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Peninsula

Warrior J O I N T February 17, 2017 Vol. 7, No. 7

B A S E

AIR FORCE EDITION

L A N G L E Y - E U S T I S

P u b l i s h e d i n t h e i n t e r e s t o f p e r s o n n e l a t Jo i n t B a s e L a n g l ey - E u s t i s

w w w. p e n i n s u l a w a r r i o r. c o m

STEM Inspires students to be innovative —Page 2

MAKING THE CUT: MCAHC surgical team —Page 10-11

For more online content, check out www.JBLE.af.mil

Army News

US ARMY First African-American Medal of Honor recipient —Page 7

F-22 PARTICIPATES IN 20TH ANNUAL HERITAGE FLIGHT – page 8


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Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

February 17, 2017

STEM inspires students to be innovative JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS EDITORIAL STAFF Joint Base Langley-Eustis Commander Col. Caroline M. Miller Joint Base Langley-Eustis Public Affairs Officer Maj. Kevin Whitlatch • kevin.whitlatch@us.af.mil Joint Base Langley-Eustis Editor Staff Sgt. Brittany E.N. Murphy • brittany.murphy.2@us.af.mil Per Air Force Instruction 35-101/Army Regulation 360-1, only stories and photos submitted by members of the Department of Defense community and DOD news services may be printed in The Peninsula Warrior. Any stories, photos or announcements must be submitted eight days prior to publication. Stories and photos should be submitted to the editor and/or assistant editor at 633abw. paedit@us.af.mil or Public Affairs Office, 601 Hines Cir., Fort Eustis, VA 23604. Announcements for the Community Section should be submitted to fteustismain@gmail.com. Announcements for the Outside the Gate Section should be submitted to fteustismain@gmail.com. For more information call 878-4920. Authors’ names may be withheld, but all letters must include the authors’ signatures and telephone number. The Peninsula Warrior is an authorized publication for all the members of the U.S. military. Contents of The Peninsula Warrior are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, Department of the Air Force or the Department of the Army. The Peninsula Warrior is printed every Friday by offset as a civilian enterprise newspaper for the Public Affairs Office, U.S. Air Force by Military Newspapers of Virginia at 150 W. Brambleton Ave. Norfolk, VA 23510 under exclusive written contract with the commander, Joint Base Langley-Eustis. MNV is a private firm in no way connected with the Department of the Air Force or Department of the Army. Printed circulation: 25,000. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. A confirmed violation or rejection of this policy of equal opportunity by any advertiser will result in refusal to print advertising from that source. All editorial content of The Peninsula Warrior is prepared, edited, provided and approved by the Public Affairs Office Joint Base LangleyEustis. All photographs are Air Force or Army photographs unless otherwise stated. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts and supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense or MNV of the products or services advertised.

MILITARY NEWSPAPERS OF VIRGINIA HOME OFFICE: 150 W. Brambleton Ave., Norfolk, VA 23510; 222-3990 ADVERTISING SALES: 728 Blue Crab Road, Suite C, Newport News, VA 23606; 596-0853; fax 622-6885

By Staff Sgt. Teresa J. Cleveland 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

According to the U.S. Department of Education there has been an approximate 14 percent increase in science, technology, engineering and mathematics careers between 2010 and 2020, and expects those numbers to increase even further into the future. As technology progressively advances, employers look for personnel based not on what they know, but rather what they can do with what they know. To prepare children for future careers, teachers at General Stanford Elementary School and volunteers hosted a Family STEM Night for students and their parents at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, Feb. 9, 2017. The family night was designed to help the teachers and U.S. service member volunteers and civilians to understand how STEM incorporates into their careers, hobbies and everyday lives. “Our goal was to bring parents to the school so they could see the types of STEM activities that we do at school on a regular basis with the kids,” said Karen Canfield, General Stanford Elementary School Talented and Gifted program teacher and STEM lead. “We try to bring in the parents to let them know that we are doing things that are innovative that you probably don’t typically see in a lot of schools and we encourage parents to continue the same types of things at home.” Volunteers from various professions across the installation worked with students to relate the challenges to their career fields. Students worked with engineers from the 633rd Civil Engineer Division to build towers as tall as possible, while still maintaining stability. Activities also included a catapult challenge, where students were given 10 popsicle sticks, seven rubber bands and a spoon. They were then instructed to use these items to create a catapult to send supplies, in this

U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Teresa J. Cleveland

Pandora Howell, 733rd Civil Engineer Division portfolio optimization chief, provides guidance as Ralph Belford, VI, age eight, son of U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Ralph Belford, V, Army Training Support Center NCO, builds a tower during the Family science, technology, engineering and mathematics Night event at Gen. Stanford Elementary School at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Feb. 9, 2017. Architectural and design professionals attended the event to help students understand how math, height and stability work together when building tall towers.

case, a marshmallow, across the room to their partner, a U.S. Army Soldier. “It was pretty neat to see the kinds of things they’re teaching the kids and preparing them for their future selves,” said U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Johnson, Bravo Company, 2nd Battalion, 210th Aviation Regiment, 128th Aviation Brigade instructor, as his daughter launched a paper glider across the room. “I’d like to be able to use some of these activities with her at home as well.” Teachers at General Stanford Elementary School work to incorporate STEM principles into everyday classroom activities, and balance fun with learning to foster growth and interests among the students within the STEM subjects. “It’s really about the careers of the future,” said Canfield. “School is nothing like it was 20 years ago; now we want children to think outside the box. We want to encourage them to try their ideas, to do tests, to innovate.”

While Canfield works with the Newport News city school system to incorporate STEM principles into lessons in the classroom, she also encourages parents to integrate them at home. She looks forward to hosting events after school in the future to continue the involvement and inspire creativity within the students. “A lot of the students came up to me to tell me how much they enjoyed it, so I think we did a great job and we’re hoping to be able to host at least one more before the school year ends,” said Canfield. “It’s our goal to keep the community involved because we see so much more success when parents, teachers and community members work together. We have to be invested in the leaders of the future and build their confidence, their innovation.” For more information about STEM activities or to volunteer for events, contact General Stanford Elementary School at 757-888-3200.

We want to hear from you. Contact us at 633abw.paedit@us.af.mil, or call 878-4920 or 764-5701.


February 17, 2017

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February 17, 2017

POL: we fuel the fight By Airman 1st Class Kaylee Dubois 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

From refueling jets and firetrucks to testing fuel samples and maintaining liquid oxygen, the 733rd Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels management flight does it all at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia. The fuels management flight, also known as POL for petroleum, oils and lubricants, provides fuel support to the Air Combat Command, Fort Eustis’ Training Doctrine, six battalions, five wings and 30 organizations across JBLE. About 70 POL Airmen supply more than 9.5 million gallons of fuel approximately 60 aircraft, all government operated vehicles, generators and GOV refueling stations around base. “We are a family here at POL and we ensure that we treat the base like that too,” said U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Kevin Mendelsohn, 733rd LRS fuels management flight commander. “We give outstanding support and make sure the service we provide and the fuel they receive is of extremely high standards.” To ensure the highest quality possible, the lab specialist repeatedly test samples

from the fuel tanks for contaminants with a variety of high-tech equipment, such as flash point testers, density meters and oxidation stability analyzers. If the sample is free of contaminants, the fuel is pumped into refueling trucks and sent to fuel equipment around base. If the sample is contaminated, it is stored separately and discarded according to environmental regulations. “The fuels lab does daily testing on samples from the refuelers, R-11 trucks, with a variety of data equipment that we have, as well as sampling the barge that comes in,” said Mendelsohn. “There is an extreme amount of care taken to ensure that we are delivering high quality fuel to the aircraft and vehicles and making sure our Air Force family is safe.” For the safety of the base personnel, the fuels flight divided their unit into six sections that work simultaneously to ensure accountability and quality control for effective and efficient mission success. These sections include refueling maintenance, training and support, distribution, laboratory, control center and materials section. The Airmen within those sections must constantly maintain their equipment to

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kaylee Dubois

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Brittany Litton, 733rd Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels laboratory technician, tests the quality of diesel fuel at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Jan. 6, 2017. The laboratory uses multiple tests and equipment to ensure the highest quality product is provided to the 1st Fighter Wing and their mission partners.

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kaylee Dubois

U.S. Air Force Airman Anthony Sanchez, 733rd Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels distribution operator, works with 1st Fighter Wing crew chiefs to refuel an F-22 Raptor during a hot pit refuel at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Jan. 6, 2017. Maintenance Airmen communicate with pilots while refueling aircraft to help gauge how much fuel is loaded.

ensure it is operating properly guaranteeing, not only are they mission ready, but the units across JBLE are as well. “As a customer support agency, we make sure we have the resources and the personnel to provide whatever the base needs and whenever it needs it,” said U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Ken Manyen, 733rd LRS fuels operations section chief. “People don’t realize the number of things we do.” One of the many ways POL personnel supports the base is by refueling the emergency vehicles daily, to guarantee the fire department and medical services are constantly available for any emergency. Along with supporting vehicles and aircraft, the flight also sustains the Aviator Breathing Oxygen for the T-38 Talon pilots and manages one of only four fuel barge piers in the Air Force. POL is also responsible for four storage tanks capable of storing over two million gallons of fuel, as well as two hydrant tanks which can store over 800,000 gallons of fuel. The fuels flight support different organizations beyond JBLE such as providing personnel and vehicles for the president, analyzing fuel for NASA’s research centers or giving equipment tours for joint training operations with U.S. Army, Navy and Marine Corps members. “LRS is one of those entities that makes things that you wouldn’t even think about happen,” said Mendelsohn. “When it comes to background support, fuels are key in making the mission happen, whether day or night, we are able to accomplish our mission at JBLE.” As a mission essential service, the fuels flight is a key factor of the base’s disaster ride-out-team, supporting emergency

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kaylee Dubois

A U.S. Air Force 1st Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief tightens the fuel line nozzle to the F-22 Raptor’s fuel tank during a hot pit refuel at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Jan. 6, 2017. Hot pits are performed while the engine of the plane is running to allow aircraft to launch quickly after refueling.

services and ensuring the base can recover immediately after a disaster. Along with disasters, POL is first to the fight when it comes to inclement weather affecting JBLE. “If the base loses powers, we fuel the generators and ensure emergency services are up and running,” said Manyen. “If you do anything on the base that uses energy or fuel, we have a part in it.” Manyen and Mendelsohn agreed that the personnel within the fuels flight have a mission-focused mentality and are constantly ensuring the priorities of their mission partners are met day and night, regardless of weather or demands of the flying schedule. “Fuel runs the majority of the things that we have at JBLE,” said Mendelsohn. “The first responders wouldn’t be able to get out there and respond to emergencies. Aircraft wouldn’t get in the air. We are part of the heart and soul of the mission here. We fuel the mission.”


February 17, 2017

Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Terrance Thomas, 633rd Medical Group emergency technician, and Senior Airman Cody Blevins, 633rd MG paramedic, preforms an ambulance equipment check at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Jan 13, 2017. Ambulance services respond to all 911 calls on base to help patients while on-scene and transport them to the hospital if needed.

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U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Tristan Biese

EMT, PARAMEDICS: READY FOR THE CALL By Airman 1st Class Tristan Biese 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLICE AFFAIRS

From treating minor abdominal pain to saving lives during emergencies, the 633rd Medical Group Emergency Medical Services personnel are here to assist patients who need to be seen by a doctor at the Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia emergency room. The 633rd MDG Emergency Medical Services section is comprised of two of the key elements; emergency room operations and ambulance services. The emergency room operations section is comprised mostly of emergency medical technicians and paramedics that provide help to any and all patients that come to the JBLE emergency room. During each shift, paramedics and EMTs work continuously for 12 hours, but not all of the EMTs and paramedics work solely in ER operations. A few are specially trained to also work as ambulance services and respond to 9-1-1 calls to help patients on scene and transport them to the hospital if need be. They respond to approximately 280 calls every year. Their days don’t end after responding to a call, since the paramedics and EMTs are back on the ER floor helping and treating other patients as soon as they return. “We respond to every 9-1-1,” said U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Edger Neal, 633rd MDG flight chief of emergency services. “If you call 9-1-1 on base, we’ll be there. There are no unanswered calls.” The 9-1-1 response team knows it is time for action when they receive a dispatch call from the 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron fire department. They imme-

diately gather their emergency response bag and any medications the may need, knowing this could mean life of death. Once they arrive on scene, they work side by side with the 633rd CES fire department and the 633rd Security Forces Squadron personnel to make immediate contact with the patient and initiate their assessment. According to Edger, on every response team, there is always a minimum of two EMS individuals, a driver, who is an emergency medical technician with an ambulance driver’s license and a paramedic, who is in charge of the ambulance. It is important to have a paramedic on the team, since they are the only one who are authorized to provide anesthetics to patients while on scene and call a doctor at 633rd MG for help or advice, if need be. To be properly certified as a paramedic, the EMT must attend special schooling and have four mandatory certifications to include, advanced cardiac life support, pediatric advanced life support, basic life support and national registry certification. “Our scope practice is definitely different than normal medical technicians that work around the hospital,” said U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Christine Castro, 633rd Medical Group NCO in charge of ambulance services. “Compared to a normal technician you would find around the hospital, our job is to save lives in the back of an ambulance.” The EMS team may be broken up into two elements, but they both work handin-hand to help all service members and military associated civilians in the event of an emergency.

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February 17, 2017


February 17, 2017

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First African-American Medal of Honor recipient By Tetaun Moffett 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

U.S. Army 1st Lt. Ruppert L. Sargent (1938-1967), is likely one of the most decorated military service members throughout the city of Hampton, Virginia. As a Hampton native, he was the first African-American officer to be awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his heroics at Hau Nghia Province, Republic of Vietnam on March 15, 1967. Sargent served as a rifle platoon leader of Bravo Company, 4th Battalion, 9th Regiment, and 25th Infantry Division during the Vietnam War. Fifty years ago today, he uncovered a Viet Cong weapons cache and tunnel complex. At the entrance of the complex Sargent observed a booby trap and tried to blow it up with a hand grenade, but he failed to destroy it.

As Sargent and his Soldiers walked closer towards the tunnel entrance, an enemy fighter tossed two grenades into the vicinity of the platoon. Without any hesitation Sargent fired three shots then threw himself on top of the grenades, fatally injuring himself, while two of his men received minor injuries. According to the Sargent’s Medal of Honor citation, because of his courageous and selfless act of exceptional heroism, he saved the lives of the platoon sergeant and forward observer, and prevented the injury or death of several other nearby comrades. His actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military services and reflect great credit upon himself and the U.S. Army. Aside from being Hampton’s only Medal of Honor winner, in 2001 the city Hampton dedicated a seven-story building in his honor. The Ruppert L. Sargent

U.S. Air Force photo by Tetaun Moffett

In 2001, the city Hampton, Va., dedicated a seven-story building and a bronze statue in honor of U.S. Army 1st Lt. Ruppert L. Sargent, located in downtown Hampton, Va., Feb. 13, 2017. Sargent was the first African-American officer to be awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his heroic actions during the Vietnam War.

Memorial City Administrative Building is located at 1 Franklin Street in downtown Hampton, and in the lobby there is

a bronze statue of him on display. Sargent’s grave site is located at Hampton National Cemetery.

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Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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February 17, 2017

F-22 participates in 20th annual Heritage Flight

U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kimberly Nagle

U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kimberly Nagle

An F-22 Raptor performs a Heritage Flight during the 2017 Heritage Flight Training and Certification Course at DavisMonthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Feb. 9, 2017. The program was established in 1997, allowing certified civilian pilots and U.S. Air Force pilots to perform flights together.

U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor Demonstration Team crew chiefs, signal to an F-22 Raptor before take-off at the 2017 Heritage Flight Training and Certification Course at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Feb. 9, 2017. The Demonstration Team assisted with more than 6 launches of the aircraft during the training and certification course.

U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kimberly Nagle

U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kimberly Nagle

An F-16 Viper completes a flight during the 2017 Heritage Flight Training and Certification Course at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Feb 12, 2017. During its time at the course, the F-16 flew with additional aircraft, such as the P-51 Mustang and A-10C Thunderbolt II.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Alexander Niccum, F-22 Raptor Demonstration Team crew chief, signals for the F-22 Raptor pilot to stop during the 2017 Heritage Flight Training and Certification Course at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Feb. 10, 2017. The Demonstration Team uses a non-verbal communication process to assist the pilot with take-off and landings.


February 17, 2017

Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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MWD: Powering through new partnership By Airman 1st Class Tristan Biese

“When I first picked up Rony, he wasn’t the greatest at detection,” explained Howard. “To be able to see the progress that he has made since we became a team, there is no feeling like it in the world.” For the first three weeks Howard was with Rony, they constantly trained and built rapport with one another. Howard slowly started introducing obedience, tactical movement, patrol and detection to Rony’s training. Working on a leash at first and gradually learning without one. Because Rony had difficulties honing in on scents and staying in place when he found items during detection, they trained constantly during their spare time to overcome their challenges. “Sometimes it’s extremely frustrating, but overall I’d say it’s extremely rewarding,” said Howard. “He’s always happy to see me when I come in.”

633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

For Howard and Rony, being selected to participate in the Police Week competition at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland, when no one thought they could do it, wasn’t easy. There were 30 other teams, most of whom U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Benjamin Howard, 633rd Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler, assumed had more experience than him and his MWD-partner of four months, Rony. The pair from Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, had challenges in the beginning of the competition, which involved detection, one of Rony’s shortcomings. Howard said he was nervous about how he and Rony were doing, but found a stride of confidence when he reflected on the milestones they had made since their initial training.

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Tristan Biese

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Benjamin Howard, 633rd Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler, works as the handler for Rony, a 633rd SFS MWD at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Dec. 14, 2016. For 9 months, Howard and Rony have been a working as a MWD team, conducting patrols and detecting explosives.

Although training was challenging and took a lot of commitment, Howard says he is proud of his job and loves working with Rony.

Howard and Rony placed second in patrol during the Police Week competition.., only confirming hard work and commitment pays off in the end. kia.com

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Call 800-333-4KIA for details. 1Optima and Sorento Auto Show Bonus available from 1/27/17-2/20/17 at a participating Hampton Roads Kia Dealer. 2SORENTO: 0% APR financing for 24-60 months from Kia Motors Finance on approved credit. 3Optima: 0% APR financing for 24-60 months from Kia Motors Finance on approved credit. 4SOUL: 0% APR financing for 24-60 months from Kia Motors Finance on approved credit. 5Military Bonus from Kia Motors America, Inc., available to active members of the United States Armed Forces or Reserves, or members that were honorably discharged from, retired from, or on disability with the U.S. Armed Forces (including reservists), and the spouse of those individuals on the purchase of a new 2017 Soul, 2017 Optima, or 2017 Sorento. Proper identification must be provided. *Optional features shown. Some features may vary. Must take delivery by 2/20/17.


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Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

February 17, 2017

February 17, 2017

Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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U.S. Army Private 1st Class Robert Garza, McDonald Army Health Center operating room technician, assists Harry Warren, MCAHC orthopedic surgeon, during a procedure at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Jan. 31, 2017. During procedures, surgeons are assisted by nurses and technicians from the same day surgery section as well as their specialty clinic. U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Teresa J. Cleveland

Making the cut: MCAHC surgical team By Staff Sgt. Teresa J. Cleveland 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Teresa J. Cleveland

Harry Warren, McDonald Army Health Center orthopedic surgeon, begins a procedure on a patient’s shoulder at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Jan. 31, 2017. Orthopedic surgeons are able to perform procedures to repair injuries such as meniscus tears, knee or shoulder arthritis, rotator cuff tears and repair fractures.

001FYA02172017.indd A10-A11

From repairing torn rotator cuffs and laparoscopic procedures to tonsillectomies and laser refraction surgeries, McDonald Army Health Center Surgical Services at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, work to heal patients on a daily basis. Surgical Services at MCAHC provide a two-room surgical suite, serving seven specialties. It is an outpatient ambulatory setting, supporting surgeries from clinics such as orthopedic, podiatry, gynecology, gastroenterology and ophthalmology. Though outsiders may think scheduling and performing approximately 160 procedures monthly has the potential to raise chaos, procedures at MCAHC are scheduled based on a template schedule shared throughout the clinics to ensure continuity, proper planning and preparation takes place. “Each of those clinics has specific days that they are assigned for the operating room, so knowing what day each week they perform surgeries allows them to also plan out their clinic schedules as well,” said U.S. Army Maj. Mari Groebner, MCAHC peri-operative services chief. “For example on Mondays we do ear, nose and throat procedures in one room and ophthalmology operations in another room.” Surgeons and medical professionals from each specialty clinic

perform surgeries with support provided by rotating operating room nurses who support both, same day surgeries and the post anesthesia care unit. Nurses are responsible for providing professional nursing care to patients undergoing surgery such as bringing patients in, processing and doublechecking all paperwork, ensuring their family members have all necessary information for care, and taking care of any needs of the patients before and after surgery. “The nurses play a vital role in taking care of the patients from every specialty,” said Dr. William Collins, MCAHC podiatrist. “We rely on them a lot to treat our Soldiers like family.” For Groebner, being able to provide surgical services on the installation plays a vital role in overall Soldier readiness and ensures they have the best opportunity to return to duty in a timely manner. “One of the benefits of being able to perform surgeries here on the installation is improving access to care instead of having to travel throughout the Hampton Roads area for care,” said Groebner. “It is also a benefit for our Soldier readiness. Our Soldiers are being taken care of here and returning back to the work force and allowing them to train and be ready for any situation that arises.” For more information on the surgical services provided, contact the MCAHC 24-hour main line at 3147500.

U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Teresa J. Cleveland

Harry Warren, McDonald Army Health Center orthopedic surgeon, uses a shaver and camera inside a patient’s shoulder to shave away unnecessary material in the shoulder during an operation at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Jan. 31, 2017. The surgical section of MCAHC is an outpatient ambulatory setting, supporting surgeries from clinics such as orthopedic, podiatry, gynecology, gastroenterology and ophthalmology. U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Teresa J. Cleveland

Karen Minetree, McDonald Army Health Center post anesthesia care unit and same day surgery registered nurse, reviews a patient’s chart prior to surgery at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Jan. 31, 2017. Approximately 150 to 160 surgeries are performed each month at MCAHC.

U.S. Army Private 1st Class Kwadwo Adapong, McDonald Army Health Center operating room technician, brings a patient back to prepare for surgery at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Jan. 31, 2017. Surgical services at MCAHC features a two-room surgical suite to support seven specialties. Harry Warren, McDonald Army Health Center orthopedic surgeon, looks at monitors displaying the camera view inside a patient’s shoulder during a procedure at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Jan. 31, 2017. Each specialty clinic performs surgeries on specific days to allow for easily transitioned preparation each week.

U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Teresa J. Cleveland

U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Teresa J. Cleveland

2/16/2017 3:30:46 PM


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Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

February 17, 2017

February 17, 2017

Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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U.S. Army Private 1st Class Robert Garza, McDonald Army Health Center operating room technician, assists Harry Warren, MCAHC orthopedic surgeon, during a procedure at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Jan. 31, 2017. During procedures, surgeons are assisted by nurses and technicians from the same day surgery section as well as their specialty clinic. U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Teresa J. Cleveland

Making the cut: MCAHC surgical team By Staff Sgt. Teresa J. Cleveland 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Teresa J. Cleveland

Harry Warren, McDonald Army Health Center orthopedic surgeon, begins a procedure on a patient’s shoulder at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Jan. 31, 2017. Orthopedic surgeons are able to perform procedures to repair injuries such as meniscus tears, knee or shoulder arthritis, rotator cuff tears and repair fractures.

001FYA02172017.indd A10-A11

From repairing torn rotator cuffs and laparoscopic procedures to tonsillectomies and laser refraction surgeries, McDonald Army Health Center Surgical Services at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, work to heal patients on a daily basis. Surgical Services at MCAHC provide a two-room surgical suite, serving seven specialties. It is an outpatient ambulatory setting, supporting surgeries from clinics such as orthopedic, podiatry, gynecology, gastroenterology and ophthalmology. Though outsiders may think scheduling and performing approximately 160 procedures monthly has the potential to raise chaos, procedures at MCAHC are scheduled based on a template schedule shared throughout the clinics to ensure continuity, proper planning and preparation takes place. “Each of those clinics has specific days that they are assigned for the operating room, so knowing what day each week they perform surgeries allows them to also plan out their clinic schedules as well,” said U.S. Army Maj. Mari Groebner, MCAHC peri-operative services chief. “For example on Mondays we do ear, nose and throat procedures in one room and ophthalmology operations in another room.” Surgeons and medical professionals from each specialty clinic

perform surgeries with support provided by rotating operating room nurses who support both, same day surgeries and the post anesthesia care unit. Nurses are responsible for providing professional nursing care to patients undergoing surgery such as bringing patients in, processing and doublechecking all paperwork, ensuring their family members have all necessary information for care, and taking care of any needs of the patients before and after surgery. “The nurses play a vital role in taking care of the patients from every specialty,” said Dr. William Collins, MCAHC podiatrist. “We rely on them a lot to treat our Soldiers like family.” For Groebner, being able to provide surgical services on the installation plays a vital role in overall Soldier readiness and ensures they have the best opportunity to return to duty in a timely manner. “One of the benefits of being able to perform surgeries here on the installation is improving access to care instead of having to travel throughout the Hampton Roads area for care,” said Groebner. “It is also a benefit for our Soldier readiness. Our Soldiers are being taken care of here and returning back to the work force and allowing them to train and be ready for any situation that arises.” For more information on the surgical services provided, contact the MCAHC 24-hour main line at 3147500.

U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Teresa J. Cleveland

Harry Warren, McDonald Army Health Center orthopedic surgeon, uses a shaver and camera inside a patient’s shoulder to shave away unnecessary material in the shoulder during an operation at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Jan. 31, 2017. The surgical section of MCAHC is an outpatient ambulatory setting, supporting surgeries from clinics such as orthopedic, podiatry, gynecology, gastroenterology and ophthalmology. U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Teresa J. Cleveland

Karen Minetree, McDonald Army Health Center post anesthesia care unit and same day surgery registered nurse, reviews a patient’s chart prior to surgery at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Jan. 31, 2017. Approximately 150 to 160 surgeries are performed each month at MCAHC.

U.S. Army Private 1st Class Kwadwo Adapong, McDonald Army Health Center operating room technician, brings a patient back to prepare for surgery at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Jan. 31, 2017. Surgical services at MCAHC features a two-room surgical suite to support seven specialties. Harry Warren, McDonald Army Health Center orthopedic surgeon, looks at monitors displaying the camera view inside a patient’s shoulder during a procedure at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Jan. 31, 2017. Each specialty clinic performs surgeries on specific days to allow for easily transitioned preparation each week.

U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Teresa J. Cleveland

U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Teresa J. Cleveland

2/16/2017 3:30:46 PM


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Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

February 17, 2017

U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Natasha Stannard

Staff Sgt. Zachary Dunn, 192nd Fighter Wing low observability aircraft structures technician, picks at radar absorbent material from an F-22 Raptor during Red Flag 17-1 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Feb. 3, 2017. The absorbent material aids in the Raptor’s low observability, a factor that makes it a stealth fighter aircraft.

U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Natasha Stannard

Maintainers with the 27th Aircraft Maintenance Unit out of Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., check for structural damages on an F-22 Raptor during Red Flag 17-1 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Jan. 27, 2017. If damages are found, low observability aircraft structure technicians must repair them to ensure the aircraft maintains its stealth capability.

Low observable technicians keep pilots undetected, alive By Staff Sgt. Natasha Stannard 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Fifth-generation F-22 Raptor and F-35A Lightning II pilots may take the reins of their respective aircraft; however, it takes preparation from outside the cockpit to get them where they need to go undetected. Low observable, according to U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Joshua Moon, 192nd Fighter Wing LO aircraft structures technician, enhances the multi-role fighter’s stealth capability – an important asset in any contingency and at U.S. Air Force training exercise Red Flag 17-1. “If the pilot’s seen by radar, he can be shot down,” said Moon. “If he isn’t, he can do his mission, go behind enemy lines, and they’ll never even know he was there until it’s too late. Without us, he’s going to get spotted, or shot down, so lives are at risk when it comes to our job.” Pilots; however, aren’t the only ones that rely on technicians like Moon to repair LO aircraft structures. Before a maintainer can fix certain parts of a fifth-generation aircraft, LO must prepare the jet. “When other people have problems with a jet, it’s going to affect LO,” said Moon pointing at an F-22 in a

maintenance hangar. “Right now, something is wrong with a light panel on that jet. Since maintenance needs to get into that panel, we have to pick the radar absorbent material off and clean all the fasteners out so they can fix the light. Once the light is fixed we will re-bind the coating and material again to make it 100 percent ready.” While fixing the light panel was unexpected – it kept the LO team working through the weekend – the technicians did prepare themselves for what Red Flag could entail. “We knew they were going to fly the hell out of the jets because this is a large-scale exercise,” said Moon. “When the pilot flies he’ll bank real hard sometimes, which can tear or rip the radar absorbent material. If there are a lot of damages, the aircraft is easier to detect, so we try to keep those damages to a minimum to where you can’t see it on radar.” For U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. William, 1st Operations Support Squadron NCO in charge of intelligence analysis, preparation and attention to detail in the LO technicians’ field directly affects what intelligence analysts provide to pilots during mission briefings. “I like to think of it like a triangle between intelli-

gence, maintenance and the pilots,” said William. “We can give them very good information for what they’re going into, but if their jet isn’t performing the way they expect it to, them knowing that information doesn’t necessarily do them any good.” For Moon, pressure doesn’t only come from enabling others jobs within the fifth-generation triangle, but from the realistic threats Red Flag presents. “An exercise like this provides some of the most realistic training our pilots are going to get, so they really need to be able to depend on that jet performing the way they expect it to, so that they can get those realistic lessons learned,” said William. “The way their jet responds in this environment is meant to be the same it would perform in real combat.” On top of the combat training, the stealth aircraft are also being tested by radar daily. “At Red Flag, they’re testing our jets by hitting them with radar over the range, so that’s a lot of pressure for us – it’s really important that those jets come back undetected,” said Moon explaining that if the aircraft came back detected, LO would have to find and fix the issues, which he his team ha worked around-the-clock to prevent. “This is training, so lives aren’t actually at risk, but we’re here for a reason,” said Moon of participating in the realistic combat training exercise. “We may be working thru the weekend here, but it’s our job and we’re blessed to have it. If we can keep up with the fast pace here, we can keep up anywhere.”


February 17, 2017

Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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2016 Heroes at Home Hampton Roads Military Spouse of the Year Spouse of Chief Elvin Bitterman, Space and Naval Warfare (SPAWAR) Systems Center Atlantic, St. Julien’s Creek

PRESENTED BY

PRESENTING SPONSOR

SILVER SPONSOR

Join us in recognizing our local military spouses for their unending strength, personal sacrifices, support for other military families and for their selfless commitment to our community. The Heroes at Home Hampton Roads Military Spouse of the Year will be chosen from nominees provided by active duty personnel from all branches of the military, spouse support groups, charitable organizations, friends and family. The 10 finalists and winner will be announced at the awards luncheon on May 4, 2017. The finalists will also be honored by Governor and Mrs. McAuliffe at a reception at the Governor’s Mansion in mid May where we will announce the Heroes at Home Virginia Spouse of the Year for each branch of service.

HOSTED BY:

BRONZE SPONSOR

MEDIA SPONSORS


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Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

February 17, 2017

COAST GUARD UTILIZES SKILLS GAINED THROUGH JOINT TRAINING

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kaylee Dubois

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kaylee Dubois

U.S. Coast Guard Aviation Electrician 2nd Class Garrett Conol, Port Security Unit 305 crewmember, secures a security boat to a forklift before loading it onto a C-17 Globemaster III at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Feb. 8, 2017. The Port Security Unit 305 will perform shore and water-side security during a joint task force deployment.

By Airman 1st Class Kaylee Dubois 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

A U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III from Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey, transported U.S. Coast Guardsmen assigned to the Port Security Unit 305 at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, to a deployed location, Feb. 8, 2017. The Coast Guardsmen accompanied security boats and essential equipment aboard the C-17 Globemaster III, while other members of the unit joined them the following week. “Overseas deployments for the Coast

Guard as a whole, are minimal, especially for a reserve unit,” said U.S. Coast Guard Machinery Technician 1st Class Eric Zupan, PSU 305 crewmember. “Our port security unit and our sister unit are the only ones who do it, so it’s fairly unique to our service.” A joint force between the Coast Guard, members of the 733rd Logistics Readiness Squadron, 1st Operation Support Squadron and 732nd Airlift Squadron allowed the coordination of assets to be transported quickly and efficiently for the deployment. For this specific deployment, the PSU 305, with the help of JBLE, brought

Any Size Hot or Iced Coffee or Large Sweet Tea @2017 McDonald’s. JO4463443

U.S. Air Force and U.S. Coast Guard personnel load a security boat on a C-17 Globemaster III at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Feb. 8, 2017. The C-17 Globemaster III assigned to Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J. transported the Coast Guardsmen and their equipment to their deployed location.

an aircraft to the flightline, which needed to move cargo downrange. “This area is a wealth of resources, opportunities for joint training and provides the ability to learn more about the other services,” said U.S. Coast Guard Chief Machinery Technician Rocky Ricapito, PSU 305 chief. “The other services can also learn more about what we can do. The opportunity to interact helps us promote the Coast Guard and our unique unit.” According to Ricapito, Coast Guardsmen are trained to be flexible to perform under a broad spectrum of crafts, and the

partnership with JBLE allows the unit to hone these necessary skills. Ricapito commends his unit’s readiness and determination to use the skills they gained during their joint training exercises. “These guys have worked extremely hard for this,” said Ricapito. “They go through an immense amount of training to be qualified to do this mission. Just like any deployment, everyone in the military, we put ourselves out there and this is no different.” For more information about the USCG Port Security Unit 305, call 757-878-5922 or visit www.uscg.mil.


February 17, 2017

Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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Red Flag 17-1 pushes domain, fifth-gen integration By Staff Sgt. Natasha Stannard 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

As coalition pilots, intelligence analysts, and cyber and space operators convene at the Nevada Test and Training Range north of Las Vegas, for Red Flag 17-1, they have one goal in mind: work together to defeat the adversary, which at times is 20 living adversaries simultaneously working to attack allied forces on a multi-domain battlefield. Integration across domains and platforms is an essential practice the realistic combat training exercise emphasizes. “It’s in our slogan; air, space and cyber space. These are the domains that we operate in. We can fight a war in an air domain only, but we are more effective when you add in cyber and space,” said U.S. Air Force Col. Peter Fesler, Red Flag Air Expeditionary commander and commander of Joint Base LangleyEustis, Virginia’s, 1st Fighter Wing. “All the capabilities in those domains when combined produce enhanced effects that are more lethal against our adversary.” Throughout the exercise, fifth-generation fighters, the F-22 Raptor and F-35A Lightning II, have incorporated intelligence, cyber and space information to better support fourth-generation pilots by suppressing targets and dominating

airspace. “The F-22 and F-35 were designed to work together,” said Fesler. “This is the first time we’ve taken the F-22, the F-35 and all of those capabilities the Air Forces of the U.S., the United Kingdom and Australia can bring to bear, and put them together in the airspace at the same time to fight together against a realistic threat.” According to U.S. Air Force Reserve Lt. Col. Dave DeAngelis, 419th Fighter Wing detachment commander at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, in this Red Flag, pilots saw approximately three to four surface-to-air missiles in one scenario. They can’t always be seen by the naked eye, which is how integration with cyber and space come into effect in aiding the fifth-generation fighters with finding targets for the fourth-generation assets to attack. “That’s what’s nice about this Red Flag, there are so many assets out here,” said DeAngelis. “It’s been great working with our intelligence, reconnaissance and surveillance assets. They’re able to give us a general location of targets and we’re able to refine it, and hand it off to our British partners that have phenomenal air-to-ground weapons and they’re able to take out those moving targets for

U.S Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Natasha Stannard

A Royal Air Force Eurofighter Typhoon takes off during Red Flag 17-1 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Jan. 26, 2017. The Typhoon is a fourth-generation fighter aircraft that has conducted it’s training missions at Red Flag with support from U.S. Air Force fifthgeneration stealth fighter aircraft, the F-22 Raptor and F-35A Lightning II.

U.S Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Natasha Stannard

Royal Air Force Flight Lt. Jonny Mulhall, 6th Squadron Eurofighter Typhoon pilot, walks to his aircraft during Red Flag 17-1 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Feb. 7, 2017. The Royal Air Force and Australian Air Force participated in 17-1 alongside their U.S. partners to enhance tactics, techniques and procedures in air, space and cyber domains.

us.” For Royal Air Force Group Commander Graham Pemberton, AEW deputy commander, this Red Flag not only gives the United Kingdom and Australia the opportunity to enhance tactics, practices and procedures across domains with its U.S. allies, but it is also helping them better understand the capabilities of their next aircraft: The F-35B. “We’ve worked really closely with the Raptor over the last couple of years, so we’re looking forward with how we’re going to do that with the Lightning as well,” said Pemberton. “[Red Flag] is a great insight into how we’ll maximize those synergies and how the Royal Air Force will use their own Lightning, so that’s been a fantastic opportunity.” Two weeks into the exercise, Pemberton noticed that the effects of the Raptor and Lightning are different, yet complimentary in defeating an advanced enemy in the air and on the surface. “We use the [Lightning] in a subtly different way,” explained Pemberton. “It’s being shielded to go into the most deep and complex environments as a lethal scalpel with the Raptor providing the overall control of the air in time and space to get the job done as well, which is working in a complementary fashion with the fourth-generation fighters giving us a massive amount of fire power.” For Pemberton, continuing training with both fifth-generation fighters

U.S Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Natasha Stannard

A 1st Fighter Wing F-22 Raptor pilot waits for his signal to taxi for takeoff during Red Flag 17-1 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Jan 26, 2017. The 1st FW pilots are integrating with cyber and space fields to better support the fourth-and fifth-generation joint and coalition aircraft.

alongside fourth-generation assets, is vital to success in a multifaceted battlefield. “I think what has really changed with the fifth generation is how are we going to take on what we face in the future with really complex surface-to-air missile systems and layered defense systems that we have to try and unpick,” said Pemberton. “Space helps us go over it, cyber helps us go under and through it, and fifth-generation assets with fourth-generation support help us go into it, and Lightning with Raptor gives us the real ability to do that on our terms.”


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Commissaries start celebration of 150-year history By DeCA corporate communications DEFENSE COMMISSARY AGENCY

Patrons can expect to see special promotions, contests and a lot of birthday flair as the Defense Commissary Agency and its industry partners kick off the 150th anniversary celebration of the modern commissary benefit. “From now through the actual July 1 anniversary date, commissaries worldwide will highlight the long history of the commissary benefit and the great savings and value the benefit has brought to our military community since 1867,” said Tracie Russ, DeCA’s sales director. DeCA is beginning the observance in February with kick-off banners placed at all stores worldwide. Over the next five

months, other scheduled anniversary events and activities include the following: · Limited edition, specially labeled products using nostalgic commissary photos and the 150th gold logo · Celebrity endorsements at commissaries with in-store radio · Beginning in March and ending July 31, commissaries will use their “Wall of Value” locations for the “150 Years of Value and Savings!,” directing shoppers to discounted promotional savings on products. · Other events will be tied to the month of May for Military Appreciation Month and the worldwide Healthy Lifestyle Festivals in June. Patrons are encouraged to check their local store for details of specific anniversary events such as cake-cutting ceremonies.

February 17, 2017

The 150th anniversary observance ties back to the official beginning of the modern commissary benefit on July 1, 1867. It was on that date, two years following the Civil War, that enlisted men received the same privileges available to officers since 1825, the right to purchase goods, at cost price, from their post’s subsistence department warehouses. These sales could take place at any post in the U.S. or its territories, wherever the local commander deemed them necessary, regardless of location. As years passed, retirees, spouses and families also became eligible shoppers. The commissaries mirrored changes and progress in the civilian retail grocery industry, from self-service to product proliferation. As the nation sent its armed forces overseas, commissaries followed: Cuba, the Philippines, China and Panama all had U.S. military commissaries before 1905. Surcharges came and went, and during the World Wars, commissaries spread all over the globe, from Europe and the Mid-

dle East to the Far East and even South America. The U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps opened their first commissaries in 19091910, and when the U.S. Air Force came into being in 1947, it inherited commissaries at then, Army Air Force bases and airfields. For many years, the posts and bases had plenty of leeway in running their stores. After World War II, the services began taking firmer control of their commissaries, professionalizing the staffs and creating career paths for military and civilian employees alike. By the 1980s, the four major services each had their own commissary system. DeCA began, in 1991, to create cost savings and store uniformity, bringing together all the stores of the four services. “At DeCA we want to celebrate our military members and their families for all they do to serve this nation,” Russ said. “We may be throwing the party, but the celebration belongs to our patrons.”

DESERT STORM: ONE AIRMAN’S PERSPECTIVE By Joseph Mangum AIR COMBAT COMMAND

Twenty-six years ago on Jan. 16, 1991 at 7 p.m. EST, President George H. W. Bush announced the start, of what would later be named, Operation Desert Storm. Coalition forces began a fiveweek bombardment of Iraqi command and control targets from air and sea, and reached a successful cease-fire within 100 hours. According to the Washington Post, on Jan. 15, President Bush sent a memorandum, National Security Directive 54, outlining the goals for the conflict with Iraq. The president had four major areas for the U.S. military to focus their efforts: • To effect the immediate, complete and unconditional withdrawal of all Iraqi forces from Kuwait. • To restore Kuwait’s legitimate government. • To protect the lives of American citizens abroad. • To promote the security and the stability of the Persian Gulf. The 1991 airstrikes on Baghdad

were the first real-time demonstrations of smart weapons that showed U.S. forces strengths and military superiority. “We learned that we could conduct bombing attacks in urban areas with precision, an important lesson. We also learned that we could survive in heavily defended areas such as Baghdad because of Stealth [jet fighters], another blockbuster lesson that most ignore,” said General Charles Horner, Persian Gulf War air commander. At the onset of Desert Storm, I, Joseph Mangum, was technical sergeant assigned to Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany as mobility NCO for the 52nd Supply Squadron. As tasking’s to the unit increased, I was moved to the wing to assist in Wild Weasel deployments in direct support of the war effort. The Wild Weasel refers to the combination of Wild Weasel version of the F-4 Phantom II and F-16 Fighting Falcon. After processing countless waves of deployments of people,

equipment and aircraft in support of Operation Desert Shield, Desert Storm had begun. The United Nation’s deadline for Jan. 15, passed for Iraqi forces to withdraw from Kuwait. With no action from Iraq, Desert Shield became Desert Storm, also known as the first Gulf War. It was not until near the end of the 100-hour war that I finally received my deployment orders. The fighting was almost over when I got the call. By then it was feared Saddam Hussein was going to launch his full arsenal of scud missiles, a surface-to-surface guided missile that is fired from a mobile launcher. Indeed, Iraq began launching scuds at Israel and Coalition Forces soon after the coalition’s Gulf War air campaign began on Jan. 17, 1991. My unit was asked to provide logistics support to F-16 aircraft and U.S. Army Patriot Missile batteries in defense of Israel. The fear was that, by Iraq attacking Israel, it would provoke an Israeli response which could dissolve

the coalition. During the deployment to Israel, I was responsible for bulk petroleum operations, which meant additizing the fuel to meet military specifications. The nearest port was in Tel Aviv, Israel where I was able to see first-hand the destruction caused by previous Iraqi scud missile attacks. Over the course of the deployment, we made several resupply runs back-and-forth from Tel Aviv. The experience enabled me to apply years’ worth of training, communicate directly with higher headquarters and make due with only the resources we brought with us. My orders were open ended, which meant I had no idea how long I would be away from home. I was already stationed in Germany on my first overseas assignment and my family was gravely concerned with the uncertainty of the war. “The worst part was not knowing,” said my wife, Laurinda Mangum. “Joe was gone for three weeks before I received a phone

Courtesy Photo

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Joseph Mangum poses for a photo during Operation Desert Storm.

call. It was just 5-10 minutes long and the line had a distinct echo, but it was enough at the time to let me know my husband was gonna be okay.” As it all worked out, I was only deployed for a period of approximately 45 days. It was my second Middle East deployment. My first was a deployment to Oman in support of the 1986 bombing of Libya. I finished my military service after 30 years and three months, with Desert Storm was my first major theater combat experience and I would go on to deploy multiple times in support of 9/11 and Desert Storm II.


February 17, 2017

LAFBCommunity 633rd FSS Fitness team transition to new PT test site The 633rd Force Support Squadron fitness section has transitioned to a new physical training test registration site as of Feb. 1, 2017. The previous sharepoint site is no longer available for PT test registration. The new PT test registration site link is https://www.milsuite. mil/book/get-started. For those who registered prior to Feb. 1, 2017 using the previous sharepoint site, the Fitness Assessment Cell has your test dates and times. For those who still need to register for February, call, email, or visit the Shellbank Fitness Center to schedule a test date and time. For more information, contact the FAC at 764-2713 or email 633FSS.FAC.FitnessAssessment@us.af.mil.

JBLE offers events in honor of Black History Month Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., will offer an luncheon event in honor of Black History Month. The Black History Month Luncheon hosted by the 633rd Air Base Wing will be held at 11 a.m. at the Bayview Commonwealth Center on Feb. 21, 2017. This annual luncheon is held as a culmination event for Black History Month. The guest speaker this year is Dr. Christopher L. Spells. Volunteers to help set-up, take down and escort DVs are needed during the event. For more information or to volunteer, call 575-2875.

The Eaglewood Golf Course hosts blind draw challenge The Eaglewood Golf Course at Langley Air Force Base will host the 2 Person Blind Draw at 9 a.m. at 630 Weyland Rd, Langley Air Force Base, Va., February 18, 2017. A blind draw will be picked while members are on the course to see who their partner will be for the event. Regular tee times will be available from 8 a.m. to 8:50 a.m. and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, call 764-4547.

Langley Chapel hosts 2017 National Prayer Luncheon The Langley Chapel will host the 2017 National Prayer Luncheon from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. at the Bayview Commonwealth Center, Feb. 22, 2017. Chaplain Dondi Costin, Headquarters Chief of Chaplains, will be the guest speaker for the event. His keynote address will focus on the new Air Force Chaplain Corps initiative entitled “FaithWorks.” The event is free, however has limited space available. For more information, contact your First Sergeant or call 764-7847.

Tax center now open The Langley Tax Center is now open! Assistance is available at the walk-in kiosks for self-file or call for an appointment at 225-5777 for additional income tax assistance during the hours of 8 a.m.-12 p.m., MondayFriday. The tax center is located at 402 Helms Ave., Langley Air Force Base, Va., Bldg. 801 on the basement

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Submit LAFB Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com level. Parking is located in the back of the building. If entering the building from the front or back entrance, use the stairwell in the lobby to access the tax center on the basement level. The elevator does not work, so call in advance for assistance down the stairs. Again, an appointment is not required to use the kiosks—the kiosks are available between 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. during the duty day. When using the kiosk, access Military OneSource, an online resource that offers free software to help prepare and file taxes online. A consultant is available to answer any question regarding Military OneSource for free during the tax season, Jan. through April 18, 2017, at 800-342-9647 while at the tax center or home. When using the kiosks, access to other free tax preparation sites will be available to help individuals prepare their taxes on their own. Military OneSource suggests that before starting on your tax return, gather all necessary tax documents and additional information such as the following: • Social Security numbers and dates of birth for you, your spouse and dependents • Child care, education and adoption costs • W-2 forms for all employers for you and your spouse • Investment income forms • Alimony information • Social Security benefits • Miscellaneous income • Form 1098-E for student loan interest • Form 1098 for home mortgage interest • Charitable donations • Medical and dental expenses • Real estate taxes • Rental property incomes and expenses For more information, call the Tax Center at 2255777.

• A coupon class will be held 2 March, 2017, at 6 p.m. to 8p.m. at the Bethel Manor Chapel, located at 1793 1st Street, Hampton, Va., 23665. To register, call 764-3990.

Military Saves Week 27 Feb. through 4 March

The Langley Air Force Base and Fort Eustis Outdoor Recreation Centers will now open on Saturdays. The hours of operation for the Langley Outdoor Recreation Center is 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday. The hours of operation for the Fort Eustis Outdoor Recreation Center is 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday. For more information, contact the Langley Outdoor Recreation Center at 764-7170 and the Fort Eustis Outdoor Recreation Center at 878-2610.

Military Saves Week will begin on 27 Feb. 2017, through 4 March, 2017. The earliest occurring events are as follows: • Military Saves kicks-off on 27 Feb. 2017, at 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. with a proclamation signing and a Blended Retirement System briefing in the 633rd Force Support Squadron auditorium, building 15 in Wing B, room 203. • A financial information booth will be available both the Langley Air Force Base and Fort Eustis Exchange on 28 Feb. 2017, at 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. • Free Lunch and Learn during a Thrift Savings Plan briefing will be on 1 March, 2017, at 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. in the 633rd Force Support Squadron auditorium, building 15 in Wing B, room 203 at Langley AFB. Seating is limited. To register, call 764-3990. • Free Lunch and Learn during a Thrift Savings Plan briefing will be on 1 March, 2017, at 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. in the Army Community Service conference room, building 650 at Ft. Eustis.

Langley Chiefs’ Group sponsors 2017 Mary Matthews Scholarship The Langley Chiefs’ Group sponsors the Mary Matthews Scholarship Fund to active-duty Airmen from E-1 through E-6, stationed at Langley Air Force Base, Va., who are pursuing a college degree. Four $300 scholarships will be presented at the May 2017 Langley Chiefs’ Group meeting. Applications are available by contacting any member of the Langley Chiefs’ Group and must be received by April 17, 2017. For more information, call 764-5638.

Langley 5/6 club hosts weekly meetings The Langley 5/6 club will meet at 11:30 a.m. at the Bayview Commonwealth Center every second Wednesday of every month. A guest speaker joins the club every month to discuss various topics. Along with being a networking tool, the group meets to brainstorm fundraising opportunities and membership drives. For more information, call 764-0507.

Mindfulness Meditation Group The Langley Chapel will host a New Mindfulness Meditation Group from 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. starting Jan. 19 – March 9, 2017. Explore how to bring balance, concentration, compassion, resilience and meaning to your daily life and work through time-honored practices of mindfulness meditation and Loving Kindness. The group is free and open to all ID card holders over 18 years old. For more information or to enroll, please contact the Chapel at 764-7801.

JBLE Outdoor Recreation Centers open Saturdays

Company Grade Officer Council welcomes members The Company Grade Officer Council will meet at 4:45 p.m. at the Bayview Commonwealth Center every third Thursday of the month and is open to all Company Grade Officers. The council has an opening for a U.S. Army officer on the council board. Join the council for professional development, social events and fun. For more information, call 764-9954.


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EustisCommunity Fort Eustis Tax Center is now open The Fort Eustis Tax Center is open until April 14, 2017 for in-person advice for active duty members, retirees and dependents. The center will open 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday for walk-in services. From 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday by appointment only for active duty members. Members should bring their W-2, 1099-R, 1098-T, interest or brokerage states, dependent care statements, mortgage statements, rental property statements and last year’s tax return to their appointments. For more information, contact 878-3031.

The Pines Golf Course hosts Par 3 Challenge The Pines Golf Course at Fort Eustis will host the Par 3 Challenge at 9 a.m. at 3518 Mulberry Island Rd., Fort Eustis, Va., Feb. 25, 2017. Each hole will be turned into a unique and fun par 3, ranging from 50 to 150 yards. This event is great for golfers of all abilities and will have a “Beat the Pro” element where golfers will try to beat Andy Weissinger, Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., golf manager. For more information, call 878-2252.

JBLE hosts Black History Month celebration Joint Base Langley-Eustis’s Headquarters Training and Doctrine Command will host a special commemorative celebration from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Jacobs Conference Center at Fort Eustis, Va., Feb. 28, 2017. This year’s theme, “The Crisis in Black Education – Success Always Leaves Footprints” focuses on the crucial role of education in the history of African Americans. Ellen M. Helmerson. Headquarters TRADOC deputy chief of staff, will host the event and Brian Smalls, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People York-James City-Williamsburg Chapter president, will be the keynote speaker. For more information, call 501-699 or 501-6784.

Military Saves Week 27 Feb. through 4 March Military Saves Week will begin on 27 Feb. 2017, through 4 March, 2017. The earliest occurring events are as follows: • Military Saves kicks-off on 27 Feb. 2017, at 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. with a proclamation signing and a Blended Retirement System briefing in the 633rd Force Support Squadron auditorium, building 15 in Wing B, room 203. • A financial information booth will be available both the Langley Air Force Base and Fort Eustis Exchange on 28 Feb. 2017, at 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. • Free Lunch and Learn during a Thrift Savings Plan briefing will be on 1 March, 2017, at 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. in the 633rd Force Support Squadron auditorium, building 15 in Wing B, room 203 at Langley AFB. Seating is limited. To register, call 764-3990. • Free Lunch and Learn during a Thrift Savings Plan briefing will be on 1 March, 2017, at 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. in the Army Community Service conference room, building 650 at Ft. Eustis.

Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com • A coupon class will be held 2 March, 2017, at 6 p.m. to 8p.m. at the Bethel Manor Chapel, located at 1793 1st Street, Hampton, Va., 23665. To register, call 764-3990.

Fort Eustis’ Regimental Memorial Chapel hosts weekly programs Regimental Memorial Chapel hosts the following weekly programs: All programs will held at the Regimental Memorial Chapel at 923 Lee Blvd., Fort Eustis, Va. • The Awana Program is held from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every Wednesday. Awana is a program for children, ages four to middle school, helping churches and parents to work together to develop spiritually strong children who faithfully follow Jesus Christ. • The Protestant Women of the Chapel bible studies is held from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. every Tuesday in the assembly room. The PWOC offers four studies from which to choose: “Prayers of the Bible” by Susan Hunt; “None Like Him” by Jen Wilkin; “Transforming Grace” by Jerry Bridges; and “Walking with God in the Season of Motherhood” by Melissa Kruger. Child care is available for preschool children and an attended home-school room. • The Fort Eustis Catholic Women of the Chapel meet from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. every Wednesday. The CWOC are currently studying “Walking Toward Eternity,” a series of studies designed to help you make real and lasting changes in your life. Through a prayerful reading of Scripture, personal reflection, and a commitment to action, you will grow in faith and be given the means to put it into practice in your daily life. Child care is available for preschool children. For more information, call 878-4316.

Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation now accepting scholarship Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation is now accepting scholarship applications for the 2017/2018 academic year and is looking to recognize both current and aspiring college students looking to make a difference both in and out of the classroom. The Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation is a 501© 3 non-profit organization which principally focuses on supporting the post-secondary educational goals of residents living in a community owned and managed by Balfour Beatty Communities, LLC. New to this year’s scholarship program, the applicant pool has expanded to include leaseholders, their spouses and their dependents at all Balfour Beatty Communities-owned and managed properties. If you live at Fort Eustis Family Homes, are attending or will be attending an accredited educational or technical institution for the 2017/2018 term and are excelling academically, while making your community a better place to live, then we want to recognize your efforts and lend a hand with your college finances. For more details and to submit an application, please visit the Foundation’s website, www.bbcommunitiesfoundation.org. Only online applications will be accepted and the application deadline is 11:59 p.m. PST, March 31, 2017.

Fort Eustis Spouse’ Club helps community with grants The Spouses’ Club of Fort Eustis (SCFE) is a private, non-profit organization that earns funds through The Whistle Stop Thrift Store, monthly luncheons, an annual gala, and other events. The funds generated from the SCFE are then dispersed throughout the community in the form of “Community Grants” that are used to benefit the soldiers and families of the Fort Eustis community. Past examples of these community grants are meals provided to soldier’s families, personal devices to help Wounded Warriors keep track of medical appointments and help for soldiers passing through airports. The deadline for grant applications is April 9, 2017. For more information or to donate, go to www. SCFEVA.com.

JBLE Outdoor Recreation Centers open Saturdays The Langley Air Force Base and Fort Eustis Outdoor Recreation Centers will now open on Saturdays. The hours of operation for the Langley Outdoor Recreation Center are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday. The hours of operation for the Fort Eustis Outdoor Recreation Center are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday. For more information, contact the Langley Outdoor Recreation Center at 764-7170 or the Fort Eustis Outdoor Recreation Center at 878-2610.

Company Grade Officer Council welcomes members The Company Grade Officer Council will meet at 4:45 p.m. at the Bayview Commonwealth Center every third Thursday of the month and is open to all Company Grade Officers. The council has an opening for a U.S. Army officer on the council board. Join the council for professional development, social events and fun. For more information, call 764-9954.

Fort Eustis’ Groninger Library encourages reading Fort Eustis’ Groninger Library has implemented an ongoing Reading Program entitled “1000 Books Before Kindergarten” and “1000 Books from 1st -5th grades.” For every 100 books read, children can take their reading log to the library to receive a prize. After reading 1000 books, children will receive a free t-shirt. For more information, contact the library at 878-5017 or visit www. groningerlibrary.com.

Wylie Theater hosts Chapel Next Sunday services Join Chapel Next at the Wylie Theater from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Sundays for contemporary Christian worship. Experience God’s goodness and grace, discover answers to life’s questions. Enjoy being spiritually revived, refreshed and fulfilled. For more information, call at 8782257.


February 17, 2017

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

February 17, 2017

THANKS TO ALL THE BRAVE MEN AND WOMEN FOR YOUR SERVICE TO OUR COUNTRY.

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Peninsula Warrior Air Force Edition: 02.17.17  

Vol. 7, No. 7

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