Issuu on Google+

T H E

MARKUS T – FLE YE – SUZY GLAM – RAY-BAN – TARIAN – STEINGA SSE 14

12

V I SI O N A RY

M AGA Z IN E

12

MARKUS TEMMING

MEN @ WORK @ MARKUS T

FLEYE X ANNETTE SAUST ESTØ ORANGE DANISH DYNAMITE

SUZY GLAM

CRAFTSMANSHIP & GLAMOUR

RAY-BAN SHOWCASE THE ORDER OF NEVER HIDE

TARIAN

PARISIAN NEO-AVANTGARDE

E

ISSUE 11

ENGLISH ISSUE


ACCESSORIES - EYEWEAR - LEATHER GOODS - SADDLERY

MAYBACH MAYBACH Icons Icons of of Luxury Luxury GmbH GmbH || Germany Germany || info@maybach-luxury.com info@maybach-luxury.com || www.maybach-luxury.com www.maybach-luxury.com „Maybach“ „Maybach“ and and the the „MM“ „MM“ logo logo are are subject subject to to intellectual intellectual property property protection protection owned owned by by Daimler Daimler AG. AG. They They are are used used by by MAYBACH MAYBACH Icons Icons of of Luxury Luxury GmbH GmbH under under licence. licence.


design by lindberg 路 made by lindberg

SILMO 2014 路 PARIS 路 HALL 5 VILLAGE 路 STAND R74


autobahn zwanzig vierzehn

www.coblens.com


DESIGN & PHOTOGRAPHY BY EYETECH V.EYE.P. CREATIV TEAM


FRAME / 086 BLACK GREY GRADIENT

PHOTO / DONATO CASPARI


#switchoffyourcellphone


MASTHEAD

EDITOR IN CHIEF Stefan Dongus dongus@eyewear-magazine.com m: +49.(0)151.14271817

ONLINE EDITOR Jana Wenge presse@eyewear-magazine. com

EDITOR Jana Wenge wenge@eyewear-magazine.com

PUBLISHER Monday Publishing GmbH Kamekestr. 20– 22 50672 Cologne GERMANY t: +49.(0)221.945267-11 f: +49.(0)221.945267-27

GRAPHIC DESIGN Till Paukstat paukstat@eyewear-magazine.com Sebastian Wegerhoff Frédéric Wiegand CONTRIBUTORS Dirk Vogela PHOTOGRAPHERS Martin Bauendahl Stefan Dongus Mert Dürümoglu Ulrich Hartmann Stefan Kapfer Benjamin Kaufmann Sabine Liewald Reno Mezger Patrick Miller Paul Ripke Raphael Schmitz Dirk Schumacher TRANSLATION ENGLISH VERSION Dirk Vogel PROOFREADING Franca Rainer

CEOS Stefan Dongus Holger von Krosigk DISTRIBUTION DPV Network GmbH Postfach 570 412 22773 Hamburg GERMANY www.dpv-network.de PRINT F&W Mediencenter GmbH Holzhauser Feld 2 83361 Kienberg GERMANY www.fw-medien.de COVER PHOTO: Stefan Kapfer STYLING: Sky Bulatovic HAIR- & MAKE-UP: Nicola Weidemann

19

EYEWEAR is published three times per year. This magazine and all its contents may not be re-used, distributed or stored in electronic databases in any way without prior written permission from the publishers. All inquiries regarding the usage of copyrighted materials, as well as the reproduction of excerpts in other formats must be directed to the publishers. The opinions reflected in this magazine do not necessarily reflect those of the publishers. All rights reserved.


MASTHEAD

INSIGHT – EMPLOYEES OF THE ISSUE Congratulations, you’re reading issue 12 of EYEWEAR magazine. Once again, getting this issue published became possible due to the joint efforts of a great number of people who poured their creativity and best work onto these pages. In this issue’s Insight, we’d like to introduce the two photographers Martin Bauendahl and Reno Mezger, who lent their signature style to our photo shoots for issue 12. And since photography is not the only creative venture behind making a magazine happen, we’re also showcasing our accountant, Irene Laudani. Thanks for your hard work, guys!

MARTIN BAUENDAHL, PHOTOGRAPHER Issue 12 marks the fourth edition of the magazine featuring Martin Bauendahl’s work. Born in Cologne and now residing in Hamburg, the welltraveled photographer has earned his chops in the business with a self-educated approach. His philosophy of ‘learning by doing’ led him into photography at the tender age of 15, and Martin opened his first studio at 21. For the past ten years, he’s been offering his services to commercial clients all around the world: His travel record includes missions in New York, Paris, Moscow, Istanbul etc. All across the globe, Martin has captured images in the realm of Fashion & Beauty, and he’s far from slowing down. Always pushing the limits and putting great demands on his models, photo shoots with Martin Bauendahl are always a memorable occasion for all involved. For past EYE WEAR magazine shoots, the seasoned photographer asked models to prove their acting skills, go deep sea diving or show up in their birthday suit – all for the love of art (and eyewear).

20


IRENE LAUDANI, ACCOUNTANT Irene lives in Cologne – and loves her city. She is a singer in her church’s choir, and dons an elaborate costume every carnival season and – much as is the mode of the town – maintains a sunny outlook on life. Additionally, Irene is also Italian and loves Mediterranean food, red wine (naturally) and her mother tongue, which she speaks loudly and expressively. We here at the office listen in awe when she lashes out in Italian on the phone at the construction workers reporting problems from her new residential construction site. We can never make out any of the details, but it sounds like Irene gets her point across and gets what she wants with no protests. With the same passion, Irene handles the accounting and subscriber care for our magazines. And although she only spends 1.5 days at our offices, the independent accountant has become a fixture in our family. On that note, here’s a quick warning to all customers out there who still owe us money: The charming Irene has just taken over our debt collection – so pay up, or suffer the consequences!

RENO MEZGER, PHOTOGRAPHER Photographer Reno Mezger is also based in the town of Hamburg, and came into photography after pursuing a desk job for many years. Born and raised in Leipzig in 1978, he earned his degree in graphic design and worked as an art director for clients such as Mercedes-Benz, Langnese and adidas. During this time, Reno developed a deep fascination with the mystical aura of photographs that landed on his desk on a daily basis. But it took until his late 20s for Reno to commit to pursuing his interest in photography. After he decided to switch sides from art direction into becoming a fashion photographer, he worked on his technique meticulously with constant focus on the details. Reno is a highly conceptual photographer who likes to leave nothing about a shoot to mere chance. There is a sense of premeditation and attention to minute details in all of his photos, yet they radiate the burning passion of someone who fell in love with photography – and never looked back.


EDITORIAL

A PIC TURE IS WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS

Allegedly, this quote goes back to P. J.

the cognitive center.

Reuter, founder of the infamous global

Photography has never been more acces-

news agency of the same name. Celebrities

sible than today. In our current smart-

and people in the public spotlight are well

phone-driven age, everyone becomes a

aware of the power of images and like to

photographer. A selec tion of countless new

strike a pose whenever they can – or when

photography apps is available to enhance our

there happens to be a photographer around. photos with professional post-processing But even without professional shutterbugs,

and publishing options. Everyone’s an

taking a ‘selfie’

artist nowadays – building and communicat-

is always an option today. As publishers of

ing with an audience. We here at EYEWEAR

an eyewear magazine, we also know about

magazine are big fans of the image-driven

the power of images. The more expressive

Pinterest platform, where we upload and

a photograph, the deeper it will become

share images from our photo shoots.

embedded in the observer’s memory. Words

By now, we have compiled quite a sizeable

fade away into oblivion – images last for-

photo inventory. Our boards are getting

ever. On a cognitive level, this is due to

hits from users all around the world, some

the fact that images stimulate the human

looking for inspiration before selecting

brain in an entirely different way than

their next pieces of eyewear, others just in

mere words. Images directly activate our

search of fashion ideas or a pretty model

emotions. Words have to take a detour via

with sexy glasses.

22


Photo: Stefan Kapfer (S. 36-47) Glasses: Cazal »8015«

Most importantly, images always make the strongest impression – at least in our experience – when they can be touched and felt. That’s why we are excited to present yet another issue printed on +200 pages of glossy paper that really makes all the hard work of our photographers, stylists and editors, and also the beautifully designed pieces of eyewear – the true focus of this magazine – shine in the spotlight. Speaking of designers, in this issue we have had the pleasure to speak with some of the most inspiring minds in the business. You’ll find their ideas documented in several thousand words and some equally impressive pictures. Enjoy! SD


+++NEWSFEED+++

ACE & TATE Dutch upstart brand Ace&Tate is committed to offering current design and high-end quality at a fair price. The mission statement of founder Mark de Lange and team: Customers should be able to change their glasses as effortlessly as their outfits. The stylish Ace&Tate website offers a broad selection of frames, which can be ordered in multiples via the ‘Home-Try-on’ service to see which pair fits the best. Customers can send back all unwanted glasses free of charge and only keep their favorite pair. An Ace idea, we say!

24


+++NEWSFEED+++

Way to brave the sunlight in style, bros! Shaun White is deeply rooted in board sports: As an outstanding snowboarder, skateboarder, and surfer, White knows the requirements of shreddable eyewear! With an emphasis

OAKLEY SHAUN WHITE SIGNATURE SERIES: ENDURO

on blending style and functionality, White contributed his design chops to the new Enduro model by Oakley. The ultra-light sunglasses with the thin frames offer a unique and comfortable fit thanks to Oakley’s proprietary O-Matter material. And crafted from Plutonite, the lenses are extremely resilient to impact – so wearers can shred hard! Best of all, here’s your chance to win a pair of Enduros in matte black with lenses in dark bronze: Sim-

W I N

ply ‘like’ the Eyewear Magazine and Oakley Facebook pages and send an email with the subject line ‘Oakley’ to presse@eyewear-magazine.com by October 1, 2014.

Studying the designs of Komono, every curvature, every screw emerges as a statement of refined artistic design. Having already garnered inter national attention with their watches collection, the trending label has now applied its signature touches to an exclusive sunglasses line, consisting of six models in four colorways each. Leaving nothing to be added, and nothing to be taken away, the details in these frames are

KOMONO CRAFTED COLLECTION

a textbook case of on-point design. Bravo!

26


+++NEWSFEED+++

THE SARTORIALIST Scott Schuman is regarded as one of the most successful inter national street style photographers, and one of the 100 most influential people in the fashion business. The streets are his studio. With his legendary blog The Sartorialist, he brought street-savvy styles to the Internet. Joining forces with Luxottica, Schuman recently launched a website dedicated to well-dressed, urban eyewear aficionados. The site is updated regularly and also features interviews with key contributors. The goal: To document the rise of eyewear from mere visual aid to key accessory in the street style vernacular. Scott Schuman’s choice of models mostly includes passersby, authentic people encountered of the streets of metropolitan cities around the world, all chosen for one key reason: their charisma.

Scott Schuman


+++NEWSFEED+++

HUMPHREY’S X HOMBRE Sometimes all the elements just fall into place: The right time, the right location, the right people. Not too long ago, artist Pablo Fontagnier aka ‘HOMBRE’ was leading an Urban Street Art Tour through the graffiti hot spots in the German town of Nuremberg. And as it happens, those in attendance included the design team at HUMPHREY’S Eyewear. Intrigued by Pablo’s extravagant eyewear frames, they struck up a conversation, during which Pablo confessed his love for unconventional glasses – and his dream of one day designing his own pair. Well, the rest is history, as the street artist joined forces with the eyewear label for a unique collabo: Hot off the press, here’s HUMPHREY’S X HOMBRE!

For what is now the sixth MYKITA campaign in

MYKITA X MARK BORTHWICK ART BOOK

cooperation with artist and photographer Mark Borthwick, friends and family of the MYKITA brand were invited to a photo shoot on the island of Lanzarote. All photos were shot with Mark Borthwick’s 25-year-old Leica camera for a vintage look and feel. The prismatic visual effects and the over-exposure of the shots lend an air of spontaneity to the images. With a warm and unique aura, the photos are featured in a MYKITA Art Edition Set book, complemented by hand-signed art prints. 28


COME HANG WITH US AT SILMO/PARIS 26-29 SEPTEMBER 2014 HALL 5 L066

BELLINGER.DK


+++NEWSFEED+++

John Varvatos is an internationally renowned fashion designer, known for producing menswear, accessories and fragrance under his own brand name. The self-taught designer maintains a constant finger on

JOHN VARVATOS SOHO COLLECTION

the pulse of current fashions, which also earned him a spot as one of the creatives behind luxury brand REM Eyewear. Since 2000, John Varvatos has been designing prescription frames and sunglasses for REM. His latest branded offering, the Soho Collection, features pantoscopic and aviator frames in three unique colorways. The frame designs include embossed temple inlays and bolt hinges with the signature John Varvatos touch: A perfect blend of casual Rock ’n’ Roll and masculine cool, for instance in the guitar-shaped hinges in select models. So far, John’s eyewear designs have won followers including KISS, Iggy Pop, Alice Cooper, Perry Farrell, ZZ Top, The Roots, Velvet Revolver and Lenny Kravitz. And starting this September, no other than Ringo Starr of The Beatles fame will be endorsing eyewear and fashion by John Varvatos. Cool!

30


+++NEWSFEED+++

As if it wasn’t hard enough for kids to deal with having to wear eyeglasses for the first time. On top if it all, they often get ridiculed by their peers as ‘four eyes’ and the like. Totally unfair. But it’s no surprise that

ETNIA BARCELONA KIDS COLLECTION

children can be reluctant when it comes to choosing their first pair of frames. But what if eyewear for kids all of a sudden looked cool and stylish? Trending Spanish label Etnia Barcelona has created a new collection aimed at kids and teens that emphasizes current color combinations and on-point silhouettes instead of cutesy gimmicks. Colorways are bright and bold for the youngest kids and a bit more mature for teenagers. Here they come, make way for tomorrow’s trend setters!

LE SPECS RUNAWAYS LUXE & WILDCHILD

Over the past few years, Le Specs has built a reputation in the eyewear world for cutting edge styles. For all people looking to make a strong impression, the

WIN

new models RUNAWAYS luxe and WILDCHILD are the perfect companions. The Australian label has managed to make a big splash on the sunglasses market in the shortest amount of time – and there’s no end in sight. Adding fuel to the flames, we’re giving away every single model in their collection in every available colorway. Huge! In order to win, you have until October 1, 2014 to ‘like’ the Facebook pages of Eyewear Magazine and Le Specs Europe and send us an email with the subject line ‘Le Specs’ at presse@eyewear-magazine.com. Good luck!

32


+++NEWSFEED+++

CLAIRE GOLDSMITH & ØRGREEN OPTICS Claire Goldsmith and Ørgreen Optics are joining forces for a unique brand partnership. Exactly 88 years ago, the Oliver Goldsmith brand was founded by its famous namesake, and would soon advance to become one of the most influential eyewear brands of the 20th century. Today, the founder’s great-granddaughter, Claire Goldsmith, is holding the reigns. Joining the party, Ørgreen Optics has been among the defining forces in eyewear design for 17 years now. Internationally known for their clear, recognizable form language and clean designs, both labels have left their respective mark on the eyewear industry. While one label represents classic designs and the other stands for modern influences, both share the same uncompromising passion for detail and a constant commitment to product development. The new brand partnership is marked by a unique arrangement: Each company will maintain its own brand name and identity, while sharing internal resources and distribution infrastructure. “Claire Goldsmith commands an incredible family heritage,” said Henrik Ørgreen, a longtime friend and admirer of Claire’s. But make no mistake: The brand partnership is not a marriage of convenience, but an organic evolution of their friendship.


Marc O’Polo »506083«

Marc O’Polo »506076«

34


THE REASON WHY

SLEEPING BEAU T Y RELOADED

What would the story of Sleeping Beauty and her Prince Charming look like today? Our photo shoot went in search of an answer. In the Brothers Grimm fairy tale, Sleeping Beauty falls into a deep, magical slumber after poking her finger on the spindle of a spinning wheel – and only true love’s kiss can ever bring her back. In the traditional story, Sleeping Beauty’s castle is surrounded by a hedge of thorny roses that grows into every room, ultimately entangling our precious heroine. Therefore, we fitted our modern-day Sleeping Beauty in a beautiful glittering dress adorned with a roses pattern. The floral jewelry on our model also adds to the modern interpretation of the thorny hedges. As for our Prince Charming, we decided to forego the traditional tights and set him up with a chic but relaxed three-piece suit. Symbolizing the magical sleep, the classic Marc O’Polo sunglasses complete the picture. Now all that’s missing is a kiss to break the spell. Dirk Schumacher and Janina Cüpper

P hoto: Dir k Schumacher/dir k schumacher .com St y l ing: Ja nina Cü pper @ 2 1 Agenc y H air & M ak e-Up: Yasmin Far ma n Model s: Sina H aw el c/o Most Wa n t ed Model s L en nart Hev ert c/o Most Wa n t ed Model s Clot hing: Dr ess a nd Belt : Gl aw/ Jew el ry: Konplot t/ He a dpiece: R ik e F eu r st ein Clot hing: Dr ess, Shirt, T ie & Clot h: Her r von Eden


THE REASON WHY

A MAT TER OF PERSPECTIVE

As the Ancient Greek fabulist Aesop showed in his tales: It’s all a matter of perspective. And naturally, this paradigm also applies to eyewear, where it’s all about the right angles – not only in terms of frame design. Because after all, you’re not only looking at the glasses, but through them. In this shoot featuring three Oakley frames, photographer Mert not only adds a playful twist on perspectives, but also surprising hues of light. P hoto: Mert – facebook .com/mert photo Model : Mich a el @ promod.org Loc at ion: fcuk-yoga .de

Oakley »Frogskins LX«

36


Oakley »Holbrook LX«

Oakley »Breadbox«


A n d y

W o l f

W h i t e H e at

Mukhina

Calling all eyewear enthusiasts with a taste for refined crafts­manship: Here’s a rare chance to get your hands on a new collection of eyewear by Andy Wolf, a brand with an international haute following including the likes of Lady Gaga. The Austria-based brand is releasing its very first collection of metal frames this summer. Every single model shipped from the very small, but highly successful manual production work-

Pevsner

shop in the Steiermark region has been subject to weeks of finishing work, and is therefore a one-of-a-kind piece. The frame designs of the White Heat line are equally impressive, featuring avant-garde form language and prominent nose bridge curvatures for that unmistakable Andy Wolf overall finish. The name says it all – these glasses are hot, so get them while you can! 38


Hunt

Calder Photos: Raphael Schmitz

Moore


La dernière passage By Stefan Kapfer

40


L.G.R. »Reunion « From lef t to right Dress: Franziska Michael | Hat: Sonja Dissberger Berlin | Braselet Fly Silver : Nina Athanasiou Dress: Franzius | Hat: Sonja Dissberger Berlin | Coat: Jale Richer t By Richer t Beil | Umbrella: Lisbeth Dahl | Gloves: Tosca Blu Hat: Augustin Teboul | Dress: Glaw | Gloves: Tosca Blu | Sholder Bag : Chloe Vintage | Handbag : Tosca Blu

L.G.R. »Lola «

Funk Food »Hush Puppies «


Cazal » 9056 «

42 Coat: Nina Athanasiou | Shir t: Sonja Dissberger Berlin | Leather Pants: Richer t Beil | Hat: Samuel Acebey


L.G.R. »Reunion «

L.G.R. »Lola « From lef t to right DRESS: FR anziska Michael | Hat: Sonja Dissberger Berlin | Braselet Fly Silver : Nina Athanasiou Dress: Franzius | Hat: Sonja Dissberger Berlin | Coat: Jale Richer t By Richer t Beil | Umbrella: Lisbeth Dahl | Gloves: Tosca Blu


Kilsgaard Âť sun4.1/15 ÂŤ

44

Leather Vest: Richer t Beil | Jacket: Richer t Beil | Pants: Richer t Beil


Dress: Steinrohner | Shoes: Steinrohner | Tights: Wolford | Hat Black: Steinrohner Hat: Haniva By Jeonga Choi | Top: Sonja Dissberger Berlin | Pants : Samuel Acebey | Shoes: Veja (Memor y Canvis)

Strada del Sole » 086 «

Strada del Sole » 032 «


Coat: Steinrohner | Shoes: H&M

Funk Food » Snert gold «

46


Tarian Âť Madeleine ÂŤ Top: Anbasja Blanken | Pants: Anbasja Blanken


All Clothing From Strehlow

götti » Xania «

Maybach » The Prince I «

48


Barton Perreira Âť Sauvestre ÂŤ Knitted Shir t: Steinrohner | Chain Heirloom: Vintage


Lindberg » 8582 «

50

Coat: Franziska Michael | Tights: Wolford | Hat: Liber ty Ribbon By Jeonga Choi | Shoes: Jeffrey Campbell


Photos: StefanKapfer.de Production: H60office.com Styling: Sky Bulatovic – skystyling.tumblr.com Assistent: Lia van Buddenbrock Hair & Make-Up: Nicola Weidemann with Weidemann Make-Up Products Assistents: Rena Beh & Anja Kim Assistent: Carlos Krug Models: Ellen van der Planck @ Modelpool, Manouche @ Tune Models, Tania Lebedeva, Elias Paulus Lopes @ Indeedmodels

Dress: Anbasja Blanken | Cross Earring : Vintage

Retouche: Carsten Klask – Postroom.de

Oliver Goldsmith »Oops (1973)«


BRAND PROFILE

CRAFTSMANSHIP & GLAMOUR SUZY GLAM Suzy Glam is not to be confused with the attractive lady with the extravagant outfits and hairstyles that’s become a fixture on the optical tradeshow circuit since the last edition of Silmo. No, that’s Susanne Klemm, the real name of the Swiss eyewear designer behind the company. Susanne represents one half of the relatively young but up-andcoming eyewear label Suzy Glam that has causes quite a stir within one year of its founding. The second half of the label with the three-dimensional design approach is the more grounded, but equally smart and style-savvy Etienne Frederiks. The odd couple – really a Yin&Yang combination of opposites – met at a party four years ago. It was a match made in heaven, not only in a business sense. When we visited Suzy Glam’s offices in Utrecht, we found out that Etienne and Susanne not only share the same workspace, but also live under the same roof. Here’s a look at how the dynamic duo is putting the glam into the eyewear business.

52


49 Photos & Text: Stefan Dongus


BRAND PROFILE

Susanne at her workshop. Entirely without pen or paper, new eyewear designs are implemented directly with the rugged touch of a rasp

SUSANNE KLEMM

Susanne earned her stripes in the industry working for opticians in Zurich and Lausanne, before she spontaneously decided to study design. During a course-related internship in Amsterdam, she felt like the city embodied her idea of what life was all about. Enamored with the Dutch way of life, Susanne enrolled for courses in Art Exhibition and Jewelry Design at the Art Academy in Utrecht. And although she quickly built a reputation as a designer, she never lost touch with her optical expertise. Or was it the other way around? The optician never lost touch with her design talent. Anyhow, the mother of a 22-year-old son has been wearing both hats for some time now: trained optician and certified designer all at once. It’s a rather rare combination in our industry, and the secret to creating eyewear that’s equally stylish and elaborately crafted.


BRAND PROFILE

Etienne appreciates exclusive products , and his fine taste in music is only matched by his brand exper tise

ETIENNE FREDERIK S

Etienne is also a trained optician who runs his own store in the town of Utrecht. Over the years, Etienne has built extensive expertise and connections in the eyewear industry. As one of the masterminds behind the Hall of Frame tradeshows in Holland, he also runs his own distribution company to bring brands such as Mykita, Barton Perreira and Leisure Society to customers in the Netherlands. But make no mistake, Etienne isn’t your run-of-the-mill optician who spends his days hunched over the workbench or planted behind the sales counter. Far from it! With a discerning eye for style and design, Etienne finds constant inspiration in a broad variety of fields, including fashion, music, interior architecture and automotive design. As a result, his output is never just plain, common taste but always that ‘special something’. And much like Susanne, he doesn’t mind extending his workday into the late hours of the day when inspiration strikes. Work time or play time – it’s all the same when you’re driven by a passion for eyewear.


BRAND PROFILE

Susanne Klemm not only applies her design skills to eyewear, but also exceptional jewelr y

THINKS BIG SUN

»SUZY GLAM LOOKS FORWARD.« IS RIGHT ON TIME

GOT THE AWARD SUN

W

hen Susanne and Etienne decided to combine their experience and expertise, it was clear that starting their own eyewear label was the only way to go. But not just any eyewear label. Especially not another label solely founded on a new, innovative technology. Instead, outstanding design would be the focus of their brand. Which is why all frames in the Suzy Glam collection are marked by a three-dimensional approach to eyewear design. Behind the scenes, Susanne’s design approach is rather unconventional, and most of all entirely analog instead of digital. With an emphasis on hands-on creative work, Susanne crafts all initial prototypes from acetate, which she trims into place through several, intricate production steps. Ultimately, 56

the frames are refined until ready to receive their finishing touches while being fitted to a wearer’s actual face. This way, Susanne tells us, she can arrive at entirely different results than a design process confined to computer representations of the real thing from end-to-end. For Suzy Glam, the goal of technology is to assist the design process, not to dictate its outcome.


Suzy Glam designs fall within the vernacular of classic eyewear design, all the while taking things further than conventional ‘retro’ design brands. Instead, the label sets out to create entirely new styles for the current generation of eyewear aficionados. Meanwhile, the Dutch label’s offering is not limited to just one particular gender. The collection features outspokenly feminine glasses for women next to expressive frames for self-confident men that aren’t afraid to add a dose of glamour to their style. What all models have in common, is that acetate is the basic material for all Suzy Glam eyewear. And not just any acetate, the lightweight material with the three-dimensional properties is crafted into frames at a production site in Italy, while all frames receive their final touches by hand at the in-house workshop in Utrecht.

Next to characteristic designs, Susanne and Etienne are also committed to staying close to their customers. Suzy Glam operates entirely without sales reps. That’s right, opticians only get the chance to place an order at eyewear trade -shows – a surprise to many in the industry. The motivation lies in maintaining a lean cost structure to avoid unnecessary sales pressures or compromises on Suzy Glam’s philosophy. And most of all: Susanne and Etienne want to keep it fun and light-hearted... and ever so glamerous! WWW.SUZYGLAM.COM

FACES THE FACE


Photo: Paul Ripke

BRAND PROFILE

PAU L R IP K E F E AT U R IN JA N D E L AY We receive countless submissions of celebrity photos here at EYEWEAR magazine. Mostly mediocre snapshots hastily taken by paparazzi on the run, or blurry attempts at zooming in from a great distance. Or both. Entirely missing from these photos – next to focus and proper lighting – is some kind of indication that the subject is actually okay with being photographed. Because most are not...

For a breath of fresh air, here’s a portrait of Hamburg-based rapper and singer Jan Delay. Shot by veteran photographer Paul Ripke, known for his monumental portrait series of the German national football team, the portrait is a textbook example of proper lighting, styling, and image quality. Not to forget the stylish glasses. Asked about their origin, Jan Delay insists on keeping some remnant of mystery: “Never explain, never complain.”


www.facebook.com/metropolitan.eyewear

OWP Brillen GmbH, www.metropolitan-eyewear.de

htp.de


INT E RV IEW

FINE LOOK ING DA NISH DE SIGN The name FLEYE is short for ‘Fine Looking EYE’ and the Danish eyewear label sure has a fine eye for stylish designs with a unique edge. EYEWEAR magazine decided to pay the label a visit at their manor estate offices in the countryside outside of Copenhagen. Although we had already seen online photos of the place before our visit, the setting turned out even more rural and remote than we had imagined. To put it mildly, the estate that houses FLEYE’s headquarters could also accommodate a sizeable golf course, with room to spare. We enjoyed talking shop with co-founder and owner of FLEYE, Annette Saust Estø, while enjoying a nice view from the terrace. And we were highly impressed with the large amount of energy the 54-yearold with a penchant for healthy living invests into her multifarious activities: Multi-tasking at FLEYE, traveling for work and pleasure – including trips to the world’s high-mountain ranges – and not to mention being a grandmother to seven grandkids. As you will see, the future of eyewear is looking mighty fine in the Danish countryside.

60

Photo: Stefan Dongus

FLEYE XX ANNET TE SAUST ESTØ


INT E RV IEW


INT E RV IEW

Hi Annette, we’re sitting on the terrace of Barfredshøj Manor House, home of the new FLEYE office. We’re overlooking the garden, or better yet, the park, which is way too big to do a lunch walk. I had expected a design-driven and internationally renowned Danish eyewear company to be located in Copenhagen or Aarhus. What brought you here? We ended up here because we were already spoiled by having a similar location when we started the company. To save the cost for renting an office, we started in my old dower house in the country side where I lived with my husband and four kids. A huge old house with a big garden and a nice view across the fields. But not large enough? FLEYE grew rapidly, and we soon needed more space. We started looking for a new place where it was possible to take the train or the car for work, and with easier access for delivering goods and picking up parcels. But all the places we looked at did not have any outdoor space for lunch or a nice view of the sky. Then finally, Lars found this amazing place. There’s no train station nearby, but it only takes 25 min by car from Copenhagen.

You need at least a 3-Wood for a good shot from the terrace all the way to end of the garden

62


INT E RV IEW

“WE NOT ONLY PLAY IT SAFE WHEN WE DESIGN OR COMBINE COLORS, WE ALSO DARE TO GO TO THE EDGE. AND SOMETIMES THE CRAZY ONES ACTUALLY BECOME BESTSELLERS!”


INT E RV IEW

It sure is remote. What are the advantages of being located in the countryside? You feel relaxed as soon as you arrive at work because it’s so quiet here – hearing the birds singing, looking at the deer and the hares. It’s amazing all year-round… The light is changing from season to season. For those of us who are spending a lot of time in big cities, it’s a nice contrast. Speaking of contrast, let’s change the subject. Give us a short lowdown on the story of FLEYE. When and why did you start the company? It’s really a coincidence how I started designing frames. When my kids were young, I could not even draw anything they could recognize! But at the former company where I worked as a sales manager, I was working with a quite lazy designer as my boss. He designed the frames and I sold them. When I complained about the long time it took to get new models he said: “If you think it’s that easy, why don’t you try for yourself!”

Ultra-lightweight materials for super-bold styles

So I faced the challenge and started drawing at my kitchen table one evening. The skills from my work as a teacher at the optometric school were very helpful, and I found out that I did not have a problem drawing frames. It felt very natural for me to do it. So I developed a lot of new models. In fact, they ended up selling much better than the models my boss had designed.

64


INT E RV IEW

So what led to the founding of FLEYE? After a while, my two colleagues Lars Halstrøm and Hanne Rosenvold Anderson and I mustered up the courage to start on our own. We founded FLEYE simply because we are passionate about eyewear design. We all had many years of experience from the optical business working for other brands but we had our own ideas about how great eyewear should be invented. So we created a concept of featherlight and allergy-friendly eyewear in innovative color combinations. And soon our new Danish design brand took off. What kinds of background do the three of you bring to the company? And how do you complement each other? Actually, our strengths and personalities are surprisingly different but together we form a symbiotic partnership that works amazingly. Lars, born in 1970, is the Sales Director of FLEYE. He is the son of an optician, so he grew up surrounded by eyewear. Hanne, born in 1958, is the CEO of FLEYE. She has a degree in business and leadership but her approach to work is very hands-on. I was born in 1959 and work as the Head of Design & Marketing. The triangle pattern in FLEYE’s visual universe is a symbolic reference to our trio.

FLEYE’s tetra-chromatic color universe: white, black, orange and sky blue


INT E RV IEW

As the only man and 12 years younger, it must be hard for Lars to survive in this strong matriarchy. Lars loves women. So he “married” Hanne and I when we started FLEYE. In fact, at his real wedding four years ago, he began his speech by telling his wife Rikke that he was already married to two older women. [laughs] People from the optical world said to Lars in the beginning: “How can you start a company with those ladies?” But actually it was his idea, Lars was the one who approached us about it back then.

Annette, how come you don’t have your own office? It can’t be a space problem, right? No, it is because I am travelling a lot. And when I am here at our head office, I want to be close to the staff that I am responsible for. I like to have people around me. Also, I never work at my desk. It is always covered with samples, papers and materials. When I design the frames, I work at home or while I’m travelling either for business or pleasure.

What was the biggest challenge while establishing your own company? To get the right idea. Why should anybody buy frames from you? There are already so many nice companies making nice products. When we had the idea, the next step was to find the money. We added our savings together and agreed on paying ourselves no salary until we had customers paying for our products. I still remember the day. One year later, we got our first salary, and I have never been so happy about a salary in my life! It filled up a huge gap.

“IF YOU ADD SOME COLOR, IT ATTRACTS ATTENTION WHEN THE FRAMES ARE ON THE WALL, IN THE WINDOW OR ON SOMEONE’S FACE.”

66


INT E RV IEW

“LIGHTNESS AND COMFORT ARE CRUCIAL TO US.” FLEYE is characterized by the colors black, white, blue and orange? Is that the exact orange of your hair color? And what was first, the hair – or the company color? I have had this orange hair for 25 years! I only took a break for three years because I wanted longer hair. So during that period I had my natural brown hair color. When it became long and very nice, I developed breast cancer, and the hair disappeared during chemo. We started FLEYE right after this period, and the graphic designer who suggested these four company colors had never seen my orange hair! So when my hair started to grow out, I colored it orange again and now it fits perfectly with FLEYE. [laughs] It’s very practical because I’m easy to recognize and people remember me.

The color of your hair, but also your multitasking job and private hobbies such as high-mountain expeditions are not exactly typical for a 54-year-old woman. Where do you get the energy? I have always had a lot of energy and like to explore things. My husband and I both like hiking and mounting climbing. Not too extreme, but trips where you push yourself a bit further than you think you can. So now that all the kids have left home, we have time for this. First we did Kilimanjaro, where we both reached the summit and last year we went for the Aconcagua, the highest mountain in South America at nearly 7000 meters. We spent 14 wonderful days in the most stunning area of a natural park, and almost made it to the summit. During the summit night there was a snow storm. Only 400 meters before the summit we had to turn back and walk down to camp due. They closed the summit for the next three days so we didn’t have the chance to try one more time. But we will be back in 2016 – we HAVE to try one more time!

Packaging and gadgets are as much of a focus as great service


INT E RV IEW

“My office is where I lay my pen.” Motto of the creative nomad

You are an extremely busy woman. Is it safe to assume that there was no time for family and kids in your life? Three husbands, four kids and seven grandchildren... [laughs] I try to do my very best to see all of them as often as possible. I have been so lucky that I’ve had my kids when I was between 20 and 30 years old. Having grandchildren early is nice because I still have a lot of energy to play with them. But I am not the kind of granny they can call in the morning for babysitting when a child is sick. I hope I will be that one day.

to anyone’s anatomy. Plus, it also serves as a cool little design detail since the wire loops in and out of the front of the eyewear. Another trademark of FLEYE frames is the customized clip-on. You can get a matching, polarized sun clip-ons for almost all our frames. It matches the shape and color of the individual frame 100 percent. The clip-ons are designed for each frame, so you get a cohesive look that integrates the clip-on beautifully. Finally, all frames are light as a feather, even when they have an expressive frame design. Most people are surprised when they try on a FLEYE frame. Lightness and comfort are crucial to us.

Well, you do have another ‘baby’ to take care of. What are the special characteristic of your products? Eyewear is not just about improving eyesight. It’s about communicating who you are. So we want to design eyewear that helps people underline their individual personalities. One of our signature design features is the beta-titanium nose pad wire on all frames. We received a Red Dot Design Award for this feature. The adjustable wire makes it possible to fit our glasses

Which materials do you use in your frames and why? We only use allergy-friendly materials like acetate, beta titanium, carbon fiber and natural horn. Apart from their allergy-friendliness, these are also very lightweight materials.

68


INT E RV IEW

Your glasses are not only very light, but often highly colorful. Why is that? It’s so boring with only brown and black frames. If you add some color, it attracts attention when the frames are on the wall, in the window or on someone’s face. We like to make combinations with bright colors on the temples and more calm fronts, but also sometimes go wild with patterns and colors in a crazy mix. We not only play it safe when we design or combine colors, we also dare to go to the edge. And sometimes the crazy ones actually become bestsellers! Compared to some other labels, your glasses are rather bulky. How do you make sure that voluminous glasses won’t become too heavy? It’s all about the materials we use. They are very lightweight, so the frames may look heavy but they’re surprisingly light. We also have a range of thin, feather-light styles for the more classic customers. FLEYE offers special shapes for your customers in Asia. Is that an important market for you? We have an entire collection for the Asian market. We use the same models but with Asian fitting and different colors. We have established our own company in Shanghai to support our Chinese customers the best way and to show them that we really are serious in this region. We heard that you also have a production site in Japan? The frames that we sell in Asia are produced in Japan. Our customers in China especially do not want frames produced in China.

On an international scale, what are other strong markets – and where’s the business rather tough? We have a very strong position in Northern Europe. Although we’re doing well in this region, we’re still experiencing a great potential for expansion, especially in the German-speaking countries. Germany is Denmark’s largest export market, and we know FLEYE can grow even stronger there. How do you help opticians to sell your product? Great question! We are not interested in ‘onenight-stands’, so to speak. [laughs] We don’t want to sell a lot of frames to an optician, and then just leave. When we win a new customer, we are entering a long-term collaboration, and we are both working towards the same goal: the optician should have as much success with our frames as possible.


INT E RV IEW

What are some concrete examples of your support? For example, if it should happen that certain models are not moving out of the shops fast enough, we give the optician an option to exchange these for more saleable models. It makes the customers feel secure that they are not left with unsellable products. We also focus a lot on designing our own point-of-sale materials. It should be an experience for the customer to buy a pair of FLEYE glasses. For example, when a customer comes to pick up his new glasses, he is handed a little gift bag including a big microfiber cloth and a foldable carrying case – all with a special FLEYE design.

“WE ARE NOT INTERESTED IN ‘ONE-NIGHTSTANDS’.” Year’ award three years in a row from one of Norway’s leading optical chains. And in the annual internal surveys of Denmark’s leading optical chain, their staff always rates our service much higher than our competitors’. How does that reflect in your staff and internal structure? Of course being service-minded is a trait that we look for when we hire new sales representatives and customer support staff. But we also make sure to have multi-lingual staff. So for example, when a German or Austrian customer calls our free hotline, we speak their language.

Is ’service beyond product’ an important issue at FLEYE? From the very beginning when we founded FLEYE, service has been at the core of our business philosophy. I think any optician will agree that service is vital to keeping customers. If you will allow me to brag a little bit, FLEYE has actually won the ‘Supplier of the

Our warehouse is located here in Denmark to ensure fast delivery. And our frames are not just delivered in boring, brown boxes. We believe it should also be a sustainable experience for the shop staff to receive deliveries from us, so we have designed our very own colorful, re-usable gift boxes. Our customers are always so excited and happy to receive these. Annette, thank you very much for your hospitality.

Thanks to beta-titanium wires in the nose pads, FLEYE glasses can be adjusted to any facial anatomy

70


INT E RV IEW


Pole

Petra

I

WONDE R

Paula

WHO

YOU

AR E

The latest campaign by Swiss eyewear powerhouse götti offers a powerful reminder of the impact of eyewear on a wearer’s face. When someone chooses a certain design for their Photos: Raphael Schmitz

glasses, they communicate something about themselves to the rest of the world. Who am I? Who do I aspire to be? The glasses are an integral part of a person’s public image, much like a suit or dress, and to a much larger extend than any other accessory. In search of expressive styles, photographer Christian Grund from the town of Basel, Switzerland, set out to capture a number of different personalities enhanced by götti eyewear. Grund enjoys a reputation for elaborate lighting and clean, highly stylized compositions. With a constant focus on the faces of his models, his bold new campaign features a number of expressive portraits in black-and-white, reduced to the main essentials: the glasses, and the manifold personalities of their wearers. 72


PAULA En vogue. These feminine frames crafted from titanium have a direct and lady-like appearance. A dynamic presence in the tradition of 1970s designs. The delicate metal crossbar adds an air of classic refinement to the frames.

P OL E Slim, exact and courageous. The Pole model is a lightweight titanium frames ready to enhance masculine facial features with delicate lines. Catches attention without being loud.

PET R A Delicate, precise and feminine. The Petra model is a feather-light titanium frame with amazing clarity. With generously curved lines, the frames make a powerful statement. A golden mean between understated, clean forms and expressive style.

Petra

Pole

Petra


Claire Goldsmith »Bradbury«

C L A IR E G OL DSMITH

Claire Goldsmith »Renshaw«

We live in an era where everything appears to be happening faster and faster every day. So to no surprise, there is a great deal of nostalgia for the “good old days” – and not only in the fashion business. Inspired by the swank styles of the Roaring Fifties, Claire Goldsmith has created the Legacy collection. It conjures up an air of tobacco and vintage cognac and men dressed in collared shirts, patterned sports coats with hole. Claire Goldsmith is the great-granddaughter of legendary eyewear designer Oliver Goldsmith, famous for creating the spectacles of choice for silver screen icons such as Audrey Hepburn and Michael Caine. With the Bradbury and Renshaw models, Claire Goldsmith turns back the clock to the laid-back extravagance of the 1950s. And who wouldn’t like to hop on for a ride back to a simpler time?

74

Photos: Raphael Schmitz

EDITOR'S CHOICE


Gesicht: Rosanna Brille: Eddi A. w w w. ma ke l lo s-p otsdam.de


By Patrick Miller

76


Woodone » Gunna «


Invu » T2508 «

78

Dress by Badgley Mischka


Dress by Badgley Mischka

Dolce & Gabbana » DG 4231 «


KBL » Rockaway Beach «

80


KBL » Liberty Island «


Trenchcoat by London Fog

Ørgreen » Capote «

82


Dress by Badgley Mischka

Ørgreen » Florence «


Munic Eyewear » Mod. 5 «

84


Munic Eyewear » Mod. 5 «


Photos: Patrick Miller, patrickmiller.de | Art Direction & Concept: Karin Postert, karinpostert.de | Styling: Janina Cüpper @ Optix Agency

Esprit » ET17835 «

86


W W W. FLE Y E . D K

A dark collection of extreme lightness


B A C K S TA G E BY R APHAEL SCHMITZ

MAKELLOS »ME 9006«

88


MAKELLOS »ME 1002«

MAKELLOS »ME 9013«


METROPOLITAN »8101«

METROPOLITAN »8103«

90


POLICE »V8742«

POLICE »MISSY«


HAPTER »E01M«

HAPTER »D01M«


COLIBRIS »JULE«

COLIBRIS »JULE«

COLIBRIS »KLARA«


WOODONE »NESSA«

WOODONE »GUNNA«

WOODONE »KEITA«

94


DISRUPTIVE BY DESIGN M A R K C A V E N D I S H _ C R O S S L I N K P I TC H A CT I V E P R E S C R I P T I O N C O L L E CT I O N ®

INTERCHANGEABLE STEMS REVOLUTIONIZE THE EVERYDAY

© 2014 OAKLEY ICON | RX.OAKLEY.COM


IVONNE AGE: 33 HAIR: DARK EYES: GREEN-BROWN FACIAL SHAPE: SLENDER DIOPTER: -5.5

96


MY

PERFECT

FIT

Ø R G R E E N »M O O D Y«

a fashion accessory that I want to wear with pride – while feeling comfortable.

Finding the right glasses is tricky. Not only am I dealing with extreme nearsightedness, but I’m equally obsessed with modern, clean eyewear designs. But as of lately, I’ve been finding myself using contact lenses more often, mostly due to the fact that my current glasses might by quite elegant, but they also feature really large lenses. This wouldn’t be a problem at lowgrade vision correction if the lenses were somewhat smaller. But when we’re talking about advanced nearsightedness necessitating highly distortive correction lenses, it’s just not a good combination. At these diopter levels, the eyes appear to be shrinking. And this effect only gets worse, the larger the lenses. So I was ready for a new pair of glasses. Modern, but equally timeless. Purist, but still visible. Not too large, but also not too minimal, since I do like wearing large glasses, after all. And I’m into upscale materials and quality finishes. Overall, I don’t have a fetish for certain products, but when it comes to eyewear, my expectation levels start soaring. Ultimately, glasses are more than a medicalvision-correcting device but

Photos: Stefan Dongus

With all this in mind, my purchasing decision consumed several weeks. On a daily basis, my preferences shifted between models by Götti, Barton Perreira, Kilsgaard and Reiz. Until I came across the “Moody” model by Ørgreen. Putting it on my face, it instantly fit. Even at second sight, it still fit. To the point where the “Moody” frames in Mat Brown / Mat Cactus Green appears custom-tailored to my facial anatomy. And it covers all my other preferences: I love titanium, just as much as the combination of brown and green that’s flattering to my hair and eye color. The slimmer lines on the bottom of the frame lend a modern feel to the design and... Well, I could go on. But ultimately, it’s really a matter of gut feeling. And I’m glad I trusted mine.


L IN DBE RG GROOVE COLOURS

9571

145B

98


Photos: Raphael Schmitz

Danish eyewear brand LINDBERG is known for its minimalist approach and timeless designs. Every model, every product is a direct reflection of the Danish design tradition of classic elegance paired with refined simplicity. LINDBERG designers identify and eliminate any superfluous elements and spare parts – including screws, rivets or bevel seams. Nevertheless, all LINDBERG frames are extremely robust, despite weighing in as some of the lightest pieces on the market.

6523

Recent accolades include the “Royal Warrant Appointment by the Danish Court” – a prestigious award presented to select companies for outstanding achievements by Denmark’s Royal Family. Apparently, Queen Margrethe II. and Prince Henrik have a taste for understated luxury, and officially endorse LINDBERG eyewear. The most recent addition to LINDBERG’s line-up, the Groove Colours concept, offers 24 different color variations that can be implemented in a matted or metallic finish. In order to work harmoniously with the titanium frames, the colors were specifically created in a new process, similar to automotive paint coatings, which makes them more durable than conventional coloring methods. While the overall frame designs remain purist and understated, the splashes of color add a new dose of individuality to the mix.


ic! berlin » Power Law «

B E L L E DE JOUR By Reno Mezger


ic! berlin » Lundi « Shir t : HIEN LE | Cardigan : SOPOPULAR Blouse : Lala Berlin | Necklace : Bond Hardware


Fleye » Selma «

102

Coat: Monki | Blouse : Monki | Pants : Forever 21


Fleye » River «

From Lef t To Right Coat: Firma | Blouse : Lala Berlin | Necklace : Sabrina Dehoff | Pants : Firma Coat: Herr Von Eden | Scar f : Tiger Of Sweden | Pullover : Tiger Of Sweden | Pants : Cos

Fleye » Marley «


Coat : Hobbs | Blouse : Hobbs | Jeans : Les Temps Des Cherises | Bag : Pierre Hardi | Boots : Reser ved

Chloé » CE635S «

104


Overall : Caruso

Metropolitan Âť Sun Mod. 8300 ÂŤ


Etnia Barcelona » Africa 02 «

106

Jacket : Scotch & Soda | Shir t : Boss | Belt : Chavit Pants : Japan R ags | Shoes : Marc Stone


Top: Eleven Paris | Vest : Michalsk y | Pants: Minimarket

Etnia Barcelona Âť Africa 01 ÂŤ


Coblens » Handgepäck «

108

Jacket : C .p. Twentynine | Roll Neck : Liu Jo | Skir t : Ep Anoui | Overknees : Justfab Coat : Tiger Of Sweden | Pullover : Tiger Of Sweden | Pants : Prairie For Weekday


Coblens » Tankwart «


110

Flat Cap : R aw Fitting | Blouse : Hobbs | Wool Cardigan : Rich Royal | Pants : Tiger Of Sweden | Tights : Falke

Photos: Reno Mezger (www.reno-mezger.de) | Art Direction & Production: Uta von Fintel | Styling: Theo Vasiliou (Blossom Management) Hair & Make-Up: Julia Junglas (Ballsaal Artist Management) | Models: Marie Kapferer (Iconic Management); Jorge Alano (PMA - Promod Model Agency) | Photo Assistant: Nici Lallemand, Sascha Lepp

Esprit Âť ET17819 ÂŤ


Moscot » Yona «

MORE TIME By Ulrich Hartmann

Moscot » Gelt «

112


From lef t to right Cap: Naviiv | Shir t: monki | Blouson: Weekday Pullover : Maiami | Skir t: Superdr y | Necklace: models own | Stockings: Falke Cap: Cute Lou Couture | Jacket Maiami | Shir t: Pferd und Baumgar ten | Socks: Falke

Barton Perreira Âť Haley ÂŤ


Andy Wolf » 5041 «

114

Blouse: Monki | Broche: Markus Lupfer | Skir t: Silvian Heach


Andy Wolf » 5042 « Bomber Jacket: Alpha Industries | Shir t: Rebekka Ruetz | Necklace: Stella and Dot | Jewelr y: Six Limited


Escada » VES334 «

116


Hamburg Eyewear »Hinnerkzz« Suit: Herr von Eden | Dressshir t: Herr von Eden / Minimum | Bow-tie: Herr von Eden Hat: Silvian Heach | Dress: Markus Lupfer | Bag : Deux Leux | Headphones: Urban Ears


Cap: Vans | Blouse: Silvian Heach | Necklace: Limited by sixx | Bag : Vans

Claire Goldsmith »Reiss «

118


Suzy Glam »Got the award«

Suzy Glam »Thinks big «

From lef t to right Shir t: Monki | Skir t: Eleven Paris | Necklace: Limited by sixx Blouse: TK MAXX


Reiz »Widder «

120


From lef t to right Cap: Muschi Kreuzberg | Pullover : 5 Preview | Watch: Nixon Blouse: Silvian Heach Pullover : Ana alcazar | Rings: Bond Hardware

Reiz »Brenz «

Reiz »Wacholder«


Cazal Âť670ÂŤ

122

Photos: Ulrich Hartmann | Art Direction: Konstantinos Gkoumpetis | Photo Assistent: Sophie Schwarzenberger | Hair: Carsten Richert | Make-Up: Kim Keusen Styling: Jennifer Mertens | Models: Marlen Nohl @ Modelwerk / Mo @ Izaio / Sarah @ M4 Models / Tino Wolf

Blouse: Silvian Heach | Pullover : Rebekka Ruetz | Necklace: Stelle & Dot


115


MEN @ WORK

M ARKUS TEMMING X M ARKUS T When it comes to innovative eyewear companies, most people will think of Berlin, Copenhagen, New York and maybe half a dozen other metropolitan cities. But is it possible for modern-day eyewear design to originate from those rural areas nobody talks about? You bet! For living proof, look no further than upcoming small-batch eyewear label Markus T. The company from the quaint Western German town of Isselhorst has been doing its own thing for some years now. Behind the scenes, Markus T is as down-to-Earth as can be. A small label masterminded by founder, namesake and faceto-the-customer, Markus Temming. Our visit at company headquarters confirmed our initial impression: The brand’s offices, production and distribution headquarters are based on a small farm without any hipster clichés or exaggerated urban fashions of the moment. The hard-working employees may roll up their sleeves to pack some boxes, but there are no gratuitous tattoos or tofu snacks to be found. It’s all somewhat more grounded and calmer than elsewhere in the eyewear business. Maybe this safe haven is the reason why Markus can approach the hectic tradeshow circuit, the fast-paced market dynamics and around-the-clock buzz on social media with an air of Zen-like calm. Compared to Markus, other luminaries in the business appear as calm and stable as a vial of nitroglycerin. But make no mistake: Markus T also had to start his business from nothing, and nothing was handed to him along the way. In Markus we have met a contemplative designer who is at rest witin himself, without ever resting. And since he’s such a creative thinker – and someone who wears many hats – we handed him catch words instead of questions for the interview, and let him fill in the blanks. For a glimpse inside the mind of Markus T, here’s this issue’s Men @ Work. 124


Photos: Stefan Dongus

Âť German Engineering Plus International Design AppealÂŤ

Quality-oriented designer on one hand...


MEN @ WORK

THE PERSON “Two souls, alas, are housed within my breast... at least.” Occupational duties and family life. Westphalian charms on one hand, purist and clearly delineated design on the other. I fluctuate between different areas of conflict. But none of them are contradictory, if you ask me. My family life is sacred and an important part of my being. On the other hand, I need restlessness, unchecked drive and inspiration – which I meet with my eyes open. The straight-lined MARKUS T frames are not manufactured in a state-of-the-art facility. Our production workshop is housed in an old farm in the town of Gütersloh-Isselhorst, inside a quaint Westphalian farmers residence. This is where rural scenery meets straightforward product design. This place provides the necessary peace and quiet to focus on my work. It’s very important for me to provide an atmosphere where my employees can feel at home – including myself. I think this is reflected in our eyewear. We want our glasses to not only look great, but also be lightweight and comfortable to wear. Maybe it’s an advantage not to be based in one of the hotbeds of our business such as Berlin or Hamburg. THE OPTICIAN “You live and learn.” I became an optician by mere chance. My family provided the impulse. My mother and older sister had the idea that this would be a trade that I would enjoy. And the optician’s trade is quite an exciting and diverse field. So I not only learned a lot about the act of seeing, but also discovered lots of features that leave room for improvement. The trade itself is super traditional and, compared to other industries, rela-

D2 060 – a model from the ‘Design’ series, his very first collection

M2 643 – Markus’ current favorite sunglasses

tively slow-moving. This can actually prove an advantage when it comes to creating sustainable, enduring eyewear frames. It has really benefited me as a designer. Then again, you have to know your basics in the optical trade. After my professional training, I attended the Cologne School of Optometry. My first job was at an contact lenses institute in Switzerland. This was a really exciting time, but my heart was already really in design and composition. So after about a year-and-a-half, I decided to return to Germany. Back home, I created the first collection at my parent’s house. The decision to base my business here in the long run gradually solidified over time. But today I’m glad about that decision. 126


MEN @ WORK

» TWO SOULS, ALAS, ARE HOUSED WITHIN MY BREAST... AT LEAST. «

...and deeply-rooted family man on the other


THE DESIGNER “Function and Form language... that’s what it’s all about.” What is design, really? And more importantly, what is great design? To me, it’s always about the overall product. Every designer should also be a developer to some extend. ‘Form follows function’ is an antiquated motto. Today, being a combination of aesthetically driven designer and technically savvy tinkerer is a must.I’ve undergone this development myself. In the past, the functionality of MARKUS T eyewear frames was a strong focus. Today the form language is also an important aspect. Whenever I see products, automobiles or buildings that have been developed strictly according to external appearances while a lot of effort is required to get the technical components to follow the form language, my blood starts boiling. Today I am convinced that such a one-directional approach can have no future and that great design will evolve towards balance and harmony. MARKUS T is also headed in that direction.

128

This image gets more and more chilled out from top to bottom: Markus , Caruso, and Arun


Since we handle production and development entirely in Germany, we are able to control every step of the process. This allows us to free ourselves from conventions and realize our ideas. The final result is a great, balanced product that brings lots of joy to the wearer. Additionally, we are lowering our environmental impact, making conscientious use of our resources and producing sustainably.

THE PERFECTIONIST “That’s not gonna be enough.” By all means, I can’t deny it. Anyone who knows me would laugh at me, if I made any claims to the contrary.

M1 043 – A piece from the ‘ME’ collection: new materials, new form language


MEN @ WORK

THE SKEPTIC

basis. Because there’s one thing I never want

“I’ll never finish this, right?”

to end up doing: stagnating.

I often question things. But I wouldn’t call myself a skeptic. We sure had to overcome

THE WESTPHALIAN

some obstacles along the way, especially in

“By now I can say I have arrived.”

the

Local pride runs strong here in Eastern West-

early days of our company. But I was still con-

phalia. I’m witnessing many

vinced that we were doing exactly the right

of my friends and acquaintances, who one day

thing. I have to admit, I did go through a

left with the goal of never, ever coming back,

stage when I wasn’t sure whether or not I

finding themselves quite happy to be back.

wanted to spend the rest of my life

It was pretty much the same for me. Once I

making eyewear. During this time, I felt like I

returned from my job

was holding back the company, so it was time

in Switzerland, my first safe harbor was my

for a decision. Since giving up was out of the

parent’s house. I did feel extremely out of

question, I had to find a way to motivate my-

place at first. But today I can see the many ad-

self again. So it was a simple idea that brought

vantages

me back on track: I set the goal for myself to

of this region: The area is especially great for

realize some other new ideas, independent of

my children. There’s lots of greenery and

the eyewear business, before

there’s a sense of community, you feel like a

reaching my 50th birthday.

part of something.

And it worked! Now I’m able to focus all my energy on constructing unique eyewear, together with some other, entirely new projects. And I will always continue to question what I’m doing on a constant

M3 327 X – Markus’ personal favorite

130


» I ALWAYS TRY TO FIND A WAY « It was pretty much the same for me. Once I re-

1950s all the way to the 1970s are fascinating to

turned from my job in Switzerland, my first

me. In the years prior to this era, automobile man-

safe harbor was my parent’s house. I did feel

ufacturers were mostly concerned with technical

extremely out of place at first. But today I can see

aspects. But then, design gradually became more

the many advantages of this region: The area is

and more of a focus. Back then, the approach

especially great for my children. There’s lots of

was totally different than today: A very small

greenery and there’s a sense of community, you

amount of people designed an automobile to-

feel like a part of something.

gether, which resulted in a highly coherent overall product. Nowadays, all kinds of different teams

THE COLLECTOR AND DESIGN AFICIO-

are designing one type of car. But what’s often

NADO

missing is some kind of coordinated effort. Every-

“Great Design is Timeless”

one specializes in their own area, but it doesn’t

I can’t deny a certain passion for collecting

complement what the others are doing.

automobiles. Design is an important aspects of

That’s probably the reason why designing eye-

all walks of life for me. I love looking at beautiful

wear is such a wonderful thing. Even the most

automobiles, objects, buildings and works of art.

minuscule detail is up for you to create,

Automobiles hold a special attraction because of

and in the end it always matches the overall

their design history. Especially cars from the late

concept. Not necessarily something that’s even possible in many other industries today.


THE VISIONARY

After 15 years in the business, we can look back on our own piece of design history. It all

“Dreaming is Highly Welcome.”

started with the Design Collection, which

I wouldn’t call myself a visionary – my wife

marked the very first line introduced by

would laugh if she was here!

MARKUS T – and it’s still going strong today.

We’re not doing something totally unattain-

It revolutionized the way of doing things and

able. Just finding new

is still exciting for us. It’s currently under-

solutions and approaches that are future-ori-

going a relaunch. The ME/M1 was the first

ented and sometimes a bit

collection after my creative crisis and clearly

ahead of today’s technologies. Dreaming is a

marks a new beginning: a novel material de-

mandatory part of my

veloped in-house, paired with a different

life, and realizing those dreams even more

form language and boldness of color. Anoth-

so. I always try to find a way, although some-

er milestone from recent MARKUS T history

times it may seem as if it doesn’t exist. But if

would be the M3 X. We’ve been adding new

you

models to the M3 Collection since 2013, all of

start out by thinking of the obstacles stand-

which carry the ‘X’ in their name. These are

ing between you and your goals, you’re not

models with an incredible depth of materi-

going to get very far. I try to really think with-

als and expressive design. The M3 X is a clear

out

reflection of our brand DNA. It’s all about

barriers. But I still don’t consider myself as a

comfort and lightweight across all material

visionary. To me, that’s a person striving for

stories, not just minimalism. My personal

the impossible.

favorite glasses right now are the M3.327 X model and our SUN M2.643 shades.

M3 325 X – A milestone in terms of depth of materials

132


THE COMPETITOR

THE DOG OWNER

“We’re rather unspectacular.”

“My dogs follow me everywhere.”

When it comes to seeing us as competitors,

A dog is part of family life to me.

we’re rather unspectacular. We concentrate

As a kid, growing up with a

on doing our own thing without imitating

dog was really important to me. And today

others.

and I’m granting

We represent timeless design and indepen-

this wish to my children. In my

dence. Trying to copy us would

eyes, animals can have a rather formative and

not be fun at all. There are very few compara-

positive influence on kids.

ble companies within

Our dog Arun is a Briard, a herding dog.

our industry, and we clearly distinguish our

He’s been my close

offering from most of them. Our products ap-

companion for eight years now. The

pear to be simple, but aren’t really since they

dog is a constant fixture at our company and

are

part of the MARKUS T team. And a couple of

based on a special overall philosophy that’s

weeks

hard to duplicate. Our products are brought to

ago, we welcomed a smaller version of him

life by the strong bond with our partners and

that’s always following

their understanding of MARKUS T. I take a

him. Caruso is a direct descendent of Arun,

lot of inspiration from other areas. We here at

and by now totally immersed into the every-

MARKUS T are living in a world of our own.

day workings of our family and company.

But naturally, we are closely following the

I really enjoy the calmness of this breed of

developments driven by our competitors. We

dog, especially during stressful periods. At

are especially impressed by companies that

least Arun...

manage to be continuously innovative and

Caruso, for that matter, tends to be a real

successful.

handful in that way puppies always do.


MEN @ WORK

The designer and his therapist

THE ADVENTURER “The waters can never be deep enough.” Adventure suits me well, but I’m also aware

Nowadays, I wouldn’t go that far anymore. As

of my limits. Next to my grounded nature,

a father of two, I carry a lot more responsibili-

a sense of adventure is also part of my per-

ty, although I maintained my appetite for

sonality. It’s a big thrill for me to accept risks

adventure. Some ideas still continue to attract

and to go that extra step. Back in the day, this

me to a point where some day in my life, I

could lead to overestimating my strengths

want to see them through. Like sailing around

and finding myself in some dangerous situ-

the world, surrendering to the moods of the

ations. I distinctly recall that unique feeling

ocean for some time and facing the challenges

of weightlessness from deep sea diving. That

of complete solitude. Now, that would be an

was a real addiction for a while – some kind of

ad-

rapture of the deep that was hard to resist.

venture to my liking!

It sure is a thrilling, exciting sensation – and sure holds its dangers.

134


FORTUNA

FELICITAS

Orange and burgundy like fallen autumn leaves, golden as the setting autumn sun and auburn as delicately roasted chestnuts, the new frame models Fortuna, Felicitas, Feronia, and Amun by Dieter Funk Eyewear paint a vivid fall season scenery. Here’s some big news: From now on, the FUNKroyal collection will be marketed under the name Dieter Funk Signature Collection. 136


Photo: Raphael Schmitz

FERONIA

AMUN

With production in the town of Kinsau in Upper Bavaria, Funk already turned heads last year at the Barre Noire runway show during Berlin Fashion Week. Speaking of Barre Noire, the young Berlin-based upstart brand by designer Timm Süßbrich is certainly one to watch next season. And so is Dieter Funk Eyewear!


Photos: Raphael Schmitz

D E TA I L S

C A Z A L 607 / 2 B L A S T F R O M T H E PA S T Whoever said say you can’t improve on a classic needs to check out the latest update on the legendary CAZAL 607: The new CAZAL 607/2 in matted black with bi-colored temples is nothing short of stunning: Flamboyant, distinctive, and self-confident, true to the brand’s almost 40-year tradition. Looking at these frames, it’s no wonder they call CAZAL the Ferrari among eyewear brands. Launched in 1975 by founder and namesake Cari Zalloni in Passau, Germany, CAZAL has become an international style

staple – and darling of hip-hop icons ever since the early days of scratching and B-Boys. This reissue of the CAZAL 607 mirrors the design of the 1980s original, which was only available in prescription versions, with the exception of the matted black colorway. Available in a strictly limited run, the highly coveted CAZAL 607/2 features metal temples, otherwise only implemented in the 634 model, and its successor, the 657. The verdict: Clap your hands if you know a classic when you see one!

138


EYEWEAR SPRING/SUMMER 2014 C H A R M A N T G M B H E U R O P E C H A R M A N T. D E , T E L E F O N : 0 8 1 3 1 - 3 8 2 8 0 | E T 1 7 8 1 9 - 5 6 5


By Martin Bauendahl

Whiteout & Glare »Theia «


Whiteout & Glare »Hamptons«


LINDBERG » 6527 «

142


LINDBERG » 9704 «


Adrian Marwitz »Stranger No. 7«

144


Adrian Marwitz »Stranger No. 1«


Hoffmann Natural Eyewear » 2202 «

146


Hoffmann Natural Eyewear » 2202 «


G-Star Raw »Flat Metal Dekay GS2110«

148


Barton Perreira » Brolin «


Carlottas Village ÂťHaikuÂŤ

150 Photos: Martin Bauendahl @ syndikat-artists.de | Styling: Helene Graves @ stilplatte.com | Hair & Make-Up: Isabel Eiler @ ballsaal.com Models: Anna Barra @ spinmodelmanagement.com | Julius Pfister @ megamodelagency.com | Lucette van Beek @ modelwerk.de Retouch: matthiasgabriel.de | Studio: highnoon-studio.de | Photoassistant: Laura Weber


E

Y

E

W

E

A

R

Neue Kollektion & Designs 2015 neue Holzart: Esche dunkel www.woodone.it


COLLECTION LAUNCH 2 .0 – A MARKETING BEST CASE In 2014, Ray-Ban single-handedly delivered a masterpiece of interactive consumer marketing with their campaign: ‘The Order of Never Hide – What are you made of?’ The campaign is unprecedented as far as advertising initiatives in the optical industry go, which usually tend to be aimed directly at opticians and store managers. Instead, Ray-Ban went straight for the average consumer – and rocked the proverbial house. The activation campaign spanned over the course of several months, accompanied by digital media initiatives and a final public event in Berlin, attended by 500 winning participants. The centerpiece of the campaign was not, as would be expected, the set of core brand values behind Ray-Ban, but actually the activities of brand ambassadors as well as target consumers; all of which were given a chance to join a fictional secret society, The Order of Never Hide. The refreshing aspect of the entire initiative was that RayBan held back on ‘in-your-face’ brand marketing in favor of staying on the sidelines while letting others do the talking. In this issue’s Showcase, we’re infiltrating the Order to reveal its secret of success.


SHOWCASE

A rugged band of brand ambassadors: Joe Hatchiban & Jesse Hughes in the Ray-Ban »Aviator Flat Metal«, Sven Marquardt wearing the Clubmaster RX 6295 in aluminum. These guys aren’t hiding!


SHOWCASE

THE ORDER OF NEVER HIDE The goal of the marketing initiative was clear from the very start: Ray-Ban, the world’s most recognizable eyewear label, was looking to advertise its latest eyewear collection, and more specifically, their new, so-called ‘hero materials’. The advertising campaign was to closely engage its target group in all initiatives, ultimately resulting in an increased image for the brand while raising brand loyalty among young consumers. The campaign would emphasize interactivity with its young consumer base and heavily rely on digital and social media. Easier said than done, as the many failed campaigns by international brands who tried to meet eye-to-eye with today’s young customers can attest. But Ray-Ban demonstrated that with a constant, intense commitment and authentic consumer communications, this was no mission impossible. As the starting point for the ‘Order of Never Hide’ campaign, marketing experts at Ray-Ban created an imaginary secret society, which customers were invited to join via a designated Website. From a branding perspective, the campaign implemented the time-honored ‘Never Hide’ slogan used by Ray-Ban for the past few years, encouraging consumers to stand out from the crowd and interact with their surroundings. But this time, ‘Never Hide’ was more than a concept – consumers had to actually prove their willingness to stand out and show the world their talents. Once they had joined the Order, the new pledges were asked to prove themselves in five different challenges. True to the ‘Never Hide’

motto, it was all about standing up for yourself and testing your abilities in full view of the rest of the order. Not for the faint at heart, pledges were asked to upload photos and videos of their exploits, which were then rated by other challengers. For the grand finale, Ray-Ban chose 500 winners from the international campaign, to be invited for the Showdown Event at Berlin’s White Trash Fast Food club. Judging by the colorful crowd – extremely diverse and international even for Berlin standards – gathered at the trendy downtown establishment, they had braved many challenges and truly were not intend on hiding. Guests of The Order of Never Hide event were not only treated to an exclusive concert by Eagles of Death Metal, but also had a chance to go head-to-head in three on-site challenges with three RayBan brand ambassadors. These three daredevils were familiar faces and part of the campaign since day one: Their videos – some with over 200,000 hits and counting – served as models for the kind of content Ray-Ban wanted pledges to submit. The message: Show us what you’re made of and compete against us – what have you got? As the icing on the cake, the overall winner of the campaign will be invited to London with a plus-one for an extended weekend in the city by the Thames.

154


Jesse ‘Cuts like Steel’ with the Aviator Flat Metal model – and barber’s clippers

JESSE HUGHES The first Ray-Ban brand ambassador is Jesse Hughes, also known as ‘J. Devil’ and lead singer of the band Eagles of Death Metal, which played an after-hours concert at the event. Jesse is more than your average run-of-the-mill musician. With a degree in journalism, Jesse’s stage act pushes the boundaries between musical performance and performance art with exploits such as riding around on roller skates in a super hero costume. Jesse is wearing the Aviator Flat Metal model. The slogan ‘Cuts like Steel’ not only applies to Jesse’s glasses, but also became the operative concept at Jesse’s challenge station at White Trash: Challengers were invited to get a haircut from J. Devil himself, knowing full well that his skills as a barber may not be on par with his musical prowess.


SHOWCASE

R B 3 513 – AV I AT O R F L AT M E TA L “CUTS LIKE S T E E L”

Meet the nex t gener ation of met al . These extremely flat and delicate metal frames are textbook examples of RayBan style , and ultr a -light and comf or t able a s well . Cr af ted with an exclusive la ser etching process , these Flat Metal Aviators are eye catchers wherever they go. Caution: Not for hiding.

When it came to selecting the brand ambassadors for the campaign, Ray-Ban assembled a motley crew of prominent characters. At the final event at Berlin’s White Trash Fast Food, each of the three VIPs manned an activity station where guests could challenge them to test their skills. And since ‘hiding’ was not on anyone’s agenda during the campaign – and especially not the final night – everyone used the chance to see how they stack up against the competition. There were long lines, victories and defeats, tears of joy and agony. In other words, it was perfect.

156


RUBRIK

Sven’s challengers had to be ‘Resistant as Aluminum’, much like his Clubmaster glasses

SVEN MARQUARDT Second in line, but just as famous as Jesse, is Sven Marquardt. The internationally-known photographer specializes in people photography in black-and-white, with constant themes including the mixture between pain, vulnerability and beauty. The expressive character with the elaborate facial tattoos is known as the unyielding bouncer at Berlin’s trending nightclub Berghain, and has recently published a best-selling autobiography. Sven is wearing the Clubmaster model in aluminum. Accordingly, the theme of Sven’s challenge was ‘Resistant as Aluminum’ – an intense, 30-second eye-to-eye stare down between the experienced bouncer and his challengers. Blink first, you lose – much like a usual night at the door to Berghain. 145


SHOWCASE

RB6295 – CLUB M A S T ER “ R E S I S TA N T A S A LU M I N I U M ”

R B 214 0 Q M – W A Y F A R E R

One of the most legendar y R ay-Ban models – the timeless Clubmaster – receives an upgrade in its RX-version. Available for the fir st time in an aluminum frame, the Clubmaster blends light weight with effor tless st yle . Additional features include a bold color palette as a perfect supplement to alumi num a s the new light weight material. A new temples design provides a distinct , new t ake on the classic . The aluminum Clubmaster is available in four color ways: black , bronze , silver and metallic gray.

For the first time in histor y, the storied Wayf arer fr ame is available with a leather coating. This harmonious blend between traditional cr af tsmanship and futuristic design puts a new spin on the classic ‘leather ’-look . Using a so -called ‘glove’-process , the frames are covered in genuine calfskin: The water-soaked leather expands in the first step, only to shrink snugly around the fr ame af ter dr ying. The current color ways of the leather-clad Wayfarer frame are black and brown , featuring polarized lenses as an added special feature.

“ TO U G H A S L E AT H ER ”

The actual stars of the campaign are not the brand ambassadors, but the Ray-Ban styles promoted in the messaging. Ray-Ban chose proven classics such as the Wayfarer, Aviator and Clubmaster models for a considerable makeover. The time-proven designs were left unchanged, but new materials and special finishes added a new dimension to these Ray-Ban classics. Unconventional materials – which Ray-Ban calls ‘Hero Materials’ – included velvet, leather, aluminum, and other surprises. 158


R B 214 0 – W A Y F A R E R URBAN CAMOUFLAGE “BLENDS IN LIKE CAMO”

R ay-Ban’s iconic Wayfarer frame has been reinterpreted with style-conscious urbanites in mind. The R ay-Ban Wayfarer Camouflage model takes a militar y pattern craf ted for blending into the environment – and turns it into a st yle st atement for never hiding. The matted acet ate front section lends an understated air of refinement , but turning one’s head reveals the temples covered in exclusive camo fabric . The insides of the temples are covered in the same color way as the front , while the temple tips are branded with the Urban Camouflage logo. Thanks to a special manuf acturing process , the f abric is water- and perspir ation-proof. The Urban Camouflage capsule collection is available in six color ways .

R B 41 7 1 – E R I K A “ S M O O T H A S V E LV E T ”

R ay-Ban’s feminine Erika model received a complete facelif t: The frame’s acetate sur face is silkscreened with a flock coating through an elaborate process , creating a soft , velvety finish. This surface texture is created by silk-screening actual velvet onto the pre-treated frame sur face . The resulting Ray-Ban sunglasses are extremely comf or t able to wear and available in five color ways: blue , black , red , violet and yellow.


RUBRIK

Think you can sing? Joe’s Aviator model is ‘Struck in a Flash’ with its reflective Flash lenses.

JOE HATCHIBAN Our last, but not least, brand ambassador is also a solid fixture of urban life in Berlin. Whenever Joe Hatchiban sets up his Bearpit Karaoke under the wide open skies at Mauerpark in Berlin, it becomes an instant gathering of thousands of spectators, as Berlin’s aspiring vocal talents step to the mic out in the park. By now, the spontaneous event has become a fixture among throngs of tourists from all over the world, who crowd the open air stage every weekend. One rule of Joe’s karaoke: No booing people off stage, the crowd is very respectful towards those brave enough to showcase their voice in front of a room full of strangers. Joe is wearing an Aviator model with reflective Flash lenses. Accordingly, throughout the entire night, Joe’s ‘Struck in a Flash’ challenge was one of the shining attractions. 160 148


RUBRIK

SHOWCASE

Would you trust these gentlemen's eyewear style advice? We sure would!

The ‘Never Hide’ theme was also the motto for the event at Berlin’s White Trash Fast Food club. Guests had to bring their A-game to the challenges hosted by Ray-Ban brand ambassadors Jesse, Joe and Sven. It was sink or swim. Go big, or go home. And so much fun...


SHOWCASE

162


MY LIFE

MY RULES. B E R L IN V IS IO N S IN C E 2006

Showlab: Rosa-Luxemburg-Straße 49, 10178 Berlin, Germany www.whiteout-glare.com Ť info@whiteout-glare.com visit us at Silmo 2014 Paris | hall 5 booth G 116


PLANETARY PURSUIT

Photos: Raphael Schmitz

CALIFORNIYEAH

PAU L F R A N K

C YA N M O O D S

Planetary Pursuit and Californiyeah are like sisters. Both enjoy a highly dynamic, active lifestyle. Planetary Pursuit is a bit more mature and likes classic, understated designs, but will also bust out some skin-tight blue jeans if she feels like it. Her mellow and laid back counterpart, Californiyeah, loves being the center of attraction and enjoys hitting the outdoors in her cool surfer girl outfits. Both have one thing in common: They’re designed by Paul Frank, the pop culture-savvy brand with the iconic monkey. Classics never go out of style! 164


Photos & Text: Stefan Dongus

HOM E S TORY

P

A

N E O

R

I

S

I

A

N

A V A N T - G A R D E

166


Meet the man behind TARIAN – Jérémy is a creative one-man show

 T

he address ‘12, Rue Dupetit-Thouars’ in the heart of the 3rd Arrondissement of Paris is a historic location. Only 100 years ago, the spacious courtyard was home to workshops and horses stables. Today, the yard is lined with artist studios of the new Parisian Avant-garde. One particularly stylish studio belongs to of-the-moment eyewear brand Tarian and its proprietor, Jérémy Miklitarian. Stepping into the minimalist interior, we are greeted by jazz music noodling away over the speakers. Alongside the rustic, original stone walls, pieces of Tarian eyewear are neatly displayed on an USM shelf like museum exhibits. A small staircase leads to the upper level, where Jérémy maintains his creative workspace. This is where the magic happens – and new pieces for the Tarian brand are executed end-to-end, from raw idea to finished design.

Only the manufacturing of the frames from acetate and metal is handled at a specialty workshop in the French town of Jura.

All products at the workshop are designed by Tarian – even this bowl. Ceramic work is one of Jérémy ’s hobbies


HOM E S TORY

To no surprise, Tarian likes to blend craftsmanship with stateof-the-art production expertise. The resulting eyewear frames are marked by Avant-garde stylistics with a unique form language. The young designer has a hand for crafting frames with a bold, three-dimensional appearance, never afraid of risking a foray into asymmetrical shapes including temples at different widths on the same frame.

to make his frames instantly recognizable out on the streets. Under the Tarian+ label, Jérémy has collaborated on eyewear design projects with artists including Berlin-based Judith Sönnecken. The resulting mirror shape model, aptly called the ‘360°’, features an inner and outer frame covered with reflective foil for a seamless, 360-degree view. And in order to share his passion with aspiring eyewear designers, Jérémy is teaching classes at HEAD in Geneva.

Overall, Jérémy’s operation is a true ‘one man show’. The mastermind behind the brand handles the entire design and communications workload, which may also be the secret behind the stringent overall presentation of Tarian. But talking to Jérémy, we soon find that this is only the beginning. Ultimately, he wants to raise the brand’s profile by crafting a signature, unmistakable design

Eyewear by Tarian conveys an exclusive sense of Parisian extravagance, supported by the fact that every colorway is strictly limited to 500 pairs each. Asked about what happens whenever the supply of 500 pieces runs out, a sang-froid Jérémy announced: “I’ll be super happy!”

168


MIKLITARIAN – JUMP START OR HEAVY BURDEN? Everyone in the eyewear business knows the name ALAIN MIKLITARIAN. Right? Maybe leaving out the ‘TARIAN’ will make things easier: ALAIN MIKLI. There we go! But is it sacrilegious to simply ‘borrow’ part of such a famous namesake? Especially for making your own eyewear? Not if your own name is MIKLITARIAN, and you happen to be the son of the famous eyewear designer. Jérémy Miklitarian is a quintessential start-up entrepreneur. At the young age of 27, he’s already been building the Tarian eyewear label for four years now. Prior to starting his own label – initially under the name ‘Jérémy Tarian’ – he studied

economics with stints in Germany, where he interned for two years at eyewear brand ic! Berlin. During this time, he already crafted his own eyewear designs, one of which won the critically acclaimed Silmo d’Or Award in Paris.


HOM E S TORY

THE CAMPAIGNS Tarian campaigns are marked by a consistent, signature style: The entire focus is on the glasses and the wearer’s face. Photographer Kate Fichard closely zooms in on her models, while structuring all campaigns around an artistic theme such as Hairs, Paper Nose, Flowers or the latest campaign, Feet. In September, Jérémy will be publishing a book featuring all Tarian campaigns to date, limited to (you guessed it) 500 pieces.

170


TARIAN

PRODUCT GUIDE

Jérémy’s guide for the development of a distinctive eyewear brand


Clothing : Tweed Dress by Chanel

Strada del Sole » 084 «

172


Clothing : Wool Coat by R alph Lauren

Strada del Sole » 084 «

HI GH - FA SHI O N & E Y E WE A R G O D E SERT S T Y LE By Benjamin Kaufmann


Clothing : Lame Floral Dress by Rochas

Oliver Peoples » OV1148S «

174


Clothing : Silk Printed Blouse and Jacket by Sacai

Oliver Peoples » Marmont «


Clothing : Silk Printed Dress by Hermes

Makellos Âť Friedrich ÂŤ

176


Clothing : Silk Pleated Dress by Salvatore Ferragamo

Entourage of 7 Âť Reseda ÂŤ


Clothing : Collarless Blouse by Hermes . Wool Cardigan by Chloe

Blac » Esteban «

178


i-spax » Chiron « Clothing : Floral Dress by Dolce Gabbana


Markus T Sun » T2 047391 «

180

Clothing : Lurex Top and Knit Skir t by Michael Kors


Markus T Sun » M2144002 « Clothing : Sequin Knit Cardigan by Kenzo


Kilsgaard » Sun 9.12/13 «

182

Clothing : Rollneck Knit Dress by Rober to Cavalli


Silk Ruffle Dress by McQ by Alexander McQueen

Kilsgaard » Sun 4.7/7 «


Clothing : Embroidered Beaded Top by R alph Lauren

LINDBERG » 8584 «

Photos: Benjamin Kaufmann Styling: Alton Hetariki Hair & Make-Up: Barrie Griffith Models: Henrietta Hellberg @ Next London, Lena Spazier

184


VISIT US AT SILMO PARIS 26–29 SEPTEMBER, BOOTH 5 P 112

ADRIANMARWITZ.COM


PRODUCT INSIGHT

HOFFMANN NATURAL EYEWEAR »2184 SPH 02 C02«

HOFFMANN NATURAL EYEWEAR »V7436 SPH 01 C01«

186


MIMICRY IN E Y E W E A R CR A F T SM A NSHIP H AVA N N A M E L A N G E BY H O F F M A N N N AT U R A L E Y E W E A R

I

n the field of evolutionary biology, ‘mimicry’ refers to a similarity between animals of one species with those of a second species, making it impossible for predators to differentiate between the two. Introducing the concept of mimicry into eyewear design, Hoffmann Natural Eyewear has created the Havanna Melange colorway: Thanks to a subtle design technique, the upscale surface texture mimics the classic contours of tortoiseshell. Here’s where the species-protecting properties of mimicry come into play: While tortoiseshell, in earlier times, was closely Photos: Raphael Schmitz

connected to the slaughter of turtles for their precious shell, Hoffmann frames are produced entirely cruelty-free. It took the Germany-based designers two full years to perfect a process to imitate the look of tortoiseshell. Following the company’s sustainable and environmentally conscious philosophy, the frames are crafted from water buffalo horn, which is collected after the animals have perished from natural causes. In order to attain the elegant tortoiseshell effect, the horn is treated with plant-based dyes blended from natural pigments. With an emphasis on longevity, the texture is immune to fading from polishing and exposure to sunlight and increases its shine over periods of prolonged wear. But as they say, a picture says more than a thousand words. Here’s Hoffmann’s unique blend of mimi-cry and originality. Quite an evolution, wouldn’t you agree?


MARTIN & MARTIN »HENRIETTE«

M A RTIN & M A RTIN PA S T E L C O L L E C T I O N Ever so quiet, like a thief in the night, a subtle trend has stolen the hearts of designers around the world in a big way: Dreamy pastel colors are popping up everywhere, and for a good reason. Make no mistake: This is not yesterday’s garish Barbie pink or the gruesome mixture of erica and violet hues. This year’s pastels include the perfect blend of mint green and strawberry ice cream colors found in trending chair, side table and lamp collections. At the beginning of the year, furniture and interior design fair IMM Cologne led the way with sorbet colors in all shades, often combined with natural, untreated wood textures. IMM Cologne was also the place where designer Martin Lehmann of Martin & Martin caught the pastel bug. His new eyewear collection features beautiful milky color shades and opal hues. Hand-made at traditional German workshops from Italian cotton acetate pressed into multilayered blocks of raw material – following the same process for more than ten years now – the frames offer comfortable surface feel, great fit and spring loaded hinges. Introducing: This season’s pastel heartbreakers, models “Henriette” and “Ulla”.

188 78


MARTIN & MARTIN »ULLA«

Photo: Raphael Schmitz

MARTIN & MARTIN »ULLA«

MARTIN & MARTIN »HENRIETTE«


D E S I G N AWA R D

KILSGAARD > S U N 9 < SLIM

&

PLASMA

Photos: Raphael Schmitz

BIG,

Whenever we are producing a new issue of the magazine, we always come across glasses that stand out for some reason. Maybe it’s the colors, or perhaps the exclusive design. The winner of this issue’s Design Award, the Kilsgaard »Sun 9« model, clearly caught our eye because of its form language. According to the brand’s head honcho, Jacob Kilsgaard, the shades are a trip back in time to the ‘Funky 80s’, with their large lenses and slim frame. Upon closer inspection, the glasses look more like a plasma TV screen than conventional sunglasses. To which Kilsgaard replied that

widescreen TV sets had actually been a big inspiration in the design stages. Looking at the frames from different angles, it soon becomes apparent that this is no conventional, two-dimensional shape. The mid-section adds a layer of depth and vivid dynamic to the design. The front section, in true Kilsgaard style, has been crafted from anodized aluminum that is highly comfortable to wear. The slim temples are made from Italian and Japanese acetate, allowing for flexible adjustments. The »Sun 9« is available in 80s-style colorways Black, Frost Blue and Funky Purple. Groovy. 190


Style: V793

#PEACEROCK S

Ringo Starr: Casa della Vista, Hollywood, CA Photographed by Danny Clinch, 2014

EYEWEAR Remdottica

+44 (0)1159 677912 SILMO Hall:6 Aisle:G Booth:#048

johnvarvatos.com/peacerocks


Photo: Stefan Dongus

R E TA I L P R O F I L E

192


R E TA I L P R O F I L E

S T E I N G A S S E 14 THOMA S HOBMAIER LOST HIS HE ART IN HEIDELBERG The slogan ‘I’ve Lost my Heart in Heidelberg’ is commonly found on T-shirts brought home by American tourists from their trips to ‘good old’ Germany. But it also sums up what happened to Thomas Hobmaier, who has been working for German eyewear company REIZ for ten years now. With their store at Steingasse 14 in the heart of Heidelberg’s historic Old Town, Hobmaier and his partners went the extra mile to create a sleek, state-of-the-art interior in the renovated, time-honored space. The result is a sales floor and ambiance worthy of being featured in Architectural Digest, replete with a brand selection that says ‘Big City’ instead of quaint tourist town. Eyewear Magazine went to Heidelberg – and all we got was a lousy T-shirt (and this interview).


Konichiwa, Hello, Ni Hao and Bonjour!

day, who now happens to be our landlord and

Thomas, which foreign language do you

resides upstairs at Steingasse 14. Now we’re

hear the most in your touristy location at

part of a unique community, offering the

Steingasse 14?

finest eyewear collection in the entire city. So

Probably the local slang from Heidelberg. That

Steingasse 14 wasn’t really an option – it was

may sound like a foreign language to most

the only way to go for the name!

people, even folks from other parts of Germany. And I would say Asian languages are a

Who are the people behind Steingasse 14?

close second.

Christian Leidmann, Philipp Foret, Franz Reutter, Jochen Gutbrod and Thomas Hob-

Last year, you opened up your new store,

maier. We’ve all known each other for a long

Steingasse 14, at the address Steingasse

time. We all started out working together, but

14. Did you get lazy looking for a name?

have since become close friends and business

Yes and no. But keep in mind that Steingasse

partners.

is a famous location, known as the prettiest

What kinds of backgrounds are your part-

and most traditional street in Heidelberg. It’s

ners bringing to the table?

really a district in its own right. Everyone

I consider Christian Leidmann and his associ-

knows one another and once you’ve been

ate, Philipp Foret, as some

accepted, you’re part of the circle. The street actually used to have its own major back in the

of the icons of our industry. Everyone knows them. They have been shaping and enhancing the market for eyewear with a unique passion. They are also in charge of operations in Austria and Switzerland at eyewear company REIZ. Franz and Jochen are the founders of REIZ and have been my bosses for over ten years now. The two have

194


been emblematic of quality ‘Made in Germa-

brand communications at REIZ,

ny’ with their designs and collections for 20

I’ve also been working in sales for ten years

years. Their glasses are internationally known

now, building the German market and winning

for their

over lots of international customers for REIZ.

unique form language. REIZ turned a niche

It's been working out great and I've had a

market into a viable business segment and

chance to meet lots of interesting people and

became a defining brand in our industry. So

see many cool stores. This wealth of experi-

in short:

ence was the basis for starting my own store

I’m surrounded by the best of two worlds!

according to my own vision. At Steingasse 14 it's all about sharing my passion for eyewear

How do you divide up responsibilities among all five partners? The store was my idea, so it’s my baby. All five of us have the same goals and contribute our unique skills to the concept. The four others entrusted me with running the store and are also the best consultants anyone could ever ask for.

You’ve been working in the marketing department for REIZ for several years. What motivated you to take on a hands-on role in retail? I’ve wanted to start the store for a long time. The location in Heidelberg, where I attended university, was really something like destiny manifesting when it worked out. Aside from

as a product.


But why Heidelberg? Wouldn’t towns like

constrained parameters. And to see how they

Stuttgart or Ulm be more obvious choices

always

and closer to your home?

manage to bring new things to market that are

Heidelberg offers the perfect preconditions. I

totally fascinating.

attended university here and have built a lasting bond with the city. Heidelberg to me is a super attractive town that I have always pictured as a location for my own retail store. So when the opportunity opened up to make my dream come true in this gorgeous location at Steingasse, I leapt at it. This store is definitely worth the daily commute.

What’s the attraction behind eyewear as a

My personal interest lies in discovering new

product?

collections for our customers and presenting

It’s really about fashion, but there’s a lot more

them with a passion. There’s a small network

substance involved than in the ordinary fash-

of specialized stores like ours throughout

ion business. Trends are more thought out

Germany. So we’re part of an ‘alliance of

and take longer to develop. Glasses are, more

elevated taste’ with Steingasse 14, as Akram

than clothing, a defining element of personal

from Klar

style. They sit smack in the middle of the face

store nicely put it at our opening.

and determine a person’s impression to a large degree. So it’s super exciting to see what all the different manufacturers are doing in terms of designs within these highly

196


R E TA I L P R O F I L E

Frederic Utz and Thomas Hobmaier ... brothers from different mothers?

The Steingasse store’s interior is rather elevated as well. What motivated you to go the boutique route? The store’s design is really based on my ideas. My wife and my friend Claudio, the architect (owner of Artikular Architekten), encouraged me to use this chance to follow my vision for the perfect retail store. Claudio just said: “You know exactly what you want, to a point where all you need is someone to string it together into a concept.” And I must say that he and his agency did a fantastic job. There’s a common denominator to all elements of the store, combined into a wonderful looking, cozy interior. The historic charms of the building lend an air of maturity to the sales floor. We put an emphasis on leaving original elements visibly exposed, combined with new materials. All the materials we implemented – oak tree, gunmetal-finished red steel and mineral floors – were left in their original state, nothing is covered up or glossed over. I want the customers to be able to see the philosophy – see what the store is all about. If they like the way our store looks, they’ve come to the right place, no matter if they’re a professor or a student. Speaking of: We offer student rebates at our store, which I would have been excited about during my student years!


A store concept like this can look entirely

Would you like to do some name-dropping

different on paper than it actually turns out

as far as brands go?

in reality. What’s your favorite part about

Well, I will mention REIZ of course since

the location?

they’re the best available glasses ‘Made in

It’s really hard to single out certain elements.

Germany’. Also Dita and Thom Browne

But I’m especially proud of

with their great eye for detail without unnec-

the lighting concept we created together

essary kitsch and a constant eye for quality.

with the guys at .PSLAB.

Garrett Leight, whose glasses pretty much

It’s a perfect blend of historic elements and

sell themselves thanks to outstanding qual-

modern architecture.

ity and a nice neo-classic approach. Barton Perreira single-handedly offers the broadest

How would you describe the special

selection, including meticulously crafted,

charms of Steingasse 14?

understated acetate frames as well as titani-

My two employees, Fred and Juha, as well as

um models and other great material stories.

the store’s atmosphere.

Lunor is a must when you’re selling to an

It’s a world-class combination!

intellectual audience – substantial, solid,

It’s safe to say that the REIZ brand is a special part of your store. Which other labels do you carry and why? We don’t sell all the famous fashion labels without any real connection to eyewear. We focus on authentic, great eyewear brands. The ones that stand out with their unique design approach and outstanding quality. They’re the true innovators in our industry.

classic, German. L.G.R is the lady killer with beautiful Italian styles and subtle designs, plus outstanding lenses. Mykita, especially Mylon, offers a unique look and technical performance from a materials stand-point. Cutler and Gross are in a league of their own, and therefore unbeatable. Hoffmann is our goto for horn frames. KBL and Anderne round out our portfolio with entry-level products at good quality. And we’ll be adding more brands since there are many gorgeous collections out there. 198


Let’s see if you’re willing to name your

So your business doesn’t take a hit during

three personal favorite brands?

the winter when the tourists are gone?

Well, I love REIZ, of course. But it’s actually

No, for that very reason.

really hard to pinpoint two others. Especially since I like a number of different brands for

Do you notice any country-specific brand

different reasons. Sorry, I have to pass on that

preferences?

one!

It’s a known fact that customers from Asia are really into ‘Made in Ger many’. Other-

Do you carry any licensed products?

wise, people really like stories. When there’s

No.

an authentic and interesting story behind a great

Why not?

product, every customer will be excited.

There are way too many beautiful, individualistic and independent brands that offer collec-

Many labels are offering specific shapes for

tions with a clear concept and brand message.

the facial shapes of Asian customers. Do you carry these models?

Going back to your retail location, what’s

No. In our experience, these customers are

the percentage of tourists among your cus-

looking for truly European products, and not

tomers?

something that has been modified for Asian

Maybe 10–15%. We don’t really get the tour-

audiences. But it’s always great to be able to

ist groups that are herded around by a tour

present a nice selection of glasses

guide. They don’t have the time. We attract

with adjustable nose pads.

the visitors who like to explore Heidelberg on their own and immerse themselves in the culture and retail landscape of our city. They’re a relaxed crowd and like to go shopping and take their time.

Most of the stores catering to tourists try to lure their customers in with bargain offers. Do you offer anything along those lines? The only thing we can offer is ‘Tax Free’ shopping, but that’s pretty much it. When somebody comes in to treat themselves to a nice


R E TA I L P R O F I L E

Steingasse 14: Modern glasses in a historical building

gift on vacation, we provide the same kind of service all other customers receive. That resonates well with our audience. People have certain expectations when they enter our store – but ‘buy one, get one free’ is not one of them.

What are your typical eyewear customers from Heidelberg like? Just like you and me, or completely different. There are many customers that haven’t been able to find the right glasses anywhere else. And there are those with a sense of exploration who heard about our store and want to check it out. Also customers following recommendations from friends. It’s a really diverse crowd and every single day brings new and amazing experiences. And how do you keep customers coming back? Because we’re a great dealer! And we’re always first in mind once they are hooked! So you are feeding addictions. What kinds of styles are currently flying off the shelves? And what’s next? Classical shapes with nice interpretations and elaborate combinations of materials that let customers see and feel their value. Sayonara, thanks for the interview.

200


made in germany | colibris.eu The only thing we can offer is ‘Tax Free’ shopping, but that’s pretty much it. When somebody comes in to treat themselves to a nice gift on vacation, we provide the same kind of service all other customers receive. That resonates well with our audience. People have certain expectations when they enter our store – but ‘buy one, get one free’ is not one of them.


GARAGE ROCK

Photos: Raphael Schmitz

CARBON BLADE

TWOFACE

OAKLEY X SCUDERIA FERRARI Despite the inflationary usage of the word ‘legend’, it’s more than appropriate in reference to Italian luxury automobile makers, Ferrari. No other car company conjures up an air of mystique and glamour as grand and enduring as Ferrari’s. Their machines, humming at an almost magical frequency, have been the forte of movie stars and moguls, models and secret agents for many decades. Now Scuderia Ferrari is teaming up with eyewear powerhouse Oakley for an eight-piece limited eyewear edition that would be instantly at home in the cockpit of any of their sleek luxury sports cars. Headlining the collection, the Carbon Blade model has been crafted from the same materials as the carriage and auto body on Ferrari’s premium automobiles.

Utilizing a brand-new construction process, the carbon frames are molded from liquid carbon for a highly flexible finish. While Ferrari sports cars are known for their smooth, responsive steering and curved, almost feminine design features, the eyewear frames adhere to the same aesthetic: The clean lines and Formula 1-inspired shock-absorption on the hinges bridge the gap between eyewear and car design for a “racy” overall finish. As the icing on the cake, all models feature the laser-etched Ferrari-horse logo on the lenses for some extra “horse power” on what promises to be a fast (and furious) seller.

202


Photos: Raphael Schmitz

HAPTER M 01 M + M 02 M No games, no gimmicks, no superfluous details. Instead, of-the-moment

with their round lenses and sun-protective leather inserts along the sides,

eyewear brand Hapter emphasizes clear, purist lines and innovative ma-

the M01M and M02M model feature a military green and steel blue textile

terials. Their brand is synonymous with modern, minimalist designs and

coating along the slimmed-down temples. Once again, the eyewear label

uncompromising quality. For living proof, look no further than the new

has been working with Cerruti Woolen Mills fabrics that are closely based

M01M and M02M models, reduced to the bare minimum through Hapter’s

on Italian military uniforms of the 1920s and 1940s. Both models feature

exclusive Mono Concept. The frames are crafted entirely without hinges,

quality lenses by traditional lens makers Carl Zeiss, offering a scratch-resis-

while the front section and temples – just like in the TXTL001 Collection –

tant and anti-reflective coating and crystal-clear visuals. As a new feature,

are crafted from one single piece of material, weighing in at a mere 12 grams.

the frames have a wider nose bridge with mesh air holes to avoid fogging up

Taking inspiration from vintage Alpine glacier goggles of the 1950s

the glasses in cold weather and rough temperatures. Stylish and on-point.

204


By Sabine Liewald


götti » Serge « Vest: Rich & Royal | Shir t: Zara | Bracelet: Uno de 50 | Necklace: Chaingang


Jacket: Ana Alcazar | Earrings: Montgrissimo | Feathers: Elke | Shir t: Zara | Belt: Stylist own

Bellinger Âť Sue Ellen ÂŤ


Shir t: Rita Lagune | Skir t: Silvian Heach | Poncho: Rich & Royal | Necklace: Chaingang

Colibris » Ida «


Strenesse » ST32 «

Top: H&M | Gür tel: Prada Vintage | Hose: Zara | Armband: Chaingang | Ohrringe: Las Dalias


Hoffmann Natural Eyewear Dress: Rita Lagune | Fur Collar : Rita Lagune | Jewelr y: Stylist own Overall : CARUSO


Poncho: Sir Oliver | Dress: Silvian Heach | Necklace: Uno de 50

ROLF Spectacles » Farina «


Shir t: Zara | Collar : Prada Vintage | Feathers: Elke

ROLF Spectacles » Dauphine «


Pullover : Ana Alcazar | Skir t: Ana Alcazar | Necklace: Chaingang | Ring : Chaingang | Foulards: Las Dalias


Martin & Martin Âť Moritz ÂŤ


Paperstyle » Fer 1 «

Top: Rita Lagune | Necklace: Chaingang


Paperstyle » Terra «


i-spax Âť Greg ÂŤ

Photos: Sabine Liewald www.sabineliewald.com | Styling: Martina Nelles | Hair & Make-Up: Gaye Hiette c/o Bigoudi with products from inglot Model: Chiara Baschetti c/o POP Models

Dress: Ana Alcazar | Vest: Rich & Royal


IN DUS T RY INSIGH T

LIR E DE SALES Literature buffs will instantly catch the reference to Arthur Miller’s drama in the title of this story. While Miller’s classic tale is about the downfall and tragic demise of a salesman, ours is a little story about a man who’s very much on the rise – and always on the move. A man named Lire de Sales, who’s not much of a salesman in the classical sense – he’s more of a marketing and PR expert – but nevertheless travels around the globe like a man on a mission. Following his Facebook or Instagram feed shows the native Brazilian oscillating between Paris, Hong Kong, New York, London, and back. Basically, every week it’s a different city. We caught Lire de Sales on one of his rare breaks in the middle of June in Berlin, where we exchanged a few quick words and some photos.

220

Photos: Stefan Dongus

LIFE OF A SALESMAN


IN DUS T RY INSIGH T

ByWP »Flip Up« Style »BY13111«

Hi Lire, where are you living at the moment and why? Hard to say... I move around a lot between Paris, Berlin, Rio de Janeiro, and soon New York City. How many nights of the year do you sleep in a bed that’s not your own? Between 180 and 240. Why do you travel so much? It’s part of my job. I am actually handling the Global Public Relations and Marketing side of things for Anderne, ByWP and Wolfgang Proksch. And why are you required to be on the move for these brands? What exactly are your responsibilities? I develop PR-strategies, negotiate partnerships with fashion brands for their catwalk shows, create capsule collections and organize my own fashion shows. And I always visit our international customers and handle social media for my brands. What are the special characteristics of these three brands? What are some catchwords to describe these labels? Anderne: Young | Trendy | Retro-Glam | Fashion | VIP Opticians | Celebrities ByWP: Modern | Fashion with an Industrial Design Attitude | High-tech Engineering | Premium acetate

and titanium Wolfgang Proksch: Classically Modern | Japanese Craftsmanship | Titanium | Luxury What makes traveling special to you? Meeting people and bringing them together, networking, as well as discovering and exploring new things, places, cultures and stores. What is the most exhausting part of travelling? Being busy 24 hours a day. Your Top 5 ... š9_j_[i0 Berlin, Rio de Janeiro, Hong Kong, New York & Paris. šEfj_Y_Wdi0Visual Culture (Hong Kong and Macau), Die Sehmänner (Berlin), The House of Eyewear (Paris), J'Epoque (Taipei), and Marc le Bihan (Paris). š;o[m[WhI^emi0Mido, Silmo, Opti, VENY, and HK š<Wi^_edI^emi0Tranoi (Paris), Premiere Classe (Paris), Pitti (Firenze), White (Milano), Bread&Butter, and Premium (Berlin). š9W\ƒir8Whi0Soho House (Berlin), Copacabana Palace (Rio), Hotel Costes (Paris), Le Petit Fer à Cheval (Paris), and Bar Hotel Fasano (Rio).


NEW IN TOWN

E XOVAULT B

R

O

O

K

L

Y

Kingsland

HIGH SOCIET Y MEETS H E AV Y D U T Y 222

N


NEW IN TOWN

It all star ted with state-of-the-ar t iPhone cases five years ago

the-art iPhone cases over the past five years, the label is now offering upscale eyewear frames for discerning tastes. Bucking the trend towards delicate light-weight frames, EXOvault eyewear is crafted at their Brooklyn workshop from massive aluminum blocks. The resulting frames are not for the faint at heart, or folks in search of understated eyewear. And because adjustability can prove a big challenge for aluminum frames, EXOvault offers optional rubber bumpers for adjusting the hinges to help maintain a secure fit. The whole set ships in beautifully crafted wooden cases for a unique upscale finish. It’s safe to say that high tech has never looked this good. For more information and detailed “How-to”-videos from the manufacturing process, visit exovault.com

A

t the latest edition of VEE tradeshow in New York City this March, one particular booth drew massive atten-tion. Although rather small in size and in a less-than-perfect location, it was swamped with visitors during the entire event. And rightly so, because EXOvault’s designer Jonathan Schipper and sales Director Francis Scarpulla had something truly unique on display. Plus, the show was a home game for the Brooklynbased label, whose members only needed to cross the Williamsburg Bridge to display their goods in front of an internal audience. But what exactly is so special about EXOvault? After building a solid reputation with state-ofPhotos: Raphael Schmitz

Why offering more than one model if the Kingsland is so good? Finally it's available in different material- and color combinations


Photos: Raphael Schmitz

AFRICA 05

ETNIA BA RC ELONA WILD LOVE IN AFRICA

Stars and celebrities have always used sunglasses to hide behind for an extra dose of anonymity. Trending eyewear label Etnia Barcelona is headed in the opposite direction with their new “Wild Love in Africa” shades collection. With loud and colorful animal prints, these frames are made for standing out – not for blending in. The lenses are made from high-end mineral glass by Italian traditionalists Barberini. The frame material is provided by Europe’s leading producer of acetate, Mazzucchelli, known for crafting large-size blocks of the 100% recyclable cotton-based fibers. Bringing the Southern European love triangle full circle, the

glasses are hand-made in Spain. For the marketing campaign behind the shades, Etnia Barcelona is working with the Africa Rising Foundation, a non-profit organization founded in the late 1990s by Ndaba and Kweku Mandela to promote advancement on the African continent. From the lush green rainforests to the dry steps and savannas, or riding an elephant along the banks of the Zambesi to the Okavango-Delta, and even back home in the city – it’s all about Wild Love in Africa. And these shades are full of it!

224


AFRICA 04


Moscot

Photos: Raphael Schmitz

Old-fashioned

In today’s high-speed society, in our current age of trend overload and digital revolution, the Moscot brand wants to offer an alternative approach marked by contemplation, purist designs and clean structures. These traditional values are also reflected in Moscot’s current sun­glasses collection: True to the company’s mission statement, the new line is a testament to eyewear craftsmanship passed on from generation to generation. Initially, the brand was born in 1915 when an Eastern European immigrant by the name of Hyman Moscot founded a store under the family name in New

York City. Actually, ‘store’ might be a euphemism, since Moscot sold glasses straight from a hand cart on the streets of the Lower East Side for the first few years. Ninety years and four generations later, brothers Kenny and Dr. Harvey Moscot are carrying on the family’s optical tradition with a sense of preserving Moscot’s proud heritage. Committed to maintaining the original quality from the early days, the Moscot brothers are using only lenses in ‘true old school colors’ reminiscent of 1940s eyewear styles. The resulting look is classic and timeless, as shown in ‘his and hers’ versions by our models Avram and Ezra. 208


IVKO GmbH | Germany | natural-eyewear@ivko.de | www.natural-eyewear.com


Photo: Martin Bauendahl (pages 128 – 138)

CARLOTTAS VILLAGE »HAIKU«

SEE WHAT’ S NE X T, NEVER MISS AN ISSUE:

SUBS C R I B E T O E Y E W E A R M AG A ZI NE Never miss out on what’s next, always be the first to know. Your subscription to EYEWEAR – The Visual Maga-zine brings the whole wide world of eyewear right to your doorstep. Subscribers will receive every new issue shipped to their mailbox, fresh off the press and neatly packaged. Subscribing to EYEWEAR Magazine is like a real-life RSS-feed of everything new and exciting from the world’s leading brands and designers. And for opti-cians, EYEWEAR offers special packages with multiple magazines. Plus, our Premium Partners can customize their issues with their own logo, creating an upscale gift for their customers. Find out about all our customization and partner options at eyewear-magazine.com. And please feel free to direct all inquiries to presse@eyewear-magazine.com.

First name, last name*: Postage required

Street address*:

ZIP, City*:

Phone*:

MAIL SUBSCRIPTION POSTCARD TO :

Email*:

Country*:

Date of birth*:

Invoice me Payment via bank transfer (default payment method for customers outside of Germany)

Please send me an annual subscription (three issues) of EYEWEAR Magazine, starting with the next issue at the annual subscription rate specified below: - Customers residing in Germany: 15.00 (incl. shipping) - Other countries: 36.00 (incl. shipping) German Issue English Issue

Bank: IBAN: Signature and date: * Mandatory information

BIC:

Monday Publishing GmbH EYEWEAR MAGAZINE Kamekestraße 20–22 50672 Cologne Germany

Monday Publishing GmbH EYEWEAR MAGAZINE Kamekestraße 20–22 50672 Cologne Germany Or via Fax: +49 221 94526727


MEET US ON STAND 5S 104 www.paper-style.it


SEPTEMBER

PRODUCTION

NOY, visitor SILMO 2013

T H E I N T E R N AT I O N A L E X H I B I T I O N F O R O P T I C S A N D E Y E W E A R I N D U S T RY

W W W. S I L M O PA R I S . C O M

PHOTOGRAPHER PIERRE-ANTHONY ALLARD

SILMO IS ALL ABOUT YOU !

#S I L M O PA R I S

PA R I S 2 0 1 4


Find out more by visiting www.opti.de

Save the dates for opti 2015 now!

The future never waits! So be sure to keep up with it. Get in on the trends and topics that the entire optical industry will be focussed on in 2015. Save the dates now and maximeyes your preparation!

9. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 11.1. 2015



Eyewear Issue 12