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CONTENTS

VOLUME SEVEN

ISSUE TWO

EXECUTIVE EDITOR/ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Shanna Forrestall shanna@louisianafilmandvideo.com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Paul Yarnold ASSOCIATE EDITOR Katie Sauro contact@louisianafilmandvideo.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS W.H. Bourne, Whitney Little LaNasa, Dawn Landrum, Patrick McConnell, Kristi Prewitt, Jennifer Schemke, Elizabeth Schindler, Gary Michael Smith, Frank Lee Wills SALES Katie Higgins, Kurt Hanson, Eric Iles PRODUCTION MANAGER John Rusnak LAYOUT/DESIGN Christopher Brittain DESIGNER Dawn Carlson WEBMASTER Eric Pederson OFFICE MANAGER On the set of The Baytown Disco. Photo by Louis Zlotowicz

Audra Higgins INFORMATION SERVICES MANAGER Lois Sanborn

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

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FOCUS ON: LOUISIANA PRODUCTION

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BARRY BATTLES HIS WAY TO THE BIG SCREEN IN THE BAYTOWN DISCO

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GENEROUS INCENTIVES CONTINUE IN LOUISIANA

NEW ORLEANS A WINNER WITH WHEEL OF FORTUNE

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BATON ROUGE FILM COMMISSION’S AMY MITCHELL-SMITH IS SIMPLY GENIUS

LOCATIONS EXPO/PRODUCED BY CONFERENCE FINDS ITS AUDIENCE

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LIGHTS, ACTION, GLAMOUR... HAIRDRESSER?

Group. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be used for solicitation or copied by any means, electronic or mechanical, including

ON THE COVER: On the set of The Baytown Disco. PHOTO COURTESY OF LOUIS ZLOTOWICZ.

DIGITAL EDITION AVAILABLE AT: WWW.LOUISIANAFILMANDVIDEO.COM

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

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his summer I’m in Los Angeles as I write this, and happy to report that Louisiana is still the “go-to” place for film. All signs point to a continued strong presence of studio and independent feature film projects in the state, as well as the continuation of the current TV shows and possible development of others. And Louisiana’s commercial and corporate production is staying strong as well, with local agencies continuing to set the bar high for production value, technological advancement, and quality work that wins awards. However, Louisiana still has a long way to go in developing the resources and experienced crew we need to sustain the industry indefinitely. There is a camaraderie and humility that crew, and even most talent, have here in Los Angeles, that is in the developmental stages in our state. I think that maybe we are still a little immature—basking in the “glory days” that is our

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industry now. So this summer I’d like to encourage our incredible Louisiana cast and crew to be grateful. Foster a spirit of giving, and continue to learn and grow. We don’t know it all... yet. Let’s help each other, and not presume that just because we’re working in the industry, we’ve arrived. This is a lifelong journey, and compared to our industry counterparts in other markets, we’re “newbies” that still have many years to log and lots more to learn. I believe in us! Go Louisiana! SINCERELY,

SHANNA FORRESTALL, EXECUTIVE EDITOR & ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER


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On set of The Baytown Disco.

BARRY BATTLES HIS WAY TO THE BIG SCREEN IN

THE BAYTOWN DISCO

STORY BY W.H. BOURNE, GUEST COLUMNIST PHOTOS BY LOUIS ZLOTOWICZ

LONG-ANTICIPATED FILM WRAPS IN LOUISIANA

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va Longoria recently wrapped shooting on The Baytown Disco, filmed in Slidell by director Barry Battles. “I love Louisiana,” exclaims Longoria. “I love shooting outside of Los Angeles. Because I shoot there 10 months out of the year, I like to go out and see other parts of the country. I shot in New Orleans eight years ago. It’s just a place so special to me.”

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Longoria joins an eclectic ensemble including Billy Bob Thornton, Paul Wesley, Serinda Swan, and Clayne Crawford. Local radio personality John “Spud” McConnell joins the list of locals who also appear in the film. “The movie is based in the South,” explains producer Bill Perkins. “It’s a Southern whoop-ass extravaganza, and it’s also got a great story of compassion and redemption. You need that Southern look... so there’s the creative aspect of shooting in Louisiana.” He continues, “Then there’s the cost aspect. Louisiana has done the infrastructure right in terms of the incentives. And because they’ve done it right and… they’ve got the crew and the day players, they’ve built up a whole industry that can support your film. There are other states that have a better financial package, but when you start adding up the expenses of having to fly in crew, cast and extras, it just doesn’t work out in the end.” Perkins estimates that 95 percent of his crew consisted of local Louisiana labor. “We stayed at a Comfort Suites in Slidell that was brand new,” says Longoria. “They had just opened in January, and it was really nice.” “It worked out great because we had close access to the airport,” adds


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Perkins. “We had most of the locations, except for the jail, within 30 minutes of the production office. Accommodations were nice, crew was outstanding, and you didn’t have to drive for hours and hours to get to the set. With the exception that it was hotter than Hades, everyone enjoyed it. Sometimes in other states I’ve shot in, you can’t always get what you need. We were able to get everything. We found great catering. We got a lot of word-of-mouth recommendations.” Perkins reveals that the budget was roughly $4 million, adding, “It’s like winning the lottery for a first-time writer/director to get a picture like this set up.” Although winning the lottery might have been easier for first-time writer/director, Barry Battles. While his script for The Baytown Disco was placed on 2009’s “Black List” of top unproduced projects, Battles still couldn’t get the film set up. Even one of the film’s eventual producers, Robert Teitel, had seen an earlier version of the script and passed. But Battles was persistent. “Battles had a lot of editing experience,” explains Perkins, “so he scraped together some money, shot some scenes and put together a five-minute clip that he sent out with the script. If it wasn’t for Barry putting that together, I probably would have never read the script. What happened was people at my office recommended it. All the staff had read it, and they were telling me to read it, and then my cousin read it and said the same thing. Finally they said, ‘Look, just watch the five-minute clip.’ I finally did, and then I read the script that night.” Longoria relates a similar experience. “I saw a couple minutes of footage that the director Barry Battles shot that was basically a trailer of the movie,” she recalls. “It was fantastic, so I read the script. After that, I thought I would just love to work with this director, so I got a meeting. Fortunately, they loved me and I got the part.” “It’s becoming more common that people are doing this,” says Perkins about Battles’ footage, “but it’s hard to scrape together. I think that for people who can manage to get the 12 to 30 thousand dollars to put together a clip like this, if the script lends itself to this, I would recommend it. But it’s a lot of money for something that might not pan out; it’s a big bet.” The gamble paid off for Battles, whose long struggle to get the film made finally came to an end with the help of Perkins and Teitel. The two producers joined forces to make the film, selecting Battles to direct. “Previously, I had a good first-time director experience,” says Perkins, “and after meeting Barry, we were determined that he was the right one. I felt that he should be trusted, and that he could pull it off. He was very familiar with Southern attitudes and culture. I felt that he was really the only one who could tell this story.” The film, billed as an action-comedy, is about a woman, “Celeste,” who hires three outlawed brothers to bring her son back from his seemingly-abusive father. “The film’s reminiscent of Robert Rodriguez’s films and that kind of really great independent spirit,” says Longoria. “I think it’s going to be really original because the writing is so specific to the South and the culture down there. And I related to it, down to my jeans and boots.” She continues, “The character of ‘Celeste’ is so opposite of ‘Gabrielle’ (her character in Desperate Housewives). It’s such a guy’s world in this movie. There was a lot of running and a lot of guns. This was the first time I was ever shot in a movie, and there was a lot of blood.” The Baytown Disco is currently posting in Louisiana and is scheduled to release in 2012.

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NEW ORLEANS A WINNER WITH WHEEL OF FORTUNE STORY AND PHOTOS BY GARY MICHAEL SMITH, GUEST COLUMNIST

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early six years ago, Pat Sajak, Vanna White, and executive producer Harry Friedman packed up their Wheel of Fortune equipment, and with the help of two bus drivers, evacuated their couple hundred crew at the same time as 1.5 million New Orleanians. As Sajak told me, “It was a mere 18 hours later that we were sitting comfortably in our living room watching those nice people we left behind struggling to make it, to survive. It was just heartbreaking.”

But they always planned to return because, as Friedman put it, “There really is nowhere like New Orleans—its historical origins, the geography, the cuisine, the sense of family.” Many other obligations had to be met, but Pat, Vanna, Harry, and the rest of the crew made it back to New Orleans April 15, 16, and 17, 2011. Wheel rolled in to the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center with 14 tractor trailers, 2 65-foot production trucks, and approximately 1 million pounds of equipment to tape 3 weeks of shows, which aired in May. They also brought 160 staffers, rented 1,600 hotel room nights and 3 convention center halls, and hired an additional 200 locals as crew, staff, assistants, carpenters, riggers, electricians, and pages. An additional 120 local security officers, ushers, and police also were used. They even dressed White in fashions from New Orleans-based designer Harold Clarke for the first two weeks of shows, then used additional fashions for the third week by the Metairie-based family-owned boutique Pearl’s Place. Although it’s not a long-term film, Wheel of Fortune is no small operation. Originating out of Culver City, California, the program is produced by Sony Pictures Television and distributed by CBS. Originally called Shopper’s Bazaar, Wheel is nationally syndicated and airs on 213 stations nationwide, and has been produced in 45 territories with international broadcasters licensing the format rights to produce the show in their own languages. This year marks Wheel’s 28th season. Just before their last taping on April 17, I was granted three individual interviews with the two gracious Hollywood Walk of Fame co-hosts and the renowned eight-time Emmy Award-winning executive producer. Here are some highlights. GARY MICHAEL SMITH: HOW HAS WHEEL OF FORTUNE LASTED FOR 28 YEARS IN SUCH A FAST-PACED, EVER-CHANGING TELEVISION ENVIRONMENT? WHAT DO YOU ATTRIBUTE TO THE LONGEVITY AND SUCCESS? VANNA WHITE: It’s a family game show that all ages can enjoy, from babies watching the wheel spin to 100-year-olds who have watched the show for 28 years. HARRY FRIEDMAN: We really try to listen to our viewers. They love it when we change up the show, whether it’s locations like coming to New Orleans, or adding new game or prize elements, contests, sweepstakes, or opportunities

to share in winnings at home. But we never change the game. At its core, Wheel is what it’s always been: spin the wheel, call the letters, solve the puzzle. PAT SAJAK: Somewhere along the way we became more than a popular show; we became part of the popular culture. We didn’t intend to, but we sort of insinuated ourselves into people’s lives. It’s become kind of a touchstone for people. Often someone will come up and say, “I just lost my grandmother, and my father’s memories as a kid were of watching Wheel of Fortune with her.” It’s the one half-hour a day when the family gets together, and no one has to be embarrassed about what’s going to happen on the air. It’s a generational thing. Even if you don’t watch it every day, you know it’s there. It’s kind of like the sunset—you might not go out to your balcony every day but it’s nice to know it’s out there. We’re part of the atmosphere now; it’d be hard to imagine that Wheel doesn’t exist. GMS: HOW DO YOU CHOOSE LOCATIONS? WHY NEW ORLEANS, FOR INSTANCE? PS: I don’t choose the locations—that’s Harry’s job—because if

it were up to me all our remotes would be here, and Hawaii. But there are other considerations—local affiliates and the finances involved. Still I’m always pushing to come here and Hawaii. All the other cities are fine but there’s something special about these two places. HF: It’s unique. You never ever go anywhere where someone says, “You know, this is kind of like New Orleans.” And I think it’s that sense of family that our viewers appreciate and pick up on. GMS: WHAT’S YOUR IMPRESSION OF THE FILM AND TV INDUSTRY IN LOUISIANA? HF: I think it’s amazing. I think the state has been so smart in the way they’ve managed to keep this industry alive with productions locating here, and studios being built here. It’s pretty remarkable. GMS: HAVING EVACUATED NEARLY SIX YEARS AGO WITH ONE AND A HALF MILLION NEW ORLEANIANS, DO YOU FEEL SOME SORT OF KINSHIP WITH THE LOCALS? HF: Oh, very much so. We had an emotional reunion yesterday with the two drivers of the buses that brought us out of New Orleans hours ahead of Katrina. They drove straight through to Houston where we were able to get flights home. We had some gifts for them and we invited them and their families to come to a taping. And on our meal break we had the opportunity to thank them on behalf of our staff, who had never gotten the chance to thank them in person. As we were gathered I asked everyone who happened to have been on those buses on that epic ride to raise their hands. I said to the drivers, “I wanted you to see the people whose lives you saved.” And they did, and that’s not overstating it one bit. Without them I really don’t know what would have happened to us. PS: Absolutely. I used to come here for the annual NATPE convention, and at one point I was coming here a lot—a couple times a year for several years. You get to know people, you get to know places. This is a welcoming area and people are thrilled you’re here and are nice to you. But we just barely got out before the storm; we had to cancel our last day’s taping. It’s not my city and I’m not from here, but I did feel I belonged to New Orleans, and my heart ached for what was going on, and we all felt a special kinship. And one of the first things we said is that we’re coming back as soon as we can. VW: Oh, absolutely. We left the evening before, and I was glued to the TV. I felt so close to the people here because we had just been here. And I did not

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Wheel of Fortune, continued from page 13

expect it to be as devastating as it was. But looking ahead, six years later, here we are, it has come back, it survived, the city is beautiful, great restaurants are here, people are smiling and happy. It has come back. GMS: WHAT DO YOU LOOK FORWARD TO MOST WHEN COMING TO WORK IN NEW ORLEANS? VW: The food and the people! Everyone’s so nice. I grew up in the South so I feel like I’m at home. HF: Coming to work here usually begins with the question, “Where are we having dinner tonight?” One of the common traits of the restaurateurs here is that they understand being good hosts, they understand the hospitality business. Obviously, the food is great, but also you can look at your watch and say, “Wow, we’ve been sitting here three hours and eating all the time and talking and having a good time.” And that’s not a common experience anymore—especially for those of us living in California who are used to having breakfast in our cars.

GMS: WOULD YOU SAY THAT THE FOOD IS ONE OF THE MOST EXCITING THINGS ABOUT TAPING IN NEW ORLEANS? PS: Oh, absolutely. Seems like we’ve been to every city in America and they all have something to offer. They’re very nice places with very nice people, but there can be a sameness to some of them. If you’re in the middle of Cleveland you might have to look around a while to figure out where you are. New Orleans is one of those places where you always know where you are, whether it’s the architecture, the people, or the smell of the food. I think that’s why America responded so emotionally to what happened here. I mean, they would in any big city, but there’s something so unique about this place. I think everybody feels that they own a little bit of New Orleans because it’s a real special, unique place, and I think everyone identifies a little bit and wants to be a part, and doesn’t want it to go away. GMS: SO MANY CELEBRITIES HAVE BOUGHT HOUSES HERE. WOULD YOU BE INTERESTED IN BUYING HERE IF GIVEN A FILM OFFER?

Oh, of course, of course! Yes! Definitely! Oh, in a second! Why, you know anything? Here’s the film offer I want: I want the film that says, “We have a role for you; it’s kind of like Raging Bull, but you need to put on about 40 pounds.” That’s what I want; then I’d just come down here and eat. You know I’m having five dinners tonight? At the end of every show one of the big restaurants is making a dish for us. HF: If I were here long enough I probably would. We come here for 10 days, and I know that films stimulate the economy by hiring people over a long period of time and that’s good. We come in for a short period of time, but our shows become a week-long love letter to New Orleans, and we are all about New Orleans—we’re not just using it for a set or a backdrop. It’s not a “location” for us. It is the show when we’re here. VW: PS:

GMS: DO YOU THINK THE CITY HAS CHANGED SINCE THE LAST TIME YOU WERE HERE? PS: I don’t think the essential nature has changed. I do think Katrina still hangs

over it; it’s hard to have a conversation where some references don’t come up, but how can you go through that and not have that happen? I think there’s such a desire to get to the way it was, that people are doing everything they can to make it feel right. I didn’t know what to expect; I knew great progress had been made and I was hopeful, but I was knocked out by how well the city is doing and how resilient the people here are. 14

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BATON ROUGE FILM COMMISSION’S AMY MITCHELL-SMITH IS SIMPLY GENIUS STORY BY KRISTI PREWITT, GUEST COLUMNIST

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“All that is valuable in human society depends upon the opportunity for development accorded the individual.” – Albert Einstein

ecently I have been attending a Developmental Psychology class and learned that the most important aspect of our development was not that our caretakers met our basic needs, but it was the positive engagement and opportunities that we were given that creates a strong trusting bond that empowers us to develop healthy relationships as we mature. During the course of this interview, it quickly became apparent that this describes the instinctual process that Amy Mitchell-Smith, the Baton Rouge Film Commission’s executive director, has towards the film industry. Actually, it was compassion that brought Mitchell-Smith to Baton Rouge. During the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, she first visited South Louisiana on behalf of Film Aid International, a non-profit organization that uses the medium of film to bring essential information and hope to people in need. Ultimately, she decided to stay to help create youth media workshops, assisting young evacuees who relocated to East Baton Rouge Parish, as well as students in the Gulf Coast community Bay St. Louis. With her prior industry experience at Miramax Films in New York City, which involved international sales and acquisitions of productions large and small, Mitchell-Smith is a valuable asset. She explains that Miramax helped her to understand what is needed to grow and nurture productions. “It was a monumental time to work at Miramax, as we had such great success with Oscar-winning films like Shakespeare in Love, Amelie and Good Will Hunting,” she says. In addition, her time at Miramax helped her to understand the importance of global box office revenues as a means of measuring a production’s bankability—a concept that has proved beneficial to Amy Mitchell-Smith building the worldwide awareness of filming in Louisiana. For example, the recently-released Battle: Los Angeles, which filmed in 2009 in both Baton Rouge and Shreveport, has generated over $158 million worldwide at the time of this writing. “It is important for the residents of Louisiana to see a return in their investment on a global scale,” emphasizes Mitchell-Smith. In 2007, she officially became the inaugural executive director of the Baton Rouge Film Commission. “After relocating to Baton Rouge, I was quite surprised to learn about the state’s incredibly successful motion picture tax credit program and the volume of production Louisiana realized as a result,” she says. “It was clear to me that Baton Rouge had so much to offer to both independent and studio motion picture projects and I wanted to help build this community into a veritable production hub.” By 2009, the state’s motion picture tax credit program had increased to 30 percent and as a result, the Baton Rouge market experienced explosive growth—from an estimated $34 million in production spend in 2007 to $196 million in 2010. Mitchell-Smith assures me that this positive trend will continue. “We are in this for the long haul,” she says. “Statewide there has been tremendous impact and growth has been really incredible, in large part due to our maturing infra16

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structure and crew base. The evolution of Raleigh Studios at the Celtic Media Centre is a major draw for studio productions into Baton Rouge.” Managing the logistical details of each production has posed one of the biggest challenges for Mitchell-Smith. Productions coming to Baton Rouge are now required to file for a blanket film permit and they are also required to attend a mandatory pre-production planning meeting with the film commission staff. “This helps to prevent any confusion about the production’s footprint in our community,” she explains. “It also allows for optimal planning with Baton Rouge traffic engineers, risk management agents, as well as police and fire department liaisons.” She adds, “We strive to build goodwill between our city agencies, production companies and the community at large.” And these growing relationships are paying off, with recently-wrapped productions like the blockbuster movie series The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn, Universal Pictures’ Battleship, and the popular HBO series True Blood all filming in the Baton Rouge area. Providing access to locations that are normally restricted also entices productions to film in the Baton Rouge area. Baton Rouge Mayor-President Kip Holden has made it possible for productions to film at unique locations such as the city’s Office of Emergency Preparedness, the City Courthouse, the Baton Rouge Metro Airport, and the Baton Rouge River Center. Baton Rouge also offers an immense complex of studio and soundstage space, as well as a wide variety of industry support services, all housed at Raleigh Studios at the Celtic Media Centre. Companies such as Digital FX, River Road Creative and Post Digital also provide post-production services locally. But meeting the logistical needs of production is only the beginning. Mitchell-Smith helped implement the Baton Rouge Entertainment Industry Preferred Vendor Discount Program, a free grassroots community program for any and all local businesses interested in promoting their services to productions. Crews are provided with an introductory package to the Baton Rouge market that encompasses a wide range of discounted services. “Our hope is that this program provides an opportunity for local businesses to market their services to productions and thus increase their prosperity,” she says. An emphasis has been made on seeing more locals educated and Louisiana people hired, as well. “We want to see more homegrown content; more showcasing of Louisiana talent,” explains Mitchell-Smith. It’s important to make an initiative to seek out others who share the same creative interests. She strongly encourages hopeful filmmakers to “get involved, collaborate; just do it.” LSU offers theater and screenwriting classes and the Baton Rouge Community College also offers a variety of industry-related classes that assist those interested in pursuing a career in film. By creating unlimited opportunities and making sure that all needs are met, the Baton Rouge Film Commission’s Amy Mitchell-Smith has helped the Louisiana film industry mature into a prodigious entity. FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.FILMBATONROUGE.COM OR WWW.FILMAID.ORG.


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We Have You Covered. We cover all the production news happening in Louisiana. Each issue features informative film, video and audio guest columns, company and individual profiles, announcements and important resource information. Missed an issue? Now you can order back issues, call 800-332-1736.

www.louisianafilmandvideo.com • www.louisianaproductionindex.com ISSUE TWO

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Central Louisiana in Film's Sherry Elligton promotes Alexandria and its surrounding areas alongside Angie DeBlieux (promoting the Monroe film office).

LOCATIONS EXPO/PRODUCED BY CONFERENCE FINDS ITS AUDIENCE

OVER 2,000 ATTENDEES FLOCK TO FIRST-EVER JOINT EVENT STORY BY W.H. BOURNE, GUEST COLUMNIST PHOTOS BY ODIN LINDBLOM

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wo great events for producers merged this year, as AFCI’s Locations Expo teamed up with the PGA’s Produced By Conference, proving to be the ultimate resource for “indie” producers trying to set up projects.

The star-studded conference included sessions with notable producers like Morgan Freeman, Kevin Smith, Eli Roth, Lawrence Gordon, and Justine Bateman. But Locations Expo is also a valuable resource for Louisiana film commissioners, as they try to lure new projects to their region. “It went great,” said Ryan Fink of the St. Bernard Parish Film Office. “This year was a lot better for meeting producers. I made a lot of contacts and plan to be back next year.” The event, which features film commissioners and vendors from around the globe, was at a new venue, taking advantage of the Disney lot in Burbank. “The climate’s been very nice,” said Arlena Acree of the Shreveport-Bossier Film Office, continued on page 20

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I.A.T.S.E. LOCAL 4 78

Motion Picture Studio Mechanics of Louisiana & Southern Mississippi Louisiana motion picture tax incentives aren’t news. They’re a success story. IATSE Local 478 now has 850 members and we’re still growing. These dedicated men and women work in various crafts in the art department, construction, crafts services, electric, first aid, greens, grip, locations, paint, props, set dressing, sound, special effects, video assist and wardrobe. We have one of the strongest and longest lasting incentives systems around which means these professionals have worked on hundreds of movies over more than ten years. They bring experience to your production. They raise the bar and lower your bottom line. If you’re looking for your next crew, look no more.

432 N. ANTHONY STREET SUITE 305 • NEW ORLEANS, LA 70119 OFFICE (504) 486-2192 • FAX (504) 483-9961 • iatse478.org

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Locations Expo, continued from page 18

Over 2000 attendees browsed the booths at AFCI's Locations Expo this year at Disney Studios lot when the event merged with the PGA's Produced By Conference.

as she stood outside under the shade of the canopy of her booth. “The traffic’s been a lot more on-target as far as what we’re looking for.” Diego Martinez of the newly opened Millennium Studios was at the Shreveport-Bossier booth. “It’s been really good, more than I expected; a lot of serious people and a lot of good possibilities,” he said. “For me it’s also been very informative personally. I’ve made some of the (Produced By) sessions and learned a lot.” Producing icon Lawrence Gordon, best known for Die Hard and more recently The Watchmen, went to school in New Orleans. His session, entitled “No Excuses,” was a rapid-fire audience question and answer session that was very nuts-and-bolts informative. Gordon told audience members he thought the four most influential films in recent times to be The Blair Witch Project, Paranormal Activity, The Blind Side, and The Hangover. Gordon joked about bluffing his way through his first book option based on what he had heard another producer do. “I offered a $10,000 option for The Warriors and an additional $10,000 to buy the rights if I could get the film set up and made. Everything was going great until he (the author) asked for paperwork!” His best piece of advice, though, was on how to deal with talent, be it actors or crew, that “won’t come out of their trailers.” Gordon’s response was price-

less: “There can be only one gorilla on a set. It will vary depending on who you’re working with.” While Gordon admitted that he was usually the gorilla, “when I’m working with Brad Pitt, he’s the gorilla.” As attendees asked producers about budget guidelines, Eli Roth weighed in on his recent producing experiences, advocating budget strategy on a filmby-film basis. “I have breakdowns on every single horror movie ever made—what their budget was and how much they made,” Roth said. “On The Last Exorcism, we wanted to use a first-time director so we knew the budget couldn’t go over $1.5 million. I think budgets are the best things for filmmakers because it squeezes their brains and makes them more creative. I watched The Last Exorcism at the same sold-out theater that I watched X-Men. Ultimately, it comes down to story.” A large portion of the conference focused on new media. Charlie Corwin (The Squid and the Whale, Storm Chasers) summed it up best: “Content is the brand, platform is incidental.” As the studios and exhibitors waged war nearby on the controversial VOD (Video on Demand) window, indie producers talked about how day and date, multi-platform release (theatrical, VOD, DVD, Internet) was beneficial to their niche markets. Most producers were in consensus with presenter Kevin Smith (Clerks, Dogma), when he said, “Indie film is not supposed to appeal to everyone. It’s supposed to be more targeted.” “In the ‘90s, filmmakers were like, ‘We’ll do it all ourselves’... until it was time to sell it and then, ‘We need your help desperately,’” joked Smith, as he talked about his recent foray into distribution. “It really hit me hard when Harvey (Weinstein) passed on (Smith’s film) Red State. After trying to set it up for several years, I realized that the business model just didn’t work. And I had to question, why do we have to spend so much money distributing films?” Smith plans to do distribution via his company Smodcast in two to three years, but for now he is researching and testing the water with the release of the aforementioned Red State. He initially did 15 screenings of the film as part of his Red State Tour. Between that and merchandise sales, he said, he has cleared over $1 million. But many suggest that Smith is already a notable brand and that his experiences are atypical for indie filmmakers. Regardless, Smith’s advice to indie filmmakers is sound. “You have to manage your expectations,” Smith said. “Indie film cannot compete with the marketing dollars of a studio. You have to find your audience.”

Eli Roth talks about producing The Last Exorcism which shot in Louisiana.

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B&Bs OFFER LOCATION & AMBIANCE

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hen filming, working or just enjoying New Orleans, “Don’t just visit N’Awlins, live it like a local!®” Booking with an experienced and knowledgeable bed & breakfast (B&B), adjacent to the French Quarter (Vieux Carre) and historic Treme, offers lagniappe to those seeking a unique experience, and ensures that the needs of your production or film crew are best matched to the desired New Orleans neighborhood and accommodation, especially when you seek an ‘off the beaten path’ experience. Banana Courtyard, located in New Orleans, is one of the city’s premier B&B resources. Mary and Hugh, innkeepers extraordinaire, offer onestop, personal, accommodation services to the film and production industry. They are also unofficial tour guides to the city’s numerous attractions, venues and secrets. Unlike other cities and chain hotels, their expertise will help to ensure that your group experiences living in New Orleans with all of their senses—like a local. Their services include providing and arranging for B&B reservations at accommodations in many of New Orleans’ historic neighborhoods, from the French Quarter to Faubourg Marigny to Uptown to Bayou St. John, and even the countryside of nearby Mississippi. Whether a short visit or a longer rental, they go above and beyond to find the right fit for your production crew, actors, and business associates. Banana Courtyard offers the convenience and excitement of the French Quarter. Ever wondered what’s behind the shrouded gates? Banana Courtyard’s main building is an 1870s Creole Victorian that was once a bordello catering to society’s elite. Now, it’s an eclectic New Orleans bed & breakfast featuring themed suites for intimate and private stays or for groups up to 16. Its location is one of the most convenient New Orleans locations. The extra expense of a car is not needed, as it is within an easy walk to all attractions in the famous French Quarter, but if you need secure parking for equipment, it’s available. Nearby are music clubs, bars on Bourbon Street (24-hour nightlife in the French Quarter is something you’ll never forget), world-renowned restaurants, neighborhood cafes and coffee houses, and there seems to be music on

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almost every corner: Cajun, Zydeco, Jazz, Blues, R&B. And don’t forget the other historic neighborhoods nearby: Faubourg Treme and Faubourg Marigny. Audubon Garden Cottage offers the tranquility, elegance and comfort of Uptown New Orleans. The guest cottage has been a favorite B&B destination for visitors to New Orleans on business and/or pleasure for over 10 years. Nestled in a private home’s garden, it is located in an elegant and quiet Uptown New Orleans neighborhood. The cottage is ideally suited for long-term rentals or for one-night stays. The guest cottage is an independent 500-square-foot building that can sleep up to four—two in the queen-sized sleigh bed and two on the queensized sofa sleeper. Your hosts, Donald and Robert, will make sure your stay is relaxing and comfortable. The cottage is a private, cozy, independent, romantic and pet-friendly ‘home away from home.’ Inside, enjoy the spacious open floor plan with sleeping, dining, entertaining and kitchenette areas, and a private bath. Amenities include Wi-Fi, cable TV, and continental breakfast items supplied inside the cottage. Outside, enjoy the shaded tropical garden, private porch and other facilities. The garden cottage is near Audubon Park and Audubon Zoo, the garden district, and the universities of Tulane and Loyola. It’s only four blocks from the St. Charles Avenue streetcar line, and walking distance to over 20 nearby cafes and restaurants, as well as shopping and other services.


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LIGHTS, ACTION, GLAMOUR... HAIRDRESSER? Special Advertisement

STORY BY FRANK LEE WILLS, GUEST COLUMNIST

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hen you’re a young hairstylist waiting for the next client to walk in the door so that you may apply your trade, what does one wish for? Do you wish for an easy hairstyle to do? Do you wish for a person who’ll become a regular customer? Do you wish for just anyone so that you can pay your rent? What about if your client in waiting would be a celebrity and it would be the last haircut this person would receive before their death? Donita Sather tells me about one such early experience working in the French Quarter. On that day, her next client happened to be Tennessee Williams, and not too long after that haircut, Sather saw that he had died. Today, she has given many celebrity haircuts and styles. She talks affectionately of taking care of Patricia Clarkson’s hair and how she would become attached to Sather’s little Chihuahua, “Sophia.” She mentions working in rough conditions, standing in swamp water in boots for hours on end to take care of her stars. “It’s not such a glamorous profession being a hairdresser in the film business,” she says, as I begin the interview. “We work long hours, in the mud, in the cold, in the swamp, but we love it!” I ask her to take me through the steps on how to become a hairstylist in the motion picture and entertainment business. Here’s what she had to offer. “The first thing I would say to get started in the business is to get a portfolio going,” she begins. “Photograph your work and get experience on any type of film set you can work on, like still sets, still photography, also any kind of independent film projects. You can work on student films to build your resume. “Then if you want to work on anything large, you need to be part of the union. On this side of the coast, it’s New York #798, which covers hair and makeup. The requirements for the union are a certain amount of hours on a film set and a test you have to go to New York to take. Then after passing, you have to pay the required initiation fee and dues to get into the union, which happens to be a couple of thousand dollars.” The next thing Sather wants to talk about is the function of the hairdresser, which she says is to “create the look of a character, working in conjunction with the actor and the director.” “These are the people who have the final say on how the character should look and be,” she explains. “You need to be able to create that look for them. The other requirement of a hairdresser on a film set is continuity. Continuity is to make sure from one scene to the next, the hair looks the same. You don’t want the bangs on the forehead in the beginning of the scene and at the bottom of the scene, you don’t want the bangs swept off to one side of the forehead. You want the person to look consistent through the scene.” Sather continues, “You also need to know how to break down a script 24

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and you need to be able to figure out what part of a scene it is. Is it day or night? Is there action going on? It’s the first thing we do, is to review the script when we get hired on a movie. Another function of a hairstylist is to know the period of the movie and the hairstyles for that period. Some of the hairstylists had to learn the hard way by saying they could do it and learned they couldn’t. Some of the department heads do have heart and helped us along to get us through it. That’s been my experience and bailed me out. That was Angel Heart.” The next thing for hairstylists to know is the “pecking order of command,” she says. “The top person would be the department head, and they are to make sure they have the right equipment and products the actor is comfortable with,” says Sather. “They’re designing the look, along with the actor and director, for that character. Then there is the key person, or second in charge, who will photograph the actors during their scenes and make sure the continuity book is accurate. The book is referred back to make sure the continuity is there from one day to the next. The key is also responsible for hiring any additional hairdressers for the film to work the background extras. Sometimes there is a large extra cast and you may need four or five additional hairstylists. In The Curious Case of Benjamin Button we had 10 hairdressers at times, in which I was an additional.” Which leads us to the benefits of the profession, and Sather says you can make a good living at it. “You do have to work a lot. Sometimes five months on a project with twelve- to fifteen-hour days and five days a week,” she says. “But then you can take two months off from all the money you’ve made. Meeting all the different people in the industry is another benefit. Then there’s the pension the union has set up for you, which if you’re not a good saver is a good thing. The union also deducts monies for your health insurance benefits so that you’re covered full-time. As long as you maintain a certain level of work and remain in the 798, the benefits are in force.” With the amount of work scheduled to film here in 2011 (over 100 films), there will not be any shortage of work for the hairdressers or crew. Sather has seen more people coming here to Louisiana from Los Angeles because of the amount of work here. Says Sather, “As long as we continue to be a good host, the film business will continue to migrate to Louisiana.” And that’s the glamorous “Hollywood South!”


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HAVE

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FOCUS ON:

LOUISIANA PRODUCTION A QUICK Q&A WITH A FEW OF THE INDUSTRY’S LEADERS. PRODUCTION COMPANIES : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : ACME FILM PRODUCTIONS ADAM BRAZY, Office Manager & Transportation Coordinator WWW.ACMEFILMPRODUCTIONS.COM • 504-482-1263 WHAT WOULD YOU SAY IS THE CURRENT STATE OF THE LOUISIANA PRODUCTION INDUSTRY?

Fantastic! There are more productions going on in Louisiana than ever. And we are proud to be an infrastructure project that has been supported by the Louisiana Film Commission’s tax incentive program. It has allowed us to get off the ground and grow into where we are today, with room for more growth in the future. WHAT CURRENT PROJECT ARE YOU WORKING ON THAT YOU ARE PARTICULARLY PROUD OF?

We just finished National Lampoon’s Dirty Movie II . It was a lot of fun. Jonathan Silverman starred and co-produced it with Alan Donnes. We handled G&E, transpo, and power. We currently have power and distro on Fire with Fire providing support for their construction and special effects department. We also just landed a threefilm deal, but I can’t disclose anything else as we are still in pre-pre-production on the first film. But I can tell you that we will be taking a major role in the productions of all three films.

VIDEO NOW GEORGE T. GRISWOLD, JR. WWW.VIDEONOW.INFO • 504-831-2009 WHAT SETS YOUR COMPANY APART FROM OTHERS IN YOUR INDUSTRY?

Video Now has stayed current with HD cameras and formats as they evolve seemingly monthly. New delivery methods have been the biggest change over the past few years with most clients preferring footage delivered as file-based media, not delivered on tape. National cable producers are still opting for DVCPRO-HD since the material is easier to archive and storage is more secure. Corporate and commercial clients are happy to have media files that they can import into their NLE of choice without the expense of a HD deck. Devices like the Convergent Designs nanoFlash can transform any HD camera into an “agnostic” file-based recorder that serves Final Cut Pro, Avid, Premier Pro CS 5.5. Supplanting the HDX-900 Panasonic is the Sony PDW-700 XDCAM-HD with a great picture, metadata capability, and proxy files than can be handed off to a producer for review on a laptop. HOW HAS CHANGING TECHNOLOGY IMPACTED YOUR COMPANY?

With the advent of HD came a more critical need for cameras and lighting that are at the peak of esthetic and technical perfection. Video Now invested in the training and equipment to offer precise, repeatable and pleasing camera looks and matching. Using a state of the art Tektronix WFM5000 scope and the trusted DSC Choma Du Mode chip chart, the results are rock solid. There is no substitute for being able to engineer a camera from top to bottom… much different from the Betacam SP days when one camera, one look, and one approach to location shooting was sufficient.

EQUIPMENT : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : CENTER STAGING JAY GERNSBACHER, President & Owner WWW.CENTERSTAGING.NET • 504-247-0020 WHAT KIND OF EQUIPMENT DOES YOUR COMPANY RENT?

Our primary rentals to the film industry are scaffolding, stage decks and aluminum beams. We have an inventory of over 40,000 square feet of plywood decks as well as 150-plus Staging Dimension decks, which are very similar to Steeldeck. We also have an inventory of mobile stages, generators, bleachers (both aluminum and wood) as well as weird things like 3,000-pound concrete ballast blocks. WHAT RECENT PROJECTS HAS YOUR COMPANY RENTED EQUIPMENT TO?

21 Jump Street is the most recent film project we provided equipment to. We just finished Essence with over 6,000 square feet of staging, as well as over 60 4’x8’ rolling risers of various heights. One of the first projects we did was with Brad Pitt, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button. They needed a fire escape, which had to be a stair unit connected to an old warehouse that they were shooting in. That ultimately led to doing all of the design and installation of Pitt’s Make It Right Pink project. We have been providing our services to the Voodoo Music Experience since its inception, we do all of the staging for French Quarter Festival, and many more events too numerous to name for this article!

THE POOL & PATIO CENTER BRUCE H. ARONSON WWW.POOLPATIO.COM • 504-837-2022 WHAT KIND OF EQUIPMENT DOES YOUR COMPANY RENT?

We rent outdoor furnishings and accessories, including dining groups, sofa groups, chaise lounges, umbrellas, and outdoor rugs. We have anything a filming company would need to furnish and accessorize an outdoor area, no matter how small or big. WHAT RECENT PROJECTS HAS YOUR COMPANY RENTED EQUIPMENT TO?

We have rented to everything from major films to national commercials that were shot in New Orleans and the surrounding area. WHAT SETS YOUR COMPANY APART FROM OTHERS IN YOUR INDUSTRY?

We have a large stock of furniture available for immediate use. We can meet most art directors’ visual needs, from traditional to contemporary and anything in between. continued on page 28 26

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EQUIPMENT (CONTINUED) : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : M3 SYSTEMS TERRI & DAVE LANDRY WWW.M3SYSTEMS-JIBS.COM • 985-796-0531/504-616-3999 WHAT KIND OF EQUIPMENT DOES YOUR COMPANY RENT?

Jimmy Jib camera cranes that offer 6- to 40-foot variable lengths and remote-controlled camera functions adaptable for film and video cameras. WHAT RECENT PROJECTS HAS YOUR COMPANY RENTED EQUIPMENT TO?

Memphis Beat, Extreme Makeover: Home Edition , Bad Girls Club, New Orleans Essence Fest, Lil’ Wayne concert in New Orleans. WHAT SETS YOUR COMPANY APART FROM OTHERS IN YOUR INDUSTRY?

Talented jib operators with a wide range of experience in field and studio shoots.

STORY TELLER EFFECTS GROUP, LLC. BOB RIGGS WWW.STORYTELLERFX.COM • 504-491-0074 WHAT KIND OF EQUIPMENT DOES YOUR COMPANY RENT?

We rent special effects equipment. WHAT RECENT PROJECTS HAS YOUR COMPANY RENTED EQUIPMENT TO?

Contraband, Cogan’s Trade, Looper , 21 Jump Street, Headshot, Abe Lincoln , Green Lantern . WHAT NEW EQUIPMENT HAVE YOU OBTAINED IN THE PAST YEAR AND HOW IS IT IMPACTING YOUR BUSINESS?

We’ve purchased gas-powered 350 Chevy Wind Machines and the classic electric Ritter Wind Machines. It’s been great for the business because now these machines are available in Louisiana without the cost and trouble of transporting from Hollywood.

POST PRODUCTION/VISUAL EFFECTS : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : SOUPFACTORY DIGITAL MICHAEL CAMPBELL, Owner & Operator WWW.SOUPFACTORYDIGITAL.COM • 504-831-5358 HOW HAS CHANGING TECHNOLOGY IMPACTED YOUR COMPANY AND/OR YOUR INDUSTRY AT LARGE?

This industry has changed drastically. We no longer send footage out of town for processing and transfer. We have digital techs, digital files, digital color correction... everything has changed and if you do not change and adapt with the changes you will be lost. Clients want everything right away over the Internet, compressed in every kind of format, like WMV, Quicktime, Youtube, Vimeo, even compressed to play on someone’s phone, and they want it to look just as good as if it were on full resolution HD master. These days you need to know how to get this done if you want to stay competitive and in the game. WHAT IS THE MOST FUN ASPECT OF YOUR JOB?

I love the process of getting a creative idea, putting my spin on it, and then being given the green light to make it happen. The entire process of pre-production planning to shooting on location and then finishing a turn key commercial product is what makes me tick.

COMPOSITE EFFECTS, LLC KEN DECKER JR., Owner & Manager WWW.COMPOSITEEFFECTS.COM • 225-756-7875 WHAT SETS YOUR COMPANY APART FROM OTHERS IN YOUR INDUSTRY?

Here in Louisiana we are the only full service prop and FX shop which can truly build a project from start to finish without having to ship in out of state talent. All work is done here in LA as opposed to being built in a California shop then brought over once completed. Also unique to our shop is the fact that all of our team members are employed full time rather than a project to project basis. This results in a consistent level of experienced staff members on hand as well as a more cohesive and predictable team. Composite was also one of the first to develop and introduce the Silicone Mask technology to the entertainment industry. WHAT IS THE MOST DIFFICULT ASPECT OF YOUR JOB?

Educating potential clients about the versatility of our shop. Some of what we can now do with the new applications of emerging technology seems like it still belongs in a Science Fiction movie rather than being able to be utilized today. Every time I tell someone about what the 3-D printer is capable of, more often than not they tilt their heads and say, “I didn’t know that was even possible.”

AUDIO/RECORDING : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : NOLA RECORDING STUDIOS MICHAEL K. HARVEY WWW.NASHVILLEAVESOUND.COM • 504-220-1531 WHAT SETS YOUR COMPANY APART FROM OTHERS IN YOUR INDUSTRY?

We have the expertise that comes with experience and high-end gear to offer clients industry-standard sound quality at an affordable rate. Every studio or engineer has a ‘signature sound.’ Ours is a clean, pristine, transparent sound with lots of punch. Our music clientele includes a lot of hip-hop, R&B, and modern jazz, for which a sound like that excels, and also is great for voice-over, ADR and scoring. As a long-time Digital Performer user, I have taken time to gain proficiency in both Pro Tools and Logic, along with our other engineers. We’re hoping to expand this to include Cubase, Sonor, Reason Record, or any other DAW that is proven to encompass a large share of use by the home-studio crowd. In this way, we want to flawlessly integrate our studio environment with the homestudio environments that today’s clients do much of their work in. WHAT IS ONE RECENT AUDIO INDUSTRY TREND YOU ARE EXCITED ABOUT?

It would definitely have to be analog modeling, and everything happening in the world of plug-in processing. Guitar amps, vintage EQs, compressors, convolution reverbs, soft-synths and samplers; I’m especially impressed by the stuff from Waves. It’s really changing the game as far as having all the warmth and character we love in a format that is completely recallable and automatable. I’ve been really excited about the sound I’m getting in my mixes with all of these great tools. continued on page 30 28

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Cameras Love Us Lighting Loves Us Stunts and Audio Too What We Do Camera Platforms Lighting Towers Stunt Platforms & Towers Custom Designed Platforms Generators & HVAC Systems Electrical Distribution Systems Truss Roof Systems Sound Reinforcements Lighting Systems Concert Staging Food & Craft Booths Viewing Stands Theater Productions Cam-Lok Connectors

30 ft. high stunt platform for “The Courier� movie

Center Staging provides infrastructure equipment and services to the film, event and corporate world. We utilize our huge inventory of QES "system" scaffolding, over 40,000 sq. ft. of stage decking, 125 Staging Dimension decks, Stageline Mobile stages, Steel-Deck staging, Multi-Quip generators, bleachers, concrete ballast blocks and all the stuff that you need but can never find! We have the best equipment, the best prices and the best service. We do all the heavy lifting and specialize in getting the job done right the first time, on time.

Center Staging can build any platform, tower or stage in any size or configuration that you need.

Center Staging, Inc. Serving New Orleans & The Gulf South Region (504) 247-0020 www.CenterStaging.Net (866) 508-0975 ISSUE TWO

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SUPPORT SERVICES : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : LIMOUSINE LIVERY RYAN BECNEL WWW.LIMOLIVERY.COM 504-561-8777 WHAT SETS YOUR COMPANY APART FROM OTHERS IN YOUR INDUSTRY?

ENNISIS CATERING JASON ENNIS WWW.ENNISISCATERING.COM • 318-286-1026 WHAT SETS YOUR COMPANY APART FROM OTHERS IN YOUR INDUSTRY?

We are passionate about food! We have combined over 50 years of experience in the food service industry. We believe every customer should demand “positively outrageous service.” If you are wondering what that entails, see for yourself.

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Passion for what we do. The ability to provide the absolute best service available is at our core. Exceeding our clients’ expectations is something we focus on heavily. We look not only to provide transportation, but a luxury experience for our clients. Also, focus on the environment. Livery recently made the change to go paperless, saving over 200,000-plus sheets of paper each year. We now use iPad technology to greet our client, track their flights and facilitate our clients’ needs. Livery maintains a small business attitude with a corporate structure. By doing so, we are able to serve our customers with individual attention and run operations to near flawless perfection, separating our company from others in the industry. WHAT RECENT PRODUCTION PROJECTS HAVE YOU BEEN INVOLVED WITH?

Twilight, Green Lantern, Dead Ahead, Flypaper, Transit, Jeff Who Lives At Home, Never Back Down 2.

AMERICAN LUXURY LIMOUSINES ANDREE DENDINGER WWW.AMERICANLUXURY.COM 504-269-5466/800-631-5466 WHAT SETS YOUR COMPANY APART FROM OTHERS IN YOUR INDUSTRY?

We are staffed 24 hours a day/7 days a week. You will never speak to an answering service. We also have a larger fleet than most of the local companies. WHAT RECENT PRODUCTION PROJECTS HAVE YOU BEEN INVOLVED WITH?

21 Jump Street, Green Lantern , Expendables, Hungry Rabbit Jumps, Memphis Beat. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE CHALLENGES THAT COME WITH BEING IN THE PRODUCTION BUSINESS?

Transportation for production companies is treated like all other VIP transportation—discreetly and professionally.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST MEMORABLE PRODUCTIONRELATED MOMENT?

WHAT IS YOUR MOST MEMORABLE PRODUCTIONRELATED MOMENT?

In support of one of our recent productions, we provided six limousines as picture cars for a few particular shots the director wanted. It was really cool to see our limousines in a significant way on the big screen!

When the crew for All the King’s Men came to “check out” our facility to see if we were up to the challenge. We were. continued on page 32


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: : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : :

EVENT RESTROOM STEVEN W. YOUNG, President & CEO WWW.ELITEPORTABLERESTROOMS.COM • 504-838-0358 WHAT RECENT PRODUCTION PROJECTS HAVE YOU BEEN INVOLVED WITH?

Event Restroom is currently in pre-production with GI Joe. This past year we have completed season two of Treme, Abe Lincoln Vampire Movie, The Loft, Medallion , 21 Jump Street, and last year we worked on Green Lantern as well as about 20 other films across the state. Our companies have been working in the film business since the early ‘90s. Some of the films we have worked on are Interview with a Vampire, Hard Target, Heaven’s Prisoners, JFK , The Pelican Brief, just name a few. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE CHALLENGES THAT COME WITH BEING IN THE PRODUCTION BUSINESS?

The biggest challenge all of us face is the time constraints when filming; the long hours and tight schedules always keep us on our toes. We pride ourselves in being able to move on a moment’s notice when we are called on. You have to be able to jump when they call, no questions, just get it done. Our company was built in a way that we can handle multiple movies as well as working our construction and special events all at one time. We get a lot of our business from last-minute calls where our competitors cannot get to a movie fast enough or they do not have the equipment in stock. We always have trailers in stock and always have trucks available.

PELICAN STATE OUTPATIENT CENTER/REMOTE MD KELLY KITTOK WWW.PELICANSTATEOUTPATIENT.COM • 504-818-0006 WHAT SETS YOUR COMPANY APART FROM OTHERS IN YOUR INDUSTRY?

As a physician group, we have two priorities—the delivery of the best medical care possible and unmatched customer service. Having worked on countless productions through the years, we have developed extensive experience and a clear understanding of the unique needs of the motion picture industry. As well, we are complemented by a very distinguished group of specialists to assist us when needed. They too have become experienced with the industry. Whether it’s a cardiologist performing a stress test on a Sunday for a pre-production physical or a dermatologist going on set to care for a concerned actor, we address the needs of the industry with discretion and a clear respect for the importance of maintaining the production schedule. WHAT IS YOUR MOST MEMORABLE PRODUCTION-RELATED MOMENT?

There have been many personal moments that we will never forget. However, being told by a noted director/producer (who has worked all over the world) that the medical services we provided for his project were the finest he had ever experienced tops our list!

L&R SECURITY SERVICES, INC. EDWARD ROBINSON, Owner WWW.LRSECURITY.COM • 504-943-3191 WHAT SETS YOUR COMPANY APART FROM OTHERS IN YOUR INDUSTRY?

First and foremost, the wealth of experience from the tenure that we have accrued within our 33 years of business. We are licensed to provide security in 13 states across the nation. We feel that our service is unique by the fact that we specialize in special event services within our security operation... Our operation does not just cater to security services; it’s inclusive of all possible phases of service to accommodate special events, from ushers and ticket-takers to executive security. I had this vision years ago and it has definitely paid off regarding our accomplishments and our reputation. WHAT RECENT PRODUCTION PROJECTS HAVE YOU BEEN INVOLVED WITH?

We recently experienced working and being a part of the filming of Treme at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival site last April 2011.

HOTELS/ACCOMMODATIONS : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : HOLIDAY INN DOWNTOWN-NEW ORLEANS SHELLY DUPUY, Sales Manager WWW.HI-NEWORLEANS.COM • 504-581-1600 HOW LONG HAS YOUR COMPANY BEEN INVOLVED IN THE PRODUCTION INDUSTRY AND WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST PROJECT?

We have been working with the production industry for the last two years. In 2009 we acquired a 7,000-square-foot office space that we knew would be perfect for film crews to use as production space. Hungry Rabbit Jumps was the first production we leased the space to, and they were such great people to work with. They were so organized and helped us ease into our first job as tenants. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE CHALLENGES THAT COME WITH BEING IN THE PRODUCTION BUSINESS?

Some of the biggest challenges are that anything can change at any moment. You just have to learn to roll with it and to be flexible with their needs and changes. They also operate differently than our normal business, so it has been an adjustment for all departments. continued on page 34

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We Have You Covered.

We cover all the production news happening in Louisiana. Each issue features informative film, video and audio guest columns, company and individual profiles, announcements and important resource information. Missed an issue? Now you can order back issues, call 800-332-1736.

www.louisianafilmandvideo.com www.louisianaproductionindex.com

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BANANA COURTYARD/AUDUBON GARDEN COTTAGE ROBERT TURNER WWW.BANANACOURTYARD.COM • 504-947-4475 WHAT KIND OF SERVICE DOES YOUR COMPANY PROVIDE?

Banana Courtyard offers bed-and-breakfast accommodations with convenient location adjacent to the French Quarter, Marigny, and Treme neighborhoods. Audubon Garden Cottage is a secluded private garden guest cottage in the Uptown area. WHAT RECENT PROJECTS HAS YOUR COMPANY PROVIDED SERVICE TO?

We have been host to individuals and groups from several projects. We have hosted writers looking for a quiet location to work, actors who are looking for a respite from the bustle of the set, and crew who are looking for an authentic experience in New Orleans. We are ideally suited for individuals who are looking for relaxing accommodations away from the commotion of a larger hotel.

ASTOR CROWNE PLAZA HOTEL DON ZIMMER, Director of Sales & Marketing WWW.ASTORCROWNEPLAZA.COM • 504-962-0500 WHAT IS YOUR MOST MEMORABLE PRODUCTION-RELATED MOMENT?

Recently we housed Rob Dyrdek’s Fantasy Factory in conjunction with New Remote Productions for a special they were filming during Mardi Gras. Unfortunately, when they called I had no idea who Rob Dyrdek was and I was quite embarrassed in my initial conversations. When I went home and told my teenage boys that Mr. Dyrdek was staying with us, the boys became very excited. They were jumping up and down asking if they could meet him and get an autograph. I was never a big fan of MTV but I now know who Rob Dyrdek is and I actually watch his show occasionally. WHAT SETS YOUR COMPANY APART FROM OTHERS IN THE INDUSTRY?

Our biggest asset is we understand the needs of a film crew. One of the most important needs of a film crew is their sleep. Film crews work long hours and their sleep is important to them. We have a quiet area in the hotel called the Alexa Wing. These rooms are away from the noise of conventioneers, and with advance notice of their scheduling we can arrange for their rooms to be serviced while they are filming so they always come back from a long day to a clean, comfortable room with most of the amenities of home.

PRE-PRODUCTION : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : AMERICAN FEDERATION OF MUSICIANS LOCAL 174-496 WWW.NEWORLEANSMUSICIANS.ORG • 504-947-1700

WHAT IS YOUR ROLE IN THE PRODUCTION INDUSTRY?

The American Federation of Musicians establishes standards in the production industry in order to protect musicians’ rights and assure fair compensation and working conditions for musicians in film or television. Local 174-496 is a subsidiary of the AFM with jurisdiction in New Orleans as well as South Central and Southeast Louisiana. WHAT SETS YOUR COMPANY/ORGANIZATION APART FROM OTHERS IN YOUR INDUSTRY?

The AFM is the largest union in the world representing the interest of the professional musician. WHAT WOULD YOU SAY IS THE CURRENT STATE OF THE LOUISIANA PRODUCTION INDUSTRY?

With the incentives offered by the State of Louisiana, the industry has grown rapidly to a competitive level supported by a dramatic increase in the support industries that make film and video in Louisiana workable and profitable.

FBT FILM & ENTERTAINMENT JANNIE MARKEY WWW.FBTFILM.COM • 504-584-5888 WHAT IS YOUR ROLE IN THE PRODUCTION INDUSTRY?

FBT Film & Entertainment (www.FBTFilm.com) has been instrumental in building the infrastructure for the Louisiana film industry. Starting in 2004, when the company was a pioneer in brokering tax credits, it used its banking relationship with First Bank and Trust to offer banking services to production companies. FBT Film then hired a full-time Los Angeles-based producer to recruit and incorporate post-production facilities in Baton Rouge, payroll and accounting firms, completion bond experts, and experienced legal talents. Thus, giving Louisiana a competitive edge with many of the other states who were entering the incentive business. WHAT SETS YOUR COMPANY/ORGANIZATION APART FROM OTHERS IN YOUR INDUSTRY?

FBT Film activities have helped to generate explosive employment growth for Louisiana residents wishing to work in the film industry. Its support and representation of International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) Local 478 has helped strengthen the income level of the many union members by successfully recruiting Los Angeles production services and lending practices to Louisiana. Out-of-state productions can now use the same companies in Louisiana that they customarily use in their home state.

STONEHENGE CAPITAL COMPANY, LLC WHITNEY LITTLE LANASA, Vice President WWW.STONEHENGECAPITAL.COM • 225-408-3000 WHAT IS YOUR ROLE IN THE PRODUCTION INDUSTRY?

Stonehenge Capital Company, LLC (“Stonehenge”) assists production companies and studios by monetizing state tax credits generated by their productions. Many times, production companies are headquartered outside of the filming location and have little to no taxable income in a given state. Stonehenge helps make the productions happen by ensuring producers the receipt of full value for the credits they’re able to generate. In some cases, we’ll also lend capital upfront to help films with tight budgets and timelines get projects off the ground. WHAT WOULD YOU SAY IS THE CURRENT STATE OF THE LOUISIANA PRODUCTION INDUSTRY?

Louisiana continues to be a leader in the industry, both in terms of numbers of productions and gross dollars. In these uncertain economic times, production crews continue to arrive within Louisiana borders because of the maturity of the industry in the state and value of the credit. As states around the country begin to scale back their own programs while Louisiana has continued to enhance its incentives, one can only expect the industry in Louisiana to continue to flourish. continued on page 36 34

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ELMWOOD SELF STORAGE & WINE CELLAR JAMIL URROZ, Marketing Coordinator WWW.ELMWOODSELFSTORAGE.COM • 504-737-7676 WHAT IS YOUR ROLE IN THE PRODUCTION INDUSTRY?

Elmwood Self Storage & Wine Cellar’s role provides a supporting service to the production industry. We are the ultimate storage experience. We are centrally located in the Elmwood Business Park and minutes away from the French Quarter and the New Orleans International Airport. We offer climate controlled self-storage units (various sizes), wine cellar, safe deposit boxes, gun storage, RV/boat/auto storage, U-Haul service and coming up soon, records management services (storage, retrieval, destruction). WHAT SETS YOUR COMPANY/ORGANIZATION APART FROM OTHERS IN YOUR INDUSTRY?

No doubt our unique features. Exclusive Drive In: all loading and unloading takes place indoors, away from inclement weather. We are the only self-storage facility with a wine cellar, a conference room with Wi-Fi available FREE to our customers. We will move you in FREE. We will even host your special event here FREE.

LOCATIONS : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : LOUISIANA LOCATIONS DAVID ROSS MCCARTY, Location Manager WWW.LOUISIANALOCATIONS.COM • 504-450-1938 WHY DID YOU GET INTO THIS FIELD?

I fell into my job as a location manager in 1977. While working on a set as an extra after college, an actress, Joanne Woodward, took me under her wing and introduced me to the location manager of the film we were working on, entitled See How She Runs (CBS Television’s first movie of the week). I was hired on the spot, having to quit my job at Copley Camera and Hi Fi... I worked with her for the remainder of the film as an assistant location manager. I moved South after this film to bring my expertise to the New Orleans area. WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR MOST EXCITING DISCOVERIES AS A LOCATION SCOUT/MANAGER?

Every day brings a new discovery for Louisiana Locations. Even after the horrible flood of Katrina, we are finding new locations to approach for filming. As suprised as I was to see the business coming back after the city was decimated, I was able to continue working steadily throughout the rebuilding of our communities. This was the most memorable experience—watching the national film community support our local professionals through tough times with flood waters still in our streets.

ISLANDS OF THE MARSH PRODUCTIONS GERARD SELLERS, Location Scout/Manager WWW.LOUISIANAFILMLOCATIONS.COM • 504-453-2451 WHAT SETS YOU AND/OR YOUR COMPANY APART FROM OTHERS IN YOUR INDUSTRY?

As Gerard Sellers/Islands of the Marsh Productions, I’ve worked on feature films, TV series, stills, commercials, and documentaries since 1983. I’ve scouted Louisiana from Cameron Parish at the Texas border to Shreveport to the Mississippi border, as well as Southern Mississippi, Alabama, Texas, and Florida. WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR MOST EXCITING DISCOVERIES AS A LOCATION SCOUT/MANAGER?

I’m still finding new and exciting locations after all these years. My reputation is such that people spread the word of their positive experiences in filming, and I’m getting weekly emails from people who have mansions, town houses, country houses, plantations or farms and want to put these locations up for the movie industry.

SCRIPTWRITERS : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : WRITE STUFF PRODUCTIONS JIM JACKSON WRITESCRIPTS@AOL.COM • 985-651-5493 WHY DID YOU GET INTO THIS FIELD?

Actually, my goal, as a child, was to be an editorial cartoonist but writing stories seemed fun and challenging, so I did both. WHAT RECENT PRODUCTION PROJECTS HAVE YOU BEEN INVOLVED WITH?

Working now with Upperline Entertainment, and New Guy Films in producing Jerome High Scream Team . Should have the movie wrapped in mid-August. Then we’ll do Cajun Gumbeaux in the fall, and Operation Longbow, before 9-11 next year. WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PART OF BEING A SCRIPT/SCREENWRITER?

I watch movies to be entertained. I write scripts that come alive with interesting characters doing interesting things that makes the audience react emotionally. That, to me, is entertainment.

TALENT/CASTING : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : LANDRUM ARTS LA (AKA LA LA) DAWN LANDRUM, Agent/Owner WWW.LANDRUMARTSLA.COM • 318-742-6554 WHAT SETS YOUR AGENCY APART FROM OTHERS IN YOUR INDUSTRY?

I don’t like to toot my own horn but I will mention what others have said sets us apart. We are often told we are unique in the manner in which we treat our actors. We KNOW our actors. They are not just faces on a computer screen. Our actors are like family to us. We expect our actors to follow a strict Code of Ethics and our agents and staff must also follow it. Landrum Arts LA (aka LALA) prefers to represent the best of the best. We represent actors who are seasoned professionals. We prefer to be the GO TO agency for productions who need LEAD and the strong supporting actors of all ages. Landrum concentrates on representing quality actors as opposed to quantity. If an actor is an amazing actor but is a terrible person to work with we will not sign them. Reputation is everything... HOW HAS YOUR BUSINESS CHANGED THROUGHOUT THE YEARS?

Our business has grown tremendously! We now represent Emmy award-winning actors, celebrities, names, and the best actors in Louisiana and Southeast as well as several from the West Coast and in between. 36

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DEBBY GAUDET’S YOUNG SCREEN ACTORS DEBBY GAUDET DEBBYGAUDET@GMAIL.COM • 504-613-7346 HOW HAS YOUR BUSINESS CHANGED THROUGHOUT THE YEARS?

When I first began teaching, I started with one class of eight students who had little to nothing on their resumes. Three years later, I have over eighty actors under my tutelage. My work has expanded to seven different classes from beginners to advance, with a waiting list to get in on each. I conduct a weekly three-hour Roll Film class where the actors work on camera. The parents are welcome in to view the playbacks to see how their child is progressing. The most significant change in my years of teaching is that I started with a small group of wide-eyed kids who were new to the industry. Today, 23 percent of my students are professional working actors and can be seen in local, regional, national commercials, TV and feature films. WHAT SETS YOUR ACTING CLASSES APART FROM OTHERS IN THE INDUSTRY?

I’ve incorporated a toned-down version of Method acting for kids, teaching them how to develop ways to pull true emotions to the surface and plug into their work. I’ve tailored this process into an intensive TV and film training program where the actors focus on on-camera techniques. I also cover the business aspect of the industry with the actors and their parents, emphasizing professionalism both on and off the set.

FAMEAGENCY

WWW.FAMEAGENCY.COM • 800-458-9112 WHAT SETS YOUR AGENCY APART FROM OTHERS IN YOUR INDUSTRY?

With a full-time working staff of two agents and a talent coordinator and affiliate offices in LA and NY, we are busy even without the TV series and movies keeping our local/regional and national clients supplied with top talent. Fameagency is the largest commercial agency in the area. HOW HAS YOUR BUSINESS CHANGED THROUGHOUT THE YEARS?

After Katrina, since we were the first agency up and running, we have increased our client and talent database significantly. Now we have moved to digital in so many areas of the business that we can get more done in less amount of time and it is more cost-effective for the talent, too. WHAT ARE SOME PROJECTS YOU’VE WORKED ON RECENTLY?

Ted Baker – London; ABC’s Final Witness; Merck – Chicago; Capital One – national; Bing – national; Robitussin – national; American Girl Doll; Volkswagen; Secretariat.

ANNE MASSEY CASTING ANNE MASSEY WWW.ANNEMASSEYCASTING.COM • 888-810-9060 WHAT WOULD YOU SAY IS THE CURRENT STATE OF THE LOUISIANA TALENT/CASTING INDUSTRY?

I think the talent pool has increased both in size and quality due to so many actors and commercial talent relocating here. Hollywood South has lured a huge number of individuals who want to work this market. And Internet castings (video taped submissions, uploads, etc.) have made it easier for talent from other markets to work this market. That’s not as good for the local talent, because their competition can be a lot stronger coming in from the bigger markets. But it’s a casting director’s dream. HOW HAS YOUR BUSINESS CHANGED THROUGHOUT THE YEARS?

Since Katrina, my focus has been on commercial castings as well as some reality TV. Although I have film, TV, music video and industrial casting credits, it seems that commercials are my niche. The casting process has changed so much; I get a little nervous about what the next “new thing” is! I often joke that pretty soon we’ll be asked to “beam up” the talent for on-the-spot casting. Gone are the days of dubbing tapes and FedEx. Now it’s uploads and video conferencing. Star Trek, here we come! WHAT SETS YOUR AGENCY APART FROM OTHERS IN YOUR INDUSTRY?

Being both an agent and casting director has its advantages. I know what to ask a client to insure that the agents will be satisfied with the rates, terms of use, etc., and I also know what “won’t work” in this market, and can communicate that to the clients up front. Very seldom have I hit an impasse. For the most part, clients are agreeable to adjusting rates and conditions before specs are even released. I’m not afraid to ask a client to amend specs or re-work a job so that everyone is happy.

DEL CORRAL MODEL & TALENT AGENCY TERRY MCNEAL WWW.DELCORRALMODEL.COM • 504-324-3782 WHAT SETS YOUR AGENCY APART FROM OTHERS IN YOUR INDUSTRY?

We are constantly moving with the times and adapting to new ideas and projects. Moreover we hold an open house policy and our larger, fresher location reflects the idea that we want to accommodate everyone and their needs. Our approach is definitely professional, intimate and family-oriented. HOW HAS YOUR BUSINESS CHANGED THROUGHOUT THE YEARS?

After 40 years we have a new owner who has brought with him a totally fresh approach. WHAT ARE SOME PROJECTS YOU’VE WORKED ON RECENTLY?

We have been working on quite a few projects recently, notably Paperboy , Haunted High School, GI Joe 2 and Wildcard.

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STUNTPEOPLE/STUNT COORDINATORS : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : DANNY COSMO

WWW.COSMOSTUNTS.COM • 504-481-9482 HOW DID YOU GET INVOLVED IN THE STUNT INDUSTRY?

I am a professional high diver from 80, 90, and 100 feet. I was competing in the 1994 World High Diving Championships and was contacted to do a high dive in the movie Basketball Diaries, doubling Leonardo DiCaprio. WHAT SETS YOU APART FROM OTHERS IN YOUR INDUSTRY?

Making movie action with passionate people regardless of the budget, and all the Action Without the Attitude. WHAT RECENT PRODUCTIONS HAVE YOU BEEN INVOLVED WITH?

Dragon Eyes with Jean-Claude Van Damme (stunt coordinator), The Philly Kid with Wes Chapman and Neal McDonough (stunt coordinator), Area 51 directed by Jason Connery (stunt coordinator), and I just started On the Seventh Day with Pam Grier and Blair Underwood (stunt coordinator).

STUNTS 305 JAY AMOR WWW.STUNTS305.COM • 954-873-0218 HOW DID YOU GET INVOLVED IN THE STUNT INDUSTRY?

Watching Superman , Batman , all the old action shows as a little boy is what got me interested. I started working in the film industry as an extra when I was a teenager, and I knew I wanted to do stunts. The first film I worked on was in 1977—Black Sunday . I was lucky enough to meet Jeannie Epper; what a wonderful person. She was the first stunt person I met in the industry who helped me get started. From that point on, I was hooked. I became a member of SAG in 1979 and have had the opportunity to work with so many great stunt coordinators and stuntmen and stuntwomen. It’s been a blessing. WHAT SETS YOU APART FROM OTHERS IN YOUR INDUSTRY?

I joined SAG in 1979, and have 32 years’ experience as a SAG talent in the business. I am bilingual, I have my own equipment, I have a true commitment and passion for doing the job safely by hiring the person who is right for the job, not just because he or she is my friend. Always being prepared, being honest and loyal. Giving the production 100 percent. WHAT RECENT PRODUCTION PROJECTS HAVE YOU BEEN INVOLVED WITH?

I was one of the stunt coordinators on Colombi ana , starring Zoe Saldana, coming out this fall. I also worked on Looper , Contraband, Medalli on , 21 Jump Street, Hungry Rabbi t Jumps, and Carjacked.

HOLLY GALPIN O’QUIN HOLLYOQUIN@ATT.NET • 504-289-9068

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE BIGGEST CHALLENGES THAT COME WITH BEING IN YOUR INDUSTRY, AND HOW ARE YOU ABLE TO OVERCOME THEM?

The biggest challenges are the sizes of the actresses that need to be doubled. They rapidly go from size 6 to size 00. The second challenge is the clothes. As a female stunt person, we are always in the least amount of clothes. We wear dresses and corsets in stairfalls, tank tops for car hits, and heels running through woods! Challenges are always easily overcome—you learn to accept what is needed to make the changes quickly to acquire the work. If it’s dieting, we diet, or we buy nude pads and low-profile padding to protect ourselves. There’s always a way to make things work! WHAT SETS YOU APART FROM OTHERS IN YOUR INDUSTRY?

Years of training and practice. Another thing is that I have been involved in not only the stunt aspect of the movies, but I have also been a set medic, RN, on set. So I understand not only the stunts themselves, but also the safety and training behind them. WHAT RECENT PRODUCTION PROJECTS HAVE YOU BEEN INVOLVED WITH?

Déjà Vu , Green Lantern , 21 Jump Street, Final Destination 4 , 12 Rounds, Medallion , Freelancers, The Baytown Disco, Carjacked, Tresspass, Dorfman , Love, Wedding, Marriage, The Chaperone, Seconds Apart, and Red, to name a few.

HAIR/MAKEUP : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : ALISKA B. MOFFETT ALIS.B.88@GMAIL.COM • 504-451-1972 WHY DID YOU GET INTO THIS FIELD?

I am a creative person, and as a young college student seeking opportunities in film, I had a “look,” which for some reason was in demand at the time. I got an agent, worked and was able to pay for college. I had no idea that the film industry would be a part of my “Destiny Road”—fate has many paths, many turns and many levels of experiences. Film, television, music and beauty was always a visual and practical intertwined magnet for me. I studied dance for many years and practiced learning most of the dance routines on movies and television shows, from Shirley Temple to Fame. Music was just another world to me. Music opened my imagination to no limits. I loved to listen to music, the words, then create a dance. I would then write a story and picture scenes. I also knew and visualized how I wanted the hair to look and what they would be wearing, including the nails, then teach it to the kids in the neighborhood that I babysat. Well, in today’s world it would be called directing/producing a movie or a music video! I have danced professionally, owned a dancing school, produced several of my own recitals, completed college, went to beauty school, opened a beauty school, done fashion shows, and have done hair and makeup in the industry. I can say, I came, I saw, and I am still here trying to grow and participate. If I only knew what I know now. One thing I do know for sure is that it is never too late to go after any dream when there is an opportunity to do so. WHAT SETS YOU APART FROM OTHERS IN YOUR INDUSTRY?

Visualization, determination, focus, working with other artists, patience and always becoming!

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GENEROUS INCENTIVES CONTINUE IN LOUISIANA STORY BY WHITNEY LITTLE LaNASA & PATRICK McCONNELL, GUEST COLUMNISTS

These days, when considering filming destinations, movie and television producers across the country have one thing on their mind: “How do we make the most of our limited financial resources without sacrificing the artistic integrity of the finished product?” In Louisiana, the answer is strong financial incentives. While many states in the nation are reducing or eliminating tax credits, imposing credit caps or making major changes to film tax credit laws, Louisiana remains a strong and viable market not only for producers, but also digital media companies. The Louisiana Film and Motion Picture Tax Credit Program creates a tax credit equal to 30 percent of a production company’s investment greater than $300,000 for all Louisiana-based production expenses, and an additional 5 percent tax credit for Louisiana labor. Further enhancing the value of the credit, the credit is freely transferable and can even be sold back to the state for 85 cents on the dollar. This is a great deal in today’s competitive entertainment industry where every dollar counts and can make the difference between a TV program running for a number of seasons, or being scrapped for the next best pilot. The Louisiana Digital Media Tax Credit Program offers a tax credit equal to 25 percent of the base investment in a digital media production performed in the state, including a 5 percent bump for using Louisiana labor. As with the film credit, the digital media credit can also be sold back to the state for 85 cents. However, unlike the film credit, a production company can also get a dollar for dollar refund from the state upon filing its Louisiana annual

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tax return. Any refund or rebate paid by the state is generally treated as taxable income for federal tax purposes. Since most out-of-state companies have no Louisiana state tax liability, producers can monetize their credits by selling them on the open market for discounted value. Stonehenge Capital Company has been a leader in monetizing these incentives for producers since the program’s inception in 2003, having financed over $400 million of tax credits to date. Our role as a vital, experienced and trusted liquidity source for these productions has assisted the growth of this important industry. When selecting your tax credit partner, it is important to look for qualified financial partners with unblemished track records and reliable sources of capital. Being left at the altar by a thinly capitalized broker that was unable to locate investors on the other side of the transaction is not something any production company wants to experience. In fact, production companies have called upon us to help them when they find out at the eleventh hour that a broker cannot execute the transaction as promised. Bottom line: Louisiana has some of the most generous programs in the country to provide you with a big head start on financing a film or digital media project. Give your project its best chance at success and come film in this great state. You will be glad you did. WHITNEY LITTLE LANASA & PATRICK MCCONNELL ARE VICE PRESIDENTS OF STONEHENGE CAPITAL COMPANY, LLC, IN BATON ROUGE. VISIT WWW.STONEHENGECAPITAL.COM.


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VIDEONOW New Orleans, Louisiana

HD FIELD PRODUCTION Corporate and Broadcast

•EXPERIENCED •CREATIVE •INSURED XDCAM-HD • DVCPRO-HD • XDCAM-EX www.videonow.info 504-831-2009 george@videonow.info

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THE ACT OF CASTING STORY BY DAWN LANDRUM, GUEST COLUMNIST

I

magine, if you will, The Godfather with a different cast. (I cringe.) How successful would this film have been without Brando or Pacino? What if James Caan was replaced with Bob Smith? Or consider the outcome if no one spoke up to book Robert Duvall or Diane Keaton? I don’t know about you, but I could not fathom a world where anyone but these actors portrayed a film quoted as being “…one of the best American films ever made.”

sions be on BDS. • When the project is smaller or local, I prefer a reply e-mail with the role (and its description I sent next to it), and underneath that, thumbnail pictures of the actors with the actors’ names directly below their picture and when I click on their picture it goes to a link with their resume and other pictures. WITHOUT HAVING TO NAME NAMES, IS THERE SOMETHING YOU ADMIRE ABOUT A SPECIFIC ACTOR/AGENT/AGENCY THAT MAKES YOUR JOB EASIER, AND CAN YOU SHARE THIS WITH EVERYONE SO OTHERS CAN FOLLOW SUIT?

• I prefer to see the best of the best, but I am always open to newer actors as well. I prefer an agent not compete too much with themselves on any one particular role. Help me narrow down who the best for the role is from your roster. • When I do commercial castings, more often than not, the role is cast based on a “look”… so I want to see all faces.

AGENTS: Efficiency; submitting immediately when receiving the breakdown (or at least replying back immediately that they received your e-mail and a timeframe of when I should expect their selects). • Allowing their actors to decide if they want to make the trip to Shreveport, Baton Rouge, or NOLA (wherever they are) for the audition. (Some agents just assume, or decide for their talent, they will not drive to Shreveport for an audition. We, as CDs, cannot help where the movies set up shop to film.) • Agents should not just submit blindly. This shouldn’t be one of those “submit everyone and hope one sticks” sort of deals. It’s very frustrating when we give agents a big time slot and only a couple actors show up because the agent didn’t know where the actor was or if they were even interested. • I love agents who communicate and who stay on top of things and follow directions. Several agents are not treating their talent fairly in that they do not share sides, scripts, storyboards and even breakdowns with their talent. Then the talent comes in unprepared and that is maddening. Some agents eliminate this problem by making certain everyone is on the same page. ACTORS: I love when they are professional from point A to point Z, and this means starting with a professional headshot, and an equally professional resume. • I also love when actors go out on a limb for us sometimes and will be a stand-in or featured extra for us if we are in a pinch, bind, or desperate. We do remember the actors that do this for us and will repay them in the future when it comes to casting them in a speaking role, especially if the director allows us to make the final decision. • Actors who reach out and communicate with their agents in letting them know the projects they’d like to audition for and where they will go is helpful, as well. Especially during vacation months, we find that there are several “no shows” at auditions. • Flat out, divas are annoying! So, you worked over 20 projects… we can read. There is no need to act cocky when you walk into the audition room. We see the resume. What we’d like you to do is show us what you can do... Present an impressive performance reel. As a matter of fact, Gary Marsh of Breakdown Services informed all of us that when agents submit on BDS, the actors who have reels on Actors Access float to the top of the submission page. Sometimes when we are in a huge hurry to cast and each agent has submitted dozens of actors per role, I honestly only have time to see those on top in choosing who to select.

WHEN USING BREAKDOWN SERVICES, WHAT MAKES ONE AGENCY OR ACTOR STAND

WHAT IS YOUR PET PEEVE THAT ACTORS/AGENTS DO OR DON’T DO?

OUT OVER ANOTHER?

Sending us unprepared talent or talent they have never even interviewed (before signing) to see if they have any talent. ACTORS: Are not prepared for auditions, have poor headshots/resumes, and actors that do not staple their resumes to their headshots before they come in the auditioning room. • I just did a casting for a national commercial spot where talent came in with 10-year-old photos, and an added 20 pounds. I don’t like surprises. The talent needs to professionalize themselves. And they need to respect themselves enough to put forth a good image by getting the right tools together. • I cannot stand it when actors come in smelling! Cigarette smoke smell on a headshot gets the headshot thrown out! Perfume, cologne, smoke, hairpray, strong lotions gross us out. After a couple hundred actors come in each day

Before an actor steps onto the movie set, there is quite a process. This begins as an actor with a dream; a mission to succeed at what they feel is their Godgiven gift—the ability to entertain. This actor spends his life training, building his resume, and finding an agent who sees in him what he sees in himself. Once this process is complete, the next step is for the agent and actor to work as a team in getting casting directors familiar with his ability. Nicknamed “the door watchers,” the casting director, or CD, is defined as being an individual or company in the performing arts whose use is vital to the pre-production process in selecting a cast of actors, dancers, singers, models and other talent for live or recorded performance. The CD is also considered the “middle man” in negotiations between the agent, actor and the production/director when offers are made or contracts are negotiated. How do agents and actors understand the casting process? Well, the agent needs to know the casting directors. This is not always easy when everyone is far too busy to have brunch. In an effort to assist, I’ve come up with some questions for the casting directors who work in the state of Louisiana. I am posting some of their responses below for the benefit of actors, agents, and CDs to have a better understanding of one another. DO YOU PREFER THAT AN AGENT ONLY SUBMIT THEIR TOP 3 - 5 ACTORS PER ROLE FOR EACH PROJECT OR WOULD YOU RATHER THEY SUBMIT ALL WHO COULD POSSIBLY FIT THE ROLE (GIVING YOU THE FREEDOM TO WHITTLE DOWN)?

AGENTS:

• Organization, easy, quick links is a favorite! • Also, an actor with a headshot over a body shot stands out over the others on BDS because the thumbnail photos on the Web are very small. If you are using a body shot, it’s hard to make out what you look like from the small thumbnail. An agency with talent that books and are trusted among the community stand out to me. • Actors who can do commercial work as well need to be sure they have a headshot reflecting a commercial appeal, as well as their theatrical one. WHEN YOU E-MAIL A BREAKDOWN TO AGENTS, HOW DO YOU PREFER THE AGENT SUBMIT THE ACTORS?

• If the project insists we post on Breakdown Services, I prefer all submis44

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The Act of Casting, continued from page 44

for over a week, the office and furniture reek of the collective smells left behind. Please… there is no amount of Febreeze that can eliminate this.

one walking in the door is as prepared as they can be. And if I forget something in a breakdown, or fail to reply to a question, stay on top of me, too. If there is a problem, talk to me. I can’t do anything about something if I don’t know about it.

WHEN AN ACTOR AUDITIONED FOR YOU ONCE AND HAD A REALLY BAD DAY LEAV-

WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO SAY TO THE ENTIRE COMMUNITY THAT COULD BENEFIT

ING A BAD FIRST IMPRESSION, HOW CAN THAT ACTOR REGAIN YOUR FAITH IN THEIR

ALL ACTORS AND AGENTS IN THE CASTING PROCESS WITH YOUR COMPANY?

ABILITY SO YOU WILL CALL THEM IN AGAIN?

• To the agents, we go the extra mile to fight tooth and nail for your actor to a producer/director to get the part when your actor is good and really deserves the part. • To the actors (and agents), if your actors are not prepared; they do not have the proper tools before going into an audition (headshots/resume, acting coaches, actor classes/workshops, privates, etc.); or they simply are not sure why they are not booking anymore, and you (the agent) may not have the time (or resource outlets) to assist them, please send them to me! I will meet with them personally to consult them on immediate avenues they can take to get back in the game and gain that edge over everyone else! • It is very appreciated when agents do so much to be available to us at all times. Sometimes a production has a night shoot and we need an emergency replacement actor. You need to know that in such a case I’m more apt to call the agent who always sends me quality actors and doesn’t bite my head off when I’m forced to phone her in the middle of the night.

• That actor needs to then immediately go to their agent, tell them their audition went poorly, and the agent needs to implement a plan of action with him/her (training, coaching, one-on-one). Then after the actor has gone through this training, the agent should send us a quick e-mail letting us know that actor is in a better place now and prepared to make a new impression on me. Seeing is believing! Let me know you are sending a video with proof of the improved ability, and as long as it’s a quick link (click and watch without waiting or downloading), I’ll take a look. • I don’t consider having a bad day as leaving a bad impression. Some actors are far too hard on themselves. Even stars have had bad auditions. It happens. Being a casting director really gives me the ability to define people. Because I see so many all the time, people are my life. So I can usually tell when someone has a bad day or is just an inexperienced actor or ill-prepared. Repeated “bad days” is reason enough for me to call the agent and have a conversation about that actor. And I’ve done that on many occasions. IN A PERFECT WORLD, HOW WOULD AGENTS BEST WORK WITH YOU IN SUBMITTING AND RESPONDING TO YOUR CASTING NEEDS?

• They would submit to us their selects as quickly as possible, not get upset with us for things out of our control (i.e., where the audition is, how many times they have to audition for the director/producer, DOOD’s changing at the last minute), and making darn sure that before they sign an actor that the person can actually act. • Stay on top of the talent you represent, follow instructions, be certain every-

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WE WOULD LIKE TO EXPRESS OUR APPRECIATION TO THE LOUISIANA CASTING DIRECTORS FOR THEIR ANSWERS TO THESE QUESTIONS AND FOR THEIR SUPPORT TO THE LOUISIANA FILM INDUSTRY. THANK YOU: RYAN GLORIOSO, CSA, OF GLORIOSO CASTING; LIZ COULON, CSA, OF COULON CASTING; MEAGAN LEWIS, CSA, OF RPM CASTING; BRENT CABALLERO OF CABALLERO CASTING; BRINKLEY MAGINNIS OF BAM CASTING; LISA MARIE DUPREE OF FILMS IN MOTION; ROBIN BATHERSON OF BATHERSON CASTING; ANNE MASSEY OF ANNE MASSEY CASTING; AND TOMMY STAUB OF TOMMY STAUB CASTING.


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OFF THE CUFF STORY BY JENNIFER SCHEMKE, GUEST COLUMNIST

If, statistically, the fear of public speaking tops the list of terror for the average human being, the art of performing improvisation might evoke the kind of anxiety usually reserved for a screeching heroine running for her life in a Wes Craven movie. Chances are, that actress studied improvisation to be able to sell that scream. Lately, though, the wisdom of “being ready for anything” suddenly seems like a skill everyone wants to learn. Improvisation, or the art of performing without a script, is, simply put, communicating under pressure. For actors, this pressure is wanting to do it right, to get the role, stay in character, impress the audience. For those behind the scenes and watching the action, the ability to communicate under pressure is just as vital. As soon as we’re in a situation that tests our cool, our listening skills go into fight or flight mode, just when we need them most. Improvisation trains us for these situations. There is rarely a moment in “real life” where we know what’s coming next, between the lines. An actor’s challenge is to simulate that, with or without a script. Shirley MacLaine said, “Jack Nicholson, in Five Easy Pieces, singlehandedly ushered in a new style of acting; a brand new spontaneity that seemed to indicate he was performing without a script.” Improv teaches this. Says Griff Furst, creative executive at Lafayette-based Bullet Films, “Improvisational training forces one to listen, to be present and to process information as a person does, rather than wait for a cue to act.” Shreveport casting director Ryan Glorioso finds that “improv training gets the actor out of their head. It allows the actor to ‘do’ rather than ‘think.’” Florida-based casting director Lori Wyman is equally passionate: “Improv-

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trained actors are usually better, because they can think on their feet. I can throw any direction at them and it doesn’t rattle them. The improv training usually gives the actor more confidence, because they are not fearful of getting a direction that may differ from what they had worked on. The more improv classes someone takes, the easier it is for them to adjust their performance at the drop of a hat, which oftentimes is necessary on the set.” Improv is being taught at top business schools to help people with social anxieties, for communication and diplomacy, and to develop bonds between members of a close-working group. The skills of improvisation can benefit anyone who deals with other human beings over the course of their day. It teaches the rule of “Yes, And,” which is a reciprocal pact between improvisers that says “I will accept what you have just said, and I will add to it.” This deceptively simple maxim allows for an almost magical building of ideas and strengths, whether between two actors and their nuances in a scene, or between the members of a group or crew. The essential benefit of good improvisation is that people, and their stories, get to be truly heard. And, at the end of the day, after the box office totals and the long hours of creation, isn’t that what film seeks to do? No screaming required! JENNIFER SCHEMKE IS AN MFA-TRAINED ACTOR AND IMPROVISER AND TEACHER AT DAUPHINE ROSE ACTING AND IMPROV STUDIO IN NEW ORLEANS. BESIDES TEACHING CLASSES, SHE HAS ALSO WORKED BRINGING APPLIED IMPROVISATION TO GROUPS SUCH AS THE IDEA VILLAGE, TULANE MEDICAL SCHOOL, EMERGING PHILANTHROPISTS OF NEW ORLEANS, AND TRANZON REAL ESTATE AUCTIONS OF MAINE. WWW.DAUPHINEROSE.COM.


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DINNER AND A MOVIE STORY BY ELIZABETH SCHINDLER,

Photo by Ashley Merheb

GUEST COLUMNIST

When asked if I would be interested in writing a guest column for this month’s issue that would in some way convey a message from the culinary industry to the film industry… I’ll be honest, I jumped at the opportunity, but didn’t know what the hell that even meant or whether I really had anything of value to say. Over the first weeks of July, I pondered what I could possibly write about from the point of view of an “expert” in the restaurant industry that other “experts” in the film industry would care about or even read. True to form, I waited eight hours before the article was due to really put on my thinking cap and get down to business… consult Google. Yes, I Googled. I typed in some of the most ridiculous word combinations I’ve ever come up with, and let me tell you, I’ve done some verbal dance moves in my day. I guess I was hoping research would inspire an angle out of my 12:50am project. I finally realized this was absurd. Here I was, doubting my ability to speak authoritatively on the topic of two of my most beloved pastimes: Eating and Entertainment. Allow me to introduce myself. My name is Elizabeth Schindler and I was born, raised and now reside in New Orleans—culinary capital of the U.S. (a title you ought not argue with any true New Orleanian about). That being said, I have been eating the best solid food for 26 years. At the age of three, I embarked on a mighty movie loop and quote quest—a compulsion that would follow me into adulthood. It all started with Labyrinth and quickly expanded to classics like Sleeping Beauty and The Princess Bride. Aside from being able to quote all of these movies, I loved watching them over and over again, each time trying to reenact scenes. While some involved things like stealing my mother’s lipstick and drawing arrows all over the patio the way Sarah did in

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Labyrinth (Karen Schindler was not pleased), most involved eating. I loved it. The food made the magic of that movie tangible and real to me. I got to be Veruca Salt licking wallpaper in Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory when I stuck pieces of Fruit Roll-Up to the wall (yes, that happened). Moving on from childhood into adolescence, there weren’t, and still aren’t, many opportunities for 12- to 15-year-olds to socialize outside of school and the supervision of their parents. I remember group experiences at Applebee’s and the movie theater being the highlights of my weekends, and the bane of the parents designated for carpool duty. The point I am trying to make is that the marriage of Dinner and a Movie is as natural, essential, and dare I say powerful, as Peanut Butter and Chocolate… Soup and Sandwiches… Unicorns and Glitter. (That was a commercial quote. Told you I was good.) All of this being said, I feel that my long-standing, passionate love affair with the aforementioned cinema/cuisine combo enables me to speak confidently with regard to the topic at hand. Here is what I know: At long last, the birth of Hollywood South in New Orleans has brought our restaurant industry its soul mate—the film industry. To those “experts” new to our town, hoping to make some magic, I have one piece of advice: Eat our food. There’s something truly special about New Orleans that sets the people, culture, and its spirit apart from anywhere else. If you really want to create something sensational, then let New Orleans in. Take it in, digest it and let it nurture your mind and spirit. Some places claim to have “something in the drinking water.” Here, it’s in the food. ELIZABETH SCHINDLER IS THE MARKETING MANAGER AT BROUSSARD’S RESTAURANT IN NEW ORLEANS. VISIT WWW.BROUSSARDS.COM.


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CFX MAKES YOUR FANTASY A REALITY

D

eep in the heart of Baton Rouge, inconspicuously perched amongst a sea of nondescript warehouses, nests Composite Effects, an award-winning props and effects production studio. Not one soul driving down Pecue Lane would ever suspect that inside the unremarkable facade of number 6786, a highly-skilled and specialized production team works diligently at blurring the lines between reality and fantasy, waking moments and nightmares, breathing life into all manner of sinister creatures. These CFX technicians specialize in creating world-famous silicone masks, unparalleled in detail, durability, and functionality. With a fully equipped makeup lab within the facility, virtually no theatrical or cinematic task is beyond their capabilities. CFX also has a full-service prop shop; they can produce almost any type of theatrical prop you might need for any type of production. With a full staff of sculptors, mold-makers, painters, costumers and hair artists, their prop-making capabilities include (but are not limited to): silicone props (body parts, dummies, creature skins), foam latex props, fiberglass and resin castings, custom breakaway items (glass, foam, fabricated props), actor-safe hazard illusions (foam weapons, rubber glass), soft and rigid foam parts, cold-cast metals and costume elements (masks, gloves, wardrobe accessories, foam creature suits), mechanical and animatronic design capability, and a fully-equipped sculpture and

mold-making studio. CFX has recently added 3D printing and rapid prototyping to its roster of production services. They’ve opened new doors in the props and product development field: producing accurate CAD-designed parts and dynamic sculptural elements, streamlining the design process, and increasing the efficiency of sculptural prototyping and model production. Character design has become an accurate science as well as an aesthetic process with material thickness and anatomical movement features measured to exact specifications. Over the past five years, the CFX machine has outgrown its workshop space and must move into a larger, built-for-purpose manufacturing facility. The specialized location not only allows for workforce to expand, but also allows them to increase production capacity with more material and product storage, and increased manufacturing efficiency. This not only facilitates decreased wait times for their made-to-order items, but affords them more opportunity to boost quantities in stock items for immediate delivery. If you happen to find yourself driving down that short stretch of Pecue Lane that snakes in front of CFX and feel all of the hairs on the back of your neck stand up, you will know that the team is inside, hard at work making monsters. And if you hear something scratching on top of your vehicle, don’t be frightened—it’s only a tree branch. Zombies use them to reach the roof of your car.

JEFFERSON BATTERY COMPANY MOVIE PRODUCTION BATTERY SUPPLIES

Batteries for a Portable World 700 Jefferson Highway Jefferson, LA 70121 Wholesale - Retail - Commercial - Private We will meet your needs! Medical - Marine - Military University & Corporate Automotive & Heavy Machinery Computers & Back-Up Systems Digital Cameras & Camcorders Smartphones, Mobile Devices, & PDA’s

BRANDS: AC Delco, Exide, Universal Power Group, YUASA, Motorcross, Gates Hawker, Poloroid, Sanyo, Duracell Procell, Cyclone, Panasonic, Saft, Tadiran, Schumacher Chargers, Cadnica, Hawker, Powersonic, Enersys, Eagle Picher, Ultra Life, Midtronics, Autometer, DEKA, Associated Equipment, and many more!

Tel: (504) 835 -1685 / Fax: (504) 835 - 5773 / E-mail: mail@thebattman.com 52

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L&R SECURITY SERVICES, INC. 3930 OLD GENTILLY ROAD NEW ORLEANS, LA 70126

PHONE: (504) 943-3191 F AX: (504) 944-1142 TOLL FREE: (800) 324-4672

CERTIFICATIONS SDVOSB HUB ZONE GSA CONTRACT GSA-07F-5683R

Preview Screenings Set Security Ushers Roving Supervisors ATM Escort Body Guards Uniformed Guards Site Managers Ticket Takers Armed & Unarmed Event Logistics Consulting Services

CLIENTS & PARTNERS NOBLE INC SECURITY HUNGRY RABBIT JUMPS LLC GERARD SELLERS FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION VETERANS AFFAIRS SCORE TRANSPORTATION SAFETY ADMINISTRATION

L&R IS LICENSED IN THE FOLLOWING STATES LOUISIANA COLORADO MISSISSIPPI ARIZONA ALABAMA MISSOURI TEXAS NEW MEXICO ARKANSAS TENNESSEE FLORIDA VIRGINIA MARYLAND WASHINGTON, D.C. WE CAN OBTAIN LICENSING IN ALL 50 STATES. TO LEARN MORE CALL (504) 943-3191.

WWW.LRSECURITY.COM L&R SECURITY SERVICES, INC.

3930 Old Gentilly Rd | New Orleans, LA 70126 phone: (504) 943-3191 | fax: (504) 942-1142 | email: info@lrsecurity.com

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BRIEFS MARK YOUR CALENDARS: 22ND ANNUAL NEW ORLEANS FILM FESTIVAL The New Orleans Film Society is excited to announce its 22nd Annual New Orleans Film Festival (NOFF), to be held Friday, October 14, through Thursday, October 20. Louisiana’s only industry-recognized international film festival, NOFF presents a comprehensive, world-class program of film screenings and associated events: panels, workshops, receptions, awards presentations, opening and closing night events, and numerous opportunities for learning, networking and celebrating the finest in cinema, with a special focus on Louisiana-produced films. NOFF will take place at various venues around the city, including but not limited to: the Prytania Theatre, the Theatres at Canal Place, and the Contemporary Arts Center. Additional venues to be announced. Tickets and passes will go on sale in late September or early October. Members of the New Orleans Film Society will be able to purchase advance tickets and will receive discounts on all events. Visit www.neworleansfilmsociety.org.

LOUISIANA FILM INDUSTRY ROLLS OUT THE RED CARPET FOR BIODIESEL Second Line Stages (SLS), in partnership with Golden Leaf Energy, recently announced that biodiesel fuel will now be offered to the region’s booming film industry. Standardized B5, as regulated by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), is interchangeable with traditional diesel and will create no adverse performance effects, nor require engine alterations. It is price-competitive with traditional diesel fuel. The biodiesel is manufactured locally, from spent cooking oil, in accordance with the highest standards (ASTM D975-11) of commercial fuel, the same standards that govern traditional diesel. The fuel will be available at Second Line Stages, located at 800 Richard Street in New Orleans. Delivery of biodiesel is also available for productions shooting on location. “As our film industry continues to grow, we applaud Second Line Stages’ continued efforts to provide cost-effective and eco-friendly options to productions,” said Mayor Mitch Landrieu. “Film New Orleans, part of the Mayor’s Office of Cultural Economy, encourages all productions to support sustainability in their production techniques and be mindful of their impact on the environment.” Hollywood Trucks, Louisiana’s largest, full-service film fleet, was the first fleet to commit to using the B5 blend in their diesel vehicles. “Hollywood Trucks is excited to partner with Second Line Stages to offer biodiesel as an alternative fuel to its clients in specific units of its fleet,” said Andre Champagne, president of Hollywood Trucks, LLC. “We believe that the future lies in renewable and sustainable resources, which reduce emissions and promote a cleaner environment.” “Golden Leaf Energy is excited to be working with Second Line Stages. We commend Second Line Stages and their customers, Hollywood Trucks, Limo Livery and others, for their commitment to alternative fuels and a cleaner environment,” said Troy Clark, managing partner at Golden Leaf Energy. “We are confident that this partnership will demonstrate the benefits and rewards of using locally produced alter-

native fuel to all fleets in the region.” Productions interested in purchasing biodiesel may contact Second Line Stages’ Diane Wheeler at 504-224-2249 or dwheeler@secondlinestages.com.

ACTORS EXPO COMES TO NEW ORLEANS The New Orleans Actors Resource Center (NOARC) has partnered with the biggest music and entertainment event in the Gulf South, Cutting Edge, in what is to be the largest, all-encompassing day of education and development for artists, performers and producers of film and music in the region. Louisiana Actors Expo, in conjunction with and sponsored by Cutting Edge (which runs September 21-24), will take place on Saturday, September 24, from 9am to 5pm at the Pan American Life Business Conference Center in downtown New Orleans. The Louisiana Actors Expo brings together casting directors, talent agents, directors, writers and other decisionmakers in the Louisiana film industry to help actors learn how to develop and move forward their acting careers. Actors from all over are invited to participate in what has been called the biggest event in Hollywood South. “I am thrilled at the opportunities that this partnership has created for the Louisiana film industry,” said Shanda Quintal, executive director of NOARC. “By combining our efforts and resources, NOARC and Cutting Edge will provide the entire entertainment community in the Gulf South access to invaluable resources, information, employment and networking opportunities.” Due to high demand from actors and the overwhelming success of the panel discussions, agent meetings and casting sessions at the 2010 expo, these programs will return at this year’s expo, with the addition of more interactive components. The Pan American Life Business Conference Center is a state-of-the-art facility that will enable all of the public programs to be more interactive, allowing for close-circuiting of all of the discussions and workshops.

HORROR FILM FESTIVAL ANNOUNCES 2011 SCHEDULE Fear Fête Horror Film Festival, Louisiana’s premier independent horror film festival to be held October 28 - 30, recently released the 2011 festival schedule. “The 2011 Fear Fête Horror Film Festival is going to knock your socks off!” said Fear Fête executive director, Derek Morris. “Our judges have selected the best new independent horror films in the industry, period!” Films entered into the festival were judged by a panel of bodies, from industry luminaries to enthusiastic horror fanatics. Fear Fête’s 2011 schedule includes 6 film blocks made up of 22 local, national, and international horror films. The 2011 Fear Fête Horror Film Festival will be held at Rave Motion Pictures 16 in Baton Rouge. The festival will kick off Thursday, October 27, with the “Dead Carpet” VIP Party at the Al Azar Grotto featuring free cocktails, Cajun cuisine, filmmakers and actors awards ceremony, and live music. Proceeds from the Fear Fête Horror Film Festival will go to the Al Azar Grotto of Baton Rouge to help support children with Cerebral Palsy. To view the 2011 festival schedule or to purchase your VIP All-Access Pass, visit www.fearfete.com.

SIGNS OF ALL KINDS

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• Neon For Rent • In House Neon Plant • Studio Friendly • www.neometix.com

Neometix neon & sign studio 54

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504.940.0888 • 504.940.0891 fax neometix@bellsouth.net 1928 Burgundy Street • New Orleans, LA 70116


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VFX

A job? More like an addiction.

OK, we admit it. Sometimes the remarkable visual effects and animations our artists create gets them so stoked that they can’t eat, sleep, or think about anything else. After all, when your job is putting creativity into motion, catching a major buzz is only natural. And with amenities like Avid, Smoke and Flame Suites, DI and color grading, the FX RED Lab, and a full-service audio post production facility (to name just a few), our clients have discovered that creating work that brings big-time buzz has never been easier. Learn why so many of the industry’s leading filmmakers and production companies are hooked on Digital FX for their postproduction needs.

To discover more, visit us at www.digitalfx.tv/vfx

Digital FX 6010 Perkins Rd (Suite B) Baton Rouge, LA 70808

www.digitalfx.tv twitter.com/digitalfx linkedin.com/in/digitalfx

Toll Free 888.898.6010 Phone 225.763.6010 Fax 225.763.6059


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Louisiana Film & Video - 2011 Issue 2  

News and information for the Louisiana entertainment industry.

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