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Commissary stores celebrate 150-year legacy of serving military community

Fort Lee

SEE PAGE 4

SERVING THE COMMUNITY OF FORT LEE, VIRGINIA, SINCE 1941

January 12, 2017 | Vol. 77, No. 2

AFTER THE STORM 7HDP/HHGLJVRXWDIWHUÀUVWZLQWHUEODVWRI SEE PAGE 3 SCHOOL SESSION INCLUDES HEARTWARMING SURPRISE After a yearlong deployment to Iraq, an Army officer-mom is greeted with tears of joy from her teen daughters during a cleverly planned homecoming event SEE PAGE 10

TO LIVE FOR LOVE An attempted suicide leads to a reality check that nurtured a Soldier’s will to survive and thrive

MONEY EXPERT ASSISTS TROOPS Suze Orman, a popular financial advisor, helps Soldiers take control of their earnings

IN YOUR FACE Social Media photo feature focuses on safety standdown, parade performance and more

SEE PAGE 2

SEE PAGE 5

SEE PAGE 8


2 | TRAVELLER | January 12, 2017 | www.fortleetraveller.com

COMMENTARY | SUICIDE AWARENESS

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Fort Lee

Commanding General ........Maj. Gen. Darrell K. Williams Garrison Commander ..................... Col. Adam W. Butler Public Affairs Officer............................. Stephen J. Baker Command Information/Managing Editor...Patrick Buffett Senior Writer/Special Assignments ......... T. Anthony Bell Production/News Assistant Editor.................. Amy Perry Family/Community Life Reporter ...........Lesley Atkinson Production Assistant .............................. Ray Kozakewicz To reach the Traveller Staff, call (804) 734-7147.

Maj. Mario Moreno

the previous week’s smoke sessions, he could not enjoy the weekend with his family as he had hoped. He also worried about what to eat or not to eat. Monday morning came, and the Soldier was putting on his PT uniform in the laundry room as it had just been washed. While getting dressed, he began to feel nervous about the upcoming APFT. Bending over tying his shoelaces, he noticed an old box cutter on the dryer. Without

hesitation, he grabbed it, opened it and slit his left wrist in relief. He felt better because he knew he would not take the APFT. Nothing else was on his mind at that moment. He stood there, expressionless, watching the blood ooze from his wrist to the floor, forming a small pool. After what seemed a lifetime, he realized this was not a good idea. He began to think of his wife and four kids. He became worried and scared he could actually die and make his wife a widow and kids fatherless. His wife did not have a job. How would they make it? He yelled out to his wife saying he messed up. She ran downstairs, yelling, “What have you done?” He kept repeating to her how sorry he was and that he loved her. She called 911 and the ambulance arrived. It took him to the hospital where he was stitched up and placed in the mental ward (for seven days). His wife could not initially go visit her husband. She had

The Fort Lee “Traveller” is printed by offset process every Thursday as a civilian enterprise in the interest of personnel at the U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command and Fort Lee, Va. 23801, by Military Newspapers of Virginia, P.O. Box 863, Colonial Heights, Va. 23834, in accordance with Department of the Army Regulations 210-20 and 360-1. This publication receives armed forces material and civilian newspapers are authorized to reprint such material without specific clearance except material specifically designated as copyrighted. Liaison between the printer and the commanding general, Fort Lee, is maintained by the Public Affairs Office, Fort Lee. Circulation: 13,000. This Civilian Enterprise newspaper is an authorized publication. Contents of the “Traveller” are not necessarily the official view of, nor endorsed by, the U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command and Fort Lee. Advertising in this publication including inserts or supplements does not constitute endorsement by the Department of the Army or Military Newspapers of Virginia. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non merit factor. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the printer shall refuse to print advertising from that source until violation is corrected. The “Traveller” is an unofficial publication authorized by AR 360-1, and printed by the Military Newspapers of Virginia, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Army Combined Arms Support Command or Fort Lee. The editorial content is prepared, edited and provided by the Public Affairs Office of Headquarters, U. S. Army Garrison, Fort Lee.

four kids to manage on her own, and her husband was under “watch.” Fast forward to the present. I am a major with more than 26 years of military service. I have been deployed seven times. I have been to numerous countries throughout the world and experienced what many will never have the chance to. My wife of 24 years and our four children have accompanied me on many of my travels. If I had succeeded with my suicide attempt, I would have never seen or experienced what a wonderful family I have. I would’ve never seen my 28-year-old gorgeous, smart and independent daughter receive her bachelor’s and master’s degrees to become a compassionate 1st grade school teacher. I would’ve never seen my 26-year-old son become an exceptional Sailor who is fast tracking within the enlisted ranks. I would’ve never met his lovely wife or the two grandkids he has honored me with. I would’ve never mend-

COVER

While stationed at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, a 25-year-old specialist was serving as an infantryman. He had been married to his beautiful wife for two years. They had a four kids ranging in age from 3 weeks to 9 years. This Soldier arrived at his newduty station after two weeks of leave. He did not run or do much physical training while on vacation. He fell out of a few infantry squad runs. His team leader decided to make an example out of him, making him run everywhere he went and throwing in sporadic smoke sessions (superior-led exercise sessions designed to correct behavior). This was very common in the infantry back then. The Soldier soon fell out of platoon runs and failed an Army Physical Fitness Test by a couple of sit-ups. This infuriated his team leader. The smoke sessions became more frequent

throughout the day, every day. Four days after failing the APFT, the Soldier was ordered to take part in another record test. He again failed by a few more situps. The specialist was so tired and sore when he made it home, he could not play with his kids nor hold his 3-week-old son. He believed he would drop his newborn due to fatigue. His wife continued to ask if anything was wrong. His reply was always, “Nothing, I just need to get in better shape to pass my PT test.” She left it at that as she was not too familiar with the Army and infantry “standard operating procedures.” Needless to say, he felt both embarrassed and angry. The first APFT was on a Monday, the second on a Thursday. He was told he would be taking another record APFT first thing Monday morning. He felt relieved the weekend had come, and he could get some rest. However, he was so exhausted and sore from

THE

Contributing Writer

ON

Maj. Mario Moreno

ed the relationship with my 24-year-old daughter whom I did not have the pleasure of raising. I would’ve never had the opportunity to meet my two grandchildren. I would’ve never seen my 20-year-old son become a great basketball player and earn a college scholarship. I would’ve never seen my intelligent, 19-year-old son begin a new life on his own. I would’ve never been able to spend over 24 wonderful years with my strong, supportive and loving wife. I would’ve never been able to say, “I love you” to my family .... Accordingly, I take suicide awareness a bit more serious than most. I’ve experienced it firsthand. Many who know my story say I’m lucky or say I’m a success story. I tend to agree but not for the same reason. Most couples I know don’t have the privilege of being a part of a long and successful marriage or lucky enough to have a close-knit, supportive and caring family. The ONLY reason I am still living was and is due to the love of family and the fear of losing them.

Lesley Atkinson

Soldiers shovel snow at the garrison headquarters building Tuesday. They were aiding clean-up efforts following a weekend winter storm that dumped 8 inches of snow on the local area. See story on Page 3.


www.fortleetraveller.com | January 12, 2017 | TRAVELLER | 3

DPTMS summary report details positive aspects of winter storm Patrick Buffett Managing Editor

Team Lee’s response to and recovery from the first winter blast of 2017 was described as efficient and effective in a summary report provided by the Directorate of Plans, Training, Mobilization and Security here. Proactive steps taken by installation leaders and emergency planning teams several weeks ago paid big dividends, the DPTMS report noted. They included a garrison staff and senior mission command briefing on Dec. 5 that covered weather forecasts, organizational responsibilities, communication and notification systems, and equipment assets. “Fort Lee emergency managers also participated in a (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) weather seminar on Dec. 15 and learned about the implementation of Experimental Probabilistic Snowfall Products,” DPTMS staffers reported. “(It’s an) internet-based system that provides users weather prediction analytics to help them better communicate forecast uncertainties and enhance decision making

Contributed Photo

An employee from the Directorate of Public Works drives a tractor snow plow to clear an intersection. Crews worked around the clock to clear icy roads after the year’s first winter storm.

during winter storm events.” In more simplistic terms, that translates to earlier identification of potentially hazardous weather conditions and more time to prepare. When Saturday’s storm popped up on their figurative radar last week, DPTMS pulled together the Fort Lee Crisis Action Team – comprised of various directorate

and garrison leaders, and headed up by the senior mission commander Maj. Gen. Darrell K. Williams – to begin emergency planning. “When assessing the potential impact of these storms, the CAT not only takes forecasted Fort Lee-area weather conditions into consideration, but also the situ-

tax center tentatively opening Jan. 24

ation west to Charlottesville because of the mountain effects on local weather,” the summary explained. “We look at forecasts east to the coast, south to Emporia and north to Fredericksburg as well because more than 70 percent of our work population commutes into Fort Lee.” Realizing the increasing severity of Saturday’s storm, the CAT focused on the foremost concerns of any weather emergency … ensuring the safety, health and welfare of the Fort Lee community and preserving the primary mission of training logistician military members and civilians. They are factors that complicate any decision to keep people on the job or curtail installation operations. “A lot of individuals ask how early release, reporting delay or post closure decisions are made,” the DPTMS summary read. “It starts with input from various organizations – garrison, CASCOM, DeCA, DCMA, AAFES and Kenner to name a few. We look at internal and external risk factors of the storm, and how manning decisions may impact recovery operations to bring the post back to a state of operational readiness. (Forecast models play) a key role as well; looking at the direction of the approaching weather, approximate time of arrival, temperature, dew-point, wind-speeds, approximate amount of precipitation and other factors. When those tools are applied SEE SNOW STORM, PAGE 11

Staff Sgt. Darcel Dingle, Fort Lee Tax Assistance Center, helps Pvt. Michael Jury, Romeo Company, 262nd Quartermaster Battalion, complete forms prior to his tax preparation session in 2014. The Tax Assistance Center, which will celebrate its 29th year of service to the Fort Lee community this year, is tentatively scheduled to open on a walk-in basis Jan. 24 in building 6052, Mekong Road, said Capt. LuBuria Johnson, the TAC officer in charge. The hours of operation will be 8 a.m. - 5 p.m., MondayFriday. The TAC offers free tax preparation services to military members, family members and military retirees through the services of a dedicated volunteer staff and military support personnel. Those receiving assistance at the TAC should bring with them all documents required to file their state and federal taxes including W-2 forms, military identification, Social Security cards, powers of attorney and last year’s tax returns. Customers should also bring mortgage documents and bank account and routing numbers. The 2017 tax season begins Jan. 23 and concludes April 18. For more info, call (804) 765-1500. File Photo


4 | TRAVELLER | January 12, 2017 | www.fortleetraveller.com

Rescheduled Garrison CSM Change of Responsibility | Jan. 17

Military members wait in line at a commissary in France in 1918. This year marks 150 years of service to the troops.

Command Sgt. Maj. Vittorio F. Desouza will assume responsibility as CSM of the Fort Lee garrison from CSM Clarence D. Richardson Jan. 17, 10 a.m., at the Lee Club. The event was rescheduled from Jan. 10. Following the ceremony, there will be a reception for the new CSM in the Lee Room.

Pediatric Clinic Out of Flu Vaccines Contributed Photo

Military’s oldest retail service celebrates 150 years of support Amy Perry Production/News Assistant Editor

The commissary benefit can be traced back to the American Revolution when Congress recognized a need to have Soldiers rations provided by the Army. Because the food lacked nutritional value, a group of vendors known as sutlers were allowed to sell additional food items to Soldiers, said Dr. Peter Skirbunt, Defense Commissary Agency historian. “Unfortunately, many sutlers acquired reputations for selling low-quality goods at high prices, so by 1825, Congress authorized the Army to sell additional items from its subsistence warehouses at cost but only to officers,” he said. “Sutlers continued selling to enlisted men. Forty years later, shortly after the Civil War, Congress became exasperated by the sutlers’ continuing abuses and authorized the Army to conduct at-cost sales to officers and enlisted men alike.” So, began the modern-day concept of the commissary where all Soldiers could get foodstuff at reasonable prices. The Navy and Marine Corps followed suit in 1909-1910 and the Air Force adopted it in 1947. In those early days, the term commissary referred to the food itself, not a building, or to the individual who manned the facility. “Early customers chose from a stock assortment of 82 items – similar to what one would find in a civilian dry-goods grocery of the era,” said Skirbunt. “The stock list began to grow as years passed and more canned and packaged goods became available.” As the agency gears up to recognize 150 years of the commissary benefit, families

should start seeing anniversary activities and sales at their store starting in February. There will be kick-off decorations in all stores worldwide. As it gets closer to July 1, the official celebration day, there will be super deals and festivals available at the stores. There also will be some historical recipes available at www.commissaries. com. Each store will have more details about their unique celebration for the 150th anniversary. Stay tuned to the Traveller for more details as the event draws near. While there are nearly 250 stores worldwide today, since 1867 there have been commissaries at more than 1,800 locations throughout the world. Many of the stores would pop up in remote deployment locations such as Peru, random Pacific islands during World War II or Cuba during the Spanish-American War. “Today, the benefit is more important than ever, because there’s a new sense of purpose among employees and customers,” said Skirbunt. “The events of Sept. 11 and the following 15 years of frequent deployments have made the importance of DeCA’s mission – that of supporting military families – more evident than before. There is a clearer appreciation for the real importance of the commissary benefit and how it helps American military personnel and their families, whether they are stationed in the United States or overseas. “When forces deploy, the families left behind lean heavily on their local community services – including the commissaries – to see them through tough, nervous, lonely times,” he continued. “There are more customers depending upon DeCA than ever before.”

Wilkerson Pediatric Clinic is out of flu vaccines for pediatric patients, ages 3-8. Delivery of additional vaccine is anticipated in one-to-two weeks. KAHC will announce flu vaccine availability when it arrives. For details, call (804) 734-9125.

Prayer Breakfast | Feb. 2, 7:30 a.m. Fort Lee’s 2017 National Prayer Breakfast observance is set for Feb. 2, 7:30 a.m., at the Lee Club on Battle Drive. All community members are welcome. Tickets are available from any chaplain across post or at the Religious Support Office on the third floor of the garrison headquarters building, corner of A Avenue and 34th Street. The theme “Building on Our Spiritual Heritage” is in recognition of the installation’s 2017 centennial celebration. For details, call (804) 734-6494.

Kenner MLK Weekend Schedule Kenner Army Health Clinic and Troop Medical Clinic 2 will be open with normal operations on Jan. 13 (training holiday) for patient care. TMC 1 will be closed Jan. 13. All Kenner clinics and services will be closed Jan. 16 in observance of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. federal holiday. To schedule appointments, call the Kenner appointment line at 1-866-533-5242. To request an authorization to visit an urgent care center, call the nurse advice line at 1-800-TRICARE and choose option 1. For medical emergencies, dial 911 or go to the nearest emergency room.

Immediate Need for Blood Donations The American Red Cross has issued an emergency call for blood and platelet donations due to a severe blood shortage. Donors of all blood types are needed to help ensure a sufficient supply for hospital patients and help save patient lives. To learn about upcoming Central Virginia drives, visit redcrossblood.org or call l-800-733-2767.

Kenner Field Sanitation Training Signup | Jan. 30 - Feb. 3 The Kenner Army Health Clinic Environmental Health staff is offering five eighthour field sanitation team training sessions from Jan. 30 - Feb. 3, 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., in the multi-purpose room of the Army Logistics University, building 12420. The class incorporates hands-on training to include water trailer inspections, water quality testing, field food service sanitation inspection criteria and more. There are 50 slots available on a first-come, first-served basis. For registration, fill out a DA 4187 and submit to tierney.r.brown.mil@mail.mil. For details, call (305) 785-1522.

Kenner Cervical Cancer Display Kenner Army Health Clinic is offering a cervical cancer awareness educational display through Jan. 23 in the pharmacy lobby. January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month and the exhibit will help educate patients on the importance of preventive screening to reduce cervical cancer. For details, call (804) 734-9086.


www.fortleetraveller.com | January 12, 2017 | TRAVELLER | 5

TV icon to help Soldiers DO YOU WANT shore up personal finances YOUR HOUSE WASHINGTON – The Army has enlisted the help of personal finance expert Suze Orman to educate Soldiers and their families on money matters so they don’t fall victim to predatory loans, mounting credit card debt or other financial issues. Orman, a popular television personality, plans to offer her services free of charge to Soldiers, including a seven-step online course, normally $54, and an upcoming video detailing the military’s new retirement system. “There comes a time in life when everybody has to serve their country, and they have to serve those who are giving us our freedom,” she said at a news conference at the Pentagon. “If anybody deserves the best financial advice in the world, which I am more than capable of giving, it’s the men and women who are serving all of us.” Orman also discussed her desire to visit military bases to speak to troops in person. “Nothing would make me happier than to personally go to every single base in the entire world,” she said. Having such a star in the finance world come on board for free has some Army leaders thrilled about the implications for the future readiness of Soldiers. “When our Soldiers don’t have their hearts and minds on their job, it is not good for their security or for the team. That’s why we’re so excited to partner with Suze,” said Under Secretary of the Army Patrick Murphy, who announced the partnership. According to Orman, she tries to simplify personal

Sean Kimmons

Suze Orman

finance tips to make them easier to understand. For instance, she noted that if a 25-year-old Soldier began placing $100 a month into a Roth Thrift Savings Plan, the account would grow to roughly $1 million by the time the Soldier reaches the age of 65. But if the Soldier waited until 35 years old to invest the same amount, he or she would get only $300,000. “Those 10 years cost them $700,000,” she said. “If you teach that to a 25-year-old, you can bet your bottom dollar that they’re going to start putting money away.” Besides retirement planning, her free online course available to all U.S. troops covers debt-free living, tackling financial obstacles, purchasing big-ticket items like a home or car, and other topics. Any military member can enroll in the course at SuzeU.com, using gift code “USA.” With Orman’s help, a video explaining the Blended Retirement System, which is set to be rolled out n 2018, is also in the works as part of the partnership. As one of the biggest changes to military pay and benefits in 70 years, the BRS

is expected to give some sort of portable retirement benefit to about 85 percent of the force, compared to only 19 percent today. “We love our troops and their families. They are the core of who we are as a team,” Murphy said. “We want to make sure that they get the best advice possible.” Murphy also hopes Orman’s advice will steer cash-strapped Soldiers away from payday loan businesses that try to exploit them with high-interest rates. “We’ve cracked down on some of that, but really that’s being reactive,” he said. “What we’re trying to do with Suze is to be proactive and let (Soldiers) know the tools that are out there.” This isn’t the first time Orman has partnered with the Army. In May, she signed a four-year gratuitous services agreement with the Army Reserve to improve the financial readiness of reservists using informational videos, written material, town hall discussions and base visits. She said she plans to devote herself to these partnerships full time since she ended “The Suze Orman Show” on CNBC in 2015. One of her goals is to serve as an impartial financial advisor to Soldiers who are unable to find one elsewhere. “It’s very difficult, in my opinion, to get true, honest, unbiased financial advice,” she said. “It’s almost as if everybody who gives you financial advice who’s in the financial arena has something to gain from it. We need an unbiased source, which I will serve as.” – Army News Service

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6 | TRAVELLER | January 12, 2017 | www.fortleetraveller.com

AMERICA’S MILITARY | SPOTLIGHT

63&1$7(6,$7851(5 Unit: Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 23rd Quartermaster Brigade MOS: 92Y – supply specialist Age: 23 Time in service: five years Hometown: Raleigh, N.C. Family: co-parent of a 2-yearold daughter Personality strengths: “I’m very caring, loving, outgoing and funny.” Personality weaknesses: “I am very sensitive. The smallest things can bother me sometimes.” Worst fear: “Not being the best role model for my daughter.” Pet peeve: “People not telling the truth. I just hate being lied to and finding out the truth later. It’s better to be honest upfront.” Dream car: “I’m not really a car person. I could drive a Honda for the rest of my life no matter how much money I have.” Your ideal life: “It’s simple – living comfortably with my family.” Favorite movie: “‘The

Temptations’ movie (about the Motown recording group); I could watch it all the time. My mom watched it a lot when I was growing up.” Favorite book: “‘The Autobiography of Malcolm X.’” Favorite TV show: “‘Martin.’” One lesson you like sharing with others: “Cherish your family members while they’re here; spend as much time with them as possible.” Most precious time with family: “Sunday dinner.” The celebrity or historical figure you would like to meet: “Malcolm X and Martin Luther King: I feel like they were smart men and had good lessons to share.” One memorable event: “I had a member of my unit commit suicide. It made me realize some people are really struggling, but you might not be able to see it just by looking at them. It’s always good to check on your battle buddies.” The person you were prior to joining the Army: “I was

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a confused 17-year-old high school student trying to figure out what I wanted to do. I didn’t have any plans, and one day, I was like, ‘Oh, I want to join the military.’” Why you joined the Army: “Honestly, I joined the Army only because the Navy didn’t have a job for me. My dad was in the Navy, so I thought it would be a stepping stone for life. I also knew I could go to school for free.”

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Did the Army fulfill any of your expectations? “Well, I’m going to school for free so that’s one thing I love about it. It also taught me hard work and being a team player.” What it means to serve your country: “It means being ready for whatever – whether it’s to deploy or going to the field; just doing the best I can for whatever the cause.” The reason you chose your military occupational specialty: “To be honest, I was in my recruiter’s office and he was like, ‘I’m going to read off a list of jobs, and you can tell me what you want.’ The first MOS was 92Y and I took it. I don’t even know what other jobs I qualified for. I think it was a mistake, but I’m happy in my MOS.” The most difficult aspect of your job: “The expectations (because of the initial entry Soldiers). There are a lot of extra tasks such as issuing PT belts and assigning rooms. There are more tasks here than in FORSCOM (operational installations and units). For example, I issue linen here, but wouldn’t have that task in a FORSCOM unit.” The things about your MOS that people don’t know:

“People will say 92 Yankees don’t work hard, but there is a lot we do. We really work hard.” Talk about the supply and equipment accountability aspect of your job: “It’s important because if I don’t have accountability, my commander could end up paying. My job is to make sure the commander doesn’t have to pay for anything.” The qualities you like to see in leaders: “I like leaders who take care of Soldiers – their well-being as well as their professional aspirations.” The qualities you like to see in your peers: “Those who can be team players; somebody who would come over and help when they see someone struggling.” The changes you would make if you were Army chief of staff: “I think daycare should be free for all military members.” Best thing about the Army: “The stability and opportunities.” Worst thing about the Army: “Toxic leaders.” Future ambitions: “I’m going to school for social work, so I guess I would like to get out of the Army one day and pursue a career in social work.” – Compiled by T. Anthony Bell

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www.fortleetraveller.com | January 12, 2017 | TRAVELLER | 7

‘Broadway Bound’ show set for Feb. 3 opening The Theater Company at Fort Lee announces the opening of “Broadway Bound,” by Neil Simon Feb. 3 at the Lee Theater, Mahone Avenue. Performances are Fridays and Saturdays, Feb. 3, 4, 10, 11, 17 and 18 at 8 p.m., and Sundays, Feb. 5, 12 and 19 at 3 p.m. Tickets are $13 (adults) and $7 (youth). All shows are open to the public. Finishing up the trilogy of “Brighton Beach Memoirs” and “Biloxi Blues,” “Broadway Bound” finds Eugene and his older brother Stanley trying to break into show business as professional comedy writers while trying to cope with their parent’s break-up.

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They have a lot of material to pull from in their own house. The play alternates between funny and serious. The situations are as relative today as they were in 1949. The cast is headed by Ben West as Eugene, Travis West as Stanley, Ann Easterling as kate, Mike White as Jack, Steve King as Ben and Mellen Minton as Blanche. This production is directed by Joy Williams. The set and lights are designed by Cindy Warren, costumes by Joy Williams, sound design by Red Redling, and stage managed by Lorie Arnold. For reservations or more information, call the box office at (804) 734-6629. – Theater Company at Fort Lee

Photo contest accepting entries until Jan. 31 FORT SAM HOUSTON, Texas – Submissions for the annual Army Digital Photography Contest will be accepted until Jan. 31. The contest, which is run by Family and MWR Directorate, Installation Management Command, is open to active-duty military and MWR-authorized patrons including families, retirees and DOA Civilians. The contest is meant to encourage novice and accomplished photographers to capture their favorite views, moments and adventures from across the world. Participants can submit photos in the following categories: animals, design elements, digital darkroom,

SOLDIERS HELPING SOLDIERS

military life, nature and landscapes, people and still life. Participants may enter up to three photos per category at the garrison level. All categories include monochrome and color photographs, according to the contest rules. Prizes are $300 for first place, $200 for second place and $100 for third place. Participants may submit their entries to www. armymwr.com/digital-photo. aspx For garrison-specific instructions and details, participants should contact a representative at the Picture Perfect Frame Shop, building 9024, Battle Drive. – IMCOM

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8 | TRAVELLER | January 12, 2017 | www.fortleetraveller.com

www.fortleetraveller.com | January 12, 2017 | TRAVELLER | 9

(BELOW) Members of Echo Company, 266th Quartermaster Battalion, take part in a UFC-2 video game tournament Dec. 10 at Joint Base Langley-Eustis. The recreational event was organized by the Ultimate Fighting Championship organization as a show of support to the military and to promote their upcoming championship series. Professional UFC fighters Ben Rothwell, Lorenzo Larkin and Valentina Shevchenko participated in the video game tournament, taking on the top winners among the 16 Soldiers who competed. A film crew also recorded the promotional event and may use the footage in a documentary about Shevchenko, titled “Road to the Octagon,” that is scheduled to be aired Jan. 23 on Fox Sports.

(BELOW) The 59th Ordnance Brigade color guard proudly represents Fort Lee and the U.S. Army during the 2016 Kiwanis Christmas Parade Dec. 11 in Chester. A local organization bearing banners with photos of fallen military members from Virginia also participated in the community celebration. Color guard members pictured in the photo include Sgt. 1st Class Benjamin Moody, noncommissioned officer in charge; Staff Sgt. Kerrilee Case; Staff Sgt. Antolyn Acosta; Staff Sgt. Luis Mitchell; and Staff Sgt. Anthony Simpson.

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INYOURFACE A Traveller feature that showcases photos from Fort Lee Facebook pages

https://www.facebook.com/23rdQMBDE

https://www.facebook.com/EchoCo266thQuartermasterBattalion

(ABOVE LEFT) Terri Ceaser from the Army Community Service Family Advocacy Program discusses toxic relationships during a 23rd Quartermaster Brigade Safety Standdown Day gathering Dec. 9 in the Lee Theater. It was one of several presentations that promoted wellness and resiliency, and discouraged risky behavior among brigade personnel, most of whom were set to depart for Holiday Block Leave the following week. The standdown also included a holiday music performance (pictured left) by members of the 392nd Army Band. The brigade conducts safety standdown events each quarter. (BELOW) Soldiers from Echo Company, 266th Quartermaster Battalion, pose in front of the massive collection of toys their unit donated for the Marine Corps Reserve’s 2016 Toys for Tots program. It’s the third time Echo Company has participated in the drive and donation totals have increased every year, with the latest contribution of more than 1,050 toys being the second highest among contributing organizations at Joint Base Langley-Eustis. The company also participated in the installation’s annual Holiday and Toys for Tots Run in mid-December.

https://www.facebook.com/832DOrdnanceBattalion

https://www.facebook.com/23rdQMBDE

(RIGHT) More than a dozen advanced individual training Soldiers officially became U.S. citizens during a mid-December naturalization ceremony at the 266th Quartermaster Battalion headquarters building. The battalion has been hosting the ceremonies for well over a year, ensuring they maintain the appropriate levels of honor and support.

Contributed Photos

Staff Sgt. Tyrone Moore checks the placement of badges and other accoutrements on a female Army uniform on day four of the QM School’s Instructor of the Year competition in late November. Eight noncommissioned officers competed in the five-day event that presented a variety of mental and physical challenges including weapons qualification, battle drill tasks, a land navigation course and conducting a class to demonstrate teaching ability. Other participants included Staff Sgt. Kenford Duncan, Staff Sgt. Norris Stevens, Staff Sgt. Felipe Vega, Staff Sgt. Lastephanie Frazier and Staff Sgt. Larita Settles. https://www.facebook.com/quartermaster.battalion

001TRA01122017.indd A8-A9

(ABOVE) Brig. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg, Quartermaster General, and Command Sgt. Maj. Jimmy J. Sellers, QM Corps Regimental CSM, pose with the winner of the QM School’s 2016 Instructor of the Year competition, Sgt. 1st Class Joseph Pina, center left, and the runner-up, Staff Sgt. Tyrone Moore, center right, during an early December award presentation in the Lee Club. Both finalists are instructors at the QM School’s Petroleum and Water Department. Pina will represent quartermasters and Fort Lee at the TRADOC-level Instructor of the Year competition this summer. (BELOW RIGHT) Staff Sgt. Aaron Broussard performs pull-ups during the physical fitness test on day one of the IOY competition in late November. In addition to traditional APFT elements like pushups and a two-mile run, the competition’s fitness exam included rowers – a modified situp that stresses upper leg and abdominal muscles – and a six-mile road march.

https://www.facebook.com/EchoCo266thQuartermasterBattalion

1/11/2017 4:29:10 PM


8 | TRAVELLER | January 12, 2017 | www.fortleetraveller.com

www.fortleetraveller.com | January 12, 2017 | TRAVELLER | 9

(BELOW) Members of Echo Company, 266th Quartermaster Battalion, take part in a UFC-2 video game tournament Dec. 10 at Joint Base Langley-Eustis. The recreational event was organized by the Ultimate Fighting Championship organization as a show of support to the military and to promote their upcoming championship series. Professional UFC fighters Ben Rothwell, Lorenzo Larkin and Valentina Shevchenko participated in the video game tournament, taking on the top winners among the 16 Soldiers who competed. A film crew also recorded the promotional event and may use the footage in a documentary about Shevchenko, titled “Road to the Octagon,” that is scheduled to be aired Jan. 23 on Fox Sports.

(BELOW) The 59th Ordnance Brigade color guard proudly represents Fort Lee and the U.S. Army during the 2016 Kiwanis Christmas Parade Dec. 11 in Chester. A local organization bearing banners with photos of fallen military members from Virginia also participated in the community celebration. Color guard members pictured in the photo include Sgt. 1st Class Benjamin Moody, noncommissioned officer in charge; Staff Sgt. Kerrilee Case; Staff Sgt. Antolyn Acosta; Staff Sgt. Luis Mitchell; and Staff Sgt. Anthony Simpson.

Top Instructor Challenge

INYOURFACE A Traveller feature that showcases photos from Fort Lee Facebook pages

https://www.facebook.com/23rdQMBDE

https://www.facebook.com/EchoCo266thQuartermasterBattalion

(ABOVE LEFT) Terri Ceaser from the Army Community Service Family Advocacy Program discusses toxic relationships during a 23rd Quartermaster Brigade Safety Standdown Day gathering Dec. 9 in the Lee Theater. It was one of several presentations that promoted wellness and resiliency, and discouraged risky behavior among brigade personnel, most of whom were set to depart for Holiday Block Leave the following week. The standdown also included a holiday music performance (pictured left) by members of the 392nd Army Band. The brigade conducts safety standdown events each quarter. (BELOW) Soldiers from Echo Company, 266th Quartermaster Battalion, pose in front of the massive collection of toys their unit donated for the Marine Corps Reserve’s 2016 Toys for Tots program. It’s the third time Echo Company has participated in the drive and donation totals have increased every year, with the latest contribution of more than 1,050 toys being the second highest among contributing organizations at Joint Base Langley-Eustis. The company also participated in the installation’s annual Holiday and Toys for Tots Run in mid-December.

https://www.facebook.com/832DOrdnanceBattalion

https://www.facebook.com/23rdQMBDE

(RIGHT) More than a dozen advanced individual training Soldiers officially became U.S. citizens during a mid-December naturalization ceremony at the 266th Quartermaster Battalion headquarters building. The battalion has been hosting the ceremonies for well over a year, ensuring they maintain the appropriate levels of honor and support.

Contributed Photos

Staff Sgt. Tyrone Moore checks the placement of badges and other accoutrements on a female Army uniform on day four of the QM School’s Instructor of the Year competition in late November. Eight noncommissioned officers competed in the five-day event that presented a variety of mental and physical challenges including weapons qualification, battle drill tasks, a land navigation course and conducting a class to demonstrate teaching ability. Other participants included Staff Sgt. Kenford Duncan, Staff Sgt. Norris Stevens, Staff Sgt. Felipe Vega, Staff Sgt. Lastephanie Frazier and Staff Sgt. Larita Settles. https://www.facebook.com/quartermaster.battalion

001TRA01122017.indd A8-A9

(ABOVE) Brig. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg, Quartermaster General, and Command Sgt. Maj. Jimmy J. Sellers, QM Corps Regimental CSM, pose with the winner of the QM School’s 2016 Instructor of the Year competition, Sgt. 1st Class Joseph Pina, center left, and the runner-up, Staff Sgt. Tyrone Moore, center right, during an early December award presentation in the Lee Club. Both finalists are instructors at the QM School’s Petroleum and Water Department. Pina will represent quartermasters and Fort Lee at the TRADOC-level Instructor of the Year competition this summer. (BELOW RIGHT) Staff Sgt. Aaron Broussard performs pull-ups during the physical fitness test on day one of the IOY competition in late November. In addition to traditional APFT elements like pushups and a two-mile run, the competition’s fitness exam included rowers – a modified situp that stresses upper leg and abdominal muscles – and a six-mile road march.

https://www.facebook.com/EchoCo266thQuartermasterBattalion

1/11/2017 4:29:10 PM


10 | TRAVELLER | January 12, 2017 | www.fortleetraveller.com

Lesley Atkinson

Col. Beth Prekker surprises her daughters, Lindsay and Caroline with an unexpected reunion at Cosby High School, Midlothian, Jan. 5 after being deployed in Iraq for one year.

Army mom surprises daughters at local school Lesley Atkinson Family/Community Life Reporter

Two military daughters in the local community were surprised at Cosby High School by their mother’s early return from a de-

ployment Jan. 5. The reunion was orchestrated for Caroline Prekker, a sophomore at CHS, and Lindsay Prekker, a junior at Old Dominion University. Col. Beth Prekker was due to

return from a yearlong Iraq deployment in late January. Along with help from Anne Canipe, a history teacher at the school, and their father Rick Prekker, a retired Soldier, she wanted to give her children a day to re-

member. Under the guise of a lecture about veterans and the students’ future plans, Canipe invited the local media to share the “good things that are happening in Chesterfield.” Lindsay was set to talk to the students about college and the application process, and there were plans to video conference Prekker for an inside look at military life while deployed. During the lesson, Canipe tried to skype Prekker, but the class thought there was a technical issue when she did not pick up the call, not knowing Prekker was waiting in the back of the room to surprise her daughters. She came out and the daughters leaped from their chairs and ran to her with excitement and big hugs. “I have so much adrenaline going right now; I am shaking,” said Prekker. “It is so good to be home, to be able to be with them, to have somebody to do things with. I missed them a lot.” The daughters had no idea they were going to be surprised. “I kind of thought it might be happening,” said Caroline. “I didn’t want to get my hopes up though.” Lindsay had not seen her mom since last winter break. “When I stood behind the col-

umn, it was so hard not to start crying,” Prekker said. “I was just so excited, and thinking let’s just get this over with, I want to see them.” It was hard to keep it quiet, according to their father. “The girls have gone through five deployments and every time it is a new experience,” said Rick. “A surprise reunion is a great welcome and always fun.” The girls have found the toughest part of the deployments is not having their mom around. “It has gotten easier the past couple of years to stay in touch because of technology,” said Lindsay. “In the earlier years, we would be lucky to get a phone call but now we can video chat, email and make phone calls.” Prekker had been waiting for almost a week to return from Fort Hood, Texas, however the holiday had pushed Soldiers home early. In order to do the surprise, she had to wait. In addition, she had flown in the night prior but stayed at a hotel waiting for the following day. After leave, Prekker plans to head back to Fort Riley, Kan., where she is stationed, but she hopes to have orders cut for Fort Lee soon. The Prekkers agreed it is hard being apart, but the time they are together is quality time.

Deployed forces celebrate holidays Soldiers and civilians at Camp Arifjan, Kuwait, participate in a Candlelight Holiday Service hosted by U.S. Army Central Command, and the 316th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) Dec. 24. The 316th ESC is deployed to Camp Arifjan in support of the 1st Theater Sustainment Command mission of providing logistics support throughout the USCENTCOM area of operations.

Sgt. Christopher Bigelow


www.fortleetraveller.com | January 12, 2017 | TRAVELLER | 11

Review the three P’s of safe winter driving To safely drive in winter weather, it’s important to prepare for the trip, protect yourself and prevent crashes on the road. Maintain your car • Check battery, tire tread and windshield wipers; keep your windows clear; put no-freeze fluid in the washer reservoir, and check your antifreeze. Have on hand

• Flashlight, jumper cables, abrasive material (sand, kitty litter, even floor mats), shovel, snow brush and ice scraper, warning devices (like flares) and blankets. For long trips, add food and water, medication and cellphone. Stopped or stalled • Stay in your car, don’t overexert, put bright markers on antenna or win-

dows and shine dome light. If you run your car, clear exhaust pipe and run it just enough to stay warm. Plan your route • Allow plenty of time (check the weather and leave early if necessary), be familiar with the maps and directions, and let others know your route and arrival time. Practice cold weather

SNOW STORM | Lots of installation support noted Continued from page 3 along with local news channel forecasts, we get a clear picture of the pending winter storm event that helps drive the decisions made in the Crisis Action Team meetings. Ultimately, it’s the senior mission commander’s call, but it’s not a decision made in a vacuum.” Another order of CAT business is facilitating community preparations for the storm. It coordinated support from the Fort Lee Exchange and Commissary to ensure individuals had sufficient time to purchase food and other essentials. Both facilities continued operations with adjusted hours throughout the weekend.

“In this area, it should be noted that preparedness is an individual responsibility. It requires active involvement by Team Lee members,” DPTMS staffers emphasized. “The point is driven home time and again throughout the year through various threat awareness and emergency preparation information campaigns, briefings and rehearsal drills. Nobody should be waiting until the last minute to get essential items. We know severe weather events are going to happen. We know they are never convenient. It’s one more case that underscores the importance of early planning and preparation, and having an emergency readiness kit.” The DPTMS summary high-

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driving • During daylight, rehearse maneuvers slowly on ice or snow in an empty lot. • Steer into a skid. • Know what your brakes will do: stomp on anti-lock brakes, pump other brakes. • Stopping distances are longer on ice even when covered with water. • Don’t idle for a long

lighted a success story involving installation dining facilities. During the record-setting winter storm in January 2016, some DFAC’s were not able to open on time with employees hindered by the weather and poor road conditions. In response, the installation provided MRE field rations to feed hungry troops. The story was different this year, thanks to rehearsal drills involving the Logistics Readiness Center, Military Contracting Command and training brigades on post. “No DFACS were impacted by the storm,” DPTMS staffers noted. “Every Soldier, Airman, Marine and Sailor had hot meals available to them. We take pride in making sure that happens.” Another proactive step the installation took was to prepare a Fort Lee Hazardous Weather Guide. The latest version is included as an

insert in today’s paper, and expanded information is available online at www.lee.army.mil/hazweather. It provides basic information on how to stay informed and make a plan, along with preparedness links and operational and release procedures. The guide was referenced in every storm update throughout the weekend. Emergency communication tools like AtHoc and the Army Fort Lee Facebook page were tagged as “essential elements” of the installation’s emergency response system in the DPTMS report. AtHoc is the primary tool for community-wide notification. It is a computer-based tool capable of contacting registered users by phone, email, text message, or any combination thereof. “AtHoc has the ability to reach a greater percentage of our population if more individuals would selfregister (through the ‘green globe’

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link on their government computer),” the DPTMS team noted. “We have 11,000 licenses but an average of 6,500 users, and we’re only able to reach about 3,500 of them at home because they haven’t provided that contact information. As a result during this winter storm, we only could reach approximately 32 percent of the self-registered users through their home email, telephone or mobile device. That’s an area this community could definitely improve upon.” In its closing paragraph, the DPTMS summary offered words of thanks to Team Lee for its cooperation during recovery operations. Most who were asked to stay off the roads did so, and community members largely met requests to park vehicles in consolidated locations to facilitate the clearing of parking lots and expedite the safe return to normal operations.

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12 | TRAVELLER | January 12, 2017 | www.fortleetraveller.com

KENNER CONNECTION | PROPER NUTRITION

Be kind to your waistline; boost your metabolism Tereasa Wade Public Affairs Officer

Are you looking to jump start your health in 2017? Your health is important to you, your family and the Fort Lee community. Understanding the importance of good nutrition will ensure success in leading a healthy lifestyle. “Proper nutrition is vital to maintaining good health and mission readiness,” said Kathleen Viau, registered dietitian and nutritionist, Kenner Army Health Clinic. Taking to heart tips on healthy food choices – and sharing with family members – will help boost the resilience of your loved ones. This is a great place to begin living a healthy lifestyle in 2017. Metabolism is defined as the process of converting the calories we consume from all food and drinks into energy that powers all our bodily processes. Your metabolism is what determines the number of calories you can eat all day and not gain weight. Many of us blame our metabolism on not being able to lose weight, but gaining weight – or not losing weight – does not come from a slow or sluggish metabolism. Weight gain results from consuming too many calories than our body needs or uses.

Your metabolism is affected by three major things: Basal Metabolic Rate: gives you the number of calories your body needs at rest. That number is determined by gender, age, size, muscle mass, genetics and some health-related factors. Your BMR makes up about 6070 percent of total calories you burn every day. Activity level: gives the number of calories used up during exercise. Your activity level makes up about 20-30 percent of the total calories you burn every day. Food thermogenesis: is the number of calories you need to metabolize your food. It makes

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up about 10 percent of the total calories you burn every day. A change in any of these three factors would change the amount of calories you need to maintain your weight. For example: If activity level decreases because of an injury or lifestyle change (new job, new baby, etc.) then calorie needs are less. Not making that adjustment of consuming fewer calories will result in weight gain. Consuming a diet high in whole foods (fruits, vegetables, plant foods) increases the amount of work the body has to do to digest and absorb that food (food thermogenesis.)

Adding muscle mass increases your BMR. So, the lower the ratio of fat to muscle your have, the more calories your body needs. It takes more energy to maintain muscle compared to fat. After age 25 your metabolic rate goes down by 2 percent or more per decade. So, in order to maintain your same weight, then calories need to be decreased as aging progresses. “A common misconception about our metabolisms is that it cannot be changed, is simply not true.” said Viau. “A slower metabolism naturally comes with aging, but we are able to minimize its accompanying results of weight gain, less energy and muscle mass loss.” These changes are not limited to older adults since changes in metabolism begin as early as age 25 – the age where we stop growing bone. “The following tips are a great place to start making changes to keep your metabolism revved up and high functioning, she said.” Ways to Fight that Slowing Metabolism Strength train. Adding muscle mass increases BMR, allowing you to burn more calories even when you are not exercising. Even if you do not care about your metabolism, maintaining and building muscle mass allows everyone to enjoy a better quality of life. Muscles are involved in every movement – from unloading groceries to playing with your children or grandchildren. Intensify your workouts. Working out harder, not longer, burns more calories, even after

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exercising. For many, finding more time to exercise is harder than simply increasing the intensity of exercise that you are already doing. Eat protein at every meal from high quality sources. Those sources include lean meats, egg whites, beans, dairy products – NOT protein-infused granola bars or cereals. High quality proteins provide the amino acids your muscles need for growth and repair – especially post-exercise. Water, water, water. All chemical reactions in your body require water – including the ones that burn calories. Aim for about half your body weight in ounces/day. If you weigh 150 pounds, drink 75 ounces of liquids (about 9 cups) a day. Avoid starving yourself or skipping meals (especially breakfast) to lose weight. The body needs its natural form of energy (calories) to burn fat. Without enough calories, the body will make sure it gets what it needs to function. It will take from muscle – not fat – that which it is not getting from food. Less lean muscle mass is not your weight loss goal. Less body fat is. So eat to lose, and spread those calories out throughout your day. “If you are looking for help this New Year with reaching your fitness or weight loss goals,” said Viau, “Kenner is a great place to start.” Appointments with Viau can be made by calling (804) 7349993, visiting Family Medicine front desk, contacting your provider’s nurse or booking via www.tricareonline.com.

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www.fortleetraveller.com | January 12, 2017 | TRAVELLER | 13

LOCAL ACTIVITIES

FOR THE

EVENTS FMWR Good Health Symposium | Jan. 17 A free Good Health Symposium is set for Jan. 17, 4-6 p.m., in the Army Logistics University, Heiser Hall. It is open to military and family members, and civilians in the community. The event will have speakers discussing topics such as nutrition, fitness, strength, diet, sleeping patterns and emotional behavior. The Family and MWR Fort Lee Community Library in conjunction with Kenner Army Health Clinic, the Army Wellness Center and FMWR Community Recreation Division is the host. For details, call (804) 765-8095.

FMWR Right Arm Night at HideAway | Jan. 18 Right Arm Night takes place every third Wednesday of the month, starting at 4 p.m. at the HideAway, 5th Street. The next date is Jan. 18.

FORT LEE COMMUNITY

It is a chance for bosses to bring their “right arm” out to relax and build camaraderie off duty. Drink specials and free snacks and pool will be available. It is open to all ranks and all services – military or civilian. For details, call (804) 765-1523.

Lee Housing Fitness Bootcamp | Jan. 19 A free fitness bootcamp featuring Caitlen Manning from Studio M Training, LLC, in Prince George, is set for Jan. 19, 6-7:30 p.m., at the Fort Lee Family Housing Sisisky Welcome Center, 1510 Sisisky Blvd. It is open to housing residents and guests. Manning, a certified personal trainer, will lead the session for a fun evening of energizing and motivating fitness instruction. Healthy snacks and drinks will be provided. For details, call (804) 895-6321.

Memorial Chapel Concert | Jan. 29 Community members are invited to

a free gospel concert Jan. 29, 6 p.m., at Memorial Chapel, 1901 Sisisky Blvd. The 90-minute event will feature Karen Peck and New River, a 4-time Grammy Award-nominated and 4-time Gospel Music Association Dove Award-winning Southern gospel group. The concert is sponsored by the Fort Lee Traditional Protestant Congregation and the Religious Support Office. While free, community members are asked to obtain tickets from their local chapel coordinator on post or contact the RSO at (804) 734-6494.

ACS Financial Readiness Class | Jan. 19 The Army Community Service Financial Readiness Program will offer a free class titled “Debt Elimination” Jan. 19, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m., at ACS, building 9023. It is open to the Fort Lee community. “Consumer

Awareness” will be held Jan. 24 at the same time and location. For details, call (804) 734-6388.

SPORTS & FITNESS FMWR Total Body Workout | Jan. 18-20 FMWR Sports will offer a variety of free total body workout fitness classes Jan. 18-20, most at MacLaughlin Fitness Center. The sessions on Jan. 18 are – Zumba (11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.); Cardio Core (4:30-5 p.m.); and Gentle Iyenga Yoga (5:15-6:15 p.m.). On Jan. 19, the schedule is – Boot Camp (5-5:55 p.m.); and Aerobics (6-7 p.m.). On Jan. 20, the classes scheduled are – Yoga 50+ (9-9:45 a.m. at Clark Fitness Center); and Zumba (5-6 p.m.) Participants must be at least 18 years of age and an eligible Family and MWR fitness facility patron to attend the classes. For details, call (804) 734-6994 or 7346198.

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Stephen Hickok

Air Force Lt. Gen. Wendy Masiello, Defense Contract Management Agency director, recognizes Jim Russell, her deputy, during a Fort Lee ceremony in December. Russell retired after 36 years of federal service, mostly with DCMA or its predecessor organizations. “Jim has embodied our vision and mission, long before we even put them into words,” said Masiello. “It’s hard to let him go … you can’t force the kind of continuity he represents. We just have to appreciate and capture it while we can. He’s been an exceptional role model.”

Stephen Hickok

Stephanie Parker, director of Fort Lee Army Community Service, accepts a donation of more than 100 toys from the Defense Contract Management Agency. The holiday gifts were delivered Dec. 20 by Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Michael Mitchell, DCMA senior enlisted advisor (left); Richard Fanney, Technical Directorate executive director (right); and Army Lt. Col. Kenneth Darnall, executive officer (not pictured).


14 | TRAVELLER | January 12, 2017 | www.fortleetraveller.com

Calendar, continued OUTSIDE

THE

GATE

ChesterďŹ eld Library Acoustic Concert | Jan. 12 Bowld Sojer Band will perform Jan. 12, 7-8 p.m., at North Courthouse Road Library, 325 Courthouse Road. As part of the free Acoustic Concert Series, the group features music from the 19th century including traditional fiddle tunes and songs from the Civil War. For details, call (804) 318-8499.

Winter Blues Jazz Fest in Williamsburg | Jan. 12-15 A Winter Blues Jazz Festival is set for Jan. 12-15 at various locations primarily in the Merchant’s Square area of Williamsburg. Venues include the Williamsburg Winery, Muscarelle Museum of Art, the Williamsburg Lodge, the Williamsburg Art Gallery and many local restaurants. Admission fees vary per event. A free community jazz concert will be held Jan. 15. For details, visit www.winterbluesjazzfest. com.

Library Wizarding Workshop | Jan. 14 A free workshop for children featuring multiple “wizard� experiences will be held Jan. 14, 10:30-11:30 a.m., at Clover Hill Library, 6701 Deer Run Drive, Midlothian. Children, in grades K-5, can take part in a Bertie Botts Every Flavor Bean challenge, taste dry ice Butter Beer Burps, try a levitating wand, meet a little fire-breathing dragon and more. Registration is required. For details, call (804) 751-2275.

WORD SEARCH | BY SGT. MCGILLICUDDY

Cavalry at Five Forks Lecture | Jan. 15 Petersburg National Battlefield will present a ranger talk discussing Union and Confederate cavalry forces at the Battle of Five Forks Jan. 15, 2 p.m., at the Five Forks Visitor Contact Station, 9840 Courthouse Road, Dinwiddie County. Visitors will learn about the events leading up to the April 1, 1865, battle including weaponry. While the program is free, the fee to enter the park is $5 per vehicle. For details, call (804) 469-4093.

Science of Toys at Ettrick Library | Jan. 21 Participants will learn what makes toys work during a free program Jan. 21, 1-2 p.m., at Ettrick-Matoaca Library, 4501 River Road, Petersburg. The event is for children in grades K-5. They will see how energy, gravity and kinetic forces can cause toys to flip, spin, roll, change color or stick together. Everyone will take home a Mad Science Yo-Yo. Registration is required. For details, call (804) 751-2275.

Storytime for Kids at County Museum | Jan. 21 The Chesterfield Historical Society of Virginia, in partnership with Chesterfield County’s Department of Parks and Recreation, will present a free story- time experience for young visitors Jan. 21, 11 a.m., at Chesterfield County Museum, 6813 Mimms Loop. The program will engage kids, ages 2-5, with stories on trees and a hands-on craft. Children also will visit the 200-year-old oak tree outside the museum. For details, call (804) 768-7311.

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:,17(5672506 T. Anthony Bell Senior Writer/Special Projects

Find the words and phrases related to winter storms. The answers in the puzzle are forward, backward, vertical, horizontal and diagonal. Black Ice Blizzard Blustery Cabin Fever Cocoa Coffee Cold Front Condensation Disabled vehicles Earmuffs Emergency Essential personnel Fireplace Flurries Freeze

Glaze Gust Ice scraper Icicle Mittens Polar Power outages Precipitation Prevailing Radar Salt Sand School closings Services Sledding Sleet Snow shovel Thaw Wind

For this week’s answers, visit www.ftleetraveller.com/ community_life/puzzle/.


www.fortleetraveller.com | January 12, 2017 | Traveller | 15

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Religious Announcements

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Church of Christ • A Cappella Singing

WWW.JJDISCOUNTGIFTSHOP.COM

Sunday Bible Schools – 9:30 a.m. Sunday Assembly – 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wendesday Assembly – 7:00 p.m.

and Wholesale Distributor Discount Gift Shop

OVER 3000 ITEMS MR. JAMES JENKINS Cell: 804-898-2534 • jenkinsje@comcast.net For Rent-House (All)

For Rent-House (All)

Nursery • Senior Citizen Group • Youth & Adult Group Activities

804-526-5286 • 601 CAMERON AV. • COLONIAL HEIGHTS WWW.CAMERONAVENUECHURCH.NET

Furniture-Household Brand New Layaway Available MATTRESS SETS Full- $99, Queen- $129, King- $169 40% Military Discount on all other sets!

Can deliver: 804-253-5154 Help Wanted DRIVERS: LOCAL & REGIONAL –

Dear Sam, I thought we were in this together, but apparently I was wrong. You’ve been ignoring me for a while. We don’t go for walks as often as we used to. You barely eat anything green anymore. And you don’t realize the daily pressure you put me under. It’s just too much.

HOME WEEKLY!

THE COMFORTS OF HOME IN A PEACEFUL SETTING

• 1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms Available (floor plans up to 1200 sq.ft.) • 6 thru 12 Month Leases • $99 Security Deposit • Small Pets Welcome • Swimming Pool & Fitness Center • Washer/Dryer • Monitored Intrusion Alarms • Stainless Appliances Available

NO APPLICATION FEE FOR MILITARY PERSONNEL

804.733.8710 1700 Johnson Road, #2D • Petersburg, VA 23805 Managed by Drucker & Falk, LLC

SERVING FORT LEE AND THE TRI CITIES SINCE 1962

1001 Boulevard • Colonial Heights, VA 23834 WWW.SWEARINGENREALTY.COM

(804) 526-0502

MINUTES TO FORT LEE

• Home Sales • Property Management • Appraisals • Rentals

Excellent Commercial location: $975 • 100 Taswell Avenue Colonial Heights. Over 1,100 sq.ft., 7 rooms, Perfect for your office space needs. LEASE TODAY!

CALL TO VIEW: 804-526-0502 Aimee Bradley – Rental Manager • rentals@swearingenrealty.com

Great Benefits! 401K, Paid Vacation/Holidays CDL-A, 1yr exp. • 800-922-1147

www.gptruck.com For Rent-Furnished Apts

COUNTY LINE APARTMENTS

I QUIT! Sincerely,

$895/mo. 1 BR, 1 BA, Fully Furnished, You need nothing but your suitcase! Smoke-free secure building, no pets. Includes individual washer/dryer. Rent includes all utilities.

Call Jeff, 804-283-5760

Your Heart

www.TheCountyLineApartments.com

For Rent-Mobile Homes

2-3 Bedrooms Apartments, Homes, & Mobile Homes FOR RENT

804-541-7386

Don’t let your heart quit on you. If you are living with high blood pressure, just knowing and doing the minimum isn’t enough. Uncontrolled high blood pressure could lead to stroke, heart attack or death. Get yours to a healthy range before it’s too late. Find out how at heart.org/BloodPressure

Taking this Shortcut Can Shorten your Life! Stay Off! Stay Away! Stay Alive! Brought to you by

www.oli.org

Check. Change. Control.™


16 | Traveller | January 12, 2017 | www.fortleetraveller.com

INTRODUCING

WELCOME

WEBSITE dedicated to military families!

MILITARYNEWS.COM ATTENTION MILITARY FAMILIES: now there’s a regional website just for you! MilitaryNews.com assists active duty military and their families, both during their transition and throughout their residence here in Hampton Roads. There’s an abundance of information at your fingertips!

★ RELOCATION INFO

1HZ

All the resources you need to make Hampton Roads your home.

M I L ITA RY

★ DISCOUNTS & DEALS

Great deals are easy to find with MilitaryNews.com’s list of military discounts and military-only coupons and contests!

★ EVENTS & CALENDAR

Looking for fun, military friendly events for the whole family? Check out our events and calendar pages for all the military happenings.

★ MILITARY NEWS & BLOGS Find information for military families by military families. Our slate of bloggers are all connected to the military and want to help you make the most of your time in Hampton Roads.

PLUS SO MUCH MORE. CHECK OUT MILITARYNEWS.COM TODAY!


Fort Lee Traveller 01.12.17