April 2021 | Sports

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april 2021 | mtparent.com

Sports +

SUMMER 2021

Camp + Activities

Listings and more...


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Pediatrics

Get Care Today! Pediatrics - Board Certified Physicians Our pediatricians care for your child’s primary and urgent care needs at a convenient location with hours to meet your needs as busy parents. You can rest assured that if your child needs a higher level of care, our pediatric specialists collaborate to keep you close to home whenever possible.

Courtney Handlin, DO

Sheila Idzerda, MD

Claire Kenamore, MD For more information or to make an appointment, call (406) 522-KIDS (5437).

Pediatrics

Same day, virtual and after hour appointments available. Mon - Fri: 8 am - 6 pm, Sat: 8:30 - 11:30 am

To talk to a registered nurse about health questions after hours, call HealthLine at (406) 255-8400 or 1-800-252-1246, available 24/7. billingsclinic.com/bozeman

Pediatric Services:

Primary care for babies, kids, & teens

Preventive care, including vaccinations

Routine well-child checkups

School, daycare, camp, and sports physicals

Illness and injury care

Management of chronic and complicated conditions

Follow-up care for childhood cancer survivors

Pediatric Specialty Care, in Bozeman:

Pediatric cardiology

Pediatric endocrinology

Pediatric pulmonology

Pediatric neurology

Pediatric urology


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mtparent.com LIMITED SUMMER SESSIONS AVAILABLE

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PUBLISHER MEDIA MAVENS LLC PO BOX 11056, BOZEMAN, MT 59719 INFO@MTPARENT.COM EDITOR IN CHIEF/ACCOUNTING/OWNER LEIGH RIPLEY | LEIGH@MTPARENT.COM CREATIVE DIRECTOR/OWNER SHAUNESCY WILLARD | SHAUNESCY@MTPARENT.COM ADVERTISING/EVENT COORDINATOR/OWNER CORA DESANTIS | CORA@MTPARENT.COM ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE ALEXIS BRILL ALEXIS@MTPARENT.COM | 406-223-2775 ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE SANDRA JACOBS SANDRA@MTPARENT.COM | 406-599-6663 LAYOUT & DESIGN SHAUNESCY WILLARD & JESSICA GEARY-CECOTTI COPY EDITORS ELEONORE SNOW & LEIGH RIPLEY AD DESIGN JESSICA GEARY-CECOTTI & SHAUNESCY WILLARD COVER PHOTO MARIAH ALLEN PHOTOGRAPHY BLOG JESSICA GEARY-CECOTTI ONLINE CALENDARS CALENDAR@MTPARENT.COM SOCIAL MEDIA JESSICA GEARY-CECOTTI, SHAUNESCY WILLARD, CORA DESANTIS

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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: LEIGH RIPLEY KATELYN COON BRITTANY STERKEL KAREN SMITH JONI HARDY CHRISTEL CHVILICEK CATY FLIKKEMA JOHN-HENRY ANDERSON CAMI ARMIJO-GROVER SHAINA ROGERS SYDNEY BERKMA BLAIR FJESETH CHERYL MAGUIRE JILL DAVIS ZOEY MAHONEY CHEF DANIELLE MILLER * Montana Parent strives to provide accurate information and entertainment to our readers. Some content may be based on opinion of the author and may not represent our views. We want all voices to be heard, so we all can be educated on both sides of important issues.

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS: MARIAH ALLEN PHOTOGRAPHY INSPIRE PHOTO ART LAUREN BROWN • What's Up? photos from event social media pages if not supplied by the organization

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BOzeman FARMERS’ MARKET Tuesdays, 5-8 p.m.

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June 15 September 7, 2021 June 7-September 27, 2015

East Side Tuesdays, of Lindley Park in Bozeman 5-8pm

Bogert Produce. Park’s Pavilion, South Church Avenue, & Bozeman Fresh Food. Art. Music More Fresh Produce. Food Vendors. Arts. Family Activities & Live Music

Volunteer, Sponsor and Vendor Info: bozemanfarmersmarket@gmail.com Volunteer, Sponsor or vendor info: bogertfarmersmarket.org

Life’s a garden…dig it!

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News Flash: My kids are not perfect.

Shocker, right? Fortunately, I have had the distinct pleasure and good luck to have amazing coaches in my children’s lives that have made them better humans. Being a coach is hard, but you make a difference – one that will impact a child’s future. You step in where parents skip out or miss out. You offer support when mistakes are made, yet still enforce a consequence. You celebrate their wins and mourn their losses. You don’t sit and witness fear; you push them to overcome it. You parent these kids but don’t receive unconditional love in return. You care for them and want the best, but you do so with strength… something parents are not always able to do. You are an influencer. A mentor… And often on the receiving end of frustration. In the eyes of the kids you coach, you may be the reason for their success and the cause of their failure. The idol and the scapegoat. Truth is, sometimes kids take it all out on their coach because coaches are not friends or parents; they are an adult who cares but won’t let you get away with anything less than your very best. I realize not all coaches are alike, but as I said earlier, my kids’ coaches have been amazing. Every child should have a good coach in their lives. This two-way street is all too often thankless and lacking gratitude. So, take a minute to thank your kids’ coaches. Listening to my own advice, I want to thank Brittany Sterkel at Motion Athletics and Amy Prechter at Cedar Ridge Equine for teaching my kids what I could not. For making them better people and strong athletes. For holding them accountable. For so much more. I thank all the coaches out there who support our kids and help shape them into the humans we want them to be.

Rhythms World Drum Camp African! Cuban! Egyptian Drumming! Storytelling, Games, World Culture! Ages 4-12 • Monday-Friday – 9 a.m.-noon Bozeman Camp Dates:

June 14-18; July 21-25; July 5-9; July 12-16; August 2-6 With Award Winning Teacher Chet Leach Meets at Rhythm Drums at The Emerson | www.rhythmdrums.com | 406.580.8229

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PHOTO LAUREN BROWN

APRIL 2021

Sports The Mindset of Trying: Why We Must Fail 12 Building a Better Person: The Power of Sports 14 Classical Ballet in Southwest Montana 16 Competitive Swimming in Montana 18 Bozeman Brookies 19 Bozeman Barracudas 19 Youth Sports and OverTraining Today 20 Gallatin Empire Lions Club Youth Football 21 Athletics for All 22 Should Kids Play a Variety of Sports? YES! 23 A Coach’s Role in Encouraging Healthy Practices 24 Summer 2021 Camp & Activities Guide 26

What’s Up? Montana Healthy Kids Pack 39 Seventh Annual Give Big 40

Regular Columns Keeping it Real 41 Deciphering Parenting Metaphors 42 Poetry Inspiration in Your Backyard 43 Zoey’s Recipes for Success 44 Ebelskievers 46

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SUMMER CAMP MONTANA INDOOR SPORTS

AGES:

Kids entering 1st to 6th grade

SCHEDULE:

Monday-Thursday 8:30 am-5 pm, Fridays 8:30 am-12:30 pm COST: $260 SESSION 1: June 14 – 18 SESSION 2: June 21 – 25 SESSION 3: June 28 – July 2 SESSION 4: July 5 – 9 SESSION 5: July 12 – 16

DON’T WAIT! REGISTER NOW!

montanaindoorsports.com

SESSION 6: July 19 – 23

ADDRESS

SESSION 7: July 26 – 30

41 Pronghorn Trail, Bozeman, MT. 59718

SESSION 8: August 2 – 6

(Next to Murdoch’s in Four Corners)

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april 2021

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2021

SPORTS Directory

PHOTO BY MARIAH ALLEN PHOTOGRAPHY

There has been a significant influx of families into southwest Montana over the last year, and these families are looking to enroll their kids into sports. New this year: Montana Parent introduces the

Southwest Montana Youth Sports Directory! For $200, list your organization in our May 2021 issue and in our online interactive Sports Finder until April 2022.

Submit your listing at www.mtparent.com 10

april 2021

by April 15, 2021 to be included in our May print issue


Sports PHOTO BY MARIAH ALLEN PHOTOGRAPHY

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april 2021

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Sports

The Mindset of Trying: Why We Must Fail WRITTEN BY KATELYN COON

Nothing brings back panic and fear like my memories of the day I tried out for eighth-grade basketball. As a shy, and mostly reserved child, I wasn't cut out for an aggressive sport at all. But I never looked at it that way. I saw my friends playing and I wanted to have fun with them. So, I wrote my name on the sign-up sheet, and I was pumped! It was my first year in a school big enough to have tryouts, so this was a brand-new world. I had no idea what I was in for.

Tryouts: Ç Day 1.

I’m pretty sure the stress of realizing what a sport like basketball actually entailed, along with the physical work of tryouts, wore me down to the point of exhaustion. I woke up with a cold.

Ç Day 2. Runny nose and all, I held my chin high and tried to pretend like I was having fun and that I could be a basketball player.

Meanwhile, I was having a severe emotional reaction. I had realized that basketball was not my sport. I wasn’t aggressive, I wasn’t superfast and I really didn’t enjoy being yelled at by the coach. I went home and cried. I didn’t want to quit, and I didn’t want people to think less of me because I didn’t like the sport. I felt trapped.

Ç Day 3.

Divine Intervention. My cold took a nasty turn. I was prescribed penicillin. I thought coach would let me off the hook.

Ç Day 4. Tryouts lasted another two weeks, and the coach said I would be able to come back and finish them. Are you serious?! I thought I had gotten out of it. More stress.

Ç Day 5.

I came to peace with the fact that I wouldn’t be getting out of tryouts and that I would have to face my fears.

Ç Day 7. Just kidding. Saved by the penicillin. Turns out, I’m highly allergic. The Benadryl I had been taking to fall sleep, was keeping the

reaction at bay. Once my nose had calmed enough to forgo the Benadryl, hives erupted all over my body. They lasted for nearly 10 days. I missed all of tryouts.

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e l t t i L s t o h S r e c c So OK, I’m sure some of you are like, “What does she mean basketball is too aggressive”? I know, I know. It’s just not my thing. I love to shoot, I love to play lightening, but that is about the extent of my basketball career. And what a blessing to know that. Come freshman year, I tried out for cheerleading, and ended up having a wonderful high school career of cheering, and absolutely loved my sport. If I hadn't had such a massive fail in eighth grade, I may not have ever considered cheerleading. My only experience with it had been derogatory and degrading comments. After the basketball fiasco, I knew I wasn’t cut out for contact sports. So, what were my options? I had no reason other than prejudice to not consider cheer. I went to tryouts and had the best time ever. The dances clicked, the cheers clicked and I had a blast. I am so grateful for the massive fail. Without out it, I wouldn’t have tried something else that ended up bringing me lots of joy. The same mindset can be applied to normal life. We are constantly trying new things throughout our lives. New school subjects, new jobs, new partners, etc. Without having these failures (or rather, lessons), how else can we learn what we don’t like or don’t want in life? Too often we beat ourselves up for not enjoying something we thought we would. Do you ever get mad at yourself for not liking a type of cookie? No, you just say, “I don’t like this” and move on. This is not to be confused with giving up. Genuinely not liking something is different than giving up when the going gets hard. Only you can know the difference. Katelyn Coon is a national Step Mom Coach and local REALTOR® in the Gallatin County. She can be reached at katelyncoonmt@gmail.com. Follow her @stepbackmom, @ katelyncoonrealestate.

Kids ages 3-5 will learn the fundamentals of soccer through fun games and activities in a non-competitive environment. MONDAY/WEDNESDAY 3-3:45pm

TUESDAY/THURSDAY 10-10:45am

Session 1: May 3-19

Session 1: May 4-20

Session 2: May 24-June 9

Session 2: May 25-June 10

Session 3: June 14-30

Session 3: June 15-July 1

Session 4: July 5-21

Session 4: July 6-22

Session 5: July 26-Aug 11

Session 5: July 27-Aug 12

$75 MEMBERS | $90 NON-MEMBERS Register through Schedulicity or contact Ridge Kids Director, Keesha Timmer at (406) 582-4452.

4181 Fallon St., Bozeman, MT 59718 • (406) 586-1737 • ridgeathletic.com

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april 2021

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Sports

Building a Better Person:

The Power of Sports WRITTEN BY BRITTANY STERKEL | PHOTOS COURTESY MOTION ATHLETICS & BRITTANY STERKEL

What have sports done for me? That’s a very loaded question, but the simple answer is that sports have truly shaped me into the person I am today. It’s the main reason I developed a love of fitness and why I chose my profession, which I truly love. Owning a gym and coaching goes far beyond teaching athletes how to cheer and tumble. It comes with the honor of impacting many young girls’ lives, and I do not take that responsibility lightly. These young athletes are learning lifelong character traits including sportsmanship, integrity, athleticism, strength, confidence, kindness, independence, responsibility, hard work and more. As they did for me, those characteristics are going to take my athletes much farther in life than any banner or trophy. To be honest, I was never the best athlete as a kid, and I’m still not the best. But it’s not about being the best, it’s about putting in the work and not giving up. After years of being told I

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wasn’t good enough in my youth to overcoming a severe eating disorder and constantly struggling in school, I still kept fighting to stay involved and be part of a team. I knew I needed to be part of a team to keep me on track and focused on my future. As a coach, I tell parents all the time about how keeping their young athletes involved is going to help them stay on track, and remain accountable and committed, which is not only important for their athletic success but also for their academic and social success. I’m so thankful for sports and know what it did for me. I come from a family of incredible athletes. Three of my siblings were all-state athletes in traditional sports like basketball and football. I played basketball through my freshman year, but I was never the best; I was the smallest, and the one who saw more bench time than play time. I was more concerned with being skinny than strong and healthy. I worried too much about the silly things like being on the “A” team rather than just being thankful for making a team. It wasn’t until I was dared to try out for the cheer team that I really found a sport I could excel in… and it would become my passion.

I still wasn’t the best, but I was blessed to have coaches who never gave up on me and truly believed in me. They spotted my skills for endless hours just to help me master something that others may have gotten easily; everything took more work for me. My coaches taught me not to give up. Do my best. Put in the work. And never quit. I held my own and cheered competitively during high school and all four years at Montana State. Go Cats! In order to cheer, I had to pay my own way, so I started coaching in addition to cheering in high school to cover the tuition. As hard as that was, I am thankful for it because I discovered an ability to lead, to coach through adversity and encourage others. I found a true love for leading others the way I had been led and being the example that my coaches were to me. Now as a coach and gym owner, I focus on encouraging athletes to be strong and confident in their own skin. We are all blessed with different shapes and sizes, tall and short, different abilities, talents... that’s why I love the sport of cheerleading, which can shine a light on every individual’s importance to the team. It truly takes a “team” to be successful in this sport. Today, after having three kids, overcoming brain surgery and other health issues, I am confident saying I am a stronger athlete than I was in my


COMPETITIVE EVENTS

youth. Whether it’s a daily workout, training for a race, riding my dirt bike, hiking a new mountain or trying a new surfing skill, I believe sports have added endless opportunities to my adult life. Why? Because I’ve learned to never give up, not compare myself to others and to always put in the work for what makes me happy. I’ve known for a long time that the structure of sports has helped shape me into who I am today. I may not have been the best athlete, but I was coachable and wanted to do everything I could to better myself. Life is full of up and downs, good times and bad times... but having a support system is like having extra family, a.k.a. your “team” or your “tribe,” to hold you accountable, support you and encourage you... that is what our kids need in this world now more than ever! As a mom of three and a coach of many, I know these kids are always watching my actions and I want to continue to set a good example. I’ve had many excuses to give up in life but I still haven’t and don’t plan too. Through my faith, the support of my family and my determination, I can do anything I put my mind to. I hope to help raise many more confident girls who will go on to conquer their own dreams, work hard and never give up! Brittany Sterkel is the owner and operator of Motion Athletics. Motion Athletics offers all-star cheerleading, recreational cheer, all levels of tumbling and ninja classes for ages 2 and up. We also have great birthday party options. For more information visit https://www.motionathleticscheer.com.

Motion Athletics is Gallatin Valley’s all-star cheerleading gym. In 2019 their Senior Level 3 team, Intensity, won the gym’s first bid ever to the D2 Summit in Orlando, FL. Because of the unfortunate cancellation last season due to COVID, these athletes are now preparing for Florida again and will be competing May 12-15, 2021 for the title! You can find more information about all of our teams on our Facebook page and Instagram or by checking out our website at www. motionathleticscheer.com.

BO ZE MA N, MT

Back Better Than Ever! JULY 21-25

• 2021 •

Barnyard Brawl Presented by Boot Barn Bozeman Roundup Presented by Frontline Ag Solutions Photography | Culinary Arts Horticulture | Creative Arts Fine Arts | Quilting Textiles Competitive Events presented by Wheat Montana 406STATEFAIR.COM

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WOMEN’S SPECIALISTS

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Call 406-414-5150 today to schedule your appointment with one of our wonderful midwives.

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april 2021

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Sports

Classical Ballet in Southwest Montana WRITTEN BY KAREN SMITH

Great Ballet Classics 2016 | Photo: Inspire Photo Art

Ballet is a time-honored art form. It’s creative, beautiful, emotional. From its origins in the Italian Renaissance courts of the 15th century to well-known classics like The Nutcracker and Sleeping Beauty to the Neoclassicism of George Balanchine, ballet has long been used as a vehicle of expression – an expression of celebration, a story, a mood or emotion. Once reserved just for nobility, today people of all ages all over the world can learn the art of ballet.

sports competitors third. The database used a combination of values to get to a final four dimensions of physical demand: strength, stamina, flexibility and coordination. The scores in each of these four dimensions were averaged to arrive at a Physical Demand Index. Dancers scored 87.8% for strength, and 100% in the stamina, flexibility and coordination categories, for a final Physical Demand Index of 97%. Professional athletes, by comparison, had a Physical Demand Index of 90.4%.

What first comes to mind when you think of a ballet dancer? Is it a delicate woman in a pink tutu? Or a princely man effortlessly spinning his beautiful partner? Whatever it is, it’s probably not a sweat-drenched student contorting their body at a barre, endlessly jumping and turning in a studio or launching themselves through the air on stage. And yet all of these are accurate. Dancers are both artists and athletes.

So, what is it about dance that leads to its number one spot? There are the physical factors naturally, the unique combination of different kinds of strength (static, explosive, dynamic), the coordination and equilibrium, the flexibility and, indeed, the stamina needed for performances. But it is the artistic element that gives dancers the edge over other athletes. Dancers must marry their movement to musicality. All of the tremendously challenging things they do must at the same time look effortless and organic, encompassing both the physicality of the choreography, and the emotion.

Ballet requires years of study: Some students may have their first experience with a preballet class at age 3, others may start later at 7 or 8, and many will train multiple days of the week by the age of 10. Upper-level students can expect to find themselves at the studio up to six days a week, while professional dancers will spend six to seven hours training during the day, and then turn around and perform in the evening. Recent statistics from the Occupational Information Network, a U.S. Department of Labor database, named dance as the most physically demanding career, followed by oil and gas derrick operators, and athletes and

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Southwest Montana is fortunate enough to be home to a number of dance studios, which is a credit to the community. One of these studios – Montana Ballet Company’s Academy – is dedicated solely to classical ballet training. MBC’s academy is one branch of a much larger nonprofit organization that includes a performing company and a host of educational and community engagement programs. The performing company was founded in 1984 by the late Ann Bates. Ann served as

Artistic Director until 1997 and believed that, “Nowhere else in the rural west is there a small dance company with our big company goals.” MBC has achieved many of these “big goals” in its vibrant history by showcasing both original productions and international guest companies. Today, under the direction of Elizabeth DeFanti, MBC has a robust academy and both junior and senior company dancers who continue this tradition of big company goals and performances. A typical year usually includes performances of The Nutcracker at the Willson Auditorium with the Bozeman Symphony, as well as mixed repertory programs, original productions and full-length classical works, most with live orchestra. MBC’s academy trains dancers of all ages in the art and discipline of classical ballet with a humanistic and holistic approach that focuses on the “whole dancer” – mind, body and spirit. As athletic artists, dancers are reliant on the health of their instruments, their bodies, and so MBC incorporates important concepts of health and wellness into its curriculum, regularly engaging nutritionists, physical therapists and Pilates experts, among others, to work with its dancers. MBC is focused not just on training wonderful dancers, but forming wonderful people, ready to go out into the world with integrity and grace. Dancers are encouraged to engage with programs such as MBC’s Teacher Assistant Mentoring program, Discover Dance performances for school children and the new Share the Dance & Dinner, which supports those in our community experiencing food insecurity.


Nutcracker 2019 | Photo: Lauren Brown

While ballet is a physically demanding art form, MBC believes it shouldn’t be an exclusive one and has a wide range of classes for all ages and levels. Classes are offered year-round and registration is always open. Dancers as young as 3 are welcome to begin their ballet training in Pre-Ballet classes, where beginning instruction is combined with an introduction to pliés, tendus and sautés and almost always ends with a free dance to Frozen’s “Let it Go.” Beginning Ballet and subsequent levels lead to Elementary, Pre-pointe, Pointe and the upper levels of instruction, and if desired, an opportunity to audition for the Company. MBC welcomes all dancers, those who simply enjoy dance and those who may wish to pursue dance as a career. Adults are welcome as well: those who have never danced but have always wanted to, those who danced as a child and stepped away from it, those who never stopped dancing and everyone in between. MBC also has an Adaptive Dance Program that offers children with Down syndrome introductory ballet instruction, creative movement and performance opportunities. ADP students learn motor coordination, balance, posture, cooperation with others, music appreciation and they gain confidence and develop a love of dance. Dance is a sport. Dance is an art. And dance is for everyone. Please visit montanaballet.org for information on open classes, the Sleeping Beauty Summer program for ages 4-8 and the two-week summer dance intensive, Dancing Under the Big Sky.

Youth

Dance Studios

Your love, our care.

in Southwest Montana

Ç Allegro School of Dance / www.allegrodance.net Ç Bozeman Dance Academy / www.bozemandanceacademy.com Ç Bridger View Ballet /

• Baby-Friendly® designated birth facility

Ç Cohesion Dance Project / www.cohesiondance.org Ç Creative Arts Center / www.dancehelena.com Ç Dance Big Sky / dancebigsky@gmail.com Ç Montana Ballet Company / www.montanaballet.org Ç Mountain Air Dance / www.mountainairdance.com Ç Queen City Ballet / www.queencityballet.com Ç Tanya’s Dance Co. / www.tanyasdanceco.com Ç The Dance Center / www.dancebozeman.com Ç Yellowstone Ballet Company /

• 24/7 Breastfeeding support

www.rplaceyourspace.com/ bridger_view_ballet

• Complimentary postpartum massage • Gourmet birthday celebration meal

For more info or to make an appointment, call 406.222.3541 or visit LivingstonHealthCare.org

www.yellowstoneballet.info

Karen Smith is the Academy and Educational Engagement Coordinator at Montana Ballet Company.

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Sports

Competitive Swimming in Montana

WRITTEN BY JONI HARDY WITH CONTRIBUTIONS FROM CHRISTEL CHVILICEK AND CATY FLIKKEMA

Swimming in Montana is often overlooked, but that doesn’t mean the sport isn’t thriving. There are 15 clubs operating around the state, with anywhere from 25 to 150 kids per team. Montana’s population and geographical size means that most swim families traverse the state in all weather conditions throughout the year for competitions. Swimming is a year-round sport with two seasons during the year: short and long course. Short course uses a 25-yard pool, and is the same that high school and collegiate teams use. Long course swimmers find themselves in a 50-meter pool, which is what Olympians use. Short course runs September through mid-March, while long course runs April through the beginning of August. Swimmers that participate in both seasons get a few weeks break between them. The journey to becoming a competitive swimmer is a long and arduous one. To advance in swimming means a commitment to attending and qualifying for different levels of meets, the first being an invitational, which is open to all swimmers of every ability. This meet introduces novice swimmers to competition and gives seasoned swimmers a chance to hone their skills. To attend any of the qualifying meets, swimmers must meet certain time standards for each race. The state meet is the first level to qualify. The next standard for which a swimmer can qualify is a regional/zone meet, with kids competing from all over the western U.S. Each new level introduces higher competition as the pool of swimmers who qualify gets smaller. The highest level meet is the Olympic Trials.

Currently, four swimmers are competing at Olympic Trials 2021 who have qualified under Montana coaches: two from Billings Aquatic Club, one from Missoula Aquatic Club, and one from the Bozeman Brookies. Competitive swimming requires determination, a good attitude and the ability to handle defeat. Success can be determined by how well one places in a meet, but, ultimately, it’s about setting a goal to beat the previous best time raced. Not only is swimming a full body workout (often, athletes swim two-to-three miles, six-to-eight times per week), but it has hidden benefits as well, such as improving social well-being, learning how to set goals, building confidence, and it can help individuals who have asthma. If you are interested in learning more or need assistance finding a swim team in your area, visit Montana Swimming on Facebook or Instagram. Joni Hardy is on the board for the Bozeman Brookies and lives in Belgrade.

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Bozeman Brookies

PHOTOS BY VERONICA SWALLOW PHOTOGRAPHY

Avid competitors to be sure, the Bozeman Brookies are a tightknit group in and out of the pool. Whether it’s the Intro group working on legal swims, the Intermediate group learning race pacing or the Senior group aiming for faster meet cuts and college swimming, the Brookies coaching staff has detailed training plans to achieve their goals and still have fun. For nearly a year, families have been living a new, difficult normal with COVID. Kids have felt the impacts of social isolation, navigating online learning and the added stress from home. Swimming has been an outlet for many kids this past year in Gallatin Valley, due to Head Coach Caty Flikemma’s determination to give them a reprieve from the stress. “This has been my most challenging year coaching, with the many COVID restrictions and lack of meets, which gives the kids goals to work toward,” she said. “We’ve made it work with social distancing guidelines and changed how we do several things because it’s important to give these kids some normal activities,” says Coach Caty. One thing is for certain: These changes have not slowed the Brookies down. Eighteen Brookies competed at Montana State Short Course and six qualified for a regional meet. It’s common to see this team cheering each other on during their races, but the challenges of this year have only drawn them even closer. New friendships have been forged and old ones have been strengthened, between both swimmers and their families. The younger Brookies on the team look up to and respect the older athletes. One former Brookie, Catherine Russo, now swims in the Big 10 for Ohio State and contributed to a conference victory with two finals swims. Look for Catherine in June 2021 as she swims at the Olympic Trials; she has the honor of being the only Olympic Trials qualifier from Bozeman. For information about joining the Brookies, email bmaswim@gmail.com, visit us on Facebook or swimbma.org.

Bozeman Barracudas Founded in the late 1960’s, the Bozeman Barracuda Swim Team has provided the children of the Gallatin Valley the opportunity to learn, engage and compete in swimming for more than 50 years. Whether your child has just figured out how to kick and float, wants to be more competitive in high school or is pursuing Olympic dreams, the Barracudas have a place for them. Led by Olympic Gold Medalist Hans Dersch, a roster of professional coaches guide beginners on a path toward competence and confidence in the water. With an emphasis on technique, graduated levels of instruction and training gives kids a chance to progress at their own pace. The Barracudas maintain a team of 80-160 swimmers, ages 5-22 (the team’s college kids often return to train in the summers), with group offerings for all levels and ages to include flexibility in practice days. As the swimmers gain skills and advance in the program, they learn to apply themselves physically and mentally in an enjoyable and supportive environment. In the words of one swimmer, “I never knew working hard could be so fun.” The Barracudas swim year-round at the Bozeman Swim Center in two competition seasons: The fall season runs from early September until the end of February and is called “short course,” as races are run in the shorter 25-yard format. The “long course” season goes from early April through the end of July. The pool bulkhead is removed for the longer 50-meter course. Families may choose to sign up for one season or for both. Swimming is a lifelong sport, and the Barracuda mission includes developing young leaders who are hardworking, responsible citizens. Their swimmers are respected role models embodying integrity, teamwork and friendship gained through commitment to excellence. For more information check out the website (bozemanbarracudas.org) or email the team at: CoachHans@BozemanBarracudas.org.

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Sports How do we prevent overuse injuries? Here are some recommendations to help parents/athletes prevent overuse injuries:

1. Do NOT specialize in one sport. College coaches, such as Urban Myer, have been very clear that when recruiting athletes, they prefer multi-sport athletes because they are more well-rounded and typically have fewer injuries in college. 2. Limit yearly sports participation to eight months per year (which is very difficult with sports such as gymnastics, soccer, basketball and volleyball that run year-round).

Youth Sports and Over Training Today

WRITTEN BY JOHN-HENRY ANDERSON, APRS PHYSICAL THERAPY

As spring arrives in Montana, we see the transition into a new (or the next) season of youth sports. With the many options of school sports, private club organizations, one-on-one lessons, personal training, etc., our youth athletes are increasingly provided with opportunities to hone their sports skills, jump higher, hit harder or run faster. Opportunities are vastly more abundant every year and with media/social media coverage on everyone’s mobile devices, we are constantly being bombarded by the latest scores and greatest play of the day. We all share, tweet or like the latest multi-million-dollar contract or YouTube highlight reel. It is not surprising that our youth athletes (and parents) feel that the more they practice, the more likely they will become the next Mikaela Shiffrin or Patrick Mahomes. Every year kids are starting competitive sports at an earlier age. Overuse injuries can be seen at early ages as well, most commonly in the 14-18-year-old age group. Every child develops at a different rate than their peers and even their siblings. Come watch a fourth- and fifthgrade YMCA basketball game or stop in at Lone Mountain Gymnastics, and you can see the tremendous difference in size and athletic ability in kids that are 12-18 months apart, yet still competing in the same arena. The demands placed on these little bodies can lead to overuse injuries, which if not recognized early could greatly affect their season and/or their general physical health. 20

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What is meant by an overuse injury? Overuse injuries are most commonly the result of repetitive micro-traumas that occur over time to the bones, tendons, ligaments and muscles. Common examples are tennis elbow, jumper’s knee, shin splints and stress fractures. However we also see acute injuries (a single, traumatic event) that are the result of overuse microtraumas that occur due to compensations or weakness brought on by repetitive microtraumas (ACL tears and hamstring strains).

What can you (the parent) do when your child has an overuse injury?

The best post-injury treatment is the PRICE protocol. Protect the injury Rest the body Apply Ice to the injured area Use Compression Elevation to keep the swelling manageable For expert evaluation, you should see your pediatrician or someone trained to evaluate and treat sports injuries such as a sports or orthopedic-certified physical therapist. An evaluation will provide an overview that can help to determine the cause of the injury (weakness, tightness, asymmetries).

3. Limit sports participation to fewer hours/week than the child’s age.

Coaching these kids is also a major piece of the puzzle. Poor form, poor technique and not paying attention to training volume can be very detrimental to an athlete’s body. Every coach should be trained by their governing body to recognize overuse injuries and to accommodate athletes that are showing signs of poor technique, fatigue, burn-out or over-training. Load management has become a major topic, especially in the NBA, over the past couple of years. Managing your athlete’s training, rest, recovery and mental health is a daunting task. It is a battle that all athletes struggle with at some point in their careers. Most coaches cannot fully account for each and every of their athlete’s load management because often they are playing on multiple teams or multiple sports. This just emphasizes the importance of parental supervision to monitor load management in young athletes. Other recommendations for overuse injury prevention are proper nutrition, hydration and getting plenty of sleep. Be sure to always assure your athlete’s gear fits and is in good working condition. Shoes, for example, can be a big problem when they are too big or too small or if they have been through too many seasons and are no longer providing the support or cushion that they once did. Youth sports are supposed to be fun and teach our kids the importance of hard work, competition, team dynamics, goal setting and a healthy lifestyle among many other things. Keep up the great work, parents, and keep our young athletes healthy. John-Henry Anderson, PT, DPT, SCS, CSCS is a Sports Physical Therapist and a Strength and Conditioning Specialist with APRS Physical Therapy. He also coaches youth sports year-round in Bozeman, MT.


Sports Gallatin Empire Lions Club

Youth Football

Improving life, work, & sport. Orthopedic Rehabilitation Sports Medicine Post Concussion Rehabilitation Pre & Post Surgical Rehabilitation bozemanaprs.com

Youth Football is one of America’s most exciting and fastest-growing sports. Gallatin Empire Lions Club (GELC) has offered Youth Football for more than 40 years. During that time we have seen many amazing kids enter the program and continue to grow and develop their skills, some entering into the NFL: Shane Collins, Brock Coyle, Will Dissly, Dane Fletcher and Corey Widmer to name a few. The GELC is a recreational program designed for fifth and sixth grade boys and girls in Bozeman and the surrounding communities, providing them with the opportunity to experience the sport with a focus on skill development, sportsmanship and fun.

CAMP BODHI

Teams practice twice a week with weekly games held on Saturdays. Practice days and times are announced after player evaluations. Each participant receives a practice jersey during equipment checkout. Registration, equipment checkout and evaluation details will be listed on our website www.gallatinempirelions.org during the month of August (COVID-19 restrictions pending). The safety and well-being of our community and volunteers is our priority. GELC is monitoring the state, local government, CDC and Gallatin Health Department recommendations and guidelines. We will do our best to navigate during these unprecedented times. Please continue to visit our website for updates. Through our caring volunteers and coaches, we help your children develop the fundamental skills not only to play the sport, but also to be successful in cooperation, commitment, dedication and sportsmanship. Help make a difference in your children’s development and register them for the GELC Youth Football. We also welcome you to sign up as a volunteer coach. Send your coaching request to gallatinempirelions@gmail.com.

A Bozeman summer camp for kids with yoga, gardening, cooking, art & exploration around the farm. Learn more & register at bodhi-farms.com.

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Sports

Athletics

for All WRITTEN BY CAMI ARMIJO-GROVER

“I played sports every year until I turned 14, which is the year I came out as transgender. No one told me I couldn’t play sports anymore but I felt like if I did, I would be treated poorly. I miss being a part of a team, but if I joined one now, I know I would be looked down on.”

young friend. Their health, well-being and lives should matter enough for all of us to look hard at some of the myths being perpetuated about trans youth in sports.

When a trans youth I know told me this, there was nothing I could say that would change this reality. As parents, we want our children (including the nearly 2% of high schoolers who identify as transgender) to be confident in themselves, have equal opportunities and most importantly, feel loved and a sense of belonging.

And simply focusing on a person’s physical performance doesn’t take into account the reality of life for trans youth. Compared to cisgender youth, trans youth are:

Kids who have the opportunity to play sports enjoy benefits like higher self-esteem, fewer depressive symptoms and decreased risk of suicidality. And this is important because a Trevor Project study of trans youth tells us that more than 50% felt sad or hopeless for more than two weeks out of the last year (compared to 30% of non-trans youth) and nearly onethird had attempted suicide in the last year. Being transgender does not cause depression and suicidal ideation. Rather, studies have shown that trans youth who are supported have similar mental health outcomes to nontrans youth. So really, it’s how supportive (or oppressive) their families and communities are that makes a difference. These aren’t just statistics, though. These are real kids living in our communities, including my 22

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The main argument people use to keep them out of athletics is that they have an unfair advantage. But there are lots of ways that various students have advantages in sports: longer legs, higher levels of certain hormones, families who can afford private coaching, etc.

» Five times more likely to be threatened

or injured with a weapon at school (24% each year)

» Three times more likely to experience sexual violence (31% each year)

» Four-and-a-half times more likely to feel unsafe going to school (27% each year)

It should come as no surprise that this translates into significantly higher drop-out rates for trans youth since school is not always safe. Trans youth have to overcome these obstacles before they can even consider joining a sports team. Another popular argument is that we need to protect girls and women by banning transgender athletes from teams and competition. I believe it is time that we, as a society, stop “doing things in the best interest of women” and instead ask female-identifying athletes how they feel about legislation that bans their friends from their sports teams. To this point, nearly 50 Montana women, mostly collegiate

and/or professional athletes, signed a letter opposing the “Save Women’s Sports Act” proposed in the Montana Legislature this session, which would ban trans athletes from competing on the sports team that aligns with their gender. Their letter says, “As female athletes, we are horrified that the Montana legislature is trying to use us as an excuse for spreading hate. Women before us had to fight tooth and nail for the opportunity to compete in sport, and that fight isn’t over. All our lives, we’ve radically demanded equity by running, skiing and playing in a system that wasn’t made for us. We stand with our transgender peers who are trying to do the same.” Banning trans students from competing in athletics based on their gender only reinforces that their communities sees them as outcasts, not worthy of protection, support or affirmation. But they are not outcasts. They are our kids, our family members, our friends, just growing up and trying to find their place in the world. And our kids’ basic humanity should never be debated or decided by strangers in a state legislature. All Montana kids deserve an equal chance to do great things with their lives, both on and off the field. [1] https://www.glsen.org/activity/gender-affirming-inclusiveathletics-participation [2] https://www.thetrevorproject.org/2019/02/22/research-briefdata-on-transgender-youth/ [3] https://www.aclu.org/news/lgbt-rights/four-myths-abouttrans-athletes-debunked/ Cami Armijo-Grover is the mother of a spunky little girl named Lucy, and the Education Director at Bridgercare, the Title X Family Planning Clinic in Bozeman, MT. She leads trainings for healthcare providers on how to provide affirming healthcare to LGBTQ+ patients and her and Lucy dream of a world where everyone (youth and adults) can be their true, beautiful selves, free of discrimination and fear.


Sports

Should Kids Play a variety of Sports?

Yes!

WRITTEN BY SHAINA ROGERS

Participating in sports can be a very enriching experience for children of all ages. In addition to the primary goal of having fun, sports can facilitate development, especially for young children, and can lay the foundation for healthy self-esteem and valuable life skills. It is important to consider your child’s readiness when you decide to enroll her in sports. People traditionally think of physical readiness in this context, but it is just as important to be sure that your child is mentally and emotional ready as well. Children are constantly growing and developing, and they do so at different rates. Toddlers and young children benefit most from unstructured free play, while sports with simple concepts can be introduced to preschool children. When children are school age, usually around 6, they are more prepared for organized sports as they are able to follow directions and understand the concept of teamwork.i While young children do not require formal sports participation physicals it is important that your child has had a complete physical exam, ideally as part of a well-child visit, to ensure she is healthy and safely able to participate.ii When deciding what sports your child will participate in, it is important to ask about your child’s desires. Most children want to have fun and play with their friends, but it is also important to listen to any particular interests he may have. It is recommended that you allow your child to try different sports. Children

are more likely to develop diverse motor skills by participating in different sports versus specializing in a single sport. While you might dream about your child being the next Serena Williams or Tiger Woods, early specialization in a single sport is not recommended. In fact, early specialization has been shown to increase stress, overuse injuries and burnout in child athletes. Kids are also more likely to figure out what is enjoyable to them by sampling different sports. The AAP Council on Sports Medicine and Fitness identified that, “If we offer children a variety of sports for all skill levels, they are more likely to try new activities and stick with the ones they enjoy.” If we are able to help our children find enjoyable ways to exercise, they are more likely to make healthful exercise a lifelong endeavor.iii Most importantly, in addition to the health benefits of moving their bodies, sports participation teaches children values and tools that can be applied to everyday life. They can develop leadership skills and boost their self-confidence. Through sports, children can better understand the concept of teamwork and how to work toward a mutual goal. They also learn about sportsmanship and how to deal with success and failure. These concepts do not need to be developed through participation at a hyper-competitive level, they can begin to develop in younger children and at recreational levels as well.iv

Regardless of the sport or level of participation, it is critical that your support of your child’s endeavors is unconditional. As a parent, especially for young children, the emphasis of sports involvement should be on having fun, learning new skills and being healthy – not winning. Children need to know that doing their best is to be celebrated regardless of the result. This is not about glorifying mediocrity or giving everyone a ribbon, it is cultivating confidence and a strong foundation in our young children. Teens and young adults are better equipped for the rigors of competitive sports, but for young children especially, sports should be a way to have fun and grow. It is imperative that this message is modeled by parents and coaches. Our children are watching all the time and their attitudes will reflect our own.v i)“Is Your Child Ready for Sports.” HealthyChildren.org, American Academy of Pediatrics, 8 Oct. 2019. ii)“Sports and Your Child.” American Academy of Pediatrics, June 2019. iii)“American Academy of Pediatrics Encourages Organized Sports – For the Fun of It.” HealthyChildren.org, American Academy of Pediatrics, 20 May 2019. iv)“Eyes on the Prize.” HealthyChildren.org, American Academy of Pediatrics, 1 Oct 2006. v)“Parenting an Athlete.” HealthyChildren.org, American Academy of Pediatrics, 20 May 2019. Shaina Rogers, D.O. is a pediatrician at Grant Creek Family Medicine in Missoula, MT. As a mother and physician, she is passionate about caring for children.

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Sports

A Coach's Role in Encouraging Healthy Practices WRITTEN BY SYDNEY BERKMA

Reaching goals both on and off the field requires children to stay healthy. Health is determined by many different factors, not all of which relate to physical well-being and development. Getting involved in a sport and being on a team is a meaningful experience that can be a milestone in a child’s life. They are putting their confidence on the line when striving to develop their competency in a sport and grow relationships with their peers in the process. Children gain valuable skills when participating in sports, which impacts their social-emotional development. Here’s a look into social-emotional development and sports.

Social Development

Many social aspects of sports education can determine how children perceive themselves and their place within a team. The coach is an important facilitator in highlighting the importance of a team and helping kids create interpersonal relationships. A coach can have children play different positions on the field and guide positive interactions between teammates with enthusiasm, motivating players to do their best, win or lose. The idea of “choosing and being chosen”1 is also important when kids are practicing sports. Ensuring these opportunities are enacted in equitable ways can boost children’s confidence. Encouraging children to choose different partners at each practice so they can interact with all of their peers is a great way to start this process. Through these experiences, kids can understand abstract concepts such as cooperation, sportsmanship and competitiveness when having to take turns, experience failure, and work together to achieve common goals.

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Emotional Development

Sports can provide great learning experiences for young children. Win or lose, the objective in sports education should always be to have fun1. Kids can feel a sense of anxiety, fear or anger before and after a game, especially if their team did not win, or from the thought of getting hurt or not playing well, battling feelings of self-doubt. Celebrating small victories or even when there is no reason can help children challenge this narrative of “I’m not good enough.” All the “good jobs” in the world may not make a child feel better in every moment, but adults can still validate emotions and provide examples of their strengths and what they did well despite the setbacks. Providing context behind praise will help students to identify their strengths and use these on the field. Coaches can check in with students to ensure their needs are being met; allow appropriate outlets for releasing anger; make learning moments constructive and fun; and overall promote healthy ways for students to problem solve, persevering toward greatness, not perfection. Whether you’re a parent, coach or caring adult, keeping the socialemotional side of sports in mind can improve and strengthen a child’s experience. (1) Reference- Humphrey, J. H. (2012). Child Development Through Sports. Taylor and Francis. Sydney Berkman is an intern at Child Care Connections and Early Childhood Senior at MSU. Child Care Connections is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit advocating for the well-being and quality care of children. Learn more at our services for families, early childhood professionals at the community at cccmontana.org.


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Summer 2021 Family travel guide

2021

cover Photo Contest

+MOR E S | FIS H I NG | | G H OST TOWN S | EATER I ES B I KE R ENTAL

back by popular demand

Family Travel Guide M O NTA NA SO UTH WE ST STO N E and YE L LOW

Family-friendly activities

+MOR E S | FIS H I NG | | G H OST TOWN S | MUS EUMS B I KE R ENTAL

Family

Travel Guide M O NTA NA SO UTH WE ST STO N E and YE L LOW

Summer

+ Fall

2 02 0

Summer

2 01 9

Local educational centers of interest

we’re looking for fun summery, outdoor family photos taken in montana or Yellowstone for the cover of our 2021 travel guide

Local family-friendly accommodations and amenities

mtparent.com

Family-friendly events

by May 1, 2021

submit photos at

Must-see lists

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SUMMER 2021

Camp + Activities

guide

Plan your kids' summer fun here for more information about these camps, visit our interactive Summer Camp & Activities Finder at www.mtparent.com

Bozeman

ALPENGIRL

GIRLS ADVENTURE CAMP

Ç 406-570-6312 Ç https://www.alpengirlcamp.com Ç https://www.facebook.com/ AlpengirlCamp Ç https://www.instagram.com/

alpengirlcamp Alpengirl is an overnight summer adventure camp for girls ages 11-16. One- or two-week outdoor camps are held in the Pacific Northwest and Northern Rocky Mountains. Trips are multiadventure and include a variety of activities such as backpacking, horseback riding, whitewater rafting, sea kayaking, rock climbing, tent camping, self-esteem development, friendship building, leadership opportunities, yoga and more. 26

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BOBCAT SUMMER YOUTH CAMP

Ç 120 Marga Hosaeus Fitness Center Ç 406-579-1067 Ç http://www.montana.edu/getfit/

bobcat_summer_youth_camp/ summercamp.html Outdoor adventure, crafts, games, sports, field trips and more await campers, grades K-6, at Bobcat Summer Youth Camp (BSYC). Located on the Montana State University campus, BSYC offers eight, one-week themed camps that are fun, engaging and sure to make your camper raring to go every morning.

BOOST YOUR CHILD'S LEARNING THIS SUMMER Sage Learning Center

Ç 2055 N. 22nd Ave., Ste. 4 Ç http://www. sagelearningcenter.com Ç http://www.facebook.com/

sagelearningbozeman There is so much success in the fun, interactive summer learning sessions at Sage. Sessions are held in a oneon-one setting with individualized instruction for children ages 4-18. They offer flexible weekly sessions throughout the summer months; both in-person and virtually via Zoom.


Inspiring a Love for the Outdoors Since 1994. AMPS -NEW C BRAND LUDING C IN G COMIN LOGY!

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WWW. O UTDOOR S CIENCE.ORG SCHOL ARSH IPS AVAIL ABLE!

406-582-0526

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april 2021

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SUMMER 2021

Camp + Activities

guide VISIT:

https://www.bozemansummeracademy.c

Or Call: 406-548-7512

BOBCAT SUMMER BOBCAT YOUTHSUMMER CAMP BOBCAT SUMMER BOBCAT SUMMER YOUTH CAMP ATBOBCAT SUMMER BOBCAT SUMMER BOBCAT SUMMER SUMMER CRAFTS SPORTS YOUTH CAMP YOUTH CAMP THYOUTH CAMP YOUTH CAMP YOUTH CAMP CAMP CRAFTS SPORTS

SWIM MING SPORTS CRAFTS SPORTS SCRAFTS W IM MING TSCRAFTS SPORTS OUTDOOR ADVENTURE CRAFTS SPORTS CRAFTS SPORTS SPORTS OUTDOOR ADVENTURE ACTIVE EXPLORATION S WIM MING S WIM MING WIMMING M MI NG S WIMMING W IM MING SS W IM MING

ACTIVE EXPLORATION OUTDOOR ADVENTURE OUTDOOR ADVENTURE CAT SUMMER OR ADVENTURE OUTDOOR ADVENTURE OUTDOOR ADVENTURE OUTDOOR ADVENTURE NINE ACTIVE EXPLORATION ACTIVE EXPLORATION UTH CAMP NINE EXPLORATION ACTIVE EXPLORATION ACTIVE EXPLORATION ACTIVE EXPLORATION WEEKLY SESSIONS

FTS SPORTS WEEKLY

NINE NINE 15 - SESSIONS AUGUST 14 NINE NINE WNINE I M MIJUNE NGNINE EIGHT JUNE 15 AUGUST 14 WEEKLY SESSIONS WEEKLY SESSIONS OOR ADVENTURE Monday - Friday LY SESSIONS WEEKLY SESSIONS WEEKLY SESSIONS WEEKLY SESSIONS E EXPLORATION Monday -- Friday JUNE 15AM AUGUST JUNE AUGUST 14 Camp: - 3 PM 5NINE - AUGUST 14 JUNE 15 AUGUST 1414 JUNE -9--AUGUST JUNE 15 15 -15 AUGUST 1414

Camp: 9 additional AM - Friday 3 PM Available for cost: KLY SESSIONS Monday Monday - Friday Monday - -Friday Friday - Friday Monday Friday Monday -additional Monday -for Friday Pre-Camp: 7:30 - 8:30cost: AM Eday 15 - AUGUST 14 Available

Camp: 9 AM 3 PM Camp: 9 AM - 3 -PM Camp: 99AM AM PM : 9 AM Camp: - 3Camp: PM Camp: -333PM PM 9 9 AM -AM 3 --PM

onday - Friday Post-Camp: 3:30 -- 8:30 5:30 PM Pre-Camp: 7:30 AM Available for additional for additional cost:cost: mp: 9 AM - 3 PMAvailable

Post-Camp: 3:30 -cost: 5:30 PM Available for additional cost: forforadditional cost: Available foradditional additional cost: Available for Available for additional ble additional cost: Pre-Camp: 7:30 - cost: 8:30 Pre-Camp: 7:30 - 8:30 AMAM Camp:7:30 7:30 - 8:30 AM AM Pre-Camp: 7:30 - 8:30 8:30 AM mp: - 8:30 Pre-Camp: 7:30 8:30 AM Pre-Camp: 7:30 AM Pre-Camp: 7:30 8:30 AM Camp: 3:30 - 5:30 PM Post-Camp: - 5:30 Post-Camp: 3:303:30 - 5:30 PMPM Post-Camp: 3:30 PM mp: 3:30 - Post-Camp: 5:30 PM Bird Post-Camp: -5:30 5:30 PM 11) -- 5:30 Post-Camp: 3:303:30 -3:30 5:30 PM (March 1 -PM April $135 Early

AGE & PRICING AGE & PRICING E & PRICING (April 121and on)11) $145 (March - April $135 Per Early Bird AGE & PRICING AGE & PRICING AGE & & PRICING AGE &PRICING PRICING AGE &Week PRICING $15 Pre-Camp Week (April 12 and on) $145 Per WeekPer

Bozeman Children's Theatre Summer Camp Bozeman Children's Theatre

Ç 1407 Bluebird Ln. Ç 702-481-3622 Ç http://bozemanchildrenstheatre.com Ç https://www.facebook.com/

bozemanchildrenstheatre Bozeman Children's Theatre is run by K-5 educators that believe in the power of theatre for all children. We know that theatre can have such a positive impact on young children by developing confidence, peer relationships, and a love of music and acting. Jungle Book Kids will take your children on a journey from auditions to full production in 10 Days with a final performance under The Big Sky! Open for all children grades K-5, July 19-30.

(March 1 - April $135 (March 1 - April 11) 11) $135 Early Bird Early Bird (March 11)11) $135 (March 1 Early -Pre-Camp April 11) Early Bird (March -April $135 (March 11 -1- April $135 (March 1 Week -Week April 11) 11) Bird$135 $30 Bird Early Bird Early Bird $15 Per Post Camp April Per (April 12 and (April 12 and on) on) $145 $145 Week PerPer Week (April 1212and and on) $145 (April and on) (April andon) on) (April 12 (April 12 and on) $145 Week $145 $145 ades: K -Per 612Per eek $30 Per Week Week Week Post Camp Per Week $15 Pre-Camp Per Week $15Per Pre-Camp Per Week $15 Pre-Camp Per Week mp Per Week $15Pre-Camp $15$15 Pre-Camp PerWeek Week Pre-Camp PerPer Week $30$30 Post Camp Post Camp Week PerPer Week OCATION $30 Post Camp $30 $30 $30 amp Post Camp Post Camp Post Camp Per Week Per Week PerWeek Week PerPer Week

-Camp Per Week t Camp Per Week

Hosaeus Fitness Center tana State University

Montana State University Marga Hosaeus Fitness Center Marga Hosaeus Fitness Center Marga Hosaeus Fitness Center saeus Marga Fitness Center Marga Hosaeus Fitness Center Marga Hosaeus Fitness Center Hosaeus Fitness Center Montana State University Montana State University rmation & registration Montana State University a State University Montana State University Montana State University Montana State University

ana.edu/getfit

More information & registration More information & registration

montana.edu/getfit

More information & registration More information & registration montana.edu/getfit More information &&registration registration mation &information registration More information registration More information & More & registration

montana.edu/getfit montana.edu/getfit na.edu/getfit montana.edu/getfit montana.edu/getfit montana.edu/getfit

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april 2021

Ç 406-548-7512 Ç https://www.

Focus on Reading Remediation and Algebra Readiness

bozemansummeracademy.com/ Small group and individual tutoring for students in middle school. Flexible schedule, inexpensive, taught by a certified Bozeman school district teacher with more than 20 years of experience.

Camp Bodhi Bodhi Farms

ly Bird (March 1 - April 11) Week (April 12 and on)

Grades: K - 6 Grades: K - 6 Grades: Grades: --66 des: K -Grades: 6LOCATION Grades: K6-K 6- 6 Grades: KK -K LOCATION Marga Hosaeus Fitness Center LOCATION LOCATION Montana State University LOCATION CATION LOCATION LOCATION Marga Hosaeus Fitness Center

Summer Tutoring for Middle School Students BOZEMAN SUMMER One/one or small groups Remote or in-person ACADEMYCertified Teacher with 20 years experience

BOZEMAN SPORTS CAMP

Ç 205 N. 11th Ave. Ç 406-661-5496 Ç http://www.bozemansports.camp Ç http://www.facebook.com/ bozemansports Ç http://www.instagram.com/

bozemansports.camp Bozeman Sports Camp is an active summer sports camp for kids entering grades K-6. They provide fun and engaging activities, games and instruction of sports of all kinds. Instruction covers the skills, drills and games of all the sports that campers participate in. Come join them this summer.

Ç 13624 S. Cottonwood Rd. Ç 406-201-1324 Ç https://www.bodhi-farms.com/ camp-bodhi Ç https://www.facebook.com/ experiencebodhi Ç https://www.instagram.com/

experiencebodhi A summer farm camp for kids! Focusing on our core values, Camp Bodhi encourages a connection with nature and each other through yoga, gardening, cooking, art and exploration around the farm. With our four-week series offered in both July and August, we start with the fundamentals in nature and naturally progress through wilderness education, homesteading skills and culminating in a week-long celebration of art. While each week is a new adventure, all weeks include: daily farm fresh lunch, kid’s yoga classes, nature hikes around the farm, guest speakers, one free adult yoga class pass.


SUMMER2021YAA! register online at www.yaacamp.org Young & Free day camp

1-4 Grade • Camp 1: June 21-25 • Camp 2: June 28-July 2 • Camp 3: July 12-16 • Camp 4: July 19-23

RESIDENTIAL CAMP

Rookie Camp 2-4 Grade • July 6-9 Trailblazer Camp 3-5 Grade • June 20-25 Pioneer Camp 5-6 Grade • June 27-July 2 Explorer Camp 6-8 Grade • July 11-16 and • July 18-23 Senior High Camp 9-12 Grade • June 13-18

YAA is permitted for outfitting and guiding in the Gallatin National Forest

MEAL DELIVERY SERVICE We are your go-to dinner service. Fully prepared family-style meals delivered straight to your door every Tuesday and Thursday. Just reheat and eat and we will handle the rest. To sign up for next week’s delivery and to learn about cooking camps and classes, please visit

AUG

BOZEMAN’S MOST POPULAR

JULY

MAY

APRIL

Kid’s

SPECIALTY CAMP Archery Camp 7-9 Grade • July 6-9 Base Camp 6-8 Grade • July 6-9

FAMILY CAMP

• July 2-4 • Sept 3-6

COOKING CAMPS & CLASSES

Easter Egg Hunt & Baking Class April 2 | 5-8 p.m. | $100 Making Pasta from Scratch April 13 | 4-6:30 p.m. | $100 Cinco de Mayo Cooking Class May 5 | 4-6:30 p.m. | $100 Mother and Daughter Cooking Class May 8 | 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | $125 per couple Baking Camp July 14-16 | 10 a.m.-1 p.m. | $290 Baking Camp July 28-30 | 10 a.m.-1 p.m. | $290 Summer Baking Sleepover Cooking Camp August 4, 5:30 p.m.- August 5, 10 a.m. | $175 Mastering Breakfast Cooking Camp August 11-13 | 10 a.m.-1 p.m. | $290

ORDERSUPDELIVERY.COM :: calendars, blog & more @ MTPARENT.COM ::

april 2021

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SUMMER 2021

Helena

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN!

Camp + Activities

guide

CAMP EQUINOX

SUMMER THEATER DAY CAMP

Ç Bozeman Summit School 3001 W. Villard St. Ç 406-522-7623 Ç https://www.campequinox.com/ Ç https://www.facebook.com/CampEquinox-Summer-Theater-DayCamp-104945576214990

Ç https://www.instagram.com/

"NO HOUR OF LIFE IS WASTED THAT IS SPENT IN THE SADDLE."

campequinox/ Bozeman’s premier summer theater camp is now in its 26th year! Acting, comedy improv, puppetry, musical theater, mask-making, you name it. A summer of great friends and creative fun. Two four-week sessions are available. In the words of one parent: “What a magical, magical place. You guys really have a gift.”

CEDAR RIDGE EQUINE

Ç 555 Rocky Rd. Ç 406-282-3355 Ç https://www.cedarridgeequines.com/ Ç https://www.facebook.com/

cedarridgeequine/ Cedar Ridge Equine offers summer horsemanship day camps and clinics for all ages from beginners to advanced riders. In all CRE Summer Horsemanship Camps, they believe it is important to teach life skill development and personal growth as an intricate component of their horsemanship program.

-Winston Churchill

SUMMER 2021 CA MP & CLINIC REGISTR ATION IS NOW OPEN!

CAMP GOTR K Beginner to Advanced Riders K Ages 5 and up K Life Skill Development Workshop K Speed/Rodeo Events K English/Western Riding K General Horsemanship Learn more about camps, clinics and events at

cedarridgeequine.com

cedar ridge equine

horsemanship camps, clinics & lessons Owner/Trainer Amy Prechter email cedarridgeequines@gmail.com phone 406-282-3355

BY GIRLS ON THE RUN Thrive

Ç 400 E. Babcock St. Ç 406-587-3840 Ç https://allthrive.org/programs/girlson-the-run/ Ç https://www.facebook.com/allthrive Ç https://www.instagram.com/

girlsforachangemt/ Camp GOTR offers a unique opportunity for girls to build self-confidence and learn life skills for now and forever, led by caring coaches. Enjoy building friendships in a fun, inclusive setting with interactive lessons, games, activities and creativity in arts, crafts and storytelling. See you there!

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april 2021

CHALLENGE ISLAND OUTDOOR CAMP

Ç Bozeman Area Park Ç 406-209-3898 Ç http://challenge-island.com/

southwest-montana School is out, Challenge Island is in! The world's #1 STEAM program is a high-energy, handson experience combining problem-solving adventures and creativity. Campers embark on fantastical journeys where they work in collaborative tribes to tackle various exciting challenges.


SUMMER 2021

Camp + Activities

guide

CIRCUS CAMP 406cirque

Ç 4720 Classical Way Ç 406-475-2513 Ç http://406cirque.com Ç http://facebook.com/406cirque Ç http://instagram.com/406cirque

A spectacular location, world-class coaches and team-oriented atmosphere—Circus Camp has it all: juggling, aerial silks and trapeze, unicycling, stilt-walking, tumbling, ninja, balloon sculpting, balance, acting and physical comedy. Three intense weeks filled with friends, new discoveries and lots of FUN!

DANCING UNDER THE BIG SKY (DUBS)

Montana Ballet Company

Ç 2304 N. Seventh Ave., Ste. C-3 Ç 406-582-8702 Ç https://www.montanaballet.org Ç https://www.facebook.com/ montanaballetco/ Ç https://www.instagram.com/

montanaballet/ Montana Ballet Company’s Annual Dancing Under the Big Sky (DUBS) two-week Summer Dance Intensive is an enriching, educational program featuring exceptional guest teachers and a full curriculum. Rachel Van Buskirk and Christian Clark, both of whom have danced and taught for the Atlanta Ballet, will serve as special guest teachers. For more information, visit www.montanaballet. org.

Helena

LCL_FullPageAd.qxp_Layout 1 4/18/19 9:52 AM1 Page 1 9:52 AM Page 1 LCL_FullPageAd.qxp_Layout 4/18/19

Join LEWIS & CLARK LIBRARY for a summer of play and activities! This year's theme is Tails and Tales.

LCL_FullPageAd.qxp_Layout 1 4/18/19 9:52 AM Page 1

DANCING FROM STAGE TO SKY: AERIAL ARTS & DANCE CAMP Mountain Air Dance

Ç 406-595-0909 Ç http://mountainairdance.org Ç https://www.facebook.com/ mountainairdance Ç https://www.instagram.com/

mtnairdance This unique day camp challenges students physically and mentally with classes in aerial arts, dance technique, yoga, Pilates, hand balancing, flexibility training, and arts and crafts. Experienced instructors guide students through their day in small groups based on age and skill level. Learn to Fly!

SUMMER ART CAMPS June 1-June 7: Birds

June 8-June14: Reptiles

June 15-June 21: Safari Animals

EMERSON ART CAMP

June 22-June 28: Rodeo Animals Kids Art Camps Emerson Center for the

June 29-July Ages 5 – 13 | Weekly | 9am5:–Montana 4pm and Patriotic Animals

Arts & Culture

Emerson Summer Art Camps are back! We Ç 111 S. Grand Ave. are pleased to offer 10 weeks of full-day camps featuring a variety of themes in a Ç 406-587-9797 conscious environment. Campers Ç http://www.theEmerson.orgCOVID explore a new theme each week through Ç https://www.facebook.com/2D Arts, Sculpture, and creative art projects.

July 6-July 12: Snails and Mollusks July 13-July 19: Marsupials

July 20-July 26: Arctic Animals July 27-July 31: Pets

Download our Summer Library Program booklet

with fun activities for all ages by visiting TheEmersondotcom Each week culminates in a Friday Art www.lclibrary.org/391/Summer-Library-Program The Emerson invites you to join them for Reception showcasing each camper’s another fun-filled, creative summer.artistic Full-dayaccomplishments. SERVING SERVING HELENA AND HELENA AND camps for ages 5 to 13 with 10 consecutive SERVING HELENA AND LEWIS & CLARK LEWIS COUNTY & CLARK COUNTY WK to DATE THEME WK DATE THEME LEWIS & CLARK COUNTY weeks choose from. Professional art 1 June 14 interns – 18 Kaleidoscope of Colors 6 July VISIT 19 – 23 VISIT Master Builders educators and will guide and inspire VISIT LCLIBRARY.ORG LCLIBRARY.ORG LCLIBRARY.ORG students using weekly themes and a variety of FOR A CALENDAR OF EVENTS CALENDAR OF EVENTS FOR A30 CALENDAR OF EVENTS 2 June 21 – 25 Yellowstone Naturalist 7 A July 26 –FOR Strange Fishes mixed-media art projects. 406.447.1690 406.447.1690 3

June 28 – July 2

Epic Myths

4

July 6 – 9*

I Heart Montana

5

July 12 –16

Flower Power

8

August 2406.447.1690 –6 Prehistoric Art

9

August 9 – 13

Cosmic Comets

10

August 16 – 20

Around the World in 5 Days

AUGUSTA

H

BO O KMO BI L E

H

E AST HE LEN A

H

H ELEN A

H

LI N C O LN

H BO O K MOHBILE H E AST HEH AUGUSTA AUGUSTA H ELENA HH HLINCOLN BO O K MO BILE LEENA ASTH HELENA ELENA H LINCOLN

* 4 day camp in observance of Independence day

:: calendars, blog & more @ MTPARENT.COM ::

april 2021

To Register call 405.581.9797, ext. 105 | www.theEmerson.org

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SUMMER 2021

Great Beginnings is hiring Summer Camp Instructors!

Camp + Activities

guide

Our summer camp runs Monday-Thursday June 14th-August 12th GBMS Summer Camps take advantage of Montana’s beautiful weather while supporting our students’ continuing academic and social development. With smaller, intimate groups, we’re able to focus on building friendships, getting outside, supporting individuals, and offering plenty of fun! Each week focuses on fun activities blending environmental education, outdoor adventure, art, academics, and summertime play.

Love Children. Love Nature.

Essential Job Functions: ( Deliver a fun program to campers ( A positive and enthusiastic attitude ( During the program, instructors participate in classroom, outdoor, and recreational activities ( Instructors assist with weekly themes, field trips, and nature-based activities.

Please contact: jamey@gbmschool.org

100 Springhill Lane, Bozeman • 406-587-0132 • www.gbmsbozeman.org

SUMMER ART CAMPS

FARM TO SCHOOL SUMMER CAMPS

Ç Story Mill Community Park 698 Bridger Dr. Ç 406-219-1010 Ç https://www.gvfarmtoschool.org/ summercamps Ç https://www.facebook.com/ gvfarmtoschool Ç https://www.instagram.com/

gvfarmtoschool/ Preschool- to middle school-aged kids get busy with Gallatin Valley Farm to School camps exploring healthy food, farming and cooking. All camps take place outdoors in the garden, and include time for growing and harvesting food, COVID-safe cooking activities, games, handson learning and LOTS of fun!

Kids Art Camps

Ages 5 – 13 | Weekly | 9am – 4pm

Emerson Summer Art Camps are back! We are pleased to offer 10 weeks of full-day camps featuring a variety of themes in a COVID conscious environment. Campers explore a new theme each week through 2D Arts, Sculpture, and creative art projects. Each week culminates in a Friday Art Reception showcasing each camper’s artistic accomplishments. WK

DATE

THEME

1

June 14 – 18

Kaleidoscope of Colors

2

June 21 – 25

3

June 28 – July 2

WK

DATE

THEME

6

July 19 – 23

Master Builders

Yellowstone Naturalist

7

July 26 – 30

Strange Fishes

Epic Myths

8

August 2 – 6

Prehistoric Art

4

July 6 – 9*

I Heart Montana

9

August 9 – 13

Cosmic Comets

5

July 12 –16

Flower Power

10

August 16 – 20

Around the World in 5 Days

* 4 day camp in observance of Independence day

To Register call 405.581.9797, ext. 105 | www.theEmerson.org

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april 2021

FIT KIDS

Ridge Athletic Club

Ç 4181 Fallon St. Ç 406-582-4452 Ç https://ridgeathletic.com/kids/kids-

programs/ Motivate the kids with Ridge Athletic Club’s healthy half- and full-day camps for children ages 3-5 and 6-11. Themed activities with fitness fun, arts and crafts, STEM play, swimming and Playzone will help the kids learn and burn energy. Snacks provided. Lunches are an additional cost. Fun is guaranteed.


SUMMER 2021

Camp + Activities

guide

HEART AND HAND CENTER GIRLS' STORIES, GIRLS' VOICES Thrive

Ç 400 E. Babcock St. Ç 406-587-3840 Ç https://allthrive.org/programs/

girls-for-a-change/girls-stories-girlsvoices/

Ç https://www.facebook.com/allthrive Ç https://www.instagram.com/

girlsforachangemt/ Thrive’s weeklong summer camp includes writing, art, movement, sharing and fun. Discover a sense of self, grow relationships, explore local and global communities and build confidence to understand yourself, appreciate uniqueness and find authentic self-expression. Led by caring staff and volunteers.

Summer Day Camps for Kids/ Teens and Virtual Adult Weekend Retreats

Ç 20010 Bridger Hollow Rd. Ç 406-587-4036 Ç http://heartandhandcenter.com Ç https://www.facebook.com/ heartandhandcenter/ Ç https://www.instagram.com/

heartandhandcentermt/?hl=en All camps include art, horses, hiking, drumming and yoga at a mountaintop ranch east of Bozeman where campers are safely socially distancing and instructors provide recreational day camps with a healing component designed to help alleviate the emotional effects of stress, depression, anger and anxiety.

LONE MOUNTAIN

Ç 1237 N. Rouse Ave. Ç 406-587-1180 Ç http://lonemountain.biz

Lone Mountain offers a variety of summer camps and activities all summer. Check out Kidventures (preschool) camp, gymnastics camps, trampoline, swimming lessons, dance and ninja. Stay active, get strong and have fun!

LOVE CHILDREN. LOVE NATURE. 2021 SUMMER CAMP Great Beginnings Montessori School

Girlsing Music and Art Camp SINGING, SONGWRITING

AND ART - MUSIC CAMP

Ç 2118 S. Third Ave. Ç 406-570-2839 Ç https://www.GirlSing.com Ç https://www.facebook.com/

GirlSingCamps Camp is held five days a week, Monday-Friday, from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. GirlSing empowers girls (ages 7-11) to explore and celebrate their unique creative spirits through music, singing, songwriting, journaling and art projects. Daily indoor/outdoor fun with hikes, picnics and time to connect. An art/music program will be held on Thursday nights. Small camp numbers: 15 girls and three adults.

LEADERSHIP WITH HORSES Windhorse Equine Learning

Ç 3477 Johnson Rd. Ç 406-522-3906 Ç https://www. windhorseequinelearning.org Ç https://www.facebook.com/ windhorseequinelearning Ç https://www.instagram.com/

windhorseequinelearning/ Give your child a unique camp experience where they learn horsemanship and riding skills while also focusing on being good leaders and fair partners. Kids have a blast while they gain confidence, build self-awareness and learn valuable lessons about respect, trust, empathy and communication.

Ç 100 Springhill Ln. Ç 406-587-0132 Ç https://www.gbmsbozeman.org/ summer Ç https://www.facebook.com/ gbmschool.org/ Ç https://www.instagram.com/great.

beginnings/?hl=en Campers will spend the summer exploring everything from the playground and local mountain ranges to the edges of local lakes. Based on their age, they will have fun getting dirty in the soil or learning about the unique ecosystems that make Montana a wonderful place to live and play.

:: calendars, blog & more @ MTPARENT.COM ::

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Development Program for kids age 2-5. + SUMMER 2021

BOOST YOUR CHILD’S LEARNING THIS SUMMER SUMMER SESSIONS BEGIN ON JUNE 14 OFFERING BOTH IN-PERSON AND VIRTUAL ZOOM SESSIONS

6 week session + Meets once per week for 45 minutes + Learn, Play, Exercise & Smile!

Camp + Activities Micro Sprouts (2 years old)

SOCCER SPROUTS

Mini Sprouts (3 years old) Super Sprouts (4 & 5 years old)

guide

COGNITIVE, SOCIAL, MOTOR SKILL DEVELOPMENT

MONTANA SPORTS FOR INDOOR MORE INFORMATION AND

Ç 41 Pronghorn Trail Ç 406-312-6111 Ç https://www.montanaindoorsports. com/ Ç https://www.facebook.com/ montanaindoorsports Ç https://www.instagram.com/ TO REGISTER, PLEASE VISIT:

montanaindoorsports.com/kid-stuff

ONE-TO-ONE INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTION FOR CHILDREN AGES 4-18. AT SAGE WE NOW OFFER FLEXIBLE, WEEKLY SCHEDULING OPTIONS THROUGHOUT THE SUMMER.

Sa geLearningCenter.c o m

406-582-9570

montanaindoorsports/ Exercise, socialize and smile! Montana Indoor Sports Summer Camp is for kids entering first through sixth grade. Each day, campers will play different sports, games and activities in a stateof-the-art sports facility!

MONTANA OUTDOOR SCIENCE SCHOOL

Ç 4056 Bridger Canyon Rd. Ç 406-582-0526 Ç http://www.outdoorscience.org Ç https://www.facebook.com/ MontanaOutdoorScienceSchool Ç https://www.instagram.com/mt_

moss/ MOSS Summer Programs offer FUN, ENGAGING and EDUCATIONAL explorations of the natural world through quality hands-on science experiments. MOSS believes that inspiring a love for nature helps children become aware of (and want to care for) the amazing environment in which we live.

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PEAK POTENTIAL

Ç 1143 Stoneridge Dr., Suite 2 Ç 406-551-2737 Ç https://www.peakpotentialmt.com/ summer-program Ç https://www.facebook.com/ peakpotential.mt Ç https://www.instagram.com/

peakpotential.mt/ Peak Potential offers high performance project-based learning in the heart of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, aimed to deepen children's connections to their surroundings through fun, interdisciplinary activities that build local connections and develop their sense of self.

PET PALS SUMMER DAY CAMP Heart of the Valley Animal Shelter

Ç 1549 E. Cameron Bridge Rd. Ç 406-404-3068 Ç https://www.heartofthevalleyshelter. org Ç https://www.facebook.com/ bozemanhov Ç https://www.instagram.com/

heartofthevalleyanimalshelter/ This six-week summer day camp is for children (6-12 years old) who love animals. Campers learn the importance of compassionate animal care through time with animals, games, crafts, humane education lessons and a wide variety of guest speakers. Each week children will have the opportunity to interact with a variety of animals.


SUMMER 2021

Camp + Activities

guide

RHYTHMS WORLD DRUM CAMPS

Held at the Emerson

Ç 406-580-8229 Ç http://rhythmdrums.com

ROCKY CREEK FARM SUMMER CAMP Rocky Creek Farm

Ç 34297 Frontage Rd. Ç 406-599-2360 Ç https://www.gallatinvalleybotanical.

Children ages 4-12 are invited to join Chet Leach (a.k.a. Mr. Chet) for weeklong drum camps at the Emerson in Bozeman. These summer camps will include drumming from Africa, Brazil, Cuba and Egypt. Your child will learn about World culture through storytelling, games and, of course, lots of DRUMMING!

com/education Join Rocky Creek Farm this summer for an opportunity to explore connections between nature and farming. Weeklong sessions give campers the chance to be farmers, explorers, scientists and artists while growing their sense of connection to the land.

ROCKHAVEN UNCAMP

SCIENCE CAMP

Rockhaven Camp and Retreat Center

Ç 406-586-9194 x267 Ç http://www.rockhavencamp.org Ç http://www.facebook.com/ rockhavencamp Ç http://www.instagram.com/

rockhavencamp UnCamp at Rockhaven is an innovative and unique summer camping program where nature-connectedness, free play, outdoor play and child-led independent play are front and center. They provide daily transportation for day programs, full meal service and financial aid is available for all programs.

SLEEPING BEAUTY SUMMER Montana Ballet Company

Ç 2304 N. Seventh Ave., Ste. C-3 Ç 406-582-8702 Ç https://www.montanaballet.org Ç https://www.facebook.com/ montanaballetco/ Ç https://www.instagram.com/

montanaballet/ Learn all about The Sleeping Beauty ballet with a daily ballet class, dance-related arts and crafts, choreography and more. Held Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m.-noon: June 14-17 (ages 4-6), June 21-24 (ages 6-8), July 12-15 (ages 4-6), and July 19-22 (ages 6-8).

Montana Science Center

Ç 2744 W. Main St. Ç 406-539-9004 Ç http://montanasciencecenter.org Ç http://www.facebook.com/ montanasciencecenter Ç http://www.instagram.com/

montanasciencecenter Discover exciting science and technology at Science Camps all summer long. Starting June 14, each week is filled with hands-on science, outdoor games, guest speakers, activities from all areas of science, and time in the high-tech makerspace, the STEAMlab. Camps run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday.

SUMMER BALLET PROGRAMS Montana Ballet Company

Ç 2304 N. Seventh Ave., Ste. C-3 Ç 406-582-8702 Ç https://www.montanaballet.org Ç https://www.facebook.com/ montanaballetco/ Ç https://www.instagram.com/

montanaballet/ Please visit montanaballet.org for more details on Summer Ballet Programs for dancers of all ages and the two-week summer intensive, Dancing Under the Big Sky, for ages 8 and up.

:: calendars, blog & more @ MTPARENT.COM ::

april 2021

35


SUMMER 2021

MUSIC CAMP

Camp + Activities

guide EMPOWERING GIRLS Through Singing, Song Writing and Self-Expressive Art! Girls Ages 7-11

5-DAY CAMP @ 9 AM to 4:00 PM

with opt-in Early Drop Off & Late Pickup Thursday Night—Family Concert & Art Show

JUNE Camp: June 21-25 OR AUGUST Camp: Aug. 16-20

www.GirlSing.com

SUMMER COOKING CAMPS SPIRE CLIMBING CAMPS

Ç 13 Enterprise Blvd. Ç 406-586-0706 Ç https://www.spireclimbingcenter. com/summer-camps Ç https://www.facebook.com/ SpireClimbingCenter/ Ç https://www.instagram.com/

spireclimbing/ Spire's summer camps are a great way for children ages 5–16 to enjoy rock climbing in a fun, structured environment. Spire's camps teach beginners the essentials of the sport while kids with prior climbing experience take their skills to the next level.

Want a recipe for fun?

STARLITE BOZEMAN SUMMER CAMPS

Explore outdoors in the garden this summer! Learn to cook, create, grow food, and more! Age 4-8th grade Different sessions offered each week! June 14- August 27 Registration is open

www.gvfarmtoschool.org/summercamps

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april 2021

Ç 622 E. Tamarack St. Ç 406-551-2220 Ç https://starlitebozeman.com/ summer-camps/ Ç https://www.facebook.com/ starlitebozeman Ç https://www.instagram.com/

starlitebozeman/ Starlite Bozeman Summer Camps feature unique adventures that will grow into a lifelong appreciation of the world around us. Choose from several unique camp themes in art, dance, nature and even gaming. Small camp sizes mean individualized instruction, the best care and fewer germs.

Ç 96 Laura Louise Ln. Unit 7 Ç 406-600-7936 Ç http://www.ordersupdelivery.com Ç https://www.facebook.com/

ordersupdelivery Summer cooking camps and classes are offered in a new 5,000 square foot kitchen. Each class will be taught by trained chefs. If you are looking for something different this summer and your child loves to cook/bake this is not to be missed. Participants will bring home everything they cook.

YELLOWSTONE ALLIANCE ADVENTURES

Ç 13707 Cottonwood Canyon Rd. Ç 406-763-4727 Ç https://yaacamp.org/ Ç https://www.facebook.com/

yaacampmt YAA runs camps throughout summer for all ages. Whether you are new to YAA or are ready for another great week, there is bound to be something amazing for you! YAA is permitted for outfitting and guiding in the Gallatin National Forest.


SUMMER 2021

Camp + Activities

Helena

guide

YMCA ADVENTURE DAY CAMPS Gallatin Valley YMCA

Ç 3673 Love Ln. Ç 406-994-9622 Ç https://www.gallatinvalleyymca.org/ Ç https://www.facebook.com/Gallatin. Valley.YMCA Ç https://www.instagram.com/gvymca/

Gallatin Valley YMCA Adventure Day Camps focus on youth development and learning through a wide range of activities, field trips and opportunities. Campers will participate in arts and crafts, daily reading, games and visit with the weekly STEM instructor to create a well-rounded experience.

Canyon Ferry Lake

THE MONTANA LEARNING CENTER

AT CANYON FERRY LAKE

Ç 7653 Canyon Ferry Rd. Ç 406-475-3638 Ç MontanaLearningCenter@gmail.com Ç MontanaLearning.org Ç Facebook.com/

MontanaLearningCenter The MLC is Montana's science camp for kids! It is a place for students to come together to solve problems, create and be empowered. Camp life includes STEM immersion experiences, friendship building and recreation. Campers enjoy fishing, kayaking, boating and swimming at the lake. The MLC's staff is composed of certified teachers, many of whom are award winning. The studentto-staff ratio is 8:1. Each of their instructors and counselors are CPR and First Aid certified.

EXPLORATIONWORKS 2021 SUMMER CAMPS

Ç 995 Carousel Way Ç 406-457-1800 Ç https://www.explorationworks.org/ summer-camps Ç https://www.facebook.com/ ExplorationWorks/ Ç https://www.instagram.com/

explorationworks/ Spend the summer as a scientist and explore the world around you. This year, ExplorationWorks is offering 80 summer camps. The fun kicks off the week of June 14 and runs through August 19. All day camp options and scholarships are available.

SUMMER READING PROGRAM

Lewis & Clark Library

Ç 406-447-1690 Ç https://www.lclibrary.org Ç https://www.facebook.com/ LewisandClarkLibraryHelena Ç http://Lewisandclarklibrary

Join Lewis & Clark Library for a summer of play and activities. This year's theme is Tails and Tales. Each week, they will celebrate a different animal with a themed take-home activity kit for gradeschool kids, reading adventures, and much more!

GRANDSTREET

y

SUMMER THEATRE SCHOOL AND MINI CAMPS

Ç 325 N. Park Ave. Ç 406-442-4270 Ç http://theatreschool.

grandstreettheatre.com/summertheatre-school/

Ç https://www.facebook.com/ grandstreettheatreschool.org Ç http://grandstreettheatreschool.

Go to our

camp finder

at www.mtparent.com

com Full-day two-week theatre camp. Develop skills in acting, improvisation, rehearsal techniques, voice and diction, character development, creative thinking, dance, movement and much more. OR take one of three half-day mini camps: Podcast and Tok Tok; Beanie show (K-2nd); Musical Theatre.

:: calendars, blog & more @ MTPARENT.COM ::

for camp dates and more info

april 2021

37


A WHAT'S UP?

Montana SPRING FAMILY EVENTS

PHOTO MARIAH ALLEN PHOTOGRAPHY

Please visit mtparent.com/calendars for the latest family events happening in Southwest montana! 38

april 2021


A MT

Healthy Kids Pack

It’s an experience you’re probably familiar with: Having a bad day. Nothing is going your way, you can’t focus at work and you’re getting irritated at the smallest thing. Then you eat something, and after just a few bites your mood completely turns around. It’s humbling to be reminded of just how much our physical, mental and emotional well-being depends on eating enough food. If you’re lucky, this experience only happens when you forget to take a lunch break. But for one in five Montana children, this experience is daily life. Kailey is one of these children. She wakes up early every morning to catch the school bus. Sometimes there’s cereal in the cupboard to eat before the bus arrives, sometimes the cupboard is empty. With her stomach rumbling until the lunch bell rings, Kailey cannot focus in class no matter how hard she tries. Weekends are even more challenging. Most kids look forward to the weekends, but for Kailey they mean a lack of school meals. She often returns to school on Mondays after not eating enough for the previous two days. Her mom, who is raising Kailey on her own, tries her best to provide for her family, but her low wages and long working hours can be stretched only so far. State-wide, the pandemic has made situations like Kailey’s more common. A recent report by the Montana Food Bank Network indicates that compared to pre-pandemic levels, child food insecurity in the state has risen by 36%.

Of all the individuals we serve here at the Gallatin Valley Food Bank in Bozeman, 30% are children. Hunger takes a toll on everyone, but children are especially affected. Kailey is at risk for increased hospitalizations, poor health, iron deficiency and behavior problems such as aggression, anxiety and depression. Fortunately, child food insecurity is solvable. Our Healthy KidsPack program provides schoolchildren with bags of weekend food at the end of each week, ensuring students return to school ready to learn on Monday; our KidsPantry program establishes pantries in schools where students can take food discreetly; and our Summer Meals program provides free breakfast and/or lunch to any individual 18 years old or younger who shows up to our meal sites. All of our programs are open to any child. You can sign your child up for Healthy KidsPack anytime during the school year (including right now). Visit our website for more information. If you’re outside our service area, contact your school to find similar programs near you. Do you want to help? There are many different ways: Wednesday, April 7

is Wear Orange Wednesday. Deck yourself out in orange to raise awareness of childhood hunger and share your photos online by tagging #WearOrangeWednesday, #MTNoKidHungry and @the_ Gallatin_Valley_Food_Bank. You can

also make a donation or volunteer your time by visiting the “Give Help” tab on our website. Your assistance will help us end childhood hunger in southwest Montana. :: calendars, blog & more @ MTPARENT.COM ::

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A MT …inspiring people of all ages to

FLY!

Seventh Annual

Give Big May 6 & 7, 2021

Birthday Parties Parent & Tot After School Classes Teen/Adult & Summer Camps! Online Class Registration at: MountainAirDance.org

an

up g gro n i t r fe or e” ofsupp Caf w y no use Coz o e h h in- “T

On May 6th and 7th from 6 p.m. to 6 p.m., One Valley Community Foundation will host the seventh annual Give Big Gallatin Valley initiative. Give Big is a 24-hour celebration that raises critical funds for nonprofits located in, or serving, Gallatin County. The initiative is designed to connect donors to the nonprofits they care most about and raise unrestricted funding to support their work. Over the past seven years, our community has come together to raise nearly $6 million through more than 25,000 gifts for over 195 local nonprofits during Give Big. Last year alone, 5,782 generous donors raised more than $1.8 million for 195 nonprofits. This year, One Valley’s goal is to inspire 7,000 donors in our community to donate to their favorite nonprofits in Gallatin County in 24 hours. To help us reach our goal and provide these organizations with much-needed support, we are teaming up with Yellowstone Club Community Foundation to encourage our community to give big on May 6th and 7th, a Gallatin County tradition. “Each year, we are humbled by the extraordinary generosity of neighbors throughout Gallatin County during Give Big. Every gift matters to our nonprofit organizations who are working tirelessly to support the needs of our growing region,” said Bridget Wilkinson, Executive Director of One Valley Community Foundation.

Comprehensive Therapy Services for Independence and Growth ✦ Occupational and Physical Therapy ✦ Speech and Language Therapy ✦ Breastfeeding and Nutrition Services A warm and comfortable environment serving: Infants, Children and Women 300 N Willson Ave Suite #2005, Bozeman

www.thecozynestmt.net

406-587-2755

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To abide by state and local recommendations and preserve the health and safety of our community, Give Big will look different this year. But the goal of coming together as a community to give back and give big remains the same. In years past, the giving day has been enhanced by in-person events such as donor lounges, a kickoff event and a finale celebration. This year, the community will come together virtually with live-stream special events, social media and the shared spirit of giving. Everyone will be able to follow along and support their favorite causes online, as a community, on the day of the event. Cash prizes and matching

funds generated by generous local sponsors will boost giving and make every gift go further. “The Yellowstone Club Community Foundation is honored to support Give Big again this year. Give Big highlights the importance of philanthropy while also showcasing the impact of nonprofits doing vital work in our community,” said Jacque Poertner, Associate Director of the Yellowstone Club Community Foundation. “This online event encourages collaboration and enables participation from individuals and groups throughout Gallatin County, and provides a platform for the Yellowstone Club to showcase our commitment to nonprofits in Big Sky and the greater Gallatin Valley.”

There are a several ways to get involved in Give Big during this year’s event: 1. Donate at www.GiveBigGV.org to the causes you care most about. 2. Help an organization by becoming a peer-to-peer fundraiser for their cause. Visit www.GiveBigGV.org to find out more. 3. Find a volunteer opportunity in your favorite organization’s profile at www. GiveBigGV.org. 4. Help spread the word! Share the initiative with your community. 5. Share Give Big or news about a cause you care about on social media with #GiveBigGV. By doing so, you could help a nonprofit you love to win the “Newsworthy” or “Star Donor” cash prize. You can stay up to date on other ways to get involved by visiting www.GiveBigGV.org, following One Valley Community Foundation and Give Big on our social media platforms, or contacting Jill Ellwood at jill@onevalley.org or 406-587-6262.


KEEPING IT REAL WRITTEN BY BLAIR FJESETH

It wasn’t until my best friend said, “I think I have a lump in my boob,” that I felt what cancer was for the first time; and feeling it was a realization that this is real life, and we are adults. A fact that, at times, is easy to forget in the mad dash of working and child-rearing. I’m embarrassed to say that, before that day, I didn’t know much about breast cancer. I knew what cancer was generally, of course. I’ve known people who had cancer, though nobody in my inner circle. I check my breasts for lumps when I’m in the shower, though I’ll admit I don’t exactly know exactly what I’m looking for, or rather, feeling for. As my fingers pushed in on the very obvious lump, my stomach knotted, my throat became dry and my eyes felt like they had been on the receiving end of pepper spray. This was my person, the person who held my babies before my family even laid eyes on them, the person with whom I have shared all my secrets; she’s the Christina Yang to my Meredith Grey. It was all too much and yet not enough. Why were we just standing there? Why were we not instantly transported to the very best doctor who already had a very reassuring game plan to inoculate her from this nasty beast who obviously picked the wrong person to inhabit? As the following weeks of tests proceeded, I felt helpless. Here is my rock star friend going through this terrifying experience and, thanks to COVID, she is doing it nearly alone. Yes, the power of FaceTime is wonderful and, thankfully, she has a super supportive spouse. Still, not having friends and family physically near in times of struggle can surely add a level of fear and anxiety to an already stressful situation. Not to mention how exhausting it is

to rehash the same information a million times on various platforms to keep everyone “in the loop.” So, I did what I do best...I joined online support groups for friends of people who have cancer, shopped for comfy clothes for her as though they could be literal shields from the pain I feared she would feel and sent her inappropriate, hysterical cards that perfectly match our oddly identical sense of humor. And yet, I felt as helpless as ever. Here we are in the year 2021, a year that was supposed to be infinitely better than the year prior, and my best friend has cancer. When did “worst year ever” become a competition our universe decided to participate in? 2021, the year my best friend fights the biggest battle of her life (except against the patriarchy). This story, her story, is yet unfinished. It’s still in its infancy, with many chapters ahead, including the one when she victoriously conquers the beast known as cancer. It’s this story, though, that’s taken up permanent residency in my mind. It’s why I’m writing- rather, pleading- for each of you reading this to take great care of yourselves, check for lumps, get yearly exams, take the time to stay up to date on your medical history. It’s a plea to look out for one another to bring back the village and check-in constantly on our fellow Montana mamas. My friend is my world, and if you are as lucky as I to have a “person,” protect and love them at all costs. This column is to say to all of you parents fighting cancer, or quite frankly, any other disease (physical or mental), I see you, and my heart is with you. You are not alone. Blair Fjeseth is a working professional and proud Montana mom. You can reach her at blairparker.inc@gmail.com. Follow her Instagram @blair_mt for more adventures.

:: calendars, blog & more @ MTPARENT.COM ::

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Deciphering Parenting Metaphors: Animals and Machines WRITTEN BY CHERYL MAGUIRE

When I was growing up, parents were referred to as...well...parents. But nowadays it is hard to keep up with the trendy terms to describe people who raise children. First there were helicopter parents, then lawnmower parents, and now the newest one is snowplow parents. I wonder what the next machinery metaphor will be. Since land and air vehicles have been covered, maybe submarine? Turns out there is already one of those too. Besides machinery, there are also animal or invertebrate types of parents. Do animals gather around and coin terms for their parents? If so, would they say, “You are really acting like a human parent right now.” Maybe that could be the basis for the next Disney Pixar movie. Until then, here is a cheat sheet of the latest lingo.

The Animal/Invertebrate Parents

Jellyfish Parent

A jellyfish parent is permissive and doesn’t create many rules or expectations. They often give in to avoid confrontation and lack a backbone like a jellyfish. How do you know you are acting like one? Your kid has been whining all day to eat their Halloween candy. Even though you know they can’t handle eating sugar, you hand over the bag and let them have at it. When they are running around the house, unable to go to sleep you realize that saying “no” would have been easier than dealing with Taz the Tasmanian Devil.

Tiger Parent

Tiger parents are strict and demanding. They prioritize academic and extracurricular success. How do you know you are acting like one? Your favorite show is Dance Moms, and you think the media has unjustly demonized the moms who are only trying to help their kid be on Broadway.

Elephant Parent

Elephant parents are the opposite of tiger parents (although I would have picked a koala bear or something cute and cuddly as the opposite) and focus on nurturing and encouraging instead of tough love and being demanding. These parents are protective of their young and intervene at the first sign of danger. Sometimes these types of parents can be jellyfish-like in the sense they are permissive and lack boundaries (again not seeing the similarity to an actual elephant—maybe I should volunteer to help coin these terms). 42

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How do you know you are acting like one? Not only did you have a videocam on your baby’s bassinet, but you also situated it directly next to your bed. At the first murmur of a whimper, you sprung out of bed and placed your baby next to you where you wanted the baby to be all along.

Snowplow Parent

The snowplow parent is more aggressive than the lawnmower since plowing requires more force than mowing. But they are similar in the sense that they remove any obstacles in their child’s way. The snowplow parent does not want their child to have to deal with problems, so they intervene and fixe everything for their kiddo. I guess people who reside in the cold weather wanted their own term since it is pretty much the same as the lawnmower parent—just more powerful. How do you know you are acting like one? Since you reside in a cold climate, you deliver your child’s forgotten jacket, mittens and hat to the school so that they can go outside for recess even though you are fully aware that they wore shorts and short sleeves to school. And you know they didn’t forget but rather chose not to bring any of those items because they have no intention of wearing it.

Bulldozer Parent The Machines

Helicopter Parent

A helicopter parent is one that hovers over their child’s every move and helps when needed. They tend to worry a lot about their child. How do you know you are acting like one? You hover next to your child as they eat their hot dog that has been cut into so many pieces it resembles grains of sand on a beach instead of food. And then you count the bites they consume to make sure they are receiving the proper amount of nutrition. If they haven’t reached 15 bites, you say, “You need to eat one more bite before you leave the table.”

Lawnmower Parent

Lawnmower parents are more aggressive than the helicopter parent. Like a lawnmower that cuts grass or anything in its path, the lawnmower parent mows away obstacles, so their child doesn’t have to experience any. How do you know you are acting like one? When your kid calls, texts or sends a smoke signal to you that they forgot their lunch, you rush it over to the school faster than a FedEx delivery truck. Ditto for homework, sports equipment and a water bottle. The thought of your child lacking in hydration for five minutes sends you into a tailspin.

See definition for Snowplow. This one is for the warmer climate parents who were not happy with the lawnmower metaphor and wanted a more robust descriptor. They also never shoveled 15 feet of cold wet snow in 30 below temperatures (not including the wind chill) and therefore don’t comprehend how powerful and savior-like a snowplow is when it clears the road. How do you know you are acting like one? Since you reside in warmer weather, before your kid goes to the beach, you not only pack the sunscreen, towel, 10 water bottles, and 100 snacks – you also apply the sunscreen to your 15-year-old who is fully capable of depressing the button on the sunscreen spray bottle.

So, Which One Are You? I’ll admit it, I’ve probably exhibited symptoms of all these types of parents over the years. When you have three kids, you are going to resort to whatever works in the moment. Instead of referring to parents as machines or animals maybe we can just call them what they are: superheroes. Cheryl Maguire holds a Master of Counseling Psychology degree. She is married and is the mother of twins and a daughter. Her writing has been published in The New York Times, The Washington Post, Parents Magazine, AARP, Healthline, Your Teen Magazine, and many other publications. You can find her at Twitter @CherylMaguire05.


Poetry Inspiration in Your Backyard WRITTEN BY JILL DAVIS

» Name Game Poem: Create an Acrostic

poem with names. Start small by putting a name vertically on a piece of paper and then adding a word horizontally that starts with each letter of the name. Then, use phrases or sentences as a second round. Here’s an example for Matt: Making a snowy igloo in our field outside All the children and me helped to make it abide Thinking kids, we gathered inside to laugh and tell stories To keep warm while the winds outside blew in flurries.

Ever heard: “You’re a poet and don’t know it?” I bet you have and maybe your kiddos have too. So, dust off the creative brain, get out some paper and a pen, and get outside for some inspo! Children are born poets; they just need our help to know it. In the words of poet Allen Ginsberg, “Poetry is ordinary magic.” By inviting your kiddo to create poems, you can unlock the magic. But where can we find inspiration? Ideas for poems are everywhere. They can appear in the clouds, in the wind as it blows, in the snow, on your ball-chasing dog, on a frog, in a stream or a dream. Who knows? Ideas are everywhere! Hopefully these tips and ideas will help you and your family become poets before mud season is over. We often stumble when we think of writing poetry because we’re locked into the idea of what poetry is. It turns out not all poetry has to rhyme, it doesn’t always have to have a certain number of syllables, and it doesn’t even have to use proper grammar…but it can if you want it to. Poetry is a creative way to get kids describing what they’re seeing and feeling – especially nature poetry.

Ideas for Poetry Play

» Rhyme Time: Though poetry doesn’t

always have to rhyme, sometimes rhyming can generate some silly poems. Challenge your kids to think of all the words that rhyme with something – snow, bug, ice, buffalo, lion, dinosaur. Keep a list of the rhyming words in a notebook and then see if you can create a poem from the word list together.

» Structure Poems: Limericks, Cinquains,

and Diamante style poems all have specific structures to follow with number of lines, rhyming words, etc. These are helpful to provide guidance if someone doesn’t know where to start.

» Haiku: These are structured poems

that are easy and fun. Only three lines included: the first and third have five syllables and the second line is made of seven syllables.

Nature Poetry Ideas:

» Sense Poem: Outside, have kids take

turns saying what they hear. Write these as one line of the poem. Next, have them say what they see, including colors. This is your second line. Third, write what they smell. The fourth and final line should be the feeling they have outside at that very moment. You might end up with something like this: Birds singing, water rushing, cars driving Brown trees, gray-blue water, mud colored trail Smells like grass, mud and dirt, more grass Happy, tired, smiling

» Outside/Inside Poem: Ask kids to draw

the outline of something they find in nature. No need for details, just the outline of the object. They can even trace it. Now, along the outside edge have them write the things they observe about the object (What color is it? What does it smell like? Is it rough or smooth?). Lastly, on the inside of the outline, have kids write how the object makes them feel (adventurous, muddy, playful).

» Ant Walk Poetry: Ask kids to imagine that

they’re as small as an ant, then take a walk and have them alternate poem lines by describing what they’d be seeing from their “ant-vantage” point and what they might be saying about their adventure. For example: The hole in the sidewalk is five times my size. “How will I get over that crack in the cement?” Human shoes are like semi-trucks. “Will they step on me?” The pond looks like the ocean. “I hope I don’t fall in!”

Kids at Montana Outdoor Science School used snow as inspiration at a recent PIR day camp to create their poetry: Ice is slippery Snow is slippery too Help! I am falling Are you? ~ Barowyn Snow is falling I want to be near the fire I want to warm up in the teepee I want to fall asleep with you Every night. ~ McKinley I do not really know What to do about being cold in the snow I like building igloos Even if it means Being part of the crew. ~ Jack If snow could talk would it, could it say my name? Would it, could it tell that no two snowflakes are made the same? Would it, could it say “Ouch! It hurts when I land on the ground? Would it, could it ask “Will you learn about me cause I’m quite profound? These are things I wonder today, Can you help me play with what snow would say? ~ Jilly Bean Davis Jill Davis, a Montana Outdoor Science School Volunteer, is an outdoor enthusiast who enjoys connecting individuals with nature writing and adventure experiences.

:: calendars, blog & more @ MTPARENT.COM ::

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Zoey’s RECIPES

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

FOR SUCCESS: Tr , s p i T

&

icks & Shortcuts

IN THE KITCHEN

ARTICLE AND PHOTOS BY ZOEY MAHONEY

A great deal of our curriculum at Gallatin Valley Farm to School centers around Harvest of the Month (HOM), a program that highlights Montana-grown foods. Each month a new food is celebrated with activities, recipes and resources for growing your own HOM product at home. I want to shine a light on the HOM product for April because it is such an important food to incorporate in our diets, and also because it is a large crop in Montana at a quarter of a million acres harvested each year. Can you guess what the crop is? Chickpeas! These little legumes are nutrition powerhouses packed with calcium, iron, vitamin B-6 and magnesium – not to mention they are delicious and oh-soversatile. Both of these recipes work well on the go or as an after-sports snack.

Chickpeas two ways

Chickpea Pumpkin Bread

It’s sort of bizarre to think of chickpeas as making a good component for a sweet dish; however, when chickpeas are pureed, they add a rich nuttiness and pack a punch of protein that enhances quick breads like this one. This chickpea pumpkin bread is great as breakfast on-the-go or as a snack for after a sports game. Supplies:

» Mixing bowls » Measuring cups and spoons » Whisk and wooden spoon » Bread pan

Ingredients:

» 1 ½ cups cooked chickpeas » ¼ cup honey » 1 cup all-purpose flour » 1 cup whole wheat flour » 1 teaspoon baking soda » 1 teaspoon salt » ½ teaspoon cinnamon » ¼ teaspoon nutmeg » ¼ teaspoon allspice » 2 eggs » ¾ cup brown sugar » 1 teaspoon vanilla extract » 1 15-oz can pumpkin puree

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Directions:

» Preheat oven to 350 degrees and grease an 8x4-in loaf pan

» In a food processor, blend the cooked

chickpeas and honey until they form a thick and smooth paste. Transfer to a mixing bowl and set aside

» In a separate bowl, combine the flours,

baking soda, salt, cinnamon, nutmeg and allspice and whisk together. Set aside

» Add the eggs and the sugar to the chickpea

mixture and whisk together. Add the vanilla and the pumpkin puree and whisk until fully combined

» Add the dry ingredients into the wet

ingredients, a small amount at a time, and stir until just combined

» Pour the batter into the prepared loaf pan and bake for 50-55 minutes or until the bread is golden on top and an inserted toothpick comes out clean. Enjoy!

» Muffin Tin Alternative: Fill a muffin tin about ¾ of the way to the top with the batter and bake for 15-18 minutes


a parent & kid collaboration Tip

Sprouted and Roasted Chickpeas

This recipe is so fun to make because you’re basically doing a science project while you’re cooking. It is a fun way to get your kids involved in the process and also challenge their scientific thinking by asking questions like: “Why are these chickpeas sprouting?” and “When do you predict the sprouts will appear?” These crunchy snacks are a great representation of the savory side of chickpeas. Supplies:

» Sheet pan » Dish towel » Mixing bowl » Measuring cups and spoons » Wooden spoon

Ingredients:

» ½ cup dry chickpeas – A mix of traditional and Black Butte chickpeas make for a fun contrast of colors in this snack

» 2 teaspoons olive oil » 1 teaspoon turmeric » ½ teaspoon chili powder Directions:

» To sprout chickpeas: Soak the dry

chickpeas overnight in 3 cups of water

» Drain and rinse the chickpeas and lay

them out on a baking sheet. Let them sit, damp, covered with a damp towel. Rinse

every 8 hours until sprouts poke out of the chickpeas. Rinse one more time and then pat dry

» Preheat oven to 325 degrees » In a bowl, combine the chickpeas, olive

oil, turmeric and chili powder and mix thoroughly to coat the chickpeas evenly with the oil and spices

» Spread the chickpeas out onto a lined

baking sheet and bake for about 30-35 minutes or until golden and crunchy

» Chickpeas will continue to cook for a few minutes after they have been taken out of the oven, so wait 5-10 minutes before eating

» Storage: Allow chickpeas to cool

completely before putting in an airtight container. These snacks will keep for about a week

suggestions for sourcing Would you believe that you can purchase legumes that have been grown and processed right here in Montana? Well, you can. Timeless Natural Foods is an organization that supports dozens of organic family farmers throughout Montana and the surrounding areas. Timeless carries products like organic lentils, chickpeas and barley, and while they may be headquartered in Ulm, MT you can find their products in just about any grocery store in the Gallatin Valley.

Roasted chickpeas are one of the most versatile snacks around...and they set the stage for a super fun activity to do with your family. If you’re looking for a way to have some extra fun in the kitchen with your kiddos, consider having a “Roasted Chickpea Flavor Contest.” Pull out all the spices from your spice drawer and let your kids experiment with different flavors to make their own roasted chickpeas. Stick to 1 tsp of seasoning per 1 cup of chickpeas to start, but feel free to add more to taste. Set up a blind taste test and see which flavor profiles are your favorites.

An Enviro-friendly Sustainability Tip Did you know that you can buy a lot of ingredients in bulk in most grocery stores? This is a great way to cut down on using single-use products that can wind up in landfills and survive far longer than one would like. Not only does buying bulk beans and legumes keep single-use cans out of the landfills, but it also puts a little more money in your pocket. The same amount of money spent on one can of chickpeas is worth about the volume of three cans of chickpeas in the bulk section. So, the next time you head to the grocery store grab a couple empty mason jars to stock up on staple items. You will save yourself some money and you will help save the planet! Zoey Mahoney is the Culinary Instructor with Gallatin Valley Farm to School and is completing degrees in Dietetics and Sustainable Food Systems from Montana State University. Zoey enjoys spending her days adventuring with her husband and building their greenhouse/chicken coop.

:: calendars, blog & more @ MTPARENT.COM ::

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Ebelskivers ARTICLE BY CHEF DANIELLE MILLER OF ORDERS UP DELIVERY | PHOTOS BY KRYSTAL BEHUNIN

While I was going to Culinary school in Santa Barbara, I took a trip north to a small Danish town called Solvang. It is there that I learned the art of making Ebelskivers, the delicious round Danish pancake. Here is the Orders UP version of the traditional danish batter – but if you are short for time, your favorite pancake mix will work well too. For this recipe you will need a specific Ebelskiver pan that can be purchased locally or on Amazon. Ingredients:

» 2 cups buttermilk » 2 cups flour » 2 eggs (separated) » 2 teaspoons baking powder » ½ teaspoons baking soda » 3 Tablespoons sugar » ½ teaspoon kosher salt » 4 Tablespoons melted butter » 1 teaspoon vanilla » Butter, oil, or nonstick spray for pan

Directions:

» In a medium bowl: Wisk together buttermilk, flour, egg yolks, baking powder, baking soda, sugar, kosher salt, and melted butter. Set aside.

» In a small bowl beat egg whites with an electric mixer or a whisk until stiff peaks form. Fold egg whites into batter.

» Over medium heat put the Ebelskiver pan on stove. Add a tiny pat of butter or oil into each well.

Once melted add 1 ½ Tablespoons of batter into each well, let cook for 45 seconds then add 1 teaspoon of jam, Nutella, or berries to the center of the batter. Then top with another Tablespoon of batter to cover filling. Flip each Ebelskiver over, using chopsticks or knitting needles. Cook for another 2 minutes. Gently take Ebelskivers out of pan.

» Dust with powdered sugar, jam or maple syrup before serving. » Note: There is somewhat of an art to getting the timing and temperature right. Keep trying and you will be cooking Ebelskivers just like they do in Denmark in no time.

Ebelskivers are a mainstay at Orders UP, which provides chef prepared, from-scratch meals, available for delivery to Bozeman area residents. They also offer kids cooking classes in their new 5,000 square foot kitchen. Classes range from an Easter egg hunt/baking class to a three-day intense baking course. Chef Danielle Miller is the owner of Orders UP in Bozeman. If you have had one of her dinners or taken a class you know how passionate Danielle is. Her goal is to feed this whole valley and she is doing that by teaching your children to cook and bringing dinner right to your door. 46

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∂ $100 win ENTER TO

MONTHLY GIVEAWAY

gift card to feltman brother's vintage and classical baby and toddler clothing

APR 2021

How to enter:

Look for this post on the Montana Parent Facebook page starting April 1.

1. L ike the post and Tag one friend (tag multiple people for additional entries)

2. Follow @mtparent on Facebook (if you don't already!)

3. Follow @feltmanbrothers on Facebook too!

Other info:

Winner will be chosen at random and announced May 1. No purchase necessary.

Just in time for warmer weather and spring/summer celebrations, the new Feltman Brothers Secret Garden collection features hand embroidered daisies and beautiful detailing such as smocking, bullions and basketweave ribbons. Available in a variety of body styles including short sleeve and sleeveless dresses, rompers as well as bibs, bloomers, bonnets and booties. Your little one will look like she stepped right out of a fairytale! Sizes NB-4T. To learn more about Feltman Brothers, visit

https://feltmanbrothers.com

Feltman Brothers is committed to providing parents and babies traditional baby clothing that’s classically designed and expertly tailored. Each dress, gown, romper, bobby suit and accessory from the Feltman Brothers collection includes hand embroidered detailing, smocking, fagotting, fluting and intricate open work designs. Perfect hand sewn rosebuds, embroidery appliques, pintucks, and French lace adorn their beautifully designed special occasion wear collection. This tradition of offering vintage styled, fine children’s apparel began nearly 100 years ago.

:: calendars, blog & more @ MTPARENT.COM ::

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Here from the start.

I’m here to help do what’s best for your child's health and well-being, so they can enjoy all of life’s adventures.

Lynne Foss, CPNP-PC

Bozeman Health Pediatrics Call 414-4900 today to schedule a same-day appointment!

Belgrade 206 Alaska Frontage Rd BozemanHealth.org/kids 48

april 2021

Bozeman 937 Highland Boulevard, Suite 5320