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Today’s ‘Great Shakeout Drill’ an opportunity to plan, rehearse lifesaving measures

Fort Lee

SERVING THE COMMUNITY OF FORT LEE, VIRGINIA, SINCE 1941

SEE PAGE 3

October 20, 2016 | Vol. 76, No. 42

FUN FITNESS FEST

Kenner Volksmarch shows benefits of positive, healthy lifestyle PHOTOS PAGE 10 TROOPS LEARN LESSONS IN CIVILIAN SECTOR The Army Sustainment community has reaped huge educational and operational rewards from the Quartermaster School’s Training With Industry Program

POST EXCHANGE VIP VISIT ‘I’ll accept nothing less than the very best for Fort Lee customers,’ says AAFES deputy director

SEE PAGE 8

SEE PAGE 4

TAFT TOUR During his 1918 Camp Lee visit, the former president urged troops to “fight on” if they held any hope for peace SEE PAGE 7

NEW PLAYHOUSE PRODUCTION Post theater group presents “Nunsense,” a musical comedy, starting Nov. 4 at 8 p.m. SEE PAGE 12


2 | TRAVELLER | October 20, 2016 | www.fortleetraveller.com

CHAPLAIN’S CORNER | HOPE IS NEVER LOST

Community members find path away from depression, despair

Is there hope for my problems? Can anyone help? Does anybody really care? Many have posed these types of questions in times of great difficulty. It’s not uncommon to feel as though the world is against you when struggling with the hardships of love, labor and life in general. It can be particularly tough for military members and their families who often are stationed far from home and the comforting support network of friends and loved ones. Let’s look at two real-life examples of individuals facing a personal struggle in our community and the outcome, which

conversations, but he was always tired and stopped listening. All I could do was think, ‘my friends have wonderful husbands, why not me? Why have I ended up with this man I do not know anymore? Is there any hope?’” Keeping Esther in mind, let’s introduce ourselves to Michael who explained the following about his situation. “I was angry and unsure if I was going to make it (in his career and life in general). My family members have rejected me. My high school friends have pretty much turned their back on me as well. When I was at basic training, I experienced similar issues of rejection. “When I got to Fort Lee, I declared my love to a girl and she told me no,” he continued. “In my heart, I knew she could have

It’s how you play the game Lisa Smith Molinari Contributing Writer

For many, thoughts of fall evoke echoes of marching bands and referee whistles. We feel the cold aluminum bleacher seats and the prickle of wool scarves. Like Pavlov’s dog, our mouths water imagining steaming coffee at 8 a.m. soccer games and chili dogs at football halftime breaks. As soon as our kids show any interest in athletics, we put them on teams so we can experience the sights, sounds and smells of

the fall sports season. We justify our pushy behavior by telling ourselves our kids will benefit from learning about teamwork, But do they? Over a decade ago, our family was stationed in Norfolk and our son, Hayden, was a squishy little 10-year-old who preferred piano to athletic pursuits. Early in the fall of his 5th grade year, Hayden showed an inkling of interest in football. As visions of tailgate parties danced in our heads, we jumped on the opportunity and contacted the local flag

Fort Lee

Commanding General ........Maj. Gen. Darrell K. Williams Garrison Commander .................... Col. Adam W. Butler Public Affairs Officer............................. Stephen J. Baker Command Information/Managing Editor...Patrick Buffett Senior Writer/Special Assignments ......... T. Anthony Bell Production/News Assistant Editor.................. Amy Perry Family/Community Life Reporter ...........Lesley Atkinson Production Assistant .............................. Ray Kozakewicz To reach the Traveller staff, call (804) 734-7147.

football league. “Sorry ma’am, the teams are full . . . now, if your husband would be willing to coach, your son could play this season.” Although my husband, Francis, had never coached sports before and was completely ignorant of the league team selection process, he agreed because he was between deployments and it was a rare chance to spend quality time with Hayden. We received a roster of 15 kids – Hayden and 14 others – who transferred from overcrowded teams. What we didn’t know was the other coaches had been asked to give up a couple of kids each, and of course they picked their worst players.

The Fort Lee “Traveller” is printed by offset process every Thursday as a civilian enterprise in the interest of personnel at the U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command and Fort Lee, Va. 23801, by Military Newspapers of Virginia, 114 Charlotte Avenue Suite A, Colonial Heights, Va. 23834, in accordance with Department of the Army Regulations 210-20 and 360-1. This publication receives armed forces material and civilian newspapers are authorized to reprint such material without specific clearance except material specifically designated as copyrighted. Liaison between the printer and the commanding general, Fort Lee, is maintained by the Public Affairs Office, Fort Lee. Circulation: 13,000. This Civilian Enterprise newspaper is an authorized publication. Contents of the “Traveller” are not necessarily the official view of, nor endorsed by, the U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command and Fort Lee. Advertising in this publication including inserts or supplements does not constitute endorsement by the Department of the Army or Military Newspapers of Virginia. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non merit factor. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the printer shall refuse to print advertising from that source until violation is corrected. The “Traveller” is an unofficial publication authorized by AR 360-1, and printed by the Military Newspapers of Virginia, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Army Combined Arms Support Command or Fort Lee. The editorial content is prepared, edited and provided by the Public Affairs Office of Headquarters, U. S. Army Garrison, Fort Lee.

has helped him explore other avenues for involvement in the community, which has opened new avenues for future friendships. “It gave me hope for a better future that could include rekindling my relationship with family members,” Michael said. Perhaps, reaching out to a unit chaplain was never something Esther and Michael considered until it was prompted by a caring individual concerned for their well-being. How many others in our community are in a similar situation? Will they see the moral of this story and seek help from a chaplain who will guide them to a better place in life? During times of struggle, trust in the Lord as He “knows the plans He has in mind for you,” as noted in Jeremiah 29:11. They are plans for peace and not calamity; to give you a future filled with hope. Seek help from unit chaplains … we will always be there for you.

Oblivious, we showed up for our first practice ready to assess the boys’ talents. The lineup was not what we expected. None of the boys knew a thing about football. Most were small for their age. Three had learning disabilities. Nonetheless, they were all excited to play. We called ourselves “The Sharks” and accepted the rejected purple league jerseys without complaint. Practices were dicey. The plays looked more like people running from a fire, but we were hopeful it would all come together on game day. As self-appointed team mom, I went SEE SHARKS, PAGE 12

COVER

832nd Ordnance Battalion

supports the theme of this article, “hope is never lost.” While discussing her marriage, Esther said the following: “I tried counselors and talking things out. I needed help. At the beginning, everything was so nice – absolutely lovely – but it soon turned into a joke, or more like a nightmare I couldn’t believe I was experiencing.” Esther does not believe in divorce and is convinced her parents and family would reject her if she abandoned the promise of her wedding vows. “I really believe my husband is a good person but (at that time) he started acting like … well, acting like a jerk. He was lying. He lost interest in me. He stopped talking to me like he did when we were dating. I tried to start

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Chaplain (Capt.) Moralesjude

a good future with me. She does not know what she has lost. I also had a loan rejected that I was really counting on to be approved. Was everyone against me? I thought, maybe I was the problem. I felt so guilty, and didn’t know what to do.” Clearly, Esther and Michael were confronting difficult situations. Both were referred by friends to the local unit chaplain. This is what happened. “The chaplain invested time in me and my husband,” Esther said. “We started marriage counseling, and now we are communicating much better. We are fighting for our happiness. We better understand our differences and have agreed to follow our own plans of success. I have found the hope, peace and resiliency I always wanted in our relationship.” Michael was referred to a financial counselor who has helped him establish a budget to improve his credit score. The chaplain also

Jerry Silva

Students of the 94th Training Command’s Advance Leadership Course (Army Reserve) show their fun-loving spirit at the starting line of the Kenner Army Health Clinic 5K Volksmarch here Saturday. For more photos, see Page 10.


www.fortleetraveller.com | October 20, 2016 | TRAVELLER | 3

7RGD\·V¶*UHDW6KDNHRXW·GULOO HPSKDVL]HVQHHGIRUSODQQLQJ Community members across Fort Lee are expected to participate in the “Great Shakeout” earthquake drill today at 10:20 a.m. The start of the exercise will be announced via the ATHOC emergency warning system and official email channels. Regardless of whether individuals receive the announcements, however, they should take steps to review and rehearse crisis response procedures. “The annual shakeout drill is meant to emphasize the importance of planning and practice to reduce the possibility of injuries or deaths,” noted Thomas Loden, installation emergency manager with the Directorate of Plans, Training, Mobilization and Security. “Earthquakes in particular are among the most de-

structive phenomenon in nature, and the fact they don’t happen often works against us because people become apathetic about preparedness. “I can’t emphasize enough how important it is to take this seriously,” he said. “Don’t assume it will never happen or that you can just deal with it when it does. Learn from history. Get into the mindset that we need to protect ourselves and those we care about and love by being aware and being prepared.” More than 160 earthquakes have occurred in Virginia since 1977. Most were negligible; however, in 2011 much of the state experienced a 5.8 magnitude tremor emanating from an epicenter in the Louisa County area approximately 72 miles north-

west of Fort Lee. It was not the first major earthquake to affect the commonwealth. The thirdlargest earth tremor in the eastern United States was recorded here in 1897 and was felt in 12 states. “That pretty much eliminates the ‘if’ question,” Loden noted, “and leaves us with when … as in, when it happens, what actions will afford the best chance of survival?” The shakeout drill is the time to reflect on that question. If homes, offices, organizations, etc., are without a plan; people should take steps to begin putting one together. Assess the potential hazards. Practice the following immediate response procedures: • DROP to the ground, • COVER head and neck with arms and seek shelter by

getting under a sturdy desk or table if nearby; and • HOLD ON to the shelter and be prepared to move with it until the shaking stops. Many injuries in earthquakes are caused by nonstructural objects – lighting fixtures, windows, ceiling tiles, etc. – falling from buildings, as well as toppling furniture and hanging objects coming loose and dropping to the floor. That’s why national safety experts recommend taking shelter under a solid object until the shaking stops. If outdoors, don’t run into a building. Find a safe spot well away from structures that can crumble or fall over, and get low to the ground to ride out the tremors. If operating a vehicle, find a safe pull-over spot away from power lines and poles. It’s important to consider also what actions would be taken after the earthquake. Accountability is the foremost goal, followed by assessment of the damage to determine if evacuation is necessary. A well-thought-out response plan also would include emergency contact information for police, the fire department, public works, your child’s school if applicable, and so on. Ask the question, what supplies would you need if the quake destroys power or water lines, or makes roads impassable? Take steps to prepare for that possibly by assembling or checking the contents of an emer-

gency response kit. There are multiple information resources on the internet to help individuals construct a thorough response plan and educate themselves on the dangers associated with earthquakes, Loden noted. Recommended sites include https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/ earthquakes and www.ready.gov/ earthquakes. “Research is a proactive step. Ensuring employees are enrolled in ATHOC is one also,” said Loden. “Every positive action puts this command closer to protecting life and property during a natural or manmade disaster. There’s no question earthquakes can happen here, as stated earlier. The shakeout drill is the ideal opportunity to ask ourselves what steps can be taken to mitigate the effects this potentially deadly hazard.” Most computer workstations connected to the Fort Lee-area network have a direct link to the ATHOC registration portal. Click the small triangle on right side of the taskbar and then select the purple globe icon (contact your system administrator if it’s not visible). While registering in ATHOC, ensure work phone number, official email, and placeof-duty address information is provided at a minimum. For questions, contact Diego Reynoso at (804) 734-7903. – DPTMS and Staff Reports

Leading by example

Keith Desbois

Chief Warrant Officer 5 Robert P. Harman, CASCOM CWO; Maj. Gen. Darrell K. Williams, CASCOM and Fort Lee commanding general; and Command Sgt. Maj. Nathaniel J. Bartee, CASCOM CSM, receive their annual flu shots recently from members of the Kenner Army Health Clinic team. They and other members of the command group participated to demonstrate the importance of getting vaccinated. Kenner is providing the flu vaccine to service members, military families and Department of the Army Civilians to help combat influenza as winter and peak flu season sets in. Service members will receive their inoculations through their commands. Pediatric vaccinations are available from 7:30-11 a.m., Monday-Friday; and 1:15-3:15 p.m. every weekday except Thursday. Adult vaccinations are administered through Family Medicine. Both departments have scheduled late flu clinics from 4-6 p.m. through Nov. 20. Flu vaccines for DA Civilians are available every Tuesday, 9-11 a.m., in the Occupational Health Department on the second floor of the facility. For more information, call (804) 734-9086.


4 | TRAVELLER | October 20, 2016 | www.fortleetraveller.com

KAHC Late Flu Clinics Offered Kenner Army Health Clinic has scheduled late flu clinics for pediatric and family medicine beneficiaries every Tuesday and Thursday, 4-6 p.m. Pediatric vaccines will be administered in the Wilkerson Pediatric Clinic and for adult beneficiaries in the Family Medicine Clinic. For details, call (804) 734-9086.

Kenner Mammography Services Kenner Army Health Clinic has made changes in its mammography services to reduce long waiting times. To aid in this process, beneficiaries should make an appointment with their provider, ask for a written order for a mammogram, schedule the procedure at the Radiology Department and attain prior studies for comparison before the appointment. The Radiology Department is open Monday-Friday, 6 a.m. - 4 p.m. For details, call (804) 734-9118. Amy Perry

Mike Immler, deputy director, Army and Air Force Exchange Service, presents a coin to Rebecca Grimsley, exchange employee, to thank her for her hard work during his Oct. 13 visit to Fort Lee. He also thanked several other employees. From left, they are: Tanja Aikins, Sasha Ortiz, Kim Hamilton, Elizabeth Isakson and Abraham Tucker.

AAFES deputy director visits Lee, recognizes employees Army and Air Force Exchange Service Deputy Director Mike Immler is making it his mission to ensure the Exchange is doing all it can to serve troops at Fort Lee. “The Exchange is dedicated to the service it provides at Fort Lee, ensuring military members, retirees and their families have a place to shop and dine they can be proud of,” Immler said. To better understand how the Exchange can best meet the needs of the community, Immler toured the main facility, food court, Military Clothing Store and Express during his Oct. 13 visit. He also visited several other AAFES locations that week. “I like talking to our employees about how we can serve troops and their families better,” he said. “Our mission is all about serving those military members and generating earnings, so we can give back to the community and support quality-of-life programs.” During his visit to the food court in the Main Exchange Mall, he learned more about an upcoming fast-food brand coming to Fort Lee: Arbys. The eatery should be ready to serve customers by mid-to-late December. “We are committed to helping make

Fort Lee a great place to live and work,” Immler said. “The Exchange remains focused on bringing terrific brands and great value to service members.” Immler said he uses these trips to recognize employees. During his visit, he gave coins to Tanja Aikins, Sasha Ortiz, Rebecca Grimsley, Kim Hamilton, Elizabeth Isakson and Abraham Tucker. Shopping at the Exchange adds value to installations because money is returned through the Family and MWR program. “For every dollar earned, historically 67 cents comes back to the community through the Army Morale, Welfare and Recreation dividend,” Immler said. “Last year, sales at the Fort Lee Exchange generated more than $1.3 million on behalf of military qualityof-life programs. Every time shoppers buy our merchandize, they generate funds to help make life better at Fort Lee.” Immler is the first civilian deputy director of the 121-year-old organization, which employs approximately 35,000 associates worldwide. In addition, 35 activeduty service members are assigned to the Exchange management team. – AAFES and Staff Reports

Release of Exchange Toyland Toy Book The Army and Air Force Exchange Service Toyland toy book will be released Oct. 21. Stocked with the hottest fall toys for boys and girls of all ages, the book features a special assortment of toys tested by military children identifiable by the Military Brat-Approved logo including products from Disney, Hasbro, Barbie, Lego, Nerf, Little Tikes, Fisher-Price, Mattel and Huffy. Visit the Exchange customer service desk for details.

Exchange Halloween Pet Photo Contest Through Oct. 31 Authorized shoppers have a chance to win a $5,000 gift card during the Army and Air Force Exchange Service Halloween Pet Photo Contest through Oct. 31. To enter, submit a photo of a pet wearing a Halloween costume to shopmyexchange. com. Five runners-up will receive a year’s supply of Science Diet pet food – a $500 value. The contest is open to those 18 and older. No purchase is necessary.

Kenner Influenza Vaccine for Civilians | Tuesdays Kenner Army Health Clinic will administer the influenza vaccination to DOD Civilians every Tuesday, 9-11 a.m., in the Occupational Health Department, located on the second floor of the KAHC main facility. The next date is Oct. 25. The vaccine is available only for DOD Civilians who must present valid CAC credentials at the time of the visit. For details, call (804) 734-9159.

New Battlefield Facility Hours Effective Nov. 6, Petersburg National Battlefield Park facilities including visitor contact stations, governmental offices, park tour roads and parking lots with controlled access will open at 9 a.m. and close at 5 p.m. The battlefield grounds will continue to be open daily at sunrise and close at sunset. This operational change coincides with the change back to Standard Daylight time and will allow the park to allocate staff resources more efficiently. For details, email chris_bryce@nps.gov.

Host Families Requested The International Military Student Office at the Army Logistics University is always looking for community members on and off-post to serve as social sponsors for international students who attend classes at Fort Lee. The hosts help the students to learn more about the local community and make them feel welcome as visitors to the U.S. For details, call (804) 765-8159 or email donna.r.king10.civ@mail.mil.


www.fortleetraveller.com | October 20, 2016 | TRAVELLER | 5

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Photos by Amy Perry

(CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) Linda Harvey, Army Community Service relocation readiness specialist, poses with members of the 54th Quartermaster Company, 11th Transportation Battalion, after presenting them with a Army Sponsorship Program trophy Oct. 13 for winning the fourth quarter competition for a medium unit. A special award was given to Staff Sgt. Kokou Gomez within the unit for ensuring Soldiers in his company logged in to take the eSponsorship online training. • Col. Sean Davis, 59th Ordnance Brigade commander, poses with Harvey and members of the brigade’s S-1 shop Tuesday after receiving the sponsorship trophy for a large unit of more than 150 members. The troops were responsible for encouraging the brigade to take the eSponsorship Application Training. • Harvey presents the small unit sponsorship trophy on Friday for fourth quarter ďŹ scal 2016 to the Staff and Faculty Company, 71st Transportation Battalion, for completing the eSponsorship Application Training. Harvey holds the competition each quarter to encourage units to have sponsors ready for incoming Soldiers. To compete the online training, go to My Training Hub at https://myhub.militaryonesource.mil, create a proďŹ le and complete the course modules.

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6 | TRAVELLER | October 20, 2016 | www.fortleetraveller.com

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Contributed Photo

Two lieutenants from the Quartermaster Basic Officer Leader Course, class 16012, volunteer at the concession stand during a recent Friday night football game at Prince George High School. Led by Capt. Alan Strange, officers in the class are at every Royals home football game in the roles of salesmen, cashiers and food preparation staff. Bringing to bare the lessons learned in class, the volunteers work out the logistics of feeding the crowds and preparing enough food for continual support of the concession stand. “Throughout the night, each member of our team plays a vital role in ensuring the concession stand can support all customers, all the while building a relationship with the community,“ noted Strange.

Susan Garling

Post employees compete in a flower-arranging contest during the Garrison Organization Day celebration Oct. 5 at the HideAway Club’s outdoor pavillion. More than 300 members of the garrison team participated in the four-hour event that also included live entertainment, picnic food, other contests and the commander’s cup presentation to the Directorate of Public Works that outscored other offices and directorates in a series of sporting events over several weeks prior to the event.

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www.fortleetraveller.com | October 20, 2016 | TRAVELLER | 7

HISTORIC PHOTO

OF THE

MONTH | 1918

7DIWYLVLWV&DPS/HH Ray Kozakewicz Production Assistant

This installment of the Historic Photo of the Month looks back to February 1918 when former President William Howard Taft visited Camp Lee. “‘No peace without victory,’ is the battle cry for the men of the Eightieth Division,’ voiced not by a militaristic war lord, but by William Howard Taft, once Secretary of War and then President of the United States, but now most of all the father of a private in the U.S. Army, on his visit to Camp Lee Saturday.” This is the first paragraph in a front page article in the Feb. 1 edition of the weekly newspaper, the Bayonet. It appeared

under the headline “PEACE AFTER VICTORY WAR’S ONLY SOLUTION, FIGHT ON, URGES TAFT” The subhead was “Ex-President, Father of Private, Tells Nationals Conflict’s End Is Far Off – Speaks Four Times During Brief Visit to Cantonment.” “In all his speeches during the busy day, Mr. Taft showed the futility of hope in early peace; a peace possible only if principle is to go unconsidered,” the 1918

story continued. “‘The allies cannot concede peace unless they conquer it,’ he declared. ‘When they do so, it will be permanent. Otherwise they fail.’” “This was the theme that underlaid his addresses – the necessity of war to the end, that the blessings of peace be made possible. “Four times the ex-president spoke in the course of a few hours. His chief address was delivered in the morning in the main auditorium of the Y.M.C.A., the second at noon when the library was opened, his third from the Hostess House and his fourth to the colored Soldiers in their Y.M.C.A. in the artillery wing of the camp. Camp Lee is one of the 12 (Army cantonments)

he is visiting under the auspices of the war work council of the Y.M.C.A. He came from Camp Devens in Massachusetts, and left for Southern camps. While here, he was escorted to all four meetings by Gen. J.M. Brett. “Upon the stage at the main auditorium were the members of the division headquarters staff and the brigade and regimental commanders. The audience was composed of men from the various commands, the seats apportioned among them. The article continued, “Miss Christine Miller, the soloist, received an ovation for her ‘Battle Hymn of the Republic.’ The 320th Infantry’s Band and the glee club assisted. “Mr. Taft was greeted with great applause as he ascended the platform. He launched right into his

U.S. Army Quartermaster Museum

“Picture in circle – Taft shakes hands with library attendants. Left to right in second top picture – E.M. Miller, camp ‘Y’ secretary; Ex-President Taft, Brig. Gen. J.M. Brett and H.S. Green, camp librarian. Below – Taft addresses Eightieth Division from Hostess House,” read the caption of this photo in the Feb. 1, 1918, edition of the Bayonet.

address. He denounced Germany’s disregard of international morality and paid a tribute to France and England whose armies he declared ‘had saved the

world for democracy.’” The Traveller welcomes comments from readers about this series. Comments can be posted on www.facebook.com/armyfortlee.

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8 | TRAVELLER | October 20, 2016 | www.fortleetraveller.com

www.fortleetraveller.com | October 20, 2016 | TRAVELLER | 9

T. Anthony Bell

T. Anthony Bell

Senior Writer/Special Projects

Senior Writer/Special Projects

O

ne noncommissioned officer spent her time at a university, performing administrative duties, teaching and producing highend pastries. Another learned the finer skills of her craft at one of the top schools of its kind in the world. Staff Sgt. Lagena Boggs and Staff Sgt. Florine Faendrich, both food service specialists, were afforded rare opportunities of an Army career when they applied for and were accepted into the Army’s Training with Industry Program. “It opened doors that didn’t think existed,” said Boggs, a 12-year Soldier assigned to the Joint Culinary Center of Excellence. “I spent my entire career in FORSCOM and deployed three times. I thought that was all there was – working in a dining facility or deployment.” TWI is an Army-wide skills development program that provides qualified Soldiers with work experiences unique to private industry. Selectees spend one year at an assignment with an industry partner and two years follow-on in a utilization slot such as an instructor position. In the food service career field, TWI assignments include the American Culinary Federation in St. Augustine, Fla., Sullivan University in Louisville, Ky., and the Culinary Institute of America in San Antonio. Boggs completed her TWI assignment two years ago at Sullivan, a private school with a well-known culinary arts program. Faendrich concluded a TWI stint with the renowned CIA earlier this year. Both are currently Advanced Culinary Skills Training Course instructors, but Boggs is scheduled to relocate to Fort Drum, N.Y., in the near future. Eligibility criteria for TWI include active duty status; a time in service requirement of two - 22 years; completion of NCO education courses commensurate with grade; secret clearance; and meeting the Army weight and height standards. Faendrich, a 14-year Soldier who completed a two-year culinary program at Johnson and Wales University prior to joining the Army, said TWI fulfilled an aspiration to return to the classroom. “It was really cool to go back to school and get the hands-on training,” she said. At CIA, Faendrich said she first completed several courses to include those involving meat and seafood fabrication and garde manger, French for cold food preparation. The

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INDUSTRY TRAINED

T. Anthony Bell

Staff Sgt. Legena Boggs and SSG Florine Faendrich are Joint Culinary Center of Excellence instructors who underwent training under the Quartermaster School’s Training with Industry Program. TWI provides a oneyear assignment with an industry partner to further develop a Soldier’s skills.

Program provides Soldiers with unique learning experience 34-year-old then became a manager in training, a position similar to a teacher’s assistant. “I was able to share my knowledge,” she said. “That was really awesome.” Boggs’ time at Sullivan was equally fulfilling. She too began with culinary classes, then moved up to teacher’s assistant, mostly supporting the program of instruction with demonstrations. Boggs later taught a basic baking class, worked as an intern in the school bakery and taught as a substitute. “I also advised their pastry team, and we competed quarterly with the local ACF,” she said. “Through all of that, my responsibilities were all over the place, but it gave me the experience I needed to come back here to teach and compete as well.” Boggs has since been selected for the U.S. Army Culinary Arts Team, earned culinary certifications from the ACF and met many of the food service leadership “I probably would not have met” if she had not applied for the program. “It’s opened so many doors,” she reiterated. Faendrich has similar sentiments. “I’m glad the Army has this for Soldiers who want to go out there and train with industry,” she said. “It opens up doors, expos-

MOS Industry Partner

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Location

Grainger Mississippi EnerNOC Mass. UPS Kentucky PONDCO Georgia Farmington CC Virginia Sullivan Kentucky CSI Texas Chevron Mississippi Nat. Cemetery Virginia Abn. Systems California To be determined Grainger Mississippi Sullivan Kentucky

ing them to amazing opportunities.” The door to opportunities also is open to Soldiers in several quartermaster military occupational specialities (see info box). Sgt. 1st Class Cheryl Cameron is a supply specialist assigned to Papa Company, 244th QM Bn. Fresh from a TWI tour of duty at Sullivan, she has learned things about supply chain management she would be hardpresssed to

learn in the Army. “I got a broader view of what my job is all about,” she said. “It helped develop my skills not only from the military side but the civilian side as well.” As TWI alum, the onus is on the Soldiers to pass on their knowledge and skills, which is the primary purpose of the program. To apply, Soldiers must meet the basic criteria then complete a Department of the Army Form 4187. Instructions for the application can be found at https://www.hrc. army.mil/EPMD/TWI%20Application%20 Processing%20Instructions. A letter of recommendation signed by the first general officer in the chain of command must accompany the application as well as a current record brief; a current DA Form 705 (Army Physical Fitness Test Score Card); and DA Form 550 (Body Fat Content). The application and supporting documents must be sent via email to USARMY. KNOX.HRC.MBX.EPMD-NCOES-TWIPROGRAM@MAIL.MIL in PDF format. The subject of the email should read “Request to compete for TWI.” The next deadline for submissions is Jan. 8, 2017.

n August, more than 25 installation law enforcement officers underwent two days of training that was a bit of a departure from the usual classroom and range sessions. From outside experts, participants learned combatives, weapons techniques, medical evacuation and room-clearing procedures that might be necessary during the course of an active shooter incident. By a number of accounts, the training was robust, relevant and constructive. It also was of minimal cost to the government. That gesture of support was made possible in part by retired Staff Sgt. Jeffrey R. Graf. The Richmond-based CSX Transportation special agent, firearms and tactical instructor, who spent 22 years as a Soldier – 17 as a military policeman – was more than willing to reciprocate the training provided to him over the course of his military career. “I love the military,” said the 50-yearold Illinois native. “I got so much out of it. I used to love it when outside instructors – veterans, guys who had been around for a little bit – came to train us. I just thought it was the greatest thing.” Graf, who has provided the training the past four years, brought with him five other veterans to support his efforts. They included Jason Bennett, a former paratrooper; Dale Williams, a former Marine and Jason Butler, a Waverly police officer. Graf’s supporting cast is a testament to his ability to make use of contacts from his varied experience in law enforcement. “He is well-versed in reaching across – not just within the military but other organizations – to conduct training,” said Capt. Keith Thayer, a 1st Cavalry Division public affairs officer who served with Graf when they were both Army recruiters. “That’s why he was so successful as a recruiter; he would bring a lot of different people to his high schools (to support his recruiting efforts). He understands the power behind using your resources.” raf spent the bulk of his time in the military police career field as a special response team noncommissioned officer in charge, completing a large number of military law enforcement courses as well as civilian training. He eventually acquired the experience, knowledge and skills to become a certified instructor and recognized subject matter

G

SOLDIER ƙƢƥƟƜƙƘ Retiree committed to sharing what Army gave him (LEFT) Retired Soldier Jeff Graf instructs law enforcement personnel during an Aug. 18 training session. Graf spent 22 years in the Army as an infantryman and military policeman. He is currently a railroad police for CSX Transportation. (ABOVE) Graf, a certified instructor, boasts a long list of credentials to include 2nd degree martial artist.

installation ranges. He assisted his friend and fellow former Soldier Sensei Vincent Marchetti in teaching combatives and trained participants on the finer details of medical evacuation and other police tactics and procedures at the installation range complex. he Provost Marshal Office’s Keith Miller said the training aimed to complement the knowledge, skills and abilities of law enforcement personnel. “The purpose was to take a basic MP, give him more information, and put more tools in his toolbox to create a better MP in the event on an active shooter,” said the Department of the Army Civilian policeman. Providing such training in light of the proliferation of mass shootings is critical to the safety of military members and others who live and work on military installations, said Graf. For that reason, he and others like Marchetti are eager to help out. “If we can show MPs one thing that might help them – it may not be tomorrow, and it may not be next week – at some point to help them save their own lives, then it’s all worthwhile. These are the good guys. We want them to come home. These are the people we want protecting us. You want to do good things for these guys.” Graf said he has plans to continue his efforts to train military law enforcement personnel as long as possible. “As long as I know I’m doing good things and helping out, and as long as they want me, I’ll keep going,” he said.

T

File photos

expert. “Once I became an instructor, I ended up teaching local SWAT teams, police departments and the military at Fort Knox, Ky.,” he said, noting his chain of command’s support in covering subjects from “barricaded gunman to hostage rescue.” Upon retirement from the Army in 2007, Graf was hired at CSX, where he teaches employees and others about security issues relating to trains. His team covers an area that encompasses most of the country east

of the Mississippi River. Graf is a certified SWAT instructor among other qualifications to include a range master, rappel master and a National Rifle Association law enforcement firearms instructor. He is also a second degree black belt in a fighting style that mixes judo, ju-jitsu and karate. Graf employed a good number of his skills during the Fight Over Flight law enforcement training held Aug. 17-18 at the Army Logistics University and the

10/19/2016 4:14:44 PM


8 | TRAVELLER | October 20, 2016 | www.fortleetraveller.com

www.fortleetraveller.com | October 20, 2016 | TRAVELLER | 9

T. Anthony Bell

T. Anthony Bell

Senior Writer/Special Projects

Senior Writer/Special Projects

O

ne noncommissioned officer spent her time at a university, performing administrative duties, teaching and producing highend pastries. Another learned the finer skills of her craft at one of the top schools of its kind in the world. Staff Sgt. Lagena Boggs and Staff Sgt. Florine Faendrich, both food service specialists, were afforded rare opportunities of an Army career when they applied for and were accepted into the Army’s Training with Industry Program. “It opened doors that didn’t think existed,” said Boggs, a 12-year Soldier assigned to the Joint Culinary Center of Excellence. “I spent my entire career in FORSCOM and deployed three times. I thought that was all there was – working in a dining facility or deployment.” TWI is an Army-wide skills development program that provides qualified Soldiers with work experiences unique to private industry. Selectees spend one year at an assignment with an industry partner and two years follow-on in a utilization slot such as an instructor position. In the food service career field, TWI assignments include the American Culinary Federation in St. Augustine, Fla., Sullivan University in Louisville, Ky., and the Culinary Institute of America in San Antonio. Boggs completed her TWI assignment two years ago at Sullivan, a private school with a well-known culinary arts program. Faendrich concluded a TWI stint with the renowned CIA earlier this year. Both are currently Advanced Culinary Skills Training Course instructors, but Boggs is scheduled to relocate to Fort Drum, N.Y., in the near future. Eligibility criteria for TWI include active duty status; a time in service requirement of two - 22 years; completion of NCO education courses commensurate with grade; secret clearance; and meeting the Army weight and height standards. Faendrich, a 14-year Soldier who completed a two-year culinary program at Johnson and Wales University prior to joining the Army, said TWI fulfilled an aspiration to return to the classroom. “It was really cool to go back to school and get the hands-on training,” she said. At CIA, Faendrich said she first completed several courses to include those involving meat and seafood fabrication and garde manger, French for cold food preparation. The

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I

INDUSTRY TRAINED

T. Anthony Bell

Staff Sgt. Legena Boggs and SSG Florine Faendrich are Joint Culinary Center of Excellence instructors who underwent training under the Quartermaster School’s Training with Industry Program. TWI provides a oneyear assignment with an industry partner to further develop a Soldier’s skills.

Program provides Soldiers with unique learning experience 34-year-old then became a manager in training, a position similar to a teacher’s assistant. “I was able to share my knowledge,” she said. “That was really awesome.” Boggs’ time at Sullivan was equally fulfilling. She too began with culinary classes, then moved up to teacher’s assistant, mostly supporting the program of instruction with demonstrations. Boggs later taught a basic baking class, worked as an intern in the school bakery and taught as a substitute. “I also advised their pastry team, and we competed quarterly with the local ACF,” she said. “Through all of that, my responsibilities were all over the place, but it gave me the experience I needed to come back here to teach and compete as well.” Boggs has since been selected for the U.S. Army Culinary Arts Team, earned culinary certifications from the ACF and met many of the food service leadership “I probably would not have met” if she had not applied for the program. “It’s opened so many doors,” she reiterated. Faendrich has similar sentiments. “I’m glad the Army has this for Soldiers who want to go out there and train with industry,” she said. “It opens up doors, expos-

MOS Industry Partner

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Location

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ing them to amazing opportunities.” The door to opportunities also is open to Soldiers in several quartermaster military occupational specialities (see info box). Sgt. 1st Class Cheryl Cameron is a supply specialist assigned to Papa Company, 244th QM Bn. Fresh from a TWI tour of duty at Sullivan, she has learned things about supply chain management she would be hardpresssed to

learn in the Army. “I got a broader view of what my job is all about,” she said. “It helped develop my skills not only from the military side but the civilian side as well.” As TWI alum, the onus is on the Soldiers to pass on their knowledge and skills, which is the primary purpose of the program. To apply, Soldiers must meet the basic criteria then complete a Department of the Army Form 4187. Instructions for the application can be found at https://www.hrc. army.mil/EPMD/TWI%20Application%20 Processing%20Instructions. A letter of recommendation signed by the first general officer in the chain of command must accompany the application as well as a current record brief; a current DA Form 705 (Army Physical Fitness Test Score Card); and DA Form 550 (Body Fat Content). The application and supporting documents must be sent via email to USARMY. KNOX.HRC.MBX.EPMD-NCOES-TWIPROGRAM@MAIL.MIL in PDF format. The subject of the email should read “Request to compete for TWI.” The next deadline for submissions is Jan. 8, 2017.

n August, more than 25 installation law enforcement officers underwent two days of training that was a bit of a departure from the usual classroom and range sessions. From outside experts, participants learned combatives, weapons techniques, medical evacuation and room-clearing procedures that might be necessary during the course of an active shooter incident. By a number of accounts, the training was robust, relevant and constructive. It also was of minimal cost to the government. That gesture of support was made possible in part by retired Staff Sgt. Jeffrey R. Graf. The Richmond-based CSX Transportation special agent, firearms and tactical instructor, who spent 22 years as a Soldier – 17 as a military policeman – was more than willing to reciprocate the training provided to him over the course of his military career. “I love the military,” said the 50-yearold Illinois native. “I got so much out of it. I used to love it when outside instructors – veterans, guys who had been around for a little bit – came to train us. I just thought it was the greatest thing.” Graf, who has provided the training the past four years, brought with him five other veterans to support his efforts. They included Jason Bennett, a former paratrooper; Dale Williams, a former Marine and Jason Butler, a Waverly police officer. Graf’s supporting cast is a testament to his ability to make use of contacts from his varied experience in law enforcement. “He is well-versed in reaching across – not just within the military but other organizations – to conduct training,” said Capt. Keith Thayer, a 1st Cavalry Division public affairs officer who served with Graf when they were both Army recruiters. “That’s why he was so successful as a recruiter; he would bring a lot of different people to his high schools (to support his recruiting efforts). He understands the power behind using your resources.” raf spent the bulk of his time in the military police career field as a special response team noncommissioned officer in charge, completing a large number of military law enforcement courses as well as civilian training. He eventually acquired the experience, knowledge and skills to become a certified instructor and recognized subject matter

G

SOLDIER ƙƢƥƟƜƙƘ Retiree committed to sharing what Army gave him (LEFT) Retired Soldier Jeff Graf instructs law enforcement personnel during an Aug. 18 training session. Graf spent 22 years in the Army as an infantryman and military policeman. He is currently a railroad police for CSX Transportation. (ABOVE) Graf, a certified instructor, boasts a long list of credentials to include 2nd degree martial artist.

installation ranges. He assisted his friend and fellow former Soldier Sensei Vincent Marchetti in teaching combatives and trained participants on the finer details of medical evacuation and other police tactics and procedures at the installation range complex. he Provost Marshal Office’s Keith Miller said the training aimed to complement the knowledge, skills and abilities of law enforcement personnel. “The purpose was to take a basic MP, give him more information, and put more tools in his toolbox to create a better MP in the event on an active shooter,” said the Department of the Army Civilian policeman. Providing such training in light of the proliferation of mass shootings is critical to the safety of military members and others who live and work on military installations, said Graf. For that reason, he and others like Marchetti are eager to help out. “If we can show MPs one thing that might help them – it may not be tomorrow, and it may not be next week – at some point to help them save their own lives, then it’s all worthwhile. These are the good guys. We want them to come home. These are the people we want protecting us. You want to do good things for these guys.” Graf said he has plans to continue his efforts to train military law enforcement personnel as long as possible. “As long as I know I’m doing good things and helping out, and as long as they want me, I’ll keep going,” he said.

T

File photos

expert. “Once I became an instructor, I ended up teaching local SWAT teams, police departments and the military at Fort Knox, Ky.,” he said, noting his chain of command’s support in covering subjects from “barricaded gunman to hostage rescue.” Upon retirement from the Army in 2007, Graf was hired at CSX, where he teaches employees and others about security issues relating to trains. His team covers an area that encompasses most of the country east

of the Mississippi River. Graf is a certified SWAT instructor among other qualifications to include a range master, rappel master and a National Rifle Association law enforcement firearms instructor. He is also a second degree black belt in a fighting style that mixes judo, ju-jitsu and karate. Graf employed a good number of his skills during the Fight Over Flight law enforcement training held Aug. 17-18 at the Army Logistics University and the

10/19/2016 4:14:44 PM


10 | TRAVELLER | October 20, 2016 | www.fortleetraveller.com

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Photos by Jerry Silva

(FROM FAR LEFT) Lt. Col. Brett H. Venable, Kenner Army Health Clinic commander, greets more than 300 participants as they get ready to run the fourth annual KAHC Volksmarch Saturday. The event featured a health fair and a 5K or 1K run or walk through the trails of Petersburg National BattleďŹ eld Park promoting the Surgeon General’s Performance Triad of sleep, nutrition and physical activity. Venable said, “This is a great opportunity for our beneďŹ ciaries to learn about healthy living as well as the free resources available to them within the Fort Lee community.â€? • A young Volksmarch participant sits in a ďŹ re truck and proudly dons a ďŹ re helmet. • Runners gather at the starting line to participate in the KAHC Volksmarch run/walk.

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Anthony Nelson Contributed Photo

Military units stand in formation at the start of the Domestic Violence Awareness Month joint services run Oct. 5 at Williams Stadium. The run included approximately 1,300 participants from Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine detachments to honor DVM and pay tribute to victims of domestic violence. A variety of activities have been held throughout the month to increase awareness of this serious social issue. A Kick Domestic Violence kickball tournament with military and DOD civilians competing is set for Oct. 28 at Williams Stadium. Call (804) 734-6381 for details.

Soldiers assigned to Uniform Company, 262nd Quartermaster Battalion, pose for a photo holding their plaques after winning the Advanced Individual Training/Initial Entry Training summer basketball championship at MacLaughlin Fitness Center Oct. 12. U-pride defeated Delta Company, 832nd Ordnance Battalion, 49-42, in overtime in the championship game. The champs road to the ďŹ nals began by defeating Papa Company, 244th Quartermaster Battalion; Alpha Company, 244th QM Bn.; Victor Company, 262nd QM Bn.; and Whiskey Company, 244th QM Bn., to set up the ďŹ nal match. Delta Co. defeated Alpha Co., Bravo Co. and No. 1 seed Charlie Co., 832nd Ord., to set up the game with Uniform Co. MVP of the tournament is Uniform Co’s Jamarcuis Jackson.


www.fortleetraveller.com | October 20, 2016 | TRAVELLER | 11

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Security tip of the week Fort Lee is observing Security Awareness Month in October. Each week has a different theme. For the week of Oct. 17-21, the theme is Best Practices for Working with Controlled Unclassified Information. The Tip of the Week is: Don’t disclose CUI to unauthorized persons. The following guidelines should be followed:

• Always use encryption when sending CUI. • Report CUI violations to your security manager ASAP. • Mark all CUI as required • Do not discuss sensitive information in public places. For questions concerning Security Awareness Month, contact the Fort Lee Security Division at (804) 734-1569.

Contributed Photo

Fort Lee Army 10-Miler team members pose for a photo here recently prior to competing in the Oct. 9 event. The Fort Lee Master’s Coed (over 40) team took 1st place again. The Open Coed Team ďŹ nished in 2nd place. The Open Men and Open Women’s Teams placed 4th in their respective categories, and the Civilian Team ďŹ nished in the top 20 percent of a large division. The top male runner for Fort Lee is 2nd Lt. Kyle Butler who completed the race in 58 minutes, and the top female runner is 1st Lt. Justina Sisler – with a 68-minute ďŹ nish time. More than 30,000 runners participated in the race that began at the Pentagon and ďŹ nished in Washington, D.C. The team, coached by Larry Toler, begins tryouts in mid-March and training in early April for the 2017 race. For details, email lorstoler@comcast.net.

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12 | TRAVELLER | October 20, 2016 | www.fortleetraveller.com

‘Nunsense’ opens at Lee Theater “Nunsense,� the second production of the Lee Playhouse 2016-2017 main stage season, opens Nov. 4, 8 p.m., at the Lee Theater. Additional performances are set for Nov. 5, 11, 12, 18 and 19 at 8 p.m. and Nov. 6, 13 and 20 at 3 p.m. All shows are open to the public. This musical comedy is based on a book by Dan Goggin, who also produced the music and lyrics. The original production ran for 3,672 performances, becoming the second-longest-running OffBroadway show in history. The “Nunsense� storyline focuses on five of the 19 surviving Little Sisters of Hoboken, a one-time missionary order that ran a leper colony on an island south of France. They discover their cook, Sister Julia, accidentally killed the other 52 residents of the convent with her tainted vichyssoise. The survivors were off playing bingo with a group of Maryknolls. Upon discovering the disaster, Mother Superior has a vision in which she is told to start a greeting card company to raise funds for the funerals. The greeting cards are an enormous success and, over-

Contributed Photo

A Little Sister of Hoboken performs a ventriliquist act during rehearsals for “Nunsense� at the Lee Theater.

estimating the profits, she buys a largescreen television for the convent, leaving her with no money to pay for the last four burials. With the deceased nuns on ice in the deep freeze, they decide to stage a variety show in the Mount Saint Helen’s School auditorium to raise the needed cash. All five participate in the entertainment showcase that includes comedy acts, madcap dance routines and an audience quiz. “Nunsense� is directed and choreographed by Tony Sharpenstein with musical direction by Steve Raybould. For reservations or further information, call the box office at (804) 734-6629.

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www.fortleetraveller.com | October 20, 2016 | TRAVELLER | 13

CHESTER CHILD DEVELOPMENT & DAY CARE CENTER LOCAL ACTIVITIES

FOR THE

EVENTS Drug Take-Back Day | Oct. 22 Community members can turn in their unused and expired prescription and nonprescription medications for safe disposal Oct. 22, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., at Kenner Army Health Clinic, building 8130. The service is free and anonymous. The collection point will be in the front circle of the facility, along 24th Street. For details, call (804) 734-9086.

Night at Transportation Museum | Oct. 24 A Night at the Army Transportation Museum is set for Oct. 24, 5-8 p.m., at 300 Washington Blvd., Fort Eustis. The free event is for children, age 12 and under, who will see the exhibits “come alive� while trick or treating through the museum. For details, call (757) 878-1115.

71st Trans Trunk or Treat | Oct. 28 The 71st Transportation Battalion will hold a Trunk or Treat event Oct. 28, 6-8 p.m., at the Army Logistics University parking lot. The free event for service members and families will award a prize for best-decorated vehicle. Participants should wear creative or scary Halloween attire but are requested not to wear clown costumes. Volunteers also are needed. For details, call (804) 765-8129 or 765-0921.

'HEW1RWLFH Any persons or firms with debts owed to or having just claim against the estate of Spc. Kaleb Michael Loyer, deceased, formerly of Headquarters and Headquarters Company,

FORT LEE COMMUNITY

FMWR Halloween Bash | Oct. 28

Fort Lee Trunk or Treat | Oct. 31

Community members can dress in their scariest, most ravishing or funniest costume and come to the FMWR Halloween Bash and Costume Party Oct. 28, 6 p.m. - 2 a.m., at the HideAway. The event will include a costume contest, music, door prizes, manager’s drink specials and more. There is no cover charge. For details, call (804) 765-1539.

The Fort Lee community is invited to a Trunk or Treat event Oct. 31, 5-7 p.m., in the Exchange parking lot. Organizers are seeking units or squadrons that want to set up creative Halloween Trick or Treat booths. For details, stop by the jewelry counter at the Exchange.

Oktoberfest at Lee Club | Oct. 29

The Family and MWR Fort Lee Community Library will host a free Fall Holiday Centerpiece craft seminar Nov. 1, 5:30-7 p.m. A selection of fall holiday crafting books will be available to inspire ideas on how to create a centerpiece. Supplies and materials will be provided. Pre-registration is required. Children 15 and under must be accompanied by a parent. The library is located on the 2nd floor of the Army Logistics University For details, call (804) 765-8095.

Family and MWR will host the 20th annual Oktoberfest Oct. 29, 5-10 p.m., at the Lee Club, Mahone Avenue and Battle Drive. The event will feature authentic German music and folk dancers. The cost is $7 for adults and free for kids, 12 and under. Tickets can be purchased at Leisure Travel Service inside the Warrior Zone or at the door. It is open to the public. Visit www.lee. army.mil for installation access requirements. For details, call (804) 734-7541.

SFL-TAP Federal Hiring Workshop | Oct. 31 A free Federal Hiring Workshop is set for Oct. 31, 10 a.m. - 2:30 p.m., at the Soldier Support Center, building 3400. The session will provide participants with information to assist in the preparation of federal resumes and help them understand the federal application screening process. For details, call (804) 734-6612.

23rd Quartermaster Brigade, Fort Lee, must contact lst Lt. Amber Shipmon, the summary court martial officer for the Soldier, by calling (804) 734-7627 or by email at amber.t.shipmon2.mil@ mail.mil.

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FMWR Fall Holiday Centerpiece Craft Seminar | Nov. 1

Federal Job Workshop | Nov. 8 The free workshop, Ten Steps to a Federal Job, will be held Nov. 8, 9 a.m. - noon, at the Soldier Support Center, building 3400. Participants will learn the steps to federal employment including the application process and developing a federal resume. It is open to active duty, veterans, DOD Civilians and spouses. Registration is requested. For details, call (804) 734-6612 or email sfl_tap_center_lee@mail. mil.

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14 | TRAVELLER | October 20, 2016 | www.fortleetraveller.com

Calendar, continued Night at QM Museum | Nov. 5 A Night at the Quartermaster Museum returns Nov. 5, 5-9 p.m., at the U.S. Army Quartermaster Museum. During the event, students in kindergarten - 8th grades use objects from the museum’s teaching collection to “piece together” the story of U.S. Army QM Corps with assistance from historical figures who step out of the museum exhibitions. Space is limited for the free event. Pre-registration is recommended. For details, call (804) 734-4203 or email laura.b.baghetti.ctr@mail.mil.

SPORTS & FITNESS FMWR Strength Center Fitness Classes | Ongoing Community members can learn to perform over 30 suspension training exercises at free TRX Suspension and Rip Training Classes on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, noon - 12:45 p.m., at the Strength Performance Center, building 6008, 16th St. Pre-registration is required. For details, call (804) 734-5979.

FMWR Halloween Story Hour | Oct. 28 A free Halloween Story Hour for children, hosted by the Family and MWR Fort Lee Community Library, is set for Oct. 28,

5:30-6 p.m., at the library on the 2nd floor of the Army Logistics University. Youngsters should wear their favorite Halloween costume or come as they are. There will be “scary” stories told throughout the hour. Registration is suggested. For details or to sign up, call (804) 7658095.

OUTSIDE

THE

GATE

Science After Dark | Oct. 21 Participants can take part in the Science After Dark: Glow program Oct. 21, 5 p.m., at the Science Museum of Virginia, 2500 W. Broad St., Richmond. The evening includes fire dancers, glowin-the-dark games, crafts and experiments and more. Admission is free for active duty military and $10 for adults and children. For details, call (804) 864-1400.

Richmond Oktoberfest | Oct. 21-22 The 48th annual Richmond Oktoberfest will be held Oct. 21-22 at the Richmond International Raceway Complex, 600 E. Laburnum Ave., Richmond. The event will run 6 p.m. - midnight, Oct. 21, and 3 p.m. - midnight, Oct. 22. Admission is $12 for all military members. For details, visit www. richmondoktoberfestinc.com.

Night With Edgar Allen Poe | Oct. 22 Poe Museum Historian Chris Semptner will portray Edgar Allen Poe during a program Oct. 22, 7-9 p.m., at the Magnolia Grange, 10020 Iron Bridge Road, Chesterfield. The event will include readings of the author’s well-known poems and letters. The cost is $10 per person. Registration is required. For details, visit www.chesterfieldhistory. com.

Church Harvest Festival | Oct. 27-29 A youth festival with free activities for children and teens will be held Oct. 27-29 at Abundant Life Christian Church International, 1000 Winston Churchill Drive, Hopewell. There will be face painting, pumpkin toss, singers, praise dancers, gospel groups, teen group steppers and speakers. For details, call (804) 919-8812.

Henricus Halloween Events | Oct. 28 Two special Halloween events are set for Oct. 28 at Henricus Historical Park, 251 Henricus Park Road, Chester. From 3-4 p.m., Haunted Henricus, Jr. for children, ages 2-8, will feature stories, a treats tour, a make-and-take 17th century craft and more. From 7-8 p.m., participants

can experience spellbinding, fireside accounts and legendary tales as storytellers relive old English and Virginia Indian legends and folklore. Registration is required for both programs. For details, call (804) 318-8797 or visit www.henricus.org.

Retiree Summit, Career Fair at VB | Nov. 4 A Retiree Summit and Career Fair is scheduled for Nov. 4, 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. at Rockwell Hall gymnasium, Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek, Virginia Beach. Speakers will provide information on issues affecting retirees. The event also includes career and health fairs. Free flu shots will be available. For details, call (757) 462-7563 or visit www.facebook.com/JEBLCFS.

Thanksgiving Festival at Berkeley | Nov. 6 The Virginia Thanksgiving Festival will be celebrated at Berkeley Plantation Nov. 6, noon - 4 p.m., in Charles City County. The event will include a living history program, tours of the 1726 manor house, tribal dancers, arts and crafts, a traditional Thanksgiving dinner, re-enactments and more. The plantation is located on Route 5 between Richmond and Williamsburg. For details, visit www. virginiathanksgivingfestival.com.

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www.fortleetraveller.com | October 20, 2016 | Traveller | 15

DEADLINE: Reader & Display Thursday 5:00 p.m. (week prior)

BY PHONE:

BY MAIL:

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Call: (804) 526-8656 Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

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Call 804-526-86 56 today!

Reach more than 10,000 active duty military, civil service employees, retirees, their spouses and the civilian community.

For Rent-House (All)

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Religious Announcements

Help Wanted

Church of Christ • A Cappella Singing Sunday Bible Schools – 9:30 a.m. Sunday Assembly – 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wendesday Assembly – 7:00 p.m. Nursery • Senior Citizen Group • Youth & Adult Group Activities

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• For active-duty, retired military, their eligible family members and active or retired civil service employees. If you are retired military or retired DOD civilian, include current employer and work phone number on the application. • Only 1 ad per week, 3 lines maximum • Renewals, corrections and cancellations cannot be taken by phone and must be resubmitted • Illegible, too long or otherwise do not conform to instructions will not be published and must be resubmitted for the next issue • Automotive ads must begin with make, model and year • Real estate ads must begin with name of city, neighborhood and must be your primary residence. • Ads will not be accepted via official mailing channels such as guard mail or postage and fees paid indicia. • Free ads cannot be of a commercial nature (i. e., business opportunities, help wanted, etc) and must be personal property of the eligible member. Should not represent a sustained income or business or listed through agents or representatives. • When advertising a home for rent or home for sale, the home must be THE PRIMARY RESIDENCE. (All rental properties are considered paid ads.)

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Fort Lee Traveller 10.20.16  

Serving the community of Fort Lee, Virginia, since 1941

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