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CONTENTS

VOLUME NINE

ISSUE TWO

Tom Cruise and Morgan Freeman in a tense scene from Oblivion. PHOTO COURTESY OF UNIVERSAL PICTURES

EXECUTIVE EDITOR Andrew Vogel andrew@louisianafilmandvideo.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Katie Sauro contact@louisianafilmandvideo.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS W. H. Bourne, Abbi Domingue, Pam Glorioso, Bobby Holbrook, Bridgette Homer, Natalie Hultman, Odin Lindblom, Cary F. McGovern, Hunter McGregor, Molly Ward SALES MANAGER Katie Higgins SALES Shay Azadi, Eric Iles PRODUCTION MANAGER John Rusnak DESIGNERS

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Dawn Carlson, Beth Harrison, Christina Poisal WEBMASTER Eric Pederson OFFICE MANAGER

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

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VELOCITY AGENCY PROFILE

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UNUSUAL PATHS TO OBLIVION

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EVENT DESIGN BUILD PROFILE

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THE SIGNIFICANCE OF SMALL PARTS

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THE FILMMAKER FRONT

THE EQUIPMENT YOU NEED, THE PEOPLE WHO PROVIDE IT

FOCUS ON SHREVEPORT/BOSSIER 16 SHREVEPORT-BOSSIER: THE OTHER SIDE OF LOUISIANA 18 MOONBOT STUDIOS: FIRST AN OSCAR, NOW A GOLEM 20 SHREVEPORT-SHOT THE PARDON HITS THEATERS 21 BEYOND GALILEE 22 LANDRUM ARTS LA: TALENT AGENCY BOASTS QUALITY OVER QUANTITY 23 TALENT GETS A BOOST FROM NEW ACTORS LAB 23 SHREVEPORT FILMMAKING WITH GEOLAND FILMS 26

CATCHING UP WITH THE WALKING DEAD’S NICK GOMEZ

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TECH TIPS WITH BOBBY HOLBROOK

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“WHERE YOU LIVE IS OUR BUSINESS”

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SPECTRUM FX: LA’S SPECIAL EFFECTS HUB

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READY SET FILM: INTRO TO GRIP & ELECTRIC

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SERVICING THE FILM INDUSTRY AND BEYOND

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EQUIPMENT LISTS PRODUCTION/POST EQUIPMENT LIST EVENT EQUIPMENT LIST SUPPORT EQUIPMENT LIST HEAVY PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT LIST

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INFORMATION SERVICES MANAGER Lois Sanborn

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LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION... AND SO OUR JOURNEY BEGINS

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BLACKBIRD COMPLETES FILMING, HEADS TO POST PRODUCTION

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LOUISIANA TALENT HEATS UP THE RED CARPET AT HOLLYWOOD PREMIERE

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BUILDING A VISUAL STORY: NOVAC’S INTRO TO CINEMATOGRAPHY WORKSHOP

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ON THE COVER: Morgan Freeman waits for his cue on the set of Oblivion. PHOTO COURTESY OF UNIVERSAL PICTURES

DIGITAL EDITION AVAILABLE AT: WWW.LOUISIANAFILMANDVIDEO.COM 4

Audra Higgins

written permission of the publisher. PRINTED IN THE USA


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

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recently attended a very inspiring interview hosted by the New Orleans Film Society with Benh Zeitlin, the director of Beasts of the Southern Wild. Although Beasts didn’t win an Academy Award, no honor was lost for Zeitlin. He talked extensively about soulfulness and the adventure and spontaneity of moviemaking. Coming from a background in music, Zeitlin also expressed his ideas as if they were part of a grander symphony. As he was talking, I couldn’t help but think that this is what true filmmaking is about. It’s about connecting with an audience on a deep emotional level versus trying to win them over with grandiose explosions and car chases. After hearing of the beauty and soulfulness that surrounded the making of Beasts, it didn’t at all surprise me that the film was as moving as it was. One of the things Zeitlin said that stuck with me was that the film industry is made up of two sides: the filmmakers and the famous people. And that once you end up on the side of the famous people, there are a lot more rules and a lot less creative freedom. This made me realize how important our independent filmmaking industry is here in Louisiana. Of course, we love to host the big budgets down here that keep our skilled crew working and our city flourishing, but when they leave, we are left with a lot of passion and, oftentimes, not a lot of money. So, thank you to all the true filmmakers in Louisiana who are keeping the creative freedom alive. Sincerely, Andrew Vogel Executive Editor

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UNUSUAL PATHS TO OBLIVION STORY BY W. H. BOURNE PHOTOS COURTESY OF UNIVERSAL PICTURES

Director Joseph Kosinski on the set of Oblivion.

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had no intentions of being a cinematographer,” says director of photography Claudio Miranda. “I just moved my way up through the ranks and then (director David) Fincher asked me if I wanted to shoot a Nike commercial. It’s never what I had planned to do. I wasn’t a kid running around with a camera in my hand. I was around Fincher from the very beginning since 1984. When you look at it retrospectively, I was always around this group of people that little bones would come my way. And then I got an agent at Dattner Dispoto, and I would get great scraps. They would call and ask for Jeff Cronenweth and when he was unavailable, my agent would say, ‘How about Claudio?’ I got accepted because I had worked on great things.” He continues, “I took a long route before shooting my first movie. I started shooting around 2000. I knew Fincher back when I was a stage manager. I was very happy with that job; I was also an electrician. Then I started gaffing. I gaffed Fight Club and The Game and a lot of Tony Scott’s movies. A lot of those got recognition. David and I liked working with each other, and eventually David gave me Benjamin Button.” Traveling a similar, unusual career path is writer/director Joseph Kosinski. There are few directors who have the opportunity to kickstart their careers by directing a blockbuster tent-pole film, but Kosinski was one of them. “I never went to school to be a director,” says Kosinski. “I studied electronic design and engineering, and then I went to architecture school in New York. Once I got out of school while I was still living in New York, I started making short films on my own, which got me my first commercial for Nike. Then I did a couple more spots for Nike before moving out to Los Angeles where I continued to do commercials for another year or two before hopping onto Tron. That was my path coming up, and I know that it usually doesn’t happen that way, but I found the world of commer8

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cials a great training ground.” Kosinski adds, “I did my first 12 or 14 commercials with Claudio before getting into the feature business and obviously brought him onto Tron: Legacy. Claudio’s a master technician. He’s got an incredible eye. We have very similar sensibilities about what we like. Claudio and I hit it off right from the very start. He’s been a dear friend, so getting Claudio on Oblivion was always my first choice; I was thrilled to have him. It’s really great now to see all the attention he’s getting for Life of Pi. I’ve known of his talent for a long time now. I did my first commercial in Los Angeles with him. Almost every commercial I worked on, he did. He was introduced to me by David Fincher. He had worked with David as a gaffer for years before working his way up to a DP on Benjamin Button.” Just as Miranda and Kosinski followed nontraditional career journeys, Oblivion also followed an unusual trajectory from the page to the screen. “It started as a treatment for a film in 2005,” says Kosinski, who will see his first writing credit on Oblivion. “It was as an eight-page short story that I wrote. The goal was always to make it into a film. Shortly after I came up with the idea, the Writers Guild went on strike so I

decided to develop it into a graphic novel for a year or two in the meantime. I got caught up in Tron: Legacy and that was a three-year diversion. But once that wrapped up, I took the idea and the series of images I had put together over the years and sold it to Disney. I developed it with a couple of screenwriters there. When it became apparent that this was more of a PG13 film, Disney was kind enough to let me take it elsewhere, so I brought it over to Universal. It’s been an eight-year journey from the initial concept to the screen.” Walking a project from one studio to another is virtually unheard of in Hollywood. Usually a writer will spend years trying to regain rights to their scripts after turnaround, and those rights usually are accompanied by either a high price tag or a hefty legal battle. So Kosinski’s experience with Oblivion was definitely an anomaly. “I had just finished Tron, and I had a good working relationship with the folks over at Disney,” explains Kosinski. “They essentially just gave it to me and let me bring it anyplace I wanted to. Universal had always been interested in it, so they jumped on it immediately. It was a very smooth process, which to my understanding usually doesn’t go that way.”


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Of course, there’s a missing piece to this movie development fairytale—San Diego Comic Con, a place where all writers and artists dream of having their creative properties break out and get discovered. “I had done a sample chapter of the illustrated novel (of Oblivion) with Radical Publishing, a comic book company I was working with at the time,” says Kosinski. “We handed out over 1,000 of those little previews at Comic Con in 2010. Somehow Tom Cruise got his hands on one of those little introduction stories… so he called me up. I went over there and sat down and talked him through the story, telling him about this character (Jack Harper) and the movie I wanted to make. So based on that one meeting, he sort of attached himself to the project before I even had a script. He got it right away; it was exactly the kind of role he was looking for. I went away and spent six months writing the script, and then I came back and we were off to the races.” Kosinski explains, “Obviously Tom was the first piece of the puzzle. It was the dream team

Tom Cruise in action on Oblivion.

of casting... I had always said, ‘Wouldn’t it be great if we can get Morgan Freeman to play (Malcolm) Beech,’ and Tom was like, ‘Yeah, I’ve always wanted to work with him,’ so I sent Morgan the script, and he responded right away that he was interested. We put a lot of focus into casting our two female leads. We spent a lot of time testing super-talented actresses and went through quite a process to narrow it down to Olga Kurylenko and Andrea Riseborough. It all just came together.” With Oscar winners Morgan Freeman and 10

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Melissa Leo performing next to Recent Academy Award-winning cinematographer Claudio Miranda Oscar-nominated Tom Cruise, at work on the set. Oblivion could boast a great cast. Even Claudio Miranda was impressed with the casting, especially Cruise and Freeman. “Everyone really did a great job,” says Miranda. “In the first scene when Morgan lights that match, you go, ‘Wow, that’s Morgan Freeman,’ as his voice is reverberating in the room.” He continues, “Tom (Cruise) is a trooper. He just doesn’t give up. You’re constantly amazed at his energy. He runs as fast as he can. He’ll do privacy, and it was very easy to work there. another take as fast as he can. Tom throws There wasn’t a lot of outside activity, and I think himself at the project... He’ll do whatever to that allowed all of us to focus on making the make the project better. I mean that guy’s a film. I think Tom really enjoyed it.” machine. And when he’s around, it’s almost Claudio Miranda is no stranger to producinfectious. Nobody’s a crybaby anymore on set tion in Louisiana, working here shortly after the because this man is going and going and going, tax credits were implemented. He finished and everyone’s like, ‘Let’s all go.’ That’s inspirshooting Failure to Launch right before Katrina ing, I thought.” hit, and he was back in Louisiana not long after After acquiring the cast, the storm, filming The Curious Case of the next piece to the puzzle Benjamin Button. It’s interesting to see how he was locations, which, for a views the impact of the economic incentives. change, followed a very typi“There’s a lot more crew to pull from, but cal path. now it’s twice as busy,” says Miranda. “And “The rebate in Louisiana is there’s a lot of crew that’s moved there from Los a huge incentive because it Angeles. That town (New Orleans) is booming. allows you to put more up on You go to the airport, and there will be five vans the screen, which is what you there picking up crew. I was amazed at how always want to do. You want to busy it was. There were three movies filming (in be able to deliver the biggest, New Orleans) all at the same time.” best movie you can, given the “It was tricky at times because there was so budget you have, and much production going on in Louisiana at the Louisiana was a big part of same time that it was hard to staff up when that plan,” explains Kosinski. we needed to bulk up in construction,” adds “Celtic Studios in Baton Kosinski. “Fortunately, we were able to make Rouge had the facilities we it work. I had a wonderful experience workwanted. I needed really large ing with all the local tradespeople and talent. stages with high ceilings, and I had an amazing experience in Louisiana.” Celtic had the size of stage we Before you jump to assumptions about the needed, as well as the facilities rest of the production being “typical,” the and the workspace and the most interesting aspect of Oblivion’s sci-fi mill. Everything was in close world is as unusual as the rest of this story. proximity, so it ended up being “Joe and I had done blue screen before on the perfect place for this movie. Tron,” says Miranda. “We kind of wanted to And then we were able to use step away from that and do an immersive a couple of practical locations environment.” in the area—New Orleans and “We had been talking about something like a couple places around Baton this since Tron,” explains Kosinski. “We were Rouge—for a few pieces of the movie and made talking about multiple different ways to do this, it all work into our overall plan…” like using giant LED screens, but the projecAccording to Kosinski, the actors also liked tion method was something that Claudio shooting in Louisiana. thought might work.” “Morgan’s a Mississippi boy, so that’s basically “Joe and I have the same similar aesthetics, in his neighborhood,” says Kosinski. “For Tom, and we kind of wanted to try the same things,” it’s always about ‘what’s best for the film,’ so he says Miranda. “It requires planning. It’s the was excited to go someplace he hadn’t been same building blocks as everything else. It just before. Once he was down there, I think he required a lot of testing and new techniques. We really loved it because he didn’t have to deal with tested cameras as they came out, but my biggest all the paparazzi there. Baton Rouge is a quiet challenge was the projector setup that we did.” community where people really respect your “We did a very similar technique that


Kubrick used on 2001 (A Space Odyssey), but we kind of updated it for the 21st century by using high-definition projections to basically light our scenes,” says Kosinski. “There are no blue screens or green screens. You’re using the projection to light the sets and light the actors. The actors can look out the window and see what the audience is seeing in the movie. It was one of the most exciting and gratifying kind of things that we were able to pull off because it was a very tricky technique.” “We surrounded the sky tower, the place where Tom overlooks the world in his section, with 20 scattered projectors,” explains Miranda. “We used screens that were 40 feet tall and 500 feet in length that completely surrounded the whole set. Then we had a crew that went off to Hawaii to shoot above the cloud plates, and we projected this 15K image around the whole set.” “We used Barco projectors and the Sony’s F65 camera, which has the light sensitivity to be able to do something like this, along with Master Prime lenses,” says Kosinski. “The combination allowed us to make this all work.” “It’s immersive; you were there,” adds Miranda. “Tom looks at me and says, ‘I love being here. I’m on a set. This is so much better than blue screen.’ And because of that we could keep all the glass on the set. We could keep reflective surfaces on the set. Skin tone looked great. We could make different lighting choices, like using a silhouette against a beautiful sky. It definitely had a different mood. We had 10 different looks, like cloud, overcast, stormy, sunlight, high sun, moonlight... with just a flip of the switch, we could have anything. There was a light that comes from all this that feels very natural. When you’re cutting the movie, you don’t have to wait for visual effects. It’s all there. And the actors feel like it’s there. Tom kept saying, ‘I love being here,’ and I gotta say, that was just awesome. It worked so well.” He continues, “We actually had to use a blue screen for one special scene. With all those reflections when you turn on a blue screen, the set all disappears with all those high-gloss images. You lose the texture of what it was. Then you have to pay the visual effects guys

to go back and paint that all in, and it’s just not quite the same when they’re done. Most visual effects guys will tell you to make all the surfaces dull or dulled down so they don’t reflect back up on the screen, but that’s not what this environment was about. It was modern and sleek; a lot of open windows and glass. “I loved the projection, and we ended up using it for more shots than I thought we would. We thought we would only be able to use it on mediums and tights; we thought the wide shot would give away too much of the screen, but what was amazing was that we got

people will really appreciate it more on the big screen, so we decided to open up on IMAX and follow it up with a regular wide release.” In closing, I asked both Joseph Kosinski and Claudio Miranda for any advice they might have for young filmmakers since neither went to film school. Drawing from his experiences, Miranda suggests, “You should just hang around the people who have the jobs you want to do.” Kosinski also has an interesting view: “You have to make something first before someone’s going to hire you to do something. So when I

Filming on the set at Celtic Studios in Baton Rouge.

away with using it so much more. Then, all of a sudden, the cost benefit actually ended up making it less expensive.” Oblivion will be releasing soon to theaters. Like its creative process, Oblivion’s distribution is also a bit unique. “We’re going to screen on IMAX starting on April 12th and wide release on April 19th, and it’s really because Oblivion is a movie that needs to be seen on the big screen,” explains Kosinski. “We shot on location. It’s not a heavy CGI movie. Everything was done in camera as much as possible. The beautiful settings are Louisiana, Iceland, and New York City. I think

was living in New York, I made a couple of short films on my own time, on my own dime. That’s really the only way to break in, or maybe the best way to break in. You gotta make your own mark and make something that represents your interests and what you want to see. And if it’s good, people will notice it.” For Miranda, the world has certainly noticed. While he was nominated for an Academy Award for The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, he recently won the Academy Award for Cinematography for Life of Pi. With all that talent plus some interesting innovation, it makes Oblivion a must-see for any cinephile. LFV

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THE SIGNIFICANCE OF SMALL PARTS STORY BY CARY F. McGOVERN GUEST COLUMNIST

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ne of the most important factors about the film industry is that there are many small parts for every single large part. Working actors understand this balance. If there are a hundred actors that are consistently cast either as the lead or a supporting role… there are a thousand with relatively small parts.

Leonardo DiCaprio and Laura Cayouette in Django Unchained.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WEINSTEIN COMPANY

So what does this mean to a struggling actor who wants to make her mark in films? The answer has been discovered by a seasoned veteran actor who has made a living with small parts and commercials. Laura Cayouette is the skilled professional who literally wrote the book on the subject. Published in 2012, her book Know Small Parts is a guide for actors who want to keep busy, employed and have a proven path to a long career in films. Cayouette shares in her book her understanding of what it takes to succeed. A clue is contained in its subtitle, An Actor’s Guide to Turning Minutes into Moments and Moments into a Career. She writes how each step of an actor’s path is important; the selection of your venue, the experience you gain and the lessons you’ve learned are ultimately critical to your career. The more work you accept, the more exposure you get, and the more people you know ultimately can lead to larger roles. Cayouette has worked in New York, Los Angeles and now in New Orleans. In L.A. and 12

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New York she split her work among movies, TV, commercials and modeling. She came back to New Orleans to work in Louisiana’s burgeoning film industry; changing her location was a move inspired by her heritage and roots. Cayouette’s parents both grew up in Louisiana and graduated from LSU. Her move back home seems to have paid off, as she recently scored a significant small part in Django Unchained. Cayouette plays “Lara Lee Candie-Fitzwilly,” a plantation owner and sister of Leo DiCaprio’s character in the film. This role was specifically written by Quentin Tarantino with Cayouette in mind, and her scenes were significant since they placed her in scenes with the lead actors. Her character will likely live in every montage of Quentin Tarantino’s work. In the last scene of the movie, Cayouette is literally “blown away” in Tarantino’s characteristi-

cally bloody style by the lead character “Django,” a slave turned bounty hunter. Cayouette met Tarantino while working with him on Kill Bill Vol. 2; her part as “Rocket” was another small but very prominent part. Small parts can be center stage—selecting these parts is a real skill that an actor can learn. Cayouette shared in a recent interview that several major film industry giants have formed an “incubator” of sorts in Hollywood. Directors, producers and writers would surely benefit from an incubator, if created in New Orleans. These can provide a place to gain experience and provide fertile ground for new talent to acquire experience and hone their skills. Formation of these incubators could add significantly to the number of skilled jobs in the local film industry and encourage industry professionals to relocate or have second homes and facilities in Louisiana. Louisiana has become the third most productive movie venue in the United States after California and New York, having grown quickly over the past decade largely due to the state’s 2002 tax incentives directed at attracting film and television companies. The success of Louisiana’s film industry has caused the state to be nicknamed “Hollywood South.” In our recent interview with Cayouette, she described her love for New Orleans and its unique character. Movies are the mainstay of film production in Louisiana, and the addition of more television series and commercials would add greatly to the breadth of potential work for actors and other film craftsmen. In 2012 there were dozens of feature films shot in Louisiana. Today, most of the larger parts are cast in Los Angeles or New York, but the smaller parts are normally cast locally. The benefits of Louisiana have become apparent to producers. The city and state seem to have an unlimited variety of unique characters and location selections available. Production of more commercials in Louisiana would also broaden the base of available talent for the rest of the film industry locally. So if you are an actor or would like to be, there is a resource waiting for you. Laura Cayouette’s experiences written in her book can give insight to framing your career. LFV


THE FILMMAKER FRONT STORY BY ODIN LINDBLOM GUEST COLUMNIST

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here always seems to be a new digital tool or service to aid filmmakers. Here’s a pair that is worth taking a look at: Kodak’s updated cinema app and Vimeo’s new VOD service. The first up is Kodak. Despite their financial woes, the company just revamped their Kodak Cinema Tools mobile app. While the app is intended to aid cinematographers shooting on film, there are some tools that are very useful for shooting digital as well.

The app features a new aspect ratio tool that lets you take a picture from your iOS device and see how different popular aspect ratios and film stocks would affect the shot. Since some of the aspect ratios are those of popular distribution formats for theatrical and video releases, it’s useful for all filmmakers. It also has a depth of field calculator to help you achieve the focus you desire. Calculations for multiple film formats, from Super 8 to 65mm, can be made, variations in F-stops can be set from F1.4 to F22, and different lens sizes can be chosen within the tool. The film calculator lets you find out how many feet of film you’ll need for the time you’ll be shooting. You can also calculate how much time you’ll get out of a particular length of film. The film calculator can be set for differ-

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ent film formats and frame rates. There’s even an interactive guide to reading film can labels. The app features an extensive glossary of film terms that anyone in the industry will find helpful. The Sun Calculator helps you take the guesswork out of scheduling sunrise and sunset shoots. Additionally, guides to Kodak film products and services are included, as well as a film laboratory locator. The new app is currently available for iOS devices. An Android version is also available, although the tool set is somewhat limited. Kodak says that they hope to have an updated Android app some time in the future, but currently there is no release date. Kodak Cinema Tools can be downloaded for free for iOS from the iTunes store or for Android at Google Play.

Next is Vimeo. Known for their high quality video, they’re setting out to make Video On Demand (VOD) easier and possibly more lucrative for filmmakers with their new Vimeo On Demand service. While Vimeo has been around for a while as a video sharing site, this is their first foray into VOD. With the new service you can make your feature films, short films or TV show episodes available for rental not only online, but also through Vimeo’s apps for mobile phones, tablets, smart TVs, XBOX Live, Roku and more. With Vimeo On Demand you set the price charged per rental, the length of the rental and the countries in which the video is available for viewing. There is even an option to charge for a download of the video. There are no run-time limitations, and your videos can be uploaded and viewed in full HD (1080p). You can also set up a custom page for your film. Possibly the best feature is that you get 90 percent of the revenue after transaction fees, with Vimeo taking only 10 percent. You need a Vimeo Pro account to upload videos to Vimeo On Demand, which costs $199 per year. With that account, you get 50GB of storage and 250,000 video plays. If needed, more storage space and video plays can be purchased. There are no bandwidth fees. The maximum file size for upload is 25GB, which is enough for a high quality, feature-length film in HD. You can customize the Vimeo page for your video, add a trailer and even set it as your film’s home page. Vimeo also has good exposure, currently reaching over 90 million viewers per month worldwide. You can learn more about distribution through Vimeo at www.vimeo.com/ondemand. If you’re trying to budget film stock for your next shoot or you need to monetize your film after its festival run, Kodak or Vimeo may be able to help. Now, if they could just build a digital solution to help catering serve lunch on time… LFV


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FOCUS ON SHREVEPORT/BOSSIER

SHREVEPORT-BOSSIER:

THE OTHER SIDE OF LOUISIANA STORY BY PAM GLORIOSO PROJECT COORDINATOR/FILM LIAISON, CITY OF BOSSIER CITY

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ing story of love, forgiveness and compassion. The month of March was surely a blockbuster one for North Louisiana, as Olympus Has Fallen, which was shot in the ShreveportBossier area, was released in theaters. For four months, residents of the area had to stop and think, “Are we still in Shreveport-Bossier City, or in Washington D.C.?,” as the area was transFantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore. formed into the nation’s capital for the film. In March, a new independent film was shown This blockbuster is an action-thriller film on the big screens of Louisiana. The Pardon, directed by Antoine Fuqua and starring an which screened in Shreveport at the Robinson ensemble cast, including Gerard Butler, Aaron Film Center and Cinemark theaters, is slightly Eckhart, Morgan Freeman and Angela Bassett. From its beginnings as the sleepy North Louisiana that was thrown into the storm of the film industry, Shreveport-Bossier has proven that it can bring filmmakers to the area, from low-budget independent films to animated films to major studio productions. The Shreveport-Bossier Film Office is ready to work with productions to help make that mere script into a reality of film, maybe even an Oscar contender. For Louisiana, and particularly ShreveportBossier City, incentivizing a creative industry such as moviemaking has helped steer its economic future towards better fortunes. Above all else, this is because the ShreveportPam Glorioso (left) and Lorenz Walker, Mayor of Bossier area has been able to reclaim its Bossier City, outside the set of Olympus Has Fallen. native creative and intellectual capital— educated, experienced and innovative individuals who reside throughout our great state. This valuable group, possessing skills and knowledge to excel in creative industries, was lost or misplaced in previous decades due to lack of such opportunities in their home state. But through the wilds of the storm that placed an area known as “the other side” into the throes of the film industry, we have developed well-formed Director Tom Anton (left) and actor John Hawkes discuss an upcoming scene for The Pardon. creative networks, independent homegrown different. Tom Anton brings to the screen the talent, and seeds for innovation that were not story of Toni Jo Henry, the first and only there before. woman to be executed by the electric chair in We must work together more than we have Louisiana. Based on a true story, Anton and his ever done before to educate our state legislawife, Sandi Russell, collected and researched the tive members of the benefits of the film induscase from the beginning of the young lady’s crimtry to all of our great state in order to continue inal history to bring to moviegoers a spellbindto be the “Hollywood of the South.” LFV

hen faced with being tossed into the film business by Hurricane Katrina, Shreveport and Bossier City officials—who had always wanted to have the film industry recognize North Louisiana as a serious filming location—were suddenly about to become part of Hollywood South. When producers opted for ShreveportBossier City as an alternative to New Orleans in the weeks after Hurricane Katrina, both cities were prepared to accommodate them. Swift action was taken by key private sector and public sector players, both local and state, to ensure production remained in Louisiana. North Louisiana’s lack of film infrastructure posed many familiar challenges, but with the tax incentives firmly in place, production companies displayed a high level of commitment to the state, opting to keep their projects in Louisiana to provide “jobs, money, and moral support” in the aftermath of the hurricane. Shreveport and Bossier City officials reacted to a potentially great economic development opportunity and, with production teams already present in Louisiana, worked diligently to take advantage of improved tax incentives. Acting as a united front, necessary resources were mobilized and existing support services were relocated upstate to meet production requirements. Both communities united to form the Shreveport-Bossier Film Office—a virtual office that is composed of Arlena Acree from the City of Shreveport’s Mayor’s Office and myself—which has worked since 2005 to market, promote, educate and grow the film industry in North Louisiana. Meanwhile, the State of Louisiana, now considered to have the third largest film industry in the United States, has grown from just doing major studio feature films to becoming a major independent film location. We’ve been fortunate to now have some of these independent films become recognized for their quality and stories that they bring to the silver screen, such as the Oscar-nominated Beasts of the Southern Wild and the Oscar-winning The 16

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FOCUS ON SHREVEPORT/BOSSIER

MOONBOT STUDIOS:

FIRST AN OSCAR, NOW A GOLEM “O ur industry continues to grow in the digital media area, and having Moonbot Studios in Shreveport has been a major part of that,” says Arlena Acree, Director of Film, Media and Entertainment in Shreveport. After Hurricane Katrina, movie productions flocked to the Shreveport-Bossier area and the emerging city has since maintained a steady production flow. Recent big titles include The Iceman, Ain’t Them Bodies Saints and Olympus Has Fallen, to name a few.

Among top contributors to the city’s success is Moonbot Studios. Started in 2010 by Lampton Enoch, William Joyce and Brandon Oldenburg, the studio has quickly boosted Shreveport’s reputation, most notably by winning an Academy Award for the animated short The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore. Although Oscar buzz has since calmed, the creative team at Moonbot has not lost any momentum. Before the team had the chance to recover from the Oscar after-party, the plans for Playstation 3 game Diggs Nightcrawler, a collaboration with Sony Computer Entertainment, were quickly unfolding into full scale. Marketing director Sara Hebert says, “Working in partnership with Sony on the project is a huge win for us. To be able to work with someone of that caliber says a lot about what Moonbot has accomplished in such a short time. ” Diggs Nightcrawler is a hybrid between a feature-length animated film and an interac-

tive gaming experience. The game features an innovative technology by Sony called a Wonderbook, which is a handheld augmented-reality guidebook to be used with the game. “There is so much animation in this project,” says founding partner Oldenburg. “It’s over the length of a normal feature film. It is 135 minutes of film animation.” Diggs Nightcrawler emerges its users into the story of detective Diggs, who is framed for the murder of his friend, a

Renderings and sketches of Moonbot’s latest video game project, The Golem.

high-profile citizen of Library City. Interestingly enough, the game is geared towards children, as Diggs is an actual bookworm and his friend is Humpty Dumpty. The highly anticipated game is expected to be released in late 2013. In addition to their collaboration with Sony, Moonbot has also ventured out on a new video game 18

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project called The Golem. Based on ancient European folklore, The Golem is a monster created from mud, glass, clay and mechanics in order to protect the city of Prague from invaders. This game, however, introduces new concepts that stray from the typical shoot-emup style of gaming. “Our game is about control and learning the capabilities of the Golem,” says an enthused Hebert. “The Golem is like a child. He doesn’t know what’s going on in the world or what his purpose is and the player is learning that at the same time. It’s about fully immersing the player in that experience. It will be fun and frustrating and sad. We are experimenting with the player feeling a wide range of emotions.” “The skill in this game is to learn how to be graceful and delicate. That’s how you will be able to beat the game,” says Oldenburg. Critically acclaimed filmmaker, producer and writer Guillermo del Toro has endorsed the project, saying he believes “in the capacity of Moonbot to turn The Golem into an incredible world. Bill [Joyce] and his team are the ones to make it happen.” A Kickstarter campaign for The Golem project is currently underway to raise money and awareness for this hopeful groundbreaker of a title. The team at Moonbot has doubled its workforce over the last year and has every inten-

tion of continuing their pattern of quality work, both in video gaming and filmmaking. “We are making strides,” says Hebert on the future of Moonbot. “In the next 10 or 15 years we hope to shoot our own feature films here in the studio. There are still a lot of obstacles, but we have a great team that can make it happen. The rate at which they are working is astonishing.” LFV For more information on Moonbot Studios, check out their Web site at www.moonbotstudios.com.


FOCUS ON SHREVEPORT/BOSSIER

SHREVEPORT-SHOT THE PARDON HITS THEATERS

The Pardon director Tom Anton (left) and star Jaime King (center) in between takes.

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he Pardon, a movie based on a sensational murder case that attracted national headlines, tells a timeless story of love, forgiveness and redemption that is just as relevant today as it was when a Louisiana jury convicted Toni Jo Henry and sentenced her to death in the early 1940s. The film, shot in the Shreveport area with most of the action set there and in Lake Charles, premiered in New Orleans on March 13 before debuting in theaters in New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Shreveport, Lafayette and Lake Charles on March 22. “Because Toni Jo was beautiful, she instantly became a notorious celebrity, drawing almost unparalleled media attention,” said Tom Anton, who directed the film and co-wrote the script with his wife, Sandi Russell. “Only the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and America’s entry into World War II grabbed more headlines.” Newspaper articles and transcripts from Henry’s trials formed the basis of the script. After being abused as a child, Henry left home and turned to a life of drugs and prostitution. While working in a brothel in Shreveport, she met the love of her life, Claude “Cowboy” Henry, a handsome boxer. With his help, she 20

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Jaime King and John Hawkes star in The Pardon.

kicked her drug habit and quit working as a prostitute. Soon after they married, and just as his boxing career started to take off, he was arrested during a trip to Texas for killing a police officer years earlier and sentenced to life in prison. In desperate need of money for her husband’s appeal, Henry and an accomplice, Finnon “Arkie” Burks, conceived an ill-fated plan to rob a bank. Needing a car, they abducted, shot and

killed J.P. Calloway, who had picked them up hitchhiking, on Valentine’s Day 1940. Who actually fired the shot remains a mystery. Against the backdrop of this action at the start of the film, the real drama begins to unfold during Henry’s trial as she is transformed from a hardened criminal into a woman who accepts God’s love and forgiveness. “The Pardon is a story about love and forgiveness and compassion… about a woman who has never loved or been loved. When she is loved, it changes her life,” said Jaime King (Pearl Harbor, Hart of Dixie), who plays Henry. “This woman’s life actually became better after she was put in jail where she was finally surrounded by people who cared for her and truly loved her. God works in strange ways.” Featuring a dynamic performance from King, The Pardon also includes Academy Award nominee John Hawkes (Winter’s Bone, The Sessions) as Henry’s murder accomplice, Jason Lewis (Sex and the City, Mr. Brooks) as her husband, M.C. Gainey (Lost, Con Air) as the jailer, and T. J. Thyne (Bones) as the priest. LFV For more information, visit www.thepardonmovie.com.


BEYOND GALILEE

SHREVEPORT DOCUMENTARY IS ONE OF THE MOST SIGNIFICANT CIVIL RIGHTS FILMS IN DECADES STORY BY MOLLY WARD GUEST COLUMNIST

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eyond Galilee is one of the most riveting films in decades. The documentary chronicles the civil rights movement in Shreveport with never-before-seen footage of Dr. Martin Luther King. The film begins with King’s visit to Galilee Church in 1958 and follows the heroes who rose above the suppression. Many of those involved in the movement argue that the level of suppression that existed in Shreveport was worse than in any other city. “Outsiders are shocked when they learn about the depth of suppression,” says director Tim DeWayne. Filmmakers DeWayne and Joey Kent began the project after meeting with Dr. C.O. Simpkins and local historian Eric Brock. Retired United Christian Movement president Simpkins invited King to speak in Shreveport. Simpkins was forced into exile after a series of pervasive attacks by the KKK. “This project gave us a chance to give back to the community,” says Kent.

Beyond Galilee filmmakers Joey Kent (left) and Tim DeWayne.

Shreveport made national headlines after the Reverend Harry Blake and students at Booker T. Washington were beaten and gassed by men on horses. Blake took part in a national movement to hold a memorial service after four girls were killed in Alabama. The film shows footage of police literally marching down the street in lockstep, military combat style. “No other city in America would allow anybody, including the FBI, to block off an

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entire town,” says Blake. One of the most poignant quotes in the film is when Reverend McClain, Sr. turns to his congregation and asks, “How can anyone possibly justify the use of horses in the house of God?” Kent says the most emotional moment of the film is when Calvin Austin tells his story. Austin was vice president of the youth chapter for NAACP at Booker T. “Here is a man who is coming to grips and reliving what happened to him,” says Kent. “I think his emotions overtook him, hauntingly on camera. This is a man with a lot of pain.” Police beat Austin nearly to death during his 45 days in custody. Austin says he felt a sense of catharsis after the film came out. “Beyond Galilee will tell the true story of what happened in Shreveport. The lessons need to be put out there—I don’t care who it embarrasses. In a hundred years, our society will be remembered as one that was engulfed in violence—that we were not as free as the red, white and blue proclaimed we were.” The documentary’s trailer can be seen on YouTube. LFV

YRS

CREATING STUNNING MOTION IMAGERY

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FOCUS ON SHREVEPORT/BOSSIER

LANDRUM ARTS LA: TALENT AGENCY BOASTS QUALITY OVER QUANTITY

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andrum Arts LA talent agency is based in Shreveport, Louisiana. Nicknamed LALA, this agency specializes in providing lead and strong supporting roles for major feature films and television shows. Husband and wife team Dawn and George Landrum are the owners/agents of this company. Preferring to have a more tailored roster, Landrum represents several one-of-a-kind actors. A production can go “shopping” for very specific types and find exactly what they need with Landrum. If they do not already have them on roster, they have the connections to find them. Many do not realize that Landrum Arts LA devoted three years after Hurricane Katrina to help local displaced actors of Louisiana, Texas and Mississippi. The Landrums also gave free weekly workshops, helped actors who lost all their headshots in the flood get more done, spoke at schools and forums, wrote for publications and shared their knowledge, all in an effort to assist in rebuilding the industry in Louisiana. They have been instrumental in getting unknown actors auditions and bookings for the many projects that came to Louisiana after the storms. The Landrums vowed to keep their doors open for three years after Katrina in accepting and training all good people who needed their help.

Landrum Arts LA’s welcoming lobby, located in the heart of Shreveport.

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Some of LALA’s talent roster.

After the three-year rebuilding effort, the Landrums went back to their plan to be the agency everyone goes to when seeking stars, leads and stronger supporting actors. Although they still welcome those who came on board during the Katrina effort, they now have a far more strenuous sign-on policy. Each actor must possess a quality unlike any other actor represented. There is no generic repetition just to increase the roster. “We are more interested in quality, than quantity,” said the Landrums. “We know each of our actors and everything about each one of them. They are like part of the family. Everyone has a mutual respect. We work as a team with our actors. We don’t work for them and they don’t work for us. We work together with the common goal of honest success.” The Landrums are proud of a very strict code of ethics that not only their actors must follow, but also the agents, owners and administration must follow. “Reputation is everything,” they said. “We get repeat bookings all the time from casting directors and productions with whom we’ve previously worked because we sign quality people and quality actors and we operate as quality professionals. And, we don’t forget to include that Southern hospitality.”

Landrum Arts LA also represents celebrities, stars, and familiar faces actively seen on popular television shows and on the big screen: “It’s very rewarding to go to the movies every weekend and see our actors in the trailers to every movie shown.” Located in downtown Shreveport at 712 Milam Street (right around the corner from Millennium Studios and the Robinson Film Center), Landrum Arts LA is in the heart of all the action. Due to the agency’s popularity and success, the Landrums are now expanding yet again. No, they are not seeking more actors… they are adding more administration, CSRs and AIT specialists to help with the increased workload. “Because we are directly in the center of the United States and in a right-to-work state, we have no boundaries,” said the Landrums. “We are effectively able to submit everywhere. We are actively booking actors all over the country, coast to coast. We fly Louisiana actors out to other states for bookings just as much as we fly out-of-state actors into Louisiana. It’s a great trade-off and our actors love it!” If the industry ever slows down, the Landrums have their own production company, GeoLand Films, LLC, which also produces films. There is always work going on with the Landrums. The Landrum daughters, Amber Dawn and Tia, are on the Board of Directors and also work throughout the industry and in all aspects of the Landrum businesses in one way or another. When not working professionally, the Landrums are active in the community locally and around the world. Thanks to Tia’s global efforts and her new organization, Giving Back In Action, the Landrums are also known for providing aid around the world. “We are not wealthy people,” they said. “We work for every penny just like you do. But we feel as if we are the richest people in the world by being blessed with the greatest family in the world. Having this agency has added so many to our family. We could not possibly ask for a better job.” LFV You can visit the agency’s resume and roster on IMDB.com and at www.LandrumArtsLA.com.


SHREVEPORT TALENT GETS A FILMMAKING WITH BOOST FROM NEW ACTORS LAB GEOLAND FILMS

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s of April 1, 2013, Shreveport is now host to a new resource offered to boost the talent pool in North Louisiana. This program is called LA Prep Actors Lab for all newcomers to learn the industry from the inside out. Founder Dawn Landrum commented, “I own several businesses, so really haven’t had the time to begin another one. However, it has become very necessary to create a place for people to go where they can find information about the entertainment industry and learn the ins and outs about acting from qualified, experienced professionals. So I can concentrate on my agency and on producing; my experienced daughters Amber Dawn and Tia Landrum will be running the program, along with the qualified actors we have on board as instructors.” Landrum Arts LA talent agency will not recruit from LA Prep and is not seeking new talent. Anyone can participate in LA Prep—even if they have an agent. LA Prep will benefit everyone with no pressure. “We’ve traveled around the country and have gathered information from several of the top industry professionals as to what works and what does not,” said Landrum. “We are here to share what we’ve discovered with you.” LA Prep will begin with a very unique way of informing non-actors and their parents about the business of acting with an Instructional Presentation. Experienced successful actors who are actively booking and working in lead, supporting, guest star/co-starring roles in major TV shows and feature films will be amongst those who instruct. Professional actors A recent session of LA Prep Actors Lab. who meet the LA Prep qualifications can become instructors for LA Prep and stay working when they are not filming on another project. This process will employ these professionals on rotation (according to their availability) and at the same time will give the public a place to go to obtain honest, up-front information about what to expect in becoming an actor. The Lab portion of LA Prep is similar to what an actor would attend in a casting director workshop. It’s essentially a “work out,” challenging actors and giving them a chance to act and evolve. Actors will be grouped with others equal to their professional acting level. They will be given sides and scenes to learn and will perform at each lab. There will be adjustment, direction and discussion. Each Lab session begins with warm-up exercises, which increase memorization capability, action and reaction timing, improvisation, as well as realistic performing. There is a session designed for almost all ages, beginning as young as age three. LA Prep Instructional Presentations will be on Monday evenings. Lab Sessions will be Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays. Times vary per session levels. LFV To learn more about LA Prep Actors Lab, e-mail LAPrep@LALATalent.com.

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wned by George Landrum Jr. and his wife Dawn, GeoLand Films LLC is a Shreveport-based production company capable of providing everything from full production services to just assisting with finding specialty equipment, services and crewmembers. Since opening their doors in 2009, GeoLand has three feature films, two short films and a Web series to their credit, and has provided assistance to many local independent and student filmmakers, providing services ranging from props and grip equipment to special and make-up effects. GeoLand Films specializes in producing and co-producing films on very small budgets that look like they were shot for much more. This is done by hiring and partnering with very talented artists that believe in what they do and in the project they are working on. The last week of February 2013, Landrum, in partnership with Derek Wayne Johnson of AJ16 Entertainment, released the feature film Broken Blood on DVD and VOD. Broken Blood was shot in Shreveport and Carthage, Texas, starring actors from the local area as well as “named actors” from Los Angeles, Miami and New York. Then on March 5, GeoLand and AJ16 showed off their teamwork again with the Shreveport premiere of their latest feature, Scrape, at the Robinson Film Center, which sold out less than one hour after the box office opened. With the investors and a distributor’s representative in the audience, this was a very good omen. It appears that since the film had all the right elements, and more importantly, the audience seemed to love the movie, it looks like a lucrative deal is in the works. Scrape recently played at the Carthage Twin Cinema in Carthage, Texas, from March 22 through April 4. This theater just happens to be where the film’s director, Derek Wayne Johnson, grew up watching films as a child. GeoLand and AJ16 have once again teamed up for another feature film slated to start shooting later in 2013, and this time one full of action and thrills. If you like a cool story punctuated with car chases, gun fights and explosions, then you will love Lemon Punk. With a distributor pledging half the shooting budget for Lemon Punk and an iconic ‘80s “New Wave” band backing the action with a killer soundtrack, investors and audiences alike are going to love this one. GeoLand Films also has a socially conscious side as well and has recently begun the groundwork on a documentary dealing with service animals, the blessings they bring to the humans they love and the pain caused by the ignorance of those who don’t understand the medical importance of these animals. GeoLand Films LLC has several other co-productions also in the works for this summer that will all be good for the Shreveport area. You will definitely want to keep your eyes on this relatively young production company. They have big plans and an even bigger vision for the future of independent film in the Shreveport area. LFV ISSUE TWO

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CATCHING UP WITH THE WALKING DEAD’S NICK GOMEZ STORY BY NATALIE HULTMAN GUEST COLUMNIST

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ver dream of being cast as a character in one of your favorite TV shows? For actor Nick Gomez that dream became a reality when he was cast as prisoner “Tomas” in the third season of the AMC series The Walking Dead. The hit show, which follows the survivors of a zombie apocalypse, only continues to add viewers to its loyal following. The recent mid-season premiere had the highest ratings of the show’s history. Gomez has an idea why the show is so popular: “It’s extremely genius. Everybody wants to know how they would react in that kind of situation, what they would do,” he says. “I think people love zombies because with the apocalypse it evens the playing field, like, it doesn’t matter how much more money someone has over you. And, as a bonus, that boss that you hate so much is now a zombie and you have to shoot him in the head.” After booking the role, Gomez dove into his character in the time prior to filming. “I was super-prepared. I had rehearsed, gone over everything, given that (character) a back story.” However, when he arrived on the Georgia set, he was in for a bit of a shock. “They’re so tight-lipped about the show that the role that I had auditioned for didn’t even exist. I didn’t know that until I went up there,” he says. “When I got to set I had a meeting with the director and the writer and they were like, ‘Okay, Nick, you think you know what you’re doing but you have no idea. Here’s the script. You’re Tomas. Good luck.’ And that was the first day of shooting. I didn’t have a lot of time to think. I basically had to just jump in and go.” So what’s it like playing such a ruthless, psychotic character? “That’s one of the things I love about acting the most,” he says. “I try to be as kind and civil as possible in my real life, so when I’m given a role where it’s my job to be socially uncouth I just get to run with it. Given the right set of circumstances, people are capable of just about anything. With a character like Tomas, the thing he was most afraid of was people thinking he was scared. So he’s constantly being a bully and pushing other people down because he’s so afraid of not being in control.” Like most fans of the show, Gomez has given some thought to how he would handle a zombie apocalypse: “My first thought would be to get my family, but my family is so spread out—I would have to hijack a plane and learn to fly it. 26

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New Orleans-based actor Nick Gomez.

Once I got my mom, my dad, my brother and sister, we could figure it out. They would be my first priority.” Though Gomez is probably best known for his role on The Walking Dead, he has been acting professionally since age 8. His first job as an actor happened when Hollywood literally came to him. Not far from his childhood home in Benson, Arizona, was an old abandoned Western film set from the 1950s. When Westerns became popular again in the late 1980s, movies like Tombstone, Young Guns, and Young Guns II basically set up shop in his backyard. “After school and on my days off I would bike over to the film set and just hang out,” he recalls. As a child, Gomez discovered that acting came with one particular perk that was even better than fame and fortune: craft services. “I was in the fourth grade and it was just this whole table of candy and chocolate bars and you didn’t have to pay for any of it. You could just go and take whole handfuls of jellybeans and have all the Coca-Cola Classics you could ever possibly want. It was like the most magnificent thing to me.” Hanging around the set led to work as an

extra and then one day, he was given a line. “I said one word. I said ‘watch’ and my check was substantially larger, so I thought, ‘huh— if I talk I get a lot more money and free candy, which is great! I’m gonna keep doing this.’ So I kept at it and eventually I started to really enjoy the whole process and the acting part of it just as much as the craft services part of it.” After high school, Gomez headed straight to New York City to study at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, joining the company program, and later studied at the Ensemble Studio Theatre. Wanting more opportunities in film, he moved to New Orleans in 2007. “I got a call from a friend saying that there was tons of film in New Orleans,” says Gomez. “I wasn’t getting as much work as I thought I could be getting in New York. I got the call on Sunday. That night I found a rideshare on Craigslist and that Tuesday, I packed up everything I owned and drove down to New Orleans. It’s such a magical city. New York and New Orleans are my two favorite American cities.” Up next, Gomez will play the assassin “El Sapo” on the eighth and final season of the Showtime series Dexter. He is currently filming the James Franco-produced short film Lily, based on a Tennessee Williams short story about a transgendered man struggling with insanity. He also has three completed films coming out in 2013: Hours, a Hurricane Katrina drama starring Paul Walker; The Iceman, starring Michael Shannon as contract killer Richard Kuklinski; and The Starving Games, a comedic spoof on The Hunger Games and other popular films. LFV

Gomez began acting at age 8 when Hollywood arrived in his hometown of Benson, Arizona.


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TECH TIPS with Bobby Holbrook SITTING ON THE DOCK OF THE BAYER

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n my last Tech Tips (Issue 1 2013), I discussed what Raw, Log and LUTs are and how they parallel with gumbo! I also mentioned that I would follow up with a breakdown of the debayering process, so here it is. Let’s start with a little history of the process, which is named after its inventor, Dr. Bryce E. Bayer of Eastman Kodak. Dr. Bayer’s patent called the green photo sensors luminance-sensitive elements and the red and blue ones chrominance-sensitive elements. There are twice as many green elements as red or blue to mimic the human eye and in an alternating pattern, which contains 50 percent green, 25 percent red and 25 percent blue pixels. So when the light comes through the lens, it hits the CMOS sensor and is captured through the CFA (Color Filter Array), which is the physical mask laid over the top of the sensor and allows it to perceive color information. Basically, a sensor is a brightness-gathering device and does not know color. It’s a group of light-sensitive buckets or “Pitch Pots” that generates an electric charge based on the intensity of light that hits it. By using filters that allow only red, green or blue light to pass through, a pattern of color information can be gathered and then be interpolated to a full-color image. Since each pixel is filtered to record only one of three colors, the data from each pixel cannot fully determine color on its own to achieve a fullcolor image; various demosaicing algorithms are used to interpolate a set of complete red, green and blue values for each pixel. Every manufacturer has its own bayer pattern and dyes used to create each color. The Sony F65 has a much different bayer pattern layout than the Canon C300. They also have their own software to apply these

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algorithms. Many have complained about the “holes” in this type of pattern and giving the algorithms final say on what gets thrown out and what stays, but everyone has their own opinions. So once you have your RAW information, it needs to be debayered. Now, debayering systems in cameras have to work in real time. The higher the pixel count, the harder this is to do and the hotter the cameras get. Often the data is dropped and only a partial debayering is done, good enough for “video assist” but not much else. So you need to use a program to do this for you. ArriRaw, Red Cine X, Assimilate Scratch, and Davinci Resolve are a few I recommend. Some are GPU driven and others are CPU driven, so making sure you have the right hardware to handle it will ensure you get the best processing. LFV

MOSAIC CAPTURE

In conventional systems, color filters are applied to a single layer of pixel sensors in a tiled mosaic pattern.

The filters let only one wavelength of light— red, green, or blue—pass through to any given pixel location, allowing it to record only one color.

As a result, mosaic sensors capture only 25% of the red and blue light, and just 50% of the green.


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“WHERE YOU LIVE IS OUR BUSINESS” 1ST LAKE PROPERTIES OFFERS QUALITY APARTMENTS THROUGHOUT THE GULF REGION STORY BY ABBI DOMINGUE DIRECTOR OF MARKETING AND CUSTOMER RELATIONS, 1ST LAKE PROPERTIES

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he filming industry in the New Orleans area has grown tremendously in the past years. After Katrina, and even before, the filming community has had a large presence in South Louisiana. Their contribution to New Orleans is so great, and we are proud to be able to help return the favor in any way possible. With over 65 great locations and over 9,000 quality apartments, 1st Lake Properties is home to thousands of residents. All New Orleans metropolitan locations are just minutes from the Downtown Central Business District, Elmwood Business District, area universities, healthcare facilities, shopping and recreation. Recently, we have added communities in Baton Rouge, Slidell, Mandeville, Covington, Jackson and Picayune to our portfolio. 1st Lake plans to continue to grow throughout the Gulf Region. At 1st Lake, our mission is to provide our residents with a positive living experience and exceptional customer service. With this

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approach, 1st Lake has become synonymous with premier apartment living, earning a reputation as the leader in multifamily communities in the New Orleans market. Many of our communities specialize in temporary furnished apartments for extended stays of 30 days or more. 1st Lake can assist in locating a corporate residence or short-term apartment that will fit the needs of just about every client. Whether you are looking for short-term housing for business or leisure, we can accommodate your needs. Take advantage of our unbeatable rates with more space and features than any extended stay hotel. Each 1st Lake Corporate apartment provides all the accommodations you have been searching for, and it comes with a “home away from home” environment. Special features that will complement your carefree lifestyle include gated access, picturesque landscaping with cascading fountains and creeks,

pristine pools, fitness centers, full-size washers and dryers in most apartments, and 24-hour emergency maintenance. Garages are available for all your extra storage needs. Our Corporate Suites include: furnished apartment, linens, kitchen wares/appliances, tasteful accessories, all utilities paid, televisions, basic cable, local telephone, Internet accessibility, and weekly maid service. Come experience the best of both lifestyles... all the benefits of apartment home living and the flexibility of short- or long-term corporate stays. With over 40 years of apartment management experience, we are recognized as a leader in customer care, offering attention to detail from our professional management and maintenance teams. LFV Contact 1st Lake Properties at 877-928-LAKE for availability and pricing, or visit our Web site at www.1stLake.com for more information. 1st Lake Properties welcomes you to New Orleans... because where you live is our business.


L&R SECURITY SERVICES, INC.

ANIMAL TALENT

3930 OLD GENTILLY ROAD NEW ORLEANS, LA 70126

PHONE: (504) 943-3191 F AX: (504) 944-1142 TOLL FREE: (800) 324-4672

CERTIFICATIONS SDVOSB HUB ZONE GSA CONTRACT GSA-07F-5683R

Preview Screenings Uniformed Guards Set Security Site Managers Ticket Takers Ushers Roving Supervisors Armed & Unarmed Event Logistics Body Guards Consulting Services ATM Escort

CLIENTS & PARTNERS NOBLE INC SECURITY HUNGRY RABBIT JUMPS LLC GERARD SELLERS FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION VETERANS AFFAIRS SCORE TRANSPORTATION SAFETY ADMINISTRATION

L&R IS LICENSED IN THE FOLLOWING STATES LOUISIANA CALIFORNIA COLORADO MISSISSIPPI ARIZONA ALABAMA MISSOURI TEXAS NEW MEXICO ARKANSAS TENNESSEE FLORIDA VIRGINIA MARYLAND WASHINGTON, D.C. WE CAN OBTAIN LICENSING IN ALL 50 STATES. TO LEARN MORE CALL (504) 943-3191.

WWW.LRSECURITY.COM L&R SECURITY SERVICES, INC.

3930 Old Gentilly Rd | New Orleans, LA 70126 phone: (504) 943-3191 | fax: (504) 942-1142 | email: info@lrsecurity.com

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SPECTRUM FX: LA’S SPECIAL EFFECTS HUB

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braham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, Shark Night: 3D, The Loft, Beautiful Creatures, Home Front and Now You See Me are just a fraction of the influx of productions Spectrum FX has hosted in its two and a half short years in Louisiana. Spectrum Effects Rain Rig in action for The Loft, filmed in New Orleans.

Kutcher recalls a particularly memorable experience with the fantastical drama, Beautiful Creatures. “It was an amazing experience,” he says. “It ran incredibly smooth and re-instilled my faith in the business. The L.A. Times did a great article, and they named four people as primary contributors. We were humbled to be a part of that list. To see your name with the director, the production designer and the visual effects artist… it blew my mind. Especially since the director sent me the article. I’m still completely blown away by it. No matter how much work you do, you rarely see any recognition.” LFV

From NOVAC to Spectrum: Spotlight on Jen Picard

Owner of Spectrum FX, Matt Kutcher, moved his company from Los Angeles to Louisiana after seeing the amazing amount of potential the Louisiana film industry had to offer. “We weren’t one of the biggest [special effects facilities] in Los Angeles, but we held our own,” says Kutcher. “We came out to do Shark Night, a feature in Shreveport. I really dug Shreveport, and I liked the people. Immediately following that picture, we got invited to do So Undercover, the Miley Cyrus film, in New Orleans. We got a chance to experience the city locally. I fell in love with the town and how it was structured down here.” After hosting Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, Kutcher was convinced that New Orleans would be the new home of Spectrum FX. “We moved our entire company down here,” continues Kutcher. “There’s nothing left in Los Angeles.” 32

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The massive facility at Spectrum FX has the capability to accomplish a seemingly endless array of effects for its films. “We do mechanic, hydraulic, and pyrotechTrain for Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, which required four motion bases be built by Spectrum FX personnel.

nic. We can build it and blow it up,” says Kutcher. “Building motion bases for different scenes is a big part of what we do. Between Abe Lincoln and Beautiful Creatures, the motion bases and amusement park rides are a good part of our bread and butter.”

“I first got involved with NOVAC while I was working on a documentary by Luisa Dantas, called Land of Opportunity. NOVAC was a fiscal sponsor for the film, and our production office was based out of their space on Louisa Street. We worked very closely with NOVAC during my time on the project, as we would cohost events and help facilitate workforce training and workshops. By the time I had left Land of Opportunity to work on another project, NOVAC had just helped us make possible our ‘premiere’ screening for the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. Spectrum entered my life after I spent five months desperately looking for work, having just come off my stint with the second season of Treme. PAs weren’t in high demand that summer, and my job search had reached fever pitch. I was answering any and every ad I came across. I don’t recall any of the ads I answered, save one. Totaling a page and a half, singlespaced, I was sure it was a scam, but my partner encouraged me to answer it regardless. At that point, I couldn’t afford to care, and answered with the most professionalism I could muster... None. It took a little over a month before my phone rang with an invitation for an interview with this still undisclosed company. I was given a time and an address that was impossible to locate on Google Maps. I arrived at a shabby-looking office trailer in a foreign area (Harahan), and readied my phone in case anything shady went down. I walked back out after having spent a little over an hour ‘chatting’ with Donnie, as Matt Kutcher listened via intercom in his office at the opposite end. I was offered the PA position via text within the hour, and have been working with Matt, Donnie, and the rest of these yahoos for the past 18 months.” — Jen Picard, P.A. (Part of the Action) at Spectrum FX


READY SET FILM: INTRO TO GRIP & ELECTRIC

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t NOVAC we understand that one of the keys to a sustainable and thriving film industry is a skilled workforce that can meet the needs of incoming productions. We are partnering with film offices across the state to build and expand film industry workforce programs that address gaps in rosters and build talent bases in multiple cities. We are using our partnerships with IATSE and production companies to ensure our programs are flexible and tailored to the needs of the industry, and are taught by working professionals so our students benefit from their expertise.” –Darcy McKinnon, Executive Director, NOVAC Students engage in hands-on training.

business agent Bill McCord was on hand to illustrate the benefits of and requirements for membership into IATSE Local 478. NOVAC also provided all participants with a complimentary year-long NOVAC membership, as well as consistent follow-up to ensure Ready Set Film participants are finding work in the industry. Completion of Ready Set Film also counted towards 2 of the “30-days-on-set” required for entry into IATSE Local 478. Said Ashley Charbonnet, NOVAC director of programs, “The biggest thing grads are taking away (as it was an intro course) is the non-stop nature of the work. You have to be on your toes, listening, being acutely aware of what is happening on set. Of course, getting a deep understanding of how the departments fit into the set structure and the basics of creating and shaping the lighting on set as per the DP’s needs to tell the story is very important as well. This was a great opportunity for those seeking entrance into the industry to see if G&E is the right fit for them.” Grip and electric training is one of the many areas in which NOVAC is helping build a skilled workforce in Louisiana. NOVAC works closely with the Mayor’s Office of Cultural Economy, Film New Orleans and Film Jefferson to address the weak areas in our film community and offer practical solutions. In the near future, NOVAC expects to expand their trainings to nearby cities. LFV For more information, visit www.novacvideo.org.

From February 16 to 17, NOVAC held “Ready Set Film,” a free two-day grip and electric intensive for 40 carefully selected candidates. The workshop was held at local special effects studio Spectrum FX, where participants gained the hands-on experience and exposure needed to work in grip and electric departments on feature film and television sets. Instructors included film industry veterans and union department heads working both locally and abroad. Key grip and IATSE 478 vice president Mike Smith (O Brother, Where Art Thou?, Ray) and gaffer Sean Finnegan (Contraband, Green Lantern) led hands-on exercises in industry standard practices, including dolly work, cable runs, setting flags, handling HMIs and generators, lighting design, and more. Equipment was provided by Cinelease. Participants also had the rare opportunity to operate a 50-foot Techno Crane, courtesy of 4:4:4 Camera’s Richard Ball (The Mechanic, Killer Joe), who led the demonstration. Union

Students are shown ‘the ropes’ of lighting design.

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SERVICING THE FILM INDUSTRY AND BEYOND

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ired of the inconvenience of bringing in your unit for maintenance or repair? Looking for a professional, experienced technician that will come to you and provide the service you are seeking at your location? Operating in the Baton Rouge area, Leo’s RV Service, LLC can come to you and provide maintenance and/or repair to your coach or trailer. Whether you are part of the film and entertainment industry, the healthcare industry, a privately or publicly held corporation, or a privately owned unit, Leo’s is your company. Leo’s RV Service has developed a long customer base list, including commercial and individual accounts. Whether the unit is a multi-million-dollar 45-foot coach, a makeup/dressing unit, or a diagnostic unit operated by a hospital, Leo’s can assist you. The company also attends to celebrity coaches when in the area for film or entertainment. This was the case when Oblivion filmed in Baton

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Rouge recently. Occasionally the celebrity’s coach would require service or maintenance attention, and Leo’s provided the film production with quality, dependable service and privacy. Leo’s RV Service is a company that celebrities trust and count on to keep their “home away from home” in absolute premium condition. Louisiana has become the “go-to” state for filming movies in the continental USA, and Leo’s

Leo’s RV Service also attends to celebrity coaches. This was the case when Oblivion filmed in Baton Rouge recently. RV Service, LLC is very excited about what that means for the state and local businesses. LFV Visit www.leosrvservice.com or call 225-772-4305 for details on the types of services they provide, along with rates, scheduling information, and more.


GRIP • LIGHTING • GENERATORS • EXPENDABLES

Louisiana New Orleans, Louisiana Manhattan Beach Studios • Second Line Stages Grip and Lighting Supplied on The Following Projects:

• “Green Lantern” • “Imagination Movers” • “Killer Joe” • “Contraband” • “Medallion” • “Looper”

TM Louisiana 1021 N. Al Davis Rd. New Orleans, LA 70123 Tel: (504) 734-3403 Fax: (504) 734-3407

• “Bullet to the Head” • “Pitch Perfect” • “Thunder Struck” • “Django Unchained” • “The Butler” • “Whiskey Bay”

Contact: TOM D. MAY - President/Chief Operating Officer tmay@tmequipmentrentals.com DAN DULL - General Manager dkdull@tmequipmentrentals.com

www.tmequipmentrentals.com


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elocity Agency is the only full service marketing and production company in the region with clients throughout the United States. Our approach is to provide a holistic marketing experience and with our team of experts we bring fresh concepts and fuse them with strategic approaches to guarantee success for your business. We can handle everything from planning to production and placement. We have a super-charged team ready to create your campaign and marketing initiatives across multiple platforms. Whether it’s corporate identity, mailing campaigns or heavy digital marketing campaigns, we produce and implement it all. Velocity strategically implements proprietary tools and techniques that optimize premium conversions for your business. Initiatives begin with client research and discovery that focus on the identification of end goals. Next, projects are launched securing the most effective platforms and channels. Finally, continual monitoring and real-time adjustments ensure exceptional ROI. For more information, visit our website at www.velocity-agency.com or call 504-838-8811. Velocity Agency, Importance In Direction

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vent Design Build is a full service live event and production company focused on producing experiential events for some of the largest companies in the United States. Our uncommon range of expertise and services allows us to create permanent exhibits, live events, HD Video production, 3D animation and everything in between. From concept sketches to complex technical development and installation, we’ve done it all. When we say that we can do it, it will get done. With over 40 years combined experience in event design, staging and construction, we will give you the attention and personal service you’ll come to expect and enjoy. Event Design Build has created and produced phenomenal events for clients spanning the country, such as Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal, TNT/TBS Essence Experience and Mercedes-Benz. Contact us with your specific inquiry and we will prepare your estimate for free. Call us at 504-834-8811 or visit our website at www.eventdesignbuild.com. What ever it takes!


I.A.T.S.E. LOCAL 4 78

Motion Picture Studio Mechanics of Louisiana & Southern Mississippi Louisiana motion picture tax incentives aren’t news. They’re a success story. IATSE Local 478 now has 1,100 members and we’re still growing. These dedicated men and women work in various crafts in the art department, construction, crafts services, electric, first aid, greens, grip, locations, paint, props, set dressing, sound, special effects, video assist and wardrobe. We have one of the strongest and longest lasting incentives systems around which means these professionals have worked on hundreds of movies over more than ten years. They bring experience to your production. They raise the bar and lower your bottom line. If you’re looking for your next location, look no more.

432 N. ANTHONY STREET SUITE 305 • NEW ORLEANS, LA 70119 OFFICE (504) 486-2192 • FAX (504) 483-9961 • iatse478.org

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The EQUIPMENT You Need The PEOPLE Who Provide It CAMTREK

CamTrek’s electric camera support vehicle/camera car is available for production use on movies, commercials, TV, music videos and live events. At 4 feet wide and 11 feet long, the vehicle is big enough to accommodate multiple cameras, remote heads, small crane or jib, generator, lights, monitors and up to five crewmembers, but its compact design allows configuration for shots in limited-access situations. CamTrek’s vehicle is equipped with a powerful electric motor and can go hours on a single charge, yet is virtually silent and gives off no emissions, making it ideal for both indoor and outdoor shoots. Other features include: programmable controller that allows for dual set speeds, air suspension system for adjustable ride and weight compensation, 2 working platforms front and rear, 4 wheel disc brakes with programmable electric braking system, side boards, tower for crane, removable platforms and an aluminum cheese plate body that supports unlimited rigging possibilities. The vehicle is available 24/7 and can be on set and ready to go on short notice. And because CamTrek is based in New Orleans, there is no expensive transportation, driver, per diem or weekly costs, which saves productions time and money. CamTrek offers additional equipment, including Steadicam, Techno cranes, cranes, jibs, remote heads, full Alexa, Red and Phantom packages, along with lenses and grip packages, at competitive rates all under the same roof. Visit www.camtrek.net or call 504-734-3973 for more information.

HD PLANET CAMERAS

With a vast array of cameras, lenses, heads, decks and other accessories, HD Planet Cameras is truly a one-stop shop for all things digital. HDPC is a dedicated RED camera rental house, delivering RED ONE MX, RED EPIC, and RED Scarlet packages to productions of all sizes, in the United States and abroad. Other camera rental offerings include: Arri ALEXA, Arri ALEXA PLUS, Arri ALEXA PLUS 4:3, Sony F65, Sony F3, Sony FS700, and Canon C300. Not sure what type of camera equipment your production needs? HDPC founder and president Tom Jordan has an intimate knowledge of all film and digital cinema cameras on the market today, and is able to share his knowledge and resources with productions of all sizes and budgets. And because HDPC has more than a dozen rental offices spread out across the country—and the ability to ship cameras, lenses and accessories nationwide—no matter where your production takes you, HD Planet Cameras will be there to help. For more information, visit www.hdplanetcameras.com.

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CUSTOM MUFFLER & AUTO REPAIR

Located in Kenner, Louisiana, just outside New Orleans, Custom Muffler & Auto Repair is the go-to shop for all your high performance exhaust and racing needs. Services include: • Catalytic Converters • Mufflers • All Types of Metal Fabrication • Custom Bending & Welding • Programmers • EFI Live Tuning • Tune-Ups • Shocks & Struts • Brakes • Suspension Repair • A/C Work • Motors • Transmissions • Diesel 5” Exhaust • Lift Kits And all services come with a lifetime warranty! For more information, visit www.thecustommuffler.com. The site also features a live webcam in the shop.

LIGHTNIN PRODUCTION RENTALS

Premier supplier of Honeywagons, Hair & Make-up Trailers, Wardrobe Trailers, Star Trailers, Production Vans, Camera Trucks & Trailers, Trucks and Generators. Credits include: G.I. Joe II, Beautiful Creatures, Cataclysm, Contraband, Dallas Buyers Club, 12 Years A Slave and 21 Jump Street. Call 770-963-1234 or visit www.lightnin.com for your transportation equipment needs.


LO U I S I A N A TA X C R E D I T Q U A L I F I E D YOUR ONE STOP FOR EVERYTHING AERIAL.

! W NE

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SERVICES:

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Single & Twin Engine Helicopters

“Yellow Hankerchief,” “Texas Killing Fields,” “Motel,“ “The Loft,” “Jonah Hex,” “12 Rounds,” “Spiderman,” “Superman,” "Pain & Gain,“ "Jack & Jill,” “Why Did I Get Married Too?,” “Get Smart,” “Burn Notice,” “Gumball 3000,” “CSI: Miami/ NY/Las Vegas,” “Project Earth” (Discovery), “Top Gear,” “Detroit 1-8-7,” “Mississippi River Quest”(NatGeo), “The Amazing Race,” “Bullrun” (Spike TV),“Madfin on ESPN,” HBO, Fox,“Bass Masters,” NBC, CBS, ESPN, BBC, NatGeo, ABC, Chevrolet, GMC, Honda, Mercedes,Volvo, Lincoln/Mercury, Kawasaki & Many More...

Airplanes & Seaplanes Film, Video, & Print Photography Location Scouting & Pre-Production SAG/AFTRA Aerial Coordinators & Pilots FAA Motion Picture & TV Manual All Camera Mounts & Systems Available

Use your aerial budget for great shots... ...not shipping and ferry charges. Our custom “BIG RIGS” deliver helicopter, camera systems, crew, even jet fuel anywhere in Louisiana and the USA! CALL FOR DETAILS!

888-463-7953

or visit us anytime online at

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The EQUIPMENT You Need The PEOPLE Who Provide It AQUATIC SPECIALTIES, INC.

LEO’S RV SERVICE

WE COME TO YOU... yes, that’s right. Isn’t it enough that you have to deal with an issue with your unit, travel trailer, luxury RV, etc., without having to also deal with locating a reputable service company that can handle your situation? WE COME TO YOU... all of the previously mentioned units will, in time, have issues that require attention. We at Leo’s RV Service, LLC, bring almost 20 years’ experience dealing with hydraulics, electronics, plumbing, electrical, satellite, air conditioning, generators... the list goes on. Our company has dealt with all these issues plus many more that cannot all be listed here. Check out our website and enjoy the convenience of calling us so WE CAN COME TO YOU. No need to locate a service center and go through the travel and time inconvenience. In the vast majority of cases, we can resolve your issue on site. Our website attempts to capture all that we do, our rates, etc. You will find us to be competitive, accountable and dependable. We have a long list of commercial accounts, along with private RV owners and many others who enjoy the services our company brings you. Our lead tech is nationally certified and most capable of working with you and the issue you have. Go ahead and call us at 225-907-5822 or click on to www.leosrvservice.com!

RZI LIGHTING

Aquatic Specialties, Inc. has been in business since 1993, owned by Keith Ericksen and Chip Van Geffen. Our role as a provider of beautiful aquariums and specialty aquatic livestock for the New Orleans movie and television industry has grown over the years, along with our commercial aquarium service. Our services include leasing (or selling) aquariums, freshwater or marine livestock and aquaticthemed decorations. We will install aquariums, deliver livestock and even transport the water to location if this is required to care for the livestock (also provided). Our retail location in Kenner, Louisiana, open Tues.-Sat., stocks a large selection of livestock, where fish can be hand-picked. Experienced aquarium wranglers are available on staff. Some of the movies in which our aquariums are showcased are Skeleton Key, Failure to Launch, Green Lantern, The Butler and Oldboy. Please contact Chip Van Geffen at 504-443-1576 or fishinfo@aquaticspecialties.com.

VIDEO EQUIPMENT RENTALS – VER

VER is your equipment rental source for AV, broadcast, audio, computers and creative LED display and lighting. Located throughout the U.S. (including in New Orleans), Canada and Europe, VER carries an extensive inventory to serve your project, whether it’s a live event, post production project, studio, episodic or film shoot. VER offers one of the largest inventories of broadcast equipment, including Hi-Def/Standard Def/3D cameras, custom flypaks, high speed and 3D camera systems, tape or file-based players and recorders, fiber, monitors (all sizes), converters, switchers, signal processing and terminal equipment. We also carry a full line of communications, sound, projection, AV and lighting equipment to complete any project, any time, anywhere. With 27 offices around the world, no matter where you are or what you’re looking for, VER is there to ensure your production’s success. Visit www.verrents.com for more information.

RZI Lighting is one of the New Orleans region’s largest suppliers of stage lighting equipment rentals and expendables, offering everything from lighting consoles (Hog4) and conventional lighting to truss, spotlights and moving lights. Our inventory includes ETC, High End Systems, Martin Professional, and many other large manufacturers. In addition to lighting, RZI also provides products to make your special events come to life, including search lights, LED sparkle drapes, mirror balls, fog machines, confetti flow machine, custom gobos and more. Our retail showroom is stocked with expendables and products to meet your show needs. We carry cables/lines, haze/fog fluids, bulbs, and XLR accessories, just to name a few. And not only does RZI have the equipment for all your lighting and event needs, but we also have the manpower. We provide stagehands, truck loaders, light and sound operators and technicians for all aspects of the entertainment business. For more information, contact 504-525-5600 or visit www.rzilighting.com.

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SOUTHERN COSTUME COMPANY

Southern Costume Company is the largest costume and wardrobe warehouse in the South. Founded in 2011 by Wingate Jones, SCC provides 9,000 square ft. of wardrobes, original designs, production offices, wardrobe cages and supplies to film production companies who are working in the state of Louisiana and need assistance in qualifying and benefiting from the Louisiana Entertainment state tax incentive program. We also create, design and manufacture original Mardi Gras Krewe costumes and have been showcased in many Mardi Gras parades. One of the largest organizations to participate in the Mardi Gras festivities is the Krewe of Nyx. In 2013, we provided original costumes for 1,000 members of the group, the Captain and her court. Our Hollywood-style costume house is located in the New Orleans Central Business District and allows the public an opportunity to be costumed like a movie star, a Disney cartoon character or a vampire for Halloween. When New Orleans needs costumes, it turns to Southern Costume Company.

PANAVISION NEW ORLEANS

Finest cameras and service in the South. We have been here since 2005. Panavision 35mm, Full Arriflex 35mm and 16mm packages, Red Epic/One, Sony F65, F55, F35, F3, Arri Alexas, PL and PV mount lenses. We carry a full line of Supertechnocranes with local technicians. Panavision New Orleans also sells expendables. From the smallest music video to the largest tent pole feature we can give your production local service with true worldwide support.

M3 SYSTEMS

HERTZ ENTERTAINMENT SERVICES

Hertz Entertainment Services is uniquely prepared to meet your Film, TV and Event production needs. We are the only one-stop industry resource for both specialized production equipment, as well as a wide selection of passenger vehicles. Our mission is to provide our customers with a full, one-stop suite of assets and consultative services that deliver the efficiencies needed to make a project successful in this competitive landscape. From lift equipment and carts to keep a project moving, climate control products to keep comfortable, power generators to keep the energy flowing, to our newest addition of a full line of lighting and grip gear to light and stage it all—Hertz Entertainment Services has the equipment to get the job done. Additionally, offering a wide selection of passenger vehicle fleet—encompassing everything from hybrids and luxury to larger multi-passenger vehicles—Hertz Entertainment Services also provides full-service support for your talent and crew mobility needs. Our team of knowledgeable experts, available 24/7 to deliver products and address needs, Hertz Entertainment Services is prepared to support our customers when and where they need it most. You can reach us by calling 1-877-HES-7320 or visit us online at www.hertzentertainment.com.

M3 Systems supplies Jimmy Jib camera cranes with remotecontrolled camera functions for film and video productions. For maximum flexibility the jibs can easily be set up to extend from 9 to 40 feet and are adaptable for film, video, HD video, 3D and Red cameras. Customized dollies allow use on all terrain types and M3’s jibs have worked in hundreds of locations—from the swamps of Louisiana to the beaches of Belize. Their ability to soar over crowds make them a mainstay of area festivals including the New Orleans Voodoo Experience, Essence Fest, New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, and Gulf Shore’s Hang Out Fest. In New Orleans M3’s jibs have worked on visiting news programs and the equipment has been used on numerous features and network series filmed in the city. From cooking series to concerts and sporting events, M3’s top-notch crews have made the jib an invaluable tool for producers. The nearly 20-year-old company has an extensive list of clients in entertainment, sports and reality programming. Credits include: CBS Super Bowl, Extreme Makeover: Home Edition, ESPN Boxing, NFL Network, Good Morning America, CBS Morning Show, World News Tonight, Chef John Besh’s Family Table, Common Law, and Memphis Beat. Additional credits are available upon request. For more information, contact Jim Moriarty (504-616-3999; jim@yesproductions.com) and Dave Landry (504-450-0942; dtlandry@bellsouth.net), or visit www.m3systems-jibs.com.

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The EQUIPMENT You Need The PEOPLE Who Provide It NEOMETIX

Neometix is a full-service sign company with the capability to provide for a wide range of sign needs. We understand the film industry’s scheduling demands and are proud to consistently meet those requirements. Our in-house neon production facility and complete sign studio is located three blocks from the historic French Quarter. This central location helps us provide fast, reliable and, if needed, emergency service. In addition, our location is convenient for viewing our large inventory of rental neon. Or if your needs require custom neon, we will make it and rent it, for a fraction of the cost. Recently, Neometix has provided neon and other types of signs for productions such as Broken City, Beautiful Creatures, The Green Lantern, The Butler, and Spike Lee’s remake of Old Boy. As required, we can easily schedule “on set” installations or service “stand-bys.” Please feel free to stop by our location at 1928 Burgundy Street in New Orleans.

STORY TELLER EFFECTS GROUP LLC

NIMS CENTER

The New Orleans Nims Center has more than 100,000 square feet of production support space and offices, including five air-conditioned sound stages, all with green screen or white infinity screens. Stage A is 20,000 square feet, Stage B is 10,000 square feet, Stage C is 7,000 square feet, and insert Stage E is 1,200 square feet. The Center’s newly constructed 10,000-square-foot Stage D, with 40’ grid, opens June 1, 2013. For the past five years the Nims ADR suite with Zepher Extreme ISDN modem and ProTools HD Avid timeline playback has been listed on EDNET for easy linking by off-site facilities for international and domestic ADR sessions. ADR clients include CBS Television, The Weinstein Company, Skywalker Sound, and the BBC. Major features shot at Nims include: The Runaway Jury, Ray, All the King’s Men, Deja vu, Failure to Launch, and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button. Series television includes Playhouse Disney, the USA Channel and CBS Television. For availability contact Roger Benischek, Executive Director, at roger@nimscenter.com. Phone: 504-430-8965. Website: www. nimscenter.com.

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John Baker and Bob Riggs started Story Teller Effects in 2010 to provide special effects rental equipment, supplies and fabrication facilities to the rapidly growing film industry in Louisiana and the Gulf Coast. Story Teller offers an extensive line of SPFX rental equipment including Ritter fans, 350 Chevy V8 fans, E Fans, hazers, foggers, steam boilers, rain equipment, mortars, ratchets and more. Story Teller is a stocking dealer for Look, Ultratec, CITC and LeMaitre. We stock a full line of SPFX expendables including pyrotechnics and carry all applicable Federal, State and Parish licenses. We also have a fully equipped fabrication shop with car lifts and 3 acres of secured parking for all of your production needs. We invite everyone to stop by and visit and we hope to see you soon. For more information, call 504-832-9800, e-mail sales@storytellerfx.com, or visit www.storytellerfx.com.

VIDOX MOTION IMAGERY

Vidox Motion Imagery, a full-service South Louisiana-based video production company, provides creative development, cinematography, editing, animation, special effects, sound design and music composition. We produce radio and television commercials, web video, long-form marketing, and animation for advertising and industrial illustration for regional, national, and international clients. Vidox brings a flair to its cinematography using a digital cinema camera package complemented by an extensive set of PL-mount lenses including a Cooke Varotal Zoom—prized by top cinematographers. We offer a location sound package with multi-channel wireless capabilities, a versatile light package including tungsten, HMI, LED, and fluorescent instruments, and numerous camera support options including jib, slider, skater, and more. Our team of professionals is a carefully honed blend of artist and technician, creating stunning motion imagery using a robust palette of tools and techniques. Over three decades, Vidox has produced award-winning content, show-stopping media, and emotionally charged pictures and sound. Trust the pros at Vidox. www.vidox.com


HOTARD COACHES AND CALCO TRAVEL

Since 1960, Hotard Coaches and Calco Travel have continuously provided outstanding service with a focus on safety and hospitality. Today, Hotard and Calco maintain offices in New Orleans, Baton Rouge, and Biloxi. To ensure quality service, Hotard... • Exceeds minimum hiring and training standards so that our drivers are fully competent to provide a safe driving experience. All drivers complete training in motorcoach operation, safety, and customer service, as well as extensive collision avoidance training. • Meets or exceeds minimum amounts of general liability and vehicle liability insurance, as required by the federal government. • Has been awarded the highest ratings by the Dept. of Transportation and Dept. of Defense and is the carrier of military personnel throughout the Southern region. • Provides 24-hour dispatch/customer service. Hotard Coaches, Inc. is proud to be a member of the International Motorcoach Group (IMG), an elite network of motorcoach operators that must meet stringent standards of performance. Contact us at www.CalcoHotard.com or 800-356-6831.

SOUTH COAST HELICOPTERS

South Coast Helicopters, one of the film industry’s premier aircraft and aerial support providers since 1990, has been responsible for some of the most dramatic and memorable images for film, IMAX, television and commercials, as seen in the U.S. and around the world. Our pilots are fully-accredited members of SAG, AFTRA, MPPA and DGA. We operate turbine helicopters based in Orange County and Van Nuys, California, and New Orleans, Louisiana, in addition to having access to aircraft throughout the United States and Canada. Some recent feature credits include Argo, Star Trek into Darkness, Captain Phillips, Iron Man 3, and The Lone Ranger. In addition to film, South Coast Helicopters also offers support for fire suppression for the U.S. Forestry, conducts heli-ski and charter operations under its FAR Part 135 certificate, surveys, and construction services under its FAR Part 133 certificate. South Coast Helicopters is proud of its 23-year accident-free safety record for every commercial use of its aircraft. For more information on South Coast Helicopters please visit www.southcoasthelicopters.com or e-mail us at info@schelicopters.com.

ST. JOHN CENTER SOUND STAGE

From Hollywood features to network television series, the film credits of the St. John Center Sound Stage can rival those of any New Orleans, Baton Rouge and even Hollywood studio. Yet its location in the city of LaPlace, Lousiana means the St. John Center Sound Stage offers something the others cannot—the ample space of a rural area combined with all the conveniences of a major city. Boasting both a bayou and a big box hardware store on the road it resides, productions are only minutes away from picturesque locales and the supplies needed during filming. And what cannot be filmed can be made in one or both of the two large sound stages located inside the center. Productions can enjoy the services of the St. John Center Sound Stage in as little as a 30-minute drive from either New Orleans or Baton Rouge. The convenience of the St. John Center Sound Stage, however, does not come with a sacrifice of quality or price for productions. Built with industry specs, the 42,000square-foot facility is equipped with top-of-the-line ventilation, sound proofing, and air conditioning system. The ample parking surrounding the building, large enough to house 18-wheelers and trailers, is but one of the amenities productions can expect at no extra charge, while a friendly and knowledgeable staff is yet another. Film Credits: 2 Guns, Django Unchained, Memphis Beat, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Monster’s Ball. Contact the St. John Center Sound Stage at info@filmlouisiana.com or 985-359-0372 for more information.

CAT® ENTERTAINMENT SERVICES

Most movie-goers are oblivious to the role played by generators, chillers and air handlers on movie sets. And it is the job of Cat Entertainment Services technicians to keep it that way. During filming, heavy lighting loads and harsh outdoor conditions can create uncomfortable, unproductive, and—sometimes—unsafe work environments. But Cat Entertainment Services has the power generation and HVAC equipment, technicians and expertise to ensure the safety and comfort of cast, crew and caterers without disrupting the set or the shoot. Oblivion, a Universal Studios sci-fi thriller released this month, is just one of several movies filmed recently in Louisiana. Don Miccio, CES account manager in Baton Rouge, oversaw the operation of the “movie-silent” generators, chillers, air handlers and air conditioners used to keep Tom Cruise, Morgan Freeman and the rest of the cast and crew safe and comfortable and the production schedule, on track. At the time of this writing, CES is powering the set construction for Dawn of the Planet of the Apes at Big Easy Studios in New Orleans. Last year, CES powered and cooled the sets for Enders Game, The Tomb and Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters, also for Big Easy.

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Louisiana PRODUCTION & POST-PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT

3rd Coast Digital Films Baton Rouge, LA 225-751-3456 www.3cdf.com 4:4:4 Camera New Orleans, LA 504-734-3973 www.444camera.com Abstract Productions LLC New Orleans: 504-644-4185 Baton Rouge: 225-297-2595 www.abstractproductions.net Advanced Audio & Stage Lighting Inc. Denham Springs, LA 225-667-4855 www.advancedaudiobr.com American AVL New Orleans, LA 888-835-8039 www.americanavl.com Anytime Rentals New Orleans, LA 504-261-4881 www.anytime-rentals.com Atherton Pictures New Orleans, LA 504-818-2190 www.athertonpictures.com Audio Visual Solutions New Orleans Harvey, LA 504-592-0672 www.avsno.net AV Express Baton Rouge, LA 225-929-6961 www.avexpressbr.com Available Lighting New Orleans, LA 504-831-5214 www.availablelighting.com Blade Studios Shreveport, LA 318-213-0777 www.bladestudios.com Briggs Equipment New Orleans: 504-733-5640 Baton Rouge: 225-926-9206 www.briggsequipment.com CamTrek New Orleans, LA 504-734-3973 www.camtrek.net CAT Entertainment Services Baton Rouge, LA 877-228-2852 www.es-cat.com Center Staging, Inc. New Orleans, LA 504-247-0020 www.centerstaging.net Chapman/Leonard Studio Equipment, Inc. New Orleans, LA 504-731-6050 www.chapman-leonard.com

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Louisiana PRODUCTION & POST-PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT

Cinelease Jefferson: 504-267-9075 Shreveport: 318-207-0299 www.cinelease.com CineSouth Lighting New Orleans, LA 318-426-8014 www.cinesouthlighting.com Clark Services Lafayette, LA 337-234-5653 www.clarkservices.biz Composite Effects, LLC Baton Rouge, LA 225-756-7875 www.compositeeffects.com Comprehensive Technical Group Kenner, LA 504-466-4454 www.ctgatlanta.com DFX Rentals - Camera Rentals by Digital FX Baton Rouge, LA 225-763-6010 www.dfxrentals.com Division Camera Baton Rouge, LA 225-308-9990 www.divisioncamera.com Encore Event Rentals Shreveport, LA 318-222-2000 www.encoreeventrentals.com Event Producers New Orleans, LA 504-466-4066 www.eventproducers.com Event Rental, LLC New Orleans: 504-362-8368 Baton Rouge: 225-355-9031 Lafayette: 337-237-1200 www.youreventdelivered.com Fletcher Camera & Lenses New Orleans, LA 504-322-4180 www.fletch.com Full Motion Productions Harahan, LA 504-220-2129 www.fullmotionproductions.com GRP Productions Baton Rouge, LA 225-235-0976 www.grpproductions.com GSE AudioVisual Inc. Kenner, LA 888-573-6847 www.gseav.com Gulf Coast Tent Rentals Harahan, LA 504-468-8368 www.gulfcoast-tent.com HD Planet Cameras New Orleans, LA 504-818-3847 www.5kcamerarentals.com

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Louisiana PRODUCTION & POST-PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT

Hertz Entertainment Services Kenner, LA 877-HES-7320 www.hertzentertainment.com Holbrook Multimedia Inc. Lafayette, LA 337-989-2237 www.holbrookmultimedia.com Hollywood Rentals Baton Rouge, LA 225-752-8965 www.hollywoodrentals.com Independent Studio Services New Orleans, LA 504-522-8078 www.issprops.com Iron Grip, LLC New Orleans, LA 504-450-1721 www.irongripllc.com LA Post, Inc. Baton Rouge, LA 225-303-0165 www.lapostgroup.com Louisiana Lift & Equipment Alexandria: 318-448-3877 Baton Rouge: 225-753-5700 Shreveport: 318-631-5100 St.Rose: 504-463-3400/www.lalift.com Louisiana Media Productions Baton Rouge, LA 225-610-1639 www.lampbr.com M&M Sound and Media Alexandria, LA 318-452-2958 www.mandmsoundandmedia.com M3 Systems Folsom, LA 504-616-3999/504-450-0942 www.m3systems-jibs.com MLD Equipment Rental Dallas, TX 214-654-9977 www.mldvideo.com NES Rentals Geismar: 225-673-3155 Sulphur: 337-625-4446 Harvey: 504-368-4277 www.nesrentals.com Ophion Films, LLC New Orleans, LA 985-705-1628 www.ophionfilms.com Outland Technology, Inc. Slidell, LA 985-847-1104 www.outlandtech.com Pace Systems New Orleans, LA 504-837-4224 www.pacesys.com Panavision New Orleans New Orleans, LA 504-733-3055 www.panavision.com

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Louisiana PRODUCTION & POST-PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT

Paramount on Location New Orleans, LA 504-736-2177 www.paramountonlocation.com Paskal Lighting New Orleans, LA 504-602-9510 www.paskal.com The Pinnacle Group Lafayette: 337-593-1149 Lake Charles: 337-477-7469 Baton Rouge: 225-767-1148 www.pingroup.com Pro-Cam Louisiana Kenner, LA 877-773-2266 www.procamrentals.com Production Plus Studio Rentals Shreveport, LA 310-321-7813 www.productionpluss.com Propaganda Audio New Orleans, LA 504-229-0773 www.propagandagroup.com PSAV - New Orleans New Orleans, LA 504-830-4360 www.psav.com Pyramid Audio Productions, Inc. Jefferson, LA 504-731-3412 www.pyramidaudio.net Quixote Studios New Orleans, LA 877-414-5209 www.quixote.com Ragtime Rentals Baton Rouge, LA 225-330-6902 www.ragtimerentals.com Reece Cinematography LLC New Orleans, LA 504-390-7781 www.reececinematography.com Rhino Staging Gonzales, LA 225-644-5600 www.rhinostaging.com Road Wrangler Motion Picture Vehicles Baton Rouge, LA 800-970-1882 www.roadwrangler.com Royal Productions Metairie, LA 800-776-9252 www.royalproductions.com Ruptured State Pictures Kenner, LA 724-747-2463

RZI Lighting New Orleans, LA 504-525-5600 www.rzilighting.com

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Louisiana PRODUCTION & POST-PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT S EQ PEC UI IA PM L F EN X T

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Second Line Stages New Orleans, LA 504-528-3050 www.secondlinestages.com See-Hear Productions New Orleans: 504-831-0501 Northshore: 985-871-7368 www.seehearpro.com Show Time Rentals, LLC Metairie, LA 504-883-7329 www.showtimerents.com Smart Source New Orleans, LA 504-737-2247 www.smartsourcerentals.com Solomon Group New Orleans, LA 504-252-4500 www.solomongroup.com Soupfactory Digital Metairie, LA 504-813-7856 www.soupfactorydigital.com SpectrumFX Louisiana New Orleans, LA 504-322-7236 www.spectrumeffects.com StageLight New Orleans, LA 504-818-1880 www.stagelight.com Story Teller Effects Group, LLC Jefferson, LA 504-832-9800 www.storytellerfx.com Studio Services Baton Rouge, LA 888-833-8803 www.studioservices.com TM Motion Picture Equipment Rentals New Orleans, LA 504-734-3403 www.tmequipmentrentals.com

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Louisiana PRODUCTION & POST-PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT

VER - Video Equipment Rentals New Orleans, LA 504-831-6966 www.verrents.com Vidox Motion Imagery Lafayette, LA 337-237-1700 www.vidox.com

Volvo Rents West Monroe, LA 318-398-9030 www.volvorentsconstructionequipment.com

Worldwide FX Shreveport, LA 318-841-3582 www.wwfx.net

WyndChaser Lighting Baton Rouge, LA 225-216-1546 www.wyndchaserlighting.com

YES Productions Metairie, LA 800-736-8812 www.yesproductions.com

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Louisiana EVENT EQUIPMENT TE LE PR OM PT ER S

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Abstract Productions LLC New Orleans: 504-644-4185 Baton Rouge: 225-297-2595 www.abstractproductions.net

ACT Technologies Reserve, LA 985-536-2934 www.acttechnologies.com

Aggreko, Inc. Baton Rouge: 225-751-3525 Lake Charles: 337-625-3450 New Iberia: 337-365-5479 New Orleans: 504-461-0556 Shreveport: 877-603-6021 www.aggreko.com

American Audio Visual LLC Baton Rouge, LA 225-928-3334 www.americanav-br.com

American AVL New Orleans, LA 888-835-8039 www.americanavl.com Anytime Rentals New Orleans, LA 504-261-4881 www.anytime-rentals.com

Audio Video Production Group New Orleans, LA 504-362-1234 www.avpg.com

Audio Visual Mart Inc. Kenner, LA 504-733-1500 www.av-mart.com Audio Visual Solutions New Orleans Harvey, LA 504-592-0672 www.avsno.net

AV Express Baton Rouge, LA 225-929-6961 www.avexpressbr.com

Available Lighting New Orleans, LA 504-831-5214 www.availablelighting.com

Brian’s Furniture & Appliances Port Allen, LA 225-346-0896 www.briansfurniture.com

CAT Entertainment Services Baton Rouge, LA 877-228-2852 www.es-cat.com Center Staging, Inc. New Orleans, LA 504-247-0020 www.centerstaging.net

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Louisiana EVENT EQUIPMENT

Chaps Party Rentals New Orleans, LA 504-944-2536 www.chapspartyrentals.com

CineSouth Lighting New Orleans, LA 318-426-8014 www.cinesouthlighting.com

Clark Services Lafayette, LA 337-234-5653 www.clarkservices.biz Comprehensive Technical Group Kenner, LA 504-466-4454 www.ctgatlanta.com

Cort Furniture Rental Jefferson: 504-733-8381 Baton Rouge: 225-927-5160 Lafayette: 337-981-2233 www.cort.com DCAV New Orleans New Orleans, LA 504-813-0845 www.dcavno.com DFX Rentals - Camera Rentals by Digital FX Baton Rouge, LA 225-763-6010 www.dfxrentals.com

Encore Event Rentals Shreveport, LA 318-222-2000 www.encoreeventrentals.com Event Producers New Orleans, LA 504-466-4066 www.eventproducers.com Event Rental, LLC New Orleans: 504-362-8368 Baton Rouge: 225-355-9031 Lafayette: 337-237-1200 www.youreventdelivered.com Event Restroom New Orleans: 866-424-4164 Lafayette: 337-269-0358 www.yourrestroomdelivered.com

Full Motion Productions Harahan, LA 504-220-2129 www.fullmotionproductions.com

GRP Productions Baton Rouge, LA 225-235-0976 www.grpproductions.com

GSE AudioVisual Inc. Kenner, LA 888-573-6847 www.gseav.com Gulf Coast Cinema Trucks Houston, TX 713-682-3572 www.gccts.com

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Gulf Coast Tent Rentals Harahan, LA 504-468-8368 www.gulfcoast-tent.com Hertz Entertainment Services Kenner, LA 877-HES-7320 www.hertzentertainment.com Hollywood Rentals Baton Rouge, LA 225-752-8965 www.hollywoodrentals.com Home Team Productions New Orleans, LA 504-733-8326 www.hometeamproductions.net J Custom Supply Co. Baton Rouge, LA 800-226-5657 www.jcustom.com Launch Media Baton Rouge: 225-612-2112 New Orleans: 504-525-2113 www.launchmedia.tv

Cameras Love Us! Lighting Loves Us! Stunts and Audio, Too! What We Do

What We Have

Camera Platforms Lighting Towers Stunt Platforms Custom Platforms Electrical Distribution Truss Roof Systems Sound Reinforcements Lighting Systems Concert Staging Food & Craft Booths Viewing Stands Theater Productions Site Consultants Cam-Lok Connectors

Stage Crews Labor Crews Scaffolding Mobile Stages 35K ft Wood Decking 4K ft Alum. Decking Multi-Quip Generators Power Distribution Feeder Cable Bleachers Ballast Blocks

30 ft. high stunt platform for “The Courier” movie

Plus all the stuff you need but can never find

“We can build any platform, stage or structure in any size or configuration you need!”

We have the best equipment, the best prices and the best service.

We do all the heavy lifting for you and specialize in getting the job done right the first time, on time, every time.

Center Staging, Inc. Serving New Orleans & The Gulf South Region (504) 247-0020

(866) 508-0975

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Louisiana EVENT EQUIPMENT

Lightnin Production Rentals Lawrenceville, GA 770-963-1234 www.lightnin.com M&M Sound and Media Alexandria, LA 318-452-2958 www.mandmsoundandmedia.com

MLD Equipment Rental Dallas, TX 214-654-9977 www.mldvideo.com

Neometix New Orleans, LA 504-940-0888 www.neometix.com NOLA Film Logistics Metairie, LA 504-710-3626 www.nolafl.com Pace Systems New Orleans, LA 504-837-4224 www.pacesys.com

Paramount on Location New Orleans, LA 504-736-2177 www.paramountonlocation.com The Pinnacle Group Lafayette: 337-593-1149 Lake Charles: 337-477-7469 Baton Rouge: 225-767-1148 www.pingroup.com The Pool & Patio Center Metairie, LA 504-837-2022 www.poolpatio.com Production Plus Studio Rentals Shreveport, LA 310-321-7813 www.productionpluss.com

The Prop Depot Gonzales, LA 225-235-4726 www.lapropdepot.com

Propaganda Audio New Orleans, LA 504-229-0773 www.propagandagroup.com

PSAV - New Orleans New Orleans, LA 504-830-4360 www.psav.com

Pyramid Audio Productions, Inc. Jefferson, LA 504-731-3412 www.pyramidaudio.net Quixote Studios New Orleans, LA 877-414-5209 www.quixote.com

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Rhino Staging Gonzales, LA 225-644-5600 www.rhinostaging.com

Road Wrangler Motion Picture Vehicles Baton Rouge, LA 800-970-1882 www.roadwrangler.com

Royal Productions Metairie, LA 800-776-9252 www.royalproductions.com

RZI Lighting New Orleans, LA 504-525-5600 www.rzilighting.com See-Hear Productions New Orleans: 504-831-0501 Northshore: 985-871-7368 www.seehearpro.com

Tara Shaw New Orleans, LA 504-525-1131 www.tarashaw.com Show Time Rentals, LLC Metairie, LA 504-883-7329 www.showtimerents.com

Silk Road Collection Asian DĂŠcor New Orleans, LA 504-894-8540 www.silkroadcollection.com

Silver Screen Rentals New Orleans: 504-737-0555 Baton Rouge: 225-810-3005 www.silverscreensupplies.com Smart Source New Orleans, LA 504-737-2247 www.smartsourcerentals.com

Solomon Group New Orleans, LA 504-252-4500 www.solomongroup.com

SpectrumFX Louisiana New Orleans, LA 504-322-7236 www.spectrumeffects.com

Story Teller Effects Group, LLC Jefferson, LA 504-832-9800 www.storytellerfx.com

Strike It Green New Orleans, LA 504-261-7546 www.strikeitgreenprops.com Studio Services Baton Rouge, LA 888-833-8803 www.studioservices.com

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Louisiana EVENT EQUIPMENT

The Tent Man New Orleans: 504-780-8368 Northshore: 985-624-7368 www.tentmantents.com

TM Motion Picture Equipment Rentals New Orleans, LA 504-734-3403 www.tmequipmentrentals.com

VER - Video Equipment Rentals New Orleans, LA 504-831-6966 www.verrents.com

Vidox Motion Imagery Lafayette, LA 337-237-1700 www.vidox.com

Volvo Rents West Monroe, LA 318-398-9030 www.volvorentsconstructionequipment.com

WyndChaser Lighting Baton Rouge, LA 225-216-1546 www.wyndchaserlighting.com

SIGNS OF ALL KINDS

NEON SIGNS • BANNER • VINYL LETTERS • WOODEN SIGNS • GRAPHICS

• Neon For Rent • In House Neon Plant • Studio Friendly • www.neometix.com

Neometix neon & sign studio

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504.940.0888 • 504.940.0891 fax neometix@bellsouth.net 1928 Burgundy Street • New Orleans, LA 70116

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Louisiana SUPPORT EQUIPMENT A M QU SU AR ARI PP INE UM LIE & S

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PR OP S

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EQUIPMENT

3rd Coast Digital Films Baton Rouge, LA 225-751-3456 www.3cdf.com 4:4:4 Camera New Orleans, LA 504-734-3973 www.444camera.com 9th Ward Studios New Orleans, LA 504-342-4798 www.9thwardstudios.com A-Z Marine Supply Baton Rouge, LA 225-927-5607 www.azmarinesupply.com Anytime Rentals New Orleans, LA 504-261-4881 www.anytime-rentals.com Aquatic Specialties, Inc. Kenner, LA 504-443-1576 www.aquaticspecialties.com Robert Berning Productions, Inc. Metairie, LA 504-838-3960 www.berning.com Center Staging, Inc. New Orleans, LA 504-247-0020 www.centerstaging.net Cinelease Jefferson: 504-267-9075 Shreveport: 318-207-0299 www.cinelease.com CineSouth Lighting New Orleans, LA 318-426-8014 www.cinesouthlighting.com Code 3 Supply New Orleans, LA 504-861-6408 www.code3supplynola.com Composite Effects, LLC Baton Rouge, LA 225-756-7875 www.compositeeffects.com CRM Studios Louisiana Shreveport, LA 318-629-8620 www.crmstudios.tv DFX Rentals - Camera Rentals by Digital FX Baton Rouge, LA 225-763-6010 www.dfxrentals.com ISSUE TWO

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Division Camera Baton Rouge, LA 225-308-9990 www.divisioncamera.com Fairfield Studios Shreveport, LA 318-220-0400 www.fairfieldstudios.com Hertz Entertainment Services Kenner, LA 877-HES-7320 www.hertzentertainment.com Hollywood Rentals Baton Rouge, LA 225-752-8965 www.hollywoodrentals.com Independent Studio Services New Orleans, LA 504-522-8078 www.issprops.com Jefferson Battery Co. Jefferson, LA 504-835-1685 www.thebattman.com Louisiana Media Productions Baton Rouge, LA 225-610-1639 www.lampbr.com Louisiana Public Broadcasting Baton Rouge, LA 225-767-4220 beta.lpb.org/index.php/site/truck The Louisiana Wave Studio Shreveport, LA 888-WAV-TANK www.thelouisianawavestudio.com Carl Mack Presents New Orleans, LA 504-949-4009 www.carlmack.com Media 2-Way Radio 877-881-7443 Dallas, TX www.media2wayradio.com Millennium Studios Shreveport, LA 318-841-3599 www.millenniumstudios.net Miss Claudia’s Vintage Clothing & Costumes New Orleans, LA 504-897-6310 www.missclaudias.com MLD Equipment Rental Dallas, TX 214-654-9977 www.mldvideo.com 60

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Louisiana SUPPORT EQUIPMENT

Nims Center Studios New Orleans, LA 504-430-8965 www.nimscenter.com NOLA Spaces New Orleans, LA 504-897-0327 www.nolaspaces.com Paramount on Location New Orleans, LA 504-736-2177 www.paramountonlocation.com Paskal Lighting New Orleans, LA 504-602-9510 www.paskal.com Production Plus Studio Rentals Shreveport, LA 310-321-7813 www.productionpluss.com The Prop Depot Gonzales, LA 225-235-4726 www.lapropdepot.com Quixote Studios New Orleans, LA 877-414-5209 www.quixote.com

Ragtime Rentals Baton Rouge, LA 225-330-6902 www.ragtimerentals.com Raleigh Studios Baton Rouge at the Celtic Media Centre Baton Rouge, LA 225-330-6902 www.thecelticmediacentre.com RZI Lighting New Orleans, LA 504-525-5600 www.rzilighting.com Second Line Stages New Orleans, LA 504-528-3050 www.secondlinestages.com Ship to Shore Co. Lake Charles, LA 337-474-0730 www.shiptoshoreco.com Shreveport Stage West Shreveport, LA 318-861-6989 www.shreveportstagewest.com Solid Communications New Orleans, LA 504-943-1888

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PL E M & IES

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RENTAL • SALES • SERVICE MOTOROLA • HYT RADIOS – SURVEILLANCE MICS HEADSETS – SPEAKER MICS FILM – VIDEO – COMMERCIALS CONVENTIONS - SPECIAL EVENTS

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Louisiana SUPPORT EQUIPMENT

Southern Costume Co. New Orleans, LA 504-523-4333 www.sccnola.com

SpectrumFX Louisiana New Orleans, LA 504-322-7236 www.spectrumeffects.com

St. John Center Soundstage LaPlace, LA 866-204-7782 www.thestjohncenter.com

StageLight New Orleans, LA 504-818-1880 www.stagelight.com

StageWorks of Louisiana Shreveport, LA 318-221-3175 www.stageworksla.com

Story Teller Effects Group, LLC Jefferson, LA 504-832-9800 www.storytellerfx.com

Strike It Green New Orleans, LA 504-261-7546 www.strikeitgreenprops.com

Studio Services Baton Rouge, LA 888-833-8803 www.studioservices.com

TM Motion Picture Equipment Rentals New Orleans, LA 504-734-3403 www.tmequipmentrentals.com

UpLit New Orleans, LA 888-720-7662 www.exceedthefeed.com

VER - Video Equipment Rentals New Orleans, LA 504-831-6966 www.verrents.com

YES Productions Metairie, LA 800-736-8812 www.yesproductions.com

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Louisiana HEAVY PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT S TR HIP AN PIN SP G OR & TA TIO N RE PA IR & PA RT S

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4:4:4 Camera New Orleans, LA 504-734-3973 www.444camera.com AeroPremier Jet Center New Orleans, LA 504-248-5240 www.aeropremier.com Automotive Fabrication/Jeff Milburn Dallas, TX 214-745-1148 www.jeff-milburn.com Barnstorm Cinema New Orleans, LA 504-458-4665 www.barnstormcinema.com Blue Hawk Aviation New Orleans, LA 504-613-6630 www.bluehawkaviation.com Briggs Equipment New Orleans: 504-733-5640 Baton Rouge: 225-926-9206 www.briggsequipment.com CamTrek New Orleans, LA 504-734-3973 www.camtrek.net Camera Copters, Inc. Miami, FL 888-463-7953 www.cameracopters.com Carruth Brothers Lumber Co., Inc. New Orleans, LA 504-522-1113 www.carruthlumber.net Celtic Marine Corporation Baton Rouge, LA 225-752-2490 www.celticmarine.com Chapman/Leonard Studio Equipment, Inc. New Orleans, LA 504-731-6050 www.chapman-leonard.com Cinelease Jefferson: 504-267-9075 Shreveport: 318-207-0299 www.cinelease.com CineSouth Lighting New Orleans, LA 318-426-8014 www.cinesouthlighting.com Custom Muffler & Auto Repair Kenner, LA 504-305-5167 www.thecustommuffler.com Event Restroom New Orleans: 866-424-4164 Lafayette: 337-269-0358 www.yourrestroomdelivered.com Full Motion Productions Harahan, LA 504-220-2129 www.fullmotionproductions.com

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Louisiana HEAVY PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT

Gulf Coast Cinema Trucks Houston, TX 713-682-3572 www.gccts.com Hertz Entertainment Services Kenner, LA 877-HES-7320 www.hertzentertainment.com Hollywood Rentals Baton Rouge, LA 225-752-8965 www.hollywoodrentals.com Hollywood Trucks Baton Rouge: 225-330-6126 New Orleans: 504-528-2480 www.hollywoodtrucksllc.com Hotard Coaches & Calco Travel New Orleans, LA 800-356-6831 www.calcohotard.com Leo’s RV Service Prairieville, LA 225-907-5822 www.leosrvservice.com Lightnin Production Rentals Lawrenceville, GA 770-963-1234 www.lightnin.com Louisiana Lift & Equipment Alexandria: 318-448-3877/Baton Rouge: 225-753-5700 Shreveport: 318-631-5100/St.Rose: 504-463-3400 www.lalift.com Louisiana Media Productions Baton Rouge, LA 225-610-1639 www.lampbr.com Millennium Studios Shreveport, LA 318-841-3599 www.millenniumstudios.net NES Rentals Geismar: 225-673-3155/Sulphur: 337-625-4446 Harvey: 504-368-4277 www.nesrentals.com NOLA Film Logistics Metairie, LA 504-710-3626 www.nolafl.com Panther Helicopters, Inc. Belle Chasse, LA 504-394-5803 www.pantherhelicopters.com Paramount on Location New Orleans, LA 504-736-2177 www.paramountonlocation.com Quixote Studios New Orleans, LA 877-414-5209 www.quixote.com Road Wrangler Motion Picture Vehicles Baton Rouge, LA 800-970-1882 www.roadwrangler.com

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Louisiana HEAVY PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT

Second Line Stages New Orleans, LA 504-528-3050 www.secondlinestages.com

South Coast Helicopters, Inc. New Orleans, LA 888-836-0882 www.southcoasthelicopters.com

Southern Helicopters Sunshine, LA 225-642-0075 www.southernhelicopters.com

SpectrumFX Louisiana New Orleans, LA 504-322-7236 www.spectrumeffects.com StageWorks of Louisiana Shreveport, LA 318-221-3175 www.stageworksla.com

Studio Services Baton Rouge, LA 888-833-8803 www.studioservices.com

SunCruisin’ RV Baton Rouge, LA 281-548-7878 www.suncruisinrv.com

That’s A Wrap Slidell, LA 504-952-9662 www.thatsawrapservices.org

Volvo Rents West Monroe, LA 318-398-9030 www.volvorentsconstructionequipment.com

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LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION... AND SO OUR JOURNEY BEGINS STORY BY BRIDGETTE HOMER LOFTON SECURITY

C

oming into this industry, I certainly expected the glitz and glamour, but rest assured that everything that glitters is not gold. The people who give their lives to this industry can all tell you that the relentless hours and grueling schedules can play havoc with our time. It truly does take a village to raise a family in this business, and every role is vital to a production’s success. This is why Lofton Security doesn’t take the opportunities we’ve been given for granted. When locations manager Bill Maursky approached Lofton Security about providing security for Oblivion, we were ecstatic. Lofton has done several films with Mr. Maursky, but Oblivion was a huge honor to play a role in. If Lofton Security has learned nothing else from this business, we’ve learned this… If you’re going to be a part of this growing industry, then you better be able to roll with the punches, and so far we’ve been rolling. Big productions equals big expectations, and

Lofton Security’s staff recently worked on Oblivion, among other production projects.

Oblivion was certainly no exception. Failure was never an option. Lofton Security strives for excellence, but

understands that while security plays a key role in all productions, a security company is only as good as its last production. This is why Lofton aims for perfection in every way. We want to be the face of security when new productions come to Louisiana. Why Lofton Security? Because we get it. If you can’t embrace consistent change, then don’t sign up. Often, I laugh with cast and crewmembers about productions being the job you love to hate, but can’t live without! While Lofton has been fortunate to work with some of the best in this industry, we are nothing without the dedicated men and women who perform our guard services. If a company can understand that they are only as good as their employees, then they’ve achieved the home field advantage. We look forward to our continued partnership with the Louisiana film industry and we’re excited to see what comes next in our state. We’ll see you on the red carpet! LFV

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SEASONED TALENT AGENCY OPENS NEW ORLEANS OFFICE I

n September of 1983, Rebecca Shrager opened the doors of People Store in Atlanta, Georgia. She recognized her uncanny ability to match the right face to the right project while working as a stylist and production coordinator in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Realizing the need in the Atlanta market for a more diverse range of talent, Shrager utilized her background from the Atlanta College of Art, and went out into the community to photograph interesting faces. She then contacted local theater companies, and discovered an untapped source of talent not yet integrated into the world of film and advertising. Over the past 30 years, People Store has grown into one of the most successful and wellrespected agencies in the country. In 2002, The Talent Group and Hot Shot Kids, co-owned by film and TV agent Brenda Pauley, joined The Atlanta staff of the People Store.

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forces with People Store, creating a multimillion-dollar agency representing the most talented and seasoned adult and child actors and actresses in the region. Today, People Store remains at the forefront of the industry, opening the boundaries between the Southeast, Los Angeles and New York. The Atlanta office now houses six agents, including Shrager, Pauley, Rick Estimond, Karen Donahue, Lavon Lacey and Victoria Temple. They are supported by Jessy Alfonso as office manager and Lesley Galaida and Beth Tebbe in the accounting department. Alexander White was tasked with opening the New Orleans office in May of 2012 to expand the company’s reach and opportunities for clients. Having graduated from Loyola University in 2009 with a degree in Music Industry Studies, he moved back to Atlanta, pursuing a career in talent representation.

White was introduced to People Store in June of 2010 and six months later was offered a fulltime position with the agency. Since then he has become an agent in the film and television department and now the director of the New Orleans branch of People Store. Some of People Store’s recent success stories include bookings in The Hunger Games: Alexander White Catching Fire, Steve McQueen’s Twelve Years a Slave, The Weinstein Company’s Random, Tom Hanks’ Parkland, Insidious 2, Safe Haven, The World Made Straight, ensemble comedy Last Vegas, and Iron Man 3, to name a few in film. Hit TV shows Nashville, Revolution, Teen Wolf, The Walking Dead, Army Wives, Necessary Roughness, Banshee, Rectify, The Vampire Diaries, Company Town and new show Under the Dome also showcase People Store talent weekly. People Store is the first company in the Southeast to open a physical branch outside of its home market. This forward thinking and commitment to innovation and relationshipbuilding is what makes the company the institution that it is. The company is thrilled to be celebrating its 30th anniversary this year and looks forward to future successes and growth of the company, as well as the film industry in the region. LFV


BLACKBIRD COMPLETES FILMING, HEADS TO POST PRODUCTION PHOTO BY KIARRA BARTHELEMY

I

bird. It was an honor to have such an experin mid-March, talented UNO director enced and talented DP on board.” Jessica Voelker completed filming on a The film included a New Orleans-based short film entitled Blackbird that she had written and Director of photography Valentina Caniglia, gaffer produced. Voelker, who also Chris Martin, director Jessica Voelker, and 1st AC directed the film, is currently Becky Metlen on the set of Blackbird. earning an MFA in Film Production at the University of New Orleans. The director of photography for the film was awardwinning, Italian-born cinematographer, Valentina Caniglia. Caniglia has worked as a director of photography for over 14 years on shoots around the world. Voelker remarks, “We were very lucky. Valentina was drawn to the script, and agreed to fly down from New York specifically to film Black-

crew, and featured three of Louisiana’s most recognizable working actors—Shanna Forrestall, Ashton Leigh and Ben Matheny. The film was shot entirely on the Northshore in Covington and Mandeville. Shooting is complete, and the film is in post production. The finished film will be headed to local, national and international film festivals. Film synopsis: Dylan Robinson has left his law firm to watch birds, paint figurines, and come up with a plan to leave his career-driven wife and his life of conformity. What he most wants to do is fly planes and be free. When his crazy bird-painting neighbor offers him help, he gets caught in a triangle of control with the two women. LFV

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Tel: (504) 835 -1685 / Fax: (504) 835 - 5773 / E-mail: mail@thebattman.com ISSUE TWO

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LOCAL COMPANY SET TO PRODUCE WWII FILM H

ope Productions LLC, a registered Louisiana-based production company, is in pre-production and development on an amazing true story based on the journals of a group of WWII Navy Veterans who fought in the last great Naval battle in history. David Lee Valle and Tracey Gaines Halbert of Hope Productions have obtained exclusive depiction rights to tell this story of courage, honor and despair. This story has been a point of debate for over 65 years and is considered a highly controversial story among the groups of Naval WWII veterans and historians. Valle and Halbert wrote the story and screenplay and will be producing the full-length feature film, entitled GQ Johnny: The Heart of a Warrior. The goal is to begin filming at the beginning

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of June in Baton Rouge at the USS KIDD, the sister ship of the USS JOHNSTON, and in

Shreveport at the Louisiana Wave Studio. The production will also be shooting at several locations in both Baton Rouge and Shreveport.

This film will launch Hope Productions’ Veterans Filming Veterans (VFV) project, aiming to employ, train and cast Louisiana military veterans and give them a chance to participate in a film depicting their brothers and sisters at war. Hope Productions encourages Louisiana-based veterans to send their letters of interest and resumes to crew@gqjohnny.com. Casting will be held directly through local agents in Louisiana. The production will be seeking actors who are also veterans for various roles, and with over 75 roles, both speaking and featured, there will be plenty of opportunities for Louisiana film actors and background actors. Producers will also be hiring true Louisiana-based local crew and vendors. LFV

For more information and a synopsis, visit www.gqjohnny.com.


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Call Roy Burger at 512-294-0231 or Melissa Burger at 512-718-4128. Royburger.rblivestock@gmail.com Melissaburger.rb@gmail.com ISSUE TWO

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LOUISIANA TALENT HEATS UP THE RED CARPET AT HOLLYWOOD PREMIERE

O

n March 18, 2013, two of Louisiana’s own stars, Shanna Forrestall and Sam Medina, shined brightly at the premiere of Olympus Has Fallen in Hollywood. The duo has been friends since meeting in a mutual acting class in 2008, and both played roles in the $80-million action film that was lensed in Shreveport in 2012. The film was directed by Antoine Fuqua, who also directed the much-lauded feature Training Day that starred Denzel Washington.

Actress Angela Bassett and Louisiana-based actor Sam Medina.

Sam Medina, Keong Sim, Gerard Butler and Shanna Forrestall at the premiere of Olympus Has Fallen.

Although quite different in looks and personality, Forrestall and Medina share a driving work ethic recognized by their industry peers and acting coach, Jerry Katz, who said, “It doesn’t surprise me that Shanna and Sam are both booking continuously. Since we started working together they have successfully integrated the art of acting with their own creativity; translating into dynamic characters. They both deserve the praise they earn.” While both actors work regularly, Forrestall has completed a range of acting projects since beginning to act professionally in 2004, including made for TV movies, TV shows, feature 74

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films, as well as commercials, industrials and several Web series. Medina, whose skill set includes impressive muscle as well as martial arts and stunt knowledge, tends to be “the good guy who plays bad guys” in action feature films and on TV. The Olympus Has Fallen premiere, held at the Arc Light Cinema on famous Sunset Blvd in Hollywood, offered an extended red carpet to facilitate press who thronged to capture the film’s long list of high-level talent in the film. Many of the film’s stars—Aaron Eckhart, Morgan Freeman, Ashley Judd, Dylan McDermott, Rick Yune, Radha Mitchell,

Angela Bassett, Cole Hauser, and many others—were in attendance. Film District, the company that facilitated the screening, also hosted a private after party where guests enjoyed a DJ and complimentary food and drinks, while mingling with the stars, the film’s director Antoine Fuqua, and other key crew like the film’s writers, editors, composers, special fx team, weapons and military consultants. “Sammy and I were thrilled to find ourselves representing Louisiana in L.A.,” said Forrestall. “We knew years ago when we met in class that we had found our passion and that we would do whatever it took to get our careers off the ground. It’s really exciting to look around and see so many native Louisiana actors making their mark across the industry right now. We are proud to be a part!” As soon as the party wrapped, both actors began preparing to return to Louisiana to get back to work. Forrestall will resume filming on her brand new show on Investigation Discovery set to launch Summer 2013, while Medina is slated to begin stunt rehearsals for the new TV show Reckless. LFV


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“AND THE ENVELOPE, PLEASE...” NEW ORLEANS FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS OSCARS PARTY AT THE PRYTANIA THEATRE

T

he New Orleans Film Society hosted its annual Oscar party on Sunday, February 24, at the Prytania Theatre, complete with film trivia and a costume contest. The theatre was packed, and attendees arrived in style, some wearing glam garb, or dressed as characters from their favorite nominated films of the year. Two sisters dressed as Abraham and Mary Lincoln won the costume contest during the Oscar party, cheered on by a runner-up dressed as Colette from Les Miserables.

Left to right: Executive director of New Orleans Film Society, Jolene Pinder, Django Unchained’s Laura Cayouette, and Django Unchained’s Dana Gourrie.

Local actresses, filmmakers and friends of the film industry pose for the camera.

enjoyed the party, and the chance to view the Oscars with so many of Louisiana’s film industry cast, crew and supporters. The energy in the room was palpable, and it was a great feeling to cheer on Louisiana-shot films and Louisiana-based cast like Quvenzhané Wallis with so many others—the love and support from the locals was genuine and heartwarming.” —Shanna Forrestall, Actress/Producer

Admission included complimentary food, beer and wine, small popcorn, and soda, and offered a festive atmosphere for viewers to celebrate film and Louisiana! Here’s what some had to say about the event: “Oscar season is always an exciting time of the year for us. It’s a chance to celebrate some of the stand-out movies of the year and take stock of the year in film. 2012 was an especially exciting year, considering that two locally shot films were nominated— Beasts of the Southern Wild and Django Unchained. We were thrilled to have cast members from Django at our Oscars party and loved having the chance to celebrate the film’s wins with them.” —Clint Bowie, Program Director, New Orleans Film Society “We attended the party with a few invited friends who drove all the way from Mississippi to accompany us. We thoroughly 76

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A large crowd of Oscar-enthusiasts gather at Prytania Theatre.


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BUILDING A VISUAL STORY:

NOVAC’S INTRO TO CINEMATOGRAPHY WORKSHOP STORY BY HUNTER McGREGOR GUEST COLUMNIST

W

hen you consider the scope of what a cinematographer does in a single day on set, it can be head-spinning. The coordination of camera work, lighting design and interpreting the director’s vision is a monumental task, but that’s even before adding in practical limitations, personnel management and a never-ending array of technical questions. In short, a cinematographer is always learning, always experimenting, never sleeping. For those up to the challenge, it is an incredibly rewarding and creative career path, fully illustrated in NOVAC’s recent Intro to Cinematography workshop, conducted by DJ McConduit. The workshop is part of NOVAC’s ongoing professional development series focusing on cinematography and lighting. Cinematography has changed fairly rapidly over the course of motion pictures, a fledgling art form when compared to paint, sculpture, dance and theater. This is true not only because it is a relative newbie within the artistic realm, but also because technology has progressed at an increasingly rapid pace compared to where it started. McConduit gave a concise 100-plus-year

Workshop attendees learn about the techniques and technology of cinematography. 78

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DJ McConduit leads NOVAC’s cinematography workshop.

overview of film genres and their changing techniques, involving composition and framing, lens technology and usage, and camera movement and equipment variety, especially focusing on lighting varieties: mood, texture, color, saturation, hue, harshness vs. softness, etc. For such an incredibly detailed technological field, the Intro to Cinematography workshop

crammed an immense amount of valuable information into a few hours. Be on the lookout for more of NOVAC’s workshops. LFV

So you want to be a cinematographer? Here’s some homework:

Check out documentaries The Cinematographer and Cinematographer Style, and movies such as The Night of The Hunter, Children of Men, Silver Linings Playbook, Goodfellas, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, Jarhead, and Inception, among others. If you would like to read more about cinematography there is a monthly publication that is released by the ASC (American Society of Cinematographers) that has interviews, pictures, etc. by great cinematographers. Check out www.theasc.com. They also have a podcast on iTunes. In addition, Roger Deakins, ASC, BSC has a great cinematography forum where he answers a lot of questions about his work and everything cinematography (www.rogerdeakins.com/forum2/). Finally, Kodak has a bunch of great downloadable information on cinematography on their website. They even let you download their book, The Essential Reference Guide for Filmmakers.


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ISSUE TWO

LOUISIANA FILM & VIDEO MAGAZINE

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