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SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

BOLD

ARTISTIC FASHION

Explore. Engage. Enjoy. HOW NEWCOMERS CAN OWN THE TOWN!

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MEET THE DOCTORS


Publisher’s Letter that I have yet to explore. One of the new places I’m excited to visit is the first Wegmans store in our state. Opening in the Midtown East Shopping Center on September 29th, Wegmans has already begun making a positive impact on our community.

F

or me there’s no contest: Fall is the best time of the year. Doesn’t matter where I’ve lived or traveled, September and October are the most gorgeous months of the year. It’s the subtle shifts from summer hot to autumn cool, the layers of textures and styles in fall fashion, and the brilliant colors that unfold across this transition season that captivate our senses. We celebrate all of these aspects with our fashion tribute to the art and style of Frida Kahlo, page 82, timed to coincide with the exhibit of her work opening on October 26th at the NC Museum of Art. While fall fashion has always played into our September editorial, we’ve traditionally called this our “newcomers issue,” because so many people move into the area over the summer months and are experiencing Midtown for the first time. Of course, we’re still talking to all you long-time readers as well, so the messages you’ll read from leaders around our market speak to how things are evolving and what we need to do to make sure the momentum that Raleigh and Wake County have today carries us forward into a future that’s the best it can be for all of us.

Last month, Wegmans delivered 16,733 pounds of non-perishable food to The Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina’s Raleigh Branch. Jenna Temple, manager of corporate partnerships for the Food Bank, reported, “This delivery will provide nearly 15,000 meals for people in need in our 34 counties and will go a long way toward ensuring no one goes hungry.” That’s the kind of corporate neighbor I’m thrilled is coming to town. And from what I know of the family-owned food store, their associates become personally engaged in the community as well. In fact, when the Wegmans’ delivery arrived at the food bank, store manager Hallie Johnston led a team of employees from the Raleigh store to help unload the truck. That same team also presented a $7,500 check to the United Way of the Greater Triangle, representing a corporate gift combined with contributions raised by Wegmans’ Raleigh employees. Johnston, who moved to our area last summer and settled her family in Apex, is one of the leaders who shares her perspectives as a newcomer in this issue (page 110). Whether you’re new to our community or have lived here for decades, I’d love to hear how you enjoy spending your time, what you’d like to see in our magazines, and how you think our communities should evolve. Cheers,

There’s a common thread across the conversations: Explore. Engage. Enjoy. As much as I’ve enjoyed so many qualities of living here, I’m constantly learning of a new event or something on the horizon

Connie Gentry Editor / Publisher

Your opinions matter to us. Let us know what you think of this issue of Midtown magazine. Please email connie@midtownmag.com with your comments. 8 | MidtownMag.com


Founder / CEO Ronny Stephens Publisher / Editor Connie Gentry Design Director / Copy Editor Cindy Huntley Graphic Design Jennifer Heinser Advertising Design Jordan Beard Social Media / Community Engagement Brittany Murdock Business Development Matthew Stephens Senior Account Executives Meredith Mills, Charis Painter Car y Living Associate Publisher Maddi Blanchard Editorial Contributors Elizabeth Brignac, Tina Dahir, Alex Dixon, Kurt Dusterberg, Kat Harding, Lipsa Shah, Jordan Hewitt, Beth Peterson, Br yan Reed, Don Vaughan, Cher yl Capaldo Traylor, Mick Schulte, Jody Maness Contributing Photographers Dyyymond Aerials, Mick Schulte Josh Manning / Jericho 7 Films Joe Reale, Matt Williams Photography F8 Photo Studios, Scott Kelly Raleigh Food Pics Distribution Manager Joe Lizana

CORRECTION We inadvertently failed to credit a photograph in our July/August issue. The photos of Cardinal Gibbons High School in the Arts Empower Education story were taken by Azul Photography. Midtown magazine regrets the error.

Midtown magazine is published six times annually. Any reproduction in part or in whole of any part of this publication is prohibited without the express written consent of the publisher. Midtown magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photography, or art. Unsolicited material is welcome and is considered intended for publication. Such material will become the property of the magazine and will be subject to editing. Material will be returned if accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. Midtown magazine will not knowingly accept any real estate advertising in violation of U.S. equal opportunity law.

SUBSCRIPTIONS 6 print issues (1 year) Available online at MidtownMag.com 4818-204 Six Forks Road | Raleigh, NC 27609 Ph: 919.782.4710 | F: 919.782.4763

10 | MidtownMag.com


CONTENTS /

features 72

OC T OBE R

2 0 1 9

Photo by Joe Reale

S E P T E MBE R

Engineering Education Schools focus on teaching technology.

82

Frida Fashion Autumn begs for bold colors and artistic style.

94

Meet the Influencers Follow these local Instagram sensations.

The Write Way Aspiring authors find resources around the Triangle.

Here to Stay In the City of Oaks, newcomers plant roots for the future.

130

82

Call to Action

Photo by Willa Stein

110

Paying tribute to the legacy of Dr. Charles van der Horst.

110

Photo by Dyyymond Aerials

106


CONTENTS S E P T E MBE R

on the scene

OC T OBE R

2 0 1 9

The World of Bluegrass returns to our city.

22 Travel Breathtaking views and fun-filled festivals in the Blue Ridge Mountains.

26 Community Transitions LifeCare eases families through the most difficult times.

Photo courtesy of Avalaire

Photo courtesy of Cameron Village

18 Music

/

departments 30 Parade Time!

The annual Parade of Homes unveils luxury living across Wake County.

34

30

34 A Village Within

The South’s original shopping community celebrates 70 years.

68 Parenting

40 Chef’s Table

A Raleigh native comes home to guide Scott Crawford’s new Jolie.

Advice on how teens can leverage social media for success.

44 Leader of the Pack 128 Fall Festivals

Meet NC State’s new athletic director, Boo Corrigan.

50 Living Well

Elegant and efficient kitchens.

64 Road to Recovery

0056

A century-old building gets a cosmopolitan revamp.

58 At Home

16 Social Scene

Tips for healthy sleep habits.

52 Contemporary Design

in every issue

Healing Transitions brings hope to difficult times.

sponsored content 135

MEET THE DOCTORS SPECIAL SECTION

39

How to Easily Sell or Buy a Home

62

Designer Living

81

Polished Impressions

92

Precious Pieces

Tastes of the City

104

Home Styler

66

Sister Cities

134

Healthy You

67

Foodie Focus

152

Mental Health

154

Fall Fashion Trends

161 Out & About

Dine & Draft

Midtown Mingles

New Around Town

178 Kaleidoscope Living

ON THE COVER: Photography by Joe Reale


On the SOCIAL Scene

Let’s Connect! BY BRITTANY MURDOCK

It may have taken a little over 18 months, but Moore Square Park is officially open! The renovated park features a restaurant called Square Burger, a splash pad, and new seating areas.

What is a trip to the Raleigh Night Market without picking up some goodies from Sweet Cravings Cookie Company? The Raleigh Night Market showcases locally made goods, artisans, food trucks, live music, and entertainment at City Market in downtown Raleigh once a month. Don’t miss their next two events on September 12th and October 17th.

Locals and travelers alike are raving over downtown’s newly opened Layered Croissanterie. Their flaky croissants include flavors like Bananas Foster, Ham and Gruyere, Pain au Chocolat, and Blueberry Danish (pictured here).

Get Social With Us! 16 | MidtownMag.com

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@midtownmagazine


On the MUSIC Scene

ROLL ON BY BRYAN C. REED

The World of Bluegrass Festival embraces the history and the future of music—and of Raleigh.

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Since it moved to Raleigh from Nashville in 2013, the International Bluegrass Music Association’s (IBMA) World of Bluegrass Festival has been an open gathering for bluegrass and Americana aficionados. It’s the site of the annual Bluegrass Music Awards and a bevy of industry conferences. But mainly, it’s an all-you-can-eat buffet of twangy tunes with free concerts dotted all over downtown Raleigh—some even forming as impromptu jam sessions—and the main stage at Red Hat Amphitheater being the only ticketed venue. In the midst of these shows and industry conferences, the festival has become a magnet for the genre’s top talents, with past headliners including the likes of Béla Fleck and Abigail Washburn, Rhiannon Giddens, and Steve Martin and the Steep Canyon Rangers. This year, the World of Bluegrass, which runs September 24th to 28th, will be more open and accessible than ever before. In March, organizers of the festival announced that, for the first time ever, the headlining concerts at Red Hat Amphitheater will be free and open to the public. Upgraded advance tickets have been sold for fans who want to guarantee seating, but the remainder of Red Hat Amphitheater will be filled on a first-come-first-served basis for sets by the Del McCoury Band with Sam Bush, Molly Tuttle, Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver, Balsam Range, Sister Sadie, Frank Solivan and Dirty Kitchen, and I’m With Her (a supergroup comprised of Sara Watkins, Sarah Jarosz, and Aoife O’Donovan). In a press release, IBMA’s executive director, Paul Schiminger, celebrated the festival’s new approach. “With the help of our Raleigh partners and key sponsors, IBMA is transitioning our festival to a free, mission-forward event, taking bluegrass to the masses by reducing all barriers to participation. All are welcome to come hear the best in bluegrass music today.”

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If past years are any indication, World of Bluegrass— and the music that gives it its name—has no shortage of fans. The News & Observer reported last year that the festival “has lured thousands of visitors to downtown and generated millions of dollars in economic impact since it moved to Raleigh.” And the city is contracted with IBMA to host the festival at least through 2021. This is fitting, given the vital role North Carolina musicians played in defining the sound of bluegrass. Though the genre takes its name from Kentuckian Bill Monroe’s band, the Blue Grass Boys, which formed in the late ’30s, the recipe wasn’t complete until a Tar Heel joined the band. According to The Bluegrass Heritage Foundation’s summary of bluegrass history, “While many fans of bluegrass music date the genre to 1939, when Monroe formed his first Blue Grass Boys band, most believe that the classic bluegrass sound came together late in 1945, shortly after Earl Scruggs, a 21-year-old banjo player from North Carolina, joined the band.”

MOLLY TUTTLE

Scruggs developed a three-finger technique on his banjo—different from the “clawhammer” style that was typical of old-time music—that, alongside Monroe’s high-lonesome vocal, gave bluegrass its identity.

Photo courtesy of NPR.org

Photo courtesy of Compass Records

Since then, bluegrass has come and gone from mainstream popularity, but endured in factions of both preservationists and revisionists. For some, only the styles forged by bluegrass’ first generation—Scruggs,

I’M WITH HER

20 | MidtownMag.com

Monroe, guitarist Doc Watson, and others— are true bluegrass. For others—from Nickel Creek or the Avett Brothers to Fleck and Bush—that foundation has provided a springboard for new sounds and approaches. At World of Bluegrass, both factions have been fully represented. The festival’s credo of inclusiveness and welcoming extends beyond tickets to the programming of the festival itself, which covers a broad swath of traditional bluegrass, folk, Americana, old-time, and other adjacent styles. Schiminger has said, “When it is all said and done, bluegrass fans will get to enjoy artists ranging from Hall of Famers and award-winning rising stars to special collaborations with amazing guests.”


Photo courtesy of Sister Sadie

SISTER SADIE

Photo courtesy of Uncork Duplin

DOYLE LAWSON, & QUICKSILVER

It’s that broad swath of interpretations of bluegrass that has made World of Bluegrass a compelling—and remarkably apt— event for Raleigh, a city rich with history, and also in the midst of constant growth and evolution. Like the regions that birthed the sound, World of Bluegrass aims to honor the past while embracing the vision of a still-brighter future.

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

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On the Travel Scene

Fall IN LOVE

GRANDFATHER MOUNTAIN

Breathtaking views and fun-filled festivals—this is the season our mountains shine.

22 | MidtownMag.com

Color your life with an escape to western North Carolina, where the Blue Ridge Mountains unveil a spectacular panorama of autumn foliage. Our state has one of the longest-running fall leaf seasons in the world, and—while many try to pinpoint the precise peak week to visit—any time from mid-September to early November will showcase varying stages of gold and crimson hues.


Photo courtesy of Beech Mountain TDA

Photo courtesy of Grandfather Mountain

The most scenic drive is along the Blue Ridge Parkway, which runs from the Virginia border down to the southwestern corner of the state at Cherokee and offers more than 200 overlooks. For drivers, the Linn Cove Viaduct is perhaps the most stunning experience, as it gracefully wraps around the contours of Grandfather Mountain. Commonly described as the “missing link” of the 469-mile parkway, the Linn Cove Viaduct opened in September 1987, successfully creating the final leg of the parkway in our state. Hikers will find access to more than 65 trails along this stretch of the parkway, with varying degrees of difficulty from easy to moderate to strenuous, as well as additional parks and hiking opportunities throughout the region. Trails at Grandfather Mountain State Park have some of the most dramatic terrain, and a walk across Grandfather Mountain’s Mile High Swinging Bridge is a bucket-list contender for everyone. The towns and vacation destinations in western North Carolina are as

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

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Photo by Matt Williams Photography Photo courtesy of Land of Oz NC

colorful in their own respect as the surrounding mountains, and this is the season when festivals and special events abound. Take your pick among charming villages, such as Blowing Rock, with its signature landmark attraction that offers its own stunning views across the gorge and hosts an annual music festival on September 14th. Nearby is Banner Elk, home to the annual Woolly Worm Festival (yes, you can race your very own woolly worm). The 42nd running of the woollies will be October 19th and 20th. And for those who don’t know: This is as close to an official winter forecast as it gets. The coloration across the 13 segments of the winning woolly worm are said to predict the snowfall across the 13 weeks of winter. Or, celebrate the 80th anniversary of The Wizard of Oz at the annual Autumn at Oz festival, September 6th–9th and 13th–15th, which celebrates the movie classic and The Land of Oz theme park. Located atop Beech Mountain (which claims the title of “highest town in the Eastern U.S.”), the Land of Oz opened in 1970 and led visitors down a yellow brick road–reenactment of the classic movie. If scarier witches and spooks are what you’re seeking for the Halloween season, the Ghost Train at Tweetsie Railroad, between Blowing Rock and Boone, runs weekends from September 20th through October. 24 | MidtownMag.com

And also, throughout the month of October, take your pick among a host of festivals in the Asheville area, including two beer festivals on the 5th: Oktoberfest in downtown Asheville and the Brewgrass Festival, also near downtown. The next Saturday you can visit the Sierra Nevada Oktoberfest or CiderFest, featuring more than 20 cider makers and 90 varieties of cider. And that same weekend, October 12th–13th, there’s the Spruce Pine Potters Market and the Cashiers Valley Leaf Festival.


On the COMMUNITY Scene

Celebrations

of LIFE

BY BETH PETERSON

Forty years ago, Hospice of Wake County began with a single doctor and two nurses. Today, the organization, now known as Transitions LifeCare, serves more than 6,000 patients a year—and much of the growth has been possible because of support from partners like North State Bank.

26 | MidtownMag.com


The folks at North State Bank know how to throw a party. In fact, their annual Summer Salute, held every May at North Ridge Country Club, has come to be known as the best beach party in Raleigh. With an atmosphere focused on fun, the live music, dancing, and adorable pink-flamingo mascot might lead attendees to think they’ve walked into a high school prom by mistake (hold the formal wear; toss in a few hundred pairs of flip-flops). Nothing against high school proms of course, but this shindig—well, it digs a little deeper. On the surface, it might look like a well-planned beach party—and it is. But the purpose of North State Bank’s Summer Salute is to celebrate all of life’s moments while adding value and meaning to life’s final moments. A few years ago, Larry Barbour, president and CEO of North State Bank, wanted the Wake County–headquartered community bank to support another local organization, and so he asked his staff who they thought North State should support. Hospice of Wake County, which has since been renamed Transitions LifeCare, was the overwhelming choice because it had touched the lives of some then-current board members and employees. That was in 2003, and the two organizations formed a committee, which included North State Bank executive and event co-chair Sandra Temple along with Kit Boney of Wake County Hospice. (Ms. Boney passed away in July 2006.) The committee quickly went to work brainstorming ideas for a fundraiser: A golf tournament wouldn’t appeal to a broad enough spectrum of people, and a black-tie event didn’t seem quite right, either. According to Temple, the priority was to create an event that would reflect the heart behind Transitions LifeCare’s mission—making the most of every moment. And so, Summer Salute was born. SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

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Photo courtesy of Transitions LifeCare / North State Bank

Photo courtesy of Transitions LifeCare / North State Bank

THE FUNDING THAT NORTH STATE BANK’S SUMMER SALUTE PROVIDES ALLOWS TRANSITIONS LIFECARE TO PROVIDE HOSPICE CARE FOR INDIVIDUALS WHOSE FAMILIES NEED ADDITIONAL ASSISTANCE.

Transitions LifeCare serves Wake County and surrounding areas. To donate or get involved, visit TransitionsLifeCare.org or SummerSalute.com.

28 | MidtownMag.com

Since its debut in 2004, Summer Salute has raised more than $1.7 million, and every penny raised by Summer Salute goes directly into providing hospice care for individuals whose families are unable to pay for hospice services. John Thoma, CEO of Transitions LifeCare, believes Summer Salute is one of Raleigh’s premier fundraising events. “The team from North State really does all the work; we are the beneficiaries. It has helped Transitions grow in size and scope of service; we couldn’t have grown without them,” he explains. “In 2004, we served 878 patients. In 2018, we served 6,200. Summer Salute allows us to be true to our 40-year legacy that we never turn anyone away, regardless of insurance or ability to pay.” Barbour has a similar approach to business, and all of life: “My purpose [at this bank] is to treat everyone with dignity and respect. Someone may come in needing a dry place to wait for the bus, but they will be treated the same as someone coming in to make a $1 million deposit.” North State Bank’s stated mission is simply “to add value to the lives of those we serve.” And that’s what makes the partnership between North State Bank and Transitions LifeCare so beautiful—the conviction that every life has value, and that their mission is to add value to every life.


BOST HOMES / AVALAIRE BOST HOMES / AVALAIRE

Parade of Homes

Everyone Loves 30 | MidtownMag.com

a Parade BY BRITTANY MURDOCK / PHOTOS COURTESY OF AVALAIRE


Especially when it’s the annual Parade of Homes that unveils the newest homes and communities in our area.

It’s North Carolina’s largest open house­­—and whether you’re searching for your forever home, looking for ideas, or are just an avid fan of interior design,it’s the perfect way to get out and see what your town and neighboring developments have to offer.

As builders show off their craftsmanship, they also take advantage of the opportunity to test emerging trends, like barn doors or contemporary kitchen hoods, and solicit feedback from community members. And if you’re looking for ways to customize or update your home, the parade is a perfect preview to experience the latest and greatest in home tech— WiFi–controlled lights and video doorbells come to mind. You’ll also find innovations to make your home a bit more sustainable, with features that incorporate eco-friendly materials or green efficiencies.

The parade is also a great way to draw inspiration from the industry’s hottest design trends. Looking to spruce up your bathroom or reinvent your master bedroom? Or what about transforming your ordinary kitchen into the one you’ve always dreamed of? With close to 270 newly-built homes to tour in this year’s parade, you’ll find the latest trends in homebuilding, from innovative floors plans and rich color palettes to brass décor and a focus on sustainability.

For your full guide to homes on this year’s tour, the annual Parade of Homes book will be available at the Home Builders Association of Raleigh-Wake County beginning September 25th, with the parade kicking off September 28th–29th and running October 4th–6th and 11th–13th. The homes that are judged to be the best in the parade will be announced before the final weekend, allowing everyone a chance to tour the top three winners.

For more than 50 years, the Triangle Parade of Homes has become a destination for those who look forward to setting their eyes on the latest and greatest homes around town. This free, self-guided tour invites the public to view the newest homes and communities throughout the Triangle.

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Tips for Touring the Homes

1 2 3 4

Find directions before heading out, as some communities are new and might not be recognizable on your GPS.

Check the website, HBAWake.com, for homes that could be closed for viewing.

Wear comfortable shoes, as available parking may require walking several blocks.

Let them know what you think! Provide feedback on the website: HBAWake.com. 32 | MidtownMag.com


MAY/JUNE 2019

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Downtown VIBES

A Village

WITHIN

B Y C H E R Y L C A P A L D O T R AY L O R / P H O T O S C O U R T E S Y O F C A M E R O N V I L L A G E

W

Inside the City of Oaks dwells the South’s original shopping and living community.

34 | MidtownMag.com


L

ifelong Raleigh resident Abbe Townsend remembers shopping at Cameron Village throughout her childhood. From visiting Santa at Sears to buying her first album at Record Bar, Townsend recalls the many roles the

shopping center played in her youth. She tossed coins into the Boylan Pearce department store wishing well, ate at Balentine’s Cafeteria, and watched movies at Village Theatre. She was there when Steve Martin, Jimmy Buffet, and the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band performed in the Village Subway, the shopping center’s popular underground live music and entertainment venue. Townsend, who works in the children’s department at Quail Ridge Books, says Village Book and Stationery was one of her favorite shops and the first bookstore she remembers visiting. Visitors from all over the Triangle have similarly fond memories since, for 70 years, Cameron Village has held a special place in the heart of many North Carolinians.

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MODERN DAY CAMERON VILLAGE IS STILL A PLACE WITH STRONG COMMUNITY TIES, WHERE PEOPLE MEET FOR COFFEE, DINNER, OR TO SHOP.

A Landmark Is Born From the beginning, developers J.W. York and R.A. Bryan wanted Cameron Village to be a true village—complete with a variety of residential options, office spaces, retail shops, and grocery stores—so residents would have an immediate sense of community and easy access to provisions. When the shopping center opened in 1949, it offered Raleigh residents an opportunity to live in an innovative retail-residential community, one of the first of its kind in North Carolina. Cameron Village was the first shopping center situated between Washington D.C. and Atlanta and, across its seven decades, has grown ever more popular and successful. Cameron Village earned its venerable spot on the map for experiencing many other firsts. The Village Post Office, which opened in 1952, was Raleigh’s first air-conditioned post office. And features we now take for granted, such as escalators and drivethrough windows, were fascinating novelties in the early days of the shopping center, when Sears shoppers could take the “moving stairs” between floors and Wachovia Bank accommodated customers from the convenience of their car windows. Through the years the shopping center has undergone many renovations. Businesses have come and gone, and several— like those in the Village Subway—became local legends before fading into memory. Cameron Village has grown from its original three stores and one restaurant to more than 75 shops and numerous restaurants. Pat Boyle, executive director of Cameron Village Merchants’ Association, says the shopping center owes much of its success to management’s ability to adapt to the community’s changing needs and to the company’s intention to remain current. 36 | MidtownMag.com

The Village Today Cameron Village has maintained York’s original vision of a place with strong community ties. “People still want to live, work, and shop in the same geographical area,” Boyle says. Shoppers appreciate the focus on independent, local merchants, who have a strong sense of customer service, and the diversity of stores is a strong attraction to visitors near and far, making Cameron Village a popular North Carolina shopping destination. Shoppers can choose from antiques, upscale clothiers, outdoor recreational equipment, or unique home furnishings. Eclectic boutiques abound throughout the shopping center, and friends can easily meet across a steaming cappuccino or a cold beer, or enjoy a savory meal at one of many exceptional restaurants. More Food and Fun in the Future Additional restaurants are being added for late-night dining, and plans are in the works for Cameron Village to become a lively entertainment and music venue once again. “It will be in the same location as the original Village Subway,” says Lynne Worth, senior vice president of retail leasing and property management for York Properties. Music might bring back a sense of nos-talgia to Townsend and others who spent their youth dancing in the Village Subway’s beloved nightclubs, listening to Barry Manilow, Tiny Tim, and local favorites like The Connells. Anniversar y Celebration A weeklong celebration, planned for October 11th–19th, boasts the theme “Come Play With Us!” For this anniversary shindig, Cameron Village will partner with the Community Music School of Raleigh, a nonprofit that provides free music lessons and instruments to underserved populations in the Raleigh community. “You can play some tunes or you can play some games,” Boyle says. Festivities will include dancing, music, and sidewalk games. Ten pianos will be placed around the shopping center, offering shoppers a chance to showcase their talent or listen to local professionals. And everyone is invited to join in Cameron Village’s attempt to beat the world record for number of kazoos played simultaneously. At ShopCameronVillage.com, you’ll find a collection of oral histories told by those who have special memories of the Village, and you can also share your story on the site’s Living History section.


SPONSORED CONTENT

SPONSORED CONTENT

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Opendoor’s mission is to empower everyone with the freedom to move, providing a simpler way to buy, sell, or trade in a home.


CHEF’S Table

A Raleigh native returns to guide Scott Crawford’s awaited Jolie.

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French

ROOTS For Madison Tessener—the chef de cuisine at Chef Scott Crawford’s new restaurant Jolie—the appointment marks a return to her hometown. Tessener wanted to be a chef since she was eight years old, and has constantly accompanying her mom in the kitchen while growing up in Raleigh. While she didn’t go to culinary school, she ended up at the College of Charleston on a college track scholarship—surrounded by a storied and celebrated dining scene. Her focus on hospitality and tourism management allowed her to meet chefs in the community, and her persistence to get into the kitchen and be a chef paid off. From taking out the trash to peeling carrots, cracking stone crab claws, breaking down whole fish, and learning to make pasta, Tessener’s knowledge improved as she worked her way up in many acclaimed Charleston restaurants— including FIG, Chez Nous, Husk, and McCrady’s, where she was sous chef. After a decade of experience in Charleston and in kitchens in New York City and Sweden, Tessener is back in Raleigh for Crawford’s French neighborhood, bistro–inspired restaurant next door to Crawford and Son. “French cuisine is the grandmother of cooking and dining, and Jolie is a great way to tip our hats to it,” Tessener says. “There’s no way to train as a chef without learning French cuisine; it’s inescapable in the most delicious way.” The new restaurant focuses on French classics with modern interpretations using the bounty of North Carolina products, from Steak Frites with Au Poivre Sauce to Trout Almondine and a White Corn Vichyssoise. The small plates menu covers more classics with a twist—such as escargot served nontraditionally with warm marigold, summer tomatoes, and sourdough crisps and a ratatouille tart with zucchini, eggplant, tomato, and Boursin

BY ALEX DIXON

PHOTOS BY JESSICA CRAWFORD PHOTOGRAPHY

cheese. The drink menu contains a focused list of food-friendly wines, French-inspired aperitif cocktails, and saison-style beers, including a signature offering from Raleigh-based Brewery Bhavana brewed exclusively for the restaurant. “It’s rustic cooking that’s simple, delicious, and executed really well,” Tessener says. Diners can view the open kitchen in the 35-seat restaurant or sit on the 25-seat pergola-covered rooftop overlooking the Raleigh skyline. Jolie shares several things with its neighbor, Crawford and Son, including the “Save Room” dessert section mirrored in French, while the malted wheat rolls at Crawford and Son became the signature bread offering of Gougères—a savory pastry with cheese— at Jolie. “We were inspired by our trip to Paris and the energetic little neighborhood French bistros that exude such happiness; we instantly wanted to bring that feeling and food to our corner of downtown Raleigh,” Crawford says. “Jolie is an intimate and cozy space, and we think this convivial setting will really lend to creating community and engaging with your neighbor in a way that happens so naturally in French bistros.” Tessener came back to Raleigh originally looking for a potential space to open her own restaurant. But after meeting up with Crawford, he told her about Jolie and thought she’d be a great fit for the restaurant. In addition to her extensive culinary training, Tessener has also completed the Introductory Sommelier Course & Examination from the Court of Master Sommeliers. “I’m honored and excited to be back and cooking in Raleigh. It’s that expression of love,” Tessener says. “I always wanted to come home and cook for my loved ones. And there’s a philosophy of creating a family (at Jolie). It’s about the guest…it’s about creating an experience.”

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RECIPE BY CHEF SCOTT CRAWFORD, CRAWFORD AND SON

Maitake

Mushroom Salad With Salted Turnip, Olive Vinaigrette, Lemon, & Hazelnuts Instructions

Ingredients For the salad:

Olive Vinaigrette:

1 lb maitake mushrooms 1 white turnip 1 cup olive vinaigrette (recipe below) 2 cups baby arugula 1 lemon 1 tsp lemon thyme leaves ½ cup fennel fronds ¼ cup hazelnuts, blanched Manchego cheese (1 year old) kosher salt sea salt olive oil freshly ground black pepper

2 cups 1 cup 1 Tbsp 1 Tbsp 1 cup

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Castelvetrano olives, pitted Champagne vinegar sherry vinegar white soy sauce extra virgin olive oil kosher salt, to taste

Combine olives, vinegars, and white soy into a blender and blend on high speed until smooth. On medium speed, slowly drizzle in olive oil until all is emulsified. Adjust seasoning and acidity as needed and reserve in refrigerator. Makes about 4 cups. For the turnips: Gently peel the turnips. Slice turnips on a mandolin (approximately 1/8" thick) and cut into strips (approximately ¾" wide). Place the strips into a mixing bowl with 1 Tbsp kosher salt. Once thoroughly mixed, cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for at least 1 hour. The salt will soften the turnips over time. Taste test! If the turnips are too salty for your liking, you can rinse them in cold water. Pat dry and reserve in the refrigerator. For the mushrooms: Pull apart the clusters of maitake into smaller, bite-size pieces and season with salt, fresh black pepper, and olive oil. Spread evenly on a parchment-lined baking sheet and lightly roast in a 350° oven until just tender. Cool and reserve in refrigerator.


For the hazelnuts: Toss the hazelnuts with a little olive oil, kosher salt, and fresh black pepper. Spread evenly on a parchment-lined baking sheet and toast in a 350° oven until golden brown and crunchy (they will get crunchier as they cool). Once cool, lightly chop the hazelnuts and store at room temperature. To complete: In a mixing bowl, combine the maitake, salted turnips, arugula, and hazelnuts. Toss with just enough vinaigrette to coat. Season with kosher salt, fresh black pepper, and olive oil and gently toss together (adjust your dressing and seasoning as you see fit). Place the salad mix in your chosen vessel. Using a peeler, shave some of the Manchego over the salad. Using a microplane, zest the lemon over the salad. Evenly drop lemon thyme and fennel fronds over the top. Finish with flakes of sea salt, fresh black pepper, and a touch more olive oil and you’re good to go! SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

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Candid CONVERSATION

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Photo courtesy of NC State Athletics

Leader of the


Pack

BY KURT DUSTERBERG

NC State’s new athletic director brings a rich legacy and a powerful resume, but most importantly, he brings strong convictions. Boo Corrigan is saddled with a name that catches people’s attention. The new athletic director at North Carolina State University is the son of Gene Corrigan, who served as commissioner of the Atlantic Coast Conference from 1987 to 1997, following eight years as athletic director at the University of Notre Dame. (We will get to the first name in a moment.) The younger Corrigan has built his own impressive resume in college athletics. He arrived after an eightyear tenure as director of athletics at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. While at Army, he helped the thletic department make dramatic improvements in fundraising and facilities, while also enjoying success in competition and the classroom. Previously he served as an associate athletic director at the U.S. Naval Academy, Notre Dame, and Duke University. He and his wife, Kristen, are now settled in Raleigh with their three teenage children.

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BOO CORRIGAN HAS MADE NC STATE HIS HOME.

How did you come to be known as Boo? I am the baby of seven kids. I’m the one that’s named after my father. It was never going to be “Little Gene.” Now I’m a 52-year-old man named Boo and it fits what I do for a living. Maybe when it’s going really well, they’ll boo me, too.

to NC State and being a part of something that is a driver in the community and a driver in the state—a group of doers that gets things done. That was part of the appeal of coming to NC State. You’re an advocate for student-athlete wellness and you prioritize mental health and social media training. Those are ver y important topics in today’s landscape.

Were you an athlete growing up? I attempted to be. I played in high school—little bit of football, basketball, and soccer—but I was just too slow to be able to play at the college level. You’ve worked at some special institutions: West Point, The Naval Academy, Notre Dame, Duke. How have those jobs prepared you for the NC State job? My wife and I made a decision a long time ago that we wanted to be at schools that were aspirational for our children. We’ve been blessed and lucky to be able to accomplish that, to include coming

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Our charge, ultimately, is to develop young people—and how you go about doing that and setting them up for the greatest success. And that’s not only success in their four or five years with us, but also for the next 40 years of their lives. [For social media it’s] what you write, what you post, what you snap (Snapchat)—but also who you are associated with in those same fields. From the mental health standpoint, it’s just a different society. What we stress over and over again is the courage it takes to raise your hand when you need help. It’s not a sign of weakness; it’s a sign of strength. It can be anything from mental health to being in an unhealthy relationship or having a substance abuse issue. We want the people we work with every day to understand the value of that and reward the strength in asking for help.


Our charge, ultimately, is to develop young people—and how you go about doing that and setting them up for the greatest success. And that’s not only success in their four or five years with us, but also for the next 40 years of their lives.

Because NC State has two rivals here in the Triangle, does that up the ante for the athletic department to be competitive? I’m not familiar with what schools you’re talking about (he deadpans). What we have to focus on is who we are. We have over 34,000 season ticket−holders for football; 10,000 for basketball. Not only are they ticket−holders, but they show up for games. If we can be the best NC State we can be, that’s going to lead to a pretty great place. It doesn’t have to be, “We’re great because we beat Duke,” or, “We’re great because we beat Carolina.” It’s got to be: “This is who we are as an institution.” When we get this thing humming and we’re all going in one direction, the outcome is going to be very special. You’ve got to rely on what your beliefs are, what your behaviors are, to drive the results. As an athletic director, you have the chance to become your school’s biggest fan. Do you enjoy rooting for teams? I love being a fan. I’m not diminishing the responsibilities of this position, but this is what I get to do every day; this isn’t what I have to do every day. If you’re having a bad day, you can go to a practice; you can go to a game. We’ll be at everything. It doesn’t mean any less to any of our athletes to be competing as it does to our high-profile ones. To them, that’s what the experience is. It’s about feeling supported and knowing we care and are part of their experiences, regardless of what sport they’re playing. Where is college sports heading in the coming years? A lot of people view Division I athletics as an arms race—nicer facilities, bigger opportunities, TV contracts. What’s next? I think you could broaden your viewfinder on this and look at every college campus in the country: Look at the size of the chemistry building or the engineering building or the research dollars. All of higher education is in an arms race—be it for professors or presidents or the most qualified students. We’re only a part of that in college athletics. At the end of the day, we’re trying to provide an unbelievable experience for the students who are coming in and competing for NC State. And, we’re making sure we are constantly ahead of the curve to create better and better experiences for them: where they’re playing; how they’re training; what they’re eating. Are we providing the [best] services we can provide? All those things are going to continue to move forward.

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Your father is obviously one of the most influential and accomplished administrators in college sports. How much impact has he had on your career? He’s my dad, above anything else. I thought it was an unbelievable way to grow up, [being] around a college campus, where people were doing great things. My father had a stroke in December, so a lot of the things that are going on now I have not been able to share with him. Was I sharing more with him before? Yeah, probably more than I even knew. But it was always just talking to my father. It was never talking to Gene Corrigan, this legendary figure. You have three kids, all in their teenage years. Are any of them athletes, and do you have any sense they might develop into college athletes? I think the only shot is if they have my wife’s genes. My wife was a field hockey and lacrosse player at Virginia, so she was the athlete in the family. They love being around sports; they love being a part of it. That’s their journey, the opportunity they have in front of them. We’re very supportive of that, and we’re also supportive when they are in a play or when they want to go to a cooking class and everything else. Our job as parents is to be there for them and be as supportive as we can be. How has your adjustment been coming to Raleigh? What are your impressions? It’s an unbelievably great town, from the food scene to the people who are here. I do find that maybe I’ve got a little too much New York in me sometimes after being there. People ask me how I’m doing and I say, “I’m doing fine. I’d be better if we could get through this line” at the grocery store. Moving into the area and feeling welcomed—it’s a little bit odd, to be honest with you, being recognized as much as I have been. It’s a new experience for me. It’s certainly not going to my head, but it’s different. We went to a movie the other night, and the guy serving popcorn leaned over the counter and said, “Are you the new AD at NC State?” I said, “Yes, I am,” hoping he was going to give me free popcorn. But he just turned and walked away. Didn’t do me much good; but he was a nice kid and he’s coming to NC State next year.


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Living WELL

Sweeter

DREAMS Hints for healthier sleep habits. BY LIPSA SHAH

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We all wish we could go to sleep the same exact way—turn off the lights, slide into our fresh sheets, close our eyes, and completely surrender our bodies to rest. But for many people, the problematic difference is that this simple task is much harder to do than for others. How we prepare ourselves for bed—physically and mentally—is just as important as how many hours of sleep we get. (Ask most health advocates and they’ll say the optimum hours should be eight!) We all know what happens the next day when we don’t get enough sleep: not only are we exhausted, but we’re also grumpy; our brains are cloudy; and the day seems to drag on longer than usual. A good night’s sleep is imperative to properly reset our bodies, both emotionally and physically. It is the time for our muscles to heal, our tissues to renew, and our brains to recharge.

Here are some tips that will help your shut-eye come more easily: Turn your electronics off at least an hour or two before you plan on calling it a night. Reducing your blue light exposure will help your brain wind down quicker.

Embrace the Cinderella deadline and aim to sleep a few hours before midnight. It is said that the sleep you get before midnight is more restorative than sleep after midnight.

If you still use your phone as an alarm clock, stop! Buy a new alarm clock; better yet, invest in a “mood clock” that will soothe you to sleep with mindful white noise or delicate sounds of nature, and wake you gently with gradually increasing light and softly chirping birds. In the meantime, turn your phone on airplane mode.

Go to bed at the same time every night. This may seem like a struggle at first, but letting your body adjust to the schedule will help you to fall asleep more quickly.

Eat a light dinner. Your dinner should ideally be no later than 7:30 PM. Enjoy chamomile tea as an after-dinner beverage to help your body wind down.

Completely clear your mind before committing the rest of your night to bed. This is another one of those “easier said than done” scenarios, but the more often you do this, the quicker it will become second nature. Here’ s one way: Take a 10-minute walk in the fresh air after dinner to unwind from the day and the stresses you may be holding onto.

Magnesium is also a great remedy to take before bed, as it relaxes your mind and muscles.

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Celery French fries

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

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Contemporary Design T E X T A N D P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y M I C K S C H U LT E

Meets Historical Setting A century-old building steps up to Raleigh’s cosmopolitan future. After a drastic transformation from an unused storage space to a contemporary design studio, Roux MacNeill Studio opened its new offices in the summer of 2017—but that was only the beginning. Owners Robert MacNeill and Brittany Roux had fallen in love with the Hargett Street property while searching through Craigslist ads in the spring of 2017. Despite the bare-bone pictures in the advertisement, they knew the space had potential. “We were immediately taken with the building’s charm—especially the gold elevators in the lobby,” Roux says. “And we love the vibrant energy the downtown Raleigh scene has to offer, so we went for it.”

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ROUX MACNEILL STUDIO OWNERS ROBERT MACNEILL AND BRITTANY ROUX NEEDED MORE SPACE TO ACCOMMODATE THEIR GROWING COMPANY AND LIBRARY OF RESOURCES, INCLUDING TRUCKLOADS OF FABRIC SWATCHES AND MOOD BOARDS.

Originally, Roux MacNeill occupied one room on the third floor— a workspace designed to feature the natural light flowing in from a large window overlooking Hargett Street. But soon after they moved in, their team grew—along with their library of resources, including truckloads of fabric swatches and mood boards. To accommodate the growth, the studio acquired the room adjacent in 2018 and dubbed it “The Library.” In designing both rooms, the Roux MacNeill team pulled inspiration from the original 1913 building, which was used for a bank and offices. “During our renovation, we found an original door inside one of the walls, and were able to reuse it to enclose our storage closet,” says MacNeill. The team also revived the original moldings below the ceiling and painted the wood floors white rather than refinishing them.

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The two designers approached the space as they do all their projects—leveraging their respective strengths and backgrounds. MacNeill has a degree in architecture, while Roux earned hers in interior design. “Rob and I bring a unique perspective to our projects, and we believe collaboration produces the best results,” Roux says. The new room serves as a casual meeting space for Roux MacNeill and design clients. “We wanted to reimagine the space to feel more like a residence than an office,” says MacNeill. Inspired by the drapery fabric, the team found a steely blue and canary yellow for their color scheme. “We were convinced these colors were the statement we needed to create a comfortable living room that fosters creative thinking and helps our clients see how we approach residential design,” Roux explains.

Rob and I bring a unique perspective to our projects, and we believe collaboration produces the best results.

Beyond creative thinking, the space evokes nostalgia for a time when Raleigh was just a glimmer of the increasingly metropolitan city it’s becoming today. MacNeill and Roux hope to build upon the Triangle’s growth and modern tastes. “Raleigh is an exciting place to live and work, and is becoming more cosmopolitan every day,” MacNeill adds. “Like many of our clients, we are transplants from the North, and we’re enthusiastic about creating the feeling of home for others who make the move here.”

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TASTES of the CITY Contact Raleigh Food Pics to be featured on their Instagram feed: raleighfoodpics@gmail.com

1

2

3

4

(1) Cortez El Fish Mac: 30% mushrooom duxelles/70% N.C. swordfish + lettuce, onion, Cherokee purple tomato, house pickles, Cortez sauce, hand-cut fries, and remixed Alabama white sauce (2) Amorino Caramello Gourmet Cup: vanilla and salted butter caramel gelati, topped with salted butter caramel sauce, tiny balls of dark chocolate, and homemade Chantilly cream (3) soโ€ขca Puerto Rican Pork Belly Mofongo: mashed green plantains, local pork shoulder, mojo pickled onions, chicharrรณn, and bacon jus (4) Trophy Brewing & Pizza Make your own pizza with pepperoni, banana peppers, arugula, and red onions 56 | MidtownMag.com


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At HOME

Elegance Meets Efficiency BY TINA DAHIR

The best kitchens are where people congregate and connect. And yes, also cook.

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W

hat does a real estate developer, entrepreneur, author, and food connoisseur have in common with luxur y residential development? Meet Henry Lambert and you’ll quickly find out. His latest venture, Clark Townhomes, features luxury $1M residential townhouses, mere footsteps from Cameron Village, that are changing the way we think about city living and eating. Here, Lambert marries his passions for cooking and urban developmental design with a touch of epicurean excellence.

Photo courtesy of Shawn Donovan/Concept 8

ORIGINAL KITCHEN DESIGN BY HENRY LAMBERT

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Photo by Joe Reale

Midtown: When did your passion for cooking begin? Henr y Lambert: It was 1976, and I was supposed to develop a space under the 59th Street Bridge in New York City. I went down to Little Italy and saw a store called Raffetto’s— a popular store in the area that sold fresh pasta. [It gave me] an idea that I thought was interesting, so I looked in the yellow pages and bought several pasta machines. I saw a cheese store that was going out of business and made a deal with the owner to store the pasta equipment in the back of the cheese store. And, I called my idea Pasta & Cheese. Fast-for ward 10 years: You now have several Pasta & Cheese retail stores that have become a national wholesale business, and you sell your company to Nestle for $57M (rebranded as Buitoni). Where does that spirit of entrepreneurship and your willingness to take risks come from? It begins where an idea meets opportunity. I saw long lines of people waiting for fresh pasta in San Francisco and there were no places to get fresh pasta where people lived in New York City, except for Little Italy. It seemed like an interesting gamble. I took the company public after a $40K investment. In this instance, it was a gamble that paid off. It did. But, during that time you never quit your job in real estate. Today, you have real estate developments in San Francisco, San Diego, Denver, and France. And, most recently, you’ve added luxur y developments across the Triangle. What elements make your residential developments luxurious? Comfort. Natural light. Smart design. Green living. My philosophy is that every building should always have a second elevator. And, because I love to cook, I believe in better kitchens. People always use their kitchen as a place to congregate and connect. And, yes: eat. I pay attention to how elegance and efficiency can make kitchen design functional. You don’t have to look at your appliances: Instead, have an appliance garage and accentuate the architecture and design of where you live. It’s all in the details. How have you have taken your passion for cooking into the kitchens of your latest development? People want to have choices, and I think that the world is different now. You have to [design kitchens] so that people sit close to where the

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HENRY LAMBERT

food is being prepared. When I was growing up, you didn’t see countertops; people had a [formal] dining room. This is not the world we live in anymore. You have to arrange living spaces that meet people where they want to be met—how they like to prepare food and eat. I don’t want to build a kitchen that is not functional or easily used. You have written two cookbooks: Pasta & Cheese: The Cookbook and, most recently, The Kitchen Sleuth. How do you create your recipes? I write cookbooks because I don’t write my own recipes: I collect them. For instance, I just got a recipe for a coconut sauce with curry after calling the chef 20 times. That didn’t work; so finally I said, “What if I come to Puerto Rico and take a cooking class from you?” And, that is how I got that recipe. Life is a series of learning from other people, from what inspires them. That is what inspires me. Will you ever retire? When you do what you love, you’re never “retired.” I wouldn’t know what I would do with myself.


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After the initial inventory, designers accompany clients through the showroom, allowing them to experience a variety of styles first-hand in order to determine what excites them. Afterwards, they take the floorplan into consideration and select the perfect pieces for form and comfort, helping the client visualize a fresh, new design incorporating both new and existing pieces. The design is polished with the selection of fabrics, finishes, case pieces, rugs, artwork, and lighting. The process, though different for each client based on scope of the project and vendor lead time, generally takes a few weeks to a few months, with full design installation happening anywhere from six to 14 weeks after the order is placed. Heading into 2020, trends are edging toward warmer color palettes punctuated by brilliant green, blushes, and peacock blue. Colorful velvets, whether done minimally on dining chairs or on an entire sofa, have also become

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GIVING Back

LEFT TO RIGHT: TRACY FREEMAN, AMANDA BLUE, AND JUSTIN GARRITY

Recovery

BY BETH PETERSON

Among Peers

PHOTO BY JOSH MANNING / JERICHO 7 FILMS

At Healing Transitions, unconditional hope leads the way.

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What does addiction look like? To be honest, it looks a lot like me. And it looks like you. In fact, if asked to describe the type person most likely to use substances, you’d have to stop at “human,” without getting any more specific. Regardless of race, religion, gender, socioeconomic background, or upbringing, addiction is an equal-opportunity disease. In fact, Amanda Blue, director of programs at Healing Transitions, a Raleigh-based long-term recovery program, says addiction is a disease that does not discriminate in any capacity. At both the men’s and women’s campuses, participants in the Healing Transitions addiction recovery program quickly discover that hope also does not discriminate. Here, hope is offered in equal—and unlimited—opportunity. Unlike many rehabilitation programs that focus on behavior management, Healing Transitions is a place for second, third, sometimes even eleventh, chances. Regardless of the number of failed attempts at breaking free from addiction’s grip, the courageous decision to ask for help will be met every single time with hope and with help. “As many times as it takes, as long as it takes” is a phrase you’ll hear within the first five minutes of a visit to either campus. “Recovery is almost never a one-time event. It’s a process,” Blue states. Aptly named, Healing Transitions is filled with individuals in transition. Everyone moves at his or her own pace on the road to recovery, and no one is rushed through the program. Some are here for a night, looking only for a safe place to sleep. Some walk in and walk right out again, not quite ready to commit to the hard work involved in recovery. Others make progress towards recovery, stay several months, and then leave. But anyone who returns to try again is welcomed back, without judgement and without shame. That judgement-free response is due in large part to Healing Transitions’ peer-to-peer program model. No one judges, because almost everyone here has “been there, done that.” Peer-to-peer means that Healing Transitions relies on people who know what recovery entails; it is not a clinical program staffed with an army of professional therapists overseeing the entire recovery process. Instead, most of the program is led by men and women who are also at varying stages of recovery. With every step toward recovery, participants turn around to encourage the next person: “If I can do this, you can do this.” The power of the peer-to-peer model impacted alumni Justin Garrity, who recalls a moment from his first few days at Healing Transitions: “There were people six months ahead of me [in the program], and they were laughing. You think, ‘Man, I remember what that was like; I’d like to laugh again.’” The hope modeled to Justin, that he could laugh again

someday, is part of what motivated him through his recovery. Justin has returned to Healing Transitions as the rapid response administrator. He also leads the Oak City Recovery Run Club. “When you’re running, you’re not an addict who lives in a homeless shelter, you’re just ‘Justin,’” Garrity says. “We’re hoping to bust the stigma, and show people that you’re not your disease. Addiction is a disease of isolation,” he adds, “and you beat the disease through connection.” Tracy Freeman, also employed at Healing Transitions as planning room supervisor, recalls her early days in recovery. Coming to Healing Transitions, she had already been through two recovery programs without success. The difference for Tracy was the commitment made to her by her peers in the program. It was uncomfortable at times, as her peers pointed out the need for change in certain areas of her life, including her tendency to isolate herself. “I was quiet; I tried to fly under the radar. My peers would not let me; they loved me until I could love myself.” She was also urged to build relationships. “I made long-term relationships, and we are still friends today. They notice when I’m having a rough day.” Healing Transitions is a place of connection; individuals recovering here are constantly and simultaneously reaching back to help the one behind or reaching forward for support from the one ahead. Thorough and thoughtful peer review coupled with clear and graduated steps to recovery are part of the reason that 76 percent of the program’s graduates remain substance-free after one year. Healing Transitions never refuses help to anyone; they never turn anyone away. And it’s completely free. But, Amanda Blue explains, “As the population increases, it will be hard to keep up.” Over the last 18 years, Healing Transitions has seen a 186 percent increase in its average daily census. In order to meet the needs of Raleigh’s booming population and to continue to do battle against America’s growing opioid crisis, Healing Transitions has launched its capital campaign, Recovery Can’t Wait. An estimated $11.75 million is needed for expansions at both campuses. Please visit Healing-Transitions. org for more information.

The ROI of Recovery According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, substance abuse costs our country more than $600 billion annually. On its website, DrugAbuse.gov, the NIDA states: “According to several conservative estimates, every dollar invested in addiction treatment programs yields a return of between $4 and $7 in reduced drug-related crime, [reduced] criminal justice costs, and [reduced] theft.”

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SISTER Cities

From the Coast

to Close Neighbors Film festivals, food destinations, and festive weekends.

Durham Marries Food and Art

Film Fest 919 Returns for its Second Year in Chapel Hill

Photo by Scott Myers

For an early look at some of the most anticipated films of the awards season and the chance to meet the artists behind them, take a short drive to Silverspot Cinema in Chapel Hill for the second annual Film Fest 919. The event takes place October 9th–13th; look for the lineup to be announced on their website in September (FilmFest919.com).

Roast and Toast on the Coast at Bald Head Island Idyllic Bald Head Island—North Carolina’s laid back, ferry-accessible, no-cars-allowed island—provides the perfect backdrop for what has become a signature fall event in southeastern North Carolina: Roast and Toast on the Coast. The three-day event will be held November 8th–10th, and includes an oyster roast, a gourmet barbecue with silent auction and live music, and Sunday brunch at the Bald Head Island Club. A portion of event proceeds will be donated to the Old Baldy Foundation, which maintains North Carolina’s oldest lighthouse. Visit RoastToastCoast.com for information.

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With several new additions to its food scene, Durham is bolstering its reputation as a foodie destination­—and artistically so. At Kingfisher, an intimate, ground-to-glass cocktail bar in downtown Durham, food and art combine as owner Sean Umstead’s craft cocktails are artfully served in wife and co-owner Michelle Vanderwalker’s ceramic creations. Italian wine bar Convivio gets its name from Dante’s literary work (translation: The Banquet), and M Restaurants’ newest venture in Durham, M Pocha, promises artful presentation with its Korean street-food tapas.

Photo courtesy of Bald Head Island

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3032 Cone Manor Lane, Linville, Raleigh $2,225,000 UNDER CONTRACT

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Kimberly Conroy Coldwell Banker Howard Perry and Walston KimberlyConroyHomes.com conroyk@hpw.com 919.539.2860


As a real estate professional since 2004, Lindsay has extensive industry knowledge and experience. Representing both buyers and sellers, she remains in the top 5% of Triangle area realtors. In 2015 Lindsay and her husband created a team of agents specializing in investment properties, luxury homes, and residential real estate. Their 220 agents have helped buyers and sellers with finding the perfect home or selling a home in order to move to the next phase of their lives.

301 Danube Street, Pannonia, Raleigh SOLD

8816 Valentine Court , Richmond Hills, Raleigh $1,749,000.00

Lindsay Taylor Jackson Coldwell Banker Howard Perry and Walston LindsaySellsRaleigh.com lindsay@220agents.com 919.389.2727

149 Perfect Moment Drive, Hills of Rosemont, Durham SOLD

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1400 Alpine Creek Drive, Alpine Creek Estates, Raleigh $5,900,000

As a full-service residential real estate agent, Mollie is committed to exceeding clients’ expectations through exceptional communication and personalized service. A consistent top producer, she is a respected leader in the luxury home market. Since beginning her career in 1996, Mollie has been an active leader with the Raleigh Regional Association of REALTORS®, serving as president in 2014 and named Realtor of the Year in 2017. She is currently serving as regional vice president for the North Carolina Association of REALTORS®.

11204 Trescott Court, River Oaks, Raleigh $1,295,000

6732 Greywalls Lane, Greywalls, Raleigh $1,195,000

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Mollie Owen, Broker Hodge & Kittrell Sotheby’s International Realty MollieOwen.HodgeKittrellSIR.com 919.602.2713


Margaret relocated to the Triangle from the New York metro area in 1996 and has been a top-producing RE/MAX broker for over 25 years. Her success stems from repeat and referral business due to the excellent personal service she provides. She has earned the respect of her clients by working tirelessly on their behalf and providing valuable counsel. Margaret’s achievements include: RE/MAX Hall of Fame, Lifetime Achievement Award, RE/MAX Platinum Club, Certified Luxury Home Marketing Specialist, and Strategic Pricing Specialist.

906 Dominion Hill Drive, Cary Park, Cary $1,650,000

103 Kazmann Court, Preston, Cary SOLD

Margaret Donovan Struble Broker, CLHMS, SPS RE/MAX United MargaretStruble.com 919.280.9994

623 The Preserve Trail, The Preserve at Jordan Lake, Chapel Hill $752,000

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3105 Cone Manor, Linville, Raleigh $1,969,000

As a Triangle native, Shawn knows the area well and has been the broker/owner of Realty World–Triangle Living since 1998. She provides professional, caring, and loyal service to her clients. She brings the knowledge and experience to “get the job done right,” with $500M+ in sales and 20+ years of experience as a top producing broker. Her business is built from past clients and referrals. She is a member of the Triangle Top Producers Council, Luxury Home Marketing Group, and Realty World Hall of Fame, and serves on the Union Bank Board.

1221 Enderbury Drive, Faircroft, Raleigh $849,900

1008 Stradshire Drive, Faircroft, Raleigh SOLD

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Shawn Britt Realty World–Triangle Living ShawnSellsRaleigh.com shawn@shawnsellsraleigh.com 919.215.3263


This wonderful city of Raleigh has been Kathy and her family's home for 33 years. By combining her appreciation and knowledge of this area with her passion for helping people, Kathy has been able to help thousands make the Triangle area their home as well! Whether you’re looking for your first home or forever home, an investment property or vacation home, Kathy would be honored to help you, too! Her integrity, expertise, creativity, and caring and fun personality have earned her distinctions such as Coldwell Banker’s No. 1 sales agent in the state, and Real Trends / America’s Best top-selling agent in Raleigh!

76 Topaz Jewel Court, The Hills of Rosemont, Durham SOLD

1000 Clovelly Court, Devon, North Raleigh SOLD

Kathy Beacham, Broker Coldwell Banker Howard Perry and Walston KathyBeacham.com kathy@kathybeacham.com 919.632.1807

2908 Spaldwick Court, Stonemoor, North Raleigh $1,787,000

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53527 Bickett, Governors Club, Chapel Hill $2,590,000

Together, Linda Craft and her team have earned the trust and commitment of their clients for more than three decades, selling over 10,000 homes. Linda’s unmatched luxury experience, strategic approach to marketing, and expert contract negotiations are just some of the reasons people hire Linda Craft. Her success has been featured in Forbes, Fortune, and Entrepreneur magazines. She was also awarded the American Red Cross Humanitarian of the Year Award, and is the corporate real estate sponsor of the Carolina Hurricanes.

6101 Charleycote Drive, The Registry, Raleigh $1,250,000

Linda Craft, CEO Linda Craft & Team, Realtors LindaCraft.com 919.235.0007

4717 Norbury Place, Faircroft, Raleigh SOLD

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Jill Rekuc, owner of Olde Raleigh Real Estate, is respected throughout our area as a reputable designated luxury broker, delivering discriminate white glove luxury services to all clientele. The firm’s core value to build and maintain steadfast trust with every client has successfully withstood the test of time. Notably, Jill is recognized for selling the most expensive home in Raleigh and Wake County (for $5.5 million in 2018).

4425 Harbourgate Drive, Harbourgate, Raleigh $849,900

8504 Bournemouth Drive, Bournemouth, Raleigh $1,345,000 UNDER CONTRACT

Jill Rekuc, Owner Olde Raleigh Real Estate OldeRaleighRealEstate.com jill@olderaleighrealestate.com 919.389.0555

1624 Morning Mountain Road, Morning Mountain Estates, Raleigh SOLD

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5116 Avalaire Oaks Drive, Avalaire, Raleigh SOLD

Deborah’s area of expertise lies in upper-tier neighborhoods and luxury properties. Her real estate career of 34 years includes 10 years as a Luxury Home Marketing Group member and previous board member. She has consistently been a company-wide top producer in multi-million dollar sales with Real Living Pittman Properties. Deborah’s clients enjoy working with her because of her knowledge and expertise of the Triangle real estate market, and her ease of facilitating the complexities of a transaction.

1501 Barony Lake Way, The Barony, Raleigh SOLD

501 Vista Del Lago, La Ventana, Wake Forest SOLD

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Deborah Nance Broker, Certified Luxury Home Marketing Specialist Real Living Pittman Properties RealLiving.com/DeborahNance 919.624.5555


Leslie concentrates her efforts on luxury properties and new home purchases for buyers and sellers. With a career that spans over 28 years, clients and colleagues recognize her professionalism and unparalleled knowledge and experience of the Triangle real estate market. Leslie has proven her expertise with consistent and record-breaking sales each year, and is listed in the Triangle Business Journal’s Top 25 Agents. She is a Certified Global Luxury Property Specialist and a Certified Luxury Home Marketing Specialist (CLHMS) Million Dollar GuildŽ member.

1412 Hedgelawn Way, North Ridge, Raleigh $3,800,000

1413 Lily Estates Drive, Avalaire, Raleigh $1,775,000

Leslie Young, Broker, SPS, SFR, CLHMS Coldwell Banker Howard Perry and Walston, Global Luxury LuxuryHomesHPW.com 919.280.5401

10609 Firwood Lane, Faircroft, Raleigh $1,295,000

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7049 Copperleaf Place, Copperleaf, Cary SOLD

As a result of her commitment to clients and in-depth knowledge of communities throughout the Triangle, Debbie has been the top performing agent at Fonville Morisey for the past 15 years. She is recognized as a leader in the real estate community, consistently ranked in the Triangle’s Top Six Agents by Triangle Business Journal. Debbie works directly with her clients throughout the entire sales process and has built a dynamic marketing team to ensure a seamless, successful client experience.

5224 Newstead Manor Lane, Newstead Manor, Raleigh SOLD

Debbie Van Horn Fonville Morisey Realty DebbieVanHorn.com 919.749.6000

101 Headlands Lane, Lochmere, Cary SOLD

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Linda’s motto, “Service First,” has been the foundation of her successful career, which spans more than two decades. Linda took the early advice of others to network, dive into education, and volunteer with leadership positions. Her involvement has earned her awards such as REALTOR of the Year, Top 10 Teams (Triangle Business Journal), and RE/MAX Circle of Legends and Hall of Fame. Linda is honored to be a part of the Luxury Home Marketing Group and to gain such valuable experience to assist her clients!

3233 Carpenter Creek Place, Olde Carpenter, Cary SOLD

218 Devonbrook Lane, Barrington Regency, Cary SOLD

Linda Trevor Broker, MSEd, CRS, ABR, CLHMS RE/MAX United LindaTrevor.com 919.469.6543

5112 Pine Birch Drive, Enchanted Oaks, Raleigh SOLD

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2342 Lyon Street, Sunset Hills, Raleigh SOLD

Service and Vision: A Raleigh native with 15 years experience successfully marketing luxury real estate, Sheri helps her clients make well-informed decisions to achieve their goals. The Sheri Hagerty Group is built on three principles that result in superior client satisfaction: work ethic, meticulous attention to detail, and creative vision. She is a consistently recognized top producer. Her team values a thriving community and supports local organizations that improve the quality of life for others.

1604 Jarvis Street, Hayes Barton, Raleigh SOLD

1512 Consett Court, Stonemoor, Raleigh $1,385,000

LUXURY HOME MARKETING GROUP SPONSORED CONTENT

Sheri Hagerty, Broker Hodge & Kittrell Sotheby’s International Realty SheriHagerty.com sheri@sherihagerty.com 919.862.6258


Ann Matteson markets properties and assists buyers with professional ethics, organizational skills, and enthusiasm. Privileged to have grown up in Raleigh, she has 40 years of experience in the Triangle market. Ann personally handles all of her transactions. She knows the new construction process meticulously, from initial design to final punch list. She has received the Previews Property Specialist award for marketing high-end homes, multiple Major Achievements in Marketing Excellence awards, and the CB Diamond Award designation  (top 6% of brokers nationally).

1016 Heydon Court, The Registry, Raleigh $1,250,000

1715 Picadilly Lane, Budleigh, Raleigh $1,895,000

Ann Watters Matteson Hodge & Kittrell Sotheby’s International Realty HodgeKittrellSIR.com ann.matteson@hodgekittrellsir.com 919.280.5295

6452 Therfield Drive, The Highlands, Raleigh $1,550,000

LUXURY HOME MARKETING GROUP SPONSORED CONTENT


THE LUXURY HOME MARKETING GROUP IS A COALITION OF REAL ESTATE LEADERS WHO SHARE THEIR KNOWLEDGE AND MARKETING EXPERTISE OF THE LUXURY HOME MARKET WITH THEIR CLIENTS AND ONE ANOTHER.

POWERFUL MARKETING STRATEGIES INCLUDE A MEMBER TOUR OF YOUR HOME ALONG WITH RECOMMENDATIONS TO INCREASE YOUR HOME-SELLING SUCCESS AND IDENTIFICATION OF POTENTIAL LUXURY BUYERS FOR YOUR HOME.

STAY INFORMED ON MARKET TRENDS: LUXURYHOMEMARKETINGGROUP.COM/FACEBOOK

CHRISTOPHER COY 919.306.8895 CHRISTOPHER.COY@TOWNEBANKMORTGAGE.COM NMLS ID #1201896

NMLS ID #512138 FEATURED HOMES MAY BE ACTIVE, PENDING, OR CLOSED LISTINGS. IT IS NOT THE INTENT OF THE LHMG TO SOLICIT THE OFFERINGS OF OTHER REAL ESTATE BROKERS.


FOODIE Focus Open Now: It’s here: Andrew Ullom’s Union Special Bread retail location in the redeveloped Gateway Plaza off Crabtree Boulevard! How good is it? Let’s put it this way, his closing time isn’t a set hour. His closing time is “sold out.” In other words, they will be open as long as the goodness is around.

Mark Your Calendar! Mandolin Restaurant will host their next Mandolin Wine Mixer on Saturday, September 7th from 11 am until 2 pm at 2519 Fairview Road in Raleigh. Taste over 60 fine wines, savor a variety of hors d’oeuvres, and support the Interfaith Food Shuttle through raffled wine and gift certificates, plus purchase select wines at exclusive discounts. Tickets are $25. Mix 101.5’s third annual Savor the Triangle Food Festival will again be held at the Kerr Scott building at the N.C. State Fairgrounds. This year it is on Wednesday, September 18th from 6–9 pm. Savor the Triangle Food Festival is a culinary event with the opportunity to sample many of the Triangle’s most delicious foods and drinks all in one place. The 10th and FINAL Terra Vita Food & Drink Festival in Chapel Hill is scheduled for October 16th–19th. Yep, you read that right: This is the grand finale. There will be no more. And heed this last (and final) warning— tickets will not last. If you’ve never been—GO! If you’ve been, don’t miss the last one. If you don’t know, it is a multi-day celebration that brings together top chefs, food artisans, sommeliers, baristas, brewers, educators, distillers, cookbook authors, and industry luminaries from across the Southeast to celebrate culinary excellence and sustainability in food and drink. On Sunday, November 3rd, more than 30 of the Triangle’s finest restaurants will be paired with world-class wines at the third annual Sip + Savor­—A Wine, Food and Music Experience. Sip + Savor will showcase 30+ culinary all-stars, sommeliers, and an on-stage experience with live music, VIP lounge, and more.

OAK STEAKHOUSE, RALEIGH

It’s rodeo season! Final year-end dates for the Raleigh Food Truck Rodeo are Sunday, October 6th, 12 to 6 pm, and November 10th. All are held along Fayetteville Street. The Durham Food Truck rodeos are September 1st and November 3rd.

Come Hungry!

Coming Soon:

BY SEAN LENNARD / TRIANGLE FOOD GUY

/

TRIANGLEFOODBLOG.COM

Following the recent openings of O-Ku Sushi and Oak Steakhouse in downtown Raleigh, The Indigo Road Hospitality Group is excited to announce continued expansion in the Triangle with its Italian concept Colletta. It is expected to open in 2021 at Fenton in Cary and will be the second location, with the original location north of Atlanta in Alpharetta, Georgia. Drawing influence largely from Northern Italy, Colletta Cary’s cuisine will put a twist on treasured classics while introducing modern culinary techniques with the changing seasons. Menu highlights will include house-made pastas, wood-fired pizzas, cheeses, and other handcrafted ingredients. It is the latest restaurant to call Fenton home, joining Ford Fry’s popular TexMex concept Superica and Scott Crawford’s newest steakhouse Crawford Brothers. Sean Lennard has been catering in the Triangle for more than 15 years, and his blog is a go-to foodie hotspot. He taps into local restaurant partners and his online catering business, Triangle Food Guy, serves events of all sizes. Check out TriangleFoodBlog.com for weekly news. SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

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Parenting

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“social”

STUDIES BY KURT DUSTERBERG

The Social Institute has a revolutionary message about your kids’ social media apps and platforms: They’re the tools for teen success.

L

aura Tierney remembers coming of age in the early days of social media.

As a student-athlete at Duke University from 2005 to 2009, she listened to the standard lectures about the dangers of texting, tweeting, and posting. All the while, she wondered if people were missing the point. “You have this incredible, premiere university that would bring in people to lecture you on how negative social media could be,” says Tierney, a four-time all-America selection in field hockey. “You weren’t getting proper training at all through high school and college.” Today, she is doing something about that. Tierney is the founder of The Social Institute, a business focused on helping students navigate social media and technology in a positive manner. Based in Durham, The Social Institute has implemented programs at schools across the country and throughout the Triangle, including Cary Academy, St. Timothy’s School, and Ravenscroft School. Tierney was inspired to build the company after seeing how social media helped launch her own career in marketing and advertising. “I got three out of my four jobs thanks to social media,” she says. “I follow so many mentors on social media. I was seeing it as this force for good in our lives, but no one was coaching you on how to use it positively.”

The Social Institute’s curriculum is implemented with a student-led, “gamified” approach. Tierney meets with high school upperclassmen (or eighth graders when visiting a middle school) at the start of the program, knowing that younger students are willing to learn from the older students. She also works with educators on each campus visit to learn about the school’s social media habits. Finally, Tierney meets with parents to counsel them on apps that are trending and behaviors that are emerging with certain age groups. “It’s a more complex world today,” she says. “There are more apps, there’s more functionality, there are more people that you’re connected with than I was 10 years ago. The stakes are higher than ever. It’s equally important that parents are educated so they can reinforce high-character behaviors and habits at home.” While the potential remains for teens to make poor choices, Tierney’s message is simple: Social media is a tool for success. Used properly, students can leave an impression on colleges and potential employers, as well as cultivate relationships with mentors. “It’s an opportunity to be on one of the biggest stages in the world,” she says. “Potentially millions of people can see what you’re sharing with the power of a screen shot. If you’re on that big stage, you have to make high-character choices and act in ways that represent your values, because there are so many people watching you.”

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Photo courtesy of The Social Institute LAURA TIERNEY, FOUNDER OF THE SOCIAL INSTITUTE, COACHES HIGH SCHOOL UPPERCLASSMEN ON HOW TO NAVIGATE SOCIAL MEDIA AND TECHNOLOGY IN A POSITIVE MANNER.

For the most part, her pitch is not a hard sell. “I do think students are optimistic and growth-minded [about] how social media can be used,” she says. “That doesn’t mean they have been trained to use it that way. They need to see more and more of the positive side of it. I don’t think kids are wired to use this negatively. They’re using it negatively because, No. 1, they weren’t coached to use it positively, and No. 2, more often than not, they’re surrounded by negative use so they are tempted to swim with the stream. That’s what we’re trying to change.”

Set Standards For Your Social Media Presence:

Tierney finds that students are usually engaged in the topic. She hears the same questions from students: “When should I make my profile public? How can I better control my Google search results? Is it okay that I’m posting photos of myself in a bikini?”

The Social Institute’s curriculum teaches seven social standards that allow students to navigate social media productively. Here are three examples:

A cynic might say those questions are aimed at hiding previous lapses in judgment, but they also show that teens are aware of what is at stake. Tierney tries not to judge what content crosses the line, but instead teaches students to be aware that the line exists. “Whether you like it or not, how you portray yourself is going to influence other people’s perception of you,” she says. “Everyone has a different spectrum of what’s okay and what’s not okay. We’re not going to tell them that posting a photo in a bikini is bad. I don’t think it’s bad. It’s making them aware of what their spectrum is and making them make the decision, not us.”

• Build a strong team around you. “Who are you following in your feed that encourages you to be the best version of yourself, who raises the bar for you each day? Induct some of those people into your feed if you don’t have them already.”

Tierney believes the key to good decision-making is thinking about the future. “By using social media positively today, you’re setting a high standard for someone else in the world who is going to learn from you,” she says. “Do things today that your future self will thank you for five years from now.”

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• Play to your core. “Click send on things that represent your character and core values. Anything you click ‘send’ on represents your core values and character, and ultimately your reputation.”

• Handle the pressure. “There is a lot of social pressure that comes with technology. It’s important to handle that and navigate those scenarios positively. You’re not giving into pressure to get the highest number of likes, and therefore you don’t post a photo that forever tarnishes your reputation.”


Photo by Laura B. Hunter Photography

RAVENSCROFT STUDENTS WORK WITH LEGO ROBOTICS IN THE SCHOOL’S MIDDLE SCHOOL ENGINEERING CLASS.

Engineering education BY ELIZABETH BRIGNAC

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Schools across the area increase their focus on digital innovation and teaching technology. Last year, seventh- and eighth-grade students at Carroll Magnet Middle School in Raleigh got a chance to design an ideal school—a school tailored to meet the specific needs of its community. In the summer of 2018, Carroll teachers Meredith Pinckney and Munroe Buie participated in the WakeED Partnership Summer STEM program, through which they learned how to develop tech-oriented, project-based learning opportunities for use in their classrooms. These kinds of projects ask students to use problem-solving skills and technological tools to address real-world challenges. During the 2018–2019 school year, the teachers got to see their project-based learning design in action. Southeast Raleigh Elementary School was being built that year, so Pinckney and Buie asked Carroll students to develop the school they would build if they were in charge of the project. The students used digital research tools to investigate southeast Raleigh community needs. They then used a wide variety of digital resources to design an ideal school on a virtual site identical to where the actual school was being built. At the end of the project, the students (who knew nothing about the plans for the real school) got to tour the completed Southeast Raleigh Elementary School. They were excited to see that the real school turned out to share many qualities in common with their vision. “They included things like community kitchens and computer labs, and large media centers with workspaces,” Pinckney says. “They shared a lot of commonalities…so [the students] were able to see the real-world applications of what they were exploring.” This project exemplifies a digital technology teaching approach that many schools in the Wake County–area are taking. Increasingly, both private and public schools place great emphasis on project-based digital learning that utilizes local resources, fosters creative thinking, addresses realworld challenges, and requires collaboration.

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Photo courtesy of The Montessori School of Raleigh MONTESSORI SCHOOLS FOCUS HEAVILY ON STUDENT-DRIVEN, INDEPENDENT LEARNING, WHICH INCLUDES GIVING STUDENTS ACCESS TO A BROAD SELECTION OF DIGITAL OPTIONS.

Problem-Solving Skills

“In the area of technology, things change so much,” notes Karen McKenzie, director of technology and innovation at Cary Academy, “that by the time you finish learning whatever that program was, either an update happens, or the program has changed, or it’s no longer the flavor of the month. But teaching kids how programs work in general, and teaching kids how to attack a problem…that is a different way that will not only help them for today, but [will also help them] approach problems for the future.” In addition to keeping students current on today’s digital tools, technology-focused schools emphasize teaching students to think about these resources in ways that are flexible and productive. The Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) and many local private schools emphasize the 4 Cs: four abilities that the Partnership for 21st Century Skills has identified as most essential for today’s K–12 students. These skills—communication, critical thinking, collaboration, and creativity— build the context in which many of today’s Raleigh-area students learn about and interact with digital technology. In teaching these skills, schools are emphasizing new ways to solve problems—approaches that are specifically relevant to the methods that many twenty-first century businesses use to deal with challenges. Reedy Creek Magnet Middle School in Cary, for example, teaches students to approach all subjects using computational thinking. Students learn to solve problems by thinking like computers: breaking down the problem into manageable parts, recognizing patterns in their data, creating principles based on their analysis, and building algorithm-like, step-by-step solutions to the problem. Reedy Creek, which won the Magnet Schools of America’s New & Emerging Magnet School of Merit Award in 2019, emphasizes computational thinking’s potential to enhance critical thinking skills. This approach also builds communication skills, since students have to be able to communicate clearly about the problem and the steps to solving it in order to enact solutions.

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Learning computational thinking also benefits students who aspire to tech-oriented careers. “They can understand what’s going on inside the computer. They’re thinking like a computer…So if they do decide to go into a digital field, that’ll be a big bonus for them because that’s what companies are looking for in their future workforce,” says Christine Sachs, Reedy Creek’s magnet coordinator. Tech instructors at Saint Mary’s School, Athens Drive Magnet High School, Ravenscroft School, and Cary Academy stress computational thinking, and they also emphasize design thinking— an approach similar to computational thinking that focuses heavily on audience needs and on experimenting with different solutions to problems. “The design thinking process has been a game-changer for our school,” says Leslie Owen, Saint Mary’s dean of teaching and learning.

Working with Tools

If we want students to think critically and communicate ideas effectively, it helps to give them access to a wide selection of tools with which to work. Most of the schools interviewed for this article aim to expose kids to diverse technological tools that support different academic tasks. “We’re trying to get away from having teachers, or even students, use technology just for the sake of using technology,” says Sarah Loyola, director of digital technology at Ravenscroft. “It has to serve a purpose.” Montessori schools focus heavily on student-driven, independent learning, so The Montessori School of Raleigh focuses on giving students access to a broad selection of digital options. “We encourage students to delve into topics that they are passionate about,” says Melissa Edwards, director of educational technology. “And within the learning, they are also figuring out the best technology tools in the moment that match their education need…They’re like, ‘I have this problem. I have something I need to research and learn about. I know this wealth of tools that are available to me. Which one is the best?’”


Photo by Paul Cory/WCPSS Communication ATHENS DRIVE MAGNET HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT CHASE GRAHAM PARTICIPATES IN A VIRTUAL LIGHTSABER BATTLE AT THE SCHOOL’S 2018 STEM WARS DAY, THANKS TO NC STATE’S COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAM.

The schools offer students tools that range from standard Google suite apps and word processing systems to options that support dozens of academic and professional fields. McKenzie says, “We try to expose them to all different areas and all different tools within technology, whether it’s office and production software…browser- or search engine–related, to having experiences with AR [Augmented Reality], VR [Virtual Reality], and AI [Artificial Intelligence].”

Real-World Challenges

Some of these tools are very cutting-edge. At Athens Drive, which focuses on medical sciences and global health initiatives, Tonya Hinton, the school’s magnet coordinator, teaches with zSpace units, which are computers with augmented reality capabilities. Students can look at a zSpace computer screen with special glasses, use a stylus to pull out an image, and interact with the image, taking it apart and viewing it from different angles. Hinton offers one example of how the school has used this technology: “Our chorus students were trying to learn about vocal health. They were worried about how to take care of their voices; their instrument. So I brought them into the zSpace room, and we actually pulled apart what’s going on in your vocal cords, because I have the 3D model, and they can actually see it in action.”

The Wake STEM Early College High School, for example, which earned the Magnet Schools of America’s 2019 Secondary Magnet School of Merit Award, works with a robust business advisory board to offer its students chances to solve real-world problems. Focusing on the National Academy of Engineering’s 14 Grand Challenges for Engineering in the 21st Century, the school asks students to complete smallgroup, integrated-curriculum projects designed to mimic industry projects run by professional teams. Linda Brannon, the school’s STEM coordinator, offers an example: “Our tenth-graders do the One

Athens Drive isn’t the only school exploring AR and VR options with students. Ravenscroft is purchasing a class set of VR goggles and adding a room in their technology center for VR experiences. The school hopes to train both teachers and students to develop their own VR programs in the near future.

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The Triangle is rich in opportunities for students to work with leaders in innovative technology. These leaders frequently volunteer their time to mentor students in project-based learning that tackles real-world challenges.


Citrix was tackling. “The people at Citrix were blown away by the innovative ideas of the students,” Loyola says. “They actually felt that they could run with several of them.” Based on the success of this project, Ravenscroft will offer Entrepeneurial Mindset this year, a course in which students will partner with local businesses on similar projects.

Women in Technology

Photo by Thomas Cooper/Christine Sachs

Women are underrepresented in STEM fields, so most schools interviewed for this article encourage women to engage digital technology. They offer extracurricular clubs like Girls Who Code, ChickTech, and other girl-focused computational and programming clubs. Most of the schools also have women running digital instruction and technology programs. Having that kind of visible role model makes a difference.

ABOVE: REEDY CREEK MAGNET MIDDLE SCHOOL MECHATRONICS TEACHER RON BOEHM SPEAKS TO STUDENTS AT THE MAGNET, EARLY COLLEGE, AND YEAR ROUND SCHOOLS FAIR AT SOUTHEAST RALEIGH MAGNET HIGH SCHOOL. RIGHT: AREA SCHOOLS ARE TAKING PROACTIVE APPROACHES TO ENCOURAGE GIRLS TO TAKE TECHNOLOGY-ORIENTED CLASSES. Photo courtesy of Wake STEM Early College High School

Health Project, where they have to come up with a medical device that will solve a potential problem—say in diabetes, or with heart disease or blood pressure, or whatever. And these teams, whether it’s through math, computer programming…they’re using the digital resources in a project-management style.” Other grades focus on challenges related to nuclear energy proliferation and providing global access to clean water. Upper-class students use the project management skills they develop through these projects in internships with businesses across the Triangle. Saint Mary’s and Ravenscroft both offer their students opportunities to work with local businesses toward building solutions for actual challenges these businesses are facing. Saint Mary’s offers Pitch Night, a night when eleventhgrade students pitch business solutions to representatives from industries across the Triangle. The students propose solutions for businesses exploring new ways to tackle problems. Leslie Owen says that student teams use designthinking processes to come up with their proposals, which the businesses receive with great respect. Ravenscroft had a similar experience last spring with a group of seniors who partnered with Citrix. Four teams presented solutions to a real problem that

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“We have noticed that since we moved to a female faculty member in our middle school, that coming up into the upper school this year, we have a lot more females registering for computer science courses,” says Loyola. Instructors at Carroll, Hopewell Academy, and Cary Academy also emphasize the importance of having visible female technology leaders on campus. Schools are taking proactive approaches to encourage girls to take technologyoriented classes. Ravenscroft, for example, has addressed low female enrollment in its Middle- and Upper-School computerrelated electives by making coding classes mandatory rather than optional in Lower School. They hope that with this change and others they are enacting, girls at the school will grow up thinking of


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Photo by Elizabeth MacWilliams

TECHNOLOGY-FOCUSED SCHOOLS, SUCH AS CARROLL LEADERSHIP IN TECHNOLOGY MAGNET MIDDLE SCHOOL, EMPHASIZE THE IMPORTANCE OF KEEPING STUDENTS CURRENT ON TODAY’S DIGITAL TOOLS, AND TEACHING THEM TO THINK ABOUT THESE RESOURCES IN WAYS THAT ARE FLEXIBLE AND PRODUCTIVE.

programming as something that everyone does rather than as a gendered subject. Saint Mary’s, likewise, has worked to get ahead of low enrollment in its tech classes. This year, the school has added courses in coding and computer science that had not been successful when they were offered before. The courses are gaining traction now, partly due to the school’s having introduced coding in various positive contexts—coding days, female technology speakers, etc.—during the semesters before they reintroduced the classes.

Changes Today

We tend to talk about kids in terms of their future contributions to society— but students at these schools are already using digital technology and project-based learning to make real changes in their communities. Dr. Sandra Mitchell, the new technology coordinator at Hopewell Academy, says that one of her main goals is communicating the following idea to students: “Being able to know that you can be able to change the world with one simplistic technology enhancement, change, or invention.” These students are getting that message. Last spring, for instance, the Reedy Creek Girls Who Code club coded a chatbot, an AI program that can simulate conversation via messaging. The bot, which remains active, offers students study preparation tips for the end-of-grade tests. The program is solid, and the bot’s test preparation advice is excellent. It can offer genuine help to students who choose to access it.

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At Athens Drive, students have used projectbased learning assignments to benefit their school and their fellow students. One group of students last year focused a semester-long senior project on getting solar panels installed at the school—figuring out permitting, energy needs, cost-benefit analyses, and other challenges. The solar panels have been installed and are saving energy at the school. Another senior group built a VR program that teaches useful life skills to special-needs students. The team worked with the students to see what they needed and created a product designed to meet those needs—one that their fellow students can genuinely benefit from using. Offering approaches to learning with real-world results means that students don’t have to wait for adulthood to contribute to their communities. This kind of educational programming means that students start today on enacting the changes they want to see in the world.


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What’s the Buzz About Radiofrequency? The lowdown on radiofrequency and skin tightening treatments. in order to reduce the appearance of fine lines and loose skin. This process induces tissue remodeling and production of new collagen and elastin. Results, which can last for six months up to one year, will continue to improve over the next few months post-treatment as the skin produces new collagen. With continued treatment, results are long-lasting, improving skin tone, texture, wrinkles, and crepiness.

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What does radiofrequency do, and how does it work? During a radiofrequency treatment, energy is applied to the skin, creating friction or heat in the cells. This heat is maintained in the skin to a designated temperature (42° C) for a designated period of time, stimulating collagen production by expanding the tissue and triggering collagen-producing cells to create more collagen. As the collagen fibers expand, the elastin contracts and tightens, causing a shrink-wrapped effect on the skin. After treatment, the top layer of skin (epidermis) will appear firmer and

Heat is key! Radiofrequency (RF) skin tightening is an aesthetic procedure to heat tissue and stimulate subdermal collagen production

smoother—imagine an industrial-strength iron smoothing out your wrinkles. At certain temperatures, a reduction in adipose (fat) tissue can also be achieved. Radiofrequency is safe for all skin types, and requires four to six treatments to achieve full results. Tissue tightening devices continue to be a major force in the noninvasive skin tightening market. Areas that can be treated effectively for either preventative or corrective care include sagging jowls, lip lines, neck contouring, eyes, abdomen, thighs, and arms.

The MedSpa at Raleigh Plastic Surgery Center

Photo by Jennifer Daniels

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Jennifer Daniels, a top-rated medical esthetician and accredited laser specialist, owns The MedSpa at Raleigh Plastic Surgery Center. TheMedSpaRaleigh.com 919.333.4418 1112 Dresser Court, Raleigh

The information on this page is provided by the advertiser mentioned above to the public. SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

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Frida

TEXT BY KAT HARDING PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOE REALE

Fashion

AUTUMN BEGS FOR BOLD COLORS, DRAMATIC STYLE, AND TEXTURED LAYERS. Summer is nearing its close and we are turning toward scarves, long sleeves, and a palette of colors of ochre, sienna, turquoise, inky black, and dusty white. In celebration of the North Carolina Museum of Art’s Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism from the Natasha and Jacques Gelman Collection, opening October 26th, we scoured local boutiques for the perfect fall pieces that pay homage to Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. We picked luxurious knits with bold accessories, lots of sterling silver, fresh flower crowns, and daring lipstick. Kahlo is best known for her self-portraits, politics, and of course, fashion. Her iconic billowing skirts, traditional embroidered tops, braids, and bold red lips have endured for decades. Born in 1907, she suffered from polio as a child and was severely injured in a bus crash in 1925. She used clothing to disguise her leg brace and surgical corsets, adding a powerful layer of identity around her wounds, wrapping herself in bright colors and indigenous fabrics. Her unibrow, which she accentuated in her self-portraits, has become a symbol in and of itself. She took her look very seriously, cultivating an image that has now appeared on everything from notebooks to lampshades, and everything in-between. She died in 1954, at the young age of 47, but lucky for us, her art—and unparalleled fashion sense—lives on.

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Sunbeam jumpsuit, $328 Copper Penny Trilogy necklace, $159 / 5-strand trilogy bracelet, $159 Chic floral embroidered vest, $48 NC Museum of Art Museum Store

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ESTHER DRESS, $255 BUCKLE BAG, $38 THE ART OF STYLE SUZI ROHER WOMEN OF ACTION SCARF, $328 MARTA’S

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FEET, WHAT DO I NEED YOU FOR WHEN I HAVE WINGS TO FLY?.

GOLD CHANDELIER EARRINGS, $28 VODA BOUTIQUE


PÉRO LINEN, COTTON, AND SILK DRESS, ORIGINALLY $2,050, ON SALE FOR $513 / VERMILLION FLOWER POWER DROP EARRINGS, $59 / MARTA’S JILLET GOLD BRACELET, $38 / THE ART OF STYLE

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Larissa dress by Blue Life, originally $326, now $220 Voda Boutique Stone snake booties, $42 / Bella Mar Jaylin gold statement earrings, $144.97 / Tenley cuff bracelet, $95 Kendra Scott Handcrafted sterling silver cuff, $368 / Hammered cuff, $21 NC Museum of Art Museum Store

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I USED TO THINK I WAS THE STRANGEST PERSON IN THE WORLD BUT THEN I THOUGHT THERE ARE SO MANY PEOPLE IN THE WORLD, THERE MUST BE SOMEONE JUST LIKE ME WHO FEELS BIZARRE AND FLAWED IN THE SAME WAYS I DO. I WOULD IMAGINE HER, AND IMAGINE THAT SHE MUST BE OUT THERE THINKING OF ME TOO. WELL, I HOPE THAT IF YOU ARE OUT THERE AND READ THIS AND KNOW THAT, YES, IT’S TRUE I’M HERE, AND I’M JUST AS STRANGE AS YOU.

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RAG & BONE LOVE TEE, $115 / VERMILLION PLEATS PLEASE SKIRT BY ISSEY MIYAKE, $680 / C.T. WEEKENDS NAIBI CROPPED DENIM JACKET BY ABLE, $148 / COPPER PENNY LEATHER EARRINGS IN PEACOCK BLUE, $44 / OXFORD GREEN

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MILA WALKTHROUGH DRESS, $65.40 SIERRA HAT BY LACK OF COLOR, $109 BELLA MAR CHANDELIER EARRINGS, $33 LEATHER CUFF IN BLACK POPPY, $104 OXFORD GREEN VIRGIN SAINTS & ANGELS MULTI-LAYER NECKLACE, $348 COPPER PENNY

I NEVER PAINT DREAMS OR NIGHTMARES. I PAINT MY OWN REALITY.

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Special

Thanks

Photography: JOE REALE / Stylists: KAT HARDING & LAURA SHANAHAN Model: NOELLE KRISHNAKUMAR / Flowers: HEATHER MILLER, ECLECTIC SAGE Location: NORTH CAROLINA MUSEUM OF ART / Illustrations: JENNIFER HEINSER

ON THE COVER: Happy Thoughts tee by Chaser, $62 / Voda Boutique Detailed ruched maxi skirt, $148 / Marta’s Risiko scarf by Franco Ferrari, $440 / Ranjana Khan floral hoops, $400 Black chain necklace with floral beads (used as bracelet) by The Woods Fine Jewelry, $660 Vermillion

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Fashion: THE ART OF STYLE, BELLA MAR, COPPER PENNY, C.T. WEEKENDS, KENDRA SCOTT, MARTA’S, NCMA MUSEUM STORE, OXFORD GREEN, VERMILLION, VODA BOUTIQUE


CREATIVE EVENT DESIGN AND INNOVATIVE FLORALS, CUSTOM-TAILORED TO MAKE YOUR DAY MEMORABLE AND UNIQUE. EclecticSage.com info@eclecticsage.com / eclecticsage

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The information on this page is provided by the advertiser mentioned above to the public.


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MEET THE

Influencers T E X T A N D P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y M I C K S C H U LT E

TO GET THE INSIDE SCOOP, FOLLOW THESE LOCAL INSTAGRAM SENSATIONS.

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I

f the Triangle had an official welcoming committee, these “influencers” would be our top recruits. With huge followings on Instagram, they bolster the community by promoting local businesses and showcasing all the Triangle has to offer while sharing their passions. Molly Stillman (@stillbeingmolly), Linda Nguyen (@lindaeatsworld), Marche Robinson (@marcherobinson), John Huisman (@triangleexplorer), and Chana Lynn (@raleighwhatsup) use social media in a way that inspires connection—and they are just as friendly in person as they are online. Each of them shared a little about their life as an influencer, what motivates them to keep posting, and their special connections to the Triangle.

Molly Stillman

//

@ST ILLBEINGMOLLY

Even with her following of almost 20,000 people on Instagram, Molly Stillman remains down-to-earth about her online presence. “It’s funny because I don’t feel like an influencer,” Molly says. “That term seems to elevate some people, but I’m really no different than anybody else.” After graduating in 2007 with a degree in creative writing, Molly started a blog with a goal of writing satire, similar to The Onion. Eventually her content shifted and she started to share more about her life and passions. “People responded to my posts about what was going on in my life more than anything, and it grew from there,” she notes. Her audience watched as she matured from a recent graduate to a mother, and, most recently, an advocate for social justice. She focuses on issues like ethical fashion and human trafficking, using her social media platform to show how there is power in purchasing. Molly hosts a podcast called Business with Purpose, where she highlights ethically minded companies, like

one of her favorites—The Flourish Market in downtown Raleigh. “I always say if I wouldn’t write about it for free, then I wouldn’t write about it,” Molly says. She is adamant about sticking to her values and staying true to her online community. “Valuing the community I’ve built over the past 12 years is my No. 1 priority. I’m never going to lie to them or lead them astray.” This perseverance has reaped some major rewards for Molly. In 2017, she was approached by Elegantees, an ethical fashion brand manufactured in Nepal by women who have overcome human trafficking. They asked Molly to design a line of clothing and, because of its success, Elegantees was able to bring on an additional artisan. “A woman was given an opportunity for sustainable employment, all thanks to the support from my online platform,” Molly says. “That was a banner moment for me and my community.” Molly lives with her husband and two small children in Durham.

What would you suggest to do around the Triangle? “I would say get out and explore! You can go to the beach at Jordan Lake, or walk the city streets in downtown Raleigh and hop in and out of some of the most amazing restaurants. (Appetizers at The District are so good!) You can go to the Eno River and play in nature, drive over to Hillsborough and hike Occoneechee Mountain, or watch top-notch performers at DPAC or The Carolina Theater. There’s literally something for EVERYONE. My family and I love exploring our area and just finding new gems and trying new places!”

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Linda Nguyen

//

@ LINDA EAT SW ORLD

“I’ve had an online presence since I was 15, and that was in 1998! Before the age of Facebook, before ‘blogging’ was a word, and way before Instagram,” says Linda Nguyen, who shares her culinary adventures through her account @lindaeatsworld. “It’s a compulsion. I never thought I could make a living creatively; I just showed up for fun.” More than 10,000 people have showed up, too. Linda’s popular account features thousands of food photos from places in the Triangle and beyond. And even though she is making part of her living from her influencer role, she admits it’s not easy. “I don’t feel successful in my day-to-day. I’m constantly running around trying to create content, most of which is unpaid content creation. And then positioning myself for prospective partnerships to help pay for life,” Linda says.

Despite the challenges, Linda loves leaning into her creative passions. Other than her food-focused account, she also works as a professional photographer, capturing families, engagements, weddings, and food images for restaurants. She highlights her photography work on the account @curiousnotionsphoto. She believes her focus on connection with her audience, and a certain amount of grit, is what has helped her accounts grow. “To get to this point took a combination of consistency, learning photography, showing my audience that I appreciate them, and trying to curate content and captions that are heartfelt,” Linda explains. “I can’t be heartfelt with every single Instagram post—sometimes a taco is just a taco. But when I can, I try to prioritize human connection.” Sometimes her personal sharing and content creation transcends the virtual relationship. “Some of my followers have become lifelong friends. They’ve followed along through college, breakups, new relationships, and now they’ve followed along as I write about losing my dad this past January,” Linda says. Nurturing these connections, both online and in real life, is what matters most to her. “Integrity and taking the time to get to know my audience are two of my highest priorities when it comes to blogging and ‘influencing.’ If you lose your audience, you lose this job.” Linda lives in the Carrboro/Chapel Hill area with her fiancé, who works at UNC. They travel for dates throughout the Triangle to cover the ever-expanding food scene.

What would you suggest to do around the Triangle? The places that are not food-related where I love taking out-of-town visitors are Duke Gardens, the NC Museum of Art, and to see the sunflowers at Dorothea Dix Park in the summer. As for food, Brewery Bhavana in Raleigh, High Tea at Fearrington House in Pittsboro, Lula’s in Chapel Hill, Pizza Mercato in Carrboro, and M Sushi in Durham are just some of my favorites. 96 | MidtownMag.com


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What would you suggest to do around the Triangle? One of the places I always recommend checking out is the Capital Area Greenway. It stretches all the way from Falls Lake in North Raleigh down to Clayton and it is a great place to walk along the river, go for a run, or just enjoy being outside in nature. If you need a place to relax and grab a cold beer, my go-to place is Trophy Brewing in Raleigh. They brew some of the best local beers and have great pizza, too. I also highly recommend people get over to Durham to explore the Bull City.

John Huisman

//

@T RIA NGLEEXPLORER

By day he’s a full-time environmental specialist for the state of North Carolina, focusing on water quality issues and protecting the state’s lakes and streams. However, outside of work, John Huisman is known to many as @triangleexplorer, an Instagram influencer who shares his explorations of the Triangle with more than 22,000 followers. “Honestly I was not trying to become an influencer when I first started. I just really like exploring the area, discovering new things, and sharing about it with others,” John explains. “Most of the time I am simply sharing about the stuff I normally do.” John’s friends and family noticed his knack for photography and local recommendations when he started sharing photos on his Facebook page 10 years ago. Thanks to their encouragement, he launched a blog—The Triangle Explorer—and his social media platforms were an outgrowth of its success. Eventually local businesses started asking him to promote their food and products on his blog and Instagram account. “I think the shift to ‘influencer’ status happened about four to five years ago for me,” John says. “I started

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getting invited to restaurant openings and events, which has offered some really fun opportunities along the way.” One of his favorite local collaborations is with the Durham Performing Arts Center. John attends their shows, usually with his wife, and then writes a review of the performance and posts a picture of the experience. His authenticity and curiosity shine through in his posts, which is partly why he thinks he’s had success. “I try not to focus so much on being the first to share about something, and instead focus on what truly interests me,” John notes. “I think keeping it authentic appeals to people.” He also emphasizes the connections he makes through his online platforms. “I think it’s important to keep the ‘social’ in social media,” John adds. “Sharing should be interactive, and I enjoy having a dialogue with the people who follow me.” John lives in North Raleigh with his wife, where they enjoy many local beers and cups of coffee together.


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What would you suggest to do around the Triangle? If you are new to Raleigh, I would highly recommend visiting the NC Museum of Art and its stunning exhibits, museum spaces, and outdoor park and events. We are members, and it’s probably my favorite thing to do in Raleigh. The Warehouse District is one of my favorite parts of the city—there is plenty to explore in that area, including CAM, which is a fantastic contemporary art museum. I love the new Transfer Food Hall on East Davie Street, or grabbing pizza with the family at Oakwood Pizza Box on Person Street. Moore Square Park just reopened and will be a great place to relax and enjoy city life, with seasonal farmers markets and lots of great restaurants and shops within walking distance.

Chana Lynn

//

@RA LEIGHW HAT SU P

She goes by @raleighwhatsup on Instagram and shares “all things Raleigh” on her account, which has almost 20,000 followers. “It was less focused in the beginning, but as Raleigh really started to grow, I started sharing more about Raleigh specifically,” Lynn says. “I quickly realized my interest was to share about local places, and encourage friends and followers to visit them.”

In addition to the opportunities within those consulting jobs, Chana has worked with national brands that want to tap into the Raleigh market. In 2017, after Alaska Airlines started flying out of RDU, they invited her to share on the Alaska Air Instagram account. She was chosen to be a “Local Wanderer” in Raleigh. “They trusted me to share what I love about Raleigh and spotlight the Triangle as a destination,” Chana explains. “It was an amazing opportunity, and one of my most exciting moments as an influencer.”

As more people started to follow along, Chana started receiving invites to local restaurant and retail openings, dinners, and media events. Outside of her @raleighwhatsup account, Chana works as a website designer and social media consultant, with clients such as Tabletop Media Group and Booth Amphitheatre.

Chana Lynn lives in North Raleigh with her husband and two teenage daughters, and they all enjoy traveling and exploring new places together. They also take part in many of Chana’s influencing adventures.

Moving back to the States after living in Sydney, Australia for three years, Chana Lynn and her husband were searching for a place to call home. They had previously lived in the D.C. area, but the big city scene didn’t fit the goals of their new family, so they decided Raleigh was a better choice. Fast-forward 20 years and some might argue that Chana knows more about her adopted town than native long-timers.

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Marche Robinson

//

@MA RC HERO BINSO N

“I’ve always been that person who shares things with people,” describes Marche Robinson, a local influencer who focuses on style, beauty, and travel. “If someone walking down the street says they like my dress, I’ll make sure to stop and tell them where I got it, how much it was, and why I love it.” With nearly 40,000 followers on her Instagram account, she has no shortage of people to share with. Marche got her start online after graduating from law school in 2010. “I couldn’t find a job because the market was terrible, so I’d spend my downtime sending my mom and aunt pictures of clothes and interior decorating ideas,” Marche says. “My mom eventually suggested I start a blog, which I think was her way of saying: ‘Stop sending me all this stuff!’” Eventually Marche did find a job as an attorney in Raleigh; she now works in contract law and balances her day job with blogging and posting on Instagram. “I used to write a blog post every day, for the first five to six years. I was writing all the time,” she says. “But now it’s evolved to where I don’t post just to post. I focus on sharing things that I love, and on collaborating with brands I already like.” Many of those brands are big names like Lou & Grey clothing and Laneige beauty products. And, thanks to the beautiful photographs on Marche’s feed that are mostly taken by her fiancé, she has received attention from national magazines, including Elle, Ebony, and In Style. “The minute I took it seriously was when I realized I could leave my job and do this for a living,” Marche says. However, she admitted that she loves having both her attorney work and the online platforms. “My day job doesn’t really allow me to be creative, but I love the work. I use one side of my brain for that and the other creative side for blogging and Instagram.” Marche seems genuinely surprised that all the work she puts into her posts has allowed her to live the life of an influencer. “It’s crazy; sometimes I’ll turn to my fiancé and be like, ‘How do I get paid for this?’” Marche and her fiancé, Michael Newell, live and work as attorneys in Raleigh. They are getting married at the Merrimon-Wynne house in October.

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What would you suggest to do around the Triangle? The Triangle has so many great restaurants! My favorites are Dame’s Chicken & Waffles, Jack Tar & The Colonel’s Daughter, Capital Club 16, and Poole’s Diner. One of my favorite things about living in the Triangle is all the cool new fitness classes and gyms opening in the area. I try a new class every month. I love the trampoline classes at Mega Raleigh, boxing at Knuckle Up, and Strength Hip Hop Explicit at Midtown Yoga.


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HOME Styler 1

LOCAL LOVE

Shop & Support Local Artists & Products STYLED BY VALERIE TROUPE ValerieTroupe.com

PHOTOS BY BRITTANY MURDOCK

The Triangle area is home to so many amazing artisans and successful businesses.

3

You can ďŹ nd just about anything or your home that was handmade, hand-painted, or produced right here: gorgeous oil paintings, awardwinning photography, stunning ower arrangements, fragrant candles, and even delicious food items! You can even get your brand printed on a myriad of promotional merchandise, right here at home. Take advantage of all our area has to offer and support local businesses!

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4

5

6

1 Peace, 40"x60" oil on canvas by Sue Scoggins, $2,800 | Vita Vite 2 Purple Cymbidium orchid by Keith Lloyd Designs, $259 | Lloyd & Lady 3 North Carolina soy candle in City of Oaks scent, $26.95 | Zest Cafe & Home Art 4 Mugs, see store for promotional product pricing | BaySix 5 Lyrix Health Elixirs, $4.95 each | NOFO @ the Pig 6 Sunrise Meditation, 30"x30" oil on canvas by Susan Hecht, $2,400 | ArtSource

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Photo by John Paul Middlesworth

The Write

Ready to tap your inner scribe? 106 | MidtownMag.com


Way

BY DON VAUGHAN

THE CARY PLAYWRIGHTS’ FORUM HOSTS A VARIETY OF THEATRICAL PERFORMANCEES THROUGHOUT THE YEAR.

N

orth Carolina has a deep literary heritage, boasting such homegrown luminaries as Thomas Wolfe, Maya Angelou, and Charles Frazier, just to name a few. If you dream of joining their ranks, an impressive array of regional writing organizations are available to help you become a published author. Among the ones you might want to explore:

THE NORTH CAROLINA WRITERS’ NETWORK Established in 1985, the 1,400-member North Carolina Writers’ Network is the largest organization serving all writers in the Tar Heel State. Annual membership is $80, with discounts for seniors, young writers, households, and others. The NCWN hosts three major writing events a year: a spring conference traditionally held in April in Greensboro, the rotating Squire Summer Writing Workshops in July, and a rotating fall conference in November, to be held in Asheville in 2019 and Raleigh-Durham in 2020. The organization also hosts a series of online classes throughout the year. In addition, NCWN Regional Reps host free monthly get-togethers that are open to the public. These range from workshops and open mics to other literarythemed events. “The North Carolina Writers’ Network believes that writing is necessary for both self-expression and a healthy community, that well-written words can connect people across time and distance, and that the deeply satisfying experiences of writing and reading should be available to everyone,” notes communications cirector Charlies Fiore. “No matter your experience, background, or publishing credits, there’s a place for you in the NCWN.” Visit NCWriters.org.

Wake County has numerous writing groups eager to help.

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THE RESEARCH TRIANGLE WRITERS COFFEEHOUSE An offshoot of the original Writers Coffeehouse in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, the Research Triangle Writers Coffeehouse was established in 2017 and currently has about 120 members, a tenth of whom attend any given meeting. It meets on the second Sunday of every month from 2–4 pm at Quail Ridge Books in Raleigh. Meetings are free and open to the public. “We have had special guests come speak to us from time to time, but our meetings are usually more of a casual discussion than a formal event,” says coordinator Gray Rinehart. “We don’t have a formal agenda, and even if I come prepared to discuss some recent development in the world of writing, we will often set that aside in favor of helping someone work through an issue or to answer a new writer’s questions about publishing.” AREA WRITING GROUPS HOLD A NUMBER OF EVENTS, FROM MEETINGS WITH GUEST SPEAKERS TO MEETUPS WHERE MEMBERS CAN READ AND REVIEW EACH OTHERS' WORK.

TRIANGLE ASSOCIATION OF FREELANCERS Established in 2003, the 150-member Triangle Association of Freelancers offers networking, education, and mentoring to freelance writers, editors, and others throughout North Carolina. Annual membership is $15. TAF meets on the last Wednesday of each month, except December, at Milton’s Pizza & Pasta on Six Forks Road in Raleigh, starting at 5:30 pm. There is usually a guest speaker at the meetings, which are free and open to the public. The organization also sponsors a one-day, multi-track spring conference called Write Now! The conference is held at The McKimmon Center at NC State. “Triangle Association of Freelancers is the perfect organization for writers who are just getting started, but it also has much to offer the experienced writer,” says executive director Nanette Lavoie-Vaughan. “One of the group’s greatest assets is its brain trust. We have members with years and even decades of writing and publishing experience, and all are more than happy to answer questions and provide support to those just starting their writing careers.” Visit TAFNC.com. THE TFC SCREENWRITERS GROUP Aspiring screenwriters are encouraged to check out the TFC Screenwriters Group, established in January 2017 under the umbrella of the Triangle Filmmaking Community Facebook group. Membership is free. The group meets twice a month, but takes a break during the summer months. Meetings are free and open to the public. Venues vary, but past meetings have been held at the Hunt Library at NC State and in Durham, says co-moderator Jim McQuaid, who has been writing and making short films for nearly 20 years. “Our focus is film scripts, both short and long, and television pilots,” McQuaid reports. “We read and review the work of two writers at each meeting, and maintain a queue of who is scheduled to bring pages to future meetings. Members and interested folks who have reached out receive an email reminder of the next meeting.” The organization does not host conferences or other events, but meetings are conducted in a workshop format. Visit TriangleFilmMaking.com/TFC-Screenwriters-Group/

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Rinehart defers to New York Times best-selling author Jonathan Maberry, the founder of the original Writers Coffeehouse, regarding the organization’s purview: “The Writers Coffeehouse attracts everyone, from absolute beginners to award winners and bestsellers. We’re all writers, whether we write fiction, poetry, plays, screenplays, comics, nonfiction books, articles...well, pretty much anything. A writer is a writer, and we all share some common ground.” Visit Facebook.com/ Groups/1952726114961138/ HEART OF CAROLINA ROMANCE WRITERS One of two state chapters of the Romance Writers of America (RWA), Cary-based Heart of Carolina Romance Writers was founded in 1993 and currently has nearly 60 members. Annual membership is $30, and members must also be a member of the RWA, which costs $99 annually. “We are primarily focused on developing the romance writer, and we work with authors at any stage of their career,” says president Laura Browning. “In addition to romance writers, RWA has a long history of developing and educating aspiring authors in a wide range of genres. We also have [authors of] children’s and young adult [works] among our membership.” The organization meets on the second Saturday of the month at ECPI on Doie Cope Road in Raleigh. General meetings run from 1 to 1:30 pm and are free and open to the public. The general meeting is usually


followed by a mini-workshop or seminar, for which there is a $10 fee. “We also hold one full-day conference,” Browning reports. “This year it will be in October, but will move to March in 2020.” In addition to chapter meetings, Heart of Carolina Romance Writers hosts small subgroups that meet in person or online to focus on developing craft. The organization also offers a wide range of online classes focused on craft, marketing, and the business of writing. Visit HeartOfCarolina.org CARY PLAYWRIGHTS’ FORUM Established in 2007, the Cary Playwrights’ Forum is aimed at scribes interested in writing for the stage or screen. It meets on the third Wednesday of the month from 7–9 pm in the conference room at the Cary Arts Center (101 Dry Avenue). Meetings are free and open to the public. “Writers usually come with 10 to 15 pages of their material to hear it read aloud and get feedback from fellow writers,” says co-founder Lydia Craft Sbityakov. “We love to have actors and directors attend as well.” The Cary Playwrights’ Forum hosts a variety of theatrical events over the year. Last year saw productions of Bar Plays (short plays by North Carolina writers that are set and performed in a local bar), PlaySlam (a three-minute play competition), and NC10 by10 with OdysseyStage, a festival of 10-minute plays. “We also hold playwriting workshops from time to time,” Sbityakov says. Visit CaryPlaywrightsForum.org. TRIANGLE WRITERS Established in 2009, Triangle Writers is on Meetup with a collective of subgroups that meet throughout the Triangle. It currently has 1,190 members, and attendance is free. “Triangle Writers subgroups hold regular meetings,” says founder/organizer Tara Lynne Groth. “Some meet monthly, others bimonthly. They are held in North Raleigh, downtown Raleigh, Apex, and West Cary/Morrisville.” In addition, Groth organizes a half-day floating creative retreat on the Haw River called Pen and Paddle, as well as occasional workshops and seminars. Visit Meetup.com/Writers-797/.

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• LEADER PERSPECTIVES • COLLEGE TEAMS • INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE • FALL FESTIVALS

EXPLORE. ENGAGE. ENJOY!


Photo by Dyyymond Aerials

Here to Stay BY CONNIE GENTRY

People come to the City of Oaks, and its surrounding communities, to put down roots.

New in town? Most of us are! In fact, even those of us who’ve lived here for years still can’t keep up with all the newness and excitement coming to our communities. The one thing that seems certain: Every day we’re growing, evolving, and adding more opportunities for work, for play, and for great experiences. The numbers are staggering: More than half of the adults living in our state were born somewhere else. And we just keep on welcoming more folks, with 43 people moving into the Raleigh area each day—12 from another county within North Carolina, 20 from another state, and 11 from another country. Whatever brings people here—school, career, retirement—it’s a place they want to be; and for many, they come believing they are here to stay. That newcomers arrive with the hope of putting down roots bodes well for the future of our communities. Many of our local leaders came to the area with that same kind of commitment, and we talked with some to learn their suggestions for newcomers—mostly, they share their ideas for making the most of today and planning for tomorrow.

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Own Your Community

Of the 64 people added to our population each day, Cole says 21 are born here and 43 are moving here. “It’s an exciting time to be in Raleigh; this is an ascending marketplace, and we have over 700 international companies in our market now. We have this thriving tech sector fueled by what I believe to be the strongest education ecosystem in the country.” She points to the quality of K-through-12 education in Wake County, the strength of Wake Tech’s offerings, and the strength of the region’s university system as fundamental reasons this market is so dynamic. But the biggest factor, she says, is this: “There’s this spirit of optimism and momentum that makes this a really special place. It doesn’t mean we aren’t without our challenges, and it doesn’t mean that there aren’t things we need to be paying attention to around affordability and upward mobility and equitable economic development.”

Photo by Joe Reale

One of the most significant trends: Growing interest from companies looking to bring their headquarters here. At the Chamber, Cole says 20 to 25 percent of their project load now consists of possible headquarters coming to town, and the benefits go beyond job creation and bragging rights. “It’s great for philanthropy, because very often headquarters in a market are strong supporters of philanthropic efforts in their market as well.”

Adrienne Cole, president and CEO of the Raleigh Chamber of Commerce, is one of those rare residents who was born here— but her family moved to New Bern when she was 3, so Raleigh wasn’t really home until she and her husband returned in 2001. (This after spending her undergraduate years at Meredith College, then moving on to Appalachian State for grad school, followed by the start of her career in eastern North Carolina.) “I traversed the state, but always came back to Raleigh,” Cole says. “For young people, it’s a great place for career trajectory and for families.” And Raleigh is also a popular retirement destination, she notes, not only for parents whose adult children have come here for careers and to raise a family, but also for seniors who appreciate the opportunities for reinventing the next phase of their lives. “People are coming because they can stay active here into retirement. They can take classes at NC State—there’s a whole program for people who want to continue their education—and Raleigh’s urban living is appealing to many seniors who may not want to take care of a yard but want walkability.”

Her advice to newcomers: “Just get involved. This is a community where you don’t have to have been here for a long time to get engaged and be a partner in what the future of this place is going to look like. There are some cities where you’re only accepted into those leadership opportunities or engagement opportunities if you’ve been there a long time. This isn’t a place like that, so newcomers can become as engaged as they want to be—whether that’s volunteering on boards or getting involved in organizations, there are different opportunities for engagement.” What our city becomes will be a product of many visions, and Cole attributes the success and opportunity here to a “rich history of collaboration,” a characteristic she believes is unique to this market. “I hear from people, ‘You guys work so well together.’ That doesn’t happen by accident. It happens because people are very intentional about working together to create the community and the kind of future we want here. That doesn’t mean we are always going to agree. But that means we are going to come to the table and have the discussion in a civil way, where we can debate things and come to the right conclusion. I don’t want to lose that; it’s something very special about this community.”

Mountains or coast? “WE DO BOTH, BUT WE ALSO PICK RIGHT HERE AND DO A STAYCATION.” Buy or rent?

“IT’S SUCH A PERSONAL DECISION, TO RENT FIRST OR BUY IMMEDIATELY. MY HUSBAND AND I RENTED FOR ABOUT SIX MONTHS BEFORE WE BOUGHT A HOUSE BECAUSE WE WANTED TO GET A HANDLE ON WHERE WE WANTED TO BE. BUT I’VE TALKED TO OTHER PEOPLE WHO FELL IN LOVE WITH A COMMUNITY AND BOUGHT IMMEDIATELY.”

Personal favorites?

“DOING THINGS AROUND THE COMMUNITY WITH MY FAMILY—WE LOVE THE FESTIVALS, LIKE ARTSPLOSURE AND WIDE OPEN BLUEGRASS; WE GO TO CONCERTS AND THEATER; AND WE’RE ON THE GREENWAY OFTEN.”

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Empowering Women Entrepreneurs After successful runs in large cities around the country, WEX adds Raleigh to its agenda. By Brittany Murdock

Alexa Carlin might be a few months new to Raleigh, but her popular Women Empower X (WEX) event has been bringing women entrepreneurs together for years, and it’s headed to Raleigh on October 12th. As a successful public speaker, Alexa saw power in community and wanted to help women collaborate in a positive environment. WEX aims to bring together a diverse community of women from different ages and socioeconomic backgrounds, with the mindset that there is enough room in this world for all women to be successful. It’s an opportunity for female leaders, entrepreneurs, and executives to reinvent themselves, create lasting relationships, and grow their business. But, most of all, it’s an event to help women feel empowered—because when you feel supported, you feel empowered. This one-day event features keynote speakers, breakout workshops, authentic networking, insightful panels, and 60 exhibitors, along with resources, coaches, and products to help women get to the next level in their personal life and their business endeavors. Visit WomenEmpowerX.com for general admission and VIP tickets.

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Favorite restaurant: THE PROVINCIAL IN APEX Favorite foodie spot:

“THE FOOD HALLS! LOVE TRANSFER CO. AND MORGAN STREET! (WEGMANS IS A FOOD HALL AS WELL, WITH CHEFS MAKING FRESH FOOD DAILY, AND YOU CAN DINE IN THE CAFÉ OR TAKE IT HOME.”

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he arrived just a year ago, and the one thing that Hallie Johnston, store manager for Wegmans Food Markets, would change is that she wishes she could have come sooner. It’s been a rollicking year, about to culminate in the September 29th grand opening of Wegmans’ first North Carolina store, located in the Midtown East Shopping Center on Wake Forest Road. Coming from Rochester, New York, what’s surprised her most is that it’s not as hot as she’d anticipated—that and the blue skies. “Definitely the blue skies! Coming from the North, we’re not used to blue skies every single day,” she enthuses.

Actually, that blue skies outlook has colored the thinking of all the newcomers Wegmans is bringing to the market. “We’re relocating 82 folks to this market from the six states where we currently do business, and all of them will arrive by September 1st,” she says. “It’s an easy sell; folks want to come here, and Raleigh has been a great market because we’re relocating whole families—everyone is so excited to be coming here.” Johnston and her family have settled in Apex, and she says the best thing about this area is that there are so many affordable options here. “A lot of our people are moving into Garner and Clayton, and buying their first homes at an incredibly affordable rate. They’re able to start their roots there,” Johnston says. “The majority of people who want to own are buying,” she adds, and sometimes that happens even before they get here. For those who want to rent, she says there are folks who are choosing to live in downtown Raleigh. “All of us coming here are saying how welcoming this community is, how helpful everyone has been, and that it’s so refreshing.” Aside from the differences in weather (Johnston says she’d be happy to never see snow again), the school systems in our market have been most surprising. “No one was ever exposed to a year-round school system before, and our employees who are involved with it here absolutely love it,” she says.

Photo by Scott Kelly

But there is one conundrum that she’s grappling with. How to answer the question she’s asked most often: Who do you root for? “We’ll have stores near all of [the Triangle universities]. Right now, NC State is closest to our Raleigh store; but soon we’ll have a store right in-between Duke and Chapel Hill. It’s terrible. I don’t have an answer, but I’ll probably have to stick with NC State, since it’s closest to our first store.”

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Except for the team loyalty quandary, she says the Raleigh area is a perfect fit for Wegmans. Pragmatically speaking, Raleigh has the density and population growth that Wegmans requires, since those are the prerequisites for hiring a lot of people and maintaining the volumes that support low prices. Johnston adds, “Raleigh is a family-friendly community; it’s a diverse area in thought, food, and experiences—we embrace all of that and want to be a part of it.”

One Year In


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Raleigh Plays Manhattan to Durham's Brooklyn This is a man who really gets the Raleigh vibe; that’s what comes across as you track the soft tempo of Lamar Heyward’s voice, more an inflection than a Southern accent, even though he’s called Raleigh home for nearly 20 years. Here’s a guy who’s totally at ease in the posh surrounds of the Civic Federal Credit Union (which he describes not as posh, but rather “brand, spanking new”) and sporting a Kermit (yes, the frog) meme on the lapel of his suit. As the senior vice president of marketing at Civic, Heyward is poised to help government workers and their families understand banking via a totally digital presence, sans brick-and-mortar branches.

It’s another sign of the times in a city that is increasingly on the cutting edge of tech and of living with ease and convenience. “One of the great things about this area is that it’s designed so you can go all over or you can stay in your little five-mile radius. There are all these great places— Midtown, Cameron Village, downtown—wherever you are, you can find places to hang out, to go eat,” he says. Heyward’s advice for someone moving to the area: Check out the digital resources, like RaleighNC.gov, but also connect and have conversations with people in different communities around the area. “Between the internet and talking with coworkers and people you meet, you can figure it out. You’ll learn if you’re an ITB (inside the beltline) person, a Midtown person, or where you want to be,” he says.

Photo by Scott Kelly

As for what makes Raleigh so appealing, Heyward thinks it has to do with access to all that the area has to offer. “It’s the diversity—the presentation of all these people from different areas—that creates more of a melting pot than Charlotte might have,” Heyward explains. “And I tend to think what we have is that [Raleigh/Durham] gives us that Manhattan/Brooklyn feel. When you go to Charlotte you lose that, because you only get Manhattan. A lot of people are very attracted to the edginess that Durham brings, the complexity of not just having the suits and the high-fashion people.”

Favorite restaurants? TASTE, WHISKEY KITCHEN, SO•CA, ORO RESTAURANT & LOUNGE Favorite hangout? FOX LIQUOR BAR OR FOUNDATION (ON FAYETTEVILLE STREET)

Rent or buy? “MY RECOMMENDATION IS TO RENT FIRST, SO YOU CAN SEE WHERE YOU REALLY WANT TO BE.

YOU CAN LEARN A LOT ABOUT THE AREA AND DETERMINE IN THAT FIRST YEAR OR TWO IF YOU WANT TO STAY IN THE AREA WHERE YOU’RE RENTING, OR MOVE.”

What's needed? A TRANSPORTATION SOLUTION / SYSTEM 116 | MidtownMag.com


Photo by Scott Kelly

Make Your Opinion Count

After new voter requirements began changing, back in 2013, Kate Fellman decided folks deserved to be better informed on the mechanics and requirements of voting. “We try to translate things into a positive empowering message: ‘You can vote, here’s how,’” says Fellman, founder and executive director of the nonprofit organization You Can Vote. The goal of the nonpartisan group is to help move voters beyond misconceptions and beyond apathy—to empower individuals “to make informed decisions instead of being overwhelmed by this whiplash of changing voting rules,” she explains. One of the best ways to impact the future of our communities is to vote in local elections. “We believe the more people who are informed about the processes and see how these lawmakers impact our lives, the better decisions we can all make together,” Fellman adds. Her No. 1 recommendation is that people take advantage of early voting. There are 17 days of early voting in North Carolina, and voters can even get a photo ID at early registration. This year Election Day in Raleigh and Cary is October 8th; both towns will be electing a mayor as well as filling council seats. Raleigh will vote to fill all seven seats on its city council; Cary will be voting for three council seats. In the surrounding communities, Election Day will be November 5th. Mayors will be elected in Apex and Fuquay-Varina; town council members will be elected in Apex, Holly Springs and Morrisville, while Fuquay-Varina and Wake Forest will be electing seats on their board of commissioners. YouCanVote.org has a wealth of facts to educate and enable the voting process.

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hen I sat down with Lee Davis, he was two months into his role as managing director of Clean, Raleigh’s preeminent integrated branding agency. His arrival was a homecoming of sorts—he played basketball down the road at Guilford College and then launched his career in the Triangle as his wife completed grad school at Carolina. But that was some 20 years ago, and he spent time at agencies West and Vaughan (before it added French to its name), and at Howard Merrill, where he worked with Jeremy Holden, now president and chief strategy officer at Clean. Davis circled the country, leading projects and agencies from Richmond, Virginia, to Portland, Oregon; Manhattan to San Francisco—and ultimately finding his way back to Raleigh this summer. Two months in town and Davis quips, “Some things haven’t changed, some have—and some should have, but haven’t.” Specific to North Raleigh, he observes, “Char-Grill is still there; I love Char-Grill, happy to see it still there. And that sandwich place, Boondini’s, I never thought it would still be in business, with the same guy running it. I hadn’t been there in 23 years and I felt like I’d gone back in time: exact same guy taking my order, same menu, same everything.”

But when Davis describes this area, he does so by leveraging a story from Robert Schwartz, CEO of TBWA. “Schwartz told me he grew up in the advertising business in New York, and, ‘Just like the city, all my thinking was vertical. Then I went out to L.A. and everything opened up; and when that happened, all my thinking opened up.’ I feel the same about coming back here; when you come here it opens up your thinking. So that’s the story I share when I tell people about this area. The region allows us to have broader thinking.” He credits the area with fostering a “mental spirit,” one that is driven by the diversity in people, culture, and thinking that this area is known for. As is often noted, Raleigh is a city of entrepreneurial ambition; like Davis says, there’s a prevailing attitude of: “Let’s just do it and see what happens.” This is possible, in part, he believes, because there aren’t the pressures of other places. “In Manhattan, you’ve got

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Photo by Scott Kelly

What’s the best new thing he’s discovered about this area? Downtown development. “It’s really exciting to see the downtowns growing like they are. It used to be one of those areas where people went to work downtown and then went home. Now, [downtown Raleigh and downtown Durham] have made a turn; I love that. It makes this area so vibrant. How the downtowns have transformed is what’s exciting; that’s the future. And we’re a little bit ahead of other places [in that regard].”

so many pressures. You can’t afford to make mistakes there. Affordability has a lot to do with it. So does diversity. What’s interesting about the Northeast is that it’s amazing how segmented the communities are, the lack of diversity in areas. Here, I don’t feel it’s that segmented. I think people a hundred years ago would have said the exact opposite: New York would be the mixing pot and here would be the segmented part. I believe that’s flipped now.” He’s thrilled to be back, working with friends, discovering the breweries and newness in Raleigh, and intent on building a better, broader future at the Triangle’s top agency as well as in the community.

A Full-Circle Homecoming


What hasn’t changed that needs to? His answers come quick: “Public schools. Education is the most important thing we can do for our future, and we don’t pay enough attention to it. I’d love to see the companies that are moving into this area have an emphasis on driving education. And mass transit is a massive problem; but we’re not alone in that. Anyone outside New York City feels that pain.” Overall, he’s convinced we’re ahead of the curve in many areas, from downtown revitalization to healthcare, innovation to sustainability. “Garbage pickup here is on par with what we had in Oregon, and Oregon is way deep into the green world. “From a technology standpoint, I’m using Google Fiber, and I never heard of that anywhere else I’ve been. It’s not available in New York, so there are things that are happening here that are more interesting,” Davis says. “I’m not savvy enough to know other things where tech is stronger, but we aren’t behind at all—like I can pay to park downtown on my phone. There are interesting things here because it is a market where you can try things.”

Favorite aspect?

“THE CRAFT BREWERY SCENE. IT’S FANTASTIC. THERE ARE A LOT OF SIMILARITIES HERE WITH PORTLAND: GREAT BEER, GREAT COFFEE, GREAT FOOD.”

Hangout spot?

RALEIGH BREWING COMPANY

Unexpected discovery?

“THE DOG CULTURE IN THIS TOWN! RUNNERS AND DOGS JUST HANG OUT AT CRAFT BREWERIES. IT’S INTERESTING, BUT I’M NOT SURE WHAT THE CONNECTION IS.”

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veryone talks about the great outdoor living in North Carolina. Even the folks who are spending most of their outdoor time on an al fresco patio still rave about all we can do outside—the greenways, the coast, the mountains. Wit Tuttle, vice president of tourism and marketing for the Economic Development Partnership of North Carolina and executive director of Visit NC, talks about it more than any of us—not only because it’s his job, but also because he and his family are avid bikers and greenway enthusiasts. Before moving here 13 years ago, Tuttle hailed from Alaska and Florida—so when he talks about the grandeur of our Blue Ridge Mountains and the unique qualities of our beaches, his frame of reference includes some pretty amazing settings. But this is the place he chooses to call home. To newcomers, he would say, “This is the most diverse state for activities, I believe, of any in the country. Where else can you go on a 30-mile stretch of beach that’s completely undeveloped—and in the same state, ski and golf in the same day? People don’t realize how much there is to do and see here; we’re the 6th most-visited state in the country.”

And living in the Raleigh area is just about perfect, as he points out: “You don’t get the difficulties of living in a beach community or mountain community, but you can go to both. And there’s a tremendous amount of things to do here—hiking, biking, lakes. I’m always experiencing things, and trying to keep the perspective of a newcomer.” Tuttle and his family lived in Fuquay-Varina for 12 years, which they loved, but they recently moved to Raleigh for easier access to some of their favorite biking along the Neuse River trails. “What North Carolina has done really well is maintain each community’s individual personality. Cary’s personality is definitely different than FuquayVarina. Unique and distinctly different, people look for that authenticity.” The challenge he struggles with is making time to venture around the state when the Raleigh area also has so much to explore and enjoy, but he encourages everyone to make that effort. In fact, 40 percent of the tourists visiting different parts of North Carolina are in-state residents. And it’s a very mobile-friendly venture, with 90 percent of visitors choosing to drive. That’s due in part to convenience and excellent highway systems, but it’s also a reflection of the lack of mass transit options in our cities. “The challenge for areas like Wake [County] is managing the growth, to make sure it’s done in a smart way that benefits as many people as possible and allows for future growth,” Tuttle says. “Transportation is key—[whether] it’s mass transit or it’s an interconnected greenway system that allows for individual transit on different types of vehicles. We have to set ourselves up for the future. How do we deal with electric scooters? How do we deal with automated cars? I think transportation is a huge part of the future, making sure everything is connected and works for our communities.”

Photo by Joe Reale

One of the biggest segments of vacationers are those who are coming to visit friends or family, and Tuttle encourages newcomers to learn all they can about places to take their outof-town guests. “People who move here probably don’t know about Cape Hatteras National Seashore; it’s the first national seashore ever. They don’t know there are over 200 scenic overlooks on the Blue Ridge Parkway or that Wilmington has one of the biggest historic districts in the country.” Whatever the reason for traveling in our state, the most impressive measure is that 90 percent of people who spend one vacation here become repeat visitors. Like all the people who move here with the intention of putting down roots, people who come tend to stay or return.

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Resources to Bookmark ApexChamber.com ApexNC.org CaryChamber.com Fuquay-Varina.com HollySpringsChamber.org HollySpringsNC.us MorrisvilleChamber.org MountainsToSeaTrail.org Project543.com RaleighChamber.org RaleighNC.gov TownOfMorrisville.org VisitRaleigh.com VisitNC.com WakeGreenways.weebly.com WakeGov.com YouCanVote.org

Favorite eats:

“I’M A BARBECUE GUY; I LOVE ALL KINDS OF BARBECUE—I’M PARTIAL TO DANNY’S BAR-B-QUE, BUT I LIKE SOME EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA BARBECUE, TOO.”

Which team?

“I’M FOR ANYONE WHO’S PLAYING AGAINST FLORIDA STATE. I WENT TO THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, SO MY HATRED OF FSU OUTWEIGHS ANY LOYALTY TO ANYONE ELSE—I’LL CHEER FOR NC STATE OR DUKE OR UNC, OR ANYONE ELSE PLAYING FSU.”

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onnecting Local and Global Art BY KAT HARDING

Photo by Scott Kelly

Valerie Hillings’ office at the North Carolina Museum of Art overlooks one of the most iconic works of art in the Ann and Jim Goodnight Museum Park—Thomas Sayre’s Gyre, 1999, three monumental rings made from local red clay— and one of the newest additions, Heather Hart’s colorful house Southern Oracle: We Will Tear the Roof Off, 2019, on view through October. “It announces itself, in a way,” Hillings says about Hart’s piece. “The first few weeks, I saw someone doing a sun salutation [yoga pose] on the roof. Of course I’m thinking ‘please don’t fall,’ but it was a moment when no one else was around except for that person, and it was amazing to see the experiences that can be created here.” Hillings, who, as director of the NCMA, is focused on the entire state, has been on a tour, getting to know artists, community leaders, and business owners from Asheville to Wilmington and everywhere in-between. “There’s a wealth of knowledge and talent that we can drive in, rather than fly in,” she says. “It’s been an incredible journey to meet talented, creative colleagues across the state and to recognize the level of passion everyone has for the arts.” Hillings isn’t a stranger to the state, having earned her undergraduate degree from Duke University. After Duke, she got her MA and PhD in art history from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. She worked at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation and in 2009 joined the Guggenheim’s Abu Dhabi Project staff, where she was charged with building a collection for a new modern and contemporary art museum, which is still under development in the United Arab Emirates. She returned to North Carolina last November, following the retirement of Larry Wheeler, who had been at the helm of the NCMA for nearly 25 years. Stepping into his colorful shoes, however, has been no problem. “I am grateful to have been able to take time to get to know the staff and hear about their ideas about our museum’s future,” Hillings adds. “It turned out we were thinking about many of the same opportunities, and armed with their knowledge and love of the NCMA, I am confident that our next chapter will be exciting.” And the next chapter includes connecting the arts of North Carolina to the national scene and to the global art world beyond. This fall, Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism will open October 26th to do just that. “Frida first came to my attention because she was in [Madonna’s collection],” Hillings says, laughing. “She was an artist I learned about in my modern art history class, and I’ve been thinking about her work for years. She has transcended her original context and become an icon of fashion and popular culture.”

And there’s a local element as well: With the same ticket, visitors can see the first solo exhibition by North Carolina artist Scott Avett of The Avett Brothers band. “[His] large-scale self-portraits and portraits of his family share an intensity and honesty with the work of Frida and Diego,” Hillings explains. Connecting the local, national, and global is also exemplified in Front Burner: Highlights in Contemporary North Carolina Painting, coming in March 2020. The exhibition includes Joan Mitchell Foundation grant winners Ashlynn Browning and Antoine Williams; chef Vivian Howard’s husband and A Chef ’s Life cast member Benjamin Knight; Juan Logan, whose work appears in the Smithsonian, the Whitney, and more; and Donald Martiny, whose work was commissioned for the lobby of One World Trade Center in New York City.

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W E LC O M E TO TO B AC C O R OA D :

What Color Do You

Bleed?

BY CINDY HUNTLEY AND JODY MANESS

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elcome to the Triangle! Now that you’ve unpacked and registerd to vote, let’s get down to business: You have to pick a team. We’re not talking professional sports, like hockey or baseball. This is Tobacco Road: We live and breathe college basketball (plus a little football in the off-season). Even with all our miles of coastline, the hurricane season here pales in comparison to the storms brewing in March. With Duke and UNC located just 11 miles apart and NC State right down the road in Raleigh, you don’t have to go far to find your enemy. And that’s what we love about these rivalries—your favorite neighbor could also be your No. 1 archrival. While the focus is often on the mens’ teams, the womens’ basketball teams at our universities are solid national forces as well. Or if basketball and football aren’t your thing, there are plenty of other teams to support at each of these universities: Baseball, gymnastics, soccer, lacrosse, golf, and field hockey, to name a few. And don’t think you’re completely off the hook because you already have a college team in another state. We’ll let that slide, because boy do we understand team loyalty…as long as you pick one of ours that you dislike more than the rest. (Just in case you’re not familiar with your options, take a quick peek at our primer on the next page before we talk more about this important decision.)

STAT IST IC S:

Want to hear the numbers? In men’s basketball alone, these three universities hold a combined 14 National Championship titles. 24 National Championship appearances. 38 Final Fours. 76 Sweet Sixteens. (We could go on, but the numbers will just keep growing.) Players of the Year, ACC titles, draft picks… you get the picture.

U N C VS D U K E :

The Carolina/Duke rivalry is unarguably the most heated college basketball rivalry in the nation—there are even books about it. (Check out the Blue Blood duo, or the astutely named To Hate Like This Is To Be Happy Forever.) They’re only 11 miles apart, they’re both blue, and they’re both consistently in the top 25—and often top 5—teams nationwide. You’ve never been to a basketball game until you’ve been to a Duke/Carolina game: There’s no predicting who will win, because adrenaline scores some of the points in these matchups.

N C STAT E VS U N C :

NC State fans hate Carolina with a passion. (Dislike, I mean; it’s not nice to hate.) But seriously, State fans are among the most loyal and passionate you’ll ever find—both at loving their team, and at hating Carolina. Since both are state universities, the majority of students grew up cheering for one or the other of these homegrown teams. And while UNC generally wins more of the basketball matchups, NC State is often on top in football (and tailgating!).

D U K E VS N C STAT E :

Eh, there’s not quite so much of a rivalry here. Maybe even a little bonding over their mutual hatred of Carolina. But if you think Duke trumps State on all counts, think again: NC State generally dominates them on the football field. Now you know the teams and the rivalries, so get to googling and figure out which team best aligns with your personality and character. Or you can take the easy route and choose by city, coach, or team color. Just know that once you pick one, you are expected to stay loyal to that team, and that team alone— no bandwagon fans allowed here. Your blood will either remain red, or will become a very specific shade of blue. Choose wisely!

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Photo courtesy of NC State Athletics

DUKE UNIVERSITY, LOCATED IN DURHAM Color: Royal blue Men’s basketball coach: Coach K (Mike Krzyzewski) Women’s basketball coach: Joanne P. McCallie Football coach: David Cutcliffe

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL Color: Light blue Men’s basketball coach: Roy Williams Women’s basketball coach: Courtney Banghart Football coach: Mack Brown Known for: Michael Jordan; the late Coach Dean Smith and ‘The Carolina Way’; Women’s soccer star Mia Hamm and women’s track and field star Marion Jones

On the radar: Football is on the rise at Duke, thanks to head coach David Cutcliffe. As former coach to both Petyon and Eli Manning, Cutcliffe has secured a recruiting advantage, which has helped lead the turnaround of this oncewoeful program. In basketball, all eyes will be on freshman Matthew Hurt, who ranked as the No. 2 high school power forward in 2019, and was also heavily recruited by UNC. Duke will need him, as they lost four of their five top scorers this year.

NC STATE UNIVERSITY, LOCATED IN RALEIGH Color: Red Men’s basketball coach: Kevin Keatts Women’s basketball coach: Wes Moore Football coach: Dave Doeren Known for: Late coaches Jim Valvano (men’s basketball) and Kay Yow (women’s basketball); Pack Pride; Cinderella men’s basketball championship in 1983

Notable men’s basketball players: Christian Laettner, Kyrie Irving, Grant Hill, J.J. Reddick, Shane Battier, Johnny Dawkins, Zion Williamson

Photo courtesy of Duke Athletics

Notable football players: Sonny Jurgensen, Jamison Crowder, Dave Brown, Brian Baldinger, Daniel Jones

On the radar: Some early predictions are looking at NC State to be a national contender this year in football. Coach Dave Doeren has dominated in state recruiting for the last several years, and that has translated to head-tohead success against NC State’s Triangle rivals. In basketball, look for DJ Funderburk and Markell Johnson (who is returning this year despite his positioning as a promising draft pick) to lead the Pack. Notable basketball players: David Thompson, Julius Hodge, Chris Corchiani, Charles Shackleford, T.J. Warren, Spud Webb, Tom Gugliotta, Dennis Smith Jr, Rodney Monroe Notable football players: Roman Gabriel, Bill Cowher, Phillip Rivers, Russell Wilson, Torrey Holt, Mario Williams

On the radar: Perhaps the biggest sports story in the Triangle this year is the return of UNC head coach Mack Brown, who previously coached the Heels from 1988-1997. His return makes UNC the first Triangle team with a national championship– winning coach (Brown won the national championship in 2005 as coach of the Texas Longhorns). The men’s basketball team lost five of their top players from last year, but look for freshmen Cole Anthony and Armando Bacot to fill some of their shoes. And women’s basketball welcomes a new coach as well: former Princeton coach Courtney Banghart. Notable men’s basketball players: Michael Jordan, Phil Ford, Eric Montross, James Worthy, Tyler Hansbrough, Vince Carter, Sam Perkins, Charles Scott, Lennie Rosenbluth Notable football players: Lawrence Taylor, Kelvin Bryant, “Famous” Amos Lawrence, Charlie “Choo Choo” Justice, Jeff Saturday, Julius Peppers, Mitch Trubiski

Photo courtesy of UNC Athletic Communications

Known for: Cameron Indoor Stadium; Cameron Crazies; Krzyzewskiville (K-ville)

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Our Local is Remarkably Global BY JENNIFER HEINSER / PHOTOS BY FIRE ROSE PHOTOGRAPHY

A PERSONAL PERSPECTIVE ON RALEIGH'S MULTICULTURAL ASIAN FOCUS NC HOSTS THE DRAGON BOAT FESTIVAL EACH YEAR AT KOKA BOOTH AMPHITHEATRE IN CARY.

I

moved here just over five years ago, so I am a relatively new transplant. After spending half my life in a bustling area of New York, and the other half in super-rural Pennsylvania, I consider Raleigh and all of Wake County as my Goldilocks Zone. Not too hot or too cold, not too busy yet not at all boring, and a day trip away from both the coast and the mountains. And with the talk of job opportunities emanating into the ether, it’s no wonder we all flock here.

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DIVERSITY.

For the same reasons I found to relocate here, people from outside the states find this area attractive when they make their big life-changing move. Our technology and healthcare industry are nationally known, and the secret is out far past our shores. In a purely personal, close-to-home account: I recently married an Egyptian man, and opportunity has always been at the forefront of our planning. He is tech-savvy with a diverse work history, so a little research was all it took to eliminate his fears of leaving Egypt and the company he’s been with for five years. IBM, Fujifilm, Lenovo, Delta, Cisco, and other global companies are nestled in the woods, mere blocks from my home in Morrisville. Even before I entered this multi-cultural marriage, I believed that ethnic diversity—all diversity for that matter—benefits anything it touches. Consider it the “Midas Touch” to any community or region. The technological, artistic, culinary, and other contributions by people of African, Asian, Arab, Hispanic, and Latino descent are too numerable to list. Without diversity, our lives would be vastly different. Diversity in thoughts, belief systems, climates, and lifestyles becomes the force that moves us forward. America is Europe, mixed with Africa, mixed with Asia, mixed with South America, all thrown into a pot and stirred together. What fun is a city without a mix of all the foods, all the clothing, and all the music?

And luckily, Raleigh is on the cutting edge of inclusivity. Just a simple example: HQ Raleigh, the coworking and office space company, sent out a newsletter recently on how to make workspaces more inclusive and aware. Things like being aware of dietary restrictions, like halal or kosher items, or making days off transferrable across holidays. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the foreignborn population in Wake County is more than 13 percent—and more than 34 percent of my neighbors in Morrisville were born outside the U.S. Maybe Raleigh has not always been growing at this rate, but welcoming newcomers isn’t new, and some resources aren’t either. The Raleigh Newcomer’s Club has been active since 1957. Membership (they do charge annual dues) includes a directory, monthly newsletter, and activity groups for all kinds of interests: movie meetups, card games, wine tastings, women’s groups, and more. And there’s always Meetup.com, which has an easy-to-use app that is even useful for transplants with some roots! Some West Wake towns also have organizations like the Cary Welcome Service and the New Neighbor Welcome Service in Apex. Raleigh and the Triangle area continue to impress me every day as a place I am proud to call home. Soon my home will be a bit more diverse, and this means I am happy to help contribute even more love, culture, and spice to this beautiful community.

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N.C. State Fair

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Celebrate everything that is uniquely North Carolina at the N.C. State Fair this year! Enjoy live music, vendors, livestock shows, food, rides, games, and much more. This fair is the largest event in the state, drawing one million visitors. NCStateFair.org

Photo courtesy of N.C. State Fair

FESTIVALS

October 17–27 1025 Blue Ridge Road, Raleigh


WIDE OPEN BLUEGRASS

SPARKcon September 13–15 Raleigh Warehouse District Each year, SPARKcon features 200+ events and showcases over 2,000 artists. This unique four-day creativity event in downtown Raleigh features performances, exhibitions, music, dance, art, fashion, film, design, and comedy. SparkCon.com

Wide Open Bluegrass September 27–28 Downtown Raleigh Photo by Robert Davezac

Enjoy live music on eight free stages throughout downtown Raleigh, with music from IBMA and Grammy Awards winners, top-notch emerging acts, and traditional bluegrass bands. The festival also features a dance tent, workshops, and an exhibit hall with instruments and gear in the Raleigh Convention Center, along with food vendors, a juried arts market area, and more. WorldOfBluegrass.org

Film Fest 919 October 9–13 Chapel Hill

Photo by Flyboy Photo & Media

Silverspot Cinema, University Place in Chapel Hill Chapel Hill–-based Film Fest 919 returns with an early look at some of the most anticipated films of the awards season, and the chance to meet the artists behind them. The 2019 film lineup will be announced in September. FilmFest919.com

NORTH CAROLINA WINE FESTIVAL

Pumpkin Palooza October 13 4191 Main at North Hills Street Back for its fourth year, this fall festival highlights the season with outdoor activities for the whole family. Enjoy the Midtown Chili Cook-Off, KidZone, pumpkin carving contest, food tents, craft beer, trivia contest, and more. MidtownRaleighAlliance.org

North Carolina Wine Festival October 26, 11am–6pm 4011 Cardinal at North Hills Street Head to the Coastal Credit Union Midtown Park at North Hills for the 5th Annual North Carolina Wine Festival. Enjoy tastings from over 100 varieties of North Carolina wines, from sweet to dry, while you groove to music from live bands. Grab a bite to eat from local food vendors and browse the exhibitor tents for treasures. NCWineFestival.com

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Call to Action

REMEMBERING THE LIFE AND LEGACY OF DR. CHARLES VAN DER HORST. 130 | MidtownMag.com

Photo by Jordan Hewitt

BY JORDAN HEWITT


Born in the Netherlands to a Holocaust survivor and a WWII veteran, van der Horst spent his childhood attending marches and raising money for progressive causes. He traveled to the South to register African American voters during the civil rights movement, because it was the right thing to do. “Charlie believed that freedom didn’t just depend on freedom for himself, but freedom and justice for everyone,” shares Peter Leone, professor of medicine at UNC, who worked with van der Horst on HIV clinical trials in the state. As an infectious disease researcher at UNC, van der Horst saw his career as an extension of his advocacy. In the 1980s, when young, mostly gay, men were dying in large numbers across the country, van der Horst contributed to scientific research that changed practice and treated the disease using cocktails of antiviral drugs. His research took him to South Africa and Malawi, where he led clinical trials in remote areas, setting up protocols for the treatment of HIV/AIDS transmissions from mother to child. He showed others that treatment could be accessible to anyone, anywhere. “Charlie always viewed his positions as a way to be a voice for those who didn’t have a platform for doing it,” Leone says. Van der Horst took the fight for justice and equality outside of his research laboratories and into the streets of Raleigh, marching alongside civil rights and Moral Monday leader, Rev. Dr. William Barber. While Moral Monday activists champion a multitude of causes, van der Horst was there for one cause in particular— his patients. Van der Horst saw his patients’ illnesses, not as a political issue, but as a larger societal problem. David Wohl, who completed a fellowship under van der Horst at UNC and is now a professor of medicine and infectious diseases at UNC recalls Charlie asking, “What is racism doing to my patients?’ ‘How are hunger and food insecurity affecting their lives?’ He saw his activism as an obligation, not a choice.” In fact, van der Horst was even arrested for protesting, and he seized that event as an opportunity to do more good, electing to carry out his community service sentence at Urban Ministries of Wake County’s Open Door Clinic. He continued to volunteer at the Open Door Clinic after his community service hours were completed, providing primary care to low-income, uninsured patients with chronic illnesses. “His patients probably didn’t even know that he was this renowned researcher,” says Leone. “Here he was, a Harvard, Duke, UNC– trained professor emeritus, taking care of people because he wanted to.” Van der Horst used his network at UNC to connect hepatitis C patients with a $70,000 lifesaving prescription. Under his care, 21 patients were cured of the deadly disease.

“Despite Charlie’s fame in the scientific world, changing the way we look at infectious disease, Charlie was always present to his patients,” says Dr. Peter Morris, Executive Director of Urban Ministries of Wake County, “He always treated them like they were his only patient.” Morris explains that most of the patients the nonprofit serves often lead complicated lives due to issues affecting their low-income status, and they typically need more than just a pill or a single doctor’s visit. “He acted like a case manager,” says Morris, “using his professional connections to get his patients into programs that ultimately affected their long-term health.’’ He even gave patients his cell phone number, just in case they needed him. Van der Horst died of a cardiac event on June 15th, while on the second-to-last leg of the 8 Bridges Hudson River Swim; at 120, miles it is reportedly the longest marathon swim in the world. Van der Horst was 67 years old. Van der Horst’s legacy lives on in the lives he touched through his lifesaving research and his friendships. Today, six of his hepatitis C patients continue to receive treatment. Van der Horst even set up a protocol for other free and charitable clinics in hopes that one day hepatitis C would be eradicated from Wake County. Many are wondering how to carry on the late doctor’s legacy. Wohl offers this advice: “Charlie taught me that if you’re asking if you should or shouldn’t do something, the answer is that you should do it.”

Charlie would ask: ‘What is racism doing to my patients?’ ‘How are hunger and food insecurity affecting their lives?’ He saw his activism as an obligation, not a choice. Photo by Steven Whitsett

“Feeling angry and upset without doing something is wasted energy,” reads a post on the late Dr. Charles van der Horst’s Facebook page, an avenue for his activism. His profile, now a memorial, is nearly all posts about a cause you should care about, a fundraiser you should contribute to, a person you should know. Van der Horst’s activism spanned beyond the walls of social media and into hospitals, the state legislature, nonprofits, and across the globe.

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says Laith Khoury, MD, a neurosurgeon at Raleigh Neurosurgical Clinic. Surgeons at Raleigh Neurosurgical were the first to perform robotic spine surgery in central and eastern North Carolina. “We can visualize and plan what we’re going to do before we even start the procedure.”

When the pain becomes debilitating, many turn to surgical options. And increasingly, in addition to finding a surgeon in the operating room, you may also find a highly-tuned robot acting as an assistant to the surgeon.

While the neurosurgeon performs the physical work of the surgery, the robot assists by providing live feedback and helping to guide the instruments into precise locations.

Robotic spine surgery is a type of minimally invasive surgery, where the neurosurgeon is assisted by a robotic system. It can help surgeons operate with greater precision and accuracy, which leads to faster recovery time and smaller incisions. It can also result in less radiation exposure and operative bleeding than traditional surgeries. “The robotic system has built-in imaging, which gives us greater navigational precision,” 134 | MidtownMag.com

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MEET THE DOCTORS

Our area is ranked among the leading healthcare centers in the country, and here’s your chance to meet some of the local providers and learn about their services.

Special Thanks to our team of photographers Bob Karp, Brian Mullins, Hans Rosemond, Josh Manning, and Mash Photography


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2019MEETTHEDOCTORS >>> Dentistry

DOCTORS ABERNETHY, SONNER, AND WELLS are passionate about creating healthy, beautiful smiles through personalized care for the entire family, and we believe in providing excellence in dentistry through a patient-centered experience. At Renaissance Dental Center, every appointment is personalized, so patients experience unsurpassed integrity, sincerity, and compassion during their dental care. This patient-centered approach is unparalleled in dentistry. After spending many years as dental associates, Drs. Abernethy, Sonner, and Wells joined forces to build a practice where they could focus on treating people uniquely—taking the focus off volume dentistry and over-generalized care. After more than three years building a state-of-the-art dental practice, Renaissance Dental opened its doors in 2009 and has been a leader in general and cosmetic dentistry ever since. Because of the doctors’ dedication to continued education and advancement of skill, Renaissance Dental excels in a variety of restorative and cosmetic treatment options unique to each patient. From cosmetic “smile makeovers” to tooth replacement options with implants, you will be elated with your smile! And with the latest advances in dentistry such as CT scans, CEREC crowns, implants, and life-like porcelain veneers, the doctors at Renaissance Dental have perfected the art of diagnosis, function, and extraordinary beauty. From simple fillings to smile makeovers, Drs. Abernethy, Sonner, and Wells are committed to keeping you and your family smiling for a lifetime!

RENAISSANCE DENTAL CENTER Dr. Anna Abernethy, Dr. Anita Wells, Dr. Jill Sonner

3803A Computer Drive, Suite 200 Raleigh, NC 27609 919.786.6766 RenaissanceDentalCenter.com

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“There is nothing more truly artistic than to love people.” –Vincent Van Gogh SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

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2019MEETTHEDOCTORS >>> Dentistry

DRS. DANIEL AND TRACY DAVIDIAN have been the face of sedation dentistry in Raleigh for the last 15 years. With a passion and expertise for alleviating dental anxiety, both modestly agree it’s the Sedation Dental Care team that makes the magic happen. “We provide many levels of sedation, from light nitrous oxide gas sedation to IV/oral sedation and general anesthesia. We often see patients who haven’t seen the dentist in as many as 15 to 20 years, doing in one appointment what would normally take seven to 10 appointments.” Sedation Dental Care’s tooth rejuvenation program uses digital technology to place and restore dental implants, achieving unprecedented functional and aesthetic results and restoring beauty and function that approaches or even exceeds the original. Designing the aesthetics before placing the implant is the cornerstone of successful cosmetic results.  If you have a lot of fear about receiving dental treatment, Drs. Davidian will tell you that you’re not alone. “It is a well-known fact that 50 percent of our population does not go to a dentist regularly. Our average new patient has not seen a dentist for 10, 20, or sometimes 30 years. We have successfully helped them conquer their fear of dentistry, and we can help you, too.”  Sedation Dental Care has mastered the art of sedation coupled with gentle, caring dental treatment and state-of-the-art techniques. Conquering the pain and embarrassment of years of neglect is the first step. Their mission and objective is simple: to help patients take the first step in overcoming their fears, getting out of pain, getting their old smile back, and/or creating a whole new smile. 138 | MidtownMag.com


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SEDATION DENTAL CARE AT RALEIGH SMILE CENTER Daniel Davidian, DDS, PA Tracy Davidian, DDS, PA 3917 Sunset Ridge Road Raleigh, NC 27607 919.783.9686 RaleighSmileCenter.com

DANIEL DAVIDIAN, DDS, PA • Implants • Premier dentures • Full-mouth dental reconstruction • Same-day crowns and bridges • Ultra high-end cosmetic

TRACY DAVIDIAN, DDS, PA • TMD/TMJ therapies • Migraine and facial pain • Sleep apnea appliances

“We often see patients who haven’t seen the dentist in as many as 15 to 20 years, and we do in one appointment what would normally take 7 to 10 appointments.” SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

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2018MEETTHEDOCTORS >>> TMJ/Facial Pain

“Chronic pain can be crippling. Most patients who suffer chronic head and neck pain have never been told that their jaw could be the source of their pain.”

CAROLINA TMJ & FACIAL PAIN CENTER is dedicated to successfully treating craniofacial pain, TMJ disorders, and sleep-disordered breathing. Our approach is a comprehensive evaluation for diagnosis and non-invasive treatment options of TMJ and muscle pain. We provide diagnosis and treatment with state-of-the-art techniques and equipment in a caring, friendly environment. Patients suffering from clicking or popping of the jaw, face pain, migraines, ringing of the ears, and loud snoring—as well as those who have difficulty tolerating CPAP treatment—should contact Carolina TMJ & Facial Pain Center to learn more.  Dr. Tracy Davidian is revolutionizing the way TMJ is treated throughout North Carolina. At Carolina TMJ & Facial Pain Center, we know that TMJ position is related to other areas of your body and physiology. Understanding these connections allows her to successfully treat muscle pain of the head and neck, which is often, but not always, connected to TMJ. Dr. Davidian often works side-by-side with other healthcare providers—such as chiropractors, physical therapists, nutritionists, ENTs, neurologists, and cognitive therapists—to ensure maximum medical recovery. Dr. Davidian is now in network with most major medical insurance companies for Dental Sleep Apnea appliances. 140 | MidtownMag.com

CAROLINA TMJ & FACIAL PAIN CENTER Tracy Davidian, DDS, PA

5904 Six Forks Road, Suite 205 Raleigh, NC 27609 919.3NO.PAIN CarolinaTMJ.com


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2019MEETTHEDOCTORS >>> Oncology

“I really love working with patients, families, and communities.�

AS A SURGICAL ONCOLOGIST, DR. CAROLYN MENENDEZ treats both male and female patients with breast concerns that are both benign and cancerous. Because every case is different, Dr. Menendez helps each of her patients navigate treatment, whether it involves understanding the technical aspects of surgery or developing a surveillance strategy based on their cancer risk factors. As part of the Cancer Care Plus+ collaborative, Dr. Menendez performs surgeries at Duke Raleigh Hospital and WakeMed Cary Hospital. Outside of work, Dr. Menendez spends time with her husband, daughters, and pets. She enjoys hiking the beautiful North Carolina waterfall trails.

CANCER CARE PLUS+ Carolyn Menendez, MD, FACS Duke Cancer Center Cary 216 Ashville Avenue Suite 20 Cary, NC 27518 919.781.7070 DukeHealth.org/find-doctorsphysicians/carolyn-s-menendezmd-facs

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2019MEETTHEDOCTORS >>> Orthodontics

“Experience the difference, and visit North Carolina’s No. 1 Invisalign Provider.” GLADWELL ORTHODONTICS Dr. Jason Gladwell 824 Rogers Road, Suite 200 Wake Forest, NC 27587 13271 Strickland Road, Suite 100 Raleigh, NC 27613 510 Glenwood South, Suite 100 Raleigh, NC 27603 919.453.6325 GladwellOrthodontics.com

142 | MidtownMag.com

FOR MORE THAN A DECADE, DR. JASON GLADWELL HAS BEEN SETTING HIMSELF apart within the orthodontic industry. His comfortable, patient-centric offices combine a relaxing environment with the best in quality orthodontic care. His highly trained staff is dedicated to providing the very best in orthodontic services and utilizes the latest technology to do so. Dr. Gladwell has always listened to what patients prefer in their treatment, and he has embraced new methods and technology. Over the years, he has become the state’s leading provider of Invisalign treatment for both children and adults. In fact, Dr. Gladwell is ranked one of the “Top Five Invisalign Providers” in the nation, and North Carolina’s No. 1 Invisalign provider. He is also a distinguished Invisalign faculty member. His knowledge and years of expertise have recently allowed for tremendous growth; he now has three office locations—downtown Raleigh, North Raleigh, and Wake Forest—in addition to the state’s only Invisalign Scan Center, located at Crabtree Valley Mall. If you want to experience the difference and have a smile that you can be proud of, then visit Gladwell Orthodontics.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

2019MEETTHEDOCTORS >>> Anti-Aging DR. BHAVNA VAIDYA-TANK, a respected integrative physician, founded Regenesis MD to fulfill the need for treating the challenges of aging. She employs the full spectrum of anti-aging medicine, from bio-identical hormones and growth hormone analogues to nutrition IV therapy, weight management services, and advanced aesthetics. Dr. Vaidya-Tank’s practice is set apart because of her experienced medical team, including physician’s assistant Lea Lott PA-C, and dedication to treating and evaluating each patient as a whole. Regenesis MD offers top-of-the-line testing, advanced procedures, and more than 200 supplements to benefit patients, and answers the cry from patients to find the answers they have continued to search for. With ever-changing needs in the medical field, Regenesis MD decided to allow patients to individualize their healthcare by offering a concierge approach. Patients choose how often and for how long they see their provider— allowing for more access, better lines of communication, and improved overall wellness. Dr. Vaidya-Tank and the rest of her medical team look deeper into underlying factors that may cause premature aging—such as hormone and vitamin deficiencies, adrenal fatigue, genetic markers, and lifestyle choices. This unique approach to healthcare is enabling the team at Regenesis MD to truly take care of their patients, inside and out.

FAMILY WELLNESS & REGENESIS MD

“We evaluate and treat each patient as an individual, and look deeply into each patient’s underlying medical factors to help address the challenges of aging.”

Bhavna Vaidya-Tank, MD Lea Lott, PA-C 8020 Creedmoor Road Raleigh, NC 27613 919.322.2844 2076 NC 42, Suite 230 Clayton, NC 27520 919.553.5711 FamilyWellnessNC.com RegenesisMD.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

2019MEETTHEDOCTORS >>> Dentistry

“We treat your family like our own.” YOUR SMILE SAYS A LOT about you. Together we can create the smile you’ve always wanted. Caring for your oral health is our expertise.  Caring for YOU is personal. Midtown Family Dentistry has been providing personalized dental care for three generations of doctors; that’s three generations of trust and confidence. Dr. Brent Meekins and Dr. Michael Holesh are a family team that value personal patient relationships.  We make it our priority to deliver gentle and compassionate care focused on prevention and conservative dentistry.  By providing exceptional services in a relaxed, welcoming environment, our dedicated staff has developed lifelong relationships with our patients.    We want every patient to have a positive experience just like this recent review, “A great time at the dentist IS possible! Every visit with Dr. Holesh and Dr. Meekins is enjoyable.  The entire staff is professional, personal and knowledgeable. Their memories are incredible; they pay attention to personal details. My questions are always answered and procedures are explained plainly and thoroughly. I look forward to my dental appointments.”  Drs. Meekins and Holesh combine experience with the latest technology and research to provide a unique and dynamic approach to enhancing and maintaining your oral health. From simple cleanings and cosmetic enhancements to Invisalign and full-mouth reconstructions, we are a full-service practice that can meet all of your dental needs. Let us care for your entire family and give you something to smile about! 144 | MidtownMag.com

MIDTOWN FAMILY DENTISTRY Brent A. Meekins, DDS Michael D. Holesh, DDS, PA 217 W. Millbrook Road, Suite B Raleigh, NC 27609 919.782.6286 RaleighMidtownFamilyDentistry.com


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECT

2019MEETTHEDOCTORS >>> Pain Management

“Dr. Weber remains committed to providing patients the best care through the newest and most effective treatments in pain management.”

DR. THOMAS WEBER FOUNDED MIDTOWN PAIN AND SPINE IN 2017 to create a pain clinic unlike all others. With a collaborative, comprehensive, and patient-centered approach to caring for patients, Midtown Pain and Spine Clinic offers conservative pain management to include non-surgical and interventional pain treatments. Dr. Weber also uses cutting-edge technology, which offers precise diagnostic proficiencies to successfully treat chronic, acute, and complex pain conditions. As the area’s only “boutique” pain clinic, Midtown Pain and Spine creates an environment where patients not only come to receive the best care, but are made comfortable, treated with compassion, and most importantly, given hope. Dr. Weber and his staff get to know each patient on a personal level because they believe that is the only way to effectively treat patients and get them back to the life and activities they enjoy. Dr. Weber’s extensive background and skill allow him to offer patients innovative treatment plans that are life-changing. Midtown Pain and Spine’s unyielding commitment to excellence will continue as new techniques emerge, so patients will be provided with the newest and most effective treatments available. Allow Dr. Weber and his team to put you on the road to new adventures, pain-free, by calling for an appointment today.

MIDTOWN PAIN AND SPINE CLINIC Dr. Thomas J. Weber, Jr. • Lieutenant Colonel (Ret.) U.S. Army with extensive work with U.S. Special Operations Forces • Board Certified in anesthesia and pain medicine, Walter Reed/Bethesda Naval Hospital • Fellowship trained in pain medicine, Wake Forest University 2605 Blue Ridge Road, Suite 240 Raleigh, NC 27607 919.277.9845 MidtownPainSpine.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

2019MEETTHEDOCTORS >>> Plastic Surgery DR. CHRISTOPHER MOREA IS A BOARD-CERTIFIED PLASTIC SURGEON with over 20 years’ experience. He has provided care for thousands of satisfied patients locally, throughout the United States, and internationally. With the highest credentials, Dr. Morea is a member of the American College of Surgeons, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, and the American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons. He has been recognized as one of America’s top plastic surgeons by many organizations, including the Consumers’ Research Council of America, The Leading Physicians of the World, and RealSelf. At your initial one-on-one consultation with Dr. Morea, he’ll listen to your individual goals and discuss the procedures to best achieve them. Dr. Morea consistently delivers quality results that are beautiful and natural. His meticulous attention to detail is evident with each patient, and many patients not only return for additional procedures but also refer their friends and family. Their stated reason is simple: The patients receive the results they desire from a surgeon they can trust. All surgery is performed at Dr. Morea’s private, freestanding outpatient surgical center, conveniently located in the heart of North Raleigh. Dr. Morea’s goal is to provide each patient with the finest medical care in a confidential and private setting.

MOREA PLASTIC SURGICAL CENTER OF NORTH RALEIGH Dr. Christopher Morea

7700 Lead Mine Road Raleigh, NC 27615 919.845.7880 DrMoreaPlasticSurgery.com

“Dr. Morea’s meticulous attention to detail is evident with each patient.” 146 | MidtownMag.com


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

2019MEETTHEDOCTORS >>> Periodontology A BEAUTIFUL SMILE CAN HELP YOU FEEL CONFIDENT AND ATTRACTIVE, affecting how you feel about yourself and how others perceive you. Healthy teeth and gums are the first step toward that radiant smile. Dr. Macon Singletary of North Raleigh Periodontics has been improving smiles from the gums up for over 25 years. As a Board Certified Diplomate with the American Academy of Periodontology and a Laser Certified Periodontist, Dr. Singletary treats gum tissue to maintain health, functionality, and aesthetic qualities for his patients. Dr. Singletary earned his BA from Duke University, followed by a DDS degree from Emory University Dental School. He then completed his specialty training at the UNC School of Dentistry, Department of Periodontics. After earning his masters degree and certificate of periodontics, he became a diplomate (“a periodontist who has made significant achievements beyond the mandatory educational requirements of the specialty and who is certified by the American Board of Periodontology”) and is board certified with the American Board of Periodontology. Dr. Singletary continuously strives to provide the highest quality dental implants and periodontal treatments to his patients, and offers sedation and financing options. “My ultimate goal is to educate patients concerning their treatment options and to provide excellent periodontal care.”

NORTH RALEIGH PERIODONTICS Dr. Macon Singletary Diplomate in Periodontology

“Start smiling again!”

North Raleigh Periodontics 7805 Fiesta Way Raleigh, NC 27615 919.518.8222 NorthRaleighPerio.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

2019MEETTHEDOCTORS >>> Plastic Surgery

“Built on the value of extraordinary patient care, which remains the hallmark of our practice.” SPECIALISTS IN PLASTIC SURGERY is a full-service cosmetic and reconstructive surgery practice in Raleigh. Located in a dramatic natural landscape, you will find spacious reception areas, private consultation suites, and a state-of-the-art surgical facility—all which deliver a safe, comfortable, and confidential environment for patients. Since opening in 1984, Specialists in Plastic Surgery’s philosophy has focused on excellent patient experiences, patient-driven outcomes, and natural-looking enhancements, and the practice is proud to still uphold this philosophy today. The practice’s highly trained, board-certified plastic surgeons—Sanjay V. Daluvoy, MD; Richard E. Carlino, MD; Don L. Oschwald, MD; Matthew W. Blanton, MD—offer you the latest in surgical and nonsurgical options to help you feel and look your absolute best. The doctors’ level of surgical expertise is complemented by their team’s commitment to excellence, and dedication to providing a caring and warm atmosphere with personalized service. Along with cosmetic and reconstructive surgery, the practice also offers a wide range of injectables, CoolSculpting treatments, and the full line of ZO Skin Health products. Specialists in Plastic Surgery is honored to have the opportunity to serve the local community, and looks forward to helping you achieve your aesthetic goals.

148 | MidtownMag.com

SPECIALISTS IN PLASTIC SURGERY, PA Sanjay V. Daluvoy, MD Richard E. Carlino, MD Don L. Oschwald, MD Matthew W. Blanton, MD

3633 Harden Road, Suite 200 Raleigh, NC 27607 919.785.0505 SpecialistsInPlasticSurgery.com


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

2019MEETTHEDOCTORS >>> Plastic Surgery FOR OVER A DECADE, BOARD CERTIFIED PLASTIC SURGEON DR. STEWART COLLINS of Synergy Plastic Surgery has set himself apart within the plastic surgery industry. Specializing in cosmetic surgery, Dr. Collins’ expertise has made local headlines, and he’s twice been featured on the nationally syndicated TV show, The Doctors. A Raleigh native, Dr. Collins completed his plastic surgery fellowship at the Kansas University Medical Center and then returned home to open his own practice in 2005. In the years since, Dr. Collins has honed his craft, and his friendly and approachable bedside manner makes patients feel at home in his North Raleigh office. Dr. Collins takes pride in staying on the forefront of technological and surgical advances, and is the Triangle’s leading provider of InMode’s BodyTite, FaceTite, AccuTite and Morpheus8. These technologies offer revolutionary skin-tightening results without the downtime and scarring of traditional surgical procedures. Synergy combines the best of both worlds in luxury and patient comfort, and its on-site operating room is both private and AAAASF–certified. Your visit will be supported by a team of over 60 medical and spa professionals who are committed to helping you look and feel your very best. Call today to schedule your consultation.

SYNERGY PLASTIC SURGERY Dr. R. Stewart Collins

8300 Health Park, Suite 205 Raleigh NC 27615 919.510.5130 FeelSynergy.com

“We don’t just perform procedures, we provide results.” SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

2019MEETTHEDOCTORS >>> Dry Eye Specialist

“Restoring health in the blink of an eye.”

SUSAN A. WATSON, MD, FACS FOUNDED WATSON DRY EYE CENTER IN 2017 after spending 35 years serving surgical ophthalmology patients in eastern North Carolina. Board-certified in ophthalmology and a true leader in dry eye disease, Dr. Watson brings unparalleled knowledge and experience to the Triangle. She provides expertise in all facets of ocular surface disease, including meibomian gland dysfunction with Lipiflow, tear film enhancement, rosacea inflammation improvement with IPL, and much more. “With modern science and technology, no one should endure the discomfort of dry eye disease. My passion for enhancing my patients’ well-being drives everything I do.” Dr. Watson has spent her career exploring advanced science and how lifestyle influences eye health. With a loyal and ever-growing patient list, Dr. Watson customizes therapies for each patient. “Dedicated eye care is essential to achieving relief from dry eye disease, so we aim to make our patients’ visits something they look forward to. The Triangle is home to busy and sophisticated men and women looking for exceptional care, so my stellar team and I are excited to deliver a unique and inviting experience.” When she is not caring for her patients, Dr. Watson relishes time with her four kids and four grandkids.

150 | MidtownMag.com

WATSON DRY EYE CENTER Susan Watson, MD, FACS

11081 Forest Pines Drive Suite 120 Raleigh, NC 27614 252.232.4485 WatsonDryEyeCenter.com


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

2019MEETTHEDOCTORS >>> Plastic Surgery

“After more than two decades caring for patients at Duke and UNC, I am delighted to serve patients in the comfort and personalized setting of my signature practice in Brier Creek.” ZENN PLASTIC SURGERY may be new to Brier Creek, but board-certified plastic surgeon Dr. Michael Zenn is no stranger to the Triangle. As former Professor and Vice Chief of Plastic Surgery at Duke, Dr. Zenn is known for his extraordinary surgical skill and comforting bedside manner. Recognized as an expert in both facial and breast surgery, Dr. Zenn specializes in cosmetic surgery of the face, breast, and body. His “Zenn Delay” technique has revolutionized the way breast surgery is performed, and his work with facial fat grafting has changed the look of the old-fashioned “windswept” facelift. Dr. Zenn is a proud graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, Cornell University Medical College, and the Harvard Plastic Surgery Residency Program. For 23 years Dr. Zenn cared for patients at UNC and Duke, where he performed cutting-edge surgeries, wrote textbooks, trained hundreds of plastic surgeons, lectured around the world, and invented new surgical techniques. His solo private practice, Zenn Plastic Surgery, is the culmination of these experiences.

ZENN PLASTIC SURGERY Michael R. Zenn, MD

7920 ACC Boulevard, Suite 110 Raleigh, NC 27617 919.480.3885 ZennPlasticSurgery.com

The integrity, commitment to excellence, and professionalism that are the trademarks of Dr. Zenn’s respected reputation are shared by his staff, all of whom are committed to providing you with a truly wonderful patient experience. Call today to schedule a consultation.

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

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SPONSORED CONTENT

Photo by Sean Junqueira

Mental HEALTH

One out of ever y five Americans: • Listens to audiobooks • Believes that aliens have visited Earth • Trusts Amazon’s Alexa to babysit their kids • Uses a smartphone as their primary internet access • Gambled on March Madness in 2019 • Has a mental illness The prevalence of mental illness cannot be overstated: It is as common as the technology we can no longer live without; as common as the risk of heart failure. And while there has undoubtedly been a sea change in the way our society confronts mental illness, misconceptions, misinformation, and stigma abound—while effective treatments are still beyond the reach of many.

The Foundation of Hope Investing in breakthrough research for mental illness.

Changing the landscape for those who live with illnesses like depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or PTSD requires a multifaceted approach: investing in the science of mental health; supporting organizations who serve those in need of treatment; and normalizing conversations about living with a mental illness. One local nonprofit—The Foundation of Hope for Research and Treatment of Mental Illness— does all of the above.

In 1984, Angus Barn owners Thad and Alice Eure established the Foundation of Hope after their son was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Since its inception, the organization has awarded 147 scientific research grants totaling more than $6.1 million; these funds have leveraged an additional $155 million from the National Institute of Mental Health and other federal agencies. The foundation has also given more than $464,000 to 39 mental health initiatives, shoring up resources for local organizations that work directly with North Carolinians who live with mental illness. By investing in early-stage scientific research, The Foundation of Hope is filling a critical, unmet need for funding new and innovative projects that are impacting thousands of lives and changing outcomes around the world. The organization’s 31st annual Walk for Hope—a walk, run, and festival that rallies our community around this important cause—will be held on Sunday, October 13th. One hundred percent of funds raised will support mental health research at the UNC–Chapel Hill Department of Psychiatry. And, just as critically, this event helps call attention to the stigma and significance of these often invisible illnesses. To learn more about the Foundation of Hope, and to sign up for the Walk for Hope, visit WalkForHope.com.

The Foundation of Hope for Research and Treatment of Mental Illness is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization based in Raleigh.

152 | MidtownMag.com

The information on this page is provided by the advertiser mentioned above to the public.


VOTING IS OPEN NOW!

2020

DIAMOND AWARDS The coveted Diamond Awards have expanded across Midtown and Cary Living. Voting ends September 15th. You name the best of the best! MidtownMag.com/DiamondAwards

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

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TRENDS 2

1 1 Moto jacket

Lori + Lulu 919.821.1350 / Facebook.com/LoriPlusLulu

2 Maurizio Baldassari menswear swackets

are comfortable and functional, with the knitwear providing an unmistakable touch of class. Liles Clothing Studio 919.510.555 / LilesClothingStudio.com

3 Contemporary fit, custom tailored

windowpane suit from the Samuelsohn Fall ‘19 made-to-measure fabric collection. Kannon’s Clothing 919.366.6902 / KannonsClothing.com/Mens

FALL

4 Sherpa is shining instead of lining

outerwear this season, as shown in this Lilla P jacket. Copper Penny of Raleigh 919.366.5000 / ShopCopperPenny.com

5 The Alvaro loafer pairs chic

style and a memory foam insole to enhance comfort. Rangoni Firenze Shoes 919.832.5278 / RangoniShoes.com

6 Chartreuse is the IT color for fall. Pair

Bella Mar’s Toxic Love cardigan with a snakeskin boot to complete your look. Bella Mar 919.916.5321 / ShopBellaMar.com

7 Fall in love with this textured ensemble

available from Lucy + Penny. Lloyd & Lady Boutiques 919.916.5252 / LloydAndLadyNC.com

8 This Russian sable vest from Douglas Furs is perfect for North Carolina’s mild winters. Douglas Furs 919.782.2165 / DHMFurs.com

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4 3


SPONSORED CONTENT

5 6

8

7

Fever

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CAMERON VILLAGE 156 | MidtownMag.com


NORTH HILLS / NORTH RALEIGH

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

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OAK PARK SHOPPING CENTER


Beauty EXPERTS

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SEPTEMBER 27th MIDTOWNMAG.COM 919.782.4710

2019

Holiday ISSUE Reserve your space in Raleigh's Leading Lifestyle Magazine today! Holiday Gift Guide, Holiday Recipes, Fashion, Community Giving & more! Reach over 140,000 readers with 1 issue and covering Raleigh's hottest zip codes.

SPACE DEADLINE: OCTOBER 9 MIDTOWNMAG.COM SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

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OUT ABOUT &

DINING GUIDE | MIDTOWN MINGLES | NEW AROUND TOWN

N.C. State Fair October 17–27

Photo courtesy of N.C. State Fair

1025 Blue Ridge Road, Raleigh NCStateFair.org

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

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MIDTOWN MAGAZINE

Dine & Draft A FOODIE GUIDE TO RALEIGH

American 41HUNDRED 4100 Main at North Hills Street 919.278.1478 41HundredRestaurant.com BERKELEY CAFE 217 W. Martin Street 919.828.9190 Facebook.com/BerkeleyRaleigh BLOOMSBURY BISTRO 509-101 W. Whitaker Mill Road 919.834.9011 BloomsburyBistro.com TROPHY TAP + TABLE 225 S. Wilmington Street 919.424.7817 TrophyBrewing.com CAMERON BAR AND GRILL 2018 Clark Avenue 919.755.2231 CameronBarAndGrill.com CAPITAL CLUB 16 16 W. Martin Street 919.747.9345 CapitalClub16.com CARROLL’S KITCHEN 19 E. Martin Street 919.670.3622 CarrollsKitchen.org CLOCKWORK 519 W. North Street 919.307.3215 ClockWorkRaleigh.com

CRAWFORD AND SON 618 N. Person Street 919.307.4647 CrawfordAndSonRestaurant.com

NORTH RIDGE PUB 6010 Falls of Neuse Road 919.790.9125 NorthRidgePub.com

THE PLAYERS’ RETREAT 105 Oberlin Road 919.755.9589 PlayersRetreat.net

DEATH & TAXES 105 W. Hargett Street 984.242.0218 AC-Restaurants.com/Death-Taxes

OAK CITY MEATBALL SHOPPE 180 E. Davie Street 919.714.9014 OakCityMeatball.com

THE RALEIGH TIMES BAR 14 E. Hargett Street 919.833.0999 RaleighTimesBar.com

EDWARDS MILL BAR & GRILL 3201 Edwards Mill Road 919.783.5447 EdwardsMillBarandGrill.com

ORO RESTAURANT & LOUNGE 18 E. Martin Street 919.239.4010 OroRaleigh.com

VILLAGE GRILL 8470 Honeycut Road 919.890.5340 VillageGrillRaleigh.com

GLENWOOD GRILL 2603 Glenwood Avenue #151 919.782.3102 GlenwoodGrill.com

PLATES NEIGHBORHOOD KITCHEN 301 Glenwood Avenue 919.828.0018 PlatesKitchen.com

WINSTON’S GRILLE 6401 Falls of Neuse Road 919.790.0700 WinstonsGrille.com

HAYES BARTON CAFE 2000 Fairview Road 919.856.8551 ImaginaryStudioOnline.com /hayes

THE POINT AT GLENWOOD 1626 Glenwood Avenue 919.755.1007 ThePointAtGlenwood.com

YARD HOUSE 4208 Six Forks Road 919.881.2590 YardHouse.com

IRIS RESTAURANT 2110 Blue Ridge Road 919.664.6838 NCArtMuseum.org/Visit/Dining

SECOND EMPIRE RESTAURANT AND TAVERN 330 Hillsborough Street 919.829.3663 Second-Empire.com

ZEST CAFE & HOME ART 8831 Six Forks Road 919.848.4792 ZestCafeHomeArt.com

KINGS 141 Park at North Hills Street 919.600.5700 KingsBowlAmerica.com

STANBURY 938 N. Blount Street 919.977.4321 StanburyRestaurant.com

LYNNWOOD GRILL & BREWING CONCERN 4821 Grove Barton Road 919.785.0043 LynnwoodGrill.com

TASTE 1912 Bernard Street 919.948.7815 JmrKitchens.com/Taste

MIDTOWN GRILLE 4421 Six Forks Road 919.782.9463 TheMidtownGrille.com

THE OAK 4035 Lake Boone Trail 919.787.9100 JmrKitchens.com/Oak

VISIT MIDTOWNMAG.COM FOR A COMPLETE LISTING 162 | MidtownMag.com

Asian BIDA MANDA 222 S. Blount Street 919.829.9999 BidaManda.com BREWERY BHAVANA 218 S. Blount Street 919.829.9998 BreweryBhavana.com


CHAI’S ASIAN BISTRO 8347 Creedmoor Road 919.341.3715 ChaisAsianBistro.com CHAMPA THAI & SUSHI 8521 Brier Creek Parkway 919.806.0078 ChampaThaiSushi.com CO Inside AC Hotel Raleigh North Hills EatAtCo.com

SHABASHABU 3080 Wake Forest Road 919.501.7755 Shabashabu.net SONO 319 Fayetteville Street 919.521.5328 SonoRaleigh.com SUSHI BLUES CAFE 301 Glenwood Avenue 919.664.8061 SushiBluesCafe.com SPRING ROLLS RESTAURANT 4361 Lassiter at North Hills 919.783.8180 5433 Wade Park Boulevard 919.803.1118 SpringRollsRestaurant.com

DAVID’S DUMPLING & NOODLE BAR 1900 Hillsborough Street 919.239.4536 DDandNB.com

SUSHI O BISTRO + SUSHI BAR 222 Glenwood Avenue 919.838.8868 SushioRaleighnc.com

FIVE STAR RESTAURANT 511 W. Hargett Street 919.833.3311 FiveStarRaleigh.com

THAIPHOON BISTRO 301 Glenwood Avenue #190 919.720.4034 ThaiphoonBistro.com

IMPERIAL GARDEN 7713 Lead Mine Road 919.846.1988 ImperialGardenRestaurant.com

WARAJI JAPANESE RESTAURANT 5910 Duraleigh Road 919.783.1883 WarajiJapaneseRestaurant.com

LEMONGRASS THAI RESTAURANT 8320 Litchford Road #142 919.954.0377 LemongrassThaiRestaurant.net MURA 4121 Main at North Hills 919.781.7887 MuraNorthHills.com NI ASIAN KITCHEN 8817 Six Forks Road 919.916.5106 NiAsianKitchen.com ORCHID JAPANESE RESTAURANT 7432 Creedmoor Road 919.890.5345 OrchidJapaneseBuffet.com

Sweet. Southern. Scratch-made. Since 1982.

Bakery & Desserts ANISETTE 209 Bickett Boulevard 919.758.3565 SweetAnisette.com ANNELORE’S GERMAN BAKERY 1249 Farmers Market Drive 919.294.8040 Facebook.com/ AnneloresGermanBakery BITTERSWEET 16 E. Martin Street 919.977.3829 BittersweetRaleigh.com

2019

BU•KU 1228 Heritage Links Drive Wake Forest 919.435.1595 BukuWakeForest.com

DIAMOND

AWARD BEST CAKES/SWEETS

4351-115 The Circle at North Hills 919.856.0604 • edibleartnc.com SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

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BOULTED BREAD 614 W. South Street 919.999.3984 BoultedBread.com

CHOW 8311 Creedmoor Road 919.841.4995 ChowRaleigh.com

SOSTA CAFE 130 E. Davie Street 919.833.1006 SostaCafe.com

DUCK DONUTS 8323 Creedmoor Road 919.847.3800 DuckDonuts.com

CHUCK’S 237 S. Wilmington Street 919.322.0126 Ac-Restaurants.com/Chucks

THE DAILY PLANET CAFE 121 W. Jones Street 919.707.8060 TheDailyPlanetCafe.com

EDIBLE ART BAKERY & DESSERT CAFÉ 4351-115 The Circle at North Hills 919.856.0604 EdibleArtNC.com

THE COWFISH SUSHI BURGER BAR 4208 Six Forks Road 919.784.0400 TheCowfish.com

THE PHARMACY CAFE 702 N. Person Street 919.832.6432 PersonStreetRx.com

MOJOE’S BURGER JOINT 620 Glenwood Avenue 919.832.6799 MojoesBurgerJoint.com

SIR WALTER COFFEE 145 E. Davie Street 919.322.0019 SirWalterCoffee.com

SNOOPY’S HOT DOGS 600 Hillsborough Street 919.839.2176 Snoopys.com

SUNFLOWERS CAFE 8 W. Peace Street 919.833.4676 SunflowersRaleigh.com

ESCAZÚ ARTISAN CHOCOLATES 936 N. Blount Street 919.832.3433 EscazuChocolates.com GOODBERRY’S FROZEN CUSTARD 2421 Spring Forest Road 919.878.8159 9700 Strickland Road 919.676.8580 2042 Clark Avenue 919.833.9998 Goodberrys.com LUCETTEGRACE 235 S. Salisbury Street 919.307.4950 LucetteGrace.com PREMIER CAKES 6617 Falls of Neuse Road #105 919.703.0095 Premier-Cakes.com YELLOW DOG BREAD COMPANY 219 E. Franklin Street 984.232.0291 Facebook.com/YellowDogBread VIDERI CHOCOLATE FACTORY 327 W. Davie Street 919.755.5053 VideriChocolateFactory.com

Burger & Hot Dog BAD DADDY’S BURGER BAR Brier Creek, North Raleigh, and Seaboard Station 919.297.0953 BadDaddysBurgerBar.com 164 | MidtownMag.com

Café BENELUX COFFEE 402 Oberlin Road 919.900.8294 BeneluxCoffee.com DESPINA’S CAFÉ 8369 Creedmoor Road 919.848.5007 DespinasCafe.com JUBALA COFFEE 8450 Honeycutt Road 919.758.8330 JubalaCoffee.com MANHATTAN CAFE 320 S. Wilmington Street 919.833.6105 ManhattanCafeNC.com PINE STATE COFFEE 1614 Automotive Way PineStateCoffee.com SOLA COFFEE 7705 Lead Mine Road 919.803.8983 SolaCoffee.com

VINOS FINOS TAPAS AND WINE BAR 8450 Honeycutt Road 919.747.9233 VinosFinosyPicadas.com

French CREPE TRADITIONS 141 Park at North Hills Street 919.977.3425 CrepeTraditions.com COQUETTE BRASSERIE 4531 The Circle at North Hills 919.789.0606 CoquetteRaleigh.com JOLIE 620 N. Person Street 919.803.7221 RestaurantJolie.com ROYALE 200 E. Martin Street 919.977.3043 RoyaleRaleigh.com SAINT JACQUES 6112 Falls of Neuse Road 919.862.2770 SaintJacquesFrench Cuisine.com

SIMPLY CRÊPES 8470 Honeycutt Road 919.322.2327 SimplyCrepes.com

German J. BETSKI’S 10 W. Franklin Street 919.833.7999 JBetskis.com

Indian AZITRA 8411 Brier Creek Parkway 919.484.3939 Azitra.com GARLAND 14 W. Martin Street 919.833.6886 GarlandRaleigh.com KADHAI THE INDIAN WOK 6260-112 Glenwood Avenue 919.785.2864 TheIndianExpressKadhai.com ROYAL INDIA 3901 Capital Boulevard 919.981.0849 RoyalIndianNc.com TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE 6611 Falls of Neuse Road 919.848.2262 TajMahalIndianRaleigh.com THE WILD COOK’S INDIAN GRILL 3212 Hillsborough Street 984.232.8530 WildCooksGrill.com ZAYKA INDIAN CUISINE 10410 Moncreiffe Road Ste 103 919.361.5370 ZaykaRaleigh.com

Italian AMEDEO’S Italian Restaurant 3905 Western Boulevard 919.851.0473 AmedeosRestaurant.com


ASSAGGIO ITALIAN RESTUARANT 3501 W. Millbrook Road 919.785.2088 Assaggios-Nc.com

CAPRI RESTAURANT   6325 Falls of Neuse Road 919.878.4424 CapriRest.com

GRAVY 135 S. Wilmington Street 919.896.8513 GravyRaleigh.com

VIVACE 4209 Lassiter Mill Road 919.787.7747 VivaceRaleigh.com

BELLA MONICA 3121 Edwards Mill Road 919.881.9778 BellaMonica.com

CASA CARBONE RISTORANTE ITALIANO 6019 Glenwood Avenue 919.781.8750 CasaCarbone.com

JIMMY V’S OSTERIA + BAR 420 Fayetteville Street 919.256.1451 JimmyVsRaleigh.com

Mediterranean / Middle Eastern

BRUNO SEAFOOD & STEAKS 11211 Galleria Avenue 919.435.6640 BrunoRaleigh.com

FARINA NEIGHBORHOOD ITALIAN 8450 Honeycutt Road 919.890.0143 FarinaRaleigh.com

MIA FRANCESCA 4100 Main at North Hills Street #114 919.278.1525 MiaFrancescaRaleigh.com

CAFE TIRAMISU 6008 Falls of Neuse Road 919.790.1006 CafeTiramisu.net

MULINO ITALIAN Kitchen & Bar 309 N. Dawson Street 919.838.8595

NINA’S RISTORANTE 8801 Lead Mine Road 919.845.1122 NinasRestaurant.com

MulinoRaleigh.com CAFFÉ LUNA 136 E. Hargett Street 919.832.6090 CafeLuna.com

PICCOLA ITALIA 423 Woodburn Road 919.833.6888 PiccolaItalianc.com

VIC’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT & PIZZERIA 331 Blake Street 919.829.7090 4035 Lake Boone Trail 984.200.9292 VicsItalianRestaurant.com

FRESH LEVANT BISTRO 8450 Honeycutt Road 984.200.3999 FreshLevant.com JASMIN MEDITERRANEAN BISTRO 424 E. Six Forks Road 919.743.3336 JasminBistro.com MONA PITA Mediterranean Grill 5260 Capital Boulevard 919.431.6500 Monapita.com NEOMONDE 3817 Beryl Road 919.828.1628 Neomonde.com

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SASSOOL 9650 Strickland Road 919.847.2700 Sassool.com SITTI 137 S. Wilmington Street 919.239.4070 Sitti-Raleigh.com TAVERNA AGORA 326 Hillsborough Street 919.881.8333 TavernaAgora.com TAZA GRILL 6325 Falls of Neuse Road 919.872.7161 TazaGrill.com THE OLIVE WAGON 8490 Honeycutt Road #106 919.845.7266 TheOliveWagon.com VIDRIO 500 Glenwood Avenue #100 919.803.6033 VidrioRaleigh.com

Mexican BAJA BURRITO 2109 Avent Ferry Road #108 919.834.3431 BajaBurrito.net CAFE CAPISTRANO 8471 Garvey Drive 919.872.1127 CafeCapistrano.com CENTRO 106 S. Wilmington Street 919.835.3593 CentroRaleigh.com EL DORADO 2811 Brentwood Road 919.872.8440 8111 Creedmoor Road 919.848.0788 ElDoradoMexican Restaurant.com GALLO PELÓN MEZCALERIA 106 S. Wilmington Street 919.835.3593 GalloPelon.com 166 | MidtownMag.com

GONZA TACOS Y TEQUILA 7713 Lead Mine Road 919.846.5478 2100 Hillsborough Street 919.268.8965 GonzaTacosyTequila.com GRINGO A GO GO 100 N. Person Street 919.977.1438 GringoRaleigh.com JOSE AND SONS 327 W. Davie Street 919.755.0556 JoseAndSons.com LA RANCHERITA 2400 Hillsborough Street 919.755.9697 RancheritaMex.com

Seafood 42ND STREET OYSTER BAR 508 W. Jones Street 919.831.2811 42ndStOysterBar.com CAPTAIN STANLEY’S SEAFOOD 3333 S. Wilmington Street 919.779.7878 Facebook.com/CaptainStanleys CAPE FEAR SEAFOOD 832 Spring Forest Road 984.242.4600 CapeFearSeafoodCompany.com MARGAUX’S RESTAURANT 8111 Creedmoor Road 919.846.9846 MargauxsRestaurant.com SALTWATER SEAFOOD MARKET AND FRY SHACK 4 Fenton Street 919.834.1813 SaltWaterSeafoodNc.com

BIG ED’S CITY MARKET RESTAURANT 220 Wolfe Street 919.836.9909 BigEdsCityMarket.com DRIFTWOOD SOUTHERN KITCHEN 8460 Honeycutt Road 919.977.8360 DriftwoodRaleigh.com HUMBLE PIE 317 S. Harrington Street 919.829.9222 HumblePieRestaurant.com
 MANDOLIN 2519 Fairview Road 919.322.0365 MandolinRaleigh.com NOFO @ THE PIG 2014 Fairview Road 919.821.1240 Nofo.com PAM’S FARMHOUSE 5111 Western Boulevard 919.859.9990 Facebook.com/PamsFarmhouse POOLE’S DINER 426 S. McDowell Street 919.832.4477 AC-Restaurants.com/Pooles RELISH CAFÉ & BAR 5625 Creedmoor Road 919.787.1855 RelishRaleigh.com RYE BAR & SOUTHERN KITCHEN 500 Fayetteville Street 919.227.3370 RyeRaleigh.com

Southern

STATE FARMERS’ MARKET RESTAURANT 1240 Farmers Market Drive 919.755.1550 RealBiscuits.com

BEASLEY’S CHICKEN + HONEY 237 S. Wilmington Street 919.322.0127 AC-Restaurants.com/Beasleys

FLYING BISCUIT CAFÉ 2016 Clark Avenue 919.833.6924 FlyingBiscuit.com


THE MECCA RESTAURANT 13 E. Martin Street 919.832.5714 Mecca-Restaurant.com

Steakhouse ANGUS BARN 9401 Glenwood Avenue 919.791.2444 AngusBarn.com BRASA BRAZILIAN STEAKHOUSE 8551 Brier Creek Parkway 919.544.3344 BrasaSteakHouse.com VINNIE’S STEAK HOUSE AND TAVERN 7440 Six Forks Road 919.847.7319 VinniesSteakHouse.com

Vegetarian/Vegan DICED 1028 Oberlin Road 919.307.3613 DicedSalads.com FICTION KITCHEN 428 S. Dawson Street 919.831.4177 TheFictionKitchen.com HAPPY + HALE 443 Fayetteville Steet 919.307.4148 HappyAndHale.com IRREGARDLESS CAFE 901 W. Morgan Street 919.833.8898 Irregardless.com RALEIGH RAW 7 W. Hargett Street 919.400.0944 RaleighRaw.com THE REMEDY DINER 137 E. Hargett Street 919.835.3553 TheRemedyDiner.com

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Midtown MINGLES

DIAMONDS DIRECT HOSTS ANNUAL SUMMER DESIGNER SHOWCASE Diamonds Direct hosted their Perfect Pair Spring Designer Showcase, featuring exclusive collections from internationally renowned designers. Guests enjoyed special savings all weekend long while indulging in bites from J. Alexander’s, ice cream from Two Roosters, cotton candy from Wonderpuff, and much more.

CAPE FEAR SEAFOOD COMPANY OPENS RALEIGH LOCATION Cape Fear Seafood Company, a regional chain with locations in coastal North Carolina towns, opened its new Raleigh location on Spring Forest Road with a weeklong series of four reservation-only charity events. Their other locations have been recognized for award-winning seafood dishes, crafted with the freshest ingredients available.

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Photo by Curtis Brown Photography

Midtown MINGLES

NC THEATRE PRODUCTION OF ANNIE NC Theatre’s presentation of Annie brought Tony award–winning actress Karen Ziemba, who played Miss Hannigan, to town. Alexa Lasanta starred in the title role, and over 30 young girls—including several NC Theatre Conservatory students—comprised the orphan cast. The production was sponsored by Synergy Face & Body.

JUST SALAD CELEBRATES GRAND OPENING Raleigh-based Cattell Street Brands celebrated the grand opening of Just Salad’s first North Carolina location, on Lake Boone Trail in Raleigh. The NYC–based fast casual concept cultivates healthier lifestyles by serving fresh, delicious and healthy food prepared from scratch daily and quick made to order service.

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Dyyymond Aerials dyyymond.com / dyyymond@gmail.com

Valerie Troupe REALTOR® & Design Consultant List

Stage

Redecorate

Remodel

Ready to sell? Want fresh upgrades? I can help navigate all things real estate and design related.

Call or text 919.607.6118 vtroupe@fmrealty.com

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Midtown MINGLES

TERRAMOR HOMES Terramor Homes hosted Triangle-area real estate professionals at a one-of-a-kind event, partnering with James Beard award-winning chef and Raleigh favorite Ashley Christensen. Guests enjoyed cocktails and hors d’oeuvres at Bridge Club while Christensen spoke about her family ties to the real estate industry, and how she built her brand and helped to shape the revitalization of downtown Raleigh.

LASH LOUNGE GRAND OPENING EVENT The Lash Lounge Brier Creek held a grand opening to celebrate its neighbors and new customers. The event was full of snacks and bubbly beverages, one-on-one consultations with the salon’s lash experts, and some of the Triangle’s most influential bloggers, and one lucky attendee won a free set of lashes.

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Scott Kelly Commercial | Editorial | Portraits scottkelly-photo.com scottkellyphoto@gmail.com | 912.655.4528

PHOTO PRINTS AND WALL ART FOR HOME AND OFFICE

PRIVATE PHOTOGRAPHY INSTRUCTION Contact for more details and pricing

MWWPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

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NEW Around Town BURIAL BEER GRAND REOPENING Burial Beer has opened a new enlarged space with ample seating, a bigger bar area, and new artwork. To commemorate, they released four incredible new beers and poured IPA from six of the very best breweries at their grand reopening celebration. 500 E. Drive Street | 919.617.1314 BurialBeer.com

DRIVE SHACK Hosts VIP Party Drive Shack hosted a VIP party and gave guests a sneak peek as they unveiled their new Raleigh location. Guests were among the first to explore Drive Shack while enjoying signature cocktails, live entertainment, BayPlay, and tastes from their chef-driven menu. Drive Shack officially opened on August 23rd. 6901 Play Golf Way 984.329.8229 DriveShack.com

SLT OPENS STUDIO In Cameron Village SLT is a challenging, high-intensity, low-impact workout that is unlike any other workout in the marketplace. With a cult-like following of A-List celebrities, models, athletes, influencers, and thousands of dedicated clients, SLT is the perfect combination of cardio, strength training, and Pilates, giving you the full-body reSuLTs you’ve always wanted through an efficient and challenging experience. 445 Daniels Street | 919.747.9440 | SLTNYC.com

STIR: Inventive, Artisanal, and Local Along with fresh food and oysters, STIR brings an intense focus to artisan ice and craft cocktails. With a commitment to local ingredients— most of which are sourced from within 100 miles of Raleigh— everything on STIR’s menu is crafted in-house, from scratch. Photo by Zach & Carolina Stamey, Tabletop Media Group

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4242 Six Forks Road | 984.200.8614 | StirRaleigh.com


NEW Around Town

BEAUTY CO. BRINGS Tailored Skincare to Midtown East Founded by Kelly Gibbs, RN, BSN, Beauty Co. opens late September in the Midtown East shopping center. The practice will specialize in natural injection techniques, non-surgical restoration, enhancements, and state-of-the-art skincare treatments. With a team comprised of aestheticians, a nurse practitioner, and a board-certified plastic surgeon, patients will have an exclusive experience tailored to their individual needs and skincare goals. 1110 Mercantile Drive, Suite 100 919.410.7147 BeautyCoRaleigh.com

RALEIGH’S FIRST Megaformer & Mini Trampoline Studio A new fitness experience, founded by Raleigh fitness aficionado Alicia Belle, has opened in Raleigh. Mega is a dual studio, featuring megaformer and minitrampoline cardio classes, with a focus on a low-impact, high-intensity workouts for full-body fat-burning cardio as well as muscle sculpting. 2330 Bale Street, Suite 104 | 919.5207594 TheMegaWorkout.com

MOBILITY CITY OPENS Raleigh Location Anyone who depends on a mobility scooter or wheelchair knows they need periodic upkeep or repairs. Mobility City is Raleigh’s service-first business, with a primary focus on getting customers rolling again, FAST. Mobility City offers sales and rentals, and their unique dispatch van provides repairs for all brands —usually within a day—at the customer’s home. 5910 Duraleigh Road #107 | 919.999.8977 MobilityCity.com/Wake 176 | MidtownMag.com


Kaleidoscope LIVING

B OY L A N S U N R I S E RA L E I G H

A RT I S T: R YA N F O X

This piece was created using a watercolor pouring technique, which involves applying masking fluid to preserve the white of the paper, then pouring three colors onto the surface. When dry, the previous layer of color is preserved with masking fluid and colors are reapplied, creating a darker value on top. This process is similar to printmaking, as you are working from light to dark. Gravity mixes the colors into shades impossible to create with a brush, and produces many unexpected surprises along the way.

Watercolor artist Ryan Fox depicts common and uncommon scenes from around the world, rendered artistically, using a variety of techniques and surfaces. While his paintings are based on photographs he has taken, he fills the shapes with interesting colors and textures to entertain the viewer’s eye. “The most important element of a piece is the atmosphere it creates,” Fox says. “Paintings evolve on their own, but as the artistic director, my choices lead to the end product. I am always surprised by the results; sometimes I am happy, too.” Fox lives in Raleigh, and is a signature member of the American Watercolor Society (AWS). He has won numerous awards in juried shows, including the AWS, Adirondacks National Exhibition of American Watercolors, and Watercolor Society of North Carolina.

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Profile for Midtown Magazine, Cary Living Magazine

Midtown Magazine  

September / October 2019

Midtown Magazine  

September / October 2019

Profile for midtown
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