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:DUULRU J O I N T June 21, 2013 Vol. 4, No. 24

B A S E

L A N G L E Y - E U S T I S

P u b l i s h e d i n t h e i n t e re s t o f p e r s o n n e l a t J o i n t B a s e L a n g l e y - E u s t i s

RECREATION

ITT offers exciting trips, events for base personnel — Page 2

Chasing the ‘carrot’ Langley Airmen compete in Armed Forces Triathlon – Page 10

HERO

NASA aerospace engineer helps rescue woman — Page 16

For more online content, check out JBLE.af.mil

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CELEBRATION U.S. Army and TRADOC celebrate birthdays — Page 12

Air force EDITION

w w w. p e n i n s u l a w a r r i o r. c o m


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Photos by Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill

Mia Hamm, former soccer Olympian, jests about referee calls during during a visit to Fort Eustis, June 15. Hamm and her colleagues, Kristine Lilly and Tisha Hoch, answered questions from attendees and shared stories from their experiences as soccer players. LEFT: Children practice ball control during an exercise directed by Hamm. Prior to the event, attendees were given a soccer ball, signing card andT-shirt for Hamm and her colleagues to sign.

Families score as Olympians visit Fort Eustis By Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Mia Hamm, Kristine Lilly and Tisha Hoch, former Olympic soccer players, walk towards the bleachers. Hamm places a soccer ball at her feet and glances at the crowd, ready to give them the show they’ve been waiting for. She then kicks the ball to a little boy, picks up her microphone and explains the next drill. Hamm, Lilly and Hoch did not come to Fort Eustis, Va., June 16, to compete. They came to show Fort Eustis’ children a few soccer drills, sign gear and talk about the impact of teamwork and perseverance. Before the Olympians took the stage, attendees were given a signing card, a soccer ball and a T-shirt for the players to sign, in addition to any personal items they brought. After a short introduction, the Olympians called down all of the children in the audience. Lining up in rows, the kids learned simple drills the Olympians used when they were training for the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta. The drills included dribbling, ball control and hand-eye coordination techniques. After each drill, a few participants were selected to demonstrate what they had just learned. Among those demonstrators, Julia Allison, 13, shared not only her skills with

Photo by Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill

The Galbraith family, with Julia Allison, 13, holds up the Team First Soccer Academy banner with former Olympians Mia Hamm,Tisha Hoch and Kristine Lilly, June 15, at Fort Eustis.

juggling, but also her insight on the event. “This was really nice, and a good opportunity to learn something,” said Allison. “Most people would have to pay a lot of money for the time we had today, but all we had to do was show up!” Jaclyn Galbraith, 19, agreed with Allison wholeheartedly, and added how

grateful she was to meet one of her icons. “These are my idols,” said Galbraith. “It really is a once in a lifetime opportunity to meet Mia Hamm.” Hamm’s father was a U.S. Air Force pilot, so she spoke about the importance of organized sports and other community involvement with an emphasis on the military child.

“I remember moving around all the time, facing the challenges of a deployment,” said Hamm. “I played soccer because my friends played soccer, and it was my way of getting involved in the community.” Hamm and her colleagues also spoke about how putting a team first makes it easier to overcome challenges. “I remember we use to do these running drills where we would run down the field and back, have what felt like three seconds to rest, and then run again,” said Hoch. “I hated those drills and always wanted to quit, but on either side of me was Mia or Kristine telling me I could make it.” Lilly spoke about the players being personally involved in helping children with soccer, and how those lessons translate to other aspects of life. “We want to lend support to something we love,” said Lilly. “Soccer teaches kids to get involved and excel as a team, not just as individuals.” Galbraith and Allison both walked away from the event carrying their signed soccer balls and T-shirts, talking about the accomplishments of the soccer stars and the excitement of meeting them. More importantly, however, they walked away with a new understanding of community, and a greater appreciation for their team, both on and off the field.


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

JUNE 21, 2013

'R' 2I¿FLDOV ZHLJK UHVRXUFH SULRULWLHV IRU ¿VFDO \HDU  EXGJHW GXULQJ VHTXHVWHU By Amaani Lyle AMERICAN FORCES PRESS SERVICE

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In light of recent budget woes, Defense Department officials are weighing resource priorities and moving toward the decision phase for the fiscal year 2014 budget, a Pentagon official said at the National Defense Industrial Association National Logistics Forum in Arlington, Va., June 14. During the strategic choices management review designed to plan a timeline over the next five years, officials will attempt a methodical assessment of the Defense Department’s resources and objectives to avoid broad-stroke cuts, said Mike McCord, the Pentagon’s principal deputy comptroller. “We want to approach problems as holistically as we can and make decisions that make the best of this bad situation,” McCord said. “Most peo-

“We want to approach problems as holistically as we can and make decisions that make the best of this bad situation.” — Mike McCord Pentagon’s principal deputy comptroller ple feel that there’s a smarter way to do it than across-the-board cuts.” McCord noted that modernization, readiness and force structure value prioritization remain central to the budget decision process. “We looked at the kind of trade-offs that people would expect us to look at, [such as] the impacts of preserving modernization as more of a primary goal to preserving readiness at the expense of modernization and force structure ... at the expense of those

other two,” McCord said. Officials also considered retaining some residual capacity that might be slower to localize or strengthening the force enough to ensure that what remains is ready to deploy and prevail. But if sequestration cuts now in effect for fiscal 2013 continue, he added, the Defense Department won’t be able to do everything the president wants it to do. “We need to review which of the many objectives we have are the most important to us and separate those that really drive resource decisions from some of those that don’t so much,” McCord said. “We can’t do all the things that the commander in chief wants us to do if we have a permanent sequester level.” But capability can increase, at least relatively, with greater lead time, stability in planning and flexibility on how to execute those plans, McCord said.

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JUNE 21, 2013

Season Begins September 14 and Ends November 9

Photos by Staff Sgt. Dana Hill

(From left) Dan Flores, Exchange food court manager; Dale Killip, Exchange Sales and Merchandise manager;Victoria Smith, Exchange store manager; Keith Morrow, 733rd Mission Support Group deputy commander;Wayne Hansen, Joint Base Langley-Eustis Exchange general manager; Cheryl Hollis, Military Clothing Sales manager; and Ivelisse Solazayas, JBLE Services business manager, cut the ribbon during the Exchange grand opening ceremony at Fort Eustis,Va., June 13, 2013.The updated Exchange features three new restaurants and an expanded, more environmentallycontrolled enclosed outdoor living section.

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)RUW (XVWLV¶ UHQRYDWHG ([FKDQJH KRVWV JUDQG RSHQLQJ FHUHPRQ\ By Staff Sgt. Dana Hill 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

The Joint Base Langley-Eustis community celebrated the grand opening of the newly-renovated Exchange, located on Fort Eustis, Va., June 13 with a ribbon cutting ceremony. The updated Exchange features new additions to the food court, the main store, clothing sales and all of the servicing operations in the Exchange. Three new restaurants have also been added to the food court. In the main store, the outdoor living section has expanded, featuring a more environmentally controlled, enclosed area. “It’s imperative for us to maintain our facilities so that we create a warm environment for our shoppers,” said Wayne Hansen, Joint Base Langley-Eustis Exchange general manager. “We review the facilities on a recurring basis to keep them updated and refreshed. The new ef-

fort that we are doing for our Exchange is a part of that package.” The Exchange’s main focus is to improve quality of life for Airmen and Soldiers. The renovations have helped identify three main shopping areas: style, home and life. The categories are divided up as to how customers shop, all aiding in a smoother in-store experience. “The new renovations have really made a difference in the Exchange,” said Pfc. Jacob Peden, 1st Battalion, 222nd Aviation Regiment, F Company. “They have improved the quality and that makes for a good shopping experience.” The renovations to the exchange started in October 2012 and were completed this May. Hansen said the renovations have helped the main Exchange on Fort Eustis. He added that bringing in additional food options and increasing the selection inside the main store is all geared towards giving the customer what they ask for.


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JUNE 21, 2013

FeatureStory LEFT: Soldiers from the 271st Movement Control Team clear a building where they suspect simulated insurgents may be hiding during a three-day counter improvised explosive device class at Naval Weapons Station Yorktown, June 13. RIGHT:Two Soldiers take cover along the wall of a building during a simulated ambush. The 271st MCT is preparing for an upcoming deployment later this year. Photos by Staff Sgt. Wesley Farnsworth

)RUW (XVWLV 6ROGLHUV WUDLQ WR ¿JKW By Staff Sgt. Wesley Farnsworth STAFF SGT. WESLEY FARNSWORTH

U.S. Army 2nd Lt. Ryan Waldorf (left), 271st Movement Control Team movement control officer, and Pfc. Alonoso Bradley, 271st MCT movement specialist, use a simulator designed to teach them how to drive in a convoy and what do to if they are attacked.

A Soldier provides cover as another Soldier performs first aid on a simulated casualty.

Soldiers from the 271st Movement Control Team, 53rd Movement Control Battalion, 7th Sustainment Brigade, Fort Eustis, Va., concluded a three-day counter-improvised explosive device training class at Naval Weapons Station Yorktown, Va., June 13, in preparation for an upcoming deployment. During the hands-on portion of the training, Soldiers learned how to move as a convoy, react to an IED explosion and ambush, and how to treat injuries that may occur during these events. “This training has been very useful,” said 2nd Lt. Ryan Waldorf, 271st MCT movement control officer. “It’s helped us prepare, ensuring we are trained and ready to go when we arrive in country.” The Soldiers used an area of the Naval Weapons Station that is set up as a small village consisting of four buildings. It is run by Department of Defense contractors who not only filled the role of cadre for the training, but also acted as insurgents using paintball guns as weapons. The simulated environment allows Soldiers to have

Photo by Staff Sgt. Wesley Farnsworth

Soldiers with the 271st Movement ControlTeam demonstrate their combat lifesaving skills on a simulated casualty.

realistic training by putting them in high-stress situations where they are actually fired upon. “Using paintball and airsoft weapons gives us a good idea of what it’s actually like to be in a firefight.” Waldorf said. “It allowed us to see how

each of us will react in a high-stress environment, and it strengthens our teamwork.” Pfc. Alonoso Bradley, 271st MCT movement specialist, is one of the many Soldiers who participated in the training. “This training taught me to be more aware of my surroundings,” Bradley said. “It also helped our team greatly. We are closer now as a team, and we know that we have each other’s backs.” Prior to the hands-on portion of the training, Soldiers used a hightech computer simulator which allowed them to experience some friendly competition. While some Soldiers learned how to react to an ambush using a simulated High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle, their battle buddies were at the other end of the training unit learning how to setup an ambush, playing the role of insurgents. While the Soldiers admitted training was intense and stressful at times, it strengthened the skills and teamwork of the 271st MCT. Over the coming months, they will continue training, building upon their new found skills as they prepare for their deployed mission.


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Langley Airmen compete in Armed Forces Triathlon By Airman 1st Class R. Alex Durbin 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

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U.S. Air Force male triathletes stand together with their silver medals won in the team portion of the Armed ForcesTriathlon, June 1, at Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, Calif.

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Fifty men adjusted swim caps and snapped goggles into place, as ocean waves that struck the sand created a rhythmic roar, overpowering the sound of their deep breathing. Behind them, 30 female triathletes spoke in hushed tones among themselves as they stretched, awaiting their turn in the water. The male athletes, each poised to run at the start point of the Armed Forces Triathlon, June 1, at Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, Calif., mentally prepared to swim nearly a mile, bike 24.8 miles and run 6.2 miles. They visualized the strokes, strides and transitions about to take place in the nearly-two-hour-long triathlon. Among the competitors from the U.S. Air Force, Army, Navy, Marines, and athletes from the Canadian military forces, stood Capt. Mitchell Kieffer and Maj. Melissa Tallent, two Airmen from Langley Air Force Base, Va., selected to be part of the elite triathletes chosen from more than 500,000 Airmen Air Force-wide. Their hearts raced and excitement grew as the culmination of their nearly 20 hour-a-week training regimens were about to be put to the test. As they waited for their individual groups to begin, they reflected on their paths leading up to the competition. Kieffer’s love of triathlons started while in college when a friend’s mother was fighting a battle with Lou Gehrig’s disease. Wanting to show his support, Kieffer pledged to lead a 6-month fundraiser in her honor, culminating with an ironman competition, the “ultratriathlon,”

subjecting participants to a crucible of a 2.4 mile swim, 112-mile bike ride and 26.2-mile run. “I picked the one thing I thought I would never do in my life, and that was an ironman competition,” said Kieffer, an Air Combat Command operations research analyst. “At that point, I had never swum more than 100 yards, hadn’t biked since I was 10 years old and had never run more than six miles at a time in my life.” On the day of the ironman competition, he stood next to the 2,500 other athletes and let his competitive nature take over. The moment he crossed the finish line, Kieffer knew the previous six months of intense training had not been in vain. From that moment on, he had a passion for pushing himself beyond his perceived limits – which led him to the starting line of the 2013 Armed Forces Triathlon. As the crowd silenced, the starting signal sounded and the race began, the male participants dashed across the beach and into the Pacific Ocean as they began the first leg of the race. As the athletes embraced the salt water and started to swim, Tallent and her fellow female competitors, anxious to begin their race, lined up where the males stood moments before. Tallent, a life-long swimmer, decided to lay down her goggles and cap and drifted away from the sport after her freshman year of college. But like most avid athletes, the hiatus was only temporary. “There was a time I only worked out to max my [physical fitness] test,” said Tallent, SEE TRIATHLON PAGE 11


JUNE 21, 2013

TRIATHLON FROM PAGE 10 710th Combat Operations Squadron flight commander. “Triathlons brought me back to my competitive mindset.” Tallent was drawn to the diverse challenges and test of mental and physical stamina triathlons provide. Tallent is now a seasoned triathlete, helping the Air Force women’s team win gold medals in each of the three Armed Forces Triathlons in which she competed from 2010-2012. As she stood on the Point Mugu beach, her competitive spirit came alive again. When the starting signal sounded for the second time that day, Tallent bounded toward the ocean with her fellow female competitors, who plunged themselves into the frigid water and began to swim. As the females fought the pounding surf behind him, Kieffer emerged from the water at the end of the first leg, his stomach churning as much as the ocean. Having stayed up most of the night prior to the race vomiting due to an unknown illness, he was slightly fatigued as he donned his protective helmet. He jammed his feet into the shoes attached to his bike’s pedals and surged forward on the next leg of the race. As a wave of nausea hit him, he reminded himself he was part of a team, and pressed on. He told himself pushing through pain was not a new concept. With his lean, athletic build, it may be nearly impossible to tell Kieffer is a combat-injured Airman. While deployed in Afghanistan, his convoy was ambushed, ultimately leaving him with a traumatic brain injury. “Getting back on the [triathlon] team was my ‘carrot’, the goal I set for myself to get me motivated,” he said. “Just being there with the other athletes was a huge accomplishment to me.” While recuperating from his injuries, Kieffer was unable to compete in two Armed Forces Triathlons, but as a life-long athlete, he would not let anything stop him from reaching his goal of making the Air Force triathlon team for the fourth time. “It’s necessary to say ‘no’ to your mind and embrace the pain,” he said. “I try to push myself further and further each time I train.” As a testament to his drive, Kieffer runs five to seven triathlons yearly and competed in the 2013 Warrior Games, a competition that showcases the resilient spirit of today’s wounded, ill or injured Service members from all branches of the military. Kieffer went home as the competition’s “Ultimate Champion,” a title reserved for

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

the top athlete based on individual performance in a 50-meter swim, 10-meter prone air rifle shooting range, 100-meter sprint, shot-put and cycling event. He made Warrior Games history as the first Airman to win the award. Reflecting on his recent triumph, Kieffer neared the end of the cycling portion. As he jumped off his bike and began to run, he focused solely on pushing through the pain. At the beginning of the bicycling leg, Tallent flew past a competitor, still trying to get her helmet on her head. As she neared the end of the second leg and prepared to run, her calf grew sore from a tear it sustained the year before. When she hopped off her bike and hit her stride, she dug deep and fed off her drive. As Tallent finished the first loop of the run, she could see the male competitors nearing the finish line. She cheered for her team mates, mustering motivation to complete the race, relying on her training with Kieffer. “We’re lucky to have each other. We are the only two Airmen on the Air Force team stationed together,” she said. “We push each other hard while we train, and help each other improve.” With the intensive training regimen, it could be easy to become bored with constant repetition, but Tallent uses her drive to propel her through all aspects of her life. “My military and athletic motivation feed off of each other,” she said. “If I’m motivated in one respect, it helps me push harder in the others.” Ahead, the familiar cheer met Kieffer as he crossed the finish line. Although he was tired, the feeling of accomplishment washed over him, feeling pride in the knowledge he met his goal. “Whenever you compete, your goal should be to do the very best you can, and leave everything on the course,” he said. “You can’t always account for weather, your body or any other outside factors – but you can control your effort. It’s important to always have that carrot, and devote yourself to catching it.” Not long after, Tallent met her fellow competitors across the finish line and cheered for the athletes still nearing the end. At the end of the day, both the Air Force male and female teams came in a close second place, winning silver medals. With the taste of triumph fresh on their lips, the athletes savored the sense of accomplishment while it lasted, knowing it would not be long before the chase started again.

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JUNE 21, 2013

JUNE 21, 2013

U.S. Army, TRA ADOC celebrate birthdays By Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Photo by Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill

U.S. Army Gen. Robert Cone (center), Training and Doctrine Command commander, cuts the Army and TRADOC birthday cake with Fort Eustis' newest Soldier, Spc. James Miller (left),TRADOC band member, and Fort Eustis’ longest-serving civilian, Nelly Herbin, TRADOC management analyst, June 14 at Fort Eustis. A saber is traditionally used to cut the cake, harkening back to the beginning of the service when horse cavalry utilized sabers instead of bayonets in close combat.

Sweat poured down the young Soldier’s face as the platoon leader called cadence. Three miles into the four-mile run, the entire platoon was exhausted, but continued to sing jodies at the top of their lungs. Not many people would consider that a birthday party. However, the four-mile formation run was only the beginning of the festivities held June 14 at Fort Eustis, Va., celebrating the U.S. Army’s 238th and Training and Doctrine Command’s 40th birthdays. After the run, Soldiers, families and civilians sang “Happy Birthday” to the Army and TRADOC before digging into some celebratory cake. U.S. Army Gen. Robert Cone, TRADOC commander, spoke on the importance of TRADOC and the Army in today’s society, as well as the critical mission Soldiers perform each and every day.

“Being in the Army isn’t just a job; it is a profession,” said Cone. “It is about being held to a higher set of values, and earning trust between one another and the American people. When you think about it that way, it is pretty special to wear this uniform.” While Cone’s speech certainly pinpointed the gravity of this year’s celebration, U.S. Army Maj. Ken Ward, TRADOC training operations staff officer, shared his feelings on being a part of the world’s greatest ground force. “Being a part of something that is 238 years old really speaks volumes about the kind of work Soldiers put in every day,” said Ward. “It is exciting to know our work, big and small, can make a big difference in the long run.” The U.S. Army is one of the oldest continuous organizations in America, and one of the oldest military entities on the planet. First established as the Continental Army on June 14, 1775, the U.S. Army has since grown

DIDYOU KNOW? The U.S. Army is one of the oldest continuous organizations in America, and one of the oldest military entities on the planet. First established as the Continental Army on June 14, 1775, the U.S. Army has since grown from 10 companies of riflemen to nearly 700,000 Soldiers today, performing missions just as numerous.

Photo by Staff Sgt. Dana Hill

(From left) U.S. Army Col. Albert Stiller, 128th Aviation Brigade deputy commanding officer; Sgt. 1st Class Forrest Boatman, 1st Battalion, 210th Aviation Regiment instructor writer; Pfc. Jacob Morris, 1st BN, 222nd AVN Regiment, A Company; and Sgt. Maj. Estevan Sotorosado, 1st BN, 222nd AVN Regiment command sergeant major, cut the U.S. Army birthday cake at the Warrior Café at Fort Eustis, June 14. The cake cutting celebrated the Army’s 238th birthday. Boatman, the brigade’s oldest member, and Morris, the youngest member, were chosen to cut the cake as a part of Army tradition.

from 10 companies of riflemen to nearly 700,000 Soldiers today, performing missions just as numerous. Among those missions, training could be considered the foundation necessary for all other aspects to function in the Army. To commemorate that mission, Soldiers also celebrated another year of TRADOC successes, which has its headquarters at Fort Eustis. Created July 1, 1973, TRADOC recruits and trains Soldiers, develops leaders, guides Army doctrine and shapes the Army by building and integrating formations, capabilities and materiel. TRADOC oversees 32 Army schools, each focused on separate areas of expertise within the Army. Separately, the Army and TRADOC have rich histories accented by accomplishments in the fields of war, humanitarianism, technology and knowledge, but together, the Army and TRADOC form a union that deserves admiration and celebration.

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“Being in the Army isn’t just a job; it is a profession. It is about being held to a higher set of values, and earning trust between one another and the American people. When you think about it that way, it is pretty special to wear this uniform.” — U.S. Army Gen. Robert Cone Training and Doctrine Command commander

Photos by Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill

ABOVE: U.S. Army Gen. Robert Cone, Training and Doctrine Command commander, thanks veterans during a birthday ceremony for the Army and the Training and Doctrine Command, June 14, at Fort Eustis. He also shared his pride for Soldiers in Afghanistan for their dedication to the mission. LEFT: The Training and Doctrine Command Band plays “Gonna Fly Now” as runners begin their four-mile run (below) across Fort Eustis. After the run, theTRADOC jazz ensemble played background music for the birthday ceremony. BELOW LEFT: Soldiers stand at attention before marching to the starting line for the celebratory birthday run. Units from across the base ran in the event, each carrying their respective unit flags.


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

JUNE 21, 2013

6DYLQJ RQ WKH FRVW RI PHGLFLQH From the 633rd Medical Group MEDICAL OPERATIONS SQUADRON

Graphic by Airman 1st Class R. Alex Durbin

When filling prescriptions at a military pharmacy, patients receive 90-day prescriptions with no co-pay, and when using a military mail-order pharmacy, co-pays can be between $0 and $43.WhenTRICARE is used for the same prescriptions at retail pharmacies, co-pays can range from $15 to $132.

Service members at Langley Air Force Base, Va., probably know they can save money by filling prescriptions at a local military treatment facility, but few may realize it can save the government a significant amount of money as well. According to statehealthfacts.org, an estimated 3.8 billion prescriptions were filled in the United States in 2011, costing Americans more than $271 billion. The total nears $300 billion when over-thecounter drug remedies are included. “Costs to the Department of Defense to fill these prescriptions vary according to point of service, but the average cost of filling a 30-day pre-

According to statehealthfacts.org, an estimated 3.8 billion prescriptions were filled in the U.S. in 2011, costing more than $271 billion. scription is $19.90 at a Military Treatment Facility, $32.89 with mail-order service and $72.11 at a retail pharmacy,” said Capt. Kellie Zentz, 633rd Medical Operations Squadron pharmacist. “When Service members fill prescriptions off base, more than $180 million of potential military revenue is lost to retail pharmacies in the Tidewater, Va., area.” SEE MEDICINE PAGE 15

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MEDICINE FROM PAGE 14 Patients using military pharmacies not only save the government money, but they also add to their personal savings. “When filling at a military pharmacy, patients receive 90-day prescriptions with no co-pay, and when using a mail-order pharmacy, co-pays for the same prescription range from $0 to $43,” said Zentz “When TRICARE is used on the same prescriptions at retail pharmacies, copays range from $15 to $132. With the national average of 12 prescriptions per person, this could save a patient up to $1,584 every 90 days.” Currently, the 633rd Medical Group satellite pharmacy accepts hard-copy prescriptions from outside physicians and is capable of filling refills on any prescription originally filled on base. The satellite pharmacy is located adjacent to the commissary and is open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday. Paper prescriptions are dropped off at a kiosk located just inside the commissary, while prescription pick up for filled paper prescriptions and refills is situated next door to the commissary. The pharmacy offers the most medication options in the Tidewater area, allowing TRICARE patients in the surrounding area to fill maintenance and outpatient medications at no cost. The formulary at Langley not only includes prescription medications, but also includes a limited number of over-the-counter medications available with a prescription. Medications available on the 633rd MDG formulary can be found by visiting http://www.jble.af.mil/633d medicalgrouphealthcare/pharmacy.asp, or by calling the outpatient pharmacy at (757) 764-7799. Another cost-effective option for Service members is the TRICARE Home Delivery service, said Zentz. The service is available when a pharmacy does not have a medication, or when members do not have access to a military pharmacy. The delivery system is cost-effective for patients when filling generic medications, which are filled and delivered at no cost. Also, patients may receive 90-day supplies of medications, while retail-pharmacy delivery systems often only offer the option of 30-day supplies. To enroll in TRICARE Home Delivery patients must simply visit the website at http://www.TRICARE.mil/ pharmacy. To see the DoD Formulary and compare the cost of medications, use the formulary search tool at the DoD Pharmacoeconomic Center website at http://pec. ha.osd.mil Medical costs are continuously on the rise. With increased costs, TRICARE members see a growing value in using military benefits. To maximize those benefits, speak with civilian physicians about receiving paper prescriptions to bring to a military pharmacy, or visit the TRICARE website for assistance with enrollment in the home delivery system.

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JUNE 21, 2013

1$6$ DHURVSDFH HQJLQHHU KHOSV UHVFXH +DPSWRQ ZRPDQ By Joe Atkinson NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER

Before Bill Leath heard the squealing tires, it was just an ordinary Wednesday morning. He brewed a pot of coffee. He walked out front to grab the newspaper. Then he walked around back to check on his garden. In his backyard, which overlooks Newmarket Creek in Hampton, Leath noticed that something -- probably an opossum -- had dug up some cantaloupe rinds from his compost pile. Not wanting the rinds to attract flies, he set about reburying them. And that’s when his morning went from ordinary to extraordinary. “I just looked up because I heard the tires squealing,” he said. Leath, a Northrop Grumman aerospace engineer working for the Air Traffic Operations Lab (ATOL) at NASA’s Langley Research Center, then watched as a car traveling southbound on Lasalle Avenue launched off the road and plunged upside-down and nose first into the creek. He was stunned. It took his brain a few startled seconds to process what he’d just seen. Then it clicked: a person was trapped in that car.

Photo by David C. Bowman

Aerospace engineer Bill Leath helped rescue a Hampton woman after she lost control of her car and crashed into Newmarket Creek.

“And the next thing I knew I was running,” he said. The 59-year-old Leath crossed more than a football field’s worth of land, some of it marshy, at a near sprint. As he ran, he could hear a woman calling for help. By the time he got to the water’s edge, the car was in so deep he couldn’t see anything more than the trunk. There was no

sign of the woman, who he feared might still be in the car. Leath, a former lifeguard and competitive swimmer, dove in. Back on shore, Leath’s neighbor, Jake Ehret, called out to him. Ehret had seen Leath run through his backyard and thought he might be chasing a burglar. Out of breath, Leath flipped over onto his back and shouted to Ehret for help. “I think he thought I was the one in trouble,” Leath said. “He looked at me like I was crazy, like, ‘Why are you swimming that way?’“ Then Ehret saw the car and jumped in to help. Leath had been swimming against the current for about a minute when he looked up. Just a few feet in front of him, the driver of the car, who police would later identify as Hampton resident Dorothea Allen-Riley, was floating face down in the water. Leath could see air bubbles in her clothes. He suspects the bubbles are what kept her afloat. He grabbed Allen-Riley and pulled her close. Water spilled out of her mouth. She took a huge breath. “I thought, ‘Thank God she’s still alive,’” he said. Now in about 8 to 10 feet of murky creek water, Leath SEE RESCUE PAGE 17


JUNE 21, 2013

RESCUE FROM PAGE 16 and Ehret each took one of Allen-Riley’s arms and swam back to shore with her, being careful to keep her head raised. With the current behind them, the swim was relatively easy. Near the shore, Leath decided it would be best to keep Allen-Riley in the water and wait for help. She was clearly hurt. Blood and water were leaking from her mouth. He was worried that her spine might be injured. Dragging her onshore could be dangerous, he told Ehret. Ehret looked up at his seven-year-old son who was waiting in the backyard with a phone and told him to call 911. As they waited for emergency crews to show up, Ehret talked to Allen-Riley, hoping to keep her conscious. He asked her if anyone else was in the car. Much to Leath’s relief, she said no. Help arrived quickly – police ďŹ rst, then medics. When Leath and Ehret handed Allen-Riley up to police, she was shaking violently. Leath thought she was suffering from a combination of hypothermia and shock. The last he saw of her, medical crews were carrying her away. Thinking the morning’s excitement was ďŹ nally over, Leath went home to shower

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and get ready for work – but work would have to wait. “Before I could get out the door, the press descended on me like the 17-year cicadas,� he said. “I got hit by all three TV channels and the Daily Press.� Stories of Leath’s heroics spread fast and wide. In the time since the accident, he says emails and calls have poured in from old coworkers and friends. A girlfriend he hadn’t heard from in 15 years got in touch with him. He’s taken a good ribbing from his coworkers at NASA Langley, too. “They were singing the ‘Mighty Mouse’ theme to me,� he said. Leath is just glad he was able to do something to help. Though he says he’s “not overly religious,� he can’t shake the feeling that “someone� was watching over Allen-Riley that May morning. To him, it’s “strange� that he happened to be outside when the accident occurred, and stranger still that he “swam right into that woman.� He laughs, though, when someone reminds him that it may very well have been a cantaloupe-craving critter that made the rescue possible. “Yeah, that opossum,� he said. “It was all because of him.�

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LAFBCommunity

JUNE 21, 2013

Submit LAFB Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

Finance closure Due to an official function, the 633rd Comptroller Squadron hours of operation for June 21 will be from 7 to 11:30 a.m. For emergencies, call (678) 993-9402 or 251-8931.

Langley Chief’s Group 5K The Langley Chief’s Group is hosting a 5K fun run/walk at 7:30 a.m. June 21 at the Bayview Commonwealth Center. The event is open to all military personnel, civilians and dependents, with a cash-only entry fee of $10.The remaining registration opportunity will take place at the start line on event day from 6:30 to 7:15 a.m. For more information, contact Chief Master Sgt. Tony Hatcher at 764-4816 or Chief Master Sgt. Chuck Collins at 764-5310.

Exchange offers back-to-school sweepstakes The Army and Air Force Exchange Service will ease the burden of back-to-school shopping for 15 lucky shoppers during the Unilever “Salute to Clean” sweepstakes. Each winner will be awarded a $1,000 gift card, redeemable at any Exchange location worldwide or online at www.shopmyexchange.com. The drawing will be held on or around Aug. 22 – just in time for students to coordinate their closets and stock up on supplies for the first day of class. Customers can fill out and drop off entry forms at any Exchange location through July 11. No purchase is required to enter. Entrants must be 18 or older with a valid driver’s license.

Armed Services Blood Program Blood Drive The Armed Services Blood Program Blood Drive will be held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 25 in the Langley Chapel Annex. For more information, contact Ralph Peters at Ralph.peters@med.navy.mil. Online appointments can also be scheduled at www.militaryblood.dod.mil.

New Moms Workshop The Pediatric Clinic hosts “New Moms Tea/Weigh Day” workshops at 1 p.m. Mondays in the Pediatrics Clinic conference room. Bring your questions to share or just come to listen in. Meet in an informal setting for expert advice, education and experience from a board-certified lactation consultant on topics including breastfeeding support, infant care, getting sleep, childproofing and safety, positive parenting skills and more. To reserve a space in the class or for more information, contact the Langley Lactation Center at 764-9730.

For more information concerning the Langley Hazmart Pharmacy or the 90-Day CAP, call 764-3837. For hazardous waste issues, contact 225-5808/5809.

Golf tournament The 2013 Tidewater Logistics Officers Association Golf Tournament will be held at 8 a.m. July 3 at the Eaglewood Golf Course. Cost is $45 per player for four-person best ball. There will be prizes and raffle giveaways. There are also special events, including longest drive and closest-to-pin. Those interested must register by June 28. To register or for more information, contact Capt. Robert Rabon at 764-3966 or Robert.rabon@langley.af.mil.

Single Airman Ministry events

Opportunity Office at 764-5878.

Langley African American Heritage Council The Langley African American Heritage Council will have its meetings the third Thursday of each month at 11:30 a.m. in the Enlisted Lounge. For more information, contact Master Sgt. Alvin Harris at 764-4410.

Langley Lanes Bowling Center events Please see below for upcoming events at Langley Lanes Bowling Center: ■ The “Incredibowl Summer Program” will be held from May 31 to Aug 31. Prizes will be available anytime open lanes are available. Fill up a 10-game punch card to be entered to win. ■ An “8 for 8” kids league will be held starting June 21 for eight weeks. ■ The “DV8 from the Norm” ball league will be held from June 17 to August 19. Cost is $16 for adults. ■ Cosmic Bowling will be held every Wednesday from 7 to 10 p.m. and Friday from 8 p.m. to 12 a.m. There will be black-light bowling, a deejay and prizes available. The bowling center also offers a game room with darts, pool tables, air hockey and other arcade games. For more information, contact the Langley Lanes Bowling Center at 764-2433.

Orthodox Christian services Orthodox Christian Vespers prayer service will be held every Wednesday at 11 a.m. at Langley Chapel. For the Holy orthodox Sacraments or for pastoral and spiritual needs, contact the Langley Chapel at 764-7847.

The 633rd Force Support Squadron is hosting a free Deployed Family Members dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. July 10 at the Crossbow Dining Facility. Register no later than July 3 by calling 764-3990.

A Shenandoah Valley National Park camping trip will take place from Aug. 30 to Sept. 2. The trip will cost $89 per person, which includes tents, food, a scavenger hunt and transportation. Those interested must sign up no later than Aug. 13. For more information, contact Larry Blakely at 2731033 or 528-0455.

Heart Link

TRICARE hazardous weather e-alerts

Langley Veterinary Clinic policy change

The next Heart Link event is scheduled from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Aug. 9 at the Airman and Family Readiness Center. There will be games, prizes and fun, and discussions on Air Force traditions, resources and the spouse’s role in today’s Air Force. Childcare is available on a spaceavailable basis. To sign up, call 764-3990.

TRICARE is offering state-specific e-alerts for beneficiaries who want the latest information about how TRICARE has been affected during and after severe weather. To sign up for state-specific TRICARE severe weather e-alerts, go to www.tricare.mil/subscriptions.

For the safety of children and pets, children under the age of 12 are no longer permitted to enter the Langley Veterinary Clinic. For more information, call 764-5678.

Deployed Families Dinner

Langley AFB Hazmart, 90-Day CAP Operations The Hazmart Pharmacy, located at 23 Sweeney Blvd., is responsible for the authorization and monitoring of all hazardous materials on Langley Air Force Base. The 90Day Central Accumulation Point facility, located at 510 Poplar Road, is responsible for curbside pickup, preparing and processing of hazardous waste. Both facilities are open Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Before purchasing hazardous materials, you must contact the Hazmart Pharmacy.

Women’s Equality Day planning committee The Women’s Equality Day planning committee will have its meetings the second and fourth Thursday of each month at 1 p.m. in the Bateman Library. For more information, contact the Equal Opportunity Office at 764-5878.

Hispanic Heritage committee meetings The Hispanic Heritage committee will have its meetings the third Wednesday of each month at 2 p.m. in the Langley bowling alley activities room. For more information, contact Master Sgt. Jose Perez at 764-1735 or the Equal

Airmen’s Attic accepting donations The Airmen’s Attic is accepting gently used donations. The following items are needed: housewares, kitchen items, linens and clothing. Items such as large couches, mattresses or box springs will not be accepted. For information, call 764-1363.

Commercial Travel Office change Alamo Travel is no longer the Commercial Travel Office serving JBLE. Effective June 1, a new contract was awarded to WingGate Travel. Implementation of this new CTO will not cause disruptions in the Defense Travel System, nor change reservation or ticketing procedures. WingGate’s telephone numbers are as follows: ■ Local telephone: 315-8349 ■ Toll-free telephone/fax: (888) 683-7848 ■ After-hours emergency toll-free: (877) 627-5801 ■ Calls to the AlamoTravel number, 764-5989, will be forwarded to WingGate’s new number until October 2013. For more information, call the Passenger Travel Office at 764-5071.


JUNE 21, 2013

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Prescription drop-off service

and college credit. The DLTF also offers training for various military occupational skills. Sixteen workstations are available for video tele-training. The Distributed Learning Training Facility is located in Hunter Hall at Bldg. 2730, Madison Ave. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more information, contact Nathan Wortham at 8786934 or visit www.dls.army.mil.

McDonald Army Health Center is now offering a prescription drop-off service at the Refill Pharmacy, located inside the Fort Eustis Exchange. Patients can drop off hand-written prescriptions, which will be filled in two hours. Prescriptions will not be accepted for controlled or scheduled medications, or any medication that has to be signed for at the pharmacy. For more information, contact a pharmacy team member at 314-7900, option three.

Soldier and Family Readiness

Civilian Management Workshop

Soldier and Family Readiness (ACS) classes and briefings for June will include: ■ Baby and Me Play Group – 10 to 11 a.m., Thursdays, Bldg. 501, Madison Ave. ■ DevelopingYour Financial Plan – 9 to 10 a.m., June 25. ■ Federal Employment Process – 10 a.m. to noon, June 27. ■ Home Buying Seminar – 4:30 to 7 p.m., June 26. ■ Military Knowledge Skills for Military Spouses – 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., June 24-27. Unless otherwise noted, classes and briefings will take place in Bldg. 650, Monroe Ave. For more information, call 878-3638.

Thomas Nelson Community College Workforce Development and Yellow Hat Group, LLC will host a free Military Leadership to Civilian Management workshop from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 22 at the Bateman Army Education Center, Bldg. 1500, Madison Ave.This event is free and open to the public. The workshop will feature lessons and best practices on understanding and identifying leadership styles, how to lead teams to success and the application of different leadership styles in military and civilian environments. For more information, contact Regina Leigh at 2913961 or e-mail ricer@tncc.edu.

Teen Summer Volunteer Program The Teen Summer Volunteer Program orientation is scheduled for 1 p.m. June 24 at Bldg. 650, Monroe Ave. The program runs from June 26 to Aug. 23. To apply, contact Donna Cloy, volunteer coordinator, at 878-3638, or e-mail donna.g.cloy.civ@mail.mil. The application deadline is June 21.

2013 Army Soldier Show The 2013 Army Soldier Show is scheduled for 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. June 25 at Jacobs Theater. Admission is free and open to all. Fort Eustis’ own Spc. Reuben Eldridge, 688th Rapid Port Opening Element, is a member of the Soldier Show cast. Come out and support Eldridge and all of the talented soldiers in this year’s show. For more information, call 878-3329.

Family Advocacy Program Picnic on the Patio Join us for a picnic on the patio from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Wednesdays in June at the Fort Eustis Club (weather permitting). The cost is $10 per person. Menu items will include chilled pineapple-avocado gazpacho soup, barbecued pork spare ribs, smoked turkey legs, hot dogs, salad, baked potatoes, corn on the cob, baked beans, cole slaw, and peach and blackberry cobbler with vanilla ice cream. For more information, call 878-5700.

School and sport physical exams are available at McDonald Army Health Center’s Pediatric and Family Health clinics by appointment only. Appointments can be scheduled for Monday through Friday. Call the Hampton Roads Appointment Center at (866) 645-4584 or use TRICARE Online to schedule an appointment (up to 28 days in advance). Appointments are also available on the following Saturdays: June 29, July 27 and Aug. 24. For more information, visit http://mcdonald.narmc.amedd. army.mil.

technician. The Range Control office telephone number is 878-4412, ext. 226 or 878-3834, ext 234. The range operations schedule through June 26 is: ■ Friday – Range BTRACS, 1, 2, 3 (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.) ■ Saturday – Range 5 (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.) ■ Sunday – Range 2, 3 (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.) ■ Monday – Range BTRACS, 1, 2, 3 (8 a.m. to 10 p.m.) ■ Tuesday – Range BTRACS, 1, 2, 3 (7 a.m. to 10 p.m.) ■ Wednesday – Range BTRACS, 1, 2, 3, 6 (7 a.m. to 10 p.m.) All personnel are required to check in and out with Range Control before going into or departing from any range or training area.

Range schedule

Distributed Learning Training Facility

Ranges, training areas and associated facilities are off limits to personnel not engaged in scheduled firing, operations or inspections unless clearance is obtained (in person) from the Range Control Fire Desk or a designated Range Control

The Distributed Learning Training Facility offers free individual Army career training for active-duty Army, National Guard, reserves and DA civilians. Soldiers can earn promotion points (enlisted), retirement points (reservists)

School and sport physical exams

Family Advocacy Program classes for June will include: ■ Anger Management – 1 to 2:30 p.m., Tuesdays ■ Conflict Resolution – 3 to 4 p.m., June 25 ■ Conflict Management – 2 to 3 p.m., June 24 To register, call 878-0807. No children please. Classes will take place at Bldg. 213, Calhoun Street.

Kiwanis Club of Fort Eustis The Kiwanis Club of Fort Eustis meets at noon on the second Thursday of each month at the Fort Eustis Club. All interested parties are invited and welcome. Kiwanis International is a global organization of members of every age who are dedicated to changing the world, one child and one community at a time. For more information, call Lance Musser at 713-1399 or e-mail lance@lennysgolf.com.

Free sitter website The Department of Defense provides a free internet sitter service for military families.The website connects families with quality local caregivers including in-home child care, nannies, tutors, elder-care providers, pet sitters and other services. Active-duty members of all military branches, including activated National Guard and reserve members and their families, can receive a free membership to the service, saving an average of $120 a year. The program provides military families with instant access to caregiver profiles, background checks, pictures, references, reviews, a four-step screening process and a specialized matching technology to select the right caregiver. For more information or to register, visit www.sittercity. com/dod.

Visit the Peninsula Warrior online at www.peninsulawarrior.com


20

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

SPECIALISTS IN ORTHODONTICS OutsideTheGate Braces For Adults and Children

JUNE 21, 2013

Submit Outside The Gate announcements to pw1@militarynews.com

Jamestown Settlement Museum

• Thomas W. Butterfoss, D.M.D., P.C. • Diplomate, American Board of Orthodontics

• Jennifer L. Butterfoss Barton, D.D.S., M.S. • New Patients Welcome Major Insurance Accepted • Invisalign Provider 3 LOCATIONS: • 2111 Hartford Rd., Hampton 838-3400 • 6882-A Main Street, Gloucester 804-695-2575 • 4310 George Washington Memorial Hwy, Grafton 898-5448 www.drbutterfoss.com

MENTION THIS PUBLICATION FOR COMPLIMENTARY EXAM

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IN THE TIDEMILL SHOPPING CENTER 2710 N. ARMISTEAD AVE. SUITE C • HAMPTON 23666 Week Day Hours: 11:30am - 2:30pm & 5:00pm - 8:30pm Saturday: 12:30pm - 8:30pm • Sunday: 1:30pm - 6pm

Good Food, Good People, Good Times rude r Blv

Commander Shepard Blvd.

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The Hampton Neighborhood Commission is sponsoring Neighborhood Pool Days through June 23. Hampton residents can swim for free at the following pools: ■ Briar-Queen Recreation Association Pool, 1680 Duke St. ■ Elizabeth Lakes Estate Pool, 1 Club Run ■ Mallory Pool, 131 Big Bethel Road ■ Riverdale Pool, 810 Charlton Drive ■ Willow Oaks Pool, 236 ½ Beauregard Heights Visitors must abide by pool rules including adult supervision and safety requirements. Accommodations for people with disabilities will be arranged where possible. For individual pool operating hours or more information, call 727-1601, 727-1123, or visit www.hampton.gov.

Mariners’ Museum

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Monday-Sunday 6:30am to 2:30pm Closed every Tuesday

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3370 Commander Shepard Blvd., Suite 100 757-865-4250

Jamestown Settlement, a living-history museum of 17thcentury American history, will host “Party on the Pier” from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. June 22. Against the backdrop of the museum’s re-created 1607 ships, guests can enjoy a barbecue dinner and live entertainment by the SlapNation Band. The Susan Constant ship will also be open for guests to board and costumed historical interpreters will be on hand. Admission is $20 (plus a $2 service fee) for adults; and $10 (plus a $1 service fee) for children ages 3-12. Tickets sold on the day of the event are $25 (adults) and $10 (children ages 3-12). Tickets are on sale at http://historyisfun. org/partyonthepier.htm. Chairs and blankets are welcome; coolers are not permitted. Jamestown Settlement is located on Route 31 South near Colonial Parkway in James City County, just southwest of Williamsburg. For more information, call 253-4219.

WATTS FAMILY DENTISTRY ~ Caring Dentistry with An Artist's Touch ~

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• EVENING HOURS & SATURDAY HOURS • INVISALIGN AND BLEACHING OFFERED

907 Big Bethel Road • Hampton, VA 23666

(757) 838-5999 • www.wattsdentistry.com

■ Boating on Lake Maury – Lake Maury’s boat operations

are open adjacent to the front entrance of the museum. Visitors can rent jon and paddle boats, and canoes for fishing or exploring. Rental boats seat one to six people, weather permitting. Motors are not provided. Visitors may provide their own trolling (electric) motors and batteries, but gas-powered motors are not permitted. Fishing is catch-and-release and a state fishing license is required. All guests using kayaks, canoes or boats on the lake must wear life jackets. Boat rental prices are as follows: 14’ jon boats ($4 per hour, $15 per day); 18’ jon boats ($7 per hour, $25 per day); canoes ($5 per hour, $20 per day). Personal kayaks and canoes are allowed on Lake Maury with a valid annual or daily pass that can be purchased in the museum or on the boat dock.The cost is $50 (season pass); and $10 (daily pass). ■ Maritime Mondays Children’s Program – Join us on Mondays from 10 to 11:30 a.m. through August for fun learning activities for children. Children will be divided into the following age groups: Mini Mariners (18 months to rising pre-kindergarten); Shipmates (rising kindergarten to second graders); and Daring Discoverers (rising third to fifth graders).The cost per program is $2 per student (members); and $2 plus admission (non-members). To register, visit http:// marinersmuseumm.org/maritimemondays. Walk-ins will be accepted as space allows. Groups will meet in the museum’s main lobby.

■ Kayak Camp – July 22-26; and Aug. 19-23.This camp is open to children between the ages of 9 and 15. Times vary depending on the age of the child. To register, visit www. chesapeakeexperience.org. For more information, call Wisteria Perry at 591-7744 or email wperry@marinersmuseum. org. The Mariners’ Museum is located at 100 Museum Dr., Newport News. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday; and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. For more information, call 591-7718 or visit www.marinersmuseum.org.

Military Appreciation Night rescheduled The Virginia Peninsula Chamber of Commerce and the Daily Press will host “Military Appreciation Night” from 6 to 11 p.m. June 29 at Langley Speedway, 11 Dale Lemonds Dr., Hampton. Come out for an evening of stock car and kart racing. Admission is free for active-duty military and their family members (with military ID). Activities will include a special recognition ceremony, military static displays and a special race where the top drivers will race for one of the five branches of the armed forces for the Chamber Cup. Register online at www.military-salute.com for your free ticket voucher. Limited tickets are available. For more information, call 325-8162.

Faith and Freedom Services Bethel Church invites active-duty service members, retirees, National Guard, reserves and family members to its Faith and Freedom Services June 30 at 1705 Todds Lane, Hampton. The services will take place at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. A free catered lunch will be provided following the 11 a.m. service. To register, call 826-1426, ext. 248 or visit bethellife@betheltemple.com.

Civil War Children’s Summer Camp A Civil War Children’s Summer Camp will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily from June 24 to 27 and July 22 to 25 at the Endview Living History Museum, 362 Yorktown Road, Newport News. The camp is open to boys and girls between the ages of 8 and 13. Registration and pre-payment are required before attending this camp. For registration or more information, contact Tim Greene at 887-1862.

Fourth of July Stars in the Sky The Virginia Peninsula’s Fourth of July Stars in the Sky event will be held from 6 to 10 p.m. July 4 at Victory Landing Park, Newport News. There will be fireworks along with a variety of foods, rides and crafts. For more information, visit www.virginia.org/Listings/EventsAndExhibits/4thofJuly StarsintheSky/.

Yorktown Independence Parade Yorktown will be hosting a number of free events to celebrate Independence Day in Historic Yorktown. The Yorktown Independence Day Parade will begin at 9 a.m. July 4 on Water Street. There will be a bell ringing ceremony at 7 p.m. and patriotic entertainment at Riverwalk Landing followed by fireworks at 9:15 p.m. on the York River. For more information, visit www.visityorktown.org or call 890-3500.


JUNE 21, 2013

â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

â&#x20AC;˘

21

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HEALTHY TEETH

CloseUp

&KDQJH RI &RPPDQG &HUHPRQLHV Photos by Staff Sgt. Wesley Farnsworth

For a Lifetime

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LEFT: U.S. Air Force Col. John J. Allen Jr. (left), 633rd Air Base Wing commander, passes the guidon to U.S. Army Col.William Galbraith (above), 733rd Mission Support Group commander, as he assumes command during the unit's change of command ceremony at Fort Eustis, June 18. Galbraith assumed command of the unit from U.S. Army Col. Thomas Wetherington.

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

JUNE 21, 2013

Preventing tick bites for a healthy summer From the 633rd Medical Group PUBLIC HEALTH CLINIC

Signs and symptoms of Lyme disease

As Service members begin to spend more time outdoors this summer, chances of being exposed to ticks and tick-borne diseases also increase. Lyme disease cases continue to rise in Virginia. An estimated 1,110 confirmed or probable cases occurred in 2012 – roughly a 9 percent increase over cases in 2011. Lyme disease in Virginia continues to spread west and south from more concentrated areas in the northern part of the state. The landscape on Joint Base LangleyEustis is an especially prone area, said Tech. Sgt. Aspen Higgins, 633rd Medical Group Community Health Clinic noncommissioned officer in charge. “Ticks are abundant in the grassy and wooded areas of Joint-Base Langley Eustis and the local community,” said Higgins. “They are waiting for the opportunity to latch on to an unsuspecting victim. Service members and their families should heed to tickbite prevention measures because tickborne diseases, including Lyme disease, are preventable.” Higgins and the Public Health Clinic offer the following tips for tick bite and tick-borne disease prevention: ■ Avoid wooded and bushy areas with high grass and fallen leaves. ■ Walk in the center of trails. ■ Wear light-colored clothing, which allows you to see ticks crawling on your clothes. ■ Tuck pant legs into socks so ticks cannot crawl up the inside of pant legs. ■ Use repellent containing 20 percent or more DEET (N, N-Diethyl-mtoluamide) on skin or clothing to discourage tick attachment. While DEET is effective, however, it only works for a few hours. Products containing permetherin can be used to treat boots, clothes, socks or camping gear, and it lasts through several washings and for several days. Pre-treated clothing is available and remains protective for up to 70 washings.

The early stage of Lyme disease is usually marked by one or more of the following signs and symptoms: • A characteristic “bull’s-eye” skin rash, called erythema migrans • Fatigue • Chills and fever • Headache • Muscle and joint pain • Swollen lymph nodes Untreated, the infection may spread from the site of the bite to other parts of the body, producing an array of specific symptoms that may come and go, including: • Additional EM lesions in other areas of the body • Facial or Bell’s palsy (loss of muscle tone on one or both sides of the face) • Severe headaches and neck stiffness due to meningitis (inflammation of the spinal cord) • Pain and swelling in the large joints (such as knees) • Shooting pains that may interfere with sleep • Heart palpitations and dizziness due to changes in heartbeat Many of these symptoms will resolve over a period of weeks to months, even without treatment. However, lack of treatment can result in additional complications. ■ Bathe or shower as soon as possible after coming indoors (preferably within two hours) to wash off and more easily find ticks that may be crawling on your body. ■ Conduct a full-body tick check using a hand-held or full-length mirror to view all parts of your body upon return from tick-infested areas. Parents should check their children for ticks under the arms, in and around ears, inside the belly button, behind knees, between legs, around the waist and especially in hair. ■ Examine gear and pets. Ticks can ride into the home on clothing and pets and then attach to a person later. Tumble clothes in a dryer on high heat for an hour to kill remaining ticks. If ticks are found on the skin, Higgins said there are several tick removal devices on the market, but a plain set of fine-tipped tweezers will remove a tick quite effectively: ■ Use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin’s surface as possible. ■ Pull upward with steady, even pressure. Don’t twist or jerk the tick;

this can cause the mouth-parts to break off and remain in the skin. If this happens, remove the mouth-parts with tweezers. If you are unable to remove the mouth easily with clean tweezers, leave it alone and let the skin heal. ■ After removing the tick, thoroughly clean the bite area and hands with rubbing alcohol, an iodine scrub, or soap and water. Higgins also suggested avoiding home-remedies such as “painting” the tick with nail polish or petroleum jelly, or using heat to make the tick detach from the skin. The goal is to remove the tick as quickly as possible, not wait for it to detach. While Lyme disease is rarely lifethreatening, if a rash or fever develops within several weeks of removing a tick, seek medical attention. The staff at the Public Health Clinic hopes Service members can be more aware of the effects of Lyme disease. Taking the necessary steps to prevent tick bites helps to ensure the Langley community can have an enjoyable summer season.

For more information on Lyme disease and tick removal, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website at www.cdc.gov/lyme, or call the Langley Public Health Clinic at 764-6731.


JUNE 21, 2013

â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

â&#x20AC;˘

Classifieds TO PLACE AN AD...

BY PHONE:

BY FAX: (757) 853-1634

MILITARY NEWSPAPERS OF VIRGINIA

Call: (757) 222-3990 Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

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DEADLINE: Reader & Display Thursday 5:00 p.m. (week prior)

BY EMAIL:

PENINSULA WARRIOR adswork@militarynews.com CLASSIFIEDS 150 W. Brambleton Ave. Norfolk, VA 23510

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Restrictions: â&#x20AC;˘ Only 5 ads per week, per household â&#x20AC;˘ Renewals, corrections and cancellations cannot be taken by phone and must be resubmitted â&#x20AC;˘ Illegible, too long or otherwise do not conform to instructions will not be published and must be resubmitted for the next issue â&#x20AC;˘ Automotive ads must begin with make, model and year â&#x20AC;˘ Real estate ads must begin with name of city, neighborhood and must be your primary residence. â&#x20AC;˘ Ads will not be accepted via official mailing channels such as guard mail or postage and fees paid indicia. â&#x20AC;˘ Free ads cannot be of a commercial nature (i. e., business opportunities, help wanted, etc) and must be personal property of the eligible member. Should not represent a sustained income or business or listed through agents or representatives. â&#x20AC;˘ When advertising a home for rent or home for sale, the home must be THE PRIMARY RESIDENCE. (All rental properties are considered paid ads.) WE DO NOT ACCEPT CALLS FOR FREE CLASSIFIED ADS Deadline Thursday, 5 p.m. for the following weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s publications


24

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

JUNE 21, 2013

% APR

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tax, registration, insurance and dealer fees are extra.

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Peninsula Warrior June 21, 2013 Air Force