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Acknowledgements FestivalSouth and the lead researches want to express appreciation to the following individuals who contributed to the FestivalSouth Economic Impact study.

The University of Southern Mississippi Trent Lott National Center for Economic Development and Entrepreneurship Dr. Shannon Campbell, Director Heather N. Brown, MSED, Research Analyst Will Ford, Lead Researcher The University of Southern Mississippi College of Business and Economic Development Dr. Chad Miller, Director Lauren Duke, Graduate Assistant FestivalSouth Staff Dr. Mike Lopinto, Artistic Director Dr. Jay Dean, Executive Director of HCA Rachel Ciraldo, FestivalSouth Sponsors & Donor Relations Harlan Mapp Additional thanks to all of the volunteers who assisted with survey gathering. Especially the following: Sarah Dixon Susan Bone 2019 FestivalSouth Youth Ambassadors


Table of Contents Executive Summary .......................................................................................................................................4 Introduction ....................................................................................................................................................4 Background ................................................................................................................................................4 Methodology ..............................................................................................................................................4 Scope ..........................................................................................................................................................5 Participant Demographic Data .......................................................................................................................6 2019 FestivalSouth Economic Impact .........................................................................................................12 Tax Report ...................................................................................................................................................15 Considerations and Limitations ...................................................................................................................18 Appendix A: Visitor Event by Event Spending Breakdown .......................................................................20 Appendix B: Resident Event by Event Spending breakdown. ....................................................................21 Appendix C: 2019 Survey............................................................................................................................22 Appendix D: Event code names...................................................................................................................23 References ....................................................................................................................................................24

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Executive Summary

FestivalSouth is Mississippi’s only multi week, multi genre arts festival. The festival includes live music, dance, theatre, visual arts, children and teen activities, and a week-long Film Expo named FSFX. This year, FestivalSouth celebrated its 10th anniversary, and FSFX celebrated its fourth. The festival has been a staple of the art and music community in Hattiesburg and surrounding areas. The 2019 festival attracted an estimated 12,610 patrons from all over the state as well as a large audience from other states. In fact, this year’s festival included visitors from 18 states and even a group from Panama. In total, FestivalSouth surveyed 46 events and used the spending reports from those surveys for the impact analysis. Due to the audience age, Artie events were not included in the survey count (St. Fabian Event is the only exception). The 2019 FestivalSouth season generated $248,439 in added labor income, $229,431 in value added, and $801,215 of output to the economy. Additionally, the festival generated $52,567 in local taxes and $36,380 in state taxes. Each of these categories will be discussed further in the report. Appendixes A and B show an initial spending report broken down by event for visitors and residents.

Introduction Background

It is beneficial for organizations to complete an economic impact study every five or so years to examine any impact changes.

Additionally, this provides an incredible opportunity for

organizations to complete a demographic analysis of who makes up their audience. Economic impact studies provide vital information concerning the fiscal aspects of FestivalSouth and how the festival contributes to the Hattiesburg local economy. Methodology

FestivalSouth staff partnered with The University of Southern Mississippi’s Trent Lott National Center for Economic Development and Entrepreneurship to complete an economic impact analysis. In total, this process was separated into three stages. The first stage was data gathering

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which was completed by surveying FestivalSouth patrons throughout the month-long festival. The second stage was data input where all of the gathered data was configured to show the average spending per event and per person for each category (food/transportation). Additionally, this is where the data was separated into two main groups: non-residents (or visitors) and residents. The third stage was transferring the spending data to a software database, IMPLAN. IMPLAN helps assess the actual economic impact to a specific location. This is discussed later within the report. The detailed patron surveys were modeled after the 2019 Natchez Music Festival and the 2013 FestivalSouth economic impact survey. An example of this survey can be found in the Appendix C. In total, the team surveyed 46 of the FestivalSouth events. The 46 data events were then combined into categories to make data processing more efficient. For example, there were four Sister Act performances, but these were all combined as just one Sister Act category for data purposes. However, each event has its own individual code. For the case of FSFX, each day had its own code, but then FSFX was grouped together. The surveying was conducted in two primary ways: 1) Staff and volunteers walked around asking patrons to complete a survey, and 2) surveys were inserted into event programs for patrons to complete. The surveying began with the Golf Tournament on May 31st and continued until Best of The Pine Belt on June 28th. In total, FestivalSouth collected 702 surveys; 361 non-residential and 341 residential surveys. Each participant was asked to complete the survey for their group, but some reported only individual spending. This was corrected by assessing their spending to whatever group number they reported. Meaning, if they reported $8 for food for three people each person was reported as spending $8 for food. Scope

There were certain issues with the survey specifically question three (estimated spending). Many residents felt this was unnecessary because they had already spent money in Hattiesburg. These issues and other considerations will be explained fully later in the report. Only Hattiesburg zip codes were considered local, even codes from Forrest or Lamar County that are not in Hattiesburg were considered visitors for the study. The zip codes used for local classification are as follows: 39401, 39402, 39404 and 39406.

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Participant Demographic Data

The total reported attendance was 12,610, estimated attendance for visitors and residents was 6,482 and 6,128 respectively. To create the estimated attendance, the percentages from the surveyed populations of 361 non-residents/visitors (51.4%) and 341 residents (48.6%) were multiplied by the reported attendance (12,610) to find an estimated non-resident vs. resident attendance (see Figure 1). Figure 1. Visitor vs. Resident FestivalSouth Attendance

Visitor Resident

341

361

Source: FestivalSouth Intercept Survey

The most common group pattern for both visitors and residents was attending with family members with over half (54%) of the visiting group reporting that they came with their families. The visitor and resident attendance patterns were similar in terms of who the groups were going to the events with. The average group number was 3.02, which supports why family and friends were the two most selected attendance categories. The least popular attendance category was people on business with less than two percent of people in this category (see Figure 2).

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Number of Survey Responses

Figure 2. Attendance Group Patterns

250

196

200

142

150 100 50

119

94

48 34

8

3

6

3

0 Alone

Family

Friends

Business

Other

Group Options

Visitor

Resident

Source: FestivalSouth Intercept Survey

The 45-65 age group was by far the largest category for visitors whereas the 65+ group was the largest for residents. This data shows that almost 50 percent of visitors were in the 45-65 age group and 40 percent of residents were 65 and older (see Figure 3).

Number of Survey Responses

Figure 3. Attendance Age Breakdown 180 160 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0

161 137

71

69

31 13

13

6

<18 Visitor

18-24 Resident

Source: FestivalSouth Intercept Survey

7

97

96

24-44 Age Groups

45-65

65+


Unsurprisingly, the largest response to reason for attending the festival was the ‘Attendee’ group for both visitors and residents. In fact, visitors and residents responded very similar within each answer category. Many survey participants answered the question as it was asking “what is your motivation for coming?” The intention, however, was for the participant to describe him- or herself within an attending category like “I am an attendee.”

Number of survey responses

Figure 4. Reason for Attending 250

199 201

200 150 100

120 89

50

9

19

8

21

0

Performer

Sponsor

Attendee

Other

Attendance Categories Visitor

Resident

Source: FestivalSouth Intercept Survey

By far, women led the attendance for FestivalSouth with both visitors and residents. Women comprised almost 68 percent in the visitor category and 63 percent in the resident category (see Figure 5). The survey provided male, female and prefer not to identify as options.

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Figure 5. Survey Gender Breakdown 300 250 200 150 100 50 0

244

216

114 110 1 Male

Female Visitor

0

Prefer Not to Identify

Resident

Source: FestivalSouth Intercept Survey

There was not a lot of racial diversity within the FestivalSouth events. The Caucasian group represented 80 percent of the FestivalSouth attendance for visitors and residents. Additionally, visitors had more representation than residents in every category besides â&#x20AC;&#x153;other.â&#x20AC;?

Number of Survey Responses

Figure 6. Survey Participant Race Representation 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0

292 272

43 33

8 9

3 1

4 3

Visitor

Race Source: FestivalSouth Intercept Survey

9

3 4

Resident


The most common level of education for both visitors and residents was a bachelor’s degree with 34.5 percent of the total audience selecting this category. Again, the visitor and resident demographics were very similar through most of the educational categories. The greatest disparity number was within the doctorate and some college categories (see Figure 7).

Number of Survey Responses

Figure 7. Level of Education 150 122

100 50

58 14

13

34

32

81

83

121

62 37

16

0

High School

Some Associates Bachelors College

Masters

Doctorate

Levels of Education Visitor

Resident

Source: FestivalSouth Intercept Survey

The most common marketing tactic was ‘Word of Mouth’ (WOM) for both residents and visitors. Facebook followed with the second most responses. The survey participants were asked to note how they had heard of FestivalSouth and then were instructed to select all that applied. The least popular tactics were Twitter and Snapchat, which correlates with the age groups of FestivalSouth (Figure 8).

Marketing category split

Figure 8. Marketing Tactics Visitor

Resident

61

59

86

79

23

115

6

2

4

172

41

49

46

63

39

29

182

4

2

5

317 107

Marketing Tactic Source: FestivalSouth Intercept Survey

10

53

78


Spending Report Survey participants were asked to estimate how much money they would spend or have spent throughout FestivalSouth events. The question was worded, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Please estimate how much you think you will spend while in Hattiesburg.â&#x20AC;? This is another question that should be revisited for the next economic impact study. To clarify for residents, we asked them to report how much they spent specifically related to FestivalSouth events (dinner/ drinks, Uber, etc.). Again, participants were asked to report spending for their group which would then be divided by the group number to find the per person spending for that category. However, some reported spending would not match with the size of the group, so the individual spending was assigned towards each member in the group to find a more accurate per person spending. Additionally, if the participant did not report a group number, the reported spending was kept as is instead of dividing it per group number. The spending chart below was taken directly from the reported spending on the surveys. The per person average for a specific category was then multiplied by the attendance number for the event. Those event totals were then added to find the total spending in each category (see Table 1). NAICS is the North American Industry Classification System which was used to more specifically measure where participants spent their money. These codes were also used later on in the process for the IMPLAN software mentioned earlier. Table 1. Initial Reported Spending NAICS 722511 7211A0 453000 711100 485000 812900 Source: IMPLAN

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Categories Food Lodging Shopping Tickets Transport Other

Non Resident $168,930.26 $111,068.62 $75,107.80 $71,307.50 $68,715.31 $19,453.10

Resident $84,083.18

$31,770.35 $83,633.23 $19,689.53 $14,972.39


2019 FestivalSouth Economic Impact

The economic impact from FestivalSouth includes five main categories: employment, labor income, value added, output, and the tax report. These numbers were generated through the software IMPLAN, which calculates different multiplier effects to estimate total economic impact. The direct effect is the amount of money spent directly for the service/event, patronizing local business through shopping, buy gas, etc. The indirect effect accounts for an intermediate-level of consumption which includes local business that have to purchase supplies, good or services from other business or even hire temporary/permanent employees to absorb demands of increased consumer traffic. Lastly, the induced effect accounts for extra money that employees of businesses may have to spend on groceries, entertainment, etc. The direct and indirect effect includes money that flows directly back into the economy, while the induced effect circulates through the employees of the services used. The indirect and induced effect are a result of the direct effect. Each section of this table is further explained below followed by the tax report. Overall, FestivalSouth supported 11.3 jobs throughout the festival. These jobs include positions supported directly by FestivalSouth and indirect and induced jobs supported through the spending and supply chain patterns of the direct jobs. The festival also generated $248,439 in labor income, which is money that is attributed to industries directly associated to FestivalSouth (restaurants, media companies, etc.) and their respective supply chains. Next, the value added to the industries associated with FestivalSouth was $395,622. Value added is money added to these industries and supply chains outside of labor income. Lastly, the overall output from FestivalSouth was $801,215. The output is considered production estimate sales for the data set, which includes change in inventory and/or sales within the direct, indirect or induced impacts. Table 2. Economic Impact Report Impact Type Direct Effect Indirect Effect Induced Effect Total Effect Source: IMPLAN

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Employment 8.7 1.5 1.1 11.3

Labor Income ($) $161,051 $47,070 $40,317 $248,439

Value Added ($) $229,431 $87,493 $78,697 $395,622

Output ($) $492,055 $170,510 $138,648 $801,215


FestivalSouth supported 11.3 total jobs throughout the festival. These jobs do not account for musicians or other people FestivalSouth reached out to directly, but rather jobs that were supported or as a result of FestivalSouth. Meaning the money generated through FestivalSouth contributed to the income of 11.3 jobs outside of the FestivalSouth and partner organizations. Direct jobs of 8.7 included employment immediately supported by FestivalSouth. Indirect jobs of 1.5 were supported when FestivalSouth patrons, staff, or partners spent money on goods or services through the supply chain. Induced jobs of 1.1 were supported when FestivalSouth employees or employees of services or goods spent their paychecks in the local economy. Figure 9. FestivalSouth Employment Contribution Induced Effect 1.1 Indirect Effect 1.5

Direct Effect 8.7 Direct Effect

Indirect Effect

Induced Effect

Source: IMPLAN Data Source

In total, FestivalSouth generated $248,439 for labor income. The direct labor income of $161,051 was generated from the industries directly associated to FestivalSouth: lodging, food and beverages, transportation, retail shopping, tickets (and other performance related spending), and other. The indirect labor income of $47,070 was generated from the suppliers and the suppliers of the suppliers of the above mentioned industries. Induced effect of $40,317 was the additional money circulated back into the employees of the initial industries or within the supply chain.

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Figure 10. Labor Income Induced effect: $40,317 16%

Indirect Effect: $47,070 19% Direct Effect: $161,051 65%

Direct Effect

Indirect Effect

Induced Effect

Source: IMPLAN Data Source

Total value added to the economy through the initial industries and their supply chains was $395,622. Value added is money that was added to the industries and their supply chains outside of labor income. The direct value added was $229,431 with indirect at $87,493 and induced value added at $78,697. The direct industries created over 34 percent more value added than the indirect and induced value added. Figure 11. Value Added Induced Effect: $78,697 20%

Direct Effect: $229,431 58%

Indirect Effect: $87,493 22%

Direct Effect

Indirect Effect

Source: IMPLAN Data Source

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Induced Effect


The total generated output was $801,215. The output represents production estimate sales for the data set, which includes change in inventory and/or sales within the direct, indirect or induced category. Again, the direct effect output of $492,055 is 65 percent larger than the indirect of $170,511 or induced of $138,649 (see Figure 12). The direct effect is 62 percent of the total generated output, while the indirect effect is 21 percent and the induced effect is 17 percent. Figure 12. Generated Output Induced Effect $138,649 17%

Indirect Effect $170,511 21%

Direct Effect

Direct Effect $492,055 62%

Indirect Effect

Induced Effect

Source: IMPLAN Data Source

Tax Report

As mentioned in the introduction, the local area was Forrest and Lamar Counties, and the total tax impact was $52,567 from FestivalSouth. The sales tax is the largest portion of this with $30,115. The city IMPLAN data source estimates tax contribution from the reported spending mentioned earlier in the report (see Table 3).

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Table 3. Local Tax Estimate

Description

Tax on Production and Imports

Employee Compensation

Dividends Social Ins Tax- Employee Contribution $ Social Ins Tax- Employer Contribution $ TOPI: Sales Tax TOPI: Property Tax TOPI: Motor Vehicle Lic TOPI: Severance Tax TOPI: Other Taxes Corporate Profits Tax Personal Tax: Income Tax Personal Tax: NonTaxes (Fines- Fees Personal Tax: Motor Vehicle License Personal Tax: Property Taxes Personal Tax: Other Tax (Fish/Hunt) Total: $ Complete Total:

Households

Corporations $

81.64

$ 3,149.98 1,202.30 189.81 93.64 24.18 4,660.00 $ $

1,310.52

7.49 15.70 $ $ $ $ $

23.00 $

30,115.32 13,797.62 275.87 188.15 2,115.19 $ $ $ $ $ 46,492.00 $

1,392.00 52,567.00

Source: IMPLAN Data Source

The state was also affected by the tax collection through FestivalSouth. The total collected for the state was $36,830. Similarly to local tax, sale tax category was the largest for the state as well with $29,187 (see Table 4). While the collection for the state is less than local, the contribution from FestivalSouth is still significant. Both of tables showcase that the arts can have a positive investment back into their community.

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Table 4. State Tax Estimate Employee Compensation

Description Dividends Social Ins Tax- Employee Contribution Social Ins Tax- Employer Contribution TOPI: Sales Tax TOPI: Property Tax TOPI: Motor Vehicle Lic TOPI: Severance Tax TOPI: Other Taxes Corporate Profits Tax Personal Tax: Income Tax Personal Tax: NonTaxes (Fines- Fees Personal Tax: Motor Vehicle License Personal Tax: Property Taxes Personal Tax: Other Tax (Fish/Hunt)

$ $

Total $ Complete Total: Source: IMPLAN Data Source

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Tax on Production and Imports

Households

Corporations $

32.95

$

1,310.52

$ 3,149.98 $ 541.53 $ 189.81 $ 0.82 $ 24.18 $ 3,906.00 $ $

1,343.00 36,830.00

7.49 15.70 $ 29,187.28 $ 120.63 $ 275.87 $ 188.15 $ 1,785.57

23.00 $

31,558.00


Considerations and Limitations Notes for data entry: -

Respondents from zip codes 39401, 39402, 39404, and 39406 were automatic “no” for staying overnight unless the specified staying at a place other than their home.

-

Many participants answered, “Reason for attending” as if it was asking “What is your motivation for coming?” The goal was for participants to describe themselves, so if they selected performer with no explanation then it was left as is. However, if they selected performer and provided a name or “student in show” then it was changed to attendee. This process goes for other descriptions such as “supporter for the arts” or “love FestivalSouth.”

-

Attendance numbers were counted twice. Once with performers included in the total and once without performers NOT included within the total. The overall spending was attributed to the attendance with performers.

-

Depending on how the participant completed the survey, there were certain assumptions made with the group number section. For example, if the participant replied with a higher number like 6 or 8 people and replied with only $10 or $12, we assumed this was per person spending. Likewise, if they provided a ticket price for one person but the group was larger than one person it was assumed that everyone paid the same price (this was based on the average ticket price response per event).

-

If the participant did not provide a group number, the spending numbers were kept as is instead of dividing or multiplying by the group number.

-

If the participant filled in some of the spending categories, but left other categories blank it was assumed they spent $0 and this was included in the average. However, if they left the entire spending section blank the responses were not included in the average.

-

Answers that were marked as “other” in the marketing section were changed to “word of mouth” if the participant included a person’s name in the “other” box.

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Recommendations for the future/ and notes on surveying: -

Change question 3 (spending question) to be more FestivalSouth specific so that more locals are encouraged to report spending.

-

Most ARTIE events were not surveyed because of audience age, and only the Artie Event at St. Fabian was included in the survey counts. .

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-

Some events were surveyed but did not yield results.

-

The “reason for attending” question should be changed to “describe yourself.”


Appendix A: Visitor Event by Event Spending Breakdown Below is event by event spending breakdown for non-residents. It shows the per person average for each category and then the total category spending after assessing the attendance. The events were sorted highest earning to lowest earning. Note that the average room cost through the month of June was $80.97 according to Visit Hattiesburg. Therefore, an estimated 1,406 rooms or nights were paid for a result of a FestivalSouth.

Avg. Lodging Per/P

Event Total FSFX Sister Act Linda Eder 1Elvis GPT BFS IHH FiveK TMJ Afternoon.. 1ARTIE FCW Golf Tourn TP HDC Total Coffee Concerts HYW Totals:

20

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

19.43 7.82 54.07 25.00 350.00 12.50 1.75 12.14 15.88 2.50 -

Lodging Total $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

49,171.42 10,756.49 17,658.15 13,791.94 18,060.00 1,686.90 574.74 937.55 949.21 293.75 -

$

113,880.16

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

Visitor Event by Event Spending Breakdown Avg. Avg. Food Transport Food Total Transport Per/P Total Per/P 27.50 $ 69,601.30 $ 9.91 $ 25,091.90 21.08 $ 28,995.76 $ 6.19 $ 8,514.41 51.61 $ 16,853.76 $ 23.92 $ 7,812.07 30.93 $ 17,063.38 $ 9.94 $ 5,483.67 167.00 $ 8,617.20 $ 75.00 $ 84.42 $ 11,392.14 $ 27.01 $ 3,645.06 65.80 $ 1,425.67 $ 605.00 $ 13,108.33 12.29 $ 4,036.29 $ 3.06 $ 1,004.97 39.90 $ 3,081.42 $ 8.03 $ 620.15 41.44 $ 2,477.04 $ 18.82 $ 1,124.95 2.50 $ 293.75 $ 8.75 $ 1,028.13 43.16 $ 1,605.48 $ 1.45 $ 53.94 14.44 $ 853.02 $ 3.18 $ 187.85 38.07 $ 1,170.53 $ - $ 27.79 $ 1,004.89 $ 10.00 $ 361.67 3.13 $ 211.46 $ 9.38 $ 634.38 3.33 $ 97.52 $ - $ $ 168,780.61

$ 68,671.48

Avg. Shopping Per/P $ 9.50 $ 8.99 $ 29.05 $ 11.25 $ 45.85 $ 11.67 $ 37.50 $ 16.88 $ 27.38 $ 26.32 $ 12.50 $ 65.00 $ 6.81 $ 100.00 $ 44.04 $ $ -

Shopping Total $ 24,044.09 $ 12,365.84 $ 9,486.18 $ 6,206.37 $ 2,365.86 $ 1,574.35 $ 812.50 $ 5,542.11 $ 2,114.52 $ 1,573.26 $ 1,468.75 $ 2,418.00 $ 402.29 $ 3,075.00 $ 1,592.78 $ $ $ 75,041.89

Avg. Tickets Per/P $ 6.96 $ 21.18 $ 20.51 $ 1.35 $ 80.00 $ 10.63 $ 17.50 $ 10.31 $ 31.79 $ 22.64 $ $ 25.63 $ 24.17 $ 16.67 $ 11.42 $ $ 8.33

Tickets Total $ 17,615.46 $ 29,133.31 $ 6,698.39 $ 744.76 $ 4,128.00 $ 1,433.87 $ 379.17 $ 3,386.02 $ 2,454.71 $ 1,353.29 $ $ 953.25 $ 1,427.56 $ 512.48 $ 413.02 $ $ 243.95 $ 70,877.24

Avg. Other Per/P $ 2.57 $ 1.16 $ $ 0.67 $ 8.35 $ 23.63 $ 10.00 $ 0.88 $ 5.00 $ 3.38 $ 25.00 $ 25.00 $ 38.69 $ $ 3.23 $ $ -

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

Other Total

Complete Event Total

6,504.56 1,590.09 367.78 430.86 3,189.33 216.67 287.37 386.14 202.04 2,937.50 930.00 2,285.36 116.75 -

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

$ 19,444.44

192,028.73 91,355.89 58,508.55 43,657.91 33,601.92 22,921.66 15,942.33 14,831.49 9,594.49 7,679.79 6,021.88 5,960.67 5,156.08 4,758.01 3,489.11 845.83 341.47


Appendix B: Resident Event by Event Spending breakdown.

Below is an event by event spending breakdown for residents. It shows the per person average for each category and then the total category spending after assessing the attendance. The events were sorted highest earning to lowest earning.

Event Sister Act $ HYW $ 1Elvis $ Golf Tourn $ Linda Eder $ Total FSFX $ TMJ $ Total Coffee Concerts$ HDC $ TP $ IHH $ FCW $ BFS $ Afternoon.. $ 1ARTIE $ FiveK $ GPT $ Totals:

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AVG Lodging Per/P 2.53 40.91 18.18 4.54 5.00 -

Lodging Total $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

3,336.88 7,188.30 8,261.63 1,536.03 129.17 -

$ 20,452.00

AVG Food Per/ P $ 12.34 $ 48.33 $ 28.68 $ 101.72 $ 22.90 $ 43.75 $ 61.48 $ 8.01 $ 10.00 $ 35.57 $ 63.00 $ 22.00 $ 17.92 $ 20.00 $ 3.75 $ $ 6.25

Resident Event by Event Spending Breakdown AVG AVG Transport Shopping Food Total Transport Shopping Total Total Per/ P Per/P $ 16,294.84 $ 0.86 $ 1,132.98 $ 3.07 $ 4,059.19 $ 8,492.27 $ 60.00 $ 10,542.86 $ 53.00 $ 9,312.86 $ 13,027.70 $ 4.69 $ 2,131.18 $ 17.50 $ 7,950.65 $ 11,588.30 $ 0.87 $ 99.00 $ 13.04 $ 1,485.61 $ 8,138.85 $ 5.23 $ 1,857.72 $ 6.68 $ 2,374.13 $ 10,545.65 $ 2.50 $ 602.61 $ - $ $ 5,027.06 $ - $ - $ 11.11 $ 908.48 $ 2,710.05 $ 0.61 $ 206.05 $ 0.61 $ 206.05 $ 258.33 $ 70.00 $ 1,808.33 $ 160.00 $ 4,133.33 $ 1,822.81 $ 8.33 $ 426.91 $ - $ $ 2,730.00 $ 5.00 $ 216.67 $ 11.75 $ 509.17 $ 545.60 $ - $ - $ 20.00 $ 496.00 $ 1,487.88 $ 2.42 $ 200.64 $ - $ $ 984.52 $ - $ - $ - $ $ 440.63 $ 7.08 $ 831.90 $ 3.33 $ 391.28 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ $ 215.00 $ - $ - $ - $ $ 84,309.49

$ 20,056.85

$ 31,826.72

AVG Tix Per/P $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

24.45 48.00 3.69 84.34 24.15 2.50 63.42 13.86 42.50 66.70 25.00 93.00 16.67 28.75 6.25 20.00 10.00

Tickets Total $ 32,285.98 $ 8,434.29 $ 1,676.45 $ 9,608.59 $ 8,583.11 $ 602.61 $ 5,185.94 $ 4,689.30 $ 1,097.92 $ 3,418.38 $ 1,083.33 $ 2,306.40 $ 1,384.15 $ 1,415.24 $ 734.38 $ 1,231.58 $ 344.00 $ 84,081.64

AVG Other Per/P $ 0.49 $ 6.00 $ 7.99 $ 36.48 $ 1.86 $ 12.50 $ 6.94 $ 0.36 $ $ $ 25.00 $ $ $ $ $ $ 1.00

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

Other Total

Complete Event Totals

652.98 1,054.29 3,630.04 4,155.71 659.99 3,013.04 567.49 123.02 1,083.33 34.40

$ 57,762.85 $ 45,024.85 $ 36,677.64 $ 26,937.20 $ 21,613.81 $ 14,763.91 $ 11,688.98 $ 9,470.49 $ 7,427.08 $ 5,668.10 $ 5,622.50 $ 3,348.00 $ 3,072.68 $ 2,399.76 $ 2,398.18 $ 1,231.58 $ 593.40

$ 14,974.30


Appendix C: 2019 Survey 2019 FestivalSouth Attendee Survey If you have already completed this survey previously, please DO NOT complete this survey again. Your answers remain anonymous and confidential (unless name is provided for prize entry). This survey is used to collect data and information concerning FestivalSouth patrons and their impact on the Hattiesburg community. Thank you for your responses! 1. Zip Code _______________or Country of Residence:_________________________________ 2. Are you staying in Hattiesburg? Yes No If yes, where: Hotel/ Motel

AirBnB/B&B

Friends/Relatives

Other:_______________

3. Please estimate how much you think you will spend while in Hattiesburg: Lodging

$____________.00

Retail Shopping

$____________.00

Food/Beverages

$____________.00

Ticket Prices

$____________.00

Transportation

$____________.00

All other

$____________.00

4. What is your age range? Under 18 18-24

24-44 45-65

Reason for attending:

Performer/Artist

What is your gender? Male

Female

65+

Sponsor

Attendee

Other:_______________

Prefer not to identify

What is your highest level of education? High School Associates Degree Some College Bachelors Degree

Masters Degree Doctoral Degree

Ethnicity: African American

Caucasian

Native American

Hispanic/Latino

Asian

Other:_______________ I cameâ&#x20AC;Ś

alone

with family

with friends

on business

other:_______________________

How many people are in your group? ___________ How many years have you attended FestivalSouth? __________ How did you hear about us? (check all that apply) Newspaper

Poster

Mail

Facebook

Snapchat

Word of mouth

Magazine

Brochure

Instagram

Twitter

YouTube

Other:_______________

Contact information for prize entry (Optional). Please write name and phone number below:

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Appendix D: Event code names Golf Classic Sister Act Sister Act

GT 1SA 2SA

Kid's International Arts Festival Sister Act Sister Act Opening Night Party Afternoon of a Faun Hattiesburg High String Quartet

1ARTIE 3SA 4SA

From City Wall to Royal Chapel Hub Dance Collective

FCW HDC

100 Years of Women Voters The Pianist as Composer Thiago and Katerina

HYW TP 2COF

Great Trios by Beethoven and Shostakovich Beethoven's 5th Symphony Irish Coffee Trio

GPT BFS 3COF

Elvis - the King of Rock and Roll

1ELVIS

Dog Days 5k run and 2 mile walk I Hate Hamlet

FVK IHH

The Meistersingers present Jubliate Deo FSFX Opening Night

TMJ FXON

AOAF 1COF

TOTAL FSFX

Elvis Double Feature: King Creole Elvis Double Feature: Viva Las Vegas Golden Age of Music Competition Screening The Last Waltz Competition Screening Purple Rain

4COF TOTAL FSFX

FSFX Competition Screening Competition Screening Competition Screening The Dark Crystal with Live Orchestration This is Spinal Tap Rosemary Clooney Competition Screening All That Jazz - Jazz Class Competition Screening All That Jazz Almost Famous Music Video Experience Competition Screening Competition Screening B.B. King: The Life of Riley FSFX Awards and Wrap Concert Broadway Bound Linda Eder Returns

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5COF TOTAL FSFX

AWARDS 6COF LER


References IMPLAN Results. Festival South Economic Impact 2019 Research on the Economic Impact of Cooperatives. University of Wisconsin Center for Cooperatives (Aug 28, 2019). Retrieved from: http://reic.uwcc.wisc.edu/implan/ Trenteseax, S. (2013). Impacting with Culture: A Study of the Economic Impacts of FestivalSouth 2013 on the Hattiesburg community. Hattiesburg Concert Association United States Zip Codes. Retrieved from: https://www.unitedstateszipcodes.org/

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Services Offered by The University of Southern Mississippi College of Business and Economic Development and Trent Lott National Center for Economic Development and Entrepreneurship The College of Business and Economic Development offers graduate education in economic development through the Master of Science in Economic Development (MSED) program and a Graduate Certificate in Economic Development. The Trent Lott National Center partners with the MSED program to further the students experience by working with economic developers, communities, companies, and non-profit organizations through five main approaches: 1. University Economic Development researchers provide technical assistance in defining problems or opportunities; evaluating the effects of change; and providing recommendations for improvements. 2. Graduate students work on applied research projects involving actual community or organization case scenarios (e.g., retail trade studies, economic impact studies). 3. Each student is required to complete a data analytics capstone project. The capstone project involves completing a Quality-of-Place (QOP) study for a community. 4. Each student is required to complete an internship in an economic development organization. 5. Communities may have sponsored research projects and tap into the faculty expertise and university data sources (e.g., EMSI and REMI). Examples of class projects involving research for Mississippi communities: • Retail Analysis for Marion County • Feasibility of a multi-sports complex in Grenada County • Economic Impact of the Gulfport-Biloxi International Airport • Ecotourism Development for the Mississippi Aquarium in Gulfport • Strategic Plans for the City of Pearl and Simpson County Development Foundation • Community Study for the Hattiesburg Mid-Town District • Competitiveness studies for defense-dependent communities • Multimodal transportation research for Mississippi Port Directors • Workforce Analyses for the Mississippi Department of Education and Department of Human Services The University of Southern Mississippi also offers economic development training for working professionals and graduate students through its annual True South Basic Economic Development Course - an International Economic Development Council accredited introductory course. This course fulfills one of the prerequisites for those who wish to take the Certified Economic Developer (CEcD) exam.

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