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CONTENTS

VOLUME 23 • ISSUE 2 2011

PUBLISHER

James R. Baker ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Katie Sauro CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Bob Baker, Frank DePalma, Sean K. Fay, Lindsay Harrop, Jerry Johnson, David Kelley, Andrew Martin, Dave Peterson, Dave Tucker, Jules Van Sant, SALES MANAGER

Katie Higgins SALES

Eric Iles, Paul Yarnold PRODUCTION MANAGER

John Rusnak DESIGNERS

Christopher Brittain, Dawn Carlson WEBMASTER

Eric Pederson OFFICE MANAGER

Audra Higgins

FEATURES 10 A FIGHTING CHANCE

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MEDIA INC.’S GUIDE TO PRODUCTION INSURANCE

33

SPOTLIGHT ON: THE BEST OF NORTHWEST PRODUCTION

INFORMATION SERVICES MANAGER

Lois Sanborn

Media Index Publishing Group P.O. Box 24365, Seattle, WA 98124-0365 1201 First Ave. S., Suite 309, Seattle, WA 98134 (206) 382-9220 • (800) 332-1736 Fax (206) 382-9437 Email: media@media-inc.com www.media-inc.com Display Advertising. Call Media Index Publishing Group for a current rate card. Discounts for frequency advertising. Advertising con-

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WHAT IS USER EXPERIENCE DESIGN?

firmation deadline is the 30th of the month prior to issue publication. Advertising mechanicals are due the 5th of the month of issue. All submitted materials become the property of Media

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Index Publishing Inc. and will not be returned.

BRAND MATTERS/PRINT DELIVERS

Subscriptions. Annual subscriptions to Media Inc. (4 issues) are $25 (+$2.20 if sent to WA address); two-year subscription is $37.50 (+$3.30 if sent to WA address). Send check or money order to Media Index Publishing Inc., or call (206) 382-9220 with VISA or

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M/C. Back issues of Media Inc. are available at Media Index Pub-

ON THE RECORD: MEDIA INC.’S Q&A SERIES WITH GOLDEN LASSO

lishing Inc. offices at the cost of $5 plus tax. Copyright © 2011 Media Index Publishing Group. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be copied by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying or recording by any information storage or retrieval system, without the express written permission of the publisher. Printed in USA

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CONTENTS 70

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RISING TO THE OCCASION

WAIT, THAT WAS DONE IN OREGON?

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MARKET RESEARCH AND THE DEATH OF KNOWLEDGE

24 CREATING BUZZ

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WHAT TO LOOK FOR WHEN HIRING A TECH FIRM

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92 3 2011 MARKETING TRENDS

GLAZER’S CAMERA HOSTS PHOTOFEST

YOU DIDN’T KNOW YOU KNEW

28 BEHIND THE SCENES AT

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COLORGRAPHICS EXPANDS MAILING CAPABILITIES

CINE RENT WEST

30 DUBS, INC. ASKS,

“ARE YOU IN DAM HELL?”

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(

GOOD, FAST, AND CHEAP

SPOTLIGHT ON: IMPACT ADVERTISING

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FOCUS ON: DESIGN FIRMS

58 MEDIA INC. INDUSTRY LISTS 59 77 99

FIM/VIDEO PRODUCTION CO.’S MARKET RESEARCH FIRMS GRAPHIC DESIGN FIRMS

CONTRIBUTORS

The illustration featured on page 20 was created by KRIS MARTIN of 826 CREATIONS. Kris is a Designer and Illustrator who specializes in graphic arts, apparel/merchandise design, concert flyers and logo design. He currently lives in Los Angeles. For more information, please e-mail him at 826creations@gmail.com 8

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WASHINGTON FILMWORKS AND THE STATE’S PRODUCTION COMMUNITY VOW TO BATTLE BACK AFTER SUFFERING A DEVASTATING BLOW.

n the night of May 25, the 2011 legislative special session adjourned and it was revealed that a bill to renew the state’s production industry incentive program did not pass. Continued on page 12

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A FIGHTING CHANCE, Continued from page 10

The bill—which would have extended the expiration date for the Washington Motion Picture Competitiveness Program from July 1, 2011, to July 1, 2017, and increased the program’s budget, among other things—died without ever being brought to the floor for a vote. “This is devastating to our industry,” said Amy Lillard, executive director of Washington Filmworks (WF), shortly after the announcement was made. WF is the non-profit organization that handles film production support and incentives statewide. “It’s so competitive out there,” she continued. “Forty-four states have incentives, and without an incentive, your state won’t even be considered for film production.” Since its establishment in 2006, Washington’s Motion Picture Competitiveness Program has created over $100 million in economic activity statewide, with more than 70 projects—films, television and commercials—receiving the incentive since 2007. According to a December 2010 report by the Joint Legislative Audit and Review Committee (JLARC), each dollar spent in Washington by the film

industry was estimated to yield $1.99 in economic return. Along with its report, the JLARC recommended to the Legislature that the bill be passed, with the following explanation: “Because the tax credit for contributions to the Motion Picture Competitiveness Program is achieving the objective of maintaining Washington’s position as a competitive location for filming, the Legislature should continue this preference and re-examine the preference at a later date to determine its ongoing effectiveness in encouraging filming in Washington State.” hough fruitless, the JLARC’s recommendation is a significant feather in the cap of the failed bill, officially named 2SSB 5539, which experienced its share of challenges prior to its death in the House. After passing through the Senate with a 30 to 17 vote, the bill made its way to the House Ways & Means Committee. There, it

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“It’s so competitive out there. Forty-four states have incentives, and without an incentive, your state won’t even be considered for film production.”— Amy Lillard

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was amended by Committee chair Rep. Ross Hunter, D-Medina, who introduced an amendment to reduce the size of the program’s fund to $1.75 million per year from the proposed $3.5 million. Two days later, when 5539 reached the House of Representatives, House Speaker Frank Chopp linked it to a housing and homelessness bill that needed to be passed in the Senate. The housing bill did not pass the Senate, effectively killing the production incentive bill as a result. It is not clear why Chopp linked the two bills, and Media Inc.’s attempts to contact him for comment went unanswered. However, in an interview with Jordan Schrader, state government reporter for Tacoma’s News Tribune, Chopp said that the defeat of the tax breaks for film production, as well as newspapers and computer servers, was simple. “There were a lot of concerns about giving tax breaks to any people,” he said, adding, “These things weren’t necessary for implementing the budget, so we ran out of time.” f there is one positive takeaway from the session, it is the strengthening of the state’s film community. Leading up to the session, the bill received unprecedented support from local production folks who participated in letter-writing campaigns and face-to-face meetings with legislators. “Traditionally the industry hasn’t been politically active,” explained Lillard. “And while the outcome of this legislative session isn’t what we wanted, we are pleased with the great support we received from our production community. Every time we were in Olympia, we talked to legislators who said, ‘I’ve heard so much about your bill,’ which means our community really stepped up and vocally supported us. There’s a real sense of community here.” Added Don Jensen, WF boardmember and president of Alpha Cine in Seattle, “We had a lot of support in both the House and the Senate, from legislators such as Senate majority leader Lisa Brown and Jeanne Kohl-Welles, among many others. “A lot of people told us we had the votes. We just ran out of time.”

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he bill’s demise has dealt a major blow to the local production community, which over the past five years has come to rely on the incentive program. “As a community, the film incentive has helped create a thriving hub for film production,” said Jeanna Hofmeister, vice president and director of destination marketing at Spokane Regional Convention and Visitors Bureau. “(Spokane production company) North By Northwest has produced several movies each year, providing jobs and economic development in the process. In fact, North by Northwest’s most recent production, River Sorrow, debuted at Cannes. That kind of recognition, both for an industry and for our community, is invaluable.” Hofmeister noted that the bill’s defeat was especially difficult considering that it came on the heels of the demise of the state’s tourism office, which was also cut in the legislative session. “It felt like a double whammy,” she said. “The tourism and film industries create billions of dollars in spending, and millions of

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A FIGHTING CHANCE, Continued from page 14

dollars in tax relief for Washington’s residents. It seems foolhardy to cut programs that generate thousands of jobs and that kind of revenue for our state.” Though many in the local community remain confident that the industry will survive with or without an incentive program in place, it will be difficult to assuage the impact of the loss and also maintain the increase in business many have become accustomed to since the incentive’s initial passing in 2006. “The incentive has given us access to an increased volume of high-profile national work, which has been good for my business,” said Peter Barnes, principal of local audio company Clatter&Din. “This additional national work has helped spread the word about Seattle’s talent pool, which, in turn, helps us all.” Added Dave Peterson, president of Seattle’s Midlakes Insurance, “Over the last few years (the incentive) has helped us compete with big brokers in SoCal for insuring projects in Washington. I have been very satisfied to be a part of the program… “Hopefully some day it will be resurrected.” illard is optimistic that “some day” will be next year, when Washington Filmworks takes the bill back to the 2012 legislative session. The WF board is meeting periodically to strategize how to best do so, and plans thus far include a grassroots lobbying campaign. “We’re seeing this as a delay, rather than a defeat,” said Lillard. “Our industry is so interesting in general. It takes time to explain how our industry works, and we’re going to spend time helping

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legislators understand. We aren’t an industry that fits in a nice box.” “We need to work to build strong political support,” agreed Jensen. “We already have key supporters, but we just have to keep working to build that base. We have a good shot when we go next year.” Lindsey Johnson, former production services manager at Washington Filmworks and current managing director at National Film Festival for Talented Youth (NFFTY), said she hopes that the coming year will be used to “re-evaluate what is needed as far as an incentive and film office by working with the film community, legislators and business community to find what would be the most helpful to grow and support a sustainable industry.” She added, “Maybe even create a new model that is innovative, competitive, and uniquely Washington State.” In the meantime, it is business as usual at WF. “We’re in no different shape financially than we would’ve been if it had passed,” said Jensen. “We raised funds in the first six months to keep us going just in case.” Added Lillard, “From January to June of this year we raised $3.5 million, so we will continue to honor the commitments we’ve made to productions, and we will continue to service the community in a film office capacity—permitting, locations, infrastructure questions.” With the money raised, WF recently awarded incentive packages to four separate productions coming to Washington. “We are committed to Washington’s production industry,” Lillard continued. “And we are not going down without a fight.”

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, T I A W

E N O D S A W T A TH IN OREGON?

f you’ve ever watched IFC, then you’ve seen their signature quirky-cool ad campaign. But did you know that it was designed and created by Oregonbased company Feel Good Anyway? Or that the 40-plus special effects in the NBC movie A Walk in My Shoes were done by Portland’s visual effects company Hive-FX? Or if you’ve been to Canada lately and seen Koodo Mobile’s adorable spokesman El Tabador, that he was produced by Bent Image Labs, based in—you guessed it—Oregon?

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Thanks in large part to TV shows such as Leverage and Portlandia shooting in Portland (as well as the recently announced Grimm), Oregon’s profile in the film industry has been rapidly rising over the last few years. Perhaps lesser known, though, is Oregon’s amazing animation and VFX industry. Three of these companies are the subjects of featured Case Studies on the recently launched Oregon Animation blog. Last year, NBC shot the feel-good family drama A Walk in My Shoes entirely in and around Portland. Post-production work stayed local, too, as Hive-FX was hired to do all the visual effects for the film. HiveFX brought top-of-the-line efficiency and professionalism to the project, as well as a Hollywood-level of quality. The film’s director, John Kent Harrison, praised the company’s work and is eager to collaborate with them again. The crew at Hive-FX has also lent their talents to ad campaigns for major companies like Quaker and Intel. If “IFC” sounds familiar, it’s probably because they’re the people responsible for the hit show Portlandia. But they’ve also brought their business to Oregon in the form of an über-hip and amusing rebranding campaign handled by local company Feel Good Anyway. Feel 18

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Oregon’s Bent Image Labs designed El Tabador, spokesman for Koodo Mobile.

rrop, By Lindsay Ha and Television or’s Office of Film rn Oregon Gove

Good Anyway won two different awards at the Brand New Awards for their work on more than 50 promos and IDs for IFC, in addition to a new logo and other brand amenities. In fact, IFC was so happy with Feel Good Anyway’s work that they’ll be keeping the company on for inspiration and additional creative partnering. With the theme of Oregon companies winning awards for creative branding, Bent Image Labs helped earn Canada’s Koodo Mobile the 2010 Brand of the Year award from Strategy magazine. Bent designed the four-inch-tall Lucha Libre Mexican wrestler El Tabador to be the company’s spokesman and he’s been a runaway success. Bent used their experience with stop-motion sets and VFX miniatures to save time and money in scouting locations in Mexico for authenticity. Collaborating with Canadian agency Taxi 2, Bent designed El Tabador from initial sketch to final computer render. Oregon companies pride themselves on creativity and innovation. Nowhere is this better seen than in the animation/VFX industry. With the spotlight on the actual filming process, it’s great to see these homegrown, behind-the-scenes companies doing so much in the industry. It’s not just familiar locations we should be looking for when we turn on our TVs or go to the movies, but for the local companies behind the magic. To learn more about Oregon’s animation and VFX industry, go to www.oregonanimation.com. Lindsay Harrop is a summer intern with the Oregon Governor’s Office of Film & Television. She grew up in the Willamette Valley but now attends Ithaca College in New York, where she studies screenwriting. Says Lindsay, “There are so many fresh, exciting things going on in Oregon’s film industry right now that it’s an awesome place to spend the summer. I’m looking forward to writing about more of these cinematic endeavors over the course of the summer!”


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Providing Security Insight and Service

security group • Set Security • Event Security • Personal Protection • Security Assessments 206.725.7192 • email@obsidiansecurity.com • www.obsidiansecurity.com ISSUE TWO 2011 MEDIA INC.

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Why obtain production insurance? Some of the Northwest’s leading entertainment insurance professionals answer that question and more in this nuts-and-bolts primer. ILLUSTRATION BY KRIS MARTIN OF 826 CREATIONS

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DAMAGE CONTROL t’s been a perfect day of shooting in remote Eastern Oregon. The weather, the location, and the way everything gelled couldn’t have been better. Now the light is starting to fade and it’s time to pack up and make the long drive back to town. It’s at this peaceful moment that you’re blindsided by your assistant’s announcement that today’s film was accidentally exposed and the whole day was wasted: $5,000 an hour in production costs down the drain—plus the nightmare of rescheduling and the frustration of trying to capture the same magic again suddenly lands in your lap. But fear not. Film production insurers have policies available for this and the other unique exposures of the film business. Though insurance can’t eliminate the hassles of rescheduling or recreating the magic, it can still pay for the out-of-pocket expenses needed to re-shoot. Even with modern video and digital technology this type of accident can still occur before a protection print or backup copy can be made. The policy form used to recoup the costs of a re-shoot because of the accident above is Faulty Stock, Camera and Processing Protection.

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By Bob Baker, Owner & Senior Vice President, Gales Creek Insurance Services

Many of the claims that we see are for equipment loss or damage. Whether you own your equipment or you rented that $80,000 camera pack, it needs to be replaced when it falls off the tripod or gets dropped in the ocean after you’re hit by a sneaker wave. A Miscellaneous Equipment form insures this type of exposure so that you can turn on a dime, get a replacement, and get back to work. The claims manager of St. Paul/Travelers Specialty Film Department says that a majority of losses that they see fall under Third Party Property Damage coverage. This is another Property/Inland Marine form that pays for damage to premises that you do not own and that are in your “care, custody, and control.” If you’re shooting at a mansion that was made available to you for the day, and at the end of the shoot realize that your crew has managed to trash a very expensive looking oriental rug, hopefully you have this coverage in force. There is a myriad of other insurance coverages essential to a production company, and these will be discussed in the following sections.

PROTECTING YOUR ASSETS

By Dave Peterson, President, Midlakes Insurance

here are many aspects to consider when purchasing insurance for your production. Here are a few questions (and answers) to keep in mind when planning your next production project.

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HOW DO WE HANDLE INTERNS AND VOLUNTEERS FOR WORKERS’ COMP COVERAGE? In the state of Washington, the Department of Labor and industries does not have any classifications for interns or volunteers. These very important members of a production staff will not be covered under your Workers’ Comp account, for any on the job injury or illness. So what to do? 1. Do not allow any volunteers or interns on the production. 2. Put them on payroll. 3. Have an airtight release for them to sign.

HOW SHOULD WE COVER OUR CAST MEMBERS? When using indispensible cast members, it is imperative to cover those persons with a Cast Protection Endorsement on your Production Policy. This type of coverage will provide extra expense reimbursement for costs incurred by the production company due to postponement, interruption or cancellation of the production resulting from an accident,

illness or death of a declared artist, or director, during the filming of principal photography. High impact animals also can qualify for this type of coverage, and when you are planning your production, please consult your agent about the advisability of Cast Coverage. It can save a bunch of headaches.

WHY DO WE NEED NEGATIVE FILM AND VIDEOTAPE COVERAGE? What the heck, we only use digital cameras and there is no film involved in any process of filming, so why cover negatives and videotape? Negative Film & Videotape Insurance provides coverage as a result of direct physical loss, damage or destruction of materials—such as raw film or tape stock, exposed film (developed or undeveloped), videotape, matrices, lavenders, inter-positives, positives, working prints, cuffing copies, fine grain prints, color transparencies, cells, art work and drawing, software and related material used to generate computer images, soundtracks and tapes used in connection with a production—that occurred during a policy period. The key words in the case of digital imaging are “software and related material used to generate computer images.”

Continued on page 22 ISSUE TWO 2011 MEDIA INC.

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PRODUCTION INSURANCE, Continued from page 21

ADDITIONAL

AVAILABLE COVERAGE he other sections in this article touch on film stock, equipment, property damage, and cast coverage—but there are many more coverages available for your production. Following is a listing and description of some of these:

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Props, Sets, and Wardrobes: Covers against the loss, damage or destruction of props, sets and wardrobes during the course of a production. Extra Expense: Covers the extra expense an insured would incur due to a delay or cancellation of a shoot because property (including props, sets, wardrobe and equipment) or a location is stolen, damaged or destroyed. Agency Reshoot: Covers increased costs associated with production deals involving advertising and other related agencies when a covered loss causes a reshoot. Talent Costs: Includes increased cost to secure the talent used in the original shoot.

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By Dave Tucker, McDonald Insurance

Office Contents: Covers business personal property for insureds that do not have enough property to need a separate property policy. Money & Securities and Blanket Employee Dishonesty: Are the same coverages found in standard property policies, once again designed for insureds who are small enough not to need a separate policy.

In Conclusion If this seems like an awful lot of information to process, don’t fret! This is where an experienced production insurance broker can step in and save the day. Before you get started on a production, it behooves you to contact one such broker. Says Gales Creek’s Bob Baker, “They may not be able to help you capture the magic, but they may end up giving you a chance to do it again when everything that can go wrong does.”

For more information, visit www.galescreek.com, www.midlakesinsurance.com, and www.mcdonaldins.com.


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The VMG team out standing in their field.

CREATING

Buzz

HOW A MEDIA-SAVVY ENTREPRENEUR TURNED A GARAGE-BASED ENTERPRISE INTO A REGIONALLY RECOGNIZED POWERHOUSE.

isual Media Group, a creative content provider based in Bellevue, Washington, is an industry-renowned company that boasts a multitude of clients and scads of awards. But the company’s tremendous success belies its modest beginnings.

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Seattle Art Institute alum Kelly Sparks, who opted to create her own video production company after graduating with a degree in Television and Video Production, founded VMG in her garage in 2004. A few years later her husband Mark Sparks, a former journalist and professional writer with 40 years’ experience as a commercial and stage actor, quit his job and joined the business venture as president. “We worked hard to keep the company going those first six months,” said Kelly, VMG CEO and self-described Queen Bee. “Four years later, those six months easily turned out to be the best investment of our lifetime.” Since the company’s inception, VMG has blossomed from a onewoman endeavor into an award-winning team of employees whose services not only include video, but also animation and motion design production, audio production, Web sites, presentations and event services. During this time, Kelly and Mark moved the company out of their garage and relocated to a 2,600-square-


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VMG’s Kelly & Mark Sparks.

foot facility in Bellevue. But growing the business from scratch—and maintaining its growth over the years—wasn’t the company’s toughest challenge. That was yet to come. In October of 2010, VMG was hit by a robbery that tested their personal and professional fortitude—and set the stage for a new chapter in the company’s history. “The burglars got away with all our camera equipment and computers and servers,” said Mark, “but they couldn’t touch our drive and determination. While it was almost like starting the business over again, we had a solid foundation from which to rebuild.” After making a few phone calls and shaking away the shock, the team quickly rallied and got back to work. “It was a tough time,” said Kelly. “But everyone came together

the freedom to show us what they can do.” Added Kelly, “We allow them to develop and grow their skills, both in and outside of their job.” For instance, when VMG was in the midst of rallying from the burglary, Kelly and Mark came up with a “passion project” concept that permitted their employees to hone their skills while the business recovered. They gave their team several paid days off and a production budget to focus on a cause they were passionate about outside of work, and then produce a video on it. “We call ourselves the VMG family,” said Kelly. “We’re still a business, but we’re also a family. Sometimes everyone is in sync, sometimes we have our challenges, but—when it comes right down to it—we’re there for each other no matter what.” Having such a tight-knit team of DPs, editors, producers, and designers—not to mention owning their equipment and studio at

“We call ourselves the VMG family. Sometimes everyone is in sync, sometimes we have our challenges, but—when it comes right down to it—we’re there for each other no matter what.”— KELLY SPARKS and supported each other through it.” Added Mark, “We had people working 16-hour days to get us back on track. It took about eight months to replace everything and get back to business as usual. During that time we kept producing quality work for our clients on time and on budget— and we never missed a payroll. Looking back, that’s something we’re really proud about.” Plus, the company was blessed with a silver lining: VMG’s insurance coverage allowed Kelly and Mark to replace their stolen merchandise with new state-of-the-art equipment. But the Sparks agree that it was their employees that really helped get the company going again—and they attribute VMG’s success to them. “Our team understands each other and it shows in our work,” said Mark. “Every time we go on a shoot, we hear, ‘my gosh, your team is amazing.’” VMG prides itself on hiring talented people, letting them develop, and then “getting out of their way,” he continued. “Sometimes Kelly or I provide input, sometimes we don’t. Our overriding concept is to establish clear guardrails and then give our people

VMG headquarters—allows the company to produce 95 percent of their projects completely in-house, from concept to completion. Also, with everyone and everything on-site, VMG is able to increase its speed to market. All of this adds up to a large and ever-expanding stable of happy clients. And as a result, VMG is gearing up for another move—this time to a 7,100-square-foot facility—to better service this growing client base. After all, it is all about the client. Though the company has won an exceptional number of awards—most recently five Tellys and an ADDY—the Sparks’ most gratifying accomplishments are when the team finishes a rewarding project and receives laudatory feedback. “When we get an e-mail from a client that says ‘you guys rock’ or ‘you’re amazing,’ we forward it to the entire office,” said Kelly. “It’s rewarding when our clients are as passionate about our work as we are. “At the end of the day, that’s what it’s all about.” ISSUE TWO 2011 MEDIA INC.

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GLAZER’S CAMERA HOSTS

PHOTOFEST Seattle photography community comes together at second annual event.

Glazer’s second annual PhotoFest was held June 11 and 12 in Seattle’s South Lake Union neighborhood. The annual festival featured 35 vendors and community partners, free classes and workshops, food trucks, and a once-yearly sale. Vendors, including Nikon, Canon, Sony, Epson and Panasonic, were also joined by community partners Youth in Focus, Blue Earth Alliance, Reel Grrls, and Photo Center Northwest. Saturday Night Live director of photography Alex Buono was Saturday’s keynote speaker. Buono spoke to a packed crowd of more than 250 people on the topic of Canon DSLR Filmmaking. On Sunday, famed underwater photographer and Nikon enthusiast Scott Frier presented “Within the Coral Lace,” a collection of his photography. “PhotoFest is a rewarding event to put together; we are able to bring together so many vendors to talk with customers and to support our annual sale,” said Glazer’s third-generation owner Rebecca Kaplan. “By offering free classes and lectures throughout the weekend, we were able to help our customers grow their skills and create an opportunity for the photo community to come together.” The festival initially started as a celebration for Glazer’s 75th anniversary in 2009, but will continue every June. For more information, visit www.glazerscamera.com.

Clockwise from top left: Attendees got an up-close look at the Space Needle through Canon’s super telephoto 600mm lens. Sony representative Jason Ahrens talks with customers about Sony’s new Alpha cameras. A PhotoFest attendee checks out a Canon 5D MarkII and Redrock Micro DSLR Follow Focus system. Attendees gather in the street for “Introduction to HDSLR Filmmaking” taught by Canon pro representative Mike Gurley.

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ISSUE TWO 2011 MEDIA INC.

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BRIEFS

Studio Blue Discovers Bears of the Last Frontier Seattle-based Studio Blue recently worked on an extraordinary nature program for PBS called Bears of the Last Frontier, which focuses on the three types of bears that reside in Alaska—Grizzlies or Brown Bear, Black Bear, and the majestic Polar Bear. The three one-hour shows, which premiered in May, are hosted by renowned conservationist/ecologist and bear biologist Chris Morgan, and produced and filmed by award-winning cinematographer Joe Pontecorvo. Both Morgan and Pontecorvo make their homes in the Northwest. Studio Blue’s duty was to edit/enhance the soundtrack and create the sound design with a mission toward making it a seamless and authentic experience for the audience. Scot Charles and Len Delorey worked across time zones to meet the deadlines for broadcast. The integrity of the odyssey/story and quality of the images demanded their best sound work. For more information, visit www.bluecharles.com.

Project Youth Doc Adds Second Session Due to popular demand, Project Youth Doc (PYD), a video documentary program for youth ages 13-16, has added a second session this summer. Taught at the Hollywood Theatre in Portland, PYD students will complete an intense course in documentary filmmaking taught by professional filmmakers using pro production equipment, industry standard lighting, sound gear, HD cameras and Final Cut Pro-equipped Macs. The class ends with a formal premiere at the historic Hollywood Theatre. Session one of PYD runs June 24 - July 22, and session two runs August 1 - August 26. Get more information and download the application at hollywoodtheatre.org/education/project-youth-doc/. For questions, contact rachel@hollywoodtheatre.org or 503-493-1128.

Seattle Film Institute Update The Seattle Film Institute (SFI) now offers professional certificates and graduate degrees in all aspects of filmmaking. SFI is carving out a unique niche where each of their programs feeds off of and strengthens the others. Filmmaking students have soundtracks composed for their projects by film scoring students; film scoring students have a steady supply of film projects on which to practice their craft and develop their skills. This symbiotic synergy holds true across all SFI’s programs. “The Seattle Film Institute is becoming the first and only film school where the collaboration between students of widely diverse film-related disciplines is specifically woven into the curriculum of each program,” notes SFI director David Shulman. “Students develop mastery of their chosen craft while learning to effectively function as part of a creative team.” SFI offers 10-month professional certificate programs in Filmmaking (AA/BA Options), 3-D Animation, Motion Graphics, Producing, Sound Design and Recording Arts, and Film Scoring. SFI’s graduate programs include Master of Arts (MA) in Producing for Film and Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Filmmaking. For more information, visit www.seattlefilminstitute.com. 28

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Behind the Scenes at CINE

RENT WEST

Portland’s Cine Rent West has hosted an exciting mix of shoots and events so far this year. Familiar agencies combined with visits from new brands, different production companies and private events have filled the calendar with a nice blend of business, continuing to make 2011 a banner year for the studio. In April, R2C Group visited the studio, shooting a direct response campaign for Dancing with the Stars’ new line of hair extensions. Kym Johnson, Australian ballroom dancer, model and celebrity, was on hand as the brand’s spokes-celebrity. Shawn Johnson, who signed an endorsement deal with Nike this year, along with other Nike athletes, visited the studio in April. They were working on an internal piece promoting the Nike Training Club, a full body-training app designed by a trainer and inspired by world-class athletes. In May, Opus Creative held a two-day shoot at the studio, shooting a very complex video for a local high-tech company. With over 20 pages of dialogue and a host of set and costume changes, the shoot went off without a hitch. In early June, Jacob Pander and his company (Radius Films) shot a short film to be shown at the opening of “Allure of the Automobile,” the Portland Art Museum’s newest exhibit. The theme was similar to a James Bond film with fast

Familiar agencies combined with visits from new brands, different production companies and private events have filled the calendar with a nice blend of business. cars, machine guns and good-looking actors. Cine Rent West has become a popular event venue for both creative groups and non-profit organizations. Pro Photo Supply hosted two events with Vincent Versace at CRW last month. The first was titled “Almost Every Black & White Conversion Technique” and the second was “Controlling the Unconscious Eye: An Exploration of ExDR.” The events were well attended and received! In June, the “Just a Field” campaign held a movie night—complete with hot dogs, popcorn and a screening of E.T.—at CRW to raise money to build a new soccer field at the nearby elementary school. The field is a memorial to a teacher who lost his battle with cancer in December. Community involvement is an integral part of the Cine Rent West philosophy. Although CRW is primarily used as a production studio, the venue is also available for fundraising events, art showings, corporate seminars and private parties. For more information, visit www.CineRentWest.com or www.facebook.com/CineRentWest.


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DUBS, INC. ASKS,

FOR THOSE OF YOU WHO DON’T KNOW, IT’S CALLED DIGITAL ASSET MANAGEMENT. or those of you who do, you know it’s the digital equivalent of cleaning up production rooms, storage closets, filing cabinets, servers, hard drives, laptops, and basically every other communication an agency or company has ever released—then organizing it in a way so that even the most oblivious employee can find what they’re looking for in a matter of minutes.

F

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For Dubs, Inc., it’s the next logical evolution of service. Dubs has been managing the physical creative assets of their clients for years. As the digital revolution progressed, more and more requests came down from those clients for a safe and secure digital storage solution that was both intuitive and accessible. So after a year and a half of research and development (and some long nights and weekends), they have arrived at an answer. Dubs, Inc. Proxy is a new Digital Asset Management system that solves the problem of digital storage, but then goes beyond that to provide an über-organized bank of information that can be used as a library, a vault, a conduit, a communication channel, or even as a branding tool for the agency, company or entity that uses it. Dubs, Inc. Proxy is a Cloud-based DAM that is fully hosted, completely customizable and accessible from anywhere there is an Internet connection. What this means to the agency producer (or their corporate counterpart) is that their company’s entire body of communications can be quickly accessed from basically anywhere in the world. So a new asset can be marked for storage from virtually anywhere, and an old asset can be quickly dug up from the depths in a matter of seconds. It also allows for the creation of dedicated “information vaults” from which certain departments or clients can access assets that only pertain to them. Using the customizable features of Dubs, Inc. Proxy, agencies and companies can brand the system and make it literally and visually their own. And finally by virtue of the fact that Dubs, Inc. Proxy is based in the Cloud, Dubs, Inc. is able to offer it at a price that won’t break the budget. In the end, with agencies and corporations trying to sort out the hell that can be Digital Asset Management, Dubs, Inc. Proxy just might be the solution that offers them a little bit of heaven.


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proxy Digital Asset Management

Think of it as Digital Asset Intervention.

Are you at the end of your digital rope? Can't find assets to save your soul? Feet hurt from kicking hard drives? Proxy is the end-all be-all of digital asset management. It’s simple to use, completely customizable, 100% secure, hugely affordable and can store basically every digital asset ever created. For more information, go to:

dubsinc.com/proxy


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STUNTS

THE WORLD’S FINEST TALENT IS AVAILABLE LOCALLY Ensure Quality. Hire a SAG Professional.

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SINGING

VOICE OVER

Serving Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Alaska, our Pacific Northwest office and franchised agents are the region’s source for professional talent.

BACKGROUND

SCREEN ACTORS GUILD Seattle & Portland Branches ph (206) 402-5958 ph (800) 724-0767, ext. 7 fx email dbeatty@sag.org www.sag.org DENA BEATTY Seattle/Portland Branch Executive Director

STAND IN


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SPOTLIGHT ON: THE BEST OF NORTHWEST PRODUCTION • • • • • • • •

HAIR/MAKEUP TALENT/CASTING VOICE TALENT LOCATIONS PHOTOGRAPHERS AUDIO/SOUND MIXERS DPS VIDEOGRAPHY/VIDEO PRODUCTION

• • • • • • • •

CRAFT SERVICES HELICOPTERS TELEPROMPTERS PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT/PROMOTION PAs SCREENWRITERS PROPS RVs

ISSUE TWO 2011 MEDIA INC.

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SPOTLIGHT ON:

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HAIR & MAKEUP M’CHEL BAUXAL 503-710-4170 WWW.BAUXAL.NET Celebrity makeup artist & hair stylist, M’chel is based out of Oregon and is known internationally for her talent with 18 years experience in the entertainment industry. TNT, TLC, ABC, NBC, FOX, Universal, Disney, Comedy Central, MTV, Bravo, Discovery Channel, Nike, Adidas, Dark Wing Productions and many other companies have sought her expertise. Celebrity clientele include Barack & Michelle Obama, Dakota Fanning, Selma Blair, Steve Buscemi, Jason Sudeikis, Dr Oz, Alicia Silverstone, Amy Roloff, Kathryn Bigelow, Henry Selick, & Aldis Hodge to name a few. Arenas she practices in range from HDTV, film, television and video to print, editorial and fashion. Winner of several prestigious international, national, regional and state makeup and hair stylist awards. She has been featured in numerous makeup publications, as well as work chosen to be on magazine covers. M’chel is an artist who is very dedicated to her career, treating her clients with respect, works hard to be punctual and professional in everything she does and strives to perfect her craft daily in order to place her at the top of her profession. Her current venture is to create her own makeup line called BAUXAL and is in pre-production of her own television show called GLAM NOW! that her production company owning husband, Dennis Gleason, is producing for her to highlight all the glamorous and beautiful elements of hair, makeup, and style!

SONIA BEECHER 503-936-5227/503-786-4499 SONIA.BEECHER@COMCAST.NET My passion in life is to take a canvas, whether it’s a face, a wall, a piece of furniture, fabric or a house, and help it reach its full potential. I enjoy seeing the potential beauty in anyone or anything. Twenty-four years ago, I started working as a makeup artist, at one of the top fashion/glamour photography studios in the country. Fortunate to be trained by master photographers in makeup and also in photography, pre-digital age, helped me develop a unique eye for detail. After receiving my esthetician’s license, I was selected to be an educator and artistic team member for a national hair care/cosmetics company, which allowed me to travel all across the country doing makeup for shows and educational events. In the film and video industry, I have done a variety of interesting and exciting shoots, from a snowboarding video on Mt. Hood, to commercials for most of our local politicians, and numerous corporate and educational shoots. People gain confidence in themselves when they know they look their best. Being a makeup artist is a rewarding experience because of the psychological impact as well as the visual. 34

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DANYALE COOK R.C. 206-849-3681 DANYALEKAY@YAHOO.COM WWW.PUREALCHEMYSALON.COM Danyale is a licensed cosmetologist, IATSE local 488 member and the owner of Pure Alchemy Organic Salon in Seattle. She spent many years perfecting her craft as a hair and makeup designer/artist working with theatrical companies around the country including five seasons as the Hair and Makeup Department Manager at Seattle Opera. Since then, she has worked on many Northwest film and television productions, including season three of TNT’s Leverage (as key hair), as well as Seattle-based features such as The Details (key hair) starring Tobey Maguire, Laura Linney, Ray Liotta and Elizabeth Banks, The Whole Truth (department head) starring Elisabeth Röhm, Sean Patrick Flanery and Eric Roberts, World’s Greatest Dad starring Robin Williams, and Utah based The Last Sin Eater starring Louise Fletcher and Henry Thomas. For additional credits see IMDB.com or PureAlchemySalon.com. Her corporate clients include: Vogue, Starbucks, The Gates Foundation, The History Channel, Holland America and PBS.

DECORATE YOUR FACE MAKE-UP ARTISTRY KARI SUE BAUMANN WWW.DECORATEYOURFACE.COM Ever since I can remember I’ve been playing with makeup. I discovered my love for theater in high school and subsequently my love for applying stage makeup. This newly directed passion followed me from high school into college. After graduation I decided to refine my talents and alter my focus from makeup applications for theater to film and photography. In 2005 I completed intensive Beauty and Character programs designed for makeup applications in the fashion, film, and entertainment industries. I planted my business in Tacoma, tapping into the local film industry. I have showcased my talents in several local short films, commercials, public service announcements, and local magazines. MY SERVICES: Beauty, bridal, and character designs for film, fashion, and photography. Personal make-up lessons available. Any occasion is the right occasion!


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EXTRAS AND REAL PEOPLE CASTING

ISSUE TWO 2011 MEDIA INC.

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SPOTLIGHT ON:

THE BEST OF NORTHWEST PRODUCTION

TALENT/CASTING BIG FISH NW TALENT REPRESENTATION SPOKANE: BECKY SEATTLE: GORDON

THE ACTORS GROUP JAMIE LOPEZ

206-427-7449 JAMIE@THEACTORSGROUP.COM WWW.THEACTORSGROUP.COM Jamie Lopez is principal of The Actors Group, a Seattle-based talent agency. Since his mother Tish gave him a job in 1992, Jamie has represented actors, voice talent, and celebrities with local and international attention. Contact jamie@theactorsgroup.com.

877-424-4347 INFO@BIGFISHNW.COM WWW.BIGFISHNW.COM What’s in a number? … Over 17,000 bookings on over 2,200 projects since 1996. In 2011 Big Fish is celebrating 10 years in Seattle and 15 years in Spokane! Representing union and nonunion actors throughout the Pacific Northwest and beyond. Principal & supporting characters, spokespersons, extras, doubles, stand-ins, promotions merchandisers, print models, voices, locations, etc. With a network of over 5,000 people and a dynamic online portfolio system, Big Fish NW Talent has you covered... Gotta cast?!

Animal Talent NW ANIMAL TALENT NW DEBBIE BETSON

360-794-6919/425-350-2869 ANIMALTALENTNW@EARTHLINK.NET Debbie Betson established, 12 years ago, Animal Talent NW, after years of working and learning with Anne Gordon. Debbie’s life long experience, love and knowledge of animals has proven crucial on projects. She understands animals’ abilities, limitations and how to accomplish the called for action, whether shooting stills, commercials or a major motion picture. She has worked on many types of projects with a great variety of animals, striving to make the venture positive for both humans and animals. Debbie maintains an expansive listing of trained animal candidates, if it’s not in the files; she will be tenacious in locating the most appropriate candidate for the job with the look that the project requires.

COPELAND WILLIAMS TALENT CALLEY COPELAND, BOOKING AGENT/CO-OWNER

425-748-5133 CALLEY@COPELANDWILLIAMS.COM WWW.COPELANDWILLIAMS.COM Talent age range: all ages Copeland Williams Talent is a full service talent agency representing experienced actors, actresses and commercial print models for feature and independent films, local and national commercials, corporate/industrials videos, voiceovers and print ads. Talents’ headshots can be viewed online at www.copelandwilliams.com.

FOREGROUND BACKGROUND LLC DENISE GIBBS, OWNER

425-246-2725 GIBBSDESIGN@COMCAST.NET WWW.FOREGROUNDBACKGROUND.COM

ARTHOUSE TALENT & LITERARY KAILI CARLTON

503-546-8862 WWW.ARTHOUSETALENTANDLITERARY.COM WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/ARTHOUSETALENT Talent age range: Adults and Teens Arthouse Talent & Literary is a boutique agency representing actors of unsurpassed quality in Portland, Oregon.

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Foreground Background provides casting services in the Pacific Northwest, with a specialization in background extras and “real people” casting. Clients range from independent feature films to national corporations. Corporate clients include: Microsoft, XBox, Bank of America, Toyota, Chevy, Ford, Aeromexico, AT&T, US Cellular, HTC, Nike, Levi’s, General Electric, Major League Baseball, Washington State Lottery, and Sound Transit. Owner Denise Gibbs is also on the advisory boards for both the University of Washington Performing Arts and Bellevue College Film Studies and Making Movies program. Ms. Gibbs also won the Merit Award in the 2010 Accolade Competition for a short film she helped produce.


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Our Mission is to make things easy for our clients. To help you deliver your creative quickly, simply, and consistently.

• Streamlined, reliable, easy to work with • Distinguished, recognized, lauded • Skilled, vetted, savvy

(206) 427-7449

If you would like to review sample materials and past projects for The Actors Group Clients, please call or E-mail for instructions on how to access our talent base.

www.theactorsgroup.com • info@theactorsgroup.com ISSUE TWO 2011 MEDIA INC.

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SPOTLIGHT ON:

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TALENT/CASTING (continued)

OPTION MODEL AND MEDIA

BILL LAWRENCE HORSES & TRAINING, LLC 509-949-5737 WMGLAWRENCE@HOTMAIL.COM WWW.IMDB.ME/BILLLAWRENCEVII Bill Lawrence Horses & Training has over 40 years in horse and cattle ranching and 20 years of experience in the film industry. We commit to a “can do” attitude, “work ethics” and always assist our customers with what it takes to see their idea through. Our company specializes in training specifics and works with customers to provide options. We pride ourselves with the ability to “Get the shot.” We have the capability to furnish and coordinate large numbers of livestock, various disciplines of horses, horsemen, and can provide over 1100 acres of historic family owned land for filming locations.

DENNIS TROUTMAN

503-233-4244 DENNIS@OMMTALENT.COM WWW.OPTIONMODELANDMEDIA.COM Talent age range: 1-100 Option Talent, a division of Option Model and Media, is a full service agency in the heart of Portland, Oregon. We pride ourselves on our prompt and professional service to the client. Our attention to detail enables us to provide a full spectrum of services to meet any productions needs. Whether it be actors, models, MUA or stylists, OMM provides the top service in the Pacific Northwest. Please contact us and let us know how we may assist your project needs.

LLL TALENT AGENCY ANNE MITCHELL, OWNER/AGENT

WA: 509-720-8312 ID: 208-818-1912 CONTACTUS@LLLTALENT.COM WWW.LLLTALENT.COM Talent age range: All Ages, Infant to Adult LLL “Triple L” Talent is a Pacific Northwest agency offering talent representation for Idaho & Washington. LLL Talent provides trained actors and reliable background extras of all ages for film, commercial, print, promotional, and voice over. LLL Talent currently represents actors with professional level training and experience including professional affiliations with AEA, SAG, and AFTRA. From Broadway performers to established film professionals, we have the resources to provide a high level of quality talent. Our staff is comprised of individuals who have worked professionally within the performing arts & business. We have a passion for actors and work to provide the best actors for our clients’ needs.

PUDDLETOWN TALENT, INC. JASON JEFFORDS

503-546-3006/503-502-8822 JASON@PUDDLETOWNTALENT.COM WWW.PUDDLETOWNTALENT.COM Talent Age Range: infant - 18 years old Puddletown Talent is a specialized talent agency focusing on the kids market. We represent talent for all areas of the industry. Our kids talent have modeled and acted for such companies as Nike, Nintendo, OshKosh, Hanna Andersson, Chrysler, and TNT’s Leverage to name a few. Puddletown Talent’s attention to detail and devotion to clients and talent will make any casting experience a smooth and memorable one.

RYAN ARTISTS CHOLEE THOMPSON

503-274-1005 CHOLEE@RYANARTISTS.COM WWW.RYANARTISTS.COM This year marks Ryan Artists’ 30th anniversary as a full service modeling, acting, styling and voice over agency here in the Pacific Northwest. Both SAG and AFTRA franchised, we proudly represent the best union and non-union talent ranging all ages and ethnicities. Ryan Artists strives to give our clients all that they need from one agency, a “one stop shop”, enabling them to create the most professional product while saving time, money and energy. 38

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ACTORS I MODELS I VOICE OVER I ARTISTS

COMMERCIALS • FILMS • INDUSTRIALS SPOKESPERSONS • FASHION • NARRATIONS COMMERCIAL PRINT • ANIMATIONS

SAG and AFTRA Franchised Accredited with the Better Business Bureau ISSUE TWO 2011 MEDIA INC.

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SPOTLIGHT ON:

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TALENT/CASTING (continued)

TCM MODELS & TALENT

SCREEN ACTORS GUILD / PACIFIC NW OFFICE

TERRI C. MORGAN

206-728-4826 TERRIM@TCMMODELS.COM WWW.TCMMODELS.COM

DENA BEATTY, AFL-CIO

206-402-5958 800-724-0767 EXT.7 DENA.BEATTY@SAG.ORG WWW.SAG.ORG Known nationwide for its extraordinary acting pool of over 1,500 professional actors, the Pacific Northwest also boasts a full-service Screen Actors Guild office to serve producers and actors. Call the Seattle/Portland office for assistance on locating franchised agents and Screen Actors Guild performers throughout the Pacific Northwest.

Talent age range: infants to mature adults TCM, now celebrating over thirty years in business, is a full service model and talent agency located in the heart of downtown Seattle. TCM, which has consistently enjoyed the reputation as one of the largest, most successful and respected agencies on the West Coast, provides a comprehensive list of services, representing men, women and children for on camera, voice-over, fashion and commercial print work. TCM offers on site casting space at no charge in order to assist you in finding the talent best suited for your project. Whatever your next project is we will put our team of professionals to work at making it your easiest and most productive ever. We love what we get to do!

TOPO SWOPE TALENT TOPO SWOPE

TIFFANY TALENT AGENCY

206-443-2021 TOPO@TOPOSWOPEWTALENT.COM TIM@TOPOSWOPETALENT.COM ERIN@TOPOSWOPETALENT.COM WWW.TOPOSWOPETALENT.COM

TANYA TIFFANY TANYA@TIFFANYTALENT.COM WWW.TIFFANYTALENT.COM

Talent age range: 15-85 Having been in business for 17 years, our main goal at Topo Swope Talent is to provide a variety of fabulous talent to satisfied clients. Throughout the years we have endeavored to maintain a highly professional work ethic within the agency and expect the same from the talent we represent. The scene at the agency is always lively with three strong team members running things as smoothly as possible. In order to maintain this structure we have to have a sense of fun, diligence and humor about us. This along with a diversified talent roster allows us to thrive in the Seattle media industry.

Talent age range: 4 – 80 Tiffany Talent is a booking agency for actors, models, and voice over talent. Whether you’re a credited producer, CSA, stock photographer, or a first time indie film director, Tiffany Talent is here to streamline the talent casting process for you. We follow through with quick turn-around times and consistently deliver welltrained, reliable talent. We take great pride in our roster, which consists of people we consider family, and whose careers we’ve nurtured every step of the way. We represent real people and are constantly adding new faces to our roster. At Tiffany Talent you’ll find a variety of ages, ethnicities, shapes and sizes ready to make your next project a great success.

We like happy ears!

info@inbothears.com • portland {503} 892-8833 • www.inbothears.com los angeles {310} 279-0713 • seattle {206} 375-8371 2505 SE 11th AVENUE, SUITE 255 • PORTLAND, OREGON 97202

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What is it that you are looking for? We can help... Experienced and easy to work with, we can provide you with any animal for your next project.

Animal Talent NW animaltalentnw@earthlink.net Debbie Betson 360.794.6919 ph. 425.350.2869 cell

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SPOTLIGHT ON:

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VOICE TALENT ROBERT BARKLEY 206-930-7345 ROBERT@GALACTICEYEMEDIA.COM WWW.GALACTICEYEMEDIA.COM

KCVOICE.COM KYMBERLI COLBOURNE

541-350-5800 KYMBERLI@KCVOICE.COM WWW.KCVOICE.COM WOW! It’s hard to believe that KCVOICE.COM has been in full swing for over ten years now. I opened my first location in the basement of my home in Seattle in early 2000. In 2005, I relocated to Central Oregon, just outside of Bend. I will never forget the first session in that Bend studio. I was no longer in a basement and I could actually see outside. Birds, bunnies and deer... it made it tempting to drift away mid-session while producers wrestled over copy changes! And the latest and biggest news is that just last year, I opened a second location in Ashland, Oregon—which makes it convenient for me to act in and direct stage plays while I keep the VO rolling! With ISDN, phone patch and vocal booths in both locations, I can deliver any kind of voice over audio your heart desires.

CATHY FAULKNER VOICEOVERS CATHY FAULKNER, OWNER/VOICE TALENT

206-521-0363 ME@CATHYFAULKNER.COM WWW.CATHYFAULKNER.COM With 19 years experience, Cathy Faulkner is a versatile voice for a variety of projects from professional, conversational and authoritative to upbeat, bubbly and fun. From smooth and sensual to soccer mom or gal next door. She specialized in e-learning, IVR and corporate narration. A sampling of Cathy’s client list includes Microsoft, AT&T, American Express, Exxon Mobil, and Sears. She’s reliable, professional and easy to direct. Plus, a digital home studio ensures timely turnaround every time.

IN BOTH EARS 503-892-8833 INFO@INBOTHEARS.COM WWW.INBOTHEARS.COM In Both Ears is a boutique voiceover talent agency with national reach. We represent over 200 world-class voice talent in the US and abroad, plus more than 300 ethnic, foreign language and youth talent. Our agency, production company and corporate clients are as diverse as the talent that we represent. We’ve done recent projects for Nike, Citgo, Red Cross, Coca Cola, Atlantis, Yahoo! and Volvo. In Both Ears offers complimentary casting services and can turn around auditions from our union or non-union talent after one business day. We’d love to help with your next script. Give us a call today! 42

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Following dramatic training and experience in New York, London, and Dublin, I returned to Seattle and completed a Bachelor of Arts in Communication at the University of Washington. After graduation I pursued a career behind the camera. I held director of photography positions on a number of feature and short films. These include the feature Where the Air is Cool and Dark and the award-winning short films A Shade of Orange and Love Stalks. I also filmed and directed music videos during Seattle’s “grunge” period including videos for the bands Tad, Gruntruck, Hater, Mad Mad Nomad, and Kill Switch Klick, while also working as the lightingcameraman for the alternative-music TV show Bombshelter Videos. My work with corporate clients includes a diverse array of events over twenty years. In addition to more conferences, webcasts, and annual meetings than can be listed, notably I have been a camera operator for many high-profile events ranging from the Boeing Dreamliner Rollout and First Flight, to Bill Gates’ retirement announcement, and also the Seattle visit of the Dalai Lama, among many others. Today, getting back to my roots as “talent,” I’m now offering professional voice-over services for both corporate and entertainment projects.

VOICEGUY.COM JIM CISSELL 206-933-8642 JIM@VOICEGUY.COM WWW.VOICEGUY.COM When the spoken word matters. When you really need to connect with someone, go to the guy who speaks for over half the Fortune 500. His work has helped win virtually every award, including a Gold Lion at Cannes. He’s voiced hundreds of national commercials, prime-time TV series, national documentaries, films, videos, games, and websites. From gritty movie trailers to fuzzy little critters, Jim’s got you covered. You’ll recognize his voice—you just didn’t know you knew him. Let’s fix that.


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SPOTLIGHT ON:

THE BEST OF NORTHWEST PRODUCTION

LOCATIONS DRUMMOND MEDIA N

W

JFOTO.COM/ ALLOVER IT LOCATIONS

DAVE DRUMMOND

E

425-269-3396 DAVE@DRUMMONDMEDIA.COM WWW.DRUMMONDMEDIA.COM

I’m a resourceful location manager and scout with extensive knowledge of the Pacific Northwest. My services include research, scouting, permitting, S site management and coordination with location owners and local officials. I’ve worked with production companies from all over the country, as well as Asia and the UK, and can facilitate all aspects of film, video or still photography shoots. Recent projects have included the feature films Safety Not Guaranteed and Late Autumn, as well as commercial clients including Microsoft, Toyota and Sonicare. I’m a creative scout and thorough location manager, let me help you navigate your next production in the Northwest!

JAY CARROLL

509-493-2007 JAY@JFOTO.COM WWW.JFOTO.COM Jfoto is All over it. Professional freelance photographer specializing in outdoor adventure sports located in the Columbia River Gorge. Providing location scouting and management for the film and print industry. For 20 years now I have been providing the “where to” and “how to” fulfilling the creative demands of the film and print industry in a variety of locations and situations. Behind and in front of the lens, hanging off a remote waterfall or dodging traffic on a metro viaduct, production always with a smile. I have a knack for “Pulling a rabbit out of my hat” in demanding situations and friendly demeanor that has been an asset in securing locations. My experiences with full feature campaigns, fast paced ad spots and refined print shoots has been an education. Over the years it has been my privilege to work with all these creative minds in production, and simply said, “I’m All Over it.”

SHAUN GAVIN LOCATIONS SHAUN GAVIN

m

503-539-6113 SPGAVIN63@GMAIL.COM

r

k

W Y G A N T productions Never Had A Bad Day 

50 States & International Experience



Complete production services 

Location Manager



Detailed Nationwide Locations



Budgets & Schedules



With about two dozen features and countless commercials under his belt, Shaun Gavin has been scouting and managing locations for movies, television series, and commercials for nearly 20 years. He’s worked in Los Angeles, Phoenix, Puerto Rico, Washington and Oregon. Whether you need urban settings, scenic roads or beautiful landscapes, Shaun is the guy to point the way for your project. From snowcapped mountains to mountainous sand dunes, he’s scouted it all. Shaun lives in Portland and he primarily works there and throughout Oregon. Please contact him for information and availability.

a

Large Crew & Resource Database



Past productions include: Anheuser Busch, AT&T, Blue Cross, Boeing, General Motors, Jaguar, John Deere, Microsoft, Nike

LOCATIONS NW DOUG REYNOLDS

503-936-4525 DOUG@LOCATIONSNW.COM • WWW.LOCATIONSNW.COM Twenty-plus years scouting and managing for film, commercials, TV and print in 12 Western States. On projects for Chrysler, Lipitor, Polaris, Jeep, Neiman Marcus, Honda, Cam-Am, etc. If they advertise I have worked on it. Large file.

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S e a t t l e , WA s h i n g t o n Tel 206.679.3072 Email wygant1@mac.com


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Craig Stewart Locations Location Scout / Manager • Location Scouting • Location Management • Location Consulting • Scouting the Northwest and beyond

206.818.6357 craigDstewart@comcast.net / www.craigDstewart.com

J?8LE>8M@E GfikcXe[#Fi\^fe

LOCATION MANAGEMENT & PRODUCTION SUPPORT CREATIVE & THOROUGH LOCATION SCOUTING FRIENDLY & RELIABLE SERVICE

DAVE DRUMMOND EXPERIENCED MANAGER & SCOUT

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P: 425.269.3396 E: DAVEDRUMMONDMEDIA.COM WWW.DRUMMONDMEDIA.COM

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SPOTLIGHT ON:

THE BEST OF NORTHWEST PRODUCTION

PHOTOGRAPHERS

AUDIO/SOUND MIXERS

JEFF HELMAN 206-718-2782 HELMANJEFF@GMAIL.COM I’ve been working in commercial/advertising photography for over 15 years. I was trained old school in the film and darkroom days by a late great mentor at Seattle Central Community College, Bart Attebery. I’ve witnessed both major studios and established professional photographers transition to digital, and continue to see the impacts and effects of that transition today. One of the many things I love about this profession is the constant learning of new technology, and applying it to tried and true traditions. I’ve worked on an incredibly diverse amount of projects, from the small studio table top, to 787s on the tarmac, but the one constant I admire is working with dedicated, knowledgeable and caring people.

AUDISEE PETER B. LEWIS

206-AUDISEE (283-4733) PETER@AUDISEE.COM • WWW.AUDISEE.COM AUDISEE specializes in creating sound environments for experiential marketing venues. We provide sound design services including consultation, composition and realization. We partner with agencies, corporations and other production groups to immerse audiences. For example, last year at the Shanghai World Expo, thousands experienced the country of Colombia through its diverse, regional music and the wonderful sounds of the Amazon forest. For Nintendo at E3 in Los Angeles, we helped put booth visitors “in the game” by integrating music and sounds with lighting, video and architecture. Sound pulls it all together. Visit www.OasisOfSound.com for a listen!

AMANDA ALLEN 206-349-6774 ALLEN.AG@GMAIL.COM I graduated from the commercial photography program at Seattle Central Community College in 2006. My first year out of school I was an assistant and studio manager for Bootsy Holler. She gave me a huge crash course in editorial portraiture and music video direction and introduced me to a lot of other creative professionals in Seattle and California. When it comes to my work now, I really consider myself a “Jill of all trades.” From lighting and styling to coordinating and location scouting, I feel very fortunate for all the varied skills and knowledge I’ve gained over the past 6 years working with many different photographers, directors and choreographers. I focus mainly on food photography and styling and assisting. In the past year I’ve also delved into honing my skills with documentary video work. From time to time I work with Portland journalist Casey Parks doing lighting design and audio recording for videos she produces for The Oregonian. This past January I had a particularly awesome opportunity to shoot and edit a small behind the scenes film of the making of the first music video by Seattle’s The Head and the Heart, directed by Christian Sorensen Hansen in Leavenworth, WA.

REBECCA DAVIS, PRODUCER

206-290-7715 REBECCA@REBECCADAVISPHOTO.COM I have experience in productions from high-end advertising to all ranges of editorial and stock photography both with live action and still work. I have produced shoots both nationally and internationally, I am very detail oriented and passionate about my job.

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CMB SOUND COURTNEY BAILEY

WWW.CMBSOUND.COM As a Native Northwesterner, I feel that your film should sound like the Northwest: clean, intense, and high quality. Specializing in foley, audio clean up, SFX work post sound, set mixing, boom operations, sound editing, and background mixing, my goal is to make your film project sound first-class. Worked on an awardwinning film with Rider and Shiloh Strong that was screened at the 2011 SIFF event, also worked with Peter Byck on his provocative documentary Carbon Nation. I am looking forward to future projects and adventures.

ROBERT MARTS CAS/ PRODUCTION SOUND MIXER 206-524-8602 BOBMARTS@YAHOO.COM Production sound recording for film and video. Feature film credits include Late Autumn, The Details, World’s Greatest Dad, The Whole Truth, End of the Spear, Highway, Prefontaine, The Hand that Rocks the Cradle. Television credits include Grey’s Anatomy (Seattle), The Fugitive (21 episodes), Northern Exposure (55 episodes), Frasier (the 100th episode), Nowhere Man, Twin Peaks pilot, Nova, National Geographic, Frontline, 60 Minutes. Three Primetime Emmy nominations, two Cinema Audio Society nominations. Hundreds of commercial, corporate, music video, and documentary shoots. Over 25 years of professional experience delivering high quality work. Complete location digital sound equipment package. Member CAS and IATSE 488.


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AUDIO/SOUND MIXERS (continued)

SCREAM MUSIC BILL SCREAM

MORTIMORE PRODUCTIONS

503-310-2566 WWW.SCREAMUSIC.COM

509-327-8384 WWW.MORTIMORE.COM

Jan 2012. 40 years of Scream Music. Wow! I prefer not to think about it... no, that’s not it... I just don’t think about it. I just go at it everyday. And I love it. Music production is a wonderful combination of science and art. An emotional cubic environment filled with an unending variety of little pieces, all measurable, all tweakable. I love the challenges, surprises, and rewards of working in that environment. Creating, always trying to find something never found before. I’ve been working at this for quite sometime. They say if you follow your passions, the money will follow. They never said “how much.” They also say “find something you love to do and you’ll never work a day in your life.” I don’t know about that one either, I work my ass off, though it may not look like it. I guess that’s ‘cause I really do love what I do. And I hope that shows in my work. Nothing leaves here until I’m excited about it, until I can’t wait for everyone to hear it. Passion... it’s a way of life.

Dan Mortimore, following 12 years in commercial broadcasting and 2 years working for an advertising agency, began Mortimore Productions in 1987. Dan’s unique style as an experienced director allowed him to be the perfect producer/engineer in the studio, and director behind the camera. Says Mortimore, “We owned our own audio equipment, Betacam, Arri 35mm cameras… we usually edited at North by Northwest, KAYU TV, or KXLY Productions, until the price of technology made it possible for us to bring it all in house…” Mortimore Productions produces audio and HD video projects for advertising agencies and corporate clients from around the Northwest region. Angela Downey, Dan’s oldest daughter, has worked beside him for the past 14 years. She is the company’s executive producer, marketing director, as well as “The Voice” when you call! Ray Gross is Mortimore’s talented Final Cut editor, and has been with the company for two years. Mortimore Productions is the only ISDN or SOURCE CONNECT equipped studio that can import/export voice talent sessions from Spokane. “After 23 years of being in business, I can honestly say that I enjoy my work, the people, and the challenges, every single day… We have fun here, and our work shows it!”

REXPOST RUSS GORSLINE

503-238-4525 RUSSG@REXPOST.COM • INFO@REXPOST.COM WWW.REXPOST.COM REX offers a high-value customized video production experience, earning a reputation for quality media production/post-production work in the Pacific Northwest. Our team focuses on your key messaging delivered appropriately— whether an entertainment, corporate, educational or informational project. And we will customize the output for delivery through DVD, web or tape. The Russ Berger designed facility houses two recording studios with a full complement of microphones and audio gear and running ProTools HD, and two video editing rooms running Final Cut Pro HD. We have a nice quiet shooting stage with a green screen if we need to shoot anything in studio. 48

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CHARLES TOMARAS PRODUCTIONS CHARLES TOMARAS

206-363-5151/206-601-3027 TOMARAS@TOMARAS.COM • WWW.TOMARAS.COM First call mixer providing professional location sound in Seattle for over 20 years. Experienced with all cameras and formats. Lots of equipment including Sound Devices recorders/mixers, Schoeps mics, Lectrosonic wireless and backups of everything. Expert handling of timecoded non-linear audio and transcription needs. See IMDB for portion of credits.


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D N A L T R O P T IN

POS

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SPOTLIGHT ON:

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AUDIO/SOUND MIXERS

DPs

(continued)

STUDIO BLUE

OPTIMISTIC CAMERA CO.

SCOT CHARLES

LARS LARSON

206-783-6797 WWW.BLUECHARLES.COM

206-890-5832 WWW.LARSLARSONDP.COM

This year Studio Blue owner and veteran sound designer/mixer Scot Charles was commissioned with perhaps the most demanding project of his career—sound design/editing for the three part PBS NATURE Series Bears of the Last Frontier. Much of the footage of the animals, especially in the Polar Bear show, was shot without sound [out of necessity for crew’s safety]. That meant that every footstep, splash, huff, growl and frolic on the ice had to be brought to life with layers of authentic believable sound. Charles and his colleague/editor Len Delory took on the challenge which involved traveling to ice covered lakes and mountains to re-recreate and record the elements they would need in post. Bear scientist and series host Chris Morgan was adamant about the authenticity of sounds. All post sound, including voice-over, sound effects, dialog, and original score by composers Williams & Biondo was assembled and blended into the final soundtracks at Studio Blue. Award winning producer/writer & cinematographer for the series was Joe Pontecorvo. If you missed the broadcasts, watch them at: www.pbs.org/wnet/nature. Charles commented in retrospect, “... most demanding intense work we’ve ever done but worth every minute—see and hear for yourself.”

Lars Larson is an award-winning director of photography (DP) and a passionate cinematographer with thirty years of experience shooting independent productions and film projects for commercial clients. He is the owner of Optimistic Camera Co. Most recently, he has been shooting for clients such as AT&T, Dell, Intel, Microsoft, Nissan, Zwilling J.A. Henckels, among others. Lars co-directed and shot the four part jazz documentary, Icons Among Us: jazz in the present tense, which premiered at Jazz at Lincoln Center in April 2009, and is currently airing on the Documentary Channel. The film was selected by the AFI’s 20/20 program to represent the U.S. internationally for 2010.

STUDIOBARD MICHAEL BARD

503-273-BARD (2273) AUDIOSPA@STUDIOBARD.COM WWW.STUDIOBARD.COM • WWW.HOTSPOTMUSICCOMPANY.COM Welcome to fully equipped studios in Portland and Los Angeles, decades of experience and unmatched creativity… Martinis, laughs and killer coffee aside, we’ve got the skills to make your production a seamless success. StudioBard was the very first NLE audio facility in the Northwest. We have been managing post production workflow in the digital domain since 1988. Our studios have state of the art equipment, massive digital storage and asset management, and most importantly, people who know how to solve your post production problems, enhance your final product, and partner with you to achieve the finest, most effective electronic media possible while bringing your production in at, or under budget. Clever…Creative….Connected….StudioBard. RADIO AND TELEVISION PRODUCTION • ORIGINAL MUSIC SCORES AND JINGLES • AUDIO TOURS AND INTERACTIVE • SOUND AND MUSIC FOR FILM, INCLUDING ADR AND FOLEY • THE HOTSPOT PRODUCTION MUSIC LIBRARY • SPOTCASTER VOICE CASTING AND ISDN DIGITAL PATCH SERVICES 50

MEDIA INC. ISSUE TWO 2011

PEAK MEDIA JIM BOLSER

509-220-4559 WWW.PEAKMEDIA.US You can count on PEAK MEDIA to deliver! We’re experienced, and we care about the product. More than 20 years of network news, sports and production experience. Director of photography and chief editor, Jim Bolser, has dozens of national and regional awards, including 18 Emmys, traveling throughout the world shooting/editing documentaries and corporate videos and providing live sports coverage. We shoot on any format, but own the Sony PDW-700 XD-HD and PNW-EX-1R. We edit on Avid and Final Cut. Based in the Northwest.

VIDEOGRAPHY/ VIDEO PRODUCTION FAT CAT VDO, INC. AARON STADLER

206-498-1554 AARON@FATCATVDO.COM WWW.FATCATVDO.COM Fat Cat Vdo offers a wide range of video services that include producing, photography and editing. We have 25 years of broadcast experience. Our ultimate goal is the client’s total satisfaction at the completion of their project. “If we can’t do it, we’ll crew it,” meaning if we are not available to help you with your production needs, FCV will connect you with another quality, professional crew. Our extensive network of resources can get you whatever you need. From HD to SD, 3D to 2D, we have you covered.


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Over 25 Years of Broadcast Experience! HD, SD, HDV, DV

206-498-1554 aaron@fatcatvdo.com www.fatcatvdo.com see us on You Tube and Vimeo.

AARON STADLER PROFESSIONAL VIDEO SERVICES PHOTOGRAPHY • EDITING • PRODUCTION

SOUN

THE LEAST EXPENSIVE WAY TO IMPROVE YOUR IMAGE

Come sweeten your stuff with us! Peter B. Lewis, President

(206) AUDISEE

www.AUDISEE.com

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SPOTLIGHT ON:

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CRAFT SERVICES

TELEPROMPTERS SEATTLE TELEPROMPTER MAIA MCQUILLAN

PICTURE PERFECT CRAFT SERVICE JANIE FORSYTHE

253-639-6706/206-947-0721 JANIEAOK@COMCAST.NET I have thirteen years’ experience in the film and video industry as a craft service provider, production assistant, extras coordinator, and extra. I have supported full length movies, commercials, infomercials, political campaigns, and TV shows during that time, sometimes alone and sometimes with an assistant. I also completed an Associate Degree in liberal arts, and now have the time and desire to expand my involvement in film and video production. I enjoy satisfying cast and crew with delectable items, an attractive presentation, and personal specialties, and pride myself in being on time and well organized. I’m there for your team.

HELICOPTERS NORTHWEST HELICOPTERS,

LLC DOUG UTTECHT

360-754-7200 360-701-2402 DUTTECHT@NWHELICOPTERS.COM WWW.NWHELICOPTERS.COM Experienced camera pilots in motion picture and television production, with various camera mounts including CINEFLEX HD and Tyler. SAG pilots available. Recent work: Animal Planet-Finding Bigfoot, Smithsonian Channel-Aerial America, Dual Survival, 12 Rounds. Charter services for location scouting. Largest helicopter/airplane operator in Washington. 27 aircraft available for story ships or camera platform including: UH-1H Hueys, AH-1 Cobra attack helicopters, Bell 206B JetRangers, Hughes/MD-500D helicopters. Vintage airplanes include: P-51 Mustang, T-6 “Tora” Zero replica, A-1E Skyraider, and more flying museum aircraft available. Painting available.

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425-454-5659/858-945-2076 TELEPROMPTING@GMAIL.COM WWW.SEATTLETELEPROMPTER.COM Maia McQuillan, owner of Seattle Teleprompter, has over 18 years of teleprompting experience internationally. Seattle Teleprompter provides prompting services for video and film projects, and live events including conferences, award shows, and concerts. With a recent move back to her hometown of Seattle, Maia is extremely happy to be here and to provide exceptional service for the production industry! Maia offers the best in teleprompter technology with shiny new gear, and a “can do” professional attitude to help your production run quickly and smoothly.

PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT/ PROMOTION DARK WING PRODUCTIONS, LLC DENNIS GLEASON

503-617-9157 MAKEMAGIC@DARKWING.BIZ WWW.DARKWINGPRODUCTIONS.COM Dark Wing Productions is a diverse entertainment and media production & management company providing many services important and necessary in today’s biz. Event promotion, IMDB information management, press releases, venue management, program design, television producing and directing, emcee and hosting. We own and manage all aspects of the well known Portland Teen Idol program & TV show and produce several local television programs, including On The Fly TV, and have GLAM NOW! and several others in pre-production. We also provide hair and makeup services via our award winning celebrity makeup artist & hairstylist that has worked with President Obama and the First Lady. We have worked with the current governor, mayors of several cities and serve on many committees & boards of directors to enhance our communities. Email us today for a quote or meeting. We are on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and other social network platforms.


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Aerial Camera Platform Cineflex HD Tyler SpaceCam

Story Aircraft Largest Helicopter and Vintage Airplane Operator in Washington

SAG Pilots Location Scouting

NORTHWEST HELICOPTERS

www.nwhelicopters.com

Olympia, WA 360.754.7200

DISCOVER THE NORTHWEST LIKE NEVER BEFORE • Aerial Photography / Video Production • Package and Cargo Services • Corporate Support • External Lifting • Scenic Tours

BELL JET RANGER III • 4 Passenger • Spacious baggage compartment • Up to 300 mile range • 120 MPH cruise speed • Operated FAR Part 135 air taxi • OAS/AMD approved

BELL LONG RANGER • 6 Passenger • Spacious baggage compartment • Up to 300 mile range • 130 MPH cruise speed • Operated FAR Part 135 air taxi • OAS/AMD approved

Office: 503.249.2770 Hangar: 503.663.9724 Fax: 503.663.9764 www.jlaviation.net

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SPOTLIGHT ON:

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PAs JEFF BRINK

CHRISTOPHER S. DRDLA

206-427-9802 JEFF.BRINK@NYU.EDU

425-830-8510 CDRDLA@YAHOO.COM

Jeff Brink is a recent graduate from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts undergraduate program. He grew up in Seattle, where he spent most of his days carrying around a camera and filming short movies. As an aspiring cinematographer, Jeff has dedicated himself to learning the art, from loading film to lighting. He’s taken numerous courses and shot projects ranging from HD to 35mm. Jeff currently freelances as an assistant cameraman and grip/electric. He loves questioning the physics behind cinematography and the strange phenomena that can occur.

PHILIP CORNWALL 253-722-9206 PCORNWALL412@MSN.COM I first became interested in movies and media when I was in the 3rd grade. My mother was a huge Stephen King fan, and she let my brothers and I watch some of his movie adaptations and read some of his books. He was the creative force that inspired me the most and made me want to become a storyteller. I wrote several novellas throughout junior high, and in high school I became interested in filmmaking. For the next two years I attended Pierce College at Fort Steilacoom, and I continued to make several short films. But I knew that I had to take it to the next level—the Los Angeles Film School. After film school I worked on War of the Worlds 2: The Next Wave, which would end up being a direct to video release, and from this production I was able to land a job on Frank TV, where I got to meet key people in the industry, work with experienced professionals, and help with every department on the production. After the show I decided to move back to Washington. Los Angeles was just too expensive. Over the last two years I have been working non-industry jobs because I have to pay bills, but I have always had the industry in the back of my mind. I cannot wait to work in the industry again, whenever that comes, because I don’t believe I was meant to do anything else.

TIMOTHY VICTOR “T.V.” KIPPES 509-328-7271/509-481-7730 TVK@COMCAST.NET At the age of 52 it is time for a full-time career change. I enjoy production assistant work and have left my Spokane School District # 81 custodian job of about 25 years to be able to work any short- or longterm PA positions that come my way. Over the years I have had to turn down or forward to associate friends PA requests from producers calling with one day or a few days notice of their needs. Between PA gigs, I’ll be producing my own shows, working on other associates’ shows, and a lot of scriptwriting.

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I first experienced working in the film industry when I was still a student at the University of Washington. There was an email to film students asking for production assistant interns on a feature film called Visioneers starring Zach Galifianakis. I was an on set production assistant throughout the 30 or so day shoot. This was a great first taste of the business as it was not only a fantastic learning experience but also a ton of fun as I was able to work with some great people. The next year I took a quarter off from UW to be a key set PA on a feature film called Perfect Sport. After dabbling a bit in other industries I became a television editor/master controller for AAT Television (Seattle’s Chinese language television station). After about a year and a half at AAT I decided to give Los Angeles a try. Working in Los Angeles was a tough and humbling experience, as finding a steady stream of work was a constant struggle. My biggest breakthrough was being hired as a production coordinator on a feature film in the post-production process. For a long while, my future goals in this business were to try and work up to being an AD on set. While this is still true, my goals have evolved a bit recently. First off, I could now definitely see myself being a coordinator again and would love to be one on future projects. Lastly, I would just like to work on a long-term project or stay with a company and really see what I would like to do. It’s sometimes difficult to discover what you like when freelancing on short-term projects. I would love to stretch my legs with a company and forge good relationships to move up within.

T.V. KIPPES

P.A. WRITER (509) 328-7271 (509) 481-7730 tvk@comcast.net


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Director of Photography HD P2 Workflow Creative Editorial and Motion Graphics

Photography

HVX200, HPX500, AF100, 5Dmkll

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SCREENWRITERS DOUGLAS HORN 310-388-5299 INFO@DOUGLASHORN.COM WWW.DOUGLASHORN.COM Screenwriter and director of feature films, television, and select corporate clients. Produced credits include: Babysitters Beware, Entry Level, Ira Finkelstein’s Christmas, Divergence, Full Disclosure.

REBECCA KELLEY 206-361-0767 RKELLEY@HALCYON.COM It’s been a long strange trip from broadcast journalism to commercial production to communications planning and writing. Along the way, I discovered a love for science, education, and Velveeta. (Okay, that last one’s not true.) These days, I write for video, print, and online projects. I’ve ridden a grizzly bear, engaged in an aerial dogfight, watched the sunset from a canopy walk in the Peruvian rainforest, and waded in the Baltic with a group of Russian iceskaters. Yep. A strange and wonderful trip. Indeed.

MATT CANNON 228-342-2319 MATTCANNON0@GMAIL.COM Matt Cannon relocated to Seattle recently and looks forward to exploring the film industry of the Pacific Northwest. Originally from the Mississippi Gulf Coast, Matt recently graduated from Florida State University’s highly-lauded film school. There, he learned and practiced nearly all areas of filmmaking, from pre- to post-production, working with and within crews of his peers. Screenwriting is his primary passion, with production design and editing being his other preferred areas, but Matt enjoys having a hand in any facet of filmmaking.

STYLISTS LISA-MARIE MOON 206-551-3105/425-522-3527 MOON.LISAMARIE@GMAIL.COM • WWW.LISAMARIEMOON.COM Seattle-based photo stylist and more. Over 15 years’ experience. Resourceful, professional and fun. Worked in Los Angeles, Seattle, Portland, New York and Boston. Crewed on many productions, varying from photo shoots to car commercials to independent films. Television, celebrity personal assisting on set. Props! Scouting. Specializing in product styling: laydowns, flats, stacks, hanging, forms, tabletop, hard goods, shoes, bags, luggage, cosmetics, homebeds, towels, accessories, soft goods, foot models, strong organization skills. On-location or in-studio. Experience with animal talent. Resourcing props & neg rental rates. Coordinating pickups and returns. Working with photographers/art director. Building shoot schedules. Clean organized enviroment. Current music, hey now! Women & children’s fashion styling. 56

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PROPS CLARKPROPS DOUG CLARK

206-930-9808 DOUG@CLARKPROPS.COM WWW.CLARKPROPS.COM Two decades of experience providing a full range of art department services including production design, art direction, set design and construction and props. Experience includes features, serial TV, corporate, and commercial advertising. A 1500-square-foot shop and studio in Fremont equipped to bring your visions to life. Available for any size project. Please go to www.clarkprops.com to see a client list and a selection of work.

RVs MIKE GREEN RVS 206-777-5192/541-619-3934 MGREEN2528@SBCGLOBAL.NET • WWW.MIKEGREENRV.COM Mike Green RVs has been serving the West Coast since 2000. My company provides motor homes for photo shoots, commercials, music videos, television and films. I pay attention to details and keep up with the latest technology; my motor homes come equipped with 4G LTE and 3G wireless and wired Internet access, and wireless printing/scanning/fax. The RVs come furnished with built-in-racks, make-up & hair stations and more. I have been involved in this aspect of the business, transportation for over eleven years; therefore I bring an uncanny level of experience for my clients.

REDLINE RV 866-720-1930 JIM@REDLINERVP.COM • WWW.REDLINERVP.COM You have seen the rest, now check out the best! Our RVs are spacious and comfortable with huge slides, wardrobe rooms, makeup stations, free wireless internet and other convenient supplies. Our drivers are experienced, friendly and fun.


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Mike Green RV’s offers Star luxury recreational vehicles, production motor homes, talent RV’s, VIP female/male restrooms, Deluxe high capacity restroom with air-conditioning and passenger vans for commercials, features, music videos, and photo shoots. Most motor homes have WiFi, copier/fax/printer, satellite TV, makeup/hair stations, wardrobe with built-in racks, steamers, plus more...

CALL MIKE GREEN:

mikegreenrv.com • http://web.me.com/mgreen2528/Site/About_Us.html ISSUE TWO 2011 MEDIA INC.

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*First appeared in The MasterLists 1991 ISSUE TWO 2011 MEDIA INC.

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NW FILM/VIDEO

PRODUCTION COMPANIES

Adams Creative; Des Moines, WA 206-824-6970 adamscreative@isomedia.com www.adamscreative.net

Dan Adams, president/ CD

ADi; Portland, OR 503-227-5914; fax 503-227-3269 kate@animationdynamics.com www.animationdynamics.com

Kate Ertmann, president

Allied Video Productions; Salem, OR 503-363-7301; fax 503-363-6477 scott@alliedvideo.com www.alliedvideo.com

Scott Hossner, CEO

@Large Films; Portland, OR 503-287-5387; fax 503-287-5886 jjenkins@largefilms.com www.atlargefilms.com

Juliana Lukasik, principal/director Jonathan Jenkins, lead producer

August Island Pictures; Seattle, WA 206-794-2411 info@augustisland.com www.augustisland.com

Mark Titus

BergWorks Media; Seattle, WA 206-239-8974; fax 206-783-9113 rob@bergworksmedia.com www.bergworksmedia.com

Robert Berg, principal

Blue Plate Digital; Seattle, WA 206-388-0174; fax 206-299-3376 brian@blueplatedigital.com www.blueplatedigital.com

Brian Pelzel, owner

ADVERTORIAL

[

926 W. SPRAGUE AVE. SUITE 100 SPOKANE, WA. 99201 509.227.5831 WWW.MAGNUSFILMCO.COM

]

FEATURED NORTHWEST PRODUCTION COMPANY

agnus was created in 2010 for the sole purpose of providing intelligent video production services to a broad spectrum of clients throughout the Northwest and worldwide. Our diverse creatives provide a unique outlook on any project, and have a firm grasp on the latest technology to bring any vision to life. From web to mobile, broadcast to big screen‌Magnus thrives on bringing out the potential of each client. Our proudest moment recently was a comment we received from a CEO upon delivery of their web based video campaign. He said, "These videos are worth five full time sales people. You really 'listened' to our needs and produced something that really 'works' for us." It's not so much that we go out of our way to be that way. It just became our ultimate goal to go out and make products that 'work'. We can only do that through a better understanding of our clients’ needs through total attention to every detail. Fully immersing ourselves in their

M

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CO MM ER CI AL CO RP OR AT E DI GI TA L

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Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

TYPES OF PRODUCTION

business is the only way we know to reach that level and help them achieve success. Magnus provides experience in just about every facet of video production, and have provided various services to many Fortune 500 companies. Our 3200 sq. ft. daylight studio is perfect for large corporate shoots and events or social gatherings. We are fully equipped with Sony XDCam, full Canon 5D and 7D systems, and RED MX with a digital imaging technician. Our Emmy Award winning location audio services are also available worldwide. Magnus also does stills and specialize in architectural, corporate, events, still-life, lifestyle and fashion. Our gear includes the latest Hasselblad 40 megapixel digital camera which can be tethered and a full array of lenses. We also have a complete Profoto still lighting package and color managed fine-art inkjet printing up to 60 inches.

SMART. CREATIVE.


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NW FILM/VIDEO

Bridge Productions, Inc.; Woodinville, WA 425-483-8840; fax 425-487-9792 madzola@aol.com www.bridgeprodusa.com

Eugene Mazzola

Capestany Films; Poulsbo & Seattle, WA 206-383-0110 producer@centerfieldstudios.com www.centerfieldstudios.com

Scott A. Capestany, EP Jade Kennedy, line producer Traeanna Holiday, production coordinator

Cesari Direct; Seattle, WA 206-281-7975 x353; fax 206-826-0200 tobrien@cesaridirect.com www.cesaridirect.com

Rick Cesari, CEO

Cinemagic Studios; Portland, OR 503-233-2141; fax 503-233-0076 joe@cinemagicstudios.com www.cinemagicstudios.com

Joe Walsh, president/ EP

CineMonster, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-780-3907 dale@cinemonster.com www.cinemonster.com

Dale Fay, president

CMD; Portland, OR & Seattle, WA 503-223-6794; fax 503-223-2430 info@cmdagency.com www.cmdagency.com

Phil Reilly, president Mike Cobb, VP accounts Mike Pool, managing director, Film and Video Group

Cross Films; Seattle, WA 206-297-3456 michael@crossfilms.com www.crossfilms.com

Michael Cross, director/ editor Susan LaSalle, producer

Dawson Media Group; Portland, OR 503-477-7462; fax 866-716-6087 info@dawsonmediagroup.com www.dawsonmediagroup.com

Meighan Maloney, CEO Harry Dawson, cinematographer/ director

First Sight Productions; Seattle, WA 206-354-5032 lindy@firstsightproductions.com www.firstsightproductions.com

Lindy & Kris Boustedt, owners

Flying Gecko Productions; Burien, WA 206-412-4363; fax 866-259-1712 greg@flyingecko.com www.flyingecko.com

Greg Sommers-Herivel, producer

Gametapes LLC; Seattle, WA fax 206-694-2720 info@gametapes.com www.thevarsitynews.com

Tim Exton

golightlyfilms, inc.; Portland, OR 503-381-1243 golightlyfilms@comcast.net www.golightlyfilms.com

Kenneth Luba, president Kaja Zaloudek, VP

GoodSide Studio; Seattle, WA 206-322-1576 studio@goodsidestudio.com www.goodsidestudio.com

Matt Krzycki, CD

Barry Gregg, DP; Poulsbo, WA 206-234-5467 barry@barrygregg.us www.barrygregg.us

Barry Gregg, DP

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PRODUCTION COMPANIES

Hive-Fx; Portland, OR 503-336-1834; fax 503-961-1016 gretchen@hive-fx.com www.hive-fx.com

Gretchen Miller, EP Jim Clark, president

Image Productions Inc.; Spokane, WA 509-891-8778; fax 509-891-8860 mlpallardy@imageproductionsinc.com www.imageproductionsinc.com

Michael L. Pallardy, president Ian E. Graham, VP

Integrated Talent LLC; Seattle & Bainbridge Island, WA 206-686-6440; fax 206-708-1631 info@integratedtalent.com www.integratedtalent.com

DND

JDP Media; Stayton, OR 503-769-1967; fax 503-769-8897 info@jdpmedia.com www.jdpmedia.com

Doug Zabroski, owner/producer Lori Zabroski, production manager

Kontent Partners; Seattle, WA 206-722-2846; fax 323-446-7178 michael@kontentpartners.com www.kontentpartners.com

Michael Bini, EP

A KTVA Production, LLC; Portland, OR 503-659-4417 mail@ktvavideo.com www.ktvavideo.com

Rick Phillips, owner

LAIKA/house; Portland, OR 503-225-1130; fax 503-226-3746 ask_house@laika.com www.laika.com/house

Lourri Hammack, president/EP

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p ro d u ctio n / mo tio n g fx / e d ito ria l IBEW - Heros

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Ivar’s - Billboards

Caterpillar - Mike Rowe

wackofilms.com 206.618.9777


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NW FILM/VIDEO

Limbo Films; Portland, OR 503-228-0844; fax 503-228-0857 info@limbofilms.com www.limbofilms.com

Gary Nolton, owner/ director

Magnus Film Co.; Spokane, WA 509-227-5830 info@magnusfilmco.com www.magnusfilmco.com

Michael Hollingworth, director

Media Agents Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-932-2030; fax 206-381-9600 andrew@mediaagentsinc.com www.mediaagentsinc.com

Mike Sunseri, director Andrew Bradner, EP

Media Arts, Inc.; Redmond, WA 206-281-8811; fax 425-968-2219 scott@mediarts.com www.mediarts.com

Scott Munro, president

Mortimore Productions; Spokane, WA 509-327-8384 info@mortimore.com www.mortimore.com

Dan Mortimore, president/ DP/producer Angela Downey, VP marketing & sales/producer Ray Gross, senior editor/ audio engineer

Pal Productions, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-361-9366 lazpal123@gmail.com www.paladventurevideos.com

Laszlo Pal, president

Palazzo Creative; Seattle, WA 206-328-5555; fax 206-324-4348 pennie@palazzocreative.com www.palazzocreative.com

Pennie Pickering Richard Roberts

Palmquist Productions, Inc.

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PRODUCTION COMPANIES

Is it possible to be too comfortable? Our 2004 37' Monaco Monarch represents a high level in production motorhome comfort and functionality.The front slideout provides a huge production or talent/client lounge area. The back room has two slideouts and is brightly lit, providing more room for wardrobe/makeup or additional production work. There’s a full galley, VCR, DVD, satellite TV with front A/V inputs, copier, steamer and wireless internet. We have an onboard 5K Onan generator and a portable 2K Honda generator. See our new website for details, rates and photos.

3355 North Delta Hwy #20 • Eugene OR 97408 • (541) 687-8627 • cell (541) 729-9406 • fax (541) 484-7320

www.palmquistproductions.com 66

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✮ Mobile Internet Service Available ✮


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Let Us Help You Plan Your Event. We take pride in using only the freshest local ingredients and serving the best food with the highest quality of customer care.

All organic upon request. Complete Catering & Event Services Our experienced staff will assist you with selecting the venue of your choice, menu design, linens, plates, silverware, glassware, fabric treatments, entertainment, audio visual, staging, flowers, decorations and anything else you may need to make your event a success.

Beverage Service Rain City Catering has a Class H Liquor License. We will gladly handle all of your alcoholic beverage needs. We will plan, organize and set up the bar as well as provide licensed bartenders.

Catering For Any Size Events • Private Parties • Tradeshows • In-Office Parties • Cocktail Parties • Theatrical Shows • Photo Shoots • On Set Locations

• Weddings • Receptions • Reunions • Meetings • Memorials • Commercial Shoots • And so much more!

Renton Pavillion Event Center Great Facility, Easy Access, Ample Parking • 10,000 square-foot bulding • In the heart of downtown Renton • Ideal for meetings, parties and trade shows • Banquet-style capacity of 450 with 655 total capacity • Adjacent 563-space parking garage • Full catering and event coordination available through Rain City Catering

Jeremy Bryant

Kenneth Rogers

Rain City Catering PO Box 4098 • Renton, WA 98057 The Personal Chefs of the Seattle Mariners

Off-Site Catering: 206.395.5126 Venue Booking: 425.277.8408

www.raincitycatering.com ISSUE TWO 2011 MEDIA INC.

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PRODUCTION COMPANIES

Persistent Image, Inc.; Langley, WA 360-321-8252; fax 360-321-8262 persist@whidbey.com www.persistentimage.com

Bruce Towne, president

Pilot Rock Productions; Medford, OR 888-262-4937; fax 541-779-5564 info@pilotrockproductions.com www.pilotrockproductions.com

Roger Harris, GM Pete Bedell, senior editor Brian Horton, production coordinator

Power to Create Inc.; Mercer Island, WA 206-230-0833; fax 206-230-0825 ken@powertocreate.com www.powertocreate.com

Ken Urman, EP

The Production Foundry; Seattle, WA 206-579-4101; fax 206-694-2720 contact@theproductionfoundry.com www.theproductionfoundry.com

Mark Goodnow, executive director

Production Partners; Seattle, WA 206-441-3773; fax 206-443-5402 john@productionpartners.cc www.productionpartners.cc

John Douthwaite

ProMotion Arts; Seattle, WA 206-938-0348 info@promotionholdings.com www.promotionarts.com

Steve Crandall, managing director Aaron Anderson, managing producer Kevin Knutson, CD

Random Original Productions; Everett, WA 323-454-3767; fax 206-984-1076 info@randomoriginal.com www.randomoriginal.com

DND

Red Door Films; Portland, OR 503-872-9280 reel@reddoorfilms.com www.reddoorfilms.com

David Poulshock, president

red jet films; Seattle, WA 206-282-4534; fax 206-812-0768 sue@redjetfilms.com www.redjetfilms.com

Jeff Erwin, owner

Rocket Pictures; Seattle, WA 206-623-7678 les@rocket-pictures.com www.rocket-pictures.com

Les Fitzpatrick, president

John Sabella & Assoc., Inc.; Port Townsend, WA 360-379-1668; fax 360-379-5148 info@johnsabella.com www.johnsabella.com

John Sabella

Sadis Filmworks; Seattle, WA 206-728-1610 stephen@sadisfilmworks.com www.sadisfilmworks.com

Stephen Sadis

Screaming Flea Productions, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-763-3383; fax 206-763-3393 sfp@sfpseattle.com www.sfpseattle.com

Matt Chan, president Dave Severson, VP/EP Charles O’Farrell, VP/EP

SoDo Media; Seattle, WA 206-285-8816; fax 206-694-2720 info@sodomedia.com www.sodomedia.com

Tim Exton

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Victory Studios; Seattle, WA 206-282-1776; fax 206-282-3535 info@victorystudios.com www.victorystudios.com

Conrad Denke, CEO Saul Mitchell, VP media services Kevin Smith, CD

Visual Media Group; Bellevue, WA 425-457-7100; fax 425-457-7104 info@visualmediagroup.net www.visualmediagroup.net

Kelly Sparks, owner/ CEO/queen bee

Wacko Films; Seattle, WA 206-618-9777 info@wackofilms.com www.wackofilms.com

Jack Barrett, owner/ director/editor

White Rain Films; Seattle, WA 206-682-5417; fax 206-682-3038 bill@whiterainfilms.com www.whiterainfilms.com

Brad Bolling, director Bill Phillips, producer

Worktank; Seattle, WA 206-254-0950; fax 206-374-2650 talktous@worktankseattle.com www.worktankseattle.com

Leslie Rugaber, CEO

YG Media; Woodburn, OR 503-481-1735 evan@ygmedia.net www.ygmedia.net

Evan Thomas, owner

Zupa Films; Portland, OR 503-860-0921; fax 503-501-4849 adele@zupafilms.com www.zupafilms.com

Adele Amos, owner Jennifer Moore, owner

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N O I S A C C O G IN HE T O T

S I R

ESS.” C C U S “ S GREAT D N I F R PLANNE T N E V E -BASED E L L I V N I WOOD

ith over 15 years of experience in the event planning business and a host of professional resources at her disposal, Jacky Grotle and her staff will make sure your special occasion is flawless.

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Event Success, based in the heart of Woodinville, Washington’s wine country, has coordinated all types of events over the course of the company’s existence, from engagement parties and weddings, to wine tastings and charity galas, to corporate gatherings and product launches. And all have gone off without a hitch. “We specialize in logistics,” says Grotle. “Making sure the flow of the event and that everything needed is in place.” This forte has proven to be a virtue for the company, as Grotle and her staff were recently honored with an Emerald City Applause Award for “Best Event Logistics.” The Seattle chapter of the International Special Events Society (ISES) bestowed the award upon Event Success for an offsite event they coordinated on Lopez Island, Washington. “We also are proud to custom everything to each individual client,” continues Grotle. “This is key since sometimes we are working with an individual, sometimes a committee, and sometimes a corporation.” Of course, there are challenges, as there are in any business. But Grotle and her staff are able to adapt to ensure success. As Grotle says, “I always have a plan B.” 70

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She namechecks weather and guest count as some of the last-minute challenges that tend to crop up. “Last November our 400 person (event) grew to 1,200,” she recalls. “(But) asking the right questions is part of an event planner’s job and I had asked the capacity maximums when speaking with the hotel on our first meeting.” Grotle’s illustrious career has included some very memorable moments. “Occasionally my position allows me to work with famous people,” she says. “Like when Will Ferrell came to Seattle to support Cancer for College or when I had to direct Steve Ballmer when and where to give a toast at a private event.” But the thing she enjoys most about her job is simply seeing the event being executed. Says Grotle, “It is rewarding to see the outcome of all the hours of planning come to life.” So what does the future hold for Event Success? Plenty. “We continue to grow each year,” she says. “Over the last couple years we have created some great relationships and alliances with the wine industry community here in Woodinville. We think this area will continue to grow and be more of a destination for both corporate and special occasions events. It is so close and yet there is so much to experience. It is great for interactive events.” One thing’s for sure—as long as Grotle’s at the helm, the company is sure to rise to the occasion.


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IT’S STILL A JUNGLE OUT THERE, But we know the trails. Celebrating 30 years.

ISSUE TWO 2011 MEDIA INC.

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Good, Fast,and CHEAP By Sean K. Fay Guest Columnist

he old saying in the production business is that clients who hire production companies can pick two out of the following three parameters for their production: good, fast, and cheap.

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You can have it good and fast, but it’s not gonna be cheap because there will be more resources thrown on the project to get work done more quickly, whether that be in hiring more resources, OT, or other expenses due to a rush process, including fixing mistakes that may result. You can have it good and cheap, but then the production company will allocate less resources on the project at any given time and it will take twice as long to complete, as the company fits the project around other higher-paying projects. You can have it fast and cheap, but the bottom line is that it will be rushed and mistakes will be made with no money to fix them. The quality is bound to suffer. Clients should always push for good, fast and cheap, and the best production companies will take the time to communicate what happens when quality is pushed, or time pressures are added, and how that will affect the budget. By clearly discussing the project details and how the different parameters affect each other, both production company and client are enhanced with a clarity of purpose and understanding of what is being endeavored. This results in appreciation for what can be a complex process, a more motivated creative team, and a high-quality final product that costs no more or less than it should. Sean K. Fay is CEO of Envision Response, Inc. in Seattle. For more information, call 800-809-8397 or visit www.envisiontv.com.

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BRIEFS

Hodgson/Meyers Launches “Woodpeckers Rock” Video Kirkland, Washington-based Business-toBusiness marketing agency Hodgson/Meyers has launched a creative, funny, entertaining, threepart music video, “Woodpeckers Rock.” Hodgson/Meyers recruited and auditioned musicians for the band, “Spike and the Noisemakers,” and collaborated with the band on the music and lyrics. The music centers around the agency’s mascot, Spike, the pileated woodpecker, and the agency’s tagline and mantra, “Make Noise. Get Noticed.” “This work demonstrates how video-based marketing can work in an interactive environment in an engaging way and that B2B marketing can be fun and creative and entertaining,” said agency president Gary Meyers. “It shows that agencies can ‘walk the talk’ and do marketing for themselves. And it’s funny.” Check it out at www.woodpeckersrock.com, and for more information visit www.hodgsonmeyers.com.

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SPOTLIGHT ON:

IMPACT ADVERTISING For over 20 years, Sam Harmon has been providing creative services for clients, agencies and event promoters in the Northwest. Through his design firm, Impact Advertising Services, Sam has created and produced visual communication for a multitude of large and small businesses, including Les Schwab Tires, GMAC, Toyota, Vestas, Providence Health & Services, Banfield Pet Hospital, Vic Alfonso Cadillac, Comcast, Garden World, Elmer’s and Rose’s Restaurants. Events include Bite of Oregon, Waterfront Blues Festival, Portland Roadster Show, Washington County Fair, Oregon Airshow and The Tulip Festival. Sam is also a regular guest columnist for Media Inc. magazine, focusing on the “art” of consumer enticement and visual effectiveness in advertising. For more info on Sam Harmon and his services, go to www.impactads.net or call 503-233-4408.


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BRIEFS

Edelman Portland Expands Visual Display Expertise, Named Agency of Record for MicroVision The Portland office of Edelman, a leading independent public relations firm, has announced that it is now agency of record for MicroVision Inc., the leader in ultraminiature laser display technology. Edelman has been working with MicroVision over the course of four months on various projects and exceeded client expectations, resulting in an extended relationship. Edelman Portland will continue to drive media relations for MicroVision and help support corporate communications to create greater product and brand visibility and further enhance the company’s role as a leader in the consumer technology and original equipment manufacturer marketplace. For more information, visit www.edelman.com.

MARKET RESEARCH of

and the

KNOWLEDGE

By Jerry Johnson Guest Columnist

ust as America hasn’t declined to oblivion yet, market research hasn’t died... yet. But it’s certainly on its way. Why?

J

There are many factors, but primary among them is the death of knowledge. Let me explain. It used to be thought that a good education was a means to money. But what if you could get the money without the education? Would you? Scores of NBA/NFL athletes are answering that question now. And remember... Bill Gates didn’t finish at Harvard—why would he? Most Americans, being pragmatists and somewhat venal, would tend to agree. The death of knowledge is a similar pattern of thinking that hastens the end of classic market research by saying: It used to be thought that knowledge was the key to the consumer transaction (i.e., the exchange of money). But what if you could get the transaction without the knowledge? Would you? Scores of companies are answering that question now. Their view is: Technology has reached the point where, if there are 232 million American adults, I can have 232 million electronic connections or “switches” that tell me if a transaction is possible. Why, then, would I ask a question? Take smoking. (Ugly example, I know, but it works.) It’s technologically possible to have 232 million switches telling you you can have a cigarette transaction with a certain adult (or, hey, smoking cessation products for that matter). It used to be the job of market research to assemble knowledge that guided cigarette marketers (or smoking cessation product marketers... alright, alright)—look here for the golden opportunities; the pickings are good with these types of people right here; say this to them and they’ll buy; and so forth. That’s gone. Or at least the lust for that type of knowledge—“insight,” if you will—is gone. We have it within our power to transact with the consumer without the intermediary of the knowledge. So why not do it? Having said all that, is this a good development? Clearly not. Something magic passed from the world when people decided to devalue knowledge. There’s something inherently good about the knowledge itself that enriches life, and life is thus cheapened without it. Take the example of a date. (I’m a married 57-year-old with five kids, so I don’t date, but the example still works.) Let’s say a woman agrees to date a certain man, but ultimately seeks to marry a loyal, hard-working soul who loves children (sorry to be so traditional). If she already has an electronic switch or connection that tells her she can transact with him in this way, why date? Clearly, the answer is that there’s something valuable in the experience of dating itself—the adventure, loss, joy, and heartache of that journey. Similarly, there’s immense inherent value in the knowledge and insight market research brings. But you wouldn’t know that from the decisions being made in the current day by manufacturers of soap, cars, and drinks. Next article is either about how market research fights back or the death of dating. I haven’t decided which. Jerry Johnson is president of Cascade Strategies, Inc. in Bellevue, Washington. Visit www.cascadestrategies.com.

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*First appeared in The MasterLists 1993 ISSUE TWO 2011 MEDIA INC.

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NW

Cascade Strategies, Inc.; Bellevue, WA 425-643-9789 info@cascadestrategies.com www.cascadestrategies.com

Jerry Johnson, CEO Juergen Bluhm, COO Juho Arens, CMO

EMC Research; Seattle, WA 206-652-2454; fax 206-652-5022 info@emcresearch.com www.emcresearch.com

Andrew Thibault, partner Ian Stewart, VP

Gilmore Research Group; Seattle, WA & Portland, OR 206-726-5555; fax 206-726-5620 info@gilmore-research.com www.gilmore-research.com

Robin Arnold John Cell Sue Black

Hardwick Research; Mercer Island, WA 206-232-9400; fax 206-232-9402 info@hardwickresearch.com www.hardwickresearch.com

Nancy Hardwick, president

illuminate Market Research & Planning; Seattle, WA 206-935-7666 info@illuminateresearch.com www.illuminateresearch.com

Debora Scott, principal Katherine Hobbs, principal

Informa Research Services, Inc.; Seattle, WA Hdqtrs: Calabasas, CA 800-848-0218; fax 818-880-8448 info@informars.com www.informars.com

Michael Adler, president/ managing director Brian Richards, SVP, business development

Market Decisions Corporation; Portland, OR 800-344-8725; fax 503-245-9677 info@mdcresearch.com www.mdcresearch.com

Michael Oilar, president Doug Verigin, COO Bert Lybrand, partner

Moore Information, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-221-3100; fax 503-221-9856 contactus2@moore-info.com www.moore-info.com

Bob Moore, president Kelly Middendorff, VP, project management

Muse; Portland, OR 503-228-0141; fax 503-242-4276 jenn@musepdx.com www.musepdx.com

Jennifer Wong, principal

Pacific Market Research LLC; Renton, WA 425-271-2300; fax 425-271-2400 mrosenkranz@pacificmarketresearch.com www.pacificmarketresearch.com

Mark Rosenkranz, managing director

Pivot Group; Wilsonville, OR 503-608-7810; fax 503-296-5446 dave@askpivot.com www.askpivot.com

Dave Nieuwstraten

Strategic Research Associates; Spokane, WA 888-554-6960; fax 509-324-7896 info@strategicresearch.net www.strategicresearch.net

DND

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NimbusTouch is the future of market research

Sentiment Analysis + Virtual Reality = NimbusTouch Column-and-row research is so 2008. Research in the 2010’s and beyond will have to engage respondents in a new way. NimbusTouch presents questions to them artfully, cleverly, creatively. The questions don’t feel like questions at all...they’re little stimuli that arise from virtual reality environments. Respondents react naturally to what they see, hear, and sense with their voice and fingers (text). We characterize their sentiments in a report to you. It’s understandable, actionable, and affordable. The way market research should have been all along.

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BY DAVID KELLEY, SPECIAL TO MEDIA INC.

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any people, including you, probably have no idea who I am and frankly sometimes I don’t know who I am, but sufficeth to say my name is David Kelley and I’m a UX professional. Am I a graphic designer? Well, no, not really. Am I a programmer of some kind? Not exactly, but I can write some code. My title is ‘Principal UX Architect’ and typically I don’t even find myself dictating ‘architecture’ of any kind, albeit I’m passionate about that, too. My job, when it comes down to it, is communication, to bring people together, and more or less be the chief Kool-Aid drinker.

What? Now you’re more confused than when we started? Okay, let’s dial back a bit then. My job is to help my team design an experience that fills a need and tells a story. To understand what that means you really need to understand ‘User eXperience Design,’ commonly called UX Design. If you look up what UX Design is, you can get lots of variations, but here is one off of Wikipedia: “A subset of the field of experience design that pertains to the creation of the architecture and interaction models that affect user experience of a device or system. The scope of the field is directed at affecting ‘all aspects of the user’s interaction with the product or service: how it is perceived, learned and used.’” To start with, let’s talk more about what UX is not. It is not “UI” (User Interface, formerly called GUI) Design, although UI Design is part of it. A common misconception is that it is just a line item, or a technology, when it really is a holistic approach that includes everyone with a vested interest in the system in question. It is about the experience and the emotional connection with a system. Further, UX is not usability, though again, this is part of UX—but just a part. Lastly in the misconceptions bucket is that UX Design is about the user, which it is not, but rather it is about the user’s “experience” with a given system. To many this might seem like a huge paradigm shift and maybe Continued on page 82 ISSUE TWO 2011 MEDIA INC.

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UX DESIGN, Continued from page 81

it is on some level, but it frequently is an evolution, a shift in the mind in how you look at or approach a problem. UX is not a single discipline but all of them working together, and you can do it one step at a time. Over the years I have seen many methodologies come and go and UX is not that. It can be, but it can be lots of methodologies and approaches; if it works one way for you, then do that. Many people ask, “Why is UX important?” This is really a topic unto itself. Probably the best example of UX is the $300-million button— the story of how a small change to a button on Amazon increased revenue by $300 million a year. This story turned out to be a login screen in the wrong spot that made customers log in to buy something. As it turned out, most users resented having to log in. In this case, user studies or UX practices were able to identify this issue. But there are lots of other reasons, including discoverability and usability. But more than usability, UX can help get users passionately engaged in a system. UX helps break out of the box. In the spirit of openness, all this UX love has a downside; specifically, it’s hard to quantify. Sure, there are great examples—like the Amazon login screen—of clear, quantifiable UX, but really that example was only quantifiable in hindsight. This tends to be true in many cases, that only in hindsight are we really able to see the difference in a way that businesses understand. So while UX is a big trend, it will be awhile before the business community as a whole really buys into User Experience Design. The next obvious question is what do UX Designers do, exactly? This tends to be a mixed bag, too, of things like A/B testing, or UX surveys, wire framing, mockups, interaction diagrams, user stories, personas, user flows, design patterns and content style guides, and the like. Many times all these tasks are done as a team. Even when it comes to UI comps, the ‘designer’ is not on their own building them, but doing it as part of the team where even the developer (*gasp* I know, but even developers, especially ones that appreciate design, can contribute) gets input. Typically, however, for this kind of dynamic to work, everyone needs to be vested in it as an approach. To help understand what this looks like, let’s look at a specific example. Nothing is better than personal experience. In 2010 there was this event Nike was sponsoring called the ‘World Basketball Festival’ and it was kicked off by a month-long series of events in New York City. One of Nike’s goals was to use this to help address a problem with the key New York demographic, which was the NY basketball scene. New York basketball fans are focused on the local street basketball, say down at Rucker Park, and are not really engaged with the larger basketball community. Our team was asked to design a digital expe82

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rience to get them engaged with the NBA and larger World Basketball. The process really was the team together identifying the demographic, researching the demographic, and looking at what they were interested in. This process also involved looking at the physical location, interior design, sound and all aspects of the experience and how to wrap that around New Yorkers. The team did this from user research with designers, developers, IAs, businesspeople and the like. Throughout the whole process, ideas were always vetted against actual users, or what we called clean representatives (meaning we use them only once), of the target demographic to look at behavior, usage patterns and get any feedback we could. In our previous methods this project would have taken months to develop and build, but the composite team was able to do this in six weeks. Granted, a large part of this was the technology that enabled this workflow, but it was this user experience approach that really raised the bar on what we delivered. So what is User Experience Design? In short, it’s a way of looking at and approaching design where the focus is on designing the “experience” of engaging with a system using a holistic approach involving as many disciplines as needed where everyone has a voice. How is UX Design done? UX Design is done with a number of tools from user stores, wire framing and actually putting things in front of users, but as suggested it’s a larger approach that includes not just users and designers, but information architects, developers, and even interior designers, physiologists or anyone else that can contribute to a better experience for the user. David has been building Targeted Customer eXperiences primarily on the Web and environmental spaces for over 10 years. David is currently the Principal User eXperience Architect for Wirestone and Director of Interact Seattle. Currently his main focus is in the retail space with touch experiences such as digital price-tags, touch walls and kiosks. Other career highlights include the Silverlight Bill Gates demo at TechEd ‘08, the Entertainment Tonight Emmy Award site for the Silverlight launch, and becoming a Microsoft MVP in 2009, as well as his work with Wirestone including the Nike Touch-wall. In his spare time David helps run Interact (Seattle’s Designer Developer Interaction Group and the Seattle Silverlight User Group) as well as writes phone 7 apps with 2 top 100 apps. Visit www.interactseattle.org and www.wirestone.com.


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Q U A L I T Y

P R I N T I N G

ISO Certified 9001:2008

ISO 9000 Certified

SFI-00570


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M A T D T N E A R R S B

PR S IN T D ELI VER By Jules Van Sant, Executive Director, PPI Association

he element of branding and consistency in messaging continues to hold value as we continue our journey into the media mix of new. It’s key as a design and marketing professional to keep this high on the priority list during the entire creative and selling process.

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Also vital: Understanding the various delivery methods of the brand messaging and how to deliver visual consistency in print, television, Web, interactive, social and mobile media. As customization has come to fruition through digital media, print also has morphed into a personalized event for the recipient, driving the reader further into custom content, carrying the branding message further than ever before. Packaging, advertising, point of sale, direct mail, collateral, trading cards and beyond bring new possibilities. Augmented reality, QR codes, personal URLs, and recipient-specific mail pieces all offer a greater return on investment in the brand, increasing loyalty and recognition. Continued on page 86

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BRAND MATTERS/PRINT DELIVERS, Continued from page 84

If you understand the diversity of platforms and can create imagery and messaging that hits the target clearly in a world of information overload, you’re winning. This means knowing the parameters to keep color, quality and overall composition of your design intact so the audience gets it. There are limitations and adjustments to be made to communicate your brand from one medium to another. Professionals need a greater understanding of creation software, production technology possibilities and limitations, and selling an end reality in the look, delivery and budget for projects. Opportunities to grow your business and that of your clients are present now more than ever, according to a 2010 study conducted by the Custom Content Council in partnership with ContentWise, a branded content newsletter. Not only are the trends upward, but according to the study, “branded content initiatives are considered by marketers to be more effective than any other leading form of advertising and marketing.” The top reasons for using branded content are customer education and retention—marketers believe their investment will fuel longer-term returns. Here are a few highlights from the study:

SPENDING AS PART OF THE MEDIA MIX: • 29 percent of the average overall marketing, advertising and

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communications budget funds were dedicated to branded content. This is the second greatest ever (first was 32 percent in 2009). • This year’s study shows that content spending is the second highest ever, at $1,366,605 per company. • Print represented 43 percent of the total spending, while electronic and other accounted for 35 and 12 percent, respectively.

OUTSOURCING BRANDED CONTENT AND SPENDING: • The use of services of external agencies (such as custom publishers, PR/marketing firms, design firms, video production companies or interactive agencies) to handle some aspect of branded content initiatives remains consistent at around 50 percent. • Outsourcing was more prevalent among print forms (45 percent) of branded content, than it was among electronic (19 percent) or other (23 percent) forms. Of all the branded content initiatives, some portion of these was outsourced 31 percent of the time.

SHIFT IN SPENDING: • For the first time in the survey’s history, responders reported to what degree their organization is shifting from traditional forms of advertising and marketing to new forms (i.e. branded content, content marketing, custom publishing, or custom media). • A total of 68 percent of companies indicate that they are shifting Continued on page 88


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BRAND MATTERS/PRINT DELIVERS, Continued from page 86

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to branded content. • The majority of companies (61 percent) have experienced a moderate shift in their spending, while 7 percent report an aggressive shift. According to Keith Sedlak, chair of the Custom Content Council and Chief Marketing Officer with Meredith Integrated Marketing, “The 2010 numbers illustrate a spending level that is nearly 100 percent above 2008. Add to that the fact that 68 percent of companies surveyed continue to shift their ad dollars to branded content. And lastly, there was a 20-percent increase in companies surveyed this year versus last year that plan to grow their branded content budgets.” Show me the money! Are you in the branding stream with your business and your clients’ businesses? Are you thinking traditionally, more digitally, or keeping it all balanced and optimized? Can you improve your position and value-add while potentially spending less? Knowledge comes from many sources—keep up and stay relevant to your customers and their brands.

If you understand the diversity of platforms and can create imagery and messaging that hits the target clearly in a world of information overload, you’re winning.

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Learn more about the renewed effectiveness of print with other mediums at Print Delivers NW, scheduled for July 26 at the Seattle Asian Art Museum. This national tour is brought to the design, advertising and marketing communities compliments of The Print Council, West Linn Paper Company and PPI. It includes experts, exhibits, networking and case studies to help fuel your next client meeting. Find out more and register at www.printdeliversnw.com.

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About the Custom Content Council study: The research was conducted via online and mailed methods targeting a random sample of companies across all industries. More than 5,000 invitations were distributed and approximately 200 surveys were completed and returned, producing a +/- 6% degree of accuracy at a 90% confidence level. Among the responding companies were: Allstate Insurance, ASPCA, Hoosier Energy, Honda Financial Services, Lockheed Martin, MS Department of Transportation, Proskauer Rose LLP, SiriusXM Radio, State Farm Insurance, World Vision, YMCA and Zale Corporation. The research was conducted by the monthly subscription newsletter ContentWise, a source of news, information and research on the content marketing industry.


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WHAT to LOOKfor when

HIRING a TECH FIRM

By Frank DePalma Guest Columnist

ave you thought about expanding your reach and servicing more of your clients’ needs? Establishing a relationship with an experienced IT firm might be the smartest business move you make this year. But what should you look for when hiring a tech firm? CUSTOMER SUPPORT. When you choose an IT team to partner with, make sure they have the best interest of your customer in mind with every decision. If your customers are used to getting quick phone response from you, but you get a slow e-mail response from your provider, it could make your customer lose confidence in your ability. Decide how your relationship with your customer and IT provider will work: Will they be contacting the customer on your behalf? Or will you be the only point of contact? Also, be sure to sign a non-compete agreement and work out the details of how any future sales will go if your customer contacts the IT company directly. COMMUNICATION SKILLS. Make sure that the IT team is able to clearly explain the technology to your client without seeming condescending and without making the client feel incompetent. And choose a firm that is able to provide valuable suggestions for new technology. APPROPRIATE COMPANY SIZE. Find an IT firm that is a good fit for your client. Small enough to provide personal attention, large enough to accommodate your client’s growth, providing good project management, and having backup staff when needed.

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DEPENDABILITY. Even the best of us make mistakes. The question is, how will problems be addressed? And what types of contingency plans are in place? PROJECT MANAGEMENT. Make sure your IT team has proven methods for tracking progress, storing important files, passwords and data, and for keeping the project moving in a positive direction. CHECK REFERENCES. This one can be tricky. Most people don’t provide the names of unsatisfied customers as references! So be sure to ask specific questions, such as: How long have you been working together? What is their strongest attribute? What kind of work have they done for you? How would you describe their customer service? THE TRUTH WILL SET YOU FREE. Maintain transparency with your customers. Although direct contact between the programmer and the customer isn’t always imperative, good communication is. I recommend introducing everyone involved at the beginning of the project via phone, e-mail or chat. Then appoint one point of contact on each team. It’s okay that your customers know that you are not the geeks behind the Web site. The reason they work with you is because of your style, skill, or whatever reason makes it a good fit. So build on your existing relationship and create more work. Frank DePalma is founder and president of Totera Web Systems. Visit www.totera.com.


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2011 MARKETING TRENDS You DIDN’T KNOW You Knew

By Andrew Martin Guest Columnist

s the first half of 2011 comes to an end, three things have become crystal clear: 2011 will see the death of digital marketing, content is still king, and making marketing fun is what all marketers should be trying to do. Digital Marketing is Dead Before a Twitter storm erupts, let me explain. Today, digital marketing is “marketing.” Digital is so ubiquitous to every aspect of marketing that qualifying digital as its own form of marketing makes no sense. In 2011, marketing is digital. Period. If you don’t believe me, then believe the facts: According to comScore, a leader in measuring the digital world, in August 2010, 75.6 million mobile U.S. subscribers ages 13 and older used downloaded applications. For the same period, 80.8 million mobile subscribers used their browser. With our continual immersion into 4G phones, iPads, iTV, social media, location apps, etc., a digital strategy should serve as the basis of your marketing in 2011. If this isn’t the case with your current marketing strategy, you can rectify the situation by planning your marketing content for multiple digital experiences and platforms. Content Remains King Sometimes in the excitement of discovering new technologies we forget that it’s the art of storytelling that helps marketers connect with their audience. In 2011 we’ve re-emerged from a long tech hangover to

A

realize that, irrespective of the latest and greatest technology trends, content remains king. Today, content is back in a big way. To be effective, the focus needs to be on handcrafting content for each marketing channel. In a digital world people’s attention is increasingly short. As marketers we must get back to thinking of our customers first. Find out what matters to them. Consider how we can make their lives easier. Getting people’s attention by delivering great content and functionality is critical to delivering real engagement and results. Let’s Play Understanding the value of “attention” in driving conversion can’t be understated. The truth is this: Attention is elevated through fun experiences; this drives engagement, which in turn delivers ROI. In the first half of 2011, we’ve learned that people just want to have fun. This has propelled the explosion of “gamification.” Adding a gaming layer to your marketing can bring the rewards of gaming into everyday offerings. Game mechanics can be used to engage users, to make the boring fun, and necessities novel. Ask yourself how to challenge and reward visitors. Don’t underestimate the power of badges, earning points, achieving new status levels. Make your experiences fun and rewarding and you’ll have an amazing 2011. Andrew Martin is VP of Seattle-based Metia, Inc., a global digital marketing agency with offices in London, New York and Singapore.

We Have You Covered. Media Inc. is the industry leader for marketing, advertising, film, video, radio, TV, print media, design, photography, printing, internet and multimedia news and information in the Northwest.

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ColorGraphics EXPANDS

Mailing Capabilities n June 2011, ColorGraphics Inc., a Cenveo company, added a Gunther Series III intelligent inserting line to complement their expanding commercial mailing capabilities. This new system offers in-line folding, four-way match mailing capability, selective envelope inserting, in-line metering, and high-resolution ink jet capabilities. The addition of the Series III inserting line serves as a complement to other production systems the company has relocated to Seattle from its sister plants to address the particular production needs of the healthcare and insurance markets, while the versatility of the system fits the production needs of the company’s other clientele. The Gunther line offers fast, reliable production throughput and serves as a strong link between Cenveo’s commercial print and envelope manufacturing capabilities. The company chose Gunther due to Gunther’s reputation in high-integrity production workflows and experience in managing critical communication, offering 100 percent package content integrity. “We need to prove the accuracy of mailing of each individual page within an envelope,” says Dion Wilhelm, Cenveo’s Regional

I

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Director of Mail & Fulfillment Services, “and this system does that by providing a process and reports that comply with HIPAA and information security regulations.” The equipment reads and collects information from a variety of barcode formats for integrity and machine control, making it flexible as well as efficient. The in-line folding and accumulating system will fold documents of varying page lengths and insert them into a #10 or 6 x 9½ envelope, while processing the collected barcode information through three on-board networked computer systems to monitor, process, and control the information flow throughout the inserting process. ColorGraphics, one of the Seattle area’s largest commercial print companies, was acquired by Cenveo in 2007 and has since merged Cenveo’s mailing capabilities into its Seattle operation. The company is known for high-end commercial print and mail production and became ISO 9001:2008 certified in February of 2011. As an extension of this drive toward quality and accuracy, the addition of this new inserting line adds the production capacity and integrity to keep pace with the company’s quality-conscious clientele.


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BRIEFS

GA Creative Receives Communitas Award GA Creative, an integrated branding and advertising agency based in Bellevue, Washington, received the Communitas Award for its work on behalf of Bellevue’s first non-profit organization, 100-year-old Overlake Service League. In renaming the organization Bellevue LifeSpring, and unveiling new identity and communication materials, GA helped the organization better communicate its mission—to transform lives through assistance with basic living needs and special programs to help individuals and families in Bellevue build a better future. “The new Bellevue LifeSpring identity speaks to the enormous spirit of this organization in supporting members of the Bellevue community,” said Rebecca Songer Laughlin, GA Communications Strategist. “It is a treat to play a continued role in building awareness and communicating its mission. Recognition from Communitas for our work is especially rewarding.” For more information, visit www.gacreative.com.

Redhook Returns to its Craft Roots with Hornall Anderson Today’s shopping experience in the beer aisle is met with a veritable barrage of choices, from mainstream to premium craft beer. Seattle-based Hornall Anderson’s long-time client, Redhook Brewery recognized the experience as having become far from simple and straightforward, with the great divide between the categories continuing to grow with options ranging from domestic to premium craft. Hornall Anderson once again partnered with Redhook to help them reconnect with consumers by simplifying the shopping experience and returning them to their craft roots. The firm implemented a creative strategy to help engage new and past consumers, while improving navigation of the beer aisle and challenging competition in the craft beer industry. Designed to launch in alignment with Redhook’s 30-year anniversary, this clean, color-coded and easily identifiable packaging system not only stands out from the competition on-shelf, but also provides clear branded messaging through a distinct voice and personality, helping to redefine customer expectations. For more information, visit www.hornallanderson.com.

Wright Business Graphics Wins PEAK Awards The Print Services & Distribution Association (PSDA) selected Portland’s Wright Business Graphics as the Grand Award recipient of two of its most prestigious 2011 PEAK Awards. Winning categories included Catalog & Commercial Printing as well as the Award of Excellence in Forms & Security Documents. “It is a sincere honor to be recognized by the PSDA for excellence in printing,” said Dan Adkison, president/COO of Wright Business Graphics. “We are extremely proud of our highly skilled and dedicated employees. They are passionate about their craft and winning these coveted awards is an affirmation of their commitment to excellence.” For more information, visit www.wrightbg.com.

PRR Designs EPA’s New Fuel Economy Labels PRR, a Seattle-based communications agency, worked with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to design the new fuel economy labels, which provide more comprehensive fuel economy information to help Americans make educated decisions about the cars they purchase. The company leveraged their marketing, research, and design expertise to help guide EPA through the most dramatic overhaul of the fuel economy label since the program began nearly 30 years ago. “For most people, buying a vehicle is the second biggest purchase they will make in their lifetime,” said PRR managing principal Mike Rosen. “With average commutes of 46 minutes and fuel costs hovering around $4 a gallon, people are looking for straightforward information to help save money and reduce environmental impacts. PRR is proud to have worked with EPA to provide Americans with information that will help them navigate through this important purchase.” The new fuel economy labels will be required to be affixed to all new passenger cars and trucks starting with model year 2013. The new design will provide more comprehensive information, including estimated annual fuel costs, savings, and information on each vehicle’s environmental impact. For more information, visit www.prrbiz.com. 96

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FOCUS ON:

DESIGN FIRMS A QUICK Q&A WITH A FEW OF THE NORTHWEST’S LEADING GRAPHIC DESIGN FIRMS

FLINT DESIGN CO. CATHERINE HEALY, Principal/Creative Director

QUESINBERRY AND ASSOCIATES, INC.

DUMB EYES

WENDY QUESINBERRY, Principal/Creative Director

Managing Director/Founder/Principal

WHAT DO YOU FEEL IT TAKES TO BE AN ELITE GRAPHIC DESIGN FIRM OR DESIGNER? Being at the forefront of design innovation, materials and marketing strategies.

WHAT DO YOU FEEL IT TAKES TO BE AN ELITE GRAPHIC DESIGN FIRM OR DESIGNER? A commitment to your core strengths.

IS THERE A PROJECT YOU’RE WORKING ON CURRENTLY THAT YOU’D LIKE TO TELL OUR READERS ABOUT? We are working with Adelsheim Vineyards in Oregon, now celebrating their 40th anniversary vintage. This is a family-owned business and we are working with them to design new packages that honor their history while incorporating a more contemporary look to appeal to the next generation of wine drinkers. It is a great challenge for us as designers to find the right balance between the brand’s legacy and the future potential.

IS THERE A PROJECT YOU’RE WORKING ON CURRENTLY THAT YOU’D LIKE TO TELL OUR READERS ABOUT? We recently completed a series of Web sites for Consolidated Restaurants that included their corporate site and fine dining restaurants: Metropolitan Grill and Elliott’s Oyster House. It was a great opportunity to help bring these two landmark restaurant brands to life. We’re particularly proud of the content strategy, especially in the case of Elliott’s, which emphasizes our client’s dutiful commitment to sustainable practices.

WHAT IS ONE RECENT GRAPHIC DESIGN TREND YOU ARE EXCITED ABOUT? I am very excited about seeing traditional print publications moving to the iPAD/ tablet format. The content is richer and I find it really engages me on so many levels.

SOME HAVE SAID THAT AS DESIGN CONTINUES TO MOVE INTO THE ELECTRONIC SPHERE, THE TERM “GRAPHIC DESIGN” IS BECOMING ANTIQUATED. WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON THAT? I agree. I think communication design is a better term, but until the mainstream understands what we do (or at least embraces that we do more than magically make things look good), I think we’re stuck. Some businesses still think “branding” means logo design.

SOME HAVE SAID THAT AS DESIGN CONTINUES TO MOVE INTO THE ELECTRONIC SPHERE, THE TERM “GRAPHIC DESIGN” IS BECOMING ANTIQUATED. WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON THAT? Possibly. But everything is blurring so much now and most designers are multidisciplinary these days. Maybe ‘designer’ is enough. WHAT IS YOUR TV GUILTY PLEASURE—THE SHOW YOU WATCH RELIGIOUSLY BUT DON’T TELL ANYONE ABOUT? I love award shows—but I don’t necessarily hide that fact. I find the glamour and spectacle of these shows very addictive.

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WHAT IS YOUR TV GUILTY PLEASURE—THE SHOW YOU WATCH RELIGIOUSLY BUT DON’T TELL ANYONE ABOUT? What I’m more embarrassed to admit is that I can’t remember what night any show airs or what network it’s on. That makes it tricky to follow anything religiously. But when I’m flipping channels I definitely stop on TMZ, Cheaters, or anything with Tyra Banks.

MICHAEL ELLSWORTH,

WHAT DO YOU FEEL IT TAKES TO BE AN ELITE GRAPHIC DESIGN FIRM OR DESIGNER? Our achievements come from having innovative and creative ideas and the ability to realize them for our clients. IS THERE A PROJECT YOU’RE WORKING ON CURRENTLY THAT YOU’D LIKE TO TELL OUR READERS ABOUT? We’re working on a Department of Energy funded Web site devoted to educating and empowering residents of the Pacific NW to make commitments to environmental sustainability, but that’s about the extent we can divulge at this time. We’re very excited about our ongoing design projects with Shabazz Palaces, especially their new album release on Sub Pop. SOME HAVE SAID THAT AS DESIGN CONTINUES TO MOVE INTO THE ELECTRONIC SPHERE, THE TERM “GRAPHIC DESIGN” IS BECOMING ANTIQUATED. WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON THAT? We disagree. The manipulation of image and text to convey information is ‘graphic design’, whether it be digital or analogue. It makes no difference. WHAT IS YOUR TV GUILTY PLEASURE—THE SHOW YOU WATCH RELIGIOUSLY BUT DON’T TELL ANYONE ABOUT? If you enjoy something, then it is good... Why would you feel guilty about it? If you enjoy something then it is simply a pleasure... Not a guilty one.


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*First appeared in The MasterLists 1991.

BETTER, BY DESIGN. There are no shortcuts on the road to great experience. DeďŹ ned by 30+ years of extraordinary experience.

hbdesign.com 2130 nw 29th portland oregon 503.944.1000

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Ad Ventures Design & Marketing; Seattle, WA 206-282-1719 www.adventuresmarketing.com

D. Alex Howard, principal Karen Skeens, CD/ principal

Arscentia; Bellevue, WA 425-454-8006; fax 425-454-1022 gcummings@arscentia.com www.arscentia.com

Grant Cummings, principal Lennie Lutes, CEO

Art4orm, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-228-1399; fax 503-224-0229 kevin@art4orm.com www.art4orm.com

Kevin York, principal/CD

Artitudes Design Inc.; Issaquah, WA 425-369-3030; fax 425-369-9609 steve@artitudesdesign.com www.artitudesdesign.com

Andrea Heuston, CEO

BHV Design Lab; Seattle, WA 206-369-9902; fax 206-374-2862 connect@bhvdesignlab.com www.bhvdesignlab.com

Benjamin Vogt, president/CD

Buoyant Creative USA; Point Roberts, WA 360-945-0488; fax 360-945-0488 spama@buoyantcreative.com www.buoyantcreative.com

Darrell Cassidy, president

Catch Design Studio, LLC; Seattle, WA 206-322-4323; fax 206-322-9177 office@catchstudio.com www.catchstudio.com

Elizabeth Montgomery Nos Narin Mahdi Montgomery

CKA, Inc. dba CKA Creative; Seattle, WA 206-448-9274; fax 206-728-1125 mark@ckacreative.com www.ckacreative.com

James P. Carey, president Mark J. Anderson, VP

CMD; Portland, OR & Seattle, WA 503-223-6794; fax 503-223-2430 info@cmdagency.com www.cmdagency.com

Phil Reilly, president Mike Cobb, VP accounts Dan Hergert, VP/COO

Creative Company, Inc.; McMinnville, OR 503-883-4433; fax 503-883-6817 optimize@creativeco.com www.creativeco.com

Jennifer Morrow, president Steve Donatelli, CD

Design Hovie Studios Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-783-8600 site@hovie.com www.hovie.com

Hovie Hawk, CD

Dumb Eyes; Seattle, WA 206-965-8952 info@dumbeyes.com www.dumbeyes.com

Christian Petersen, CD Corey Gutch, interactive director Michael Allsworth, managing director

Effective Design Studio; Seattle, WA 206-328-8989; fax 206-328-2285 caroline@effectivedesign.com www.effectivedesign.com

Caroline Scull, CD Michael Scull, managing partner Joy Rubin, art director

Fitch; Seattle, WA 206-624-0551; fax 206-624-0875 www.fitch.com

James Sundstad, managing director

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C R E AT I V E , E X P E R I E N C E D SPECIALISTS IN PREMIUM FOOD & BEVERAGE BRANDING S T R AT E G Y ~ PA C K A G E D E S I G N P R I N T ~ P O I N T- O F - S A L E ~ W E B S I T E S E V E N T, R E T A I L , R E S T A U R A N T & T R A D E S H O W B R A N D D E S I G N I N T E G R AT I O N

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Funk/Levis & Associates; Eugene, OR 541-485-1932; fax 541-485-3460 annemarie@funklevis.com www.funklevis.com

Anne Marie Levis, president

GA Creative; Bellevue, WA 425-454-0101; fax 425-454-0464 marlice@gacreative.com www.gacreative.com

Marlice Gulacsik Wally Lloyd

Gage Design; Seattle, WA 206-622-0905; fax 206-622-8824 bill@gagedesign.com www.gagedesign.com

William Gage, president

Girvin Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-674-7808; fax 206-674-7909 info@girvin.com www.girvin.com

Tim Girvin

Glitschka Studios; Salem, OR 971-223-6143 info@glitschka.com www.vonglitschka.com

Von Glitschka, principal

Golden Lasso; Seattle, WA 206-838-3170; fax 206-838-3161 philips@goldenlasso.com

Bridget Culligan, CEO Philip Shaw, president

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Hammerquist Studios; Redmond, WA 425-869-0191 fred@hammerquist.net www.hammerquist.net

Fred Hammerquist, president

Hansen Belyea; Seattle, WA 206-682-4895 patricia@hansenbelyea.com www.hansenbelyea.com

Patricia Belyea, strategic director Ron Lars Hansen, design director Michael Stone, IT director

Hansen Design Company; Seattle, WA 206-285-3000 pat@hansendesign.com www.hansendesign.com

Pat Hansen, CD

HB Design; Portland, OR 503-944-1000; fax 503-944-1030 www.hbdesign.com

Noma Hanlon, president Gail Snow, VP strategic development Leslie Worth, CD

Hornall Anderson; Seattle, WA 206-467-5800; fax 206-467-6411 info@hadw.com www.hornallanderson.com

Jack Anderson, CEO John Anicker, president of development, finance & operations Lisa Cerveny, president of creative & culture

ImagiCorps; Redmond, WA 425-869-0599; fax 425-869-1285 info@imagicorps.com www.imagicorps.com

Thomas Hutchinson, president

Kl端ndt/Hosmer; Spokane, WA 509-456-5576; fax 509-456-5848 info@klundthosmer.com www.klundthosmer.com

Rick Hosmer

Methodologie; Seattle, WA 206-623-1044; fax 206-625-0154 info@methodologie.com www.methodologie.com

Janet DeDonato & Dale Hart

Moto Interactive + Branding LLC; Portland, OR 503-914-5832 nibble@motointeractive.com www.motointeractive.com

Dru Martin, CD

Opus Creative; Portland, OR 503-220-0252 info@opuscreative.com www.opuscreative.com

Jim Fletcher, owner Todd Jetton, COO

Phinney Bischoff Design House; Seattle, WA 206-322-3484; fax 206-322-3590 nathano@pbdh.com www.pbdh.com

Leslie Phinney, CEO/CD Karl Bischoff, president

Pivot + Levy; Seattle, WA 206-285-6191; fax 206-285-6130 www.pivotandlevy.com

Terry Stoeser Matt Trinneer

Plexipixel Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-781-1405; fax 206-352-1311 info@plexipixel.com www.plexipixel.com

Vicky Tamaru, co-founder/EP

Prentice Design, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-933-0608; fax 206-933-0620 info@prenticedesign.com www.prenticedesign.com

Paul Prentice, president

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Quango, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-968-0825; fax 503-968-1565 info@quangoinc.com www.quangoinc.com

Dave Anolik, CCO

Quesinberry and Associates, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-323-1173; fax 206-323-1296 info@quesinberry.com www.quesinberry.com

Wendy Quesinberry

RMB Vivid, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-956-0688 brian@rmbvivid.com www.rmbvivid.com

Brian Boram, principal/ design director Keith Rea, principal

RocketDog Communications; Seattle, WA 206-254-0248; fax 206-254-0238 info@rocketdog.org www.rocketdog.org

Susan Elliott Michael Elliott

Rusty George Creative; Tacoma, WA 253-284-2140; fax 253-284-2142 info@rustygeorge.com www.rustygeorge.com

Rusty George, creative principal Kitura George, operations Emily Cook, business development

Sakkal Design; Bothell, WA 425-483-8830; fax 425-483-9707 mamoun@sakkal.com www.sakkal.com

Mamoun Sakkal, principal

Silver Fox Productions, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-329-6805; fax 206-329-7066 info@silverfoxprod.com www.silverfoxprod.com

Ellen Moos, principal Scott Karman, acct director Sean Masterton, acct director

Smith/Walker Design; Seattle, WA 253-872-2111; fax 253-872-2140 jeff@smithwalkerdesign.com www.smithwalkerdesign.com

Jeff Smith Robin Walker

Stafford Creative, Inc; Edmonds, WA 425-412-1550 inquire@staffordcreative.com www.staffordcreative.com

Sid Stafford, CD Tina Stafford, account executive

Synchro Creative Communications; Bellevue, WA 425-885-5661; fax 425-957-7202 bonnie@synchrocreative.com www.synchrocreative.com

Bonnie Chelini and Candy Young, principals

Turnstyle, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-297-7350; fax 206-297-7390 info@turnstylestudio.com www.turnstylestudio.com

Matt Diefenbach, principal Ben Graham, principal Steve Watson, principal

Victory Studios; Seattle, WA 206-282-1776; fax 206-282-3535 info@victorystudios.com www.victorystudios.com

Conrad Denke, CEO Saul Mitchell, VP media services Kimberly McGregor, VP production

View Design, Inc.; Lake Oswego, OR 503-961-5516 jason@viewdesign.net www.viewdesign.net

Jason Halstead, president/CD

Walsh Design; Seattle, WA 206-284-4430; fax 206-284-4425 miriam@walshdesign.com www.walshdesign.com

Miriam Walsh Lisco, owner/president

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T ATES E, L E TH SU USS EACH IS C S I D WE MPANY H C I WH EST CO ASSO. N I , L HW S ERIE T NORT GOLDEN S IEW REN RM TERV A DIFFE ASED FI N I B ’S H INC. ST WIT EATTLEA I MED GREATE WITH S AND TINUES CON

G

olden Lasso is a 13-year-old design and marketing firm where old school meets new school. According to Bridget Culligan, CEO, “We utilize the tried and true and combine it to whatever’s new—as long as it is right for the client’s goals.” HERE IS CULLIGAN, ON THE RECORD: WHAT IS YOUR DESIGN PHILOSOPHY? To really listen to our clients first. Then we help them discover what their customers care about and then we connect the two, in creative and engaging ways, of course.

WHO OR WHAT INSPIRES YOU, EITHER PERSONALLY OR PROFESSIONALLY? Personally: Beauty, wherever you can find it; something that is stunning and unexpected makes a lasting impression. It is just that simple. Professionally: I am fortunate to be working with great companies, organizations and our people at the firm. Our staff and our clients make it worth doing every day. WHAT CURRENT PROJECT ARE YOU WORKING ON THAT YOU ARE PARTICULARLY PROUD OF? We just finished an incredible partnership with CRG Events in developing inspirational collateral and publications for Bill and Melinda Gates and Warren Buffett’s Giving Pledge effort. They are an inspiration to the world and just to be able to be involved is humbling and

has been a highlight of our year. HOW IMPORTANT IS IT FOR YOUR COMPANY TO CONNECT AND ENGAGE WITH YOUR SURROUNDING COMMUNITY? Extremely! Community is core to our mission. We believe in helping clients build community—and we work to support local organizations that we feel are crucial to an engaged and supportive citizenship. Peace for the Streets by Kids from the Streets (PSKS) is one example. Golden Lasso developed a pro-bono granting process we call Golden Giving to be able to offer our strategic marketing and design services to worthy causes. PSKS was our first recipient; we produced brand and supporting materials for a capital campaign so they can extend the services they offer in helping transition homeless youth and young adults off the streets, getting them back on track. WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR MOST GRATIFYING PROFESSIONAL ACCOMPLISHMENTS? Being acknowledged by the Puget Sound Business Journal for our Corporate Citizenship and dedication to good causes. And we are really proud of our client tenure. It is not typical in the industry. For example, we have been doing great work with Holland America Line for eight years. Another client, a pharmaceutical company that we helped to launch their core product, has now been working with us for over 11 years. WHAT WOULD YOU DO IF YOU WON THE LOTTERY? You Have to Play to Win! We wrote that. Actually, we didn’t, but it is true and some day we will play and if we win we’ll all ride off into the sunset together. Until then we spend our extra money on culture, food and fun. BE HONEST: ARE YOU TEAM EDWARD OR TEAM JACOB? Team Jacob. I’d take a werewolf over a sparkly vampire anyday! For more information, visit www.goldenlasso.com.

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Media Inc, Issue 2 2011  

Media industry news and information

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