Page 1

2013/14 UTAH SYMPHONY SEASON

#utahsymphony

Apr–May


Finally,

a rewards program as unique as your business.

The AmaZing Rewards® for Business Visa® Credit Card from Zions Bank lets you earn points for every purchase and redeem any purchase as your reward. You have your own way of doing things, and you know what you need to succeed. The AmaZing Rewards card lets you run your business your way.

For a limited time, Utah businesses can earn $250 or 25,000 bonus points on new accounts.1 Offer expires August 31, 2014. To learn more visit your local Zions Bank Financial Center.

Follow us on

zionsbank.com®

Member FDIC

Cards are subject to credit approval. All offers subject to change at any time. Certain terms, conditions, and restrictions apply. 1) Bonus offers – For a limited time, Utah businesses can earn $250 cash bonus with AmaZing Cash®or 25,000 rewards points with AmaZing Rewards® when your business spends $2,500 in the first 90 days of account opening (Cash advances, balance transfers and quasi-cash amounts do not qualify toward $2,500 spend). One bonus payment is allowed per business, not per account or per card. Cash bonus payment of $250 will be deposited to a deposit account and rewards points bonus will be added to rewards points balance within four to six weeks from the end of the 90-day promotion. Offer applies to new AmaZing Business Credit Cards opened on or after 02/12/2014. Offer expires August 31, 2014. ©2014 Zions Bank.


Contents PUBLISHER Mills Publishing, Inc. PRESIDENT Dan Miller OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR Cynthia Bell Snow ART DIRECTOR / PRODUCTION MANAGER Jackie Medina PROGRAM DESIGNER Patrick Witmer GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Leslie Hanna Ken Magleby Patrick Witmer ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Paula Bell Karen Malan Dan Miller Paul Nicholas

25

29

Chris Botti in Concert

Third Annual Pro-Am

31 Mozart, Bernstein & Nielsen

53

43 Mahler’s Symphony No. 5

61

OFFICE ASSISTANT Jessica Alder ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Kyrsten Holland EDITOR Melissa Singleton Cover photo: Abravanel Hall The UTAH SYMPHONY | UTAH OPERA program is published by Mills Publishing, Inc., 772 East 3300 South, Suite 200, Salt Lake City, Utah 84106, 801-467-9419. Inquiries concerning advertising should be directed to Mills Publishing, Inc. © COPYRIGHT 2014

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

Tchaikovsky’s Suite No. 3

69 All-Star Evening 6 Welcome 8 Music Director’s Message 10 Board Chair’s Message 11 Board of Trustees 12 Utah Symphony 13 Musician Spotlight 14 Season Honorees 15 Season Sponsor 17 Symphony Education

The Beat Goes On! Music of the Baby Boomers

73 Rachmaninoff’s Symphonic Dances 82 Campaign for Perpetual Motion 85 Utah Symphony Guild 86 Planned Giving 87 Tanner & Crescendo Societies 88 Corporate & Foundation Donors 90 Individual Donors 95 Administration 96 Classical 89 Broadcasts 98 Acknowledgments 5


Welcome There is quite a bit of buzz in the arts world today surrounding innovation, and how we can be innovative with an art form that is hundreds of years old. In my opinion, innovation isn’t just creating something completely new, it is also giving new life and energy to the things we are most comfortable with and know in the most traditional ways. The unique quality of classical music is that it has stood the test of time on its own merit. Our challenge is not to change the art itself, but to be innovative in the way our audiences interact with, embrace, and consume our work. This means nurturing our relationship with patrons, creating unique experiences that value the LIVE aspect of what we do, and engaging with technology in meaningful and impactful ways—this is our challenge.

Melia Tourangeau President & CEO

A few of our innovative efforts are directly connected to our organization’s vision, which is to “Connect the community with great live music. Perform—Engage—Inspire.” Examples of this include our upcoming Third Annual Pro-Am event where local amateur musicians rehearse and play a concert side-by-side with our professional musicians, and our Children’s Opera Showcase where children perform an original opera they create in their classroom with the assistance of mentors and support through our organization. This summer we will collaborate with Utah’s National Parks and the state’s Mighty 5™ tourism initiative which will allow us to jointly celebrate the natural and artistic treasures of Utah. As cultural ambassadors for the state, the symphony, smaller chamber ensembles, and opera soloists will present a series of unforgettable free outdoor concerts August 11–17 under the baton of Utah Symphony Music Director Thierry Fischer against the backdrop of Utah’s iconic National Parks to create one epic experience of a lifetime. This tour is the kickoff to many other special events we have planned as we approach the celebration of Utah Symphony’s 75th Anniversary. All of these events are possible thanks to the support of many local community leaders, none more dedicated than Pat Richards who has served as the USUO Board Chair for the past 9 years. I am grateful for her support and advocacy of these activities which not only draw focus to the high quality artistry we provide in every performance, but demonstrate how we serve our community in meaningful and relevant ways. Thank you for being a part of this great performance this evening, and for your ongoing support of Utah Symphony | Utah Opera.

6

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


ESCAPE INTO THE MUSIC

2014 Deer Valley® Music Festival Summer Home of Utah Symphony | Utah Opera

KENNY ROGERS with the utah symphony July 5, 2014 (Sat) | 7:30 pm | Deer Valley Resort Jerry Steichen, Conductor

THE MUSIC OF JOHN WILLIAMS July 11, 2014 (Fri) | 7:30 pm | Deer Valley Resort Jeff Tyzik, Conductor

MARY CHAPIN CARPENTER with the utah symphony

July 19, 2014 (Sat) | 7:30 pm | Deer Valley Resort Vince Mendoza, Conductor

DISNEY IN CONCERT: TALE AS OLD AS TIME august 1, 2014 (Fri) | 7:30 pm | Deer Valley Resort Jerry Steichen, Conductor

SUPER DIAMOND: A TRIBUTE TO NEIL DIAMOND august 2, 2014 (Sat) | 7:30 pm | Deer Valley Resort Jerry Steichen, Conductor

THE BEN FOLDS ORCHESTRAL ExPERIENCE with the utah symphony

august 9, 2014 (Sat) | 7:30 pm | Deer Valley Resort Jerry Steichen, Conductor

ALSO THIS SUMMER: The Texas Tenors: Let Freedom Sing!, The Music of U2, Beethoven’s Egmont Overture, 1812 Overture!, The Muir String Quartet, Tchaikovsky’s Serenade for Strings, Rosco and Friction Quartets Visit deervalleymusicfestival.org or call 801-533-6683 SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR VALUED SPONSORS:

Summer Symphony Sponsor

Summer Entertainment Sponsor


Music Director’s Message

Thank you for joining us tonight! Spring is a time for renewal and reflection, and as we approach the end of our season, I would like to take a moment to reflect on how the pursuit of innovation animates our artistic vision at Utah Symphony. Innovation is an opportunity for change, and with change new possibilities arrive. Innovation starts with seeing beauty in the details.  Mastering and perfecting the details, no matter how small, eventually leads to achieving larger things that you can refine and recombine to make something new.  It is always with this vision that we approach our programs; we are constantly trying to find new things in the old and fresh approaches to known concepts.

Thierry Fischer Music Director The Maurice Abravanel Chair, endowed by the George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Foundation

As we perform works of established composers like Mozart, Nielsen, and Rachmaninoff, we endeavor to find new interpretations and contrasts in their music. Likewise, we challenge any static ideas about these composers and their work, ideas that hold them as artifacts rather than as living and evolving elements of our artistic heritage.  It is with this vital spirit of musical innovation that we share performances throughout the season. We hope that you find this spirit in our exciting programs in April and May. Some highlights include the debut of Utah Symphony Associate Concertmaster Kathryn Eberle as soloist performing the work of Bernstein. We are also thrilled to be joined by percussionist Colin Currie, who returns for an amazing performance that will be followed on the same evening by Mahler’s Symphony No. 5. The Nielsen Symphony Cycle comes to a close with Symphonies No. 5 and No. 6, and we end our season with a very special program featuring cellist Matthew Zalkind, the son of two of our very own Utah Symphony musicians, Associate Principal Violist, Roberta Zalkind and Principal Trombonist, Larry Zalkind. With this innovation in music, we reflect on the innovation that is happening all around us—in our homes, our schools, our communities—and as we conclude the 2013–14 season, we hope that you will find new sounds and ideas in our musical experience together.

8

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


Gary Thor WedoW ConduCTor Celena Shafer KonSTanze amy oWenS Blonde

the ABDUCTION from the SERAGLIO May 10–16 (7:30 pm) / May 18 (2 pm)

capitol theatre

The fair damsel is most certainly in distress! Will the dashing nobleman rescue the woman from her Turkish keepers and the powerful man who desires her in vain? Or will the true lovers die in the attempt? Mozart’s incomparable skill for vocal melody and dramatic tension are on full display in his exotic masterpiece The Abduction from the Seraglio.

orchestra level seats start at only $29. FOR TICKETS VISIT UTAhOpERA.ORG OR CALL 801-355-ARTS (2787)

Season Sponsor:

andreW STenSon BelmonTe

MOZ ART’S


Board Chair’s Message

This season I complete nine years as Chair of the Utah Symphony | Utah Opera Board of Trustees. It has been a challenging and exciting time and I have never had a more rewarding experience. I deeply appreciate the opportunity I have had to serve this great organization. No one can be successful as a leader without the dedication of others. I am so grateful to our Board of Trustees for their steadfastness, vision and courage in the face of a challenging economy, and to our management, musicians and staff for joining together and working positively toward a stronger, more vibrant organization. Most of all, to you our audience and donors, thank you for your presence and support as we share with you the greatest music ever written. The Utah Symphony has become one of the finest orchestras in the nation. What we are building here is truly exciting. As we Patricia Richards near our 75th Anniversary celebration in 2015–16, we are ready to Board Chair showcase that excellence and highlight the quality of the arts in Utah with exciting projects that will bring increased recognition to the orchestra and the state, and build stronger community participation and pride. We invite you to help us further this goal over the next year as we reach out to each of you through our Campaign for Perpetual Motion. thank you for your presence and Our future has never been brighter. With your continued support, the Utah support as we share with you the Symphony will continue as a beacon of excellence and a vital contributor to the greatest music ever written. quality of life in Utah.

10

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


Board of Trustees ELECTED BOARD Patricia A. Richards* Chair David A. Petersen* William H. Nelson* Vice Chairs Annette W. Jarvis* Secretary John D’Arcy* Treasurer Melia P. Tourangeau* President & CEO Amy Rees Anderson Jesselie B. Anderson Edward R. Ashwood Dr. J. Richard Baringer Senator Robert F. Bennett Kirk A. Benson Judith M. Billings Kathryn Carter Howard S. Clark

Gary L. Crocker David L. Dee* Alex J. Dunn Kristen Fletcher* Kem C. Gardner* David Golden Gregory L. Hardy* Thomas N. Jacobson Ronald W. Jibson Laura S. Kaiser R. David McMillan Brad W. Merrill* Greg Miller Edward B. Moreton Theodore F. Newlin III* Joseph J. Palmer Dr. Dinesh C. Patel Frank R. Pignanelli Mark H. Prothro Brad Rencher

Bert Roberts Joanne F. Shiebler* Bob Wheaton John W. Williams

LIFE-TIME BOARD William C. Bailey Deedee M. Corradini Jon M. Huntsman Jon Huntsman, Jr. G. Frank Joklik

Clark D. Jones Herbert C. Livsey, Esq. David T. Mortensen Scott S. Parker Chase N. Peterson

Harris Simmons Verl R. Topham M. Walker Wallace David B. Winder

TRUSTEES EMERITI Carolyn Abravanel Haven J. Barlow John Bates Burton L. Gordon

Herold L. Gregory Richard G. Horne Warren K. McOmber Mardean Peterson

E. Jeffery Smith Barbara Tanner

HONORARY BOARD Rodney H. Brady Kim H. Briggs Ariel Bybee R. Don Cash Bruce L. Christensen Raymond J. Dardano Geralyn Dreyfous

Lisa Eccles Spencer F. Eccles Howard Edwards The Right Reverend Carolyn Tanner Irish Dr. Anthony W. Middleton, Jr. Marilyn H. Neilson

O. Don Ostler Stanley B. Parrish Marcia Price David E. Salisbury Jeffrey W. Shields, Esq. Diana Ellis Smith Ardean Watts

NATIONAL ADVISORY COUNCIL Joanne F. Shiebler Susan H. Carlyle Chair (Utah) (Texas) David L. Brown Robert Dibblee (S. California) (Virginia) Anthon S. Cannon, Jr. Senator Orrin G. Hatch (S. California) (Washington D.C.)

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

MUSICIAN REPRESENTATIVES

John Eckstein* Lee Livengood* EX OFFICIO

Julie Meredith Utah Symphony Guild Dr. Paul Sonntag Ogden Symphony Ballet Association Jennifer Streiff Vivace Judith Vander Heide Ogden Opera Guild *Executive Committee

Harold W. Milner (Nevada) Marcia Price (Utah) Alvin Richer (Arizona) 11


Utah Symphony Thierry Fischer, Music Director / The Maurice Abravanel Chair, endowed by the George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Foundation Jerry Steichen

Roberta Zalkind

James Hall

Vladimir Kulenovic

Joel Gibbs Julie Edwards Carl Johansen Scott Lewis Christopher McKellar Leslie Richards†† Whittney Thomas

Lissa Stolz

Principal Pops Conductor Associate Conductor VIOLIN*

Ralph Matson

Concertmaster The Jon M. & Karen Huntsman Chair, in honor of Wendell J. and Belva B. Ashton

Kathryn Eberle

Associate Concertmaster The Richard K. & Shirley S. Hemingway Chair

Leonard Braus

Associate Concertmaster

David Park

Assistant Concertmaster

Claude Halter Principal Second

Wen Yuan Gu

Associate Principal Second

Hanah Stuart

Assistant Principal Second

Associate Principal

CELLO*

Matthew Johnson Acting Principal The J. Ryan Selberg Memorial Chair

John Eckstein

Acting Associate Principal

Walter Haman Noriko Kishi†† Anne Lee Kevin Shumway Pegsoon Whang Robin Dunn†† BASS*

David Yavornitzky Principal

Karen Wyatt •• Tom Baron • Joseph Evans LoiAnne Eyring # Teresa Hicks Lun Jiang Julianne S. Johnson • Rebekah Johnson Tina Johnson†† Veronica Kulig David Langr Melissa Thorley Lewis Elina Lev • Yuki MacQueen Alex Martin Rebecca Moench David Porter Judith Rich • Lynn Maxine Rosen Barbara Ann Scowcroft • M. Judd Sheranian Lynnette Stewart Julie Wunderle ••

Corbin Johnston

VIOLA*

Caitlyn Valovick Moore

Principal The Sue & Walker Wallace Chair

Robert Stephenson

Brant Bayless

12

Associate Principal

James Allyn Frank W. Asper, Jr. Edward Merritt Claudia Norton Jens Tenbroek Thomas Zera

Mark Davidson

Associate Principal

Associate Principal BASS TROMBONE

ENGLISH HORN

Graeme Mutchler

CLARINET

Gary Ofenloch

Principal The Norman C. & Barbara Lindquist Tanner Chair, in memory of Jean Lindquist Pell

George Brown

Lissa Stolz

TUBA

Tad Calcara

Principal TIMPANI

Principal

Eric Hopkins

Erin Svoboda

Associate Principal

Associate Principal

Lee Livengood

PERCUSSION

Keith Carrick

BASS CLARINET

Principal

Lee Livengood

Eric Hopkins

E-FLAT CLARINET

KEYBOARD

Erin Svoboda

Jason Hardink

BASSOON

Principal

Lori Wike

LIBRARIAN

Principal The Edward & Barbara Moreton Chair

Clovis Lark

Associate Principal

Associate Librarian

Principal

Maureen Conroy

Leon Chodos

Jennifer Rhodes

ORCHESTRA PERSONNEL

Eric V. Johnson

CONTRABASSOON

Director of Orchestra Personnel

Leon Chodos HORN

Bruce M. Gifford

Myroslava Hagen

Matthew Tutsky ††

Llewellyn B. Humphreys Ronald L. Beitel Stephen Proser Nathan Basinger ††

Chip Dance

FLUTE

Travis Peterson

Assistant Stage & Properties Manager

Principal The Val A. Browning Chair

Jeff Luke

• First Violin •• Second Violin

HARP

Louise Vickerman # Principal

Acting Principal

Mercedes Smith Lisa Byrnes

Associate Principal

Caitlyn Valovick Moore PICCOLO OBOE

Assistant Orchestra Personnel Manager

Principal

STAGE MANAGEMENT

Production & Stage Manager

Mark Barraclough

TRUMPET

Principal The Robert L. & Joyce Rice Chair Associate Principal

Peter Margulies Nick Norton TROMBONE

Larry Zalkind

* String Seating Rotates † Leave of Absence # Sabbatical †† Substitute Member

Principal

Principal

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


Musician Spotlight Biography I’m George Brown, Principal Timpanist. I grew up in Eastern and Central Kentucky, and attended both the University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville. However, I arrived in Salt Lake via a rather circuitous route that included Culver, Indiana; Washington, D.C.; New London, Connecticut; Colorado Springs and Mexico City. I’d been performing in, and commuting between, these last two cities for seven years when I won the Timpani Audition here in 1987.

George Brown Principal Timpanist

Hobbies/Interests My lovely wife, Shirley, was living in Kansas City when we met and she introduced me to the mind blowingly wonderful world of Kansas City Barbecue. From there, I developed a keen interest in smoking my own meats and I can now smoke a brisket that will make your mouth water. But instead of competing on the BBQ circuit, I decided it was easier and cheaper to become a Certified Barbecue Competition Judge—which is also a superb way to be fed large quantities of great (and free) BBQ. Musical Notes The perspective of the timpanist is unique in the orchestra in that on one level, one is a principal without a section (unless the composer is Berlioz who often wrote for a section of kettledrummers). So the timpanist’s role in the orchestra really depends upon the piece being played. On some works, I’m basically just a “sound effects” man, playing rolls here and there to provide “atmosphere.” But on really vigorous, rhythmically active pieces, I’m helping to drive, shape and color the performance. In those cases, the entire orchestra is my section.

UTAH SYMPHONY

PRE-CONCERT LECTURES Arrive early and enjoy our Conductor and/or Guest Artist give a fun, behind the music lecture for the Masterwork Concerts. 7:00 pm in Abravanel Hall.

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

13


Season Honorees Utah Symphony | Utah Opera is grateful to our generous donors who through annual cash gifts and multi-year commitments at the following levels make our programs possible. The following listing reflects contributions and multi-year commitments received between 8/3/2012 and 2/28/2014.

M I LLE N I U M $250,0 0 0 & A B OV E

EDWARD R. ASHWOOD & CANDICE A. JOHNSON

LAWRENCE T. & JANET T. DEE FOUNDATION

E.R. (ZEKE) & KATHERINE W. DUMKE

KEM & CAROLYN GARDNER

MR. & MRS. MARTIN GREENBERG

CAROL & THEODORE NEWLIN

GAEL BENSON

DIANE & HAL BRIERLY

ANTHONY & RENEE MARLON

PATRICIA A. RICHARDS & WILLIAM K. NICHOLS

MARK & DIANNE PROTHRO

14

THEODORE SCHMIDT

SHIEBLER FAMILY FOUNDATION

UTAH STATE LEGISLATURE/ UTAH STATE OFFICE OF EDUCATION

JAQUELYN WENTZ

NAOMA TATE & THE FAMILY OF HAL TATE

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


Utah Symphony | Utah Opera Season Sponsor Since 1983, unwavering support from the George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Foundation has been integral to the success of Utah Symphony | Utah Opera. The Foundation’s 2013-14 Season Sponsorship celebrates this 30-year tradition of generosity established by its founders ... and its continued commitment to USUO’s vibrant and exciting future!

George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Foundation Board of Directors Robert M. Graham • Spencer F. Eccles • Lisa Eccles


Season Honorees E N C O R E $10 0, 0 0 0 & A B OV E

DR. J. R. BARINGER & DR. JEANNETTE J. TOWNSEND

R. HAROLD BURTON FOUNDATION

DELL LOY & LYNNETTE HANSEN

ROGER & SUSAN HORN

THE RIGHT REVEREND CAROLYN TANNER IRISH

EMMA ECCLES JONES FOUNDATION

EDWARD & BARBARA MORETON

GIB & SUSAN MYERS

WILLIAM H. & CHRISTINE NELSON

DR. DINESH AND KALPANA PATEL

ARTS FOUNDATION

JAMES LEVOY SORENSON FOUNDATION

B R AVO $ 50, 0 0 0 & A B OV E

Scott & Jesselie Anderson Thomas Billings & Judge Judith Billings Patricia Dougall Eager† Marriner S. Eccles Foundation The Florence J. Gillmor Foundation Elaine & Burton L. Gordon Grand & Little America Hotels* William Randolph Hearst Foundation Janet Q. Lawson Foundation Elinor S. McLaren & George M. Klopfer

16

Montage Deer Valley Pauline C. Pace† Scott & Sydne Parker Frank R. & D’Arcy Dixon Pignanelli St. Regis Deer Valley Stein Eriksen Lodge The Swartz Foundation UBS Financial Services Jack & Mary Lois† Wheatley Lois A. Zambo

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


2013/14 UTAH SYMPHONY SEASON 2013/14 UTAH SYMPHONY SEASON

We’re very proud of the incredible talent of Utah’s young We’re very proud of the incredible talent of Utah’s young musicians and we’re excited to share their performances musicians and we’re excited to share their performances with you. We’ve got two opportunities coming up for you to with you. We’ve got two opportunities coming up for you to hear outstanding young musicians in concert. hear outstanding young musicians in concert. Utah Symphony Utah Symphony Youth Guild Recital Youth Recital Tuesday,Guild April 15 | 7 pm

Utah Symphony Utah Symphony All-Star Evening All-Star Evening Tuesday, May 20 | 7 pm

Vieve Gore Recital Hall, Westminster College

Abravanel Hall

Tuesday, April 15 | 7 pm Vieve Gore Recital Hall, Westminster College Youth Guild members prepared for Youth memberspractice. preparedAuditions for monthsGuild in dedicated months in dedicated practice. Auditions in March selected a wonderful array of in March selected a wonderful array of talents and repertoire for you to enjoy. talents and repertoire for you to enjoy. Join us for the Youth Guild recital which is Join the Youth free us andforopen to the Guild public.recital which is free and open to the public.

Season Sponsor: Season Sponsor:

Tuesday, May 20 | 7 pm Abravanel Hall High school student Catherine Winters High Catherine Winters solos school with thestudent Utah Symphony playing solos with the Utah Symphony Liebermann’s Concerto for Fluteplaying and Liebermann’s forhalf Flute Orchestra. InConcerto the second of and the Orchestra. In the second of the program students from tenhalf different program studentssitfrom ten different youth orchestras side-by-side with the youth orchestras sit side-by-side musicians of the Utah Symphonywith withthe musicians of the Utah Symphony Vladimir Kulenovic on the podium.with Vladimir Kulenovic on the podium. For tickets, visit utahsymphony.org For tickets, visit utahsymphony.org or call 801-533-6683 or call 801-533-6683


Season Honorees OV E R T U R E $25, 0 0 0 & A B OV E

Arnold Machinery Mr. & Mrs. William C. Bailey Ballard Spahr, LLP** BMW of Murray BMW of Pleasant Grove Rebecca Marriott Champion Chevron Corporation Thomas D. Dee III & Dr. Candace Dee Deer Valley Resort John H. & Joan B. Firmage Thierry & Catherine Fischer**

Kristen Fletcher & Dan McPhun Tom & Lorie Jacobson Frederick Q. Lawson Foundation Jack & Jan Massimino Carol & Anthony W. Middleton, Jr., M.D. Ogden Opera Guild James A. Parke Charles Maxfield & Gloria F. Parrish Foundation Alice & Frank Puleo S. J. & Jessie E. Quinney Foundation

Simmons Family Foundation The Sam & Diane Stewart Family Foundation Norman C. & Barbara Tanner Zibby & Jim Tozer Nora Eccles Treadwell Foundation Wells Fargo Vivint M. Walker & Sue Wallace John W. Williams Workers Compensation Fund Edward & Marelynn Zipser

Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting Gallery Mr. Joseph F. Furlong III Sterling & Shelli Gardner Foundation Gastronomy, Inc.* Ann & Gordon Getty Foundation Shari Gottlieb Haven J. Barlow Family Douglas & Connie Hayes Richard K. & Shirley S. Hemingway Foundation Susan & Tom Hodgson Holland & Hart** Hotel Monaco* Hyatt Escala Lodge at Park City** Mary P. Jacobs & Jerald H. Jacobs Family Ronald Jibson G. Frank & Pamela Joklik Jones Waldo** Laura & Chuck Kaiser Mr. & Mrs. Wayne Lyski Mr. W. A. Holman Mr. & Mrs. Charles McEvoy Harold W. & Lois Milner Rayna & Glen Mintz Moreton Family Foundation Fred & Lucy Moreton Mount Olympus Water* Sally Boynton Murray Trust Terrell & Leah Nagata National Governor’s Association New York Ltd. OK3 Air Park City Chamber/Bureau Mr. David A. Petersen

Promontory Foundation Protel Networks* Radisson Hotel* Brad Rencher Dr. Clifford S. Reusch The Joseph & Evelyn Rosenblatt Charitable Fund Salt Lake City Arts Council Lori & Theodore Samuels Peggy & Ben Schapiro SelectHealth Sky Harbor Apartments* George & Tamie Speciale Thomas & Marilyn Sutton Jonathan & Anne Symonds Thomas & Caroline Tucker Albert & Yvette Ungricht Utah Food Services* Utah Hispanic Chamber Of Commerce* Utah Symphony Guild Kathleen Digre & Michael Varner Wheeler Foundation

M A E S T R O $10, 0 0 0 & A B OV E

Adobe American Express Anonymous Maggie & Nadim Abuhaidar Art Works For Kids! Bambara Restaurant* B. W. Bastian Foundation David & Sylvia Batchelder E. Wayne & Barbara Baumgardner Brent & Bonnie Jean Beesley Foundation Mr. & Mrs. William Bierer Lynn Blodgett Berenice J. Bradshaw Charitable Trust Judy Brady & Drew W. Browning Mr. & Mrs. Neill Brownstein Carol Franc Buck Foundation Caffè Molise* Marie Eccles Caine Foundation-Russell Family The Capital Group CenturyLink Howard & Betty Clark C. Comstock Clayton Foundation Daynes Music* Skip Daynes* The Jarvis & Constance Doctorow Family Foundation Dorsey & Whitney LLP The Katherine W. Dumke & Ezekiel R. Dumke, Jr. Foundation Edwards Lifesciences EY Hague† & Sue Ellis Estee Lauder* Fabian & Clendenin

18

See page 88–94 for an additional listing of our generous donors whose support has made this season possible. * In-Kind Gift ** In-Kind & Cash Gift † Deceased

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


Challenger School offers uniquely fun and academic classes for preschool to eighth grade students. Our students learn to think for themselves and to value independence. The results are unmatched at any price! Come see for yourself. Observe our classrooms any time— no appointment needed.

An independent private school offering preschool through eighth grade © 2014, Challenger Schools • Challenger School admits students of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin.


BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND!

©Disney

May 29 - Oct 24

June 5 - Oct 23 ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER & TIM RICE’S

AND THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT

Aug 1 - Oct 22 Great Savings on Season Ticket Packages Call (866) 321-8072 • tuacahn.org Remember to ask about our upcoming concerts!


Beautiful Spaces... Unique architectural details. Fabulous rug. Rich hardwood floors. Dramatic lighting. Stunning art. Chic cabinets and countertops. If you think we only sell nice furniture, think again.

2013

174 East Winchester, Murray

I hamiltonparkinteriors.com


BEST OF STATE in Education and the Performing Arts SALT LAKE SCHOOL FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS is a fully accredited, tuition-free, public charter high school, where students grades 9 through 12 receive rigorous training in MUSIC, DANCE, THEATRE and ACADEMICS

Dream bigger. Reach further.

Achieve MORE.

It’s not too late to enroll for the 2013-2014 school year!

www.saltlakespa.org 801-466-6700

SLPerforming Art.proof.indd 1

5/20/13 4:36 PM

More Than A Mortuary A home in which to...

celebrate life More important than the casket, the flowers or anything you might purchase is the opportunity for friends and family to gather and comfort you with their loving memories and condolences. At Starks, our private chef, our memorial displays, our live musicians and staff of hosts incline visitors to stay and reminisce with you…and celebrate the life of your loved one.

A Home For The Bereaved

801.474.9119 l www.StarksFuneral.com l 3651 South 900 East • Salt Lake City Prepaid funeral plans are easily transferable and we accept most programs issued by other mortuaries.


Utah Symphony gratefully acknowledges the George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Foundation as the 2013–14 Season Sponsor and the lead donor to our Campaign for Perpetual Motion

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

23


Until every music stand is set and every musician is set to play, Stage Manager Chip Dance will not rest.

Until standards have not just been met but surpassed. Until everything is studied and thought through. Everything checked and rechecked. Until every move has been subjected to careful examination. Until exacting standards of preparedness bring about the best performance. Ours. And our clients’. Until you see that we’re always working. Always refining. Without missing a beat. Without missing a note. Until then…

We will not rest www.ubs.com/wewillnotrest-us Names and/or references to third parties in this print advertisement are used with permission. © UBS 2012. All rights reserved.


Chris Botti in Concert

program

Chris Botti in Concert Apr 2 | 8 pm Abravanel Hall Chris Botti, Trumpet Billy Kilson, Drums Richie Goods, Bass Geoffrey Keezer, Piano Andy Ezrin, Keyboards Leonardo Amuedo, Guitar Serena McKinney, Violin Sy Smith, Vocals George Komsky, Vocals

SELECTIONS TO BE ANNOUNCED FROM STAGE.

UTAH SYMPHONY GUILD

GIFT SHOP

Open prior to and during the intermission of Utah Symphony performances. Located in the Abravanel Hall lobby.

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

SPECIAL EVENT

25


Chris Botti in Concert

artist’s profile

Since the release of his 2004 critically acclaimed CD When I Fall In Love, Chris Botti has become the largest-selling American instrumental artist. His success has crossed over to audiences usually reserved for pop muisc and his ongoing association with PBS has led to four #1 jazz albums, as well as multiple Gold, Platinum and Grammy Awards. His latest album Impressions won the Grammy for Best Pop Instrumental Album at the 55th Grammy Awards. Performing worldwide and selling more than three million albums, he has found a form of creative expression that begins in jazz and expands beyond the limits of any single genre. Over the past three decades, Botti has recorded and performed with the best in music, including Sting, Barbra Streisand, Josh Groban, Yo-Yo Ma, Michael Bublé, Paul Simon, Joni Mitchell, John Mayer, Andrea Bocelli, Joshua Bell, Aerosmith’s Steven Tyler and even Frank Sinatra. Hitting the road for as many as 300 days per year, the trumpeter has also performed with many of the Chris Botti finest symphonies and at some of the world’s most prestigious Trumpet venues from Carnegie Hall and the Hollywood Bowl to the Sydney Opera House and the Real …has thoroughly established Teatro di San Carlo in Italy. Impressions, Botti’s 2012 Columbia Records and Grammy winning is the latest in a stellar parade innovative figures of the release, of albums—including When I Fall In (2004), To Love Again: The Duets contemporary music world. Love (2005), Italia (2007), and the CD/ DVD Chris Botti in Boston (2009)—that has firmly established him as a clarion voice in the American contemporary music scene. Playing with his uniquely expressive sound and soaring musical imagination, Botti is joined on the disc by featured artists Andrea Bocelli, Vince Gill, Herbie Hancock, Mark Knopfler and David Foster in a warm, intimate celebration of melodic balladry.

himself as one of the important,

With Impressions and the albums that preceded it, Chris Botti has thoroughly established himself as one of the important, innovative figures of the contemporary music world.

26

SPECIAL EVENT

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


Subscribe Now! Save 25% on your tickets when you subscribe to the Utah Symphony’s 2014–15 season.

HigHligHts include:

• Mahler Symphonies 1, 2, 3 & 4 • André Watts performs Beethoven’s “Emperor” Concerto • Beethoven’s Ninth • Yefim Bronfman performs Brahms‘ Piano Concerto No. 2

MAHLER SYMPHONIES 1, 2, 3, 4

ANdRé WATTS, PIANO

BEETHOVEN’S SYMPHONY NO. 9

For subscriptions, visit utahsymphony.org or call 801-533-6683

Season Sponsor:

YEfIM BRONfMAN, PIANO


Third Annual Symphony Pro-Am

program

Third Annual Symphony Pro-Am Apr 3 | Abravanel Hall Vladimir Kulenovic, Conductor

 Adult amateur musicians sit side by side with the professionals of the Utah Symphony. Selections from Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet will be rehearsed and then performed.

SERGEI PROKOFIEV

Romeo and Juliet, Suite No. 2

I. Montagues and Capulets VII. Romeo at the Tomb of Juliet

Schedule: 7:00-8:00 pm 8:00-8:30 pm 8:30-9:30 pm

rehearsal break rehearsal and performance

The audience will be seated at 7 or 8:30 pm.

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

PRO-AM

29


Utah Symphony gratefully acknowledges OC Tanner as the 2013–14 Masterworks Series Sponsor and a lead donor to our Campaign for Perpetual Motion

30

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


Mozart, Bernstein & Nielsen

program

Mozart, Bernstein & Nielsen Apr 11–12 | 8 pm Abravanel Hall Thierry Fischer, Conductor Kathryn Eberle, Violin WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART

Eine kleine Nachtmusik, K. 525 I. Allegro II. Romanze: Andante III. Menuetto: Allegretto IV. Rondo: Allegro

LEONARD BERNSTEIN

Serenade, after Plato’s Symposium

I. Phaedras - Pausanias: Lento - Allegro II. Aristophanes: Allegretto III. Eryximachus: Presto IV. Agathon: Adagio V. Socrates - Alcibiades: Molto tenuto - Allegro molto vivace

Kathryn Eberle, Violin

­/ INTERMISSION /

LEONARD BERNSTEIN CARL NIELSEN

Overture to Candide Symphony No. 5, op. 50

I. Tempo giusto - Adagio II. Allegro - Presto - Andante poco tranquilo

This program is dedicated in loving memory of Conrad O. Hansen of the C. Comstock Clayton Foundation for his years of dedicated and generous support. CONCERT SPONSOR

GUEST ARTIST SPONSOR

C. COMSTOCK CLAYTON FOUNDATION

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

MASTERWORKS

31


Mozart, Bernstein & Nielsen

artists’ profiles

Swiss conductor Thierry Fischer recently renewed his contract as Music Director of the Utah Symphony, where he has revitalized music-making and programming and brought a new energy to the orchestra and organization as a whole. Fischer has given many world premieres, and has instigated a major commissioning program in Utah, starting in Spring 2012 with a cello concerto for Jean-Guihen Queyras composed by Michael Jarrell, which he will also conduct with the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande in 2014.

Thierry Fischer Music Director The Maurice Abravanel Chair, endowed by the George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Foundation

Fischer was Principal Conductor of the BBC National Orchestra of Wales from 2006–12 and continues to return as a guest conductor. Other engagements include the Philharmonia, Czech Philharmonic, Orchestre National de Lyon, Frankfurt Radio Symphony, Cincinnati Symphony, Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, London Sinfonietta, Scottish Chamber Orchestra, and Swedish Chamber Orchestra. Last summer he made his debut at the Grant Park Music Festival in Chicago and he is guest conducting with the Oregon Symphony, the Detriot Symphony, Atlanta Symphony and the Pacific Symphony this season. He will also be conducting at The Deer Valley® Music Festival this summer.

In 2012 Fischer’s recording for Hyperion of Frank Martin’s opera Der Sturm with the Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra and Chorus was awarded the International Classical Music Award (opera category). Other recent Hyperion Fischer’s hallmarks are a releases have included Honegger, d’Indy and Florent Schmitt with the BBC lightness of touch and National Orchestra of Wales—with whom he has also recorded the Stravinsky transparency of texture, allowing ballets for Signum and Stravinsky and Frank Martin concerti with Baiba Skride room for vivid characterization. for Orfeo. Fischer started out as Principal Flute in Hamburg and at the Zurich Opera. His conducting career began in his 30s when he replaced an ailing colleague, subsequently directing his first few concerts with the Chamber Orchestra of Europe, where he was Principal Flute under Claudio Abbado. He spent his apprentice years in Holland, and then became Principal Conductor and Artistic Advisor of the Ulster Orchestra 2001–06. He was Chief Conductor of the Nagoya Philharmonic 2008–11, making his Suntory Hall debut in Tokyo in May 2010, and is now its Honorary Guest Conductor. 32

MASTERWORKS

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


202 S. Main, Salt lake City (801) 363-5454 | baMbara-SlC.CoM Bambara is hip urban chic, casual and comfortable upscale American bistro dining; bringing a sophisticated, yet approachable element to Salt Lake City’s dining scene. Enjoy Bambara’s seasonally inspired menu for special occasions or business...before and after the arts...or just because. Voted: 2011 Best Lunch Salt Lake magazine Annual Dining Awards.


Mozart, Bernstein & Nielsen

artists’ profiles

Kathryn Eberle is Associate Concertmaster of the Utah Symphony | Utah Opera. Previously, Ms. Eberle was a violinist with the St. Louis Symphony and Guest Concertmaster with the Omaha and Richmond Symphonies. She served extensively as Concertmaster for the Juilliard Orchestra, including the ensemble’s tour of China, as well as performances in Avery Fisher, Alice Tully and Carnegie Halls.

Kathryn Eberle Violin

Ms. Eberle’s solo performances include appearances with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Louisville Orchestra, the Nashville Symphony, the National Academy Orchestra of Canada, the Bahia Symphony in Brazil and the Fireworks Ensemble at the Library of Congress. She has collaborated with such artists as Edgar Meyer, Jaime Laredo, Arnold Steinhardt, Ricardo Morales and members of the New York Philharmonic. Eberle garnered grand prizes in the YMF National Debut, Pasadena Instrumental and USC Concerto Competitions and top prizes in the Klein, Stulberg and Corpus Christi International Competitions. An avid chamber musician, her festival appearances include Aspen, Banff, Yellow Barn, Encore School for Strings, Missillac (France), Sewanee, Laguna Beach, Innsbrook and Festival Mozaic. Ms. Eberle received a Master’s Degree from The Juilliard School studying with Sylvia Rosenberg. She previously studied with Robert Lipsett both at the Colburn School and the University of Southern California, where she received the String Department and Symphony awards upon graduation. A native of Nashville, Tennessee, she was a pre-college student of Cornelia Heard at Vanderbilt’s Blair School of Music. Ms. Eberle performs on a J. B. Vuillaume, Paris, 1870.

34

MASTERWORKS

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


Mozart, Bernstein & Nielsen

program notes

1/4

Eine kleine Nachtmusik THE COMPOSER – Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1770–1827)

Mozart lost his father in May of 1787 and his passing weakened the last bit of glue that held the Mozart family together. Mozart had always remained fitfully connected to his Salzburg roots but without the patriarch around to demand regular family contact, Mozart began to ignore even his once beloved sister. Don Giovanni was under construction during this period and after the success of Figaro, much was expected. THE HISTORY – The term “Nachtmusik” (“Notturno” in Italian)

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Composer

INSTRUMENTATION: strings DURATION: 16 minutes in four movements

described an 18th-century composition written in the style of a serenade. The literal “night music” translation was in keeping with the historical intent of serenades as a kind of “lovers’ window” music meant specifically for evening performance. Mozart composed several serenades and serenade-like works but only three had the “night” designation in their titles. Easily most famous from that subset was the K. 525 Serenade in G Major, known as Eine kleine Nachtmusik. It is only natural to read some specialness into the work’s title since, in today’s language, “A Little Night Music” sounds rather charming and evocative. But in truth, Mozart likely only scribbled a note in the language of his day that designated this music as “a little serenade” in comparison to the other not-so-little ones in his catalogue. Still, the more literal and less appropriate translation persists and frankly, it serves the piece best. Mozart worked on this miniature gem concurrently with Don Giovanni and probably finished it only mere months after his father’s death. The elegant, effervescent tone of Eine kleine Nachtmusik puts it at odds with a family tragedy and surely confirms the belief that it was written upon request for a social occasion of some sort. The nature of that event is no longer known but the music itself has proven eternal and Eine kleine Nachtmusik exists now as one of the most popular creations of any composer. THE WORLD – The United States Constitution was created

in September of 1787. Also that year, the HMS Bounty set out on its fateful voyage and the two largest moons of Uranus were discovered by astronomer William Herschel. THE CONNECTION – Surprisingly, Eine kleine Nachtmusik has only appeared once before on the Masterworks Series. The year was 1976 and the conductor was Maestro Abravanel.

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

MASTERWORKS

35


Mozart, Bernstein & Nielsen

program notes

2/4

Serenade, after Plato’s Symposium THE COMPOSER – Leonard Bernstein (1918–1990)

In a decade remembered mostly for his dramatic creations (Wonderful Town, Westside Story and Candide to name a few), Bernstein did compose one of his most important concert works in the 1950s. The Serenade for Violin and Orchestra was completed in 1954, the same year Bernstein began his historic run of appearances on the CBS culture show Omnibus with an engaging and critically acclaimed discussion of Beethoven’s 5th Symphony. THE HISTORY – After completing the serenade in August, Bernstein

Leonard Bernstein Composer

INSTRUMENTATION: solo violin, timpani, tambourine, suspended cymbal, snare drum, tenor drum, triangle, glockenspiel, xylophone, chimes, Chinese blocks, harp, strings DURATION: 31 minutes in five movements (played without pause)

wrote the following explanation of his intentions: “There is no literal program for this serenade, despite the fact that it resulted from a rereading of Plato’s charming dialogue, The Symposium. The music, like the dialogue, is a series of related statements in praise of love, and generally follows the Platonic form through the succession of speakers at the banquet. The ‘relatedness’ of the movements does not depend on common thematic material, but rather on a system whereby each movement evolves out of elements in the preceding one. For the benefit of those interested in literary allusion, I might suggest the following points as guideposts: I. Phaedrus opens the symposium with a lyrical oration in praise of Eros, the god of love. Pausanias continues by describing the duality of lover and beloved. II. Aristophanes does not play the role of clown in this dialogue, but instead that of the bedtime storyteller, invoking the fairy-tale mythology of love. III. Eryximachus speaks of bodily harmony as a scientific model for the workings of love-patterns. IV. Agathon’s panegyric embraces all aspects of love’s powers, charms and functions. V. Socrates describes his visit to the seer Diotima, quoting her speech on the demonology of love [and endures] the famous interruption by Alcibiades and his band of drunken revelers…” Bernstein also describes the “hint of jazz in the celebration” as the “natural expression of a contemporary American composer imbued with the spirit of that timeless dinner party.” THE WORLD – Marilyn Monroe married Joe DiMaggio in 1954.

Also that year, Alan Turing committed suicide, the First Indochina War ended, the first Godzilla film was released in Tokyo and William Golding published Lord of the Flies in England. THE CONNECTION – Serenade was last performed by Utah

Symphony in 2004. Keith Lockhart conducted and Robert McDuffie was soloist. 36

MASTERWORKS

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


Mozart, Bernstein & Nielsen

program notes

3/4

Overture to Candide THE COMPOSER – Leonard Bernstein (1918–1990)

Bernstein’s ascendance to the Music Directorship of the New York Philharmonic in the late 1950s necessitated a pause in his composition of dramatic music. The last two projects before the break were constructed simultaneously but enjoyed very different trajectories following their completion. It goes without saying that West Side Story went supernova right away but Candide was very poorly received in nearly all of its various iterations.

Leonard Bernstein Composer

INSTRUMENTATION: 2 flutes, piccolo, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, bass clarinet, Eb clarinet, 2 bassoons, contrabassoon, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, timpani, bass drum, cymbals, snare drum, tenor drum, glockenspiel, xylophone, harp, strings DURATION: 5 minutes

THE HISTORY – Based on a satirical 1759 novella by Voltaire called Candide: The Optimist, Bernstein’s 1956 comic operetta originally featured a libretto by Lillian Hellman. Hellman’s fingerprints are all but gone now and the text of this troubled work now bears the marks of its many ensuing collaborators. Revivals and revisions dot the post-premiere history of Candide with significant new versions of the operetta appearing in 1973 and 1989 (this last was the “Final Revised Version”). The basic plot, for the most part, survived the various changes of authorial voice and tells of Candide, a young man who is convinced that all things happen for the best possible reasons. He travels the world in a series of adventurous tests to his naïve theory and Bernstein’s ability to juggle different musical styles aptly depicts the diverse succession of disasters encountered by the “eternal optimist.” Aside from a few memorable and oft-excerpted arias, it is the fantastic overture that has kept this mostly unsuccessful music in vogue today. Bernstein was never at a loss for catchy themes and they shoulder each other with good-natured ease over the 5-minute course of this fleet, virtuosic showpiece. Nothing lasts too long and every note and phrase reflects the breezy tale to come. Bernstein featured the overture on a New York Philharmonic program in 1957 and it was as immediately beloved as the opera was misunderstood. THE WORLD – The Suez Crisis occurred in 1956. Also that year,

Tunisia gained its independence from France, Hungarian citizens staged a revolt against their Soviet-controlled government and C. S. Lewis published the final Narnia novel. THE CONNECTION – Candide Overture is performed often by

the Utah Symphony but rarely on a Masterworks program. The last time was in 1987 under Andrew Litton.

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

MASTERWORKS

37


Mozart, Bernstein & Nielsen

program notes

4/4

Symphony No. 5, op. 50 THE COMPOSER – Carl Nielsen (1865–1931)

Nielsen was on the road a lot during the early 1920s. Trouble at home had reached an untenable level, with Nielsen and his wife both sufficiently miserable that their marriage was best served by an increase in his conducting engagements abroad. Nielsen was never an overly quick worker when composing and the paired stresses of spousal estrangement and other professional responsibilities made for an especially labored creative process. THE HISTORY – One of the works that suffered somewhat from

Carl Nielsen Composer

INSTRUMENTATION: 3 flutes (3rd doubles piccolo), 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, contrabassoon, 4 horns, 3 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, timpani, tambourine, triangle, suspended cymbal, 2 snare drums, celesta, strings DURATION: 34 minutes in two movements

this crisis was Symphony No. 5, a work Nielsen described as among the most difficult projects of his career. He toiled over the score for more than a year and completed it in 1922 only little more than a week before the scheduled premiere. To meet this deadline, Nielsen had been forced to limit his social engagements while in Gothenburg as a guest conductor, stating: “…I need peace to work on my symphony…” and that, to find such peace, he had “completely avoided dinner parties.” It might not seem like such a terribly high price to pay for one’s work, but imbedded in the innocence of the statement is an acknowledgement of Symphony No. 5’s immense depth and importance. The Great War was over when Nielsen first set to work on the piece but the brutality of that incredible calamity had impressed itself onto his soul in permanent ink. By declining to apply a nickname for the first time in his symphonic career, however, Nielsen kept the specific inspiration for Symphony No. 5 just out of frame. He was never inclined to call it his “war” symphony (as many do today), but nearly all of his references to contrast, opposition and the presence of “evil” in the music support his demurral that no one was or would ever be the same after the war. Nielsen chose a unique two-movement structure to portray the elemental conflicts of man. The first section, according to biographer Robert Simpson, represents “the crux of the conflict itself” while the second offers “a finale that rise[s] out of the ashes in a great fount of regenerative energy.” THE WORLD – 1922 was the year of the Lincoln Memorial

dedication in Washington D.C. Also in 1922 was the publication of James Joyce’s Ulysses in Paris, Egyptian independence and the installation of Benito Mussolini as Prime Minister of Italy. THE CONNECTION – Nielsen 5 has only been performed in one

previous Utah Symphony program. Varujan Kojian conducted the performance in 1980. 38

MASTERWORKS

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


Selection, Style, VALUE.

Furniture | Electronics | Appliances | Flooring | Mattresses Syracuse 801-774-2800 • Orem 801-227-8800 • South Salt Lake 801-461-3800 Riverdale/Ogden 801-622-7400 • Taylorsville 801-967-4800 • Murray 801-261-6800 Open 11 Hours A Day • 6 Days A Week • Monday-Saturday 10am – 9pm Closed Sunday Shop on-line rcwilley.com


IT’S EASY TO KEEP YOUR BUSINESS IN THE

SPOTLIGHT PANY ING COM T C A E K A SALT L

CENTE TUACAHN RMING ARTS O THE PERF ATRE

ORMIN

ERA T IVA L O P S E F H A UT G ARTS

AUER H C A B GINA PHONY M Y S H A T U PERA U TA H O R FOR

HE GRAND T

S L L I B Y A L P Inc.

BYU PERF

KIN

NYCHAELL DA GSBUR

RIRIE

EST W T E L L URY BA WOODB

C E RT AS CON M T IS R H NY C C O M PA BESTOR E T R C U N K A A Y D ODYSSE

ESTIVAL F E R A E P S E K UTAH SHA

PLACE YOUR AD IN THESE FINE PUBLICATIONS & REACH WORLD-CLASS AUDIENCES

ISE AY IN BO W D A O R B IATION T ASSOC - UTAH E LL A B Y N Y SYMPHO MERICA OGDEN AY ACROSS A EATRE COMPAN W H T K D EER LT L A E BROA MS PION A L SA ®

UNIVERS

OOR O U T D UIDE G S P O RT S ZINE MAGA

S T R O P S H ITY OF UTA

U K E C IT Y S A LT L A T IO N A L IN T E R N A T I V A L S JAZZ FE

ALL B T E K S A B L L A B FOOT ICS

REALTOR E MAGAZIN

NTA UTAH DE TION ASSOCIA I N E Z MAGA

A PROGR A R T S F E S T I V TA H

TRADE E U L A V THE R EXAMINE L

ARTS Publishing Mills

S T SITY FOOTBALL - BASKET A N M Y G NIVER

BALL

Image licensed by Ingram Image

TE U UTAH STA

CALL NOW TO SECURE YOUR PLACE IN THE SPOTLIGHT www.millspub.com info@millspub.com 801-467-8833


Direct Importer of the World's Finest Rugs

ExpErt rEstoration & consErvation • appraising Buy/tradE • traditional hand clEaning

Decorate your home with the finest rugs from Adib’s extensive and unique collection of hand woven masterpieces.

at thE historic villa thEatrE

3092 South Highland Drive • Salt Lake City, Utah 84106 (801) 484-6364 • (888) 445-RUGS


Mahler’s Symphony No. 5

program

Mahler’s Symphony No. 5 Apr 18–19 | 8 pm Abravanel Hall Thierry Fischer, Conductor Colin Currie, Percussion Jason Hardink, Piano FRANZ JOSEPH HAYDN ELLIOTT CARTER

“The Representation of Chaos” from The Creation Figment V Colin Currie, Marimba

Two Controversies and a Conversation

I. Controversy 1 II. Controversy 2 III. Conversation

Colin Currie, Percussion Jason Hardink, Piano

JOHANN PACHELBEL

Canon in D

­/ INTERMISSION /

GUSTAV MAHLER

Symphony No. 5 in C-sharp minor

I. Trauermarsch II. Stürmisch bewegt, mit grösster Vehemenz III. Scherzo: Kräftig, night zu schnell IV. Adagietto, sehr langsam V. Rondo - Finale: Allegro CONCERT SPONSOR

KEM & CAROLYN GARDNER

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

MASTERWORKS

43


Mahler’s Symphony No. 5

artists’ profiles

For Thierry Fischer‘s biography, see page 32.

Recognized for his “athletic percussionism, compulsive showmanship and deep musicality” (Guardian), Colin Currie is a solo and chamber artist at the peak of his powers. Championing new music at the highest level, Currie is the soloist of choice for many of today’s foremost composers and he performs regularly with the world’s leading orchestras and conductors.

Colin Currie Percussion

From his earliest years Currie forged a pioneering path in creating new music for percussion. He was awarded the Royal Philharmonic Society Young Artist Award in 2000 for his inspirational role in contemporary music-making and received a Borletti-Buitoni Trust Award in 2005. Currie has premiered works by composers such as Elliott Carter, Einojuhani Rautavaara, Jennifer Higdon, Kalevi Aho, Kurt Schwertsik, Simon Holt, Alexander Goehr, Dave Maric, Julia Wolfe and Nico Muhly. He recently had the privilege of premiering a new work from Elliott Carter: a double concerto performed with Pierre-Laurent Aimard and commissioned by the New York Philharmonic, Aldeburgh Festival and Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France. Upcoming commissions include Championing new music new works by Steve Reich, James MacMillan, Louis Andriessen, Andrew at the highest level… Norman and Anna Clyne. Currie is Artist in Residence at London’s Southbank Centre, a role which allows him to develop relationships with artists and ensembles across a variety of art forms, as well as take part in collaborative and educational projects. In autumn 2013, as part of this residency, Currie performed seminal works by Stockhausen and Steve Reich within Southbank Centre’s major festival The Rest is Noise. Another highlight of Currie’s 2013–14 season will be the world premiere Tapdance by Louis Andriessen with Asko-Schoenberg/ Reinbert de Leeuw.

44

MASTERWORKS

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


c a P ito l r e e F

·

arches

·

c a N yo N l a N d s

·

B ryc e c a N yo N

·

F iv e N ati o N al Par ks . o N e e Pi c We e k . Only in Utah. utahsymPhoNy.org/mighty5

the Utah SymphOny’S

mighty 5™ tour august 11–17, 2014 presented by

ZioN


Mahler’s Symphony No. 5

Jason Hardink Piano

artists’ profiles

Pianist Jason Hardink is the Principal Keyboard of the Utah Symphony and the Artistic Director of the NOVA Chamber Music Series. His performances include a wide-ranging repertoire of music by living composers and works of the historical canon. This season he is performing world premieres of new works by Jason Eckardt, Morris Rosenzweig, and Bruce Quaglia. On NOVA he is collaborating with Utah Symphony Associate Concertmaster Kathryn Eberle on the complete Beethoven Sonatas for Violin and Piano paired with Utah’s first cycle of solo Klavierstücke by Wolfgang Rihm. Over the last few seasons, he has given a series of lecture recitals on Beethoven’s piano sonatas, performed a cycle of recitals situating the late piano music of Franz Schubert in dialogue with works by Second Viennese School composers, and toured with Olivier Messiaen’s monumental Vingt Regards sur l’Enfant-Jésus. Hardink holds a DMA from Rice University, where he studied with Brian Connelly. He is married to pianist Kimi Kawashima, and they are parents of twin boys, Luc and Derek.

Four Centuries, Four Continents...

One Delightful Evening May 2 & 3, 2014 7:30 p.m. St. Ambrose Catholic Church 1975 South 2300 East, Salt Lake City For more information and online ticketing, visit

childrensing.com Auditions for new members ages 8-15, now through May 31. No experience required. To schedule an audition, call: One of America’s Finest

801.537.1412


Mahler’s Symphony No. 5

program notes

1/4

“The Representation of Chaos” from The Creation

THE COMPOSER – Franz Joseph Haydn (1732–1809)

Haydn returned to Vienna from London in 1795 having established himself as the most famous musician alive. He produced many significant works during his London years and also had important inspirational experiences that informed the projects he took up later at home. No other composer, before or since, ever approached the complete notoriety Haydn had achieved while alive and his time in England was integral to his legacy. THE MUSIC – The potential potency of legacy was something

Franz Joseph Haydn Composer

INSTRUMENTATION: 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, contrabassoon, 2 horns, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones, timpani, harpsichord, strings DURATION: 7 minutes

Haydn experienced regularly in London, thanks to that city’s enduring love for their other second son from the continent, Handel. Handel had been dead for over thirty years but his mark on the English consciousness was indelible. Haydn attended a performance of Messiah in 1791 and it humbled him deeply and motivated him to consider writing a grand-scale oratorio himself. To that end, Haydn arrived in Vienna in 1795 with a libretto given to him by his London benefactor Johann Peter Salomon. The text was based on the Books of Genesis and Psalms as well as Milton’s Paradise Lost and it might actually have been the remnants of something prepared for Handel long before. Using this document to create both an English and German version, Haydn began work on what would become The Creation in 1796 and completed it 1798. He spent a careful amount of time on the opening “Representation of Chaos” section of Part I, discarding entire versions of it until he finally felt it evoked just the right primordial atmosphere. The “Chaos” music is one of the most arresting moments of Haydn’s entire compositional career, given how far he stretched the accepted Classical limits of his craft. There is a harmonic, rhythmic and formal shiftiness that perfectly portrays the disorder and confusion of pre-creation and the sounds that result from Haydn’s risk-taking still seem very fresh today. THE WORLD – Napoleon invaded the Swiss Confederacy in 1798.

That same year, the Irish rebelled against British rule, the Alien and Sedition Acts were signed into American law and Coleridge and Wordsworth published the Lyrical Ballads. THE CONNECTION – The Creation was last performed by Utah

Symphony in 2009, Jeffrey Kahane was on the podium.

48

MASTERWORKS

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


Mahler’s Symphony No. 5

program notes

2/4

Figment V & Two Controversies and a Conversation THE COMPOSER – Elliott Carter (1908–2012)

Carter’s 100th birthday received international attention in 2008. Since music history has its fair share of composers who died in their 30s (or younger!), Carter’s life was celebrated not only for its longevity but also for the incredible productivity he maintained throughout. His 100th birthday concert in Carnegie Hall featured a piece he had written only a year earlier and he continued to compose nearly up to his death in 2012. THE HISTORY – The music of Carter’s final period often gravitated

Elliott Carter Composer

FIGMENT V INSTRUMENTATION: Marimba DURATION: 2 minutes TWO CONTROVERSIES AND A CONVERSATION INSTRUMENTATION:

solo piano, solo percussion, flute (doubles piccolo), oboes, 2 clarinets (2nd doubles bass clarinet), bassoon, horn, 2 trumpets, trombone, strings

DURATION: 11 minutes in three movements

toward a lighter, leaner style that incorporated a much less systematic approach to tonality and often resulted in very brief statements. As part of his late-life flurry of creativity, Carter wrote a total of six very short Figments for various solo instruments between 1999 and 2011. Figment V for solo marimba was composed in 2009 as a “present for the 17th birthday of [his] dear grandson Alexander, who is interested in percussion instruments.” Carter wrote the Conversation movement of Two Controversies and a Conversation first in 2010 and added the contrasting Controversies the following year. He told an interviewer in 2012 that Conversation was “unlike anything I’ve ever written.” The pianist and percussionist take part in a lively musical discussion, during which the participants attempt to elicit certain desired responses and are “all of the time playing some sort of game with each other.” Carter decided in 2011 that Conversation would benefit from an introduction and created a pair of terse Controversies for the task. The character of Controversies is altogether different from Conversation in that the two soloists are less playful and are, according to Carter, a bit more “cross” with one another. The crossness manifests itself in a decidedly more halting style of communication that precipitates an ongoing tempo tug of war. Neither really “wins” the debate before moving on to Conversation and the new dialogue benefits from increased involvement by the orchestra. THE WORLD – The Maersk Alabama hijacking (the story behind

the film Captain Phillips) occurred in 2009. In 2011, the Occupy Wall Street protest movement began in New York City’s Financial District. THE CONNECTION – These concerts represent the Utah

Symphony premieres of Elliott Carter’s Figment V and Two Controversies and a Conversation.

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

MASTERWORKS

49


Mahler’s Symphony No. 5

program notes

3/4

Canon in D THE COMPOSER – Johann Pachelbel (1653–1706)

Johann Pachelbel was well known in his day for many things. He was an accomplished organist and excellent composer of vocal music, chamber music and keyboard works of virtually every 17th century kind. But Pachelbel’s substantial contributions to German High Baroque art, however progressive and important at the time, would have remained the subject of only the most diligent scholarly efforts were it not for the one thing for which he is well known today. THE HISTORY – That one thing was a big thing, or at least was

Johann Pachelbel Composer

INSTRUMENTATION: strings DURATION: 5 minutes

destined to become so. Where to begin? There are several works from music history that have enjoyed a measure of popularity far beyond anything their authors could have reasonably predicted or, in some cases, preferred. From Blue Danube to Adagio for Strings to Pomp and Circumstance to the finale of Beethoven’s 9th Symphony, there are many pieces that can be found in the dinner party collections of even the most casual listeners. But then there are the true forces of nature, the pieces that achieve fame in a way that defies calculation. Pachelbel’s Canon in D is just such a phenomenon. Originally composed in 1700 as a companion to a lively Gigue, the Canon has been arranged for virtually every kind of instrumental ensemble and has been adapted for use in many non-classical styles. The Canon entered modern consciousness in the 1960s thanks to a few chamber orchestra recordings and enjoyed pride of place as the world’s most recognizable music for decades. Numerous films, rock bands and instrumental celebrities have made good use of the Canon and, like Air on a G String and Trumpet Voluntary, it has become a standard part of most American weddings. The 20th century fascination with this engaging little piece has waned a bit recently but even the most casual Internet search reveals it as a continual mainstay. A note about tempo: most contemporary performances feature a pace much slower than Pachelbel intended but this practice does no harm. In fact, the contemplative aspects of Pachelbel’s lovely counterpoint come alive in this guise. THE WORLD – The Great Northern War between Tsarist Russia

and the Swedish Empire began in 1700. Also that year, much of Europe implemented the Gregorian calendar and the Pacific island of New Britain was discovered by William Dampier. THE CONNECTION – These concerts represent the

Masterworks Series premiere of Pachelbel’s Canon. 50

MASTERWORKS

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


Mahler’s Symphony No. 5

program notes

4/4

Symphony No. 5 in C-Sharp Minor THE COMPOSER – Gustav Mahler (1860–1911)

Mahler’s new villa in the village of Maiernigg on the Wörthersee in the Austrian state of Carinthia was completed in 1901, so he was able to spend the entire summer there at work on new scores, including his new 5th Symphony. By the following spring he would be married to Alma Schindler and, though their marriage was anything but perfect, she would introduce Mahler to many of Vienna’s most important modernists. THE MUSIC – The productive summer at Maiernigg was preceded

Gustav Mahler Composer

INSTRUMENTATION: 4 flutes (all double piccolo), 3 oboes (3rd doubles English horn), 3 clarinets (3rd doubles Eb clarinet and bass clarinet), 3 bassoons (3rd doubles contrabassoon), 6 horns, 4 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, timpani, snare drum, cymbals, bass drum, triangle, whip, glockenspiel, tam-tam, harp, strings DURATION: 68 minutes in five movements

by a significant health scare. Internal bleeding had necessitated an operation and a lengthy period of recuperation, during which Mahler immersed himself in the study of Bach. It might seem counterintuitive, but the brush with death and subsequent re-awakening of his respect for Bach actually put Mahler in a distinctly progressive mood. He was anxious to strike out on a new path as a composer and fully aware that his new symphony must be wholly different from its predecessors (5th symphonies had been known to have that effect). Mahler frequently quoted himself in his symphonies, often borrowing liberally (and quite literally in the 4th) from his own song cycles. The mention of the 4th Symphony is important here as the striking trumpet fanfare from that work’s first movement was transferred almost verbatim to the opening of the 5th. There is no express reason to read premonitory intent into the earlier music but also no reason to deny that Mahler was trying to say something with this link. Maybe, to paraphrase commentator Michael Steinberg’s theory, Mahler meant to show that the new must contain parts of the old. The recent fascination with Bach plausibly defends this idea, and is substantiated by the highly intricate instrumental writing of the 5th. Mahler had not written a solely orchestral symphony since No. 1 but comparisons to that early piece are wanting. The new symphony was entirely new and, according to fellow composer Ernst Krenek, it thrust Mahler firmly into the 20th century. THE WORLD – Edward VII was crowned King of the United

Kingdom in 1902. Also that year, Cuba gained formal independence, the Second Boer War ended and Alfonso XIII began his reign in Spain. THE CONNECTION – Mahler 5 was most recently performed by

the Utah Symphony in 2006. Keith Lockhart was on the podium.

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

MASTERWORKS

51


Tchaikovsky’s Suite No. 3

program

Tchaikovsky’s Suite No. 3 Apr 25–26 | 8 pm Abravanel Hall Andrey Boreyko, Conductor

NIKOLAI RIMSKY-KORSAKOV OLIVIER MESSIAEN

Russian Easter Overture, op. 36 The Ascension

I. Majesty of Christ praying that His Father should glorify Him II. Serene Alleluias from a soul longing for Heaven III. Alleluia on the trumpet, Alleluia on the cymbal IV. Prayer from Christ ascending towards His Father

­/ INTERMISSION /

PIOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY

Suite No. 3 in G Major, op. 55 I. Elegy II. Melancholic Waltz III. Scherzo IV. Theme and Variations

C O N D U C TO R S P O N S O R

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

MASTERWORKS

53


Tchaikovsky’s Suite No. 3

artist’s profile

Andrey Boreyko holds the positions of Music Director of the Orchestre National de Belgique and the Düsseldorfer Symphoniker. With the Orchestre National de Belgique, he ended the 2012–13 season with a highly successful concert in the Amsterdam Concertgebouw with Nikolai Lugansky and this season sees the orchestra touring Germany with Boris Berezovsky, performing a Dvořák Festival in May 2014 and returning to the Concertgebouw. In North America, Andrey Boreyko is also Music Director Designate of Naples Philharmonic (his first concert with them was in November 2013 featuring Sarah Chang) and he additionally holds the position of Principal Guest Conductor of the Orquesta Sinfónica de Euskadi. As a guest conductor Andrey Boreyko has worked with major orchestras around the world including the Berliner Philharmoniker, Münchner Philharmoniker, Staatskapelle Dresden, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Wiener Symphoniker, Filharmonica della Scala, Andrey Boreyko Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, Tonhalle-Orchester Conductor Zürich, Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, London Symphony, Czech Philharmonic, Philharmonia, …received awards for the most BBC Symphony and Royal Concertgebouw. In North America, he innovative concert programming in has conducted the Chicago, Boston, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Detroit, Dallas three consecutive seasons and Montreal Symphony Orchestras. Boreyko has previously held positions including Chief Conductor of the Jenaer Philharmonie (of whom he is now Honorary Conductor) and the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, as well as the Berner Symphonieorchester, the Hamburger Symphoniker and the Poznan Philharmonic Orchestra, He was also Principal Guest Conductor of the Vancouver Symphony and Music Director of the Ural State Philharmonic Orchestra. Boreyko was born in St. Petersburg where, at the RimskyKorsakov Conservatory, he studied conducting and composition (with Elisabeta Kudriavtseva and Alexander Dmitriev), graduating summa cum laude. While with the Jenaer Philharmonie, Boreyko received awards for the most innovative concert programming in three consecutive seasons from the German Music Critics Association (Deutscher Musikverleger-Verband)—the first in the history of the prize.

54

MASTERWORKS

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


taste is grand


Tchaikovsky’s Suite No. 3

program notes

1/3

Russian Easter Overture, op. 36 THE COMPOSER – Nikolai Rimksy-Korsakov (1844–1908)

Rimsky-Korsakov had no opera projects in the queue during the 1887-88 season so he was able to focus on orchestral composition. The three successive works he created during that time would eventually bring him international fame, but Rimsky-Korsakov would have been unlikely to assume so at the time. He was soon to fall under the enchantment of Wagner anyhow, so these pieces became part of a closed chapter for the composer. THE MUSIC – The three pieces in question were none other than

Nikolai Rimksy-Korsakov Composer

INSTRUMENTATION: 3 flutes (3rd doubles piccolo), 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, timpani, bass drum, glockenspiel, triangle, cymbals, suspended cymbal, snare drum, harp, celesta, strings DURATION: 14 minutes

Capriccio Espagnol, Scheherazade and the Russian Easter Overture. The first two require no introduction today but the third is perhaps slightly less well-known in the 21st century. Written during the same 1888 summer as Scheherazade, Russian Easter Overture was given its premiere just before Christmas of that year. The music is based on themes from a historical collection of Orthodox hymns called the Obikhod but also includes references to the pagan precursors of Christian tradition. Rimsky-Korsakov’s own words on the topic are especially descriptive. From his autobiography: “In this Overture were thus combined reminiscences of the ancient prophecy, of the gospel narrative, and also a general picture of the Easter service with its pagan merrymaking…the legendary and heathen side of the holiday, the transition from the gloomy and mysterious evening of Passion Saturday to the unbridled pagan-religious merrymaking on Easter Sunday morning is what I was eager to reproduce in my Overture.” These words came long after the premiere though, so only Rimsky-Korsakov’s heavily Biblical program note accompanied the first performance. He quoted from Psalm 68 and the Gospel of Mark and ended with a flurry of powerful imagery that included references to the “archangel’s trumpets,” the “fluttering wings” of the seraphim and the “chiming of triumphant bells.” THE WORLD – The National Geographic Society was founded

in 1888, the same year the Concertgebouw was inaugurated in Amsterdam. Also in 1888, Vincent Van Gogh famously removed a portion of his ear. THE CONNECTION – Russian Easter Overture is an infrequently

programmed work in Utah Symphony history. The last time was in 1996 under Joseph Silverstein.

56

MASTERWORKS

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


Tchaikovsky’s Suite No. 3

program notes

2/3

The Ascension: Four Symphonic Meditations THE COMPOSER – Olivier Messiaen (1908–1992)

Messiaen left the Paris Conservatory in 1930 and became the organist at La Trinité Church in Paris the following year. Both the instrument and the setting would define the rest of his life. Messiaen’s sole pursuit as an artist, then and ever, was to glorify the mysteries and doctrines of his Catholic faith and he spent the early 1930s writing important works for both organ and orchestra. THE MUSIC – In the case of The Ascension (1933), he wrote for

Olivier Messiaen Composer

INSTRUMENTATION: 3 flutes, 2 oboes, English horn, 2 clarinets, bass clarinet, 3 bassoons, 4 horns, 3 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, timpani, bass drum, triangle, tambourine, cymbals, strings DURATION: 27 minutes in four movements

both at once by producing separate organ and orchestral versions of the score. Each medium shows itself in the voice of the other in interesting ways that could be said of the majority of his output. A word or two about Messiaen’s devoted religious life is necessary here. Once described to this annotator by a Catholic theologian as “so Catholic he scares me,” Messiaen was possessed of an incredibly simple and complete doctrinal acceptance. Messiaen denied that he was himself a mystic, but he was powerfully drawn to the more mystical aspects of Catholicism. His desire to illuminate the great mysteries of theology manifested itself in depictions of divinity that stood apart from conventional space and time and created one of the most uniquely personal musical styles of the 20th century. In terms of extramusical inspiration, only birdsong rivals the celestial in Messiaen’s catalogue but even those naturalist excursions seem to serve the larger message of holy elevation. Each of the four sections of The Ascension is connected to specific scriptural quotations and there are hints of the block-like juxtaposition of instrumental groupings that would become Messiaen’s signature mode of realization. The Ascension is the most often performed of his early period pieces but the sense of wonder he captured in both versions was indistinguishable from the mature compositions to come. THE WORLD – Hitler was proclaimed Chancellor of Germany in

1933. Also that year, James Joyce’s Ulysses was deemed fit for U.S. publication after an historic court ruling removed the decadelong ban and the film King Kong was released. THE CONNECTION – These concerts represent the Utah

Symphony premiere of Messiaen’s The Ascension.

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

MASTERWORKS

57


Tchaikovsky’s Suite No. 3

program notes

3/3

Suite No. 3 in G Major, op. 55 THE COMPOSER – Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840–1893)

With his brief but calamitous marriage well behind him in 1884, Tchaikovsky was in a rare “good” place professionally when the Tsar awarded him the Order of Saint Vladimir. His mind continued to swirl with the doubts his personal life engendered (it always would), but he was enjoying freedom from financial worry thanks to his generous patron Nadezhda von Meck, and also a high level of international fame after several recent successes. THE HISTORY – Unlike the two orchestral serenades of Brahms,

Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Composer

INSTRUMENTATION: 3 flutes (3rd doubles piccolo), 2 oboes, English horn, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, timpani, triangle, bass drum, cymbals, snare drum, tambourine, harp, strings DURATION: 41 minutes in four movements

the suites of Tchaikovsky were not essentially pre-symphonies that tested the waters of large-scale instrumental composition before plunging fully into the hallowed form of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. Tchaikovsky wrote his four suites between his 4th and 5th Symphonies, so, though none of the presumed cautiousness that Brahms felt was in play, it is apparent that Tchaikovsky held symphony aspirations for at least one of them. As work progressed on Suite No. 3 though, it became obvious to the composer that it would never be a proper symphony. It lacked the formal rigor he demanded of himself in the symphony form and the dance character of the music more closely matched his two previous suites. So, a suite it was and it proved to be one of his most beloved works for a short time. The path to completion was strewn with the usual trip hazards, most related to an original first movement that had to be replaced after Tchaikovsky admitted that he “must destroy it” in disgust. The lyrical Elegie he composed instead turned out to be just the thing and the rest of the suite flowed well from it. The Theme and Variations finale was so successful in fact that Tchaikovsky often conducted it as a stand-alone concert work. Tchaikovsky’s letter to his patron following the premiere of Suite No. 3 showed him in uncommonly fine spirits. “Never have I had such a triumph,” he told her, “Such are the best moments in an artist’s life.” THE WORLD – Construction on the Washington Monument

was completed in 1884. Also that year, Germany took possession of Togoland in West Africa, the Siege of Khartoum began in Sudan and Edwin Abbot Abbot published Flatland. THE CONNECTION – Suite No. 3 has only appeared on one

previous Utah Symphony Masterworks program. The year was 1992 and Joseph Silverstein conducted.

58

MASTERWORKS

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


Sunrise Buffet the

Spend an evening with us and wake up to a buffet of traditional favorites. Package includes a one night stay and breakfast buffet for two. Rates start at $129 and are subject to availability. 800.281.7899 | SALTLAKE.LITTLEAMERICA.COM


The Beat Goes On! Music of the Baby Boomers

tribute

The Beat Goes On! Music of the Baby Boomers is lovingly dedicated to the memory of Shelley Gillespie, Utah Symphony | Utah Opera’s Senior Development Coordinator from 1994 to 2012. In her 18 years of service to the organization, Shelley built relationships with patrons, musicians and staff alike, and was an integral part of the USUO family. 1947–2014


The Beat Goes On! Music of the Baby Boomers

program

The Beat Goes On! Music of the Baby Boomers May 2–3 | 8 pm Abravanel Hall Jack Everly, Conductor Starring: Roy Chicas Jim Hogan Marissa McGowan ARR. EVERLY

Baby Boomer Prelude

SONNY BONO ARR. BARKER

“The Beat Goes On”

ARR. BAKER ORCH. BARTON ARR. EVERLY BURT BACHARACH ARR. BARKER FRANCIS LAI ARR. EVERLY ARR. BARKER ORCH. BARTON

N’Kenge Kristine Reese Max Quinlan

Stop! In the Name of Music The Wonderful World of Television Back to Bacharach Theme from Love Story Valli & The Dolls ­/ INTERMISSION /

ARR. BARTON

Symphonic Sounds of the Sixties

ARR. BARKER

Hits of the Tie-Dyed Decade

MAURICE JARRE ARR. BILL HOLCOMBE LENNON & MCCARTNEY ARR. BARKER C O N D U C TO R S P O N S O R

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

“Laura’s Theme” from Dr. Zhivago The Beatles Medley GUEST ARTIST SPONSOR

ENTERTAINMENT

61


The Beat Goes On! Music of the Baby Boomers

artists’ profiles

Jack Everly is the Principal Pops Conductor of the Indianapolis and Baltimore Symphony Orchestras, Naples Philharmonic Orchestra and the National Arts Centre Orchestra (Ottawa). He has conducted the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl, The New York Pops at Carnegie Hall and appears regularly with The Cleveland Orchestra at Blossom Music Center. In the 2013–14 season he will debut with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and the Philadelphia Orchestra at The Mann Center. This year Maestro Everly will conduct over 90 performances in more than 20 North American cities. Mr. Everly is also the Music Director of the Duke Energy Yuletide Celebration, now a 27-year tradition. He led the ISO in its first Pops recording Yuletide Celebration, Volume One, which included three of his own orchestrations. Some of his other recordings include In The Presence featuring the Czech Philharmonic and Daniel Rodriguez, Sandi Patty: Broadway Stories, the soundtrack to Disney’s The Hunchback of Notre Dame, and Everything’s Coming Up Roses: The Complete Overtures Of Jule Styne.

Jack Everly Conductor

Originally appointed by Mikhail Baryshnikov, Mr. Everly was conductor of the American Ballet …will conduct over 90 performances in Theatre for 14 years, where he served as Music Director. In addition to his more than 20 North American cities ABT tenure, he teamed with Marvin Hamlisch on Broadway shows that Mr. Hamlisch scored. He conducted Carol Channing hundreds of times in Hello, Dolly! in two separate Broadway productions. In 1998, Jack Everly created the Symphonic Pops Consortium, serving as Music Director. The Consortium, based in Indianapolis, produces new theatrical pops programs, including this season’s On Broadway with Kander & Ebb. In the past 12 years, more than 250 performances of SPC programs have taken place across the U.S. and Canada. Maestro Everly, a graduate of the Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University, holds an Honorary Doctorate of Arts from Franklin College in his home state of Indiana. He is a proud resident of the Indianapolis community for over 12 years and when not on the podium you can find Maestro Everly at home with his family which includes Max the wonder dog.

62

ENTERTAINMENT

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


KUER Mobile KUER News, RadioWest and NPR always at your fingertips

iPhone | iPad | Android

NEWS HEADLINES

ON-DEMAND AUDIO

LIVE STREAMING

ALARM CLOCK

Keep up with the latest in local news from KUER’s award-winning news team

with pause-and-resume for all three of KUER’s streams

MEMBER BENEFITS

Find businesses nearby that participate in our MemberCard program featuring 2-for-1 dining savings and admission discounts

of all your favorite public radio programs, including KUER’s RadioWest Wake up to the latest in local and national news


The Beat Goes On! Music of the Baby Boomers

artists’ profiles

Roy Chicas has appeared as a soloist with the Indianapolis, Baltimore, Detroit, Nashville, Phoenix, Long Beach and Fort Worth Symphony Orchestras. He played Doody in the National and European tours of Grease and starred as Judas in the European tour of Jesus Christ Superstar. Roy’s Off-Broadway credits include Hello Again (Lincoln Center Theatre), Bring in the Morning (Variety Arts) and Forever Plaid. Most recently, he appeared in The Superhero Suites as part of The Puzzle’s 2013 Festival of New Works in New York City. His recordings include The Radio City Christmas Spectacular, A Broadway Christmas and Michael Feinstein’s Only One Life. Roy is a native New Yorker and an alumnus of The Hartt School of Music and The Boston Conservatory.

Jim Hogan is thrilled to be performing with the Utah Symphony. He comes to Utah directly from the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, where he most recently performed in Yuletide Celebration, hosted by Sandi Patty. He has appeared in the National tour of Spring Awakening. Regional theater productions include A Little Night Music (Arden Theatre Company); Grand Hotel; Kiss Me, Kate; Sweeney Todd (Penn State Centre Stage) and Spring Awakening (Mazeppa Productions). He received his Bachelor of Fine Arts in Musical Theatre at Penn State University. @jimhogan220 and jimhogan.org.

64

ENTERTAINMENT

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


The Beat Goes On! Music of the Baby Boomers

artists’ profiles

Marissa McGowan had the honor to be chosen by Mr. Marvin Hamlisch to star as Stella Purdy in the world premiere of his last musical The Nutty Professor (directed by the legendary Jerry Lewis), for which she won the “best leading actress” award in Nashville for  her performance. Marissa has appeared on Broadway in the revival of A Little Night Music alongside Catherine Zeta-Jones and Angela Lansbury (Original Cast Recording), Bonnie And Clyde (Original Cast Recording) and Les Misérables (Revival and National Tour) where she performed both the roles of Éponine and Cosette. Favorite regional roles include Magnolia in Show Boat; Maria in The Sound of Music; Guinevere in Camelot; Mary Jane in Big River; Bianca in Kiss Me, Kate; Philia in A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum; and Johanna in Sweeney Todd.  Her television credits include Major Crimes (TNT). Concert work includes Lincoln Center (tribute to Marvin Hamlisch, directed by Mike Nichols), guest soloist with Annapolis Chorale, Alpine Theatre Project and the American Cancer Society Gala at the Hudson Theater in NYC, and guest principal soloist with the Baltimore Symphony alongside Maestro Jack Everly. Marissa received a BFA in musical theater from Syracuse University. www.marissamcgowan.com Direct from Broadway’s smash hit Motown: The Musical, the New York Post calls N’Kenge “electrifying” in the role of Mary Wells, and she has been praised by critics for her show-stopping performances. She made her Broadway debut in Sondheim on Sondheim performing alongside Vanessa Williams and Barbara Cook, has starred in Michael Jackson’s World Tour and has sung leading roles in opera productions in Italy, Israel and Austria. This season, she takes a weekend break from Broadway to perform the role of Sieglinde in Wagner’s Die Walküre in California. A native New Yorker, N’Kenge graduated from The Juilliard School and Manhattan School of Music. The New York Times called her a “more classically oriented Lena Horne” when she made her Carnegie Hall debut with the New York Pops Orchestra. She has performed alongside such jazz greats as Wynton Marsalis and Ornette Coleman at Lincoln Center and had the honor to perform at the Commander-in-Chief ’s Inaugural Ball hosted by President Barack Obama. For more on N’Kenge’s tours and recordings, please visit nkengemusic.com.

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

ENTERTAINMENT

65


The Beat Goes On! Music of the Baby Boomers

artists’ profiles

Kristine Reese is best known for playing over 1,000 performances as Nessarose in the first and second National tours of the hit musical Wicked. She made her Broadway debut in the 2007 revival of Les Misérables and also appeared in the National tour of Mamma Mia!, understudying the role of Sophie Sheridan. Other notable credits include Grease (Frenchy; St. Louis Muny), Annie (Star-to-be; Atlanta’s TOTS), The Mystery of Edwin Drood (Rosa Bud), Brigadoon (Fiona), Footloose (Ariel), Hello, Dolly! starring Michele Lee (Kansas City Starlight Tour) and the role of Emily in Save the Date, winner of the 2013 New York International Fringe Festival’s Best Overall Musical. Kristine has also appeared as a concert soloist with more than a dozen orchestras internationally, including the Cincinnati Pops, the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra and The Cleveland Orchestra. She is a graduate of the University of Cincinnati CollegeConservatory of Music (CCM) and a proud member of Actors Equity. Visit kristinereese.com for more or follow on Twitter, @KristineReese. Max Quinlan recently starred as Marius in the 25th anniversary National tour of Les Misérables for the past two years, for which he won a San Francisco BroadwayWorld Award. This coming year, he will make his Broadway debut in the highly anticipated revival of Les Misérables. His regional theatrical credits include his Jeff Award-winning performance as Fabrizio in The Light in the Piazza at the Marriott Theatre in Chicago and his BroadwayWorld Awardwinning portrayal of the title character in Jesus Christ Superstar at Theatre at the Center in Indiana. He has been seen Off-Broadway with the York Theatre Company, Maine State Music Theatre, Ravinia Festival in Chicago, The Muny in St. Louis and the Drury Lane Theatre in Oakbrook, Illinois. Max has also appeared as soloist with the Indianapolis, Chicago, Omaha, Florida and Cincinnati Symphony Orchestras and has had the honor to work with Maestros Jack Everly, Paul Gemignani, James Levine, Michael Krajewski and the late Erich Kunzel. He holds a BFA in Musical Theatre from the University of Cincinnati-College Conservatory of Music and has been a member of the Actors’ Equity Association since 1998. Visit maxquinlan.net for more.

66

ENTERTAINMENT

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


The Beat Goes On! Music of the Baby Boomers

credits

Co-produced along with Symphonic Pops Consortium

The Symphonic Pops Consortium mission is to conceive, create and produce high quality, innovative, symphonic Pops concerts by uniting a group of symphony orchestras and combining their resources. The Symphonic Pops Consortium is comprised of the Indianapolis (managing partner), Detroit, Milwaukee, National, and Seattle Symphony Orchestras. Music Director: Jack Everly Producer: Ty A. Johnson Stage Direction/Special Material: David Levy Arranger/Orchestration: Jack Everly, Wayne Barker Additional Orchestration: Fred Barton Lighting Design/Stage Management: Brandy Rodgers

Enjoying MT.O Spring Water During the Performance? Your container is our new Reverte™ Oxo-Biodegradable and Recyclable Bottle. Nice To Know The Best Water Is Also The Best for the Environment.

Natural Spring Water We’ve Been Recycling Since 1898

801-974-5000

For Home and Office Delivery. Ask About Our Symphony-Opera Special Offer.


Utah Symphony gratefully acknowledges Emma Eccles Jones Foundation as the 2013–14 Family Series Sponsor EMMA ECCLES JONES FOUNDATION


All-Star Evening

program

All-Star Evening May 20 | 7 pm Abravanel Hall Vladimir Kulenovic, Conductor Catherine Winters, Flute Youth Orchestra All-Stars

BEDŘICH SMETANA LOWELL LIEBERMANN

Overture to The Bartered Bride Flute Concerto, op. 39 Catherine Winters, Flute

­/ INTERMISSION /

JOHANNES BRAHMS SERGEI PROKOFIEV PIOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

Academic Festival Overture, op. 80 March from Love for Three Oranges Capriccio Italien, op. 45

FAMILY

69


All-Star Evening

artists’ profiles Currently Associate Conductor of the Utah Symphony and Resident Conductor of the Belgrade Philharmonic, Vladimir Kulenovic has also served as Principal Conductor of the Kyoto International Music Festival in Japan. Among his 2012–13 season highlights were debuts with the Leipzig Symphony, Zagreb Philharmonic and with the Jacksonville Symphony as one of the six top emerging conductors chosen by the League of American Orchestras for its bi-annual Bruno Walter National Conducting Preview. Upcoming debuts during the 2013/2014 season include Evergreen Symphony/Taipei, Grand Rapids Symphony, Knoxville Symphony and Lake Forest Symphony, as well as re-invitations to the Jacksonville Symphony and Macedonian Philharmonic.

Recent engagements include performances with the Beethoven-Orchester Bonn at the Beethovenhalle, Deutsche Kammerakademie/Neuss am Rhein, the Juilliard Orchestra, the National Arts Centre Orchestra in Ottawa and the Slovenian Vladimir Kulenovic Philharmonic. Festival appearances include Aspen, Cabrillo, Salzburg Conductor Mozarteum and Verbier. As conducting fellow at the Verbier Festival in 2009, Mr. Kulenovic conducted two “An admirable statement internationally televised performances and was subsequently invited to serve as the of talent and potential…” conducting assistant to Kurt Masur at the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra.  He also - The Baltimore Sun had the honor of preparing the Belgrade Philharmonic at the Dubrovnik Festival for Zubin Mehta. He has collaborated with celebrated soloists such as Leon Fleisher, Augustin Hadelich, Mischa Maisky, Philippe Quint, Joseph Silverstein and Akiko Suwanai.  Vladimir Kulenovic was awarded the Alfred B. Whitney Award for highest scholastic achievement at The Boston Conservatory, where he graduated summa cum laude and as valedictorian, earning a Bachelor’s degree in piano performance and a Master’s degree in conducting. Among his other awards are the Bruno Walter Memorial Scholarship, Mendelssohn-Bartholdy Scholarship, the 2012 and 2013 Solti Foundation U.S. Career Development Award, and the Charles Schiff Conducting Prize for Excellence. Mr. Kulenovic holds graduate diplomas from both the Peabody Conservatory and The Juilliard School and has studied with Marin Alsop, James DePreist, Kurt Masur and Gustav Meier.   www.vladimirkulenovic.com

70

FAMILY

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


All-Star Evening

artists’ profiles

Catherine Winters Flute

Catherine Winters has studied flute since age six and currently studies with Dr. Elizabeth Weissman. She has soloed twice before with the Utah Symphony on the Salute to Youth concerts, twice with the Utah Valley Symphony, and with the American Fork Symphony. Last August, Catherine won first place in the National Flute Association’s High School Soloist Competition. She has won three other national competitions as well: MTNA Senior Woodwind Performance Competition (2012), MTNA Junior Woodwind Performance Competition (2009), and the Stillman-Kelly competition (2011) sponsored by the National Federation of Music Clubs. Catherine has won first place in the Utah State Fair Competition, is a three-time winner of the UMTA Concerto Competition, and a multiple first-place winner in Utah Flute Association’s Sonata and Concerto Competitions. She also plays the piano and sings. Catherine teaches private flute and piano, and she taught orchestra at an elementary school for several years. Catherine loves to run cross country, create beautiful things, and be with her friends. She attends Timpanogos High School and is the daughter of Alan and Jill Winters of Lindon, Utah.

Youth Orchestra All-Stars 2013–14 American Heritage Lyceum Philharmonic Kayson Brown & Denise Willey, Directors Raya Esplin, Flute Scott Fidel, Cello Jessica Freeman, Violin Charlotte Harrison, Oboe Seth Manesse, Viola Joshua Mecham, Horn Yuna Page, Violin Christian Stone, Trombone Canyons Symphony Orchestra Randal Clark, Brandon Cressall, & Kristi Pehrson, Directors Nathan Guertler, Cello Samantha Heaton, Violin C.J. Hellige, Tuba Marin Russell, Bass Mason Short, Horn Melissa Ylst, Flute Davis Youth Symphony Rodney Wayman, Director Justice Ferguson, Percussion Sara Harward, Violin Michael Marsden, Timpani* Lindsay Mortensen, Bass Sarina Mountcastle, Viola Ben Mullins, Horn Jayden Mullins, Trumpet* Caleb Saunders, Cello Zach Smith, Horn

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

Granite Youth Symphony Orchestra Gary Jensen, Amber Tuckness, & James Thompson. Directors Emmy Beck, Violin Alex Johnson, Violin* Justin Morgan, Bass* Jenny Thompson, Bassoon Jordan Symphony Orchestra James Thompson, Jenna Baumgart, & Meagan Thorup, Directors Katie Hokanson, Violin Kolbe James, Trombone Nola Martin, Violin Emily Suckow, Oboe/English Horn Lincoln Youth Symphony Conrad Dunn & Jayme Dunn, Directors Jarom Essler, Viola Andrea Nef, Violin Caleb Thomson, Clarinet Nebo Youth Philharmonic Julie Christofferson, Paul Wells & Jamie Teot-Blake, Directors James Carrington, Viola Westley Cook, Cello Jessica Corey, Bass Tate Grimshaw, Percussion Timpanogos Chamber Orchestra Lois Stout, Director Lisa Jackson, Cello Adrienne Williams, Violin Kjerstin Woodbury, Violin

Utah Valley Youth Symphony Orchestras Britton Davis & Terry Hill, Directors Cheung Chau, Director Kylie Lincoln, Bassoon Margot Porter, Viola Scott Smith, Clarinet Peter Young, Violin Utah Youth Symphony Orchestra Utah Youth Philharmonic Barbara Scowcroft, Music Director & Conductor Camille Backman, Violin Ethan Buss, Trumpet Lisa Dean, Flute/Piccolo Alexander Fritz, Bass Jordan H.C. Hughes, Oboe Jamie Jackson, Violin Molly Langr, Harp Catherine Miller, Viola Jake Miller, Cello Samantha Mulder, Trombone Emily Nelson, Violin Gavin Yehle, Bassoon Young Artist Chamber Players Jack Ashton, Director Rachel Batty, Violin Shannon Brown Violin Spencer Day, Viola *students play in more than one youth orchestra

FAMILY

71


The Drama

Continues

Mr. Seldridge Sundays 8PM Doc Martin Saturdays 8PM Call the Midwife Sundays 7PM

kued.org


Rachmaninoff’s Symphonic Dances

program

Rachmaninoff’s Symphonic Dances May 23–24 | 8 pm Abravanel Hall Thierry Fischer, Conductor Matthew Zalkind, Cello

CARL NIELSEN

Symphony No. 6, “Sinfonia semplice”

PIOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY

I. Tempo giusto - Allegro passionato II. Humoreske III. Proposta seria IV. Tema con variazioni

Variations on a Rococo Theme for Cello and Orchestra, op. 33 Matthew Zalkind, Cello

­/ INTERMISSION /

SERGEI RACHMANINOFF

Symphonic Dances, op. 45

I. Non allegro II. Andante con moto (Tempo di valse) III. Lento assai - Allegro vivace

C O N C E R T & C O N D U C TO R S P O N S O R

GUEST ARTIST SPONSOR

EVELYN ROSENBLATT AWARD

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

MASTERWORKS

73


Rachmaninoff’s Symphonic Dances

evelyn rosenblatt young artist

This weekend’s Masterworks concerts mark the annual Evelyn Rosenblatt Artist recognition created to honor a young soloist or conductor of exceptional promise who has an emerging national reputation. The 2013–14 Artist of Distinction is Matthew Zalkind, this evening’s talented cellist. This annual recognition is endowed in perpetuity by Evelyn Rosenblatt and her family, who personally selected Mr. Zalkind as this year’s honored artist. Previous Rosenblatt tributes have been awarded to pianists Olga Kern, Yu Kosuge, Denis Matsuev, Cédric Pescia and Denis Kozhukhin; violinists Viviane Hagner, Scott St. John, Baiba Skride and Will Hagen; cellist Julie Albers; and conductors Keri-Lynn Wilson and Andrew Grams.

Matthew Zalkind Evelyn Rosenblatt Young Artist

74

MASTERWORKS

The love of great music always played an important role in the life of Evelyn Rosenblatt. As a high school student, Evelyn took the train from Ogden to Salt Lake City every Saturday to study piano. Following her marriage to Joseph Rosenblatt in 1930, she hosted many of Utah Symphony’s musicians and guest artists in her home over the years. These include Leonard Bernstein, Jascha Heifetz, Gregor Piatigorsky, Artur Rubinstein, Beverly Sills, Glenn Gould and Isaac Stern. The Rosenblatt sculptural plaque, designed to honor Evelyn Rosenblatt for her care and love of the Utah Symphony, is located in the lobby outside the First Tier Reception Room in Abravanel Hall. In 1997–98, Mr. and Mrs. Rosenblatt served as the first chairs of the Symphony’s Annual Fund Committee. In January 2000, the Rosenblatt family created the Evelyn Rosenblatt Young Artists Endowment to honor Mrs. Rosenblatt on the occasion of her 90th birthday. Mr. Rosenblatt passed away in May 1999, and Mrs. Rosenblatt in April 2004. Utah Symphony | Utah Opera gratefully thanks and recognizes Evelyn Rosenblatt.

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


Rachmaninoff’s Symphonic Dances

artist’s profile

For Thierry Fischer‘s biography, see page 32.

Praised for his “impressive refinement, eloquent phrasing, and singing tone” by The New York Times, American cellist Matthew Zalkind has performed throughout the United States and abroad as a recitalist, soloist and chamber musician. As a soloist, Mr. Zalkind has performed concerti with such organizations as the Moscow Chamber Players, the Albany Symphony, the Hongzhou Philharmonic, the Utah Symphony, the Tongyeong International Music Festival Orchestra and the Music Academy of the West Festival Orchestra in Santa Barbara. As soloist with the Juilliard Symphony Orchestra he performed in New York’s Avery Fisher Hall under the baton of Ludovic Morlot. Upcoming solo appearances include a recital at the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C. An active chamber musician, Mr. Zalkind has participated in numerous music festivals, including Marlboro and Ravinia. He has collaborated in chamber music with Mitsuko Uchida, Richard Goode, Menahem Pressler, Charles Neidich, Bruno Canino, Scott St. John, Jonathan Matthew Zalkind Biss and members of the Guarneri String Quartet. In addition, Mr. Cello Zalkind has performed at the Kennedy Center and in New York’s Alice Tully Hall and Metropolitan Museum of Art. He is a current member of the internationally acclaimed “impressive refinement, eloquent Harlem String Quartet. Mr. Zalkind has a strong interest in teaching and outreach. In addition to teaching as a graduate student instructor - The New York Times at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, he was assistant faculty for two summers at the Meadowmount School of Music in New York. Mr. Zalkind was awarded a Gluck Community Service Fellowship at The Juilliard School for four years, performing concerts at treatment facilities throughout the five boroughs of New York City. Mr. Zalkind also served as guest professor at Utah State University from September to December, 2012.

phrasing, and singing tone”

A Salt Lake City native, Mr. Zalkind began his studies with Richard Hoyt. He has worked extensively with Pegsoon Whang, Hans Jensen, Ronald Leonard, and Alan Stepansky. Mr. Zalkind was accepted to The Juilliard School with presidential distinction in 2004 as a student of Timothy Eddy. He received his Bachelor’s Degree from Juilliard in 2008, and his Master’s Degree in 2010 as the recipient of Juilliard’s Irene Diamond Graduate Fellowship and the Rena Robbins Shapiro Memorial Scholarship in Cello. Mr. Zalkind received his Doctorate of Musical Arts from the University of Michigan in 2013 under the tutelage of Richard Aaron. 76

MASTERWORKS

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


C

M

Y

M

Y

Y

MY

K

�e perfect day begins with perfect planning. Serving the Wasatch front, back and beyond. hoopesweddings.com | 435-414-0090


Rachmaninoff’s Symphonic Dances

program notes

1/3

Symphony No. 6, “Sinfonia semplice” THE COMPOSER – Carl Nielsen (1865–1931)

Nielsen’s 60th birthday celebration in 1925 was a national event in Denmark. The attention was both tonic and poison to the composer, who was appreciative but also frustrated at the mildness of international opinion compared to what he received at home. In a newspaper column a few months later, Nielsen admitted that, “If I could live my life again, I would chase any thoughts of Art out of my head…” THE HISTORY – Though depressions like this one often made for

Carl Nielsen Composer

INSTRUMENTATION: 2 flutes (2nd doubles piccolo), 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, timpani, glockenspiel, xylophone, snare drum, bass drum, triangle, suspended cymbal, strings DURATION: 31 minutes in four movements

slow going, Nielsen always continued to work. The 5th Symphony had been a difficult process, both in terms of craft and the emotional depths it plumbed, and Nielsen was interested in a new direction for No. 6. He told his daughter that he was planning a work of “completely idyllic character” but acknowledged to others that he could not predict “what currents I may run into during the voyage.” In the end, Nielsen did create something quite unique from his previous five symphonies but it differed in ways he might not have foreseen. The “Simple Symphony” title (which he appeared to have had some doubt about just prior to publication) did seem to fit in comparison to his earlier works but the psychological temperature of the new piece projected many ironic complexities. Nielsen was keenly mortal at 60 thanks to his failing health, so his original intentions for a symphony that would be more “amiable and smooth” than its predecessors ran into the “currents” of his own personal realities. What resulted instead was a collection of emotional puzzles, some humorous, some grim but all of them ambiguous and fascinating. Nielsen later commented that he had “tried to make the symphony as lively and gay as possible.” Biographer Robert Simpson made the astute observation that Nielsen was careful not to claim that Symphony No. 6 actually was lively and gay, only that he tried to keep it so. But serious questions lurk where the liveliness was hoped for and wisps of similar ironies are everywhere in this masterful score. THE WORLD – F. Scott Fitzgerald published The Great Gatsby

in 1925, the same year Hilter published Mein Kampf. Also in 1925, British explorer Percy Fawcett sent his last telegram before disappearing in the Amazon. THE CONNECTION – These concerts represent the Utah

Symphony premiere of Nielsen’s Symphony No. 6.

78

MASTERWORKS

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


Rachmaninoff’s Symphonic Dances

program notes

2/3

Variations on a Rococo Theme, op. 33 THE COMPOSER – Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840–1893)

Tchaikovsky’s famous row with Nikolai Rubenstein over the First Piano Concerto in 1874 led to a rare moment of courage from the composer. Tchaikovsky refused to change a single note and withdrew the planned dedication in a huff. Little of that strength of will was present just two years later, however, when a disastrous marriage attempt and ongoing financial woes left Tchaikovsky tentative and highly pliable. THE HISTORY – The next test came in the form of a new work

Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Composer

INSTRUMENTATION: solo cello, 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, strings DURATION: 18 minutes

for cello and orchestra. Tchaikovsky sought the advice of Wilhelm Fitzenhagen and, to the surprise and frustration of his publisher, the composer acquiesced to nearly every “suggestion” Fitzenhagen offered. Fitzenhagen was a highly acclaimed cellist for whom Tchaikovsky had great respect but it is difficult to imagine why the composer allowed him such a strong editorial hand. Fitzenhagen made many changes to the Rococo Variations (including the re-ordering of the variations themselves and even the deletion of one) and the sum of their impact altered the score significantly. The “Fitzenhagen version” of the music is how audiences (and cellists) know it best today but there were efforts in the 1950s to resurrect the original. The Rococo theme Tchaikovsky created for the work was purposefully reminiscent of Mozart and that brief moment in history when music was both Post-Baroque and Pre-Classical. The variations (in whatever order they are presented) flow with incredible ease and stylistic mastery. Much is demanded of the soloist but the rewards are equally plenty, with the virtuosity and beauty co-existing in perfect accord. Tchaikovsky was often defensive before questions of his demurrals to Fitzenhagen. Perhaps he found the joyous charisma of the piece too difficult to reconcile, given the turbulent personal issues that were leading him so inexorably toward the late symphonies. Perhaps he also saw it for what it really was—a genial, magnificent relic from a bygone day that was better served by Fitzenhagen’s enthusiasm than his own darkening mind. THE WORLD – Queen Victoria was proclaimed Empress of India

in 1877. Also that year, Romania began its war of independence from the Ottoman Empire and Oglala Sioux leader Crazy Horse was bayoneted while resisting confinement in Nebraska.

THE CONNECTION – The Rococo Variations were last presented

on Utah Symphony Masterworks concert in 2007. Keith Lockhart conducted and Julie Albers was soloist. UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

MASTERWORKS

79


Rachmaninoff’s Symphonic Dances

program notes

3/3

Symphonic Dances, op. 45 THE COMPOSER – Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873–1943)

Like so many of his artistic brethren, Rachmaninoff decided that Europe was no place to be in 1939. At his age (he had recently fallen in England and was forced to miss the ballet based on his Paganini Variations), another global conflagration was more than he could endure so he returned again to the relative calm of the United States. He would never see Switzerland, let alone his long-lost Russia, again. THE MUSIC – In the latter years of his compositional life,

Sergei Rachmaninoff Composer

INSTRUMENTATION: piccolo, 2 flutes, 2 oboes, English horn, 2 clarinets, bass clarinet, 2 bassoons, contrabassoon, 4 horns, 3 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, alto saxophone, timpani, bass drum, glockenspiel, snare drum, xylophone, chimes, cymbals, triangle, harp, piano, strings DURATION: 35 minutes in three movements

Rachmaninoff favored a leaner and more focused orchestral language. The luxuriant textures that fueled his rise to prominence became rare and in their place was a more concise, less emotional presentation of ideas. Rachmaninoff’s somber seriousness as a person was often at odds with his early Romantic opulence as a composer, so the turn towards directness in his December years is perhaps an understandable eventuality. In his last completed work, Rachmaninoff found reason to blend a bit of the old with the new. The Symphonic Dances of 1940 actually date in part back to 1915 and a ballet project that Rachmaninoff had proposed to Mikhail Fokine. Nothing came of it so the sketches remained on the shelf for twenty-five years before finding a new home in the score of Symphonic Dances. The work was dedicated to Eugene Ormandy and the Philadelphia Orchestra and, though not an overwhelming success at the premiere, Symphonic Dances is regularly and quite reasonably held up as Rachmaninoff’s finest masterpiece. The spare angularity of his late style was reminiscent of his countrymen Stravinsky and Prokofiev but the lushness of his harmonic language and the occasional, well-placed “big” melody (in honor of his own younger self) were elements that no composer ever truly matched. Present also of course was the Dies Irae chant that shadowed Rachmaninoff throughout his life and figured prominently in his final three large-scale works. “Last” works often beg a summative place in a composer’s history. The music does not always oblige but with Symphonic Dances, no stretch is needed. THE WORLD – Winston Churchill became Prime Minister of

the United Kingdom in 1940. Also that year, the first McDonald’s restaurant opened and Lhamo Thondup was officially installed as the 14th Dalai Lama in Tibet. THE CONNECTION – Symphonic Dances was last performed by

the Utah Symphony as part of their European Tour in 2005. Keith Lockhart was on the podium. 80

MASTERWORKS

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


THANK YOU TO OUR ADVERTISERS Adib’s Rug Gallery Bambara Caffè Molise Challenger School City Creek Living Classical 89 Daynes Music Flemings Steakhouse Flower Patch Gina Bachauer International Artists Competition Grand America Hamilton Park Hoopers Weddings Humane Society Intermountain Therapy Animals KUED

KUER Lisman Studio Little America Maserati of Salt Lake Mill Creek Coffee Monarch Cottage Mount Olympus Water New Yorker Peter Prier & Sons Violins Protel Networks RC Willey Rowland Hall Ruth’s Chris Steak House Salt Lake Children’s Choir Salt Lake School of the Performing Arts Shilo Inn

Starks Funeral Parlor Thomasville Tuacahn Tuck Landscape UBS United Way University of Utah Health Care Utah Festival Opera Utah Food Services Zions Bank

If you would like to place an ad in this program, please contact Dan Miller at Mills Publishing, Inc. 801-467-8833


P E RP ET UAL motion


PERP ET UA L motion

CAMPAIGN LEADERSHIP Campaign Co-Chairs

Scott and Jesselie Anderson Lisa Eccles Kem and Carolyn Gardner Gail Miller and Kim Wilson Bill and Joanne Shiebler

Honorary Co-Chairs Spencer F. Eccles

Jon M. Huntsman The Right Reverend Carolyn Tanner Irish

UTAH SYMPHONY | UTAH OPERA IN PERPETUAL MOTION

In November, we announced The Campaign for Perpetual Motion, a $20 million public campaign to celebrate the Utah Symphony’s 75th Anniversary in 2015–16. We have exciting plans leading up to this anniversary—including recording, broadcasting and touring at the state, national and even international levels. We look forward to sharing these plans with you in the coming months. We launched the Campaign with a remarkable $5 million lead gift from the George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Foundation, whose tradition of support totaling more than $32 million spans three decades. This lead gift was made in addition to a $1 million gift from the Foundation to our Leadership Campaign, which during 2011 and 2012 prepared a solid foundation for the public fundraising effort. More than 35 individuals, corporations, and foundations contributed to the Leadership Campaign, including an extraordinary $4.6 million capstone gift from O.C. Tanner Company. Stay tuned—we know you will be proud of our plans to build and showcase your world-class symphony and opera throughout Utah, and beyond. Find out more at usuo.org/support

T H e a r T o f g o o d e aT i n g .

D o w n to w n

60 West Market street (350 south) 801-363-0166 www.newyorkerslc.com


P E RP ET UAL motion

We are forever grateful to the following leaders whose visionary support secured the permanence of Utah Symphony | Utah Opera through our Leadership Campaign in 2011 and 2012, and who set the stage for its bright future as lead supporters of The Campaign for Perpetual Motion.

FOUNDING CAMPAIGN DONORS George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Foundation ($6 Million) O.C. Tanner Company ($4.6 Million) PRINCIPAL GIVING ($1 Million and above) Gael Benson The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Foundation Lawrence T. & Janet T. Dee Foundation Kem & Carolyn Gardner Larry H. & Gail Miller Family Foundation Mark & Dianne Prothro Patricia A. Richards & William K. Nichols Shiebler Family Foundation Sorenson Legacy Foundation Zions Bank LEADERSHIP GIVING (up to $1 Million) Anonymous (2) Scott and Jesselie Anderson Edward R. Ashwood & Candice A. Johnson Mr. and Mrs. William C. Bailey Dr. J. R. Baringer and Dr. Jeanette J. Townsend Thomas Billings and Judge Judith Billings R. Harold Burton Foundation Thomas D. Dee III & Dr. Candace Dee Deer Valley Resort E. R. (Zeke) & Katherine W. Dumke Burton & Elaine Gordon Mr. & Mrs. Martin Greenberg Dell Loy & Lynette Hansen Roger & Susan Horn Anthony & Renee Marlon 84

The Right Reverand Carolyn Tanner Irish Carol & Anthony W. Middleton, Jr., M.D. Edward & Barbara Moreton William H. & Christine Nelson Carol & Ted Newlin Scott & Sydne Parker Dr. Dinesh & Kalpana Patel Frank R. Pignanelli & D’Arcy Dixon John and Marcia Price Family Foundation Bert Roberts Theodore Schmidt Norman C. & Barbara Tanner Naoma Tate & the Family of Hal Tate M. Walker & Sue Wallace

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


Utah Symphony Guild UTAH SYMPHONY GUILD EXECUTIVE BOARD Julie Meredith President

Ann Petersen

Executive Vice President

Kari Landro

Membership Vice President

Heather Benson

Social Vice President

Anne Asman

Development Vice President

Carol Radinger

Education Vice President

Janet Hales

Youth Guild Vice President

Janice Maughan

Immediate Past President

Marlene Dazley

UTAH SYMPHONY GUILD

Supporting the Utah Symphony and Utah Symphony Guild has never been easier—When shopping at Smith’s, swipe your rewards card! See below on how to enroll. Use your Smith’s Points toward purchases at the Symphony Guild Gift Shop. UPCOMING GUILD EVENTS

Guild Luncheon April 9th, 11:30 am Market Street Grill, Cottonwood Youth Guild Recital April 15th, 7 pm Vieve Gore Concert Hall Westminster College

Recording Secretary

Heidi Mandy

Corresponding Secretary and Historian

Mary Lynn Kinsel Treasurer

For further information on these events, please contact Julie Meredith, 801-891-3250

Helen Petersen Publicity

SandyLee Griswold Parliamentarian

Roberta Zalkind Orchestra Liaison

Natalie Cope

USUO Staff Liaison

 

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

85


Planned Giving

Photo: Carol and Ted Newlin

Ted Newlin has been a member of the Deer Valley® Music Festival Advisory Council since 2008, and is now in his third year of service as Chairman of the Council. Ted also joined the Utah Symphony | Utah Opera Board of Trustees in 2010 and is currently chairing the Board’s Strategic Planning Committee.

“The quality of the artistic talent and performances presented by USUO has remained consistently high since the of Utah Symphony | Utah Opera. day that both the Utah Symphony and the Utah Opera were founded. But What are your plans? even so, a few years ago our leadership envisioned that we could rise to even higher levels of excellence,” says Ted, who has also served as Board Chairman for the Lake George Opera Festival (now Opera Saratoga) in Saratoga Springs, NY. “This period of intense revitalization is going strong and will continue well into the future. We are so proud of what we can do here in Utah, where the remarkable performances are in keeping with our state motto, life elevated—and more specifically in this case, art elevated. We want to help share this experience with others.”

Together, we’re planning the future

To do so, Ted and Carol are extending their already significant service and support for Utah Symphony | Utah Opera with a generous commitment to The Campaign for Perpetual Motion (see pages 82–84). Their campaign commitment includes both an outright gift, which will support new performances in Summit County, as well as a planned gift that will support our endowment, ensuring that great performances will go on across Utah for years to come. To learn how you too can help plan the future of Utah Symphony | Utah Opera through your charitable giving, contact us at 801.869.9013 or sgee@usuo.org, or visit us online at usuo.org/support.

86

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


Tanner & Crescendo Societies Utah Symphony | Utah Opera thanks the members of our Tanner and Crescendo Societies, patrons who have included USUO in their financial and estate planning. Together, we can ensure that great live music is preserved for future generations. Membership is open to all those who express their commitment through a planned gift at any level. Please contact Shaleane Gee at sgee@usuo.org or 801.869.9013 for more information.

Tanner Society of Utah Symphony Beethoven Circle

gifts valued at more than $100,000

Anonymous (3) Dr. J. Richard Baringer Haven J. Barlow Alexander Bodi† Edward† & Edith Brinn Captain Raymond & Diana Compton Elizabeth W. Colton† Anne C. Ewers

Flemming & Lana Jensen James Read Lether Daniel & Noemi P. Mattis Joyce Merritt† Anthony & Carol W. Middleton, Jr., M.D. Robert & Dianne Miner Glenn Prestwich & Barbara Bently Kenneth A. & Jeraldine S. Randall

Robert L.† & Joyce Rice Mr. & Mrs. Alvin Richer Patricia A. Richards Sharon & David† Richards Harris H. & Amanda P. Simmons E. Jeffrey & Joyce Smith G.B. & B.F. Stringfellow Mr. & Mrs. Norman C. Tanner Mr. & Mrs. M. Walker Wallace

Herbert C. & Wilma Livsey Mrs. Helen F. Lloyd† Gaye Herman Marrash Ms. Wilma F. Marcus† Dr. & Mrs. Louis A. Moench Jerry & Marcia McClain Mr. & Mrs. Warren K. McOmber Jim & Andrea Naccarato Pauline C. Pace† Mr. & Mrs. Scott Parker Mr. & Mrs. Michael A. Pazzi Richard Q. Perry Chase & Grethe Peterson Glenn H. & Karen F. Peterson

Thomas A. and Sally† Quinn Helen Sandack† Mr. Grant Schettler Glenda & Robert† Shrader Dr. Robert G. Snow† Mr. Robert C. Steiner & Dr. Jacquelyn Erbin† Kathleen Sargent† JoLynda Stillman Edwin & Joann Svikhart Frederic & Marilyn Wagner Jack R. & Mary Lois† Wheatley Afton B. Whitbeck† Edward J. & Marelynn Zipser

Mahler Circle Anonymous (3) Dr. Robert H.† & Marianne Harding Burgoyne Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth E. Coombs Patricia Dougall Eager† Mr. & Mrs.† Sid W. Foulger Paul (Hap) & Ann† Green Robert & Carolee Harmon Richard G. & Shauna† Horne Mr. Ray Horrocks† Richard W. James† Estate Mrs. Avanelle Learned† Ms. Marilyn Lindsay Turid V. Lipman

Crescendo Society of Utah Opera Anonymous Mr. & Mrs. William C. Bailey Alexander Bodi† Berenice J. Bradshaw Estate Dr. Robert H. † & Marianne Harding Burgoyne Elizabeth W. Colton† Dr. Richard J. & Mrs. Barbara N. Eliason Anne C. Ewers Edwin B. Firmage

Joseph & Pat Gartman Paul (Hap) & Ann† Green John & Jean Henkels Clark D. Jones Turid V. Lipman Herbert C. & Wilma Livsey Constance Lundberg Gaye Herman Marrash Richard W. & Frances P. Muir Marilyn H. Neilson Carol & Ted Newlin

Pauline C. Pace† Stanley B. & Joyce Parrish Patricia A. Richards Mr. & Mrs. Alvin Richer Robert L.† & Joyce Rice Richard G. Sailer† Jeffrey W. Shields G.B. & B.F. Stringfellow Norman & Barbara Tanner Dr. Ralph & Judith Vander Heide Edward J. & Marelynn Zipser †Deceased

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

87


Corporate & Foundation Donors We sincerely appreciate our annual contributors who have supported our programs throughout the last eighteen months with gifts up to $10,000. For a listing of our Season Honorees, who have made gifts of $10,000 and above see pages 14–18. $5,000 to $9,999 Anonymous (2) AT&T** Bourne-Spafford Foundation Byrne Foundation Doubletree Suites* Durham Jones & Pinegar, P.C. Spencer F. & Cleone P. Eccles Family Foundation Henry W. & Leslie M. Eskuche Charitable Foundation Every Blooming Thing* Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar* Flower Patch* Hamilton Partners* Huntsman Corporation Martine* McCarthey Family Foundation Parallel Wines* Louis Scowcroft Peery Charitable Foundation Rasmussen Landscapes* Ruth’s Chris Steak House* Security National Life Insurance Co. Snell & Wilmer L.L.P. Stoel Rives Union Pacific Foundation U. S. Bancorp Foundation Utah Families Foundation Victory Ranch Club $1,000 to $4,999 Advanced Retirement Consultant AXA Richard D. Bass Foundation Bertin Family Foundation Rodney H. & Carolyn Hansen Brady Charitable Foundation Robert S. Carter Foundation Castle Foundation Chevron Humankind Matching Gift Fund City Creek Ellessa Mae, LLC Enterprise Holdings Foundation ExxonMobil Foundation Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund Fisher Vineyards* Goldman, Sachs & Co. Victor Herbert Foundation

88

Home Depot* Homewood Suites By Hilton Thomas A. & Lucille B. Horne Foundation Hyatt Place Hotel* Iasis Healthcare Inn at Rancho Santa Fe* J. Wong’s Asian Bistro* Joe Wrona Law Firm Jones & Associates Jones Waldo Park City Kirton McConkie Leavitt Group of Salt Lake, Inc. Love Communications The Lund Foundation M Lazy M Foundation Macy’s Marriott City Center* Millcreek Cacao Roasters* Millcreek Coffee Roasters* George Q. Morris Foundation Mountain Dentistry Nebeker Family Foundation Park City Foundation Ray, Quinney & Nebeker Foundation The Charles & Annaley Redd Foundation Resorts West Shilo Inn* Snow, Christensen & Martineau Foundation So Cupcake* Strong & Hanni, PC Summit Sotheby’s Squatters Pub Brewery* Swire Coca-Cola, USA* Bill & Connie Timmons Foundation United Jewish Community Endowment Trust Utah Humanities Council $300 to $999 Henricksen/Butler Jewish Federation of Cleveland Legacy Music Alliance Megadyne Medical Products Romney Lumber Company SAD Foundation Utah Medical Products

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


The

OutOn

the new yorker 60 West Market Street. SLC’s premier dining establishment. Modern American cuisine is featured in refined dishes and approachable comfort food. From classic to innovative, from contemporary seafood to Angus Beef steaks – the menu provides options for every taste. Served in a casually elegant setting with impeccable service. Private dining rooms for corporate and social events. Lunch & Dinner. No membership required. L, D, LL, AT, RR, CC, VS. 801.363.0166 market street grill downtown 48

West Market Street. Unanimous favorites for seafood dining, providing exceptional service and award winning. The contemporary menu features the highest quality available. Select from an abundant offering of fresh seafood flown in daily, Angus Beef steaks, and a variety of non-seafood dishes. Open 7 days a week serving breakfast, lunch, dinner, Sunday Brunch. B, L, D, C, AT, S, LL, CC, VS. 801.322.4668

Tow n

dining guide Consistently Rated “Tops”–Zagat 60 W. Market Street • 801.363.0166

Salt Lake City’s #1 Most Popular Restaurant –Zagat

48 W. Market Street (340 South) 801.322.4668

M

martine 22 East 100 South. Located in an historic

brownstone, Martine offers Salt Lakers a cosmopolitan experience. Cafe and Tapas. Casual European dining. Extensive bar and wine service. Highly rated in Zagat 2000 survey (26). L, D, T, LL, RA, CC, VS. 801.363.9328

• An intimate euro café • 22 East 100 South Phone • 801.363.9328 www.martinecafe.com

B-Breakfast L-Lunch D-Dinner S-Open Sunday DL-Delivery T-Take Out C-Children’s Menu SR-Senior Menu AT-After-Theatre LL-Liquor Licensee RR-Reservations Required RA-Reservations Accepted CC-Credit Cards Accepted VS-Vegetarian Selections

vivacissimo!

THREE DELICIOUS COURSES ONE INCREDIBLE EVENING

[it.]very lively, energetic

Local and fresh Global selection 20 years of brilliant coffee

Prime Time EXPERIENCE OUR

DINNER MENU

offered nightly until 6:30pm Contact us at www.millcreekcoffee.com

3 —COURSE MENU STARTING AT

$ 44. 95

cosm dini High CC,


Individual Donors We sincerely appreciate our annual contributors who have supported our programs throughout the last eighteen months.

2013–14 Abravanel Society Partner ABRAVANEL & PETERSON SOCIETY $5,000 to $9,999 Anonymous (4) Mr. & Mrs. Alan P. Agle Scott Amann Jeremy B. Andrus Doyle Arnold & Anne Glarner Dr. & Mrs. Clisto Beaty JJ Bienaime Berenice J. Bradshaw Charitable Trust Carol, Rete & Celine Browning Hal & Cecile Christiansen Edward & Carleen Clark Hal M. † & Aileen H. Clyde Amalia Cochran B. Gale & Ann Dick John & Margarita Donnelly Dr. & Mrs. Ralph Earle Spencer & Cleone† Eccles Jack & Marianne Ferraro Thomas & Lynn Fey Peter Fillerup* Robert & Elisha Finney Robert & Annie-Lewis Garda Jeffrey L. Giese, M.D. & Mary E. Gesicki Ray & Howard Grossman The James S. Gulbrandsen, Sr. Family Marti Harvey Mr. & Mrs. William Hindle Charles & Kathie Horman Scott Huntsman Mary P. Jacobs & Jerald H. Jacobs Family Robert & Debra Kasirer Jeanne Kimball Bill Ligety & Cyndi Sharp Robin & Nassir Marrouche Daniel & Noemi P. Mattis Richard & Jayne Middleton Mr. & Mrs. Richard Mithoff Francie Denise Mortenson O. Don & Barbara Ostler Jon & Betty† Poesch Glenn & Mary Potter Keith Rattie Mr. & Mrs. Alvin Richer James & Gail Riepe Dr. Wallace Ring Frank & Helen Risch Todd Romano David & Lois Salisbury Michael & Chris Savage William G. Schwartz & Joann Givan Daniel & Diane Siegel Elizabeth Solomon

90

Dr. & Mrs. Charles W. Sorenson, Jr. David & Susan Spafford Sam & Diane Stewart Melia & Mike Tourangeau Frederic & Marilyn Wagner David J. & Susan Wagstaff John & Marva Warnock Lynnette C. Loveland Weston Tom & Wendy Wirth $3,000 to $4,999 Anonymous (5) Brent Amil & Allisyn Okawa Robert & Cherry Anderson Richard & Alice Bass Charles Black* Mr. & Mrs. Jim Blair Robert W. Brandt James & Marilyn Brezovec Richard & Suzanne Burbidge Michael Callen Mr. & Mrs. William D. Callister, Jr. Mark Casp Raymond & Diana Compton Cindy & Christopher Cutler Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth R. Cutler Dr. & Mrs. J. Michael Dean David L. & Karen Dee Mrs. Keith Dillard J. I. “Chip” & Gayle Everest Neone F. Jones Family Midge & Tom Farkas Robert S. Felt, M.D. Jerry & Sara M. Fenn Larry Flanders & Ursula A. Zwick Drs. Fran & Cliff Foster Bob & Linda Frankenberg Heidi Gardner Susan Glassman & Richard Dudley Wallace Graham & Lynn Nicholas David & Sandylee Griswold Kenneth & Kate Handley John B. & Joan Hanna Kenneth & Geraldine Hanni Dr. & Mrs. Bradford D. Hare Bob & Ursula Hoshaw Gary & Christine Hunter M. Craig & Rebecca Johns Dale & Beverly Johnson William G. & Kelly Johnson Barbara Jones Carl & Gillean Kjeldsberg Donald L. & Alice A. Lappe Kurt Larsen Roger Leslie James Lether Harrison & Elaine Levy Herbert C. & Wilma S. Livsey Kathy Lynch David & Donna Lyon Mac & Ann MacQuoid David & Nickie McDowell Michael & Julie McFadden Mr. & Mrs. Michael Mealey Rich & Cherie Meeboer

George & Nancy Melling Brad & Trish Merrill Dr. Louis A. Moench & Deborah Moench Bill & Connie Timmons Foundation Marilyn H. Neilson Thomas Parks & Patricia Legant Chase & Grethe Peterson Joel & Diana Peterson Leslie Peterson & Kevin Higgins Victor & Elizabeth Pollak Dr. Glenn Prestwich & Dr. Barbara Bentley Joe Prothro Dr. & Mrs. Marvin L. Rallison Henry Roenigk Mark Saltzman John F. Foley, M.D. & Dorene Sambado, M.D. Mr. & Mrs. Carmelo Santoro Bertram H. & Janet Schaap Deborah Schiller Stuart & Molly Silloway Gibbs & Catherine W. Smith Christine St. Andre Jason & Shayneh Starks Jerry Steichen Drs. Gerald B. & Nancy Ahlstrom Stephanz Jolynda Stillman Dr. Paula M. Swaner Temkin Family Verl & Joyce Topham Dr. Jeannette J. Townsend Mr. & Mrs. Glen R. Traylor Mr. & Mrs. Vincent Trotta Jane Urbaska John & Susan Walker Gerard & Sheila Walsh Ardean & Elna Watts Jeremy & Hila Wenokur David Wilson David & Jerre Winder $2,000 to $2,999 Anonymous (3) Craig & Joanna Adamson Joseph & Margaret Anderson Mr. & Mrs. Marshall Beere Anneli Bowen, M.D. & Glen M. Bowen M.D. Jonathan & Julie Bullen Mr. & Mrs. Chris Canale Paul & Robyn Carter David Cohen Ms. Debbi Cook Mr. & Mrs. Tom Cooper Mike Deasy Thomas & Laurie Eastwood Alice Edvalson James P. Felt Genevieve I. Gardner Mr. & Mrs. Dave Gill Robert & Joyce† Graham Randin Graves Val John & Elizabeth Green Barbara Hartman Mr. & Mrs. Jim Haynes

Lisette & Charles Hetzel The Steven Horton Family Sunny & Wes Howell Dixie S. & Robert P. Huefner Gil & Thelma Iker Summer Irvin Jay & Julie Jacobson Annette & Joseph Jarvis Bryce Johnson Jill Johnson Mr. & Mrs. Clark D. Jones J. Allen & Charlene Kimball Scott & Stefani Kimche Mr. Darryl Korn & Ms. Jeannie Sias David & Tami Krajeski Arthur B. Laffer Mihail Lari Mr. & Mrs. W. Alan Larson Mary Leader Philip & Naomi Lippincott Patricia & Mark Lucas Milt & Carol Lynnes John MacFarlane Jed & Kathryn Marti David Mash Barry & Kathy Mower Mary Muir Jake Murdock Dan & Janet Myers Oren & Liz Nelson Bradley Olch Edward W. & Arlene Otto Linda S. Pembroke Patricia Pond Julie Korenberg, Ph.D, M.D. and Stefan Pulst, M.D. Dan & June Ragan W. E. & Harriet R. Rasmussen Dr. Richard & Frances Reiser Richard & Carmen Rogers Wayne & Amy Rogers Mr. & Mrs. Robert Rollo Mr. Robert Rose† Margaret P. Sargent Mr. August L. Schultz K. Gary & Lynda† Shields Margot L. Shott Dr. Otto F. Smith & Mrs. June Smith Jill Smith Thomas Stemberg Mr. & Mrs. G. B. Stringfellow Steven Taylor Ann Jarcho Thomas Judith & Ralph Vander Heide Marion L. & Sue Ann Walker Bryan & Diana Watabe Suzanne Weaver E. A. Woolston & Connie Jo Hepworth-Woolston $1,000 to $1,999 Anonymous (4) Ms. Cynthia Adams Christine A. Allred Drs. Crystal & Dustin Armstrong Fred & Linda Babcock

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


no one does more for as many. adopt one. help thousands.

Intermountain Therapy Animals PETS HELPING PEOPLE

Serving Our Communities Since 1993

8 0 1 . 2 7 2 . 3 4 39

T he r a p y An im a l s . o r g

utahhumane.org


Individual Donors Daniel & Sheila Barnett Keith & Connie Barnhart Mr. & Mrs. Peter J. Barris David & Rebecca Bateman James & Judy Bergman Barry Bergquist Bruce Bienenstock John & Toni Bloomberg Alex Bocock & Amy Sullivan Mr. & Mrs. John Brubaker Mr. & Mrs. Lee Forrest Carter James & Andrea Clarke Dr. & Mrs. David Coppin William & Bonnie Daniloff Ruth Davidson James & Rula Dickson Mr. Paul Dougan Curtis & Susan Empey Edward B. & Deborah Felt Donna Flanagan Dena Fleming Heidi Gatch Stuart† & Diana George Nancy Gilbert Mr. & Mrs. Richard R. Graham Amanda Greene Phillip Grigg Geoffery Grinney C. Chauncey & Emily Hall John Edward Henderson Mr. John P. Hill, Esq. Connie C. Holbrook Kay Howells Caroline Hundley Joel & Joy Kellman Mr. & Mrs. Alan D. Kerschner Eunice Kronstadt Tim & Angela Laros Mel & Wendy Lavitt Sonja Margulies† Jimmy & Kat Martin* Christopher & Julie McBeth Greg Miller David & Suzanne Moore Nancy Nichols Stephen & Mary Nichols Dr. & Mrs. Richard T. O’Brien Ann G. Petersen Dr. & Mrs. S. Keith Petersen Rori & Nancy Piggott Eugene & Pamela Podsiadlo James & Anna Romano Hildegard & Angela Rayner Mindy Reynolds Gina Rieke Catherine Rowan Mr. & Mrs. D. Brent Scott David & Claudia Seiter Julie Senet Angela Shaeffer Mr. Jeffrey W. Shields & Ms. Mary Ross Lisa Shine Mr. John Shuff Barbara Slaymaker Dorotha Smart Larry & Pamela Stevenson Dr. John Robert Stewart Kay Stoneburner

92

Nancy Straetmans Ms. Bente Strong Mary Sumner Ronald W. Tharp & Kate F. Little Douglas Terry Carol A. Thomas David Thomas Karen Urankar Carleen A. Wallace Susan Warshaw Charles & Ellen Wells Bob & Sharon Winders Gayle Youngblood $500-$900 Anonymous (8) John C. Abercrombie Fran Akita Dr. Jay & Susan Aldous Patricia Andersen Mr. & Mrs. David Anderson Dr. & Mrs. Jeffrey L. Anderson Dianne & Anthon Anderson Ronald I. Apfelbaum, M.D. & Kathleen A. Murray, M.D. Elias† & Jayne V. Arellano Robert C. Arnold Stephen & Lois Baar Drs. Wolfgang & Jeanne Baehr Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence R. Barusch Dr. & Mrs. Lee L. Bean Robert Behra Dr. & Mrs. Joseph C. Bentley Reverend James Blaine Jed Boal Dale & Barbara Bradley Allan & Millie Bradley Archie Brugger John & Kathryn Burnham Thomas H. & Mary Ellen B. Caine Mr. & Mrs. David R. Campbell Mr. & Mrs. Fred L. Carter, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. David S. Chapman Barbara Christensen Michael Clark Dr. & Mrs. Hal S. Cole William J. Coles & Dr. Joan L. Coles Richard Collings Kathia Dang & Sam Sleiman Norm & Kris Davis Robert DeBry Ashby & Anne Decker Mr. & Mrs. Richard Dibblee Josephine Divver Margaret Dreyfous Rena D’Souza Mr. & Mrs. James E. Duane Robert P. & Mary Evans Omni Flux Carolyn C. Fredin Mr. & Mrs. B. Delworth Gardner Martin & Sheila Gelman Jonathan Genzen Mr. & Mrs. Guido Gerig Raymond & Harriett Gesteland Ralph & Rose Gochnour Mr. & Mrs. Theodore Gurney, Jr. Charles Harrison

Jonathan Hart Doug Hattery Dr. Alan B. Hayes Lex Hemphill & Nancy Melich Richard & Darlene Hirschi Ronald & Judith Holdaway Robert & Virginia Huber Randy & Nikki Huizenga Michael & Stacy Hurst Gordon Irving Dr. Richard & Helene Jaffe Eldon Jenkins & Amy Calara Jeff & Rachel Jensen Maxine & Bruce Johnson Dr.s Sara & Jason Johnson Dr. & Mrs. Michael A. Kalm Richard H. & Sally P. Keller Scott & Susan Kenney Scott & Stefani Kimche Keith Kofoed Ms. Kristen Keefe David & Sandra Lamb Guttorm & Claudia Landro Gary & Suzanne Larsen J. Craig Larson Claudia Laycock Gene & Carol Linder Gary & Sandra K. Lindstrom John & Julie Lund Lisa Vroman & Patrick O’Neil Herbert & Helga Lloyd Dennis & Pat Lombardi Nicola Longo Mr. & Mrs. Wayne Lyski Dr. & Mrs. Ned L. Mangelson John & Karen Mauger Ralph & Peggy McElvain Mr. & Mrs. Michael Mealey Paula Michniewicz Drs. Jean H. & Richard R. Miller Robert & Dianne Miner Dr. Michaela S. Mohr Nathan & Karen B. Morgan Rob & Carlyle Morris Faye Muntz David & Debra Neff John & Mary Ann Nelson Ms. Cynthia New E. Dilworth & Peggy S. Newman Ferron & Donna Lee Olson Maura & Serge Olszanskyj Dr. Anne M. Pendo & Duncan Edwards Ms. Kersten Pollack Laszlo & Sandra Preysz Analie Rathke Mr. Bill Reagan Dr. Barbara S. Reid Nina Richards Richard F. Riesenfeld & Elaine Cohen Mr. & Mrs. Robert Rollo Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Wohl Dr. John W. Rose & Ms. Carolyn A. Pedone Thomas & Shirley Rossa Gerry & Ginny Rothstein Patricia Curtis Rothwell Rodolphe & Paula Ruffy

Dr. S. Brent Scharman Shannon Scott Christopher Simon Allen & Karen Sims Val & Barbara Singleton Michael & Julie Solot Steve & Negin Urry Lisa Stout & Greg Miyatake Annie & Cory Strupp Max Tanner Dr. & Mrs. Anthony R. Temple Anna Topham Sarah & Alexander Uhle Dr. Jennifer Van Horn William & Heidi Vriens Dr. James C. Warenski Judith Warner Charles & Ellen Wells The Whittenburg Foundation Marsha & Richard Workman Kent Young Mr. & Mrs. Hugh Zumbro $150-$499 Anonymous (26) Angela Aalbers Mr. Bradley S. Adams Jacob Adams Ken Adlam Mr. & Mrs. Alan P. Agle Dr. & Mrs. Dominic Albo, Jr. Marie Alfonso S. William & Carolynn Allred Susan Memmott Allred Christine & Marco Andrei Robert & Eleanor Anderson Ms. Anderson Kristin Andrus Ronald Archibald Nina Armstrong Mr. & Mrs. William P. Armstrong Eugene Arner Thomas & Beth Arnett Roger & Susan Arsht Mr. Dennis D. Austin & Dr. Ann Berghout-Austin Sylvie & Richard Backman Robert & Vivia Baldwin Mr. David Ballard Judy Barking Almina Barksdale Joyce C. Barnes Lynn & Diane Barnett Marlene Barnett Greg Barrus Aditi & Michael Risbud Bartl Michael Bartl Mr. Jaise A. Batty Esq. Brenda Bauer J. P. & Rosemary Beck Mary Beckerle & David Murrell Michael Behring & Debra Marin Dr. W. Dean Belnap Barbara Belnap Mary Bennack Gordon & Marilyn Bennett John W. Bennion Francine R. Bennion Reed & Jeanne Benson

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


Individual Donors C. Verl & Shirley M. Benzley Robert & Charlene Bereskin Anthony Best Earle & Linda Bevins Anneliese Bienek Mr. & Mrs. Jay Bjorklund Eric & Tanya Blake Thomas Bowen & Martha Brace Elise Bowers Mr. & Mrs. John R. Bowman Mr. Robert Boyle Jeff & Peggy Bridge Ms. Diana Brixner Mark & Diane Bromberg Carol Ann Brown Susan Brown Barbara Brunker Robert H. Burgoyne, MD Kent & Marilyn Burningham Ms. Stephanie Burnside Walter & Julie Busse Scott & Jean Calder Antonio & Linda Capobianco Luzmaria Cardenas Thomas & Karen Carey David Carrier Patrick & Karen Cassity Frederic Catoni Betty & Lee Chalker Margaret Chapman Brad & Kathleen Charon Harla Macqueen Dale Childs Mr. & Mrs. H. S. Cho Douglas & Laraine Christensen Mr. & Mrs. Paul G. Christensen William & Renee Christensen Ryan Christianson Pitichoke Chulapamornsri Jim & Barbara Clark Dr. & Mrs. David C. Classen John & Patricia Clay Orson C. & Dianne Clay Catherine Coda Jeri G. Collings Gloria Comiskey Mr. Lacey Compton David & Sandra Cope Milada Copeland Kevin Cornwell Linda Craig Julie Crittenden Dorothy B. Cromer Thida & Matt Crouse Susan Cullen Rod Cullum Richard & Julie Cummings Carey & Andy Cusimano David & Donna Dalton Donalt Dalton Dean & Darla Davies Andrew A. Davis Drs. Pilar & Christopher Decht Robert & Gaye DeLange George & Mona Delavan Charles Desantis Catherine deVries, M.D. Dr. Kent C. DiFiore & Dr. Martha R. Humphrey

John Doty Mrs. Suzanne C. Driggs Vernon Dwire Judith A. Eagan Alan & Vicki Eastman Frank M. Edmunds John & Arlene Edwards Kathryn S. Egan Edward Ehrenberger Mr. & Mrs. Richard Emery Philip & Elaine Emmi Edmund & Gloria Evans Laura Lee Falk David Felt & Lynda Wendel Spencer & Barbara S. Felt Ms. Rosann Fillmore Edward & Sharon Fisher Pamela Fitzgerald James C. & Pauline J. Fontaine Linda Fontenot Drs. Norman & Carol Foster James R. Fowler Dr. Elizabeth L. Frank Harry Franta David & Sheila Frens Ernst Friedrich, M.D. & Marianne Friedrich, Phd. Gilbert A. Fuller Dr. & Mrs. G. R. Fehr Patricia Gaines Mr. & Mrs. G. Donald Gale Al Galik Mr. R. Q. Gardner Joseph & Constance Gates Wallace & Ruth Gatrell David E. Gee David & Ann George Gordon & Andree George Theresa A. Georgi Deanna Gerber Catherine Gerwels Pete Giacoma William L. Glad Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Godfrey John & Beth Goebel Lawrence & Suzanne Goldsmith Rosanne & Robert Gordon Melvin & Diane Gourdin Grabert/Dumas Family Mr. & Mrs. Brooke Grant Dr. & Mrs. William R. Gray Pamela Greacen Tammy Green Dr. Martin C. Gregory Peter Groom Maxine Haggerty Arlen Hale Janet & Joseph Hales Gary Halversen Mary Hammer Karen E. Hannahs Karla Hansen Kristine Hansen Ronald S. & Shirley M. Hanson David & Judi Harris Dixie L. Harris Virginia Harria Mrs. Edward I. Hashimoto Eastman N. & Anne Hatch

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

Charles Hawker Laura Heckler Susan Hendry John & Jean Henkels John Hesch Sara L. Hiler Richard & Ruth Ann Hills Lew Hitchner Michael & Estrellita Hoffmann Steve Hogan & Michelle Wright Bryan & Melissa Holbrook Dr. & Mrs. John H. Holbrook Mr. & Mrs. Lee Hollaar Lee & Audrey Hollaar Mark & Wendi Holland Mr. & Mrs. John W. Holt Vernon Hopkinson Jim & Cindy Horrocks Ron & Marsha Houston Ms. Debra Hoyt Virginia A. Hughes Preston G. Hughes Foundation Jesse N. Hunsaker, M.D. Marta Hvolka Eric & Becky Jacobson Dr. Brent James James & Jeanne Jardine Pat & Boyer Jarvis Michelle Jenkins Robert D. Jenkins Dr. & Mrs. Joseph D. Jensen Mr. & Mrs. Jerry Sanders Cosette Joesten Robert & Mary Johnson Mr. & Mrs. Wayne H. Johnson Chester & Marilyn Johnson Dorothy T. Jonas Peter & Jean Jorgensen Mike & Joanne Kaeske Saria Karhunen Dr. Siegfried & Ellen Karsten Sofia Kassel James & Lucille Kastanis Mr. & Mrs. Martin E. Kearl Alfred E. Kessler Michael & Margaret King Mr. & Mrs. K. Ronald Knight Marcia Knott Robert Knox Pat Koch Dr. & Mrs. Michael Kottler Brooke & David Kubinski Charly Kuecks Wendy Kuo Kathryn Langr Clarann Larsen Karen & Craig Larsen Dr. & Mrs. Laurence D. Loeb Robert & Nila Lee Bruce Leisz Glen M. & Karen W. Leonard Ilsa Leonhart Bill & Sally Lindsay Lisa & Sean Lindberg Karen Lobrot Uri Loewenstein & Elizabeth Tashjian Cheryl Lomax Rhiannon Longstaff

Marilyn Lott Diane Luke Elaine Lyon Ralph & Sylvia S. Mabey Annette MacFarlane Bonnie MacFarlane G. Macglaughlin & D. Costley Sharon Macey Janet Ellison Anat Madanes Sharon Madden Doralee Madsen Katie Madsen Mary B. Magee Filippo Magistro Susan R. Marquardt G. Dean & Barbara Martin Penelope Mathews & David Horner Dr. & Mrs. Fumisuke Matsuo Linda Matthews Laurel Maughan Gerald & Janice Maughan Mr. & Mrs. Norman Mayhew Neylan McBaine John & Kimmie McCann James McGauley Clifton & Terri McIntosh Jerilyn McIntyre & David Smith Johanna & Jack McManemin Heather McMaster Macoy & Marjorie McMurray Thomas G. & Diane S. McNeill Vanene Mcshane Edward G. “Skip” & Patricia Mencimer Dr. & Mrs. Thomas Metcalf Ron & Tamara Meyers Rose Ann Milano Ms. Zella F. Millard Roland Byron Miller Dan P. Miller Katie Misaka Richard Mitchell & Carol Berrey Cyndee Miya Dave Moore & Mary Mallon David & Suzanne Moore Susan Moore Bill & Jane Moore William Moore Dr. Susan Morgan Dr. Alan & Marilyn Morris Hans & Velda Morrow William Mosby Mr. & Mrs. J. Larry Murdock John Mulderig Renate B. Nebeker Nelean Meadows Layne Dalmas & Joann Nelson Dr. Russell M. Nelson Jack & Sylvia Newton Dr. & Mrs. John H. Newton Mr. & Mrs. Donald R. Nielsen Dr. & Mrs. Elwin C. Nielsen Kathleen Nielsen Mr. Lewis T. Nielsen Shirley J. Norton Elder & Mrs. Dallin H. Oaks Dr. & Mrs. Merrill C. Oaks

93


Individual Donors Thomas & Barbara O’Byrne Mary Jane O’Connor Susan & James Ogilvie Ruth & William Ohlsen Don E. & Sandra Lee Olsen Fredrick & K. Kristine Olsen Ilene Olson Ivan & Carol Olson Keith & Patricia Olson Greg & Joyce Oman Keith & Ellen Opprecht Carolyn L. Orthner Ralph & Kay Packard Dr. Cheryl A. Palmer Mr. & Mrs. Donald M. Pantone Kay Papulak Jeffrey G. Paris William & Carole Pariseau Dr. & Mrs. E. William Parker Virgil Parker Mary Parsons Mrs. Paula S. Paterson Clarence & Elaine Patnode Ms. Helen C. Patterson Mr. & Mrs. James Patterson David & Elodie Payne Sonja Penttila & Lewis Boynton Mr. Justin Peterson Robert & Virginia Peterson Ray Pickup Nancy G. Pitstick Dr. & Mrs. Robert L. Poulson Rose Powell Matthew & Maria Proser Glen & Dorothy Purdie Jennifer Dawson & Phillip Purdom Jeff & Melissa Quigley Stephen & Cydney Quinn Daniel Rapp Sydney Dunn & Harry† Reed Ralph & Rita Reese Thomas & Ginger Reeve Dr. David Roman Renner Lyle Rich Mr. Richard Miner Drs. John & Gayle Richards Carolyn Rich-Denson Dr. & Mrs. Delbert G. Ririe Gwen Roberson John & Mary Jo Robinson Mike & Kathy Rodman Dr. & Mrs. Walter A. Romney

Ronald Bennett Keith & Lousje Rooker Allen G. Rosenshine Don & Noreen Rouillard Carolyn & Charles Rozwat Gail T. Rushing Ronald & Marjorie Rushworth Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Russon Rachel Sabin Phyllis C. Safman Dr. Kent Samuelson Bill & Beth Sanders Peggy J. Saunders Max & Teri Savage Karl & Sharon Schatten Ann Schlupp Terry Schmidt Jane Schnauber James Schnitz Darrell Schrick Kent & LaRae Scott Catherine Seale Roger & Connie Seegmiller Mr. & Mrs. Seth Johnson Anneliese & David Shapiro Ms. Janine Sheldon Michael W. Shelton M. Tom & Junko Shimizu Joshua Shimizu Glenda & Robert† Shrader Annabelle Shrieve Aharon Shulimson & Julie Terry John & Marolyn Siddoway Sandra Perry Sigman Dr. Robert & Denise Silver Dr. Bernard J. Simbari Bonne Simmons Deborah Simmons Mrs. Margaret M. Simmons Lynn Skene Steve Slotee Martin & Tani Smihula Ron W. & Marcia M. Smith Patricia Smith John & Geraldine Snow Jane Snyder Neal & Carol Sorensen Steven & Susan Sorensen Mr. & Mrs. J. Leon Sorenson Roger & Shirley Sorenson Ms. Susan Sosin Linda & James Soulek

Carolyn Souza Laurie W. Sowby Robert & Arita R. Sparks Kenneth A. & Claudia M. Sperling Elaine S. Sperry Robert B. Spigle, Jr. Joseph & Kathleen Stanford Ms. Judith Stauder Bruce & Christy Steadman Mr. & Mrs. Isaac Stein Mr. & Mrs. Larry Stevens Gordon Steyaert Lewis & Betty C. Stone Ms. Nan Stratton Ramona Stromness Ms. Gina Stryker Barbara & Jim Svoboda Jeannette Swent Lois Swick Mrs. Gaylia Tanner Dr. & Mrs. Robert Tayler Lucy C. Taylor James & Carolyn Taylor Dr. John R. Taylor Dr. & Mrs. Kim Y. Taylor Isabella Tcaciuc Joe & Evalyn Terry Mr. Thomas Schenkenberg Susannah Thomas Anthony Tolokan Melia & Mike Tourangeau Arthur & Dorothy Traiger Allen & Diane Trevino Mr. & Mrs. Theron T. Twogood, Jr. Tevy Vetter Mr. & Mrs. Robert K. Vickery, Jr. Brian Voiles Darrel & Ruth Vorwaller Bruce & Leigh Washburn Susan Waters Mr. Rodwell B. Watson & Joan C. Watson Werner & Dorothy Weixler Roderick & Barbara Wendt John Wester Henry O. Whiteside Reatha Whiting Ken Wilbert Sandra Wilkins Christian T. Williams Jody L. Williams Mckay & Jean Willis Glenn & Connie Wimer Bob & Sharon Winders Carol A. Withrow James & Carolyn Wold Michael Wolfe Ron & Kris Wood John & Martha Wunderli Ralph Yarro Beth Young & David Waid Marjorie Young Bill Young Robert & Diane Zarbock

Jen Banta-Brownstein Ray Brim Frances Darger Mr. & Mrs. David L. Dee Killian Dent Paula J. Fowler Sharon Jameson Jessica John Monica Morgan Patricia A. Richards & William K. Nichols Dan Ragan Joanne Shiebler Jerry Steichen Naoma Tate Alida Tyler Utah Symphony Musicians In Memory Of Madelyn Acree Jay Ball David Wells Bennett Betsy I. Bowen Helen M. Brown Dr. Robert H. Burgoyne Kathie Dalton Oreta Delameter W. Harold Dobson Loraine L. Felton Neva Langley Fickling Patricia Glad Duane Hatch Janice Hinckley Tom Jordan Ronald Jay Kaplan Robert Louis Clyde Meadows Dr. P. Brent Petersen Katherine Peterson Klaus Rathke Ken Sansom Kathy Sargent Shirley Sargent Elizabeth Schmidt Ruth Schwager Ryan Selberg Dr. Ann O’Neill Shigeoka Joseph V. Siciliano Robert P. Shrader Thomas V. Southam Helen Stahlke Jay Swint John Henry “Jack” Totzke Roger Van Frank *In-kind gift **In-kind & cash gift Donations as received between 8/31/2012 & 2/28/2014

In Honor of Barbara & Steven Anderson Barbara C. Arnold H. Brent & Bonnie Jean Beesley Joseph & Barbara Bentley Todd Brownstein &

94

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


Administration ADMINISTRATION

Thierry Fischer, Music Director DEVELOPMENT

Melia P. Tourangeau

Leslie Peterson

David Green

Carey Cusimano

President & CEO

Senior Vice President & COO

Julie McBeth

Vice President of Development

Steve Hogan

Vice President of Development, Deer Valley® Music Festival

Mike Lund

Director of Major Gifts

Controller

Executive Assistant to the CEO

Shaleane Gee

Executive Assistant to the Music Director and the Senior VP & COO

Hillary Hahn

Office Manager & Artistic Operations Assistant

Ashley Magnus

Marsha Bolton

Cassandra Dozet

ACCOUNTING & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Director of Foundation & Government Gifts Manager of Corporate Gifts

Vice President of Finance & CFO Director of Information Technologies

SaraLyn Pitts

Alison Mockli

Payroll & Benefits Manager

Jared Mollenkopf

Patron Information Systems Manager

Julie Cameron

Accounts Payable Clerk

SYMPHONY ARTISTIC

Rebecca Buxton

Symphony Music Director

Natalie Cope

Vice President of Symphony Artistic Planning

Ruth Eldredge Grants Manager

Beverly Hawkins

Principal Pops Conductor

Development Coordinator

Tracy Hansford

Thierry Fischer

Anthony Tolokan Jerry Steichen

Vladimir Kulenovic Associate Conductor

Barlow Bradford

Annual Giving Manager Special Events Manager

Conor Bentley

Kate Throneburg

Development Assistant

EDUCATION

Paula Fowler

Director of Education & Community Outreach Symphony Education Manager Education Assistant COSTUMES

MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS

Patti Campbell

Director of Orchestra Personnel

Vice President of Marketing & Public Relations

Verona Green

Assistant Orchestra Personnel Manager

Director of Public Relations

Assistant Rentals Supervisor

Symphony Chorus Director

Eric V. Johnson

Myroslava Hagen

Jon Miles

Renée Huang

Costume Director

Rentals Supervisor

Melonie Fitch

SYMPHONY OPERATIONS

Aaron Sain

Director of Operations

Mike Call

Manager of Artistic Operations

Ginamarie Marsala

Production & Stage Manager

Crystal Young-Otterstrom

Assistant Stage & Properties Manager

PATRON SERVICES

Anna Marie Coronado

Director of Ticket Sales & Patron Services

Natalie Thorpe

Chris Hambers Connie Warner

Shawn Fry

Yancey J. Quick

Faith Myers

Chris Hambers Jenny Bakes Shelley Carpenter Tanner Crawford Daniel Hill

Kimberly K. Erickson Charlotte Craff Chip Dance

Mark Barraclough Melissa Singleton

Program Publication & Front of House Manager 0PERA ARTISTIC

Christopher McBeth Opera Artistic Director

Caleb Harris

Opera Chorus Master

Carol Anderson Principal Coach

Michelle Peterson

Opera Company Manager

Shaun Tritchler

Production Coordinator OPERA TECHNICAL

Jared Porter

Opera Technical Director

Jay Morris

Assistant Technical Director

Keith Ladanye

Production Carpenter

Kelly Nickle

Properties Master

Lane Latimer Assistant Props

John Cook

Scene Shop Manager & Scenic Artist UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014

Graphic Design & Branding Manager Website Manager

Marketing Communications Manager Vivace & Cadenza Coordinator

Nina Richards

Patron Services Manager Group & Corporate Sales Manager Sales Manager

Andrew J. Wilson

Patron Services Assistant

Ellesse Hargreaves Account Coordinator

Brooke Adams Kati Garcia Ben Ordaz Marie Maxfield Jackie Seethaler Powell Smith Robb Trujillo

LisaAnn DeLapp Rentals Assistant

Vicki Raincrow

Wardrobe Supervisor

Milivoj Poletan Tailor

Tara DeGray Cutter/Draper

Milliner & Crafts Artisan Stitchers

Wigs/Make-up Designer

Wigs/Make-up Crew

We would also like to recognize our Interns and temporary and contracted staff for their work and dedication to the success of Utah Symphony | Utah Opera.

Sales Associates

Sophie Bona-Layton Janae Hollenbeck Chelsea Madsen Emma McFarland Emily O’Connor Liz Shattler Aubrey Shirts Ticket Agents

95


Classical 89 Broadcasts

March 1 | 9:30 AM MAHLER Symphony No. 10, I. Adagio Thierry Fischer, conductor (Recorded 11/16/12)

April 19 | 9:30 AM KODÁLY Dances of Galánta Gilbert Varga, conductor (Recorded 1/12/13)

March 8 | 9:30 AM RAVEL Boléro Thierry Fischer, conductor (Recorded 11/9/12)

April 26 | 9:30 AM ELGAR “In The South” Overture Thierry Fischer, conductor (Recorded 2/9/13)

March 15 | 9:30 AM STRAVINSKY The Fairy’s Kiss: Divertimento Thierry Fischer, conductor (Recorded 11/9/12)

May 3 | 9:30 AM PROKOFIEV Romeo & Juliet: Romeo at Juliet’s Grave Romeo & Juliet: Montagues & Capulets Romeo & Juliet: Masks Thierry Fischer, conductor (Recorded 2/16/13)

March 22 | 9:30 AM RAVEL La Valse Thierry Fischer, conductor (Recorded 11/9/12) March 8 | 9:30 AM MOZART Symphony No. 41, “Jupiter,” I. Allegro vivace Thierry Fischer, conductor (Recorded 11/9/12) April 5 | 9:30 AM MOZART Symphony No. 41, “Jupiter,” IV. Finale Thierry Fischer, conductor (Recorded 11/9/12) April 12 | 9:30 AM ENESCO Rumanian Rhapsody No. 1 Gilbert Varga, conductor (Recorded 1/11/13)

May 10 | 9:30 AM RAVEL Piano Concerto for the Left Hand Thierry Fischer, conductor Nicholas Angelich, piano (Recorded 2/16/13) May 17 | 9:30 AM MENDELSSOHN Symphony No. 1, IV. Allegro con fuoco Thierry Fischer, conductor (Recorded 2/23/13) May 24 | 9:30 AM MENDELSSOHN Symphony No. 5, “Reformation” Thierry Fischer, conductor (Recorded 2/23/13) May 31 | 9:30 AM GERSHWIN An American in Paris Andrew Grams, conductor (Recorded 3/8/13)

classical89.org 89.1 & 89.5 fm


Concert highlights from around the World. Hear it weekdays on Classical 89 at 6pm.

classical89.org / 89.1 & 89.5 fm


Acknowledgments UTAH SYMPHONY | UTAH OPERA 123 West South Temple Salt Lake City, UT 84101 801-533-5626 EDITOR

Phone Systems for Your Business

Melissa Singleton HUDSON PRINTING COMPANY www.hudsonprinting.com 241 West 1700 South Salt Lake City, UT 84115 801-486-4611 AUDITING AND ACCOUNTING SERVICES PROVIDED BY

Tanner, llc LEGAL REPRESENTATION PROVIDED BY

Service Training Technology Proud Supporters of the Utah Symphony | Utah Opera

Voicing Our Community Since 1984

Ballard Spahr Andrews & Ingersoll, llp Dorsey & Whitney, LLP Holland & Hart, LLP Jones Waldo GOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS REPRESENTATIVE

Frank Pignanelli, Esq. Utah Symphony | Utah Opera is funded by the Utah Arts Council, Professional Outreach Programs in the Schools, Salt Lake City Arts Council, Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts, and Parks Tax (ZAP), Summit County Restaurant Tax, Summit County Recreation, Arts and Parks Tax (RAP), Park City Chamber Bureau, and the Utah Humanities Council. The organization is committed to equal opportunity in employment practices and actions, i.e. recruitment, employment, compensation, training, development, transfer, reassignment, corrective action and promotion, without regard to one or more of the following protected class: race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, family status, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity and political affiliation or belief. Abravanel Hall and Capitol Theatre are owned and operated by Salt Lake County Center for the Arts. By participating in or attending any activity in connection with Utah Symphony | Utah Opera, whether on or off the performance premises, you consent to the use of any print or digital photographs, pictures, film, or videotape taken of you for publicity, promotion, television, websites, or any other use, and expressly waive any right of privacy, compensation, copyright, or ownership right connected to same.

801-485-1107

UTAH SYMPHONY APR–MAY 2014


Your heart works hard for you. No breaks. No vacations. Take care of it. We can help. Your risk for heart disease can be significantly lowered or eliminated, through small, meaningful life changes. The heart experts at the University of Utah Cardiovascular Center will work with you to ensure that you have the tools to fight heart disease in all its forms.

heart.uofuhealth.org


AN ELEGANT PERFORMANCE

AN ELEGANT PERFORMANCE P R E S E N T E D B Y M A S E R AT I O F S A LT L A K E C I T Y

THE ALL-NEW MASERATI QUATTROPORTE S Q4 WITH INTELLIGENT ALL-WHEEL DRIVE. The Quattroporte S Q4 offers exhilarating Maserati performance and the sure-footed agility of intelligent all-wheel drive. Its powerful Maserati twin-turbo V6 engine delivers 404 HP to an advanced AWD system that achieves unprecedented handling and precise control, with an 8-speed automatic transmission designed for maximum acceleration and fuel efficiency. Available in rear-wheel drive with a 523 HP V8 engine, the Quattroporte celebrates performance, luxury and driving pleasure that is pure Maserati. Priced from $102,500.*

MASERATI OF SALT LAKE CITY 801.521.0340 / www.maseratisales.com 808 South Main Street, Salt Lake City, UT 84101 *MASERATI QUATTROPORTE S Q4 BASE MSRP $102,500, NOT INCLUDING GAS GUZZLER TAX, DEALER PREP AND DESTINATION CHARGES. DEALER PRICE MAY VARY. TAXES, TITLE, REGISTRATION FEES AND ADDITIONAL OPTIONS NOT INCLUDED. ©2013 MASERATI NORTH AMERICA, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. MASERATI AND THE TRIDENT LOGO ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF MASERATI SPA. MASERATI URGES YOU TO OBEY ALL POSTED SPEED LIMITS.


Utah Symphony Apr–May 2014  

April–May program for the Utah Symphony.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you