Page 1

THURSDAY, AUGUST 14, 2008

VOL. 13 NO. 17 NEWS HEADLINES

50 cents

City increases cost of electric

BOATING - Margie Wilson of Delmar has spent her summer recovering from serious injuries because of the negligence of another boat operator. Page 2 CEREMONIAL SOIL - A groundbreaking was held early Wednesday to set the stage for the construction of a new library. Page 5

By Lynn R. Parks

VETERAN TOM SAWYER - He witnessed the worst pain and suffering that one nation could inflict on another. Page 8 WORST NIGHTMARE - What happened on the Chesapeake Bay Bridge early Sunday is the material for nightmares for those already nervous about the crossing. Page 9 FUEL SERIES - How bad are farmers being hit by the high cost of fuel? Would you believe a $30,000 monthly fuel bill? Page 12 YOUTH VOLUNTEERS - These young people are helping to improve the quality of life in their hometowns. Page 10 WOODLAND FERRY - The new ferry for Woodland is in the water. The date for the “Tina Fallon” to start carrying traffic is getting close. Page 20

The cost of power is up for the city of Seaford. Tuesday night, the city council voted to pass those costs on to consumers. With the July bills, increases in the cost of electricity to the city will be reflected in the Purchased Power Cost Adjustment Clause (PPCAC) portion of the statements. City manager Dolores Slatcher said that the average residential customer using 1,000 kilowatt hours of electricity will pay $25 more in July. She forecasted that after August, the increase will go down to $14.50 a month. In addition to the higher power costs, city electric customers also used “significantly more kilowatt hours” in July than they normally do, Slatcher said. “Many people will get a double whammy when they get their bills,” she said. “People are going to be extremely unhappy with this.” And, she said, some people will have trouble paying their bills. “There are some people we are going

SENIOR SOFTBALL - The District III Senior League softball team was eliminated from the World Series semifinals with a narrow loss to Latin America last week. Coverage begins on page 45.

AFRAM FESTIVAL - Jada Evans, Seaford, reads the Maya Angelou book, “Life Doesn’t Frighten Me At All,” during the pageant at the 11th annual Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival, held last weekend in Nutter Park, Seaford. Jada was crowned Little Miss AFRAM. Story on AFRAM and related photos on page 29. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

EASTERN REGIONALS - The District III Big League softball team advanced to the Eastern Regionals championship before losing a pair of games to Connecticut. Page 47

‘Forensic Files’ TV show featuring episode on ‘95 attempted murder

OPINION - Local police have their hands full keeping our communities safer. What else could be done to help? Page 62

INSIDE THE STAR BUSINESS BULLETIN BOARD CHURCH CLASSIFIEDS EDUCATION ENTERTAINMENT FINAL WORD FRANK CALIO GOURMET HEALTH LETTERS MIKE MCCLURE MOVIES

6 21-24 26 34-41 56 44 63 42 14 57-59 43 51 7

'

OBITUARIES 27 OPEN HOUSES 14-15 OPINION 62 25 PAT MURPHY 54 PEOPLE POLICE JOURNAL 18 PUZZLES 24 SNAPSHOTS 60 SPORTS 45-52 TIDES 7 TODD CROFFORD 43 42 TONY WINDSOR VETERANS OF WWII 8

By Tony E. Windsor It has been almost 13 years since Brenda Kaye Robinson suffered a horrific attack in her Laurel mobile home which left her close to death. In the years following the attack she was forced to live under a cloud of uncertainty. Early on in the case, police arrested a Prince George’s County, Md., man for the brutal crime. However, he was eventually released from prison after DNA evidence showed no connection to the crime. In September 2005, 10 years after the crime occurred, Mark R. Eskridge, 46, of Laurel, who is serving a life sentence in Cambridge, Md.,ß for a rape in 2002, was found to be guilty of Robinson’s 1995 attack. Ironically, it was DNA evidence that released one man from prison, but it was also DNA evidence that enabled

police to conclusively identify Eskridge as Robinson’s assailant. It is this type of forensic evidence that law enforcement agencies are using daily to help build cases in crimes throughout the country. It is also stories of how forensic evidence is used to help law enforcement agencies solve crimes that has attracted a national television crew to Seaford in the next two weeks to spotlight Robinson‘s case. “Forensic Files,” a documentarystyle television show, demonstrates how science can be used to help solve crimes. According to Chip Selby, a producer for the show, each episode profiles a single case, from the discovery of a crime, through the police investigation, forensic analysis of the evidence, arrest and trial. He said the stories are told through a series of on-camera interviews with

Continued to page 16

people involved in the case. “We also show the forensic experts demonstrating their scientific work they provided to help solve the case,” he said. It was while filming an episode of “Forensic Files” in the Harrington area earlier this year that Selby said he learned about the Robinson case. The show was investigating the 1991 murder of Dorothy Donavan that went unsolved until DNA evidence led to an arrest in April 2008. “We were having lunch with state police detectives while shooting for the show and they told us about the Robinson case,” he said. “They explained how DNA evidence played a major part in both helping lead to the release of one suspect and the eventual arrest of the man who committed the crime.” Selby said the case is a perfect fit for the type of show that Forensic Files Continued to page four


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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

Irresponsible boaters causing injuries to others By Donna Dukes-Huston With approximately 70 million recreational boaters in the United States occupying more than 290,000 square miles of water, it is imperative that boat operators are well-versed in safety rules and regulations. Margie Wilson of Delmar has spent her summer recovering from serious injuries instead of enjoying her own boat all because of the negligence of another boat operator. On Memorial Day weekend Margie and her husband, Wayne, took their 18-foot center console Seaquest out on the Nanticoke River for their first ride of the season. Wilson said that the weather was gorgeous and the river was calm. After about 45 minutes on the water, they were approaching the Mardela area when they noticed a much larger boat passing by them. The Wilsons were in the center of the river, and this other boat was cruising along the shoreline. Wilson remembered thinking, “What a beautiful boat,” but never anticipated what was to come. Wilson said that they could tell that the approaching boat was traveling at a speed greater than it should have been for that area. “This contributed to the height and intensity of the wake it caused,” Wilson said. The Wilsons acknowledged the wake of this boat, and Margie reached for the railing at the first swell as she normally would in a typical wake. Instead of their boat smoothly rolling over the wake, Margie was flipped up into the air before she could reach the rail. She came down on her back and landed across the bow storage area. She was unable to get up before being thrown up in the air a second time then landed on her arm and shoulder which caused her a great deal of pain. “It was like being slammed against concrete,” Wilson said. “I never imagined it could have hurt like that.” But the water was not finished with her yet. As she struggled to right herself, she was lifted off the boat one more time. When she came back down this time, she could not stand up or move into any other position. Wilson’s husband and grandson tried to help her, but Wilson said that everything happened so quickly that they were unable to do anything for her until the boat calmed. Fortunately they were able to dock fairly quickly at a private dock along the shoreline where Margie was transported to the hospital. She suffered an L2 compression fracture and must wear a corset-style back brace for a minimum of 12 weeks. She also suffered a right humeral fracture

which was surgically repaired. She has worn an arm sling for the past six weeks and now faces at least six weeks of physical therapy. She believes that the other operator had no idea that his wake caused any damage at all, and because of this, he could make this same mistake again and cause injury to someone else. “The other boater was going too fast to begin with, but once he produced the wake, he could have slowed down and this would have slowed the effects of the wake a bit more,” Wilson said. According to www.boatsafe.com, every operator is responsible for his own wake and any damage caused by it. When a larger, faster boat is overtaking a smaller vessel, such as the Wilsons’ boat, it must do so with as much room as depth conditions allow. It may be necessary for the larger boat to slow its speed so as not to rock the other vessel. Negligent operation of a boat can lead to an operator being charged with careless operation, inattentive operation, reckless operation or assault by vessel. On average, approximately 700 people die in recreational boating accidents each year. The Coast Guard's 48th annual report, Boating Statistics 2006, indicates that 70% of reported deaths occurred on recreational boats where the operator had not received any formal boating safety instruction. It is the belief of boating safety experts that requiring recreational boaters to have boating safety instruction could save numerous lives each year, according to the Coast Guard Auxiliary. In a boating safety course, potential operators would learn navigation rules in order to avoid causing any accident or injury. For example, when two powerboats are meeting headon, or nearly so, either can signal their intention of passing port to port using one short blast. The other vessel should signal agreement by signaling one short blast, according to Delaware Boating Basics-A Guide to Responsible Boating. Operators would learn additional navigation rules for other situations in a safety course. Operators are also responsible for having proper equipment on their boats to ensure the safety of all passengers. First and foremost, federal law requires recreational boaters to carry one Coast Guard-approved life jacket of the correct size and in good condition for each person aboard. They come in both adult and chil-

dren’s sizes. Other types of required equipment include fire extinguishers, sound signals, backfire flame arrestors, mufflers and proper ventilation. Boating can and should be a fun and relaxing activity, but the operator must be responsible for his actions at all time. Coast Guard studies indicate that as

many as 50% of all boating accidents may be alcohol related. Under Delaware law, no person shall motor, sail, row, operate, command or have actual physical control of any vessel or boat underway on Delaware waters while under the influence of intoxicating liquor or drugs or any combination of drugs and/or intoxicating liquors.

Anyone convicted of such charges with a blood alcohol concentration of 10% could be fined from $500 to $2,000 with up to 30 days in jail. To sign up for a boating safety course, contact Wayne Hickman of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary at 629-6337. Classes are offered at the Nanticoke River Yacht Club in Seaford.

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STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

PAGE 3

Bridgeville Commission passes ordinance By Mike McClure The Bridgeville Commission passed an ordinance regarding building permit fees following a public hearing on Monday night. The Commission also discussed the status of fine money from traffic stops and criminal arrests. A public hearing was held during Monday night’s Commission meeting on an ordinance that would require a 1.5 percent building permit fee for property that goes to settlement before a house is built on it. The fee was originally proposed at three percent, but Commission President Joe Conaway proposed the reduction to 1.5 percent. Dorothy Harper, representing the Heritage Shores builder and developer, said she had no objection to paying the one and a half percent when she applies for a building permit. She said the developer builds spec houses with no purchaser involved and no price when it is built. Conaway said the fee will only be collected if a settlement occurs with a lot without a house on it and that it wouldn’t apply to spec houses. The standard fee applies with a settlement with a lot and a house. According to Conaway, the ordinance was proposed because once a property is sold, whatever is put on the property is not transfer tax eligible. Harper said the developer set up a program to break down the settlement to help buyers pay for it while they try to sell their other house and was not trying to avoid paying the transfer tax. Police chief Allen Parsons reported that he has been doing some research into the fine money from traffic and criminal arrests in town. The fines go through Delaware Court system. Parsons said some of the fines are being assessed and suspended, meaning that the town is not receiving any money from the fines. Parsons plans to talk to the local elected officials to see if they can do something about the problem. He also said it is taking the town about five to six months to receive its fine money. Conaway added that the town is only getting about one third of the fines of what the police department writes up. Conaway also suggested that the town look into using jump out squads to address crime in town. The jump squads, which are used in upstate towns, are 15 to 20 policemen who go into high crime areas and enforce warrants, look for weapons, and go after drug dealers. Conaway said the town does not have enough officers to do this yet, but added that the town could get state police officers and officers from other towns involved. He also said that the jump out squads have been criticized but have not been challenged. Town Manager Bonnie Walls thanked the United Methodist Church for sending 10 children to the town’s sanctuary park to help clean it up. The church held a summer camp and did projects throughout the town. Walls also said that the town’s spray irrigation project is about 99 percent complete. The town is looking to get DNREC permits so it can begin spray irrigation once the project has been completed. A public hearing was held on a zoning change request by Pet Poultry Products. Elwood Hunsberger came before the Commission to request a change in zoning from residential planned community (RPC) to commercial for 1.378 acres of land located on a parcel adjacent to the old Pet Poultry facility. According to Hunsberger, there are three leaseholders in the facility including a dry ice company. That company has tractor trailers backing into the facility, causing a hazard on Federalsburg Road. Hunsberger wants to use property for turning tractor trailers around. The Commission voted, 5-0, to approve the property owner’s request to remove the 1.378 acres from the residential planned community. It also approved the change of zone request. The Commisson’s meeting in September will take place on Tuesday, Sept. 16. A meeting will also be held on Thursday, Aug. 14 at 7 p.m. at the fire hall. During this meeting owners of three commercial properties proposed for annexation will make their presentations. The annexation vote will take place on Saturday, Aug. 16 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at town hall. The town is also holding a public meeting on Sept. 11 at 7 p.m. at the fire hall. The town will invite DelDOT to give status of construction on Routes 13 and 404. Also invited to the meeting are local developers; the library board of trustees; and the organizers of Apple-Scrapple, Christmas in Bridgeville, and Punkin Chunkin.

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PAGE 4

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

‘Forensic Files’ episode Continued from page one

investigates and after talking with Robinson, pitched the show to the network and moved forward with scheduling interviews. Robinson, a Seaford insurance agent, said she was surprised when she was contacted by Forensic Files, because she was not aware of any activity surrounding her case since the 2005 arrest of Mark Eskridge. “I appreciate any opportunity to use my case as a way to help make people aware,” she said. “I faced an attack that came out of nowhere and from someone that I did not know. I think it is important that people realize how important it is to be aware of your surroundings and take precautions to try and stay safe. I spent 13 years totally uncertain of anything until police made the arrest in 2005.” Robinson’s nightmare began in the early morning hours of Sept. 19, 2005, when she was awoken by a knock on the door of her Laurel Village Mobile Home park residence. She went to the door and standing on her tip-toes to look through a window on the door, she saw a man standing on her doorstep who said he wanted to use her telephone. After offering to make a call for the man, rather than let him in the house, the man walked away. Robinson notified police about the suspicious man, but when police arrived there was no sign of him. She went back to bed but a short time later was awoken again, this time by the sound of a slamming door. When she walked out of her bedroom into the kitchen area of her home she saw the man crouched on the floor with a knife. For the next four hours Robinson was brutally tortured as her then 13-year-old son lay sleeping in the next room. Stabbed repeatedly and beaten, Robinson finally

collapsed to the floor and after saying the “Lord’s Prayer,” made a last-ditch attempt to save her life by acting as though she were dead. Thinking he had killed his prey, the man fled the home and Robinson’s son went and got help from neighbors. “I thought after this happened that I would never feel safe again,” she said. “But, in time, I was able to take the initiative to do things, such as self defense and firearms classes, to equip myself with a stronger sense of confidence. I feel I am much better now.” Robinson is now working on a book about her ordeal and the efforts she has made to attempt recovery. She hopes to find a publisher for the book in the near future. Selby said both the Donavan and Robinson cases were solved utilizing law enforcement’s newest forensic tool known as CODIS (Combined DNA Index System). The national data base includes DNA evidence from felony suspects, as well as DNA samples retrieved from crime scenes. The CODIS data base enables police to input a suspect’s DNA to check for possible connections to other crimes, such as the case with Eskridge’s involvement in the Robinson attack. The data base will first check locally and then enhance the search to nationwide. Selby said the tool has enabled law enforcement to resolve violent crime cases that have been “cold case” files for as long as 10 and 20 years. Selby said “Forensic Files” crews plan to arrive in Seaford sometime in the middle of next week and film through August 27. The show is produced by Medstar Television, Inc. and airs on truTV, which is featured on the Comcast Cable Television lineup. It is not clear when the show

Thirteen years ago Brenda Kaye Robinson suffered an attack in her Laurel mobile home which left her close to death. Forensic evidence helped law enforcement agencies solve this crime that has attracted a national television crew that will spotlight Robinson‘s case.

will air, however, Selby estimates it may be sometime after February 2009. For more information about Forensic

Files visit the website http://www.forensicfiles.com.

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

PAGE 5

Bridgeville breaks ground for $2.3 million library By Lynn R. Parks After months of planning, workers and volunteers with the Bridgeville Public Library broke ground Wednesday morning for a new facility. The new 13,500-square foot library, expected to cost about $2.3 million, is being built on South Cannon Street, where the old town and the new Heritage Shores golf community meet. “We are all so excited,” said Cathi Hochstedler, publicity chairwoman for the Friends of the Bridgeville Library. “We have been working so long toward this.” Construction will be done by Regional Builders, Seaford. Hochstedler was unable to say when the project will be completed. It is still awaiting final approval from the town of Bridgeville, as well as from the state fire marshal’s office and from the state, which has to approve the storm water retention pond. In addition, fund-raising for the project is not complete. The library recently received a $1 million matching grant from the state, as well as a $30,000 grant from the Marmot Foundation. The library’s next big fund-raiser will be a Kiss the Pig contest, in which people in the community will vote with their dollars for the local celebrity they would most like to see kiss a pig. Contestants are town commission president Joseph Conaway, Woodbridge School District superintendent Kevin Carson and Bridgeville police chief Alan Parsons. Collection boxes will be set up around town. The grand finale kiss will take place during the October Apple-Scrapple Festival, on the center stage. Hochstedler said that the friends group is also planning a late-winter fundraiser, similar to the art auction it sponsored in April.

Bridgeville Library dignitaries and elected officials break ground for the new library. From left are: Cathi Hochstedler, member; Randolph Jones, member; Town Commissioner President Joe Conaway; state Senator Thurman Adams; Ruth Gilefski, secretary/treasurer; and Jeanine Scott, member. Photo by Daniel Richardson


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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

Business DelDOT installs new system for truckers to bypass weigh stations Delaware Department of Transportation (DelDOT) announces that Delaware will install PrePass, a system allowing trucks traveling along northbound U.S. Route 301 near Middletown to deploy on-highway credentialing verification technology. Once operational, the system will permit truckers in compliance to bypass weigh stations, saving time, energy and gas; savings which hopefully should be passed on to the consumer. PrePass enables truckers and motor carriers to validate electronically with state weight, safety, and credential requirements while traveling at highway speeds. Employing transponders within the ve-

hicle and over-road reading devices, much like E-ZPass, motor carrier participation is voluntary and carrier eligibility is subject to state safety qualifications. The system is anticipated to help improve highway safety as well as reduce greenhouse gases by reducing congestion and idling at the new U.S. Route 301 Delaware weigh station currently under construction. PrePass is provided at no cost to the state of Delaware and is funded through Heavy Vehicle Electronic License Plate, Incorporated (HELPinc.). Truck travel comprises up to 35% of traffic volume along Route 301. The new weigh station

will be equipped with a weigh-in-motion (WIM) scale and an over-height detector to identify vehicles exceeding the legal limits. Vehicles without PrePass or in violation of height or weight limits would receive notification through a series of static, directional, and variable message signs. The vehicle would be required to enter the Truck Weigh Station and Inspection Facility passing through the static-scale area for height/weight verification by the Delaware State Police. The facility’s design incorporates components of DelDOT’s intelligent transportation management system program

known as DelTrac. DelTrac includes advanced systems that provide real time control, monitoring and information capabilities to improve the safety and efficiency of Delaware’s transportation system. As a carrier incentive, since its inception, PrePass has resulted in the consumption of 136 million fewer gallons of fuel and 22.5 million fewer hours of driver time. Launched in California in 1995, PrePass is now operational at 280 locations in 29 states. More than 450,000 trucks have voluntarily enrolled in PrePass. For more information, visit www.deldot.gov.

Sussex Tech Adult Division offers training programs in September Apprenticeship training This program offers theory and handson training through an employer sponsor. Classroom instruction is provided in the evenings on the campus of Sussex Tech High School, west of Georgetown. Classes will be offered in auto mechanics, electricity, HVAC, industrial mechanics, marine mechanics, plumbing, welding, and early care and education. Medical training Nationally certified medical training courses begin this fall. Daytime, and

nighttime classes are available. Courses include Pharmacy Technician, Medical Office Administration, Medical Assisting, Medical Billing and Coding Specialist, Physical Therapy Aide and Phlebotomy Technician. Nursing assistant program The Sussex Tech Adult Division has one of the top nursing assistant programs in Delaware. The state prescribed curriculum is delivered by registered nurses with experience in long-term care and other specialties. Clinical experiences are con-

Fulton reports quarterly earnings

the Corporation recorded a $13.2 million reserve related to auction rate certificates (ARCs) held in certain customer accounts of the Corporation's trust company subsidiary, Fulton Financial Advisors, N.A. These three items decreased net income by approximately $15.6 million, or 9 cents per diluted share, net of tax. Excluding these items, diluted net income per share for the second quarter of 2008 would have been 24 cents. Total assets at June 30, 2008 were approximately $16.1 billion. Fulton Financial Corporation will pay a quarterly cash dividend of 15 cents per share on its common stock on Oct. 15 to shareholders of record as of Sept. 19, 2008. Delaware National Bank is a member of Fulton Financial Corporation. For more information, visit www.fult.com.

Fulton Financial Corporation earned $25.7 million for the second quarter ended June 30, 2008, a 35.6 percent decrease from the same period in 2007. Diluted net income per share for the quarter was 15 cents, a 34.8 percent decrease from the 23 cents reported in the same period in 2007. Diluted net income per share for the quarter decreased 37.5 percent from the 24 cents reported in the first quarter of 2008. During the second quarter, three items significantly impacted earnings. First, the Corporation recorded a $24.7 million pretax charge for other-than-temporary impairment of bank stocks. Second, the Corporation recognized a $13.9 million pretax gain on the sale of its approximately $87 million credit card portfolio. Third,

ducted in local facilities. Customized training The division also offers customized business and industry training. Programs have ranged from pre-employment assessment, recruitment and training to updating the skills of an existing workforce. In some cases, companies with similar needs have been able to combine employees to provide a more cost-effective training program. Industrial training classes include mechanical skills, industrial maintenance,

general maintenance, electrical, motor controls, technical writing, OSHA safety training, appraisal and classification systems. Office and computer training, customer service training and supervisory training are available. Contact information A complete selection of courses can be viewed online at www.SussexTechTraining.net. For information about programs, tuition assistance, and payment plans, contact the Sussex Tech Adult Division at 302-856-9035.

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PAGE 7

MORNING STAR • AUGUST - 14-20, 2008

Visit seafordstar.com or laurelstar.com for descriptions of current movie selections

MO V I E S

Diamond State Drive-In Theater US Harrington, Del. 302-284-8307 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRI. 8/15, SAT. 8/16 & SUN. 8/17 Star Wars: The Clone Wars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:20 Tropic Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:00 The Movies At Midway Rt. 1, Midway Shopping Ctr., Rehoboth Beach, 645-0200 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY 8/15 THRU TUESDAY 8/19 The Dark Knight . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:50, 3:50, 6:50, WALL-E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:05, 3:35, 6:20, The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:30, 4:35, 7:05, Swing Vote . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:05, 4:25, 7:00, Mamma Mia! . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:50, 4:20, 6:40, Journey to The Center of The Earth . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6:40, Tropic Thunder . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:20, 4:00, 7:10, Hancock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:05, 3:15, 5:25, 7:35, Brideshead Revisited . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 3:45, 6:30, Star Wars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:10, 1:40, 3:30, 4:05, 6:15, Step Brothers . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:00, 4:30, 7:15, Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants II . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 3:45, 6:30, Mirrors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:45, 4:10, 6:45, Traveling Pants II . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00, 3:45, 6:30, Pineapple Express . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:00, 4:30, 7:15,

9:50 8:40 9:30 9:35 9:00 8:50 9:30 9:45 9:20 8:35 9:40 9:15 9:10 9:15 9:40

all shows subject to change and availability

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Regal Salisbury Stadium 16 2322 N. Salisbury Blvd., Salisbury, MD, 410-860-1370 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY 8/15 THRU THURSDAY, 8/21 Mirrors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tue (1:30, 4:45) 7:30, 10:20 Star Wars: The Clone Wars . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tue (12:30, 2:00, 3:00, 4:30, 5:30) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:15, 8:15, 9:50, 10:40 Tropic Thunder* . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tue (1:00, 2:00, 4:00, 5:00) 7:00, 8:00, 9:40, 10:40 Pineapple Express . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tue (1:00, 2:15, 4:00, 5:00) 7:45, 9:30, 10:30 Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants II . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tue (1:15, 4:15) 7:15, 10:00 The Mummy: Tomb of Dragon Emperor . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . .Fi-Mon (12:45, 3:30) 6:30, 9:15 Tue (12:45) 6:30 Swing Vote . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tue (1:00, 3:45) 6:45, 9:30 Step Brothers . . . . . . . . . . .R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri (4:30) 7:30, 10:00, Sat (1:45) 7:30, 10:00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sun (4:30) 7:30 Mon (4:30) 10:00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tues (1:45, 4:30) 7:30, 10:00 The Dark Knight* . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tue (12:30, 1:30, 3:45, 4:45) 7:00, 8:30, 10:15 Mama Mia . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tue (12:45, 3:30) 6:30, 9:15 Journey To The Center of The Earth . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tue (1:45, 4:15) 7:05, 9:40 Hancock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tue 10:10 WALL-E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fri-Tue (12:25, 2:55, 5:20) 7:45 Advance Tickets on Sale : Babylon Ad (PG13) Mirrors* (R) * Pass Restrictions Apply Discounted Show Times in Parenthesis ()

Clayton Theater Dagsboro, Del. 20 732-3744 SCHEDULE SHOWN IS FOR FRIDAY 8/15 THRU THURSDAY, 8/21 Mamma Mia! . . . . . . . . . . .PG13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nightly 5:00, Sunday 2:00 The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Slayer PG13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nightly 8:00

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PAGE 8

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

Thomas Sawyer witnessed cruel effects of the war By James Diehl Seaford resident Thomas Sawyer didn’t arrive on the Asian continent until after the formal surrender of Imperial Japan, but he saw many times over the effects decades of occupation by the Japanese had on the people of neighboring Korea. They are images that still remain with him today, more than six decades later. “Life in Korea for us was so miserable and so devastating,” says Sawyer, who today makes his home at the Methodist Manor House with Dorothy, his wife of 57 years. “To see the starvation and the poorness of these devastated people was very hard. They were afraid every day that we were going to knife them or rob them or something. It was very depressing.” Sawyer spent nearly 18 months in South Korea immediately following the surrender of Japan. He fell in love with the country – with its sites and with its natural beauty. But the suffering of the people was hard to take for the native of Arizona. “The saddest part for me was in the morning when we would be marching to our headquarters. We always saw dead children with bloated stomachs lying along the roadside,” Sawyer remembers. “That was really tough for me.” Sawyer was one of thousands of American soldiers who were assigned duty as socalled occupation forces toward the end of World War II. Though sent to South Korea, his military service would have been much different, and likely much more intense, if not for the sharp eyes of U.S. officials in 1945. “I enlisted in Baltimore when I was only 16, but they looked at my birth certificate very closely and caught me,” says Sawyer, who admits he was a bit of a handful in his younger years. “My parents didn’t know I had doctored my birth certificate, but, even though I was an honor student, they knew I was going to quit [school] and go somewhere.” Though he got caught the first time, young Sawyer was not about to give up on his dream of entering the United States military. “Growing up in D.C., I was a newspaper boy across from the Washington Navy Yard, which is where all of the military guys were encamped prior to being shipped off to Europe to fight,” Sawyer re-

calls. “The largest group there were members of the 29th infantry division, who were headed to the Normandy beachhead and to Africa. I just got interested in the military and figured that I should go and do what they were doing.” But there was one thing that never occurred to the young man as he began making plans to go overseas and fight for Uncle Sam – he never considered the possibility that he may not return home. “The events of World War II to teenagers like me were pretty darn exciting,” admits Sawyer. “But we didn’t get to see all the bloody stuff on television – we just felt we were going to go and fight the enemy. It never entered our minds that the bullets would be going both ways.” Finally, at the age of 17, young Sawyer got his wish when his parents finally relented and signed the papers, allowing him to enter the U.S. Army. That was in May of 1946. Leaving for basic training at Fort Polk, La., Sawyer soon learned valuable lesson number one – the importance of following instructions to the letter. “They taught us in basic training that, when we pitched our tents, we should put dirt all around the edge of the tent and also build a ditch in case it rained,” remembers Sawyer. “They said [the dirt] was to keep the snakes and scorpions out of your tent. That was fun going to bed at night wondering if you were going to see a snake or a scorpion. “Well, I got up one morning and there was a snake halfway under my tent where I hadn’t put enough dirt. It turned out to be a coral snake, one of the deadliest snakes in the world.” After completing basic training, Sawyer departed for South Korea – when he arrived, he was welcomed by a night he’ll never forget. “We spent the first night in an old converted mill on cots and we kept hearing these horrible screams,” remembers Sawyer. “We had been warned to stay within the confines of that mill and not leave it. But typical G.I’s, they want to go out and find a girl. So that’s what one of the guys did. “Well, her family caught him and castrated him. That was the policy there. If a Korean caught you with a Korean girl, they castrated you, and that’s what happened.” The following day, Sawyer and his fel-

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Seaford resident Thomas Sawyer served in South Korea in 1946 and 1947, working as a statistical clerk for the 6th infantry division in Pusan. He also served for 26 years in the U.S. Army Reserves, retiring in 1982 as a lieutenant colonel.

low soldiers were sent to a staging area and dispatched to different places around the country. Sawyer got on the train headed to Pusan, in the southeastern section of South Korea. His job was to compile health reports from units scattered all throughout the country from his office at the 6th division hospital center in Pusan. But the first night in his new city was spent on guard duty, along with another soldier. “We asked why two of us were being put on that post and we were told that the night before the fellow on guard duty was shot and killed by a Korean sniper,” Sawyer recalls. “It was on the waterfront and there was a conveyor belt that went from the ice house to the boats. This Korean had been hiding on that conveyor belt behind a block of ice.” Sawyer’s service in South Korea was during a time of great civil unrest for a country that had been occupied by the Japanese for 35 years. Even mealtime wasn’t safe for American soldiers. “We would have bullets come through our mess hall all the time when we were in there eating,” Sawyer remembers. “We were always in danger of snipers.” But, despite being regularly shot at, the hardest moments for Sawyer were still the personal ones – the ones that detailed the human suffering so rampant in Korea during the 1940s. Continued to page nine


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

PAGE 9

Probe continues into cause of Bay Bridge crash Driver dies when truck plunges into Chesapeake Bay By Lynn R. Parks A major artery that connects the Delmarva Peninsula to the western shore of Maryland was partially closed Sunday and Monday after a westbound tractor trailer truck carrying frozen chickens crashed through a concrete Jersey wall on the Chesapeake Bay Bridge and fell nearly 40 feet into the water. The driver of the truck, John Robert Short, 57, Willards, Md., was killed in the accident, which took place at 4 a.m. Sunday. Two other people were injured. As of Tuesday, the cause of the accident had still not been determined, said Cpl. Jonathan Green, spokesman for the Maryland Transportation Authority Police. “We are not detailing who struck whom,” he said. Also, no cause of death has been determined for Short, whose body was pulled from the water by divers Sunday at around 5:40 a.m., Green said.

The accident happened about 1/4 mile west of Kent Island. According to Green, three vehicles were involved in the accident, the truck, which Short was driving for Mountaire Farms, a poultry processing company based in Selbyville, a 1997 Camaro and a 2005 Toyota Prius. The truck was traveling west and both cars were traveling east, he said. The newer, three-lane span, which normally carries west-bound traffic, was closed for maintenance, Green said. All traffic was traveling on the older, two-lane span. As of Tuesday, the driver of the Camaro, Candy Lynn Baldwin, 19, Millington, Md., was in University of Maryland Shock Trauma, Baltimore. A passenger in the crash, Trisha Ann Michele Carrigan, 21, Quincy, Calif., was released from Shock Trauma Sunday afternoon. The two people in the Prius, driver Seung Won Hong, 41, Springfield, Va., and Ho Yoo, 42, Alexandria, Va., were not injured. Long traffic backups, more than 10 miles in each direction, followed the accident. One lane of the two-lane span was reopened Sunday at about 8:15 p.m. and the second lane was reopened Monday at about 4 p.m. The 8-foot piece of Jersey

wall that the truck sent into the water has been replaced with a temporary wall, Green said, “and it is as strong or stronger than what it was.” He said that a permanent wall will be installed in late September. The bridge did not suffer any other damages, Green said. The truck’s tractor was recovered from the water Monday

morning. The trailer was recovered Monday at around 4 p.m. Both parts of the truck were loaded on barges and taken to the shore. Green said that to his knowledge, this is the first time that a truck has crashed through the bridge’s wall and plunged into the bay. The older span of the Bay Bridge was built in 1952.

“I have talked with a lot of people, and they all say that this is a first,” he said. He said that engineers have examined the bridge, “and there is no indication that there were any unsafe conditions or irregularities,” he said. “This was a unique situation in which a number of different components came into play at the same time.”

Veteran Tom Sawyer Continued from page eight

“Besides the dead children, the other thing that was troubling was to watch young kids serving as pimps on the street for the female members of their family,” he says. “Life in Korea for us was just so miserable and so devastating having kids proposition us for their sisters, seeing dead kids on the streets and being sniped at. It was very depressing.” U.S. military officials recognized it as such. So, after Sawyer had been in Korea for eight months, military leaders arranged for soldiers to take a weeklong sabbatical of sorts in Japan. As depressing as Korea was, it was nothing compared to the destruction Sawyer saw on his way to the Japanese city of Kyoto. “We took a train and on that train ride we went through Hiroshima,” he remembers. “As the train went through the area, it slowed down so we could see what was left of the city. All we saw was what appeared to be a smokestack from a factory. The entire city was just leveled. There wasn’t a standing structure anywhere. “It was like a ghost town, just a feeling of total emptiness and tragedy.” After a couple of side trips, including a visit to the historic Japanese city of Osaka, Sawyer

returned to Korea for the rest of his tour. When he returned home near the end of 1947, he received a piece of good news. It was news that helped shape the rest of his life. “I learned that the veteran’s administration had established a high school program [named the G.I. Bill] and I was able to graduate,” he says. “The G.I. Bill benefited veterans of World War II who had served their country for periods as long as four or five years, many of whom never would have thought about going back to school. It was an indefinable reward for those people. Those of us who served during this period were able to receive an education and turn into productive and income-producing citizens.” Sawyer graduated from the Veterans High School Center in 1949 and later from American University in Washington, D.C. He went on to work as a biologist at the National Institute of Health, and later as a marine biologist. Sawyer also served in the U.S. Army Reserves from 1956 to 1982, retiring as a lieutenant colonel. He and his wife, Dorothy, moved to the Methodist Manor House in 2002. They have two sons and one daughter.

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PAGE 10

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

Lions and Leos work together to help the community By Donna Dukes-Huston For the past sixteen years a group of Laurel teens has been supporting the local Lions Club through volunteer efforts. The Laurel Leo Club was established in 1992 as an extension of the Lions Club. Since then the group has expanded and become an active and vital part of the community. Although Lions clubs around the country support Leo clubs, there are very few in Delaware. “There are six Leo clubs in the state and two of them are in Laurel,” said Brad Spicer, Secretary of the Laurel Lions Club and Leo extension chairman for District 22 D, Delaware. When the Leo Club was first formed, it was open only to high school students. About four years ago, a second group was formed for middle school-age students, according to Joy Spicer, club advisor and President of the Laurel Lions Club. Joy’s daughter, Sierra, had watched her older sister participate and did not want to wait until she was in high school to join the Leos. She urged her mother to start another club for students her age. The high school club currently has around thirty members while the middle school club is smaller. Joy hopes to expand that club this year. “If they start early, then volunteering becomes part of their life,” Joy said. The Leos work with the Lions on many of their projects, most of which raise money to support the visually impaired. One such project, Vision Days, occurs each October. Leos and Lions stand in front of local stores and collect money for the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins for research, according to Spicer. Later that month the middle school Leos participate in Sight Night on Halloween. “As they are too old to go trick-or-treating for candy, they instead go from door to door asking for used eyeglasses, sunglasses, and hearing aids,” Spicer said. “We try to let the public know about this beforehand so they are ready for us. Last year we collected over 260 pairs of glasses that night.” In November each year the Leos partner with the Lions on a Journey for Sight which is a five mile walk through Trap Pond. Other groups are encouraged to raise money and walk as well.

“These groups donate half of the money they raise to the Lions Club to help people who are visually impaired, and they get to keep the other half,” Spicer said. According to Spicer one of the more rewarding projects for the kids is the annual Lions Club Christmas dinner for the visually impaired which is held at the Millsboro Convention Center. Prior to the dinner, the Leos make ornaments for the guests. “We try to make them textural so that the guests can recognize them by feel,” Joy said. “That way each year when they put them on their tree, they can feel the distinctiveness of our ornament and remember where it came from.” Leos present these ornaments along with other gifts from the Lions at dinner that night. They also help serve the guests dinner and dessert. Springtime means the annual Lions Club Variety Show, and the Leos do not want to be left out of that. In fact, they have been participating in the show in many ways for the past ten years. “We have a great time doing the show every year,” Sierra said. “We get to have our own skit or song. Last year we did the Thriller dance.” Those Leos who shy away from the limelight work backstage moving props, running presentations, and working the lights. The middle school Leos provided concessions at last year’s show. Not only do the Leos support Lions’ projects, they also have developed some of their own. Two of these projects were developed to support victims of natural disasters. The middle school Leos started Coins for Katrina to help the hurricane victims in Mississippi. “We made a pledge to the Lions Club in Mississippi that we would give $250 each year,” Sierra said. “The middle school kids collected change throughout the school and sent it to the victims.” The Leos later decided that they wanted to help victims of the tsunami when that tragedy struck. They held a rock-a-thon in the middle school gym from 7 p.m. until 7 a.m. on a Saturday night. Participants got pledges and formed rocking teams. Team members took turns rocking as each team’s chair had to be moving for twelve hours, Sierra said. When the kids were not rocking, they took part in many other fun

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Pictured from left is Sierra Spicer, High School Leo club vice-president; Gaven Parker, High School Leo club president; Ashley Hastings, Middle School Leo club president; and Haley Layton, Middle School Leo club secretary.

activities such as playing basketball, watching videos, and dancing to music provided by a DJ. Seventy-five kids participated in this event and raised over $1,700. Sierra coordinated this event and found it to be the most rewarding. Sierra hopes next year to expand the Leos’ efforts internationally with Pens and Pencils for Peace. She plans to contact Leo clubs around the United States and ask them to collect new or used writing utensils or donate money to purchase them for children in Africa. “I was talking to someone recently who

had been to some of the schools in Africa,” Sierra said. “They told me that if the kids don’t have a writing utensil, they can’t go to school.” For Sierra’s extensive efforts with the Laurel Leos, she was selected as one of the top three Leos in the world at a convention in Boston in 2006 and earned the title of Lions Club International Leo of the Year last year. She was also a Jefferson Award winner in 2007. “I love to think that we can make a difference,” Sierra said. “A lot of teenagers don’t think they can, but we really do.”

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STAR • AUG. 14 - 20, 2008

PAGE 11

Golf tournament will benefit youth The Laurel site of Western Sussex Boys & Girls Clubs is slated to benefit from an upcoming charity golf tournament being held in Bridgeville. The annual Johnny Janosik Charity Golf Tournament to be held at Heritage Shores Golf Course will provide support to the area youth development organization. This year’s event is scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 18, beginning with a breakfast and registration at 8 a.m. Along with supporting the Laurel Boys & Girls Club, the Janosik charity tournament will also pay tribute with a memorial to Frank Gerardi, Jr., who died earlier this year. Gerardi’s father, Frank Gerardi, is former Johnny Janosik World of Furniture Galleries CEO. In honor of Frank Gerardi, Jr. a special annual scholarship will be given out at the Boys & Girls Club at Laurel in his name. The scholarship will be given to the annual “Youth of the Year” candidate from the Laurel club site. This funding will be used to help advance his or her future education. The Johnny Janosik Charity Golf Tournament features a “4-Player Scramble.” The cost per player is $150 and $600 per four-member team. Following the breakfast and registration there will be a 9 a.m. “Shotgun Start.” There will be a box lunch on the course and refreshments, awards and an auction will also highlight the event. Special entertainment will be provided by nationally known comedian, Joe Conklin. For more information contact John Evans at 302-398-1018.

Harold L. Slatcher President/CEO

Your Hard Earned Money Remains Safe and Sound at County Bank There are a lot of headlines out there about some of our larger competitors who have become caught up in the lure of making risky loans and who are now trying to recover from those decisions.

upgrades, and upgrades to our technology so that we can continue to provide you, our valued customer, with the quality customer service you deserve. Our sights are set firmly on the future.

The security of your nest egg is our most important responsibility. County Bank is a local, FDIC-insured bank. We consistently maintain a cautious, wise and careful approach to managing the money our depositors have entrusted to us, investing only in safe, AA and higher rated investments.

Natallie LeCates on Dean’s List

Natallie LeCates from Seaford made the dean’s list for the spring ‘08 semester with a 3.94 grade point average. LeCates graduated from Seaford Senior High School in 2005. She is majoring in Elementary Education at Penn State Berks Campus where she is a Lion Ambassador, Orientation Leader, Freshman Class Mentor and works in the Housing & Food Services Offices. This fall, she will be student teaching for 2nd graders in the Reading school district on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Visit our website, or stop in one of our 9 convenient locations in Southern Delaware to learn more about what County Bank can do to help you secure your financial future. We appreciate your continued confidence, and look forward to working with you.

County Bank is as strong as ever. Our investments are solid, our reserves are more than sufficient, and we are performing well in this challenging economic environment. We continue to invest in our local communities and lend to local businesses. We continue to invest in the education and training of our employees. We continue to invest in capital

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Page 12

MORNING STAR • AuGuST 14 - 20, 2008

Farmers struggle to get ahead with high fuel costs By Donna Dukes-Huston Fourth in a series When the price of oil began to rise significantly, we first felt the pain in our pocketbooks at the pump. This pain quickly spread to many other areas of our daily lives. Our pocketbooks are now being stretched every time we open them to purchase almost any type of product. We know that the cost to ship goods has increased dramatically, but so has the cost of producing many goods, namely our number one commodity - food. It’s that time of year when we share our rural roads with tractors and combines and look forward to fresh produce at roadside stands. But how much have we stopped to consider how the increase in fuel prices is hurting our farmers? The most obvious burden is the additional money they are spending on fuel to keep these tractors and combines running. Irv Handy, a farmer with land in Seaford, Federalsburg and Bridgeville, says that his fuel costs have doubled this year. Jeff Allen, a farmer from Bridgeville, agrees. “We have a 10,000-gallon tank on our farm, and we use 30,000 gallons of diesel fuel each year,” Allen said. “Last year we paid around $2.80 per gallon and this year we’ve paid about $4.20.” Some of Allen’s tractors hold 300 gallons of fuel. "$1,300 in fuel will only last two days for one of those tractors," he said. Allen said that their combines use 90 gallons per day. “When we’re harvesting, we could spend $420 per day,” he added. All this is only one part of a farmer’s cost of doing business. Next add in irrigation costs. These systems are powered by electricity and diesel fuel. Allen has 14 irrigation systems which burn 10 gallons of fuel per hour. To irrigate 100 acres takes 20 hours, he said. That’s not all there is to the irrigation process. Farmers must check on these systems even more carefully now to ensure that they don’t run too long or

too far. In order to do this, they drive around in a farm pick-up truck which Allen said gets eight miles per gallon. “All our farms are within 10 miles of our home,” Allen said. “We travel 34 miles in a pick-up to check all of our systems. We used to check them three to four times a day, but now because of the fuel increase, we can only check them twice a day.” Allen said they are spending $70-$80 every other day to fill up just this truck. Allen has also drastically cut back on certain crops and is focusing on the more economical crops to grow, such as soybeans. “Soybeans are more economical because they don’t need as much water to grow,” Allen said. “They only need about an inch and a half to two inches per week where corn needs an inch every other day.” While Mother Nature has been kinder to farmers this season than last, good weather alone is not enough to produce successful crops. The price of the chemicals they need to add nutrients to the crops has increased as well. This is due in part to the increased cost in shipping. The fact that most of these chemicals are petroleum based is an even larger factor. “The price for chemicals is outrageous this year,” Allen said. “We just got our bill for the month of July $30,000 for one month.” An added factor this season is that availability of some chemicals that are produced in China is down. Allen said that China has closed many of their chemical factories in an effort to improve air quality for the summer Olympics being held there this month. To combat these increased costs in producing their crops, they need to get a strong price for these crops in order to be able to turn a decent profit. Unfortunately, this is not happening with all of their crops, particularly corn. “The price of corn has dropped $3 a bushel in the last six weeks,” Handy said. “It was over $8 in the middle of June, and it just closed at a little over $5 a bushel.”

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Farmers are spending a lot more money for fuel to keep tractors and combines running. Jeff Allen, a farmer from Bridgeville, has a 10,000-gallon tank on his farm, and used 30,000 gallons of diesel fuel last year. Some of Allen’s tractors hold 300 gallons of fuel and their combines use 90 gallons per day.

Handy said that it costs him around $4 per bushel to grow corn. If he produces 180 bushels per acre, it will cost him $720 per acre. “At 100 acres, that’s $72,000 in cost,” Handy added. “You’re putting your money out there as a gamble.” Farmers can lose money another way when they try to sell their crops. “When a crop is harvested, the ideal moisture content is 13.5%,” Allen said. “Anything over that and you get docked at the mill.” This is called a discount schedule. If a crop comes to the mill too moist, the mill must use propane-fueled dryers to bring it to the desired moisture content. Therefore, they must increase the discount schedule which decreases the price the farmer gets for that load. “If we bring in 1,000 bushels of wheat at a 15% moisture content, they’re going to cut 60 bushels,” Allen said. “If we’ve contracted for $7 a bushel, we’ve just lost $360 for one load.”

Both Handy and Allen have taken another measure to decrease their costs this season, but this is only a short term fix. They have done a lot of no-till practice instead of working up all the land. “You can get away with this for one or two years, but then the ground hardens and crops won’t get air to the roots and the nutrients don’t move as well.” Handy said that he will need to have a 25-50% increase in yields or price to make the same profits as last year. “We’re all going to be in a world of hurt if something doesn’t turn around,” he added.

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PAGE 14

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

Farm stands are great, but buyers still have to be selective I’d like to add my kudos to all the positive feedback from the deORETTA NORR but of the Seaford farmer’s market. Patrons were treated to displays of locally-grown hybrid and heirloom tomatoes, summer squashes, sweet corn and melons, not to mention other exotic and unusual produce never seen in the supermarkets. I hope more vendors will be encouraged by the favorable response to join their eager and friendly compatriots in the all too short time we have left to enjoy summer’s bounblotches. Yet, there they lie — as lovely as ty. the day they were purchased. You can’t But caveat emptor — let the buyer beconvince me they weren’t chemically ware! All farm stands are not equal. At treated to retard spoilage and produced another venue out of town, I picked up a somewhere other than this guy’s back couple of suspiciously perfect tomatoes. yard. When questioned, the vendor assured me At another stand, the seller tried to that he’d grown them himself. Not comoblige by pulling the bright green stem pletely convinced, I brought them home from a cantaloupe I was eyeing. No for my kitchen counter test. That was three thanks. That tattletale tail told that this weeks ago. By this time they should be melon was yanked from its bed much too swimming in a less than odiferous pool of early and would never taste sweet no mattheir own juices and scarred by unseemly ter how long I waited.

L

K

The Practical Gourmet

So, please do patronize local stands and into 1/4-inch slices farmer’s markets but do try to be a savvy 2 tablespoons olive oil consumer. Salt Food and Wine Fresh-ground black magazine offers the pepper I picked up a couple of suspifollowing suggestions 1/4 teaspoon wine for your fresh, locally ciously perfect tomatoes. When vinegar grown — and wise 1 clove garlic, questioned, the vendor assured — purchases. minced me that he’d grown them himself. 1 tablespoon chopped flat-leaf Not completely convinced, I parsley brought them home for my kitchen 1/2 pound salted Grilled Zucchini with Fresh Mozfresh mozzarella, counter test. That was three zarella cut into thick weeks ago. Yet, there they lie — The delicate taste of slices fresh mozzarella ofas lovely as the day they were fers a delicious counLight the grill or terpoint to the garlic- purchased. heat the broiler. In a and-vinegar-maceratlarge glass or stained zucchini. However, less-steel bowl, toss if you prefer a stronger cheese flavor, try the zucchini with 1 tablespoon of the oil, goat cheese instead. 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/8 teaspoon pepper. Serves 6 to 8 Grill or broil the zucchini, turning once, until tender and golden, about 5 minutes 3 zucchini (about 1 pound), cut lengthwise per side. Put the zucchini back in the

MLS555499 4 BR, 3 BA warm & inviting custom home in “River’s End” 2 BR, on first floor w/ morning room by kitchen. Built 2004 w/1 yr. home warranty. Hostess: Brenda Rambo 302-2362660 Directions: Seaford, Old Furnace Road to Old Meadow Road, left into Rivers End, bear left follow to 80 Rivers End Drive. CENTURY 21 TULL RAMEY

Welcome Home to this gorgeous 2-story classic colonial in ATLANTA ESTATES . Many upgrades including duro-ceramic floors, newer appliances, and Corian countertops. Features include lots of living space w/a nice flow, sunroom w/ skylights, screened-in back porch. This 3-4 bedroom, 2-car garage home is a must see! $279,900 MLS #552763 Directions: From Atlanta Rd 30 turn into Atlanta Est., 2nd home on R Hostess: Trina Ruark. CALLAWAY, FARNELL & MOORE • 629-4514

218 N CANNON ST, SEAFORD - Lovely brick colonial w/ LR & FR, 3 BRs, 1.5 BAs, porch, patio & garage. Features include wood floors, fireplace & home warranty. $192,000 (MLS 556116) HOST: TrentR uark

31 RIVERS END DR, SEAFORD - This 4-BR, 2.5-BA home in Rivers End offers the perfect blend of comfortable living, choice location & affordable price. Features a 3-season room, fireplace, garage & more! $389,000 (MLS 560325) HOSTESS: Fran Ruark

17837 ATLANTA RD, BRIDGEVILLE Convenient to Seaford and Maryland, this 4-BR, 3-BA Cape Cod w/ a huge “Bonus” room & garage sits on 2.4 country acres. Addt’l acreage can be purchased separately. Even the home next door can be purchased if you’re looking for investment income. (MLS 560785) HOSTESS: Tina Moore

25 RIVERS END DR, SEAFORD - Immaculate 4-BR, 3.5-BA Cape Cod in Rivers End offers over 3,000 sq. ft. of living space plus 2-car garage. Features beautiful upgrades such as granite countertops, ceramic tile, hardwood floors, & more! $460,000 (MLS560045) HOSTESS: Phyllis Parker (Licensed Agent/Owner)

CALLAWAY, FARNELL & MOORE • 629-4514

CALLAWAY, FARNELL & MOORE • 629-4514

CALLAWAY, FARNELL & MOORE • 629-4514

CALLAWAY, FARNELL & MOORE • 629-4514

SUNDAY, AUGUST 17 2-4 PM

M O T IV A T E D S E L L E R S

305 CHRISTOPHER DR., CRESTFIELD Lovely 3 BR, 2.5 BA home. Nice floor plan with spacious rms. New kit. in 2004, hardwood flrs. & more on a nicely landscaped lot. $288,500 Directions: From Shufelt Rd. west of Seaford, turn left into Crestfield. Turn right then first left. Home on right.

6987 CLARK RD., SEAFORD - Custom built 4 BR, 3 BA home w/many upgrades. Open floor plan, custom tile work, vaulted ceilings, over 2100 sq ft of living area, corner 3/4 acre lot. $294,900 Directions: From Blades take River Rd. to intersection with Clark Rd. (across from entrance to Holly Shores)

GLENN SIZEMORE REALTORS • 629-3066

GLENN SIZEMORE REALTORS • 629-3066

522 VINE ST., BETHEL, DE - You will be impressed from the moment you enter this lovely Cape Cod home located in quaint & historic town of Bethel, Del. This home in A-1 Condition offers 3 BRs (with one on 1st flr.) 2 baths, kit w/all appl’s., DR, LR w/FP, spacious family w/FP & cathedral ceiling leading out to lg. deck & gazebo. Home features hdwd. flrs. in hall & DR, plus carpet thruout, CA, det. 26’x30’ garage w15’x30’ unfinished bonus rm. Motivated sellers! (561652) Host: Jim McTeer ROBINSON REAL ESTATE • 629-4574

505 OAK RD, WESTVIEW, SEAFORD - Attention 1st time home buyers & veterans - 100% Financing can be yours. See this spacious 4 BR, 2 bath Cape Cod home offering 1st flr. w/2 lg. BRs, bath, LR, DR, eat-in kit., den (great for 5th BR), sunporch/util. rm. & back porch - 2nd fl. has bath & 2 lg. BRs ( 1BR offers add’l. space perfect for nursery, sewing rm. or walk-in closet) Home offers bsmt., 3 attics, hdwd flrs thru-out, AC & new roof. This one owner home is located on dbl. corner lot. Motivated sellers! (542761)) Hostess: Marla McTeer ROBINSON REAL ESTATE • 629-4574


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008 bowl. Toss the zucchini with 1/2 tablespoon of the oil, 1/8 teaspoon salt, the vinegar, garlic and parsley. Let cool. Put the mozzarella slices on a serving plate, fanning them out to form a circle. Drizzle them with the remaining 1/2 tablespoon oil and sprinkle them with a pinch of pepper. Fold the zucchini slices in half and tuck them between the pieces of cheese. Recipe by “Quick From Scratch Italian.” A note about fresh mozzarella Soft mozzarella is shaped into balls and stored in water to keep it moist. It is available both salted and unsalted, but the latter is very bland indeed. We prefer the salted variety; salting brings out the mild, milky flavor of the cheese. Pickled Farm Stand Tomatoes with Jalapenos At Blue Duck Tavern in Washington, D.C., chef Brian McBride serves side dishes sep-

arately from entrées so diners can mix and match. This side dish of pickled tomatoes is terrific with a simply grilled steak, but it’s also delicious with plenty of crusty bread to sop up the ginger-and-cuminscented tomato juices. Serves 12 1 cup rice vinegar 1/4 cup light brown sugar 1 teaspoon salt 1 cup extra-virgin olive oil 1 garlic clove, minced 1 and 1/2 teaspoons finely grated fresh ginger 1 teaspoon mustard seeds 1 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper 1 teaspoon ground turmeric 1 teaspoon ground cumin Pinch of cayenne pepper 6 tomatoes (1 and 1/2 pounds), each cut into 6 wedges 4 scallions, white and tender green parts only, thinly sliced 2 jalapeños, thinly sliced into rings and seeded

In a medium saucepan, bring the vinegar, brown sugar and salt to a boil, stirring. Remove from the heat. In a medium skillet, heat the oil. Add the garlic, grated ginger, mustard seeds, black pepper, turmeric, ground cumin and cayenne pepper and cook over low heat until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Carefully pour the hot oil into the vinegar mixture. In a large heatproof bowl, combine the tomatoes, scallions and jalapeños. Stir in the hot pickling liquid and let stand at room temperature for 4 hours or refrigerate for 8 hours, then serve. Green Bean and Tomato Salad with Tarragon Dressing 2 pounds green and yellow string beans 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 2 medium shallots, minced 2 tablespoons chopped tarragon Salt and freshly ground pepper 1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved In a large pot of boiling salted water, cook the beans until just tender, about 4

PAGE 15

At another stand, the seller tried to oblige by pulling the bright green stem from a cantaloupe I was eyeing. No thanks. That tattletale tail told that this melon was yanked from its bed much too early and would never taste sweet no matter how long I waited. minutes. Drain the beans and spread them on a large baking sheet to cool. Pat dry. In a small bowl, whisk the olive oil with the shallots and tarragon and season with salt and pepper. Place the beans and tomatoes in a large bowl, add the dressing and toss well. Transfer to a platter and serve. To make ahead, the cooked beans and dressing can be refrigerated separately overnight. Bring to room temperature before tossing.

OPEN HOUSES • SUNDAY, AUGUST 17 • 2-4 PM

Lot #2 Cypress St., Seaford -- HAVE ONE BUILT FOR YOU! Look what I found! Brand New 1,400 Sq. Ft. Ranch Home with 1 car attached garage! Paved driveway all appliances included. Pick your cabinets and your wall, floor & countertops colors. You can’t beat the price for the square footage. In Town Limits! $185,000 (MLS#561893) Directions: From Rt. 13 in Seaford, go West on Rt. 20 (Stein Hwy). Turn Left at Pizza King, Left on Tulip and Right on Cypress Dr. See Signs. Your Host:J ohn Allen COOPER REALTY ASSOC. • 629-6693

SELLER SAYS BRING OFFERS! JUST REDUCED $15,000!! Brand New 2 Story, 3BR, 2.5 BA Colonial in Quiet Country Area! Home has an inviting second story balcony, 17’ vaulted ceiling in foyer, dining room, kitchen combo, huge master bath, walk in closets. A Paved driveway and a 14 x 22 detached 1 car garage with electric. Bring your furniture and move right in! $225,000 $2,500 SELLER’S ASSISTANCE MLS#557265 Directions: From Rt. 13 in Seaford, Go West on Rt. 20 (Stein Hwy) to Right on Atlanta Rd. Go approx. 3 miles, home on Left, see sign. Your Host: TheB uilder COOPER REALTY ASSOC. • 629-6693

MLS# 561915 NEW LISTING $195,000 14 Robinson Circle, Seaford Get to know your neighbors in this cozy in town community with sidewalks and street lights. Rancher home offers 3 bedrooms and 2 baths. Walking distance to public pool, rec. center, schools, work and shopping. Directions: From Seaford, 20 W (Stein Highway), right on 13A (Bridgeville Highway), left on Virginia Avenue, entrance on your left, stay to the right of circle, home is on the right. Hostess - Trina Joyner 302745-3840

Add your touches and move right in! This quaint, 3 bedroom 1 bath rancher in River Vista is ready for your own touches and located in a convenient, quiet area just east of Seaford. Enjoy your well landscaped yard with a swimming pool and all this home has to offer. (MLS#561892) $179,900 Directions: From Rt. 13 in Seaford, Turn East on Middleford Rd. to Left on River Vista Drive. House on Corner. Your Host: The Owner

MLS# 560939 REDUCED $187,900 32 Crossgate Village, Seaford Extremely well kept townhouse w/ 1st floor master, custom hickory cabinets, cheery sunroom w/ heat & ac, alarm system, multi-zone heating, storage galore, maintenance free exterior & grass cutting. Plush lawn w/ irrigation. Close to beaches, golfing, shopping, & medical facilities. Directions: West on Stein Highway, turn right on Atlanta Road, turn right into Crossgate, property is on the left. Hostess - Sandy Hughes 302228-7427

COOPER REALTY ASSOC. • 629-6693

HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

MLS# 560978 GRAND OPENING 12-4 $192,900 7501 Station Lane, Seaford Enjoy your new home in Ross Station. This home offers 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, a large family room and appliances. Home situated on .76 acres and is perfect for everyone. Directions: From Route 13 in Seaford, turn on Herring Run Road by Lowes, follow thru lights to Ross Station intersection, turn right onto Station Road, second right into Ross Station. Home will be on the left past cul-de-sac. Host Adam Gaull 443-359-1343

MLS# 559348 GRAND OPENING 12-4 $204,900 7491 Station Lane, Seaford This 4 BR, 2 BA home delivers the essentials,downstairs master suite, vaulted ceilings and a 2 car garage all on a .78 acre lot. You have got to see this one! Directions: From Route 13 in Seaford, turn on Herring Run Road by Lowes, follow thru lights to Ross Station intersection, turn right onto Station Road, second right into Ross Station. Home will be on the left. Host - Adam Gaull 443-359-1343

MLS# 554629 GRAND OPENING 12-4 $209,900 7478 Station Lane, Seaford Ready to Move In! Enjoy your new home in Seaford’s newest affordable development. Ross Station offers you a 1424 sq ft home with 3 bedrooms (lg mastersuite) and 2 baths on a 3/4 acre lot. Two car garage. This home offers all you need for little cost!!!! Directions: From Route 13 in Seaford, turn on Herring Run Road by Lowes, follow thru lights to Ross Station intersection, turn right onto Station Road, second right into Ross Station. Host - Adam Gaull 443359-1343

HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

MLS# 559975 NORTH SHORE COURT $259,900 9669 North Shore Drive A terrific home ready for you to enjoy. Tastefully maintained. New custom kitchen, beautiful refinished hard wood floors. A wonderful neighborhood, peaceful and quiet. Come take a look Directions: From Rt 13 heading east on Middleford Rd, go about 1.5 miles, turn right onto North Shore Drive, follow around the bend, house is on the left. Hostess - Rachael Carey 302-841-7760

MLS# 562205 NEW LISTING $139,900 8791 Garden Lane Cute and cozy with a great room, wood burning fireplace, replacement windows, screened porch, 33x12.6 detached 2 car garage with plenty of room for the hobbiest. Upgraded electric and fresh paint. Ready to go! Directions: Heading north on Bridgeville Highway (Alt 13), just north of Seaford, property across from ThermoKing repair shop, property at the entrance toG reen Acres. Host - Mike Procino 302-542-9726

MLS# 559644 HERITAGE SHORES $349,900 6 Amanda’s Teal Drive, Bridgeville Spectacular house - enjoy views of the pond, golfers & the club house from your 3 season porch, 1st flr has MBR with full bath & walk-in shower, guest bedroom/den & full bath. Second floor has a 3rd full bath, private guest bedroom suite with sitting room plus bonus/bdrm. 3 zone gas hot water heat. Directions: Heritage Shores entrance is on the southbound lane, just south of RTE 404, turn into community, pass clubhouse and sales office, left on Willis Island next left on Amanda’s Teal Drive, go to end, house is on left. Hostess Carol Crouse 302-236-4648

HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711

MLS# 558477 CLOSE TO BEACH $238,000 25264 Prettyman Road Close to the beach but not the traffic! This 3 bdrm, 2 bath modular features a large living room with wood stove, large eating area in kitchen and beautiful sunroom. Directions: From Rt. 113 N, go east on Rt 9, almost to Harbeson, turn on Prettyman Rd. 6 miles, sign on left. Hostess - Mariana Thomas 302-245-8242 HOME TEAM REALTY • 629-7711


PAGE 16

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

Greenwood CHEER center gets help with funding By Carol Kinsley A bus load of members of the CHEER Senior Center in Greenwood were on hand August 5 to see Congressman Mike Castle, representatives of Senators Tom Carper and Joe Biden, and USDA Rural Development State Director Marlene Elliott Brown hand over a $1 million check to help construct a new facility. The check represents a $500,000 loan from USDA and a $500,000 guaranteed loan from the Bank of Delmarva. “There is a real need in Sussex County for these kinds of services, and CHEER is making a difference in the lives of so many seniors,” said Castle. “It is important that we support these efforts as much as possible.” Elliott Brown said the CHEER centers are the hub of activity for many individuals. “CHEER promotes well being, fun and fellowship for all who walk through their doors. What we do at USDA Rural Development is to help improve the quality of life and increase economic opportunity in rural America, and what better way to return the people’s money than to strengthen a community senior center.” Arlene Littleton, executive director of CHEER, said the loan had required a lot of paperwork, but was worth it. The new, million-dollar-plus building being constructed near the intersection of Route 13 and Route 16 in Greenwood will seat 125. It will become, she predicted, “the focal

point of Greenwood.” She thanked the USDA and Delaware’s elected officials “for fighting for us.” She anticipates being able to move out of the old facility, which was formerly the Lettuce Bowl Restaurant, at the end of September. That building and the commercial property on which it sits along Route 13 are owned by CHEER and are for sale. CHEER operates nine nutrition sites, seven CHEER centers and two independent senior centers in Sussex County. CHEER provides active, mature adults 50 and over with a variety of innovative programs designed to promote a healthy physical, mental and emotional lifestyle, explained Susan Welch, site manager of the Greenwood facility. Social interaction and educational activities such as exercise programs, craft classes, health seminar and support groups available at the center attract some 30 members a day, Welch said. A mid-day meal is offered at the center for a fee or donation. An additional 30 homebound individuals receive “Meals on Wheels.” Home services, such as housekeeping and home health support which enable older citizens to live a healthy lifestyle in their own homes, can be arranged through a placement coordinator in Georgetown (854-9555). Transportation is provided within a short radius of the center. After the check presentation, Welch led the members on a tour of the building which is still under construction. “This

Electric costs increase Continued from page one

to have to work with, some we haven’t had to work with in the past,” she said. Councilman Mike Vincent, liaison with the electric department, said that the city had no choice but to pass increased costs on to consumers. “This isn’t a profit thing,” he said. “We are just passing along costs.” The city’s 2008 budget assumes a power cost of 8.9 cents a kilowatt hour. That is what its electric rates are based on. But the power cost in June was 10.8 cents a kilowatt hour, an increase that was absorbed by the Delaware Municipal Electric Corporation, which purchases power for Seaford and eight other municipalities in the State. The power cost in July was 11.4 cents a kilowatt hour, an increase that DEMEC could not absorb. Expected cost in August is 11.2 cents a kilowatt hour. DEMEC buys 74 percent of its power through contract, at a fixed cost, and pays the market rate for the remaining 26 per-

cent of its power. Up until now, that process resulted in lower costs to the city, Slatcher said. But with market rates soaring, “it certainly hurt us now,” she added. The nine municipalities that purchase power from DEMEC have directed it to change its purchasing procedure, so that 90 percent is fixed and only 10 percent is at the market rate. Slatcher said that the benefit of passing costs on to consumers through the power cost adjustment clause is that, when costs go down, so will consumers’ bills. “This method will allow for the immediate collection of increases and the immediate passing along of any decreases,” she wrote in a memo to the council.

A ceremonial check for $1 million from U.S. taxpayers was presented to the CHEER Senior Center in Greenwood as a loan to help pay for construction costs. On hand for a tour of the facility were Tim Winstead, left, representing Senator Tom Carper; Marlene Elliott Brown, state director, USDA, Rural Development; Congressman Mike Castle; Arlene Littleton, executive director, CHEER Inc.; John Craig, vice president, The Bank of Delmarva; Christina M. Chase, loan specialist, USDA; and Kevin Smith, representing Senator Joe Biden. Photo by Carol Kinsley

was their first time at the construction site,” Welch explained. “We had been allowed to watch as five ‘boxes’ from Beracah Homes were put together, but this was their first time inside.” The dignitaries joined the members as they inspected the fitness room, the office,

the extra large bathrooms, the conference room, the dining area complete with fireplace, commercial kitchen and the storage and delivery areas. For more information on the services provided by the Greenwood CHEER center, call 349-6237.

OPEN SUNDAY 12 NOON -2 PM 36671 HORSEY CHURCH, DELMAR, DE: Beautiful 5+ Acre lot in Delaware. Features 3-Car garage w/ bonus rm above with half bath & bar, blacktop driveway, central vac, wireless candles in windows, large Master Suite with walk-in closets, sunroom, large walk-up attic, beautiful kitchen w/walk-in pantry, custom maple cabinets. $599,900 (557746) Call Pam!

BEAUTIFUL HOMES - STOP IN & SEE!

Send us your news items

Email to editor@mspublications.com. Send photos as attachments in the jpg format. Items may also be mailed to Morning Star Publications, Inc., P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973. Deadline is one week before preferred publication date.

For the Right Price, call Pam Price for all your real estate needs! Pamela Price, Realtor Porter Marshall Group

Home Team top producers Frank Parks and Rob Harman, co-brokers and owners of Home Team Realty are proud to announce that Mike Procino was the top producer for the month of June with Judy Rhodes being the top listing agent.

36705 HORSEY CHURCH, DELMAR, DE: Beautiful 4,000 sq. ft. home on 4 acres. 5 BR, 3 BA, open floor plan, tile and hardwood floors, 1st & 2nd floor master suites, 2 car attached garage, 24X24 det. garage, Pond on property. $554,900 (546677) Call Pam!

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Applies to item #13588 only. Offer valid 8/14/08 - 8/18/08. Discount taken at register. See store for details.

now

$

Offer valid 8/14/08 - 8/18/08. Discount taken at time of order. See store for details.

now $

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97 was 26

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was $228

3/4-HP Garage Door Opener with EverCharge™ Battery Backup #248754

6' x 8' Stockade Fence Panel #20206

Open a new Lowe’s Business Credit Account and ask for

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When you open and use a new Lowe’s Business Credit Account. Some exclusions apply. Offer valid 8/14/08 - 8/18/08. See bottom of page, store or Lowes.com for details. C

89

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A. Variable-Speed Reciprocating Saw B. Variable-Speed Compact Jigsaw C. 4-1/2" Grinder D. Heavy-Duty Laminate Trimmer E. 9.6-Volt Cordless Drill/Driver Kit

#48681 #47180 #58972 #254859 #238743

now $ 97 was $997

8

20 oz. 15-count case

Gatorade® Thirst Quencher •Orange, Lemon-Lime and Fruit Punch #240727

now $ 98 $was98

22

25

6-gallon pail

Black Jack Drive-Maxx™ 700 Driveway Filler and Sealer #238299

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$ 08

Pricing for commodity items may vary due to market conditions. We reserve the right to limit quantities.

2" x 4" x 96" Kiln-Dried Whitewood Select Stud #6005

For the Lowe’s nearest you, call 1-800-993-4416 or visit us online at Lowes.com Prices may vary after 8/18/2008 if there are any market variations. “Was’’ prices in this advertisement were in effect on 8/27/2008 and may vary based on Lowe’s Everyday Low Price policy. See store for details regarding product warranties. We reserve the right to limit quantities. *Ask for 10% off your first single-receipt in-store purchase charged to your new Lowe’s® Accounts Receivable or Lowe’s® Business Account when you open your new account in any Lowe’s store and make your first purchase between 8/14/2008 through 8/18/2008. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase and cannot be used in conjunction with any other coupon or discount. This coupon is good for a single-receipt purchase and of any in-stock or Special Order merchandise only up to $5,000 (Maximum discount $500). Coupon is not redeemable for cash, is non-transferable and cannot be replaced if lost or stolen. Void if altered, copied, transferred, or sold through any online auction. Limit one coupon per business. Not valid on sales via Lowes.com, previous sales, purchases of services or Gift Cards. Offer must be requested at time of purchase. Offer is subject to credit approval. Coupon valid for one time use only. Offer is not valid for accounts opened prior to 8/14/08. Excludes Lowe’s® Consumer Credit Accounts, Lowe’s® Project CardSM Accounts, Lowe’s® VISA® Accounts, and all Lowe’s® Canada Credit products. While Lowe’s strives to be accurate, unintentional errors may occur. We reserve the right to correct any error. Prices and promotions apply to US locations only. ©2008 by Lowe’s®. All rights reserved. Lowe’s and the gable design are registered trademarks of LF, LLC. (080891)

001/080891/003

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

Police Journal Man charged in pornography sting

Erick Clayville, 34, Bear, was arrested Aug. 7 when members of the Delaware Child Predator Task Force (ICAC) and FBI agents from the Wilmington office executed a search warrant at his home in the 400 block of Hickory Drive, Hickory Woods, Bear. Police said that Clayville was downloading child pornography as investigators entered the residence. The search warrant was obtained as a result of an online, undercover investigation. Task force members, again with the help of the FBI, conducted a forensic preview of Clayville’s computer. Illicit sexual images of children were observed, police said. Clayville was transported to Troop #2 for further investigation. He was charged with 29 counts of using a computer to deal in child pornography and one count of using a computer to distribute child pornography. He was ordered to be held on $450,000 secured bail.

Wesley Church is burglarized

Thieves who broke into Wesley United Methodist Church, in the 22000 block of Atlanta Road, Seaford, took electronic equipment from a church office, police said. The incident occurred between noon on Sunday, Aug. 3, and approximately 8:30 a.m. on Monday, Aug. 4. Police said that unknown suspect or

suspects entered the church. Force was used to access the interior office, police said. Anyone with information pertaining to this case is asked to contact investigators at 302-337-1090 or Crime Stoppers at 1800-TIP-3333.

Police searching for assault suspect

On Saturday, July 5, Delaware State Troopers were contacted by a 45-year-old female who awoke in a field off Bayside Drive near Dover at approximately 7:15 a.m. The female victim told police that she was sexually assaulted by a white male whom she initially met at a bar on Loockerman Street, Dover. During the investigation, Delaware State Police Troop 3 detectives obtained surveillance photographs from Irish Mike’s Bar of the suspect and victim together on the date that the incident ocVideo footage curred, police said. Additionally, detectives have contacted witnesses in this case confirming that the suspect and victim departed the place of business together. The suspect is a white male approximately 35 to 40 years of age. He has either

a very closely shaven head or is bald and has a stocky build. The Delaware State Police urges anyone with information to contact Troop 3 at 302- 697-4454 or Crime Stoppers at 800TIP-3333.

Man arrested for firing shots

A Bridgeville man was arrested after witnesses told police that they heard shots fired from a vehicle. Brandon L. Palmer, 27, was charged with possession of a weapon by person prohibited, disorderly conduct and discharge of weapon in city limits. Seaford Police officers who were called to the area of Norman Eskridge Highway on Aug. 8 at approximately 2:52 a.m. were told that the shots were fired from a vehicle that was traveling on Norman Eskridge Highway. Witnesses said that the vehicle headed south on Chandler Street off of Norman Eskridge Highway. Officers located the vehicle in the Chandler Heights II parking lot, where they saw the defendant, Brandon L. Palmer, 27, of Bridgeville, and two other persons exit the vehicle, they said. Officers also reportedly saw a loaded .22 caliber High Standard revolver in the floor of the vehicle. Palmer was taken to Justice of the Peace Court #3 where he was committed to the Department of Corrections in lieu of $6,000 cash bond.

Police say man threatened woman

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Delaware State troopers have arrested a Laurel man and charged him with threatening a 27-year old female victim and her two 12-year-old children. The victims did not sustain injury and were able to flee the area. According to police, on Wednesday, Aug. 6, at approximately 7 p.m., Banks threatened the women and her children with a handgun. Police filed an arrest warrant for Banks, charging him with possession of a firearm during commission of a felony, possession of a firearm by person prohibited (felony), aggravated harassment (felony), aggravated menacing (felony), two counts of endangering the welfare of a child (misdemeanor) and driving while suspended/revoked. He turned himself in to police on

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Watermelons stolen in Laurel

A bus loaded with watermelons was stolen Tuesday, Aug. 5, from the fenced-in yard at the Laurel Auction Block. When police found the bus, all 3,960 pounds of melons that it had held were gone. Estimated value of the melons is $400. Police said that the bus was taken between 1 and 4:30 a.m. It was driven through a chain link fence, causing damage to the fence and bus, police said. The bus was later recovered on Bethel Road. Anyone with information pertaining to this case is asked to call investigators at 302-337-1090 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800TIP-3333.

Sex offender arrested

On Thursday, Aug. 7, Delaware State Police detectives arrested Charles D. Casterline, 49, of Moore Street, Holiday Estates Mobile Home Park, Dagsboro, and charged him with sexually assaulting a 6year-old girl. Casterline also goes by the name Charles Whitten. Casterline is a tier II (moderate risk) registered sex offender as a result of a 1997 conviction for third-degree unlawful sexual intercourse. In 2003, he was listed on the Sex Offenders Registry. At the time of this arrest, CasterCasterline line was in compliance with his conditions. Police said that the 6-year-old girl was at the residence visiting family members when the incident occurred. The victim reported the incident to her mother, who contacted authorities. Casterline was formally charged with two felonies, first-degree rape of a victim less than 12 years old and sex offender unlawful sexual conduct against a child. He was committed to Sussex Correctional Center in lieu of $200,000 cash bond. People who feel that they have been

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008 victimized by Casterline are urged to contact Troop 4 at 302-856-5850 ext. 255 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP-3333.

Man arrested on gun charges

A Harrington man was arrested after he allegedly fired off several shots at a party. On Sunday, Aug. 10, at approximately 1:50 a.m., state police responded to the 800 block of Chimney Hill Road east of Felton after receiving a report that a subject had a gun. Troopers were told that Matthew A. Layton, 20, of the 2000 block of Brownsville Rd., Harrington, and some of his friends had come to the social gathering uninvited. When Layton was asked to leave by numerous people at the function, he displayed a .45 caliber pistol and fired several shots in the air, police said. Layton was quickly subdued from behind and the gun was secured by an individual in attendance, police added. According to police, Layton was able to break free and depart the area in a vehicle. He was later located by police at his residence in Harrington. Layton was transported back to Troop 3 where he was charged with two counts of first degree reckless endangering, carrying a concealed deadly weapon, possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony and possession of a deadly weapon (firearm) by person prohibited. He was arraigned at Justice of the Peace Court 7 in

Dover and committed to the James T. Vaughn Correctional Center in Smyrna on default of $21,000 secured bond. No one was injured in the incident and the weapon has been seized by investigators.

Police share alert about email hoax

On Friday, Aug. 8, and Saturday, Aug. 9, Delaware State Police in Sussex County began taking reports about a threatening email that appears to be a hoax. The email, which is attempting to extort money from its victims, appears to have been sent out primarily to Sussex County real estate agents via a mass email address list. State Police are aware of the nature of the email and are investigating. To report a similar incident, contact Troop 4 at 302-856-5850 ext. 216.

Fugitive arrested in Rehoboth

A fugitive wanted for homicide in Norfolk, Va., was arrested Aug. 6 in Rehoboth Beach by a team of law enforcement officers led by U.S. Marshals. Hubert A. Jason, 25, previously from Norfolk, Va., was being sought on warrants issued in Norfolk, charging him with homicide and other related charges from a murder that occurred on June 18. Jason was also wanted for several other

BB gun causes damage

On Aug. 7, several vehicles and a Seaford business were damaged by BB shot, police said. Seaford Police officers were called to the Bradford Street, Porter Street and Delaware Avenue area. The Seaford Police Department is asking anyone with information about this crime to contact them at 302-629-6644 or Delaware Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP3333. Delaware Crime Stoppers is offering a reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of anyone involved.

4.50

charges stemming from a kidnapping in Portsmouth, Va., that occurred on Aug. 2. U.S. Marshals in Virginia received information that Jason may have relocated to the Rehoboth Beach area. This information was passed on to deputies in Delaware. Police went to the area of 105 Norwood St., Rehoboth, and saw Jason outside. He was taken into custody without incident. Jason is being held in Delaware pending extradition to Virginia.

State police crack down on speeders In the first month of a statewide enforcement initiative to get drivers to “Stop speeding before it stops you,” Delaware law enforcement officers issued 840 citations for speeding violations, including 192 that were issued from July 28 through July 31. Officers also made 14 aggressive driving arrests, two DUI arrests and 16 other arrests for criminal offenses such as drug use/possession and having outstanding warrants for prior violations. They also issued 534 citations for other traffic violations including offenses such as running red lights and stop signs, which are identified as individual aggressive driving behaviors. Preventing speed-related crashes and fatalities is the new focus of the Office of Highway Safety’s 2008 Stop Aggressive

% APY*

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Driving campaign, which OHS and law enforcement launched July 7. Participating agencies include the Delaware State Police, the Dover Police, the New Castle County Police and the Wilmington Police. In 2007, 62 percent of Delaware’s fatal crashes were caused by aggressive driving behaviors, with speed being the most frequently cited violation. Nationally, nearly 13,500 people died in speed-related crashes in 2006. Speeding is second only to DUI as the leading cause of traffic deaths in Delaware according to statewide crash data. The speed-focused Stop Aggressive Driving Campaign is the third component of the 120 Days of Summer HEAT initiative, a summer-time crackdown on traffic violators. For more information, visit the Web site www.ohs.delaware.gov.

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PAGE 20

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

Internet providers unite and shut down child pornography websites Internet Service Providers (ISPs) AT&T and AOL-Time Warner joined Time Warner, Sprint and Verizon in shutting down child pornography websites from their servers. Time Warner, Sprint, and Verizon have donated $1.1 million to the attorney general’s ongoing child pornography investigations. Officials initiated an eight-month investigation into child pornography on the Internet and found 88 different news groups that were devoted to child porn. All 88 of these news groups are being shut down. Child pornographers and pedophiles have been dealt two major defeats in the past six months, as the U.S. Supreme Court recently upheld a federal ban on child pornography, and now, as cable providers have begun removing such sites from servers. In the past, ISPs have inexplicably refused to take action against blatant purveyors of child pornography, and neither federal nor state prosecutors have tried to force ISPs to act. The New York Attorney General’s office has created a new Web site, www.nystopchildporn.com, which provides details on which ISPs have signed agreements with his office to eradicate access to child porn on their servers.

SEA TRIAL - The new Woodland ferry was lowered into the water on Friday, August 8. The ferry is being built by Chesapeake Ship Builders of Salisbury. The old ferry, the Virginia C, was taken out of operation on December 31, 2007. Work is being performed on the docks on both sides of the Nanticoke River. The hope is to have the new ferry, which will be named after retired state Rep. Tina Fallon, in operation by November 2008. The Woodland Ferry Festival has been cancelled for this year because of the construction. Photos by Phil Livingston

REAL ESTATE RENTALS INSURANCE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

FRIENDS TO ELECT

DANNY SHORT for Delaware State House of Representatives

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Get Your PASSPORT TO PARADISE Now! FAIRWAY VILLAS, MILLSBORO 2 BR, 2 Bath townhouse w/garage overlooking golf course. $950 monthly. Call Kim Derrickson.

COUNTRY CLUB VILLAGE, GEORGETOWN 3 BR, 2.5 Bath Rancher w/garage. Drive the golf cart home! $1700 monthly. Call Tango Rogers

ATTENTION LANDLORDS Tired of dealing with late payments? Don’t have time to call a plumber? No time to qualify new tenants?

MAIN STREET, DAGSBORO Zoned commercial. 3 BR single family home or small business use. $900 monthly. Call Kim Derrickson

We can handle all your rental management needs. Contact one of our year round specialistsGeorgetown - Tango Rogers (302) 855-0500 X20 Millsboro/Bethany - Kim Derrickson (302) 539-3030 Lewes - Cal Weible (302) 654-9215

Looking for the perfect rental? Year round or summer get-away? Don’t delay, call today! We Have 3 Convenient Offices to Serve You. BETHANY BEACH GEORGETOWN LEWES 32904 S. Coastal Hwy. 210 West Market St. 1520 Savannah Rd. 302-539-7511 302-855-0500 302-645-9215 1-800-441-8118 1-888-421-6521 1-888-421-6521

Come to the luau and support Danny Short’s 2008 Fundraiser

MUSIC

When: Saturday, August 23, 2008 Where: Nanticoke River Yacht Club Time: 5 pm to 8 pm Tickets: $40.00

Silent & Live Auction

Pulled Pork - Hawaiian Bread - Seafood

For tickets contact Danny’s campaign line at 628-5222. Paid for by Friends to Elect Danny Short


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

PAGE 21

Community Bulletin Board Seaford’s Farmers & Artisans Market

Come out between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and noon on Saturdays to enjoy the Seaford Farmers & Artisans market at Kiwanis Park. Enjoy a vast selection of locally grown produce while strolling the park with your friends and family. Take home delicious tomatoes, squash, peppers, and melons. Select unique, handmade jewelry, glassware, and paintings for yourself or those on your gift lists. Most importantly, come out to the park and share the spirit of community. We’re ‘Going Green’ in Seaford, and invite you to be a part of this one-of-a-kind market during August. Aug. 16: Musician Tony Windsor from 10 a.m. to noon and additional demonstrations by vendors Aug. 23: Give-away Day – doorprizes to be given away to shoppers Aug. 30: Musician Tony Windsor from 10 a.m. to noon and ‘feedback day’ – stop at registration table to jot down your comments on the market so that we can plan for the 2009 season. For additional information, contact any committee member: Jeannie Conner, Beverly Hutton, Erroll Mattox, Faith Robinson, Lynne Betts or Sonja Mehaffey. Messages may be left at 629-3949.

Seaford library IHOP fundraiser

The Seaford District Library is pleased to announce that we have joined with IHOP in an effort to raise money for the library. All you have to do is enjoy a meal at the Seaford, Dover, Rehoboth, or Salisbury IHOP locations on any day with any meal and return the receipts along with a comment card to the Seaford District Library. We must have the comment cards and the receipts in order to receive the reimbursement.

Seaford District Library events

• The Nehemiah Gateway Community Development Corp. will meet at the Seaford District Library on Saturday, Aug. 16, from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. • Medtronic will meet at the Seaford District Library on Wednesday, Aug. 20,

GR M O

A N N D A

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at 2 p.m. • AAUW will meet at the Seaford District Library on Wednesday, Aug. 20, at 4:30 p.m. • “Vines and Vessels” Christian Writers Group will meet at the Seaford District Library’s meeting room on Saturday, Aug. 23, starting at 9 a.m. • The Celiac support group will meet in the Seaford District Library’s meeting room on Monday, August 25, 2008 starting at 5:30 p.m. • The Seaford District Library Board Meeting will be on Tuesday, Aug. 26, starting at 5 p.m. • “Lights Camera Action!” The Seaford District Library is having “Movie Night” on Thursday, Aug. 28, starting at 5:30 p.m. • Do you have health concerns? Confusing lab reports? Questions you should ask your doctor? Visit the Seaford District Library the 2nd Wednesday of each month from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Meet with Linda Leonard, Consumer Health Librarian for Sussex County. All reference services are free and confidential.

Art Show at the Seaford Library

The Seaford District Library is proud to announce it will be hosting it’s 2nd Annual Art show on Sept. 5 & 6 from 12-4 p.m. This will be a multi-medium art show with many different forms of art, from oils to wood. Come and show your support for your local artist and enjoy the beauty that they create. Refreshments will be provided. For more information contact Amber Motta at 629-2524.

DuPont 25-year dinner

The 25-year dinner for DuPont employees will be held Friday, Sept. 5, at the Laurel Fire Department. Anyone who has not received a letter and who wishes to attend, call Ray Whaley at 537-6113, or Connie Keene at 629-3377.

Church seeks craft vendors

Christ Lutheran Church need craft vendors for its Christmas bazaar to be held on Sept. 27, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. - $20 per space. Contact Joan at 628-3601. The church is located at 315 N. Shipley St., Seaford.

Breakfast cafe

VFW 4961 breakfast cafe, open Monday-Friday, 7-10 a.m., Seaford VFW, Middleford Road, to benefit Veterans Relief Fund.

P E N IN G . 18,4 P

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THURSDAY, SEPT. 18, 2008 For Registration, Sponsorships, Payment, contact: John Evans, PO Box 157, Harrington, DE 19952

302-398-1018 4 Player Scramble: Cost $150 per player Start Time 8 a.m. for Breakfast & Registration FREE Carry On Golf Bag for ALL Golf Participants!

Please Help Us Provide A “Positive Place for Kids” The Day’s Events Include: • Hole-in-One Prizes: $50,000 cash, new cars, Bose Music System, set of Nike Irons, $500 Visa Gift Card & More! • Silent Auction: Autographed sports memorabilia by Jimmy Rollins, Chase Utley, Cole Hamels, Steve Carlton, Derek Jeter, A-Rod, Brian Westbrook, Brian Dawkins, Bobby Clarke, Bernie Parent, Muhammad Ali, Joe Frazier & More! • Entertainment: Joe Conklin, “Man of a Thousand Voices”

www.johnnyjanosikcharitygolf.com


PAGE 22

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

LHS Class of ‘87 reunion

The LHS Class of '87 will hold a class reunion on Saturday, Aug. 30, at Georgia House restaurant in Laurel at 6 p.m. Invitations have been mailed to those classmates who have been located. If any classmate did not receive information contact Michele Procino-Wells at mpw@seafordlaw.com or call 628-4140.

Biff Lee Pig Picken’

40th District Rep. Clifford “Biff” Lee will be holding his 21st annual “Pig-Picken” at the Laurel Fire Hall on Saturday, Sept. 13. The event is from 4 until 7 p.m. Plenty to eat and a good time for all with door prizes. Tickets are $15 in advance by calling 875-5448, or at Small Insurance, South Central Avenue. They are also available at the door.

LHS class of '98 reunion planned

Laurel High School class of 1998 is planning a class reunion. Contact Megan Jones by email megj22@comcast.net or phone 302-841-5835 with your contact information: (phone/address)

Annual Youth Fishing Tournament

American Legion Post 19 in Laurel will be holding their annual Youth Fishing Tournament on Saturday, Aug. 23. The hours are 9 a.m. through noon and you provide your own tackle. Registration is at A & K Enterprises on Central Avenue. Age groups are 4-7 years, 8-11 years and 12 to 15 years. There is no entry fee and it is a catch and release program. Parents join your children for a day’s fun on Records Pond and Broad Creek.

p.m. until 11 p.m. DJ will be provided. The next meeting will be Thursday, Aug. 14, at 6:30 p.m. at Bargain Bill’s. For more info, contact Jan Conaway Allen at 443-614-0338, Gale Hall Daugherty at 410-726-3214, Tammy Hastings Whaley at 302-228-7267, Tammy Myers Wharton at 302-258-7371 or Sue Pressley at 302875-3968

LHS Class of ‘93 reunion planned

Laurel High School’s class of 1993 is scheduled to celebrate their 15th reunion. The reunion will be held on Saturday, Aug. 30, at 2 p.m. It will be held at Trap Pond State Park’s screened pavilion. We are in need of contact information for the following classmates: Gary Anderson, Eric Bailey, Jennifer Belong, Greg Bernal, Shawn Crites, Dangelle Dixon, Allery Elder, Brandy Gilchrist, Michael Greene, Sam Hastings, Gail Hearn, Michelle Hindt, Nick Horsey, Jeff Howard, Patrick Johnson, Robyn Justice, Aaron Kellam, Kenneth LeCates, Martin LeCates, Tracy Matthews, Misty McKinstry, Carlos Mitchell, Christina Morris, Bodny Olivince, Jason Pfeilmeier, Traymane Savage, Karen Short Townsend, Twana Stanley, John Stevens, Sean Vincent, Mark Walsh, Chris Walston, Nikki Webb, Antonio West, Albert Wooters, Jason Young and Ami Zimmerman. If you have contact information for any of these classmates, contact Michelle Rogers Moyer at 875-2563 or mmoyer19956@yahoo.com.

Chicken BBQ benefit

The annual fall get-together of former athletes, band members and interested Laurel High School graduates is on Sept. 12 at the Georgia House with a 4 p.m. social hour and dinner, followed by the Laurel football game. Remember the stories from previous years and bring some new ones. Tickets call Craig Littleton at 302875-7445 or 302-462-7450.

Chicken barbecue benefit will be held for John Benson on Aug. 16. On June 22, 2008, John Benson was tragically injured in a driving accident, his spinal cord is severely damaged and at this point he is paralyzed from his chest down. He is currently in rehabilitation at Magee Rehabilitation in Philadelphia. On Saturday, Aug. 16 a chicken barbecue will be held at Bargain Bills, corner of Rt. 13 and 9, from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Cost $6 each. Tickets can be purchased in advance at the Perdue DMV North grow-out office, 302-855-5649; or by contacting: Jan Otwell at 302-2365839; Susan Steen at 302-542-2555; or Frances Cook at 410-422-0567. All checks made payable to John Benson Support Fund. Monetary donations can be mailed to: Perdue DMV north, c/o Frances Cook, 10242 Stone Creek Drive, Unit 3, Laurel, DE 19956.

LHS Class of ‘78 reunion

LHS Class of ‘63 plans reunion

LHS former grads dinner

LHS Class of 1978 30-year class reunion is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 27, at the Beach House “Tiki Bar” at Bargain Bill’s in Laurel. Light finger food will be served, cash bar $15 per person from 7

Laurel High School’s Class of 1963, 45th reunion is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 20, at the Lakeside Community Center in Long Neck. We are in need of up-todate addresses. If you have not received

your letter contact Janet Lynch LeCates 875-3955, or Sandra Kellam Russell 8755985, or e-mail russellsk@dmv.com.

349-5309. The Greenwood Public Library is located at 100 Mill St., just east of the railroad tracks, in Greenwood.

LHS Class of ‘88 plans reunion

Victory in Japan Celebration

LHS Class of 1988 twenty year class reunion dinner is set for Saturday, Sept. 20, starting at 5 p.m. at the Beach House in Laurel. We are also planning other events around that weekend. We need your help. Contact the committee with your address information at Reunioninfo2008@yahoo.com, call the reunion hotline 302-280-6655, or register on classmates.com to help us connect to everyone.

Basket bingo fundraiser

The annual basket bingo fundraiser for the Laurel Historical Society will be held on Tuesday, Aug 26, at the Laurel Fire Hall. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and the games start at 7 p.m. The $20 ticket will give players “double” bingo cards and one ticket for the raffle of a large, Longerberger storage basket. A 2008 Holiday Hostess Basket will also be won by another lucky raffle winner. The traditional 50-50 will also be offered along with free desserts, drinks and snacks. Hot dogs will be available at $1 each. The Laurel Historical Society members donate delicious homemade treats for this event each year. Tickets can be bought at the door, but for advanced ticket reservations call 875-9427 or 875-4217 and leave a message. Profits from the event will be used to maintain the society’s properties and collections. Efforts are now being made to raise funds to repaint the society’s headquarters, the Cook House, which is open for public visits each Sunday from 1-4 p.m. For more information call 875-2820 or email laurelhistoricalsociety@hotmail.com

Adult Summer Reading Club

The Greenwood Public Library’s adult summer reading club, “Basking in Books,” continues through Aug. 25. It is open to all 18 years and older or those who have graduated from high school.To participate, please register at the Greenwood Library and start reading or listening to your favorite books. Entry slips are filled out for each book enjoyed; these entry slips enter you in weekly drawings for prizes as well as for a grand prize to be awarded on Aug. 25. For further information, contact the Greenwood Library at

A period piece of history will be presented by the Ladies Auxiliary of Greenwood Memorial VFW Post 7478 on Aug. 14, at 7 p.m. In honor of the nation’s World War II veterans there will be an Americanism program entitled “A V-J Day Celebration.” Prof. Darlene SpitzerAntezana, an Associate Professor of history at Prince George’s Community College in Maryland and Life Member of VFWLA 7478, will highlight V-J Day in our history. There will be a commissioning service presided over by VFW Ladies Auxiliary Dept. of Del. President Nadine Slack. The WWII U. S. Army uniforms of the late technician 4th grade Charles F. Jones will be commissioned to be sent to the WWII museum in Louisiana. He was a lifelong resident of Greenwood, and served in the Central Burma and India and Burma Campaigns. He was the late husband of Dorothy Jones of Greenwood. The public is invited to attend this unique celebration saluting America’s Greatest Generation. The Post is located on Governors Avenue in Greenwood. For more information contact president Michaele Russell at 302-349-4220.

Big Saturday yard ‘n’ flea sale

The Town of Greenwood is having their annual Big Saturday yard ‘n’ flea sale and are offering 10x20 vendor spaces for $10 to whomever would like to set up tables and participate with residents. The date is Sept. 6 (rain date Sept. 13) from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tables must be set up by 8 a.m. Call 410-227-1621 to reserve your space or for more information. So plan to set up or visit Greenwood on Sept. 6 to do some treasure shopping and bargain hunting . . . at the Big Saturday yard ‘n’ flea sale, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. This year, they will be hosting a “Strut Your Stuff” pet fashion show. If you would like to participate, call 443-614-3420 for more info. It’s free and all pets are welcome. Registration for the pet show starts at 11 a.m. and event is at 1 p.m.

Historical Society’s Museum

The Bridgeville Historical Society Museum will be open to the public on the

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008 first Sunday of each month from June to October from 1 p.m - 4 p.m. The museum is located at 102 William Street, Bridgeville.

and dividers are available upon request. For more information or to order a basket please contact King Lion Mildred Riley at 846-3846 or kragera@verizon.net.

IHOP Family Night every night

Delmar church sandwich sale

The Friends of the Bridgeville Library have another delicious fundraiser to promote. All you have to do is enjoy a meal at the Seaford, Dover, Rehoboth, or Salisbury IHOP locations, any day, any meal. Take and fill out the comment card; staple your receipt to the comment card and drop it off at the Bridgeville Library, Bridgeville Town Hall, or the Providence Sales Cottage in Heritage Shores. For more information, call Pat McDonald at 337-7192.

A sandwich sale will be held on Saturday, Aug. 30 at 9 a.m. at the Delmar Church of God of Prophecy, Rt. 13 North and Dorothy Road (3 miles north of MD/DE state line). It will feature: oyster, crab cake, soft crab, chicken salad sandwiches, cheese steak subs, hamburgers, hot dogs. Baked goods and yard sale will also be available.

Searching for ancestors

Are you searching for your ancestors? Do you need guidance to begin your family tree? Are you stuck or do you need help organizing your research? The Bridgeville Public Library will provide genealogy consultations facilitated by Alice duBois Min on the last Saturday of each month — Aug. 30, Sept. 27 and Oct. 25 — from 10 a.m. to noon. Sign-up is required. Call the library at 337-7401, or e-mail Alice at famgen88@comcast.net. For special needs contact Karen Johnson 302-337-740

St. Stephen’s United Methodist Church in Delmar is excited to announce our very first annual golf tournament, to be held on Monday, Sept. 8, at the scenic River Marsh Golf Club, located at the Chesapeake Bay Hyatt in Cambridge, Md. Start time is 8:30 a.m., with registration from 7:45 to 8:15 a.m. The cost is $100 per single player or $400 per team. For local businesses, $100 silver sponsor includes a professionally printed 18 x 24 tee sign or $450 gold sponsor will register a foursome of golfers in addition to a tee sign. All fees include a buffet lunch with awards ceremony to follow. There will be many great prizes for 1st through 3rd place men’s and women’s teams, as well as great prizes for longest drive and closest the pin. Visit www.ststephensumc.com, or call Jamee Elliott at 302-846-9501, or Tom Jewell at 302-846-2525 for tournament sponsorship or registration information. Registration deadline is Monday, Aug. 25.

Longaberger sale

The Delmar Lions Club is holding a Longaberger basket sale with all proceeds from the sale going to the local community and the visually impaired. Baskets, with blue and orange trim and Wildcat paws, cost $49 apiece. The price of the lid, with a Delmar and Wildcat logo, is $30. Liners

Chamber’s Arts Festival

On Thursday, Aug. 14, from 6 to 8 p.m. (doors open at 5:30 p.m.) at Bethel A.M.E. Community Center, 204 N.W. 44th St., Milford, the audience will have the opportunity to ask questions of the candidates. Candidates will discuss their platforms and qualifications, and also their views on critical issues affecting Delaware. For more information contact: Dwayne Powell 3939658 or Jane Hovington 856-7656.

Police memorabilia and show

Georgetown Library events

Meet the candidates!

The Delaware State Police Museum, Inc., will host its 4th annual Police Memorabilia and Collector’s Show on Saturday, Aug. 16, between the hours of noon and 5 p.m. The Delaware State Police Museum is located at 1425 North DuPont Highway, Dover, north of the Dover Mall. A nominal donation of $3 will cover admission. Children under the age of 12 will be admitted free. There will be antique police vehicles on display. For additional information or to reserve a table contact 302739-5906.

The adventures of science at sea Golf Tournament

Gail Archer, international concert organist, lecturer, and recording artist in concert Sunday, Aug. 31, 4 p.m., St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, Lewes. She will also conduct a master class on Monday, Sept. 1, 10 a.m., at St. Peter’s. The public is welcome to the concert and the master class. Donations will be accepted. Archer has performed this summer in the U.S., Switzerland, Italy, Germany, and Belgium. She performs regularly at festivals worldwide, including the Spoleto Festival in South Carolina and the Bach Festival at Rollins College in Florida. The Bethany-Fenwick Area Chamber of Commerce’s (BFACC) award-winning 30th Annual Bethany Beach Boardwalk Arts Festival is Saturday, Sept. 6, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The festival features jewelry, art glass, pottery, sculpture, watercolor and oil painting, basketry, woodworking, and much more. The event is bigger and better than ever this year. The BFACC is excited that this year’s show will showcase more artists than ever before. Thanks to a larger pool of applicants, and strong support from the Town of Bethany Beach, the show will be expanded to include three street festival areas, with entertainment, at Second Street, Garfield Parkway and Parkwood Street. Artists will stretch the entire length of the boardwalk. For more information contact the BFACC at 302-5392100.

Trinity Golf Tournament

The 5th annual Trinity Foundation Golf Tournament will be held Sept. 6 at Heritage Shores Golf Club in Bridgeville. The tournament is a charity event to raise money for the Trinity Foundation, a non-profit organization founded in 2005 by the employees of Trinity Transport, Inc. In 2007 the tournament succeeded in raising over $20,000. Special thanks go out to our top sponsors so far for 2008, including Trinity Transport, Inc. and Discover Bank, with more expected to follow.

PAGE 23

Learn more about the exciting world of marine scientists at a talk titled, “Ships, Submersibles, and Underwater Habitats: Diving into the Adventures of Science at Sea,” given by Nancy Targett, dean of the University of Delaware’s College of Marine and Earth Studies (CMES). The free lecture will take place Thursday, Aug. 21, at 7 p.m., in Room 104 of the Cannon Laboratory at the University of Delaware’s Hugh R. Sharp Campus on Pilottown Road in Lewes. Light refreshments are provided at the event, which is free and open to the public. Seating is limited and reservations are recommended. For reservations, contact CMES’ Peggy Conlon at peggy@udel.edu or 302-645-4279. You can also visit the CMES web site at www.ocean.udel.edu.

Bethany Beach Jazz Funeral

For 23 years, the “Friends of Summer” have mourned the passing of the summer tourist season at Bethany Beach. The 2008 Bethany Beach Jazz Funeral is celebrated on Labor Day Monday, Sept. 1, beginning about 5:30 p.m. at the north end of the boardwalk. In addition there is the Jazz Funeral Silent Auction held on Friday, Aug. 29, 3-5 p.m. at Bethany Blues Restaurant to support the American Cancer Society and Relay for Life program.

Organist in concert

The Southern Delaware Chapter of the American Guild of Organists will present

• The Georgetown Public Library will hold story time at 10:30 a.m. every Tuesday morning with Miss Sherri. • Come see the classics at the Georgetown Public Library. To find out what will be showing, call the library at 856-7958.

• The Georgetown Public Library is having a movie matinee at 2 p.m. on Fridays until Aug. 22. For information about the movie call the library at 856-7958.

‘Touch-A-Truck’ event

The MOMS Club of Rehoboth Beach Area will be hosting a Touch-A-Truck event to benefit the March of Dimes on Saturday, Aug. 23 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The event will be held at the Big K (Kmart) parking lot in Rehoboth Beach rain or shine. Kids of all ages will love to visit the trucks set up for their exploration, such as a fire engine, dump truck, crane, ice cream truck, police vehicle, tractor, and so many more. Admission will be $5 for ages 2-12; everyone else is free. Children will not be admitted without a responsible adult. Touch-A-Truck will also feature mini-train rides, face painting, raffles, and refreshments. Free goody bags will be given to the first 500 children to arrive. To receive more information about the MOMS Club of Rehoboth Beach Area, e-mail momsclubde@gmail.com.

Rotary Club golf tournament

The Georgetown-Millsboro Rotary Club is now accepting reservations to play in its charity golf tournament on Aug. 21. The newly renamed Clayton Bunting Golf Classic will be conducted that day at the Peninsula Golf and Country Club off Route 24 east of Millsboro. Most of the proceeds from the charity event are earmarked for the Delaware Red Cross. The balance goes to the Club’s charity programs such as scholarships and grants to needy organizations. The golf tournament itself will be in a scramble format beginning at 10 a.m. on Aug. 21. Box lunches will be served during the golf outing. Megee Motors in Georgetown is offering a

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PAGE 24

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

free new car for a hole in one on one of the par-3 holes. Local businesses and groups are being encouraged to avail themselves of the $1,000 fee for a foursome. For just $100 more, the business can have a tee sign for advertising. Green’s fee for an individual is $250, inclusive of meals and other amenities, including a gift. Various corporate sponsorships remain available. To inquire about such sponsorships, call Paul Mylander at 6455006 or pmylander@comcast.net.

Coast Guard Auxiliary

Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 12-04 meets the second Thursday of each month at Nanticoke Yacht Club in Blades. Call Wayne Hickman at 629-6337 for details.

Senior Center trips

Trap Pond Partners meets

Trap Pond Partners (a volunteer non-profit organization) meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Bald Cypress Nature Center at Trap Pond State Park, Laurel. We are always looking for new members and ideas to improve our state park. To learn more, visit www.trappondpartners.com.

Nanticoke Senior Center’s Nashville and Memphis trip will take place on Sunday, Sept. 14 to Saturday Sept. 20. Cost is $850 double occupancy. Some of the sights you will see are Graceland, Grand Olé Opry, and Memphis Rock ‘n’ Soul Museum. For information call 629-4939. Trip includes motor coach transportation, tip for bus driver, snacks from center and dinner theatre.

Travel with Delaware Tech

All Knitters: The “Sea Purls” Chapter of The Knitting Guild Association meets on the first Wednesday of each month from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at The CHEER Center in Georgetown on the corner of Rt. 9 and Sand Hill Road. For more details: Call Joyce Smirk, secretary, 302-7326495. Lunch available.

Make friends and have fun traveling with trips offered by Delaware Technical & Community College, Owens Campus, Georgetown. Sports fans can attend the Phillies vs. Dodgers game on Aug. 23 in Philadelphia. On Aug. 27, view the soaring musical “Phantom” based on Gaston Leroux’s 1910 novel “The Phantom of the Opera” at the Candlelight Dinner Theater in Ardentown. Watch “Young Frankenstein,” Mel Brook’s wickedly funny twist on Mary Shelley’s classic story, on Broadway on Aug. 27. Take a cruise from Crisfield, Md. to charming and historic Tangier Island on Aug. 30. For more information about these or other trips, contact Delaware Tech’s Corporate and Community Programs at 302856-5618.

Widowed Persons Service

Longaberger bus trip

Delaware Equine Council

Next meeting of the Delaware Equine Council will be Monday, Aug 18, at 7 p.m. in the Harrington Public Library, Harrington. All those interested in horses are welcome. For more information, contact Stan 684-3966.

Knitting Guild meets

The Seaford Chapter of the Widowed Persons Service will have its next meeting on Tuesday, Aug. 19, at 12:15 p.m., at the Golden Corral. The planned guest speaker will be Cindy Mitchell, marketing director of CHEERS in Georgetown. All widowed persons of all ages are invited to attend. Come join us – we all enjoy the trips, lunches/dinners, etc. that we do.

Marine Corps meeting

The Marine Corps League meets the first Thursday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at the Log Cabin in Seaford.

Cancer support group

The Wellness CommunityDelaware is offering a support group for people affected by cancer and their loved ones at the Nanticoke Memorial Hospital in Seaford. The group meets at the Cancer Care Center on the second Monday of the month from 4:30 to 6 p.m. For more information call Kaye or Lori at 6459150.

Longaberger collectors will want to step aboard a bus trip to Boyd’s Bear Country in Gettysburg, Pa., for the Boyd’s Bear Country Basket Fest. Join collectors at the World’s Most Humongous Teddy Bear Store for a funfilled event that takes place Aug. 23. The bus will leave from the Seaford Village Shopping Center at 6 a.m. and return at 8 p.m. Longaberger Basket giveaways will take place every hour! Cost is $59 per person (includes motor coach transportation, snack filled Longaberger Tote and door prizes). For more information call Renee Morris at 245-8842 or email at RGMorris93@comcast.net.

Bus trip to Nashville

Seaford will host a trip to Nashville, Tenn., Nov. 13-17. Cost of $799 per person/double occupancy includes lodging at the Opryland Hotel, performance of Radio City’s “Christmas Spectacular” featuring world-famous Rockettes, Fantasy in Ice, holiday dinner show featuring Louise Mandrell, most meals, motorcoach transportation and much

more. For more information call Frances Horner at 629-4416.

Bus Trip to N.Y. City

Bus trip to N.Y. City, Saturday, Oct 25, to the American Museum of Natural History to visit “The Horse” exhibit. Fee is $65/person includes bus fare and admission to the Exhibit. Reservations must be paid and received by Monday, Sept 1. Bus will board approx 7 a.m. in the Sears parking lot at the Dover Mall. Call Mary Everhart 302659-0460, or Paula Barto 6295233, or visit website www.delawarequinecouncil.org

Seaford AARP trips

• Oct. 13-16 - New Hampshire White Mountains for 4 days. Stay in Laconia, N.H. at the Margate Resort Hotel with seven meals included. Cost is $650 per person, double occupancy. Visit Franconia Notch State Park, Chutter’s Store, Sugar Hill Sampler, Harman’s Cheese & Country Store, Hampton Pewter, and more. Have lunch (included) aboard The Café Lafayette Dinner Train during your two hour ride! Then ride the Lake Winnipesaukee Scenic Railroad before taking a cruise on a 230’ ship across Lake Winnipesaukee. • Nov. 19 - Rainbow Dinner Theater in Pennsylvania to see the comedy: “Deck The Halls And Clean The Kitchen.” Cost: $65. Bus leaves Seaford Peebles parking lot at 7:30 a.m. • Dec. 5 - The American Music Theater to see “Christmas Show.” Enjoy holiday songs and comedy sketches! We will also have time to Christmas shop at the Rockvale Outlets and have lunch on your own before going to the theater. Contact Rose Wheaton at 629-7180 for more information on these trips.

Jamaica, Queens bus trip

A bus trip to Jamaica, Queens, N.Y., on Saturday, Aug. 16, from Big Lots, Seaford. Bus will leave at 5 a.m. Departure from New York, 5 p.m. Price $50, flat rate. For information contact Sister Paris Twyman, at 410-754-9135.

AARP Chapter #915 trips

• Branson, Mo - Sept. 13-20, cost is $875 per person. Call 410-822-2314. • New England/Vermont, NH, Boston and Salem, Oct. 13-19, cost is $1085 double, and $1335 single. Call 410-673-7856. • Myrtle Beach - Nov. 10-13, cost $430 per person. Call 410754-8588.

Bus trip and cruise

Smith Island Cruise on Saturday, Aug. 23, includes: bus transportation, boat ride, and deluxe family-style dinner. The bus will be leaving from Roses parking lot in Denton, Md. Cost is $69 per person. Call ASAP for reservations, 410-822-2314. Submit Bulletin Board items by noon, Thursday. Send to Morning Star Publications - PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, email to editor@mspublications. com or drop off at 628 West Stein Hwy., Seaford.

SUDOKU

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle! Answers on Page 50


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

PAGE 25

Good Samaritan Shop provides clothes for fashion show What do you do on a Friday evening after getting off work? AT URPHY You go to a fashion show! Yeah, that’s what I did this Need clothes for those past Friday as the Lighthouse youngsters going back to Church put on a fashion show to school and under the benefit the Good Samaritans Aid gasoline crunch? Some Organization. Models included Miss Laurel, Lauren Hitch; Miss outfits the models were Harbeson, Sara Penny and many wearing cost as little as members of the church. They $1.25 to $3. raised $243 from donations and received more later. What was so neat about the event was unteers at the shop. It has lost five volunteers in the last several months. how nice everyone looked in their If you have an hour a week or even a clothes that came from the Good Samaritan Shop. Need clothes for those young- month, put your name on the volunteer sters going back to school, but under the list. I would be terribly remiss if I did not gasoline crunch? Some outfits the modmention the similar good work done by els were wearing cost as little as $1.25 the Soroptomist Club in Seaford and by to $3. Good Will Industries in Bridgeville, but Can you imagine this? Your children in this case we are talking about the will look every bit as good as someone Good Samaritans, whom I have not diswith a $30 pair of pants and an $8 shirt. cussed in a while. The show was entitled, “Fashions at The Good Samaritans have been there low prices,” and they certainly were, since 1978 and Henrietta Koch has been whether it was for a youngster or adult. the director for most of those years. As you probably know, all money Midge McMasters has more than 15 taken in at the Good Samaritan shop years and both work hard for the organigoes to help those with needs within the zation. community. It could be for doctor bills, As pastor Tim Jones’ wife Rebecca, medicines, heat and electric, phone or other special needs through the organiza- who was master of ceremonies, said at the end of the fashion show, “This is tion’s outreach program. very exciting for us to be able to do this. There is a never-ending need for vol-

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This may not be the last time they do it, as much fun as the members seemed to be having.” John H. Benson, who was tragically injured in a diving accident, is getting a lot of community support and prayers from the community. There is to be a chicken barbecue on Saturday, Aug. 16, at Bargain Bills Flea Market from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m., and the cost is $6. John , who just turned 21, certainly can use our support. The Laurel Chamber of Commerce began moving into its new building on Monday, Aug. 11. It is in the old Conner’s Drug Store building on East Market Street. New chamber secretary is Joyce Ramsey. More on this later. The Delmar VFW opened for breakfast Monday morning and the old “round table” was fully occupied. Life goes on but Linda, you are missed. Friday, Sept. 12, the Laurel Alumni Sports and Fans group will meet for dinner again, at the Georgia House in Laurel at 4 p.m. for social and 5 p.m. for dinner. Of course, you can call Craig Littleton to be included in the group. Last year, 50 or so people showed up and all had a good time, some more than others, as Craig was in top form. Or if

you are like me, you might think that it was low form. His number to make reservations is 462-7450. The other day I was in The Insurance Market Financial Center in Laurel, waiting for a brief chat with John Downes. For those of you who do not know, the financial center is in the old post office building, on Central Avenue in Laurel. What a beautiful, beautiful building inside. Memories came back to me of visits to that post office as a mere kid of perhaps 10 or 11. I was always selling something seeds, TV Guides, greeting cards or magazines, and I was always anxious for my shipment to arrive. My patience was not always the best, as I often made several trips, sure that today it would arrive. One thing I forgot to do in those younger years was to enjoy the beauty of that historic post office. Am I trying to tell you something? Do we get older and wiser? I had better not go there as I will get plenty of replies on that one, but I do know we appreciate things more as we get older. Now, I should appreciate Dick Whaley a whole lot!

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

Church Bulletins St. John’s multicultural services

Celebrate Recovery

Siempre Verde, a multicultural, bilingual service is being led by Pastor Luis Almandoz on Sunday afternoons at 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall at St. John’s United Methodist Church at Pine and Poplar streets, Seaford. Praise music, powerful preaching and a small meal unite this fellowship of persons of both Hispanic and Anglo origins. Alberto Mendez leads worship on the keyboard.

Celebrate Recovery, a step program which claims Jesus Christ as its higher power, is meeting at St. John’s United Methodist Church, Pine and Poplar streets, on Tuesday evenings from 7-9 p.m. This program is open to persons who wish to turn over their hurts, habits, and hang-ups to God such that they may be healed. For more information, call Rev. Constance Hastings, 629-9466, or Robert Spadaccini, 841-1720.

Ladies’ bible study There is a ladies’ bible study, held every Tuesday starting at 10 a.m., at Laurel Baptist Church, Bi-State Boulevard in Laurel. This bible study is a non-denominational study, only God’s word is studied, making us to be more like Christ. Should you have any questions regarding the study, feel free to call Gertrude R. Smith at 875-5300.

The Lighthouse Rising gas prices, wars and rumors of wars, rising food prices, it’s all so frightening. Come join Rebecca Jones as she presents “God’s Deliverance and Provision,” Wednesdays at 7 p.m., at The Lighthouse Church, 27225 Kaye Road, Laurel. Find out how the Bible can show you how to live and face hardships today. Pastor Timothy Jones provides kid’s church for grades K-6, and a nursery is available. Call 875-7814.

Community anti-drug rally Annual community anti-drug rally and march will be held Saturday, Aug. 16. The march will begin at 11 a.m. from the grounds of the Booker Street Church of God, located on Booker Street near the Richard Allen School, Georgetown. The march will return to the church grounds, where Fun Day activities will be held from noon until 4 p.m. There will be games, food, dunking booth, moon bounce, train rides, drill teams, creative dance teams and much more. For more information, contact Minister Anthony Neal at 854-6692 or call the Booker Street Church of God at 8569097.

Latin Mass Aug. 17 A Latin mass according to the Missal of 1962 is celebrated on the third Sunday of every month at 3 p.m. at Holy Cross

Church in Dover. The mass will be celebrated on Aug. 17. The mass is always a Missa Cantata using traditional Gregorian chant. For further information, call 302-674-5781.

real race cars, tour race haulers and swim in the pool! Reserve you racers’ position today. Call Paula Holston at 875-8191, or Tammy LeCates @ (302) 542-2520 to preregister by Aug. 20.

Laurel Church of Christ meeting

Church hosts dinner and a movie

Laurel Church of Christ, 1010 S. Central Ave., will host a gospel meeting, “Come Hear the Word,” from Sunday, Aug. 17 through Aug. 20. Preaching and Teaching: Sunday, Aug. 17: 9 a.m., Bible Class; 10 a.m., Worship, and 7 p.m., Worship. Aug. 18, 19, 20 – Worship at 7 p.m. each evening.

Church of God & Saints of Christ presents Dinner and a Movie, at 10016 Concord Road, Seaford, on Aug. 24. Doors open at 3 and movie starts at 3:30 p.m. The movie title is “The Great Debaters,” starring, Denzel Washington. Donation is $10. For more information call Robert Brown, 628-3903 or Phyllis Grice 6292124.

Seaford Wesleyan hosts Youth Rally “Freedom, Fire, Love Youth Rally” will be held Friday, Aug. 22, from 5:30 to 10 p.m., at Seaford Wesleyan Church. Cost is $3. The speaker is a former U.F.C. wrestler named J.J. and we will also have live music from the Ben Spear band.

Bethel Worship Center VBS Bethel Worship Center would like to welcome children ages 3 to 12 to join us for The Incredible Race on Saturday, Aug. 23, from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. at 28604 Deer Lane (Woodland Ferry Road), Seaford, (home of Phyllis & Byard Layton). They will prepare for the all-important race of life, fill their tanks with God’s word, tune up their engines, sing trackside praises, enjoy pit-stop snacks, see

Delmar Church of God sale A sandwich sale will be held on Saturday, Aug. 30, from 9 a.m. until…, at the Delmar Church of God of Prophecy, Rt. 13 North and Dorothy Road (3 miles north of MD/DE state line). It will feature: oyster, crab cake, soft crab, chicken salad sandwiches, cheese steak subs, hamburgers, hot dogs. Baked goods and yard sale will also be available.

Old Christ Church schedule Sept. 7 - 9:30 a.m., Holy Eucharist Sept. 14, 21, 28 - 9:30 a.m., morning prayer Oct. 7 - 10 a.m., blessing of the animals, morning prayer

DIRECTORY: Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship TRINITY UNITED METHODIST Trap Pond, CHURCH NearLaurel, D el. 875-7715 Sun. School 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pastor Julie A. Lewis

“A caring church, a giving church, a sharing church; showing love, warmth and friendship to all.”

St. John’s United Methodist Church Pine & Poplar Sts., Seaford 302-629-9466 E-mail: st_johns@verizon.net NURSERY & HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

SUNDAY WORSHIP 8:30 & 11:15 am Traditional 9:45 Sunday School 10:00 am Hearts Afire (Contemporary) Come as you are… and be transformed in the love of Christ!

Centenary United Methodist Church “Where Caring is Sharing” “NEW SONG!” - Contemporary Celebration, 8:45 a.m. Sunday School, Classes for ALL ages, 9:45 a.m. Traditional Family Worship, 11:00 a.m.

Rev. K. Wayne Grier, Pastor, 875-3983 200 W. Market St., Laurel, Del.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

1010S .C entral Ave., Laurel Ph:8 75-7748 WorshipS ervices: Sunday 10 a.m. 6:00 p.m. BibleS tudy: Sun. 9:00 a.m.; Wed. 7:00 p.m. In The Interest Of New Testament Christianity

CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 510 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE Rev. Donna Hinkle, Pastor Church: 875-4233 Sunday Services: 8:30am Praise 9:30am Sunday School,11am Worship

DIAL DAILY DEVOTIONS: 875-4309

Christ Evangelistic Church Great Worship - Talented Singers Loving People - Powerful Preaching

Youth Group Wednesday 7:00 pm

Worship 10:45 a.m. • Sun. School 9:45 a.m. Wed. Night 7:00 p.m. • Sun. Night 7:00 p.m. Located on Camp Road between the Dual & Alt. 13 For info call: 629-3674 or 875-2915 Sr. Pastor Roland Tice

Christian Church of Seaford Dual 13N., Seaford, DE • 629-6298 Minister: John Herbst SCHEDULE OF SERVICES Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Morning Worship 10:30 Wed. Night Service & (Nursery & Jr. Church) Youth Groups 7:00 p.m. A Firm Foundation • A Sure Hope • An Unending Love

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church & Old Christ Church

“A Place to Belong”

600 S. Central Ave., Laurel, DE 19956 (302) 875-3644 Rev. Rita B. Nelson, Rector www.dioceseofdelaware.net/churches/stphlps.html Holy Eucharist with Healing and Church School ~ Sunday @ 9:30 am

SUNDAY WEDNESDAY Underground Family Worship (7-12 grade) 6:15 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Sunday School 9:00 a.m. Prayer Team ‘The Table’ God’s Big Back Yard (last Wed. of mo) 7:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m.

94 Walnut St. Laurel, DE 19956

875-7873

Centrally located at 14511 Sycamore Rd., Laurel, DE 19956 Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. FasTrak Children’s Ministry - 10:30 a.m.; E318 Youth - 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Services - 7 p.m.

For info, call 875.7995 or visit www.centralworshipcenter.org

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church Road6 8, South of Laurel Laurel,D el.

Sun. School 10 a.m. • Worship 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study 7 p.m. Hymn Sing: Last Sunday Each Month - 7 p.m. www.StPaulsUMCLaurelDE.org

Pastor - Donald Murray - 856-6107

Thank You to the churches that sponsor these pages. Your contribution makes it possible for the “Good News” to be published each week.


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

PAGE 27

Basket for the next month. The Lewes-Rehoboth Association of Churches would appreciate any financial donations community members can make to help cover this crisis. Donations can be mailed to Cape Henlopen Food Basket, P.O. Box 567, Nassau, DE 19969. All donations are tax exempt.

LRAC seeks help for food crisis The Lewes-Rehoboth Association of Churches is asking the community to consider a short-term need at the Cape Henlopen Food Basket. The recent theft of trucks from the Delaware Food Bank will affect the availability of chicken for the Food

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 543 N. BRADFORD ST., SEAFORD, DEL. • 629-7161

Rev. Michael A. Hopkins, Pastor WEDNESDAY SUNDAY Sunday School......9:45 a.m. Prayer & Praise 7:00 p.m. Worship...............11:00 a.m. Patch Club (kids) 7:00 p.m. Eve. Worship........7:00 p.m. Youth Group 6:00-8 p.m.

Obituaries George Neal Walston, 95 George Neal Walston of Seaford passed away on Saturday, Aug. 2, 2008, at Country Rest Home in Greenwood. He was born on Oct. 1, 1912 in Denton, Md., a son of George Cummings Walston and Clara Trice Walston Hubbard. He was also preceded in death by his wife of 72 years, Rhea E. Walston on April 2, 2007. He had worked as a licensed practical nurse in New York and was a buyer and supervisor for Lloyd’s Shopping Center in Middletown, N.Y. He was a member of the Elks since 1964 and transferred his membership from Middletown to Seaford in 1991, where he became an officer for five years. He became a life-member of the Elks in 2002 and also was a member of Elks National. He had been a member of Howells Fire Company, in Howells, N.Y. and also served there as captain of the fire police for 20 years. He was also a member of the Webb Horton Church where he had served as usher for several years and was a member of the A.A.R.P. both nationally and locally. George excelled in all sports and especially enjoyed, softball, basketball, horse shoes and bowling. He is survived by three sons, Jon Neal Walston of Constableville, N.Y., David R. Walston and Dennis E. Walston, both of Seaford; three grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren. Besides his parents and his wife, he was also preceded in death by a brother, Harlan Walston and an infant sister, Mary. A graveside service was held on Wednesday, Aug. 6, at Denton Cemetery

in Denton, Md. with the Rev. Dan Walker officiating. Interment followed the service. Framptom Funeral Home in Federalsburg handled the arrangements.

Eugene H. Sockriter Sr., 75 Eugene H. Sockriter Sr., died Aug. 6, 2008, at his home in Seaford. Eugene was born in Angola, the son of Edward Harry Sockriter and Alberta H. Downs and his stepfather, Albert Downs. He was a loving husband, father, grandfather and great-grand dad. Eugene, known as “Gene,” has put up a long fight in the past 5 years with his illness. He lost his wife, “Mattie,” a year and a half ago, since then all he had talked about was going home to be with his wife, now his wish has come true; he’s in heaven with his loved ones. Loved ones left to cherish his memory include eight children: William Hawkins and his wife Janet of Seaford, Evelyn Faircloth and her husband Joe of Laurel, Patsy Colliongsworth and her husband Billy of Delmar, Eugene H. Sockriter Jr. and his wife Christine of Seaford, Nancy Bundick and her husband Jeff of Seaford, Alberta “Tinkerbell” Shockley of Seaford, Louise Sockriter of Seaford, Wanda Walton and her husband Johnny of Seaford; 19 grandchildren, 22 greatgrandchildren and 3 step-great-grandchildren. Funeral Services were held on Saturday, Aug. 9, at Watson Funeral Home, Millsboro, where friends called prior to the services. Interment was in Blades Cemetery, Blades. Pastors Joe LeCates and Tim McDurman officiated. Arrangements were handled by Wat-

Tony Windsor’s brand new Gospel CD compilation is on sale now. Tony sings songs of faith and inspiration including “The Angels Cried,” “Everlasting Arms,” “I Saw the Light” and much more. Get your copy at the Star office for only $6.00 [includes $1.00 donation to NIE (Newspapers in Education) program].

Call: 302-236-9886

Besid e the StillW aters

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH

302-629-8434 • www.graceseaford.org Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:45 am SPANISH Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Activities 7 pm Pastor: Homer McKeithan Youth Minister: James Hollis Music: Jim Burket “The Cross Is Grounded In Grace”

27225 Kaye Road Laurel, DE 19956 Ph: (302) 875-7814

www.thelighthouselaurel.org Timothy P. Jones, Pastor Sunday Family Worship - 10:00 a.m. Wednesday Family Ministries - 7:00 p.m.

“Shining His Light”

532 Stein Hwy., Seaford, DE 19973 Redemptorist Fathers • 629-3591 MASSES: SUNDAY: Sat. Eve. - Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Spanish 7:30 p.m. Sunday - 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. DAILY: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.; First Sat. 9 a.m. HOLY DAYS: Eve. 7:30 p.m.; 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. NOVENA DEVOTIONS: Wed. 9 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. CONFESSION: Sat. 4:30 p.m.

“The Pickle Church” CHRIST THE CORNERSTONE COMMUNITY CHURCH PICKLE MINISTRIES OUTREACH & CORNERSTONE NOTE MUSIC MINISTRY Corner of Bethel Rd. & Alt. 13 • 302-875-8150 Church School -All Ages - 9:15 a.m. Worship Service - 10:00 a.m. Rev. Rick Elzey Wings of Prayer - Tues. 7:00 p.m. Come Join Our Family

VICTORY TABERNACLE CHURCH OF GOD

SUNDAY WORSHIP 11 AM and 6 PM ~ Sunday School 9:45 AM

WEDNESDAY NIGHT Ministry for the wholef amily 7 PM

Pastor Stacey Johnson 28261 Seaford Rd., Laurel, 2 miles N. of Laurel on Alt. 13

302-877-0443

The Atlanta Road Alliance Church 22625 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE (302) 629-5600 • www.atlantaroadcma.org Rev. Edward J. Laremore, Sr. Pastor David A. Krilov, Associate Pastor

CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH

315 N. Shipley St., Seaford, DE 19973 • 302-629-9755 Pastor: Rev. Andrew C. Watkins www.christlutheranseaford.com

Praise Worship 8:30 AM • Sunday School 9:30 AM • Traditional Worship 11 AM

ROCK CHURCH

SUNDAY WEDNESDAY 8:30 Worship 6:45 Pioneer Clubs (age 3 9:45 Sunday School thru grade 6) & Divorce Care® 11:00 Worship/Kids Church 7:00 Prayer Service & Youth 7:00 Evening Service Group (grades 7-12)

30320 Seaford Road, Laurel, Del. Ph: 875-7275 • Pastor Bill Konkel Sunday School: 9a .m. Worship: 10:30 a.m. & 1st & 3rd Sunday Evening: 5 p.m. Thurs Evening Prayer: 7p .m.

COKESBURY CHURCH

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church

All Welcome Where Love Abides -- John 3:16

The Church by the Side of the Road 15092 Cokesbury Rd, Georgetown, DE (302) 629-5222 • www.cokesburywc.org Pastor Harold Carmean & Congregation Sunday School 9 am Contemporary Church Service 10 am

United Methodist Church Serving Christ in the Heart of Seaford since 1830 315 High St. • Seaford, DE

Sunday Services: Informal Worship in Chapel 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11:00 a.m. Sanctuary 9:45 Sunday School

Pastor: Rev. Jim Sipes • 302-629-4458 PROFESSIONAL NURSERY CARE PROVIDED

T on y W in d sor

PO BOX 60, LAUREL, DE 19956

PRE-SCHOOL - 12TH GRADE - Office 629-7161 Quality Traditional Education Since 1973 Fully Accredited By Middle States in ACSI

SEAFORD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

Mount Olivet

New Gospel CD: ‘Beside the Still Waters’

Located at Tyndall’s Furniture Plaza on Discountland Rd & Rt. 13, Laurel 302- 875-4646

Dr. Carl G Vincent, Senior Minister Pastor Barry B. Dukes, Music Minister Sunday 9:30 am Wednesday 7:00 pm Children’s Church • Nursery

A Cooperative S.B.C. Church 805 Atlanta Rd., Seaford, DE

Obituaries are run without charge thanks to the support of area churches

Messiah’sV ineyard Church

Laurel Wesleyan Church Rt. 13A, Just North of Laurel Sunday School - 9:30 Worship - 9:00 & 10:45 Sunday Evening Worship Wed. Youth Ministries 6:30 p.m. Thurs.W KID, The Zone Children’s Ministries6:30 Church 875-5380 • Sr. Pastor Ken Deusa Asst. Pastor: Rev. Rick Green; Youth: Kyle Horton Children’sP astor:M arilyn Searcey

629-7979 Holy Eucharist: 9:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Forum: 10:30 a.m. Thurs. Eve. Service: 6 p.m. Front & King St., Seaford, DE

The Rev’d. Jeanne W. Kirby-Coladonato, Rector

Seaford Church of Christ Acapella

(Rm. 16:16)

N. Dual 13, P.O. Box 783, Seaford, DE 19973 302-629-6206 Evangelist - G. W. Cliver - 629-6206 Elder - Don Birch - 629-8949 Elder - Ron Russell - 629-6033 Sunday School 10 a.m. Sun. Worship 11 a.m., Sun. Evening 6 p.m Wed. Evenings 7 p.m. Live For God, Love Each Other, Light The World

A Gathering Of Faith Come together under Christ’s roof and share together in his love. Attend Church this Sunday


PAGE 28 son Funeral Home, Millsboro. Letters of condolence may be emailed to: Watson Funeral Home Delmarvaobits.com, or Watsonfh.com

James Searcey, 85 James “Jake” Searcey of Delmar, died peacefully on Sunday, Aug. 10, 2008, at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury. He was born on Feb. 8, 1923 in Alabama, a son of John V. Searcey and Virgie Searcey Wilson, who preceded him in death. He lived most of his life in Delmar and called Delmar his home. James Searcey Jake, as he was fondly known by family and friends, retired in 1985 after 24 years as a plumber and electrician. His biggest joy was spending time with his grandchildren and great-grandchildren. He was a member of Laurel Wesleyan Church and had a strong relationship with God. His faith helped him face his illness and in his last days, he looked forward to God calling him home. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by three brothers, George and John Searcey and Ernest Bailey and two sisters, Katherine Hughes and Emma Wooten. He is survived by a family who loved

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008 him dearly, his wife of 64 years, Kathleen; a son, Jimmy Searcey and his wife Nancy; a grandson, Robert Searcey and his wife Marilyn; a granddaughter, Kimberly van Vulpen and her husband Gaby; and five great-grandchildren, Ryan, Luke and Hannah Searcey and Alex and Amanda van Vulpen. He is also survived by a sister, Chlorina Jamison and several nieces and nephews. A funeral service was held on Wednesday, Aug. 13, at Short Funeral Home, 13 E. Grove Street, Delmar, where family and friends called prior to the service. Interment followed the service at St. Stephen’s Cemetery in Delmar. Memorial contributions may be made in his memory to Laurel Wesleyan Church, P.O. Box 68, Laurel, DE 19956; or to Coastal Hospice at the Lake, P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, MD 21802. Online condolences may be sent to the family by visiting www.shortfh.com.

Elizabeth Helen White Isenhower, 90 Elizabeth Helen White Isenhower of Seaford died Monday, Aug. 11, 2008 at home. Born in Federalsburg, Md., the daughter of William W. and Lola Helen White, she was a homemaker. She was a former member, with 50 years of service with the Seaford Volunteer Fire Department's Ladies Auxiliary, and a former 50-year member of the Miriam Rebecca Lodge, Order of the Odd Fellows. She is survived by her husband George Daniel Isenhower of Seaford; a son, John

“ExclusiveD ealer”

Family Owned & Operated ServingD elmarva since “1869”

Henry Isenhower, and a daughter, Dottie F. Johnson, both of Seaford; two sisters, Roberta Leonard of Seaford and Rowena Tyrell of Hyattsville, Md.; 6 grandchildren and 7 great-grandchildren. Services will be Thursday, Aug. 14, at 2 p.m. in Watson-Yates Funeral Home, Front & King Streets, Seaford, where friends may call from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., prior to the services. Burial will be in Odd Fellows Cemetery, Seaford.

David L. Fluharty Sr, 86 David L. Fluharty Sr. of Seaford died on Sunday, Aug. 10, 2008, at home. Mr. Fluharty was born in Preston, Md., a son of Alfred and Elsie Fluharty, who predeceased him. A brother, William Kenneth Fluharty and a sister, Isabelle Sellers, also preceded him in death. He worked in the powerhouse at the DuPont Company in Seaford for more than 33 years, retiring in 1978. He was a Navy veteran of World War II, a member of Woodland United Methodist Church in Woodland, and a Past Master of Gethsemane Masonic Lodge in Reliance. David’s wife Geraldine “Gerry” Fluharty died in 2006. He is survived by a son, David L. Fluharty Jr. and his wife Rose of Laurel; three daughters, Ann Buckley and her husband Seward of Parkville, Md., Jane Medford and her husband Wayne of Seaford, and Debbie Marvel and her husband Ric of Seaford. He is also survived by four grandchildren, Matthew Buckley, Bryan Medford and his wife Christy, Lynn Riggins and her husband Mark and Kristen Fluharty and three great-grandchildren, Daniel Buckley, Mariah and Seth Riggins. A brother, Calvin Fluharty of Fredericksburg, Va. also survives David. Funeral services were on Wednesday, Aug. 13, at the Woodland United Methodist Church, 5123 Woodland Church Road, where friends called prior

Union United Methodist Church 2 North Laws St., Bridgeville, DE 19933 Across from Bank 337-7409 HandicapF riendly WORSHIP TIMES:

9 am Contemporary Service 10 am Sunday School 11 am Traditional Worship Youth Group (Sun. 6 p.m.)

to the services. Masonic Services were also held. Burial was in Odd Fellows Cemetery, Seaford. The family suggests donations may be made to Woodland United Methodist Church, 5123 Woodland Church Road, Seaford, DE 19973. Arrangements were handled by the Cranston Funeral Home, Seaford.

Madelyn E. Mitchell, 88 Madelyn E. Mitchell, of Laurel passed away at Atlantic Shores Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Millsboro on Aug. 11, 2008. She was born in Georgetown, a daughter of Ira and Carrie Wilson Adams. Her husband Isaac Mitchell, whom passed in 1976, also precedes Madelyn in death. Madelyn was a poultry grower and a loving homemaker. Her son Donald M. Mitchell and his wife Joanne of Laurel survive her. Two grandsons: Robert M. and Aaron M. Mitchell of Laurel, and a great grandson Kyle Mitchell. Four brothers, James Adams and his wife Virginia, Ira Nelson Adams and his wife Barbara, Alton Noah Adams and his wife Sandy of Laurel and William T. Adams of Georgetown. Six sisters: Edna Adams of Millsboro, M. Elizabeth Parker of Georgetown, Gertrude Shockley of Frankford, Eva Rimel and her husband Paul of Kansas, Lois A. Truitt and her husband Everett of Laurel and Sallie Wharton and her husband James of Laurel. A funeral service will be held at the Hannigan, Short, Disharoon Funeral Home, 700 West St., Laurel, on Saturday, Aug. 16, at 11 a.m., where friends and family may call one hour prior to the service. The Rev. Dr. Carl Vincent will officiate. Internment will follow in Millsboro Cemetery. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions can be made in her memory to a charity of your choice.

BETHEL WORSHIP CENTER 9431 Ginger Lane, Seaford (2.4 mi. north of Wal-Mart on US 13) 628-4240 Recorded Info 628-4241 Church Office

Pastor Joseph Lecates - 875-2059 Adult Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Children’s Church 10:30 am Nursery 10:30 am & 6:30 pm Youth Meeting Sun. 7 pm Promise Keepers Tues. 7 pm Wed. Night Bible Study 7 pm “We’re not building a church, we’re building God’s Kingdom!”

Welcome… SEAFORD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Wm. V. Sipple & Son Main Office and Display 300S. Rehoboth Blvd., Milford,D E 302-422-4214 AreaR epresentative: Hannigan, Short & DisharoonF .H.

302-875-3637 1-800-673-9041

Sunday School 9 am Morning Worship 10 am

701B ridgeville Road 629-9077

“Welcome Home!”

Wesley United Methodist Church 22025 Atlanta Road, Seaford, DE Pastor James Bongard Contemporary Worship 9 am Sunday School & Bible Education 10 am Traditional Worship 11 am Wednesday Worship 6:45 pm 302-629-3029 * Info Line 302-628-0112

743 E. Clarence St., Seaford, Del. Carlton L. Cannon, Sr. Paster

629-9443, Cell: 448-0852 • cogclarence@verizon.net Sunday: Midweek Activities: Church School........9:45 am Call for Details Morning Worship......11 am Children’s Church & Youth Explosion ........6 pm Nursery Provided Evening Worship.........7 pm *Counseling by appt. only Tuesday: Thursday: Bible Study & Family Corporate Prayer.........7 pm ‘Come and Grow with Us!’ Training Hour...........7 pm

Laurel Baptist Church, SBC Where everybody is somebody & Jesus Christ is Lord 33056 Bi-State Boulevard, Laurel, DE 19956 LBC Sunday School ~ 10:00 Morning Worship ~ 11:00 Wednesday Bible Study ~ 7:00 P.M. NurseryP rovided Pastor: Rev. Steven Booth Music Director: Linda Lewis

302-875-7998


Page 29

MORNING STAR • AuGuST 14 - 20, 2008

Celebration of culture brings community together By Lynn R. Parks Brooks Parker had a cheering section in the audience. As the 8-year-old sang in the Little Mr. AFRAM pageant Friday night, his mother, aunt and grandmother listened attentively, sometimes singing along. When the song was over, the women yelled and applauded in approval. “He likes to sing, so we decided to let him enter the contest,” said Brook’s mother, Adrienne Parker, Laurel. Sitting next to her was Brook’s grandmother, Ruth Belle, Laurel, and in front of them was Parker’s sister, Sherita Belle, Laurel. Also joining them in the stands was a cousin, Evelyn Maddox, Seaford. As happy as they all were to hear Brooks sing, that was not the only reason they attended the 11th annual Eastern Shore AFRAM Festival, held last weekend in Nutter Park, Seaford. “I really like it here,” said Sherita Belle, who has attended the festivals since they started. “I want to come here to support my neighbors.” “This really brings the community together as a whole,” added Maddox. “There is a lot of socializing.” And, as with every good festival, there is a lot of food. “I also come here to eat,” said Maddox, her hands around a large fried fish sandwich. The festival started Thursday evening with a basketball shooting tournament and fish fry. Volunteer Desi Laws-Moore said that nearly a thousand people attended the festival that evening. “The basketball court was filled with competitors,” she said. Activities Friday night started with the pageant. In addition to the Little Mr. AFRAM competition, which Brooks Parker won, the pageant featured the Junior Mr. AFRAM, Little Miss AFRAM and Junior Miss AFRAM competitions. Junior Mr. AFRAM was Nygjiem Roberts, 10, Bridgeville. Junior Miss

AFRAM was Mary Andrick, 10, Seaford, and Little Miss AFRAM was Jada Evans, 4, Seaford. Jada, daughter of Vincent Jr. and Chanelle Evans, recited a poem, “The Prayer of Hope,” by Marian Wright Elderman, read a book, Life Doesn’t Frighten Me At All, by Maya Angelou, and sang “Life Every Voice and Sing,” commonly referred to as the AfricanAmerican national anthem. Saturday’s activities started at 10 a.m. with a parade. Entertainment, including singing and dancing went through the day. Dennard Hill and Erroll Mattox, both of Seaford, shared a booth at the festival, at which they sold fresh produce from their gardens. Mattox, who grows heirloom vegetables in his 1,000-square foot organic plot and who is a frequent participant in the weekly Rehoboth Beach farmer’s market, said that organizers of the festival asked him to set up a booth. “They wanted to expand their offerings at the festival,” he said. Both Hill, who gardens near his home on Bloxom School Road, and Mattox praised the efficiency of the festival. “I participate in many of this type of event and they are often chaotic,” Mattox said. “This one is very well organized.” And, he added, looking around, “people are enjoying themselves.” Laws-Moore credited festival chairwoman Pat Jones for the smooth-running event. “Pat Jones has done it again,” she said. “Everything is running great.” Laws-Moore said that the festival brings members of the African-American community together. At the same time, the festival is inclusive, she said, with “something for everybody.” “We want to focus on our culture, and celebrate our culture,” she said. “And we want people to see how proud we are of our culture.”

Kai Anderson dances in the Miss AFRAM pageant Friday night. The pageant also included a question and answer session. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

Mary Andrick, who was crowned Junior Miss AFRAM, dances to gospel music. Photo by Lynn R. Parks

Dancers from Sankofa’s African Drummers and Dancers entertained the crowd after the opening ceremonies on Saturday. Photo by Cassie Richardson

Jeff Johnson, Seaford, was this years recipient of the Community Recognition Award. The award is given out each year during the opening ceremonies of the AFRAM festival to an individual who is making a difference in the community. Photo by Cassie Richardson

Nygjiem Roberts, 10, Bridgeville, was the only competitor in the Junior Mr. AFRAM pageant Friday night. In the talent portion of the pageant, he sang. Photo by Lynn R. Parks


Remembering Derrick Henry By this time a career in criticism appealed greatly to me, and I therefore applied to the now defunct This page is intended to acquaint the readers of Record Rockefeller Program in Music Criticism centered at Review with the backgrounds of our staff members. USC. I was not admitted, but instead went to work for Featured this issue is the autobiography of Derrick the Los Angeles Philharmonic writing press releases Henry, Associate Editor of Classical Music. and program material as part of my promotional and public relations duties. While at the Philharmonic I I have been interested in music as long as I can was able to meet many well-known musicians and all remember. As a kid one my greatest delights was to the city’s critics; it became clear how much more I play little Golden Records (my favorite was Davy Crockett) on my great-grandmother’s gramophone. The needed to learn about music to become a really competent critic. This awareness first classical piece I can remember enjoying was Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker Suite. When I was about ten, solidified my desire to study music history at the graduate level, my mother brought home the first of a series of and so let my entering the Yale classical records offered by the A&P supermarket doctoral program in the fall chain. That disc contained Schubert’s Unfinished of1 974. Symphony and the first movement of Tchaikovsky’s First Piano Concerto. I wasn’t overwhelmed, but I was In this program I am enticed. A few weeks later the featured work was preparing for a career as Dvorak’s New World Symphony. It was a revelation; I a scholar and a teacher couldn’t believe anything could be so beautiful. We of music history at the went on to buy all 16 recordings in the series. university level. While I Since I grew up in Dover, Delaware when it was still a am greatly looking quiet little town of 6000, opportunities to hear classical forward to such a concerts or even to meet people with whom to share my career, I have also retained my interest in new musical discoveries were slim. Consequently I writing about music on a became a classical FM radio addict, thereby more general level. I have familiarizing myself with the basic orchestral written record reviews for repertoire. After a while I learned to distinguish the Los Angeles Times since between the various recordings of individual pieces, 1973, and wrote program notes and soon began to form my own preferences. A for the Claremont Music Festival in subscription to Stereo Review, and later to High 1973 and 1974 and for the Yale School of Fidelity, broadened my musical horizons and sparked Music’s resident orchestra, the Yale Phil harmonica, an interest in music criticism. This interest was during my first two years at Yale. In addition to my intensified when I began to study with Martin work as classical editor, I have served as a teaching Bernheimer, head music critic of the Los Angeles Times, during my junior year at UCLA. Mr. Bernheimer assistant in courses in general music history and in twentieth-century music, and am currently at work on a encouraged me, so the next year I began writing regular concert and record reviews for the UCLA Daily dissertation regarding the Symphoniae Sacrae oft he great seventeenth-century German master Heinrich Bruin. Schuetz.

Meet the Press

Dear Eleanor and Robert,

Sharing his memory...

though we lived on opposite coasts. I appreciated getting together or talking on the phone every year he Please accept my sincerest sympathy; I am deeply saddened for your loss of Derrick. There must came to California to visit with you. It was be nothing so painful to parents than for their child to providential we would work together again. On my first trip to Atlanta in January 1990 I learned Derrick suffer. He is better now, and his spirit will live in the was a music critic for the Atlanta Journal/ hearts and minds of those who knew and loved him. Derrick became my brother as a UCLA undergrad in Constitution. I did not know at the time about Spivey Hall, but when I applied for the director job Derrick the 1960s where we shared a passion for music and wrote a convincing letter of recommendation on my basketball. While I attended every UCLA basketball home game from 1963-1973, Derrick was enjoying the behalf. I will always remember his first Spivey Hall games from his Bruin band court side seats. Our first review “it appears to be the sort of place where artists will clamor to play an audiences will flock to hear full-time jobs were as working buddies in the LA Philharmonic PR department in 1970. When he moved them.” In the mid ‘90s my new boss asked the Spivey east for graduate studies at Yale we remained in touch Foundation chair what contributed most the successful launch of Spivey Hall; his answer was

“Derrick Henry.” Derrick was more that a music critic, he was a journalist who had the gift to educate and inspire readers. When his AJC job assignment changed, I was fortunate to persuade Derrick to write Spivey Hall’s program notes where he was able to continue his knowledge and love of music with appreciative reader. His friendship was unconditional and non-judgmental, he was a devoted friend whenever I faced daunting challenges in my personal life and career. We shared our feelings, bared our souls and provided encouragement and support as only true friends can do. I will always love him as my brother.

Dear Kirk,

human being who was able to grasp the essence of another’s life well lived and celebrate that to the fullest, in the scant column inches that he was allowed. It is impossible to gauge the gratitude of the survivors for these beautiful testimonials to their loved ones. A well-written and well-informed concert review was certainly valuable to the performers for professional reasons, but each of Derrick’s obituaries served as loving investments in eternity. NancyR aabe

remain with you all. I have been pondering in these last few days the extent not only of Derrick’s musical Thank you for letting me know about the legacy but his human legacy as well. He was of course plans for Derrick’s extensive library. I am still trying an extraordinarily gifted music critic (ah, there have to come to grips with his death; he was such an been so few!), but I might venture to say that his last integral part of my life, despite the divisions of time role as obituary writer was where his most defining and distance, that I still cannot comprehend that he vocation lay. I have found many, many of his elegantly will not be there on the other end of the phone line in written, insightful obituaries posted online by all the event that I should call. Your family is so close that manner of web sites to whom various people he wrote I cannot imagine how you are coping with his loss, his about were connected. Each one shows the hand of not long illness notwithstanding. My thoughts and prayers only an expert writer but a remarkably sensitive

Yours sincerely, Sheryl


Derrick Henry, 58, music critic, AJC obituary writer Reporter had degrees in music from UCLA, Yale. He was so sensitive he would often cry with the families heinter viewed. By Bo Emerson Gladys Henry loved to listen to the classical music programs that her favorite radio station in Laurel, Del., played every Sunday, and she loved to listen with her first grandchild in her lap. “Watch this baby,” she told her daughter-in-law one Sunday. “He loves classical music.” Eleanor Henry thought that Grandmother Henry’s observation was wishful thinking, but then she noticed her son Derrick was listening attentively. The boy listened just as carefully when his mother went to the A&P and brought home, with the eggs and butter, record albums from the store’s “Basic Library of the World’s Greatest Music” series. Years later, he managed to buy his own baton and would stand at the stereo and pretend to conduct Cesar Franck and RimskyKorsakov. Then he would hide his conductor’s stick on top of the china cabinet, where his younger siblings couldn’t reach it. Listening was a skill and a passion for Mr. Henry, who went on to earn degrees in music from UCLA and Yale, and to become the classical

music critic for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Even more important than his ability to hear and understand music, say his friends and co-workers, was his ability to listen when creating the obituaries he wrote for the newspapers starting in 2001. He was adept at the difficult art of capturing a personality in a few column inches of type, and at interviewing bereaved family members. “I remember him telling me he would often cry with them, because it really touched him so much to write these stories,” said his girlfriend, Nancy Field, of Sandy Springs. Robert Derrick Henry, 58, of Smyrna, died Tuesday at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, D.C., of complications from an inoperable tumor. The body was donated to Georgetown University School of Medicine, his family member said, in the hope that a cure for desmoid tumors may be found. Plans for a memorial service will be announced later. Mr. Henry grew up in Dover, Del., a fiercely competitive, scholarly and athletic boy. The results of Scrabble and Monopoly games, Ping Pong contests and boxing matches with his younger brothers Kirk and Todd were entered faithfully into an ongoing book of standings. “I think he was the fastest pitcher in Little League,” said Kirk Henry, of Malibu, Calif. Mr. Henry studied ethnomusicology at UCLA, while playing saxophone in the pep band at Bruins basketball games during coach John Wooden’s glory

years. Sherryl Nelson, of Bellingham, Wash., was a fellow undergrad and said Mr. Henry was a raving basketball fan, who brought a higher sensitivity to the appreciation of the game. “He loved the beauty of the plays, the intricacies of movement on the court. He spoke of them the same way he might the interworkings of counterpoint in a Bach fugue.” While pursuing a doctorate at Yale, he freelanced for the Boston Globe and several music magazines. He was hired as the classical music critic at the Atlanta newspapers in 1985 before he finished his disertation. Later he wrote about religion and the nonprofit sector before becoming an obit writer. Mr. Henry’s obituaries prompted many appreciative letters from readers. One reader wrote, “Not only it is nourishing to know others cared for those you love, but your articles convey their personalities and their histories in a way that formal obituaries cannot, and that means more to us than I can say.” Managing Editor for Enterprise Hank Klibanoff said Mr. Henry wrote with the heart of a humanist. “He worked in constant pursuit of words that could match the fascinating lives of those whom he wrote...Through his obituaries, readers got a tour of forgotten Atlanta,” Mr. Klibanoff said. In addition to his brother, he is survived by his parents, Robert and Eleanor Henry, of Seaford, Del. another brother Todd Henry of Manhattan Beach, Calif., and a sister Susan Henry Jones, of Laurel, Del.

...and celebrating his life. Please join us. August 16, 2008 at 2 p.m. Centenary UMC, Laurel

Eleanor Records and Bob Henry are planning a celebration of life for their son, Robert Derrick Henry on August 16, 2008 at 2 p.m. at Centenary United Methodist Church on Market Street in Laurel. Derrick was baptized there in 1949 by Rev. David Baker. Rev. William Hemphill Jr. of Lancaster, Pa. will assist Rev. Wayne Grier with the service. The family requests that all friends and acquaintances attend. Please send no flowers. A random act of kindness would be a fine memorial to Derrick or give support to the Good Samaritan Shop in Laurel where he enjoyed browsing and buying books and records or contributions to Centenary United Methodist Church for Food for the Hungry. Derrick graduated from Dover High School in 1967. He spent his senior year with the Hemphill family. Then he moved to California to join his family. He was the grandson of Gladys and Newell Henry and Bill Records and his first wife Gertrude Johnson. Eleanor and Bob thank everyone who prayed for Derrick over the years. Those prayers were sincerely appreciated.


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PAGE 34

MORNING STAR

• AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

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LIVE WELL PORTABLE, includes pump, $85. 3377359, 559-8061 cell. 7/24 12’ BASS BOAT w/Trailer, elec. motor, fish finder, ready to go, $850. 6284159. 7/3

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES AMERICAN GIRL DOLL, Molly, with 6 outfits, exc. cond., $150. 536-7287. 2 LIONEL TOY TRAIN SETS, standard gauge. Black 400E locomotive (restored) and six freight cars (unrestored); two-tone 408E elec. locomotive w/ State Set (orig. cond. w/3 cars 7 boxes) $3500. 6293794. 7/10

FOR SALE WASHER $120; DRYER $120. 628-1320. 11/29/tnc CANON EOS CAMERA 35mm Model 3000 (body only, no lens) w/instructions, $50. Minalta 35mm camera, 3000 I w/35-70 AF lens, $75. Minalta 35mm camera 550 SI w/AF35-70 lens, $50. 875-1877. 8/14 4-WHL. FUNNEL WAGON, exc., $750. Seed Rye, $13.50/bushel. 349-4874. LADIES’ WHIRLWIND 10 spd. Bike; 1 Exercise Bike. Make offer. 875-5396 before 9:30 pm. 8/14

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LITTLE TYKES KITCHEN SET with access., $60. 877-0644 Eves. after 7 pm.

WOMEN’S 10 SPD. BIKE, Vintage Fuji, 20.5”, super conditon, updated parts, $60. 629-4628. 8/7

DINING ROOM SET: table, 4 highback chairs & hutch, dark brn. stained, nice set, $250. 875-2115. 8/14

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LAWNMOWERS: Craftsman 22”, 3 spd., self propelled, elec. start, w/bagger, $50. Lawnboy 2 cycle, 21”, self-propelled w/bagger, $50. 628-0102. 8/7 NOMAD GOLF CLUBS & bags. 1 man’s, 1 woman’s. 13 clubs ea. set, like new, must see, $400 ea. set. 628-5388. 7/31 LOWERY PIANO & Bench, exc. cond., needs tuning. heavy, you move. 2’ deep, 3’ 4” high, 4’10” long. $600. 628-5388. 7/31 LIFESTYLE 1000 TREADMILL, $100. 875-8677. 7/31 PLANTS FOR HANGING BASKETS, very reasonable. Petunias, English ivy, vinca, 4 o’clocks, summer hyacinth, lilacs, day lilies, sm. holly trees & flowering purple basil & more. $2 & up. 875-5217, ac. from Trap Pond St. Park. 7/31 AIR CONDITIONER: Whirlpool, 10,20 BTU window unit, exc. cond., $99. 302519-1568. 7/31 DISHWASHER: Whirlpool 24” portable, exc. cond., $249. 302-519-1568. 7/31 CATNIPPER LIFT CHAIR, good cond., $400. Hugo Walker w/seat, $50. 3379647. 7/24 BAND SAW, Black & Decker, 12”, variable speeds, incl. extra blades, $65. Delta Scroll Saw, 16”, variable speed, $85. 337-7359 or 559-8061. 7/24

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PAGE 35

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PAGE 36 ing. Call Now 1-800-8881262. Real Estate CASH FOR TRASH - We love ugly, dirty, run down, smelly houses. We pay cash for houses in need of repairs. Call Keri 301-9199501. RV For Sale Lake Somerset Camp Ground, Eastern Shore. Leave your RV on site all year. $1300 includes water, electric & sewage. Call for brochure 410-957-1866 or 410-957-9897. Tickets REDSKINS SEASON TICKETS. tickets@ brucehallsports.com 703-904-0647 Vacation Rentals Art & Wine Festival Packages! Deep Creek Lake, MD - Long & Foster Resort Rentals Lodging packages available for the annual Art & Wine Fest, Sept. 5-7. Lakefront, lake access, mountaintop homes, condos & townhomes. Pet friendly! 800.336.7303 www.DeepCreekResort. com OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND. Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2102. Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com. Waterfront Properties 5 ACRES RIVERFRONT ON JAMES RIVER Smithfield area. Beautiful sandy beaches with over 250’ of frontage. Minutes to Chesapeake bay. Unparalleled views. Ready to build with utilities, water, sewer. Only $199,900. Won’t last, call now: 866-764-5238.x 1918. Deepwater Creekfront! 3.9 AC- $95,000 170' frontage. Short drive to Smithfield. Close to Williamsburg ferry. Priced way below mkt to sell. Free Kayak or Canoe with Purchase. Call Patty 866-764-5238. x1918.

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LEGALS LEGAL NOTICE ON SEPTEMBER 23, 2008 at 11:00 a.m., Laurel Storage Center, Road 468, Laurel, DE will conduct a sale pursuant to Title 25, DEL. C. ANN. 4904-4905. The contents of the following bins will be sold: Bin #(s): 37 Brittany Williams; #88 Arthur Stunk; $107 Edwina Taylor; #109 Lavonne C Bland; #153 Larry Faist; #192 Bonnie Boyce. BIDDERS: Call office on day of sale to confirm, (302) 875-5931. 8/14/2tc

PUBLIC NOTICE You are hereby notified the below applications will be before: The City of Seaford Board of Adjustment and Appeals for their determination on Wednesday, September 3, 2008, at 12:00 P.M., in the Council Chambers of City Hall, 414 High Street, Seaford, Delaware: V-14-08: SHAT, LLC, property owner of 614-624 W. Poplar Street, Tax Map and Parcel 531 13.10 8.00 is seeking two variances from the Municipal Code, Chapter 15 Sec. 15-15 Area and bulk requirements (4) front yard setbacks to build a porch on the front of each unit; and, a variance from Sec. 15-13 Accessory Uses (5) setbacks in order to place storage sheds for the units. V-15-08: TLT Property Management, LLC, property owner of 620 W. stein Highway, is seeking a variance from the Municipal Code Chapter 15, Sec. 1568(10) Limitations on signs, in order to install (5) 3’x8’ illuminated signs for each tenant space, on the west side of the building. If any of these projects are of concern to you and you wish to present your position or evidence, please attend this meeting. You may have counsel attend on your behalf. Issued this 14th day of August 2008 pursuant to the Rules heretofore adopted by the City of Seaford. THE CITY OF SEAFORD Dolores J. Slatcher City Manager 8/14/1tc

PUBLIC NOTICE You are hereby notified the below applications will be before: The City of Seaford Planning and Zoning Commission for their review and recommendation on Thursday, September 4, 2008, at 7:00 P.M., in City Hall, 414 High Street, Seaford, Dela-

• AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

ware; and, The City of Seaford Mayor and Council for their determination on Tuesday, September 23, 2008, at 7:05 p.m., in City Hall, 414 High Street, Seaford, Delaware: 1) J.D. Butler Custom Homes, LLC, property owners of 123 Stein Highway, Tax Map and Parcel 531 13.06 60, are seeking a preliminary plan approval to convert former commercial space into four - 2 bedroom apartments and to convert a single family dwelling into a duplex. 2) Hoober, Inc., 6367A Stein Highway, Tax Map and Parcel 531 12.00 41 is seeking a sketch plan approval to construct a new 15,750 sq. ft. building on the east side of the property. If these projects are of concern to you and you wish to present your position or evidence, please attend this meeting. You may have counsel attend on your behalf. Issued this 14th day of August 2008 pursuant to the Rules heretofore adopted by the City of Seaford. THE CITY OF SEAFORD. Dolores J. Slatcher City Manager 8/14/1tc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BROAD CREEK HUNDRED Subdivision #2007-7 Notice is hereby given that the County Planning and Zoning Commission of Sussex County will hold a public hearing on Thursday evening, SEPTEMBER 11 , 2008, in the County Council Chambers, Sussex County Administrative Building, Georgetown, Delaware, on the application of TUONG T. QUAN to consider the Subdivision of land in an AR-1 Agricultural Residential District in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, by dividing 20.25 acres into 18 lots, located north of Road 78, 800 feet west of Road 490A. Planning and Zoning public hearings will begin at 6:00 P.M. Text and maps of this application may be examined by interested parties in the County Planning and Zoning Office, Sussex County Administrative Building, Georgetown, Delaware. If unable to attend the public hearing, written comments will be accepted but must be received prior to the public hearing. For additional information contact the Planning and Zoning Department at 302-855-7878. 8/14/1tc

PUBLIC NOTICE The following Ordinance was approved by Sussex County Council on July 29 2008: ORDINANCE NO. 1984 AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 99, ARTICLES I, III, IV AND VI OF THE CODE OF SUSSEX COUNTY RELATING TO FORESTED AND/OR LANDSCAPED BUFFERS, SITE PLANS AND BONDING REQUIREMENTS AND TO AMEND CHAPTER 115 OF THE CODE OF SUSSEX COUNTY, ARTICLE III TO ADD A PROVISION ALLOWING COUNCIL TO REQUIRE A FORESTED AND/OR LANDSCAPED BUFFER FOR CONDITIONAL USES AND RESIDENTIAL PLANNED COMMUNITIES OF SINGLE-FAMILY OR MULTI-FAMILY DWELLINGS. 8/14/1tc

NOTICE Estate of George W. Sparrow, Jr., Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of George W. Sparrow, Jr. who departed this life on the 3rd day of May, A.D. 2008 late of Delmar, DE were duly granted unto Beverly S. Michelsen, Beth R. Wilson on the 5th day of August, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Co-Executrices without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Co-Executrices on or before the 3rd day of January, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Co-Executrices: Beverly S. Michelsen 38131 St. George Road Delmar, DE 19940 Beth R. Wilson P.O. Box 294 Fruitland, MD 21826 Attorney: David W. Baker, Esq. David W. Baker, Esq. PO. Box 551 Georgetown, DE 19947 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/14/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Gina Smith, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the estate of Gina Smith who departed this life on the 21st day of July, A.D. 2008 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Rosemary Martin on the 4th day of August, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are re-

quired to make payments to the said Administratrix without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administratrix on or before the 21st day of March, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Administratrix: Rosemary Martin 8651 Garden Lane Seaford, DE 19973 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/14/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Charles L. Miller, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Charles L. Miller who departed this life on the 12th day of July, A.D. 2008 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Charles Craig Miller on the 29th day of July, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 12th day of March, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Charles Craig Miller 7 Brant Ct. Middletown, DE 19709 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 8/7/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Alice Marie Phillips, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Alice Marie Phillips who departed this life on the 29th day of June, A.D. 2008 late of Seaford, DE were duly granted unto Roy E. Phillips on the 17th day of July A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 28th day of February, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: Roy E. Phillips 9927 Middleford Road Seaford, DE 19973 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 7/31/3tc

NOTICE Estate of Marcella Marie Reed, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Testamentary upon the estate of Marcella Marie Reed who departed this life on the 8th day of June, A.D. 2008 late of Laurel, DE were duly granted unto John J. Reed on the 24th day of June, A.D. 2008, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are required to make payments to the said Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Executor on or before the 8th day of February, A.D. 2009 or abide by the law in this behalf. Executor: John J. Reed 14925 Johnson Road Laurel, DE 19956 David L. Wilson Register of Wills 7/31/3tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 19, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece, parcel or tract of land, lying and being situate in the Town of Greenwood, Sussex County, Delaware known as Lot 71, The Cove, Phase I, as shown on a survey prepared by Land Tech, dated April 13, 2006, bounded and described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron pipe located on the northerly right of way of Cove Court, said iron pipe being a comer for this lot and Lot 83; thence by and with the northerly right of way of Cove Court, North 72 degrees 16 minutes 24 seconds West, a distance of 49.99 feet to an iron pipe, being a point of curve to the right having a radius of 25.00 feet, a central angle of 90 degrees 01 minute 20 seconds, and a chord bearing of North 27 degrees 15 minutes 44 seconds West, 35.36 feet; thence northwesterly along the arc distance of 39.28 feet to an iron pipe; thence by and with the easterly right of way of Duck Creek Lane, North 17 degrees 44 minutes 56 seconds East, a See LEGALS—page 38


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PAGE 38 LEGALS - from Page 36 distance of 41.71 feet to an iron pipe, being the point of curve of a non tangent curve to the left, having a radius of 545.00 feet an having a chord bearing of North 14 degrees 59 minutes 55 seconds East, 51.88 feet; thence along the are, through a central angle of 05 degrees 27 minutes 21 seconds, a distance of 51.90 feet to an iron pipe; thence by and with Lot 88, South 68 degrees 33 minutes 52 seconds East, a distance of 77.56 feet to an iron pipe; thence by and with Lot 83, South 17 degrees 44 minutes 56 seconds West, a distance of 113.51 feet to the point of beginning. AND BEING the same lands and premises which John Robert Collins Trustee under Revocable Trust Agreement of John Robert Collins dated 1/3/200 and Peggy Joann M. Collins, Trustee under Revocable Trust Agreement of Peggy Joanne M. Collins dated 1/3/2000, by deed dated April 28, 2006 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Record 3312, Page 109 did grant and convey unto SEAN E. COLEMAN, in fee. Tax Parcel: 5-30-10.0086.00 Property Address: 102 Duck Creek Lane, Greenwood Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 2, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented

MORNING STAR to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of SEAN E. COLEMAN and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/7/2tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 19, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the Town of Laurel, Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, and lying on the West side of Copper Street, adjoining lands now or formerly of Jerome M. Callaway, Charles W. Riggin Estate, Edmund Hitchens and contained within the following courses and distances. BEGINNING for the outline of the same at a stone on the west side of Cooper Street and the Northeast corner of the said Jerome Calloway lot and running from thence with the said Callaway lot South 40 degrees West 150 feet to the lands of Edmunds Hitchens thence with the same North 53.5 degrees West such distance as will be required to reach a stone at the Southwest corner for said Riggin lot thence with the same North 45 degrees East to the West side of the aforesaid Cooper Street thence with the West side of the said Cooper Street South 50 degrees East 100 feet to the place of beginning. AND BEING the same lands and premises conveyed unto Virginia V. Bailey, by deed of Edward James Bailey dated January 21, 1992 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware in deed Book 1826, Page 348. Tax Parcel: 3-32-1.07245.00 Property Address: 514 Cooper Street, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sus-

• AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

sex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 2, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of VIRGINIA V. BAILEY and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/7/tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of an Alias writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 19, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain lot, piece or parcel of land situated at Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being all of Lot 4 as shown on a plot entitled "Lands of Housing Unlimited, Inc." dated July 24, 2000, prepared by MillerLewis Inc., recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware in Plot Book 68, page 319. AND BEING the same lands conveyed unto Amy L. Maker by deed of Housing Unlimited, Inc. dated April 25, 2002 and of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and

for Sussex County and State of Delaware in Deed Book 2703, Page 31. Tax Parcel: 2-31-13.0034.04 Property Address: 12016 Old Furnace Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 2, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of AMY L. MAKER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/7/tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 19, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece parcel and tract of land lying and being situate in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being described more particularly as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a 1 inch rebar found lying on the

northerly right of way line of Garden Lane (40 feet right of way), said 1 foot rebar found being a common boundary line for this lot for Lot 47; thence by and with aforesaid right of way North 67 degrees 28 minutes 16 seconds West 50.00 feet to a 1 foot rebar found; thence turning and running by and with a common boundary line for this lot 49 North 22 degrees 31 minutes 44 seconds East 150.00 feet to a 1 foot Rebar found; thence turning and running by and with a common boundary line for this lot and for lands now or formerly of Ray S. Mears & sons, Inc., South 67 degrees 28 minutes 16 seconds East 50.00 feet to a 1 foot Rebar found; thence turning and running by and with a common boundary line for this lot an for Lot 47 south 22 degrees 31 minutes 44 seconds West 150.00 feet home to the place of beginning. BEING the same lands and premises which Elvira Diemicke by James Anthony Diemicke, her Attorney In Fact did by deed dated December 20, 1001 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, Sussex County, Delaware in Deed Book 2659 Page 235 did grant and convey unto Leonide Cantave. Tax Parcel: 3-31-3.00222.00 Property Address: 8579 Garden Lane, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 2, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confir-

mation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LEONIDE CANTAVE and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/7/tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 19, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, on the western side of Gibson Avenue and being known as Lot November 59 extending back a distance of 120 feet, as shown on a plot of lands of Harvey D. Williams and William R. Williams, made by Harold L. Cook in 1946 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware in Deed Book 310 page 582. BEING the same land and premises that Rajun Cajun Homes, LLC by deed dated January 8, 2007 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3423 Page 25, did grant and convey unto Jesse L. Watson, in fee. Tax Parcel: 4-32-8.0548.00 Property Address: 106 Gibson Avenue, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 2, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid See LEGALS—page 39


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 38 by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JESSE L. WATSON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/7/tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 19, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN Lot piece or parcel of land, situated in the Town of Laurel, Sussex County, State of Delaware and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a point, a set PK nail, located at the intersection of the easterly line of Spruce Street with the southerly line of Fourth Street; thence, running from said point of beginning with the southerly line of Fourth Street, South 60° 09' 42" East 104.48 feet to a point, a found iron pipe, at a common corner for this lot and lands now or formerly of Mark E. and Patricia A. Sikora in the southerly line of Fourth Street; thence, turning and running in part with lands of Sikora and in part with lands now or formerly of Naz, LLC, South 28° 27' 36" West 122.13 feet to a point, a found iron pipe, at a common corner for this lot and Lot #3 of Lands of Howard W. Abbott in line of lands of Naz, LLC; thence, turning and running with Lots #1, #2, and #3 of Lands of Howard W. Abbott, North 61 ° 22' 28" West 107.22 feet to a point, a found iron pipe, at a com-

mon corner for this lot and Lot #1 of Lands of Howard W. Abbott in the easterly line of Spruce Street; thence, turning and running with the easterly line of Spruce Street, North 29° 44 00" East 124.37 feet to the point and place of Beginning, containing 13,033 square feet of land, ±, with all improvements thereon, as surveyed by Michael L. Adkins, Registered Land Surveyor, on May 28, 2005. BEING the same lands conveyed unto Kevin G. Parker and Thomas A. Hubler by virtue of a Deed from Eastern Shore Properties, a Delaware general partnership, dated the 28th day of July, 1988, and filed of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, at Georgetown, Delaware, in Deed Book 1583, at Page 74. AND BEING the same lands and premises conveyed unto Rosemary Johnson by Deed dated July 13, 2005 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware by Kevin G. Parker and Thomas A. Hubler. Tax Parcel: 3-32-1.0776.00 Property Address: 302 East 4th Street, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 2, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these

• AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ROSEMARY JOHNSON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/7/tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 19, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at a concrete monument set on the westerly right of way line of Road no. 446, a distance of 543.44 feet from the center line of road no. 476; thence with the right of way line of Road no. 446, north 10 degrees 30 minutes east 105.00 feet to a concrete monument; then, with lands now or formerly of Kenneth M. Hastings, North 79 degrees 30 minutes west 200.00 feet to a concrete monument; then, with lands now or formerly of Burton W. Whaley, south 10 degrees 30 minutes west 105.00 feet to a concrete monument; then south 79 degrees 30 minutes east 200.00 feet, home to the point of beginning, containing herein 21,000 square feet of land, more or less. "EXCEPTING AND RESERVING ANY AND ALL OUT CONVEYANCES FROM ORIGINAL TRACT OF LAND" SUBJECT to covenants, easements, and restrictions of land. BEING the same lands conveyed unto Lance A. Foxwell by Deed of Lance A. Foxwell and Heather M. Foxwell, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, Delaware, on July 17, 2002, in Deed Book 2730, Page 64. AND BEING the same lands and premises which Lance A. Foxwell by Deed dated August 28, 2006 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County and State of Delaware did grant and covey unto Lance A. Foxwell and Heather M. Foxwell.

Tax Parcel: 2-32-8.0018.03 Property Address: 28256 Beaver Dam Branch Road, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 2, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LANCE A. & SARAH A. FOXWELL and will Be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/7/tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 19, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the Town of Blades, Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, being deposited as LOT NO. 38, on the plot of MOORE'S ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF BLADES and being

PAGE 39 more particularly described as follows; BEGINNING at a concrete monument located on the eastern side of Route No. 13A (Market Street) said monument being 19.1 feet from the centerline of said Route No, 13A and being 70.5 feet from the centerline of Sixth Street and also being a corner for these lands and lands now or formerly of AR. Bowden; thence along lands now or formerly of A.R. Bowden, North 87 degrees 00 minutes East, 97.90 feet to a concrete monument and other land now or formerly of AR. Bowden; thence along lands now of formerly of A.R. Bowden South 04 degrees 59 minutes East, 49.2 feet to a concrete monument and lands now or formerly of Harvey D. Hitchens; thence along lands now or formerly of Harvey D. Hitchens South 86 degrees 09 minutes West, 102.4 feet to a concrete monument located at a 4 foot sidewalk on the eastern side of the aforesaid Route No. 13A; thence along these lands and said sidewalk North 00 degrees 09 minutes East, 50.75 feet to the place of Beginning, containing 5,000 square feet of lands, more or less. BEING the same property conveyed to Clinton David Dunn from Michael T. Ewton, by Deed dated February 15, 2000, and recorded on February 16, 2000, in Book 2461, Page 261. BEING the same land and premises that Clinton David Dunn by deed dated April 12, 2006 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3305, Page 235, did grant and convey unto Monty Twilley, in fee. Tax Parcel: 1-32-1.15151.00 Property Address: 602 South Market Street, Blades Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 2, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent

Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of MONTY TWILLEY and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/7/tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of An Alias writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 19, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Seaford Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, being known Lot 34, BEAVER DAM HEIGHTS, as shown on plot of subdivision recorded in Plot Book 2, Page 75, and being more particularly described as follows, to-wit: Beginning at a pipe located on the Southeasterly right-of-way line of Beaver Dam Drive, said pipe being a corner for this lot and Lot 33, South 40 deg. 28' 52" East 261.60 feet to a concrete monument; thence containing the same course along Lot 33, 12.2 feet more or less, to a point and Williams Pond; thence turning and running by and with the said Williams Point; in a Southwesterly direction, the distance necessary to reach a point and Lot 35; thence along Lot35, North 32 deg. 05' 00" West 19 feet more or less to a concrete monument; thence continuing the same course along Lot 35, a distance of 222.43 feet to a pipe located on the Southeasterly right-of-way line of the said Beaver Dam Drive; thence See LEGALS—page 40


PAGE 40 LEGALS - from Page 39 with a curve, whose arc is 77.90 feet, along the Southeasterly right-¬of-way line of the said Beaver Dam Drive, a chord bearing of North 45 deg. 50' 43" East 77.65 feet back to the place of beginning, said to contain 25,475 square feet of land, be the same more or less, as shown on a survey prepared by Thomas A. Temple, Jr., Registered Surveyors, dated June 20, 2005. Being the same lands and premises which Jane E. Tate did grant and convey unto Richard A. Ashby by deed dated June 30, 2005 and recorded on July 1, 2005 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 3164 Page 332. Tax Parcel: 3-31-6.00215.00 Property Address: 24431 Beaver Dam Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 2, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of RICHARD A. ASHBY and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/7/tc

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MORNING STAR SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 19, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece and parcel of land situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, together with all improvements thereon, known and designated as Lot No.5, on a subdivision plan of May's Delight, prepared by Adams-Kemp Associates, Inc., Registered Surveyors, dated March 3, 1994, and filed for record in the office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, Delaware, in Plot Book 52, Page 40, and being described more particularly in accordance with a survey by Temple-Sellers, Inc., dated April 20, 2005, as follows, to wit: Beginning at a pipe found on the Easterly right-of-way line of Sussex County Road No. 497 (50' R/W), a common corner for this lot and Lot No. 44, said point being 95.12 feet, more or less, from Road No. 495; thence with said Lot No.4, South 89 degrees 58 minutes 08 seconds East a distance of 471.78 feet to a pipe found at a common corner for this lot and Lot No.4, and in line of Lot No. 10; thence turning and in part with said Lot NO.1 0, South 15 degrees 09 minutes 11 seconds East a distance of 82.85 feet to a pipe found in the line of said Lot No. 10, and a common corner for this lot and Lot No.6; thence turning and with said Lot No.6, South 82 degrees 31 minutes 27 seconds East a distance of 436.21 feet to a pipe found in the Easterly right of way line of said Sussex County Road No. 497 and a common corner for this lit and Lot No.6; thence turning and with said right of way line, North 18 degrees 37 minutes 50 seconds West a distance of 4.60 feet, thence continuing with said right of way line and a curve to the left having a radius of 738.00 feet, the central angle being 09 degrees 34 minutes 58 seconds, the arc distance being 123.43 feet, the chord bearing North 23 degrees 25 minutes 19 seconds West a distance West of 123.29 feet; thence continuing with said right of way line, North 28 degrees 12 minutes 48 seconds West a distance of 22.11 feet home

• AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

to the point and place of beginning, said to contain 1.144 acres of land, be the same, more or less. Being the same lands and premises which Ted Liszewski H. Edward Maull, Jr. and Theodore J. Liazewski, Attorney in Fact for Clifford Kauffman did grant and convey unto Sharhjane Pitcher and Maurice L. Kraemer by deed dated December 6, 1995 and recorded on December 8, 1995 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 02093 Page 072. Tax Parcel: 4-32-7.008.04 Property Address: 31707 Old Hickory Road, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 2, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of ROBERT R. TITUS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/7/tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 19, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County

Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: Beginning at a concrete monument found on the southerly right of way of Nanticoke Circle and being a comer for these lands and Lot 46; thence along lot 46 South 12°-33'-50" West a distance of 21)1.12 feet to a concrete monument found; thence with lot 60 South 78°-59'-2 I" West a distance of 87.63 feet to a concrete monument found; thence with Lot 48 North 12°-37"22" East a distance of 237.1,8 feet to a concrete monument found; thence with Nanticoke Circle South 76°-20'-57" East a distance of 80.09 feet home to the point and place of beginning and containing 17,593 Sq. ft., more or less. Being the same lands and premises which Toby Tucker and Jennifer Tucker (known of record as Jennifer Schrader) Joint Tenants did grant and convey unto Toby Tucker and Jennifer Tucker, Tenants by the Entirety by deed dated 8/31/2006 and recorded 9/13/2006 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record 03359 PG 332. Tax Parcel: 1-32-2.00211.00 Property Address: 9889 Nanticoke Circle, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 2, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within

Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of TOBY & JENNIFER TUCKER and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/7/tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of an Alias writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 19, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece, parcel or tract of land lying and being situate in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, known as LOT NO. 32 of SHILOH WOODS II Subdivision, being described more particularly as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron pipe found on the Easterly right-of-way line of Jillian Run (50 foot right of way); said pipe being situate a distance of 290 feet, more or less, from Megan Way; thence with Lot No. 31 North 74 degrees 50 minutes 05 seconds East a distance of 172.95 feet to an iron pipe found; thence with the lands of Blue Ribbon Properties, now or formerly, South 05 degrees 11 minutes 33 seconds East a distance of 316.25 feet to an iron pipe found; thence with "Shiloh Woods I" subdivision South 84 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds West a distance of 157.31 feet to an iron pipe found; thence with Lot No. 33 North 18 degrees 22 minutes 09 seconds West a distance of 233.16 feet to an iron pipe found; thence with the cul-de-sac of Jillian Run and along a curve to the left having a radius of 53.00 feet, the central angle being 86 degrees 47 minutes 48 seconds, the arc length being 80.29, the chord bearing North 28 degrees 14 minutes 00 seconds East a distance of 72.83 feet home to the point and place of beginning said to contain 1.26 acres of land, be the same more or less as shown on a survey prepared by Miller-Lewis, Inc., dated April 18, 2003. Being the same lands and premises which Blue Ribbon Properties, LLC did

grant and convey unto Laurie A. Koesters by deed dated May 1,2003 and recorded on May 7, 2003 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Book 2833 Page 200. Tax Parcel: 2-32-14.00174.00 Property Address: 14429 Jillian Run, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 2, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LAURIE A. KOESTERS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/7/tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 19, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN TRACT, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being See LEGALS—page 41


MORNING STAR LEGALS - from Page 40 in the Town of Blades, Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, more particularly bounded and described as follows: BEGINNING at an iron stob on the Northerly side of West Third Street, which iron stob is 256.00 feet, more or less, from Route No. 13A; thence from said point of beginning along the Northerly side of West Third Street North 87 deg. 40' 00" feet to an iron stob; thence along a line between these lands and lands now or formerly of Lillian Hill North 04 deg. 00' 40" East 113.45 feet to an iron stob; thence along a line of lands between these lands and lands now or formerly of John J. Reeb, Jr., etux South 04 deg. 00' 40" West 113.29 feet to the point of beginning be the contents what they may, as surveyed by Peninsula Surveying & Site Design, Inc. Registered Land Surveyors, on June 18, 1998. Being the same lands and premises which Wayne E. Gray, Jr. and Tammy K. Gray did grant and convey unto Luther M. Jennings by deed dated 6/30/1998 and recorded 7/7/1998 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record 02301PG195. Tax Parcel: 1-32-1.1549.01 Property Address: 11 West Third Street, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 2, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented

to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LUTHER M. JENNINGS and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/7/tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 19, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land with improves thereon situate, lying and being in Little Creek Hundred, County of Sussex, State of Delaware, in or near the corporate limits of the Town of Laurel binding on the State Highway leading from Laurel to Sharptown and being more particularly described as follows: Being Lot No. 15, Plot A as shown on a plot of lots as surveyed by Raul K. Torbert in October 1934, said plot being recorded in the Recorder of Deeds Office at Georgetown in Deed Book 297, Page 596, said lot lying on the North side of the State Highway leading from Laurel to Sharptown and beginning on the line of said State Highway and a corner of this lot and Lot No. 16 running in a Northerly direction 200 feet to the corner of Lot No. 18; thence along Lot No. 18 Easterly a distance of 50 feet to Lot No. 19; thence in a Southerly direction along Lot No. 14 a distance of 200 feet to the State Highway; thence with said State Highway Westerly a distance of 50 feet to the point and place of beginning, by the contents thereof what they may. Being the same lands and premises which Richard D. Ferguson, Charlotte Ferguson and Dorothy L. Vannoy did grant and convey unto Jacob H. West by deed dated 7/17/2006 and recorded 7/26/2006 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record 03338PG263 Tax Parcel: 4-32-8.10104.00

• AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

Property Address: 9253 West Sharptown Road, Laurel Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 2, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of JACOB H. WEST and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/7/tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of a writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 19, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware, being all of Lot 43 In Nanticoke Acres Annex, as the same now appears of record in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds at Georgetown, Delaware, in Plot Record 2, page 23 and being more particularly bounded and

described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at an iron stob located on the southerly right of way line of Route No. 20, said stob being 29 feet from the centerline of the paying of the waid Route No. 20 and being 475.0 feet from the centerline of the entrance road to Nanticoke Circle and also being a corner for this land and Lot 42; thence by and with the right of way line of the said Route No. 20 South 77 degrees 50 minutes East 80 feet to a concrete monument, and Lot 34; thence along Lot 34 North 76 degrees 24 minutes West 80.02 feet to a concrete monument being a corner for the aforesaid Lot 42; thence along Lot 42 North 12 degrees 13 minutes East 161 feet back to the place of beginning, be the contents thereof what they may. Being the same lands and premises which Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, a corporation formed by and Act of Congress did grant and convey unto Terry Wayne Johnson by deed dated 2/1/1999 and recorded 2/9/1999 Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware, in Deed Record 02361 PG001. Tax Parcel: 1-32-2.00236.00 Property Address: 1421 Concord Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 2, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confir-

PAGE 41 mation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of TERRY W. JOHNSON, A/K/A TERRY WAYNE JOHNSON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/7/tc

SHERIFF SALE By virtue of an Alias writ of Levari Facias, to me directed, will be exposed to Public sale on: Tuesday, August 19, 2008 At 9:30 A.M. & Thereafter At the Sussex County Sheriff's Office, West Complex, 22215 DuPont Boulevard, Georgetown, Delaware, Georgetown Hundred, Sussex County, State of Delaware, the following described real estate to wit: ALL that certain piece, parcel and tract of land being situate in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County and State of Delaware and being and described more particularly as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING at a rebar set on the westerly side of U.S. Route 13-A and being a corner for this Lot and Parcel "B" to be conveyed to Richard M. Lloyd, II; thence with Parcel "B" North 74° -41' -00" West a distance of 431.80 feet to a rebar set; thence with lands of Conrail Railroad North 11° -46' -35" West a distance of 193.42 feet to a rebar set; thence with lands of Melvin A. Stanley North 74° -25' -00" East a distance of 418.82 feet to a rebar set; thence with U.S. Route 13-A South 15° -37' 20" East a distance of 195.00 feet home to the point and place of beginning said to contain 1.8942 acres of land be the same more or less. As shown on a plat by Temple-Sellers, Inc. dated Aug. 25, 2004. BEING the same land and premises that Richard M. Lloyd, II and Joan W.

Messick, by deed dated September 14, 2004 and recorded on October 14, 2004 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for Sussex County, State of Delaware in Deed Book 3047 Page 111 did grant and convey unto Larry S. Winston, in fee. Tax Parcel: 1-32-6.00190.00 Property Address: 26446 Seaford Road, Seaford Registration is required for all bidders prior to sale. A $4,000.00 deposit (Cash or Cashiers/certified check payable to Sheriff of Sussex County) and valid driver’s license or photo I.D. are required to register. TERMS: 20 percent of the purchase money will be demanded on day of sale (The $4,000.00 Bidder Registration Fee will be credited to the 20% deposit). Cash, Certified Check or Cashier's Check, is required. The balance is to be paid on or before September 2, 2008. Sale subject to confirmation by the Superior Court on September 5, 2008 and also subject to a 1 1/2 percent Delaware Realty Transfer Tax; 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Also subject to 1 1/2 percent Sussex County Realty Tax, 3/4 percent to be paid by the Seller and 3/4 percent to be paid by the Purchaser. Any further Transfer Tax is the responsibility of the Purchaser. The Purchaser will be required to pay the cost of the deed; a $200.00 deposit will be collected at the time of sale and will be refunded if a proper deed is presented to the Sheriff’s Office within Forty-Five days of confirmation. If the Purchaser fails to comply with these terms the percentum paid at the time of sale will be forfeited. Please make checks payable to: Sheriff of Sussex County. Seized and taken in execution the property of LARRY S. WINSTON and will be sold by Eric D. Swanson, Sheriff 8/7/tc

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

Ever wonder why good people won’t seek office? Ever wonder why it's so difficult to get business people or pillars of RANK ALIO society to seek public office? One has to look no further than For every job given to a your local newspaper and read the unfair criticism they receive from guy with a hammer or people who don't have a clue how government operates. The three county councilmen air nail gun, another who opted not to seek re-election have come under fire for years three jobs are supported. from anti-development know-it-alls who have openly accused them of as well as a realtor. serving for self interest. If Councilman George Cole and Recently this paper printed a guest colPhillips don't sell the lots, Dale Dukes umn from a writer who sent the same colcan't sell lumber, Butch Jones can't sell umn to several newspapers. I'm not sure why we print these articles that are not ex- steel and Lynn Rogers can't sell signs advertising the developments. clusives. But who's who on the Council does not The writer took the opportunity to acmatter to me. I served under all of them cuse these three Democrats of self interest and took a pot shot at State Senators Thur- and I found them to serve in the best interests of the county. man Adams and Bob Venables while givIf some business falls their way because ing a boost to Republican Council hopeof development so be it. fuls. Everyone, and I mean everyone, who It didn't take a rocket scientist to know has ever served in government has a conthis guest columnist was a Republican flict of interest at some time. who forgot to mention some important Whether it be your church wanting to points. hold a fair or your civic club a walk-aThese Republican writers forget to acthon and you have to approve the permit, knowledge that the two Republican Counyou have a conflict. ty Councilmen are realtors who sell lots There are teachers, farmers, retired powhen these sub-divisions are sold, and licemen, doctors and people who work for Councilman Vance Phillips is a developer

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large businesses as elected officials in Delaware and Washington. And they all vote when a bill which butters their bread comes up. Heck, at one time when DuPont was in its heyday, one third of Delaware's General Assembly was employed by Uncle Dupee. And, they were paid their full salary while away from their job. Most likely the County Council will revert to Republican control this fall and in a way I can't wait. They only need to capture one seat and they could take all three. I want to see them battle for who becomes president of the council, and then watch them attempt to put a moratorium on development as the economy slips even further. The guest columnist is a retired Army and Delaware National Guard brigadier general living at the beach area. I'm sure he gets more than most Sussex Countians do in a week with his hard earned retirement check. Unfortunately, he and others who have moved to this area with fat retirement checks, don't want anyone else here. They don't understand the full economic effect of the building trade, the number of jobs created and the spin off jobs which support the industry. For every job given to a guy with a hammer or air-nail gun, another three jobs are supported. They need clothes, a dry

cleaner, a vehicle, gas, tires, groceries, to eat out and go see a movie. You get the point. When they're not working none of these businesses get as much income, which causes these businesses to buy less from their vendors, causing the vendors to produce and sell less and lay off help. Without a job, no one can spend money. When people buy a new home they are purchasing new appliances, window treatments, carpet and new furniture inside and out. That's why we are in a deep recession. Hundreds of thousands are out of work and less spending has trickled down to even the poor waitresses who are complaining about smaller tips. I'm praying the newly elected county Republicans will see the light and I hope the recession will end. If not, their only recourse is to raise taxes because the cost of doing business whether you are government or private enterprise goes up every year. Even if they don't give county employees a raise, the cost of healthcare, utilities, etc. will continue to climb. You can't stop that. Democrats have not raised county taxes in 20 years. Did I ever tell you when Bush took office gas was $1.46?

Keeping insects out of the house was not easy for Mom The faith that young kids have is great. When you’re a kid you beONY INDSOR lieve that a bumblebee and a firefly can live in a jar just as long as you ...my mother would have poke holes in the lid. I remember every summer I beaten me till I was a would be found in the yard scanning the yellow dandelions for midget if she knew I had honey bees. It was amazing the talbrought bees in the ent I had for catching many small creatures with nothing more than a house. jar and lid. I could fill a jar with bees in the tear around the edge. Within only about morning and then in the evening go out and catch fireflies. I can still remember the three to four more shoves someone's hand would bust through. Of course, it was the many nights that I would go to sleep hand that actually broke through that got watching the fireflies on one side of my the blame. bed as their tails lit on and off, almost in I remember one day my younger brothconcert. er and I were arguing. We started shoving On the other side of the bed I could each other around and he ran outside. He hear the muffled buzzing of about a dozen stood on the other side of the screen door bees. I had to sneak the jars into my bedmaking faces and taunting me. room because my mother would have He put his face against the screen and beaten me till I was a midget if she knew I having had enough, I took the book I was had brought bees in the house. For some reading and threw it at him. Fortunately, unknown reason she had a problem with my brother moved his face before the enspending all day trying to keep the sumtire collection of “Aesop’s Fables” struck mer pests outside, only to have me bus the imprint where his face only moments them in at night. before had been. Of course we kids didn’t make the job Unfortunately, the book tore through any easier. We were in and out the doors the screen like a bulldog tearing through a like air. Not that it mattered because I hambone and I was suddenly looking at a can’t recall the screened door ever being screen hanging by only one corner. without rips big enough to stick your head Now, I knew my parents would underthrough. stand that my brother's face-making and It was amazing. None of us kids could dancing about like a drunken sailor would open the screened door using the handle. I be enough to cause anyone to have a sudmean, this door had a handle the size of a den loss of good judgment and at the least, crowbar, and we still had to push on the throw a book through the screen door. screen to open the door. After about four Sure they would. Now, back to reality. to five shoves, the screen would begin to

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My brother was pleased. As a matter of fact he was ecstatic. He was so happy for me that he ran as fast as he could to share his joy with my mother who was outside hanging clothes on the line. As I saw her approaching the house I was understandably concerned that she had for some reason, stopped long enough to pick up an old wooden shingle that had blown off the roof. Now bear in mind, that unlike my father, whose primary tool of discipline was his belt, my mother was a woman of great variety. She would dole out our beatings with whatever was handy. Though I was worried about the wooden shingle, I considered myself lucky that she had not instead reached for the clothesline prop. Much to my brother's chagrin, Mom was also one who cared less about who actually did the deed of destruction as she

did about the fact that we were fighting with one another. My brother's leaps of joy suddenly turned into the "whupping dance," as my mother struck his bare leg with the shingle. In my mother's defense, she always had a knack for choosing lightweight, easily breakable things to beat us with, like a yardstick. So, like the yardstick, the shingle broke on my brother's legs and when she got around to me she was striking my arms and legs with a piece of balsa wood the size of a baseball card. Of course both my brother and I wailed like we were being beat half to death. It was good practice because later that day my father would be home and faced with having to fix a screened door that had been torn by a flying book. I don’t really recall, but I am sure we were probably “beat half to death.”

Gas Lines Declining demand reduces prices

Good news at the pump as the national gas average continued to fall to its lowest prices since the start of the summer, beginning the week at $3.88/gallon last Monday and ending the week at $3.84 gallon last Friday, the AAA reports. Crude oil continued its decline to its lowest level in three months, trading at $119 a barrel Wednesday, and will likely drop further. Crude oil closed the week trading at $115 on Friday, down $10 a barrel from Monday. The dollar strengthened this week, trading at a 7-week high against the euro.


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

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Letters to the Editor Thanks for prompt assistance

Just wanted to send a note of appreciation to Rhea Shannon and Larry from the City of Seaford, for their assistance in getting a security light installed in such an expedient manner behind my office. A friend of mine once told me to “criticize in private but praise in public.” I wanted to thank and praise them for their help. With so much negativity, it seems, it’s nice to know that good things still do happen from good people. Many thanks. Dr. Brad Lemon

Seaford

When will violence end?

Greg McKendry and Linda Kraeger attended their last church service on July 27. I suspect that like most people who go to church they felt safe. I imagine that like so many they would feel spiritually renewed and sacredly grounded. As the minister of the Unitarian Universalists of Southern Delaware in Lewes, I try to guide the parishioners I serve in that direction. But, for reasons still not completely clear, McKendry and Kraeger died at the hands of a man who apparently resented liberals, especially those who opened their arms to the gay and lesbian community. The tendency might be to blame this man, Jim Adkisson, and see him as a terrible individual. Perhaps, because of his alleged past, some of his actions have been terrible, but I suspect that he did not plan to become this way. It would be easy to point the finger at the agenda of the far right – politically, socially, and religiously – and say that agenda caused Adkisson to carry a shotgun into a church sanctuary and start shooting. It would be easy to say that so-called newspersons, representing the conservative side, have created such angst against the liberal cause, even as some of them claim not to spin the news. Yes, It would be easy to do all of these things. And, yes, we do live in a world that feels frightening, especially with foreclosures, high gas prices, terrorists lurking everywhere. Even as I read my own words, I feel anxious. And, I ask myself, “When will it end?” However, McKendry, Kraeger, and Adkisson, along with the other victims wounded physically and emotionally, must be stripped of labels – at least those of liberal and of conservative – in order to sort out what lies beneath this awful tragedy. They share one thing, as do we all: they are human beings. I do not know if they are bad or good. I just know that they are part of the interconnected web of life. That is one of the Unitarian Universalist principles. Another one claims that we value the “inherent worth and dignity” of all life. We stand by these principles even now despite the tendency to feel angry at the crime. It bodes no one any good to seek vengeance, however, or to feel hatred toward a hateful act. The only way to ensure that such an act will not occur again, if that is possible, is to begin to seek ways to end those things that continue to create the

Stars’ Letters Policy All letters should include the writer’s name, address and phone number for verification purposes. Names will be published. No unsigned letters will be published. No letters which the management deems to be libelous will be published. The Star reserves the right to edit or reject any letters. Send your letters to Morning Star Publications, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973, or email morningstarpub @ddmg.net kind of world that sees through the lens of us and them, of conservative and liberal, of religious and secular. We must begin to seek equanimity and remove a class structure that holds up education, economics, race, gender, sexual orientation, and such as barriers. Otherwise, the question of “When will it end” will continue to be asked. Greg McKendry and Linda Kraeger were not so much victims of a lone gunman as they were of a society that focuses on fear rather than on hope. Jim Adkisson, despite his evil act, is not likely an evil man. He may ask the same question, “When will it end.” One more victim in this tragedy is less identifiable: the right to worship – to seek “worth ship” – in a safe environment. I am certain that McKendry and Kraeger would not want anyone to be afraid to attend their churches because of this event. Perhaps, the best way to celebrate them is to do what they would likely do if they were still alive: attend their church to find their spiritual and sacred center in love, hope, and peace. In doing so, one might resolve the question, “When will it end.” For it – all of the chaos, all of the blaming, all of the hatred – ends when we learn to understand each other, to forgive each other and to love each other The Rev. D. Michael Smith

Minister, Unitarian Universalists of Southern Delaware

Which candidate is fit to serve?

In this presidential election process, one incident reveals a very basic characteristic: degree of loyalty to the United States and not to other interests. In a recent vote in the Senate to declare English the official language of the United States, the reason behind it was to test the loyalty of U.S.citizens to the lawfulness of the invasion of illegal aliens into the United States, to determine those who approve and support such invasion and those who demand obeyance to immigration laws on the books. To vote against English as our official language deliberately encourages illegal foreign intrusion against the wishes of the

majority of Americans. To institute a multiple language policy is a deliberate attempt to cause division of citizenship and future political power struggles, as has occurred in other countries. To wish for it is, actually, treason Among the 33 senators who voted against English were four presidential candidates at the time: Obama, Clinton, Biden and Dodd. A retired Colonel of the U.S.Army, Harry Riley, wrote: “Your vote makes you unfit as United States Senators and impeachment ...and other appropriate action is warranted or worse.” He echoed the words of our President Abraham Lincoln who said: “Congressmen who wilfully take actions in wartime that damage morale and undermine the

military are saboteurs and should be arrested, quickly, tried and hanged.” Strong words, but the intent is there. We should not be tolerant of open actions against our government and its people, especially in time of war. While the matter of English seems minor, to vote against it is to vote for foreign interests above our own. It cannot be tolerated. The fact that Joe Biden, the Clintons and Obama were among those who openly dismissed the United States as their only national interest is highly significant. Any presidential candidate should be above suspicion. They certainly should not be president. Charles N.Valenti

Rehoboth Beach

Five reasons to leave John Edwards alone I’ve got a word for the media. If any of you are out there listenEV ODD ROFFORD ing, “Please leave John Edwards alone.” If Bill Clinton is any indiYou really don’t see how you make things worse, but here are cator, it is not the faithfive reasons why there shouldn’t be a single additional report on this lessness that people are scandal. unwilling to forgive, it is First, his wife is dying of canthe cover-up. cer. As if the news of a husband’s philandering is not devastating enough to a woman’s self confidence and security, she faces this Fourth, there is no redeeming value in news at a time when she most needs him. continuing to dig into this story. There is If there is hope for him to yet be the husno federal crime statute concerning mariband who will usher her to death’s door, tal unfaithfulness. There are two entire then repentance, healing, and restoration families that need to pick up pieces and need to take place. So leave it alone, if for move on. Give ‘em a break and let them no other reason than she matters more in work at moving on with some semblance this world than your next scoop. of dignity and hope of a future that is not Second, John Edwards’ infidelity has defined by one tragic decision. absolutely nothing to do with our current Finally, we deserve a better definition election. He is not Obama’s campaign of “news” in this day and age. I have said manager, advisor, running mate, or any it before and I repeat that we are a deother significant influencer in this elecpressed and voyeuristic society when the tion. It is a ruse to argue this story carries news we most want to hear is salacious, significance because it is a major influsensational, and denigrating to the ones ence in the future leadership of the counwe are reporting about. There is sometry. His actions do not prove there is thing within us that wants to set people up something endemic within the Democratic on pedestals only to take great delight in Party that does not exist among the Reknocking them off. publicans. The personal choice of secret How else would we explain the great sin and cover up is not made with a (D) or success of magazines like National En(R) label in consideration. quirer? Do enquiring minds want to Third, Edwards’ career is effectively know? Apparently we do. We want every washed up. If Bill Clinton is any indicator, juicy detail that not only tingles our own it is not the faithlessness that people are senses but justifies our own indulgences. unwilling to forgive, it is the cover-up. I God forgive us for what cable news and know the argument that private lives tabloid media have turned us into. should be kept private, but if you run for So, from a personal viewpoint I wish public office you must expect scrutiny. If John and Elizabeth Edwards and Reille you have skeletons in the closet, you are Hunter a future set free from the mistakes best to bring them right out and display of the present. I pray that there will be forthem instead of covering them in a fog of giveness, restoration and love within their half-truths and misdirection like Edwards homes and that one day they will all smile has for the past six months. So, the media again. can leave the poor boy alone at this point That day will come a whole lot sooner because politically he is a non-player for if the media leaves them alone and goes many years to come. off chasing after some other poor soul.

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

Entertainment Briefs Jazz funeral to feature silent auction

One of the most important parts of the Bethany Beach Jazz Funeral on Labor Day is the Jazz Funeral Silent Auction, according to Jim McGinniss, associate chairman of the Bethany Beach Jazz Funeral. The Bethany Beach Jazz Funeral Silent Auction is Friday, Aug. 29 from 3 to 5 p.m. The auction benefits the American Cancer Society and their Relay for Life program. The 23rd annual Jazz Funeral is scheduled for Labor Day beginning at 5:30 p.m. at the north end of the Bethany Beach Boardwalk. At the Jazz Funeral, spectators join in a funeral procession of mourners, along with three Dixieland jazz bands, that carry a casket with a mannequin representing the “Summer of 2008� to its final resting place at the Boardwalk Bandstand. Entertainment for the Jazz Funeral and Silent Auction is provided by the Dixie Cats, the Downtown Dixieland Band, and the Jazz Funeral Irregulars, all known as New Orleans-style Dixieland Bands. Local businesses are encouraged to participate. “The number one most favored item for our silent auction is a gift certificate for goods or services,� McGinniss said. For more information, leave a message at 302-537-1585.

Hispanic festival planned

El Centro Cultural invites the public to attend Festival Hispano on Sunday, Aug. 24 in Millsboro from noon to 6 p.m. The free event will be held at the Little League Complex on State Street in Millsboro. Formed in 1995 to provide more artistic, cultural and social programs, El Centro Cultural plays an important role in discovering and promoting local Hispanic artists. Festival Hispano is a cultural celebration for Hispanic immi-

grants who have come from many different countries to live and work in Sussex County. This year’s program features a marimba band, mariachi band, traditional Mexican dances, music from the Andes and a Puerto Rican dance group. Festival Hispano will also host two regional musical groups this year. “Urama Shikanâ€? is originally from Ecuador and specializes in traditional music and folkloric dances from the Andes region of Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador and northern Chile. “Expresiones de Chileâ€? from New York will present typical dances from Chile including the national dance “La Cueca.â€? There will be a designated children’s area, coordinated by the Maranatha Church of God of Seaford, with information and activities for the whole family. The area includes a moonbounce, piĂąatas, games and information tables about social service agencies in Sussex County which target Hispanic families. Food vendors will offer tacos, pupusas and aguas frescas. To promote your business, inform the community of your services and reach thousands of Hispanic residents, visit www.elcentrocultural.org, email festivalhispano@hotmail.com or call 302-745-6828.

and earth-bound dance style with active head and upper body movements portraying hunting, tracking or fighting actions. Fancy Feather Dancers use many visual elements in regalia, face paint and movements to attract attention. These dancers have to concentrate to make sure their steps correspond with the beat of the drum and their jumps are high. Women Jingle Dancers is one of the most popular dance categories in the powwow circuit. The dance tempo is fast which requires delicate footwork to create the harmonic sound of the cones in time with the drumbeat. Other dances include the Women’s Traditional, sneak up, snake dance, round dance, rabbit dance and honor dances. For more information, visit www.nanticokeindians.org or call 302-945-3400.

Caroline Summerfest

Caroline Summerfest, an annual family festival, is Friday, Aug. 15 and Saturday, Aug. 16 in downtown Denton, Md. Festival Highlights • A non-competitive classic and custom car cruise-in on Friday from 5 to 8 p.m. on the 100 block of Market Street and a car show from 2 to 8 p.m. on Saturday on Market Street between the 200 and 300 blocks and Third Street • Pedestrian and mini-wagon parade led by the international African drumming and dance troupe Farafina Kan and Caroline County’s own NCHS Band of Blue, stepping off at Third and Market streets at 7 p.m. on Friday • A performance by the acclaimed U.S. Navy’s premier jazz

ensemble, the “Commodoresâ€? at 8:45 p.m. on Saturday. A specialty unit of the United States Navy Band, the group features 18 of the Navy’s top jazz and “big bandâ€? musicians • Fireworks display at 10 p.m. Saturday on Market Street. For the second year, the Choptank River Queen will be the setting for five, one-hour themed cruises at Summerfest. Festival goers can relax aboard this exquisite reproduction of an authentic 80-foot turn-of-the-century paddlewheel riverboat. Cruises will take place on Saturday. Tickets are $8 per person, $4 for ages 4 to 12 and children under 3 are free. Passengers should arrive at G. Daniel Crouse Memorial Park at least 15 minutes before departure time. For more information, call 888-786-3378 or visit www.carolinesummerfest.com.

Back - to - School

Annual powwow to be held The 31st annual Nanticoke Indian Powwow Celebration is Sept. 6 and 7 on Route 24 in Millsboro. Powwow signs will be posted along Route 24 between Routes 113 and 1 (beach areas). On Saturday grounds open at 10 a.m. and entry is at noon with a second dance session at 4 p.m. Sunday morning begins with a worship service at 10 a.m. and entry at 1:30 p.m. The 40 crafts and food vendors open at 10 a.m. on Saturday and noon on Sunday. Dances include the Grass Dancers who use a side-to-side swaying motion and come into the arena first to clear the dance area - to flatten the grass for the other dancers. The Men’s Traditional Dancers - the warriors and storytellers - have a flat-footed

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

Shown (l to r) is the Laurel Senior League softball team, which competed in the Senior League World Series last week: front- Abbie Evans and Jessica Evans; second row- Jenna Allen, Brittney Brittingham, Alyssa Martin, Courtney Evans, Meagan Colston, and Brooke Evans; third row- Yasmin Davis, Alexis Oliphant, Taylor Oliphant, Kelsey Oliphant, Jenna Cahall, Melissa Trout, Ashley Brittingham, and Mariah Dickerson; back row- coach Bob Trout, manager Jeff Evans, Stephanie Wheatley, and coach Rodney Hearne. Photo by Mike McClure

PAGE 45

MAJOR LEAGUE CHAMPS- Shown (l to r) are the A’s, the 2008 Nanticoke Major League baseball champions: front row- Cody Wilkerson, Kyle Glime, Raidel Gomez, Keith Mercie; second row- Nick Bennett, Michael Delgado, Lance Wilkins, Ethan Wilkins; third row- Ryan Wagner, Justin Carney, Jamie Stang, Michael Sabino; Coaches- Bill Stewart, Brice Smart (manager), and Artie Perdue.

Laurel Senior League softball loses heartbreaker to Puerto Rico Controversial calls, triple play dash team’s title hopes By Mike McClure The District III Senior League softball team entered Thursday’s showdown with Latin America (Puerto Rico) needing a win to advance to the semifinals. Each team entered the much anticipated match up with a 2-1 record with only one playoff spot open for the winner of the contest. The game lived up to the expectations with two no calls by the umpires proving to be the difference in the otherwise evenly played game. Down 4-2, District III loaded the bases with no outs in the final inning but a game-ending triple play gave Puerto Rico, the eventual World Series champions, the victory. “The girls were just devastated because they could taste it. This year I’m not willing to say we underachieved because I think we played good enough to go 3-1,” Laurel manager Jeff Evans said. Puerto Rico threatened in the top of the first when Annette Cruz hit a leadoff single and Glorily Lozada hit an infield single to put runners on the corners with two outs. Laurel pitcher Stephanie Wheatley struck out Magdaly Arroyo looking to end the inning. But in the top of the second the Latin American champs would not be denied. Wilmarie DeLeon drew a leadoff walk, Carmen Garcia put down a sacrifice bunt to move the runner up, and Alexandria Verrios launched a two-run home run well over the fence in center field. Laurel bounced back in the bottom of the inning as Alexis Oliphant reached first on a fielder’s choice and motored to third

Shown (l to r) Yasmin Davis, Meagan Colston, Courtney Evans, Brittney Brittingham, Brooke Evans and the rest of the District III all-stars look on as teammate Jenna Cahall crosses the plate following a game-tying home run last week in Roxana. Photo by Mike McClure

Seaford/Laurel Star Minor League baseball update: Derrik Gibson

District III right fielder Yasmin Davis makes a grab during her team’s showdown with Puerto Rico. Davis had a pair of hits in Laurel’s 4-2 loss. Photo by Mike McClure

on a sac bunt by Jenna Allen who appeared to be safe at first. With two away Jenna Cahall smashed a game-tying home run (2-2). Puerto Rico pitcher Nemesis Vega retired the side in the third inning while Wheatley worked 1-2-3 innings in the third and fourth. Continued on page 48

The following are the Gulf Coast League statistics for Seaford graduate Derrik Gibson who is playing for the Gulf Coast League Red Sox (as of Sunday, Aug. 10): 21 for 66, .318 Avg., 18 games, six doubles, one triple, eight RBIs, nine walks, nine-for-nine in stolen bases.

Field hockey players invited to meet SHS coach Aug. 14 Any girl in grade 9-12 who is interested in playing field hockey for Seaford High School should report to the varsity hockey field on Thursday, Aug. 14 at 6 p.m. and meet with head coach Robin Verdery.

Woodbridge boys’ soccer players need physicals prior to practice The Woodbridge High School boys’ soccer team will start practice on Friday, Aug. 15 at 9 a.m. at the athletic complex soccer field. You must have your physical and all paperwork completed before you can practice. Please contact Coach Bleile at 629-3736 with any questions or problems.


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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

SGCC’s Emma O’Donnel practices her butterfly last week to prepare for the championships which she qualified for at the last away meet against Lewes Yacht Club. The championships were held August 2 in Dover and Emma competed in Fly, Back and Breast stroke. On Wednesday, August 6, the Heritage Shores Ladies’ 18 Hole Golf Association played the game of ‘Field Shots’ where players subtracted their putts from their net scores. From left are: Anne Kellagher (third place), Dottie VanHelmond (second place), and Ursula Gardner (first place).

District III players Yasmin Davis, Jenna Cahall, Jenna Allen, Stephanie Wheatley, Melissa Trout, and Brittney Brittingham are all smiles as their teammates’ nicknames are announced during the pre-game introductions last week. Photo by Mike McClure

Sussex Slammers 12U baseball to hold tryouts Aug. 20 The Sussex Slammers 12u travel baseball team is having tryouts for the upcoming 2009 season on Saturday, Aug. 16 from 1-3 p.m. and Wednesday, Aug. 20 from 6-7:30 p.m. All tryouts will be at Central Elementary in Seaford. The team will participate in approximately six tournaments in ‘09 and will be heading to Cooperstown. Please call Mike Sturgeon at 302-245-8612 or Darrel Banning at 302-249-2418 with any questions.

Western Sussex’s source for local sports, the Star.

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

PAGE 47

District III Big League softball team falls to Connecticut The District III Big League softball team lost to Connecticut, 6-1 and 6-3, in the Eastern Regional finals last Thursday. The Delaware state champs went undefeated in pool play, including a 3-1 win over Connecticut on Tuesday, before losing both games on Friday.

Woodbridge Pop Warner to host softball fundraiser The Woodbridge Pop Warner Association would like to invite the local community to come and play softball with the league August 16-17. Woodbridge Pop Warner is raising money for the upcoming season. The cost is $10 per player with a minimum of 12 players per team and a maximum of 15 for this slow pitch tournament. Each batter starts out with one ball and one strike. There will be at least one certified umpire. The teams can be coed and each player must be at least 16 years old. There will be awards given out to the first, second, and third place teams. There will also be an annual trophy and the first place team’s name will be placed on that trophy. The winning team will be asked to return next year to defend their title at no charge. This will be a fun filled day with barbecue for sale and many other refreshments. Contact: John Mosley at 302-258-5259 or Ty Smith at 302-745-5593 To register please send your roster and payments to: Woodbridge Pop Warner, P.O. Box 231, Greenwood, DE 19950.

Laurel catcher Kelsey Oliphant throws to second base as a Virginia Beach runner attempts to steal a base during last Friday’s Senior League Softball World Series game. Laurel won the game, 9-3, to finish 3-2 in tournament play. Photo by Mike McClure

District III caps World Series play with a 9-3 win over USA South By Mike McClure The Laurel Senior League softball team ended World Series play with a 3-2 mark following a 9-3 win over USA South (Virginia Beach) last Friday in Roxana. “It’s always nice to end on a positive note,” Laurel manager Jeff Evans said. “I think the best teams that come out here are the ones that conquer the unity. Last year, from a chemistry standpoint, was probably the best.” District III starter Courtney Evans sent Virginia Beach down in order in the first inning, but the southern region champs came back with a pair of runs in the second. Amy Aguirre reached first on error, went to second on a wild pitch, and moved to third on a sac bunt by Courtney Corriere. Kaitlyn Buswell was hit by a pitch, stole second, and went to third on an error with Aguirre scoring the first run of the game. Erin Corey hit a bloop single to score Buswell before Lauren White hit into an inning ending double play (Brittney Brittingham to Brooke Evans to Stephanie Wheatley). Laurel came back with a pair of runs in the top of the third as Brooke Evans hit a two out single, stole second and third, and scored on a wild pitch. Kelsey Oliphant walked, stole second, and scored when Jenna Cahall drew a bases loaded walk (2-2). USA South regained the lead in the bottom of the inning thanks to a an RBI single by Amy Aguirre which scored Theresa Rollins (double). Laurel responded with four runs in the top of the fourth to take a 6-3 lead. Alexis Oliphant singled in Taylor Oliphant (fielder’s choice) and Brooke Evans (first on error) and Jenna Allen doubled in Kelsey Oliphant (walk) and Alexis Oliphant.

hit a two out single to put runners on first and second before Allen, who came on in the third inning, got a come backer to the mound to end the inning. Virginia Beach had one more chance to rally in the bottom of the seventh inning as Rollins reached on an infield single. Allen recorded a strikeout before Brooke Evans snared a line drive and threw to first baseman Mariah Dickerson for the game ending double play. Allen paced Laurel with a pair of doubles and three RBIs as well as two runs allowed on five hits with four strikeouts in five innings of work. Alexis Oliphant added one hit, one run, and two RBIs; Kelsey Oliphant had one hit, two runs,

one RBI, two walks, and two steals; and Brooke Evans added one hit, three steals, and three runs. Davis contributed one hit and one run and Wheatley and Trout each had one hit. Laurel, coming off the heartbreaking loss to Puerto Rico the night before, spent the day at the beach to get away from the pressure filled tournament. Evans is hopeful that his team, minus the older players, will be able to return to the World Series for the third straight year in 2009. “We’ve got a couple of players that can’t come back (next year). We have a strong group back next year,” Evans said. “It’s not going to be a rebuilding year, it’s going to be a reloading year.”

District III first baseman Mariah Dickerson tags out USA South’s Amy Aguirre to seal her team’s 9-3 win last Friday in Roxana. Photo by Mike McClure

District III pitcher Courtney Evans winds and delivers a pitch during her team’s win over USA South last Friday. The Laurel team went 3-2 in World Series play. Photo by Mike McClure

The District III champions put three more runs on the board in the top of the fifth when Melissa Trout led off with a single, Yasmin Davis singled, and the runners moved up on a wild pitch. Pinch runner Alyssa Martin scored on an error, Brooke Evans walked and stole second, Kelsey Oliphant grounded out to plate Davis, and Allen doubled in Evans 9-3. In the bottom of the fifth, Amy Aguirre

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PAGE 48

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

Laurel softball team earns second win with 13-0 victory over Canada By Mike McClure District III pitchers Stephanie Wheatley, Jenna Allen, and Courtney Evans combined to blank Canada (Windsor South), 13-0, last Wednesday in Roxana. Three different Laurel players collected a pair of hits and Yasmin Davis slammed a solo home run to move District III to 2-1 in Senior League Softball World Series play. Wheatley struck out a pair in a 1-2-3 first inning for District III. Davis then homered in the bottom of the inning to make it 1-0. Laurel opened things up in the bottom of the second inning as Melissa Trout reached first on a fielder’s choice before giving way to pinch runner Meagan Colston. Colston beat the throw to second with Alexis Oliphant reaching first on the fielder’s choice with two away in the inning. Kelsey Oliphant delivered a two-run double before scoring on a triple by Brooke Evans who scored on an error to make it 5-0. Jenna Allen singled in Davis (intentional walk) and advanced to second on the throw to third. Wheatley hit an infield double to score both runners (8-0) as the popup she hit down the third base line landed fair. In the top of the third, Canada’s Stephanie Church lined the ball off Wheatley who threw to first for the out. Wheatley later got a pair of strikeouts in the inning following a long delay during which the umpires chased fans away from the outfield fence at the crowded Connie Mack field. Alexis Oliphant singled and scored on a double by Kelsey Oliphant in the bottom of the third. Kelsey Oliphant went to third on an error and scored on a wild pitch. Brooke Evans walked, stole second, and scored on a sac fly by Jenna Cahall to make the score 11-0. Allen came on to pitch in the fourth inning and allowed a leadoff single to Nichole Bocchini before striking out a pair. Catcher Kelsey Oliphant threw Bocchini out trying to steal second to end the inning. In the bottom of the inning, Evans doubled in Mariah Dickerson (walk) and Meagan Colston (walk) for a 13-0 District III advantage. Courtney Evans worked the fifth inning, striking out three and allowing one walk to seal the win. The entire team contributed to Laurel’s win over Canada, something not new to this team. “We have a lot of athletes on this team.

Laurel’s Taylor Oliphant gives a high five to coach Rodney Hearne after delivering a pinch hit single in a Senior League Softball World Series game last week. Photo by Mike McClure

District III shortstop Brooke Evans motors to first during her team’s 13-0 win over Canada last week. Evans had a pair of hits in the game to help Laurel move to 2-1 in the Senior League Softball World Series. Photo by Mike McClure

We’ve been playing together so long we know if somebody can’t play a position they can play another and we can back them up,” said Allen. “Some of the same teams (from last year’s World Series) came back and we know what their strategies are.” Brooke Evans went 2-for-3 with a double, triple, two runs, and three RBIs; Allen was 2-for-4 with a run and two RBIs; and Kelsey Oliphant batted 2-for-2 with two doubles, two runs, and three RBIs. Wheatley doubled and allowed two hits and no runs while striking out four in three innings and Davis homered and scored a pair of runs. Tara Smith, Bocchini, and Randy Dunn singled for Canada. The District III team features triplets Kelsey, Alexis, and Taylor Oliphant. Their sister, Samantha, played on the first two District III teams to play in the World Series in Roxana. “It seemed like she was so old when she played. Now she comes and watches us,” Kelsey Oliphant said.

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Senior softball continued In the bottom of the fourth, Yasmin Davis led off with a double and Stephanie Wheatley walked. Vega fielded a ground ball and threw Davis out at third with Alexis Oliphant reaching first on the fielder’s choice; Allen put down a sacrifice bunt to move the runners up; and Cahall was intentionally walked to load the bases before a fielder’s choice ended the Laurel threat. Allen took the hill in the top of the fifth and allowed a one out walk to Vega. Courtesy runner Gloria Alvarez went to third on a single by Cruz, who advanced to second on a Laurel error. Center fielder Alexis Oliphant made a nice running grab and strong throw to keep the runners from advancing. Oliphant was shaken up on the play and had to leave the game but she eventually returned. Lozada hit a ground ball which shortstop Brooke Evans attempted to field but Cruz ran into her, preventing her from making a play. No interference was called and both runners scored to give Latin America the 4-2 lead. Wheatley, who returned to the mound in the sixth, sent Latin America down in order in the top of the seventh to keep her team within two. Laurel mounted a rally in the bottom of the final inning with Cahall leading off with a single, Taylor Oliphant delivering a pinch hit single, and Brittney Brittingham drawing a walk to load the bases with no outs. Brooke Evans lined out to center fielder Annette Cruz who threw to second to double up pinch runner Meagan Colston. Cahall, who went back to third to tag up, got to the plate long before the ball got there but catcher Glorily Lozada was

Laurel second baseman Brittney Brittingham catches a pop up during her team’s Senior League Softball World Series game against Puerto Rico last Thursday in Roxana. Photo by Mike McClure

blocking the plate. Cahall still appeared to beat the tag, but she was ruled out to end the game. Again, no interference was called. Cahall went 2-for-2 with a home run, one run, and two RBIs and Davis was 2for-3 with a double.

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

PAGE 49

Nanticoke Minor baseball edged in Pat Knight finals By Lynn Schofer The Nanticoke Little League field in Seaford was host to the Minor League Pat Knight championship game recently. Rehoboth and Nanticoke played under the lights for the title of champion. Nanticoke led the entire game but lost the lead in the sixth inning and lost 7-6. Manager Mike Milligan congratulated his team and told them to be proud, “hold your heads up high, you are a great team.” To the boys of Nanticoke it was hard, they fought hard and the disappointment showed in their faces. Nanticoke took the early lead when Jawuan Rodriguez scored on an RBI single by Noah Jones. Dillon Kensinger reached base on a fielder’s choice and Kyle Jester drew a walk. Nanticoke’s Nathan Milligan receives Justin Gray hit the ball hard and reached first the ball from catcher Matt Torbert beon a throwing error which scored Jones. Nanti- fore tagging out a Rehoboth runner coke added security in the second when Nate trying to stealing second base. Milligan and Matt Torbert were walked. RoPhoto by Lynn Schofer driguez hit one deep to center field and with his speed came home with an inside the park home run. The inning ended with the score 50. In the third inning Rehoboth scored one run on two consecutive base hits. Nanticoke pitcher Kyle Jester finished his three innings with seven strikeouts and two hits. Jones came on to pitch for Nanticoke in the fourth. Rehoboth scored a run on a fielding error but the defense came back together to make Rehoboth strand two batters. Nanticoke added another run in the fourth when Jacob Lemon led off with a single and moved up two bases on passed balls. Jones helped himself by hitting an RBI single. Rehoboth chipped away at the lead again in the fifth by scoring another run. It was in the sixth that the game changed directions. Rehoboth scored four runs on three hits and four walks. Nanticoke came to the plate in the bottom of the sixth. The crowd’s cheers were getting louder, moms and dads started pacing, and coaches had to yell louder to their players. Everyone was on the edge of their seats. Jordan Gambrel hit a single with one out but Rehoboth’s pitcher struck out the next batter and a fly out to right field ended the game. The crowd cheered again. This time it was for both teams and the great game they all played in front of their families, friends, and fans. Sports editor’s note: This story, which originally ran in the July 31, contained a misspelled name.

SEAFORD STAR SUMMER SCRAPBOOK- Shown (from top) are scenes from the summer sports season: Woodbridge’s Taylor Walls jumps high to make a grab during her team’s District III Junior League softball game; Post 6 third baseman Steve Sharff fires to first during an American Legion baseball game; and Nanticoke’s Maryann Hicks throws to first after fielding a ball hit by Millsboro/Georgetown’s Katlyn Parsons during District III Junior League softball tournament play. Photos by Lynn Schofer and Mike McClure


PAGE 50

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

Watson gets first career win in Delaware Big Blocks By Charlie Brown Three weeks ago at the Delaware International Speedway, 17-year-old rookie Joseph Watson almost pulled off the upset in the NAPA Big Block Modifieds until a late race caution erased his lead and allowed his uncle, Jamie Mills, to take the lead with five laps to go. On Saturday night, Watson was not to be denied as he held off the challenges of defending point champion H.J. Bunting to record his first career win in the Bonus Night 25-lap feature. Brad Trice held off the two car challenge of Herman Powell and John Curtis to win the exciting 15-lap AC Delco Modified win and Tim White started on the pole but had to contend with Rick Wheatley before winning the 15-lap Modified Lite feature. Watson has been very quick on the learning curve in his rookie season and has been consistently turning in stronger and stronger performances. On Saturday night, Watson captured his qualifying heat then started on the pole in the feature. He immediately took control at the drop of the green as Jeff Brown and Ricky Johnson battled for second. The yellow was out on lap four when George Richardson came to a stop. Under the yellow Tim Millman headed into the pits. H.J. Bunting was on the move from his seventh starting spot taking fourth on lap six and third from Brown on lap later. The race stayed green with Watson comfortably in command. At the halfway sign Bunting had climbed past Johnson for second with Johnson, Brown, and Robert Dutton holding down the top five. It looked as if Watson might once again get bitten by the yellow as his brother Jordan Watson, who had captured the second qualifying heat, came to a stop with just five laps left to go. On the restart, Bunting cranked up the pressure taking the lead by a nose in the third turn. Joseph raced back to the front by the start/finish line and would hold on for the rest of the distance in his Cortland Manor/Bicknell to take the win by one second over Bunting. Johnson finished in the third spot with Matt Jester coming on strong late to finish in fourth and Howard O’Neal rounded out the top five. The bonus night win was worth $1,750 for Watson. The 15-lap AC Delco Modified Feature was a thriller. Herman Powell led the first lap before Brad Trice moved on top. A three car tangle brought out the yellow on lap two. On the restart, Tim Trimble

moved by Joseph Tracy for fourth while John Curtis held down the third spot. Scott Baker came to a stop on lap five bringing out the yellow for the second and final time. Curtis grabbed second from Powell on the restart and at the halfway point the top five were Trice, Curtis, Powell, Trimble and Tracy. The order would not change the rest of the distance but coming to the checkered, Curtis and Powell made one final challenge. Curtis went to the inside of Trice with Powell going to the outside and the trio crossed the finish line separated by less than two tenths of a second. Trice, in the Mitchell’s Auto & Truck Salvage/Bicknell, took his third win of the season with Powell second and Curtis third. Trimble finished in the fourth spot with Tracy fifth. Tim White started on the pole and took the early lead in the 15-lap Mod Lite feature. Rick Wheatley challenged from the second spot taking the lead just before halfway. Two laps later, Wheatley got around and White found himself back on the point. Curt Miles, Jr. was now running in the second spot with Brandon Dennis charging by Eric McKinney for third. White would make no mistakes as he brought the Floyd Carey/CLC Cabling/Lightning home for the win by less than an second over Miles, Jr. Dennis took the third spot with Jimmy Wills getting by McKinney with two laps to go to finish in third. James McKinney also got by Eric McKinney on the final lap to finish in fourth. This Saturday night will be another “bonus night” at Delaware International. It will also be Laurel Fan Night with any resident of Laurel with a picture I.D. admitted free to the spectator side. The NAPA Big Block Modifieds will run 25 laps for $1,750 to win plus an extra $50 in positions second through sixth. The Super Late Models will also run 25 laps for $1,250 to win plus $100 to take the green and an additional $50 for positions second through sixth. The AC Delco Modifieds, Crate Models, and Modified Lites will all compete for an additional $100 for the winner and $25 extra in positions second through sixth. Gates open at 5 p.m. with hot laps at 7 p.m. Spectator general admission will be $12 with pit admission $25 and children 13 and under admitted free with a paying adult on the spectator side. The United Racing Company Sprints that were rained out on August 2 have been rescheduled for Saturday night, August 23.

David Tucker stops Bastianelli, wins Super Pro at U.S. 13 By Charlie Brown Danny Bastianelli has been on a tear lately in the Super Pro division but on Friday night, Ellendale’s David Tucker was up for the challenge as he captured the Super Pro final over Bastianelli. Tim Foskey, Jr. of Rhodesdale, Md. captured the Pro final while James Farmer of Felton rode to the win in Pro Bike. Other winners on the day included: Matt Hurd of Georgetown (Street Eliminator); Jack Belleville of Parsonsburg (Import); Mykl Johnson of Delmar, Md. (Bike Trophy); Cortney Cathell of Laurel (Jr. Dragster 1) and Roland Morris of Delmar (Jr. Dragster 2). The all-dragster Super Pro final was a good one between last week’s winner, Danny Bastianelli and David Tucker with his fuel injected small block. Bastianelli had the better reaction with a .009 to Tucker’s .016 but Tucker had the better run to take the win with a 7.878/166.11 on a 7.86 dial. Bastianelli ran a 7.537/174.28 on a 7.50 dial. Semifinalists were Andy Olenik of Dover and Lou Thibault of Millsboro. Quarter-finalists were Jay Parrott, Jr. of Quantico, Md., Greg Olenik of Dover and Alan Clayville of Laurel. The Pro final matched Tim Foskey, Jr. and Frank Parks of Denton. Foskey took the double break out win with an 11.467/114.30 on an 11.49 dial. Parks was out by a greater margin with an 11.477/116.85 on an 11.50. Semi-finalists were Andre Blades of Fruitland and Jesse Truitt of Parsonsburg. Quarter-finalists were Eddie Baker of Salisbury, Michael Miller of Harrington, Steve Long of Linthicum, Md. and Steve Taylor of Severn, Md. James Farmer rode up against Sean Tilghman of Ridgely, Md. in the Pro Bike final. Tilghman had a red light foul and Farmer rode to the win with an off the throttle 13.477/54.64 on a 9.59 dial. Semi-finalists were Doug Thomas of Ellendale and Chris Waters of Easton. Quarter-finalists were Preston Hopkins of Millsboro, Gary Witcher of Dover, Jay Windsor of Felton and Tony Mumford of Berlin. Matt Hurd took advantage of a red light foul to defeat Steven Horner of Salisbury in the Street Eliminator final. Hurd ran a 12.019/112.47 on a 12.04 dial. In Import it was Dustin Krauss of Tyaskin, Md. leaving too early and fouling and Jack Belloville took the win with a run of 16.878/82.31 on a 16.52 dial. Mykl Johnson once again topped Bike Trophy as he defeated Aaron Ames of Townsend. Ames also fell victim to the “red light fever” and Johnson ran a 13.004/94.05 on a 12.90 dial for the win. Courtney Cathell remained unbeaten for the second week in a row in Jr. Dragster 1. Cathell had the better reaction over Phillip Palmer of Snow Hill and drove to her second consecutive win with a 9.054/70.36 on a 9.03 dial. Palmer ran a solid 9.005/71.50 on a 9.000 dial. In Jr. Dragster 2 it was Roland Morris taking the win on a single with a 9.952/63.59 on a 9.80 dial. This Friday night will be the last Friday night before switching back to Sundays and will feature the Bad 8 along with the Summit E.T. Point Series racers. Gates open at 3:30 p.m. with time runs at 4:30 and eliminations at approximately 8 p.m.

Whaley survives cautions to win in Delaware Late Models RESULTS: 1. RICK WHALEY; 2. Richard Jarvis, Jr.; 3. Ray Davis, Jr.; 4. Mark Byram; 5. Hal Browning; 6. Dave Hertz; 7. Kevin Scott, Jr.; 8. Derrik Hill; 9. David Pettyjohn; 10. David Hill; 11. Staci Warrington; 12. Kerry King; 13. Bryan Driver; 14. Jon Callaway; 15. Bob Geiger; 16. Trent Collins; 17. Ed Drury. 15-Lap Crate Model Feature: 1. JOE WARREN; 2. Barry Beaucham; 3. Tyler Reed; 4. Herb Tunis; 5. Justin Breeding; 6. Eric Vent; 7. Mike Wharton; 8. Mike Wilson; 9. Darin Henderson; 10. Josh Millman; 11. Nick Davis; 12. Clint Chalabala; 13. Gus Economides; 14.Chris Hitchens; 15. John McLanigan; 16. Jeff Patilla; 17. Mark Williams; 18. Sparky White; 19. Russell Dadds; 20. Kelly Putz; 21. Jeff Swartz; 22. Roy Hassler; 23. Chris Jestice; 24. Travis Justice; 25. Mike Williams; 26. Skip Syester; DNQ: Richie Hornsby; Eddie Williams; John Imler; Mike Wilkins. 10-Lap Little Lincoln Feature: 1. DONALD ROBINSON, JR; 2. Mel Joseph, Jr.; 3. Bill Brittingham;4. Jamie Wagner; 5. Mark Cashdan; 6. Tony Daisey; 7. Duke Walsen; 8. Steven Baker; 9. Chris Loveland; 10. Albert Mitchell; 11. Pat McNeal; 12. Brian Brasure; 13. Jeff Wheatley; 14. Emory West; 15. Matt Johnson; 16. Richard Zach.

15U Delaware Roadrunners holding tryouts Aug. 14 The 15U Delaware Roadrunners select baseball team will hold tryouts on Thursday, Aug. 14 at 6 p.m. at Sports at the Beach, Field 8. The tryouts are open to serious baseball players that turn 15 after April 30, 2008. If you are interested in trying out, please call (302) 249-7957.

The Seaford Department of Recreation is holding signups for the following leagues: Youth Tackle Football- Ages 7-13. The cost is $30 and includes a physical and all equipment. Tryouts are September 6, so sign up early. NFL Flag Football- Ages 6-11. The cost is $20 and the league is co-ed. Games start in September and are played on Sunday afternoons. Youth Cheerleading- Ages 7-14. The cost is $40 and includes a uniform that you can keep. Practice starts in September and the girls cheer for the tackle football league on Saturdays. Youth field hockey- Ages 7-12. The cost is $20 and includes a shirt. This is an instructional league that runs on Saturday mornings and starts Sept. 6.

Covering all the local sports, the Seaford/Laurel Star.

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Seaford Department of Recreation to hold fall signups


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

PAGE 51

It seems like just yesterday you were startng school Now you’re leaving home

A view from the cheap seats By Mike McClure, Star Sports Editor Umpires blow calls- I realize that umpires are human beings who make mistakes, but what went on at the Senior League World Series goes well beyond just an honest mistake. There was clear intent in the umpires’ blown calls, all of which went against the local team. This year’s World Series had to make the Laurel team wish it didn’t receive an automatic bid in the tournament, which has been hosted by Sussex County for the past five years. The team that represents District III always gets heckled by the other teams for making the tournament without winning a regional. That didn’t stop this year’s team from beating the Eastern Regional champs, who went on to play in the championship game. Last year’s team placed third in the world and the team from two years ago (Seaford) placed second after advancing to the finals. That team played in the Big League softball Eastern Regional finals this year. So the local teams obviously can play with any team in the country and the world. Unfortunately, this year’s team played with a handicap throughout the tournament, the umpires. The calls didn’t really impact the result of the games prior to the Puerto Rico game. The umpires tried so hard not to give the local team a home field advantage, they created an advantage for the opposing team. In the Puerto Rico game, the game was well played but not well called. With the score tied at 2-2, a missed call allowed Puerto Rico to take a 4-2 lead. With two away and runners on base, the Laurel shortstop attempted to make a play on a routine ground ball and was plowed into by the runner on second, allowing the ball to get past her. The Wilmington and Salisbury papers reported that the runner merely interfered with the shortstop. I’m not sure what game those reporters were watching. Despite the fact that this missed call gave the Latin American team the lead,

Laurel fought back in the final inning. The District III champs loaded the bases with no outs when a fluke play occurred. The center fielder, who had been making great plays throughout the game, caught a simking liner and fired to second for a double play. In the meantime, the runner at third went home where she was met by the catcher who was blocking the plate even though she didn’t have the ball. Even when she did get the ball, it looked like the runner beat the tag. The home plate umpire ruled her out for a game ending triple play. I, like everyone else in attendance, was in shock following this play. There are alway what ifs in sports, but usually not what if the umpires called a fair game. You may disagree with a call or two, but usually you go away from a game believing that the game was called evenly. To add insult to injury, the two teams that made it to the championship were USA East (which probably wouldn’t even be in the World Series if the Laurel team played in the regionals) and Puerto Rico. Fall sports anyone?- Now that Little League season is over I guess it’s time to focus on the Fall sports season. High school practices start this week. Our annual Fall sports special will run August 28. We’ll have varsity schedules, photos from the practices, and the first preview stories. The preview stories will continue the following week and then the season starts. We will continue to run the Stars of the Week and the Star team of the week photos. We also plan to offer weekly prizes to help encourage readers to enter their Fall sports predictions, which will also bring back this year. Quick hits- The Woodbridge Little League closing ceremonies will take place on Saturday, Aug. 23 at 6 p.m. at the Greenwood complex.

Lady Tigers 18U college showcase team to hold tryouts The Lady Tigers 18U college showcase team has expanded into Delaware and is looking for young ladies 15 to 18 years old who are looking to play softball at the college level. Tryouts will be Aug. 23 at 3 p.m. at the Diamond Dreams facility in Delmar, Md. Call Mike Wallace at 302-228-5285 with any questions.

25th anniversary Make-A-Wish Triathlon set for September Registration is open for the 25th Anniversary Make-A-Wish Triathlon at Sea Colony in Bethany Beach. The event, featuring a 1.5K ocean swim, 40K bike and 10K run, will benefit the Make-A-Wish Foundation of the Mid-Atlantic and will take place Sept. 20. For additional information and to register, visit midatlantic.wish.org or call 301962-9474.

ESBF Hall of Fame nominations are due Friday Nominations for the Eastern Shore Baseball Foundation Hall of Fame are due on Friday, Aug. 15. The Hall of Fame and Museum are located at Perdue Stadium in Salisbury, home of the Delmarva Shorebirds. The museum is free to the public and is open during most Shorebirds’ home games. Interested fans may mail ideas to the foundation at P.O. Box 2071, Salisbury, Md 21802; visit the ESBF website at esbf@comcast.net; or call 410-546-4444. The vision of the Eastern Shore Baseball Foundation is to preserve and advance the rich legacy of baseball on the Eastern Shore. For more information, contact Jeff Fields at 443-783-4920 or Kenny Green at 410-430-5497.

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

Seaford Bowling Lanes Wednesday AM No Tap High games and series Doug Avery 339,

1296 Dot Dulis 328, 1209 Paulette Sammons 328

Summer Senior Express High games and series Patrick Curran 267, 777 Elizabeth Pinkett 291, 811

Summer Adult Youth High games and series Sean James 287, 804 Kim Marine 301, 832 Ethan Wilkens 299, 827 Brittany Hastings 272, 785

Thurs. Summer Mixed

High games and series Jay Lewis 303 Nick Wheatley 791 Christy Sammons 270, 718

Tuesday Nascar High games and series Todd James 325, 941 Veronica Brittingham 262, 742

STAR TEAM OF THE WEEK- Shown (l to r) is the Laurel Major League Pat Knight softball team which recently placed first in a tournament held in Rehoboth Beach: back rowcoach Duane Calloway and coach Karen Short; middle- Natalie Culver, Brooke Jones, Lexie Ullman, Sarah James, Morgan Cooper, Danielle Bishop, Bethany Watson, and coach Marcy Walls; front- Lexi Harris, Hannah Layton, Jenna Calloway, Marissa Walls, and Rachel Burke.

Send your team photo to the Seaford/Laurel Star at sports@mspublications.com to be a Star team of the week.

Star Sports Calendar August- Thunder Dawgs to hold travel baseball tryouts- The Thunder Dawgs will hold tryouts on Aug. 24 and Aug. 31 at 11 a.m. at the Laurel Little League park. Visit www.leaguelineup.com/thunderdawgbaseball for more information. Fall- Sussex County Sports Foundation fall ball program registrations openThe Sussex County Sports Foundation will be hosting its second annual ball ball baseball and softball program in Laurel. The league will accept teams such as Little League and travel ball teams. Players must be associated with a team and teams can be formed for this purpose. Doubleheader games will be played every Sunday. Each team will get 10 games and championship games will be played. Games will be played at the Laurel Little League complex. All registrations and payments must be submitted by August 15. Please note you will be playing the ‘09 season age. For more information please visit the league’s website at www.sussexcountysportsfoundation.com or call 302-644-7777. Upward Soccer League Fall signups- Sign up now for the Upward Soccer Sept.Oct. 2008 season. The league, is open to boys and girls ages 6-11, and allows every child to play, learn, and be a winner. The cost for early registration (by Aug. 5) is $50 with family discounts available. Players receive the following: Upward reversible jersey, Upward water bottle, Upward soccer socks, and end of season award and celebration, and equal playing time every game. Forms can be picked up at the Laurel Wesleyan church office at 30186 Seaford Road in Laurel Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Sunday mornings. All practices and games will be at Laurel Wesleyan church. For more info call 302-875-5380.

The SGCC Gator swim team held its end of season banquet last Sunday and all the swimmers were awarded trophies for various categories. Shown, left, is Chelsea Procino with her trophy for the Arnold Smarte Award which is for Attitude Conduct and an exemplary role model for the sport of swimming. Arnold Smarte was a key figure in having the pool built at the Seaford Golf and Country Club. Chelsea was also the high point winner for the 18U girls. The John Hollis award was given to Alexis Carey for all around sportsmanship, helpfulness to younger swimmers, conduct and attitude in the field of swimming. Pictured above (l to r) are John Hollis and his wife, Alexis, and the Gator swim coach Robin Verdery.

Delaware Magic fast pitch softball tryouts to take place

Diamond State Swoop to hold fast pitch softball tryouts

The Delaware Magic fast pitch softball team will hold tryouts for the new season at Caesar Rodney High in Camden. On Aug. 16, the 10U tryouts will be held 9-11 a.m. and the 12U tryouts will be 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. On Aug. 17, the 14U tryouts will be held 10 a.m. to noon and the 18U tryouts will be 12:30-2:30 p.m. All players must be there 15 minutes early to register.

The Diamond State Swoop fast pitch softball organization will be holding tryouts for the upcoming 2008-09 season on the following dates: 10U- Saturday, Aug. 16 and 23 at 10 a.m.; 12U- Saturday, Aug. 16 and 23 at noon; 14U- Saturday, Aug.16 and 23 at 2 p.m.; 16U- Sunday, Aug. 17 and 24 at 2 p.m. Tryouts will be held at the team’s O’Neal Farms practice facility in Laurel. This past season the Swoop’s 10U team won the NSA B World Series, its 12U team won USSSA and NSA state championships and was a top 20 team out of 74 in the NSA A World Series, and the 13U team finished in the top 10 at the 13U USSSA World Series. This is a great opportunity to join a winning and growing organization that always puts the girls first. For more information and for directions to the practice facility, call Dean Culver at 302-381-0282, Jay Davis at 302-258-5057, Jay Covey at 410-8292635, or Mike Riggleman (16U) at 302-841-7676. Please plan to arrive 15 minutes early to complete registration forms.

East Coast X-plosion 18U fast pitch softball to hold tryouts The East Coast X-plosion 18U fast pitch softball team will be holding tryouts for the 2008-09 season on Sunday, August 17 from noon to 2 p.m. at the Laurel Little League complex. Tryouts will be held at Crown Sports in Fruitland in the event of rain. The team is committed to four or five college showcases this fall and summer as well as two local state tournaments. The X-plosion is focusing on showcasing its players to colleges within the Mid-Atlantic area. For more information, directions to tryouts, or if you need to schedule an individual tryout please contact Jeff Allen at jalln5@comcast.net or call 443-235-6141.

Delaware Blue Hens select baseball to hold tryouts Aug.16

See next week’s Star for a summer wrapup. The Star’s fall sports special will come out August 28.

The Delaware Blue Hens select baseball team will hold tryouts Aug. 16 at the Sports at the Beach complex. The 10-11 year olds tryouts will be held 9-11 a.m., and the 12-13 year olds will try out 11 a.m.- 1 p.m. Contact Brian Deleon at 302-745-9412 for more information.


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

PAGE 53

What is the best way to help curb climate change? Beets me Large metal canner? Check. Pint-sized canning jars, with YNN ARKS two-piece lids? Check. Jar tongs, funnel, clean cloth to The kitchen sink was wipe the mouths of the jars? Check, check, check. filled with small and mediFinally, I was ready to start the um-sized ruby red globes, process of canning the beets that I their long, green and red had pulled from the garden early that morning. leaves overflowing onto I already had the canner, left the counter. over from my days as a young mother, when I did a lot of canning. When we had an abundance “Beets all winter, beets all winter,” I of cabbage one year, my husband and I sang to the bubbling rhythm of the cookmade sauerkraut, aging it in a large stone ing root vegetables. On another burner, the crock that was my grandmother’s. I even pickling syrup simmered, making the made brandied peaches, which were delikitchen smell sweet and tangy. In the joy cious in mid-January, served over ice of doing something, no matter how small, cream. to help our Earth, I danced into the dining With our children grown and living room and back, waking the cats from their elsewhere, though, my enthusiasm for pre- mid-afternoon naps. serving summer’s fruits waned. But it is Finally, the beets were tender. I back, even stronger, perhaps, than it was dumped them into their cooling bath and, before. Now, what with the practices of as soon as I could handle them, skinned agribusiness contributing mightily to clithem of their outer coats. mate change, not to mention to pollution That done, I started slicing them into of our earth and waterways, preserving lo- the clean, hot jars. And realized that it cal foods has become a political statement. takes a lot of beet slices to fill a pint jar. And we all know how I love political In the end, I had two — yes, just two statements! — pint jars of beets in their pickling I am determined to eat as locally as syrup. I processed them in the canner for possible, even through the winter, when the required 30 minutes and set them out our garden is brown and all the vegetable on the counter, where about 15 minutes stands that have sprung up recently are later their caps snapped in, making that closed. Already, I have strawberries, ascharacteristic popping sound and reassurparagus, peaches, applesauce and blueber- ing me that they were sufficiently sealed. ries in the freezer — we recently traded in Two pints of beets, and how much enour large refrigerator on a smaller, underergy did I consume to get there? Gasoline the-counter version, so that we have room to drive to town to buy the jars and the on our back porch for a large freezer. By vinegar, electricity to heat the canner filled the end of summer, I hope to add lima with water to boiling and to keep it there beans, corn, peppers and maybe even throughout the process, more electricity to broccoli and cauliflower to the mix. cook the beets and the pickling syrup. My But on this day, with a warm breeze guess is that my carbon footprint that day blowing in the kitchen window, it was was big enough to fill with a whole crate time to do beets. The kitchen sink was of beets. filled with small and medium-sized ruby My song was ended, my dance over. red globes, their long, green and red This week, I planted kale in one of the leaves overflowing onto the counter. It five raised beds in our garden, something I looks like, I thought, I will have enough have never grown before. “You don’t even beets to feed the county. like kale,” my mother said when I told her Well, maybe not, I realized after I cut what I had done. off the leaves. Even so, I was glad that I I am learning to like it. And when the had bought two dozen pint-sized jars insmall plants first erupt from the soil, with stead of just the one dozen I had planned the promise of food for the winter, I am on buying. hoping that I feel like dancing again.

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PAGE 54

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

People Jayden Trout born June 14

Cummings and Harris plan to be married in October Jessica D. Cummings of Seaford and Michael F. Harris Jr. of Bridgeville announce their engagement. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Danny and Donna Cummings of Seaford. Her grandparents are Herb and Doris Cummings, Seaford, J. Donald Parsons, Dagsboro, and the late Vera Parsons. She is a graduate of Seaford High School, class of 2005, and works at Harrington Raceway and Casino. The groom to be is the son of Michael F. Harris Sr. and Brenda MarQuess, both of Hurlock, Md. His grandparents are the late Betty Happersepp and the late Joan Williamson, Federalsburg, Md. He is a

Gary Trout and Beverly Watson of Seaford announce the birth of their son, Jayden Carter Trout on June 14, at 9:06 a.m., at Peninsula Regional Medical Center, Salisbury. He weighed 8.6 pounds and was 21 inches long. His maternal grandparents are Bob and Valerie Watson of Laurel and his paternal grandparents are Barry and Gina Barker of North Port, Fla. His great-grandparents are George and Hazel Hudson of Delmar, Md., Eugene and Pauline Burris of Laurel and Charlotte Noble of Fruitland, Md. Jessica D. Cummings and Michael F. Harris Jr.

graduate of Colonel Richardson High School, Federalsburg, and works for Solo Cup. An Oct. 25 wedding is planned.

Southern Del. Choral Society has new executive director Gail Launay is the new executive director of the Southern Delaware Choral Society. The Rehoboth Beach resident began her position on July 1. As owner of Launay Consulting, Launay specializes in working with human service agencies and organizations and has done so at the local, state and national levels. She is vice chairwoman of the

Delaware Human Relations Commission and is in the Governor’s Council on Equal Employment Opportunity. She also serves on the board of directors for the First State Community Action Agency and is a member of the Village Improvement Association of Rehoboth Beach. She is a graduate of Rowan University with a bachelor's degree in speech, theater and dance.

Jayden Carter Trout

Dickerson named new chairman of advisory committee Robert E. Dickerson has been named chairman of the Southern Delaware Advisory Committee (SDAC) of the Delaware Community Foundation, a nonprofit organization that manages charitable funds and awards grants to nonprofits to benefit Delawareans. Dickerson One of the SDAC’s founding members, Dickerson serves as administrator of the town of Selbyville, a post he accepted

soon after retiring from a 35-year career in banking. Dickerson was president of the Selbyville-based Baltimore Trust Company for many years before its acquisition by Mercantile Peninsula Bank; there he served as executive vice president until his retirement in 2007. A lifelong resident of Sussex County, he resides in Williamsville with his wife, Jackie. They have two grown children and one grandchild. To learn how you can start a fund through the advisory council, contact Hugh D. Leahy Jr. at 302-856-4393 or visit www.delcf.org.

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PAGE 56

MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

Education Del Tech classes to start Aug. 25 And it’s not too late to register for classes

Sam Brittingham, automotive technology department chairman; Michael Love, community traffic safety program coordinator for the University of Delaware Cooperative Extension Service; and Huey West, automotive technology faculty, in front of the new trailer that was purchased with grant funds to transport ‘Ima Hirtin’ and her car to various sites to demonstrate the supplemental restraint system (seat belts).

Trailer makes spreading the word about seat belts easier The Automotive Technology department at Delaware Technical & Community College, Georgetown, takes a proactive role in promoting car safety, both for drivers and passengers. A major focus of students and staff is the supplemental restraint system (SRS), commonly known as seat belts. Much time and effort is expended to demonstrate driver and passenger safety and the correlation between the improper fit of seat belts and the resulting injury that can be caused by air bag deployment in an accident. Staff and students assembled various pieces of equipment — mannequin, steering wheel, dash board, etc. — to simulate a driver and car. After piecing together all the parts to make a demo that helps the public understand what happens in a car crash, it was then necessary to transport the equipment. And that was almost always a problem as the automotive department didn’t have the proper means.

Michael Love, community traffic safety program coordinator for the University of Delaware Cooperative Extension Service, decided to help. “It was quite a contraption that had been put together to emphasize the importance of the SRS,” Love commented. “But it needed to be more realistic and easier to transport from site to site.” So Love applied for a grant from the Safe Kids Delaware for Sussex County program to purchase a new trailer to transport the air bag demonstration to various events. Bridgeville Auto Center, which supplies the airbags used in the demonstrations, donated seats, a dashboard and steering column to give the demo a more realistic appearance. Now, with the support of students and staff in the automotive department at Delaware Tech, mannequin “Ima Hirtin” and her car can relay the message that seat belts save lives.

Web site school profiles are easier to read Delaware’s Department of Education has a new look on its Web site for school profiles. The Web site was first developed in 1997. Delaware was one of the first states in the nation to publish school profile information both on the Internet and in hard copy form. In the 11 years since, constantly changing state and federal requirements have caused the school profiles to be modified but never completely redesigned. Last year, DOE decided to redesign the school profiles in order to meet state and federal requirements while incorporating suggestions from Vision 2015.

“The goal was to make it more understandable, easier to read, and reduce the number of printed copies of school profiles,” said Robert Czeizinger, director of technology management for DOE. The new school profiles contain easy to read graphs and data, term definitions as well as access to more detailed educational data. Data is categorized through the use of tabs and drop down fields into school, staff and student graphs, tables and charts, making it easier to access information users are seeking. To view online school profiles, visit http://profiles.doe.k12.de.us.

If you haven’t decided what you are going to do this fall and the availability of jobs seems dismal, it’s not too late to consider becoming a student at Delaware Technical & Community College. Fall semester classes begin Monday, Aug. 25. There are more than 100 associate degree, certificate and diploma programs that provide specific preparation for employment in the field of your choice. Knowing that many of its students are employed and have family responsibilities, Delaware Tech, Owens Campus, continues to broaden its scope of offerings. In addition to the classes offered Monday through Friday during the day and evening, there will be an increased num-

ber of Saturday and weekend classes. Various science, commercial transportation, education, math, and English classes will be offered on Saturdays; courses addressing U.S. history, general psychology, and ethical issues in health care will be the focus of entire weekends. Delaware Tech also offers students the option to take classes on campus and via distance education, including online, telecourses and interactive classroom courses. Registration for the fall semester is in progress now. For more information, call Student Services at 302-856-5400, ext. 6010.

CFM top producers Kathy Farnell, broker and vice president of Callaway, Farnell and Moore in Seaford announces the firm's top producers for May. Fran Ruark was the top listing agent for the month, and Terry Scott was the top selling agent.

Ruark

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MORNING STAR • AuGuST 14 - 20, 2008

Page 57

Health Long waits at the ER are difficult to avoid By Anthony Policastro

When I was in the Air force, my hospital had the second busiest emergency room in the entire Air Force. When you consider that it was the 16th biggest hospital, that is pretty impressive. When you consider that we only saw 4,000 patients a year less than the biggest Air Force Hospital, that was more impressive. To put it into a local perspective, my hospital was about one third the size of Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. However, we saw twice as many ER patients as Nanticoke does. As you might expect there were times when the ER was overwhelmed with patients. When that happened, I had the ability to do several things. First, Air Force hospitals have many out patient areas. For that reason, I could open the examining rooms in a clinic near the ER. It allowed me to have more patients in rooms. The second thing I could do was to call in the pediatrician, family practice physician and internist on call to help. Since they all worked for the hospital I could do that. The third thing I could do was to go to the medical dormitory and ask support personnel to come in and help the on call doctors.

Those support personnel usually arrive in the ER, all other patient care staffed the outpatient clinics and were must stop until the patient is treated. off when those clinics were closed after Therefore, if there are life threatening hours. The result was a quick fix to the emergencies when you are waiting, your backlog. wait will be longer. Many people have The second reason had very long waits ER’s in this country often is that some people in emergency rooms. have emergencies that Civilian ER’s do not have long waits. There is no are not life threatening. have the ability to get However, they need to extra help. When the be seen before patients one reason why that is so. assigned staff gets with minor problems. overwhelmed, they That is why there is no one They take precedence must work through the as well. That will also backlog. prolong the wait for fix for it either. There are no nearby other patients. additional exam rooms. The third reason is There are no on call physicians who that patients will fill an ER when they do work for the hospital. not have an emergency. They are all in private practice and In some cases, it is because they only on call for patients that need to be could not get an appointment with their hospitalized. primary care physician (PCP). In other There are no extra staff. People are cases, it is because they could get an either already working or just coming off appointment with their PCP, but it would a shift. For those reasons, most civilian not be soon enough. In some other cases, ER’s will have periods with very long they do not have a PCP to call. waits. The result is that they have to go to Those waits are created for multiple the ER. They should not be there, but reasons. The first is that the purpose of have no other choice. an ER is to treat emergencies. There are A fourth reason is that people think very few people with life threatening that they have an emergency when they emergencies. However, when one does

Kris Smith, Chuck Landon, Dave Smith and Representative Daniel Short make up Integra Administrative Group’s 2007 $1,000 Titanium Foursome.

LDAF plans annual golf tournament

The Lower Delaware Autism Foundation’s 6th Annual Beach Classic Golf Tournament is Monday, Sept. 15 at Baywood Greens in Long Neck. Registration and a putting contest begin at 10 a.m. followed by lunch at 10:30 a.m. and a shot gun start at noon with a scramble format. The tournament will feature prizes, contests, lunch on the verandah and a cocktail reception with auction. Graphite Foursomes are $700 and

Titanium Foursomes are $1,000 and include a hole sign. A new option this year is the opportunity to register as an individual player and be assigned a foursome for $175. Businesses can show their support by choosing one of the many sponsorship opportunities or by purchasing a hole sign. The tournament generally sells out so early registration is suggested. For more information or to register, visit www.ldaf. com or call 302-644-3410.

do not. When I was in the Air Force, I gave patients a questionnaire about their reason for being in the ER. Many of them said that they were there because they had a real emergency. When we reviewed their charts, we found that 20% of them did have a real emergency. The other 80% did not. They thought they did. They had no medical training so there was no way that they could tell the difference. It was appropriate for them to be in the ER since they did not know any better. The result of all of this is that it is very difficult to predict how many patients will actually show up in an ER. For that reason, it makes staffing difficult to predict. In addition, certain times of the day are busier than others. Staffing must be aimed at guessing how much staff to have when it gets busy. That is not as predictable as one might expect. For all these reasons, ER’s in this country often have long waits. There is no one reason why that is so. That is why there is no one fix for it either. The flexibility that I had in the Air Force is not present in civilian hospitals. Therefore, waits are common to see and hard to correct.


Page 58

MORNING STAR • AuGuST 14 - 20, 2008

Health Briefs Nanticoke plans golf tournament

The 22nd annual Nanticoke Health Services Golf Tournament is Friday, Sept. 5 at the Seaford Golf and Country Club. The day will consist of practice, lunch, 18-holes of golf, dinner and door prizes. A full field of participants is expected with a noon shotgun start and scramble format. The tournament’s goal is to raise over $35,000 for Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. Proceeds will be used for the hospital’s charity endowment prescription fund, a special indigent fund for patients in need of assistance with their prescriptions. Teams of four players will compete for various donated prizes. During the course of the day, golfers will have chances to test their skills by competing in contests for Longest Drive, Closest-To-The-Pin, Hit-The-Green and a Hole-In-One. All participants will have the opportunity to putt through a three-step qualifying round. Following dinner, three people will putt for $2,500 each. Entry fees are $150 per player and $600 for a foursome. Sponsorships packages are available. Anyone interested in individual reservations or sponsorship opportunities should contact the Nanticoke Health Services Development office at 302-629-6611, extension 2404 or email MorrisR@nanticoke.org.

Depression support

The Mental Health Association in Delaware will be sponsoring a Depression Support Group in Laurel on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month. The meetings begin at 7 p.m. The MHA encourages anyone dealing with a depressive disorder to attend. Register in advance by calling 1-800-2876423. Peer support groups sponsored by Mental Health Association of Delaware are not intended to replace professional mental health treatment. MHA does not publish support group locations; locations are provided with registration.

Oncology symposium

The Sixth Annual Seaside Oncology Symposium will take place Saturday, Oct. 11, at the Boardwalk Plaza Hotel in Rehoboth Beach. The Tunnell Cancer Center and the Medical Society of Delaware sponsor this annual, half-day symposium to update participants on the diagnosis and management of cancer. It is designed for physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals. The conference, which begins at 7:30 a.m. and ends with lunch at 1 p.m., is planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and Policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint-sponsorship of the Medical Society of Delaware and Beebe Medical Center. The Seaside Oncology Symposium is supported by unrestricted educational grants from various pharmaceutical companies and programs. Details regarding this year’s topics and speakers will be available soon. Hotel reservations may be made directly with the Boardwalk Plaza at 800-332-3224.

MS Society plans bike event

The Delaware Chapter of the National

Multiple Sclerosis Society needs volunteers to help organize and run the 2008 Bike MS: NRG Energy Indian River Power Plant Bike to the Bay. Participants cycle 45 miles, 75 or 150 miles from Dover to Rehoboth and back over two days to raise money for multiple sclerosis. Taking place on Sept. 27 and 28, the annual fundraiser attracts more than 1,600 cyclists who ride across Kent and Sussex counties over two days. To ensure a safe and enjoyable event, each of these miles needs to be monitored by support-andgear vehicles and bike mechanics. Rest stops are set up every 10 to 12 miles and stocked with beverages, fruit and highenergy bars. More than 200 volunteers are needed to register cyclists; set up rest stops and man them throughout the ride weekend; monitor the route; clean up; hand out rider numbers, t-shirts, goodies and information packets; load and unload the equipment truck; prepare and serve breakfast, lunch and dinner; distribute information packets; direct traffic; and provide logistical and clerical support. To volunteer, contact Volunteer Coordinator Jenna Wagner at 302-655-5610, or email jenna.wagner@MSdelaware.org.

Beebe to hold Fun Fest

The Beebe Medical Center Auxiliary will hold the 8th annual Fun Fest at Winswept Stables on John J. Williams Highway (Rt. 24), in Lewes, on Saturday, Sept. 27, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event is open to the public and a great place to bring the entire family. Proceeds generated at this annual event will be used to support the programs at Beebe Medical Center. Numerous games, including two obstacle courses, a train ride, and a moon bounce, will be featured. There also will be face painting. Winswept Stables’ petting zoo and pony rides will be part of the day’s activities. Members of the Winswept Stables Pony Club will give riding demonstrations throughout the day. Refreshments, including hot dogs, hamburgers and homemade baked goods from Auxiliary members, as well as pumpkins and chrysanthemums, will be available for purchase. Members of the Beebe Medical Center Auxiliary and of the Junior ROTC at Cape Henlopen High School will be volunteering at the event.

McElroy promoted at Nanticoke

Nanticoke Health Services announces the promotion of Ms. Janan McElroy, RN, CPUR to director of Case Management. In her new position, she will play a vital role in bringing the most appropriate, cost efMcElroy fective care to the patients of Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. McElroy has over 33 years experience in the health care field, focusing on Case Management during the last 10 years. She began as an LPN at Nanticoke in 1977. McElroy was one of the first LPNs to work in Nanticoke’s Intensive Care Unit, progressed to ICU staff nurse and then to charge nurse. By 1993, McElroy was working as Nanticoke’s first Home Health staff nurse.

She quickly advanced within Home Health to patient care coordinator and then to agency coordinator. Between 1998 and 2007, McElroy worked as outpatient case manager, pediatric/ICU case manager, was promoted to hospitalist Case Manager and then to PCU/ICI case manager.

McElroy received a registered nursing degree from Delaware Technical & Community College, is an active ACLS instructor, a CPR instructor and is working towards achieving accreditation in Case Management.

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Page 59

UD awarded grant to continue avian flu research Researchers at the University of Delaware will continue avian influenza research through a five million dollar grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES). The grant, to be spent over three years, renews the Avian Influenza Coordinated Agricultural Project (AICAP), a partnership between the University of Maryland College Park and 17 other leading institutions of avian influenza across the U.S., including UD. Jack Gelb, chair of the department of animal and food sciences and professor of avian virology, and Eric Benson, associate professor of bioresources engineering, along with many other UD scientists, conduct research and extension programs that provide solutions and assistance to the poultry industry, a major food resource and economic driver on the Delmarva Peninsula. Avian influenza research and outreach activities at UD are supported by AICAP as well as state and other federal funds. Projects include surveillance programs in commercial poultry, backyard flocks, and wild birds; development of

rapid diagnostic tests; emergency poultry depopulation research; in-house composting for responding to catastrophic poultry losses; efficacy of disinfectants and common chemical compounds on avian influenza virus; viral pathogenesis and vaccine evaluations; and regional, national and international technical assistance programs. Since 2005, AICAP researchers and educators have: • assembled the first continent-wide network to study the ecological and biological characteristics of avian influenza viruses isolated from wild birds; • integrated research and education into a unique program available to a range of poultry producers; • shown that quail can change and expand the host range of avian influenza viruses, and found that quail respiratory and intestinal tracts have human-like sialic acid receptors that could partially explain the emergence of avian influenza strains with the capacity to infect humans; • developed a comprehensive program that has been delivered in 33 states and in Canada and Brazil to train producers and veterinarians on the depopulation

Drs. Jack Gelb and Eric Benson, along with many other UD scientists, conduct avian influenza research and extension programs that provide solutions and assistance to the Delmarva poultry industry.

and composting of flocks with avian influenza; developed a testing component for rapid diagnosis of avian influenza in birds; and • developed promising vaccines for mass immunization of birds.

For more information about the University of Delaware’s poultry health system and the Avian Bioscience Center visit http://ag.udel.edu/abc/index.html.

Health Briefs Continued from page 58

Nanticoke welcomes associate

Nanticoke Health Services welcomes Steven A. Rose, RN, MN, to the position of vice president of Operations. In this position, Rose will be responsible for a variety of professional and support services. Rose has over 34 years experience in the health care field including nursing, hospital administration and serving as Pennsylvania’s Medical Rose State Area Command Executive Officer of the Army National Guard. He holds a master’s degree in nursing from Pennsylvania State University and acquired a post-master’s certificate in hospital administration from Villanova University.

Nanticoke appoints board members

ccepting ANew Patients Nanticoke Health Services announces

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four new members that will serve on the board of directors for Nanticoke Health Services: Kevin E. Carson, D.Ed.; David E. Crouse, CWA; Greg Johnson; and Patricia Gane Olekszyk. Dr. Kevin Carson has served as the superintendent for the Woodbridge School District since Aug. 1998. Before that, he served as assistant superintendent for one year. Dr. Carson came to Woodbridge from Sussex Tech, where he was assistant superintendent for nine years. He received his underCarson graduate degree from Wesley College in Business Administration, master’s degree in Personnel Management from Central Michigan University and doctorate of education from Temple University. Dr. Carson resides in Bridgeville. David Crouse is a senior vice president and senior financial consultant for PNC Investments in the Lewes office. Crouse

joined PNC Investments in July 1993 and has over 20 years of experience. He earned a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from Longwood University in Farmville, Va. Crouse holds the Chartered Wealth Advisor designation from the Estate & Wealth Strategies Crouse Institute at Michigan State University. Greg Johnson is the president of CAP Management, providing administrative, accounting and management services to its wholly owned subsidiaries: The Car Store, Delmarva Motors Acceptance Corporation, Atlantic Financial Credit Services, Cash Advance Plus, PreJohnson mier Company, Wye River Foods and Affordable Used Cars. Johnson has been in the insurance industry for over 20 years, is a Certified Insurance

Counselor, is on the board of directors for Delaware National Bank and is a member of the Nanticoke Rotary Club. Patricia Olekszyk, along with her husband, Dr. Joseph P. Olekszyk, and son, Michael Olekszyk, has been a resident of Seaford for 18 years. Mrs. Olekszyk, co-owner of Nanticoke Ear, Nose and Throat Associates in Seaford, earned a bachelor’s degree in Accounting and has taken MBA program graduate courses from St. Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, Pa. Olekszyk handled accounts receivable for 70 physicians at Olekszyk the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and was practice manager for Practice Management Associates, a physician billing service. Olekszyk served as a member of the Nanticoke Health Services Auxiliary for 17 years. During that time, she also served as president.

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MORNING STAR • AuGuST 14 - 20, 2008

Snapshots

AUXILIARY ATTENDS CONVENTION - The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 6 of Seaford attended the State Convention held at the Sheraton Hotel in Dover on July 12 and 13. The following officers (from left) attended: Frances Turner, president; Nancy King, treasurer; Beverly Buchanan, historian; Betty Russell, sgt.-at-arms; and Dolores Taylor, chaplain. Three of their members have been elected to the Department of Delaware American Legion Auxiliary as state officers. They include Frances Turner, department treasurer and past department president; Beverly Buchanan, department vice president; and Dolores Taylor, department sgt.-at-arms.

TAkINg A DIp - West Seaford Elementary School teacher Chanella Evans climbs back out of the dunking booth. Evans volunteered her time at the AFRAM festival to promote the elementary school. Photo by Cassie Richardson

STEppINg STONES - Mrs. Violet’s Stepping Stones childcare held their annual Fashion Show on August 1. Special thanks to founder and operator of Stepping Stones childcare, Violet Waters, for her outstanding services teaching her children and having fun while learning.

AFRAM ThEME CONTEST - Christel Mathews, Seaford, was honored during the opening ceremonies at the AFRAM festival for developing this years theme. A contest was held during the last Martin Luther King Day celebrations in Seaford and Mathews' theme of "preserving the village by conserving the family" was selected as the winner. Photo by Cassie Richardson


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

Seaford Museum exhibit to honor the life of Dave Webb By Lynn R. Parks

munity service. Also in the exhibit are several plaques, Seaford Historical Society board including an award of merit from then member Anne Nesbitt does not hesitate to Gov. Russell Peterson for employing the sing the praises of a new exhibit in the handicapped and an award from the society’s Seaford Museum. Seaford Historical Society “in recogni“This is a spectacular exhibit of Dave tion of dedicated service and effort in the Webb’s life,” she says. “It makes you refounding of the Seaford Museum.” alize what a terrific person he was.” “It is really remarkable what he acWebb, who died June 1 at the age of complished, and how dedicated he was to 77, was founder of the serving his community,” Seaford Museum, Edgell said. which opened in 1997 In a newspaper article and was moved into the that appeared shortly beformer Seaford Post Offore the museum moved fice in 2003. into the former post office, At the time of its Webb discussed his pasopening, the area in sion for history. which revolving ex“Without a knowledge hibits are displayed was of history, we are like a christened the Webb ship without a rudder,” he Exhibit Room, in recogsaid. “This museum will nition of his efforts. act as a rudder, guiding us The new Webb exthrough Seaford’s history.” hibit, set up in the old In that interview, Webb the late David Webb post office safe, focuses acknowledged that creaton Webb’s professional life as well as his ing the museum, and renovating the old work with the historical society. post office, was a lot of work. It will be in place through September. But it was work that he enjoyed, he “We wanted to honor him for all that said. he did,” said Sharlana Edgell, museum “In working on this, I am expressing director. “The museum really was his vimy love for the area,” he said. sion and his dream.” And he acknowledged that preservaA native of Seaford, Webb graduated tion of the past is a never-ending effort. from Seaford High School in 1950 and “Telling the story about a place is nevby 1955 had started his first ventures as a er done,” he said. “Everything you do developer and land and housing consultevery day is history. What you and I are ant. doing right now – someday that will be Featured in the exhibit are pictures, in- history.” cluding several of Webb as a young man and one showing him in a military uniFor your information: form, and newspaper articles. The Seaford Museum, in the old post The articles, from the News Journal, office building on High Street, Seaford, Delaware State News, the Seaford Star, is open Thursday, Friday, Saturday and the Leader and the Seaford Banner, reSunday, 1 to 4 p.m. The Dave Webb port on the several awards he received, Memorial Exhibit will be on display including the business person of the year through September. Admission to the muaward from the Greater Seaford Chamber seum is $3, $5 for a combination ticket of Commerce, the man of the year award for the museum and the Ross Plantation. from the Seaford Jaycees and the John A. Children 12 and under are admitted free. Jr. and Helen M. Moore Award for comFor details, call 628-9828.

“Without a knowledge of history, we are like a ship without a rudder. This museum will act as a rudder, guiding us through Seaford’s history.”

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Loading dock enclosure would allow for permanent exhibit By Lynn R. Parks The Seaford Historical Society is accepting donations to the Dave Webb Memorial Fund. Money from the fund will help pay to have the old loading dock at the Seaford Museum enclosed for a permanent exhibit on the history of the Nanticoke River. The museum is in downtown Seaford in the former Seaford Post Office. Sharlana Edgell, museum director, said that Webb, who died June 1, wanted the museum to enclose the loading dock. Preliminary plans for the enclosure have been approved by the city of Seaford, she added. Edgell is working to get the museum named as one of the points of inter-

est of the Capt. John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail. The National Park Service has until July 2009 to devise a comprehensive plan for the management and use of the new 3,000-mile Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail, established in December 2006 to commemorate the 400th anniversary of Smith’s voyages in 1607 through 1609. Getting the museum named as one of the “gateways” on the trail could mean that grant money for the enclosure project would be available, Edgell said. Contributions to the Webb Memorial Fund can be sent to the Seaford Historical Society, 203 High St., Seaford DE 19973. Checks should be made out to the Seaford Historical Society.

Seating is available for Seaford SAT Prep classes Officials at Seaford School District report that seating is now available for the 11-week SAT-Prep class being offered at Seaford High School at the beginning of the 2008-2009 school year. This is the eighth year of the program. For a cost of $100, students receive 11 three-hour-sessions and accompanying materials and supplies. The program is open to all Seaford School District students in grades 6-12. Students will have the option of participating in either a Tuesday after school class (from 3:45-6:30 p.m.) or a Saturday morning class (from 9 a.m.-noon). Seats will be filled on a first come, first served basis. The Tuesday schedule is as follows: Sept. 2, 9, 16, 23; Oct. 14, 21; Nov. 18; Dec. 2, 9 and; Jan. 6, 13. The Saturday schedule is as follows:

Sept. 6, 13, 20, 27; Oct. 18, 25; Nov. 22; Dec. 6, 13 and; Jan. 10, 17. Students are encouraged to take the Jan. 24, 2009 SAT, which will be given at Seaford High School. For more information regarding this program, or to register, contact Ms. Pat Tifft at 629-4587, ext. 267.

Send us your news items

Send items to editor@mspublications.com. Send photos as attachments in the jpg format. Items may also be mailed to Morning Star Publications, Inc., P.O. Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973. Deadline is one week before preferred publication date. Items are used on a first-come basis.

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MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

Opinion Editorial Help citizens be prepared Recent incidents of serious crimes in the Town of Delmar, including a home invasion and the violent attack of three men by a large group of assailants, are unfortunate examples of the times we live in. Along with these types of serious crimes against people, citizens in many of our local communities also face random acts of crimes against private property, including the breaking of vehicle windows and theft of personal items. State and local police in all of our communities are challenged daily with a variety of criminal activities, as well as attempting to maintain enforcement of traffic laws and investigating traffic accidents. We commend these hard working men and women for the service they provide. The job of a police officer is oftentimes unique in contrast to how many of us fulfill our job responsibilities each day. For police investigating crimes there is a need to be somewhat judicious in how information is communicated to the public. We understand this to be an important tool for investigators. However, we also encourage local law enforcement to help us strike a balance between the need for being cautious with the release of information and the opportunity to provide community awareness and address public safety. The use of “police releases” has long been a very useful and much appreciated resource provided by law enforcement to inform the public of criminal activity and suspect apprehensions. However, these in many cases are released only for more high profile, serious crimes, including homicides, assaults, drug arrests and fatal traffic accidents. While we need to continue to bring this information to the public, we also encourage state and local police agencies to share more information about crimes against private property, especially when there appears to be a trend in local neighborhoods. We realize that police agencies are overwhelmed in many cases with the daily rigors of the job. However, among the outstanding services the police can provide in the area of protection, is the opportunity to also keep a community aware of potential threats to personal and property safety. A more open dialogue between local law enforcement and the public will certainly promote public safety. But it will also educate citizens and help them to become the “eyes and ears” for law enforcement as it pertains to providing valuable information that can be helpful in the resolution of police investigations. Enhanced police communications to the citizens it serves results in a more educated and aware public, and communities that can take necessary steps to better protect themselves and their property.

Morning Star Publications Inc. P.O. Box 1000 • 628 West Stein Highway Seaford, DE 19973 629-9788 • 629-9243 (fax) editor@mspublications.com

Meals program needs financial help The cost for food has increased by 20% and delivery costs by 35% By Cindy Mitchell CHEER has a proud 30-year tradition of providing meals and related nutrition services to Sussex County’s elderly population. Tens of thousands of our fellow citizens have received millions of meals through our seven congregate activity centers as well as our homebound meal program. In addition CHEER has been providing meals to help support the independent senior centers in Bridgeville and Laurel. Over the past year, the cost for food has increased by 20% while the fuel used to deliver those meals

GUEST COLUMN has increased by 35%. Each of us has experienced these increases in our household budgets. For the fourth consecutive year, the State funding for these nutrition programs has not increased once cent. In fact the current year cuts in the grant-in-aid funding have further stretched already strained budgets. We have squeezed programs to the point where there just isn’t any more juice left in the squeeze. The Bridgeville and Laurel centers have been important partners with CHEER in the senior citizen nutrition programs. As we continue doing more with less, each CHEER center director is being challenged to increase the amount of donations for meals pro-

vided through their centers. We appreciate the difficulty of this task and it will require additional fundraising activities just to try and maintain current service levels. We have asked Bridgeville and Laurel to join each CHEER center to answer this challenge. We are asking the Bridgeville and Laurel centers to each increase their donations and fundraising activities for meals to the same level we are requiring from each of our CHEER centers. These are difficult times and we must all do what we can. We want to continue to provide meals for the Bridgeville and Laurel programs, but each center must do their part. We will be there to help, but we all must pitch in. Cindy Mitchell is coordinator of the CHEER Community Center in Georgetown.

What issues concern you the most? The Primary Elections are approaching RYANT ICHARDSON and the Seaford and Laurel Stars are planI feel it’s our job to ask ning to run an “Issue and Answers” section. those questions that This is our way of helping voters make may be a little outside wise decisions when of the comfort zone of selecting the best future officeholders. candidates to answer. I do not feel that voters gain much understanding of the caneven have to risk typographical erdidates if we merely report on their rors in printing their responses. staged activities and run their press With that said, now I’m requestreleases. ing your help. What issues are you Naturally, they are going to concerned about at the county, state avoid the most controversial topics and national levels? when they select issues to discuss. For example, at the county level, Who could blame them? what are your concerns about I feel it’s our job to ask those growth, traffic, quality of life, etc. questions that may be a little outAt the state level, what topics side of the comfort zone of candiwould you like to see our legislators dates to answer. tackle next session? Should we ask I also am concerned about propthe candidates if they favor school erly expressing the true opinions of vouchers, for example? the candidates. That’s why we will And at the national level, you run their responses to our questions could include questions related to verbatim. In this modern age of solving the energy problems. For computers and emails, we don’t

B

R

President Bryant L. Richardson

Editor Daniel Wright Richardson

Vice President Pat Murphy

Managing Editor Mike McClure

Secretary Tina Reaser

Editorial Lynn Parks Tony Windsor Cathy Shufelt Frank Calio

Donna Huston Carol Kinsley James Diehl Elaine Schneider Kay Wennberg Ann Wilmer

example, if elected, would you vote to allow offshore oil drilling? These are just a few ideas to start you thinking. Keep your questions brief and try not to interject your own opinions. The purpose of the “Issue and Answers” feature will be to learn all we can about the way future officeholders would vote on key issues. We will also ask the candidates to select what problems they think are the most serious and what they would recommend as possible solutions. Help us come up with some good questions. We need your responses soon for the Primary Election. We need to give those candidates adequate time to respond. Email your questions today to editor@mspublications.com or mail your questions to Star, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973. This is another important election season. The problems we face as a county, state and nation are very serious. We need to elect good leaders to help put us back on the right track. Circulation Karen Cherrix Sales George Beauchamp Rick Cullen Emily Rantz Laura Rogers Doris Shenton Jimmy McWilliams

Composition Cassie Richardson Subscriptions - $19 a year in-county, $24 a year in Treasurer Rita Brex Kent and New Castle, Del., and Federalsburg, SharpCarol Wright Richardson Carol James town and Delmar, Md.; $29 elsewhere out of state. Publishers of the Seaford Star and Laurel Star community newspapers, (Salisbury, Md.) Business Journal and the Morning Star Business Report


MORNING STAR • AUGUST 14 - 20, 2008

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Democratic candidates spinning fundraising data One of the most interesting races in Delaware this year is the race for the governor’s seat, especially the upcoming Primary. The Democrats have two wellknown candidates, both current officeholders. They are State Treasurer Jack Markell and Lieutenant Governor John Carney. The following two news releases were sent to newspapers this week. It’s interesting to see how fast the news from Markell’s office is spun by Carney’s camp in an attempt to explain the difference in the gap between the two fundraising efforts. The releases are presented verbatim, including the headlines. Jack Markell’s campaign shows recordshattering support, building momentum State Treasurer Jack Markell announced Tuesday, Aug. 12, his campaign for governor has raised $1.12 million this year and enters the critical last four weeks before the Sept. 9 primary with $2.1 million on hand. The level of support is unprecedented for a Democratic candidate for governor. When Gov. Ruth Ann Minner ran for reelection in 2004, she raised about $800,000 in the first nine months of the year. Today’s totals build on the momentum Markell built last year, when he raised $1.6 million and easily surpassed records for the year before a gubernatorial election. “This is not about money, and this is not about me, this is about an overwhelming number of Delawareans who want to go in a new direction instead of staying on the same path set by the Minner-Carney administration,” Markell said. “I am humbled that so many have chosen to be so generous to my campaign. “My campaign is fortunate to have such a large outpouring of support from so many Delawareans who share my vision and want to go in a new direction to a brighter future.” On July 31, Markell told supporters he had already raised $1 million this year, which was also unprecedented. Since then, supporters have contributed another $120,000. Adding to Markell’s momentum, Sen. Karen Peterson recently switched her endorsement to Markell, and hundreds of grassroots supporters have been making phone calls and knocking on doors for more than a year. “Delawareans all over the state are telling me they are not satisfied with the status quo and are thirsty for change,” Markell said. “I'm proud to be the only Democratic candidate with a plan to pro-

Send us your ‘Final Words’ The Final Word is a compilation of thoughts and ideas from Star staff members and members of the public. We encourage readers to submit items. If you have a pet peeve or word of encouragement you can express in a few words, email the item to us at editor@mspublications.com or mail it to Star, PO Box 1000, Seaford, DE 19973. Sign it and include your hometown and a daytime phone number.

Final Word vide high quality, affordable health care to all Delawareans now and to create 25,000 jobs during my first term in office. We cannot nibble around the edges or keep trying the same things and expect a different result. We need bold, Democratic solutions to the issues facing Delaware.” The campaign has spent $1.5 million this year. Markell Press Release

John Carney’s support among Delawareans continues to grow with less than 30 days to go Lt. Governor John Carney’s campaign announced Tuesday, Aug. 12, that it has raised over $420,000 thus far in 2008. This brings Carney’s fundraising total to more than $1.75 million in his race for Governor, 70 percent of which has been given by Delawareans. In contrast, Jack Markell has raised just over 30% of his money for his Gubernatorial Campaign from Delawareans. “John Carney’s support among Delawareans continues to grow, said Car-

FOOD LION WEEKLY SPECIALS Ask your local Food Lion Manager how you can receive the Food Lion Weekly Specials Flyer. We need your help to get the Food Lion’s Weekly Specials Insert in the Laurel Star and the Seaford Star.

ney’s Campaign Manager Dave Hamrick. “John Carney is proud to have raised more than 70 percent of his contributions from Delawareans and to have earned the support of so many voters here in the First State. Finance reports show that more than two thirds of Markell’s campaign funds have come from his wealthy out of state donors, from his campaign for treasurer and from a personal loan of $725,000. “Jack Markell wants to make this race about money and negative attacks against John Carney and fellow Democrats,” added Hamrick. “But this race isn’t about money – it’s about getting things done and making the changes Delawareans want a reality. John Carney’s focus has been on bringing Bluewater Wind to Delaware, passing a Cancer Right to Know law, creating jobs and building a 21st century economy. “These are the kinds of changes that take more than talk, and more than campaign fundraising. They take leadership and the ability to bring people together to get things done. Rather than pouring millions of dollars of his personal fortune and out of state contributions into a negative campaign attacking John Carney and other Democrats, Jack Markell should be using his time to talk about the issues Delawareans care about. Delaware’s Democrats will reject Jack’s attempt to buy this election.” With less than 30 days to go before the

Democratic primary for Governor, Carney’s support among Delaware Democrats continues to grow as voters are drawn to his experience and his vision for change. Carney has been endorsed by the Delaware Democratic Party, dozens of state and local elected officials, and thousands of Delawareans around the state. Carney Press Release

We need to lighten up What better way to lighten up than to reprint some of the humor of Red Skelton. His humor was clean and he was a great entertainer with a gift for one liners. Following are some examples taken from his advice for a “perfect marriage.” • Two times a week we go to a nice restaurant, have a little beverage, good food and companionship. She goes on Tuesdays. I go on Fridays. • I take my wife everywhere...but she keeps finding her way back. • I asked my wife where she wanted to go for our anniversary. “Somewhere I haven’t been in a long time!” she said. So I suggested the kitchen. • We always hold hands. If I let go, she shops.


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