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FREE

M O N TA N A SUMMER

2017


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M O N TA N A S U M M E R


WELCOME TO YOUR

M O N TA N A

SUMMER

Few places offer as much natural beauty as the Flathead Indian Reservation and Lake County. This is Montana at its best, with countless ways to fulfill outdoor recreational cravings. The area is full of choices: hiking, fishing, cycling, bird watching, boating, water skiing, kayaking, camping, sightseeing, golfing and so much more. Driving in from the south, the view from the crest of Ravalli Hill is breathtaking. The craggy-topped Mission Mountains jut from the valley floor with eye-catching beauty, towering over a lush landscape of rolling hills and sweeping fields. Clear mountain streams fed by winter snowpack cut paths from the mountains and meander through the valley floors en route to Flathead River or Flathead Lake. Viewed from atop Polson Hill, the 28-mile-long lake, dotted with islands and bordered by mountains, is breathtaking. The National Bison Range and the Ninepipe Wildlife Refuge are home to abundant wildlife including deer, elk, antelope, bear, birds and bison. Numerous town festivals, powwows, rodeos, stockcar racing, basketball tournaments, fishing derbies and fairs throughout the summer offer tourists and local residents plenty to do each and every weekend. If a person can’t find something fun and exhilarating to do, it’s because they aren’t looking — or, perhaps they prefer to embrace the laid-back lifestyle of the friendly and fortunate folks who call the Flathead Indian M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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CONTENTS FLATHEAD LAKE FACTS . . . . . . . . . . 5 WATER QUALITY MONITORED . . . . . 7 BIRDING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 HIKING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 FARMERS MARKET . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 AIS UPDATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 CHEFF GUEST RANCH . . . . . . . . . . 17 POLSON INTERPRETIVE TRAIL . . . .19 LAKE COUNTY BREWERIES . . . . . . 21 GLACIAL LAKE MISSOULA . . . . . . . 23 RECREATIONAL PERMITS. . . . . . . . 25 SUMMER FIRE SEASON . . . . . . . . . 26 POWWOWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 PORT POLSON PLAYERS . . . . . . . . 30 VISIT GLACIER PARK . . . . . . . . . . . 31 DAY TRIPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 MONTANA WILDLIFE . . . . . . . . . . . 37 COUNTY MAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40-41 FLATHEAD LAKE STATE PARK . . . . .42 RODEOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 SUMMER EVENTS CALENDAR . . . . 49 CITY INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . 75

M O NTANA SUMMER 2017 Montana Summer is a yearly publication of the Valley Journal, a weekly newspaper published each Wednesday in Lake County, Montana, for readers in the Mission, Jocko and lower Flathead Valleys. Our main office is located in Ronan at 331 Main Street S.W. Office hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Business phone - (406) 676-8989. Fax - (406) 676-8990.

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Our mailing address is: Valley Journal, PO Box 326, Ronan, MT 59864. Our Web address is www.valleyjournal.net. News and calendar submissions may be sent by email to vjeditor@valleyjournal.net Copyright 2017, the Valley Journal. All rights reserved. Reproduction, reuse or transmittal in any form or by any means is prohibited without written permission of the Valley Journal.

Serving Montanans Since 1885

Publisher/Editor...... Summer Goddard

Advertising mgr/Owner... Boone Goddard

Reporter..................... Karen Peterson

Copy Editor...................... Kathi Beeks

Reporter...............Caleb M. Soptelean

Advertising Sales......... Mickele Schultz

Sports Reporter ..............Rob Zolman

Advertising Sales...............Jerry Beeks

Photographer..............Nicole Tavenner

Office Manager .................. Leni Baker


F L AT H E A D L A K E F A C T S • The striking azure of the water is what grabs the attention of most northbound travelers as they crest the top of Polson Hill and look down at Flathead Lake, but the sparkling body grows more translucent as people grow close. When unobstructed by waves, the clearness reveals every outline of objects along the bottom, which can sometimes give the illusion of shallowness. Don’t be fooled: the deepest part of the lake is 370 feet — the length of approximately 10 standard school buses parked end to end. Average lake depth is 167 feet, greater than that of the Persian Gulf. • Flathead Lake is one of the 300 largest natural lakes in the world and is the largest natural freshwater lake in the western United States. The 197-square-mile water body is known for its impressive size in the current era, but it was actually part of a much larger lake called Lake Missoula that existed an estimated 15,000 years ago. Lake Missoula was created by a 2,000-foot tall ice dam of the Clark Fork River. Lake Missoula was the largest documented ice-dammed lake in the world. It covered 3,000 square miles. A sign at the National Bison Range’s Red Sleep Drive designates a high water mark

of Lake Missoula and ripple marks from the lake’s former surface are visible in the surrounding hills. Flathead’s remnant size is still significant. It takes approximately 2 hours to drive the 82 miles of roadway around the entire lake without stopping, not accounting for traffic. • Flathead Lake contains 10 islands of various sizes and ownership. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks manages four of the islands. Wildhorse Island near Big Arm Bay is the largest island in the lake and consists of 2,163 acres. It doubles as a wildlife refuge and state park that is noted for its herd of Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep and several wild horses. Bird Island is located near the Narrows, a small group of islands easily visible from Polson, along the northern part of Polson Bay. The island is owned and managed by the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks and the Flathead Lake Biological Station as a bird refuge. Geese, osprey, herons and eagles frequent Bird Island. Cedar and O’Neil islands are also managed by the state. Melita Island is a 64-acre island near Big Arm that is owned by the Boy Scouts of

America and serves as a summer camp for the organization. • Seli’š Ksanka Qlispe’ Dam, formerly known as Kerr Dam, was built between 1930 and 1938 and raised the elevation of the lake by approximately 10 feet, which brings it to 2,893 feet above sea level at full pool. Three turbines within the dam produce 194 megawatts of power, enough to power more than 145,000 homes. The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes became the first native government in the United States to own a dam after the transfer of ownership of the dam was complete in September 2015. If runoff conditions in the mountains don’t warrant flood threats, the lake level is brought to full pool by mid-June. • Today, summer brings a myriad of different boats to Flathead Lake. Sailboats, motorboats, kayaks, stand-up paddleboards and other types of watercraft teem in the warm months. In days of yesteryear, there were other types of vessels that frequented the lake for less recreational purposes. Late historian and journalist Paul Fugleberg wrote “Flathead Lake Steamboat Days,” a book S E E PA G E 6 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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about the era of the steamboat in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Steamboats carried passengers and freight on the lake during that time. Native tribes also traversed the lake via canoe. The Pend d’Oreille self-identified as “people who live along the broad water.” Broad water meant Flathead Lake. • Flathead Lake is one of the cleanest watersheds. Studies at the Flathead Lake Biological Station show that water quality in Flathead Lake is among the best in the world. In spite of its renowned purity, studies at the Bio Station show the water quality of Flathead Lake has declined over the last decade due to the combined effects of increased pollution from human sources, erosion of the shoreline caused by dam operations and introduction of nonnative biota (flora and fauna). A massive group effort to keep aquatic invasive species from entering the lake and the entire Columbia Basin watershed is currently underway. • Flathead Lake Biological Station was established in Bigfork in 1899 by Dr. Morton J. Elrod. The Flathead Lake Biological Station was moved to its present location in 1908 and is currently operated as a year-round academic and research facility mainly dealing with aquatic studies. 6

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• The lake’s major tributaries are the Flathead and Swan Rivers. Numerous small streams flow directly into the lake at its shoreline, particularly on the wetter East Shore.  • Maximum flow in the Flathead River generally occurs during spring freshet between May 15 and June 10, creating a plume of sediment that covers the lake surface.  • Due to its massive volume and normally active winds over the surface, Flathead Lake does not freeze over most winters, although the bays often have winter ice cover. The lake did freeze over in the winters of 1978-79 (all winter), 198788 (all winter), 1988-89 (March only) and 1989-90 (January only).  • The name Yellow Bay was derived from the yellow rock outcrop on the point which is Precambrian without fossils. The outcrop belongs to the Algonkian substrata, which also outcrops Glacier Park.  • The first wagon trail in the 1880s from Polson to the north end of the Lake followed the west side of the lake and was steep and hazardous. At some places, wagons had to be lowered by ropes.  In 1911, work started from the south end of the Lake to build an east shore road with the work primarily done by convict labor. It was completed in September of

1946. • Flathead Lake is currently described as oligomesotrophic (oligotrophic means being deficient in plant nutrients while mesotrophic means having a moderate amount of dissolved nutrients).  • Average surface temperatures of the lake range from 2.3°C (36°F) in midJanuary, to 13.5°C (56°F) in mid-June, to 20.3°C (68°F) in mid-August.  • Of the 25 fish species most commonly found in the Flathead RiverLake ecosystem, 10 species are native and 15 have been introduced. The native species include redside shiner, peamouth minnow, squawfish minnow, largescale sucker, longnose sucker, sculpin, bull trout, cutthroat trout, pygmy whitefish and mountain whitefish. Lake trout, lake whitefish and yellow perch are the most common non-natives and have increased in abundance since 1970, whereas native species have declined. Each spring and fall, the Mack Days fishing tournament offers anglers prizes for catching and removing non-native lake trout from the lake. The event is sponsored by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and sanctioned by Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks. VJ


W AT E R Q U A L I T Y M O N I T O R E D

An estimated 3.5 million people get sick each year after swimming in natural water bodies containing harmful bacteria and pollution, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). On average, after swimming in a natural water source like a lake or a coastal beach, you have an estimated 3-8 percent chance of getting sick. Your risk of falling ill depends on a number of factors, such as your age, the health of your immune system, the concentration of contaminants in the water, and the amount of contact you have with the water. During the summer of 2017 (July 1 through September 1), Flow Swimmers, The Natural Resource and Water Quality

Department of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, and the Flathead Lake Biological Research Station are coordinating their efforts to monitor the “recreational” water quality of the Polson swimming areas (Riverside Park, Salish Point, and Boettcher Park) on a weekly basis and publish the results on The Swim Guide (www.TheSwimGuide.org.) and in the Valley Journal newspaper. The Swim Guide is a website and Smartphone app for iPhone® and Android that helps people easily find the closest beaches and know at a glance which ones are safe for swimming. The Swim Guide delivers free real-time water quality information for over 7,000 beaches, lakes,

rivers, and swimming holes in Canada, the U.S., Mexico, New Zealand, and now, Flathead Lake. In true “Citizen Science” fashion, The Swim Guide project is funded by local businesses. In addition to Flow Swimmers, Alpine Landscape Design, and UBS are providing financial assistance. The Greater Polson Community Foundation is providing directed gift support for any additional contributions. To keep up with the water quality of Polson’s beaches, download The Swim Guide app at www.TheSwimGuide.com, call the Lake Hotline at 406-298-LAKE (5253), and watch for weekly reports in the Valley Journal this summer.

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BIRDING OPPORTUNITIES ABOUND By Karen Peterson Valley Journal

NINEPIPE – Bird watching opportunities are abundant in summer months at the National Ninepipe and Pablo Wildlife Refuges located along U.S. Highway 93. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service manages the refuge system with support from neighboring land managers including 8

M O N TA N A S U M M E R

the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks. “Ninepipe and Pablo NWRs support an abundance of species and offer remarkable birding opportunities,” according to the FWS. “Enjoy a walk on a short interpretive trail at Ninepipe NWR and learn about

refuge habitats and the animals that live there.” Many different species can be seen at the wildlife refuges. “With the Mission Mountains to the east providing a dramatic backdrop, look for flocks of trumpeter swans, great blue heron rookeries, bald eagle and osprey nests,

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Forester’s tern colonies, and much more.” After Pat Jamieson retired from the National Bison Range, she started spending a lot more of her time birding. She has a degree in wildlife biology and enjoys sharing her knowledge about birds. She says birding is a great way to tie people and nature together. Morning hours are the best time to see birds. “That is when they are up and active,” Jamieson said. Smaller birds however are often out at any time of the day. In the summer months, birds are finished with their mating season and many are less colorful. “It’s still fun to figure out which one is the male and which one is the female,” Jamieson said. She recommends stopping for long periods of time to watch for birds when walking on trails. “Go slowly and quiet,” she said. When birding in more wooded areas, “It’s also important to turn around in a full circle to make sure bears haven’t wandered behind you while you’re looking at the birds.”

Jamieson cautions people about backing up while looking through binoculars. “Don’t back yourself off a cliff,” she said. She added that it’s important to respect the birds and their habitat by observing them from a distance. Ninepipe and Pablo wildlife refuges are open from sunrise to sunset, except during seasonal closures. Off-road travel is not permitted. Special closures are sometimes due to low water or other unforeseen events, according to FWS. For current updates, visit the FWS website at www.fws.gov/refuge/ninepipe and www.fws.gov/.refuge/Pablo. A permit isn’t needed for bird watching on the refuge, but one is needed for non-tribal members who are birding on tribal lands. VJ TREE SWALLOW

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M O N TA N A S U M M E R

BABY MALLARD DUCKS


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Besd t Burd RICHWINE’sDDD gers G oin’ D D D D RGERVILLE DBU D D BURGERS

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Royal Burger Single………

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Royal Burger Double……

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Royal Burger Triple………

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Cheese Dx Single…………

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Cheese Dx Double………

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Cheese Dx Triple…………

$8.70

Cheese Plain Single………

$3.75

BLT………………………. . . . Garden Veggie Burger………. Steak Sandwich…………. . . . . Pork Sandwich …………. . . . . Chicken Burger…………. . . . . Hot Fish Sandwich…….…. . . . Shrimpwich……………. . . . . . . Grilled Cheese. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Grilled Ham and Cheese. . . . . . $3.95

Cheese Plain Double……… $6.15 Cheese Plain Triple………

$8.55

Hamburger Dx Single……

$3.40

Hamburger Dx Double……

$5.30

Hamburger Dx Triple……

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Hamburger Plain Single……

$3.25

Hamburger Plain Double…

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Hamburger Plain Triple……

$7.05

Bernie Burger Single……

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Bernie Burger Double……

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Bernie Burger Triple……

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SPECIALTIES Shrimp Dinner………………. Seafood Dinner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oyster Dinner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chicken and Chips. . . . . . . . . . . . Fish and Chips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Foot Long Hot Dog. . . . . . . . . . . Foot Long Hot Dog w/Chili Foot Long Hot Dog w/Chili and Cheese…………. . . . . . . . . Burrito. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Coke, Diet Coke, Sprite, Dr. Pepper, Root Beer, Lemonade, Orange, Iced Tea 12 oz . . . $1.00 16 oz . . . $1.25 24 oz . . . $1.50 32 oz . . . $1.75 24 oz $3.75 Malts, Shakes, Sodas, Floats & Spins . . . 16 oz $3.25 Coffee and Tea. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 oz $1.00 Hot Chocolate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 oz $1.00 MILK. . . .12 oz $1.50 16 oz $1.75 24 oz $2.25 32 oz. $2.50 Huckleberry Shakes. . . 16 oz $4.75 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 oz $5.25 Frozen Huckleberry Lemonade 16 oz $2.75 with ice cream $3.50 Huckleberry Sundae $4.00 Huckleberry Sundae Deluxe $4.25

DESSERTS

$9.25 $9.25 $9.25 $6.25 $6.50 $3.75 $4.50 $5.00 $2.00

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Corn Dog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.00

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$4.25 $4.50 $5.25 $5.00 $4.50 $4.50 $4.50 $2.75

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EXTRAS

Tomato………………. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $0.50 Cups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $0.25 Catsup/Fry Sauce/Ranch 1 oz $0.15 2 oz $0.25 Flavors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $0.25 Cheese. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $0.50 Patties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.00 Bacon or Ham. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1.25 Gluten-Free Bun. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1.50

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SIDES Onion Rings 4 oz. . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 oz. . . . . . . . . . . . . Family Fries 14 oz Potato Salad

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Green Salad $1.50 Fries 5 oz. . . . . . . . . . . $1.85 7 oz. . . . . . . . . . . $2.35

Prices may change without notice. We accept

50567 Hwy 93, Polson • 883-2620 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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BLAZING NEW

TRAILS

By Caleb M. Soptelean/Valley Journal

Numerous hiking opportunities await the outdoor enthusiast on the Flathead Indian Reservation and in Lake County. While most hiking trails are on the reservation, one popular trail in Lake County is actually off the reservation. Beardance Trail, located several miles south of Woods Bay on Montana Highway 35. The parking area leads to an interpretive trail that goes down to Flathead Lake. Across the highway the Beardance Trail leads to higher ground and the Phillips and Crane Creek trails. Lester Bigcrane, wildland recreation program manager with the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, is the authority for tribal trails, which were originally either Indian trails or built by the Civilian Conservation Corps. He notes that 12 of the tribes’ 15 trails are considered wilderness. The non-wilderness trails include Hellroaring, located east of Montana Highway 35, Swartz Lake, southeast of Ronan, and Three Lakes Peak, south of Montana Highway 200 in the southwest portion of the reservation. The Hellroaring Trail offers a scenic view of Flathead Lake, but is unmarked and reached after several turns on logging roads. After about two hours, the trail reaches a snow cabin and U.S. Forest Service boundary. It is accessed via the Hellroaring Road, which turns into B 4000. Next is B 4300, and that can present a challenge as the roads are marked with small brown wooden signs. A map that can be picked up at the tribes’ natural resources office at 406 Sixth Ave. E. in Polson is recommended. The wilderness trails include the Mission Falls Trail, which Bigcrane called “pretty scenic but pretty rough,” and the Post Creek Trail, a “pretty flat” trail behind McDonald Lake east of Post Creek. The Mission Falls Trail goes past Lucifer Lake and the Garden Wall but is not maintained past the falls. Bigcrane stressed that there are inherent risks and dangers with hiking in the mountains. Firearms are not allowed for non-tribal members. He recommends all carry bear spray. The wilderness trails are not intended for recreational purposes, he said. Hiking is allowed as long as it doesn’t degrade the natural environment. Those who access tribal lands are obligated to “leave no trace.” A number of other restrictions include not picking berries or mushrooms, 12

M O N TA N A S U M M E R

MCDONALD LAKE

which are reserved for tribal members. Livestock, including riding or pack animals, are prohibited from wilderness areas between March 1 and June 30. Conservation permits are required for accessing tribal lands. A three-day pass is $13 and a yearly pass that runs from March 1 to Feb. 28 of the following year is

$17. Permits can be purchased at various locations throughout the county. For a list go online at nrd.csktribes.org. Some of the higher elevation trails cannot be accessed until July. For more information, call Bigcrane at 675-2700, ext. 7289. Tribal offices are closed on Fridays.


FA R M E R S M A R K E T S E A S O N R E T U R N S Farmers markets are growing from Arlee to Polson this year to give people the opportunity to support the local economy and purchase fresh vegetables, arts and crafts, prepared meals, and much more. The Arlee Farmers Market is located next to the Huckleberry Patch for the first time this year at 72532 N. Couture Loop. New board members decided to open it up from 4 to 7 p.m. on Wednesdays until September. They can be found on Facebook. “Having it on Wednesday allows local growers to participate in other markets later in the week,” said Shelly Fyant, board member. “We want to give people the opportunity to buy local and eat healthy food.” Market vendors offer goods such as tomatoes, vegetables and flowers. Local organizations and student groups will hold fundraisers while the market is open. “This is also a way to bring the community together,” said board member Windy Windy Boy. A market is opening in St. Ignatius this year called Mission Falls Farmers Market. The market will be open from 5 to

7 p.m. on Fridays. Vendors will sell various items in the parking lot of the Golden Yoke Creamery, located on U.S. Highway 93 and Mountain View Drive. The market will be open until September 8. In Ronan, the Farmers Market is located

in front of the flower shop on the corner of First and Main Street, a block west of U.S. Highway 93, although the location might change. The market is open on S E E PA G E 1 4

Downtown Polson

3rd Ave. WEST

May - Oct • Fridays 9am - 1 pm

j CaFGhKIQweMOfzXdGPk “Thanks to the Polson Community for helping make the market such a huge success!” eshvendors bring . . . Buy FrOur Shop Local

Fresh Meats Fresh Produce Wood Working Jams & Jellies Cheese/Honey Baked Goods Fresh Eggs EBcaT/rdDEs BIT/CREDIT accepted Bedding Plants Fresh-cut Flowers Soaps Jewelry Beauty Products Check us Plant Starts out on and much, Facebook! Original Art much MORE! To our wonderful customers. PLEASE DON’T PARK in the First Citizens Bank parking lot.

For more information call Market Master Lou Anne 675-0177 or Bill 261-5700

visit our website at

www.polsonfarmersmarket.com M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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Wednesdays from 3 to 7 p.m. until the fall. For more information, contact Brianna Ewert, market organizer, at 676-5901 ext. 124. The Polson Farmers Market runs from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Friday until October. It’s located on Main Street and Fourth

Avenue in downtown Polson. The market accepts cash, debit, credit, and SNAP benefits, which stands for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. Some individual vendors accept Farmers Market Coupons from WIC, a Women, Infants and Children benefit program. The Polson market is part of a region-wide group of markets

that also have a matching incentive program for those with SNAP benefits. For every $10 spent at the market, $10 is matched to purchase locally grown and healthy fruit, vegetables, seeds, eggs and meat. Visit the market’s website at polsonfarmersmarket com/freshsnap.

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M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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VJ


C H E C K B O AT S , S A V E W AT E R S The large orange sign sitting alongside Highway 93 in Ravalli bears a simple message: all watercraft must stop. Ignoring the heed is tempting, but is also illegal and could undermine the multilayered extreme measures organizations have put in place in recent years to prevent aquatic invasive species from wreaking havoc on the ecosystem and economy of the Flathead Basin. Anything that floats – boats, kayaks, canoes, paddleboards, inflatables, etc. – is required to be inspected. Other inspection stations are located in Pablo, Thompson Falls, Kalispell, Missoula and Clearwater Junction. New legislation will result in the doubling of inspection stations across the state this year from 17 to 34, including some roving stations. State officials are requiring out-of-state watercraft to be inspected prior to launch after quagga mussel larvae were found in the Tiber Reservoir in eastern Montana last year. And locals who do not take their watercraft outside of the area will be required to get inspected at least once this season prior to launching in any water

body on the Flathead Indian Reservation, namely Flathead Lake and the Lower Flathead River below SKQ Dam. The Pablo and Ninepipe reservoirs are closed to all watercraft. The five-minute stop might seem like an inconvenient delay for enthusiastic lake-goers, but it’s a small price to be paid to make sure the crystal blue waters and world class fishery aren’t harmed by disruptions in the ecosystem. A quick scan is done by trained individuals who can spot tiny plants or animals that could lead to an infestation. A “clean, drain and dry” message is being promoted to all watercraft owners. Tom McDonald, director of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes’ division of fish, wildlife and recreation, said the best way to ensure that a boat is 100 percent decontaminated is to dry it for 30 days. “There are so many hidden spots, you’re not going to be able to power wash (mussels or their larvae) off,” he said. The mussels filter large amounts of nutrients from the water – something

that could disrupt the food web and spell disaster for species in Flathead Lake that have worked to carve out a niche in an already low-nutrient body of water. The mussels also form a secreted layer of shells on everything that comes within their path. They can completely block pipes and cause financial devastation to hydroelectric power, for example. There have been some close calls over the years. In 2011 a boat carrying zebra mussels was intercepted just before it launched in Flathead Lake from a ramp near Dayton. There were three vessels caught carrying zebra or quagga mussels in 2015. “It’s a paradigm shift. It’s tragic,” said CSKT’s Lester Bigcrane, who manages the Blue Bay campground on Flathead Lake. He notes that Minnesota was successful at containing mussels to 10 lakes due to education. Lake Tahoe has also been successful at keeping aquatic invasive species out by requiring watercraft to see page 16 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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launch from only four locations with mandatory inspections at each. He said similar education and regulations are needed to stop AIS as the range of the mussel species is spreading closer, with fouled boats coming from Lake Powell in Utah, for example. Invasive species of plants also remain a concern. Eurasian watermilfoil can crowd out native species and have already been found in Flathead Lake and the greater Flathead Basin. “Be sure that the plug on your boat is pulled between water bodies,” Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Aquatic Invasive Species Specialist

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Linnaea Schroeer said. “Don’t be carrying any water in live wells or in a bucket or in any other container in your boat. Standing water can carry microscopic larvae of invasive species. It can carry viruses that cause fish diseases and fragments of plants that can start new populations. I think a lot of people don’t understand the danger of moving even a small amount of standing water.” Fragments of plants and standing water are the easiest to handle when discovered by inspectors. The offending substances will be removed, and travelers can get back on the road quickly. If invasive mussel species are found, boaters can face hours or days

of delays. The best way to prevent delays is to thoroughly clean, drain and dry the boats immediately after they are removed from the water so problems don’t arise later.

For more information on inspections in the Flathead Lake area, call McDonald, Georgia Smies or Germaine White at 406-675-2700. VJ

Your resource for current conditions for Riverside, Salish Point, and Boettcher Parks: • WATER QUALITY • WATER TEMPERATURE • LAKE LEVEL


EVERGREEN TRAIL RIDE By Rob Zolman/Valley Journal

Surrounded by evergreen forests, wildlife and towering snow-covered peaks of the Mission Mountains, the Cheff Guest Ranch has everything needed for a classic Montana adventure. The ranch is located just north of Ninepipe National Wildlife Refuge off U.S. Highway 93. Bud Cheff Sr. started the ranch back in the 1930s, making it one of the oldest familybased outdoor businesses in Montana. Today, it continues to be a family affair, with Mick, his wife Karen and their children and grandchildren at the ready to guide visitors on a truly unforgettable Montana wilderness adventure. S E E PA G E 1 8

• e Ronan Chamber will sponsor a Dutch Oven cooking class in June 10 at 9:30 am • Ronan Crab Fest - June 23 • Lake County Jr. Fair - July 24-29 • Ronan Pioneer Days - August 4-6 • 9th Annual Harvest Fest - September 16th Featuring the Mission Valley Harvest Fest Dutch Oven Cook Off

R ONAN A REA C HAMBER

OF

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We have lots of information to help you explore all we have to offer.

(406) 676-8300

www.ronanchamber.com M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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Guests can expect to enjoy a wide variety of outdoor recreation - from simply relaxing and taking in the spectacular views to more action-packed activities like horseback riding, hiking, fishing, mountain biking, swimming and canoeing. Two-hour, half-day and full-day guided horseback trail rides on proven mountain horses offer riders awe-inspiring views of the Mission Valley and Mission Mountain Range. On the full day trip, riders make their way from the ranch to an evergreen forest-lined trail, where pocket meadows afford opportunities to take in the beautiful surrounding vistas. At the trail’s end, cradled among granite summits, riders are rewarded with the emerald green waters of Swartz Lake. For those who prefer other forms of recreating, trails for hiking and biking also abound. Hundreds of acres of private, uncrowded terrain beckon to be explored. After a ride or hike, cool off by jumping in the private lake or kick back under the covered porch of one of the cozy cabins. The ranch has comfortable single room cabins available for rent. Each cabin comes with full kitchens, full bathroom, fireplace and covered porch with barbecue. Also available are hunting and fishing pack trips into the Bob Marshall Wilderness and South Fork of the Flathead River; rates vary depending on length and type of trip. The Cheff Guest Ranch is a place where departing guests say, “We will be back” instead of goodbye. For additional information and reservations, call 406-6442557 or visit wwwcheffguestranch.com VJ

Authentic Mexican Food • Daily lunch specials

• Seafood

• Combinations

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• Children’s menu • Full bar

• American food • To go orders

Kids room with arcade. Special appetizers everyday. (On lounge side)

Outside dining and great views. Open 7 days a week, 11 a.m. - 9 p.m.

110 Main St. #10, Polson • 883-5854 • www.fiestaenjalisco.net 18

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PAT H T O H I S T O R Y By Linda Sappington

Exploring local history is merely a walk in the park along the new Polson Interpretive Trail. More than a dozen weather-resistant signs are posted along the paved path bordering Flathead Lake in the Salish, Sacajawea and Riverside Parks. The signs depict tribal and city history through words and historic photos. The educational information explores tribal ways of canoeing and fishing, the building of the bridge over Flathead River, the birds of Flathead Lake, steamboat history and the names of visual landmarks. The signs are in Kootenai, Salish and English. The collaborative effort between the City of Polson and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes has been in the making since 2014.

The inspiration for the project came from Jules Clavadetscher, former city councilman and mayor, according to Tom McDonald, division manager for the tribes’ fish, wildlife, recreation and conservation division. McDonald served on the Salish Point committee with Clavadetscher. “He was the original cheerleader, and it didn’t take long for all of us to jump in,” McDonald said. “It’s all part of embracing the lake, history, environment — it is so rich, so it was pretty easy to get everybody on board.” Input was gathered from numerous sources, such as cultural experts with the Salish, Kootenai and Pend d’Oreille Tribes, including historian Thompson Smith, wildlife expert Germaine White and cultural language specialist Tony Incashola. The late Paul Fugleberg, local journalist and

author, also contributed photos and historical facts. “There was a lot of different history and resources,” McDonald said. And the history isn’t sugar-coated, he said. “It is represented very fairly and accurately.” Decisions on content and photos resulted in numerous drafts, designs, and revisions. Initially, the project was slated to be completed in one year, according to Polson City Manager Mark Shrives. “It was a long process for a lot of reasons,” Shrives said. “In the end, it came out as a really nice project.” Funding came from a variety of sources including fundraisers and grants. The Polson Redevelopment Agency chipped in some funding, the tribes contributed see page 20 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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2017 7th Annual

Flathead Lake Blues Festival Polson, MT

Friday’s Montana Musician Review Andre Floyd and the Mood Iguana Mike Murray Band Halladay Quist Ticket Sauce Off in the Woods Kenny James Miller Band Big Daddy and the Blue Notes Jameson and the Sordid Seeds Mudslide Charley

Saturday’s Women of the Blues

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$5,800, the Greater Polson Community Foundation pitched in $15,000, the Lower Flathead Community Foundation contributed $5,000, and committees held fundraising events, according to Shrives and McDonald. The installation was done by the city. A few more signs are still under construction and are expected to be installed on the West Pier and under the bridge, prior to the ceremony honoring the project’s completion, tentatively planned for Memorial Day weekend. Visitors and locals alike can now enjoy the panoramic lake view stroll at the top of Salish Point Park and learn a bit too. “It’s a value-added thing: it’s something to do in town, and an educational tool for all the people that enjoy the waterfront,” McDonald said. VJ 20

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Michelle Taylor Band Estelle and the Atomic Jive Polly O’Keary and the Rhythm Method Andrea Harsell and the Luna Roja

Regatta Shoreline Amphitheater Polson Fairgrounds

August 18th & 19th

Flatheadlakebluesfestival.com Art By: Julie Christopher ~ Jewels Art Burst


SOMETHING’S BREWING

By Caleb M. Soptelean/Valley Journal

Something’s brewing in Lake County. For those who like to support home-grown businesses, the Flathead Lake Brewing Co. has a brewery/taproom in Woods Bay, Glacier Brewing Co. has the same in Polson, and one could be on the way in Ronan. Lake County Community Development Corp. held a community event on April 20 to gauge the level of interest in creating a cooperative brewery. A number of reasons why Ronan might support such an endeavor were offered by those who attended, including: jobs, adding value to local agricultural products, use as a community gathering place, bringing people together, Main Street revitalization and making people happy. Gypsy Ray, director of the LCCDC, noted that consultant Craig Koontz has been hired to help with such a cooperative. He was involved in getting the Tamarack Brewing Co. up and running in Lakeside and has experience with similar endeavors in a variety of places, including Sitka, Alaska, Lake Havasu City, Arizona, and Seattle. “Ronan is truly a good viable place (for a brewery),” Koontz said, noting that, according to a Bloomberg study, Montana is second in the nation in beer consumption. Brianna Ewert, LCCDC’s program manager, explained that a cooperative brewery is one that is owned by the people it serves. She cited examples of two that charge $150 or $200 for a yearly membership per person. The benefits of being a cooperative member would include voting rights, member “happy hours,” discounts, priority access to new beers, input on recipes, member refunds when the operation is profitable and additional investment opportunities. Ewert said the Mission Mountain Enterprise Center could house such a cooperative either temporarily or permanently, depending on the situation. Koontz estimated that it would cost

$200,000 to purchase the necessary equipment for a 50-barrel-a-year operation and “do it right” by buying American-made steel products as opposed to something used or made in China. Ewert said the next steps forward include forming a core group to work on a feasibility study and then a business plan. Woods Bay operation The Flathead Lake Brewing Co. opened as a taproom/brewery in 2004 in Woods Bay. It added a pubhouse/brewery in Bigfork in 2015. Some 15 employees are involved in the brewing operations at both facilities and another 15-30 in the pubhouse, depending on the season. Kasey Schmidt, a St. Ignatius native, is the company’s head brewer. He has been on the job for two years, and enjoys the variety, which includes brewing, cleaning equipment, filling kegs or bottles and designing recipes. Hilary Robinson, a recent graduate of Flathead Lake Community College with an associate degree in brewery science and brewery operations, is Schmidt’s assistant. S E E PA G E 2 2

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She started working as a waitress in the pubhouse in Bigfork and moved over to production in the brewery. “I fell in love with it,” said the Kansas native, who said she enjoys learning about something in a classroom while actually doing that kind of work on her job. Things turned sour The Woods Bay facility makes small-batch and seasonal beers, including sours, which are infected with bacteria with fruit puree added, such as cherries, plums or apples. The sours are aged in oak casks for a year or more. A cask of Carina Sour Brown had been aged two years as of May, Schmidt said, noting the company began making its first sour beers in January. He described a six-step process for making beer: mashing, boiling, whirlpooling, cooling, fermenting — which takes three weeks — and bottling, canning, kegging or growling, the latter

Mission Mountain Enterprises, Inc.

being the process of filling growlers, a large bottle that comes in 32 or 64 ounces. The Woods Bay and Bigfork operations combined make about 5,000 barrels a year, including 900 in Woods Bay. “We make about 20 different styles throughout the year,” Schmidt said. Customers who visit the Woods Bay taproom can consume up to 48 ounces a day. “We can only serve the beer we make on site,” said Sarah Peterson, the company’s marketing manager. The company has a community connection in that it gives all of its “spent grain” to Al Walhood, a Polsonarea farmer who uses it as pig feed. Flathead Lake Brewing Co. continues to grow, Peterson said. “We’re making a profit.” VJ

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Climb the highest point you can find on the Mission Valley floor, and you’d still be under nearly a half-mile of water in the days of Glacial Lake Missoula, the largest known proglacial (ice-dammed) lake in history. From about 18,000 to 12,000 years ago, a lake big enough to cause a Noah’s Ark-scale flood covered much of Northwestern Montana. The lake, formed as an arm of the Cordilleran ice sheet, reached into the Idaho Panhandle and present-day Lake Pend Oreille, damming the Clark Fork River drainage. At its fullest, Glacial Lake Missoula held more than 500 cubic miles of water — today’s Lake Erie and Lake Ontario combined — and reached 4,250 feet above sea level. Geologists believe Lake Missoula drained with catastrophic flooding, but how many times severe flooding occurred is up for debate. As evidenced by sediment layers and old lakeshore lines visible on surrounding hills, the lake filled and drained at least 50 times and possibly more than 100, said Dr. Gordon Warrington, a member of the Glacial Lake Missoula chapter of the Ice Age Floods Institute. According to the Institute, Glacial Lake Missoula drained about every 40 to 140 years as its waters pushed through the 2,000-foot-thick Clark Fork ice dam. If you’ve seen the popular children’s movie “Ice Age 2: The Meltdown,” you have some idea of what the dam bursting would have looked like, Warrington said. While it’s unlikely that a squirrel pulling an acorn out of the ice could cause the dam to fail, as purported in the movie, the dam probably burst in a matter of an hour or two, and the ensuing torrents of glacial floodwaters would have been an incredible sight. Whether anyone was there to see it is another story, but some sacred tales of the Kootenai Tribes

... a great flood of water abruptly issued from the Spokane icesheet. - J. Harlen Bretz 1920s Geologist

imply that their ancestors may have witnessed some of the flooding, Warrington said, and “there could have been a mammoth around.” Without eyewitnesses, it’s hard to say what the lake itself would’ve looked like, but it was most likely not the vibrant bluish-green color depicted in artists’ renderings, geologist Norm Smyers said. As glaciers migrated, the ice ground rocks into a fine white powder known as glacial flour, which would have given the lake a milky appearance, perhaps with browner areas where streams and groundwater entered the lake. “It was very likely a milky white,” Smyers said. In modern-day glacial lakes, glacial flour often turns the water turquoise, in part due to the refraction of sunlight. But Glacial Lake Missoula would have had so much rock flour suspended in its waters that light couldn’t penetrate it, Smyers explained. A lack of sunlight, along with glacial temperatures, made the lake unfriendly to life, and no evidence has been found to suggest that anything lived in Glacial Lake Missoula, Smyers added. But the lake forever left its mark on the region, carving out gullies, transporting giant rocks encased in ice to new locations — even forming giant ripples of earth along the lake bottom. The first geologist to note curious features in the

Flathead Lake region was T.C. Chamberlin, head of the glacial division of the U.S. Geological Survey. In a report from 1885, he described “a series of parallel watermarks of the nature of exceptionally slight terraces sweeping around the sides of the valley and encircling the isolated hills within it, like giant musical staves.” A quarter of a century later, J.T. Pardee argued in a paper titled “The Glacial Lake Missoula” that a huge ice-dammed lake had once covered much of Northwestern Montana, but he offered no explanation as to where all the water had gone. J Harlen Bretz took up that charge in the 1920s as he studied the channeled scablands of Eastern Washington. He determined that a catastrophic flood must have formed the scablands: “The only genetic interpretation yet proposed, which is inherently harmonious and which fits all known facts, is that of a great flood of water abruptly issued from the Spokane icesheet,” Bretz told colleagues at a meeting sponsored by the Geological Society of Washington D.C., in 1927. But his idea was rejected, partly because he didn’t know where the flood could have originated. In 1942, Pardee proposed that cataclysmic flooding had formed features such as giant ripple marks in Camas Prairie — these ripples had to have been caused by “unusually large and rapid currents,” he wrote. This evidence provided Bretz with a source for his giant flood, but it would be decades later before a Glacial Lake Missoula flood (or floods) was considered a sound explanation for the giant ripples in Montana and the channeled scablands in Washington.

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406-872-2000

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Parties Open gyms Dance Tumbling Date Nights

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S E E PA G E 2 4 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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STRANDLINES

GLACIAL LAKE MISSOULA F E AT U R E S

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Up until the 1960s, the idea of epic flooding in the Western United States wasn’t widely accepted; most scientists still bought into a theory that landscapes were formed gradually, Warrington explained. With a relatively short history of studying Glacial Lake Missoula, scientists still have a lot to learn about this fantastic tale of one of the world’s largest known floods. For more information on the Ice Age Floods and the Glacial Lake Missoula chapter of IAFI, visit www. iafi.org. VJ

• • • • • • • • • • •

Layered sediments – Spring Creek – U.S. Highway 93 between Arlee and Ravalli. Strandlines (wave cut shore lines) – National Bison Range – north side. Giant ripple marks – Camas Prairie – pull off along Highway 382 just south of Markle Pass. Erratics (rocks moved by glacial ice and deposited) – National Bison Range – drive the loop in summer. Kolk (pit formed by an underwater whirlpool) – Markle Pass – east side of Highway 382. Gulch fill (rocks piled at the ends of gulches by floodwaters) – many valleys on the north side of Highway 200 west of Ravalli. Polson Moraine (hill formed by glacial debris and moving ice) – Polson Hill – south end of Flathead Lake. Elmo Moraine – west of Elmo on Highway 28. Alpine Moraine – valleys east of U.S. Highway 93 – “U” shape extending up the Mission Range. Erratics – sometimes buried – rock piles along farm fences. Lake bottom – valley sediments are 200 feet or more deep – see downstream from Polson Bridge on the Flathead River.

Cort D. Potter

Marsh Creek

EntErprisEs, inc. General Contractor office

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(406) 883-2837


R E C R E AT I O N P E R M I T T E D Popular outdoor recreational activities on the Flathead Indian Reservation include hiking, picnicking, swimming, photography, camping, fishing and boating. These activities require various permits and licenses. Non-tribal members are not allowed to pick berries and mushrooms on tribal lands unless they are children or the spouse of a tribal member who accompany and assist their tribal member parent or spouse. For complete details on fishing and recreation

regulations of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks pick up a handbook at any of the following locations where licenses and permits are sold: POLSON • CSKT Division of Fish, Wildlife, Recreation, and Conservation 406 Sixth Ave. E. in Polson (Behind Linderman School) Open Monday-Thursday from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

406-883-2888 ext.7200 or 7237 • Walmart 36318 Memory Lane 406-883-9211 PABLO • Zimmer Tackle 32 Carlyle Lane 406-675-0068 RONAN • Ronan Sports and Western 63298 Hwy. 93 406-676-3701 • Westland Seed 36272 Round Butte Rd. 406-676-4100

ST. IGNATIUS • Mountain View Cenex 240 Mountain View Dr. 406-745-3634 HOT SPRINGS • Cornerstone Convenience 1893 Hwy. 28 406-741-3200 Reservation permits are also available on the Internet at http://app.mt.gov/Als/Index. A reservation permit must be purchased initially from a retail outlet/reservation permit vendor, and then subsequent permits can be purchased online.

Friendly service. Fair Prices. On-location rental cars.

Brendeon Shoening/Owner 53466 Hwy. 93 • Polson MT • Office (406) 883-3041 • Fax (406) 883-3042 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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MOLLIE LEMM PHOTO

FIRE WISE By Karen Peterson Valley Journal

Outdoor recreation draws millions of visitors to western Montana every year. Here on the Flathead Indian Reservation, mountain lakes, wooded forests and rocky trails provide ample opportunity to enjoy Montana’s wilderness. To ensure these pristine areas are protected from fire year round, the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes’ Division of Fire stands at the ready watching over some one million acres of land. They are especially vigilant during the hot summer months. Although some years are worse than others, “It is a fact that we will have a fire season every year,” said veteran fire educator Devlin Lafrombois. Lafrombois has been a fire prevention and education officer for the Division of Fire for the past 20 years. While the Division of Fire’s primarily focus is on wilderness protection, they also provide mutual aid to fire departments across the reservation. Each town has its own department to handle fires, rural departments also provide fire suppression, and the tribe supports both, if needed. “We work with all the fire departments in the valley,” Lafrombois said. For example, if a tractor catches fire in a field outside of town, the tribe would respond to the scene and work with the rural fire department if needed. The tribal crew will coordinate with the incident commander from the rural department on the scene. The Division of Fire has six 350-gallon fire response trucks, three fire engines with 750 gallons, and in the summer months, 26

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they contract with an air crew so they have access to a helicopter and a single engine aircraft tanker. “We have a lot of engines and lots of water,” Lafrombois said. About 46 administrative personnel are on staff all year at the division of fire. In the summer months, the fire crew expands to include 50 to 60 Native American firefighters. The firefighters have to be able to pass a physical in 45 minutes that includes packing 45-pounds on their backs during a three-mile walk. “We have to take that test once a year,” he said. Unattended campfires, tire or chain sparks, debris fires, fireworks, and lightning are the main causes of fire on the reservation. Spark caused fires usually occur when people pull a camper or a trailer and the safety chain drags on the ground. A blown tire or hot brakes can also cause a sparking situation. “Between July and August, it’s around 90 degrees out and the humidity is down. It’s so dry that it can easily start a fire,” Lafrombois said. “People need to be careful and avoid driving in tall grass.” Camping is a popular recreational activity in the summer that can quickly turn into a disaster if campfires are left unattended. The tribe’s fire crews put out about ten campfire-caused wilderness fires every year. “When people go camping, they need to make sure the campfire is out,” he said. “The best way to do that is to pour a bucket of water over the fire, stir it up, and make mud.” Fireworks are another common way fires are started, but restrictions and education

have helped the numbers go down, he said. With the help of Smokey Bear, the tribe has worked all across the reservation to educate children about the dangers of unattended flames. “We talk to the kids and they talk to their parents,” Lafrombois said. “It makes a big difference.” While fire crews are often busy putting out human-caused fires, nature also keeps them busy. “Lightning-caused fires can get big,” he said. “They start in places where there aren’t any roads. We walk in or send the aviation crew in. They fly to the fire, get as close as they can, and (then) hike in.” The tribes don’t let a fire burn out of control if they can help it. They approach a fire with the idea that they will try and put it out or they will monitor it. Their philosophy for fire management is based on prevention. Crews work to thin out trees before fire season and organize prescribed burns in designated areas. During fire season, they keep watch. “If we see lightning coming, we will put a crew in that area,” he said. “This lets us get to the fires quickly.” Protecting cultural resources is an important aspect of fighting fires on the reservation. Cultural resource advisors are called in on fires to let the crews know if anything in the area needs priority. “There might be a medicine tree or huckleberries in the area.” Lafrombois recommends calling emergency dispatchers in Lake County if people see smoke plumes or fire. The dispatch service will notify the appropriate fire department or contact tribal dispatch. The CSKT Division of Fire Management can be reached at 406-676-2550.


Polson Main Street

Flathead Cherry Large tent for shade and seating.

Festival

2 17

Kids’ activities!

July 15 & July 16

Great selection of vendors • Flathead cherries Cherry quilts on display in store windows • Homemade cherry pies Unique arts & crafts • Entertainment • Sidewalk sales and specials

Fun for the whole family Saturday, July 15

Sunday, July 16

9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

9 a.m.

Vendor booths open

10 a.m.

Vendor booths open

2 - 4 p.m.

Shamrockers will be strolling the streets.

1 - 3 p.m.

The Great Scots Bagpipers will be strolling the streets.

2 p.m.

Pit Spitting Contest in front of the Cove Deli and Pizza.

4 p.m.

Pie Eating Contest in front of the Cove Deli and Pizza.

Win gift certificates from downtown merchants!

For Vendor space visit our website: www.flatheadcherryfestival.com Questions? Call (406) 883-3667 or email: pcf@flatheadcherryfestival.com

A large variety of cherry products to choose from! Proudly sponsored by the Polson Business Community and Flathead Lake Cherry Growers, Inc. M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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C E L E B R AT E C U LT U R E Several powwows are held each year on the Flathead Indian Reservation and two of them are happening this summer with the 119th Arlee Celebration and the Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow — and the public is welcome to attend both. Powwows have been an important part of the Salish, Kootenai and Pend d’Orielle Tribes’ — and other Indian tribes’ — lives for centuries as a celebration with singing, dancing, socializing, education, craft work, and feasting. Many Native Americans travel hundreds of miles each year to participate in this important tradition because the powwow trail is much more than just entertainment; it’s a way to honor their ancestors. DANCING At powwows, various dance styles are performed, including Intertribal dance, where everyone is welcome regardless of dress; War Dance, where each warrior dances his own style to a wide range of songs with fast and slow tempos; Women’s Traditional Dance, consisting of women remaining stationary with a slight movement 28

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of the feet; Men’s Traditional Dance, in which the dancers tell stories through dance about battles or hunting. The Round Dance is a social dance that is meant to have everyone participate; Scalp Dance is done by women dressed in men’s clothing; Prairie Chicken Dance resembles the movements prairie chickens use for mating or fighting. Some “newer” dances include Fancy Dance, where dancers are dressed in colorful regalia and dance in less restricted styles; Jingle Dance, where women dance in jingle dresses festooned with 365 metal cones or jingles; Grass Dance, a plains Indian dance where dancers move in swaying motions that move the fringes on the grass dance clothing; and the Owl Dance, which is a social dance where couples dance together in a circular motion with men on the outside circle and women in the inside circle. P O W W O W D AT E S The Arlee Fourth of July Celebration, a week-long event held close to the first week of July, first coincided with the

traditional mid-summer break in the hunting and gathering cycle of the Salish and Pend d’Oreille Tribes in the late 1800s, but the road to maintaining the celebratory tradition was fraught with obstacles set up by the federal government. The government policy of assimilation put such traditions on the fast track to elimination. However, through oftenclandestine tenacity, that did not happen. Indian people continued to practice traditions despite federal policies aimed at eliminating them. This year, the 119th Arlee Celebration runs Wednesday, June 28, to Tuesday, July 4. The official opening of the celebration will begin with a grand entry that includes an honor guard bearing the flags of the Salish Nation and America. A procession of dancers follows the honor guard. A Flag Song is sung in honor of the flags, then a prayer is said to complete the opening ceremonies. After a Veterans’ honoring ceremony, the dancing begins in earnest. For more event information, go to www.arleepowwow.com S E E PA G E 2 9


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On the third weekend in July, the Flathead Indian Reservation hosts the Kootenai Tribes’ annual celebration, the Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow. This year’s three-day celebration at the Elmo Powwow Grounds starts on July 13 and ends on the 16th. The Indian social gathering in the west shore community of Elmo

features drumming, dancing and traditional dress and food. There will be dance contests with numerous categories, a drum contest, and traditional games. Visitors are welcome and asked to respect the dance area by staying off of it, and leaving front row seating for tribal elders. VJ

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C E N T E R S TA G E The Port Polson Players present the Richard RodgersMartin Charnin musical comedy, Two by Two, before their 42nd summer season starts in earnest. In this fresh retelling of the Biblical story of Noah and the Ark, which is both inspirational and hilarious, the show promises good fun from a talented Mission Valley cast. Two by Two plays May 19 – 28; Fridays and Saturdays curtain is at 7:30 p.m. with Sunday matinees at 2 p.m., at Polson’s beautiful theatre on the lake. After Two by Two, the Players launch their summer teaser, Guys on Ice, the ice fishing musical. The show is back by popular demand and only plays three evenings, June 16 -18. The Players original cast spends a day on the ice as fishing buddies boom off musical numbers like, “Ode to a Snowmobile Suit,” “Beer in the Bucket” and “The One That Got Away.” Curtain time is 7:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, with a Sunday matinee at 2 p.m. July 5 – 16 offers the everpopular Murder at the Howard Johnson’s. This Clark and Bobrick farce brings back the perennial mid-life crisis comedy for a reunion with cast members from the Players initial 1988 production. Neal Lewing, Karen Lewing and Todd Mowbray have performed this iconic comedy together in their 30’s, 40’s, 50’s and now 60’s. The trio plans five-

year “reunion performances of the comedy until one of them croaks.” Variety tags the script with “Enough laugh lines, mirth-provoking situations and extravagant sight gags to outfit two rapid fire farces!” The musical comedy Pump Boys and Dinettes plays July 20 – Aug. 6. Set in contemporary Georgia, this refreshing story features selections like Tips, Farmer Tan, Catfish and Mona Mona in a country musicinfused celebration. The ‘Pump Boys’ sell high octane on Highway 57, as the ‘Dinettes’ run the Double Cupp diner next door. Together they fashion an evening of country western songs on guitars, piano, bass and, yes, kitchen utensils. Aug. 10 – Aug. 27 wraps up Polson’s Summer Theatre season with Gregg Kreutz’s

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comedy-mystery Death By Golf. When an escaped convict, an anxious bride, a scheming new husband, and a suspicious attorney all convene at Grandpa’s house, it doesn’t take long for Grandpa to realize he has to reschedule his golf game. This show pays tribute

to the Players’ location on the Old Nine of the Polson Golf Course. All Port Polson Players shows are presented at Polson’s 1938 log theatre on the south end of Flathead Lake. Curtain times for Murder, Pump Boys and Golf are Wednesdays through Saturdays at 8 p.m., and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. with Pump Boys and Golf opening on Thursdays. Reservations can be made by calling the theatre box office – 406-883-9212 – or visiting portpolsonplayers. com. Tickets are $18 for adults and $17 for students and seniors, with family discounts and group rates available; the Players accept cash, check, MasterCard and Visa. Concessions are available and the theatre is handicap accessible. Updates can be found by following Port Polson Players on Facebook.

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VISIT A

N AT I O N A L T R E A S U R E

Say “Montana” and most people nationally or even globally think Glacier National Park. A major draw to the area, the park has an estimated 2.4 million visitors annually. “Glacier National Park welcomes visitors from across the country and around the world,” Superintendent Jeff Mow said. “We are delighted to share the story of this place and the experiences it provides.” People have flocked to the area since President William Howard Taft proclaimed Glacier the nation’s 10th national park in 1910. More than 700 miles of hiking trails provide access to a unique mix of mountains, lakes, valleys, glaciers and waterfalls within the 1,583-square-mile breathtaking wilderness area. Visitors should note that motorized watercraft are prohibited in the park in 2017 as park officials develop a program to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species. Hand-propelled watercraft, such as kayaks, canoes and paddleboards, are allowed as long as they are inspected prior to launch at one of four locations, including Apgar Village, Two Medicine, St. Mary and Many Glacier ranger

stations. This is a change from last year when owners of these vessels could complete an AIS-free self-certification form. The Glacier Park website provides information — maps, webcams of sites, photos and hours of operation — at www.glacierparkinc.com or the visit Montana website at visitmt.com/ national_parks/glacier. But don’t just look through the photos and check out the webcams and think you’ve seen Glacier. There’s something about the pinescented high country air, muddy hiking trails that make your muscles work, interesting rocks and clear lakes that just can’t be distilled onto a website. The rolling gait of a grizzly bear or a resting mountain goat on the side of Going-tothe-Sun Road can be photographed, but there’s just something about hearing the sheep’s delicate breathing and hoping you’re far enough away from the bear. Glacier is home to many species of wildlife from grizzly bears and moose to elk, wolves, deer, black bear, bighorn sheep, mountain lions and coyotes to S E E PA G E 3 3 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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Polson Health offers acute, chronic, and preventive care, in addition to family practice and specialty services. Urgent Care/Walk-In Clinic 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Monday - Friday Walk-In Clinic 9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. Saturdays

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smaller mammals such as marmots, picas, badgers, porcupines, wolverines and lynx. Birds — 260 species from meadowlarks to bald and golden eagles and harlequin ducks — also live in the park. One of Glacier’s highlights is Going-ToThe-Sun, a 50-mile engineering marvel climbing to 6,646 feet in elevation that takes people through the wilderness to Logan Pass and down the other side to St. Mary. It carves its way along the edge of mountainsides and seems hardly large enough for two vehicles to meet. Vehicles with large mirrors should fold them in because sometimes the road is littered with mirror frames and pieces from those who didn’t.

Bev Luedtke

Going-To-the-Sun Road is plowed each spring, with short stretches opening along the way. The entire road is generally plowed by mid-June, but travelers must check Glacier’s website for daily plowing status updates. The latest possible day for visitors to drive the entire length of Going-To-TheSun is Oct. 8, as the west side of the park will be closed at Apgar Visitor Center/Lake McDonald on Oct. 9. Visitors will be able to access Logan Pass from the east side until mid-October, weather permitting. Glacier National Park is part of the larger Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park of the United States and Canada. WatertonGlacier has recently been designated an International Dark Sky Park through the International Dark Sky Association.

Buying or Selling?

Dark skies are integral not only for human health and enjoyment, but play an essential role in wildlife health. To achieve the designation, each park completed a significant number of lighting improvements to reduce light pollution as well as committing to completing further lighting retrofits in the coming years. This summer, the parks will host a series of star parties and solar viewing programs for the public to learn more about this new designation. In celebration of National Park Service’s Birthday, you can visit Glacier National Park for free on Friday, Aug. 25. Free admittance to the park will also take place on Sept. 30 in commemoration of National Public Lands Day. VJ

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• Garden of the Rockies Museum, 518 Round Butte Road in Ronan, features Sloan’s Flat Stage Stop, a one-room schoolhouse, an old log home with dovetailed construction, and a tool shed and farm machinery building. Call 406676-5210 for hours and more information. • Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana, 69316 Highway 93 in Charlo, boasts well-crafted exhibits of weaponry, spurs and saddlery, “grizzly set,” and a vast collection of Native American beadwork. Life-size dioramas of wild animals and of an Indian camp make this museum unique. Call 406644-3435 for hours and more information. • Arlee Jocko Valley Museum, run by the Arlee Historical Society, is located two blocks east of Highway 93 on the corner of Bouch and Fyant, south of the Arlee Elementary School. The museum features a military display, with stories and photos of Jocko Valley residents who lost their lives in the service of their country and athletic trophies, uniforms, pictures, and stories about the athletes

from Arlee schools. For hours, more information on special features this summer, and to arrange a viewing appointment, call Alvaretta Morin at 406-7263167. • The People’s Center and Museum at 53253 Highway 93 in Pablo is open MondaySaturday, from 9 a.m.-5 p.m., during the months of June through September. The center features an exhibit gallery, educational programs and Native EdVenture interpretive tours focusing on Native American heritage, natural history and cultural interpretation. Call 406-675-0161 or go to www. peoplescenter.org for more information. • The Polson Flathead Historical Museum, “The Pioneer Museum on Main Street,” invites you to view amazing exhibits of daily life in the Mission Valley and Flathead Lake area in the late 1800s and early 1900s, such as the stagecoach, chuck wagon, fire trucks, Calamity Jane’s saddle and Flathead Lake’s ‘Nessie” (some say it was, some say it wasn’t, caught here) and much

more. We open for the season on Memorial Day each year, and go until Friday, Sept. 15. The museum is located at 708 Main Street and operates MondaySaturday from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. (Closed on Sundays) There is a visitor fee of $10 and children under 10 years old are admitted free with a paying adult. For more information, go to: www. flatheadmuseum.org. • Miracle of America Museum, 36094 Memory Lane in Polson, is open all year. Displays include Native American items, cars, motorcycles, toys, dolls, guns, clothing, wagons, buggies, sleighs, snowmobiles, military items, tools, tractors, wooden boats, logging memorabilia, a pioneer village and much more. Call 406-883-6804 for hours and more information. ART GALLERIES • Sandpiper Art and Gift Gallery, 306 Main Street in Polson, is a non-profit artists’ cooperative, supporting the arts and art education in Lake County, Montana. It was founded in 1971 by a group of S E E PA G E 3 5


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artists, many of whom remain involved today. Their mission is to encourage and promote participation in the arts in Lake County through workshops, scholarships, exhibits, a library, and other resources. For additional information, call 406-883-5956. Hours of operation are: MondayFriday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and on Saturdays from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. • The Red Poppy, located at 1 Eisenhower Street in Ronan, features local artists’ creations. Call 406-676-3010 or go to www.theredpoppy.org for more information. • Hangin’ Art Gallery and Coffee Shop in Arlee displays local art in a cozy environment. The community gathering place and arts center at 92555 Highway 93 offers local music, organic free trade espresso and locallysourced organic foods. For hours and more information call 406-726-5005 or go to hanginartgallery.com. CITY PARKS DAYTON • Dayton Park, a Lake County park located in the center of the town, provides tree shaded picnic tables, a vault toilet, a playground with swings, a slide, spring riders and a teeter-totter. There’s ample parking area for cars, designated parking for trucks towing boat trailers,

and it’s just a one-block walk to a roped swim area with dock and ladder. The park is the site of the Easter Egg Hunt each spring, and Dayton Daze in September. POLSON (Note: Alcohol is not allowed in any Polson park without a permit, which must be obtained from Polson City Hall, 106 First St. E) • Boettcher Park, adjacent to the Polson Bay Golf Club, offers picnic tables and shelters, swimming area, playground, restrooms and shower, concession stand, volleyball court and horseshoe pits. • Sacajawea Park, north of the bridge in Polson, provides large shaded grassy areas, swimming (area is not roped off), picnic tables, benches, restrooms and dogs are allowed on a leash. • Riverside Park is on Flathead River just south of the bridge. It includes a swimming area, boat launch ramp, children’s playground, picnic tables, benches, volleyball court and restrooms. • Ducharme Park is on Highway 93 and Seventh Street E with shady trees and benches to enjoy the outstanding lake view. • O’Malley Park is on the corner of 11th Ave. E and Fourth Street E in Polson and consists of an American Legion baseball field, Little S E E PA G E 3 6

CELEBRATING 25 YEARS OF SERVICE

Thank you for your support over the years!

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League baseball field, concession stand, basketball court, swings, horseshoe pits, restrooms and picnic tables. • Pomajevich Park is on the corner of 12th Ave. E and Third St. E in Polson and offers a baseball field, children’s playground and restrooms. • Sports Complex (Kerr Dam Field) is on Seventh Ave. W and Kerr Dam Road and includes soccer fields, two softball fields, a basketball court, a children’s playground, picnic tables, shelter and restrooms. • Seventh Avenue Skatepark, located at 613 Seventh Ave. W next to Kerr Dam Fields, offers skaters of all levels and BMX bikers a great place to spend an afternoon. It boasts the first-ever helmetshaped bowl. RONAN • Bockman Park in Ronan offers a paved walking path alongside Spring Creek, playground equipment and a small waterworks playground. ST. IGNATIUS • Good Old Days Park, across from Cenex in St. Ignatius, includes a large shaded picnic area and a grandstand. • Skate Ignatius Skatepark, adjacent to St. Ignatius Mission, is a cloverleaf with two shallow bowls for learners and a deep bowl for the more advanced skaters. There’s also a ramp for easy access on the shallow end. CHARLO • Charlo Park, located next to the Charlo Senior Center, is a shaded grassy park with picnic tables and rose bushes. SENIOR CENTERS Senior Centers and nutrition sites in Lake County offer delicious meals, friendly atmospheres and plenty of activities: Arlee Senior Center - 406-726-3213, 34522 Wessinger; St. Ignatius Center - 406745-4462, 212 North Main Street; Ronan Senior Center - 406-676-2371, 528 Main Street SW; Polson Senior Center - 406883-4735, 504 Third Ave. E. OTHER ATTRACTIONS • Mission Valley Aquatic Center, 309 Ridgewater Drive, Polson, is an indoor swimming facility for the Mission Valley community with drop-in day rates for the public. The center provides a stateof-the-art aquatic facility with a 25-yard competitive/fitness pool with eight lanes; a warm water therapy/instructional pool; a party room, locker rooms and a lobby. The pools accommodate a variety of programs such as youth and adult competitive swimming, recreational swimming, swim lessons for all ages, water safety instruction, senior fitness, physical 36

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N I N E P I P E S M U S E U M O F E A R LY M O N TA N A

therapy/cardiac rehabilitation and family fun. Call 406-883-4567 or go to: www. mvaquatics.org for more information. • National Bison Range, located at 132 Bison Range Road in Moiese, is open from Mother’s Day to Labor Day. Red Sleep Mountain Drive is open daily 7 a.m. to dark (need to start by 7 p.m. to finish by dark). The Visitor Center is open daily, call for hours. Take the two-hour Red Sleep Mountain Drive self-guided tour to view bison, whitetail and mule deer, elk, bighorn sheep, pronghorns and Rocky Mountain goats. Call 406-644-2211 for more information, or go to bisonrange.fws.gov. • St. Ignatius Mission, located at 300 Beartrack Ave., two blocks off Highway 93 in St. Ignatius, was built in the early 1890s and features 61 original fresco paintings on its interior walls by Brother Joseph Carignano, S.J. Call 406-745-2768 for more information. • Ninepipe Wildlife Refuge is located right off Highway 93, five miles south of Ronan. The refuge includes numerous observation areas and walking paths and provides prime nesting habitat for grebes, loons, cormorants, great blue herons, swans, geese and various species of ducks. Nearly 200 bird species have been observed in the refuge. • Pablo Wildlife Refuge is approximately three miles west of Pablo. The wetland habitat supports Canada geese, mallards, redheads, pintails, American wigeon, northern shovelers, ruddy ducks, gadwalls, common mergansers, western and red-necked grebes, and American coots. The refuge has an active bald eagle

nest and is home to yellow warblers, American robins, warbling vireos and many other bird varieties. • Seli’š Ksanka Qlispe’ Dam, formerly Kerr Dam, was transferred to tribal ownership in September 2015 and is located off Kerr Dam Road. Head west on Seventh Ave. and continue as Seventh Ave. turns into Kerr Dam Road and follow the signs. The concrete arch-type dam stands at 205 feet high. A 1,000-foot boardwalk takes spectators down, right above the falls, where they can enjoy an amazing view of the canyon — and sometimes a rainbow in the mist. In the spring and early summer, the rushing water is fantastic. It offers picnicking, white-water rafting, fishing and vista overlook. Tours are by appointment. Call 406-883-1113 for more information. • Flathead Lake, the largest freshwater lake in the western U.S., is 28 miles long by 15 miles wide and more than 300 feet deep in places. The lake was originally formed by a glacier and is now continuously fed by the Swan and Flathead Rivers. Swimming and boating access is available in several locations. Two scenic highways parallel the lake. Highway 93 on the west side and Highway 35 on the east side wind along the curving shorelines, offering majestic views of the lake, mountains and the beautiful Montana scenery. In late July and early August, Flathead cherries are available from cherry stands primarily along the east shore, providing a tasty, local snack for a scenic drive. VJ


N AT U R A L O B S E R V AT I O N S For those wanting to see wildlife, a diverse population of species from the largest land mammals to the smallest creeping creatures live in Lake County. Multiple management agencies have created a haven for wildlife in the valley, so plenty of viewing opportunities are open to the public as long as people use caution and respect. Some of Montana’s iconic large mammals – grizzly and black bear, bighorn sheep, moose, and elk – call the area home, though they often are located off the beaten path, in the heart of desolate wilderness. “They aren’t ones you see very often,” said Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes Wildlife Management Program Manager Dale Becker. Wildlife officials ask that

any sightings of grizzly bear, mountain lion, wolverines, or moose be reported so biologists can log the data. Bighorn sheep that are away from established herds need to be reported immediately because they are at risk of contracting diseases from livestock that can decimate entire wild herds. Porcupine sightings are also of interest as the tribes try to get a handle on how many live in the area. In over two decades, Becker has seen two or three reports of dead porcupines, typically hit by vehicles. The species is of interest culturally because of quillwork, but most people who do quill work locally don’t get their quills from Mission Valley-based porcupines since the critters are so hard to find. S E E PA G E 3 8

EUGENE BECKES PHOTO

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EUGENE BECKES PHOTO

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“They are generally associated with wooded habitat, so it’s not uncommon to find them along streams, ” Becker said. “Also in the mountains.” The National Bison Range, established in 1908, is a great spot to find wildlife. The range is located on U.S. Highway 212 in Moiese about 37 miles south of Polson and 5 miles southwest of Dixon. Visitors need to pay a $5 per vehicle fee or $15 for an annual pass, available in the visitor’s center just over the hill after entering the gates, or at the Iron Ranger in the parking lot. Each year more than 115,000 people enjoy the 19-mile Red Sleep Mountain scenic drive from the safety of their car. The 2-hour loop is chock-full of animal-watching possibilities including large game like bears, 38

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elk, or bighorn sheep. Bison also roam across the range along with whitetail deer, mule deer, and pronghorn antelope. “People do see the bighorn sheep once in a while, and black bear,” volunteer and former longtime employee Pat Jamieson said. “Occasionally a mountain lion will pop out, or a badger. If people stop at the visitor center we can tell people where other people have seen animals.” Jamieson said one of the best ways to have a successful day and see lots of animals is to allow plenty of time for the adventure. “The biggest thing is that if people want to see the animals, they have to take their time,” she said. Early morning and late evening are best for viewing opportunities, though a few species typically stay out of the forest all day long.

“The bison and the pronghorn don’t care what time it is,” Jamieson said. “They like to be out in the open. The other animals, the heat drives them into the forest.” Jamieson said crowds of people are typically thinnest in early morning. “People don’t get up that early,” she said. “The other trick is that if there is a light rain, the animals don’t mind that. If it’s too rainy to go to the lake, it can be really great wildlife viewing.” Jamieson said it is important that people stay at their cars to avoid injury from animals on the drive. People can get out of their cars to take a photo, but they need to stay close to the car. People should always stay inside the car if range animals are close. The Bison Range website includes S E E PA G E 3 9


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information about visiting hours: http://www.fws.gov/refuge/ National_Bison_Range. For those that want to see feathered creatures, CSKT Wildlife Program Manager Becker said that many bird species live in the valley. “This is one of the premiere areas in the west,” Becker said. “There is just real diverse habitat on the reservation. We’ve got sub-alpine habitats at the top of the Missions to dry sagebrush grassland west of the Flathead River. All of those niches have their own species that have adapted through time.” Several places are open to the public where people can spot trumpeters and other waterfowl in the valley. Ninepipe Wildlife Refuge, Ninepipe Wildlife Management Area, and Ducharme boat launch in Polson are some good areas to explore. People should check regulations for hours, times and rules. More information is available at: http://www.fws.gov/refuge/ nine-pipe.

EUGENE BECKES PHOTO

VJ

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F L AT H E A D S TAT E PA R K To encourage a “sense of place,” Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks grouped the six state parks along the shores of Flathead Lake into one big state park, with “units” at West Shore, Big Arm, Finley Point, Yellow Bay, Wild Horse Island and Wayfarer’s. “We’re managing it cohesively as one park, and it makes sense,” said Flathead Lake State Park Manager Amy Grout. Last fall a new ranger station was built in the Harry Horn day use area near the entrance to the Wayfarer unit, just south of Bigfork off Highway 35, a location with easier access to campers than the Kalispell office. “It’s a big step,” Grout said. “We’re more integrated in the parks and into the community. We’re reaching out and building relationships.” The center is a convenient location to gather information, purchase a forgotten camping necessity or buy a Flathead Lake T-shirt or ball cap. It’s a great stop to chat with friendly staff while children scramble around on the shaded playground. A covered picnic area on the grounds can be reserved for large groups but is open to all. AmeriCorps volunteers are on hand to help with interpretive displays, guided hikes and programming. Montana State Parks receive no general tax funds. They function on revenue generated from campsite rentals, user fees, and a $6 State Parks fee that Montana residents can opt to pay when they register their vehicle. Montana State Parks Foundation, the official nonprofit fundraising partner of Montana State Parks, accepts donations. People can designate their contribution toward their favorite unit, a special project, or in honor of a loved one or special occasion. Find out more at montanastateparksfoundation.org. Online reservations for campsites can be made at: stateparks.mt.gov. Wayfarer’s Unit As the name suggests, the drive-in park is a perfect place to stop and snap photos of the lake, let cranky children unbuckle from their car seats and enjoy the playground, and chow down on a beachside picnic. The 69-acre facility also includes amenities to enjoy overnight stays. There are 30 campsites, six of which are designated for only tents. Flush toilets, showers and a dump station are on-site. 42

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drive into the secluded heart of cherry orchard country. Finley Point is known for its varied camping opportunities on the eastern shore. The disability-accessible park has 16 slips for vessels up to 25 feet long, four of which can be used for overnight visits and 16 spaces for RVs up to 16 feet long. All RV spaces and four boat spaces have 30-amp electricity and water hookups available. A pump out station for boats and RVs is on site. Big Arm Unit Located 13 miles north of Polson off Highway 93, the park is shady and has amazing views of Flathead Lake. It’s a great place to watch sunsets or sunrises over the lake. Big Arm also features excellent swimming and a nature trail as well as a dock and a boat ramp. The park has 40 campsites, a day use area, a picnic shelter, picnic areas, showers and flush toilets as well as pit toilets. Yurts are available at the Big Arm unit and are “extremely popular,” Grout said. Small rental cabins may be built in the future, she added.

Hiking, biking, swimming, fishing, and sunset photography are some of the site’s most popular activities. Yellow Bay Unit For those who enjoy roughing it in tents, Yellow Bay, located halfway between Polson and Bigfork, might be a good option. The 15-acre primitive camping haven has five tent sites available, but has one touch of civilization – flush toilets. Don’t plan on singing “Kumbaya” around the campfire, though. Only charcoal and camp stoves are allowed. Yellow Bay is the perfect place to fish or swim on the park’s beach or keep a keen eye out for birds ashore. Finley Point Unit The southernmost and largest park along the eastern shore is Finley Point, which is located 7 miles east of Polson. The 28-acre park has the most facilities of any park on the eastern shore, but requires a 4-mile

Wild Horse Island Unit Legend has it Wild Horse Island got its name from the herd of escaped horses the Salish and Kootenai tribes lost when they used the island to pasture their horses. A handful of wild horses still live on the 2,000-acre primitive park that is home to mule deer, bighorn sheep, coyotes, marmots, squirrels and many birds, including golden eagles and ospreys. Accessible only by boat, Wild Horse Island is open year round for day use only. No camping, motorized vehicles or bicycles are allowed. Boats can be rented in Polson or Bigfork to make the trek to the island. There are six public landing sites on the island, and one public dock. West Shore Unit West Shore is timbered with lots of shade and offers great views of the Missions and the Swan Range, fishing, boating and camping — 31 campsites of which seven are tent only. RVs must be 40 feet or smaller to camp here. Camp hosts live in the park, and there is a dock, boat launch, picnic areas, electricity and water. Campsites have established fire pits and grill or fire rings. Trash cans are available, and there are vault toilets.


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SUMMER RODEOS It’s hard to describe the magic of rodeos — they are a glimpse through the softened lens of time. The rodeo scene appears much like it did some 50 to 75 years ago. You can almost imagine saddle bronc champion Casey Tibbs from the 1950s pulling into the rodeo grounds in his famous purple Cadillac, or 50s-60s calf roper Dean Oliver driving up and unloading his horse. If you’re a traveler passing through from an urban area and never been to a rodeo or even if you’ve lived in Montana your whole life and gone to hundreds of rodeos, there’s always something enticing about the sport. Perhaps it’s the smell of grilled burgers, or maybe the rhythmic thudthud of horses’ hooves on the powdery fairgrounds dust or possibly the glittery sparkle of the rodeo queens carrying flags and leading the grand entries. All rodeo events evolved from the ranching culture. Cowboys in the old West assimilated knowledge from the Mexican vaqueros. To accustom horses to being ridden, bronc riding was a necessary skill since all ranch work was done a horseback. Barrel racing demonstrates a horse’s speed and agility and the athletic ability of both the cowgirl and her horse. Sick cows and calves needed to be doctored so calf roping and team roping developed from this needed skill of speed on a well-trained horse. The fearless, devil-may-care attitude of western cowboys probably prompted the daring event of bull riding. The Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame gives the Prescott Arizona rodeo credit for setting up all the modern rodeo rules. Other sources say Deer Trail, Colorado, in 1864 was the site of a showdown, where two groups of cowboys from neighboring ranches showed up to see who were best at everyday cowboy work. Competition included: roping for taking down sick calves; breaking horses so they could be used for ranch work and “bull dogging” or steer wrestling skills were needed for throwing down big troublesome cattle. Rodeo stock, a bull, a bronc, a calf or a steer, is drawn for each contestant, usually by a judge. Cowboys talk to other cowboys to learn information about the animal they drawn. They learn which calf runs straight and true and which bull spins to the left and then goes straight. The money from the rodeo ticket you purchase helps hardworking volunteer ARLEE RODEO 44

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and local rodeo committees pay for getting a stock contractor, who supplies the bucking horses, bulls, calves and steers. If it’s your first rodeo, and that’s okay, get a program when you pay for your ticket. The program will have the order of events, the names of the contestants and, for broncs and bulls, their names, too. You won’t understand everything at first but it’s easy to enjoy the grace of the horses, the fearlessness of the competitors, the antics of the rodeo clowns, the bravado of the bullfighters,

the heart-pumping country music and the energy of the crowd. Here is some additional information you might find interesting: 1. The cowboy and cowgirl contestants pay entry fees to compete. Of course they are hopeful they will win some prize money. Winners also score points in their rodeo association. The highest scorers are eligible for the finals in that association. The contestants travel from rodeo to rodeo paying their own expenses. 2. In the bronc riding competition, a cowboy’s spurs need to be over the point of the horse’s shoulders when the horse

exits the chute. Today’s spurs aren’t the needle-sharp ones of the olden days; they have to be dulled and the rowels can’t be locked. Spurs wake a horse up, but they don’t break the skin or hurt the animal. 3. If it looks like the calves are being strangled in the calf roping event, they aren’t. It certainly beats becoming a hamburger. 4. The flank strap put around the loins of a bucking horse or bull does not have tacks or nails in it, and it is not pulled too tight. The strap is lined in sheep’s wool and required to have a quick release S E E PA G E 4 6

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buckle so it’s easy to remove. Each bronc and bull is outfitted with a flank, but many of the animals will buck without it. 5. Most of the “rough stock,” (rodeo lingo for broncs and bull), are not wild. They are just animals that don’t like to be ridden. The stock crews load them in trucks, unloads them, feeds them and runs them in the chute to be ridden. They work for eight seconds a day and sometimes only once a week. 6. Saddles in bronc, roping or barrel racing, are all held on with a cinch and latigos, which are leather straps hooking the saddle to the cinch. The cinch goes under the horse’s belly. 7. The bullfighters have a dangerous job; they are in the arena to keep bucking bulls from hurting a cowboy if he gets bucked off. The clown/barrel-man tells jokes and encourages the crowd’s involvement. Both bullfighters and clowns wear baggy pants and paint on their faces. 8. Riders on “rough stock,” bulls or broncs, are required to ride for a full eight seconds. You will hear a loud horn sound when 8 seconds have passed. 9. The two riders who gallop alongside a bronc rider’s horse after the whistle blows, are the pickup men. One usually pulls a

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little ahead of the rider so the cowboy can grab onto them and swing off his bronc. The other pickup man removes the horse’s flank. The pickup men then guide the animal out of the arena and into the unsaddling chute. 10. Stock contractors make a living hauling their stock to different rodeos.

They take very good care of them. Bucking stock, steers and calves are rodeo athletes, too, and very hard to replace. 11.Timed events, such calf roping, steer wrestling, barrel racing and team roping are won by the person(s) with the fastest score. S E E PA G E 4 7


INFR RODEO

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12. Rough stock events require two judges, one on each side of the animal. Each judge scores the cowboy and the animal from one to 25, with 25 being the best. Then the two judges’ scores are added up and that’s the cowboy’s final score. 13. Cowboys are scored on spurring, getting a rhythm with the horse or bull, staying on for a full eight seconds and not touching the animals with their left hand. 14. In the calf roping, steer wrestling and team roping events, contestants start behind a barrier. A rope attaches from the

POLSON RODEO

chute containing the calf or steer, which in front of the cowboy or cowgirl’s horse and fastens to a post with a piece of string. When the chute opens, the steer or calf runs to the score line, which gives it a head start, before the barrier in front of the contestant opens. If the roper or steer wrestler starts his or her horse too soon, the piece of string on the barrier breaks and he or she is given a penalty of 10 seconds added to their time. 15. One judge sets the barrier, and another judge on a horse waves an orange flag to signal when the calf is tied, the steer is roped or the steer is wrestled. 16. Rodeo associations have rules

about apparel. In the Professional Rodeo Cowboy Association, contestants must wear western boots, western hats, a “cut and sewn” long-sleeved collared shirt, with either buttons or snaps (no pullovers are allowed), and jeans without holes. Under Northern Rodeo Association rules, contestants are fined $25 for not wearing approved apparel. Some rough stock riders wear helmets and others wear cowboy hats; it’s the rider’s choice. If you have other questions, just ask the folks around you. Chances are you might be sitting next to a rodeo family or an old rodeo hand. VJ

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W E D N E S D AY, M AY 3 1 ARLEE — The last day of school for Arlee School District. • POLSON — Sandpiper Art Gallery, 306 Main Street, Polson, presents “Montana West of the Mountains.” This exhibit will be the best images of everything we love about Montana and features member artists Antonia Wolf (photography), Sue Arneson (watercolor), Marie Stockhill (pottery), and guest artists Mike and Belinda Williams (photography) and jeweler Donna Miller. The exhibit continues until June 25. The Gallery is open Monday-Friday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and on Saturday from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. • POLSON — The Polson Flathead Historical Museum •

opens for the season on Memorial Day each year, and goes until Friday, Sept. 15. The museum is located at 708 Main Street and operates MondaySaturday from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. There is a visitor fee of $10 and children under 10 years old are admitted free with a paying adult. For more information, go to: www.flatheadmuseum.org. T H U R S D AY, J U N E 1 CHARLO — Last day of schools for Charlo School District. • DAYTON — Last day of school for Dayton School. • RONAN — The Garden of the Rockies Museum, located at 400 Round Butte Road, will open on Thursday, June 1. The museum features the Round •

Butte Gym, the fire escape from the old Ronan School, Sloan’s Flat Stage Stop, a one-room schoolhouse, an old log home with dovetailed construction, and a tool shed and a farm machinery building. Hours for the museum are MondayThursday from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Call 406-676-5454 for more information. • CHARLO — The Ronan Chamber of Commerce will hold a general meeting on Thursday, June 1, at noon at Allentown Bar and Restaurant. F R I D AY, J U N E 2 ST. IGNATIUS — The last day of school for St. Ignatius School District. • POLSON — Friday racing at Mission Valley Raceway •

will have V8 Modifieds, Pepsi Cola Hobby Stocks, Pro 4 Modifieds, and Hornets. Qualifying time trials are at 7 p.m. and racing starts at 8 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors, seniors, and/or veterans are $8. Kids 7 and under are free. Family passes are also available at a discounted rate. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. For more information go to: missionvalleyraceway@gmail. com or call: 406-210-5400. • HOT SPRINGS — Bases Covered will provide familiar and favorite music from the ‘50s and ‘60s at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. S E E PA G E 5 0

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• PABLO — The second annual Men’s Health Fair will take place at Salish Kootenai College in the Sherry McDonald reception room on Friday, June 2, from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Lunch will be served. Join them for health screenings, healthy games, prizes and speakers. Transportation and childcare are available. Call SKC’s Tribal Health at 406-675-2700 ext. 1630 for more information.

S AT U R D AY, J U N E 3 PABLO — Missing from Our Circle Art Show will take place at The People’s Center on Saturday, June 3, at 6 p.m. Missing from Our Circle is a three dimensional display of the “Save Our Sisters: Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women Awareness Project” dresses made by Marita Growing Thunder. The piece depicts the impact that the missing and murdered Indigenous women crisis has had on our communities, lives, and cultures. We will honor their lives, spirits, and journeys as we call for justice for the MMIW crisis. Be a witness to their silent honor dance. • POLSON — Providence St. Joseph Medical Center’s Charity Golf Tournament is •

scheduled for Saturday, June 3. Registration is at 8 a.m. and shotgun start is at 9 a.m. This will be an 18-hole/four-person scramble with an entry fee of $100 per team, which includes golf/golf cart/tees/prizes and lunch. For questions or team registration contact Cameron at Polson Bay Golf Course at 406-883-8230 or go to: polsonbaygolfcourse@gmail. com. • RONAN — The Garden of the Rockies Museum will hold a Flea Market, Craft Fair, Yard Sale at their Round Butte Gym across from the VFW, the first Saturday of each month from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Do you have yard sale items but not enough room to hold your own sale? Ten-foot spaces will be available inside and out for $10. All proceeds go to the operation of the Museum. Call 406-676-3261 as soon as possible to reserve your spot. • CHARLO — The Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana, located just south of Ronan, invites local artists to showcase their artwork on the first Saturday of each month, JuneOctober, in the gift shop at the museum. Artists Nicole and Merle Bigbow will exhibit their work, plus fry bread and Indian tacos by Nancy Vaughan and crew, will be available from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy yourself as Mark Chase provides Americana music at

the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. M O N D AY, J U N E 5 ST. IGNATIUS — The St. Ignatius School District will provide a summer school program Mondays-Thursdays, June 5-Thursday, June 22, from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Call 406-7453811 x 3 for more information. Food services in the Elementary Cafeteria will serve breakfast from 8:30-9:30 a.m. and lunch from 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. • POLSON/RONAN — The Boys and Girl Club of the Flathead Reservation and Lake County, in both Ronan and Polson, will be closed from Monday, June 5, through Friday, June 9. •

T U E S D AY, J U N E 6 ARLEE — The Jocko Valley Library’s Summer Reading Program, “Build a Better World,” invites readers of all ages and abilities to enjoy the following themes: “explore” their five senses; “discover” the natural treasures of our area; and finally to investigate the final theme “transformation.” Each event will include a snack, craft activity or game and time for new books. The program runs from June 6-Aug. 1, with special events on Tuesdays from 9:30-11 a.m. Call 7263572 for more information.

W E D N E S D AY, J U N E 7 POLSON — Polson Chamber of Commerce’s general meeting

and luncheon is scheduled for Wednesday, June 7, at the KwaTaqNuk from noon1 p.m. Scheduled speaker is County Commissioner Bill Baron. For more information, call the Chamber Office at 406883-5969. F R I D AY, J U N E 9 POLSON — Friday racing at Mission Valley Raceway will have Big Sky Late Models, Legends, Thunder Roadsters and Bandoleros. Qualifying time trials are at 7 p.m. and racing starts at 8 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors, seniors, and/or veterans are $8. Kids 7 and under are free. Family passes are also available at a discounted rate. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. For more information go to: missionvalleyraceway@gmail. com or call: 406-210-5400. • HOT SPRINGS — Ocelet Wizard will provide acoustic rock music at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. • POLSON — Last day of school for Polson School District. • RONAN — Last day of school for Ronan School District. • POLSON –– The Polson Splash Classic Softball ASA tournament will be held at the Polson softball complex between June 9-11. For details, call Kelley Druyvestein at 406253-1590. •

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JUNE FRIDAY, JUNE 9 (CONTINUED) • HOT SPRINGS — The 68th annual Homesteader Days celebration is a family fun weekend that begins on June 9 with arts, crafts, a two-day rodeo and food booths on Main Street from noon to 5 p.m. At 6 p.m. the annual alumni basketball game takes place at the Hot Springs High School gym. Fergie’s Pub will host the Good, the Bad and the Ugly playing classic rock music beginning at 9 p.m. For general information call 406-741-2662; car show call 406-741-3630; rodeo 406-741-5707. S AT U R D AY, J U N E 1 0 POLSON — Lake County Search and Rescue will hold a fundraising event with an ATV, UTV, and Dirt Bike Poker Run on Saturday, June 10. The event will begin at 11:30 a.m. at Buffalo Bridge and ends at Sloan Bridge. After the

H O M E S T E A D E R D AY S

event there will be a barbecue dinner back at Buffalo Bridge. Pre-registration will take place Friday, June 9, from 6-8 p.m. at the VFW in Polson. Late registration starts at 8 a.m. June 10. Registration fees are $35 for the first poker hand and a T-shirt; $10 for additional hands. Additional T-shirts will be available to purchase: $15 for children and $18 for adults.

The top three hands will receive prizes. For more information, call 406-261-4886. • DAYTON — Come join us Saturday, June 10, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m, for our summer kick off celebration “Merlot Madness.” We will be doing a free vertical tasting of three of our International Gold Medal winning Merlots from the 2005, 2006 and our 2009 vintage.

This is a part of the winery’s continuing program to educate the community about the aging and care of fine wine. What is a vertical tasting? It is the presentation of wine from older to younger vintages allowing one to see the effects of time upon a wine from the same place. Mission Mountain Winery is located on Highway 93 in Dayton on the west shore of beautiful Flathead Lake. For more information, call 406 849-5524, or go to: www. missionmountainwinery.com. • HOT SPRINGS — Homesteaders Days continues with all-day arts, crafts, and food booths on Main Street. At 9 a.m. is a Car Show (by Valley Bank); at 9:30 is a 3K and 10K Skunk Alley Run (meet at Wall Street Place); a breakfast fundraiser for the library is from 8-11 a.m. at the Tribal Nutrition Center on Spring Street; an open house at the shooting S E E PA G E 5 2

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S AT U R D AY, J U N E 1 0 (CONTINUED) range is from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Country Western music by Tom Clontz on the Main Street stage from 10 a.m.-noon; an 11:30 ice cream social at the Senior Center; a Kiddy Parade downtown on Main and Spring Street at noon (prizes); Kiddy games in the park at noon (prizes); Andrea Harsell and Luna Roja on Main Street stage from 1-3 p.m.; Car Show judging and Classic Rock DJ on Main Street from 3-4:30 p.m.; from 4:30-6:30 p.m. Alex 52

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Boey plays rock music; Badger Hound plays hillbilly rock from 6:45-8:45 p.m.; a rodeo will be held at 6 p.m. (east of the school); and the Flathead V8s will perform rock for the street dance from 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m. • HOT SPRINGS — Andrea Harsell presents “Roots and Rock” music at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. S U N D AY, J U N E 1 1 HOT SPRINGS — Homesteader Days continues with a pancake breakfast at the Masonic Lodge from 7:30 -11:30 a.m.; Andrea Harsell will provide music for the gospel hour from 11 a.m.-noon; at noon the grand parade will take pace featuring Great

Scots Pipes and Drums; a Homesteader Reunion will take place at the Senior Center at 1 p.m.; a rodeo begins at 2 p.m. M O N D AY, J U N E 1 2 POLSON — Registration for North Lake County Library’s Family Summer Reading Program begins at 10 a.m. Call 406-883-8225 for more information. • PABLO — Salish Kootenai College, “Making Fitness Fun Program” (open to youth 7 years and older) begins Monday, June 12 and goes from 8:30 a.m.-noon, Monday through Thursday, until Aug. 17. The program will be held at the Salish Kootenai College Joe McDonald Gymnasium. Physical •

activities will be provided inbetween breakfast and lunch. Activities include: swimming, kickball, football, basketball, dodge ball, Native games, volleyball, soccer, shinny, bike riding and gardening. Activities are intended to keep kids busy and active during the summer months. Transportation is provided Monday through Thursday to Ronan and Polson Boys and Girls Clubs daily at about noon. Contact Mike Tryon or Paul Phillips at Salish Kootenai College for more information at 406-275-4916 or 406-275-4917. • ARLEE — Arlee Schools’ Summer Food Program will start on June 12 and go until Aug. 4, Monday-Friday.


JUNE Breakfast will be served from 7:30-10:30 a.m. and lunch will be served from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. • RONAN — Ronan Middle School will serve kid friendly meals for lunch and breakfast Monday-Friday (excluding July 4th) from June 12-Aug. 18. Breakfast will be served from 8:15-10:30 a.m. and lunch from 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. There is no cost to all children 18 years old and younger or for special needs children to age 21. Adult meal prices are $2.50 for breakfast and $4 for lunch. For more information, call 406-6763390 x 7226. • PABLO — Lunch only will be served at Pablo Elementary in the gym from 11:30 a.m.-noon, Monday-Friday, from Monday, June 12-June 30. For more information, call 406-676-3390 x 7226. • POLSON — Monday, June 12, is the first day of the free breakfast and lunch Summer Food Service Program in

Polson. Cherry Valley, 107 Eighth Ave. W, is the site for the program. Breakfast will be served from 7:30-9:30 a.m. and lunch from 11 a.m.-1:15 p.m., Monday-Friday. All children 18 years old and under eat for free. Lunches are available for adults for a fee. All kids can come enjoy food in a safe, fun, healthy environment. The program ends on Friday, Aug. 4. • RONAN/PABLO — Ronan School District #30 will offer Summer Volleyball Camps June 12-13, for students entering grades first-eighth. Call 406676-3390 x 7423 for more information. • POLSON — Polson Youth Basketball and Volleyball Summer Camps for grades 2-8 will take place MondayWednesday, June 12-14 at Linderman School. The cost is $60 for both camps or $30 for each sport. The basketball clinic runs from 9 a.m.-noon, a

free lunch is offered from noon to 1 p.m. and the volleyball clinic is from 1-4 p.m. Contact: pluetzen@polson.k12.us or jquinn@polsonk12.mt.us, for more information. • LAKE COUNTY — The Flathead Reservation and Lake County Boys and Girls Club will operate a summer program at both their Polson and Ronan sites Monday-Friday (not July 4) from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. The cost is $25 per month or $75 for the entire summer program, which runs June 12-Aug. 18. The summer program focuses on academics, good character and citizenship and developing healthy lifestyles. Applications may be picked up onsite or at: www.flatheadbgc.org. T U E S D AY, J U N E 1 3 ARLEE — Another Jocko Valley Library Summer Reading Program, “Build a Better World,” event is on Tuesday, June 13, from 9:30-11 a.m. Call

726-3572 for more information. T H U R S D AY, J U N E 1 5 POLSON — North Lake County Library begins registration for their summer reading program, “Building a Better World,” at 10 a.m. on Thursday, June 15. Children, teens, and adults each receive a reading record at registration, with eight reading benchmarks they need to achieve (for a total of 32 hours of reading or reading to your child). Prizes, coupons and raffle tickets are awarded and we’ll be partnering with Bob Ricketts to offer free Happy Hippo rides to all reading program participants who finish all 8 levels. Those wanting to participate in the library’s big events on Thursdays need to register for those activities ahead of time on this day. For more information, contact the library at 406-883-8225.  •

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For information call Flathead Transit.

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PABLO 52001 US Hwy., Pablo • 406-275-2877

MISSOULA 1660 West Broadway, Missoula • 406-549-2339 EVARO 20750 US Hwy. 93, Missoula • 406-726-3778 ARLEE 92345 US Hwy. 93, Arlee • 406-726-7777 RAVALLI 27330 Hwy. 93, Ravalli • 406-396-6522 ST. IGNATIUS 240 Mnt. View Drive, St. Ignatius • 406-745-3634 PABLO 52001 US Hwy. 93, Pablo • 406-275-2877 POLSON 49708 US Hwy. 93, Polson • 406-883-3636 LAKESIDE 7170 US Hwy. 93, Lakeside • 406-844-3372 KALISPELL/EVERGREEN 2076 US Hwy. 2 W., Evergreen • 406-755-7447 WHITEFISH 500 Depot Street, Whitefish • 1-800-872-7245

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T H U R S D AY, J U N E 1 5 (CONTINUED) • MISSION VALLEY — The 32nd Annual Montana Senior Olympic Games will be held in the Pablo, Polson, Ronan areas on June 15-17, 2017. This involves competition in 14 different sports for men and women who are 50 years of age and older. The sports include: archery, bowling, badminton, cycling, basketball, golf, horseshoes, pickle ball, race-walk, tennis, table tennis, road race, swimming and track & field. Gold, silver and bronze medals will be awarded. Social events include a spaghetti supper on Thursday, June 15, at the Polson VFW and an informal banquet on Friday, June 16, at the Polson Elks. For more information, call 406-586-5543, 406-212-1699 or 406-871-9747 or go to: montanaseniorolympics.org/ summer.html. • POLSON — SPLASH (Support Polson Late Afternoon Social Hour) takes place on Thursday, June 15. from 5-7 p.m. Your host will be Valley Bank and Finley Point Grill. Location for Splash will be at Valley Bank located at 49430 Highway 93. For more information, call 406-883-5969. See you there. • RONAN — Ronan School

MIRACLE OF AMERICA MUSEUM

District #30 will offer Basketball Camp for boys and girls June 15-17. For more information, call 406-676-3390 x 7423. • POLSON — The first annual “Blues, Brews and Booze” event will include 10 local breweries, three bands and go from noon to 10 p.m. For more information, call 406-396-0125. F R I D AY, J U N E 1 6 POLSON — Friday racing at Mission Valley Raceway will have V8 Modifieds, Pepsi Cola Hobby Stocks, Pro 4 Modifieds, and Hornets. Qualifying time trials are at 7 p.m. and racing starts at 8 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors, seniors, and/or veterans are $8. Kids 7 and under are free. Family passes are also available at a discounted rate. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. For more information go to:

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missionvalleyraceway@gmail. com or call: 406-210-5400. • HOT SPRINGS — Private party – no music at the Symes Hotel. • POLSON — The Port Polson Players launch their summer teaser, “Guys on Ice,” the ice fishing musical. The show is back by popular demand and only plays three evenings, June 16 -18. The Players original cast spends a day on the ice as fishing buddies boom off musical numbers like, “Ode to a Snowmobile Suit,” “Beer in the Bucket” and “The One That Got Away.” Curtain time is at 7:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, with a Sunday matinee at 2 p.m. S AT U R D AY, J U N E 1 7 HOT SPRINGS — Private party – no music at the Symes Hotel. • ARLEE — The Arlee Brown Building committee •

is sponsoring a community yard sale on June 17, from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Table or space rent is $15 and spaces will be available in the Old Fire Hall and Brown Building. A Brown Building Happy Meal, which includes a choice of hamburger or hot dog, drink, cookie and chips will be available from 11 a.m. -2 p.m. for $5. For more information or to rent a space, call 406-726-3227 or email: arleebrownbuilding@gmail. com. Vendors must remove any unsold items at the end of the day. S U N D AY, J U N E 1 8 FAT H E R ’ S D AY • POLSON — Polson Motorcoach and RV serve from 8-10:30 a.m. huckleberry or regular pancakes to all Dads for free on Father’s Day. • HOT SPRINGS — John Kelley sings the Blues at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. T U E S D AY, J U N E 2 0 SUMMER SOLSTICE • ARLEE — Another Jocko Valley Library Summer Reading Program, “Build a Better World,” event is on Tuesday, June 20, from 9:30-11 a.m. Call 406-726-3572 for more information. W E D N E S D AY, J U N E 2 1 RONAN — Ronan School District #30 will offer a high school Football Camp June 2123. For more information, call 406-676-3390 x 7423.

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JUNE T H U R S D AY, J U N E 2 2 POLSON — The Miracle of America Museum, 36094 Memory Lane, invites all to their “Free Night at the Museum,” the fourth Thursday of every month at 6:30 p.m. The classic movie “The World’s Fastest Indian” will be shown on Thursday, June 22, along with a tour of the Indian Motorcycles (the first motorcycle manufacturer in America) in the MOAM’s motorcycle collection. Treats and donations are always welcome. • POLSON — The North Lake County Public Library’s Summer Reading Program’s “big event” on Thursday, June 22, at 10 a.m. is “Invasion of the Lake Snatchers” with Georgia Smies (CSKT). Call 406-883-8225, for more information. •

F R I D AY, J U N E 2 3 POLSON — Friday racing at Mission Valley Raceway will have their second annual Legend Car Madness event

with INEX Legends, Thunder Roadsters and Bandoleros. Qualifying time trials are at 7 p.m. and racing starts at 8 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors, seniors, and/or veterans are $8. Kids 7 and under are free. Family passes are also available at a discounted rate. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. Bring the family. For more information go to: missionvalleyraceway@gmail. com or call: 406-210-5400. • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy Pamela Van Kirk’s version of Coffee House Folk music at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. • RONAN — On June 23, 2017, the Ronan Area Chamber of Commerce will present “Crab Fest 2017,” which is a benefit for the Bockman (Ronan City) Parks. The dinner will begin at 5 p.m. and has been moved to the horticulture barn at the fairgrounds. Tickets are $35 per person and $10 for children

10 years of age and under. Purchase tickets at Ronan Flower Mill, Valley Banks, Ronan Napa, Glacier Bank, First Interstate Bank, Polson, Access Montana and Ronan Power Products. Enjoy fresh crab boiled right there for you. Bring your own beverages, crab pliers and appetite. For more information, call the Ronan Chamber at 406-676-8300. • POLSON — Mission Mountain NRA Rodeo is on Friday and Saturday, June 23-24 beginning at 6:30 p.m. There will be youth events including mutton bustin’ and mini bull riding at 7:30 p.m. NRA Rodeo events include bareback, steer wrestling, saddle bronc, team roping, tie down toping, ladies and youth barrel racing, ladies and youth breakaway roping and bull riding. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for children under 12 years of age. Tickets will be available at the gate. There will be no pre-sale tickets. Food, beverage and

beer garden concessions will be available. There will also be live music after the Friday night performance. (Free vendors fair, no food items.) Call 406261-2861 or for general rodeo information call 406-883-1100. S AT U R D AY, J U N E 2 4 HOT SPRINGS — Bluegrass music is on tap at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Music provided by the Black Mountain Band. • ST. IGNATIUS — The St. Ignatius Volunteer Fire Department Fireman’s Auction will take place on Saturday, June 24, at 11 a.m. at the Old Town Field. Concessions begin at that time and include hamburgers, hot dogs, pulled pork sandwiches with coleslaw and ice cream. Meals will be served until approximately 5 p.m. (Purchase a meal and you’re entered in the door prize drawing.) The silent auction starts at 11 a.m.; the live •

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S AT U R D AY, J U N E 2 4 (CONTINUED) auction starts at noon with raffle drawings and door prizes. Raffle tickets will be sold before the auction for a ½ beef; a whole hog cut and wrapped; and a .308 rife with scope. To donate auction items please call 406-531-4082 or 406-7454266. S U N D AY, J U N E 2 5 POLSON — Sandpiper Art Gallery, 306 Main Street - Polson, presents “Single, Double, Triple,” an exhibit

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featuring Sandpiper Member Artists Karla Martinson (mixed media), Juanita Small Salmon (painter), Matt and Heather Holmes (mixed media and raku pottery), Holly Wurl (leather), and guest Kay Langland of Moondance Artwork and Jewelry. This exhibit runs from June 25-July 28. The artist reception is scheduled for Friday, June 30, from 5-7 p.m. at the Gallery. M O N D AY, J U N E 2 6 YELLOW BAY — The Flathead Biological Station at Yellow Bay will host a “Data and Donuts Seminar” on Monday, June 26, from 10-11 a.m. These seminars are open to the public, and everyone is

invited to attend. Stop by to have a donut and learn more about ecology and current research in the Flathead. Call 406-982-3301 x 229, for more information. • POLSON — Summer camps will be available in Polson starting Monday, June 26, through the After School Program. For more information, contact Polson School District #28 at 406-883-6335. • RONAN — Ronan School District #30 will offer a Wrestling Camp June 26-30. For more information, call 406-676-3390 x 7423. T U E S D AY, J U N E 2 7 ARLEE — Another Jocko Valley Library Summer Reading

Program, “Build a Better World,” event is on Tuesday, June 27, from 9:30-11 a.m. Call 726-3572 for more information. W E D N E S D AY, J U N E 2 8 ARLEE — The 119th annual Arlee Powwow celebration begins Wednesday, June 28, and ends Tuesday, July 4. All events are open to the public and free of charge. Arts, crafts, stick games, dance competitions, Indian and other ethnic foods will be available. Absolutely no alcohol, firearms, unleashed dogs or motorcycles are allowed in the camp area. This year dance competition will expand to 31 categories. There will be separate style categories for adults age 40-59. Women


J U N E / J U LY W E D N E S D AY, J U N E 2 8 (CONTINUED) and men 60 years and over will be competition categories of all styles combined. The event takes place on Powwow grounds on Powwow Road in Arlee. Wednesday is “Camp Day. Visit the website: www. arleepowwow.com, for more information. T H U R S D AY, J U N E 2 9 POLSON — The North Lake County Public Library’s Summer Reading Program’s, “big event” on Thursday, June 29, at 10 a.m. is “Building Local” with Beth Palm of AmeriCorps/Finley Point State Park. Call 406-883-8225, for more information. • POLSON — The Sandpiper Art and Gift Gallery will hold “Band Weaving” for children and adults. You can create colorful, patterned, ‘inkle’ woven bands with master weaver Mary Sale. You can use them as belts and headbands, or to ornament clothes, backpacks, or purses. Class will be on Thursday, June 29, from 9:3011:30 a.m. Call 406-883-5956 for more information. • ARLEE — The 119th annual Arlee Powwow celebration continues with a Memorial at 7 p.m. followed by a stick game. Visit the website: arleepowwow.com, for more information. Registration for dance and singing contests opens at 8 p.m. •

BIGFORK — This is the last day to sign up for the seventh annual BigFork Battle in the Bay 3 on 3 Basketball Tournament. Call 406-2611521 for more information.

F R I D AY, J U N E 3 0 HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy original music by Wayo and Keiko at Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. • ARLEE — The 119th annual Arlee Powwow celebration continues with registration for dance and singing contests at noon. The speaking and dance portion of the Miss Salish-Pend d’Oreille competition begins at 6:30 p.m. There is a Drum Roll Call at 6:45 p.m. Grand Entry begins at 7 p.m. with honorees and the crowning of Miss Salish-Pend d’Oreille 2017-18. •

S AT U R D AY, J U LY 1 POLSON — Saturday racing at Mission Valley Raceway will hold their Independence Day Late Model 125 event with Late Models, Pro 4 Modifieds, and Hornets. Qualifying time trials are at 6 p.m. and racing starts at 7 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors, seniors, and/or veterans are $8. Kids 7 and under are free. Family passes are also available at a discounted rate. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N

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S AT U R D AY, J U LY 1 (CONTINUED) Reservoir Road. For more information go to: missionvalleyraceway@gmail. com or call: 406-210-5400. • ARLEE — The 119th annual Arlee Powwow celebration continues with Drum Roll Call at 12:45 p.m. and Grand Entry at 1 p.m. and contests for juniors and teens. Adult singing competition at 7 p.m. At 11 p.m. original style vs. contemporary Jingle Dance for women 18 and over. The Men’s Grass Special takes place at this time also. • HOT SPRINGS — Folk music played by Euphonium Spaceship takes place at Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. • RONAN — The Garden of the Rockies Museum will hold

a Flea Market, Craft Fair, Yard Sale at their Round Butte Gym across from the VFW, the first Saturday of each month from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Do you have yard sale items but not enough room to hold your own sale? Ten-foot spaces will be available inside and out for $10. All proceeds go to the operation of the Museum. Call 406-676-3261 as soon as possible to reserve your spot. • CHARLO — The Ninepipes Museum of early Montana, located just south of Ronan, invites local artists to showcase their artwork on the first Saturday of each month, JuneOctober, in the gift shop at the museum. Artist David Dragonfly will exhibit his work from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. S U N D AY, J U LY 2 ARLEE — The 119th annual Arlee Powwow celebration continues with an Indian Mass at 11 a.m.; Drum Roll Call at

Circus Time CARNIVAL FAMILY FUN GAMES PRIZES

June 24th Lake County Fairgrounds Ronan, Montana For tickets or info. call

406-676-0800 58

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12:45 p.m.; Grand Entry at 1 p.m. M O N D AY, J U LY 3 YELLOW BAY — The Flathead Biological Station at Yellow Bay will host a “Data and Donuts Seminar” on Monday, July 3, from 10-11 a.m. These seminars are open to the public, and everyone is invited to attend. Stop by to have a donut and learn more about ecology, and current research in the Flathead. Call 406-982-3301 x 229, for more information. • ARLEE — The 119th annual Arlee Powwow celebration continues with Youth Day. •

T U E S D AY, J U LY 4 POLSON — Please join us for the July 4th Parade in downtown Polson beginning at noon. The theme this year is TBA.  Parade entry forms are available at the Chamber office. Entry forms must be returned

to the Polson Chamber office by July 3. The parade will begin at Cherry Valley Elementary School, head down Main Street, turn at Third Ave. and end on the following block. Please call the Chamber office for more information, at 406-883-5969. • HOT SPRINGS — Barbecue and fireworks are on tap at Symes Hotel from 4-6 p.m. • ARLEE — The 119th annual Arlee Powwow celebration continues with a parade at 1 p.m. and the Snake Dance at 2 p.m. The Arlee Rodeo will be at 2 p.m. on Powwow Road in Arlee. For more information, call 406-726-3762 or visit the website: arleepowwow.com. • ARLEE — The Arlee Volunteer Fire Department will host its annual pancake breakfast from 7-11 a.m. at the old Arlee Fire Hall. The cost is $5 per person and it’s all you can eat. For more information, call 406-2104144. • ARLEE — The Arlee Jocko

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J U LY T U E S D AY, J U LY 4 (CONTINUED) Valley Museum, run by the Arlee Historical Society, opens for the summer July 4 and will be open every other Saturday from 2-4 p.m. or by appointment, until Labor Day. The museum has many historical displays including many photographs of Native and homesteading families. There are hundreds of obituaries with genealogy information. There’s also a military display commemorating those who have given their lives for this country. The Arlee Museum is located at the corner of Bouch and Fyant (by the grade school). For more information or to arrange a viewing, call 406-726-3167.

W E D N E S D AY, J U LY 5 POLSON —Port Polson Players offer the ever-popular Clark and Bobrick farce, “Murder at the Howard Johnson’s.” This perennial midlife crisis comedy reunites cast members from the Players’ initial 1988 production. Neal Lewing, Karen Lewing and Todd Mowbray have performed this iconic comedy together in their 30’s, 40’s, 50’s and now 60’s. The trio plans fiveyear “reunion performances of the comedy until one of them croaks.” Variety tags the script with “Enough laugh lines, mirth-provoking situations and extravagant sight gags to outfit two rapid fire farces.” Reservations can be made by

calling the theatre box office at 406-883-9212 or visiting portpolsonplayers.com. • POLSON — Polson Chamber general meeting and luncheon is cancelled for the month of July to enjoy our family and friends for the holiday. For more information, call the Chamber office at 406-883-5969. T H U R S D AY, J U LY 6 POLSON — The North Lake County Public Library’s Summer Reading Program’s, “big event” on Thursday, July 6, at 10 a.m. is “Avian Architecture” with Allen Bone of Mission Mountain Audobon. Call 406-883-8225, for more information. • CHARLO — The Ronan Chamber of Commerce will hold •

a general meeting on Thursday, June 6, at noon at Allentown Bar and Restaurant. F R I D AY, J U LY 7 HOT SPRINGS — Shiloh Rising provides acoustic folk, blues rock ‘n roll and their original music at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. • POLSON — The Polson Chamber of Commerce will hold their annual “Chamber Blast” on Friday, July 7, at Big Sky Sporting Clays from 12:304 p.m. The event begins with a quick beginner’s shooting clinic, followed by a shooter’s safety briefing prior to the Sporting Clays Tournament. An awards ceremony is planned •

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F R I D AY, J U LY 7 (CONTINUED) for 4:30 p.m. The cost is $110 per shooter or $330 per three-person team. Bring your shotgun, eye and ear protection. No experience is necessary. Registration deadline is June 30. Contact the Polson Chamber at 406-883-5969 for more information. S AT U R D AY, J U LY 8 • POLSON — Saturday racing at Mission Valley Raceway will hold their V8 Modified 75 event 60

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with V8 Modifieds, Pepsi Cola Hobby Stocks, and Legends. Qualifying time trials are at 6 p.m. and racing starts at 7 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors, seniors, and/or veterans are $8. Kids 7 and under are free. Family passes are also available at a discounted rate. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. For more information go to: missionvalleyraceway@gmail. com or call: 406-210-5400. • HOT SPRINGS — John Kelley brings the Blues to Symes Hot Springs from 8-10 p.m. • CHARLO — Mark your calendars. The Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana will

hold the second annual Cultural Arts Fair on the museum grounds from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Saturday, July 8. This fun, family-friendly outdoor arts fair will be an opportunity for Montana artists to exhibit and sell their work to visitors enjoying their summer vacations in the Mission Valley as well as to local friends and neighbors. Nancy Vaughan and crew will provide fry bread and Indian tacos. Call 406-644-3435 for complete details. S U N D AY, J U LY 9 FLATHEAD LAKE — Paddle for clean water in the third annual Poker Paddle on Sunday, July 9. Bring your

kayak, canoe, paddleboard or other human-propelled watercraft and paddle through the Narrows. Early bird registration is available now through May 31 on the Flathead Lakers website: www. flatheadlakers.org. Regular registration closes June 30. The event is limited to the first 150 paddle craft registered. Last year’s event sold out. Participants start from Kings Point and choose a short (1.6mile), middle (3.6-mile), or — new this year — an extended distance (5-plus mile) course that stops at island checkpoints where participants will collect a card at each location. Prizes will be awarded for best and


J U LY nations and the general public to the 38th annual “Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow” at the Elmo Powwow Grounds on Thursday, July 13-Sunday, July 16. It is a Native American gathering featuring drumming, dancing and traditional dress.

S U N D AY, J U LY 9 (CONTINUED) worst poker hands. There will be a silent auction, a catered picnic dinner and live entertainment by local band Highway 93. Proceeds benefit the Flathead Lakers education programs and community work to prevent the spread of invasive mussels, promote clean water practices and inspire future watershed citizens. Call Hilary at 406883-1346 or email hilary@ flatheadlakers.org, for more information. M O N D AY, J U LY 1 0 YELLOW BAY — The Flathead Biological Station at Yellow Bay will host a “Data and Donuts Seminar” on Monday, July 10, from 10-11 a.m. These seminars are open to the public, and everyone is invited to attend. Stop by to have a donut and learn more about ecology, and current research in the Flathead. Call 406-982-3301 x 229, for more information. • RONAN — Ronan School District #30 will offer a Volleyball Camp July 10-12. For more information, call 6763390 x 7423. • POLSON — Hand build ceramic wind chimes from clay with raku artist Heather Holmes at the Sandpiper Art and Gift Gallery on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, July 10, 12 and 14, from 1:30-3:30 p.m. You •

will take home glazed and fired wind chimes hung from local driftwood. Call 406-883-5956 for more information. • POLSON — Create your own personal mandala using your unique creative energy with instruction from multi-media artist and jeweler Margery Christensen, Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, July 10, 12, and 13 from 9:30-11:30 a.m. at Sandpiper Art and Gift Gallery. Call 406-883-5956 for more information. T U E S D AY, J U LY 1 1 ARLEE — Another Jocko Valley Library Summer Reading Program “Build a Better World” event is on Tuesday, July 11,

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F R I D AY, J U LY 1 4 HOT SPRINGS — Wayo and Keiko provide their original music at Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. • BIGFORK — Mission Valley 3 on 3’s seventh annual Battle in the Bay will be held the second weekend of July at Bigfork High School and hosts 100 plus teams from third grade through adult. There will be 6-foot, 8-foot, and 9-foot dunk contests, 3-point contests and free throw contests held on Leonard Park Logging Inc. center court. The final day for signups for this tournament is June 29. For more information, go to: missionvalley3on3.com or call 406-261-1521. •

from 9:30-11 a.m. Call 406726-3572 for more information. T H U R S D AY, J U LY 1 3 POLSON — The North Lake County Public Library’s Summer Reading Program’s “big event” on Thursday, July 13, at 10 a.m. is “Build a Better World … and Discover New Ones” with NASA. Call 406-883-8225, for more information. • RONAN — 4-H Lake County Fair entries fees are due by 4 p.m. in the Lake County Fair Office. No late entries will be accepted. • ELMO — The Kootenai Tribe, also known as the Ktunaxa Ksanka Band, welcome all •

S AT U R D AY, J U LY 1 5 PLAINS —The second annual Plains Wild Horse Shootout signups will be held July 15 to benefit the Wildhorse Sports Association, a local charity developing a new sports complex for Plains and Sanders County. For more information, visit our webpage at: missionvalley3on3.com.

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S AT U R D AY, J U LY 1 5 (CONTINUED) • DAYTON — Mission Mountain Winery encourages all Summer gourmets to attend our free event on Saturday, July 15, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.: Ice Cream Social at the Winery. The staff and winemaker have collaborated in producing some sorbet and ice cream treats: Muscat Sorbet and Vanilla Ice Cream with Cocoa Vin Chocolate Port. For more information, call 406 849-5524, or go to: www. missionmountainwinery.com. • ST. IGNATIUS — St. Luke Community Healthcare’s 35th Annual Buffalo Run will be held July 15 and consists of a 1-mile, a 4-mile, and a 7-mile half marathon runs. The half 62

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marathon starts promptly at 7 a.m. with the other races starting at 8 a.m. The annual run begins in front of Gamble’s Hardware. The course is in and around the town of St. Ignatius and mostly flat. Entry deadline is July 10. Download entry forms from stlukehealthcare. org or call 406-528-5321. • POLSON — Polson Main Street Flathead Cherry Festival will be held Saturday, July 15, from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sunday, July 16, from 10 a.m.4 p.m. Come enjoy the great selection of vendors, Flathead Cherries, homemade cherry pies, cherry quilts on display in store windows, unique arts and crafts, entertainment, sidewalk sales and specials all weekend long. Saturday’s schedule includes live music from 1-4 p.m.; a children’s cherry spitting contest in front of the Cove Deli at 2 p.m.; and an adult cherry spitting contest at 3 p.m. On

Sunday there will be live music from 1-3:30 p.m.; a children’s pie eating contest takes place at 3 p.m. and the adult pie eating contest will be at 3:30 p.m. For more information, including vendor applications, go to: flatheadcherryfestival.com. • HOT SPRINGS — Americana music provided by Mark Chase can be heard at Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. • POLSON — Mark your calendars for a fun-filled weekend called “Live History Days” at the Miracle of America Museum, 36094 Memory Lane, on July 15 and July 16. There will be historic movies Saturday morning and Sunday afternoon. There will be ice cream and other concessions; rides on two trains; Army rigs; spinners and wood carvers; a sawmill in action; a jet trainer cockpit; a blacksmith shop; whirling flywheel engines; a tennis

ball cannon; a one room schoolhouse, a flint knapper and educational gun exhibits. The “Country Combo” of fiddlers, pickers, singers and accordions will provide listening and dancing entertainment on Saturday. Join the fun, sell your wares and be a part of history. New exhibitors and volunteers are welcome. Vendors must have a direct link to things historical i.e.: soap making, broom making, pottery, beading, etc. For more information, contact Gil at 406-883-6264 or www. miracleofamericamuseum.org. • PLAINS — The Wild Horse Shoot Out takes place the third weekend of July at the Wildhorse Outdoor Sports Complex in Plains. Divisions are from third grade through adult. Go to: www.missionvalley3on3. com, or call 406-261-1521 for more information. S E E PA G E 6 4


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S U N D AY, J U LY 1 6 LAKE MARY RONAN — Kootenai Christian Senior Camp for students entering grades 10-12 will be held July 16-21. The camp offers swimming, boating, fishing, sports, plus Bible study, daily devotions and group worship times and will be held at Lake Mary Ronan. Register at www. kootenaichristiancamp.org go call 406-745-4667. • POLSON — The third annual Polson Mud Run will be held on Sunday, July 16, at the Polson Fairgrounds. This is a fund raising event for the Flathead Boys & Girls Club. The 5K Obstacle Course includes many different types of terrain and obstacles to overcome, including mud. The race starts at 9 a.m. The cost is $40 per person, plus a $3 signup fee. For more information, call 406676-5437or go to: flatheadbgc. org or the sign up account: https://runsignup.com/Race/ MT/Polson/GetMuddyBGC. • POLSON — Polson Main Street Flathead Cherry Festival continues from 10 am.-4 pm. •

M O N D AY, J U LY 1 7 YELLOW BAY — The Flathead Biological Station at Yellow Bay will host a “Data and Donuts Seminar” on Monday, July 17, from 10-11 a.m. These seminars are open to

usic em Liv iday Fr ht! Nig

the public, and everyone is invited to attend. Stop by to have a donut and learn more about ecology, and current research in the Flathead. Call 406-982-3301 x 229, for more information. • RONAN — Glacier View Adventist School will hold Vacation Bible School, SonSpark Labs, on July 17-21 from 5:30-8 p.m. at Glacier View School, 36332 Mud Creek Lane. Come have a blast discovering God’s plan for you.

events@flbs.umt.edu or 406982-3301 x 229 or visit our website at: http://flbs.umt.edu/.  • POLSON — Explore painting in oils with master artist Terry Droll. Learn the wet-in-wet oil painting technique without the stink of turpentine on Wednesday and Thursday, July 19 and 20, from 9:3011:30 p.m. for free. Call the Sandpiper Art and Gift Gallery at 406-883-5956 for more information.

T U E S D AY, J U LY 1 8 • ARLEE — Another Jocko Valley Library Summer Reading Program “Build a Better World” event is on Tuesday, July 18, from 9:30-11 a.m. Call 7263572 for more information.

W E D N E S D AY, J U LY 1 9 LAKESIDE — On Wednesday, July 19, from 3:30-6 p.m. Flathead Lake Boat Tours in Lakeside will graciously host an afternoon cruise aboard the Far West to one of the Biological Station’s Flathead Lake monitoring sites. Join FLBS researchers for appetizers, beverages, music and an overview of Flathead Lake ecology and the FLBS Research and Monitoring program. The cost is $50 per person. Proceeds benefit the FLBS Research and Monitoring Program. Reservations are required, since limited space is available on the tour boat. For more information or to RSVP, email or call Tom Bansak at:

Mission Mountain

NRA Rodeo

T H U R S D AY, J U LY 2 0 POLSON — The North Lake County Public Library’s Summer Reading Program’s, “big event” on Thursday, July 20, at 10 a.m. is “Bees! Busy little builders” with Chuck Lewis (and some bees). Call 406-8838225, for more information. • POLSON — Support Polson Late Afternoon Social Hour will be held on Thursday, July 20, from 5-7 p.m. Your host will be KwaTaqNuk Resort and Casino located at 49708 US Highway 93, E. See you there. • RONAN — Open Class entries for the Lake County Fair are due by 4 p.m. in the Lake County Fair office. No late entries will be accepted. • POLSON — From July 20 – Aug. 6 the Port Polson Players will offer the musical comedy “Pump Boys and Dinettes.” Set in contemporary Georgia, this refreshing story features selections like “Tips, Farmer Tan,” “Catfish” and “Mona Mona” in a country musicinfused celebration. The ‘Pump

Boys’ sell high octane on Highway 57, as the ‘Dinettes’ run the Double Cup diner next door. Together they fashion an evening of country western songs on guitars, piano, bass and, yes, kitchen utensils. F R I D AY, J U LY 2 1 POLSON — Friday racing at Mission Valley Raceway will have Big Sky Lake Models, Legends, Thunder Roadsters and Bandoleros. Qualifying time trials are at 7 p.m. and racing starts at 8 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors, seniors, and/or veterans are $8. Kids 7 and under are free. Family passes are also available at a discounted rate. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. For more information go to: missionvalleyraceway@gmail. com or call: 406-210-5400. • POLSON — This 3-on-3 basketball tournament is played in the streets of downtown Polson, July 21-23, just a slam dunk away from beautiful Flathead Lake. Please join us for one of the most fun and popular athletic events in Montana. Financial support, provided mainly through team fees and corporate sponsors, has enabled 3-on3 to donate its net proceeds to local charities. Play hard, laugh a lot and lend a hand to this charitable event. For more information, go to: missionvalley3on3.com. • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy Kevin •

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J U LY F R I D AY, J U LY 2 1 (CONTINUED) Ray’s “Upbeat Contemporary” music at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. • ST. IGNATIUS — The 35th “Good Old Days” celebration will take place all day on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, July 21, 22, and 23 at the St. Ignatius Good Old Days Park. Friday family night will start with a barbecue dinner, followed by entertainment and fireworks. Saturday there will be a pancake breakfast at the community center, a parade, fun and games in the park, lots of special events and food. On Sunday there will be a pancake breakfast and a Fly-In at 8:30 a.m. at the airport. S AT U R D AY, J U LY 2 2 HOT SPRINGS — Listen to Out on Bail play rock ‘n roll music at the Symes from 8-10 p.m.

S U N D AY, J U LY 2 3 • RONAN — The Lake County Fair Shotgun Event is at Big Sky Sporting Clays at 10 a.m.

LAKE MARY RONAN — Kootenai Christian Intermediate Camp for students entering grades 7-9 will be held July 23-28. The camp offers swimming, boating, fishing, sports, plus Bible study, daily devotions and group worship times and will be held at Lake Mary Ronan. Register at: www. kootenaichristiancamp.org or call 406-370-1117.

M O N D AY, J U LY 2 4 RONAN — The Lake County Fair begins in Ronan. This year’s theme is “Blue Skies, Cow Pies, and Family Ties.” Livestock judging, open class exhibits, agricultural displays, and local live entertainment return, but expect some new attractions as well. The Minihorse Show is at 8:30 a.m.; the Horse Show is at 11:30 a.m. and Interview Judging will take place at noon.

T U E S D AY, J U LY 2 5 ARLEE — Another Jocko Valley Library Summer Reading Program “Build a Better World” event is on Tuesday, July 25,

from 9:30-11 a.m. Call 406726-3572 for more information. • RONAN — 4-H dog obedience and showmanship/ rally and agility will take place at the Lake County Fair from 8 a.m.-2 p.m.; large animal check-in is from 3-7 p.m.; 4-H family style-dinner is from 5-8 p.m.; non-perishable open class check-in is from 5-8 p.m.; 4-H and open class poultry/ rabbit check-in is from 6-8 p.m. and from 6-9 p.m. large animal weigh-in takes place. W E D N E S D AY, J U LY 2 6 RONAN — The Lake County Fair judges’ orientation begins at 8:30 a.m.; perishable open class check in is from 9 a.m.-noon; swine showmanship/judging is from 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; llama/ alpaca showmanship/judging begins at 10 a.m.; cat show is at 3:30 p.m.; open class judges’ orientation at 5 p.m.; 4-H family style dinner and entertainment from 5-8 p.m.; open class judging from 6-9 p.m.; market beef judging at 7 p.m. Concessions by 4-H

Clubs, commercial, educational and non-profit booths will take place Tuesday, July 25-Sunday, July 31. T H U R S D AY, J U LY 2 7 RONAN — The Lake County Fair judges’ orientation takes place at 8:30 a.m.; sheep showmanship at 9 a.m.; market sheep judging at 11 a.m. followed by market goat judging and goat showmanship; 2 p.m. dairy showmanship/ judging; 2:30 p.m. poultry showmanship/judging; 4 p.m. fashion revue; 5 p.m. small fry stock show; 5:30 p.m. buyer’s recognition dinner; 7 p.m. market livestock sale. • POLSON — The North Lake County Public Library’s Summer Reading Program’s “big event” on Thursday, July 27, at 10 a.m. is “Biomimics Inherit the Earth” with Kari Eneas (CSKT). Call 406-883-8225 for more information. •

F R I D AY, J U LY 2 8 RONAN — The Lake County S E E PA G E 6 6 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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F R I D AY, J U LY 2 8 (CONTINUED) Fair judge’s orientation begins at 8:30 a.m.; beef breeding is at 9 a.m.; rabbit showmanship and judging is at 11:30 a.m.; project costume contest is at 2 p.m.; 4-H open class talent show is from 5-7 p.m.; beef showmanship is at 7:30 p.m. and the 4-H Ambassadors’ Dance is from 9-11 p.m. • HOT SPRINGS — Celebrate at the Symes Hot Springs Blues Festival. Opening music begins from 8-10 p.m. This is a twoday fun festival. • RONAN — The Lake County Fair’s Mission Mountain Quilt Show takes place from 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m. on July 28 at K. William Harvey Elementary gymnasium. Deleen Winters will be the featured quilter. Raffle tickets for a bed quilt following the theme “Sharing the love of Quilting through Curves” and for a fat-quarter basket, will be available. Please come and vote for your favorite quilt. S AT U R D AY, J U LY 2 9 • POLSON — Saturday racing at Mission Valley Raceway will hold their Good Old Days Hobby Stock 100 event with Pepsi Cola Hobby Stocks, V8 Modifieds and Pro 4 Modifieds. Qualifying time trials are at 6 p.m. and racing starts at 7 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors, seniors, and/or veterans are $8. Kids 7 and under are free. Family passes are also available at a discounted rate. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. For more information go to: missionvalleyraceway@gmail. com or call: 406-210-5400. • POLSON — The MSU Scholarship Golf Scramble and Barbecue event is scheduled for Saturday, July 29. This event is a Fundraiser for the MSU Bobcats’ scholarship 66

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association. This will be a great event for all MSU alums and families. For registration and information, call 406-883-8230. • POLSON — The Sandpiper Art and Gift Gallery is sponsoring the third annual Festival of Art on Saturday, July 29, and Sunday, July 30, from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. on Sunday. This is an exciting two-day, juried, fine art show on the shores of Flathead Lake at Sacajawea Park. Featuring beautiful original fine art from some of the most talented artisans in Montana and beyond. For more information, visit: www.sandpiperartgallery. com information, or call 406883-5956. • RONAN — The Lake County Fair’s Mission Mountain Quilt Show takes place from 10 a.m.-3:43 p.m. on July 29 at K. William Harvey Elementary gymnasium. Deleen Winters will be the featured quilter. Raffle tickets for a bed quilt following the theme “Sharing the love of Quilting through Curves” and for a fat-quarter basket, will be available. Please come and vote for your favorite quilt. • RONAN — The Lake County Fair large animal round robin is at 10 a.m. and the small animal round robin is at 11:30 a.m. The Lake County Fair will hold an open ranch rodeo at 1 p.m. A ranch rodeo dinner and awards ceremony will take at 5 p.m. At 7 p.m. all exhibits may leave the grounds. In the ranch

rodeo arena there will be a dance with music performed by “Exit 53” from 7:30-10 p.m. • DAYTON — The Idle Spur is having a pig roast, live music provided by the James Miller Band and a car show on Saturday, July 29. Call 406849-5543 for more information. • HOT SPRINGS — The Symes Hot Springs Blues Festival continues with the Mike Bader Band, Mudslide Charley and more. Enjoy barbecue, beer, camping, and vendors. Call 406-741-2361 for more information. S U N D AY, J U LY 3 0 RONAN — All Lake County Fair exhibits may leave the grounds from 8 a.m.-1 p.m. From 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. 4-H stall and cage cleaning will be done. At 9 a.m. a rancher’s barrel race will take place with the entry office open. From noon to 4 p.m. the MBHA Barrel race will take place and ladies breakaway roping is at 4 p.m. • POLSON — Sandpiper Art Gallery, 306 Main Street, presents “Pause and Reflect,” a unique show for members only featuring current and former Sandpiper member artists past and present. The artist reception for this exhibit will be held at the Gallery from 5-7 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 4. •

M O N D AY, J U LY 3 1 LAKE MARY RONAN — Kootenai Christian First Chance Camp for students entering

grades 1-3 will be held July 31-Aug. 2. The camp offers swimming, boating, fishing, sports, plus Bible study, daily devotions and group worship times and will be held at Lake Mary Ronan. Register at www. kootenaichristiancamp.org or call Kim Beaudin at 406-4614803. • LAKE MARY RONAN — Kootenai Christian Junior Camp for students entering grades 4-6 will be held July 31-Aug. 4. The camp offers swimming, boating, fishing, sports, plus Bible study, daily devotions and group worship times and will be held at Lake Mary Ronan. Register at www. kootenaichristiancamp.org or call Jonathan Larsson at 406546-1117. • RONAN — 4-H stall cleaning will take place at the Lake County Fairgrounds from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. • RONAN — This is the last day to sign up for the 22nd annual Pioneer Days 3 on 3 Basketball Tournament. Call 406-261-1521 for more information. T U E S D AY, A U G . 1 ARLEE –– The last day of the Jocko Valley Library Summer Reading Program is on Tuesday, Aug. 1, with certificates, rewards, and lunch from 9:30-11 a.m. • RONAN — 4-H stall cleaning will take place at the Lake County Fairgrounds from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. •

W E D N E S D AY, A U G . 2 YELLOW BAY — The Flathead Lake Biological Station will hold an Open House on Wednesday, Aug. 2, from 1-5 p.m. The Flathead Lake Biological Station’s annual Open House provides an opportunity for the interested public to learn more about the ecology of Flathead Lake and its watershed, as well as FLBS and its research around the globe. The Open House allows FLBS scientists to showcase the breadth of their activities, as well as show examples of how ecological


AUGUST W E D N E S D AY, A U G . 2 (CONTINUED) research at FLBS benefits Flathead Lake and subsequently area visitors and residents. Activities this year will include: tours of Biological Station facilities; boat trips on our 30’ research vessel the Jessie B; exhibits on recent Flathead research, including Flathead Lake ecology; presentations by FLBS research scientists and a visit by Monte, the UM mascot. The event is free and open to all. Call for more information: 406-9823301 x 229. • POLSON — The Polson Chamber General Meeting and Luncheon is scheduled for Wednesday, Aug. 2, at the KwaTaqNuk Resort in Polson from noon-1 p.m. Speaker TBA. For more information, call the Chamber office at 406-883-5969. T H U R S D AY, A U G . 3 POLSON — North Lake County Library will hold Movie Day on Aug. 3 and go to the Showboat Cinema in Polson and watch the “Lego Movie.” For more information, contact the library at 406-883-8225. • CHARLO — The Ronan Chamber of Commerce will hold a general meeting on Thursday, Aug. 3, at noon at Allentown Bar and Restaurant. •

F R I D AY, A U G . 4 HOT SPRINGS — Ocelot Wizard brings acoustic rock to the Symes from 8-10 p.m.

RONAN –– Pioneer Days celebration begins in Ronan on Friday, Aug. 4, and will be held Friday, Saturday and Sunday Aug. 4-6. Ronan Pioneer Days is a community event with fun for the whole family. There will be plenty of good old-fashioned entertainment. There will be a fishing derby from 8 a.m.-noon and happy hour will take place with the Ronan Pioneer Days Company at 5 p.m. The Bulls and Broncs Rodeo is at 7:30 p.m. Scholarships will be given out at the rodeo and you must be present to win. A street dance is planned for 9 p.m. If you have questions or want more information, call at 406675-0177.

S AT U R D AY, A U G . 5 POLSON — The 15th Annual Water Daze 1-Mile Swim will take place on Saturday, Aug. 5. Swim from Salish Point, through the pristine waters of Flathead Lake, to Boettcher Park with the backdrop of the Mission Mountains. Registration will open from 11 a.m. to noon with a 1 p.m. start time. Swimmers will be provided transportation to KwaTaqNuk from Boettcher about 30 minutes prior to the start of the race. Local kayakers and emergency personnel will be along the racecourse for safety and support. Since the beginning, Water Daze has been an essential part of the Mission Valley Aquatic’s mission, outreach and fundraising campaign. There is beautiful scenery, clear water,

great food and friends — all in support of the Lake Monsters Swim Team and Mission Valley Aquatics. See you there. • POLSON — Saturday racing at Mission Valley Raceway will hold INEX Legends Lake County Clash event with Legends, Thunder Roadster and Bandoleros. Qualifying time trials are at 6 p.m. and racing starts at 7 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors, seniors, and/or veterans are $8. Kids 7 and under are free. Family passes are also available at a discounted rate. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. For more information go to: missionvalleyraceway@gmail. com or call: 406-210-5400. • RONAN — The 22nd annual Ronan Pioneer Days 3-on-3 tournament will be held Aug. 5 at the Ronan High School parking lot. For more information, visit: missionvalley3on3. com, call 406-261-1521 or go to: Facebook.com/ missionvalley3on3. The final day to signup for this tournament is July 31. • RONAN — The second day of Pioneer Days begins at 7 a.m. with a pancake breakfast at the Ronan VFW. The 36th annual Mission Mountain Classic Run, (5k and 10k), begins at 8 a.m. The Co-ed Softball Tournament is at 9 a.m. There will be a car show at 10 a.m. and a Kiddie Slicker Rodeo at noon. The open rodeo and

Ring of Fire begins at 7:30 p.m. with scholarships again being given (must be present to win). Another street dance is planned for 9 p.m. • HOT SPRINGS — John Kelley is back with the Blues at Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. • CHARLO — The Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana, located just south of Ronan, invites local artists to showcase their artwork on the first Saturday of each month, JuneOctober, in the gift shop at the museum. Horsehair hitching artists Shoni and Ron Maulding will exhibit their work from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Also, Nancy Vaughan and crew will have fry bread and Indian tacos to mark Paxson Day of Celebration. The entire month of August is dedicated to artist Edgar S. Paxson and this special day marks the 100th year anniversary of his arrival in Montana. Family members will be on hand to commemorate the day with stories about the famous artist. S U N D AY, A U G . 6 RONAN — Pioneer Days ends with a 9 a.m. volleyball tournament at the City Park; a parade with the theme “Candy Land” at 12:30 p.m. (registration is at 10 a.m. at Round Butte Mini Storage); an open rodeo and wild buffalo riding at 3 p.m. and a family karaoke night at the Valley Club at 6:30 p.m.

S E E PA G E 6 8

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T U E S D AY, A U G . 8 POLSON — Create, fun, whimsical paper maché animals with unique hide-a-way storage with wildlife biologist and member artist Sue Ball on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, Aug. 8, 9 and 10, from 1:30-3:30 p.m. at the Sandpiper Art and Gift Gallery. Call 406-883-5956 for more information.

T H U R S D AY, A U G . 1 0 POLSON — The North Lake County Library will hold the 32nd annual “Bug Race” at the VFW on Aug. 10. For more information, call the library at 406-883-8225. • POLSON — From Aug. 1027 the Port Polson Players production of Gregg Kreutz’s comedy-mystery “Death By Golf” wraps up Polson’s Summer Theatre season. •

When an escaped convict, an anxious bride, a scheming new husband, and a suspicious attorney all convene at Grandpa’s house, it doesn’t take long for Grandpa to realize he has to reschedule his golf game. This show pays tribute to the Players location on the Old Nine of the Polson Golf Course. Reservations can be made by calling the theatre box office at 406-883-9212 or visiting portpolsonplayers.com. F R I D AY, A U G . 1 1 POLSON — Friday racing at Mission Valley Raceway will hold their Pioneer Days Festival with Legends, Thunder Roadsters and Bandoleros. Qualifying time trials are at 7 p.m. and racing starts at 8 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors, seniors, and/or veterans are $8. Kids 7 and under are free. Family passes are also available at a discounted rate. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road.

For more information go to: missionvalleyraceway@gmail. com or call: 406-210-5400. • POLSON — Day one of Polson’s Summerfest is Friday, Aug. 11. • HOT SPRINGS — Jerry and David provide acoustic rock at Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. S AT U R D AY, A U G . 1 2 POLSON — Saturday, Aug. 12, Mission Valley Raceway will hold a Car and Bike Show, a drift exhibition, a burn out competition, and a Demo Derby Festival with Legends, Thunder Roadsters and Bandoleros. Qualifying time trials are at 7 p.m. and racing starts at 8 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors, seniors, and/or veterans are $8. Kids 7 and under are free. Family passes are also available at a discounted rate. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. For more information go to: missionvalleyraceway@gmail. com or call: 406-210-5400.

DAYTON — Mission Mountain Winery encourages all wine lovers to attend our free event on Saturday. Aug. 12 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.: Vertical Tasting of Mission Mountain Winery Cabernet Sauvignon. This is a part of the winery’s continuing program to educate the community about the aging and care of fine wine. The Winery is located on Highway 93 in Dayton on the west shore of beautiful Flathead Lake. For more information, call 406 849-5524, or go to: www. missionmountainwinery.com. • POLSON — Day two of Polson’s Summerfest, Saturday, Aug. 12, includes a car show. • POLSON — The 46th Annual Sandpiper Art Festival on the Lake County Courthouse lawn will be on Saturday, Aug. 12, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Artists and artisans from around the region sell their work in this 1-day show.  Enjoy a day of art, fine crafts, food and entertainment on the beautiful courthouse lawn. For more •

2017 Pioneer Days Friday

August 4th, 5th and 6th Saturday

8 am-noon Fishing Derby 5 pm Happy hour with Ronan Pioneer Days Company 7:30 pm Bulls & Broncs Rodeo 9 pm - Close Street Dances Sponsored by the: Valley Club, Second Chance Saloon and 325 Bar (ID Required)

50/50 Buttons $5 each Benefits the Ronan Pioneer Days Scholarship Fund contact Pioneer Days members to purchase! 68

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7 am 8 am 8 am

VFW Pancake Breakfast 3 on 3 Basketball 36th Annual Mission Mountain Classic Run 5k and 10K 9 am CO Ed Softball Tournament 10 am Car Show 12 pm Kiddie Slicker Rodeo 7:30 pm Open Rodeo and Ring of Fire 9 pm - Close Street Dances Sponsored by the: Valley Club, Second Chance Saloon and 325 Bar (ID Required)

Sunday 9 am

Volleyball Tournament at the City Park 10 am Big Parade Registration at Round Butte Mini Storage Big Parade theme “Candy Land” 12:30 pm Big Parade down Main Street 3 pm Open Rodeo and Wild Buffalo Riding 6:30 pm Family Karaoke Night at Valley Club

Visit or Like Ronan Pioneer Days on Facebook

DON’T FORGET! SCHOLARSHIPS GIVEN AWAY FRIDAY & SATURDAY DURING THE RODEOS (MUST BE PRESENT TO WIN)

Y’all come back next year!


SUMMERFEST

AUGUST S AT U R D AY, A U G . 1 2 (CONTINUED) information, visit: www. sandpiperartgallery.com or call 406-883-5956.  • HOT SPRINGS — Pamela Van Kirk brings her “Coffee House Folk” music to the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. • POLSON — The 11th annual Rotary Chili Cook-off will be held Saturday, Aug. 12, from noon-2 p.m. at Riverside Park. Make sure you purchase your raffle tickets, ($25 per ticket or 5 tickets for $100), to help raise funds for the Boys Scouts’ Summer Camp; the Mission Valley Aquatic Center’s bleachers, youth pool toys; and the Linderman Elementary summer program. Prizes this year include: $1000 cash, groceries and gas ($1000 total value), more than 100 bottles of wine, 2 annual golf passes, $1000 worth of local beef, a sight seeing trip and dinner for four. Raffle tickets are available from any Rotarian or the Rotary Booth at the Polson Cherry Festival on July 15. Anyone wishing to enter the Chili Cookoff Contest can find contest rules and an application form on the Polson Rotary website: https://portal.clubrunner. ca/1867. For more information

call 406-883-1842 or 406-2535452. • POLSON — The Aber Day Reunion Concert will take place at the Regatta Shoreline Amphitheater on the banks of the Flathead River in Polson from 3-9 p.m. Mission Mountain Wood Band, Sam Riddle, Andrea Harsell and Luna Roja will provide the music. This event is family friendly with food, beer and wine vendors on site; free parking; dry camping available, (no animals except service dogs); no coolers or glass containers; bring lawn chairs and blankets. Bus pickup at various locations to be announced. This is a non-profit event with proceeds distributed to area non-profits by Anderson Broadcasting Charitable Foundation. Tickets may be purchased at the UM Alumni Association at: www.grizalum. com. • POLSON — This is the final day, Saturday, Aug. 12, at 4 p.m., to turn in Family Summer Reading Program Reading Logs to the North Lake County Library in Polson. S U N D AY, A U G . 1 3 POLSON — Sunday, Aug. 13, is the third and final day of Polson’s Summerfest. A

special “brunch cruise” on the Shadow ship from the KwaTaqNuk Resort is planned. Call 406-883-3636, for more reservations. • CHARLO — Montana Shakespeare in the Parks will perform William Shakespeare’s “You Never Can Tell” Sunday, Aug. 13, at 6 p.m. at Palmer Park west of Charlo, during its upcoming summer tour of 61 communities throughout Montana, northern Wyoming, eastern Idaho, western North Dakota and eastern Washington. The performance is free and open to the public. Audiences are encouraged to arrive early with chairs, blankets and picnics. For more information on the plays and a complete tour schedule, visit the company’s website: www. shakespeareintheparks.org. T U E S D AY, A U G . 1 5 POLSON — Finish all 8 levels and 32 hours of reading and join the North Lake County Public Library in the library meeting room as the library hosts the “Happy Hippo Excursion” for all finishers. • DAYTON — First day of school for Dayton School is Tuesday, Aug. 15. •

T H U R S D AY, A U G . 1 7 PLAINS — Montana Shakespeare in the Parks will perform William Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” Thursday, Aug. 17, at 6 p.m. at the Sanders County Fairgrounds. Audiences are encouraged to arrive early with chairs, blankets and picnics. For more information on the plays and a complete tour schedule, visit the company’s website: www. shakespeareintheparks.org. • POLSON — The North Lake County Library will hold their prize drawing and “pinch of stardust” ice cream social the morning of Aug. 17 for the summer reading program. • POLSON — Support Polson Late Afternoon Social Hour (SPLASH) will be held on Thursday, Aug. 17, from 5-7 p.m. at Riverside Recreation/ OH Well Drill and Pump. •

F R I D AY, A U G . 1 8 POLSON — Mission Valley Raceway will hold their Pro 4 Modified 44 event with V8 Modifieds, Pepsi Cola Hobby Stocks, Pro4 Modifieds and Hornets. Qualifying time trials are at 7 p.m. Racing starts at 8 p.m. General admission is $10;

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S AT U R D AY, A U G . 2 6 POLSON — The Flathead River Indian Rodeo continues at the Polson Fair Grounds on Saturday, Aug. 26. For more information call 406890-3309 or email peter@ pistolcreekrodeo.com. • HOT SPRINGS — Bluegrass music by the Black Mountain Band is on tap at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m.

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F R I D AY, A U G . 1 8 (CONTINUED) juniors, seniors, and/or veterans are $8. Kids 7 and under are free. Family passes are also available at a discounted rate. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. For more information go to: missionvalleyraceway@gmail. com or call: 406-210-5400. • POLSON — The seventh annual Flathead Lake Blues Festival will be held Friday, Aug. 18. Music includes Andre Floyd and the Mood Iguana, the Mike Murray Band, Halladay Quist, Ticket Sauce, Off in the Woods, the Kenny James Miller Band, Big Daddy and the Blue Notes, Jameson and the Sordid Seeds and Mudslide Charley. On Saturday, Aug. 19, the music includes the Michelle Taylor Band, Estelle and the Atomic Jive, Polly O’Keary and the Rhythm Method and Andrea Harsell and Luna Roja. All of this happening on the shores of Flathead Lake at Sacajawea Park in Polson. For more information go to: www. flatheadlakebluesfestival.com. • HOT SPRINGS — Shiloh Rising provides acoustic folk, blues, rock ‘n roll and their original music at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. S AT U R D AY, A U G . 1 9 POLSON — The Flathead Lake Blues Festival continues on Saturday, Aug. 19, and the music includes the Michelle Taylor Band, Estelle and the Atomic Jive, Polly O’Keary and the Rhythm Method and Andrea Harsell and Luna Roja. All of this happening on the shores of Flathead Lake at Sacajawea Park in Polson. For more information go to: www. flatheadlakebluesfestival.com • POLSON — Vintage and handmade items will be on sale at the Small Town Girl Market at the Polson Fairgrounds from 9 •

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a.m.-4 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 19. For more information, call 406-274-7979. • POLSON – The sixth annual Polson Triathlon will be held on Saturday, Aug. 19, at Riverside Park starting at 8:40 a.m. The Polson Triathlon is a locally run, locally inspired Olympic Distance Triathlon. For more information, visit: www. polsontriathlon.com  or contact Matt Seeley at 406-871-0216 or email: seeleyspeedwagon@ gmail.com.  • PABLO –– The annual Social Powwow at the People’s Center on Highway 93 in Pablo is planned for Aug. 19 and is open to all artists and vendors. This is a social gathering of native dancers, drums, stick games and singers celebrating their different native dance styles. Vendors of native arts and crafts and food will have their goods available. (There will be no contest dancing.) For times and more information call 406-675-0160. W E D N E S D AY, A U G . 2 3 CHARLO — The first day of school for Charlo Schools is Wednesday, Aug. 23. • ARLEE — The first day of school for Arlee Schools is Wednesday, Aug. 23. •

F R I D AY, A U G . 2 5 POLSON — Friday racing at Mission Valley Raceway will hold their INEX Thunder Roadster 40 event with Big Sky Late Models, Legends, Thunder Roadsters and Bandoleros.

Qualifying time trials are at 7 p.m. and racing starts at 8 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors, seniors, and/or veterans are $8. Kids 7 and under are free. Family passes are also available at a discounted rate. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. For more information go to: missionvalleyraceway@gmail. com or call: 406-210-5400. • GLACIER PARK — There will be a free entrance day at Glacier National Park along with all other National Parks on Friday, Aug. 25, in commemoration of National Park Service Birthday. • POLSON — The Flathead River Indian Rodeo will be held at the Polson Fair Grounds on Friday and Saturday, Aug. 25 and 26, starting at 7 p.m. Tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for students and senior citizens, children 6 and under are free. Tickets may be purchased at the gate. For more information, call 406-890-3309 or email peter@pistolcreekrodeo. com. The Indian National Finals Tour Rodeo is well attended and brings over 600 Native American contestants and their families from all over the US and Canada to Polson to compete in all the rodeo rough stock and timed events. There will be live music after the rodeo each night. Food and beverage concessions will be available. Vendors spaces are available. • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy Wayo

W E D N E S D AY, A U G . 3 0 RONAN — The first day of school for Ronan Schools is Wednesday, Aug. 30. • ST. IGNATIUS — The first day of school for St. Ignatius Schools is Wednesday, Aug. 30. • POLSON — The first day of school for Polson Schools is Wednesday, Aug. 30. •

T H U R S D AY, A U G . 3 1 PLAINS — The 2017 Sanders County Fair buildings open. PRCA Bull riding takes place at 8 p.m. For information regarding 4-H competitions contact: County Extension Office at 406-827-6934.) No dogs are allowed in the fairway.

F R I D AY, S E P T. 1 POLSON — Friday racing at Mission Valley Raceway will hold their Fan Appreciation Day event and have free entry. There will be V8 Modifieds, Pepsi Cola Hobby Stocks, Pro4 Modifieds and Hornets. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. Qualifying time trials are at 7 p.m. and racing starts at 8 p.m. Come have some fun. Bring the family. For more information go to: missionvalleyraceway@gmail. com or call: 406-210-5400. • HOT SPRINGS — The 7th annual Inland Northwest Permaculture Convergence will be held Sept. 1-3 in Hot Springs. Bring the family and tour local permaculture gardens and farms, attend workshops, learn from leaders on the undulating edge of design and •


SEPTEMBER F R I D AY, S E P T. 1 (CONTINUED) application of appropriate technologies, exchange ideas, children’s and teen programs provided by Ravenwood. Permaculture is the development of agricultural ecosystems intended to be sustainable and selfsufficient and can be applied to both urban and rural living. For more information, visit: inlandnorthwestpermaculturecom. • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy bluegrass at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. • PLAINS — Powder River Rodeo L.L.C.– at 8 p.m. Carnival, amusement, and midway concessions will also be available. For information regarding 4-H competitions contact: County Extension Office at 406-827-6934.) No dogs are allowed in the fairway. •

S AT U R D AY, S E P T. 2 CHARLO — The Ninepipes

Museum of early Montana, located just south of Ronan, invites locate artists to showcase their artwork on the first Saturday of each month, June-October, in the gift shop at the museum. Photographer Cordell Hardy will exhibit his work from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. • PLAINS — As the Sanders County Fair continues, the Powder River Rodeo L.L.C. will take place at 8 p.m. Carnival, amusement, and midway concessions will also be available. For information regarding 4-H competitions contact: County Extension Office at 406-827-6934. No dogs are allowed in the fairway. • RONAN — A Flea Market will be held at the Garden of the Rockies Museum, located at 400 Round Butte Road, the first Saturday of each month from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. For more information, call 406-676-3261. •

S U N D AY, S E P T. 3 HOT SPRINGS — JIMnl

Not just oil, Pennzoil®.

provides acoustic, folk, and rock music at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. • PLAINS — The Sanders County Fair continues at
9 a.m. The Demolition Derby takes place in the main arena at approximately 7 p.m. Carnival, amusement, and midway concessions will also be available. For information regarding 4-H competitions contact: County Extension Office at 406-827-6934. No dogs are allowed in the fairway.

(jewelry), and Sue Ball (linoprints). The exhibit will run from Sept. 4 until Oct. 13. Artists reception for this exhibit is on Sept. 8 from 5-7 p.m. at the Gallery. • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy a Labor Day barbecue and beer with Andrea Harsell providing music at the Symes Hotel from 4-6 p.m. • HOT SPRINGS — Peace Tribe provides original music at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m.

M O N D AY, S E P T. 4 L A B O R D AY • POLSON — Sandpiper Art Gallery, 306 Main Street, Polson, presents “Making It Up As I Go.” This exhibit will definitely capture your imagination. It features artists Nancy Miler (painter), Donna Winn (3D mixed media), Nancy Zadra (impressionist/abstract painter), Gerald Garcelone (woodwork), Susan Evans (3D mixed media), Carol Rae

W E D N E S D AY, S E P T. 6 POLSON — Polson Chamber general meeting and luncheon is scheduled for Wednesday, Sept. 6, at the Red Lion Hotel from noon-1 p.m. Our speaker is Jackie Cripe with the Polson Business Community. For more information, call the Chamber office at 406-883-5969. T H U R S D AY, S E P T. 7 CHARLO — The Ronan Chamber of Commerce will

S E E PA G E 7 2

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Oil change specialists. Marcus Simonich, O.D.

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676-0400

“Your Mission Valley Tire Headquarters”

417 Main St. SW, Ronan • ronaneyeclinic.com Check us out on Facebook - Ronan Eye Clinic - Mission Valley Eye Center M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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T H U R S D AY, S E P T. 7 (CONTINUE) hold a general meeting on Thursday, Sept. 7, at noon at Allentown Bar and Restaurant. F R I D AY, S E P T. 8 POLSON — Friday racing at Mission Valley Raceway will hold their 9/11 Salute to our Service Men and Women with Big Sky Late Models, Legends, Thunder Roasters and INEX Bandolero 35. Qualifying time trials are at 7 p.m. and racing starts at 8 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors, seniors, and/or veterans are $8. Kids 7 and under are free. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. call: 406-210-5400. • HOT SPRINGS —Enjoy blues music provided by John Kelley at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. •

S AT U R D AY, S E P T. 9 LAKESIDE — The sixth annual Montana Dragon Boat Festival will be held on Sept. 9-10, in Lakeside. The annual Montana Dragon Boat Festival brings family fun, spirited competition and colorful pageantry to Volunteer Park on Flathead Lake in Lakeside. For more information about registration go to: MontanaDragonBoat. com. • DAYTON —Mission Mountain Winery encourages you to attend our free event on Saturday, Sept. 9, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.: Dayton Day at the Winery. We are joining the community of Dayton in celebrating its 105th anniversary. You are invited to enjoy the Dayton Daze festivities of bazaars, parades, sailboat rides, barbecues and wine tasting. Mission Mountain Winery is located on Highway 93 in Dayton on the west shore of beautiful Flathead Lake. For more information, call 406 8495524.com. •

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ST. IGNATIUS — The Fort Connah Restoration Society will host their annual fall Open House Rendezvous, which depicts life during the fur trading era of Montana, on Saturday-Wednesday, Sept. 9-13, with the main events taking place on Saturday, Sept. 9, from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and Sunday, Sept. 10, from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. This five-day event is a great opportunity to see the 1846 historic Hudson’s Bay Fort Connah Trading Post come to life. This event is free and includes demonstrations of time-era activities, a Moose Creek chuck-wagon-style barbecue, a baked goods sale, beer and wine, crafts and kids games. There will be historical talks after the opening ceremony at noon on Saturday. Fort Connah is located 6 miles north of St. Ignatius at mile marker 39 on Highway 93. For general information and trader/ demonstrator set-ups call 406745-4336 or email: 4winds@ blackfoot.net. • DAYTON — The Chief Cliff Volunteer Fire Department is traveling back to the fifties this September for the 26th annual Dayton Daze celebration. “Fired Up for the Fifties” is the theme of this year’s fundraiser and everyone is encouraged to dress up and join the fun. Whether you choose to channel Holly Golightly, Kookie, Rizzo or the Fonz, you can be one “cooool cat” recapturing the fun and innocence of the 1950s. Because you can’t revisit the ‘50s without a few cherry hotrods, we’re bringing back the car show, along with our ever-popular parade (line-up at 1 p.m., parade at 2 p.m.- prizes for best floats and costumes), live music by Larry Myer, flea market, kids’ games, firefighter competitions, free blood pressure screenings, food and a shuttle to the Mission Mountain Winery, the Dayton Harbor (for free sailboat rides) and to historic sites in Proctor. To cap off the event, we’ll be raffling off a gorgeous, •

lever-action Henry Big Boy .44 mag (or $500 cash), and gift cards for gas and groceries and more. (Tickets available from all CCVFD members and at the Farmers’ Market in Polson.) Drawings will be held throughout the day, with the BIG prize drawings at 5 p.m. The fun starts at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 9, at the Dayton Park. Come out and support the Chief Cliff Volunteer Fire Department and QRU at this community-wide event and see what all the excitement is about. For more information, call 406-849-5917. • DAYTON — The Idle Spur is having a pig roast and live music provided by the band Out on Bail in celebration of Dayton Daze. For more information, call 406-849-5543. • POLSON — Local artists join artists around the world for the 16th Annual Great Worldwide Paint-out, sponsored by the International Plein Air Painters Group, on Saturday, Sept. 9, at Polson’s Riverside Park. Contact Margery Christensen for details on the local event and visit ipap.homestead.com, for international events. • HOT SPRINGS — Pamela Van Kirk provides coffee house folk music from 8-10 p.m. at the Symes Hotel. M O N D AY, S E P T. 1 1 • PABLO — The People’s Center holds Native American Awareness Week activities during the second week of September. Events are geared towards educating school children about Salish, Pend’Oreille and Kootenai history, culture and traditions. The week’s activities and events are free and open to the community to participate in. See demonstrations of slicing and drying wild game, fry bread making, hide tanning, drumming and singing and native dancing. There will be crafts for kids, native games and tribal language demonstrations. For more information and confirmed dates, call 406-675-0160.

F R I D AY, S E P T. 1 5 POLSON — Friday racing at Mission Valley Raceway will hold their Championship Night with V8 Modifieds, Pepsi Cola Hobby Stocks, Pro 4 Modifieds, and Hornets. Qualifying time trials are at 7 p.m. and racing starts at 8 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors, seniors, and/or veterans are $8. Kids 7 and under are free. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. For more information go to: missionvalleyraceway@gmail. com or call: 406-210-5400. • HOT SPRINGS — Mark Chase brings Americana music to the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. •

S AT U R D AY, S E P T. 1 6 POLSON — Lake County High School Rodeo will be held at Polson Fairgrounds Saturday, Sept. 16, starting at 9:30 a.m. Two rodeos will be run that day. Watch as the girls and boys participate in a wide range of rodeo activities. There will be a concession stand. For more information, call 406-544-8836. • HOT SPRINGS — Tap your toes to the sounds of acoustic, blues, Americana and folk music provided by Shenanigans at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. •

S U N D AY, S E P T. 1 7 ARLEE — Save the date for the 13th annual Festival of Peace and the sixth Annual Walk-A-Mile for Peace at the Garden on Sunday, Sept. 17, which begins at 10 a.m. The all-day free event invites people to come together to sing, dance and pray for peace and harmony until 7 p.m. There will guest speakers, live music, meditation as well as goods and craft vendors. This is a free event. Call 406-726-0555 or go to: www.ewambuddhagarden. org/, for more information.

T H U R S D AY, S E P T. 2 1 POLSON — Support Polson Late Afternoon Social Hour on Thursday, Sept. 21, from 5-7 p.m. Your host will be Whitefish Credit Union, 110 Third Ave E. 


SEPTEMBER F R I D AY, S E P T. 2 2 HOT SPRINGS — Wayo and Keiko bring their original music back to the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m.

S AT U R D AY, S E P T. 2 3 POLSON — Saturday racing at Mission Valley Raceway will hold Crazy Backwoods Camper Race, Championship Night event with Legends, Thunder Roadsters and Bandoleros. Qualifying time trials are at 6 p.m. and racing starts at 7 p.m. call: 406-210-5400. • HOT SPRINGS — Kathy Colton and the Reluctants provide rock, folk, and percussion music at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. •

F R I D AY, S E P T. 2 9 HOT SPRINGS — Folk blues and Americana music by Jerry Fletcher are on tap at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m.

S AT U R D AY, S E P T. 3 0 HOT SPRINGS — Americana music by Andrea Harsell can be enjoyed from 8-10 p.m. at the Symes Hotel. • GLACIER PARK — There will be a free entrance day at Glacier National Park, on Saturday, Sept. 30, in honor of National Public Lands Day. •

R E G U L A R LY SCHEDULED EVENTS M O N D AY S POLSON — Ken Camel will provide boxing training to kids seven and older every Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 5 p.m. at the Co-op, 401 Main Street. Adult boxing will take place at 6 p.m. Call 406-2851149 for more information. • ARLEE — The Jocko Valley Library is open on Mondays from 1-5 p.m. • POLSON — North Lake County Public Library will host Mother Goose Time, a half-hour program, at 10 a.m., for infants and toddlers. The North Lake County Public Library is located at 2 First Ave., E. For more information, call 406- 8838225. •

POLSON — Makerspace Mondays is for preschool-aged children through teenagers, from 3:30-5:30 p.m. on Mondays at North Lake County Library. • POLSON — NAMI Mission Valley/LAC meets the first Monday of each month at 7 p.m. at North Lake County Library. The group invites all as they conduct business meetings and set up “Family Support” meeting dates and times. For more information, call 406-883-1086. • POLSON — The Lions Club will meet in the Lake Bar on the first and third Monday at 6:30 p.m. Come at 6 p.m.; they have a great bar menu. For more information, call Jan Phillips at 406-370-4714. •

T U E S D AY S POLSON — The Co-op HUB, 401 Main Street, will provide a Robotics class for children

5 years and up every Tuesday and Thursday at 4 p.m. Call 406-285-1149 for more information. • POLSON — Missoula Self Help Law Center will be at the North Lake County Public Library, 2 First Ave. E, from 11 a.m.-4:30 p.m. They will provide services on the first and third Tuesdays of each month. Call to verify hours. For more information please call 406-258-3428. • ARLEE — The Jocko Valley Library is open Tuesdays from 9-11 a.m. • ST. IGNATIUS — The St. Ignatius Neighborhood Watch chapter meets on the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the St. Ignatius Senior Citizens’ Center on north Main Street. • POLSON — The Northwest Montana Beekeepers group meets on the fourth Tuesday of each month at 6:45 p.m.

at the HUB, 401 Main Street. There will be a potluck followed by a meet and greet. Come with your ideas and questions. Current and prospective beekeepers are welcome. Please RSVP to northwestmtbeekeepers@gmail. com. • ARLEE — Readers of all ages are welcome this summer as The Jocko Valley Public Library presents “Build a Better World,” during their 2017 Summer Reading Program. Activities may include costume creation, group games, physical challenges, art projects, science and engineering experiments, and more. The Summer Reading Program is open to young people, preschool through young adults, with programs, prize drawings, story times, a reading club, and more. Activities will take place on Tuesdays from 9:30-11 a.m. starting on June 6, at the Library, located in the basement of the Arlee Brown Building. The Summer Reading Program finale will be on Aug. 1, immediately following regular activities. Registration takes place on the first day of activities. For more information, call 406726-3572 or visit our website at: http://www.arleemontana. org/jocko-valley-library. All programs are free. • POLSON — The Polson Ukulele Club will be meeting at the Polson Library weekly every Tuesday from 6:30-7:30 p.m. starting June 13. Players of all levels are welcome to join the Ukulele community in Lake City. For details call 406-471-6051. W E D N E S D AY S POLSON — Ken Camel will provide boxing training to girls and boys seven years and older every Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 5 p.m. at the Co-op HUB, 401 Main Street. Adult boxing training for men and women will take place at 6 p.m. Call 406-285-1149 for more information.

S E E PA G E 7 4 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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• POLSON

— The Elks Club, 512 Main Street, holds a community dance in their ballroom on the first and third Wednesday of each month from 7-10 p.m. • PABLO — The People’s Center Dance Performance Circle takes place on Wednesdays from 5:307:30 p.m. and is sponsored by SAMHSA. An informal meal will be provided. Families are invited. Call for more information and to register at 406-675-0160. • POLSON — The Marine Corps League Hellroaring Detachment #1041meets every second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the VFW on Main Street. For more information, call 406890-0964. • PABLO — The SKC D’Arcy McNickle Library’s Storytime includes stories, crafts and activities for children of all ages. Storytime takes place on Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m. For more information, go online at RonanLibrary.org or call 406676-3682. • HOT SPRINGS — Are you affected by someone else’s drinking? AlAnon can help. Area meetings are anonymous, nonsmoking, 12- step recovery for family and friends of alcoholics. Come join us. There are no membership dues. Meetings are held Wednesdays at 9 a.m. at Lutheran Church on Wall Street in Hot Springs. • POLSON –– AlAnon meetings take place on Wednesdays at noon in Polson at the Alano Club on Third Ave. W. • ST. IGNATIUS — TOPS (taking off pounds sensibly) meets every Wednesday at 9 a.m. at the United Methodist Church on the top of Post Creek Hill. For more information, call 406-745-4653. THURSDAYS — The Co-op HUB, 401 Main Street, will provide a Robotics class for children 5 years and up every Tuesday and Thursday afternoon at 4 p.m.

• POLSON

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Call 406-285-1149 for more information. • POLSON — A free “Night at the Museum” event takes place at the Miracle of America Museum, 36094 Memory Lane, on the fourth Thursday evening of each month. Programs start at 6:30 p.m. Treats and donations are happily accepted. Call 406-8836804 if you have questions. • POLSON — North Lake County Library invites you to the library’s day for children’s “Big Events” at 1 p.m. For more information, call 406-883-8225. • RONAN — Ronan Library District’s Kids’ Club is on Thursdays, from 10:30-11:30 and includes stories, tales, drama, crafts, folk songs and lots of fun. Call the library at 406676-3682 for more information. The library is located at 203 Main Street SW. • RONAN — Ronan Flower Mill, 106 Main Street, is the location for the weekly Ronan Farmers Market held on Thursdays from 3-7 p.m. through Sept. 12. • ST. IGNATIUS — Area AlAnon meetings are anonymous, nonsmoking, 12-step recovery meetings for family and friends of alcoholics. There are no dues. Meetings take place on Thursdays at 5:30 p.m. at the CMA Church on Third Ave. in St. Ignatius. FRIDAYS — Ken Camel will provide boxing training to kids seven years and older every Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 5 p.m. at the Co-op HUB, 401 Main Street. Adult boxing training will take place at 6 p.m. Call 406285-1149 for more information. • POLSON — Mission Valley Raceway, 1113 N Reservoir Road, has racing on Friday evenings. Gates open at 5 p.m., time trails are at 7 p.m., and racing starts at 8 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors and seniors, and/or veterans are $8. Kids 7 and under are free. Family passes are also available at a discounted rate. • ARLEE — The Jocko Valley Library is open Fridays from • POLSON

noon-4 p.m. • PABLO — The Friday Arts and Crafts Circle takes place at the People’s Center in Pablo every Friday, all year long, from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Local bead workers work on their projects and help new beaders learn. There is also sewing and outfit construction. Everyone is welcome. • POLSON — North Lake County Library will have Friday Flicks and Game Days for children and teens on alternating weeks from 3:45-5:15 p.m. The library is located at 2 First Ave. E. For more information, call 406-8838225. • POLSON — Polson’s Farmers Market is held every Friday from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. through the summer season. The market is held in downtown on Third Ave. W, between Main Street and First Street W. For more information please call 406-675-0177. or go to Facebook for more updates.   • ARLEE ­–– The Farmers Market will open Wednesday, May 31. The market will be every Wednesday, 4-7 p.m., through the end of September. and is located at the Huckleberry Patch yard, 72532 N. Couture Loop. For more information, go to: www.facebook.com/groups/ FarmersMarketArlee/. • POLSON –– AlAnon meetings are 12- step recovery for family and friends of alcoholics. There are no dues. Meetings are held Fridays at 8 p.m. at the Presbyterian Church on Fourth Ave. E in Polson. SATURDAYS — Mission Valley Raceway, 1113 N Reservoir Road, has racing on Saturday evenings. Gates open at 5 p.m., time trails are at 6 p.m., and racing starts at 7 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors, seniors, and/or veterans are $8. Kids 7 and under are free. • RONAN — The Ronan VFW, 35981 Round Butte Road, will serve breakfast from 7 a.m.noon the first Saturday of every month. Prices are $7 for adults and $5 for children 12 and under. Everyone is welcome. . • POLSON

• POLSON

— The first Saturday of each month from 6-9 p.m., a Birthday Bash/Open Mic Night/ Potluck will take place at the Co-op HUB, 401 Main Street. Anyone who enjoys playing or listening to live music is welcome. Bring food to the potluck. Bring friends/family. • POLSON — The Montana Co-op will hold a Farmers/Flea Market every Saturday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m., at 401 Main Street. Buy, sell, trade, or give things away. Rent a table for $10. Call 406-290-2070 for more information. Musicians are welcome. • RONAN —Do you have yard sale items, are you a compulsive craft maker, do you have a home business that you would like to share with the public? The Garden of the Rockies Museum will hold a Flea Market, Craft Fair, Yard Sale at their Round Butte Gym across from the VFW on the first Saturday of June, July and August from 9 a.m.- 1 p.m. Spaces will be available inside and out for $10, which will be used for the museum. You get to keep whatever you make. Call 406-676-3261 to reserve your spot. SUNDAYS — Weekly Sunday “Barefoot Church” services are from 1-2 p.m. at the Montana Co-op. Come as you are. Bask in the Spirit, no judgment, just love and worship, forgiveness and healing. • POLSON — A “Celebrate Recovery Group” meets every Sunday evening for any hurt, habit, or hang-up, from 5-8 p.m. at the Polson Foursquare Church. All are welcome to attend. For more information, call 406-883-9347 or go to: www. polsonfoursquare. • ST. IGNATIUS — AA Women’s Wing and a Prayer Group meets on Sundays at 4 p.m. at the Methodist Church on Post Creek Hill. Call 1-888-607-2000 or go to www.aa-montana.org, for more information. • POLSON

VJ


POLSON Located at the base of Flathead Lake, 70 miles north of Missoula and 51 miles south of Kalispell, Polson is Lake County’s seat and has a total population of 4,488.*

School District #23 Schools: Cherry Valley Elementary School (grades K-1) Linderman Elementary School (grades 2-4) Polson Middle School (grades 5-8) Polson High School (grades 9-12) Valley View School (grades K-6) Dayton Elementary School (grades K-6) Private School: Mission Valley Christian Academy (grades K-12) Hospital: Providence St. Joseph Hospital Library: North Lake County Public Library

Polson City Commission meetings are the first and third Mondays of the month at 7 p.m. at City Hall. For more information about Polson, visit the Polson Chamber of Commerce: www.polsonchamber.com. * based on 2010 census

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410 Main St. SW

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BLOCKBUSTERS ALL SUMMER M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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POLSON

BUSINESS DIRECTORY Head Over Heels 101 Whitewater Place, Suite B Polson, MT 59860 (406) 872-2000

Appliance Care 805 Main Street Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-3904

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Eagle Bank 80 Heritage Lane Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-2940 www.eaglebankmt.com

Fiesta En Jalisco 110 Main Street, #10 Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-5854 www.fiestaenjalisco.net

Glacier Lake Sand & Gravel 37246 Caffrey Road Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-3773

www.glacierlakesandandgravel.com

Hair Etc. 49664 US Hwy. 93 Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-0707 Check us out on Facebook

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Nifty Thrifty 417 Main Street Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-3443

SUMMER

Kara’s Signworks 802 1st St. E, Suite C, (Space with garage door) Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-5614 cell (406) 212-3910

Lake County Abstract & Title 314 1st St. E, #101, Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-6226 lctitles.com

Mission Fitness 805 7th St. E, B Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-1001 missionfitnessmt.com

Napa Auto Parts 49560 US Highway 93 Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-5251

Perfectly Imperfect 305 Main St. Polson, MT 59860 (406) 274-7979 Check us out on Facebook!

Polson Chamber of Commerce 418 Main Street Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-5969 www.polsonchamber.com

Polson Farmers Market Third Ave West Downtown Polson (406) 675-0177 or (406) 239-8445 Check us out on Facebook!

Polson Health 106 Ridgewater Drive Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-3200 www.krh.org/polsonhealth

Providence St. Joseph Assisted Living 11 Seventeenth Avenue East Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-1011 Montana.Providence.org/seniorcare/St-joseph-assisted-living/

Richwine’s Burgerville 50567 Highway 93 Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-2620 www.richwinesburgerville.com

Satori Massage 6 Third Avenue West Polson, MT 59860 (406) 253-4968 www.satorimassage.net

Subway 50033 Highway 93 Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-9202

Super 1 Foods 50331 Highway 93 Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-2498 www.super1foods.com


RONAN Located 56 miles north of Missoula and 14 miles south of Polson along Hwy. 93, Ronan is a community based largely on agriculture with a population of 1,871.* Ronan City Council meetings are held the first and third Mondays of the month at 6 p.m. at City Hall. For more information about Ronan, visit the Ronan Chamber of Commerce: www.ronanchamber.com * based on 2010 census School District #30 Schools: Pablo Elementary School (grades K-4) K. William Harvey Elementary School (grades K-6) Ronan Middle School (grades 6-8) Ronan High School (grades 9-12) Private School: Glacier View Christian School (grades K-9) Hospital: St. Luke Community Hospital Library: Ronan City Library

BUSINESS DIRECTORY Bev’s Bloomers 34951 Creekside Ln. Ronan, MT 59864 (406) 676-2735 bevsbloomers.com

Les Schwab Tire Center 63360 Highway 93 Ronan, MT 59864 (406) 676-7800

St. Luke Healthcare 107 6 Ave. SW, Ronan, MT 59864 (406) 676-3600 stlukehealthcare.org

Harvest Foods 63802 Highway 93 S. Ronan, MT 59864 (406) 676-3301 www.harvestfoods.com

Napa Auto Parts 10 Main Street SW Ronan, MT 59864 (406) 676-5700

Twice But Nice 229 Main Street SW Ronan, MT 59864 (406) 676-2727

Ronan Area Chamber of Commerce Hwy. 93 next to Glacier Bank Ronan, MT 59864 (406) 676-8300 www.ronanchamber.com

Valley Bank 63659 Highway 93 S. Ronan, MT 59864 (406) 676-2000 www.valleybankronan.com

Lake County Community Development Corp. 407 Main St. SW Ronan, MT 59864 406-676-5901 www.lakecountycdc.org

GREAT SELECTION FRIENDLY • HELPFUL LOCAL STAFF

Nationaay known. Locaay Owned.

RONAN (406) 676-5700 10 MAIN ST. SW

POLSON (406) 883-5251 49560 US HWY. 93

Valley Club Bar & Café 407 3rd Ave. NW Ronan, MT 59864 (406) 676-9441 Check us out on Facebook

Western Builing Center 36203 Round Butte Road West Ronan, MT 59864 (406) 676-5726

Westland Seed 36272 Round Butte Road West Ronan, MT 59864 (406) 676-4100 westlandseed.com

Wright Real Estate P.O. Box 725 63228 Highway 93 S Ronan, MT 59864 (406) 676-8610 www.western montanaland.com

Valley Journal 331 Main Street Ronan, MT 59864 (406) 676-8989 www.valleyjournal.net

Shopping to

sing about!

Clothing, jewelry, toys, Montana-made gift items & more

20% off (see store for details)

The Gift Gallery k Family Health Pharmacy

63307 Hwy. 93 S. Ronan • 676-2111 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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PA B L O Located 62 miles north of Missoula and 60 miles south of Kalispell off of Hwy. 93, Pablo serves as headquarters for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Indian Reservation. Pablo is also home to Salish Kootenai College. Population: 2,254.* Public Schools: Pablo Elementary School (part of School District #30, grades K-4) Private Schools: Two Eagle River School (grades 7-12) Salish Kootenai College (Tribal College) Learn more about the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes by visiting their website at: www. cskt.org. Learn more about Salish Kootenai College by visiting their website at: www.skc.edu

BUSINESS DIRECTORY CSKT Transit 59969 US Hwy. 93 Pablo, MT 59855 (406) 275-2792

Quick Silver Express 59969 US Hwy. 93 Pablo, MT 59855 (406) 675-5000

CHARLO Located 55 miles north of Missoula and 5 miles west of Hwy. 93 on MT Hwy. 212. Charlo is a small town rooted in farming and ranching with a population of 379*. School District #7 Schools: Charlo Schools (grades K - 12)

BUSINESS DIRECTORY Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana 69316 Highway 93 Charlo, MT 59824 (406) 644-3435 ninepipesmuseum.org

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M O N TA N A

SUMMER

* based on 2010 census


S T. I G N AT I U S Located 43 miles north of Missoula on Hwy. 93, St. Ignatius is Lake County’s oldest town, founded in 1854 by Jesuit missionaries, and has a population of 842.* The Mission Church, more than 100 years old, is adorned with beautiful frescoes and murals and is open daily to visitors.

School District #28 Schools: St. Ignatius Elementary School (grades K - 5) St. Ignatius Middle School (grades 6 - 8) Mission High School (grades 9 - 12) St. Ignatius Twon Council meetings are held the first Tuesday of every month at 7 p.m. at City Hall. For more information about St. Ignatius visit www.stignatiusmt.com.

BUSINESS DIRECTORY Mission General Store 61307 Watson Road St. Ignatius, MT 59865 Turn East on Airport Rd to Watson Rd (follow signs) (406) 745-7200 mission-general-store.com

Mission Valley Properties 101 Mountain View Drive St. Ignatius, MT 59865 (406) 745-4940 www.missionvalleyproperties.com

Mountain View Cenex 240 Mountain View Drive Just off Highway 93 St. Ignatius, MT 59865 (406) 745-3634

Stuart’s Napa 153 N. Main Street St. Ignatius, MT 59865 (406) 745-2190

ARLEE Located 26 miles north of Missoula on Hwy. 93, Arlee is a developing community grounded in the arts with a population 636.* Arlee is also home to the annual Arlee Celebration and Powwow.

School District #8J Schools: Arlee Elementary School (grades K - 6) Arlee Junior High (grades 7 - 8) Arlee High School (grades 9 - 12) Private Schools: Nkwusm School (grades pre-school - 8) Library: Jocko Valley Library

The Arlee Community Development Corporation meets the second Wednesday of each month, September through June, at 4:30 p.m. at Valley Bank. For more information about Arlee visit www.arleemontana.org. * based on 2010 census

M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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406-676-9441

eek w a s y a d 7 n pe y

a d l l a t as f k a e r B

O

TWO Happy Hou

rs!

Karaoke Thursday and Friday

Open mic night the first Saturday of every month

Club night the last Saturday of every month PIONEER DAYS

we will have a patio dance with music outside!

us Follow k! boo on Face

407 3rd Ave NW • Ronan, Montana

Montana Summer 2017  
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