kissed away the pain. And now w it’s your turn, tu because she needs you more than ever. We can be there to lend d a hand. We res respond quickly and listen carefully. We tailor what we do to what she needs and what yyou need. T ease the bu To burden and relieve the stress, call Delaware’s most trusted ted hospice. hos Call today for your confidential visit, 302-856-7717. Or go to www.delawarehospice.org.

PAGE 52

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2007

Snapshots

TEEN IDOL - Delaware’s best young talent was showcased at the Kid’s Fest, Teen Idol Contest on Saturday, June 14, at the Delaware State Fairgrounds. This year’s 1st place winner was Brittney Trout, right, who sang “Independence Day” by Carrie Underwood. The top three best performances were awarded prizes, courtesy of the 2008 Teen Idol sponsor, Del-One. Also pictured is Del-One’s Marketing Coordinator Tanya McDaniels. Photo submitted

OYSTERS - William West, left, and Tyron McGlotten, Seaford, serve up oyster sandwiches during the forth of July festivities in Laurel. West and McGlotten are both members of the Westfield Circle Club. Photo by Bryant Richardson

CASTLE VISITS RED CROSS - Margi Prueitt is shown giving Rep. Castle an Emergency Preparedness Kit as a thank you for visiting the Seaford Red Cross office. Submitted photo

FIVE YEARS OF DANCE - Kara Hignutt, a fourth grader at Blades Elementary School, received her 5-year trophy during the annual dance recital for Dance Alley in Millsboro. Kara is the daughter of Lisa and David Hignutt, Sr. of Seaford. Submitted photo

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

PAGE 53

Starlites Baton and Guard Teams win Championships The Starlites Baton and Guard Teams have had a successful season. The 2008 teams consisted of a Novice Majorette Team (Moulin Rouge), Junior Majorette Team (Fabulous from High School Musical 2) and Junior Colorguard Team (Harry Potter). Both baton teams won their Chapter Championship which was held at Cab Calloway in Wilmington. The Colorguard team placed second at the Chapter Championship. The three teams went on to represent their Chapter at the All-Chamber Championships held in Wildwood, N.J. Both baton teams came home as the Independent Majorette Champions in their classes. The Colorguard Team placed fourth. Pictured here are the members of the 2008 Starlites Competitive Teams.

Highlights for the Starlites: “Fabulous” received Most Entertaining and Overall High Score at the Ticket to Broadway Competition in Glasgow, Del. This routine was invited to perform for free at their national competition which will be held in Baltimore, Md., this summer. Brooke Mitchell received a Platinum Score for her solo performances at the Ticket to Broadway Competition in Glasgow, and the Beyond The Stars Competition in Baltimore. Brooke was invited to be a part of both shows National Dance Production. Ellyn Rozell and Megan Hamilton placed second and third respectively, for Teen Top Solos at the Beyond The Stars event in Baltimore.

Pictured here are the members of the 2008 Starlites Competitive Teams. Top row: Megan Hamilton, Lauren Goslee, Courtney Hastings, Kami Brittingham, Erin Bunting, Ellyn Rozell, Chelsea Zweigle; Middle Row: Kalie Cooper, Mackenzie Reed, Mean James, Brooke Mitchell, Kelly Dehoroch, Jackie Toggart, Terra Marvel. Bottom Row: Logan Galbreath,Courtney Russum, Isaac Mitchell, Rachel Buckler, Madison Galbreath.

St. John’s honors Margaret Nixon

Former and present clergy from St. John's United Methodist Church honored Margaret Nixon at her retirement celebration. From left are the Rev. Ralph Ellis, the Rev. Kari Jones, the Rev. David Humphrey, Margaret Nixon, the Rev. Rich Evans, the Rev. Constance Hastings and the Rev. J. Christopher Pennington.

Hughes to visit Concord Pond

K.C. Anthony, assistant to Secretary John Hughes of D.N.R.E.C., has confirmed that Hughes will address the concerns of the citizens of Concord. A newly formed group, C.H.O.P.P.E.R. (Concord Historical Organization for Property Preservation and Environmental Restoration), asked the secretary to meet with them at the Concord boat ramp on July 17 at 3:30 p.m. Topics to be discussed include the

restoration of Concord Pond to a wildlife refuge in compliance with an order given by Secretary Bryson in 1975 and the maintenance and control of the Concord spillway. This meeting is open to the public. Information about the pond can be found at www.Concordpond.com. A petition to restore the pond to a wildlife refuge has been drafted and is available at the Seaford Museum, located at 203 High St., Seaford. You do not have to be a landowner on the pond, as Concord

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St. John's United Methodist Church recently honored Margaret Nixon upon her retirement after 30 years of service as church administrative assistant with a dinner on June 28. Former pastors returned for the celebration while others sent letters to honor her servant ministry and care to the pastoral staff and congregation. In many respects, she served St. John's Church beyond the standard duties of a secretary. She said at her retirement celebration that her job description over the years was actually simple: "Know it all. Do it all. And always keep your mouth shut." With a master's of Divinity from Harvard University and a master's in Community Counseling from Wilmington Univer-

sity with national certification in counseling, her credentials more than qualified her to support the ministers of St. John's, who totaled approximately 24 including senior and associate pastors and one deacon. She also knew the challenges that clergy and their families face as she was the wife of the late Rev. Chuck Nixon of the Seaford Presbyterian Church. Margaret stated that she has no plans for retirement other than to follow whatever paths God opens for her next. With her active participation as a member of the Seaford Presbyterian Church, her involvement with the church build at Habitat for Humanity at Concord, and her counseling credentials, her friends at St. John's Church know that she will continue to bless others as she has blessed them.

Pond belongs to all Delawareans. For more information, contact Kurt Brown at 302-945-8545, D.N.R.E.C. at 302-739-9000 or the Seaford Museum at 302-628-2984.

25 at the request of the site sponsor. Residents in the Blades area who are interested in recycling, can take their recyclables to the nearest center located at the Nylon Capital Shopping Center on Atlantic Avenue in Seaford; The Seaford Manor House located on Middleford Road; or the Seaford Wal-Mart on North Dual Highway. For more information, call the Citizens’ Response Line at 800-404-7080 or visit www.dswa.com.

DSWA removes recycling drop-off

The Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) has removed the Recycling Dropoff Center at the Blades Fire Station located in the town of Blades in Sussex County. The center was removed Thursday, June

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MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

PAGE 54

Opinion Editorial Fuel costs may inspire positive change High gas prices may not be a bad thing. Now before you begin thinking that there is some strange chemical in the water at the Star that is causing us to lose our minds, let us explain. Most people can agree that burning fossil fuels for energy is harming the environment and even if you still don't accept that premise, we can at least agree that oil is not a very renewable resource and eventually, at the current, ever-increasing rate of usage, we will run out of it. We know this. We have known this. But when gas only cost $1.15 a gallon, it was easy to say, "ehhh, we'll worry about that problem later." Now that gas is around $4 a gallon, we are beginning to realize that it is far past time to be aware of our individual oil consumption. Compared with other developed countries, we have had some of the cheapest gas prices in the world and still do (gas is over $8 a gallon in much of Europe). Because demand for oil is increasing, most likely gas prices are not going to go back down. We as individuals must now look for ways to decrease our own dependence on oil. This does not mean we all need to immediately go out and buy a smaller house closer to where we work, equip it with solar panels and ride our bikes to work everyday. But there are things that all of us can do daily. The key here is to be energy conscious. When you need to replace a light bulb in your home, buy a compact fluorescent bulb instead. Instead of driving to the store every time you think of something you need, consolidate all of your errands into one trip. Look for the opportunity to carpool with a friend. Maybe instead of spending your savings on remodeling your bathroom, you could invest in a solar panel for your home. Both Delmarva Power and Delaware Electric Co-op offer their customers the ability to purchase renewable energy. The Co-op allows you to buy 100 kWh blocks of renewable energy at an additional 20 cents a block and Delmarva Power allows customers to choose which company provides their share of electricity to Delmarva Power, including companies that provide renewable energy alternatives. We make choices every day that affect the amount of energy we consume. If we all choose to reduce our own oil consumption, we are not only doing the right thing for the future, we are also saving a little money in the mean time.

Morning Star Publications Inc. P.O. Box 1000 • 628 West Stein Highway Seaford, DE 19973 629-9788 • 629-9243 (fax) editor@mspublications.com Subscriptions - $19 a year in-county, $24 a year in Kent and New Castle, Del., and Federalsburg, Sharptown and Delmar, Md.; $29 elsewhere out of state.

Opening doors for all students must be a priority for the U.S. ...over 400,000 students across the country who qualified to go to a fouryear college this year will not go because they cannot afford it By Sen. Joe Biden (D-DE) It is this time each year that America’s educators are rewarded with the knowledge that they have had a lasting impact on the lives of so many young people, and I congratulate those who played an instrumental role in the graduating Class of 2008. For students and parents, these are exciting times. For some, the upcoming months will be daunting, as parents confront the challenge of figuring out how, or if, they can pay for college. I’ll never forget the look on my dad’s face during my senior year of high school when he told me the bank didn’t give him the loan he needed to send me to the University of Delaware. Eventually, he got the loan. I had a summer job, and I went on to college the following September. But the look on his face – I could tell he thought he was letting me down – has been a memory that has lasted a lifetime. The price of going to college has increased dramatically in the last two decades. In fact, over 400,000 students across the country who qualified to go to a four-year college this year will not go because they cannot afford it. Nearly 200,000 of those students won’t attend any college at all. You know, as do I, that this is unacceptable.

GUEST COLUMN College is on the verge of becoming a luxury good – and the doors of opportunity are in danger of being shut to all but the wealthiest. In the last 18 months, Congress has worked across party lines to make a college education more affordable. We committed an additional $20 billion in new and enhanced student aid and benefits, including lower interest rates on Stafford loans, larger Pell Grants, and capped loan repayments. This past May, we also increased the amount of federal loans that a student can borrow, and provided families who are behind in their mortgage payments or medical bills with flexibility in obtaining and repaying student loans. Still we must do more. Just as our workforce and economy must innovate to stay a step ahead of the competition, our education policies must as well. You’ve seen firsthand students who think college education is out of reach lose motivation. We have to keep them engaged by starting the conversation about college sooner and ensuring the cost doesn’t put higher education out of reach. That is why I introduced the College ACCESS Plan last year. If enacted, my plan would consolidate two of the existing tax incentives for college (the Hope Credit and the tuition deduction), creating a single, refundable tax credit worth up to $3,000 per student. This would fully cover the average cost of tuition and fees at a

President Bryant L. Richardson

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two-year college and cover more than half the cost of tuition and fees at a public four-year college. The credit would also be tied to inflation, so that when the cost of tuition goes up, the amount of assistance increases with it. The ACCESS Plan would also build on recent increases to the maximum Pell Grant, boosting it to $6,300. As educators, you know the importance of instilling high expectations in students. My plan would create a demonstration program to guarantee Pell Grants to 8th graders in order to launch the formal college planning process much earlier, cultivating an expectation that the student’s future includes higher education. My hope is that this will also encourage families and students to plan ahead for college. I am pleased to say that this initiative was included in the renewal of the Higher Education Act passed by the Senate, and I am working to see that it is included in the final bill. Looking ahead, one of the first priorities of Congress next year will be to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. While I have heard from some of you already at the DSEA’s annual Representative Assembly meeting back in April, I encourage you to share your views with me on the current law – both its successes and its shortcomings. Your insights and experiences working on the front lines will be enormously helpful in the development of a new bill. I will continue to fight just as hard as ever to ensure that you and your students have the resources and support you need and deserve. We both know the stakes are high, and that every door we fail to open for our students today is a missed opportunity for our country down the road. Circulation Karen Cherrix Sales George Beauchamp Rick Cullen Emily Rantz Laura Rogers Doris Shenton Jimmy McWilliams

MORNING STAR • JULY 10 - 16, 2008

PAGE 55

A ‘not so’ Supreme Court decision A few weeks back the United States Supreme Court ruled that the rights detailed in the Constitution of the United States apply not only to Americans, but to our enemies as well. How is this justifiable? I do not understand how Justices Kennedy, Souter, Ginsburg and Breyer reconciled this decision in their minds or their consciences. This decision grants those the United States holds prisoner in Guantanamo Bay the right of habeas corpus. This means that foreign terrorism suspects held at the Guantánamo Bay naval base in Cuba now have constitutional right to challenge their detention in United States courts. It is not as if these prisoners are not being released if no fault can be found in them. Nearly 800 prisoners have been sent to Guantanamo Bay and of those, 420 have already been released without charge. When I read the opinion of the majority on this case (Boumediene v. Bush) I was astounded. For the first time in a long time, I was left speechless. In his 23-page-long majority decision, Justice Kennedy admits that the court cannot determine whether the writ of habeas corpus historically extends to aliens held abroad, and it also admits that Guantanamo Bay lies outside the sovereign territory of the United States, where the Constitution of the United States has no legal authority! This decision also provides that any admission of guilt nor any evidence gathered by a detainee under duress is not admissible in a civilian court. Justice Scalia's dissent was joined by Chief Justice Roberts, and Justices Alito and Thomas. Justice Scalia asserted that Johnson v. Eisentrager (where the Supreme Court decided that U.S. courts had no jurisdiction over German war criminals held in a U.S.-administered German prison) "thus held—held beyond any

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Final Word doubt—that the Constitution does not ensure habeas for aliens held by the United States in areas over which our Government is not sovereign." He also stated that, "The game of baitand-switch that today’s opinion plays upon the Nation’s Commander in Chief will make the war harder on us. It will almost certainly cause more Americans to be killed. That consequence would be tolerable if necessary to preserve a time-honored legal principle vital to our constitutional Republic. But it is this Court’s blatant abandonment of such a principle that produces the decision today… It sets our military commanders the impossible task of proving to a civilian court, under whatever standards this Court devises in the future, that evidence supports the confinement of each and every enemy prisoner." If this article sounds like an angry tirade from a right wing extremist at her wit's end, that's because it is. I have grown weary of Americans that hate America. I have no stomach for it and I am not capable of understanding it. The importance of choosing a Commander in Chief that will choose Justices capable of rational thought rather that advancing an agenda has never been more clear. This decision is a direct attack on the Constitution of the United States. The five Justices that handed down this decision clearly have no regard for their country or the security of her citizens. It is my belief that there are at least four Justices on the Court that will rule against whatever the Constitution states simply because they hate America. These Justices are an important part of a liberal attack on America from within and this decision is further proof of it. Laura Rogers

Star Staff

Fundraiser will proceed

Fireworks at Heritage Shores - A July 4 fireworks show was held during a celebration at Heritage Shores in Bridgeville. Organizers managed to set off the fireworks once the storm blew over around 10 p.m. Photo by E.W. Faircloth

A fundraiser to help with the medical expenses for Lillian Tune will proceed. Mrs. Tune died on Friday, June 27, 2008, at home, following a battle with cancer. Mrs. Tune was active in the Seaford Volunteer Fire Department Ladies Auxiliary for nearly a quarter of a century, was president of the Department of Delaware American Legion Auxiliary, Past President of the American Legion Unit 6 Nanticoke Post 6 Auxiliary, was a life member of the VFW Virgil Wilson Post 4961. She received many national awards for her volunteer work on behalf of veterans. A spaghetti dinner fundraiser will be held Sunday, July 20, in the Seaford Volunteer Fire Department Banquet Hall. Other activities were planned, but have been altered. See next week’s Star for more information.

The winner of the best cake at Laurel’s Fourth was Sharon Donlin of Seaford. Here’s the recipe: Pina Colada Crunch Cake 1-1/4 cup packed brown sugar 6 tbs. butter or margarine at room temperature 2 tsp. ground cinnamon 1 pkg. (18.25 oz.) pineapple cake mix 1/2 cup sweetened, flaked coconut, chopped 1 can (20 oz.) crushed pineapple, well drained 3 cans (16 oz. each) vanilla frosting. 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Coat 2 (9”) round cake pans with cooking spray. Line bottom of each pan with parchment paper; coat with cooking spray. In bowl combine sugar, butter and 1 teaspoon cinnamon. Divide mixture in half. Press half over bottom of each pan to within 2 inches of edge. Refrigerate until ready to use. 2. Prepare cake mix according to package directions; stir in coconut. Spoon batter evenly over sugar layer in each pan. Bake 25-30 minutes or until toothpick inserted into center comes out clean. Cool on racks 15 minutes. Remove from pans. Remove Parchment paper. Cool layers, sugar side up, on racks. 3. Stir remaining cinnamon into frosting. Place one cake layer, sugar side up, on plate. Spread with 1 cup of frosting. Top with crushed pineapple to within 1/2 inch of edge of frosting. Top with remaining cake layer, sugar side down. Spread top and side of cake.

FOOD LION WEEKLY SPECIALS Ask your local Food Lion Manager how you can receive the Food Lion Weekly Specials Flyer. We need your help to get the Food Lion’s Weekly Specials Insert in the Laurel Star and the Seaford Star.

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July 10, 2008_S