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Elks ‘Help Children Hear’ Lottery aims to raise funds for service organization Fundraiser to feature $50K grand prize lottery with other impressive prizes, 50-50 lottery Randy Palmer - Moose Jaw Express

The Elks of Sasets available, the winner will katchewan have receive over $100,000 on a launched a massell-out sive fundraiser to The idea to create a largehelp children with scale provincial lottery came hearing difficulties out of similar ventures that in the province. have taken place across the The first-ever province. ‘Help Children “We’ve had two or three Farm Shops, Industrial Shops, Garden Hear’ lottery is different lotteries that were Centers, Small and Large Box Stores currently underthree-for-five dollar tickets way and features and we just weren’t selling a big-ticket draw enough to break even anythat includes a more,â€? Claffey explained. $50,000 grand “So we came up with this prize or a new Ford idea because large-ticketor Dodge truck or price lotteries seem to go $1,000 a week for really well in Saskatchewan a year. That’s in and we put a 50-50 with it MOTHER’S DAY FEATURE addition to a 50-50 because those are popular in PAGE A10 draw that is also Research funded by the Elks of Saskatchewan helped develop cochlear im- Saskatchewan as well.â€? expected to bring plants that are widely used to help children hear. (Getty Images) All proceeds from the event in plenty of cash to will remain in the province the service organi– and anyone wondering just zation’s coffers – and provide a nice boost of summer cash to how effective those funds are used just has to look at the a lucky winner. Saskatchewan Pediatric Auditory Rehabilitation Centre at “If we sell out the 50-50 and the main lottery, we should be the University of Saskatchewan. around the $250,000 mark,â€? said lottery chair and longtime “We founded SPARC over 40 years ago and we’re one of the LOOKING TO GIVE Moose Jaw Elks member Harold Claffey. “It would be nice to main fundraisers for them,â€? Claffey said. Windmill Greenhouses MOM A BREAK FOR have too much money and looking for places to put it instead “You see those videos all over the internet, where the child   Mother’s Day?        of looking for places to find it. With COVID-19, I don’t know has the cochlear implants turned on for the first time? That   WE CAN HELP!     NURSING WEEK  how likely that is, though‌We’re just encouraging people to was pioneered here in Saskatchewan by SPARC, which was 306.692.1663 I buy tickets and hoping for a sell-out.â€? directly funded by the Elks. So the Elk’s are directly respont being aPAGE momA16 really means‌ Tickets for the main draw are $50 each, and have a limited sible for developing cochlear implants, and that happened run of only 4,000. In addition to the main prizes, there are right here in Saskatchewan.â€? 11 other draws for trips and cash, with an early bird draw on The lottery has been set up to be completely pandemic-proof. Tickets can be purchased by debit or credit card by calling May 14 and the main draw on June 13. The 50-50 is also expected to do well, featuring $10 tickets, toll-free 1-833-769-0100, with 50-50 tickets e-mailed within four for $20 and 15 for $50. As of Apr. 28, the pot already moments of purchase and main draw tickets sent by mail. sat at $5,070 with the winner taking half. With 62,000 tick- The main draw date for all prizes is June 13. Ltd

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an having given birth to a child. It’s loving and ven see it. It’s carrying and caring for a life comurvival. It’s giving air to the lungs that grew within t will never see you as anything but mommy. It’s ratches and scrapes, it’s being stern and protective. walk and to eventually run. It’s learning to hand them teach what you cannot at times. It’s bracing em off after they do. It’s seeing them cry and not sit on the floor and hold them and cry right along m that they are smart, capable, funny and giving things. It’s building their self-esteem, supporting unconditionally. It’s letting them go, letting them get back up. It’s going without so that they don’t . unimaginable to any woman who does not have a ction that is unmatched and insurmountable in any s a love that grows continually, a love that always ing terrified that you can’t prevent pain, injustice, death. It’s laughing at jokes that aren’t even funny, s it’s hilarious. It’s listening to stories that go on

LOVE YOU

y Mother´s Day

and on without a point. It’s always being available for the “Mommy watch me!� yells and “Mommy I need you� pleas. It’s drowning out the word MOM repeated over and over in attempts to get your attention. Its songs sang out of tune and settling squabbles with siblings. It’s being mean, and teaching hard lessons, that hurt you inside so deep you want to cry, but you must stand strong with resolve. It’s being strong for them when you are weak. It’s smiling when you want to cry and crying when you’re smiling with pride. It’s looking through photographs and feeling your heart swell with love and happiness when you see the beauty, the happiness and life in your child’s smile and eyes. It’s confusion, mistakes, uncharted territory and blindfolded guessing. It’s snuggling on the couch watching a movie, braiding hair till your fingers hurt, it’s being woken up early on Saturday morning because they want to crawl in bed and be close to your heart. It’s having the worst day and having them hug you and tell you “mommy I love you�, and needing nothing more. It’s a blessing, a gift, a relationship that never ends and a love that never dies. It’s the best thing I have ever become, the greatest love I have ever felt and the best part about being me. https://www.huffpost.com/entry/what-being-a-mom-really-means_b_7242784

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Happy Mother’s Day! They literally face the daily threat of COVID-19 to do proud to acknowledge those incredible ho provide hands on care toyou our residents, what is best for those in need of care. make for those you love. • ients in our public health care system • greglawrencemla@sasktel.net Their work is invaluable because their skill and profes-

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Moo-ving birthday partyJason features herd of cows, parade of vehicles G. Antonio - Moose Jaw Express Nineteen cows on her front lawn and a parade of well-wishers driving past her house thrilled Jayleen Mantell, who spent her 19th birthday at home and unable to celebrate with friends. “That was pretty good,” Jayleen exclaimed with a smile, after half a dozen balloon-covered vehicles filled with her friends drove past her house on April 24 while honking their horns and holding up birthday signs. Two friends held birthday gifts out their respective driver’s window for Jayleen to grab. Jayleen has been in the 4-H program since she was a little girl and has managed an animal every year, so it made sense to create signs with cows on them, her mother Karen explained. Since her daughter can’t go out and do anything with her friends due to the pandemic lockdown, Karen It was a moo-ving 19th birthday celebration for Jayleen Mantell, as her family installed 19 cow-themed signs on the front lawn to help celebrate the special occasion. Mantell is a 4-H member. Photo by Jason G. Antonio

A friend of Jayleen Mantell hands out a birthday gift while slowly driving past the birthday girl’s house during a parade of friends’ vehicles. Photo by Jason G. Antonio

thought installing the cardboard animals on the lawn was the best decision. There used to be an organization called Herd for Hire that would put humorous animal signs on lawns, but Karen was unable to locate the group. Instead, she turned to the Moose Jaw Express to produce the signs. This was one way to make her daughter’s birthday special. The Moose Jaw 4-H Beef Club has plenty of meat to sell if anyone is interested, she added. Check the Facebook page for

details. “It’s pretty awesome considering I love cows,” smiled Jayleen, explaining she could see the signs from her bedroom window but not what was on them since the blank side faced the house. However, she came outside to check after her mother encouraged her to investigate. “I had a feeling they were cows … but I came out and there they were. And I loved it.” Besides the cow signs, Jayleen had no idea a parade would be part of her birth-

day celebration either. “I feel really bad for her,” Karen said. “Her and another friend both have had their birthdays when they’re at home. She was looking forward to going out … 19 is a big year.” The family will order in food but won’t be able to invite over their grandmother or any friends to celebrate. “It kind of sucks (to be stuck at home), but I get to celebrate with my family. We would have (done that) anyway even if we could go out,” Jayleen said. Karen’s son Bryten organized the small parade and vehicle drive-by that featured Jayleen’s friends honking and holding signs. Karen, her husband, and son erected the lawn signs in the middle of the night to ensure Jayleen didn’t see them undertaking this stealth project. With a chuckle, Jayleen remarked that she would probably give her brother a hug for organizing the parade and rounding up some friends. “For years and years and years, we would (have) Ernie from Sesame Street — who would sing Happy Birthday — (and) we would crank it up on the stereo,” added Karen. “But the last few years we haven’t been doing it, so this will be good for her.” Besides the ability to make signs with cows, the Express also has nine different signs with messages related to COVID-19 and staying healthy. Call 306-694-1322 for more information.

Moose Jaw Elks among service organizations feeling COVID pinch

Wide variety of summer fundraisers could be on hold or cancelled, club now accepting direct donations Randy Palmer - Moose Jaw Express

The Moose Jaw Elks Lodge finds itself in much the same situation service clubs throughout the city and all over Canada are going through. Just how do you meet your fundraising and donation obligations when all the fundraising events you have planned are being cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic, especially when some of your largest fundraisers are in the summer months? The answer at the moment is direct donations, far from an ideal situation but one the group plans to manage as best as possible. “Unfortunately there are a lot of events that we have in summer that are being cancelled, so it’s looking like we’re going to have to take the summer off, but we’re still accepting donations,” said longtime Elks member and club organizer Harold Claffey. “We use the money well and we use it in the city; every year we give some to the Food Bank, some to Hunger in Moose Jaw, some to the Salvation Army Christmas Fund. We put a tree in the Festival of Trees every year; we run a concession stand at Park Art in Crescent Park…

there’s always something that’s coming up that we’re working on.” That would be the case right now, normally – in addition to Park Art, the Elks have annually run the concession at the massive Show and Shine out at 15 Wing and last year did the same for the revival of the Saskatchewan Air Show, one of their largest local fundraisers to date. “The Air Show, we just went nuts; we made a marvelous amount of money over the two days there,” Claffey said. “It was a long line-up both days and it was incredible.” All told, the Elks annually donate around $20,000 to local causes, a number the Air Show helped push closer to $30,000 this past year. Taking away the summer events will naturally put a dent in those funds, but the Elks are hoping the always charitable spirit of Moose Jaw will help with their call for direct donations, which can be sent to 325 4th Avenue Southwest, Box 315. Supporters can also check out the Elks ‘Help Children Hear’ provincial lottery, from which proceeds will go

back to Lodges throughout Saskatchewan. Of course, this COVID-19 outbreak isn’t going to last forever, and when the time comes that major fundraising is a thing again, volunteers and new members will be more than welcome. The club is currently around 50 members strong, with information on how to join and what they’re about available on their website at www.moosejawelks.com or anyone interested can pop down to Flattop Automotive and have a chat with Benevolent and Protective Order of the Elks Lodge 7 president Sam Morrison. As for folks looking for support from the service organization, they just have to ask. “We’re always funding worthy causes and helping where we can; if people ask and it’s within our mandate and we can afford it, we’ll certainly look into donating funds,” Claffey said. “So, like all the Lodges in Saskatchewan, we’re strong in our community. One of our slogans is ‘Community people helping community people’ and that’s what we’re always trying to do.”

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MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020 • PAGE A3

Re-Open Saskatchewan updates online at Saskatchewan.ca/COVID19.

Warren Michelson Saskatchewan Party MLA for Moose Jaw North 306-692-8884 • 326-B High St. W. • moosejawnorthmla@shaw.ca

Sask. Polytech provides helpful supplies to front-line workers Jason G. Antonio -Moose Jaw Express

When health-care workers across Saskatchewan slip on personal protective equipment (PPE) to stay healthy during the pandemic, they will have Saskatchewan Polytechnic to thank for providing some of those supplies. The organization recently collected thousands of items of PPE and other supplies from its campuses in Regina, Saskatoon, Prince Albert and Moose Jaw. It then wrapped up those items in seven pallets and shipped them to a central location, where the provincial government then distributes the equipment to health regions through Saskatchewan. Among the items shipped were: • 741 boxes of gloves; • 40 boxes of masks with face shields; • 212 boxes of procedural masks;

• 219 boxes of N95 masks and another 420 individual N95 masks; • Four boxes of surgical masks; • 780 isolation gowns; • 41 containers of hand sanitizer; • 20 tubs of wipes. “(I’m) absolutely so proud of our staff and faculty who conducted the inventory of supplies and materials at each campus and then … gathered the material and worked to put the seven pallets of supplies together,” said Cheryl Schmitz, CFO and vice-president of admin services. “I feel really proud as a member of Sask. Polytech that we could provide these items to safeguard our health-care workers. And many of those are Sask. Polytech alumni, so that’s really important to Sask. Polytech.”

The technical college is in constant contact with the Ministry of Advanced Education, so when the ministry put a call out for PPE equipment and any assistance to donate, the college jumped at the chance, Schmitz said. The institution had received requests for support from smaller groups and health-care providers. However, it

decided to work with the ministry and SaskBuilds to ensure the equipment was distributed on a province-wide basis since Sask. Polytech is a provincial organization. Sask. Polytech has not given away all of its PPE supplies, but kept what was necessary for its campuses to continue functioning, Schmitz said. Some employees are still required to be on-site at the campuses to receive goods and to ensure the buildings continue to operate, such as information technology staff and professors who might have to run lab experiments. “… (the) health of our students and staff is our number 1 priority,” she added. “But we also didn’t want to hoard it when there is such a need in the province for PPE.”

REFLECTIVE MOMENTS

Moon and Mars not necessarily good for all mothers

If my Mother were alive for this year’s Mother’s Day observances, she would not be happy with some of the gift choices that are being promoted by enterprising on-line companies. In her lifetime she received the usual gamut of gifts — hand-made cards decorated with Joyce Walter For Moose Jaw Express stick figures and printing of dubious skill; jars ronjoy@sasktel.net painted and then spattered with shredded crayons to be used as a flower vase or pencil holder; a hand print in hardened then painted paper mache; flowers, chocolates, books, fruit baskets, jewelry and dinners out. Her favourite place for Mother’s Day brunch was Bonanza where she enjoyed the salad bar and always ordered the shrimp dinner with baked potato. Halfway through the meal, out would come a plastic bag from her purse and in

Rewrite your life by Sheila Webster, MA Certified Counsellor and Coach As Covid-19 restrictions press on and ease at the same time there is hope and new competing challenges arising together. If you are a parent you have already experienced some of these and are wondering how to mitigate them. Challenge one is there is now some freedom but not all. How do you explain that to your child. You worked tirelessly the last six weeks finding some kind of balance, now an explosion of questions and meltdowns. For example you can tell your young children you can go

would go the shrimp she couldn’t eat and half the baked potato — her lunch for the next day. By not eating her whole main course, she had saved room for dessert of ice cream, rice pudding, tapioca or fresh fruit. The carnation provided by Charlie Corrin and his staff was the icing on her cake. Regardless of the gifts presented to her on the day for mothers, she was always appreciative and even happier to be with members of her family. Even though she’s been gone 15 years, Mother’s Day always brings memories. If she were still here, and having to endure self-isolation and social distancing, I doubt she would be too happy to receive one of the gifts that seems to be popular this year: a one acre piece of land on Mars, selling for $15, a reduction of $20. She might not reveal her true feelings about such a gift, but in her mind she would definitely consider it a waste of good money, despite having a deed for the acre, a map of the location and an informational Mars e-book. Surprisingly, the Mars option has already sold out. A related option is the one acre of moon property, selling for $11.99, down from $33. With it comes a deed and map, but no e-book. Only one acre per person is permitted

and if the recipient is unhappy with the gift, that is too bad — no cancellations, refunds, or even an exchange for a better location. Again Mom would say “thank you” but she would be having those same wasteful spending thoughts. And if asked, she would voice her opinion that as soon as we on earth started sending explorers to space, the world order changed and weather patterns were disrupted. We knew her opinions so other than having a joke at her expense, none of us would have ever offered her part of Mars or the moon. Maybe the gift this year might have been a handful of face masks — which she would have studied and then got out her bag of fabric to make a mask for every family member. The nicest masks would, of course, be saved for family members who didn’t laugh at her at Bonanza when she loaded the shrimp into her plastic bag. I would have received one of the ugly, scratchy ones because I did laugh. Joyce Walter can be reached at ronjoy@sasktel.net The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the position of this publication.

Time Limits out for a walk or bike ride for this many minutes and then do another activity. This will limit your running across friends (hopefully) and the no-win situation of why can’t we play together. Challenge Two It is even more important when you are out in warmer weather to keep the kids hydrated with water, for every hour of play they should be drinking water. An easier idea is individual water bottles and check clean and refill on a schedule. That gives you a visual of how much is being consumed. Challenge Three Can we go to camp? Kids camps are a great part of many families summer plans. However at this moment know one knows how things will progress. It is best not to half promise a hope - just saying probably not this summer but we will make sure we sign up early next year. Affirm the importance in the child’s life. Some camps are

doing online mini camps. Check with yours to see if this is happening. Challenge Four The promise of warm weather also brings more challenges with shopping. Kids have outgrown things over winter and it is frustrating to figure out how to buy for them. Tracing your child’s feet helps for shoes and for sandals etc wait a couple weeks and see what restrictions will be then. Mental health tip for parents. These challenges bring more stress and questions. Try and get up earlier than your kids for some alone time. Create an online group with no more than four friends with same age kids that you can share the ups and downs with a couple quick times a day. Recharge your own batteries with outdoor time with and without the kids. Setting time limits on yours and the kids activities makes them more manageable

INVESTING DURING A BEAR MARKET COULD PAY OFF IN THE END! Please call for your personal face-to-face appointment to review your investment plan today.

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Raymond James Ltd., Member-Canadian Investor Protection Fund.

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PAGE A4 • MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Phone: 306.694.1322 Fax: 888.241.5291 32 Manitoba St. West, Moose Jaw SK S6H 1P7 www.mjvexpress.com

Publisher: Robert Ritchie - rob@mjvexpress.com Editor: Joan Ritchie - editor@mjvexpress.com Sales: Wanda Hallborg - sales@mjvexpress.com Bob Calvert - sales@mjvexpress.com Gladys Baigent-Therens - Sales2@mjvexpress.com Steve Seida - Special Sales Thank you to all the contributing writers, without your time and support, the paper would not look the same. Send your stories, events and pictures to; Joan Ritchie Ron Walter Joyce Walter

editor@mjvexpress.com

Jason Antonio Larissa Kurz

Randy Palmer Dr. Steven Heidinger Wanda Smith

Where would we be without the unconditional love a mother holds for her children? No matter what age we get to be, mom is one of the sweetest words on our tongue to speak. From the moment we are born, the nurturing begins…feeding, diapering, sleepless nights and Joan Ritchie EDITOR endless days… She is there through every bump and bruise her child takes to cuddle and kiss the hurt away. Moms are the centre of a child’s universe, doing what only moms can do… She is there to guide and teach and brings a mother’s wisdom and kindness to every situation as little people grow up; she takes joy in every success experienced and swells with pride in every step taken. And as they grow from babies to adults, the years bring different levels of nurturing, but being a mother never gets easier…your children are always in your thoughts and minds and every wish you hope and breathe for them is for happiness, success and life-fulfillment. There’s always heartache, too, and many tears, but mothers can never let go…when the kids are grown and gone, every prayer that is breathed is in blessings that all is ok with them in their world; it’s a lifelong commitment but done unselfishly, always putting their needs before one’s own. They years accumulate and moms become grandmothers, and on and on…but the loving part never stops…a love only a mother feels for her children and the peripheral vision to acknowledge the sacrifices their mother made for them. And as another generation starts, mothers’ hearts grow bigger…grandkids remind grandparents to remember back to a simpler life when toys and play, snacks and treats, delightful squeals of joy and exuberant bursts of energy were part of everyday life. It seems so long ago…but oh so good! For those of us who are now grandmothers and are still blessed to experience the love of our mother on this earth, our hearts are so grateful and appreciative for them, too; words can’t express the depth of thankfulness we feel to be able to hold their hand or kiss their cheek and still say, “I love you, mom!” …the sweetest name on our lips!

Moose Jaw’s Métis community stepping up to help each other Jason G. Antonio - Moose Jaw Express

Moose Jaw’s New Southern Plains Métis Local 160 has been reaching out to its members during the pandemic to understand better how it can meet their needs and support them. “A lot of (our members) are tired of being shut in, but they’re doing well,” Darrell Hawman, president of Local 160, said recently. “We had a good response … (of) people saying they’re OK, but they’re referring us to other folks who might not be as fortunate as them.” The three main areas in which people need the most help have been with paying bills and acquiring medications and groceries. To address these concerns, Local 160 has either helped people with their medication and grocery issues or referred people to the regional Métis Nation – Saskatchewan (MN–S) office for financial support. The Métis community in Moose Jaw is reasonably resilient, Hawman said. Many people are relieved that the local office is reaching out to them, especially since some members have “little disasters” that require attention. It has been gratifying to help people during this difficult time and to have the support of regional and provincial leaders. Métis Nation – Saskatchewan recently announced it would provide $7.25 million to households across the province that the coronavirus pandemic has negatively affected. Hawman thought this funding was a big deal and knows it will help many Métis people in the community. The provincial organization is already rolling out several programs to help its members, explained Wendy Gervais, regional representative for MN–S Western Region 3 (southwest Saskatchewan). A command centre has been created in Regina to co-ordinate the requests people are emailing in for financial support. “There was a great demand throughout the whole region — including Moose Jaw — so that was a very positive experience for us as a region … ,” she said, adding the provincial funding was a stop-gap measure to help those waiting for federal assistance. The leaders of New Southern Plains Métis Local 160 have done an excellent job of supporting their members, continued Gervais. She commended them for helping residents who need deliveries of groceries or medications. The last six weeks have been a learning experience for the Métis community, she noted. The regional office has encouraged its members to stay home and practise physical distancing. As the provincial government moves to re-open the province in the coming weeks, the regional Métis leadership will determine how it can meet the needs of residents. One idea will be to develop community gardens in every community in which there are Métis people. MN–S will ask municipalities if they will provide tracts of land so gardens can be created and produce grown this season. Another idea will be to ensure a supportive community surrounds seniors and people who are isolated. This could include establishing phone trees and reaching out to people that way. Even a 10-minute call to some seniors can brighten their day, added Gervais. Hawman recalled one phone conversation he had with an 82-year-old woman, who told him her mother had died at age 102. The woman remarked that she hoped to survive the pandemic and live as long as — if not longer than — her mother. “In this region, we are really seeing communities step up and support each other,” Gervais added. “It is humbling to see that and that involvement.”

Road ban exemptions for agriculture products

The Government of Priority Goods Exemptions Map Date: April 16th, 2020 Saskatchewan and SasEXPRESS katchewan Association of Rural Municipalities (SARM) are working together to lift spring road bans for priority goods to help lessen the difficulties the agricultural sector is experiencing this year. “We have been working with SARM and the RMs to provide consent to determine which roads can handle secondary weights,” Highways and Infrastructure Minister Greg Ottenbreit said. “At the same time, we will work with these municipalities to monitor roads to prevent unnecessary road damage.” “This measure will help producers finish last year’s harvest, market last year’s crop, and get this year’s crop in the ground,” Agriculture Minister David Marit said. “We know that the agriculture sector is under pressure and we are here to assist our producers.” There is a need for critical supplies such as seed, fuel and fertilizer for producers. “We are encouraging RMs to work with highway officials to determine whether or not to allow the same weights on their local roads,” SARM President Ray Orb said. “This will be important to ensure trucks have access to farms and other facilities once they leave provincial highways.” Providing higher weight limits will require close monitoring by highway and municipal officials to ensure that if conditions changes or if road damage occurs, weight restrictions can be re-applied to ensure road safety – and minimize the need for costly repairs. Shippers are reminded to check in to ensure they understand what restrictions are in place on provincial roads at https://www.saskatchewan.ca/business/transportation-and-road-construction/information-for-truckers-and-commercial-trucking-companies/ regulations-and-road-restrictions/increased-weights-androad-restrictions. Official spring restriction orders are issued every Tuesday and Friday by 12:30 p.m. (CST) during the ban period. There will be no permit requirements for priority goods for this year only. Local authorities will help determine routes based on local conditions.

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LIBERTY

AYLESBURY

RIVERHURST

32

342

BEECHY

2

32

GOLDEN PRAIRIE

BETHUNE

WEBB

NEUDORF

334

13

ORMISTON

358

FORGET

ARCOLA

48

FAIRLIGHT

MCTAGGART

WEYBURN

334

PANGMAN

2

377

MANKOTA

13

TROSSACHS

13

13

MCCORD

18

9

OSAGE

33

LAFLECHE

36

RADVILLE

35

BENGOUGH

WOOD MOUNTAIN

4

VAL MARIE

48

FRANCIS

306

39

13

CONSUL

8

1

36

LIMERICK

BRACKEN

RICETON

WILCOX

AVONLEA

KINCAID

201

47

KENDAL

GRAY

BRIERCREST

2

MOSSBANK

19

FRONTIERCLIMAX

ODESSA

33

43

58

13

47

SINTALUTA

35

6

39

CODERRE

VANGUARD

CADILLAC

SHAUNAVON

22

247

1

339

363

SHAMROCK

NEVILLE

43

47

39

361

28

ALAMEDA

6

18

34

ROCKGLEN

37

18

4

18

CORONACH

2

sask at chew an. c a

22

DISTRICT OF KATEPWA

56

10

48

2

HODGEVILLE

379

18

EDENWOLD

364

REGINA

VIBANK

19

4

21

210

CRAVEN

PENSE

343

37

80

KILLALY

99

54

301

MOOSE JAW

58

363

21

MACNUTT

CHURCHBRIDGE 8

15

10

DISLEY

TUXFORD

CARONPORT

1

WALDECK

1

MAPLE CREEK

11

MELVILLE

22

6 SILTON SASKATCHEWAN BEACH KANNATA VALLEY

SUN VALLEY

42

CARON

CHAPLIN

ERNFOLD

4

SWIFT CURRENT SWIFT CURRENT

271

EARL GREY

381

9

20

INDIAN HEAD

SUCCESS

332

1

322

354

FINDLATER

10

310

BULYEA

220

DILKE

19

PENNANT

37

HOLDFAST

367

42

ABBEY

FOX VALLEY

16

15

LUCKY LAKE

LEADER

TOGO

369

80

35

CRAIK

373

10

52

52

2

RUNNYMEDE

357

309

YORKTON

19

5

8

SEMANS

15

44

30

21

57

229

219

DINSMORE

47

310

15

42

21

44

5

FOAM LAKE

317

7

NORQUAY

49

6

365

31

7

13

9

38

14

BIGGAR

51

35

HUMBOLDT

5

SASKATOON

307

980

982

WEEKES

368

12

374

31

BJORKDALE

SYLVANIA

WAKAW

11

RADISSON

21

HUDSON BAY

3

2

312

ERWOOD

PRAIRIE RIVER

41

320

LAIRD

HAFFORD

340

16

376

SCOTT

35

BEATTY MELFORT

3

ST. ISIDORE-DE-BELLEVUE

225

RICHARD

MAYMONT

14

317

3

20

NORTH BATTLEFORD

29

UNITY

3

25

212

RIDGEDALE

FAIRY GLEN

BIRCH HILLS

11

MARCELIN

378

376

17

ZENON PARK

40

16

21

40

9

120

263

STEWART VALLEY

The contents of this publication are the property of the Moose Jaw Express. Reproduction of any of the contents of this publication, including, but without limiting the generality of the following: photographs, artwork and graphic designs, is strictly prohibited. There shall be no reproduction without the express written consent of the publisher. All ads in the Moose Jaw Express are published in good faith without verification. The Moose Jaw Express reserves the right to refuse, classify, revise or censor any ads for any reason in its sole discretion. This paper may include inaccuracies or errors. The Moose Jaw Express does not under any circumstances accept responsibility for the accuracy or otherwise of any ads or messages in any of the publications editions. The Moose Jaw Express specifically disclaims all and any liability to advertisers and readers of any kind for loss or damage of any nature what-so-ever and however arising, whether due to inaccuracy, error, omission or any other cause. All users are advised to check ad and message details carefully before entering into any agreement of any kind and before disclosing personal information. If in doubt, please take legal advice.

928

120

264

4

FRENCHMAN BUTTE

3

913

926

943

321

Send your letters to the editor to: letters@mjvexpress.com or 888-241-5291 All columns, letters to the editor and editorials are solely the personal opinions of the writers themselves and not necessarily the opinions of The Moose Jaw Express.

927

55

55

DENARE BEACH

167

106

912

916

DORINTOSH

4

26

CREIGHTON

106

921

224

55

FLIN FLON

911

165

2

929

917

924

903

950

21

371

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the position of this publication.

106

912

936

919

18

TORQUAY

350

9

ROCHE PERCEE

39

318

CARNDUFF

18

ESTEVAN

8


MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020 • PAGE A5

IF GOOD PEOPLE DO NOTHING EVIL TRIUMPHS

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR EDITOR@MJVEXPRESS.COM

M&M Hair & Body Salon The Wait is Over!

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Despite pandemic halving business activity, auction company still taking bids Jason G. Antonio - Moose Jaw Express

While the coronavir us EXPRESS pandemic has cut in half the amount of business Johnstone Auction Mart does, the company has managed to adapt by moving most of its activities online. The auction mart is doing more business online than ever before, while more customers — limited to 25 people in the sale arena with proper spacing — are making their bids either online or by phone, explained owner Scott Johnstone. These bidding processes have gone well and products have been selling just as good as before. “That part’s been good. The public is adapting. They’re not bucking it. They are going along with it,” he said. However, the auction mart is doing half the regular business it did before the pandemic shut down everything. Yet while the company is less busy, it’s still functioning, Johnstone continued. Agriculture-related businesses

AGRIMART

were exempt from the shut-down orders since the provincial governments deemed them essential services. Johnstone Auction Mart has a YIouTube video showing pictures of cow-calf pairs that will be for sale during an upcoming auction. Photo contributed Doing less business has been challenging and it’s no different than what other companies have faced, he added. According to the Johnstone Auction Mart website, some upcoming auctions are still going ahead while others

have been cancelled. For example, the next cow/calf sale is on May 2, while the auction of exotic birds and small animals has been re-scheduled to Oct. 26. A catalogued horse sale has been re-scheduled to Aug. 23, while a regular horse sale is tentatively set for June 4. Auction prices for cattle and cow/calf pairs have still been good despite the uncertainty of the pandemic. However, there have been fewer animals to sell and fewer auctions in which to sell them, Johnstone said. The agriculture sector is doing well right now, but the cattle side is troubled since two major beef processing plants in Alberta have shut down, he continued. Many people hope this is only temporary and things can get back to normal. “It’s good that we can still operate … We can hardly wait until we reopen again,” Johnstone added. “Same as everybody, I guess.” For more information visit http://johnstoneauction.ca.

Agribition plans to hold livestock show this fall By Ron Walter - For Agri-Mart Express

AGRIMART

EXPRESS

The biggest cattle show in Canada will go ahead this fall. The announcement was made on Twitter in an open letter to the Agribition Family. “Canadian Western Agribition will cel-

ebrate its 50th show this year,” said the Twitter message. “For half a century Agribition has withstood recessions, droughts, washouts, booms, busts, BSE, trade wars, price wars, early frosts and late harvests. Like you we have seen it all. “This (pandemic) has not kept you from calving and it will not keep you from

seeding. When calves are fat and the crops are off Agribition will be here, we will be ready.” The show is scheduled for Nov. 30 to Dec. 5 at Evraz Place in Regina – the week after the Grey Cup. Meanwhile organizers of the Grey Cup with the Saskatchewan Roughriders are

working on plans but have not declared that the cup game will proceed. The Canada Farm Show, also known as the Farm Progress Show, has postponed its June 16-28 show at Evraz Place. No new date has been announced. Ron Walter can be reached at ronjoy@ sasktel.net

BIZWORLD By Ron Walter For Moose Jaw Express

Council reversal on Canadian Tire project erode city’s bargaining position

If the great playwright William Shakespeare had witnessed Moose Jaw City Council’s April 27 discussion about the Canadian Tire project he would have had inspiration for his comedy, “Much Ado About Nothing.” The Canadian Tire project – a consolidation of the local Canadian Tire, Mark’s Work Wearhouse and Sports Chek stores— has been spinning wheels for almost five years without getting anywhere. Originally pegged at $10.5 million, then $12.5 million, and now at $20 million by Chamber of Commerce CEO Rob Clark, the project was dead when the company wrote city council a letter advising the company it was no longer interested in the land deal. As part of the response to the pandemic and the chaos caused the company by closure of 250 Ontario stores, Canadian Tire has halted all such projects. This is the second time since the original 2016 deal that the national retailer has put a hold on any renewal/expansion projects. Once the letter of no interest was received council believed the deal was dead. The mayor and the city manager, without telling council, took it upon themselves to try and re-interest the company in locating the development on the Thatcher Drive East location on the former race track site. They successfully renegotiated the deal and brought it to council. A surprised council reacted by voting four to

three to require Canadian Tire to post a $200,000 non-refundable deposit of good faith on the property. Purpose of the $200,000 non-refundable deposit on the site was the same as when someone makes an offer on a house and provides a good faith deposit to hold the owner from doing another deal until this offer has been dealt with This kind of deposit is common in property deals. There was another reason for the deposit request as Coun. Scott McMann stated in the April 27 discussion. He wanted to crystallize the deal: in other words he wanted Canadian Tire to get off the pot. Some councillors may have voted for the deposit out of embarrassment at the lost $7.5 million industrial park sale to Carpere. When Carpere asked for an extension council rejected a request to demand interest worth $100,000 to grant the extension. When Carpere walked away council was left with eggs on its face and costly infrastructure work on the park. In the April 27 attempt to salvage his hero status for renegotiating the Canadian Tire deal, Mayor Fraser Tolmie declared any councillor wanting the $200,000 deposit was opposed to economic development.

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Nothing is further from the truth. Those originally voting for the deposit were following standard commercial procedure in these matters, based on usual practices, not out of desperation for development. Two of those councillors — McMann and Dawn Luhning – reversed their votes April 27. So now the city will go grovelling to Canadian Tire asking for the old deal. Canadian Tire will build this project in Moose Jaw when it suits the company standards of return on investment, when the company has investment funds and when the business climate is conducive to new development, not when council wants a success to brag about in this fall’s election. In the meantime, council’s cap in hand begging erodes future negotiating power when Canadian Tire does build. Ron Walter can be reached at ronjoy@sasktel.net The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the position of this publication.

• Sat, May 9 - 50 Heifer Pairs, More - online bidding available • Tues, May 26 - Last Chance All-Breeds Bull Sale - online bidding available • Thu, June 4 - Regular Horse Sale (tentative) • Sun, June 7 - Bethune Consignment Machinery/Vehicles • Sat, June 13 - Consignment Machinery/Vehicles at our yard

Check our website or call for updates, postponements or cancellations. We will resume regular sales as soon as possible.

In Business since 1968!


PAGE A6 • MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020

- Moose Jaw’s Source for News! Localelementary news, weather and sports Empire’s teachers working connection the worldlearning throughYour challenges of todistance Larissa Kurz

With the announcement of the Saskatchewan government’s plan to re-open the province in five phases on April 23, teachers from all over were likely paying close attention to see what decision will be made regarding the province-wide closure of schools — and whether they’ll be back in their classrooms anytime soon. Teachers in the Prairie South School Division have been working at a distance since March 27, providing their students with a supplementary learning program since school facilities closed abruptly on March 20. “I don’t think there’s a teacher out there that doesn’t feel like our year was cut short,” said Angela Simoneau, kindergarten teacher at Empire Community School. “I never ever envisioned this happening, at least in my teaching career.” Since then, teachers have shifted to providing their lessons through an online format. YouTube videos of lessons, Zoom meetings to answer questions in real-time, and online assignments provided through the ClassDojo app have become the new norm for students and educators alike. The switch to digital and distant learning hasn’t necessarily created more work for educators, said some teachers from Empire, but it has changed the way they interact with students. The biggest challenge so far is that connecting with their entire class is nearly impossible because of the different circumstances in every household. Some families have limited access to tech-

nology, said Simoneau, or have several children who are all working on different schoolwork at the same time. Some parents are working from home and can’t facilitate their child’s schoolwork all day, and some parents aren’t working from home and have someone else taking care of their children. It has been especially tough for the elementary age, said grades one and two teacher Ellen Krogan, as the younger age group needs help to set up video meetings and submit schoolwork electronically. “They need their parents to help them, whereas in middle years or high school, you can kind of put that responsibility more into the kids’ hands,” said Krogan. Teachers are relying on the dedication of parents right now, said Empire’s teachers. Working individually from home means that teachers have no face-to-face contact with their students, and for many, it can be hard to focus without the structure of a classroom. “It’s just not the same in a home environment, as it is at school,” said grades two and three teacher Sandi Gray. “Some parents have commented saying like, it’s really hard to get their kid to do any work. They just don’t want to focus, they don’t want to do it. They don’t see the point,” added Krogan. Krogan and Gray have done instructional video calls for their whole class, as well as one-on-one calls with students to help with any questions or concerns. But the draw of the Zoom meetings, for students, seems to

be about more than just seeing a visual lesson rather than an online assignment. “Lots of our Zoom meetings are more so to connect with the kids and say hi, and let the kids talk with each other because they’re not seeing each other and they need that time too,” said Krogan. Both Krogan and Gray are only seeing a handful of their students participating consistently and returning assignments since the change to distance learning, but that number tends to spike during the social Zoom calls. “Zoom is definitely probably the highlight for the kids, and I think that’s what they need,” said Krogan. “They need to see their friends and that’s what they look forward to. They’re not looking forward to doing the page of math.” Most Prairie South teachers are focusing on just English Language Arts and Math with their distance learning curriculums right now, which is only two out of seven subjects that would normally be taught. Krogan, Gray, and Simoneau said they are feeling a bit worried that if the shutdown continues, students may feel behind come September when classes resume normally. “We already see a slide, when they leave in June and go back in September, and now we’ve left in March,” said Simoneau. “And if we don’t come back to school, then it’s a five-month break because there’s a lot [of students] that aren’t engaging.” On the converse, however, all three teachers felt that returning to school before the end of this year could pose its own unique challenges as well. For Simoneau, the success of primary students is so relationship-based that she feels her class would need time to rebuild their trust after leaving so abruptly. “I feel, probably, that [some of my students] think they’ve been abandoned a bit and I’m not sure that I would have the same trust coming back that I had when they left, and I think that would make my job more challenging,” said Simoneau. For Gray and Krogan, they felt it would take a lot of extra set-up at this point to return

their classrooms to their functional state and to get all of their students back on the same page. “You would feel like you have to get through everything that you’ve missed so far,” said Gray. “And then you’ve got kids that are at different spots because some are doing work now and some are not.” “If you want a picture of [what it’s like] in the school, our classrooms are turned upside down. It’s not like it was left before. It looks like it’s summer holidays,” said Krogan. The province hasn’t yet made a decision about the remainder of the school year, however, and so teachers will continue to provide their students with a regular weekly schedule of lessons. Although, the notice to parents to retrieve any student belongings left in the schools last week was a moment that felt like a definitive answer to the question of whether schools will be back to normal at all this year. “We haven’t been given the [notice that] it’s for sure done, and yet we’re sending everything home, so it feels done and that’s the hard part,” said Simoneau. For now, the main piece of advice that the group of Empire teachers offered parents who may be feeling stressed about keeping their child’s education on track is to work through assignments at a pace that is manageable in your household. “Take it at your own pace. Like don’t stress, don’t get overwhelmed. [At Empire], we all have our lessons set up so that families can move at their own pace,” said Krogan. “We’re very thankful to still have our jobs and be able to connect to families that are willing and wanting to and are not overwhelmed with it.” Simoneau, Krogan, and Gray also recommended parents reach out to their child’s teachers if they have any questions or concerns, and if parents do nothing else, to keep their child’s reading skills sharp. “I also think [it’s important] to just read with your kid, because we all know it’s a stressful time,” said Krogan. “And just spend time with your kid, love them up.”

LARGE FARM & LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT AUCTION

is still open for operation HOURS OF OPERATION Monday to Saturday 9am–6pm Sunday Closed DELIVERIES AVAILABLE Monday to Saturday Call 306-692-1516 or you can place an order online at www.southhillfinefoods.ca

FOR: BIG CHARLIE RANCH LTD. (Yvette Friesen & the Late Charlie Shaheen) Rush Lake, Sk. (306) 741-2867 or (306) 784-7646

Switzer Auction

SATURDAY, MAY 23, 2020 - Starting at 10:00 a.m. C.S.T.

Location: From the Rush Lake Turnoff on #1 Hwy., go 4 miles West on #1 Hwy., 1 mile North on Range Road 3115 gravel road, 3/4 mile East on gravel road, 3/4 mile North /OR From the East side of Waldeck, go 4 miles East on #1 Hwy., 1 mile North on Range Road 3115 gravel road, 3/4 mile East on gravel road, 3/4 mile North (GPS: N50.24.19; W107.28.42)

www.switzerauction.ca The following Farm Equipment Auction will be conducted as planned. We encourage pre-viewing before the auction. You will be able to bid online, so register and be approved to bid. There will be no online registrations sale day. If you come to the auction, please come by yourself and you can participate in the auction as usual. Anyone with a cold, coughing or sneezing, we ask you to stay home and bid online. Those of you who come for socializing, we welcome you back when the Emergency Order is over, but for now, please stay home. NOTE: Everyone must stay 6 feet apart. You will also be able to bid from your vehicle. There will be no lunch available.

TRACTORS -2016 Kubota M6-141 MFWA Diesel Tractor w/FEL, Bucket w/grapple fork, manure tines *2015 Kubota M135GX MFWA Diesel Tractor w/FEL, Bucket w/grapple fork *1988 Case IH 7130 Magnum MFWA Diesel Tractor w/FEL, Silage bucket, grapple fork, manure tines *1988 Kubota MFWA Diesel Tractor w/FEL, bucket, grapple fork *1984 White 2-110 MFWA Diesel Tractor *Land Pride QD Bale Fork GPS -Raven Light Bar GPS System *3 PT. HT. - 7’ Blade *7’ Inland Snowblower *5’ Bush Hog Rebel Rotary Mower *General Rd. Bale Unroller TRUCKS, TRAILERS - 2005 GMC Sierra 2500 HD Ext. Cab Truck *1995 GMC 1500 SLE Ext. Cab Truck *1990 GMC 2500 Sierra 3/4 Ton Reg. Cab Truck *2015 8’x26’ Rainbow Express 5thWh Flat Deck Trailer *2014 Southland 7’x20’ 5thWh Stocktrailer *WW 6’x17’ 5thWh Stocktrailer *5’x15’ Homebuilt Bumper Pull Stocktrailer SEEDING/TILLAGE -30’ Morris 9000 Seeding Tool *24’ New Noble 8000 Cult. *30’ Bourgault 4000 Packer Bar *60’ Brandt QF Field Sprayer *Riteway Rockpicker *Slide-in Fert. Tank HAYING/ LIVESTOCK -2016 FK Easy Rake 14 V-Rake *12’ Hesston 1340 Hydroswing Diskbine *MF Hesston Rd. Baler *NH Sq. Baler *NH 512 Manure Spreader *Tuff Cattle Squeeze *Calving Chute *HD Calf Tipping Table *Flexicoil Post Pounder *Calf Shelters *Port. Wind Breaks *Set of Matching Harness *Metal Corral Panels *Cattle Oilers *Rd. Bale Feeders *Metal Gates GRAIN BINS -2-3200 Bu. Westeel 1505 H/B Bins *2000 Bu. W.Rosco F/B Grain Bin *1600 Bu. Behlen F/B Bin *1400 Bu. W.Rosco H/B Bin *Keho 3 hp. Squirrel Aeration Fan HARVEST -1993 Case IH 1660 SP Combine (Cab has had mice in it) *Augers *ATV’S -2017 Polaris 500 Range Side by Side ATV *2012 Yamaha Kodiak 450 ATV *2008 Yamaha Kodiak 350 ATV *Husqvarna Zero Turn Lawn Mower *Kubota Ride On Lawn Tractor. Plus Other Items. NOTE: All machinery will be started and demonstrated 1 hour before machinery sale time. For further info call (306) 741-2867 Terms: Cash or Cheque w/Letter of Guarantee. Bins sell at 12:30 p.m. Machinery & Vehicles Sell at 1:00 pm. This is a partial listing. No Lunch Available

MORE INFO ON FACEBOOK & OUR WEBSITE: www.switzerauction.ca

SWITZER AUCTION

(306) 773-4200 Swift Current, Sk. SK. LIC. 914494

Bruce Switzer

AB. LIC. 313086

Website: www.switzerauction.ca

Glenn Switzer


legacy

MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020 • PAGE A7

Need a quick & easy gift for a special someone while you are staying home? You can order a Sahara Spa gift card online and have it delivered right to your inbox or send it directly to the recipient to brighten their day! When you purchase a $100 gift card we will add an extra $15 as our gift to you! Don’t worry we will be back to full spa operations as soon as we can!

What legacy will you leave

behind

BEHIND?

Please include the Moose Jaw Health Foundation in your estate plan.

(306) 692-1012 341 Stadacona St E Moose Jaw, SK www.saharaspa.ca

(306) 694-0373

www.mjhf.org

Lentil markets response to covid-19 pandemic

These are unprecedented times we live in. The last global pandemic was in 1918 as the Spanish flu wiped out much of the population. As a matter of fact, my great grandparents had just settled in the Lady Lake region in Northeastern Saskatchewan. My great grandfather, and eight of his children died in the winter of 1919. This pandemic has the entire world locked down with stay at home measures implemented to slow the spread and flatten the curve. The result has been a spike in consumer hoarding pulses like we have never seen before. Importers had become comfortable to keep stocks low as there appeared to be a sufficient supply of lentils and stable prices for the remainder of this crop year. Instead, we have seen a spike in demand that will consume the remaining stocks by June/ July. This opens the door for continued strong demand until November/December as the pipeline will need to be replenished with new crop. There is more uncertainty now that we have COVID-19 to navigate. The “new normal” will have an impact on the food supply chain. We have new risks to mitigate with respect to our employee’s health, the lack of container supply, delivery of goods to the markets and the weather. In this newsletter I will try to provide what we know now and our best guesstimate of the direction of the market. Meanwhile, have a safe farming season and we look forward to continue being your local family business to serve you and to fulfil our mission to “Nourish the World”. This is Saskatchewan agriculture’s time to shine! SPANISH BROWN CDC IBERINA™ We are pleased to report that the global stocks for Spanish Brown lentils will be virtually sold out by June/July. Spain has no stocks and will rely on imports once again. Spain will consume about 30,000 MT annually, but they normally produce 8,000 MT. This opens the door for Canada and the USA to grow and export about 22,000 MT. We have a new version of CDC IBERINA™ that is higher yielding and is Clearfield resistant. We are looking to contract 3,500 acres. This niche lentil pays a premium to red lentils but is similar to grow as a red. The new CDC IBERINA™ holds its color very well and yields higher than many red lentil varieties. We can guarantee delivery of the contracted portion from September to December as our customers in Spain call in Spanish Brown lentils for the canning

Thepulse newsletter spring 2020; simpsonseeds.Com

and packaging program. We are certain there will be extraordinary demand as it will take several months to restock grocery stores and distribution warehouses. LAIRD LENTILS Stocks are being drawn down quickly as we are running our plants at fully capacity to resupply the pipeline. We expect that we can sell everything that growers want to sell to us for June and July delivery. The premium prices will likely remain in place this summer. New crop prices will ease as the new crop becomes available in August/September. There are several unknown factors that will impact the prices one way or another. First, what will the Black Sea Region produce this year? Russia is getting good prices for wheat and we think Russian growers will seed fewer lentils. Kazakhstan has closed their borders to export as they are hoarding their remaining supplies of pulses. This reduces competition from the Black Sea Region for now. Nobody knows how much they will be a factor come new crop. In our opinion, they will not be as disruptive as they have been in the past. Second, how many acres will Canadian growers plant? This price spike may have come too late to increase seeded acres of Laird lentils. On the other hand, Laird lentils at +30 cents per pound will likely increase acres because Laird lentils will be very profitable and will provide much need cash flow for farmers in the fall. Furthermore, seed is in good supply. Richlea lentils are completely sold out in Canada. We could easily export 40,000 MT this next year if they were made available. We expect India to continue to import green lentils, especially Laird and Richlea as they make a good substitute for Pigeon Peas. Pigeon pea prices are escalating due to a shortage of stocks in India. We expect strong demand for the remainder of 2020.

“The “new normal” will have an impact on the food supply chain” ESTON LENTILS Eston stocks are very lower due to COVID-19 demand increasing imports. We can buy and sell all remaining stocks of Eston and have them shipped in June. Morocco had been quiet for several years and suddenly they step up imports prior to Ramadan. We had additional demand come from Italy and Spain who suffered some of the highest number of deaths related to the virus. South America is heading into winter so countries such as Peru will be looking for additional stocks for delivery in June to our plants. Peru is currently under Martial law and will likely remain locked down for several months. Demand will remain high as many people are struggling to maintain the supply chain as

warehouses are restricted the number of days they are open to distribute stocks. Mexico will step into the market for new crop in a big way as bean prices are very high. Mexico imports about 30,000 MT annually. We believe Mexico had good stocks going into the crisis, but stocks have been drawn down rapidly in the past 6 weeks. Importers are dealing with a devalued peso and high asking prices for replacement stocks. Food inflation is going to become a serious issue for Mexico and other emerging markets. High unemployment is adding additional stress to the consumer. Bids have been as high as 28 cents per pound and we anticipate prices will be firmer right through to December. RED LENTILS Bids reached as high as 33 cents per pound a few weeks ago. I believe some companies are caught short and are in a technical situation that will keep prices up until new crop deliveries relieve the pressure on the market. India will increase imports this year as Rabi crop was estimated to be 1.3 million metric tonnes and is now estimated to be 1.2 million metric tonnes. This past season India imported +500,000 MT so

we expect good demand the remainder of this season. Canada will be the predominant supplier to India and the rest of the global market right up to December. Australia is down to 50,000 MT of red lentil stocks and will be sold out by July. Container shortages have increased the cost to transport red lentils to tide water. This has made Australia less competitive until the container shortage issues are resolved over the next several months. But they will also still increase acres planted as the higher prices are also encouraging more to be planted. Sri Lanka has closed their boarder to exports. In addition, the government is buying all stocks from the splitting mills in Sri Lanka. The government is selling the red split lentils at a subsidized price to feed their local people. This policy will remain in place for several months. Meanwhile, this has increase demand for red split lentil for the milling industry in Canada, Turkey and Dubai. Import demand will remain strong until new crop. Once again, we do not know how much the Black Sea region will disrupt the market, but we can plan on prices to settle down below 30 cents once harvest begins.

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PAGE A8 • MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Meat processing closures haunt industry By Ron Walter - For Agi-Mart Express

AGRIMART

EXPRESS The Covid-19 pandemic has caused concerns in the meat processing industry. Outbreaks of the coronavirus have force temporary closures of meat processing plants in Canada and the United States. The JBS pork processing plant in Minnesota, killing 20,000 hogs daily, shut down when 20 workers tested positive for the disease.

The Smithfield Foods pork plant in South Dakota, representing about five per cent of U.S. pork processing capacity, closed when 700 cases of infection were traced back to the plant. National Beef Processors of Iowa shut the plant over Covid-19 cases and Cargill closed a beef and pork processing plant in Pennsylvania for the same reason. In Canada Harmony Beef of Calgary closed temporarily when a worker tested positive. Cargill’s High River, Alberta plant, processing 30 per cent of Canadian beef, cut

back to one shift as a precaution then closed when workers tested positive. A one-week closure would leave 31,000 head of cattle stranded with no market. The JBS Canada plant in Brooks, Alberta, has cancelled one shift because workers are not showing up. Nearly 70 JBS workers have been confirmed with Covid-19 infection. Making the closures sinister is the small number of large plants that process beef and pork. Between them. JBS and Cargill process 70

per cent of Canada’s meat. Most of that meat is exported. Quebec-based Olymel Pork closed temporarily over the infections. Meanwhile the Saskatchewan Agriculture beef price report indicates the Covid-19 infections have contributed to price volatility. The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association says feed cattle prices dropped 20 cents a pound year over year. According to some reports feedlots are losing $600 a head. Ron Walter can be reached at ronjoy@sasktel.net

Moose Jaw cancels Hometown Fair and Parade due to pandemic concerns

The Midway at last year’s Hometown Fair in Moose Jaw was bustling, but this year the Exhibition grounds will unfortunately remain empty as the fair has been cancelled.

Larissa Kurz The Moose Jaw Exhibition Company has size of the Fair,” said George Fowler, genannounced that this year’s Hometown eral manager at the Moose Jaw Exhibition Fair and Parade will not be taking place Company. “There’d just be too much sodue to the ongoing concerns related to the cial interaction to be safe.” As a result, the board of directors made coronavirus pandemic. The Hometown Fair and Parade was going the decision to cancel the fair and parade to be a four-day event this year, from June with the safety of Fair attendees in mind, 18-21, but the continued uncertainty of said Fowler. when the pandemic restrictions on crowds “It’s not a decision that you want to have will be lifted means that the annual sum- to make, but we just felt for everyone’s mer event is not likely to be possible. safety and what government regulations Based on the phases of the Re-Open Sas- that are in place, we had no choice but to katchewan plan laid out by the provincial cancel at this point,” said Fowler. government on April 23, by the time the The Hometown Fair and Parade are a Hometown Fair was meant to take place, package deal, said Fowler, which is why the province would likely be at the stage both events will not be taking place. where only groups of 15 or 30 people are The parade tends to draw as many as allowed to gather at a time. 4,000 spectators and requires both secu“Obviously [that] wouldn’t work, with the rity and insurance to take place — a fi-

nancial cost that is covered by the fair’s revenue each year. It was also unclear how crowds would be able to properly social distance at such an event. For these reasons, organizers had to cancel both events in tandem, much to their disappointment. Organizers begin working on planning the next year’s Fair almost immediately after the conclusion of the event each year and are hoping that the return of the Hometown Fair and Parade in 2021 will be worth the wait. “We think we had an amazing lineup at the Fair this year, so hopefully we can duplicate it again next year,” said Fowler. “At this time, with everything that’s going on, we hope everyone stays safe and follows the government’s guidelines.”

TRADING THOUGHTS

Governments around world practising “funny money” policies

An Alberta-based political movement inspired my interest in money, its purpose, how it works, and the economy. Called Social Credit, the movement’s party governed Alberta from 1935 to 1971. Social Credit was elected in the midst of the Great Depression with promises of providresidents with a dividend by Ron Walter ing called social credit from government. The Social Credit victory got some help from the incumbent United Farmers of Alberta government, whose premier Brownlee was involved in a lengthy sensational trial for having coitus with a government secretary over three years. The trial was widely covered across Canada with full pages of testimony. The idea behind Social Credit came from a British Army Major C.H. Douglas. Douglas believed in reviving the economy by giving money to people. He realized without money circulating people were unable to buy anything and business would stagnate. A few European regions tried to print their own money and were able to better withstand the Depression. Social Credit critics labelled the policy “funny money” –

Oh Clark’s

a term that grabbed my attention. The argument against “funny money” was based on the limited supply of goods and services that an economy can produce. Just putting unearned money into the hands of people would create inflation as all that money chased a limited supply of goods and services in the economy. The people of Alberta never bought the argument against “funny money” for two reasons. Both the first two Social Credit Party leaders were radio evangelists who equated opposition with the devil. And from 1949 on the oil gusher in Leduc gave the province all the money it needed to spend. Social Credit tried the dividend thing twice with issuance in the 1930s of property certificates and a $25 dividend to residents in the 1950s. Neither was well accepted. While attending rural grade school I borrowed Maj. Douglas’ book from the Medicine Hat Public Library, using my grandfather’s city address to get a library card. The theories didn’t make sense to me. The book offered a primitive form of guaranteed income. Years later when our neighbour Bud Olson ran successfully for federal Social Credit and I had one university economics course under my belt, I argued with him. Olson insisted that the Pearson Liberal government of the day was effectively using “Social Credit” policy by running big annual deficits. He was also concerned that interest payments on the debt had reached nine per cent

of the federal budget. This is the same Bud Olson who crossed the floor in 1967, won re-election in 1968 as a Liberal, became Liberal minister of agriculture and a senator. Bud and Maj. Douglas must be laughing in their graves now. Under the fear of the pandemic, governments around the world are finding money — via the printing press — to stave off economic collapse caused by quarantining and business shutdown. In Canada, the announced spending and tax deferrals must be nearing $200 billion. By contrast the national debt was $645 billion at the end of 2019. While it’s easier to owe yourself the money via the central Bank of Canada, the interest burden will starve needed future government expenditures. The future tax burden will probably become heavier as we pay for the cure of our virus-infected economy. The one-time money-to-the-people practice could become more regular with guaranteed incomes for all. Boy, we do live in interesting times, “funny money” or not. Ron Walter can be reached at ronjoy@sasktel.net The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the position of this publication.

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MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020 • PAGE A9

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306-693-3511 Greenhouses excited to open this spring even with a few COVID-19 rules Larissa Kurz May has always been a month of excitement for greenhouses, as they open their doors to the spring sunshine and welcome gardeners, plant enthusiasts, and tag-along guests alike — and despite the pandemic restrictions, this May will be no different. Well, it may be a little different, as most greenhouses and garden centres have had to make some adjustments to remain in line with the ongoing public health orders regarding social distancing and group gatherings. Deemed to be allowable businesses at this time, greenhouses have made necessary changes to adhere to government safety regulations. These regulations include proper social distancing measures, enhanced sanitation practices between customers, and the closure of public washrooms. Greenhouse facilities are also only allowed one customer per 1,000 square feet of retail space, to a maximum of 10 people at a time, and are keeping a close eye on staff if they are feeling ill. These restrictions have changed the ways that greenhouses in Moose Jaw are used to seeing their opening weeks, but they remain excited to have their doors open in time for Mother’s Day, as is tradition. MooseJawToday.com/Moose Jaw Express has the rundown of what to expect when heading out to satisfy that green thumb.

Cornell Design & Landscape is located 11 kilometres south of Moose Jaw on Highway 2, near the airbase and Sukanen Ship Pioneer Village and Museum.

Cornell Design and Landscape

Owner Leslie Cornell was excited to open her greenhouse and tree nursery on April 27 and laid out the new rules for the 2020 season at Cornell Design and Landscape. The greenhouse, located just 11 kilometres south of Moose Jaw on Highway 2, will be open from Monday to Saturday each week, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. beginning on May 4. Customers are allowed to do their shopping in person, but Cornell can only have three people in the greenhouse at a time due to the social distancing rules. Because the tree nursery is larger in size, Cornell can allow seven customers in that space at a time. There will be hand sanitizer available for use, and directional arrows in the greenhouses to help traffic. The greenhouse is asking that customers refrain from bringing family and friends with them to shop this year, to keep the wait times to get into the greenhouse short. “We’re just asking that people be considerate of the next person in line, because we may be lined up out into the parking lot,” said Cornell. Cornell Design and Landscape also has an online store, where customers can look at their stock and purchase what they’d like, to be picked up on location at the greenhouse without all the trouble of standing in line. Cornell is also offering free delivery of orders worth over $50 to the local area, and will have 15 per cent off hanging baskets for Mother’s Day on May 10. This year’s tree nursery order will also be a little different, said Cornell. Because it won’t be submitted until June, customers can put in their requests anytime before then, or come see the full tree nursery on location. Cornell promised that the selection of plants and garden-

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ing products will be the same as usual, with plenty of annuals, perennials, vegetables, and supplies like seeds and soil — and lots of tomatoes. “Once we found out that tomatoes were the new toilet paper, we grew more,” said Cornell. She has also had lots of interest about growing food and herbs at home directed her way already and is prepared to provide all the things new gardeners need to do so. “This is our new normal and if everybody can put on their happy face, we’ll get through it together by being apart,” said Cornell. Cornell Design & Landscape can be found online at cornelltrees.com or contacted by phone at 1 (306) 693-8733, and they post regularly on their Facebook page.

ects — especially with the increased interest in gardening while people are at home right now. “Gardening is something they can do with all this time they have, being stuck at home,” said Duffey. “[And] we are open, we have everything, and we’re keeping everybody as safe as we possibly can.” Keon Garden Centre is online at keongardencentre.ca and can be contacted by phone at 1 (306) 693-6771. They also post regularly on their Facebook page.

Windmill Greenhouses is located at 1640 Ominica Street East. Keon Garden Centre, at 1645 Stadacona St W.

Keon Garden Centre

Keon Garden Centre, nestled out on Thatcher Drive at 1645 Stadacona St W, opened its doors to customers on April 28. The greenhouse is currently open from Tuesday to Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and owner Marci Duffey said those hours will be changing to 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., beginning May 5. Right now, Keon’s is able to welcome 10 customers at a time thanks to their large greenhouse space. They are also able to take 10 customers at a time in the landscape nursery outside, which has a separate entrance and till for customers to pay. Keon’s is requiring all customers to take a cart when they enter, to help with distancing measures, and have directional arrows on the floor to guide the flow of traffic. There is hand sanitizer available at the entrance and exit, and staff are sanitizing regularly. “We’ve made sure that there’s the ability to properly social distance, no matter where you are shopping in our store,” said Duffey. Keon’s also has an online store, where customers can do their spring shopping from home, and are also taking orders over the phone. Both of these no-contact methods require customers to arrange a curb-side pickup time at the greenhouse after ordering, at one of the four safe locations just outside of Keon’s. “Actually, that’s been used a lot, especially when we first opened. It’s been very, very busy,” said Duffey. “Those that don’t feel comfortable coming in can just order that way, and we’ll do the safe delivery right out to the gate for them.” Duffey is already busy filling people’s carts with all of the usual supplies, such as flowers, shrubs, vegetables, seeds, and yard items. Everything that a gardener can expect to need is available this year, with the exception of some tropical plants that the greenhouse usually stocks. “Everything is coming in as we speak and we should be completely full by [May 5],” said Duffey. For Mother’s Day on May 10, Keon’s will be posting photos of hanging baskets available for purchase, which can be picked up using the greenhouse’s no-contact method. For all other plant-based interests, Keon’s is prepared to help get people started on their spring and summer proj-

Windmill Greenhouses

Located at 1640 Ominica Street East, Windmill Greenhouses is also ready to welcome gardeners into their space beginning on May 1. The greenhouse will be open Monday to Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. and is limited to only three customers in the space at a time, said owner Sandy Couture. This means customers will have to be conscious of how long they peruse the plants while they’re shopping, unlike other years past. “We have numbers that we have [to stick to], which is really too bad,” said Couture. “[We know] you want to enjoy it, but you have to know that there’s other people waiting until you’re finished so they can come in. It’s going to be hard on them.” Windmill Greenhouses is also offering curbside pickup for customers who phone in to place an order. They will be providing hand sanitizer for use and cannot offer access to public restrooms. Windmill Greenhouses won’t be hosting their usual Mother’s Day festivities on May 10, as there is no food or drink allowed on the premises, but they will be open from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. for those who make it a tradition to visit. Couture has been hard at work making sure that all of the usual plants are available again this year, including flowers, vegetables, herbs, seeds, and so on. The greenhouse gift shop will also be open, which offers pots, ornaments, and more. “Everything is here still, our greenhouses are full and plants are growing,” said Couture. “We have a greenhouse that’s mainly all veggies and herbs [and] we have about 50 different kinds of tomatoes.” Couture has heard plenty of concern from people about the state of their yards and is confident that there won’t be anything missing this year despite the different regulations. She encourages customers to keep checking back, as the greenhouse and gift shop will be adding more plants and items as they mature throughout the season. “If people are [worried], they won’t miss out if they’re not here the first day,” said Couture. Windmill Greenhouses are also thinking of ways to give the greenhouse a more outdoor setting later in the season, to allow more customers at a time, and will be sharing those details as they are worked out later. Windmill Greenhouses can be contacted at 1 (306) 6921663, and post regularly on their Facebook page.


PAGE A10 • MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020

LOOKING TO GIVE MOM A BREAK FOR    

   

Mother’s Day? WE CAN HELP!



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What being a mom really means‌ By Jessica James

Being a mom means more than having given birth to a child. It’s loving and knowing a soul before you even see it. It’s carrying and caring for a life completely dependant on you for survival. It’s giving air to the lungs that grew within you, and sight to the eyes that will never see you as anything but mommy. It’s sleepless nights, its nursing scratches and scrapes, it’s being stern and protective. It’s teaching them to talk, to walk and to eventually run. It’s learning to hand your child to a stranger to let them teach what you cannot at times. It’s bracing them for a fall, and dusting them off after they do. It’s seeing them cry and not knowing how to fix it, so you sit on the floor and hold them and cry right along beside them. It’s teaching them that they are smart, capable, funny and giving them the security to do great things. It’s building their self-esteem, supporting their dreams and loving them unconditionally. It’s letting them go, letting them fail and teaching them how to get back up. It’s going without so that they don’t have to, and being OK with it. Being a mother is a gift that is unimaginable to any woman who does not have a child in their life. It’s a connection that is unmatched and insurmountable in any form or other relationship. It’s a love that grows continually, a love that always wants more and better. It’s being terrified that you can’t prevent pain, injustice, heartbreak and at times even death. It’s laughing at jokes that aren’t even funny, but the way they say it makes it’s hilarious. It’s listening to stories that go on

and on without a point. It’s always being available for the “Mommy watch me!� yells and “Mommy I need you� pleas. It’s drowning out the word MOM repeated over and over in attempts to get your attention. Its songs sang out of tune and settling squabbles with siblings. It’s being mean, and teaching hard lessons, that hurt you inside so deep you want to cry, but you must stand strong with resolve. It’s being strong for them when you are weak. It’s smiling when you want to cry and crying when you’re smiling with pride. It’s looking through photographs and feeling your heart swell with love and happiness when you see the beauty, the happiness and life in your child’s smile and eyes. It’s confusion, mistakes, uncharted territory and blindfolded guessing. It’s snuggling on the couch watching a movie, braiding hair till your fingers hurt, it’s being woken up early on Saturday morning because they want to crawl in bed and be close to your heart. It’s having the worst day and having them hug you and tell you “mommy I love you�, and needing nothing more. It’s a blessing, a gift, a relationship that never ends and a love that never dies. It’s the best thing I have ever become, the greatest love I have ever felt and the best part about being me. https://www.huffpost.com/entry/what-being-a-mom-really-means_b_7242784

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Happy Mother’s Day A mother is she who can take the place of all others, but who’s place no one else can take. Warren Michelson

Saskatchewan Party MLA for Moose Jaw North moosejawnorthmla@shaw.ca

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Greg Lawrence

Saskatchewan Party MLA for Moose Jaw Wakamow

Happy Mother’s Day! you make for those you love. 306-694-1001 • 412 Lillooet Street West • greglawrencemla@sasktel.net


MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020 • PAGE A11

Quotes for Mom

Our moms are our superheroes and biggest supporters, but we usually don’t tell them enough how much they’re appreciated. On her special day, tell your mom how much she means to you with these heartwarming messages about motherhood.

· “A mother is your first friend, your best friend, your forever friend.” —Unknown · “When you are looking at your mother, you are looking at the purest love you will ever know.” —Charley Benetto · “Mother is the heartbeat in the home; and without her, there seems to be no heartthrob.” —Leroy Brownlow · “Mothers are like glue. Even when you can’t see them, they’re still holding the family together.” —Susan Gale

· “My Mother: She is beautiful, softened at the edges and tempered with a spine of steel. I want to grow old and be like her. ” —Jodi Picoult · “Mother is the name for God in the lips and hearts of little children.” —William Makepeace Thackeray · “The influence of a mother in the lives of her children is beyond calculation.” —James E. Faust · “It may be possible to gild pure gold, but who can make his mother more beautiful?” —Mahatma Gandhi · “There is no role in life that is more essential than that of motherhood.” —Elder M. Russell Ballard · “Youth fades; love droops; the leaves of friendship fall; A mother’s secret hope outlives them all.” —Oliver Wendell Holmes

Mother

· “Motherhood is the exquisite inconvenience of being another person’s everything.” —Unknown · “Only mothers can think of the future because they give birth to it in their children.” —Maxim Grosky · “My mother was my role model before I even knew what that word was.” —Lisa Leslie · “To describe my mother would be to write about a hurricane in its perfect power.” —Maya Angelou · “Motherhood is the biggest gamble in the world. It is the glorious life force. It’s huge and scary – it’s an act of infinite optimism.” —Gilda Radner

https://www.shutterfly.com/ideas/mothers-dayquotes/

Mother

You taught me the right from the wrong. You sat up with me through the nights so long, on the days when I was sick and bad. Today, I just want to tell you, Mother, it is only you who understands. I love you so much.

More Quotes for Mom

• “Any mother could perform the jobs of several air-traffic controllers with ease.” —Lisa Alther • “A mother is a person who, seeing there are only four pieces of pie for five people, promptly announces she never did care for pie.” —Tenneva Jordan • “An ounce of mother is worth a ton of priest.” —Spanish Proverb • “A mom forgives us all our faults, not to mention one or two we don’t even have.” —Robert Brault • “In the end, mothers are always right. No one else tells the truth.” —Randy Susan Meyers

• “God could not be everywhere, and therefore he made mothers.” —Rudyard Kipling • “We have a secret in our culture, and it’s not that birth is painful. It’s that women are strong.” —Laura Stavoe Harm • “It’s not easy being a mother. If it were, fathers would do it.” —The Golden Girls • “When your mother asks, ‘Do you want a piece of advice?’ it’s a mere formality. It doesn’t matter if you answer yes or no. You’re going to get it anyway.” —Erma Bombeck • “The phrase ’working mother’ is redundant.” —Jane Sellman

MLA

Lumsden-Morse Constituency lumsdenmorse.mla@sasktel.net

Happy Mother’s Day Great Selection of Mother’s Day Gift ideas! We are open for shopping by appointment only! Please call 306-692-9955 Visit us on Facebook Gifts galore from ceiling to floor. 26 Main St. N. • 306-692-9955

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PAGE A12 • MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020

D.&D. Quality Care YOUR HOME HEALTHCARE STORE We are remaining open our regular hours! Due to the COVID-19 we are willing to provide home deliveries to those who may be at risk. We are taking pre-cautionary measures to ensure both our safety and yours. Call to book a house call 306-691-0300

& 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR EDITOR@MJVEXPRESS.COM

Moms give us many gifts: love, care, energy, money. They also give us a gift of something they can never get back for themselves. It is one of the most precious gifts they can ever give us: we watch it every day, Color Key: P = Pink Y = Yellow

we use it, it flies by, once we spend it, we can never get it back...

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Mothers spend their _______ on us.

WORDSEARCH

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A Precious Gift!

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Puzzles

IF GOOD PEOPLE DO NOTHING EVIL TRIUMPHS

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DOWN 1. Proclaim one’s support 2. Be fully aware 3. Arrive (abbrev.) 4. Flexible mineral 5. Views 6. Brigand 7. About a US quart 8. Arab chieftain 9. Shade tree 10. Downy juicy fruit (plural) 13. Steps 14. Stitched 15. Grain storage buildings Daily Sudoku Puzzles by KrazyDad, April 29 16. Unacceptably 19. Doorkeeper

S U D O K U Sudoku #5 - Challenging

3

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Sudoku #6 - Challenging 2 3 4 8 9 5 7 6 5 9 1 3 7 6 2 8 6 8 7 2 4 1 3 9 Puzzle 9 4 8 5 3 2 6 1 7 2 5 6 1 9 8 4 Solutions 3 1 6 7 8 4 5 2 8 5 9 4 2 3 1 7 4 6 2 1 5 7 9 3 1 7 3 9 6 8 4 5

3 9 6 8 2

Fill in the blank squares so that each row, each column and each 3-by-3 block contain all of the digits 1 thru 9. 4

8

If you use logic you can solve the puzzle without guesswork.

4 3 9 5

4 9 3 2 8 5 5 6 2 8 7 1 6 4 9 7 1 3 2

Need a little help? The hints page shows a logical order to solve the puzzle. Use it to identify the next square you should solve. Or use the answers page if you really get stuck. 7 1 5 9

7

5

1 4

AMPLY, ASSETS, BROWN, COUNCIL, COVER, DASH, DOCUMENTARY, EARTHQUAKE, FORCE, FRONT, FULLY, GRAIN, GRASS, HANGS, JOCKEY, JOINS, LABEL, MUGS, NASTY, OBSESS, PERFORATE, RELEASE, RUNE, SECOND, SIDES, SKATE, STARTS, STRIP, STRONG, TEASE THERAPY, THERE, TIGHTS, TYCOON, VALOR

Š 2020 KrazyDad.com


MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020 • PAGE A13

Congratulations New Parents! Brandi & Josh Redshaw of Moose Jaw April 27, 2020, 9:11 am Male 9lbs, 1.25oz

Taylor Denet & Derek Wilson of Moose Jaw April 27, 2020, 11:07 am Male 7lbs, 9oz

Rosanna & Ron Entz

of Brownlee April 20, 2020, 5:24 pm Female 6lbs, 11oz

Bajramsha & Faruk Huscimi of Moose Jaw April 29, 2020, 11:52 pm Male 8lbs, 6oz

Sierra Sloan-Gauthier & Adam Carefoot of Moose Jaw May 1, 2020, 11:15 pm Male 10lbs, 5oz

Sasha & Thomas Uzzell of Moose Jaw May 2, 2020, 12:32 am Female 6lbs, 11oz

From The Kitchen

P u t a l i t t l e l o ve i nto f a m i l y-p rep a re d m e a l s By Joyce Walter For Moose Jaw Express

Children and dads will put their meal-making skills to work on Mother’s Day to make the day an extra-special one for the moms, grandmas, aunts, sisters and other special woman in their lives. This week’s recipes come from the family recipe box. ••• Hawaiian Pasta Salad 1 lb. elbow macaroni, cooked and drained 1/3 cup apple cider vinegar 1-20 oz. can pineapple chunks, drained 1-8 oz. can diced ham 1 cup shredded carrots 1/2 cup green onion Dressing: 3/4 cup pineapple juice 1 tbsp. sugar 1 1/2 cups mayonnaise 1-6 oz. container pineapple yogurt Cook and drain macaroni. Stir in vinegar and set aside to cool.

In a large bowl pour in macaroni, pineapple chunks, diced ham, carrots and onion. In a medium bowl stir mayonnaise and yogurt into pineapple juice. Add sugar and mix well. Add dressing to macaroni mixture and toss until combined. Chill in refrigerator before serving. ••• Chicken and Vegetables in Foil 8 chicken legs or thighs, skin on 1 onion, sliced 1/4 cup or more barbecue sauce, regular or sweet and sour 1 cup sliced mushrooms 1/2 green pepper, sliced in rounds salt and pepper to taste Four large pieces of heavy duty foil. Spray dull side with non-stick spray. Brush both sides of chicken pieces with barbecue sauce and place two pieces on each piece of foil. Divide prepared vegetables between four piec-

es. Season to taste. Fold foil to make a tight package and place on a baking sheet. Place in a pre-heated oven at 350 degrees F and cook for 25-30 minutes or until chicken is cooked and vegetables are soft. Serve immediately. Be careful of hot steam when opening packages. ••• Baked Banana Split 4 large bananas 1/2 cup crushed pineapple, drained 16 marshmallows Peel and cut bananas in half lengthwise. Arrange side by side in a buttered, shallow baking dish. Spoon crushed pineapple over the bananas and top with marshmallows. Bake at 350 degrees F for 10-15 minutes until marshmallows are melted. Serve while hot. Joyce Walter can be reached at ronjoy@sasktel.net

City Hall Council Notes

No change in city operations means no need for media briefings, mayor says Jason G. Antonio - Moose Jaw Express

The City of Moose Jaw has not held its weekly pandemic news conferences in weeks, which has prevented the media from asking questions, so the Moose Jaw Express went directly to the mayor for answers. The Express emailed Mayor Fraser Tolmie several coronavirus-related questions at 12:53 p.m. on April 24, seeking more information about the cancellation of the news conferences and clarity on other issues such as when the media can attend city council meetings in person. At 4:45 p.m. that day, Tolmie emailed back his responses. He did not answer all of the questions. The first set of questions asked about the cancellation of the news conferences, what prompted this decision, how city hall planned to communicate with residents, and why Tolmie was showing preference to one Moose Jaw news outlet despite saying in a previous email that all media should be treated with “fairness.” “The premier rolled out the ‘Re-Open Saskatchewan Plan’ yesterday (April 23). Council and administration will be closely reviewing this document and the potential impacts it will have in the future concerning Moose Jaw,” Tolmie wrote. “News conferences these past two weeks have not been necessary because there have been no significant operational changes. This has not stopped us from issuing media updates, which all media are entitled to. Typically, when media receive those releases, they are free to contact us just like you have done through this email.”

In the second set of questions, the Express asked when city hall would allow the media to attend meetings in person and who made the original decision to lock out media. “According to the Re-Open Saskatchewan plan, we will be looking at restrictions being lifted for media in Phase 3 when public gatherings are being increased to 15 persons,” wrote Tolmie, “but no date has been decided by the province on when Phase 3 will be implemented.” Another question asked how many people attended the April 13 council meeting. The Express learned from sources at city hall that more than 10 people attended the meeting at one point. “Our last council meeting had a limit of 10. However, one person from administration did show up unexpectedly during the middle of the meeting and he was asked to leave once it was recognized that we were over the limit,” Tolmie said. City manager Jim Puffalt said on April 9 that Moose Jaw is an “independent organization,” that makes its own decisions and doesn’t need to follow the example of other cities, the Express pointed out. However, Puffalt’s April 13 council report indicated city administration followed Regina and Saskatoon as examples to implement financial measures to help residents during the pandemic. The Express wondered if Tolmie approved of the city manager misleading the media and giving contradictory answers. “Concerning the financial measures that Moose Jaw

City Council has taken, we decided to work from what we felt we could make cuts to. In discussions with mayors of other communities such as Regina and Saskatoon, they implemented measures and then had to find ways to cut costs,” Tolmie wrote. “We looked at ways that we could save and deliver internally before making any decisions. “The end result may have been the same outcome, but our process was different from other communities. It would be irresponsible for council and administration not to look at other communities and see what measures they are taking at this time. It must be stated the decisions are with council and we are looking out for the best interests of the residents of Moose Jaw.” The city manager also said on April 9 that city hall had locked out the media to keep council chambers safe for the emergency measures organization (EMO) team, the Express noted. The newspaper asked the mayor how city administration determined whether EMO members were healthy and whether the members were tested beforehand. “It is essential that the EMO team are protected from any unnecessary exposure,” Tolmie said, “and we have made every effort to provide multiple viewing options so that media and the public have unfiltered access including recorded votes.” The next regular council meeting is Monday, May 11.

Don’t complain about what you allow

editor@mjvexpress.com jritchie@moosejawtoday.com


PAGE A14 • MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020

City Hall Council Notes

DON’T COMPLAIN ABOUT WHAT YOU ALLOW - MAKE A COMPLAINT

AsitseemsthatMooseJawCityHalldoesnotseemtoacknowledgecitizencomplaints,ifyouare disgruntledaboutthelackofcommunicationatCityHallorfeelyouhaveaviablecomplaintwith howtheCityofMooseJawisconductingtheiraffairsandspendingourtaxpayers’money,please make your voices known to the Ombudsman’s office in Saskatchewan. OmbudsmanSaskatchewanpromotesandprotectsfairnessandintegrityinthedesignand deliveryofgovernmentservices.Theytakecomplaintsaboutprovincialgovernmentministries, agencies,Crowncorporationsandmanyhealthentities.Theyalsotakecomplaintsaboutmunicipal entities.

OmbudsmanSaskatchewanofficesarelocated at 150 – 2401 Saskatchewan Drive Regina Sask. S4P 4H8. Back in July the Ombudsman was Mary McFadyen; she can be reached by phone at the Regina office at (306)787-6211, Fax306.787-9090ore-mailombreg@ombudsman.sk.ca.Letthemknowhowyoufeelandget them to investigate.

Canadian Tire rejects council’s request for $200,000 non-refundable deposit Jason G. Antonio - Moose Jaw Express

Canadian Tire rejected city council’s demand of a $200,000 non-refundable deposit for its proposed project, so city hall will attempt to convince the company to continue forward with a new agreement. During its April 13 regular meeting, council passed an amended motion to pursue a revival and amending agreement with Canadian Tire Real Estate Limited subject to payment of a $200,000 non-refundable deposit. The original agreement would have given the company a one-year project extension and extra time to pay deposits totalling $250,000. Canadian Tire wants to purchase 4.78 hectares (11.95 acres) of land on the exhibition grounds for $3.17 million. In a letter to city hall on April 16, the company’s commercial real estate manager rejected the amendment and demand for the deposit. Council decision During its April 27 regular meeting, council voted 5-2 to have the city clerk and mayor pursue the original revival and amending agreement with Canadian Tire, without the non-refundable deposit. In favour were Mayor Fraser Tolmie and councillors Dawn Luhning, Chris Warren, Scott McMann and Crystal Froese. Opposed were councillors Heather Eby and Brian Swanson. Swanson called a point of order by noting this was simply another attempt to reconsider the original April 13 motion. However, city clerk/solicitor Myron Gulka-Tiechko replied that amended motion attempted to counter Canadian Tire’s request to extend the agreement by forcing it to pay the deposit. This motion was the original one. Council discussion Mayor Fraser Tolmie, who introduced the motion, explained residents have asked why the community doesn’t have certain businesses or why they have to travel elsewhere to pick up items. They have also allegedly asked him when council plans to attract businesses instead of

turning them away. Residents’ lives have been turned upside down by the coronavirus pandemic, while their jobs and educational chances are in doubt, he continued. Yet, it’s positive that the provincial government plans to lift restrictions soon to allow forward progress. “But forward to where, though? Where is the City of Moose Jaw going if its council kills opportunities?” Tolmie said. Residents will need jobs when this pandemic is over, but there won’t be any if there are no opportunities. People will question what their community leaders did to create jobs, he added, and whether they ensured the municipality could succeed. Canadian Tire has been here for more than 20 years, is a great community partner, and wants to grow, said Froese. It wants to put the project on hold due to the pandemic and has asked for support. “This is about collaboration and looking forward to the future, for sure,” she added. Claim of anti-business untrue The claim that councillors who voted for the April 13 motion are anti-business and anti-economic development is untrue, Eby said, adding she is not either of those and is offended by those accusations. “This was a vote for me based on the merits of the deal,” she continued. While some have claimed council added the non-refundable deposit at the last minute, she pointed out Canadian Tire wanted an extension at the last minute and did not indicate it would even sign the deal. Although Canadian Tire rejected the non-refundable deposit, it still wants to work with council, said Warren. City administration has worked hard on this project and talks with the company show that. “It was and still is disappointing that we wanted to do this to a good corporate citizen,” he continued, adding an agreement for a project worth $25 million doesn’t happen

overnight. Doubtful project will proceed “I think it’s a stretch to say council has killed this deal,” said McMann. McMann doubted the project would proceed, especially since it has been four years, and the retail sector likely won’t be able to support this in the future. Furthermore, he thought it was a twisted claim that the $200,000 killed the project. A two-inch-thick sheaf of papers on this issue has accumulated since 2016, said Swanson while holding up the documentation. He, too, was offended by the implication that he was anti-business for supporting the deposit. Failure to attract businesses Instead, he believed doing deals like this was the reason businesses don’t come here. He pointed to Carpere Canada, the Southeast Industrial Park and property on Diefenbaker Drive as areas where council failed to attract business. “There is a clear record and that it’s we don’t do a very good job on our end,” Swanson continued. It’s false that city council changed the original agreement at the last minute since it expired on April 13 anyway, he pointed out. Council wouldn’t have received any money from Canadian Tire when the agreement expired. City administration should have given a report saying the deal had expired, but instead, someone at city hall negotiated a new agreement without authorization, said Swanson. Canadian Tire has put $250,000 into its trust accounts as part of the agreement, while council has kept this land off the market for four years. “Non-refundable deposits are a normal part of business … ,” he added. “There should be some attempt to recoup costs for the city. That’s good business.” The next regular council meeting is May 11.

Church of God gets approval to turn properties into parking lots Jason G. Antonio - Moose Jaw Express

Moose Jaw’s Church of God is exploding at the seams with people and needs to expand its building to continue to run its programs and provide a suitable space for worship. To accommodate a future expansion, though, the church would have to use valuable parking space on its current lot. It would then have to find additional parking on nearby properties. It solved that problem by purchasing two lots —at 73 Hochelaga Street East and 630 First Avenue Northeast — from Jones Funeral Home on March 20, and intends to demolish the residential one-unit dwellings and private trees on those properties and construct parking lots. However, the municipality must give permission due to zoning requirements. During its April 27 regular meeting, city council voted 4-3 to give Moose Jaw Church of God discretionary approval to turn the two properties into parking lots, with the church to bear all project costs. Mayor Fraser Tolmie and councillors Chris Warren, Dawn Luhning and Heather Eby were in favour, while councillors Crystal Froese, Scott McMann and Brian Swanson were opposed. City administration had recommended that council deny approval since the project did not meet specific criteria in the downtown Local Area Plan and the Official Community Plan, while there were already many underused spaces available in the area. Council voted 4-3 against

that motion. Participating via video link, Church of God’s Craig Matt explained the church has been part of the community since 1943 and has resided at 50 Hochelaga Street East since 1985. The church has grown in the last two decades, and in 2010, it added more space to accommodate that increased attendance. However, Matt noted that was a Band-Aid solution and the building is now bursting with 650 to 750 members. One of its community programs, Born to Dance, has roughly 300 underprivileged children who participate. “We are one of the largest churches in Moose Jaw operating in a medium-sized building … ,” he said. “We believe with extra parking and an addition on the church, our congregation would grow by 200 to 300 people.” A building committee has looked at purchasing a building but found most are too small, while it would be too expensive to build a new structure. Church of God has worked with its neighbours to address its parking issues, Matt said. Congregants can park at places such as KFC, Rexall Drugs, Jones Funeral Home, and empty lots in the area. However, that is not ideal, since members have had to move their vehicles at inopportune times, such as during weddings. Since the community uses the building almost every day, Matt noted people like to meet beforehand for coffee or

supper, which provides an economic boost to the downtown. More parking would likely bring more people to the area and be a “solid win for our city.” “I support Church of God and all the great work you’re doing there, especially the Born to Dance program,” said Eby, pointing out the amount of activity proves church happens more than once a week. Churches were built downtown years ago, but by the 1980s and 1990s, they had moved to the outskirts, she added. Now churches are moving back to the heart of the community, which she thinks is great since people will live downtown. Swanson was not in favour of turning two tax-paying properties into locations that did not pay taxes. He also pointed out two nearby neighbours wrote letters against the proposed projects. “I appreciate the difficulties the church is experiencing, but I do not see converting more of this area into parking lots as in the best interests of the city,” he added. In November 2016 council passed a similar motion to allow Victory Church to expand its parking, said Tolmie. He didn’t want to see “any religious wars” occur even though parking is an issue. Council has helped Church of God in the past, while this is a last-ditch attempt to address those concerns.


MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020 • PAGE A15

City Hall Council Notes Households have produced less garbage during pandemic than originally thought, data shows Jason G. Antonio - Moose Jaw Express

While the pandemic has forced more residents to live at home, the municipality has actually collected less garbage during the past two months compared to the same time last year. City hall has monitored the volume of waste going to the landfill since the provincial government ordered everyone to stay home on March 17, a city council report explained. Since then, city hall has analyzed bi-weekly residential waste collection for March and April compared to March, April and May of last year. The data for 2019 and 2020 show: • March: 224,642 kgs / 214,273 kgs; • April: 299,994 kgs / 274,440 kgs; • May: 308,810 kgs/ N/A. Based on these numbers, the quantity of waste disposed of in the residential stream in April is 8.5-per-cent less compared to last year, the report noted. Based on the empirical data, the coronavirus pandemic has not contributed to an increase in residential waste disposal. City administration had considered starting weekly garbage collection a month early, on May 1 versus June 1, although this would have cost $25,000. “We are not sure why that (decrease in garbage) is. We

double-checked the figures and they are accurate,” city manager Jim Puffalt told council on April 27. “We polled other cities. This is across the board. Some are increasing, some are decreasing, and some are staying the same.” Since more people are at home and this has been a warm spring, city hall believes providing a free day at the landfill to drop off yard waste would be beneficial, he continued. This would also ensure yard waste doesn’t end up in garbage bins. The weekend of May 2 and 3 allowed residents to dispose of their yard waste for free at the landfill. The second such weekend will be the Victoria Day long weekend from May 15 to 17. It will cost the municipality $1,500 to run this second weekend. City administration can live with two free weekends at the landfill, Puffalt added. This might take pressure off some people if only a few residents have additional garbage. Coun. Chris Warren supported having two free weekends at the landfill for yard waste, noting four of five people in his household are now at home every day and they have not produced any extra garbage. Besides yard waste, Warren also wondered what options

residents had to dispose of hazardous household waste. There were two hazardous household waste days scheduled, but the pandemic caused the cancellation of the spring drop off, said Darrin Stephanson, manager of utilities. However, the second drop-off day could occur in the fall, depending upon how the rollout of the province’s Re-open Saskatchewan Plan goes. However, he added, the landfill does accept materials such as oil, antifreeze and typical motor lubricants. It’s good to receive feedback about just how much garbage the municipality has collected during this time, while it’s also positive that city hall double-checked the numbers, said Coun. Heather Eby. However, she still hears from some homeowners that their garbage is full regularly and they want weekly pickup to start on May 1. “I understand that this is an issue for some people,” she added, “but we do have to follow the report and information we have from administration.” Council later approved a motion to receive and file the report and to approve a second free drop-off of yard waste at the landfill during the May long weekend for $1,500.

Appeals board approves construction of garages despite bylaw conflict Jason G. Antonio - Moose Jaw Express

The Development Appeals Board continues to approve projects that contradict the zoning bylaw, with two more property owners receiving the green light to proceed with projects. The board approved the appeal applications of Dennis Grado of 204 Stadacona Street West and Norm Hales of Horizon Homes at 1017 Vaughan Street during its April 21 meeting. The board then sent a report to city council with the results of the meeting. Council approved a motion during its April 27 regular meeting to receive and file the report. 204 Stadacona Street West Grado wants to build a detached garage that takes up about 45 per cent of the proposed site. This is contrary to the 40 per

cent as prescribed in the zoning bylaw, the report explained. The property is zoned R1 — large lot low density residential district, which allows for a one-unit dwelling and any complementary community uses. In this situation, Grado’s house is large and covers 35 per cent of the yard space, excluding any accessory buildings. The largest accessory building that he could construct would have to be 298 square feet in size; the proposed detached garage would be 642 square feet. After reviewing the appeal application, the board approved the project for three reasons: • City hall recently granted similar variances to neighbouring properties in the same zoning district, so granting this appeal would not amount to special priv-

Coun. Scott McMann named deputy mayor for next two months Jason G. Antonio - Moose Jaw Express

Coun. Scott McMann will act as deputy mayor at city council meetings during the next two months, after new appointments were made recently to lead council committees. During its April 27 regular meeting, council voted unanimously to have McMann act as deputy mayor from May 1 to June 30, or until a successor is appointed. Other appointments include Coun. Heather Eby acting as chairwoman of the executive committee, and Coun. Chris Warren acting as chairman of the personnel committee, from May 1 to June 30, or until successors are found. From March 1 to April 30, Coun. Dawn Luhning was deputy mayor, McMann was chairman of the executive committee and Eby was chairwoman of the personnel committee. Once the next two months are completed, from July 1 to Aug. 31, Eby will be deputy mayor, Coun. Chris Warren will be chairman of the executive committee and Coun. Crystal Froese will be chairwoman of the personnel committee.

UNLESS SOMEONE LIKE YOU STARTS TO CARE, NOTHING IS GOING TO CHANGE Letters to the editor

editor@mjvexpress.com jritchie@moosejawtoday.com

ilege; • Granting the appeal would not compromise the purpose and intent of the bylaw, especially since Grado has to remove the existing garage and shed before he can build a new garage; • None of Grado’s neighbours objected to this project, so it would not injuriously affect neighbouring properties. 1017 Vaughan Street Hales wants to construct a detached garage that would cover 49 per cent of the proposed site area and 38 per cent of the rear yard, which is contrary to the 40 per cent and 35 per cent, respectively, prescribed in zoning bylaw, the report explained. This property is also zoned R1; Hales wants to construct a garage that is 520 square feet in size.

After reviewing the appeal application, the board approved the project for three reasons: • City hall recently granted similar variances to neighbouring properties in the same zoning district, so granting this appeal would not amount to special privilege; • Granting the appeal would not compromise the purpose and intent of the bylaw, especially since Hales’ property lot is smaller than average, which limits the buildable area, so the board thought leniency should be given; • None of Hales’ neighbours objected to this project, so it would not injuriously affect neighbouring properties.

VILLAGE OF CARONPORT PUBLIC NOTICE

Public notice is hereby given that the Council of the Village of Caronport intends to adopt a bylaw pursuant to The Planning and Development Act, 2007 to amend Bylaw 5/93 known as the Zoning Bylaw. The proposed bylaw is intended to amend the Zoning Map to rezone part of the SE 29-17-28-W2M, Plan No. 92-MJ02767-2 from I - Institutional District to R-2 Medium Density Residential District. The reason for this amendment is to support the subdivision and potential development of five (5) new residential lots as illustrated below.

A copy of the proposed amending bylaws may be viewed at the Village Administration Office. These documents are available for viewing by any person without payment of any fee between the hours of 9:00am - 4:00pm, Monday through Friday, excluding holidays, up to and including May 21, 2020, by appointment only. Council will hold a public hearing on May 21, 2020 at 7:30pm at the Golden Age Centre located at 203 Valleyview Drive, to hear any person or group that wants to comment on the proposed bylaws. Council will also consider written comments received at the hearing or delivered to the undersigned at the Village Administration Office prior to the hearing. Issued at the Village of Caronport, this 16th day of April, 2020. Gina Hallborg, Administrator


PAGE A16 • MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020

SEIU-West

NURSING WEEK

2020

In Celebration of Nursing Week SEIU-West is proud to acknowledge those incredible front line staff who provide hands on care to our residents, clients, and patients in our public health care system (hospitals, home care, and long-term care facilities), retirement homes, group homes, and private care homes. Our members work in the following family of nursing classifications: Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs), Continuing Care Assistants (CCAs), Personal Support Staff, and Direct Care Workers. In the context of the current public health crisis, we want to showcase for the public the great dedication, professionalism, and compassionate care that our family of nursing is during this time of uncertainty and risk. The work they do is hands-on, personal, and intimate; it is physically, emotionally and mentally intense.

They literally face the daily threat of COVID-19 to do what is best for those in need of care. Their work is invaluable because their skill and professionalism are necessary to build stronger and healthier communities. Your SEIU-West family of nursing not only does the hands-on care, they provide emotional support to their patients, clients, and residents when their families can’t be there. They do all this and advocate for the end of understaffing in our public health care system (find out more at www.EndUnderstaffing.ca) which will ensure they can provide the care necessary to improve the health and quality of life for all in Saskatchewan. While our communities come together in an effort to

National Nursing Week May 11 to 17, 2020 Headquarters: Public Health Care Favourite Saying: Solidarity Forever! Slogan: Stronger Together! Superpowers: • Calm under pressure • Compassionate • Champions of justice Known for: Provision of quality hands on care for clients, patients, and residents Weakness: None known

flatten the curve – we know that safety is critical. Every single one of us shares in the responsibility to do our part – we should know that these members of the nursing team are in need of access to adequate supplies of PPE and that they require our continued community effort to stay home. It’s this group of tremendous individuals that have set aside so much in their personal lives to manage daily care needs during this pandemic, along with the rest of the health care provider team. Find out more about your public health care team of front line heroes at PurpleWorks.ca. On behalf of SEIU-West, I want to thank all members of the nursing team for their incredible knowledge, skill, and compassionate care.

Name: Brenda Occupation: Continuing Care Assistant AKA: CCA

Front Line Heroes Name: Charlene Occupation: Licensed Practical Nurse AKA: LPN

PurpleWorks.ca


MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020 • PAGE A17

SEIU-West

NURSING WEEK

2020

Greg Lawrence

Moose Jaw-Lake Centre-Lanigan

Saskatchewan Party MLA for Moose Jaw Wakamow

Tom Lukiwski

MP

We are so grateful for your compassion and dedication keeping our community healthy. Thank you to all Nurses!

Join me in saluting National Nursing Week 2020; your dedication to our community is greatly appreciated.

Call the office at: 306-691-3577

306-694-1001 • 412 Lillooet Street West • greglawrencemla@sasktel.net

Thank You to All Our Nurses! Warren Michelson

Saskatchewan Party MLA for Moose Jaw North

A Nurses Prayer Give to my heart, Oh Lord... COMPASSIONS AND UNDERSTANDING. Give to my hands skills and tenderness. Give my ears the ability to listen. GIVE TO MY LIPS WORDS OF COMFORT. Give to me, Lord.... STRENGTH FOR THIS SELFLESS SERVICE. And enable me to give hope to those I am called to serve. Amen

Join Me In Recognizing National Nursing Week 2020 This year’s theme of Nurses: A Voice to Lead – Nursing the World to Health demonstrates the importance of nurses in maintaining a healthy community. Thank you for choosing to serve our families.

306-692-8884 • 326-B High St. W. • moosejawnorthmla@shaw.ca

Thank You Nurses Our Front-line Heroes Please donate at mjhf.org or call 306-694-0373


PAGE A18 • MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020

City Hall Council Notes

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More recyclable items go to the landfill than into blue bins, report says Even though Moose Jaw households recycled roughly 1.5 million kilograms of materials last year, an estimated 2.4 million kilograms of recyclables still ended up the landfill, a council report says. The current residential recycling collection program began in late 2015, with 381,830 kgs of recyclables collected during the last three months of that year. Since that time, there has been an 81-per-cent increase in such materials collected, the report explained. In 2016 the amount collected was 1.51 million kgs; in 2017 it was 1.54 million kgs; in 2018 it was 1.56 million kgs; and in 2019 it was 1.53 million kgs. However, the report continued, an analysis of residential waste at the landfill indicates an estimated 1.31 million kgs of paper and 1.11 million kgs of plastic are still disposed of in the residential waste stream annually, the report continued. A more significant portion of these products could be collected by increasing public education on recycling practices and introducing program changes such as smaller waste carts or bi-weekly waste collection. The solid waste utility started increas-

Jason G. Antonio - Moose Jaw Express ing education last December using initial three-year term, with two op- time in our community to increase recymail-outs, with further communica- tional extensions of two years each. cling and reduce unnecessary waste in tion planned in 2020, said the report. The first two-year extension concludes our landfill with our blue bin recycling The residential waste collection service on Sept. 30, while the second two-year program, but the recent numbers show was moved to an eight-month bi-week- extension starts Oct. 1, 2020 and runs to that we can do a better job,” Tolmie said. ly schedule more than two years ago. Sept. 30, 2020. “This is disappointing, but I can see in However, the data shows that change If council had terminated the agree- the future that there will be improvehad little effect on increasing recycling ment after the first two-year extension, ments over time as more of our younger it would have cost the municipality generations become homeowners.” collection. Cardboard, newspaper and mixed fi- $250,000 to buy out the 12,500 collec- Tolmie has two daughters, ages four bre paper make up 82.7 per cent of the tion carts. and seven, who are aware that society residential recycling stream, with these Mayor’s response should recycle more. He believes they items still carrying value and still sold In an email to the Moose Jaw Express learned at school how important recyon the commodity markets, city coun- after the meeting, Mayor Fraser Tolmie cling is and want to practise it at home. cil learned during its April 27 regular pointed out not all the paper and plastic “As I mentioned before, we still have a meeting. The remaining 17.3 per cent mentioned in the report is recyclable. way to go, but with an educational camof the recycling stream is plastic, steel, For example, single-use plastic bags and paign being implemented, I would like aluminum, glass, and waste. Material food-stained cardboard cannot be recy- to see better numbers in the future,” he sorting and recycling centres have been cled. said, adding an 81-per-cent increase in challenged to find suitable markets for However, he continued, that does not volume of recyclable materials since excuse the fact there is too much recy- 2015 has been positive. these products. The recycling statistics were part of an clable material going to the landfill. overall report to council about extend- “We have made great strides over ing the current recycling collection contract. In a vote of 6-1, council awarded the final two-year contract extension to Loraas Disposal Services Inc. Coun. Brian Swanson was opposed. The recycling contract with Loraas beJason G. Antonio - Moose Jaw Express gan in October 2015 and included an Financial measures to ease the economic Furthermore, city hall won’t add late burden on residents whom the coronavi- payment charges to customers’ utility acrus pandemic has affected will go into counts for recycling, garbage collection, effect quickly now that city council has water or sewer services from April 1 to passed amendments to municipal bylaws. Sept. 30. During its April 27 regular meeting, city City council has also instructed city adcouncil unanimously approved amend- ministration to redirect collection efforts ments to the tax payment, discount and and adjust any short- and medium-term penalties bylaw, and the sewer and water payment terms for customers. utility bylaw. The unanimous approv- This means administration should redial means there won’t be a long delay to rect collection activities and work with tax implement the changes that council dis- and utility customers to establish payment plans. Moreover, it will also review the cussed during its April 13 meeting. As part of the tax payments, discounts tax instalment payment program (TIPPS) and penalties bylaw, city hall won’t pe- and the water instalment payment pronalize customers’ tax accounts between gram (WIPPS). City administration will April 1 and Sept. 30. With the sewer and then bring revisions to council for approvwater utility bylaw, city hall will waive al, with those changes expected to provide penalties for outstanding bills from April additional flexibility for these programs to 1 to Sept. 30, while additional changes help residents facing large balances once will alter collection requirements that the the penalty-free period passes. bylaw specifies.

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Bylaw changes to help residents affected by pandemic

Broken hydrants won’t be fixed during pandemic unless necessary Jason G. Antonio - Moose Jaw Express There are 33 fire hydrants throughout Moose Jaw that are out of service, but city hall is not prioritizing the repair of these fixtures ahead of other projects. These three-dozen hydrants are on the active backlog list with 129 other jobs that require attention, Darrin Stephanson, manager of utilities, told city council during its April 27 regular meeting. Unless there is poor fire coverage in an area, the municipality will not repair the hydrants ahead of other issues such as service leaks, water main breaks, or failed water connections to homes. “When we do get notice of a hydrant, we

do confirm that there is adequate fire coverage for the trucks to hook to with hoses if required to in the area,” he continued, “and that will determine if it needs to be fixed immediately, or if it can wait on our backlog list until we get to it.” Repair requests arise every day throughout the community, so hydrants are not a priority, Stephanson added. City administration decided to push off hydrant repairs during the coronavirus pandemic since city hall would have to shut down the water for one full block. City administration wanted to avoid that since handwashing is important during this time.


MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020 • PAGE A19

Construction group happy that council removed deposit from Canadian Tire deal Jason G. Antonio - Moose Jaw Express

The Moose Jaw Construction Association (MJCA) is pleased that city council withdrew its demand of a $200,000 non-refundable deposit from a proposed land agreement with Canadian Tire. The association sent council a letter on April 27 — in the morning before council’s meeting that evening — expressing its concern about the non-refundable deposit. The MJCA thought council’s decision was “bad for business and (would) reflect poorly on the city.” Justin Hoyes, MJCA president, pointed out in the letter that Canadian Tire wanted to postpone its $20-million project on Thatcher Drive East due to the coronavirus pandemic. Since the MJCA and its members rely on council to facilitate growth opportunities, a “decision like this breaks trust and negatively affects the ability of the city to create future business partnerships” and “is contradictory

to your message that the City of Moose Jaw is open for business.” During its April 27 regular meeting, council voted 5-2 to have the city clerk and mayor pursue the original revival and amending agreement with Canadian Tire, without the non-refundable deposit. Councillors Heather Eby and Brian Swanson were opposed. “At the MJCA, we’re definitely happy that the decision was overturned and that they’re proceeding with the proposed agreements for the extension, so it’s good news,” Hoyes told the Moose Jaw Express recently. The concern the association had was about more than just the non-refundable deposit, he continued. To ask for the money retroactively “kind of leaves a bad taste” in the community’s mouth. “I’m not arguing (against) a non-refundable deposit. I think that’s a good way to

kind of seal the deal, but it’s just late in the game in the middle of a pandemic. I think that’s where the rest of us were like, ‘ugh,’” Hoyes said. “It doesn’t look so good from the outside.” The mission of the association’s board is to provide value for its members, so a proposed $20-million project would fulfill that mission, he explained. While Canadian Tire won’t award the entire project to community tradesmen or suppliers, the opportunity exists for that to happen. For example, there could be paving, concrete, plumbing, and electrical work that local suppliers could complete. Council’s request for the non-refundable deposit “blew up in their face a bit,” Hoyes remarked. He thought the deposit was probably a must-have in this case, but council should have re-negotiated the original agreement in good faith. “Canadian Tire, as big as they are, they’re

still in a position where they’re hurting. It’s just bad optics,” he added. Canadian Tire is a billion-dollar company that is looking to invest millions of dollars here with this project. Moreover, it already has three businesses firmly established in the community, said Hoyes. He thought it was important to be patient with this potential deal since it doesn’t just happen overnight, even if it has taken four years. If Canadian Tire is willing to come back to the table, council would be foolish not to entertain that. “I don’t think there is going to be a triple-A type client like that knocking at our door anytime soon,” he stated. Other big-box stores could come to Moose Jaw, although any business is good business for the community, Hoyes added. He simply wanted Moose Jaw to encourage more deals and have other big players invest here.

Moose Jaw Gamers Association offers plenty of ideas to cut the isolation boredom Larissa Kurz

While everyone moves into their second month of social isolation, it’s safe to assume that the gamers of the world are the demographic doing the best at keeping themselves entertained at home — and the Moose Jaw Gamers Association is certainly no exception. MJGA spokesperson Kristian Sjoberg surveyed his fellow members to find out just how local gamers have been keeping busy and staying connected, in case anyone else may be in need of some new ideas as the pandemic measures continue. “Right now, where we have to be apart from each other, this can actually bring us all together, having all these activities to do that nowadays don’t necessarily require you to leave your house anymore,” said Sjoberg. For starters, the MJGA has moved its usual public Dungeons & Dragons adventure sessions onto the MJGA Discord server, with dungeon masters hosting video chats to play one-shot RPG sessions with eager adventurers. The next virtual D&D session is set to take place on May 9, with three different adventures available, and Sjoberg encourages anyone to reach out and sign up to take part in the event. The MJGA Discord server is actually a great place to be

right now, said Sjoberg, as plenty of members are getting creative with how they can use the online chat app’s features. “The other day they were doing karaoke and they did that through the video chat thing [on Discord] as well,” said Sjoberg. “That was hilarious, it was like a Friday night kind of thing, where normally you’d go to the bar [for it].” The Discord server is also an easy way to stay in touch while playing video games, since the app offers text and audio capabilities, and lots of members have been playing together that way as well. Some MGJA members have even been sharing updates on their new non-gaming hobbies through Discord — like one member’s growing stack of crochet projects, which she’s calling COVID Couture, said Sjoberg. Members have also used the flexibility of the Internet to stay old school in their entertainment, playing card games and board games together over video — setting up the same board game on both ends of the video call and playing along for each turn. “So the boards match each other and then you’re still able to play board games that way,” said Sjoberg. There is also a website that lets people play cards and oth-

er games together called playingcards.io, said Sjoberg, which has also become pretty popular with members as of late. Now is a great time to get into something new and nerdy, agreed Sjoberg, whether it be a new video game, cosplay project, board game, or tabletop RPG game — and the MJGA is always happy to help with the journey. The MJGA is always open to give recommendations on games to try or ways to get started with a new hobby, said Sjoberg. “As nerds, we’ve been preparing for this our entire lives, so we actually have lots of great ideas for things you can do,” laughed Sjoberg. “People can message us on Facebook or anything like that and we’ve got lots of suggestions if they’re having trouble thinking of stuff.” There’s plenty of resources available to run your own online RPG sessions, including the specialized website Roll20.net made for virtual D&D, and the MJGA has already shared some advice and tips on their Facebook page. The MJGA Discord server is also open for anyone to join right now, and the MJGA recommends keeping an eye on their social media for more stuff coming soon.

A Safe and Successful Growing Season MLA’s Column

Warren Michelson Moose Jaw North

Warren Michelson, MLA

The Re-Open Saskatchewan plan in response the COVID-19 pandemic was announced last week. The five-phase plan will continue to protect health and safety, while slowly lifting restrictions so that more businesses and facilities can reopen, and more employees can go back to work. Saskatchewan remains committed to supporting our businesses and industries even as restrictions are gradually lifted. In addition to the Saskatchewan Small Business Emergency Payment, The Business Response Team has been established to work with businesses to identify provincially and federally support programs available. Businesses can access this assistance by calling 1-844-800-8688 or emailing supportforbusiness@gov.sk.ca. Our government recognizes the challenges facing the agriculture industry as it begins its busiest season. Physical distancing restrictions require working in different ways. Many producers rely on temporary workers during the planting season, and any temporary workers arriving from outside Canada must self-isolate for fourteen days. Livestock industries also face challenges as cattle, pork and poultry producers have seen their markets diminish because of the closure of packing plants due to the COVID-19 pan-

demic. Staying focused on safety requires even more diligence when there is distraction due to stress or time pressures. SaskPower reminded farmers to be aware and take precautions around power lines as they head out to begin work for the spring season. There were 327 reported incidents of farm machinery contacting electrical equipment in 2019, which is up slightly from the previous year. All line contacts can be prevented by taking safety measures. One of these safety measures is taking care of physical and mental health, such as getting proper rest, drinking plenty of water and taking breaks throughout the day to prevent fatigue. The Farm Stress Line is an important tool in managing mental health during stressful times. The service is free, confidential and available 24/7 by calling 1-800-667-4442. Having the mental health support needed can be key to a safe and successful season. To further assist producers, our government continues to evaluate the business risk management programs to ensure they are meeting the needs of Saskatchewan’s agriculture industry. The AgriStability enrollment deadline for the 2020 program year has been extended to July 3, 2020. This step, which has been agreed

to by federal, provincial and territorial governments, will help producers manage the impacts of current market disruptions, increased expenses and production challenges. The federal and provincial governments have also agreed to increase the 2020 AgriStability interim benefit payment from 50 per cent to 75 per cent for Saskatchewan producers. Interim benefits can provide producers with a portion of their final AgriStability benefit early, to help support losses and cover costs. Saskatchewan producers can now apply for an interim benefit to receive 75 per cent of their estimated final 2020 benefit before completing their program year. Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Corporation is also

waiving the six months farming and one production cycle criteria for participants applying for 2020 interim benefits. To enroll in the AgriStability Program or to apply for an interim benefit, producers can contact their local Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Corporation office, call the AgriStability Call Centre toll-free at 1-886-270-8450 or email agristability@ scic.ca. Thank you to all agricultural workers for feeding our families. I wish you a safe and successful growing season. The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the position of this publication.


PAGE A20 • MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Online contest offers free portraits to six lucky graduates Jason G. Antonio - Moose Jaw Express

With all 2020 grad celebrations cancelled due to the coronavirus, Amy Prydalko with Purple Cloth Photography, thought she could brighten some students’ days by offering free portraits to graduates. Prydalko follows several photographers on social media and the internet, so she did some research to see what they were doing to help others during the pandemic lockdown, she explained. One idea she liked was where photographers shoot pictures of families on their front porches. She figured she could also help others by shooting grad portraits for free. “And I have a whole lot of friends who have kids who are graduating this year, so I was just kind of thinking (that) their whole world has been turned upside down, and they don’t get to do a lot of the things they may be planned for that they wanted to do,” she said, “like the banquets and grad parties and all those things that are a given in a normal year.” The idea to offer free portraits to six graduates is also a way to help families, especially since some parents might not be working right now. The six graduates — who are selected during a six-week online Facebook contest and can be graduating either Grade 8 or Grade 12 — can choose to have pictures taken of them in casual dress or

(Shutterstock) more formal wear. The students will have their photos taken once the physical distancing is no longer an issue. The grad will receive a 30-minute portrait session and 10 digital images, with print and photo release. Prydalko chose a six-week contest since she was unsure how long the pandemic restrictions would be in place, she said. She didn’t want to run a more extended contest until she had a better idea of what was happening in the province; she might only be able to shoot the pictures in the fall or winter.

“It seems like people are interested,” she continued. “Everyone is kind of commenting and sharing, so I’m happy with it. It’s not so much about publicity as much as giving back at this time …. It’s a way I can help out when the time is right.” Prydalko — who has four kids, with her oldest being 14 — also wanted to protect her own family and not go out if it wasn’t necessary. It will be disappointing and challenging for many students this year since they won’t be able to celebrate their graduations, she said. Many students she knows are disappointed about the situation. While the provincial government has said parts of the province would re-open by June, it’s unlikely that large numbers of students will be able to celebrate together. Purple Cloth Photography has been around for three years, but Prydalko prefers to operate the business more as a hobby then a full-time job, she explained. She loves everything about it, she added, including photographing kids since they are filled with joy, while it’s more fun to shoot natural pictures versus posed ones. For more information about the contest, visit www. facebook.com/purple.cloth.photography or www.purpleclothphotography.com.

Birthday Parades are no problem: Moose Jaw Police Service “We support anything that would bring a bit of sunshine into people’s live in these tough times.” Randy Palmer - Moose Jaw Express

When you have a rapidly growing phenomena like the Moose Jaw Birthday Parade, there are going to be some questions as to whether or not things are on the up-andup when it comes to the legality of the whole thing. Traffic issues and noise concerns immediately come to mind, given the number of cars and occasional horn honk or revved engine. But according to the Moose Jaw Police Service, not only are things being done properly and in a safe fashion, PUBLIC NOTICE RESORT VILLAGE OF SUN VALLEY

NOTICE OF INTENTION TO ADOPT BYLAW NO. 1-2020

Public notice is hereby given that the Council of the Resort Village of Sun Valley intends to adopt a bylaw, under The Planning and Development Act, 2007, to amend Bylaw No. 04-2017, known as the Zoning Bylaw. INTENT: The proposed bylaw will rezone: 1. The eastern portion of Lot 7, Block 19, Plan 63MJ03441, outlined in red, from RR-Resort Residential District to R1-Residential District; and 2. Lot 12, Block 19, Plan 63MJ03441, outlined in blue, from R1L-Residential Limited District to RR-Resort Residential District as shown on the following map.

they’re fully behind the whole proposition. “Of course, we support anything that puts a positive mood on the COVID-19 situation,” said Staff Sgt. Randy Jesse with the MJPS. “Some of the organizers have been in touch with the Moose Jaw Police Service when organizing their parades; they’ve been very respectful of the public health order and obeying the rules of the road. “So we support anything that would bring a bit of sunshine into people’s lives in these tough times.” Head organizer Jody Chell has regularly made adjustments to the parades in order to make things safer and more manageable, with one of the largest changes from the first parade at the end of March being the creation of two routes in order to shorten the length of the event. That immediately led to less traffic and a more comfortable experience for both the parade’s drivers and recipients. When it comes to the number of cars and the traffic the parades create – the second edition had close to 80 cars involved – as long as regular driving laws are followed and nothing untoward takes place it’s all fine and dandy. “I can’t say we’ve received many calls, a couple that are curious as to what’s going on, but when we assure them

RURAL MUNICIPALITY OF MARQUIS NO. 191

REASON: The reason for the bylaw amendment is to accommodate a proposed subdivision for residential development. PUBLIC INSPECTION: Any person may inspect the bylaw at the Resort Village of Sun Valley Office between 9:00 am and 3:30 pm on Thursdays and Fridays excluding statutory holidays. Copies are available at cost at the Municipal Office. PUBLIC HEARING: Council will hold a public hearing to receive submissions on the proposed bylaw on the 22nd day of May, 2020 at 2:00 p.m. at the Regional Municipal Plaza, Municipal Office Boardroom. Council will also consider written submissions received at the hearing or delivered to the undersigned at the municipal office before the hearing. For further information, please contact the municipal office at 306-694-0055. Issued at the Resort Village of Sun Valley this 1st day of May, 2020. Signed Melinda Huebner, Administrator

Notice is hereby given that the assessment roll of the Rural Municipality of Marquis No. 191 for the year 2020 has been prepared and is open to inspection in the office of the assessor from 9:00 a.m. to noon and 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on the following days: Monday to Friday inclusive, May 8th, 2020 – July 8th, 2020. A bylaw pursuant to Section 214 of The Municipalities Act has been passed and the assessment notices have been sent as required. Any person who wishes to appeal against his or her assessment is required to file his or her notice of appeal with: The Assessor, Rural Municipality of Marquis No. 191, Box 40, Marquis Saskatchewan, S0H 2X0 by the 8th day of July, 2020.

Dated at Marquis, Saskatchewan this 8th day of May, 2020.

Gwen Johnston, Assessor

that we know about them and that they’re following the rules of road and obeying the law, they’re pretty happy with it,” Jesse said. Then, of course, there’s the noise. The first parade was a cacophony of joyous horn honks and loud engines that ran a little too long for some folks, leading to people voicing their concerns online and even an occasional call to police. That, too, was quickly cut back once it was realized as a problem and the MJPS have heard little since. “We encourage them not to honk their horns, we don’t really think it’s necessary,” Jesse said. “People have complained about the unnecessary noise, and in talking with the organizers we’ve asked them to try not to honk at all. The cars are dressed up very pretty and they have their signage and stuff, that’s probably sufficient. But when people get together in a group, and especially for birthdays, it’s a celebration and people get a bit excited,” he added. “There might be some people who object, but overall public perception is positive for these things.” For more information on the Moose Jaw Birthday Parade, check out their Facebook page.

VILLAGE OF MARQUIS Notice is hereby given that the assessment roll of the Village of Marquis for the year 2020 has been prepared and is open to inspection in the office of the assessor from 9:00 a.m. to noon and 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on the following days: Monday to Friday inclusive, May 8th, 2020 – July 8th, 2020. A bylaw pursuant to Section 214 of The Municipalities Act has been passed and the assessment notices have been sent as required. Any person who wishes to appeal against his or her assessment is required to file his or her notice of appeal with: The Assessor, Village of Marquis, Box 40, Marquis Saskatchewan, S0H 2X0 by the 8th day of July, 2020. Dated at Marquis, Saskatchewan this 8th day of May, 2020. Gwen Johnston, Assessor


MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020 • PAGE A21

Provincial Court The Provincial Court section holds articles that have been written without prejudice with the information that has been presented in a public court of appeal available to the media and public.

Judge denies bail to motorist who allegedly fled police, crashed car A provincial court judge has denied a bail request from Mahamed Bashir Farah, after determining the Edmonton man would likely fail to obey his court conditions based on past behaviour. During a bail hearing on April 23, Judge Daryl Rayner ordered that Farah, 32, be remanded back into custody until May 4. Legal Aid could then either set a trial date or enter guilty pleas for Farah. According to information that police previously released, Farah is charged with one count of driving while disqualified; one count of flight from police; one count of impaired operation of a conveyance; one count of dangerous operation of a motor vehicle; and six counts of failing to comply with recognizance. These allegedly occurred on April 19, where Farah reportedly fled from police and crashed his vehicle into a fence. Judge Rayner established a publication ban that prevents the media from reporting the facts of the alleged incident. However, the reasons for his decision, and the arguments made by the Crown and defence, can be reported. Judge’s decision While in Moose Jaw, Farah had been on two recognizances — types of court

Jason G. Antonio - Moose Jaw Express orders — for offences from Edmonton, The Crown opposed Farah’s release, Rayner said. Those orders put stringent mainly because he was already on two reconditions on Farah, including an around- cognizances from Alberta, where police the-clock curfew that prevented him had charged him with driving disqualfrom leaving his home. Yet he was found ified, resisting and obstructing police, in Moose Jaw, while his bail supervisor identity theft, and traffic safety offences, didn’t even know he had left his residence. said Crown prosecutor Stephen Yusuff. Rayner was not satisfied that Farah would Farah has 68 convictions over 12 years attend court if he was released, especial- that fill six pages. Four convictions inly since the man has an “extraordinarily clude failing or refusing to provide a lengthy criminal recordâ€? of 68 convic- breath sample; two convictions are for tions from 2008 to 2016 that includes six driving while impaired; and three convicprevious fail to attend court charges and tions are for driving while disqualified. 28 convictions for disobeying court con- For his past actions, in 2016 Farah received jail time of 13 months and a fiveditions. “I am satisfied that detention is neces- year driving ban, the Crown prosecutor sary ‌ ,â€? the judge said. “There is a good continued. However, he drove anyway abundant amount of evidence that he has while in Moose Jaw and showed “wanton breached (his Edmonton court orders) by disregard for the safety of the communibeing in Saskatchewan. My confidence ‌ ty,â€? the vehicle’s occupants, himself, and if he were to abide by any conditions he’d the police officer chasing him. Based on his criminal record and the sebe released on, is greatly diminished.â€? Judge Rayner acknowledged two issues riousness of these offences, Farah faces that Legal Aid raised: the identity of the serious jail time, added Yusuff. If a trial vehicle’s driver and keeping Farah in re- occurred, the Crown would ask for 12 to mand during the pandemic. Rayner not- 15 months, which is “an extremely genered he could not rule on the former now, ous (and lenient) offer.â€? while he didn’t believe the latter concern Defence’s arguments posed a significant issue since Farah ap- Farah was last sentenced for impaired driving in 2016, which is four years ago, peared healthy. said Legal Aid lawyer Tyne Hagey. She Crown’s arguments

pointed out Farah’s current charges are not related to assault, violence against others, or weapons’ use. The issue is police know what happened, but not who the driver was, she continued. The Crown also faces a serious problem with the driver’s identity. Furthermore, there is supposedly a discrepancy in eyewitness testimony of how many people were in the vehicle. Hagey referred to two police reports and then she cast doubt on several paragraphs about the driver’s identity. She also cast doubt on whether Farah really was impaired and how fast the vehicle was going. Farah’s release plan would see him live with his mother and sister in Edmonton, Hagey said. Both of his sisters have licences and can drive him to and from Moose Jaw for court dates. Meanwhile, a friend is willing to post $1,000 for bail, while Farah would attempt to attend a recovery centre in Edmonton. Yusuff refuted Hagey’s comments about the alleged ambiguity of the driver’s identity and pointed to other comments in the reports as proof. The Crown prosecutor also doubted that the bail money would keep Farah from re-offending, or that he would listen to his mother and sisters.

Meeting set for possible resolution between court and man accused of attempted murder Jason G. Antonio - Moose Jaw Express

A case management meeting has been set between court officials and Jordan Reinhold Dean Shields to determine if they can resolve his charges, including that of attempted murder. Shields, 36, from Eyebrow, appeared in Moose Jaw provincial court by video from the Regina Correctional Centre on April 29. He is accused of allegedly assaulting Nathan Forbes with a weapon (a cane); allegedly assaulting Forbes with a dog; allegedly attempting to murder Forbes with a prohibited weapon (handgun); allegedly discharging the firearm at Forbes; and allegedly conducting a break and enter into a place with intent to commit an indictable (serious) offence, all from an incident on March 27 in Moose Jaw. A case management meeting will help the court and Shields see whether there are common issues on which they agree, whether there are possible resolutions to the charges, whether they can set dates to address those issues, and whether Shields could enter pleas. Shields appeared in provincial court on April 27, where court heard he had fired his Legal Aid lawyer — a free service — and would represent himself during any future bail hearing, preliminary trial, or trial. Judge Brian Hendrickson told him that the Regina Legal Aid office would represent him, that the office would need two weeks to review his file, and that the allegations against him are serious. Shields said he understood, but would still represent himself. Crown prosecutor Stephen Yusuff told Hendrickson that, since Shields wanted to do this, the Crown office wanted

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a court-appointed duty counsel assigned to the case. This would ensure that Shields couldn’t cross-examine the victims. Hendrickson agreed and adjourned the matter to April 29 so the Crown could look into that option. Yusuff told Hendrickson on April 29 that the idea of having the court appoint another counsellor was made in haste. Instead, the Crown would prefer if Shields’ information — or disclosure — was sent to him on a USB stick. They could then set a bail hearing in a week. Hendrickson again asked Shields if he wanted to represent himself and if he wanted to run a show-cause (bail) hearing; Shields said yes. He added that he wanted a paper copy of his disclosure since he had no computer in his cell and wanted to review his files privately. Susanne Jeanson, Moose Jaw Legal Aid Lawyer, informed the court that the remand centre did not allow paper-based disclosure, only digital information. Hendrickson then explained to Shields what a bail hearing is and how it would run. He also noted that he could VILLAGE OF BELLE PLAINE TAX TITLE PROPERTY FOR SALE

The Village of Belle Plaine is offering for sale by tender the following tax title property: 108 Jennifer Court Lot 15 Blk Z Plan 102007808 Frontage: 70.0’ Flankage: 130.0’ Assessment: $18,400 (land) Approximate o/s taxes & costs: $14,243.56

107 Jennifer Court Lot 9 Blk Z Plan 102007808 Frontage: 63.9’ Flankage: 130.0’ Assessment: $16,600 (land) Approximate o/s taxes & costs: $14,202.03

Tender Conditions:

1. A tender shall be submitted in a sealed envelope on which the address of the property is clearly marked. A certified cheque in the amount of 10% of the offer shall accompany each offer. Tenders must be postmarked, or hand deliver by 4:00pm, Tuesday June 2nd, 2020. Village of Belle Plaine Box 63 Belle Plaine, SK S0G 0G0 2. Highest or any tender will have 30 days to provide the balance of cash to complete the purchase. 3. The purchaser is responsible for fees of Transfer of Title. The purchaser must provide the name of the solicitor who will be undertaking the registration Tranfer Authorization on the purchaser’s behalf. The Village of Belle Plaine will provide a Transfer Authorization to the purchaser’s solicitor upon receipt of the balance of the purchase price. Property taxes will be adjusted as per the possession date. 4. The Village of Belle Plaine reserves the right to reject any or all offers.

order a bail verification report, which would provide background information about Shields. Shields asked if he could have a family friend help him review the disclosure, to which Yusuff replied unless the person was a lawyer, then no one else was allowed to review the disclosure since it was for Shields only to help with his potential bail hearing. Yusuff then asked the judge to issue a Muirhead order, which would ensure only Shields saw the disclosure and that he could not share it with anyone else; Hendrickson agreed. The judge attempted to set a bail hearing, but Shields asked if they could skip that and go right to a preliminary hearing. Hendrickson decided to set a case management meeting for May 15 instead, which would mean there would be no bail hearing or bail verification report produced. He then explained what a case management meeting was, before adjourning the matter.

Under the provisions of The Alcohol and Gaming Regulations Act, 1997,

Notice is hereby given that 102074337 Saskatchewan Ltd. has applied to the Saskatchewan Liquor and Gaming Authority (SLGA) for a Restaurant permit to sell alcohol in the premises known as Barburrito at 493 Thatcher Drive Moose Jaw, SK S6J 1L8 Written objections to the granting of the permit may be filed with SLGA not more than two weeks from the date of publication of this notice. Every person filing a written objection with SLGA shall state their name, address and telephone number in printed form, as well as the grounds for the objection(s). Petitions must name a contact person, state grounds and be legible. Each signatory to the petition and the contact person must provide an address and telephone number. Frivolous, vexatious or competition-based objections within the beverage alcohol industry may not be considered and may be rejected by the Saskatchewan Liquor and Gaming Licensing Commission, who may refuse to hold a hearing.

Write to: Saskatchewan Liquor and Gaming Authority Box 5054 Regina Sk S4P 3M3


PAGE A22 • MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020

“Dust hung in the air:”

Local resident looks at Dirty Thirties and pandemic experiences side by side Larissa Kurz

Moose Jaw resident Gwen Boivin remembers growing up during the Great Depression and the Second World War, and she couldn’t help but notice that a lot of the things people are dealing with during this pandemic really resonate with her childhood experience here in rural Saskatchewan. Born in 1934, Boivin grew up just outside of Moose Jaw, with six other siblings. She was just a young girl during the time of economic rationing in the Dirty Thirties, which more or less bled right into wartime rationing during World War Two. For her, the social changes that residents of Saskatchewan are adapting to currently feel somewhat familiar, while at the same time they feel strangely different. “This is all bringing me back to when I was a kid, and it wasn’t that easy [then],” said Boivin. “And it’s different now, really different, but there’s a lot of things connecting in a different way, too.” Boivin couldn’t help but compare her experience growing up with the experience she’s having during this pandemic — which she joked is just another world event to add to the list of things she’s lived through. “This is a walk in the park. Once you’ve been through the 30s, where there wasn’t much, this is nothing,” she said. “I was born into that, in ‘34 when it was just starting to get bad, and I just grew up with it and didn’t know any different.” Staying inside isn’t new As a child in the late 30s, Boivin remembers also having to stay inside a lot of the time — but during that time, it was because of the perennial drought that plagued the prairies, rather than the spreading coronavirus keeping people at home now. “I could write my name in the dust on the windowsill, and it was like that every day,” said Boivin. “We’d eat dust, everything was dust, and it was everywhere.” Boivin said that the dust was fine like sand, and it piled up along fence lines like snowdrifts and hung in the air. Her grandfather had a rope tied between the house and the barn to act as a guideline, because some days it was impossible to see even that far because of the dust. The sky was gloomy during the Dirty Thirties, she said, not like the clear weather outside the windows of Moose Jaw lately. The only time she stayed home from school was when the weather was poor, including days that were so dusty it was difficult to breathe, and she doesn’t remember school ever being cancelled. Boivin is also staying put at home in the present, to follow the province’s social distancing orders and protect her health, but it has made her think about how her current quarantine allows a bit more freedom than the one in the 30s. “We were in because we couldn’t go outside [then], and now we’re in because we’re [supposed to be],” said Boivin. “People can still go outside and take a walk and be

Moose Jaw resident Gwen Boivin, 85, flipped through the photo album her mother made that’s filled with family memories from growing up in the Dirty Thirties, World War II, and beyond. distant, when during the Dirty Thirties, we just couldn’t go outside.” Rationing those supplies Because of the dirt in the air keeping people inside, and as many didn’t have cars to take for a drive, families in the 30s and 40s were facing a lot of the same conundrums as families in 2020. For starters, running to the grocery store every other day wasn’t the norm even back then, and grocery deliveries weren’t a common practice — especially for rural households. Boivin remembers her mother sometimes had to time her shopping trips to town with her neighbours’ trips or take herself by horse and sleigh in the winter, which meant she shopped for groceries very efficiently. The family supplied some of their own food, like milk from their cows and vegetables from the garden, but some things had to come from town. Boivin also remembers there being limits on food availability — although not quite for the same reasons as the empty shelves in some grocery stores earlier this month. Baking supplies, like sugar, were often hard to come by sometimes back then too, said Boivin. Plenty of people did their own baking at home, which many people began to do during the current pandemic. During the war, grocery shopping was dictated by ration books, limiting families on items like meat to keep them in supply. Modern grocery stores took up a vaguely similar practice earlier this month, when they imposed item limits on things like toilet paper, flour, and disinfectants because shelves were swept clean. “[When I saw that happening] I thought, you know, the next thing we’re going to get is ration books,” laughed Boivin. Boivin doesn’t recall there ever being a shortage of toilet paper during WWII, but she does remember that TP was a bit of a luxury to begin with, and many families

Two photos of the snowbank-like dirt after a dust storm in the early 1930s, taken by Boivin’s mother.

Gwen Boivin holds a framed photo of herself and her six siblings, who all grew up outside of Moose Jaw. made do with substitutes like Eaton’s catalogue pages or Christmas orange papers in their outhouses. People were quite diligent with their pantry when they cooked during the 30s and 40s, much like people now. Meals were rationed and prepared according to exactly how many people would be at the table, and having leftovers wasn’t a regular practice.

“We’d eat dust, everything was dust, and it was everywhere.” -Gwen Boivin Staying entertained at home Children also had to entertain themselves without technology, especially when they were stuck inside during the too-dusty days in the 30s. Boivin finds it amusing to see so many families getting into the same tried-and-true activities she remembers filling her time with when she was younger. Puzzles, card games, music, and handcrafts like knitting and crocheting are on the rise once again — and were all things Boivin did as a child and young adult to keep her busy. “But we didn’t do it by electricity, we did it by candlelight,” said Boivin. “But isn’t that funny, how it’s come back to doing things like that?” Listening for news about the state of the world was also a bit different back then, but no less important. Rather than being able to check hundreds of news sites at the flick of a finger, Boivin said her father would turn on the radio just to hear the

news update from the local station before shutting it off. “And it was only the news, we didn’t get sports and all that stuff,” said Boivin, before adding, “Well, we did get Superman; we were allowed 15 minutes of Superman and we caught it just after we got home from school.” For more widespread news, Boivin remembers coming into Moose Jaw to the Capitol Theatre to see informational films about world events — like the concentration camps during the war, for example. Still a community Unlike this pandemic, the rationing during the 30s and 40s didn’t extend to the social setting. Boivin remembers community dances every Friday night to fundraise for the Red Cross, and neighbours still interacted normally. It’s also apparent that people in rural Saskatchewan have always been a generous community, said Boivin, always willing to lend a hand or money to those in need. As one of the millions of Canadians who took part in the Red Cross wartime knitting project during the 40s, Boivin remembers being sent a ball of yarn, which she would knit into a scarf or a blanket square to be sewn together and sent overseas to soldiers in WWII. It was a home-based initiative that is greatly reminiscent of the people who have begun making handmade protective face masks for frontline health care workers during the pandemic right now. Keeping in touch with friends and family who weren’t nearby was also much more complicated, said Boivin. Where she grew up, lots of households didn’t have a phone yet and those who did only used it for important situations, like emergencies. During the war, letters and telegrams were the main forms of communication — and they travelled much slower than today’s phone calls, text messages, and video chats. Advice from the 30s and 40s For the most part, Boivin looks back on her history very fondly but it has reminded her that things were much tougher when she was a child compared to her isolation situation now. “It’s not like now, where everybody has what they need in their house, and [I think] that’s the difference between then and now,” said Boivin. Boivin remembers what it was like for the country following the war, and how difficult it was for many to return to regular work and life. Although things weren’t necessarily closed down like they are currently, it was still a tough adjustment for the economy. Staying at home the last several weeks hasn’t been tough for Boivin, who remembers the isolation of the 30s and 40s as much tougher. The advice that Boivin offers to people experiencing the social climate right now is fairly simple. “Use it as a holiday,” she said. “Use it to relax and spend time with family, enjoy it, because when you finally get what you’re wishing for, it’s not going to be easy to bring everything back.” Boivin also shared a saying that her father used to tell her and her siblings when the weather was poor and they were to stay inside — one that she felt is as pertinent today as it was when she was a child. “When it was fifty below and he didn’t want us walking to school, ‘stay the heck home,’ he’d say,” said Boivin, adding that his age-old advice is just another version of a phrase she’s been hearing a lot recently as well.


MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020 • PAGE A23

Give yourself a fighting chance, be prepared for an emergency Annual campaign for emergency preparedness takes on extra heft in Moose Jaw after winter storms Randy Palmer - Moose Jaw Express

Moose Jaw residents might have only had to deal with a handful of power outages in recent years, but it was a winter storm back on Sept. 30 that showed just how important preparing for an emergency can be. With high winds and over a foot of snow in only 24 hours, power went down for almost a full day in some parts of the city as crews toiled through the tough conditions. The question is, what if the situation had been far worse? If it had been the Quebec Ice Storm of 1998 where power was out for over a week where 35 people died, would you be prepared? The annual Emergency Preparedness campaign, with the Moose Jaw Fire Department among many organizations all over the world aim to see households put together 72-hour survival kits designed to keep them supplied and safe in case of a disaster. “It’s everything from the pandemic that’s going on now to the winter storms we had or a tornado, flood, anything like that,” said MJFD deputy chief Mike Russell. “How are you going to make yourself self-efficient in that situation.” The first step is gathering supplies – non-perishable food, water, a flashlight and extra batteries, a portable radio and a means to keep your phone charged for messages and alerts. A comprehensive list can be found at www.getprepared.gc.ca Those who want to make sure they have power can purchase portable generators, although Russell warns to keep said items and all cooking appliances in a well-ventilated area to avoid noxious gases. “Even since the storm we had last winter, it’s ironic how many people I talked to who had put together a kit or even had portable

generators wired into their house and electrical systems, so they have power and heat at least,” Russell said. Emergency preparedness also extends to pets, with fire departments throughout the province partnering with the SPCA to make sure family critters are also included in preparations, with a full checklist on their website at www.saskspca.ca/fact-sheets “Have a back-up plan for your pets, have someone available to check up on them or retrieve them if you can’t, if you were out of town or at work and something was to happen,” Russell said. “And especially the area we’re in, there’s lots of livestock and domestic animals as well and we want to protect them just as much as anybody else.” And last but not least, have a plan. Where to be, where to go and what to do when things get that bad. “Speaking with your family about it only takes five minutes,” Russell said. “The kids could be at school, you could be at work, it’s all those different things. So it’s understanding what you’re doing and what you’re being told to do, and making sure everyone in your family knows, too.” The good news is that emergency preparedness is continuing to grow at an impressive rate as more and more people learn just how important being ready can be. Russell said, “People are starting to realize, we’re getting away from the concept of ‘it doesn’t happen to me, it happens to someone else’, and that’s great. It shows that people are buying into (putting together an emergency preparedness plan). “It’s just taking some time and it could be life-saving.”

Know the Know the Risks Risks Across
Canada,
we
face
a
number
of
natural
hazards,
which
can
vary


Across
Canada,
we
face
a
number
of
natural
hazards,
which
can
vary
 from
region
to
region.
Knowing
what
to
do
during
an
emergency
is
an
 from
region
to
region.
Knowing
what
to
do
during
an
emergency
is
an
 important
part
of
being
prepared.

Find
out
more
about
risks
in
your
region
and
how
to
 important
part
of
being
prepared.

Find
out
more
about
risks
in
your
region
and
how
to
 prepare
by
visiting
GetPrepared.ca.

Then
use
this
guide
for
information
on
what
to
do
 prepare
by
visiting
GetPrepared.ca.

Then
use
this
guide
for
information
on
what
to
do
 in
different
situations.
 in
different
situations.


During an emergency…… During an emergency…… 
 


The
following
steps
should
be
taken
in
emergency
 The
following
steps
should
be
taken
in
emergency
 situations:
 situations:
 1. Make
sure
you
are
safe
before
assisting
others.
 1. Make
sure
you
are
safe
before
assisting
others.
 2. Follow
your
emergency
plan.
 2. Follow
your
emergency
plan.
 3. Get
your
emergency
kit.
 3. Get
your
emergency
kit.
 Severe Storms Severe Storms During
severe
storms:


4. Monitor
radio,
television
and
online
for
 4. Monitor
radio,
television
and
online
for
 information
from
authorities.

Follow
their
 information
from
authorities.

Follow
their
 instructions.
 instructions.
 5. Stay
put
until
it
is
safe
or
you
are
ordered
to
 5. Stay
put
until
it
is
safe
or
you
are
ordered
to
 evacuate.
 evacuate.
 6. Limit
phone
calls
to
urgent
messages
only.

 6. Limit
phone
calls
to
urgent
messages
only.

 Keep
the
lines
free
for
emergency
responders.
 Keep
the
lines
free
for
emergency
responders.
 Power Outages Outages Power Check
if
the
power
outage
is
limited
to
your

 

Unplug
radios,
TV’s
and
appliances.
Use
a
 
battery‐operated
or
wind‐up
radio
to
listen
for
weather
 
battery‐operated
or
wind‐up
radio
to
listen
for
weather
 warnings
and
instructions
from
authorities.
  warnings
and
instructions
from
authorities.
 Avoid
using
a
corded
phone
and
stay
away
from
items
that
  Avoid
using
a
corded
phone
and
stay
away
from
items
that
 conduct
electricity.
  conduct
electricity.
 If
there
is
hail,
stay
away
from
windows,
glass
doors
and
  If
there
is
hail,
stay
away
from
windows,
glass
doors
and
 skylights.
 skylights.
 If
you
are
outside:


Check
if
the
power
outage
is
limited
to
your

 home.

If
your
neighbours
have
power,
 home.

If
your
neighbours
have
power,
 check
your
circuit
breakers.
  check
your
circuit
breakers.
 If
your
neighbours’
power
is
also
out,
contact
your
electrical
  If
your
neighbours’
power
is
also
out,
contact
your
electrical
 supply
company.
  supply
company.
 Turn
off
all
tools,
appliances,
electronics
and
all
but
one
light
  Turn
off
all
tools,
appliances,
electronics
and
all
but
one
light
 inside
and
outside.
  inside
and
outside.
 Use
your
thermostat
to
turn
off
heating
or
air
conditioning.
  Use
your
thermostat
to
turn
off
heating
or
air
conditioning.
 Avoid
opening
your
freezer
or
fridge.
  Avoid
opening
your
freezer
or
fridge.
 Do
not
use
barbeques,
camping
heating
equipment
or
home
  Do
not
use
barbeques,
camping
heating
equipment
or
home
 generators
indoors.
They
can
produce
dangerous
levels
of
 generators
indoors.
They
can
produce
dangerous
levels
of
 carbon
monoxide.
  carbon
monoxide.
 Monitor
a
crank
or
battery‐powered
radio
and
online
for
  Monitor
a
crank
or
battery‐powered
radio
and
online
for
 weather
warnings
and
instructions
from
authorities.
  weather
warnings
and
instructions
from
authorities.
 If
possible,
use
a
battery
or
crank‐powered
light
source.

If
you
  If
possible,
use
a
battery
or
crank‐powered
light
source.

If
you
 must
use
candles,
use
proper
candle
holders.

Never
leave
lit
 must
use
candles,
use
proper
candle
holders.

Never
leave
lit
 candles
unattended.

Always
extinguish
candles
before
going
to
 candles
unattended.

Always
extinguish
candles
before
going
to
 bed.
 bed.
 When
the
power
returns:


During
severe
storms:
  If
possible,
take
shelter
in
a
building
and
stay
indoors.
       

If
possible,
take
shelter
in
a
building
and
stay
indoors.
 Monitor
radio,
television
and
online
for
weather
warnings
and
 Monitor
radio,
television
and
online
for
weather
warnings
and
 instructions
from
authorities.
 instructions
from
authorities.
 If
you
have
time,
secure
items
that
might
be
blown
around
or
 If
you
have
time,
secure
items
that
might
be
blown
around
or
 torn
loose,
such
as
lawn
furniture.
 torn
loose,
such
as
lawn
furniture.
 Stay
away
from
windows,
doors
and
fireplaces.
 Stay
away
from
windows,
doors
and
fireplaces.
 If
you
are
driving,
stop
your
car
away
from
trees
or
power
lines.
 If
you
are
driving,
stop
your
car
away
from
trees
or
power
lines.


Thunder and Lightning Storms Thunder and Lightning Storms If
you
are
inside:


If
you
are
inside:
  Unplug
radios,
TV’s
and
appliances.
Use
a
 

If
you
are
outside:
  If
caught
in
the
open,
crouch
in
the
“leap
frog”
position
to


When
the
power
returns:
  In
cold
weather,
turn
heating
back
on
first,
then
wait
10


 

 

 


If
caught
in
the
open,
crouch
in
the
“leap
frog”
position
to
 minimize
ground
contact.

Do
not
go
under
a
tree.
 minimize
ground
contact.

Do
not
go
under
a
tree.
 If
you
are
driving,
stop
your
vehicle
away
from
trees
or
power
 If
you
are
driving,
stop
your
vehicle
away
from
trees
or
power
 lines.
 lines.
 If
you
are
on
the
water,
head
for
the
shore
immediately.
 If
you
are
on
the
water,
head
for
the
shore
immediately.


Tornadoes Tornadoes If
you
are
inside:


If
you
are
inside:
  If
you
are
in
a
high‐rise,
do
not
use
elevators
  

If
you
are
in
a
high‐rise,
do
not
use
elevators
 Go
to
the
basement
or
small
interior
ground
 Go
to
the
basement
or
small
interior
ground
 floor
room.

Take
shelter
under
a
table
or
desk.
  floor
room.

Take
shelter
under
a
table
or
desk.
 Stay
away
from
windows,
outside
walls,
  Stay
away
from
windows,
outside
walls,
 fireplaces
and
doors.
  fireplaces
and
doors.
 Avoid
using
a
corded
phone
and
stay
away
from
  Avoid
using
a
corded
phone
and
stay
away
from
 items
that
conduct
electricity.
  items
that
conduct
electricity.
 Limit
phone
calls
to
urgent
messages
only.
  Limit
phone
calls
to
urgent
messages
only.
 If
you
are
outside:


If
you
are
outside:
  If
time
permits,
go
to
the
nearest
solid
shelter.

If
not
take
cover
    

If
time
permits,
go
to
the
nearest
solid
shelter.

If
not
take
cover
 in
a
low
lying
area
such
as
a
ditch
and
protect
your
head.

 in
a
low
lying
area
such
as
a
ditch
and
protect
your
head.

 Beware
of
flooding
and
downpours
and
be
prepared
to
move.
 Beware
of
flooding
and
downpours
and
be
prepared
to
move.
 Do
not
shelter
under
a
bridge
as
winds
can
accelerate.
 Do
not
shelter
under
a
bridge
as
winds
can
accelerate.
 Do
not
shelter
in
a
mobile
home
that
does
not
have
a
solid
 Do
not
shelter
in
a
mobile
home
that
does
not
have
a
solid
 foundation.
 foundation.
 
 


In
cold
weather,
turn
heating
back
on
first,
then
wait
10
 minutes
before
reconnecting
everything
else.
 minutes
before
reconnecting
everything
else.
 Check
food
supplies.

If
a
freezer
door
has
been
kept
closed,
 Check
food
supplies.

If
a
freezer
door
has
been
kept
closed,
 food
should
stay
frozen
for
24‐36
hours.

Food
contaminated
 food
should
stay
frozen
for
24‐36
hours.

Food
contaminated
 with
bacteria
does
not
necessarily
smell
or
look
spoiled.

When
 with
bacteria
does
not
necessarily
smell
or
look
spoiled.

When
 in
doubt
throw
it
out.
 in
doubt
throw
it
out.


Shelter in Place Shelter inBiological, Place Radiological or Nuclear Incident) (Chemical, (Chemical, Biological, Radiological or Nuclear Incident) If
you
are
told
to
shelter
in
place
due
to
a
CBRN
incident:


If
you
are
told
to
shelter
in
place
due
to
a
CBRN
incident:
  Close
and
lock
all
windows
and
exterior
doors.
  

Close
and
lock
all
windows
and
exterior
doors.
 Turn
off
all
fans,
heating
and
A/C
systems
to
avoid
drawing
in
 Turn
off
all
fans,
heating
and
A/C
systems
to
avoid
drawing
in
 outside
air.
 outside
air.
 Get
your
emergency
kit.
 Get
your
emergency
kit.
 Go
to
an
interior
room
without
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If possible, turn a radio to local stations, CHAB 800, Country 100 If a radio to to local stations, CHAB 800, Country 100 or possible, Mix 103.9turn or computer http://www.moosejaw.ca/ or or Mix 103.9 or computer to http://www.moosejaw.ca/ or message http://www.discovermoosejaw.com/ or until the “all clear” http://www.discovermoosejaw.com/ or until the “all clear” message is broadcast. In order to prevent the telecommunications system is broadcast. In order prevent the telecommunications system from overloading, onlytouse your phone if it is an emergency. from overloading, only use your phone if it is an emergency.

Share your team’s news, pictures and results with us!

email: editor@mjvexpress.com

Western Canadian Baseball League delays season start to late June Ongoing COVID-19 pandemic continues to push back league plans for 2020 campaign Randy Palmer - Moose Jaw Express

With the way things have been going on the COVID-19 front in Alberta and Saskatchewan, it seemed like only a matter of time before the Western Canadian Baseball League had to officially push the start of their season back. That day officially came last Thursday when the WCBL announced that the start of the 2020 season would be delayed until late June or early July at the earliest after a meeting of the league’s board of governors. The move was made to give the league a chance to possibly play a shortened season should a dramatic improvement in the ongoing pandemic occur. “Although the circumstances are not moving quickly

enough at present in our favour, we want to look at all options in order to play this year,” WCBL president Kevin Kvame said in a press release, adding that even with a month of leeway, the late May start is now unfeasible. “At the same time, however, we express that with ever-changing dynamic and circumstances on this pandemic and the measures needed to curtail it, we still want to maintain hope that a partial season can be played.” That, of course, would rely on government go ahead through re-opening plans in both provinces. “We know our talented players want to play and we know communities are looking for positive, family-friendly activities to return. We’re embracing that role, whenever the green light is turned on,” Kvame said. The release touched on the possibility that games may be at only some ballparks depending on when and how things re-open and reiterated that any decisions that are

made will be fully within provincial health authority guidelines. “The health and safety of our players, coaches, officials and fans are paramount in all of our decision making,” said Kvame. How a late-June, early-July schedule would play out has yet to be determined. The WCBL also revealed that it is currently working on a project that will enable teams to continue to show their community pride when the games resume – a project with a sizable enough scope to involve federal, provincial and local governments as well as involvement from other industries. Further information, including a potential league start date, will be coming as more information on COVID-19 and provincial response is released in coming weeks.

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PAGE A24 • MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Share your Team’s news, pictures and results with us! email: editor@mjvexpress.com

Moose Jaw’s Helland looking forward to re-joining Miller Express after solid college season Standout pitcher turned in impressive campaign despite battling injury Randy Palmer - Moose Jaw Express

There was a time not that long ago when Moose Jaw baseball prospect Reece Helland was looked at as a hard-hitting third baseman with solid defensive capabilities, the kind of guy who fit in perfectly on the hot corner. But an opportunity to throw a bullpen session for his college team last season has changed all that, and has the 20-year-old second-year Moose Jaw Miller Express veteran looking for big things going forward. Helland put together an impressive campaign this past season at Monterey Peninsula College in Monterey, California, serving as the team’s closing pitcher as the Lobos put together a 15-7 record in the California Community College Athletic Association. And he did so in style – even while battling an elbow injury, Helland made five appearances, not allowing a run in 10.2 innings of work, surrendering only four hits and striking out 15 while walking only two. That included an appearance on Feb. 15 where Helland recorded all seven outs of a 2 1/3 innings appearance by strikeout. So not too shabby, to say the least. “It was a really good season, we had a pretty good team and a really good pitching staff, obviously, that really helped us out,” Helland said from Monterey recently. “But I think for me this year, the thing that really got me going was playing summer ball in Moose Jaw. That really built my confidence up, especially after last year here and red-shirting.” Helland was actually going to return to the team for the 2020 campaign as a third baseman, but head coach Daniel Phillips saw his numbers from this past season with the Miller Express – 12 relief appearances with 19 strikeouts and a 2.95 earned run average – and decided the freshman righthander with the wicked movement on his ball would be the Lobos’ closer. How it all came to that point was a matter of good fortune and timing beginning with the natural movement on his

Reece Helland with family members after a Miller Express game last season. (Facebook photo). fastball. “In high school I pitched a little bit, and then when I was down here redshirting, my coach asked me if I wanted to throw a bullpen because I have a pretty strong arm, and I have a natural cut on my fastball, so he wanted to see what it would look like on the mound,” Helland explained. “He liked it and told me to go home last summer and pitch as much as I could. Then when I came back they put me right into a pretty big role on the team.” The majority of the Western Canadian Baseball League features players in their junior and senior years of university and college. So when Helland went back to junior college after putting together that kind of a showing, things were a lot different.

“So then when I was facing freshmen and sophomore and young guys down here, it went really well,” he said. “I don’t throw hard enough to completely dominate, but the movement on my ball is a big help for me, so I feel like that was the one thing that really made me think ‘yeah, I can do it down here’. Helland was looking forward to seeing how the rest of the season would turn out when COVID-19 shut everything down in mid-March. He’s currently doing the online-learning thing and will be back home in early May. Fortunately for Helland and his teammates, the CCCAA has granted an extra year of eligibility to players who lost this season, meaning Helland will be returning as a freshman. “I have another four years of baseball that I can’t wait for,” he said happily. There’s a good chance it won’t all be down in Monterey, though – coach Phillips has told Helland that after next season, it’ll likely be time to move on to a higher level of play. “My coach said he expects me to stay down here for one more year and then there’s no point in a guy like me staying down here for four years, so after this year we’re going to talk about it and go from there,” Helland said. And then there’s this coming season with the Miller Express. Even with so much up in the air with COVID-19, Helland is looking forward to returning to the friendly confines of Ross Wells Park. Some of that depends on how he recovers from what appears to be a forearm strain but he expects that won’t be a factor if and when the season begins. “I’m really hoping that this year will get going, I don’t know what I’d do without baseball this summer,” Helland said. “It’s always a lot of fun playing at home and I’m really looking forward to it.”

How One Cheer Club Owner is Pivoting her Business During Hard Times

By Reah Good I will be doing a series of articles profiling some movers and shakers in Canadian Allstar Cheerleading. Samantha Thomas, known as Sam, is the co-owner of CheerCore Inc in Collingwood, Ontario with a second gym location in Barrie, Ontario. Like many gym owners, Sam fell in love with cheerleading in high school and imagined that maybe she could turn her passion into her vocation. Sam continued competitive allstar cheerleading during her years at York University. Then, CheerCore was established in 2009. As a program, CheerCore has always been known for strong showings at competitions and they were the first Canadian program to win a first place division title at the prestigious National Cheerleading Association (NCA) Competition in Dallas, Texas, in 2015. Their Senior Gold

team earned an impressive score of 96.43%. Since then, Sam has joined forces with tumbling specialist, Coach Sahil, to help CheerCore athletes gain an edge. This year the CheerCore’s senior open division team, “24K”, would have been going to Cheerleading Worlds in April 2020, but unfortunately because of the COVID-19 pandemic their qualification bid is in limbo. Since physical training inside a gym isn’t possible, Sam and Sahil will soon be launching a service called CheerCore Online which will contain specific multi-week long workouts for all acrobatic athletes that can be done from the comfort of their own home. The very first program, “Flight School At Home” will be available starting in May 2020 with programs for jumps, tumbling and stunt strength to follow. For those who would like a little taste of the drills that you can expect, head over to CheerCore.ca/flyer to get free access. You can also find lots of other training videos on the CheerCore youtube channel. This break from team practice is the perfect opportunity to work on individual goals like balance and flexibility. How is your heel stretch? Maybe a scale stretch like Sam’s by end of May?

Sam Thomas demonstrates a scale stretch at home. The roller is used to imitate the sensation of the relative instability of hand grips that would hold the flyer’s supporting leg.


MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020 • PAGE A25

your Team’s news, pictures and results with us! email: editor@mjvexpress.com SportsShare Science online course series to be offered free of charge

South West District for Culture, Recreation and Sport joins with Sport Medicine Science Council of Saskatchewan to offer six one-hour courses beginning in mid-May With the constant evolution of sports training and knowledge surrounding peak athletic performance, it often isn’t enough to just head out on the field and throw around a ball or shoot a few hoops. Learning how to prepare and recover and everything in-between can be just as important as practice, especially when trying to compete at the highest levels or develop the skills to reach top-flight status. The South West District for Culture, Recreation and Sport has partnered with the Sport Medicine and Science Council of Saskatchewan to help out in that regard during the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. The SWDCRS will be offering a series of free sport science classes beginning on May 14, covering the gamut of mental performance, sleep and nutrition in a weekly run beginning Thursday, May 14. “These kind of courses are on our radar every year, and with the COVID-19 restrictions we’ve definitely shifted our gears to more virtual programs,” said Elizabeth Heatcoat, community consultant with the SWDCRS. “The folks at the Sports Medicine Science Council were very much on board with their courses being delivered to our communities so we’re happy to be able to offer them online.” The courses came about out of a request by Chantelle Rouault-Gibson with the Thunder Creek Volleyball Club as she looked for further training opportunities for the her team. As the sports coordinator at 15 Wing Moose Jaw, Rouault-Gibson regularly signs on with the SWDCRS in order to have residents of Bushell Park use their workshops, and when 15 Wing closed down their athletic

Randy Palmer - Moose Jaw Express facilities due to the COVID-19 outbreak, the perfect opportunity arose to help both her players and the community in general. “Most of our workshops are delivered by a request from the community so we know we have a core group of people interested in this,” Heatcoat said. “And when we had that interest, it was something that we felt was a good opportunity.” Each of the six classes are one hour long and will take place on the Zoom social media platform, with a registration deadline of 48 hours prior to the start of the workshop. The courses offered include: • Sleep and Performance Thursday, May 14, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Sleep quality and quantity, deprivation, effects on sleep through travel, nutrition, exercise and mental, medical considerations and how to sleep better. • Mental Performance – Goals Tuesday, May 19, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Goal setting, setting realistic short term and long term goals, monitoring goals. • Mental Performance - Stress and Relaxation Tuesday, May 26, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Attention, emotional, and arousal control to deal with anxiety or stress. • Mental Performance – Imagery Tuesday, June 2, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. How to use mental imagery and visualization effectively. • Mental Performance - Routines Tuesday, June 9, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Local youngsters, families and athletes can learn a bit about sports science from home with a new series of free courses. (Getty Images).

How to use routines and practices effectively. • Sport Nutrition Thursday, June 11, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Basic sport nutrition, importance of fluids, weight issues, pre/post event nutrition, nutrition on the road, tournament and multi-event nutrition. Registration has been on-going since the announcement, with the minimum 10 participants already exceeded and plenty more having signed on since. For more information or to register, visit www.gosouthwest.ca and click on the What We Do link, which will take you to the virtual workshop class site. Scroll down to the Sports Science courses, sign up and tune in!

Warriors sign high-scoring forward Thomas Tien

St. George’s Academy standout has 141 points in only 64 games over last two seasons

Randy Palmer - Moose Jaw Express Any Moose Jaw Warriors fans who followed the Canadian Sport School Hockey League this past winter and checked out player stats to see how Connor Bedard was doing might have raised their eyebrows once or twice. That’s because for much of the season, a Warriors prospect was battling Bedard for the scoring lead in the entire CSSHL, across all divisions. Moose Jaw Warriors forward Thomas And when Warriors general manager Alan Tien signs his Western Hockey League Millar talks about late-round picks work- standard player agreement. ing hard and earning their spot, Richmond, B.C.’s Thomas Tien did just that. Tien -- who the Warriors selected in the 11th round, 236th overall in the 2019 Western Hockey League Bantam Draft – signed a standard WHL players agreement last week, capping an impressive season with a much-earned award. “We are very excited to announce the signing of forward Thomas Tien to a WHL Standard Player Agreement,” Millar said in a press release. “Thomas is a very hard working, competitive player who combines a good skill set with a strong will and determination in his game and in his development. We are very pleased that Thomas and his parents Ed and Anne have chosen the Moose Jaw Warriors and the WHL to pursue his hockey and academic goals.” If the now 5-foot-8, 155-pound forward had a strike against him heading into his draft year, it was his size and definitely not his offensive production, as he scored 24 goals and 64 points in only 30 games with the St. George’s School Bantam Prep team. A couple of inches of height and a few more pounds on his frame led to Tien lighting up the CSSHL Elite 15 loop this past season, including a goal and an assist in a 4-3 win over Prairie Hockey Academy in November. Overall, Tien would score 33 goals and 77 points in 34 games, finishing second in team scoring, before adding another three goals and six points in two playoff games. Playing up with St. George’s Midget Prep team he’d score twice with three points in eight games. Tien was nominated for the Elite 15 Most Valuable Player honour at the end of the campaign. “Thomas is a player with lots of speed, skill, and character,” commented Assistant General Manager Jason Ripplinger. “He is a determined and competitive player that we want to build our team and culture around.”

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PAGE A26 • MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020

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Campsite reservations launched this week Campers will soon be able to once again get out and enjoy the great outdoors. The Saskatchewan Provincial Parks Campsite Reservation Launch has begun with camping to start on June 1. “While the reservation launch was initially delayed due to COVID-19, we are pleased to cautiously open for the 2020 camping season,” Parks, Culture and Sport Minister and Minister Responsible for Tourism Saskatchewan Gene Makowsky said in a press release. “We are looking forward to welcoming visitors back to our parks, where they can naturally physical distance and enjoy the outdoors. However, campers should be aware of numerous restrictions and understand that at least at first, camping will look different this year.” In addition to the online reservation launch, provincial parks will be open to vehicle traffic for Saskatchewan residents. You will be able to enjoy activities like angling, hiking, and biking. Anyone visiting parks will be expected to follow physical distancing rules and are encouraged to be mindful while on docks, trails and in the parks. Campgrounds will initially open at 50 per cent capacity, meaning only every other campsite will be available for booking. Camping will only be open to Saskatchewan residents until further notice. Reservations for campsites will open at 7 a.m. on the scheduled days below, with the queue opening at 6:40 a.m. Staggered launch dates and the queuing system will be implemented again in 2020 to help manage the volume the site experiences. Seasonal campsite fees have been pro-rated for the June 1 opening. The schedule is as follows: Monday, May 4: Seasonal campsites across provincial parks*; Wednesday, May 6: Pike Lake, The Battlefords, Narrow

Buffalo Pound Camground Hills, Blackstrap; Thursday, May 7: Bronson Forest, Meadow Lake, Makwa Lake, Lac La Ronge; Friday, May 8: Saskatchewan Landing, Douglas, Danielson; Monday, May 11: Buffalo Pound, Rowan’s Ravine, Echo Valley, Crooked Lake; Tuesday, May 12: Cypress Hills; Wednesday, May 13: Duck Mountain, Good Spirit Lake, Greenwater Lake; Thursday, May 14: Candle Lake, Great Blue Heron, Moose Mountain; Seasonal and nightly campsites can be reserved through the online system (https://saskparks.goingtocamp.com/) or through the call centre at 1-855-737-7275.

Sask. big game draws open to online applications in May Larissa Kurz

Come join P&H as an Administrative Assistant in Moose Jaw! As Administrative Assistant, the successful candidate will be responsible for facilitating the overall operation of the facility’s office through daily administrative tasks. Reporting to the General Manager, the Administrative Assistant will also be the first point of contact for producer/customer calls and will redirect inquiries to the appropriate resource or Manager when needed. To qualify, you will have excellent customer service and communication skills and ideally at least 1 year of experience in an office/admin/clerical role. To apply drop off your resume at our Moose Jaw facility or apply online at: https://parrishandheimbecker.com/company/careers/

The big game draw for Saskatchewan is now open for the 2020 hunting season and due to the closure of field offices in the wake of COVID-19, all draw applications will have to be submitted online this year. Hunters have until midnight on May 25 to submit applications for this year’s available draws. Due to mild winters, there will be increased opportunities for the elk, pronghorn, mule deer, and whitetail deer draws. The changes to the priority pool format implemented in 2018 remain in place again this year. Most of the 2019 Legacy applicants were successfully drawn, and so officials say chances to be drawn out of this year’s Legacy pool are good. The Ministry of Environment encourages hunters to apply early, to avoid complications using the online system. Those applying for draws must have a

Saskatchewan Hunting, Angling, and Trapping License (HAL), where clients can submit and review their applications, and check pool history status. The HAL system is also where draw results will be available, in mid-July for pronghorn draws and mid-June for the other draws, and where successful applications can purchase their draw hunting license beginning Aug. 1. Application instructions are available online at saskatchewanhal.ca. For information about HAL accounts or for help with completing an application, call 1 (888) 773-8450. More information about the big game draw is available online from saskatchewan.ca/hunting, and questions about pool status or hunting in Saskatchewan can be directed to 1 (800) 567-4224.


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En direct de l’univers (N) Rire Tout simplement country Téléjour. Humanité Crime Beat (N) Border Sec. Private Eyes (:29) Saturday Night Live (N) Coronavirus Special W5 CTV News Special Cardinal “Scott” Evenings on TWN Storm Evenings on The Weather Network Overnight on TWN Dateline NBC Saturday Night Live (N) News (:29) Saturday Night Live (N) “The Adventure Club” (2016) Billy Zane, Kim Coates. ›› “Into the Forest” (2015, Suspense) Ellen Page. S.W.A.T. “Fire in the Sky” 48 Hours (N) Two Men Two Men NCIS: New Orleans American Idol The top 10 are revealed. News Immortals Castle “The Fifth Bullet” “Roux the Day: A Gourmet Detective Mystery” (2020) “Hailey Dean Mysteries: Killer Sentence” (2019) UFC 249: Prelims SportsCent. NBA Basketball (N) NHL NHL Classics NHL’s Best NHL Classics Game 2. Holmes on Homes Mighty Trains Flashpoint W5 (N) (6:00) “Just My Type” “Season for Love” (2018, Romance) Autumn Reeser. Movie (6:55) ›› “Beautiful Creatures” (2013, Fantasy) ››› “Ever After: A Cinderella Story” (1998) Frasier Frasier Engagement Engagement Engagement Engagement 3’s Comp. 3’s Comp. Self-Quarantined Self-Quarantined sMothered (N) Self-Quarantined North Woods Law North Woods Law North Woods Law North Woods Law Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends Big Bang Big Bang (6:00) “Ace in the Hole” ››› “The Front Page” (1931) Adolphe Menjou. ››› “Mildred Pierce” (6:30) ››› “Twister” (1996, Action) Helen Hunt. Line of Duty (:25) Twister (6:30) Greatest Races: NASCAR eNASCAR iRacing Pro Series ABB Formula E Hotel 3 “Swan Princess: Kingdom” ››› “Downton Abbey” (2019) Hugh Bonneville. (6:05) ›› “The Meg” › “The Intruder” (2019) Michael Ealy. (:45) ›› “Climax” (2018, Drama) (:10) ›› “The Dead Don’t Die” (2019) Bill Murray. ››› “Blinded by the Light” (2019) Viveik Kalra. ›› “Lansky” (1999) Richard Dreyfuss, Eric Roberts. His Dark Materials His Dark Materials

3 CBKFT 5 CFRE 6 CKCK 7 WEATH 8 WDIV 9 CBKT 11 WWJ 12 WXYZ 13 CTYS 19 TSN 20 NET 25 EDACC 26 W 29 ENCAV2 33 CMT 35 TLC 38 DISC 41 COM 42 TCM 47 AMC 48 FSR 55 CRV1 56 CRV2 57 CRV3 58 HBO

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Rétroviseur Vies Beautés meurtrières (N) Bonsoir bonsoir! (N) Le téléjournal (N) NCIS “Lonely Hearts” FBI “Fallout” New Amsterdam Global News at 10 (N) The Resident Ellen’s Game of Games For Life “Fathers” Big Bang etalk (N) (5:00) Evenings on The Weather Network Evenings on TWN Overnight on TWN Ellen’s Game of Games New Amsterdam News News Tonight Show-J. Fallon Coronation Family Feud Kim Creek Moms Baroness The National (N) FBI “Fallout” FBI: Most Wanted Two Men Late Show-Colbert Corden Garry Marshall For Life “Fathers” News J. Kimmel Nightline (N) J. Kimmel Hudson & Rex Mod Fam Mod Fam Mom Mom Dirt Farmers Dirt Farmers (6:30) ESPN Films SportsCent. 30 for 30 (N) 30 for 30 (N) NHL Rewind NHL Classics Blue Jays Rewind Big Bang etalk (N) Criminal Minds Goldbergs Big Bang Seinfeld Goldbergs “Love, Fall & Order” (2019) Drew Fuller, Erin Cahill. ››› “Love Actually” (2003) Hugh Grant. Way Back (:25) ››› “Don’t Think Twice” (2016) ›› “Chasing Mavericks” (2012) Gerard Butler. Raymond Raymond Creek Creek Frasier Frasier black-ish black-ish Little People, Big World 7 Little Johnstons (N) Sweet Home Sextuplets Little People, Big World Gold Rush: Dave Turin’s Deadliest Catch (N) Homestead Rescue Gold Rush: The Dirt (N) Goldbergs Fresh-Boat Friends Friends Friends Friends Big Bang Big Bang “The Miracle Worker” ››› “A World Apart” (1988) Barbara Hershey. “Blossoms in the Dust” (6:00) ››› “Star Trek” (2009) Chris Pine. › “Legion” (2010) Paul Bettany, Lucas Black. Greatest Races: NASCAR Greatest Races: NASCAR From Oct. 30, 1999. NASCAR Race Hub “Driven” (2018) Jason Sudeikis, Lee Pace. ››› “Downton Abbey” (2019) Hugh Bonneville. (6:20) ›› “The Nun” ›› “Stuber” (2019) Dave Bautista. (:40) ›› “The Meg” (2018) Hotel 3 (:20) “Bulletproof 2” (2020) Kirk Fox Billions Penny Dreadful: City Bright “After Truth: Disinformation” “Any One of Us” (2019) Nichole Munk Black Lady

WEDNESDAY EVENING 3 CBKFT 5 CFRE 6 CKCK 7 WEATH 8 WDIV 9 CBKT 11 WWJ 12 WXYZ 13 CTYS 19 TSN 20 NET 25 EDACC 26 W 29 ENCAV2 33 CMT 35 TLC 38 DISC 41 COM 42 TCM 47 AMC 48 FSR 55 CRV1 56 CRV2 57 CRV3 58 HBO

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Rétroviseur Lâcher prise Les chefs! (N) Bonsoir bonsoir! (N) Le téléjournal (N) 9-1-1 “What’s Next?” (:01) Private Eyes Bull “The Flying Carpet” Global News at 10 (N) Big Bang Bob Heart All Rise Cardinal “John & Lise” Big Bang etalk (N) (5:00) Evenings on The Weather Network Evenings on TWN Overnight on TWN (6:00) The Voice (N) (:01) Songland (N) News News Tonight Show-J. Fallon Coronation Family Feud Baghdad Central (N) Fortitude (N) The National (N) All Rise Bull “The Flying Carpet” Two Men Late Show-Colbert Corden The Bachelor Baker-Beauty News J. Kimmel Nightline (N) J. Kimmel The Bachelor Presents: Listen to Your Heart (N) Baker-Beauty Mobile MD Mobile MD (5:00) NFL Football (N) SportsCent. NFL Football From Feb. 7, 2016. (N) NHL Rewind Blue Jays Rewind Big Bang etalk (N) Criminal Minds › “Grown Ups” (2010) Adam Sandler, Kevin James. “Love on a Limb” (2016, Romance) Ashley Williams. ›› “The Holiday” (2006) Cameron Diaz, Jude Law. (6:55) ›› “The Statement” (2003) Michael Caine. Vida (:35) Weeds (:05) Weeds (:35) Weeds Raymond Raymond Creek Creek Frasier Frasier black-ish black-ish Self-Quarantined 90 Day Fiancé Dragnificent! “Episode 5” Self-Quarantined Gold Rush (N) Homestead Rescue (N) Homestead Rescue Gold Rush Goldbergs Fresh-Boat Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang (:15) ››› “Stormy Weather” (1943) (:45) ››› “No Maps on My Taps” ›› “The Little Colonel” (6:00) “Beetlejuice” (1988) Creepshow (N) (:01) Creepshow (:02) “Bride of Chucky” eNASCAR iRacing ABB Formula E Formula E NASCAR Race Hub ›› “Tomb Raider” (2018) Alicia Vikander. “The Price of Everything” (2018) Penny (6:35) “Arizona” (2018) “Tall Tales” (2019) Vica Kerekes (:35) “Killers Anonymous” (2019) Once We ››› “Western Stars” (2019) ›› “Yesterday” (2019) Himesh Patel, Lily James. Radio (:25) Lindsey Vonn: The Final Season We’re Here Betty Insecure

TUESDAY EVENING 3 CBKFT 5 CFRE 6 CKCK 7 WEATH 8 WDIV 9 CBKT 11 WWJ 12 WXYZ 13 CTYS 19 TSN 20 NET 25 EDACC 26 W 29 ENCAV2 33 CMT 35 TLC 38 DISC 41 COM 42 TCM 47 AMC 48 FSR 55 CRV1 56 CRV2 57 CRV3 58 HBO

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Découverte Pharmac Tout le monde en parle (N) Téléjour. Coronavirus: New Reality NCIS: New Orleans NCIS: Los Angeles News Block American Idol (N) The Rookie “The Hunt” I Do, Redo Kitchen Evenings on TWN Storm Overnight on The Weather Network Overnight on TWN Zoey’s-Playlist Good Girls News FlashPoint! Paid Prog. BISSELL Heartland “Fairytale” What’re You At?-T. Power Standing Standing The National (N) (6:00) ›››› “Forrest Gump” (1994) Tom Hanks. Joel Osteen The World’s NCIS: New Orleans (6:00) American Idol (N) The Rookie “The Hunt” News Coronavirus Bensinger Castle Simpsons Duncanville Burgers Family Guy Vagrant Queen (N) Dirt Farmers Dirt Farmers (5:00) Curling (N) Curling (N) “I Am Durán” (2018) Robert De Niro. NHL Classics NHL Classics Stanley Cup Question Period Motive “The Score” American Idol (N) “Just for the Summer” (2020) Hayley Sales. Nancy Drew Outlander (N) (6:55) ››› “The Birds” (1963) Rod Taylor. ››› “Philomena” (2013) Judi Dench. Kids Are All Raymond Raymond Man-Plan Man-Plan Man-Plan Man-Plan 8, Rules 8, Rules 90 Day Fiancé 90 Day Fiancé Find Love LIVE 90 Day Fiancé Naked and Afraid “Double Down in the Jungle” (N) Lone Star Law (N) Lone Star Law Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends (6:00) ›››› “I Remember Mama” ››› “Stella Dallas” (1937) Barbara Stanwyck. Steamboat A Discovery of Witches A Discovery of Witches ›› “Con Air” (1997) Nicolas Cage, John Cusack. (6:00) Greatest Races From March 17, 2019. eNASCAR iRacing Pro Series eNASCAR (5:25) › “The Goldfinch” VICE (N) America Billions (N) Penny Dreadful: City “A Dog’s Way Home” ›› “A Dog’s Journey” (2019) Voice of Josh Gad. “Possession-Han” (:05) ›› “Pacific Rim Uprising” (2018) Jing Tian “We Die Young” (2019, Action) Superfly (6:35) Mildred Pierce Real Time With Bill Maher I Know This Much Is True Insecure (N) Run “Jump”

MONDAY EVENING 3 CBKFT 5 CFRE 6 CKCK 7 WEATH 8 WDIV 9 CBKT 11 WWJ 12 WXYZ 13 CTYS 19 TSN 20 NET 25 EDACC 26 W 29 ENCAV2 33 CMT 35 TLC 38 DISC 41 COM 42 TCM 47 AMC 48 FSR 55 CRV1 56 CRV2 57 CRV3 58 HBO

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Rétroviseur L’épicerie Dans l’oeil du dragon (N) Bonsoir bonsoir! (N) Le téléjournal (N) Survivor (Season Finale) (N) Global News at 10 (N) The Masked Singer (N) Transplant “Relapse” (N) Big Bang etalk (N) (5:00) Evenings on The Weather Network Evenings on TWN Overnight on TWN Chicago Fire Chicago P.D. News News Tonight Show-J. Fallon Coronation Family Feud The ABC Murders (N) Ordeal by Innocence The National (N) (6:00) Survivor (Season Finale) (N) Two Men Late Show-Colbert Corden Housewife Single Shark Tank (N) News J. Kimmel Nightline (N) J. Kimmel Chicago Med Chicago Fire Chicago P.D. Paramedics: Paramedics: UFC Fight Night - Prelims UFC Fight Night: Jacksonville From Jacksonville, Fla. (N) Blue Jays NHL Rewind Blue Jays Rewind Big Bang etalk (N) Shark Tank (N) Goldbergs Big Bang Housewife Goldbergs “Love on Iceland” (2020) Kaitlin Doubleday. ›› “Notting Hill” (1999) Julia Roberts, Hugh Grant. (5:45) ›››› “Gandhi” (1982) Ben Kingsley. ›› “The Bonfire of the Vanities” (1990) Raymond Raymond Creek Creek Frasier Frasier black-ish black-ish (6:00) My 600-Lb. Life (N) My 600-Lb. Life Brianne begins a weight-loss journey. My 600-Lb. Life Expedition X (N) Mighty Trains Disasters at Sea Expedition Unknown Goldbergs Fresh-Boat Friends Friends Friends Friends Big Bang Big Bang Crimson ›› “House of Bamboo” (1955) Robert Ryan. “Love Is a Many Splendored Thing” (6:00) ››› “Mission: Impossible III” (2006, Action) (:05) ›› “Hitman” (2007, Action) Timothy Olyphant. Ultimate Disc Second semifinal. (N Taped) NASCAR NASCAR Race Hub (:10) ›› “The Darkest Minds” (2018) Mandy Moore ›› “Pacific Rim Uprising” (2018) John Boyega. “Life of Pets 2” Billions Penny Dreadful: City Gary Owen: DoinWhatIDo (6:40) “Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw” “The Domestics” (2018) Kate Bosworth. Sorry Loss “Beware the Slenderman” (2016) Morgan Geyser. Barry Barry Betty I Know This


PAGE A28 • MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Local food truck favourite opening with new guidelines, same treats

On the Front Porch by Wanda Smith

Larissa Kurz

Time to Arise & Shine “Arise and shine! Daylight in the swamp!� This was a favorite saying of my dad’s when he’d ring the gong to awake sleepy trail riders and campers over the years. As far as research goes, what I can find is that this phrase originated with the Minnesotan loggers in the early days when they lived in logging camps. The Iron Range of Minnesota boasts of a lot of swampy, boggy areas so the majority of the logging was done during the winter months when the teams of horses (then advancing to modern day machinery) could pull logs on frozen terrain. “Daylight in the swamp� meant it was time to get up and get going! As I pray throughout each week about what is on God’s heart for this column, I feel that He is guiding me to continue to build hope in your hearts; and not only to build hope but also to build a vision for coming out of this crisis. As I recount the true historical accounts in the Old and New Testament, I am greatly encouraged as I read through many situations that looked hopeless but were always turned around. Of course, the most hopeless of all was when Jesus was crucified on the cross. The whole world went dark and the enemy mocked those who believed. It looked like all was lost. BUT. GOD! What was buried was resurrected! What is buried in your life that has died? Dreams? Ideas? Love? Vision? “Behold, I will do a new thing, now it shall spring forth; shall you not know it? I will even make a road in the wilderness and rivers in the desert.� Isaiah 43:19 If you can dream it, you can do it! I’ve heard countless stories of new innovations coming out of this COVID-19 situation. Inventions, innovative ideas and strategies will come out of this season! True accounts throughout the Bible such as Daniel in the lion’s den, Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego in the fiery furnace, the disciples on the stormy seas, Esther’s plight, Joseph being sold as a slave and becoming 2nd in command over all of Egypt, the flight of the Israelites and the parting of the Red Sea, feeding all the Israelites (2 Million plus) for 40 years and not one of their shoes wore out, Gideon (who was shy and fearful) and his army of 300 taking out thousands of warriors in the Midianite army show God does not abandon or forsake us. He is everything we need and He has a great plan for our lives. As we fill our minds with the truth of who God is, what He’s done and what He will do, we can confidently look forward with expectation of His provision, protection, promises, and preservation. We can look at Noah’s testimony of coming into a new normal and seeing God provide for him in unprecedented ways. Remember, it had never rained before the flood. Can you imagine the feeling of being the only family on the face of the earth to emerge from the worldwide crisis? Noah took God at His Word. He trusted Him. He obeyed Him. He walked it out by faith. That is exactly what we need to do right now! Readers, it is time to arise and shine! “Arise, shine; for your light has come! And the glory of the Lord is risen upon you. For behold, the darkness shall over the earth, and deep darkness the people; but the Lord will arise you, and His gloryEast will be seen upon you.� 60over Athabasca Street Isaiah 60:1,2 306-692-0533 Minister: Rev. Jim Tenford Music Director: Karen Purdy

The Cone Artist Ice Cream Truck will once again be returning to the streets of Moose Jaw this summer, but the ongoing effects of the pandemic mean that the popular food truck is making some changes to do their part in flattening the curve. “We figure we’ve got to adapt to new stuff and new changes in life. We can’t always run things the exact same way, when life throws curveballs, [and] so we’re just finding different ways that we can stay afloat during this,� said Izaak Falk, from the Cone Artist. Beginning on May 1, the Cone Artist Ice Cream Truck is back roaming the city with a few stipulations. In order to stay in line with public health recommendations, the Cone Artist will be practicing stricter sanitation protocols and limiting payment options to debit or credit only. The food truck has also changed the way it serves up its menu, especially as many of the events the truck normally attends during the summer — like the Sidewalk Days street festival — have already been cancelled. The Cone Artist has moved to an order-based model, and is offering contactless delivery of all menu items on Tuesdays through Saturdays from 2 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Delivery is free with a $10 purchase, or costs an additional $2 on orders less than $10. The switch to orders means that the Cone Artist has also made some changes with their menu, but it’s all changes for the better, said Falk. All the usual treats people know and love are still available, with some extras coming soon. “We’ve decided to add premium flavours that we don’t typically offer,� said Falk, adding that he’s tried one of the new ice cream flavours, Black Forest, and thinks Moose Jaw will be impressed. Ice cream will also be served in covered cups rather than cones this summer, because of the nature of orders and contact-less delivery options. The full menu has been shared on their Facebook page, now that they are open for the season.

The Cone Artist Ice Cream Truck will still be serving Moose Jaw tasty treats, but will a slightly different format this year. (supplied)

The Cone Artist will also be travelling a pre-designated route around the city and making a few stops at specific locations, where customers can meet the food truck and order directly. These stops will vary week to week, said Falk, and customers are welcome to message their Facebook page with and specific location requests for the future. “We’ll be going by a lot of busy shopping areas, where people are waiting outside, and we’ll be going down near walking trails and stuff so people should just keep their eyes out [for us],� said Falk. Falk said he would be posting all of The Cone Artist updates about the menu and upcoming stops as they are decided on Facebook.

211 SK Resource for Support During COVID-19 Crisis 211 SK is a resource available day or night for supports such as food, housing, mental health and any other immediate needs during the COVID-19 crisis. Please use this resource in seeking supports on behalf of others or yourself. You can call, text or go on the webpage simply by entering 211 – its just that easy.

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of Sunday, May 14th, 2017 the author, and do not necessarily reflect the position of this Worship Service 10:30am publication.

& Sunday School

St. Andrew’s United Church

NEW LOCATION

St. Barnabas

Traditional Anglican Parish Now worshipping at

27 Hochelaga St. W., Moose Jaw



60 Athabasca Street East 306-692-0533 Minister: Rev. Jim Tenford

Music Director: Karen Purdy • Choir Director: Jenna Nash

Sunday, May 10th, 2020

Rev. Jim will be presenting his message on Youtube/Facebook this Sunday.

Sanctuary Services and Sunday School at St. Andrew’s United have been cancelled until further notice.

E-mail: st.andrews.mj@sasktel.net Facebook: www.facebook.com/StAndrewsUnitedChurchMooseJaw Website: http://standrewsmoosejaw.ca

The beautiful home of Central Lutheran Church Holy Communion Book of Common Prayer Sunday 11:30 am (new time) Coffee & fellowship after the service For more information contact: Fr. Glenn Galenkamp, Rector 306-691-2715

All Are Welcome!

www.saintbarnabasmoosejaw.ca

LAWN CARE & WINDOW CLEANING

FAST, RELIABLE REASONABLE

306-631-8014

MOOSE JAW, SASKATCHEWAN


MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020 • PAGE A29

Higher beef prices at meat counter possible By Ron Walter - For Agri-Mart Express

AGRIMART

EXPRESS Consumers can expect higher prices and possibly less beef selection at grocery stores in the coming months. With pandemic uncertainty and various North American packing plants reducing shifts or closing temporarily as a precaution for Covid-19, meat supplies will be affected. Indeed in the week ended April 17 USA average carcass values, known as cutout price in the industry, jumped

20 per cent to $2.84 a pound and started the next week at $2.90. Cattle market analyst Anne Wasko of Gateway Livestock said in her online broadcast that this trend should continue as challenging conditions hit the market across the board. With less cattle needed by packers, she said Western Canadian cash prices for live cattle have fallen between 10 and 12 cents a pound. Adding to the short supply issue is placement of livestock on feedlots with a reduction of animals. March placements of cattle in feedlots was down 32 per

cent. In the United States placements of cattle in feedlots was down 23 per cent. The impact of lower feedlot placements will be felt with reduced supply to packers just as the barbecue season starts in summer. Livestock marketings in Canada are down as well with 502,000 head last month compared with 640,000 head last year. Some local abattoirs have limited quantities purchased and increased prices. Ron Walter can be reached at ronjoy@sasktel.net

Church bells ring out to offer hope during gloom of pandemic Jason G. Antonio - Moose Jaw Express

To help dispel the gloom of the coronavirus, St. Joseph’s Roman Catholic Church has been ringing its bells every day at noon to offer some hope during this unsettling time. The idea to make a joyful noise with the bells popped into the head of parishioner Janie Fries several weeks ago after all houses of worship were ordered to close. She remembered that the community collectively rang its bells on Nov. 11, 2018, to help commemorate the centennial of the end of the First World War and thought it would be nice to do that again. Being part of the Moose Jaw Band and Choral Festival, Fries had all the email addresses of the churches and sent them messages about participating in this uplifting initiative. However, she ran into an unforeseen problem. “There are not many churches with bells in the city,” Fries laughed. “St. Aidan (Anglican Church) and St. Joseph have bells, and I have a feeling those are the only ones, which is unfortunate.” Fellow parishioner Rosalie Boots joined

Fries in her quest to have the Catholic church ring its bells. They originally thought about having the bells rung at 11 a.m. on Sunday, but realized many churches were broadcasting services live online. So they thought about ringing the bells at noon, before deciding it should be done every day. It has mainly been maintenance manager Martin Rossler who has rung the bells, with the parish priest also participating. Ringing the bells — even for a short time — offers hope and positivity and reminds people that no one is alone in attempting to cope during this trying time, said Fries. It also provides a message of remembrance and a call to consider that this will eventually end. It might be difficult to see that now, but this too shall pass. The bells are rung for only a couple of minutes each day, mainly out of consideration for the neighbours around the church, Fries continued. However, both want to hear the gong go on a little longer each time every day.

Janie Fries and Rosalie Boots stand outside St. Joseph Roman Catholic Church and listen to the bells ring out, as part of a new initiative to offer hope to the community during the coronavirus. Photo by Jason G. Antonio

Remembering

MOOSE JAW

EXPRESS.COM

IN LOVING MEMORY

Phyllis C Hill

January 13, 1914 - May 5, 2010

NO READERS LEFT BEHIND

Obituaries & Memorials 3.3" X 4" in Full Color

Picture included Approx. 200 words – $100 Additional Inch – $25/inch Email: mjexpress@sasktel.net

Make me an instrument of Thy Peace St Frances Prayer

ELSYE READER

June 12, 1937 - May 10, 2018

With Love from the families of Twiy, Benita, Renee, Rolene Please include the Moose Jaw Health Foundation in your estate plan to help your community for generations to come. Please contact us for more information. Moose Jaw Health Foundation 55 Diefenbaker Drive Moose Jaw, SK S6J 0C2 Phone (306) 694-0373

www.mjhf.org

(306) 694-1322

Remember her with a smile today. She was not one for tears. Refelect instead on memories. Of all the happy years. Recall to mind the way she spoke, And all the things she said. Her strength, her stance. The way she walked. Remember them instead. Your loving husband Jerry & Families

Going ABOVE and BEYOND expectations

Tradename for W. J. Jones & Son Ltd & Parkview Funeral Chapel

Jones Funeral Home 106 Athabasca St E 306.693.4644

Parkview Funeral Chapel 474 Hochelaga St W 306.694.5500

Honouring all Mothers and Mentoring Women this Mother’s Day

is what sets us apart


PAGE A30 • MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020

COVID-19: What’s cancelled and closed in Moose Jaw

The following is a running list of groups, businesses, and organizations that have been closed or have cancelled upcoming events due to concerns about COVID-19. Moose Jaw Express staff will be updating this list as needed. If you would like your notice added to this list, contact us at editor@mjvexpress.com For information about the status of COVID-19 in Saskatchewan, or for more information on symptoms and preventative measures, check saskatchewan.ca/ coronavirus. Saskatchewan declared a provincial state of emergency on March 18, limited public gatherings to 10 people and implemented restrictions on businesses and health facilities, and public health urges all residents to avoid public contact whenever possible. On April 23, Premier Scott Moe announced the Saskatchewan government’s plan to begin reopening the province’s economy as early as May 4 for some sectors.

Education:

All schools in Saskatchewan, from pre-kindergarten to high school are presently closed. Distance learning resources are now available. Saskatchewan Polytechnic has cancelled all programming and classes on campus but online courses and alternative delivery options are available. All non-essential events are also cancelled. Campuses remain open but with limited services. The University of Regina is providing instruction from a distance for the remainder of the semester. A decision about how final exams will be conducted is yet to be made.

Organizations:

SARCAN is closed until further notice. SGI is no longer offering road tests until further notice. Those who have already booked an appointment will be notified to reschedule. SGI offices are currently closed to the public, but appointments to complete transactions in person can be made by calling the Moose Jaw branch at 1 (306) 691-4570. Riverside Mission has suspended its daily lunch program until further notice, but is still providing supper service with increased safety protocols. The shelter is also not taking leftover food donations or clothing donations at this time, and men’s emergency shelter capacity has been reduced from 10 beds to 4 beds only available to Saskatchewan residents at this time. The Western Development Museum is now closed to the public, with all upcoming events cancelled until further notice. The Wakamow Valley Authority office is closed to the public, with staff available to contact by phone at 1 (306) 692-2717 or email at wakamow.events@sasktel. net. The Moose Jaw Police Service has suspended some services such as criminal record checks, inspection tickets and civilian fingerprinting until further notice. The building on Fairford St. is now closed to the public without an appointment, which can be made by calling 1 (306) 694-7600. City Hall is closed to the public until further notice. Payment can be deposited in the mail slot on the front of the building or processed online. The Festival of Words office is closed to the public, but can be contacted by phone at 1 (306) 691-0557 or by email. Tourism Moose Jaw is closed until further notice but executive director Jacki L’Heureux-Mason can be contacted by phone at 1 (306) 692-0555 or by email at director@tourismmoosejaw.com. Cadet activities with the #1856 Moose Jaw Schools Cadet Corps Royal Canadian Army Cadets, the #40 Snowbird Royal Canadian Air Cadets, and the #99 Royal Canadian Sea Cadets Corps Assiniboine have been cancelled until August 31. The Moose Jaw Elks Lodge No. 7 has cancelled its Friday meat draws and Wednesday night dart league until further notice. The Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 59 is now closed to the public. Veterans in need of assistance can contact the Legion service officer at 1 (306) 6813835. All churches in the city are closed to the public, with most still available to contact by phoning their individuals offices. TOPS Chapters across Canada cancelled weigh-ins and meetings. Please check with TOPS to see when they will resume activities. The Moose Jaw Multicultural Council office and the Newcomer Centre is closed to the public until further notice. Staff and settlement workers are still available to contact through phone or other digital communication by calling the MJMCC at 1 (306) 693-4677 or the Newcomer Centre at 1 (306) 692-6892. The Moose Jaw & District Senior Association has closed Timothy Eaton Gardens and Timothy Eaton Cafe until further notice.The Cosmo Centre is closed until further notice. The Moose Jaw Public Library is closed until further notice. Book deadlines will be extended to accommodate, and overdue fines will be waived for the time being. The Moose Jaw Museum & Art Gallery is closed. All

events and programs during this time will be postponed and rescheduled at a later date. Grief Support Groups from Jones-Parkview Funeral Home are cancelled until further notice. South Central ECIP has indefinitely suspended all home visits and has cancelled all Learn and Playu and Zumbini groups effective immediately. Hunger in Moose Jaw is closed to the public, but is available through phone, email, and social media messages. The Good Food Box will be cancelled until further notice, and families taking part in the children’s lunch program are to contact Hunger in Moose Jaw directly at 1 (306) 692-1916. Hunger in Moose Jaw staff are checking messages from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Monday through Thursday. Yara Community Garden’s registration night for returning members will be rescheduled at a later date. Prairie Hearts Quilters Guild has cancelled meetings until the end of May, and the General Meeting will be postponed until a later date. Bel Coro has cancelled meetings until further notice. Girl Guides meetings and events have been cancelled until further notice. Girl Guide cookies are available for purchase from Canadian Tire, both online and in-store for pick-up. The Moose Jaw Humane Society is suspending all volunteer activities and opportunities at the shelter until further notice and will be closed to the public for the next two weeks. Adoptions, cremations, and emergency services are still available by appointment by contacting the shelter at 1 (306) 692-1517. SCRAPS has closed its 9 Lives Boutique at the Town ‘n’ Country Mall until further notice. The Moose Jaw Genealogical Society has cancelled their monthly meetings at the Moose Jaw Public Library until further notice. Joe’s Place Youth Centre is closed to the public and is only offering online programs until further notice. Moose Jaw Families for Change has cancelled all upcoming community events and has postponed regular programming. Questions can be directed to MJFFC at 1 (306) 693-2271. Grandmothers 4 Grandmothers Raffle Draw on May 8 is postponed until Aug. 17, and a COVID-19 relief fund through the Stephen Lewis Foundation is now open to take donations. More information can be found online or by calling 1 (888) 203-9990.

Sports and Recreation

Gyms and Fitness Centres are closed by mandate of the provincial government, and will re-open as part of Phase Three of the Re-Open Saskatchewan Plan at an undetermined date. Golf courses will be allowed to open as early as May 4 as part of Phase One of the Re-Open Saskatchewan Plan, as will low-risk outdoor activities, such as fishing and boat launches, provincial parks, and golf courses. The Western Hockey League has cancelled the remainder of the 2019-20 season. The Saskatchewan Midget AAA Hockey League has been cancelled. Moose Jaw Minor Hockey office is closed to the public and can be reached via admin@mjhockey.com. Gymtastiks has cancelled pre-school drop-in gymnastics until further notice; classes are suspended until further notice. Martial arts classes, including programs at Empire School, are cancelled. Moose Jaw Special Olympics has cancelled all programming until May 1, including bowling, floor hockey, curling, bocce ball, and the Active Start and FUNdamentals youth programming. The board meeting will also be rescheduled for May 7. The Moose Jaw Kinsmen Flying Fins has cancelled all training until further notice. The Moose Jaw Wildlife Federation has cancelled its Walleye Challenge, which was scheduled for June 12 and 13. The Moose Jaw Soccer Association has postponed all programming and will be announcing a plan for the outdoor season as Phase 4 and Phase 5 details of the Re-Open Saskatchewan Plan are confirmed. The Moose Jaw Tennis Club is now shut down until further notice, including both indoors and outdoors. The Lynbrook Golf Club is closed until May 15 when it is set to re-open, but members are currently able to purchase their 2020 memberships or any golf-related items from the clubhouse by phone, from the ProShop at 1 (306) 692-2838. Credit card payments and E-transfers are accepted. The Hillcrest Golf Course will reopen on May 15, with tee-time available to book beginning May 10 for members and May 12 for non-members. Memberships are available to purchase by visiting the proshop or calling 1 (306) 693-1921. The 2020 Saskatchewan Summer Games, set to be hosted in Lloydminster, have been postponed until July 2021.

Events

All recreational and entertainment venues including Yara Centre and the Kinsmen Sportsplex are closed by mandate of the provincial government, and will be allowed to re-open at an undetermined date as Phase Four of the Re-Open Saskatchewan Plan.

Arts and Culture:

The Moose Jaw Humane Society has cancelled all in-person fundraising activities, but is still holding the 2020 4 Paws Lottery. Tickets are available by calling the shelter at 1 (306) 692-1517. The Saskatchewan Country Music Awards will host a Virtual Awards Show on May 16 at 8 p.m., airing on Access7 Cable TV and streaming on their website. The Moose Jaw Music Festival has been cancelled. The Cultural Centre events/concerts have been rescheduled. The Cultural Centre is closed to the public with all events rescheduled. The Box Office can be contacted during regular operating hours by phone at 1 (306) 693-4700 or by email at info@moosejawculture. ca The Moose Jaw Shriners annual gourmet wind-up banquet has been postponed. A new date is to be determined, with the May long weekend a possibility. The Early Childhood Intervention Program’s Mother’s Day Craft and Trade Show on May 9 has been cancelled. The Moose Jaw Band and Choral Festival on May 11-14 has been cancelled. The Moose Jaw Royal Canadian Legion has cancelled its annual Decoration Day Memorial on June 7. Sidewalk Days on July 2-4 has been cancelled. The Moose Jaw Hometown Fair and Parade on June 18-21 has been cancelled. The Gravelbourg Summer Solstice Festival on June 18-21 has been postponed to June 18-20, 2021. The Moose Jaw Gamers Association has cancelled the 2020 Summer GAX on July 11-13. The Saskatchewan Festival of Words will no longer be taking place in-person, but will instead be moving to a virtual platform on July 13-19. Attendance will also be free, but organizers encourage donations to help keep the festival running.

Businesses/Facilities

Clinics that provide services in dentistry, physical therapy, opticians, podiatry, occupational therapy, and chiropractic services will be allowed to re-open regular services to clients beginning May 4, as Phase One of the Re-Open Saskatchewan Plan. Some retail businesses will be allowed to re-open beginning May 19 during Phase Two of the Re-Open Saskatchewan Plan, in addition to some personal services such as hairdressers, massage therapists, and acupuncturists. The Moose Jaw Express is closed to the public but staff can still be contacted by email or phone at 1 (306) 694-1322. If no one is available to answer, please leave a message. Our newsroom is still taking tips and both The MooseJawToday.com online daily and Moose Jaw Express newspaper are operational as an essential service and putting out the news. Visitors are no longer allowed in any hospitals, clinics, or continuing care facilities operated by the Saskatchewan Health Region. Some exceptions may be made for compassionate reasons, such as family visiting a patient at end of life care, or family of patients prior to major surgery. All community gatherings at SHA-operated facilities are on hold, as are volunteer services from those over the age of 65. Points West Living condos are restricted to essential visitors only. Essential visitors are defined as those who provide care necessary for the well-being of a resident and visitors attending to a resident who is at an end of life situation. Visitors are restricted to one or two persons at a time and must be immediate family or designated support persons. Visitors will be required to go through a screening process. Dance Images by BJ has closed the studio for the time being, and classes are available by video. Dr. F.H. Wigmore Regional Hospital Gift Shop and Canteen Cart are closed until further notice. Casinos Moose Jaw and Regina have suspended operations. The Moose Jaw Warriors office is closed. Leisure Time Bingo is closed until further notice. Primary Eye Care Centre will be re-opening on May 4, and clients will be contacted to reschedule appointments. Until then, the office is still able to provide treatment for emergencies, and can be contacted by phone at 1 (306) 693-8584 or email at peccicare@gmail.com. The Tunnels of Moose Jaw is closed, but can be contacted by phone at 1 (306) 693-5261 or email at info@tunnelsofmoosejaw.com. Wrapture Spa & Boutique has suspended its spa and massage services but the boutique remains open for deliveries at this time. Staff can be reached Tuesday through Saturday by phone at 1 (306) 692-4341.

Restaurants:

Restaurants, lounges, bars, and nightclubs are closed to the public by mandate of the provincial government, as part of the state of emergency declaration on March 18. Deliver, take-out, and drivethrough services are still operating. Restaurants will be allowed to re-open at an undetermined date as part of Phase Three of the Re-Open Saskatchewan Plan, and will be limited to 50 per cent capacity at that time.


MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020 • PAGE A31

of moose jaw

THANK YOU to all healthcare workers, to all first responders, to all essential service providers! Beth Vance REALTOR® 631-0886

140 Main St N | 306-694-5766

Charming bungalow, welcoming glassed in veranda, hardwood floors. Updated kitchen with eat up bar, formal dining room. 2 bedrooms. Lower level with family room, utility laundry area and storage. Garage.

Executive style condos in West Park starting at $434,900. Stunning open concept designs ofer 1500 sqft and up! Soaring windows, gas fireplaces, stunning custom kitchens. Walk out basements. Seeing is believing!

Palliser School area. Over 1100 sqft bungalow, 3 bedrooms on main floor. Lots of cabinets and counter space in kitchen. Large dining area adjoins kitchen. Basement completed. Heated garage plus attached work shop.

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Across from Crescent Park, well maintained 2 bedroom condo. Spacious living room with adjoining dining area that has garden doors to a private balcony. Abundance of kitchen cabinets. Heated underground parking. REDUCED!!

North West location! Updated windows on main floor. 2 + 1 bedrooms. Lower level with family room, open for development. Good sized back yard and deck. Single garage.

Spacious 2 bedroom 1 1/2 bath townhouse condo. Open concept living-kitchen-dining. Beautiful white cabinetry in kitchen, centre island. Dining area has patio doors to cozy deck. Lower level open for development. REDUCED!!

Market Place REAL ESTATE

LETTER TO THE

EDITOR

into your life!

Send your letters to the editor to: letters@mjvexpress.com or 888-241-5291

All columns, letters to the editor and editorials are solely the personal opinions of the writers themselves and not necessarily the opinions of The Moose Jaw Express.

We are here and well at Moose Jaw Extendicare Hello and Happy Spring Iwantedtotakethetimetoreachouttoeveryoneandjust say Hi. We are into week 6 of COVID 19 pandemic. Overall things have been great here. We have amazing staff that have steppeduptremendouslyandhaveshowednothingbeside careforourresidentsinthistimeofneed.Theyhavetaken everyprecautiontoprotectthemselves,theirfamiliesandour residents.Justtokeepyouinformedthatatthistimewehave hadnocasesorevensymptomsofCOVID19throughtheresidentsorthestaff.Todatewehaveonlyhad2staffbetested andtheycamebacknegativeandthatwasintheearlystates ofthispandemic.Thatalonejustshowstheduediligenceof

the team we have here and I couldn’t be prouder. Wehavehadsomegreattimesherestayingbusy.TheEasterbunnycamebyanddeliveredsomegreattreatsandthis WednesdaywearehavingaHamburgerBBQforallresidents andstaff.AstheweathergetsnicerIhopetocontinuetoBBQ moreforeveryone.Theyheldahealthcareparadeforushere andwehadabout25residentsouttowatchanditwasgreat tosee.Weareaveragingabout8-12facetimemeetingsaday withfamiliesandweencourageyoutotakeadvantageofthat processifyouhaven’talready.YoucanreachouttoSienna Stewart@SiStewart@extendicare.comifyouwouldlikemore information. IwantedtosayThankYoutoyouthefamily.Weappreciateall thesupportandprayersinthistimeandIhopeyoucontinue

todosointheupcomingdays. Iknowtwoimportantdates are coming up which is Mother’s day and Father’s day. As ofrightnowwearenotallowingitemsintothehome. Ifthat changes we will let you know as soon as possible. Atimelikethisnoonecouldpredictandtoaffectoursectorof carelikeithas. Inthistimeweneedtotakecareofourselves andfamiliessothelightgetsbrighterattheendofthetunnel. We will prevail and our patience will show that. Take care and stay safe. Sincerely Tara Yaskow Administrator

This year declared International Year of Plant Health by United Nations By Ron Walter - For Agri-Mart Express

AGRIMART

The year 2020 has been declared the International Year of Plant Health by the United Nations to raise awareness of the “critical importance of this natural resource.” With so much attention to the Coronavirus pandemic this declaration has escaped notice by the public and even by the agriculture industry. Science Canada notes healthy plants are the foundation for all life, making up 80 per cent of the food

EXPRESS

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we eat and producing 98 per cent of the oxygen we breathe. Canada had planned a series of events to mark the year starting with the annual invasive species forum in February. With the pandemic many events had to be cancelled. Among the likely cancellations are a Canada Produce Marketing Association Trade Show in May, and a Canada-wide science fair in May. Two July events in Canada include a plant health science vision and a plant protection survey, both by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

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Amber Tangjerd

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E.G. (Bub) Hill

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Beautiful Character home main floor features a large living room with a bay window, dining room and an updated kitchen, upstairs master suite, laundry room, two additional bedrooms and a 4 pc bath complete with claw foot tub. loft area that is perfect for the kids to call their own. The basement is in excellent condition ready for your personal touch, Single detached garage and a fully fenced yard complete this home.

$265,000 Great revenue property with basement suite home features a large custom kitchen, 3 bedrooms, 4pc bath, and livingroom on the main floor. Downstairs you will find a second kitchen, 4pc bath, 2 additional bedrooms, and a family room. Shared laundry room is also located in the basesment. There is 2 furnaces, central air, updated windows, most painting has been updated, new shinglese, and a clean sewer line.

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PRIME LOCATION! Located on a corner lot in the Tourist Area of Downtown Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada. Approximately 54 x 125 and across from the Grant Hall Hotel, close to Temple Gardens Mineral Spa and the Tunnels of Moose Jaw. The corner lot is Zoned for Commercial (C2HER) and is currently a parking lot which runs close to 0% vacancy. Build your new office building here, apartment, mixed use or keep as a parking lot.

www.moosejawrealestate.net

More information about the year and Canada’s involvement can be found at the science.gc.ca website. Controlling pests that threaten plants plays a role in the year. Up to 40 per cent of global crops are lost every year to plant pests and disease, representing $220 billion losses and leaving millions of people in hunger. Climate change and human activity alter the environment and create conditions allowing pests to flourish. At the same time, the growing volume of international trade has allowed quick spread of pests around the globe. The pine forest beetle, decimating B.C. forests, first arrived by hitching a ride from China and began to destroy trees. It has no predators here to control populations. The International Year of Plant Health comes at a time when plants and plant protein seem to assume more importance with a small but growing trend to plant-based meat substitutes. Ron Walter can be reached at ronjoy@sasktel.net

Mike Botterill 306-631-9663 | Brenda McLash 306-630-5700 | Dave Low 306-631-9201 | Jim Low 306-631-7340 | Jennifer Patterson 306-684-9267 Ken McDowell 306-631-4624 | Marlene Williamson 306-631-7508 | Patricia McDowell 306-631-4188 | Shauna Audette 306-631-0960 | Sue Brabant 306-690-9959 Carmen Davey 306-631-9217 | Julie Davidson 306-631-5099 | Larry Mathieson 306-631-1493 | Greg Boyle 306-631-1374 | Twyla Tondevold 306-631-6895 | Chris Harden 306-630-6570

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PAGE A32 • MOOSEJAWEXPRESS.COM • Wednesday, May 6, 2020

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