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GERMAN ENGLISH No. 21 – III / 2017 EURO 15


W EL COME

TO

IS S U E

A L L COV ER F R A ME S: LINDBERG SIRIU S TITA NIU M

2 1


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CONTENT

32

36

ØRGREEN QUANTUM COLLECTION

HUNTING GROUNDS

Danish Eyewear Brand Envisions the Future

BL ACK F IN Collection Shoot

44

T R E S PA S S I N G

By A ngelika Buettner

56

MAKELLOS BACKFLIP

66

From Japan to Germany

EDITOR’S CHOICE

58

YA M A M O T O D E S I G N TA L K

New A N DY WOL F White Heat St yles

69

The Philosophy of a Living Fashion Design Legend

BERLIN IT!

Fresh Goods from the German Capital

72 FA L S E F R I E N D S By Stefan K apfer

90

86

S A LT. COLLECTION SHOOT

ROLF EXCELLENCE

Reduction and Sophistication

New Self-Conf ident Masterpieces

98 P O W D E R & H E AT Next Generation 3D-P rinting

100

LINDBERG S I R I U S T I TA N I U M Permanent Ice meets Modern Urbanit y

120 SUZY GLAM C E L E B R AT E S

108

HIGH TIDE

5-Year A nniversary

By Verena K nemeyer

124

C U R AT E D S H O P P I N G

With Specs Berlin

126

BRAZILIANS

By Sacha Tassilo Höchstetter


CAZAL

745


CONTENT

140

136

MARWITZ SINCE 1919

Indebted to the Past

C A M PA I G N I N S I G H T S F L E Y E Goes Smørrebrød

144

D E PA RT E D

By Stephan Ziehen

158

NEUBAU EYEWEAR

164

See & Do Good

HANDSOME FOURSOME

162

By Aglaja Brix & Florian Maas

FM HOFMANN

Sneak Peak in Berlin

176

GLCO LAB CONCEPT Eyewear Stores Go Tech

180

KOMONO

From A nt werp to A ll A round the World

196

184

REDUCED TO ITS CORE

B R E A K A W AY S

IC! BER L IN Suprematist Collection

By Edisonga

200

COPENHAGEN SPECS From Denmark to Germany

204 E Y E VA N 7 2 8 5 Matching Classics from Japan

208

206

Theme Shoot with Opticals

L U C A S D E S TA Ë L X BLITZ MOTORCYCLES

INVITED TO DINNER

210

True Vintage Motorbike Eyewear

LA VIE EN ROSE

Theme Shoot with Sunnies

212

TRISTESSE

By Ulrich Hartmann


THE p u r i s t i c C O L L E C T I O N BY

SILMO PA R I S

NORD VILLEPINTE HALL 5 BOOTH F 139


photo E D ISON GA (page 184 – 194)

IMPRINT EDITOR IN CHIEF

Stefan Dongus dongus@spectr-magazine.com m: +49.(0)151.14271817

L AYOUT

Caro Ross ross@spectr-magazine.com

EDITORIAL STAFF

Jana Wenge press@spectr-magazine.com Dirk Vogel vogel@spectr-magazine.com

PROOFRE ADING Florian Deckert Insa Muth Franca Rainer

TR ANSL ATION Dirk Vogel

ONLINE EDITOR

Franca Rainer online@spectr-magazine.com

PHOTOGR APHERS

Aglaja Brix & Florian Maas Angelika Buettner Stefan Dongus Edisonga Ulrich Hartmann Sacha Tassilo Höchstetter Stefan Kapfer Verena Knemeyer Raphael Schmitz Tanja Tremel Valtin & Calisti Stephan Ziehen

PUBLISHER

Monday Publishing GmbH Kamekestraße 20-22 50672 Köln t: +49.(0)221.945267-11 f: +49.(0)221.945267-27 www.spectr-magazine.com www.facebook.com/spectrmagazine

CEOS

Stefan Dongus, Holger von Krosigk

DISTRIBUTION

DPV Network GmbH Postfach 570 412 22773 Hamburg dpv-network.de

PRINT

F&W Mediencenter GmbH Holzhauser Feld 2 83361 Kienberg fw-medien.de SPECTR is published three times per year.

co v e r photos ST E FA N D ON GUS conce pt & a ss is t a nt CARO ROS S s t yl in g A R K A DIU S G IES EK a t 21AGEN CY h a ir & m a ke -up E VA -M ARIA P ILARTZ a t 21AGEN CY mo d el s VA LE R IE & LA RA a t ICE MOD ELS & LUK a t MOD ELWERK German version

English version

gl a ss e s LINDB E R G SIR IUS TITAN IUM

This magazine and all its contents may not be re-used, distributed or stored in electronic databases in any way without prior written permission from the publishers. All inquiries regarding the usage of copyrighted materials, as well as the reproduction of excerpts in other formats must be directed to the publishers. The opinions reflected in this magazine do not necessarily reflect those of the publishers. All rights reserved.


EDITORIAL

PR INT B ITE S

BACK

photo S T E FAN DONGU S (page 100 – 106) For the past few years, the publishing industry has been trying to come to terms with the overall sentiment that “Print is dead”. And that may be the case, since the vast majority of print industry processes that cruised along on autopilot only ten years ago have crashed into the wall at this point. But the overwhelming growth of digital has also shown: some things actually do work in print, perhaps even better. Not so much daily news or current information, but entertainment and elaborate productions. Printed paper still appears to hold more value than the pixels on screen. We have even been hearing about a renaissance of print magazines, changing the tune to “Print is back”. Even digitally native firms are banking on printed cellophane to send strong messages to select customers. And the manufacturers of upscale paper products are reporting record-breaking sales. We also have to admit that we are romantics when it comes to print, which is why we have always worked with special paper finishes from day one. Special glosses, foils, or fold-out covers – all of these features have garnered amazingly positive feedback. And when we introduced stitch binding to our magazine in January 2016, our readers were also delighted about the craftsmanship and great tactile experience offered by this alternative book binding method. (They loved being able to open the mag on any page and place it on the table, without it flipping shut. Try that with a glue-bound title.) On the flipside, we also received the occasional subscriber inquiries about “defective magazines without book backs.” We’re always happy to set the record straight and inform readers about the technicalities behind our new binding method. But our inner artist is also a bit hurt by the fact that our elaborate stitch binding is perceived as a defect. We are still determined to make our binding a solid part of our corporate design identity and really encourage you to flip it open on the table on any page and watch it remain open, without external pressure or stabilization. Neat. And of course, don’t just stay on one page but move through 200 pages of the latest in eyewear design, inside information, and the people behind some of the most fashionable frames on the market. Welcome to SPECTR. SD 30


EDITORIAL

LINDBERG »Nanok«

31


COLLECTION CHECK

ØRGREEN »1.16«

ØRGREEN’s design DNA revolves around smart shapes, advanced concepts, and premium materials. Now the evolution continues: Poised for an October 2017 launch, the brand’s Quantum collection presents a bold leap into the future, showcasing next-level technology and a new material with that special ØRGREEN twist. Cofounder Henrik Ørgreen, who started the label in 1997 with Tobias Wandrup and Gregers Fastrup, provides spectr with an exclusive look at the technically-driven line in this issue’s Tech Talk.

32

»1.12«


COLLECTION CHECK

Ø R GRE E N

QUANT UM

C O L LE CTION Danish Eyewear Brand Envisions the Future t e x t D IRK V OGE L, photos R A S M US D EN G S Ø , re touch RAP HAEL S CHMIT Z

At Danish eyewear brand ørgreen, the design team is not asking what the future of eyewear design is going to look like – they’re inventing it, one prototype at a time. The latest innovation will arrive in Fall 2017: The Quantum Collection – or “Q” in short – will launch at Silmo tradeshow in October with an initial offering of 20 to 24 models featuring radical innovations. “This collection is different from what we have done so far. It’s a new look, and a departure from designing only in titanium with a new material combined with beta titanium temples. The DNA is, as always, all about the quality and finish. But these are very technical frames,” said Henrik Ørgreen. The timing for launching a technology-driven collection is ideal. ørgreen is at the cusp of its 20th brand anniversary and ready to inno-

vate their way forward. “In this period of our company history we like cleanness, which is also a large part of Danish architecture and eyewear design,” said Henrik Ørgreen, while putting the quintessentially Danish approach into perspective. “The main difference between Danish and Japanese design is that in Japan, you come up with 20 great ideas and

»1.7«

they all go into one product. In Denmark, we also come up with 20 great ideas – but only one makes it into the product!” The Technology In the Quantum Collection, that single great idea is the hinge of the frame; or better yet, the entire principle of connecting the front of the frame to the temples. ørgreen co-founder Tobias Wandrup came up with the basic technical concept a few years ago. The goal was to create a fundamentally simple design that solves the problem of attaching the individual components of the frame without resorting to screws, wires, magnets, glues, and the like, while also keeping the number of individual parts at an absolute minimum. “We wanted to do it simple. But then again, simple is always harder,” said Henrik Ørgreen. As a solution, the team decided that the temples of the frames should do all the work in the Quantum Collection. The unique design consists of two components: The front end of the titanium temples includes an asymmetrical ball that fits right into the second part, a polyamide front with a channel on each side, precisely built to encompass the ball tip ever so snuggly. Once the ball is secured into the 8-10mm deep channel, a third element snaps everything tightly into a place: A so-called puzzle piece locks in the connection between 33


COLLECTION CHECK

temples and front end. “The puzzle piece is what brings the temple

working with titanium in all kinds of variations and techniques. We

into position. It fits in a way that you cannot even see it from the

really fell in love with it, but that also meant that the collections

outside.”

around different materials such as wood or acetate were left behind a little bit.” This will change, as the fronts of the Quantum Collection

Disclaimer: Not a Gimmick

frames are produced from a high-end member of the nylon family:

Make no mistake – although the hinge snaps into place during as-

polyamide. “Compared to acetate, polyamide offers several advan-

sembly without the use of screws and bolts, it should only be opened

tages. It’s very flexible, very light and strong, and it can be crafted

by trained opticians. “Once the puzzle piece clicks into place, it’s

very precisely.”

supposed to stay locked because it also holds the lens in place,” said

While the polyamide front is paired with two titanium hinges

Henrik Ørgreen, emphasizing that the Quantum Collection is not one

and nose pads crafted from silicone, the innovative aspect behind

of those fun “change your temple colors” kind of concepts.

the new material can hardly be overstated. “Polyamide is a step into the future. We have known and worked with polyamide for many

The Name

years in building prototypes. But it took until now to ensure the

Asked about the inspiration for the name, Henrik Ørgreen offered:

finish and quality are high enough for ørgreen to start using it in

“We chose ‘quantum’ because the principle is all about using the mi-

a collection. It leads the way on how to use tech materials in a nice

nimal amount of space. So Quantum represents minimal space. And

way,” said Henrik.

also the clean Danish design tradition.” How about the collection’s target group? “This one is appealing to a younger audience, in terms

Branding

of styles and colors,” said Henrik Ørgreen, “but the quality is in the

Despite all the innovation, one thing will stay the same: ørgreen

same high level that we are known for.“

has never been one for big logos, “and nobody buys our frames because they think our logo is cool.” Instead, the technology will

Models and Styles

be visible – the connection between ball-tip and frame front expo-

ørgreen likes to have fun when it

sed – and act as a form of recognizable

ØRGREEN

comes to putting a name to a frame, but this collection will take a more

»1.7«

technical route to fit the overall

branding. “You can see the titanium ball and the technique. So it’s visible technology, not visible branding.“

aesthetic. “The models will have physics-inspired names such as ‘Q1’

The Full Package

and ‘Q2’,” said Henrik Ørgreen

Rounding out the “quantum” leap into

while admitting that the names – at

the future, ørgreen also reengineered

the time of this writing – are “still

their packaging for the collection. All

under development, but we will

pairs will ship in hard boxes in dark

surely add some fun and sex appeal

grey with a soft rubber finish, plus a

to the names.” The shapes in the

neoprene sock on the inside in what

Quantum Collection also present

ørgreen calls “1970s roundness

a bit of a break from the norm: “In

meets with the iPhone.” What’s more,

titanium, it is more natural for models

the team in Copenhagen is already

to have a square shape. But since we

planning the next step, as 2018’s

are working with a new material here,

expansion of the Quantum Collection

get ready for more round shapes, soft

will introduce sunglasses with the new hinge concept as well as materializa-

shapes, and more panto shapes.“

»1.16«

tions such as acetate. “We have grown

Materials

up and changed a bit over the past 20

Speaking of “new material,” the

years,” said Henrik Ørgreen, hinting

Quantum Collection marks a leap

at the brand’s roots as action sports-

into unfamiliar territory for ørgreen.

inspired rule breakers. “When you look

“Over the last fourteen years or so,

at an ørgreen frame now, it’s really

we have really been specialized in

not that crazy. 34


COLLECTION SHOOT

BLACKFIN »O ys t e r B a y«

36


COLLECTION SHOOT

BLACKFIN »G ol d B e a ch«

BLACKFI N Hunting Grounds photos TANJ A T REMEL s t yli n g KAI KIL IAN h ai r & m ake - up CARS T EN RICHERT for MAC COSME TICS & AVE DA mod els P HARAH V ON L OET ZEN a t ICONIC MANAGE ME NT & BYRDI a t V IVA MODEL S MANAGEMENT loca tion BERL IN

The Venetia region in the South Eastern part of the Dolomite Mountains, Italy, can be reached fairly quickly from the Po plains. But it’s somewhat removed from all areas North of the Alps, which is why the small town of Agordo is a quiet community where things tend to happen at their own pace. Away from the hustle and bustle of big cities, the residents appear to take more time for the essential things in life. They appear more grounded in the present moment. Which also helps when it comes to detailed craftsmanship in processes like high-grade titanium eyewear manufacturing. Resident eyewear brand blackfin has been subscribing to the highest quality levels in blending hand-crafted excellence with state-ofthe-art technology under the maxim “neomadeinitaly.” And despite its remote location and strong Italian roots, blackfin keeps charming the global fashion literati with their sure hand for shapes and color palettes that are on-trend and on-style around the world. The shining star of the new collection is the »Slot« – with its golden lenses also available as a special edition model designed in cooperation with Blue Marlin on Ibiza. For all the other cutting-edge styles in the new blackfin offering, have a look at this photo shoot created by Tanja Tremel in Berlin, where the Venetia-based brand is also becoming the talk of the town with its cutting edge designs.

37


COLLECTION SHOOT

BLACKFIN »Slot – Ne w L imit ed E d ition« p ants BRACHMANN jacke t L EV I’ S

»Slot – B lue Marli n Sp e c i al E d ition«

38


COLLECTION SHOOT

BLACKFIN »Mar tini q ue«

ja c ke t T I G ER O F S W E DEN

39


COLLECTION SHOOT

40


COLLECTION SHOOT

BLACKFIN »S aint Mar tin«

sh ir t C OS p a nt s T IGE R OF S W E D E N 41


COLLECTION SHOOT

BLACKFIN »Palm B e a ch« ja c ke t D I M I T R I

42


Flagship Store ︳ Münzstraße 5 ︳ 10178 Berlin ︳ www.ic-berlin.de


J . F. R E Y » J F 142 7«

su it H UG O B O S S shoe s M A N O L O B L A NIK

T P J . F. R E Y » J F 142 9 «

s ui t BROOKS BROTHE RS shoe s PRADA

44


BY ANGELIKA BUETTNER a ss i s t a nt M IROSLAV PAT US H EV s t yli n g ROD N OV O A a t C R EAT I V E S PA C E A RT I S T S h a ir D AM IAN M ONZI L L O m a ke - up E M I K OI Z UM I a t C R EAT I V E S PA C E A RT I ST S mo d el s K RIST IN A a t M A R I LY N -A G EN C Y N Y & R A QU EL L IMA a t ONE MANAGEMENT NY pos t p ro d uc t ion S T EP H A N I E W E N C E K lo ca t ion N E W YOR K

R

ES A S S I

N

45

G


ØRGREEN »R ain«

jacke t SAINT LAURE NT p ants HUGO BOSS s hee r top ASOS shoe s PRADA choke r SAINT LAURE NT

46


ØRGREEN »Snow«

ja c ke t C H A N E L , s hi r t CHANEL , ne ck c uff MART IN MARGIEL A

47


MAKELLOS »F re d d y Q «

jacke t RAG & BONE

48


MAKELLOS » Pe t e r F «

suit MAX MARA s he e r top A S O S

49


SILHOUETTE »2 9 0 9 «

shi r t & h a t J EAN PAU L GAU T IER

50


SILHOUETTE »15 8 0 «

s ui t PAU L S MIT H

51


MODO »70 07«

re d sh ir t B A R N E Y S , red tie PAT RICIA F IEL DS , red le a the r s ki r t J CREW

52


MODO »70 07«

bl a c k sh ir t KARL L AGERF EL D, tie HU GO BOS S , bl ack s ki r t HEL MU T L ANG

53


COLIBRIS »St ine«

re d Jacke t HU GO BOS S , p ants ADIDAS

»Jona«

bl a c k jacke t DIOR, red p ant HEL MU T L ANG 54


T E C H TA L K

M A K E LLOS B A C KF LIP From Japan to Germany »ME 2000«

photos RAPAHEL S CHMIT Z

Established in 2011, quality eyewear label MAKELLOS has made a name for itself with upscale frame designs, manufactured in Germany and Japan according to the highest standards. Now MAKELLOS is raising the bar in eyewear design with a radically new concept: Their Backflip technology inverts the classic structure of lens bevels – turning the edge of the lenses inside out – and has hit retail in a titanium prescription frames collection. Company founder Thomas Akiyama tells the story behind Backflip in this issue’s Tech Talk.

MAKELLOS »ME 2003«

56


T E C H TA L K

Traditionally, eyewear designers have attached the lens bevels behind the front of the frame. It’s been done this way for decades. But why bow to tradition? Why not use the bevels as visible design elements instead of concealing them? In 2016, these questions were on the mind of Thomas Akiyama, founder of eyewear label makellos and a true hybrid of two cultures with a German mother and a Japanese father. Looking for alternatives to the old way of mounting lenses, the designer felt inspired by the words of French poet Antoine de SaintExupéry: “Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” In search of a highly reductionist approach, Thomas Akiyama drew on the Japanese part of his heritage: “The essence of a Japanese-inspired eyewear frame is a search for harmony and beauty. It’s marked by reduction, clarity, and balance. There is a lack of excessive decorations, the focus remains on essentials. The principle of Japanese understatement follows, much like the Scandinavian approach, the magic of reduction. It’s a design with enormous impact and long staying power.” Reduced to the maximum, Backflip literally turns the established order upside down. On Backflip frames, the lens bevels are visible on the exterior, thereby transforming the front of the frame into a background element. Last year, makellos released the first frames featuring the inverted principle with the highly limited »ZERO« aviator shades. The new design drew on classic inspirations, namely Japanese air force pilot shades as well as curvatures of Mitsubishi A6M1 airplanes from the 1930s. From a technical perspective, implementing a “flip” on lens attachment posed some challenges. “We needed to reevaluate conventional manufacturing processes. And create a new, intelligent design without affecting the balance of the frames,” said Thomas Akiyama. What ultimately led to the breakthrough was the other half of Akiyama’s heritage: German design thinking. “Despite the enormous technical challenges, it was less about realizing technical innovations than creating a new design approach – which is indeed rather German.” With technical design sketches supplied by Munich-based designer Richard Rembs, the technology behind the Backflip collection is now mature enough to enter into serial production. In April 2017, the first collection of Backflip titanium frames hit retail. Developed in Germany, they are “manufactured according to Japanese cultural and craftsmanship tradition in Sabae,” said Thomas Akiyama about his collection that delivers the best of both worlds.

57

Inside out: The lens bezels protrude visibly on the front as a design feature.


D E S I G N TA L K

YO H JI YA M AMOT O The Philosophy of a Living Fashion Design Legend por t ra it s S T EFA N D O N G US , re touch S T EP HANIE W ENCEK, s tills VALT IN & CAL IS T I

Fashion has always had a fundamental influence on eyewear design. Actually, both aspects evolved side by side: as glasses advanced from basic visual aids to fashion accessories and statement pieces, the sheer diversity of designs in the optical market mirrored the explosive growth of choices in designer clothes. The pollination was intense – countless eyewear labels drew inspiration from designer fashions. Some outstanding designers even achieved the rare feat of setting trends in both worlds, eyewear and apparel. Japanese label YOHJI YAMAMOTO counts among the trailblazers of brands with a solid footing in eyewear and apparel. Only few brands can boast the type of influence and thought leadership as the label headed by designer Yohji Yamamoto, one of the true living rock stars of fashion design. At age 73, Yamamoto-san exudes a charismatic presence and remains as trend-savvy as ever, mostly due to the fact that he has consistently looked inwards and followed his own fashion aesthetic over the past decades. The cuts and silhouettes of yohji yamamoto apparel follow a clear philosophy and universal principles. The resulting products are unique, featuring timeless contours and colors – with black as a strong favorite – paired with Japan’s affection for wider cuts, upscale materials and elaborate craftsmanship. The designer approaches eyewear with the same eye for details and materials, based on similar principles. One of them reads: “Deconstruction of the essential and reconstruction of the beauty”. In the bigger picture, color and material choices also resonate with current yohji yamamoto apparel collections to bring the brand offering of

the legendary designer’s eponymous label full circle. SPECTR joins up with Yamamoto-san for a Design Talk after his latest fashion show in Paris. While patiently fielding our questions and posing for hundreds of photos, Yamamoto-san offers a glimpse into the mind of a truly unique thinker and designer. We are instantly reminded that we are in the presence of a beautiful mind with its own creative approach, a blend of creativity and spirituality, also reflected in the man’s calm, yet charismatic presence. And we also sense that, on the inside, the designer behind the world-famous brand draws on unchanging values while pursuing higher goals. Welcome to a unique interview. 58


D E S I G N TA L K

59


D E S I G N TA L K

Yamamoto-san, first of all thank you very much for taking the time for

formula of good taste and good design?

SPECTR during your busy fashion week schedule.

I always make clothes from the back, not from the front. And I’m

You have stated before that you don’t consider yourself a fashion designer,

not interested in pre-established harmonies derived by a formula.

but a tailor. Would you please elaborate on your connection to the art of

What I think of as beautiful is always something unexpected. As

tailoring?

for making clothes, I like it when there’s air between the body and

I consider myself as a tailor because I want to make clothes that

the fabric. We call it “Ma”– an aesthetic that uniquely exists in

allow people to live and grow old in them. I think “commitment to

Japan. These principles are clearly visible in your fashion designs. Your looks

someone’s life” underlies the art of tailoring. Based on this, what are the main sources of inspiration for you? How do

are also defined by a very restricted color palette. Does that also apply to

they leave a mark with your creations?

your eyewear collection?

Women. They teach me the beauty of trace, someone who passes

The eyewear collection’s palette has been developed exclusively

by and a person who disappears.

and reflects the clothing: dark, somber shades that look black at

Your design philosophy in a word.

first glance, but with further examination reveal multiple layers of

Imperfection.

dark hues that together create a richness in color that black alone

And what is at the core of aesthetics for you?

cannot supply. Why do you like Black that much?

Never-ending dissatisfaction. Fashion is often seen as an expression of individuality and a personal

Black is modest and arrogant at the same time. Black is lazy and

thing. Are there universal principles at work? Is there such a thing as a

easy – but mysterious. Black can swallow light, or make black say

Y O H J I YA M A M O T O »YY3013«

YY3013 Sometimes the sunglass collection is the greatest source of inspiration for the optical range. »YY3013« is the sister version for sun «YY7010«. The frame has been so successful – it was also personally chosen by Yamamotosan to be featured in his SS17 show – it was a nod to the Master to develop it also for the optical range.

YY3014 The Titanium »YY3014« is minimalism

»YY3014«

in its purest form. It exudes femininity. Its delicate curvature around the bridge and linear titanium form along the brow line add mystery and sensual volume. yohji yamamoto’s visual aesthetic often says the most when saying nothing at all.

60


D E S I G N TA L K

Yohji up close in the SPECTR interview shoot. 61


D E S I G N TA L K

62


D E S I G N TA L K

this: I don’t bother you, so don’t bother me!

My favorite styles in the optical collection are »YY1032« for its

What are your favorite materials in fashion?

silhouette and »YY3014« for its feminine simplicity. The former

Fabric is everything. Often I tell my pattern makers, “Just listen to

interweaves curves with perfectly straight lines creating juxtaposi-

the material. What is it going to say? Just wait. Probably the material

tions of round eye shapes with flat brow lines, while the titanium

will teach you something, so you have to study waiting, how to

form of the latter is mysterious. For the sunglasses, the mask-like

wait, how to listen.”

»YY7013« is my favorite model. Its one-piece lens has the form of

And how do you apply that in eyewear?

an acetate silhouette, while the rounded metal frame sits proudly

In the latest sunglasses collection, we have experimented with

on it for a frame-through-a-frame effect.

fabric-like textures on acetate and created »YY5019«. Here, layers

Which elements are common to your ready-to-wear and eyewear collec-

are cut away from the frame leaving a textured surface reminiscent

tions?

of the iconic Japanese fabric.

One of the most distinctive elements of my garments is that there

What is your design philosophy behind the eyewear collection?

is no difference between men and women, and the same applies to

Starting from what people call “Dramatic, Avant-garde and/or

the eyewear range.

Intelligent”, the eyewear collection is not inspired by the comings and goings of fashion, but by the lines that recall the essence of

Why? We are different in body but sense, spirit and soul are the same. Words to live by. Mr. Yamamoto, thank you very much for the inspiring

Japanese drawing techniques. Talking about the collection, what are your favorite eyewear styles?

insights.

Y O H J I YA M A M O T O »YY5019«

YY5019 The »YY5019« is an ode to fluidity. Akin to the flowing lines of an elegant kimono, layers are cut away from the frame leaving a textured surface reminiscent of fabric enveloping its surface. Every single fiber in rich, mysterious base tones of matte black, brown and navy at one with matte finished lenses.

YY7013 This style is all about illusion. The one-piece mask-like lens adopts the form of an acetate silhouette while the rounded metal frame sits proud of the

»YY7013«

lens, conveying a feeling that has somehow emerged from within. Temples extrude from the front pushing a frame through a frame. 63


D E S I G N TA L K

YY1032

Y O H J I YA M A M O T O

This model interweaves curves with perfectly straight lines. Juxtapositions

»YY1032«

of round eye shapes with flat brow lines show Yohji at his deftest – a delicate layer of laminated acetate bleeding into the lens form and a low incision slices across the bridge. This is Yohji at his most avant-garde.

»YY5018«

YY5018 Oversized and elegant in shape is »YY5018«. Subtle almost invisible laminations evoke mystery and otherworldliness. Here, lace is interwoven with blacks and golds resulting in a print that mimics the exceptional handmade Japanese fabrics. 64


EDITOR’S CHOICE

A N DY W H I TE

W O LF HEAT

Unique Nose Bridge as a Design Highlight

»St e in«

photo RAP HAE L S C HM I T Z White Heat is the name of a new purist design concept created by

models joining the collection reinstate the nose bridge’s supremacy in

andy wolf around a radical premise: The acetate nose bridge is not

a number of different shapes, including oversized aviators, progressive

only a characteristic design element of the frames, but the main star,

cat eyes, and a full range of proven classics with their signature avant-

breathing a unique sense of soul into andy wolf glasses. The new

garde look. The colors of the acetate nose bridges are traditionally

»St e in«

66


EDITOR’S CHOICE

»R oss«

chosen in synch with the tones of andy wolf’s metal frames, which

the style of the Austria-based label, an effortless blend of bold sophis-

tend to reside on the understated side of the spectrum, for instance a

tication and utmost wearability. Their aesthetic is bound to turn heads,

cool copper tone. At first sight, the new White Heat models instantly

while also remaining understated enough for everyday usage. The best

bring home the fact that andy wolf is making a strong statement,

of both worlds and a bold step forward, please welcome the recipient of

elevating the brand’s design heritage. The new models create, true to

our Editor’s Choice of Issue 21.

»S e r ra«

67


THEME SHOOT

B ER L IN

IT !

Internationally renowned brands such as mykita and ic! berlin have established Berlin as a global hotbed for trend-setting eyewear design. The German capital is also home to small but mighty brands with their own unique perspectives. Here’s a selection of

Fresh Goods from the

styles that make a great impression in all of Berlin’s boroughs – and beyond – in our label roundup.

German Capital

OWL »E ins« Quality and a moderate price point are important to OWL-founder David Kamp. His hand-crafted matted acetate frames speak a reduced, clear form language built on slim lines and minimalistic contours – free of elitist attitudes. The »Eins« is putting the “sexy” in unisex in a geometric and style-conscious shape.

R . T. C O »C or vo« Former skateboarder Tobias Bergmann has been offering frame designs cut from acetate blocks and fitted with Carl Zeiss lenses since 2006. The »Corvo« is a case study in essentials. R.T.CO goes back to classic, slim frame shapes for an elegant aesthetic.

IC! BERLIN »Sup re m a c y« Founded in 1996, ic! berlin’s design DNA is based on proprietary technology: The company’s patented interlocking hinge system as been heralded as a game changer, connecting the frame and temples via a detachable clip. The »Supremacy« model is equally feather light as it is unconventional, flexible, high-quality and ready for everyday wear.

69


THEME SHOOT

LUNETTES KOLLEKTION »Here we Come«

Founded by designer Uta Geyer, the label is located on Torstrasse in the city’s vibrant Mitte district. After starting out with a store for vintage eyewear in 2006, Uta quickly earned the respect of her international peers. She now also designs her own models like the extravagant and urban »Here we Come« which is much like wearing a piece of art.

KUBORAUM »Ma ske N3« The label founded by Livio Graziottin and Sergio Eusebi is having a moment in the international eyewear scene, also thanks to their flame-melted acetate. The two Italian expats also take pride in manufacturing the heaviest frames available right now. These may require the wearer to invest some boldness, but in the end rewards them with a boost in appearance, much like the model »Maske N3«.

M Y K I TA »St u d io 4.3« Bridging the gap between trendy hipness and elegant timeless nature, the stainless steel, acetate and Mylon frames are being sold at 13 independent mykita stores and distributed to more than 80 countries. Inspired by the idea of “colorblocking”, the different modules of a frame were elaborately painted in three colors from both inside and outside on the »Studio 4.3«.

70


FA F

L S

E

RIEND

B Y S T E FA N K A P F E R p ro d uc t ion & re touch H 6 0 O F F I C E. C O M d i git a l a ss i s t a nt C AR L O S K R UG s t ylin g J ILL K RAM E R a t 2 1 A G EN C Y m a ke -up J U LIA K RÄMER a t 2 1 A G EN C Y mo d el s C HRIST IN A K . a t M O D E LW ER K , C H R I S a t P MA & IS AAC a t V IVAMODEL S lo ca tion D U SSE L D OR F

MODO »684«

t ur tle n e c k S U IT S U PP LY, sh ir t B O S S

»685«

t ur tle n e c k AS OS 72

S


73


GÖTTI » Pe r s p e c t i v e i n G o l d « s hi r t S U IT S U P P LY

74


GÖTTI »Gilber t Moss«

75


KBL »A u d re y «

s hi r t HU GO BOS S , p ants ACNE

76


KBL »W i l d E y e s «

sh i r t HU GO BOS S , p ants COS , belt AS OS

77


MARTIN & MARTIN »David«

shir t HU BO BOSS, p ant s C O S

78


MARTIN & MARTIN »Leo«

s hi r t S U IT S U P P LY

79


COBLENS »A u t o p i lo t «

t ur tle ne ck T OMMY HIL FIGE R

80


ADRIAN MARWITZ »Universu s No. 5«

s hi r t AMERICAN AP PAREL , jacke t COS

81


GLCO » Pe m m a r w i t h C l i p «

jacke t COS , s hi r ts COS & AME RICAN APPARE L

82


GLCO »V i s t a «

sh ir t C O S , d re ss S . O L I V ER 83


HOF FM A NN N AT UR A L E Y E W E A R » 316 H 10 «

co r s a g e A L E X A N D R A F U N K S

t ur tleneck COS jacket TOMMY HILFIGER

84


COLLECTION CHECK

R OLF E XCELLENCE Elite, Carlo & Somerset – R O L F S P E C TA C L E S »C arlo«

New Self-Confident Masterpieces photos RAPHAE L SCHMITZ

86


COLLECTION CHECK

rolf spectacles has been driven by innovation

from day one. The Tyrol-based label achieves the rare feat of bridging the gap between traditional, high-grade craftsmanship and progressive fashion attitude. All while making a strong statement with major self-confidence. Over the past few years, rolf spectacles has made a name for itself with a

R O L F S P E C TA C L E S »Elit e«

constant output of innovative materials and unique technologies, especially when it comes to implementing wood into eyewear frames. The resulting frames are case studies in unique refinement, always with that special rolf touch. For inspiration, the Austrian designers like to draw on the bounties of nature right on their doorstep in the scenic town of Lech. Mindfulness and reduction to essentials are some of the major ingredients in rolf’s design DNA, always blended with a sense of style that works in an urban environment. Bringing the local inspiration full circle, the frames are hand-crafted in a nearby eyewear workshop. For their latest offering, rolf spectacles releases the Excellence Collection, consisting of the models »Elite«, »Carlo« and »Somerset«. With a unique blend of aesthetics and avant-garde styling, the frames introduce precious woods in novel com-

87


COLLECTION CHECK

R O L F S P E C TA C L E S »Som e r s e t«

binations, for instance a blend of eucalyptus with maple or oak. All

most striking model of the new collection is the »Elite«, which draws

of these ingredients receive elaborate finishes before assembly; the

on inspirations from the last century and brings them into the present

eucalyptus veneer passes through a fumigator, lending the surface an

with circular lenses encompassed by a bold frame with delicate details.

expressive color while significantly expanding its lifespan as a shield

Not for the faint of heart, but nevertheless excellent. The »Carlo« and

against signs of aging. The oak veneer receives a steam finish, thereby

»Somerset« models also make strong statements, oozing with self con-

creating an upscale, silver-like sheen.

fidence. Taking wooden eyewear frames to new heights, these three new models continue the rolf spectacles tradition for innovation

Featuring excellent designs and materials true to its name, the Excellence Collection also adds delicate line engravings to the mix. The

88

blended with natural inspirations and a sense of refinement.


COLLECTION SHOOT

S A LT. »F ran«

outfi t P HILLIP LIM A sophisticated woman’s acetate style in flattering, soft upswept lens shape.

90


COLLECTION SHOOT

S A LT. FA L L- W INT ER Reduction and Sophistication photos S T E FA N D O N G US conce pt C A R O R O S S s t yl in g A R K A D I US G I E S E K a t 2 1 AGENCY h a ir & m a ke -up E VA -M A R I A P IL ART Z a t 2 1 AGENCY mod el s L A R A & VA L E R I E a t ICE MODEL S loca t ion C Y B ER S PA C E , C O LOGNE

The latest Fall-Winter 2017 by salt. features hybrids and mixes in color, materials and styles. The California label implements gradient acetate patterns in dark and light shades inspired by the transition from summer to autumn. Marble patterns offer renewed focus on an organic, earthy aesthetic and give depth to the collection’s traditional Tortoise patterns. The ultra lightweight titanium frames include classic aviators modified in streamlined unisex teardrop shapes, stylish circular silhouettes and versatile square designs that are minimalism at its best. salt. once again delivers a full package with modern materials and high-grade finishes. With a strong connection to nature and the brand’s signature design DNA inspired by minimalism, the new collection also checks all the boxes for what’s currently trending in fashion. For a closer look at this textbook blend of reduction and sophistication, here’s our Collection Shoot with designer David Rose.

91

2 017


COLLECTION SHOOT

S A LT. »Mar t y«

outf it D OROT HE E S C H UM A C H E R top A E N C E A modern, slightly oversized optical frame designed for a more sophisticated look.

92


COLLECTION SHOOT

S A LT. »F ufkin«

jacke t P ORS CH E DE SIGN blou s e DES IGNE RS RE MIX dre ss W EEKDAY s hoe s T RIP P EN

Stylish unisex sunglasses model with a delicate, rounded aviator shape crafted from Japanese titanium and beta titanium.

93


COLLECTION SHOOT

S A LT. »He ss e m an«

coa t A N T O NEL L I F IRENZE pu l lov e r COU RRÈGES p a nt s D E S IGNERS REMIX b a g ZI G N Essential masculine style for everyday wear: Crafted from titanium and beta titanium, this angled adaptation of the classic aviator scores high on style.

94


COLLECTION SHOOT

S A LT. »St . Hu bbins«

top, p a nt s & b a g D E S I G N E R S R E M I X pullo v e r whi t e D O R O T H EE S C H UM A C H ER pullo v e r bl a c k L O V E S T O R I E S 1980’s inspired, round lens shape crafted of the finest acetate and refined by contrast platting and beta-titanium temples.

S A LT. »Dibe rgi«

ca p e DOROT HEE S CHUMACHE R Vintage-inspired sunglasses with a unique combination of acetate and beta-titanium temples and titanium bridge details.

95


COLLECTION SHOOT

S A LT. »B obbi«

outfi t P HIL L IP LIM Retro-inspired, feminine sunglasses in glamorous cat-eye shape with bold styling.

96


NEW TECH

PO W DE R &

H E AT

Next Generation 3D Printing: Colors / Textures / Finishings

POWDER & HEAT counts among the trailblazers when it comes to innovation in 3D-printed eyewear. And they have just achieved a major breakthrough: Until now, 3D-printed frames tended to be limited to reduced designs, single colors and matted surfaces. This will change, as the label created by Georg Vollmer and Manuel Breit pushes the boundaries with a new proprietary process. photo RAP HAEL SCHMITZ Out of all industries, the eyewear business has whole-heartedly adopted 3D-printing technology, and 3D-printed frames have become a staple at optical stores. The technology provides considerable advantages: Personalization and customization, but also expanded

P OW DE R & HE AT

options in terms of unique shapes; not to

»309 T he W r it e r«

mention cost-savings and a 30% smaller resources footprint than acetate. As a young company based in Erding near Munich, powder & heat combines extensive knowledge in the realm of design with 3D-printing and software know-how. And this unique mix is what now allows the award-winning brand to expand the possibilities of 3D-printing. The label’s luxury nylon frames are

»306 T he Voya ge r«

now also available with multi-colored textures, luminous colors and high-grade finishes in an unprecedented overall package. The new process also expands options for customizing frames to individual wearers: With 24 models in 18 sizes as well as nine color combinations and twelve texture options, powder & heat is offering a wealth of choices to

fashion-conscious customers. Helping opticians who are unfamiliar with the technology adopt the process swiftly, the

»307 T he G e niu s«

label is offering an easy-to-use software interface. Overall, it’s a quantum leap for boosting the stylistic qualities of 3Dprinting technology and bringing it to broad audiences. 98


@myjfrey

J.F.REY TITANIUM COLLECTION

SILMO PARIS 6-9 OCTOBRE 2017 STAND K107 HALL5


COLLECTION SHOOT

L INDBERG SIR IUS

T ITANIUM

Permanent Ice Meets Modern Urbanity photos S T EFAN DONGU S conce pt & a ss i s t ance CARO ROSS s t yli n g ARKADIU S GIES EK a t 2 1AGE NCY h ai r & m ake - up EVA- MARIA P ILARTZ a t 21AGE NCY mod els L ARA & VAL ERIE a t ICE MODE LS & L U K a t MODELW ERK loca tion COL OGNE 100


COLLECTION SHOOT

LINDBERG »Nalu«

pullov e r BAL ANCIAGA

The new lindberg Sirius Titanium Collection owes its name to a Danish Navy unit: The Sirius Patrol not only has a cool name, but also is tasked with conducting reconnaissance at the borders of Greenland in extremely cold weather conditions. That’s why the Sirius Titanium Collection was developed with a curved design to protect these elite troopers from blinding sunlight reflected in the snow. For added protection, lindberg also offers optional acetate rims with side shields. The exchangeable frame system offers a real innovative step as it lets users configure their glasses to perfectly fit their faces and visual needs. The system is especially tailored towards wearers with prescriptions by allowing the lenses to be switched in the blink of an eye without additional tools. Whether it’s working on a computer, driving or actively enjoying life hiking, skiing, golfing or sailing – the patent-pending system accommodates lenses for all use cases. Each frame is accompanied by a hard-shelled case for traveling, and a soft 4-pocket wallet for carrying your cleaning pouch and two pairs of extra lenses. As always, the frames are entirely screw-less, using the patented lindberg hinge design. And don’t be fooled – our photo shoot for the Sirius Titanium Collection did not take place in the barren plains of Greenland, but at a snow-white photo studio. Our version of the Sirius Patrol also deviated from the standard-issue Danish Navy uniforms in favor of fashion-forward black garments, and also featured women. But then again, these glasses are not just for braving the ice cold winter landscapes, but also for bringing some heat to the city. 101


COLLECTION SHOOT

LINDBERG »Nanok«

pullo v e r AN N I C ARL S S O N top LOV E ST ORIE S p a nts D E S IGN E RS RE M I X

102


COLLECTION SHOOT

LINDBERG »Nanok« & »Tajak«

s hi r t RICHARD BEIL p ants J ACOB COHEN v e s t ANT ONEL L I F IRENZE

LINDBERG »Nalu«

jacke t JOSE PH sh ir t RICHARD BE IL p ants JACOB COHE N shoe s DR. MARTE NS socks FALKE 103


COLLECTION SHOOT

LINDBERG »Nanok«

jacke t MARCIANO pullov e r J OS EP H

LINDBERG »Tajak« & »Nalu«

dre ss ADIDAS EQT jacke t HOU S E OF DAGMAR jacke t PAIGE pullov e r J OS EP H p ants PAT RIZIA P EP E MAN 104


COLLECTION SHOOT

LINDBERG »Tajak«

su it A N T O N EL L I F I R EN Z E d re ss D O R O T H E E S C H UMACHER

105


COLLECTION SHOOT

LINDBERG »Tajak«

dre ss HOU S E OF DAGMAR

106


H

I

GH

TID

E

BY VERENA KNEMEYER s t ylin g T IN I RAT HE a t L I G A N O R D h a ir & m a ke - up C L A UD I A P L AT H a t L I G A N O R D mo d el s L U K JON AS S C H WA L B a t M O D E LW ER K & L AU RA S T OL L a t P L ACE MODEL S lo ca tion S C HL E SWIG -H O L S T EI N 108


A L LIED ME TA L WORK S »B 040«

p ants KINGS OF INDIGO, belt L EV I’ S , d e nim sh ir t DIE SE L, jacke t S EL ECT ED HOMME, bl a z e r ASOS

»A 0 01«

p ants PAT RICIA P EP E, t ur tle ne ck RICH & ROYAL, bombe r jacke t IVI, f ur jacke t KAP ORAL , hip ba g J U S T FAB, be anie LE VI’S

109


I-SPA X » B e r n i e 125 W«

p a nt s N . A , sh ir t AS KET, hood ie jacke t HYP E, coa t W EMOT O 110


I-SPA X » B l a i r 155 «

hood ie & c u lot t e s YF L RES ERV ED, coa t CINQU E, b racele t J U S T FAB 111


CAZAL » 8 037«

p a nt s W EEK D AY, sh ir t O NLY & S ONS , jacke t S ‘ OL L IV ER, q u il t e d ja c ke t N O I S Y M AY, sca r f CHEAP MONDAY, s hoe s DR. MART ENS

»886«

p a nt s D IE S EL , v el v e t sh ir t V I L A , blou s e GINA T RICOT, bombe r jacke t CHEAP MONDAY

112


113


FACE À FACE » S t i j l 2«

skir t AN N I C ARLS O N , coa t PA UL & J O

114


FACE À FACE » O w e n s 1«

s ui t T IGER OF S W EDEN, s hi r t & pullov e r DIE SE L, backp ack KONTO

115


KARMOIE »To t e m « -

s w e a t p a nt s W EM O T O , sh ir t & b ow t ie S ’ OL L IV ER, coa t W EEKDAY, ca p NEW ERA s ki r t T RAF F IC P EO P L E , hood ie V E R O M O D A , s w e a t e r DICKIES , coa t EL EMENT E CL EMENT E

116


117


MARKUS T » S U N T i t a n T 26 4 6 «

ja c ke t & sh ir t PAT RIZIA P EP E, bl a z e r V ERO MODA, ca p NEW ERA

118


ANNIVERSARY

SUZY GLAM Dutch Brand Celebrates 5-Year Anniversary

Five years of keeping it glamorous in the eyewear business have flown by and much has happened since Dutch brand SUZY GLAM made its debut at Silmo tradeshow in Paris. With their three-dimensional designs, love for great fits and carefully chosen color palettes, the Amsterdam-based company has dazzled audiences – including us. We here at spectr have kept a close eye on the evolution of the label that is now a fixture among independent brands. Now that the five-year anniversary is upon us, the brand is releasing a limited edition frame while expanding its horizons to olfactory designs with their own SUZY GLAM store scent. We took the chance to reflect with company founders Susanne Klemm and Etienne Frederiks on the past, present, and future of SUZY GLAM. A five year retrospective in five chapters.

s tills RAP HAEL S CHMIT Z

I – The design philosophy When Susanne and Etienne joined forces in 2012 to launch their own brand, the move had been a long time coming. Having worked for more than 20 years in several positions in the eyewear industry, the two were ready to make a contribution and put Susanne’s unique design skills to work. Plus, their inside knowledge and familiarity with the business helped them identify something that was missing among the building trend for vintage-inspired eyewear. Creating their own approach, the two agreed on defining their own design DNA and build suzy glam from the ground up. Susanne: „We wanted to create eyewear designs from scratch. Our goal were sculptured glasses that look good on a face – bold and elegant at the same time and with a perfect fit.” Right from the start, this technique led to the three-dimensional, shape-oriented form language that would become the label’s unique calling card. “I work with every frame almost directly in the material, like a sculptor. This makes all our frames look good from every angle. The temple fitting to the front is not just a technical solution, but an important part of the total design. Every frame is recognizable as a suzy glam frame.“ II – The first show Time to find out if eyewear audiences would appreciate the “glam” vision. The two packed up six styles – their first collection – and headed for Silmo 2013 in Paris. Although, in retrospect, Susanne and Etienne admitted not having big expectations, but neither did they feel any pressure. Etienne: „We just wanted to do the show because we thought we could do this well. And if no-one would have liked it, we would have gone doing something else. But the reactions were far better then we expected and on the third day we were already out of order sheets.“ 120


ANNIVERSARY

suzy glam is banking on sustainability

and consitency in its marketing as well: The current campaign was captured – like all previous ones – by Aisha Zeijpveld. The artist residing in Amsterdam has had a defining influence on the visual presentation of suzy glam.

III – A different approach the next step was creating a business plan. Again, the two founders

Photography: Aisha Zeijpveld /styling: Lise de Natris

Photography: Aisha Zeijpveld /styling: Lise de Natris

Buoyed by the positive response to the design aspect of the brand, decided to organize their business the same way Susanne designs her frames; from scratch. As a result, the two maintained direct contact with their clients instead of working with sales reps – a bold move for a young brand that still had lots of doors to open. Keeping core business aspects minimal, suzy glam set off without a dedicated marketing department, working with substantial and highly targeted editorials instead while letting the photographers shooting their campaigns proceed with full creative freedom. Susanne: „This emphasis on design and aesthetic also meant liberation from conventional order cycles and the pressure for announcing novelty at regular intervals. We present new styles only when it’s interesting. After working half a year to get the perfect round shape, it doesn’t make sense to create a new round one for commercial reasons – only because people want something ‘new’.

Photography: Aisha Zeijpveld /styling: Lise de Natris

Photography: Aisha Zeijpveld /styling: Lise de Natris

Eyewear fashion doesn’t change that rapidly.“ IV – Sustainable glamour The eyewear- and fashion-business is currently marked by the fact that those constant product releases and ordering cycles tend to flood the market with far too much product, which also impacts the environment. suzy glam arrived at this realization quite early on. Etienne: „This approach of coming out slowly with new styles also has an effect on sustainability. We rather make something that lasts long. And it makes sense to keep good models in the collection. In fact, our first design is still one of the bestsellers today.“ As a direct commitment to sustainability, suzy glam uses biodegradable acetate whenever available while working closely with manufacturers that share a mutual interest in making fair products. Growing slowly 121


Photography: Aisha Zeijpveld /styling: Lise de Natris

ANNIVERSARY

but surely over the years, suzy glam now works with independent retailers in 19 countries worldwide, from Cape Town to Helsinki and from Tokyo to London – a testament to the power of building heat slowly instead of burning out in a flash. Susanne: „We want to have a solid firm, but certainly don’t want it to grow big. In fact, we try to do as much as possible ourselves. The whole company is still ran just by the two of us, and it would be

SUZY GLAM »C eleb ra t e s«

ideal if we can keep it that way. We like to build our own showroom, to explain our collection ourselves at the fairs and to think about new designs while having a coffee in our garden. It is fun to play with all these aspects whenever we like. It’s not only our company. It’s also our life and in this way we can be focussed on the quality and the relation to our clients and suppliers in the best way possible.“ V – suzy glam Celebrates Celebrating the fifth brand anniversary, suzy glam is releasing a new limited edition sunglasses model named Celebrates. Aside from these cheerful, asymmetric, heart-shaped sunnies, Susanne and Etienne also went from creating visionary designs to shaping their own olfactory experience. Their new unique store scent features traces of cucumber, vanilla and cedar wood to accompany the suzy glam experience. It’s the sweet smell of success, and Susanne and Etienne have literally had their hands in every step along the way. And they’re far from finished. 122

suzy glam Store Scent


C U R AT E D S H O P P I N G

"ahlem achieves a blend of minimalist and classic shapes in my personal collection favorite, crafted with lots of love for detail and a unique design signature."

AHLEM

Curated shopping at

»Pl a ce d e l a Ma d ele ine«

SP ECS

"This latest collaboration by

B ER L IN Julia Koester’s Four Favorites

TGC is a timeless companion thanks to its authentic shape. The »2078« is at the intersection of elegance and uniqueness in a limited edition."

THE GERMAN COLLECTIVE X CUTLER AND GROSS »2078«

photos ST E FAN D ON G US Consumers are faced with an overwhelming wealth of product information and ways to make purchases these

"mykita’s »Zima« model

days. To no surprise, curated shopping is an emerging

is a textbook example of

trend to help customers make informed decisions. Lea-

combining stainless steel with delicate acetate. The

ding the way, a number of optical boutiques are offering

loftiness and presence of

personalized shopping services, and the response has

this model represent my

been overwhelmingly positive. Because when it comes

hometown of choice –

to eyewear, finding the right pair of glasses not only

Berlin."

includes a number of complex technical factors, but also a variety of stylistic criteria that vary from shopper to shopper. In this issue, we visit specs berlin, where Julia Koester is sharing her current top four favorite models of

M Y K I TA »Z im a«

the season. The 28-year-old is currently enrolled in the optometry program in Berlin and about to finish her Masters degree. Julia has been working at specs berlin for the past four years now and lends her personal expertise not only to

"This model from the

fashion-savvy Berlin residents, but also a revolving door

sunday somewhere

collection pairs provo-

of tourists from around the world visiting the store in the

cative design with a

bustling Berlin-Mitte district. Speaking of “around the

feminine appearance. The

world,” Julia has broadened her horizons by spending her exchange semester at Garrett Leight California Optical in Los Angeles, where she also did two weeks of house-keeping for Mr. Garret Leight himself. With that said, here are Julia’s current favorites from the specs berlin line-up.

S U N D AY SOMEWHERE »Min g gu« 124

»Minggu« is actually my all-time favorite from the Australian label."


B Y S A C H A TA S S I L O H Ö C H S T E T T E R s t ylin g C AROL ROQU E T E h a ir & m a ke - up AN D R É M AT T O S mo d el s L IZ A S . & LAUR A P I G AT T O a t WAY M O D E L S BRAS IL lo ca tion S ÃO PAU LO

B

R A Z

I A N

I

L S

YO H J I YA M A M O T O »143/ 0 -14 0 4 0 0 « & » 5 4/ 2 0 -145 - 079 « 126


127


FLEYE »P r ince«

128


FLEYE »F o x «

129


SUZY GLAM » C e l e b ra t e s «

130


SUZY GLAM » S t r i k e s a Po s e «

131


MASUNAGA »W r i g t h S u n «

132


MASUNAGA »G. M. S 804 Sun«

133


BLACKFIN »Mar t inique«

134


BLACKFIN »Mar t inique«

135


ANDY WOLF »Cor tez«

136


C A M PA I G N I N S I G H T S

F LE YE

GOES

SM ØRREBRØD A Blend of Danish Flavors photos C O L UM B US L E T H

Danish eyewear label FLEYE is drawing inspiration from one of Denmark’s greatest national dishes: Smørrebrød. Although the connection between tasty morsels of sliced bread and eyewear design may appear a bit far-fetched at first sight, the parallels are actually quite striking. Smørrebrød consists of several layers of ingredients, piled high in a variety of colors. So it’s very much like in eyewear, as there’s flavor in carefully chosen combinations. FLEYE went all the way in designing a series of glasses – featuring a layered structure of differentcolored materials inspired by Smørrebrød – and even enlisted a prominent chef as well as a famous food photographer. For this issue’s Campaign Insight, we spoke to FLEYE founder and designer Annette Saust Estø about the tasty collaboration. 138


C A M PA I G N I N S I G H T S

Annette, looking at the new collection we get the impression that fleye is becoming more fashionable. True or false? True. Your new campaign is based on a typical Danish heritage icon: Smørrebrød. How come? We were looking for inspiration from a local perspective and wanted to make a strong connection to Danish culture. Smørrebrød is an important part of Danish heritage and reflects the Danish state of

It starts with a smørrebrød creation by food stylist Rasmus Kjær.

mind when it comes to art, design and lifestyle. We actually wonder why nobody used it before (laughs). Maybe no one feels as committed to smørrebrød as you do. Why do you like it so much? Smørrebrød reflects the Nordic way of thinking of food in a visual way. In fact, it has become a lifestyle phenomenon, and a playground for chefs to try out different but powerful colors, textures, and flavor combinations. So let us ask, what does your new collection have in common with smørrebrød? Smørrebrød and fleye eyewear share a layered approach to construction. They are built in a similar way, with a variety of colors

Vividly colored foods form a basis for the color palette.

and textures placed on top of each other. And how does that affect the new collection? Focusing on smørrebrød as our inspiration allows us to play with these layers, mixing solid and transparent acetate and creating delicate color combinations. Smørrebrød also offers a lot of graphical elements we were referencing in order to create new shapes that are modern and sophisticated. Is sophistication also the overall idea behind this new collection? Our intention was to create small art pieces inspired by these traditional open-faced sandwiches – some obvious in their inspiration and others much more abstract. We wanted to create a collection that stands out, with roots in our heritage but also injected with young fashion.

Sandwiches made from acetate sheets – not fit for human consumption.

Your brand name stands for “Fine Looking Eye,” but the campaign images sure feature some fine-looking smørrebrød. Who prepared these tasty creations? Actually, we have asked Danish Smørrebrød champion and food stylist Rasmus Kjær to work with us and he said “yes”. We are very excited about working with him, since Rasmus has earned quite a number of awards throughout his career and is regarded an expert on Danish Smørrebrød. How many pieces did he create for fleye? He created four different pieces of smørrebrød, two for every season. Seeing it all together, the parallels between the pieces of smørrebrød and

Model »Jackson« – an unmistakable adaption of the Danish cultural asset. 139

your designs are really obvious. Who took the photos?


C A M PA I G N I N S I G H T S

The pictures were taken by Columbus Leth, who has a proven track in food art photography. Columbus had already been working with chef Rasmus Kjaer for years, putting his creations into the spotlight. What were your criteria for selecting the ingredients? None at all. Rasmus selected the ingredients for the seasonal smørrebrød. We separated the single elements in order to define our seasonal colors. We then chose solid and transparent acetate Current campaign pictures

colors and started creating shapes and color combinations by layering. Speaking of layering, which materials did you use for the frames? Carbon with colored wood, sheet and block titanium, and acetate in layers. In how far did Rasmus’ smørrebrød influence your usage of these materials?

For our acetate frames, we have already been layering different acetates and mixing solid and transparent colors. The smørrebrød inspired us to play with geometric shapes just like the layers in smørrebrød, where something sticks out, for example like salad under meat. We have worked with circles, squares and triangles by “cutting an edge” of a semi-round pair of frames and adding an acetate layer to develop new shapes. How many pieces will the new collection encompass? The Signature Collection will have 24 models in four colors, so 96 pieces total, and in the Classics Collection we introduce 15 models in four colors for a total of 60 pieces. How will you be using the campaign images in your communication? Since we documented the entire process from the single ingredients

FLEYE

to the completed smørrebrød, we will start by launching our first

»Fox«

campaign storybook. This is a new way to tell our story about the inspiration for this season’s collection and to illustrate the creative process. We have also created story foldings with seasonal cloths for different purposes, some more technical, others more fashionrelated. Because Columbus Leth took pictures of every ingredient and layering, we have created a stop-motion video as well as limited edition of art prints. We have also produced acetate sandwiches for the POS.

»W il d e«

Acetate sandwiches... what’s that? The acetate sandwiches were one of the steps within the creative process to find the best color combinations for our frames. Solid and transparent acetate plates in different colors were cut in smaller pieces and assembled like sandwich layers. We liked the idea so much that we decided to produce them in bigger numbers and sizes in order to offer them to our opticians for their shop window. We’re sure it will whet consumers’ appetites. Thanks for the inspiring insights, Annette.

»C h a p m an« 140


RETROSPECTIVE

M A R WITZ B Y

SINCE

ADRIAN

1 9 1 9

MAR W IT Z

Indebted to the Past photos VA LT I N & C A L I S T I

The Marwitz family name looms large over the history of German eyewear manufacturing. And the legacy that started almost 100 years ago is alive and well today. Three generations later, the eyewear heritage is in the hands of Adrian Marwitz. More than just continuing the family tradition, the Munich-based designer decided to add his own perspective by launching his own eyewear brand four years ago. ADRIAN MARWITZ blazed its own trail with a combination of craftsmanship and forward-thinking designs that have won over opticians across the world. At the same time, Adrian wanted to pay tribute to his family’s storied history, which is why he is now launching the new Marwitz Since 1919 collection. spectr sat down with Adrian Marwitz for a retrospective of his family’s achievements and a close look at the new models.

MARWITZ SINCE 1919 »1919«

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RETROSPECTIVE

MARWITZ SINCE 1919 »1920«

Adrian, how many generations have been crafting eyewear under the

No, they’re mine now. Zeiss was kind enough to sign over the

Marwitz name?

residual rights last year. The registration date on the brand name is

Granddad, dad, and myself. Three generations, so far.

September 21, 1955. Pretty far out.

You are now paying homage to this heritage with the Marwitz Since 1919

And how did your father continue the eyewear tradition?

collection. What’s the story?

He founded Conquistador, Marwitz Berlin in the 1970s. The

I wanted to create a reminder on how long our family has been

company is still successful today. And since our family has a strong

manufacturing eyewear. The fact that my grandfather started it

drive for self-actualization, I also went and started my own company,

almost 100 years ago and we have never been able to put it down.

which brings us full-circle. It’s been four years since you launched adrian marwitz. Was it a logical

Eyewear is our life and just so much fun!

choice to use the family name?

How did your grandfather get started making eyewear? In 1919, he and his partner started the firm Marwitz & Hause in the

I knew right from the start that I wanted to use my name. It was

town Aalen, near Stuttgart.

all about creating my own designs and fully standing behind my

And what happened then?

creations, which is enhanced by using my own name. It wasn’t

Through a couple detours, the company ended up under the ownership of Carl Zeiss in the 1960s. My grandfather continued to work

primarily about using the family name Marwitz, but going at it as Adrian Marwitz. Does your family name create a kind of commitment to tradition that goes

for the company for his entire life. Does Zeiss still hold the rights?

beyond your personal standards? 143


RETROSPECTIVE

MARWITZ SINCE 1919 »1921«

I think that my personal standards are very much in line with any

titanium collection, thereby making sure that wearers with nickel

traditional obligations towards the family heritage. All of our eye-

allergies can still wear these frames.

wear is basically “Made in Germany,” so our quality positioning is really solid!

Do you think the new materials will help reach a new target demographic? Well, using these materials naturally creates much more affordable

Let’s talk about the new collection. How many models does the Marwitz

price points than our titanium frames. So it does expand our poten-

Since 1919 line entail?

tial customer base. Otherwise, our targeting is similar and we also

We’re starting out with three prescription frames and three

want to keep our eyewear exclusive to select optical boutiques. Will the collection name be featured visibly on these frames?

sunglasses. It’s a manageable size, which we intend to continue in similar quantities over time.

Yes. The temple insides will read, “Marwitz since 1919 by Adrian

In how far are your new styles inspired by models from family history?

Marwitz,” together with the original logo from the old Marwitz

A whole lot, for instance by the Conforta Collection from the year 1940. Back then, frames with very thin wire proved to be in high

Collection. Will your regular collection also expand its focus to new materials?

demand, and have now made a big return. That’s also proof that

adrian marwitz will remain dedicated to titanium frames, at

everything tends to come back at some point. And we’re also using

least for now. We’ll see how things evolve in five years.

Zeiss lenses in our sunglasses. You have been known to focus exclusively on titanium, a material not yet implemented into eyewear in the last century. What materials will be used in the ‘1919 collection?

Adrian, let’s be honest. You’re launching a throwback to the first Marwitz

Collection from 1919 in 2017. You couldn’t wait two more years for the full 100-year anniversary?

Now we’re at 98 years. Which is also quite nice!

We will be working with classic materials such as nickel silver and

So what will you be doing for the 100-year anniversary two years from

monel, similar to what people used back in the day. But we are

now?

also bringing in titanium in our pads, thereby creating a link into

I really don’t want to create high expectations, but we’ll be thro-

modern-day designs and our main collection. We are also using

wing a party for the ages with lots of confetti, champagne, and off-

acetate in our temple tips. The coating is almost identical to our

the-hook German country music. It’s going to be a blast! 144


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BRAND PROFILE

»P ie r re«

NEUBAU EYEWEAR »R ebe cca«

»Vale r ie« »P ie r re«

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BRAND PROFILE

»F elix«

N E U BAU

»S arah«

EY EWE A R See & Do Good photos RAPHAE L S C H M I T Z

Upcoming Austrian label NEUBAU EYEWEAR has been launched in summer 2016, less than one year ago. With this in mind, the size of the collection, quality of brand building and extend of their distribution network are downright impressive. Especially since the core team at NEUBAU EYEWEAR’s headquarter in the town of Linz only consists of five people, plus key support on production and technology by parent company Silhouette International. We spoke to Global Brand Director Daniel Liktor about how NEUBAU EYEWEAR got to this point, as well as the label’s “See & Do Good” campaign.

Hello Daniel, since when have you been married to neubau eyewear?

humor – that’s how we like to describe neubau eyewear.

Since May 2015, but I would say that neubau eyewear is more

How does the fashion aspect fit into the picture?

like my baby – or the entire team’s – than a spouse. We really had

We constantly work with fashion designers, among other things.

our hands on every step from the concept stages to the launch. So it

These cooperation projects offer exciting opportunities to flex

makes us all really proud to see our baby grow up into an increasingly

our design chops and position our frames in a thrilling, creative

strong brand.

environment.

What exactly does your job entail?

What are some recent examples?

I’m in charge of the entire brand aspect. It’s super exciting, since I

Last year we presented at New York Men’s Fashion Week together

cover everything and work very closely with my team on design,

with upcoming men’s fashion brand Rocheambeau, followed by

technical product aspects, as well as brand building and distribution.

collabs with Gringko for Milan Fashion Week as well as Berlin-

How would you describe the brand?

based designer Hien Le.

Inspired by Vienna’s creative neighborhood, known as the Neubau,

Aside from fashion-driven attitude, what’s the common denominator

we at neubau eyewear blend young, fashionable design with the

between your products?

extensive know-how of our parent company Silhouette Interna-

Our glasses embody contemporary design, extravagant colorways,

tional. Urbanity and sustainability blended with authenticity and

as well as perfect fits and premium quality. We offer glasses crafted

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BRAND PROFILE

polymer plate while 80% of the material ends up being discarded. How large is the share of naturalPX frames in the overall collection?

»Er win« & »Manu«

Since April 2017, our entire line of polymer glasses has been crafted from naturalPX. For our metal frames, we continue to rely

from stainless steel as well as polymer as well as mixed materials – meaning a combination of both materials in one frame.

on stainless steel. The overall split between polymer and stainless steel is about 50/50.

Does your collection favor sunglasses or prescription models?

In what other areas do you implement sustainable methods?

Prescription models constitute the majority of our collection,

In terms of product presentation and POS materials. We want our

while sunglasses still play a major role.

glasses to not only feel nice on the nose and ears, but also rest easy

What kind of wearers do you have in mind for your glasses?

on the conscience. Could you please be a bit more specific?

We create glasses for all people who view eyewear as a lifestyle accessory. The typical neubau customer is looking to express his

Our new cases are based on cellulose and assembled entirely

personality through his stylistic choices and sees glasses as part of

without the use of glue, which makes it ideal for recycling. Our

his outfit. At the same time, customers place major emphasis on

cleaning cloth consists of recycled PET-bottles, while our entire

product quality and contoured fit for all-day comfort. Sustainability

packaging is free of plastic. And what about the POS materials?

is another aspect that’s dear to our target group. On that note, let’s talk about the inspiration behind your motto “See & Do

We no longer use PVC banners and have transitioned to recyclable

Good”?

paper. Our displays are crafted from wood and are intended for

“See & Do Good” represents our commitment to integrating

long-term usage. We implement new campaign themes via exchange-

environmental stewardship into everything we do. We are dealing

able chipboard plates. Aside from your own products, do you also support projects to protect the

with sustainability while acting with our living space in mind. Is this concept tied to the current collection or more of a long-term brand philosophy?

environment? That’s correct, there are so many exciting projects that provide

For us, “See & Do Good” is not a short-lived campaign theme, but

opportunities to drive sustainability, which we want to support as

part of the fundamental neubau eyewear philosophy. Urbanity

a brand. What are some specific projects you have worked on?

and sustainability are our two core brand values – and that’s not going to change.

There are several, both large and small. Since the beginning of

How does this reflect in the manufacturing of your glasses?

this year, neubau eyewear has been supporting the Honey Bee

It means that all of our plastic glasses are crafted from a highly

Conservancy, a US-based organization dedicated to protecting the

advanced and environmentally sound polymer. The name for this

honey bee. In New York City, two neubau bee hives have already

novel material, sourced from renewable resources, is naturalPX.

been installed. Research has proven that green spaces frequented

What makes naturalPX better than conventional acetate?

by bees make a stronger contribution to the city climate. We see it

More than two-thirds of naturalPX are based on renewable resour-

as our own small share of making sure that the trees in Central Park

ces, the oil of the castor-oil plant, to be specific. Simply put, we

continue to blossom.

rely on plants instead of crude oil for our polymer frames. But at

Sounds like a great initiative. And where is the road headed for your

the same time, for us it is equally important to maintain a high

eyewear journey?

quality standard in this process. As an advantage, the resulting

Well, I’m already really proud of what we have achieved within

frames from this new material are much lighter and more flexible

one year. We already convinced around 2000 opticians in 20 coun-

than acetate frames. And from a production standpoint, naturalPX

tries with our brand, and our collection is growing continuously. Of

is also much less resource-intensive than acetate.

course we are always striving for more and are focused on growing

How come?

the collection, especially in the high-end segment. We will have

Mainly because manufacturing with an injection molding method hardly creates waste. Much unlike acetate, which is milled from a 162

some news in that aspect in Spring 2018, I promise! We will take you up on it!


Come and visit us at Silmo Hall 5 — Booth E082

Deutschlandvertrieb: Lake Distribution GmbH — 83684 Tegernsee — info@lakedistribution.com — 08022/93 92 661


SNEAK PEEK

F M HOFMANN Sneak Peek in Berlin photos S T EFAN DONGU S In the international eyewear business, Berlin-based designer Fabian Hofmann is a household name. Over the years, the progressive designer with roots in Switzerland has been lending his talents to numerous labels from across the world. Now Hofmann is ready to take things into his own hands by launching his own eponymous brand: fm hofmann, which is short for Fabian Maximilian Hofmann. As a

long-time friend of SPECTR, Hofmann invited us to Berlin for a sneak peek of the first range of eyewear released under his own name. And of course we said yes. When we meet with Fabian Hofmann at Volksbühne in Berlin Mitte, he is beaming with excitement about his new “baby”. True to his penchant for pushing the boundaries, the new frames – crafted in a 3D-printer – follow a clearly defined aesthetic marked by bold, three-dimensional lines treating eyewear frames as spatial objects. Achieving this look, fm hofmann relies on 3D-printing all components, even the titanium hinges, while adding intricate interior details to parts such as the temples and fronts, making them lightweight and easy to configure. This coming autumn, the new offering will be released to the public in a drop consisting of twelve styles at five colors each, both sunglasses and RX-frames. Planning ahead, Fabian Hofmann is already working on an athletic-inspired follow-up collection. The industry is watching closely, here’s a first look at fm hofmann. Enjoy the sneak peek.

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GLCO LAB

CONCEPT

Garrett Leight’s Eyewear Stores Get Technical t e x t D I R K V O G E L , photos J OS HU A S P ENCER

Style, fashion appeal, and a healthy dose of California sunshine feeling helped GARRETT LEIGHT CALIFORNIA OPTICAL – better known under the acronym GLCO – stake its own claim on the international eyewear scene. The quintessential formula remains unchanged, but the design-driven brand is now adding technical gadgetry and optical equipment to its GLCO retail stores. It’s all part of the journey for the company started by LA-based designer Garrett Leight five years ago. True to the company motto, “The details are not the details; they make the product,” everything at GLCO matches the brand’s carefully curated vibe. And that also includes all retail stores. Initially, GLCO stores such as the flagship location on high-profile Abbot Kinney Boulevard in Venice, California, resembled boutiques rather than somber optical shops. Boring equipment, geeky gadgetry – all that was left in the backroom until now. Fast-forward to summer 2017 and the times have changed. Technology has gone from ugly necessity to center-stage attraction. Athletic

at restaurants, and customers are enjoying the spectacle. Starting things off, the brand is rolling out its GLCO Lab Concept

apparel, designer fashion – a host of industries are creating value

where everything began a few years ago: the Abbot Kinney flagship

propositions around visibly technical products. Tech has also become

store. “I see our labs as full service in a technical way, but also in a

cool again in the eyewear industry and for final proof of this building

personal way. Our Abbot Kinney store started out as a neighborhood

trend, GLCO is putting pro-grade optical equipment at the center

optician. We wanted to expand that customer service and the sense of

of its retail locations. Customers can now choose from a full range of

fun experimentation we had in Venice to all of our stores,” said Garret

optician services such as custom lens tinting and frame configuration,

Leight, before diving deeper into the new service offering and how it

performed on-site at GLCO stores in full view of the patronage as a

fits into the evolution of his brand in our SPECTR Label Update.

major attraction. It’s the optical industry’s equivalent to “front cooking” 179


L A B E L U P D AT E

Your GLCO stores were always reminiscent of boutiques and rather style-driven. What was the motivation to include

frames or restore old ones. We’re happy to perform these services

these technical services into your retail experience?

on glco frames or any other brands, and we can do most of these

Everyone who works at glco is a total eyewear and design nerd.

jobs in a single hour. If you can imagine it, we’ll try our best to

It sounds cheesy, but the way we talk about our materials on our

make it happen.

website is exactly how we talk about them in our office. We train

Aside from bringing the lab out the back room and into the store, how are

every team member on the different components of design, the

you offering this service with a GLCO twist? At glco we pride ourselves on operating at the intersection of

quality of materials, even how to adjust frames. But why did you decide to make the technical aspect a centerpiece of the

art, craft and technology. The opticians in our labs embody those

store experience by moving it to the front where customers can see it?

values fully. They’re our best representatives. An eyewear wonk

Labs in optical stores are not revolutionary. Most have them, but

could walk into one of our labs and start talking about aberration,

usually they are hidden in a back room or basement. I wanted to

chromatic dispersion, and color theory and our opticians wouldn’t

bring this experience to the front lines and allow our customers to

bat an eye. But they’re also trained in fit and style, which is what a

see the craftsmanship that goes into the final product. We pride

lot of our customers are looking for when they come in.

ourselves on the high quality frames and service we offer, and we

Will you be offering new GLCO product concepts tied in with the new

felt that labs visually connected to the retail experience not only

GLCO Labs initiative?

contribute to customers‘ experiences but also processes them

Definitely. We’ve always offered basic customization services, but

about their new frames.

it‘s become a much larger brand initiative for us and the addition of

Speaking of education, let us know what kind of equipment the state of

labs in each store allows us to do so on-site. Everything from custom

art optical lab offering consists of?

lens tinting to matching a bowtie for a formal event to filling a

We’ve got standard tools for adjusting and reworking frames: hot

prescription in under an hour can now be done in every one of our

air frame warmers, an ultrasonic cleaner, a UV bath, a set of hand

stores. So it’s a clash between style and technology?

adjusting tools. For filling prescriptions we use a lensometer, which finds the optical center of a lens and verifies prescriptions,

As a mono-brand store with a very prominent brand lifestyle,

and a custom hand edger, which we use to refine safety bevels before

we certainly are not neglecting the style-driven side of the retail

we pop finished lenses into frames. For custom lenses we use a

experience. I like to think of our retail staff as stylists as much as

Phantom, which is an automatic lens tinting machine that applies

they are technically trained employees. The decision to purchase

an even gradient to your lenses. But the piece of equipment we’re

something that you wear on your face is important, and we train

most excited about is our Santinelli, a state of the art lens edging

our staff to fit customers based on personal style as much as your

station with a custom vintage-inspired salmon finish. It comes

standard variables like face shape and coloring. In my opinion,

with a matching frame tracer, which uses an automated metal

eyewear is the single most transformative accessory – it can com-

needle to outline the inner rim of a frame.

pletely change the way people are perceived, or how they perceive

What optical services will be available to customers on-site?

themselves.

Our opticians are able to cut prescriptions, tint lenses, matte new 180

Thanks for the interview, Garrett.


L A B E L U P D AT E

F R O M

A NTWERP

A R OU ND

T HE

T O

AL L

W ORLD

Komono’s Success Story photo S T E FAN D ON GU S , s t il l s R A P H A E L S C H M I T Z

At first sight, Belgium’s latest hot export may not sound like a product from the Benelux region: KOMONO is the Japanese word for “small thing,” and the finer details in life are exactly the Antwerpbased company’s specialty. KOMONO brings Antwerp’s leading design heritage to the global fashion runway with expertly crafted eyewear and watches collections. spectr had a chance to visit KOMONO headquarters in Antwerp, where 42 employees out of a worldwide staff of 50 handle the brand’s design, production, distribution, and marketing. The company founded by Anton Janssens and Raf Maes in 2009 also operates two additional offices, one in Santa Monica, California, and the other in Hong Kong. In our Label Update, Anton Janssens opens up about the brand’s initial focus on fashion stores, the evolution of KOMONO and what the future holds for the label and partner opticians. Anton, please tell us a little more about your background. You’ve spent years working in the extreme sports and fashion industries, and ran a distribution company in Belgium, correct? anton janssens: Yes. Twenty years ago, Raf and I were pro snow-

boarders – that’s how we met. We traveled the world and discovered many things. Afterwards we started a distribution company, beginning with sports but over the years we switched to fashion with a focus on clothing, footwear, and accessories. At some point we started wondering: why give brands feedback on market opportunities and trends if we can use this experience ourselves? So in 2009, you decided to leave distribution and do your own thing? anton: We’re natural entrepreneurs. And we saw a change in

the wider fashion market and a big opportunity to make luxury accessible to many people. At the time, no one had thought to try that with sunglasses and watches. So we took the leap – and the rest is history. Tell us more about your relationship with Raf and how you decided to partner up. anton: When you travel a lot, you get to know people quickly.

Our energies really connected. We both have a lust for life, and want to make things happen! That was probably the reason we were snowboarding. Raf, do you think that your background in extreme sports has had an 182


L A B E L U P D AT E

effect on the way you run your business? raf maes: Yes, definitely. Snowboarding is not a “classic” sport. It’s

more about aesthetics, how you read the mountains and make your movements look good. And making things look good is central to what we do at komono.

KOMONO »T he F rankie«

Do you think there’s an underserved demand for lifestyle products among the optical stores that you can fill with komono? raf: Absolutely. We live in a fast-evolving world, and the new

generations are demanding. They have it all online, and want it all now! komono is unique: we understand these consumers. We were raised in that environment, so we don’t have to adapt. We’re constantly driven to innovate. The amazing feedback we’ve gotten from opticians is proof that komono offers something special. What exactly led to the great feedback? anton: Our focus has always been making luxury accessible. We

won’t make compromises when it comes to quality or design, and insist on giving a luxury experience. And we really want to bring our community to the opticians. After all, the opticians’ knowhow is central to offering the perfect service that your eyes deserve.

»T he W ilbur«

There are a lot of rising brands who want to bypass that important role and sell directly to the customer. We are convinced that komono is the best defense for opticians against this trend! How does your headquarters in Antwerp factor into your brand DNA?

raf: We’re very proud of our Antwerp roots. It’s the home of many

Raf Maes & Anton Janssens in their Antwerp headquarters.

of today’s influential designers. We create contemporary designs with signature Antwerp style: clean lines, modern feel and innovative materials. What other brands on the market are close to komono? anton: It’s hard to name a direct competitor. Aesthetically, some

of the new players are following our lead. Different ones pop up in every country, like Warby Parker in the United States. But conceptually? None of these brands give back to the opticians. We do, and that makes our concept different. Let’s talk frames. What’s typical for komono’s style? raf: Everything we do must have a sense of purity and refinement.

There must be a clear coherence throughout everything we design and do – always driven by a clear sense of innovation. Ultimately, we want people to recognize our products even without the logo! Speaking of innovation, what are some examples of technical advancements in your product line? raf: Most recently, our drive for innovation resulted in the

NEUTRØ series. These sunglasses are made from a CO2-neutral material developed in-house. Aesthetics are always the number one priority for komono. While designing this series, we learned that we had an opportunity to be part of a bigger thing and raise awareness. So that’s what we did. We wanted the designs to hint 183


L A B E L U P D AT E

KOMONO »T he Monroe«

at 1960’s fiberglass furniture designs, and that worked out really well. Which of your product styles perform the best in terms of sales? anton: We listen to our customers. Based on their feedback, we’ve

developed new styles that mix acetate and steel. These frames – like »The Frankie«, »The Boris« and »The Wilbur« – do very well,

»T he Har p e r«

both as sunglasses and optical models. People can express themselves freely in komono. Some collections that we expected to be more conceptual surprise us and sell extremely well, like our Purple Rain collection. New styles like »The Monroe« are receiving great feedback. As a general rule, I’d say that trends are evolving towards lighter, slimmer steel styles.

»T he B or is«

You originally started your eyewear collection with sunglasses and later launched your optical line. What was your motivation for branching out? raf: There was big demand from the opticians. We had seen great

success with our sunglasses, and we realized that for most opticians, this is only a small part of their business. We also felt that we had enough experience in manufacturing to take that next step. We launched our first optical collection at Silmo 2016, so that was only about ten months ago. Your booth at Silmo was almost always totally slammed with visitors. Did

that reflect in your order volumes as well?

conservative space than the open, innovative fashion world. If you’re the first brand to bring change to a long-standing model,

raf: You never know how a new product launch will go, so we

you’ll always bump into some resistance. But that drives us to

were a bit nervous! We developed a new business approach,

respond and do better.

pushing online brand awareness through social media. We brought

You emphasize that it’s important to question processes and conven-

this community exclusively to the retailer. Word started spreading

tions. Why the rebellious attitude?

and our booth was packed throughout the entire show. People

anton: I’m afraid that’s my nature. I’m not interested in the status

loved the concept, the whole brand experience. These elements are

quo. When I get to that point it’s time to move on! This attitude

what makes komono really unique.

has brought me everywhere I’ve been in life, and now pushes the

What are your strongest markets in general?

entire komono team. And as they say: never change a winning

anton: First of all, our local markets Belgium and The Nether-

team. What kind of wins can we expect from komono next?

lands. Next up are our neighbors Germany, Italy, and France. Globally, the United States are really starting to pick up speed, and

raf: We have so many plans. It feels like we’ve only just begun.

Japan is doing a fantastic job as well.

We’re investing heavily in marketing as we speak. We’ve already

Why do you think opticians need to offer brands like komono?

hired ten people this year to reinforce our team. We’re confident

raf: Things are changing and you’re either part of the change, or

that our concept is working. Also, we’re opening our retail locations

you fade out. komono will keep evolving and re-inventing itself!

in key cities worldwide. We just opened our first flagship store in

What was your biggest challenge working with opticians?

Antwerp, and are working on some big collaborations. Keep a close

anton: Gaining confidence! In general, it’s a more self-contained,

184

eye on our social media for the latest news!


B

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A W

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BY EDISONGA p ro d uc t ion TAM ARA S A R I S C H W I L I s t ylin g AL E X AN D RA H E C K EL a t L I G A N O R D a ssis t e d b y DENIS E ROT T MANN h a ir & m a ke - up AL E X A N D ER A US C H I L L a t L I G A N O RD mo d el s J AD E M C SC O R L EY & K A R O L I N A H A J ZI UK a t CORE MANAGEMENT re touch BLU E BU N N Y P O S T P R O D UC T I O N lo ca tion L AK OM A

186

K S


ROL F SPEC TACL E S »Canis Major«

ju mpsu i t VAL ENT INE GAU LT HIE R ja c ke t AS OS

»Cassiopeia«

top & p ants L AL A BERL I N

187


ETNIA BARCELONA »Mar ina«

sh ir t S A NDRO MEN, p ants KINGS OF INDIGO 188


ETNIA BARCELONA »F e r l a n d i n a «

blou s e BAL ENCIAGA, jacke t W OOD W OOD 189


NEUBAU EYEWEAR »Edmund«

ho o d ie M AIS ON S UN E V E o v e rkn e ss M AI P I U S EN Z A

190


NEUBAU EYEWEAR »Carla«

blou s e LOVE STORIE S d e nims BALE NCIAGA boots ASOS 191


ESPRIT »17933 «

blou s e J ACQU EMU S 192


ESPRIT »179 4 9 «

blou s e L ALA BE RLIN

193


LIEBESKIND BERLIN »11014 « «

top H A US A C H , sk ir t L AL A BERL IN, ba g EAS T PACK, be re t S T YL IS T ´ S OW N 194


AIGNER »3 0 537«

blou s e GUCCI

195


INVU »T 18 01 C «

d e nim s BL AC K V E LV ET C I R C L E top AE AN C E ja c ke t L E V I S

196


BLESSED BY THE MUSE

IC !

B ER

SU P R EM

IC! BERLIN »Te ktoni k a«

198


BLESSED BY THE MUSE

L I N AT I ST

COLLECT ION

Reduced to its Core

»Sup re m a c y« photos RAPHAE L S C H M I T Z As a progressive eyewear label in one of Europe’s hottest cultural melting pots, ic! berlin has always had a penchant for blending eyewear designs with philosophical ideas. Not necessarily a road well-traveled by other brands, but ic! berlin likes to take the time to be inspired by the muses. And after all, an eyewear frame is only considered complete for the young label when it perfectly complements the wearer’s face in all its proportions. It’s a long process and in order to reach this goal, the Berlin-based brand’s design philosophy revolves around reducing a frame to its basic geometry. Round, oval, or square shapes – they all share the same symbiotic relationship between their design and the wearer’s physiognomy. Similar to the world of art, where the reduction to fundamental forms and colors leads to what proponents of a major art movement call, “the supremacy of pure artistic feeling.” This philosophy features front and center in ic! berlin’s autumn collection. Designs exhibit

clear lines, reduced to fundamental geometric outlines, thus inspiring the name Suprematist

»G eom e tr y«

Eyewear. The major star in the collection – and a real head-turner at recent Fashion Week runway shows – is the »Tektonika« model that sets the overall tone for the rest of the line. The »Tektonika« blends several reflective lenses in a design that the eyewear business had previously never seen before in such shape and form, a real new philosophy. 199


C A M PA I G N I N S I G H T

IC! BERLIN »Circ ul ar it y«

»Tr i an gul ar it y«

Here’s a quick disclaimer: Despite the philosophic overtones, the new frames can also be enjoyed on a purely material level for what they are. Like in this photo shoot. But anyone asking about the Berlin label’s inspirations for the Suprematist Collection may want to look into the early 20th century Russian art movement called Suprematism, best-known through the works of its founder, artist Kazimir Malevich. Suprematism relies on maximum reduction down to basic geometric shapes and colors in order to achieve visualization of the “highest” levels of human insights. ic! berlin takes this search for purity to the next level in their new collection. It is stripped down to no gimmicks, no bolts and screws, no dead weight. Pure, naked, raw. And beautiful. 200


S H A R E M O M E N T S F R A M E

Y O U R

P E R S O N A L I T Y


INDUSTRY INSIGHT

F R O M T O

CO P ENHAGEN

BE R L IN

A New Show for Independent Eyewear photos ST E FAN D ON G US

202


INDUSTRY INSIGHT

Hi Morten, it’s nice to see you in Germany. To get started, please give us a short summary of the copenhagen specs show. Copenhagen specs is an independent eyewear show started in March 2014 in Copenhagen. The show has a unique atmosphere created by the fantastic venue, the great designs shown by exhibitors and funky music from our house DJ. How do you decide what classifies as “independent eyewear”?

The European eyewear tradeshow calendar will welcome a new attraction in October 2018, and it’s a heavy package: The city of Berlin has already been a Fashion Week destination for years at this point. Come next year, opticians and buyers will head to the German capital for the latest product news in the eyewear business. What’s more, the new show is brought to you by the folks behind copenhagen specs, which has become known as an independent eyewear destination over the past four editions in the Danish capital. The founder and organizer of the show, Morten Gammelmark, is drawing on the success of copenhagen specs and status in the eyewear business to take the leap into Germany next autumn. Meanwhile, the focus on independent brands – the heart and soul of copenhagen specs – will remain unchanged. In this issue’s Industry Insight, spectr meets Morten Gammelmark at the future venue of his show, the Arena Berlin, to get an early glimpse of what’s in store at copenhagen specs in Berlin.

For me independent means that you are free to do exactly what you want. Independent eyewear is when the brand is purely designerdriven and not mass-produced licensed eyewear. Copenhagen specs is independent, because we don‘t have to ask for permission or have to refer to any supply chains or association, and that‘s what makes the show successful. What’s special about your concept? The show builds on the idea that every exhibitor is equal. What does that mean in practice? All exhibitors have the same opportunity to present their brand to the visitors regardless of how big of a budget they have. In what sense do they have the same opportunities? In line with the rural vibe of the show venue, the booths are built from wooden and rustic materials. The back walls consist of wooden boards, the partition walls can either be stacks of wood or old windows so the booths are open to every visitor. All booths

In the Molecule Man’s shadow and with a view to the new exhibition grounds right next to the Spree River: Morten Gammelmark is looking forward to the copenhagen specs in Berlin. 203


INDUSTRY INSIGHT

create fantastic eyewear and fashion in general. So for me, Berlin is the natural choice for expanding. The atmosphere in Berlin is just amazing, and I feel the copenhagen specs concept fits perfectly. Which other cities were up for discussion? I’ll keep that to myself! Maybe another city will be added in the coming years (laughs). Aren’t you afraid as a “foreigner” you may have to deal with resistance in Germany? No, not at all. I see myself as an ambassador for independent eyewear, and in this business, we all speak the Next to a number of high-profile fashion shows, Arena Berlin will also host the latest iteration of copenhagen specs in fall 2018.

same language. Your show will take place in October 2018, a couple of weeks after Silmo in Paris. What’s the difference between these shows? Is it just for the visitors who didn’t make it

look the same when the exhibitors arrive, and if they like, they are

to Paris?

allowed to build their own booth outside our pre-built back walls.

Silmo and copenhagen specs in Berlin are two totally different

But we really encourage them to stay true to the rustic concept.

shows. Silmo is a great trade fair where you can find every brand

Booth sizes are pre-determined and smaller [than other shows],

and everything in the eyewear business. Copenhagen specs in

which forces the brands to focus on the actual products instead of

Berlin will focus on frames and, as I mentioned, only independent

how big and spectacular a booth they can build.

labels. We have stripped down all the fuzz, and at copenhagen

Don’t you think you are limiting the brands in their options to present

specs there’s a completely different atmosphere than at Silmo or

themselves?

any other eyewear fair or show.

No, not at all. The simple wooden booth concept gives the exhibitors

Berlin is big, but the surrounding areas are rather rural. Is it a show just

the opportunity to bring out the uniqueness of their brands. The

for Berlin-based opticians, then?

exhibitors have to think “outside the box” and find their own

No, of course not. Much like the show in Copenhagen is not only

expression in this concept. And they have done an exceptional job

for Copenhagen-based opticians or Danes, but for all opticians re-

doing exactly that. The simple booth concept, together with the

gardless of country or attachment to a supply chain. As long as you

unique brands, creates an atmosphere you will not find anywhere

love eyewear and want to get inspired in a creative environment

else. The concept takes away all the bling and the fuzz and just

and great atmosphere, you’re welcome. Do you think you might succeed in addressing private visitors as well?

focuses on the product. So they can‘t hide. Are the exhibitors really happy with this concept?

Copenhagen specs in Copenhagen and Berlin are B2B-shows. The

It definitely seems that both exhibitors and visitors like the show.

idea is not to bring in private visitors. I want them to go to their

After four shows, the number of both exhibitors and visitors has

local optician instead and see and buy their independent eyewear

increased by over 100 percent.

there. But I want all opticians to come and get inspired by the

Is it a natural conclusion to replicate this concept in another city?

fantastic brands, so they can tell great stories to customers in their

Yes!

shops.

Couldn’t you also just have done a second show in Copenhagen?

Finally, why do you focus on independent labels only? What drives you to

For now, I’m not interested in having two shows in Copenhagen.

support these brands?

I think it would over-saturate the market. I want opticians from

I’ve always been fascinated by uniqueness and how to differentiate

other countries to come to Copenhagen and visit the show, but

oneself from the crowd. And I’ve always been fascinated by entre-

at the same time, I want Scandinavian opticians to go out of their

preneurship. So for me it comes natural to support independent

comfort zone and be inspired by visiting independent shows in

labels, who often have an entrepreneurial mind-set and not at last

other cities. That’s why I‘m giving them an opportunity to come to

a strong passion for their unique design. To see, feel, and touch the

Berlin.

products and listen to the stories behind the brands and designs is

Why did you choose Berlin as your second show destination?

very inspiring to me. And that’s what encourages me to promote

Berlin is similar to Copenhagen in many ways. They’re both

independent labels. Thanks Morten, we look forward to next autumn.

vibrant cities with many trendsetting brands and people, who 204


GENDER FIT

EY EVA N 7 285 Matching Classics from Japan

EYEVAN 7285 »757«

»755«

photo RAP HAE L S C HM I T Z We handle a lot of different frames during the production stages for

utmost quality. The secret? These glasses are injected with manu-

each issue. But we are always on the lookout for ones that truly stand

facturing mastery from the Japanese Fukui province. Here, timeless

out, whether it’s because of bold colorways, exquisite materials or

models such as the »755« for men and the charming »757« for women

unconventional shapes. In the eyevan 7285 glasses, it was definitely

are created. For a special note, the inside of the acetate frame is execu-

the latter – no gimmicks but a clear, purist form language. eyevan

ted from transparent materials, adding a layer of style to a beautiful

7285 represents modernity, minimalism, and a constant drive for

package. 206


COLLAB OF THE ISSUE

L U C A S B L I TZ

DE

STAËL

X

M OT ORCYCLES

A True Vintage Motorbike Eyewear

photo R A P H A EL S CHMIT Z Our Collab of the Issue in this edition of SPECTR is drawing on two genuinely unique design approaches. On one hand, it draws on one of the finest new independent brands, lucas de staël eyewear, a French label founded in 2012 by the designer of the same name. And on the other hand we really enjoy a taste of vintage bicycles and opportunities like last year’s photo shoot with Fred Jourden and Hugo Jézégabel at their blitz motorcycles workshop in Paris, where they create custom motorbike magic. And while their fellow Parisian Lucas tends to prefer a baby blue 1950s Vespa over a rugged custom bike, both labels agreed on their passion for high quality eyewear. The result of the collaboration is a new sunglasses model available in three colorways. The frame is covered in genuine cow leather, which happens to be the same material blitz used in their baggage collab with Bleu de Chauffe. The refined leather is a staple in the vintage motorbike scene and assumes a nice patina over time. Fred’s and Hugo’s design expertise truly shines in the frame’s thin temples, perfect for pairing up with a bike helmet, while Lucas added his signature expertise for well-balanced frames. Combining the best of designer eyewear and custom bike mastery, the blitz x lucas de staël collab is now available at finer optical stores or online at blitz-motorcycles.com. If vintage motorbikes are your jam, ride like the wind to get one. 208


THEME SHOOT

BLACKFIN »G ol d B e a ch«

LA

VI E

EN

RO S E

With the »Gold Beach« model, the Italian brand offers

photo RAP HAEL S CHMIT Z

the perfect counterpart to a lofty summer dress.

After past season’s dominance of over-sized frames, autumn season brings a resurgence of a more delicate and feminine aesthetic: Cat Eye silhouettes are back with lots of sex appeal – and some updated pastel colorways. Here’s a look.

R AY- B A N »RB3580-N« ray-ban created a modern interpretation

of classic Cat Eye frames with this mono shield version.

NEUBAU »C arl a« The neubau model blends a bold shape with a semi-transparent frame crafted from natural PX.

VOGUE »W74584« The vogue model lends wearers the grandeur of an Italian classic film star.

210


THEME SHOOT

INVITED T O

DIN N ER photo RAPHAE L SCHMITZ A love letter to feminine design: For the upcoming eyewear season, we are endorsing soft lines and gentle rosé colorways. Protruding cross bars,

metallic strips and curved front sections add stylistic complexity to these frames.

BARTON PERREIRA »A d el ai d e« »Adelaide« steps in the room with muted gold details and intriguing clarity.

LINDBERG »Str ip T it anium 9902« Simple design is simply beautiful, as proven again and again by Danish label lindberg.

ANDY WOLF »L arkin« Guaranteed to make a stylish impression: Stunningly elegant in soft matted pink.

M E T R O P O L I TA N »8252« Despite its bold appearance, the »8252« comes with a gentle feminine touch. 212


BY ULRICH HARTMANN p ro d uc t ion BIAN C A W ÃœR R I E H A US EN a t TA K E A G E NCY P RODU CT ION a ssis t e nt V IVIAN E GR I G UL L s t ylin g K ON STAN T IN O S G K O UM P E T I S h a ir K ARIN A BE RG a t B I G O UD I w it h B UM B L E A N D BU MBL E m a ke -up YOU N E S BE N T a t L O UI S A A RT I S T S w it h S IS L EY COS MET ICS mo d el s S C HIRIN F. a t M D M A N A G E M EN T, H A N N A H EL IZA NOVAK & RAINA MAS T ERS a t ICONIC, SA SC HA M . a t M OD E LW E R K & S I M O N L O R I N S ER a t KU LT re touch S OP HIE S C HWA R Z EN B E R G ER lo ca tion C E N T RAL C O N G R ES S , H A M B UR G 214


R AY- B A N »35 8 0 - N «

dre ss ANTONIA GOY

»35 76 - N «

dre ss ANTONIA GOY

T RI E

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SS 215

E


M AY B A C H »T h e P i o n e e r I «

sh ir t VL ADIMIR KARAL EEV

216


M AY B A C H »T h e H o r i z o n I «

t u r t le n e c k T I G ER OF S W EDEN, jumps ui t AS OS , rolle r s k a t e s VAJ A

»T h e H o r i z o n I I «

top S A M S O E& S A M S O E , su it VA L ENT INE GAU T HIER, socks COS , s hoe s ZIGN, belt MARINA HOERMANSE DE R 217


TAVAT »Split I«

d re ss H A U S ACH rol le r sk a t e s VAJ A

TAVAT »Dr if t I«

s ui t F ORM OF INT EREST socks CALV IN KL EIN s hoe s V IV IENNE W ES T WOOD 218


TAVAT »W i n g m a n I «

coa t A N T O NIA GOY p olo sh ir t FARRAH p a nt s G UES S MEN

TAVAT »Split II«

TAVAT

s u i t D AWID T O M A S ZEW S K I b ra IN T I M I S S I M I s ho e s C L A R K S

»W i n g m a n I «

dre ss MARINA HOE RMANSE DE R 219


IC! BERLIN » s u p re m a c y «

ja cke t MANGO MEN, s hi r t FARRAH

» c i rc u l a r i t y «

blou s e S T RENES S E 220


IC! BERLIN » lo a n I «

coa t & dre ss STE INROHNE R

221


S A LT. »Hesseman«

s ui t RICHERT BEIL s hi r t S AMS OE& S AMS OE s hoe s T IGER OF S W EDEN

S A LT. »St. Hubbins«

S A LT.

blou s e S E ID EN S T I C K ER p a nt s M AN G O W O M A N coa t UN I Q L O s ho e s ZI G N

»Bobbi«

dre ss BA&SH s hoe s T RIP P EN X MICHAE L SONTAG 222


S A LT. »F u f k i n «

coa t MICHAEL S ONTAG s hi r t J A QU ES BRIT T p ants S T EINROHNER s hoe s MAI P IU S ENZA

S A LT. »Tu f n e l «

coa t NOBI TALAI s hi r t ATE LIE R.NA p ants GOE TZ E s hoe s MISSONI 223


KOMONO »T h e L o g a n «

su it s D AW I D T O M A S ZEW S K I , s hi r ts MARINA HOERMANS EDER, s hoe s VAL ENT INE GAU T HIER

224


AND NOW THERE’S EVEN MORE:

OPTI IS GETTING BIGGER! More innovation, more style, more flair. More wide eyes, more aaah and more oooh! More opportunities, more international business and more enjoyment: opti 2018 is expanding to hall B4 and thus offering you more of everything that makes it much more than just a trade fair. Don’t miss it!

FRIDAY – SUNDAY

12. – 14.01.2018 www.opti.de


S PE C TR

INVU »T 18 01 C «

M AG AZ INE Lost in Nowhere? Are you finding yourself living far away from the nearest well-assorted international newsstand or optical shop carrying the latest issue of SPECTR? Fear not, because we can help: Our convenient SPECTR subscription ships all the way into the further reaches of the international stratosphere. German or English – it’s all your choice. Once you fill out the form, every issue is headed your way as soon as it comes out, delivered freshly to your doorstep, neatly packaged, around the world. So no matter where you live, everything new and exciting from the world’s leading brands and designers is going to find its way to you. Guaranteed. photo E DI S O N G A (page 184 – 194)

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SPECTR Issue 21  

Design Talk with Fashion Legend Yohji Yamamoto | Collection Shoots with Lindberg, Salt. and Blackfin | Trend Shoots in New York, São Paulo,...

SPECTR Issue 21  

Design Talk with Fashion Legend Yohji Yamamoto | Collection Shoots with Lindberg, Salt. and Blackfin | Trend Shoots in New York, São Paulo,...

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