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Brendan Fernandes

Free Fall

This publication was produced on the occasion of artist Brendan Fernandes’ first solo exhibition at moniquemeloche in winter of 2017.

Š 2016


Brendan Fernandes, Free Fall, 2017, installation view


For his first solo exhibition in Chicago, Brendan Fernandes continues his ongoing exploration into the physical act of falling through new works in glass sculpture, installation, photography and performance, offering an extended metaphor for contemporary queer politics. Beginning with an opening night performance, Fernandes takes over the entire gallery, including a timely new installation piece as part of the gallery’s on the wall exhibition space: forty-nine handmade crystal coat hangers, symbolizing the forty-nine victims of the Orlando massacre. This project continues inside the gallery, along with new blown glass sculptures evoking ghostly bodies, created during his 2016 residency at the Museum of Glass, Tacoma, WA. Unique photographic compositions comprising dancers’ limbs and African artifacts printed using the chine-collÊ method accompany the sculptures. Presented together, these bodies of work illuminate Fernandes' ongoing occupation with the falling form, suggesting contemporary notions of desire and loss through bodily movement.


Brendan Fernandes, Free Fall, 2017, installation view


Bodies that Dance/Bodies that Fall

Francey Russell Interviewing Brendan Fernandes (BF) for BOMB Magazine, June 21st, 2016

Francey Russell: Why don’t we start with you telling me a bit about your own experience with homophobia and racism this past year. Brendan Fernandes: This past year one of the biggest things was when I was just sitting on the subway and a man just sat beside me and then kind of looked at me and just said “goddamn mother fucking faggot terrorist” and he got up and said “You’re a goddamned mother fucking faggot terrorist” and he walked away. And, in that moment, I was like sort of taken aback thinking about the conflation of those terms, and what that means, but also being frightened because at that moment I was like what’s gonna happen to me? Are people going to react? We’re in a public space in New York City, you know, are people going to freak out? One other thing in mind was at one point when I left the subway and I got out I was like why did he call me that? I felt like I looked masculine today. FR: Wow. BF: And it was really weird and it was because I was wearing...I was like what made me not pass? You know? And I was wearing...I remember exactly what I was wearing, I was wearing a black toque and a black bomber jacket and black jeans and my docs. And I was just like huh. I was sort of like how did I not pass in this state? FR: The idea of being called a "faggot terrorist" is so frightening and it just seems like such a cry of fear from somebody. Those are two words that are so associated with some fearsome other, yet one is hyper aggressive masculinity, the other is the stereotype of femininity. We definitely can't understand what you were called in that moment without an intersectional analysis. BF: Yes, definitely. FR: How do you think about those things coming together for you, or at you? BF: You know, coming together for me, it's still, it's a place of confusion. But it makes me think about how the word queer can mean, and be. When I think about queer I always think of it as an open model for inclusivity. And it is uniqueness, and it's strangeness, it’s a kind of undefined place. And this term [“faggot terrorist”] for me, it doesn't make sense, it’s indefinable in a way, and that for me sort of feels strangely, like, queer. I think that perhaps within this idea of a queer utopia, there can also be a kind of queer dystopia perhaps? I think about how at times there can be a kind of hegemony within queers, as well you know? And you know someone will say, well you know perhaps not say it exactly this way or straight forwardly, but expressed their feeling that their queer has more agency or power over my identity as queer.


Support I, 2016 Photo-collage and ink on paper 25 x 19 inches


FR: A conversation that came up with two separate friends of mine was that thinking about Orlando in connection with the role of homophobia made them realize that even while the gay community has made massive strides, we're still not great at talking about the homophobia that persists, that so many still harbor within themselves. There's this idea that because we got gay marriage or because we can be out at work, that this will inner experience will just sort of go away with those advances, and yet so many people still are very intimately familiar.... BF: I definitely think in the United States it's still a huge issue. There's still a huge taboo about it in certain instances. I'm going to say this and you may have to edit it out, but quoting RuPaul, "If you can't love yourself how the hell are you going to love somebody else?" and I think those are really important words you know? FR: I want to return to RuPaul. I think there's something really true about that, but I also believe that we come to know who we are or come to understand ourselves with others. And so there's this sort of belated process where others have to recognize you before you can see yourself properly. So I wanted to ask you about that specifically within gay clubs, and the idea that maybe for a lot of queer people, there's this sense of self-discovery that takes place right there on the dance floor. BF: Yeah! I think, as you say those words, I get a sense of energy, I get a sense of excitement, I get a sense of actually wanting to move. I think because of this critical mass, this mass of people that come together... and the gay club is not neutral, it has it's own politics within gay subcultures or queer subcultures... but I think at the end of the day it is a space of critical mass and solidarity. That’s something that is just so exciting, and it becomes this kind of organic thing where everyone is moving together, and I think that is the kind of sanctuary that the gay club can be. And it's a safe ground, it's a safe space. It becomes this environment for our freedom to kind of happen. It's funny because the same thing happens on Fire Island, I always say it's the Island of Lost Boys, or Lost Queers. But it's because there's this idea that you can just be you there. FR: And I think that's what makes this massacre especially painful because it feels like that openness, and that sense of not being totally self-conscious for once in your day, it makes it such a vulnerable space and to have that aggressed... BF: Totally, it's an invasion. You know if someone breaks into your home, or something happens close to you, it tarnishes that space. And we're embarking on Pride month in New York, and I'm reading posts on facebook from different parties and people are asking, “are we going to be safe? It is going to be safe in the club?” And party organizers are responding “we have the NYPD that are going to come and special security, come celebrate and participate. Don't worry, you'll be fine." So there's this idea that things have changed.


Brendan Fernandes, Free Fall, 2016, detail


FR: I think also just the idea of queerness, safety, and the police being brought together is very unsettling. The police have not historically been champions of safety for gay people but massive aggressors. And to this day for so many people in the gay community I think the presence of police officers would not make them feel safe at all. BF: No, it doesn't. And I definitely don't believe in it. Thinking about another incident this year in February, I was walking home in Chelsea, 8th Avenue, walking towards the subway and a man came out of 15th St and punched me in the back and kneed me and yelled "faggot" and then pushed me into 8th avenue. And luckily I was with somebody who picked me up in my disheveled moment. I could see the man who did this standing outside a bodega and I saw his face and I started to freak out, and I was shaking and the person I was with called the police. And the police came and asked me, the first question they said was, "do you need an ambulance?" And in that moment of panic and fear, I said "no because I don't have insurance that will cover the ambulance." And he said, "I asked you that question because if you need an ambulance that means you're hurt. If you're hurt I can press charges on that man. But you're not hurt so I can't do anything about this." And I said "I'm not asking you to arrest this man or to charge this man, but there's clearly something going on here with this person, but also I am hurt. I'm physically hurt, I'm mentally hurt, and just because I'm not bleeding, and not in need of an ambulance, I am still hurt." And they said "Well there's nothing we can do. What we'll do is we'll ask this person to move somewhere else and we suggest you go home." And I felt betrayed because I didn't know if it was because it was a homophobic act that that's why it didn't have the same urgency that perhaps another case would have‌ FR: Right. You had to prove that you were hurt in order to be protected, and if you weren't hurt enough, they weren't going to protect you. Maybe to return to what we said earlier, we're talking about hurt right now. You said you earlier that you affectionately call Fire Island a haven for lost boy. BF: The island of lost boys FR: The island of lost boys. And I was thinking about the connection between feelings of queerness and feelings of lostness. And wondered if that feels like an important connection to you? BF: I think perhaps within the idea of being lost there's the idea of being unique, where its not necessarily a negative thing. I think in this lostness there is also a freedom to be...sometimes I think, “I would just love to just walk around the city and just be lost. And not have anything specific aim and just kind of walk and feel a sense of empowerment in that unknowingness.â€? And I think that's why I define [Fire Island] as being this space of lost boys. I can do or act in a way that I want to act and not feel that I'm being shamed or that it's inappropriate. I don't have to explain what I'm doing to anyone.


FR: It's almost like some of these spaces allow us to be....I mean they let us be who we are and they let us be more of ourselves, but they also give us breathing space to be a little less of ourselves. We don't have to be our everyday self. BF: Totally, and I think that's also part of what the lostness is. I can be me, but I also can be a part of me that's not me in my every day and I think that's kind of lovely. FR: Yes that's really lovely, I like that a lot. And it reminds me of that classic childhood fantasy of running away. Why was that attractive? I think it has to do with this idea of lostness and freedom being quite linked. BF: Well Peter Pan right? The lost boys. FR: Exactly. Right. About as gay as it comes. BF: *laughs* Yes, about as gay as it comes. And Neverland, I think the main gay bar in Disneyland is called Neverland. FR: I didn't know there was a gay bar in Disneyland. BF: I think it's where all the staff go and hang out and it's called Neverland FR: That's amazing. So, now, I want you to tell me about yet another experience you’ve had this year. You spoke earlier about issues of masculinity and femininity and being masculine presenting and you have a big beard and it's wonderfu,l but it has also been target of hateful speech. Can you tell me about that? BF: Yeah, actually two incidents come to mind. The first incident is when I was....both actually in the airport. I'm in the airport a lot, and the space of the airport is a very precarious tentative space where I feel anxious all the time because I feel like within it my body of color is being questioned. But in these two incidents it was confronted. The first one was when I was coming through US customs and you know I have the paperwork that gives me allowance to be in the United States as a Canadian. The customs agent looked at me in a very stern, confronting look and said "what is the purpose of your beard?" And I said "Pardon me?" And she said "You heard me. What is the reason for you having that beard?" And I said, you know in that moment of how do I neutralize the situation and my tendency is to make a joke, I said "Well I don't have hair on my head, so I decided to grow it on my face." And I think she just stopped and looked for a while and then she scanned my passport and said "go". Again, what did she want me to say? I think she was asking for me to say it was for religious purposes, and that you know, being religious, as a person of color, a brown body with the beard, I must be Muslim, hence possibly a terrorist. And I just kind of was taken back by that. But I just continued on my way.


FR: The idea that these people assumed you had some reason and they thought they knew what it was and wanted you to just admit it. Something I've thought about a lot this week in response to the Orlando shooting, there was this desperate effort to connect the action with ISIS, and it just seemed like, why aren't we paying attention to what's right in front of our faces? Why are we hunting for this other reason when it was clearly targeting gay people? Just like that security guard was hunting for some hidden reason behind your beard. BF: We're looking for the problem to be elsewhere, when the problems are here on home ground. It's like you know, we can't actually question ourselves, it has to be someone else's problem. It made me think about something I see on social media, American Muslims committee groups making videos that say "look at me, I'm just like you. I can have tattoos, I like American things! I am American as well!” And, maybe that represents some Muslims, but you know, a lot of Muslim people aren't like that. FR: It's a way of dividing up marginalized people into "good ones" and "bad ones," and the good ones are the ones in blue jeans. BF: Exactly. FR: Another major source of frustration for me this past week was this ongoing question as to whether [the shooter] was "radicalized." Being radicalized has turned into a totally technical term to refer only to Muslim terrorists. But I was thinking, of course he is “radical,” he just killed 50 people! But because “radicalization” has been so connected with the idea of Islamic terrorism, there was this open question. And then I read an article that said, no, he wasn’t radicalized, he was just an ordinary mass shooter. BF: It’s interesting, the criticism of “becoming radicalized” like you're mentioning. Because you know, we use the word radical in positive ways when we describe queerness. You know, radical queers. So how does that word have agency or question agency in different ways? Again I go back to the question of utopias and dystopias and the different senses of radicalizing… FR: Well that actually is a nice way to transition. Maybe you can tell me how as an artist you've been metabolizing this event? Most of your work does concern homosocial and queer interaction and also questions about the violence and tenderness that arise in those interactions. So what are you thinking about in terms of your art? BF: I've really been paying attention to the idea of the dance floor. The actual physical structure of the dance floor and the space it creates for gatherings. But also the idea that the dance floor is an actual object that hits back, that can create pain in the body. When you're moving on the floor, it hurts you.


I’m also thinking about how in dance, you can't fall. And these bodies fell at a dance club. And the kind of power and sadness in that image. And you know, thinking about these performers in this particular floor who died from AIDS crisis, and perhaps those bodies fell. So falling bodies, and how in dance you can never fall, you have to show strength in order to endure. FR: I like this idea of the floor hitting back. And the idea also that we talked about earlier of finding community on the dance floor. Part of what's powerful and gentle about going on to these dance floors is that we meet resistance in the form the floor and in other people. Something is hitting you back, but in the best way. You're finding confirmation of your body and confirmation of your sexuality and this idea of getting hit back being both a violent and a tender, supportive physical interaction. These ideas sound amazing and I can't wait to see what you do with them. And I hope that you and I will find each other on a dance floor very soon. BF: I hope so too. I know we will. We're going to dance very soon. Francey Russell is a PhD candidate in Philosophy at the University of Chicago. Her research concerns ethical significance of self-knowledge and selfstrangeness. She also writes art and cultural criticism for the Los Angeles Review of Books and Lenny Letter.


Free Fall, 2016 49 hand-pulled crystal coat hangers, 5 coat racks Dimensions variable


Free Fall, 2016, detail


Brendan Fernandes, Free Fall, 2017, installation view


No Body I, 2016 Hand-blown glass 18 x 8 x 5 inches


No Body II, 2016 Hand-blown glass 18 x 8 x 5 inches


No Body III, 2016 Hand-blown glass 18 x 8 x 5 inches


No Body IV, 2016 Hand-blown glass 18 x 8 x 5 inches


No Body V, 2016 Hand-blown glass 18 x 8 x 5 inches


No Body VI, 2016 Hand-blown glass 18 x 8 x 5 inches


No Body VII, 2016 Hand-blown glass 18 x 8 x 5 inches


No Body VIII, 2016 Hand-blown glass 18 x 8 x 5 inches


Encounter, 2016 Hand-blown glass Left: 20 ½ x 7 x 6 inches Right: 20 x 8 x 6 inches


Free Fall I, 2016 Cut-out photo, graphite and thread on paper 8 ½ x 11 inches


Free Fall II, 2016 Cut-out photo, graphite and thread on paper 8 ½ x 11 inches


Free Fall V, 2016 Cut-out photo, graphite and thread on paper 8 ½ x 11 inches


Invisible Life I, 2016 Hand-pulled crystal 10 x 17 inches


They, 2014 Three-channel video 10 minute loop Edition of 5


Previous: on the wall Strong Bodies, 2016 Vinyl lettering Edition 1 of 3 Dimensions variable Free Fall, 2016 49 hand-pulled crystal coat hangers, 5 coat racks Dimensions variable


Strong Bodies, 2016, detail


Strong Bodies, 2016, detail


BRENDAN FERNANDES

B. 1979, Nairobi, Kenya lives and works in Chicago, IL Education 2006 – 2007 2003 – 2005 1998 – 2002

Whitney Museum of American Art, Independent Study Program, New York, NY The University of Western Ontario, Masters of Fine Arts in Visual Arts, London, ON York University, Honours Bachelor of Fine Arts in Visual Arts, Toronto, ON

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2018 To Find a Forest, Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, Victoria, BC 2017 Aljira Center for Contemporary Art, Newark, NJ Saint Mary’s University Art Gallery, Halifax, NS Recess, NY, NY 18th Street Art Center, St, Santa Monica, CA Free Fall, moniquemeloche, Chicago, IL Saint Mary's University Art Gallery, Halifax, NS 2016 Lost Bodies, Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Queen's University, Kingston, ON. Traveling to Textile Museum of Canada, Toronto, ON, 2017 2015 We As One, Mixed Greens, NY, NY (Curated by Larry Ossei-Mensah) In Position, Varley Art Gallery, Markham, ON Still Move, Southern Alberta Art Gallery, Lethbridge, AB Recent Acquisitions Spotlight: Brendan Fernandes, Art Gallery of Nova Scotia - Yarmouth, Halifax, NS The Footmade, KW|AG, Kitchner, ON Seeing I, Freedman Gallery, Center for the Arts, Albright College, Reading, PA (Erin Riley Lopez) 2014 They, Rodman Hall Art Centre, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON The Inverted Pyramid, Abrons Art Center, NY, NY 2013 Night Shift, Nuit Blanche, Toronto, ON (curated by Crystal Mowry and Ivan Jurakic) 2012 The Devil’s Noise, Gallery Seven Art Limited, Delhi, India 2011 Encomium, Diaz Contemporary, Toronto, ON Disscontinent, Surrey Art Gallery, Surrey, BC (curated by Jordan Strom) Speaking Tongues, Neutral Ground, Regina, SK Buli, The Print Studio, Hamilton, ON (curated by Sally Frater) On Becoming, Art Gallery of Southwestern Manitoba, Brandon, MB (curated by Jenny Western) Dada Africa, Station Gallery, Whitby, ON (curated by Olexander Wlasenko ) 2010 From Hiz Hands, Art in General, NY, NY (curated by Andria Hickey) Until We Fearless, Art Gallery of Hamilton, Hamilton, ON (curated by Melissa Bennett) Haraka Haraka, MAI (Montreal Arts Interculturels), QC 2009 Relay League, Art Gallery of York University, Toronto, ON Pray For Us, Diaz Contemporary, Toronto, ON Mutual Surrender, Truck Gallery, Calgary, AB 2008 Future (… - - - …) Perfect, Nuit Blanche, Toronto, ON (curated by Haema Sivanesan) New Work, Momenta Arts, Brooklyn, NY For My Culture, Alternator Gallery for Contemporary Art, Kelowna, BC 2007 Matter of Fact, Robert Langen Art Gallery, Waterloo ON Project Row House, Houston TX Decoy, Artspace, Peterborough ON Wish You Were Here, Eyelevel Gallery, Halifax NS 2006 Handle With Care, Centre Des Arts Actuels Skol, Montreal QC 2005 Poser, Forest City Gallery - Window Space, London ON Unsettle, Eldon House, Museum London, London ON On Safari, Macintosh Gallery, London ON 2003 Darning, Zsa Zsa Gallery, Toronto ON Selected Group Exhibitions 2017 World on the Horizon: Swahili Arts Across the Indian Ocean, Krannert Art Museum (KAM) at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL. Travelling to The Fowler Museum at UCLA, LA, CA, & The Smithsonian National Museum of African Art, Washington, DC. 2016 Retrogarde, Logan Center for the Arts, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (Curated by Yesomi Umolu)


Selected Group Exhibitions continued 2016 University at Buffalo Anderson Art Galleries, Buffalo NY Asia Society, NY, NY African’s in America, Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg, SA Retrogarde, Logan Center, Univerisy of Chicago, Chicago, IL Yonder, Koffler Gallery, Toronto, ON (Curated by Mona Flip and Matthew Brower) Ties / Tongues, Grizzly, Grizzly, Philadelphia, PA (Curated by Cindy Stockton Moore) Enacting Stillness: An Exhibition in Nine Parts, Meet Factory, Prague, Czech Republic (Curated by Sara Reisman) Bucharest Biennial 7, Bucharest, Romania (curated by Niels Van Tomme) Bend and Hold, Kaplan Gallery, Rockville, MD (Curated by Jackie Milad) Land Mark, Socrates Sculpture Park, Long Island City, NY Whisper or Shout, BRIC, Brooklyn, NY 2015 Exercices de Lecture / Reading Exercises, Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Montreal, QB (Curated by Katrie Chagnon) Between Body and History, 8th Floor Gallery, Rubin Foundation, NY, NY, (Curated by Sara Reisman) Pop Up Shop, Centre 3 (Barton Street), Hamilton, ON (Curated by Rita Komacho) Disguise, Seattle Art Museum, Seattle, WA (Curated by Pam McClusky and Erika Dalya Massaquoi) Traveled to: Brooklyn Museum, BK; and Fowler Museum of Cultural History, LA Looking Back at You: Masks by Artists, Confederation Centre Art Gallery, Charlottetown, PE (Pan Wendt) You Speak / I Dance, Doris McCarthy Gallery, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Nam-In Kim) No Such Place: Contemporary African Artists in America, Nahem Gallery, NY (Curated by Dexter Wimberly and Larry Ossei-Mensah) 40 Years/40 Artists, University Museum of Contemporary Art, Amherst, MA (curated by Loretta Yarlow) Biding Time: The Collection Strikes Back, Art Gallery of York University, Toronto, ON TEMPERAMENTAL, Doris McCarthy Gallery, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Curated by Erin Silver) Performing Blackness, The Allegheny College Art Galleries, Meadville, PA 2014 In Other Words (collaboration with Nanna Debois Buhl), MacLaren Art Centre, Barrie, ON Speculations. Risquer l’interprétation, Galerie Leonard & Bina Ellen, Montreal, QC (Curated Mélanie Rainville) Crossing Brooklyn, Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY Nocturne, Halifax, NS (Curated by Eryn Foster) What is, Isn’t, Alan Koppel Gallery, Chicago, IL (Curated by Megan Green and Anne Huntington) What is this Heart, Berliner Festspiele, Berlin, (Performace collaboration with How to Dress Well and Simon Portigal) Restless Precinct, The Guild in Scarborough, ON (curated by SUM°) Art for a Century: 100 for the 100th, Art Gallery of Hamilton, Hamilton, ON Stage It! (Part 3) – SCRIPTED, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam HARD TIMES: Selected Works by Three Years of FIAR, Leslie Lohman Museum, NY Still Acts, La MaMa Galleria, NY (curated by Sara Reisman and Ian Daniel) In Practice: Chance Motives, Sculpture Center, Long Island City. NY 2013 Queer Objectivity!, The Stamp Gallery, The University of Maryland, College Park, MD (curated by Kris Grey) Pack Move, Hamilton Artists' Inc, Hamilton, ON (curated by Brad Isaacs) Du Bois in Our Time, University Museum of Contemporary Art, Amherst, MA (curated by Loretta Yarlow) R + G + B ? W, Blackwood Gallery, University of Toronto, Mississauga, ON (curated by Johnson Ngo) Ghar Ghar Ki Baat / Tales from Two Homes, Margaret Lawrence Gallery: The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia (curated by Vikki Mcinnes and Heidi Fichtner) New Acquisitions, Burnaby Art Gallery, Burnaby, BC Land marks, Thames Art Gallery, Chatham, ON (curated by Andrea Fatona) Traveled to: Art Gallery of Windsor, 2014, Art Gallery of Peterboroug. Stock Pile, Luminato Festival, Toronto, ON (curated by Denise Markonish) We Are What We Hide, ICA Maine College of Art, Portland, MA (curated by Daniel Fuller) Road Sins, Centre 3, Hamilton, ON (curated by Ingrid Mayrhofer) Empire, FiveMyles, Brooklyn, NY (curated by Natika Soward)


Selected Group Exhibitions continued 2013 The Art Bank in the 21st Century, Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Queen's University, Kingston, ON The Artist Poster Show, Burnaby Art Gallery, Burnaby, BC 2012 Builders, National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, ON Oh Canada, MASS MoCA, North Adams, MA (curated by Denise Markonish) Traveled to: Confederation Centre Art Gallery, 2012, Esker Foundation, 2015. (Da Bao)(Takeout), Varley Art Gallery, Markham, ON (curated by Shannon Anderson + Doug Lewis) Traveled to: Art Gallery of Mississauga, 2012, Plug In Institute of Contemporary Art, 2013, Surrey Art Gallery, 2014 2011 DisFluency, Aronson Galleries, Parsons The New School for Design, NY, NY Brendan Fernandes: New Video Acquisitions, Art Gallery of Hamilton, Hamilton, ON (curated by Melissa Bennett) No Sense of Place, Bergen Kunsthall, Bergen, Norway (curated by Elisabeth Byre) Never Odd or Even, Grimmuseum, Berlin, Germany (curated by Solvej Ovesen) Telefone Sem Fio: The Word-Things of Augusto de Campos Revisited, The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts, NY, NY (curated by Michelle Levy) Barroco Nova, Macintosh Gallery, London, ON (curated by Susan Edelstein / Patrick Mahon) Location/Dislocation, Justina M. Barnicke Gallery, Toronto, ON (curated by Denise Ryner in collaboration with Barbara Fischer) The Global Contemporary: Art Worlds After 1989, ZKM Museum of Contemporary Art, Karlsruhe, DE (curated by Peter Weibel, Andrea Buddensieg, Jacob Birken, Antonia Marten) Sense and Sensibility, Salzburger Kunstverein, Salzburger, Austria (curated by Hemma Schmutz) Buli, Harvest Work / Govenor’s Island, New York, NY Every Line / Every Other Line, Platform: Centre for Photographic and Digital Arts, Winnipeg, MB (curated by J.J. McFadden) Are you a Hybrid?, Museum of Art and Design, NY, NY (curated by Stephen Burks) In Other Words (collaboration with Nanna Debois Buhl), Karen Blixen Museum, Copenhagen, Denmark Where Do We Migrate To?, Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture, Baltimore, MD (curated by Niels Van Tomme) Traveled to: Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Gallery, Parsons The New School for Design, NY, 2012, Contemporary Arts Center in New Orleans, 2013,Varlmlands Museum in Karlstad, Sweden, 2015, Richard E. Peeler Art Center at DePauw University, Greencastle, IN, 2016 Found in Translation, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, NY, NY (curated by Nat Trotman) Traveled to Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin, in 2012 NY / Prague 6, The Czech Center New York, NY (curated by Omar Lopez-Chahoud) Serious Play, Space Studio, London, UK (curated by Pamela Edmonds) Towards Middle Ground, Stiftelsen 3,14, Bergen, Norway (curated by Aileen Burns / Johan Lund) 2010 Sobey Art Award, Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, Montreal, QC NY / Prague 6, Futura Gallery, Prague, Czech Republic (curated by Omar Lopez Chahoud) The Traveling Show, Botkyrka Konsthall, Stockholm, Sweden (curated by Johan Lund) Wordless, The Elizabeth Foundation, NY, NY (curated by Felicity Hogan) Field Work, Access Gallery, Vancouver, BC (curated by Shaun Dacey) Manif D’Art, The Quebec City Biennial, Quebec City, QC (curated by Sylvie Fortin) Harlem Postcards, The Studio Museum in Harlem, Harlem, NY The Arbitrariness of Signs, Momenta Arts, Brooklyn, NY (curated by Sara Reisman) Bunny Redux: Contemporary Artists Rethink the Iconic Playboy Bunny, The Andy Warhol Museum Pittsburg, PA (curated by Eric Shiner) Alternorthern, The Lab, San Francisco, CA (curated by Kevin Bertram and Jason Gowans) Accented, BRIC Rotunda Gallery, Brooklyn, NY (curated by Murtaza Vali) 2009 Invisible Homes, SOMArts Center, San Francisco, CA (curated by Justin Hoover) Mobile Archive, Art in General, NY, NY DIASPORArt, Ambassadors Room, Rideau Hall, Ottawa, ON Air Conditioned Jungle, Diaz Contemporary, Toronto, ON (curated by Gregory Elgstrand) Everywhere, Nowhere, Somewhere, Power House, Memphis, TN One Size Fits All, On Stellar Rays, New York, NY Fallow, Flux Factory - Anonymous Gallery, NY, NY (curated by Bridget Stixrood) Emerge 10, Aljira Center for Contemporary Art, Newark, NJ (curated by Sara Reisman)


Selected Group Exhibitions continued 2009 Living and Dreaming, AIM Program, Bronx Museum, Bronx, NY (curated by Micaela Giovannotti) South-South: Interruptions and Encounters, Justina M. Barnicke Gallery, Toronto, ON (curated by Tejpal S. Ajji and Jon Soske) Shifting Shapes—Unstable Signs, Yale Art Gallery, New Haven, CT (curated by Jaret Vadera and Robert Storr) Longitude/Latitude, Rush Arts Gallery & Resource Center, New York, NY (curated by Nico Wheadon) 2008 Freeze Frame, Miami Art Week, Miami FL / Michael Stevenson Gallery, Cape Town, ZA (curated by Nico Wheadon) The Third Guangzhou Triennial, Guangdong Museum of Art, Guangzhou, China The Gatekeeper, Horland Art Centre, Bergen, Norway / Momenta Arts, Brooklyn, NY (curated by Eric Hiest) Red Badge of Courage Revisited, Newark Art Council, Newark, NJ (curated by Omar Lopez Chahoud) Near Sighted, Far Out, Harvestworks Digital Media Arts Center, New York, NY (curated by Nicole Caruth) Toronto International Art Fair, Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art, Toronto, ON (curated by Camilla Singh) Dyed roots: the new emergence of culture, Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art, Toronto, ON (curated by Camilla Singh) LOLA Festival, London, ON (curated by Paul Walde) Intransit, Moti Hasson Gallery, New York, NY (curated by Omar Lopez-Chahoud) 2007 Deer Art: Animal Imagery in Contemporary Art, Like the Spice Gallery, Brooklyn, NY Big Stories, Little India, Harbourfront Centre, Toronto, ON Arthaus, White Box Gallery and Ethan Cohen Fine Arts, Miami, FL On Migration, ASpace Gallery, Toronto, ON (two person show with Mona Kamal) Simulasian (Asian Contemporary Art Fair), New York, NY (curated by Eric Shiner) Beyond/In Western New York Biennial, Albright Knox and the U of B Anderson Art Galleries Buffalo NY Big Stories, Little India (Gerrard Street East project), SAVAC and [murmur], Toronto ON Whitney I.S.P. Group Show, Artists Space, NY Foire comme si tout allait bien!, Centre Des Arts Actuels Skol, Montreal QC Unpaked and Reheated, Artspace, Victoria, BC (two person show with Steve Rayner) 2006 The Life and Death of I.D, McMaster Museum of Art, Hamilton ON (curated by Sally Frater) Big, Durham Art Gallery, Durham, ON (curated by Patrick Mahon) 2005 The Joke, UWO Faculty Exhibition, Art Lab, London ON Toronto Alternative Art Fair International, Toronto ON The Knot Show, Lonsdale Gallery, Toronto ON Artwallah, Barnsdall Art Gallery, Los Angeles CA The Assosiation, Art Lab, London ON 2004 included in the present classification, Art Lab, London ON Exposé 67, Forest City Gallery, London ON Unusual Suspects, Gallery One, Toronto ON 2003 Mend, The Propeller Centre for the Visual Arts, Toronto ON Den, Gallery 61, Toronto ON 2002 Den, The Propeller Centre for the Visual Arts, Toronto ON Toronto Outdoor Art Exhibition, Toronto ON Awards 2016 2015 2013 2010 2009 2007 Grants 2016 2015

Ontario Association of Art Galleries, Best Show – Innovation in Collection-Based Exhibition, Toronto, ON Rema Hort Mann Foundation Grant Nomination, NY, NY Sobey Art Award, Longlist Sobey Art Award, Longlist Sobey Art Award, Ontario Finalist New Commissions, Art in General, NY, NY Artist of the Year, South Asian Visual Arts Collective, Toronto ON Canada Council for the Arts, Travel Grant, Ottawa, ON Ontario Arts Council Visual Artists Mid-career Grant, Toronto, ON Canada Council for the Arts, Travel Grant, Ottawa, ON


Grants continued 2014 Canada Council for the Art, Assistance to Visual Artists: Project Grants, Ottawa, ON Ontario Arts Council Exhibition Assistance Grant, Toronto, ON 2013 Canada Council for the Art, Travel Grant, Ottawa ON Ontario Arts Council Visual Artists Mid-career Grant, Toronto, ON 2012 Franklin Furnace Fund Grant Canada Council for the Art, Assistance to Visual Artists: Long-Term Grants, Ottawa ON Canada Council for the Art, Travel Grant, Ottawa ON 2011 Ontario Arts Council Exhibition Assistance Grant, Toronto, ON Canada Council for the Art, Travel Grant, Ottawa ON Ontario Arts Council Visual Artists Emerging Grant, Toronto, ON 2010 Canada Council for the Art, Assistance to Visual Artists: Project Grants, Ottawa, ON Ontario Arts Council Exhibition Assistance Grant, Toronto, ON 2009 Ontario Arts Council Visual Artists Emerging Grant, Toronto, ON Ontario Arts Council Exhibition Assistance Grant, Toronto, ON Ontario Arts Council Exhibition Assistance Grant, Toronto, ON 2008 Canada Council for the Art, Travel Grant, Ottawa ON Ontario Arts Council Exhibition Assistance Grant, Toronto, ON 2007 Ontario Arts Council Exhibition Assistance Grant, Toronto, ON 2006 Canada Council for the Art, Assistance to Visual Artists: Project Grants, Ottawa, ON Ontario Arts Council Visual Artists Emerging Grant, Toronto, ON Ontario Arts Council Access Career Development Grant, Toronto, ON Ontario Arts Council Exhibition Assistance Grant, Toronto, ON Ontario Arts Council Exhibition Assistance Grant, Toronto, ON 2005 Canada Council for the Art, International Residencies Program in Visual Arts, Ottawa ON Ontario Arts Council Exhibition Assistance Grant, Toronto, ON Canada Council for the Art, Travel Grant, Ottawa ON Residencies 2017 Session Artist at Recess, NY, NY 2016 Museum of Glass, Tacoma, WA. Dance Studies and Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 2015 The Allegheny College Art Galleries, Meadville, PA 2014 Critical Practices Inc., New York, NY Lower Manhattan Cultural Council Process Space Residency, New York, NY Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Residency, Captiva, FL Field House Residency, Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver, BC 2013 Blackwood Gallery, University of Toronto, Mississauga, ON Margaret Lawrence Gallery: The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia 2012 Western Front Society, Vancouver, BC Centre3 for Print and Media Arts, Hamilton, ON Fire Island Artist Residency, Cherry Grove, NY 2011 ZKM | Center for Art and Media, Karlsruhe, Germany 2010 NY / Prague Six, Chateau Trebešice, Cáslav, Czech Republic Art Gallery of Hamilton, Hamilton, ON DIVA Artist Residency, Copenhagen, Denmark 2009 Gyeonggi Creation Center, Gyeonggi Museum of Modern Art, Korea New Work Residency, Harvestworks, New York, NY AIM, Bronx Museum, Bronx, NY 2008 Lower Manhattan Cultural Council Swing Space Residency, New York, NY Emerge 10, Aljira: A Center for Contemporary Art, Newark, NJ 2007 Lower Manhattan Cultural Council Work Space Residency, New York, NY 2006 Caribbean Contemporary Arts, Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago Publications & Catalogues 2016 “Still Move: Brendan Fernandes” (monograph). Black Dog Publishers. London, UK. “Lost Bodies” (exhibition catalogue). Kingston University Press, Ontario. Canada. Graham, Amanda Jane. “Acting Out: Pointing in the Museum.” Visit Curatorial Art Magazine. http://visitmagazine.org/index.php/issue-3/z_acting-out-pointingIn-the-museum/. Brown, Nicholas. “The Floor Hits Back: Talking Dance With Brendan Fernandes”. Canadian Art Magazine. Liss, Dana. "Studio Visit: Brendan Fernandes."Studio Magazine, The Studio Museum in Harlem. Spring/Winter 2015 - 2016. pg. 34 - 35.


Publications & Catalogues continued 2015 Snider, Jenn et al. "Break it down: Sighting/Citing/Siting Performance Art; Discussing Encomium with Brendan Fernandes." KAPSULA Magazine. Special Issue: Multiple Li(v)es of Art/ists & ... ; Disciplinary Fuzziness and the Future(s) of Art Criticism. September 2015. Lambert, Audra. "One for All: Brendan Fernandes' Performance 'We As One' at Mixed Greens Gallery." Artfuse. November 10, 2015. McClusky, Pamela, Disguise: Masks and Global African Art, Seattle Art Museum and Yale press "Brendan Fernandes", Art Metropole Blog Portis, Ben. "Temperamental". C International Magazine. Issue 126. Pg 62 - 63. Clemans, Gayle. "Grand Illusion: Seattle Art Museum show pairs African masks, contemporary art". Seattle Times. June 19th, 2015. Graves, Jen. "SAM Invokes New Spirits in the Ambitious Disguise: Masks and Global African Art". The Seattle Stranger. June 24, 2015. Graves, Jen. "It's Basically Carnaval at Seattle Art Museum Until 11pm Tonight". The Seattle Stranger. June 19, 2015 Frank, Priscilla. "Global African Artists Explore The Meaning of Disguise In The 21st Century". The Huffington Post. June 24, 2015. Blankinship, Donna Gordon. "Seattle Art Exhibit Puts Spotlight on Race, Identity". The Huffington Post. June 29, 2015. Mahon, Patrick, “Brendan Fernandes Balances Politics and Optimism”, Canadian Art Magazine Hanna, Maeve, “Three: Brendan Fernandes' They at Rodman Hall Art Centre”, Esse Magazine 2014 Wilcox, Jessica and Wendy Wogel. BOMB Artist in Conversation: Brendan Fernandes. BOMB MAGAZINE 2013 Portis, Ben, “New Day Rising: Brendan Fernandes Returns to Dance”, Dance Current, Fall 2013. Pgs. 20 - 24 Bourland, W. Ian, “Breaking the Codex”, NKA Journal of Contemporary African Art, # 31, Fall 2012. Pgs. 22 – 35 2012 Belting, Hans, Andrea Buddensieg & Peter Weibel. "The Global Contemporary and the Rise of New Art Worlds", MIT Markonish, Denise. “Oh Canada” (Catalogue) MASS MoCA, North Adams, MA “Builders” (Catalogue) National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, ON “(Da Bao)” (Takeout) (Catalogue) Varley Art Gallery, Markham, ON “Barroco Nova” (Catalogue) ArtLab, London, ON “From Hiz Hands” (Catalogue) Art in General, NY, NY 2011 Parmer, Amanda. “In Your Words; Review” Art in America. November 2011. Pg. 41 Byre, Elisabeth. “FUKT #10”. Pgs. 72 - 77 Howe, David, Everitt. Elocution Lessons: Q+A With Brendan Fernandes. Art in America Online Bourland, Ian. Critic’s Pick: Found in Translation. Artforum.com Syperek, Pandora. “The Nature of Culture”. Canadian Art Magazine. Spring 2011. Pg. 66 69 Yusuf, Farah. “Brendan Fernandes: until we fearless”. C International Magazine. Spring 2011. Pg 41 – 42 2010 “until we fearless” (Catalogue) Art Gallery of Hamilton, Hamilton, ON. Essays written by Melissa Bennett, and Eric C. Shiner Rackham, Michele. “The Spirit behind the Mask”. The Maple Tree Literary Supplement. Issue #7. Whyte, Murray. “Art World Likes Where he’s Coming From”. The Toronto Star. July 31st. E1E9 Vaughan, R.M. “Brendan Fernandes at The Art Galery of Hamilton”. The Globe and Mail. July 24th. Pg. R9 Sandals, Leah. “Behind the Mask”. The National Post. July 6th. Pg. AL8 Lund, Johan. Conversation with Brendan Fernandes. Residency Unlimited. Kennedy, Jen. Undoing Identities: Brendan Fernandes’ Haraka Haraka. Fuse Magazine. Vol. 33. No. 03.Pg. 38 -40 Snukal, Alex. “Brendan Fernandes”. Bad Day. Issue 7. Pg. 58 – 65 Momenta Art, 2007 / 2008 Year Book, Brooklyn, NY Momenta Art, 2008 / 2009 Year Book, Brooklyn, NY Medley, Mark. “Sobey Art Award announces 2010 longlist” Alternorthern, The Lab, San Francisco, CA Conversation Pieces: Speaking in tongues-and-cheek, The Art Gallery of York University


Publications & Catalogues continued 2009 Circle Jerk, Art Metropole / Printed Matters Reisman. Sara. Emerge 10 Catalouge, Aljira Center for Contemporary Art Giovannotti, Micaela. AIM 29 Catalogue, Bronx Museum Johnson, Ken. “Young Artists Arrive, Either Rough or Ready”. New York Times. July 8, 2009 South- South Encounters, Justina M. Barnicke Gallery, Toronto, ON: 09. Murray, Whyte. “Chewing on the Carcass” www.thestar.blogs.com/untitled/ Cotter, Holland. “Why University Museums Matter”. New York Times. February 20th. Landry, Mike. “Mutual Surrender” www.thingsofdesire.ca Ryan, Carol-Ann. “Future Forward”. C International Magazine. Issue 101. Pg 26 – 28 Mitra, Srimoyee. “Mutual Surrender”. Truck Gallery. Calgary, AB: 09. Lax, Thomas J. “Connected by a Distance”. Rush Arts, NY Ny: 09 Dykhuis, Peter. “Art Gallery of York Universiy Studio Blog”. 2008 Gerrity, Jeanne. "Brenendan Fernandes, Momenta Art Brooklyn, NY" Art Papers: Nov / Dec 2008, 32-06. Pg 58-59. Priegert, Portia. “For My Culture”. Border Crossings, Summer 2008, Vol. 27 Number 2, Issue 106. Pg 100 - 102 Turnbull, Glenna. “African Safaris to New York Art Wolrd”. Kelowna Capital New. February 27, 2008. Pg. 26 Priegert, Portia. “Cultural Authenticity”. eVent Magazine. February 22nd 2008. Pg 4. “Unpacked and Reheated” (Catalogue) Open Space Gallery, Victoria BC.Essays written by Ted Hibert, Catlin Lewis and Helen Marzolf 2007 Caruth, Nicole. ”Wine Gums” December 4th 2007, www.sweetcontemporary.blogspot.com Follwell, Matthew. "Artist Profile" Our Neighbourhood. September 2007. Pg. 34. Chan, Elaine. “On Migration” A Space Gallery, Toronto, ON: 07 “Artist Project” Fuse Magazine 30th Anniversary Issue, Fall 2006, Vol. 30 number 4. pg. 5 Eller, Erin. “Brendan Fernandes’ Quest for Culture” Locus Suspectus Issue 4: Nature and Technology 2007.Pg 14 -16 Kurd, Nadia. “Big Stories, Little India” South Asian Visual Arts Collective, Toronto, ON: 07 Sayej, Nadja. “Getting the Real Story on Little India” Globe and Mail. August 18th 2007. Pg 43 Yelaja, Prithi. “Little India: Six Blocks, Many Stories” Toronto Star. August 25th 2007. “Artist Project”, Fuse Magazine. Volume 30. Number 4 Pg. 5 Beyond / In Western New York Catalogue Diack, Heather. “Point and Shoot: Brendan Fernandes' Decoy Takes Aim” June 1st 2007, Diack, Heather. “Strike a Pose: The Diaspora of Brendan Fernandes' Decoy” Art Space, Peterborough ON. Dault, Meredith. “Brendan Fernandes: Wish You Were Here” January 18th 2007 2006 Westcott, Scott. “Identity Theft.” The Silhouete. October 12th 2006. Haggo, Regina. “Identity Crisis” Hamilton Spectator. October 31st 2006. Pg 34 “Preview”, Canadian Art Magazine. Fall 2006, Vol. 23 number 3. pg. 58 Frater, Sally. “The Life and Death of I.D.” McMaster Museum of Art, Hamilton ON. “The Art of Authenticity” Sunday Express Mix. July 30th 2006. Pg. 5. Trinidad and Tobago Mahon, Patrick. “BIG” Durham Art Gallery, Durham ON. 2005 Beaulieu, Derek, Jason Christie, Angela Rawlings. Shift and Switch: New Canadian Poetry. Toronto: Mercury Press (cover art) Temple, Kevin. “Double Your Art Fair” Now Magazine.NOW. November 3 - 9, 2005, VOL. 25 NO. 10. Toronto Alternative Art fair International Catalogue Windover, Michael. “On Safari” MacIntosh Gallery, London: 05. Rae, Staci. “UWO’s MaIntosh Gallery Goes On Safari” Scene Magazine. Issue:499. September 1st – 14th. Pg. 26 Artwallah Catalogue, Los Angeles, CA 2004 Pidsadny, Terry. “Unusual Suspects” DHL Graphics and Gallery One. 2003 Hirschmann, Thomas. “Threads that Thrill” NOW Magazine. Vol. 22 No. March 20th to 26th. Pg. 65 Dault, Gary Michael. “Brendan Fernandes’ Art of Comfort” Universe. Feb. 03: Pg. 20 Artist Lectures 2017 Artist Talk / Studio Visits, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON 2016 Artist Talk / Studio Visits, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL 2015 Artist Talk / Studio Visits, Columbia University, NY, NY Artist Panel, Barnard College, NY, NY Artist Talk and Workshop, The Reach, Abbotsford, BC


Artist Lectures continued 2015 Artist Talk / Studio Visits, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY, NY, NY Panel, Commoditizing Art in Africa, African Economic Forum, Columbia University, NY, NY Artist Talk, KW|AG, Kitchener, ON Artist Panel on Dance, University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, ON Artist Talk, University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, ON Artist Talk and Movement Workshop, LOMAA, London, ON 2014 Artist Talk, Visual Arts and Dance Departments, York University, Toronto, ON Artist Talk / Studio Visits , Rodman Hall Art Centre, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON Artist Talk / Studio Visits, Low Res MFA, Emily Carr Institute of Art + Design , Vancouver, B.C Artist Talk Seattle Art Museum, Seattle, WA 2014 Artist Talk, Abrons Art Center, NY, NY (Conversation with Jennie Goldstein) Artist Talk, University of Richmond, Richmond, VA 2013 Nuit Talks, Nuit Blanche, Toronto, ON Artist Talk, John Wardle Architects & Spacecraft Studio, Melbourne, AU Artist Critic / Studio Visits, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, Rhode Island Artist Talk, Pratt Institute, NY Artist Talk (with Nanna Debois Buhl), Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, NY 2012 Artist Talk / Studio Visits, University, Victoria, BC Artist Talk, Concordia University, Department of Painting and Drawing, Montreal, QC Artist Talk / Studio Visits, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, Rhode Island Artist Lecture, Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin 2011 The University of Western Ontario, Department of Visual Arts, Speaker Series, London, ON Artist Talk, Surrey Art Gallery, Surrey, BC Artist Lecture, Burnaby Art Gallery, Burnaby, BC Artist Talk, Contemporary Art Society, Vancouver, BC Artist Talk, Harvest Works / Governor’s Island, NY, NY Artist Talk, Van Alen Institute, NY, NY Artist Talk, SAVAC, Toronto, ON Artist Talk, Toronto School of Art, Toronto, ON Artist Talk with Kalia Brooks, Art in General, NY, NY Artist Talk, Mc Master University, Department of English and Cultural Studies, Hamilton, ON 2010 Artist Talk, Rio Bravo, Copenhagen, DK Artist Talk / Studio Visits, Parsons the New School for Design, NY, NY Artist Talk / Studio Visits, Yale School of Art, New Haven, CT Artist Talk / Studio Visits, Hunter College of The City University of New York, NY, NY Artist Talk, Concordia University, Department of Visual, Montreal, QC 2009 Artist Talk, University of Toronto Scarborough, Department of Visual and Performing Arts, Toronto, ON Artist Panel, Emerge 10, Aljira Center for Contemporary Art, Newark, NJ Artist Tak, Harvest WorksNY, NY MFA Studio Visits, Parsons the New School for Design, NY, NY Yale School of Art, Artist Panel: Shifting Shapes - Unstable Sign, New Haven, CT South- South Encounters Workshop, The University of Toronto. Toronto, ON South- South Encounters Artist Lecture, The University of Toronto. Toronto, ON University of Lethbridge, Visual Arts Department, Lethbridge AL 2008 The University of Western Ontario, Department of Visual Arts, Speaker Series, London, ON ARCCO National conference - Hot Buttons / Points Chauds, Ottawa, ON Toronto School of Art, Toronto, ON Colour School, Emily Carr Institute of Art + Design , Vancouver, B.C Alternator Gallery, Kelowna, B.C. 2007 MFA Graduate Seminar and Studio Visits, York University, Toronto, ON Wilfrid Laurier University, "Identity Politics and Tourism" Waterloo, ON A-Space Gallery, Toronto, ON Open Space, Victoria, BC 2006 Skol Gallery, MontrÊal, QC McMaster Museum of Art, Hamilton, ON (panel discussion) Caribbean Contemporary Arts 7, Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago 2005 Fanshawe College, London ON Juries 2016 2015 2013

Artist Residency, NYC Department of Cultural Affairs Ontario Arts Council: Mid-Career Artist Grants. Franklin Furnace Fund Canada Council for the Arts: Artist Project Grants


Juries continued 2012 Lower Manhattan Cultural Council (LMCC) > Swing Space New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) > Interdisciplinary Work Category 2009 Canada Council for the Arts: Artists and Community Collaboration Program in the Visual Arts 2009 Ontario Arts Council: Visual and Media Arts > Artist-Run and Organizations Grants 2006 Ontario Arts Council: Emerging Artist Grants Public Collections 2015 Rodman Hall Art Centre/Brock University, St. Catharines, ON 2013 University Museum of Contemporary Art, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University, Montreal, QC Public Collections continued 2013 The Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Queens University, Kingston, ON 2012 Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Halifax, NS 2011 The National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, ON 2010 Art Gallery of Hamilton, Hamilton, ON Art Gallery of York University, Toronto, ON 2009 Mobile Archive, The Israeli Center for Digital Art Canada Council Art Bank, Ottawa, ON Wedge Curatorial Projects, Toronto, ON 2008 Momenta Art (Video Library), Brooklyn, NY The University at Buffalo Art Galleries, Buffalo, NY


moniquemeloche was founded in October 2000 with an inaugural exhibition titled Homewrecker at Meloche’s home, and officially opened to the public in May 2001. Working with an international group of emerging artists in all media, the gallery presents conceptually challenging installations in Chicago and at art fairs internationally with an emphasis on curatorial and institutional outreach.


Profile for Monique Meloche Gallery

Brendan Fernandes: Free Fall  

Published on the occasion of Brendan Fernandes' first solo exhibition at moniquemeloche, in Winter 2017.

Brendan Fernandes: Free Fall  

Published on the occasion of Brendan Fernandes' first solo exhibition at moniquemeloche, in Winter 2017.

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