Issuu on Google+

Nr 16 – 1 /2016 EURO 12


design by made by


ACCESSORIES - EYEWEAR - LEATHER GOODS - SADDLERY MAYBACH Icons of Luxury GmbH | Germany | www.maybach-luxury.com info@maybach-luxury.com | www.facebook.com/maybachluxury | www.twitter.com/maybachicons „Maybach“ and the „MM“ logo are subject to intellectual property protection owned by Daimler AG. They are used by MAYBACH Icons of Luxury GmbH under licence.


WE ARE TITANIUM

Made in Germany


RAY-BAN OPTICAL


www.ic-berlin.de

Photographed by Edmir Asoski


p hoto VERENA KNEMEYER mo d e l TIM a t VIVA MODELS

NINE »252 9 «

INTRO EY EW EAR ISSUE 16


INSIGHT – MEET THE ARTISTS BEHIND THIS ISSUE This issue’s editorial already hinted at the growing dominance of women in our ranks here at Eyewear Magazine. So for our Insight column, we’re introducing an all-female cast of talents who have contributed their creativity, passion, and initiative to make our media

output a smashing success – both in print and online. Please let us introduce our Online Editor Piera Montenero, photographer Marie Bärsch, and Stylist Andrea Kadler. We couldn’t have done it without these three.

PIERA MONTENERO, ONLINE EDITOR After earning her Business Law degree this past spring, Piera interned at our humble publishing house. Not at Eyewear, though, but our sister magazine Sneakers. And that was far from coincidental, as the 24-year-old Italian knows her way around athletic footwear and even maintains her own sneakers blog. A digital native and tech-savvy writer, Piera has been a great addition to the team with her extensive skills. That’s why we asked her to join our editorial team full-time last summer, and Piera now maintains all our online initiatives and newsletters. Her favorite pastimes, cooking and basketball, took a slight hit ever since we purchased our decked-out new coffee maker, on which Piera concocts the most amazing coffee drinks. Word of her Barista skills have already spread to other agencies in town, but hey: Don’t get any ideas, we’re holding on to this one!


INSIGHT – MEET THE ARTISTS BEHIND THIS ISSUE

MARIE BÄRSCH, PHOTOGRAPHER

ANDREA KADLER, ST YLIST & PRODUCER

This issue’s photo shoot Votre Dame marks Marie’s third assignment for Eyewear Magazine, entirely shot in Paris this time. Her two previous jobs took the savvy traveler to Los Angeles and Cape Town, and her own portrait for this short profile arrived via email from Bangkok. These days, chances of meeting the jet-setting photographer in her native town of Leipzig, Germany, are slim. She enjoys traveling far too much, and conveniently liaisons the most exotic locations for her assignments as a photographer, which has been her bread and butter since 2013. Her approach consists of realizing images that she creates in advance in her own mind. Everything is planned in advance before she gets onto the set to bring her mental pictures to life. This amount of meticulous planning and preparation make Marie a pleasure to work with, and we’re already looking forward to her next series for Eyewear: She’s hitting Cape Town once again, but we’re sure she’ll find some fresh angles.

When we met Andrea for the very first time in person, she was dropping by the offices en route to a Madonna concert in town where she waited patiently for two hours with 20,000 fans for pop music’s leading diva to perform. Andrea didn’t mind the wait, she’s far too passionate – as anyone working with her on a set will attest. Her energy and optimism are the driving forces behind her work as a stylist and producer in the realms of fashion, advertising, and interior design. Andrea enjoys the diversity in her job, and the many talented and creative people she gets to work and realize new ideas with. For inspiration, she likes to surround herself with art and music. Asked about her motto, she offered: “Do or do not. There is no try!” Well, someone’s going to enjoy the new Star Wars movie, it appears.


IMPRESSUM

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Estelle Klawitter

This magazine and all its

Stefan Dongus

Verena Knemeyer

contents may not be re-used,

dongus@eyewear-magazine.com

Sabine Liewald

distributed or stored in electronic

m: +49.(0)151.14271817

Alex Otto

databases in any way without

Raphael Schmitz

prior written permission from

Christian Steinhausen

the publishers. All inquiries

Tanja Tremel

regarding the usage of copy-

LAYOUT Caro Ross ross@eyewear-magazine.com

CONTRIBUTORS Daniel Giebel Piera Montenero Peter O’Toole Franca Rainer Dirk Vogel

PUBLISHER Monday Publishing GmbH Kamekestr. 20-22 50672 Köln t: +49.(0)221.945267-11 f: +49.(0)221.945267-27 eyewear-magazine.com

PROOFREADING

facebook.com/eyewearmagazine

Franca Rainer

CEOS

TRANSLATION

Stefan Dongus,

English Version

Holger von Krosigk

Dirk Vogel

DISTRIBUTION

ONLINE EDITOR

DPV Network GmbH

righted materials, as well as the reproduction of excerpts in other formats must be directed to the publishers. The opinions reflected in this magazine do not necessarily reflect those of the publishers. All rights reserved.

Nr 16 – 1 /2016 D: 6 € | AT: 7,50 € CH: 10 €

Piera Montenero

Postfach 570 412

presse@eyewear-magazine.com

22773 Hamburg

PHOTOGRAPHERS

dpv-network.de

Marie Bärsch

PRINT

Tomaso Baldessarini

F&W Mediencenter GmbH

Stefan Dongus

Holzhauser Feld 2

Nic Frechen

83361 Kienberg

Ulrich Hartmann

fw-medien.de

Sacha Tassilo Höchstetter

EYEWEAR is published three

Stefan Kapfer

times per year.

German

Nr 16 – 1 /2016 EURO 12

English

cov e r-photos STEFAN DONGUS s t ylin g JULIA ATITIÉ a t LIGAWEST h air & m ake -up TEAM WEIDEMANN: NIUSHA NAHRJOO & ANNA BORHO re touch STEPHANIE WENCEK mod el FINN BROCK a t NO TOYS gl a ss e s IC! BERLIN » K a t h a r i n a L . « clothin g HUGO BOSS


E D I TO R I A L

THE FEMININE PERSPECTIVE p hoto ULRICH HARTMANN

The battle over gender equality and increasing the quota of women in public office has been raging in politics for decades. It’s an ongoing struggle, in which Hillary Clinton may yet have the last word. But when it comes to increasing the share of women in power positions, we here at Eyewear are somewhat trailblazers of the cause. And it happened quite organically, no politics needed. In the production of our magazine, women already shoulder the majority of the workload – have done so, actually, for quite some time now. They have strategically taken over our editorial offices, growing their numbers with sleight of hand and a key secret weapon: unbeatable performance! Ever since our first issue, we have had the please of working with some of the most talented stylists and hair & make-up artists in the industry on photo shoots. The latest trend, when looking at the bigger picture, are all-female casts on the set, because more and more photographers in the business are women. Actually, this issue marks the first time the majority of photos have been shot by women, including Sabine Liewald (P. 36), Marie Bärsch (P. 72), Tanja Tremel (P. 138),

Estelle Klawitter (P. 200) and Verena Knemeyer (P. 216). Our online editor Piera and our new graphic designer Caro – who singlehandedly designed the entire issue herself – further increase our women’s quota here at Eyewear. And as always, we are relying on our proof reader Franca, who also conducted the interview with Olivia Delorme at Ørgreen in this issue. We’re not going to call it the “Women’s Issue” just yet, but this edition of Eyewear sure offers a unique perspective. Just take our Berlin photo shoot Witch Love (P. 106) in collaboration with vegan fashion magazine Noveaux Magazine: Their editor in chief, Julia Akra Laurien, assembled a selection of haute couture created entirely without animal products. Which doesn’t mean without fashion appeal – just the opposite, as readers of both magazines will see in this jointly published photo series, directed by a woman, of course. Make no mistake, we did work with quite a number of male creatives during the making of this issue. And their time to shine will come. Sometime soon. Perhaps. If the ladies are okay with it... SD


ØRGREEN »Tr i b e c a 639 « co a t MARC O´POLO, sh i r t RICH & ROYAL

ØRGREEN » S om m e li e r 59 0 « b l a z e r PATRIZIA PEPE , s w e a t e r SAMSØE & SAMSØE


NE

WY

BROOKLYN BOMBERS BY SABINE LIEWALD conce pt & s t ylin g MARTINA NELLES m ake -up DIANE NOORLANDER wit h CLINIQUE h air ANDREA GRABHER a t SACHA&OLIVIER wit h BUMBLE AND BUMBLE mod els ANZHELA TURENKO & CATRINA STELLA a t MODELWERK loca t ion NEW YORK

O

RK


M A R C O´P O L O »50 6 0 99 « co a t MARC O´POLO


M A R C O´P O L O

»50 6102« s m o k i n g MICHAEL KORS, sho e s MICHAEL KORS


HOFFMANN NATUR AL EYE WE AR »V 745 4 « d re ss MARLENE BIRGER

HOFFMANN NATUR AL EYE WE AR »2216 « co a t DRYKORN


HOFFMANN NATUR AL EYE WE AR »2156 « p a n t s MICHAEL KORS, ja c k e t RICH & ROYAL , b lou s e RICH & ROYAL , sho e s ADIDAS


SA LT. »Hou s ton « b lou s e STEFFEN SCHR AUT, c a t s u it STEFFEN SCHR AUT, sho e s STEFFEN SCHR AUT, co a t SAMSØE & SAMSØE


SA LT. »J a c q u e s « c a p e L AGERFELD, s w e a t e r PAIGE , p a n t s RICH & ROYAL , h a t GOORIN BROS


KBL »B l a c k b i rd « d e ni m s RICH & ROYAL , v e s t RICH & ROYAL , b lou s e RICH & ROYAL

KBL » S il v e r L a k e « d re ss FILIPPA K , v e s t RICH & ROYAL , sho e s STEFFEN SCHR AUT


FHONE »B e r t h a « co a t STEFFEN SCHR AUT, d e n i m s CURRENT ELIOT, sho e s IMMY CHOO


CHARMANT.DE I ESPRIT.COM/EYEWEAR


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

» 8 4 03« d re ss TED BAKER

POISON IVY

LINDBERG SUN – 2016


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

photos SACHA TASSILO HÖCHSTET TER s t ylin g ALEX HUBER a t PHOENIX AGENTUR h ai r & m a ke - up EVANGELOS TZIMIKAS FAME wit h AVEDA BOBBI BROWN a ss i s t a nt PATRICK PLATZDASCH mo d el RIEKE a t MOST WANTED MODELS

Danish eyewear label Lindberg enjoys a reputation for clear, minimalist designs; true to the tradition of universally cherished Danish design. With its latest sunglasses collection, the label based in the town of Aarhus continues its aesthetic approach, all the while branching out into new territory. The Lindberg 2016 Sun collection bridges the gap between hand-made quality and the world of high fashion with progressive lines and shapes, especially in women’s models. The sunglasses lend a modern, cosmopolitan aura to their wearers, and some may not be suited for the faint at heart. But then again, being boring is easy, standing out is for originals.


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

» 8 4 02« d re ss TORY BURCH


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

»8404« sh i r t MICHAEL KORS, p a n t s MICHAEL KORS


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

» 8 4 01« d re ss DIMITRI

» 8 570 «


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

» 83 07« d re ss MULBERRY

» 8 6 01« b lou s e STEFFEN SCHR AUT, v e s t BELSTAFF


DE SIGN E R IN T E R V IE W

“NO DESIGN – NO FUTURE!” WOLFGANG PROKSCH i nt e r vie w DIRK VOGEL , photos STEFAN DONGUS, s t ills RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

Designer, visionary, globe trotter, trendsetter: Wolfgang Proksch has been leaving his mark on the international eyewear business since the late 1980s. After lending his design talents to brands such as Bugatti, Paul Smith, Oliver Peoples, Sama L.A. and ic! berlin, Proksch founded the distribution company PM/D in 2003 with headquarters in Königsbach-Stein, Germany. As the mastermind behind three eyewear labels – Wolfgang Proksch, ByWP and Anderne – the Good Design Award winner blends classic-modern design with an international outlook and traditional craftsmanship. After our photo shoot in Tokyo, Wolfgang brainstormed this story with us on a layover in Seoul only to conduct the interview via video chat from his hotel suite in Hong Kong. The fact that the writing took place in Los Angeles and the layout in Cologne is a fitting reflection of Wolfgang Proksch’s international outlook.


DE SIGN E R IN T E R V IE W

C a pt u red i n Tok yo. I t ‘ s e a s ie r to s ho ot Wol f ga n g in A s i a th a n in G e r m any .


DE SIGN E R IN T E R V IE W

As human beings, we spend the majority of our lives without any answers to the major questions behind our existence: Did I choose the right path? Was this the right decision? Could I have done something better? The universe remains silent for the most part and the search continues, except for those rare transcendental moments when the curtain slides back and we get a short glimpse behind the scenes. Such a short flash of insight hit Wolfgang Proksch unexpectedly in Spring of 1999: A friend had just seen the world premiere of the mega blockbuster “The Matrix” and had to call right away. In a taxi scene, the lead actress is shown seen wearing a pair of sunglasses from Proksch’s then current collection; the design in the style of the number eight flipped horizontally. There it was – the universe had revealed an answer. Proksch had made the right choice in eyewear design. “While shooting the movie in Sydney, the production company found the glasses at a small optical store and that’s how they ended up in the movie. It really interests. Today, Wolfgang manages twelve brought an enormous amount of fame, but employees and his designs count among the unfortunately our US distributor didn’t marquee pieces in the inventory of opticians stock enough glasses, so it in the US and Europe as well kind of evaporated,” Proksch THREE LABELS – as Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and remembers with a smile. Hong Kong. True to his interONE PASSION Ever since then, Wolfgang national focus, Wolfgang Proksch’s eyewear design career Wolfgang Proksch | Proksch divides his time bethas followed a firm path, and ween several time zones and ByWP | Anderne a steep trajectory. After numarkets, which over the years – merous design assignments for large labels together with friendships among the whosuch as fashion mainstays Loewe, Givenchy is-who of the eyewear business – has afforand Fendi, he created the labels ByWP and ded him a unique perspective. But let’s hear it in his own words. Anderne as outlets for his various design


DE SIGN E R IN T E R V IE W

WP1404 and WP1406 “My two favorite WP designs. These are hybrid models with a significantly new, elastic ‘V’ design on the temples”

WOLFGANG PROKSCH Established in 1999, the label has built a reputation with “classic modernism” in a contemporary interpretation. As the characteristic style element, the shades and prescription frames feature Proksch’s flexible hinge design with a balance spring effect, protected by a number of patents worldwide. “I’m very much in love with design and always try to include some surprising Wow effects in this collection,” said Proksch. Next to the aesthetic of classic modernism – Wolfgang is a self-proclaimed Bauhaus fan and dedicated to subtle designs with a twist – the designer also puts an emphasis on quality and craftsmanship. All glasses are produced at hand-picked manufacturing outfits in Japan, using only the finest acetate and titanium for an upscale finish. “Producing in Japan has been a formative experience for me. The craftsmanship, the philosophy – people in Japan are fascinated with quality and precision and have a high regard for history. You get a level of respect here as an individual and designer that can hardly be found in Germany,” said Wolfgang Proksch.


DE SIGN E R IN T E R V IE W

BYWP The name of the label created in 2003 reflects the initials of Wolfgang Proksch while the company’s goal lies in blending current trends with industrial design. “I view the label as based around designer products and we present ourselves accordingly,” said Proksch. The frames are crafted from ultra-thin stainless steel and beta titanium from Japan, refined with an ionic coating. The brand’s signature design element lies with the patent-protected screw-free hinge design featuring a cylindrical half-shell as a gliding and rotating element and spring tongues for the snap-mechanics. “At the time, I offered the technology to a popular Berlin-based eyewear label – and they turned it down. So I decided to go for it myself! And we instantly sold quite a large number of glasses, about 5,000 on the first morning. I still remember as if it was yesterday,” said Wolfgang Proksch. Next to various design awards, ByWP glasses have also won quite a number of endorsements from stars and celebrities over the years, most notably the brand’s stylish sunglasses OY16402 “Top-bar frame with a contemporary look and flat sheet construction. As the stylistic model, the design draws on the 057 model released by Essilor in 1963; a classic among designers. It’s my favorite frame right now, because it’s refreshingly in its design.”


DE SIGN E R IN T E R V IE W

Hello Wolfgang, what brings you to Asia at the moment? We are using the Hong Kong tradeshow to see all our business partners. Hong Kong remains a gateway to the Asian markets and the city itself is wildly inspiring to me, so it’s always worth a visit. And much like in the fashion business, the eyewear industry has become accustomed to releasing two collections every year. So we’re showing our new models to opticians here. Speaking of the fashion business, the constant demand for novelties is already causing some backlash among some brands. Yes, I would also like to downgrade a bit and instead take some more time to develop the glasses and keep them in our lineup for the long run. I’m a consumer myself and own some favorite pieces that have

OY16401 “Thin-framed design from acetate and steel with a striking, extremely delicated double brigde and flat lenses.”

been with me for ten years and will never go out of style. So when I’m designing a piece of eyewear today, my goal is that the wearer can still go out on the street three years from now without people saying, “Oh wow, that’s so yesterday.” Yesterday you were still in Korea and we shot the photos for the interview a bit earlier in Tokyo. How much time do you usually spend traveling? Generally, I’m out in Asia about four to six times per year. Other than that, we also attend tradeshows in Milan and Paris, either with our own booth or a trunk show like recently at the Buddha Bar Hotel in Paris during Silmo. Tradeshows nowadays aren’t really for selling products, it’s more about being seen and keeping the conversation going. As a widely traveled jetsetter, what’s your perspective on the international eyewear business? Things are really running in overdrive at the moment. There’s a constant influx of new brands and trends are being copied at lightning speed. It’s a “me too” surge of product, which can be rather troublesome at times. Whenever someone comes out with a good idea, you’ll see it across 20 different brands in the next collection. The pace has accelerated and the industry has changed quite a bit. How is the German optical business doing from an international perspective? The Germans are really doing their own thing. Our products are quite easy to pinpoint, actually. We are strikingly different


DE SIGN E R IN T E R V IE W

ANDERNE The brand name Anderne reflects the hybrid concept of “Another Moderne” – a new interpretation of the modern aesthetic with a sense for tradition without shying away from experiments. The label celebrates a modernist passion for traditional, functional shapes that create vibrant new impulses in today’s fashion context. “Anderne is highly fashion-oriented, the collection is composed of 60 percent sunglasses. We treat the brand as a fashion accessory label and we constantly offer spontaneous takes on current trends,” said Wolfgang Proksch. Ever since releasing the first collection, the brand has made its mark with its signature double bridge design that has been imitated frequently ever since. “And pink is one of the colors for us that keep coming back in a number of variations.” Anderne is aimed at customers with a passion for the finer things in life. The label is at home in the world’s major metropolises, where great taste and an appreciation for quality eyewear are integral to daily life.” CLOUD NO. 9  “A fashion statement in the style of a glacier goggle in bright red. Adjustable side shields blend with flat lenses.”

STRAIGHT EDGE “Trendy combination frames with extruded chasing on the bridge and temples in a baroque-gothic style.”


DE SIGN E R IN T E R V IE W

from Asian collections and that kind of unique selling proposition is really safeguarding our position of the markets out there. What exactly is this unique proposition? Eyewear from Germany and our Scandinavian neighbors tends to be rather minimalist, very subtle and clear in terms of design, but also unique in terms of quality. There are also a number of design collections that are avantgarde and artistic – which is also part of our DNA. Speaking of design, your career path into eyewear design wasn’t exactly linear, right? True, I actually started out in marketing and design came much later. In my midthirties, I worked with brands such as Bugatti, right around the time when the Porsche Design glasses really caused a major splash and moved an incredible amount of units. The Bugatti glasses also caught this wave with a rather unique design and only one shape of lens sold in a number of different models. Back then I was taking my very first steps as a designer and some of my earlier models are still available as vintage versions. My first collection was manufactured by Traction Productions, then the producer of l.a. Eyeworks, in Jura, France. After more than two decades of working as a designer, where do you still find inspiration for new designs? There is an incredible amount of impressions that I get from my travels. And naturally, I also take inspiration from my peers

who have great ideas. Then there are automobile design and architecture. And vintage movies are an endless source of inspiration, much like my friendship to Oliver Goldsmith, whose work I really treasure together with his lasting impact on the industry with Breakfast at Tiffany‘s. Metropolitan cities and street wear also contribute quite a lot. Every city has its own style and I get my influences from everywhere. While we’re talking about trends, are there certain things that are done to death by the optical industry at the moment? On a fundamental level, I’m really disturbed by brands flooding the market with more and more product nobody needs. At this point in our industry, everybody seems to think they need to launch their own collection. And which design trends do you find encouraging? I’m mostly glad that after years of plastic, plastic, plastic more people are starting to


DE SIGN E R IN T E R V IE W

remember metal. I was really influenced by working with metal, so it’s great to see that plastics are used more as a combined elements and in a subjugated, decorative role. Overall, frames are also getting lighter and feel great to wear, also thanks to innovative materials. Looking at retail, what’s the perfect eyewear store for your products? The perfect retailer should have a contemporary store design and offer a clear selection instead of being overstocked with thousands of frames. There’s no need to carry everything from cheap products to luxury goods. The staff needs to be a good match and have a passion for designer products. Because after all, our products aren’t self-explanatory. You need to be able to tell an engaging story in order to get the customer’s attention. Where do you see the eyewear industry headed over the next ten years? Survival will get increasingly hard for smaller brands, unless they are backed by strong partners and a solid network. Largescale shake-out on the market will be inevitable. In retail, the large chain stores will increase their presence and once they also cover the luxury segment, times are bound to get really tough for independent opticians. Overall, I think that independent opticians will need to cooperate with each other better. Another opportunity lies in catering to niche products, through exclusive cooperation with certain collections and brands that can’t be found at larger retailers. All the one-store-retailers that

are riding the trend towards cheap product are going to disappear. They won’t stand a chance. And where do you see your own labels over the next ten years? Headed to the top, hopefully… positive thoughts! Marketing and a clear brand presentation that triggers certain emotions are fundamental aspects. We will continue to build our brands and sharpen our brand positioning and customer communications. Any last words? Without design – there is no future! Design will define us and lift products from their anonymity. Design has advanced into a major factor behind purchase decisions – whether it’s in the optical business or when it comes to buying mobile phones. Without design, nothing will function in the future! wolfgangproksch.com


F E AT U R E C R E AT U R E

Oakley »Latch« is a tribute to the creative and collaborative mindset that exists in the skate community and a nod to style and functionality.

OAKLEY » L a tc h « m a t t e g re y i n k wit h s a pp hi re i r i d iu m pol a r i z e d


Lightweight and stress-resistant O Matter frame | Zero-pressure. Three-Point fit for comfort | 100% UV protection of Plutonite lens | Premium Oakley polarization and Iridium coatings to balance light transmission

F E AT U R E C R E AT U R E

photos STEFAN DONGUS a ssis t ant s CARO ROSS & PIERA MONTENERO s t ylin g JULIA ATITIÉ a t LIGAWEST h air & m ake -up KERSTIN HUESGES a t NINA KLEIN mod el KEVIN a t MODEL POOL

OAKLEY » L a tc h « m a t t e b row n tor toi s e wit h d a rk g re y sh i r t DUNDERDON, p a n t s SCOTCH & SODA


BRAND PROFILE


BRAND PROFILE

AM EYEWEAR GLASSES FROM DOWN UNDER photo STEFAN DONGUS, s t ills RAPHAEL SCHMITZ, illu s tra tion PETER O‘TOOLE

Many start-up companies owe their initial spark to a common scenario: The founders are unable to find their objects of desire anywhere on the market – and decide to take things into their own hands. This is exactly what happened to Andhra-Kumar, aka Simon Ponnusamy. About 13 years ago, Simon was searching high and low in his native Australia for old school-style eyewear frames – but to no avail. This state of affairs ultimately led to the launch of Am Eyewear, Simon’s upcoming glasses company from “Down Under.” When we first met the creative designer at the Paris tradeshow in 2013, we instantly fell in love with his signature design style. Two years later, the stylistic evolution continues as Am Eyewear is available to an increasingly international retailer base. Here’s the lowdown on Am Eyewear.


BRAND PROFILE

» Mie s«

»C h ico«

»T i ra«

»S e i dle r«


BRAND PROFILE

Any attempt at understanding Am Eyewear needs to start with the founder and designer behind the brand: Andhra-Kumar, which is his Hindu name, grew up as the son of an Indian father and a German-Italian Christian mother with Jewish roots in Australia. His mother’s Christian influence is reflected in his alternate first name: Simon. But Andhra-Kumar – or Simon – likes to leave it for people to choose how to address him. We’ll follow his dad’s example in this story and call him Kumar. Simple. The rest is a bit more complex. At 38 years of age, Kumar’s poly-religious approach blends a mix of philosophies and beliefs that might just have the potential to make the world a better place, should everyone adhere to them. Did we mention that his parents were hippies? Maybe that also explains the brand slogan “Be Kind To Others.“ From a European perspective, the rise of Am Eyewear comes a tad bit out of left field. While the label rose to fame rather quickly across Australia and New Zealand, the brand remained an underdog in Europe for quite some time. Instead, development focused on gradually opening doors across Asian markets, before approaching Europe in 2012. But once leading style ladies such as Beyoncé, Rihanna, and Lady Gaga began buying the glasses directly from Down Under, the flood-

gates opened and Am Eyewear’s rise to international fame began. The brand philosophy behind Am Eyewear is rather straightforward: The Australian label is out to create eyewear that is not only beautiful, but exceptional and unique. Eyewear that stands out from the rest of the pack. True to the high quality standards pursued by Kumar and his team, all frames are manufactured by hand – all the way from the handdrawn design sketches to the final polishing of the frames by seasoned craftsmen. On the manufacturing side, Am Eyewear relies on close relationships to proven raw material suppliers and workshops. Their acetate is sourced from the renowned Mazzucchelli workshops in Italy, while the titanium glasses are made in Japan. In some models, raw materials are sourced from as many as five different countries. And in order to prevent manufacturing blemishes from finding their way into retail, the quality control process relies on a three-tier inspection routine. Also reflecting the close attention to quality, Am Eyewear is among the few international labels that offer official co-branding with renowned German lens crafters Carl Zeiss. Throughout its 13-year history, Am Eyewear has not only become a staple at fashion runway shows across the planet, but also played its hand in numerous charitable initiatives.


BRAND PROFILE

»C ox«

»B on d y Toni «

In 2014, the Australian label cooperated with fashion photographer Pierre Toussaint on a capsule collection under the moniker Saint: True to the name, 10% of proceeds are donated to the charitable initiative Optometry Giving Sight. Am Eyewear’s current Salt on Skin collection pays homage to the natural elements and their unique effects during the summer months, when we emerge from the ocean freshly bathed and the sunlight leaves a slight trace of salt on our skin. Befitting the warm summer vibes, the glasses are convenient and lightweight, featuring cat-eye and club shapes in an array of colors such as gold, milk white, and navy blue. The contemporary, cosmopolitan look is supplemented by a

range of exotic materials including leather, Japanese titanium, and a special blend of acetate. In Kumar Ponnusamy’s mind, all glasses are a direct reflection of the love and dedication invested by everyone involved in the manufacturing process. And each pair of glasses fulfills its ultimate destiny in the moment when a new wearer takes it out of the box and slips it on his face. Meanwhile, actually having ocean water leaving salt on your skin is not a prerequisite. It’s the thought that counts, and keeping your mind on the sunny side of life goes right along with the vibe of Am Eyewear, the latest rising star from the land Down Under. And always remember: Be Kind To Others.


AUTHENTIC PEOPLE/   DIRK WEARS MARKUS T  100% Handmade in Germany

VISIT US OPTI 2016, MUNICH JANUARY 15 – 17


l o v i n g str angers welcome to our

p a r a l l e l u n i v e r s e

d e s i g n e of the mont n o v e m b e 2 0 1

r h r 4


P

A

VOTRE DAME BY MAR IE BÄRSCH a ssis t ant DANUTA PRZYBYLEK pos t p roduc t ion DGTL-CRAFT h air & m ake -up MIRIAM GÜNTHER mod els ANAELLE a t KARIN MODELS PARIS & BENJAMIN a t CIT Y MODELS PARIS loca t ion PARIS, ÎLE DE LA CITÉ

RI

S


ESPRIT » E T 178 8 4 « glo v e s ROECKL , co a t DIMITRI

ESPRIT » E T 178 91« s u it H& M, s w e a t e r TIGER OF SWEDEN


co a t TIGER OF SWEDEN, s w e a t e r H& M, p a n t s MARCIANO GUESS, h a t H& M

COLIBRIS »R osa « co a t ZAR A , s u it BOBBY KOL ADE , s w e a t e r L AL A BERLIN


COLIBRIS »Ma r i a « co a t DIMITRI, s w e a t e r ZAR A , glo v e s ROECKL


MARTIN & MARTIN » E d u a rd « s u it H& M, b u t ton - dow n sh i r t H& M, h a t H& M

MARTIN & MARTIN » Ulr i c h « co a t DAWID TOMASZEWSKI, s w e a t e r ZAR A , r i n g SWAROVSKI


MARTIN & MARTIN » E d u a rd « co a t TIGER OF SWEDEN, b u t ton - dow n sh i r t H& M, s u it H& M, h a t H& M


s w e a t e r H& M, p a n t s H& M

MODO »4084« co a t ZAR A , s w e a t e r DAWID TOMASZEWSKI, sk i r t ZAR A


MODO » 4 050 « co a t BOBBY KOL ADE , s w e a t e r MANGO


GIORGIO ARMANI »A R 6 031« co a t TIGER OF SWEDEN, s w e a t e r H& M, p a n t s MARCIANO GUESS, h a t H& M


STARK EYES » S H 3 028 « co a t TIGER OF SWEDEN, s w e a t e r H& M, p a n t s MARCIANO GUESS, h a t H& M

MIKLI »A 05017« s w e a t e r STRENESSE , p a n t s STRENESSE , r i n g SWAROVSKI


LINDBERG »9823« d re ss MANGO, co a t ZAR A , e a r r i n g s SWAROVSKI


OWP Brillen GmbH, www.metropolitan-eyewear.de


ANNIVER SARY

25 years in business

ANDREAS 3 MALATHOUNIS iBRANDS EUROPE


ANNIVER SARY

In this issue’s Anniversary segment, we’re not celebrating the birthday of a brand or eyewear label. We’re celebrating the 25th work anniversary of an industry veteran who knows the business like few others: Andreas Malathounis has been to this rodeo for a while now, and he currently distributes three international labels through his Switzerland-based iBrands agency. Eyewear caught the well-traveled jetsetter in a rare quiet moment for our interview.

photos STEFAN DONGUS, s tills RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

Andreas, which three emotions best sum up your current state? Pride, happiness, and contentment. But there are more on my wish list. What was your first step into the eyewear industry 25 years ago? Working as an optician, I was ready for a change, so I founded my first agency in 1990. Back then, the market just didn’t offer that many interesting collections. So after a few interviews I opted for Wolfgang Proksch and Theo, both of which were unique in their own right at the time.

And I had the privilege to build them up in the DACH region. What was the journey like from there? Turbulent. I initially spent ten years working for Theo, before founding my own eyewear label to bring frames crafted from natural horn to a worldwide audience. Then I worked on various projects and designs for international eyewear brands. Simultaneously, I was working as a consultant on a wide number of projects, until in 2010 I received an offer to distribute three eyewear brands – which marked the start of


ANNIVER SARY

»Am a n d a «

»8M 3P«

»G G7 1 «

»Br i d ge t «

»8M 5«

»G G5 6 «

Kirk & Kirk

8000 E y e w e a r

Germano Gambini


ANNIVER SARY

iBrands Europe. What’s the unique feature of iBrands? We strive every day to meet the wishes of our clients and work towards our mutual success. And do you always succeed? I would like to think so. I’m really happy that we get the opportunity of working with loyal customers – at this point you can call them friends – in an atmosphere of mutual respect. And that’s not necessarily a given nowadays. Which labels are currently part of your portfolio? Germano Gambini, Kirk & Kirk and Ottomila (8000) Eyewear. What makes these three labels unique? Germano Gambini has been known a traditional Italian eyewear label since the 1960s. Germano supplies leading Italian fashion

houses with his eyewear designs. Until this day, the brand represents 100% craftsmanship “Made in Italy” – never compromising the quality and workmanship. With the iLeggeri collection, the brand has become synonymous with extremely lightweight and thin acetate frames that suit current lifestyles. Kirk & Kirk is not your average eyewear collection, but brings decades of tradition into the mix. The British label is known for its acrylic frames, implemented with fashionsavvy designs. Ottomila Eyewear is the third label and our main sunglasses collection. 8000 Eyewear is the label for flat lens designs blending a vintage look with modernist aesthetics. With ultra-flat, mineral lenses, the models are crafted in limited editions while the aesthetics always follow a sense of purpo-


ANNIVER SARY

se – from the actual products all the way to the packaging. Does each label follow a unique distribution strategy? No, there are no separate strategies. I’m generally convinced that in each city, there is a demand for exclusive styles. Unfortunately, there are only a few opticians with the necessary guts to clearly stand out from others. But their numbers are growing. It’s up to every individual optician to choose. And everyone can get in the ring with us. But as far as your responsibilities go, you serve different functions with each of your three labels. That’s rather unusual, no? My primary task for all three labels is actually the same: Business development, one my strengths. For Kirk & Kirk, my agency serves as the connection between the brand and the optical boutique, so we consciously chose to be the sales agent. For Germano Gambini we work as a traditional distribution company, building a well-organized network within the DACH countries. And for 8000 Eyewear we are a European distribution companies with some of the best optical boutiques on our list of close friends. Andreas, let’s be honest: three brands and such a large distribution region? Sounds like a Mission Impossible?

No, just the opposite. A well-planned structure and organization make it a Mission Possible. We are able to reach the majority of our customers at one fell swoop through international tradeshows such as opti, Mido, and Silmo. What are the three main reasons why opticians should buy from iBrands Europe? Top-of-the-line collections, close customer focus and potential for mutual success. What are three eyewear styles that are going to gain relevance in 2016? Minimalism is the way to go. What are the three mega trends for the future? Intelligent products and infrastructure, disruption in markets and consumer behaviors, and transformation of gender roles. What are three urban areas every visitor to Europe needs to see? Paris – the upbeat and intense way of live cultivated by the Parisians is always refreshing. Berlin – my daughter lives there and the town is always a cultural and culinary standout. Athens – currently home to an interesting budding subculture. You reside in the small town of Kreuzlingen on the Bodensee lake. How come? Due to the high quality of life – and the wonderful lake, of course.


COLLEC TION CHECK

SAM CRAIG Age 38 years | Family Creative – fashion, architecture, theatre, music | Base London | Designer since 17 years | Designer for Brando since 3 years | Designer for YY since 2 years | Passion Music, graphics, art, travel, food, laughter


COLLEC TION CHECK

YOHJI YAMAMOTO SAM CRAIG‘S 2016 COLLECTION photo JONATHAN MALONEY a t WHAT THE FOX BUREAU in SAI YING PUN, HONGKONG, s til l s RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

Yohji Yamamoto is one of the most renowned names in the international design scene, while the unique philosophy and signature style of the man behind the eponymous brand are the stuff of legend. Over the years, the Japanese fashion designer, who would much rather refer to himself as a “tailor,” has earned some of the most coveted design awards around the world. Next to designer fashion pieces, Yohji Yamamoto has also been releasing its own branded eyewear for the past two years. And true to the label’s strong heritage, the glasses and sunglasses live up to the highest quality standards in order to earn the YY name. After such a short period hardly any other fashion label out there has made the leap from haute couture into designer eyewear as gracefully as Yohji Yamamoto. In search of the secret behind the success, Eyewear talked to the man in charge of eyewear design for YY, Mr. Sam Craig, Creative Director at Mondottica. The YY eyewear collection is available through Brando, the luxury division of Mondottica. Prepare to be inspired.


COLLEC TION CHECK

his designs appear – neither retrospective Hi Sam, to be in charge of the eyewear denor futuristic. sign for a label like Yohji Yamamoto must He is a lover of women; their form, their be an accolade for every designer, isn’t it? beauty and he often talks of designing Yes! I was in Tokyo in September and visiclothes back to front. He talks of the back ted his Omotesando flagship store. It was being more important than the front. That one of those ‘pinch me’ moments to see clothes are held by the shoulders and the our collaboration on full display, and to back. This is typical Yamamoto. A philosohear many of the most extreme pieces had phical approach to design, art is what sets sold out. It was an amazing confirmation him apart. that if you are brave enough to create someHe is however probably most famous for thing special, there are people that underhis use of the color black. “Black is modest stand what you are striving to achieve. and arrogant at the same time. Black is lazy Yamamoto is one of the great designers of and easy– but mysterious.” But his blacks our time; it is an honour to work with him are often not black at all. He showed me and his team. He is a true polymath; a desisome military-inspired trousers and asked gner, a musician, an artist, a poet, a philowhat color I thought they were. “Black?” sopher, and a rock star. He really is as close I naively replied. “No, they are green on to genius as I have ever had the fortune to green on green. That makes them more meet. As a designer, projects such as this than black,” he replied. are infrequent and I am aware of this. I How do you transfer this unique design have the chance to remove boundaries, to philosophy into eyewear collections? work on theory, to realise not only avantAt the start of the collaboration we were garde designs but to go against the grain. given a three-word brief: “avant-garde, Actually, YY is best known as a designer dramatic and/or intelligent.” We exclufashion label. What would you say are the sively developed the acetate with Eleanor philosophy and the key design elements? Mazzucchelli. We talked about making coYamamoto often refers to fabric as his lors that were more than black, creating the source of inspiration, he believes the matedarkest shades of material possible, how rial speaks to you – if you bother to listen. to make them deep, yet distinct, by using There is something timeless about his demore pigment to create an unusual depth. signs, they seem to almost transcend time. Deconstruction and reconstruction are For the uninitiated, it is hard to look at his major themes in the collection. Frames are retro-spective and put any sort of decade cut in two and put back together. Traditito it. He avoids using the word ‘fashion’ as onal shapes are disassembled into pieces it implies faddishness. One of my favourite and put back together in a non-conformist quotes from the master is “With my eyes way. Round eye-shapes are punched out turned to the past I walk backwards into of traditional silhouettes; lens shapes are the future.” To me this best sums up how


COLLEC TION CHECK

“The »YY1028« captures the essence of YY as deep, bold eyeshapes are finished in delicate white marbled acetate, featuring the extruded ‚Y‘ temple.”

“Inspired by imperfect beauty, wisps of greys dance across the surface of the »YY1029« creating a smoke that unfurls with a sense of freedom whilst the solid metal bridge brings the construction together.”

directly. We also work in depth with his capped off with acetates. design team in Tokyo. We work with the The inside of the frames became as imporlatest fabric swatches, color palettes and tant as the outside, the fit had to feel like design concepts to ensure we are compleYamamoto’s clothes; like you had owned tely in tune with their next collections. a pair of the eyewear for years, as if it had Do you have an example of developing a been uniquely fitted to you. We hope we design from start to finish?? captured the avant-garde aesthetic here We start with a design philosophy, typitoo, by creating forms that are challenging cally a singular concept that runs through and unique. There is nothing commercially the entire body of work. We then move to focused about the collection. developing materials even before we know In terms of the design process, do you work what the frames are going to look like, this hand-in-hand with Yamamoto-san or draws from the swatches sent to us, mood rather autonomously? boards and any research we have compleWe are lucky enough to get time with him


COLLEC TION CHECK

„The »YY7005« is the icon of the collection. Exploring the idea of shapes within shapes, traditional silhouettes are traced in a wire frame and signature round eye shapes are punched out and ultra matte gold lenses complete the look.”

“An exploration in depth of color, the »YY5014« layers deep, dark shades that look black at first glance, but disguise multiple lamination.”

ted. We then start with a blank piece of paper and sketch. Using ones hands is such an important principle. I believe drawing directly into a computer somehow never quite captures the details of the human touch. Not yet. Has the brand philosophy behind YY changed since the beginning until today? Not at all, as Yamamoto has not changed his unique approach in decades. What’s special about the new YY collection? What’s the unique feature?

We have introduced an incredible matte lens. The unique technology diffuses reflecting light, which is also given an extra matte effect by an anti-reflective coating to the inside on the lens. During wear, there is no loss of optical clarity and aside from the beautiful aesthetic, the lens also gives a wonderful calming effect to the eye. We wanted to create the ultimate matte frames and it always bothered me that the lenses seemed to detract from this look, these new lenses complete this quest. The


COLLEC TION CHECK

“A masterpiece in construction, our »YY5016« was one of the most challenging to make. The fine metal rim forms the foundation of the frame whilst the carefully crafted acetate is then shaped over the top.”

“Featuring the now signature Yohji Yamamoto bridge shape, the »YY5012« epitomizes his philosophy of reconstruction through deconstruction. Taking apart the frame, chopping off the top brow and reconstructing it with a metal top bar integrated to perfection.”

at metals, making them thin, light, yet matte gold lens is simply abyss-like. Drastrong in look. They are extremely chalwing from the Japanese design philosophy lenging from a production aspect, yet their ‘Wabi Sabi,’ which celebrates imperfection appearance is deceptively simplistic. and nature, we have developed our ‘dirty’ gold metallic finish. It is both old and new Aside from metals, where did you get the inspiration for the new collection? at the same time, as if the metal has been Inspired by his recognizable hand-written left to evolve in the hands of nature. logo, the new sunglasses are a celebration of What’s the difference between the current Yamamoto’s mastery in design. The frame and the next collection? is the result of the sinuous movement of We went heavier into metal designs and the pencil on paper that dances, mastering a the balance of the collection reflects this. precise technique where the nib never leaves We wanted to create a new way of looking


COLLEC TION CHECK

“The »YY1027« is given an added dimension with a step cutaway across the bridge giving a sense of depth to the frame, and enhanced by linear graphic 3D acetate.”

“Our »YY3010« model is unafraid and confident. Picking out red accents from his SS16 show, the round metal eye shape is given a new form, full of expression by the bold acetate top brow. Yamamoto‘s expert use of black is often juxtaposed with carefully considered use of color.”

the surface. The entire collection is an exploration of the round eye shape, traditional forms are brought into the future by punching out circles and exploring deconstruction. How many styles do you have in the new collection? The new sunglasses collection is made up of ten models, while the optical will introduce twelve new styles. Each are available in three to four colors. What are special technical features in the new collection? With bespoke acetates developed exclusively with Mazzucchelli, the new acetate

palette mimics his exceptional hand made Japanese fabrics. Here lace is interwoven with blacks and golds from which the acetate takes direct inspiration. Sounds quite elaborate. That’s because it is. When a frame is deconstructed, to reunite the two parts is essentially a surgical procedure. Each separated element had to be perfectly fitted back to the other, to replenish strength, to patch up the incisions, to create a new form. Achieving this requires an incredible attention to detail where metal meets acetate, where surfaces bond together for the first time.


C A M PA I G N AWA R D

I WANT MY COLORS BACK CARMEN MITROTTA FOR GÖTTI photos CARMEN MITROT TA

Looking at the most recent campaign by Swiss eyewear label Götti, the inspiration from fine art photography stands out imme-

» Da n«

diately. For the follow-up, the brand teamed up with photographer Carmen Mitrotta from Milan. The Italian enjoys a reputation for capturing shapes and colors in her work, rendered in her own abstract visual style. Through the lens of Carmen Mitrotta, viewers get to explore an entirely new world of photography, which now also includes a healthy dose of designer eyewear: During Götti’s latest campaign, I Want My Colors Back, the photo shoot turned into an unforgettable experience, both for Carmen as well as label head Sven Götti. The results speak for themselves. The styledriven photographer captures the collection in a way that enhances the personal identity of the models through eyewear. With that said, the campaign goes far beyond mere portrait photography. The lofty design language that is typical of Götti also shines through in Mitrotta’s scenic stills. In a mixture of shapes and photography, Götti’s designs meet Carmen Mitrotta’s unique, graphics-driven aesthetic. Completing the picture, the campaign is supplemented by a soundtrack by Swiss singer Lea Lu. Due to a condition known as synesthesia, Lea Lu has the ability to see colors based on sounds. Accordingly, her theme song “I want my colors back” provides the perfect background for the Götti campaign. Asked about the inspiration for the campaign, the Swiss label had the following colorful statement: “Everyone wearing a pair of Götti glasses is not concealing anything behind the frames, but finds their perfect companion to suit their personal type.”


C A M PA I G N AWA R D

»Ya b a «

»A b r y «


F INISHING

ROLF EXCELLENCE COLLECTION NEXT LEVEL FINISHING photos RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

The Rolf Spectacles motto “handmade in a family business in the Tyrolean Alps” represents a trustworthy seal of quality. As an added bonus, the frames created by Rolf Spectaclesare also top-of-the-line in terms of style and innovation, once again proven in the new Excellence Collection. In the signature style of all Rolf glasses, the Excellence Collection’s new models are crafted entirely without any bolts, screws, or metal components. For this latest edition, the innovative wooden hinges have received a crucial update together with the lens fitting system. For subtle designer touches, the frames feature two-tone variations of cont-

rasting wood grains as well as delicate engravings to enhance each frame’s unique characteristics. For instance, the » Flaminia 203« model’s engravings enhance the curvature of the frames, while the »Zephyr 203« model puts an emphasis on straight lines. The technology behind these upscale features is a new 3D-measuring process, implemented by Rolf Spectacles for the very first time in this collection. The precise system, together with the updated lens fitting process, supports extremely lean frame designs crafted from eleven-ply wood. The result is a unique blend of traditional craftsmanship and technical innovation for a new level of upscale finish.

»I mp e r i al«

»Brou g h a m «


F INISHING

»V ig na le «

»F

in lam

ia«

» 105

hy p e Z


FREAK OUT

BYWP »FUTURAMA« F ROM 60IES TO NOW


FREAK OUT

photo SUZANA HOLTGRAVE, mod el BELLA OELMANN a t ICONIC MANAGEMENT

The »Futurama« model is a Limited Runway Edition courtesy of eyewear label ByWP. And it’s also the reason why we’re adding an entirely new column to our magazine – Freak Out. The reason? Looking at the »Futurama«, we instantly realized that our existing categories could never do justice to such a strikingly different design. But make no mistake, the design created by eyewear mainstay Wolfgang Proksch is not only limited to the world’s runways and fashion shows. The »Futurama« is highly

wearable in daily life, as a number of avantgarde wearers in metropolitan cities around the world will attest. In terms of concept, the »Futurama« pays homage to the styles of the late ‘60s and early ‘70s. As a major inspiration, designer Wolfgang Proksch named the Silhouette »570« from that specific era. With that in mind, it’s easy to picture celebrity model Twiggy Lawson rocking the Futurama through “Swinging Sixties” London night clubs, or André Courrèges hitting the scene in Paris.


FREAK OUT

Proksch chose a strong and rugged design for the »Futurama«, not for the timid at heart and a bold statement. Taking the aviator style to new heights (see what we did there?), the »Futurama« flies its freak flag in five different, bright colors. The frames are available in unitoned or mirrored lenses. The two metallic lines on the temples symbolize ByWP’s signature slits featured in the patent-protected plug-in temple hinge design. For the Futurama’s photo shoot, we set the scene with style photographer Suzana Holtgrave aka Suzy Love. The results: A worthy first entry into our Freak Out segment – stay tuned for more!

Ready to strike a pose with a pair of »Futurama« glasses? We got you covered! For your chance to win an extra dose of flavor, visit  eyewear-magazin. com where our Futurama giveaway is up until the end of January.


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

THE VISIT

RAY-BAN 2016 – ROUND / FRESH / OPTICAL For an eyewear label that needs no further introduction, look no further than Ray-Ban. The iconic sunglasses label enjoys a worldwide following with its unique heritage of classic styles. But then again, few people know there’s far more to Ray-Ban than just shades. While the popularity of sunglasses styles such as the Aviator, Wayfarer etc. may outshine the label’s high-end offering in the prescription segment, more and more customers are picking up the label’s RX-frames. And they’re on to something: For the 2016 collection, Ray-Ban is setting a new style in prescription eyewear with rounded lenses, as captured in this Collection Shoot by stylist Andrea Kadler and photographer Alex Otto in the comforts of his Berlin apartment. Young, urban, stylish – and RX. We like.

»R B7073 - 558 8 « ja c k e t A .O.CMS, sh i r t HUGO BOSS, n e c k l a c e CHIEF OF NOTHING, j e a n s ZAR A

photos ALEX OT TO s t ylin g & p roduc t ion ANDREA KADLER h air & m ake -up JEREMY RINALDI mod els JONATHAN a t VIVA MODELS, MICHAEL a t VIVA MODELS, ZAOE a t SEEDS MODELS & ALICE a t MIRR/RS MODELS


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

»R B7073 - 2077« d re ss RICH & ROYAL , b e lt PAUL & JOE

»R B 3532 V - 2502« s u it ANTONY MOR ATO, sh i r t ANTONY MOR ATO, b e lt HUGO BOSS


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

jacket

S .O L I V

» R B 24 ER PR E MIUM

47 V 20 0 0« -

, shir t S .O L I V

ER , d e n ims

S . OLIV ER

»R B24 47 V - 5 493« ja c k e t HUMAN SCALES, sh i r t S.OLIVER

DEMIM


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

»R B218 0 V - 5 495 « -

»R B218 0 V - 20 0 0 « -

ja c k e t LIEBESKIND BERLIN, b u s t i e r HUNKEMÖLLER , p a n t s RICH & ROYAL , b ra c e l e t VIERI

ja c k e t MADS NORGA ARD, top WON HUNDRET, b ra WON HUNDRET, c u lot t e s TRIANGLE BY S.OLVIER , so c k s OTHER STORIES


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

»R B70 69 - 520 6 « »R B70 69 - 5519 « p u llo v e r TRIANGLE BY S.OLIVER , b ra WON HUNDRET

h a t S.OLIVER , sh i r t MATS NORGA ARD, shor t s RICH & ROYAL , a n k l e b oot s CHI MIHAR A


唀䰀吀刀䄀 匀吀刀伀一䜀⸀ 唀䰀吀刀䄀 䰀䤀䜀䠀吀⸀  䌀伀䴀䤀一䜀 匀伀伀一 


BE

R

WITCH LOVE BY ULR ICH HART MANN IN COLL ABOR AT ION W IT H NOV EAUX MAGAZINE a ssis t ant SOPHIE SCHWARZENBERGER s t ylin g KONSTANTINOS GKOUMPETIS h air FLORIAN FERINO m ake -up YVONNE mod els ELISABETH EHRLICH & ELLINOR VOGEL c u ra tor JULIA AKRA-LAURIEN

L

loca t ion BERLIN

All shown clothes are vegan, sustainable and fairly produced. All frames are made in Europe.

IN


STR ADA DEL SOLE »10 0 « w h it e b lou s e ALMA & LOVIS, b lou s e NUDIE JEANS, b u t to n d ow n NUDIE JEANS, b u t ton dow n ARMEDANGELS, d o t s- b lou s e PEOPLE TREE , sk i r t ELENI KONTI COUTURE , b oot s VEGETARIAN SHOES

STR ADA DEL SOLE » 0 99 « d e ni m s GOODSOCIET Y, d e n i m sh i r t NUDIE JEANS, a p ro n NUDIE JEANS, rop e BENU BERLIN


REIZ » L e F ou n q u e‘ 20 « d re ss BENU BERLIN, b oot s DR . MARTENS

GÖTTI »Ma rlot« d re ss BENU BERLIN


FACE À FACE » C os t e 2« d re ss BENU BERLIN, b oot s VEGETARIAN SHOES


IC! BERLIN »F a h rl e h re r K l a u s « sc a r f BENU BERLIN, c h a i r BENU BERLIN, sk i r t FRISUR CLOTHING


MARKUS T

»T 2 . 662« p a nt s BENU BERLIN, co a t RICHARD BEIL , b o ot s VEGETARIAN SHOES

MARKUS T »M 2 . 655« co a t RICHARD BEIL


ANDY WOLF LOVE »H u m b l e « b lou s e BLEED, ja c k e t GOODSOCIET Y, v e s t BENU BERLIN, shor t s KUYICHI


8000 » 8 M1« d e ni m s GOODSOCIET Y,ja c k e t GOODSOCIET Y

8000 » 8 M5«


SILHOUET TE » 815 4 20 6205« ja c k e t BENU BERLIN, d e n i m s ALMA & LOVIS


©2015 www.pmd-eyewear.net


M AT E R I A L W O R L D


M AT E R I A L W O R L D


N E W IN TOW N

HAMBURG EYEWEAR SUNGLASSES

photo NIC FRECHEN, s tills RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

Hamburg Eyewear has been a famous German independent eyewear label for some time now. But most of their reputation has been based on their unique style of prescription frames. That’s about to change, as the label launches its new sunglasses collection that marks their first foray into metal frame designs. With their own youthful and somewhat loud aesthetic, the sunglasses turn a new page for Hamburg Eyewear, all the while

staying true to the quality and craftsmanship of previous collections. The retro-inspired stainless steel frames are equipped on the insides with super-antireflective shades perfectly suited for young urbanites. The aviator style metal frames will position Hamburg Eyewear towards a broader, more international audience. And while the overall age of the consumer goes down, the style level is nothing but up. We like it!


N E W IN TOW N

» Flut «

» E bb e«

» T i d e«


NEW TECH


NEW TECH

IC! BERLIN »EXOSKELETON« SCIENCE FICTION IS NOW photos RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

The future looks bright: German label Ic! Berlin is using state-of-the-art 3D-printing technology in pursuit of a new stylistic direction in eyewear design. The recently released »Exoskeleton« men’s sunglasses are blending a number of technological manufacturing innovations with a futuristic interpretation of the classic aviator frame. At first sight, the unique surface structure of the »Exoskeleton« – a cellular arrangement of geometric angles – is reminiscent of science fiction blockbusters such as Blade Runner or Alien. But according to Ic! Berlin’s design team, the geometric shapes emerged quite organically: The intricate cellular shapes are a magnification of the molecular structure of the frame material, raw polyamide, which is 3D-printed into an eyewear frame.


NEW TECH

The biggest technological breakthrough behind the »Exoskeleton« is the 3D-printed hinge. The temple now attaches directly into the frame front without a clamp or clip; a technical achievement previously impossible with acetate. The frame’s cellular surface structure could also never have been realized without the use of 3D-printing from extremely light and moldable polyamide. For a secure, contoured fit the frame features built-in silicone nose pads as well as temple tips from thermoplastic elastomer. But despite all the technological innovations, the frame’s shape stays true to Ic! Berlin’s signature design language: strong, masculine, and a perfect blend of modern and classic. On that note, the ideal wearer of the »Exoskeleton« need not be a space ship pilot. Every self-confident man who appreciates the classics while willing to take a chance on some futuristic designs can go out and turn heads with this unique piece of eyewear.


OPTI 2016 / 15-17 JANUAR / MESSEGELÄNDE MÜNCHEN STAND 508 + 612 / HALLE C4

contact@jfrey.fr


CHANGE YOUR LIF E , YOUR T HINK ING AND T HE PEOPLE AROUND YOU, BU T DON’ T CHANGE YOUR GL ASSES.

Some glasses are so stylish and captivating, you never ever want to take them off again. And you don’t have to, as the versatile, all-day specs in our series The Change – Don‘t Do It! illustrate. We added an extra edge to these 24/7 glasses by fitting them with Transitions lenses, which tint automatically in contact with sunrays. All day, all night, don’t you ever change.

PERSOL »P O3132 V« ja c k e t CINQUE , t- sh i r t CARHART T, p a n t s CINQUE


CO

LO

THE CHANGE – DON‘T DO IT! BY ST EFAN DONGUS a ssis t ant s CARO ROSS & PIERA MONTENERO s t ylin g JULIA ATITIÉ a t LIGAWEST h air & m ake -up KERSTIN HUESGES a t NINA KLEIN re touch JONG-HO BARK mod els ULLA LOMMEN a t MODEL POOL , ANDREAS VON TEMPELHOFF a t MODEL POOL & FINN BROCK a t NO TOYS

G

loca t ion COLOGNE

MODO » 66 03« t u r tl e n e c k COMMA , ju m p e r STEFFEN SCHR AUT, p a nt s PATRIZIA PEPE , j e w e lr y ARIANE ERNST

NE


LINDBERG » 8 6 01« T r a n s i t i o n s l e n s e s i n b row n ja c k e t CINQUE , sh i r t ADLER , p a n t s PATRIZIA PEPE , b a g JOOP, j e w e lr y ARIANE ERNST


LINDBERG » 83 05« ja c k e t CINQUE , sh i r t CINQUE , p a n t s CINQUE


ROLF SPEC TACLES »Va nt a g e 10 « T r a n s i t i o n s l e n s e s i n g ra phit e g re e n sh i r t STEFFEN SCHR AUT, t u r tl e n e c k COMMA , p a n t s LYN, j e w e lr y ARIANE ERNST


SILHOUET TE » S PX Illu s ion F u llr i m « ja c k e t PENFIELD, sh i r t JOOP, t u r tl e n e c k PIERRE CARDIN, p a n t s CINQUE


KERBHOLZ » L e opol d « ja c k e t STEFFEN SCHR AUT, t u r tl e n e c k TIGER OF SWEDEN, p a nt s PATRIZIA PEPE , j e w e lr y ARIANE ERNST


ALIUM »X 4 9359 « T r a n s i t i o n s l e n s e s i n g ra phit e g re e n ja c k e t PATR ZIA PEPE , b lou s e STEFFEN SCHR AUT, p a n t s ADLER , b a g PATRIZIA PEPE , je w e lr y ARIANE ERNST

ALIUM »R a y 1 9128 « T r a n s i t i o n s l e n s e s i n g ra phit e g re e n v e s t PENFIELD, sh i r t GARCIA ,  p a n t s CINQUE , w a tc h DIESEL


ROLF SPEC TACLES »V ig n a l e 203« T r a n s i t i o n s l e n s e s i n g ra p hit e g re e n sh i r t CINQUE , p a n t s SCOTCH & SODA


LINDBERG » 8 570 « T r a n s i t i o n s l e n s e s i n b row n ja c k e t CINQUE , sh i r t ADLER


FACE À FACE »V ig go 2« T r a n s i t i o n s l e n s e s i n g re y ja c k e t PENFIELD, t u r tl e n e c k PIERRE CARDIN


CA

PE

THE SECRET GARDEN BY TANJA T R EMEL h air & m ake -up LARS RÜFFERT a t INFIDELS LONDON s t ylin g KAI KILIAN re touch MARIO SEYER mod els CHARISSA DU PLESSIS & LOUREN GROENEWALD a t ICEMODELS.CO.ZA

TO

loca t ion CAPE TOWN, ARDENE GARDENS

WN


I -SPA X » O sc a r« p a nt s ZAR A , t u r tl e n e c k TOP MAN,  ja c k e t COS

I -SPA X »W il b u r« top BAUM& PFERDEGARTEN, sk i r t REBEKK A RUETZ,  je w e lr y SIF JAKOBS


MUNICEYEWEAR » 875 -3« top MARC CAIN, p a nt s MARCEL OSTERTAG, sho e s H& M,  je w e lr y SIF JAKOBS


MUNICEYEWEAR » 8 83 -1« t u r tl e n e c k TOP MAN,  ja c k e t COS


REIZ »T. 01« top ANA ALCA ZAR ,  je w e lr y SIF JAKOBS


REIZ »Mi a‘ 20 « top MARCEL OSTERTAG, sk i r t ANA ALCA ZAR


GÖTTI »Te d - S « top MARC CAIN, p a n t s ANA ALCA ZAR ,  je w e lr y SIF JAKOBS


GÖTTI »R a n d y « top REBEKK A RUETZ,  je w e lr y SIF JAKOBS


CAZAL » 659/3« b u t to n - d ow n sh i r t COS, lon g sl e e v e COS, p a n t s TOP MAN


CAZAL »3 0 4 4 « top BAUM& PFERDEGARTEN,  je w e lr y SIF JAKOBS


INVU »P 26 03« top MARCEL OSTERTAG


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

ØRGREEN’S OLIVIA DELORME A F EMALE DESIGN TALK


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

By the time I arrive, Olivia already stands waiting outside the cafe by the Spree river canal in Berlin Kreuzberg. It’s a cold and windy day in the German capital, and although I have never met Olivia in person, I can tell from far away that it’s her I will be interviewing. The giveaway? Perhaps it’s her signature French charms, or the distinct Ørgreen glasses that pointed me in the right direction. After exchanging initial pleasantries as the blustering wind picks up momentum, we head inside the warm comforts of Café Spindler to talk about Olivia’s career, her personal approach to eyewear, and what’s in store from Ørgreen in 2016.

i nt e r vie w FRANCA RAINER , photos TOMASO BALDESSARINI, s t ills RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

Any connection to your professional life? Olivia, you were the one who picked this Okay, here’s the connection to Ørgreen: cafe as the meet up for the interview. Nice choice! Very tasteful, and with lots of love Our collections also reflect the goal of creafor detail. Is there a particular reason you ting dynamic and innovative designs with chose Café Spindler? a minimalist aesthetic. We also take great There is, indeed. This cafe is really elecare in choosing every single small detail. gant and modern, without coming across And we also pursue high standards when it as uptight. The quality is really on point, comes to offering comfort to our custofrom the interior decorations all the way to mers. That’s why we’ve come to the perthe food and service. I find it all rather well fect place for talking about my work at executed, a subtle mixture of refinement Ørgreen. and industrial chic. Cool, but well-mainHold up, let’s take it back a quick notch. tained. Who are you and what do you do?


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

I was born on the Côte d’Azur and studied art at the Art Academy in Brittany. Today I work as the Senior Product Designer at Ørgreen. But the company is headquartered in Copenhagen. How did you end up in Berlin? Right after earning my diploma, I found a job with a Berlin-based eyewear company. That was an invaluable experience and offered so many insights. Then I met Tobias Wandrup (Head of Design) and Henrik Ørgreen (CEO and Creative Director) from Ørgreen at an eyewear tradeshow. The timing for our meeting could not have been any more perfect: They were looking for a new designer – I was looking for new challenges. We instantly got along swimmingly; the chemistry was perfect right from the start. A few weeks later they invited me to meet them in Copenhagen and it was just like at the tradeshow – we were instantly on the same wavelength. We ate Danish smørrebrød and I sketched up a few designs, and it was pretty much already clear that we would be working together. What’s your collaborative workflow with your remote set-up? We worked out a pretty good deal. I work in Berlin, but I fly out to Copenhagen and stay there half of the time. That’s been working well for us for over three-and-ahalf years now. And whenever we’re about to finalize a new collection or receive prototypes, I take multiple trips. Speaking of new collections, how many are

there each year? We work on an exact plan for when and how many new styles we’ll be releasing over the course of a year. We know when to start designing so everything gets done on time. We really work pretty far in advance. We’re currently working on late 2016 collections. We have five launches, three major collections for each big tradeshow. For opti in Munich, Mido in Milan, and Silmo in Paris. We work with a strong teamspirit and in the end, it is Tobias, Head of Design, and I, who are in charge of designing all the styles, for men and women – from sunglasses to prescription. That must take close cooperation in order to keep everyone on the same page. What’s a typical day like when it comes to connecting Berlin and Copenhagen? We’re pretty much communicating all the time. Email, texts... Skype is always open – it’s as if I was at the office! Although I have my own life here in Berlin, I often wonder if it would make more sense to just move out to Copenhagen... It’s such an incredible city with amazing people. Most of the design trends originate in Scandinavia, especially product and fashion designs. So I’m definitely tempted. Where do you find inspiration for your own design process In Scandinavia? Most definitely! I love Scandinavian furniture – the minimalism and clear lines definitely have a major impact on my eyewear collect-ions. But for me, inspiration mostly


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

»Rh a pso d y « “A m i d - s i z e d , cl a ss i c f ra m e w it h a p re t t y, e l e g a nt , a n d s moot h u pp e r e d g e to s u b tly a c c e nt u a t e t h e e y e b row s . M e a nw i l e , t h e low e r p a r t of t h e f ra m e i s re c t a n g u l a r a n d a n gl e d . I t e m b o d i e s t h e t y pi c a l , cl e a n m i ni m a li s t Ø r g r e e n L oo k ! ”

comes from people, facial expressions, personalities... Whenever I meet people that have a special something about them, or that are creating something out of the ordinary, or have a unique lifestyle – it’s inspiring to me. In multi-cultural metropolitan cities such as Berlin there are plenty of unique individuals – one of a kind faces, if you will – which I find super exciting and inspiring. So it’s all about creating a frame for unique faces. After all, a pair of glasses ultimately has to emphasize existing facial features. Glasses should never conceal; they shouldn’t be a mask. They need to complement the wearer’s face by subtly following the facial features. Where do you start your designs? Please

walk us through the creative stages towards a finished eyewear design. The creative process always starts out with a meeting in the Copenhagen office, where I together with Tobias and Henrik decide on the direction. We also have the sales team as part of the meeting to give us some of their input. However it is Tobias and I, who at the end of the day filters all the input from all people involved and then use our own inspiration combined with a list of customer needs, detailing which market or which country currently lacks a certain design; and in which size and style category. Do they need something rather eccentric or conservative? Tobias and I work off of this list simultaneously by starting our


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

»Ys a bel« “ Thi s f rame i s the e sse nce of fe mininit y. A woman we ar ing the se gl a ss e s ra d i a t e s a n a u ra of i n n e r s t re n g t h a n d s e lf- conf i d e n c e . T h e c u r v e d upp e r li n e com pl e m e nt s t h e som e w h a t s q u a re low e r li n e , con n e c t e d vi a a sl a t e d br idge in the middle – a c h e e k y f ra m e t h a t go e s a g a i n s t t h e g ra i n .”

own sketches and having a close dialogue. It’s all about the teamwork. Our initial drafts are then digitized to serve as the basis for the first round of prototypes made from stainless steel. That’s the point when I get on a plane and fly out to Copenhagen to look at the prototypes with the team. We get to choose the best models from a line-up of 50 to 100 samples. Then we create the technical design drafts, which we send to Japan for manufacturing a second prototype. About two months later, they send us the prototypes which usually are subject to a few more tweaks and changes. From that point onwards, it’s all about working on the lines until we arrive at the final designs. Getting there can require up to three additional rounds of prototypes.

But we have high standards when it comes to the quality of our lines. We also use a 3D-printer to get quick results and get an initial impression whether or not a certain model is going to work out. We always fine-tune our lines until everyone involved is satisfied with the results. It’s a real precision job, someone with an untrained eye would never catch all the relevant details. A pair of glasses not only has to be innovative, but also work in the wearer’s face. It has to fit. All of that takes some time and we create up to 3-400 prototypes every year to get it right. What kind of materials do you work with? Do you get to introduce new ones into the collection? We have a reputation as experts in tita-


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

»Webs t e r « “ T h e p e r f e c t p a i r of gl a ss e s for s e lf- conf i d e nt m e n . T h e re c t a n g u l a r sh a p e i s ult ra - m a sc u li n e , w it h p rom i n e nt , s t ron g li n e s a n d a s u b tl e i n d e n t ion i n t h e nos e b r i d g e . T h e s e gl a ss e s a d d a d a sh of e x c it e m e nt to e v e r y fa c e ! ”

nium eyewear, but we’ve also worked with wood or acetate before. Through it all, the most important factor for us is that our glasses need to feel great and have a function. Our customers always point out the comfort of their Ørgreen glasses, together with their ability to accentuate facial features, but also stand back where it’s appropriate. Many of your glasses are unisex designs. Does that require a different approach? After all, the glasses need to work with softer, feminine faces just as much as rugged men’s features. Interesting question. The entire unisex theme is really important and currently gaining relevance with the growing androgynous movement. It’s a real challenge. For instance, you need to make sure that the outer line does not

curve too far upward, as that would be too feminine, while the lower line refrains from bending too strongly. And it gets really interesting once you realize that these kinds of perceptions differ greatly from country to country. What’s construed as feminine in one country, is considered masculine in the next. The majority of people in Asia are wearing women’s eyewear, even the men wear what we in Europe would call a female design. But even in between Asian countries there can be striking differences, as the facial shapes vary just as much as the regional tastes in terms of colourways. Creating eyewear for different countries is a whole different story. And even within Europe, demands vary greatly by region. Italian


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

»K re u zb e rg « “ T h e e x a c t p a r t of tow n w e’re i n r igh t now! I t ’s a p ro vo c a t i v e d e s i g n w it h u n con v e nt ion a l d e t a il s s u c h a s t h e ‘ s t e p dow n’ nos e b r i d g e a n d sl a nt e d li n e s a lon g t h e e d g e s . A n e q u a lly cool and mod e r n look , and d e f initely my fa vor ite op t i n e w com e r. T h e »K re u z b e rg « i s a g re a t e xample of the Ø r g r e e n of fe r ing: Mode r nit y paire d with t imele ss ne ss, pe r fe c t line s, ele gance a n d m i ni m a li s m , a s w e ll a s c a re f u lly i m pl e m e nt e d d e t a il s t h a t c re a t e a n e x c it i n g a s w e ll a s w e a ra b l e p a i r of gl a ss e s .”

customers prefer different shapes and colors help end-consumers find the perfect pair compared to Scandinavians or Germans, of glasses for their face. And to make sure and so on. However I would not say we that our implementation of overall trends have many unisex frames, we of course have and specific wishes is in-line with market some, but it is pretty evenly balanced betdemands, we also put an emphasis of capween men and women. turing the essence of Ørgreen in each new What are the special features of your new collection. How-ever we also design in a 2016 collection that will premiere at opti? different direction, where we would like We here at Ørgreen always strive to evolve to surprise our customers, with something they do not know is on the market, a new and optimize our portfolio in order to creadirection they have not seen before – so it’s te as much diversity as possible. The launch a good balance where we try to make sure at opti is a great example of how closely we we always introduce something new, that are connected to our customers, the opticiwas unexpected. ans. We always listen and respond to their Thank you kindly, Olivia for sharing your experiences when it comes to expanding our collections with a new palette of styles insights! and sizes. After all, the ultimate goal is to


Titan Accent Mod. 4497

Silhouette l채sst Sie strahlen.

Weil Sie Einzigartig Sind

www.silhouette.com


SOCIAL HUB

EY EW EAR MAGAZINE PR ESENTS

THE VINTAGE EXHIBITION AT

V int a g e i s hot In d e p e n d e nt i s hot opt i i s !hot

We’re taking it back to the classics! As part of the newly launched !Hot area at opti tradeshow in Munich, Eyewear presents the firstever Vintage Exhibition. For the premiere of our vintage event, we invited internationally renowned collectors of vintage eyewear, including Christian Metzler (Pforzheim), Lee Yule (London), Matti Piipponen (Helsinki), and Siegfried Schlögl (Wien). These four vintage aficionados opened their vaults to present opti visitors some treasured pieces of eyewear history. The exhibition is open throughout the entire duration of opti tradeshow, and what’s more, every day from 1:30–3:30 PM, visitors will have the chance to meet the four collectors and get up close and personal about their

exhibits and passion for eyewear collecting. During those hours, visitors also have the opportunity to wear one of the display pieces and get their photo taken. Who knows, with a little luck – and sex appeal – their picture may even make the pages of the next issue of Eyewear Magazine. We’re looking forward to welcoming you in Munich. Please keep the following two things in mind: First of all, collecting vintage eyewear is highly contagious – you might catch the bug. Secondly, all eyewear on display is actually vintage, not retro. There’s a huge difference. And that’s also why we can only hand visitors the exhibits for the short duration of the photo shoot. Please be gentle.


Started in 2009, the Yes! Area in opti’s Hall C4 has become a melting pot for independent eyewear labels. With this year’s addition of the Hot! Area in Hall C1, the tradeshow’s design offering comes full circle. Actually, the name Hot! is an acronym for Home of Optic Talents, reflecting its mission to provide a second platform next to Yes! for upcoming independent labels to showcase their innovative products. Over 1,800 square meters of exhibition space will host over 60 exhibitors from around the world, and tons of fresh ideas.

Christian Metzler Having been featured on the pages of this publi-cation twice at this point, the photographer and vintage collector from Pforzheim, Germany, is no stranger to the readers of Eyewear Magazine. Seen IRL, Christian is a memorable personality – partly because of his outfits, but also his endearing personality – and once you’ve met him at our Vintage Exhibition you will surely agree.

Lee Yule Lee has been an active part of the eyewear business for more than 20 years. His store Bridges and Brows in London’s hip Shoreditch neigh-borhood is an internationally renowned institu-tion for authentic vintage eyewear. And not just vintage, Lee also sells the occasional current frames – but mostly historic treasures. A self-proclaimed Acid House fan, Lee likes to switch up his looks as often as his eyewear... let’s wait and see what he has in store for opti.


SOCIAL HUB

opti-Forum Our vintage collectors will also be featured at the opti Forum in Hall C2 (C2. 136) on January 15 at 12:45 PM and January 17 at 3:35 PM.

Matti Piipponen Vintage eyewear from the late 1990s is Matti’s biggest passion. The optometrist successfully turned this passion into a profession when he opened his Vintage Eyewear Shop Runebergin Silmälasi in downtown Helsinki, offering thousands of models to customers. In his spare time, Matti finds the time to design his own eyewear frames, which might just end up considered as vintage classics sometime in the future.

Siegfried Schlögl Siegfried caught the eyewear collecting bug at the young age of 12, when he happened upon a pair of Boeing 5700 sunglasses at a London vintage store. He’s been searching high and low for new models ever since, and is a major fan of Serge Kirchhofer aka Udo Proksch. Actually, Proksch’s brother, at the age of 85, ran Siegfried over while he was riding his bike. Siegfried lived to tell the story and started his own collector’s blog Solaris Vintage.


F INISHING

WOODONE NATURE COLLECTION ULMUS, FIENUM, ROSES & VIÖL

photos RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

»R »R ososeess««

»Ul»Ulmu mu ss««

Blazing a new trail in the wooden eyewear segment, South Tyrol-based label Woodone has built quite the reputation in the three years since its inception. In order to offer clear segmentation, the product offering will now be divided into two lines: Wood and Nature. The Wood series will offer a total of 23 designs geared around native wood varietals from the label’s home region, including acacia, ember, chestnut, and walnut. The Nature collection draws design inspiration from the South Tyrol


F INISHING

region’s alpine environment. The frame of the special edition »Ulmus« model is wrapped in the leaves of the wych elm tree, resulting in a characteristic grain texture that is one-of-a-kind for each model. Just as in nature – no two specimen are alike. The same manufacturing technique is at the heart of the »Fienum«, » Roses« and »Viöl« models that feature hay straws as well as rose and violet leaves, respectively. The subtle colorways of these models lend a unique sense of sophistication to the wooden frames; all of which are hand-layered with the decorative blossoms and plant textures. Again, no two pairs are the same and each is a unique work of nature in its own right. Now that Woodone has mastered the hand-made process, these unique surface texture treatments can be added to all basic frame models. And what’s more, all frames can be fitted with RX as well as sunglasses lenses. All in all, this marks a whole new chapter for the natural charms of Woodone, and the evolution of the entire wooden eyewear segment. As this features shows: Wood plus Nature equals styles for miles.

»F num« »F ieie num«

»V »V iöiö l« l «


R E TA I L P R O F I L E

Ex pos e d conc re t e , le a th e r s e a ts : C hr is L e i dm an n & Philipp Fore t f ram e q u al it y e y e w e a r i n a s le e k s e t t in g.


R E TA I L P R O F I L E

Reputation goes a long way in eyewear retail. And for this issue’s Retail Profile, reputation among industry insiders actually preceded our visit to the Bavarian metropolis of Munich, where optical retailers Leidmann run three locations. Their latest and most on-trend store is on Munich’s hottest high street, the Maximilianstrasse. Stepping inside the basement store front, we are greeted with a textbook case of successful eyewear presentation: The interior decorations feature luxe materials that mirror the upscale, hand-chosen selection of products from independent eyewear labels. There is actual moss growing on the walls, and they serve a mean cappuccino to elevate the eyewear shopping experience to new heights. This is boutique eyewear retail at its finest, and as we get the tour from co-founders Chris Leidmann and Philipp Foret, we already wish that every optical store could be a bit more like Leidmann.


R E TA I L P R O F I L E

St ylish a n d e ffic ie nt . Dis pl a y dra w e r s sli d e out a t touch .

Hi Chris and Philipp, congratulations on come? your tasteful eyewear store – what a locaCHRIS: I fell in love with collections by tion. It sounds like you both bring years of Christian Roth, but they didn’t have a experiences into the mix. What are your sales team at the time. So I offered my backgrounds? services, which also marked the start of my CHRIS: I had a rather classic entry by starcareer as a sales rep. ting my apprenticeship as an optician. But PHILIPP: Aside from my routine tasks when the business was facing bankruptcy at the store and my passion for buying, I around 2001, I took the leap of faith and always thought it would be exciting to get became a partner. Ever a 360-degree view of our “We don’t care about since then it’s been sink industry. So I leapt at the or swim and I’ve been opportunity to work with brands. All we care going with the flow. And Reiz, which has worked out about are the best in 2011 we changed our great for me. glasses in the world.” company name to LeidYou have several locations mann. across Munich. What is the difference PHILIPP: I came on board as an apprenbetween these stores in terms of their tice in 2003 and we’ve been on this ride concepts? together with the occasional close brushes CHRIS: Our store on Leopoldstrasse is with disaster here and there. the mother ship. Since the store is located You two are not just opticians but also roam in the basement, we also had the idea of around the country as sales reps. How opening a kind of walk-in window dis-


R E TA I L P R O F I L E

Sp e c i a l showca s e for out s t an d in g pie ce s of e y e w e ar.

play, which became our store on Hohenzollernstrasse. After ten years in business we finally gained a foothold in downtown Munich with our shop on Maximilianstrasse. All three store concepts share the exact same DNA in terms of customer service and quality standards, but overall purchasing budgets are different depending on location. Do you run a different selection of brands at each store? CHRIS: Yes, of course. We do have five core collections that we offer at all of our stores, but all the other labels are specifically tailored to suit the locations and their individual target groups. What are the five core collections featured at all stores? CHRIS: Dita, Thom Browne, Reiz, Mykita and Lindberg. When did you start branching out into other cities with your retail locations?

PHILIPP: Our long-time friend Thomas Hobmaier had been offered a dream piece of real estate in the town of Heidelberg at Steingasse 14. He was super animated and had a sparkle in his eye when he told us about this opportunity. And since we trust him as one of the greatest humans ever, we didn’t hesitate to get onboard and branch out into a whole new city. Some folks out there claim that the Leidmann store in Maximilianstrasse is the most beautiful optical store not only in Munich – but all of Germany. How do you respond to such flattery? PHILIPP: By quoting Geraldine Chaplin: “The truth is rarely so and so. Most of the times it’s so and so.” But seriously, we are really flattered by your question. In the first place, our goal was to create a kind of working space in which our guests can really feel at ease. They can arrive and get a sense


R E TA I L P R O F I L E

T h e ic i n g on th e ca ke : T h is is how w e are r s “ m ee t ” t he ir f ram e s for t he f i r s t tim e , roun d in g out t he lu xu r y re t ail e xp e r ie nce .

of the dedication and passion that goes into the manufacture and selection of all our products. The passion can literally be felt in the air. Where did you get the inspiration for your store’s interior design? CHRIS: Most of it happened rather subconsciously – mostly on our travels. We both enjoy moving between unfamiliar rooms and concepts and draw lots of inspiration from stores, galleries, hotels, or restaurants. It’s exciting stuff. Who took the lead on the store’s design? PHILIPP: Our long-time friend Stefanie Thatenhorst. Stefanie worked together with Kirsten Scholz in designing this room. She has a gift for designing a room in a sober, but warm atmosphere all at the same time. She was – and will always be –­­ our only choice for the job. The majority of the interior relies on untre-

ated wood, combined with industrial elements and exposed concrete. PHILIPP: Yes, the contrast between the cold exposed concrete and the warmth of raw oak creates a sense of balance in the room, all the while without distracting from the true highlights in here: the glasses. You also have a rather selective way of presenting those highlights. You’re not afraid to let some empty spaces create an emphasis on what’s on display – is that an aesthetic choice? CHRIS: Every visitor should instantly recognize upon arrival, what the store is about – but without being overwhelmed by a massive amount of eyewear. So we gradually expose them to more and more pieces through the hidden drawers that electrically pop out the walls, revealing the real “treasures.” Sounds intriguing, but aren’t you afraid


R E TA I L P R O F I L E

forward to for quite some time. That’s that customers may end up missing a prowhy we have designed a unique counter, duct they might have liked? where customers get to pick up their new CHRIS: Most customers recognize rather pieces of eyewear. Once the glasses have quickly whether our line-up suits their passed their final quality inspection, we demands, and trust us to lead the way toplace them inside the counter in a personal wards the perfect pair of glasses. locker covered by tinted glass. And when Once a customer has found the perfect the customer stands before the counter, the pair of glasses, what happens next? inside lights up and the glasses appear. It’s PHILIPP: That’s when we leave them at our way of creating a festive moment and Klaus’ mercy. His experience in terms of lasting memories. quality and lens fitting is our pride and joy. What’s your strategy for choosing new His rich experience and ability to build labels for your store? rapport with customers is the crowning CHRIS: Our philosophy is best summed up moment of each purchase experience. For as: “We don’t care about brands. All we care technical support, we rely on a DNEye about are the best glasses in the world.” For Scanner and our own concept for fineus, products don’t qualify by virtue of neat tuning each specific piece of eyewear. Our brand names or cute stories. What we’re expert workshop in the town of Schwabing looking is quality, craftsmanship, and high supports all three of our stores. The workdemands on manufacturing and aesthetics. shop is under direction of our valued employee Ferdi, another resident expert when It seems like this approach can also lead into quite elevated price ranges. With it comes to blending frames with lenses in Onono and Ralph Vaesa perfect symbiosis that sen, your portfolio also inis nothing short of a work “We’re by no means cludes labels with prices of art. And quite natulooking to define our well into the four-digits. rally, he also gets to work identity via price points, But with all the Hermès with state-of-the-art rather by our selection and Chanel boutiques technologies for deliveof the most beautiful down the street, you proring optimal results. products our industry bably find the right buyOnce the lenses are fiters. ted, it’s time for the final has to offer.” PHILIPP: Well, it’s no semoment: Handing the cret that the Maximilianstrasse attracts a finished glasses to the customers. clientele that’s definitely willing and able CHRIS: We all know the special moment to afford a nice pair of glasses. But we’re by when you finally get your hands on sono means looking to define our identity via mething new that you’ve been looking


R E TA I L P R O F I L E

Don ‘ t b e fo ole d b y th e ca lm a m b i ance : Not to be conf u s ed wit h a d e vice for e y e si g h t t e s ts , the 7 5 - i nch s c re e n f e a t ure s h e a t e d FI FA m a t che s be t w ee n C hr is an d Philipp on a d i a ly b a sis .

price points, rather by our selection of the most beautiful products our industry has to offer. During our years establishing the store on Leopoldstrasse we started to realize that our penchant for pretty things also coincided with a certain price point strategy. Limited editions, buffalo horn, and gold have always fascinated us – but they tend to have their price. That’s why this particular store location is the perfect place for us. How about celebrities? Is your store frequented by famous actors and pro football players? PHILIPP: That tends to be the case with upscale products like ours. Do you shield them from the eyes of prying onlookers? PHILIPP: We offer a sense of privacy. An electronic curtain along our street side windows can shield the store from view to create a private shopping ambiance. On the day of our photo shoot, Bayern

Munich’s goalie Manuel Neuer missed the ball by a good meter in the Champions League match versus FC Arsenal. In case he shows up at your store next week, what kind of glasses would you recommend to him? PHILIPP: A pair of Titan glasses. Football seems to be an ongoing theme for you two. Your lunch breaks are usually spent on PlayStation with heated FIFA matches on the store’s 75-inch B&O display. Who’s the better player? CHRIS: That’s always down to the slightest mistake. It’s an extreme mental warfare, which I tend to lose more often than my tender soul can endure. But it’s one of the last addictions I’m happy to feed at this point. PHILIPP: Some days you win, some days you lose. I actually prefer winning, especially because Chris is unbearably condescending for the rest of the day if he wins.


C

O P

E N H

A G E N S

P

E

C

S

THE BIGGEST INDEPENDENT EYEWEAR SHOW IN SCANDINAVIA THE 5TH – 6TH OF MARCH 2016 GET YOUR FREE VISITOR BADGE AT WWW.COPENHAGENSPECS.DK

LOKOMOTIVVÆRKSTEDET, OTTO BUSSES VEJ 5A, 2450 COPENHAGEN SV.


CA

PE

SUMMER OF ‘69 BY ST EFAN K APF ER s t ylin g MICHELLE JUNKER s t ylin g a ssis t ant RYAN FORSTER m ake -up RICHARD WILKINSON p roduc t ion NORTH SOUTH PRODUCTION CAPETOWN ar t d ire c t ion EVA KHATCHATURIAN re touch STEPHANIE WENCEK mod els CATHRINE NORDA ARD a t OUTLAWS AGENCY, ALEX GLENDAY, KEVIN PABEL & BRADEN WOBBE a t BOSS MODELS

TO

loca t ion CAPETOWN

IC! BERLIN »H e r r Voi g t«

WN


IC! BERLIN »B or i s N . «


IC! BERLIN »H u b e r t W. «


M AY B AC H »T h e E a rl V I «


M AY B AC H »T h e S c re e n I «


COBLENS »F lu gk a pit ä n «


COBLENS »R e i s e f lu ghö h e «


ANDY WOLF LOVE »5058 « KERBHOLZ

Leopold« A N D Y »W O- L F L O V E j a c k e t S TEFFEN SCHR AUT, t u r t l e n e c k TIGER OF S WEDEN,«p a n t s PATR IZIA PEPE , j e w e l r y AR IANE ER NS T »5059


ANDY WOLF LOVE » S a l v a tore «


CAZAL » 659/ 3«


OLIVER GOLDSMITH »Ma n h a t t a n (196 0)«


REIZ »R 20 L i m it e d E d it ion« KBL » S u m m e r of L o v e «


L.G.R »Togo « d re ss MARKUS LUPFER , l e a t h e r ja c k e t FILIPPA K , c a p VINTAGE


M

UN

FILM NOIR BY SACHA TASSILO HÖCHST ET T ER s t ylin g ALEX HUBER a t PHOENIX AGENTUR h air & m ake -up EVANGELOS TZIMIKAS FAME wit h AVEDA BOBBI BROWN a ssis t ant PATRICK PLATZDASCH mod el ERIKA PALKOVICOVA a t MODEL MANAGEMENT

I

loca t ion MUNICH

C


E V E VA N 7285 »728 « sh i r t ANITA , b ra MARLIES DEKKERS, sk i r t AUGUSTIN TEBOUL


E V E VA N 7285 »736 « sh i r t K ARL L AGERFELD, sk i r t K ARL L AGERFELD, b e lt ISABEL MAR ANT, so c k s TRES BONJOUR , sho e s AQUA ZZUR A , c a p VINTAGE


PERSOL »P O3132S « l e a t h e r co a t MICHAEL KORS, so c k s TRES BONJOUR , sho e s CHARLOT TE OLYMPIA , c a p VINTAGE


ØRGREEN »Moon S a fa r i « ja c k e t TIGER OF SWEDEN, top GUESS BY MARCIANO, p a n t y DIMITRI


YO H J I YA M A M O T O »Y Y 70 07« v e s t WILLLIAM FAN, b ra TRES BONJOUR , p a n t y TRES BONJOUR , b e lt MARC JACOBS


YO H J I YA M A M O T O »Y Y 5015« d re ss AUGUSTIN TEBOUL , b l a z e r COMPTOIR DES COTONNIERS, c a p VINTAGE


ETNIA BARCELONA »Yo ko h a m a S u n s e t« sh i r t BY MALENE BIRGER , b e lt MARC JACOBS, p a n t y TRES BONJOUR


ETNIA BARCELONA »A f r i c a 01« ja c k e t PAVLINA JAUSS, sh i r t CHEAP MONDAY, sk i r t VICTORIA BECKHAM, c a p VINTAGE


BOZ » C a d i x« d re ss CHEAP MONDAY, v e s t HUGO, c a p VINTAGE


BOZ »B il b ao « d re ss TALBOT RUHOF


GO SEE NEW MODELS IN TOWN photos CHRISTIAN STEINHAUSEN a ss i s t a nt DENIS KONOVALOV s t yl i n g LIN ADLER h a i r & m a ke -up ANNE TIMPER mo d el s JULIUS PALM a t IZAIO & VALERIO a t MODELWERK

PA P ER S T Y L E » E g a . 2«


PA P ER S T Y L E » S t ë re «


APPE TIZER

ØRGREEN »W i non a «

HEIDI & PETERLI AN ALPINE APPET IZER FOR T HE BR ILLENMESSE photos MARC GYSIN id e a NATHANAËL WENGER s t ylin g JEANSLIFE m ake -up JOE KUPPER mo d els TINA a t AQUA-MODELS & ELIAS

COBLENS »A u tob a h n «

214


Find out more online at www.opti.de/en

Save the dates for opti 2017 now!

The ultimate optical trade show is back – exciting, original and sensational. And, for one time only, opti 2017 will start on a Saturday: experience the major industry event opti, with all its variety of trends and technologies, innovations and ideas, information and inspiration!

SATURDAY – MONDAY

28. – 30.01. 2017


F INISHING

J.F. REY SOPHISTICATED LEATHER APPLICATIONS photos RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

»JF1

»JF13

76«

375«

Picture a sartorial gentleman in a private London club, sunk into a leather armchair with his bow tie undone, unwinding with a glass whiskey in an air of wood, leather, conversations, and cigar smoke after a long day of business. Pretty much what Jean-Francois Rey must have had in mind when he chose to cover the surfaces of the frames in his Au Masculin collection with high-grade Italian leathers. And to get all the details right, J.F. Rey developed a new technology for the finest luxury finish and upscale aesthetics: Through a unique process, the leather is directly glued onto the frame surface for an irreproachable grip. The lines along the edges are cut to such utmost precision that the material of the frames seems to blend with the leather coating. Initially, the vegetable-tanned leather coating was only available on select models in J.F. Rey’s men’s collection. In understated colorways such as brown, black, and blue, the leather application lent a sleek vintage chic to the eyewear line. Following the enormous success of the leather process in men’s prescription eyewear, the label recently expanded the unique finish to its sunglasses collections for male and female audiences. And since the French label has never been shy about pushing the envelope, the sunglasses feature the leather coating in powerful hues of red, blue, and green for the perfect blend of chic and cheek. Speaking of cheek, the leather feels impeccably smooth on the skin, while the unique grain of the leathers enhances the individual style of the wearer. Sophisticated, cool, and luxurious – the perfect finish. 216


F INISHING

»P

o

x llu

«

»

g a P

e od

«

rr »P ie

217

ot«


BL ACKFIN » E a gl e « t u r tl e n e c k MIU MIU

BL ACKFIN »Pe ra son « t u r tl e n e c k MIU MIU


GLINT, BABY, GLINT!

SSE

BY EST ELLE KL AW IT T ER s t ylin g URSULA KLAWIT TER make-up DAGMAR SCHWARZ with MAC & SHISEIDO hair EVA MARIA PILARTZ at 21AGENCY.DE with AVEDA pos t p roduc t ion TOM STEIN a t ZERONE-GROUP.DE mod els FABIA VON HAUFF & JILL LAUREN a t TUNE-MODELS.COM loca t ion DÜSSELDORF

LDO

RF


LEISURE SOCIET Y »Vo ys e y « t u r tl e n e c k H& M, c a t s u it STEFFEN SCHR AUT, p a n t s MAISON SCOTCH


LEISURE SOCIET Y »T ilm a n « b a n gl e & r i n g s H& M


ANDERNE »Holi d a y i n T h e S u n« b l a z e r ASOS, r i n g s QUINN


ANDERNE »B loo d B rot h e r« d re ss H& M, co a t MINIMUM, a n k l e b oot s NO ANIMAL BR AND


L.G.R » L a w re n c e F l a p « l e a t h e r ja c k e t FAUX LONDON


IC! BERLIN »Mi r rore d Mou nt a i n « d re ss MA JE , sho e s STEVE MADDEN, b a n gl e H& M


BARTON PERREIR A »Quimby« pu llo v e r MAISON SCOTCH, t rou s e r s MAISON SCOTCH


STR ADA DEL SOLE » 0 98 « t u r tl e n e c k HOLY, l e g g i n g s H& M, b ra c e l e t DIOR , r i n g s ST YLISTS OWN, sho e s STEVE MADDEN


PAUL SMI T H »B a r son « d re ss OH MY LOVE , b ra c e l e t s CALVIN KLEIN

PR ADA » S PR 51R « ju m p e r JOHN ZAKK , b ra c e l e t s CALVIN KLEIN


T H E M E SH O OT

photos RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

Since the dawn of mankind, gold has ranged as a valuable commodity, and a privilege of rich and noble folk. The rare precious metal – used as the prime ornament in the grandest palaces, temples, and churches – owes its appeal not only to its material purity, but also its warm glimmer. This season, the luxe aura of gold has caught the eye of numerous eyewear designers across the globe. The latest models are blending the classic golden look with of-the-moment frame designs. A sparkling combination! Here are our favorites with that special golden touch.

L e i s u r e S o c i e t y »L e C a nne t« L e i s u r e S o c i e t y b l e n d s e x t re m e ly ra re li gh t- colore d a c e t a t e w it h gol d i n t h e » L e C a n n e t« mo d e l for a s t u n n i n g f i n i sh .

E y e va n 7285 »738« -

T h e » 7 3 8 « b l e n d s s u r p r i s e w it h a h e a lt h y dos e of s t yl e , a c h i e v e d a c a re f u lly o rc h e s t ra t e d con t ra s t b e t w e e n gol d a n d b l a c k t h a t l e n d s a f u t u r i s t i c a pp e a l to t h e cl a ss i c p a n to sh a p e .


T H E M E SH O OT

E m p o r i o A r m a n i »E A 4 0 6 2 « -

L u x u r y l a b e l E m p o r i o A r m a n i u s e s gol d a ppli q u é to c re a t e a n i n t e re s t i n g t h re e d i m e n s ion a l e f f e c t i n t h e » E A 4 0 6 2 « mo d e l .

A m E y e w ea r »Noj « -

E q u a l p a r t s u n con v e n t ion a l a n d e l e g a n t , t h e sh a p e of t h e »Noj« i s g u a ra n t e e d to b e a n e y e c a t c h e r, s u ppl e m e n t e d b y u p sc a l e l e a t h e r d e t a ili n g.

I c ! B e r l i n »B l a nca F. «

Tr u e to I c ! B e r l i n t ra d it ion , t h i s gol d e n pi e c e i s or i g i n a l , e x t raord i n a r y, a n d u n i q u e .


A R T PA G E S

EYEWEAR AS A STATEMENT PAPERSTYLE X TRUUS BRANDS photos TRUUS BRANDS, illu s t ra t ion PETER O‘TOOLE

The name says it all: Paperstyle is dedicated to blending paper as the source material for innovative eyewear frames with a strong dash of style. And style also means art, which is how the upcoming eyewear label stepped into the bright and colorful world of Dutch graphic artist Truus Brands. The result is a limited edition collection of 500 pieces of two unique frames – all in Paperstyle’s hand-made South Tyrolean quality – featuring Truus Brands artworks under the motto “Eyewear as A Statement”. For the inside scoop,Eyewear talked to Truus Brands in the quaint little village of Hurwenen, where the inspired artist with a background as a florist and clothing designer has set up her studio. How did the collaboration with Paperstyle come about? As a publicity stunt, Jeroen van de Graaf at optical store Zien & Zijn in Hedel asked for a brainstorm proposal. He had already discovered Paperstyle on the marketplace and immediately thought of my art as a cool combination with their eyewear. They liked the design and that started the battle of transferring the artwork to the Paper-

frames. The end result is very nice, and every pair came out as a masterpiece. You mentioned a “battle.” What was the biggest challenge in working on artwork for such a project? First of all, the question of, what kind of design do you make? Whether you opt for a split design or for a large artwork. I chose the latter because of the end result. I wanted the glasses to come from a real work of art. The next challenge was how do you bring the art design to the frames? And with as little as possible loss of compromising the quality of the original work. That’s where the craftsmanship of Paperstyle got involved. What has been the response so far, both at Jeroen’s store and in general? The reactions of the customers were great. And the question always came up: “Paper glasses? Really?” People thought of it as an art form, but not for functional use. After some explanation of what Paperstyle does and stands for, they were very enthusiastic. Another cool thing was that for the launch, the store walls and displays also featured style


A R T PA G E S


A R T PA G E S


A R T PA G E S

my artwork for the collection. That also included the cut-outs for some frames, so people can actually see which part of the art ended up in their glasses. Speaking of cut-outs for the frames, are these all one-of-a-kind pieces very piece is unique, a handmade design in combination with art. So the chance that there are similar models is very small. Do you have a funny story... something that occurred during this collaboration? Sometimes the language barrier was a bit of a challenge. I talked a lot with Sabine Pretz at Paperstyle, which ran smoothly in terms of German to English and back. Sometimes I would call the office when Sabine was not there and after three words it was clear to everyone: “Aha, the Dutch artist is on the line!” I can imagine they were all shaking with laughter at their desks, but it all worked out in the end. Art as a universal language is beautiful music to my ears! What other products and objects have you implemented your artwork on? Paperstyle was the first brand to ask for an

art design in an actual commercial product. I also designed a guitar before as a tryout, and my overall goal is to work on more art collaborations. I would like to design a number of well-known band’s LP covers. All this is all on my bucket list, supplying beautiful artwork for things like furniture, tableware, fashion, surfboards, to music instruments. It does not matter – the sky is the limit! Now that the collection is available to retailers, will you be at the opti show in January in Munich as well? Yes, I am a guest at Paperstyle and part of their program at the booth. See you there, guys! Sounds great. Thanks for the interview, Truus!

PAPERSTYLE X NOIS7

For the next artist collabo, Paperstyle has tapped Hamburgbased photo artist Robert Jahns (nois7) to supply the imagery. Stay tuned!


B R O O K LY N S P E C T A C L E S »K e nt« co a t EMPORIO ARMANI, d e n i m s EMPORIO ARMANI,  top ST YLIST ‘S OWN


HA

MB

LATE MOD BY V ER ENA KNEMEY ER s t ylin g ADRIAN FEKETE a t BIGOUDI groomin g ISABEL PETERS a t BIGOUDI mod els TIM a t VIVA MODELS BERLIN & ALPHA a t MODELWERK loca t ion HAMBURG

U

RG

B R O O K LY N S P E C T A C L E S »B e n son « co a t FILIPPA K , p a nt s LEVI‘S, top ST YLIST ‘S OWN,  d uf f e l b a g TIGER OF SWEDEN


FLEYE » L ol a n « sh i r t TIGER OF SWEDEN, p a nt s JOSEPH

FLEYE »Ma rlon « ja c k e t LEVI‘S, sh i r t UNIQLO, a n t s MASTERCR AFT UNION


FLEYE »Eddi« ja c k e t CHEAP MONDAY, b u t to n d ow n CHEAP MONDAY, d e n i m s MASTERCR AFT UNION OWN

FLEYE » L ol a n « ja c k e t BARBOUR L AND ROVER , b u t ton dow n UNIQLO, p a nt s FILIPPA K


MAKELLOS »M E 9 035« ja c k e t JOSEPH, sh i r t FRED PERRY


MAKELLOS »M E 9 028 « co a t STUT TERHEIM, ja c k e t TIGER OF SWEDEN, t rou s e r s TIGER OF SWEDEN, b u t ton dow n LEVI‘S MADE & CR AFTED


OWP » 8233 -10 0 « b l a z e r FILIPPA K , b u t to n d ow n BARBOUR , p a n t s FILIPPA K , t i e ST YLIST ‘S OWN


OWP » 8 02 9 -3 0 0 « ja c k e t GIPSY, b l a z e r TIGER OF SWEDEN, b u t ton dow n LEVI‘S, p a nt s TIGER OF SWEDEN, t i e ST YLIST ‘S OWN, sho e s DR . MARTENS


LINDBERG »1037« sh i r t UNIQLO, d e n i m s LEVI‘S, b oot s DR . MARTENS


HAMBURG EYEWEAR » E r i k V. « v e s t VERSUS VERSACE , b u t ton dow n VERSUS VERSACE ,  ja c k e t CITIZENS OF HUMANIT Y


NINE »252 9 « ja c k e t LEVI‘S


PaperStyle proudly presents: New models and new designs in two exciting collections!

THE THINCOLLEKTION THE ROCKCOLLEKTION Dare to be different – dare to be yourself!

www.paper-style.it

PaperStyle – The Original The Unique and Original paper frame from South Tyrol. The greatest ideas start on a piece of paper, a material we use every day. We used it for something different. Top eyewear trend, creative and extraordinary! OPTI 2016 We are pleased to welcome you to visit our booth in Hall C4 – 134


MODO »4 0 5 0 «

W hile this Par isian ne wss tand sure provi des an ambie nt backdrop for our model Anaelle , we ’re af raid it doesn’t offe r E y e w e a r M a g a z i n e i n a p r i nt e d ition . For all t ho s e lo okin g to ge t t he i r h a n d s on t he l a t e s t iss ue – i nclu d i n g int e r n a t ion al re a d e r s  – w e su g ge s t our su bsc r ipt ion s e r vice . photo MARIE BÄRSCH

GET EYEWEAR MAGAZINE – AT NEWSSTANDS OR VIA SUBSCRIPTION What’s happening in the whole wide world of eyewear? Always be the first to know with a subscription to Eyewear Magazine. And no need to leave the house if you’re too shy – subscribers will receive every new issue shipped to their mailbox, fresh off the press and neatly packaged. Subscribing to Eyewear Magazine is like a real-life RSS-feed of everything new and exciting from the world’s leading brands and designers. And for opticians, Eyewear offers special packages with multiple magazines. Plus, our Premium Partners can customize their issues with their own logo, creating an upscale gift for their customers. Find out about all our customization and partner options at eyewear-magazine.com. And please feel free to direct all inquiries to presse@eyewear-magazine.com.


p ho to STEFAN DONGUS mo d e l ANDREAS VON TEMPELHOFF a t MODEL POOL s t yl i n g JULIA ATITIÉ a t LIGAWEST h a i r & m a ke -up KERSTIN HUESGES a t NINA KLEIN

LINDBERG » 83 05« T r a n s i t i o n s l e n s e s i n g re y

OUTRO WATCH OUT EY EW EAR ISSUE 17 MAY 11, 2016



Eyewear Issue 16