Issuu on Google+

MI 2-12 Cover:Layout 1

7/10/12

2:18 PM

Page 1


oppenheimer fp ad:Layout 1

7/6/12

8:41 AM

Page 2


talent services- inside front ad:Layout 1

7/2/12

9:17 AM

Page 3


MI 2-12 TOC:Layout 1

7/10/12

12:19 PM

Page 4

CONTENTS

VOLUME 24 • ISSUE 2 2012 Grimm shooting in the Portland area. Photo by Scott Green/NBC

PUBLISHER

James R. Baker ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Katie Sauro SALES MANAGER

Katie Higgins SALES

Eric Iles Kathy Riley PRODUCTION MANAGER

John Rusnak DESIGNERS

Dawn Carlson Jenny Carlson Christina Poisal WEBMASTER

Eric Pederson OFFICE MANAGER

Audra Higgins INFORMATION SERVICES MANAGER

Lois Sanborn

FEATURES 10

SEASON 2 KICKOFF OF GRIMM ALSO A CELEBRATION OF THE LOCAL SMALL BUSINESS SUPPLY CHAIN

16 WASHINGTON GETS BACK TO WORK 46 MAX AWARDS HONOR PORTLAND MARKETERS

ON THE COVER: David Giuntoli as Nick Burkhardt films a firstseason episode of Grimm. Photo by Scott Green/NBC

Media Index Publishing Group P.O. Box 24365, Seattle, WA 98124-0365 1201 First Ave. S., Suite 309, Seattle, WA 98134 (206) 382-9220 • (800) 332-1736 Fax (206) 382-9437 Email: media@media-inc.com www.media-inc.com Display Advertising. Call Media Index Publishing Group for a current rate card. Discounts for frequency advertising. Advertising confirmation deadline is the 30th of the month prior to issue publication. Advertising mechanicals are due the 5th of the month of issue. All submitted materials become the property of Media Index Publishing Inc. and will not be returned. Subscriptions. Annual subscriptions to Media Inc. (4 issues) are $25 (+$2.20 if sent to WA address); two-year subscription is $37.50 (+$3.30 if sent to WA address). Send check or money order to

64 DEALS DON’T

MAKE THEMSELVES

Media Index Publishing Inc., or call (206) 382-9220 with VISA or M/C. Back issues of Media Inc. are available at Media Index Publishing Inc. offices at the cost of $5 plus tax. Copyright © 2012 Media Index Publishing Group. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be copied by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying or recording by any information storage or retrieval system, without the express written permission of the publisher. Printed in USA

4

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012


paragon ad:Layout 1

7/2/12

9:21 AM

Page 5

Maarketing arketing Kits • Marketing Broochures • Brochures Boooks • Books Binnders • Binders Poostcards • Postcards riable • Va Variable Daata Data

• Custom Sle Sleeves eeves eeves • Wraps • Inserts • Booklets and many more.. m ...

Have a unique packa aging idea? packaging Let’s talk t about it!

Envirronmentallly Environmentally F Friendly Solution S Solution.

• Inks and toners uused sed in digital printing are safer afer for the raditional inks. environment and produce fewer toxins than traditional Quaantites, therefore no unused inventory invento • No Minimum Quantites, for the landfill. ener en nergy ner gy than traditional offset printing. p • Uses 70% less energy products available. • Recycled products

Q Quick TTurn u - Sh urn Short hort Ru Run un Custom Custo om Pack Packaged kaged Me Media edia Pro Products oducts As sim simple mple or comple complex ex as you needd it, when you nneed it.

Design Services Available Avvailable A

SEATTLE S ATTLE 206-808-7600 206-808--7600 Solutions@ParagonGroup.com Solu utions@ParagonGrooup.com

CHICAGO CHIC CAGO 224-372-7808 08 www. www.ParagonGroup.com .ParagonGroup.coom


MI 2-12 TOC:Layout 1

7/10/12

12:20 PM

Page 6

CONTENTS 8 WHO’S NEWS 20 SAG-AFTRA MERGER: ONE UNION, ONE VOICE, ONE CALL

THINGS THAT REALLY EXCITE ME 67 FOUR ABOUT THE FUTURE OF DESIGN

68 DESIGN DOESN’T MATTER GRAPHICS’ RISE AS THE 69 MOTION COMMUNICATION KING

22 A HINT OF SERENDIPITY TAURUS OWNER WINS 24 TALL 70 THE DNA OF A VALUABLE LOGO “ENTREPRENEUR OF THE YEAR” AWARD FROM A PRODUCTION 26 NOTES TO BE A GREAT CLIENT FOR YOUR 71 HOW ASSISTANT AD AGENCY (IT WILL BOOST YOUR BOTTOM LINE) VIDEO SIMULCAST FOR SEATTLE 28 HD OPERA 72 THE EVOLUTION OF MOTIONOGRAPHY 42 THE MAD-LIB WAY TO SELL MORE STUFF 73 IN SEARCH OF INSPIRATION 44 74 SHIFTING TIDES TAKING IT TO THE STREETS: NASHVILLE PROJECT CAPTURES 88 PHOTOGRAPHY THE HOPE AND SPIRIT OF A COMMUNITY 89 IT’S ALL ABOUT THE CONTENT THE RECORD: 94 ON MEDIA INC.’S Q&A SERIES WITH BIGink THE BENEFITS OF WORKING WITH AN 48 AD AGENCY

49 HAVE YOU HEARD THE SECRET? 50 BLU ROOM: THE ROAR OF GUERILLA MARKETING WHEN IT COMES TO PRINT, THINK 62 CREATIVELY 6

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

32 MEDIA INC. INDUSTRY LISTS 32 52 82 90

FILM/VIDEO PRODUCTION COMPANIES CORPORATE MEDIA BUYERS GRAPHIC DESIGN FIRMS PHOTOGRAPHERS/PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIOS


Power MacPac ad:Layout 1

7/2/12

9:23 AM

Page 7


MI 2-12 Whos News:Layout 1

7/3/12

4:51 PM

Page 8

WHO’S NEWS Check out the latest hires and promotions throughout the Northwest’s media companies. If you would like to submit an announcement and photo for Who’s News, e-mail them to the editor at editor@media-inc.com, or mail to P.O. Box 24365, Seattle, WA 98124. Photos should be 3” x 5” at 300 dpi, tiff or jpeg, labeled as the person’s name. ADVERTISING/MARKETING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS

Borders Perrin Frause/Portland Norrander/Portland MARK HETT LORI GAFFNEY hired as Managing named President Director

Frause/Seattle

Frause/Seattle

Frause/Seattle

Frause/Seattle

KATE HUDSON

EMILY NAUSEDA

NATALIE PRICE

ROSE THORNTON

hired as Assistant Account Executive

hired as Assistant Account Executive

hired as Vice President

hired as Project/ Sustainability Associate

AMANDA WHITESIDE Bruer/Portland JAMES MCINTYRE hired as Senior

CREATIVE

Account Executive

FILM/VIDEO

Weber Shandwick/ Seattle

GA Creative/ Bellevue, WA

GA Creative/ Bellevue, WA

GA Creative/ Bellevue, WA

GA Creative/ Bellevue, WA

GA Creative/ Bellevue, WA

Mmmmm Society/Portland

BROOKE SHEPARD

TESS ANDERSEN

KAREN AXTELL

JULIE BURKE

SARA PATILLO

JEFF WELSH

JAMES WESTBY

appointed Executive Creative Director

added as Senior Designer

promoted to Principal, Client Services

promoted to Principal, Client Services

promoted to Principal, Creative Services

promoted to Principal, Creative Services

added as Director

8

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

McClenahan

Frause/Seattle

promoted to Partner/VP of Client Services


posterGIANT ad:Layout 1

7/2/12

9:23 AM

Page 9


MI 2-12 OR Film:Layout 1

7/10/12

12:27 PM

Page 10

(Left to right) Oregon Governor Kitzhaber with Grimm stars David Giuntoli, Bitsie Tulloch, Silas Weir Mitchell and Russell Hornsby. Photo by Greg Wahl-Stephens/NBC

Season 2 Kickoff of Grimm Also a Celebration of the Local Small Business Supply Chain By Nathan Cherrington Oregon Governor’s Office of Film & Television

recent season two kickoff event for the NBC series Grimm at their Portland stages was a great time for all to celebrate the fact that several hundred Oregonians are now hard at work making the first of 22 episodes for the new season.

A

It was also a great opportunity to feature several local vendors who have benefited in many different ways because of Grimm and other projects filming in Oregon, such as TNT’s Leverage and IFC’s Portlandia. 10

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

While visiting the sets of both Grimm and Leverage, Governor Kitzhaber has remarked several times about the film and television industry’s great use of the local supply chains. A few of those small business owners were present at the kickoff event to tell their stories. One of my favorite stories came from Greg Knowles, who owns ATI in Bend, Oregon. ATI makes industrial electric cabling for many different types of industries. Two of his clients are Hollywood Lights and Pacific Grip and Lighting in Portland. Thanks to Continued on page 12


MI 2-12 OR Film:Layout 1

7/2/12

2:40 PM

Page 11

ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

11


MI 2-12 OR Film:Layout 1

7/10/12

12:27 PM

Page 12

Grimm is back in Oregon for season two. Cast and crew pictured here shoot a season one episode. Photo by Scott Green/NBC

Continued from page 10

the influx of orders from these two vendors, Greg has put several Bend residents on his payroll to meet the demand. Hollywood Lights and PGL would not have made those orders with ATI were it not for the increase of film production here in Oregon. Lauren Henry, co-owner of Talented Animals in Corvallis, Oregon, was also in attendance. She brought with her two of the

animal stars (Justice the dog and Mac the cat) that were featured in the first season of Grimm. Mac was the cat that scratched Juliette (played by Bitsie Tulloch) in the season one finale, sending her into a mysterious sleep. Mac (and Lauren Henry) are currently back at work to be featured in the season two opener. Other vendors in attendance included Steve and Dave Besaw

Commercial recording in a more relaxing atmosphere* (*recently added both incense AND peppermints!)

12

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

Continued on page 14


MI 2-12 OR Film:Layout 1

7/2/12

2:41 PM

Page 13

q High quality production. q Low rates. ®

q All you can eat M&M’s.

AFFORDABLE AUDIO PRODUCTION + VOICE TALENT

Full service recording studio

Sound de sig Dialog ed n iting ADR Music pro duction Sound eff ects ISDN

541.343.2692 EUGENE, OR

donrossproductions.com

ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

13


MI 2-12 OR Film:Layout 1

7/10/12

2:28 PM

Page 14

Continued from page 12

OREGON’S PRODUCTION INCENTIVE PROGRAMS

Greg Knowles from ATI in Bend, OR. Photo courtesy Governor’s Office of Film and Television

The state boasts a number of generous incentive programs that attract major productions like Grimm. Read on:

from 52nd Avenue Hardware, Michael Koerner from Koerner Camera, Doug Boss from PGL, and Dave Etchepare from Dennis’ 7 Dees. Did you think all that greenery on Grimm was in nature? Well, not exactly. Grimm spends a tremendous amount of money on both plants and a crew to set up those plants. What’s great for Dennis’ 7 Dees is that they are rentals! They get the plants back at the end of the show. Dave figures that he gets between $20,000 and $30,000 of rental income every year from the film industry. It is estimated that Grimm spent over $50 million in Oregon producing season one. They used over 1,000 local vendors and had 557 local hires on their payroll. This helped to make 2011 Oregon’s biggest year for film, television, and commercial production, with a total spend of over $130 million in the state.

Grip & Lighting Gear Production Supplies Dollies & Jib Arms Expendables Service

14

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

The Oregon Production Investment Fund offers qualifying film or television productions a 20% cash rebate on production-related goods and services paid to Oregon vendors and a 10% cash rebate of wages paid for work done in Oregon, including both Oregon and non-Oregon residents. The labor portion of this rebate can be combined with the Greenlight Oregon program for an effective labor rebate of 16.2%. A production must directly spend at least $750,000 in Oregon to qualify. There is no per production cap. The Greenlight Oregon Labor Rebate offers productions that spend more than $1 million in Oregon a cash rebate of up to 6.2% of Oregon-based payroll. This rebate can be combined with the Oregon Production Investment Fund incentive for an effective rebate of 16.2% on qualifying production payroll. The 2009 Oregon legislature passed SB863, which created the Indigenous Oregon Production Investment Fund (i-OPIF). The i-OPIF program provides the same rebates of 20% of goods and services and 10% of Oregon labor for films produced by Oregon filmmakers who spend a minimum of $75,000 but not more than $750,000 on their project. In addition to the savings associated with the incentive programs listed above, filming in Oregon can save you money in the following ways: • No Sales Tax • Fee-free State Parks, Cities and Counties • Lodging Taxes Waived For more information, visit www.oregonfilm.org.

3357 SE 22nd Ave Portland, OR 97202 503-542-3990 gearheadgrip.com


actors first agency ad:Layout 1

7/2/12

9:24 AM

Page 15

Elicia Walker is back... and better than ever!

AFTRA Franchised

Providing the right talent for all your casting needs. Representing Union and Non-union Actors for: Voice Over • Film • Commercial Corporate Video • Multimedia Contact us for your next casting. 206.522.4368 | actors@actorsfirstagency.com www.actorsfirstagency.com 7220 Woodlawn Avenue NE | Seattle, WA 98115 Like us on Facebook


MI 2-12 Filmworks:Layout 1

7/6/12

9:09 AM

Page 16

Washington Gets Back to Work By Jessie Wilson Communications Consultant, Washington Filmworks

he Washington film industry wasted no time returning to work after renewal. As of press time, the Washington Filmworks (WF) Board of Directors had approved five incentive projects and more inquiries continue to arrive daily. The slate of projects includes two commercial productions that will film in the Puget Sound area, one with a regional reach and the second with a global reach. In addition, three features have been approved since renewal, two that will be shot in the greater Seattle area and one that will film in Spokane.

T

Seattle director Rob Devor’s You Can’t Win was one of the final projects approved for funding under the 2011 program. The feature shifted production dates and completed photography in early June of this year. The film is an adaptation of the 1926 autobiography of traveler and thief Jack Black, and stars Michael Pitt of HBO’s Boardwalk Empire. In a recent interview in The News Tribune (Tacoma), You Can’t Win writer Charles Mudede calls the picture a regional film that would not have been possible without the Washington film incentive. Production took place in

16

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

locations across the area, including Tacoma, Port Angeles, Snohomish and Seattle. In late May, production wrapped on director Lynn Shelton’s latest film, Touchy Feely. The Seattle-based production is Shelton’s fifth feature and her second project approved for funding assistance through WF. The first was in 2009, when Shelton spearheaded the MTV series, $5 Cover: Seattle. Touchy Feely was spotted at several locations in and around the Emerald City, helping to build excitement about film crews working in local neighborhoods this summer. The six-week production employed more than 50 Washington resident cast and crew members, and utilized a number of local film production vendors. While Shelton calls Seattle home, Touchy Feely producer Steven Schardt explained that it was the Washington film incentive that kept the production in-state. “Our goal is to always work locally, but with other states offering incentives, we have to consider what is best for the film economically,” he said. “In the case of Touchy Feely, not only were we able to stay local, but we were also able to grow our crew by a factor of three. Our wages were better and we were able to provide health benefits to the crew as well. The incentive is an Continued on page 18


MI 2-12 Filmworks:Layout 1

7/2/12

9:39 AM

Page 17

ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

17


MI 2-12 Filmworks:Layout 1

7/6/12

9:10 AM

Page 18

Continued from page 16

absolute boon to our local economy.” Over on the eastern side of Washington, the Spokane studio North by Northwest (NxNW) is negotiating several upcoming feature projects. Washington Filmworks recently checked in with NxNW CFO, Brad Harland, who had great things to say about the return of the Motion Picture Competitiveness Program. “We are thrilled about the renewal of the Washington production incentive program,” he said. “When the program sunset in 2011, our business was heavily impacted and we struggled to secure feature films during that period. With the return of the incentive, we have already lined up two features and have several others in consideration. The program really is the best tool we have to keep crews working in Spokane.” In recent weeks, Washington Filmworks has been traveling the state to discuss our film community’s legislative success and address how the film office, the production incentive, and the statewide industry can work together to make the most of the future of filmmaking in Washington. One of the most exciting developments is the launch of a new program called the Filmworks Innovation Lab, which is designed to offer professional development opportunities for accepted applicants. The Lab provides financial assistance to filmmakers who are Washington residents. It also addresses digital distribution changes in the industry by fostering projects that utilize new forms of production and emerging technologies. Watch for the launch of the Filmworks Innovation Lab on our Web site (www.washingtonfilmworks.org) in July.

AUDIO POST PRODUCTION MUSIC COMPOSITION | ISDN SOUND DESIGN | MUSIC LICENSING VOICE RECORD | ADR | SOURCE CONNECT

503.236.7829 info@sonicmediastudios.com www.sonicmediastudios.com 915 NW 19th Ave. Portland, OR 97209 18

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

Changes to the Motion Picture Competitiveness Program Since Renewal DEFINING MOTION PICTURE – The definition of “Motion Picture” has been expanded, allowing the WF Board to consider projects that take advantage of developments in digital distribution paradigms. FILM OFFICE – In 2009, WF integrated the resources of the previous Washington State Film Office. WF now has the legislative authority to maintain the functions of that office, servicing both incentive and non-incentive clients. WF remains a first point of contact for all filmmakers shooting in Washington. We offer our Reel Scout online location database and over 25 years of production resource information. EPISODIC SERIES – WF may now offer up to 35 percent funding assistance for episodic series that produce more than six episodes and spend more than $300K per episode in Washington. Securing an episodic series continues to be a priority for the state film industry and for WF. COMMERCIALS – Commercials remain priority because they represent good paying work for Washington residents and high-profile exposure for our film industry. The WF Board recently renewed funding assistance for commercials at the 15-percent level in order to maximize economic development opportunities. NON-RESIDENT LABOR – In our ongoing effort to remain competitive on the national scene, WF will now consider (on a limited basis) funding assistance for non-resident labor, provided the cast and crew are 85-percent Washington residents. Further eligibility requirements apply. Please contact WF for more details. REPORTING PRACTICES – Significant changes are being made to the reporting practices for the incentive program, allowing WF to collect much more detailed information about the economic impact of the program. More details are coming soon.


MI 2-12 Filmworks:Layout 1

7/2/12

9:49 AM

Page 19

FILM IN WASHINGTON STATE Up to 35% Cash Back in 30 Days

Get way more than you bargained for. Let our team of film-industry professionals help you bring your vision to the big or small screen. • Diversity of locations • Experienced and professional crew base • Full-service production community • Up to 35% cash back in 30 days

It’s easy to see why Washington State is fast becoming one of the west coast’s premier filming destinations.

For more information call

206.264.0667 washingtonfilmworks.org ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

19


MI 2-12 SAG:Layout 1

7/6/12

9:13 AM

Page 20

SAG-AFTRA Merger: One Union, One Voice, One Call By Dena Beatty Executive Director, SAG-AFTRA, Seattle Local

he members of Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists made history on March 30, 2012 when they overwhelmingly voted to merge the two organizations into a single union named SAG-AFTRA. Over 50 percent of the members who were eligible to vote returned their ballots, with over 80 percent voting yes. The members of SAG and AFTRA sent the message that they were ready to stand together as one union speaking with one voice. Over the years, SAG and AFTRA have recognized that members of both unions could benefit from a merger. Preference changed to necessity with the explosion of digital technology. Historically, the organizations had clear lines of responsibility, with SAG representing performers on projects using film and AFTRA representing live television, broadcast professionals and performers appearing on projects using analog video tape. When digital technology became widely available, those lines blurred to the point where much of the work no longer belonged to SAG or AFTRA but instead to both SAG and AFTRA, making it confusing for performers and employers alike. With SAG and AFTRA having overlapping jurisdiction of much of the work being produced using digital technology, many perform-

T

ers who would have joined either SAG or AFTRA in the past found themselves having to join both, resulting in two initiation fees and two sets of dues. This was made more confusing and frustrating when the majority of their work was under the same contract, for example scripted television, as SAG and AFTRA jointly negotiated many of their contracts, resulting in identical terms and conditions. This created the popular question, “Is this a SAG or AFTRA job?” which often resulted in performers and other industry professionals guessing wrong and calling the wrong organization for answers to their questions. The creation of SAG-AFTRA will benefit the entertainment and advertising industries worldwide as, once the transition is complete, industry members—whether performers, broadcasters or employers— only need to call one organization to get all their on-camera and voiceover performer questions answered. Some employer groups have also made clear their preference for one negotiation. The merger answers their request with a resounding yes by enabling not only one negotiation and one contract, but only one organization to bargain with. The newly formed SAG-AFTRA represents over 150,000 actors, announcers, broadcasters, journalists, dancers, DJs, news writers, news editors, program hosts, puppeteers, recording artists, singers, stunt performers, voiceover artists and other media professionals. SAG-AFTRA has 33 locals across the country, including two in the Northwest.

We specialize in: Talent Ta alentt De Development evelopment

MGM-TTalent is a TTalent MGM-Talent alentt Management Fir Firm m with h offices in Pacific NW and Los Angeles A Califor California. nia.

• Actor Actorss • Models •V Vocalists ocalists •W Workshops orkshops - film/tele fifilm/television/stage/ vision/stage/ Fashion Fashion • Coaching - A Audition/Development udition/Development • Classes - Beg Beginners ginners and Exper Experienced ienced de development velopment

We represent talent for Pacific NW and We Los Lo os Angeles Acting as well as New YYork ork for theatre theeatre and Modeling. Vocalists Vocalists develop velop for Los Angeles An ngeles Music Producers auditions annually. aannually. Wee currently have auditions scheduled W uled for film a television Pilot season Januar and January ry 2013 and R Runway New YYork ork Fall 2012.

818-614-2101 81 818 8-614 614-2101 • www www.mgm-talent.com ww ww.mg mgm-ta tale ent ent. en t com c m • tj@ co tj@mgm-talent.com t @mgm tj @m @ m m-ta mg talent n .co nt c com m

20

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012


MI 2-12 SAG:Layout 1

7/2/12

10:03 AM

Page 21

ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

21


MI 2-12 Actors First:Layout 1

7/6/12

9:15 AM

Page 22

A Hint of Serendipity ELICIA WALKER RETURNS TO THE INDUSTRY WITH ACTORS FIRST AGENCY ourteen years is a long time to be away from your true love. Elicia Walker knows this all too well. Walker had been a part of the theatre and production industry for decades, performing on stages, acting in commercials and recording voiceover work. She soon discovered that what she really wanted to be was an agent, so she went to work for two agencies before starting her own, which she ran for 10 years. Then, in 1998, she became extremely ill with a Lupus-like disease, and was forced to leave the business she so loved. “I could not work at all,” she recalls. “I could not give attention to anyone or anything, and I wasn’t making great decisions, I was so ill. I had to leave to get better.” After regaining her health, Walker decided to take a long rest, re-group, and take a look at other perspectives other than theatre. She decided to go back and get her master’s, and is currently finishing up her doctorate. But Walker soon realized that she missed the industry and could no longer be away from it. “I always missed being an agent, and anything to do with theatre,”

Providing operators and equipment

F

22

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

425-891-8575 Duffel@akteleprompt.com www.akteleprompt.com

she says. “Even though I went back to get my master’s and doctorate, I felt like I stood out like a sore thumb. I did not always agree with what I was learning, and I definitely realized that people really had a hard time voicing what they felt was right, or fighting for what was equitable, because their reputation would be hurt or blemished. “I realized that one of my strengths was supporting and advocating for myself and for others. I loved doing it. The best place I could be was to advocate for actors in the profession I loved.” And how better to advocate for actors than as an agent? “It was serendipitous,” says Walker. “I was finishing my doctorate and I was going to do something I loved, and that was opening up an agency again.” With the support and encouragement of industry friends, Walker has opened Actors First Agency, 14 years after leaving the business. The SAG-AFTRA-franchised agency represents union and nonunion actors for film, commercials, corporate videos, voice-overs, live performance and multimedia productions. Upon embarking on this new venture, she has discovered something even better than true love—a reunion with true love. Walker threw herself into Actors First Agency with a renewed excitement and an enlivened passion for the industry, and for her actors.


MI 2-12 Actors First:Layout 1

7/6/12

9:15 AM

Page 23

“I am older and wiser and bolder!” she exclaims. “I love to negotiate and it is important for the actors to get what they deserve. I am a strong champion and advocator for what is best for the actor.” Walker believes in the “small agency” mentality—her target number of actors on her roster is around 60—so every actor gets the necessary attention and support to ensure that each one reaches his or her full capability as a performer. “I want to concentrate on each individual actor,” she explains. “I really believe that the agent-actor relationship is a partnership, and I do not want to waste people’s time if I cannot give them the atten-

Walker’s affable personality, infectious positivity, and hands-on approach. “I want to have fun and enjoy every aspect of this business and keep my sense of humor,” she says. “I do not like the thought that because I am an agent and I own the business that I am somehow this untouchable figurehead. I want clients and actors to feel comfortable.” Having just opened a few short months ago, Actors First Agency has already signed around 30 actors and has booked a number of small jobs. So what’s next for the agency?

Upon embarking on this new venture, she has discovered something even better than true love—a reunion with true love. tion. I love actors. I want to help them grow and see their potential, and I cannot do that if I have too many.” Walker adds that this approach is not only actor-friendly, but client-friendly as well. “I want actors to feel worthwhile in the agency, and that each one is respected and not ignored,” she says. “That also goes for clients—I want them to know how important they are to the agency.” She continues, “I understand what the client wants and I really look at the specifics to give them the right fit. I do not believe it is fair to give the client too many actors and waste their time if no one is right. I would rather send no one than the wrong one. I have to believe in the actor’s ability before I can submit them.” Her relationships with clients and actors are further buoyed by

“Continuing to book up the base of my actors,” says Walker, “and reaching out to more clients—the ad agencies, the audio studios, the game people—so that they know I am here and have really great talent.” She adds, “Right now I am strongest in on-camera talent, and I am now focusing on voice work. It is a slow growth and there will be many changes in the next year, I am sure.” Walker is excited to see what changes and opportunities will come her way in the near future, eager to help talented actors see their potential come to fruition. “I really love this business and I love people,” she says. “And this is a people industry.” Reunited never felt so good.

ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

23


MI 2-12 Holbrook:Layout 1

7/3/12

10:26 AM

Page 24

Tall Taurus Owner Wins “Entrepreneur of the Year” Award JONATHAN HOLBROOK EARNS PRESTIGIOUS HONOR FROM HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL By John Wolcott Features Northwest News Service

nly a few months after winning Videomaker magazine’s national award for his new high-tech, high-end DVGear professional video editing and production equipment, Jonathan Holbrook is in the news again as the first person to win the Herald Business Journal’s new Entrepreneur of the Year honor.

O

In different ways for different accomplishments, both awards recognize the spirit of a true entrepreneur, someone who sets their mind on a goal, creates imaginative new products, services or techniques to serve a new marketplace need, and then risks all they have to create their own niche, clientele and success. Long hours of creativity and hard work often pay off for the best of entrepreneurs, like Holbrook. Yet the price usually includes years of emotional ups and downs, fluctuating bank balances and a severe testing of your dreams, products, marketing skills, personality and fortitude in the public arena. “It feels really good to get an award for something you’ve worked hard at, something you love,” said Holbrook. “It can be very discouraging at times. Being an entrepreneur can be hard on your marriage, too, even with a very supportive wife, especially in a recession. We should be thanking the other half, who puts up with her husband as a business owner… My first thought about getting this award was that my wife should be getting it rather than me.” Having his own business has been a persistent dream since he was a young boy.

(

BRIEFS

EBF Talent & Management Opens for Business EBF Talent & Management is now representing actors for film, television, commercial/industrial projects, voice-over and live events. They also provide management for actors and spokespeople. EBF Talent is an agency built to work with seasoned casting agents and experienced producers, as well as those companies new to production and casting. They provide experienced and unique talent, ensuring client satisfaction from beginning to end. “I represent confident actors that understand what it takes be part of a team and get the job done right the first time,” said owner Erin Bryn Fetridge. “Time is very much money in this profession and my clients can be certain that when they call EBF Talent for their casting needs, they’ll find actors who are prepared, professional and engaged.” Fetridge has lived and worked in the arts in Seattle for over 25 years. She began her theatrical career at just 11 years of age at Village Theatre in Issaquah, Washington. From there she spent 8 years in arts administration at local theaters including Village Theatre and Seattle Children’s Theater, as well as performing on many Seattle stages. In 2000, Erin opened Stumbling Goat Bistro, which she owned and operated for over nine years. She is currently a steering committee member for 14/48: the world’s quickest theater festival. Most recently she spent the last two years as an agent with Topo Swope Talent, one of Seattle’s icons

24

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

“Since I was a child I wanted to be my own boss. I love to call my own shots,” said Holbrook. “Even family members laughed at me and didn’t think I’d ever do it. In 1990 I moved up here from Texas, where I was doing warehousing work. When I came up to Everett, where my dad was living, Everett Community College had a video film program where I learned studio video production skills and did really well with it. My dream then was to become an independent filmmaker.” In 1996-97 he learned more in a University of Washington video course and read books for everything he wanted to know or use in the field. Still, he wound up back in warehousing work and management. He wanted to follow his dream but it kept floating off ahead of him. Then, with his wife working at Providence Hospital, where she’s employed today, Holbrook found an opportunity to launch his business. “First job I did was for a friend, a memorial for his mom and dad. Both of them passed away within a week of each other,” he said. “He wanted to capture a lot of memories and it turned out really beautifully.” Later he recorded weddings and worked to build his clientele. Soon he found himself doing a series of video promotions for Village Theater for several years. Later, he created a promotional animated video for State Roofing in Monroe, “The Happy Roofer,” and then linked up with Taiwan-based SportsArtFitness, an exercise machine manufacturer with U.S. headquarters in Woodinville. “I went to Taiwan to shoot a corporate video of their production

of actor representation. For more information, visit www.ebftalent.com.

Update from Marc Bowen Productions The past year has found Marc Bowen Productions busy with many interesting and comprehensive projects. The company kicked off 2012 by producing several point of sale marketing videos on a series of Golf Range-finders for Leupold and Stevens, followed by a series of campaign spots for Tim Knopp, a candidate for State Senator from Bend. In addition, Marc Bowen Productions recently completed a series of instructional videos for Quality Chain Corporation, a safety orientation video for Hoffman Construction Company, and a fundraising video to inform donors of a new proposed Community Pavilion at Portland State University As the business climate has evolved, the Portland-based production company has re-tooled and become more competitive, providing a wider range of resources to clients. Marc Bowen Productions now handles everything from small consulting projects to large complex Web site production. For their foundation business they provide video production for everything from simple one-man shoots to full-blown productions involving large crews with multi-camera set-ups, talent and staging. For more information, visit www.marcbowenproduction.com.


MI 2-12 Holbrook:Layout 1

7/6/12

9:18 AM

Page 25

plan,” said Holbrook. “It was a wonderful opportunity. What I love about this work is that I get to meet all kinds of people and learn about a lot of new things.” In the course of producing a variety of videos, Holbrook’s talent and creativity was proven in his film Customer 152, which became the official selection for the 2004 New York International Independent Film Festival. Later, it was named the Best Feature of the 2005 Northwest Independent Film Festival and played in theaters in selected cities across the United States. One of his latest ventures is videotaping business promos that can be displayed on wall-mounted screens for customers’ viewing when they visit. “I’ve got some of these video signage screens at Alexander Printing in Everett, as well as another Everett firm, BIT Consulting Group, which provides Internet Web sites and computer services. I often use them for my own needs,” he said. “Everett Naval Station has one they use to broadcast things like the commander’s video reports. It’s easy to change programs on the screen. It’s not for everyone but it fits a perfect need for many clients, so I’m promoting them wherever I can so people understand their value.” Besides Tall Taurus Media’s video work, Holbrook promotes products of his DVGear division, which creates and markets highend computers for video editing and production needs. He also uses the powerful, sophisticated equipment for his own video work. “Using my own equipment is a good marketing strategy,” he said, “and my newest product, the Apprentice video editing and production computer, was recently named Videomaker magazine’s Best New Product for 2012.” The award has drawn a lot of attention for Holbrook, who proved

once again that even a relatively small entrepreneurial video producer and video editing equipment company can make big waves across the country by concentrating on quality products, creative excellence and the foremost needs of his customer market niche. Holbrook’s success is as much in how he’s structured his business as it is in his savvy use of technology for his video productions and his video editing equipment. “DVGear is a Web-based company, so even though we have an office in Everett (which also houses Tall Taurus Media), we’ve found that being Web-focused allows us to work with partners who don’t have to be full-time on our payroll but they’re still able to provide their special expertise to our clients,” he said. Grant Eckstrom’s BIT Consulting, LLC, for instance, is an Everett-based tech firm that handles support requests for DVGear customers, as well as working closely with Holbrook on developing new DVGear equipment. So far, business is picking up in 2012, said Holbrook, noting that “people are starting to get brave again and try new things… they also find out I’m not as expensive as they think I am.” He said he knows that “it’s hard to make money as a creative person,” who is basically marketing his ideas and talents, but he loves what he does and sees how important it is for helping other people. “You have to open your mind to your clients, do what you think will help them, but don’t fall in love with your own work because you need to take a lot of direction and criticism sometimes to do what the client wants … but have a good time doing it. It helps that I don’t take myself too seriously, too,” Holbrook said with a chuckle.

ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

25


MI 2-12 TV Kippes:Layout 1

7/3/12

11:35 AM

Page 26

Notes from a Production Assistant By Timothy Victor “T.V.” Kippes Guest Columnist

or the second time in a month, this production assistant was offered a job as if he was a general laborer standing on a street corner waiting for day work. The first person to run to the truck gets the job. Similarly, the first person to get a resume to the producer gets the job. Regardless of the reason why, if the main criteria that these producers are looking for is the first person who can get a resume to them that meets the minimum qualifications, their production gets the performance they deserve.

F

the PA role as a stepping stone into a specific field. A lot of production assistants do this. Fantastic! Then, there are a few production assistants who view their careers as similar in task to the Himalayan Sherpas. When a commercial or show comes to town, in a sense, it is Mt. Everest to the production company and the investors. To the mountain climbers, the Sherpas are the guides, the emergency information source, the outfitters, and the personnel/equipment transport. It is the career goal of this production assistant to do the same thing. Would you hire a mountain guide on a street corner? I am not the best PA in the world. I have made mistakes. But I

The inefficiency of the production always shows in the final product. Is that the best you can do for your clients? There is a lot to be said for a person with hustle. But is it smart business, with as much money as is involved in a production, for a producer to make a critical crew decision like hiring the first PA that responds back? The inefficiency of the production always shows in the final product. Is that the best you can do for your clients? First impressions do mean a lot. That kind of an expectation tells me something about a company. Do I want my name on your product? There are good production assistants and producers who view

26

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

am experienced at a lot of things and the master of a few things. Please think about contacting potential PAs earlier in the preproduction process. Take less than half a minute to read my one-page resume, and any other resumes of PAs you contacted and who responded in a reasonable and timely manner. Your production’s performance depends on it. T.V. Kippes is a production assistant based in Spokane, Washington.


MI 2-12 TV Kippes:Layout 1

7/3/12

11:35 AM

Page 27

LISTEN TO THIS!

Voice of Vicki

Vicki Amorose Voiceover Talent www.voiceofvicki.com/demos.php

REALLY LISTEN AT WWW.MEDIA-INC.COM/CATEGORY/LISTEN-TO-THIS


MI 2-12 Barkley:Layout 1

7/3/12

10:15 AM

Page 28

HD Video Simulcast for Seattle Opera By Robert Jett Barkley Guest Columnist

arlier this year I was privileged to have been one of several camera operators utilized to capture the pageantry of the live stage show of the Seattle Opera production of Madama Butterfly. All of the cameras were high-definition units, and our video signals went to a master control station set up far backstage at Seattle Center’s McCaw Hall.

E

The stage performance was rehearsed until perfected, and then performed to a live audience at McCaw. Our camera rehearsal time lasted about a week with the cast and our video director, who called out each camera’s specific shots during the show. Our daily post-rehearsal debriefings went over what we’d done and what might be improved, and our “shot-sheets” evolved to reflect any changes that had been decided upon. Each operator had their own custom shot-sheet that had their cues detailed, in order, upon it, and we all followed these very, very closely during the performance. The video imagery that our five cameras captured was mixed live at the backstage master control and the final broadcast cut was then sent over fiber-optic lines, across the breadth of Seattle Center, to the high-definition video projectors displaying the opera on a mammoth screen installed at Key Arena. At one point during rehearsals, the entire video crew left

28

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

McCaw and walked across the Seattle Center grounds to Key Arena so that we could see and experience the show similarly to how the audience would. A previously recorded rehearsal that we’d shot was projected on the huge screen, which almost filled an entire side of the venue. It was an impressive sight. The 5,000 seats at Key Arena were offered gratis with online reservations, and on the day of the performance garnered an audience very close to capacity. Truly notable about this event is that this was the first time that the Seattle Opera had performed a show at McCaw Hall that was simulcast for a live audience at Key Arena. This type of operatic simulcast has only been around for a relatively short time, with some previous events exhibited in the arenas and stadiums of California. Combining technology with culture in this fashion has enabled a much larger audience to enjoy and appreciate the art form that is opera, and I’m happy to have been allowed to have been a part of this event. If you can see a performance when it returns, you’ll be glad you did. Robert Jett Barkley has been freelancing as a director of photography and camera operator in the film and video industry for over 20 years.


MI 2-12 Barkley:Layout 1

7/6/12

9:48 AM

Page 29

NORTHWEST PRODUCTION SHOWCASE

Visual Imagery Production Since 1995, Visual Imagery Production has been offering creative camera movement via use of the Stanton Triangle Jimmy Jib. When I arrive on set with my gear I am prepared to help production get the most out of the gear. This means being flexible by offering options like: eight different arm lengths to choose from; the use of specially built dolly troughs; wireless BarTec follow focus system; two HD monitors; Honda 1000 generator; mitchell male mount on the pivot for easy adaptability to mitchell receptacle. My experience has taught me to be a good listener, be patient, and to always go the extra mile to help production get the shots they need. Thinking about camera movement? Then think Visual Imagery Production. www.vipjib.com

ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

29


MI 2-12 Barkley:Layout 1

7/6/12

9:49 AM

Page 30

NORTHWEST PRODUCTION SHOWCASE

\  * 7 /# 0 ) ' 01 /'  ( 1 4    1 0' g 6 * 1 7 5 # 0&  & 1 . . # 4 5 T [ 10 4 16 10 '37'0%'4 { #70%* + &'1

*#6 s 5 ; 174  56 14 ; ` 10 14 4 '06  #0& 4 #+ 0# '5+ )0 #5'& 75 6 1 75' 174  %14 ' 56 4 '0)6 *X  %#4 '( 7. . ;  %4 #( 6 '& %+ 0'/#6 + % 56 14 ; 6 '. . + 0)X  6 1 24 12'.  # $4 '#6 *4 17)* $75+ 0'55 + &'#T  ' %#. .  6 *+ 5X  \ 6 14 ;  + 0 16 + 10{T [

999T 2+ 04 '#6 + 8 ' 4 172T %1/

Pixelfire Pixelfire is a Seattle-based motion graphic, VFX and post production studio with deep roots in Times Square NYC. They have extensive experience working with brands and agencies, helping create and/or interpret fresh and exciting visual communication. 4K/Red workflow and editing, shooting, directing and keying green screen, motion tracking, 3D motion graphics composited in live action. All at prices that will help you stay on budget. Next time you need a responsible and professional team on a project, call this New York team that happens to be based here in the Northwest. www.pixelfire.net

30

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

Spin Creative Story in Motion™ Our core strength is cinematic storytelling that is carefully crafted to propel your business idea. We call this, “Story in Motion™.â€? We’re Spin Creative and we believe in crafting digital films that make an audience sit up and take notice. To engage with a message and remember it a week later. To be moved by well-crafted storytelling and eye-catching imagery. That’s compelling media. It creates a memorable experience for an audience that can lead to learning, behavioral change and motivation. It’s a powerful tool for reaching your most important audiences—and ultimately influencing the success of your campaign, idea or business. We approach every project in a spirit of partnership. We cultivate strong client relationships built on a foundation of trust, consistency and follow-through. From technology to creative development, we constantly push ourselves to become ever-more knowledgeable and capable. All of this is fueled by our passion for creativity, an appreciation of story and excitement in harnessing the right technology for targeted and impactful communication. We want to be your strategic and creative partner. What’s your story? www.spincreativegroup.com


MI 2-12 Barkley:Layout 1

7/6/12

9:50 AM

Page 31

NORTHWEST PRODUCTION SHOWCASE Funnelbox Production Studios Creativity is part of the environment of the Pacific Northwest. It’s in the people who play, dream and work here; it’s in the landscape we live in, sculpted by winds, polished by water, shaded by evergreen trees; it’s fermented in our local beers, brewed in our fair trade coffees, pressed from our hardy grapes; and it is almost certainly in the rain. Funnelbox Production Studios embodies this creativity, collecting crew members whose passion is focused on achieving our clients’ goals. We craft stories, connecting our creativity to a discipline devoted to exceeding expectations. We own our building, we own our tools, we own our careers, so we can take ownership of each project. We simplify a complex process, taming the intricate industry of video production to produce peerless work every day. We plan, we shoot and we deliver. With a full-time crew of producers, designers, cinematographers, editors and motion graphic artists, Funnelbox is able to deliver a project from beginning to end. It’s these projects, and the relationships developed during them, that drive the growth for which we’ve been recognized as one of the fastest growing private companies in Oregon and SW Washington for the past three years. And in the fertile soil of the Northwest, we will continue to grow, nurtured in the constant rains of creativity. www.funnelbox.com

Limbo Films Established by award-winning director/director of photography Gary Nolton in 1992, Limbo Films produces live-action media including broadcast and web-based commercials, corporate video, documentary and short narrative films. Shooting for clients all across the United States, we bring the highest production value and inspired solutions to every production. No matter what the challenges, we’ll deliver a well orchestrated production and make sure it’s a fun journey every step of the way. www.limbofilms.com

ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

31


MI 2-12 Film Video List:Layout 1

7/3/12

1:38 PM

Page 32

NW FILM/VIDEO

Adams Creative; Des Moines, WA 206-824-6970 adamscreative@isomedia.com www.adamscreative.net

Dan Adams, president/ CD

ADi; Portland, OR 503-227-5914; fax 503-227-3269 kate@animationdynamics.com www.animationdynamics.com

Kate Ertmann, president

Allied Video Productions; Salem, OR 503-363-7301; fax 503-363-6477 scott@alliedvideo.com www.alliedvideo.com

Scott Hossner, CEO

@Large Films; Portland, OR 503-287-5387; fax 503-287-5886 jjenkins@largefilms.com www.atlargefilms.com

Juliana Lukasik, principal/director Jonathan Jenkins, lead producer

August Island Pictures; Seattle, WA 206-794-2411 info@augustisland.com www.augustisland.com

Mark Titus

Bennett Watt HD Productions; Issaquah, WA 425-392-3935; fax 425-392-4104 info@bennett-watt.com www.hdvideoproduction.net

Jim Watt, president Kelly Watt, VP

BergWorks Media; Seattle, WA 206-239-8974; fax 206-783-9113 rob@bergworksmedia.com www.bergworksmedia.com

Robert Berg, principal

Beyond Home Productions; Seattle, WA 206-501-3054 info@beyondhome.com www.beyondhome.com

Kevin Maude, CEO Paul Killebrew, lead producer Ben Medina, CD

Blue Plate Digital; Seattle, WA 206-388-0174; fax 206-299-3376 brian@blueplatedigital.com www.blueplatedigital.com

Brian Pelzel, owner

Bridge Productions, Inc.; Woodinville, WA 425-483-8840; fax 425-487-9792 madzola@aol.com www.bridgeprodusa.com

Eugene Mazzola

Capestany Films; Poulsbo & Seattle, WA 206-383-0110 producer@centerfieldstudios.com www.centerfieldstudios.com

Scott A. Capestany, EP Jade Kennedy, line producer Traeanna Holiday, production coordinator

Cesari Direct; Seattle, WA 206-281-7975 x353; fax 206-826-0200 tobrien@cesaridirect.com www.cesaridirect.com

Rick Cesari, CEO

Cinemagic Studios; Portland, OR 503-233-2141; fax 503-233-0076 joe@cinemagicstudios.com www.cinemagicstudios.com

Joe Walsh, president/ EP

CineMonster, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-780-3907 dale@cinemonster.com www.cinemonster.com

Dale Fay, president

32

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

R

NT AR DI Y RE CT RE SP E ON IN DUC SE ST A RU TIO CT NA IO L/ FE NA AT L UR EF ILM TE LE VI SI ON AN IM AT IO N IN PO TE DC RA AS CTI T/ VE WE / VI DE BC OAS ON T DE S MA ST OUN UD DS ND IO TA GE OT / HE

DO CU ME

ER CI AL CO RP OR AT E DI GI TA L

TYPES OF PRODUCTION

CO MM

Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

T EX OP L EC OC UT A IVE L S

PRODUCTION COMPANIES


talent services- production ad:Layout 1

7/2/12

9:26 AM

Page 33


MI 2-12 Film Video List:Layout 1

7/3/12

1:38 PM

Page 34

NW FILM/VIDEO

CMD; Portland, OR & Seattle, WA 503-223-6794; fax 503-223-2430 info@cmdagency.com www.cmdagency.com

Phil Reilly, president Mike Cobb, VP accounts Mike Pool, managing director, Film and Video Group

Cross Films; Seattle, WA 206-297-3456 michael@crossfilms.com www.crossfilms.com

Michael Cross, director/ editor Susan LaSalle, producer

Dawson Media Group; Portland, OR 503-477-7462; fax 866-716-6087 info@dawsonmediagroup.com www.dawsonmediagroup.com

Meighan Maloney, CEO Harry Dawson, cinematographer/director

EMA Video Productions, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-241-8663 sales@emavideo.com www.emavideo.com

Ed Mellnik, president

First Sight Productions; Seattle, WA 206-354-5032 lindy@firstsightproductions.com www.firstsightproductions.com

Lindy & Kris Boustedt, owners

Flying Gecko Productions; Burien, WA 206-412-4363; fax 866-259-1712 greg@flyingecko.com www.flyingecko.com

Greg Sommers-Herivel, producer

Funnelbox Production Studios; Oregon City, OR 503-595-5901; fax 503-595-5908 ken@funnelbox.com www.funnelbox.com

Robb Crocker, founder/CEO

golightlyfilms, inc.; Portland, OR 503-381-1243 golightlyfilms@comcast.net www.golightlyfilms.com

Kenneth Luba, president Kaja Zaloudek, VP

GoodSide Studio; Seattle, WA 206-322-1576 studio@goodsidestudio.com www.goodsidestudio.com

Matt Krzycki, CD

Barry Gregg, DP; Poulsbo, WA 206-234-5467 barry@barrygregg.com www.barrygregg.com

Barry Gregg, DP

Hansen Belyea; Seattle, WA 206-682-4895 patricia@hansenbelyea.com www.hansenbelyea.com

Patricia Belyea, strategic director Ron Lars Hansen, design director Michael Stone, IT director

Hive-Fx; Portland, OR 503-336-1834; fax 503-961-1016 gretchen@hive-fx.com www.hive-fx.com

Gretchen Miller, EP Jim Clark, president

Image Productions Inc.; Spokane, WA 509-891-8778; fax 509-891-8860 mlpallardy@imageproductionsinc.com www.imageproductionsinc.com

Michael L. Pallardy, president Ian E. Graham, VP

34

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

R

NT AR DI Y RE CT RE SP E ON IN DUC SE ST A RU TIO CT NA IO L/ FE NA AT L UR EF ILM TE LE VI SI ON AN IM AT IO N IN PO TE DC RA AS CTI T/ VE WE / VI DE BC OAS ON T DE S MA ST OUN UD DS ND IO TA GE OT / HE

DO CU ME

ER CI AL CO RP OR AT E DI GI TA L

TYPES OF PRODUCTION

CO MM

Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

T EX OP L EC OC UT A IVE L S

PRODUCTION COMPANIES


cine rent west ad:Layout 1

7/2/12

9:29 AM

Page 35


MI 2-12 Film Video List:Layout 1

7/3/12

1:39 PM

Page 36

NW FILM/VIDEO

PRODUCTION COMPANIES

Integrated Talent LLC; Seattle & Bainbridge Island, WA 206-686-6440; fax 206-708-1631 info@integratedtalent.com www.integratedtalent.com

DND

JDP Media; Stayton, OR 503-769-1967; fax 503-769-8897 info@jdpmedia.com www.jdpmedia.com

Doug Zabroski, owner/producer Lori Zabroski, production manager

Kontent Partners; Seattle, WA 206-722-2846; fax 323-446-7178 michael@kontentpartners.com www.kontentpartners.com

Michael Bini, EP

A KTVA Production, LLC; Portland, OR 503-659-4417 mail@ktvavideo.com www.ktvavideo.com

Rick Phillips, owner

LAIKA/house; Portland, OR 503-225-1130; fax 503-226-3746 ask_house@laika.com www.laika.com/house

Lourri Hammack, president/EP

Limbo Films; Portland, OR 503-228-0844; fax 503-228-0857 info@limbofilms.com www.limbofilms.com

Gary Nolton, owner/ director

Magnus Film Co.; Spokane, WA 509-227-5830 info@magnusfilmco.com www.magnusfilmco.com

Michael Hollingworth, director

36

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

R

NT AR DI Y RE CT RE SP E ON IN DUC SE ST A RU TIO CT NA IO L/ FE NA AT L UR EF ILM TE LE VI SI ON AN IM AT IO N IN PO TE DC RA AS CTI T/ VE WE / VI DE BC OAS ON T -D SO E MA ST UN UD DS ND IO TA GE OT / HE

DO CU ME

ER CI AL CO RP OR AT E DI GI TA L

CO MM

T EX OP L EC OC UT A IVE L S

Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

TYPES OF PRODUCTION


MI 2-12 Film Video List:Layout 1

7/2/12

11:21 AM

Page 37

McDONALD INSURANCE GROUP, INC. SPECIALIZED INDUSTRIES Special Effects Wa r d r o b e

Sets

Tr a n s p o r t a t i o n

Lighting and Grip Rentals

Po s t P r o d u c t i o n

Props

Co m m e r c i a l s

Stages

Music Videos

V i d e o D u p l i c a t i o n B r o a d c a s t i n g A u d i o, S o u n d, V i d e o Fe a t u r e F i l m s S h o r t Te r m P r o d u c t i o n s D o c u m e n t a r y I n f o m e r c i a l V i d e o g r a p h y OFFERING COVERAGE FOR ALL YOUR INSURANCE NEEDS.

Call John R. Gunn ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE TOLL FREE: 1.888.827.7400 DIRECT: 425.897.5956 D I R E C T FA X : 4 2 5 . 8 9 7 . 5 9 5 7 johng@mcdonaldins.com 4 1 6

6 t h

S t .

S

K i r k l a n d ,

W A

9 8 0 3 3 ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

37


MI 2-12 Film Video List:Layout 1

7/3/12

1:39 PM

Page 38

NW FILM/VIDEO

PRODUCTION COMPANIES

Media Agents Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-932-2030; fax 206-381-9600 andrew@mediaagentsinc.com www.mediaagentsinc.com

Mike Sunseri, director Andrew Bradner, EP

Media Arts, Inc.; Redmond, WA 206-281-8811; fax 425-968-2219 scott@mediarts.com www.mediarts.com

Scott Munro, president

Mortimore Productions; Spokane, WA 509-327-8384 info@mortimore.com www.mortimore.com

Dan Mortimore, president/ DP/producer Angela Downey, VP marketing & sales/producer Ray Gross, senior editor/audio engineer

Pal Productions, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-361-9366 lazpal123@gmail.com www.paladventurevideos.com

Laszlo Pal, president

Palazzo Creative; Seattle, WA 206-328-5555; fax 206-324-4348 pennie@palazzocreative.com www.palazzocreative.com

Pennie Pickering Richard Roberts

Persistent Image, Inc.; Langley, WA 360-321-8252; fax 360-321-8262 persist@whidbey.com www.persistentimage.com

Bruce Towne, president

Pilot Rock Productions; Medford, OR 888-262-4937; fax 541-779-5564 info@pilotrockproductions.com www.pilotrockproductions.com

Roger Harris, GM Pete Bedell, senior editor Brian Horton, production coordinator

Power to Create Inc.; Mercer Island, WA 206-230-0833; fax 206-230-0825 ken@powertocreate.com www.powertocreate.com

Ken Urman, EP

The Production Foundry; Seattle, WA 206-579-4101; fax 206-694-2720 contact@theproductionfoundry.com www.theproductionfoundry.com

Mark Goodnow, executive director

Production Partners; Seattle, WA 206-441-3773; fax 206-443-5402 john@productionpartners.cc www.productionpartners.cc

John Douthwaite

ProMotion Arts; Seattle, WA 206-938-0348 info@promotionholdings.com www.promotionarts.com

Steve Crandall, managing director

Random Original Productions; Everett, WA 323-454-3767; fax 206-984-1076 info@randomoriginal.com www.randomoriginal.com

DND

Red Door Films; Portland, OR 503-872-9280 reel@reddoorfilms.com www.reddoorfilms.com

David Poulshock, president

red jet films; Seattle, WA 206-282-4534; fax 206-812-0768 sue@redjetfilms.com www.redjetfilms.com

Jeff Erwin, owner

38

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

R

NT AR DI Y RE CT RE SP E ON IN DUC SE ST A RU TIO CT NA IO L/ FE NA AT L UR EF ILM TE LE VI SI ON AN IM AT IO N IN PO TE DC RA AS CTI T/ VE WE / VI DE BC OAS ON T DE S MA ST OUN UD DS ND IO TA GE OT / HE

DO CU ME

ER CI AL CO RP OR AT E DI GI TA L

CO MM

T EX OP L EC OC UT A IVE L S

Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

TYPES OF PRODUCTION


MI 2-12 Film Video List:Layout 1

7/2/12

11:22 AM

Page 39

ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

39


MI 2-12 Film Video List:Layout 1

7/6/12

9:19 AM

Page 40

NW FILM/VIDEO

PRODUCTION COMPANIES

Rocket Pictures; Seattle, WA 206-623-7678 les@rocket-pictures.com www.rocket-pictures.com

Les Fitzpatrick, president

John Sabella & Assoc., Inc.; Port Townsend, WA 360-379-1668; fax 360-379-5148 info@johnsabella.com www.johnsabella.com

John Sabella

Sadis Filmworks; Seattle, WA 206-728-1610 stephen@sadisfilmworks.com www.sadisfilmworks.com

Stephen Sadis

Screaming Flea Productions, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-763-3383; fax 206-763-3393 sfp@sfpseattle.com www.sfpseattle.com

Matt Chan, president Dave Severson, VP/EP Charles O'Farrell, VP/EP

Spin Creative, LLC; Seattle, WA 206-452-5947; fax 206-922-5523 matthew@spincreativegroup.com www.spincreativegroup.com

Matthew Billings, president/CD

Spirit Media; Happy Valley, OR 503-698-5540; fax 503-698-8408 bill@spiritmedia.com www.spiritmedia.com

Bill Dolan Anne DeRock

Tall Taurus Media; Everett, WA 425-374-7901 producer@talltaurusmedia.com www.talltaurusmedia.com

Jonathan Holbrook

Victory Studios; Seattle, WA 206-282-1776; fax 206-282-3535 info@victorystudios.com www.victorystudios.com

Conrad Denke, CEO Saul Mitchell, VP media services Kevin Smith, CD

VMG/Studio520; Bellevue, WA 425-457-7100; fax 425-457-7104 info@visualmediagroup.net www.vmgstudio520.com

Kelly Sparks, CEO/queen bee

Voda Brands; Seattle, WA 206-441-8158 info@vodastudios.com www.vodastudios.com

DND

Wacko Films; Seattle, WA 206-618-9777 info@wackofilms.com www.wackofilms.com

Jack Barrett, owner/ director/editor

Wattsmedia, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-456-6553 david@wattsmedia.us www.wattsmedia.us

David Mangone, partner/EP/director Andrew Watts, partner

White Rain Films; Seattle, WA 206-682-5417; fax 206-682-3038 bill@whiterainfilms.com www.whiterainfilms.com

Brad Bolling, director Bill Phillips, producer

Worktank; Seattle, WA 206-254-0950; fax 206-374-2650 talktous@worktankseattle.com www.worktankseattle.com

Leslie Rugaber, CEO

YG Media; Woodburn, OR 503-481-1735 evan@ygmedia.net www.ygmedia.net

Evan Thomas, owner

Zupa Films; Portland, OR 503-860-0921; fax 503-501-4849 adele@zupafilms.com www.zupafilms.com

Adele Amos, owner Jennifer Moore, owner

40

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

R

NT AR DI Y RE CT RE SP E ON IN DUC SE ST A RU TIO CT NA IO L/ FE NA AT L UR EF ILM TE LE VI SI ON AN IM AT IO N IN PO TE DC RA AS CTI T/ VE WE / VI DE BC OAS ON T DE S MA ST OUN UD DS ND IO TA GE OT / HE

DO CU ME

ER CI AL CO RP OR AT E DI GI TA L

CO MM

T EX OP L EC OC UT A IVE L S

Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

TYPES OF PRODUCTION


MI 2-12 Film Video List:Layout 1

7/2/12

11:22 AM

Page 41

ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

41


MI 2-12 Carr Knowledge:Layout 1

7/6/12

9:21 AM

Page 42

The Mad-Lib Way to Sell More Stuff By Rich Carr, CRME Guest Columnist

year from now, what are we celebrating? It’s the first question we ask a business who understands that their business makes great (your products) or has the best services when it comes to (your service). “Selling more ______” is the number one reason a business advertises or needs assistance marketing to reach that basic and obvious goal. Here’s why this number one answer is also wrong. Most businesses started because they feel they make or do the best (your product or service) on the market. Because most business is still managed by the people who started it, they also think they’re the best judge of how to inform the public of what they do. It’s this thinking that gives us startling statistics like “8 out of 10 new businesses fail within the first 3 years.” Holy (expletive)! This is the reason savvy businesses seek marketing companies. Your business may make and service the greatest (consumer item) of all time, but I guarantee you some other business can help you sell more. Data has no agenda. The reason NIKE, Harley-Davidson, and (your business) hire marketing firms is a focused, comprehensive and cohesive approach to everything that reaches the consumer and steers them to the overall goal—sell more stuff. Spending between 3 and 5 percent of your total gross sales each year on advertising in hopes that it will increase sales by (planned increase) percent deserves a little forethought. You need a marketing plan—an essential document to assure your marketing decisions

A

are based in fact. A marketing plan tells us what we’re celebrating next year. It also tells us how to get there. If the time and acumen of researching, creating, producing and picking media isn’t something your business can handle honestly, don’t give it to the intern and say, “Go get ‘em, (Motivating Nickname)!” Just knowing what you need will help you find which agency can offer you the best service. It will also save you money. At Carr Knowledge, most of our clients have been in business for decades and they know their business better than anybody. They also know that it takes huge investment and years of experiments to discover what will and will not work—they just don’t spend their (synonym for money) finding out. They hire a marketing agency, hold them accountable for the agreed upon goals in the marketing plan, and utilize that agency to make sure it happens. As digital medias and the ever-changing landscape of advertising choices vibrate and splinter, an agency worth its salt should approach you the same way. Just ask them, “Can you help me develop a marketing plan, and then manage that marketing plan for my business so I can sell more stuff?” The answer should include something akin to, “With this plan, we can help you outline the best and most cost-effective way to get to where you are going—yes, we can.” With knowledge in hand, then it’s time to get creative. Never before. Rich Carr, CRME, is president and co-founder of Carr Knowledge Interactive Marketing. Visit www.carrknowledge.com.

Quality with great service, it just comes naturally to us. D High quality print and web ad preparation. D Catalog production - including image retouching and product matching. D Color accurate proofing to SWOP or GRACoL standards. D High quality scanning and archival posters. D Animated web banners.

Blooming this Summer: MarketRight! The brand integrity solution adservices.com/marketright (206) 623-6963 www.adservices.com 10000 Lake City Way NE, Seattle, WA 98125 42

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012


hanna ad:Layout 1

7/5/12

10:16 AM

Page 43


MI 2-12 PosterGiant:Layout 1

7/10/12

3:48 PM

Page 44

Taking it to the Streets: Nashville By Doug Cox Guest Columnist

ashville might be known as Music City, but at posterGIANT we’re not alone in seeing it as a Land of Oppor-

N

tunity. The New York Times recently ran a feature on the city’s exploding food scene that rightly identified Nashville’s inherent Southern grace in integrating old traditions and new innovations—something we’ve experienced firsthand when it comes to street-level marketing, and a trait that makes it a welcoming and worthwhile market for our clients. South By Southwest might turn the international spotlight on Austin each March, but combine the one-two punch of the neighboring Bonnaroo Festival with the magnum industry event that is the Country Music Awards, and Nashville becomes the place to be in June. While the outside world is just figuring that out, Nashville insiders know a great opportunity when they see one. This year, we assisted local non-profit the Martha O’Bryan Center in generating awareness and participation in their “Break the Line” campaign, and helped local up-and-coming music star BREE ramp up her presence before her debut performance. In both cases, timing and execution combined with creativity and opportunity to deliver stellar results. In the case of the “Break the Line” campaign, our efforts literally stopped people in their tracks. Utilizing simple, brightly colored sidewalk stencils of the effort’s trademark arrow and tagline, we took

44

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

the message of “Break the Line”—the need to eradicate the separation between the “haves” and “have-nots” in East Nashville—to the street. Together with strategically placed bold and unusual retail materials and a targeted billboard campaign, the pointed message scored a bullseye with passersby. For relative Nashville newcomer BREE, early June provided the perfect opportunity to make a splash in her adopted hometown. To promote her upcoming show at the High Watt, BREE asked us to target select retail outlets and key neighborhoods with a high-profile poster campaign. Combined with the debut of an intoxicating video for “Whisky” and a promotional push to local radio, she grabbed enough attention to be voted “Nashville Artist of the Month” for June—even before she took the stage. With a diverse and engaged population, an appetite for culture and the cutting-edge, and an increasing place in the national eye, Nashville holds a treasure trove of effective and efficient marketing opportunities year-round—not to mention added value when you know when and where to look.

posterGiant’s “Break the Line” campaign took it to the streets.

Doug Cox is the president and founder of posterGIANT, a national guerrilla marketing company based in Seattle with over a decade's worth of experience reaching audiences efficiently and effectively.


MI 2-12 PosterGiant:Layout 1

7/2/12

11:30 AM

Page 45

SOUTH SOUND BUSINESS We’ve Got You Covered

BUSINESS NEWS

Relax. Targeted marketing is our specialty. www.gcdirect.com 206.262.1999 x 205

DAILY BIZ BRIEFS

RESOURCE GUIDES

TV

SOCIAL MEDIA

EVENTS & NETWORKING

www.BusinessExaminer.com (253) 404-0891 | (800) 540-8322 ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

45


MI 2-12 MAX awards:Layout 1

7/6/12

9:24 AM

Page 46

MAX Awards Honor Portland Marketers he Portland chapter of the American Marketing Association (AMA) recently held their annual Marketing Awards of Excellence (MAX). The MAX event was held June 14 at the West End Ballroom in downtown Portland.

T

MAX Awards judges and coordinators.

Each year, the MAX Awards honor achievements in marketing. “This year’s entrants represent the outstanding marketing talent to be found here in Portland,” said Erika Kirkland, AMA MAX Awards co-chair. “The winners are a true testament to the quality of campaigns submitted this year.” MAX categories (and winners) include: Integrated Marketing Campaigns, for a mix of at least three media. Entrants must demonstrate how integrating their campaign established measurable results. One is awarded in each of the following sectors: • Business to Consumer (Winner: KEEL Creative for Little Boxes) • Business to Business (Winner: Grady Britton for Travel Portland) • Nonprofit (Winner: Mambo Media for OHSU / 95.5 The Wolf Radiothon) It’s Beyond HTML, for outstanding Web sites or blogs. The winner in this category was STRUCK for their Mambo Media won in the Integrated project, MarryBacon.com. Marketing Campaign, Nonprofit, category.

You watched Seattle’s own Jones Advertising battle New York agency Bandujo on The Pitch. Now follow Jones Advertising on Facebook and get exclusive behind-the-scenes interviews and content.

46

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

Photos by Mercy McNab Photography

Being Social, for engaging and relevant social media content. The winner in this category was Context Partners for their BME (Black Male Engagement) project. Single Medium Advertising, for a stand-alone


MI 2-12 MAX awards:Layout 1

7/6/12

9:26 AM

Page 47

medium. The winner in this category was Maxwell PR for their Thrillist project. Marketer of the Year is an honor for an individual’s lifetime achievement, selected by a peer group of past AMA Presidents. This year’s winner was Kent Lewis of Anvil Media, Inc. Rising Star represents individuals with less than 10 years of marketing experience that have shown major accomplishments. This year’s winner, selected by past AMA Presidents, was Christy McCreath of Puppet Labs. The Judges’ Choice Award denotes the “best of show,” which went to Context Partners for their BME (Black Male Engagement) project. The winners were selected by a panel of judges, which included: Bill Kent of Lead Lizard; Burk Jackson of CreativeCares; Carri Bugbee of Big Deal PR; Curt Collinsworth of Ziba Design; Doug New of The New Group; Frank Grady of Grady Britton; Kent Lewis of Anvil Media; Mark Jacobs of Umpqua Bank; Paul Anthony of Rumblefish; Ryan Buchanan of eROI; Scott Townsend of Urban Airship; and Steve Potestio of Mathys+Potestio. The 2012 event was a success thanks to a multitude of sponsors. Highlights included appetizers provided by Morso, dessert Rising Star, Christy McCreath, with award. provided by Mio Gelato, beer

Celebrating

Context Partners won the Judges’ Choice Award.

provided by Golden Valley Brewery, wine sponsored by KendallJackson, and signature cocktails sponsored by Vitamin T with vodka donated by New Deal Distillery. Entertainment was provided by DJ Alex Asher Daniel and the photo booth was courtesy Paparazzi Tonight. The event’s emcee talent was provided by Dave Sullivan of Perkins & Co. Additional sponsors included Frazier & Co., West Coast Event Productions, Phil Jasso of Waddell & Reed, B&B Print Source, AngelVision Technology, Inkwell Creative, Migration Brewing Co., Mercy McNab Photography, and Alicia Plate. Established in 1959 with 12 core members, the Portland AMA Chapter connects marketers in the Portland and Southwest Washington area through networking opportunities, educational and professional development events, and luncheons. Portland AMA members represent a diverse group of industries, companies and marketing functions from a wide variety of local businesses. For more information, visit www.ama-pdx.org.

23 Years

ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

47


MI 2-12 Realite:Layout 1

7/3/12

11:28 AM

Page 48

The Benefits of Working With an Ad Agency By Malania Calugas Guest Columnist

here is a method to the madness, a psychology, a formula, a science! A good agency is going to understand your product, target audience, demographics, and what type of advertising will give you the most success. We add the sizzle to your steak; create a plan, and execute it. Everyone knows advertising your business is important, but many don’t understand the true value. It is no secret how many millions are spent per minute during the Super Bowl in advertising. The real question is, what is the worth of a new customer? An agency will know the best strategy. You can have the best products or services, but what if no one knows about them? We “technically” work as an ad agency. You may have a consultation for a Web site, but you may need to crawl before you can walk. For Web design and development, we may have to begin at the branding or marketing plan before even getting to the technical infrastructure of the site. The four main components to any good Web site or ad campaign are: Business, Creative, Technical and Marketing. Let’s build a Web site! My favorite analogy to give clients is this: You wouldn’t have a decorator build your house, do the plumbing and electrical, and then sell it, too. Think of the business side as the blueprints and

T

STRATEGIC BRAND THINKERS

objectives. Do you have a business/marketing plan? Is this an addition, new location, service or product? The creative side is your branding: logos, marketing materials, writers and design. Technical is the development, programming and functionality. This is where you benefit from having an agency involved; it takes a team to build a great site or ad campaign, and an agency acts as the project manager. To market your Web site, the big trends right now are in social media and search engine optimization (SEO). Customers always want to know how to be in the top results of the search engines. This is a combination of things, starting with the coding of the site and searchable content; try to avoid sites fully developed in a video format. The more links you have coming in and out of your site, the better. And most importantly, keep your site up to date. Social media can be customized and integrated, feeding content to your site, which is also great for keeping things current. Imagine every time a change is made to your site, you get back to the front of the line. So whatever your objective may be, a diversified agency will help you develop and execute your project! Malania Calugas is president and CEO of Realite Networks in Seattle. Visit www.realitenetworks.com.

bam! AGENCY

bamagencyinc.com

48

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

( 503 ) 566-7878


MI 2-12 Magnuson:Layout 1

7/3/12

2:18 PM

Page 49

Have You Heard the Secret? By Lisa Magnuson Guest Columnist

here’s a secret in sales that you need to know. A secret so straightforward, yet so potent and up till now surprisingly little understood. Chances are your competitors don’t know it. I’m talking about ‘win themes.’

T

Win Themes. Win themes are the intersection of your client’s priorities and your strengths. They’re the top three to four areas of overlap that create a sweet spot which translates into immediate client receptivity. Yes, it’s that simple. Win themes are the messages that will be reinforced throughout your proposal, presentation and all interactions with the client. They comprehend your strengths and competitive advantages. They can only be built on a solid understanding of your client’s vision, mission, goals, priorities, initiatives and problems. They are your differentiators. They form the basis of your custom value proposition. If your client desperately needs to increase profits and one of their issues is lack of resources and your organization has expert resources with a track record of improving profits, then you have a win theme (and most likely a sale). Why So Powerful? Once win themes are identified, tested and expanded, they can be incorporated into proposals, presentations and other prospect interactions. List your win themes in order of impact. Determine what ‘evidence’ can be offered to support each win theme. To test for strength and validity, have a neutral trusted

Carol Ann DeCoster and The Media Place Team treat media rate cards like t.p.: highly disposable. Which, by all accounts, might explain why they’ll negotiate over $5,000,000 in media this year alone. Television. Radio. Print. Outdoor. Transit. You name it. They’ll buy it.

advisor read through your proposal or listen to your presentation and tell you the top three things that stood out. Strong win themes will effectively lock out the competition. A Sales Success Story. One of my clients was recently responding to a sizable RFP (request for proposal), doing a great job of answering each question. However, after reading through the entire response, there weren’t any ‘stand out’ points that the potential client could hold on to. Utilizing the Win Theme Development Tool (downloadable at www.toplinesales.com), we zeroed in on several prospect goals that were areas of strength for my client’s company, and bingo, we had our win themes. My client re-purposed each answer, including the executive summary, finding creative ways to highlight and reinforce the win themes throughout the response. The result: a big sale and a new customer! Shush… Now that you know the secret, feel free to use it to enhance your close ratios. However, you might want to keep it hushhush from your competitors. As always, I love to hear about your sales successes. Please let me know how using win themes helped you land more business. Lisa Magnuson, sales strategist and founder of Top Line Sales, LLC, helps high potential and top performing sales people and business owners land larger deals, connect to new customers and expand business. Lisa is passionate about her mission to help her clients ‘win’ more often.

If you need media help, contact Carol Ann at 206-524-2919 or mediaplace@aol.com And yes, they do have a fire extinguisher.

ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

49


MI 2-12 Blu Room:Layout 1

7/3/12

2:11 PM

Page 50

Blu Room: The Roar of Guerilla Marketing n a Mad Men-esque landscape of advertising clichés, sweat-inducing rate sheets, and shirt-collared zombies clutching their coffee cups, the team at Blu Room Advertising stands out.

I

It’s an approach they call guerilla marketing: out-of-the-box strategies, customized identity-focused branding, and socially aware teamwork, while always putting each relationship above the bottom line. Blu Room listens to their clients, and then sends out their cavalry of specialists to manufacture unique, effective ways to help businesses achieve their goals. Founded in 2004 on Steilacoom’s banks of the Puget Sound, Blu Room cut its teeth teamed with small-business owners looking for a fresh, focused way to stand out. Their business grew alongside the success of their clients. It’s a team of goal-oriented, award-winning experts who love what they do: design, video, Web development, photography, print, and everything else in between, all while providing unmatched customer service. It’s much more than lacquered-on personal attention just to keep clients happy— real relationships are how they do business.

50

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

Out of those relationships come goals. From goals, ideas are born. Ideas breed creativity. Creativity spawns... the brand. Blu Room exercises each client’s brand by putting creativity and street smarts to work in the best way to reach eyes, ears, hearts, minds and fingertips. Maybe it starts with a logo and a mailer. Next, a social media campaign that’s grounded in the local market takes off. Then, it’s an eye-catching Web site. After that, a viral video or a TV commercial really adds an exclamation point. Blu Room makes your business move—on time, on budget, and on track for success. Employing a marketing approach free from predictable, cookie-cutter ideas, their focus is to guide and shape each client’s image by zipping their brand to the forefront of the target market. Then, using continual marketing, Blu Room champions forehead-smackingly simple ideas that get back to basics and help businesses achieve their goals at maximum value. Blu Room is upfront and no-nonsense. They’re affordable. They’re professional. And, they know your success is also directly tied to their own. Armed with ideas, words, pens, technology and cameras, experience the roar of guerilla marketing. Visit www.bluroomadvertising.com.


MI 2-12 Blu Room:Layout 1

7/6/12

9:28 AM

Page 51

BRIEFS Local Marketing Company Featured in Adweek Coeur d’Alene-based marketing communications company Hanna & Associates, Inc. was recently featured by Adweek magazine, a leading national trade publication covering media, marketing and related industry technology. In its April 25 edition, the publication highlighted Hanna & Associates in an article entitled “Big Fish, Small Ponds.” “We were one of only eight small-market agencies throughout the country to be included,” said founder and president Dayne G. Hanna. “We were selected based on the quality of our work and for being able to serve clients not only in the Northwest, but in other regions of the country.” Adweek writer Gabriel Beltrone said, “…when it comes to blending local expertise with a populist aesthetic, these are the experts.” Hanna offers expertise in three separate—yet interdependent— areas of service. These include strategic development and planning for branding and marketing; creative concept development, design and production; and media planning and placement. For more information, visit www.hanna-advertising.com.

DNA Seattle Secures Five New Accounts Building upon a track record of breakthrough work that has created distinctive Northwest brands such as PEMCO and BECU, DNA Seattle announced that it has signed five new clients, including Group Health Cooperative, Benaroya Research Institute, Trupanion, RDM Properties and Futures Without Violence. “Each of these new clients have come to us to help them create meaning for their brands. Brands that truly make a difference in people’s lives: healthcare, insurance, and even the not-for-profit segment,” said Chris Witherspoon, principal and director of client service at DNA Seattle. “We’re working with great organizations that match our own DNA and that we think can be pioneers in their respective categories.” For more information, visit www.dnaseattle.com.

Olympus Press is not your average print company. tarting in a home garage in 1968, owners Glenn Blue and Frank Vertrees have seen a lot of change in the industry, and in their own operation. Their first print jobs were run on a letterpress and they steadily built up their shop to include multiple presses capable of High Definition printing. All these presses are housed under the roof of their 20,000-square-foot office/manufacturing facility near the new light rail station in Tukwila. Throughout the years, Glenn and Frank have grown into industry leaders, helping to mold the direction of the print industry in Seattle. In the early part of the last decade they helped pioneer the green movement by completely overhauling their shop into an impressively sustainable operation. “Our disposed press waste went from 2,200lbs to only 55lbs between 1995 and 2004,” says Glenn Blue—a statement backed up by a 2004 State of Washington Department of Ecology report. Forty years is a long time for a dual partnership like Frank and Glenn’s to persist; in fact it’s a long time for a company to maintain original ownership. “The fact that Frank and Glenn are still at the helm says a lot about the way we do business,” says Laura Coppess,

S

an 11 year veteran of the Olympus Press sales team. “We are all passionate about the whole process—the papers, the inks, var-

nishes, letterpress techniques—everything.” Talking to the people of Olympus Press gives one a nostalgic feeling. This is a company where hard working men and women and quality American craftsmanship still live. Contrasting with their all-American appeal, you won’t find them sitting back on 40 year old technologies riding the business of yesterday. Olympus continues to re-invent itself, constantly delving into new technologies and finding ways to make printing more efficient for their clients.

Their latest technology is found in pleasingly simple online web-stores that, among other things, are enabling their corporate clients to effortlessly layout and typeset business card orders in less than five minutes. The Olympus team may be more excited about print right now than they have ever been before. “This is the perfect time for print and smart marketing managers are just starting to get wide-eyed with the possibilities of it,” says Jeremiah Easter, marketing director at Olympus Press. “We are experiencing digital glut. The content of free publishing has proven unreliable whereas paid publishing [print] weeds out the lower denominators.” According to Jeremiah, the simple economics of publishing will continue to breathe new and vibrant life into the printing industry and Olympus Press is leading the way.

www.olypress.com 206-242-2700 3400 South 150th St. • Seattle, WA 98188 ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

51


MI 2-12 Corp Media List:Layout 1

7/3/12

1:46 PM

Page 52

NW CORPORATE MEDIA BUYERS COMPANY NAME

CONTACT

WEB SITE

LOCATION

Alaska Airlines

Halle Hutchison, Managing Director, Brand & Marketing Communications

www.alaskaair.com

Seattle, WA

Amazon.com

Jeffrey M. Blackburn, SVP, Business Development

www.amazon.com

Seattle, WA

American Airlines

Robert Johnston, General Manager

www.aa.com

Fort Worth, TX

Amgen Inc.

Robert A. Bradway, President & CEO

www.amgen.com

Seattle, WA

AT&T Wireless

Catherine M. Coughlin, Senior EVP & Global Marketing Officer

www.att.com

Dallas, TX

Bank of America

Brian T. Moynihan, President & CEO

www.bankofamerica.com

Charlotte, NC

Banner Corp.

Mark J. Grescovich, President & CEO

www.bannerbank.com

Walla Walla, WA

Bartell Drug Co.

Theron Andrews, VP of Marketing

www.bartelldrugs.com

Seattle, WA

Boeing Company

W. James McNerney, Jr., Chairman, President & CEO

www.boeing.com

Seattle, WA

BridgePort Brewing Co.

Stacey Williams, National Director of Marketing

www.bridgeportbrew.com

Portland, OR

Burgerville

Sean Blixseth, Director of Marketing

www.burgerville.com

Vancouver, WA

Car Toys, Inc.

David Drew, President & COO

www.cartoys.com

Seattle, WA

Century Link

Meg Andrews, Media Relations & Marketing Manager

www.centurylink.com

Seattle, WA

Chase Bank

Joe Evangelisti, Media

www.chase.com

Seattle, WA

Cmedia

Michelle Cardinal, Group President & CEO

www.cmedia.tv

Portland, OR

Coinstar Inc.

Marci Maule, Director of Public Relations

www.coinstar.com

Bellevue, WA

Columbia Sportswear Co.

Timothy P. Boyle, President & CEO

www.columbia.com

Portland, OR

Comcast Spotlight

Whitney Joy, Marketing Manager

seattle.comcastspotlight.com

Seattle, WA

Costco Wholesale Corp.

Ginnie M. Roeglin, SVP Ecommerce & Publishing

www.costco.com

Issaquah, WA

Cutter & Buck Inc.

Jens Petersson, CEO

www.cutterbuck.com

Seattle, WA

Dell Inc.

Michael Dell, CEO

www.dell.com

Round Rock, TX

Delta Air Lines, Inc.

Richard H. Anderson, CEO

www.delta.com

Atlanta, GA

Draper Valley Farms, Inc.

Richard Koplowitz, CEO

www.drapervalleyfarms.com

Mount Vernon, WA

Eddie Bauer Inc.

Kristen Elliott, Director, Marketing Programs

www.eddiebauer.com

Redmond, WA

Emerald Queen Casino

Tonia Coffee, Marketing Director

www.emeraldqueen.com

Tacoma, WA

Experience Music Project/Science Fiction Museum and Hall of Fame Mandy Davis, Marketing & Promotions Manager

www.empsfm.org

Seattle, WA

FedEx Corp.

Steve Pacheco, Advertising Director

www.fedex.com

Memphis, TN

Fisher Communications, Inc.

Colleen B. Brown, President & CEO

www.fsci.com

Seattle, WA

Fluke Corporation

Leah Friberg, Public Relations Manager

www.fluke.com

Everett, WA

Fred Meyer Stores, Inc.

Kaci Cooney, Print Procurement Assistant

www.fredmeyer.com

Portland, OR

Full Sail Brewing Co.

Sandra Evans, Marketing Coordinator

www.fullsailbrewing.com

Hood River, OR

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Sylvia Mathews Burwell, President, Global Development

www.gatesfoundation.org

Seattle, WA

Group Health Cooperative

Mike Foley, Media Relations Manager

www.ghc.org

Seattle, WA

Haggen, Inc.

John Boyle, SVP, Sales & Marketing

www.haggen.com

Bellingham, WA

52

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012


cenveo ad:Layout 1

7/2/12

11:42 AM

Page 53


MI 2-12 Corp Media List:Layout 1

7/6/12

3:42 PM

Page 54

NW CORPORATE MEDIA BUYERS CONTACT

COMPANY NAME

WEB SITE

LOCATION

Heritage Financial Corp.

Donald V. Rhodes, Chairman of the Board

www.heritagebankwa.com

Olympia, WA

Holland America Line-Westours Inc.

Mark Kammerer, SVP Marketing & Sales

www.hollandamerica.com

Seattle, WA

Home Depot, Inc.

Joe McFarland, President, Western Division

www.homedepot.com

Atlanta, GA

Intel Corp.

Kim Miller, Online Marketing Manager, Sales & Marketing Group

www.intel.com

Hillsboro, OR

Gene Juarez, Inc.

Leanne Siguenza, Marketing Manager

www.genejuarez.com

Bellevue, WA

Kmart Corp.

Louis J. D'Ambrosio, CEO & President

www.kmart.com

Royal Oak, MI

Lithia Motors, Inc.

Bob Striplin, VP Marketing

www.lithia.com

Medford, OR

Live Nation

Dave Aust, VP, Sponsorship Sales

www.livenation.com

Seattle, WA

Lowe's Home Improvement Warehouse

Kevin S. Measel, SVP of Store Operations, West Division

www.lowes.com

Mooresville, NC

Macy's

Noelle LaDuca, Newspaper/Mixed Media Manager

www.macys.com

Seattle, WA

Microsoft Corporation

Rich Glew, Director of Marketing

www.microsoft.com

Redmond, WA

Muckleshoot Casino

Wayne Shadd, Marketing Director

www.muckleshootcasino.com

Auburn, WA

Nike Inc.

Cheryl Hunter, Marketing Operations Director, North America

www.nike.com

Beaverton, OR

Nintendo of America Inc.

Scott Moffitt, EVP, Sales & Marketing

www.nintendo.com

Redmond, WA

Nordstrom

Linda Toschi Finn, EVP Marketing

www.nordstrom.com

Seattle, WA

O'Reilly Auto Parts

David O'Reilly, Chairman

www.oreillyauto.com

Springfield, MO

Enthusiast Media Group: Print and Branding Management and why it is critical to your successful business growth Bring your brand to life! This is our tagline and also our belief in creating solutions in print and promotion management. I founded Enthusiast Media Group in 2006, focused on providing complete solutions for magazines and catalogs across the country. We have over 20 years’ experience in Web, sheetfed and mailing production. We added digital printing (large and small format) plus promotional item management in 2009 to support our client growth and capitalize on technology advancements for them. Printing is an art that does not work on the notion that the more you pay, the better the quality or service. Quite the opposite is true. The reality of today is: “The less you pay, the more improved the quality and service.” This is due to technology advancements in the printing industry over the past seven years. Does this mean if you get the lowest quote, you should not question it? Absolutely not. What it does mean is that to be consistently successful, you need a good print management group that has a network of plants and knows immediately where your print media projects belong. Our statistics show that we save our clients 25%, on average, in the first year of 54

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

working together, based on equipment fit, paper options, postage, and volume economies. We work with over 20 publications and 60 catalogers and we are an extension to their

company in print management and buying. Our clients are industry leaders in their niche and are supported through the education, print management, and the guidance of our team. Our printing services include full web, sheetfed, packaging, digital and large format signage. Our mailing and comail expertise will ensure that you are paying the lowest postage possible and we will show you through analysis. Our aggressive newsstand approach, both traditional and in the APP

stores, provides exceptional distribution growth. And finally, our digital page turning and iPad app built directly from your print media platform is the hottest addition to catalog and magazine production. We make it simple for you to save money, create value, and be profitable. We understand your hard earned reputation deserves just the right printed message, quality, and professional management to ensure your success. If you are working directly with a plant and you have multiple print and promotional item projects in progress, give us a call. We will find the right fit, the right price, and the right print solution. Enthusiast Media Group is dedicated to our clients’ success. Become one of our clients! You will benefit from the results and we will enjoy working with you. We don’t talk about stretching your print marketing dollars—we talk about getting the most exposure and opportunity within your current budget and saving you money. This is what we do exceptionally well. Please see our Web sites at www.enthusiastmediagroup.com and www.emgpromo.com for over 800,000 promotional item ideas.


enthusiast media group ad:Layout 1

7/6/12

9:51 AM

Page 55


MI 2-12 Corp Media List:Layout 1

7/2/12

11:52 AM

Page 56

Century Publishing – Commercial Printing Done Right!

O

Service & Commitment

A

About Century Publishing

ur expertise is in printing and related services. However, all that expertise would be wasted without Service and an unfailing Commitment to our customers. We know our success is dependent upon the success of our customers. That is why we view our relationship with every customer as a partnership. We invite you to experience the “Century” difference so you too can "Love Where You Print."

We print full-color magazines, trade publications, catalogs, real-estate listing publications, maps, brochures, and much more for publishers and print buyers both in the Northwest and throughout North America.

D

Capabilities igital Workflow with Online File Submission & Proofing Computer-to-Plate Technology Four-Color Heat Set Web Printing CIP 3 / 4 and Closed-Loop Color System Six-Color Sheetfed Printing Four-Color Digital Printing with Variable Data Full-Service Finishing Department Including: • Saddle Stitching • Perfect Binding • UV Coating • Folding • Trimming • Tipping • Drilling • Fullfillment Full-Service Bulk Mailing Facility Including: • Inkjet Labeling • Tabbing • Polybagging

s one of the largest publication printers in the Northwest, Century Publishing is recognized for superior print quality and personalized service. Since we opened our doors in 1971, Century has focused on exceeding each customer's printing expectations.

We use technological advances to offer more reliable, cost-effective solutions to your printing needs. We are dedicated to the latest digital technology and industry standards. Our commitment to a personal customer relationship assures you a quality product. At Century Publishing, we are proud to be Your Printing Partner!

Love Where You Print!

www.centurypublishing.com

208-765-6300 • 800-824-1806

5710 E. SELTICE WAY, POST FALLS, ID 83854

Your Northwest P r i n t i n g partner

Because printing is more than just ink on paper.

Ma ga z ine s• Cat a log s•B roc hur es• M ap s Gra ph ics •M ail ing

… an d m o re

Love Where You Print!

www.centurypublishing.com 56

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

208-765-6300 • 800-824-1806

5710 E. SELTICE WAY, POST FALLS, ID 83854


MI 2-12 Corp Media List:Layout 1

7/2/12

11:53 AM

Page 57

Noticeable Changes Happening at Oregon Web Press regon Web Press is in the midst of a total make-over. “We’re not just putting a little lipstick on this pig,” says president Steve Crowe. “In a rapidly changing print market, we knew it was going to take more than a little lipstick if we wanted Oregon Web Press to be considered a thought and profit leader amongst our peers.” Steve Crowe talked more about what changes were going on at Oregon Web Press, formerly Western Oregon Web Press, other than just a name change. Here are some of his comments.

O

Q. What do you mean, “a thought leader” in the printing industry? A. I’ve only been in printing for a few years, after a career as a CPA. I immediately recognized how PIA and NAPL identified industry leaders in their ratio and surveys studies. As a numbers guy, my goal was for Oregon Web Press to always be a top performer and a part of this group. Q. Why change now? A. When I came into the printing industry, it had already experienced five years of decline due to the expansion of digital communica-

tions. In addition, soon after I took over the company—the country began slipping into a recession. Printers were dropping like flies and the industry outlook was a little bleak. At the time we considered ourselves a small-run commercial printer of newspapers, catalogs and advertising inserts. We had two formable competitors, both larger with more iron on the floor and with their own newspaper publications. We looked at these challenges as an opportunity to grow. Q. What kind of changes are you talking about? A. Our leadership team decided to make two major changes to our business model. First, we wanted to redefine what we could offer our customers. We no longer wanted to be just a print house. Our new focus was helping customers communicate their vision and content more effectively to their customers. As cliché as it may sound, we wanted to be much more of a solutions provider for our customers. We have done this by bringing in new talent and increasing the overall capabilities of our existing employees. Secondly, we wanted to be able to provide our customers with a higher quality printed

product. I’ve always considered Randy Leopard, our production manager and OWP principal, to be one of the best printing minds in the Northwest. Randy always says, “If you are not in a continual state of improving print quality and operating more efficiently you can’t stay competitive.” I am pleased with where we are today and we remain dedicated to continual improvement. Our goal is to meet the needs of our clients today and be able to solve their print communication problems of tomorrow. With our new value added services and our ability to print some of the highest web quality, both conventional coldset and heatset in the Northwest, we have been pleasing customers and growing.

www.oregonwebpress.com 541-926-3000 263 29th Ave SW • Albany, OR 97322

fall in love with print again.

Heatset | Coldset | Bindery | Mailing

541.926.3000 OregonWebPress.com

ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

57


MI 2-12 Corp Media List:Layout 1

7/3/12

1:48 PM

Page 58

NW CORPORATE MEDIA BUYERS CONTACT

COMPANY NAME

WEB SITE

LOCATION

Office Depot

Neil Austrian, Chairman & CEO

www.officedepot.com

Boca Raton, FL

OfficeMax Inc.

Ravi K. Saligram, President & CEO

www.officemax.com

Naperville, IL

Oregon Lottery

Chuck Baumann, Sr. Comm. Spec.

www.oregonlottery.org

Salem, OR

PACCAR Inc.

Mark C. Pigott, Chairman & CEO

www.paccar.com

Bellevue, WA

Papa Murphy's International Inc.

Jenn Lovelace, Marketing Manager

www.papamurphys.com

Vancouver, WA

PCC Natural Markets

Laurie Albrecht, Marketing Director

www.pccnaturalmarkets.com

Seattle, WA

Pierre Enterprises, Inc.

James P. Pierre, President & CEO

www.pierreautocenters.com

Seattle, WA

Pope & Talbot, Inc.

Harold Stanton, President & CEO

www.poptal.com

Portland, OR

Premera Blue Cross

H. R. Brereton Barlow, President & CEO

www.premera.com

Seattle, WA

Public Storage

Ronald L. Havner, Jr., Chairman, CEO & President

www.publicstorage.com

Glendale, CA

Puget Sound Energy Inc.

Philip Malkin, Manager Creative Services

www.pse.com

Bellevue, WA

Pyramid Breweries, Inc.

DND

www.pyramidbrew.com

Seattle, WA

QFC/Quality Food Centers

Kristin Maas, Public Affairs Director

www.qfc.com

Bellevue, WA

RealNetworks Inc.

Dan Sheeran, SVP Marketing

www.realnetworks.com

Seattle, WA

Red Lion Hotels Corporation

Pam Scott, Director, Corporate Communications

www.redlion.com

Spokane, WA

Redhook Ale Brewery Inc.

Craft Brands Alliance

www.redhook.com

Woodinville, WA

Color Matters You asked for tangerine but ended up with grapefruit Over the last 43 years we’ve experienced every color issue imaginable. Technological advances have changed the game and our team has risen to the challenge. ‡ 'LJLWDO 3ULQW ‡ µ 6KHHW )HG 2IIVHW ‡ :LGH )RUPDW

‡ )XOO 6HUYLFH %LQGHU\ ‡ 'DWD 6HUYLFHV ‡ ,QKRXVH 0DLO 6KRS ‡ * &HUWLÀHG ‡ (PSOR\HH 2ZQHG ‡ 8QLRQ ‡ (VW 

We’ve partnered with industry leaders from Fujifilm, HP, Komori and Xerox to build a cross-platform, color management program that produces accurate, consistent color. Now, your brand standards will be achieved whether printing offset catalogs, digital rack cards or wide format displays.

Contact the experts at Capitol City Press for a demonstration today. We’ll be happy to share what we’ve learned.

www.CapitolCityPress.com 58

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

888.943.3556


MI 2-12 Corp Media List:Layout 1

7/2/12

11:54 AM

Page 59


MI 2-12 Corp Media List:Layout 1

7/3/12

1:48 PM

Page 60

NW CORPORATE MEDIA BUYERS CONTACT

COMPANY NAME

WEB SITE

LOCATION

REI/Recreational Equipment, Inc.

Tom Vogl, VP of Marketing

www.rei.com

Sumner, WA

SAFECO Corp.

Michael Hughes, President

www.safeco.com

Seattle, WA

Safeway Inc.

Steven Burd, Chairman, President & CEO

www.safeway.com

Pleasanton, CA

Schwab Tire Centers, Les

Brian Capp, VP Marketing

www.lesschwab.com

Bend, OR

Seattle Art Museum

Matthew Renton, Director of Communications

www.seattleartmuseum.org

Seattle, WA

Seattle Mariners

Gregg Greene, Director of Marketing

www.seattlemariners.com

Seattle, WA

Seattle Opera

Ed Hawkins, Advertising Manager

www.seattleopera.org

Seattle, WA

Seattle Seahawks

Stephanie Gray, Marketing & Sales Manager

www.seahawks.com

Renton, WA

Seattle Sounders FC

Adrian Hanauer, Owner/General Manager

www.soundersfc.com

Renton, WA

Seattle Storm

Shannon Burley, Vice President of Marketing

www.storm.wnba.com

Seattle, WA

Sleep Country USA

Terry Horsley, VP Brand Strategy

www.sleepcountry.com

Kent, WA

Sound Transit

Tim E. Healy, Marketing & Creative Services Manager

www.soundtransit.org

Seattle, WA

Dave Ridley, SVP & CMO

www.southwest.com

Dallas, TX

Space Needle Corp.

Mary Bacarella, Director of Marketing

www.spaceneedle.com

Seattle, WA

Sprint Nextel Corp.

Dan Hesse, CEO

www.sprint.com

Dallas, TX

St. Helens Beef

Robert Rebholtz, Jr., President & CEO

www.wabeef.com

Toppenish, WA

Standard TV & Appliance

Daniel Reese, Director of Marketing

www.standardtvandappliance.com

Portland, OR

Sterling Financial Corp.

Cara Coon, Communications & Public Affairs Director

www.bankwithsterling.com

Spokane, WA

T-Mobile USA, Inc.

Philipp Humm, CEO

www.t-mobile.com

Bellevue, WA

Taco Time Northwest

Gretchen Everett, Director of Marketing & Advertising

www.tacotimenw.com

Renton, WA

Target Stores Inc.

Jeffrey J. Jones II, EVP & CMO

www.target.com

Tukwila, WA

Thriftway Stores of Washington

DND

www.thriftway.com

Portland, OR

Tillamook County Creamery Association

Harold Strunk, President & CEO

www.tillamook.com

Tillamook, OR

Ron Tonkin Dealership

Ron Tonkin, President & CEO

www.tonkin.com

Portland, OR

Trader Joe's

Joe Coulombe, Founder

www.traderjoes.com

Monrovia, CA

Tulalip Resort Casino

Juan Echevarria, Marketing Director

www.tulalipcasino.com

Tulalip, WA

Tully's Coffee Corp.

Diane Geurts, Director of Marketing

www.tullys.com

Seattle, WA

United Airlines Corp.

Jeffery A. Smisek, President & CEO

www.united.com

Chicago, IL

UPS/United Parcel Service

Scott Davis, Chairman & CEO

www.ups.com

Atlanta, GA

Verizon Wireless

Greg Haller, President, West Area

www.verizonwireless.com

Bellevue, WA

Wal-Mart Stores Inc.

Michael Duke, CEO

www.walmart.com

Bentonville, AR

Washington Lottery

Jean Flynn, Director of Marketing

www.walottery.com

Olympia, WA

Wells Fargo & Company

John G. Stumpf, Chairman, President & CEO

www.wellsfargo.com

San Francisco, CA

Weyerhaeuser Co.

Frank Mendizabal, Director, Media Relations

www.weyerhaeuser.com

Federal Way, WA

Whole Foods Market, Inc.

John Mackey, CEO

www.wholefoodsmarket.com

Bellevue, WA

Windermere Real Estate

Reilly Schanno

www.windermere.com

Seattle, WA

Southwest Airlines

60

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012


MI 2-12 Corp Media List:Layout 1

7/5/12

10:06 AM

Page 61

Printing Control: Harnessing the hearts of craftsmen and the minds of marketers here’s an art and a science to applying ink to paper in beautiful and creative ways—but that’s only part of the job. The heart of printing has always been about sharing messages and ideas with as many people as possible—and today, being a great printer means being a great business partner. At Printing Control, we understand the new world of marketing communications and the role an outstanding printing partner should have in it. Of course, a printer should always deliver a timely and outstanding product but they should also bring fresh ideas and strategies to your projects that enhance effectiveness and efficiency. And that’s what we strive to bring to our clients, every time. Whether it’s through topnotch in-house production and technology solutions or engaged client service and collaboration, Printing Control is committed to being the go-to resource for helping talented creatives and smart businesses produce, distribute, and manage campaigns that can deliver value beyond their expectations. How? Well, with more than a century of printing experience at our command, Printing Control has delivered consistently exceptional work that separates us from other printers; and our clients from their competitors. We have a passion for craftsmanship and quality

T

that our customers share. We also understand where our industries are going: that the value and efficiency of digital printing requires the same commitment to quality; that technology can help our clients manage costs and have a greater degree of control and insight into critical parts of the production process. Today, we offer the kinds of easy-to-use technology solutions that our customers have asked for as they become increasingly strategic in their approaches to marketing, communication, distribution and cost control. One of those solutions is our WorkSmart Suite—part of a complete solution for creating, distributing and managing break-through marketing campaigns. Its four key components (Streamline, Connect, Organize, and Publish) can be used collectively by our clients or individually as their needs dictate—because sometimes you need a toolbox; and sometimes you just need a hammer. Other technology solutions we can provide include the Kyp Key and the Sony eBridge Arc, two USB devices that bridge the gap from printed collateral to digital experiences. The Kyp Key creates a direct route to online destinations, while the Sony eBridge Arc delivers rich media content. We’ve also worked hard to make sure that using either

device can be cost-effective for direct mail or publishing projects. Of course, it’s not all about software and amazing gizmos, either. Our state-of-the-art digital presses allow us to quickly deliver shortrun projects—and use personalized data in innovative ways to make sure messages and campaigns get maximum exposure and drive action. With this state-of-the-art digital technology, we can meet your most creative needs— including the ability to overprint white ink on all types of different materials—from metallic papers to plastics. Finally, as part of the Consolidated Graphics network, we share the world’s most advanced and largest digital footprint—with 70 printing companies strategically located in every major market across 27 states, Canada, the European Union, South America, and Asia. This collection of resources helps us guarantee a wide variety of capabilities—from tools to talent—no matter where in the country, or in the world, you need to be. So, challenge us. Push the limits. Set the bar high and we’ll show you the difference a dedicated, experienced, innovative printing partner can make. Give us a call—and let’s get to work. www.printingcontrol.com 206-575-4114

ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

61


MI 2-12 PPI:Layout 1

7/6/12

9:37 AM

Page 62

When it Comes to Print, Think Creatively By Jules Van Sant Executive Director, PPI Association

hey say radio is the theater of the mind. Its success over the years has been its ability to engage you beyond the spoken word. Print could be considered the multisensory driver of thought and opportunity. It engages all other mediums and delivers results. From TV Guide, to QR codes that point to mobile sites, to live event invitations and posters, to digitally watermarked magazines—you name it, print truly delivers. As printed marketing differentiates itself from all other messaging, it’s important that it is a strong partner in promoting your/your client’s end results as part of the new media mix. More measurable than ever before, getting attention from your investment in print means more sales, customer retention, and better utilization of the spend in the “newer” medias. Need some backing on that? Check out PrintInTheMix.com for lots of stats.

T

HOW TO STAND OUT Remember that print production has new, and long-established, techniques to make your piece pop. There are a variety of printing techniques to consider early in the design phase, depending on what you’re looking to accomplish and depending on your budget. Don’t assume it’s too expensive, unrealistic, or can’t be done. Ask your print supplier about the possibilities so you get the most impact. Embossing/Debossing. Embossing creates a raised impression on stock; debossing creates a depressed impression on stock. Silk Lamination/Lamination. Silk lamination provides a soft, silk-like finish, is water-resistant, is tear-resistant, and complements vibrant colors. The effect could be glossy, dull or satin. Foil. A foil layer is affixed to a certain material by a heating process. Engraving. The image is carved by hand or machine onto a metal plate. The spaces are filled with ink and the paper pressed on top of it, resulting in slightly raised crisp images and saturated colors. Thermography. Thermography produces raised printing similar in appearance to engraving. Die Cut. This technique involves cutting irregular shapes in paper or paperboard using a die. Letterpress. A surface with raised letters is inked and pressed to the surface of the printing substrate to reproduce an image in reverse. Silk Screening. A printing technique that uses a woven mesh to support an ink-blocking stencil. The attached stencil forms open areas of mesh that allows ink to transfer onto the material. Varnish. A liquid coating applied to a printed surface to add a clear glossy, matte, satin, or neutral finish. 62

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

Gloss Varnishing. Gives the printed surface a glossy, sheen look. Matte Varnishing. Gives the printed surface a non-glossy, smooth look. Silk or Satin Varnishing. Gives the printed surface neither a high gloss nor matte, but the middle ground. UV Varnishing. Ultraviolet (UV) varnishing is a process for achieving an even more striking type of coating on your printed material. All-Over UV Varnish. This is a UV seal applied all over the printed surface. Spot UV Varnish. Applied to chosen spots (areas) of a printed piece. This has the effect of highlighting and drawing attention to that part of the design.

PAPER POSSIBILITIES There are a variety of amazing resources from paper suppliers that illustrate different techniques on multiple surfaces. The material available, compatibility with newer production technology, and advancements in environmentally-sound manufacturing and recycling make paper a wonderful, interesting platform to promote onto. Sappi’s The Standard: Special Effects, Volume 5 just came out. Boy, does it have some amazing samples of what can be accomplished with technology and imagination. Neenah also has a new online tool called the Neenah Cabinet that will let you play with paper choices during the design process, archive the options you’ve picked, and send you samples on demand. Mohawk has an expansive library of examples for papers that make digital production more interesting than ever before. Also check out PaperSpecs.com for lots of great tips and tricks on how to design on a budget, yet make it look like a million bucks. They have a free ebook available, 19 Ways to Cut Your Paper Costs, loaded with suggestions and inspiration. The leader behind this movement, Sabine Lenz, is a self-proclaimed paper enthusiast. She thrives on the love of paper, and on making sure designers and other users are current on offerings and have insight into what works in today’s ever-changing marketplace. So don’t feel limited. Be inspired to go out and create. Ask your printing reps, your paper houses and your peers to share amazing examples of how printed matter grabs our senses and drives the audience to engage and ultimately buy more. Get involved in communities, both live and online, that keep you informed. And please don’t write it off as too expensive until you’ve done more research… you might be surprised! And you might just be able to show measurable returns (think QR codes, augmented reality, digital watermarks). Until next time—cheers!


MI 2-12 PPI:Layout 1

7/2/12

11:58 AM

Page 63

Produce, Pr oduce, protect, prottect, and deliver your brand.

Offset Of fset Printing

Digital Printing

Fulfillment

Envelope M Manufacturing anufacturing

Specialty Bindery

Direct Mail

DCGWest.com 206.784.6892 206. .784.6892

ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

63


MI 2-12 Quesinberry:Layout 1

7/6/12

10:03 AM

Page 64

Deals Don’t Make Themselves SUCCESSFUL PROJECTS BEGIN AND END WITH STRONG CLIENT RELATIONSHIPS By Wendy Quesinberry Guest Columnist

ecently, I was in the uncomfortable position of being a third-party observer to a disagreement where the client and another consultancy did not see eye-to-eye. It was two months into a six-month-long project, and their concepts were being presented. After about an hour, the client expressed his dissatisfaction in measured and clear tones. The conversation became heated and continued into a downward spiral. Two days later, the consultancy resigned the project. How did this project go from such a high note to dissolution in a matter of days? A relationship had not been established. All relationships are built upon mutual trust and agreed expectations. You trust and expect your parents will keep you safe and healthy until you reach adulthood, you trust and expect your partner to be a friend and support, you trust and expect your employees to do their best, and you trust and expect your vendors to inform and perform. As a client services vendor, it’s our job to set those expectations and cultivate a trusting relationship. In the most simple set of business circumstances, we all want to know what is going to happen and when. That’s it. We may disagree with the “what” and the “when,” but if it’s negotiated at the start, all parties are working from the same set of expectations. Additionally, there is the “give a sh*t” factor. I once heard that an agency lost a pitch because they didn’t seem excited enough to get the work. The agency’s response? They thought it was saccharin to be exuberant. Apparently the client disagreed, and the winning agency sweetly

R

64

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

smiled. Most of us want to have a support structure that cares. Excitement and passion yields innovative results. Merely taking on a “project” yields check marks on a cold to-do list. At the beginning of any new client relationship, I begin by asking lots of questions. Not just about the project, but about the company. Where do they want to be in 1, 5, 10 years? Beyond the money, why do they go to work each day? Why is their business worth doing? I want them to be excited so I can be excited. This helps me paint a full picture of their company and the variables that affect their business. Variables that do not present themselves in the form of Web site specs. Information that helps us to develop a marketing strategy. Details that maybe even the client hasn’t realized are important to the long-term welfare of their company. These are emotional intangibles and cultural values that on the surface may seem trite or superfluous, yet often take a business over difficult plateaus. They are also where we connect and build meaning. For years I belonged to various business organizations where I attended lectures on how to increase a company’s client base. Frequently the topic was “Customer Relationship Management.” These lectures were often heavy on the management and light on the relationship. Each technique seemed very cold and calculated. People were considered an unfortunate hurdle in front of “the deal.” I tried that technique for a week. It was depressing. Then I handed the job off to someone in my office. He got depressed. We have a poster hanging in our office that reads “Be interested Continued on page 66


premier press-inside ad:Layout 1

7/2/12

12:01 PM

Page 65


MI 2-12 Quesinberry:Layout 1

7/3/12

9:39 AM

Page 66

Continued from page 64

and you’ll be interesting” and I take that sentiment to heart. I want to know if we helped our client shine during a presentation, or where they went on vacation, or why they have a jar of kombucha on their desk. I’m also the person who gets into a long conversation with “that guy” on the bus because I might learn something. No matter what industry you work in, relationships are vital. Deals don’t make themselves. We’re a world filled with the need to create connections. The Mad Men three-martini lunch existed for a reason. Be interested in your clients. Allow them the opportunity for you to discover who they are and why they do what they do. When you get the gig, survey your client. Find ways to mine the intangibles that interest them. For instance, we build mood boards both to set the tone for an individual project but also as a Rorschach test for clients and also to reveal a little about our own company culture. And when appropriate, we have a cocktail with them. We’re all busy and have a multitude of circumstances that affect our needs and behaviors from day to day. Even after we’ve established a set of criteria, a new variable may present itself, sending a project sideways. If we trust that all of the people on our team are working towards a mutual goal—then the relationship is strong enough to weather this kind of storm. BTW, I’m happy to say that we’re still working with the client. Wendy Quesinberry is principal at Quesinberry and Associates, Inc. Contact her at wendyq@quesinberry.com.

Introducing “B Line PULSE”

(

BRIEFS

Riders of Metro Transit’s B Line can now participate in a community-wide art project through individual mobile game play during their daily commute. 4Culture, Metro, and Hornall Anderson recently introduced “B Line PULSE,” a new mobile game designed to enhance the transit experience for riders on RapidRide buses. An artist team comprised of designers, developers, writers and strategists at Seattle branding and design firm Hornall Anderson were commissioned by 4Culture to design a mobile game for Metro’s new, WiFi-equipped RapidRide B Line. B Line PULSE invites riders to interact with artist-designed visualizations based on their real-time input and literally see how they relate to fellow riders. “With the increasing significance of mobile devices in our daily lives, gamelike behavior is becoming increasingly prevalent outside of typical game-play settings,” says Joseph King, design director of Hornall Anderson. “B Line PULSE was designed to push the boundaries of what a game is and to explore the relationship of transit, information and art in this digital age.” For more information on the project, visit www.blinepulse.com. For more on Hornall Anderson, visit www.hornallanderson.com.

GA Creative Receives Multiple Awards GA Creative, an integrated branding and advertising agency based in Bellevue, Washington, has been recognized by the Summit Creative Awards, the Communicator Awards, the Healthcare Advertising Awards, and in two categories of The Marketing Awards. GA’s work on the 2011 annual report for Northwest Kidney Centers garnered a Bronze Award from the Summit Creative Awards, and a Merit Award from The Marketing Awards. The Marketing Awards also honored GA Creative’s logo design for the Campaign for Tacoma Art Museum—a $17-million fundraising campaign. The Communicator Awards and Healthcare Advertising Awards, meanwhile, recognized GA Creative’s work for long-time client Franciscan Health System. For more information, visit www.gacreative.com.

66

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012


MI 2-12 Arscentia:Layout 1

7/6/12

9:40 AM

Page 67

Four Things That Really Excite Me About the Future of Design By Lee Ater Guest Columnist

’m so grateful to be a design professional right here, right now. Two years ago that wasn’t the case. I was questioning my own relevance—and the relevance of the profession I have practiced for more than 20 years. It seemed so many people preferred mediocrity. I was deeply saddened. So how could my view be so different now? How could so much change in such a short time? Sure, part of it is a shift in my own perception. But I believe it’s more than that—it’s a change in the profession and perception of design. And that change has me genuinely excited! Here are four good reasons to get amped about design right now. 1. Multi-disciplinary approach. Part of this renewed energy comes from a shift to a more multi-disciplinary design approach. Perhaps this is a result of the recession. As businesses downsized, individual experts went off on their own and were forced to find new ways of working. We had to look at our own skills in new ways to stretch and grow—or wither away. And, most importantly, we had to take collaboration seriously—as something more than a buzzword. This time, we had to really do it! We learned how to come together as experts and how to value each other’s contributions. 2. Soul-searching and getting real. Who hasn’t had time to do some soul-searching during the recession? The results of this search,

I

I find, are more transparency, more humanity—more reality. The truth is always beautiful. And the closer we get to it—in our own perception of ourselves and how we relate to the world as a whole— the more we are able to do that same thing for our clients. 3. The new education. I’m also excited by the shifts I see in education. From established university programs to the newly formed Bachelor of Design programs in unexpected educational venues, there’s less focus on individual design disciplines and more focus on process and thinking as the common denominator in design curricula. These programs encourage designers to look at problems, throw everything on the table, sort and dissect, and put it all back together again in a new, functional, intentional and sustainable way. 4. Corporate America—from MBA to MFA. And probably the most encouraging of all is that corporate America is beginning to really see and embrace a “design” way of being. More and more organizations are moving away from the prescribed MBA model of doing business and developing a culture of design as their driving mechanism. So yes, today I am truly excited. The future seems bigger somehow—and I’m so glad to be right where I am. Lee is a veteran design professional. She is a partner at Arscentia, overseeing all brand strategy and creative initiatives, and leads Arscentia’s industry partner and education exchange program.

PPI REGIONAL CONFERENCE SEPTEMBER 14 -16, 2012 HI P LO C AT I ON: Embassy Suites, Downtown Portland Connecting the dots for Print and Communications Firms with workshops on: Marketing, Finance, Diversification, Sales... Learn about technologies and how to integrate them into a profitable business model for tomorrow.

ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

67


MI 2-12 Walsh:Layout 1

7/3/12

9:19 AM

Page 68

Design Doesn’t Matter By Miriam Walsh Lisco Guest Columnist

realize that most designers, advertising and marketing firms understand what I am saying. The truth is, “design,” as in pretty colors or nice graphics, is not what’s important. What is important is clear, targeted communication about a company’s products, story, goals, vision and the audience they are communicating to. The name, logo and other graphics are just tools to facilitate that process. This message can get lost on companies that are launching new ventures with limited resources, or they have the resources but don’t understand the importance of a name, logo and verbal messaging as communication tools. Over the past few decades, it has become increasingly clear that a design-only focus, as often happens with start-up companies in particular, is doomed to failure. Most often, even before the ink is dry on the business plan, the founders come up with a name and (of course) a logo they like, sometimes in a business meeting and sometimes over a glass of wine. Or they succumb to four common methods of logo development. • Overspending without a clear purpose. The marketing team or CEO assume that the more money they spend, the better the solution. While high-end design and branding firms can and do come up with great brands and solutions for companies, big

I

spending does not always equal big solutions. • A business owner or leader decides to save money by asking a relative or friend to “come up with a logo.” • The corporate decision-maker—CEO, marketing director, or over-sized committee—selects a logo based on personal preferences (for example, because it’s designed in their favorite color, or relates to their personal tastes). • As with many services, we’re seeing with increasing frequency the use of the Internet to solicit visual brands. While this concept may seem to be a clever way for start-up companies to avoid overpaying for their logo, business papers and other marketing collateral, in fact, it’s a recipe for disaster. More often than not they are far off the mark and the company is forced to start over after several years, and scrap a design or name that they are totally invested in. These are not just small companies—many are on a national scale and have created layers of logos and graphics that have no relationship to their messages and products. They change when they realize it is hindering their ability to grow their companies, or they are losing market share. The point is, no matter how much money has been spent, it’s never too late to go back to the drawing board, scrap the “design,” and get down to the business of communication. Miriam Walsh Lisco is principal at Walsh Design in Seattle. Visit www.walshdesign.com.

WE’LL L MAKE E YOU YOU SO SO HAPPY PPY Y, W ’LL WE LW WISH ISH WE WERE W EY YOU OU. MARKETING M A RKETING :: BRANDING BRAND ING :: DESIGN

LIFESTYLE L I FES T Y L E A AND ND CULTURE C U LT U R E

Quesinberry Q uesinberry a and nd Associates, Associates, Inc. Inc. [p p]] 2 206 06 323 323 11 1173 73 [ w ] qu quesinberry.com esinberry.com S Seattle eattle :: S San an FFrancisco rancisco

68

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012


MI 2-12 HB Design:Layout 1

7/3/12

8:59 AM

Page 69

Motion Graphics’ Rise as the Communication King By Liana Safian Guest Columnist

ore and more clients are realizing the value of digital multimedia as a means to communicate complicated messages and concepts. This area of design has moved at an incredibly fast rate over the last decade due to advances in technology and software. At HB Design, our work in motion graphics has tripled in recent years. With so much hype surrounding this industry, it’s advantageous to examine the driving force behind motion graphics’ success.

M

Motion graphics encompass everything from highly-produced effects for movies to basic animated charts. Essentially, motion graphics are used to communicate. Sometimes this communication is for entertainment value, but more frequently we’re seeing them used for educational and informative purposes. Motion graphics enable data, hierarchy, chronology and processes to be communicated clearly and concisely. They typically incorporate multiple multimedia assets such as video, audio, animation, illustration and typography. This is why motion graphics are such a powerful and valuable tool for communicating. Additionally, multimedia software has dramatically improved in quality and decreased in price throughout the last decade. Due to the broad spectrum of motion graphics needs and technologies available, various niches have emerged throughout the industry. Some agencies focus solely on 3D rendering, illustrations or special effects. At HB Design, the majority of our work is within

educational, informational, brand recognition and awarenessbuilding segments of the market. Our clients typically approach us with a specific communication problem. We’ve found that motion graphics are an incredibly powerful tool that can solve multiple communication challenges with one solution. The ability to communicate several messages and achieve numerous objectives via one piece of collateral makes motion graphics a cost-effective solution for many clients. Additionally, these pieces can have a huge customer reach thanks to social media and networking sites. Increased impact is another advantage of motion graphics. Animated visuals depicting data are more compelling and easier to comprehend than text-based information. Copy and audio can be incorporated to enhance messages and make dry statistics feel powerful and dramatic. Furthermore, the combination of audio, visuals and text appeals to various learning styles. This allows a larger number of people to digest and retain information, compared to only utilizing one or two learning models. Higher retention rates mean higher awareness and brand recognition, as well as better training and educational results. With so much excitement and so many possibilities in the motion graphics market, there is a huge opportunity for the design industry to provide valuable and compelling materials to clients. Liana Safian is account coordinator at HB Design. For more information, visit www.hbdesign.com.

Your brand is your story. Say something compelling. Optimize your brand.

An optimized brand flows from the point of choice, where your audiences’ choose to respond.

creativeco.com |

optimizemybrand.com |

@optimizemybrand |

503.883.4433

ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

69


MI 2-12 Graphica:Layout 1

7/10/12

3:50 PM

Page 70

The DNA of a Valuable Logo By Craig Terrones Guest Columnist

mart businesses strive to have a strong visual brand. Everyone wants a brand as identifiable as Apple’s, Nike’s, or Nordstrom’s. It’s a good thing to aspire to.

S

The cornerstone of a great visual brand is a strong logo. Creating logos can seem easy, even to some designers. I once interviewed a designer who told me she could “crap out a logo or whatever I needed.” She didn’t get the job. But she reminded me that for some, it is all-too tempting to have a logo knocked out without much thought. Creating a logo that becomes a business asset requires much care. Here are a few of the many things to consider, whether creating a new logo or refreshing an existing one. Is it appropriate? Does your logo reflect the tone and nature of your business? Your company’s values and mission? Does it connect with current and future customers? Is it strategic? Decisions about your brand need to map back to your business plan. If they don’t, reconsider. This includes logo development, which may feel to the uninitiated like a fun art project but is possibly one of the most crucial business decisions you’ll make. Can it be reproduced? Can your logo live beyond one medium? Will it look equally good on collateral, Web sites, ads,

70

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

coffee mugs, or engraved on a crystal statue? There are many reproduction processes to consider. It will be difficult to embroider a logo with color gradations on a company shirt. A logo with tiny details will not reproduce well at a small size, nor read well at a distance. Is it creative and long-lasting? Is your logo unique? Will it be memorable? Your logo should be distinct enough to blot out your competition in the minds of your customers and be able to stand the test of time. Do you apply your logo consistently? Do you have brand guidelines to protect your brand’s integrity? Make sure everyone who goes near your logo learns them, loves them, and lives them. Are you ready to have it done right? The brands mentioned earlier have one thing in common—they’ve spent a ton of energy and dough building their brands. A great logo requires an investment. Period. So while you might be tempted to, er, crank out your logo without giving it much thought, make sure you spend the time and money necessary to do it right instead. You may not achieve the ubiquity of an Apple or a Nike. But your business will thank you. Craig Terrones is principal and creative director at Graphica, Inc. www.graphicainc.com.


MI 2-12 McIntyre:Layout 1

7/3/12

11:57 AM

Page 71

How to be a Great Client for Your Ad Agency (It Will Boost Your Bottom Line) By Dan McIntyre Guest Columnist

efore hiring an ad agency, you probably did an extensive search to find a great match for your needs. But did you also think about how to be a great client for that agency? After running an agency for 21 years, I know this: getting great results from any agency requires a partnership—great agency, plus great client. Found a great agency? Here’s how to hold up your end of the relationship. 1. Don’t put a designer in sole charge of your agency. Agencies are about selling. Designers are about appearance. They’re different. And they often conflict. In my agency’s specialty (cataloging), designers will always prefer more white space, smaller fonts, tiny headlines, and copy grouped away from its product image. All look nice. All reduce sales. A better in-house review team is a designer paired with a marketer. They’ll often disagree. But you’ll get better results. 2. When reviewing comps, ignore your personal taste. Working with a great agency can be intoxicating—you just ask, and great design floods your inbox. But before you pick up your blue pencil, consider. You’re you. Just one person. Your target audience is large, with a broad range of preferences. A great agency will send you comps that will sell into a huge chunk of your audience. And you can totally undercut their work by blue-

B

ZZZSULQWZHVWQHW

From humble beginnings, PrintWest has grown into one of the largest and PRVW GLYHUVL´HG FRPPHUFLDO SULQWHUV DQG UHODWHG VHUYLFHV SURYLGHUV LQ Western Washington. Operating out of Woodinville, WA from our 30,000 square foot facility, PrintWest provides Offset – Digital – and Wide Format capabilities along with complete bindery, mailing and IXO´OOPHQW VHUYLFHV 2XU 2Q/LQH %% software solution “PrintCenter� is popular with enterprise clients as it allows them to manage their inventories in the PrintWest warehouse as well as place orders for Stocked items, Print on Demand and Custom Print Items from the convenience of their desktop FRPSXWHUV RU PRELOH GHYLFHV 7KH powerful PrintCenter is a proprietary software package that was developed E\ DQG LV PDLQWDLQHG E\ RXU LQKRXVH VWDII RI VRIWZDUH HQJLQHHUV :LWK IHDWXUHV GHVLJQHG VSHFL´FDOO\ WR

penciling whatever doesn’t suit your personal taste. You’ll end up with a marketing piece you adore—but sells poorly. If you dislike something in a comp, first ask for your agency’s reasoning. If it’s persuasive, consider going with it. 3. Understand why the Mona Lisa doesn’t have a dot whack, but your marketing piece should. When you hire a great agency, you’ll be tempted to create something gorgeous, something to show off to friends and colleagues. Don’t do it. What sells best and what is most beautiful aren’t the same. A great agency will create pieces that sell strongly, and then they’ll make them as beautiful as they can. But if you insist on removing everything that isn’t gorgeous, you’ll reduce sales. Let your agency put a dot whack on your Mona Lisa. You’ll get more sales. 4. Give your agency enough money to work with. There’s a point where an agency can really get their teeth into your work. It’s where your budget is large enough for the agency to dedicate a full-time employee exclusively to your account. Yes, agencies can and do deliver great work for far less than that. But when an agency can devote at least one full-time staff person to your account, you’ll notice a big difference immediately. McIntyre Direct is a full-service catalog agency based in Portland, Oregon, since 1991.

EHQH´W FOLHQWV WKDW VHHN WR VLPSOLI\ DQG streamline the management of their important print collateral, PrintCenter is WKH VROXWLRQ PrintWest has been recognized as a top quality producer in many SULQW FRPSHWLWLRQV 0RVW UHFHQWO\ and notably the fourth annual Print Rocks! Competition as PrintWest lead WKH ´HOG ZLWK  DZDUGV LQFOXGLQJ VL[ EHVWV ´YH VHFRQGV WZR WKLUGV and six honorable mentions – the PRVW DZDUGV RI DQ\ SULQWHU LQYROYHG Additionally, PrintWest won two First 3ODFH $ZDUGV LQ WKH %LJ 0 $ZDUGV competition participating in the LQDXJXUDO 0$5.(7,1* 1HZVSDSHU SULQW FRPSHWLWLRQ Our diverse capabilities and reputation for quality has allowed PrintWest to be a vendor of choice with many enterprise clients in the greater 3XJHW 6RXQG 5HJLRQ :LWK WKH UHFHQW DGGLWLRQ RI RXU VL[ FRORU .RPRUL SOXV FRDWHU +89 SUHVV ZH MXVW JRW D ORW EHWWHU 7KLV FRPPLWPHQW WR WHFKQRORJ\ has positioned PrintWest to be a leader

in both cutting edge surface treatments as well as an environmentally sensitive manufacturer as this is the greenest SUHVV PDGH ,Q IDFW 3ULQW:HVW ZDV UXQQHU XS LQ WKH 0DQXIDFWXULQJ &DWHJRU\ RI WKH  :DVKLQJWRQ &(2 0DJD]LQH FRPSHWLWLRQ UHFRJQL]LQJ EXVLQHVV OHDGHUV LQ VXVWDLQDELOLW\ 7KLV *UHHQ :DVKLQJWRQ FRPSHWLWLRQ EUDQGHG PrintWest as the second greenest manufacturer in the state and the RQO\ SULQWHU PHQWLRQHG 7KLV YDOLGDWHV our longstanding commitment to the HQYLURQPHQW PrintWest also provides great FXVWRPHU VHUYLFH 2XU VWDII RI 6DOHV Representatives and Customer Service Representatives works in concert to PHHW FOLHQW QHHGV DQG UHTXLUHPHQWV 2XU SURSULHWDU\ ÂŞ-RE 7UDFNHUÂŤ GDWD collection software allows us to provide real time information to client inquiries and keeps us on target for important FOLHQW GXH GDWHV

Call PrintWest today...

425.402.8600

3ULQW:HVW ¨ FRPPLWPHQW WR WKH HQYLURQPHQW ¨ WHFKQRORJ\ ¨ TXDOLW\ DQG FXVWRPHU VHUYLFH ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

71


MI 2-12 Blank:Layout 1

7/6/12

9:42 AM

Page 72

The Evolution of Motionography By Bobby Hougham Guest Columnist

I

“ f you love hats, a career in motion design may be the choice for you!” Perhaps an unexpected rallying cry for the aspiring motionographer, yet an absolutely accurate metaphor for the way we work. As technology progresses our ability to throw the moving image onto more and more things in an expanding variety of places, the demand for content increases and so do the requirements of expertise in constantly changing “standards.” When thenewBlank was first formed, claiming the moniker of “motion designer” basically meant you were designing film titles, industrial film infographics, or commercial end tags. In the years since, we have seen bandwidth and computer processor power increases and video compression improvements that have made our work relevant on new platforms, ranging from Web site home page animations, to banner and interactive ad space, to point-ofsale kiosks, and even 26-story interactive billboards in Times Square. Our animations went from end tag design to full spots with live action elements augmented by visual effects, fully animated 3D environments and characters. A typical motionographer today needs to not only have a solid comprehension of design theory, but a strong understanding of 3D modeling and animation, 2D design and compositing, visual effects

72

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

creation, color correction and editorial. You can also add a basic grasp of interactive software, sound design, music composition and live action production direction. It is a rare occurrence when a job walks through the door that is literally “only an edit” or “simply an end tag animation.” When we find ourselves working on one of those projects, during the discovery and development phase the other shoe drops and we realize we want to add visual effects and animation or pushing color to give it a filmic look. It’s exciting to be a part of such a dynamic and broadening industry; literally everyone coming into this career path can customize their relative expertise and become specialists or dabble in a plethora of disciplines and techniques to constantly keep their creative mind fresh. With as much change as we have witnessed over the last few decades in motion design, I can only imagine where it will go. Considering our whole purpose is visual communication, we are storytellers at the core. To have the ability to touch upon every aspect of the story enables us to augment the narrative in new and interesting ways. The hats we wear are legion, but it ensures that every project benefits from a singular eye for concept, storytelling, and all from a designer’s point of view. Bobby Hougham is the creative director at Seattle-based firm thenewBlank. For more info, visit www.thenewblank.com.


MI 2-12 GA Creative:Layout 1

7/6/12

9:45 AM

Page 73

In Search of Inspiration By Jeff Welsh Guest Columnist

here do you get your creative inspiration? When I was in school, one of my instructors made us keep a journal and document where and when we came up with our best ideas. The thinking was that if you can identify where inspiration hits you—then you can recreate those conditions whenever you are in need of that big idea.

W

Back then I never had a chance to compare journals and I wonder how different our entries would have been? As I stare at my screen, I know that for me, getting up and doing something, going somewhere, or having an engaging discussion with a peer is often the true spark for me. With more and more resources having migrated online—from word and image searches to communities and conversations to join—I began to wonder if there is a tendency, and perhaps even a complacency, to try and draw inspiration from the Web. I decided to ask some of my most respected peers. There were results I expected and some I didn’t. And thankfully, the Web did not make the top 15 list. 1. Nature 2. Reading 3. Driving 4. Music

5. Gardens 6. Playing video games 7. Cooking or eating 8. Working out 9. Fashion 10. Movies/theater 11. Art galleries/museums 12. Shopping 13. Architecture 14. Fabric/textures 15. Peers But it’s not just about the big idea, the inspiration. Science Daily* reported on research that suggests that creative ideas can promote uncertainty, which makes most people uncomfortable. So when you’re tasked to come up with a big creative idea, remember, research shows people aren’t necessarily prepared to challenge their existing thinking, despite what they say. So don’t toss your ideas to the floor and go back to the proverbial drawing board just yet. As I embark on the second half of this 2012 calendar year, I’ve bought a journal, and will be reporting just where I go to draw inspiration—and more importantly, to chronicle my creative ideas. Jeff Welsh is principal + client services at GA Creative. Visit www.gacreative.com.

*Cornell University (2011, September 3). Why we crave creativity but reject creative ideas. Science Daily.

ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

73


MI 2-12 Opus:Layout 1

7/6/12

10:09 AM

Page 74

Shifting Tides 5 TIPS FOR WEATHERING THE STORM By Andrew Scott Guest Columnist

H

ave the tides shifted? Are we back to business as usual? The only thing worse than weathering a rough patch is not taking the time to learn from it. To that end, as companies begin to reemerge from a troubled past few years and reach out to us for help, we cannot forget those lessons. We are a creative agency and, like many of our friends in the marketing world, felt the ups and downs of an uncertain landscape; clients with shrinking budgets being asked to do the jobs of two or three employees. Here are five tips from an agency who remained resilient throughout: Remain nimble and service-oriented. The bottom line is important, but it isn’t the only thing. People remember how they were treated when they recall the success of a project. Find partners, not clients. An Opus mantra, make sure you look for companies that are prepared to step into the ring with you and fight for common goals.

74

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

Remember your core competencies. Don’t try to be everything to everyone. Autograph your work with excellence. This world is still all about talent. Stamp your work with personal pride and hire people who do the same.

The only thing worse than weathering a rough patch is not taking the time to learn from it. Stay humble and keep learning. In our world, complacency is a death sentence. Be candid about your shortcomings and push hard to learn, adapt and excel. Andrew Scott is vice president of account services at Opus Creative in Portland. Opus Creative delivers compelling design, creates impactful campaigns, and excels at video storytelling. Contact andrew.scott@opuscreative.com or visit www.opuscreative.com.


sandstrom-fp ad:Layout 1

7/2/12

12:22 PM

Page 75


MI 2-12 Opus:Layout 1

7/10/12

3:57 PM

Page 76

NORTHWEST DESIGN SHOWCASE SEE MORE DIGITAL PORTFOLIOS AT WWW.MEDIA-INC.COM/CATEGORY/DIGITAL-PORTFOLIOS

BEAUTIFUL POWERFUL LEGENDARY

Ferrari in America Exhibit www.arscentia.com 425.454.8006

RECENT WORK: LEMAY—AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM & EVERGREENHEALTH

www.arscentia.com 425.454.8006

BRANDED COMMUNICATIONS, EXPERIENCES AND ENVIRONMENTS. Beautiful.


MI 2-12 Opus:Layout 1

7/6/12

10:11 AM

Page 77

NORTHWEST DESIGN SHOWCASE

1S PEVD U J WJ U Z 5IS PVHI .PCJ M J U Z J 1IPOF  J 1BE  J $M PVE  J .BD     J ,OPX 8F D BO IFM Q ZPV L FFQ VQ XJ U I BM M  U IF OFX U FD IOPM PHZ BOE U FD IOJ RVFT 

BUILD CONNECTIONS WITH YOUR CUSTOMERS

WWW.PIVOTANDLEVY.COM

websites web applications graphic design

206-285-6191 WWW.PIVOTANDLEVY.COM

SEE MORE AT WWW.MEDIA-INC.COM/CATEGORY/DIGITAL-PORTFOLIOS


MI 2-12 Opus:Layout 1

7/6/12

10:12 AM

Page 78

NORTHWEST DESIGN SHOWCASE

COMPELLING DESIGN TO ELEVATE BRANDS. ENGAGING CAMPAIGNS TO MULTIPLY IMPACT. VIDEO STORYTELLING TO IGNITE EMOTIONS.

OPUSCREATIVE.COM // 503.220.0252

SEE MORE AT WWW.MEDIA-INC.COM/CATEGORY/DIGITAL-PORTFOLIOS


MI 2-12 Opus:Layout 1

7/6/12

10:12 AM

Page 79

NORTHWEST DESIGN SHOWCASE

Five decades of design excellence 1962 - 2012

walshdesign.com

walshdesign.com

SEE MORE AT WWW.MEDIA-INC.COM/CATEGORY/DIGITAL-PORTFOLIOS


MI 2-12 Opus:Layout 1

7/6/12

10:13 AM

Page 80

NORTHWEST DESIGN SHOWCASE

SEE MORE AT WWW.MEDIA-INC.COM/CATEGORY/DIGITAL-PORTFOLIOS


MI 2-12 Opus:Layout 1

7/6/12

10:14 AM

Page 81

NORTHWEST DESIGN SHOWCASE

Think left Think right Think high Think low

Dr. Seuss

360º thinking on every project – to ensure your success.

hansen design L O G I C A L

C R E A T I V E

Brand Strategy & Development | Online & Web | 206.285.3000

SEE MORE AT WWW.MEDIA-INC.COM/CATEGORY/DIGITAL-PORTFOLIOS


MI 2-12 Design List:Layout 1

7/3/12

3:29 PM

Page 82

NW

Ad Ventures Design & Marketing; Seattle, WA 206-282-1719 www.adventuresmarketing.com

D. Alex Howard, principal Karen Skeens, CD/principal

Arscentia; Bellevue, WA 425-454-8006; fax 425-454-1022 gcummings@arscentia.com www.arscentia.com

Grant Cummings, principal Lennie Lutes, CEO

Art4orm; Portland, OR 503-228-1399; fax 503-224-0229 kevin@art4orm.com www.art4orm.com

Kevin York, owner

Artitudes Design Inc.; Issaquah, WA 425-369-3030; fax 425-369-9609 steve@artitudesdesign.com www.artitudesdesign.com

Andrea Heuston, CEO

Bamboo River Marketing (formerly ID Graphics); Portland, OR 503-761-4360; fax 503-761-2563 kirsten@bamboorivermarketing.com www.bamboorivermarketing.com

Fer Klug, principal

BHV Design Lab; Seattle, WA 206-369-9902; fax 206-374-2862 connect@bhvdesignlab.com www.bhvdesignlab.com

Benjamin Vogt, president/ CD

Buoyant Creative USA; Point Roberts, WA 360-945-0488; fax 360-945-0488 spama@buoyantcreative.com www.buoyantcreative.com

Darrell Cassidy, president

Catch Design Studio, LLC; Seattle, WA 206-322-4323; fax 206-322-9177 office@catchstudio.com www.catchstudio.com

Elizabeth Montgomery Nos Narin Mahdi Montgomery

CKA, Inc. dba CKA Creative; Seattle, WA 206-448-9274; fax 206-728-1125 mark@ckacreative.com www.ckacreative.com

James P. Carey, president Mark J. Anderson, VP

CMD; Portland, OR & Seattle, WA 503-223-6794; fax 503-223-2430 info@cmdagency.com www.cmdagency.com

Phil Reilly, president Mike Cobb, VP accounts Dan Hergert, VP/COO

Creative Company, Inc.; McMinnville, OR 503-883-4433; fax 503-883-6817 optimize@creativeco.com www.creativeco.com

Jennifer Morrow, president Steve Donatelli, CD

DEI Creative; Seattle, WA 206-281-4004; fax 206-281-0262 sara@deicreative.com www.deicreative.com

Sara Green, principal/CD Shannon Palmer, creative producer

Design Hovie Studios Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-669-2894 site@hovie.com www.hovie.com

Hovie Hawk, CD

Dumb Eyes; Seattle, WA 206-965-8952 info@dumbeyes.com www.dumbeyes.com

Christian Petersen, CD Corey Gutch, interactive director Michael Allsworth, managing director

Effective Design Studio; Seattle, WA 206-328-8989; fax 206-328-2285 caroline@effectivedesign.com www.effectivedesign.com

Caroline Scull, CD Michael Scull, managing partner Joy Rubin, art director

82

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

ER

E P T EV XHIB LAY EN IT /T T S SI RA UP GNA DES PO G HO RT E A W OT ND / H

VI RO NM EN DIS

EN

ES IG N

TD

S BR OCIA AN L M DIN E G DIA ST RA TE PR GY IN /

SERVICES PROVIDED

ID DE ENT VE ITY LO /B PM RA EN ND CO T LL AT ER AL /PA INT CK WE ER AG B AC IN TIV G ED ES MO IGN AN TI / IM ON AT G IO RA N PH IC V S/ VI IDE DE O O- PR ON OD -D UC ST EM TI RA AN ON/ TE D GY

Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

T EX OP L EC OC UT A IVE L S

GRAPHIC DESIGN FIRMS


adpro litho ad:Layout 1

7/2/12

1:47 PM

Page 83


MI 2-12 Design List:Layout 1

7/3/12

3:29 PM

Page 84

NW

Electric Pen Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-528-1207 john@electricpen.com www.electricpen.com

John Pletsch, president

Fitch; Seattle, WA 206-624-0551; fax 206-624-0875 info@fitch.com www.fitch.com

Ali Tamblyn, client director David Vilkama, associate design director

Funk/Levis & Associates; Eugene, OR 541-485-1932; fax 541-485-3460 annemarie@funklevis.com www.funklevis.com

Anne Marie Levis, president/CD

GA Creative; Bellevue, WA 425-454-0101; fax 425-454-0464 joe@gacreative.com www.gacreative.com

Marlice Gulacsik, principal Wally Lloyd, principal Joe Bowman, business development director

Gage Design; Seattle, WA 206-622-0905; fax 206-622-8824 bill@gagedesign.com www.gagedesign.com

William Gage, president

Geologie; Corvallis, OR 541-753-4003 hello@studiogeologie.com www.studiogeologie.com

Ian Russell Johnson, president

Girvin Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-674-7808; fax 206-674-7909 info@girvin.com www.girvin.com

Tim Girvin

Glitschka Studios; Salem, OR 971-223-6143 info@glitschka.com www.vonglitschka.com

Von Glitschka, principal

Golden Lasso; Seattle, WA 206-838-3170; fax 206-838-3174 philips@goldenlasso.com www.goldenlasso.com

Philip Shaw, chief creative strategist

Graphica, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-652-9646; fax 206-652-9654 info@graphicainc.com www.graphicainc.com

Kim Falcon, co-founder/CEO Craig Terrones, co-founder/ CD/COO Camberly Gilmartin, VP client services, business development Fred Hammerquist, president

Hammerquist Studios; Redmond, WA 425-869-0191 fred@hammerquist.net www.hammerquist.net

Hansen Belyea; Seattle, WA 206-682-4895 patricia@hansenbelyea.com www.hansenbelyea.com

Patricia Belyea, strategic director Ron Lars Hansen, design director Michael Stone, IT director

Hansen Design Company; Seattle, WA 206-285-3000 pat@hansendesign.com www.hansendesign.com

Pat Hansen, CD

HB Design; Portland, OR 503-944-1000; fax 503-944-1030 www.hbdesign.com

Noma Hanlon, president Gail Snow, VP strategic development Leslie Worth, CD

Hornall Anderson; Seattle, WA 206-467-5800; fax 206-467-6411 us@hornallanderson.com www.hornallanderson.com

Jack Anderson, CEO John Anicker, president Lisa Cerveny, president

84

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

ER

E P T EV XHIB LAY EN IT /T T S SI RA UP GNA DES PO G HO RT E A W OT ND / H

VI RO NM EN DIS

EN

ES IG N

TD

S BR OCIA AN L M DIN E G DIA ST RA TE PR GY IN /

SERVICES PROVIDED

ID DE ENT VE ITY LO /B PM RA EN ND CO T LL AT ER AL /PA INT CK WE ER AG B AC IN TIV G ED ES MO IGN AN TI / IM ON AT G IO RA N PH IC V S/ VI IDE DE O O- PR ON OD -D UC ST EM TI RA AN ON/ TE D GY

Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

T EX OP L EC OC UT A IVE L S

GRAPHIC DESIGN FIRMS


MI 2-12 Design List:Layout 1

7/2/12

1:55 PM

Page 85

ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

85


MI 2-12 Design List:Layout 1

7/3/12

3:30 PM

Page 86

NW

ImagiCorps; Redmond, WA 425-869-0599; fax 425-869-1285 info@imagicorps.com www.imagicorps.com

Thomas Hutchinson, president

Kl端ndt/Hosmer; Spokane, WA 509-456-5576; fax 509-456-5848 info@klundthosmer.com www.klundthosmer.com

Rick Hosmer

McIntyre Direct; Portland, OR 503-286-1400; fax 503-286-1300 dan@mcintyredirect.com www.mcintyredirect.com

Susan McIntyre, founder/chief strategist

Methodologie; Seattle, WA 206-623-1044; fax 206-625-0154 info@methodologie.com www.methodologie.com

Janet DeDonato & Dale Hart

Moto Interactive + Branding LLC; Portland, OR 503-914-5832 nibble@motointeractive.com www.motointeractive.com

Dru Martin, CD

Oakley Design Studios; Portland, OR 971-221-5023; fax 503-241-3812 info@oakleydesign.com www.oakleydesign.com

Tim Oakley, owner/CD

Opus Creative; Portland, OR 503-220-0252 info@opuscreative.com www.opuscreative.com

Jim Fletcher, owner Todd Jetton, COO

Perpetual Promotion; Seattle, WA 206-691-3883 bruce@perpetualpromo.biz www.perpetualpromo.biz

Bruce Bieber, CMO

Phinney Bischoff; Seattle, WA 206-322-3484; fax 206-322-3590 nathano@pbdh.com www.phinneybischoff.com

Leslie Phinney, CEO Karl Bischoff, COO Holly Keenan, co-president Nathan Oliver, co-president

Pivot + Levy; Seattle, WA 206-285-6191; fax 206-285-6130 www.pivotandlevy.com

Terry Stoeser Matt Trinneer

Plexipixel, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-781-1405; fax 206-352-1311 info@plexipixel.com www.plexipixel.com

Matt Tamaru, president Vicky Tamaru, CEO

Prentice Design, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-933-0608; fax 206-933-0620 info@prenticedesign.com www.prenticedesign.com

Paul Prentice, president

Quango, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-968-0825; fax 503-968-1565 wes@quangoinc.com www.quangoinc.com

Sean Henderson, president/ CEO

Quesinberry and Associates, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-323-1173; fax 206-323-1296 info@quesinberry.com www.quesinberry.com

Wendy Quesinberry

RMB Vivid, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-956-0688 brian@rmbvivid.com www.rmbvivid.com

Brian Boram, principal/ design director Keith Rea, principal

RocketDog Communications; Seattle, WA 206-254-0248; fax 206-254-0238 info@rocketdog.org www.rocketdog.org

Susan Elliott Michael Elliott

86

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

ER

E P T EV XHIB LAY EN IT /T T S SI RA UP GNA DES PO G HO RT E A W OT ND / H

VI RO NM EN DIS

EN

ES IG N

TD

S BR OCIA AN L M DIN E G DIA ST RA TE PR GY IN /

SERVICES PROVIDED

ID DE ENT VE ITY LO /B PM RA EN ND CO T LL AT ER AL /PA INT CK WE ER AG B AC IN TIV G ED ES MO IGN AN TI / IM ON AT G IO RA N PH IC V S/ VI IDE DE O O- PR ON OD -D UC ST EM TI RA AN ON/ TE D GY

Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

T EX OP L EC OC UT A IVE L S

GRAPHIC DESIGN FIRMS


MI 2-12 Design List:Layout 1

7/3/12

3:30 PM

Page 87

NW

Rusty George Creative; Tacoma, WA 253-284-2140; fax 253-284-2142 info@rustygeorge.com www.rustygeorge.com

Rusty George, creative principal Kitura George, operations

Sakkal Design; Bothell, WA 425-483-8830; fax 425-483-9707 mamoun@sakkal.com www.sakkal.com

Mamoun Sakkal, principal

Sandstrom Partners, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-248-9466; fax 503-227-5035 jack@sandstrompartners.com www.sandstrompartners.com

Jack Peterson, president

Silver Fox Productions, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-329-6805; fax 206-329-7066 info@silverfoxprod.com www.silverfoxprod.com

Ellen Moos, principal Scott Karman, acct director Sean Masterton, acct director

Smith/Walker Design; Seattle, WA 253-872-2111; fax 253-872-2140 jeff@smithwalkerdesign.com www.smithwalkerdesign.com

Jeff Smith Robin Walker

Stafford Creative, Inc; Edmonds, WA 425-412-1550 inquire@staffordcreative.com www.staffordcreative.com

Sid Stafford, CD Tina Stafford, account executive

Synchro Creative; Bellevue, WA 425-885-5661; fax 425-957-7202 bonnie@synchrocreative.com www.synchrocreative.com

Bonnie Chelini Candy Young

thenewBlank; Seattle, WA 206-625-0670; fax 206-443-2640 info@thenewblank.com www.thenewblank.com

Bobby Hougham, CD Sevrin Daniels, CD

Toolhouse Inc.; Bellingham, WA 360-676-9275; fax 360-676-8976 info@toolhouse.com www.toolhouse.com

Rand Lien, president Elizabeth Lien, VP/controller Chance Martenson, VP/CD

Turnstyle, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-297-7350; fax 206-297-7390 info@turnstylestudio.com www.turnstylestudio.com

Matt Diefenbach, principal Ben Graham, principal Steve Watson, principal

Victory Studios; Seattle, WA 206-282-1776; fax 206-282-3535 info@victorystudios.com www.victorystudios.com

Conrad Denke, CEO Saul Mitchell, VP media services Kimberly McGregor, VP production

View Design, Inc.; Lake Oswego, OR 503-961-5516 jason@viewdesign.net www.viewdesign.net

Jason Halstead, president/ CD

Voda Brands; Seattle, WA 206-441-8158 info@vodastudios.com www.vodastudios.com

DND

Walsh Design; Seattle, WA 206-284-4430; fax 206-284-4425 miriam@walshdesign.com www.walshdesign.com

Miriam Walsh Lisco, owner/president

Wattsmedia, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-456-6553 david@wattsmedia.us www.wattsmedia.us

David Mangone, partner/ EP/director Andrew Watts, partner

Wines of Washington Promotion; Seattle, WA 206-691-3883 bruce@wowpromotion.com www.wowpromotion.com

Bruce Bieber, CMO

ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

ER

E P T EV XHIB LAY EN IT /T T S SI RA UP GNA DES PO G HO RT E A W OT ND / H

VI RO NM EN DIS

EN

ES IG N

TD

S BR OCIA AN L M DIN E G DIA ST RA TE PR GY IN /

T EX OP L EC OC UT A IVE L S

Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

SERVICES PROVIDED

ID DE ENT VE ITY LO /B PM RA EN ND CO T LL AT ER AL /PA INT CK WE ER AG B AC IN TIV G ED ES MO IGN AN TI / IM ON AT G IO RA N PH IC V S/ VI IDE DE O O- PR ON OD -D UC ST EM TI RA AN ON/ TE D GY

GRAPHIC DESIGN FIRMS

87


MI 2-12 Brofsky:Layout 1

7/3/12

1:44 PM

Page 88

Photography Project Captures the Hope and Spirit of a Community By Keith Brofsky Guest Columnist

ot being much of a gambler, I can’t say I’ve given much thought to this particular form of entertainment. It seems too risky to me. They say even if you’re savvy at card playing, the odds are usually in favor of the house. But step back and take a broader look at the bigger house, the state of Washington, and the winnings are greater than any of us might have imagined. To illustrate this phenomenon, I’ve had the honor and pleasure to be commissioned by the Washington Indian Gaming Association to photograph the positive influence Indian gaming has had on the state. The assignment was right up my alley; photograph and tell the stories of the people and places that are thriving and progressing, thanks to tribal funding and investment. It turns out we’re talking about many jobs and countless business opportunities for all Washingtonians, not just the Native tribal people. The numbers are impressive: $3.5 billion in overall economic contribution to Washington’s gross state product in 2010 alone. Included in that number is $1.3 billion in wages and benefits to over 27,300 employees, including 18,000 non-tribal member employees. This is really good news and a significant positive influence on our economy, which continues to grow. What this means for me, as a photographer with a passion for meeting people and telling their stories, is access to all sorts of fascinating locations filled with a bevy of happily busy people. Witnessing work-

N

88

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

ing people with pride and dedication in their faces, reflecting the pleasure of being wanted and needed on the job, was a joy to behold. As we all know, this crucial part of our lives has been in short supply in these stubborn “recessionary” times. How fortunate for my subjects, and equally for me, to capture their hope and achievement in action. As is often the case, such big things start from the ground up... namely, construction. And construction is an exciting subject matter to shoot. Between all that heavy duty machinery, with its bold colors and shapes, and the men and women in the field, wearing the earth, while on a mission to build big—it’s a winning formula for dynamic visuals. But it doesn’t stop there. I photographed everyone from proud pastry chefs to happy hotel clerks, gregarious golf resort managers to caring childcare workers, lovely lifeguards to pleasant police officers, and friendly firemen to a beaming biologist. The list of working Washingtonians is long and I’m happy to report, this is one working photographer with a great project that will continue on throughout the year. To see some of my favorite images from this shoot thus far, please visit my Web site at www.brofsky.com. They’re in the Portfolio section, under Recent Images. Throughout his 30-year career, Keith Brofsky has honed his technical skills and his designer eye. His commercial photography business has recently branched into short documentary filmmaking. Brofsky enjoys life on Bainbridge Island with his wife, three daughters, and the family dog.


MI 2-12 After Image:Layout 1

7/6/12

9:46 AM

Page 89

It’s All About the Content By Kathy Fridstein Guest Columnist

ecent trends in the design and photography fields are evolving at a rapid pace, yet, as designers and photographers, the core of what we do and who we are remains unchanged. Our job is to create engaging, memorable and effective visual communications for our clients. We help tell their unique stories, which position them from the crowd. Telling stories visually has a long history. Ancient cave paintings depict stories of prehistoric life. In Werner Herzog’s exquisite film, Cave of Forgotten Dreams, he documents the cave paintings, which have just been confirmed to be the oldest and most elaborate ever discovered. The detailed drawings help us create stories of what could have happened at that time. We can almost hear the sounds of the clashing rhinoceros horns depicted in the detailed images. Nearly 32,000 years later, in the late 19th century, the photographer William Henry Jackson’s dramatic images of unexplored territory in the Wild West told a story that helped convince Congress to make Yellowstone the first U.S. National Park. Prior to these photographs, ideas of monumental landmarks in the unexplored West were considered myth. Whether it was drawing on cave walls or creating collodian wet plates, the vehicle for messaging was difficult and time consuming. Today, the process of communication is easier, quicker, even instantaneous, and is continually evolving. However, the significance of the role of content remains unchanged. With a photograph,

R

does the story change if we capture the essence with a pinhole camera, an analogue camera, a digital camera, or with video? Does it matter if the designer conveys the message through print media, or interactive media? Sometimes the vehicle is crucial to the meaning, but often, the story does not change, just the technology. Cutting-edge technology may be more effective in today’s world, but without relevant content there is no message. Sadly, with our busy lives and media overload, everyone’s attention span has decreased. In a good sense, this puts the pressure on designers and photographers to be better than ever. The visual message must be engaging and compelling, or the audience is gone within moments. The challenge is to convey depth and nuance, to create visual communication that provides the viewer with something new, which will draw them in. Advanced technology provides us with exciting and innovative ways to deliver our message and capture the audience, but it is the depth of the content that will keep the viewer’s attention. We need to tell an authentic story. What is the essence of who you are; what sets you apart in the marketplace? Effective brands have a genuine and unique story. A successful product is the proof of a compelling and truthful story, no matter what media or technology is used to deliver the message. Kathy Fridstein is the principal and creative director of aftertheimage (www.aftertheimage.com), a full-service design firm offering brand development, marketing collateral, Web design/development, and photography. Kathy also creates fine art and stock photography (www.kathyfridstein.com).

ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

89


MI 2-12 Photo list:Layout 1

7/3/12

3:03 PM

Page 90

NW

aftertheimage; Seattle, WA 206-283-9383; fax 206-283-5686 kathy@aftertheimage.com www.aftertheimage.com

Kathy Fridstein, owner/principal

Allegory - commercial photography; McMinnville, OR 971-237-2513 allegory-photo@comcast.net www.allegory-photo.com

Bill Miller, owner/photographer Cindi Miller, marketing

Appeal Studios/Linna Photo; Seattle, WA 206-683-9203 jim@appealstudios.com www.appealstudios.com

Jim Linna, owner/president

Adam Bacher Photography; Portland, OR 503-281-3777 adam@adambacher.com www.adambacher.com

Adam Bacher, owner

Kate Baldwin Photography, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-284-5678 kate@katebaldwinphotography.com www.katebaldwinphotography.com

Kate Baldwin

Gary Benson Photography; Seattle, WA 206-242-3232 gl.benson@comcast.net www.garybensonphoto.com

Gary Benson

Bernstein Productions; Seattle, WA 206-708-6686 studio@bernsteinproductions.com www.bernsteinproductions.com

Darryl Bernstein

Blackstone Edge Studios; Portland, OR 503-234-4883 pizzithompson@comcast.net www.blackstoneedge.com

Donna Pizzi Philip Clayton-Thompson

Brofsky Productions, LLC; Bainbridge Island, WA 206-842-0756; fax 206-842-0756 keith@brofsky.com www.brofsky.com

Keith Brofsky, owner

Bob Byrd Photography; Vancouver, WA 360-906-0597 bbyrd@wa-net.com

Bob Byrd

Melanie Conner Photography; Seattle, WA 206-499-7359 melanie@melanieconner.com www.melanieconner.com

Melanie Conner, president

Conrad & Company Photography; Seattle, WA 206-284-5663 www.conradfoto.com

Christopher Conrad, chief image creator

Michael Craft Photography; Seattle, WA 206-282-7628; fax 206-282-6713 michael@michaelcraftphotography.com www.michaelcraftphotography.com

Michael Craft, owner

Jared Cruce Studio; Ashland, OR 541-944-5453 jared@jaredcruce.com www.jaredcruce.com

Jared Cruce

Rick Dahms, Photographer; Seattle, WA 206-463-3328; fax 206-463-3506 rick@rickdahms.com www.rickdahms.com

Rick Dahms

G S DeBré Imaging; Rogue River, OR 541-299-0022/800-540-6795 greg@gsdebreimaging.com www.gsdebreimaging.com

Greg DeBré, owner

DeGabriele Photography; Seattle, WA 206-938-9400 www.degabrielephoto.com

Dale DeGabriele

Flying Trolley Cars; Puyallup, WA 425-829-6737 andrew@flyingtrolleycars.com www.flyingtrolleycars.com

Andrew Jacobs, owner

Harper Studios, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-763-9101 info@harperstudios.com www.harperstudios.com

Earl Harper, president

Ben Kerns Photography; Seattle, WA 206-910-9007 ben@benkernsphoto.com www.benkernsphoto.com

Ben Kerns, owner

90

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

PHOTOGRAPHY SPECIALTIES/SERVICES

OD ING OT . / HE R

AD VE RT IS IN G CO RP OR AT E ED ITO RI AL /FA PE OP SH LE IO N PR OD UC TS FO OD /B EV ER LIF AG ES E TY LE FIN EA RT AR CH ITE CT UR DI E GI TA LS ER ST VI OC CE K S IM AG VI E S DE O PR OD V UC PO IDEO ST E TIO PR DIT N

Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

T EX OP L EC OC UT A IVE L S

PHOTOGRAPHERS/ PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIOS


rick dahms ad:Layout 1

7/2/12

2:05 PM

Page 91


MI 2-12 Photo list:Layout 1

7/3/12

3:04 PM

Page 92

NW

Lance Koudele Photography; Hood River, OR 503-544-6387 lance@ionimagery.com www.lancekoudele.com

Lance Koudele, owner/photographer

KRAYS Productions Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-622-5275; fax 206-878-1053 kevin@krsmith.com www.kraysproductions.com

Kevin Ray Smith, president

LensSmith Photography; West Linn, OR 503-539-7496 bruce.macgregor@comcast.net www.brucemacgregorphotography.com

Bruce MacGregor

Lommasson Pictures LLC; Portland, OR 503-939-1939 jim@lommassonpictures.com www.lommassonpictures.com

Jim Lommasson, owner

Don Mason Photography, LLC; Seattle, WA 206-409-6180 don@donmasonphotography.com www.donmasonphotography.com

Don Mason

McGowan Photography; Tacoma, WA 253-383-4724; fax 253-473-0117 kevin@kmcgowanphoto.com www.kmcgowanphoto.com

Kevin McGowan, owner

Jeff Miller Photography; Seattle, WA 206-323-3370 jeff@jeffmillerphoto.com www.jeffmillerphoto.com

Jeff Miller

Rosanne Olson Photography; Seattle, WA 206-633-3775 rosanne@rosanneolson.com www.rosanneolson.com

Rosanne Olson

Timothy J. Park Photography; Redmond, OR 541-526-3034 info@timothypark.com www.timothypark.com

Timothy Park

Pixel Light Studio; Portland, OR 503-241-5005 christie@pixellightstudio.com www.pixellightstudio.com

Christie Hazen

David Putnam Photography, Inc.; Tacoma, WA 253-905-2312 dave@davidputnamphoto.com www.davidputnamphoto.com

David Putnam, president

Kenneth Benjamin Reed Photography; Portland, OR 503-877-4041 ben@kennethbenjaminreed.com www.kennethbenjaminreed.com

Kenneth Benjamin Reed, photographer

Jeff Romeo Photography; Seattle, WA 206-601-9995 jeff@jeffromeo.com www.jeffromeo.com

Jeff Romeo

Smith/Walker Design and Photography; Seattle, WA 253-872-2111; fax 253-872-2140 jeff@smithwalkerdesign.com www.smithwalkerdesign.com

Jeff Smith Robin Walker

Straub Collaborative, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-331-1002; fax 503-331-1007 david@straubphoto.com www.straubphoto.com

David Straub, president

Studio 3, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-238-1748; fax 503-236-6014 lee@studio3.com www.studio3.com

Jim Felt, president

Studio 3, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-282-0939; fax 206-282-0413 brian@studio3.com www.studio3.com

Jim Felt, president

Voda Brands; Seattle, WA 206-441-8158 info@vodastudios.com www.vodastudios.com

DND

Wattsmedia, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-456-6553 david@wattsmedia.us www.wattsmedia.us

David Mangone, partner/ EP/director Andrew Watts, partner

Dean Zulich Photography LLC; Seattle, WA 206-353-0706 info@deanzulich.com www.deanzulich.com

Dean Zulich

92

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

OD ING OT . / HE R

T EX OP L EC OC UT A IVE L S

Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

PHOTOGRAPHY SPECIALTIES/SERVICES AD VE RT IS IN G CO RP OR AT E ED ITO RI AL /FA PE OP SH LE IO N PR OD UC TS FO OD /B EV ER LIF AG ES E TY LE FIN EA RT AR CH ITE CT UR DI E GI TA LS ER ST VI OC CE K S IM AG VI E S DE O PR OD V UC PO IDEO ST E TIO PR DIT N

PHOTOGRAPHERS/ PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIOS


pro photo supply ad:Layout 1

7/2/12

2:06 PM

Page 93


MI 2-12 On the Record:Layout 1

7/3/12

11:14 AM

Page 94

T ATES E, L E TH SU USS EACH IS C S I E D ANY CH WT COMP I H W , IN RTHWES S E I O ER W S ERENT N E I V IFF TER S IN ITH A D . ’ . C IA IN ST W Gink MED GREATE WITH BI AND TINUES CON

L

ocated near the stadiums in downtown Seattle, BIGink produces environmental graphics for architects and retailers, museum exhibits, and vehicle wraps for trucks and trailers. “We’ve been known to print a few large banners and signs, too!” says John Scholl, BIGink’s president and owner. Here is Scholl, on the record:

HOW HAS YOUR BUSINESS CHANGED THROUGHOUT THE YEARS? There is more emphasis on vertical or “niche” markets. You need to make yourself an expert and set yourself apart from the competitors. For example: Everyone will tell you they can print banners and signs, but how many can suggest custom décor (wall paper, acrylic signs, fabric banner display systems) and then travel across the country to have it installed? Same with vehicles; many sign shops these days are slapping decals on vehicles, but who can pull a 53foot semi-trailer in out of the rain to install custom graphics and manage the graphic details for the other vehicles in the client’s fleet? BIGink DESIGNS, PRINTS, AND INSTALLS— YOU DO IT ALL. SO WHAT IS ONE RECENT PROJECT—THAT ENCOMPASSES ALL THREE OF THESE SOLUTIONS—YOU ARE PARTICU94

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2012

LARLY PROUD OF? Coug fan Scholl and his team created Do you know Flynn a vehicle wrap for this semi. the Carpet guy in the Hawaiian shirt? He had a small fleet of tired-looking delivery vans. Staying with his brand, our team came up with a basic design that refreshed his look. This design worked out to be easily modified for different vehicles, bus to “give back” to the community. We get graphics and signage. Once you see his many requests for donations or to particismiling face dressed in a purple Hawaiian pate in a variety of events. It works for us shirt with a pink orchid background, you to prioritize these requests as: activities our won’t forget. employees are involved with, nonprofit clients who already do business with us, WHAT DO YOU LIKE BEST ABOUT YOUR JOB? and organizations which help people help Providing solutions. Instead of starting themselves, such as Washington Women in with the end product, we like to work with Need and Plymouth Housing Group. the client to create the “atmosphere” and suggest options that meet their needs and IF YOU WERE NOT IN THE PRINT INDUSTRY, stay within their budget. WHAT WOULD BE YOUR DREAM JOB? I would be a speaker. I enjoy talking with WHO OR WHAT INSPIRES YOU, EITHER people and sharing experiences that can PERSONALLY OR PROFESSIONALLY? help others grow and reach their potential. My family. A loving wife I met at WSU over 30 years ago and 2 young adults (Michael IF YOU COULD BE ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD and Courtney) now making their way out RIGHT NOW, WHERE WOULD YOU BE? in the world on their own. They have been Road trip with my wife and the golf clubs my motivation to get up, go to work and in the trunk. The destination doesn’t matter. share my gifts with others. I want to make them proud. IF A GENIE GRANTED YOU 3 WISHES, WHAT WOULD YOU WISH FOR? HOW IMPORTANT IS IT FOR YOUR COMPANY Today or when I was 21? Make that health, TO CONNECT AND ENGAGE WITH YOUR recognition of my efforts by my peers, and SURROUNDING COMMUNITY? a win for the Cougars against the Huskies It is the responsibility of a good company in next year’s Apple Cup.


MI 2-12 On the Record:Layout 1

7/2/12

2:12 PM

Page 95

ISSUE TWO 2012 MEDIA INC.

95


premier press-back cover ad:Layout 1

7/2/12

9:25 AM

Page 96


Media Inc. Issue 2, 2012