Page 1

WWW.CAMPLEJEUNEGLOBE.COM

VOLUME 74, EDITION 51

The

GL BE SERVING CAMP LEJEUNE AND SURROUNDING AREAS SINCE 1944

Operation Afghan Border Police conduct independent mission | 4A

Sandy Marines return to sea | 9A

THURDSDAY DECEMBER 20, 2012

WWW.LEJEUNE.MARINES.MIL

Photos by Sgt. Richard Blumenstein

(Above) Cpl. David J. Dickson, a rifleman with Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, embraces a loved one during a homecoming ceremony aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune Dec. 16. (Top right) A Landing Craft Air Cushion hovercraft carrying Marines with the 24th MEU lands at MCB Camp Lejeune’s Onslow Beach Dec. 16. (Right) A Marine with BLT 1st Bn., 2nd Marines, 24th MEU, embraces a loved one during a homecoming ceremony aboard MCB Camp Lejeune Dec. 16.

CAPT. ROBERT SHUFORD

24th Marine Expeditionary Unit

The 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit returned to the U.S. after completing nearly nine months deployed as an expeditionary crisis response force with the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group. Approximately 2,300 Marines and sailors of the 24th MEU will be offloading over the next few days from amphibious assault ships USS Iwo Jima, USS New York and USS Gunston Hall, using Navy hovercrafts at Onslow Beach, by flying in with their own aircraft and by using the Morehead City Port facility. The 24th MEU left in March

to serve throughout the U.S. European, Central and Africa Commands where they participated in a number of exercises, theater security cooperation engagements, and remained on alert for a total of approximately 150 days to respond to a number of crises. “Our Marines and sailors did a fantastic job demonstrating what it means to be a forward-deployed, expeditionary force ready to answer the Nation’s call,” said Col. Frank Donovan, commanding officer, 24th MEU. Their presence throughout the various operating areas provided decision space for combatant commanders and senior leaders knowing the 24th

MEU’s Marine Air Ground Task Force was postured and trained to respond to a variety of missions, said Donovan. The unit was due home in November but was delayed while serving in the 6th Fleet area of responsibility and remained in an alert status in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. Delays and changes in deployment timelines are common for MEUs, with the past two East Coast MEUs also participating in extended deployments. Even after being extended just as they were supposed to be heading home in November, the Marines and Sailors remained focused and ready, explained Donovan.

“Our young Marines and sailors were true professionals throughout the entire deployment. After notification of our extension they buckled down and pushed forward. They are truly incredible and I couldn’t ask for anything more,” said Donovan. Even though they missed Thanksgiving the 24th MEU is returning just in time for the rest of the holiday season, which many of their families are thankful for. “Our families and friends are absolutely amazing. Their support and dedication on the home front allows us to stay focused on the mission. I cannot thank them enough,” said Donovan.

News Briefs

Ticket to play 1B

CAMERON, NC.

Operation Coming Home provides wounded Marine veteran with new home CPL. JEFF DREW

2nd Marine Division

The cheers of the gathered crowds overpowered the roaring of the motorcycles that escorted Lance Cpl. Richie Chavis as he arrived at his new home. Marines with 1st Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, Chavis’ former unit, joined vendors, friends and family in applause as he arrived to receive the keys. Chavis, a bilateral amputee, who was injured by an improvised explosive device while in Helmand province, Afghanistan, is the recipient of the fourth home constructed by Operation Coming Home. Since 2007, Operation Coming Home provided homes for wounded veterans. More than 98 percent of the materials and labor are donated by more than 50 local companies and vendors. “We wanted to give a vet who sacrificed so much, a home to start their life - It’s where we raise our family, where we become part of the community,” said Tim Minton, the president of Operation Coming Home. “I have three daughters and the sacrifices the men and women make in the military so they can have the freedoms they have and the freedoms I have, well, it’s just a very small way to say thank you and we appreciate what Photo by Cpl. Jeff Drew Lance Cpl. Richie Chavis arrives to receive the keys to his new home they did.” during the Operation Coming Home presentation ceremony. SEE HOME 9A

N.C. leaders visit Lejeune 1C

Gunny Claus’ visits military kids 1D


2A DECEMBER 20, 2012

THE GLOBE, CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.

with Randy Reichler

Filing for VA disability is a personal choice Veteran Affairs disability receives a lot of attention, some good and some bad. Filing for VA disability is based on two primary things – the VA physical and the supporting documentation. In order to file a claim, retirees need to see a County VA or veteran organization representative or a Veteran Affairs Officer. An individual can file their own claim without seeing anyone, but it is not advisable. The acquired knowledge and experience of an expert is a great asset when filing a claim. Retirees will need a copy of their active duty record before submitting a claim, if they don’t currently have a copy in their possession they can request one by submitting a Form 180 to Military Personnel Records. They will also need either a VA Form 1010EZ, Application for Health Benefits or VA Form 21-526, and Application for Compensation and Pension. These forms will need to be sent to VA with the accompanying supporting documentation. The VA is supposed to notify the

sender of receipt of application within two months. The VA will notify retirees where they must go for a medical evaluation, normally done through QTC, the largest private provider of governmentoutsourced occupational health and disability examination services in the nation and headed by the former United States Secretary of Department of Veteran Affairs Anthony Principi. After making an appointment at QTC, a questionnaire should be mailed with questions regarding each disability claimed, and it should be brought along for the examination. This questionnaire is important; take great care in answering the questions. Make a copy of the completed questionnaire before handing it in. Be honest during the physical! If it hurts, tell the doctor it hurts. This is no time to suck it up. Most retirees probably have a higher threshold for pain than a civilian would, and the perceived level of pain can affect the outcome of the physical evaluation. When there’s

discomfort, stop the movement or the procedure, don’t wait until it gets worse or the portion of the exam is finished. Veterans are used to feeling uncomfortable; do not let your pride get in the way of your benefits. Occasionally, follow-up visits or referrals may be scheduled by QTC. Documentation is essential to a claim. If a retiree has a medical problem they should have it documented. The VA uses a reference manual called CFR-38 to determine VA percentages from disabilities submitted. Those retirees who are reluctant to file a claim should know their family members may benefit indirectly from their VA rating. When going to a VA physical evaluation, it is the same as going to a competitive event – know the rules before walking onto the field before getting your head handed to you. Retirees can contact the Retired Activities Office at 451-0287 or the County VA Office at 347-3309 for further information and referral.

Resource Roundup By Mark Munger

A safe place to call their own The Children Youth and Teen Program aboard Camp Lejeune has many activities to support our military families. One program is set up for a specific population; this population will become the next generation of leaders, and they now have the new Brewster Teen Center designed especially for them. Patrick Larkin discussed the opening of the Brewster Teen Center and the types of activities available. RR – Where is the new Brewster Teen Center is located, and how long has it been open? PL – Brewster Teen Center is located on Brewster Boulevard in building 780. The facility used to be Brewster Annex Child Development Center. With tremendous help from Facilities and Maintenance we were able to convert it into a teen center. The Grand Opening and Open House was Dec. 14. RR – What types of activities are available at the Brewster Teen Center? PL – Homework help is available every day. We have a CYTP staff member responsible to help youth and teens with assignments and homework. This staff member also coordinates volunteer opportunities for youth and teens. Brewster Teen Center is able to certify SAT-volunteer hours for Lejeune High School. Through volunteering and homework participation we are also able to have group discussion on life and career plans. Transportation is available after school from Brewster Middle School and Lejeune High School to Brewster Teen Center. After the center closes at 6 p.m., we offer bus transportation to Tarawa Terrace and New River housing as well. Brewster Teen Center has separate

activity areas. As mentioned previously, one area is designated primarily for homework, volunteering and career planning. The middle schoolprogram area and our high schoolprogram area are separated. Additionally a lounge and meeting space was created. This programming area is used for Boys and Girls Clubs, and additional programs based on teen feedback. Defining the specific programs offered is difficult because the staff is constantly surveying the youth and teens for their input. After surveying our participants, programs are designed to meet their needs. We incorporate leadership, social skills, healthy-life habits, career and educational components, and volunteering in the community. Finally, a teen fitness center was installed. The goal is to partner with fitness professionals and establish a program designed to promote healthy activities. The vision is open gyms and group exercise. Adjacent to our teen fitness center is an outdoor basketball court and a large open field to host intramural activities for those not engaged in school sports. The program was created to be very flexible. Teenagers with an interest are invited to share with us. Our goal is to generate a safe space for our military youth and teens, and programs specifically for them. RR – Are there any special requirements for utilizing the Brewster Teen Center? Is someone who lives off base also welcome to utilize the facilities? PL – Participants can utilize Brewster Teen Center at their convenience. The program was designed for dependents of active duty military members or De-

partment of Defense employees. Upon visiting each teen is asked to complete a registration packet, which helps us capture relevant data. Off-base participants are more than welcome, however we do not offer transportation to and from housing locations off-base. RR – The Teen Center was located in Midway Park, what were some of the reasons for changing facilities? PL – Temporarily, our program was housed at Midway Park Community Center. We are indebted to the leadership of the program because they welcomed us with open arms, and we are truly appreciative. The location was always temporary. This opportunity to move to Brewster Boulevard now allows youth and teens to walk or ride bikes if they have no personal transportation. Finally, the new facility is much larger and allows for more space, specifically space to separate our two target age groups – middle school and high school. It is important the parents and guardians know they are more than welcome to stop by and view the new location. To contact the Brewster Teen Center call Cedric McDonald at 451-9241, the front desk at 451-2672 or the Teen Center Cell Phone at 376-1531. Doors open immediately after school until 6 p.m. Special operating hours are available during winter, spring and summer breaks. During student holidays, the center is open from 12 through 6 p.m. Having a safe place to hang out with peers, develop teambuilding skills and simply have a good time provides Brewster Teen Center an exciting future. For more information visit www.mccslejeune.com/teens.

BaseLegal Base Legal By M.S. Archer

Taxable estate changes may affect service members, here is what you can do Those who serve in our armed forces are surely more patriotic than most Americans. Even so, most service members would rather give their estate to their loved ones than to the tax man. The credit shelter trust can be a very useful tool to this end. Through the end of this year, the federal government will not tax estates under $5 million. However, the threshold for estate taxation diminishes to $1 million New Year’s Day, with tax rates hovering at 55 percent. Considering the taxable estate includes personal property, real estate, investments and life insurance, the change may affect many service members, particularly more senior members. The deceased can gift his spouse without paying any federal estate tax. However, post 2013, the unremarried surviving spouse will only be able to pass $1 million to beneficiaries without paying a hefty tax. One way to avoid estate taxation is to diminish the estate through lifetime gifting. However, there are limits to the nontaxable gifting such as approximately $13,000 per person per year, and larger amounts for educational and medical expenses paid directly to the institutions and qualifying charities. The most powerful estate tax avoidance mechanism for most people is the credit shelter trust. Consider the following two examples: Example 1: No tax planning Assume a husband has a taxable estate of $1.5 million. His wife has assets in

her own right worth $500,000. The husband dies in 2012 with a simple will giving all his property to his wife. The wife takes tax free under the unlimited marital deduction. The wife dies the following year with a will giving all of her property equally to her two children. Upon her death, the wife’s estate is $2 million. Half of this amount, $1 million, will pass tax free to the children under the wife’s $1 million tax credit. However, the wife’s estate will pay tax on the excess over the amount, a major tax bite. Example 2: Credit Shelter Trust Assume the same facts as above; however, this time the husband executed a will containing a credit shelter trust. Basically, the husband’s will stipulates $1 million of his estate goes outright to his wife, no strings attached. Anything over the amount goes into the trust. The trust instructions give the wife access to all of the trust income and limited access to the trust principal during her lifetime. When his wife dies, all remaining trust assets go to the children. In order to prevent a large chunk of the assets being absorbed into taxes when the husband dies in 2012, $1 million is given to his wife outright and not subjected to estate tax. It is protected by the unlimited marital deduction. The excess going into the trust is not considered a gift to his wife; rather, it is a gift to the children. Although it is not protected by the unlimited marital deduction, it is shielded from tax up to the amount covered by the husband’s $1 million credit. Unlike in the

first scenario, the unified credits of both the husband and wife were put to good use and when the wife dies, the amount taxed is zero. The surviving spouse’s access to the assets in the credit shelter trust assets is not unlimited. It may be unacceptable, especially to the surviving spouse, as the primary concern may not be to avoid tax, but to ensure the surviving spouse has lifetime access to sufficient funds. The Internal Revenue Code allows the surviving spouse to have considerable control and access to the trust funds. However, if the surviving spouse is given too much control and access, then the trust appears to the tax man like a direct gift to the spouse and treats it as such. Then tax reduction benefits of the credit shelter trust are lost. The will can be drafted to give the surviving spouse the maximum access allowed by the IRS. More importantly, the trust can be set up so the surviving spouse determines how much of the predeceasing spouse’s estate, if any, goes into it and conversely, how much the surviving spouse takes outright for herself. The practical lesson for the surviving spouse is, “When your spouse goes to meet his maker, you go meet your estate planning attorney.” The credit shelter trust is an important tool for upper income married couples. Further, with the anticipated decrease of the tax threshold after Dec. 31, this planning tool will become important to far more Marines, retirees and their dependents.

What do you think about random breathalyzer tests slated to begin after Jan. 1 to curb drinking into the wee hours of the morning during the week and underage consumption? I think we need to fix the underlining issues as to why some of these guys drink the way they do before we can keep putting band aids on gushing wounds. Maureen ‘Freeman’ Steele

Absolutely. It won’t stop people from doing it, but the ones who do will suffer the consequences. Jenny Miranda

For every action there is a reaction and for every reaction there is a consequence whether it be good, bad, or ugly. Sherria Douglass-Fitzpatrick

Please do. People need to know Pleas it’s no ot socially acceptable. Linsey Curran

Welll if it is given equally across board d, from private to general, but you k know it is targeting the you unger Marines. Greg Jeppson

Love it. It’s a shame it’s had to come to this. Erika Rodriguez

I don’t believe old enough to serve is old enough to drink. When serving you are trained to do so. When drinking you are only as old as you act therefore drinking until 2 or 3 a.m. at 19 then headed to the range at 5 a.m. with a gun is not what I consider responsible, nor smart. With that, a 30 year old should not do the same, However, hopefully by 30 you matured. Jaime Robinson Hurlburt

WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/CAMP.LEJEUNE WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/CAMPLEJEUNEGLOBE

Commanding General, Marine Corps Installations East — Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune Brig. Gen. Thomas A. Gorry Public Affairs Officer Capt. Joshua Smith Public Affairs Chief g Theresa Seng Staff Sgt. theresa.seng@u theresa.seng@usmc.mil Publishe Publisher James M. Co Connors jim.connors@piloto jim.connors@pilotonline.com Managing Editor E Ena Selle Sellers ena.sellers@pilotonline.com Assistant Managing Editor Amy Binkley amy.binkley@pilotonline.com Layout Editor Sarah Anderson sarah.anderson@militarynews.com Sports Editor Jessie Heath jessie.heath@pilotonline.com This Department of Defense newspaper is an authorized publication of the DOD. Contents of The Globe are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. government, the DOD, or the Public Affairs Office, Camp Lejeune, N.C. The Globe is published by Landmark Military Newspapers of N.C., a private enterprise not connected with the DOD or the U.S. Marine Corps, under exclusive written contract with Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement of these products or services by the DOD, the U.S. Marine Corps, or Landmark Military Newspapers of N.C. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other nonmerit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Public Affairs Office, Camp Lejeune, N.C. Any questions may be directed to: Commanding General, (Attn: Public Affairs Office), Marine Corps Base, PSC Box 20004, Camp Lejeune, N.C. 28542-0004. For distribution and advertising inquiries, call 347-9624. Mail subscribers: Any notices to report a change of address need to be sent to: Landmark Military Newspapers - NC, 1122 Henderson Dr., Jacksonville, N.C. 28540. For advertising questions or to submit free trader ads, call 347-9624, ext. 101.


THE GLOBE, CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.

DECEMBER 20, 2012

3A

Photo by Cpl. Anthony Ward Jr.

Marines with 2nd Battalion, 7th Marines, Regimental Combat Team 7, patrol through the streets of Zaranj with an Afghan security element and officials in Nimroz province, Afghanistan, Dec. 4. The Marines accompanied the officials to the remote district as a part of Operation Karwaan IV, an initiative to bolster the reintegration programs throughout the country.

Nimroz provincial officials meet with Joint Secretariat members CPL. ANTHONY WARD JR. Regional Command Southwest

Regional Command Southwest Marines and their coalition partners helped facilitate a meeting with key Afghan officials about reintegration in the remote Zaranj District of Nimroz province, Afghanistan, Dec. 4. As the transition toward a more independent Afghanistan continues, so does the expansion of outreach programs to those who were once insurgents or supported insurgent activity. For this

reason, the Nimroz Provincial Joint Secretariat Team was established and coordinates the return of former insurgents to become peaceful members of society. “The purpose of (the meeting) was to facilitate members from the Joint Secretariat in Kabul to meet with their counterparts in Nimroz,” said Maj. Ethan Harding, Nimroz Provincial Director for RC (SW) Governance. “It allows them to get to one of the more remote provinces in the country and actually help stand up a reintegration program.” Provincial leadership sees

the importance of having reintegration programs and has taken steps to create one. “With the establishment of the new governor, he realized the value in the program as far as conflict resolution,” said British Army Lt. Col. Chris Huthwaite, RC (SW) Fires and Effects Coordination Cell. “With the establishment of the Provincial Joint Secretariat Team, it is providing a foundation upon which the province can then take forward the president of Afghanistan’s national priority program.” The reintegration program is one of the key parts

of Operation Karwaan IV, which involves the coordination of International Security Assistance Force members, sections of RC (SW) and the Afghan government, who is leading the operation. The newly elected provincial governor, Mohammad Sardar Sabat, played a big part in increasing the frequency of meetings between his team and the Kabul officials. “With Governor Sabat, whose been on the job for about two months now, (meetings) actually are happening more and more,” said Harding. “It’s a very

encouraging sign.” There were two separate meetings with one taking place the day prior with three separate ministers and the main one occurred once the Kabul officials arrived with RC (SW) personnel. Officials ranged from those in charge of Hajj and religious affairs, ISAF Reintegration Cell personnel and cultural and governance advisers with the RC (SW) FECC. The coordination and meeting of high-ranking Afghans helps the country move toward a positive direction of independence. “Nimroz is showing it-

self to be a model for what a province would be after its done with transition,” said Harding. “It’s very independent. They actually asked us to come down Tuesday because Monday they had additional visits and meetings. It shows a fully selfsufficient government that wants to have a relationship with ISAF but is not dependent on us.” Nimroz province continues to show an increase of development and governance. The reintegration meeting is a sign of the province’s willingness to continue to be an example in southern Afghanistan.

It’s more than a car. It’s your future.

Cheers to our heroes

The MILES® (Military Installment Loan & Educational Services) Program was created to help educate Active Duty Service Members. We help you get a great deal on a vehicle, and help you build positive credit for the future.

3 ways the MILES Program protects you.

AT&T wishes all our armed forces and their families a happy and safe New Year.

1

Purchase protection. Our buying protections help ensure that you get a fair deal on a quality vehicle.

2

Buyer education. We provide one-on-one Vehicle Purchase Training to educate you about purchasing, financing and ownership.

3

Building credit. Responsible financing from a reputable lender can help you establish positive credit for the future.

We’ve protected over 100,000 Service Members and counting. ©2012 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, the AT&T logo and all other AT&T marks contained herein are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies.

Buy quality, buy smart. Learn more at usmiles.com ®


4A DECEMBER 20, 2012

THE GLOBE, CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.

SOUTHERN HELMAND PROVINCE, AFGHANISTAN

Photo by Sgt. John Jackson

An MV-22 Osprey with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 161 prepares to land in southern Helmand province, Afghanistan, Dec. 9. The Osprey was picking up coalition and Afghan government officials following a visit to a remote area. The officials were checking the status of a 6th Zone Afghan Border Police clearing operation.

Afghan Border Police conduct independent clearing operation in southern Helmand SGT. JOHN JACKSON Regional Command Southwest

G

over nor Naeem, Helmand province governor, Maj. Gen. David Berger, Task Force Leatherneck commanding general, and coalition and Afghan National Security Forces officials visited members of the 6th Zone Afghan Border Police at a remote location in southern Helmand province, Afghanistan, Dec. 9. The visit allowed Naeem, Berger and the officials the opportunity to see the 6th Zone ABP conduct a clearing operation in southern Afghanistan. The operation, which includes four kandaks of ABP from both Helmand and Nimroz provinces, was planned, coordinated and executed by the 6th Zone ABP commanders. “There are several different things we are trying to accomplish during this clearing operation,” said Col. Hamidullah Sadiki, 6th Zone ABP chief of staff. “We are trying to rid the area of Taliban. We are talking to the civilians about government policy.

Photo by Sgt. John Jackson

Photo by Sgt. John Jackson

Col. Mahmood, left, the 6th Zone Afghan Border Police commander, points out an area of interest to Governor Naeem, the governor of Helmand province, during an operations brief in southern Helmand province, Afghanistan, Dec. 9.

Maj. Gen. David Berger, the Task Force Leatherneck commanding general, speaks with Col. Hamidullah Sadiki, the 6th Zone Afghan Border Police chief of staff, during an operations brief in southern Helmand province, Afghanistan, Dec. 9. During the past five days, the 6th Zone ABP conducted a clearing operation and had success accomplishing their mission.

We are also speaking to them about poppy and telling them why they should not be harvesting it. And we are also meeting with village elders to discuss what issues they have.” During the past five days, the 6th Zone ABP conducted the operation and had success accomplishing their mission. “When we started this operation, the men had

operation, it continues to be 100 percent Afghan led. “(The adviser teams) are here solely as enabler support,” said Army Maj. Will Garrison, adviser to the 6th Zone ABP chief of staff. “There is about 500 ABP conducting the operation, and this is the first time a zone-level operation was conducted in Helmand province.” Although this is the first

very high morale, and they were proud to be serving their country,” said Sadiki. “We had very good coordination throughout, and we continue to keep pushing. We found and disposed of 21 (improvised explosive devices). The men are very brave, and their morale continues to be high.” While there is a small element of coalition advisers with the ABP during the

time an operation of this size was conducted by the ABP in southern Afghanistan, the results are exactly what the soldiers were hoping to obtain. “We had great leadership and management,” Sadiki said. “I am very proud of my soldiers, and they are doing a great job.” The small group of advisers embedded with the ABP is pleased with the

coordination and execution of the mission, and they see the positive impact it is having. “After seeing this operation, I think (the ABP) are doing great,” said Staff Sgt. Jeffrey Wilburn, an ABP adviser. “They have a very strong group of soldiers who know what they are doing, and they are making this country a safer and better place.”

Photo by Sgt. John Jackson

Col. Hamidullah Sadiki, 6th Zone Afghan Border Police chief of staff, gives an overview brief of the clearing operation to Governor Naeem, the governor of Helmand province, Maj. Gen. David Berger, the Task Force Leatherneck commanding general, and coalition and Afghan National Security Forces officials in southern Helmand province, Afghanistan, Dec. 9. The 6th Zone ABP executed a clearing operation in southern Helmand province for five days.


The Globe, Camp lejeune, n.C.

Happy Holidays from Holden Temporaries, Inc 25 years in business and 153 years combined experience serving our communities.

99 Village Drive Suite 3 Jacksonville, NC 28546 910-577-7768

DeCember 20, 2012

2008 dodGE aVENGEr

2002 CHEVY CaMaro Z28

2009 SCIoN TC

2009 CHEVY SILVErado 1500

2008 dodGE raM 2500

2001 Ford F150 XLT

2009 INFINITI G37

MErrY CHrISTMaS! FroM US, To YoU!

2006 NISSaN PaTHFINdEr

2008 ToYoTa TaCoMa Sr5

2010 dodGE raM SLT

2005 CadILLaC ESCaLadE

5a

JaCkSoNVILLE 1914 Wilmington Hwy 910.478.0533

SNEadS FErrY

py Hap ays id l o H

2145 US Hwy 172 910.327.3070

WWW.GarYSaUToSaLES.CoM

n e p O w o

N

a

g n i t p e c c A nd

E R A TRIC der,

O

D n a x Ale Elmore Ziemba, MD l Mariso , MD r e k l a W Shayna gado, MD lle a H e n NP-BC Arle H M P , C , FNP-B N S M , ger n Soon a l g e n i B m e gy Co d Mari eurolo ccepte

Child N Insurances A Major

Child neurology Coming january 7, 2013 Call now 910.333.9860 or 910.938.1114 | 200 Doctors Drive, Suite L Located next to the Jacksonville Mall


6A DECEMBER 20, 2012

THE GLOBE, CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.

MUSA QAL’AH DISTRICT CENTER, AFGHANISTAN

Mission Rehearsal Exercise prepares SpecialPurpose MAGTF Africa for deployment SGT. AUSTIN HAZARD 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit

M

arines a n d sailors with S p e cial-Purpose Marine AirGround Task Force Africa completed their mission rehearsal exercise, the unit’s last major predeployment requirement, aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune Dec. 13. The four-day exercise included role players originally from African nations who speak their native languages in order to familiarize the unit with situations they are likely to face during their upcoming deployment to support U.S. Africa Command. Four security cooperation teams spread throughout local training areas worked independently to build relations with and mentor their foreign partners on weapons safety, combat first aid, patrolling and perimeter security. “The entire scenario was essentially a concentrated version of their upcoming deployment,” said Capt. Ross Sanders, 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit assistant air officer who evaluatPhoto by Sgt. Austin Hazard ed one of the teams for the Chief Petty Officer Mark Chesney, a Special-Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force exercise. “Each situation Africa corpsman, teaches a class on field medical equipment and combat first was meant to represent the aid to role players portraying soldiers of an African partner nation during the unit’s worst that could happen. mission rehearsal exercise aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune Dec. 11. Every point of tension was pushed to its climax.”

The role players gave the Marines and sailors a realistic opportunity to interact with partner nation service members while contending with cultural and language barriers. “It helped me learn to look at the situation from their perspective and to value their input as experts on the areas we’ll be working in,” said Cpl. Calvin Taliaferro, a Special-Purpose MAGTF Africa combat engineer. “I think it’s good to have a chance to learn how to interact with the people we’re going to be working with during the deployment.” Every team was observed and evaluated by a 22nd MEU Marine and a member of Marine Corps Security Cooperation Group. MCSCG and 22nd MEU controlled the scenarios throughout the teaching and advising portion of the exercise. “They maintained composure,” said Sanders. “They had a good working knowledge of the culture they were working with and a good resident knowledge of what they were trying to teach.” Most of the challenges the teams experienced were not caused by a lack of planning, knowledge or maturity, said Sanders. The exercise is intended to help prepare the Marines and sailors for the unexpected, and better equip them to diffuse or avoid unwanted situations. After simulating going through customs, and deal-

ing with the many tense and difficult scenarios that may occur during the deployment, the unit received orders to head to the base’s urban training compound to support embassy security and execute a noncombatant evacuation operation. “The 22nd MEU is been outstanding in not only supporting the MRX, but supporting the entire duration of our (predeployment training program),” said Capt. Caleb Weiss, Special-Purpose MAGTF Africa operations officer. “In reference to the MRX itself, the MEU has created a scenario, coordinated with training providers, to include contracting role players, getting scenario support from Marine Corps Security Cooperation Group and from Special Operations Training Group East.” Weiss said the MEU “did a fantastic job of setting up a realistic, challenging training scenario to test all of the Marines of Special-Purpose MAGTF Africa. The MEU went beyond just facilitating and evaluating training.” Special-Purpose MAGTF Africa, currently attached to the 22nd MEU, is composed of reserve Marines from 2nd Battalion, 25th Marine Regiment out of the New York area as well as around the country. They will deploy early next year to participate in security cooperation efforts with partner nations, advising their militaries on effective security procedures.

INTRODUCING OUR NEW IN STORE

GOOD GOOD CREDIT CREDIT BAD BAD CREDIT CREDIT NO NOCREDIT CREDIT EVERYONE’S EVERYONE’S APPROVED APPROVED NO CREDIT CHECK PAYMENT OPTION! See store for complete details.

Ashley Furniture HomeStore 252-295-HOME (4663) 1250-A Western Blvd

Jacksonville

5160 W 70 Hwy Suite 700

Morehead City

1975 SE Greenville Blvd

Greenville

ATTENTION BACHELORS, DOD EMPLOYEES, RESERVISTS & MILITARY RETIREES

%UDGOH\V

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR

J e w e l e r s

McCutcheon Manor at MCAS New River

Holiday Hours t Conveniently located to WORK t $20K Renter’s Insurance Included t Pet-Friendly Community with no pet deposits t Basic Electricity, Water & Garbage Service Included t 24-Hour On-site Maintenance Service t Professional, On-site Property Management Team t Access to AMCC Community Center includes free wireless, and 24/7 Fitness Center

Limited Time Only CALL TODAY FOR A WOW TOUR DON’T WAIT! Call today at (910) 219-6451 or stop by the AMCC Leasing Center located at 43 Inchon Street Tarawa Terrace, NC to speak with a leasing specialist today!

Friday, December 21st 9:30am-8pm Saturday, December 22nd 9:30am-8pm Sunday, December 23rd 10am-7pm Monday, December 24th 9am-6pm

910-353-1450 353 A Western Blvd. | Jacksonville

BRADLEYJEWELERS.COM JOIN TODAY! ducks.org 800-45-DUCKS

Continental Conservation: You Make it Happen A CFC participant - provided as a public service A CFC participant - provided as a public service


Proud The Globe, Camp lejeune, n.C.

DeCember 20, 2012

7a

to serve those who serve our

Country NISSAN Celebrating the opening of our new facility

Alycia Tomazic would like to invite everyone to the NEW Don Williamson Nissan dealership located at 310 Western Blvd, Jacksonville. Don Williamson Nissan has been serving Jacksonville and surrounding counties for over 10 years. If you are in the market or just looking for a new or pre-owned vehicle, please stop by and check out our large selection.

NISSAN

910-353-7700

310 Western Blvd. Next to the Mall, Beatin’ ‘Em All!

www.dwnissan.com


8A DECEMBER 20, 2012

THE GLOBE, CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.

MUSA QAL’AH DISTRICT CENTER, AFGHANISTAN

Iowa native serves country on first combat deployment Marine Corps would challenge me the most out of any branch.” Clote is currently serving on his third deployment, his first two were with Marine Expeditionary Units. During his time in the Marine Corps, Clote had the opportunity to go to Thailand, Singapore, the Philippines, mainland Japan and Afghanistan. For Clote, this deployment to Afghanistan is what he was waiting for his entire time in the Marine Corps. “This is the deployment I was waiting for,” Clote said. “I came in, and I expected to be in Iraq or Afghanistan within six months of joining. It took me four and half years longer than I expected, but I finally made it out here. I’m definitely glad I got to experience all these different places and do all the things I’ve done. It’s what I was looking for when I came into the Marines.” Clote decided to join the infantry because it allowed him a chance to do what he wanted in the Marine Corps. After arriving at 2nd Bn., 7th Marines, he went on to become a sniper.

CPL. MARK GARCIA Regional Command Southwest

Photo by Cpl. Mark Garcia

Cpl. Aaron Clote is now serving on his third deployment as a sniper and as the radio operator with the scout sniper team, Regimental Combat Team 7, Clote assists the Afghan National Security Forces with the transition of responsibilities.

For Cpl. Aaron Clote, the challenge involved with becoming a Marine and the chance to experience the world was something he couldn’t miss out on. Clote, now a sniper and the radio operator with Regimental Combat Team 7, was homeschooled, graduated in May 2008 and was off to recruit training the following month. “One factor for me enlisting was the need to pay for college,” said Clote. “I wanted to get out and get some life experiences, and the Marine Corps was the only way for me to do both. I was looking for something to challenge me and develop me more as a person, and I thought the

Futrell and Reese Family Dentistry, voted Onlsow County's best dental office by local newspaper readers three years in a row, and we're recognized in the top one percent of practices nationwide by dental insurer United Concordia and Metlife.

D.D.S.

• Chad S. Reese,

support the transition for the Afghan National Security Forces to take over the wellbeing of their country,” Clote said. “For us specifically we are been going out and visiting ANA posts and doing what we can to help them.” Since becoming a sniper, Clote became a proficient radio operator and a vital member to his sniper team. “As a Marine, Cpl. Clote is a highly valuable asset to my team,” said Sgt. Andrew Meriwether, a team leader with scout snipers, 2nd Bn., 7th Marines, RCT-7. “His sniper knowledge and skills are undeniable, and he’s an invaluable asset. He’s a person of undeniable moral character. He’s one of the best overall Marines and operators I ever worked with. He’s our radio operator and a school-trained sniper, it really doesn’t get any better than this. He’s exactly what a corporal should be.” During the duration of his deployment, Clote will continue to provide assistance to the ANSF as coalition forces continue to withdraw from Afghanistan.

Visit Our Store for a

HUGE SELECTION! TWO LOCATIONS IN JACKSONVILLE TO BETTER SERVE YOU!

For family dental care in a family-friendly atmosphere, contact us for an appointment today.

Stephen C. Futrell,

“I never had an interest in a specific job,” Clote said. “I just wanted to become a Marine and kick in doors.” “It’s been good, I don’t regret coming into the Marine Corps,” Clote said. “It’s the best thing I could have done coming straight out of high school. I needed something to challenge me and make me grow, and it definitely did that.” Clote plans on getting out after his current enlistment is finished and pursuing a career that allows him to mentor children. “I was looking at some different Bible colleges,” Clote said “I like working with kids, so I’ll probably work in a youth ministry or as youth camp counselor.” Recently, Clote participated in Operation Helmand Viper, during October in Zamindawar, Afghanistan, a known insurgent hotbed between Musa Qal’ah and Kajaki. He also participated in visits to Afghan National Army posts to ensure the transition between coalition forces and the ANA is occurring. “The battalion is trying to

2015 Lejeune Blvd. Jacksonville, NC 28546 Phone: 910-353-5522

507 Bell Fork Road Jacksonville, NC 28540 Phone: 910-455-9595

D.M.D

Family Dental Practice 32 Office Park Dr. • Jacksonville, NC United Concordia Dental Provider

910-353-8200 www.camplejeuneglobe.com www.futrellandreesefamilydentistry.com

Celebrate the Holidays at your Favorite Chinese Buffet!

MAI TAI

SOUP SALAD BAR DESSERTS INCLUDED

Many favorites to choose from s s s s s s s s

Sushi Bar Steamed Shrimp Ribs Pepper Steak Shrimp Fried Rice Sesame Chicken Crab Rangoon Mussels

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK HOURS: MON - SAT LUNCH 11:00 - 2:30 PM DINNER 4:30 - 10:00 PM FRI & SAT 4:30 - 10:30 PM SUNDAYS 11:00 - 9:30 PM

s s s s

Kung Po Chicken Shrimp Subgum Potstickers Sweet & Sour Pork & Chicken s Chicken Lo Mein s Fried Shrimp s Grilled Lemon Chicken

s s s s s

Fried Wonton Egg Foo Young Chicken Teriyaki Chicken With Broccoli Charbroiled Pork Chop Zucchini & Corn s And Much, Much More!

CALL FOR YOUR RESERVATION OR TAKE OUT ORDER TODAY! ALL ABC PERMITS

346-5382 or 346-6675 109 Henderson Drive www.MaiTaiJacksonville.com


DECEMBER 20, 2012

THE GLOBE, CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.

9A

Photo by Cpl. Michael Petersheim

Lance Cpl. Curtis Overholt, a rifleman with Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, stacks baggage aboard USS New York Dec. 13 in preparation for the MEU’s offload. The 24th MEU returned home in time for the holidays after spending most of 2012 deployed in the U.S. Navy’s 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility as an expeditionary crisis response force, maintaining presence aboard the ships of the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group within the U.S. Central, European and Africa Commands.

ATLANTIC OCEAN

Marines, sailors of 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit prepare for next phase — post deployment 2ND LT. JOSHUA LARSON

24th Marine Expeditionary Unit

The 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit returned home, nine months after departing the Carolina coast near Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune last March. Smiles and long-anticipated embraces from friends and family members awaited them, but the MEU’s Marines and sailors remained focused — they understood the mission wasn’t quite over. “The goal is to enjoy the reunion as it is one of the great benefits of our expeditionary lifestyle — renewing those things we love and enjoy best about family, friends and life in the United States,” said Col. Frank Donovan, the commanding officer of the 24th MEU. “It’s vitally important we take the time to sit down, and discuss the positives and potentially negative aspects of our return to the United States and reunion with our friends and families.” Lt. Col. David Sosa, the commanding officer of Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, the infantrybased ground combat element of the 24th MEU, structured schedules not only to offload and ac-

count for the massive amount of equipment on his unit’s return home, but coordinated training for his Marines including a variety of lectures, instruction, discussion and even practical application in the days before sending them off to loved ones on leave and liberty. “Our return home will mark a significant change of environment for our Marines, and we want to make sure they are prepared for it,” said Sosa, a veteran of 22 years of active duty and one of 2,300 Marines and sailors who left homes and his family in the United States last March for what was a scheduled eightmonth deployment. The 24th MEU spent most of 2012 sailing in the U.S. Navy’s 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility as an expeditionary crisis response force, maintaining presence aboard the ships of the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group within the U.S. Central, European and Africa Commands. They conducted significant training operations in Morocco, Jordan, Kuwait and Djibouti, Africa, and maintained a robust alert status much of the time, prepared to launch America’s 9-1-1 force at a moment’s notice.

A successful deployment under their belt, the Marines are excited to return home. “I’m looking forward to just getting home and relaxing, to be able to be alone without seeing 30 other guys every time I turn around,” said Cpl. Christopher Moritz, a machine gunner with BLT 1st Bn., 2nd Marines. This is Moritz’s second deployment; his first was also with 1st Bn., 2nd Marines when they went to Afghanistan. “I think we prepared well (for post-deployment). It was different last time because we flew home from Afghanistan and were back in the states in one day. With the MEU, we’ve had all this time on ship to prepare for our reunions back home and our heads are in the right place.” Staff Sgt. Chris Harrison, the air-frames staff noncommissioned-officer-in-charge of the detachment of Marines from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 261 (Reinforced) aboard USS New York, shared similar thoughts. “We’re all looking forward to being back and I am telling the Marines to do everything they can to get their families to the homecoming because it’s a great

experience,” said Harrison, adding post-deployment stresses are a concern but were addressed. “The (Aviation Combat Element) is a tight group, and we have a good sense of who’s doing what for the holidays, which is important.” Leadership at all levels took time to talk to Marines and Sailors to ensure a comfortable transition from deployment to postdeployment routines. “We were gone 38 weeks, we trained in four countries, and were separate from our families the entire time,” said 1st Lt. A.J. Kowaleuski. “The person our loved ones remember is certainly not the person they are now. The Marines had life-altering experiences, new routines were established, and lifestyles changed.” Kowaleuski, a platoon commander with Battery I, the artillery attachment for the 24th MEU, is finishing up his first deployment. This was he and his wife’s first homecoming and the first time he will see his now 10month-old son since he left last spring—when he was just sixweeks old. “Simple things like the freedom to go and drive somewhere and get a sandwich by yourself,

going to your room and reading a book without 25 other people standing next to you—these are the things we have to get used to again,” he said. The 24th MEU was scheduled to be ashore and released for leave and liberty before the holidays, but their deployment didn’t end there. Kowaleuski’s commanding officer, Maj. Gregory Goober, explained it best as he addressed his sergeants and staff noncommissioned officers. “What this boils down to is doing right by the Marines,” said Goober. “We need to get them back to their families and reunited, but our leadership responsibilities do not end when postdeployment leave starts.” Of course, the support of family and friends throughout the deployment hasn’t gone unnoticed, especially by those at the very top. “Our focus is on the most important thing,” said Donovan. “Conducting our final amphibious operation of the deployment in a safe and efficient manner so we can get our Marines and sailors home to their family and friends who provided unyielding love and support over the past nine months.”

REAL WARRIORS. Photo by Cpl. Pete Thibodeau

REAL BATTLES. Photo by PhotoAlto/Michele Constantini

Photo by Cpl. Jeff Drew

Lance Cpl. Richie Chavis hugs a Marine from 1st Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, his former unit, after the Operation Coming Home presentation ceremony. Chavis, a bilateral amputee who was injured during a deployment to Helmand province, Afghanistan, is the fourth recipient of a new home. Operation Coming home is a program dedicated to building new homes for injured veterans. HOME FROM 1A This was the first year Operation Coming Home has been able to start and finish a home in one year and the program plans to to finish two homes next year. “This type of project is an amazing process and being able to watch all this come together and with today being the finale to honor Richie and his service,” mentioned Minton. “There is no way to say thank you for the sacrifice that Richie and others have made, so to be able to provide them with a home is a just a small way that we can do that.” Chavis and his family couldn’t hide their smiles as they received the keys to his new home. Ready to start their new lives together, Richie joined his wife and two children, entering to explore their new home together. “It’s not every day that you get a free house,” said Chavis. “I really appreciate all of the people who came out, who spent their time to be here - thank you.”

REAL STRENGTH. Photo by SrA. Gina Chiavenotti

REACHING OUT MAKES A REAL DIFFERENCE. Discover real stories of courage in the battle against combat stress.

Call Toll Free 866-966-1020  www.realwarriors.net


10a DeCember 20, 2012

The Globe, Camp lejeune, n.C.

Be Responsible

Don’t Drink & Drive easterncarolinabrawlingbetties.com

The Brawling Betties love charity work! Please contact us if we can help. email: ldyrmpg@gmail.com

SPECIAL OLYMPICS ONSLOW COUNTY

Special olympics onslow County

POLAR PLUNGE Onslow Beach • Saturday, January 5, 2013

onslow Beach, nC

2013 Emcee Skip Waters WCTI Channel 12

Registration 9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Children’s Sandcastle Contest 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

Chat on Facebook about your team.

facebook.com/wcti12

MUSiC BY DJ FineSSe

Costume Judging* 10:15 a.m. Opening Ceremony 10:40 a.m.

Plunge is at 11:00 a.m.

No Wetsuits allowed for Costume Contest. No pets allowed on the beach.

*

Individual plunge with minimum of $25 in pledges | Teams of 8-20 plunge with minimum of $200 in pledges 21-30 plunge with minimum of $300 in pledges | 31 or more plunge with minimum of $400 in pledges

INDIVIDUAL PLEDGES OF $100 OR MORE ARE ELIGIBLE FOR “THE BIG” DOOR PRIZE AT 10:30 A.M. (an iPad!) DireCtionS to onSLoW BeACH, CAMP LeJeUne ***NOTE*** If you do not have a DOD Sticker, you must enter Camp Lejeune through the Front Gate and stop to get a pass to enter the installation. Please allow extra time for this process! You’ll need driver’s license, vehicle registration and current proof of insurance.

From Jacksonville, NC | Enter Camp Lejeune’s Main Gate on HWY 24. Proceed on Holcomb Blvd. Turn left on to Sneads Ferry Road, merge with HWY 172, then left onto Beach Rd. at traffic light. Go over drawbridge (ICW) onto Onslow Beach. With Base Sticker from Swansboro, NC | HWY 24W, turn left onto HWY 172. Stay left when HWY 172 and Sneads Ferry Rd. merge, then turn left on Beach Rd. at the traffic light. Go over drawbridge (ICW) onto Onslow Beach. With Base Sticker from Wilmington, NC | HWY 17N, turn right on HWY 172, heading to Sneads Ferry. Go through back gate onto Camp Lejeune. At the 3rd traffic light, turn right onto Beach Rd. over drawbridge (ICW) to Onslow Beach.

For additional information and registration forms, go to www.sonconslow.org or www.mccslejeune.com or call 910-265-1756.

To advertise on this page, call Shannon at 910.347.9624 or drop by our office at 1122 Henderson Drive, Jacksonville.


THE GLOBE, CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.

DECEMBER 20, 2012

11A

AFGHANISTAN

Wounded Warriors return to Helmand, Kandahar for Operation Proper Exit CPL. ANTHONY WARD JR Regional Command Southwest

A harsh reality of war is some service members must pay the ultimate sacrifice, while others are severely injured in the pursuit of freedom. For those who are injured, the healing process is not only physical but mental. Both must be repaired to help these heroes move forward in life. To aid these wounded warriors, the Troops First foundation started Operation Proper Exit, sending wounded veterans back to the battlefield, allowing them to leave Afghanistan on their own terms. The tour brought eight service members, to include five soldiers and three Marines, to the Helmand and Kandahar provinces of Afghanistan.

The visit began with the warriors arriving aboard Camp Leatherneck and then escorted to the Camp Bastion Hospital, a place a few of them already visited but under different circumstances. Specialist Adam Bates, who was wounded in Kandahar province, was greeted by a familiar face, the nurse who helped save his life during his deployment. After seeing the care providers, they were then taken to the Camp Leatherneck Townhall, and given a chance to discuss their injuries and talk with the Marines, sailors and soldiers in attendance. “I didn’t feel any of the blast,” said Staff Sgt. Glen Silva, a wounded warrior. “Something so violent and fast just kind of sears all of the nerve endings.” Silva stepped on an impro-

CAMP LEATHERNECK, AFGHANISTAN

Artillerymen celebrate St. Barbara’s Day CPL. ROBERT REEVES

Regional Command Southwest

Artillerymen from throughout Regional Command Southwest gathered aboard Camp Leatherneck, Afghanistan, as a harmonious coalition of “cannon cockers” to pay homage to the patron saint of artillery, Saint Barbara, Dec. 4. During the two-hour traditional ceremony, more than 200 artillerymen and their guests from the Marine Corps, Army, British Army and Jordanian Armed Forces enjoyed historical stories as esprit de corps as it echoed throughout the townhall. St. Barbara is know for protecting patrons from thunderstorms, fires, explosives and sudden death. Dating back to the 17th century gunners, St. Barbara’s Day is celebrated by artillerymen throughout the globe. “It’s about brotherhood and camaraderie, and a nice taste of home,” said Gunnery Sgt. Reynaldo Philbrook, RC(SW) targeting chief. “No matter what or where, we will celebrate and have our St. Barbara’s Day, forward or otherwise.” During the St. Barbara’s Day celebration participants listened to a reading of the lore of St. Barbara. Cmdr. Edward J. Nash, a chaplain with RC(SW), gave an invocation before service members gathered to share a meal. After breaking bread together, the guest of honor, Brigadier Stuart Skeates, RC(SW) deputy commander, spoke about his love for artillery. A plaque was presented to Brig. Skeates by 5th Battalion, 11th Marine Regiment, in recognition of his continued support to the artillery community. The fabled story of “Fiddler’s Green” was read aloud, followed by the mixing of a ceremonial and comical “artillery punch.” The punch mixture offered tribute to the brethren of artillery stationed throughout the globe. The meaningful ingredients included exotic liquids and secret substances, to include woodpecker feathers, tacos, whole raw eggs, liberty passes from Okinawa and a horse shoe. British Royal Air Force Group Capt. Bruce Hedley, was selected to test the concoction and the evening concluded with everyone drinking the punch while toasts were made. “Although we didn’t do a skit, it’s normally the best part of the night,” said Philbrook. “For a lack of a better term, (the skit) means artillery is the king of the battlefield. Mixing the arty punch is great because you get to honor all the rest of the arty community in a joking way. We use this day to have a little fun, but really to reflect on those who came before us and to come together and use forethought on where we will be headed in the near future.”

ANSF, RC(SW) discuss Afghanistan’s infrastructure CPL. ANTHONY WARD JR

Regional Command Southwest

Afghan National Security Forces and Regional Command Southwest service members gathered for the ANSF Infrastructure Execution and Transition Conference aboard Camp Leatherneck, Afghanistan, Dec. 5 and 6. The RC (SW) service members met with members of Afghanistan’s National Army, Border Police, Uniformed Police and its National Civil Order Police to discuss Afghanistan’s current infrastructure and ways to improve it as the Afghans prepare to assume complete control of their country. “The principle really is to try and get the ANSF in a room to talk about the infrastructure they’re going to have,” said British Army Maj. Charlie Beatty, officer in charge of ANSF construction and development with RC (SW) engineers. “It’s an opportunity for them to talk about their plans.” The two-day conference was mostly comprised of ANSF engineers. The forces were seated panel style in the center of the room as exchanges of information flowed from ANSF and RC (SW) representatives. RC (SW) facilitated the conference, providing the location and aiding in extending the invitations out to the many difference branches. The rest of the work was done by the Afghans, who were joined at the conference by officials from Kabul. “What I see is very encouraging,” said Gunnery Sgt. Richard Arvey, ANSF construction chief for RC (SW). “Just how they’re wanting to grow as a nation, they want to build. The leaders who we deal with are striving the best they can to build infrastructure.” Improving infrastructure covers a large umbrella of tasks to aid the country and the ANSF. A few of these areas were discussed during the meeting. Each ANSF representative was given time to discuss and present their thoughts on how to move forward in Afghanistan. Conferences like this are scheduled to occur every three months, allowing the ANSF to track and control issues as they arise, and as they continue to build Afghanistan to greater heights.

vised explosive device and was left with amputations to both legs, perforated eardrums and damages to vital organs. “To date, I had about 45 surgeries,” said Silva. “I have about five more major surgeries to go. I’m still thankful I’m here.” The sentiment was expressed by each warrior as they took turns discussing their injuries and answering questions from the audience. No matter how bad their injuries were, they were happy to be alive. “This was an opportunity for those soldiers and Marines to come back to Afghanistan, see the progress made and share their story,” said Sgt. Maj. Kenneth Rocquemore, sergeant major for I Marine Expeditionary Force Headquarters Group (Forward). “We read a lot of the reports about IEDs and things

of that nature, but a lot of Marines aboard Camp Leatherneck are removed from it, somewhat distant.” Not actively engaging the enemy can dull the senses of Marines to the harsh reality of Afghanistan. Having service members who actively engaged the enemy, wounded and are still in high spirits, can bring them closer to understanding the seriousness of their environment. “I think their coming back, telling their stories and still being upbeat — letting everyone know they were service members, and were proud to serve and still proud of their service says a lot,” said Rocquemore. After sharing their stories, the warriors made their way from the stage amidst rounds of applause and cheers from the audience.

Photo by Cpl. Anthony Ward Jr

Wounded Warriors walk through the halls of the Camp Bastion Hospital during a visit to Camp Leatherneck Dec. 6. The warriors visited Camps Leatherneck and Bastion as part of Operation Proper Exit.


12A DeCember 20, 2012

The Globe, Camp lejeune, n.C.

NO CREDIT?

INSTANT

NEED CREDIT?

NO PROBLEM! ★

“RIALTO”

STARTING AT

42

INCLUDES LOVE SEAT, SOFA, COCKTAIL TABLE, 2 END TABLES, 2 LAMPS AND A RUG.

FREE 32" TV WITH PURCHASE OF ANY 8-PIECE LIVING ROOM PACKAGE special buy tv

$

32" HDTV

tv and gaming bundle

10

TWICE MONTHLY*

25% OFF

free printer

40

$

50" LCD HDTV Plus Playstation® Gaming Bundle

TWICE MONTHLY*

With Purchase of 15.6" LED HP® Laptop Computer

TWICE MONTHLY*

TWICE MONTHLY*

**

24

$

PERFECT HOLIDAY GIFTS FROM $39

ALL DIAMOND FASHION JEWELRY

Sterling Silver and Diamond Pendant

¼ CT. T.W.

$18

$39 Orig. $56

Sterling Silver and Diamond Earrings

$69 Orig. $99

Twice Monthly* $699 Orig. $932

¼ CT. T.W.

13

18

$

$

Twice Monthly* $499 Orig. $665

¼ CT. T.W.

16

$

CT. T.W. in Sterling Silver

¼ CT. T.W.

Twice Monthly* $699 Orig. $932

Twice Monthly* $599 Orig. $799

¼ CT. T.W. 10K‡

CT. T.W. 10K

10K Rose Gold

13

8

Twice Monthly* $299 Orig. $399

11

$299 Orig. $399

$

$

$

Twice Monthly* $499 Orig. $665

His and Her Sentinel Diamond Dial Watch with Sapphire Crystal

Twice Monthly* $399 Orig. $532

Sterling Silver Diamond “DAD” Ring

YOUR CHOICE ¼ CT. T.W. 10K Yellow or White Gold

20

$

Twice Monthly*

$199 Orig. $284

¼ CT. T.W. 10K

13

$

Twice Monthly*

$499 Orig. $665

¼ CT. T.W. 10K‡

16

$

$139 Orig. $180

Twice Monthly*

$599 Orig. $799

$149 Orig. $195 Steel Cable Bracelet

$69 Orig. $99

$749 Orig. $999

All jewelry is 14K Gold unless noted.

Located Inside USA Discounters

FletchersJewelers.com All jewelry is 14K Gold unless noted.

®

The Jewelry You Want...The Credit You Deserve.

ZERO INTEREST! ON ANY PURCHASE WHEN PAID WITHIN 6 MONTHS!!!¥

GET PRE-APPROVED ONLINE NOW! USADISCOUNTERS.NET

JACKSONVILLE, NC 2770 PINEY GREEN RD. 910-353-0403 877-866-4466

WHY RENT WHEN YOU CAN OWN?

SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE • QUALITY MERCHANDISE • IMMEDIATE DELIVERY • PAYROLL AND ALLOTMENT EXPERTS • POWER OF ATTORNEY ACCEPTED *Payments listed are examples only and are based on zero down payment at 19.99% APR for 24 months with approved credit, taxes and any delivery and installation charges not included. To calculate the total cost of financing simply multiply the payment amount by 48. Other financing rates and terms are available with approved credit and differ depending on the state where purchased. Jewelry is enlarged to show detail and may not always be exactly as shown. Items shown may not represent items in stock. Diamond carat weights (CT.) represent the approximate total weight (T.W.) of all diamonds in each setting and may vary no more than .07 below the stated weight. Limited time offer; no substitutions; limited quantities. Offer expires 1/2/2013. All products or service names mentioned on ad are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners. See store for details. **Off original/regular prices. Offer excludes everyday low prices on diamond solitaire rings. Interim markdowns may have been taken. See store for details. ‡Colored diamonds may have been treated or enhanced. ¥Subject to credit approval. Other terms may apply. Offer not valid on previous purchases or a refinance of or add-on to a current account. Any late payment nullifies the zero interest offer. Minimum payments required. See store for details.


WWW.CAMPLEJEUNEGLOBE.COM

LejeuneSports Lejeune Sports By Golly, Be Jolly 5K runners spread cheer | 10B

Hunt with Heroes Father, son duo gets once-in-alifetime hunt | 4B THURSDAY DECEMBER 20, 2012

B | THE GLOBE

Youth basketball gives kids chance to burn energy JESSIE HEATH

Sports editor

Photo by Jessie Heath

(Above) A young athlete seizes control of the ball during the Timberwolves vs. Blazers youth basketball game at Tarawa Terrace Youth Pavilion aboard the Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune housing area Saturday.

ssie Heath Photo by Je e

ers of th (Left) Memb and s e Timberwolv o uth sp rts’ Blazers yo ams wait te basketball und during o b re e for th at the TT their game n aboard o Youth Pavili p Lejeune m a C B the MC a Saturday. housing are

T

he buzzer sounded and fans erupted in a cheer as two basketball teams took to the court for their last game of 2012 Saturday. The Blazers and Timberwolves spent more than 10 hours on the court in preparation for the start of basketball season, and with a major break for the holidays right around the corner, both teams knew a lot was on the line. Their last game of 2012 was a time to go out as winners. They gave their coaches one last look as they stood on the court, waiting anxiously for the game to begin. As soon as the ball was in play, parents and siblings cheered from the sidelines, shouting for the young athletes on the court. They celebrated their rebounds, and encouraged every shot and dribble. “This age is fun to watch,” said Tasha Huskey, who’s daughter and son play on the Timberwolves. “They’re learning something new and getting a better idea of how to work with other people, which is an important skill for them to learn.” Huskey, whose husband coaches the same team his children play for, saw firsthand the impact youth sports made on her family since the beginning of the season. SEE BASKETBALL 11B

Photos by

Jessie Heath (Left) Two Blazers teammembers travel downcourt with the basketball during their game against the Timberwolves at TT Youth Pavilion aboard the MCB Ca mp Lejeune housing area Satur day. (Below) Cheerleaders from the blue squad pump up the crowd du ring a break in a basketball game Saturday.


2B DECEMBER 20, 2012

THE GLOBE, CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.

Weathering winter waters Untangling fishing patterns for new-comers

While the winter season does not officially begin until tomorrow, signs of winter are everywhere along the Crystal Coast. With shortened daylight hours, the sun sitting low in the sky and Geminid meteor shower paying a visit last week, it is clear winter is on the way. Like everything else, the fish seem to have settled into their winter pattern. The surf is running slow, and the backwater creeks are offering anglers speckled trout and drum on a slower basis. Fish coming out of waters along the Crystal Coast of North Carolina are noticeably smaller. Anglers have to work hard to secure their catches, unlike a few weeks ago when fish were a dime a dozen. Anglers along the surf and on the piers are catching the same thing. Most anglers are catching small speckled trout,

dogfish, skates, rays and an occasional black drum. Another sign of the late season solstice is the gathering of red drum outside the local inlets, specifically around Shackleford banks and Bear Island, where many will spend the winter months – unless the water grows too cold and they decide to swim south. This also means the drum bite is very hot at the rock jetty. The drum bite artificial bait, but like most fish, prefer live shrimp and cut mullet. When using natural baits on a cork in the hopes of targeting trout, skip the treble hooks and switch to circle hooks. I heard a lot of drum were caught with treble hooks stuck in their throats. Drum and some specks are still by the fuel tanks at Radio Island and by the Radio Island submerged rock jetty too. While there was a bit of a shift of trout, there are still plenty of fish out there. With the mild weather and water temperatures some moved back inside into the creeks, which are full of mullet baits. As per usual this time of year, Neuse and New River creeks are still

producing nice sized speckled trout, mostly on artificial bait, like plastic shrimp and a variety of suspending MirrOlures. If you want to try live shrimp, Chasin’ Tails on the Atlantic Beach Causeway was still able to get some in. There were also some good trout caught in the lower Neuse River creeks, like Dawson’s Creek. Farther up the state in New Bern, there are reports on the striper action around the bridges. Oceanana Pier closed for the season and will remain closed until spring. Bogue Pier is closed until mid-March, but access for 2013–pass holders with a gate key is still available. On Topsail Island, Seaview Pier is open year round. The Surf City Pier is closed until March. Jolly Roger Pier is open during daytime hours when the pier house is open. Finally, the offshore wahoo fishing is still very good along with blackfin tuna. Although it was a bit bumpy lately, but the fish are still found from the Big Rock to Swansboro Hole. However, there are still no signs of bluefin tuna or stripers yet. You may have heard about arrests for illegal gill netting in Hancock Creek near Cherry Point along the Neuse River. A

father and son were taken into custody as well as their fish, boat and gear. This was possible because of a report to officials of possible suspicious activity at night in the creek. The bottom line here is if you see suspicious or suspected illegal activity, pick up your cell phone and make a call to the authorities. Finally, the offshore fishing is still going strong. Wahoo and blackfin tuna are biting from the Big Rock to the Swansboro Hole. The recent calm weather allowed anglers to leave the coastline in search of bluefin tuna and stripers, however most returned empty–handed. I will keep you up to date on the bluefin tuna and striper sightings in the area. The Ask Dr. Bogus Fishing show can be heard every Monday morning at 7:30 on 107.1 FM and 1240 AM, and can be accessed on the Coastal Daybreak Facebook page at any time. For full regulations on catches visit www.portal.ncdenr.org/ web/mf. To contact the North Carolina Department of Marine Fisheries call 800-682-2632 or the Wildlife Resources Commission at 800-662-7137 to report any suspicious or illegal activity on local waterways.

NEW RIVER INLET TIDE TABLES

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration For more information about the New River Inlet tides or other locations visit www.saltwatertides.com.

High tide Low tide

THURSDAY 1:05 a.m. 7:18 a.m. FRIDAY 2:07 a.m. 8:26 a.m. SATURDAY 3:05 a.m. 9:30 a.m. SUNDAY 3:58 a.m. 10:27 a.m.

4:09 p.m. 10:07 p.m.

High tide Low tide

MONDAY 4:45 a.m. 11:16 a.m.

4:57 p.m. 10:51 p.m.

High tide Low tide High tide Low tide High tide Low tide

High tide Low tide High tide Low tide

1:18 p.m. 7:36 p.m. 2:18 p.m. 8:29 p.m. 3:16 p.m. 9:19 p.m.

TUESDAY 5:28 a.m. 5:41 p.m. Noon 11:33 p.m. WEDNESDAY 6:08 a.m. 6:21 p.m. 12:39 p.m.

Giants and super heroes

Victor Cruz stands up for Sandy Hook

I know a super hero. His hands are calloused from working on a farm. His skin is stained with patches of blue ink from hours spent in the press room fixing machinery to ensure daily newspapers were printed in a timely fashion. He coughs a lot and walks slow like most elderly gentlemen, but in my eyes, my grandfather will always be the tallest man on earth. He is my giant. Every little kid has a role model. In their eyes, their role model is the biggest person alive. They can slay dragons, protect the castle, rescue the princess and defeat the villain without being injured. They stand tall and everybody looks up to them with respect. Whether they are parents, grandparents, actors or athletes, our giants are larger than life characters who manage to walk the fine line between pride and humility with grace and dignity. As children, our role models seem invincible. But as we age our perspective changes. We see their flaws and our view is altered by the world, morphed into a cynical and jealous perspective, often without us realizing the change ever occurred. In the wake of the tragedy in the small town of Newtown, Conn., last week, super heroes are stepping up to help families of the young, innocent victims of the Sandy

Hook school shooting. Like many, New York Giants’ receiver Victor Cruz was deeply shaken and saddened to hear the horror unfolding in Newtown Friday. Already shaken by the tragic and unexpected event, Cruz was even more shocked to learn he had a personal connection to a victim. Cruz’s football career made such an impact on young Jack Pinto he would put on his Giants Cruz jersey for every game before watching it on television. As one of the most important people in a young boy’s life, Cruz knew he needed to pay homage to Pinto’s memory. After learning of the impact he had on Pinto, Cruz made a decision to publicly express his commitment to Pinto’s family. He wrote Pinto’s name on the bottom of his shoes before participating in last Sunday’s game. He contacted Pinto’s family and spoke to them on the phone, trying to help the struggling parents wade through their grief. He made a promise to help provide comfort to the Pinto family, and is planning to pay them a visit and present them with the cleats and gloves he wore during Sunday’s game. Cruz accepted his title of role model in the eyes of a young boy, and is publicly committed to the well-being of the family Pinto left behind. Cruz isn’t the only athlete showing his public support for the families of the Sandy Hook shooting tragedy. The Indianapolis Colts participated in a moment of silence before the start of their game in Houston Sunday. The Chicago Bears, Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Washington Redskins also paid similar homage to the lives tragically lost Friday. All these athletes recognized

the importance of using the public eye to honor those lost in the horrific event in Newtown. Viewed as giants for a multitude of young sports fans like Pinto, professional athletes across the nation stood up for families hurting in Connecticut. It doesn’t take a nationally acclaimed athlete to be a giant. Every athlete who steps onto a field or court is a role model. Every role model is expected to behave in a way befitting of their giant status. Every athlete has a duty to stand up for those on the sidelines. Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune and Jacksonville are full of athletes. I challenge every one of you to think about the giants in your life. Think about how they earned your respect, and consider how you might earn the respect of those who look up to you as their role model. Not every role model will wear cleats and bear his name on the back of his jersey. Role models come in all shapes in sizes. Some carry footballs. Others carry M-16s. Either way, they are still giants in a world of mortals, and they still hold the power to inspire and influence. Even in the darkest of times, our role models are still a light, burning brightly with a strength and ferocity larger than life. Go be a giant. Check out 3B to view the Globe’s Football Forecast and get involved for your chance to win big prizes. Access more information by visiting www.camplejeuneglobe. com or be our friend on the MCB Camp Lejeune Globe Facebook page. Do you tweet? Don’t forget to follow the @LejeuneGlobe Twitter account. Feel free to leave me a tweet @GlobeJessie.

Dec. 31.

For more information on games, tryouts, special events and exercise classes around Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune check out Sports On Tap each week. To add your event e-mail jessie.heath@pilotonline.com. Space is limited to availability.

Jujitsu Today, 6:30 to 9 p.m. Learn the art of weaponless self-defense using throws, holds and blows from a 6th degree black belt. Dominate your attacker by using his weight, strength and energy against him. The cost of the class is $50 per month, and costs are due during the first class of the month. Class size is limited. For more information visit www.mccslejeune. com/martialarts. Paradise Point Customer Appreciation Day Today Grab some friends and go to Paradise Point Golf Course. The Customer Appreciation Day special is $23 for 18 holes. The greens and cart fees are included in the price. For more information visit www.mccslejeune. com/golf. New Year’s Eve at Bonnyman Bowling Center Jan. 31, 10:30 p.m. Join other families for a New Year’s Eve black-light bowling party. Participants 19 and older can bowl for $15, while participants 18 and younger will bowl for $10. The price includes two hours of bowling. Registration is first come, first served. Please register by Dec. 30. For more information visit www.mccslejeune.com. French Creek fitness center closed Through September 2013 The French Creek fitness center is currently closed for renovations. The renovations and upgrades will include a complete renovation of the locker rooms and sauna facilities. While closed, French Creek’s regular patrons are encouraged to make use of the extended hours at the Area 2 gym or the HITT Center, both staffs will do their best to meet the needs of patrons. For more information visit www.mccslejeune. com/fitness.


The Globe, Camp lejeune, n.C.

DeCember 20, 2012

3B

ThE GlobE’S Annual Football

ConTEST GAME PICKS

Tennessee TiTans cincinnaTi BenGals new york GianTs new orleans sainTs oaklanD raiDers minnesoTa vikinGs new enGlanD PaTrioTs clevelanD Browns chicaGo Bears san DieGo charGers

vs vs vs vs vs vs vs vs vs vs

Green Bay Packers PiTTsBurG sTeelers BalTimore ravens Dallas cowBoys carolina PanThers housTon Texans Jacksonville JaGuars Denver Broncos arizona carDinals new york JeTs

RulES & InSTRuCTIonS

1.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

The 2012 Globe’s “Football Contest” is an annual contest. Each week there will be 10 NFL games selected by for the contestants to choose. The contestant will choose what they believe will be the winner of each game. The Globe will keep a running percentage of the contestants week to week. At the end of the 16th week (December 23rd), the contestant with the best winning percentage for the entire year will win a 42” Flat screen Television from Freedom TV and Stereo. The contest with the second best winning percentage will win $400 in cash and the third best winning percentage will win $150 in cash. Each week, all participants will be entered to win an 8 piece chicken box from Bojangle’s Famous Chicken-n-Biscuits. The weekly drawing will take place on Monday morning (after the preceding Sunday games). The winner of the weekly drawing for the Chicken Special will be emailed or called. The Bojangle’s certificate can be picked up at the Globe and RotoVue’s office anytime (1122 Henderson Drive, Jacksonville … across from the Jacksonville High School) To play go to www.camplejeuneglobe.com. Click on the “Football Contest” football icon. Select the winners for each game and submit. A minimum of 10 weeks must be played by each contestant to be eligible for any of the top 3 prizes. Only one entry per person per week. Correct answers consist of picking the actual winner of each game. Eligible participants must be 18 years of age or older. Landmark Military Newspapers employees and family members are not eligible to play. Play each week to increase your chances on a better winning percentage!

1ST PlACE PRIzE

ToShIbA 40E220u 40-InCh 1080P 60hz lCD hDTV fRoM fREEDoM fuRnITuRE

2nD PlACE PRIzE

$400

3RD PlACE PRIzE $150 1153 Western Blvd. ACROSS FROM STAPLES

910-346-8457

EVERy wEEK wE wIll hAVE A DRAwInG foR An 8PC ChICKEn box fRoM bojAnGlES

oCMC onslow County Motor Company


4B DECEMBER 20, 2012

THE GLOBE, CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.

Father, son veterans Hunt With Heroes JESSIE HEATH Sports editor

For Brandon Hughes, hunting was always more than walking through woods in search of game. It was time to cherish with his father, Air Force Technical Sergeant John Hughes. Having not been able to hunt together since Brandon was a teenager, the chance to win a hunting trip through W.L. Gore and Associates’ Hunt With Heroes contest was welcomed with open arms. Gore’s Hunt With Heroes contests awards military veterans hunting experiences through a partnership with Freedom Hunters, a program of the nonprofit organization American Military Families, Inc., based in Colorado. The six-day elk hunting trip was originally awarded to the Hughes in 2011 after judges were moved by John’s contest entry, describing his desire to share a hunting trip with his son, a Marine stationed aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune. Between the two of them, the Hughes shared a collective 10 tours of duty. Unfortunately, when John was notified they were selected to participate in the once-in-a-lifetime hunting trip in 2011, Brandon was deployed with 2nd Marine Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment in Afghanistan. “My dad emailed me and told me he was interested in this contest, and we won,” said Brandon. “I was in Afghanistan and I was cool with going hunting with my dad, but didn’t really think about the complexity of getting us both there at the same time. I said it was a good idea and I was game for it, but I really had no idea how difficult it would be to go on the actual hunt.” Brandon, a lance corporal at the time was

scheduled to go on the hunt with his father, and John contacted the event organizers and explained their dilemma, hoping the hunt could be rescheduled. Juggling two military careers, alternating deployment schedules and conflicting training schedules, it took more than a year before the Hughes were able to finally claim their prize. “Last spring, the company asked us again, and we knew we’d be able to make the trip in 2012,” explained Brandon. “We were fortunate to know we’d both be able to attend together like planned.” After traveling to his father’s home in Michigan in early November, Brandon and his father made the trip to Aspen, Colo., where they were fitted with full gear from the Gore company, a leading manufacturer in the Concealment Open Country pattern. With the assistance of two licensed guides from Capitol Peak Outfitters, the father– and–son duo spent six days on a backcountry hunt. “Our guides really knew what they were talking about and were great at their craft,” explained Brandon. “They were amazing. It was interesting and a nice opportunity to get to know them.” Every day of the hunt started before daylight. Brandon and John rose between 3 and 3:30 a.m., ate breakfast and prepared to leave by 5 a.m. They traveled by horseback for the first part of the morning, usually arriving to their hunting location by the time the sun was coming up. After unloading their gear and settling into camp, the Hughes and their guides spent the morning watching for any sign of elk activity. Their guides gave them pointers Courtesy photo on the best places to target Brandon Hughes (left) sits with his father, John Hughes, during their Hunt With Heroes trip in Colorado recently. Collectively, the father and son duo completed 10 tours of duty and won the one–of–a–kind SEE HUNT 9B elk hunting trip in Colorado, sponsored by W.L. Gore and Associates Hunt With Heroes contest.

Jacksonville Parks and Recreation to offer intramural sports programs in 2013 JESSIE HEATH Sports editor

The 2012 year may be drawing to a close, but the winter weather isn’t enough to stop the City of Jacksonville Recreation and Parks Athletic Division from staying active. With 2013 bearing down on them, Warren Musgrove, an athletic program assistant with the department of recreation and parks, is working to make sure 2013 is the year of the sports teams in Jacksonville. Musgrove carefully planned and coordinated the development of 10 adult sports programs within the Jacksonville community. From kickball to fast pitch softball, he worked to ensure a sport to suit every style. “My goal is to provide community involvement, and help foster a love of athletics in the kids and adults who live in town,” explained Musgrove. “We want to help keep kids and adults as physically fit as possible.” As the athletic program assistant, Musgrove strives to provide families with athletic opportunities in the community. As a Navy veteran he understands the obstacles many military families overcome every time they move. The good thing about the sports program, he believes, is the continuous opportunities it presents to participants. “I understand there is a multitude of things to do when families move to new towns,” admitted Musgrove. “We are a very diverse town because of the military, and our melting pot community is constantly filled with festivals like the Jacksonville Jamboree or other things. The leagues provided take part in those festivals on a regular basis, so families always have something to keep them moving.” The sports programs offered by the Recreation and Parks athletic division give new military families a method to begin exploring their new surroundings after a move. By getting involved in sports in the community, they are meeting other families and creating new bonds over a shared love for sports.

We’re not a really competitive league. We just want people to have fun participating in fellowship with one another. Warren Musgrove, Athletic Program Assistant

The love of the game is what drives Musgrove to push for his programs. An athlete himself, the atmosphere provided in a sports setting is easy to get swept up in. “We’re not a really competitive league,” explained Musgrove. “We just want people to have fun participating in fellowship with one another.” The laid-back atmosphere of the Jacksonville Recreation and Parks Athletic Division is open to all Onslow County residents. While there is a small fee for residents who do not live in the city limits, the playing fee for all active-duty service members and their families is waived. Most sports are open to residents as young as 16. Others require participants to be 18 or older. An over–40 softball league is open to all interested participants who meet the age requirement. Musgrove also plans to start a women’s fast pitch softball league in the spring of 2013. “We do get young women who come in and don’t want to play slow pitch after growing up with fast pitch,” said Musgrove. “If we can get the interest in it, we’ll be playing some fast pitch this year. We have to have enough pitcher’s to cover the teams, though.” The Jacksonville Recreation and Parks Athletic Division will begin their 2013 season with a co–ed kickball league in February before diving into softball, volleyball, football, basketball and futsal, an indoor version of soccer. Approximately one month before the start of each season, Musgrove will hold a meeting to discuss the upcoming season and help stabilize and finalize team plans. After the season begins, he will continue to accept new players into the league as long as space permits.

each team has enough people to play every game. While new participants may not be placed to a team immediately, most teams will find themselves with a few open spots before the season ends. “The bottom line is we’re out here and we welcome anybody who wants to come play with us,” said Musgrove. “We’re just eager to have athletes.” The Jacksonville Recreation and Parks Athletic Division also offers a full selection of youth sports for participants under the age of 16. Spyder Pylant, the Assistant Athletic Program Supervisor, helps younger athletes find their niche in the local sports community. “As you can see, we have something for everybody around,” said Musgrove. “All they need to do is know we’re here, and we want them to come.”

“If people are new to town or don’t hear about the season until after it began, all they have to do is contact me,” explained Musgrove. “Because this is a community that moves around a lot, we have situations where we lose players to deployment or permanent change of duty stations.” Interested participants who contact Musgrove after the start of the season will be asked to provide a description of their level of play and placed on a team as soon as an opening becomes available. If all teams are full at the moment, For more information visit www. ci.jacksonville.nc.us. To contact Musgrove will work with newcomers to Musgrove email wmusgrove@ place them with a team to practice with ci.jacksonville.nc.us or call 938-5268. until a space becomes available. The added practice time helps new participants get to know their fellow athletes and keeps them involved in the community. “We want to help introduce athletes Sport Start Age to teams in the area when they are new,” Kickball Feb. 25 16 said Musgrove. “If Over 40 Softball March 11 40 they call and ask us how to get on a Spring Softball March 18 16 team, we’ll work Volleyball April 25 16 with them to make Fast Pitch Softball June 17 16 sure they get the right placement as Summer Softball June 17 16 quickly as possible.” Flag Football Sept. 23 18 Musgrove will place athletes on Fall Softball Sept. 23 16 teams any time a Basketball Sept. 30 18 team has less than 14 players. He will Futsal Sept. 30 19 place as many as 20 athletes on a single roster to ensure

Intramural Sports Seasons


The Globe, Camp Lejeune, N.C.

Madison’s

Prime rib Steak Seafood

10% MiLitAry DiScount on BuFFet 2 For $20 riBeye SpeciAL

Daily Lunch & Dinner Buffet Breakfast Buffet Sat & Sun Full Menu Available

all-you-can-eat crab legS

910.741.0138

Located at Four Corners & Hwy 172 in Sneads Ferry

welcome to our customers Adult HAircuts $12.95 Kids HAircuts $7.95 MilitAry HAircuts $10.00

December 20, 2012

Save $5-$14 per round when you get our 2013 Military Golf Discount Card For $29.95 enjoy the Following best deal in golF! Weekdays at $23.00 Weekends & holidays at $28.00 Dual venue discount card.*

M A D I S O N S

*Rates include cart and green fee. Must have own clubs

910-324-5151 rock Creek or 704-882-8282 Charlotte national golf Club

Healthy Holiday Cooking

Natural Health Foods Center

Jacksonville at Freedom villaGe by wal-mart 910-577-7274 835 Piney Green rd. 910-219-1077

1249 Hargett Street Jacksonville 910.347.4721

Mon to Fri 9:30am to 6pm Sat 9am to 5pm

(910) 579-0750 (800) 352-5988

www.oceanisleinn.com

Red, white & Blue packages

From

$209

Includes two nights ocean front accommodations and a wine gift basket. We support the military! Special military rates on wedding packages

CoUntry USA

EquinE

Winter Horse Camp

Dec.26-29 9am-2pm. Ages 6 & up

Pony Rides with Santa

Dec 15 and 22 from 1pm-4pm SurpriSe your child with a week of horSe camp!

1259 McAllister Rd, Jacksonville 910-347-4511 H H H www.EquineCountryUSA.com H H H

On the 12 Days of Christmas, Celebrate what Hairtage Can Give to You... Enjoy some holiday cheer with daily promotions and discounts December 11th-24th. Please call or visit our website for details Please call to schedule your appointments 910-455-5822 2420 Henderson Dr | Jacksonville, NC www.hairtage.com

CLINTON’S BODY SHOP, INC Complete Body & Paint Work • All Work Guaranteed

Wrecker Service

coupon expires dec 31, 2012 Jacksonville at Gateway Plaza by tarGet 910-989-5957

5B

Wheel Lift/Roll Back Towing

Quick FREE Estimates Computerized Estimates Insurance Claims

Certified

®

910-353-1681

2535 Commerce Road, Jacksonville

Between Bob’s Auto Center & Comfort Suites

To AdverTise in The Business spoTlighT conTAcT BoBBy, emily or TeresA AT

(910) 347-9624


6b DECEMber 20, 2012

The Globe, Camp Lejeune, N.C.

DECEMber 20, 2012

7b


8b December 20, 2012

The Globe, Camp Lejeune, N.C.

Madison’s

Prime rib Steak Seafood

10% Military Discount on buffet 2 for $20 ribeye special

299

Pioneer AVHX1500DVD In dash DVD player

910.741.0138

Located at Four Corners & Hwy 172 in Sneads Ferry

all-you-can-eat crab legS

RO CLEANING, IN

C.

CLEANING SERvICE 910.455.6338 Your Cleaning and Steaming SpeCialiStS liCenSed • Bonded • inSured CARPET CLEANING Clean 2 Rooms & a Hall

fOR ONLy $65 Call today for an appointment.

EMPTy HOUSE SPECIAL

$95

3 Bedrooms, Living Room, Dining Room, Hallway • Regular $120 Call today for an appointment.

Absolute $

Daily lunch & Dinner buffet breakfast buffet sat & sun full Menu available

AP & M

NOW OPEN

 Professional, trained, checked technicians

 Convenient Appointments

 Powerful, truck mounted equipment

 BASE ACCESS

AUDIO TINT &

69

$

Pioneer DEH1300mp CD player

472-E Western Blvd  Jacksonville, NC 28546 (910) 577-5005 Fax: (910) 577-5006

To AdverTise in The Business spoTlighT conTAcT BoBBy, emily or TeresA AT

(910) 347-9624

VISIT US ONLINE AT WWW.CAMPLEJEUNEGLOBE.COM


DECEMBER 20, 2012

THE GLOBE, CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.

9B

Courtesy photo

John and Brandon Hughes talk as they sit on the side of a mountain during their elk hunting exhibition with Hunt With Heroes in Colorado recently. The Hughes, a father and son duo, are both veterans and have completed 10 tours of duty between them. HUNT FROM 4B and gained their trust when elk were on the horizon, in range of the group. “If we didn’t see anything by about 10:30 or 11 a.m., we usually loaded the horses back up and moved on to find another spot,” said Brandon. “We had to do a little bit of hiking in areas too steep for the horses, and the elevation was a challenge for us. You can train as much as you want, but when you’re trying to breathe at 11,000 feet in the air, thin oxygen isn’t an easy thing to grasp.” With the assistance of their guides, Brandon

and his father were led to hunting areas with plenty of time to enjoy the scenery and plenty of elk, deer, black bear and big horn sheep. “The timing everything was very nice,” admitted Brandon. “Our guides really knew what they were doing, so they made sure we got where we needed to be at the right time.” The most active point of their day was typically early in the morning or near sunset, according to Brandon, when the elk were starting to get active or settling in for the night. Despite the difficulties he and his father

experienced shooting with ballistics they were not familiar with, both father and son enjoyed the chance to take aim and fire in their new surroundings, testing their abilities. “Looking back I was a little off on my shot placement,” Brandon admitted. “but in the heat of the moment, you trust your guide more than yourself, and I was trying to listen and adjust like he told me. I wasn’t used to what I was using, but it was a great opportunity.” Having never been on an elk hunt before, the Hughes quickly learned

hunting elk in the backwoods of Colorado was a highly unique and different experience from what they were used to. “We hunted turkey, some deer, and other animals, but never elk,” explained Brandon. “The elk is an amazing creature, though. Watching them run down the mountains makes you realize what an awesome animal they are, and what a great experience you’re getting on a hunt like this, especially with my dad after not being able to hunt together for such a long time.” The Hunt with Heroes

organization, that made the Hughes’ hunting trip a possibility after two years of planning, was dedicated to ensuring the enjoyment of the two veterans. “It was an honor and privilege to provide this opportunity for two men who dedicated their lives to serving our country,” said David Dillon, the Hunting Category Leader at W.L. Gore and Associates. “Gore is committed to providing the best experience for the avid hunter–athlete, and we are proud to bring this father and son team together for a once–in–a–

lifetime experience and to provide them with gear designed to maximize their success in the field.” The Hunt with Heroes annual hunting trip contest is open to all veterans interested in sharing their story and dream of hunting in the Colorado backcountry. For more information on Hunt with Heroes visit www.gore.com. For more information on Freedom Hunters visit www.freedomhunters. org. For more information on American Military Family, Inc. visit www.amf100.org.

** The leaderboard is based on participants who have played at least 10 weeks.

*Winner determined by the percentage of correctly picked games. Must play a minimum of 10 weeks.


10B DECEMBER 20, 2012

THE GLOBE, CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.

Photo by Jessie Heath

Runners leave the starting point of the Tarawa Terrace By Golly, Be Jolly 5K aboard the Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune housing area Saturday. The end-of-year 5K culminated a year of progressively longer races into a final 5K challenge for participants.

By Golly, Be Jolly runners hit streets happy JESSIE HEATH Sports editor

While most families stay inside Saturday morning this time of year, families aboard the Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune Tarawa Terrace housing area were preparing to take to the streets. After a year of giving up their Saturdays to run, the final challenge was upon them. The Tarawa Terrace Community family fun run season was coming to a close with the longest run yet. The By Golly, Be Jolly 5K beckoned families aboard MCB Camp Lejeune to test their strength and endure the chilly winter air Saturday. “When we get a cold Saturday for a run, not as many people come out,” said Lorraine Fuller, Tarawa Terrace Community Center manager. “But those who do attend always have a great time.” The By Golly, Be Jolly 5K marked the end of a journey for many participants who took part in every Tarawa Terrace Family Fun Run in 2012. Looking back to their first run in January, a one-mile jog, participants marked their growth as runners with the 5K. “These runs are more than about fitness,” said Fuller. “It’s rewarding to develop relationships with the families who come to

the runs on a regular basis. They know us, we know them, and we’re making connections and friendships with them. It’s why we are here. “We’re creating a network of people within the base,” Fuller continued. “I think it helps develop friendships when you come to the fun runs as a family, and it certainly builds their trust in the community center. They can come in and talk to us about anything they want. I’m thankful for it.” While the By Golly, Be Jolly 5K marked the end of the 2012 fun–run year, Fuller and her dedicated crew of volunteers are already preparing for the 2013 run. The format will stay the same until further notice, as it works well for families who are starting with a 5K program. Every month, a race will be scheduled at the Tarawa Terrace Community Center. Beginning in January with a one-mile fun run, participants will run or walk progressively further with every race, finally building up their tolerance to run the end-of-year 5K. Races will begin at 9 a.m. every month except July and August, when they will begin at 8 a.m. “We’re going to have a Superhero race in June,” explained Fuller. “It will be a really exciting one. Everyone can dress up, just

like we encourage them to do now, like superheroes, and we’ll celebrate all types of heroes – batman, superman, mommy and daddy.” For families who make the Tarawa Terrace fun runs a priority, headbands and sports packs will be given as rewards after completing their fourth race. “We’re going to change from t-shirts to headbands and packs because we’re trying to keep with the times,” explained Fuller. “Everyone gets a t-shirt at every event on base, and we wanted to do something a little different that still had a functional meaning and was useful.” Fuller is also working to compliment the Grand Prix Series races in 2013. Whenever possible, Tarawa Terrace family fun runs will take place around Grand Prix series races, giving avid runners equal opportunity to enjoy both. “We really want to be complimentary to the other runs around base in order to help our patrons get the most out of the programs we offer,” said Fuller. “We’re hoping to be able to let people take advantage of as much as possible.” For more information on the Tarawa Terrace 2013 family fun run schedule visit www.mccslejeune. com/community.

Photo by Jessie Heath

Avis Geronime, a family fun run participant, jogs along the By Golly, Be Jolly 5K race route with her dog at her side. Participants ran, walked and rolled along the year-end race route with family, friends and pets Saturday.

Photo by Jessie Heath

Runners prepare to warm up for the By Golly, Be Jolly 5K at Tarawa Terrace Community Center aboard the MCB Camp Lejeune housing area Saturday.


DECEMBER 20, 2012

THE GLOBE, CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.

11B

ppy New Year! Merry Christmas & Haall our special events. Visit our holiday web page for

mccslejeune.com/holiday

BASKETBALL FROM 1B “My son is six so he should play in the younger league, but because his dad was coaching the Timberwolves, they bumped him up. He’s obsessed with sports now. He is always watching college teams on television, and constantly talking about basketball and other sports.” Getting kids involved in athletics at a young age helps them develop their motor skills, as well as encourages physical fitness and gives them ample opportunity to work with others as a team, said Huskey. “We wanted our kids to know how to work together and be part of a team,” explained Huskey. “My husband usually coaches when he can. He likes teaching kids how to work together and play as a team.” Youth sports programs like basketball also give little athletes something constructive to do with the abundance of energy they have. “Little kids are energetic,” laughed Huskey. “This gives them something to focus all their energy on so they aren’t getting into trouble. The focus is absolutely necessary. It helps them grow and mature.” For kids who are not interested in the constant running, and level of physical contact brought about by basketball or other sports, the cheer squads are available. Every youth sports basketball game is supported by a squad of enthusiastic and willing cheerleaders, who cheer for both teams participating. Natalie McClure, the blue team’s volunteer cheer coach, as well as her eight cheerleaders, never questioned her desire to cheer. “We love to cheer,” said McClure. “It’s something fun. We like energy and smiles, and we really like to be cheerleaders.” McClure, who has two of her own daughters on her cheer squad said cheerleading also enables young girls to exercise their personality. “My two girls really get a different personality when they cheer,” explained McClure. “One of them is really outgoing and talkative in school and at home. When we get here, she has a reason to be loud and talkative, and it’s all going into a certain activity instead of getting her in trouble. The other is very quiet and timid until she gets to the game, then she yells and screams the entire time. At least they’re doing it constructively.” For more information on youth sports visit www.mccslejeune.com/ youthsports/index.

New Year s, Eve Party

Mon, Dec 31 | The SNCO Club

$15 per person

Purchase tickets by Fri, Dec 21.

N Party starts at 8 p.m p . $25 | PER PERSON

$40 | PER COUPLE Call 451-2465 opt 2. Purchase tickets by Dec 21.

Celebration begins at 8 p.m. Info: 910- 450-9556

Paradise Point 2ɑFHUVȆ&OXE

Dec 31•10:30 p.m. until Jan. 1•12:30 a.m. mccslejeune.com/bowling

y t i s r vaC OACHES Photos by Jessie Heath

(Top) A member of the Blazers (right) and the Timberwolves basketball teams make their way down the court at Tarawa Terrace Youth Pavilion aboard the Marine Corps Base Camp Lejune housing area Saturday. (Above) A member of the Blazers shoots the ball during a game against the Timberwolves at the TT Youth Pavilion aboard the MCB Camp Lejeune housing area Saturday. While the eight and nine–year–old leagues do not keep score and play shortened periods, their dedication to the game is obvious on the court. (Below) Cheerleaders from the blue cheer squad keep spectators engaged in the game by cheering for both teams during the TT Youth Pavilion Timberwolvers versus Blazers basketball game Saturday aboard the MCB Camp Lejeune housing area.

NEEDED! ™ ®

PLEASE VOLUNTEER! Your support makes a difference!

INFO: 910-451-2061 .

MCCSLEJEUNE COM/SPORTS

COUNTY SPECIAL OLYMPICS ONSLOW

E G201 N U L P R A L O P 3 13 20 5, y uar Jan w Beach • Saturday, slow Onslo

201 3 Freezin’ For A Reason

Marine & Family Readiness Programs DECEMBER ––––––––––––––––––––––

FIND these Marine & Family Readiness Programs on FACEBOOK! MCFTB – Search: Marine Corps Family Team Building, Camp Lejeune

Youth Sports Standings SEASON STANDINGS AS OF DEC. 15 10-12 BASKETBALL W L Blazers Rockets Magic Suns

3 3 2 2

0 0 1 1

Warriors (AS) Lakers Knicks Celtics Hornets Pistons (AS) Hawks (AS)

1 1 1 1 1 0 0

1 1 1 2 2 3 3

Education Assistance – Search: MCC S Camp Lejeune Education Assistance EFMP – Search: MCCS Camp Lejeune Exceptional Family Member Program Camp Lejeune Libraries – Search: Camp Lejeune Libraries Resilience Education – Search: Resilience Education, Camp Lejeune

FREE

BREWSTER TEEN CENTER

NOW

OPEN

Enroll for Winter Break and Teen Open Recreation! Winter Break Dec 19-Dec 31.

CA LL FO R INF O: 91 0-4 51- 26 72 mc csl eje un e.c om /te en s

COMMUNITY COUNSELING CENTER Bldg 798, Behind Bldg 40, Brewster Blvd | 910-451-2864 Details at mccslejeune.com/counseling

mccslejeune.com


12B DeCember 20, 2012

The Globe, Camp lejeune, n.C.

Happy Holidays

0% APR finAnCing on All 2012 SilveRAdo PiCk-uP tRuCkS And otheR SeleCt modelS

2012 Chevy malibu 0% APR for 60 months for qualified buyers. Monthly payment is $16.67 for every $1000 you finance.*

2012 Chevy CAmARo 2-Door Coupe excludes ZL1 0% APR for 60 months for qualified buyers. Monthly payment is $16.67 for every $1000 you finance.*

2012 Chevy Cruze 0% APR for 48 months for qualified buyers. Monthly payment is $16.67 for every $1000 you finance.*

2012 Chevy silverado 1500, 2500, 3500 0% APR for 60 months for qualified buyers. Monthly payment is $16.67 for every $1000 you finance.* * Example down payment: 0%. Some customers will not qualify. Take delivery by 01-02-2013. Residency restrictions apply. See Dealer for details.

888-261-0128 228 S. College Rd. Wilmington

WWW.jeffgoRdonChevy.Com


WWW.CAMPLEJEUNEGLOBE.COM

InsideLejeune Lejeune Marine shares love of fishing with wounded brothers | 2C C | THE GLOBE

2nd MLG

Sergeants major swap roles | 3C THURSDAY DECEMBER 20, 2012

Photo by Lance Cpl. Joshua Grant

Brig. Gen. Thomas A. Gorry, commanding general of Marine Corps Installations East – Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, Pat McCrory, the North Carolina governor-elect, Governor Beverly Purdue, and Fernando Schiefelbein, MCI-East operations specialist visit the Beirut Memorial Dec. 14.

DSTRESS Line offers help to Marines LANCE CPL. NIK S. PHONGSISATTANAK

Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune

COURTESY STORY Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune

North Carolina Governor Beverly E. Perdue and Governor-elect Pat McCrory visited the three bases in the state attached to Marine Corps Installations East Dec. 14 to build relationships between the incoming governor and military and community leaders. “Each installation has its own specific issues and concerns,” said Commanding General of MCI East – Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune Brig. Gen. Thomas A. Gorry. “It’s important for the governors to have an appreciation for the specific military issues, and get a site visit in order to better understand the varying dynamics.” The governor and governorelect arrived by plane aboard Marine Corps Air Station New River where they were greeted by Gorry, boarded a UH-1Y Venom Huey from Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 269 and were

given a bird’s eye view of the area during a helicopter tour. From there the elected officials were treated to a luncheon with civilian and military leaders at Gorry’s quarters, followed by a tour of Camp Lejeune, the Memorial Gardens in Jacksonville and Marine Corps Air Station New River. On what might be her last visit to military installations as governor, Perdue was reflective about her term. “We’ve done a lot of things to make the quality of life different, but at the end of the day as governor and lieutenant governor this Marine force has been deployed for more than 11 years. We’ve seen the valor and giving of the communities and families, and it makes me proud to have this relationship with the military.” Their tour also highlighted key locations aboard MCB Camp Lejeune such as the Wounded Warrior Complex, the Naval Hospital, the new base entry road project, SEE VISIT 2C

Photo by Lance Cpl. Joshua Grant

Brig. Gen. Thomas A. Gorry, commanding general of Marine Corps Installations East – Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune speaks with Governor Beverly Purdue after she lands at Marine Corps Air Station New River Dec. 14. Purdue and Governor-elect Pat McCrory visited MCAS New River, MCB Camp Lejeune, and MCAS Cherry Point as part of their effort to build relationships with military leaders of installations in North Carolina.

Service members face some of life’s toughest challenges. Among these stressors they may encounter problems such as separation from family and the death of comrades. Facing these challenges alone is difficult, but Marines and sailors have resources like the DSTRESS Line they can call to speak with caring counselors and confidants. Every source of aid can be helpful and could also save a life. “The Marine Corps considers (the DSTRESS Line) part of the battle when dealing with suicide,” said Robin Schoolfield, the Resilience Education branch head with Marine Corps Community Services. “The DSTRESSLINE was developed by Headquarters Marine Corps, for Marines by Marines.” The help line is open to both military and civilian personnel. Callers have the option of speaking with a licensed technician with full knowledge of Marine culture, or they can choose to speak with veteran Marines, corpsmen, military spouses or military family members. “Everyone picking up the phone is somehow connected to the Marine Corps,” said Schoolfield. “They were either a Marine or still in the Marines, a family member or a behavioral specialist. When a Marine knows you’re speaking their language, they’re much more willing to open up.” The well-being of service members and their families is important to the commands. These helpful recourses are just one way of connecting with someone SEE DSTRESS 2C

Quick, decisive action saves Marine’s life at Camp Lejeune COURTESY STORY

2nd Marine Logistics Group

A Marine with Combat Logistics Regiment 2, 2nd Marine Logistics Group saved the life of one of his own in the pre-dawn hours, Dec. 11. Maj. Matthew D. Reis, the adjutant for CLR-2, received the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal for his exceptional situational awareness and immediate action after saving another Marine from taking his own life. Reis was in his office working around 2 a.m. for the unit’s pre-deployment exercise when he heard commotion outside. As he walked outside, he saw a fellow Marine hanging from the second floor of a nearby barracks. Reis called for assistance as he attempted to prop the Marine up. With the help of others, they lowered the Marine and Reis began to conduct CPR. A crowd of Marines also working with Reis during CLR-2’s training exercise came outside, alerted by the commotion. Col. Dwayne A. Whiteside, the CLR-2 commanding officer, was among the concerned first responders. “The Marine wasn’t breathing. I couldn’t feel anything with my hands on him, and his chest wasn’t rising,” said Whiteside, recalling Reis’s efforts to revive the service member. “The training you learn – you never know when you’re going to need it.”

The incident happened less than a week after the unit underwent “Never Leave a Marine Behind” training, which is the Marine Corps’ suicide prevention program. During the training, Marines learn the acronym R.A.C.E – Recognize the signs of distress, Ask about the signs of distress, Care about and show you care about the Marine, and Escort the Marine to help. In addition, CLR-2 recently went through combat lifesaver training for their upcoming deployment. After several minutes of resuscitative efforts, Reis successfully revived the Marine. “Without Maj. Reis’s quick thinking and unyielding determination to care for his fellow Marine, the Marine would have been a fatality,” his award citation read. After the award ceremony, Reis talked to the CLR-2 Marines emphasizing the importance of never leaving a Marine behind. “We have a nation that’s counting on us,” he said after the ceremony. “We’re Marines, and we must be ready to answer the call. If you’re hurting, you must reach out and get help.” As CLR-2 prepares for deployment and the holiday season nears, stress is more common than normal. Reis encouraged the Marines to remain vigilant. “You’ve got a purpose in life, and you have to fulfill it,” said Reis. “Now he’s got a second chance.”

Photo by Sgt. Rachael Moore

Maj. Matthew D. Reis, the adjutant of Combat Logistics Regiment 2, 2nd Marine Logistics Group, listens during a ceremony aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune Dec. 11, as the commanding officer talks about the disturbance Reis responded to early in the morning. Reis received the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal for his actions. Editor’s Note: This story is a story about one Marine helping another. If you or someone you know is contemplating hurting themselves, there are resources available to help.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1 800-273-TALK (8255), DStress Hotline: 1 877-476-7734, Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune Chaplain: 451-3210.


2C DECEMBER 20, 2012

THE GLOBE, CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.

Photo by Cpl. Paul Peterson

Cpl. Joshua T. Shakeshaft, a combat engineer and head instructor for improvised explosive device awareness at the Battle Skills Training School aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C., accepts the 2012 Veteran of the Year award from Mayor Sammy Phillips (right) of Jacksonville, N.C., during a ceremony held Nov. 20. The ceremony recognized 30 veterans from around the area for outstanding service to the community.

Marine shares love of fishing with wounded brothers CPL. PAUL PETERSON 2nd Marine Logistics Group

They called his name, and the rest was just a blur. Cpl. Joshua T. Shakeshaft, a combat engineer and head instructor for improvised explosive device awareness at the Battle Skills Training School here, walked to the head of the council chambers at City Hall in Jacksonville, N.C., to accept the 2012 Veteran of the Year award Nov. 20. Jacksonville is proud of its unique bond with local veterans, said Mayor Sammy Phillips, who personally handed the award to Shakeshaft. Every year since 1988, the city takes a moment to recognize

veterans from each of the city’s veteran organizations for demonstrating outstanding volunteerism, support and leadership. More than 100 people filled the council chambers as Phillips thanked each of the 30 recipients for their continued service to the local community and the nation. “I was perfectly happy with a pat on the back,” said Shakeshaft, who accepted the award as the nominee for Heroes on the Water, an organization that provides wounded and disabled veterans with an outlet for stress though kayak fishing. “The last thing I ever expected was to get an award from the mayor.” Shakeshaft, a veteran of

Operation Enduring Freedom, first became active with the organization after returning to the states to be with his mother, who was dying of cancer. He instantly found an outlet for his own combat stress and personal loss through an activity he loved from his time back home: fishing. “He was hooked the very first time he went out with us, and he has gone out ever since,” said Patrick Curley, one of Shakeshaft’s personal mentors and the Chrystal Coast Chapter coordinator for Heroes on the Water. “He found something he enjoys doing and now he is sharing it with other people.” Shakeshaft saw his par-

ticipation as a personal means of healing and a way to help his fellow veterans struggling with visible and unseen wounds. It increasingly consumed his free time. “No one here knew I was taking veterans out fishing every weekend,” said Shakeshaft. “I don’t expect recognition for it. I’m doing it for me. I’m doing it for my gratification – helping people helps me. I got it from my mom.” He continued to share his expertise with IEDs as an instructor at BSTS during his working hours, but his weekends belonged to the waterways of North Carolina. “It changed my life,” Shakeshaft said. “It is like

the brotherhood you see when you are in combat … (Whether) it is a double amputee or someone who has post traumatic stress disorder, everybody can relate with each other.” Shakeshaft said his wife, Traci, is his biggest supporter. Fishing and volunteering cut into the couple’s small amount of free time, but she understands its importance and even tells him to go out. He takes particular joy in seeing what he calls a “hero’s moment,” when a wounded warrior finds a few minutes of peaceful sleep in a kayak while his feet dangle in the water. His contributions to the community quickly grew after his first volunteering

experience with the group. Shakeshaft regularly brought new participants to events and became increasingly involved in other volunteer opportunities. Whether it is mentoring local youth, participating in veteran meetings and parades, or simply providing an open ear to a fellow servicemember, he said the gratification of doing something good helps him heal. Shakeshaft even started planning additional outreach programs. He hopes someday to return to his hometown in Colorado, where he can help veteran communities find some of the peace he experiences nearly every weekend in North Carolina.

Corpsmen learn Logistician receives Career Service to save lives Award after 40 years of service LANCE CPL. MEL JOHNSON 2nd Marine Division

Cries for help echoed through the warehouse as the corpsmen moved from one casualty to the next as quickly as they could. “Hurry up doc, you got people dying over here,” shouted an instructor as the corpsman frantically gathered his supplies and moved to help the next casualty. After a quick assessment of the simulated casualty, the corpsman rushed to treat the other patients. Despite the thick layer of fog, ambient noise of gunfire, helicopters and victims, the corpsmen successfully completed the final part of their Tactical Combat Casualty Care Course. The course taught corpsmen the combat first aid needed when tending to wounded Marines in a deployed environment. “TCCC is designed to sharpen and further advance the skills of junior corpsmen who were not yet in a combat situation,” said Petty Officer 3rd Class Christopher R. Trimmer, a TCCC instructor with 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division. During this week-long course, sailors with various companies from 2nd Medical Battalion, 2nd Marine Division learned how to keep casualties alive while waiting for transport to medical care. “We start with four days of didactic (classroom instruction) and practical application,” said Trimmer. “Then we end the class with a training scenario, which includes a mass casualty extraction.” All corpsmen learn basic skills in field med, but TCCC goes more in depth, said Trimmer. “We try to create the best stress environment for the corpsmen by focusing on the casualty side of it and making it as real as possible,” said Trimmer. “It’s really a class taught for corpsmen by corpsmen.” Students in the class said taking TCCC allowed them to further expand their knowledge of field medicine. “The training is a great opportunity for us to increase our skills, both as new and experienced corpsmen,” said Petty Officer 3rd Class David Smith, a corpsmen with 2nd SEE CORPSMEN 3C VISIT FROM 1C and the numerous, newly-finished and current construction projects featuring LEED Platinum certifications for energy efficiency. Midway through the visit, McCrory offered some thoughts on his future tenure as governor of the most military friendly state in the nation. “This tour strengthens my resolve to make sure we keep and expand the strong military presence here in N.C.,” he said. “We have the resources, and it’s been extremely good for our economy and it’s important for national security. I have the responsibility to continue to work with Washington especially during these difficult times to ensure the investment remains in N.C.” “Everything we do within Marine Corps Installations East affects the state of North Carolina,” said Gorry. “Environmental and energy issues, natural resources, conservation, water and land management, economic impact, transition assistance for our veterans, and quality of life for our military families – everything has to be done in a

Photo by Lance Cpl. Joshua Grant

Johnnie Orris (center), a program of instruction manager with the Logistics Operations School, poses for a picture with Lt. Col. Paul Bertholf (left), the commanding officer of Marine Corps Combat Service Support Schools, and Lt. Col. Mike Monroe, the commanding officer of LOS, after receiving his Career Service Award aboard Camp Johnson Dec. 4. Orris served 30 years on active duty in the Marine Corps and currently works as a civilian to develop logistics Marines during their military occupational specialty training.

transparent manner and in corporation with the state. It’s with great satisfaction we have such a bond between the military and civilian community here, as well as with the state legislature.” Once the ground tours aboard MCB Camp Lejeune and Marine Corps Air Station New River were complete, the gubernatorial party traveled to Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point and were scheduled to meet with Col. Philip J. Zimmerman, the commanding officer for the air station in Havelock, N.C., and tour Marine Transport Squadron 1, Fleet Readiness Center East, and the Future Joint Strike Fighter Facility before concluding their visit. “As we move forward during this time of budget constraints,” Gorry added, “it’s even more important to firmly understand all of the issues, all of the options, and have very open communication between the civilian community and the base so we can make the best decisions for our Marines, sailors and their families.”

DSTRESS FROM 1C who cares about the safety of military members. “(The support line) helps establish an initial trust based on a common understanding of the culture,” said Schoolfield. “(The program) allows the Marines to get accustomed to asking for help. It’s not just a crisis line; (callers) can talk about things in their life they’re unsure about to seek guidance on where to go.” Service members who fall have help getting up from supporting resources. Organizations such as DSTRESS act as an extended family to Marines. They also work to secure the mission readiness of the Marine Corps. The DSTRESS line is a 24/7, anonymous and confidential counseling service. To locate local resources or to chat live with a help assistant visit www.dstressline.com or call 877476-7734.


THE GLOBE, CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.

DECEMBER 20, 2012

3C

Photo by Sgt. Rachael Moore

Sgts. Maj. Lanette N. Wright (foreground) and Anthony L. Crutcher salute the colors during the national anthem during an appointment and relief ceremony aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune Dec. 11. Crutcher, the outgoing sergeant major, passed responsibilities to Wright, who will deploy with Combat Logistics Regiment 2, 2nd Marine Logistics Group at the beginning of 2013.

Sergeants major swap roles within 2nd MLG PFC. SULLIVAN LARAMIE

2nd Marine Logistics Group

Two sergeants major with 2nd Marine Logistics Group assumed responsibility for new commands aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune Dec. 11. Sgt. Maj. Anthony L. Crutcher, the outgoing sergeant major of Combat Logistics Regiment 2, 2nd MLG, turned over the Sword of Office to Sgt. Maj. Lanette N. Wright, the incoming

sergeant major. Wright came to CLR-2 from CLR-27 and Crutcher will move to the command. Although both Marines are staying within 2nd MLG, their knowledge and experience will be helpful to their new units and the service members under their charge. After the Sword of Office was passed, Col. Dwayne A. Whiteside, the commanding officer of CLR-2, spoke about the trust

Marines place in their sergeants major. “(Sergeants major) constantly sharpen our swords,� said Whiteside. “They’re constantly there, they’re faithful and dependable. They give you the good guidance you need in order to do the job the Marine Corps has entrusted in us.� Crutcher said he developed a fondness of the service members of CLR-2 during his time with the regiment.

“It was an honor being your sergeant major here and in Afghanistan,� Crutcher said. “I know most of you hated me coming, but I was doing my job. My job was very simple; it is to maintain good order and discipline.� Wright expressed her affection for CLR-27. However, she said she is excited for her future as sergeant major of CLR-2, marking it as a highlight of her career. “I’ve heard great things about this command,� Wright added.

“I know the Marines are well trained, and we have a lot of veterans here who already went to Afghanistan and looking forward to going back.� Whiteside concluded his speech with a message about leadership. “There are a lot of changes, a lot of things evolving; we need the steady, level leadership,� Whiteside said. “It’s not the rank behind the man or the woman. It’s the man or woman behind the rank.�

Marines strive for environmental excellence 2nd Marine Logistics Group

Service members with 2nd Marine Logistics Group kicked off a go-green movement by placing recycling bins around their buildings here in November, but they didn’t stop there. Approximately 50 Marines attended environmental awareness briefs with base specialists. The briefs were for Marines who already had some environmental training, explained Gunnery Sgt. Ethan J. Mahoney, the environmental compliance coordinator with the unit. “The brief was based on why we do what we do, not how.� Charity M. Rychak, an environmental restoration manager on base, explained some consequences of not properly disposing of waste such as expended ammunition and empty bleach bottles. Explosive hazards on base ranges and water contamination are possible health risks. “You might think you can get away with throwing batteries away or dumping chemicals,� Rychak said. “Sometimes all it takes is one drop (of a chemical) to contaminate an area.� In addition, wildlife is directly affected by dumping trash on the ground. Craig E. Ten Brink, the threatened and endangered species program manager for Camp Lejeune, taught the Marines about wildlife safety awareness.

“A lot of these military installations date back at least to the 1940s, if not earlier, and have a relatively low impact on the land,� said Ten Brink. “As a result, military installations have more endangered species per acre than the National Park Service or Forest Service.� Populations of endangered species are high on Camp Lejeune because Marines take care of the environment and military bases do not expand much, added Ten Brink. The speakers also discussed what to do if Marines find hazardous materials. “It’s really important to properly dispose of things and properly document them,� Rychak said. She instructed the Marines to contact the proper base authorities such as (explosive ordnance disposal technicians) or a hazardous materials team if they encounter dangerous waste they cannot go near themselves. The unit started its green movement with the different colored bins to help coordinate what items should be recycled together, but service members have to be vigilant. Bottles and cans cannot be recycled with cardboard, and mixed materials have to be thrown away. “I’d like this to get around the base,� said Mahoney, “We want everyone to do their part and help the environment.� Marines can be environmentalists, too, added Mahoney. If Camp Lejeune gets healthier, the Marines are doing their jobs.

OFF-LIMITS ESTABLISHMENTS The following businesses are designated by the base commander as “off-limits�

Bell Auto Salvage II at 136 Abbits Branch Rd., Hubert, N.C. Dash-In at 1316 Hargett Street, Jacksonville, N.C. D’s Drive Thru at 226 Wilmington Highway, Jacksonville, N.C. D’s Quick Mart at 2840 Highway 258 West, Richlands, N.C. Discount Tobacco at 331 G&H Western Boulevard, Jacksonville, N.C. Express Way at 1261 Gum Branch Road, Jacksonville, N.C. King’s Drive Thru at 1796 Gum Branch Road, Jacksonville, N.C. Laird’s Auto and Truck Repair (U-Haul Rental) at 1197 Piney Green Rd., Jacksonville, N.C. Moe’s Mart at 2105 Belgrade Swansboro Road, Maysville, N.C. New York Tobacco Center (A.K.A. Tobacco for Less) at 439

Western Boulevard, Jacksonville, N.C. One Stop Shop at 501 Corbin Street, Jacksonville, N.C. Smart Buy Jacksonville, N.C. Smitty’s R&R at 3742 Highway 17, SC (South of Myrtle Beach, SC) Tobacco at 521 Yopp Road, Unit 106, Jacksonville, N.C. Tobacco Club at 487-B Western Boulevard, Jacksonville, N.C. Tobacco House Cigarette Center at 1213-C Country Club Rd., Jacksonville, N.C. Tobacco Leaf at 215 Western Boulevard, Jacksonville, N.C. Veterans Affairs Service Jacksonville, N.C. (This is a private organization not affiliated with the Department of Veterans Affairs or the VA Outpatient Clinic.)

Photo by Pfc. Sullivan Laramie

Craig E. Ten Brink, the base threatened and endangered species program manager, talks to Marines with 2nd Marine Logistics Group about preservation of endangered plant and animal species aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune Dec. 5. CORPSMEN FROM 2C Medical Battalion, 2nd Marine Division. The course is designed to teach corpsmen to respond quickly, accurately and diagnose the casualty, he added. “The course taught us the guidelines of combat care but also provided the skills to think independently when treating a casualty,� said Smith. Though the division-level TCCC course aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune is still relatively new compared to those at Camp Pendleton and on Okinawa, Japan the instructors work hard to ensure the sailors fully understand the importance of the course. “This is what being a corpsman is all about, not just giving shots and taking temperatures,� said Smith. “This is what really matters because it’s going to save lives.�

MCIEAST

Ä‘ĆŤ.!-1!*0ĆŤ1.%*0%+* Ä‘ĆŤ.+3/%*!//ĆŤ+.ĆŤ(!0$.#5 Ä‘ĆŤ *.!/! ĆŤ,,!0%0!

TECOM Naval Hospital MARSOC

Hotline - (703) 432-1650 tecom.ighotline@usmc.mil Hotlines - (910) 450-4154/4155 med.navy.mil/sites/nhcl/Pages/feedback.aspx Hotlines - (910) 440-1045/0941 marines.mil/unit/marsoc/Pages/ig/Inspector-General.aspx

Ä‘ĆŤ1 !*ĆŤ3!%#$0ĆŤ(+// Ä‘ĆŤĆŤ1 !*ĆŤ2%/%+*ĆŤ$*#!/ Ä‘ĆŤ1#.ĆŤ%*ĆŤ0$!ĆŤ1.%*! Ä‘ĆŤ.1%05ĆŤ+ +.ĆŤ+*ĆŤ0$!ĆŤ.!0$ Ä‘ĆŤ!25ĆŤ+.ĆŤ(+.! ĆŤ.!0$%*#

Hotline - (910) 451-5555 marines.mil/unit/iimef/Pages/Contact-Us/default.aspx Hotline - (910) 451-3928 lejeune.usmc.mil/ig/

Warning signs of T1D may occur suddenly and include: Ä‘ĆŤ40.!)!ĆŤ0$%./0

Hotline numbers to report fraud, waste, abuse and corruption II MEF

Warning Signs

Fight childhood cancer and other deadly diseases with St. Jude.

Š2012 ALSAC/St. Jude Children's Research Hospital (11415)

PFC. SULLIVAN LARAMIE

Ä‘ĆŤ01,+.ĆŤ+.ĆŤ1*+*/%+1/*!//

St. Jude patient, Denise, with her father Chief Petty OfďŹ cer, Travis Hale

tTUKVEFPSH

JDRF.org 1-800-533-CURE

Provided as a public service.

A CFC participant. Provided as a public service.


oCTober20, 25,2012 2012 4C 4CDecember

The Globe, Globe, Camp lejeune, Lejeune, n.C. N.C. The

Trader Ads are FREE for active duty military, retirees, and their family members. Advertising deadline is Friday, 11:00AM. One week prior to publication.

Classifieds To place your ad in the classifieds, go to www.camplejeuneglobe.com and click on place classifieds

H reasure

Real Estate for Rent

Business & Services

Real Estate for Rent

H

Real Estate for Rent

H

Real Estate for Rent

H

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz Other 1, 2, 3 or 4 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz CARPENTER WANTS WORK! I can abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz BR’s available ABCDEFGHIJHHMNHHHHHHHHHHHH ABCDEFGHIJHHMNHHHHHHHHHHHH ABCDEFGHIJHHMNHHHHHHHHHHHH build you a house from ground up orABCDEFGHIJHHMNHHHHHHHHHHHH abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz build you a shed, deck, garage,abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz addiabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz tions, remodeling, fencing, siding, RENTAL PROPERTIES, INC. BUILDERS REAL ESTATE VACATION RENTALS 1-800-762-3961 or concrete work. No job too big or abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz HOMES FOR RENT small! Estimates, senior discounts, abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxy abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxy abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxy z z z z Local 327-4444 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxy www.bluewaterglobe.com Property BR/BA Rent and references, 25 Years ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ Experience. ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ www.TreasureRealty.com 1933 Countrywood 1/1ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ $495 8 6 6 9 3 5 4 1 2 9 Contact Tracy @ TLC Carpentry. (910) 107 Easy St. 1/1 $495 340-0117 Swansboro loNG Term reNTals 257 Cordell Village - upgr.1/1 $550 1 BR 134 #2 Morningside Dr. 2/1 $495 4 Bermuda Landing $600 Real Estate for Rent 104D Ravenwood 2/1 $450 3BR/2BA. Furnished, town home, ---------------------------B-5 Village Terrace 2/1 $595 located on Topsail, community pool, Jacksonville abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 46-C Sophia 2/1 $595 3 BR ** FREE TIMESHARE**Westgate Vilcommunity fishing dock, garage. Pets ABCDEFGHIJHHMNHHHHHHHHHHHH $700 231-A Lakewood Dr. 2/1 $600 la’s Town center, Kissimmee FL go to Negotiable. Available Now. $1095 mo ---------------------------abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz ----------------------------------www.wgtowncenter to view. Contact 586 Haw’s Run #36 2/2 $650 Emerald Isle 6903 12th Ave abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz Steve: (910) 265-7154 or 586 Haw’s Run #15 2/2 $695 1 BR 1BR/1BA. Unfurnished studio style abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz sgriffin13@ec.rr.com 213 Cordell Village 2/1 $625 $895 Sun deck and small fenced in abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyhome. z 212 Cordell Village 2/1.5 $675 ---------------------------area for small pet. Has out door shower, ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ Cedar Point Villa 1801 Countrywood 2/2 $695 2 BR multiple storage areas, and washer 119 Windsor Ct. 2/2 $625 $900 and dryer included. Very unique! Pets 117 Charlton Rd. 2/2 $750 ---------------------------Negotiable. Available Now $895 mo 209 Faison Ln. 2/2 $850 Jacksonville ----------------------------------205 Faison Ln. 2/2 $850 3 BR 102 E. Seabird Ct. 405 Winner’s Circle 2/2.5 $825 $950 3BR/2.5BA. Unfurnished, single family ---------------------------2380 Dawson Cabin Rd. 3/1 $695 home, located in Sneads Ferry, minutes Hubert 528 Henderson Dr. 3/1 $825 from back gate and beach. Large bonus 3 BR 11 Crown Point Rd. 3/1.5 $825 $950 room. Garage with storage shelving and a 306 Leonard St. 3/2 $625 ---------------------------back yard sun deck. Lawn care included. 1643 Blue Creek Rd. 3/2 $695 1 & 2 BEDROOM APARTMENTS 1 BR Beaufort No Pets. Available Now. $1350 mo 002 Collins Dr. 3/2 $775 3 BR starting at $489 2BR starting at ----------------------------------$1000 103 Mars Dr. 3/2 $825 $540! Includes water, sewer, trash 407 B Villa Capriani pickup, & lawn maintenance. For more 1035 Massey Rd. 3/2 $850 2BR/2BA. Furnished ocean front condo, Offering furnished and $119,900 READY NOW! Move in for info 866-590-2232. 118 Ervin Ct. 3/2 $975 unfurnished Condos, Duplexes, community pool and tennis courts. as little as $99. Brand new 3 bedand Houses throughout Carteret and 106 Meadowview Ct. 3/2 $925 Water, sewer, trash, basic cable and local room single family home with two car Onslow County. Pet Friendly 212 RIVERSIDE DR 3 Bedroom, 1.5 2297 Catherine Lake 3/2 $950 phone included. No Pets. Available Now. garage. Located in Richlands area. properties available. bath home with sunroom, large family 603 Oakwood Ave 3/2 $950 $1195 mo Seller will consider “buyer possesroom, storage building, washer, dryer, ----------------------------------105 Appleton Ln. 3/2 $975 sion” before closing (certain condidishwasher. Convenient to MARSOC & 105 Volusia 119 Poplar Ridge Rd. 3/2 $1100 Close to Sneads Ferry Gate 2 bed- tions apply). $2,398.00 offered toCourthouse Bay. No pets. $900 per 3BR/2.5 Unfurnished, duplex located room apartment. Water, trash & lawn ward buyer’s closing cost on this new 112 Ramona Ave. 3/2.5 $1100 month. Realty World-Ennett & Associin North Topsail. Multiple decks, views maintenance included. Storage area. home! Call Jody Davis @ CHOICE Jack235 Bishop Dr. 3/2 $1100 ates (910) 327-3600. of the Ocean and Intracoastal. Outdoor no pets. $625 per month. Realty sonville Realty today for details. (910) 402 Cornhusk Ct. 4/2 $1100 World-Ennett & Associates (910) 265-0771 www.soldbysamnjody.com shower. Covered Parking. No Pets. 910-347-4049 327-3600 Available January 1st. $1395 mo Email: aba@abarents.com $129,000 BRAND NEW single family Website: www.abarents.com www.TreasurerealTy.com COMFORT COUNTRY HOMES- Nice home with fenced yard and two car clean, modern, mobile homes. garage. READY NOW! Seller will con2BR/1BA TOWNHOUSE Half off 1st 3BR/2BA MOBILE HOME 14x70 very Garbage, water and lawn service sider “buyer possession” before closmonth. Close to MCAS & Lejeune. clean, with washer/dryer near MCAS. included. 910-455-8246. ing (certain conditions apply). Home Amenities dishwasher, washer and Lawn care, garbage pickup, water in7501 Emerald Drive includes side by side refrigerator, dryer, free lawn service, & trash. No cluded. $550/month. $550.00 deN. TOPSAIL BEACH Ft Condo furn, smooth top range/oven, microwave Emerald Isle, NC 28594 pets, $750 + dep. 910-389-5230 posit. No pets. Call 910-346-3320. 1bd-1bth. Avail now thru Apr $725 per hood, dishwasher, vaulted ceiling, mo, util incl except elect. Free WiFi, 1 spacious master bedroom with large 3BR/1.5BA HOME for rent. Close 4BR/2BA 1 CAR GARAGE in Hubert. mo sec. 434-610-7789 walk-in-closet, installed mini blinds in Live At The Beach! proximity to MCAS and Mainside. $1000 a month w/security deposit. all bedrooms and much more. Beautiful, large, fenced back yard. utilities not included pet friendly no ROOM FOR RENT 910-330-2900 in$2,598.00 is offered toward buyer Pets are welcome. $950/month. smoking. 304-927-0616 Erika cludes utilities, NO animals, share closing cost assistance by seller. Sell8813 Krystal Court Villas, Emerald Isle 910-333-0367 bathroom w/ guests & full access. er also request only a $99.00 Earnest 3BR, 2 ½ BA - $900 per month Stable job, non smoker, and open Money Deposit! Home is over 1200 minded. Run criminal record. $450. heated square feet and located in 303 Cape Fear Loop, Emerald Isle month $250. deposit. Cash. Richlands area just minutes from 4 BR, 3 BA - $1,300 per month downtown Richlands local airport. Call SWANSBORO MOBILE LOT FOR Jody Davis at CHOICE Realty to view 138 Fawn Drive West, Emerald Isle RENT for 2BD/2BA 2009 or newer this home today! (910) 265-0771 3BR, 2 BA - $950 per month home. Private lot. Yard care and boat www.soldbysamnjody.com access included! Month-to-month To view homes 116 Periwinkle Drive East, Emerald Isle $175. Call Bobby at (910) 326-3099. online visit:

TR•E•A•L•T•Y

HUBERT MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT! NEW 16'x80' w/Central Heat & Air

H

Choose From 3 Bedroom 2 Bath 2 Bedroom 2 Bath 2 Bedroom 1 Bath Minutes from the back gate & the beach!

ROYAL VALLEY MOBILE HOME PARK 221 Riggs Road, Hubert

910.353.9327

866-616-3347 Available Now!

3 BR, 2BA - $1,425 per month

ATTN: OWNERS Need help renting your property? Give us a call to find out about our annual rental program!

www.EIHousing.com

Over 100 Rental Homes in all Price Ranges.

MOBILE HOMES & LOTS FOR RENT

www.criproperties.com

Water, Garbage & Lawn Care Included.

829-A Gum Branch Rd. Jacksonville, NC 28540 Office: 910-455-2860 Toll Free: 888-819-7653 Fax: 910-455-0557

Prices Subject To Change Without Notice

Triangle Mobile Home Park

910-455-4923

WATERFRONT 2 Bedroom apartment overlooking Courthouse Bay at 185 Riverside Dr. Lawn maintenance provided. $750 per month. Call Realty World Ennett & Associates (910) 327-360 www.CampLejeuneGlobe.com

Happy Holidays from all of us at


The Globe, Camp lejeune, n.C.

New Construction

I

$134,900 NEW HOME with over 1,350 heated square feet. Move in before closing (certain conditions apply)! Spacious kitchen, dining, and great room areas, laundry room off kitchen area, kitchen pantry closet, vaulted ceiling, dual vanity in master bathroom, installed mini blinds in all bedrooms, automatic garage door opener with remotes, sodded front yard, fenced back yard. PLENTY of home at a very reasonable price. Home also includes 10 year limited bonded builder’s warranty. Seller is offering $2,698.00 toward buyer closing cost assistance and only request a low $99.00 Earnest Money Deposit. Located just minutes from downtown Richlands and local airport this neighborhood also has an outside play area! Call Jody Davis (910) 265-0771 @ CHOICE Jacksonville Realty to view this home today. www.soldbysamnjody.com

The holidays are just around the corner...

New Construction

I

New Construction

I

$175,000 NEW TWO STORY HOME with 1.9 acres. Located within just 11 miles to The Camp LeJeune Piney Green Gate. Features include stone front accents, architectural shingles, sodded front yard, 3 bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms, bonus room, spacious kitchen, dining area with bay windows, large living area with laminate wood entry way, master suite with trey ceiling, separate shower and soaking tub in master bath along with dual vanity and walk-in closet with plenty of space. Seller offers $5,000 toward buyer closing cost or “use as you choose” as allowed by lender. Estimated Completion of this new home is middle of January. Please call Jody @ CHOICE Realty (910)265-0771 www.soldbysamnjody.com

Sept 2013. With over 1,200 square feet this home features a spacious great room and dining area with sliding glass doors. Kitchen is equipped with microwave hood, electric range/oven, refrigerator and dishwasher, plus a small eat in area perfect to two to dine in. All bedrooms have ceiling fans. Generous sized master suite has sliding glass doors that lead out onto a small patio and a large walk-in closet. Within walking distance to area Walmart, shops, schools and restaurants. Call Jody Davis @ CHOICE Jacksonville Realty (910) 265-0771 for more details. www.soldbysamnjody.com

$111,200 GREAT RENTAL OPPORTUNITY! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, 1 Car Garage Single Family Home within Foxhorn Village. This home is currently listed for $825.00 per month through

108 EASTVIEW CT $129,900 3br/2ba 10 minutes from main gate. Fenced in back yard with 16 by 20 ft covered deck. TRANE heating/cooling system Call Joe 910-358-0605

Real Estate for Sale

B

Real Estate for Sale

deCember 20, 2012

5C

B

NEW KITCHEN, Custom Deck, 3BR/2BA Rancher lg wooded lot conv located off Gum Branch $148,000 Call Lisa Hamner, ChoiceRlty 910-467-6530 1660 CHADWICK SHORES 3 Bedroom (possible 4th), 3 bath home with garage, fireplace, screened porch, fenced back yard on nice corner lot in gated community. Access to community boat ramp included. Call Realty World-Ennett & Associates (910) 327-3600 www.CampLejeuneGlobe.com

Give Santa a hand this ChriStmaS... Bring home a Terrain Acadia Yukon Sierra

uP to $10,000 off!

the ProfeSSional Grade With a Beat or at leaSt meet PriCe PoliCy ...always remember to drive safely and wear a seatbelt.

aGainSt any BuyinG ServiCe - in toWn or out of toWn!

r e 400 Certified Pre Owned V O nO risk Buying rates @ 3.9%

acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra 1500  Sierra 2500 Hd  yukon  yukon XL  encLave  LacroSSe  regaL  acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra 1500  Sierra 2500 Hd  yukon  yukon XL  encLave  LacroSSe  regaL  acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra 1500  Sierra 2500 Hd  yukon  yukon XL  encLave  LacroSSe  regaL  acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra 1500  Sierra 2500 Hd  yukon  yukon XL  encLave  LacroSSe croSSe  regaL  acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra 1500  Sierra 2500 Hd  yukon  yukon XL  encLave  LacroSSe  regaL  acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra 1500  Sierra 2500 Hd  yukon  yukon XL  encLave  LacroSSe  regaL  acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra 1500  Sierra 2500 Hd  yukon  yukon XL  encLave  LacroSSe  regaL  acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra 1500  Sierra 2500 Hd  yukon  yukon XL  encLave  LacroSSe  regaL  acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra 1500  Sierra 2500 Hd  yukon  yukon XL  encLave  LacroSSe  regaL  acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra 1500  Sierra 2500 Hd  yukon  yukon XL  encLave  LacroSSe  regaL  acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra 1500  Sierra 2500 Hd  yukon  yukon XL  encLave  LacroSSe croSSe  regaL  acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra 1500  Sierra 2500 Hd  yukon  yukon XL  encLave  LacroSSe  regaL  acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra 1500  Sierra 2500 Hd  yukon  yukon XL  encLave  LacroSSe  regaL  acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra 1500  Sierra 2500 Hd  yukon  yukon XL  encLave  LacroSSe  regaL  acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra 1500  Sierra 2500 Hd  yukon  yukon XL  encLave  LacroSSe  regaL  acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra 1500  Sierra 2500 Hd  yukon  yukon XL  encLave  LacroSSe croSSe  regaL  acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra 1500  Sierra 2500 Hd  yukon  yukon yukon XL  encLave  LacroSSe  regaL  acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra 1500  Sierra 2500 Hd  yukon  yukon XL  encLave  LacroSSe croSSe  regaL  acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra 1500  Sierra 2500 Hd  yukon  yukon XL  encLave  LacroSSe  regaL  acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra 1500  Sierra 2500 Hd  yukon  yukon XL  encLave  LacroSSe croSSe  regaL  acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra 1500  Sierra 2500 Hd  yukon  yukon XL  encLave  LacroSSe  regaL  acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra 1500  Sierra 2500 Hd  yukon  yukon XL  encLave  LacroSSe  regaL  acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra 1500  Sierra 2500 Hd  yukon  yukon XL  encLave  LacroSSe LacroSSe  regaL  acadia  terrain  canyon  Sierra

t a y r o t n e v n i e r i t n m e r o u c o . C w Vie ysGM

o b e r o m o o c m . . k w c i u ww b e r o o m . www

a t n a S oved r p Ap

(800) SHOP-GMC 910-455-1414  Hwy 17 - 1 Mile North of Walmart


SANTA SALE

6c DECEMber 20, 2012 $

The Globe, Camp Lejeune, N.C. b

ZERO DOWN! 100% CREDIT APPROVAL IS OUR GOAL! VOLKSWAGEN JETTA S

$

VEHICLES AS LOW AS $

159

48 Mo Lease, $1999 down, ZERO Security Deposit, 1st payment, +tax, title and tag WAC, 12Kmiles per year

VOLKSWAGEN GOLF S

4,995 $199 *

PAYMENTS AS LOW AS

$

99

*

PER MO

199

NATIONAL AUTOMOTIVE

$

$

189

36 Mo Lease, $2810 down, ZERO Security Deposit, 1st payment, +tax, title and tag WAC Residual $13354. 10Kmiles per year

2013 DODGE DART SXT

$

48 Mo Lease, ZERO down, ZERO Security Deposit, 1st payment, +tax, title and tag WAC, 10Kmiles per year

CREDIT GOT YOU SUBARU STUCK WITH AN FORESTER X UGLY CAR? Our Finance Team Can Get You The Loan For the Car You Really Want!

2013 CHRYSLER 200 LIMITED

48 Mo Lease, $1999 down, ZERO Security Deposit, 1st payment, +tax, title and tag WAC, 10Kmiles per year

SUBARU LEGACY 2.5

$

500

$

NATIONAL KNOWS WHAT YOU WANT FOR CHRISTMAS...

232

48 Mo Lease, ZERO down, ZERO Security Deposit, 1st payment, +tax, title and tag WAC, 10Kmiles per year

199

36 Mo Lease, $2800 down, ZERO Security Deposit, 1st payment, +tax, title and tag WAC Residual $10940. 10Kmiles per year

2013 DODGE DURANGO SXT

$

299

36 Mo Lease, $2700 down, ZERO Security Deposit, 1st payment, +tax, title and tag WAC Residual $15595. 10Kmiles per year

SUPERSTORE

VOLKSWAGEN SUBARU

2324 North Marine Blvd Jacksonville, NC 28546

2406 North Marine Blvd Jacksonville, NC 28546

2223 North Marine Blvd Jacksonville, NC 28546

910-346-5075

866-730-2897

888-335-3079

SuperStoreCars.com

NationalVW.com

NationalDodge.net

*offers not in conjunction. Financing on approved credit, see dealer for details. Payments do not include tax, title and license.

DECEMber 20, 2012

Christmas Cash with Every Purchase!

DOORBUSTER DEALS EVERY DAY THROUGH NEW YEARS!

FREE PHOTOS WITH SANTA

SATURDAY 12/22 FROM 10:30AM TO 1:30PM VOLKSWAGEN SUBARU

7c


8C DECEMBER 20, 2012 Real Estate for Sale

B

The Globe, Camp Lejeune, N.C.

Miscellaneous

s

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 2100 SQFT MODULAR HOME 4.6 ABCDEFGHIJHHMNHHHHHHHHHHHH acres. 4BR/3BA $185,000. Located bcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz about 1.5 miles from Jacksonville airbcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz port. Call David at (910)-546-7611. abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz bigbear4017@yahoo.com bcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz Get your 2nd month FREE after DEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ TWO BEDROOM TOWNHOUSES conyour 1st month venient to Sneads Ferry Gate, MARSOC & Courthouse Bay. Only 3 left at 8x40 feet of storage up to 2 cars & other reduced price of $107,900! Call Repersonal items alty World - Ennett & Associates (910) 327-3600 to view

STORAGE

Automobiles

p

2008 CHRYSLER Town & Country Heated leather seats, DVD, backup camera, remote start, auto doors, 74k miles. Excellent condition. V6 3.8 Litter, Automatic 6-speed w/od. $14,495. Call 214-931-0154.

$70.00 per month

Employment

910-326-4578 HUBERT BEAUTIFUL, 8-PIECE CHINA SET. English castle artwork, ivory and red. Excellent condition. Great Christmas gift! Please call: Chris 910-581-9059 CHRISTMAS TREES Justice choose & cut. frasier furs, wreaths & stands. 1325 Gould Rd Hwy 53 910-346-6783 Visa & Mastercard accepted

MOTOR COACH OPERATOR Horizon Coach Lines Part Time positions available. Clean driving record, CDL w/ P Endorsement, 2 Yrs driving exp required. Apply M-F 9-4 at 408 Center Street, Jacksonville.

2008 NISSAN 350Z Enthusiast Edition 38,000 Miles, Tinted Windows, Kicker Speakers, Rear spoiler, high flow catalytic, K&N Godspeed exhaust, molded mud guards, Extended warranty 910-389-519595

Boats & Recreation

o

2008 4 WHEEL DRIVE ATV red Like new not used a lot need to sell. $7,500. OBO Call David at 910-546-7611 Email me for pictures bigbear4017@yahoo.com

LOCALLY GROWN PECANS for the holidays $2.00 lb. Belgrade area. Call Bill 910-581-9660 Thank you. No text Motorcycles msg please. abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 2008 HARLEY SPORTSTER custom, PURPLE BICYCLE kent with training ABCDEFGHIJHHMNHHHHHHHHHHHH 1200, black & orange, 9k miles, 2 wheels, basket, lightly abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz used $45 new tires, recent state insp. Priced 910-548-1694 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz $200 below NADA book. $7300. Email for picture. Call Bill abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz SKECHERS SHAPE UPS womens 8.5, 910-581-9660 No text msg’s please. z abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxy slightly worn, ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ clean. $45 Special 910-548-1694 have pics.

U

REAL ESTATE AGENTS Wanted for Announcements large real estate firm in Jacksonville, NC. Our market is outstanding and P Pets & Supplies abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz LOST PHONAX HEARING AID left ear, our agents are very successful. Will ABCDEFGHIJHHMNHHHHHHHHHHHH train and assist with education. abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz in vicinity of Harbor Freight on Westabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz GRANDKIDS EASTER BUNNIES are Please send resumes or inquiries toABCDEFGHIJHHMNHHHHHHHHHHHH ern Blvd. Possibly elsewhere in Onabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz All col- slow County or Eastern North Carolilejeune332@hotmail.com or fax out of hand; need to sell some. abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz ors, $15 each. 252-764-2704 na. Please contact Jim Rider USMC 910-577-3368. abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxy Retired at 910-934-0425 or email z abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz All breeds wel- sueandjim104@yahoo.com Life withSEEKING HELPDESK ANALYST with “THE DOG SCHOOL”ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxy Active Secret Clearance to Work at come. Since 1974 New Bern, NC. out az hearing aid is frustrating! Naval Hospital at CampABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ Lejeune. 252-636-5225 wellerkennels.com Please send resume to AKC ENGLISH BULLDOG Puppies!!! bherberger@marathonts.com Champion Bloodlines, Show quality. 3 males, fawn/white, short and stocky. $2,000. 252-916-9601

L

Wanted

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 100 GALLON PROPANE TANK. Call V-22 CREW CHIEFS/MECHANICS ABCDEFGHIJHHMNHHHHHHHHHHHH needed immediately!! Great pay and Bill 910-581-9660. No text msg’s abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz outstanding benefits, USAF installa- please. abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz tion. Contact John Totty, V22 Program abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz Manager, 505-948-0886, abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxy z john.totty@s3inc.com ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ www.CampLejeuneGlobe.com

Giving Healthy Futures

Classified Ad Form Traders is a free service provided by the Public Affairs Office and submitted by active duty and retired military personnel and their dependents, and civilian personnel aboard Camp Lejeune and MCAS New River. Ads must be resubmitted each week and reach the Public Affairs Office by noon Thursday for the following week’s publication. Ads should be submitted on a Trader form, located below and at the Public Affairs Office. Ads are reserved for the exchange or sale of personal goods only. Ads for personal services or businesses may not be printed. The public Affairs Office reserves the right to withhold ads that may be deemed inappropriate for any reason. Official phone numbers CANNOT be listed. Limit is three ads per week. If the Public Affairs Office receives more ads than space permits, certain ads may not be published until the following week. • Individual forms must be filled out for each “Category” of items (automobiles, pets, etc.) and written legibly. • No more than 25 words per form. • Trader ad submissions cannot be accepted by phone, guard mail, or fax, as these means are reserved for official business only. Submit your ad by dropping it off at the Public Affairs Office, mailing it to the address listed, or visiting www.camplejeuneglobe.com or www.newriverrotovue.com

Trader Form Mail to: Commanding General (Attn: Public Affairs Office) Marine Corps Base PSC Box 2004 Camp Lejeune, NC 28542-004

Drop off form: Public Affairs Office Bldg. 67 Virginia Dare Rd. (Mainside) MCB Camp Lejeune, NC

Category: Ad:

Plasma Donors Needed Now

(25 words per form- write legibly)

Please help us help those coping with rare, chronic, genetic diseases. New donors can receive $30 today and $70 this week! Ask about our Specialty Programs! Must be 18 years or older, have valid I.D. along with proof of SS# and local residency.

028TheGlobe5.67x5c-V2.indd 1

Walk-ins Welcome. Wireless Internet Available. New donors: Bring in this ad for a $10 bonus on your second donation E ONLIN M E NT POINT A .COM P A R YOU L A SM BOOK BIOTESTP AT:

Biotest Plasma Center 1213 Country Club Road Jacksonville, NC 28546 910-353-4888 www.biotestplasma.com

I certify that I have read and understand the above information. I certify that I am not involved in any commercial enterprise and if requesting advertisement for rent or sale of a house or trailer, it is available without regard to race, creed, or religion. Signature: Rank: Organization: Home Address: Home Phone: Work Phone:

8/31/12 9:39 AM

Have you placed your trader ad in the classifieds yet?

Don’t know how? Go to www.NewRiverRotovue.com and click “Place Classifieds’


The Globe, Camp lejeune, n.C.

DeCember 20, 2012

Earn Extra Money Looking for hard working peopLe as independent contractors deLivering the gLobe aboard camp Lejeune in the foLLowing areas:

berkeLey manor  watkins viLLage  watkins grove home deLivery routes  base access required  reLiabLe transportation

caLL dennis at

910.347.9624

9c


SPOTLIGHT

10C december 20, 2012

The Globe, Camp Lejeune, N.C.

of HOMES

OPEN HOUSE

111 Bosco Drive, Jacksonville, NC 28540 Come Tour This Lovely Home 11am - 1pm on Saturday, December 15, 2012 MORTGAGE PAYMENT LESS THAN RENT SALE PRICE $139,000

7407 Coral Court ● Emerald Isle, NC ● $299,900 This affordable sound side three bedroom, two bathroom home features over 1000 square feet of living space and could be a great second home or permanent residence. Located in a quiet cul-de-sac and on a wooded lot, this home is perfect for your beach retreat and has ample amount of storage space. There have been many upgrades within the last five years including flooring, cabinets, plumbing fixtures, roof and heat pump.

Chuck Compton Choice Realty Jacksonville 910-330-5413 Call me for a private showing of this home Directions: Henderson Dr to left on Barn St, right on Vernon, to left on Clyde, to right on Seminole Trail, to left of Mitchell, to left on Bsco Drive home on right. BRING A FRIEND!

7501 Emerald Drive, Emerald Isle, NC 28594 Sales 877.592.4072 * Rentals 866.689.6256 sales@eirealty.com * www.EmeraldIsleRealty.com

INVEST YOUR MONTHLY RENTAL

PAYMENTS IN A HOME OF YOUR OWN! Similar Photo

$119,900 NEW HOME

Location, location, location. This home is close to schools, shopping and restaurants of Jacksonville. Close to schools, shopping and restaurants of Jacksonville. They don’t make homes like this anymore, from the hardwood floors to the nice upgraded kitchen and formal dining room, this home is built for the family. Check out the bonus room, ideal for home office, den or kids game room. Large covered patio overlooks nicely landscaped, fully fenced back yard. Stop by and visit this home. You will be impressed.

235 Sweet Gum Lane $119,900 @ 3.5 % for 30 years = $550 per month, 0 down, P & I. 3 BR/ 2 BA/ 2 Car Garage. Similar Photo

$129,900

Let us help you sell or buy your home!

Ofcial Toys for Tots aryDropawls ealty Off site

M

r

r

SEA COAST PROPERTIES

CALL US TODAY! 2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU!

910.326.5980 Address Jacksonville / Hubert / Swansboro www.mrawls.com MARY RAWLS REALTY 307 Bracken

241 Sweet Gum Lane, Richlands NEW 3 BR/ 2 BA/ 2 Car Garage Home with 1200 Square Feet. REAdy By dECEMBER!

Let us help you sell or buy your home! Jacksonville 910.353.5100 / Surf City 910.328.6732

for Tots cial Toys for Tots www.mrawls.com site Of

BR BA

2 286 Riggs (Hubert) 3 226 Branchwood 3 301 Sterling 3 1/2 off 1st mo 3 Serving Onslow & Carteret Counties 200 Streamwood Mesa 2 Member Both Boards of Realtors & Multiple Listing 116 Services 6 MO LEASE 3 509 Oak Ln. 1117 Hammocks Beach Rd. • Swansboro 227 Parnell (Hubert) 3 311 Providence 3 Let us help you sell or buy your home! 111 Boysenberry (Maple Hill) 3 218 ELM ST - HISTORIC SWANSBORO 3008 Foxhorn 3 213 Wedgefield (Maple Hill) 4 989 W. Pueblo 2 EXPERTISE • INTEGRITY 244 Bishop 3 Historic duplex recently re-roofed with PROVEN RESULTS 200 Murrifield 3 www.mrawls.com 115 Hac Historic home 3 Serving Onslow & Carteret Counties new tin roof. Charming Mary S. Rawls 215 Stillwood 3 Member Both Boards of Realtors & Multiple Listing Services Broker/Owner Serving 326-5980 Onslow & Carteret Counties (910) in downtown Swansboro. Each side has 159 Hawks Point 3 1117 Hammocks Beach Rd. • Swansboro 1097 Hines Town 3 ber Both Boards of Realtors & Multiple Listing Services 3 bedrooms 1½ 408 baths. All appliances Myna 3 218 ELM ST – HISTORIC SWANSBORO Haileyside including 3 Hammocks Beach Rd. • Swansboro are included on116 each 203 Silver Hills 3 $228,000 Parnell of shops within 3 washer and dryer.256Lots Historic duplex recently re-roofed with 106 Palace 3 walking distance. Just a short 2 blocks Richlands new tin roof. Charming Historic home Mary S. Rawls Charles Rawls 1/2 off 1st mo 1880 HawWater Branch Front. 3 to the Broker/Owner in downtown Swansboro. EachSwansboro side has Associate Broker 204 Chandler Simpson 3 dec rent free 3 115 Annie 3 bedrooms 1½ baths. Historic duplex recently re-roofed withAll appliancesSneads Ferry / Topsail / North Topsail Beach are included on each side including 304 Woody Way 3 new tin roof. Charming Historic 202 Bayview Dr 2 washer and dryer.home Lots of shops within 145 Riley Lewis Rd 3 walking distance. a short 2 blocks in downtown Swansboro. Each sideJust has Holly Ridge / Surf City / Hampstead / Wilmington Charles Rawls to the Swansboro Water Front. 11 S OakFurnished 3 Associate Broker 3 bedrooms 1½ baths. All appliances 208 Sandpiper Studio Apartment 0 101 Kisskadee Ct 3 are included on each side including 151 Belevedere 2 208 Belevedere 3 washer and dryer. Lots of shops within 362 Rosebud Lane 100 off 1st mo w 12 mo lease 3 Furnished Winter Rentals on Topsail Island walking distance. Just a short 2 blocks Alice’s Wonderland-N. Topsail Beach 3 Campbell-Surf City 4 to the Swansboro Water Front. Great Bambino-N. Topsail Beach 3 Marra-St. Regis-N. Topsail Beach 1 1117 Hammock Beach Road • Swansboro, NC 28584 Sweet Searenity 5

EXPERTISE • INTEGRITY PROVEN RESULTS

(910) 326-5980 Drop Off site us help you sell or buy your home!

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

218 ELM ST – HISTORIC SWANSBORO MARY $228,000 RAWLS REALTY $228,000

Y RAWLS REALTY EXPERTISE • INTEGRITY PROVEN RESULTS

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

ST – HISTORIC SWANSBORO $228,000

Conveniently located between Cherry Point and Camp Lejeune in the Friendly City by the Sea.

Pets

Avail.

Price/Mo

1.5 2 2 1 2.5 2 1 2 2 2 2 2.5 2.5 2 2 2 2 2.5 1 2 2 2 2 2

No No Neg. Neg. Neg. Neg. Neg. Neg. Neg. Neg. Neg No Neg. Neg. Neg. Neg. No Neg. Neg Neg Neg Neg Neg Neg

Now Now 12/10 Now Now Now Now Now Now Now Now 1/21 Now Now Now Now Now 1/2 Now Now Now 3/1 1/7 1/4

$725 $950 $975 $825 $875 $639 $825 $925 $1250 $850 $825 $1700 $785 $985 $1250 $950 $875 $1100 $675 $895 $1100 $1200 $1100 $875

2.5 2 2

Neg. Neg. Neg.

Now 11/1 Now

$1000 $900 $975

2 1.5 2

Neg. Neg. Neg.

Now Now Now

$1100 $1100 $900

2 1 2.5 3 2 2

Neg. Yes Neg Neg Neg Neg.

Now Now 1/14 3/3 1/10 Neg.

$1350 $595 $1400 $1100 $1150 $1400

2 3.5 2 2 4.5

Yes Yes Yes No Yes

Now Now 1/1 Now Now

$1350/UI $1400 $1100 $1050/UI $2000

Call Sam or Jody Today! Jody Davis (910) 265-0771

Sam Davis (910) 330-4154

www.SoldbySamNjody.com

UI-Utilities included, No smoking inside of Homes

UnitedBeachVacations.com

Ashley Park DECEMBER

SPECIAL $

650

WALKING DISTANCE TO MALL, W MOVIES, RESTAURANTS, COLLEGE & COUNTRY CLUB 950 Square Feet!

AMENITIES INCLUDED

* Landscaped Natural Setting * Washer and Dryer Hook-ups in Individual Units * Private Porches on Each Residence * Central Heat and Air Conditioning (Heat Pumps) * Ample Parking Facilities * Wall to Wall Carpeting and Sheet Vinyl Flooring * Swimming Pool, Exercise Room, Tennis Court, Laundromat * Dishwasher and Frost Free Refrigerator

(910) 353-7515 2100 COUNTRY CLUB RD.

Tired

of

Paying PeT dePosiTs?

Buy Today!


You Auto BuY Now! The Globe, Camp lejeune, n.C.

deCember 20, 2012

11C

2008 Acura RDX 2006 Buick Rendezvous 2011 Hyundai Genesis 2008 Saturn Vue XR $24,000 $11,975 $27,575 $17,625

2011 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2009 Acura TL 2008 Chrysler 300 LX 2006 Lexus IS 350 2011 Hyundai Sonata $27,000 $15,975 $22,550 $17,950

2011 GMC Sierra 1500

2012 Buick LaCrosse 2007 Cadillac SRX V6 2010 Chevy Camaro 2012 Dodge Challenger

2009 Honda CR-V

$28,468

347-3777

$18,450

347-3777

$30,855

347-3777

2011 Jeep Grand Cherokee 2012 Ford Focus SEL 2010 Subaru Forester

$23,500

347-3777

2011 Buick Regal

$22,999

877542-2424

2011 Dodge Ram

$24,990 D&E 799-4210

$18,775

347-3777

$20,925

347-3777

$25,325

347-3777

2012 VW Pasat

$28,925

347-3777

1965 Chevy Corvette

2006 Lexus GS300

2009 Mercedez-Benz

877542-2424

877542-2424

877542-2424

$55,000

2008 Ford Escape

$14,900 D&E 799-4210

$22,516

2008 Honda Accord

$18,995 D&E 799-4210

$26,950

$33,975

$22,266

347-3777

2011 Mazda 3

$22,625 347-3777

2008 Pontiac G-8

$25,777

$19,980

2006 Kia Sorento

2008 Mazda CX-7

$12,900 D&E 799-4210

877542-2424

$18,995 D&E 799-4210

You Auto BuY Now!

PRE-OWNED

PRE-OWNED

PRE-OWNED

PRE-OWNED

PRE-OWNED


12c december 20, 2012

The Globe, Camp Lejeune, N.C.

Buy HErE, PAy HErE! finAnCing AvAilABlE for All lEvElS of CrEdit!

500

$

First year of oil changes and tire rotation free!

stk# 50339A

‘11 Dodge Ram

$380/mo

‘06 Lexus GS 300

$290/mo

‘94 Jeep Wrangler

‘09 Lexus ES 350

$345/mo

‘35 Chevy Street Rod

350 Auto Mustang II Front Suspension

350 700R tranny Mustang II Front Suspention. PW Great Driver.

$31,900

‘59 Lincoln Premier

350 4speed 411 gears. One bad car totally rstored. looks fast sitting still

70k original miles. PW auto #s matching. All original

stk# 50222

$13,995

‘67 Plymouth Satellite 440 with 2 4’s Auto. Fully restored. Excellent condition

$29,900

stk# 50509

‘72 Chevy Nova

$365/mo

stk# 50506

stk# 50165C

‘31 Ford Street Rod

‘71 GMC 1500

stk# 50425

‘12 Dodge Challenger

‘12 Chevy Camaro

$24,900

$18,500

$14,750

stk# 50463

stk# 50127

stk# 50333

‘04 Jeep Wrangler

$14,500

$12,995

$33,900

stk# 50417

‘03 Jeep Wrangler

350 cu in Auto lift kit

stk# BC-S88870

Not to be combined with other sales

stk# 50485

stk# 50306A

stk# 50504

off your purchase!

stk# 50487

‘57 Chevy Bel Air

$21,995

$11,900

stk# BC-142329

‘81 Ford F150

$8,500

stk# 50493

‘41 Ford Sedan

$21,900

stk# 50454

‘73 Dodge Challenger Off Frame restoration 340 Auto restored to original condition

$28,900

stk# 50507

stk# 50316C

‘07 Chevy Silverado

$340/mo

stk# OC100835

‘04 Chevy Corvette

$23,995

stk# 50332

‘74 Plymouth Duster

Gold Duster package with rare fold down back seat. 62k original miles. #s matching AC restored to original condition

$14,900

stk# 50502

‘62 Ford Galaxie

‘39 Ford Tractor

Convertible #s matching. 32 original miles. Great Cruiser

Fully restored. Great Running

$29,900

stk# 50473

‘55 Chevy Nomad LT1 Corvette engine & Tranny Fully Restoerd

$49,000

$5,995

stk# 50502

‘61 Studebaker Champ

$13,900

* 72 Months @ 6.99% APR. WAC. tAx, tAgs & AdMin. fee extRA. ALL PAYMents sUBJeCt to BAnK APPRoVAL. see deALeR foR detAiLs.

Bogue Auto SAleS.com CrEdit HotlinE 5326 Hwy. 24 (East of Swansboro) for PrE-APProvAl

252-393-2469

WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM

WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM

WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM

• WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM •


WWW.CAMPLEJEUNEGLOBE.COM

CarolinaLiving Living Still Serving Awards

2nd Marine Division Band makes musically merry holidays | 3D

Kopka wins top title | 9D THURSDAY DECEMBER 20, 2012

D | THE GLOBE

Photo by Gunny Claus listens close to Amy Binkley child a m d’’s Christmas w ish list during a ilitary the USO of N visit to orth Carolina Jacksonville Center Dec. 15 . Gunny Claus will see close to 10,000 milita ry children this season.

y

Photo by Amy Binkle

th waits patiently wi Angel Ortiz (left) A a r fo uis Minguela, h his grandfather, Lo the at s au Cl Gunny c ance to visit with ch ille Center Dec. 15. nv so ck Ja C. USO of N.

Photo by Amy Binkley

Elves from a local business give Gunny Claus a hand in handing out presents to 200 military children during a visit at the USO of N.C. Jacksonville Center Dec. 15. Gunny Claus will visit several military installations this season including Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune and Marine Corps Air Station New River.

Gunny Claus comes to town AMY BINKLEY

Assistant managing editor

Y

ou better watch out, pivot and step, stay within regs and salute with some pep. Gunny Claus is coming to town. Old Saint Nicholas took a backseat to the Marine Corps’ own Gunny Claus as 200 military children and their parents anxiously awaited the leader of the 1st Reindeer Division at the USO of North Carolina Jacksonville Center Dec. 15. “Christmas in the

Marine Corps is all about family,” stated Gunny Claus, a Vietnam veteran whose true identity remains concealed. “Moms, dads, kids and spouses are just as much a part of the Corps as we are.” Decked out in his dress reds, customized, white Eagle, Globe and Anchor, good conduct medal and a medal for every conflict that took Marines from their families on Christmas since 1918, the jolliest member of the Marine Corps greeted the youngsters with hugs, presents and questions about what they wanted for Christmas.

“We do this every year to help the service members celebrate the Christmas holiday,” said Deb Fisher, director of the local USO. “Most of the people here today are families of the deployed.” Gunny Claus holds a special place in his heart for the children of service members and will visit with almost 10,000 military kids before Christmas. “So many families say their kids won’t come near the department store Santa, but they love Gunny Claus,” pointed out the man of the hour. “I think it’s because they relate the

medals and uniform to their dads. Some of these guys have been away a long time, and when they return, it’s amazing.” Capt. Kyle Andrews, 2nd Assault Amphibious Battalion, arrived at the USO with his wife, two young children and visible excitement to see Gunny Claus. “What a great way to spend time with family,” he commented. After two years of attempting to meet the special Marine, Louis Minguela finally brought his grandson, Angel Ortiz, who enjoyed the breakfast and holiday activities provided by the

volunteers at the USO. “We never had this opportunity,” confessed Minguela. “I made sure to get on the list this year.” Gunny Claus praised the work of volunteers, staff non-commissioned officers, commanding officers and family readiness officers who go above the call of duty to provide a happy Christmas for their Marines. “The Marine Corps is a family,” he declared. “If one Marine is in need, another will help.” For more information visit www.gunnyclaus.org.


2D DECEMBER 20, 2012

THE GLOBE, CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.

‘Guardians’ rise, hobbits return for ‘Journey’ Now playing at Camp Lejeune “RISE OF THE GUARDIANS” (PG) “Rise of the Guardians” is a 3-D computer animated fantasy adventure based on William Joyce’s “The Guardians of Childhood” illustrated children’s book series. The film is set about 200 years after the book series when the evil spirit Pitch launches an assault on Earth, and the Immortal Guardians team up to protect the innocence of children all around the world. This good-versus-evil story presents first iconic characters each child remembers. The prominent characters are voiced by the following actors : Chris Pine as Jack Frost, the spirit of winter, Jude Law as Pitch, aka The Boogeyman, and the Nightmare King, Alex Baldwin as Nicholas St. North, aka Santa Claus, the leader of the guardians, and the Guardian of Wonder. Also starring are Hugh Jackman as E. Aster Bunnymund, aka Easter Bunny, the fabled keeper of Easter and the Guardian of Hope, Isla Fisher as Queen Toothiana, aka Tooth Fairy, and the Guardian of Memories, Sanderson Mansnoozie as the silent Sandman, and Dakota Goyo as Jamie, the child who does not give up believing in the guardians. First time director Peter Ramsey took the idea for this film from Joyce’s children’s book series and the short film by Joyce and Reel FX, “The Man

in the Moon.” “Rise of the Guardians” is a light-weight and likeable computer-generated, animated Christmas movie with a story for both the children and adults and some good life lessons for all.

From the

FrontRow Front Row

Now playing at Jacksonville “THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY” (PG-13) “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey” is the first installment in a series of three epic fantasyadventure films based on J.R.R. Tolkien’s popular masterpiece. The three films tell a continuous story set in Middle-earth 60 years before “The Lord of the Rings.” The adventure follows the journey of the title character, Bilbo Baggins, who is swept into an epic quest to reclaim the lost Dwarf Kingdom of Erebor from the fearsome dragon Smaug. Approached out of the blue by the wizard Gandalf the Grey, Bilbo finds himself joining a company of 13 dwarves led by the legendary warrior, Thorin Oakenshield. Their journey takes them into the Wild, through treacherous lands swarming with Goblins and Orcs, deadly Wargs and Sorcerers. Although their goal lies to the East and the wastelands of the Lonely Mountain, they first must escape the goblin tunnels, where Bilbo meets the creature Gollum who will change his life forever.

With Reinhild Moldenhauer Huneycutt

Here, alone with Gollum, on the shores of an underground lake, the unassuming Bilbo not only discovers depths of ingenuity and courage that surprise even him, he also gains possession of Gollum’s “precious” ring that holds unexpected qualities. A simple, gold ring is tied to the fate of all Middle-earth in ways Bilbo cannot begin to know. Martin Freeman (“What’s Your Number,” “Breaking and Entering”) stars as Bilbo Baggins, a curious and peace-loving hobbit, who journeys to the Lonely Mountain with a vigorous group of dwarves to reclaim a treasure stolen from them by the dragon Smaug. Ian McKellen (“X-Men”) returns as wizard Gandal the Grey; and Richard Armitage (“Captain America”) debuts as the dwarf leader Thorin Oakenshield. Also reprising their roles from “The Lord of the

FRIDAY “Alex Cross,” PG-13, 6:30 p.m.; “Skyfall,” PG-13, 9:15 p.m. SATURDAY “Rise of the Guardians,” PG, 3:30 p.m.; “Fun Size,” PG-13, 6:30 p.m.; “Man with the Iron Fists,” R, 9:15 p.m. SUNDAY “Wreck It Ralph,” PG, 3:30 p.m.; “Lincoln,” PG-13, 6:30 p.m. MONDAY FREE SHOWING “The Polar Express,” G, 2 p.m. TUESDAY “The Muppet Christmas Carol,” G, 2 p.m.; “Skyfall,” PG-13, 7:30 p.m.

ROMAN CATHOLIC Main Protestant Chapel (Bldg. 16) Weekend Mass: Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m. & 12 p.m. Weekday Masses: Monday through Thursday 11:45 a.m.

CLOSED FOR RENOVATIONS

CLOSED FOR RENOVATIONS

3

Adopt a new friend today, save a life...

Photos by Sarah Anderson

LATTER DAY SAINTS Camp Geiger Chapel Worship Service: Sunday 5 :30 p.m. For more information, call 381-5318. 2T7:1 LIVE (Youth Group) Meets in Bldg. 67 (Second Deck in Classroom 2) Sunday from 5 to 7 p.m.

Tarawa Terrace Chapel Main TT Chapel (Bldg. TT-2469) Worship Service: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Camp Geiger Chapel Main Camp Geiger Chapel (Bldg. TC 601) Worship Service: Sunday 5 p.m. Camp Johnson Chapel Main Camp Johnson Chapel (Bldg. M-101) Worship Service: Sunday 8:30 a.m. JEWISH The Jewish Chapel (Bldg. 67) Sabbath Service: Friday 7 p.m. Jewish School: Sunday 10 a.m. For information about other faith provisions (Muslim, Buddhist, etc) call 451-3210.

For information on concerts, festivals, special events and classes up and down the Carolina coast check out What’s happenin’ Carolina each week. To add your event e-mail amy.binkley@pilotonline.com. Space is limited to availability.

New Year’s Eve party Dec. 31, 10:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Bowl your way into the new year during the final celebration of the year at Bonnyman Bowling Center aboard MCB Camp Lejeune. Enjoy a strikingly good time playing under the blacklights and competing for prizes. The event is open to all Department of Defense identification card holders. Admission is $15 for adults and $10 for youth 18 years and younger. Admssion includes two hours of bowling and shoe rental. Space is limited. First come, first served. Register by Dec. 30 to participate. For more information call 451-5121. Polar Plunge Jan. 5, 9 a.m. Who’s ready to be freezin’ for a reason? The Special Olympics organization of Onslow County is bracing for another chilly dip in the ocean at Onslow Beach aboard MCB Camp Lejeune for their biggest fundraiser of the year. Get your teams together now, come up with a creative name, and decide on unique costumes for the plunge. Registration and the children’s sandcastle contest begin at 9 a.m. with the costume contest at 10:30 a.m. and the plunge at 11 a.m. No wetsuits are allowed for the costume contest, and no pets are allowed on the beach. For more information visit www.sonconslow. org or call 910-265-1756.

EASTERN ORTHODOX St. Nicholas Chapel, Camp Johnson Divine Liturgy: Sunday 10 a.m. Holy Days: As announced, 6 p.m. For more information, call 450-0991.

Midway Park Chapel Contemporary Praise & Worship Worship Service: Sunday 10:45 a.m. Youth Group, Children’s Church and Nursery provided

Ms. Huneycutt is the public affairs assistant at the Base Public Affairs Office.

2

*Movies are subject to change without notice.

Save--A-Pet Save

Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament First Friday of every month: 11:45 a.m. Benediction at 6 p.m. Holy Day Masses: As announced, 11:45 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Confession: Saturday 3:45 to 4:45 p.m. Or by appointment, by calling 451-3210

PROTESTANT Main Protestant Chapel (Bldg. 16) Worship Service: Sunday 10 a.m. Children’s Church and Youth Service provided

trilogy is over. Get ready for an exciting and thrilling journey. This spectacular undertaking and dazzling eye candy can be seen in 3-D splendor or regular 2-D format. However, the new technology Jackson used, filming 48-frames-persecond, can only be seen in about 500 theaters around the country. The second installment “The Desolation of Smaug” will come out in December 2013; and the third film “There and Back Again” will be released in July 2014.

Gunny Claus visits Friday, noon to 2 p.m. Santa’s right-hand man will return to Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune to meet with children of all ages. Gunny Claus will pay a visit to the Exceptional Family Member enrolled families and their guests at the Russell and Marine Family Center aboard base from noon to 2 p.m. Friday. Participants will have fun playing holiday-themed games, watching a Christmas puppet show and spending time with Gunny Claus. For more information call 451-4103. For movie times, call 449-9344.

MARINE CORPS BASE CHAPEL SCHEDULE

Rings” are Cate Blanchett (“Robin Hood”) as elf queen Galadriel; Ian Holm (“Lord of War”) as the elder Bilbo; Christopher Lee (“Dark Shadows”) as wizard Saruman; Hugo Weaving (“Cloud Atlas”) as elf lord Elrond; Elijah Wood (“The Romantics”) as Frodo; and Andy Serkis (“King Kong”) as Gollum. Peter Jackson (“King

Kong”), who won huge fame with the “Lord of the Rings” trilogy, gathered an international cast, and directed, co-wrote and produced this fantasy tale. The screenplay for this film was also co-written by his writing partners Philippa Boyens and Guillermo del Toro and Jackson’s wife Fran Walsh. “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey” is the most anticipated prequel to the award-winning “Lord of the Rings.” The colorful yarn is told in more detail and length than the original Hobbit and brings J.R.R. Tolkien’s dark Middle-earth back to life; however how the story ends remains to be seen until the

Have yourself a merry little Christmas with me by your side. I am a male, black labrador retriever mix. The shelter staff think I am about 5 years old. I’m the perfect companion for those cold winter nights.

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas, and you are on my wish list. I am a tan and white domestic short hair. The shelter staff think I am about one year and 6 months old. Let’s wish for snow and snuggle.

Pet ID# A062984

Pet ID# A063092

The Onslow County Animal Shelter is open Monday through Thursday from 11 to 5:30 p.m., Friday from noon to 3 p.m., Saturday from 10 a.m. to noon and 1 to 3 p.m. To see more photographs of pets available for adoption visit www.petharbor.com. To adopt a pet visit the Onslow County Animal Shelter at 244 Georgetown Road, Jacksonville, N.C., or call 455-0182.

Free movie night Jan. 11, 6:30 p.m. If you’re looking for fun after the holidays, but don’t want to stretch your wallet any further, come out to the Harriotte B. Smith Library aboard MCB Camp Lejeune for their monthly free movie night. This month’s film is the third in director Christopher Nolan’s Batman series, “The Dark Knight Rises,” rated PG-13. For more information call 451-5724. Suicide Prevention and Awareness for Families Jan. 8, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Never leaving a Marine behind extends beyond the battlefield and beyond the base. Strong, knowledgeable, and aware families can identify when someone is in need, and step in to help before it’s too late. Gaining a better understanding of the problem, and learning what tools and resources are available can help save lives. This free workshop is located at Resilience Education Bldg 257 aboard base, and is open all DOD identification cardholders. For more information call 451-2865.


THE GLOBE, CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.

DECEMBER 20, 2012

3D

Photo by Amy Binkley

Under the conduction of Master Gunnery Sgt. Matthew Boatright, bandmaster and officer in charge, the 2nd Marine Division Band plays a classic Christmas tune to a packed house during their annual holiday concert at the Base Theater aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune Dec. 15.

2nd Marine Division Band sets musical holiday mood AMY BINKLEY

Assistant managing editor

Photos by Amy Binkley

(Above) (From left to right) Lance Cpl. Michael Frick, Staff Sgt. Austin Hunt and Sgt. Richard Anderson perform “Bugler’s Holiday” by Leroy Anderson during the 2nd Marine Division Band’s holiday concert aboard MCB Camp Lejeune Dec. 15. (Below) The 2nd Marine Division Big Band lets loose and has fun while playing holiday songs like “Go Tell It on the Mountain” and “Winter Wonderland” during the annual holiday concert aboard base Dec. 15.

g n i t n e s e r P d u Pro onsor of... Sp

If it has our name on it, You have our word on it!

910-937-1555 www.stevensonscion.com

910-938-0555 www.kia.stevensonauto.com

910-937-1555 www.stevensontoyota.com

910-455-1551 www.lejeunemotorco.net

910-347-6678 www.mazda.stevensonauto.com

STILLAwards SERVING December 11, 2012

910-353-1515 www.stevensonusedcars.com

910-326-1804 www.stevensonchevy.com

910-455-1555 www.stevensonhyundai.com

REMEMBE ...

910-577-9158 www.stevensontruckplus.com

910-455-1555 www.stevensonsuzuki.com

910-395-1116 www.stevensonacura.com

LIFE

WA TI ME ite RRA NT Acc d Miles epte d N Unlimit Y

Unlim

For Our Most Updated and Complete Pre-Owned Selections Go To:

www.StevensonAuto.com

atio e nwidd Time e

Christmas is not complete without classic holiday tunes, and members of the 2nd Marine Division Band were happy to deliver some of the best during their annual holiday concert at the Base Theater aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune Dec. 15. “It’s a tradition that brings everyone together,” remarked Master Gunnery Sgt. Matthew Boatwright, bandmaster and officer in charge. “This reminds people of home and makes them happy. We get to show them another side of the Marine Corps in a more intimate setting.” Playing to a packed house, the band provided a high-caliber performance they are known for. Melodic sounds ushered in the holiday spirit with

pieces like “Waltz of the Flowers” by Peter Tchaikovsky and “Sleigh Ride” by Leroy Anderson. It didn’t take long for an ease to settle over the audience. “Having the concert on base is fantastic and allows families to gather for something fun,” said retired Master Sgt. Mark Munger. “It’s important to give the young Marine families a sense of home, especially if they can’t leave for Christmas. (The concert) helps make (MCB) Camp Lejeune feel a little more like home.” The 2nd Marine Division Band provides musical support for the five major commands aboard MCB Camp Lejeune, and entertainment typically takes a backseat to ceremonial duties as they fulfill their role as musical ambassadors for the Marine Corps. At the annual holiday concert, however, the instrumentalists let their hair

down and had a good time. “I love Christmas music so this is great for me,” admitted Enlisted Conductor Staff Sgt. Christopher Dwyer. “It’s an opportunity for our military families and civilians to witness the Marine Corps in a more human light.” Several smaller groups from within the band including a trombone quartet, jazz trio and big band, engaged the audience during their performances, and showed a fun, light-hearted side of the larger musical ensemble. Accompanied by the band, Munger read “’Twas the Night Before Christmas” to several military children before the final number, “Here Comes Santa Claus” gave the cue for the arrival of Gunny Claus. “(This concert) brings families together,” Dwyer said.


4d DeCember 20, 2012

The Globe, Camp lejeune, n.C.

STILLAwards SERVING December 11, 2012

Congratulations to the 2012 Still Serving Winner

John KopKa Retired Colonel, USMC

$1000 gift made in Col. Kopka’s name to Hope for the Warriors

& finalists Travis hanson Daniel Stoy Joseph Yannessa Raymond applewhite Presented by

sPonsored by

Patrons TM

910-346-4315

brought to you by

Landmark Military Media

of North Carolina, Inc.

Partners


THE GLOBE, CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.

DECEMBER 20, 2012

5D

Photo by Lance Cpl. Scott W. Whiting

Budweiser’s Clydesdale horses walk around the parking lot of the Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune Marine Corps Exchange as families watch and take pictures Dec. 8. The well-known horses drew a large crowd of people who were going to the MCX, and when the horses stopped, people swarmed to take pictures up close.

Clydesdales trot through Lejeune LANCE CPL. SCOTT W. WHITING

Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune

T

he Budweiser Clydesdale horses recognizable from the brewing company’s Super Bowl commercials and other promotions visited Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune Dec. 8 as part of an East Coast military installations tour. The horses arrived at the Marine Corps Exchange at approximately 1 p.m. and put on a small show for patrons on hand to watch the Clydesdales pull a Budweiser wagon around the parking lot. After they walked around for a while, the conductors halted the horses near a growing crowd of people. They were able to get up close and take pictures with the widely-recognized horses for the two hours they were on MCB Camp Lejeune. “The Clydesdale horses are probably the most recognizable animals on the planet,” said Everett Vaughn, Marince Corps Community Services markets and brand manager. “We are very fortunate that they have visited (MCB) Camp Lejeune for the past few years. The expression on the children’s faces are priceless and always put a smile of amazement on their faces.”

Take command of your future— with Boston University’s on-base graduate programs in Leadership & Project Management. The MS in Leadership provides core skills in: ě Decision-making & strategy ě Diplomacy & negotiation ě Organizational dynamics & group behavior Graduate Certificate in Project Management may be taken separately.

Also offered on base: MS in Computer Information Systems Earn a master’s degree from BU in as few as 20 months— alternate weekends or online. Classes begin January 12 on MCB Camp Lejeune.

Learn more. Call 910-451-5574 or 252-447-5036 or email lwatson@bu.edu.

bu.edu/military An equal opportunity, affirmative action institution.


6D DECEMBER 20, 2012

THE GLOBE, CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.

Marines, sailors cheer on Christmas season CPL. PAUL PETERSON

2nd Marine Logistics Group

Photo by Cpl. Paul Peterson

Petty Officer 1st Class William A. Hall, the host for 2nd Supply Battalion, 2nd Marine Logistics Group’s master of ceremonies, tests the knowledge of Lt. Cmdr. Darren J. Pierce, the commanding officer of Medical Logistics Company, 2nd Supply Bn., on classic Christmas songs during the battalion’s annual Christmas party aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune Dec. 3.

The Marines and sailors of 2nd Supply Battalion, Combat Logistics Regiment 25, 2nd Marine Logistics Group decked the halls of the Goettge Memorial Field House here for their annual Christmas party Dec. 3. More than 600 service members attended the event and filled the large gymnasium with their families and friends who enjoyed a night of raffles,singing contests, food, a tacky sweater competition, and the everpresent encouragement of their very own master of ceremonies. “We all have something in common – our love for camaraderie, our love for fellowship and our love for a happy spirit,” said Petty Officer 1st Class William A. Hall, the battalion’s host for the event. “This is an opportunity to share different things I was blessed with and lift up their spirits.” The unit kicked off the merriment with a Christmas-themed sweater contest. Participants mounted the stage and vied for shouts of approval from the hundreds of attendees. A cheesy, inelegant vest with Christmasthemed adornments took the prize after a few twirls and a round of laughter spurred on by Hall. Not to be outdone, the battalion’s five company commanders reluctantly took their places beside Hall, who quizzed each of them on their basic knowledge of popular holiday music.

The five leaders stumbled their way through songs such as “Jingle Bells” and “Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer” while enduring the laughs and jeers of Hall and the partygoers. “We will always support them, but this is definitely entertaining,” chuckled Cpl. Karlin A. West, a supply administration and operations clerk with the battalion. “It shows we are not just about work, we’re also fun.” The celebration came right after the unit’s first food-drive competition, which collected more than 6,000 pounds of nonperishable items for the USO. “We have a giving spirit here,” said Lt. Col. Jesse A. Kemp, the battalion’s commanding officer. “I get a lot of opportunities to talk with the Marines and sailors about Supply Battalion and everything they do. This is a one-of-a-kind battalion.” Medical Logistics Company claimed the Supply Battalion Humanitarian Award, a large can of sweet corn mounted on a stand, for collecting more than 30 pounds of food for every member of the company. “It is not just for Christmas or the holiday season,” said Hall as he addressed the audience from the stage. “We want to give all year round, and it starts right here.” The battalion handed out prizes as a thank you for the service members’ hard work. Kemp said they intend to continue the food drive and Christmas party tradition next year.

Photo by Cpl. Paul Peterson

Cpl. Karlin A. West, a supply administration and operations clerk with 2nd Supply Bn., 2nd MLG, enjoys herself as the battalion’s company commanders attempt to recite classic Christmas songs during the unit’s annual Christmas party aboard MCB Camp Lejeune Dec. 3.

THE ORIGINAL T

piggly wiggly

®

Down Home, Down The Street.

SM

1

Sale

59 per lb.

19-23 lb. Average Smithfield Whole Smoked Ham Shank Portion...$1.49lb. Butt Portion...$1.59lb.

Sale

1

Sale

49

Grade A, Fresh Frozen House of Raeford Turkey Breast

10-22lb. Average, Grade A House of Raeford Fresh Frozen Turkeys

Sale

6

99

329

119

per lb.

Family Pack, Fresh Frozen Wize Buy Split Fryer Breast

Sale

Sale

per lb.

Blackwell Angus Boneless Sirloin Tip Roast Family Pack Boneless Sirloin Tip Steaks...$3.99lb.

per lb.

Sale

per lb.

Blackwell Angus Bone In Rib Eye Steaks Blackwell Angus, Bone In Half Rib Eyes...$6.79lb.

1

19

per lb.

5 lb. Bag White Potatoes

199

THREE LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU 2960 Richlands Hwy, Jacksonville Π1040 Henderson Dr., Jacksonville ΠHwy 17 & 58, Maysville

Prices Available at these Locations Only. Prices Available December 20-27, 2012.

Visit idigthepig.com to save more every day!


The Globe, Camp lejeune, n.C.

DeCember 20, 2012

7D


8d DeCember 20, 2012

The Globe, Camp lejeune, n.C.


DECEMBER 20, 2012

THE GLOBE, CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.

9D

Photo by Ena Sellers

(From left to right) Robin Kelleher, president and CEO of Hope for the Warriors, retired Col. John Kopka, Paul McCarthy and Jim Connors pose with a check to Hope for the Warriors after Kopka’s win at the Heroes at Home Still Serving Awards dinner held at the Paradise Point Officers’ Club aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune Dec. 11. Kopka works closely with the charity and was thankful to be able to help further with his winnings.

Kopka wins for continued community service AMY BINKLEY Assistant managing editor

The mindset of a volunteer mirrors that of a service member – do what needs to be done without the expectation of recognition. For many members of the retired military community of Onslow County, taking off their uniform was only the end of one chapter of their service. More than 40 retired service members from all branches of the military b were honored during the 2012 Heroes at Home Still Serving Awards at

the Paradise Point Officers’ Club aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune Dec. 11. “There’s not a greater feeling than to be able to serve someone other than yourself,” said Ret. Sgt. Maj. Joe Houle, the 2010 Still Serving winner. “I’m proud to be here this evening.” The ideals and values instilled during boot camp continue to drive the men and women who were nominated, but one stood out among the crowd. Ret. Col. John Kopka humbly accepted the 2012 Still Serving Award and his prizes, including a $1,000 donation to Hope

for the Warriors, his charity of choice. Kopka’s daughter, Kim Ratcliff, nominated her father and said, “When I tell people about my father, I do it with pride and honor. His military career speaks volumes but what he chose to do afterwards really stands out. He gave me inspiration and the desire to give back to the community as well.” Kopka, who appeared much less comfortable in the spotlight than he is working behind the scenes, was asked why he continues to serve even after retirement. He simply stated, “It’s just the right thing to do.”

Ret. Col. Paul O’Toole gets into the holiday spirit before performing his duties as military guest of honor at the 2012 Still Serving Awards Dec. 11.

Photos by Jessie Heath

Ret. Col. John Kopka receives a well-earned reward, a $1,000 check for his charity of choice, after being named the 2012 Heroes at Home Still Serving Awards winner aboa aboard o rd MCB Camp Le Lejeune ejeune Dec. 11.

Photo by Sarah Anderson

Photo by Jessie Heath

Ret. Col. Paul O’Toole, military guest of honor, presents Ret. Sgt. Maj. Joe Houle with a certificate of nomination during the Heroes at Home Still Serving Awards at the Paradise Point Officers’ Club aboard MCB Camp Lejeune Dec. 11. Houle won the top award in 2010 and continues to serve the Onslow County community by assisting with many local organizations.

Director of Public Affairs for Marine Corps Installations East - Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, Nat Fahy (left), poses with Raymond Applewhite, Public Affairs Officer for Naval Hospital Camp Lejeune, during the 2012 Heroes at Home Still Serving Awards aboard MCB Camp Lejeune Dec. 11. Applewhite was named one of the five finalists for the award which recognizes retired service members who continue to serve their community.


10D december 20, 2012

The Globe, Camp Lejeune, N.C.

Giving Healthy Futu Giving Healthy Futures

Plasma Donors Ne Plasma Donors Needed Now

Giving Healthy Futures Plasma Donors Needed Now ng Healthy Futures

Healthy Futures

Plasma Donors Needed Now

Plasma Donors Now GivingNeeded Healthy Futures

Plasma Donors Needed N Please help us help those coping with rare, chronic, genetic diseases.

Walk-ins Welcome. Wireless Internet Available.

New donors can receive $30 today New donors: Bring in this ad se help Walk-ins Welcome. and us $70help thisthose week!coping for a $10 bonus on your second h rare, chronic, genetic diseases. Wireless Internet Available. Ask about our Specialty Programs! donation w donors can receive $30 today New donors: Bring in thisWalk-ins ad Biotest Must be 18 yearsWalk-ins or us older, p$70 those coping Welcome. Please help those coping Welcome. E this week! help NLIN O for a $10 bonus on your second have valid I.D. along with T 1213 Cou N E genetic with diseases. M T N rare, chronic, genetic diseases. I Wireless Internet Available. M PO about ourofSpecialty donation APWireless proof SS# and Programs! local residency. .CO A R Internet Available.Jacksonv U M S O Y A L K P ceive $30 today O T O OT ES I New donors: Bring in this Bad B : Biotest Plasm T st be 18 years or older, A New donors can receive $30 today ! E N LI for a $10 bonus on your second New donors: Bring in1213 thisCountry ad ON e valid I.D. along with T Cl N E M T www.biot and $70 this week! N I cialty Programs! donation OM PP O Ca A of of SS# and local residency. . A R for $10 bonus on your second NC Jacksonville, U M S O Y A L K P BO O T E ST O I Biotest Plasma Center910-3 r older, Ask about our Specialty B : AT Programs! donation E NLIN O 8TheGlobe5.67x5c-V2.indd 1 g with T 1213 Country Club Road N E M T N I www.biotestplas M PO O P C A ocal residency. . A R Jacksonville, NC 28546 U older, Must be 18 years SM Oor Y A L K P O T Please help Walk-ins Welcome. BOhelp us OTESthose coping I B : T A ON 910-353-4888 have valid I.D. along with T N with rare, chronic, genetic diseases. E Wireless Internet Available. OINTM be5.67x5c-V2.indd 1 8 M P O P www.biotestplasma.com C A proof of SS# and local residency. . A R U New donors can receive $30 today M S O Y A New donors: thisEad ST P L BOOKBring BinIO T and $70 this week! for a $10 bonus Walk-ins Welcome. ATon: your second dd 1 8/31/12 9:39 AM Ask about our Specialty Programs! donation

es.

ay

WirelessMust Internet Available. be 18 years or older, have valid I.D. along with

New donors: Bring inlocal thisresidency. ad proof of SS# and for a $10 bonus on your 028TheGlobe5.67x5c-V2.indd 1 second ms! donation E N I L N TO N E M I NT O M P O P C A . A R U M S O Y A L K P ST E BO O T O I AT: B 028TheGlobe5.67x5c-V2.indd 1

NLIN O T N TME N I O P P COM A . A R U M S YO LA B O O K B I O T E ST P AT:

E

Biotest Plasma 1213 Country Clu Jacksonville, NC 910-35 www.biotestplasm


DECEMBER 20, 2012

THE GLOBE, CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.

11D

Cling to joy when happiness fades Chaplain’s Corner Happiness hooks on to fleeting feelings while joy digs deep, rooting inside the heart.

Oh my word with Amy Binkley

Assistant managing editor

I surrender. I can no longer hide behind my wall of detachment I built to keep from feeling the impact of last week’s senseless tragedy. My tears betray my broken and grieving heart. When the wide-eyed students and vacationready teachers of Sandy Hook Elementary School bounded through their classroom doors last Friday, no one could imagine the terror following their footsteps. A lone gunman, shrouded in mystery and an unknown motive, forced his way inside and massacred 20 children and six faculty members before killing himself. Lives weren’t the only things lost that day. Our innocence as a nation took a mighty blow. My imagination ran wild with each new detail of the

event, and I flashed back to my time spent as a school secretary right after college. I know what it’s like to be the first line of defense to protect children who aren’t m mine. My initial reaction to the fflood of emotions I felt was tto shut down. I acquired a n numbing immunity after years of working in an environment where each day is met with the name of another fallen service member. It’s simpler not to feel the overwhelming sadness. However, as the names, pictures and stories of the victims continued to splash across the television, I succumbed to the grief for people I will never meet. Paul the apostle once wrote, “Rejoice with those who rejoice, and mourn with those who mourn.” Sharing in the anguish of the friends and families of the lost seems easier than remembering reasons to rejoice. Yet, this is the season of not only comfort but joy. How, in the midst of such tragedy, do we move forward? I don’t have a magic answer, but I do have a suggestion. Decide to be joyful. Don’t misunderstand. Joy is not happiness. Joy

is difficult. Happiness is dependent upon circumstances, but joy is a foundational truth to stand on when everything else around you is falling apart. Happiness hooks on to fleeting feelings while joy digs deep, rooting inside the heart. Military families around the globe understand the necessity of clinging to joy even when happiness is nowhere to be found. Thousands of service members are separated from their friends and families during the holidays, and would give anything to hold their loved ones close. Others who are home may be reminded of those who didn’t return. There’s nothing happy about sacrifice. It’s not fair, and it doesn’t feel good. But planting your feet on the solid ground of joy makes for a much easier walk through the rocky terrain of grief. I saw the power of joy personified as Marines and sailors with the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit finally made their way to the shores of home this week. Months of separation and the agony of changing return dates came to an end as families reunited and

embraces took the place of words. After seeing the waves of excitement spread throughout the crowds, I came to a realization. Happiness is simply joy running over. Without joy, happiness does not exist. The slayings at Sandy Hook will never be forgotten. The heart can never completely heal when innocence is murdered, but in our time of mourning, let us also remember to rejoice. Let us rejoice for the teachers, many of whom spent their last moments protecting their students. Let us rejoice for the lives saved. Let us rejoice in the unveiling of heroism. True heroes aren’t the ones who wear capes, show up during an emergency and disappear when it’s over. Heroes are the ones who choose to lay their lives on the line, sacrifice sleep, make plans for a better future and protect the innocent day after day on the streets, on the battlefield or in the classroom. This season, mourn with those who mourn, but don’t forget to embrace the ones you still have. There’s always a reason to be joyful.

ChristmasSafety Tree

As you deck the halls this holiday season, be fire smart. A small fire that spreads to a Christmas tree can grow large very quickly. PICKING THE TREE ...Choose a tree with fresh, green needles that do not fall off when touched. PLACING THE TREE ...Before placing the tree in the stand, cut 1–2” from the base of the trunk. ...Make sure the tree is at least three feet away from any heat source, like fireplaces, radiators, candles, heat vents or lights. ...Make sure the tree is not blocking an exit. ...Add water to the tree stand. Be sure to add water daily. LIGHTING THE TREE ...Use lights that have the label of an independent testing laboratory. Some lights are only for indoor or outdoor use. ...Replace any string of lights with worn or broken cords or loose bulb connections. Connect no more than three strands of mini string sets and a maximum of 50 bulbs for screw-in bulbs. Read manufacturer’s instructions for number of LED strands to connect.

After Christmas Get rid of the tree after Christmas or when it is dry. Dried-out trees are a fire danger and should not be left in the home or garage, or placed outside against the home. Check with your local community to find a recycling program. Bring outdoor electrical lights inside after the holidays to prevent hazards and make them last longer.

FACTS

s !

s !

...Never use lit candles to decorate the tree. ...Always turn off Christmas tree lights before leaving home or going to bed.

s !

One of every three home Christmas tree fires are caused by electrical problems. Although Christmas tree fires are not common, when they do occur, they have a higher chance to be deadly. A heat source too close to the tree causes one in every five of the fires.

Your Source for SAFETY Information NFPA Public Education Division U 1 Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02169

Tax Services Available for • Civilians • Military • Retirees We Have Competetive Rates!

Prior & Current Customers Will Receive an Extra 20% Off Their Tax Preparation

www.nfpa.org/education

It’s Our Turn To Serve You!

Loans From $800 - $3,000!

113-B Western Blvd - Jacksonville

Now offering Civilian loans!

910-355-2023 Call or Come By Our Office TODAY! SLOW CREDIT • NO CREDIT • PRIOR BANKRUPTCIES BANKRUPTCIES All loans are subject to our liberal credit policy & credit limitations, if any.

"You can never do enough for the military and their dependents."

Approval in 15 minutes! Get Money the Same Day!

PATRIOT LOAN CO.

The diamond ring you want. Th The price you deserve. Diamond Ring & matching band

TRI-CARE for EYE EXAMS NOW AVAILABLE

Your choice Princess or Round! On sale - $2,799.95

ON CAMP LEJEUNE

Affordable Monthly Payments for Military Personnel!

Contact lenses Routine eye exams • Pathology Dr. Steve Shelton, Optometrist, is located next door to Base Optical, between the Exchange and the Commissary on Camp Lejeune.

WE BUY GOLD!

E-1 & up with Approved Credit

Jacksonville Mall (910) 353-7333

CALL 451-5249 • 451-8529

For An Appointment Walk-Ins WALK-INS upon ALWAYS Availability. WELCOME

STEVE SHELTON, OD MCCS Complex Bldg. 1231 Camp Lejeune, NC 28542

451-5249

Your Family-Owned Jeweler ~ Trusted for Generations

Reconstruct your spiritual road CMDR. JOHN LYLE

Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune

Anyone who spends some time driving around Camp Lejeune cannot help but notice all of the road construction taking place. Old roads are being reworked and brand new roads are being built. It’s fascinating to watch the construction being carried out. While I have not seen any master plan for what is being done, I can imagine how some of the roads will look once the construction is complete. Every day as I drive through the roundabout on Holcomb, I see just enough progress to visualize how it will look when the project is finished. Any time there is road construction, it can be a bit inconvenient. There can be delays, detours, even some stopped traffic, but the minor inconvenience is, in the long run, are worthwhile. Ultimately, the roads will be safer, smoother, more efficient and more pleasant to drive upon. In the journey of life we travel many different roads, whether in our car, on a bike or walking. We also travel on different roads emotionally and spiritually. No matter how we are travelling though – physically, emotionally, or spiritually – it is the straight, smooth roads that are better for us. Winding, curved, bumpy roads with pot holes and cracks always makes the journey more difficult. During this time of year, as we celebrate holy days and holidays, two prophets from the scriptures challenge us to do a little personal road reconstruction. Both Isaiah and John the Baptist tell us to “make straight paths.” They tell us “winding roads shall be made straight, and rough roads made smooth.” How we can we make the roads we travel spiritually and emotionally a bit straighter and smoother? Allow me to make a few suggestions. Perhaps filling in the pot hole of anger with some cement of forgiveness or filling in the cracks of complaining with a bit of appreciation will smooth things out. Straighten out the twists and turns from bitterness into kindness. Avoid the winding road of overindulgence in technology with a bit of old fashioned time in prayer. Maybe the bumpy road of self-centeredness can be made smooth with a bit of generosity. No matter what holy day or holiday we find ourselves celebrating, this is a wonderful season to heed the prophets’ call to make straight our paths and smooth our roads. Engage in a bit of spiritual and emotional road reconstruction so the journey of our lives may be a bit safer, more pleasant and grace filled.


12D december 20, 2012

The Globe, Camp Lejeune, N.C.

Buy HErE, PAy HErE! finAnCing AvAilABlE for All lEvElS of CrEdit!

500

$

First year of oil changes and tire rotation free!

stk# 50339A

‘11 Dodge Ram

$380/mo

‘06 Lexus GS 300

$290/mo

‘94 Jeep Wrangler

‘09 Lexus ES 350

$345/mo

‘35 Chevy Street Rod

350 Auto Mustang II Front Suspension

350 700R tranny Mustang II Front Suspention. PW Great Driver.

$31,900

‘59 Lincoln Premier

350 4speed 411 gears. One bad car totally rstored. looks fast sitting still

70k original miles. PW auto #s matching. All original

stk# 50222

$13,995

‘67 Plymouth Satellite 440 with 2 4’s Auto. Fully restored. Excellent condition

$29,900

stk# 50509

‘72 Chevy Nova

$365/mo

stk# 50506

stk# 50165C

‘31 Ford Street Rod

‘71 GMC 1500

stk# 50425

‘12 Dodge Challenger

‘12 Chevy Camaro

$24,900

$18,500

$14,750

stk# 50463

stk# 50127

stk# 50333

‘04 Jeep Wrangler

$14,500

$12,995

$33,900

stk# 50417

‘03 Jeep Wrangler

350 cu in Auto lift kit

stk# BC-S88870

Not to be combined with other sales

stk# 50485

stk# 50306A

stk# 50504

off your purchase!

stk# 50487

‘57 Chevy Bel Air

$21,995

$11,900

stk# BC-142329

‘81 Ford F150

$8,500

stk# 50493

‘41 Ford Sedan

$21,900

stk# 50454

‘73 Dodge Challenger Off Frame restoration 340 Auto restored to original condition

$28,900

stk# 50507

stk# 50316C

‘07 Chevy Silverado

$340/mo

stk# OC100835

‘04 Chevy Corvette

$23,995

stk# 50332

‘74 Plymouth Duster

Gold Duster package with rare fold down back seat. 62k original miles. #s matching AC restored to original condition

$14,900

stk# 50502

‘62 Ford Galaxie

‘39 Ford Tractor

Convertible #s matching. 32 original miles. Great Cruiser

Fully restored. Great Running

$29,900

stk# 50473

‘55 Chevy Nomad LT1 Corvette engine & Tranny Fully Restoerd

$49,000

$5,995

stk# 50502

‘61 Studebaker Champ

$13,900

* 72 Months @ 6.99% APR. WAC. tAx, tAgs & AdMin. fee extRA. ALL PAYMents sUBJeCt to BAnK APPRoVAL. see deALeR foR detAiLs.

Bogue Auto SAleS.com CrEdit HotlinE 5326 Hwy. 24 (East of Swansboro) for PrE-APProvAl

252-393-2469

WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM

WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM

WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM

• WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM • WWW.BOGUEAUTOSALES.COM •

Globe December 20, 2012  

Serving Camp Lejeneune, NC