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:DUULRU J O I N T June 20, 2014 Vol. 5, No. 24

B A S E

L A N G L E Y - E U S T I S

P u b l i s h e d i n t h e i n t e re s t o f p e r s o n n e l a t J o i n t B a s e L a n g l e y - E u s t i s

:K\ 'R <RX 6HUYH" Joint women’s symposium fosters networking, leadership development SAFETY

– Page 12

Prepared driving gets you there and back safely — Page 4

FEATURE

Armorers provide combat firepower — Page 8

For more online content, check out www.JBLE.af.mil

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CELEBRATION Eustis Soldiers celebrate Army’s 239th birthday — Page 3

Air force EDITION

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

JUNE 20, 2014

CrosswordPuzzle Joint Base Langley-Eustis Editorial Staff Joint Base Langley-Eustis Commander Col. John J. Allen Jr. Joint Base Langley-Eustis Public Affairs Officer Capt. Kevin Whitlatch • kevin.whitlatch@us.af.mil Joint Base Langley-Eustis Editor Senior Airman Aubrey White • aubrey.white@us.af.mil Fort Eustis Managing Editor Staff Sgt. Katie Gar Ward • fteustismain@gmail.com Per Air Force Instruction 35-101/Army Regulation 360-1, only stories and photos submitted by members of the Department of Defense community and DOD news services may be printed in The Peninsula Warrior. Any stories, photos or announcements must be submitted eight days prior to publication. Stories and photos should be submitted to the editor and/or assistant editor at 633abw.paedit@langley. af.mil or Public Affairs Office, 601 Hines Cir., Fort Eustis, VA 23604. Announcements for the Community Section should be submitted to fteustismain@gmail.com. Announcements for the Outside the Gate Section should be submitted to fteustismain@gmail. com. For more information call 878-4920. Authors’ names may be withheld, but all letters must include the authors’ signatures and telephone number. The Peninsula Warrior is an authorized publication for all the members of the U.S. military. Contents of The Peninsula Warrior are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, Department of the Air Force or the Department of the Army. The Peninsula Warrior is printed every Friday by offset as a civilian enterprise newspaper for the Public Affairs Office, U.S. Air Force by Military Newspapers of Virginia at 150 W. Brambleton Ave. Norfolk, VA 23510 under exclusive written contract with the commander, Joint Base Langley-Eustis. MNV is a private firm in no way connected with the Department of the Air Force or Department of the Army. Printed circulation: 25,000. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. A confirmed violation or rejection of this policy of equal opportunity by any advertiser will result in refusal to print advertising from that source. All editorial content of The Peninsula Warrior is prepared, edited, provided and approved by the Public Affairs Office Joint Base Langley-Eustis. All photographs are Air Force or Army photographs unless otherwise stated. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts and supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense or MNV of the products or services advertised.

MILITARY NEWSPAPERS OF VIRGINIA • HOME OFFICE: 150 W. Brambleton Ave., Norfolk, VA 23510 222-3990 • ADVERTISING SALES: 728 Blue Crab Road, Suite C, Newport News, VA 23606; 596-0853; fax 596-1473

ACROSS 4 The 1969 March on _________ is commemorated in the LGBT Community during LGBT History Month. 6 The 1969 _________ Riots were a tipping point for the Gay Liberation Movement in the United States. 7 After a mandatory 60-day time period passed, the repeal of DADT took effect on _________ 20, 2011. 8 The last Sunday in June was originally celebrated as ___ _____ ___.

DOWN 1 National ______ ___ Day is celebrated on October 11. 2 LGBT Pride Month is celebrated every year during what month? 3 This U.S. President pledged to overturn the former U.S. policy during his campaign for the 2008 presidency.

9 What former U.S. policy theoreti5 The Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual & cally lifted a ban on service of homo- ___________ Community

Heritage Spotlight The Khobar Towers bombing was a terrorist attack on part of a housing complex in the city of Khobar, Saudi Arabia, located near the national oil company headquarters of Dhahran on June 25, 1996. At that time, KhobarTowers was being used as quarters for foreign military personnel. During the attack, a truck-bomb was detonated adjacent to Building #131, an eight-story

sexuals in the military, but continued a statutory band instead?

What do you know about Pride? Throughout June, keep an eye out for Pride Month trivia questions. If you think you know the answer, email the Langley Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender committee at sonya.hildebrand@langley.af.mil. The first person to answer accurately will win a prize! Question: The Department of Defense extended benefits to same-sex spouses after which Act was found unconstitutional?

June 21, 2001: Thirteen indicted for attack on Khobar Towers structure housing U. S. Air Force personnel from the 4404th Wing (Provisional), primarily from a deployed rescue squadron and deployed fighter squadron. In all, 19 U.S. Service members were killed and 498 of various nationalities were wounded. The three-year investigation led the FBI to conclude that Iranians were involved in the attack.

At that time, the Clinton administration hoped to open a dialogue with reformist president Mohammad Khatami, which would be impossible after accusing Iranians of supporting terrorist action. A secret letter, delivered directly to Khatami by Sultan Qaboos of Oman, stated that the United States had evidence of direct Iranian involvement in the act and demanded that those involved be

held responsible for their actions. Khatami refused to begin an investigation and Iranian officials stated that al-Qaeda was responsible for the attack. On June 21, 2001, an indictment was issued in United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia in Alexandria, Virginia charging 13 people with murder, conspiracy and other charges related to the bombing.

We want to hear from you. Contact us at fteustismain@gmail.com and 633abw.paedit@langley.af.mil or call (757) 878-4920 or (757) 764-2144.


JUNE 20, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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“We are celebrating those who have served, are serving and who will serve.” — Lt. Gen. Kevin Mangum TRADOC deputy commanding general and chief of staff

By Airman 1st Class Kimberly Nagle 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

U.S. Army Soldiers, civilians and family members from across Fort Eustis gathered to celebrate the Army’s 239th Birthday, June 13. The event included a concert by the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Band, a ball and more. The concert and streamer ceremony kicked off the celebration and were hosted by U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Kevin Mangum, TRADOC deputy commanding general and chief of staff. He also swore-in 46 future Soldiers during the ceremony. “We are here to celebrate the Army Birthday; 239 years that your Army has carried the banner of freedom around our world for those oppressed,” said Mangum. “We are celebrating those who have served, are serving and who will serve.” During the streamer ceremony Soldiers from the 7th Transportation Brigade (Expeditionary) dressed in period uniforms spanning from the Revolutionary War to current combat attire. Those Soldiers presented streamers to be placed on the Army flag. By the end of the ceremony, 189 streamers hung on the flag, each representing a campaign that the Army has fought in. “We reflect on the courage and sacrifice of Soldiers to bring peace and to guarantee our nation’s freedom,” said Sgt. Maj. Jose Velazquez, TRADOC Public Affairs Sgt. Maj., the event’s narrator. “The Army

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“We reflect on the courage and sacrifice of Soldiers to bring peace and to guarantee our nation’s freedom. The Army continues to be America’s force of decisive action and it stands as a shining light around the world.” — Sgt. Maj. Jose Velazquez 239th Army Birthday concert and streamer ceremony organizer continues to be America’s force of decisive action and it stands as a shining light around the world.” The evening’s events were not just a time to reflect on the past, but to celebrate the present and future of the Army. After the crowd sang “Happy Birthday” with the TRADOC band, Mangum joined the youngest Soldier at the instillation, Pvt. Natalie Peterson, 128th Aviation Brigade, and the oldest and youngest recruits and Soldiers cut the Army birthday cake together. “Today’s Soldiers, just like those in days past, refuse to accept defeat and are disciplined and committed to the Army values,” said Velazquez. “The American Soldier is committed to our nation, the mission and fellow Soldiers.” Birthday festivities continued with a run at and a ball at the Fort Eustis Club.

Photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Nagle

(From left) U.S. Army Pvt. Natalie Peterson, 128th Aviation Brigade, Justin Cooke, Delayed Entry Program member, Lt. Gen. Kevin Mangum, TRADOC deputy commanding general, chief of staff and Shakira Smith, DEP member, cut the Army Birthday cake during the 239th Army birthday concert and streamer ceremony at Fort Eustis, June 12.These members represented the oldest and youngest Soldiers at the installation, and the youngest and oldest of the recently-enlisted recruits.

Photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Nagle

Photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Nagle

Photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Nagle

More than 40 members of the U.S. Army Delayed Entry Program recite the Oath of Enlistment.The recruits were sworn in by U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Kevin Mangum, TRADOC deputy commanding general and chief of staff.

U.S. Army Pfc.Troy Gray, 155th Inland Cargo Transfer Company cargo specialist, holds theArmy flag during the 239thArmy Birthday concert and streamer ceremony.The streamers represent the various campaigns the Army has supported.

Members of the Fifes and Drums of York Town perform during the 239th Army Birthday concert and streamer ceremony. By the end of the ceremony, 189 streamers hung on the Army flag, each representing a campaign the Army took part in.


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â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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JUNE 20, 2014

SummerSafety

&ULWLFDO GD\V FULWLFDO GHFLVLRQV 3UHSDUHG GULYLQJ JHWV \RX JHW WKHUH DQG EDFN VDIHO\ By Senior Airman Jason J. Brown 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Each summer, millions of Americans hit the road, venturing out on vacations and road trips. These trips can range between a quick drive down the road to a transcontinental epic, with thousands of potential miles and hours of trafďŹ c. Increased trafďŹ c on roadways can be dangerous, but is only one of the potential threats drivers face. Travelers can greatly improve their chances of successful, incident-free travel by preparing their vehicles â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and themselves â&#x20AC;&#x201C; before even starting the engine.

Before the rubber hits the road Keeping vehicles road-ready should be the ďŹ rst step travelers take before venturing out on any trip. Regular maintenance, such as tune-ups, oil changes, battery checks and tire rotations, go a long way toward preventing breakdowns. From 2009 to 2013, the Air Force suffered two fatalities and 10 injuries over the summer months due to 12 blown tires. Between 2005 and 2007, tire failure contributed to

43.3 percent of crashes. Always inspect tires thoroughly before travel, especially long-distance driving. Use the following guidelines when giving wheels a look-over: â&#x2013; The best way to avoid a ďŹ&#x201A;at tire â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or a blowout â&#x20AC;&#x201C; is to check the pressure on all tires, including the spare, at least once a month. â&#x2013;  A tire doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to be punctured to lose air. All tires naturally lose some air over time. In fact, under-inďŹ&#x201A;ation is the leading cause of tire failure. â&#x2013;  Monitoring tire pressure on trucks, vans and sport utility vehicles is critical, as these vehicles have a higher center of gravity and are more prone to rollover than cars. â&#x2013;  Exercise special care with regard to tire inďŹ&#x201A;ation and tire condition on older tires, particularly in warm weather. â&#x2013;  InďŹ&#x201A;ating tires to the recommended pressure is important when towing a trailer, as some of the weight of the loaded trailer is transferred to the towing vehicle. Check the tire information placard or the ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s manual for the maximum recommended load for the vehicle and the correct tire pressure.

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Photo illustration by Senior Airman Jason J. Brown

Once a vehicle is road-ready, drivers should take extra care to ensure they are prepared for the rigors of long drives. (1) Pack healthy snacks, which provide sustained energy without â&#x20AC;&#x153;sugar crashes.â&#x20AC;? (2) Be aware of â&#x20AC;&#x153;highway hypnosis,â&#x20AC;? an effect caused by the repetition during long drives on highways that can potentially put drivers into a dangerous lull. (3) Stay alert while driving and be aware if you begin to feel fatigued or sleepy. (4) When possible, consider breaking long trips into sections and schedule rest stops at hotels along the route.

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JUNE 20, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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CRITICAL FROM PAGE 4

JUNE 20, 2014 Before embarking on a summer road trip, drivers should exercise proper vehicle preparation, with tire care being especially important. (1) Visually inspect tire tread. (2) Use the “penny test” to determine the amount of tread left. If the tread does not cover Lincoln’s head, you may need to replace the tire. (3) Use a pressure gauge to check tire pressure. (4) Inflate tires to the manufacturer-recommended pressure.

■ Always

check pressure when tires are cold, meaning they haven’t been driven on for at least three hours. ■ Inspect tires for signs of excessive or irregular wear. Use the “Lincoln’s head” penny test, or look for the built-in wear bar indicators to determine when it’s time to replace tires. Place a penny in the tread with Lincoln’s head upside down and facing you. If you can see the top of Lincoln’s head, you have less than 1/16 of an inch of tread and need to replace the tires. ■ Irregular tread-wear patterns indicate the need for tire rotation, realignment or proper inflation. Accomplish this before any trips.

Dangers of drowsy driving Once the vehicle is inspected and all necessary repairs and routine maintenance has been performed, drivers should prepare themselves for the stress of traveling. Heavy traffic and long-distance driving can have dangerous effects on motorists, including fatigue, complacency and “highway hypnosis,” a lull caused by the repetition of driving long distances in similar roadway conditions.

Drowsy driving causes more than 100,000 crashes a year, resulting in 40,000 injuries and nearly 1,550 deaths annually. The following tips can help drivers get from Point A to Point B safely: ■ Create a positive driving environment. Use music to keep entertained and

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■ Avoid over-eating. Try light meals and regular intervals. Don’t drive on an empty stomach, but over-eating can increase fatigue. Stay hydrated while driving – water is the best choice. ■ Drive well-traveled, major roadways. Taking back roads unnecessarily improves the chances of getting lost or encountering poorer driving conditions in inclement weather. ■ Don’t try to make long trips all at once. If possible try to limit driving to 12 hours each day, and budget time to stop and rest. Consider breaking your trip into sections with stops to sleep and recharge along the way. The open road can bring a world of great adventure, enjoyment and much-needed time away during the summer months, but without proper planning and discretion, an otherPhoto illustration by Senior Airman Jason J. Brown wise fun road trip can end up becoming a permanent vacation. Don’t become a statistic. alert during the drive. For more information about vehicle ■ Bring snacks and water. Avoid salty and driving safety, contact the 633rd ABW snacks, and consider packing fruits, which Safety Office at 633ABW/SEGround provide energy between meals. Safety@us.af.mil. ■ Drive at an easy pace. Avoid hurryEditor’s Note: This feature is a part of a series ing, which can tire drivers and make sushighlighting Critical Days of Summer safety tips. taining alertness difficult.

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

JUNE 20, 2014

FeatureStory

‘Keepers of the flame’ 633rd SFS armorers provide combat firepower to Langley By Senior Airman Jason J. Brown 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Tucked in the back of Langley Air Force Base’s Herron Hall at the base of a stairwell is a cardinal-red door bearing placards warning against unauthorized entry. Beyond the seemingly impregnable door lies a monumental cache of firearms, ammunition and other tactical equipment, meticulously numbered and organized in rolling cases. This hidden vault is the 633rd Security Forces Squadron armory, the focal point for all firearms, ammunition and law enforcement equipment for not only the base’s security forces personnel, but all assigned U.S. Air Force Airmen. Inside, a small team of dedicated SFS Airmen – the armorers – work to ensure this equipment is not only safeguarded, but issued properly, in serviceable condition and accounted for at all times. “Our job is to supply SFS Airmen on regular day-to day operations for protecting the base,” said Senior Airman Mark Walker, 633rd SFS armorer. “Anything they need – weapons, ammunition, lessthan-lethal equipment, radar, radios – they come through us to get it. We’re like a ‘one-stop shop.’”

Photo by Senior Airman Jason J. Brown

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Mark Walker, 633rd Security Forces Squadron armorer, inspects an M9 handgun at the squadron armory at Langley Air Force Base, June 11.The armory stores and maintains accountability for nearly every weapon on the installation, including firearms and ammunition issued to all Airmen deploying downrange.

“Our job is to supply SFS Airmen on regular day-to day operations for protecting the base. Anything they need – weapons, ammunition, less-than-lethal equipment, radar, radios – they come through us to get it. We’re like a ‘one-stop shop.” — Senior Airman Mark Walker 633rd SFS armorer Walker explained each piece of gear an Airman takes on shift is issued by the armorers. With defenders on shift at any given time, the armory must maintain 24hour operations to ensure security forces have access to equipment vital to force protection and law enforcement. Security forces Airmen have multiple levels of force available for daily use including the M4 carbine rifle, M9 pistol, batons and less-than-lethal weapons. Law enforcement patrol Airmen also issue vehicles and radars at the armory. The armorers’ job doesn’t end at arming patrol Airmen – they supply gear to Airmen training at the combat arms range, Military Working Dog handlers on duty, visiting cadets training with simulation rounds, and perhaps most importantly, arming every Airman from Langley tasked to deploy across the globe. “During duty hours, most Airmen pick up their weapons from [the 633rd Logistics Readiness Squadron], but even LRS gets the weapons from us, and if Airmen are leaving for deployment after duty hours, they come to us,” Walker said. “We get to help every deploying Airman, and that really increases the emphasis on how important our work is. We’re the keepers of the flame.” Between issuing and accepting gear, the small team of armorers must meticulously account for every single piece of equipment every day – a daunting task due to

Photo by Senior Airman Jason J. Brown

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Mark Walker (left) and Staff Sgt. Steven Owens, 633rd Security Forces Squadron armorers, work to ensure Airmen at Langley Air Force Base receive combat-ready firearms, ammunition and equipment to accomplish the mission at home and downrange.Their positions allow them to interact with nearly every Airman at Langley, which they said gives them a great sense of satisfaction and purpose.

the sheer volume of weapons, ammunition and communications gear in the armory. In addition to maintaining the arsenal, the armory stores and protects weapons for other units on the installation, including the 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordnance Disposal team and the 192nd Fighter Wing of the Virginia Air National Guard. “We literally count the equipment every day, and we can’t go home until it’s done,” Walker said. “We also do ‘serialization,’ which is cross-referencing each and every piece of equipment to our records once a month.” The armory houses more than government-owned firearms. Airman dormitory residents and visitors with firearms store their weapons at the armory. Additionally, personnel living in base housing must file a record of all personally-owned firearms with the armorers. Not surprisingly, being the go-to for every weapon on the installation makes the red diamond-grated issue window near the rear of the armory a popular destination. For a room hidden in the back of the squadron headquarters, it is easily one of the most routinely visited spots at Langley. The armorers said they “wouldn’t have it any other way.” “We have a big responsibility down here because we’re in charge of every weapon and round of ammo that enters the hands

of Airmen here. We take pride in being able to do that,” said Walker, who has served in the armory for nearly a year-and-a-half. “We get to know everyone, too. “The best thing about my job is that I’ve been able to meet so many new people,” he continued. “When I first arrived here as a new Airman, I’d work my shift then go home, so I only got to know the other [Airmen] in my flight. Everyone in our squadron comes to the armory for equipment issues, and I’ve built connections and friendships from having the opportunity to help them.” The armorer’s position is a squadron special duty; interested Airmen apply, complete an interview and are selected by unit leadership. Staff Sgt. Steven Owens, the armory’s new assistant noncommissioned officer in charge, said he embraced the chance to take on a new and demanding leadership position. “I wanted a change of tempo from working on flight, and I worked in the armory at my last base so I generally knew what to expect as an armorer,” Owens said. “Getting to be the NCOIC is a step in my career progression because I get to improve my leadership skills in one of the most challenging but mission-critical organizations on the base. “Without us, our Airmen can’t protect and defend the base, and can’t go forth into the fight,” he added. “We may be stuck here in the back of the building, but we’re out there on the frontlines of the fight.”


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JUNE 20, 2014

MCAHC ‘Steps up’ for Performance Triad kickoff By Andrew Brown MCDONALD ARMY HEALTH CENTER

More than 60 U.S. Army Soldiers and civilian employees participated in the first of three kickoff events to promote the Army’s Performance Triad hosted by McDonald Army Health Center, June 3. The Performance Triad is an Army Medicine health initiative that promotes an optimal balance of sleep, activity and nutrition to improve the overall health of soldiers, family members, civilians and retirees. The first event, called “Step Up and Step Out!” included a sign up for a 10,000 step, 30-day challenge. “Hospital staff members showed their willingness to step out of their activity comfort zones and step up to the challenge of 10,000 steps a day over the next month,” said Maj. Tameka Bowser, Army Public Health Nursing chief. Additional kickoff events included presentations on “Fuel for Healthy Living,”

“This is just the beginning. We will continue to have challenges over the summer that will concentrate on improving what we eat and the quality of our sleep.” — Maj. Tameka Bowser Army Public Health Nursing chief and “10 Tips for Better Sleep.” While the hospital staff target their kick-off events this month, the health aspects of the triad should always be a focus, Bowser said. “This is just the beginning,” she said. “We will continue to have challenges over the summer that will concentrate on improving what we eat and the quality of our sleep. We take a step-by-step approach to the triad, addressing one pillar each month and we hope to incorporate all of our healthy habits into the 26-week

Photo by Andrew Brown

More than 60 U.S. Army Soldiers and civilian employees participated in the first of three kickoff events to promote the Army’s PerformanceTriad hosted by McDonald Army Health Center at Fort Eustis, June 3. The Performance Triad is an Army Medicine health initiative that promotes an optimal balance of sleep, activity and nutrition to improve the overall health of soldiers, family members, civilians and retirees.

Performance Triad Challenge in the fall.” For now, the team is looking for creative and fun ways to reach their 10,000 steps. Some are tracking with pedometers, but plenty are using their smartphone apps.

For more information on the triad or to participate in McDonald Army Health Center programs, contact Bowser at 3148037 or e-mail tameka.d.bowser.mil@ mail.mil.

CYBERWARFARE HAS A NEW FIRST LINE OF DEFENSE. LEARN FROM THE LEADER. B.S. IN CYBERSECURITY M.S. IN CYBERSECURITY STUDIES

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JUNE 20, 2014

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([SHUW $UP\ PXVW DGDSW WR JOREDOL]DWLRQ By Nick Duke FORT BENNING, GEORGIA

Maneuver Captains Career Course students got a look into the workings of a globalized world June 5, during the latest installment of the Combat Leader Speaker Program. Dana Eyre, a senior social scientist with SoSACorp and a research associate with the Centre for International Studies at Oxford University, was on hand to discuss the implications globalization has for the Army, as well as the future challenges the Army faces in the years ahead. Globalization, he said, is not a new trend. “It’s not news to say that the world is globalized, but we haven’t really fully thought through the implications of a globalized world for the role of the Army,” Eyre said. “What the Army has to be prepared to do is to help preserve the security of that globalized system. Ultimately, we don’t want to rule the world – we want a world where Americans can go about their lives as they choose in safety and security. “What we need is a world that functions so that Americans and all the people in the rest of the world that we’re connected to can live their lives absent of security threats. So, the challenge is adapting to a globalized world in which the preservation of the functioning of the world system is the central thing we’re trying to achieve.” Eyre said gaining a broader understanding of the various societies that make up this globalized system will be paramount. “We have to understand the societies, the systems, what motivates and why threats arise,” he said. “That’s an incredibly complex environment. It’s not a world in which you can just focus on your narrow job and a narrow set of things, you have to understand context and apply those basic skills in that wider context.” To that end, Eyre said the major challenge the Maneuver Captains Career Course students and other future Army leaders will face, is finding ways to remain adaptable. “Leaders have to understand and be able to adapt and maintain mental flexibility,” Eyre said. “They have to develop skills in terms of understanding social systems, understanding people and understanding the dynamics of conflict and social change. That’s the context in which operations are going to occur.” In addition to discussing globalization, Eyre also discussed how the study of war is conducted, and suggested that the lessons of past conflicts may not provide a realistic image of future conflict. “The Army knows it has to be ready for an uncertain future,” he said. “The problem is what the future is going to be is almost certainly not what we expect. What the Army has to do is integrate the lessons of the past with an anticipation of how the world is going to evolve. We’ve got to integrate the lessons of Iraq and Afghanistan, and we can’t deny or be unprepared for any challenge in the full spectrum of activities. So, the central challenge is figuring out how we integrate current lessons with past lessons to produce an Army that’s ready for the future.”

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;You represent more than the 100 ladies here today â&#x20AC;&#x201C; you represent the whole Air Force. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been in 29 years and when I think of why I serve, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s because of all of you.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chief Master Sgt. Trae King 633rd Air Base Wing command chief

ABOVE: U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sgt.Trae King, 633rd Air Base Wing command chief, shares her personal experiences in a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Leaders Who Serveâ&#x20AC;? discussion panel at the 27th Annual Joint Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Leadership Symposium in Norfolk, June 13. More than 100 Airmen from across the world attended.The twoday event, themed â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why Do We Serve?â&#x20AC;?, offered opportunities for personal and professional development with a focus on leadership, while also highlighting the achievements of female leaders who continue to break barriers and achieve greater success around the world. RIGHT: U.S. Air National Guard Brig. Gen. Dawne Deskins, Air National Guard sexual assault prevention program ofďŹ cer, encourages Airmen during the symposium.The second day of the symposium was servicespeciďŹ c and the Air Force sessions highlighted the perspective of the serviceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s senior leaders.

Photos by Staff Sgt. Antoinette Gibson

JUNE 20, 2014

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:RPHQÂśV V\P PSRVLXP IRVWHUV QHWZRUNLQJ OHDGHUVKLS GHYHORSPHQW By Staff Sgt. Katie Gar Ward 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

The Sea Services Leadership Association hosted the 27th Annual Joint Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Leadership Symposium in Norfolk, June 12-13, to recognize the strengths and talents of women in the armed forces and discuss the unique aspects of being a female Service member. More than 800 U.S. and international Service members from all branches attended the two-day event, which featured keynote speakers, an awards luncheon, professional development sessions and service-speciďŹ c forums. In conjunction with the conferenceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theme, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why Do You Serve?â&#x20AC;?, the guest speakers expanded on aspects of military lifestyle that impact women the most, challenges that are unique to female Service members, as well as lessons from their careers and life experiences. The ďŹ rst day of the symposium began with opening remarks from retired U.S. Coast Guard Rear Adm. Mary Landry, Coast Guard director of incident management and preparedness policy. She spoke about the history and evolution of women in the military and government departments. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have this amazing country, Constitution and history, and women have been a part of it since the Revolutionary War,â&#x20AC;? said Landry. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I realize the struggles of what it means to be a woman in the service and I have so much respect for the women who came before us.â&#x20AC;? Landry also offered advice and insight

rrelating to why she chose to serve, and how iit relates to women currently serving in the military. m â&#x20AC;&#x153;While you all have various reasons for sserving, they are all right reasons,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your reasons will also change and evolve over time, so allow that wonderful evolution. o You will look back and see how much you Y have accomplished, because the military is a h great place for lifetime learning.â&#x20AC;? g During her remarks, Landry touched on tthe various challenges that face women in the aarmed forces, such as trying to ďŹ nd a perfect balance between home life and work, and enb ccouraged female Service members to accept tthat sometimes there will be an imbalance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Many of you are top achievers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; you wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t survive in the military if you w werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t, so donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be hard on yourself. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t w dwell on the things that challenge you,â&#x20AC;? she d ssaid. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Respect each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s diversity and rrespect what you all bring to the military. We are women in the service, but we are W aalso people in the service, with a relevant place in it. As we rest on the shoulders of p aall those who served before us, we have to tthank them and I also and thank you. Each day you are paying them back through your d ccontributions.â&#x20AC;? Following the opening guest speakers, Service members attended professional deS velopment sessions and informational fov rrums, which focused on ďŹ nancial planning aand decision-making strategies and also inccluded a session pertaining to the Depart-

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have this amazing country, constitution and history, and women have been a part of it since the Revolutionary War. I realize the struggles of what it means to be a woman in the service, and I have so much respect for the women who came before us.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; retired U.S. Coast Guard Rear Adm. Mary Landry Coast Guard director of incident management and preparedness policy ment of Defenseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sexual Assault Prevention Strategy. The forums fostered many networking opportunities and helped promote a learning environment for future leaders, said Coast Guard Rear Adm. Cari Thomas, chairman of the board for SSLA. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is a legacy in leadership. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been in the Coast Guard since 1980 and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been an amazing 34 years of wearing this uniform. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my job now to give back to the women who will follow and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the purpose of this symposium,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want them to learn from each other, because we all come from different places and backgrounds, have different thought processes and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just one right way to do something.â&#x20AC;? Thomas also shared what she thinks can be an obstacle for female Service members, which is something she calls the â&#x20AC;&#x153;canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t-say-no gene,â&#x20AC;? an aspect of oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work ethic that can sometimes take away from time with family. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In our nature as wives and mothers, we want to love and give compassion, so when we see someone who is hurting or needs help, we want to help them. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s part of what our

ethos is,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important to ďŹ nd ďŹ&#x201A;exibility in your family, to be able to handle all the vagaries of life. When I put this uniform down, I still want to be married and I still want to be a mom. The work is going to be there afterward and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s okay to stop work to go home and spend time with your family.â&#x20AC;? The second day of the symposium was centered around service-speciďŹ c activities, where members of each branch gathered with their respective services for question-and-answer sessions, forums and small-group discussions. During the Air Force sessions, participants discussed health tips, Sexual Assault Prevention and Response and retention issues among women in the military. For U.S. Air Force Tech Sgt. Monica Alvarado, 633rd Medical Group ophthalmic technician, hearing from women who share similar challenges creates a collaborative environment where she can apply those lessons to help shape her own reasons for serving. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I serve because I wanted to make a difference in my community and for my children, to show them you can do something for the com-

munity as well as yourself,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This symposium a simply amazing experience Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never had before. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve learned a lot from the women in the different services, their perspectives, their experiences and successes, and that even if you go through challenges, you can still be successful.â&#x20AC;? During the Air Force session, Chief Master Sgt. Trae King, 633rd Air Base Wing command chief, addressed the more than 100Airmen in attendance, ďŹ rst expressing her experience after attending her ďŹ rst symposium four years ago, where only 30 Airmen were present. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I left my ďŹ rst year so inspired and encouraged. You represent more than the 100 ladies here today â&#x20AC;&#x201C; you represent the whole Air Force,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been in 29 years, and when I think of why I serve, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s because of all of you.â&#x20AC;? King continued, sharing her motivations for joining after coming from humble beginnings. She said her initial goal was to make the rank of master sergeant, but that desire expanded over the course of her career. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see women in higher ranks, I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see female generals. I couldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gotten out 10 years ago, but the Air Force has changed my entire life,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s afforded me many opportunities, and allowed me to raise my daughter. I started going to school. Now I serve because I have the opportunity to lead women like you all the time, and you encourage and empower me every single day,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When people ask me why I serve, I say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;well why not?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?

Photo by Staff Sgt. Antoinette Gibson

Photo by Staff Sgt. Antoinette Gibson

Photo by Staff Sgt. Antoinette Gibson

The Granby High School U.S. Navy all-female color guard presents the colors at the 27th Annual JointWomenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Leadership Sym mposium in Norfolk, June 12.

U.S. Coast Guard Rear Adm. CariThomas, Sea Service Leadership Association chairman of the board, delivers opening remarks at the symposium. More than 800 Service members from across the world attended.

U.S. Air Force Airmen and international Service members participate in a small group discussion.The discussion groups, titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Desire to Serve,â&#x20AC;? focused on womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s retention in the military.


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JUNE 20, 2014 United States Air Force Staff Sgt. William Harth, 1st Maintenance Squadron Aircrew Egress craftsman, left, and Staff Sgt. Angelo Lowe, 1st MXS Aircrew Egress journeyman, remove the cover of an F-22 Raptor canopy at Langley Air Force Base, June 9. Egress Airmen ensure all components responsible for safely ejecting a pilot from an F-22 Raptor are functioning properly and efficiently.

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As the canopy releases from the fighter jet and the seat detaches from a set of rails, a pilot’s life is being saved. The mission of the U.S. Air Force is to “Fly, Fight and Win.” However the men and women assigned to the 1st Maintenance Squadron Aircrew Egress shop do their part in ensuring the mission is accomplished by providing a pilot’s last lifeline. Egress Airmen maintain the capabilities to save a fighter pilot’s life in the event the aircraft can’t be recovered. “The Air Force spends a lot of time and money to make sure pilots are trained properly and can protect the people on the ground,” said Staff Sgt. Angelo Lowe, 1st MXS Aircrew Egress journeyman. “We are here to protect the pilots and make sure they see another day in the event their aircraft begins to go down.” There are three ejection possibilities, each dependent on the speed and altitude at which the aircraft is flying. “Their drogue parachute will deploy depending on the speed and altitude at which the pilot is flying,” Lowe explained. “The drogue

“The Air Force spends a lot of time and money to make sure pilots are trained properly and can protect the people on the ground. We are here to protect the pilots and make sure they see another day in the event their aircraft begins to go down.” — Staff Sgt. Angelo Lowe 1st Maintenance Squadron Aircrew Egress journeyman

parachute will slow down the pilot until it gets to a certain altitude, to allow the actual recovery parachute to separate from the seat.” To achieve a successful ejection, egress Airmen work with up to 45 explosives components on a single aircraft, totaling 1,700 components between all the egress systems. Each explosive is responsible for doing a separate job. First, there are the thermal batteries, which start the ejection process for the pilots as soon as they pull the ejection handle. Once the pilot pulls the handle, a signal is sent to the recovery sequencer, or “the brains of the seat.” The recovery sequencer will then tell every explosive what to do and when to do it. Every 30 days Airmen conduct “egress finals,” which are required inspections of the total egress sys-

tem. During this assessment, Airmen check everything from seat cushions to canopy rockets. The examination also checks the oxygen bottle, guaranteeing it is at the correct levels. Anytime the egress system becomes disconnected, personnel conduct an inspection. If problems arise with the system, Airmen fix the issues on the spot. Dealing with such sensitive material can be challenging, but the Airmen working on the egress system know the importance of their mission. “The pilot’s life is literally in our hands,” said Lowe. “If anything goes wrong with our system – if we don’t make sure a component is functioning properly – that could be the difference between life and death.”


JUNE 20, 2014

AFSCs removed from eligibility for retention boards Courtesy of Secretary of the Air Force Public Affairs Fewer Airmen than originally expected will meet involuntary retention boards this summer and fall, Air Force officials said June 13. Air Force leaders eliminated approximately 4,000 Airmen from eligibility for the upcoming boards at Secretary of the Air Force Deborah Lee James’s direction to bolster manning for nuclear-related air force specialty codes and to account for Air Force leaders budgetary uncertainty reeliminated approxigarding proposed force structure changes. mately 4,000 Airmen “Establishing full manfrom eligibility for the ning in our nuclear posiupcoming boards. tions underscores the vital importance of this mission,” James said. “It also offers these critical Airmen a more stable work schedule and improves their quality of life. Budgetary uncertainty regarding proposed force structure actions is also driving us to retain more Airmen in some career fields. Adjusting our force management programs reduces risk at this point.” Commanders will be provided updated eligibility rosters for their units reflecting these changes; however, given the short timelines associated with these updates, Airmen should check their respective AFSC, grade or year group on the updated matrices posted on myPers to ensure they know their latest status. The enlisted retention boards and officer enhanced selective early retirement board for Airmen who are still eligible will occur in June with results released in late July or early August. “Based on our discussions with Air Force senior leaders, the secretary and I decided to retain 4,000 Airmen who were previously eligible for the involuntary retention boards this summer,” said Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Welsh III. “This adjustment is necessary because we’re not sure whether we’ll be allowed to execute the difficult decisions we made to divest force structure next year and because of our recent decision to increase manning in the nuclear mission. “We don’t want to cut a single Airman more than the number absolutely necessary to keep our force in balance. This adjustment is another action that keeps us aligned with that principle. Thanks again for who you are, what you do and what you stand for,” Welsh said. Updates to information on force management and other personnel programs will continue to be available on myPers. Airmen can also use the force management graphic on the Air Force Portal, which will take them to updated matrices and force management program details.

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The Army is introducing the power of 4G to the battleďŹ eld, providing coverage that stretches across a forward operating base so Soldiers can access mission information from their smartphones, or whevever is needed. The 4G LTE infrastructure is part of a new collection of advanced commercial technologies, including coalition and ďŹ rst responder capabilities and Wi-Fi for command posts, that answer Soldiersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; demands for tactical network systems delivering increased bandwidth and enhanced capabilities in smaller packages. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Soldiers and commanders in tactical operations centers need more bandwidth for data-intensive tasks like sending large PowerPoint ďŹ les, maps, and full motion video,â&#x20AC;? said Lt. Col. Joel Babbitt, product manager for WarďŹ ghter Information Network-Tactical, Increment 1, which is responsible for ďŹ elding this new equipment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The transformational nature of these technologies is increasing situational awareness and effectiveness for Soldiers at all echelons.â&#x20AC;? The Army ďŹ elded the Tactical Network Transmissions equipment package, known as TNT, for the ďŹ rst time to the 86th Expeditionary Signal Battalion, to support the Network Integration Evaluation 14.2 at Fort Bliss, Texas. The exercise was the seventh in the Armyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s series of semi-annual evaluations designed to integrate and mature the tactical network in a relevant operational environment. As their name suggests, the expeditionary nature of these signal battalions requires agility and advanced communications capabilities. These units are ďŹ&#x201A;exible and modular in nature, so they can support a vast range of missions in the most austere regions. They primarily support other units that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have their own communications equipment. Expeditionary signal battalions can support higher headquarters at corps- and division-levels, but they also have smaller teams to support units within a brigade combat

File photo

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Soldiers and commanders in tactical operations centers need more bandwidth for data-intensive tasks like sending large PowerPoint ďŹ les, maps and full motion video. The transformational nature of these technologies is increasing situational awareness and effectiveness for Soldiers at all echelons.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lt. Col. Joel Babbitt product manager for WarďŹ ghter Information Network-Tactical team, or when needed, to provide network support for natural disaster relief efforts or other emergencies around the world. The Army is providing the new TNT equipment collection to signiďŹ cantly increase network capability and throughput while reducing size, weight and power, to help signial battalions become leaner, more versatile and rapidly deployable. Some of the TNT equipment is also scheduled to be ďŹ elded to National Guard units for improved communications during civil support such as natural disasters. Among the multiple capabilities provided by the TNT equipment is WiFi coverage for the tactical operations center, removing some of the cables that tend to clutter command posts and allowing Soldiers to roam from their desks so they can be more effec-

tive. In addition, a 4G LTE infrastructure, which covers the entire forward operating base, allows Soldiers to use their secure network on the battleďŹ eld via smartphones, and in the near future they will be able to use laptops and tablets with the capability as well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Commanders can just pick up their cell phones and directly call or text anyone they need to within the radius. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a much faster line of communication,â&#x20AC;? said Cpl. Michael Bullis, B Company, 86th Expeditionary Signal Battalion, who operated the equipment at NIE 14.2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;On the software end, Soldiers have a centralized knowledge base on their phones, and the Army will continue to add apps to provide a more realistic view of what is going on in operations.â&#x20AC;? SEE WI-FI PAGE 17


JUNE 20, 2014

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WI-FI FROM PAGE 16 As part of the TNT effort, the Army married its 4G LTE/Wi-Fi system with a National Security Agency encryption solution, Commercial Solutions for Classified. It uses the same encryption technology as the commercial Internet, enhanced for military purposes, enabling the Army to avoid research and development costs to incorporate this advanced technology; TNT is the first Defense Department program to use the solutions for military purposes. “Medics can use the 4G phones in forward operations, with apps like ‘patient tickets,’” Bullis said. “They put the information directly into their phone while they are right there on the scene, instead of having to come back, or give the information to someone over a radio to type it in.” The TNT technologies also include the Tropo Lite terminal, nick-named “Tropo in a can” by Soldiers, because of its transit-cased deployability. Tropo Lite bounces microwaves off the atmosphere for high-speed transfer of large volumes of data between sites and over mountains – providing an alternative to expensive satellite communications. It also includes a smaller, more transportable line-of-sight radio system, called TRILOS, which significantly increases throughput over legacy radios from 16 Mbps to 200 Mbps. “Having more throughput means faster and more reliable services and in wartime it is critical for a commander to send his message quickly,” said Capt. Levelle Moore, B Company commander, 86th Expeditionary Signal Battalion. This spring’s NIE included increased joint and coalition force participation and to help support the coalition aspect of the event, the TNT package introduced the versatile Mission Network Enclave. Within 10 minutes this network stack can be reconfigured to provide tactical access for one of four different networks: The coalition network, Secure Internet Protocol Router, Non-secure Internet Protocol Router, or commercial Internet and phone service. This flexibility enables the enclave to support either coalition operations or

civil support, such as first responders in disaster relief efforts. The system’s integrated radio-bridging and cross-banding solutions provide seamless interoperability among disparate radio nets that previously could not communicate. The need for this type of capability was made evident by communication lapses such as those that occurred during Hurricane Katrina relief, when first responders could not communicate between agencies. “The enclave is going to be great because we may be called to support a natural disaster or an emergency around the country, like Hurricane Katrina or Sandy,” said Maj. Rickie Meers, operations officer for the 86th Expeditionary Signal Battalion. “It is going enable us to integrate all the different civilian agencies and combine all of their different radio systems and frequencies to be able to talk quickly between each of the agencies and with everyone out there. That is invaluable.” Along with increased capability, ease of use and size, weight and power reduction are high priorities for the Army, and Soldiers in the field are beginning to notice significant improvements as technology evolves. Before the turn of the century, electronic devices like televisions were large and cumbersome, and it took a lot of effort to move from location to location. But fast forward to 2014 and movies are being watched on smartphones and tablets. As technology continues to evolve, it’s going to make missions easier on Soldiers and their units, Moore said. Additionally, today’s Soldiers have grown up in a digital age and are often found teaching their parents how to operate the remote. The Army is working to make new technologies such as TNT more intuitive and easy to operate, which will also ease Soldier burden, he said. “Soldiers are used to having some of this technology at home, so they just pick it up and can use it right away,” Moore said. “These new capabilities are going to be an asset in the long run and the Soldiers are excited about receiving this equipment.”

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JUNE 20, 2014

86 &\EHUFRP &KLHI &\EHUVSDFH RSHUDWLRQV DUH NH\ WR IXWXUH ZDUIDUH By Cheryl Pellerin AMERICAN FORCES PRESS SERVICE

In the cyber domain of 2025, the ability of military formations to operate offensively and defensively will be a core mission set and commanders will maneuver the capability much as they maneuver ground forces today, the commander of U.S. Cyber Command said recently. Cybercom Commander NavyAdm. Michael S. Rogers, who also is director of the National Security Agency, was the keynote speaker at a June 12 meeting at a cyber seminar hosted by the Association of the U.S. Army’s Institute of Land Warfare. The theme was “Army Networks and Cybersecurity in 2025.” “In the world of 2025, I believe the ability of Army formations to operate within the cyber domain, offensively and defensively, will be a core mission set for the U.S. Army and its operational forces,” Rogers told the audience. The Cybercom commander said that by 2025 the military services will have ingrained into their culture the reality that networks and cyber are a commander’s business. The admiral, who most recently served as commander of the U.S. Fleet Cyber Command and the U.S. 10th Fleet, said this has been a major cultural challenge in the Navy. “In the year 2025, I believe Army commanders will maneuver offensive and defensive capability much today as they maneuver ground forces,” Rogers said, adding that command and control, key terrain, commander’s intent, synchronization with the broader commander’s intent, and a broader commander’s operational concept of operations will be cornerstones of Army cyber operations by then. “In 2025,” he said, “the ability to integrate cyber into a broader operational concept is going to be key. Treating cyber as something so specialized, so unique – something that resides outside the broader operational framework – I think that is a very flawed concept.” Between now and 2025, Rogers said,

Photo by Staff Sgt. Kelvin Green

Army Sgt. 1st Class Michael Deblock (left),Vermont Army National Guard Computer Network Defense Team, discusses new ways to make the exercise more challenging for cyber defenders with a fellow Red Cell team member during the 2014 Cyber Shield exercise at the National Guard Professional Education Center, North Little Rock, Ark., April 29.

a primary challenge will be integrating cyber and its defensive and offensive capabilities into a larger operational construct that enables commanders to apply another, broader set of tools in achieving their operational missions. When he thinks about how Cybercom and the services will get to 2025, Rogers said, he tries to keep three points in mind. The first, he said, is that cyber is operations. Commanders must own the cyber mission set, integrating it into the operational vision and becoming knowledgeable about the broad capabilities of a unit, formation or organization and its potential vulnerabilities. “I think it’s going to be foundational to the warfighting construct of the future,” Rogers said, adding that the challenge is as much cultural as technical. “To make this work, in the end, it’s about our ability to synchronize the capabilities of a team,” he added, “from our junior-most individuals to our senior-most individuals, from capabilities resident within the services and as a department, to the external partnerships we’re going to have to form.” The second point Rogers said he keeps

in mind is that requirements of the future include a joint network backbone for all of the Defense Department. “I never understood why Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and, arguably, our Coast Guard teammates were spending a lot of time and money to independently create, maintain, build and operate a global communications backbone,” Rogers said. Instead, he added, “make the services responsible for the last tactical mile of a Department of Defense-wide backbone that spans the globe, down to mobile and tactical users, whether they’re in a garrison scenario or whether they’re out maneuvering in the field, on an aircraft, on a ship or in a squadron.” The third point, Rogers said, is that people and partnerships are key. “Don’t ever forget that, in the end, operating efficiently in cyberspace by 2025 is all about people and partnerships,” the admiral said. “It’s about our ability to create a workforce that understands the vision, has the tools and capabilities they need to execute this vision, and is integrated into the broader effort.” SEE CYBERSPACE PAGE 19


JUNE 20, 2014

â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

AIR FORCE PERSONNEL CENTER PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Summer is just around the corner and right now is the perfect time to begin putting together your familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s summer reading list. Air Force libraries have launched the summer reading program, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paws to Readâ&#x20AC;? and are planning a range of activities for children, teens and adults. Activities will range by location and include everything from nature programs to K-9 demonstrations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We hope people will sink their teeth into this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program and fetch more books than ever before,â&#x20AC;? said Marjorie Buchanan, the Air Force Personnel Center libraries branch chief. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last summer the global program set a new reading record of 14.6 million minutes spent reading. Our goal this year is to break that record by providing activities and books for the whole family to enjoy.â&#x20AC;? Base libraries throughout the Department of Defense will sponsor events and themes developed by iREAD. Resource guides, animal-themed materials and activities were developed by librarians to motivate chil-

dren to read. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our goal is to make sure reading is fun for children and their families, but we also know itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a very important program for supporting brain development, student achievement and learning over a lifetime,â&#x20AC;? Buchanan said. Registration is underway at more than 200 Department of Defense libraries. Interested readers can go to their base library for more information visit http://ila.org/dodsumread. Those who are not near an installation can email dodsumread@navy.mil for participation information. For Airmen interested in checking out library books electronically, the online Air Force library provides Airmen, civilians, retirees and family members resources such as electronic books, audio books and much more. To access the online Air Force library, visit the Air Force Portal at www. my.af.mil and click on the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;Libraryâ&#x20AC;? in the navigation bar. For more information about other library programs and quality of life initiatives, visit the AFPC Services website at www.myairforcelife.com or www.usafservices.com.

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CYBERSPACE FROM PAGE 18 operational concepts for use in cyberspace; and â&#x2013; Being mindful of policy and administrative changes needed to operate in cyberspace. Addressing the departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to compete on the open market for exceptional cyber talent, Rogers said cyber is no different from any other Defense Department mission in terms of going after talented individuals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If the view is that pay is the primary criteria to get people with cyber expertise to join the department, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to work for us,â&#x20AC;? he added. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll compete because of what makes us different. We will appeal to men and women who have an ethos of service and who believe in the idea of being part of something bigger than themselves.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to compete for the same people because, quite frankly, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to give them the opportunity to apply their knowledge in a way that you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t legally do on the outside,â&#x20AC;? he added, prompting chuckles from the audience.

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The partnership piece is a key area, he added, â&#x20AC;&#x153;because we, the Department of Defense, are not the cutting edge when it comes to networks, communications or information technology.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are a user of technology that is largely generated by individuals and organizations that reside outside the DoD. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see that trend changing between now and 2025,â&#x20AC;? he added. As Cybercom commander and operational commander for the cyberspace mission set, the admiral said focusing on ďŹ ve Cyber Command priorities will help military commanders build the joint force for 2025. The priorities are: â&#x2013; Building a trained and ready operational cyber force; â&#x2013;  Building a joint defensible network which architecture has core design characteristics of defensibility, redundancy and resilience; â&#x2013;  Creating shared situational awareness in cyberspace; â&#x2013;  Creating command and control and

19

www.peninsulawarrior.com 21 6$/( 72'$<

Libraries launch â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Paws to Readâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; reading program for families By Staff Sgt. Ian Hoachlander

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20

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

LAFBCommunity

JUNE 20, 2014

Submit LAFB Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

FTAC curriculum change

American Red Cross needs volunteers

Effective immediately the First Term Airmen’s Center Completion Ceremony is no longer a part of the FTAC curriculum. Airmen will use this time to tour the Community Commons. For more information, contact Tech. Sgt. Terry Bufkin at 764-3166.

The American Red Cross is in need of volunteers to help Privee Bride of Ghent will host a wedding gown giveprovide emergency coverage to families in crisis. Training away July 7 at 350 West 22nd Street, Suite 112 in Norand support will be provided on an individual basis. For folk. For more information or to register, visit www.bridemore information, contact the Red Cross Office at 878- sacrossamerica.com. 3339 or email Sheila.keenan@redcross.org.

Langley Toastmasters meeting

Street Clean up

Vehicle Operations Center duty hours change

Volunteers are needed to help clean up the area around Effective June 16, the 633rd Logistics Readiness Squad- South Seldendale Drive from 3:30 to 5 p.m. For more inron Vehicle Operation Center’s duty hours will change to 5 formation or to register for the clean up, contact Pat Parka.m. to 10 p.m., Monday to Friday and 7 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sat- er at paparker1@cox.net. urday and Sunday. Services will be limited to on-call emergency wrecker operations, protocol service and aircrew Junior Golf Camps support. For any of these emergencies, please contact the The Pines and Eaglewood Golf Courses will host junior Fuels Service Center at 764-4105 or 764-3505. golf camps this summer. Each course will accommodate For more information contact the Vehicle Operations various ages and abilities. Control Center at 764-5714. For more information or to register, visit www.active.com.

Bundles for babies

Dining rooms available

The Langley Airman and Family Readiness Center will The Fireside Room at Eaglewood Golf Course and the host a Bundles for Babies course from 3 to 4:30 p.m., ev- Patio at the Pines Golf Course are available for reservation. ery Wednesday of every other month. For more informa- For more information, call the Eaglewood Golf Course at tion or to sign-up, call 764-3990. 764-4547 or the Pines Golf Course at 878-2252.

Upcoming events at Langley Lanes ■ Dollar Day – Noon to 5 p.m., July 4. Games, hotdogs and hamburgers are all $1 each. ■ Bring your report card – If you have received an “A” on your report card you will receive one free game each day until the end of June. ■ Operation Naked Wings – Mondays and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wings are 60 cents with a choice of buffalo, barbecue and Asian Zing sauce. ■ Cosmic Bowling – Wednesdays from 7 to 10 p.m. Cost is $8 each person and $3 for shoe rental. ■ Stackers are now available at the Kingpin Kafe. Starting at $3.25 each. An additional Burger is $2. For more information, call 764-2433.

Wedding gown giveaway

Oakland Cemetery needs volunteers

The Langley Toastmasters meet at noon every second and fourth Wednesday of the month in the Community Commons. For additional information, please contact Senior Airman Marissa McNitt at 225-5610 or Staff Sgt. Shanell Howard at 225-7377.

JBLE pools schedule Below are the times the pools at Joint Base Langley-Eustis are open: June 13 to Sept. 1 – noon to 6 p.m. ■ Langley Shellbank outdoor pool – open Friday to Wednesday, closed Thursday ■ Fort Eustis community outdoor pool – open Friday to Wednesday, closed Thursday ■ Langley Club outdoor pool – openThursday to Sunday, closed Monday to Wednesday For more information and for summer passes, contact Langley Outdoor Recreation at 764-7170, the Shellbank indoor pool at 225-8163 or the Fort Eustis Aquatic Center at 878-1090.

Oakland Cemetery is searching for volunteers willing to adopt the cemetery and help keep it clean and neat on a long-term basis. Some of the initial work will involve moving Mandatory BAH recertification branches and matching headstones with burials. All U.S. Air Force Airmen receiving dependent-rate BaFor more info, contact Debbie at hccc@hampton.gov. sic Allowance for Housing are required to recertify their entitlement by Dec. 31.Those affected are required to proApprenticeship opportunity vide the Financial Services Office a signed Air Force Form The Norfolk Naval Shipyard located in Portsmouth is 594 and source document validating the requirement for searching for individuals to fill apprentice slots. For more dependent-rate BAH. Service members will be notified by email when they are required to recertify and may use information, call 356-3816. a marriage certificate, youngest child’s birth certificate or QTEMP quit smoking program court order attesting to physical custody. Those who do This year, the Quit Tobacco – Make Everyone Proud pro- not respond by the established suspense date will have gram’s “Tough Enough” campaign is intended to encour- their BAH reduced to single-rate until they recertify. Family Advocacy classes age Service members ages 18 to 34 to quit using tobacco. For more information about Basic Allowance for Housing The Family Advocacy Program is hosting the following For more information or enroll in the SmokefreeMIL text recertification, contact the FSO at 764-3333 or 633cpts. classes at the Health and Wellness Center: messaging program, visit www.ucanquit2.org/en/HowTo- service@us.af.mil. ■ Stress Management classes from 11 a.m. to noon the Quit/SmokefreeMIL.aspx. Machen Elementary tutoring first Tuesday of each month. SGLI premium adjusted ■ Five Love Languages classes from 11 a.m. to noon Machen Elementary School is asking for volunteers to the first Wednesday of each month. Effective July 1, Service members Group Life Insurance tutor students in math, reading and writing. Sessions will ■ Mind over Mood classes from 11 a.m. to noon the premium rate will be adjusted from 6.5 cents to 7 cents take place on Thursdays. second Tuesday of each month. per $1,000 of insurance. For example, the premium for For more information about the tutoring program, con■ Healthy Relationship Skills for Singles classes service members with $400,000 coverage will rise from tact terry.yates@us.af.mil. from 11 a.m. noon the second Wednesday of each month. $26 to $28 a month. Exchange Game Division ■ A four-week Anger Management class begins the first For more info, visit www.benefits.va.gov/insurance. Monday of each month. Participants must attend all four The Army and Air Force Exchange Service now buy used Annual Restoration Advisory Board classes to receive credit. video games in exchange for gift cards through its new pro■ A 1-2-3 Magic from 9 a.m. to noon, July 11. The class Joint Base Langley-Eustis is soliciting public interest re- gram, Game Division. Shoppers can visit the Exchange will explore a positive discipline technique program for par- garding the annual Restoration Advisory Board for Lang- PowerZone to sell games, consoles and accessories includent of children two to 12 years old. ley Air Force Base. The purpose of the RAB is to inform ing from Xbox One, Xbox 360, PS3, PS4, PSP, Wii, Wii U, ■ Prenatal Fitness classes from 1 to 3:30 p.m. the third the public of the base environmental restoration program. Nintendo and Nintendo 3DS games. For more information, contact Mr. JohnTice at 764-9394 For more information about the Game Division program, Tuesday of each month.To sign-up, call 764-6321. or john.tice@us.af.mil. call 766-1282. For more information contact Aillen Ford at 764-9581.


JUNE 20, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

EustisCommunity

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Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

National Guard and Reserve MGIB start error

2014 U.S. Army Soldier Show

Headquarters Army Continuing Education System is aware the Integrated Total Army Personnel Database is capturing the wrong data element for the Montgomery GI Bill eligibility start date from National Guard and Reserve personnel systems and that many Soldiers were wrongly put on One-Year Service Eligibility hold; HQ ACES has given all Army education counselors the ability to defer this hold for up to 90 days. If you have been put on this hold, contact the Education Center at 878-2083 to have the hold deferred. Counselors will use the Soldier’s Joint Services Transcripts, pay entry base date or other systems to validate this deferral; HQ ACES is working to resolve this issue as quickly as possible.

The U.S. Army Installation Management Command presents the 2014 U.S. Army Soldier Show on June 23 at Jacobs Theater. This year’s theme is “Stand Strong.” Watch a 90-minute live Broadway-style variety show at 2 and 7 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, visit army.mwr.com/soldiershow.

GoArmyEd mobile application The GoArmyEd mobile application is free and allows users access to information while on-the-go. Soldiers can use the app to locate points of contact or Army education centers and offices.The app is available for Apple and Android devices. For more information, contact the Army Education Center, at 878-2083.

GM Military Discount Ride and Drive The General Motors Military Discount Ride and Drive will take place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 20 at the Exchange parking lot. Each participant will receive a $10 AAFES gift card. For more information, contact Sherri Noland at 878-4430.

Balfour Beatty Communities events ■ Post-wide yard sale – 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., June 21. Residents are welcome to set up items on their front yard. They are also reminded to not leave unwanted items or trash on the curbside. ■ Welcome Summer Family Luau – 3:30 to 5 p.m., June 27. Free food and prizes. Donation of used paired shoes, personal care and beauty product containers will also be accepted for the TerraCycle program. For more information, contact Jana Cooper at 328-0691 or jacooper@bbcgrp.com and visit www.fteustishomes.com.

Vacation Bible School The Fort Eustis Regimental Memorial Chapel invites boys and girls who have completed kindergarten through fifth grade to take part in the SonTreasure Island Vacation Bible School at 923 Lee Blvd. Classes take place from 9 a.m. to noon, June 23-27. Children can sing songs, watch skits, create crafts and play games. Van transportation is available for children residing on post. Class size is limited. To register, visit the chapel from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday and from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Sunday. For more information, contact Jeanne Vaul at 878-1455 or verna.j.vaul.civ@mail.mil.

Ammunition Supply Point inventory Appointments will not be accepted during the Fort Eustis Ammunition Supply Point scheduled inventory on June 23-27. For more information, contact Chief Warrant Officer 5 Carolita Green at 878-1330.

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July 4th weekend rental specials

The 733rd Force Support Division warehouse is offering July 4th weekend rental specials at 1607 Patch Road. Department of Defense cardholders are offered a one-day rental fee for items picked up on July 3 and returned by 11 a.m., July 8. Rental items include tables, chairs, canopies, trash cans and bounce houses. Bounce houses require a $25 nonrefundable deposit which is credited toward the Movies Under the Stars rental cost at pick up time. Hours are from 7:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. For prices, phoThe 733rd Mission Support Group will host Movies Under the Stars at 7 p.m. at the Murphy Field Sports tos and directions, visit http://jble.newforcesupport.com. For more information, call 878-2002. Complex. The event is free and open to the public. Gates open at 6:30 p.m. Bleachers are available for seating and attendees are encouraged to bring blankets and lawn Family child care providers needed chairs. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. The Joint Base Langley-Eustis Family Child Care office The inclement weather location is Jacobs Theater at 647 is seeking fun-loving, self-motivated individuals to provide Monroe Ave. licensed child care in their homes on and off base. AppliThe schedule is as follows: cants must meet the following criteria: ■ June 25 – Thor: The Dark World (PG-13) ■ Schedule a family interview with the FCC coordinator; ■ July 9 – Frozen (PG) ■ Pass a background check, which includes all family ■ July 23 – Iron Man 3 (PG-13) members ages 12 and older; ■ Aug. 6 – Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG) ■ Submit to fire, health and safety home inspections; ■ Aug. 20 – Planes (PG) ■ Attend orientation training. For more information, visit www.jbleforcesupport.com. The next orientation training will take place July 10-18. Child care providers are needed for children ages 4 weeks Music Under the Stars concerts and older, for all shifts. All individuals who care for other The U.S. ArmyTraining and Doctrine Command will host families’ children for more than 10 hours a week on a regMusic Under the Stars outdoor summer concerts from 7 ular basis must be licensed to provide care in governmentto 8:30 p.m., Thursdays, at Magnolia Park at Fort Eustis. owned or privatized homes. Concerts are June 26, July 10, 17, 24 and 31. A concert will For more information, contact Romona Butler at Fort not take place on July 3. Eustis at 878-5584/5726 or Joanne Reddick at Langley Air The concerts are free and open to the public and Force Base at 764-3585/2845. guests are invited to bring picnic dinners, lawn chairs and blankets. Food and beverages will also be available Army Community Service Army Community Service classes and workshops for for purchase. To learn more about the concerts or to sign up for the June include: ■ Baby and Me Play Group – 10 to 11 a.m. on ThursTRADOC Band’s newsletter, visit www.tradocband.com days at 501 Madison Ave. or call 501-6944. ■ Civilian Professional Development – 9:30 to 11 a.m., Summer Volunteer Program June 26, Overcoming Stress. Registration is required. Fort Eustis organizations and teens who are interested ■ DevelopingYour Financial Plan – 9 to 10 a.m., June 24. in participating in the Summer Volunteer Program can con■ Federal Employment – 10 a.m. to noon, June 26. tact Donna Cloy at 878-3638 or donna.g.cloy.civ@mail.mil. ■ Married to the Military – 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., June 24. ■ Play Mornings Play Group – 10 to 11:30 a.m. on Range schedule Wednesdays at 1102 Pershing Ave. Unless otherwise noted, classes and briefings take Ranges, training areas and associated facilities are off limits to personnel not engaged in scheduled firing, oper- place in Bldg. 650, Monroe Ave. For more information, ations or inspections unless clearance is obtained in per- call 878-3638. son from the Range Control Fire Desk or a designated Range Control technician. The Range Control office tele- Funded Legal Education Program The Office of The Judge Advocate General is accepting phone number is 878-4412, ext. 226 or 878-3834, ext 234. applications for the Army’s Funded Legal Education ProThe range operations schedule through June 25 is: ■ Friday – BTRACS, Range 1, 3 (7 a.m. to 10 p.m.) gram. Under this program, the Army projects sending up ■ Saturday and Sunday – POW Range 3 (8 a.m. to 6 p.m.) to 25 active-duty commissioned officers to law school at ■ Monday and Tuesday – BTRACS, Range 1, 3 (7 a.m. government expense. Selected officers will attend law to 10 p.m.) school in the fall of 2015 while remaining on active-du■ Wednesday – BTRACS, Range 1, 3, 5 (7 a.m. to 10 p.m.) ty. The program is open to commissioned officers in the All personnel are required to check in and out with Range ranks of second lieutenant through captain. Interested officers can contact Capt. David Johnson at Control before going into or departing from any range or 501-5771 or david.f.johnson1@us.army.mil. training area.


22

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

OutsideTheGate Peninsula Pilots baseball games Bring the family and enjoy Peninsula Pilots baseball games scheduled for 7:05 p.m. at War Memorial Stadium at 1889 West Pembroke Avenue in Hampton. Gates open at 6 p.m. and home games are scheduled for June 20, 23, 24, 27 and 29. A fireworks show will take place on June 20 and July 3 and 25. Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for children ages 11 and under, senior citizens ages 60 and older, and free for active-duty U.S. military personnel. The Peninsula Pilots’ organization also hosts birthday and team parties and group picnics. For more information, call 245-2222 or visit online at www.peninsulapilots.com.

JUNE 20, 2014

Submit Outside The Gate announcements to pw1@militarynews.com

Music by the Bay summer concerts

The Music by the Bay outdoor summer concert series will take place from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Fort Monroe’s Continental Park. The concerts are free and open to the public. Visitors are encouraged to bring a picnic dinner, lawn chairs and blankets. The schedule for June and July is as follows: ■ June 26 – U.S. Navy Fleet Forces Band, Brass Ensemble ■ July 3 – U S. Navy Fleet Forces Band, Four Star Edition ■ July 4 – U.S. Navy Fleet Forces Band, Wind Ensemble ■ July 10 – U.S. Navy Fleet Forces Band, Brass Band ■ July 17 – U.S. Air Force Heritage of America Band, Full Spectrum ■ July 24 – U.S. Navy Fleet Forces Band, Four Star Edition ■ July 31 – U.S. Air Force Heritage of America Band, DiFree Langley Speedway tickets xie Ensemble Langley Speedway and the Hampton Convention and For more information, visit www.fmauthority.com. Visitor Bureau are offering Hampton residents free tickets to the NASCAR K & N Pro Series race scheduled for 7 to Virginia Living Museum ■ StoryTime at the Museum –The third Saturday of the 11 p.m., June 21. An autograph session will take place at 6 p.m. Residents are limited to four free tickets per house- month is story time at the museum. Bring the kids at 10 hold, on a first-come, first-served basis. Tickets are avail- a.m. on June 21 to hear “Wild and Free” by JoEllen Pledgable at the Hampton Visitor Center at 120 Old Hampton er and see a live ferret. Recommended for ages 2 and oldLane. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Satur- er and included in museum admission. ■ Wild andWell Exhibit – Children can play being an anday. An official state identification card or residential utility imal keeper and wildlife specialist at the Wild and Well perbill must be presented as proof of residency. The Langley Speedway is located at 3165 North Ar- manent interactive exhibit, which opens June 21. Activities mistead Avenue in Hampton. Regular admission is $12 for include preparing special diets for museum animals, diagadults, $10 for active-duty or retired military and senior cit- nosing illnesses and injuries, and performing treatments to izens ages 60 and older, $5 for children ages 6-12 and free improve the animal’s health. for children ages 5 and under. The Family Pack admission ■ The Really Big Dinosaur Puppet Show – Noon, 1 p.m. fee is $30 for two adults and two children. and 2 p.m., weekends only, through June 22. Rainbow PupFor more information, visit http://langley-speedway.com. pet Productions presents The Really Big Dinosaur Puppet Show, featuring original songs, more than 20 giant puppets, Free admission at Hampton’s pools an eight-foot-tallT-Rex, a 16-foot long dinosaur and more. The Hampton Neighborhood Commission is sponsor■ Spirit of America Laser Shows – Come out and enjoy ing Community Pool Days through June 22. Hampton resi- laser displays at 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 p.m., July 4 at the museum’s dents can swim for free at the following community pools: Abbitt Planetarium. Spirit of America mixes patriotic music ■ Briar-Queen Recreation Association Pool – 1680 with American-inspired rock and roll, and songs that have deDuke Street, 826-7868 fined American music, including John Fogerty, Garth Brooks, ■ Elizabeth Lake Estates Pool – 1 Club Run, 851-9885 Lee Greenwood and more. The cost is $3 for members and ■ Northhampton Pool – 1438-B Todds Lane, 826-9808 $6 for nonmembers. Recommended for ages 6 and older. ■ Mallory Pool – 131 Big Bethel Road, 826-4113 ■ Young Professionals event – Join other profession■ Riverdale Pool – 810 Charlton Drive, 838-8303 als ages 21-45 at 5:30 p.m., July 9 and enjoy an evening ■ Willow Oaks Pool – 236 1/2 Beauregard Heights, of classic games and sports. The cost is $10 and includes 850-2813 refreshments. For individual pool hours, visit www.hampton.gov. The Virginia Living Museum is located at 524 J. Clyde Morris Boulevard in Newport News. Admission is $17 for adults, Summer Fun Program camps $13 for children ages 3-12, and free for children ages 2 and Registration is open for the York County Parks, Recre- under. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily through Labor Day. For more info, call 595-9135 or visit www.thevlm.org. ation andTourism’s Summer Fun Program camps.The program is open to children who have completed grades five through seven. Camps take place from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Vacation Bible School The Chapel of the Centurion Interdenominational Church Monday through Thursday, June 23-July 25 at Grafton and Queens Lake middle schools. Participants will be super- will host Vacation Bible School from 9 a.m. to noon, July vised by qualified camp leaders in a safe environment. Ac- 14-18 at Fort Monroe. The school is open to children ages tivities include field trips, crafts, sports, water play, mov- 4-16 who will be separated into four age groups. Activities include Bible stories, music, arts and crafts and lunch. To ies, karaoke and more. The registration fee is $200 for York County, James City pre-register, visit www.chapelofthecenturion.org. For more information, email info@chapelofthecenturion. County and Williamsburg residents and $300 for residents of other localities.To register or for more info, call 890-3500. org or call 329-8410 or 224-7263.

Storytelling in the Park Hampton Parks and Recreation will sponsor Storytelling in the Park from 11 a.m. to noon, Fridays at Bluebird Gap Farm at 60 Pine Chapel Road. Bring the family to experience the art of storytelling through magic, music and puppetry. The event is free and open to the public and guests are encouraged to bring picnic baskets and visit the farm animals. The inclement weather site is the West Hampton Community Center at 1636 Briarfield Road. The schedule is as follows: ■ June 27 – The Magic of Krendl ■ July 11 – The Flaming Ginger ■ July 18 – Rob Westcott ■ July 25 – Shells ■ Aug. 1 – Rainbow Puppets For more information, visit www.hampton.gov/parks or call 727-8311.

Yorktown 4th of July celebration The 35th Annual Yorktown 4th of July celebration will take place July 4 at Historic Yorktown along the waterfront. The activities are free and open to the public. The best viewing area is along the waterfront and the beach picnic area will be open to the public but not to vehicular traffic. Free transportation will be available via the Yorktown trolley, with service from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.The trolley is handicapped accessible. The event schedule is as follows: ■ 8 a.m. – Yorktown Independence Day 8K Run and 5K Walk at York High School on Route 17. Race day registration begins at 6:30 a.m. Pre-registration is recommended at www.happypaceraces.com. ■ 9 a.m. – Parade on Water Street featuring live music by the U.S. Coast Guard Ceremonial Band. ■ 4 p.m. – Event parking opens at the corner of Cook Road and Ballard Street. ■ 7 p.m. – Sounds of Liberty Bell Ringing Ceremony at Riverwalk Landing Stage. ■ 8 p.m. – U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Band (Dixie Band) at Riverwalk Landing Stage. ■ 9:15 p.m. – Fireworks display over the York River. For more information, visit www.visityorktown.org or call 890-3500.

Newport News photo contest The annual “Zoom in on Newport News” photo contest, sponsored by the Newport News Tourism Development Office, is open to professional and amateur photographers. This year’s theme is “Best-kept Secrets of Newport News.” Show us families having fun at these locations and submit photos for a chance to win a $500 grand prize. Participants may submit up to five digital or film photographs and the grand prize will be awarded to the winning entry in both categories. The two honorable mention prizes are VIP passports to Newport News attractions for four people.The contest is open to all U.S. citizens ages 18 and older. Entries will be accepted through Oct. 31. For contest details, visit www.newport-news.org. Printed entry forms and contest rules are also available at the Newport News Visitor Center at 13560 Jefferson Ave. For more information, call 886-7777 or (888) 493-7386.


JUNE 20, 2014

â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

â&#x20AC;˘

Classifieds TO PLACE AN AD...

BY PHONE:

BY FAX: (757) 853-1634

MILITARY NEWSPAPERS OF VIRGINIA

Call: (757) 222-3990 Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

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Pets-Dogs,Cats,Other Malinois. Borders, GSD Pups, Backhoe work, Dog training. 804-654-1967.talksk9@yahoo.com

Articles For Sale 21 inch Briggs & Stratton Lawn mower runs great. $85. 740-391-0300

Furniture-Household Brand New Layaway Available MATTRESS SETS Full- $99, Queen- $129, King- $169 40% Military Discount on all other sets!

BY MAIL:

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BY EMAIL:

PENINSULA WARRIOR adswork@militarynews.com CLASSIFIEDS 150 W. Brambleton Ave. Norfolk, VA 23510

Call 222-3 990 today!

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

JUNE 20, 2014

NEW 2014.5

1500

CAMRY

$

Includes Hybrids

Cash Back Or

NEW 2014

500 Cash Back

Or

From Toyota**

1,000

U.S. Military

Incentive

*

NEW 2014

1500

VENZA

$

Cash Back

NEW 2014

NEW 2014

CASEY TOYOTA

CHARLES BARKER TOYOTA 1877 Laskin Road • Virginia Beach 757-437-4000 • charlesbarkertoyota.com

CHECKERED FLAG TOYOTA 5301 Virginia Beach Blvd. • Virginia Beach 757-490-1111 • checkeredflagtoyota.com

FIRST TEAM TOYOTA

3400 Western Branch Blvd. • Chesapeake 757-673-2345 • firstteamtoyota.com

$

0 6357 George Washington Hwy. • Gloucester 804-693-2100 • gloucestertoyota.com

PEARSON TOYOTA

12978 Jefferson Ave. • Newport News 757-874-6000 • pearsontoyotascion.com

500 Toyota

From Toyota**

Finance Cash†

APR Financing For Up To 5 Years*** Plus

750 Toyota

Finance Cash†

LEASE AN LE FOR

Or

Financing***

$

189mo.

at signing 24mos. $2199 due

††

tax, registration, insurance and dealer fees are extra.

Up to

As low as

GLOUCESTER TOYOTA

APR Financing For Up To 5 Years*** Plus

1750

% APR

††

0% 0%

0

NEW 2014

at signing 24mos. $1999 due

$

% APR

TUNDRA

159mo.

From Toyota**

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CAN BE COMBINED WITH TOYOTA SPECIAL CASH BACK OR SPECIAL FINANCING OR SPECIAL LEASES!

601 East Rochambeau Drive • Williamsburg 757-259-1000 • caseytoyota.com

Or

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RAV4

$

tax, registration, insurance and dealer fees are extra.

$

PRIUS LIFTBACK

Finance Cash†

LEASE AN LE FOR

$

COROLLA

APR Financing For Up To 5 Years*** Plus

750 Toyota

$

From Toyota**

THANKS TO ALL THE BRAVE MEN AND WOMEN FOR YOUR SERVICE TO OUR COUNTRY.

$

0%

Financing***

Or

1000

$

Cash Back

From Toyota**

PRIORITY TOYOTA GREENBRIER 1800 Greenbrier Parkway • Chesapeake 757-366-5000 • prioritytoyota.com

RK TOYOTA

2301 W. Mercury Blvd. • Hampton 757-838-5000 • rktoyota.com

Smartphone users scan here for more incentive information. Go to gettag.mobi to download the free application. *HOW TO QUALIFY: 1.BE IN CURRENT ACTIVE DUTY STATUS IN THE U.S. MILITARY (NAVY, ARMY, AIR FORCE, MARINES, NATIONAL GUARD, COAST GUARD AND ACTIVE RESERVE) OR A U.S. MILITARY INACTIVE RESERVE (I.E., READY RESERVE) THAT IS PART OF THE INDIVIDUAL READY RESERVE, SELECTED RESERVE AND INACTIVE NATIONAL GUARD. RETIRED MILITARY PERSONNEL ARE NOT ELIGIBLE EXCEPT FOR RETIREES OR VETERANS HONORABLY DISCHARGED WITHIN ONE YEAR OF SERVICE AND HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS OF ELIGIBLE QUALIFYING MILITARY PERSONNEL. 2.PROVIDE VERIFIABLE PROOF OF MILITARY STATUS OR ACTIVE SERVICE AT THE TIME OF PURCHASE: LEAVE AND EARNING STATEMENT OR MILITARY IDENTIFICATION CARD. 3.RECEIVE A SALARY SUFFICIENT TO COVER ORDINARY LIVING EXPENSES AND PAYMENTS FOR YOUR TOYOTA. 4.RECEIVE CREDIT APPROVAL THROUGH A TOYOTA DEALER AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. INCENTIVE OFFERED BY TOYOTA MOTOR SALES, U.S.A., INC. ON LEASE CONTRACTS INCENTIVE MUST BE APPLIED TOWARD THE AMOUNT DUE AT LEASE SIGNING OR TOWARD THE CAPITALIZED COST REDUCTION. ON FINANCE CONTRACTS, INCENTIVE MUST BE APPLIED TOWARD THE DOWN PAYMENT. ONE INCENTIVE PER FINANCE OR LEASE TRANSACTION. NOT COMPATIBLE WITH THE TOYOTA COLLEGE GRADUATE INCENTIVE PROGRAM. FINANCE OR LEASE CONTRACT MUST BE DATED BY JANUARY 5, 2015 FOR INCENTIVE OFFER. THE MILITARY INCENTIVE PROGRAM IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE OR TERMINATION AT ANY TIME. OFFERS ON APPROVED CREDIT TO QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS THROUGH A PARTICIPATING TOYOTA DEALERSHIP AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. TERMS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS APPLY, INCLUDING A MAXIMUM TERM OF 60 MONTHS ON FINANCE CONTRACTS. PROGRAM IS AVAILABLE AT PARTICIPATING DEALERS IN MARYLAND, VIRGINIA, WEST VIRGINIA, PENNSYLVANIA, AND DELAWARE; AND MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE IN ALL STATES. NOT ALL APPLICANTS WILL QUALIFY. SEE PARTICIPATING DEALER FOR DETAILS. **PURCHASERS CAN RECEIVE $1500 CASH BACK FROM TOYOTA ON CAMRY, CAMRY HYBRID, $500 CASH BACK ON COROLLA, $1500 CASH BACK ON VENZA, $1750 CASH BACK ON PRIUS LIFTBACK, AND UP TO $1000 CASH BACK ON TUNDRA (CASH BACK ON TUNDRA VARIES BY MODEL. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.) OR CAN APPLY CASH BACK TO DOWN PAYMENT. ***0% APR FINANCING UP TO 60 MONTHS AVAILABLE TO QUALIFIED BUYERS THRU TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. TOTAL FINANCED CANNOT EXCEED MSRP PLUS OPTIONS, TAX AND LICENSE FEES. 60 MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF $16.67 (CAMRY, VENZA AND PRIUS), OR 36 MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF $27.78 (RAV4 AND TUNDRA), FOR EACH $1000 BORROWED AT 0%. NOT ALL BUYERS WILL QUALIFY. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. †FINANCE INCENTIVE FROM TOYOTA IN ADDITION TO 0% APR FINANCING IF VEHICLE IS PURCHASED AND FINANCED THROUGH TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. ON FINANCE CONTRACTS, INCENTIVE WILL BE APPLIED TO THE DOWN PAYMENT. ONE INCENTIVE PER FINANCE TRANSACTION. FINANCE INCENTIVE IS AVAILABLE ON APPROVED CREDIT TO QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS THROUGH TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. ††ALL LEASE OFFERS: CUSTOMER IS RESPONSIBLE FOR EXCESSIVE WEAR AND EXCESS MILEAGE CHARGES OF $.15 PER MILE IN EXCESS OF 24,000 MILES. YOUR PAYMENT MAY VARY BASED ON DEALER PARTICIPATION AND FINAL NEGOTIATED PRICE. NOT ALL CUSTOMERS WILL QUALIFY. TAX, REGISTRATION, INSURANCE, AND DEALER FEES ARE EXTRA. COROLLA DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $1840 DOWN FIRST $159 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. 2014 COROLLA LE 4 CYLINDER AUTOMATIC MODEL 1852, MSRP $19,110. RAV4 DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $2,010 DOWN, FIRST $189 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. 2014 RAV4 2WD 4 CYLINDER AUTOMATIC MODEL 4430, MSRP $24,650. †††TOYOTACARE COVERS NORMAL FACTORY SCHEDULED SERVICE. PLAN IS 2 YEARS OR 25K MILES, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. THE NEW VEHICLE CANNOT BE PART OF A RENTAL OR COMMERCIAL FLEET, OR A LIVERY/TAXI VEHICLE. SEE PARTICIPATING TOYOTA DEALER FOR PLAN DETAILS. VALID ONLY IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S. AND ALASKA. ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE DOES NOT INCLUDE PARTS AND FLUIDS. OFFERS DO NOT INCLUDE DEALER FEES. OFFERS END 7/7/14.

Peninsula Warrior June 20, 2014 Air Force Edition  

Langley Air Force Base