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:DUULRU J O I N T September 14, 2012 Vol. 3, No. 36

B A S E

ARMY EDITION

L A N G L E Y - E U S T I S

P u b l i s h e d i n t h e i n t e re s t o f p e r s o n n e l a t J o i n t B a s e L a n g l e y - E u s t i s

w w w. p e n i n s u l a w a r r i o r. c o m

REDEPLOYMENT

Resolute Warriors from the 119th ICTC return — Page 4

TRAINING

Fort Eustis first responders participate in MARE — Page 24

For more online content, check out JBLE.af.mil

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We remember JBLE and local community honor Sept. 11 anniversary – Page 16

HONORS Langley firefighters qualify for national challenge — Page 18


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SEPTEMBER 14, 2012


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“Life is worth living. There are always reasons to live. Living gives us the opportunity to live together.” — U.S. Public Health Service Cmdr. Bryan Davidson

ABOVE: U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Micah Amey, 439th Supply Chain Operations record maintenance technician, wears a yellow ribbon to signify losing an extended family member to suicide. BELOW: U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Gregory Lambert, 633rd Medical Support Squadron nutrition medical flight noncommissioned officer in charge, learns to fold an origami paper crane.

Photos by Senior Airman Racheal Watson

Hampton Roads community members join together to raise suicide awareness during the Out of Darkness Walk at MountTrashmore Park, Sept. 8.The impact suicide has on the lives of surviving family members, friends, co-workers and neighbors can be devastating and long-lasting.

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-%/( MRLQV FRPPXQLW\ WR KHOS UDLVH VXLFLGH DZDUHQHVV By Senior Airman Jarad A. Denton 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

The crowd was silent as the woman spoke through the tears that fell down her face, Sept. 8. More than 3,500 people, including representatives from all branches of the U.S. military, who came out to participate in the 4th annual Out of the Darkness suicide awareness walk, here, listened as her voice strained when she described the death of her husband, a master chief petty officer in the U.S. Navy who shot himself in the shower at their home. He was two years away from retirement and had showed no overt signs of depression. This woman’s story, along with several others, was shared as people joined togeth-

er and walked in support of the largest Out of the Darkness community walk in the nation. The event was open to the public, and provided an outlet for people to share stories of how suicide affected their lives, raise suicide awareness and meet other individuals who may be grieving, or suffering from depression. “We want people to be aware that depression is something they can seek help for,” said U.S. Public Health Service Cmdr. Bryan Davidson, 633rd Medical Operations Squadron director of psychological health. “Never feel that you are at a loss. Though it seems dark, taking that first brave step of asking for assistance is really, really important.” Davidson, who joined numerous volunteers as a counselor- on-hand during the event, said it was sometimes heart-wrench-

ing to hear the stories people shared. “One person I spoke with had lost two siblings to suicide many years ago,” he said. “It still affects her to this day.” Another volunteer counselor, Maj. Elizabeth Najera, 633rd MDOS behavioral flight commander, said even though many people who attended the walk were at various stages of the grieving process, most of them either came with a support group or found one at the event. “For a lot of people the healing process can be a lifelong event,” Najera said. “Grief impacts people in many different ways. It’s so important for them to let someone know what they are going through.” Najera shared a story of an individual who lost a loved one nearly 27 years ago. She said the grief was still a part of the person’s life. Najera wanted every-

one who attended the event to know they weren’t alone. “In some ways it’s good to hear these stories,” Najera, who has attended the walk for the past three years, said. “It makes me glad to see people willing to talk and seek help.” Davidson also encouraged individuals struggling with grief or depression to seek out resources in their local area. “Anywhere someone lives there are resources designed to help people in pain,” he said. “Many of them are totally free.” He also hoped that everyone would come away from this walk with a newfound appreciation for life and one another. “Life is worth living,” Davidson said. “There are always reasons to live. Living gives us the opportunity to live together.”

According to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, a life is lost to suicide every 18 minutes in the United States.


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SEPTEMBER 14, 2012

Resolute Warriors from the 119th ICTC return By SPC Victor Marin 11TH TRANSPORTATION BATTALION UPAR

Courtesy photos

SPC Jessie Castillo (second from left), assigned to the119th Inland CargoTransfer Company, 11thTransportation Battalion, 7th Sustainment Brigade, was cheerfully greeted by a group of friends within the battalion after the 119th ICTC Redeployment Ceremony held at the Fort Story gym, Sept. 6.The deployment lasted for seven months in Afghanistan.

Family, friends and fellow Soldiers anxiously waited to reconnect with Soldiers from the 119th Inland Cargo Transfer Company, 11th Transportation Battalion, 7th Sustainment Brigade as they marched into the Fort Story gym, Sept. 6, after a seven-month deployment to Afghanistan. As Cpl. Mandy Burnett sang the NationalAnthem, the atmosphere swelled with pride and fulfillment. Capt. Richard Bragg, 119th ICTC Rear Detachment Commander shared his thoughts to ease the emotions of the crowd. “Through their sacrifices, every day we all sleep a little sounder and breathe a little easier,” said Bragg. “The Soldiers were not the only ones that made sacrifices. Their families [...] also sacrificed. Now the only thing standing between these families and their brave Soldiers is how quickly I finish this speech.” Right after the Soldiers were “dismissed” from formation, they shared plenty of hugs, kisses, jokes and stories from overseas. SPC Jessie Castillo, assigned to the 368th Seaport Operation Company, 11th Trans. Bn., who also volunteered to deploy with ICTC, was excited to see some of his battle buddies among the crowd. “I’m really happy to be back,” said Castillo. Minutes later our heroes left the premises. Their faces were weary after a long journey home from overseas. There’s still plenty of catching up to do but, nevertheless, it’s time to relax and appreciate a safe return home.


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phoenix.edu/militarynews

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For more information about our on-time completion rates, the median loan debt incurred by students who complete a program and other important information, please visit our website at phoenix.edu/programs/gainful-employment.html While widely available, all programs may not be offered at all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Advisor. No Federal or Marine Corps endorsement of advertisers or sponsors is implied. University of Phoenix is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association (ncahlc.org). The University’s Central Administration is located at 1625 W. Fountainhead Pkwy., Tempe, AZ 85282. Online Campus: 3157 E. Elwood St., Phoenix, AZ 85034. The State Council of Higher Education for Virginia has certified University of Phoenix, Richmond Campus, to operate in Virginia. University of Phoenix, Richmond Campus, 6600 West Broad St., Ste. 200, Richmond, VA 23230. © 2012 University of Phoenix, Inc. All rights reserved. | MIL-01828

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2012

Photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Hawkins

Ed Donaldson (standing), Army Support Activity simulations specialist, explains the various scenarios available through theVirtual Battle Space 2 simulator training at Fort Eustis, Sept. 6. The ASA usesVBS2 simulated battleďŹ eld scenarios to train Soldiers; accurately recreating elements such as ďŹ re-control systems, physics and weapon ballistics.

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Soldiers don headsets and peck meticulously at keyboards, focused on the computer screens before them. The character on their screen, clad in an Army Combat Uniform, executes a variety of maneuvers based on their input - running, jumping, low-crawling, and ďŹ ring his weapon at targets. When targets are hit, the Soldiers exclaim victoriously, prodding the troops beside them in congratulations or in jest. This could easily be the scene of a Friday game night in a barracks day room for a group of young Soldiers enjoying the latest ďŹ rst-person shooter video game. However, these troops are not simply playing a video game. They are in real training, using an advanced-computer simulator to immerse them in realistic battleďŹ eld scenarios. The system is known as Virtual Battle Space 2, and offers a conďŹ gurable virtual environment that can simulate real-world systems or be employed on different simulators to provide realistic visuals. Army Support Activity uses VBS2 simulating battleďŹ eld scenarios, accuately recreating elements such as ďŹ re control systems, physics and weapon ballistics. The software looks similar to most modern combat

video games, using a “high-ďŹ delity virtual sandboxâ€? where Soldiers conduct individual or collective training. Soldiers break down into two rival teams – OPFOR and BLUEFOR – to accomplish a custom variety of mission objectives. Ed Donaldson, an ASA simulations specialist, said the Army began using VBS2 in 2006, and is anticipating an upgrade in the near future. He said the system provides operational and budgetary advantages for the Army, as Soldiers receive realistic training without risking injury, and limiting the use of equipment, ammunition and supplies, saving money. “There’s no substitute for ďŹ eld training, but it’s a step toward getting them ready for reality in the comfort of the classroom,â€? Donaldson said. “It allows us go through these scenarios without being in ďŹ eld. I like it,â€? said Sgt. Samuel Maryman, who recently trained using VBS2. “Soldiers get the mental knowledge of what were doing, using what we learned on the game in real-life scenarios.â€? Commanders and noncommissioned ofďŹ cers in charge can schedule use of the VBS2 for their units, and work with Donaldson to develop speciďŹ c training scenarios based on their mission requirements. SEE SIMULATOR PAGE 7


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Photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Hawkins

U.S. Army Sgt. Marcus Rogers, 576th Inland Cargo Transfer Company cargo specialist, begins the interactive portion of the Virtual Battle Space 2 simulator training.

SIMULATOR FROM PAGE 6 “We can build convoy scenarios, small arms ďŹ re, [improvised explosive device] attacks, land navigation, road marching,â€? Donaldson explained. “It’s a good team building tool, as you need to communicate with your team members to succeed. It gets Soldiers more in-tune when they have to do the real thing.â€? Spc. Carlos Gutierrez, a cargo specialist, said VBS2 does a “good jobâ€? at recreating even the smallest details of downrange operations. “I’ve deployed, and from what I saw it does give us better situational awareness. The game uses the same weapons we use downrange, the same landscape, buildings, vehicles, everything,â€? he said. “It really helped me with eye-hand coordination.â€? Donaldson said he thinks “every Soldier needs to go throughâ€? VBS2 training due to its realism. “You can get killed in the simulation, and you don’t just come back to life like in a video game. In real battle, if you’re not paying attention and not working as a team and just want to be an individual, your life expectancy isn’t too great,â€? Donaldson said. “It’s the same thing here. If you’re all working together, your lifespan will likely be greater.â€? Most Soldiers that utilize the VBS2 training tool genuinely enjoy the experience. “The ďŹ rst thing they ask their NCOIC when they ďŹ nish is ‘can we come here tomorrow?’â€? said Donaldson. “I think the experience sticks with them if and when they have to go into a combat situation.â€?

     



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FeatureStory

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“My parents told me about the benefits and how life changing it would be before I considered coming in. They both told me I should join the Air Force if I was going to enlist.” — Airman 1st Class Shanique Cameron 633rd Force Support Squadron fitness specialist

633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Stop any Soldier, Sailor, Marine or Airman in uniform, and they will all give you a different reason why they chose to raise their right hand to join the military. Airman 1st Class Shanique Cameron, a fitness specialist with the 633rd Force Support Squadron, is no different. “I joined the Air Force for the guaranteed job and educational benefits,” Cameron said. Cameron enlisted a little more than a year ago, on Sept. 6, 2011, choosing an “open general” career-field, meaning she would take any available job. “After graduating from high school, I looked for over a year for a job,” Cameron, a native of Dayton, Ohio, said. “But I wasn’t having much luck because of little employment history and experience.” After weighing her choices, Cameron carefully considered information previously provided by her parents about the military before making her choice to enlist. Both of her parents are veterans of the U.S. Army. “My parents told me about the benefits and how life changing it would be before I considered coming in,” Cameron said. “They both told me I should join the Air Force if I was going to enlist.” Cameron’s mother Sharon Coates was very proud of her daughter’s choice to enlist. “I knew it would be a good opportunity to serve and go to college at the same time,” Coates said. “I’d love to see her stay in, and retire from the Air Force.” Her mother also recognizes how unique Cameron’s decision was. “She is the only one from her generation of our family to enlist,” she said. “I’m very proud of her.” In addition to her family’s pride, Cameron is also recognized by her leadership as

Graphic by Senior Airman Jarad A. Denton Photo by Staff Sgt. Wesley Farnsworth

This story is part of the 2012 Joint Base Langley-Eustis fall series, highlighting individuals with interesting stories.

Airman 1st Class Shanique Cameron, 633rd Force Support Squadron fitness specialist, helps people develop workout routines and answers any facility and equipment questions patrons may have. She has been in the Air Force a little more than a year.

an outstanding Airman who will go above and beyond to help her wingmen. “Cameron is one of my go-to Airmen,” said Tech. Sgt. Julie Nix, 633rd FSS, noncommissioned officer in charge of the

Shellbank fitness center. “I can always count on her to get things done.” Cameron recently completed her mandatory career development course material, and is looking forward to starting

Photo by Staff Sgt. Wesley Farnsworth

Airman 1st Class Shanique Cameron, 633rd Force Support Squadron fitness specialist, writes down the number of people currently using cardio equipment on her checklist inside the Shellbank Fitness Center at Langley Air Force Base, Sept. 6.The checklist is completed several times a day by fitness center staff to track the overall usage of the facility.

college classes. “It’s great knowing that I can go to school without having to worry about the loans and other expenses that most college students have to worry about,” she said. “I also like that I’ll be able to pass on my educational benefits to my future children.” Cameron plans on attending school and earning a bachelor’s degree in earlychildhood education. “I’ve been around smaller children all my life, and I want to become a part of molding their future,” Cameron said. “Eventually, I would like to become a principal, and then the superintendant of a school district.” When not at work or planning her education, Cameron also enjoys volunteering with the Airman and Family Readiness Center, and recently she started the application process to become a “Big,” with Big Brothers Big Sisters of America. “I always wanted a little sister when I was growing up,” Cameron said. “This is one way I’m able to get that, and give back at the same time.” Looking back at her first year in the Air Force, Cameron said she has never regretted her decision to enlist. “I know that I am making a better life for myself and my own family in the future.”

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The Air Force 2012 Critical Days of Summer campaign ended Sept. 4 with zero fatalities for the Labor Day weekend for the first time in five years. “We at the Safety Center always have a Quest for Zero mission,” said Bill Parsons, Air Force Chief of Ground Safety. “It is, and always should be, our pursuit. Even if we suffer an always-tragic fatality, we strive to prevent another from happening, and we must continue to be aware of the risks associated with off-duty choices and to be the best wingmen possible.” Parsons attributes the fatality-free holiday weekend to summer safety campaigns, and the contributions of the Airman to Airman Safety Advisory Council members. “That program allows Airmen ages 17-

26 to address their peers in commander’s calls and safety briefings to share their personal safety lessons so that others may be persuaded to make solid risk management decisions,” Parsons said. While the Air Force had no a fatalities over the Labor Day weekend and zero onduty fatalities during the 15-week CDS campaign, 16 Airmen died in off-duty mishaps; two of those involved alcohol. According to safety reports, nine of the mishaps involved motorcycles. The other seven included sports and recreation, privately-owned motor vehicles and mishaps occurring at home. So far this fiscal year, the Air Force has lost a total of 44 Airmen in off-duty mishaps. Air Force Safety Center officials remind all Airmen that most mishaps and fatalities are preventable, and that every Airman lost impacts many lives, including family, friends and colleagues.

“We at the Safety Center always have a Quest for Zero mission. It is, and always should be, our pursuit. Even if we suffer an always-tragic fatality, we strive to prevent another from happening, and we must continue to be aware of the risks associated with off-duty choices and to be the best wingmen possible.” — Bill Parsons Air Force Chief of Ground Safety

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2012

)RUW (XVWLV MRE IDLU WR SURYLGH ZLQGRZ RI RSSRUWXQLW\ WR MRE VHHNHUV By Senior Airman Jason J. Brown 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

The Fort Eustis Army Career Alumni Program is teaming with Army Community Service and the Virginia Employment Commission to host a job fair, Sept. 20 at the Fort Eustis, Va. Club from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The job fair is open to all active duty Service members, National Guardsmen, reservists, retirees and spouses, and will feature more than 50 employers seeking qualified candidates in a

variety of career fields. Employers present will include federal agencies, government contractors and private sector employers in law enforcement, medical and associated fields. Edgar Williams, a Local Veteran Employment Representative with the VEC, said job seekers should “come dressed for success and with resumes in hand.” However, children will not be allowed at the job fair. “It is a great opportunity for job seekers to find meaningful em-

ployment,” Williams said. “Employers have job openings for qualified candidates, and an individual must sell his or her talents and skills to the benefit of the organization.” Williams also suggests job seekers conduct employer research to match their skills to available job openings. For more information about the upcoming job fair, call Williams at (757) 878-0906 or Reba Gordon at (757) 878-2881.

A job fair is scheduled for Sept. 20 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Fort Eustis Club

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Military-Friendly Higher Education Begin your next chapter today at the Cambridge College Chesapeake Regional Center, with programs designed for adult learners seeking to advance their careers and enhance their earning potential. Advantages • responsive transfer credit policy • no entrance exams • convenient weekend & evening classes • adult teaching model • financial assistance for those qualified • military-friendly Programs • Undergraduate • Master of Education • Master of Management • Certificate of Advanced Graduate Studies Photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Hawkins

The Hazardous Material Pharmacy building stands as the hazardous-material supply store for units at Fort Eustis, Aug. 29.The 733rd Logistics Readiness Division is scheduled to assume overall responsibility of the Fort Eustis HazMart, Sept. 22, after having been contracted under the Navy for the past 14 years.

733rd LRD assumes control of HazMart from the Navy By Senior Airman Jason J. Brown 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

After 14 years, the Navy will relinquish operation of the Fort Eustis Hazardous Material Pharmacy, or HazMart, Sept. 22. The 733rd Logistics Readiness Division, formerly the Directorate of Logistics, along with contractor support, will assume overall responsibility for operating the HazMart in its current location. Under the 733rd LRD, the HazMart will track hazardous materials from the initial procurement process, bar-coding the items to ensure proper handling through the entire process. Upon approval, units will be authorized to purchase local items using their Government Purchase Cards, and will no longer be required to pay the 15 percent surcharge assessed in the past. The procurement process will still require Activity Environmental Coordina-

tors, Unit Environmental Coordinators or Hazardous Waste Coordinators to certify each purchase. Safety, Industrial Hygiene, and the 733rd Civil Engineer Division will approve purchases utilizing the Electronic Environmental Safety, and Occupational Health, Management Information System. All contractors and subcontractors using hazardous materials on the installation are required to have these items entered into the EESOH-MIS system through the HazMart. These operational changes only affect the management of hazardous materials procured by the government in support of the installation mission at Fort Eustis. The changes do not apply to items purchased for personal use in family housing, such as items bought at the Army and Air Force Exchange or Commissary. For more information on HazMart operations, call 878-0332, or 878-4123 ext. 300 concerning EESOH-MIS.

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Saying goodbye is always hard. Saying hello just got a little easier. HRBT / Photo by Ben Schumin

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The Virginia Department of Transportation will close multiple lanes at a variety of water crossings over the next two months due to maintenance activities. All eastbound lanes of the Interstate 64 Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel will be closed beginning the weekend of Sept. 14 for paving operations. For three consecutive weekends, motorists are advised to use the Interstate 664 Monitor-Merrimac Memorial Bridge-Tunnel as an alternate route. A signed detour will be in place. Weekend closures are scheduled as follows: ■ Friday, Sept. 14, beginning at 9 p.m. until Monday, Sept. 17, at 5 a.m. ■ Friday, Sept. 21, beginning at 9 p.m. until Monday, Sept. 24, at 5 a.m. ■ Friday, Sept. 28, beginning at 9 p.m. until Monday Oct. 1, at 5 a.m. (Rain Date) The Route 17 James River Bridge southbound lanes will close for five consecutive weekends so crews can begin replacing the bridge grid deck. Beginning on Sept. 14, crews will close all southbound lanes. Upon completion of work on the southbound lanes, crews will close the northbound lanes for four consecutive weekends. Motorists are advised to use the MMMBT as an alternate route. The weekend closure schedule is as follows: ■ Friday, Sept. 14, beginning at 9 p.m. until Monday, Sept. 17, at 5 a.m. ■ Friday, Sept. 21, beginning at 9 p.m. until Monday, Sept. 24, at 5 a.m. ■ Friday, Sept. 28, beginning at 9 p.m. until Monday, Oct. 1, at 5 a.m. ■ Friday, Oct. 5, beginning at 9 p.m. until Monday, Oct. 8, at 5 a.m. ■ Friday, Oct. 12, beginning at 9 p.m. until Monday, Oct.15, at 5 a.m. All maintenance operations will occur during periods with the least possible impact to motorists, while maintaining safe and efficient travel conditions throughout the area. These scheduled maintenance activities are weather dependent. Motorists are encouraged to call 511 or the Traffic Information Line at (757) 361-3016, visit www.511virginia. org, or listen to Highway Advisory Radio (HAR) 1680 AM for current traffic and travel information.


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Âľ5HWLUHH +HDOWK ([WUDYDJDQ]DÂś WR IRFXV RQ KHDOWKFDUH EHQHÂżWV By Marlon J. Martin MCDONALD ARMY HEALTH CENTER

U.S. military retirees are invited to visit the McDonald Army Health Center at Fort Eustis, Va., and attend its Retiree Health Extravaganza, Sept. 29 from 9 a.m. to noon. This is the ďŹ rst open-house style health fair hosted by the health center. Attendees will have a unique opportunity to gain valuable health information, tour the clinics and meet the staff. “The theme for the Retiree Health Extravaganza is ‘Health Starts Here,’ meaning that both the individual and the healthcare team play a role in wellness,â€? said Maj. Tameka D. Bowser, chief of Army Public Health Nursing. The Retiree Health Extravaganza is a free event open to all TRICARE eligible retirees. It will be held inside the Health Center, with healthcare professionals set

The Retiree Health Extravaganza is a free event open to all TRICARE eligible retirees. It will be held inside the Health Center, with healthcare professionals set up at informational tables to discuss general and specialty health topics.

up at informational tables to discuss general and specialty health topics. As retirees make their way through the Health Center, their attention will also be directed to the various health clinics and services available to them at McDonald where they can receive quality care – once they are enrolled at McDonald. The McDonald staff has learned that many retirees are traveling a great distance to receive healthcare services that are provided right here at Fort Eustis. To alleviate such an inconvenience, McDon-

ald wants to fully inform all retirees of the healthcare services available to them here at Fort Eustis. Once enrolled, retirees will have access to the following healthcare services: Allergy/Immunization, Dermatology, Health Management, Ear Nose Throat (ENT), Family Practice, Gastroenterology, General Surgery, Internal Medicine, Nutrition Care, Ophthalmology/Optometry, Orthopedics/Podiatry, Pathology (Lab), Pharmacy, Pediatrics, Physical Therapy, Radiology (X-ray), Sleep

Lab, and Women’s Health (GYN). In addition to the health screenings, vaccination screenings, and other updates that will be provided during the Retiree Health Extravaganza, all eligible retirees will have an opportunity to enroll as a TRICARE Prime beneďŹ ciary. McDonald is committed to providing the best healthcare possible, and wants to ensure its beneďŹ ciaries are maintaining good health. “Health fairs such as this are a great opportunity for the individual to do their part by increasing knowledge about healthy behaviors and key steps to wellness,â€? Bowser said. Key topics to be covered during the Retiree Health Extravaganza will include: breast and cervical health, hypertension, diabetes, asthma, nutrition, importance of vaccination, skin cancer prevention and awareness, orthopedic injury prevention, and medication safety.

To learn more about the healthcare programs offered at McDonald, individuals are encouraged to follow McDonald on Facebook at www.facebook.com/mcdonaldahc, or visit the Health Center’s Website at http://mcdonald.narmc.amedd.army.mil.

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

SEPTEMBER 14, 2012

Online survey seeks Soldiers’ experiences with new ASU TRADOC Public Affairs

© Disney, © Disney/Pixar.

U.S. ARMY TRAINING AND DOCTRINE COMMAND

Soldiers will soon have the opportunity to share their experiences with the new Army Service Uniform (ASU) with Product Manager Soldier Clothing and Individual Equipment (PM SCIE). An online survey will be posted Sept. 17, and will run until Oct. 9. The Soldier feedback will be used to assess the performance of the uniform and to make improvements. “The more Soldiers who take the survey, the better informed we will be when we improve the ASU,” said Assistant Product Manager Capt. Mia Bruner. “Soldiers have two years of experience with the ASU, and their opinions will be valuable.” The blue ASU was adopted to reduce the burden Soldiers faced in maintaining a variety of different uniforms. It has been in use since autumn of 2010. The new ASU, based on the Army’s dress blue

uniform, replaced the Army green, and Army white uniforms. The new survey will ask questions about how often Soldiers wear the ASU, for what purposes, and how they might want to change particular parts of the uniform. Questions cover everything from braid on trousers to the preferred type and placement of the Combat Service Identification Badge. It also covers the fit and cut of trousers, blouses, and skirts. The information, said Bruner, will be used to improve, not replace, the ASU. “Uniforms are part of Army life,” said Bruner. “I encourage Soldiers to take the time to register their likes, dislikes, and suggestions. Soldiers can access and fill in the survey form locations with or without [Common Access Cards].” To take the survey via CAC Login, visit https://asusurvey.natick.army.mil. NonCAC users can visit https://surveys.natick. army.mil/Surveys/asu.nsf.

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

SEPTEMBER 14, 2012

SEPTEMBER 14, 2012

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

www.peninsulawarrior.com

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Wee remember -%/( ( DQG OORFDO FRPP PXQLW\ KRQRU 6HSW  By Senior Airman Jarad A. Denton 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Interested in learning more? Use a barcode reader application on a cell phone to scan the code on the left. It will open a browser and navigate to the associated link.

Photo by Senior Airman Jarad A. Denton

Police officers from the Hampton Sheriff's Office rifle team march into position during a remembrance ceremony at Gosnold's Hope Park, Sept. 11.The ceremony was held to pay respects to the victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

It was a fair autumn wind that blew through Gosnold’s Hope Park as Service members, local police and citizens of Hampton, Va., gathered to pay their respects on the 11th anniversary of what has widely been regarded as the single-greatest act of terrorism ever committed on American soil. “We will not, we cannot forget what happened on this date 11 years ago,” said retired U.S. Army Lt. Col. John Gately, chairman of the Hampton Military Affairs Committee. “We remember that day and we hope for a brighter tomorrow.” As the clock struck 8:46 a.m. on Sept. 11, 2001, America was forever changed when American Airlines Flight 11 struck the North Tower of the World Trade Center in New York City. Eleven years later, that precise moment was remembered in Hampton by the tolling of a single bell, followed by silent reverence from the crowd. “That day so much changed for our country and our family,” said Donn Weaver, fa-

ther of U.S. Army 1stt Lt. Todd Weaver. “I Americans who speak for the nearly 7,000 7 gave their last full measure for this nation.” n was killed Sept. 9, Weaver, whose son 2010 – while serving in Afghanistan, said Lieutenant Weaver was w motivated to join by the events of Septt. 11. Weaver called it y of infamy.” He also this generation’s “day recalled the message put p forth by President George W. Bush, afterr the attacks. an shake the founda“Terrorist attacks ca uildings, but they cantions of our biggest bu not touch the foundatiion of America,” Bush said. “These acts shattter steel, but they canresolve.” not dent the steel of American A n’s resolve was never Weaver said his son shaken, not even at the t very end. He and heir son the night behis wife spoke with th fore he was killed. He H said it was a simple conversation – hee asked them for help ation. It wasn’t a congetting some informa versation parents would have had if they knew it was going to be the last time they would speak with theeir son. The next day y to Dover Air Force they were on the way Base to welcome theirr son home in a coffin,

with a flag draped over top. Today, Lieutenant Weaver is buried at Section 60 of Arlington National Cemetery, alongside countless other national heroes. “His story is not unlike all the other stories of those who solemnly heeded the call,” said Weaver. “Memory is mightier than death.” The crowd sat silently as Weaver left the podium before a rifle volley from the Hampton Sheriff’s Office rang out through the morning air. People covered their ears and shuddered with each shot, but did not look away. As the volley concluded, the gunshots were replaced by the soft melodic notes of “Amazing Grace,” played by U.S. Marine Corps Maj. Sean Smith. The crowd stood and began to walk toward a table that contained the names of all those who lost their lives as a result of the attack on Sept. 11. Through it all, the message of hope and appreciation was constantly heard from the lips of those in attendance. “Our lives have been blessed in many ways because we are Americans,” said Weaver. “May God continue to bless our United States of America.”

Photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Hawkins

W.H. Beckwith,Veterans of Foreign Affairs commander, tolls the remembrance bell during the A Day of Remembrance ceremony.The bell was tolled at 8:46 a.m. for a moment of silence to remember the American Airlines flight that hit the NorthTower of theWorldTrade Center in NewYork City.

Photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Hawkins

Laine Beckwith, Veterans of Foreign Wars senior vice president, hands out flowers to Service members during the remembrance ceremony.

Photo by Senior Airman Jarad A. Denton

ABOVE: Retired U.S. Army Lt. Col. John Gately, chairman of the Hampton Millitary Affairs Committee, speaks before a crowd gathered at Gosnold's Hope Park. The crowd consisted of Service members, local police and citizens of Hampton who joined together to pay their respects to the victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. RIGHT: Brig. Gen. Pete Utley, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command’s deputy chief of staff for operations and training, consoles retired Navy Senior Chief Petty Officer Larry Sticklen, who lost his son in the attacks on Sept. 11.

Photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Hawkins

Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Kelly Jo Bridgwater

Photo by Senior Airman Jarad A. Denton

Photo by Senior Airman Jarad A. Denton

Photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Hawkins

U.S. Marine Corps Maj. Sean Smith plays “Amazing Grace” on the bagpipes during the remembrance ceremony at Gosnold's Hope Park.

The Flag of Hono or stands next to a shovel and soil from the site of the Sept. 11 terrorist attack. The flag is composed of the names of individuals who perished from the attack and was delivered to o Gosnold's Hope Park, Hampton for the remembrance ceremony, Sept. 11.

Gloria Murray holds a rose and a photo of her daughter during a remembrance ceremony. Murray’s daughter, Sondra White, was killed at the Pentagon attack, Sept. 11, 2001.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Christopher Cronsell, with the U.S. Air Force Heritage of America Band, plays Taps during a Sept. 11 ceremony. Members of theVeterans of Foreign Wars hold the ceremony every year in remembrance of all Service members who have sacrificed their lives protecting the country.


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

SEPTEMBER 14, 2012

/DQJOH\ ¿UH¿JKWHUV TXDOLI\ IRU QDWLRQDO FKDOOHQJH By Airman 1st Class R. Alex Durbin 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Let no man’s ghost return to say his training let him down. These words hang in a training room at the 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron fire department at Langley Air Force Base, Va. In testament to this mantra, a sevenmember team of 633rd CES fire protection specialists qualified to compete in the world Firefighter Combat Challenge, Aug. 18, after two days of qualifying heats at the regional Firefighter Combat Challenge in Charleston, W.Va. The Firefighter Combat Challenge sought to encourage firefighter fitness and demonstrate the rigors of the profession. Wearing full gear and a breathing apparatus, competitors raced against the clock as they simulated the physical demands of real-life firefighting. During the challenge, teams performed a series of five events, including climbing a five-story, 41-foot-tall tower, simulated chopping, dragging hoses and rescuing a life-sized, 175-pound mannequin as they strove to finish the course as fast as possible. “The Firefighter Combat Challenge is the Olympics of firefighting,” said Senior Master Sgt. Matthew McQuaig, 633rd CES deputy fire chief. “The challenge brings firefighters together from all over the world to test their skills that are used in real life.” Firefighters need to have above-average strength and agility, and many job functions cannot be performed without maintaining a high fitness level. They require determination and strength to be the first on scene, and run into buildings that others flee from. The team showed these traits when the physical training to prepare for the regional challenge began in March 2012. The team began training with an advanced-fitness regimen 5 days a week, then focused on strength training and individually practicing each event they would face during the challenge. After months of training individual strength, the team focused on working as a team for the medley events. “We had a lot of two to three hour sessions, and two-a-days,” said McQuaig. “The training pushed our bodies and minds

Photo by Staff Sgt. John Strong II

The team of 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron fire protection specialists stand in front of a fire truck holding their championship finalist flag, Aug. 24, at Langley Air Force Base.The flag was awarded to the team after they qualified for the national Firefighter Combat Challenge, during the regional challenge at Charleston,W.Va.

“It’s a dream to have the opportunity to have the chance to compete at the world level. Only 2 percent of the national firefighters compete in the challenge. It’s an amazing feeling a member of the elite out of the 2 percent, representing the Air Force.” — Senior Master Sgt. Matthew McQuaig 633rd CES deputy fire chief

to new levels we didn’t think was possible.” The team qualified for the national challenge in the medley category, and Staff Sgt. Kira Enlow, 633rd CES fire protection specialist, qualified in two events by placing first in the tandem race and third in the individual category. “It felt great to place, and know that all of our hard work paid off;” she said with a laugh. “But I was disappointed that I didn’t do as well as I wanted.” Enlow said that not only did the months of vigorous training get the team to peak physical condition, but it created a strong bond between teammates.

“It’s amazing to use camaraderie to achieve something great,” she said. “We give each other the drive to work hard and will to do better.” Enlow recalled the cheers of support from her teammates urging her on as she heard the voice of doubt grow, emphasizing her fatigue. With the encouragement from her team, she was able to push through her mental barrier and qualify for the national challenge. “I knew I couldn’t give up,” she said, almost at a loss for words. “The team worked hard, and I knew that I could do it.” Not only does the challenge give the

team bragging rights, but it translates into real-world scenarios that can help the firefighters potentially save a life. With 17 years of experience of as firefighter, McQuaig knows all too well that training is an important aspect of a firefighter’s life. The team has pushed themselves to the limit to use the skills they’ve learned in real life. “It’s great to know that this training can help us save lives,” he said. “There are times we use the skills that we’ve practiced for the challenge.” The 2012 World Firefighter Combat Challenge is scheduled to be held at Myrtle Beach, S.C., Nov. 12 through 17. The time before the almost week-long challenge will allow the team to focus on their weaknesses and come to the world challenge stronger than ever. “It’s a dream to have the opportunity to have the chance to compete at the world level,” said McQuaig. “Only 2 percent of the national firefighters compete in the challenge. It’s an amazing feeling a member of the elite out of the 2 percent, representing the Air Force.”

A seven-member team of 633rd CES fire protection specialists qualified to compete in the World Firefighter Combat Challenge after two days of qualifying heats at the regional Firefighter Combat Challenge in Charleston, W.Va., Aug. 18.


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Attention Jobseekers! The job market is improving! Meet face to face with employers ready to interview and hire now at the

Career & Education Expo Wednesday, September 19th • 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Hilton Norfolk Airport • 1500 N. Military Hwy. • Norfolk, VA 23518 FREE ADMISSION AND ONSITE PARKING

Photo by Mike Casey

Col. Michael Barbee, director of the CombatTraining Center Directorate, addresses the CTC Commanders Conference at Fort Leavenworth, Kan.

CTC conference focuses on changes in Army training By Mike Casey COMBINED ARMS CENTER-TRAINING

The Combat Training Center Commanders Conference discussed how the Army will adjust live training events and exercises to respond to the post-Iraq and soon to be postAfghanistan operational environments. Representatives from the Army, sister services and international partners met Sept. 5-6 to discuss a wide range of issues as the Army adapts its training strategy to meet future requirements. Lt. Gen. David Perkins, commanding general of the Combined Arms Center, opened the conference, saying the roles of the CTCs, home station training, the Army Force Generation cycle and other issues are interconnected. “We’re talking about all these topics within the larger training strategy,” Perkins said. He added that the training strategy also is connected to the Army’s leader development strategy. One issue facing the Army is how to prepare Soldiers for future operations now that the war in Iraq is over and combat operations in Afghanistan are winding down. Col. Michael Barbee, director of the Com-

bat Training Center Directorate, noted that Army warfighting doctrine requires forces to conduct Decisive Action – simultaneous offensive, defensive, and stability operations – in Unified Land Operations. “The Army is determining the home station capabilities necessary for units to train to standard before they deploy to the CTCs for intense live training exercises,” he said. “Live training at the CTCs uses the Decisive Action Training Environment to build challenging high-resolution exercises to develop adaptive leaders and versatile units.” In future operations, units will face a dynamic hybrid threat consisting of conventional and irregular forces, terrorists, and criminal elements, which may or may not be unified. “That type of threat is the most complex and cannot be fully replicated in training at home station,” Barbee said. “And because we expect funding to diminish as the troops redeploy from Afghanistan, we are also growing our ability to integrate both simulations and virtual training at the CTCs. This improves the overall quality and complexity of the training we provide at the CTCs, but at less cost than with live-only training.”

Recruiters: To reserve your booth at this event, please call Denise Wilson at 757.446.2143


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

SEPTEMBER 14, 2012

*UDVV EHFRPHV WK FKLHI RI 1DWLRQDO *XDUG %XUHDX By Sgt. 1st Class Jim Greenhill ARMY NEWS SERVICE

Gen. Frank Grass became the 27th chief of the National Guard Bureau in a Pentagon ceremony, Sept. 7. “I’m very excited about the future; there’s hard work to do,” Grass said. “To the men and women of the National Guard: You’re the most professional, most well-trained and experienced National Guard our nation has ever had. I pledge that I will work every day to serve and support you so that we can continue to be a ready, accessible and essential operational force for our states as well as our nation.” Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta hosted the change-of-responsibility ceremony in the Pentagon Auditorium. “I know our citizen-warriors will be in good hands,” Panetta said. “Today, we entrust General Grass with a national treasure – a force that has been transformed from a strategic reserve to an essential part of the operational military and whose ranks are now

filled with skilled combat veterans.” Grass relieved Air Force Gen. Craig McKinley as the chief of the National Guard Bureau. Grass also received his fourth star during the ceremony. “I am confident that General Grass will be a strong advocate for the National Guard’s most valuable asset -its Soldiers, its Airmen and their families,” Panetta said. “The reason we are the greatest military power on earth lies not in our weapons, lies not in our planes or our ships or our advanced technology, as great as they all are: The strength of our military lies in our people.” As chief of the National Guard Bureau, Grass serves as a military adviser to the president, the secretary of defense and the National Security Council and is the Department of Defense’s official channel of communication to the governors and adjutants general in all 54 states and territories on all matters pertaining to the National Guard. SEE GRASS PAGE 21

Photo by Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Chad J. McNeeley

Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta (left) swears in Army Lt. Gen. Frank J. Grass as National Guard Bureau chief during a change-of-responsibility ceremony at the Pentagon, Sept. 7. Grass, who received his fourth star during the event, replaced Air Force Gen. Craig R. McKinley.

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GRASS FROM PAGE 20 He is the second chief to also serve as a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. McKinley was the first, and also the first four-star officer in the National Guard’s more than 375-year history. “The chiefs and I welcome General Frank Grass and his wife Patricia to the team,” said Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. “This is the right man for the job: A thinker, a learner and one of the most experienced leaders in our military today. He knows what it means to put service before self and to put people first. And he knows what it will take to overcome the challenges of tomorrow – and those challenges are not going to be easy.” “It’s because of leaders like you and the Soldiers and Airmen of the National Guard that we remain the world’s preeminent military force,” he said. Grass is responsible for ensuring that more than half a million Army and Air National Guard personnel are accessible, capable and ready to protect the homeland and to provide combat resources to the Army and the Air Force. The National Guard rose to the challenges of the past decade, Panetta said.

“The men and women of the Guard have shown again and again that they are always ready and always there. Throughout our history, America has depended on the citizen-Soldier.” — Leon Panetta Secretary of Defense

“The Guard responded,” he said. “Be it patrolling our nation’s skies. Be it fighting and dying on the war fronts. Be it responding swiftly and compassionately to floods and fires, disasters of one kind or another, meeting the needs of their fellow countrymen in distress here at home and abroad – and that is what the National Guard is all about.” “Last year in Libya, the Air National Guard was there providing the bulk of the tankers that were so essential to that effort. And today more than 28,000 National Guardsmen remain deployed in support of operations in Afghanistan, in Kosovo and elsewhere overseas. “When I travel to the war zones, when I travel abroad, I cannot tell the difference between Guardsmen and the active-duty

force, and that’s the way it should be, because we are all part of one team.” “The men and women of the Guard have shown again and again that they are always ready and always there. Throughout our history, America has depended on the citizen-Soldier. Those citizen-Soldiers who’ve been willing to leave their farms, to leave their homes, to leave their businesses, to leave their jobs, to leave their families in order to fight to protect this country. “In deploying the Guard, we have made certain – this is very important – we have made certain that every community, every citizen shares in the responsibility of defending America. If we are to fight wars – as we must when we are called to do that – all of us, all of us need to be part of that effort if we are to succeed.”

2012

Hampton Roads

The United States is beginning to emerge from a decade of war that has seen more than 460,000 Guard personnel deploy to Afghanistan, Iraq and other overseas operations, Panetta said. “Our National Guard today is far more capable, far more experienced and battlehardened than at any point in our nation’s history,” he said. “The Guard remains not just an important part of our fighting force, but they are our first responders when disasters strike here at home.” More than 7,000 Guard members were assisting civil authorities Friday in the aftermath of Hurricane Isaac, he noted. “The Guard has always been there for the nation,” Dempsey said, noting the Air National Guard’s role routinely protecting the nation’s air sovereignty from Soviet intrusions during the Cold War – missions that McKinley participated in. “Today, the Guard is still on the front lines, both at home and abroad,” Dempsey said. The Minuteman, ready to set down the plow and pick up the musket at a moment’s notice, is the Guard’s symbol. “Guardsmen and women breathe life into that emblem every day,” Dempsey said, adding a tribute to McKinley: “Craig’s been their greatest advocate.”

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

SEPTEMBER 14, 2012

Photo by Capt. Raymond Geoffroy

Airmen with the 455th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron prepare to roll out to an entry control point at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Aug. 18.

'HSOR\HG VHUYLFH PHPEHUV DUH GHIHQGHUV RQ WKH OLQH By Tech. Sgt. Shawn McCowan 455TH AIR EXPEDITIONARY WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

The population of Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, represents a melting pot of the ongoing international effort to support stability in Afghanistan. Service members from America’s four major military branches, military members from several NATO member nations, civilians and Afghans, all work together toward the common goal of ensuring the nation remains free and secure. The thousands of men and women from around the world who call BAF their temporary home depend on an effective security force to keep them safe. It might be easy to imagine such a major responsibility belonging to an elite special operations unit. In actuality, Bagram’s safety rests in the capable arms of U.S. Air Force security forces teams deployed from active-duty, Reserve and Air National Guard units from all over the world. While the mission may be challenging and complex, both leadership and security forces individuals agree that the current team is ready for the trials their job may bring. Lt.Col. Thomas Sherman, 455th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron commander and Bagram Defense Force commander, said the plan for this blended band of “Defenders” has been in the works for

years, but is being expertly executed today. “This operation is a great actualization of the ideals that began with Operation Safeside in Vietnam in the 1960s,” said Sherman. “Enemy forces can not touch us in the air. We have an incredible amount of air superiority. Our adversaries realized they need to get those birds while they were in the nest. Having Air Force defenders responsible for that is the best way we can accomplish that mission. “We have Air Force defenders working in an integrated base concept both from the source to the perimeter and throughout the Bagram security zone. Air Force defenders ensure Bagram Airfield is protected.” He credits their effectiveness to the professionalism of the diverse team of defenders who work for him, from personnel management to the newest patrol member. “We have got an incredible mix of everything from America’s sons and daughters, coalition and allied forces and even contractors. We have new Airmen and experienced personnel, combat veterans to firsttimers, and the great integration of the (Air National) Guard, Reserve, and active duty components. The way we structured this is absolutely seamless. As our defenders arrive on the ground, we’re compartmentalizing them into mission sets.” SEE DEFENDERS PAGE 23


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DEFENDERS FROM PAGE 22 Looking back at his years leading security forces both deployed and stateside, Sherman believes his current team at Bagram is the best he’s known. “I’ve had the pleasure in my career to work with the (Air National) Guard, Reserve, and active duty through a variety of mission sets. I have to admit, this has probably been the best integration I’ve seen in 17 years of doing this job.” Integration as seamless as this may reflect great planning and great management, but Sherman says it starts with positive and dedicated individuals, all willing to step into harm’s way in one of the most dangerous places on earth. Airman 1st Class Kory Caldwell, who lives in Dayton, Ohio and is deployed from the Ohio Air National Guard’s 179th Airlift Wing, spends his days standing guard at one of Bagram’s many entry control points. He did not hesitate to echo the positive attitude Sherman refers to. “I love this (job),” said Caldwell. “Since I first joined, I always wanted to deploy. This has definitely been an experience of a lifetime. As a little kid, I saw camo and guns and I just thought it was cool. Then as I get older, I knew I wanted to

Photos by Capt. Raymond Geoffroy

Staff Sgt. James Neace and Senior Airman Vincente Carter scan for activity along the base perimeter at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Aug. 17. Neace and Carter are advanced designated marksmen deployed to the 455th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron.The ADM team’s specialized equipment and skilled marksmanship enable Bagram defenders to identify and, if needed, defeat threats the base from long distances.

do something for my country. Now I can see it means more than that. If we weren’t here people back home couldn’t do what they do. My favorite part of the job is camaraderie and meeting new people from different places.” He was also quick to point out that indi-

viduals from varied backgrounds at units all over the U.S. truly work together seamlessly. “I feel very integrated here.” said Caldwell. You sometimes hear stories about active duty, guard and reserve ... but it actually works very well here. Everyone meshes together very well, side by side,

and it works for everyone.” Another (overwatch) responsibility performed by the blended base security team is that of the advanced designated marksman. Staff Sgt. James Neace, from Moody Air Force Base, is one of those (ADM) Airmen, who specializes in keeping a watchful eye on potential threats from afar. He takes his duty to protect those he cares about seriously. “I grew up with playing with guns, hunting; things like that,” said Neace.”This is one of those career fields that allowed me to keep doing the things I love to do. Now we come here and represent our country, while both keeping this (threat) away from home and helping your brothers and sisters. It’s like a family out here.” Some of the local populace works on Bagram during the day, which is why Senior Airman Ryan Rucker, a Reservist deployed from the 514th Security Forces Squadron at Joint Base McGuire-DixLakehurst, monitors one of Bagram’s special security measures; an array of X-Ray scanners used to protect Bagram. Rucker and his active duty co-workers make sure any type of contraband, weapons, or any unauthorized items are discovered before workers enter the base.

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

SEPTEMBER 14, 2012

&KRSSHU GRZQ (XVWLV ¿UVW UHVSRQGHUV SDUWLFLSDWH LQ 0$5( By Senior Airman Jason J. Brown 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

A military helicopter goes down on an active airfield, spewing flaming fuel and smoke and trapping flight crew inside. Every second counts, as lives hang in the balance. Fortunately, this scenario is fictional. Nevertheless, the first responders at Fort Eustis – including firefighters from the 733rd Civil Engineer Division, as well as Service members from the 1st Fighter Wing at Langley Air Force Base reacted and responded as

if it were truly happening, testing their knowledge and proficiency during a major accident response exercise, or MARE, at Felker Army Airfield Sept. 12. The MARE was the first rotary-wing crash exercise performed by the 633rd Air Base Wing at Fort Eustis since becoming a joint base in 2010. Approximately 50 personnel, including emergency responders, command and control representatives, and U.S. Navy safety personnel participated.

The scenario began with an U.S. Navy H-60 helicopter crashing at the slope area at Felker with four crew members on board. From there, firefighters and security forces reacted to perform fire suppression, rescue and recovery, and crash site security. The Emergency Operations Center activated, providing the C2 communication element to manage the operation and keep information flowing. “It tested our ability to respond and recover with command and control

nodes, first response nodes, and with the cooperation of other emergency responders,” said Mark Atlow, the 633rd ABW emergency management exercise coordinator. “In this kind of situation, we all need to work together and fire on all cylinders.” SEE MARE PAGE 25

A Firefighter with the 733rd Civil Engineer Division fire department locates and checks on a victim that had been thrown from a simulated-downed U.S. NAVY UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter during its landing as part of a major accident response exercise at Fort Eustis, Sept. 12. Approximately 50 personnel, including emergency responders, command and control representatives, and U.S. Navy safety personnel participated in the MARE. Photo by Staff Sgt. Wesley Farnsworth

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A Firefighter with the 733rd Civil Engineer Division fire department pulls U.S. Army Sergeant 1st Class Robert Browder, crash victim, to safety from a simulated-downed U.S. NAVY UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter. A firefighter with the 733rd Civil Engineer Division fire department, checks on a simulated crash victim, after pulling him to safety during a downed helicopter major accident response exercise.The exercise was held to ensure all first responders are ready should the event happen for real.

Photos by Staff Sgt. Wesley Farnsworth

Firefighters with the 733rd Civil Engineer Division fire department load a crash victim onto a stretcher for transport to waiting medical personnel during a major accident response exercise at Fort Eustis, Sept. 12. The MARE was the first rotary-wing crash exercise performed by the 633rd Air Base Wing at Fort Eustis since becoming a joint base in 2010.

MARE FROM PAGE 24 Danger was not limited to the site of the crash. Responders exercised risk mitigation tactics and observed possible threats to the surrounding environment. In this scenario, fire department and airfield management personnel reacted to a plume of toxic smoke rising from the crash site and traveling toward the nearby Pines Golf Course. According to Jim Langley, the fire department’s assistant chief, responders had to understand how wind direction and speed would influence the path of the smoke, know who to alert and when to evacuate the surrounding area in case of a threat. Additionally, keeping track of contami-

“We like seeing what we did well, but most importantly, we exercise to see what processes are broken and how we can fix it. We find risks we may have and mitigate them as much as possible.That way, if something happens for real, we’re not stuck wondering ‘how do we do this?” — Mark Atlow 633rd ABW emergency management exercise coordinator

nants, such as leaking fuel and oil, enabled crash recovery technicians to prevent these elements from reaching the nearby environment, which is ripe with wetlands and waterways. Atlow said the exercise is built around a

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“We have overall objectives that we want to see met. We’ll look at each individual objective, as well as each unit’s secondary and tertiary objectives underneath,” Atlow explained. “From there we complete an after-action report to see how we met or did not meet our objectives, with recommendations for improvements.” While the exercise is a part of routine EM requirements and training, Atlow said it is more than just “checking boxes.” “We like seeing what we did well, but most importantly, we exercise to see what processes are broken and how we can fix it. We find risks we may have and mitigate them as much as possible,” he said. “That way, if something happens for real, we’re not stuck wondering ‘how do we do this?’”

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

EustisCommunity Boys and Girls Club Day Boys and Girls Club Day for Kids will take place on Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m. at Youth Services, Bldg. 1102, Pershing Ave. This event will feature inflatable rides, games, crafts, face painting, food, beverages, door raffles and more. Open to all DoD ID cardholders. For more information, call 878-4448.

Movies Under the Stars Come out and join us for a free showing of “Puss in Boots” at the Movies Under the Stars series Wednesday at 8:15 p.m. on Murphy Field. Bring your lawn chairs, blankets, friends and family. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. Movie title is subject to change. For more information, call 878-2716.

Marriage enrichment program The Regimental Memorial Chapel is hosting a Marriage Enrichment program from 6 to 8 p.m. each Thursday through Oct. 25 at the chapel, Bldg. 923, Lee Blvd. This program is open to all married and engaged couples, and spouses of service members who are deployed or training elsewhere. Free child watch-care will be provided for children up to age 11 years old. For more information, contact Mike and Carole Carkhuff at 218-1034 or email carkhuffs2@verizon.net.

JBLE Job Fair The Army Career and Alumni Program, Army Community Services and the Virginia Employment Commission will host the Joint Base Langley-Eustis Job Fair onThursday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Fort Eustis Club, Bldg. 2123 Pershing Ave. More than 45 employers are expected to attend. This event is open to the public, but no children please. Non-DoD ID cardholders must use the Fort Eustis main gate to secure a pass. Valid vehicle registration, proof of insurance and a photo ID are required. For more information, call 878-0906.

Family Advocacy Program ■ Anger Management – Tuesdays, 1 to 2:30 p.m. (ongoing), Bldg. 213 Calhoun Street. Do you find yourself fuming when someone cuts you off in traffic? Does your blood pressure go through the roof when your child refuses to cooperate? Anger is a normal and even healthy emotion but it’s important to deal with it in a positive way. Classes are open to all DoD ID cardholders. Call 878-0807 to register.

SEPTEMBER 14, 2012

Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com ■ Play Morning – Wednesdays, 9:30 to 11 a.m., Youth Services Gym, Bldg. 1102, Pershing Avenue. This playgroup features fun and socialization for parents, caregivers, and children up to school age. For more information, call 878-0807. ■ Family Advocacy Safety Education Seminar –Thursday, 9 to 11 a.m., Bldg. 213, Calhoun Street. FASES is a 90-minute seminar that describes the dynamics of domestic violence and child abuse, who is at risk, and what resources are available. The class is open to anyone on post who is interested in learning more about these topics. No children please.To register, call 878-0807. ■ Couples Communication – Sept. 24, 10 to 11 a.m., Bldg. 213, Calhoun St. To register, call 878-0807.

Lost and found items Have you lost anything on Fort Eustis? The 733rd Security Forces Squadron has cell phones, wallets, keys, tools and other items that have been lost and found on Fort Eustis. For more information, please contact Sgt. Chris Bowen at 878-5515. Property can be picked up at Bldg. 648, Washington Ave.

Balfour Beatty communities ■ Car BuyingTips – BBC will host a Car Buying Tips seminar Tuesday from 4:40 to 5:30 p.m. at the Community Center. This is an RSVP-only event that will include a raffle and light refreshments. To RSVP, call 328-0691. ■ TerraCycle Donation Bash – Join BBC staff for the TerraCycle Donation Bash on Sept. 21 from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the Community Center. Don’t forget your donations of used oral care, personal beauty product packages, and used paired shoes. Come out and listen to the DJ and enjoy the Splash Park. There will be snacks, crafts and prizes for the largest donation. ■ Family Bingo Night – Residents can enjoy an evening of pizza and bingo with family and friends Sept. 26 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the Community Center. Due to limited space, please call 328-0691 to make your reservations by Sept. 24. The activities listed above are for BBC residents only. The Community Center is located at Bldg. 126, Madison Ave. For more information, call 328-0691.

Retiree Health Extravaganza The Retiree Health Extravaganza will be held Sept. 29 from 9 a.m. to noon at McDonald Army Health Center, Bldg. 576, Jef-

ferson Ave. Health topics will include immunizations, orthopedic injury prevention, breast and cervical health, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, asthma, healthy eating, medication safety and more. For more information, call Army Public Health Nursing at 314-8037.

Jacobs Theater Schedule

Disney on Ice tickets The Fort Eustis Ticket and Travel Office has tickets available for Disney on Ice scheduled for Sept. 27-30 at the Hampton Coliseum. Tickets are $16 for select performances. The office is located at Bldg. 671, Lee Blvd. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (MondayFriday); and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. (Saturday). For more information, call 878-3694.

Gold Star Mother’s Day Tribute Survivor Outreach Services is hosting a Gold Star Mother’s Day Tribute on Sept. 30 at 11 a.m. at the Regimental Memorial Chapel, Bldg. 923, Lee Blvd. Light refreshments will be served. For more information, call 878-3887 or 878-3963.

MCAHC Public Flu Fair McDonald Army Health Center will host a Public Flu Fair in October at Jacobs Theater for all eligible military beneficiaries. The vaccination schedule is: Oct. 3, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Oct. 11, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; and Oct. 25, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. For more information, contact Sgt. 1st Class Jeffery Bowers at 314-7526.

Range schedule Ranges, training areas and associated facilities are off limits to personnel not engaged in scheduled firing, operations or inspections unless clearance is obtained from the Range Control Fire Desk or a designated Range Control Technician. The Range Control office telephone number is 878-4412, ext. 226 or 878-3834, ext 234. The range operations schedule through Wednesday is: ■ Today – Ranges RD, 5 (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.); ■ Saturday – Range 2 (8 a.m. to 4 p.m.); ■ Sunday – No scheduled ranges; ■ Monday – Ranges RD, 1, 2, 3 (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.); ■ Tuesday – Ranges RD, 2, 3 (7 a.m. to 10 p.m.); ■ Wednesday – Ranges RD, 1, 2, 3 (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.). All personnel are required to check in and out with Range Control before going into or departing from any range or training area.

Friday, 7 p.m. NO SHOW Saturday, 4 p.m. Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG) Scrat’s nutty pursuit of the cursed acorn, which he’s been after since the dawn of time, has world-changing consequences – a continental cataclysm that triggers the greatest adventure of all for Manny, Diego and Sid. In the wake of these upheavals, Sid reunites with his cantankerous Granny, and the herd encounters a ragtag menagerie of seafaring pirates determined to stop them from returning home. Saturday, 7 p.m. The Bourne Legacy (PG-13) The fourth installment of the highly successful Bourne series, which sidelines main character Jason Bourne in order to focus on a fellow estranged assassin (Jeremy Renner). Edward Norton and Rachel Weisz co-star, with Joan Allen and Albert Finney reprising their roles from the previous films. Sunday, 2 p.m. NO SHOW Movie synopsis and show time information is available online at www. shopmyexchange.com/ReelTimeTheaters/Movies-Eustis.htm.


LAFBCommunity Earn a CCAF Degree The Air Force Culture and Language Center is taking applications for a new session of its crosscultural competence course.“IntroductionTo Culture” is an online, self-paced course which fulfills three residency hours of either Social Science or Program Elective credit required for the Community College of the Air Force degree programs. Enrollment for the Academic Year 2013 Fall ITC session is from Sept. 6 to Oct. 3 and seating will be limited to 1,000 students. For specifics on registration, enrollment window dates, enrollment instructions, and a frequently asked questions file, visit http://culture. af.mil/courses/. For more information, e-mail 633fss.fsde.e0@langley.af.mil.

Youth Bowling League The Langley Air Force Base Youth Bowling League is now accepting registration for participants ages 5 through 19 for the upcoming season scheduled to start Sept. 15. A sign-up sheet is available at the Langley Lanes. For more information contact Langley Lanes at (757) 764-2433 or contact coach Joe Sirois at (757) 846-8479 or joe.sirois@langley.af.mil

48th Squadron Reunion The 48th Squadron Associate is hosting a reunion for Airmen who served with the 48th Aero Squadron, 48th School Squadron, 48th Pursuit Squadron, 48th Fighter Squadron, 48th Fighter Interceptor Squadron or 48th Flying Training Squadron, Sept. 19-23. Registration begins Sept. 19, 4 p.m. at the Point Plaza Suites at City Center, Newport News. For more information, contact Bob Maurice at BigBob880@aol.com, or visit http://48thsquad ronassociation.com/.

JBLE Job Fair The Army Career and Alumni Program, Army Community Readiness Program and the Virginia Employment Commission are sponsoring the Joint Base Langley-Eustis Job Fair from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Sept. 20, at the Fort Eustis Club. Over 40 employers will be participating. For more information, call (757) 878-0906.

Adult Membership Appreciation The Langley Club will feature comedian Derrick Tennant for Adult Membership Appreciation Night at the Langley Club, Sept. 27 from 7 to 9 p.m.

AGF Club Championship The A.G.F. Club is hosting a championship for all AGF members in good standing Sept. 29-30 at the Eaglewood Golf Course. There is a $25 entrance fee, and sign up ends Sept. 26.

Submit LAFB Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com For more information, contact the Eaglewood Golf Course at (757) 764-4547.

Memorial Golf Tournament The Langley Air Force Base Chiefs Group is hosting the Chief Master Sgt. Denise E. Mikolajezyk Memorial Golf Tournament, Oct. 5, beginning 1 p.m. at the Eaglewood Golf Course. The cost to register is $50 per golfer, with all proceeds directly supporting Joint Base Langley-Eustis Force Support programs. Additionally, registration includes green fees and a golf cart, beverage cart service, hot dog and soda before play and smoked pork barbecue for 19th hole awards. Teams of four players should be registered with Chief Master Sgt. Paul Hughes at (757) 764-1178, or Staff Sgt. Ryan Lee at (757) 7647751. A collared shirt, mock turtleneck, soft spikes or sneakers are required to play. No outside food or beverages are permitted. For more information, visit www.facebook. com/pages/Langley-Chiefs-Group-Annual-CMSgt-Mik-Golf-Tournament/200117933394076.

Star & Stripes Car Show The Maintenance Professional of the Year Committee is hosting the Stars & Stripes Car Show, Oct. 13 at the Langley Speedway. Register from 8 to 10:30 p.m. There will be 30 categories featuring Corvettes, Mustangs, Jeeps and more. Participation is $20 for pre-registration and $25 on the event day. For more information, e-mail starsandstripescarshow@yahoo.com.

MCAHC Public Flu Fair The McDonald Army Health Center is hosting a public flu fair in October for all eligible military beneficiaries. This event will be held at Jacobs Theater, Fort Eustis. Flu vaccinations will be administered on the following dates: Oct. 3 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Oct. 11 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and Oct. 25 from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. For more information, call Sgt. 1st Class Jeffery Bowers at 757-314-7526.

Discounted tuition available Hampton University College of Continuing Education is offering discount tuition and no application fees for military and their dependents. Registration for the Fall I Session is until Oct. 5, and Fall II Session is between Oct. 15 and Dec. 14, for on-base, distant-learning and online courses. All courses are transferrable to the Community College of the Air Force degree. For more information, speak with a Hampton University representative in Room 120 at the Langley Education Center, or call (757) 7661369 or (757) 727-5773.

Marriage Enrichment Program The Regimental Memorial Chapel is hosting a marriage-enrichment programThursdays from Sep. 13 to Oct. 25, 6 to 8 p.m. The program is opened to married and pre-married couples. For more information, call Mike and Carole Carkhuff at 757-218-1034.

POW-MIA run, walk and vigil The 2012 JBLE POW-MIA run, walk and vigil is scheduled to begin Sept. 20 at 10 a.m. and end Sept. 21 at 10 a.m. The continuous event kicks off at the Shellbank Fitness Center, then travels with the POW-MIA flag along the JBLE perimeter before ending at the POW-MIA Memorial, on base. Conservative attire is encouraged for all participants. The designated time for walkers to carry the POW-MIA flag is from 6 to 8 p.m. Both individuals and squadrons are welcome to run, walk and volunteer. To register, visit https://einvitations.afit.edu/ inv/anim.cfm?i=123449&k=0363410D7F5E

Retiree Health Extravaganza A retiree health extravaganza will be held at the McDonald Army Health Center, Sept. 29, from 9 a.m. to noon. The event will address healthcare needs and will highlight the worldclass services McDonald can provide. For more information call (757) 878-7500.

Mary Matthews Scholarship The Langley Chiefs Group manages the Mary Matthews Scholarship Fund. Four $300 scholarships will be presented to Airmen (E1-E8) this fall. Any LCG member will provide applications. Applications must be received or postmarked by Oct. 15. Scholarships will be presented at the Chiefs Group meeting Nov. 8. For more information, contact CMSgt John Sanders at john.sanders@langley.af.mil or call 764-0686.

Military scholarships The Council of College and Military Educators is offering 15 $1000 scholarships to all service members, veterans and their spouses who are working towards the completion of higher education degrees. The scholarships are divided between Service members (including National Guard and Reserve) military spouses and military veterans. Eligibility requirements, instructions and applications are available at www.ccmeonline.org/scholarships. The application will be available through Oct. 1. Finalists will be required to provide documentation of service. For more information, contact Senior Master Sgt. David W. Umlang, Council of College and Military Educators, Armed Services Liaison, at david.unlang@us.af.mil.

Langley Theater Schedule Friday, 7 p.m. NO SHOW Saturday, 2 p.m. Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG) Scrat’s nutty pursuit of the cursed acorn, which he’s been after since the dawn of time, has worldchanging consequences – a continental cataclysm that triggers the greatest adventure of all for Manny, Diego and Sid. In the wake of these upheavals, Sid reunites with his cantankerous Granny, and the herd encounters a ragtag menagerie of seafaring pirates determined to stop them from returning home. Saturday, 4:15 p.m. Studio Appreciation Advance Screening Free Admission (R) Saturday, 7 p.m. The Bourne Legacy (PG-13) The Bourne Legacy expands the Bourne universe created by Robert Ludlum with an original story that introduces us to a new hero whose life-ordeath statkes have been triggered by the events of the first three films. Stars Jeremy Renner, Edward Norton and Rachel Weisz, Joan Allen and Albert Finney. Sunday, 2 p.m. NO SHOW Movie synopsis and show time information is available online at www. shopmyexchange.com/ ReelTimeTheaters/Movies-Langley.htm.


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

OutsideTheGate

Christopher Newport University is hosting a Symphony Under the Stars concert featuring the Virginia Symphony Orchestra today at 7:30 p.m. on the Great Lawn (near the intersection of Warwick Boulevard and Avenue of the Arts in Newport News). The concert is free and open to the public. Bring your family, friends, blankets and coolers and enjoy light classics, pop favorites and more. For more information, visit www.virginiasymphony.org.

Opera in the Park concert The fourth annual Opera in the Park concert will take place Saturday from 6 to 9:30 p.m. at Town Point Park in downtown Norfolk. Entertainment will be provided by the Virginia Opera and Virginia Symphony Orchestra. The concert is free and open to the public. Attendees are invited to arrive early as the park opens to reserve a spot on the lawn. Coolers, food and nonalcoholic beverages are permitted (no alcohol or glass). Food and beverages will also be available for purchase. For more information, visit www.festevents.org.

The Old Dominion University Student Veterans Association is sponsoring a free Legal Clinic to assist military veterans on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the ODU Virginia Beach Higher Education Center, 1881 University Drive. Separate presentations will focus on three areas of law: Department of Veterans Affairs disability compensation claims; the basics of starting a small business; and wills, trusts and estate planning. The clinic will also include free individual legal consultations. Please bring your DD Form 214, recent rating decisions and any other documentation that will help in evaluating your situation. Breakfast and lunch will be served; snacks will be available throughout the day. For more information, visit http://vavetslegalclinic.wordpress.com. To register, email Sarah Schauerte at scs@legalmeetspractical.com.

Fall plant sale in Hampton The Hampton Master Gardeners Fall Plant Sale is scheduled for Saturday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Bluebird Gap Farm, 60 Pine Chapel Rd., Hampton. Admission is free (rain date will be Sunday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.). For more information, call the Hampton Cooperative Extension Office at 727-1401.

Rare Packard Car Show The 47th Packard Club National Meet

SEPTEMBER 14, 2012

Submit Outside The Gate announcements to pw1@militarynews.com

Symphony Under the Stars

Free legal clinic for veterans

will take place Monday through Sept. 21 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, 6945 Pocahontas Trail, Williamsburg. As part of the meet, a Rare Packard Car Show will be held at the Lee Hall Mansion on Thursday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the front lawn. The show is free and open to the public. More than 130 classic Packard cars are expected to participate in this special event. Lee Hall Mansion, an antebellum home owned and operated by the City of Newport News, is located at 163 Yorktown Rd., Newport News. For show details, email Bob Robb at packrobb@verizon.net. For more information about the Lee Hall Mansion, visit www.leehall.org.

■ Fall Heirloom Plant Sale –The annual Fall Heirloom Plant Sale will be held Sept. 21 and 28 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fall planting allows roots to establish and strengthen before winter dormancy and also helps to create a frame of your garden design. The sale will feature heirlooms, annuals, perennials, shrubs and native and wetlands plants that grow well in the Tidewater area. Museum members will receive a 10 percent discount. For more information, contact Yolima Carr at 423-2052, ext. 202 or email ycarr@ thehermitagemuseum.org. The museum is located at 7637 North Shore Rd., Norfolk. Forty-five minute guided tours are offered, on the hour, of 15 galleries filled with art, furniture and more. The Visual Arts Studio houses classrooms, a complete ceramics studio, and darkroom photography facilities. Admission is free for museum members, children under 6 and active-duty military. Regular admission is $5 (adults); $2 (ages 6-18); and $3 (students). Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily; 1 to 5 p.m. Sundays; and closed Wednesdays andThursdays. For more information about Hermitage Museum and Gardens, call 423-2052, ext.

208 or visit www.thehermitagemuseum.org.

Hampton Library used book sale The Friends of the Hampton Public Library will host a Used Book Sale on Sept. 21-23 at the main library, 4207 Victoria Blvd., Hampton. The preview sale for members will take placeThursday from 7 to 9 p.m. Children’s books will cost 25 cents; paperbacks, 50 cents to $1; and hard back books, $1. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Sept. 21-22); and 1 to 4 p.m. (Sept. 23). Attendees will be able to join at the event. For more information, call 727-1154.

Free admission to Virginia Zoo Come out and join the USO for Military Appreciation Day at the Virginia Zoo on Oct. 14 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission will be free for active-duty and retired military, DoD civilians, Reserves/National Guard, and eligible family members. This event will feature children’s games, inflatable rides, face painting, clowns and military static displays. The Virginia Zoo is located at 3500 Granby St., Norfolk. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. For more information about the USO event, visit www.usohrcv.com.

Hermitage Museum and Gardens ■ Sunsets on the River – The Hermitage Museum and Gardens’ Sunsets on the River continues this fall with concerts on the Hermitage back lawn. All concerts will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. Admission is $7 for the general public and free for museum members and children ages 12 and under. Guests are invited to bring blankets, lawn chairs, and a picnic dinner. Nonmembers who join the museum at each concert will receive a discounted membership, free admission to the concert, and beverage tickets. The concert schedule is: Thursday, Big Red Tree; Sept. 27, The Bartones; and Oct. 4, Esoteric Ramblers.

Courtesy photo

Mid-Autumn Moon Festival The seventh annual Mid-Autumn Moon Festival will be held Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. at Town Point Park in downtown Norfolk. This event will feature food, storytelling, authentic Asian ceremonial fashion shows, ribbon and dragon dancing, martial arts demonstrations, family activities, musical and dance performances, and a children’s lantern parade. The festival is free and open to the public. For more information about the festival, visit www.festevents.org.


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Col. Korvin Auch, 633rd Air BaseWing commander, inhales as he receives his flu immunization, Sept. 7, in the 633rd ABW headquarters building at Langley Air Force Base. Immunizations are available at the USAF Hospital Langley Immunization Clinic on Sept. 17 through 21 for all beneficiaries. For more information, contact the Immunization Clinic at (757) 764-6985. Photo by Airman 1st Class R. Alex Durbin

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

SEPTEMBER 14, 2012

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The Army’s Master Fitness Training Course, discontinued in 2001, will soon be back. The pilot course for the new Master Fitness Training Course, or MFTC, which began Aug. 27, is underway at Fort Jackson, S.C., and the class of about 30 Soldiers will graduate Sept. 21. The MFTC rebirth was announced at the same time U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, known as TRADOC, decided to retain the three-event Army Physical Fitness Test. TRADOC also emphasized that Training Circular 3-22.20, published August 2010 to prepare troops for combatspecific tasks, will remain the physical readiness training program for the Army. “The objective of the MFTC is to target [mid-level] NCOs (noncommissioned officers) and junior officers and teach them the fundamentals of exercise and nutrition science, using TC 3-22.20, Physical Readiness Training, as the foundation,” said Capt. Donald Maye, operations officer, Physical Readiness Division, Fort Jackson. “When they return to their units, they will have the skills and expertise to tailor a comprehensive physical readiness training plan for their unit.” Upon graduation, the master fitness trainers will return to their units to provide fitness mentoring, in consultation with their commanders, according to Maye. Maye explained how fitness programs should be customized for each commander’s mission requirements. He said the MFTC instruction – taught by subjectmatter experts with backgrounds in exercise science and physical therapy – “is broad and flexible enough to accommodate the specific requirements of the unit mission to which they are assigned. For example, a program for engineers who do a lot of heavy lifting might be different from one at a medical treatment facility.” In addition to consulting with their commanders, Maye said the eventual goal of the MFTs will be to collaborate regularly with medical personnel, physical therapists, nutrition experts and even those involved with Comprehensive Soldier Fitness and Family, or CSF2. “The goal of the program is not to train

Photo by David Vergun

The new Master Fitness Training Course will be based on exercises inTC 3-22.20, designed to prepare Soldiers for combat-specific tasks.

Soldiers to improve their physical fitness test scores,” he emphasized. “It is to train to doctrine (TC 3-22.20), which itself is based on exercise science principles.” He added that improved PT scores and injury rate reduction would be byproducts of a fitness plan based on the doctrinal principles found in TC 3-22.20. Although all Soldiers are expected to benefit from the MFT once they arrive at their units, the ones who will see the most improvement are those at the lowest levels of fitness. “Our goal is to provide leaders the tools to safely and effectively train Soldiers,” Maye said, adding that the program advances at a slow enough pace to prevent injuries from over training or from progressing too quickly to allow the body to recover and rebuild. He also said those with injuries will benefit from MFT-supervised fitness and reconditioning programs. Maye said the MFTC is progressing “exceptionally well” and the trainees are providing constructive feedback for further improvements in the course. Once they graduate, they will retain their primary military occupational specialty and will receive the Army skill identifier as MFT-certified. He said the goal is to eventually provide one MFT per company-level command. Also, TRADOC is working on changing the designation of TC 3-22.20 to Field Manual 7-22.


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Peninsula Warrior Sept. 14, 2012 Army Edition