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FREE

Montana Summer

2019


AIS PROGRAM

KEEP FLATHEAD LAKE

PREVENTION IS THE ONLY

SOLUTION.

[

FREE OF INVASIVE MUSSELS our mission

is to develop and implement programs and strategies designed to prevent the introduction of aquatic invasive species into waters of the Flathead Reservation, and to help contain, control and where possible, eradicate aquatic invasive species already present on the Reservation.

IT’S UP TO YOU!

CLEAN. DRAIN. DRY.

Tiny, razor-sharp shells would coat and clog every

[

hard surface of the lake - rocks, boats, docks & dams. Invasive Mussels Would Ravage the Lake Environment

Zebra and quagga mussels devastate native species by stripping the food web of plankton, and that has a cascading effect throughout the ecosystem. Lack of food causes populations of native trout, whitefish and native mussel species to plummet. Invasive mussels typically cause harmful algal blooms and permanently alter water quality in a way that impacts aquatic life and even humanhealth.

Drain

Drain onto land all water from bait buckets, live wells, pumps, motor, Clean bilges, and remove Clean off all plants, animals, drain plugs. and mud from your watercraft Eliminate all water (canoe, kayak, boat) and BEFORE LEAVING equipment (boots, waders, an area where you fishing gear). Use a high have had your pressure washer or available boat and trailer. power washing stations. If you use your own high pressure washer or a car wash, make sure the water goes into a contained-water holding area. Rinse with very hot water (140 °F).

Dry

Dry all items completely before launching the watercraft into another body of water. Allow at least five days for you boat, trailer, and Confederated Salish and equipment to Kootenai Tribes completely dry Natural Resources Department before launching www.csktnomussels.org into other waters. email: erik.hanson@cskt.org (406) 675-2700 ext. 7280

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Montana moments.

They’re hard to define. But you know when you’re experiencing one. For me, it’s a friendly wave, a glimpse of a wild creature, the smell of pine and damp earth, the call of a bird breaking a silent morning or the exhilaration of a swim in the lake. It could also be the deep rumble of an approaching storm or a sudden (and sometimes extreme) change of weather that reminds me just how wild Montana’s landscapes can be. Wildflowers blooming on green hillsides of rocky mountains, or s’mores around a campfire under a blanket of stars … Whatever your Montana moment is, savor it. This is a sacred place. Those of us lucky to call it home, welcome you to our backyard. We ask that you help us keep this majestic place pristine – free from litter, invasive species and human-caused fires. We know once you experience the grandeur of Northwest Montana you’ll come to love her as we do. In addition to her rugged, wild beauty, Montana boasts a small-town experience like no other. Farmers markets, outdoor concerts, festivals and fairs … there’s no shortage of things to do or places to see. (A full calendar of summer events proves just this. See pages 42 and beyond for details.) Whether you’re here on vacation, back for a visit or live here year-round, I wish you a summer full of majestic Montana moments. Happy trails!

Summer Goddard, Publisher

Sure fire reci pe for a five -star Montan – Close friend a evening s and fami

ly – Comfy chai rs in a sere ne outdoor se – Campfire tting – Graham cr ackers – Marshmallo ws – Chocolate bar (bring ex – Mo tra) ntana-made brews or spir its * I’m telling you – with th is combinatio lot could go n – there’s no wrong. Cheers t a whole ! -S.R.G Polson , 2019

M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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Contents

Small Town . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Permits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Rodeos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Farmers Markets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Birding Paradise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Powwows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Flathead Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 National Bison Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Flathead Cherries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Glacier National Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 County Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32-33 Aquatic Invasive Species . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Flare Pops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Lake Monster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Summer Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42-62

MONTANA SUMMER 2019 Montana Summer is a yearly publication of the Valley Journal, a weekly newspaper published each Wednesday in Lake County, Montana, for readers in the Mission, Jocko and lower Flathead Valleys. Our main office is located in Ronan at 331 Main Street S.W. Office hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Business phone - 406-676-8989. Fax - 406676-8990.

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Our mailing address is: Valley Journal, PO Box 326, Ronan, MT 59864. Our Web address is www.valleyjournal.net. News and calendar submissions may be sent by email to vjeditor@ valleyjournal.net. Copyright 2019, the Valley Journal. All rights reserved. Reproduction, reuse or transmittal in any form or by any means is prohibited without written permission of the Valley Journal.

Publisher.................... Summer Goddard Editor.............................. Karen Peterson Reporter ............................. Rob Zolman Contributing Writer ............ Mary Auld Copy Editor..........................Kathi Beeks Photographer/Artist...Nicole Tavenner

2019

Advertising Mgr/Owner.Boone Goddard Advertising Sales.........Mickele Schultz Advertising Sales................ Jerry Beeks Office Manager .................... Leni Baker Media Production.........Benjamin Stone


Montana at its best.

N AT I O N A L B I S O N R A N G E, M O I E S E

That’s what the Mission, Upper Jocko and Lower Flathead Valleys generously offer to their visitors. Wild, rugged sky-reaching mountains, tranquil stream-fed lakes, lush, sprawling valley floors and gently rolling hills can all be seen in the span of an hour’s drive. Wildlife viewing opportunities abound for those who stop to enjoy the vistas. For folks who stay a little longer to attend hometown celebrations, patriotic parades or fresh farmers markets, small town Montana will reveal her charms. And for those who take the extra time to really know this place – its people, its stories – the rich history and vibrant cultural heritage, a treasure beyond measure awaits discovery. Welcome to your Montana Summer. Just north of Missoula, U.S. Hwy. 93, the Glacier National Park Corridor, winds its way through a myriad of small towns that dot the map. The towns are as unique as

their surrounding landscape and each has a story to share. ARLEE Twenty-six miles north of Missoula, the town of Arlee lies on the southern end of the Flathead Indian Reservation. On the mountainside, south of the railroad tracks, the silhouette of the Dancing Boy playing his drum can be seen. The naturally occurring image was formed around an avalanche chute, starting close to the top of the mountain. The image continues down the terrain with the boy’s torso until a perfect pair of legs can be seen as if in middance step. Winter snow makes the image even more visible. The town of Arlee started to develop in the early 1900s when the post office was

established. The town’s name comes from Chief Arlee. His people knew him as Chief Alee, but white settlers added the “r” to his name. The annual Arlee Esyapqeyni (Celebration) brings thousands of people to the town every year for a weeklong event starting in late June and ending on the Fourth of July on Pow Wow Road. The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes sponsor the event each year with traditional dance competitions, drumming and singing. Food and retail vendors also set up at the event. On the Fourth of July, Arlee also celebrates with an annual rodeo at the Arlee Rodeo Grounds. Competition includes everything from bull riding to S EE PAG E 6

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Dixon

D I XO N M E LO N S

DA N C I N G B OY, A R L E E F ROM PAGE 5

barrel races. The volunteer fire department puts on their annual pancake breakfast in the morning, and the afternoon begins with a delightful parade that winds through town. The Hangin’ Art Gallery is one of the 6

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big attractions in town and a hub for information. The community art gallery, located in a renovated brick building, hosts many local artists from painters to poets. The Killdeer Artisans Guild of local artists often organizes events at the gallery. A variety of delicious food can be found on the changing menu like pumpkin scones with whipped maple frosting along with a long list of coffee mixtures like the blueberry chocolate latte. The town features several other shops including the Huckleberry Patch where all things huckleberry can be found, including pie. For homemade meals, the Biscuit Cafe is another place to go. Further north along U.S. Highway 93 is the small town of Ravalli. RAVALLI Ravalli is located at the base of a hill where U.S. Hwy. 93 intersects with Hwy. 200. The hill climbs up one of the steepest inclines in Lake County before opening up to spectacular views of the Mission Range

of the Rocky Mountains. The town, once a train stop, was named after Italian missionary Anthony Ravalli in the late 1800s. Ravalli is most known for his work with the St. Mary’s Mission in the Bitterroot Valley, but he did spend time at the St. Ignatius Mission Church. One of his carvings can be seen at the church. A section of National Bison Range is located here, and occasionally a few wild bison can be seen along the hillside. The town’s Bison Inn Café offers bison burgers and other home-cooked items. The Windmill Village Bakery, on the south end of the town, serves freshly baked doughnuts and pastries that sometimes include huckleberry muffins or cowboy cookies. A few tables are set up both indoors and outside on the deck where people can sit to enjoy an adjacent pond and windmill. DIXON Dixon is another tiny town, but it’s a bit bigger than Ravalli, and although it’s in


St. Ignatius Sanders County, the town is only about 10 miles from Ravalli on Hwy. 200. It’s often the town people go through to get to the National Bison Range where a herd of bison roam among a diverse ecosystem of grasslands, Douglas fir and ponderosa pine forests. The town was named after former Montana governor Joseph Dixon and is another relic of the railroad era. Several charming old buildings line the highway in the town along with a working post office. The historic Dixon Mercantile, the pink building, was built in 1912 and recently restored. The town is also home to the famous Dixon melons – which are often available in local grocery stores. The Flathead River is another scenic attraction close to town. ST. IGNATIUS In September of 1854, two Jesuit brothers and a priest were led by a group of Indian people to a remote Montana valley known as the “rendezvous” or

F O RT CO N N A H

“gathering place.” The area was considered to be common ground among various area tribes, and as such, was deemed by the Jesuits the perfect place to establish a mission. A small wood cabin, hastily built before a quickly approaching winter, remains on the mission grounds today. The mission church and the town that grew around it were both named after St. Ignatius of Loyola – patron saint and founder of the Jesuits’ religious order – the Society of Jesus (S.J.) Church documents note that in 1855 as many as 1,000 Indians from various tribes had settled near the mission. Built in 1891, masses are still celebrated in the historic mission Catholic church. The church measures 120 feet by 60 feet, with the belfry (bell tower) reaching nearly 100 feet. Visitors can see 58 murals painted on the ceiling inside the church by Brother Joseph Carignano that depict scenes from the Bible as well as pictures of saints. A restoration project to save the murals, which have begun to crack in recent years

due to sagging walls, is currently underway at the mission. Before the church was built, Fort Connah was developed in 1847 about seven miles north of current day St. Ignatius as a fur trading outpost. It was the last Hudson’s Bay trading post built in what is now the United States. The fort is thought to be one of the oldest still-standing buildings in Montana. The Fort Connah Restoration Society hosts events at the location several times a year. People are allowed to look at the building although the visit might require a climb over a fence. Complementing its rich history and natural beauty is the town’s modern addition of the Skate Ignatius skate park. St. Ignatius also hosts an annual Good Old Days celebration in late July with three days of fun that include a dessert-baking contest, a tug-of-war in the mud and a fantastic parade that is often said to be one of the longest in the county. S EE PAG E 8 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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Charlo F ROM PAGE 7

CHARLO The area’s best 4th of July parade is said to be put on by the town of Charlo. Found by turning off U.S Hwy. 93 and driving down Hwy. 212 for a few miles as the road wraps around scenic farmlands, Charlo lies nearly in the center of the lush Mission Valley. Several back roads also converge into the town with views of large glaciermade potholes where waterfowl and other birds can be seen. The National Bison Range is about 7 miles southwest of the town from Hwy. 212 while the Ninepipe National Wildlife Refuge is located a few miles east of town. The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service calls the protected region the center of a glacial terminal moraine with a high density of small wetlands and upland grasses. The land was going to be utilized as an irrigation reservoir in 1910. The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes requested the establishment of the 2,062acre refuge. The land is now surrounded 8

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4T H O F J U LY PA R A D E

by 3,420 acres of Montana State Wildlife management areas, approximately 3,000 acres of CSKT lands, 3,160 acres of Federal Waterfowl Production Areas, and 6,400 acres of Fish and Wildlife Service conservation easements. The refuge is open to bird watching where people can see waves of birds moving through the area such as the occasional flock of tundra swans or the western grebes. Red-winged blackbirds and swallows begin to flock together in summer months, among other species. Charlo’s boundaries stretch to Hwy. 93, where the Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana history is located, next to the Ninepipes Lodge and Allentown Restaurant. A wealth of early life on the Flathead Indian Reservation can be found here including the history of Native Americans, trappers, miners, loggers, settlers, cowboys and ranchers. The museum holds both long-term and temporary exhibits. The Fourth of July parade and cookout

are big summer events in Charlo, with antique cars, horses and floats. Visitors can also stop at a tavern or convenience store. The town holds its own rich history. The post office was established in 1918, and the town was named after Chief Charlo. Charlo was the head chief of the Bitterroot Salish in the late 1800s, during a time when his people were being forced to move to the Flathead Indian Reservation. He refused to sign a contract to do so, but the people were moved anyway. Documents from the St. Mary’s Mission and Museum state Father Ravalli corroborated Chief Charlo’s claim that he didn’t sign the document. Father Ravalli was also an important local leader at that time (noted in information about the town named after him). RONAN If you can pull your eyes away from the towering, snow-capped Mission Mountains, you’ll find Ronan is a friendly, agricultural town chock-full of local culture and history. Originally called Spring Creek by the


Ronan Salish residents, in 1893 the town’s name was changed to Ronan Springs as a tribute to Major Peter Ronan, who served until his death as the Flathead Indian Reservation superintendent for 16 years from 1877 to 1893. Gradually, the “Springs” was dropped and the shortened Ronan name became official. 1912 was a historic year for Ronan. E.H. Rathbone had been elected to serve as the first mayor of the newly-organized city government, while a disastrous fire fueled by one of the fiercest windstorms of the season wiped out all but four buildings on the city’s westside. When in Ronan, stop by the Garden of the Rockies Museum, a volunteerdeveloped and operated museum housed in the first church built in Ronan in the early 1900s. The museum offers visitors

B O C K M A N PA R K A N D S P R I N G C R E E K

a glimpse into Ronan’s past with displays and memorabilia, which include a oneroom schoolhouse and farm machinery. The museum is open from Memorial Day to Labor Day and is located four blocks west of U.S. Hwy. 93 on Round Butte Road. The Ronan Visitor Center is another iconic treasure. People stop in from all over the world to find local and state information in what once was a stagecoach stop built in 1870. The 10-foot by 14-foot cabin was once located across Flathead River near Sloan Bridge, several miles west of town. Longtime Ronan resident Grace Sager has spent many hours sitting on the cabin’s porch in its new location during the summer as a volunteer to wait for visitors who stop and ask for information about the town or anything else of interest. She likes to tell the story passed down

to her about when the cabin was out by the river. She said the man that ran the stagecoach, possibly named Sloan, would ferry people across the river with a boat before the bridge was put in. People traveling between Dixon and Polson often used the stop. Now, people can look at the amazing handcrafted woodwork or learn about local attractions by stopping at the old stagecoach cabin. With a current population around 3,000, Ronan remains an agricultural hub for the Mission Valley. Each year, the city of Ronan hosts the Lake County Fair, a family-oriented community event that includes an extensive display of youth and adult exhibits, from flowers and artwork to 4-H projects and animals. S EE PAG E 10

Polson Theatres

The Digital Movie Experience

Entertainer Showboat Mtn. Cinema 4 Ronan

410 Main St. SW

676-4496

FREcoErn

Pop ys Tuesda

Polson

416 Main St.

883-5606 Showtimes at

Whitefish

6475 US Hwy 93

862-3130

Air Conditioned

www.polsontheatres.com

BLOCKBUSTERS ALL SUMMER M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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Pablo

F ROM PAGE 9

While visiting the fair, take in the sights and sounds of a wide variety of entertainment acts, educational programs, contests, tasty foods and rodeo events. Ronan’s rich pioneer heritage is honored annually the first weekend in August during Pioneer Days. The three-day festivities feature a 3-on-3 basketball tourney, volleyball and softball tourneys, a kids’ fishing derby in the city park, bulls and broncs rodeo, 5k and 10k runs, kiddie slicker rodeo, a car show, a wild buffalo ride, a street dance and a big parade on Sunday afternoon. Decorated hay bales begin to appear in and around Ronan in September as the town prepares for its annual Harvest Fest. Kids’ pumpkin bowling, zucchini races, a petting zoo, outdoor vendors and a Dutch oven cookoff are hallmarks of the celebration. Bordered to the east by the jagged peaks of the Mission Mountains, westward views from Ronan give way to the lush, sprawling Mission Valley floor. With all its natural attractions and outdoor activities like hiking, river rafting, hunting, boating, lake and stream fishing, camping, golfing, horseback riding and bike path trails, it’s no wonder Ronan is considered an outdoor enthusiast’s paradise. PABLO The Pablo National Wildlife Refuge, Confederated Salish and Kootenai tribal government, Salish Kootenai College and The People’s Center all call the small town 10

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of Pablo home. Pablo was named for Michel Pablo, a tribal elder, a stockman and a rancher who has been credited as one of the essential individuals responsible for saving the bison of Montana from extinction. The bison raised by Pablo, formed the nucleus of the 300-400 bison herd that now roams the National Bison Range in Moiese. Although a fire in the 1920s brought the once flourishing town to near ruin, Pablo continues to play an indispensable role in the Mission Valley as the headquarters of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai tribal government. Because of Pablo’s central location on the Flathead Reservation, the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes moved its government offices to Pablo in the late 1970s. In 1977, Salish Kootenai College was established to provide quality postsecondary educational opportunities through career, technical and academic training. The D’Arcy McNickle Library, located at the college, houses special collections of historical books about Native American tribes as well as the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The People’s Center in Pablo is a triballyowned and operated museum established in 1990 that shares the traditions and rich cultural heritage of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes through an educational learning center, artifacts, exhibit gallery and gift shop. Visitors are encouraged in taking a guided tour of the museum along with

participating in other cultural celebrations and activities provided by The People’s Center. Located a few miles west out of town is the Pablo National Wildlife Refuge, an extraordinary wetland complex containing over 2,500 acres of water, marsh and upland grassland. Although water levels are controlled primarily for irrigation and flood control, the refuge provides a haven for nesting waterfowl and migrating shorebirds. Water levels are properly maintained to accommodate nesting waterfowl in the spring and low enough to expose extensive mudflats in late summer for shorebirds to congregate during southward migration. Open for travel during daylight hours, an access road provides abundant opportunities for observation and photography of wildlife, songbirds, upland game birds and waterfowl. Pablo Reservoir wetland habitat supports abundant waterfowl species such as American widgeon, blue- and greenwinged teal, blue herons, Canada geese, common loons, coots, double-crested cormorants, gadwalls, mallards, northern shovelers, pintails, redheads and ruddy ducks. Bald eagles are occasionally seen, along with other species of water, marsh and upland birds. Boats or floatation devices are not permitted on the reservoir and there are no recreational facilities available. Shore fishing is permitted in accordance with applicable state, federal and tribal


Polson regulations. A tribal recreation and fishing permit is required. Yellow perch, largemouth bass and rainbow trout are regularly caught. POLSON Located at the base of beautiful Flathead Lake, the town of Polson is a welcoming stop to enjoy unparalleled lake, island and Swan Mountain views. During the summertime, this lakeshore community with a population just shy of 5,000 becomes a very popular travel destination. The town hosts a variety of community events throughout the summer season, including the annual Flathead Cherry Festival, Summerfest, the local Farmers Market, the Sandpiper Gallery Art Festival, Flathead Lake 3-on-3 Tournament, Firecracker Baseball Tournament, an annual Blues Fest and the Mission Mountain NRA Rodeo to list a few. Boasting a population of around 900 citizens in 1910, the town of Polson, complete with electricity and city water, was incorporated and named after pioneering rancher David Polson. Pictorial displays, historic memorabilia and antique artifacts at Polson’s Flathead Lake Museum take visitors through Polson’s rich local history of lumbering, ranching, steamboats and stagecoaches. Numerous cherry orchards dot the east shore of Flathead Lake. In fact, the

Flathead Valley’s climate with 40 to 50 degree nights and warmer summer days makes the area one of the prime cherrygrowing regions in the country. Polson celebrates the Flathead Lake cherry with a three-day festival. Familyfriendly activities include a cherry pieeating contest, cherry-pit spitting and a cherry stem-tying contest. Local vendors sell fresh cherries, cherry foods and Montana-made items during Polson’s Main Street Flathead Cherry Festival celebrated annually the third weekend in July. Every Friday, the city closes a block-long area down for the farmers market. Local farmers and vendors sell everything from fresh fruit and vegetables to art, photos, crafts and baked goods. In July, the downtown streets of Polson come alive during the annual outdoor Flathead Lake 3-on-3 basketball tournament. Drawing more than 250 teams, it is one of the oldest and largest summer basketball events in Montana. An annual vintage car show during the town’s Summerfest lines the streets of Polson every August with hot rods, custom and classic cars. The two-day event starts with a poker run on Friday evening followed with a show-and-shine all day Saturday. Taking place simultaneously with the vintage car show on Saturday is the Sandpiper Gallery Art Festival, which is

held on the Lake County Courthouse lawn. The outdoor festival features fine art, artisan crafts and food vendors from around the Pacific Northwest. The festival also offers live entertainment throughout the day. Located five-miles out of town is the Seli’š Ksanka Qlispe’ Dam, formerly known as Kerr Dam. Rising 204 feet high, the concrete arch-type dam soars more than 50 feet higher than Niagara Falls and generates 1,100,000,000 kilowatt hours annually. A 1,000-foot boardwalk with 355 steps makes its way down the hillside stopping at a vista overlook, offering bird’s eye panoramic views of the spillway, river and canyon below. Five city-maintained parks situated along the lake offer opportunities for relaxation and fishing access as well as swimming and paddling experiences. There’s even a special, riverside park known as the Travis Dolphin Dog Park for your canine companions. HOT SPRINGS A trip to Hot Springs, Montana is like journeying through a portal to another time. Nestled at the base of Baldy Mountain, the town is tucked away from the outside world and its influences. It’s not a place people go to join the rat race, it’s where they go to run from it. S EE PAG E 12

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Hot Springs F ROM PAGE 11

Hot Springs is best known for having one of the most mineral-rich natural water supplies in the country. The town’s Symes Hotel has even reported that some of its visitors come from as far as Taiwan to visit the unique site. The water comes from an underground well that the Symes Hotel and the other spas in town tap into. Ginette Abdo, a hydrogeologist with the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology said the mineral-rich water phenomenon is created by a variety of factors. Molten material deep below the earth’s surface heats up the water, which builds up pressure and then pushes it toward the surface. The water gets its high mineral content from the materials it passes through on its journey toward the surface. Abdo explained that there is, however, no definitive answer as to why

the water in Hot Springs has such a high mineral content. Opened in 1929, the Symes Hotel is one of the more popular soaking destinations for those visiting the town. The hotel has a very classic feel to it. There are no TVs or phones in most of the rooms, but the hotel is one of few places in town where you can get access to the Internet thanks to the hotel’s public Wi-Fi. Like many other small towns across Montana, Hot Springs has its own yearly festival: Homesteader Days. The yearly celebration brings together people of all ages to celebrate the small town’s heritage. In past years the event has brought as many as 600 people to Main Street, where the majority of the event’s activities take place. For a small town with a population of around 500, it’s quite the happening, Smith said. The small-town

festival is highlighted by a street dance, a kids’ parade, a grand parade, a car show, a rodeo and many other activities. In 1948, the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes built the Camas Hot Springs Bathhouse. A big celebration was held for the opening of the bathhouse. The governor and several tribal officials attended the event. A buffalo was roasted and the celebration became an annual gathering for tribal and nontribal people alike. The bathhouse celebration eventually evolved into what is now Homesteader Days. For a town its size, Hot Springs is surprisingly self-sufficient. There are a few restaurants, three bars, two grocery stores and a gas station on the edge of town. Rob Zolman, Karen Peterson, Summer Goddard and Dakota Wharry contributed to this story.

Moriah Lundeen, Eagle Bank’s Vice President of Commercial and Real Estate Lending. Whether you are buying a home or growing your business, Moriah is eager to help. Give us a call today! Moriah Lundeen

Vice President Commercial & Real Estate Loan Officer NMLS# 193988

Call us! 406-883-2940

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Did you know? -The origin of the name “Montana” comes from the Spanish word for “mountainous.” -Montana is the fourth largest state in the U.S. with the 44th largest population. -Montana offers almost 28 million acres of public lands, almost 30 percent of the state’s total acreage.  -Montana is home to seven State Forests and 53 State Parks. -Montana has more different species of mammals than any other state in the U.S. -Flathead Lake is the largest fresh water lake west of the Mississippi River. -Glacier National Park has 250 lakes in its boundaries. -The famous fly-fishing movie “A River Runs Through It” focuses on the Blackfoot River in Montana, but most of the fishing footage was shot on Montana’s Gallatin River. -The largest observed snowflake fell during a storm in 1887 in Montana. It was measured at 15 inches wide. -Jeannette Rankin from Missoula was the first woman elected to the U.S. Congress in 1916.

It’s Always Happening in Polson!

2019

TBD May 27 May-Aug. June 28 June 28-29 July 1-7 July 4 July 13-14 July 20-21 July 20-21

Recreational permits Popular outdoor recreational activities on the Flathead Indian Reservation include hiking, picnicking, swimming, photography, camping, fishing and boating. These activities require various permits and licenses. Non-tribal members are not allowed to pick berries and mushrooms on tribal lands unless they are children or the spouse of a tribal member who accompany and assist their tribal member parent or spouse. For complete details on fishing and recreation regulations of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks, pick up a handbook at any of the following locations where licenses and permits are sold: Polson • CSKT Division of Fish, Wildlife, Recreation, and Conservation 406 Sixth Ave. E. in Polson (Behind Linderman School) Open Monday-Thursday from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 406-883-2888 ext.7200 or 7237

• Walmart 36318 Memory Lane 406-883-9211

July 27-28 July 27-28 August 9 August 9-11

Pablo • Zimmer Tackle 32 Carlyle Ln. 406-675-0068 Ronan • Westland Seed 36272 Round Butte Rd. 406-676-4100

August 10 August 10 August 10 Aug. 16-17 August 17

St. Ignatius • Mountain View Cenex 240 Mountain View Dr. 406-745-3634

Sept. 7 Nov. 29

Hot Springs • Cornerstone Convenience 1893 Hwy. 28 406-741-3200

Jan 24-26 2020

Reservation permits are also available on the Internet at http://app.mt.gov/Als/Index. A reservation permit must be purchased initially from a retail outlet/reservation permit vendor, and then subsequent permits can be purchased online.

December

“Diamonds & Jeans” Wine and Beer Tasting plus more! Memorial Day Parade in downtown Polson at 12:30 pm (Last Tuesday of each month) – “Tours & Tidbits” presentations at Salish Kootenai College; 275-4983 Chamber Blast Sporting Clays at Big Sky Sporting Clays; 883-5969 Mission Mountain NRA Rodeo, Polson Fairgrounds 7:30 pm with live music Friday night after rodeo; 261-2861 or 883-1100 Flathead Lake Cheese Open House 10-4 pm off Hwy 93; flatheadlakecheese.com 4th of July Parade at noon in downtown Polson followed by fireworks at dusk Mud Run for Boys and Girls Club at Polson Fairgrounds; runsignup.com/race/MT/Polson/PolsonMudRun Live History Days at Miracle of America Museum, 36094 Memory Lane Polson; 883-6264 or miracleofamericamuseum.org Polson Main Street Cherry Festival 9 am Sat. and 10 am Sun; 883-3667 or flatheadcherryfestival.com Flathead Lake 3 on 3 Basketball Tourney, downtown Polson; theflatheadlake3on3.com 5th Annual Flathead Lake Festival of Art 10-6 pm at Sacajawea Park, Polson; sandpiperartgallery.com Flathead Lake Bio Station Open House; flbs.umt.edu Summerfest in Polson with many activities; andersonbroadcasting.com Cruisin By The Bay Car Show in downtown Polson; andersonbroadcasting.com 48th Annual Sandpiper Art Festival on courthouse lawn 10 am, Polson; sandpiperartgallery.com Polson Rotary Festival for Youth Chili Cookoff at Riverside Park 11-2 pm; 883-1842 Flathead Lake Blues Festival; flatheadlakebluesfestival.com Small Town Girl Market at Polson Fairgrounds; smalltowngirlmarket.com or 274-7979 21st Annual Polson Fly-In at Polson Airport 8 a.m. Polson’s Parade of Lights and Art Walk in downtown Polson First 3 weekends – Lights Under The Big Sky at Lake County Fairgrounds in Ronan, MT; bigskylights.org Flathead Lake International Cinemafest in Polson, MT; Flicpolson.com

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406-883-5969

Montana Summer

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Kicking up some fun at the rodeo

Scratching your head over something a little different and fun to do this summer? Maybe it’s time to saddle up and experience the fun and excitement at one of the fast-paced, action-packed rodeos held each year throughout the Mission Valley. During a rodeo, cowboy and cowgirl athletes put their skills and speed to the test in traditional ranch-style activities to compete in events such as bareback bronc riding, saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling, calf roping, barrel racing and bull riding. Believed to be the start of the rodeo tradition, bareback bronc riding is one of the wildest and most physically demanding events in the rodeo. A successful ride includes a spurring cowboy and a bucking bronco. Scores are obtained by combining the score of the rider and the score of the bucking horse. Saddle bronc riding was truly born in the Old West, where ranch hands would test themselves against one another on unbroken horses. Scoring is based on the horse’s bucking action and the cowboy’s control of the horse and combined with his spurring action.

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Steer wrestling is another classic rodeo event where the concept seems straight forward enough: jump from a horse, grab a steer by the horns, wrestle it to the ground and stop the clock as quickly as you can. Easily said, not easily done. Calf roping is another timed rodeo event based on ranch work in which calves are roped for branding, medical treatment or other purposes. A horse-mounted rider gives chase to a running calf going down the arena and attempts to rope the calf around the neck with a lariat. After successfully roping the calf, the rider dismounts, runs to the calf, throws it to the ground and ties three feet together. Barrel racing is also a timed speed and agility event where horse and rider gallop around a cloverleaf pattern of barrels, making agile turns without knocking the barrels over. After the final barrel, contestants race fullspeed back to the finish line. Perhaps the most exciting event to watch during a rodeo for many is the bull riding. Bull riding is an event where a cowboy tries to ride a full-grown bull for eight seconds while holding a rope, which is looped around the bull’s midsection. Scoring is based on a possible perfect score of 100 points. Spectators can mingle with the locals and enjoy some authentic rodeo action at one of the Mission Valley rodeos.

Mission Mountain NRA Rodeo – Polson, Montana The Mission Valley rodeo season starts at the Polson Fairgrounds’ Les Baldwin Arena on June 28 – 29th during the 79th annual Mission Mountain NRA Rodeo. The Mission Mountain Rodeo features two nights of bareback riding, saddle bronc riding, barrel racing and steer wrestling. Bull riding tops off every evening and will keep you on the edge of your seat until the very end. July 4th Arlee Rodeo – Arlee, Montana Nothing says Fourth of July like whoopin’

it up at the legendary Arlee rodeo. Since 1982, the Arlee Rodeo has been entertaining rodeo fans with high-energy action. The Arlee Rodeo is a favorite among many events that competitors choose from as the nation celebrates its birthday each summer. Ronan Pioneer Days – Ronan, Montana Celebrate one of small-town America’s best community celebrations in August. The three-day rodeo scene attracts rodeo professionals from all over who compete in all the rodeo favorites, including a wildbuffalo ride.

VJ

B A R R E L R AC I N G

WE WELCOME our vistors to explore & discover

RONAN VISITOR CENTER ON HIGHWAY 93 in RONAN, MONTANA

our friendly Country Store! • snacks • groceries • kitchen wares • fresh produce • deli sandwiches • fresh deli meats and cheeses • clocks • quilts • fabrics & sewing supplies • hickory rockers

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Dutch Oven Cooking Class Chainsaw Carving Rendezvous Crab Fest Carnival/Circus Lake County Jr. Fair Ronan Pioneer Days 10th Annual Harvest Fest & Dutch Oven Cook Off

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Farmers markets: uniquely local There aren’t many other places you can spend your evening nibbling a homemade pastry while perusing locally made wares with friends. “You get to know what your fellow community members are doing and see how much food we grow in this valley,” said Katie Helser, owner of Ginger Roots Farm and board member for the Mission Falls Market in St. Ignatius. Farmers markets in the area offer everything from fresh vegetables and eggs to handmade soaps. The four local markets offer opportunities to engage with community, support local creativity and growers and indulge in the treasures of the area. “It’s just a really beautiful outlet to feed people in our community,” Helser said. The Arlee Farmers Market offers items grown and made in the Jocko Valley. The market will be held every Wednesday

starting May 22 from 5 to 7 p.m. This summer the market will be held at a new location, outside the Arlee Brown Building. Each week a local organization will sell meals as a fundraiser at the market. The market accepts cash only. The Polson Farmers Market, the oldest in Lake County, is open every Friday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. from May 3 to mid-October. The market is held on 3rd Avenue West, on the street in front of the Cove Deli. The

market’s website calls it the “heartbeat of Polson.” The Mission Falls Market is located in St. Ignatius. This summer will be its third season. The market will take place at the Good Old Days Park. It will be held on Fridays from 5 to 7 p.m. from May 24 to Sept. 27. The Mission Falls Market also features a youth market where all vendors and board members are local children. The Ronan Farmers Market takes place every Thursday from 4 to 7 p.m. in the parking lot of the visitors’ center. The market will run from May 16 to Sept. 26. All four markets accept SNAP benefits as payment. The Polson, Mission Falls, and Ronan markets each offer “double SNAP benefits.” Customers can get double the value of their SNAP benefits when they purchase food at the markets. Senior Farmers Market coupons can be used at each of the markets. Story by Mary Auld for the Valley Journal

Keeping Grizzlies You can prevent the death of a grizzly bear down the road by protecting your livestock property today with an electric fence and preventing that bear from learning bad behaviors!!

WiLD

A conflict at your coop or pen may not get a bear in trouble, but that same learned behavior at a neighbor’s farm or house can lead to that bear being removed from the population due to that first encounter with livestock. Since 2010: It is up to us as landowners to 30 Grizzlies have been captured or handled and prevent that first contact!!!

15 have been killed or removed due to conflicts

with chickens, pigs, goats, sheep and llamas

iN tHE MiSSiON VALLEY To report a grizzly bear conflict, or to learn more about grizzly bears in the Mission Valley on the Flathead Indian Reservation and how to keep your livestock safe, contact the

The majority of conflicts involving grizzly bears and small livestock can be prevented by using electric fencing.

CSKT Wildlife Management Program at

(406) 883-2888

Our Actions Matter!! Their survival depends on it . . .

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Defenders of Wildlife offers a 50% reimbursement up to $500 toward the cost of an electric fence. Contact them at

(406) 728-8800!!


STARK ravin’ Mission Valley is birding paradise

If you look up, chances are you’ll spot one. The Mission and Jocko valleys are home to hundreds of bird species from the carnivorous to the granivorous for summer wildlife watching adventures. The Montana Audubon organization works with people from all walks of life to become more effective stewards of Montana’s birds, wildlife and landscapes. They report that birding is one of the fastest growing recreational activities in the United States. “Ask any birder and they will be able to tell you why: the enjoyment that comes from being outdoors, the satisfaction of learning about the natural world and the pleasure of seeing an unexpected flash of color in the trees.” Along with the resident bird species, “thousands of birds make a pit stop in the Mission Valley every year along their north-south migratory route,” according to the organization. “This birder’s paradise offers multiple birding spots.” The prime locations for bird watching include the National Bison Range, Ninepipe and Pablo National Wildlife Refuges, Thompson Chain of Lakes, Bull River Wildlife Management Area, Lone Pine State Park, Jewel Basin hiking area, Owen Sowerwine natural area, the Danny On Trail, Smith Lake Waterfowl Production Area, Lawrence Park, Lower Valley (Road), Church Slough and the Blasdel Waterfowl production area. “Polson provides the best local opportunity to find rare gulls and serves as the gateway to the Mission Valley, one of the best raptor areas in the western United States,” the organization notes. “Stop at Boettcher Park, along the lakeshore behind (north of) the golf course east of town, to scan the lake for migrant loons and waterfowl. Pacific loons occur annually here among the migrant flocks.” The waterfront areas along downtown Polson are often good places to spot gulls, and the sewer ponds also host these species along with Barrow’s goldeneye. “Take 7th Avenue west off Main, which becomes Kerr Dam Road. Montana’s only Little Gull was sighted here in November of 1999. The river below has yielded Pomarine jaeger, white-winged and surf scoter, dunlin and rusty blackbird in recent years.” Continuing south towards the Pablo National Wildlife Refuge is a good direction to take your bird watching adventures. This habitat provides “extraordinary” SEE PAGE 1 8

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F ROM PAGE 17

opportunities to study the various plumages of rough-legged and red-tailed hawks. Prairie falcons and gyrfalcons are also in the area. At the Ninepipe Wildlife Refuge in Charlo, a wetland complex of hundreds of glacial potholes, like the Pablo refuge, creates prime habitat for birds. According to the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks, 18

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access roads and trails provide great waterfowl and shorebird viewing where about 200 bird species have been recorded. “Great blue herons, double-crested cormorants, ducks, grebes, short-eared owls and a wide variety of songbirds can be observed, along with superb viewing of raptors.� With lush wetlands, vast farmland

and thick wilderness, the birds across Lake County and the Flathead Indian Reservation are able to thrive. The American Birding Association recommends a few rules to promote the welfare of birds in their environment while on bird watching adventures, including habitat protection by staying back from nests and roosts and keeping any disturbance to a minimum.


Eugene Beckes, of St. Ignatius, takes a camera on his bird watching adventures. He sits among dense foliage, covered in camouflage attire, for hours to capture the perfect moment. He takes hundreds of photos every year with the hopes of inspiring people to save the world and the habitat where birds live. “It doesn’t always work out,” he said of taking photos. Sometimes a tree limb will be in the way, a bird’s head will be hidden behind a leaf

or something else will alter the composition, he said. But if you watch closely, through the thick deciduous woods, among the leaves and tall grass, a little bird could appear. Story by Karen Peterson / Valley Journal, photos by Eugene Beckes. See more of Eugene’s photography at www.facebook.com/arthur.beckes. Or to contact him for prints and cards, email starkraven@blackfoot.net.

VJ

M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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Summer powwows

Celebrate Culture

Several powwows are held each year on the Flathead Indian Reservation and two of them are happening this summer with the 121st Arlee Celebration and the Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow. The public is welcome to attend both. Powwows have been an important part of the Salish, Kootenai and Pend d’Orielle tribes’ — and other Indian tribes’ — lives for centuries as a celebration with singing, dancing, socializing, education, craft work and feasting. Many Native Americans travel hundreds of miles each year to participate in this important tradition because the powwow trail is much more than just entertainment; it’s a way to honor their ancestors. Dancing At powwows, various dance styles are performed, including Intertribal Dance, where everyone is welcome regardless of dress; War Dance, where each warrior dances his own style to a wide range of songs with fast and slow tempos; Women’s Traditional Dance, consisting of women remaining stationary with a slight movement of the feet; Men’s Traditional Dance, in which the dancers tell stories through dance about battles or hunting. The Round Dance is a social dance that is meant to have everyone participate; Scalp Dance is done by women dressed in men’s clothing; Prairie Chicken Dance resembles the movements prairie chickens use for mating or fighting. Some “newer” dances include Fancy Dance, where dancers are dressed in colorful regalia and dance in less restricted styles; Jingle Dance, where women dance in jingle dresses festooned with 365 metal cones or jingles; Grass Dance, a plains Indian dance where dancers move in swaying motions that move the fringes on the grass dance clothing; and the Owl Dance, which is a social dance where couples dance together in a circular motion with men on the outside circle and women in the inside circle. Powwow Dates The Arlee Fourth of July Celebration, a week-long event held close to the first week of July, first coincided with the traditional midsummer break in the hunting and gathering cycle of the Salish and Pend d’Oreille tribes in the late 1800s, but the road to maintaining the celebratory tradition was fraught with obstacles set up by the federal government. Government policies attempted to force Native Americans to assimilate by eliminating traditional practices. However, through often clandestine

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tenacity, Native people kept their culture alive. Indian people continued to practice traditions despite federal policies aimed at eliminating them. This year, the 121st Arlee Celebration runs Wednesday, July 3, to Sunday, July 7. The official opening of the celebration will begin with a grand entry that includes an honor guard bearing the flags of the Salish Nation and America. A procession of dancers follows the honor guard. A Flag Song is sung in honor of the flags, then a prayer is said to complete the opening ceremonies. After a Veterans’ honoring ceremony, the dancing begins in earnest. For more event information, go to www.arleepowwow.com On the third weekend in July, the Flathead Indian Reservation hosts the Kootenai Tribes’ annual celebration, the Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow. This year’s threeday celebration at the Elmo Powwow Grounds starts on Wednesday, July 18 and ends on Saturday, July 20. The Indian social gathering in the west shore community of Elmo features drumming, dancing and traditional dress and food. There will be dance contests with numerous categories, a drum contest, and traditional games. Visitors are welcome and asked to respect the dance area by staying off of it, and leaving front row seating for tribal elders.

VJ

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Fridays 9 am - 1 pm

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To our wonderful customers, PLEASE DON’T PARK in the First Citizens Bank parking lot.

M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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lathead Cherr y F

2019

Festival Downtown Polson, MT

July 20 & 21

S LOT ORS! Flathead Cherries • Homemade Cherry Pies END V F O

Cherry Products & Gifts • Unique Arts & Crafts Sidewalk Sales & Specials Food Court • Entertainment • Activities for the Kids

Fun for the whole family

SATURDAY, JULY 20 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

9 a.m. 2 p.m. 4 p.m.

Vendor booths open

SUNDAY, JULY 21 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

10 a.m. Vendor booths open

Pit Spitting Contest

in front of the Cove Deli & Pizza

Pie Eating Contest

in front of the Cove Deli & Pizza

Prizes awarded from downtown merchants

Kids’ Activities & Entertainment throughout both days

www.flatheadcherryfestival.com • Large tent for shade and resting • A wide variety of cherry products to choose from! Proudly sponsored by the Polson Business Community and Flathead Lake Cherry Growers, Inc. Questions? Call (406) 883-3667 or email: pcf@flatheadcherryfestival.com 22

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The Flathead Nearly 200 square miles of crystal clear water

With the multitude of outdoor activities to participate in and the myriad of breath-taking splendors to enjoy in the Mission Valley, Flathead Lake definitely rates top on any list of Northwest Montana places to see and enjoy. Nestled beneath the snow-tipped craggy peaks of the Swan and Mission ranges, Flathead Lake boasts more than 160 miles of shoreline, depths that reach 370 feet and nearly 200 square miles of crystal clear water - making Flathead Lake the largest natural freshwater lake west of the Mississippi S EE PAG E 24 River.

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That means there’s plenty of room for trophy-size fish to thrive – and Flathead Lake is indeed one of the hottest sport fisheries in the lower 48. More than 25 species of fish call Flathead Lake home. Those species include: native bull and cutthroat trout, huge lake trout, rainbow trout, whitefish, northern pike, pumpkinseed sunfish and yellow perch. No matter what time of year, some sort of fishing is in season with generous daily limits. Wild Horse Island, the largest island in Flathead Lake, is a day-use-only 2,160acre state park only accessible by boat. The island is home to abundant wildlife including record-size bighorn sheep, mule deer, waterfowl, osprey, bald eagles and of course a small herd of wild horses. Unlimited opportunities for camping, picnicking, fishing, hiking, swimming or just dipping your toes into the cool, clear water are scattered all along Flathead Lake’s extensive shoreline. Even for those who don’t leave their vehicles, spectacular scenic views across the lake can be enjoyed as you cruise along either U.S. Highway 93 on the lake’s west shore or Montana Highway 35 on the east.

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Flathead Lake Facts • The striking azure of the water is what grabs the attention of most northbound travelers as they crest the top of Polson Hill and look down at Flathead Lake, but the sparkling body grows more translucent as people grow close. When unobstructed by waves, the clearness reveals every outline of objects along the bottom, which can sometimes give the illusion of shallowness. Don’t be fooled: the deepest part of the lake is 370 feet — the length of approximately 10 standard school buses parked end to end. Average lake depth is 167 feet, greater than that of the Persian Gulf. • Flathead Lake is one of the 300 largest natural lakes in the world and is the largest natural freshwater lake in the western United States. The 197-square-mile water body is known for its impressive size in the current era, but it was actually part of a much larger lake called Lake Missoula – a prehistoric proglacial lake that existed an estimated 15,000 years ago. Lake Missoula was created by a 2,000-foot tall ice dam of the Clark Fork River and was the largest documented ice-dammed lake in the world. It covered 3,000 square miles.


A sign at the National Bison Range’s Red Sleep Drive designates a high water mark of Lake Missoula and ripple marks from the lake’s receding shorelines are visible in the surrounding hills. Flathead’s remnant size is still significant. It takes approximately 2 hours to drive the 82 miles of roadway around the entire lake without stopping, not accounting for traffic. • Flathead Lake contains 10 islands of various sizes and ownership. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks manages four of the islands. Wildhorse Island near Big Arm Bay is the largest island in the lake and consists of 2,163 acres. It doubles as a wildlife refuge and state park that is noted for its herd of Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep and several wild horses. Bird Island is located near the Narrows, a small group of islands easily visible from Polson, along the northern part of Polson Bay. The island is owned and managed by the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks and the Flathead Lake Biological Station as a bird refuge. Geese, osprey, herons and eagles frequent Bird Island. Cedar and O’Neil islands are also managed by the state. • Seli’š Ksanka Qlispe’ Dam, formerly known as Kerr Dam, was built between 1930 and 1938 and raised the elevation of the lake by approximately 10 feet, which brings it to 2,893 feet above sea level at full pool. The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes became the first native government in the United States to own a dam in September 2015. If runoff conditions in the mountains don’t warrant flood threats, the lake level is brought to full pool by mid-June. • Flathead Lake is one of the cleanest watersheds. Studies at the Flathead Lake Biological Station show that water quality in Flathead Lake is among the best in the world. In spite of its renowned purity, recent studies have shown a decline in quality over the last decade due to the combined effects of increased pollution

usic em y v i L ida Fr ht! Nig

WILDHORSE ISLAND

from human sources, erosion of the shoreline caused by dam operations and introduction of nonnative biota (flora and fauna). A massive group effort to keep aquatic invasive species from entering the lake and the entire Columbia Basin watershed is currently underway. • The lake’s major tributaries are the Flathead and Swan Rivers. Numerous small streams flow directly into the lake at its shoreline, particularly on the wetter East Shore.  • Maximum flow in the Flathead River generally occurs during spring freshet between May 15 and June 10, creating a plume of sediment that covers the lake surface.  • Due to its massive volume and normally active winds over the surface, Flathead Lake does not freeze over most winters, although the bays often have winter ice cover. The lake did freeze over in the winters of 1978-79 (all winter), 198788 (all winter), and 1989. This past winter the lake nearly froze over again. The Flathead Lake Biological Station reported that 90-95 percent of the lake’s surface

Mission Mountain

froze – reaching peak ice cover on March 5. • The name Yellow Bay was derived from the yellow rock outcrop on the point which is Precambrian without fossils. The outcrop belongs to the Algonkian substrata, which also outcrops Glacier Park. • The first wagon trail in the 1880s from Polson to the north end of the Lake followed the west side of the lake and was steep and hazardous. At some places, wagons had to be lowered by ropes.  In 1911, work started from the south end of the lake to build an east shore road with the work primarily done by convict labor. It was completed in September of 1946.  • Flathead Lake is currently described as oligomesotrophic (oligotrophic means being deficient in plant nutrients while mesotrophic means having a moderate amount of dissolved nutrients).  • Average surface temperatures of the lake range from 2.3° C (36°F) in midJanuary, to 13.5°C (56°F) in mid-June, to 20.3°C (68°F) in mid-August. 

VJ

For all your FRAMING needs including: • Shadow Boxes • Canvas Stretching • Needle Point • Photos • Children’s Art & More

Youth events begin at 6:30 p.m. Rodeo 7:30 p.m. both nights! Food & Beverage Concessions Available

Polson Fairgrounds Arena 883-1100

for more information • www.polsonfairgroundsinc.com

Adults $10 ~ Children under 12 $5 ~ 3 & under FREE

Barbra Stone #10 7th Ave. East Polson, MT

406-883-9469

Wed., Thur. & Fri. 10:00 am - 6:00 pm M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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Bison range offers immersion in natural world There aren’t many other places in the world where you can watch a bison calf frolic in the wildflowers of a near-obsolete grassland habitat. “We allow the bison the opportunity to act as wildlife within our fence,” bison range wildlife biologist Amy Lisk said. “All these species interact in a natural setting.” The National Bison Range is a National Wildlife Refuge and was established by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1908. The bison range promotes the survival of bison, and provides opportunities for the public to view them in the wild. When the refuge opened, it was intended to ensure that bison continued to exist in North America. According to the National Parks Service, there were about 80,000,000 bison in 1800, but when the bison range opened only about 500 remained. European settlers killed bison in huge numbers. Today, the population has rebounded to about 500,000 in North America. “We still feel as though it’s important to manage bison as wildlife,” Lisk said. She hopes visitors to the refuge are inspired to work for conservation of land and wildlife. Bison Bison have lived on the Flathead Reservation since the 1800s when a P’end d’Oreille man brought bison to the Mission Valley from eastern Montana. Some of the animals in today’s refuge herd are descendants of those original bison. Bison live out their full lives on the refuge. Female bison live for 18 to 20 years on average, and most males live to about 15 years old, Lisk said. Bison give birth to calves in May and June. Lisk expects 50 to 60 calves to be born this year. Today, about 300 bison call the refuge home. “They’re stoic beings, but nobody messes with a bison,” Lisk said. “They’re a force to be reckoned with.” Female bison at maturity weigh an average of 1,000 pounds. Males often weigh up to 2,000 pounds. According to Lisk, bison are surprisingly fast and agile for their huge 26

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size. Other Wildlife Bison are just a small part of a robust ecosystem. The refuge’s 18,800 acres provide habitat for a wide variety of plants, animals and birds. Lisk said bighorn sheep, mule deer, whitetail deer, and pronghorns are also readily seen from the trails and roads in the refuge. Visitors often see bears as well. Coyotes, mountain lions and bobcat are less easily observed but do exist in the refuge. The animals in the refuge are accustomed to vehicle traffic. “If you don’t get out of your car you can really watch them do their thing,” Lisk said. The refuge is also popular with birders. More than 200 species of birds have been documented in the refuge. Grassland, riparian and transitional habitats are preserved breeding grounds for birds, so the area attracts diverse species. This year, Lisk will invite birders to participate in a citizen science project to monitor the number of bird species in the refuge. Wildlife photography is a popular activity in the refuge. For more

information, stop at the visitors’ center. Landscape The refuge offers a look into the geologic history of the area. The refuge has been shaped by weather, geologic processes and human activity over thousands of years. It highlights Glacial Lake Missoula, which existed in the area about 13,000 to 18,000 years ago. The upper part of the refuge was above water when the lake was full. Old “beach lines” where the water in Glacial Lake Missoula lapped the shores can be observed on the hills of the range. Visitors to the range can witness native intermountain grassland landscape that is rare in the United States. While western North America featured this type of grassland in the past, most of it has been altered for agricultural use. Visitors can see birds and bison interact with this rare habitat. Seasonal highlights The seasonal cycle brings unique wildlife and fauna to center stage in the refuge. In the spring season, a blanket of blooms showcase diverse native wildflowers. In June, bison calves can be viewed playing and July and August bring the rut, the bison mating season. As male bison compete for the affection of females you may hear the deep bellows of male bison, or see them wooing females. Males may show aggression toward other males to protect their chosen mates. Bison activity is at a high point during the rut. The mating season for elk and deer begins in September.


Tips for a visit You can access the refuge from its entrance on U.S. Highway 212, near Moiese. Visitors should respect the refuge by minimizing their impact on the area. “Leave things the way you see them so that others may see them that way,” Lisk said. Visitors should adhere to all refuge rules. All trash should be taken out of the refuge or put in a designated receptacle. The collection of natural items including rocks, plants and antlers is prohibited. Visitors must drive on established roads. Trailers must be left at the center. Visitors are prohibited from leaving their vehicles, except on designated trails or at viewpoints. Drivers who stop to view wildlife should pull off to the side of the road to allow others to continue their drive. Visitors should never approach wildlife. Lisk said her best advice for spotting wildlife is to bring binoculars. “Often things don’t happen right on the road, but with a pair of binoculars it can

be like front row seating,” she said. Visitors should take their time moving through the range. Sometimes the sound of a car will scare wildlife away, but if you turn off your engine and stick around, animals will come back into view. Because, wildlife is in general most active at dawn and dusk, visitors stand a better chance of catching a glimpse of them during those times. For more information, visit the Bison Range Visitors Center where staff are on hand to teach visitors about the history of the refuge as well as about the wildlife. It’s impossible to predict what you might see at the refuge, but Lisk said a patient observer could observe true wonders. “Things you might expect to only see on television, you see right here,” Lisk said. By Mary Auld / Valley Journal Photos by Linda Sappington

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Cherries on top Flathead cherries provide unique culinary treats, entertainment Gary and Susan Snow love everything about the Flathead Lake region: the community, the landscape and, most importantly, the cherries. “Something about this place just gets into your heart and you don’t forget it,” Gary said. The Snows own Tabletree Juice, which is a company that transforms Flathead cherries into juice. They say Flathead cherries make some of the best juice in the world. Flathead cherries are a summertime staple in the region. The fruit is an anomaly in the state of Montana where temperatures are generally too cold to support cherry trees; however, Flathead Lake creates a cherryfriendly microclimate. Because of its large size, Flathead Lake rarely freezes. This keeps the temperatures on its shores close to 32 degrees even when temperatures plummet elsewhere. A variety of fruit trees are grown around the lake, but Flathead sweet cherries are the best

known. “I don’t know if it’s the soil, the moisture, the weather or the combination that makes them so good,” Gary said. The experts agree: Tabletree’s Black Cherry Juice was named the “Best Pure Juice” at the World Juice Awards in Barcelona, Spain. The Snows lived in the Flathead region in the 1980s, but they weren’t involved in the cherry industry at that time. They left the area for British Columbia to grow cherries in an orchard that has been in Susan’s family for generations. They spent 20 years there, growing fruit and making juice. The Canadian iteration of Tabletree Juice was a success, but the couple felt their true home was at Flathead Lake. In early 2015, the Flathead Lake Cherry Growers’ co-op asked the Snows if they would consider moving to Bigfork to make juice from Flathead cherries. It didn’t take long for them to make a decision. “Before the end of 2015, we had moved here and made our first Flathead juice,” Gary said. Cherry trees have been growing in Montana for more than 150 years. Weather conditions in the area cultivate flavorful sweet cherries.

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Today, Flathead Lake’s 120 growers produce three to five million pounds of the fruit each year on average. Flathead cherries are exported all over the northwest. Because of the area’s unique climate, Flathead growers supply late-season cherries to the region after cherry trees in other places have stopped producing. Gary thinks relocating has improved the flavor of Tabletree’s juice. Before he moved to the Flathead, he thought the cherries in British Columbia, where the company was located before, were the best. Now, he’s changed his mind. “We like the juice down here better, and it was pretty good up there,” he said. When Flathead Cherry growers harvest their cherries, some are blemished or missing their stems. They still taste

good but don’t appeal to customers. It’s these “cull” cherries that growers sell to Tabletree. The partnership gives cherry growers a source of revenue from cherries that otherwise would have been worthless. “We’ve been able to make money from essentially our bad cherries,” Flathead Lake Cherry Growers’ co-op board president Bruce Johnson said. All the cherries in Tabletree juice come from orchards that are members of the Flathead Lake Cherry Growers’ co-op. The association is a cooperative with about 80 members. The members support one another by sharing equipment and growing techniques. They also combine their product so they can provide cherries for larger markets than they could individually. The rejected “cull” cherries produced by members of the FLCG provide enough fruit for all of Tabletree’s production. Tabletree’s juice production space is located on FLCG land. Flathead cherries are the main ingredients in Tabletree’s juice. One 8.5 ounce bottle of juice contains the juice of a whole pound of cherries. Small amounts of honey and cinnamon are added, but they don’t change the flavor of the juice. They are used as natural preservatives. The honey in the juice is produced in Montana. Gary said customers appreciate the simplicity of the ingredients in the juice. They trust that it’s pure. The juice can be used as an ingredient for cooking and for making cocktails. Gary likes to mix it with ginger ale or lemonade for a refreshing summer drink. In addition to being recognized for its flavor, the juice is known for providing health benefits. According to Gary, cherry juice has strong anti-inflammatory properties. “Any health problem caused by inflammation can be helped with juice,” Gary said. Cherry juice is also used as a sports recovery drink. Tabletree juice can be found in Polson at Super 1, Ace Hardware, Polson Wine and Liquor and Total Screen Designs. It’s

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also available at a number of locations in Kalispell and Missoula. The juice is distributed in stores in eight states and through the mail for individual orders. Gary said when it comes to cooking and making beverages the potential uses for Tabletree juice are endless. “Let your imagination be your guide,” he said. Visitors and locals gather to celebrate cherries at the annual Polson Main Street Flathead Cherry Festival. The Cherry Festival’s 18th annual celebration will be held July 20 and 21 this year in downtown Polson. That weekend, the streets of Polson will be full of live music and kidfriendly activities. The annual cherry-pit spitting contest and cherry-pie eating competition headline the event. Recipes Tabletree Cherry Lemonade Ingredients: Half a bottle of Tabletree Cherry Juice One standard pitcher of lemonade of your choice Directions: Mix and enjoy! Adding a touch of ginger ale or spirits of your choice makes an amazing alcoholic or nonalcoholic drink. Tabletree Barbeque Sauce Ingredients: ½ cup ketchup 1 cup rice vingegar 1 bottle Tabletree Cherry Juice 1 small onion, diced 2 tsp. garlic powder 2 tbsp. brown sugar 2 tsp. dry mustard A few drops liquid smoke (optional) Directions: Combine all ingredients in a saucepan and reduce for 20 minutes. By Mary Auld for the Valley Journal, Photos by Nicole Tavenner

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Glacier National Park Crown of the Continent

P E A K S O F G L AC I E R PA R K AS S E E N F ROM P O L S O N

On a walk through Glacier National Park, saw-toothed mountains rise on all sides while fireweed brushes your shoulders and powder blue lakes sit like gems in the distance. The land seems designed to astonish those who witness it. Among fresh forests and artfully chiseled rock faces, visitors can immerse themselves in the impeccably preserved wilderness. To walk through the park beneath towering mountains and around lakes is to take part in a great marvel of the natural world. Whether your ideal trip to a national park involves strolling through pristine wilderness with your family, photographing sweeping mountain views, intimacy with spectacular flora and fauna or a weeklong backcountry trip, Glacier National Park will not disappoint. The park features delicate ridgelines, dramatic glacial valleys, alpine lakes and a plethora of wildlife. Known as the “Crown of the Continent,” Glacier National Park offers the opportunity for wonder to naturalists of all kinds. Modern tourists are not the first people to travel the land within the borders of Glacier National Park. The park lies in the traditional territories of several Native American tribes, including the Blackfeet, Kootenai and Salish. The first European trappers came to the area in the early 1800s seeking valuable beaver

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pelts. In 1981, the Great Northern Railway connected to the area, providing access to European homesteaders, miners and tourists. After being struck by the beauty of the Glacier National Park during a trip in 1885, early conservationist George Bird Grinnell worked to have it designated a national park. President William Howard Taft signed legislation to create the park in 1910. The park’s popularity has grown in recent years. In 2017, Glacier drew more than 3.3 million visitors – the highest attendance in the history of the park. Decades-long efforts to protect diverse ecosystems in the park have yielded incredible opportunities for wildlife to thrive. An array of animals call the park home, including deer, mountain lions, marmots, picas, wolverines and lynx. Keep an eye out for mountain goats climbing sheer mountainsides and moose wading in lakes. Look to the skies to see a golden eagle or harlequin duck, two of the 260 species of birds in the park. If you’re interested in taking in the most spectacular views of the landscape, start with Lake MacDonald just inside the west entrance to the park. The spot provides an iconic view of a pristine lake, met by forested hills and framed by jagged mountains. Turn your head at nearly any spot in the park and you will find a view fit for a photograph. 

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44 Years of Live Theatre On the Lake Park officials closely regulate boat launches in Glacier National Park waters in order to prevent aquatic invasive species from disrupting aquatic ecosystems. Especially strict quarantine and inspection rules will be enforced this summer because 2016 saw the introduction of invasive mussels to lakes in the region. If you don’t bring your own boat to the park, you can still take to the waters on a rented boat or a boat tour. Glacier Park Boat Tours have paddleboards, kayaks and other boats for rent at locations throughout the park. Visitors can also tour some of the park’s lakes on a vintage boat through Glacier Park Boat Tours.  Glacier National Park extends to the Canadian border in the north where it connects to Waterton Lakes National Park in Canada. Together the parks form Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park. The partnership preserves the shared ecosystem of the parks and celebrates the relationship between Canada and the United States.  The park is named for its glaciers, and many visitors travel to the park specifically to see these expansive frozen fields. Glaciers are masses of ice, snow, rock and sediment that flow with the force of gravity. The glaciers in the park are over 7,000 years old and reached their peak size and number in the mid-1800s. Today only 37 of the 150 active glaciers that were present in the park in 1850 remain. As a result of rising global temperatures related to climate change, scientists predict that all of the active glaciers in the park will be melted by 2030. Some hypothesize that part of the recent increase in the park’s popularity is a result of people visiting to see the glaciers before rising temperatures eliminate them. In addition to stunning daylight vistas, the park’s star-gazing opportunities are second to none. Waterton Lakes and Glacier National Park have received a Dark Sky designation, S EE PAG E 3 4

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Going-to-the-Sun Road, one of the most distinguishing features of Glacier National Park, is a 50-mile, two-lane road that connects the St. Mary Visitor Center to Apgar Visitor Center. The road allows visitors to experience the heart of the park by vehicle. Going-to-the-Sun Road climbs to its highest point of 6,646 feet at Logan Pass. The narrow road is edged by precipitous drops, which can add an element of danger to the spectacular views. The design of the road is an engineering feat to behold and has been designated a National Historic Landmark. Visitors can drive their own vehicles on the road but the park also offers a free two-way hop-on, hop-off shuttle service. Another option is taking a narrated tour of the road in a vintage red bus. You can book seats on these buses through the Glacier National Park website.  Going-to-the-Sun Road is open when park staff can plow it fully. The open dates vary from year to year, but visitors can usually drive the length of the road from late-June to midOctober. Plan for the full 50-mile drive to take no less than two hours. If you prefer to leave the road behind, Glacier offers more than 700 miles of hiking trails. There is a hike to meet every visitor’s desires. The 11.4-mile Highline Trail provides one of the most spectacular day trips. It features a bird’s eye view of lakes, wildlife and the foliage-studded Garden Wall. Hike the Hidden Lake Overlook Trail if you’re hoping to run into bighorn sheep, marmots, mountain goats or wolverines. From the 2.7-mile Swiftcurrent Nature Trail, you may spot a bear, moose or elk.  Visitors can utilize the lakes in the park. Paddling on a serene glacial lake will give visitors a new perspective for taking in views of mountains and wildlife. Inspected and authorized motorized and non-motorized boats can launch on Lake MacDonald. On all other park waters, non-motorized boats like canoes and kayaks will be allowed after they are inspected and receive a permit.

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based on their commitments to minimizing light pollution. This collaboration creates the first International Dark Sky Park. Preserving dark skies benefits wildlife and gives human visitors the opportunity to view stars in a clear sky, a rarity in today’s world. On a clear night, you can easily identify constellations throughout the sky and the Milky Way. Facilitated night sky programs at Glacier National Park work in tandem with the Dark Sky designation. These are some of the best-attended park programs. Details about the programs can be found on the Glacier website. The 2019 season will be the fourth for one of the park’s most popular employees: a border collie named Gracie. Also known as the Bark Ranger, Gracie protects wildlife by herding them away from heavily traveled areas in the park. Gracie’s handler, Natural Resources Manager Mark Biel, brought Gracie to the park as a new way to prevent harmful interactions between humans and wildlife. Gracie primarily works near the Logan Pass parking lot where she herds mountain goats away from areas used by visitors. Gracie’s charm also gives Biel the chance to educate people about wildlife safety. If you can’t find Gracie at Logan Pass, you can check out her Instagram page, @barkrangernps.  By Mary Auld for the Valley Journal, Photos by Linda Sappington VJ

Take to the stage Polson’s beautiful theatre on the south end of Flathead Lake is home to the Port Polson Players, now in their 44th season. The historic 1938 log building on the old nine of the Polson Bay Golf Course hosts musicals, comedies, theatre classics and children’s programs. The Players, in association with Mission Valley Friends of the Arts, provide a combination of the aforementioned in the form of community, children’s and summer theatre opportunities. Summer shows run Wednesdays through Sundays through July and August. Curtain times for summer shows are 8 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday and a 2 p.m. matinee on Sunday. Mondays and Tuesdays are dark. Curtain for community and children’s shows is at 7:30 pm. Recipients of Montana Governor’s Arts Award, Polson Players Producers Neal and Karen Lewing suggest PortPolsonPlayers.com for

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Prevention: the only line of defense

Preventing the spread of aquatic invasive species requires effort, especially in the summer months when people travel from one body of water to the next. Zebra and quagga mussels are the fingernail-size invaders that would have a devastating impact on Flathead Lake if they get introduced to local habitat by hitchhiking on watercraft. Erik Hanson, the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe’s Aquatic Invasive Species Program coordinator created a visual of the damage during the opening of the inspection station last year. He said imagine walking on the shoreline of the lake with your shoes off and you feel a stabbing pain in your foot. The razor-sharp edge of a mussel shell would make it difficult to walk barefoot around the lake or on any hard surface where they would attach. Tribal, state and local governments are working to prevent mussels from becoming established in the lake, but it only takes one contaminated boat to introduce the invaders into a body of water. The issue becomes more urgent every year as the invaders spread further across the country. Invasive mussel larvae were found in Montana in 2016 when the Tiber Reservoir tested positive. Canyon Ferry Reservoir and Missouri River near Townsend both had water samples suspected of mussel larvae, but adult mussels haven’t been established in the state. In 2018, Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks and partners conducted 109,000 watercraft inspections in Montana with 16 mussel-fouled vessels intercepted at check stations. The 2018 season had the highest number of inspections since the inception of the watercraft

inspection station program, according to FWP. “The July 4th holiday was again the busiest period for boater movement.” According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, quagga and zebra mussels have been documented in more than 600 lakes and reservoirs in 30 states across the country. Should the mussels become established in the Flathead, officials say the effects would be devastating. The mussels could decimate food supplies for native species, create harmful algal blooms and alter water quality. Algal blooms are toxin-producing algae overgrowths. “It would change our way of life forever,” Hanson said. “Prevention is our only tool right now.” Aquatic invasive species inspection stations are the state’s greatest prevention measure. Here on the Flathead Indian Reservation, the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Department have teamed up to provide an inspection station in Ravalli. Hanson often visits inspection stations. He crawls under boats and checks inside kayaks for any sign of AIS along with several other inspectors. The stations remain open through the summer. Hanson said letting even one mussel get by could cause a problem because that one mussel could put millions of eggs into the water, and those eggs grow into larvae that attach to any hard surface including rocks, docks and dams. According to FWP, both zebra and quagga mussels have byssal threads that allow them to attach to those hard surfaces, which are like little dangling strings until they attach to something. S EE PAG E 36

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The U.S. Geological Survey says the quagga and the zebra mussels are closely related and alike in appearance with similar impacts to the environment, but the two species can be distinguished. When placed on a hard surface, the zebra mussel is stable with a flattened underside while quagga mussels lack a flat underside. The zebra mussel is named for the striped pattern on its triangular shell much like the larger animal with the same name, although color patterns can vary to the point of having only a light or dark colored shell and no stripes. Zebra mussels are also more often found attached to hard surfaces including objects and other mussels. Quagga mussels can colonize both soft and hard material including sandy lake bottoms and mud, according to FWP. Their color patterns vary widely from black, cream, or white bands. They often have dark rings on their rounded shells that get paler near the hinge. The quagga mussel was named after the extinct relative of the four-legged zebra. The mussels are filter feeders and can increase the transparency of the lake water they inhabit, which might seem like a nice side effect, but that water clarity increases light penetration, according to FWP. More light means more plants that change the entire ecosystem. The mussels also produce waste as they filter the water, and that waste accumulates to create “a foul environment.” As those waste materials decompose, oxygen is used up and toxic byproducts are produced. The mussels also create economic problems as they colonize hard surfaces and clog pipes and screens. CSKT notes that lake front property along Flathead

“It would change our way of life forever. Prevention is our only tool right now.” - ERIC HANSON CSKT AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES PROGRAM MANAGER

Lake is currently valued at $6 to $8 billion, and invasive mussels would cause a drop in property value of about $1.5 billion. It was also noted that the impact to tourism, hydropower, and infrastructure systems could be around $95 million a year if mussels get into the lake. With the looming threat of invasive mussels, watercraft inspection stations and decontamination programs have been implemented in many states including Montana. Trained personnel inspect watercraft and equipment at different check stations. In 2015, Montana’s legislature authorized inspection stations with the Department of Transportation and the Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks. Anyone carrying or towing any watercraft or water-based equipment, nonmotorized and motorized, must stop at all open watercraft inspection stations they encounter in Montana, according to FWP. If people fail to stop, local agencies including the Lake County Sheriff’s Office, FWP game wardens, Montana Highway Patrol, tribal officers and tribal conservation officers work together to respond to those calls and make sure all watercraft is inspected. Boating and watercraft regulations on the reservation state that all boats and

watercraft need to stop at open inspection stations along their travel route. All boats and watercraft need a new inspection if they leave the Flathead Basin prior to launching into reservation waters. Regulations also state that felt-soled waders are not permitted in any waters on the reservation and that all water gear and equipment must be clean and dry before use on any body of water. In an effort to reduce the chance of contamination, people are asked to clean, drain and dry watercraft after leaving any body of water. Cleaning off plants, animals and mud reduces the chances of transporting an invasive species. If mussels are found, the watercraft is expertly cleaned with high-pressure water to remove the mussels and 140 degree temperatures are used to kill the mussel after 10 seconds. Invasive mussels can live for as long as 30 days outside of water, depending on weather temperatures, so a decontamination time is also determined. People traveling from outside the state can also volunteer to have their watercraft cleaned using the “hot wash” method to make sure none of the tiny larvae were brought into the state. If inspection stations are closed, an inspection can be arranged at CSKT offices at 406 Sixth Ave. E. in Polson, Monday through Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., call 406675-2700 ext. 7200 to arrange a time. For more information about Montana’s efforts to defend against aquatic invasive species, visit cleandraindrymt.com and the “Protect Our Waters Montana” Facebook page. For more information about the CSKT AIS prevention program, visit CSKTnomussels.org. By Karen Peterson, Valley Journal VJ

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The taste of a Mission Valley summer

Flare Pops offer farm-to-pop frozen treats

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POLSON – On a sweltering summer day there’s nothing quite like a fruity, frozen treat on a stick — especially when the ingredients were grown locally. On any given summertime Friday patrons young and old wander the Polson Farmers Market savoring the refreshing local flavors of Flare Pops. “People smile and socialize and enjoy them in the heat of summer,” Flare Pops owner Karl Sutton said. Flare Pops has seasonal fruits and vegetables in the style of the Mexican frozen treat called a paleta. The business is an enterprise of Fresh Roots Farm in Polson, owned by Sutton and Darci Jones. According to Sutton, there’s a difference between a paleta and an ice pop found in the grocery store. Paletas are made of local, seasonal fruits and vegetables. The ingredients in the Fresh Roots paletas are grown either right at Fresh Roots farm or elsewhere in the Mission Valley.

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Flare Pops is dedicated to using hyperlocal ingredients, which means that each pop reflects the area’s specific agricultural character. Fresh Roots’ wellknown strawberries take center stage in a few flavors. The apples come from Moss Orchard in Rollins; and, of course, there is a Flathead cherry flavor. You won’t find citrus or tropical fruit flavors as main ingredients in the paletas. “I’m not making

flavors of things that are not from right here,” Sutton said. Fresh Roots grows the strawberries, carrots, raspberries and melons for the pops. They also house the production kitchen for the product. Flare Pops are sold at farmers markets in Polson, Whitefish, Missoula and at special events like music festivals and concerts. This year, Flare Pops will have freezer bags

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at the market so customers can bring paletas home with them. The business also caters to private events and fills orders for individuals. Sutton and his daughter, Kena, were in Mexico on an escape from the cold Montana winter when they came up with the idea for Flare Pops. “We were eating paletas, and we agreed this is something we could make,” Sutton said.

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According to Sutton, his farm was losing money on strawberries that were blemished and couldn’t be sold fresh. Paletas gave a home to that flavorful but imperfect fruit. “The popsicle business allowed us to increase our sales in the summertime without actually producing more vegetables and fruit,” Sutton said. In 2017, the business started producing paletas at Mission Mountain Food Enterprise Center in Ronan. Last year, production moved to a commercial kitchen Sutton built on the farm. Kena has remained an integral part of the Flare Pops creativity team. She and her friends taste-test every flavor. “If my daughter doesn’t like it, we don’t make it,” Sutton said. Sutton, Jones, and employees of the farm also contribute feedback to shape the recipes. The paletas are made with simple ingredients; for example, the strawberry flavor features just strawberries, lemon, and sugar. The ingredients in the pops are grown organically. The first flavor Sutton produced was apple rosemary, made from apples grown in Rollins and rosemary grown locally. Flare Pops has an option for everyone — most of the pops are dairy free, and Sutton

even makes rice horchata for the pops from scratch. Some flavors, like strawberry and raspberry are simple, but others are more complex. Rhubarb jasmine, cherry hibiscus and melon are all popular flavors. A strawberry balsamic combination is a unique offering. “It’s a lot of trial and error, but we’re getting better every year,” he said.

Sutton said the business has been a natural business complement to the farm. Fresh Roots sells certified organic produce at farmers markets. Their main products are lettuce, carrots, and strawberries. The farm also produces organic vegetable seeds. The competition for small, organic farms like Fresh Roots in

the area can be stiff. Flare Pops give Sutton and Jones a new market for their produce. “We wanted to have something different to bring people to our stand,” Sutton said. One limitation of the business is that the season is short. Sutton finds his sales plummet when the temperature is below 70 degrees. As a solution, he’ll be making real fruit soda to add to Flare Pops’ inventory. “We’ll have strawberry vanilla soda just like an old fashioned soda fountain,” he said. Sutton said choosing a Flare Pops paleta is an investment in the community. “You’re supporting a small family farm in the valley,” he said. “When you buy from us we return that by buying from you.” Parents appreciate the opportunity to feed their children a healthy treat made from fruits and vegetables. Adults can pair them with an alcoholic beverage for a trendy treat. As for the best reason for adults and children to try a paleta “ultimately, they’re just really good,” Sutton said. By Mary Auld for the Valley Journal Photos by Nicole Tavener / Valley Journal

VJ

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Secrets of the deep

A school of fish or a monster?

Beneath the tranquil blue waters of Flathead Lake, a mysterious secret lurks. While the lake may have been generously forthcoming with all its beauty and splendor, only a select few have seen what is hidden in its darkest depths. What’s the secret? No one can say for sure. It’s anyone’s guess. It has been called a prehistoric serpent, giant lake sturgeon, large school of fish, natural phenomena, huge log bobbing in the water or just a sightseer’s hyperactive imagination. The theories of what it is or what it is not are as varied as those who have reported the sightings. The very first documented sightings date back between the mid to late 1800s with the most publicized sighting taking place in 1889, which was the year Montana achieved statehood. What was witnessed and the number of witnesses made the encounter significant. At first, it appeared to be another boat or large floating log in the water to the approximately 100 passengers, crew and skipper of the U.S. Grant, a lake steamboat in service to ferry passengers and cargo between the south and north shores of Flathead Lake. The story has been recounted in numerous newspaper stories and magazine articles over the years. As the steamboat drew closer, those on board quickly realized that the unidentified object of about 20 feet long wasn’t just floating in the water but was very much alive and actually swimming towards them. Frightened, one of the passengers on the steamer retrieved his rifle from his stowed belongings and fired a shot at the creature – scaring it off. In the 130 years since, there have been more than 107 documented Flathead Lake monster sightings, according to the “keeper of the record” Laney Hanzel, a former Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks biologist. Hanzel retired two decades ago after serving more than 30 years with the state agency. “I don’t know scientifically what it’s called,” Hanzel said. “The typical sighting is of a shiny black eel-like creature which is about 20-40 feet in length with steely40

M O N TA N A S U M M E R

ILLUSTRATION BY BEN STONE / VALLEY JOURNAL

black eyes. It undulates through the water as it swims along.” Hanzel’s description closely resembles what Lake County Judge Jim Manley and his wife Julia witnessed after a dead boat battery left them floating marooned out on the lake near Big Arm. While waiting for a rescue from family members, the couple spent their time swimming in the lake and relaxing on the boat deck. “We heard loud splashing,” Manley explained in a July 2018 KECI TV interview.

What the Manleys saw next would give any seasoned boater goosebumps. They saw a creature with several humps moving through the water against the current. “I remember saying, ‘look, look! That’s it! We’re seeing it!’ Manley said. “It was like 25 feet long from what we could see.” Most of the sightings occur on the open water, but people along the shoreline have their fair share of sightings. In a booklet by Paul Fugleberg titled “Montana Nessie of Flathead Lake,” there are many “Nessie”


“I don’t know scientifically what it’s called. The typical sighting is of a shiny black eel-like creature which is about 20-40 feet in length with steely-black eyes. It undulates through the water as it swims along.” L ANEY HANZEL, RETIRED BIOLOGIST

stories reported by witnesses from the shore. In one such account, a west shore family was eating dinner on the patio when they noticed something shiny and black swimming toward their dock. By the time they got up from the table for a better view, whatever it was had submerged, leaving a big wake behind, rocking the dock and surrounding boats. Even motorists traveling along the shoreline on U.S. Highway 93 and Highway 35 have gotten in on the action by reporting glimpses of something dark and large dipping up and down and swimming parallel to the shoreline. The next time you are traveling along Flathead Lake to your favorite Montana playground or even at the lake, keep your eyes open. You never know when the lake may let you have a glimpse of the mysterious little secret that lurks beneath the surface. Story by Rob Zolman, Valley Journal

VJ

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summer

calendar May / June

Sunday, May 26 • ARLEE — Arlee High School graduation. • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy live music and a barbecue at the Symes Hotel from 4-8 p.m. as part of the Memorial Day celebration.

Monday, May 27 • POLSON — The Memorial Day Parade will assemble at the Elks Club on Main Street between 9 and 9:30 a.m. with step off time at noon. The parade will go down Main Street and turn to end at First Citizens Bank. Free ice cream will be served at the Polson Flathead Lake Museum on Main Street at 1 p.m. 42

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Wednesday, May 29

Friday, May 31

• POLSON — Sandpiper Art Gallery, 306 Main Street, Polson, presents until June 14, “As I Was Wandering.” This exhibit will be everything we love about Montanans and the Montana Experience. This show will feature past and present member artists; Sue Arneson (Montana Watercolor Artist), Carolyn Ekland-Olson (World Wide Photography), Karla Martinson (3D Paintings & Publisher), Mary Kelley (Plein Aire and the Old Masters in Oil), Judith Wright (Mixed Media). Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Saturday.

• ST. IGNATIUS — Final day of school for St. Ignatius students. • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Ole Red Coyote performs country rock and alternative music.

Saturday, June 1 • ST. IGNATIUS — St. Ignatius High School graduation. • PLAINS — The Wildhorse Shootout will be held on June 1 at the Amundson Sports complex in Plains. The deadline for entries is May 27 and cost is $100 per team. Divisions include first grade through adult. Register online at:

missionvalley3on3.com • POLSON — Providence St. Joseph Medical Center’s Charity Golf Tournament is scheduled for Saturday, June 1. Registration is at 8 a.m. and shotgun start is at 9 a.m. This will be an 18-hole/four-person scramble with an entry fee of $120 per team, which includes golf, golf cart, tees, prizes and lunch. For more information or to register contact Cameron at Polson Bay Golf Course at 406-883-8230 or go to: polsonbaygolfcourse@gmail. com. • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Bob Wire performs max honky-tonk.


June • RONAN — The eighth annual Papa Bear Memorial Motorcycle Poker Ride will take place on June 1, starting at 10 a.m. and ending at 5 p.m. There is a $10 entry fee, which benefits the youth of Lake County. After starting at S&S Sports in Ronan, stops include: Town Pump in Plains, Fergies Pub & Grill in Hot Springs, Del’s Bar in Somers. The ride ends at S&S Sports again in Ronan. Vintage cars 1979 and older are welcome to join the event. Food, beverages and awards begin at 5 p.m.  • POLSON — Soar into summer with the Mission Valley Christian Academy at their “On Eagle’s Wings” benefit dinner and auction on June 1 at the Red Lion Inn. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Call 406-883-6858 for tickets at $50 each. The event will feature the following auction items: plane tours, a 4th of July fireworks package, Wild Horse Island day of fun,

Pellet grill, Henry .22 Golden Boy, Duck Dynasty speaker/ dinner event tickets, and many more. • CHARLO — Ninepipes Museum is honored that artists will exhibit their beautiful work in the Earl W. Wharton Memorial Gallery during the following “First Saturday” events of the 2019 season: June 1, July 6, Aug. 3, and Sept. 7. Laurel Cheff and her husband Bud built the Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana in 1997. It is located at 69316 U.S. Highway 93, Charlo, Montana 59824. Visit: http:// www.ninepipesmuseum.org for more information. • WILDHORSE ISLAND — National Trails Day – Meet new people in your area and give back to your local parks by helping to beautify and protect our trails. This year the focus is on maintaining the habitat and trails of Wild Horse Island. This event is free from 10 a.m-

2 p.m. Call 406-837-3041 for transportation and meeting location information. • PABLO — The People’s Center will hold a social powwow on Saturday, June 1, from 1-3 p.m. to celebrate their summer hours starting. There will be dancing, drumming and singing. The People’s Center will be open Monday through Saturday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. during the summer months. • POLSON — The North Lake County Public Library will hold a “Friends of the Library” book sale from 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. in the large meeting room.

Sunday, June 2 • RONAN — Ronan High School graduation. • CHARLO — Charlo High School graduation.

Wednesday, June 5 • ARLEE — Final day of school for Arlee students.

• POLSON — The Polson Chamber of Commerce luncheon will be held at the Red Lion Inn from noon-1 p.m. Featured speaker is Bridger Mahlum of the Montana Chamber of Commerce. The cost of lunch is $14.50. No reservations required. For more information call the Chamber office at 406-883-5969.

Thursday, June 6 • DAYTON — Final day of school for Dayton Elementary students. • VALLEY VIEW — Final day of school for Valley View School students. • RONAN — The Ronan Chamber of Commerce will hold their monthly luncheon at the Mission Mountain Golf Club from noon-1 p.m. Join this monthly social networking and lecture series. There is a fee for lunch. S EE PAG E 4 4

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F R O M PAG E 43

• ST. IGNATIUS — St. Ignatius Elementary School will hold a “Reading Enhancement” program from June 6-28, from 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Call the school for more information at 406-7453811 ext. 302.

Friday, June 7 • RONAN — Final day of school for Ronan students. • HOT SPRINGS — The 71st annual Homesteader Days celebration is a family fun weekend June 7-9 with arts and crafts, parades, a two-day rodeo, food booths on Main Street and a street dance. For more information call 406-7412662. • POLSON — The Polson Splash Classic Softball ASA tournament will be held at the Polson softball complex

(behind Cherry Valley Elementary School) on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, June 7, 8 and 9. Many teams from all over Montana and Washington compete in games starting at 5 p.m. on Friday and all day Saturday and Sunday. For details, call Kelley at 406-2531590.

and 5K run/walk start at 9:30 a.m. Participants will be bussed from town to the beginning of the race down the hill back to Hot Springs. Registration begins at 8 a.m. Call 406-2742638 for more information. Race form available at: http:// cancernetworksanderscounty. org/.

Saturday, June 8

Monday, June 10

• POLSON — Polson High School graduation day. • BIGFORK — Day at the Lake – Help us kick off the summer and celebrate all the fun things that Flathead Lake State Park has to offer at this familyfriendly event from 10 a.m.- 2 p.m. at the Wayfarers Unit. • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Kathy Colton & the Reluctants perform rock, folk and percussion music. • HOT SPRINGS — A staple of Homesteader Days, the 10K run

• LAKE COUNTY — The Boys and Girls Club of Lake County and the Flathead Reservation in Ronan will operate a summer program Monday-Friday from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. from June 10-Aug. 16 (closed July 4). The cost is $20 per week or $150 for the full summer. The summer session is 10 weeks of fun – opportunities, discovery, learning, and activities galore. Applications may be picked up onsite or at: www.flatheadbgc. org. • PABLO — Pablo Elementary School begins their reading

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camp. This camp will go from June 10-28 from 8:45 a.m.12:15 p.m. Applications may be picked up at the school’s front office. Call 406-676-3390 for more information. • RONAN — Ronan Middle School students (grades 5-8) may attend literacy and math classes at RMS from 9 a.m.noon, Monday-Friday, from June 10-28. There will be a couple of special activities included. • RONAN — Ronan Middle School students (grades 5-8) may attend afternoon summer camps (with priority given to morning summer school students). Afternoon camps are from 12:30-3:30 p.m. and include: Salish language, STEM, swimming and more. • RONAN — Ronan High School students may attend HS Credit Recovery Summer School. Two separate sessions will run: June 10-28 and Aug. 5-23. Both sessions are from 9 a.m.-noon,

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June sessions are from 9 a.m.-noon, Monday-Friday. • RONAN — Afternoon HS Summer Camps are from June 10-28 from 12:30-3:30 p.m. All camps are free.

Thursday, June 13 • POLSON — Final day of school for Polson students. • BIGFORK — Flathead Fledglings – This one hour program, designed for children ages 4-7, gives kids a chance to get outside and learn about the great outdoors. This is the first in a five-part series, although participants need not attend all five. Parents are encouraged to attend with their children. The cost is $4 per child and takes place at the Wayfarers Unit – Harry Horn picnic shelter. • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Tommy Alexander performs folk music. • MISSOULA — The 34th

annual Montana Senior Olympic Games will be held in Missoula June 14-16. The event involves competition in 14 different sports for men and women who are 50 years of age and older as of Dec. 31, 2019. The sports include: archery, bowling, badminton, cycling, basketball, golf, horseshoes, pickle ball, racewalk, tennis, table tennis, road race, swimming and track & field. Gold, silver and bronze medals will be awarded. Social events include a social hour at 6 p.m. and a pasta dinner at 7 p.m. on Thursday, June 13, at the Fort Missoula Regional Park Bella Vista Pavilion, for $11. Contact Annie Petschauer at: 406-552-6664 or petschauera@ci.missoula. mt.us, for more information.

Friday, June 14 • POLSON — The Kiwanis Club is hosting a local beer and wine fest from 6-9 p.m.

at the KOA Campground, 200 Irvine Flats Road, on June 14. This fundraiser supports local Kiwanis community projects and local youth activities including scholarships, the Boys and Girls Club, Boy Scouts, Special Olympics and the Polson Middle School band. Call 406-883-3890 for more information. • MISSOULA — The 34th annual Montana Senior Olympic Games continues with a taco banquet and opening ceremony on Friday, June 14, at 6 p.m. at the Missoula Brewing Company, 200 International Dr., for $19 per person. This event is for athletes and guests and tickets are required. Contact Annie Petschauer at: 406-552-6664 or petschauera@ci.missoula. mt.us, for more information.

p.m. at the Flathead Lake Ranger Station – Wayfarers Unit to chat with a ranger, participate in fun games and activities, learn about the park and Flathead Lake and earn your Junior Ranger badge. This is a free event.

Sunday, June 16 Father’s Day • POLSON — The Father’s Day two-person scramble golf tournament takes place at the Polson Bay Golf Course. Call 406-883-8230 for more information. • POLSON — Polson Motorcoach and RV Resort will serve free huckleberry or regular pancakes to all Dads from 8-10:30 a.m. on Father’s Day.

Monday June 17

Saturday, June 15 • BIGFORK — Junior Ranger Day – Drop by from noon – 3

• RONAN — K.W. Harvey S EE PAG E 46

Locals and visitors alike…

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M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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June su mme r

calendar

F R O M PAG E 4 5

Elementary School will offer a “Salish Language Camp” from June 17-21 from 9 a.m. – noon. • POLSON — Registration for the North Lake County Public Library’s Family Summer Reading Program begins at 10 a.m. The program is open to all ages. Call 406-883-8225 for more information. • CHARLO — The Ninepipe Arts Group will sponsor their annual “Kids’ Art Camp” beginning Monday, June 17, and running through Thursday, June 20, from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. For additional information call 406644-2311. • POLSON — A members only open show entitled “Magic Moment,” featuring Sandpiper Art Gallery member artists past and present will be exhibited from June 17-July 26. All

e

submissions will be accepted in the artist’s interpretation of the theme. This is member magic at its best. Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Saturday. • POLSON — The Boys and Girls Club of Lake County and Flathead Reservation in Polson will operate a summer program Monday-Friday from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. from June 17-Aug. 16 (closed July 4). The cost is $10 per week or $75 for the full summer. The summer session is 9 weeks of fun – opportunities, discover, learning, and activities galore. Applications may be picked up onsite or at: www.flatheadbgc.org. • POLSON — Registration for this summer’s reading program at the North Lake County Public Library opens at 10 a.m. on Monday, June 17. Online registration will be offered again this year, so if you are not able to make it into the library to register

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Tuesday, June 18 • POLSON — The Mission Valley Jr. Golf Camp is free and open to youth going into the first through the eighth grade at the Polson Bay Golf Course. Call 406-883-8230 for more information. The camp takes place from 7:30 a.m. – 12:30

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physically, watch our Facebook page and website (www. northlakecountylibrary.org) for that link to go up on June 17. Registration will remain open throughout the remainder of the program, with reading logs due back by closing on Aug. 2 in order to ensure eligibility for incentives and prize tickets. • POLSON — The Usborne “New Book Fair” at the North Lake County Public Library begins at 10 a.m. An Usborne book representative will be there with the latest books. She can help you find the perfect books for your young and teen readers.

p.m. on Tuesday, June 18, and repeats on June 19, 20 and 21.

Wednesday, June 19 • POLSON — The Mission Valley Jr. Golf Camp is free and open to youth going into the first through the eighth grade at the Polson Bay Golf Course. Call 406-883-8230 for more information. The camp takes place from 7:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. and repeats on June 20 and 21.

Thursday, June 20 • POLSON — The Mission Valley Jr. Golf Camp is free and open to youth going into the first through the eighth grade at the Polson Golf Bay Course. Call 406-883-8230 for more information. The camp takes place from 7:30 a.m. – 12:30 and repeats on June 21. • RONAN — From Thursday, June 20, until Sunday, June 23, a “Chainsaw Carving

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June Rendezvous” will be held at the Lake County Fairgrounds from 9 a.m.-8 p.m. The event includes daily carving seminars, nightly quick-carve auctions and a main auction on Sunday afternoon. Watch all the action and see some amazing works of art by chainsaw carvers from across the U.S. Craft and food vendors, a beer garden, lumberjack log milling, a Dutch oven cooking class and the CSKT Forestry and Fire Departments will be on site. For more information, call the Ronan Chamber at 406-6768300 or go to their website: ronanchamber.com. • POLSON — Sponsor of the June SPLASH (Support Polson Late Afternoon Social Hour) is PayneWest Insurance and Alpine Designs. The event will be held on Thursday, June 20, from 5-7 p.m. at Alpine Designs, 111 Third Ave. E. • POLSON — The North Lake County Public Library will hold a computer basic class on “Internet Privacy” at 2 p.m. Visit www.northlakecountylibrary. org for more information. • POLSON — The North Lake County Public Library will begin their “A Universe of Stories” program at 10:30 a.m. This is a space-center children’s program that will run weekly until Aug. 22.

Friday, June 21 Summer Solstice • POLSON — The Mission Valley Jr. Golf Camp is free and

open to youth going into the first through the eighth grade at the Polson Bay Golf Course. Call 406-883-8230 for more information. The camp takes place from 7:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. • POLSON — The Sandpiper Art Gallery will hold a reception from 5-7 p.m. for their “Magic Moment” art show. • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Aaron Jennings performs honky-tonk, and western swing music. • RONAN — On Friday, June 21, the Ronan Area Chamber of Commerce will present “Crab Fest 2019,” which is a benefit for the Bockman (Ronan City) Park. The dinner begins at 5 p.m. and will take place at the Lake County Fairgrounds. Tickets are $35 per person or two for $60 for the all-youcan-eat event. Purchase tickets at Ronan Flower Mill, Valley Banks, Ronan Napa, Glacier Bank, First Interstate BankPolson, Access Montana and Ronan Power Products. Enjoy fresh crab boiled on site. Bring your own beverages, crab pliers and appetite. For more information, call the Ronan Chamber at 406-676-8300. • RONAN — Safe Harbor will present a “Circus and Carnival” on Saturday, June 22. Shows are at 2 and 4:30 p.m. Tickets are $15 for adults and $8 for children. The free-admission carnival will take place from 11 a.m. until 5 p.m. Game tickets

QUICKSILVER EXPRESSO

675-5000 51999 US 93 • PABLO

• ST. IGNATIUS — The St. Ignatius Volunteer Fire Department Fireman’s Auction will take place on Saturday, June 22, at 11 a.m. at the Old Town Field. Concessions begin at that time and include hamburgers, hot dogs and pulled pork sandwiches with coleslaw. Meals will be served until the end of the auction at approximately 5 p.m. (Purchase a meal and you’re entered in the door prize drawing.) The silent auction starts at 11 a.m.; the live auction starts at noon with raffle drawings and door prizes. Raffle tickets will be sold before the auction for a ½ beef; a whole hog cut and wrapped; and an .AR15 rifle with scope. To donate auction items please call 406-543-2288 or 406-531-0375. • POLSON — The Polson Bay Golf Course will host the Pitch, Putt and Drive Contest, the culminating event of the junior camp week. The contest is from noon-5 p.m. and is followed by awards and a potluck barbecue. • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Ole Red Coyote

Sunday, June 23 • BIGFORK — Let’s Bee Friendly – Learn about native pollinators, from 2-3 p.m. at the Wayfarers Birch Grove picnic shelter and discover how to identify a bee from a wasp and create your own mason bee condos using recycled materials. Space is limited. Please call 406-837-3041 to register. There is a $4 per person or $10 per family fee.

Monday, June 24 • POLSON — For the week of June 24-27, a field trip to Philipsburg is planned for the Polson summer school program. Contact Mandie Steele, Polson School District #23 afterschool program director at 406-212-6784 or email: asteele@polson.k12. mt.us • YELLOW BAY — The 2019 Data and Donuts Seminar series is offered every summer during the first four weeks of the Flathead Lake Biological Station Summer Session. The series offers students and the public a chance to hear speakers across a wide variety of ecological topics. Come to S EE PAG E 4 8

See the

Flathead Lake Monster

HUGE

selection of snacks & beverag es!!

www.polsonflatheadmuseum.org 7 days a week

(near the walking bridge in Pablo)

Saturday, June 22

performs country rock and alternative music. • RONAN — American Legion No. 138 will serve up breakfast at the VFW beginning at 8 a.m. • RONAN — Don’t miss the 325 Bar street dance.

The Reservation Pioneer Museum

TAKE A BREAK!

Come in for: • Soup & Sandwiches • Coffee Bar • Free Wi-Fi • Ice Cream • Car Wash & Vacuum • Laundromat • ATM • Flathead Transit/ Jefferson Line connect

will be 50 cents each. • RONAN — Crazy Days takes place in Ronan as local merchants put on spectacular sales on Friday, June 21, and Saturday, June 22. There will also be a 325 Bar street dance on both of these evenings.

Monday- Friday 6:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 7:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.

406-883-3049 708 Main St. Polson Mon-Sat 10-4 • Sun 1-4 May 15th-Sept 16th 2019 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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F R O M PAG E 47

the seminar at the FLBS at Yellow Bay on Monday, June 24, from 10-11 a.m. These seminars are open to the public, and everyone is invited to attend. Stop by to have a donut and learn more about ecology, and current research in the Flathead. The speaker for June 24 is Janene Lichtenberg, department head of wildlife and fisheries at Salish Kootenai College. Her topic will be, “Tribal wildlife research and management: Perspectives and success stories.” Call 406-8724503, for more information.

Thursday, June 27 • BIGFORK — Flathead Fledglings – This one hour program from 11 a.m. – noon, designed for children ages 4-7, gives kids a chance to get outside and learn about the great outdoors. This is the second in a five-part series, although participants need not attend all five. Parents are encouraged to attend with their children. This event takes place at Wayfarers Harry Horn picnic shelter. The fee is $4 per child. • POLSON — The North Lake County Public Library continues their “A Universe of Stories” program at 10:30 a.m. This is a space-center children’s

program that will run weekly until Aug. 22.

Friday, June 28 • POLSON — Join us on Friday, June 28, for the eighth annual Chamber Blast hosted at the world-class Big Sky Sporting Clays in Polson. Team registration includes shells, door prizes, lunch and an awards ceremony. Bring a shotgun, eye protection and ear protection – no experience is necessary. Profits from this event go to support the Polson Chamber’s fundraising efforts, including the 4th of July fireworks show, hanging flower baskets and more. Registration is from 11 a.m.-noon, a shooter safety briefing takes place from 11:20—11:30 a.m. and the tournament takes place from 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m. with a lunch and awards ceremony from 3-3:30 p.m. Station sponsorship (banner displayed at event and recognition at awards ceremony) is $150. Team price is $345 and the cost of a team and sponsorship is $495. For more information call 406-8835969. • POLSON — The Mission Mountain NRA Rodeo takes place at the Polson Fairgrounds, 320 Regatta Road, June 28 and 29. Youth events including Mutton Bustin’ and Mini Bull Riding begin at 6:30 p.m. and the NRA Rodeo begins at 7:30 p.m. Events include: bareback, steer

Friendly service. Fair Prices. On-location rental cars.

Brendeon Shoening/Owner 53466 Hwy. 93 • Polson MT • Office (406) 883-3041 • Fax (406) 883-3042 48

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wrestling, saddle bronc, team roping, tie down roping, ladies and youth barrel racing, ladies and youth breakaway roping and bull riding. Tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for children under 12 and are available at the gate, (no pre-sale tickets). Food, beverage and a beer garden concessions will be available. There will be live music after Friday night’s performance. There is a free vendors fair but no food items. Call 406-2612861 for more information or for general rodeo information call 406-883-1100. • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Paul Lenihan will perform on the piano and the guitar. • POLSON — North Lake County Public Library presents “Friday Night at the Library.” A family-friendly movie (PG or PG-13) will be shown at 6 p.m. Attendees must be in the library before 6 p.m. as the doors lock at that time.

Saturday, June 29 • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Cat Bay Moon will perform blues and rock music.

Monday, July 1 • POLSON — For the week of July 1-4, a field trip to the old state prison in Deer Lodge is planned for the Polson summer school program.

Contact Mandie Steele, Polson School District #23 afterschool program director at 406-2126784 or email: asteele@polson. k12.mt.us • POLSON — Flathead Lake Cheese, 208 First Ave. E, will hold an open house on Monday, July 1, from 10 a.m.4 p.m. Come for tours and tastings. Call 406-883-0343 or visit: flatheadlakecheese.com, for more information. • YELLOW BAY — The 2019 Data and Donuts Seminar series is offered every summer during the first four weeks of the Flathead Lake Biological Station Summer Session. The series offers students and the public a chance to hear speakers across a wide variety of ecological topics. Come to the seminar at the FLBS at Yellow Bay on Monday, July 1, from 10-11 a.m. to have a donut and learn more about ecology, and current research in the Flathead. The program on July 1 will feature Diane Boyd, wolf biologist with Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks. She will speak on “Wolf recovery, management, and conservation: 20 years of challenges and progress.” Call 406-982-3301 x 229, for more information. All are welcome.

Wednesday, July 3 • ARLEE — The 121st annual Arlee Celebration Powwow begins Wednesday, July 3, and ends Sunday, July 7. The Arlee


July Powwow Esyapqeyni is the premier annual celebration of the Salish and Pend d’Oreille tribes, sponsored by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribal Nation. Please join us for traditional dance competitions, singing and drumming and a big July 4 parade. There are also many vendors with handmade beaded crafts and food booths, which include a variety of Indian tacos for sale. All events are open to the public and free of charge. Arts, crafts, stick games, dance competitions, Indian and other ethnic foods will be available. Absolutely no alcohol, firearms, unleashed dogs or motorcycles are allowed in the camp area.

Thursday, July 4 Independence Day • ARLEE — The Arlee Volunteer Fire Department will host its annual pancake breakfast from 7-11 a.m. at the old Arlee Fire Hall. The cost is $5 per person and it’s all you can eat. For more information, call 406-2104144. Bring a friend. • POLSON — Please join us for the July 4th parade in downtown Polson beginning at noon at Cherry Valley School. Parade entry forms are available at the Polson Chamber of Commerce. Call the chamber office for more information: 406-883-5969. Fireworks take place at dusk. The best place to view the fireworks is Riverside Park. • HOT SPRINGS — Celebrate the 4th of July with a barbecue, live music and fireworks at the Symes Hotel. • ARLEE — The Arlee Jocko Valley Museum, run by the Arlee Historical Society, opens for the summer July 4. and will be open until Labor Day. The museum has many historical displays including many photographs of Native and homesteading families. There are hundreds of obituaries with genealogy information. There is also a military display

commemorating those who have given their lives for this country. The Arlee Museum is located at corner of Bouch and Fyant (by the grade school). For more information, hours of operation or to arrange a viewing appointment, call 406726-3167. • ARLEE — The 121st annual Arlee Celebration continues. The Arlee Powwow Esyapqeyni is the premier annual celebration of the Salish and Pend d’Oreille tribes, sponsored by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribal Nation.

Friday, July 5 • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Aaron Jennings will perform honky-tonk, and

western swing music. • ARLEE — The 121st annual Arlee Celebration continues. The Arlee Powwow Esyapqeyni is the premier annual celebration of the Salish and Pend d’Oreille tribes, sponsored by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribal Nation.

Saturday, July 6 • BIGFORK — Mission Valley 3 on 3’s annual Battle in the Bay will be held Saturday, July 6 at Bigfork High School and hosts 100 plus teams from third grade through adult. There will be 6-foot, 8-foot, and 9-foot dunk contests, 3-point contests and free throw contests held on Leonard Park Logging Inc. center court. The final day for signups for this tournament

is June 25 either online at: missionvalley3on3.com, or Bigfork Dairy Queen on June 25 from 7-8 p.m. • POLSON — Mission Valley Speedway Superoval, 1113 N. Reservoir Road, presents Premier Night – 100. They will have Limited Late Models, Hobbys and Hornets scheduled for racing. Call 406-212-9159 for more information. • CHARLO — Ninepipes Museum is honored that artists will exhibit their beautiful work in the Earl W. Wharton Memorial Gallery during the following “First Saturday” events of the 2019 season: July 6, Aug. 3, and Sept. 7. Laurel Cheff and her husband Bud built the Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana in 1997. It is located at 69316 US Highway 93, Charlo, Montana 59824. Visit: http://www. ninepipesmuseum.org for more information. • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Aaron Jennings will perform honky-tonk, and western swing music. • ARLEE — The 121st annual Arlee Celebration continues. The Arlee Powwow Esyapqeyni is the premier annual celebration of the Salish and Pend d’Oreille tribes, sponsored by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribal Nation.

Sunday, July 7 • ARLEE — The 121st annual Arlee Powwow celebration ends.

Monday, July 8 • YELLOW BAY — The 2019 Data and Donuts Seminar series is offered every summer during the first four weeks of the Flathead Lake Biological Station Summer Session. The series offers students and the public a chance to hear speakers across a wide variety of ecological topics. Come to the seminar at the S EE PAG E 50 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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FLBS at Yellow Bay on Monday, July 15, from 10-11 a.m. These seminars are open to the public, and everyone is invited to attend. Stop by to have a donut and learn more about ecology, and current research in the Flathead. On this date Scott Mills, associate vice president of Research for Global Change and Sustainability and professor of wildlife biology at the University of Montana, Missoula, will speak on “Climate change, demography and genetics: lessons from population viability analysis to lynx-gate.” Call 406-982-3301 x 229, for more information. • POLSON — For the week of July 8-11, a field trip to Glacier National Park is planned for the Polson summer school program. Contact Mandie Steele, Polson School District #23 afterschool program director at 406-212-6784 or email: asteele@polson.k12. mt.us 50

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Tuesday, July 9 • LAKESIDE — Flathead Lake Boat Tours in Lakeside will graciously host an afternoon cruise aboard the Far West to one of the Flathead Lake Biological Station’s lake monitoring sites. Join FLBS researchers for appetizers, beverages, music and an overview of Flathead Lake ecology and the FLBS Research and Monitoring program. Proceeds benefit the FLBS Research and Monitoring program. Reservations are required, as limited space on the tour boat is limited. Cost is $50 per person. For more information call 406-872-4503 or go to: http://flbs.umt.edu/.

Thursday, July 11 • BIGFORK — Flathead Fledglings – This one hour program from 11 a.m. – noon, designed for children ages 4-7, gives kids a chance to get outside and learn about the great outdoors. This is the third in a five-part series, although participants need not attend all five. Parents are encouraged to attend with their children. This event takes place at Wayfarers

Harry Horn picnic shelter. The fee is $4 per child. • RONAN — 4-H fair entries are due by 4 p.m. in the Lake County Fair office. • POLSON — The North Lake County Public Library continues their “A Universe of Stories” program at 10:30 a.m. This is a space-center children’s program that will run weekly until Aug. 22.

Friday, July 12 • BIGFORK — Raptors Around Us – Rescued ospreys, hawks, kestrels, and falcons from Montana Wild Wings will help us explore the adaptations these remarkable animals have that allow them to thrive in Flathead Valley. Come to Wayfarers Harry Horn Picnic Shelter from 7-8 p.m. This event is $4 per person or $10 per family. • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Woke Creations will perform Conscious Reggae music.

Saturday, July 13 • CHARLO — The Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana

will hold the second annual Cultural Arts Fair on the museum grounds from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Saturday, July 13. This fun, family-friendly outdoor arts fair will be an opportunity for Montana artists to exhibit and sell their work to visitors enjoying their summer vacations as well as to local friends and neighbors. Nancy Vaughan and crew will provide fry bread and Indian tacos. Call for complete details: 406-6443435. • ST. IGNATIUS — The 17th annual Mission Valley Consignment Auction gets underway at 9 a.m. at 31827 Allison Road. There will be quilts, outdoor furniture, mini storage barns, flowers, tack and more. A portion of all proceeds go to support the Mission Valley Amish Christian School. Lunch will be available. Call 406-218-4885 or 406-7454395 for more information (no Sunday or evening calls please). • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Soul City Cowboys will perform classic rock music.


July Monday, July 15 • YELLOW BAY — The 2019 Data and Donuts Seminar series is offered every summer during the first four weeks of the Flathead Lake Biological Station Summer Session. The series offers students and the public a chance to hear speakers across a wide variety of ecological topics. Come to the seminar at the FLBS at Yellow Bay on Monday, July 15, from 10-11 a.m. These seminars are open to the public, and everyone is invited to attend. Stop by to have a donut and learn more about ecology, and current research in the Flathead. Call 406-982-3301 x 229, for information about the speaker for this date. • POLSON — For the week of July 15-18, a field trip to Missoula to the SpectrUM is planned for the Polson summer school program. Contact Mandie Steele, Polson School District #23 afterschool program director at 406-2126784 or email: asteele@polson. k12.mt.us

Thursday, July 18 • ST. IGNATIUS — The 37th annual Good Old Days Celebration begins with the first annual tennis tournament beginning at 5:30 p.m. Tournament runs through Saturday with singles, doubles, mixed, beginner and advanced games. For more information call 406-273-8203. • POLSON — Support Polson Late Afternoon Social Hour (SPLASH) will be held on Thursday, July 18, from 5-7 p.m. at the KwaTaqNuk Resort. • RONAN — Open class entries for the Lake County Fair are due by 4 p.m. in the Lake County Fair office. No late entries will be accepted. • POLSON — The North Lake County Public Library continues their “A Universe of Stories” program at 10:30 a.m. This is a space-center children’s program that will run weekly until Aug. 22.

G O O D O L D DAYS

Friday, July 19 • ELMO — The Kootenai Tribe, also known as the Ktunaxa Ksanka Band, welcome all nations and the general public to the 39th annual Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow at the Elmo Powwow Grounds from Friday, July 19, to Sunday, July 21. The Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow is a Native American gathering featuring drumming, dancing and traditional dress. Thursday is campers’ night. • ST. IGNATIUS — The second day of Good Old Days starts with the Little Mr. and Miss Good Old Days Pageant at 10 a.m. in the St. Ignatius Elementary multi-purpose room. Contestants ages 0-6 will be judged at 10 a.m., the 7-12 year old contestants at 1 p.m. and 13-18 year old contestants at 4 p.m. Register early as space is limited. Call 406-396-7838 or go to: missionmountainpageants. weebly.com. Good Old Days Park is the site of the day’s dessert baking contest at 4 p.m. There will be adult and junior divisions, with unlimited entries. There is no entry fee. First prize is $100 for adults and $50 for juniors. All entries are welcome. There will be fresh roasted beef, potato and macaroni salads, baked

beans, fruit salad and dessert for $10 for adults and $5 for kids 10 and under from 5-7 p.m. at Good Old Days Park. Big toys and a farmers market will take place from 5:30-8:30 p.m. Beginning at 7:30 p.m. at the amphitheater a free concert will play classic country and rock with Jeff Daniels. • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Cat Bay Moon will perform blues and rock music. • POLSON — Polson High School’s class of 1969 is preparing to hold their 50th class reunion this summer the weekend of July 19-20. Talk to your classmates and stay alert for updates.

Saturday, July 20 • ELMO — The 39th annual Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow continues at the Elmo Powwow Grounds until July 21. The Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow is a Native American gathering featuring drumming, dancing and traditional dress. • ST. IGNATIUS — Good Old Days continues. A pancake breakfast served from 7-11 a.m. at the St. Ignatius Senior Center begins the third and final day of the celebration. The annual Buffalo Run begins

at 7 a.m. for the half-marathon runners. One, four and seven mile runners begin at 8 a.m. All runs start at the corner of Main and Mountain View Drive. The course is in and around the town of St. Ignatius and is mostly flat. Entry forms are available on the St. Luke Community Healthcare website: stlukehealthcare. org. From 1-4 p.m. there will be big toys and a climbing wall at the Good Old Days Park. Dog races and lawn mower races take place at 1 p.m. There will be food and craft vendors all day. Egg races, water balloon toss, sprints, gunny sack races will take place at 2 p.m. A classic five on a team, couples and individual Tug-O-Wars start at 2:30 p.m. Bingo will be played at the St. Ignatius Senior Center from 2-4 p.m. The amphitheater is the site of the second annual UKE Jam beginning at 3 p.m. Register beginning at 7 p.m. to compete in the pizza pie eating contest at 7:30 p.m. There will be prizes and pre-movie activities. At dusk a community movie will be shown at the amphitheater. At 5 p.m. at the St. Ignatius Airport there will be helicopter rides, a barbecue and entertainment. S EE PAG E 52 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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• POLSON — Bootcamp Run, a preparation for the sixth annual Polson Mud Run, will be held on Saturday, July 20, at the Polson Fairgrounds, 320 Regatta Road, at 9:30 a.m. and ends at 3 p.m. Final registration is at 3 p.m. This is a fundraising event for the Boys & Girls Club of Lake County and the Flathead Reservation. The 5K obstacle course includes many different types of terrain and obstacles to overcome, including mud. Cost is $40 per person and a $3 sign-up fee. For more information, call 406676-5437or go to: flatheadbgc. org. • POLSON — The Polson Main Street Flathead Cherry Festival will be held Saturday, July 20, from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sunday, July 21, from 10 a.m.4 p.m. Come enjoy the great selection of vendors, Flathead cherries, homemade cherry pies, cherry products and gifts, unique arts and crafts, specials, food court, entertainment and activities for kids. On Saturday a children’s and an adults’ cherry pit spitting contest takes place in front of the Cove Deli at 2 p.m. The children’s and an adults’ pieeating contest starts at 4 p.m. For more information, including vendor applications, go to: flatheadcherryfestival.com.

Sunday, July 21 • ST. IGNATIUS — From 8 a.m.noon the Good Old Days’ FlyIn takes place complete with huckleberry pancakes, biscuits and gravy, eggs, coffee or juice. There will be door prizes and a large general aviation aircraft display. Beginning at 9 a.m. you can purchase a duck for the 10 a.m. duck race. This event supports St. Ignatius High School seniors. •RONAN — The Lake County Fair holds a shotgun event at Big Sky Sporting Clays starting at 10 a.m. • POLSON — The Polson Main Street Flathead Cherry Festival continues on Sunday, July 21, from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Come enjoy the great selection of vendors, Flathead cherries, homemade cherry pies, unique arts and crafts, sidewalk sales and specials and kids’ activities. Prizes will be awarded from downtown merchants. For more information, including vendor applications, go to: flatheadcherryfestival.com. •ELMO — The 39th annual Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow at the Elmo Powwow Grounds ends.

Monday, July 22 • RONAN — Lake County Fair

Summer Camps M-F 8:00 - 3:00 Parties Dance Open Gym Times: Preschool Tiny Tot Open Gym

Tuesdays + Thursdays 9:00-10:00

All Ages Open Gym

Tuesdays + Thursdays 3:00-4:00 Saturdays from 10:00-Noon

406-872-2000

For more information, or to enroll, go to our website.

101 Whitewater Place Suite B

www.headoverheelsmontana.com

52

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Bring this ad in for one HALF PRICE Open Gym!

calendar

F R O M PAG E 5 1

• RONAN — The Lake County Fair begins on Saturday, July 20. This year’s theme is “Dusty Boots and Country Roots.” At 9 a.m. the horse show starts with mini horses shown first.

gymnastics

su mme r

interview judging takes place at noon. • POLSON — Plans are still being finalized for the Polson summer school program. For the week of July 22-25, a fieldtrip to the Conrad Mansion in Kalispell is planned. Contact Mandie Steele, Polson School District #23 afterschool program director at 406-2126784 or email: asteele@polson. k12.mt.us

Tuesday, July 23 • RONAN — Lake County Fair events include: 4-H Dog obedience and showmanship/ rally and agility takes place from 8 a.m.–2 p.m. Large animal check-in is from 3-7 p.m. From 5-8 p.m. there will be a 4-H family style dinner. From 5-8 p.m. non-perishable open class check-in happens. 4-H and open class poultry/ rabbit check in is from 6-8 p.m. From 6-9 p.m. large animal weigh-in takes place. There will be concessions by 4-H clubs, as well as commercial, educational, and non-profit booths from Tuesday, July 23, through Sunday, July 28.

Wednesday, July 24 • RONAN — At the Lake County Fair: Judges orientation at 8:30 a.m. and perishable open class check-in is from 9 a.m.-noon. Swine showmanship and judging is from 9 a.m.12:30 p.m. Open class judges orientation takes place at 5 p.m. and from 5-8 p.m. a 4-H

family style dinner is served. At 6 p.m. there is the cat show and from 6- 9 p.m. open class judging takes place. Market beef judging is at 7 p.m. • BIGFORK — Junior Ranger Day – Drop by from noon – 3 p.m. at the Flathead Lake Ranger Station – Wayfarers Unit to chat with a ranger, participate in fun games and activities, learn about the park and Flathead Lake and earn your Junior Ranger badge. This is a free event.

Thursday, July 25 • PLAINS — Shakespeare in the Park comes to the Sanders County Fairgrounds on Thursday, July 25, from 6-8 p.m. Plains High School is the back-up location in case of bad weather. “The Merry Wives of Windsor” will be performed. • RONAN — Judges orientation begins the day at 8:30 a.m. at the Lake County Fair. Sheep showmanship is at 9 a.m., sheep breeding is at 10 a.m. and market sheep judging is at 11 a.m. At noon goat showmanship and judging takes place followed by poultry showmanship and judging at 2 p.m. A fashion revue begins at 4 p.m. and small fry stock show starts at 5 p.m. The Buyer’s Recognition Dinner starts at 5:30 p.m. The market livestock sale starts at 7 p.m. • BIGFORK — Flathead Fledglings – This one hour program from 11 a.m. – noon, S EE PAG E 54

Take me to the River Something for everyone! Burgers • Pizza • Pasta Salads • Appetizers Desserts 207 Ridgewater Drive, Polson

406-872-2100


d

d d d Besd D D t Burgers Goi

RICHWINE’sD D D DDRGERVILLE BU D DD

DD

BURGERS

n’

DRINKS

SANDWICHES

Royal Burger Single………

$5.90

Royal Burger Double……

$8.30

Royal Burger Triple………

$10.70

Cheese Dx Single…………

$4.05

Cheese Dx Double………

$6.45

Cheese Dx Triple…………

$8.85

Cheese Plain Single………

$3.90

BLT………………………. . . . Garden Veggie Burger………. Steak Sandwich…………. . . . . Pork Sandwich …………. . . . . Chicken Burger…………. . . . . Hot Fish Sandwich…….…. . . . Shrimpwich……………. . . . . . . Grilled Cheese. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Grilled Ham and Cheese. . . . . . $4.25

Cheese Plain Double……… $6.30 Cheese Plain Triple………

$8.70

Hamburger Dx Single……

$3.55

Hamburger Dx Double……

$5.45

Hamburger Dx Triple……

$7.35

Hamburger Plain Single……

$3.40

Hamburger Plain Double…

$5.30

Hamburger Plain Triple……

$7.20

Bernie Burger Single……

$5.30

Bernie Burger Double……

$7.70

Bernie Burger Triple……

$10.10

$4.25 $4.75 $5.25 $5.00 $4.75 $4.75 $4.75 $3.00

SPECIALTIES Shrimp Dinner………………. Seafood Dinner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oyster Dinner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chicken and Chips. . . . . . . . . . . . Fish and Chips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Foot Long Hot Dog. . . . . . . . . . . Foot Long Hot Dog w/Chili Foot Long Hot Dog w/Chili and Cheese…………. . . . . . . . . Burrito. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Coke, Diet Coke, Sprite, Dr. Pepper, Root Beer, Lemonade, Orange, Iced Tea 12 oz . . . $1.00 16 oz . . . $1.25 24 oz . . . $1.50 32 oz . . . $1.75 24 oz $4.00 Malts, Shakes, Sodas, Floats & Spins . . . 16 oz $3.50 Coffee and Tea. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 oz $1.00 Hot Chocolate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 oz $1.00 MILK. . . .12 oz $1.50 16 oz $1.75 24 oz $2.25 32 oz. $2.50 Huckleberry Shakes. . . 16 oz $5.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 oz $5.50 Frozen Huckleberry Lemonade 16 oz $3.00 with ice cream $3.75 Huckleberry Sundae $4.25 Huckleberry Sundae Deluxe $4.50

DESSERTS

$9.75 $9.75 $9.75 $7.00 $7.00 $4.00 $4.75 $5.25 $2.00

Hot Fudge Sundae. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plain $3.25 Deluxe $3.50 Sundaes Plain. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.75 Sundaes Deluxe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3.00 Black And White Sundae. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3.75 Cones. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Small $1.75 Large $2.25 Dip Cones. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Small $2.25 Large $2.75 Big Wheel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1.75 Soft Ice Cream Quart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5.00 1/2 Gallon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9.00

Corn Dog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.00

ng

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EXTRAS

Tomato………………. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $0.50 Cups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $0.25 Catsup/Fry Sauce/Ranch 1 oz $0.15 2 oz $0.25 Flavors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $0.25 Cheese. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $0.50 Patties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.00 Bacon or Ham. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1.25 Gluten-Free Bun. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1.50

RS! Y EA6 2 -2 0 1 9 19

SIDES Onion Rings 4 oz. . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 oz. . . . . . . . . . . . . Family Fries 14 oz Potato Salad

$2.25 $4.50 $4.70 $1.50

Green Salad $1.50 Fries 5 oz. . . . . . . . . . . $1.85 7 oz. . . . . . . . . . . $2.35

Prices may change without notice. We accept

50567 Hwy 93, Polson • 883-2620 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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designed for children ages 4-7, gives kids a chance to get outside and learn about the great outdoors. This is the fourth in a five-part series, although participants need not attend all five. Parents are encouraged to attend with their children. This event takes place at Wayfarers Harry Horn picnic shelter. The fee is $4 per child. • POLSON — The North Lake County Public Library continues their “A Universe of Stories” program at 10:30 a.m. This is a space-center children’s program that will run weekly until Aug. 22.

Friday, July 26 • RONAN — Lake County Fair judges orientation starts at 8:30 a.m. At 9 is rabbit

showmanship and judging. At noon is the superintendent debriefing. At 4 p.m. alpaca/ llama showmanship and judging and dairy showmanship and judging takes place. Beef showmanship is at 5 p.m. The Western Montana Stockmen Scholarship Heifer Futurity event takes place at 6:30 p.m. The beef breeding event begins at 7 p.m. • RONAN — The 4-H Ambassador’s Dance is from 9-11 p.m. • RONAN — The annual Mission Mountain Quilt Show, in conjunction with the Lake County Fair, will be held on Friday, July 26, from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Saturday, July 27, from 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. in the Ronan K. William Harvey Elementary School gymnasium. Admission is free to all. Featured quilters will be Debbie Thinglestad and Marion Sands. Raffle tickets for the theme quilt “Seasons of Montana” and raffle tickets for fat quarters will be available.

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Vendors will be present and the country store/consignment items will be available. A full slate of demonstrations has been scheduled for the two days. All attending are encouraged to be part of the People’s Choice voting for favorite quilts. • HOT SPRINGS — This is the first day of a two-day blues festival. Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel will be performed by Mudslide Charlie, Full Crown Band and Pleasure King. The Symes Hot Springs Blues Festival features true blues from around the Northwest. Come relish the spectacular mineral water, entertainment and small town ambiance. Lodging and camping accommodations are available. • POLSON — North Lake County Public Library presents “Friday Night at the Library.” A family-friendly movie (PG or PG-13) will be shown at 6 p.m. You must be in the library

before 6 p.m. as the doors lock at that time.

Saturday, July 27 • RONAN — The large animal round robin starts off the Lake County Fair at 10 a.m. The small animal round robin begins at noon. The ranch rodeo starts at 3 p.m. • HOT SPRINGS — This is the second day of a two-day blues festival. Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel will be performed by Mudslide Charlie, Full Crown Band and Pleasure King. • POLSON — The MSU Scholarship Golf Scramble and Barbecue event is scheduled for Saturday, July 27. This event is a fundraiser for the MSU Bobcats’ scholarship association. This will be a great event for all MSU alums and families. For registration and information call the Polson Bay Golf Course at 406-883-8302.


July / August • POLSON — The fifth annual Flathead Lake Festival of Art will be held Saturday, July 27, from 10 a.m.- 5 p.m. and Sunday, July 28, from 10 a.m.4 p.m. The Sandpiper Gallery is pleased to present its 2019 two-day juried show, featuring original fine art and fine crafts. This outdoor festival is more stringently juried than Sandpiper’s one-day event in August and attracts high quality artists from throughout Montana and the Northwest. The festival’s dates are in the midst of the Flathead Valley’s summer tourist season, and the location at Sacajawea Park offers great views of the Mission Mountains and high visibility from Highway 93 and Polson Bay. Application fee is $25 and the booth fee is $175. Visit the Flathead Lake Festival of Art page for more information and application forms for artists and food vendors. For more information, visit: www.sandpiperartgallery. com information, or call 406883-5956. • POLSON — The Flathead Lake 3-on-3 basketball tournament takes place on Saturday, July 27, and Sunday, July 28. Established in 1992, the Flathead Lake 3-on-3 is Montana’s longest running 3-on-3 basketball tournament. During the fourth weekend in July, the streets of downtown Polson are transformed into a tournament venue. Just steps away from beautiful Flathead Lake, the Flathead Lake 3-on3 promotes fun, amateur athletics, sportsmanship and physical fitness in a familyfriendly, drug and alcohol free environment. All proceeds of the event benefit local projects and organizations. Play hard, laugh a lot and celebrate 27 years with us. Registration deadline is July 23 at 10 a.m. Go to: www.theflatheadlake3on3. com to register. The entry fee is $125.

Sunday, July 28 • RONAN — Lake County Fair

• POLSON — The North Lake County Public Library continues their “A Universe of Stories” program at 10:30 a.m. This is a space-center children’s program that will run weekly until Aug. 22.

Friday, Aug. 2 • POLSON — Sandpiper Art Gallery will host a reception for their art show “Montana Backroads” from 5-7 p.m. • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Shiloh Rising will perform. • RONAN — The Pioneer Days celebration begins in Ronan on Friday, Aug. 2, and will be held Friday, Saturday and Sunday Aug. 2-4. Ronan Pioneer Days is a community event with fun for the whole family. There will be plenty of good oldfashioned entertainment. If you have questions or want more information, call 406-675-0177.

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F L AT H E A D L A K E 3 O N 3 D U N K CO N T E ST

barrel race office opens at 9 a.m.; time only takes place from 10 a.m.-noon. The NBHA Barrel Race goes noon-4 p.m.

Monday, July 29 • POLSON — Sandpiper Art Gallery presents “Montana Backroads.” Everything about this art show is in the name and theme of the show. Featuring member artists Michael Stockhill (photography), and Marie Stockhill (pottery). We’ve also invited a few past Sandpiper members who continue to inspire us with their work: Gail Trenfield (Plein Air Artist), Olivia Olsen (Master’s Degree in Fine Art and passionate educator) and Joan Mason (Painter), and Sharon Wald

who will delight us with her whimsical and delightful 3D Mixed Media. • POLSON — For the week of July 29-Aug. 1, a field trip to Lake Mary Ronan is planned for the Polson summer school program. Contact Mandie Steele, Polson School District #23 afterschool program director at 406-212-6784 or email: asteele@polson.k12. mt.us

Thursday, Aug. 1 • RONAN — The Ronan Area Chamber of Commerce will hold their monthly luncheon at the Mission Mountain Golf Club from noon-1 p.m. Join this monthly social networking and lecture series. There is a fee for lunch.

• RONAN — Pioneer Days 3-on3 basketball tournament will be held on Aug. 3 at Ronan High School. The entry fee $120 per team and registration deadline is July 29 online, by mail or in person at the Ronan Dairy Queen from 7-8 p.m. Ninetyplus teams are expected for participants grade one to adults. There will be 6, 8, and 9-foot dunking contests and free throw contests. Go to: missionvalley3on3.com for more information. • CHARLO — Ninepipes Museum is honored that artists will exhibit their beautiful work in the Earl W. Wharton Memorial Gallery during the following “First Saturday” events of the 2019 season: Aug. 3, and Sept. 7. Laurel Cheff and her husband Bud built the Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana in 1997. It is located at 69316 US Highway 93, Charlo, Montana 59824. Visit: http:// www.ninepipesmuseum.org for more information. S EE PAG E 5 6 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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• HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Jimni will perform acoustic and folk music. • RONAN —The 39th annual Mission Mountain Classic Run, (5k and 10k), begins at 8 a.m. behind Glacier Bank. Love the Mission Valley and Mountains? Come out and run it with us this August! This Classic run includes a 5k and a 10k that takes you through the streets of Ronan with fantastic views of the Mission Mountains. All proceeds benefit the Boys & Girls Club of the Flathead Reservation & Lake County. We appreciate your support. The registration fee is $20. For more information go to: https:// www.flatheadbgc.org. 56

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Monday, Aug. 5 • POLSON — Plans are still being finalized for the Polson summer school program. For the week of Aug. 5-8, a field trip to the Flying Squirrel in Missoula is planned. Contact Mandie Steele, Polson School District #23 afterschool program director at 406-2126784 or email: asteele@polson. k12.mt.us

Wednesday, Aug. 7 • POLSON — The Polson Chamber of Commerce luncheon will be held at the Red Lion Inn from noon-1 p.m. The cost of lunch is $14.50. No reservations required. For more information call the Chamber office at 406-883-5969.

Thursday, Aug. 8 • BIGFORK — Flathead Fledglings – This one hour

program from 11 a.m. – noon, designed for children ages 4-7 gives kids a chance to get outside and learn about the great outdoors. This is the final in a five-part series, although participants need not attend all five. Parents are encouraged to attend with their children. This event takes place at Wayfarers Harry Horn picnic shelter. The fee is $4 per child.

Friday, Aug. 9 • BIGFORK — Something to Hoot About - Join a ranger and explore the amazing adaptations that allow owls to thrive in diverse ecosystems, and discuss threats to their habitat today at Wayfarers Harry Horn picnic shelter from 7-8 p.m. After the program, Montana Wild Wings Recovery Center will introduce visitors to several live owls. Visitors may even learn to hoot hello to an

owl. There is a $4 per person or $10 per family fee. • YELLOW BAY — The Flathead Lake Biological Station will hold their annual open house on Friday, Aug. 9, from 1-5 p.m. The annual open house provides an opportunity to learn more about FLBS research and education around the world along with the ecology of Flathead Lake and its watershed. The event allows FLBS scientists to showcase the breadth of their activities. The bio station has something for everyone in the family: science presentations, boat trips on their 30 foot research vessel, the Jessie B, interactive science demonstrations for the kids, science kiosks presented by FLBS researchers and Monte, the UM mascot. The event is free and open to all. For more information call: 406982-3301 x 229 or go to the website: flbs.umt.edu/.


August • POLSON — Day one of Summerfest in Polson is Friday, Aug. 9. Events include music, car show and vendors. • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Crazy Dog Trio will perform acoustic covers.

Saturday, Aug. 10 • POLSON — The 48th annual Sandpiper Art Festival will be held Saturday, Aug. 10, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Founded in 1971, the Sandpiper Art Festival is a popular one-day, juried outdoor festival that features fine art and artisan crafts. It is held on the Lake County Courthouse lawn in Polson. Taking place simultaneously with the annual car show (one block away), the Sandpiper Art Festival is typically attended by several thousand visitors and is a great opportunity for sales and exposure to new customers. The festival offers live entertainment throughout

the day and several onsite food or beverage vendors. The application fee is $25 and the booth fee is $85. Please visit the Sandpiper Art Festival page for more information and application forms for artists and food vendors. • POLSON — Day two of Summerfest in Polson. Events include music, car show, and vendors. • POLSON — The 13th annual Rotary Chili Cook-off will be held Saturday, Aug. 10, from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. at Riverside Park. Make sure you purchase your raffle tickets, which help raise funds for various children’s programs. The cash prize awards will be: $500-1st, $250-2nd, and $100-3rd. An additional non-monetary prize will be given for best decorated or themed booth. Anyone wishing to enter the Chili Cookoff Contest can find contest rules and an application form on the Polson Rotary website: https://portal.clubrunner.

ca/1867. For more information call 208-816-1425. Taster kits will be sold to the general public for a fee of $3 per kit, 2 for $5. People’s choice ballots will be provided with each kit purchased and must be shown when requesting samples of contestant chili. Chili will be served until 2 p.m. at which time ballots will be tallied and winning teams announced. • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Cat Bay Moon will perform blues and rock music.

Sunday, Aug. 11 • POLSON — Sunday, Aug. 11, is the third and final day of Polson’s Summerfest. • BIGFORK — The fifth annual Poker Paddle will be held on Sunday, Aug. 11, from noon to 5 p.m. Human propelled watercraft start from the Bigfork community dock and paddle a short, middle, or

extended distance (5+ miles) course to designated stops in beautiful northeastern part of Flathead Lake, collecting one playing card at each location. Prizes will be awarded for best and worst hands. There will be a silent auction and a picnic after-party with music - all at Brookside Yard. Proceeds benefit Flathead Lakers education programs and community work to prevent the spread of invasive mussels, promote clean water practices and inspire future watershed citizens. Go to: www.brownpapertickets.com/ event/3380946, to register.

Monday, Aug. 12 • POLSON — For the week of Aug. 12-15, a field trip to Woodland Water Park in Kalispell is planned for the Polson summer school program. Contact Mandie Steele, Polson School District S EE PAG E 59

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#23 afterschool program director at 406-212-6784 or email: asteele@polson.k12. mt.us

Thursday, Aug. 15 • POLSON — Support Polson Late Afternoon Social Hour (SPLASH) will be held on Thursday, Aug. 15, from 5-7 p.m. at Whitefish Credit Union. • POLSON — The North Lake County Public Library continues their “A Universe of Stories” program at 10:30 a.m. This is a space-center children’s program that will run weekly until Aug. 22.

Friday, Aug. 16 • POLSON — The Flathead Lake Blues Festival is coming to the Regatta Shoreline Amphitheater again on Friday and Saturday, Aug. 16 -17. Much fun is to be had at this annual music-filled weekend event staged on the Flathead River. There’s 40 acres of free camping and parking. Go to: Flatheadlakebluesfestival.com or call 406-890-9952 for more information. • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. The Merry Makers will perform music. • POLSON — This is the final day, Friday, Aug. 16, at 6 p.m. to turn in Family Summer Reading Program Reading Logs to the North Lake County Public Library in Polson in order to receive incentives and prize tickets. • PABLO — The Salish Kootenai College 28th annual golf scramble takes place on Aug. 16 and 17 at the Silver Fox Golf Course on the SKC Campus. Call 406-275-4983 for more information.

Saturday, Aug. 17 • POLSON — The Flathead Lake Blues Festival continues

C A R S H OW

on Saturday, Aug. 17. For more information go to: www. flatheadlakebluesfestival.com. • POLSON — “Small town girl market” is a juried craft event that will take place at Polson Fairgrounds from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. An application does not guarantee booth space at the market. We are excited to share this event with you and look forward to seeing everyone’s creations. All items must be handmade, homegrown, homemade, vintage or repurposed items - no imports or bulk retail sales. Deadline to apply is June 30. We will reply to all applications by July 6 via email. For an application go to: smalltowngirlmarket.com. Return the application and sample pictures via email. Call 406-885-2738 for more information. • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Ole Red Coyote will perform country rock and alternative music. • PABLO — ­ The annual Social Powwow at the People’s Center on Highway 93 in Pablo is planned for Saturday, Aug. 17, from 1-5 p.m. and is open to all artists and vendors. This is a social gathering of native

dancers, drums, stick games and singers celebrating their different native dance styles. Vendors of native arts and crafts and food will have their goods available. (There will be no contest dancing.) For more information call 406-675-0160.

Wednesday, Aug. 21 • DIXON — The first day of school for Dixon Schools is Wednesday, Aug. 21.

Thursday, Aug. 22 • POLSON — The North Lake County Public Library ends their “A Universe of Stories” program with a final event at 10:30 a.m. This is a spacecenter children’s program. • POLSON — The summer reading program wrap-up takes place at the North Lake County Public Library at 10:30 a.m. with an ice-cream social.

Friday, Aug. 23 • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Cup O Joe will perform. • POLSON — North Lake County Public Library presents “Friday Night at the Library.” A family-friendly movie (PG

or PG-13) will be shown at 6 p.m. Attendees must be in the library before 6 p.m. as the doors lock at that time.

Saturday, Aug. 24 • CHARLO — Montana Shakespeare in the Parks will perform William Shakespeare’s “Henry IV - Part I” on Saturday, Aug. 24, from 6-8 p.m. at Palmer Park. Audiences are encouraged to arrive early with chairs, blankets and picnics. For a complete tour schedule, visit the company’s website: www.shakespeareintheparks. org. Food and beverages can be purchased. This event is sponsored by Ninepipe Art Group. • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Paul Lenihan will perform on the piano and guitar.

Sunday, Aug. 25 • GLACIER PARK — Admission to Glacier National Park is free on this day in recognition of the National Park Service anniversary. • ST. IGNATIUS — Montana Shakespeare in the Parks will S EE PAG E 6 0 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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perform William Shakespeare’s “The Merry Wives of Windsor” on Sunday, Aug. 25, from 6-8 p.m. at the Good Old Days Park. Audiences are encouraged to arrive early with chairs, blankets and picnics. For a complete tour schedule, visit: www. shakespeareintheparks.org. Food and beverages can be purchased. This event is sponsored by Ninepipe Arts Group.

Monday, Aug. 26 • RONAN — The first day of school for Arlee Schools is Monday, Aug. 26.

Tuesday, Aug. 27 • POLSON — The North Lake County Public Library will hold a Computer Basics class on “What Google Can Do from Calendars to Job Searches,” at 2 p.m.

Wednesday, Aug. 28 • RONAN — The first day of school for Ronan Schools is Wednesday, Aug. 28. • CHARLO — The first day of school for Charlo Schools is Wednesday, Aug. 28. • ST. IGNATIUS — The first day of school for St. Ignatius Schools is Wednesday, Aug. 28. • POLSON — The first day of school for Polson Schools is Wednesday, Aug. 28

Thursday, Aug. 29 • PLAINS — The 2019 Sanders County Fair begins Thursday, Aug. 29 and goes through Sunday, Sept. 1. Exhibitions, carnival, amusement, and midway concessions will be available. For information visit: sanderscountyfair.com. Exhibition doors open at 10 a.m. No dogs are allowed in the fairway. 60

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Friday, Aug. 30 • PLAINS — The 2019 Sanders County Fair continues and goes through Sunday, Sept. 1. For information go to the fair website at: sanderscountyfair. com. Exhibition doors open at 10 a.m. No dogs are allowed in the fairway.

Saturday, Aug. 31 • PLAINS — The 2019 Sanders County Fair continues through Sunday, Sept. 1. For information visit: sanderscountyfair.com. Exhibition doors open at 10 a.m. Check the schedule for rodeo times. No dogs are allowed in the fairway. • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Becca will perform rock music.

Sunday, Sept. 1 • PLAINS — The 2019 Sanders County Fair continues through Sunday, Sept. 1. For information go to the fair website at: sanderscountyfair.com. Check the schedule for demolition derby times. No dogs are allowed in the fairway. • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy a barbecue and live music at the

Symes Hot Springs Hotel as you celebrate Labor Day.

Monday, Sept. 2 Labor Day

Thursday, Sept. 5 • RONAN — The Ronan Chamber of Commerce will hold their monthly luncheon at the Mission Mountain Golf Club from noon-1 p.m. Join this monthly social networking and lecture series. There is a fee for lunch.

Friday, Sept. 6 • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Jimni will perform acoustic and folk music.

Saturday, Sept. 7 • DAYTON — 2019 marks the 75th anniversary of D-Day - the dramatic invasion by American and Allied soldiers on the beaches of Normandy during WWII. This year, the Chief Cliff VFD/QRU’s annual fundraiser at the beautiful Dayton Park is paying homage to these great heroes with their theme: “Dayton Daze Honors D-Day.”

The event takes place on Saturday, Sept. 7. Festivities will start at noon with an open car show, craft booths, music, kids’ games, face-painting, a silent auction, a kids’ raffle, firefighter games, soft drinks, beer, and free hot dogs. This is your opportunity to put together a great costume (and float) to show your patriotism and to honor the brave men and women who fought for the freedom of our allies overseas in 1944. The parade starts at 2 p.m. (line-up at 1 p.m.) with prizes for best entries, and best costumes. Whether you dress as one of the Band of Brothers, an Andrews sister, or Rosie the Riveter, you’ll be guaranteed an afternoon of fun, festivities, and fundraising, all while raising money for the Chief Cliff VFD and QRU. For more information, call 406-849-5917. • BIGFORK — The annual Montana Dragon Boat Festival will be held on Sept. 7-8, in Bigfork. The Montana Dragon Boat Festival brings family fun, spirited competition and colorful pageantry to Bigfork Bay on Flathead Lake in Bigfork, just southeast of Kalispell. The Montana Dragon Boat Festival has become a


S A L I S H P O I N T, P O L S O N

September favorite since its founding in 2012, each year drawing thousands of people to the shores of Flathead Lake for two days of exciting races. The move to Bigfork Bay promises calm waters and smooth paddling. The 2019 festival will be held on Grand Drive, just a few steps from Bigfork’s iconic Electric Avenue. • POLSON — The 21st annual Polson Fly-In takes place at the Polson Airport starting at 8 a.m. • CHARLO — Ninepipes Museum is honored that artists will exhibit their beautiful work in the Earl W. Wharton Memorial Gallery during the this final “First Saturday” event of the 2019 season on Sept. 7. Visit: http://www. ninepipesmuseum.org for more information. • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Jerry Fletcher, the “Piano Man” will perform. • ST. IGNATIUS — The annual

Fort Connah Fall Rendezvous, which depicts life during the fur trading era of Montana, is on Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 7 and 8. This is a great opportunity to see the 1847 historic Hudson’s Bay Fort Connah Trading Post come to life. This event is free to the public and includes demonstrations of era activities, a chuckwagon-style barbecue, a baked goods sale, beer and wine, crafts and kids’ games. There will be historical talks after the opening ceremony at noon on Saturday. The hours are from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. both days. Fort Connah is located six miles north of St. Ignatius at mile marker 39 on U.S. Hwy. 93. For general information and trader/ demonstrator set-ups call 406745-4336 or email: 4winds@ blackfoot.net.

Sunday, Sept. 8 • BIGFORK — The second day

of the Montana Dragon Boat Festival will be held on Sunday, Sept. 8, in Bigfork. Go to MontanaDragonBoat.com for more information. • ST. IGNATIUS — The second day of the annual Fort Connah Fall Rendezvous takes place from 10 a.m.- 4 p.m.

Monday, Sept. 9 • PABLO — The People’s Center holds Native American Awareness Week activities during the second week of September. Events are geared toward educating schoolchildren about Salish, Pend’Oreille and Kootenai history, culture and traditions. The week’s activities and events are free and open to the public. See demonstrations of slicing and drying wild game, fry bread making, hide tanning, drumming and singing and native dancing. There will be crafts for kids, native games and tribal language

demonstrations. For more information and confirmed dates, call 406-675-0160.

Thursday, Sept. 12 • POLSON — The North Lake County Public Library will be closed for staff development.

Friday, Sept. 13 • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Bob Wire will perform his max honky-tonk music.

Saturday, Sept. 14 • BIGFORK — Art in the Park - Enjoy an evening along Flathead Lake at this park fundraiser at Wayfarers Birch Grove picnic shelter featuring the work of several local artists. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. Admission is free. The time is TBD. Go to: stateparks.mt.gov/ S EE PAG E 62 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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September Lake County Fairgrounds. Proceeds from this event support the promotion of cycling safety and continuation of efforts to make the Mission Valley a safe and accessible place to cycle and walk. The cycling tour will be held Sunday, Sept. 22, from 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Cyclists who have the desire and ability to cycle 40 miles in six hours are welcome to participate. Checkin begins at 9:30 a.m. at the Lake County Fairgrounds. Cost is $50 to participate. For more information call 406-676-5913.

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wayfarers for more information. • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Good Old Fashion will perform bluegrass music. • POLSON — Lake County High School Rodeo will be held at the Polson Fairgrounds Saturday, Sept. 14, starting at 9:30 a.m. Two rodeos will be run that day. Watch as the high school and middle school girls and boys participate in a wide range of rodeo activities: barrels, saddle broncs, goat tying, and breakaway and possibly there will be sports shooting. There will be a great concession stand complete with homegrown Montana beef direct from our valley. For more information, call Sheila Young at 406-824-4095.

Spaceship will perform Celtic music.

Saturday, Sept. 21

• POLSON — Sponsor of the September SPLASH (Support Polson Late Afternoon Social Hour) is 1st Citizens Bank. The event will be held on Thursday, Sept. 19, from 5-7 p.m. For more information, call 406-883-5969.

• HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Shenanigan’s Blue Grass will perform American gospel. • RONAN — The 10th annual Harvest Festival and Dutch Oven Cook-off will take place on Saturday, Sept. 21, behind Glacier Bank. This is an all-day event. For more information call the Ronan Chamber of Commerce at: 406-676-8300.

Friday, Sept. 20

Sunday, Sept. 22

Thursday, Sept. 19

• HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Euphorium

Friday, Sept. 27

M A R K E T F LOW E R S

• RONAN — The Mission Mountain Area Pedal to Plate (MMAPP) ride is a family-

cycling tour of the Mission Valley and its local farms and producers. The 40-mile ride in the Polson and Ronan areas celebrates the diversity of agriculture and cycling in the beautiful Mission Valley. The ride includes stops at organic farms and showcases other local farmers and producers. Cyclists will carry their forks (provided) to the farms and sample delicious local fruits, vegetables, and meats along the way. Participating farms have yet to be determined but will be different than last year. The Mission Mountain Pedal to Plate cycling tour begins and ends at the Lake County Fairgrounds in Ronan. Join us after the ride for a locallysourced dinner served at the

• HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. The Chorduroys will perform a variety of musical genres. • POLSON — North Lake County Public Library presents “Friday Night at the Library.” A family-friendly movie (PG or PG-13) will be shown at 6 p.m. Attendees must be in the library before 6 p.m. as the doors lock at that time.

Saturday, Sept. 28 • GLACIER PARK — Admission to Glacier National Park is free on this day in recognition of Public Lands Day. • HOT SPRINGS — Live music at Symes Hot Springs Hotel from 8-10 p.m. Mark Chase will perform Americana music.

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(After hours 883-7972) missionvalleypower.org • Follow us on Facebook

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The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes invite you to visit, swim, shop and relax on our Indian Reservation PLACES TO PLAY

PLACES TO STAY

PLACES TO EXPLORE

M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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Profile for Valley Journal

2019 Montana Summer  

2019 Montana Summer  

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