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Heavenly Ha‘ena on Kaua‘i’s north shore. Photo by Kicka Witte Photography

G E T

T H E

D E TA I L S

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H A W A I I F I L M O F F I C E . C O M

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CONTENTS

H AWAII film & video M A G A Z I N E

www.hawaiifilmandvideo.com www.hawaiifilm.com PUBLISHER

James Baker EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Tim Ryan tryan@media-inc.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Katie Sauro ksauro@media-inc.com SALES MANAGER

Katie Higgins

SALES EXECUTIVES

Steve Joseph, Paul Yarnold

PRODUCTION MANAGER

John Rusnak DESIGNER

Dawn Carlson, Beth Harrison, Sonjia Kells WEBMASTER

Jon Hines

OFFICE MANAGER/ACCOUNTING

Audra Higgins

INFORMATION SERVICES MANAGER

Lois Sanborn

Director Gareth Edwards on the set of Warner Bros. Pictures and Legendary Pictures epic action adventure Godzilla. PHOTO BY KIMBERLEY FRENCH

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Editor’s Letter

Waikiki Beach Stars in Epic Godzilla Reboot

10 Talking Bugs and Beasts with Hawaii Animal Wranglers

14 Indie Beat: Ride the Thunder Transitions from Book to Film SPECIAL FOCUS ON MAUI 18 Aloha to Maui’s Aloha Film Studios

22 Coming Attractions: Maui Film Festival

24 Capitalist, Protector, Hedonist, Pioneer, Showman Supermensch:The Legend of Shep Gordon to Screen at Maui Film Festival

30 Valley Isle Production

Talking Story with Paul Ehman and Glenn Beadles

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34 Maui’s Got Talent!

36 Maui Provides Opportunities for Extraordinary Production Content 38 Local Filmmaker Brings Home Pele Award

40 Meet Maui Film Industries’ Casey LeDoux 42 Hawaii’s One-Stop Rental Shop 44 Cinematography Reaches New Heights INDUSTRY LISTS 46 Production & Post Equipment Rental 52 Support Equipment Rental

On the Cover: Director Gareth Edwards (center) on the set of Warner Bros. Pictures and Legendary Pictures epic action adventure Godzilla. PHOTO BY PHIL BRAY

HAWAII FILM & VIDEO MAGAZINE ISSUE TWO 2014

Media Index Publishing Group (800) 332-1736 media@media-inc.com

Display Advertising: Call Media Index Publishing Group for a current rate card. Discounts for frequency advertising. All submitted materials become the property of Media Index Publishing Group and will not be returned. Subscriptions, call (800) 332-1736 for information and rates. Copyright © 2014 Media Index Publishing Group.All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be used for solicitation or copied by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying or recording by any information storage or retrieval system, without the express written permission of the publisher. PRINTED IN THE USA.


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Editor’s Letter I

t’s not surprising what incentives can do to attract productions and grow businesses in a state. Hawaii has had a consistent string of blockbuster films—in terms of large budgets, at least—since enacting a 15-percent to 20-percent tax credit in 2006. That forward-thinking lured the following major productions to Hawaii: Tropic Thunder, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides, Battleship, The Descendants, and Godzilla. Not to mention CBS’s Hawaii Five-0, which begins filming its fifth season this July. In July 2013, Hawaii expanded its production tax credit—now known as Act 88/89—to 20 percent on Oahu and 25 percent on the neighbor islands (Hawaii Island, Kauai, Lanai, Maui, and Molokai) for motion picture, digital media, and other production. “The timing of the increase was very opportune,” Honolulu film commissioner Walea Constantinau told Variety. “It allowed shows that were either on the fence or needed a little bit more to come to the islands.” The new incentives also lured to Oahu feature films such as Tim Burton’s Big Eyes, writer/director Cameron Crowe’s romantic comedy Deep Tiki, and the Jurassic Park sequel Jurassic World. Deep Tiki filmed nearly three months on Oahu, while Jurassic World shot for six weeks split between Oahu and Kauai. Godzilla had decided to come to Hawaii months before the increased incentives were approved by the state legislature. The film had been scripted for Hawaii, but producers were still considering other less expensive locations, including Puerto Rico, which offers a 40-percent tax credit. The overall budgets for the biggest films shooting in Hawaii this year were $150 million

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for Jurassic World, $160 million for Godzilla, and an estimated $80 million for Deep Tiki, although an exact number was not reported. For season five, Hawaii Five-0 will film at least 22 episodes beginning this summer. According to various sources, each Five-0 episode costs between $2.5 million and $2.7 million, or $55 million to $59.4 million total. The increased tax incentives have also helped lure productions to the neighbor islands. This fall, Hawaii Island will once again play host to Wheel of Fortune when the show celebrates its 32nd season. Host Pat Sajak, co-host Vanna White, and the entire Los Angeles-based crew will set up shop at the Hilton Waikoloa Village in September to tape four weeks of shows.

It’s the fifth time Wheel of Fortune has taped in Hawaii since 1996. The production will ship 37 trailers and containers with 1.8 million pounds of equipment. More than 225 staff and crew will be on hand to produce the episodes. In 2008, the last time Wheel shot on Hawaii Island, the production reportedly spent about

HAWAII FILM & VIDEO ISSUE TWO 2014 • hawaiifilmandvideo.com

$10 million. “We’ve taped Wheel of Fortune on location 65 times,” said the show’s executive producer Harry Friedman. “But no destination creates a greater sense of excitement than Hawaii. The scenery, the hospitality and the warmth of the aloha spirit simply can’t be found anywhere else.” Meanwhile, on Maui, the tax incentive increase drew the Point Break remake, which filmed at the Jaws surf break this past winter. The sequence—edited down to three minutes—will close the film. Sources said Point Break producers are strongly considering returning to Hawaii this winter for additional footage. The film is scheduled for release in July 2015. And no doubt the $105-million fantasy film Ethyrea: Code of the Brethren is set to film only on the neighbor islands of Maui, Molokai and Kauai, likely due to the higher incentive rate. Filming is scheduled to start in late December or early January. And part of the reason that Maui’s Socrates Buenger continues construction on Aloha Film Studios—the largest soundstage in Hawaii—is not only the Valley Isle’s underused scenic locations, but also the incentives. In fact, MBS Equipment Co. is so confident of future neighbor island production that it will supply the studio with grip and lighting gear. Read more on page 18. Hana hou! Tim Ryan Executive Editor


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Waikiki Beach Stars in Epic Godzilla Reboot

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his spring the world’s most revered monster was reborn, as Warner Bros. Pictures and Legendary Pictures unleashed the epic action-adventure film Godzilla. From director Gareth Edwards, this new Godzilla tells a powerful story of human courage and reconciliation in the face of titanic forces of nature, when the beast rises to restore balance as humanity stands defenseless. Godzilla stars Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Oscar nominee Ken Watanabe, Elizabeth Olsen, Oscar winner Juliette Binoche, and Sally Hawkins, with Oscar nominee David Strathairn and Bryan Cranston. Waikiki, and especially the Hilton Hawaiian Village, played a major part in Godzilla. The film features scenes depicting the destruction of the celebrated Rainbow Tower, located at the hotel. Since its opening in 1968, the Rainbow Tower has become a favorite for guests because of its proximity to the Duke Kahanamoku Lagoon and Waikiki’s widest stretch of beach. The Rainbow

Director Gareth Edwards and Bryan Cranston on the set of Warner Bros. Pictures’ and Legendary Pictures’ action adventure Godzilla. KIMBERLEY FRENCH © 2014 WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC & LEGENDARY PICTURES PRODUCTIONS LLC

Tower, boasting the newly restored Rainbow Mural, is digitally demolished in the scene. “Hilton has long set the stage for memorable moments in entertainment, and we are

Aaron Taylor-Johnson and director Gareth Edwards on the set of Godzilla. KIMBERLEY FRENCH © 2014 WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC & LEGENDARY PICTURES PRODUCTIONS LLC

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HAWAII FILM & VIDEO ISSUE TWO 2014 • hawaiifilmandvideo.com

thrilled to be a part of this movie and pay homage to the original Godzilla film, with a modern twist,” said Rob Palleschi, global head, Hilton Hotels & Resorts. “We are excited that Hilton Hawaiian Village Waikiki Beach Resort will be featured in this rousing reimagining, and the destruction of the Rainbow Tower for the film is a testament to the power of this Hilton icon as an important character in Honolulu’s history.” The set built for this scene was the largest set to have ever been built on Waikiki Beach. More than 200 crewmembers worked on the film and 250 extras were cast in various roles for the shoot. The Hawaii crew included production supervisor Renee Confair Sensano, VFX data wrangler Steve Kai Bovaird, set costumer Charlie Kaeo, SPFX pyro coordinator Archie Ahuna, propmaster/armourer Harry Lu, location manager Randy Spangler, construction foreman Guy Belegaud, extras casting Katie Doyle, caterer Moumen El Hajji, set medic Mark Yeager, animal trainer Sue Chipperton, and marine coordinator Victor Lozano. Godzilla opened nationwide on May 16 and was presented in 3D, 2D and IMAX® in select theaters. HFV


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Talking Bugs and Beasts with Hawaii Animal Wranglers BY TIM RYAN Executive Editor

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hen feature film or television productions want exciting, beautiful, ugly, terrifying or rare insects, animals and plants, they go to Steven Lee Montgomery, Ph.D., and Anita Manning at their Waipahu home. For nearly 30 years the couple has supplied wasps, scorpions, spiders, centipedes, cockroaches, and even maggots to TV shows and movies such as The River, Off the Map, LOST, Tropic Thunder, Raven, and Tour of Duty, as well as networks like BBC, Nova, Animal Planet, and National Geographic.

A videographer for Animal Planet’s Wild Hawaii<recreates the forest floor in a lab to record insects interacting. photo caption here

But in case you happen to be the couple’s neighbors, don’t be concerned: They never actually store the creepy critters in their home or on their property, except for carpenter bees, which seek out the soft wood there. By the way, the harmless carpenter bees usually double for the more aggressive bumblebees. “We started bug wrangling for Tour of Duty in 1987,” said Manning of the Oahufilmed TV series. “We collect the bugs as needed by the productions.” 10

The secret to managing creepy crawlers, the couple agreed, comes down to understanding their normal behaviors, then tailoring those behaviors for a specific shot, and using their knowledge to fulfill the filmmakers’ needs. “If the filmmaker says they specifically want something to happen, the trick is to provide a creature we understand that can be manipulated to fill their needs,” said Manning. Perhaps the best example of that was on the Ben Stiller film Tropic Thunder. “Stiller and the director needed some big,

HAWAII FILM & VIDEO ISSUE TWO 2014 • hawaiifilmandvideo.com

impressive insect that would look a little fierce,” said Montgomery. “I came up with a five-inch-long praying mantis. It’s a bold insect that I knew would work well.” The director wanted the insect on a log next to where Stiller would be sitting. The premise was that Stiller’s character had been out in the jungle for weeks and he’s sort of going crazy, so he starts talking to this insect, which stares him in the face. As soon as Stiller sat down, the mantis jumped at his face. The shocked Stiller pulled back and swatted the insect, which then landed on his shoulder. Everyone on set was thrilled with what had happened. “It was so fantastic—perfect,” said Montgomery. The production did several more takes, but none of them equaled the first shot. Montgomery has played with mantises since he was a boy, so he understands the insects’ characteristics. “But you still never know exactly how a bug will react,” he said. “It’s part luck and setting it up, then allowing it to happen.” The coordination is much more than simply bringing the insect, rodent or mammal to the set. “You have to convince the filmmaker when Entomologist Steven Lee Montgomery used an Orb Weaver spider for the ABC series LOST.


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Animal wrangler providing horses, cattle, goats, pigs, chickens and other livestock. Contacts on all islands. Have access to ranch locations, farms, cowboys. Also have semi-truck trailer, hauling containers, movie trailer, water tanker and water trucks, dump trucks, loader, backhoe, wagon, tack and more

Client List • Predator • Battleship • Hawaii Five-0 • George of the Jungle • Krippendorf’s Tribe • One West Waikiki • American Savings Bank • Paniolo • Wind on Water • Tears of the Sun • North Shore • Indiana Jones • Godzilla • River

808.881.1645 Email: mwmtrucking@gmail.com

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Actor Ben Stiller stares down a praying mantis supplied by Steven Lee Montgomery and Anita Manning’s Oahu-based company.

you know things about an animal, what it will do or not do,” said Manning. On a Big Island commercial last year for a Chinese milk company, the director insisted that he wanted the cow to look into the sun for an early morning shot. “But a cow will not look into the morning sun,” said Manning. “The trick is to get on the other side of the cow to distract it. It’s that kind of advice that makes things work well. It’s not just bringing the critter to the set.” For an episode of ABC’s LOST, a scene required centipedes to crawl out of a skull’s eye socket. Montgomery went to his favorite centipede hunting spot, Tantalus, a wet area in the Koolau Range above Honolulu, where he snagged a few. On set it was tough to figure out how to control the horrid-looking insect, but he improvised. “I used tubes and corks to guide it,” he said. “We were able to do it 10 times with the 10 centipedes we had. It worked great.” The only down side was that all 10 specimens eventually escaped into the surrounding jungle. If a venomous insect is going to be in contact with a human, Montgomery said he uses “a secret biologist trick”—he removes the stingers. That’s what he did on the Tour of Duty TV series. “The production brought in a centipede from Thailand and wanted the stinger removed, so they called me to do it,” said Montgomery. The problem was the state of Hawaii had confiscated it since it’s not indigenous here.

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“So I headed back to the jungle to find local centipedes,” explained Montgomery, who removed stingers from a dozen Hawaiian centipedes for filming. Manning emphasized that since there are no trained animal talent in Hawaii, it’s important for productions to contact them as soon as possible to detail what animals they need and the scene to be shot. Having a biologist on set as an advisor is also important, said Manning, who has a degree in anthropology and for years worked at the prestigious Bishop Museum in Honolulu. Montgomery received his doctorate in entomology from the University of Hawaii. “We can help prevent errors, like having a strictly North American or African plant in a

Manning are never creeped out by the multi-legged demons from hell. “The trick is to be respectful and careful around them,” said Manning. “Steve understands their behaviors. You don’t get yourself into a stupid situation. Being afraid usually comes from not knowing what it’s going to do.” But Montgomery admitted that centipedes have stung him three times, “and yes, it’s a real bite and a painful one,” he said. The couple makes sure that on productions when an insect will be in direct skin contact with an actor, they know the creature’s characteristics. “For a scene on LOST, we selected the Orb Weaver spider that only bites its prey after wrapping it in a web,” said Montgomery. “But they are large and creepy, black and yellow

A Chinese milk company filmed in Waimea on the Big Island where Montgomery and Manning assisted with the animals.

scene,” she said. To spice up an insect scene, the couple may suggest using something unique in Hawaii called an ambushing inchworm that eats no plant matter but just lies in wait to literally ambush insects that happen by. “Of the 25 or so projects I’ve worked on, probably half of what I use have been what I call the carnivorous caterpillar,” said Montgomery. Manning added her two cents: “It’s the original snuff film; it catches live prey and eats it while it’s still alive and struggling.” And if your blood curdles when you just think of even being in the same room with a centipede, take heart that Montgomery and

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with a one-inch body, but with its long legs appears to be three times that size.” The scene called for the spider to walk up an actress’ leg. “They do clutch the skin, but they never bite in that position,” Montgomery told the production. Nevertheless, the actress “freaked out” and refused to do the scene. Added Montgomery, “They ended up giving her stand-in an extra $50 to do it, so they did get the shot.” HFV ContactStevenLeeMontgomery,Ph.D.,andAnitaManning at 808-676-4974 or manninga001@hawaii.rr.com.


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BUGS & BEASTS PLANTS & PLACES Beautiful, ugly, terrifying, or disgusting Critter wrangling & location help on all islands since 1980

Steven Lee Montgomery, Ph.D. Anita Manning Contact us about your needs 808-676-4974 manninga001@hawaii.rr.com 94-610 Palai St, Waipahu, HI 96797

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Indie Beat: Ride the Thunder Transitions from Book to Film BY TIM RYAN Executive Editor

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t’s not about money, fame or headlines for author-turned-film producer Rich Botkin.

“No, it’s about passion for the truth, to tell the real story about the Vietnam War,” he said on the set of his Ride the Thunder documentary at the Kualoa fishponds. “The goal, the purpose of this film is simply tell the truth about what happened there and why (the United States) was there.” It took Botkin, a U.S. Marine for 15 years and Punahou Schools graduate, 4 visits to Vietnam to conduct interviews and 5 years to write his book. Ride the Thunder was published in 2009. Then, with the encouragement of friends and fellow Marines, he decided that “it made sense” to make the documentary. But Botkin, who admits, “I’m not a filmmaker,” had few contacts in Hawaii’s filmmaking community. “I don’t have a clue in knowing how to make a film,” he confessed. “I just reached out to the filmmakers with the message of what I wanted to do.” After Botkin’s partner, director Fred Koster, contacted production entrepreneur Branscombe Richmond at his Maui home, as well as Honolulu’s Connie Flores, Hawaii crew started applying. Richmond is the film’s associate producer, but on this day he was also assisting first-time director Koster, who is also the screenwriter and executive producer. Flores serves as a producer and the unit production manager. Depending on the day, crew numbers fluctuate between 60 and 80, including 11 from Maui, all working below union scale since the film is an independent project. The on-set atmosphere is refreshingly cheerful. Crewmembers have time to say hello to friends and visitors between shots. Ride the Thunder tells “the entire history about Vietnam overlaid on the personal stories of five Marines”—three U.S. Marine officers and two South Vietnamese officers, said Botkin. The film’s budget is about $300,000, most of which is Botkin’s money with some donations from friends, former Marines and U.S. Army personnel. The film is being shot

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Ride the Thunder filming a prisoner of war scene at Kualoa Ranch, Oahu.

Ride the Thunder i>Ride the Thunder</i> producer/screenwriter Rich Botkin with actor Joseph Hieu, who plays the South Vietnamese major Le Ba Ninh.

Producer Alan Fiord.

Branscombe Richmond, associate producer.

HAWAII FILM & VIDEO ISSUE TWO 2014 • hawaiifilmandvideo.com

on Oahu, Maui, and in Hollywood. The two main characters in the film are an American officer, Colonel John Ripley, played by Eric St. John of California, and Major Le Ba Binh, played by Joseph Hieu. Ripley was an American hero awarded the Navy Cross after he blew up a strategic North Vietnamese bridge that stopped the communists’ offensive on Easter Sunday in 1972. The bridge’s superstructure, built by American Seabees, was supported by six enormous I-beams three feet tall. To destroy it, Ripley had to hand-walk and crawl with 500 pounds of dynamite and plastic explosives 100 feet into the bridge’s underbelly. All the while he was under continual enemy fire. After several hours, everything was put in place, the charges were detonated and the bridge came down. Perhaps the most prominent character in the film is Binh, a South Vietnamese Marine officer who served his country for 13 years until 1975. He was wounded nine times and awarded the American Silver Star. Binh’s battalion was called “Wolves of the Sea.” His men held their ground defending the bridge because it was the only crossing in the area sturdy enough to support the more than 200 tanks the enemy had assembled on the north side of the river. “When the war ended, Binh remained in Vietnam and put in a re-education camp for nine years,” said Botkin. “These camps had nothing to do with regaining lost knowledge. (The camps) were nothing more than organized revenge on a massive scale.” After his release, Binh and his family moved to the United States, where he became a successful businessman. “He achieved the American dream; he’s a metaphor for all Vietnamese in the U.S.,” said Botkin. “Ripley is a metaphor for the American effort: honorable, brave, courageous.” The film deviates a bit from the book for narrative purposes. “We’re taking Binh into the re-education camp, then use flashbacks to get us to the interviews we did with significant people who can tell the story through their experience,” said Botkin. These include American POWs, Marine officers and enlisted men, and key Army officers. There are 8 principal characters and about 44 extras that portray prison-


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JIMMY JIB TRIANGLE. 40’, 30’, 24’, 18’, 12’, 6’, 3’

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Actor Eric St. John stars as Capt. John Ripley.

ers of war. “Every member of this crew is so awesome,” said Botkin. “They get it and bust their butts for us.” The major challenge for Botkin has been “keeping all the balls in the air at one time and

staying organized.” Filming a “POW cell” at Kualoa Ranch, Oahu. He continued, “On this film I’m basically the logistics officer, like what I was trained to do as a Marine. I coordinate the vans, food, travel. I feel like I’m leading the Marines and everyone is rising to the cause.” Ride the Thunder is following an unusual business plan for its release. “We’re going to release the film in just one theater in Southern California,” said Botkin. “Hopefully, we’ll do well and create a buzz. This film certainly will appeal to veterans. Then hopefully get into general release.” HFV

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Maui

Aloha to Maui’s Aloha Film Studios BY TIM RYAN Executive Editor

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t’s been a long and winding road for Maui Film Studios. Co-owner Socrates Buenger has had highly publicized disagreements with a Hollywood movie mogul about the competition his facility might cause, followed by “discussions” with the Maui County mayor’s office, and then a major financial partner dropped out due to health problems and “other issues.”

But anyone who knows Buenger—even informally—learns quickly that the former production assistant on E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial is no quitter. The loss of a major partner for most people might have been a deathblow, and a sign that the dream of operating the largest soundstage in Hawaii in order to propel Maui County into a prominent production location was just that—a pipe dream. Instead, Buenger just re-imagined the dream. In May, he dissolved Maui Film Studios and renamed the same Kahului facility Aloha Film Studios. “I never thought of giving up; never,” said Buenger. “It has a new name, but it is the same 23,183 square feet of floor space, making it the largest soundstage in Hawaii.” Buenger is not only upbeat, but hyper-optimistic about Maui’s prospects in attracting film and television projects, and “maybe even a TV series, the gift that keeps on giving.” “We still have a lot of opportunities ahead

Gov. Neil Abercrombie tours Maui Film Studios with Socrates Buenger (l) in 2013.

of us and I couldn’t just let the whole idea die,” he said. “So while we were dissolving (MFS)… we are forging new partnerships with equipment suppliers and vendors. This is still a very exciting time for us and we feel invigorated.” “We” being other partners he declined to identify. Now Buenger can start “the actual build out of the studio and its facilities, and not be forced to wrestle with behind-the-scenes stuff and business machinations,” he said. Aloha Film Studios (AFS) is partnering with MBS Media Campus of Manhattan Beach, California. Its subsidiary, MBS Equipment Co., is the largest studio-based provider of grip and lighting equipment in the United States. Formerly known as TM Equipment Rentals, MBS Equipment Co., now celebrating its eighth year on Oahu at its WaikeleWaipahu location, supplies grip, lighting and electrical equipment, pre-loaded grip trucks, lighting trucks, and grip and lighting expend-

MANAGEMENT CHANGE AT ALOHA FILM STUDIOS? California-based MBS Equipment Co., formerly TM Equipment Rentals, has extended its agreement with Aloha Film Studios, formerly Maui Film Studios, to remain the facility’s exclusive equipment rental company. MBS Equipment Co. is owned by the private investment company The Carlyle Group. One of the world’s largest private investment firms, The Carlyle Group owns more than 200 companies and boasts more than $185 billion under management. Activities include management-led buyouts, minority equity investments, real estate, venture capital, and leveraged finance opportunities in the energy and power, consumer and retail, defense and aerospace, and technology and business services industries. Because the transition from Maui Film Studios to Aloha Film Studios has been kept so tightly under wraps, this has led some in the Oahu and 18

Maui production community to think some sort of a management change for the Kahului soundstage is in the works. “It is within the realm of possibility that The Carlyle Group may take an active management role in Aloha Film Studios, but discussions on that structure and other issues have not been decided,” said Socrates Buenger, co-owner of the studio. An MBS Media Campus spokesperson at the company’s flagship Manhattan Beach facility said, “There is an ownership structure within the (production equipment) agreement, but we don’t comment on these things publicly. “We operate MBS studios and the equipment company ourselves in terms of managing those assets.” The spokesperson would not comment on possible new management scenarios or if there

HAWAII FILM & VIDEO ISSUE TWO 2014 • hawaiifilmandvideo.com

even are any. A TM Equipment Rental Company executive in Burbank said he had “no idea” if The Carlyle Group planned on either managing Aloha Film Studios or taking over its lease. Maui sources said in mid-May that “an agreement with (Buenger) hasn’t been signed yet to make any deal happen.” “Any outside company would have to offer something to get something,” the source said. Another major company is said to be arriving on Maui in late May or early June to discuss a restructuring deal in which “Buenger is not part of,” the source said. Pacific Beverage, which owns the building housing Aloha Film Studios, did not immediately return calls to comment on the length of Buenger’s lease, including how much longer it exists.


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ables throughout Hawaii for feature films, television series, television commercials, music videos, and special events. The company has supplied equipment to television series such as LOST for six seasons, Off the Map, The River, and Last Resort, along with the feature films The Descendants, Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides, Just Go With It, Battleship, Forgetting Sarah Marshall, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, and Godzilla. The deal with MBS, according to Buenger, includes having some of its production equipment stocked at the Aloha Film Studios’ site. “We expect equipment to arrive no later than mid-June,” he said. “It will make the two of us the largest studio equipment partnership in Hawaii.” Meanwhile, Buenger’s more immediate project is having about 3,000 square feet of production office space on two floors built in a corner of the soundstage. A partition wall will be constructed to keep the offices separate from the filming area. The production office construction will take about three months, Buenger said. AFS will also have an 8,000-square-foot sec-

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tion for low-budget indie films, as well as grip and lighting packages at a lower price to support local productions. “Right now the soundstage is empty, but all the acoustics are in place,” said Buenger. “We could easily host a production now.” Productions that had committed to using the studio under the Maui Film Studios moniker have to be “re-engaged” since it’s legally a new business called Aloha Film Studios. “This is tricky because we’re starting over,” said Buenger. “I have to be careful so that it doesn’t look like I’m poaching from the old company. But we’re very excited about getting them. We have already been contacted by a lot of productions coming to Hawaii.” The oft-delayed pre-production start for the fantasy film Ethyrea: Code of the Brethren— set to film on Maui, Molokai and possibly Kauai—suffered a major setback in December when the project’s senior legal counsel was killed in an auto accident as he bicycled in Los Angeles County. Buenger last spoke with the film’s executive producer and writers in May when he was told filming is expected to begin this December and early January. Tracy Bennett, Maui film commissioner, said he’s “con-

fident” the film will be made on Maui, but doesn’t know when. The film is based on author Danica Fontaine’s young-adult book series. Maui sources, including the county’s former film commissioner Harry Donenfeld, had estimated that production spending on Maui alone will be about $60 million. The entire budget is about $105 million and may also include filming in Louisiana locations. Maui filming will include as many as five locations, including Aloha Film Studios, and one on Molokai, sources said. Author Fontaine reportedly owns a home on Molokai. Casting is expected to begin in Los Angeles in June, though one Maui source said some “major actors” have been signed. “The hope is that having these actors on board will lure other name ones to do the film,” said the source. Last August, Ethyrea Films concluded negotiations on a $9-million visual effects co-production deal with Reliance MediaWorks. Reliance Group has been a contributor to blockbusters like Cowboys and Aliens, War Horse and the critically acclaimed film Lincoln. HFV

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Maui Coming Attractions: SPECIAL FOCUS

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he Maui Film Festival (MFF), celebrating its 14th year, continuously reinvents itself but without sacrificing its mission statement or goals. “We showcase life-affirming stories,” said Barry Rivers, MFF’s director. “We wanted a festival that suggests how things might be, rather than how they necessarily were or are. I describe the program as living at the intersection of smart and heart.” This year’s festival, running June 4 – 8, has reinvented itself yet again by adding a new venue, the Seaside Cinema Music Cafe & Sunset Lounge presented by Hawaiian Airlines and hosted by the Grand Wailea. Five of this summer’s most buzz-worthy films will be shown there. These include: • Supermensch: The Legend of Shep Gordon, directed by Mike Myers. This documentary is about the legendary Maui entertainment and culinary industry maven whose friends and clients are a virtual who’s who of household names and revered talent. Read more about this film on page 24-28. • Begin Again, directed by John Carney and starring Keira Knightley, Mark Ruffalo and Adam Levine. The comedy is about what happens when lost souls meet and make beautiful music together. • Tracks, directed by John Curran and starring Mia Wasikowska and Adam Driver. A true story of Robyn Davidson, a young woman who leaves her life in the city to make a solo trek through almost 2,000 miles of sprawling Australian desert, accompanied by only her dog and four unpredictable camels. • The Grand Seduction, directed by Don McKellar and starring Brendan Gleeson and Taylor Kitsch. The small harbor of Tickle Cove is in dire need of a doctor so that the town can land a contract to secure a factory that will save the town from financial ruin. Village resident Murray French leads the search, and when he finds Dr. Paul Lewis, he employs—along with the whole town—tactics to seduce the doctor to stay permanently. 22

• Cuban Fury, directed by James Griffith and starring Nick Frost, Chris O’Dowd and Rashida Jones. Beneath Bruce Garrett’s shabby, overweight exterior, the passionate beating heart of a salsa king lays dormant. In addition to screenings, four out of five award presentations will take place at the new venue. The group of honorees is one of the most prestigious in years. “For an event that’s often been referred to as a ‘jewel box’ film festival, this year’s intelligent, talented and beautiful—both inside and out— list of luminaries seamlessly fit into the tapestry of ‘diamonds, rubies and pearls’ we have honored since our inception in 2000,” said Rivers. “To say the least, we’re thrilled beyond words.” The honorees include: • Shep Gordon will receive the festival’s Maverick Award for “the courage of his convictions and sparing no effort to do the right thing to help those whose life’s work inspires him. • Emma Roberts will receive the Shining Star Award given to the film artist “who dares to dream big dreams and delivers brilliantly charismatic and revelatory performances every time that opportunity knocks.” Roberts can currently be seen in Gia Coppola’s directorial debut Palo Alto alongside James Franco and Jack Kilmer. • Lupita Nyong’o is receiving the Rainmaker Award for having “the magical ability to impact

HAWAII FILM & VIDEO ISSUE TWO 2014 • hawaiifilmandvideo.com

the creative dynamics of every project they touch.” Nyong’o made her feature debut in Steve McQueen’s 12 Years A Slave. For her portrayal of Patsey, she received the Academy Award for “Best Supporting Actress” as well as multiple accolades including the Screen Actors Guild Award and the Critics’ Choice Award. • Evan Rachel Wood will receive the Nova Award for “the artist’s astonishingly original and seamless performances, and the way they consistently infuse each character that they embody with insight, humanity and wisdom.” Wood gained critical acclaim, a Golden Globe and Emmy nomination for “Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie” for her portrayal of Veda Pierce in the HBO miniseries Mildred Pierce. • Joe Manganiello is receiving the Triple Threat Award, as “a multi-talented film artist that brilliantly shines in three major roles—producer, director, actor—in the creation of the feature-length documentary La Bare. The film takes a candid look at life as a male exotic dancer both on and offstage at La Bare Dallas, one of the world’s most popular dance clubs. This presentation will be held at the Celestial Cinema. The famous outdoor Celestial Cinema at the Wailea Gold and Emerald golf course remains MFF’s iconic symbol. Fifteen films will be screened at Celestial, including the opening night film, Goddess, directed by Mark Lamprell and starring Laura Michelle Kelly, Ronan Keating, and Magda Szubanski. So what happens when you give a lonely Australian housewife a webcam? She becomes a goddess. Well, at least that’s what happens to Elspeth Dickens, a housewife who abandoned a budding theatrical career for a lackluster life with her bratty twin toddlers and cranky, absentee husband. Stuck in a remote farmhouse while her marine-biologist spouse James is off saving the whales, the imaginative Elspeth finds solace in a kitchen webcam. Goddess will be followed by Taking My Parents to Burning Man, also a Celestial Cinema


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screening. The documentary, directed by Joel Ashton McCarthy and Bryant H. Boesen, is about self-proclaimed party animal Bryant ‘Spry Bry’ Boesen, who actually took his parents to the world-renowned flaming festival in Black Rock City, Nevada. The parents, Chuck and Li Boesen, somehow agree to let their 22-year-old son Bry pull them out of their cushy, nearly retired senior lives and drag them into a fully inverted coming-of-age adventure of a lifetime. Other MMF film venues include the Castle Theater and McCoy Theater at the Maui Arts and Cultural Center in Kahului, where 23 films will be screened, and the Toes-in-the-Sand Cinema at Wailea Beach. Maui Film Festival isn’t only about film, but premier culinary events as well. For instance, the Opening Night Twilight Reception (June 4) at Hotel Wailea’s Capische outdoor venue features unique creations like beet, fennel, and berry shooters, ratatouille, seared kampachi, Capische mushroom truffle risotto, pasta pomodoro, Malama Farms pork tortellini’s, kula tomato ragu, piave cheese, and basil salad. And the popular Taste of Chocolate will be held June 6 at the Four Seasons Resort Maui at Wailea with the theme “Cocktail meets Dessert.” There will be eight stations where dessert-aholics can sample liquid nitrogen white chocolate ice cream, salted caramel float, dark chocolate fudge brownie, Graham Cracker ice cream, marshmallow fluff, mini chocolate soufflés with raspberry sauce, chocolate fountain for dark chocolate mousse cones, apricot fluid gel, lime vodka syrup, and molten milk chocolate shots. The finale of the festival’s culinary events is the Taste of Wailea on late Saturday afternoon. This signature event is where the area’s top chefs pull out all the stops with specialty items. HFV For more MFF information, visit www.mauifilmfestival.com.

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Maui

Capitalist, Protector, Hedonist, Pioneer, Showman SUPERMENSCH: THE LEGEND OF SHEP GORDON TO SCREEN AT MAUI FILM FESTIVAL

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hep Gordon, a talent manager with a vaudevillian’s sense of shamelessness and show, crafted what became the gaudy careers for ‘70s and ‘80s legends like Alice Cooper, Teddy Pendergrass, Luther Vandross, and Raquel Welch by testing the limits of decency and doing just about anything to get attention. “I didn’t have any training in managing talent, but no one did in those days,” said Gordon. “There certainly was no training for working with rock and roll bands.”

Surfing filmmaker Dana Brown, Maui Film Festival director Barry Rivers, actor Adrien Brody, and Shep Gordon. Front row: Savannah Jane with dad Jimmy Buffett.

He changed the suit-and-tie-wearing Pendergrass into an oiled-up balladeer, while Cooper became the zany ghoul in dripping greasepaint with a boa constrictor draped casually across his shoulders. Gordon, who now lives in an oceanfront house in Wailea, Maui, helped conceive the stage spectacles that made Cooper a huge draw with his savaging of female effigies or chopped-up baby dolls that on stage were “hanged” or “guillotined.” “Where did I get those crazy ideas, I real24

ly don’t know,” said Gordon. “I would wake up in the morning and do what I had to do by thinking about it.” He also packaged one of the band’s albums in paper panties, and put a huge photo of Cooper—nude but for a snake coiled around his privates—on the side of a flatbed truck, then paid the driver to “break down” in London’s West End during rush hour. Diabolical or just plain clever, he brought uncanny cunning to his stunts: During a 1969 Toronto concert, Gordon hurled a live chick-

HAWAII FILM & VIDEO ISSUE TWO 2014 • hawaiifilmandvideo.com

en onstage, hoping to generate headlines. Assuming a thing with wings could fly, Cooper flung it back. When the hapless bird sank into the churning crowd, it was promptly torn to shreds. Cooper’s reputation as a chickenkilling freak was made. It wasn’t long before Gordon was a major management player, traveling on the Concorde in silk suits. In the ‘80s, his management company, Alive Enterprises, was grossing more than $22 million a year. He slept with models, dated Sharon Stone, and married (then quickly divorced) a Playboy Playmate he’d met at Hef’s mansion. Gordon drove a white Bentley and a white Rolls, and owned several large homes. Gordon’s Brentwood spread had so many rooms, there were six he never even entered. Now Gordon is no longer backstage, but rather in front of the camera as the subject of Mike Myers’ comedic documentary, Supermensch: The Legend of Shep Gordon. Myers approached Gordon more than 10 years ago but the super manager kept refusing. “I don’t make my living through notoriety,” said Gordon. “There’s nothing about fame that I’ve ever seen that’s healthy. The ones who rose to the top got hurt the worst. I felt the stress of L.A.—the culture of what you are, not who you are. I had spent my life living other people’s lives, and I wanted to see what my life was.” Then, during a hospital stay, Myers called a heavily sedated Gordon to ask again. “So I said yes,” he said. The documentary, which took about 18 months to produce, focuses on Gordon, one of the most prominent behind-the-scenes figures in the entertainment industry. Those who know him best—his pals and colleagues—tell Gordon’s unlikely story. He partied with Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin, did LSD with Alice Cooper, started an independent film company, and even made chef Emeril Lagasse into celebrity chef Emeril Lagasse. “The chef may be part of the culture now, but I was outraged how the chefs were being treated,” said Gordon, who monetized the


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culinary arts into the multi-billion-dollar industry it is today. Wealth and fame in pop culture didn’t seem to be in the cards when Gordon was a boy. His CPA dad and a tough mother raised him in a Long Island suburb, and he always felt that she preferred his older brother. After college at SUNY Buffalo, Gordon went to New York’s New School for Social Research for a master’s in sociology. He supported himself with odd jobs, including shipping backless garments to funeral homes for corpses to wear. In 1968, he headed to Los Angeles, lasting a single day as a probation officer before meeting up with a college friend, Joe Greenberg, at the fabled rock and roll mecca, the Hollywood Landmark hotel, where later Janis Joplin would die of a drug overdose. Jimi Hendrix was hanging out there, along with the Chambers Brothers and Joplin. Gordon and Greenberg were told they looked like rock managers. Coincidentally, there was a fledgling band living in the Chambers Brothers’ basement—Alice Cooper— that needed a manager. Desperate for work but clueless about what such a job might entail, the Buffalo, New York,

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Shep Gordon relaxes at his Wailea, Maui home.

buddies decided to fake it. Alice Cooper, who today is Gordon’s only client, said his and Gordon’s “long, fruitful relationship was forged on lies.” In their first meeting, Gordon said he was a manager, and Cooper said he was a singer.

By 1973, Gordon was building his management company and working bi-coastally. In 1974, he purchased a home on Maui and traveled frequently between here and L.A. “I could see that what I had been doing for more than a decade just wasn’t a fulfilling life,”

Mike Myers on Supermensch Shep Gordon HAWAII FILM & VIDEO CATCHES UP WITH THE ACTOR/FILMMAKER Hawaii Film & Video Magazine: You’ve been trying to get Shep to agree to let you make a movie about him for 10 years. Why do you think he finally relented? Mike Myers: Shep is a very modest man. He’s not comfortable in the spotlight but he is very comfortable at the edge of the frame, being in service to others. I think I just wore him down. I wanted everyone to pay a lot of attention to the man behind the curtain. HF&VM: What prompted the idea for your film and how did it evolve? MM: His stories. Name an artist from the last 50 years and Shep has a first-person story about them. It’s Six Degrees of Shep Gordon. He helped shape Alice Cooper, which in turn begat so many other great bands from Kiss to the Sex Pistols. If it was folk, soul, shock, metal, glam, goth, etc., etc., etc., Shep was there, protecting, nurturing, guiding and in many cases creating out of whole cloth. He also found time to manage Groucho Marx in the last days of that comedic genius’ life (pro bono) and he even found time to invent the celebrity chef (also pro bono). He is one of the best showmen on earth, an ethical hedonist, a progressive capitalist, and one of the nicest human beings I have ever met. 26

HF&VM: What were your biggest challenges in shooting or editing the film? MM: The biggest challenge in making this film was taking the many disparate stories from Shep’s life and sculpting them into a single narrative. Once you let all the stories wash over you, you start to see the similarities. First, he hears about someone not getting their due. Second, he helps that someone, with no expectation of anything in return. Then through guile, instinct and wisdom, Shep turns that someone into a massive success. The Midas touch. However, the story of King Midas is a cautionary tale. Midas’ magic touch turns even his family into gold. Although Supermensch is steeped in show business, it’s really a film about family. HF&VM: What surprised you the most about Shep when you were making the film? MM: I was surprised at the wide variety of people that agreed to be in the film. From Michael Douglas to Emeril to Anne Murray to Sylvester Stallone to Willie Nelson to Rinchen Dharlo (His Holiness the Dalai Lama’s American emissary and president of the Tibet Fund). They all wanted to “testify” on Shep’s behalf. Shep is beloved. I never really understood fully the notion of what it is to be “beloved” until I made this film.

HAWAII FILM & VIDEO ISSUE TWO 2014 • hawaiifilmandvideo.com

HF&VM: What was the one question that you wished you had asked Shep in the film but didn’t or couldn’t? MM: Shep had a near death experience two weeks into shooting. His chance of surviving the sudden illness was estimated to be one in ten. And yet, despite the terrible odds, he lived. I wanted to ask him why he “came back.” Somehow I knew the answer would be unsatisfying on camera. I don’t know why, just an instinct. After we wrapped, I asked him, “Shep, given how dire your illness was, you must have really wanted to stay on the planet. Why did you want to stay?” Shep, being a JewBu (Jewish Buddhist), was perplexed by the question. He said in his thick Long Island accent, “I never really thought of it as an ‘I’ coming back. It felt more like a ‘we’ situation.” The showman became the shaman. HF&VM: Has making this film changed your relationship with Shep? If so, how? MM: I loved Shep before I began this film and now having spent time listening to Shep and all his friends saying the nicest things about him, I love him even more. He really is a Mensch. Ask anyone.


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he said. “I came to Maui (for the first time) and fell in love with the place.” In addition to his rock clients, Gordon also minted the concept of the celebrity chef, turning his culinary mentor, Roger Vergé, along with Wolfgang Puck, Emeril Lagasse, and others, into the A-list personalities they are now. He’s been inducted into the Hawaii Restaurant Association’s Hall of Fame for helping found the Hawaiian regional cuisine movement. So what are the lessons that Gordon learned in nearly a half-century of managing talent? “Well, where your career starts is not where it has to end,” he said. “The bottom line is be diverse, put yourself out there, and don’t take no for an answer if something interests you.” He points to Cooper, who used to be a track star in Arizona, and the infamous chicken stunt. The day after that incident, Cooper’s career skyrocketed thanks to a dead chicken, a lot of angry parents, and the shock factor, Gordon said. In another example, when trying to boost the career of the squeaky-clean Canadian folk singer Anne Murray, Gordon was having some trouble getting her name out. Cooper used to have a drinking club that included

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John Lennon, so Gordon invited the drinking club to one of Murray’s first shows. After the show, he pushed her into the rock ‘n’ roll stars, had a picture taken, sent it to the press, and Murray’s career took off faster than she could have ever imagined. The documentary also touches on Gordon’s spirituality with one interweaving theme showing how dedicated he was to his clients, many of which became family. He also said being called a “mensch” is one of the highest compliments one can receive. Mensch is a Yiddish term for a person of integrity and honor. A mensch puts others’ happiness before his own and is fiercely loyal to his friends and family. But after nearly fatal emergency surgery, Gordon reflected on his roller coaster life and decided to no longer put his own happiness on the back burner. “I felt like I was living in other people’s happiness,” he confessed. So he retired from the business, retaining only Alice Cooper as a client. Now at 68, he exudes such everyman mildness, even kindness, that it’s difficult to reconcile with the tough-as-nails dealmaker he used to be. But Gordon has some words of advice about being a talent manager:

SHEP GORDON’S CLIENT LIST Alice Cooper Anne Murray Ben Vereen Blondie Burton Cummings The Calloways Celestino Drago Emeril Lagasse Frankie Valli George Clinton Gipsy Kings Groucho Marx Jean Luc Ponty Kenny Loggins Luther Vandross Lydia Shire Maxi Priest

The Purple Sage Nobu Matsuhisa Peter Merriman Piero Salvaggio Pink Floyd (9 days) Pointer Sisters Raquel Welch Rick James Roy Yamaguchi Sam Choy Sarah Miles Stephanie Mills Teddy Pendergrass Wolfgang Puck Alan Wong Yvonne Elliman

“The three most important things a manager does is get the money, always remember to get the money, never forget to always remember to get the money.” Supermensch: The Legend of Shep Gordon will screen on Wednesday, June 4, at the Maui Film Festival. Visit www.mauifilmfestival.com for more information. HFV

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Maui

Valley Isle Production TALKING STORY WITH PAUL EHMAN AND GLENN BEADLES BY TIM RYAN Executive Editor

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here’s a reason why Maui’s Paul Ehman and Glenn Beadles have run successful production houses for 35 and 25 years, respectively. In separate interviews, the men agreed in essence that their achievements occurred for several reasons, including providing great customer service, qualifying their customers, keeping up with technology, building a great team, and going the extra mile.

PAUL EHMAN, EHMAN PRODUCTIONS Ehman Productions continues to be one of Hawaii’s leading production companies, producing award-winning sports programming, reality shows, print campaigns and commercials. The company also provides grip and lighting packages, production equipment, expendables, trucks, generators and crew. Ehman says much of his company’s success is due to customer service. He says a good customer service experience gets clients talking about his business with their friends and other business relationships. He also notes that qualifying prospects before turning them into customers is “important.” “I believe good customers are passionate about their business, whether it’s feature films, television, commercials or a still shoot,” he says. Good customers have passion, communicate well, and listen to suggestions, adds Ehman. While the modest Ehman says he’s been “very lucky,” he also emphasizes the hard work he and his crew of 10 do. Ehman isn’t stingy when it comes to crediting his core crew with making the company so successful. “It’s more important than ever to have talented creating people on your team,” he says. “Great video production teams consist of people who are excellent at creating greatlooking titles and graphics screens… Originality is the key to successful video production and talented people are innovative.” Another key to Ehman’s continued success has been keeping up with technological trends and investing the time and materials. 30

Paul Ehman

“We manage our time to include reading and maybe watching videos to keep up with new technologies,” he says. Ehman says that’s important because new software and techniques are released and discovered on a daily basis. “We don’t wait for calls to come in,” he says. “We go out to get jobs to produce and work on.” For CBS’s The Amazing Race, Ehman and company created the concepts for the Hawaii shows, including “writing the whole show,” and then produced them. “It takes a lot of specialization and time to do a show like Amazing Race,” he says. “But (we) have to come up with the jobs to keep us working.” For The Amazing Race, the company worked on six episodes from 2005 to 2013. Other television work has included The Dating Game, Destination Paradise, Disney Vacations, Ford Super Model, Hawaiian Tropic, and My Fair Brady (VH1). Feature films have included Crowfoot (Paramount Pictures), Gone to Maui (Hallmark), In God’s Hands (Sony Pictures), Off the Lip (Film Farm), and Hereafter (Warner Bros.).

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Ehman has also done music videos for Jack Johnson, Hootie & the Blowfish, Mary J. Blige, Big Mountain, LL Cool J, and Mötley Crüe, as well as dozens of commercials, sports-themed events, print and still shoots. Ehman Productions’ schedule hasn’t slowed down in 2013 or 2014. This year they did a two-day shoot for a Subway commercial that introduces two new sandwiches. The spots were filmed in a Kula, Maui, avocado orchard and vegetable field. There have also been marketing program productions that included a Tupperware convention in Waimea on Hawaii Island, a pilot also on Hawaii Island for the reality show The Ark, and one episode of Brew Dogs for Esquire Network. In Brew Dogs, Scotsmen James Watt and Martin Dickie bring an evangelist’s sensibility to their celebration of craft beer and part of their hope is to convert craft beer virgins. Each episode’s premise is simple: They visit a town with a thriving craft beer scene, Anthony Bourdain-style, and brew a crazy beer celebrating that scene. Ehman Productions is also in the planning stages for two more reality shows, which the company isn’t allowed to discuss. Ehman says every project is different and a challenge. “You can go along on cruise control, then someone doesn’t show up for work or a truck breaks down, the horse doesn’t do what you want it to, equipment gets lost or broken, or someone gets hurt,” he says. “You have to be diligent and prepared. You’re on the spot all the time, but you just deal with it and fix it.” One of the company’s most recent shoots was Mike Myers’ documentary on Maui’s bigger-than-life entertainment and restaurant entrepreneur Shep Gordon called Supermensch: The Legend of Shep Gordon. (Read more about this project on page 24-28.) “We worked a week on Maui filming interviews and going to situations where Shep was attending to interview him, his friends, and colleagues,” says Ehman. The film will debut at the Maui Film Festival in June.


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worked on this year was the remake of Point Break in 50-plus-foot surf at Maui’s Jaws surf break. Ehman served as marine coordinator. “We arranged for all the boats and gyros, putting everything together in our warehouse,” he says. “We spent two days building the picture boat.” The winter swell was forecast to be the largest in decades, so the call from Los Angeles that the shoot was a go came in just two days before the swell hit. The surf, Ehman says, was “epic.” “It was everything the production company wanted,” he adds. “We were supposed to leave Jaws around 3 p.m. to get back to the other side, but the surf was so perfect that we stayed until 4:30.” Ehman and company made sure they had the state’s best water safety team, including Brian Keaulana and Archie Kalepa, and the best captains and boat crew. “We had to since the conditions were so dangerous,” he explains. “The production was very cool with letting us do what we wanted to do.” Were there close calls? “No, but definitely hairy moments,” says Ehman. “Were we scared? Uh, yeah, the whole time!” GLENN BEADLES, ON LOCATION SERVICES With nearly a quarter-century of experience as a Maui-based production and locations manager, Glenn Beadles has worked on his share of challenging shoots. But when asked about his most difficult projects, he takes mere seconds to respond. “Uh, Peahi and, uh, Peahi,” says Beadles. For the non-surfing crowd, Peahi is a behemoth of a wave commonly referred to as Jaws. Surf here can exceed 50 feet, and that’s just what happened earlier this year— just in time for producers of Point Break to scurry from Hollywood to Maui to film “thrill-seeking” surfers riding the massive waves. Beadles was Point Break’s Hawaii locations manager. The project was fraught with danger and logistical problems. “We needed state permits to film offshore on Maui and on Oahu because originally we thought we could film this swell in both locations,” says Beadles. “There was a lot of paperwork and preparation even though we started pre-pro just after Thanksgiving.” The production ended up only filming Jaws because conditions on Oahu were rainy and stormy. Swells were so huge that there 32

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was also a chance that Maui’s Kahului Harbor would be too dangerous to get the needed boats and water craft in and out. “It’s very rare that the state would close the boat harbor, but they could have left it up to the discretion of the boat captains,” says Beadles. “If that had happened, we would have had to use Maalaea Harbor on Maui’s leeward coast, a much longer trip to Jaws.” In 2001, Beadles faced some of the same problems when he assisted the producers of the James Bond film Die Another Day for a similar sequence at Jaws. In what would be the film’s opening sequence, big wave riders Laird Hamilton, Derek Doerner and Dave Kalama were paid to deliberately wipe out on 35-plus-foot waves at Jaws. That film sequence cost about $750,000. Point Break’s Jaws scene cost around $1 million. “We had the same type of professional water team working with us on both shoots, but there are a lot of moving parts and elements in something like this,” says Beadles. “It was extremely complex and I’m thankful no one got hurt. In fact, I’m amazed no one didn’t.” Some 50 Hawaii water and land crew worked on Point Break, according to Beadles. “It was, uh, exciting,” he says. “Very exciting.” As a Hawaii production and locations manager, Beadles reiterates that the challenges of filming on Maui, Kauai and the Big Island, as opposed to the central island of Oahu, are numerous, but “the rewards are well worth it.” “All of Hawaii’s production managers and locations managers have to deal with a client’s often limited resources and budgets,” he says. “I think we still manage to produce some of the more dramatic shows, commercials and photo shoots that highlight the incredible scenery that neighbor island locations offer.” A frequent question that Beadles gets asked is, “Why does it cost more to shoot on the neighbor islands?” His answer is always the same: “Because of the production value you’ll have up on the screen from the dramatic locations you choose.” He adds, “Eventually, production executives realize that those production values make it well worth the increased costs.” In the past year, Beadles’ company On Locations Services has had several still photo shoots and catalogue work for clients such as The Gap, J. Jill, and Hanna Andersson Clothing. “That’s been our bread and butter for the

HAWAII FILM & VIDEO ISSUE TWO 2014 • hawaiifilmandvideo.com

Glen Beadles

last several months,” says Beadles. “We’ve also been doing a lot of scouting for projects, including a sunglasses manufacturer in Canada.” On Location Services, which incorporated in 2001, is considered one of Hawaii’s most experienced and professional companies that provides complete film production, location, coordination, management and photographic services. Beadles and company have extensive experience with aerial, marine, land and water sports cinematography, videography, and 35mm, medium and large format photography for national and regional commercials, feature films, television episodic shows, high fashion, catalogue and magazine editorials. “Location scouting, coordination and production management is our specialty with access to Hawaii’s most film-friendly, dramatic scenery and exclusive locations,” says Beadles, who is a published professional photographer. But Beadles does not rest on his laurels. “I actively pursue and am involved with a number of advertising agencies that request my stock imagery and access to my locations database,” he says. “I get quite a bit of referral business through those agencies and clients I’ve worked with.” The biggest challenge remains making sure that clients get the quality they seek. “They may want Mercedes-Benz quality on a Volkswagen budget,” says Beadles, “but you just do your absolute best.” HFV


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ADR / PRE-RECORD / MIX / ISDN

Hawaii Five-0 • LOST • Forgetting Sarah Marshall Real Steel • American Hustle • NCIS • Desperate Housewives 24 • Princess Kaiulani • Baywatch Hawaii • Lilo & Stitch Identity Theif • Zombieland • 47 Ronin • Cars 2 • Surf’s Up

adr@audioresourcehonolulu.com www.audioresourcehonolulu.com hawaiifilmandvideo.com • ISSUE TWO 2014 HAWAII FILM & VIDEO

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Maui Mauiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Got Talent! SPECIAL FOCUS

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outique talent agency Larson Talent has had great success in Hawaii, landing clients such as Apple, Disney Aulani, Pottery Barn, and Hawaii Five-0. But what most people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know is that the agency, owned and operated by former model and Honolulu native Dawn Larson-Lord, is based on the neighbor island of Maui, not Oahu. Now celebrating one full year of business on the Valley Isle, Larson-Lord said the agency plans on increasing their presence on the island throughout the coming months. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This summer we plan to generate more opportunities in Maui by making our presence known to clients and talent,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not many people realize that we are based in Maui and commute to and from Honolulu on a monthly basis. We currently have talent on Oahu, Big Island, and Maui and will be selectively choosing top talent by street scouting and casting calls this summer for Maui and Kauai.â&#x20AC;? Since working on Maui, Larson Talent has provided talent for a Hawaii Visitor Bureau video, a Sheraton Maui Resort & Spa video, Shops of Waileaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newest ad campaign (soon to be featured in Hana Hou and Maui No Ka Oi magazines), a Mauna Loa commercial called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maui Style,â&#x20AC;? a fashion editorial spread in the March/April issue of Maui No Ka Oi, and Dakine Surfâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spring 2015 catalogue. And with Aloha Film Studios opening soon on Maui, Larson Talent hopes to get involved in many of those upcoming projects. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are looking forward to working with the Maui film studio and any feature films coming to Maui to film,â&#x20AC;? added Larson-Lord. But while Larson Talent has found much success working on Maui, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still not the pro-

& U L L 3E R V I C E 4 A L E N T  -O D E L I N G !G E N C Y

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our Maui talent is a phenomenal group consisting of Alyssa Hudson, Michael Gingerich, Rachel Schumacher, Thayra & Thayna Guedes, Jazmin Repollo, Karisse & Anna Hallsten, Karlie Thoma, Thomas Hackett, Savannah Peterson, Kayleena Park, Michelle Falk and the Lucy Family. We have a core group of top-notch talent that has definitely been getting attention from national clients.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Dawn Larson-Lord duction hub that Oahu is. Larson-Lord is looking to help bridge that gap. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oahu has steady work in acting and modeling, whereas Maui and Big Island have a lot of top-caliber models and actors, there just isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough work,â&#x20AC;? she explained. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For this reason, I am the bridge for outer island models to get a shot at castings and bookings that

For more information, visit www.larsontalent.com.

/A H U

-A U I

+A U A I  "I G ) S L A N D           WWW L A R S O N T A L E N T  C O M L A R S O N T A L E N T G MA I L  C O M F A C E B O O K  C O M L A R S O N T A L E N T 2E PR E S E NT I NG (A WA I I g S 4 O P -O DE L S

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they normally wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be able to try for in Oahu. For example, our Big Island and Maui models have been consistently booking jobs in Oahu, and our Oahu models have been booking work in Oahu as well as in Maui and Big Island.â&#x20AC;? HFV

HAWAII FILM & VIDEO ISSUE TWO 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ hawaiifilmandvideo.com

M averick Events


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Maui

Maui Provides Opportunities for Extraordinary Production Content BY SAM SMALL Guest Columnist

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aui continues to blossom as a venue for world-class educational workshops providing excellent content for multi-camera, live-switched tele-productions that are distributed internationally over the web. Small Wonder Video Services has been honored to provide the equipment and creative skills for several such productions over the past few months.

Sam Small (center) supervising a production at the Andaz Hotel in Wailea, Maui. PHOTO BY ERIK AEDER

“Youthing-Maui” was a three-day, five-camera shoot that streamed live to four different websites. At its peak it had an estimated 10,000 viewers. Fred Spanjaard of Maui’s Global Media Productions staged the event at the Andaz Hotel in Wailea for Brazil’s Beach Park Resort. I produced and directed the live feed, backed by Jim Langford as technical director. Taking a turn as narrator, I did a 30-second radio spot to promote the event locally. Presentations by Viktoras Kulvinskas on dietary enzymes for sports performance and life extension were punctuated by two concerts from The Boom Booms, a Vancouver world-beat band that’s gained popularity in Brazil by raising its voice in resistance to the controversial Belo Monte Dam project. The event was capped off by a rare visit to Maui and talk by Sri Prem Baba, a popular Brazilian spiritual leader who pleaded for the protection of the environment from the current 36

onslaught of exploitation, including the exploding use of pesticides associated with GMO experimentation and seed production here in Hawaii. On the other side of the content spectrum, the subject of longevity was another three-day workshop titled “Life, Death, Near Death and Beyond,” an exploration of the wide range of end of life issues. The event was sponsored by California’s Sunrise Center and held at Maui’s Hale Akua retreat facility. Three cameras captured the proceedings and 16 hours of unique educational content is now being packaged for web marketing and distribution. Maui County has been abuzz with the first ever citizens’ petition drive to submit enough registered voters’ signatures so as to get a motion on the November ballot. Proposed is a temporary moratorium on GMO and pesticide experimentation until the agro-chemical companies show independent health studies proving that exposure to what they are unique-

HAWAII FILM & VIDEO ISSUE TWO 2014 • hawaiifilmandvideo.com

ly spraying on Maui and Molokai is safe for humans and the land. A grassroots group called The SHAKA Movement has been promoting the drive and Small Wonder has been commissioned to provide video and radio production as well as press release and social media marketing services. The chemical companies have purchased millions of dollars of advertising time in local markets and have their public relations agencies churning propaganda to defend their position. One of the local papers made note that it’ll be a battle of public relations “big dogs” that Maui’s never seen before. Small Wonder is proud to be on the front lines of this initiative supporting reason and safety for Maui County’s keiki and the aina. Recent interviews have covered some interesting topics: a British version of the popular Ancient Aliens television show put on camera Maui’s Sasha Lessin, an anthropologist who’s widely studied ancient Sumerian tablets as translated by the late Zecharia Sitchin. The interview centered around DNA manipulation in Earth’s ancient past by a race of extraterrestrials from the planet Nibiru called the Anunnaki to create a slave labor force to mine for gold, which led to the emergence of humans as we are today. Another interview I filmed is now part of a feature-length documentary that will screen at the upcoming Maui Film Festival in June. Maui’s Ram Dass, author of the seminal counter-culture book Be Here Now, back when he was teaching at Harvard as Dr. Richard Alpert, teamed with Timothy Leary to introduce an entire generation to the wonders of psychedelic journeys as a step to raising one’s consciousness beyond the mundane, towards a more spiritual existence. The film, titled Dying To Know: Ram Dass and Timothy Leary, was produced and directed by Gay Dillingham and includes footage spanning over 80 years. It’s an intimate and entertaining conversation about life, death and the psychedelic explorations that began it all. Spanning life and death, and both inner and outer space, Maui continues to provide opportunities for extraordinary production content in various forms, and Small Wonder Video Services is pleased to be riding the production wave towards whatever comes next. HFV


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Maui

Local Filmmaker Brings Home Pele Award

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enneth K. Martinez Burgmaier, a Maui-based filmmaker, recently received a 2014 American Advertising Federation Bronze Pele Award for his film Aunty Nona Beamer – Malama Ko Aloha in the Cinema Advertising – Movie Trailers category. This was the first time that a Maui film won in this category. Martinez Burgmaier, of Jazz Alley TV and HawaiiOnTV.com networks, was commissioned by Mohala Hou Foundation to produce a documentary film on Aunty Nona Beamer, the first ever to be done on this legendary Hawaiian matriarch of the Beamer family. Aunty Nona Beamer – Malama Ko Aloha (Keep Your Love) explores Aunty Nona in her own words, the journey of her life and her fight toward preserving, perpetuating and creating awareness of Hawaiian culture. It will serve to educate people around the world about traditional Hawaiian culture and how it can serve as a way of bringing people of all backgrounds together. Some of Hawaii’s most respected artists contribute in sharing

HAIRST YLIST

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their own stories and what Aunty Nona Beamer has achieved as being recognized as one of Hawaii’s Treasures of Aloha.

Martinez Burgmaier, an Emmy, Billboard, and Na Hoku Hanohano award winner, directed and produced the film. “It’s a wonderful honor to have worked and become part of her ohana working with Aunty Nona, Keola, Moanalani Beamer for well over a decade in documenting her incredible journey of perpetuating our Hawaiian culture,” said Martinez Burgmaier. “We are so blessed to have an amazing cast of Hawaiian musicians, teachers, students and the Beamer family telling her story, and Aunty Nona on camera delivering her message of true aloha (love) to everyone.” Aunty Nona had its official Maui screening at the 22nd Annual Celebration of the Arts on Mother’s Day at the Ritz-Carlton Kapalua. The film also won an audience award at the Lanai Film Festival and was selected as the Opening Night film at the Big Island Film Festival in May. PBS Hawaii has requested to broadcast the film in the near future. See the trailer at www.HawaiiONTV.com/ auntynonabeamerfilm. HFV

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HAWAII FILM & VIDEO ISSUE TWO 2014 • hawaiifilmandvideo.com

Hawaii’s leading plastics manufacturing company. Initially we produced wall panels using Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) foam. EPS Foam have innumerable possibilities and can be used for various production sets and art projects and is made in Hawaii.

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Maui

Meet Maui Film Industries’ Casey LeDoux

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aui Film Industries founder, Casey LeDoux, started off in the ‘80s working for Anchorage Community Theater editing in Avid, and then moved on to L.A., where he enjoyed building a career in television, commercial and feature film acting as well as print modeling.

With experience on both sides of the camera, he expanded into production of a webbased political comedy providing insight to the need for better production facilities and infrastructure on Maui. He spent several years working in the shadows to bring attention to the potential of the neighbor islands’ television and film industry success. Working and consulting with industry professionals, he built a power team to create Mobile Editing Suites Hawaii. Now you can do everything from reviewing daily rough cuts, or complete your whole project with MESH.net on location with new, state-of-theart Mac Pro machines loaded with Final Cut ProX, Motion5, Compressor4, Avid MC,

LeDoux spent several years working in the shadows to bring attention to the potential of the neighbor islands’ television and film industry success.

Adobe Premier Pro CC and more. Use their experienced editors to support transcoding and editing your projects in the multifunctional mobile van, private studio, or your hotel room! Full 4K and HD monitor inputs work with multiple formats. Corporate clients can use the MESH van as a dubbing area with USB station and editing suite. Location kits available with broadcast quality 4K cameras, carbon fiber tripod with hydraulic fluid head, slide, lights, boom mics and support crew. LeDoux will coordinate your project needs and MESH them all for you in one stop—supporting photography, advertisements, events, commercials, television and more. Ask him about corporate accommodations, cast, crew, make-up, catering and craft services, transportation, party bus for wrap parties, and anything else needed to complete your production. Working on the neighbor islands can be logistically challenging. Let MESH simplify it for you! Call 808-280-0546 or e-mail info@MESHvan.com. HFV

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Hawaiiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s One-Stop Rental Shop

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n the five years that Hawaii Photo Rental has been in business, the unique Kaimuki company has grown its state-of-the-art inventory from $80,000 worth of goods to about $2 million.

From its barely 500-square-foot store on Waialae Avenue, owner Josh Strickland and his team have established the company as the place to rent the latest and best in photo and video gear that includes Canon, Nikon, Sony and Fuji, as well as lighting and audio/visual gear. Hawaii Photo Rental has been so successful that the company, desperately in need of more space, is moving a block away to a 1,600-squarefoot, second-floor facility at 3457 Waialae Ave. Hawaii Photo Rental is expected to make the move in June. Strickland is an entrepreneur, having started his first business at 14, mowing lawns. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No one in Hawaii was doing what I wanted to do with Hawaii Camera,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was just a consumer (of photo gear) at the time.â&#x20AC;? Born in Hawaii but raised on the East Coast, Strickland returned to Hawaii where he bought a Canon camera, some lenses, and a flash to try his hand at wedding photography as a side business. He had a consulting company but he wanted something creative to do. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I did a couple of weddings, but I just couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do what it required,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was too much work.â&#x20AC;? When he tried to rent some photo gear, Strickland couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really find anyone in Hawaii who did that on a large scale. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I immediately thought, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an opportunity,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; so I sold my equipment, then leased the store and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how it all happened,â&#x20AC;? he said. Certainly one of the attractions of Hawaii Photo Rental is not only its vast inventory, but its stock of the most exotic and expensive gear

Josh Strickland

made. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have incredible high-end gear that we can show people firsthand because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all in the store,â&#x20AC;? said Strickland. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really fun. A lot of people come to us because they have never seen some of this gear except in catalogues.â&#x20AC;? When the company opened its doors, it only had one Canon DSLR, two Canon lenses, a flash, and two memory cards. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That was it,â&#x20AC;? said Strickland. Today, part of its arsenal includes Canonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s state-of-the-art EOS 1D C DSLR that sells for about $13,000 (24-hour rental is $190). The camera features an 18.1-megapixel full frame CMOS image sensor that offers a wide range of image acquisition options, including 4K (4096Ă&#x2014;2160), HD (1920Ă&#x2014;1080), or 18-megapixel (5184Ă&#x2014;3456) still images. The company even has a Canon EOS 1N HS film camera that goes for just $12 a day. On the lens side, if you need a super tele-

photo, Hawaii Photo Rental carries Canonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mega-zoom 800mm f/5.6 ($14,000 list price, or $180 a day). It will take about six years for Hawaii Photo Rental to make its money back on such a rare piece of glass. For less expensive, high-demand items, the return time is about 10 months. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People do think a rental store should have that lens in stock,â&#x20AC;? said Strickland. Hawaii Photo Rentalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s original business goal remains the same: attract the largest market possible of photography consumers who need to be able to rent high-end gear. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew there was a huge market out there for that,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No one was supporting this biggest market, or the everyday photographer.â&#x20AC;? Hawaii Photo Rentalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s popularity with production companies is growing, a market the company plans to pursue aggressively. They have recently rented gear to productions by BBC, Sony, NBC, and CBSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hawaii Five-0, in addition to several independent film companies. They just recently put together a super highend video â&#x20AC;&#x153;packageâ&#x20AC;? that includes everything a filmmaker needs, rather than renting gear piecemeal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most companies may have a kit, but it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the lenses, or tripod, just the camera and the battery,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With our kits you literally donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to add anything else to it. Just pick it up and walk out the door.â&#x20AC;? The company recycles all of its lenses and camera gear after 2 years, or 40 days of rental usage. Said Strickland, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have to make sure that every item is working properly and will not shut down on a job.â&#x20AC;? HFV For more information about Hawaii Photo Rental, call 808-735-3838.

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Cinematography Reaches New Heights AN INTERVIEW WITH BLUE SKY AERIAL SOLUTIONS

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hen Hawaii Film & Video Magazine wanted to find out more about the use of drones for aerial filming, we talked to Sue Yee Duong with Blue Sky Aerial Solutions. Read on to learn more about this new tool making waves in the industry. We have heard conflicting reports on the use of drones for production in Hawaii. Can you elaborate on this? According to our sources and extensive research, there is currently no State or Federal legislation in place to limit the use of drones/UAVs/UASs in Hawaii. There is a bill, SB-2608, that will limit the use of UAVs for law enforcement, but allow for their use for commercial and recreational purposes in a safe and prudent manner. Have you done an assessment on financial savings using a drone instead of helicopters? If so, what are those numbers? With our current pricing schedule, Blue Sky Aerial Solutions’ (BSAS) services generally cost 50 percent less than the total cost of manned helicopter video time. To charter a turbine helicopter costs an average of just over $2,000 per hour according to published numbers, then on top of that, a videographer will charge between $300 and $700 per hour, plus Tyler Mount or Cam-Motion (BSAS’s Electric Steadicam alternative) rental. As demand for drone use develops, the pricing will most likely adapt to reflect that. How do you see the industry changing when it comes to drones? Is there a sea of change or is it slowly starting to trend? BSAS is on the cutting edge of drone technology and it’s quite impressive to see the adoption rate of these machines across all areas; most exciting of all is in the film industry. We’ve seen indie movies, TV commercials, and box office hits have all included footage captured from an unmanned aerial system in one way or another. Filmmakers are always looking for the new tool that will allow their talents to shine. Drones and 44

UAVs are that new tool, and when used properly, will add the right touch to generate amazement in the audience. Most video tools used in the right hands won’t ever be noticed in the finished product. This keeps the audience immersed in the story and not being reminded they are simply watching a film. We’d say that there is definitely a great deal of change for the industry—both in the ability to get more unique perspectives, as well as cost-savings. What is the quality difference between traditional aerial and drones? Is it a dramatic difference in quality? That depends on the camera outfitted on the drone, as well as the operator of the machine. BSAS’s custom-built machines can carry large cinema rigs with professional 4K and Red Epic cameras. Being at a lower altitude, drones can capture the same high quality video as manned helicopters, but they are less invasive to the set, less cumbersome, faster to set up and reposition. Drones provide a better and more efficient product for certain circumstances, but helicopters have their equally important role for high altitude and highspeed tracking, long-range establishing shots, etc. There are a large number of hobbyists and small operators flying drones with action cameras like the GoPro because they are easily accessible. We sometimes fly with them, too, but while these cameras have their time and place, the quality difference is evident. Keep in mind that hobby drones are not built specifically for filming or carrying large cam-

HAWAII FILM & VIDEO MAGAZINE ISSUE TWO 2014

era rigs. As with any industry or career, we all must start somewhere. But when you’re looking for cinema-quality footage to use in a large production, you want to make sure you have the right people and machine for the job. What should producers look for when choosing someone to hire for drone camera shots? What do they need to know about the legalities and what would any red flags be? Some of the more obvious criteria that producers should look for in drone operators are flight hours and experience, which translate to safety practices and smooth flights. For example, BSAS’s lead pilot has filmed from manned helicopters and has also operated model aircraft and drones for almost two decades and continues to add flight time every day. Some questions may also include: Does the drone operator provide a range of camera options? What is his knowledge of current laws and regulations? Some states have passed laws regulating drone use, so this must be taken into account and the drone operator should make the producer aware of such laws. In addition, ask about their Association of Model Aeronautics (AMA) membership where specific safety and flight rules must be followed. Producers can also request for flight demos so that they can make sure that the operator can safely fly a drone and be part of a professional working environment before hiring. Being able to see in person how an operator flies will help to make any red flags more evident. HFV


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SET DECORATOR

Rick Romer

ART DIRECTOR

DESIGNER Photo by Rick Romer, Set Decorator, “LOST” Pilot ABC-TV

cell: (808) 258-3848 richardromer@yahoo.com flickr.com/photos/rick_romer/sets Hawaii Five-0, LOST, The River, North Shore Pilot, E.R., Princess Ka’iulani, Baywatch Hawaii, Fantasy Island, One West Waikiki, Diagnosis Murder Pilot, Jake and the Fatma, Magnum, P.I. Series, & Others Member: I.A.T.S.E 665 (Hon.) & 44 (L.A.), SDSA

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HAWAII

Aerial Filmworks Maui 808-281-1921 www.aerialfilmworks.com Aerial Stunt Service Palos Verdes Estates, CA 310-543-2222 www.aerialstuntservice.com Ahuna’s Special Effects Services Oahu 808-368-1303 Aloha Film Studios Maui 808-877-7701 www.alohafilmstudios.com Alpen Glow Lighting Big Island 808-339-7922 www.griptruckhawaii.com Attco, Inc. Oahu 808-836-1191 www.attcoinc.com Audio Visual Services Hawaii Oahu 808-331-8403 www.audiovisualhawaii.com Austin ImageWorks, LLC Maui 808-283-5190 www.austinimageworks.com Big Island Gigs Big Island 800-244-0482 www.bigislandgigs.com Blue River Productions Oahu 808-388-6068 www.blueriverpro.com Crew Hawaii Television Oahu 808-383-6811 www.crewhawaii.tv Duarte’s Film Production Equipment, LLC Oahu 808-864-0445 www.duartesfilm.com Eggshell Light Company Oahu 808-843-0383 www.eggshellhi.com Ehman Productions, Inc. Maui 808-870-4732 www.ehmanproductions.com Farish Media, Inc. Big Island 808-329-1655 www.hawaiivideo.com Colin C.L. Fong Oahu 808-526-3000 www.colinfong.com Foton Inc. Oahu 808-206-5244 www.fotonhawaii.com Fujifilm Hawaii Oahu 808-677-3854 www.fujifilmhawaii.com GP Roadway Solutions Oahu 808-521-6785 www.gproadwaysolutions.com

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HAWAII

GSE AV Hawaii Oahu 888-573-6847 www.gseav.com

John Guild Communications Oahu 808-596-2211 www.john-guild.com

Harrington Productions Maui 808-280-1098 www.harringtonprovideo.com

Hawaii Photo Rental Oahu 808-735-3838 www.hawaiicamera.com

Hawaii Explosives & Pyrotechnics Big Island 800-240-6064 www.hipyro.com

Hawaii Media Inc. Oahu 808-484-5706 www.hawaiimedia.com

Hawaii Pro Sound & Video Rentals Oahu 808-842-0077 www.hawaiiprosound.com

Hawaii Sound & Vision Big Island 808-982-8330 www.hawaiisav.com

Hawaii Stage & Lighting Rentals Inc. Oahu 808-831-0333 www.hslr.com

Hawaii Tents & Events Oahu 808-677-8785 www.hawaiitents.com

Hawaiian Crane & Rigging, Ltd. Oahu 808-682-7444

HD Under H2O Oahu 808-722-1573 www.hdunderh2o.com

Healy Tibbitts Builders, Inc. Oahu 808-487-3664 www.healytibbitts.com

Shawn Hiatt/Edge City Films Oahu 808-383-4374 www.edgecityfilms.com

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Big Island Hawaii Licensed & Fully Insured www.GripTruckHawaii.com ^ĐŽƩ ĂƌƚůĞƩ p: (808) 339-7922 c: (970) 389-0965 1 & 3 Ton Grip Trucks ϭϴϬϬ ƐƋ͘ Ō͘ &ĂĐŝůŝƚLJ

GRIP & Electric ZZ/͕ DŽůĞͲZŝĐŚĂƌĚƐŽŶ͕ <ϱϲϬϬ͕ <ŝŶŽ &ůŽ͕ >ŝƚĞWĂŶĞů͕ >ĞŬŽ ƵŐ͕ ŵĞƌŝĐĂŶ 'ƌŝƉ͕ ĂŶĂ ŽůůLJ͕ D^͕ ǀĞŶŐĞƌ͕ ĂĐŬƐƚĂŐĞ ƋƵŝƉŵĞŶƚ͕ dŚĞ ZĂŐ ^ŚŽƉ͕ Honda, MicroGrip, Cannon, Expendables

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Hui Productions Oahu 808-375-2843 www.huiproductions.com Jazz Alley TV Maui 808-573-5530 www.jazzalleytv.com Kauai Sound Cinema Kauai 808-635-3213 www.kauaisoundcinema.com Lite Panels Oahu 808-429-7610 www.litepanels.com LunaKai Hawaii LLC Big Island 808-889-1332 www.lunakaihawaii.com Mark Morgan/Steadicam Hawaii Oahu 808-255-4531 www.steadicamhawaii.com Maui Film Industries Maui 808-280-0546 www.mauifilmindustries.com/www.meshvan.com MBS Equipment Co. Oahu 808-678-6640 www.mbseco.com Music & Video Hawaii Oahu 808-732-0838 www.hawaiiav.com Keith Nealy Productions Big Island 808-987-8093 www.keithnealy.com Paradise Helicopters Big Island 808-329-6601 www.paradisecopters.com Presentation Services Maui 808-877-9400 www.psav.com/hawaii Sight & Sound Studios, LLC Oahu 808-599-7600 www.sightandsoundhawaii.com SkyCam Oahu 808-391-6383 www.skycamhawaii.net Theatrix Hawaii, LLC Oahu 808-836-5647 www.theatrixhawaii.com TNT Productions Hawaii Oahu 808-306-7228 www.tntproductionshawaii.com Village Audio & Lighting Maui 808-875-7049 www.villageaudio.com Work Horse Productions and Kauai Grip Truck Kauai 808-645-6303 www.kauaifilmandstageservices.com

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Ahunaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Special Effects Services Established since 1984

The best all Licensed Special Effects Technician team in the state of Hawaii.

Specializing in Explosives, Pyrotechnics and Physical Effects. A fully equipped rental company ready for projects big or small. Recent work experience: -Pearl Harbor -Windtalkers -Tears of the Sun -Big Bounce -Fifty First Kisses

Resume available upon request.

Archie K. Ahuna License #COF 0-4-28 State of Hawaii Explosive Certificate With over 30 years experience on numerous Motion Picture, Television and Commercial productions in the state of Hawaii.

Cell: (808) 368-1303 Email: AhunasSpecialEffects@yahoo.com

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Company Island Phone Web site 3 Star Movie Equipment LTD Oahu 808-479-5694 www.3starrentals.com 1013 Integrated Branding + Production Oahu 808-593-8848 www.1013integrated.com A & E Equipment Rentals, Inc. Oahu 808-847-4267 www.aeequipment.com Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Party Portables Oahu 808-668-6362 www.pumpersinc.com Aerial Filmworks Maui 808-281-1921 www.aerialfilmworks.com Aerial Stunt Service Palos Verdes Estates, CA 310-543-2222 www.aerialstuntservice.com Air Reps Hawaii Oahu 808-846-9270 www.airreps-hi.com Airborne Aviation, Inc. Maui 808-878-1088 www.airborneaviationhawaii.com Akamai RV Maui 808-383-1962 Allied Machinery Corp. Oahu 808-671-0541 www.alliedmachinerycorp.com Aloha Air Cargo Oahu 888-942-5642 www.alohaaircargo.com Aloha Film Studios Maui 808-877-7701 www.alohafilmstudios.com Alpen Glow Lighting Big Island 808-339-7922 www.griptruckhawaii.com Aqua Photo & Film Oahu 714-812-3825 www.aquanui.com Attco, Inc. Oahu 808-836-1191 www.attcoinc.com The Audio Visual Company Oahu 808-485-3200 www.theavco.com Audio Visual Services Hawaii Oahu 808-331-8403 www.audiovisualhawaii.com Bacon-Universal Co., Inc. Oahu 808-839-7202 www.baconuniversal.com Big Island Gigs Big Island 800-244-0482 www.bigislandgigs.com Big Island Tents Big Island 808-885-3534 www.bigislandtents.com

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Company Island Phone Web site Blue Hawaiian Helicopters Maui 808-871-8844 www.bluehawaiian.com Blue Sky Aerial Solutions Maui 808-280-9660 www.blueskyaerialsolutions.com Conrad Tent Rental Kauai 808-822-7080 www.conradtentrentalkauai.com Duarteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Film Production Equipment, LLC Oahu 808-864-0445 www.duartesfilm.com Ehman Productions, Inc. Maui 808-870-4732 www.ehmanproductions.com Epic Experience Productions Oahu 808-779-8961 www.epicxpro.com Farish Media, Inc. Big Island 808-329-1655 www.hawaiivideo.com Foton Inc. Oahu 808-206-5244 www.fotonhawaii.com Gale Force Production Services, Inc. Big Island 808-323-9790 www.galeforcehawaii.com Genesis Aviation Inc. Oahu 808-840-1111 www.genesisaviation.net GP Roadway Solutions Oahu 808-521-6785 www.gproadwaysolutions.com GSE AV Hawaii Oahu 888-573-6847 www.gseav.com John Guild Communications Oahu 808-596-2211 www.john-guild.com Hana Productions, LLC Maui 808-248-7314 www.hanaproductions.com Harper Car & Truck Rentals Big Island 800-852-9993 www.harpershawaii.com Jack Harter Helicopters 888-245-2001 Kauai www.helicopters-kauai.com Hawaii Photo Rental Oahu 808-735-3838 www.hawaiicamera.com Hawaii Film Studio Oahu 808-586-2565 www.hawaiifilmoffice.com/hawaii-film-studio

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Company Island Phone Web site

EQUIPMENT RENTED

Hawaii Johns Inc. Big Island 808-775-0460 www.hawaiijohns.com Hawaii Media Inc. Oahu 808-484-5706 www.hawaiimedia.com Hawaii Pro Sound & Video Rentals Oahu 808-842-0077 www.hawaiiprosound.com Hawaii Prop & Production Rentals Oahu 808-754-4136 www.hawaiiproprentals.com Hawaii Sound & Vision Big Island 808-982-8330 www.hawaiisav.com Hawaii Stage & Lighting Rentals Inc. Oahu 808-831-0333 www.hslr.com Hawaii Tents & Events Oahu 808-677-8785 www.hawaiitents.com Healy Tibbitts Builders, Inc. Oahu 808-487-3664 www.healytibbitts.com

■ Urban and

remote location access on all islands ■ Cargo + crew transportation ■ Location scouting, aerial coordination and logistical support for the photogrpahy and film industries ■ Long-line external load experts ■ Hughes 500 four-passenger helicopters

ISLAND POWER HAWAI‘I INC. Quiet Generators • Crystal Sync • Acoustically Quiet Enclosure • Cables, Connectors, and Power Boxes

37 New Gen Sets 80 total Gen Sets 150-7200 Amps.

Donald M Naruse P.O. Box 893568 Mililani Hi 96789

• Load Sharing • Paralleling • Quiet & Reliable Generators

Phone: 808-621-9944 Fax: 808-621-9940 Email: iph@hawaii.rr.com

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Company Island Phone Web site Hui Productions Oahu 808-375-2843 www.huiproductions.com Inter-Island Helicopters Kauai 808-335-5009 www.interislandhelicopters.com Island Helicopters Kauai, Inc. Kauai 808-245-8588 www.islandhelicopters.com Island Power Hawaii Oahu 808-621-9944 Island RV, Inc. Big Island 808-960-1260 www.islandrv.com K & T Water Hauling Big Island 808-982-8252 www.topwaterhauling.com Kauai Tent & Party Rental, Inc. Kauai 808-828-1597 www.kauaitent.com Lucky Dog Kauai Kauai 808-652-5210 www.luckydogkauai.com LunaKai Hawaii LLC Big Island 808-889-1332 www.lunakaihawaii.com Makani Kai Helicopters & Air Charters Oahu 808-834-5813 www.makanikai.com Maui Film Industries Maui 808-280-0546 www.mauifilmindustries.com/www.meshvan.com Maverick Events, Inc. Maui 808-357-4766 www.maverickeventsinc.net MBS Equipment Co. Oahu 808-678-6640 www.mbseco.com Music & Video Hawaii Oahu 808-732-0838 www.hawaiiav.com New Generations, Inc. Big Island 808-990-0405 www.newgenhawaii.com Nohokai Production Services, Inc. Oahu 808-677-3335 www.nohokaihawaii.com NSC Construction Oahu 808-225-1956 Pacific Allied Products Ltd. Oahu 808-792-8528 www.pacificalliedproducts.com Pacific Helicopters Maui 808-871-9771 www.pacifichelicoptertours.com Pacific Pile & Crane, Inc. Maui 808-242-4782 www.ppcmaui.com

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HAWAII SUPPORT EQUIPMENT RENTAL Company Island Phone Web site Pacific Portables Maui 808-878-1665 www.pacificportables.net Pacific Teleprompter Oahu 808-734-3877 Pacific Warbirds Oahu 808-753-1346 www.vintage-aviation.com Pacific Wireless Communications Oahu 808-837-4300 www.pwchi.com Paradise Helicopters Big Island 808-329-6601 www.paradisecopters.com Paradise Lua, Inc. Oahu 808-668-6885 www.paradiselua.com Presentation Services Maui 808-877-9400 www.psav.com/hawaii Production Hawaii Oahu 808-832-7878 www.productionhawaii.com

6QQNU 'SWKROGPV CPF 6TWEMU HQT JQOGQYPGTU EQPUVTWEVKQP CPF EQOOGTEKCN DWUKPGUUGU 3061 Aukele St., Lihue, HI 96766 p: 808-246-1000 Fax 808-246-1155 www.toolmasterhawaii.com Hrs: 6:30 a.m to 4:30 p.m. Mon - Fri â&#x20AC;¢ 8 a.m. to 12 noon Sat ISSUE TWO HAWAII FILM & VIDEO MAGAZINE

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Company Island Phone Web site The Professionals Kauai LLC Kauai 808-246-0405 www.rescueservices.com Radio & Cellular Wireless Rentals Oahu 808-537-3480 www.radiocellularwireless.com Rainbow Rentals Maui 808-877-0496 www.rainbowrentalsmaui.com Safari Helicopters Kauai 808-246-0136 www.safarihelicopters.com Safety Systems Hawaii, Inc. Oahu 808-847-4017 www.ssshinc.com Service Rentals & Supplies, Inc. Maui 855-808-RENT www.service-rentals.com Sight & Sound Studios, LLC Oahu 808-599-7600 www.sightandsoundhawaii.com Starcomm Wireless Oahu 808-845-7827 www.starcommwireless.com Sunshine Helicopters, Inc. Maui 808-270-3999 www.sunshinehelicopters.com Theatrix Hawaii, LLC Oahu 808-836-5647 www.theatrixhawaii.com TNT Productions Hawaii Oahu 808-306-7228 www.tntproductionshawaii.com Toolmaster Hawaii, Inc. Kauai 808-246-1000 www.toolmasterhawaii.com Transair Oahu 808-357-5172 www.transairhawaii.com Village Audio & Lighting Maui 808-875-7049 www.villageaudio.com West Hawaii Electronics, Inc. Big Island 808-329-1252 westhawaii.radio-dealers.com Windward Aviation, Inc. Maui 808-877-3368 www.windwardaviationmaui.com Work Horse Productions and Kauai Grip Truck Kauai 808-645-6303 www.kauaifilmandstageservices.com

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