Issuu on Google+

$4.99 2013 ATLAS

u|xhCFCHEy24792tz]v&:.


CONTENTS OLYMPIC PENINSULA 8 10 12 14 16 18

Sekiu Summer Kings Olympic Peninsula Coho Bogachiel River Steelhead Sol Duc River Steelhead Humptulips River Coho Wynoochee River Steelhead

SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON 20 22 24 26

Willapa Bay Salmonids Cowlitz River Steelhead Mayfield Lake Coho Lewis River Coho

NORTHWEST OREGON 28 30 32 32 34 35 36 38

Nehalem Bay Salmon Columbia Estuary Ducks Tillamook Bay Ducks Nehalem Bay Ducks Clackamas River Steelhead Willamette Falls Springers Siletz River Steelhead Alsea River Steelhead

SOUTHWEST OREGON 39 40 42 43 44 46 48 49 50 51 52 54

Siuslaw River Steelhead Umpqua River Steelhead Siltcoos, Tahkenitch Lakes Coho Eugene Summer Steelhead Santiam, McKenzie Rivers Steelhead Coos Bay Salmon Coquille River Coho Coquille River Steelhead Diamond Lake Rainbows Rogue Bay Chinook Chetco River Steelhead Howard Prairie, Hyatt Lake Trout

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

MACK’S LURE

www.mackslure.com

COLUMBIA RIVER 66 68 70 71 72 74 76 78

Lower Columbia Steelhead Multnomah Channel Spring Chinook Longview Fall Chinook Lower Columbia Springers Columbia Pikeminnow John Day Cast & Blast McNary Dam Steelhead McNary Tailrace Walleye

Northwest Sportsman’s ATLAS Volume 4 PUBLISHER

James R. Baker ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Dick Openshaw EDITOR

Andy Walgamott MAPS CONDENSED FROM ORIGINAL STORIES BY

Ralph Bartholdt, Tim Bush, Robert Cgraggen, Dennis Dauble, Duane Dungannon, Rob Phillips, Matt Smith MAP ART

WASHINGTON CASCADES 80 82 84 86 88

Lake Chelan Kokanee Chelan County Bears North-central Washington Bucks Western Yakima County Elk Klickitat River Salmon, Steelhead

INLAND NORTHWEST 89 90 91 92 94 96 98 100 102 104 106 108 110

Quincy Lakes Trout Brewster Pool Summer Kings Sprague Lake Trout Tri-Cities Spring Chinook Potholes Reservoir Walleye Blue Mountains Steelhead Chewelah Grouse Grande Ronde-Wallowa Steelhead Spokane Whitetails Washington Private Lands Hunting Lower Clearwater Steelhead Snake River Steelhead Brownlee Reservoir Crappie

Richard Thompson OPERATIONS MANAGER

Katie Higgins SALES MANAGER

Brian Lull NATIONAL ACCOUNTS MANAGER ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Megan Carlen, Jim Klark, Michelle Kovacich, Mike Nelson, Mike Smith, Paul Yarnold DESIGNERS

Dawn Carlson, Beth Harrison, Christina Poisal PRODUCTION MANAGER

John Rusnak WEBMASTER

Jon Hines OFFICE MANAGER

Audra Higgins ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Katie Sauro INFORMATION SERVICES MANAGER

Lois Sanborn CIRCULATION MANAGER

Heidi Belew DISTRIBUTION

Tony Sorrentino, Gary Bickford ADVERTISING INQUIRIES

ads@nwsportsmanmag.com CORRESPONDENCE

111

Look East, To Montana

Email letters, articles/queries, photos, etc., to andy@nwsportsmanmag.com, or snail mail them to the address below. ON THE COVER

Angie Volk shows off a fall Chinook caught on the Lower Columbia River with a wobbler. (ANGIE VOLK)

GREATER PUGET SOUND 56 58 60 62 64

San Juan Islands Blackmouth Skykomish River Steelhead, Kings Central Puget Sound Chinook Kitsap Lake Trout Skookumchuck River Steelhead

Get daily updates at nwsportsmanmag.com and like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

SUBSCRIBE TODAY! Visit nwsportsmanmag.com NORTHWEST SPORTSMAN ATLAS is published annually by Media Index Publishing Group, 1201 1st Avenue South, Suite 309, Seattle, WA 98134. For display advertising information, call Media Index Publishing Group for a current rate card. Discounts for frequency advertising. All submitted materials become the property of Media Index Publishing Group and will not be returned. Copyright © 2013 Media Index Publishing Group. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be copied by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying or recording by any information storage or retrieval system, without the express written permission of the publisher. Printed in U.S.A.

6 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

MEDIA INDEX PUBLISHING GROUP P.O. Box 24365 • Seattle, WA 98124-0365 1201 First Ave. S., Suite 309 • Seattle, WA 98134 (206) 382-9220 • (800) 332-1736 • Fax (206) 382-9437 media@media-inc.com • www.media-inc.com


OLYMPIC PENINSULA

Sekiu Summer Kings SEKIU, Wash.—July is prime time for big Chinook in the calm, sheltered waters of this Strait of Juan de Fuca port. What’s known as “The Caves” might be the most productive area of all. Just off the kelp beds here in 80 to 225 feet of water, fish tend to gather first thing in the morning looking for a meal. Whether using a cut-plug or whole herring, green or blue label, mooching or motor mooching, work the water 30 to 60 feet down. Off a downrigger, use a whole herring in a helmet 50 inches behind a Pro-Troll flasher in some shade of green. After the morning bite, Chinook tend to spread out, so trolling 4inch Gold Star Squids, both UV and glow in green spatterback, army truck or purple haze, or an Ace Hi Fly in greens or purple haze will be more productive. –TERRY WIEST Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

8 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]


FOR A DEMO VIDEO ON YOUTUBE:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=pq9RsTy7E8I

Leelock Anchor Systems has the most versatile power boat anchor "system" available.

The Bigwater is back! This is the original design that started it all.

Anchor Line Bag

www.leelock.com (360) 380-1864 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Dealer Inquirees Welcome!

Northwest Sportsman 9

P E N I N S U L A

Leelock also makes the most innovative anchor systems for drift boats, lake boats and pontoon boats.

O L Y M P I C

It allows the boat owner to easily and quickly switch accessories depending upon fishing and boating needs.


OLYMPIC PENINSULA

Olympic Peninsula Coho FORKS, Wash.—Fall weather brings with it the return of fall coho. Puget Sound gets healthy returns, but when I think about the lockjaw that fish from local rivers often have, I start fantasizing about Silver Shangri-La, the Olympic Peninsula. Its rivers teem with runs of coho, and whether you prefer to fish big-water glacial rivers or smaller, lowland-origin streams, the variety that the OP offers is unbeatable. The stocks are a mix of wild and hatchery fish, and as you might guess, fishing spinners, floating salmon eggs or twitching jigs near a production facility can work very well. A lot of anglers will add a small hot pink or chartreuse plastic squid to the end of their spinner too. All of the West End’s rivers have good boat and bank access, but it’s best to go with a guide if it’s your first float. –ANDREW MORAVEC

Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

10 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


O L Y M P I C P E N I N S U L A

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 11


OLYMPIC PENINSULA

Bogachiel River Steelhead uc

LEGEND

er v i R

D ol

1. Hatchery Drift: drift, float fishing 2. Calawah Confluence: drift fishing 3. Tall Timbers: drift, float fishing; divers, back-trolling 4. Crescent Hole: plugging, float fishing 5. Ice Box: drift, float fishing; divers, back-trolling 6. Hundley Flats: drift fishing 7. Mary Lou: back-trolling, drift fishing 8. Goodman Mainline: plunking, divers, plugging

S ute llay Qui

Roa

d

Forks

Calawah River Bo R sh

La

3 2 8

ine R

d.

110

1

6 4 5

101

Bogachiel River

Maxfi

G oo

dma

nM

ainl

Wilson’s Bridge

c

y Wa

The Ponds

Pu

7

ga

l hie

d oa

Boat launch

Leyendecker Park

110

eld Cr eek 0

Murphy Creek

Mapped Area

1/4

1/2

scale in miles

1

Map information courtesy National Geographic Maps

FORKS, Wash.–When it comes to December steelheading, the Olympic Peninsula’s Quillayute River system is tops, and tops amongst its tributaries is the Bogachiel, or Bogy. Not only can you intercept fish headed for the state hatchery on it, but double up on Calawah steelies. It’s a no-brainer where to fish: from the rearing ponds down. “The fish tend to stack in the tailout of each hole before moving up to the next section of holding water,” says guide Mike Zavadlov (360-640-8109). Launch at the ponds and take out at either Wilson’s Bridge (3.4 miles), at the end of Wilson Road, or Leyendecker Park (5.0 miles), at the confluence with the Sol Duc. The “Hatchery Drift” is probably the easiest and least technical water on the peninsula. From boat or bank, drift fish eggs, Corkies or pink worms, or run a float and jig. –TERRY WIEST Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

12 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


O L Y M P I C P E N I N S U L A

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 13


OLYMPIC PENINSULA

Sol Duc River Steelhead 0

1/ 4

1/ 2

to Port Angeles

1

Sol Duc Salmon Hatchery

101

7

6

Conley Rd.

scale in miles

4

8 9

Shuwah to Forks

1

Sol Duc River LEGEND

11

101

Eagle Pt.

3 5

10

2

Mapped Area

Map art by RJThompsonART.com Map information courtesy National Geographic Maps

1. Hatchery Hole 2. Upper Connolly 3. Ledge Rock 4. Lower Connolly 5. Leaning Alder 6. Loop Hole 7. Mossy Rock 8. Salmon Flats 9. Garbage Dump 10. Jude’s Flat 11. Lake Creek Hole Boat launch

FORKS, Wash.–The risk and the reward of the Sol Duc River is in its rocks – boateaters behind which hide giant steelhead. Guide Mike Zavadlov (360-640-8109) divides the Duc into six runs “which will all have fish from January through March. From the top down is Riverside, Bear Creek, Hatchery, Maxfield, Middle Run and Lower End.” The first two are probably the most difficult and it’s highly suggested you book a trip with a qualified guide who has made these runs numerous times. The Duc is good for side-drifting, float fishing and pulling plugs. –TERRY WIEST Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

14 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


OLYMPIC PENINSULA

Humptulips River Coho Stevens Creek Hatchery Humptulips

Mapped Area Highway 101

Reynvaan Bar

Kirk

patr

ick R

oad

101

Copalis Station

Humptulips River

Copalis Crossing

LEGEND

Bank fishing Best late season water Boat launch

Thorberg

Tulips Oce

an

Bea

ch

Roa

New London

d

Morley (Jet sled launch) 109

Grays Harbor

101

0

1

2

scale in miles

16 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

4

ABERDEEN, Wash.–The Humptulips River starts getting big coho in September and provides good fishing all the way through January. Some of the best fishing – and certainly the best bank access – is near the hatchery on Stevens Creek. But the Hump is made for floating. Don’t go past the dangerous boat chute below the Highway 101 bridge without pounding the water for fish stacked up around the hatchery. Target back sloughs, eddies and deep pools, especially ones with cover such as log jams. In low water twitch jigs such as 3⁄8-ounce black-and-purple Mack’s Glo Getters or similarly colored jigs while in rising waters try size 3 to 5 Vibrax in silver and chartreuse or silver and fluorescent red. Casted or back-trolled Wiggle Warts also work. –JASON BROOKS Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.


ALUMAWELD

ARIMA

GLASTRON

SMOKERCRAFT

O L Y M P I C

Verle’s LLC Your Complete Hunting, Boating, Fishing and Repair Destination Since 1948.

1-877-426-0933 www.verles.com

P E N I N S U L A

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 17


OLYMPIC PENINSULA

Wynoochee River Steelhead MONTESANO, Wash.—The ’Nooch, as it’s known, is no stranger to most steelheaders. Typically it’s among the top rivers in Washington, producing fish as early as November, but really picking up in January and February, and good through the end of season, March 31. Bankies, drift boats and sleds all have room to play. Your bait will be determined on how each stretch of river looks. In flats and deeper holes, use bait; for boulderridden areas and near brush, use jigs; around undercuts and slots near the bank, use pink worms. Some of the best bank spots are up high, near spur road 7400, while plunkers like the water near Montesano. Sledders work from Black Creek down to the Chehalis while drift boaters enjoy the 14-mile-long 7400 to White Bridge, and 9-mile White Bridge to Black Creek floats. Go left at the diversion dam and rope your boat over – do not float it. –Terry Wiest Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

18 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]


O L Y M P I C

And don’t forget to keep checking back for specials and new products.

WE HAVE EVERYTHING YOU NEED

RODS • REELS PLUS GEAR & ACCESSORIES

RE-POWER WITH US! Biggest inventory in the area. We service all major brands

810 Auburn Way N. - Auburn • HOURS Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm • Sat. 9am-4pm

253-833-1440 • www.AuburnSportsMarineInc.com

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 19

P E N I N S U L A

Your Complete Boating & Fishing Store

See Our Online Store www.AuburnSportsMarineInc.com


SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON

Willapa Bay Salmonids

Willapa Basin Steelhead, Coho, Kings LEGEND

Trolling water Bank access Boat launch Map art by RJThompsonART.com Map information courtesy National Geographic Maps

Mapped Area

Artic

North River

101

Lower Salmon Cr. Smith Creek Smith Creek

105

Tokeland

Ward Creek Willapa-Monahan Landing Rd.

Raymond

Wilson Creek

Willapa South Bend North Fork

6

Canon River

Nemah

Willapa River

South Fork

Palix River Willapa Bay

Menlo

Willapa Hatchery

h

ut

So

Nemah Hatchery 0 3 6 No rth Mi scale in miles dd Ne le m Ne ah ma R. er hR Riv . le sel Na Bennos Naselle Hatchery Easement, Hwy. 4 Salmon Creek Ne

ah m

R.

101

Naselle Resort Hotel

401

20 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

4

Rosburg

NASELLE, Wash.–If coho, steelhead and even Chinook sound like an appetizing Christmas spread, consider heading for Willapa Bay streams this holiday season. The rivers get a mix of hatchery and wild stocks, some of which come in pretty stout thanks to feeding late into the year in the ocean. Silvers in the 18- to 20-pound range aren’t uncommon; the average will run 10 to 12 pounds. Bait under a bobber is the most popular offering, but the fish will readily take spinners and spoons. Light-lined Corky-yarn combos, especially when the rivers are low and clear, are also effective. The drawback is access. While you can reach the water via highway bridges, hatcheries, pull-offs and timberlands, there’s also a lot of private land to be aware of. There are limited boat ramps, but some anglers get around that by trolling tidewater. Just beware that Willapa Bay is shallow and dangerous. –TERRY OTTO Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.


S O U T H W E S T

LIGHTWEIGHT. The lightest 200-hp four stroke on the market

POWERFUL.

2.8L displacement and Variable Camshaft Timing give it the best power-to-weight ratio of any 200-hp four stroke

COMPACT.

Nearly 120 pounds lighter than our four-stroke V6 F200

FORWARD THINKING.

Show the water who’s boss with the new F200 In-Line Four. Incredibly light, responsive and fuel efficient, it serves up plenty of muscle to handily propel a variety of boats. On top of that, its 50-amp alternator offers the power to add a range of electronics, and its 26-inch mounting centers and compatibility with either mechanical or digital controls give you the flexibility to easily upgrade your outboard or rigging. Experience legendary Yamaha reliability and the freedom of forward thinking, with the all-new F200 In-Line Four. IDAHO Hayden Mark’s Marine, Inc. 888-821-2200 www.marksmarineinc.com

WASHINGTON Auburn Auburn Sports & Marine Inc. 253-833-1440 www.auburnsportsmarineinc.com

OREGON Coos Bay Y Marina 541-888-5501 www.ymarinaboats.com

Chinook Chinook Marine Repair, Inc. 800-457-9459 www.chinookmarinerepair.com

Eugene Maxxum Marine 541-686-3572 www.maxxummarine.com

YamahaOutboards.com/F200InLine

Mount Vernon Master Marine 360-336-2176 www.mastermarine.com

Olympia US Marine Sales & Service 800-455-0818 www.usmarinesales.com

Port Angeles Port Angeles Power Equipment 360-452-4652 www.papowerequipment.com

Pasco Northwest Marine and Sport 509-545-5586 www.nwmarineandsport.com

Port Townsend Westside Marine 360-385-1488 www.westsidemarine.com

Port Orchard Kitsap Marina 360-895-2193 www.kitsapmarina.com

Seattle Jacobsen’s Marine 866-742-2335 www.jacobsensmarine.com

Follow Yamaha on Facebook® and Twitter™

REMEMBER to always observe all applicable boating laws. Never drink and drive. Dress properly with a USCG-approved personal intended to be an endorsement. © 2013 Yamaha Motor Corporation, U.S.A. All rights reserved.

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 21

W A S H I N G T O N

THE ALL-NEW F200 IN-LINE FOUR.


SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON

Cowlitz River Steelhead Blue Creek Blue Creek ramp

Toledo-Winlock pencer Ro S Airport

505

H

ad

eR ow

oa

Massey Bar

5

d

Evans Road Layton Road

Massey Bar ramp

Toledo-Vader Rd.

Eadon Road

Toledo

505

Toledo ramp

Cowlitz River

LEGEND

n

I-5 ramp

o cks

. y. S w H

Ja

Mapped Area

Sa

lm

on

0

Cr ee

1/ 2

1

scale in miles

k

2

Best side drifting water Best plug and diver and bait water 505 Best bank fishing Boat launch

TOLEDO, Wash.—Turkey Day is the official kick-off to winter steelheading in the Northwest, but you don’t have to wait until the holiday to start fishing. Watch Tacoma Power’s weekly “Cowlitz Fish Report” starting at the beginning of November for fish numbers in the productive Southwest Washington river. Blue Creek is ground zero for the fishing, thanks to very large smolt releases, but there’s also good water at Massey Bar and Toledo. Bank anglers drift fish, run bobber and jigs or swing flies while jet boaters side-drift with eggs and yarnies. When winter temperatures hit, most boaters switch to back-trolling K-11Xs, Wiggle Warts, Brad’s Wigglers and 3.5 MagLips in green or blue pirate, and red, green or blue metallics. – ANDY SCHNEIDER

Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

22 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]


SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON

Mayfield Lake Coho

MOSSYROCK, Wash.—Looking for a change from combat fishing on Southwest Washington winter steelhead rivers? Target 16to 18-inch landlocked coho on Mayfield Lake. The 2,200-acre reservoir on the middle Cowlitz is also heavily stocked with rainbows and produces native trout. Best results come from slow trolling a small flasher or dodger followed by a Wedding Ring or other spinner baited with a nightcrawler, corn or shrimp, or an F4 FlatFish. Target the 25- to 45-foot depths for coho, shallower for trout. There are launches at two parks. – ROBERT CGRAGGEN Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

24 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]


*R¿VKLQJ

Rent an adventure!

! stment e v n i r you Protect

For more information call

253-591-5325

S O U T H W E S T

Dry, secure and affordable boat storage for vessels 17' and under Elevator service to the water and access to South Puget Sound Discounts on tackle for tenants Live herring available most of the year PERITYFPMGFSEXPEYRGLWXEJJIHMRWYQQIVJSVWQSSXLXVEJ½G¾S[ Largest and nicest launch facility in the South Sound nceMarina.com Large parking area, rental boats available tDe½a n i o P Ethanol free gas

W A S H I N G T O N

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 25


SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON

Lewis River Coho

WOODLAND, Wash.—The Lewis River features two coho runs, an early one which arrives in late August and peaks in late September, and a second which comes in in mid-October and peaks in early November. Some bright fish are caught as late as December. All are returning to the salmon hatchery, about 4 miles below Merwin Dam, and home to the Meat Hole, but coho also stack up in holes below there. Anglers cast spinners such as size 3 through 5 Vibrax, sometimes dressing them with a hoochie skirt, cast or back-troll purple plugs, float eggs under a bobber or side-drift or drift fish Corkies plain or with bait. –TERRY OTTO Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going. Phil Rudat with a North Fork Lewis River coho. (FISHINGADDICTSNORTHWEST.COM)

26 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


“For those hi-performance boats” Go where no prop has dared! Feel confident going into those shallow waters.

Made of hi-impact stainless steel!

Look for the Northwest Sportsman ATLAS app. coming soon. Check out nwsportsmanmag.com for availability.

See your local dealer or call FROM $116

1-888-658-4700

www.propsavers.com

! G N I C I R P y l d n ie r F r e m o t s Cu 1-5 Exit 36 • Kelso, WA

www.UNEEKRV.com

Right on the Freeway – Right on the Price

800-248-6335

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 27

W A S H I N G T O N

TRUCK CAMPERS • TRAVEL TRAILERS / 5TH WHEELS PARK MODELS / TENT TRAILERS

S O U T H W E S T

FROM $121


NORTHWEST OREGON

Nehalem Bay Salmon WHEELER, Ore.—Imagine a forgotten bay, loaded with crab, Chinook and coho, all less than two hours from Portland. That’s Nehalem, “a very healthy bay,” in the words of local guide Russ Morrow (503-310-9733). He says mid-September is best as that’s when the weeds thin out and fresh salmon move in on every tide. He fishes a plugcut herring with a 12-inch dropper and up to 16-ounce weight, 6-foot leader, and bead-chain swivels behind “plain chrome, plaidpatterned flashers.” He advises crabbing on the incoming tide as the outgoing’s current can carry light pots into the ocean, or to look for corners and coves out of the current to drop your traps during big tides. –ANDY SCHNEIDER

Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

28 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


N O R T H W E S T O R E G O N

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 29


NORTHWEST OREGON

Columbia Estuary Ducks Tillamook Bay Ducks Nehalem Bay Ducks OREGON COAST WATERFOWLING, PART 1—How do you predict when to hunt waterfowl on the massive Columbia River estuary as well as Tillamook and Nehalem Bays to the south? With that book you used to figure out when to fish those waters for salmon: a tide table. Ducks will come into freshly flooded grass to feed with every incoming tide through high tide, and head to sandy and muddy flats to rest on the last of an outgoing tide. Unlike their inland counterparts, which primarily wing at first and last light, coastal ducks will move with the tide no matter what time of day, so you can easily plan a midmorning or afternoon hunt around an incoming tide. In fact, when hunting a new area and arriving at low tide midmorning, you could scout promising areas, all in the light of day, and set up where ducks are promised flooded grass offering food. –ANDY SCHNEIDER OREGON COAST WATERFOWLING, PART 2—One thing that can spook even the unwariest of coastal waterfowl is a giant blind bought from a store. It is tough to match the ever-changing color of natural grass – except with natural grass. Instead, simply sitting in tall grass, or behind some natural cover, is one of the best ways to blend in in the estuaries and bays. If a blind or boat is a must, utilize natural vegetation for your cover. Just make sure to harvest it from another location than where you will be hunting. Not having a set blind can also be a big 30 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]


800-325-2220

Made in the

www.tcsjerky.com

Located on HWY 101 in Tillamook Oregon

SMOKED SALMON SALMON JERKY SMOKED BEEF RD BEEF STICKS GIFT PACKS CHUBS

Using superb quality, lean, ground Oregon beef, flavored with hand-blended fresh herbs, and her great grandfather’s, grandfather’s and great uncle’s recipe’s she has made a very special sausage line. Low in fat and sodium, with a minimum of preservatives, this is a sausage for the health conscious diets of today. Salmon is our specialty. Smoked salmon with the Debbie D label is spectacular in both flavor and texture. It is moist and delicious. Our salmon jerky is simply the best jerky product anywhere.

We vacuum package and smoke fish and game. We ship all over the US and just next door.

To order visit www.debbiedssausage.com or call 503-842-2622 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 31

O R E G O N

THE BEST SAUSAGE AND JERKY YOU EVER ATE!

N O R T H W E S T

Tillamook Country Smoker, Inc. Bay City, Tillamook County, Oregon 97107


NORTHWEST OREGON benefit as winds often change around high tide. No matter the estuary, high tide always seems to bring a wind with it. If you are simply hiding in grass, you can easily move to put the wind at your back and have the birds land in front of you without much hassle. –ANDY SCHNEIDER OREGON COAST WATERFOWLING, PART 3—Not only does the tide have a huge effect on how you hunt, you also have to watch it closely to avoid being stranded from your boat or route back to higher ground. A 5-foot exchange – the average – will turn a 1-foot-deep mud puddle into a 6-foot-deep swimming hole in just a few hours. More than one duck hunter has lost his life attempting to get back to his boat during the wrong part of the tide. If stranded, just wait it out for safe passage once again. Having a small chase boat or kayak to run down cripples or shuttle you back to safety is a good idea. A retriever is almost a must too. Also, make sure your decoys have, at least, 10 feet of line to a 5-ounce lead. Large spreads are not as necessary. –ANDY SCHNEIDER Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

O E C 5 w

K P 5 w

32 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]


Perfection Is Worth Waiting For. The outboard you’ve been waiting for is here. The new Honda BF250: the ultimate in Honda engineering and performance. The advanced features below are just a glimpse of the world-famous Honda technology built into the BF250, helping make it a 2011 IBEX Innovation Award winner. Plus, you can count on legendary Honda reliability, so you’re always sure that your outing is a round-trip ticket. The best-in-class BF250 is available at your award-winning Honda Marine Dealer. In the meantime, take a closer look at hondamarine.com. You’ll quickly see that perfection has arrived.

BLAST boosts low speed torque for maximum hole shot performance.

Lean Burn Control adjusts the air-fuel mix for tremendous fuel economy.

O R E G O N

SPECIAL FINANCING AVAILABLE!

VTEC for a superior combination of power and torque throughout the operating range.

NMEA 2000ÂŽ Certified connectivity allows engine data to be interfaced with on-board systems and systems displays, such as SONAR and GPS.

Coverage The Last Day As It Is On The First.

See Your Honda Marine Dealer For Details.

†

$2800 Value vs. Competitor’s Warranty &!#4/29 "!#+%$ s ./. $%#,).).' 4/0 4/ "/44/- s ./ $%$5#4)",%3 Remember, A Honda True 5 Warranty Is Better Than A Third Party 6 Year.

N O R T H W E S T

Introducing The New Honda BF250

Honda Marine Excels In Customer Satisfaction — 8 Years Running!

!WARDED "Y 4HE .ATIONAL -ARINE -ANUFACTURERS !SSOCIATION !ND 4HE "EST )N #LASS "& 7ON 4HE  )"%8 )NNOVATION !WARD

OREGON EUGENE Clemens Marina 541-688-5483 www.clemensmarina.com

WASHINGTON AUBURN Auburn Sports & Marine Inc. 253-833-1440 www.auburnsportsmarineinc.com

PASCO Northwest Marine and Sport 509-545-5586 www.nwmarineandsport.com

KLAMATH FALLS Pelican Marina 541-882-5834 www.pelicanmarinaoregon.com

CHINOOK Chinook Marine Repair, Inc. 800-457-9459 360-777-8361 www.chinookmarinerepair.com

TACOMA King Salmon Marine Sales and Service 253-830-2962 www.kingsalmonsales.com

To Find Your Nearest Authorized Honda Marine Dealer, Visit

hondamarine.com

TACOMA Tacoma Boat Sales & Service 253-301-4013 www.tacomaboatsales.com

† 5 year, Honda-backed, transferrable, non-declining outboard warranty value established by comparing to the cost of a competitive four stroke 250hp outboard extended service contract. Š 2012 American Honda Motor Co., Inc. Always wear a personal flotation device while boating and read your owner’s manual. All Honda outboards meet EPA and CARB emission levels.

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 33


NORTHWEST OREGON

Clackamas River Steelhead Clackamas

212

224

Riverside

205

99E

Carver 224

Outlook

Gladstone

SE 232nd Dr.

Carver

Barton Barton

S. Forsythe Rd.

S. Red

Oregon City

land R

Bonnie Lure State Park

d.

205

224

S. Bradley R

West Linn

d.

Redland 0 213

1

2

4

Feldheimer

scale in miles

Lower McIver

Four Corners

Clackamas River Clackamas

Steelhead

LEGEND Excellent bobber and jig water Good plug water Good side drifting water Boat ramp Boat slide

Milo McIver State Park

McIver

Estacada

ESTACADA, Ore.–The best drift boat stretches on the Clackamas River are from Feldheimer’s to Barton and Barton to Carver while Riverside or Carver are good putins for jet sleds. Both put you in the middle of prime side-drifting water. Best bank access is at Milo McIver Park, though winter steelhead won’t push into this stretch until midseason. Early on, look to Bonnie Lure at the mouth of Eagle Creek, Barton Park, Carver Park or the pull-offs on Clackamas River Drive below Carver. Plunkers should try Riverside and Clackamette Park during high flows. Best river levels for sleds are 12.75 to 13.5 feet while any time the river level is below 12.5 feet is good for drifters and bankies. –ANDY SCHNEIDER Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

34 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]


Willamette Falls Springers

Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

Map art: RJThompsonART.com

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 35

O R E G O N

–TERRY OTTO

N O R T H W E S T

OREGON CITY–Drive over one of the Willamette’s many downtown bridges from midwinter into midspring and you’ll see Portland anglers hoglined up or plunking from the bank, hoping for a Chinook to bite their plugs, Spin-NGlos, herring, prawns, eggs and other baits. The best stretch is from Willamette Falls to Sellwood Bridge. Whatever kind of fishing you like to do, there’s a place for it in this reach. There are deep, slow holes good for deepwater trolling; shallower shelves for trolling on the bottom; gravel bars that make for good anchoring and plunking spots; and great fastwater places to back-bounce bait. Just beware that the currents below the falls can be tricky, and the area has become home to sea lions.


NORTHWEST OREGON

Siletz River Steelhead Siletz River

LEGEND

ree k

Ro ot C

South Fo

rk

k

Wildcat Creek

ird

Eu

Cr ee

k

k

ch re C

e re

re e

Big Eddy

Private gate Palmer Creek ODFW acclimation Site

Sun sh Cre ine ek

Steel Bridge

Wildcat Bridge

Moonshine County Park k Moonshine ree Park Road Mill C

Oj

al

la C

r.

Jay b

Ojalla Bridge (rough slide launch)

ork st F

yC Ro

229

Jack Morgan Park

Ea

Strome Park HEAD OF TIDE

k or tF es W

Plum Creek timberland. Great bank fishing. Walk in from private gate 7 days a week. Drive in only on Saturdays and Sundays. Boat launch Drifts 1 Moonshine Park to Twin Bridges 2 Twin Bridges to upper part of town of Siletz 3 The Town Run 4 Lower part of town of Siletz to Ojalla Bridge 5 Ojalla Bridge to Morgan 6 Morgan to Strome Park, especially on a high out-flowing tide

to Lincoln City

0

1

2

4

scale in miles

Second Steel Bridge Mil

ler

Cre

ek

Siletz

BRING ROPE TO PUT IN AND TAKE OUT

Logsde n

Mapped Area

Road

Old Mill Park

to Newport 229

Logsden

Hee Hee Illahee Park

Twin Bridges

Sam Creek

Rock

Cree k

Map information courtesy National Geographic Maps

SILETZ, Ore.–Among the most successful of Oregon Coast steelhead broodstock programs is the one on the Siletz, which sees solid returns of fish each winter. Anglers love this river because of its 55 miles of accessibility from tidewater up to where smolts are released, at Moonshine Park. Fishing kicks in around Thanksgiving and remains robust through April. Guide Nathan Cornelius (541-961-7749) says, “One of the nicest pieces of steelhead water is from Moonshine Park down to Twin Bridges.” It floats best between 51⁄2 up to 8 feet. The easiest drift is Twin to Hee Hee Illahee, best at 4 to 6 feet. There’s textbook water for every type of gear on the Siletz. –LARRY ELLIS Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

36 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


N O R T H W E S T O R E G O N

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 37


NORTHWEST OREGON

Alsea River Steelhead Crooked Creek

Kozy Kove Mill Cr.

Scott Creek

Hatchery Cr.

Tidewater

Barclay Creek

2

Mill Cr. Hellion Rapids Quarry Hole Cedar Cr.

Barclay Breaks Mike Bauer Blackberry Park

North Fork Alsea

1 Stoney Point

Grass Creek Forest Camp

34

Five Rivers Benner Cr. Five Rivers

1

2

4

scale in miles

Seeley Cr.

Alsea Honey Grove Cr.

Missouri Bend

Birch Cr. Salmonberry Park Sulman Creek

South Fork Alsea Bummer Creek

Map information courtesy National Geographic Maps

WALDPORT, Ore.–The Alsea River kicks out robust numbers of hatchery steelhead from mid-November through April. “We get one of the highest total catches out of all the coastal basins in Oregon,” says James Ray, a state fisheries biologist. Martin Thurber of Willakenzie Guide Service (541-741-7927) says, “There are so many different runs that have classic steelhead water. Depending on the water level, you may encounter five different types of water in the same run. You have to be prepared for just about everything.” His drift boat resembles a floating porcupine, with at least three rods apiece for plugging as well as side-drifting roe. “This river fishes best when it’s between 4½ to 6 feet, but it’s perfect at 5 feet,” he adds. –LARRY ELLIS

Mapped Area

BEST FLOATS Drift 1 Drift 2

Mill Creek Park

Minotti Cr.

Lake Creek 0

Schoolhouse Cr. Fall Creek Digger Cr. Maltby Cr. River’s Edge Campbell Park

Alsea River Fish Hatchery

Drift 3 Drift 4

Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

GOOD BANK FISHING 1 Mike Bauer Wayside (bank fishing, plunking) 2 Barclay Breaks (bank fishing) Boat launch

38 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


Siuslaw River Steelhead Deadwood Landing

Deadwood Green Creek Konnie Memorial Access

Rainrock

L a ke C re e k

0

1/ 2

2

1

scale in miles

36

Tide

Firo

Siuslaw Swisshome Tide Landing

Siu

sla

Schindler Landing Rd. coach Stage

w R ive r

Mapleton Mapleton Landing 126

Siuslaw River & Lake Creek LEGEND

126

Top float Good bank access Boat launch

Austa Landing

Linslaw Park

Richardson

Whittaker Creek

SWISSHOME, Ore.—The new year marks the time when winter steelhead move into the Siuslaw River, and while the return of hatchery fish back to its tributaries Whittaker and Green Creeks peaks around President’s Day, they can be caught into April. Bank access is good, but floating the river is the best option and there are a good number of ramps. Boaters side-drift or pull plugs. Other good baits include pink worms, Corkies and roe, and egg, articulated prawn and bunny leech pattern. But with large portions of this river quite snaggy, bring a lot of gear. River levels at or between 4 to 7 feet by the Mapleton gauge are best for fishing during the winter. Also be aware that you’ll need a Lane County Park Pass for the majority of parks and ramps. –TROY RODAKOWSKI Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 39

O R E G O N

Mapped Area

Nekoma

S O U T H W E S T

Farnham Landing Tiernan


SOUTHWEST OREGON

Umpqua River Steelhead

Umpqua River LEGEND BEST DRIFT TIMING Thanksgiving – December 15 December 15 – January 10 January 10 – February February – March Map information courtesy National Geographic Maps

0

2

4

Mapped Area 8

scale in miles

ELKTON, Ore.–The Umpqua is legendary for trophy steelhead. Winter-runs begin to trickle in around Thanksgiving, and as fall deepens, the fish push further and further up. Martin Thurber (541-741-7927) says the ideal height for an early-season float from Scott Creek to Scottsburg Park is just under 6½ feet. Pull Mud Bugs and sand shrimp or Hot Shots, or side-drift Puff Balls and roe. There is also great bank fishing at the Sheep Shed and Beckley holes. The ramp at Kellogg Bridge, also known as Lefflers, is a must-take-out situation. –LARRY ELLIS Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going

40 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


Beautiful

G

Umpqua River Settin

(541) 584-2832 Reservations accepted

elktonrvpark.com

Up To* nwsportsmanmag.com

72%

ORDER ONLINE

OR CALL 800-332-1736 DIGITAL VERSION AVAILABLE

36 issue for only $49.95 ONLY $1.98 24 issues for $39.95. SAVE 66% 12 issues for $29.95. SAVE 50%

*For 3 year subscriptions. Please allow 6-8 weeks for delivery of first issue.

AN ISSUE

NWSPORTSMANMAG.COM/DIGITAL 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 41

O R E G O N

Save

S O U T H W E S T

Full Hook-up Sites River Sites Pull-Thrus Available Groups Welcome Pavilion • Fire Ring Drift Boat Slide Fish year-round Walk to: Restaurants, Wineries & Gardens


SOUTHWEST OREGON

Siltcoos, Tahkenitch Lakes Coho Cr ee k

Map information courtesy National Geographic Maps

1/2

1

2

scale in miles

Siltcoos Landing

Ma

Miller Arm

Kiechle Arm

0

pl e

to Florence

Mapped Area

Siltcoos

Arrowhead Point

Dunes City

FLORENCE, Ore.–The productive waters of these two central Oregon Coast 101 Booth Is. lakes make them great places for young Ada Park coho to grow before heading out to sea, Reed Is. ek re C and when the salmon come back, dle Fid they’re often bigger than other silvers reared in streams. To catch one, the Fiddle best advice is to get as close to the inCreek Inlet lets as possible without encroaching on fishing deadlines. Siltcoos coho start going on the bite in mid-October and action peaks arund mid-November; Tahkenitch’s fishery goes into December. Early in the day or during low-light conditions, use dark plugs and spinTahkenitch ners, says guide Jeff Jackson Lake (541-268-6944), and when the sun is up, go with pinks, oranges and blue or green pirate. “The hot spinner for LEGEND both lakes is the Sonic Bell Cast Siltcoos Special spinners in the Maple Arm in hot-candy-pink with a and toward Maple Creek Troll Wiggle Wards and Size 7 blade,” says local k Super Hoochies between ree Cherry Arm C l luremaker Dean Hendricks the Male and Fiddle Creek te Lie Arm Mallard Arm (541-997-7080). –LARRY ELLIS Cast Siltcoos Special Fiv em il

eC

ree k

Siltcoos Lake

101

to Coos Bay

42 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Mallard Creek

Siltcoos & Tahkenitch lakes

spinners Troll Hot Shots and Wiggle Warts near th outlet at high water Cast Sonic Bell spinners and Super Hoochies Boat launch

Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


Eugene Summer Steelhead Mapped Area

S O U T H W E S T

Willamette River

O R E G O N

LEGEND The Town Run Pengra-to-Jasper float Smolt liberation sites, ramps Boat ramps

EUGENE–Guide Bret Stuart (541-988-3828) has one word for the upper Willamette River’s “Town Run,” an 8-mile stretch between Eugene and Springfield. It’s home to summer steelhead as well as trout, features numerous boat ramps, can be run in drift boats or jet boats, and is the “shizzle.” ODFW releases smolts at Island Park and the “D” Street boat ramps in Springfield, the Alton Baker and Valley River boat ramps in Eugene, and two sites in the Middle Fork Willamette above Springfield. Throughout the run are numerous pilings which help create structure and cover. A good tactic is to run a diver, 5-foot leader, size 14 Spin-N-Glo in a bright color like egg-fluorescent with Mylar wings, two 5mm beads and a 2/0 Gamakatsu hook baited with a sand shrimp. –LARRY ELLIS Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 43


Santiam, McKenzie Rivers Steelhead

WALTERVILLE, Ore.–Anglers in the central and southern Willamette Valley have a very nice pair of streams to work for hatchery summer steelhead, the McKenzie and South Santiam Rivers. If one’s not fishing, hit they other – they’re only 45 minutes or so apart. The former is one of Oregon’s most pristine and scenic rivers; most of its fish range between 7 and 9 pounds. The latter provides big numbers of fish in concentrated locations. Both feature good floats, several boat ramps and other accesses. Drifting eggs or sand shrimp works well, as do Little Cleo spoons in blue and silver or green and silver combos, Hot Shots in blue/green or silver contrast and fluorescent, Moal Leeches in a purple/pink or purple/black, Green Butt Silver Hiltons and Egg-sucking Leeches. –TROY RODAKOWSKI Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

44 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]


S O U T H W E S T O R E G O N

SUBSCRIBE TODAY! nwsportsmanmag.com

800-332-1736 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 45


SOUTHWEST OREGON

Coos Bay Salmon Glasgow

Coos Bay LEGEND

Best coho fishing September 15-18 September 18-24 Sept. 18-Nov. 30

101

Airport

North Bend

Great bank fishing Boat launch

ou

Boardwalk lev ard

Coos Bay

Ca pe Ar ag oH igh wa y

h rt No

C FI CI PA

Barview South Jetty

nB

Sp

OC

it

EA

N

Oc ea

Isthmus Slough

Marshfield Channel Catching Slough

0

1/ 2

1

scale in miles

2

Bunker Hill 101

Charleston

Mapped Area

COOS BAY, Ore.–Coos Bay coho are really clean-tasting, just like in the ocean. They can be caught just about anywhere in this, the largest bay on the Central Oregon Coast. The action might be taking place at the jetties, around the Highway 101 bridge, in front of the boardwalk in town, or up in the Marshfield Channel – it changes at the whim of the salmon. General trolling tactics using cut-plug herring, heavy cannonball drop sinkers and a Big Al’s Fish Flash are the go-to methods here. –LARRY ELLIS Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

46 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]


S O U T H W E S T O R E G O N

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 47


SOUTHWEST OREGON

Coquille River Coho

BANDON, Ore.—A great spot to troll on the lower Coquille River for coho is the Rocky Point area, close to the boat ramp, and where you also stand a chance at hooking a Chinook. A great setup for coho in this estuary is a plug-cut herring trolled behind a Kone Zone flasher on a spreader bar using a 12-inch dropper with 2 to 4 ounces of lead. Bright pink Blue Fox spinners, Perry’s Mag Spinners, spinnerbait setups with bright red No. 4 G-spot blades and various other shocking pink concoctions trolled either behind a boat or cast from the bank can also get aggressive strikes. –LARRY ELLIS

Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

48 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]


Coquille Steelhead

Mapped Area

LEGEND A Acclimation sites Good bank access P Good plunking Good day drifts Boat ramp Coquille-Fairview Rd.

P A

LaVerne County Park

North Fork Coquille

FairviewMcKinley Rd.

Fairview

Middle Creek

McKinley

Hantz Cr.

A

Fishtrap Rd.

Frona County Park

Myrtle PointSitkum Lane

Johnson

Dora

42

Arago Norway

East Fork Coquille

Myrtle Point Powerie 42

Hoffman Wayside

Bridge

Middle Fork Coquille

Cheney Broadbent

to Roseburg

Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going

Albert H Powers Memorial Park Seven Mile

Gaylord A P

Myrtle Grove Memorial Park

Map art by RJThompsonART.com Map information courtesy National Geographic Maps

P

Powers

C dw ar d

A

W oo

Powers Highway

r.

Beaver Cr. Hayes Hole

0

1

2

4

scale in miles

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 49

O R E G O N

Fat Elk Rd.

MYRTLE POINT, Ore.—There are two qualities Northwest fishermen want in a steelhead run: aggressive biters and combative fighters. Premium filets for the table and trophy steelhead over 20 pounds are merely a bonus. In the Coquille, which features four fishy forks, you can catch fish with all those traits. Chromebright fish between 8 and 20 pounds begin trickling in around Thanksgiving, and by December, the run is in full swing and doesn’t slow down until April. Smolts are released at LaVerne Park on the North Fork, Hantz Creek on the East, Woodward and Beaver Creeks on the South. Depending on water height, either plunk with Spin-N-Glos, drift- or back-drag Corkies, Puff Balls or yarnies and roe, throw spinners, bobber fish with sand shrimp or shrimp-roe cocktails, or pull silver/black Hot Shots. –LARRY ELLIS

S O U T H W E S T

Rock Prairie County Park

Coquille

Coquille River Steelhead


SOUTHWEST OREGON

Diamond Lake Rainbows Lake Creek outlet

NF 4

795

Mapped Area

Diamond Lake Resort Cheese Hole

Marina store boat rentals

Campground

138

Thielsen View Campground

NF 0

Lake

40

40

NF 4

795

Diamo nd

30

20

10

5 479 NF

NF 0

1/4

1/2

scale in miles

50 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

1

Broken Arrow Campground

00

1

230

NF 6592

Silent C

reek

Pizza parlor and store

DIAMOND LAKE, Ore.–Imagine fishing in a hatchery that spans almost 3,000 surface acres, where rainbow have an unlimited food supply and grow 2 inches a month. That’s Diamond Lake. The southern Oregon Cascades trout factory has opportunities for all types of anglers – flyfishing with size 8 black or olive Woolly Buggers, or dragonfly and damselfly nymphs on the south end; baitfishing along its weed edges in 20 feet of water; trolling the main lake with Ford Fenders or Cowbells with a Wedding Ring tagged with a nightcrawler, or an F4 or F5 frog-colored FlatFish; and plunking PowerBait or Pautzke salmon eggs from the shore along Diamond Lake Campground and near Diamond Lake Resort (800733-7593). There are 450 campsites at three USFS campgrounds around the lake. –LARRY ELLIS Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

Diamond Lake 138

Troll flies, Needlefish & FlatFish Bait fish Troll Fly fish & bait fish Shrimp beds DEPTHS ARE SHOWN IN FEET

Good shore fishing Reed beds Weed beds Boat ramp

Map information courtesy National Geographic Maps

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


Rogue Bay Chinook 0 101

1/ 2

1/ 4 scale in miles 545

Mapped Area

Indian Creek

Rogue Bay Chinook Gold Beach

101

Better high tide fishing Better low tide fishing Boat launch

GOLD BEACH–The Rogue Bay has earned its reputation as one of the Northwest’s most productive Chinook fisheries. The salmon are big and bright – witness the 71pounder caught here in 2002 – fish populations are healthy, and the action runs from July through October. This is a troll fishery, and the vast majority of boaters use a Rogue Bait Rig, a green- or metallic-bladed spinner fished above an anchovy and with a treble hook, with a wire spreader, a 5- to 6-foot leader and beadchain, and a 15- to 18-inch dropper. The bay is shallow, and unlike some estuaries, Rogue anglers troll both directions. Typically, fishing is best high in the bay at high tide, and low in the bay at low. –ANDY MARTIN Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 51

O R E G O N

LEGEND

S O U T H W E S T

595


SOUTHWEST OREGON

Chetco River Steelhead

BROOKINGS, Ore.—The prime time to land a trophy Chetco River steelhead begins in January. How you fish the South Coast river depends on its height. When the river is dropping and between 3,000 and 4,000 cubic feet per second, most anglers side-drift, pull plugs or ”baby” back-bounce in the softer water near the sides of the river. When the river is between 2,500 and 3,000 cfs, you can still side-drift, or consider back-bouncing with roe or yarn balls. When the river is between 1,200 and 2,500 cfs, side-drifting Puff Balls-and-roe and yarnies, or long-lining Kwikfish, Wiggle Warts and Hot Shots become the textbook techniques. The Chetco becomes a little iffy for side-drifting when it drops to 1,000 cfs. If the river blows out, as soon as it starts dropping and clears to a milky-green or slate-gray hue, bank fishermen do quite well plunking a No. 4 Spin-N-Glo in flame/chartreuse (stop-and-go) and sherbet (tequila sunrise). Plunkers account for a majority of steelhead over 20 pounds. –LARRY ELLIS Editor’s note: This article ran in a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

52 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com

P b p


Honda. Built to Last.

S O U T H W E S T

EU3000is

EU3000i Handi

EU6500

• 2000 watts (16.7 A) of Honda Inverter 120V AC Power • Eco-Throttle – Runs up to 15 hrs on 1 gallon of fuel • 3000 watts (25 A) of Honda Inverter 120V AC Power • Eco-Throttle – Runs up to 7.7 hrs on 1.56 gallons of fuel

• 3000 watts (25 A) of Honda Inverter 120V AC Power • Eco-Throttle – Runs up to 20 hrs on 3.4 gallons of fuel • 6500 Watts (54.1/27.1 A) 120/240V of Honda Inverter Power • Eco-Throttle – Runs up to 14 hrs on 4.5 gallons of fuel

WASHINGTON ANACORTES Sebo’s Hardware 1102 Commercial Ave (360) 293-4575 www.sebos.com

PASCO Columbia Grain & Feed 2001 W Lewis St (509) 547-8818 www.columbiagrainandfeed.net

ISSAQUAH Issaquah Honda-Kubota 1745 NW Mall St (425) 392-5182 www.issaquahhondakubota.com

SPOKANE Spokane Power Tool 801 E Spokane Falls Blvd (509) 489-4202 www.truevalue.com/spokanepowertool

Please read the owner’s manual before operating your Honda Power Equipment and never use in a closed or partly enclosed area where you could be exposed to carbon monoxide. Connection of a generator to house power requires a transfer device to avoid possible injury to power company personnel. Consult a qualified electrician. © 2012 American Honda Motor Co., Inc.

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 53

O R E G O N

EU2000i


SOUTHWEST OREGON

Howard Prairie, Hyatt Lake Trout

ASHLAND, Ore.–Because most Oregon lakes are open to year-round trout angling, the opening day of the general fishing season in April doesn’t mean much to most local fisheries, but two notable exceptions are Howard Prairie and Hyatt, two reservoirs located in the Southern Cascades. Anglers prize the fast-growing fish in these two lakes, believing that the trout are superior in their eating quality because they’re stocked as fingerlings. Fishing on opening weekend can be better in the shallows, which are the warmest in the spring. After the weather warms, focus more on the deeper water. The usual trout baits are all productive, as is trolling with small spinners, or worms behind flashers. When you’ve had your fill of rainbows, there are bass and crappie to had near the willows. Both lakes feature USFS campgrounds and resorts. –DUANE DUNGANNON Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going. 54 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


S O U T H W E S T O R E G O N

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 55


San Juan Islands Blackmouth San Juan Islands Blackmouth

Bellingham

LEGEND

Sucia Island

Best trolling areas Boat launch

m Lu

Buckhorn

Waldron Island

mi

Beach Eastsound Haven

d an Isl

Waldron

Stuart Is.

Orcas

Island

Dolphin

Point Lawrence

Bellingham Bay

Doe Bay East Sound

Roche Harbor

Samish Bay

Orcas

Mosquito Pass

Shaw Island Friday Harbor

Guemes Is.

Port Stanley Thatcher Pas

s

Decatur Lopez Is.

Lopez Sound Lopez Island Pass

A

AD

Mapped Area Cattle P t.

Richardson

Salmon Bank

Rosario Stra it

CAN IA, MB OLU TON HC NG SHI WA

TIS

BRI

San Juan Island

Cypress Is.

Blakely Is.

Padilla Bay

Anacortes Cap Sante Marina Skyline Marina

Fidalgo Island

Iceberg Pt.

Deception Pass 0

2

4

8

scale in miles

Whidbey Island

La Conner

Map information courtesy National Geographic Maps

ANACORTES, Wash.–When winter blackmouth season begins in the productive San Juans, three things are certain: the immature kings will be thick in the islands, feasting on the plentiful feed, and regardless of the wind, there will be somewhere to get out of the waves and work a herring. “The baitfish are small in the islands during the winter and (blackmouth) are a sucker to inhale a green-label plug-cut herring, 20 feet behind a downrigger ball, managed to troll 5 to 10 feet off the deck,” says expert Tony Floor. “I like to fish in water from 90 to 140 feet.” Mooching also works, but if the dogfish are thick, Floor switches to a Coyote spoon or Coho Killer. –TIM BUSH Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going. 56 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


GREATER PUGET SOUND

Skykomish River Steelhead, Kings k

e re sC

d

oo W

Al Borlin Park

2

Sultan Sultan launch Jim’s Rock

Monroe St. ain W. M Lewis Street Bridge launch

2

522

lough

Thunderbird

lS

Haske

Younkers Cracker Bar CONTINUES BELOW

Elwell

Bar

Ben Howard launch

k ree

rC

Two Bit

203

0

Mapped Area

363 Ave. SE Wallace River mouth

1/2

1

2

scale in miles

Startup

. Reece Rd

Wallace River Gold Bar May Creek

Reiter Intake (above no-fishing deadline) Cable Hole (below no-fishing deadline)

Mann Road

Reiter Ponds

Skykomish River LEGEND

Good bank/boat fishing Good boat fishing Bank access

0

1/2

1

High Bridge launch 2

scale in miles Map information courtesy National Geographic Maps

SULTAN, Wash.—Doesn’t matter if you own a pimped-out jet sled, a beater drift boat or just a pair of hip-boots, the Sky is your river for summer steelhead and Chinook. The stretch between Lewis Street Bridge and the Wallace River is best for both species. Fish 10-pound hi-vis mainline and 8-pound leaders with 6 feet of leader. Salmon eggs are popular, but fishing prawn chunks or scented yarnies can be very productive for summer-runs. The mouth of the Wallace is also very productive during early mornings for float fishing or drift-fishing eggs, or tossing spoons. During high-water years or when visiblity is low, focus on inside corners. As summer progresses and the river drops and clears, diver and bait setups are best bets. –ANDREW MORAVEC Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going. 58 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


Central Puget Sound Chinook Port Townsend Midchannel Bank Marrowstone Point

Marysville Langley

Bush Point

Freeland

Port Ludlow

Everett

Foulweather Bluff Skunk Bay Point No Point

Mukilteo Possession Point 0

Port Gamble

Apple Cover Point

2

4

8

scale in miles

Edmonds

Kingston Mapped Area

Point Wells

Poulsbo

Area 9-10 Chinook Silverdale LEGEND

Top Chinook areas Boat launch

Jeff Head

Meadow Point

Kirkland

West Point

Seattle

Yeomalt Point Elliott Bay

Bellevue

Bremerton

Map information courtesy National Geographic Maps

EDMONDS, Wash.—When Puget Sound’s Marine Areas 9 and 10 open in mid-July for hatchery Chinook, angler Nelson Goodsell says you must “start thinking like a big lazy king” to figure out where to fish: behind points in back eddies where the salmon don’t have to fight the current, and right on bottom where there’s feed such as candlefish. Nelson has had success with a Silver Horde Coho Killer spoon in “cotton candy.” Also try a Kingfisher Lite Spoon, which has a thinner blade and a super flicker flutter to its action. Run them behind 40 to 50 inches behind a flasher, using downriggers. –TIM BUSH Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going. 60 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


G R E A T E R P U G E T S O U N D

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 61


GREATER PUGET SOUND

Kitsap Lake Trout Kitsap Lake LEGEND

Still fishing Bank angling Trolling Boat launch

3

Mapped Area

Kitsap Creek ti Aus nD rive Kitsap Way

La ke Dr ive

ke R

e riv

p La

wD rlo

itsa

Ha

st K We d.

BREMERTON, Wash.—The I-5 corridor in Western Washington is thick with trout lakes, but venturing west of the interstate will turn up a nice late winterearly spring water, Kitsap Lake. Even in mid-March it can see bug activity, making for good trolling, still-fishing or bank angling. Covering 240 acres and reaching depths of around 30 feet, Kitsap warms quickly and weeds become an issue because they grow just as quickly. As season progresses, you will also see an increase in fastmoving recreational watercraft. There are two ramps on its south end. –“UNCLE WES” MALMBERG

0

250 500

Fishing dock Kitsap Lake Park launch

10 0 0

scale in feet

Price R

WDFW launch

Kitsap Lake Park 62 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

oad

Map information courtesy National Geographic Maps

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


G R E A T E R P U G E T S O U N D

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 63


GREATER PUGET SOUND

Bucoda

Grand Mound Bucoda Volunteer Park

507

Hanafor d Creek Schaeffer Park

Fort Borst Park

Dam

Skookumchuck Reservoir

Chehalis River

1

2

scale in miles

Centralia 5

Map information courtesy National Geographic Maps

Thompson Creek

Skookumchuck River 0

Riverside Park

Hatchery

Skookumchuck Road

Thompson Creek Rd.

Fords Prairie

r.

nC Cr .

od yC

d

on

Blo

Ol

lm

nso

12

Hw

Sa

9 y. 9

Joh

5

r.

Skookumchuck River Steelhead

Mapped Area

LEGEND Parking and access Drift fishing with Corkies and yarn, bobbers and jigs, or bait Plunking Closed waters

BUCODA, Wash.—Though there are many topnotch winter steelhead rivers in the Northwest, if you live along I-5 between Portland and Seattle, add the Skookumchuck to your list of waters to check out. It offers good fishing from January through March, but primarily for bank anglers. “The No. 1 method used is plunking nightcrawlers off the bottom,” says Todd Rock of Auburn Sports & Marine (253-833-1440), but a float and a scented fluorescent pink jig, or a jig tipped with a piece of nightcrawler should also work. The water below the hatchery is also good for drifting Corkies and yarn or bobbers and jigs. –MATT SMITH Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

64 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


Lower Columbia Steelhead Rosburg Ilwaco

Brookfield

County Line Park

4

Skamokawa Cathlamet

Willow Grove

5

Astoria Westport

Kalama Beach

Quincy Rainier

Jones Beach Dibblee Beach 30 Rainier Riverfront Park Prescott Beach Sand Island Marine Park Cannon Beach

Seaside

Kalama

Dike Road 0

5

Woodland

10

20

scale in miles

St. Helens Warren

26

101

Mapped Area

Longview Kelso

30

Walton Beach Willow Bar

Nehalem

Frenchman’s Bar Park

Vancouver Lewis & Clark SRA Camas 503

6

84

Lower Columbia Tillamook River Steelhead

Portland Meldrum Bar

LEGEND

Summer steelhead spots

5

205

Bonneville

Troutdale Chinook Landing

Rooster Rock State Park Government Island SRA M. James Gleason Memorial Boat Launch

PRESCOTT BEACH, Ore.—Break out the T-shirt, barbecue and poleholder – late spring brings the start of some of the easiest, most productive fishing around: plunking for summer-run steelhead. From mid-May through August, hundreds of thousands of these fish will stream past Lower Columbia River beaches. Gearing up is easy and inexpensive, and local tackle shops have staff experts. Best baits include Spin-N-Glos and a 1/0 hook tipped with a cured prawn tail, and X-5 FlatFish or Brad’s Wigglers in fluorescent red. Watch where other fishermen are casting – typically tighter to the bank early on – and then fish that depth yourself. Also buy a tide book: the Columbia is tidally influenced all the way to Bonneville Dam, and the outgoing tide is best because it creates stronger currents that will work your baits better, and force the steelhead close to the bank. – TERRY OTTO

Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going. (KIRBY CANNON)

66 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]


C O L U M B I A R I V E R

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 67


Multnomah Channel Spring Chinook PRESCOTT BEACH, Ore.—When I take friends spring Chinook fishing, I often choose the Multnomah Channel over the Columbia or Willamette Rivers. It’s a softer, easier fishery that appeals to the less fanatic fishermen, and features long, productive flats ideal for leisurely trolling without having to turn and run back upstream every few minutes. Most fishermen troll whole or plug-cut herring behind a flasher while others flat-line sardine-wrapped plugs. Herring that is brined or dyed will usually draw more strikes, and scents are a good addition too. Best depths are from 10 to 24 feet, and the key is to adjust your baits so they stay within a foot of the bottom. Below the Gilbert River ramp is hogline country when the tide runs out, and it can be tough to find room for trolling once the lines form. –TERRY OTTO Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

68 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]


C O L U M B I A R I V E R

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 69


COLUMBIA RIVER

Longview Fall Chinook LONGVIEW, Wash.–After fall Chinook make it past Buoy 10, they often seem to disappear until they reach the mouth of the Cowlitz and other tributaries which run a good 5 degrees colder than the mainstem Columbia, drawing in the kings. One of the best ways to catch the salmon in these waters is with a wobbler. As ocean tides still influence these waters, you’ll need a wobbler with more bend for times of less current to maintain the lure’s action and in stronger currents, less bend. Use a 5-foot dropper line to a 10- to 20ounce weight and a 5-foot leader that ends with the wobbler. –TERRY OTTO Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

70 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]


Lower Columbia Springers Camas-Troutdale Spring Chinook Mapped Area

205

Excellent anchor locations Excellent trolling locations

Camas

14

Gove

LEGEND

Washougal rnme

nt Isl and

Lady Is.

ON IN G T WA S H G O N ORE

Parkrose

14

Gary Is. 84

0

1/ 2

2

1

Fairview

ed

1/ 2

scale in miles

O R E G O N W A S H I N G T O N

C at er p

Re

0 1/ 8 1/ 4

Lo w er

um

Van couver L ake

ad R iv er Ro

Col

G illi han Loo p Roa d

501

bia Riv

PORTLAND—Guide Pat Abel (503-307-6033) says no single technique has a lock on catching spring Chinook on the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam. “No matter if you’re on the bank or the boat, you have to spend time on the water to catch fish. By your own trial and error and watching other anglers on the water you will learn what works and what doesn’t,” Abel says. He likes to troll brined herring, cutplugged and run on a 30-pound, 24-inch leader with a two-hook setup behind a chartreuse flasher. Other times he anchors in water as shallow as 12 feet deep, but sometimes up to 30, and deploys Kwikfish, FlatFish or even a cutplug. “If you are getting bit or seeing fish caught around you, keep fishing that area,” he tips, adding that anglers should let the salmon really chew on the lure before setting the hook. –ANDY SCHNEIDER Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

501

er

Mapped Area

Troutdale

LEGEND

lla Riv mett er e

Columbia River Spring Chinook Wi

Best anchor locations Best trolling locationsPe a rc y Island Best plunking locations

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 71

R I V E R

il la r Is la n d

er

Ro

ad

scale in miles

C O L U M B I A

McGuire Is.

30

Reed Island


COLUMBIA RIVER

Columbia Pikeminnow 12b 11

2013 Registration Stations

12a 12

1a 1b 10

2a

The Northern Pikeminnow

2c

Rewards given for 9 inches or larger 10b

2d 7b 4a 3

4

5a

8a

6b

3a

Y

9 8

ou can help save salmon and get paid to do it! The Pikeminnow Sport Reward Program pays registered anglers for pikeminnow they catch that are 9 inches or longer. The program runs May 1-Sept. 30 in the Columbia from the mouth to Priest Rapids Dam and in the Snake up to Hells Canyon Dam. Pikeminnow tend to congregate in rocky areas with fast current near dams, islands, stream mouths, points, eddies, piling rows and bars in the river. Most are caught in 7 to 25 feet of water; best fishing is during low light as they move shallow. Anglers plunk, back-bounce and drift fish with an assortment of minnow-imitating plastics or bait such as chicken livers or fish guts. For more info, go to pikeminnow.org.

72 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Spring-Fall]

Registration Stations: 1a. 1b. 2a. 2c. 2d. 3. 3a. 4.

(Times as indicated)

Cathlamet Marina Willow Grove Boat Ramp Rainier Marina Kalama Marina Ridgefield M. James Gleason Boat Ramp Chinook Landing Washougal Boat Ramp/Port of Camas

4a. Marine Park (PORTCO) 5a. Beacon Rock 6b. Cascade Locks Boat Ramp 7b. Bingen Marina 8. The Dalles Boat Basin 8a. Maryhill 9. Giles French 10b. Umatilla Boat Ramp 10. Columbia Point Park 11. Vernita Bridge Rest Area 12a. Lyons Ferry 12b. Boyer Park 12. Greenbelt

10:00 am 2:00 pm 9:30 am 1:00 pm 3:30 pm 12:00 pm 9:00 am 9:30 am -

1:30 pm 5:00 pm 12:30 pm 3:00 pm 5:30 pm 5:30 pm 11:30 am 3:30 pm

4:00 pm - 6:00 pm 9:30 am - 12:30 pm 1:00 pm - 5:30 pm 9:00 am - 12:30 pm 9:00 am - 3:00 pm 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm 1:30 pm - 5:30 pm 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm 2:00 pm - 6:30 pm 10:00 am - 2:30 pm 10:30 am - 12:30 pm 10:30 am - 2:00 pm 3:30 pm - 6:30 pm


COLUMBIA RIVER

John Day Cast & Blast

RUFUS, Ore.—Before the John Day River empties into the Columbia, its flooded last 9 miles provided Northwest sportsmen a great cast-and-blast opportunity for steelhead and upland birds. Above the 500-foot safety zone that starts at water’s edge, work the willow, scrub draws, sage hills and rimrock for quail, chukar and Hungarian partridge. Back on the water, troll standard-sized Wiggle Warts in flame orange or fire tiger 100 feet behind the boat, or try wind-drifting or very slowly trolling a bobber and shrimp. –ANDY SCHNEIDER Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

74 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]


C O L U M B I A R I V E R

WASHINGTON ANACORTES Sebo’s Hardware 1102 Commercial Ave (360) 293-4575 www.sebos.com

HOQUIAM Harbor Saw & Supply Inc. 3102 Simpson Ave (360) 532-4600 www.harborsawandsupply.com

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 75


Hewescraft: A 65-Year Tradition of Performance

ewes Marine Company doesn’t measure company performance by the number of boats that it builds and delivers throughout North America; it measures its success in years. For more than 65 years (since 1948), Hewescraft has set the standard for roomy, rugged, and reliable fishing boats. Hewescraft boats are not just built for a day out fishing with the kids—they are built with room for the grandkids too. After all, they’ll be teaching their own kids how to fish out of the same boat someday. Hewescraft is the #1-selling boat in Alaska and throughout the Pacific Northwest because each all-welded aluminum hull is ten times stronger than fiberglass so each boat can last for gen-

H

76 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

erations. Hewescraft’s family-run company knows the value of ensuring that your crew is comfortable and safe on every journey, whether it’s in a quick-running river, a glassy mountain lake, or the chop of the open sea. Big-Water Comfort Meets Trailering Practicality With the recent development and production of its Pacific Explorer model, Hewescraft has answered the call for a comfortable cuddy cabin cruiser that can handle tough ocean waters and is also genuinely trailerable. The Pacific Explorer’s powerful 8-foot-wide, quarterinch-thick hull, self-bailing deck, and comfortably appointed interior are all available in a boat that re-

tains an 8’ 6” beam. This allows you to trailer it without any oversizeload restrictions. With an all-up weight that is roughly 1/3 lighter than any comparably equipped fiberglass cruiser, you’ll get to your favorite fishing grounds with gas money left in your wallet. With Hewescraft’s legendary strength and reliability, you’ll get back to the marina in safety and comfort. Visit www.hewescraft.com to find the Hewescraft dealer nearest you and to find out more about each of Hewescraft’s roomy, rugged, and reliable models. From the small (but tough) 16-foot Open Fisherman all the way up to the 26-foot Pacific Explorer, there’s a Hewescraft that will help you start your own family tradition of fun on the water.


COLUMBIA RIVER

McNary Dam Steelhead

UMATILLA, Ore.—In fall, maybe the best place to fish for steelhead bound for Inland Northwest rivers is near the McNary Dam. “Bobber and shrimp, or pulling plugs,” answers guide Bruce Hewitt (509-430-6448) when asked the “What do you use?” question. His favorite plug is a 1⁄2-ounce FatFish, but he will also use Wiggle Warts and Hot Shots, all in shades of metallic pink, black with silver flecks, or black-silver-fleck-red butt, and run in the top 10 to 30 feet of water. In the morning, he trolls downstream above the dam, then switches to upstream trolling by afternoon; below the dam, he back-trolls. Many boat anglers also use a smaller dyed shrimp below a slip bobber, and from bank or boat, bucktail or marabou jigs in black, or black and red are also favorites. –ROB PHILLIPS Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

78 Northwest Sportsman OCTOBER 2009


McNary Tailrace Walleye 221

51 Run Green channel marker 32-38 feet of water

Peterson Point

14

Paterson

64 to 62 Drift (River Markers) Big flat, fish the dropoff in 35 feet of water. When they spawn, fish the flats.

Boulder Alley 14

Shallow mud flat 35 to 37 feet

Irrigon 730

0

1/ 2

1

2

scale in miles

Columbia River 84

Mapped Area

Best hot spots

BOARDMAN, Ore.—In winter, guide Bob Roberts (541-276-0371) concentrates on a 15-mile stretch of the Columbia River between Irrigon and Boardman where he believes a new state record 20-pound walleye will come from. He fishes from Feb. 15 until the first full moon in April for the prespawn sows. Launching out of either town, depending on the wind, he targets waters from 32 to 40 feet deep, keying on the 34to 37-foot range, especially near shallow mud flats. He loves to jig and his favorite lure is a Whistler with a stinger hook on the end. Between the two hooks he will string out a whole nightcrawler so it’s nice and straight. The walleye will be either right on bottom or within 16 inches of it. Roberts says it is critical to position your boat so you can make vertical casts. –LARRY ELLIS Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

Map art: RJThompsonART.com

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 79

R I V E R

LEGEND

Boardman

84

C O L U M B I A

Glade Creek Run 40 to 44 feet of water


WASHINGTON CASCADES

Lake Chelan Kokanee

F D P & CHELAN, Wash.–Late April is the beginning of kokanee fishing on lower Lake Chelan, and action improves at the North-central Washington fjord through midMay. With June’s high sun and oncoming heat, the fish go a little deeper and begin their long trip uplake. Leaded line with Pop Gear works, but Mack’s Lures’ Flash Lites and light-action rods seem to hold these fish on better. The rig is simple: 10pound mainline, a ½- to 1-ounce banana weight, Flash Lite, rubber snubber and then either a Wedding Ring spinner or Double Whammy with a Smile blade with 24 to 30 inches of leader. Tip the hooks with white shoepeg corn and a piece of worm and troll slowly back and forth with your gear well behind the boat. There are ramps on the east end of the lake as well as many motels. –JASON BROOKS Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

80 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com

I

1

8


FULL LINE DEALERSHIP... PARTS, SERVICE & SALES!

In Yakima

1904 Fruitvale Blvd.

866-888-1021

YVMARINE.COM


WASHINGTON CASCADES

Chelan County Bears

CASHMERE, Wash.—I always seem to stumble upon bears during the hot summer months. Not because I am some sort of “bear whisperer,” but because I tend to look for them in areas that most people just blow by or overlook. Most bear hunters look at open slopes or bedding areas offering cover and escape routes and basically hunt them like they would a deer as that is what they’re used to. But bears aren’t prey animals and really only need to worry about other bears and man, so they don’t sit perched on overlooks spying down and using thermal drafts to scent what’s coming uphill. Instead, they stay where they are comfortable and can eat. In the heat of summer this means cool, wet places. Season opens Aug. 1 in southern Chelan County. –JASON BROOKS Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

82 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]


BESTWAY FIREARMS 22 S. 1st Street • Yakima 509-248-3421

Open Mon. - Fri. 9am to 6pm • Sat. 9am to 5pm

• Rifles • Shotguns • Pistols • Ammo • Reloading Supplies • Buy • Sell • Trade • Estate Purchases & Appraisels • Internet Transfers & Sales

W A S H I N G T O N

GUNS NEW & USED

C A S C A D E S

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 83


WASHINGTON CASCADES

North-central Washington Bucks CHELAN—Much of Chelan and Okanogan Counties are exceedingly rumpled, providing plenty of escape cover as well as a range of different hunting opportunities for mule deer hunters. Sportsmen look to the open, cloud-scraped meadows for the biggest bucks, but trail cams show they also like timber between 3,800 and 5,000 feed. Hunters are also learning to gravitate to burned areas. Both counties had large fires in the 1990s and 2000s, creating large areas of fresh, new nutrient-rich browse for deer, most famously illustrated by the 9x10 Tripod buck, shot in the Okanogan County burn of the same name. The wild card are weather conditions. Spring and summer rains and moderate temps provide good forage, but harsh winters can knock down the fawn crop, leading to fewer legal bucks two seasons down the line. –ANDY WALGAMOTT Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going

84 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]


W A S H I N G T O N C A S C A D E S

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 85


Western Yakima County Elk

0

5

10

scale in miles

NACHES, Wash.—If you’re an elk hunter in Washington, and you hunt the eastern half of the state, there is a better than even chance that you will find yourself in Yakima County. Why? Because that is where the elk are. In the area between the Cascade crest, I-90, the Yakima River Canyon and the Yakama Indian Reservation is a herd of nearly 10,000 animals. They’re spread from the wide-open sage to the deepest, darkest timber at elevations of 7,000 feet or more. Where you hunt depends on the weather. A decent snowstorm will get the cows and yearlings – aka, spikes – moving out of the mountains towards winter feeding grounds at Oak Creek, Joe Watt Canyon and elsewhere. Snow or snow, though, consistently successful hunters will make an effort to get away from the roads. Canyons big and small are where you will find elk holed up, so be willing to get in there after them. This takes a pair of strong legs and lungs, and if you get one down, it will take help getting it out. –ROB PHILLIPS WITH DAVE WORKMAN

Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

86 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


WASHINGTON CASCADES

Klickitat River Salmon, Steelhead

LYLE, Wash.— I am typically not one to seek a guide before trying a fishery, but the Klickitat’s reputation precedes it. It is a dangerous, cold river that eats boats and drowns anglers, and no one reading this article should think otherwise just because we made a map. The water between “The Slide” and Pitt Bridge are in the calmest stretch in the river’s best salmon water (fish color up fast in the Klick, so folks fish low in the system), but even here there are obstacles and a couple of significant rapids. October is the best month to fish the river. Steelhead are present throughout, as are Chinook and coho as the month progresses. Trout beads are very popular with flyrodders and gear fishermen drifting them below bobbers. Fly anglers also do well with Egg-sucking Leeches, streamers and egg patterns. The river is blessed with excellent spinner and spoon water, as well as excellent back-trolling opportunities for running divers, 5-foot leaders, a Spin-N-Glo and bait; divers and wrapped FlatFish and Kwiks; or chrome green and blue plugs. –JEFF HOLMES Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

88 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


Quincy Lakes Trout

I N L A N D N O R T H W E S T QUINCY, Wash.—Burke and Quincy Lakes near the small town of George in Central Washington open on March 1, providing a good early-season opportunity to catch limits of trout at waters with good shore access and boat launches. Dough like Pautzke Fire Bait or Berkley’s PowerBait is most common, but don’t forget salmon eggs, marshmallows or small chunks of salad shrimp, or small spinners or spoons such as Promise Keepers, Rooster Tails or Kamloopers. Trollers work nymph patterns such as Woolly Buggers, Carey Specials or Mack’s Smile Blade flies in olive green, black, and brown, or FlatFish F4 in frog, orange, or black with silver flake. Other good stocker waters include the Caliche Lakes and Martha Lake. Oh if you decide to venture to the many other lakes in the area, read the current regulations. Some have bait and catch restrictions. –JASON BROOKS Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

Map art: RJThompsonART.com

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 89


INLAND NORTHWEST

Brewster Pool Summer Kings 0

1/2

1

2

Brewster

scale in miles

97

Ft. Okanogan State Park

173

Pateros

Rocky Butte Lake Pateros

17

LEGEND

Good for Chinook, Sockeye Good for Chinook 97

Central Ferry Canyon NW

Bridgeport State Park

Bridgeport Lake Pateros

Wells Dam

Chief 17 Joseph Dam

Mapped Area

Map information courtesy National Geographic Maps

BREWSTER, Wash.—For 15- to 25-pound Chinook and smaller but tastier sockeye, the upper Columbia’s Brewster Pool in July, August and early September is where to head for easy salmon fishing. In low-snowpack years, the warmer Okanogan keeps the fish in the cooler reservoir off that river’s mouth, says guide Shane Magnuson (509-630-5433). For kings he packs Super Bait Cut Plugs – greens early, reds, oranges later – with canned tuna mixed with scent behind 11-inch Hot Spot flashers in red, green or white and runs them 15 to 25 feet, even 35 feet down off downriggers. Some anglers use cut-plug herring behind a O or OO chrome dodger or M-2 or M2-SP FlatFish with a bait wrap. Surprisingly, those work for sockeye too, but a OO or OOOO silver dodger with a 2-inch pink hoochie 10 inches behind the attractor is more consistent. Another hot spot is below Wells Dam, but watch currents there. –LEROY LEDEBOER Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

90 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


Sprague Lake Trout

I N L A N D N O R T H W E S T SPRAGUE, Wash.—Since the roetenone treatment in fall 2007 to kill of its spinyray species, and the subsequent aggressive restocking of trout, super-fertile Sprague Lake is churning out the brawniest rainbows in Eastern Washington. They grow fat on the midges that splatter your windshield as you drive past on I-90, but Sprague is also rich in leeches, water boatmen, damselflies, crawdads, and other invertebrates. While that seems like it would bring out the fly guys, the lake is more known for bait fishing and trolling worm harnesses or plugs. Its trout fishery is best in spring and fall. –JEFF HOLMES Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 91


INLAND NORTHWEST

Tri-Cities Spring Chinook u ol C

261

m a bi r ve Ri

ke

Mapped Area

Ringold

r ve i R

a Sn

Little Goose Dam

Starbuck

Lower Monumental Dam 395

Tri-Cities Richland Pasco

Eureka

Ice Harbor Dam

124

LEGEND Bank fishing Boat fishing Boat and bank fishing

Kennewick 12 12

395

Walla Walla River 12

82

Walla Walla

WASHINGTON OREGON McNary Dam

Milton-Freewater

Columbia River 730

Umatilla River

Hermiston

0

3

6

12

11

scale in miles Map information courtesy National Geographic Maps

PASCO, Wash.–The Lower Columbia isn’t the only place to catch spring Chinook. They can be had north, east, and south of TriCities, in the Hanford Reach, lower Snake River and McNary Dam areas. Local guide Bruce Hewitt (509-430-6448) favors a downstream troll using cut-plug herring off a 5- to 6 foot-long leader and an inline flasher, keeping his gear close to the bottom, or back-trolling a Kwikfish or FlatFish. Bank anglers at McNary use chartreuse or tiger-stripe Spin-N-Glos with cut-plug herring, although prawn rigs are favored at stronger currents, while those in the reach cast size 5 or 6 Vibrax in silver, brass or red/black or drift roe. –DENNIS DAUBLE Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

92 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


I N L A N D N O R T H W E S T

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 93


INLAND NORTHWEST

Potholes Reservoir Walleye C

ra

Sa nd D une s

b

Potholes Reservoir Walleye

C e re

nn el

F re 0

nch

H il l s

man

1/2

K S.E.

ha

S an d Du nes

st Wa

ew

Blythe

2

scale in miles

262

Mapped Area

5 S.E.

6 S.E.

Lind Coulee East Bridge Lind Coulee West Bridge

Goose Island

ay

Potholes State Park 1

L S.E.

C

Medicare Beach

M S.E.

k

LEGEND Troll, jig humps, dropoffs to deeper water March prespawn staging areas Boat launch

an lliv u S O’

m Da

Glen Williams

Lind Coulee Island Good in spring above bridge

Mar Don Resort

MOSES LAKE, Wash.–If you enjoy solitude, have warm thermals and can handle a rod and reel with neoprene gloves, consider a winter outing to Potholes Reservoir in the central Columbia Basin for walleye. “Just about anywhere you find 22- to 25foot water breaking off to 35- to 45-foot water, you’re going to find walleyes,” says guide Levi Meseberg (509-346-2651). “I’ve always done best this time of year with either jigs or blades, but I know guys who do really well dragging spinner-baited rigs.” By late winter and early spring, walleye will turn up in as little as 6 feet of water in Lind Coulee. –LEROY LEDEBOER Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

94 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


• Sales For Mercury & Mercruiser Motors • Repairs for Mercury,Mariner, Evinrude, Johnson, OMC/COBRA, Mercruiser • Gas on the Lake • Boat Accessories, Parts and Motor Parts

Bring your boat in today:

8138 Scott Road NE Moses Lake, WA

Indoor Outdoor Storages Available

N O R T H W E S T

509-765-6718

• Tune - up • Engine Oil Change • Water pump repair

Welcome to Ephrata!

If you’re looking for outdoor fun and adventure, you’ve found the center of all Washington state has to offer. With thousands of acres of water and land found only minutes from our town, you have more room than you’ll ever need to hunt, fish, bike and hike year round. Uniquely positioned in the Columbia Basin, only Ephrata offers adventure seekers a central location from which to explore Central Washington’s unparalleled geological terrain and natural resources. So if you’re chasing after the biggest trout of your life, a strap full of ducks, a perfect technical mountain bike ride or a challenging climb among basalt monuments, you can find it all near our friendly town.

Visit www.vacationephrata.com and start your adventure today! Follow us on Facebook and Twitter @CityofEphrata

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

I N L A N D

PERFORMING AT A HIGHER LEVEL

Northwest Sportsman 95


INLAND NORTHWEST

Blue Mountains Steelhead Blue Mountains rivers

127

Snake River

Starbuck

261

Lower Hartsock

Tucannon River

LEGEND

12

Access sites

Mapped Area

Eureka

Prescott Waitsburg

Touchet River

12

Turner

Dayton

124

Burbank

Pomeroy

Lewis & Clark Trail SP

Tucannon Fish Hatchery

12

12

Wallula

Walla Walla River Touchet 12 Walla Walla

9 Mile Rd.

Madame 730 Dorian

McDonald Bridge Stovall, Stegle roads

WA S H I N G TO N OREGON

0

3

6

12

scale in miles Map art by RJThompsonART.com Map information courtesy National Geographic Maps

WALLA WALLA—Summer steelhead stage in the Columbia and Snake Rivers until conditions are suitable for them to enter the Walla Walla, Touchet and Tucannon. The first surge occurs after flows ramp up in early fall. Each successive high flow event encourages further upstream movement, and as spring spawning time nears, the fish make a final push to headwaters. When scouting out places to work, focus on current edges, deep runs, boulder patches, deep pools, “pocket water” and outside corners of bends. Standard bait includes cured roe, shrimp and nightcrawlers. A drift bobber can also be effective, particularly in snag-filled water. Tipping a bright red jig with shrimp often produces good results. Access is typically through boat ramps, bridges, parks and wildlife areas. –DENNIS DAUBLE Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

96 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


:762(5,9=9,:69; +,,97(92.63-*3<) H^VVKHSS»ZYH[LKÄ]LZ[HYY]YLZVY[

 Spacious RV paved sites specifically catering to big rigs and family camping  Full hookups including 50 amp service, WiFi & cable TV  Large pavilion available for events

 18-hole golf course  Lake & stream fishing nearby  Open in the fall for hunting  Swimming pool & hot tub  Only 18 miles from Spokane

3\_\Y` 9=3V[Z-VY Sale

1205 N Country Club Drive, Deer Park, WA 99006

;633-9,, >>>:762(5,9=9,:69;*64 05-6':762(5,9=9,:69;*64


INLAND NORTHWEST

Chewelah Grouse Mapped Area

Heale y Cr.

C

ile

Th

. Rd

Cr.

CHEWELAH MOUNTAIN k

e re C d

sh rse

oe

L

e ak

FR4347

oo . Rd erw h

FR4342

Ho

S

Ho

rse

sh

oe

La

ke

Rd .

C

ol

vi

lle

Flyck t

Rd.

Ri ve r

r.

r. Bur n t Val ley R d.

r.

S. Fo rk C

C

hew elah

ile

m

il Tra

Ten m

Chewelah

395

rC Palme

x Si

ry we Flo

n

so

a om

. Cr

Cottonwo o

d Creek R

d.

Cottonw ood Cre

ek

Chewelah Grouse LEGEND Good grouse hunting Public land

Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

Grouse Creek Rd.

Bulld

CHEWELAH, Wash.–My suggestion is to get hold of a Colville National Forest map; the forest’s headquarters is along Highway 395/Main Street in Colville. You’ll find good gravel roads in the region. This is grouse country, with varying terrain and woods that run from thick to thin. There are berry patches, good water and more. It’s all timbered, with fir, hemlock and pine, various hardwoods and lots of cover – just the kind of place where one can expect blue grouse and some ruffed grouse. Either work old abandoned logging skid roads or get away completely from anything remotely resembling a road and hammer through the cover. –DAVE WORKMAN

ek

og C

reek

use Gro

Cre

0

1

2

4

scale in miles

98 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


Stop in for Local Information on Hunting & Fishing!

Bennyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Colville Inn Welcome Hunters!

I N L A N D

We know the Area Geographically knowledgeable Staff 106 Guest Rooms to choose from Wireless Internet Indoor Pool and Spa Breakfast at 5am (4:30am turkey season)

800-680-2517 509 684-2517

915 South Main Colville, Washington

www.colvilleinn.com

VISIT US ONLINE

nwsportsmanmag.com

N O R T H W E S T

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 99


INLAND NORTHWEST

Grande Ronde-Wallowa Steelhead Anatone 129

WASHINGTON OREGON

Snake River

Troy Flora 0

Grande Ronde River

2

4

8

scale in miles

3

Mapped Area

Minam

Wallowa

Wallowa River

Grande Ronde & Wallowa rivers LEGEND

Good remote float Good roadside access (beware private land) Best fishing

82

Lostine

Enterprise

Map information courtesy National Geographic Maps

TROY, Ore.–Two solid waves of steelhead head up Washington’s and Oregon’s Grande Ronde. The leading one heads for the river’s major Beaver State-side tributary, the Wallowa, and is fishable in October and again February-April. The second arrives in late winter at Cottonwood Creek, just above Washington’s Highway 129, where guide Mac Huff (800-940-3688) says accomplished anglers can have 20- to 30-fish days under ideal conditions. With so many fish, it doesn’t matter whether you’re a bait, plug, spinner, fly, jig or spoon guy, you will get bit. There are numerous boat ramps on the system, and plenty of bank access. The rivers sometimes freeze up in winter, but more worrisome is a rain- or sun-fueled blowout. Call Boggan’s Oasis (509-2563372) for updates before making the trek. –ANDY WALGAMOTT Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

100 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


INLAND NORTHWEST

Spokane Whitetails 105

95

Metaline 31 Falls

111

25 395

1

Northport Leadpoint

113

108

Tiger

Kettle Falls Colville 31

1 Bonners Ferry

Nordman

2

20

Ruby

Naples

57

25

2

Addy

Cusick Chewelah

Gifford

121

117

Sandpoint 200

Newport

Clark Fork

211

Springdale 395 2 Diamond Fruitland Lake Deer Park Tumtum 231

41

Athol

124

Long Lake

Lakeview

54 95

206

291

4A

2

Hayden

4

53

Mapped Mapped Area Area

Coeur d’Alene 90

Spokane

Best whitetail areas Unit boudary State boundary

Harrison

Murray

3

90

Pinehurst

Wallace 5

Calder 50

95

5

6

Avery

6

Santa 3

8 0

5

10

9 Elk River

20

10A

scale in miles

COLVILLE, Wash.–As the weather grows cold and snowy and the rut comes on, November’s late hunts are the best time to shoot a trophy whitetail buck in Northeast Washington and North Idaho. “The greatest concentration of deer and ... highest success rates” come from low-elevation private lands, says outfitter Dale Denney (509-684-6294) in Colville, but some big bucks can be found on state and federal lands just off the valley floors. Snows will also sometimes concentrate deer along the region’s reservoirs. Some hunters rattle from treestands while others still-hunt clear-cuts and stream corridors.” –LEROY LEDEBOER AND RALPH BARTHOLDT

7

Fernwood

I D A H O

LEGEND

W A S H I N G T O N

Inland Empire Whitetails

3

Pierce

Orofino 11

Greer

Kamiah Kooskia

Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going. 102 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


I N L A N D N O R T H W E S T

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 103


INLAND NORTHWEST

Washington Private Lands Hunting

This screen grab off WDFW’s Go Hunt page shows the rough locations of Feel Free To Hunt (green circles), Hunting Only By Written Permission (orange triangles) and Register to Hunt (red stars) properties in this part of Eastern Washington, where almost all of the enrolled private lands are located. The site allows you to zoom within 4 miles or so of each ranch or farm before the beacons disappear and a road trip is required. (WDFW)

ST. JOHN, Wash.—Some of the most productive hunting grounds in Washington are also the most private – but that doesn’t mean you can’t chase ringnecks, deer and other game on them. The Palouse, Blue Mountains foothills, Northeast Washington and North Sound are rife with farms and ranches that allow sportsmen on through the Department of Fish & Wildlife’s various private lands access programs. The Feel Free To Hunt, Register to Hunt and Hunt By Written Permission options are probably the most well known and have provided over a million acres of land to hunt on. But in recent years, WDFW has added the online Hunt By Reservation system – big in pheasant- and whitetail-rich Whitman County – and the Snow Goose and Waterfowl Quality Hunts, mostly in northern Puget Sound. For more on these great options as well as good mapping, go to wdfw.wa.gov/hunting and look for the “Private Lands Hunting Access” tab. “Remember, all private land access is built on a foundation of goodwill, and landowner-hunter bonds are the most critical ingredient. If hunters don’t do their part, there’s nothing state or federal officials can do to save it,” says Curt Merg, a WDFW access manager. –NWS Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going 104 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]


INLAND NORTHWEST

Lower Clearwater Steelhead WASHINGTON

0

1/ 8

1/ 2

1/ 4

128 128

scale in miles

12

Snake River

CLARKSTON Dik 12

LEGEND

5th Street

Clearwater River

eB

yp

Clearwater River ass 12

LEWISTON

Boat ramp Bank access August fishing Bobber fishing from bank or boat Trolling with plugs Anchor fishing around pilings August retention fishery boundaries September fishing in Washington Good in coolwater tongue

12

IDAHO

Mapped Area

LEWISTON—When steelhead retention season on Idaho’s Clearwater opens Aug. 1, scores of trollers and bobber fishermen will gather in the lower 1 1⁄2 miles of river. The perfect 54-degree water draws thousands of steelhead bound for upstream tribs such as Salmon, Imnaha and Grande Ronde. Fishing lighted plugs, whether at night or during low-light conditions, is highly effective. Today’s most popular baits are the Brad’s Lighted Wigglers in 3⁄8 and ¾ ounce, which come in a variety of finishes with either red or chartreuse strobes. A 013 Lighted Kwikfish will draw lots of strikes too. Some anglers use downriggers while others flatline troll. The steelhead tend to seek structure-like bridge pillars at night and current whenever they can get it. Trolling in circles, zigzags and serpentine patterns will usually draw more strikes than a straight troll. –JEFF HOLMES Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

106 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]


5 AM Hot Breakfast

I N L A N D N O R T H W E S T

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 107


INLAND NORTHWEST

Snake River Steelhead

LEWISTON—Whether you choose to fish right next to the world’s biggest steelhead hatchery, drift the river below it, head into North America’s deepest gorge, or troll the calm waters of a sprawling reservoir, you can’t go wrong where Washington, Idaho and Oregon come together. From August through March, the waters here are lousy with 3- to 8-pound A-run steelhead and big B-runs; as many as 320,000 have finned through these waters in recent years, though the average over the past 10 years is in the 180,000-fish range. There are numerous boat ramps and bank accesses on the Snake and Clearwater Rivers. As the fish wait to make their spring spawning runs, the fish will smack shrimp and/or jigs under a bobber, back-trolled plugs, trolled plugs, side-driftied eggs, and flies off spey rods, depending on water type. Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

108 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]


I N L A N D N O R T H W E S T

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 109


INLAND NORTHWEST

oo W

Moody Road

Brownlee Reservoir Crappie ds La ne Ro

Brownlee Reservoir

bi

Richland

ne tte Ro ad

Sullivan Lane

0

Hewitt, Holcomb Parks

1/ 4

1/ 2

1

scale in miles Map information courtesy National Geographic Maps

Powder River Arm

Powder River Arm LEGEND

Fish points for bass Work backs of coves for bluegill, crappie and catfish Snake River Road Daly Creek Road

Zigzag off points, coves looking for dense plankton blooms which attract crappie schools Boat launch

RICHLAND, Ore.–Brownlee Reservoir is great for crappie in May when the mot-

Mapped Area

tled slabs are grouped near shore, gulping down jigs as fast as you can toss them out. In June, the fish move offshore and scatter, and then in July, they are voraciously feeding. To find them then, watch for rock slides and points of land. Zigzag your boat around either until you locate a school on your meter. Brownlee is also good in July for catfish in the muddy shallows and around brush. Use a bobber with a 4-foot leader and bait. For smallmouth, don’t pass up any point with all the usual bass lures. –LARRY ELLIS Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

110 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Map art: RJThompsonART.com


Look East, To Montana H NORTHWEST SPORTSMAN SALES MANAGER FINDS ANTLERLESS DEER TAGS APLENTY IN THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE STATE, DETAILS HOW TO GO ABOUT HUNTING THERE.

2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 111

N O R T H W E S T

WHAT I LEARNED The biggest misconception I had about hunting in Montana was that it’s too expensive to do every year, it takes too much time, I’d need to hire a guide to find animals, etc. All excuses! With a little homework anyone can find great public hunting all over Montana as well as its neighbor to the west, Idaho. For example, we hunted in the Missouri River basin outside of Plentywood. I sent away to the local tourism bureau (missouririver.visitmt.com) for their travel guide early in the year and started getting

I N L A N D

aving been a public-land hunter in Washington all my life, I have noticed a marked decline in the opportunities we once enjoyed here in the Evergreen State. As a kid, I can remember a buck hanging at our house at least every other year. That was before “watchable wildlife,” antler-point restrictions, shorter and earlier seasons, and “choose your weapon” became the foundations of game management here. Like many other frustrated West Coast hunters, I’ve decided to do something about it by exploring my out-of-state options. Because life is too short for mediocre hunting. My desire to hunt with my wife, Gina, who had never pursued deer before, also factored greatly into my decision to hunt Montana this past season. I did not want to subject her to the “quality” armed camping experience of seeing more hunters than deer back home.


INLAND NORTHWEST familiar with the lay of the land. Idaho has a great website too, fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/hunt/, with an easy-to-use nonresident hunt planner. Deeper digging revealed that the area we chose, Sheridan County, has a very easy-to-read land ownership map book, which shows exactly who owns what. But if you’re not up for knocking on doors, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks has plenty of Block Management Lands throughout that area. All one has to do is sign in at the posted drop box at the property (look for the bright green signs), and retain the receipt stub while you’re on the property. The state compensates landowners for opening their lands up to public hunting access, so it’s very important to sign in each time you hunt. SHOW ME THE DOES While it is true that Montana and other Western states’ nonresident pricing for horn tags has gone up, the antlerless tags are still a huge bargain, in my opinion. At $80 each, I was able to purchase four doe mule deer tags, two for my wife and two for myself.

At the beginning of last year, I wouldn’t have expected to have been able to do that. The nonresident tag quota was greatly reduced due to last winter’s horrific weather, so we thought the trip was off. Imagine my surprise when our friends Jeff and Carrie Richardson called and told us to phone in Sept. 3 because surplus tags were going on sale that day. (In a “normal year,” there are usually plenty of antlerless B tags left, enough that one can expect to purchase them over the counter.) The second benefit of doe hunting is that permission to get on private land is often much easier than it is for bucks. Many landowners want the bucks for their family and friends. 1,026 MILES ON THE ROAD If you look at drive time as a negative, Montana probably isn’t for you if you live west of Spokane, Lewiston or Baker City. In Montana and Idaho, everything is at least 3 hours from Nowheresville. Indeed, me and Gina’s drive to Plentywood – which is up near where Montana meets North Dakota and Alberta – took 16½ hours over two days of travel. We

Gina Blancaflor, the author’s wife, and friend Carrie Richardson, both killed their first as well as second deer while hunting Montana. (BRIAN LULL)

112 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Another tag gets notched. All totaled, the hunters harvested eight antlerless mule deer on their trip. (BRIAN LULL)

drove Seattle to Missoula the first night and then down the Hi-Line to Plentywood. But we felt the road trip was half the fun. Outside of Alaska, I have never seen a more beautiful land. THE HUNTING With five days in the field and eight tags to fill between my wife and I and our friends, we were very busy hunters. The typical day meant killing one or two deer, taking them back to camp and hanging, skinning and butchering at night. With everyone participating, we could process the meat of two or three deer each night within a few hours. A warm wood stove, cold beers, and good tunes added to the ambiance of the butchering shack. The terrain of Eastern Montana is varied and open, with expansive wheat, lentil and other dryland grain fields interspersed with coulees filled with brush and box elder trees. You can see for miles from any vantage – they don’t call it Big Sky Country for nothing! Deer were not around every corner, but they were around just about every other corner. In this particular area, I’d estimate the ratio to have been 10:1 mule deer to whitetail. And these muley does are no pushovers – they are hunted hard and do not stand around to see what’s up when you push them out of the coulees. Our shots ranged from 93 to over 317 yards. Gina killed her first-ever deer at 250 yards with one very well-placed shot from my late father’s vintage Remington Model 600 Mohawk .308, one of the proudest moments of this


INLAND NORTHWEST Gina with her second deer of the trip. (BRIAN LULL)

day, and it almost cost me a deer. That brings me around to the most important part of the trip: Hunting with my wife and our good friends was something I’d always dreamed of. I know we would not have had anywhere near the quality experience in terms of game seen, animals available to harvest, and yes, meat in the cooler, if we’d tried this in Washington. Montana and Idaho are not just for the TV hunters. Regular people like us, who save our money and vacation time, still have a great opportunity for a true quality hunting experience in the great American West. —BRIAN LULL Editor’s note: This article is from a previous issue of Northwest Sportsman. Be sure to check current regulations before going.

hunter’s life! Gina practiced long and hard this summer on her field-shooting skills and it paid off. Expect shots that are over 200 yards, and practice a lot for them. Northwest Sportsman’s On Target columnist, Dave Workman, cooked up

some handloads for us that featured Hornady’s wind-bucking 165-grain SST boattails in front of 43 grains of Hodgdon H4895 powder. Indeed, wind is your constant companion out on the high plains of Eastern Montana. I forgot to calculate windage one

TRIP CHECK

It wasn’t all hunting, all the time – the crew dressed up for Halloween and hit the Antelope Bar in Plentywood. (BRIAN LULL)

Destination: Plentywood, northeast Montana. Distance: 1,026 miles from Seattle; 1,132 miles from Portland. What a gas: My Toyota Tacoma gulped down $512 worth of unleaded, which included the round trip and all the daily driving to hunt locations once we arrived. Gas stations are few and far between out here – know your vehicle’s range and carry an extra gas can. Weather: Expect it all. Hunting over five days in late October, we had snow, fog, wind, sun, rain and freezing rain for good measure. Final score: Gina; 2; Brian: 2; Carrie: 2; Jeff: 2 — and plenty of deer leftover; we shall return. Game check stations: You must stop at each one. Have your license ready and your animals’ meat clearly labeled and notched tags packaged with each if you’ve butchered them. Carcass quarters require evidence of sex naturally attached. More info: Missouri River Country Tourism (800-653-1319; missouririver.visitmt.com/ contact/) 114 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]


2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]

Northwest Sportsman 115


116 Northwest Sportsman 2013 ATLAS [Winter-Spring]


Atlas 2 13 web