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FREE

M O N TA N A SUMMER

2018


AIS PROGRAM

KEEP FLATHEAD LAKE

FREE OF INVASIVE MUSSELS

PREVENTION is the ONLY SOLUTION.

[

IT’S UP TO YOU!

our mission

programs and strategies designed to prevent the introduction of aquatic invasive species into waters of the Flathead Reservation, and to help

contain, control and where possible, eradicate aquatic invasive species already present on the Reservation.

CLEAN. DRAIN. DRY.

Tiny, razor-sharp shells would coat and clog every hard surface of the lakerocks, boats, docks & dams

[ [ [ [

is to develop and implement

[

Invasive Mussels Would Ravage the Lake Environment Zebra and quagga mussels devastate native species by stripping the food web of plankton, and that has a cascading effect throughout the ecosystem. Lack of food causes populations of native trout, whitefish and native mussel species to plummet. Invasive mussels typically cause harmful algal blooms and permanently alter water quality in a way that impacts aquatic life and even human health.

Clean

Clean off all plants, animals, and mud from your watercraft (canoe, kayak, boat) and equipment (boots, waders, fishing gear). Use a high pressure washer or available power washing stations. If you use your own high pressure washer or a car wash, make sure the water goes into a contained-water holding area. Rinse with very hot water (140 °F).

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Drain

Drain onto land all water from bait buckets, live wells, pumps, motor, bilges, and remove drain plugs. Eliminate all water BEFORE LEAVING an area where you have had your boat and trailer.

[ [

[ [ Dry

Dry all items completely before launching the watercraft into another body of water. Allow at least five days for your boat, trailer, and equipment to completely dry before launching into other waters.

Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

Natural Resources Department

www.csktnomussels.org email: erik.hanson@cskt.org (406) 675-2700 ext. 7280


Montana at its best. That’s what the Mission, Upper Jocko and

Lower Flathead Valleys generously offer to their visitors. Wild, rugged sky-reaching mountains, tranquil stream fed lakes, lush, sprawling valley floors and gently rolling hills can all be seen in the span of an hour’s drive. Wildlife viewing opportunities abound for those who stop to enjoy the vistas. For folks who stay a little longer to attend hometown celebrations, patriotic parades or fresh farmers markets, small town Montana will reveal her charms. And for those who take the extra time to really know this place – its people, its stories – the rich history and vibrant cultural heritage, a true treasure state awaits discovery.

WELCOME TO YOUR

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SUMMER S E E PA G E 5

EUGENE BECKES PHOTO M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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CONTENTS MISSION VALLEY TOWNS. . . . . . . . . . . . 5 HOT SPRINGS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 PERMITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 GLACIER NATIONAL PARK . . . . . . . . . . . 15 GLACIER TRAVEL INFO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 G.P. BOAT INSPECTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 SAFE WATERS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 FLATHEAD LAKE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 SUMMER THEATRE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 TRADITIONS PRESERVED. . . . . . . . . . . . 24 CULTURE CELEBRATED . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 FROM ‘GRAIN TO GLASS’. . . . . . . . . . . . 29 PROTECTIVE MEASURES . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 COUNTY MAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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FRESH FARE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 BURGERVILLE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 SUMMER CALENDAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

MONTANA SUMMER 2018 Montana Summer is a yearly publication of the Valley Journal, a weekly newspaper published each Wednesday in Lake County, Montana, for readers in the Mission, Jocko and lower Flathead Valleys. Our main office is located in Ronan at 331 Main Street S.W. Office hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Business phone - 406-676-8989. Fax - 406676-8990.

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Our mailing address is: Valley Journal, PO Box 326, Ronan, MT 59864. Our Web address is www.valleyjournal.net. News and calendar submissions may be sent by email to vjeditor@valleyjournal.net Copyright 2018, the Valley Journal. All rights reserved. Reproduction, reuse or transmittal in any form or by any means is prohibited without written permission of the Valley Journal.

2018

Publisher/Editor...... Summer Goddard

Copy Editor...................... Kathi Beeks

Reporter..................... Karen Peterson

Photographer/Artist.....Nicole Tavenner

Reporter ......................... Rob Zolman

Advertising Mgr/Owner... Boone Goddard

Contributing Writer ............. Mary Auld

Advertising Sales......... Mickele Schultz

Contributing Writer ...... Dakota Wharry

Advertising Sales...............Jerry Beeks

Contributing Writer ........ Grace Sievert

Office Manager .................. Leni Baker


A R L E E C E L E B R AT I O N

DISCOVERY AWAITS Just north of Missoula, U.S. Hwy. 93, the Glacier National Park Corridor, winds its way through a myriad of small towns that dot the map. The towns are as unique as their surrounding landscape and each has a story to share. ARLEE Twenty six miles north of Missoula, the town of Arlee lies on the southern end of the Flathead Indian Reservation. On the mountainside, south of the railroad tracks, can be seen the silhouette of the Dancing Boy playing his drum. The naturally occurring image was formed around an avalanche chute starting close to the top of the mountain where a side profile of the boy’s head can be seen. The image continues down the terrain with the boy’s torso until a perfect pair of legs can be seen as if in mid-dance step. Winter snow makes the image even more visible. The town of Arlee started to develop in

the early 1900s when the post office was established. The town’s name comes from Chief Arlee. His people knew him as Chief Alee, but white settlers added the “r” to his name. The 121st Annual Arlee Esyapqeyni (Celebration) brings thousands of people to the town every year for a weeklong event starting in late June and ending on the Fourth of July on Pow Wow Road. The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes sponsor the event each year with traditional dance competitions, drumming, and singing. Food and retail vendors also set up at the event. On the Fourth of July, Arlee also celebrates with an annual rodeo at the Arlee Rodeo Grounds. Competition includes everything from bull riding to barrel races. The Volunteer Fire Department puts on their annual pancake breakfast in the morning and the afternoon begins with a delightful parade that winds

through town. The Hangin’ Art Gallery is one of the big attractions in town and a hub for information. The community art gallery, located in a renovated brick building, hosts many local artists from painters to poets. The Killdeer Artisans Guild of local artists often organizes events at the gallery. A variety of delicious food can be found on the changing menu like pumpkin scones with whipped maple frosting along with a long list of coffee mixtures like the blueberry chocolate latte. The town features several other shops including the Huckleberry Patch where all things huckleberry can be found, including pie. For homemade meals, the Biscuit Cafe is another place to go. Further north along Hwy. 93 is the small town of Ravalli.

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S T. I G N AT I U S

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R AVA L L I Ravalli is located at the base of a hill where U.S. Hwy. 93 intersects with Hwy. 200. The hill climbs up one of the steepest inclines in Lake County before opening up to spectacular views of the Mission Range of the Rocky Mountains. The town, once a train stop, was named after Italian missionary Anthony Ravalli in the late 1800s. Ravalli is most known for his work with the St. Mary’s Mission in the Bitterroot Valley, but he did spend time at the St. Ignatius Mission Church. One of his carvings can be seen at the church. A section of National Bison Range is located here, and occasionally a few wild bison can be seen along the hillside. The town’s Bison Inn Café offers bison burgers and other home-cooked items. The Windmill Village Bakery, on the south end of the town, serves freshly baked doughnuts and pastries that sometimes include huckleberry muffins or cowboy cookies. A few tables are set up both indoors and outside on the deck where people can sit to enjoy an adjacent pond and windmill.

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DIXON Another tiny town, Dixon is a bit bigger than Ravalli, and although it’s in Sanders County, the town is only about ten miles from Ravalli on Hwy. 200. Dixon is often the town people go through to get to the National Bison Range where a herd of bison roam among a diverse ecosystem of grasslands, Douglas fir and ponderosa pine forests. The town was named after former Montana governor Joseph Dixon and is another relic of the railroad era. Several charming old buildings line the highway in the town along with a working post office. The historic Dixon Mercantile, the pink building, was built in 1912 and recently restored. The town is also home to the famous Dixon Melons – which are often available in local grocery stores. The Flathead River is another scenic attraction close to town. S T. I G N AT I U S In September of 1854, two Jesuit brothers and a priest were led by a group of Indians to a remote Montana Valley known as the “rendezvous” or “gathering place.” The area was considered to be common ground among various area tribes,

and as such, was deemed by the Jesuits the perfect place to establish a Mission. A small wood cabin, hastily built before a quickly approaching winter, remains on the Mission grounds today. The Mission church and the town that grew around it were both named after St. Ignatius of Loyola – patron saint and founder of the Jesuits’ religious order – the Society of Jesus (S.J.) Church documents note that in 1855 as many as 1,000 Indians from various tribes had settled near the Mission. Built in 1891, masses are still celebrated in the historic Mission Catholic Church. The church measures 120 feet by 60 feet, with the belfry (bell tower) reaching nearly 100 feet. Visitors can see 58 murals painted on the ceiling inside the church by Brother Joseph Carignano that depict scenes from the Bible as well as pictures of saints. A restoration project to save the murals, which have begun to crack in recent years due to sagging walls, is currently underway at the Mission. Before the church was built, Fort Connah was developed in 1847 about seven miles north of current day St. Ignatius as a fur trading outpost. It was the last Hudson’s Bay trading post built in what is now the


CHARLO

United States. The fort is thought to be one of the oldest still-standing buildings in Montana. The Fort Connah Restoration Society hosts events at the location several times a year. People are allowed to look at the building although the visit might require a climb over a fence. Complementing its rich history and natural beauty, is the town’s modern addition of the Skate Ignatius skate park – which is celebrating its tenth anniversary this year. St. Ignatius also hosts an annual Good Old Days Celebration in late July with three days of fun that include a dessert baking contest, a tug-of-war in the mud and a fantastic parade that is often said to be one of the longest in the county. CHARLO The area’s best 4th of July parade is said to be put on by the town of Charlo. Found by turning off U.S Hwy. 93 and driving down Hwy. 212 for a few miles as the road wraps around scenic farm lands, Charlo lies nearly in the center of the lush Mission Valley. Several back roads also converge into the town with views of large glacier made potholes where waterfowl and other birds

can be seen. The National Bison Range is about seven miles southwest of the town from Hwy. 212 while the Ninepipe National Wildlife Refuge is located a few miles east of town. The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service calls the protected region the center of a glacial terminal moraine with a high density of small wetlands and upland grasses. The land was going to be utilized as an irrigation reservoir in 1910. The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes requested the establishment of the 2,062acre refuge. The land is now surrounded by 3,420 acres of Montana State Wildlife management areas, approximately 3,000 acres of CSKT lands, 3,160 acres of Federal Waterfowl Production Areas, and 6,400 acres of Fish and Wildlife Service conservation easements. The refuge is open to bird watching where people can see waves of birds moving through the area such as the occasional flock of tundra swans or the western grebes. Red winged blackbirds and swallows begin to flock together in summer months among other species. Charlo’s boundaries stretch to Hwy. 93 where the Ninepipes Museum of Early

Montana history is located, next to the Ninepipes Lodge and Allentown Restaurant. A wealth of early life on the Flathead Indian Reservation can be found here including the history of Native Americans, trappers, miners, loggers, settlers, cowboys and ranchers. The museum holds both long term and temporary exhibits. The Fourth of July parade and cookout are big summer events in Charlo with antique cars, horses and floats. Visitors can also stop at a tavern or convenience store. The town holds its own rich history. The post office was established in 1918, and the town was named after Chief Charlo. Charlo was the head chief of the Bitterroot Salish in the late 1800s during a time when his people were being forced to move to the Flathead Indian Reservation, and he refused to sign a contract to do so, but the people were moved anyway. Documents from the St. Mary’s Mission and Museum state Father Ravalli corroborated Chief Charlo’s claim that he didn’t sign the document. Father Ravalli was also an important local leader at that time (noted in information about the town named after him). S E E PA G E 8 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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RONAN

F R O M PA G E 7

RONAN If you can pull your eyes away from the towering, snow-capped Mission Mountains, you’ll find Ronan is a friendly, agricultural town chock full of local culture and history. Originally called Spring Creek by the Salish residents, in 1893 the town’s name was changed to Ronan Springs as a tribute to Major Peter Ronan, who served until his death as the Flathead Indian Reservation superintendent for 14 years from 1877 to 1893. Gradually, the “Springs” was dropped and the shortened Ronan name became official. 1912 was a historic year for Ronan. E.H. Rathbone had been elected to serve as the first mayor of the newly organized city government, while a disastrous fire fueled by one of the fiercest wind storms of the season wiped out all but four buildings on the city’s westside. When in Ronan, stop by the Garden of the Rockies Museum, a volunteerdeveloped and operated museum housed in the first church built in Ronan in the early 1900s. The museum offers visitors a glimpse into Ronan’s past with displays and memorabilia which include a one-room schoolhouse and farm machinery. The museum is open from Memorial Day to Labor Day and is located four blocks west of U.S. Hwy. 93 on Round Butte Road. The Ronan Visitor Center is another iconic treasure. People stop in from all over the world to find local and state information in what once was a stagecoach stop built in 1870. The 10-foot by 14-foot cabin was once located across Flathead River near 8

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Sloan Bridge, several miles west of town. Longtime Ronan resident Grace Sager has spent many hours sitting on the cabin’s porch in its new location during the summer as a volunteer to wait for visitors who stop and ask for information about the town or anything else of interest. She likes to tell the story passed down to her about when the cabin was out by the river. She said the man that ran the stagecoach, possibly named Sloan, would ferry people across the river with a boat before the bridge was put in. People traveling between Dixon and Polson often used the stop. Now, people can look at the amazing handcrafted woodwork or learn about local attractions by stopping at the old stagecoach cabin. With a current population around 3,000, Ronan remains an agricultural hub for the Mission Valley. Each year the city of Ronan hosts the Lake County Fair, a family-oriented community event that includes an extensive display of youth and adult exhibits, from flowers and artwork to 4-H projects and animals. While visiting the fair, take in the sights and sounds of a wide-variety of entertainment acts, educational programs, contests, tasty foods and rodeo events. Ronan’s rich pioneer heritage is honored annually the first weekend in August during Pioneer Days. The three-day festivities feature a 3-on-3 basketball tourney, volleyball and softball tourneys, a kids’ fishing derby in the city park, bulls and broncs rodeo, 5k and 10k run, kiddie slicker rodeo, a car show, a wild buffalo ride, a street dance and a big parade on Sunday afternoon.

Decorated hay bales begin to appear in and around Ronan in September as the town prepares for its annual Harvest Fest. Kids’ pumpkin bowling, zucchini races, a petting zoo, outdoor vendors and a dutch oven cookoff are hallmarks of the celebration. Bordered to the east by the jagged peaks of the Mission Mountains, westward views from Ronan give way to the lush, sprawling Mission Valley floor. With all its natural attractions and outdoor activities like hiking, river rafting, hunting, boating, lake and stream fishing, camping, golfing, horseback riding and bike path trails, it’s no wonder Ronan is considered an outdoor enthusiast’s paradise. PA B L O The Pablo National Wildlife Refuge, Confederated Salish and Kootenai tribal government, Salish Kootenai College and The People’s Center all call the small town of Pablo home. Pablo was named for Michel Pablo, a tribal elder, a stockman and a rancher who has been attributed as one of the essential individuals responsible for saving the bison of Montana from extinction. The bison raised by Pablo, formed the nucleus of the 300-400 bison herd that now roams the National Bison Range in Moiese. Although a fire in the 1920s brought the once flourishing town to near ruin, Pablo continues to play an indispensable role in the Mission Valley as the headquarters of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai tribal government. Because of Pablo’s central location on


PA B L O

the Flathead Reservation, the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes moved its government offices in the late 1970s to Pablo. In 1977, the Salish-Kootenai College (SKC) was established to provide quality postsecondary educational opportunities through career, technical and academic training. With an ever-growing enrollment, SKC offers 17 Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees, 24 associate arts, associate science, and associate applied science degrees and six certificate-earning programs. The D’Arcy McNickle Library houses special collections of historical books about Native American Tribes as well as Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The People’s Center in Pablo is a tribally owned and operated museum established in 1990 that shares the traditions and rich cultural heritage of the Confederated Salish

and Kootenai Tribes through an educational learning center, artifacts, exhibit gallery and gift shop. Visitors are encouraged in taking a guided tour of the museum along with participating in other cultural celebrations and activities provided by The People’s Center. Located a few miles west out of town is the Pablo National Wildlife Refuge, an extraordinary wetland complex containing over 2,500 acres of water, marsh, and upland grassland. Although water levels are controlled primarily for irrigation and flood control, the refuge provides a haven for nesting waterfowl and migrating shorebirds. Water levels are properly maintained to accommodate nesting waterfowl in the spring and low enough to expose extensive mudflats in late summer for shorebirds to congregate during southward migration. Open for travel during daylight hours, an access road provides abundant opportunities

for observation and photography of wildlife, songbirds, upland game birds, and waterfowl. Pablo Reservoir wetland habitat supports abundant waterfowl species such as American widgeon, blue- and green-winged teal, blue herons, Canada geese, common loons, coots, double-crested cormorants, gadwalls, mallards, northern shovelers, pintails, redheads, ruddy ducks. Bald Eagles are occasionally seen, along with other species of water, marsh, and upland birds. Boats or floatation devices are not permitted on the reservoir and there are no recreational facilities available. Shore fishing is permitted in accordance with applicable State, Federal, and Tribal regulations. A tribal recreation and fishing permit is required. Yellow perch, largemouth bass and rainbow trout are regularly caught. S E E PA G E 1 0

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POLSON

POLSON Located at the base of beautiful Flathead Lake, the town of Polson is a welcoming stop to enjoy unparalleled lake, island and Swan Mountain views. During the summertime, this lake shore community with a population just shy of 5,000 becomes a very popular travel destination. The town hosts a variety of community events throughout the summer season, including the annual Flathead Cherry Festival, Summerfest, the local Farmers Market, the Sandpiper Gallery Art Festival, Flathead Lake 3-on3 Tournament, Firecracker Baseball Tournament, an annual Blues Fest and the Mission Mountain NRA Rodeo to list a few. Boasting a population of around 900 citizens in 1910, the town of Polson, complete with electricity and city water, was incorporated and named after pioneering rancher David Polson. Pictorial displays, historic memorabilia and antique artifacts at Polson’s Flathead Historical Museum and the Miracle of America Museum, take visitors through Polson’s rich local history of lumbering, ranching, steamboats and stagecoaches. Numerous cherry orchards dot the east shore of Flathead Lake. In fact, the 10

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Flathead Valley’s climate with 40 to 50 degree nights and warmer summer days makes the area one of the prime cherrygrowing regions in the country. Polson celebrates the Flathead Lake cherry with a three-day festival. Family friendly activities include a cherry pieeating contest, cherry pit spitting, and a cherry stem tying contest. Local vendors sell fresh cherries, cherry foods and Montana-made items during Polson’s Main Street Flathead Cherry Festival celebrated annually the third weekend in July. Every Friday, the city closes a block-long area down for the Farmers Market. Local farmers and vendors sell everything from fresh fruit and vegetables to art, photos, crafts and baked goods. In July, the downtown streets of Polson come alive during the annual outdoor Flathead Lake 3-on-3 basketball tournament. Drawing more than 250 teams, it is one of the oldest and largest summer basketball events in Montana. An annual vintage car show during the town’s Summerfest line the streets of Polson every August with hot rods, custom and classic cars. The two-day event starts with a poker run on Friday evening followed with a show and shine all day Saturday.

Taking place simultaneously with the vintage car show on Saturday, is the Sandpiper Gallery fArt Festival which is held on the Lake County Courthouse lawn. The outdoor festival features fine art, artisan crafts and food vendors from around the Pacific Northwest. The festival also offers live entertainment throughout the day. Located five miles out of town is the man-made marvel Seli’š Ksanka Qlispe’ Dam, formerly known as Kerr Dam. Rising 204 feet high, the concrete arch-type dam soars more than 50 feet higher than Niagara Falls and generates 1,100,000,000 kilowatt-hours annually. A 1,000-foot boardwalk with 355 steps makes its way down the hillside stopping at a vista overlook, offering bird’s eye panoramic views of the spillway, river and canyon below. Five city-maintained parks situated along the lake offer opportunities for relaxation and fishing access as well as swimming and paddling experiences. There’s even a special, riverside park for man’s best friend – The Travis Dolphin Dog Park.

Valley Journal staffers Rob Zolman, Karen Peterson and Summer Goddard contributed to this story.

VJ


SOAKING IT IN

HOT SPRINGS: A trip to Hot Springs, Montana is like journeying through a portal to another time. Nestled at the base of Baldy Mountain, the town is tucked away from the outside world and its influences. It’s not a place people go to join the rat race, it’s where they go to run from it. Hot Springs is best known for having one of the most mineral rich natural water supplies in the country. The town’s Symes Hotel has even reported that some of its visitors come from as far as Taiwan to visit the unique site. The water comes from an underground well that the Symes Hotel and the other spas in town tap into. Ginette Abdo, a hydro geologist with the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology said the mineral rich water phenomenon is created by a variety of factors. Molten material deep below the earth’s surface heats up the water, which builds up pressure and then pushes it toward the surface. The water gets its high mineral content from the materials it passes through on its journey toward the surface. Abdo explained that there is however, no definitive answer as to why the water in Hot Springs has such a high mineral content. According to a sample conducted by the

A SMALL TOWN WITH A BIG STORY

Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, the three most prevalent chemicals in the water are sodium, bicarbonate and silica. A study conducted by the University of Maryland Medical Center found that soaking in hot springs with chemical makeups similar to this can help with several different forms

of arthritis, reduce stiffness, inflammation, ease swelling and relieve joint pains. The sodium in the water can also help with several skin-related conditions. For years the Symes Hotel has advertised soaking and drinking the water from the hot springs as a way to aid in treatment for everything from blood pressure issues to stomach

ulcers. Opened in 1929, the Symes Hotel is one of the more popular soaking destinations for those visiting the town. The hotel has a very classic feel to it. There are no TVs or phones in most of the rooms, but the hotel is one of few places in town where you can get access to the Internet thanks to the hotel’s public Wi-Fi. Leslee Smith bought the business with her husband in 1996 after visiting Hot Springs from Seattle. They fell in love with the place, she said, so when they saw the for sale sign, it didn’t take long before they were convinced it was the right move for them. Under their ownership, the Symes has been expanded from 31 to 47 units. Dave Stephens, from Whitefish, Montana, said he makes the trip to Hot Springs twice a month. “I’m always really relaxed at the end of it all, there’s a lot of good energy in the town,” he said. For Stephens, Hot Springs is an escape. There’s little to no cellphone service in most of the town, and that’s the way people there like it. It’s a great way to get away from the bustle of city life, he said. S E E PA G E 1 2

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While the mineral rich water may be the main attraction for many who visit, there’s a lot more to life in Hot Springs than just soaking in the water. Like many other small towns across Montana, Hot Springs has its own yearly festival: Homesteader Days. The yearly celebration brings together people of all ages to celebrate the small town’s heritage. In past years the event has brought as many as 600 people to Main Street, where the majority of the event’s activities take place. For a small town with a population of around 500, it’s quite the happening, Smith said. The small-town festival is highlighted by a street dance, a kids’ parade, a grand parade, a car show, a rodeo and many other activities. It’s all pulled together by Smith who has been organizing the event since 1997. For the town of Hot Springs, Homesteader Days has been one of few things that have remained a constant. The town itself have been through much change. The festival celebrates the area’s homesteading heritage. In 1910 12

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the government opened the area to homesteading. Small communities formed, and one of them was Hot Springs. It was originally known as Camas-Hot Springs, but the two towns eventually merged. The town grew and so has the festival. In 1957 the town’s lumber mill burned down and workers there lost their jobs. This was the first major blow to the small town’s growth. It also changed the festival. As a part of the logging culture, the festival used to include logging games, but when the mill went, so did the games. Gwen Nelson was born in 1936. She was raised in Lone Pine, a small community just north of Hot Springs. She has seen Hot Springs go through boom and bust. More than just a mill has been lost in the fires that dot the small town’s past. A movie theatre, a grocery store, and a hardware store also burned down. With the loss of each business, additional jobs disappeared, Nelson said. In 1948 the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes built the Camas Hot Springs Bathhouse. A big celebration was held for the opening of the bathhouse. The governor, as well as several tribal officials

attended the event. A buffalo was roasted and the celebration became an annual gathering for tribal and nontribal people alike. The bathhouse celebration eventually evolved into what is now Homesteader Days. For years the Camas Hot Springs Bathhouse, and the tourism it brought, were staples for the community. It was said that if you stayed and soaked in the water for 21 days you would be healed of any ailments you might have. Just like the Symes Hotel, people came from all around the world to stay and soak at the bathhouse. All across town local people with properties rented out to those who came for the water. Many families took advantage of this opportunity to make money. The prosperity ended when the bathhouse closed in 1985. “It was really a blow for the small town,” Nelson said. Locals suspect the closure came about due to the poor upkeep of the facilities, combined with people’s changing vacation habits. Families no longer came and stayed S E E PA G E 1 3


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for weeks. They would spend a weekend, then move on. As the town declined, its population fell from over 1,000 residents at its peak down to approximately 400 people. Current mayor and Hot Springs native, Randy Woods, remembers when the town was at one of its lowest points during the 1980s. As the population dwindled, the town filled with abandoned and rundown buildings. Due to clean-up and restoration efforts in the late 1980s, the town of Hot Springs began to heal. By the early 2000s, the town’s population began to stabilize and under the new management of Smith, the Symes Hotel gained popularity again. Just as things were looking up, local crime became a big problem, Woods said. The town’s police force only had one officer working 40-hours a week. Theft, vandalism, drunk driving, street races and domestic abuse became prevalent with little to no police presence much of the time. Woods worked to change that after becoming the mayor of Hot Springs in 2008. Under Woods’ leadership, the town’s police force grew and now there is a large enough team to provide around the clock police coverage. Woods says that in the beginning they used a heavy hand to

stop crime and even offered rides to bar patrons to help eliminate drunk driving. Joe Ferguson, co-owner of Fergie’s Pub and Grill, has been in Hot Springs since the early 2000s and in that time he says he’s noticed change. “When I first got here, if two people got into a fight, they would just step outside and duke it out then come back in for another drink,” Ferguson said. “But now you don’t see that kind of stuff anymore.” He went on to say that the increased police presence, along with new ownership and renovations of local businesses, has helped turn the town around. As tourism

has increased and crime has decreased, Ferguson said his bar and grill has become more of a family gathering place. For a town its size, Hot Springs is surprisingly self-sufficient. There are a few restaurants, three bars, two grocery stores and a gas station on the edge of town. Woods says young people have opened or purchased businesses in town and in general things are looking up. “We’re trying to revitalize the town and make it a destination again,” Woods said Story by Dakota Wharry for the Valley Journal.

VJ

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MONTANA LAND TITLE ASSOCIATION AMERICAN LAND TITLE ASSOCIATION

• Lake County Abstract & Title Company • 314 First Street East, Polson • 883-6226 • Fax 883-2586 • www.LCTitles.com M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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R E C R E AT I O N P E R M I T T E D

Popular outdoor recreational activities on the Flathead Indian Reservation include hiking, picnicking, swimming, photography, camping, fishing and boating. These activities require various permits and licenses. Non-tribal members are not allowed to pick berries and mushrooms on tribal lands unless they are children or the spouse of a tribal member who accompany and assist their tribal member parent or spouse. For complete details on fishing and recreation

regulations of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks pick up a handbook at any of the following locations where licenses and permits are sold: POLSON • CSKT Division of Fish, Wildlife, Recreation, and Conservation 406 Sixth Ave. E. in Polson (Behind Linderman School) Open Monday-Thursday from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

406-883-2888 ext.7200 or 7237 • Walmart 36318 Memory Lane 406-883-9211 PABLO • Zimmer Tackle 32 Carlyle Lane 406-675-0068 RONAN • Ronan Sports and Western 63298 Hwy. 93 406-676-3701 • Westland Seed 36272 Round Butte Rd. 406-676-4100

ST. IGNATIUS • Mountain View Cenex 240 Mountain View Dr. 406-745-3634 HOT SPRINGS • Cornerstone Convenience 1893 Hwy. 28 406-741-3200 Reservation permits are also available on the Internet at http://app.mt.gov/Als/Index. A reservation permit must be purchased initially from a retail outlet/reservation permit vendor, and then subsequent permits can be purchased online.

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G L A C I E R N AT I O N A L PA R K ‘CROWN OF THE CONTINENT’ On a walk through Glacier National Park, saw-toothed mountains rise on all sides while fireweed brushes your shoulders and powder blue lakes sit like gems in the distance. The land seems designed to astonish those who witness it. Among fresh forests and artfully chiseled rock faces visitors can immerse themselves in impeccably preserved wilderness. To walk through the park beneath towering mountains, around lakes, and beside grizzly bears is to take part in a great marvel of the natural world. Whether your ideal trip to a national park involves strolling through pristine wilderness with your family, photographing sweeping mountain views, intimacy with spectacular flora and fauna, or a weeklong backcountry trip, Glacier National Park will not disappoint. The park features delicate ridgelines, dramatic glacial valleys, alpine lakes, and a plethora of wildlife. Known as the “Crown of the Continent,” Glacier National Park offers the opportunity for wonder to naturalists of all stripes. Modern tourists are not the first people to travel the land within the borders of Glacier National Park. The park lies in the traditional territories of several Native American tribes, including the Blackfeet, Kootenai, and Salish. 

The first European trappers came to the area in the early 1800s seeking valuable beaver pelts. In 1981 the Great Northern Railway connected to the area, providing access to European homesteaders, miners, and tourists. After being struck by the beauty of the Glacier National Park area during a trip in 1885, early conservationist George Bird Grinnell worked to have it designated a national park. President William Howard Taft signed legislation to create the park in 1910. The park’s popularity has grown in recent years. In 2017 Glacier drew more than 3.3 million visitors – the highest attendance in the history of the park. Decades-long efforts to protect diverse ecosystems in the park have yielded incredible opportunities for wildlife to thrive. A vast array of animals calls the park home, including deer, mountain lions, marmots, picas, wolverines, and lynx. Keep an eye out for mountain goats climbing sheer mountainsides and moose wading in lakes. Look to the skies to see a golden eagle or harlequin duck – two of the 260 species of birds that can be seen in the park. If you’re interested in taking in the most spectacular views of the landscape, start with Lake MacDonald just inside the west

entrance to the park. The spot provides an iconic view of a pristine lake met by forested hills and framed by jagged mountains. And this is just the beginning: turn your head at nearly any spot in the park and you will find a view fit for a photograph.  Going-to-the-Sun road, one of the most distinguishing features of Glacier National Park, is a 50-mile, two-lane road that connects St. Mary Visitor Center to Apgar Visitor Center. The road allows visitors to experience the heart of the park by vehicle. Going-to-the-Sun road climbs to its highest point of 6,646 feet at Logan pass, clinging to sheer mountainsides and offering its travelers ever-changing views of the landscape. The narrow road is edged by precipitous drops, which can add an element of danger to the spectacular views. The design of the road is an engineering feat to behold and has been designated a National Historical Landmark.  Visitors can drive their own vehicles on the road but the park also offers a free two-way hop on, hop off shuttle service. Another option is taking a narrated tour of the road in a vintage red bus. You can book seats on these busses through the Glacier see page 16 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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National Park Lodges website. Going-to-the-Sun road is open when park staff can plow it fully. The open dates vary from year to year, but visitors can usually drive the length of the road from late-June to midOctober. Plan for the full 50mile drive to take no less than 2 hours. Throughout the summer of 2018 visitors should expect regular delays due to road maintenance.  If you prefer to leave the road behind, Glacier offers more than 700 miles of hiking trails. There is a hike to meet every visitor’s desires. The 11.4-mile Highline Trail provides one of the most spectacular day trips. It features a bird’s eye view of lakes, wildlife, and the foliage-studded Garden Wall. Hike the Hidden Lake Overlook trail if you’re hoping to run into bighorn sheep, marmots, mountain goats, or wolverines. From the 2.7-mile Swiftcurrent Nature Trail you may spot a bear, moose, or elk. 

Visitors can utilize the myriad lakes in the park by taking in the landscape from the water. Paddling on a serene glacial lake will give visitors a new perspective for taking in views of mountains and wildlife. In 2018 new regulations will allow inspected and authorized motorboats to launch on Lake MacDonald, in addition to the previously permitted nonmotorized boats. On all other

Your resource for current conditions at Riverside, Salish Point, and Boettcher Parks: • WATER QUALITY • WATER TEMPERATURE • LAKE LEVEL

Download the APP at www.TheSwimGuide.org or call the HOTLINE at 406-298-LAKE (5253)

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park waters, non-motorized boats like canoes and kayaks will be allowed after they are inspected and receive a permit. Park officials closely regulate boat launches in Glacier National Park waters in order to prevent aquatic invasive species from disrupting aquatic ecosystems. Especially strict quarantine and inspection rules will be enforced this summer because 2016 saw the introduction of invasive mussels to lakes in the region. If you don’t bring your own boat to the park, you can still take to the waters on a rented boat or a boat tour. Glacier Park Boat Tours rents paddleboards, kayaks, and other boats at locations throughout the park. Visitors can also tour some of the park’s lakes on a vintage boat through Glacier Park Boat Tours.  Glacier National Park extends to the Canadian border in the north, where it connects

to Waterton Lakes National Park in Canada. Together the parks form Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park. The partnership preserves the shared ecosystem of the parks and celebrates the relationship between Canada and the United States. The park is named for its glaciers, and many visitors travel to the park specifically to see these expansive frozen fields. Glaciers are masses of ice, snow, rock, and sediment that flow with the force of gravity. The glaciers in the park are over 7,000 years old, and reached their peak size and number in the mid-1800s. Today only 37 of the 150 active glaciers that were present in the park in 1850 remain. As a result of rising global temperatures related to climate change, scientists predict that all of the active glaciers in the park will have melted by 2030. Some hypothesize that part of the recent increase in the park’s popularity is a result of people visiting to see the glaciers before rising temperatures eliminate them. In addition to stunning daylight vistas, the park’s stargazing opportunities are second to none. Waterton Lakes and Glacier National Park have received Dark Sky designation based on their commitments to minimizing light pollution. This collaboration creates the first International Dark Sky Park. Preserving dark skies benefits wildlife and gives visitors the the opportunity to view stars in a clear night sky,


a rarity in today’s world. On a clear night you can easily identify constellations throughout the sky and the Milky Way sweeping overhead. Facilitated night sky programs at Glacier National Park work in tandem with the Dark Sky Designation. These are some of the best-attended park programs. Details about the programs can be found on the Glacier website. The 2018 season will be the third for one of the park’s most popular employees: a border collie named Gracie. Also known as the Bark Ranger, Gracie protects wildlife by herding them away from heavily traveled areas in the park. Gracie’s handler, Natural Resources Manager Mark Biel, brought Gracie to the park as a new way to prevent harmful interactions between humans and wildlife. Gracie primarily works near the Logan Pass parking lot, where she herds mountain goats away from areas used by visitors. Gracie’s charm also gives Biel the chance to educate people about wildlife safety. If you can’t find Gracie at Logan Pass you can check out her instagram, @barkrangernps.  Story by Mary Auld for the Valley Journal

VJ

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GLACIER TRAVEL INFO VISITORS ADVISED TO PLAN AHEAD FOR CROWDED SUMMER CONDITIONS Glacier National Park began preparations in May to open roads and facilities for the summer season. This winter, some areas of the park saw record or near record snowfall amounts. This spring, cool temperatures and continued snow have created challenging conditions as crews plow roads, parking areas, campgrounds, and access utilities to turn them on for the season. Early Season Tips The park expects that some campgrounds or campsites, including some reservation campsites, will not be available by their projected opening dates. Campground staff will contact visitors with campground reservations about moving to alternate spaces if necessary. Early season hikers should consult the park’s trail status page to see trail clearing activity and projected trail clearing start dates. The spring hiker-biker shuttle will run on weekends (Saturday and Sunday) from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and will continue until the Going-to-the-Sun Road opens through Logan Pass to vehicles. The shuttle will depart from the Apgar Visitor Center and drop off at both Lake McDonald Lodge and Avalanche Creek (once open to vehicle traffic).   Construction Spring and summer construction on the Going-to-the-Sun Road has begun, including work that was previously anticipated for last fall, but was rescheduled due to the Sprague Fire. In May, crews began working on paving

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and road bed work between the West Entrance Station and the area east of the four-way intersection in Apgar known as the Apgar Curve. Traffic will detour through Apgar Village while that work is completed. A pilot car will be used between the West Entrance Station and the four-way intersection at Apgar. Many turnouts between Apgar and Avalanche Creek will be unavailable this season while they are rehabilitated. Those turnouts will be marked with traffic cones and drums. In late summer, crews will work above Triple Arches for approximately one week to install veneer on the removable railing sections that were completed last summer. Traffic delays are anticipated to be minimal for this work. A maximum 30-minute traffic delay will be in effect for the west side of the park this summer due to scheduled construction between the West Entrance Station and Avalanche Creek. In September, the park will start on a road repair roughly 1.5 miles west of Avalanche Creek. Once Avalanche Campground is closed for the season, Avalanche Campground Road will close for approximately two weeks beginning Sept. 17 for rehabilitation.  A modification to the St. Mary Kiosk roof will begin this fall. Traffic delays are anticipated to be minimal for this work.  Park Regulations In response to congestion and resource impacts, the park has updated several park

regulations for the 2018 season. Visitors will not be permitted to hold campsites for other parties not yet present. People with hammocks should ensure that the webbing they use to attach their hammock to a tree is at least one inch in width to avoid harming tree bark. The area around Big Bend will be closed to off-trail travel to reduce trampling, though climbing access will be available. A 21-foot vehicle limit will be in place on all North Fork roads due to road width and increasing use, in accordance with the North Fork Plan that identified this action should roads become significantly more congested. Llamas are no longer included in the list of permitted pack animals to reduce the spread of domestic diseases to wild bighorn sheep, mountain goats, deer, moose, elk, and caribou.  Other Visitor Updates Construction is complete on the Many Glacier Hotel following more than a decade of rehabilitation to improve critical life-safety elements and restore historic finishes. All rooms and public areas are now available for use. In 2017, the park welcomed 3.3 million visitors. This is a one million person increase over 2015 visitation levels. This summer, some areas again may temporarily fill, and visitors will be asked to return when congestion clears and parking spaces and roadways become available for use. This year, the park will be using its Twitter page to communicate live congestion updates throughout the season.  


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invasive quagga or zebra mussels within the State of Montana. The park received funding again this year from the Glacier National Park Conservancy to expand inspection capacity to prevent the introduction of non-native aquatic invaders. These funds allow the park to offer significantly extended inspection dates and hours of operation.  Procedures and locations for obtaining a non-motorized watercraft launch permit are outlined below:  Lake McDonald* 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. (station closure times will adjust as summer daylight wanes) Parking lot across the street from the Apgar boat ramp  *Offers motorized boat inspections and seals  North Fork Area There are no inspection stations located in the North Fork region. Boaters traveling to the North Fork should visit the Lake McDonald inspection station prior to launch. North Fork residents should contact the Polebridge Ranger Station for possible alternate inspection procedures. Two Medicine beginning June 1 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Two Medicine Ranger Station St. Mary beginning June 1 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. St. Mary Visitor Center Many Glacier beginning June 1 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Many Glacier Ranger Station   For rules and regulations about boating, please visit the park’s web page at:  http://www.nps.gov/glac/planyourvisit/ boating.htm

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inspected, including but not limited to canoes, kayaks, row boats, sail boats, paddleboards, float tubes, inner tubes, and wind surfboards. · Small, low grade inflatable children’s water toys including water wings, rings, and the like will not require a permit. · Watercraft must be accessible and inflated for inspection: uninflated rafts or float tubes, watercraft with internal water holding tanks, wash systems, etc. will be denied a launch permit. · New, unused inflatable watercraft will not require an inspection; however they will require a permit before launching. · An inspection will be required upon each entry to the park if intending to launch. Visitors staying overnight in the park will not need a daily inspection.  Park personnel inspected over 13,000 nonmotorized watercraft in 2017. Visitors should plan ahead, build time into their schedules, and have their watercraft prepared, to speed inspection times.  Visitors can speed up the inspection process by ensuring that their watercraft are clean, drained, dry, and ready for inspection upon arrival. Although many non-motorized boats can be inspected on top of vehicle roof racks, boaters should be prepared to take their boats down for inspection, especially if they have internal standing water or are dirty.  The park will continue to assess the inspection program and aquatic invasive species threat throughout the summer and may make adjustments in hours and scope of the permitting process, and areas where boats are permitted, depending on funding and as new information emerges. The park’s aquatic invasive species prevention program and boating regulations have undergone significant changes since 2016 following the detection of

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Park waters will open between May 12 and June 1. Lake McDonald area inspection stations and west side waters will open on May 12. East side park waters and inspection stations will open to boating on June 1. Gas powered motorized watercraft will be permitted on Lake McDonald following a 30day “dry time.” Lake McDonald is the only lake in the park where gas-powered motorized watercraft will be permitted to launch. Motorized boats will be sealed to their trailers after inspection, and seals will then be removed by park personnel following the 30-day “dry time” prior to launch. Montana State, Blackfeet Nation, Confederated Salish-Kootenai, and Whitefish Lake inspection seals will be honored in Glacier after a 30-day “dry time.”  Non-motorized, non-trailered watercraft may also launch without the 30-day dry time on May 12 on west side waters after inspection, along with motorized boats that have already completed the 30-day dry time and have an intact seal. All watercraft should be clean, drained, and dry before inspection. This summer, non-trailered boats with electric trolling motors may launch on Lake McDonald, Bowman, Kintla, Two Medicine, St. Mary, and Swiftcurrent Lakes. They will not require a 30day dry time because the motors are not watercooled and therefore are classified as lower risk, similar to hand-propelled watercraft.  Motorized watercraft rented and operated under National Park Service contract with Glacier Park Boat Company will continue to be available, in addition to boat tours. Motorboat rentals will be available this summer on Lake McDonald and Two Medicine Lake.    Inspection Standards · All watercraft must be clean, drained, and dry prior to inspection · All non-motorized watercraft will be

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S A F E W AT E R S Every year, over 60 percent of Americans visit beaches, rivers, lakes, and ponds to swim and engage in other recreational water activities. Many of the people who enjoy a day at the beach will come in contact with pollution and, as a result, become ill. Thankfully, Flathead Lake is recognized as one of the cleanest lakes in the world, but again this summer, Flow Swimmers, The Natural Resource and Water Quality Department of the Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribes, and the Flathead Lake Biological Research Station are coordinating their efforts to monitor the recreational water quality of our local swimming areas. On a weekly basis starting in June, the team will begin processing water samples from Riverside, Salish Point, and Boettcher Parks. New in 2018, the group hopes to add the Tribal beaches at Elmo, Blue

Bay, and King’s Point. During the summer of 2017, weekly samples were drawn for 10 weeks from Riverside, Salish Point and Boettcher Park. Last year 100 percent of the tests at Salish Point were green (good) while two tests at Boettcher Park and one at Riverside showed increased levels of e-coli and considered yellow (cautionary.) It was deduced that the e-coli reading was due to increased geese

presence and an extended warm weather pattern. As soon as the wind came up, the water mixed, and the e-coli levels dropped to green. Lake water at Salish Point tends to circulate better. Test results are published on The Swim Guide (www. TheSwimGuide.org.) and weekly in the Valley Journal. The Swim Guide is a website and Smartphone app for iPhone® and Android that helps people

easily find the closest beaches and know at a glance which ones are safe for swimming. The Swim Guide delivers free real-time water quality information for over 7,000 beaches, lakes, rivers, and swimming holes in Canada, the U.S., Mexico, New Zealand, and Flathead Lake. The app also provides a platform to immediately report pollution to local authorities. In true “citizen science” fashion, The Swim Guide project is funded by local businesses. In addition to Flow Swimmers, Alpine Landscape Design, and UBS are providing financial assistance. The Greater Polson Community Foundation is providing directed gift support for additional contributions. To keep up with the water quality of Polson’s beaches, download The Swim Guide app at www.TheSwimGuide.org, call the Lake Hotline at 406-298LAKE (5253).

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F L AT H E A D L A K E With the multitude of outdoor activities to participate in and the myriad of breathtaking splendors to enjoy in the Mission Valley, Flathead Lake definitely rates top on any list of Northwest Montana places to see and enjoy. Nestled beneath the snowtipped craggy peaks of the Swan and Mission ranges, Flathead Lake boasts more than 160 miles of shoreline, depths that reach 370 feet and nearly 200 square miles of crystal clear water - making Flathead Lake the largest natural freshwater lake west of the Mississippi River. That means there’s plenty of room for trophy-size fish to thrive – and Flathead Lake is indeed one of the hottest sport fisheries in the lower 48. More than 25 species of fish call Flathead Lake home which include, native Bull and

Cutthroat Trout, huge Lake Trout, Rainbow Trout, Whitefish, Northern Pike, Pumpkinseed Sunfish and Yellow Perch. No matter what time of year, some sort of fishing is in season with generous daily limits. Although many species can be caught in abundance along the lake’s picturesque shores, a quick search online will reveal a list of very lake worthy charter boat captains available to take you out and provide all the gear you’ll need to catch that state record fish. Whether you prefer a day of sailing, power boating, waterskiing, jet skiing, paddle boarding or kayaking there’s plenty of lake for everyone to enjoy. For those of who’ve never experienced the lake closeup, boat rentals and charter services are available for a memorable cruise around the

lake or a day trip to Wild Horse Island. Wild Horse Island, the largest island in Flathead Lake, is a day-use-only 2,160-acre state park only accessible by boat. The island is home to abundant wildlife including record-size bighorn sheep, mule deer, waterfowl, osprey, bald eagles and of course a small herd of wild horses. Unlimited opportunities for camping, picnicking, fishing, hiking, swimming or just dipping your toes into the cool, clear water are scattered all along Flathead Lake’s extensive shoreline. Even for those who don’t leave their vehicles, spectacular scenic views across the lake can be enjoyed as you cruise along either U.S. Highway 93 on the lake’s west shore or Montana Highway 35 on the east.

Flathead Lake Facts • The striking azure of the water is what grabs the attention of most northbound travelers as they crest the top of Polson Hill and look down at Flathead Lake, but the sparkling body grows more translucent as people grow close. When unobstructed by waves, the clearness reveals every outline of objects along the bottom, which can sometimes give the illusion of shallowness. Don’t be fooled: the deepest part of the lake is 370 feet — the length of approximately 10 standard school buses parked end to end. Average lake depth is 167 feet, greater than that of the Persian Gulf. • Flathead Lake is one of the 300 largest natural lakes in the world and is the largest natural freshwater lake in the western S E E PA G E 2 2 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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United States. The 197-squaremile water body is known for its impressive size in the current era, but it was actually part of a much larger lake called Lake Missoula that existed an estimated 15,000 years ago. Lake Missoula was created by a 2,000-foot tall ice dam of the Clark Fork River. Lake Missoula was the largest documented ice-dammed lake in the world. It covered 3,000 square miles. A sign at the National Bison Range’s Red Sleep Drive designates a high water mark of Lake Missoula and ripple marks from the lake’s former surface are visible in the surrounding hills. Flathead’s remnant size is still significant. It takes approximately 2 hours to drive the 82 miles of roadway around the entire lake without stopping, not accounting for traffic. • Flathead Lake contains 10 islands of various sizes and ownership. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks manages four of the islands. Wildhorse Island near Big Arm Bay is the largest island in the lake and doubles as a wildlife refuge and state park that is noted for its herd of Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep and several wild horses. Bird Island is located near the Narrows, a small group of islands easily visible from Polson, along the northern part of Polson Bay. The island is owned and managed by the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks and the Flathead Lake Biological Station as a bird refuge. Geese, osprey, herons

and eagles frequent Bird Island. Cedar and O’Neil islands are also managed by the state. Melita Island is a 64-acre island near Big Arm that is owned by the Boy Scouts of America and serves as a summer camp for the organization. • Seli’š Ksanka Qlispe’ Dam, formerly known as Kerr Dam, was built between 1930 and 1938 and raised the elevation of the lake by approximately 10 feet, which brings it to 2,893 feet above sea level at full pool. Three turbines within the dam produce 194 megawatts of power, enough to power more than 145,000 homes. The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes became the first native government in the United States to own a dam after the transfer of ownership of the dam was complete in September 2015. If runoff conditions in the mountains don’t warrant flood threats, the lake level is brought to full pool by mid-June. • Flathead Lake is one of the cleanest watersheds. Studies at the Flathead Lake Biological Station show that water quality in Flathead Lake is among the best in the world. In spite of its renowned purity, studies at the Bio Station show the water quality of Flathead Lake has declined over the last decade due to the combined effects of increased pollution from human sources, erosion of the shoreline caused by dam operations and introduction of nonnative biota (flora and fauna). A massive group effort to keep aquatic invasive species from entering

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the lake and the entire Columbia Basin watershed is currently underway. • Flathead Lake Biological Station was established in Bigfork in 1899 by Dr. Morton J. Elrod. The Flathead Lake Biological Station was moved to its present location in 1908 and is currently operated as a yearround academic and research facility mainly dealing with aquatic studies. • The lake’s major tributaries are the Flathead and Swan Rivers.  Numerous small streams flow directly into the lake at its shoreline, particularly on the wetter East Shore.  • Maximum flow in the Flathead River generally occurs during spring freshet between May 15 and June 10, creating a plume of sediment that covers the lake surface.  • Due to its massive volume and normally active winds over the surface, Flathead Lake does not freeze over most winters, although the bays often have winter ice cover. The lake did freeze over in the winters of 1978-79 (all winter), 1987-88 (all winter), 1988-89 (March only) and 1989-90 (January only).  • The name Yellow Bay was derived from the yellow rock outcrop on the point which is Precambrian without fossils. The outcrop belongs to the Algonkian substrata, which also outcrops Glacier Park.  • The first wagon trail in the 1880s from Polson to the north end of the Lake followed the west side of the lake and was steep and hazardous. At some

places, wagons had to be lowered by ropes. In 1911, work started from the south end of the Lake to build an east shore road with the work primarily done by convict labor. It was completed in September of 1946.  • Flathead Lake is currently described as oligomesotrophic (oligotrophic means being deficient in plant nutrients while mesotrophic means having a moderate amount of dissolved nutrients).  • Average surface temperatures of the lake range from 2.3° C (36°F) in midJanuary, to 13.5°C (56°F) in mid-June, to 20.3°C (68°F) in mid-August.  • Of the 25 fish species most commonly found in the Flathead River-Lake ecosystem, 10 species are native and 15 have been introduced. The native species include redside shiner, peamouth minnow, squawfish minnow, largescale sucker, longnose sucker, sculpin, bull trout, cutthroat trout, pygmy whitefish and mountain whitefish. Lake trout, lake whitefish and yellow perch are the most common nonnatives and have increased in abundance since 1970, whereas native species have declined. Each spring and fall, the Mack Days fishing tournament offers anglers prizes for catching and removing non-native lake trout from the lake. The event is sponsored by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and sanctioned by Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks. VJ


The Port Polson Players announce an outstanding lineup for their 43rd year of Summer Theatre. The Players 2018 summer season opens with the musical “After the Ball.” The show features music of the Gay 90’s through the Roaring 20’s, along with the title song, parlor tunes, ragtime, cowboy ballads and Tin Pan Alley favorites. Alexander’s Ragtime Band, Swanee and over 70 tunes track music and the influence it had on the westward movement. The Man on the Flying Trapeze, Grand Old Flag, and medleys from Irish composers, George M. Cohan, and Stephen Foster are featured in this rip-snorting evening that will enlighten and entertain. Polson actress Amy Nelson Knutson appears with four other performers and musicians. “After the Ball,” a regional premiere, plays July 5 – 22. Next up is the Hallmark Hall of Fame classic “Foxfire,” by Susan Cooper and Hume Cronyn. Annie Nations and her husband Hector loved their life together in the Blue Ridge Mountains, but when Hector dies, Annie has to decide if she season is Stephen Temperley’s can handle the wilderness on masterful “Souvenir.”  Missoula her own. When son Dillard, a favorite Alicia Bullock Muth rising country - singing star, returns to the Polson stage returns, he must deal with a in this musical slick real estate retelling of agent to decide the true story the fate of the “After the Ball” of Florence farm. Montana plays July 5-22 Foster Jenkins, Governor’s an American Awards for the socialite who Arts recipients, “Foxfire” was noted as and Players plays July 26 - Aug. 12 the world’s producers, worst opera Neal and Karen singer. Directed Lewing are “Souvenir” by Andy Meyers featured as plays Aug. 16-26 with scenery Hector and designed by Annie. Jay Roberts,  A tender, this comic masterpiece has witty and wise comedy toured Montana to rave drama, “Foxfire” plays July 26 reviews. Bullock Muth is joined – Aug. 12. by Billings native, Travis Kuehn, Wrapping up the summer

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who plays pianist Cosme McMoon. “Souvenir,” which culminated in a 1944 soldout performance at Carnegie Hall, plays on the Polson stage Aug. 16 – 26. All shows are presented at Polson’s beautiful Theatre on the Lake, on the Polson golf course, with an 8 p.m. curtain Wednesday through Saturday evenings, and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. The Players are dark Mondays and Tuesdays. Reservations can be made by calling 406-883-9212 or at portpolsonplayers.com. All shows are produced by Port Polson Players in association with The Mission Valley Friends of the Arts.

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THE PEOPLE’S CENTER

TRADITIONS PRESERVED extending outwards. When entering the center, speakers broadcast the sounds of traditional drums and singing. The three sections of the center, a museum, a gift shop, and an education area, are visible from the entryway, making for the difficult decision of

Alongside U.S. Highway 93 in Pablo stands the People’s Center, a holding place of authentic Kootenai, Salish, and Pend d’Oreille cultural items. The center has a unique architectural design representing a tribal lodge with a circular center room and three rectangular rooms

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which section to explore first. In 1991, a group of tribal members had the idea to open a cultural center for the Kootenai, Salish, and Pend d’Oreille tribes of the Flathead Reservation. They traveled the country visiting other Native American cultural centers, doing research


“Any time we are able to share our culture with others is very important ... We may have adapted to modern times, but we still hold onto our traditions and culture.” - Marie Torosian, People’s Center director

to determine what to include in the Flathead Reservation’s museum. Later that year, to support the opening of the center, the group applied for a grant from the Administration for Native Americans. They received the grant and in April of 1995 the People’s Center was officially opened. Today the center is funded mainly by the tribal government and new grants the center receives. The museum’s displays are placed in chronological order, covering local Native American history from the 1800s on. The historic tribal items such as traps and clothing give a glimpse into the past two centuries and provide visual representations of how the tribe’s people have evolved over time. Tour guides offer visitors detailed explanations of the museum’s displays. All of the museum’s items have been donated. The tribal committee and an elder council substantiates and approves each item’s historical accuracy before putting them on display. Some items are not put on display, but instead stored in the center to be used for education and studies. Although there are other museums in the

area that provide Native American history, Marie Torosian, the director of the center, explains that the People’s Center’s museum is one of a kind. “We are the only triballyowned museum that will present authentic and accurate history based on our tribal knowledge,” Torosian said. The center is also unique because of their hands-on education program. According to Torosian, the center’s education program keeps the tribe’s culture alive by providing classes that teach Native American traditions, such as the Cultural Arts class held each Friday. “Almost everything we teach, history, stories, language, traditions, it is all passed down orally from generation to generation,” Torosian said. “It goes as far back as you can remember and beyond.” The People’s Center makes it a point to support local artists such as Marita GrowingThunder, a graduate of Polson High School. In the summer of 2017, the education program displayed her stunning beadwork. The center’s directors stock the gift shop with works created strictly from local tribal artists.

The People’s Center holds an annual powwow each summer, along with many other events throughout the year. The summertime social powwow includes dancing, drumming, singing, and the recent addition of stick games. “Any time we are able to share our culture with others is very important,” Torosian said. She added, “We are very excited for the annual powwow this year.” The powwow is located at the People’s Center on the third Saturday of August each year. If there is one thing the employee’s of the People’s Center want guests to take away from their visit it is that the Kootenai, Salish, and Pend d’Oreille’s culture is still alive and thriving. “We still exist and always will,”’ Torosian said. “We may have changed our lifestyles and adapted to modern times, but we still hold onto our traditions and culture.” The People’s Center is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, and from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Fridays. By Grace Sievert for the Valley Journal

VJ

www.covedeli.com M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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A R L E E C E L E B R AT I O N

C U LT U R E C E L E B R AT E D , S H A R E D Several powwows are held each year on the Flathead Indian Reservation and two of them are happening this summer with the 120th Arlee Celebration and the Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow. The public is welcome to attend both. Powwows have been an important part of the Salish, Kootenai and Pend d’Orielle Tribes’ — and other Indian tribes’ — lives for centuries as a celebration with singing, dancing, socializing, education, craft work, and feasting. Many Native Americans travel hundreds of miles each year to participate in this important tradition because the powwow 26

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trail is much more than just entertainment; it’s a way to honor their ancestors. Dancing At powwows, various dance styles are performed, including Intertribal dance, where everyone is welcome regardless of dress; War Dance, where each warrior dances his own style to a wide range of songs with fast and slow tempos; Women’s Traditional Dance, consisting of women remaining stationary with a slight movement of the feet; Men’s Traditional Dance, in which the dancers tell stories through dance about battles or hunting. The Round Dance is a social dance that is meant to have

everyone participate; Scalp Dance is done by women dressed in men’s clothing; Prairie Chicken Dance resembles the movements prairie chickens use for mating or fighting. Some “newer” dances include Fancy Dance, where dancers are dressed in colorful regalia and dance in less restricted styles; Jingle Dance, where women dance in jingle dresses festooned with 365 metal cones or jingles; Grass Dance, a plains Indian dance where dancers move in swaying motions that move the fringes on the grass dance clothing; and the Owl Dance, which is a social dance where couples

dance together in a circular motion with men on the outside circle and women in the inside circle. Powwow Dates The Arlee Fourth of July Celebration, a week-long event held close to the first week of July, first coincided with the traditional mid-summer break in the hunting and gathering cycle of the Salish and Pend d’Oreille Tribes in the late 1800s, but the road to maintaining the celebratory tradition was fraught with obstacles set up by the federal government. The government policy of assimilation put such traditions on the fast track to elimination. S E E PA G E 2 8


The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes invite you to visit, swim, shop and relax on our Indian Reservation PLACES TO PLAY

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S TA N D I N G A R R O W P O W W O W

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However, through oftenclandestine tenacity, that did not happen. Indian people continued to practice traditions despite federal policies aimed at eliminating them. This year, the 120th Arlee Celebration runs Monday, July 2, to Sunday, July 8. The official opening of the celebration will

begin with a grand entry that includes an honor guard bearing the flags of the Salish Nation and America. A procession of dancers follows the honor guard. A Flag Song is sung in honor of the flags, then a prayer is said to complete the opening ceremonies. After a Veterans’ honoring ceremony, the dancing begins in earnest. For more

event information, go to www. arleepowwow.com On the third weekend in July, the Flathead Indian Reservation hosts the Kootenai Tribes’ annual celebration, the Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow. This year’s three-day celebration at the Elmo Powwow Grounds starts on Thursday, July 12 and ends on Sunday, July 15. The Indian social gathering

in the west shore community of Elmo features drumming, dancing and traditional dress and food. There will be dance contests with numerous categories, a drum contest, and traditional games. Visitors are welcome and asked to respect the dance area by staying off of it, and leaving front row seating for tribal elders. VJ

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FROM ‘GRAIN TO GLASS’ The character of northwest Montana is a central ingredient in spirits made at Whistling Andy Distillery in Bigfork. Since the award-winning distillery opened in 2010, it has produced high quality spirits inspired by northwest Montana and made from locally sourced grains. Contributing to the local economy and community connection have been important to owners Brian Anderson and Lisa Cloutier since the business started. Whistling Andy takes the concept of “grain to glass” seriously. The distillery sources its wheat, corn, barley, and rye from farms in the Mission Valley. Whistling Andy’s straight bourbon whiskey, Harvest

Select Whiskey, moonshine whiskey, and vodka are made from these Montanagrown grains. Distillers source water from an aquifer below Bigfork for the spirits.

Lake Seed, Inc., a family farm in Ronan, grows the wheat, barley, and rye that are featured in the distillery’s bourbon and whiskeys. Farmer Ernie Faust of Moiese grows the corn that is made into Whistling Andy vodka. Farmers or Whistling Andy employees transport grains directly from where they’re grown in the Mission Valley to the distillery. Then, distillers hand-mill and mash them on site. And integration with the local food system doesn’t stop with production. After they are processed, a local farmer feeds the spent grains to his pigs. S E E PA G E 3 0

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General Manager Dex VanFossen said that the quality of locally grown ingredients adds value to Whistling Andy spirits. He said that the soil and water in the region contribute, but that “the heart that Montanans put” into producing grains for the distillery truly elevates their quality. The spirits are popular in the region, but they are also marketed nationally and internationally. Whistling Andy has won a variety of awards, including those from the International Review of Spirits and the Spirits International Prestige. Those in the area can

purchase Whistling Andy spirits at the distillery in Bigfork. The distillery also features a tasting room where visitors can sample the spirits. Liquor stores in Montana and five other states also sell Whistling Andy products. Beyond supporting local farmers by purchasing their grains, the distillery participates in community in northwest Montana by supporting local causes. Starting this summer the distillery will sell a huckleberry vodka called “The Spirit of Sperry.” All proceeds from sales of the vodka in the first year after it is released will fund the restoration of Sperry Chalet in Glacier National Park, which burned down as a result of wildfires last summer.

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According to Van Fossen, Whistling Andy’s dedication to supporting local farmers and the northwest Montana community is central to the identity of the business. “Doing things locally and

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VJ


SELI’Š KSANKA QLISPE’ DAM

PROTECTIVE MEASURES Invasive mussels haunt Georgia Smies. A soft-spoken but ebullient Southerner, Smies formerly worked as a water-quality specialist for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, on the clear waters of Flathead Lake in western Montana. A prehistoric remnant of Glacial Lake Missoula, Flathead is ringed by forests of fir and larch and hemmed in by the Swan and Mission mountain ranges. On its banks are swamp meadows and sandy beaches, cherry orchards and small lakeside towns buoyed by summer traffic. Loons and geese bob on the water, eagles troll for coots, and osprey dive for suckers. Bears and mountain ungulates roam the hills, not far from vacation homes. Flathead feels like the tranquil heart of a wild and rugged landscape. Smies has come to know this place both professionally and personally, and she clearly loves it. But she’s deeply worried about its future. Back in 2006, Smies and her family lived in Wisconsin, along the shore of

“It’s an extinction-level event. There will be no fishery in Flathead Lake.” - Georgia Smies, water quality specialist

Lake Michigan. It’s here that Smies first encountered the genus Dreissenidae — zebra and quagga mussels — the tiny, malignant bivalves that have invaded the Great Lakes and Mississippi River Basin over the last 25 years. Aided by lake-hopping watercraft in the West, they reached Lake Mead in 2007 and Lake Powell in 2012. “There’s a self-preservation element to mussels that makes them diabolical,” Smies says, “Mussels take over, they turn lakes into aquatic deserts.” Her manner betrays her history as an educator. She is attentive and disarming, her red hair pulled back into a ponytail. Smies grimly recalls Wisconsin beaches

wrecked by razor-sharp mussel shells and stinking detritus. Fish stocks shrank and businesses went bankrupt, and toxic algae blooms left the water fouled. In 2016, Smies made for Montana, a place she’d lived once before, and breathed a sigh of relief at the sight of Flathead’s pristine water: a rare jewel still untouched by the mussel catastrophe. But that fall, as Smies was settling into work with the Salish and Kootenai Natural Resources Department, the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks announced the detection of mussel larvae in Tiber Reservoir, just two hours east of Flathead Lake. The mussels had followed Smies home. Since then, Smies and the Salish and Kootenai have been feverishly working to stop an invasion. A breach of Flathead Lake would bring irrevocable damage to the Crown of the Continent, a critical wilderness corridor from S E E PA G E 3 2

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QUAGGA AND ZEBRA MUSSELS

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Canada into the U.S. It is up to state and tribal agencies — working together — to keep Flathead out of this invader’s clutches. The necessary cooperation, however, is proving difficult — leaving Georgia Smies wondering if Montana is doomed to a future of mussel-infested waters. As large freshwater lakes go, Flathead is world-renowned for its purity. The lake owes its health to geology, geography and hydrology. Fed by remote drainages and mountain snow, the lake has a rapid flushing rate; it can replace all the water it holds in just over two years’ time. That’s incredibly fast. Lake Tahoe, which is similar in size, takes 650 years to do the same. This hydrological cycle, along with the low surrounding population density, helps keep the water clean. The biological history of the lake is not as clean as its waters. In the late 1800s, fisheries managers began stocking the non-native species, mostly from the Great Lakes region, that anglers generally preferred. Once-dominant natives like the westslope cutthroat trout (Montana’s state fish) and bull trout gradually lost ground to introduced lake trout, lake whitefish, yellow perch and Kokanee salmon. In the 1980s, Mysis shrimp, another nonnative introduced to plump up certain fish populations, began gorging on the lake’s rich zooplankton, robbing the land-locked Kokanee of their primary diet. The salmon population collapsed completely in 1989. Mysis, lake trout and lake whitefish now outnumber anything else. Management’s decisions, meant to “enhance” the fisheries, ultimately upended the lake’s once-distinct ecology. It’s fair to say, then, that Flathead has been under siege by invasive species for a very long time. But for Smies, mussels are of another order entirely. “It’s an extinction-level event,” Smies says, looking out at the lake from her back 32

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porch in Polson, Montana. “There will be no fishery in Flathead Lake.” And they’re coming fast. The same year that Flathead’s salmon stock hit rock-bottom, zebra mussels first turned up in Lake Erie. In a relatively short time, these Eurasian mollusks colonized the Great Lakes and fundamentally altered that aquatic community. They traveled downstream and migrated by boat along highways and interstates. They crossed the 100th meridian, making unrelenting progress toward an open West, an invasive expeditionary force if there ever was one. “I think my response to mussels in Montana was visceral,” Smies says ruefully, conveying the near-nausea she felt at the news of their presence near the Flathead Basin. Flathead Lake is an essential part of Montana’s recreational economy, along with Glacier National Park to the north. But where Glacier is managed by one entity, the National Park Service, Flathead’s management is partitioned — and complicated. The Confederated Salish and Kootenai oversee the southern half of the lake on the Flathead Reservation. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks administers the northern half. The Mysis shrimp debacle proved that management decisions on one end of the Flathead Basin carried reverberations throughout the area. It was a turning point in the relationship between the tribes and the state. In the aftermath, two different strategies emerged on how to manage the lake’s fishery: The tribes put more value on restorative ecology, while the state held fast to practical economics. This conflict has been re-ignited by the arrival of mussels. Starting from an economical or ecological basis results in very different ideas about how to protect Flathead — and the rest of the West — from an advancing army of quagga and zebra mussels. The tribes have been clear about

their determination to fortify Flathead in statements they have made to the Montana Legislature. Shelly Fyant, a member of the Tribal Council of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai, told lawmakers during the 2017 Legislative session that, quite simply, “Water is life.” “Protecting the water cuts to the core of who I am as a Salish woman,” Fyant testified. “As a Native woman, in our worldview, men are keepers of the fire, women protect the water, as we are both life-givers. From our very conception, we are carried by our mothers in sacred water, and as women we carry that responsibility throughout life. As a tribal councilwoman, as a mother to four sons and a grandmother to six, I take this responsibility very seriously.” The state’s argument for action tends to hew to a more traditional management perspective based on economic values. Sustain the fishery, keep boaters boating. State revenue from anglers and waterbased recreation is a significant part of Montana’s $6 billion outdoor economy. “The states downstream are watching us very carefully to see what we are doing, and we in Montana do not want the blood on our hands,” Flathead Biological Station’s Assistant Director Tom Bansak says. He is speaking from an office nestled in Yellow Bay, along the east shore of Flathead Lake. The Bio Station grounds resemble a summer camp, with cabins, dormitories and a commissary. Canoes crowd at the water’s edge. Bansak works on the threshold of tribal jurisdiction, near the invisible demarcation line spanning the lake. The Flathead Biological Station has been here since 1908, serving as a research center for scientists and students and faculty from the University of Montana. Bansak says the Bio Station began working with both the state and the tribes on aquatic invasive species in 2009. Given the urgency of the threat, though, mussels will require even more


“With these mussels, early detection is the only hope ... We should be using every tool in the tool box.” - Tom Bansak, Flathead Lake Biological Station assistant director

determined efforts. “With these mussels, early detection is the only hope,” Bansak insists. For the last five years, the Bio Station has carried out environmental DNA, or eDNA, tests on 40 lakes, including Flathead, in northwestern Montana. This detection technique can pick up an organism’s cellular traces — dead or alive — in the water column. Sampling does not require the optimum water conditions or timing reproduction cycles needed by microscopy, the other long-standing, tried-and-true method of detecting mussels. EDNA testing, Bansak points out, extends the time period in which mussels can be found and is much more sensitive. “In addition to that, eDNA will allow you to determine which species it is, whether it’s zebra or quaggas, and that can be challenging or even impossible when you’re looking at the veligers,” Bansak notes. (Veligers are juvenile specimens that show up in the water after spawning.) Microscopy can’t do that. With microscopy, samples are collected during the warm-water breeding season (usually July to August) and subjected to light that makes mussel larvae glow under a microscope. The cruel drawback of microscopy is that a positive reaction generally shows more than just a single veliger — meaning that chances are, by the time it’s detected, colonization is well underway. It is far from an early detection method. The Bio Station and Bansak believe eDNA can find mussels early, before the shells hit the shores. Smies and the tribes agree, so the tribes have partnered with the Bio Station to conduct joint sampling on reservation waters.

The state has been less proactive about integrating eDNA into its mussel response. Following detection in Tiber Reservoir, the state brought together a panel of experts in December 2016 to make recommendations on how to proceed. This group included researchers from the Bio Station and both regional and national U.S. Geological Survey scientists. The consensus of the panel was to utilize eDNA alongside microscopy in statewide sampling — a recommendation Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks seemed uninterested in at the time. In later meetings with the tribes, the state communicated that microscopy alone would be sufficient. “It’s like taking the wheels off the truck before getting on the road,” an exasperated Smies says. “Science is science; do it right.” Bansak agrees: “We should be using every tool in the tool box.” Though the state balked at eDNA for most of 2017, it eventually brought it into its detection arsenal toward the end of July. A few weeks later, Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ Aquatic Invasive Species Bureau chief, Tom Woolf, sat down with stakeholders in the Flathead — the first time the state had met directly with Salish and Kootenai representatives all summer. Woolf said the state, in coordination with the USGS, had carried out eDNA tests on Tiber and Canyon Ferry reservoirs. But he was uncertain about eDNA prospects for Flathead Lake. “The DNA thing, we’re just starting to tiptoe into it. This is the first year the state has done it,” Woolf says. “I don’t know that the state had planned to do eDNA sampling on Flathead.” Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ hesitation to support early detection efforts in the

Flathead Basin was in part due to a lack of confidence in eDNA’s reliability. It did, in fact, carry a “false positive” risk: A mussel confirmation could derive from dead cells years old that posed no real threat today. Another factor to the state’s position, perhaps, were the bureaucratic constraints keeping the agency’s mussel response behind the pace the tribes wanted for the Flathead Basin. “I understand your issue is here, but what we do here has to also encompass what’s going on around the state,” Woolf says. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks has been adamant that its mussel strategy is consistent statewide, even at the cost of limiting more aggressive localized efforts and alienating regional stakeholders like the Salish and Kootenai. For better or worse, Flathead’s fortunes are tied up with policy emerging from the state capital, Helena, 180 miles away on the other side of the Continental Divide. “I think one of the biggest challenges with a response is coordination with all of the stakeholders and people on the ground,” Bansak says. “(Fish, Wildlife and Parks) is based in Helena and will be running any statewide response from Helena.” It was in Helena, on a gusty June Tuesday, that Tom Boos, the former aquatic invasive species coordinator for Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks, guided an audience through slides detailing the progress of Montana’s mussel response. Boos spoke of the difficulties in managing large, high-traffic bodies of water. Local boater access points dotted the shores. Boos admitted that these were understaffed or not staffed at all. S E E PA G E 3 4

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“We need enforcement support,” he said. At a local boater launch, operators are expected to have obtained proper watercraft 883-3338 certification through local Fish, Wildlife and Parks #9 3rd Ave. E. Polson offices or via an online test. Vessels are marked with a sticker to show local status. This exempts local boaters from decontamination requirements when they leave certain high-risk waters. The ALL AMERICAN FOOD state created the local boater program to ease the watercraft screening process for those CHICKEN TENDERS who recreate primarily at Tiber or Canyon Ferry BASKET reservoirs, east of the Continental Divide. But according to Boos, the program was hard to police and staffing was spread thin, so the state leaned heavily on signs and the honesty of boaters. This meant local launch sites were essentially sieves. Boaters could leave those two reservoirs without decontamination and potentially take mussels for a ride down the road (ostensibly to a 50205 Hwy. 93 place where they would eventually be inspected). Polson Even at Canyon Ferry’s four full inspection and Mission Mountain Area Pedal to Platedecontamination stations, there were loopholes. Boos talked about how the state had defined “decontaminated” at the major high-risk reservoirs to mean, “cleaned, drained and dry.” The previously quiet audience shifted audibly in the MMAPP Ride the MMAPP their seats. A series of questions followed. In the West, “decontamination” is widely Mission Mountain Area understood as a high-temperature, high-pressure water treatment. The Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission specifically defines the September 22, 2018 method, saying that hot water decontamination Lake County’s inaugural using a pressure-washing unit is currently the Cycling + Farm event! only scientifically validated method that kills and for more information call... removes mussels. 406.676.5901 But “Clean. Drain. Dry.” — Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ official requirement for boaters — puts RAMES #Ride the MMAPP the bar at a level of routine maintenance outside consistent “decontamination” standards. Representatives from the Flathead Basin Commission and the Salish and Kootenai Tribes were among those in the crowd who objected to the state’s definition of “decontamination.” They wanted clarification on what Boos was actually regular sunglasses saying. In the midst of this relatively chummy and and straightforward meeting, Boos’ explanation prescription sunglasses had hit a nerve. Did this mean that boats from suspect waters were getting a decontaminated SES pass without the proper protocol? Why was the S A L G N featuring ALL SU state mixing this language? Up in the Flathead, Smith Optics saying that a vessel was “cleaned, drained, and & Wiley X dried” meant that it had passed inspection. But it JEFFREY D. HENINGER, O.D. wasn’t synonymous with “decontaminated.” 410 1st st. East,Polson • 883-4355 Boos explained that boater volume was beyond

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what the state could manage. He was blunt about a lack of resources. Decontaminating every boat during high season traffic, Boos maintained, “would be next to impossible.” But if messaging was not consistent across the state, not consistent on both sides of Continental Divide, from one agency to another, the general public might get the wrong idea about how to prevent the spread of mussels. And the public is perhaps the best defense in beating back this threat. When you’re driving in western Montana, getting to Flathead likely means passing through the tiny outpost of Ravalli, about 35 miles south of the lake. Train tracks hug the road in this narrow corridor at the north end of the Jocko Valley. The Big Sky briefly gets pinched by the hillsides, before opening back up miles ahead to reveal the grandeur of the Mission Mountains. On the edge of town, the speed limit cools to 45 mph, but Ravalli can still slip by your window in an instant. Once, the largest buffalo herd in the country resided here under the watch of a buffalo breeder named Charlie Allard. There are no buffalo to be seen in Ravalli proper now, just a handful of homes, a bakery, a bar and the Bison Café, which hangs a banner advertising “Buffalo Meat for Sale.” In the middle of this highway blip, a watercraft inspection station sits in a gravel lot. There is not much to the site — some traffic cones, a camp trailer and a wall tent to shade a few staff from the beating sun. Drivers hauling motorized and non-motorized watercraft — including paddleboards, kayaks and canoes — are required to stop here and spend some time with the state’s watercraft inspectors. Aquatic invasive species technician Russell Erickson is one of them. Erickson, a stocky, bearded guy who gives off a gruff but amiable impression, is part of an imperfect but essential firewall. He works 40 hours a week over four shifts, three of them 12-hour watches. “They can be murder, especially if it’s hot and you get 450 boats through here,” he says, foreshadowing an upcoming Fourth of July weekend that is sure to test the inspection team’s resiliency. Folks like Erickson are the sentinels of Montana’s mussel watch. Their job involves a delicate mix of PR, soft enforcement and shrewd observation. Every inspection must be thorough, but also quick. Erickson says they handle hundreds of boaters over Fridays and Saturdays during the summer. He sees his job as “serving a greater good.” “The damage that’s done if Flathead Lake is contaminated with mussels is going to be in the hundreds of millions. If that day comes, they’re


INSPECTION COMPLIANCE ENFORCEMENT

not going to look back and say we spent too much money inspecting boats at the Ravalli station,” he says. Montana legislators pushed House Bill 662 through the 2017 session. The bill revised general invasive species laws and set aside $14 million of the state’s budget for aquatic invasive species prevention. This included an expansion of inspection station personnel and funding for additional on-site decontamination units. By all accounts, state and tribal, this was a huge boon to the cause. Erickson has little patience for public cynicism directed at funding the mission. He sees a future Flathead infestation as a taxpayer’s nightmare. Economists have estimated that if the mussels set down roots in this region, Montana, Washington, Oregon and Idaho — as well as three Canadian provinces — will be shelling out around half a billion dollars annually to deal with the mess. It makes sense, then, that Montana law requires all boats be inspected. But Erickson thinks about his contact with boaters, and he’s not sure the message is getting to the public. “Very often they are hearing things for the first time,” he admits. “It is illegal to bring a boat into Montana or to this side of the Continental Divide and launch it without being inspected.” “Ninety-eight, 99 percent of the people who come through here want to do the right thing and they are on board with the program. There’s another 2 percent that don’t,” Erickson says. He recalled a ticked-off boater who pulled into the station, fuming. The crew had called the driver in to law enforcement for passing the stop. A county deputy turned the boater around to Erickson and company for inspection. And it’s a good thing: The boat was contaminated with standing water and headed for Flathead Lake. “I’m not getting the sense that the

public really understands that they have a greater role here,” he says. Erickson is also right about the public’s lack of information about the mussel threat. A recent study from the Institute of Tourism and Recreation Research at the University of Montana highlighted a lack of awareness of invasive species among the state’s young people. The report showed 18- to 36-year-old Montana residents were high-use water recreationalists, but that their knowledge of mussel-related closures — and general invasive species threats — was slim to none. If these younger groups were not being reached, the report concluded, state agencies should be concerned. It suggested the state ratchet up its communication and education efforts, particularly those outside of traditional media outlets like TV, radio and newspapers. The tourism institute’s findings tapped into a core component of any invasive species defense: public education. An informed base is able to translate state messaging into action and give substance to strategy. Look no further than Minnesota, a state that has fended off mussels with some success thanks in part to an aggressive education campaign. Fewer than 2 percent of Minnesota’s nearly 12,000 lakes are infested. Much of Minnesota’s success has to do with outreach. Keegan Lund, who works for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, is tasked with speaking to communities. The payoff is cultivating personal responsibility that helps shift how the public interacts with water. A “change in culture,” as Lund puts it. He admits that “success” is sometimes hard to find once your state is already infiltrated. But the fight goes on. Every year, the Land of 10,000 Lakes allocates $10 million to aquatic invasive species work, and infestation rates have slowed. Moreover, Lund says, the public has come

to grips with the reality of mussels, and life goes on. “The ‘game over’ narrative is not the case,” Lund explains. “They don’t kill lakes, they change lakes.” But up in the Flathead, for people like Georgia Smies, that kind of “change” carries too high a toll. She returns to Lake Michigan and the grim reality there. “It’s a tale of woe. There’s not a mussel-free inch in substrate,” she says, referring to the invader’s total takeover of underwater surfaces. First came the zebra, then the quagga, which outstripped the former and now numbers around 950 trillion. Smies left her position with the Salish and Kootenai in August 2017, but remains involved in education efforts to thwart invasive species. She says Montana could learn from Minnesota’s blueprint. An educated public is really the difference between no mussels and mussels in the Flathead. Both the state and the tribes are trying to drill their messaging on mussels into the public consciousness through billboards and traditional media. It largely remains to be seen if the information is sticking. The 2018 boating season will undoubtedly tell that tale. “We just have to do everything we can all of the time,” Germaine White, a member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, says of the tribes’ public information campaign. “We’re charged with protecting our natural resource, it’s all hands on deck.” Housed in a blue office in Polson, White manages tribal outreach efforts for the Salish and Kootenai Natural Resources Department. “We are one of those ecotone tribes on the backdoor to where the waters begin,” she explains. “Water is precious and we need it, and our elders remind us to care for it.” The state operates a “Montana Mussel S E E PA G E 3 8 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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Response” website and an associated Facebook page. The tribes, along with the Flathead Basin Commission and regional stakeholders are pursuing more robust regulations to deal with mussels in their corner of the world. Fish Wildlife & Parks is working to expand the staffing and resources of its aquatic invasive species department. Divisions between Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks and the tribes are hindering progress in the Flathead, but there are signs that some hard incompatibilities may be softening. “From my perspective, from where I’m sitting, I’m really trying to build partnerships and build capacity around the state to help protect the state and individual water bodies from invasive species,” Tom Woolf, the chief of the state agency’s Aquatic Invasive Species Bureau, says. He expressed a desire for better communication and coordination between entities. Tribal representatives were happy to hear it. “We want to become a strong link,” responded Salish and Kootenai member Paula Webster, who is the water-quality program manager at the Natural Resources Department. Keeping a cooperative position in this fight helps both sides of Flathead Lake fend off ecological collapse. Working

3rd Ave. WEST

AIS INSPECTION

together, the state and tribes might be better equipped to tackle the tall order of educating the public and instilling a collective responsibility. Because, in the end, these agencies alone cannot hold back the mussel tide. It has to be done by the boating public, by the people who know Flathead Lake on a personal level, who derive something from its fresh waters.

Downtown Polson

That’s what gives Smies hope. “We have the good fortune here of protecting one body of water that everyone cares about in their own way,” she says. Story by Beau Baker of Montana Public Radio. This story was produced as part of the Crown Reporting Project, at the University of Montana in summer, 2017. VJ

See you at the market!

May - Oct. • Fridays 9am - 1 pm

j CaFGhKIQweMOfzXdGPk “Thanks to the Polson Community for helping make the market such a huge success!” esh bring . . . Buy FrOur Shop vendors • Cheese/Honey L ocal • Fresh Produce • Fresh Eggs

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• Jams & Jellies • Fresh-cut Flowers • Baked Goods • Beauty Products • Soaps • Jewelry • Bedding Plants •Plant Starts • Fabric Creations Check us •Original Art • Wood Working EBcaT/rdDEBIT/CREDIT out on s accepted ! Facebook •Fresh Meats and much, much MORE! To our wonderful customers. PLEASE DON’T PARK in the First Citizens Bank parking lot.

For more information call Market Master Lou Anne 675-0177 or Judie 274-2029

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Ronan Farmers Market Thursdays 4-6 pm thru mid-October

Ronan Visitors Center • Hwy 93 next to Glacier Bank

Contact Market Master Jaci Webb 698-3312

like us on

RonanFarmersMarket2018 for more info


F R E S H FA R E FARMERS MARKETS OPEN FOR SEASON

LAKE COUNTY — Farmers markets are growing from Arlee to Polson this year to give people the opportunity to support the local economy and purchase fresh vegetables, arts and crafts, prepared meals, and much more. The Arlee Farmers Market is located next to the Huckleberry Patch at 72532 N. Couture Loop and is open from 4 to 7 p.m. on Wednesdays until September. Market vendors offer goods such as tomatoes, vegetables and flowers. Local organizations and student groups will hold fundraisers while the market is open.

The Mission Falls Farmers Market is open from 5 to 7 p.m. on Fridays. Vendors will sell various items in the parking lot of the former Golden Yoke Creamery, located on U.S. Highway 93 and Mountain View Drive. The market will be open until September. The Ronan Farmers Market is located in the grassy area behind the Ronan Visitor Center off of U.S. Highway 93. The market is open on Thursdays from 4 to 6 p.m. until mid October. A variety of vendors will be offering items such as cheese, sourdough bread, vegetable starts and microgreens. Plans are to offer live music and showcase local artists.

Those interested in becoming a vendor or showcasing music or artwork at the market, should contact market manager Jaci Webb at 698-3312 or email her at jaci.webb@lakecountycdc.org. The Polson Farmers Market runs from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Friday until October. It’s located on Main Street and Fourth Avenue in downtown Polson. The market accepts cash, debit, credit, and SNAP benefits, which stands for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. Some individual vendors accept Farmers Market Coupons from WIC, a Women, Infants and Children benefit program. All of the local Farmers Markets groups listed can be found on Facebook. M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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BURGERVILLE

A TA S T E O F A M E R I C A N A In the spring of 1961, a baby girl was born prematurely in Polson. Enoch and Lucille Richwine were overjoyed to have a new child, but also concerned about how they would pay their medical bills. On April 20, 1962, the couple found a solution to their financial issues. They bought a little burger stand called “Burgerville No. 2” in Polson. It was part of a chain of burger stands with two other locations, one in Plains and another in Missoula. Little did they realize that their purchase of the burger stand would have a long lasting influence not only on their family but on the community as well. Today, Polson’s Burgerville still serves up “the best burgers goin’.” (The Plains and Missoula locations closed many years ago.) What was 40

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once a stand is now a building and the name has changed from Burgerville No. 2 to Richwine’s Burgerville. Located on the south side of U.S. Hwy. 93 in Polson, Burgerville is easy to spot with its iconic signage including a big arrow,

a windmill, and two huge cows dressed in police uniforms, smiling and waving. The restaurant is now owned by Enoch and Lucille’s daughter, Marcia, who grew up working at the family business. Open for business each spring and

summer from March through September, Burgerville has become a favorite place to dine in the Polson community. In fact, it’s had multiple national recognitions. In the late ‘70s, the New York City–based United Press International, named Burgerville one of the 10 “cheaper gourmet good eats” in the nation. The article was published in newspapers all over the nation, from the Denver Post to the Missoulian. Just a few years later the popular food magazine “Bon Appetit” sent a letter to the restaurant asking for their burger recipe. The Richwine family politely declined, reserving their recipe for customers only. In the late 1980s Marcia’s brother, Shane, took over running the business. Throughout that decade Marcia helped


run Burgerville on weekends even though she was married, living in Missoula and working at H&R Block. In 1990 Marcia and her husband had their first child. This date also marked her 20-year hiatus from full-time work at Burgerville. In 2006, Enoch Richwine passed away. Two years later, in October of 2008, Marcia got a call from her brother Shane, who told her that he had been diagnosed with stage four melanoma. Marcia promised to come and help him, but he was doubtful because of her already busy schedule. “He told me that I couldn’t work at H&R Block and Burgerville too. I said, ‘Do you want to make a bet?’” Shane passed away in June of 2009 and Marcia has run Burgerville ever since. She quit her job at H&R Block and travels back and forth between Polson and Missoula to be with her family. Although 56 years have passed since Marcia’s parents bought Burgerville, not much has changed. As much as

possible, Marcia has worked to keep the restaurant the same as it was when it opened. “Burgerville as you see it now, is the same Burgerville as when I was a kid,” she said. “The standards that my mom and dad had are the same standards we carry today. We do our best each day to deliver the ultimate customer experience.” Even the refrigerators, grills, and machines are in the same place as they were when Enoch and

Lucille moved into the new building. The sizzling burger patties, the creamy milkshakes, and the crispy fries are all made as similar as possible since day one. Just as Burgerville hasn’t changed, neither has its popularity. Burgerville serves a steady stream of customers from their two drive-thru windows on either side of the building. “The busier the season, the longer the days are,” Marcia explains. “I arrive

at 8 a.m. each day and close when the last customer is served. Sometimes that’s 9 p.m. but as we get busier it gets later. Last Fourth of July we were open until 10:30 p.m.” She added that sometimes “… the lines can be an hour and a half long.” No matter what the time of day, there is always a line at Burgerville. How does Burgerville continue to be a customer favorite? Marcia says that there is no secret, just quality food and good customer service. She explains, “Consistency is a huge part of running Burgerville. We always have fresh ingredients, we always grind our own beef, and we cook everything the same. There’s a satisfaction in taking all these ingredients from the ground level and creating a quality product to go out the window.” An important factor of their consistency involves grinding their own beef. “It usually takes about eight hours to grind the beef. We also add the fat S E E PA G E 4 2

RONAN VISITOR CENTER ON HIGHWAY 93 in RONAN, MONTANA

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ourselves, which makes a huge difference in taste,” Marcia explained. Marcia takes pride in hiring and training her employees. She tries to hire Polson’s teenagers in order to boost the local economy. “The community dollars are actually going back into the community,” she said. “The employees are able to take the money they make here and go out and spend it in the local economy. That is so important to me.” Marcia’s goal in training her employees is to encourage good habits instead of simply showing them how to close down shop each night. “This is where I learned my work ethic, and that got me far in life.” she said. “I want to pass that on to the kids I train.” These efforts were noticed in 2017 by the Lake County Job Service who named Burgerville “Employers of Choice” for the care they have for their employees. Marcia makes it a point each year to donate money locally. “I try my hardest to contribute to as much as I can. Whenever someone comes to me and has a legitimate need, I will make a donation to them because without those locals, Burgerville wouldn’t be here.” In 2017 Marcia donated to the Polson Scholarship Foundation, the CASA Association, the Polson Fairgrounds, the Red

Cross and more. Proof of Burgerville’s generosity is right on the menu with the “Bernie Burger,” a burger in honor of Marcia’s brother Shane (nicknamed Bernie). Each year, a portion of the proceeds from the burger’s sales goes to the American Cancer Society. For locals, Burgerville is more than just a place to eat. Over the last 55 years it has become a gem of the Polson community. Melissa Early, who is 43 and has lived in Polson her whole life, reminisced on her childhood memories of Burgerville. “It was always a special treat when my parents would take us to Burgerville.” Melissa said. “They have always had the best burgers and milkshakes. I would always get the chocolate milkshake and the double burger.” As for the future of Burgerville, Marcia plans to wait and see. Her two children have other ideas for their futures and aren’t interested in inheriting the business. Marcia isn’t worried though. “I just take it one day at a time,” she said. “Burgerville has influenced my entire life. It was opened in order to provide income for my parents and the cool thing is, it has actually provided income to every one of us in the family.” “I love this place,” she said. “The daily memories, the family spirit, and the love the people have for Burgerville are what make it so amazing.” VJ

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SUMMER


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SUMMER

CALENDAR M AY / J U N E

W E D N E S D AY, M AY 3 0 • ARLEE — The Arlee Farmers Market season kicks off on Wednesday, May 30 from 4-7 p.m. in the Hangin’ Art Gallery and in front of the Merc on 93. Items sold are hand-baked, hand-crafted and locally grown. • POLSON — Sandpiper Art Gallery, 306 Main Street, Polson, presents until June 15, “Living in the Moment.” This exhibit will be everything we love about Montana and will feature member artists Kathy Calkins (acrylic painter), Marla Hall (photography), Mary K. LeProwse (fused glass), Joanne Simpson (batik watercolor and jewelry) and a guest artist to be announced. Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday and 44

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SUMMER

10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Saturday. F R I D AY, J U N E 1 • ST. IGNATIUS — Last day of school for St. Ignatius School District grades K-11. • DAYTON — Last day of school for Dayton School. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Ned & Nicole guitar duo. S AT U R D AY, J U N E 2 • POLSON — The Sandpiper Art and Gift Gallery’s “Living in the Moment” exhibit continues until June 15 at 306 Main Street. This exhibit will be everything we love about Montana and will feature member artists: Kathy Calkins (acrylic painter), Marla Hall (photography),

Mary K. LeProwse (fused glass), Joanne Simpson (Batik watercolor/jewelry) and a yet to be announced guest artist. Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Saturday. • PABLO — The annual Artists’ Market will be held at the People’s Center on Saturday, June 2, from 10 a.m.- 2 p.m. All artists are invited to promote their work at this event. Simply call and register at 406-6750160. • CHARLO — Ninepipes Museum is honored that artists will exhibit their beautiful work in the Earl W. Wharton Memorial Gallery during the 2018 season. Nancy Vaughan’s terrific fry bread and Indian tacos will be

available in conjunction with the artist receptions for four months — June, July, August and September. Laurel Cheff and her husband Bud built the Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana. She had the opportunity to paint the mannequins, and a mural on the upper part of the diorama room. She remains on the Board of Directors and looks forward to the opportunity to improve her painting and spend time in her garden. Her work will be on display Saturday, June 2, along with multi-media artist, Kate Davis. Davis will display some of her latest photographs during her exhibit at the museum. Davis will be on hand from 2-4 p.m. with Sibley, a Peregrine Falcon.


JUNE S AT U R D AY, J U N E 2 (CONTINUED) • RONAN — The 8th annual Papa Bear Run will be held Saturday, June 2. The ride will begin at S& S Sports store in Ronan going to Plains, Hot Springs, and Somers and ending back at S&S in Ronan. Sign-up and start at 10 a.m. There is a $10 entry fee. Race ends and awards given at 5 p.m. This event benefits Boys and Girls Club of the Flathead Indian Reservation. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Pamela Vankirk – coffee house folk. • ST. IGNATIUS — St. Ignatius High School graduation ceremony from 2-4 p.m. • POLSON — Saturday racing will have Mod 4, Big Sky West Coast late models, and Thunderstocks. Spectator gates open at 5 p.m. Qualifying time trials are at 6 p.m. and racing starts at 7 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors ages 8-17 are $7. Kids 7 and under are free. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. No outside food, beverages or alcohol. For more information call 406-210-5400. • POLSON — Polson School District High School graduation will be held. • PLAINS — The third annual Plains Wild Horse Shootout will take place on June 2 at the Amundson Sports Complex. Divisions include first grade through adult. Deadline is

May 28 to register. Entry fee is $120 per team. Go to missionvalley3on3.org for more information and to register. • POLSON — Providence St. Joseph Medical Center’s Charity Golf Tournament is scheduled for Saturday, June 2. Registration is at 8 a.m. and shotgun start is at 9 a.m. This will be an 18-hole/four-person scramble with an entry fee of $120 per team, which includes golf/golf cart/tees/prizes and lunch. For questions or team registration contact Cameron at Polson Bay Golf Course at 406-883-8230 or go to: polsonbaygolfcourse@gmail. com. M O N D AY, J U N E 4 • POLSON/RONAN — The Boys and Girl Club of the Flathead Reservation and Lake County, in both Ronan and Polson, will be closed from Monday, June 4, through Friday, June 8. T U E S D AY, J U N E 5 • BIGFORK — Jess Newby from Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks will present “Ecology of Montana Moose” at the Flathead Lake Brewing Co. in Bigfork starting at 6 p.m. This is an outreach program from the Flathead Lake Biological Station called “Science on Tap Flathead.” W E D N E S D AY, J U N E 6 • ARLEE — The last day of school for Arlee School District. School is out at 12:30 p.m.

• POLSON — The Polson Chamber of Commerce luncheon will be held at the KwaTaqNuk Resort from noon1p.m. The featured speaker for this month is Webb Brown from the Montana Chamber of Commerce. Lunch is $11. T H U R S D AY, J U N E 7 • POLSON — Last day of school for Polson School District. • CHARLO — The Ronan Chamber of Commerce will hold a general meeting on Thursday, June 7, at noon at Allentown Restaurant. • RONAN — Warwick Workout Advanced Offensive Basketball Skills Girls Camp is designed for players at Ronan School District who are looking to enhance and expand their skill set. Workout trainers will work with players to excel at their respective positions through progression based teaching and repetition. The camp will focus on shooting skills, finishing drills and ball handling. The camp is from Thursday, June 7 to Saturday, June 9. The cost is $40 and athletes receive a T-shirt. Call Steve Woll at 406261-1521 or email him at: steve. woll@ronank12.edu for more information. F R I D AY, J U N E 8 • RONAN — Last day of school for Ronan School District. • HOT SPRINGS — The 70th annual Homesteader Days celebration is a family fun weekend June 8-10 with arts

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and crafts, parades, a two-day rodeo, food booths on Main Street and a street dance. For more information call 406-7412662. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Shiloh Rising – progressive folk. • POLSON –– The Polson Splash Classic Softball ASA tournament will be held at the Polson softball complex (behind Cherry Valley Elementary School) on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, June 8, 9 and 10. Thirty-four teams from all over Montana and Washington compete in games starting at 5 p.m. on Friday and all day Saturday and Sunday. For details, call Kelley Druyvestein at 406-253-1590. S AT U R D AY, J U N E 9 • POLSON — Saturday racing at Mission Valley Raceway will have Hobbys, Hornets, Big Sky West Coast lates, Mod 4, and Legends. Spectator gates open at 5 p.m. Qualifying time trials are at 6 p.m. and racing starts at 7 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors ages 8-17 are $7. Kids 7 and under are free. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. No outside food, beverages or alcohol. For more information call 406-210-5400. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Kathy Colton & the Reluctants – rock, folk & percussion. S E E PA G E 4 6

Mission Mountain

NRA Rodeo

Friday & Saturday, June 22 & 23 Youth events begin at 6:30 p.m. Rodeo 7:30 p.m. both nights!

Food & Beverage Concessions Available

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(406) 883-3643 210 Main Street, Polson • Open Mon. - Sat. 9:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Adults $10 ~ Children under 12 $5 ~ 3 & under FREE

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JUNE SUMMER

CALENDAR

F R O M PA G E 4 5

M O N D AY, J U N E 1 1 • POLSON — The Mission Valley Jr. Golf Camp is free and open to youth going into the first through the eighth grade at the Polson Golf Course. Call Cameron Milton at 406-883-8230 for more information. The camp takes place from 8 a.m. – noon on Monday, June 11 and repeats on June 12 and 13. • POLSON — Registration for North Lake County Library’s Family Summer Reading Program, “Libraries Rock!” begins at 10 a.m. The program is open to all ages. Call 406-883-8225 for more information. • LAKE COUNTY — The Flathead Reservation and Lake County Boys and Girls Club will operate a summer program at both their Polson and Ronan sites MondayFriday (not July 4) from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. from June 11-Aug. 17. The

cost is $25 per month and must be paid up front in addition to membership fee. Space is limited. The summer program focuses on academics, good character and citizenship and developing healthy lifestyles. Applications may be picked up onsite or at: www. flatheadbgc.org. T U E S D AY, J U N E 1 2 • POLSON — The Mission Valley Jr. Golf Camp continues. The camp is free and open to youth going into the first through the eighth grade at the Polson Golf Course. Call Cameron Milton at 406-883-8230 for more information. The camp takes place from 8 a.m. – noon and repeats June 13. W E D N E S D AY, J U N E 1 3 • POLSON — The Mission Valley Jr. Golf Camp continues. The camp is free and open to youth going into the first through the eighth grade at the Polson Golf Course. Call Cameron Milton at 406-883-8230 for more

information. The camp takes place from 8 a.m. – noon. T H U R S D AY, J U N E 1 4 • POLSON — North Lake County Public Library is hosting a free Thursday morning program from 10 – 11 a.m. Children of all ages are welcome. Programs emphasize Science, Technology, Engineering and Math principles. Call 406-883-8225 for more information. • MISSION VALLEY — The 33rd Annual Montana Senior Olympic Games will be held in the Pablo, Polson and Ronan areas June 1416. Competitions in 14 different sports for men and women who are 50 years of age and older include: archery, bowling, badminton, cycling, basketball, golf, horseshoes, pickle ball, race-walk, tennis, table tennis, road race, swimming and track & field. Gold, silver and bronze medals will be awarded. Social events include a pasta buffet on Thursday, June 14, at the Polson Elks, for $11 at 7 p.m. A banquet

and opening ceremonies will take place on Friday, June 15, at the Polson Elks, at 7 p.m. for $19. (No host cocktails on both June 14 and 15 are at 6 p.m.) For more information visit: http://montana. fusesport.com or call 406-5865543. F R I D AY, J U N E 1 5 • POLSON – The Kiwanis Club is hosting a local beer and wine fest from 6-9 p.m. at the KOA Campground in Polson on June 15. This fundraiser supports local Kiwanis community projects including scholarships, the Boys and Girls Club, Boy Scouts, Special Olympics and the Polson Middle School band. • RONAN – Come on over to a farm-to-table western-style cookout at the Lake County Fairgrounds on Friday, June 15 from 6 to 8 p.m. Tickets are $50 per person with a cash bar. This fundraiser supports the Lake County Community Development Corporation. For more information call 406-676-5901.

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M O N TA N A

SUMMER


MISSION RESERVOIR

JUNE S AT U R D AY, J U N E 1 6 • POLSON — The Polson Golf Course will hold the Pitch, Putt and Drive Contest, the culmination of the junior camp week. The contest is from noon4 p.m. and is followed by awards and a potluck barbecue. • POLSON — Saturday racing at Mission Valley Raceway will have Hobbys, Hornets, Big Sky West Coast lates, Thunderstocks and Bandoleros. Spectator gates open at 5 p.m. Qualifying time trials are at 6 p.m. and

racing starts at 7 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors ages 8-17 are $7. Kids 7 and under are free. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. No outside food, beverages or alcohol. For more information call 406-210-5400. • POLSON – The public is invited to attend the Montana PBS Library Tour’s “Meet Clifford” event for photo opportunities and crafts at 10 a.m. on Saturday, June 16 at the North

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Lake County Public Library. Discover, create and learn all about music. S U N D AY, J U N E 1 7 FAT H E R ’ S D AY • POLSON — The Father’s Day Scramble golf tournament at Polson Golf Course will close the 18-hole course. The 9-hole course will be available for play. Call 406-883-8230 for more information. • HOT SPRINGS – Father’s Day brunch and live music at the

Symes Hotel. M O N D AY, J U N E 1 8 • POLSON — “Let Me Tell You My Story,” an art exhibit of Members Only artists, is an open show featuring Sandpiper member artists past and present at the Sandpiper Art and Gift Gallery, 306 Main Street. Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Saturday. S E E PA G E 4 9

QUICKSILVER EXPRESSO Come in for: • Soup & Sandwiches • Coffee Bar • Free Wi-Fi • Ice Cream • Car Wash & Vacuum • Laundromat • ATM • We sell Greyhound Bus Tickets!

TAKE A BREAK!

YES! We are a FULL SERVICE Station!

7 days a week

675-5000 51999 US 93 • PABLO

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select ion & bev of snacks erage s!!

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Monday- Friday 7:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 7:30 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. M O N TA N A S U M M E R

47


d d d

d B e s d t B ’s ur RICHWINE DDD gers Goin’ D D DRGERVILLE D BU D DD

DD

BURGERS

SANDWICHES

Royal Burger Single………

$5.85

Royal Burger Double……

$8.25

Royal Burger Triple………

$10.65

Cheese Dx Single…………

$4.00

Cheese Dx Double………

$6.40

Cheese Dx Triple…………

$8.80

Cheese Plain Single………

$3.85

BLT………………………. . . . Garden Veggie Burger………. Steak Sandwich…………. . . . . Pork Sandwich …………. . . . . Chicken Burger…………. . . . . Hot Fish Sandwich…….…. . . . Shrimpwich……………. . . . . . . Grilled Cheese. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Grilled Ham and Cheese. . . . . . $4.25

Cheese Plain Double……… $6.25 Cheese Plain Triple………

$8.65

Hamburger Dx Single……

$3.50

Hamburger Dx Double……

$5.40

Hamburger Dx Triple……

$7.30

Hamburger Plain Single……

$3.35

Hamburger Plain Double…

$5.25

Hamburger Plain Triple……

$7.15

Bernie Burger Single……

$5.25

Bernie Burger Double……

$7.65

Bernie Burger Triple……

$10.05

$4.25 $4.50 $5.25 $5.00 $4.50 $4.75 $4.50 $3.00

SPECIALTIES Shrimp Dinner………………. Seafood Dinner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oyster Dinner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chicken and Chips. . . . . . . . . . . . Fish and Chips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Foot Long Hot Dog. . . . . . . . . . . Foot Long Hot Dog w/Chili Foot Long Hot Dog w/Chili and Cheese…………. . . . . . . . . Burrito. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Coke, Diet Coke, Sprite, Dr. Pepper, Root Beer, Lemonade, Orange, Iced Tea 12 oz . . . $1.00 16 oz . . . $1.25 24 oz . . . $1.50 32 oz . . . $1.75 Malts, Shakes, Sodas, Floats & Spins . . . 16 oz $3.25 24 oz $3.75 Coffee and Tea. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 oz $1.00 Hot Chocolate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 oz $1.00 MILK. . . .12 oz $1.50 16 oz $1.75 24 oz $2.25 32 oz. $2.50 Huckleberry Shakes. . . 16 oz $4.75 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 oz $5.25 Frozen Huckleberry Lemonade 16 oz $2.75 with ice cream $3.50 Huckleberry Sundae $4.00 Huckleberry Sundae Deluxe $4.25

DESSERTS

$9.50 $9.50 $9.50 $6.75 $6.75 $3.75 $4.50 $5.00 $2.00

Hot Fudge Sundae. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plain $3.00 Deluxe $3.25 Sundaes Plain. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.50 Sundaes Deluxe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.75 Black And White Sundae. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3.50 Cones. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Small $1.50 Large $2.00 Dip Cones. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Small $2.00 Large $2.50 Big Wheel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1.50 Soft Ice Cream Quart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4.75 1/2 Gallon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8.75

Corn Dog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.00

ng

ti bra e l e C

56

EXTRAS

Tomato………………. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $0.50 Cups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $0.25 Catsup/Fry Sauce/Ranch 1 oz $0.15 2 oz $0.25 Flavors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $0.25 Cheese. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $0.50 Patties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.00 Bacon or Ham. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1.25 Gluten-Free Bun. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1.50

RS!18 A E Y -2 0 196

DRINKS

2

SIDES Onion Rings 4 oz. . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 oz. . . . . . . . . . . . . Family Fries 14 oz Potato Salad

Prices may change without notice. We accept

50567 Hwy 93, Polson • 883-2620 48

M O N TA N A

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$2.25 $4.50 $4.70 $1.50

Green Salad $1.50 Fries 5 oz. . . . . . . . . . . $1.85 7 oz. . . . . . . . . . . $2.35


M I S S I O N M O U N TA I N N R A R O D E O

JUNE SUMMER

CALENDAR

F R O M PA G E 4 7

M O N D AY, J U N E 1 8 (CONTINUED) • POLSON — Polson Motorcoach and RV serve from 8-10:30 a.m. free huckleberry or regular pancakes to all Dads for free on Father’s Day. T H U R S D AY J U N E 2 1 SUMMER SOLSTICE • RONAN — Ronan School District will offer a Wrestling Camp from June 21-23 at the Activities Center. Breakfast and lunch are included and breakfast starts at 8 a.m. Bring headgear, shoes etc. This camp will teach technique, drills, and skills for all age levels and abilities. Develop a championship style. The cost is $40 per wrestler. Call Dylan

Kramer at 406-671-6615 for more information. • POLSON — North Lake County Public Library is hosting a free Thursday morning program from 10 – 11 a.m. Children of all ages are welcome. Programs emphasize Science, Technology, Engineering and Math principles. Call 406-8838225 for more information. • POLSON — Sponsor of the June SPLASH (Support Late Afternoon Social Hour) is St. Luke Community Healthcare. The event will be held on Thursday, June 21, from 5-7:00 p.m. at St. Luke Community Clinic. F R I D AY, J U N E 2 2 • RONAN — On June 22, the Ronan Area Chamber of Commerce will present “Crab Fest 2018,” which is a benefit for the Bockman (Ronan City)

Parks. The dinner will begin at 5 p.m. and has been moved to the horticulture barn at the fairgrounds. Tickets are $35 per person and $10 for children 10 years of age and under. Purchase tickets at Ronan Flower Mill, Valley Banks, Ronan Napa, Glacier Bank, First Interstate Bank-Polson, Access Montana and Ronan Power Products. Enjoy fresh crab boiled right there for you. Bring your own beverages, crab pliers and appetite. For more information, call the Ronan Chamber at 406676-8300. • POLSON — A reception for a Members Only Open Show entitled, “Let Me Tell You My Story,” will take place from 5-7 p.m. on Friday, June 22, at the Sandpiper Art and Gift Gallery, 306 Main Street. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Wayo & Keiko

– the drummer full spectrum originals. • POLSON – The Mission Mountain NRA Rodeo will be held at the Polson Fairgrounds, 320 Regatta Road, June 2223. Youth events including mutton bustin’ and mini bull riding begin at 6:30 p.m. NRA Rodeo starts at 7:30 p.m. NRA events include bareback, steer wrestling, saddle bronc, team roping, tie down roping, ladies and youth breakaway roping and bull riding. Tickets are $10/ adult, $5/Children under 12 and available at gate, no pre-sale tickets. Food, beverage and beer garden concessions available. Live music is planned after Friday night’s performance. Free vendors fair, no food items. Call Sharon at 261-2861 for more info. For general rodeo info call 883-1100. S E E PA G E 5 0

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JUNE seminars are open to the public, and everyone is invited to attend. Stop by to have a donut and learn more about ecology, and current research in the Flathead. Call 406-982-3301 x 229, for more information.

SUMMER

CALENDAR

F R O M PA G E 4 9

F R I D AY, J U N E 2 2 (CONTINUED) • POLSON – The public is invited to meet the Polson Police Department’s canine officer, Brody, at 10 a.m. at the North Lake County Public Library to celebrate “Bring Your Dog To Work Day.” S AT U R D AY, J U N E 2 3 • POLSON — Saturday racing at Mission Valley Raceway will have Hobbys, Hornets, Big Sky West Coast late models and Thunderstocks. Spectator gates open at 5 p.m. Qualifying time trials are at 6 p.m. and racing starts at 7 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors ages 8-17 are $7. Kids 7 and under are free. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. No outside food, beverages or alcohol. For more information call 406-210-5400. • POLSON — The Mission Mountain NRA Rodeo continues at the Polson Fairgrounds, 320 Regatta Road. NRA rodeo events include bareback, steer wrestling, saddle bronc, team roping, tie down roping, ladies and youth breakaway roping and bull riding. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for children under 12 years of age. Tickets will be available at the gate. There will be no pre-sale tickets.

T H U R S D AY, J U N E 2 8 • POLSON — North Lake County Public Library is hosting a free Thursday morning program from 10 – 11 a.m. Children of all ages are welcome. Programs emphasize Science, Technology, Engineering and Math principles. Call 406-8838225 for more information. N O R T H C R O W FA L L S

Food, beverage and beer garden concessions will be available. There will also be live music after the Friday night performance. (Free vendors fair, no food items.) Call 406-261-2861 or for general rodeo information call 406-883-1100. • ST. IGNATIUS — The St. Ignatius Volunteer Fire Department Fireman’s Auction will take place on Saturday, June 23, at 11 a.m. at the Old Town Field. Concessions begin at that time and include hamburgers, hot dogs, pulled pork sandwiches with coleslaw and ice cream. Meals will be served until the end of the auction at approximately 5 p.m. (Purchase a meal and you’re entered in the door prize drawing.) The silent auction starts at 11 a.m.; the live auction starts at noon with

Check out our patio! Best view in Polson!

raffle drawings and door prizes. Raffle tickets will be sold before the auction for a ½ beef; a whole hog cut and wrapped; and an AR15 rifle with scope. To donate auction items please call 406531-4082 or 406-745-4266. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Jimni – acoustic, folk, rock. M O N D AY, J U N E 2 5 • YELLOW BAY — The 2018 Data and Donuts Seminar series is offered every summer during the first four weeks of the FLBS Summer Session. The series offers students and the public a chance to hear speakers across a wide variety of ecological topics. Come to the seminar at the Flathead Biological Station at Yellow Bay on Monday, June 25, from 10-11 a.m. These

50

M O N TA N A

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406-872-2100

S AT U R D AY, J U N E 3 0 • POLSON — Saturday racing at Mission Valley Raceway will have Legend Madness, Hobbys, Hornets and Thunderstocks.

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F R I D AY, J U N E 2 9 • POLSON — All ages are welcome for a night under the stars to enjoy a movie and refreshments at Polson Bay Golf Course. This event is from 8-10 p.m. and hosted by XiAlpha Gamma Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi Polson and the Polson Golf Course. • POLSON — The Polson Chamber of Commerce will hold their annual “Chamber Blast” on Friday, June 29, at Big Sky Sporting Clays. Contact the Polson Chamber at 406-8835969 for more information. HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Soul City Cowboys – country rock.

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J U N E / J U LY S AT U R D AY, J U N E 3 0 (CONTINUED) Spectator gates open at 5 p.m. Qualifying time trials are at 6 p.m. and racing starts at 7 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors ages 8-17 are $7. Kids 7 and under are free. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. No outside food, beverages or alcohol. For more information call 406-2105400. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Tony Voodoo & Friends – country rock. S U N D AY, J U LY 1 • POLSON — Flathead Lake Cheese, 208 First Ave. E, will hold an open house on Sunday, July 1, at 10 a.m. full of tours and tastings. Call 406-8830343 or go to their website: flatheadlakecheese.com, for more information.

M O N D AY, J U LY 2 • YELLOW BAY — The 2018 Data and Donuts Seminar series is offered every summer during the first four weeks of the FLBS Summer Session. The series offers students and the public a chance to hear speakers across a wide variety of ecological topics. Come to the seminar at the Flathead Biological Station at Yellow Bay on Monday, July 2, from 10-11 a.m. These seminars are open to the public, and everyone is invited to attend. Stop by to have a donut and learn more about ecology, and current research in the Flathead. Call 406-982-3301 x 229, for more information. • ARLEE — The 120th annual Arlee Powwow celebration begins Monday July 2, and ends Sunday, July 8. All events are open to the public and free of charge. Arts, crafts, stick games, dance competitions, Indian and other ethnic foods will be available. Absolutely no

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alcohol, firearms, unleashed dogs or motorcycles are allowed in the camp area. This year’s dance competition will expand to 31 categories. There will be separate style categories for adults age 40-59. Women and men 60 years and over will be competition categories of all styles combined. The event takes place on powwow grounds on Powwow Road in Arlee. Wednesday is “Camp Day.” Visit the Arlee Esyapqeyni Powwow Facebook page for more information. W E D N E S D AY, J U LY 4 • POLSON — Please join us for the July 4th parade in downtown Polson beginning at noon. The theme this year is “Montana Roots.” Parade entry forms are available at the Polson Chamber of Commerce. There is a $20 fee for 2018 parade participants. Please call the chamber office for more information at 406-8835969.

• ARLEE — The Arlee Volunteer Fire Department will host its annual pancake breakfast from 7-11 a.m. at the old Arlee Fire Hall. The cost is $5 per person and it’s all you can eat. For more information, call 406-210-4144. • ARLEE — The Arlee Jocko Valley Museum, run by the Arlee Historical Society, opens for the summer July 4. and will be open until Labor Day. The museum has many historical displays including many photographs of Native and homesteading families. There are hundreds of obituaries with genealogy information. There is also a military display commemorating those who have given their lives for this country. The Arlee Museum is located at corner of Bouch and Fyant (by the grade school). For more information, hours of operation or to arrange a viewing appointment, call 406726-3167. S E E PA G E 5 2

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C H A R L O 4 T H O F J U LY PA R A D E

J U LY SUMMER

CALENDAR

F R O M PA G E 5 1

W E D N E S D AY, J U LY 4 (CONTINUE) • HOT SPRINGS – Barbecue, live music and fireworks at the Symes Hotel from 4 to 6 p.m. Voodoo Horseshoes – dance band. T H U R S D AY, J U LY 5 • POLSON —The Port Polson Players’ 2018 summer season, (their 43rd summer season), opens with the musical “After the Ball.” The show features music from the Gay ‘90s through the Roaring ‘20s, along with the title song, parlor tunes, ragtime, cowboy ballads, and Tin Pan Alley favorites. All summer theatre shows are presented at 52

M O N TA N A

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Polson’s beautiful theatre on the lake on the Polson golf course - U.S. Hwy. 93, Boettcher Park. This regional premier plays from July 5-22. Reservations can be made by calling the theatre box office at 406-883-9212 or visiting portpolsonplayers.com. Tickets are $19 for adults, $18 for senior citizens and students. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Chris Alexander – piano. • POLSON — North Lake County Public Library is hosting a free Thursday morning program from 10 – 11 a.m. Children of all ages are welcome. Programs emphasize Science, Technology, Engineering and Math principles. Call 406-8838225 for more information. F R I D AY, J U LY 6 • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Shameless

Society – blues. S AT U R D AY, J U LY 7 • BIGFORK — Mission Valley 3 on 3’s seventh annual Battle in the Bay will be held the second weekend of July at Bigfork High School and hosts 100 plus teams from third grade through adult. There will be 6-foot, 8-foot, and 9-foot dunk contests, 3-point contests and free throw contests held on Leonard Park Logging Inc. center court. The final day for signups for this tournament is June 29. For more information, go to: missionvalley3on3. com, Facebook or twitter.com/ missionvalleybb. • CHARLO — Ninepipes Museum is honored that artists will exhibit their beautiful work in the Earl W. Wharton Memorial Gallery during the 2018 season. Nancy Vaughan’s terrific fry

bread and Indian tacos will be available in conjunction with the artist receptions for the next three months — July, August and September. Joshua Marcea, a first descendant of the Bitterroot Salish tribe, will exhibit his sterling silver setting and lapidary work, which he combines to make handmade one-of-a-kind pieces. Marcea also does leather tooling and carving to make wallets and sheathes for his handmade inlayed knives. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Dean & Ian – originals and covers. • CHARLO — Mark your calendars. The Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana will hold the second annual Cultural Arts Fair on the museum grounds from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Saturday, July 7. This fun, family-friendly outdoor arts fair


J U LY S AT U R D AY, J U LY 7 (CONTINUED) will be an opportunity for Montana artists to exhibit and sell their work to visitors enjoying their summer vacations in the Mission Valley as well as to local friends and neighbors. Nancy Vaughan and crew will provide fry bread and Indian tacos. Call for complete details: 406-644-3435. • POLSON — The NSRA Winged Sprints, Legends, Mod 4, Bondoleros racing at Mission Valley Raceway will include dinner with the drivers. Spectator gates open at 5 p.m. Qualifying time trials are at 6 p.m. and racing starts at 7 p.m. Special events prices are: Adults $15, Juniors 8-18 $10 and Kids 7 and under are free. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. No outside food, beverages or alcohol. For more information call 406-210-5400.

M O N D AY, J U LY 9 • YELLOW BAY — The 2018 Data and Donuts Seminar series is offered every summer during the first four weeks of the FLBS Summer Session. The series offers students and the public a chance to hear speakers across a wide variety of ecological topics. Come to the seminar at the Flathead

Memorial Day Parade in downtown Polson at noon with ice cream social at Polson Flathead Historical Museum at 1 pm on Main St.; 883-3049 June 14-16 Senior Olympics in Polson & Ronan; 586-5543 June 22-23 Mission Mountain NRA Rodeo at Polson Fairgrounds 7:30 pm with live music Friday night after rodeo; 261-2861 or 883-1100 June 29 Chamber Blast Sporting Clays at Big Sky Sporting Clays; 883-5969 June 29 Movie on the Lawn 8 pm at Polson Bay Golf Course Driving Range - for all to enjoy July 1-7 Flathead Lake Cheese Open House 10-4 pm off Hwy 93; flatheadlakecheese.com July 4 4th of July Parade at noon downtown Polson, ice cream social at Polson Flathead Historical Museum at 1 pm at 708 Main St. followed by fireworks at dusk July 21-22 Live History Days at Miracle of America Museum, 36094 Memory Lane Polson; 883-6264 or miracleofamericamuseum.org July 21-22 Polson Main Street Cherry Festival, 883-3667 or flatheadcherryfestival.com July 28-29 Flathead Lake 3 on 3 Basketball Tourney in downtown Polson; theflatheadlake3on3.com July 28-29 4th Annual Flathead Lake Festival of Art 10-6 pm at Sacajawea Park, Polson; sandpiperartgallery.com August 4 Small Town Girl Market at Polson Fairgrounds August 11 Summerfest Car Show in downtown Polson; andersonbroadcasting.com August 11 Bop A Dips Concert at Regatta Amphitheatre, Polson Fairgrounds; andersonbroadcasting.com August 11 47th Annual Sandpiper Art Festival on the courthouse lawn 10-5 pm Polson; sandpiperartgallery.com 883-5956 August 11 Polson Rotary Festival for Youth Chili Cookoff at Riverside Park 11-2; 883-1842 August 17-18 Flathead Lake Blues Festival; flatheadlakebluesfestival.com September 8 20th Annual Polson Fly-In at Polson Airport 8 a.m. September 15 Polson Chamber Uncorked Wine Festival at Polson Motorcoach KOA November 30 Lake County Christmas Parade and Art Walk in downtown Polson January 25-27, Flathead Lake International Cinemafest in Polson, MT; Flicpolson.com 2019 Be listening and watching for concert acts and dates in July and August at the new Flathead Lake Regatta Amphitheater; andersonbroadcasting.com

Biological Station at Yellow Bay on Monday, July 9, from 10-11 a.m. These seminars are open to the public, and everyone is invited to attend. Stop by to have a donut and learn more about ecology, and current research in the Flathead. Call 406-982-3301 x 229, for more information.

T U E S D AY, J U LY 1 0 • LAKESIDE — On Tuesday, July 10, from 3:30-6 p.m. Flathead Lake Boat Tours in Lakeside will graciously host an afternoon cruise aboard the Far West to one of the Biological Station’s Flathead Lake monitoring sites. Join FLBS researchers for appetizers, beverages, music and an overview of Flathead Lake ecology and the FLBS Research and Monitoring program. The cost is $50 per person. Proceeds benefit the FLBS Research and Monitoring Program. Reservations are required, since limited space is available on the tour boat. For more information call 406-9823301 x 229 or visit: http://flbs. umt.edu/ T H U R S D AY, J U LY 1 2 • RONAN — 4-H fair entries are due by 4 p.m. in the Lake S E E PA G E 5 4

May 28

For information call Flathead Transit.

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12:00 p.m. Flag Stop

12:15 p.m. 1:00 p.m. 1:25 p.m. 2:10 p.m. 2:30 p.m. 3:10 p.m.

PABLO 52001 US Hwy., Pablo • 406-275-2877 MISSOULA 1660 West Broadway, Missoula • 406-549-2339 EVARO 20750 US Hwy. 93, Missoula • 406-726-3778 ARLEE 92345 US Hwy. 93, Arlee • 406-726-7777 RAVALLI 27330 Hwy. 93, Ravalli • 406-396-6522 ST. IGNATIUS 240 Mnt. View Drive, St. Ignatius • 406-745-3634 PABLO 52001 US Hwy. 93, Pablo • 406-275-2877 POLSON 49708 US Hwy. 93, Polson • 406-883-3636 LAKESIDE 7170 US Hwy. 93, Lakeside • 406-844-3372 KALISPELL/EVERGREEN 2076 US Hwy. 2 W., Evergreen • 406-755-7447

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J U LY admission is $10; juniors ages 8-17 are $7. Kids 7 and under are free. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. No outside food, beverages or alcohol. For more information call 406-210-5400. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Pamela Vankirk – coffee house folk. • ELMO — The 38th annual Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow continues at the Elmo Powwow Grounds until July 15. The Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow is a Native American gathering featuring drumming, dancing and traditional dress.

SUMMER

CALENDAR

F R O M PA G E 5 3

T H U R S D AY, J U LY 1 2 (CONTINUED) County Fair office. • POLSON — North Lake County Public Library is hosting a free Thursday morning program from 10 – 11 a.m. Children of all ages are welcome. Programs emphasize Science, Technology, Engineering and Math principles. Call 406-883-8225 for more information. • ELMO — The Kootenai Tribe, also known as the Ktunaxa Ksanka Band, welcome all nations and the general public to the 38th annual Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow at the Elmo Powwow Grounds on Thursday, July 12 to Sunday, July 15. The Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow is a Native American gathering featuring drumming, dancing and traditional dress. F R I D AY, J U LY 1 3 • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Wayo & Keiko – the drummer full spectrum originals. • ELMO — The 38th annual Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow continues at the Elmo Powwow Grounds until July 15. The Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow is a Native American gathering featuring drumming, dancing and traditional dress.

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S AT U R D AY, J U LY 1 4 • RONAN — The “Blues, Brews and Booze” event will include 10 local breweries and three bands from 2-10 p.m. For more information, call 406-396-0125. This event will take place at the Ronan fairgrounds.

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883-1115 • 214 Main St. Polson

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• POLSON — The Coca Cola Hobby Stock 100 racing at Mission Valley Raceway will have Hornets, Mod 4 and Bandoleros. Spectator gates open at 5 p.m. Qualifying time trials are at 6 p.m. and racing starts at 7 p.m. General

S U N D AY, J U LY 1 5 • POLSON — The fourth annual Polson Mud Run will be held on Sunday, July 15, at the Polson Fairgrounds. This is a fund raising event for the Flathead Boys & Girls Club. The 5K obstacle course includes many different types of terrain and obstacles to overcome, including mud. The race starts at 9 a.m. The cost is $40 per person for those 18 years and older and $25 for those 17 years and younger. For more information, call 406-6765437or go to: flatheadbgc.org. • ELMO — The 38th annual Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow continues at the Elmo Powwow Grounds. The Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow is a Native American gathering featuring drumming, dancing and traditional dress.


J U LY accepted. • POLSON — North Lake County Public Library is hosting a free Thursday morning program from 10 – 11 a.m. Children of all ages are welcome. Programs emphasize Science, Technology, Engineering and Math principles. Call 406-8838225 for more information.

M O N D AY, J U LY 1 6 • YELLOW BAY — The 2018 Data and Donuts Seminar series is offered every summer during the first four weeks of the FLBS Summer Session. The series offers students and the public a chance to hear speakers across a wide variety of ecological topics. Come to the seminar at the Flathead Biological Station at Yellow Bay on Monday, July 16, from 10-11 a.m. These seminars are open to the public, and everyone is invited to attend. Stop by to have a donut and learn more about ecology, and current research in the Flathead. Call 406-982-3301 x 229, for more information.

F R I D AY, J U LY 2 0 • HOT SPRINGS — Join us on the north lawn of the historic Symes Hot Springs Hotel located for a two-day music festival. The Symes Hot Springs Blues Festival features true blues from around the Northwest. Come relish the spectacular mineral water, entertainment and small town ambiance. Lodging and camping accommodations are available. Celebrate at the Symes Hot Springs Blues Festival. Opening music begins with Hambone and the Headliners from 6-8 p.m. on Friday, July 20 p.m. followed

T H U R S D AY, J U LY 1 9 • POLSON — Polson SPLASH will be held from 5-7 p.m. at KRMC Polson Health. • RONAN — Open class entries for the Lake County Fair are due by 4 p.m. in the Lake County Fair office. No late entries will be

will be on display from 5:30-8:30 p.m. courtesy of the St. Ignatius Chamber of Commerce. • BIG ARM — The fifth annual Flathead Lake Swim Series will take place Friday, Saturday and Sunday, July 20-22, at Big Arm State Park with 4 swims over 3 days: 5K, 10K, 1 mile and ½ mile. This is a charity event with 100 percent of the proceeds going to the Enduring Waves Foundation. The Enduring Waves Foundation is a nonprofit that assists Montana children with various medical expenses. Go to enduringwaves.com for more information.

by Full Grown Band from 8:3010:30 p.m. Zeppo, Slow Cookin, Mudslide Charley, Kenny James Miller Band and more will play. Barbecue, beer, camping and vendors. Packages, tickets available. • ST. IGNATIUS — The 36th “Good Old Days” celebration will take place all day on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, July 20, 21, and 22 at the St. Ignatius Good Old Days Park. Friday family night will start with a dessert baking contest at 4 p.m. at the Oldtimer Café. There will be adult and junior divisions with unlimited entries. There is no entry fee and first prize for adults is $100 and for juniors is $50. From 6-7 p.m. enjoy a gourmet burger dinner with all the fixin’s: fresh beef, potato and macaroni salad, baked beans, fruit salad and dessert, all for $10 for adults and $6 for kids under 12. Entertainment will follow with a free concert of country and rock music with Jeff Daniel. Big Toys

S AT U R D AY, J U LY 2 1 • ST. IGNATIUS — The annual Good Old Days Celebration kicks off on Saturday with a pancake breakfast served at the senior center from 7-11 a.m.; the Buffalo Run at 7 a.m., followed by a parade at noon, S E E PA G E 5 6

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G O O D O L D D AY S

J U LY SUMMER

CALENDAR

F R O M PA G E 5 5

SATURDAY, JULY 21 (CONTINUED) fun and games in the park, along with lots of special events and food. Big Toys will be on display from 1-4 p.m. courtesy of the St. Ignatius Chamber 56

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of Commerce. Dog races will be held at 1 p.m. at the St. Ignatius Vet Clinic. Find out how fast your dog is. Lawn mower races begin at 1 p.m. at Stuart’s NAPA. Family games including egg races, water balloon toss games, sprints, gunny sack races and more start at 2 p.m. at Rod’s Harvest Foods. A classic tug of war with 5-man teams of couples

and individuals takes place at Mountain View Cenex at 2:30 p.m. Bingo will be played at the Senior Center from 2-4 p.m. with quarter cards. There will be food and craft vendors all day long. From 1-4 p.m. the skate park will be busy with activities and in the amphitheater at 4 p.m. there will be a Uke Jam. A pizza pie eating contest will happen at Cornerstone Pizza

at 7:30 p.m. followed by a community movie at dusk. • ST. IGNATIUS — St. Luke Community Healthcare’s 36th annual Buffalo Run will be held July 21 and consists of a 1-mile, 4-mile, 7-mile and half marathon runs. The half marathon starts promptly at 7 a.m. with the other races starting at 8 a.m. The annual run begins in front of Gamble’s


J U LY S AT U R D AY, J U LY 2 1 (CONTINUED) Hardware and the course is in and around the town of St. Ignatius and is mostly flat. Entry forms are available on the St. Luke website: stlukehealthcare. org or by calling 406-528-5321. • HOT SPRINGS — Join us for the second day of Hot Springs’ blues festival that begins with Zeppo playing from 1:30-3:30 p.m., Slow Cookin’ from 4-6 p.m., Mudslide Charley from 6:30-8:30 p.m. and the Kenny James Miller Band from 9-11 p.m. (Check with Symes Hotel for time changes.) • POLSON — The Polson Main Street Flathead Cherry Festival will be held Saturday, July 21, from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sunday, July 22, from 10 a.m.4 p.m. Come enjoy the great selection of vendors, Flathead cherries, homemade cherry pies, cherry quilts on display in store windows, unique arts and crafts, entertainment, sidewalk sales and specials all weekend

F L AT H E A D C H E R R Y F E S T I V A L

long. Saturday’s schedule includes live music from 1-4 p.m.; a children’s and an adults’ cherry spitting contest in front of the Cove Deli beginning at 2 p.m., a children’s and an adults’ pie eating contest starts at 4 p.m. For more information, including vendor applications, go to: flatheadcherryfestival.com. • POLSON — Racing at Mission Valley Raceway will include Hobbys, Hornets, and Big Sky West Coast Late Models.

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Spectator gates open at 5 p.m. Qualifying time trials are at 6 p.m. and racing starts at 7 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors ages 8-17 are $7. Kids 7 and under are free. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. No outside food, beverages or alcohol. For more information call 406-2105400. • POLSON — Mark your calendars for a fun-filled Flathead Lake GRILLE 214

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tribes, the Bitterroot Salish,Site Upper Pend d’Oreille, Fort Connah Historical and the Kootenai. The territories of these three 406-644-2882 tribes covered all of western Montana and www.fortconnah.org

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Garden of rich thetribal Rockies Museum Today that history still weaves through Week-ends by appointment the clear streams, lush mountainsides and fertile (406-676-3261), 406-676-5210 valley floor. Walk in the footsteps of tribal ancestorsofwho still consider this stunning Miracle America Museum

landscape their homeland, the only remaining 406-883-6804 place where they can still practice their tribal www.miracleofamericamuseum.org lifestyles.

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weekend called Live History Days at the Miracle of America Museum, 36094 Memory Lane, on July 21 and July 22. There will be historic movies Saturday morning and Sunday afternoon. There will be ice cream and other concessions; rides on two trains; Army rigs; spinners and wood carvers; a sawmill in action; a jet trainer cockpit; a blacksmith shop; whirling flywheel engines; a tennis ball cannon; a one room schoolhouse, a flint knapper and educational gun exhibits. The “Country Combo” of fiddlers, pickers, singers and accordions will provide listening and dancing entertainment on Saturday. Join the fun, sell your wares and be a part of history. We welcome new exhibitors and volunteers. Vendors must have a direct link to things historical i.e.: soap making, broom making, pottery, beading, etc. For more information, contact Gil at 406-883-6264 or visit: www. miracleofamericamuseum.org.

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J U LY SUMMER

CALENDAR

F R O M PA G E 5 7

S U N D AY, J U LY 2 2 • ST. IGNATIUS — The third funfilled day of the Good Old Days Celebration begins with a Fly In and breakfast of huckleberry pancakes, biscuits and gravy, eggs, coffee or juice from 8 a.m.-noon. Door prizes and general aviation aircraft will be on display. At 6 p.m. there will be a Gospel sing-a-long, and a hamburger potluck dinner at the St. Ignatius CMA Church. • POLSON — The Lake County Fair will hold a Shotgun Event at Big Sky Sporting Clays at 10 a.m. M O N D AY, J U LY 2 3 • RONAN — The Lake County Fair begins in Ronan. This year’s theme is “Calling All Superheroes.” Livestock judging, open class exhibits,

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agricultural displays, and local live entertainment will return. The mini-horse show is at 8:30 a.m.; the horse show is at 11:30 a.m. and interview judging will take place at noon. • DEER PARK, WASHINGTON — Since 1921 Camp Gifford, run by the Salvation Army, has given youth opportunities to camp, swim, canoe, paddle-boat, hike, play team games and more. A camp for children ages 8-12 and teens ages 13-17 will take place Monday, July 23 to Friday, July 27. Call Francy at 406-471-2398 for more information. T U E S D AY, J U LY 2 4 • RONAN — 4-H dog obedience and showmanship/rally and agility will take place at the Lake County Fair from 8 a.m.-2 p.m.; large animal check-in is from 3-7 p.m.; 4-H family-style dinner is from 5-8 p.m.; nonperishable open class check-in is from 5-8 p.m.; 4-H and open class poultry/rabbit check-in

is from 6-8 p.m. and from 6-9 p.m. large animal weigh-in takes place. W E D N E S D AY, J U LY 2 5 • RONAN — The livestock barns will be open to the public from 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Wednesday, July 25, through Saturday, July 28. • RONAN — The Lake County Fair judges’ orientation begins at 8:30 a.m.; perishable open class check-in is from 9 a.m.noon; swine showmanship/ judging is from 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; cat show is at 1:30 p.m.; open class judges’ orientation at 5 p.m.; 4-H family-style dinner and entertainment from 5-8 p.m.; open class judging from 6-9 p.m.; market beef judging at 7 p.m. Concessions by 4-H clubs, commercial, educational and non-profit booths will take place Tuesday, July 24-Sunday, July 29. T H U R S D AY, J U LY 2 6 • POLSON — The second

production by the Port Polson Players is “Foxfire,” a Hallmark Hall of Fame classic. Annie Nations and her husband Hector loved their life together in the Blue Ridge Mountains, but when Hector dies, Annie has to decide if she can handle the wilderness on her own. When son Dillard, a rising country music singing star returns, he must decide the fate of the farm. Players’ producers Neal and Karen Lewing, Montana Governor’s Awards for the Arts recipients, are featured. All summer theatre shows are presented at Polson’s beautiful theatre on the lake on the Polson golf course (Highway 93, Boettcher Park. This tender, witty and wise comedy-drama plays from July 26-Aug 12. Reservations can be made by calling the theatre box office at 406-883-9212 or visiting portpolsonplayers.com. Tickets are $19 for adults, $18 for senior citizens and students.


L A K E C O U N T Y FA I R

J U LY T H U R S D AY, J U LY 2 6 (CONTINUED) • RONAN — The Lake County Fair judges’ orientation takes place at 8:30 a.m.; sheep showmanship at 9 a.m.; sheep breeding at 10 a.m. followed by market sheep judging at 11 a.m.; 2 p.m. rabbit showmanship/judging; 3:00 p.m. poultry showmanship/ judging; 4 p.m. fashion revue; 5 p.m. small fry stock show; 5 p.m. entertainment; 5:30 Buyer’s Recognition Dinner; 7 p.m. market livestock sale. • POLSON — North Lake County Public Library is hosting a free Thursday morning program from 10 – 11 a.m. Children of all ages are welcome. Programs emphasize Science, Technology, Engineering and Math principles. Call 406-8838225 for more information. F R I D AY, J U LY 2 7 • RONAN — The Lake County Fair judge’s orientation begins at 8:30 a.m.; dairy showmanship and judging is at 9 a.m.; llama/

alpaca showmanship and judging is at 9 a.m.; market goat judging and showmanship is at 11:30 a.m. and project costume contest is at 2 p.m.; from 5-7 p.m. beef breeding/ showmanship takes place and from 9-11 p.m. is the 4-H Ambassadors’ Dance. • RONAN — The annual Mission Mountain Quilt Show, in conjunction with the Lake County Fair, will be held on Friday, July 27, from l0 a.m.- 6 p.m. in the Ronan K. William Harvey Elementary gymnasium. Featured quilters will be Rosa Tougas and Linda Schoon. Raffle tickets for theme quilt “Dresden Fireworks” and raffle tickets for fat quarters will be available. All attending are encouraged to be part of the people’s choice voting for favorite quilts. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Jimni – acoustic, folk, rock. S AT U R D AY, J U LY 2 8 • RONAN — The second day of the annual Mission Mountain

Quilt Show, in conjunction with the Lake County Fair continues from 10 a.m.-3:45 p.m. • RONAN — The Lake County Fair large animal round robin is at 10 a.m. and the small animal round robin is at 11:30 a.m. The Lake County Fair will hold an open ranch rodeo from 3-7 p.m. The Mission Valley Spotlight Talent Show will take place from 7-9 p.m. From 7-9 p.m. all exhibits may leave the grounds. • POLSON — The MSU Scholarship Golf Scramble and Barbecue event is scheduled for Saturday, July 28. This event is a fundraiser for the MSU Bobcats’ scholarship association. This will be a great event for all MSU alums and families. For registration and information contact Shad Hupka at: shad. hupka@fib.com. • POLSON — The 26th anniversary of Montana’s longest running 3-on-3 basketball tournament takes place on Saturday and Sunday, July 28 and 29, in downtown Polson. This tournament is played just a

slam dunk away from beautiful Flathead Lake. Please join us for one of the most fun, alcoholfree and popular athletic events in Montana. Financial support provided mainly through team fees and corporate sponsors has enabled 3-on-3 to donate its net proceeds to local charities. Play hard, laugh a lot and lend a hand to this charitable event. For more information, go to: theflatheadlake3on3.com. • POLSON — The Sandpiper Art and Gift Gallery is sponsoring the fourth annual Festival of Art on Saturday, July 28, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday, July 29, from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. This is an exciting two-day, juried, fine art show on the shores of Flathead Lake at Sacajawea Park. Featuring beautiful original fine art from some of the most talented artisans in Montana and beyond. For more information, visit: www.sandpiperartgallery. com information, or call 406883-5956. S E E PA G E 6 0 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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CALENDAR

F R O M PA G E 5 9

S AT U R D AY, J U LY 2 8 (CONTINUED) • RONAN — The second day of the annual Mission Mountain Quilt Show, in conjunction with the Lake County Fair, will be held on Saturday, July 28, from l0 a.m.- 4 p.m. in the Ronan K. William Harvey Elementary gymnasium. Featured quilters will be Rosa Tougas and Linda Schoon. Raffle tickets for theme quilt “Dresden Fireworks” and raffle tickets for fat quarters will be available. All attending are encouraged to be part of the people’s choice voting for favorite quilts. • POLSON — The Chuckie McClure Memorial Race at Mission Valley Raceway will include 125 Laps, Big Sky West Coast Late Models, Hornets, Mod 4, Thunderstocks and Bandaleros. Spectator gates

open at 5 p.m. Qualifying time trials are at 6 p.m. and racing starts at 7 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors ages 8-17 are $7. Kids 7 and under are free. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. No outside food, beverages or alcohol. For more information call 406-210-5400. HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Barnett Bergeson & Company – country rock. S U N D AY, J U LY 2 9 • RONAN — All Lake County Fair exhibits may leave the grounds from 8 a.m.-1 p.m. From 8:30-4 p.m. 4-H stall and cage cleaning takes place. At 9 a.m. the rancher’s barrel race – entry office open. The MBHA barrel race takes place from noon-4 p.m. Ladies’ breakaway roping takes place at 4 p.m. M O N D AY, J U LY 3 0 • POLSON — The Sandpiper

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Art and Gift Gallery, 306 Main Street, begins their new exhibit, “Where does the Story Begin?” The show runs from July 30-Aug. 31 and features member artists Carole Carberry (watercolor), Maryann Eikens (sculpture/ watercolor), Gitti Miller (basket weaving) Jan Brooks (wearable art), Jan Lindgren (watercolor), Julie Christopher (everything and anything), and guest artist, John Ashley (photography). Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Saturday. • RONAN —From 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 4-H stall cleaning will be done at the Lake County Fairgrounds. T U E S D AY, J U LY 3 1 • RONAN — 4-H stall cleaning will take place at the Lake County Fairgrounds from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. T H U R S D AY, A U G . 2 • CHARLO — The Ronan Chamber of Commerce will hold a general meeting on Thursday, Aug. 2, at noon at Allentown

POLSON

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F R I D AY, A U G . 3 • YELLOW BAY — The Flathead Lake Biological Station will hold an open house on Friday, Aug. 3, from 1-5 p.m. The annual open house provides an opportunity for the interested public to learn more about the ecology of Flathead Lake and its watershed, as well as FLBS and its research around the globe. The event allows FLBS scientists to showcase the breadth of their activities, as well as show examples of how ecological research at FLBS benefits Flathead Lake and subsequently area visitors and residents. Activities this year will include:

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AUGUST F R I D AY, A U G . 3 (CONTINUED) tours of Biological Station facilities; boat trips on our 30foot research vessel the “Jessie B”; exhibits on recent Flathead research, including Flathead Lake ecology; presentations by FLBS research scientists and invited speakers and a visit by UM mascot Monte. The event is free and open to all. For more information call: 406-982-3301 x229. • POLSON — The Sandpiper Art and Gift Gallery, 306 Main Street, will hold a reception for their new exhibit, “Where does the Story Begin?” on Friday, Aug. 3, from 5-7 p.m. at the gallery. • RONAN –– The Pioneer Days celebration begins in Ronan on Friday, Aug. 3, and will be held Friday, Saturday and Sunday Aug. 3-5. Ronan Pioneer Days is a community event with fun for the whole family. There will be plenty of good old-fashioned entertainment. There will be a fishing derby from 8 a.m.-noon and happy hour will take place with the Ronan Pioneer Days Company at 5 p.m. The Bulls and Broncs Rodeo is at 7:30 p.m. Scholarships will be given out at the rodeo and you must be present to win. A street dance is planned for 9 p.m. If you have questions or want more information, call at 406675-0177. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Aaron Jennings – honky tonk, western swing.

S AT U R D AY, A U G . 4 • POLSON — A Small Vintage Market will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Polson Fairgrounds, 320 Regatta Rd. • CHARLO — Ninepipes Museum is honored that artists will exhibit their beautiful work in the Earl W. Wharton Memorial Gallery during the 2018 season. Nancy Vaughan’s terrific fry bread and Indian tacos will be available in conjunction with the artist receptions for the next two months — August and September. Nancy Miller, a Montana native, will exhibit her work on Saturday, Aug. 4. Miller paints different mediums and different subjects, but her favorite is flowers. Nancy has been a member of the Sandpiper Gallery for several years. Painting for her is a genuine pleasure and blessing. • POLSON — The Canadian NASCAR Truck Series, racing at Mission Valley Raceway will have Hobbys, Mod 4, Thunderstocks and Legends. Spectator gates open at 5 p.m. Qualifying time trials are at 6 p.m. and racing starts at 7 p.m. Special events prices are: Adults $15, Juniors 8-18 $10 and Kids 7 and under are free. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. No outside food, beverages or alcohol. For more information call 406-210-5400. • RONAN —The 38th annual Mission Mountain Classic Run, (5k and 10k), begins at 8 a.m. behind Glacier Bank. For those 18 years and older the fee is

$22 and for those 17 years and younger the fee is $15. Fees include a T-shirt. For more information go to: https://www. flatheadbgc.org. • RONAN — Pioneer Days’ second day begins with a pancake breakfast at the VFW, followed by a 3-on-3 basketball tournament at 8 a.m. at the Ronan High School parking lot, and a co-ed softball tournament at 9 a.m. There will be a car show at 10 a.m. and a Kiddie Slicker Rodeo at noon. The open rodeo and Ring of Fire begins at 7:30 p.m. with scholarships again being given (must be present to win). Another street dance is planned for 9 p.m. More information about the 3-on-3 tournament can be found at: missionvalley3on3. com, or Facebook.com/ missionvalley3on3. • LAKESIDE — West Shore Community Library will hold an ice cream social from 2-4 p.m. complete with lakeside games and stories. This is a free-will offering event. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Brett & Janet Dodd – acoustic folk. S U N D AY, A U G . 5 • RONAN — Pioneer Days events continue with a 9 a.m. volleyball tournament at the city park; a parade with the theme “Favorite Movie” at 12:30 p.m. (registration is at 10 a.m. at Round Butte Mini Storage); an open rodeo and wild buffalo riding at 3 p.m. and a family karaoke night at the Valley Club

at 6:30 p.m. T H U R S D AY, A U G . 9 • POLSON — North Lake County Public Library is hosting a free Thursday morning program from 10 – 11 a.m. Children of all ages are welcome. Programs emphasize Science, Technology, Engineering and Math principles. Call 406-8838225 for more information. F R I D AY, A U G . 1 0 • POLSON — Day one of Polson’s Summerfest is Friday, Aug. 10. • POLSON — This is the final day, Friday, Aug. 10, at 6 p.m., to turn in Family Summer Reading Program Reading Logs to the North Lake County Public Library in Polson. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Shiloh Rising – progressive folk. S AT U R D AY, A U G . 1 1 • POLSON — The 12th annual Rotary Chili Cook-off will be held Saturday, Aug. 11, from 11 a.m.2 p.m. at Riverside Park. Make sure you purchase your raffle tickets, which help raise funds for various children’s programs. Cash prize awards will be: $500 for first, $250 for second, and $100 for third place. An additional non-monetary prize will be given for the best decorated or themed booth. Anyone wishing to enter the Chili Cook-off Contest can find contest rules and an application form on the Polson Rotary S E E PA G E 6 2

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S AT U R D AY, A U G . 1 1 (CONTINUED) website: https://portal. clubrunner.ca/1867. For more information call 406-883-1842. Taster kits will be sold to the general public for a fee of $3 per kit, 2 for $5. People’s choice ballots will be provided with each kit purchased and must be shown when requesting samples of contestant chili. Chili will be served until 2 p.m. at which time ballots will be tallied and winning teams announced. • POLSON — Day two of Polson’s Summerfest, Saturday, Aug. 11, includes a car show. • POLSON — The 47th Annual Sandpiper Art Festival on the Lake County Courthouse lawn will be on Saturday, Aug. 11, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Artists and artisans from around the region 62

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sell their work in this 1-day show. Enjoy a day of art, fine crafts, food and entertainment on the beautiful courthouse lawn. For more information call 406-883-5956 or visit: www. sandpiperargaller.com.  HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Jerry Fletcher – piano man. S U N D AY, A U G . 1 2 • POLSON — Sunday, Aug. 12, is the third and final day of Polson’s Summerfest. • BIGFORK — The fourth annual Poker Paddle will be held on Sunday, Aug. 12. Human propelled watercraft start from the Bigfork community dock and paddle a short, middle, or extended distance (5+ miles) course to designated stops in beautiful northeastern part of Flathead Lake, collecting one playing card at each location. Prizes will be awarded for best and worst hands. There will be a silent auction, a picnic after-party

with music. Proceeds benefit Flathead Lakers education programs and community work to prevent the spread of invasive mussels, promote clean water practices and inspire future watershed citizens. Go to: brownpapertickets.com for more information. T H U R S D AY, A U G . 1 6 • POLSON — Wrapping up Port Polson Players’ summer season is “Souvenir.” Missoula favorite Alicia Bullock Muth returns to the Polson stage in this musical retelling of the true story of Florence Foster Jenkins, an American socialite who was noted as the world’s worst opera singer. All summer theatre shows are presented at Polson’s beautiful theatre on the lake on the Polson golf course – U.S. Hwy. 93, Boettcher Park. This production plays from Aug. 1626. Reservations can be made by calling the theatre box office at 406-883-9212 or visiting

portpolsonplayers.com. Tickets are $19 for adults, $18 for senior citizens and students. • POLSON — Support Polson Late Afternoon Social Hour (SPLASH) will be held on Thursday, Aug. 16, from 5-7 p.m. at Riverside Recreation. • PLAINS — Montana Shakespeare in the Parks will perform William Shakespeare’s “Love’s Labour’s Lost” on Thursday, Aug. 16, from 6-8 p.m. at the Sanders County Fairgrounds. Audiences are encouraged to arrive early with chairs, blankets and picnics. For more information on the plays and a complete tour schedule, visit the company’s website: www.shakespeareintheparks. org. F R I D AY, A U G . 1 7 • POLSON — The Flathead Lake Blues Festival is coming to the Flathead Riverfront Amphitheater again on Friday and Saturday, Aug. 17 and 18. Much fun is to


AUGUST F R I D AY, A U G . 1 7 (CONTINUED) be had at this annual music filled weekend event staged on the Flathead River. Music, parking and camping all onsite. Go to: Flatheadlakebluesfestival.com or call 406-616-2096 for more information. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Aaron Jennings – honky tonk, western swing. S AT U R D AY, A U G . 1 8 • POLSON — Friday racing at Mission Valley Raceway will hold Fan Appreciation Day event and have free entry with all classes. Spectator gates open at 5 p.m. Qualifying time trials are at 6 p.m. and racing starts at 7 p.m. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road.

No outside food, beverages or alcohol. For more information call 406-210-5400. • POLSON — The Flathead Lake Blues Festival continues on Saturday, Aug. 18, For more information go to: www. flatheadlakebluesfestival.com. • PABLO –– The annual Social Powwow at the People’s Center on Highway 93 in Pablo is planned for Saturday, Aug. 18, from 4-9 p.m. and is open to all artists and vendors. This is a social gathering of native dancers, drums, stick games and singers celebrating their different native dance styles. Vendors of native arts and crafts and food will have their goods available. (There will be no contest dancing.) For more information call 406-675-0160. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Pamela Vankirk – coffee house folk.

W E D N E S D AY, A U G . 2 2 • POLSON — The first day of school for Polson Schools is Wednesday, Aug. 22. • ARLEE — The first day of school for Arlee Schools is Wednesday, Aug. 22. • DIXON — The first day of school for Dixon Schools is Wednesday, Aug. 22. F R I D AY, A U G . 2 4 • POLSON — A three-day Lake County racing event will take place at Mission Valley Raceway with all classes. Other events will be added to this championship weekend. Spectator gates open at 5 p.m. Qualifying time trials are at 6 p.m. and racing starts at 7 p.m. Special events prices are: Adults $15, Juniors 8-18 $10 and Kids 7 and under are free. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road.

No outside food, beverages or alcohol. For more information call 406-210-5400. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Jimni – acoustic, folk, rock. S AT U R D AY, A U G . 2 5 • CHARLO — Montana Shakespeare in the Parks will perform William Shakespeare’s “Love’s Labour’s Lost” on Saturday, Aug. 25, from 6-8 p.m. at Palmer Park. Audiences are encouraged to arrive early with chairs, blankets and picnics. For a complete tour schedule, visit the company’s website: www. shakespeareintheparks.org. • POLSON — Day two of a three-day Lake County racing event will take place at Mission Valley Raceway with all classes. Other events will be added to this Championship Weekend. S E E PA G E 6 4

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S AT U R D AY, A U G . 2 5 (CONTINUED) Spectator gates open at 5 p.m. Qualifying time trials are at 6 p.m. and racing starts at 7 p.m. Special events prices are: Adults $15, Juniors 8-18 $10 and Kids 7 and under are free. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. No outside food, beverages or alcohol. For more information call 406-210-5400. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Thomsen Clan – Irish music & little of others. S U N D AY, A U G . 2 6 • POLSON — Day three of a three-day Lake County racing event will take place at Mission Valley Raceway with all classes. Other events will be added to this Championship Weekend. Spectator gates open at 5 p.m. Qualifying time trials are at 6 p.m. and racing starts at 7 p.m. Special events prices are: Adults $15, Juniors 8-18 $10 and Kids 7 and under are free. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. No outside food, beverages or alcohol. For more information call 406-210-5400. • ST. IGNATIUS — Montana Shakespeare in the Parks will perform William Shakespeare’s

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“Othello” on Sunday, Aug. 26, from 6-8 p.m. at the Good Old Days Park. Audiences are encouraged to arrive early with chairs, blankets and picnics. For a complete tour schedule, visit the company’s website: www. shakespeareintheparks.org. T U E S D AY, A U G . 2 8 • RONAN — The first day of school for Ronan Schools is Tuesday, Aug. 28. W E D N E S D AY, A U G . 2 9 • CHARLO — The first day of school for Charlo Schools is Wednesday, Aug. 29. • ST. IGNATIUS — The first day

of school for St. Ignatius Schools is Wednesday, Aug. 29. T H U R S D AY, A U G . 3 0 • PLAINS — The 2017 Sanders County Fair buildings open. PRCA Bull riding takes place at 8 p.m. For information regarding 4-H competitions contact the county Extension Office at 406827-6934. No dogs are allowed in the fairway. F R I D AY, A U G . 3 1 • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Wayo & Keiko – the drummer full spectrum originals.

S AT U R D AY, S E P T. 1 • CHARLO —Ninepipes Museum is honored that artists will exhibit their beautiful work in the Earl W. Wharton Memorial Gallery during the 2018 season. Nancy Vaughan’s terrific fry bread and Indian tacos will be available in conjunction with the artist receptions. David weber, a crafter of Native American styles flutes, will bring not only his creations to exhibit at the Ninepipes’ gift shop, but provide a concert as well. He designs, carves and crafts his flutes from a selection of more than 20 different exotic and tradition woods, birds and keys, and each

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SEPTEMBER S AT U R D AY, S E P T. 1 (CONTINUED) piece receives careful attention to detail and tuning. • POLSON — The West Coast Vintage Sprints racing event at Mission Valley Raceway will include all classes, fun and cash. Spectator gates open at

5 p.m. Qualifying time trials are at 6 p.m. and racing starts at 7 p.m. Special events prices are: Adults $15, Juniors 8-18 $10 and Kids 7 and under are free. Come have some fun. Bring the family. Mission Valley Raceway is at 1113 N Reservoir Road. No outside food, beverages or

alcohol. For more information call 406-210-5400. • PLAINS — As the Plains County Fair continues, the Powder River Rodeo L.L.C. will take place at 8 p.m. Carnival, amusement, and midway concessions will also be available. For information

regarding 4-H competitions contact the county Extension Office at 406-827-6934. No dogs are allowed in the fairway. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Kathy Colton & the Reluctants – rock, folk and percussion. S E E PA G E 6 6 M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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S U N D AY, S E P T. 2 L A B O R D AY • PLAINS — The Sanders County Fair continues at 9 a.m. The Demolition Derby takes place in the main arena at approximately 7 p.m. Carnival, amusement, and midway concessions will also be available. For information regarding 4-H competitions contact the county Extension Office at 406-827-6934. No dogs are allowed in the fairway. • HOT SPRINGS – Labor Day barbecue, beer and live music at the Symes Hotel from 4 to 6 p.m. M O N D AY, S E P T. 3 L A B O R D AY • POLSON – The Sandpiper Art and Gift Gallery, 306 Main Street, begins their new exhibit, “Where Were You Hiding?” This exhibit runs from Sept. 3-Oct. 12. This is a non-juried show, open to all artists. Artistic interpretation of the theme, in any medium, will be accepted. There is a small entry fee for non-Sandpiper member artists. 66

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Visit: sandpiperartgallery.com for submission information. Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Saturday. T U E S D AY, S E P T. 4 • DAYTON — First day of school for Dayton School is Tuesday, Sept. 4. W E D N E S D AY, S E P T. 5 • POLSON — The Polson Chamber of Commerce general meeting and luncheon is scheduled for Wednesday, Sept. 5, at the KwaTaqNuk Resort from noon-1 p.m. Our speaker is Rex Weltz on the state of the school district. For more information, call the chamber office at 406-8835969. T H U R S D AY, S E P T. 6 • CHARLO — The Ronan Chamber of Commerce will hold a general meeting on Thursday, Sept. 6, at noon at Allentown Restaurant. F R I D AY, S E P T. 7 • POLSON – The Sandpiper Art and Gift Gallery, 306 Main Street, will hold a reception for their new exhibit, “Where Were You Hiding?” on Friday, Sept. 7, from

5-7 p.m. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Good Old Fashioned – bluegrass. • POLSON — The annual Harvest Dinner is a celebration of local food and will take place on Friday, Sept. 7, at Glenwood Farms in Polson, from 6-8 p.m. Tickets are $50 per person with a cash bar. This is a fundraiser to support Lake County Community Development Corporation. For more information call 406-6765901. S AT U R D AY, S E P T. 8 • LAKESIDE — The annual Montana Dragon Boat Festival will be held on Sept. 8-9, in Lakeside. The annual Montana Dragon Boat Festival brings family fun, spirited competition and colorful pageantry to Volunteer Park on Flathead Lake in Lakeside, just 10 miles south of Kalispell. Races are 200 meters and begin at 8:30 a.m. There will be live music in the entertainment pavilion. There will be free fun in the Dragon Lair kids’ activity area from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. For more information about registration and the festival, go to: MontanaDragonBoat.com. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Shameless

Society – blues. • LAKESIDE — The second day of the Montana Dragon Boat Festival will be held on Saturday, Sept. 8. Races are 500 meters and begin at 8:30 a.m. There will be live music in the Entertainment Pavilion. This day’s activities include kids’ races, a hula performance, a chant competition and an awards ceremony and more. For more information about registration and the festival, go to: MontanaDragonBoat.com. • POLSON — Local artists join artists around the world for the 17th annual Great Worldwide Paint-out, sponsored by the International Plein Air Painters Group, on Saturday, Sept. 8, at Polson’s Riverside Park. Contact Margery Christensen at: dcartworks09@yahoo.com for details on the local event and visit IPAP’s website: ipap. homestead.com, for international events. • POLSON — The 20th annual Polson Fly-In takes place at the Polson Airport all day. • DAYTON — The town of Dayton will be whisked back to the days of the Montana Gold Rush this year during Dayton Daze on Sept 8. The Chief Cliff Volunteer Fire Department and


SEPTEMBER S AT U R D AY, S E P T. 8 (CONTINUED) Quick Response Unit holds its annual fundraiser the first Saturday after Labor Day each year, and this year is no different—except for the theme. Over the last five years we’ve seen old west heroes and gunslingers, dance hall girls, flappers from the roaring ‘20s, patriots dressed in red, white, and blue, greasers, beatniks, and firefighters galore. Fantastic floats and old west wagons are the highlight of the parade, along with an ever-expanding and improved fleet of CCVFD/ QRU vehicles, horse entries and delighted children dressed for the west. Activities start about noon and go all-day long with an open car show, parade, live music, flea market and craft sale, silent auction, rifle raffle (another Henry this year), beer, and much more. Don’t miss out on this annual costume event—held rain or shine or smoky haze—and show your support for our hard-

working volunteer firefighters and EMTs. They’re the gold in our communities. For more information, call 406-849-5917. • ST. IGNATIUS — The annual fall Fort Connah Fall Rendezvous, which depicts life during the fur trading era of Montana, is on Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 8 and 9. This is a great opportunity to see the 1847 historic Hudson’s Bay Fort Connah Trading Post come to life. This event is free to the public and includes demonstrations of time era activities, a chuckwagon-style barbecue, a bake goods sale, beer and wine, crafts and kids’ games. There will be historical talks after the opening ceremony at noon on Saturday. The hours are from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. both days. Fort Connah is located six miles north of St. Ignatius at mile marker 39 on U.S. Hwy. 93. For general information and trader/ demonstrator set-ups call 406745-4336 or email: 4winds@ blackfoot.net.

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S U N D AY, S E P T. 9 • ST. IGNATIUS — The second day of the annual Fort Connah Fall Rendezvous takes place from 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. M O N D AY, S E P T. 1 0 • PABLO — The People’s Center holds Native American Awareness Week activities during the second week of September. Events are geared towards educating school children about Salish, Pend’Oreille and Kootenai history, culture and traditions. The week’s activities and events are free and open to the community to participate in. See demonstrations of slicing and drying wild game, fry bread making, hide tanning, drumming and singing and native dancing. There will be crafts for kids, native games and tribal language demonstrations. For more information and confirmed dates, call 406-675-0160.

at the Symes Hotel. Euphorium Spaceship – Celtic & Eastern European. S AT U R D AY, S E P T. 1 5 • POLSON — Lake County High School Rodeo will be held at Polson Fairgrounds Saturday, Sept. 15 starting at 9:30 a.m. Two rodeos will be run that day. Watch as the girls and boys participate in a wide range of rodeo activities: barrels, saddle broncs, goat tying, and breakaway and possibly there will be sports shooting. There will be a great concession stand complete with homegrown Montana beef direct from our valley. For more information, call Sheila Young at 406-824-4095 or Rocky Knight at 406-5448836. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Mark Chase – American.

F R I D AY, S E P T. 1 4 • HOT SPRINGS – Live music

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S U N D AY, S E P T. 1 6 • RONAN – Ronan’s 10th annual Harvest Fest will be held Sunday, Sept. 16 and features the annual Mission Valley Harvest Fest Dutch Oven Cook Off. For more information contact the Ronan Chamber of Commerce at 406676-8300. T H U R S D AY, S E P T. 2 0 • POLSON — SPLASH (Support Polson Late Afternoon Social Hour) takes place on Thursday, Sept. 20, from 5-7 p.m. Your hosts will be Access Montana and Xtreme Weed & Pest. Location for Splash is TBD. For more information, call 406-883-5969. F R I D AY, S E P T. 2 1 • HOT SPRINGS — The 8th annual Inland Northwest Permaculture Convergence will be

held Sept. 21-24 in Hot Springs. Bring the family and tour local permaculture gardens and farms, attend workshops, learn from leaders on the undulating edge of design and application of appropriate technologies, exchange ideas, children’s and teen programs. Permaculture is the development of agricultural ecosystems intended to be sustainable and self-sufficient and can be applied to both urban and rural living. For more information, visit: inlandnorthwestpermaculturecom. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Jimni – acoustic, folk, rock. S AT U R D AY, S E P T. 2 2 • GLACIER PARK — There will be a free entrance day at Glacier National Park, along with all other National Parks, on Saturday, Sept. 22, in commemoration of National Public Lands Day. • RONAN — The Mission

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Mountain Area Pedal to Plate (MMAPP) ride is a cycling tour of the Mission Valley and its local farms and producers. The 40mile ride celebrates the diversity of agriculture and cycling in the beautiful Mission Valley. The ride includes stops at two organic farms and showcases other local farmers and producers. Cyclists will carry their forks (provided) to the farms and sample delicious local fruits, vegetables, and meats along the way. Participating farms include Glenwood Farm, Fresh Roots Farm, and other local farmers and producers. The Mission Mountain Pedal to Plate cycling tour begins and ends at the Lake County Fairgrounds in Ronan. Except for a couple of short sections on dirt road, the entire ride follows paved country roads and bike trails. Join us after the ride for a locally sourced dinner served at the Lake County Fairgrounds. Proceeds from this event support the promotion of cycling safety and continuation

of efforts to make the Mission Valley a safe and accessible place to cycle and walk. The cycling tour will be held Saturday, Sept. 22 from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Cyclists who have the desire and ability to cycle 40 miles in six hours are welcome to participate. Check-in begins at 9:30 a.m. at the Lake County Fairgrounds. Cost is $50 to participate. For more information contact Jaci Webb at: jaci.webb@ lakecountycdc.org or call 406676-5901. • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Shenanigans – gospel, folk, bluegrass. F R I D AY, S E P T. 2 8 • HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Pamela Vankirk – coffee house folk. S AT U R D AY, S E P T. 2 9 HOT SPRINGS – Live music at the Symes Hotel. Big Sky Family Band – folk, Americana. VJ

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R E G U L A R LY S C H E D U L E D E V E N T S M O N D AY S • ARLEE — The Jocko Valley Library is open on Mondays from 1-5 p.m. • POLSON — North Lake County Public Library will host Mother Goose Time, a half-hour program, at 10 a.m., for infants and toddlers. Mother Goose is here and always ready to do nursery rhymes and stories with her friends. The North Lake County Public Library is located at 2 First Ave., E. in Polson. For more information, call 406-8838225. • POLSON — Makerspace Mondays is a 90-minute program for preschool-aged children through teenagers, starting at 3:30 p.m. on Mondays at North Lake County Library. Come build, make and play. T U E S D AY S • PABLO — The People’s Center Dance Performance Circle takes place on Tuesdays from 5:307:30 p.m. and is sponsored by SAMHSA. An informal meal will be provided. Families are invited. Call for more information, to confirm dates and to register at 406-675-0160. • ST. IGNATIUS — The St. Ignatius Neighborhood Watch chapter meets on the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the St. Ignatius Senior Citizens’ Center on north Main Street. W E D N E S D AY S • FLATHEAD RESERVATION — The Traveling People’s Center will spend two days each week (Wednesdays and Thursdays) in one of 12 different locations throughout the reservation bringing opportunities to partake in Native American arts and crafts activities from 9 a.m.–12:05 p.m. Locations include: Elmo, Polson, Turtle Lake, Pablo, Woodcock, Clarise Paul, Pache, Charlo, Dixon, Hot Springs, Mission and Arlee. Call 406-675-0160 to find out which week the Traveling People’s Center will be in a location near you. • POLSON — The Polson Ukulele Club will be meeting at the Polson Library weekly every

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Wednesday from 6:30-7:30 p.m. Players of all levels are welcome to join the ever-growing ukulele community in Lake City. For details call 406-883-6155. • ARLEE —The Arlee Farmers Market season has kicked off. The market, located in the south parking lot of the Hangin’ Art Gallery and in front of the Merc on 93, will be open every Wednesday from 4-7 p.m. until Sept. 26. The vendors will not be charged a booth fee. Items sold must be hand-baked, handcrafted and locally grown. Used items will not be allowed. For the health and safety of our vendors and customers there will be no smoking allowed on market premises. • POLSON — The Elks Club, 512 Main Street, holds a community dance in their ballroom on the first and third Wednesday of each month from 7-10 p.m. • POLSON — The Marine Corps League Hellroaring Detachment

#1041 meets every second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the VFW on Main Street. For more information, call John Miller at 406-890-0964 or go to: mclhellroaring1041mt@gmailcom. • HOT SPRINGS — Are you affected by someone else’s drinking? AlAnon can help. Meetings are held Wednesdays at 9 a.m. at Lutheran Church on Wall Street in Hot Springs. • POLSON –– AlAnon meetings take place on Wednesdays at noon in Polson at the Alano Club on Third Ave. W. • ST. IGNATIUS — TOPS (taking off pounds sensibly) meets every Wednesday at 9 a.m. at the United Methodist Church on the top of Post Creek Hill. New members are welcome. For more information, call 406-745-4653. T H U R S D AY S • RONAN — Each month, the Ronan Chamber works with a business to help promote them

within the community. This provides locals and visitors the chance to meet the business, the people who work there and the impact it has upon the community. The Ronan Round Up is held on the second Thursday of each month. Are you interested in hosting one? Please call the Ronan Chamber at 406676-8300 for more information. • FLATHEAD RESERVATION — The Traveling People’s Center will spend two days each week (Wednesdays and Thursdays) in one of 12 different locations throughout the reservation bringing opportunities to partake in Native American arts and crafts activities from 9 a.m.–12:05 p.m. Locations include: Elmo, Polson, Turtle Lake, Pablo, Woodcock, Clarise Paul, Pache, Charlo, Dixon, Hot Springs, Mission and Arlee. Call 406-675-0160 to find out which week the Traveling People’s Center will be in a location near you. POLSON — A free “Night at the Museum” event takes place at the Miracle of America Museum, 36094 Memory Lane, on the fourth Thursday evening of each month. Programs start at 6:30 p.m. Treats and donations are happily accepted. Call 406-8836804 if you have questions. • POLSON — North Lake County Public Library invites you to a “Story Time” for school-aged children, on Thursdays at 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. For more information, call the library at 406-883-8225 or go to northlakecountylibrary. org. • RONAN — Ronan Library District’s Story Time is on Thursdays, from 11 a.m.-noon and includes stories, tales, drama, crafts, folk songs and lots of fun. Call the library at 406-676-3682 or go online at RonanLibrary.org for more information. The library is located at 203 Main Street SW. • RONAN — The Ronan Visitor’s Center, 106 Main Street, is the location for the weekly Ronan Farmers Market held on Thursday from 4-6 p.m. • ST. IGNATIUS — Are you affected by someone else’s M O N TA N A S U M M E R

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R E G U L A R LY S C H E D U L E D E V E N T S drinking? AlAnon can help. Meetings take place on Thursdays at 5:30 p.m. at the CMA Church on Third Ave. in St. Ignatius. F R I D AY S • RONAN — Ronan Library District, 203 Main Street W, holds a “Family Movie Night” on the third Friday of each month from 4-6 p.m. • ST. IGNATIUS — Mission Falls Farmers Market, Mountain View Dr. and Highway 93, will take place every Friday until Oct. 5, from 5-7 p.m. Vendor set up begins at 4 p.m. This can be a quick stop on your way to the lake and for all your summer adventures. Buy fresh produce, flowers, baked goods, various crafts and sundries. SNAP benefits are accepted this year. Email: missionfallsmarket@gmail. com for more information or follow us on Facebook. • PABLO — The Friday Traditional Arts Circle takes place at the People’s Center in Pablo every

Friday, all year long, from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Local bead workers come together to work on their projects or to help new bead workers learn to bead. There is also sewing and outfit construction. Starting in May, homemade frybread will be sold every Friday. Call 406-675-0160 for more information. Everyone is welcome. • POLSON — North Lake County Library will have Friday Flicks and Game Days for children and teens on alternating weeks from 3:45-5:15 p.m. The North Lake County Public Library is located at 2 First Avenue E. For more information, call 406-883-8225 or go to their Facebook page for an activity schedule. • POLSON — Polson’s Farmers Market will be held every Friday from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. until Oct. 12. The market is held in downtown Polson on Third Ave. W, between Main Street and First Street W. Vendors offer locally made baked goods, fabric creations, crafts, photography, homegrown

• Open to the Public • 18 Holes • Range • Rentals • Lounge

Full Service Restaurant & Lounge Featuring Gourmet Burgers and Local Craft Beer MENTION THIS AD FOR A FREE BUCKET OF BALLS!

vegetables and more. For questions or more information please go to Facebook for more updates. Now accepting SNAP, credit/debit cards and Farmers Market Senior Coupons. • POLSON –– Are you affected by someone else’s drinking? AlAnon can help. Meetings are held Fridays at 8 p.m. at the Presbyterian Church on Fourth Ave. E in Polson. S AT U R D AY S • POLSON — Mission Valley Raceway, 1113 N Reservoir Road, has racing on Saturday evenings. Gates open at 5 p.m., time trails are at 6 p.m., and racing starts at 7 p.m. General admission is $10; juniors, senior, and/or veterans are $8. Kids 7 and under are free. Family passes are also available at a discounted rate. Come have some fun. Bring the family. • RONAN — The Ronan VFW located at 35981 Round Butte Road, will serve breakfast from 7 a.m.-noon the first Saturday

of every month. Prices are $7 for adults and $5 for children 12 and under. Everyone is welcome. Profits help with VFW expenses. S U N D AY S • POLSON — Northwest Accordion Jam is the first Sunday of each month from 2-5 p.m. at the Elks Club on Main St. All singers, players, viewers and dancers are welcome. So, bring your guitars, drums, saxophones, accordions, etc. and join us. • POLSON — A “Celebrate Recovery Group” meets every Sunday evening for any hurt, habit, or hang-up, from 5-8 p.m. at the Polson Foursquare Church. All are welcome to attend. For more information, call 406-883-9347 or go to: www. polsonfoursquare.org. From 5-6 p.m. dinner is served; from 6-7 p.m. music and teaching/ testimonies take place. From 7-8 p.m. discussion groups gather and dessert is served. VJ

WE WELCOME our vistors to explore & discover our friendly Country Store! • snacks • groceries • kitchen wares • fresh produce • deli sandwiches • fresh deli meats and cheeses • fabrics

and much more!

Located 3 miles west of Ronan on Round Butte Road 46664 Golf Course Way, Ronan, MT 59864

(406) 676-GOLF (4653)

Twilight Special Unlimited Golf After 5:30 pm w/cart and Beverage $20 70

M O N TA N A

SUMMER

16 Flavors!! HOURS: Mon.- Fri. 9 am -5:30 pm • Sat. 9 am - 5 pm (Deli closes 15 minutes earlier every day)

61307 Watson Rd, St. Ignatius, MT

turn East on Airport Rd. to Watson Rd (follow signs)

406-745-7200


Did you know we provide the best selection of in the Mission Valley? Polson Outdoor Equipment offers an excellent selection of new equipment:

• RENTALS • SALES • SERVICE • REPAIRS

Offering a SERIOUS SELECTION of more than

8,000 MADE IN THE USA products IN STOCK!

WBC is your complete building center. Find anything you need from: PAINT & SUPPLIES • HARDWARE • LUMBER POWER TOOLS & HAND TOOLS PLUMBING • ELECTRICAL *Remember we offer delivery service with two self-unloading trucks. We also offer free estimates and material take-offs.

Remember this number!

883-RENT Largest selection of hardware/fasteners in town!

Dan

Rodney

Mick

POLSON OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT (406) 883-RENT 705 1st Street East, Polson • www.polsonrental.com

Tanner

Cathy

Cameron

Sharyn

Stephanie

WESTERN BUILDING CENTERS POLSON • 905 1st Street E. • 883-5284 w w w.westernbuildingcenter.com

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lathead Cherr y F

2018 RS! DO

EN

FV SO

Festival Downtown Polson, MT

July 21 & 22

Flathead Cherries • Homemade Cherry Pies

LOT Cherry Products & Gifts • Unique Arts & Crafts • Sidewalk Sales & Specials

Fun for the whole family

Food Court • Entertainment • Activities for the Kids

SATURDAY, JULY 21 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

9 a.m.

Vendor booths open

Noon1:30 p.m. Bram Brata-Steel Drum Band 2 p.m.

Pit Spitting Contest in front of the Cove Deli & Pizza

4 p.m.

Pie Eating Contest in front of the Cove Deli & Pizza

SUNDAY, JULY 22 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

10 a.m. Vendor booths open 1 - 3 p.m. The Great Scotts - Bagpipers traditional fun for all All Day Variety of Kids’ Activities

Prizes awarded from downtown merchants

www.flatheadcherryfestival.com • Large tent for shade and resting • A wide variety of cherry products to choose from! Proudly sponsored by the Polson Business Community and Flathead Lake Cherry Growers, Inc.

Questions? Call (406) 883-3667 or email: pcf@flatheadcherryfestival.com

Profile for Valley Journal

2019 Montana Summer  

A guide to fun under the sun in beautiful Mission Valley, Montana. Complete with summer calendar of events.

2019 Montana Summer  

A guide to fun under the sun in beautiful Mission Valley, Montana. Complete with summer calendar of events.

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