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:DUULRU J O I N T May 31, 2013 Vol. 4, No. 21

B A S E

L A N G L E Y - E U S T I S

P u b l i s h e d i n t h e i n t e re s t o f p e r s o n n e l a t J o i n t B a s e L a n g l e y - E u s t i s

VETERINARY

Treatment Facilities on a four-legged mission — Page 6

WEATHER WARRIORS The first line of defense against nature’s wrath — Page 8

For more online content, check out JBLE.af.mil

Fort Eustis Memorial Day ceremony honors the nation’s fallen warriors

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ENGINEERING Langley Bioenvironmental offers protection through detection — Page 12

– Page 21

ARMY EDITION

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Honors&Recognition

480th ISR Wing manpower chief named Air Force’s best for 2012 By Airman Areca T. Wilson 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Ed Banaszek, 480th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing manpower and organization chief, was named the 2012 Air Force Installation Level Section Chief of the Year March 10. Winners are judged on leadership skills and job performance in their respective duty titles, self-improvement and base or community improvement. Though the award is a great achievement, the father of three and grandfather of one remains humble. Banaszek, who was also nominated for a team award along with his section, said he was honored to have even been nominated. “I was fortunate to win the award, but it’s really not about me,” said Banaszek. “To be nominated is an honor, but to win is a reflection of the strong work center that you have. No one can do it alone.” The Arkansas native got his start in the military when he joined the Air Force in 1980, graduating high school only three weeks before he enlisted. “Growing up, there weren’t a lot of opportunities,” said Banaszek. “It was four and a half miles of dirt road

‘til you hit black top. Growing up in that type of environment, you have limited opportunities.” Originally part of a communications squadron, Banaszek retrained into manpower in 1996, and retired as a master sergeant at Headquarters Air Combat Command after 20 years of service. He then entered a career in civil service after his time in uniform. As manpower and organization chief, Banaszek’s responsibilities include managing 5,800 positions, which include six groups, 23 squadrons and nine detachments and operating locations. “It’s a pleasure coming to work,” said Banaszek. “More here than other places, we get to see the fruits of our labor. Often you do a lot of staff work, and you don’t see the end product.” Banaszek’s positive attitude toward his work and those around him is mirrored in his coworkers. Banaszek’s contemporaries are happy that he is a part of their work family. “We were all very thrilled. It was definitely deserved,” said Debra Locke, 480th ISR Wing mission support chief. “Sometimes it’s a thankless job, moving billets around. Ed is a very meticulous. He has a knack for keeping up with almost 6,000 authorizations in our wing that are

Photo by Airman Areca T. Wilson

Ed Banaszek, 480th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing manpower and organization chief, was named the 2012 Air Force Installation Level Section Chief of the Year, March 10.

networked across the world. He really is involved in the units themselves and keeping up with billets.” Banaszek is proud to perform his job day to day, and is happy he can help play a part in protecting the lives of troops abroad. “We always joke to each other that we work at the speed of war, though we’re state side,” he said. “We’re in the fight 24-7-365. We are providing support to commanders out in the field to ensure they give the right information to troops on the ground. It’s ultimately about saving lives.”

75$'2& UHFRJQL]HV LWV  ,QVWUXFWRUV RI WKH <HDU By Frederick Poole U.S. ARMY TRAINING AND DOCTRINE COMMAND

Gen. Robert W. Cone, commanding general of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, congratulated the winners of the 2012 TRADOC Instructors of the Year during the 24th Annual TRADOC IOY Awards May 22 at the TRADOC Headquarters on Fort Eustis, Va. Instructors were judged on their tactical and technical knowledge, communication skills, appearance and military bearing. Their contributions to training, including literature development, research and article publication are also considered. “Congratulations to all of you,” Cone said. “To be recognized as the best really says a lot about you, your personal standards and your commitment to excellence. This is what it’s all about in the TRADOC school system – setting high standards and sharing your tremendous knowledge with students.” In honor of their achievements, each of the seven winners received an Instructor of the Year plaque

and TRADOC coin during the ceremony. Educator of the Year Lt. Col. Celestino Perez Jr., from the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., was thankful to receive such honors. “I’m happy for the college,” Perez said. “Each department is filled with very good instructors, and it is an honor to represent them.” Like Perez, Marine Staff Sgt. Erin Rios, TRADOC’s Noncommissioned Officer Instructor of the Year from the Maneuver Support Center of Excellence at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., also highlighted the talents of her fellow instructors, attributing her recognition to her passion for teaching. “I just like to teach,” Rios said. “I’ve seen instructors that are just as good, if not better than me. I know they can compete all the way up also; they just have to start with the instructor of the quarter.”According to Rios, she probably would not have competed if her team leader didn’t ask her to participate in the 2011 Motor Transport Instruction Company’s Instructor of the Quarter competition.

2012 TRADOC Instructors of the Year • Officer Instructor of the Year – Maj. Maria Lindsey, U.S. Army Financial Management School, Soldier Support Institute, Fort Jackson, S.C. • Warrant Officer Instructor of the Year – Chief Warrant Officer 3 Cecilia McCann, Army Logistics University, Technical Logistics College, Fort Lee, Va. • Noncommissioned Officer Instructor of the Year – Staff Sgt. Erin Rios, Maneuver Support Center of Excellence, Non-Proponent Group, Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. • Civilian Instructor of the Year – David Barton, Army Logistics University, Staff and Faculty Development Office, Fort Lee, Va. • National Guard Instructor of the Year – Staff Sgt. Nicholas Ash, Army Mountain Warfare School, Jericho, Vt. • U.S. Army Reserve Instructor of the Year – Michael Gibson, Army Reserve Readiness Training Center, Fort Knox, Ky. • Educator of the Year – Lt. Col. Celestino Perez Jr., U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, Department of Joint, Interagency and Multinational Operations, Fort Leavenworth, Kan.


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MAY 31, 2013 The following awards and adornments were presented to retired U.S. Air Force Senior Master Sgt. JohnT. Millan: • Meritorious Service Medal • Air Force Commendation Medal • Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with two bronze oak leaf clusters • Air Force Good Conduct Medal with three bronze oak leaf Courtesy photo clusters At the age of 17, retired Se• Good Conduct Medal nior Master Sgt. John T. Milwith four bronze loops lan enlisted in 1947 following • World War II Victory the formation of theAir Force. Medal • Army of Occupation Medal with Japan Clasp • National Defense Service Medal with one bronze service star • Korean Service Medal with one silver service star • Vietnam Service Medal with four bronze service stars • Air Force Longevity Service Award with one silver & one bronze oak leaf cluster • Noncommissioned Officer Professional Military Education Ribbon • Small Arms Expert Marksmanship Ribbon • Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm • United Nations Service Medal • Vietnam Campaign Medal • Korean War Service Medal

Dedicated to the deserving: Veteran recognized for his service By By Airman 1st Class Victoria H. Taylor

Retired U.S. Air Force Senior Master Sgt. JohnT. Millan’s family poses with five of Millan’s 17 decorations at Hampton Veterans Affairs Hospital, Hampton, March 15. Millan was awarded overdue medals for his military service in the Korean and VietnamWars.

633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

As the officials at the Air Force Personnel Center thoroughly reviewed retired U.S. Air Force Senior Master Sgt. John T. Millan’s request for a replacement set of awards and decorations, it was apparent something was missing. In addition to the replacement ribbons he requested, AFPC officials noticed Millan was due more awards and decorations based on his service record. On March 15, the culmination of these efforts led to a ceremony conducted by U.S. Sen. Mark Warner as he presented Millan’s family members with a new set of medals and decorations earned throughout his esteemed military service in the Korean and Vietnam Wars. Unfortunately Millan was unable to

Photo by Airman 1st Class Victoria H. Taylor

attend his own ceremony at the Veterans Memorial Hospital in Hampton, Va., due to his hospitalization earlier that morning after suffering a stroke. A total of 17 awards and adornments were presented on behalf of the Department of the Air Force.

Unfortunately, the day after the delivery of his well-deserved decorations, Millan passed away in the Hampton Veterans Affairs Medical Center at the age of 83. SEE DEDICATED PAGE 11

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9HWHULQDU\ 7UHDWPHQW )DFLOLWLHV RQ D IRXUOHJJHG PLVVLRQ By Senior Airman Teresa Aber 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

For many military members, not all of their family members stand on two feet. For some, four-legged, furry animals are extremely important members of their family, and taking care of them is a top priority. Luckily for those Service members, Veterinary Treatment Facilities at Langley Air Force Base and Fort Eustis, Va., provide comprehensive veterinary services to keep pets and military working dogs in tip-top shape. The VTFs are staffed by U.S. Army Veterinary Corps personnel with the primary mission of providing complete veterinary care for all government-owned animals. “We take care of just about everything for the MWDs,” said U.S. Army Maj. Gerri Fletcher, Public Health Command, Fort Eustis branch chief. “They come to us for everything from vaccines to removing items the MWDs may have ingested that they shouldn’t have.” For the MWDs, the veterinary clinic pro-

vides bi-annual check-ups, dental services, routine sick call, emergency care and deployment physicals. The personnel at the veterinary clinics also perform safety inspections at the MWD kennels, as well as the horse stables located on both installations. Inspections at the stables include ensuring all horses are current on required vaccines, especially during hurricane season. “Horses that are not up-to-date on their vaccines are not allowed to be relocated during hurricane evacuations,” Fletcher said. “It’s important that we make sure the animals living on the installations are living in safe environments and are current on their vaccines.” While the veterinary clinics’ priority is to provide care for government-owned animals, they also take pride in care for Service members’ privately-owned pets. “Our staff understands how important your pets are to you,” said Staff Sgt. Darlene Terminel, VTF noncommissioned officer in charge. SEE VETERINARY PAGE 11

For availability of services or to schedule an appointment, call the Langley Veterinary Clinic at 764-5678 or the Fort Eustis Veterinary Clinic at 878-5824

Photo by Airman Areca T. Wilson

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Michael Walters (left), 633rd Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler, holds Zsomi, an MWD, while U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Darlene Terminel, Public Health Command, District Fort Eustis, Veterinary Treatment Facility noncommissioned officer in charge, draws blood during a bi-annual physical at Langley Air Force Base, May 10. The veterinary clinic provides bi-annual check-ups, dental services, routine sick call, emergency care and deployment physicals for MWDs.

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MAY 31, 2013

FeatureStory

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7KH ¿UVW OLQH RI GHIHQVH DJDLQVW QDWXUH¶V ZUDWK By Senior Airman Jason J. Brown 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Weather affects everyone. From a flightline mechanic turning wrenches on fighter jets to a financial specialist crunching numbers at their desk; from Soldiers practicing land navigation in the woods to little leaguers swinging for the fences – all Airmen, Soldiers, civilians and family members are impacted by the weather in one way or another. As a result, knowing what the weather will do ahead of time is essential to keep the installation and its people safe. The Airmen of the 1st Operations Support Squadron weather flight accept this challenge, using cutting-edge technology and comprehensive meteorological training to keep Joint Base Langley-Eustis high and dry when the weather is at its worst. The weather flight’s staff of 20 Airmen provides meteorological forecasts for Langley Air Force Base and Fort Eustis to support each installation’s variety of missions, ranging from flying operations, land-based training, force support activities and emergency management and response.

Eyes in the sky At Langley, a majority of the flight’s mission is supporting the 1st Fighter Wing’s F-22 Raptor and T-38 Talon flying program. Without timely and accurate weather monitoring and forecasting, the jets can’t leave the ramp, which prevents fighter squadrons from maintaining proficiency and mission readiness. Similarly at Fort Eustis, forecasters provide up-to-the-minute information to fixed and rotary-wing aviators at Felker Army Airfield, home to several reserve, National Guard and experimental aviation units. Forecasters analyze data to give pilots complete weather situational awareness, including cloud ceiling, visibility, temperature, wind speed and direction, precipitation – all factors that affect where, when and how long pilots can fly. Before pilots even step to their fighters, forecasters brief

them face-to-face about what to expect. “We do our best to get those aircraft out to complete their mission as opposed to simply grounding them due to weather,” said Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Rich Corey, the 1st OSS weather flight superintendent. “We want to find what the weather is going to do, and be able to leverage that knowledge to get the mission accomplished so they can get their training completed.” “Good weather” and “bad weather” are often misnomers, as there is more than meets the eye in terms of what’s happening – and how it affects the flying mission. Forecasting capabilities allow the weather team to help mission planners maximize training time in the sky by selecting optimal areas and timeframes to fly. “Even on a ‘good’ weather day, we’re looking ahead to interrogate the next system to see what the weather is going to do then,” said Air Force Capt. Justin Puckett, 1st OSS weather flight commander. “If we can get airspace reserved that isn’t going to be impacted, that’s more opportunities for our pilots to fly their training missions in order to stay current and ready to go should a contingency operation break out, or even for their next deployment.”

Beyond the flightline While most of the weather flight’s operations center around each installation’s flying mission, their forecasts provide weather data to tenant units and support agencies to assist in mission and training plans. According to Puckett, the NASA Langley Research Center adjacent to Langley AFB uses the forecasters’ tidal projections to implement flood mitigation efforts on their campus. In addition, Corey said force support programs use weather outlooks to plan events and alert patrons to take shelter in the event of severe weather. For example, the 633rd Force Support Squadron Fitness Assessment Cell team checks with the weather flight daily for forecasts in order to plan physical training testing for Airmen, as pre-

Photo by Senior Airman Jason J. Brown

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgts. Adam Ybarra (left) and Daniel McGonigle, 1st Operations Support Squadron weather flight forecasters, use a TMQ-53 tactical meteorological observing system to gather weather data on the flightline at Langley Air Force Base, May 14.

cipitation, wind speed and temperature affect the availability of outdoor PT testing. Air Force Master Sgt. Nicky Brown, the flight’s Fort Eustis weather station chief, and his team of forecasters provide data to support the various missions at Fort Eustis. The 1st OSS weather flight’s forecasts help Service members from all branches of the military and local civil authorities safely train in the post’s training areas and ranges, as well provide marine forecasts for the 7th Sustainment Brigade’s maritime mission at 3rd Port. “Our forecasts are out there for anyone to use. There are many organizations we don’t have regular communication with that can still use our weather data to help plan their operations,” Corey explained. “It’s a huge spectrum compared to what most people assume we do.”

Tropic thunder Hampton Roads is no stranger to severe tropical weather. The area typically experiences effects from one to two tropical systems annually, and occasionally falls in the path of powerful storms, most recently in October 2012, when “Superstorm” Sandy tore through the region. Hurricanes Irene in 2011 and Isabel in 2003 resulted in millions of dollars in damage to the installation due to extreme winds and flooding. Monitoring tropical systems and tidal activity is a constant task because of Langley’s geographical position on a low-lying

peninsula amongst wetlands and waterways – especially during the Atlantic hurricane season. In the battle against tropical storms, the weather flight is the catalyst in the emergency management chain, providing crucial data for leadership to implement appropriate measures. Puckett said the weather flight is “the indicator,” keeping a close eye on potential storm systems every day. When models indicate the possibility of a storm system impacting the area, the forecasters track the system and prepare daily updates for wing leadership, even if a storm isn’t projected to make landfall. “Regardless whether or not [tropical storms] actually make landfall, we’ll at least see rain bands and high tides, being so low and close to sea level,” Puckett said. “When it rains, [runoff] doesn’t have anywhere to go a lot of the time because the water is right there.” Puckett said 5.2 feet is the flood threshold for Langley, which means any tidal activity above that mark will lead to flooding of low-lying areas on the installation. When tides are projected to rise above that level, the weather flight alerts 633rd Air Base Wing leadership as soon as possible to implement flood mitigation efforts, including sandbagging, vehicle storage and, in extreme cases, evacuation. SEE WEATHER PAGE 9


MAY 31, 2013

The meteorological mindset Puckett considers Air Force forecasters to be among the best trained weather professionals in the nation. Each Airman attends a comprehensive nine-month technical training course, where they routinely practice actual weather observation and forecasting. Weather Airmen do on-the-job training every day for two years at their first assignment, the captain explained, which provides the Air Force with an “undeniable reachback support that no other fighting force in the world has.” “Training was intense, but it genuinely prepared me to get to a base, jump in and start forecasting the weather,” said Staff Sgt. Adam Ybarra, a forecaster with the weather flight. Even with the newest technology and razor-sharp forecasters, predicting what the weather will do is “an imperfect science.” Sometimes, forecasters simply get it wrong. Puckett and Corey agree that missing the mark on weather forecasts is the hardest part of being an Air Force forecaster. “I know our forecasters out there pride themselves on being right all the time, so the days we are wrong hurt the most because we like to support this installation by giving them the 100 percent right information all the time, but that’s just not always the case,” Corey said. “The weather sometimes is truly unpredictable.” On the other hand, getting a forecast right is the most rewarding aspect of a career in weather. During Hurricane Sandy, Puckett and his team advised installation leadership that storm surge associated with the storm would be between five and seven feet, with six to eight inches of rainfall and maximum wind gusts to 50 knots. The forecasters hit the nail on the head. Tidal surge peaked at 6.92 feet, the base recorded 7.1 inches of rain and wind gusts topped out at 44 knots. Puckett said the satisfaction in correctly forecasting weather events comes not so much from being right, but more from ensuring the base’s people and assets are safe. “If everyone is safe and there’s no major damage that we could’ve avoided, that’s what we consider a success,” Puckett said. “We want to make sure first and foremost that our people are safe, and secondly that the installation is protected. We drive our support to Joint Base Langley-Eustis to keep everyone safe.”

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WEATHER FROM PAGE 8 When a tropical storm is projected to directly impact the installation, the flight deploys a ride-out team to remain on the base throughout the duration of the storm, providing around-the-clock updates to commanders. Puckett and three forecasters spent more than five days at their operations center through the duration of Hurricane Sandy. While protecting JBLE’s assets is a major priority for the forecasters, ensuring the base populace is safe remains paramount. “Taking care of our people is most important. It’s easy to get the jets out of here, but it’s not always easy to get people out of here,” said Corey. “Our weather forecasts and flood projections help security forces know what areas to evacuate and cordon off in the event of a storm surge or other severe weather event.”

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â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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MAY 31, 2013

6HF$) 6HTXHVWUDWLRQ KLWV $) UHDGLQHVV PRGHUQL]DWLRQ By Jim Garamone AMERICAN FORCES PRESS SERVICE

Sequestration has hit the Air Force particularly hard, impacting its force structure, readiness and modernization, senior Air Force leaders said during a brieďŹ ng at the Pentagon May 24. Air Force Secretary Michael B. Donley and Gen. Mark A. Welsh III, the chief of staff, said Congress must provide a solid budget number so the Air Force can ground its planning in reality. The Air Force understands it must do its part to work through the debt and deficit reduction problem, Welsh said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just want to get to the bottom line or the new top-line budget ... and get on with preparing our Air Force to remain the best in the world,â&#x20AC;? he said. Sequestration has hit the Air Force hard and the effects are felt throughout the full range of accounts from force structure to readiness to modernization, Donley said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Twelve combat-coded squadrons have stopped ďŹ&#x201A;ying, and important training has been canceled,â&#x20AC;? Donley said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weapon system sustainment reductions will delay maintenance, increase costs and create backlogs. The impending civilian furlough will hamper us further and will impact morale and reduce productivity across the Air Force.â&#x20AC;? Even before sequestration there was a

readiness crisis in the Air Force, the secretary said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The readiness hole that we have been trying to dig out of just got deeper, and we are facing a readiness crisis from which it will take many months to recover,â&#x20AC;? he said. And it is not just operations and readiness accounts that are at risk, said Donley, noting the Air Force needs modernization â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in aircraft, missiles, and capabilities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As advanced technologies proliferate around the globe, these cutbacks in modernization would put at risk the Air Force capabilities this nation will need in the decades ahead,â&#x20AC;? Donley said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Despite our near-term and long-term concerns, we are working to ensure that our most signiďŹ cant Air Force priorities remain on track, including the ďŹ fth-generation F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, the KC-46 tanker, and the long-range strike bomber.â&#x20AC;? Aircraft must support the warďŹ ghters, but budget cuts mean that airmen cannot train for full spectrum operations, Welsh said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still the best Air Force in the world,â&#x20AC;? Welsh said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And our great airmen will rely on experience and their unmatched dedication to succeed in any operation that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re asked to execute. But atrophied skills elevate risk, and stagnant proďŹ ciency will only grow over time if we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t restore some sense of budget normalcy. And so thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re hoping for.â&#x20AC;?

Unit deployment manager now two-year special duty position By Debbie Gildea AIR FORCE PERSONNEL CENTER PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Unit deployment manager is now a two-year-controlled special duty assignment (identiďŹ er 8U000); a change Air Force ofďŹ cials say will help professionalize the position and improve deployment program continuity. In past the UDM retained his or her Air Force specialty code, and even though UDMs were working outside of their specialty, the position counted against the number of people a unit could have in that rank and career ďŹ eld. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The result was a frequently unstable

situation,â&#x20AC;? said Chief Master Sgt. Michael Holmquist, the Air Force UDM and Logistics Plans career ďŹ eld manager. â&#x20AC;&#x153;UDMs could be â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and often were â&#x20AC;&#x201C; tasked for deployment themselves, which left the unit without a UDM. Commanders had to start the selection and training process again from scratch.â&#x20AC;? As in the past, the UDM will still come from unit resources, and members will rotate from their functional ďŹ&#x201A;ight/section to the UDM position. Once a UDM tour is complete, the Airman will be replaced by another member from the squadron. SEE MANAGER PAGE 15


DEDICATED FROM PAGE 4 “I believe the awards that meant most to him were those that were from the Korean War because he loved the people he deployed with,” said John Millan Jr. “He always told stories of them. He was a very selfless person and loved the people who he served with and [his] country. I believe I’ll miss that most about him.” As a thirty-year veteran of the Air Force and a fifteen-year retiree of the Naval Air Rework Facility in Norfolk, Va., Millan had many stories to share. Retired Senior Master Sgt. Millan enlisted in 1947 at the ripe age of 17, right after the Air Force was formed as a separate branch of military from the Army Air Corps. He began as a generator mechanic and soon after his enlistment was assigned

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to a multi-force combat Marine platoon in the Korean War. After the Korean War, Millan chose to continue active duty and stay in the Air Force, later to go to Vietnam where he continued his service to the country he loved so much. “Our nation owes so much to military men and women, our veterans and their families,” said Warner during the ceremony. “All of us respect Mr. Millan’s military service in Korea and Vietnam, as well as his involvement in support of other veterans throughout his lifetime.” Millan was able to watch from the hospital as his family members each were given one of the many awards presented by U.S. Sen. Warner on behalf of AFPC. He then later passed away, knowing he was given the recognition he deserved.

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VETERINARY FROM PAGE 6 “We want to make sure your pet gets the best possible care, while not breaking the bank in the process.” Langley’s VTF recently moved to a new location, allowing for more space to provide routine physicals, vaccines and dental care. In the near future, they will have X-ray capabilities and be able to perform some basic surgical procedures, such as spaying and neutering pets. Part of their mission is also the prevention and treatment of zoonotic diseases, such as rabies, that can be transmitted from animals to humans, or from humans to animals. “We want to make sure the animals and people are safe,” said Fletcher.

“We have to work together to make sure all animals are up to date on their vaccines.” While the VTFs offer many routine services for personally-owned animals, to ensure the highest level of care in an emergency case, animals needing extensive care are best served through a full-service civilian veterinary hospital due to the VTFs’ limited manpower and resources. With the highest quality veterinary care available, Joint-Base Langley-Eustis personnel can rest assured the four-legged members of their extended family are in the best of health, and military working dogs are in the best condition. to protect their military community.

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

MAY 31, 2013

MAY 31, 2013

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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Langley Bioenvvironmental Engineering offers protectio on through detection By Master Sgt. Pamela Arellano 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Photo by Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman RonellTennant, 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron emergency management technician, tightens his breathing apparatus during a training exercise at Langley Air Force Base, May 16.The training included personnel from the 633rd Medical Group’s bioenvironmental division and the 633rd CES’s fire and emergency services.

Photos by Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill

LEFT: U.S. Air Force Capt.Terry Klein, 633rd Medical Group bioenvironmental engineer, undergoes a thorough scrub-down. Team members were washed and scrubbed in a decontamination area to ensure contamination was contained. ABOVE: Terry Klein sits down for a routine medical check after removing his contaminated gear.To ensure the participants did not pass out from heat exhaustion in training or on the field, they receive vests with ice packs to keep them cool.

The hiss of a respirator pulsed rhythmically as alien-like figures, swathed in fluorescent yellow and blue plastic suits, waved chemical detection equipment over a row of jars and test tubes filled with a mysterious brown substance. This surreal scene was the culmination of a sequence of peculiar events. A security forces Airman reported seeing the strange substances and smelling something earthy, “like something that was outside, but it was coming from inside.” Investigators began to scribble notes, compare data and confer quietly. While this may seem the stuff of science fiction, it was simulated reality for Langley Air Force Base Bioenvironmental Engineering technicians during an Integrated Base Response Training exercise at Langley’s Raptor Town training facility May 17. The five-day exercise was a workshop that provided emergency base responders with an opportunity to employ homeland defense and expeditionary detection equipment in realistic scenarios. The goal of the workshop was to improve the overall incident response abilities of bioenvironmental engineering, fire and emergency services, and civil engineering emergency management personnel by encouraging realistic training and improving proficiency. Such scenarios are the bread and butter of bioenvironmental engineering, or ‘bio’ for short, who, as part of the 633rd Medical Group, execute the critical mission of protecting the personnel and assets of the 633rd Air Base Wing and its surrounding community from chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear contamination and illness. With the information they gather, bio provides operational health risk assessment expertise to support health services and aid the commander in decision making. As first responders, bio has the capability of keeping CBRN threats at bay. On a day to day basis, they monitor and recommend treatment for hazards like noise pollution and water contaminants. “We provide occupational and environmental health surveillance activities to over 90 industrial areas in three wings on the base through on-site visits and inspections,” said Maj. Greg Garrison, 633rd Medical Group bioenvironmental engineering flight command-

Photos by Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill

U.S. Air Force S Senior Airman Ronell Tennant, 633rd 6 Civil Engineer Squadron n emergency management tec chnician, suits up before going inside a contaminated buildin ng.

er. “Surveillancee includes ensuring the base pplicable laws and regulations complies with ap ational Safety and Health Adfrom the Occupa he Environmental Protection ministration, th Agency, the Nucclear Regulatory Commission, ment of Defense and Air Force and the Departm occupational safeety and health standards.” Protecting thee public is a critical mission. Lives can be at stake, and the technicians of bio take that misssion seriously. “When we go into an all-hazards situation, [the threat] is. We take in we don’t know what w collect samples and take our equipment and a nstruments,” said Senior Airreadings with in man Jessica Ketteering, bioenvironmental engian. “One could measure radineering technicia her could measure for certain ation while anoth chemicals. With that information, we help the commander deteermine how to better protect personnel.” Bio troops likee Kettering play a critical role in emergency-reesponse situations, gathering information to piece together clues about posut they don’t work alone. As sible hazards. Bu ained team, they work side by part of a well-tra

side with fire and rescue personnel and emergency managers. “We each have a different piece to play when we respond,” said Airman 1st Class Evan Bialk, 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron emergency manager and exercise participant. “We’re emergency responders. Bio goes in with their equipment and handles the situation to get a greater degree of certainty of what [the threat] is, and while we get the information too, they analyze the information on how it’s going to affect the base.” Bialk acknowledges that exercises like these are essential to readiness. “It’s not every day you get a call for a realworld event, so most of our experience comes through our exercises. This gives us the ability to determine how our plans work; this keeps us current and helps us get better.” The importance of realistic training with Langley first responders is evident to the entire team, including the Airmen of bio. “I have been doing this for a little over two years and, thank goodness, I have not used this [emergency training] in a real-world sit-

“I was ama azed at the ability of our enlisted Airmen to expertly demonstrate their respond der skills in this training. The three disciplines representing medical and mission support teams understood their objectives, worked together flaw wlessly as a cohesive team and demonstrated extraordinary understandin ng and application of the tools and resources needed to respond to an all-haza ards CBRN incident.” — Maj. Greg Garrison 633rd Medical Group bioenvironmental engineering flight commander

uation,” echoed Ketterring. “Exercises like these se help us practice for the he real thing.” Part of that practice involves donning real-world protective gear, such as gas masks ks tors equipped with respirators on and chemical protection ned suits worn over ice-lined cooling vests, which made working in the near-ninety inety degree heat tolerable. “We wear a full-encapsulatpsulating suit,” Kettering explained. lained. ards ap“We’re doing an all-hazards proach to protect us from m any kind of CBRN hazard that’s hat’s out there. We don’t know what kind of situation we’re going into.” Garrison is understandably ndably proud n do, as well of the work his Airmen as the risks they are willing ling to take to keep the base and its ts personnel safe and operational. al. “I was amazed at thee ability of our enlisted Airmen men to expertly demonstrate their rerainsponder skills in this training,” he stated. “The three hree disciplines representing medical and mission support teamss understood d together flawlesstheir objectives, worked ly as a cohesive team and nd demonstrated exding and application traordinary understanding of the tools and resources ces needed to respond to an all-hazards CBRN N incident.” esented to the team durThe final scenario presented ing the exercise, titled ‘Facility Survey,’ was a hazardous-materials response sponse to a terrorist lab contaminated with unknown nown biological and radiological materials. Together, ogether, they identified the hazard and mitigated ed the threat. With the simulated threat of test tubes and jars packed away in boxes, oxes, and the protective gear, equipment and diagnostic agnostic tools stowed in irmen of Langley Bioencases and trailers, the Airmen vironmental Engineering ng returned to their offices, prepared to take on any chemical, biological, or radiological threat eat that may occur. With the Airmen of bioenvironmental ronmental on duty, the Langley community can an have peace of mind knowing they are always ys ready to protect.

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

MAY 31, 2013

Asymmetric Warfare Group targets NIE 13.2 By Lt. Col. Deanna Bague BRIGADE MODERNIZATION COMMAND

The Asymmetric Warfare Group, the “operational arm” of U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, is leveraging Network Integration Evaluation 13.2’s multi-echelon training and live mission sets in which Soldiers from 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division, are conducting tactical operations. Referring to the Asymmetric Warfare Group, or AWG, as the Army’s global scouts, Lt. Gen. Keith C. Walker, deputy commanding general of Futures, and director of Army Capabilities Integration Center, said the group will work with Soldiers to identify new capability needs as the Army becomes regionally aligned throughout the world. “The advantage of Fort Bliss (Texas), the [Network Integration Evaluation] and the entire Second Brigade, First Armored Division, is these Soldiers go to the field every six months in an operational environment,” said Walker. “They evaluate new

Photo by Lt. Col. Deanna Bague

U.S.Army Spc. James Marsh, with 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division, pulls security outside a tunnel at the Network Integration Evaluation 13.2, atWhite Sands Missile Range, N.M.

capabilities and it gives the Asymmetric Warfare Group another important venue to get views of Soldiers to try out new ideas. Whether it’s doctrine, organization [or] training, it’s a tremendous venue.” “As we look at the future of rapid acqui-

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sition on the materiel side and the rapid development of other ideas for doctrine, organization and training -- the Asymmetric Warfare Group’s involvement with [Network Integration Evaluation] is huge and there’s tremendous amount of

potential to that,” added Walker. According to military officials, Network Integration Evaluation, or NIE, is critical to the Army because these events get operationally-tested equipment to Soldiers faster and at less cost. In addition to providing operational validation of network capability, the NIE also provides integrated training, techniques and procedures, enhancing a unit’s ability to prevent, shape and win. “The NIE is an incredible point of synergy for the Army to understand its emerging capabilities and to collaborate with other organizations to start to anticipate future operational challenges,” said Maj. Scott Bailey, a test and evaluation officer with AWG’s Concepts and Integration Squadron. “You certainly have the newest technology that units are going to potentially be receiving, so what better place to see how units will be empowered.” The AWG is trying to baseline what a company’s capability would be in a subterranean setting right now, he added. SEE WARFARE PAGE 15

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WARFARE FROM PAGE 14 “We want to articulate what some of the gaps might be as the Army anticipates operations in a subterranean environment,” Bailey said. “And describe some of the challenges in doctrine, training, techniques and procedures that may exist. From our aspect [we want] to understand what new technologies might actually fill some of these gaps.” Master Sgt. Michael Kelly, AWG’s Integration Troop senior enlisted adviser, said the use of subterranean environment, which includes man-made tunnels, caves, and hardened and or deeply buried facilities, is something that will probably be dealt with in the future in several different areas around the world. “One of our objectives is to write an Army Techniques Publication that directly addresses the subterranean environment and operations within it,” said Kelly. Two companies from 2-1 AD’s 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, were identified to conduct a raid on an underground objective. “This is probably one of the best environments for this type of assessment,” said Kelly. “Within the larger tactical exercise, this smaller objective and the raid [conducted] on it, fits perfectly into that. Also, the land out here, the brigade that’s available and the whole infrastructure that goes along with NIE is very important to our objectives with this.” The Asymmetric Warfare Group is also leveraging the NIE to work on doctrine and tactics, techniques and procedures development. In this case they are focus-

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

ing on subterranean concepts, said Lt. Col. Timothy O’Brien, battalion commander for 1-6 Infantry. The subterranean theme supports the overall NIE scenario in which Soldiers are helping a mock host nation stabilize their government, O’Brien said. “It’s just another sub-component, since there are tunnels all over the world. So a mission may entail clearing a tunnel of weapons caches, weapons of mass destruction, you name it,” he added. “It’s great training for the Soldiers,” said O’Brien. “They get to actually train on something that we haven’t necessarily touched in quite some time – probably since Vietnam. So it’s an outstanding opportunity for them to get involved and it nests well within the scenario of NIE. It also allows us to test the equipment that we have out here and see how it affects and operates in different conditions.” Bailey said 1-6 Infantry has been very supportive in affording AWG the opportunity to discover what they are able to do with some of their Joint Tactical Radio Systems products. He said the one of the biggest things the group is trying to learn is how will the new mission-command platforms enable units to operate effectively in a subterranean environment. “Quite frankly, we don’t know that yet,” Bailey said. “And as we start to understand and watch several units do this – it will help us very quickly understand what Programs of Instruction we can recommend to U.S. Training and Doctrine Command and what recommendations we can give to the materiel community.”

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FORT EUSTIS EDUCATION OFFICE MANAGER FROM PAGE 10 “The noteworthy part is that a commander gets a dedicated UDM for two full years,” said Holmquist. “A commander gets great return on investment by retaining the Airman they invested time and money training, instead of potentially losing that Airman to a deployment six months into their tour.” In addition, the USAF Expeditionary Center is finishing work on an webbased training module that will be supplemented with some live instructor interaction, so UDMs will have the benefit of institutional information. The installation level curriculum will vary from base to base, though, to meet each

installation’s unique process needs. The new training program is in addition to the current installation deployment officer’s responsibilities to provide initial orientation for UDMs, Holmquist said. Although classified as a special duty, Airmen interested in serving as the UDM don’t apply for the position online. “UDMs are locally-selected,” Holmquist explained. “Airmen interested in serving should review the enlisted classification directory for the list of duties and responsibilities, and communicate their interest through their chain of command.” For more information about career opportunities and other personnel issues, visit the myPers website.

(757) 887-1166 forteustiscenter@saintleo.edu

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â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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MAY 31, 2013

AFOSI, security forces train Airmen to track, report suspicious activity By Senior Airman Kayla Newman 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Note: The names of some individuals mentioned in this story have been withheld due to operational and personnel security reasons.

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An unmarked package sits partially hidden in the parking lot at the baseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Exchange. A passerby recalls past training, and calls the security forces law enforcement desk to report the suspicious package. Within minutes, emergency responders cordon the area and assess the situation. Without the situational awareness and cooperation of the base population, potential threats could go unnoticed â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and could cause harm to those around. While keeping Langley Air

Force Base, Va., safe and secure is every Airmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s responsibility; personnel from the 633rd Security Forces Squadron and the Air Force OfďŹ ce of Special Investigations train and devote time and effort to programs that ensure Service members have the tools to protect the base from threats. The Eagle Eyes Program is strategically designed to focus the eyes and ears of Airmen and community members on potential threats. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Eagle Eyes program is designed to empower Airmen to go after what threats are impacting the base,â&#x20AC;? explained the AFOSI counterintelligence branch chief. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If Airmen witness a felony-level crime, they can report it to OSI.â&#x20AC;? SEE AFOSI PAGE 17

Photo by Airman 1st Class Victoria H. Taylor

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Andre Thomas, 633rd Security Forces Squadron response force leader, apprehends Staff Sgt. Trayshawn Humphries, 633rd SFS trainer, during a high-risk trafďŹ c exercise at Langley Air Force Base, May 8.

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MAY 31, 2013

â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Army

AFOSI FROM PAGE 16 Eagle Eyes was created by the Air Force, and has become the Department of Defenseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Neighborhood Watchâ&#x20AC;? program. According to Linda Card, the Headquarters AFOSI chief of public affairs, the program was originally established as a force protection counter-terrorism program, but after Sept. 11, 2001, became a more of a neighborhood watch program at the wing-level. The program teaches Service members to remain vigilant, aware of various situations and maintain open communication, since AFOSI canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be everywhere at one time. The branch chief said that Airmen play a key role in noticing and identifying suspicious activities and behaviors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes the enemy may be among us,â&#x20AC;? the chief said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why Airmen should look out for reportable behaviors.â&#x20AC;? Types of reportable behaviors include: surveillance, people or organizations attempting to gain information about military operations, capabilities of people, tests of security, illegal acquisition of supplies or individuals out of place. Airmen should familiarize themselves with reportable behaviors because they are crucial to the safety of the Air Force, the chief said. Along with the Eagle Eyes Program, the 633rd SFS set up a crime hotline for Service members to report any non-emergency crimes. The 633rd SFS training section also provides non-tactical brieďŹ ngs and training to

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units on base, including taser training, baton training and active shooter brieďŹ ngs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We all play a big part in keeping the base safe and secure,â&#x20AC;? explained Master Sgt. Randy Knightner, 633rd SFS noncommissioned ofďŹ cer in charge of training. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is not just up to the defenders and OSI.â&#x20AC;? Airmen and civilians on base should also act as sensors, the branch chief explained. The people act as an early warning detection system for law enforcement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If there are no incidents, then we are doing our jobs correctly,â&#x20AC;? said Knightner. Organizations or individuals that are threats to the base and the Nation will not distinguish between a security forces badge, a maintenance badge or a medical badge. As a whole, everyone must be vigilant and refrain from becoming complacent. To report a crime to AFOSI call 7647971, or for the 633rd SFS crime hotline call 764-1100. To schedule a training or brieďŹ ng with the 633rd SFS, call the training section at 764-6108.

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

EustisCommunity

MAY 31, 2013

Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

Cotillion Dinner Dance The Father-Daughter/Mother-Son Cotillion Dinner Dance will take place from 6 to 10 p.m. June 8 at the Fort Eustis Club. Join us for a special evening of tradition, dinner and dancing.The menu will include a fruit and cheese tray, salad bar, roast chicken, green beans, red bliss potatoes, chicken fingers, macaroni and cheese, rolls, cupcakes, cookies and assorted beverages. The cost is $35 (parent-guardian); $20 (children ages 5 and older) and $15 (children ages 4 and under). Tickets may be purchased at the club, Bldg. 2123, Pershing Ave. For more information, call 878-5700.

Technology Exposition The 93rd Signal Brigade will host a Technology Exposition from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 12 at the Fort Eustis Club. All military, civilian and contractor personnel are invited to attend this free event. More than 20 exhibitors will be demonstrating their latest products and services. Complimentary refreshments and giveaways will be available while supplies last. For more information, contact Katie Johnson at (443) 561-2462 or email johnson@ncsi.com.

Army birthday run The Senior Commander Army Element – Fort Eustis will conduct an organizational run to celebrate the Army’s 238th birthday at 630 a.m. June 13 at Murphy Field and other locations along the designated physical fitness route. Motorists should expect road closures and brief traffic delays during the run. For more information, call 501-6435 or 501-5819.

Olympic Gold Medalists Come out and meet Olympic Gold Medal winners Mia Hamm, Kristine Lilley and Tisha Venturini Hoch from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. June 16 at Anderson Field House, Bldg. 643, Dickman St. The Team First Soccer Academy trio will sign autographs, answer questions and demonstrate soccer drills. Free T-shirts will be available while supplies last. For more information, call 878-3329.

School and sport physical exams School and sport physical exams are available at McDonald Army Health Center’s Pediatric and Family Health clinics by appointment only. Appointments may be scheduled for Monday through Friday starting June 3 and ending Sept. 13. Call the Hampton Roads Appointment Center at (866) 6454584 or use TRICARE Online to schedule an appointment (up to 28 days in advance). Appointments are also available on the following Saturdays: June 29, July 27 and Aug. 24. For more info, visit http://mcdonald.narmc.amedd.army.mil.

Groninger Library ■ Summer Reading Program – Registration begins June 17 for the library’s “Have Book,WillTravel!” summer reading program. Join us for fun and adventure as we travel through reading (June 17-Aug. 11). The program is open to children ages 2-17. ■ Library Services –The library offers free Internet andWi-

Golf tournament In celebration of the Army’s Birthday and TRADOC’s 40th anniversary commemoration, a nine-hole golf tournament will kick off with a 1 p.m. shotgun start June 13 at the Pines Golf Course. The format will be four-person Captain’s Choice. Any organization may create a team consisting of military, civilians, contractors and family members. Teams may consist of members of different organizations. The cost is $35, which will include greens and cart fees, range balls, two drink tickets and prizes. Payment is due at the time of registration. To sign up, email armando.j.maldonado.civ@mail.mil with the following information: name of organization; names, email addresses and phone numbers of four team members with the primary point of contact listed first; and name of a potential stand-in who can fill in if one of your member’s drops out at the last minute. For more information, call 878-2252.

The Pines Golf Course ■ “Get Golf Ready” Classes – Come out and “Get Golf Ready” for only $99 per person. Participants will receive five lessons from our PGA teaching professional in a group setting. Golf clubs, balls and other equipment will be provided.To register, visit GetGolfReady.com. ■ Payday Scramble – 1 p.m., June 7. Come out and join us for 18 holes of golf, cart, range balls, food and prizes. The cost is $25 (members); $40 (retirees and DoD civilians); $45 (guests); $18 (E4 and below); and $20 (E5 and above). For more information, call 878-2252 or visit www. eustismwr.com.

Fi; computers with CAC readers; fax; photocopier; printers; magazines; newspapers; best sellers; classics; audio books; movies on DVD; music on CD; storytime; arts and crafts; brown bag lunch series; free classes; and special events. The library is located at Bldg. 1313, Washington Blvd. Hours are 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Wednesday; noon to 9 p.m. Thursday; and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday-Sunday. For more information, call 878-5017 or visit www.groningerlibrary.com.

2013 Army Soldier Show The 2013 Army Soldier Show is scheduled for 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. June 25 at Jacobs Theater. Admission is free and open to all. Fort Eustis’ own Spc. Reuben Eldridge, 688th Rapid Port Opening Element, is a member of the Soldier Show cast. Come out and support Eldridge and all of the talented soldiers in this year’s show. For more information, call 878-3329.

Vacation Bible School The Fort Eustis Regimental Memorial Chapel invites boys and girls who have completed kindergarten through sixth grade to join us at SonWest Roundup Vacation Bible School at Bldg. 923, Lee Blvd. Classes will start from 9

a.m. to noon June 17 and end June 21. Children can sing songs, watch skits, create crafts and play games. Van transportation will be available for children who live on post. Class size is limited. Register by calling 878-1455 or stop by the chapel from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more information, contact Jeanne Vaul at 878-1455 or email verna.j.vaul.civ@mail.mil.

Teen Summer Volunteer Program Teen Summer Volunteer Program orientation is scheduled for 1 p.m. June 24 at Bldg. 650, Monroe Ave. The program runs from June 26 to Aug. 23. To apply, contact Donna Cloy, volunteer coordinator, at 878-3638, or email donna.g.cloy.civ@mail.mil. The application deadline is June 21.

Range schedule Ranges, training areas and associated facilities are off limits to personnel not engaged in scheduled firing, operations or inspections unless clearance is obtained (in person) from the Range Control Fire Desk or a designated Range Control technician. The Range Control office telephone number is 878-4412, ext. 226 or 878-3834, ext 234. The range operations schedule through June 5 is: ■ Friday – Range BTRACS, 1 (8 a.m. to 5 p.m.); ■ Saturday-Sunday – No ranges scheduled; ■ Monday – Range BTRACS, 1 (8 a.m. to 5 p.m.); ■ Tuesday – Range BTRACS, 1 (8 a.m. to 4 p.m.); ■ Wednesday – Range BTRACS, 1, 2, 3, 6 (7 a.m. to 4 p.m.). All personnel are required to check in and out with Range Control before going into or departing from any range or training area.

Soldier and Family Readiness Soldier and Family Readiness (ACS) classes and briefings for June will include: ■ Baby and Me Play Group – 10 to 11 a.m., Thursdays, Bldg. 501, Madison Ave. ■ Credit Reporting, Scores and Debt Management – 9 to 10 a.m., June 4, 18. ■ DevelopingYour Financial Plan – 9 to 10 a.m., June 11, 25. ■ Effective Resume Writing – 9 a.m. to noon, June 21. ■ Federal Employment – 10 a.m. to noon, June 27. ■ Financial Readiness Training – 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., June 21. ■ Funds Custodian Training – 1 to 3 p.m., June 5. ■ Home Buying Seminar – 4:30 to 7 p.m., June 26. ■ Improving Personal Relationships – 10 to 11:30 a.m., June 5. ■ Installation Volunteer Orientation – 9 to 10:30 a.m., June 4. ■ Instructor Facilitator Training, Army Family Team Building – 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., June 17-20. ■ Managing Your Checking Account, Online Banking – 8:30 to 9:30 a.m., June 20. Unless otherwise noted, classes and briefings will take place in Bldg. 650, Monroe Ave. For more information, call 878-3638.


MAY 31, 2013

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

LAFBCommunity

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Submit LAFB Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

Langley CDC parenting sessions The Langley Child Development Center will be hosting sessions on parenting young children from noon to 1 p.m. every Wednesday during the month of June. These sessions are open to all military parents: ■ June 5 – Potty Training Young Children ■ June 12 – Relief and Relaxation for Young Children ■ June 19 – Anger and Frustration in Young Children For more information or to register for one or all sessions, call the CDC at 764-3585 or Family Advocacy at 764-9581.

Clean the Bay Day The Langley community’s Clean the Bay Day will be held from 9 a.m. to noon June 1 at Langley Eagle Park. For more information or to volunteer, call 764-1141 or e-mail Michael Mallozi at michael.malozzi@langley.af.mil.

Langley AFB Technology Expo Air Combat Command Communications Support Squadron will be hosting a free technology expo from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 11. There will be more than 30 exhibits and live demonstrations of the latest mission-centric technologies. For more information, contact Katie Johnson at Johnson@ncsi.com, or (443) 561-2462.

Family Advocacy Safety Education Seminar A Family Advocacy Safety Education Seminar will be held from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. June 14 at the Health and Wellness Center. This seminar reviews the dynamics and impact of domestic violence and child maltreatment, tools for healthy relationships and parenting, and available community resources on and off base. For more information or to register, contact the Family Advocacy Program at 764-2427.

Airmen’s Attic accepting donations The Airmen’s Attic is accepting gently used donations. The following items are needed: housewares, kitchen items, linens and clothing. Items such as large couches, mattresses or box springs will not be accepted. For information, call 764-1363.

Langley Veterinary Clinic policy change For the safety of children and pets, children under the age of 12 are no longer permitted to enter the Langley Veterinary Clinic. For more information, call 764-5678.

Langley Community Center events Line Dancer-cise: “Step Into Fitness” from 5:30 to 6:50 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays in the Air Combat Command Fitness Center aerobics room. Classes are $40 per month for adults and $24 per month for children 12 and under. Work up a sweat as you learn the latest and most popular line dances while dropping pounds and inches. For more information on Community Center events, email james.murrell@langley.af.mil or call the Community Center at 764-2983/2984.

Orthodox Christian Services Orthodox Christian Vespers prayer service will be held

Mobile Vet Center The Department ofVeterans Affairs MobileVet Center will visit Langley AFB from 8 a.m. to noon June 1 at the 633rd Mission Support Group distiguished visitor parking circle, located at 45 Nealy Ave. The Mobile Vet Center offers a variety of counseling and support services at no cost to veterans, including individual and group counseling, marital and family counseling, medical referrals, assistance in applying for VA benefits, employment counseling, alcohol and drug assessments and more. For more information, call 1 (877) 927-8387 or visit www.vetcenter.va.gov.

every Wednesday at 11 a.m. at Langley Chapel. For the Holy orthodox Sacraments or for pastoral and spiritual needs, contact the Langley Chapel at 764-7847.

Single Airman Ministry events Please see below for upcoming events sponsored by the Langley Single Airmen Ministry: ■ Luray Caverns Trip – From 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. June 8. The trip will cost $10 per person, which includes a tour of the cave, garden maze and transportation.Those interested must sign up no later than June 4. ■ Camping at ShenandoahValley National Park – From Aug. 30 to Sept. 2. The trip will cost $89 per person, which includes tents, food, a scavenger hunt and transportation. Those interested must sign up no later than Aug. 13. For more information on these events, contact Larry Blakely at 273-1033 or 528-0455.

“Let’s Stay Together” marriage seminar Langley Chapel will conduct a free marriage seminar entitled “Let’s Stay Together” from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 13 at the Langley Club. Those interested must register by June 11. To register, visit https://einvitations.afit.edu/inv/ anim.cfm?i=153482&k=0364410D7355. For more information, contact Chap. (Capt.) Tara Dixon at 764-0587/7847 or tara.dixon@langley.af.mil.

Cinderella’s Closet The Langley Enlisted Spouse’s Club is sponsoring a new project, Cinderella’s Closet, which is a loan closet of formal gowns, cocktail dresses, shoes, accessories and more. The items will be signed out free of charge to those with a military identification card, and must be returned dry cleaned. The LESC is collecting gently used formal gowns, cocktail length gowns, shoes, shawls and handbags. The location, hours and details of the closet are being finalized, with a possible opening this summer. For more information on donating or volunteering, contact Amanda Bryie or Amye Pederson at 504-0746 or via e-mail at cinderellasclosetlafb@gmail.com.

Commercial Travel Office change Alamo Travel will no longer be the Commercial Travel Office serving JBLE, effective June 1. A new contract

was awarded to WingGate Travel. Implementation of this new CTO will not cause any disruptions in the Defense Travel System, nor change reservation or ticketing procedures. To facilitate the changeover, the Passenger Travel Section and Alamo Travel will be closed May 31 for transition. Emergency travel can be arranged by calling the Passenger Travel Office at 764-5071. Contact information, location and hours of operation will remain the same.

Discounted tickets and passes Discounted tickets and season passes to local amusement parks are available through Langley Information, Tickets and Tours. For more information, call 764-7176.

‘Maintenance Operations Management’ course The 367th Training Support Squadron, “The Griffin,” announced the release of “Maintenance Operations Management” course April 30 to ADLS. This course is designed to teach management principles associated with maintenance career fields. Civilian managers and Airmen of any rank can benefit from this course. The MOM course can be found on the ADLS gateway. For more information, contact Staff Sgt. Kevin Spalding at kevin.spalding@hill.af.mil or 586-4014.

Hispanic Heritage Committee meetings The Hispanic Heritage Committee will have its meetings every third Wednesday of the month at 2 p.m. in the Langley bowling alley activities room. For more information, contact Master Sgt. Jose Perez at 764-1735.

Communications Squadron CSI walk-in hours NIPR account creations, virtual private-network, Blackberry, iPad or iPhone walk-in hours are from 9 to 11 a.m. Trouble tickets will be handled from 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. For more information, call 764-9811.

The Exchange’s ‘Salad Wednesday’ The Army and Air Force Exchange Service restaurants are now offering $2 off any salad priced $4 or more every Wednesday. “Salad Wednesdays” will occur at all participating Exchange restaurants and are open to anyone on the installation, including civilians, contractors or visitors. For more information, visit www.shopmyexchange.com.


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â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Army

OutsideTheGate

â&#x20AC;˘

MAY 31, 2013

Submit Outside The Gate announcements to pw1@militarynews.com

Steam and Gas Engine Show Chippokes Plantation State Park will host its 23rd annual Steam and Gas Engine Show from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 1-2 at 695 Chippokes Park Rd., Surry. Activities will include tractor pulls, craft booths, classic cars, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities, mansion tours, an evening canoe trip along the James River and live demonstrations at the historic sawmill. Admission is $5 per person; and free for children under age 12. Chippokes Plantation State Park is located on the south side of the James River. It is one of the oldest continuously farmed plantations in Virginia.The park features a campground, four historic cabins, swimming complex, visitor center, historic area and the Farm and Forestry Museum. For more information, call 294-3625 or visit www.virginiastateparks.gov.

Boating on Lake Maury Lake Mauryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s boat operations are now open adjacent to the front entrance of the Mariners Museum, 100 Museum Dr., Newport News. Visitors can rent john and paddle boats, and canoes for ďŹ shing or exploring. Rental boats seat one to six people, weather permitting. Motors are not provided. Visitors may provide their own trolling (electric) motors and batteries, but gas-powered motors are not permitted. Fishing is catch-and-release and a state ďŹ shing license is required. All guests using kayaks, canoes or boats on Lake Maury must wear life jackets. Boat rental prices are as follows: 14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; john boats ($4 per hour, $15 per day); 18â&#x20AC;&#x2122; john boats ($7 per hour, $25 per day); canoes ($5 per hour, $20 per day). Personal kayaks and canoes are allowed on Lake Maury with a valid annual or daily pass that can be purchased in the museum or on the boat dock. The cost is $50 (season pass); and $10 (daily pass). For more information, call 591-7718 or visit www.marinersmuseum.org.

Virginia Living Museum The new â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bodies Revealedâ&#x20AC;? exhibition is open to visitors through Sept. 2 at the museum. The exhibition showcases real human bodies, dissected and preserved through a revolutionary process. Many of the whole body specimens are dissected in vivid athletic poses, allowing the visitor to relate to everyday activities. To ensure that everyone has the best possible visit, the museum is offering timed tickets. Tickets can be purchased online at www.thevlm.org or in person at the

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Bay Days Poster Contest Hampton Bay Days, the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest annual festival, is accepting entries for its 31st annual Poster Contest. The contest is open to amateur and professional artists. The cost is $35 per entry, and submitted artwork must be original. Multiple entries by a single artist will require separate entry fees. Computergenerated work is not eligible. The winner will be awarded $250 in cash, 50 percent of the proceeds of the auctioned original, and a complimentary booth at the festival (Sept. 6-8). All artwork becomes the property of Hampton Bay Days. Entries are due by 4 p.m. June 14 to: Hampton Bay Days, Inc., 34 Wine Street, Suite A, Hampton, VA 23669. The winner will be announced on or before July 5. For more information, contact Marqueta Tyson at 723-8500 or email tysonteam@aol.com.

museum. The cost is $7 (museum members); $15 (nonmembers); $12 (children); and free for ages 2 and under. Combination tickets for the museum and exhibition are $26 (adults); $20 (children ages 3-12); and free for ages 2 and under. The exhibition will also be open from 6 to 8 p.m. June 8, July 13 and Aug. 10. The Virginia Living Museum is located at 524 J. Clyde Morris Blvd., Newport News. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Saturday; and noon to 5 p.m., Sunday. For more info, call 595-9135 or visit www.thevlm.org.

Port Warwick Concert Series Virginia Health Services presents the annual Summer Concert Series from 6 to 9 p.m. Wednesdays at Port Warwickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Styron Square in Newport News (Jefferson Avenue at Loftis Boulevard). The concerts are free and open to the public. The schedule for June is: â&#x2013;  June 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Tumbao Salsero â&#x2013;  June 12 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Party Fin â&#x2013;  June 19 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Mercy Creek â&#x2013;  June 26 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Jae Sinnett Jazz Trio For more information, contact Debi Ernest at 2230284, email debi@portwarwick.com, or visit www.liveonthesquare.org.

Big Bands on the Bay Come out and join us for live music and dancing at the Big Bands on the Bay music series from 7 to 9 p.m. Sun-

days at Ocean View Beach Park, 300 W. Ocean View Ave., Norfolk. The music series is free and open to the public. Bring a lawn chair or blanket for seating. The schedule for June is: â&#x2013;  June 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Don Case and the Satin Sounds â&#x2013;  June 9 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Glen Boswick and the Sounds of Swing â&#x2013;  June 16 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Top Hats â&#x2013;  June 23 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Original Super Band â&#x2013;  June 30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Continentals In the event of inclement weather, visit www.festevents.org to check for event delays or cancellation.

Free Admission to Museums Blue Star Museums is a collaboration among the National Endowment of Arts, Blue Star Families, the Department of Defense and more than 2,000 museums across America to honor active-duty military from all services. Free admission is available through Labor Day for active-duty military, National Guard, reservists and their family members (military ID cardholder and up to ďŹ ve family members). Local participating museums include the Casemate Museum, U.S. Army Transportation Museum, Hampton History Museum, Chrysler Museum of Art, Hampton Roads Naval Museum, Hermitage Museum and Gardens, Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Museum, Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art, Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg and York County Historical Museum. For a complete listing and maps to help with visit planning, visit www.arts.gov/bluestarmuseums.

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(XVWLV 0HPRULDO 'D\ FHUHPRQ\ KRQRUV QDWLRQÂśV IDOOHQ ZDUULRUV Photos by Staff Sgt. Dana Hill ABOVE: Soldiers from the 7th Sustainment Brigade perform a ďŹ&#x201A;ag folding ceremony during the Memorial Day Ceremony at Jacobs Theater at Fort Eustis, May 23. The ceremony included a guest speaker, a performance by the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Band and a 21-gun salute in honor of fallen U.S. Service members. LEFT: U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Mark MacCarley, TRADOC deputy chief of staff, addresses the audience during the Memorial Day Ceremony. MacCarley served as guest speaker, providing signiďŹ cant facts about Memorial Day and helping pay tribute to fallen U.S. Service members. RIGHT: Soldiers from the 7th Sus. Bde. perform a ďŹ&#x201A;ag folding ceremony.

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

MAY 31, 2013

6KLIW\ VXSSOHPHQWV 'DQJHUV RI GLHWDU\ DLGV By Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

“People ask me all the time about With summer on the horizon, everyone what supplements to take or not to is looking to get that perfect beach body. take. I tell them all the same thing – For many of us, reaching that goal means just try to avoid them.” hitting the gym, eating better and eventually fitting into the bikini or trunks gathering dust in the closet. While those goals to become more physically fit are admirable, Service members should be cautious about adding supplementation to their workout regimen. Certain commercial supplements are not allowed for use by Service members due to health concerns. Members should understand what to look out for to avoid the consequences, and more importantly the risks, of taking a banned supplement. “People ask me all the time about what supplements to take or not to take,” said Tony Arroyo, Health and Wellness Center exercise physiologist. “I tell them all the same thing - just try to avoid them.” Supplement manufacturers alone are responsible for ensuring supplement safety. While they do need approval from the Food and Drug Administration in order to introduce a new ingredient into a supplement, manufacturers do not need clearance to utilize the pre-approved ingredients in any combination they see fit. Unfortunately, it seems a supplement will only be banned after a tragedy occurs as a result of the unknown effects of “new and improved” formulas. In 2011, two Soldiers from Fort Bliss, Texas, died of heart failure during physical training. Doctors later determined that use of dimethylamylamine, or DMAA, was a factor in their deaths. In July 2012, another Soldier died during physical fitness training. His death was also linked to DMAA usage. While people rarely die from supplementation, Service members can still face consequences if they test positive for a banned ingredient. Since it is up to the commander’s discretion, members can face a Letter of Reprimand or even courts-martial, according to the Langley legal office.

— Tony Arroyo Health and Wellness Center exercise physiologist Trying to determine each and every banned supplement by their ingredients is risky, so Service members should be wary of any kind of supplementation and should avoid them outright, said Arroyo. If Service members do choose to use supplements, Arroyo urged them to follow the instructions for the products. “A lot of people like to believe more is better when it comes to supplementation,” said Arroyo. “If you want to avoid injury, however, it is important to read the labels and follow them to the letter.” Arroyo also cautioned against replacing traditional, proven methods of health improvement with supplementation that promises to help users reach their goals quicker with less work. “With all of the information out there on supplementation, not to mention people’s personal opinions, researching the effects of supplementation can be confusing,” said Arroyo. “Most of the time, Service members just throw away their money when it comes to supplementation.”

Photo by Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill

Adding supplementation to a diet and workout plan can have benefits, but service members should be wary. Some supplements have been banned for health concerns, and one has even been linked to the death of three Soldiers.

If a member decides to consumer supplements, however, Arroyo stressed the importance of a good diet while utilizing supplementation in order to maintain a healthy lifestyle. “Anything you find in a supplement can be found in the foods we eat every day,” said Arroyo. “Supplementation means just that; a supplement to your diet.” Although there are some unknowns concerning supplementation in our diets, there is one fact that is indisputable –

In 2011, two Soldiers from Fort Bliss, Texas, died of heart failure during physical training. Doctors later determined that use of dimethylamylamine, or DMAA, was a factor in their deaths. In July 2012, another Soldier died during physical fitness training. His death was also linked to DMAA usage.

where they are purchased doesn’t make a difference to their legitimacy. “Many people believe buying supplements on base means the supplement is safe to use and approved by the military,” said Arroyo. “That isn’t always the case.” Companies who sell these products on base do not fall under any military organization, and while they often try to comply with military interests, they do not have to forbid selling certain supplements, said Arroyo. Army and Air Force Exchange Services and GNC have pulled some supplements off shelves. However, for customers who do not purchase supplements from either retailer, a list of the banned supplements and ingredients can be found here. Looking good in the summer often means staying fit and eating healthy, and supplements might seem to help while working towards a perfect physique. However, fitness is a year-round effort, so stay vigilant about supplementation in order to spend summer at the beach, not the commander’s office.

Check out the Peninsula Warrior online at www.peninsulawarrior.com


MAY 31, 2013

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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For Rent-House (All) Bayview/Ocean View Area - Good School District 3 bed/1 bath. Newly remodeled bathroom. Conveniently located near base Den, Shed, and large backyard with deck. Pets are welcome. 1 year lease. $1300 per month Call Jason @ (757) 617-4244.

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Restrictions: • Only 5 ads per week, per household • Renewals, corrections and cancellations cannot be taken by phone and must be resubmitted • Illegible, too long or otherwise do not conform to instructions will not be published and must be resubmitted for the next issue • Automotive ads must begin with make, model and year • Real estate ads must begin with name of city, neighborhood and must be your primary residence. • Ads will not be accepted via official mailing channels such as guard mail or postage and fees paid indicia. • Free ads cannot be of a commercial nature (i. e., business opportunities, help wanted, etc) and must be personal property of the eligible member. Should not represent a sustained income or business or listed through agents or representatives. • When advertising a home for rent or home for sale, the home must be THE PRIMARY RESIDENCE. (All rental properties are considered paid ads.) WE DO NOT ACCEPT CALLS FOR FREE CLASSIFIED ADS Deadline Thursday, 5 p.m. for the following week’s publications


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MAY 31, 2013

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