Page 1

The

FOOD ISSUE HEALTHY

EATING

Hairstyles

for SUMMER

GOLFING from

MOUNTAINS to SEA J ULY /A UGUS T

2 0 1 8

+

EDUCATIONOPTIONS


Raleigh’s Cameron Village and Crabtree Valley Mall

|

www.baileybox.com


BEST PLACE TO BUY CUSTOM JEWELRY

AWARD

BEST PLACE TO BUY WEDDING RINGS

DIAMOND

AWARD

BEST PLACE FOR DESIGNER JEWELRY

2018

DIAMOND

2018

AWARD

2018

2018

DIAMOND

DIAMOND

AWARD

BEST PLACE TO BUY A UNIQUE GIFT


AWARD BEST DENTIST

2018

2017

DIAMOND

DIAMOND

AWARD BEST DENTIST


HARRY’S GUITAR SHOP 556 PYLON DR., RALEIGH, NC 27606 T (919) 828 4888 HARRYSGUITARSHOP.COM

A NOTE FROM THE PUBLISHER

Martin d-28 a classic Reimagined.

C

atching you between summer adventures? One of the best perks of living in Raleigh is the easy access to our gorgeous mountains and coast—I especially appreciate this after living in Atlanta and Dallas, where a weekend drive to the beach wasn’t happening. There are so many incredible day trips, weekend getaways, and vacation ops in close proximity that it’s easy to take for granted just how lucky we are. That was my failing decades ago when I trekked off to Golf Safari. The thing that excited me about going to summer camp was that there were more boys attending than girls. How sad that I was such a predictable preteen who couldn’t appreciate the incredible opportunity of being taught how to play golf by Peggy Kirk Bell, renowned LPGA leader. She and her husband, Warren (“Bullet”), hosted the summer camp at their club in Southern Pines, and her family continues the legacy at Pine Needles Lodge & Golf Club, with the 2018 Golfari set for July 8th to the 14th.

To be honest, I was also a total wimp about the heat and humidity. Coming from Boone, it was beyond my comprehension why anyone would sweat through a round of golf when they could be playing in the refreshing mountain air. Whatever your preference, we’ve highlighted the top courses in the Triangle, the mountains, and the coast—as ranked by the N.C. Golf Panel. (Story on page 126.) For many in our community, the living is not so easy. In the summer months, our friends at Urban Ministries tell us that it’s particularly difficult to keep food donations flowing in because contributors who typically give are on vacation. Take a look at the story on page 44 to see how you might help. On page 78, you’ll find the first in a series of stories we’ll be bringing to you about the affordable housing crisis in Wake County, and how each of us might find a way to make a difference. I’m truly thrilled that Midtown is a Partner Sponsor of Habitat for Humanity’s 2018 Women Build, which will be building two new homes in Wake County between October and December. If you want to talk about ways you might be involved, or possibly even join our Midtown building team, please send me an email. Finally, I’d love to hear your feedback (yep, cheesy pun) on any of the great foodie spots in our area—whether it’s one featured here in our annual food issue or one that you’d like us to write about. Cheers,

Connie Gentry Editor / Publisher

Your opinions matter to us. Let us know what you think of this issue of Midtown magazine. Please email connie@midtownmag.com with your comments.

6 | midtownmag.com


The Haydon Difference

Look Closely At The Rubies, Each Is Marked As Is The Mounting. Since No Two Stones Are Identical, The Setting For Each Is Painstakingly Adjusted To Accommodate The Unique Dimensions Of Each Ruby. This Process Alone Can Take Days Until The Fit Is “Perfect”.

The 18k Yellow Gold Undercarriage And The Platinum H&Co Logo Are Now Filed, Fitted And Welded Into Place.

The Diamonds Now Undergo The Same Setting Procedure As The Rubies.

Finishing With “Perfect” Bead Work And Polish Completes The Haydon & Company Ring.


Discover the Haydon Difference

Burmese Ruby And Diamond Ring In Platinum And 18k Yellow Gold.

The Haydon & Company Distinction Means No Shortcuts Or Bypassing Quality. Perfection Is The Goal…Always.

Haydon & Company

® 1803 Oberlin Road • Raleigh, NC 27608 • 919.781.1293 • Toll Free: 866.429.3667 www.haydonco.com • Member of the American Gem Society


Editor/Publisher Connie Gentry Advertising Sales Charis Painter Ashley Carter Maddi Blanchard Amy Tucker Creative Director Lori Lay Graphic Design Jennifer Heinser Fran Sherman Social Media & Marketing Coordinator Brittany Murdock Contributing Writers Mark Cantrell Alex Dixon Kurt Dusterberg Julie Johnson Sean Lennard Tim Peeler Beth Peterson Valerie Troupe Cheryl Capaldo Traylor Carla Turchetti Don Vaughan Carol Wills Ruhama Wolle Photography F8 Photo Studios Joe Reale Nathan Richards Mick Schulte Photography Raleigh Food Pics Distribution Manager Joe Lizana

Midtown magazine is published six times annually. Any reproduction in part or in whole of any part of this publication is prohibited without the express written consent of the publisher. Midtown magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photography or art. Unsolicited material is welcome and is considered intended for publication. Such material will become the property of the magazine and will be subject to editing. Material will be returned if accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. Midtown magazine will not knowingly accept any real estate advertising in violation of U.S. equal opportunity law.

SUBSCRIPTIONS 6 print issues (1 year) Available online at midtownmag.com 4818-204 Six Forks Road Raleigh, NC 27609 Ph: 919.782.4710 F: 919.782.4763

10 | midtownmag.com

A


BORN IN LONDON, ENJOYED AROUND THE WORLD CASE GOODS, UPHOLSTERY, LIGHTING, ACCESSORIES, RUGS AND OBJETS DE VERTU!

WE ARE SO MUCH MORE THAN JUST A GREAT FURNITURE STORE!

Any Furniture Any Finish

CAMERON VILLAGE 2030 Clark Avenue Raleigh, NC 27605 919.803.1033

MOULTRIE PLAZA 640 Coleman Boulevard Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464 843.216.3900

www.stevenshellliving.com


PIZZA LA STELLA PHOTO BY PAM VARELA

contents JULY

/

AUGUS T

2018

features 72 HEALTHY DINING UNC Rex serves a chef-driven, fresh menu at Kardia Café.

78 BEYOND THE TIPPING POINT Affordable housing has become a pipe dream for many.

88 LIFE LESSONS FOR ALL The Frankie Lemmon School serves diverse needs.

116 ANIMAL ADVENTURES Exotic wildlife centers can be seen around our state.

126 GOLFING GREATS Top-ranked courses from the mountains to the sea.

97 SPONSORED CONTENT: 2018 Education Options

82 BUILDING BLOCKS TO AFFORDABILITY Habitat for Humanity and Ply Gem work to improve housing options.

104

EAT YOUR WAY TO URBAN ECSTASY

Raleigh restaurants rival national foodie towns.


BEST DENTIST

DIAMOND

AWARD BEST DENTIST

2018

AWARD

2017

2018

DIAMOND

DIAMOND

AWARD

FRIENDLIEST CUSTOMER SERVICE


contents JULY

/

AUGUS T

departments

2018

C

W o p

T

50 CHEF’S TABLE 54 MINDING YOUR BUSINESS

16 ON THE SCENE

58 HAIRSTYLES FOR SUMMER

30 BEER & BARREL

64 FOODIE FOCUS

34 MIDTOWN LIVING

66 HOMESTYLER

36 DOWNTOWN VIBES

70 TASTES OF THE CITY

40 CANDID CONVERSATION

87 RAISING THE BAR

44 GIVING BACK

96 FINANCIAL FOCUS 139 HEALTHY YOU 141 DINING GUIDE 149 OUT & ABOUT 162 KALEIDOSCOPE LIVING

40

CANDID CONVERSATION

with KIDZNOTES

The

FOOD ISSUE HEALTHY

EATING

Hairstyles MARCUS ONE OF KIDZNOTES’ MOST TENURED STUDENTS. PHOTO COURTESY OF KIDZNOTES.

for SUMMER

GOLFING from

MOUNTAINS to SEA

SPECIAL THANKS TO NATHAN RICHARDS FOR OUR BEAUTIFUL COVER PHOTO FEATURING MANDOLIN.

JULY/A UGUST

2 0 1 8

+

EDUCATIONOPTIONS

©201

FTB_CB_


Capitalize on the “aaahhh”.

P R I VAT E C L I E N T

With complex financial needs comes complex financial stress. That’s why you need to capitalize on the peace of mind that comes with Private Client services from Capital Bank. With personalized services, innovative products and financial planning assistance, we’re dedicated to helping make your financial future thrive. To speak with a Relationship Manager, visit CapitalBank-us.com/raleighvip.

©2018 First Tennessee Bank National Association operating as First Tennessee Bank and Capital Bank.

FTB_CB_9152_PrivateClient_28918_8.375x10.875_4c_BeachC.indd 1

6/6/18 2:22 PM


The scene Let’s Connect!

on

SOCIAL

BY

BRITTANY MURDOCK

Poke Shooter Board anyone? They may look little, but these bites pack some serious flavor. Check out Poke Burri in their new location on Falls of Neuse Road.

Cameron Village is blooming with flowers. Visit their flower installations throughout the village.

Clouds Brewing is pulling out all the stops for their Bloody Mary bar on Sundays. Bacon, cheese, eggs, and celery are just some of the many items on the list you can add to your drink. PHOTO BY JEN HEINSER

We stepped out of the Triangle for the day and headed to Pilot Mountain State Park. With a view like this, it was worth every mile.

Get Social With Us! 16 | midtownmag.com

MidtownMagazine www.midtownmag.com

MidtownMag MidtownMagazine


The scene

on

HOME

Gardening

to Attract Birds BY CHERYL CAPALDO TRAYLOR PHOTOS COURTESY OF WAKE COUNTY AUDUBON SOCIETY

18 | midtownmag.com

AFTER YEARS OF WATCHING THE RALEIGH area lose green space to urban development, Christina Harvey decided to create a more bird-friendly garden. “Replacing some of that landscape is one small thing I can do to help save our favorite birds,” she says. Harvey, an avid gardener and one of more than 1,200 members in the Wake County Audubon Society, says that personal enjoyment is a major benefit to having a birdfriendly garden. Homeowners know the joy of listening to birdsong and watching colorful birds flit around their yards and feeders.


Kim Brand, field organizer for the North Carolina Audubon Society, says birds also provide a crucial role in maintaining a healthy ecosystem. Birds eat a variety of insects, from mosquitos to caterpillars, keeping the insect population in balance. Birds are also pollinators and efficient seed dispersers, creating forests that have both ecological and economic value. To help maintain a healthy bird population, it’s necessary to landscape with native plants that support the insects and caterpillars birds like to eat, and, as Brand notes, “Nonnative plants that don’t have a shared evolutionary history with the insects that live here are basically a food dessert for our birds.” Or, perhaps worse, they are providing junk food. Many of the popular non-native landscape plants, like privet, don’t support the necessary insects that feed our birds. Insects either don’t perceive their leaves as food, cannot bite them, or find them toxic. While these plants can be used as shelter, they are not a food source for our insects or birds. Some non-natives are actually poisonous to birds. For example, the berries of nandina have proven fatal to cedar waxwings. North Carolinians are fortunate to have many native plants that are both utilitarian and beautiful, such as our majestic oaks. According to Douglas Tallamy, author of Bringing Nature Home, oak trees support 534 different kinds of moths and butterflies, which lay eggs on the leaves. The hatched caterpillars eat the leaves, grow, and eventually become high-protein food for baby birds. Brand says this series of events is crucial because caterpillars are the No. 1 food source for baby songbirds. Black cherries and hickories are also important trees for birds. For smaller gardens, native blueberries are the perfect bird-friendly choice. The birds will keep the insects off the plants, and there will be berries for both birds and people, as well as caterpillars for baby birds. Other small bird-friendly shrubs include flame azalea and spicebush. If you have space for only one plant on a balcony or patio, Brand suggests planting a trellised container with coral honeysuckle. The bright red tubular-shaped flowers attract hummingbirds, while finches and robins will eat the red fruit.

midtownmag.com | 19


BIRD-FRIENDLY LANDSCAPING INCLUDES SHRUBS—LIKE BEAUTYBERRY (CALLICARPA AMERICANA), BUTTONBUSH (CEPHALANTHUS OCCIDENTALIS), AND DECIDUOUS HOLLY (ILEX DECIDUA)—AND PERENNIALS—LIKE MILKWEED (ASCLEPIAS TUBEROSA), YARROW (ACHILLEA MILLEFOLIUM), AND GOLDENROD (SOLIDAGO RUGOSA).

A few native perennials that will attract birds are purple coneflower, swamp sunflower, and black-eyed Susan. However, Harvey advises there is more to creating a bird-friendly garden than growing flowers. “Birds also need other native food sources—like nuts, berries, and insect larvae—as well as evergreen plants for shelter and nest sites, water year-round, and layers in the landscape ranging from ground cover to shrubs to trees.” Supplemental feeding is very beneficial during the winter season, and suet blocks are especially appreciated on bitter cold nights. The Audubon Society recently began advising people to leave hummingbird feeders up year-round as rufous and other species are showing up more regularly during the winter months. Seed heads of flowers and ornamental grasses are also a valuable food source during the coldest months. To ensure bird populations remain healthy, aim to reduce the use of pesticides in your landscape. Allow for some imperfection, and don’t be overly concerned about nibbled plants. Rely on the natural food chain to keep many pests in check. Brand says the best advice for homeowners wanting to create a bird-friendly garden is to start by adding a variety of native plants. She explains, “You’re going to help birds raise more babies. You’re going to help birds on their migration journeys. You’re going to make sure your bird neighbors have enough to eat. You’re going to bring more birds into your life, which will in turn make you happy.” To learn more about bird-friendly gardens and related events, contact the Wake Audubon Society at wakeaudubon.org.

20 | midtownmag.com


GALLERY OF

LUXURY HOMES

LUXURY HOME MARKETING GROUP

The Luxury Home Marketing Group, a powerful network of inter-brokerage top luxury home experts, established in 2004.

2913 Ryton Court, Raleigh Stonemoor: $875,000 Kathy Beacham: 919-632-1807 Coldwell Banker HPW

5978 Cavanaugh Dr, Raleigh The Registry: $1,325,000 Shawn Britt: 919-215-3263 Realty World-Triangle Living

3032 Cone Manor Lane, Raleigh Linville (Gated): $2,399,000 Kimberly Conroy: 919-539-2860 Coldwell Banker HPW

2925 Debra Drive, Raleigh Debra Forest: $1,100,000 Linda Craft: 919-235-6300 Linda Craft & Team, REALTORS

1602 Jarvis Street, Raleigh Hayes Barton: $1,799,000 Sheri Hagerty: 919-862-6258

60 China Doll Court, Durham The Hills of Rosemont: $1,999,000 Mollie Owen: 919-602-2713

Hodge & Kittrell Sotheby’s International Realty

1501 Barony Lake Way, Raleigh The Barony: $1,250,000 Deborah Nance: 919-624-5555 Real Living Pittman Properties

Hodge & Kittrell Sotheby’s International Realty

3913 Lewis P. Olds Wynd, Raleigh Olde Raleigh: $1,495,000 Jill Rekuc: 919-389-0555 Olde Raleigh Real Estate

632 The Preserve Trail, Chapel Hill The Preserve at Jordan Lake: $752,500 Margaret Struble: 919-280-9994 RE/MAX United

1024 Stradshire Drive, Raleigh Faircroft: $1,699,000 Lindsay Taylor: 919-389-2727 Coldwell Banker HPW

2093 Van Gogh Lane, Apex Greyhawk Landing: $889,500 Linda Trevor: 919 469-6543 RE/MAX United

5224 Newstead Manor Lane, Raleigh Newstead Manor: $925,000 Debbie Van Horn: 919-749-6000 Fonville Morisey

4732 Saratoga Falls Lane, Raleigh Belmont Ridge: $1,135,000 Leslie Young: 919-280-5401 Coldwell Banker, HPW Global Luxury

5011 Pomfret Point, Raleigh The Hamptons at Umstead: $839,900 Kimberly Conroy: 919-539-2860 Coldwell Banker HPW

Lindsay Taylor Coldwell Banker HPW Jill Rekuc Olde Raleigh Real Estate Mary Edna Williams RE/MAX United Deborah Nance Real Living Pittman Properties Linda Craft Linda Craft & Team Mollie Owen Hodge & Kittrell Sotheby’s Linda Trevor RE/MAX United Shawn Britt Realty Executives-Triangle Living Leslie Young Coldwell Banker HPW Kimberly Conroy Coldwell Banker HPW Kathy Beacham Coldwell Banker HPW Sheri Hagerty Hodge & Kittrell Sotheby’s Margaret Struble RE/MAX United Debbie Van Horn Fonville Morisey service@triangleluxuryhomemarketinggroup.com | www.luxuryhomemarketinggroup.com


The scene

on

CRAFT

THE PLUM UMBRELLA STUDIO: OWNER EMILY SCHMIDT CREATES JOURNALS AND PHOTO ALBUMS, USING ONLY ACID-FREE MATERIALS, IN A VARIETY OF DESIGNS INCLUDING LINED, UNLINED, DOT-GRID, OR MIXED MEDIA PAGES.

The Art of the Journal By Carol Wills FAMOUS DIARISTS LIKE VIRGINIA Woolf and Thomas Merton would have been the first in line had the beautiful journals that Emily Schmidt makes been available in their day. Her artistic journals are handcrafted to the most exacting standards. Schmidt, who studied journalism and mass communication/graphic design at UNC–Chapel Hill, currently works full-time as the conservation lab manager at N.C. State University Libraries. Her task is to care for the physical health of the library’s collection, repairing and rebinding wellworn books. She’s been practicing the art of bookbinding for 15 years. “It’s a fun job,” Schmidt says, adding that there is always more to learn about bookbinding. In 2014 she took her fondness for bookbinding to an artistic 22 | midtownmag.com

level and started The Plum Umbrella Studio—named for her love of rain and the color purple. Schmidt creates journals and photo albums, using only acid-free materials, in a variety of designs including lined, unlined, dot-grid, or mixed media pages. The journals are sold online and at craft fairs. “My ultimate goal,” says Schmidt, “is to create journals that function properly, using bold colors and patterns that make them beautiful, too.” In this digital age, when few people print out the photos taken with their cellphones, a photo album with real pictures would be lovely to have in your home or to pass on to future generations. Schmidt also creates sketchbooks and pocket notebooks. She makes her own book cloth from fabric she carefully curates, and she does all the

cutting, folding, punching, and sewing to bring her vision into completion. A relatively new way of recording tasks accomplished or future plans is the bullet journal. Instead of daily entries in paragraph form, the bullet journal is a collection of lists that are meaningful to you. It could even include a calendar with birthdays of family and friends circled. And, as with all journals, you can include pictures, art, poems—whatever you want to keep, remember, and enjoy. In this computer age, the art of writing by hand is often neglected, but it is a much more intimate experience than typing on a keyboard. If you are interested in seeing Schmidt’s handmade journals up close, look for her booth at the Lazy Daze Arts and Crafts Festival on August 25th in downtown Cary.


BUY BUY BEFORE BEFORE JULY JU ULY Y 31ST 31ST FOR BEST F O R B EST 2018-19 2018-1 19 SEATS! SEATS!

FEBRUARY 12-17, 2019

MARCH 19-24, 2019*

APRIL 26-MAY 5, 2019

JULY 23-28, 2019

OCTOBER 16-21, 2018

NOVEMBER 13-18, 2018*

MINI PACKAGES ON SALE NOW!

4 SHOWS FOR AS LITTLE AS $95!

2018

nctheatre.com/minis

DIAMOND

AWARD BEST ORTHODONTIST

Paula Leggett Chase “Tanya,” Kim Huber “Donna,” and Karen L. Robu “Rosie” in Music Theatre Wichita’s 2016 production of MAMMA MIA! Photo by Christopher Clark.

midtownmag.com | 23


The scene

on

MUSIC

STICK FIGURE, COMPLETE WITH COCOA, POSING AND SUPERVISING THE CROWD. PHOTO BY KEITH ZACHARSKI/IN THE BARREL

Reggae in Raleigh

BY JENNIFER HEINSER

IF SOMEONE ASKED YOU TO ATTEND A reggae concert, you might think, “There’s a current, American reggae scene?” I had this thought eight years ago, when my friend— who hails from southern California—was shocked to learn that I was unaware of the band Slightly Stoopid. I giggled at the name, but later that day I started an internet radio station on Spotify based on the band.

THIS MUSIC GENRE IS “BRINGING ONLY GOOD VIBES” TO FANS. 24 | midtownmag.com


I was hooked. Not just hooked on Slightly Stoopid, which began in the days of Sublime, but they became my “gateway band,” if you will, to everything else that came after them. (Worth mentioning here are reggae fans—a breed unto themselves!) My ticket stub collection contains memories from shows spanning rock and metal to rap and reggae. And by far, there is nothing like the reggae crowd. Fellow fans don’t mind saving your spot if you need to run for a beer, or to the bathroom between sets. The fan page groups on Facebook send each other mail to encourage and uplift each other—bumper stickers, bracelets, artwork, etc. After one family had a rough year, members of their fan group chipped in and donated a tree to be delivered to their home and planted in their yard from “The Family.” On Valentine’s Day, I came home to a package of band stickers, a bracelet, and a handwritten note. After hundreds of concerts in venues from bars to arenas, bands like Slightly Stoopid, Rebelution, Stick Figure, Dirty Heads, and more know what a great support structure they have. They are super-connected to the fans through social media, actively engaged in fan pages, and most even have songs that are odes to their fan base. Other bands worth the trip to your local venue include Iration, The Green, Hirie, Tribal Seeds, The Expendables, Soja, and J Boog. For me, Rebelution became a favorite right away—with their intense bass line thanks to Marley Williams, and inspiring riffs and lyrics from singer Eric Rachmany. The group, based out of Santa Barbara, California, met in music school and their musical precision shows. They bring even more energy to the stage than to their album, which is hard to believe. The uplifting lyrics are always about “bringing only good vibes.” They played Red Hat Amphitheater in late June, but they stop by this area annually. If you want those chill vibes— the beach-bum kind—you’ll find all you need in Stick Figure, also out of California. Scott Woodruff started with a solo project, until he connected with more talented musicians who slowly joined the pack. And I do mean pack: An acknowledged band member is a rescued Australian shepherd named Cocoa. She has her own Instagram, @cocoathetourdog, and has a cult following herself. Fans buy dog toys midtownmag.com | 25


REBELUTION ROCKING THE RED HAT; PHOTO BY SAM DEEN PRODUCTIONS

FRONT MEN JARED WATSON (“DIRTY J”) AND DUSTIN BUSHNELL (“DUDDY B”) ON MICS. PHOTO BY ASHLEY KIDWELL

before the show and throw them to her on stage. She travels the world with the guys, surfing and hanging on the beach with them in exotic locations. You’ll find her front-and-center posing for fans. Stick Figure opens for Slightly Stoopid on July 13th in Portsmouth, Virginia, and then August 14th at Red Hat. Keep a watch for additional dates, as they have headlined their own show at the Lincoln Theater in the past. For some hip-hop groove to go with your reggae, Dirty Heads—the ever-evolving boys out of Huntington Beach, California—play in this area at least twice a year. While they’ve broken into the mainstream with hits like “Lay Me Down” (Any Port in a Storm, 2008),

26 | midtownmag.com

“My Sweet Summer” (Sound of Change, 2014), and “That’s All I Need” (Dirty Heads self-titled, 2016), every album sounds different and they admit they don’t have a “genre.” Whatever they are feeling at the time they plan an album is what is created. Perhaps if you’re only familiar with their earlier songs, you’d be surprised to listen to songs like “Medusa.” New fans are disoriented when their last album sounds completely reggae, and the next is rap-heavy. But I think it’s this diversity and dynamic range that keeps them fresh and interesting. They just played at Red Hat in May, but this summer tour could see dates added. They’ve also played at the House of Blues in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, for the last couple of years. While inspired by the likes of Bob Marley and Sublime, or even Cypress Hill, American reggae has its own flavor, its own vibe. It is like a microcosm of America—a melting pot of influences and cultures—and that is its strength. Check out the next show, because you will be welcomed with open arms (and even some tie-dye). Keep looking for new dates being announced by each of these bands, and find tickets to see Slightly Stoopid and Stick Figure at StickFigureMusic.com/tour-dates/.


The scene

on

THEATER

Strike a Meaningful Pose

LIKE THE NEWSBOYS’ STRIKE OF 1899, TODAY’S YOUTH ARE OUT TO IMPROVE THE WORLD.

FIGHTING FOR WHAT YOU BELIEVE IN can be a considerable feat, especially if you are part of the younger generation. Many are told they can’t make a difference due to their age, race, living conditions, and more, so rising above the naysayers takes courage and willpower in the face of various intimidating factors. Around the country, we’re seeing a revival of young people who are taking charge and fighting for the change they want to see in the world. They aren’t concerned with the possibility of negative backlash; they have simply banded together to create an unstoppable force that demands attention. The 119th anniversary of the

28 | midtownmag.com

Newsboys’ Strike of 1899 occurs in July and marks the event where young newsboys across New York City refused to distribute papers produced by Joseph Pulitzer, publisher of the New York World, and William Randolph Hearst, publisher of the Journal. The strike was due to the raised costs of a newsboy bundle of 100 newspapers from 50 cents to 60 cents, a price increase that at the time was offset by increased sales. The strike lasted from July 21st to August 2nd, and the newsboys were ultimately able to influence the publishers to buy back all unsold papers, leading to an improved quality of life for existing as well as future newsboys. The story of the Newsboys’ Strike

and their fight to be heard can be applied to the culture we live in today and the story of our youth, as they strive for change across the world. The powerful marches and campaigns that make frontpage news every day are empowering, and beg the question, “How can we each seize the day and make a difference in our own community?” For inspiration, consider attending the North Carolina Theatre’s production of the hit Broadway musical, Disney’s Newsies, which is based on the Newsboys’ Strike of 1899 and will run July 24th to 29th at Duke Energy Center for the Performing Arts in downtown Raleigh. Visit nctheatre.com to purchase tickets.


midtownmag.com | 29


beer& barrel LEFT: PHOTO OF ASHLEY CHRISTENSEN BY JOHNNY AUTRY. RIGHT: PHOTO COURTESY OF FULLSTEAM BREWERY.

FOOD-FRIENDLY Signature Beers WITH THE WIDE SELECTION OF TOP quality breweries available in North Carolina, restaurateurs are spoiled for choice—and a few have been inspired to seek out a friendly brewer and create a signature brew that is available exclusively on their menu. A house beer can complement a distinctive cuisine, express the restaurant’s philosophy, or anchor a special occasion. It can also become a

30 | midtownmag.com

special attraction for patrons. When Ashley Christensen, the awardwinning chef, opened Beasley’s Chicken + Honey, it was the second of what are now six restaurants she has founded in Raleigh. “With the concept being chicken and honey, it felt like such an opportunity. It was our first restaurant where it was about one item as the center of the concept,” she says.

BY JULIE JOHNSON

She approached Sean Lilly Wilson, founder of Fullsteam Brewery in Durham and an avid promoter of beer and food with marked Southern roots. “We are big fans in that shop of the pairing of fried chicken and Champagne, but beer is so present here, you know?” she says. “I felt like Sean knew my food so well that he would be the perfect person to imagine that pairing.”


They discussed the project over—what else?—plates of fried chicken. Beasley’s was featuring North Carolina gallberry honey on its menu at the time. “We talked about feeling like it had this presence of tellicherry peppercorns. It has an innate, almost peppery spice all its own.” The base beer Wilson proposed was a Belgian wit, or white beer, a style with little to no hop bitterness and that traditionally incorporates a range of spices for balance. After a few test batches, Fullsteam Beasley’s Honey White was born: softened with gallberry honey, spiked with tellicherry peppercorns, and brewed with a touch of oats for texture. “It has a slightly cloudy richness to it; the spice kind of clears your palate after whatever bite you’ve had and complements it, then it gives you a nice reset for the next bite or the next sip,” Christensen says. She and Wilson debated a second beer—richer and darker to go with dark-meat dishes—but Honey White turned out to be a favorite accompaniment to all of Beasley’s menu items. It’s the restaurant’s best-selling beer. Fearrington House in Pittsboro also partnered with Wilson on a brewing project, but instead of a single beer, the renowned restaurant wanted a rotating series of four to suit the restaurant’s seasonal menu. Max Kast, the beverage director at the time, says, “Sean and I thought it would be a cool idea to have something that expressed the essence of Fearrington, which Fullsteam shared: the farm-to-table philosophy,” or, as Fullsteam puts it, “plow to pint.” The four seasonal beers are designed to be only medium in alcohol, foodfriendly, and enhanced with seasonal ingredients. Fall, for example, features an ESP (extra special pale ale) made with the addition of Foggy Ridge apples from Virginia. The winter porter is flavored with home-roasted coffee and pecans from the inn’s hundred-year-old trees. The spring offering is a dry-hopped saison, and the summer seasonal, available now, is a session-strength IPA flavored with black tea and lemon peel. “It’s basically a play on iced tea, which is about as Southern as it gets,” Kast says. At the AC Hotel North Hills in Raleigh, a compelling opportunity inspired Anthony Zinani, the general manager of beverage and food, to commission a single, special beer. It happened when Level7, the rooftop bar, purchased a barrel of Knob Creek bourbon. “They sent us the barrel from Kentucky with our own hand-selected

Artful. Natural. Zenn. Dr. Michael Zenn is one of the country’s foremost experts in plastic surgery. For more than 20 years he has shared his artistry, surgical skill, and compassionate care exclusively with patients at UNC and Duke.

ZENN PLASTIC SURGERY 7920 ACC Blvd., Suite 110, Raleigh | 919.480.3885 ZENNPLASTICSURGERY.COM

midtownmag.com | 31


bourbon,” says Zinani. Once the barrel was emptied, he approached Raleigh Brewing, whose beers are regularly on tap at the hotel, and proposed a collaboration. “The first thing I thought of was that it would be cool to have them brew a beer for us and age it in our own barrel.” Barrel-aging, which has grown in popularity recently, allows a beer—generally one that is full-flavored and higher in alcohol—to pick up new flavors from the wood. If the barrel has previously housed another beverage, some of those qualities will pass into the beer over weeks or months of aging. “We chose a beer that would kind of stick out for that typical oaky, wood-age of the bourbon,” Zinani says. “We wanted to go with something a little darker, so it’s kind of a mix between a Belgian strong ale and a porter. It’s a dark amber color, and the beer will be a little higher in ABV, around 9 to 10 percent.” Zinani joined the Raleigh Brewing team to brew the beer. “I was able to mash everything up, pick out the hops, dump in the hops, and really get in with the master brewer about how we’re going to do this.” Now comes the wait. The beer will mature in the Knob Creek barrel for several months before it is unveiled around October. Zinani plans to make an occasion of the release, because once this beer’s gone, it’s gone. Not all signature beers are that fleeting, but all attempt to capture something unusual and distinctive to deliver a unique experience for guests.

ANTHONY ZINANI, GENERAL MANAGER OF FOOD AND BEVERAGE, AC HOTEL RALEIGH (LEVEL7 ROOFTOP BAR) ASSISTING THE STAFF AT RALEIGH BREWING COMPANY WHILE BREWING THE LEVEL7 SIGNATURE BEER.

WHERE PLAYING WITH YOUR FOOD IS ENCOURAGED Located at 32 | midtownmag.com


midtown living

R E C L A IM

Simplicity

The Midtown Raleigh Farmers Market is a producersonly event where you’ll enjoy meeting the people as much as sampling their food and wares. BY BETH PETERSON // PHOTOGRAPHY BY LORI LAY

THERE’S SOMETHING ABOUT A FARMERS market that works like a tonic on our souls. From the moment we arrive, blood pressure seems to drop and each breath feels deeper. Why? Is it the mingling scents of earth and produce, calling to mind a simpler time, when entire days were spent outdoors? Is it the feel of a sun-warm tomato, heavy in our hands? Chances are, it’s the many reminders of our connection to the earth and to each other.

34 | midtownmag.com

At the Midtown Raleigh Farmers Market, conveniently located in the Commons at North Hills, you’ll find all the charm and simplicity of a producecentric farmers market right in the middle of one of Raleigh’s most popular shopping centers. Every Saturday from mid-April until early November, from 8am until noon, you can find a soul-nourishing combination of fresh air and live music serving as backdrop to the panoply of 40-plus tents.

Along with traditional farmers market vendors and their rainbow displays of produce, you’ll marvel at the diversity of products curated for this weekly exhibition. There is so much worth noticing here, but the air of welcome is what is hardest to miss. With smiles on their faces and pride in their eyes, the vendors invite visitors to slow down—to taste, smell, touch, or admire something truly unique, something that is defined by the person selling it. The Midtown Raleigh Farmers Market is different than most farmers markets because it is a producersonly market, which means that everything you see was made or grown by the people whose smiles greet you when you pass their way. Slow down to speak to any of the 45 or so vendors, and you’ll feel like you’ve made a new friend. You’ll find out that Nancy, of Weathers Cheddars, sells homemade cheese straws, using the same recipe her mother used— which is probably the same recipe her mother’s mother used.


Lauren, of Wicked and Woven, sells scented soy candles and wearables. Some scents are woodsy while others are beachy or floral, but every scent has a name and a story to go with it. Bobbie sells compost bins because she believes in reducing landfill waste. For similarly eco-minded people without the yardspace to compost, the organization compostnow.org offers easy answers. Julie, who stands tucked a bit behind racks of gorgeous, handmade children’s dresses at the Crown Jules Clothing tent, will joyfully share the reason she started sewing at age 9, and why, if you buy one dress, she sends another to orphans in need. Stop by the Michael’s English Muffins tent, and Izzy or Annabelle might tempt you to try a sample of the delightful baked paradox that is somehow both fluffy and chewy. On and on the list goes: There’s Scott selling honey he harvests from hives scattered around Raleigh. Tharaa is selling mamool because her husband couldn’t stop making the delicate cookies after he discovered them on a trip to Egypt. And Patrick is selling beard oil he makes right in his own kitchen. There are makers of bath salts and painters of pet portraits. You can stock up on all manner of baby items, or find herbs, berries, and salsas to sample. Even if the Midtown Raleigh Farmers Market wasn’t as conveniently located and easy to access as it is, this is one farmers market that is worth a special trip. But don’t just come for the food, or for the lastminute baby gifts. Come and be reminded that we are meant to live in community; that knowing the name of the lady who makes the cheese straws isn’t just good manners—it’s good for your soul. Oh, and in case you’ve forgotten, her name is Nancy.

LEFT: HANDMADE GIRL’S CLOTHING BY OLIVE + LOU. RIGHT: MICHAEL’S MUFFINS

COLOR FIELDS FARM IS AN ORGANICALLY MANAGED FLOWER FARM AND FLORAL DESIGN STUDIO BASED IN HILLSBOURGH.

NOURISHING ACRES (ORGANIC VEGETABLE FARM)

midtownmag.com | 35


downtown vibes

MAKUS EMPANADAS COW BAR

COUSINS MAINE LOBSTER

Where Foodies

GATHER

RALEIGH STANDS POISED TO WELCOME TWO FOOD HALLS BY THE END OF SUMMER. BY

CARLA TURCHETTI

WHEN THE MORGAN STREET FOOD Hall opens on July 23rd, it will bring a worldwide food trend to downtown Raleigh’s Warehouse District. Not to be confused with a food court (like those you find in a shopping center or transportation hub), a contemporary food hall is a place where local experimentation and innovation intersect in a food lover’s paradise. The Morgan Street Food Hall is a project of the Hibernian Hospitality Group, led by chef/owner Niall Hanley. This is the group behind the Hibernian Irish Pubs, The Station, Raleigh Beer Garden, XOCO Mexican Bar & Grill, and more. The food hall concept will fill the 22,000 square feet of the former Jillian’s site with stalls and shops featuring local eateries and local food retailers—20 culinary concepts and two bars are on tap for the opening. There will be a shared seating area, which 36 | midtownmag.com

//

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MORGAN STREET FOOD HALL

means at any given meal you can meet friends or family for pizza, sushi, curry, tacos, and smoothies—and find it all underneath one roof. “I describe it as a collaborative interaction between the guest and the food vendors,” says James Sauls, general manager of Morgan Street Food Hall. “It’s not just about getting food, it’s actually watching someone prepare your food and having front-line folks—or even a chef in an open kitchen—interact with you, and that makes it a unique experience.” Restaurant marketing experts say the food hall concept appeals to chefs because they can take more risks and experiment with tastes and ingredients without the boundaries of a brick-andmortar concept. Menus can change, dishes can rotate, and the focus can be on the food instead of on front-of-the-house

issues like hosts and servers. At Morgan Street Food Hall, management will handle the shared dining space and is responsible for the liquor license.

Vendor Variety There isn’t much menu duplication among the vendors setting up shop in the food hall. “We asked for menus in the beginning, and that was very intentional so that we didn’t have overlapping concepts,” Sauls says. “But we want their menus to grow and morph over time, while still providing the staples that people expect from these vendors.” When the Food Hall opens, expect to find Bella’s Wood Fired Pizza and Tapas; Makus Empanadas, featuring authentic Argentinian empanda recipes; Cow Bar, a


handcrafted artisan burger enclave by Chef Dan Yeager; Iyla’s Southern Kitchen; local favorites Sasool and Raleigh Raw; and Hook & Cleaver, a boutique butcher and fresh food market. Four of the area’s most popular food trucks will also be setting up permanent space in the food hall: Cocoa Forte, Cousins Maine Lobster, Curry in a Hurry, and Oak City Fish and Chips. After hearing Hibernian’s Niall Hanley give a presentation about his food hall plans, Deb Keller, owner/operator of the Cousins Maine Lobster franchise in the Triangle, introduced herself, handed him her business card, and went home with visions of food halls dancing in her head. “I couldn’t get it out of my brain,” Keller says. “I told my husband about it and intuition just said: ‘Let’s go for this.’” She went to the Cousins founders, and they agreed it was a great fit. In addition to the items customers seek from the Cousins Maine Lobster trucks, there will be two new offerings on the food hall menu—a lobster BLT and a harvest green salad, which can be served with or without lobster. “The salad has butternut squash, goat cheese, cranberries, and hazelnuts—and it is just crazy delicious,” Keller says. Two bars will round out the tenant mix when the food hall opens: The Arbor includes both indoor and

outdoor patios, and Auntie Betty’s promises a quaint gin and cocktail setting.

Casual and Communal Food halls fill a unique niche by offering quick and sophisticated dining in a casual setting. With common seating areas, a patio, and two bars, the dining experience becomes very social and interactive. “Our expectation from the guests is that they’ll move over and make friends,” Sauls says. “If you’re at a four-top and there’s two of you, there is an expectation that someone will sit down with you.” In the urban centers where food halls originated— places like New York City, San Francisco, and Washington, D.C.—food halls have become prime gathering spots. A similar scenario will likely play out in Raleigh, where the Morgan Street Food Hall’s neighbor is going to be The Dillon, a mixed-use city block in the Warehouse District that will include an 18-story office tower with retail space and two six-story apartment buildings. The Warehouse District is emerging as one of Raleigh’s most vibrant and exciting neighborhoods. And, thanks to the Morgan Street Food Hall, it will also be loaded with good taste.

Another Food Hall by Autumn In downtown Raleigh’s Olde East neighborhood, the Transfer Co. Food Hall expects to open later this summer with 42,800 square feet dedicated to its tenants. This food hall is being developed inside the historic Carolina Coach Garage & Shop. Tenants will include Che Empanadas, Boulted Bread and Jubala Coffee, Locals Seafood, Saxapahaw General Store, and Videri Chocolate Factory. Transfer Co. Food Hall will be located at 500 East Davie Street.

TRANSFERCOFOODHALL.COM 38 | midtownmag.com


candid conversation MALINOWSKI RAPPELLING DOWN THE CAPITAL BANK PLAZA BUILDING FOR THE #NEWHEIGHTS EVENT IN EARLY JUNE.

Uplifting Music KURT DUSTERBERG PHOTOS COURTESY OF K I D Z N O T E S BY

Kidznotes is changing children’s lives across the Triangle. Nick Malinowski makes music appear in places where you would least expect it. He is a trained opera singer, but his real passion is bringing music to children. Malinowski is the executive director of Kidznotes, an intense afterschool music program offered at 11 elementary schools in low-income communities in Raleigh and Durham. The idea is unique: The kids are taught to play classical music, which requires discipline, teamwork,

40 | midtownmag.com

and intrinsic motivation—traits that can enhance academic performance. Currently, the program has 440 students, with plans to expand to Chapel Hill next year. Raised in High Point, Malinowski followed an interesting path before finding his way home to North Carolina with his wife, Julia, and their 21-month-old son, James. Today, he can’t imagine a better life than creating bright futures, one violin at a time.


TOP: NICK AND THE KIDZ WITH VIVIAN HOWARD AT THE SEASON 5 PREMIER OF A CHEF’S LIFE. BOTTOM: MARCUS (ONE OF KIDZNOTES’ MOST TENURED STUDENTS) AT THE GALA.

How long do students participate in Kidznotes? Our oldest kids are going into 10th grade; these are kids who started with us in first grade. Kids are encouraged to stay for all 12 years of school. Some students choose to pursue other things in middle school, but we try really hard to make the program interesting and compelling for kids of all ages. As the executive director, what is your role? Setting and implementing a vision and a strategic plan for the organization. The biggest part of that is implementing an ambitious growth plan that we’ve named “Kidznotes 2020,” which [expects to] grow our student enrollment to 850 students in the next three years. That includes making sure we have the infrastructure, the staff, and the support in place to make it successful, and then going out and raising the funds to make it possible. I love talking about what we do. There’s a genuine passion behind it, so I have no problem trying to get a person to invest their time, talent, or treasure in this mission, because it’s important. We spend about $2,500 per student per year. With that, a student gets a high-quality instrument and about 400 hours of instruction. What do you ultimately hope to accomplish for the kids who come through the program?

Midtown: Kidznotes is described as a “music for social change” program. What does that mean? Malinowski: We give students the opportunity to come together and make music in a group setting, and make really challenging, interesting, and beautiful music. We’re doing this for students who wouldn’t otherwise have the opportunity. We do it because the creation of music in an ensemble is not only a microcosm of a well-functioning society, but also it’s a tool to create that society. You’re working with young kids who have no musical training, in a setting where there is considerable expense. How do you make that work? No student pays a dollar to be in Kidznotes. It’s complete open access with really high rigor. A lot of what we do is built on a foundation of what students already have. The first year of the Kidznotes program is a lot of general music, like singing and movement, [skills] that kids already have a natural ability to do. Every student gets a violin, and it’s incredible to see a 5-year-old student with a violin in his or her hands for the first time. Our kids actually start with cardboard violins, so they’re learning how to hold the instrument and take care of it. We introduce the violin and sightreading over time, so it doesn’t seem overwhelming to a 5-year-old.

Our goal is not to make professional musicians. If students want to pursue that, we set them up for success in that regard. But we’re trying to help students prove what is possible within their own lives, and help them become the best people and citizens they can be. How did you get involved? We moved home to North Carolina when my wife and I were starting a family. I’m an opera singer by training, and I was in the education department at Seattle Opera. I was leading the program for another nonprofit here in the Triangle, and this opportunity for Kidznotes came along. It really spoke to me. I had never come across an opportunity that was a more perfect mix of my passion and experience, and that served a community that I care deeply about. You have an interesting educational background. You went to a small school in Iowa, Grinnell College. You studied classical voice, but you were also a 1,000-point scorer in basketball, which is a big accomplishment. I played for the highest-scoring team in the history of basketball. We had strange positions. My position was called ‘preferred shooter.’

midtownmag.com | 41


It was essentially a small forward. I missed almost all of my junior year with an ACL injury, so I think I would have been closer to 1,500 points. I was really fortunate to plug into a system that took advantage of what I do well. I was a really good 3-point shooter. You don’t see a lot of basketball stars who are opera singers. The most fun thing I did was singing the national anthem in my basketball uniform before every home game. You’re trying to be tough and intimidating, then getting up in your uniform and singing to the entire gym. It was fun, and no one ever gave me a hard time about it from the opposing team. In four years, we only lost one game at which I sang the national anthem, so I feel pretty good about that. Did you go on to sing professionally? I like to tell people I have come to my career because of a tonsillectomy. My senior year, I was set to audition for graduate schools in voice, then I had a series of debilitating throat infections. I had to have my tonsils taken out. I couldn’t audition for graduate schools right away, and I had to find something else to do once I graduated. I taught in second grade in Arkansas for two years, then I went back to graduate school in New York City and studied voice there, but I really missed teaching and working with students. I had an opportunity to go back to Helena, Arkansas, and start a music program from scratch at a charter school. The music program consisted of one choir of eight students. When I left five years later, we had three choirs, a music theater program, a marching band, and more. It sounds like music is who you are, as well as what compels you professionally. And serving people who otherwise wouldn’t have the opportunity to access it. I am working with the most gifted and talented people in the world. The only thing they lack are resources and access. Nothing makes me feel more fulfilled—or feels like more important work—than giving access to people who deserve it and are ready to jump at the chance. 42 | midtownmag.com


2017

DIAMOND

AWARD BEST DENTIST


giving back

A Season for Sharing URBAN MINISTRIES OF WAKE COUNTY SERVES NEEDY NEIGHBORS YEAR-ROUND, BUT DONATIONS ARE IN SHORTER SUPPLY IN THE SUMMER. BY CAROL WILLS // PHOTOS BY RICH COX

It was the winter of 1981 when two homeless men in our area died as a result of hypothermia. This tragic circumstance was the impetus for people who were concerned about the plight of homeless people to form Urban Ministries of Raleigh. Initially, the founders of Urban Ministries met in the basement of Edenton Street United Methodist Church. Since then, the organization has acquired partners of many denominations and groups—and today the organization, now known as Urban

44 | midtownmag.com

Ministries of Wake County, is a thriving community of 40 paid staff and more than 1,300 volunteers. The positive impact of Urban Ministries’ outreach is widespread and meaningful: Through its welcoming food pantry, the nonprofit provides groceries to last a full week for as many as 50 families each weekday. Last year, its volunteers distributed 270 tons of food. However, more food and more volunteers are always needed—especially during the summer months when donations and volunteer

availability are reduced because of vacations and distracted schedules. Last year, Urban Ministries’ food pantry became the largest client-choice pantry in Wake County. Previously, clients of the pantry had been given packages of food that were assembled by volunteers, but there were problems with that arrangement, since it didn’t take into account the recipients’ food preferences. Now, with the free-choice system in the food pantry, individuals and families experiencing food insecurity can select whatever they


For over 450 families, We’ve Helped Make home possible. Habitat for Humanity is a registered trademark of Habitat for Humanity International, Inc. Ply Gem, the Ply Gem logo and Home For Good are trademarks of Ply Gem Industries, Inc.

As the trusted leader in home exterior building solutions, Ply Gem creates products that make homes beautiful. From windows and siding to shingles and shutters, we have something for every style and budget. And we believe everyone deserves a place they love to call home.

We’ve teamed up with country music’s biggest stars and Habitat for Humanity® to help build over 450 homes in 70 communities with families in need of affordable housing. This year, Brett Young, Triple Platinum Artist, is joining us to revitalize neighborhoods here in the Triangle.

Together, we’re making an impact in Raleigh. See the stories, photos and videos at HomeForGoodproject.com

S I DI N G + ACCE S SO R I E S | WI N DOWS + DOO RS | S TO N E VE N E E R | TR I M + M O U LDI N G S | FE N CE + R AI LI N G | ROO FI N G


want to eat from the open shelves. Chill-and-fill tables offer choices of fresh produce and frozen meat, and about 40 percent of the food that families select at the food pantry are taken from these tables. It provides an opportunity for the clients to eat healthier, fresher meals, and giving people a choice has also eliminated waste, since people can select the foods they really like. The self-service pantry—open Monday through Friday, from 9 am to 12:30 pm—is staffed by one employee and eight to 10 volunteers and provides a resource where its guests are welcome and maintain the dignity of independent shopping. The face-to-face interactions create an opportunity for friendly conversations and an exchange of recipes. In addition, there are gardens outside, created and maintained by several retired men—some of them medical volunteers, who periodically exchange their white coats for overalls, the better to dig, plant, and weed. Providing healthy food is especially important in the summer when children who typically receive free or reducedprice meals at school don’t have that food resource. Another need that Urban Ministries is meeting is providing free medical care for nearly 2,000 patients each year. The Open Door Clinic is staffed by volunteer doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and lab techs. Patients can be referred to specialists at no charge, thanks

Urban Ministries of Wake County: Neighbors Served in 2017 32,528 30,630 1,579 319

People in Wake County served by Urban Ministries People served by the Crisis: Hunger and Nutrition Program People served by the Open Door Clinic People served by the Helen Wright Center

To make a donation, visit UrbanMin.org/donate. To become one of the more than 1,300 volunteers who are working with Urban Ministries of Wake County, please download a volunteer application at UrbanMin.org/volunteer and return it to the Manager of Volunteer Services at volunteer@urbanmin.org.

46 | midtownmag.com


3623 Rolston Drive • Listed at $1,050,000

From Downtown’s vibrant City Center to desirable Inside the Beltline neighborhoods, to Raleigh’s Midtown, Glenwood Agency is here to assist you in the home selling or buying process! Our team looks towards to being your source of assistance in finding your dream oasis, like this stunning new home!

BUY • SELL • RENT This one-of-a-kind luxury home boasts upgrades galore; wine cellar, coffered ceilings, built-ins & more. Chef’s kitchen, impressive spaces for entertaining including exquisite outdoor patio, grill, pergola & fireplace.

glenwoodagency.com • 919-828-0077 cabelldtr@glenwoodagency.com

midtownmag.com | 47


to community partnerships, and in-house mental health counseling is also available. Lab work is done on-site at Urban Ministries, and Duke Raleigh Hospital serves as the partner for processing lab results. In addition, the Open Door Clinic remains the only free and charitable clinic in Wake County with an onsite, fully licensed pharmacy, which provides assistance and guidance to people who need help in staying on their medications—a vital service when it enables those individuals to maintain their jobs and keep their families together. The clinic serves people with low incomes and no insurance, a growing population where the need is so acute that there is a long waiting list for people with health problems. Medical referrals help serve the needs of patients who are seriously or chronically ill. WakeMed partners with the organization to help individuals who visit emergency rooms frequently to find help for chronic disease management. Urban Ministries also provides safe shelter in the Helen Wright Center for Women, which serves women over 18 years of age, without children in their custody, who are in need of a place to stay. The center, which can accommodate as many as 36 women each night, provides warm food and genuine care. Twenty-four beds are dedicated for emergency shelter, where women can stay for up to two weeks while caseworkers help them connect with services in the community. The remaining beds are for women who are involved in Urban Ministries’ three-month program that aids them in saving money to be able to move into appropriate housing. Another partner, Wake Tech, sends instructors to teach the women skills such as interviewing techniques, résumé writing, and budgeting for expenses. Congregational and civic groups also provide games and activities to help the women—many of whom are victims of domestic violence— find outlets to relax and have fun. Urban Ministries’ Helen Wright Center program has a 68 percent success rate in helping its guests leave with a lease and move forward in their lives. 48 | midtownmag.com


E D E N K N O WS B R E A S T

I M P L A N T S

I am so honored to have been named “ ‘A Woman’s Most Trusted Source on Breast Implants.’ (Thank you, ladies!!)

To help you see what breast augmentation is really like, I’d love to invite you to watch my documentary at: EdenKnowsImplants.com!

— Much love — Jenny Eden

midtownmag.com | 49


chef ’s table

Raleigh’s

Nod to

New

Orleans

Cocktails and community are always in season at Hummingbird.

ALEX DIXON PHOTOGRAPHY BY J O E R E A L E BY

50 | midtownmag.com


I F Y O U ’ V E E V E R WA N T E D A C O F F E E C O C K TA I L W I T H Y O U R B U T T E R S C O T C H S T I C K Y B U N O N A W E E K D AY M O R N I N G , L O O K N O F U RT H E R THAN RALEIGH’S NEW ORLEANS–INSPIRED CAFÉ, HUMMINGBIRD. With menu items like oyster or shrimp po’boys, and classic muffulettas paired with creative cocktails that change seasonally, Hummingbird showcases owner and chef Coleen Speaks’ roots. The restaurant and cocktail bar opened in late 2017 in the Dock 1053 warehouse, and is one of the latest additions in a trio of offerings from Speaks, who started her cooking career at Emeril Lagasse’s NOLA restaurant. Since moving to Raleigh 18 years ago, Speaks has created a successful catering company called PoshNosh, in addition to her events space, Whitaker & Atlantic, which is next door to Hummingbird. “The timing prior to opening Hummingbird [opportunity] wasn’t there,” Speaks says. But throughout her time in Raleigh, she saw increased opportunity given the area’s rapid growth, particularly when it came to dining. In developing the concept for her café, Speaks says she didn’t want either the food or the cocktails to steal the show—rather, she wanted them to work together. The result is a breakfast menu that flows into lunch, then transitions seamlessly into a small plates menu for dinner—with items like togarashi-seasoned popcorn and brandied pâté. It’s all served over the course of a 16-hour day that extends from 8am to 12am. “There’s a reason not many people do these long service hours,” Speaks notes, “because it is really challenging. But I think our menu has been designed and developed in a way that helps it work.” And regardless of whether you visit at 8am or midnight, the cocktails are always available. “I’m trying to promote the cocktails all day long—that may be one of the more [classic] New Orleans features,” Speaks adds. Hummingbird recently unveiled its new summer cocktail menu, featuring selections like the “I Hate to See You Leaf,” a creamy egg white drink with rum and passionfruit, and the “Kiss from a Rose,” a smoky cocktail that utilizes strawberry-peppercorn–infused Mezcal and a spicy habanero shrub. In every serving, Hummingbird places an emphasis on appearance. “Aesthetic is

very important to me, and I think my New Orleans experiences and time there helped develop my attention to it,” Speaks says. This attention to detail isn’t just apparent in the cocktails—it carries over to the space where they’re served, as well. The bar has 12 bright yellow stools, and an adjacent Portrait Room allows customers to sit at café tables. As the temperature rises, Hummingbird has also opened its outdoor patio to customers. “Lighting and design are all part of the dining experience,” Speaks notes. “People want to go to a place that’s happy, with

good energy, and a pretty [setting]. I put a lot of thought into that.” The café strives to be a melting pot that is welcoming to everyone, highlighting these values in a mission statement front and center on its website. “Community is important to me, but really, it’s important to everyone,” Speaks says. “We all have to live here, and I was raised to have mutual respect for everyone and accept everyone for who they are. Raleigh is a great place to have this community because there are so many people moving here daily, bringing new talents and ideas.”

COLEEN SPEAKS, OWNER AND CHEF OF HUMMINGBIRD

midtownmag.com | 51


chef ’s table

Courtesy of Chef Coleen Speaks

Shrimp Dip

1 pound peeled, deveined,

poached shrimp

4 oz softened cream cheese ¼ cup sour cream

or crème fraîche

¼ cup heavy cream 2 Tbsp mayonnaise 2 Tbsp lemon juice 2 Tbsp seafood seasoning 2 Tbsp chives, chopped 1 lemon, zested 1 tsp sea salt

1) Place poached shrimp into food processor and pulse (in batches) until shrimp is chopped but still chunky. 2) In a large steel bowl with a heavy whisk, beat together cream cheese, mayonnaise, and sour cream until smooth. 3) Whisk in lemon zest and juice, heavy cream, and seasonings. 4) Fold in chopped shrimp and chives until thoroughly combined. 5) Chill before serving and serve with potato chips.

52 | midtownmag.com


midtownmag.com | 53


minding your business

MARTA OLSZEWSKA, OWNER OF POLONEZ POLISH MARKET, BELIEVES THE KITCHEN IS THE HEART OF THE HOME.

CUS

Flavors from Afar

AUTHENTIC EASTERN EUROPEAN FOODS CAN BE FOUND IN RALEIGH AT THE POLONEZ POLISH MARKET. BY CHERYL CAPALDO TRAYLOR // PHOTOS BY MICK SCHULTE PHOTOGRAPHY

OF THE MORE THAN 23,000 NEW residents who came to Wake County in the last year, the U.S. Census Bureau reports that 18 percent were relocating from other countries. For many, coming to America meant leaving behind the traditional foods of their native lands. Marta Olszewska remembers how that felt. When she moved to Cary from Bydgoszcz City, Poland, in 2001, one of the things she missed most were favorite ingredients and dishes from her homeland. She eventually found them at Polonez Polish Market in northeast Raleigh. She began working there and—when the owners decided to close the shop and move back to Poland in 2010—she decided to buy it 54 | midtownmag.com

and keep the shop running, although she was only 26 years old at the time. “This is comfort food for many people. It gives you that little piece that you are missing from home. It’s kind of a cure for homesickness,” Olszewska explains, adding that many shoppers experience a sense of nostalgia when they walk into Polonez. Polonez comes from the French word for Polish, Polonaise, and is one of the national dances of Poland. While customers won’t find dancing at Polonez Market, they will find a wide selection of European specialty groceries. In addition to Polish foods, the store sells items from about a dozen other countries, including Bulgaria, Romania, and Russia. Many

Eastern European cuisines overlap, and although the names and recipes vary with each country, they are often quite similar. Olszewska wants Polonez to be a place that brings people together. “Food connects us,” she says. “This store is here to unite us, not to divide us into cultures.” She believes the kitchen is the heart of the home, so it is important to sell products that families can easily make into a homemade meal. Shoppers will find a variety of goods including soup mixes, pickled vegetables, and various pastas and grains. Visitors are always pleasantly surprised to see a huge variety of Polish pickles and entire shelves devoted to krauts. The store’s two bestsellers are the


f u r n i s h

8 7 2 4 G L E N W OO D AV E N U E R A L E I G H , N C 9 1 9 . 6 7 0 . 4 4 0 0 // F U R N I S H N C . C O M

C U S TO M F U R N I T U R E F O R L I V I N G , BE D RO O M , D I N I N G , OFFICE, ENTERTAINMENT & OUTDOOR

plu s RU G S , A RT, AC C E S S O R I E S , LIGHTING, + WA L L C OV E R I N G S

C O M P L I M E N TA RY I N T E R I O R D E S IG N S E RV IC E S

N OW O P E N… U R BA N G A R D E N S BY F U R N I S H !

I N S TAG R A M @FURNISHRALEIGH FAC E B O O K @FURNISHNC


THE POPULAR DELI SELECTIONS AT POLONEZ POLISH MARKET CHANGE FREQUENTLY, PROVIDING CUSTOMERS WITH CHEESES, SAUSAGES, AND OTHER SPECIALTY MEATS THAT ARE HARD TO FIND ANYWHERE ELSE.

fresh sausages and the frozen pierogies that come with an assortment of fillings, among them cabbage, cheese, potato, and fruits. The popular deli selections change frequently, providing customers with cheeses, sausages, and other specialty meats that are hard to find anywhere else. Freezers packed with babkas, cakes, crepes, nut rolls, and strudels line the back wall near the checkout counter, assuring that customers don’t leave without buying dessert. Thursdays are bakery delivery day, and the aroma of fresh-baked items wafts throughout the store. Looking ahead, Olszewska would like to add a beer and wine section, but that would require a larger space and moving is not in Polonez’s near future. For now, she plans to experiment with a delivery service in a limited area, and her greatest satisfaction is in the positive experiences she creates for her customers. A woman with her hands full of grocery bags walks towards the

56 | midtownmag.com

door— Olszewska automatically moves to open it for her and thanks her for coming in. The most satisfying part of owning her business is watching a customer walk out with a smile. “I feel like I did something to make others happy, even if it seems like only a very small thing,” she says, adding that there is never a boring day at the store as there is so much work to do, and interesting people are always coming in. She enjoys talking to them and learning more about their traditions and cultures. Demonstrating generosity and the importance of unity, Olszewska mentions the other family-owned ethnic businesses in the Spring Forest Square Shopping Center, including African, Caribbean, Jamaican, and Latino restaurants and shops. She says all of the shop owners and store employees share a special relationship, one that she describes as being almost like family. “We chat outside, help each other, and look after one another,” she says.

POLONEZ POLISH MARKET

is located in Raleigh at 5440 Atlantic Springs Road, Suite 103, in the Spring Forest Square Shopping Center.

Visit PolishMarketNC.com for more information.


The Montessori School of Raleigh is an authorized IB World School and will oer the IB Diploma Program beginning in the fall of the 2018 school year!

Visit msr.org today! 18 months to 12th grade

midtownmag.com | 57


RUHAMA WOLLE, OUR FASHION AND STYLE WRITER, BEGAN AS AN INTERN WHEN SHE ARRIVED IN TOWN FROM LOS ANGELES. NOW A FULL-TIME N.C. STATE STUDENT, RU IS A REGULAR CONTRIBUTOR TO OUR EDITORIAL CONTENT.

“An easy off-theface look using twostrand Dutch braids in sections on each side, which gives her thick curly hair an elongated look. Her make up, also professionally done, uses earthy neutrals and a pop of copper to brighten her deep complexion.”

Von Kekel STYLIST // JANINE

4209 LASSITER MILL ROAD #114 VONKEKELSALONSPA.COM

SUMMER LOOKS for Longer HAIR BY

RUHAMA WOLLE

//

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

JOE REALE

WITH SPECIAL THANKS TO KAT HARDING AND NCMA

Local stylists make summer hair easy and fashionable for members of Midtown magazine’s team. 58 | midtownmag.com


Ah, the season of sun is back. A time of outdoor fun full of sun, sand, and sweat. Okay, obviously not the last one, but it is the inevitable price of summer’s heat and humidity. And how difficult is it to appreciate a summer cookout when your hair feels all sweaty and messy? No worries: Summer styles are trending cool, even for longer locks. You can simply strap on a few extra hair bands and then, stress not, as we’ve got some easy fixes for you. You might not even have to resort to the big chop.

EARRINGS // KANNON’S CLOTHING $24

BRITTANY MURDOCK STARTED CREATING ONLINE BUZZ AS OUR INTERN, FINISHING UP HER DEGREE AT UNC–WILMINGTON. NOW, SHE’S OUR SOCIAL MEDIA AND MARKETING COORDINATOR. SHE LIVES IN CARY, AND BRINGS JUST THE RIGHT BLEND OF NEW YORK SPUNK (LONG ISLAND WAS HER CHILDHOOD HOME) AND SOUTHERN CHARM.

Salon Blu STYLIST // DORIS

141-108 PARK AT NORTH HILLS STREET SALONBLUHAIR.COM

“Side waterfall braid with HALOCOUTURE Extensions to give this look more volume and length.” midtownmag.com | 59


AMY TUCKER RECENTLY CAME ON BOARD AS OUR JUNIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE, HAVING GRADUATED FROM N.C. STATE EARLIER THIS YEAR. SHE’S MAKING RALEIGH HER HOME AFTER GROWING UP NEARBY IN SANFORD.

Let’s try three simple styles to keep you looking fresh and fashionable in the summer, without embarking on a major hair makeover: The ponytail never goes out of style, but it is about time we make the everyday style feel updated. Try a polished, low ponytail as the staple look this summer, and add a French braid at the root or finish the sleek look with a fishtail at the end. Another way to get every stray piece of hair tucked away is with braids. Try a double Frenchbraided bun, with an accessory to complete the look. Leave a few loose strands in the front for a wispy effect.

Robledo Studio HAIR AND MAKEUP BY

STYLIST // RODNEY 8321 BANFORD WAY, SUITE 103 ROBLEDOSTUDIO.COM

“Loose, natural curls are in style this summer— the more organic the better. I added a loose braid on the top to create some volume and still give her that modern touch, since messy braids are also in style this year. The makeup is fresh and natural, with some pink and gold tones, to enhance her natural beauty.” 60 | midtownmag.com


LORI LAY, CREATIVE DIRECTOR, IS IN HER FOURTH YEAR AT MIDTOWN AND CARY LIVING MAGAZINES AND LIVES IN NORTH RALEIGH, JUST DOWN THE ROAD FROM HER HOMETOWN ROOTS IN CREEDMOOR.

And for all you naturally curly and wavy-haired beauties, a half up, half down hairstyle is an effortless look that can be paired with any cute summer dress. It’s the perfect look when you want it out of your face, but still want the length. And remember: It’s time to send your hair straightener on vacation, because you just can’t live with those hot tools when it is this sweltering outside. Experiment with your individuality and your hair’s natural texture. Whether you’re seeking a dramatic new look or just a tweak to freshen up your image, try one of our styles to help you beat the heat this summer!

PLUM Hair Atelier STYLIST // PAIGE

1028 OBERLIN ROAD #228 PLUMHAIRATELIER.COM

“I created this summer look by mixing textures. Think braids, curls, crimping, or teasing—adding multiple layers of texture makes any hairstyle look effortless. And summer is for accessorizing, so add a little glitter, beads, rings, or colorful thread to make your summer look stand out.” midtownmag.com | 61


EARRINGS // SWAGGER BOUTIQUE $24

MADDI BLANCHARD, ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE, JOINED OUR TEAM EARLIER THIS YEAR AFTER WORKING WITH PUBLICATIONS ALONG THE OUTER BANKS AND, PRIOR TO THAT, IN THE U.K., WHERE SHE WAS BORN AND RAISED. SHE’S SHOWN US ALL: BRITISH ACCENTS TOP SOUTHERN, NO MATTER WHAT YOU SAY.

Triniti Salon STYLISTS // SHARON AND LIZ 1061 DARRINGTON DRIVE, CARY TRINITISALON.COM

“Effortless summer up-dos can be achieved with a few tricks from the experts. Braids, ponytails, and headbands make fashion easy.”

JENNIFER HEINSER, GRAPHIC DESIGNER, COMES TO US BY WAY OF LONG ISLAND AND LIVES IN WESTERN WAKE, GIVING HER A HOMETOWN ADVANTAGE AS SHE’S DESIGNING THE PAGES OF OUR SISTER PUBLICATION CARY LIVING.

62 | midtownmag.com


Celebrate your Independence with Our July Specials!

Salon

Celebrate by giving your hair freedom from FRIZZ.

$25 off all Keratin Express and $35 off full keratin treatments. 20% off all Keratin safe products this month.

Jbat

(RenĂŠ Furterer and Brazilian Blowout)

50% off all Jbat clothing and shoes (North Raleigh)

Your Beauty Defined 6325-27 Falls of Neuse Rd 919.876.5411

301 Glenwood Ave Suite 130 919.836.0083

douglascarrollsalon.com


foodie focus IYLA’S SOUTHERN KITCHEN; PHOTO COURTESY OF MORGAN STREET FOOD HALL.

COMING

TO

TRIANGLE

COMMUNITIES:

Come Hungry! TRIANGLE RESTAURANT NEWS BY SEAN LENNARD, TRIANGLE FOOD GUY, TRIANGLEFOODBLOG.COM

June Openings in Raleigh: Viva Chicken opened in the former McAlister’s Deli space in North Hills. An authentic Peruvian rotisserie chicken joint that started in Charlotte, Viva is known for its Pollo a la Brasa. Caretta Coffee opened in North Raleigh, next to The Hop Yard in the Falls River Town Center at 1141 Falls River Avenue. They serve coffee, breakfast and lunch frittatas, fresh baked goods, smash toast, and smoothies. Their original location is in Hilton Head, South Carolina. Also last month: Sean Degnan and Tony Hopkins of bu•ku in downtown Raleigh (and bu•ku in Wake Forest and so•ca in Cameron Village) announced that, at the end of their lease in December, they will move bu•ku into the former AN spot off Cary’s Harrison Avenue, across from the SAS campus. On the heels (pun intended) of the opening of the Triangle’s first food hall over in Chapel Hill (Blue Dogwood Public Market

opened in early June), the Morgan Street Food Hall in downtown Raleigh announced an opening date of July 23rd. The spot will feature more than 20 culinary options. Also by the end of July, Lola’s Cantina will be serving up street tacos, elote, and more in Raleigh’s Five Points. It will be located next door to Third Place coffee shop. David Harris, who owns Remington Grille and Amedeo’s, has purchased Sammy’s Tap and Grill, located at 2235 Avent Ferry Road. He says the menu will be getting new additions including a veggie burger, but don’t expect the popular wings and beef burgers to go away. Work is now underway on The Davie Street Pub, which will go into the former Calavera Empanadas space at the corner of Blount and Davie on the ground floor of the Palladium Plaza condos. The new pub will reportedly open later this summer.

Up in Wake Forest, there is a sign at the corner of Capital Boulevard and Stadium Drive for the first Triangle-area location of Showmars. The brand, which has 29 locations in and around Charlotte and neighboring South Carolina, is a fast-casual concept featuring a blend of Greek and Southern dishes. No word on a timeline. Over in Cary, The Neighborhood Sports Bar and Arcade is coming to the old Train Station Bar & Grill location at 301 North Harrison Avenue. They are working towards a July 4th opening. Coming in August to Apex: The folks with The Mason Jar Tavern and The Mason Jar Lager Company announced that they have teamed up with Jeff and Meredith Kromenhoek to open Scratch Kitchen and Taproom at 225 Salem Street in the former Blistered Pig / Cantina 2 Twenty Five space. Holly Springs will welcome Sir Walter Coffee into the Town Hall Commons; it will open sometime in 2019. In addition to their coffee and tea, breakfast, light lunch, and all-day snacks will be served.

Sean Lennard has been catering in the Triangle for more than 15 years, and his blog is a go-to foodie hotspot. He taps into local restaurant partners and his online catering business, Triangle Food Guy, serves events of all sizes. Check out TriangleFoodBlog.com for weekly news.

64 | midtownmag.com


2018

DIAMOND

AWARD

2017

BEST STEAKHOUSE

DIAMOND

AWARD BEST STEAKHOUSE

midtownmag.com | 65


home styler

STYLED BY VALERIE TROUPE VALERIETROUPE.COM

Local

PHOTOS BY F8 PHOTO STUDIOS F8PHOTOSTUDIOS.COM

MEETS

Global

A WORLD TOUR IN YOUR OWN HOME

Ahhh ... summertime. Time for vacations and relaxation. A trip to the islands can be just the thing to recharge your batteries. Riding a train on a tour of Europe is exciting and full of adventure. Climbing the Great Wall of China and taking in the view can give you perspective. Memories are the best keepsakes, but we can have subtle reminders of our travels and faraway places through items in our home. Place a comfy chair with an island print in your sunroom, along with some tropical plants and a Japanese water fountain. A hand-painted porcelain box on your dresser, with lavender-scented candles and soaps in your bathroom, takes you straight to Provence, France. Take a nap on sofa pillows with printed Chinese dragons, and dream of nights in Hong Kong. An old English butter dish on the dining room table will be perfect for teatime. Follow your own design compass and find ways to sprinkle items from all over the world around your home. “Though we travel the world over to find the beautiful, we must carry it with us or we find it not.” — Henry David Thoreau

1 (1) 630 chair in Seaspray, $789; DEXTER FURNITURE 8411 GLENWOOD AVE #101; DEXTERFURNITURE.COM

66 | midtownmag.com


2

3

4

(2) Lollia by Margot Elena; candles $34, shower gel $22, perfume $55; NOFO @ THE PIG 2014 FAIRVIEW RD; NOFO.COM (3) Oval hand painted porcelain box with 14k gold trim $35; REVIVAL ANTIQUES 1505 CAPITAL BLVD #14; REVIVAL-ANTIQUES.COM (4) Chester sofa by Norwalk Upholstery shown in Stallone top grain leather $5,861; Riley ottoman by Norwalk Upholstery shown in Stargo top grain leather $1,451; Traditions hand-knotted rug from Jaunty Rugs $2,972; Fable pillows in Granite $210; FURNISH 8724 GLENWOOD AVE; FURNISHNC.COM midtownmag.com | 67


home styler

5

6

(5) Calligaris Status 98.5"W dark oak dining table $3,887; Calligaris Romy Chair $435 each; Calligaris Gava rug $1,220; AMBIENTE MODERN FURNITURE 3915 BERYL RD; AMBIENTEFURNITURE.COM (6) Mud Pie Door Knob butter dish $28; SWAGGER BOUTIQUE 5011 D FALLS OF NEUSE RD; SWAGGERGIFTS.COM (7) Windsor round coffee table - 48"W x 48"D x 18"H; the global design of the Windsor console and round table reflect the arches of Windsor Castle. Shown in Old World White; STEVEN SHELL LIVING 2030 CLARK AVE; STEVENSHELLLIVING.COM

7

68 | midtownmag.com


2018

DIAMOND

AWARD

midtownmag.com BEST REAL ESTATE AGENT| 69


tastes of the city

BY ASHLEY AND ANDREW

@RALEIGHFOODPICS

1

2 5

3

4

(1) BULKOGI FOOD TRUCK; Bibimbap: white rice, sesame oil, fresh arugula, sautéed zucchini, sautéed carrots, pickled daikon radish, seasoned blenched bean sprouts, eggs and sesame seed, served with a side of gochujang (pepper paste sauce) (2) VIDRIO; Moroccan Beef Skewers with harissa Greek yogurt (3) COQUETTE; Quiche Lorraine: bacon, ham, and caramelized onions, served with a petite mesclun salad (4) HUMMINGBIRD; Reuben with pastrami, kimchi, spicy Thousand Island dressing, and Swiss, served on rye (5) TASU BRIER CREEK; Pad Thai: rice noodles, scallions, bean sprouts, egg, roasted peanuts, Thai chili, and lime

Contact Raleigh Food Pics to be featured on their Instagram feed: Raleighfoodpics@gmail.com 70 | midtownmag.com


Healthy

BY

ALEX DIXON

Dining HEART THE

FROM

Kardia Café HOUSE SALAD WITH PICKLED ONIONS, OLIVES, FETA, ROASTED TOMATO SERVED WITH HOUSE TOMATO CAPER VINAIGRETTE AND CHOICE OF PROTEIN (SALMON PICTURED).

72 | midtownmag.com

Located in the Heart and Vascular Hospital at UNC REX Healthcare, Raleigh Open 7 AM to 7 PM, Monday through Friday


YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE A PATIENT TO PARTAKE OF UNC REX HEALTHCARE’S FRESH MEDITERRANEAN-INSPIRED CAFÉ.

A

classically trained team of chefs is putting heart into the food served at the restaurant located in UNC REX Healthcare’s North Carolina Heart and Vascular Hospital. Kardia Café—named after the Greek word for heart—has been serving fresh Mediterranean-inspired food to patients, their families, and hospital staff for the past year. Café staff chose a Mediterranean concept because of the cuisine’s emphasis on heart-healthy foods like fresh fruits and vegetables, seeds, nuts, and whole grains. There aren’t many restaurants inside hospitals across the nation, so Kardia is a novel approach, says Chef James Castellow, one of Kardia’s founding team members and the former executive chef of North Raleigh’s

Zest Cafe & Home Art. “The whole department pioneered this, and the hospital was behind that happening,” he says. Kardia is one of the newer efforts UNC REX has made toward keeping patients healthier in all aspects of life. In 2012, UNC REX removed its fryers, and the chefs there have always focused on healthy food. But the addition of Kardia in 2017 gave the team the opportunity to take this food to the next level, with items like a bright and tangy take on chicken salad with capers, dried cranberries, and golden raisins, and customizable grain bowls. Rather than serving soft drinks, the café creates naturally sweetened beverages that change daily depending on seasonality, such as Lavender Honey Black Tea, or their staple Kardia Kolada, made with coconut and pineapple juice. Kardia’s founding team includes UNC REX’s director of food and nutrition, Jim McGrody, and its executive chef, Ryan Conklin, along with a total of seven classically trained chefs who have attended culinary school. For Chef Castellow, Kardia was a natural extension of his culinary vision at Zest Cafe, which has served healthy food for 20 years and doesn’t have fryers or serve sweet tea, which Castellow says is more acceptable in North Carolina now but wasn’t the norm when Zest opened. The chefs at Kardia are cognizant of the reputation—and sometimes the jokes—that often accompany hospital food, but with each

GREEK YOGURT BOWL WITH FRESH BLUEBERRIES, LOCAL HONEY, AND WALNUTS.

midtownmag.com | 73


What’s in

North Carolina’s #1 Invisalign Provider & the #1 Invisalign Teen Provider on the East Coast

Dr. Jason Gladwell

Come experience the difference!

GLADWELL ORTHODONTICS

Visit us at one of our convenient locations: 2824 Rogers Rd. - Wake Forest Crabtree Valley Mall - Invisalign Scan Center 13271 Strickland Rd. - Raleigh *NOW OPEN* Downtown Raleigh *AUGUST 2018*

919.263.2411 gladwellorthodontics.com 74 | midtownmag.com

dish they serve out of their café, they’re changing that status quo perception. “Places like this are a great opportunity to showcase the world-class culinary talent that we have now in healthcare,” Conklin says. “No more just plopping mashed potatoes on the plate ... hospital food has evolved.” Everything at Kardia is house-made, from the burger made with a mixture of lamb and beef to the dressing on the Kardia house salad. Even the restaurant’s wooden tables are made from the willow oaks that were cleared for construction of the hospital. “A lot of hospitals may have one chef; we have seven classically trained chefs, and they’ve all been to culinary school,” Castellow says. “There’s a lot of firepower in our department. Some of the ingredients in our spice cabinet, like sumac, I think other hospitals would definitely be intimidated by them.” Kardia’s chefs even hold their own against fine-dining chefs, as Chef Conklin and the team of UNC REX chefs beat dozens of other culinary teams in the “Got to Be NC” dining competition in 2015. The team at Kardia focuses not only on serving healthy food, but also on educating their diners on what they’re eating and providing tips on how to eat more healthily at home. “It took a lot of talking to customers and explaining to them what we were,” Castellow says. “When we first opened, our menu was quite ethnic in its descriptions, and we had to tone it down to make sense to the demographic we were trying to target—patients and their families who may not have been exposed to food like this. For instance, baba ganoush became eggplant spread, and things like that.” Patients, family members, hospital staff, and community members can also take part in educational healthy cooking classes led by Kardia’s team in a 100-seat demonstration kitchen. The chefs at Kardia have seen increased interest from their hospital coworkers in both the cooking demonstrations and the café itself. The restaurant even draws in diners from the community who aren’t connected to the hospital.

SEASON July

BLACKBERRIES

EGGPLANT

BLUEBERRIES

FIGS

BUTTERBEANS

GARLIC

CABBAGE

GREEN ONIONS

CANTELOUPES

GREENS

CARROTS

HERBS

CHERRY TOMATOES

HONEYDEW

COLLARDS

MELONS

CUCUMBERS

August APPLES

GARLIC

BUTTERBEANS

GREEN ONIONS

CABBAGE

GREENS

CANTELOUPES

HERBS

CHERRY TOMATOES

HONEYDEW MELONS

COLLARDS CUCUMBERS

MUSCADINE GRAPES

EGGPLANT FIGS

September APPLES

HERBS

BLACKBERRIES

MUSCADINE GRAPES

CABBAGE CHERRY TOMATOES COLLARDS CUCUMBERS FIGS GREEN ONIONS GREENS

MUSHROOMS MUSTARD GREENS


If you can’t always make it to Kardia to enjoy the restaurant’s healthy fare, the chefs recommend shopping on the outer edges of the grocery store to focus on eating fresh fruits, vegetables, and meat, while avoiding the packaged and often heavily processed foods in the middle. “You have to be organized and plan what you are eating. Take the time to make a game plan for shopping, and plan your menus in advance for the week,” Conklin said. “When you are rushed for time, typically you fall back to convenience, which can often lead to many pre-made and over-processed meals.”

Tips for

EATING Healthier at Home

The Black Hat Chefs To maintain Kardia’s commitment to food quality, its team formed an in-house culinary training program called The Black Hat Chefs. Initially developed as a way to train cooks to have the knowledge and tools necessary to elevate to the next level of healthcare food, the organization has now become a booster to the culture. “We invested in our culinary team, and over time our cooks have become more engaged and passionate about the food we serve here at the hospital,” Conklin said. The Black Hat Chefs have done more than just train together; they travel together, such as a trip to West Virginia to help flood victims.

But perhaps the most special component about a job at Kardia is the impact it has on patients and their families. “As a chef in the restaurant and hotel industry, you always concentrate on preparing food that makes people feel good,” Conklin says. “As a chef in healthcare, you can really do so much more than that. You can prepare food that can nourish people who are sick, you can teach patients and even coworkers about eating better, and you have the opportunity to create memories. Our team is very proud of the work we do because we know we are making a difference.” 76 | midtownmag.com

RYAN CONKLIN, EXECUTIVE CHEF AT UNC REX

W e l s fl t c


New in town with the hottest trends in all things DIY! Our Mission: To Create Cool Stuff 1

pick your project & design

2

get creative

3

make it: you got the KNACK of it!

Come get Crafty with Us! We offer projects for all—beginners to experts. Pop in for a project or an instructorled workshop. Projects range from wood signs to cupcake bath bombs, paper flowers to cornhole boards, pillows, and totes. Spend 30 minutes or 3 hours, just come for fun!

Crafting is better with BYOB

www.knackdiy.com 1131 Falls River Ave #103 Raleigh, NC 27614


AS NEWCOMERS TO RALEIGH AND THE greater Triangle area arrive from more populous places such as the Northeast, they often remark on our small-town feel. Longtime residents, however, have borne witness to a rapid pace of growth that saw the region’s population increase by 43.5 percent between 2000 and 2010. While some county commissioners have praised the influx— it’s certainly a boon for the area’s tax base—our quickly inflating population has brought challenges as well. Chief among them is finding affordable living spaces for people of low and average means. To be considered affordable, housing costs should comprise no more than 30 percent of total income, according to the Congressional Budget Office. But a study contracted by the county commission and conducted by real estate consulting firm HR&A Advisors found that more than 49,000 local families spent more than a third of their wages on housing, putting them in the “financially burdened” category. For 42,000 additional families, that figure was more than 50 percent, causing them to be “financially overburdened.”

Beyond the

TIPPING

POINT BY

According to NCJustice.org, a single mother moving to the area with her two children would need to make $27.52 an hour in order to make ends meet—65.2 percent more than the median wage. Twoearner couples would fare somewhat better: Those making $50,000 a year would “only” spend $1,250 a month on housing to stay within the 30 percent guideline. But according to the N.C. Housing Coalition, the average renter can afford to spend just $817 a month.

MARK CANTRELL

Affordable housing has become a pipe dream for many people in the Triangle. 78 | midtownmag.com


FEATURED LEFT: HOMETOWN HERO VOLUNTEERS AT THE PLY GEM HOME FOR GOOD PROJECT BUILD IN RALEIGH, COMPLETED FIVE FULL EXTERIOR REMODELS FOR HOMES IN NEED OF CRITICAL REPAIRS. THE CITY OF RALEIGH DECLARED TUESDAY, MAY 8TH, AS “PLY GEM HOME FOR GOOD PROJECT DAY.”

I WOULD CALL THE HOUSING AFFORDABILITY SITUATION IN THE TRIANGLE

A CRISIS.

Jessica Holmes, Wake County Commissioner

A Critical Issue “I would call the housing affordability situation in the Triangle a crisis,” says Wake County Commissioner Jessica Holmes. “The issue became so acute that I advocated forming an Affordable Housing Steering Committee to address it. While growth is great for many facets of our county, the current trends show that prosperity doesn’t necessarily extend to each and every resident. Unmet housing needs are growing rapidly; right now there are 56,000 working families in our area who are unable to find housing they can afford. Current trends project that number may increase to as many as 150,000 families over the next 20 years.” One solution, of course, would be to build more affordable housing units, but the trend is actually in the opposite direction. The News & Observer reports that the county lost almost 5,000 low-income units between 2009 and 2015, while the need is projected to increase by some 3,700 more people a year. Meanwhile, housing costs have increased by 19 percent since 2006, with rental prices ballooning by 35 percent. Unfortunately, federal aid in the form of subsidies for affordable housing is expected to decline in the coming years, which could create a critical inflection point for low-income residents.

WAKE COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS CHAIR, JESSICA HOLMES, ADDRESSES LOCAL MEDIA, COMMUNITY LEADERS, AND BUILD VOLUNTEERS DURING THE PLY GEM HOME FOR GOOD PROJECT COMPLETION CEREMONY IN RALEIGH, ON TUESDAY, MAY 8TH. SINCE 2016, PLY GEM, AN EXTERIOR BUILDING PRODUCTS MANUFACTURER BASED IN CARY, HAS HELPED BUILD OR REMODEL 450 HOMES NATIONWIDE.

midtownmag.com | 79


Roots of the Problem How has Wake County found itself in such an unfortunate dilemma? According to the HR&A study, there are several causes: • The rate of growth is outstripping developers’ ability to keep up with the need. • Housing prices have risen faster than income. • Renovations and teardowns have eaten into the supply of low-cost housing. • A large percentage of new construction is unaffordable to low-income, and even averageincome, residents. Rising prices are among the most concerning issues, according to Alicia Arnold, Wake County Director of Housing and Transportation: “We’ve seen that incomes have not kept pace with housing costs. Over the past 10 years, those costs have increased by 35 percent, while the median income in this area has increased by only 16 percent. For someone who has no bachelor’s degree and is typically in a lower-wage job, their income has increased by just 10 percent. So that’s a 26 percent wage gap in just 10 years, where the cost of housing is outpacing our income.” Arnold notes that post-recession housing starts are nearly back to previous levels. “We’re producing about 10,000 units a year, on average,” she says. “Unfortunately, only 4 to 7 percent of those have been designated affordable housing.” That means many workers in the service sector can no longer afford to live near their jobs. According to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), transportation costs are the secondhighest monthly expense for most families. Being able to live near where they work would reduce the financial burden, leaving more discretionary income for other important needs.

Advantages of Affordability And the benefits of affordable housing don’t end there. “It helps to contribute to things such as stress reduction, better educational outcomes, and [improved] physical and mental health,” Arnold says. “People who don’t know where they’re going to lay their head at night are not going to be productive employees. Providing them places to live reduces the cost of social services, public health, and behavioral health, among others.” In fact, providing adequate low-cost housing provides benefits that extend far beyond its residents. “Investment in affordable housing produces jobs, 80 | midtownmag.com


local income, sales, increased property values, and property tax revenues,” Holmes notes. There’s a popular perception that lowincome housing lowers property values, but a study conducted by Trulia, a real estate consulting firm, found no evidence to support that claim. The study, which examined more than 3,000 low-income projects in 20 of the nation’s most expensive markets, found no significant effect on home values.

A National Problem The critical shortage of affordable housing isn’t just a local issue; major metropolitan areas across the country are in the same predicament. The reasons are complex and manifold, and in addition to the previously noted causes, include the not-in-mybackyard (NIMBY) syndrome as well as the fact that contractors increase their revenue by constructing high-end residences. Of course, builders and developers are in business to make money, and it’s understandable that they focus their resources on the areas where they can turn the most profit. That leaves local government as the major recourse for those seeking economical living quarters. And Wake County has indeed taken steps to rectify the problem. In September 2016, the county Board of Commissioners established the Wake County Steering Committee on Affordable Housing, helmed by Commissioner Holmes, to address the issue. In upcoming installments, we’ll examine some of the affordable housing solutions the committee has generated, and talk to some local residents who’ve been affected by the shortage. (The September / October issue of Midtown will include the next feature in our series on affordable housing.) midtownmag.com | 81


Building Blocks to

AFFORDABLE

SOLUTIONS BY

DON VAUGHAN

Affordable housing has been a topic of discussion in Wake County for decades, as municipalities struggle to provide safe, low-cost housing for those who need it while simultaneously boosting tax revenue through higher-end construction. While state and municipal officials debate the issue, Cary-based Ply Gem Building Products and Habitat for Humanity of Wake County are working to make a difference. The result has been newly constructed low-mortgage homes and significant exterior renovations on existing older residences—fixes that have improved the lives of dozens of Wake County residents. “Housing is foundational for everything,” observes Kevin Campbell, president/CEO of Habitat for Humanity of Wake County. “When families don’t have a place to stay, or certainty about where they are living, it impacts everyone, but especially the children.” According to Campbell, families who pay more than 30 percent of their annual income for housing are considered financially burdened and the most

82 | midtownmag.com

WILLIAMS HOUSE BEFORE & AFTER; PHOTOS COURTESY OF PLY GEM.

in need of assistance. In Wake County, an estimated 91,000 families fall into this category, Campbell says. Habitat for Humanity of Wake County is addressing the affordable housing issue by doing what it does best—constructing new homes and selling them at the appraised rate with a low, sustainable mortgage. By selling houses at the appraised rate, Campbell explains, such sales do not adversely affect the appraisals of surrounding homes. But regardless of the appraisal rate, approved homeowners never pay more than 30 percent of their annual income. If necessary, a portion of the sale price will be deferred until the homeowners sell the house. “We have shown that people in that income range can be good payers on mortgages,” Campbell says. “As a result, we have been able to convince some financial institutions to lend to our buyers.” Three years ago, Ply Gem took a corporate lead on helping to make a difference through its Home for Good project, a multiyear initiative that helps families in need of a safe, affordable home. “We believe everyone deserves a safe place to call home,” says


From Learners to Leaders At Ravenscroft, students not only learn to think, they learn to do. We pair a stimulating curriculum with collaboration, hands-on learning, and leadership skills. We graduate confident, well-rounded students who are prepared to thrive in our complex world as educated citizens and leaders. Learn more about our community!

Join us! Call our Admissions Office to schedule a tour: 919.848.6470, or visit www.ravenscroft.org. 7409 Falls of Neuse Road Raleigh, NC 27615 919.847.0900 www.ravenscroft.org

midtownmag.com | 83


2018/19 SEASON HIGHLIGHTS

SERVING AS PLY GEM HOME FOR GOOD PROJECT REGIONAL AMBASSADOR, BRETT YOUNG, THE ACADEMY OF COUNTRY MUSIC AWARDS’ NEW MALE VOCALIST OF 2018, PRESENTS THE OWNER OF A NEWLY RENOVATED HOME WITH A WELCOME MAT ON MAY 8TH.

MEYMANDI CONCERT HALL, RALEIGH

Beethoven’s 5th FRI/SAT, SEPT 21-22 | 8PM

Grant Llewellyn, conductor North Carolina Master Chorale

“Star Wars: A New Hope” in Concert FRI/SAT, OCT 5-6 | 8PM SUN, OCT 7 | 7PM

Holiday Cirque Spectacular FRI, DEC 21 | 8PM SAT, DEC 22 | 3PM & 8PM

Wesley Schulz, conductor

VALENTINE’S WEEKEND

The Music of Whitney Houston FRI/SAT, FEB 15-16 | 8PM

Brent Havens, conductor Rashidra Scott, vocalist

Saturday Concert Sponsor: Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC

Music Inspired by the Sea FRI/SAT, APR 12-13 | 8PM

Grant Llewellyn, conductor Brian Reagin, violin Saturday Concert Sponsor: The Cypress of Raleigh

Carmina Burana FRI/SAT, MAY 3-4 | 8PM

Carlos Miguel Prieto, conductor North Carolina Master Chorale Capital City Girls Choir

Pink Martini

FRI, MAY 10 | 8PM SAT, MAY 11 | 3PM & 8PM

Wesley Schulz, conductor

Subscriptions on sale now! ncsymphony.org | 919.733.2750 84 | midtownmag.com

Susan Selle, CMO of Ply Gem, adding that the company has made it their mission to help address the affordable housing crisis. The company’s focus is four-fold: • Donating products for the construction of new homes. (To date, Ply Gem has donated more than $1.8 million in building products, while helping to build more than 450 homes in 70 communities around the U.S.) • Rallying associates, colleagues, and customers to volunteer with groups such as Habitat for Humanity that are involved in the construction of affordable housing. • Encouraging leaders from all sectors of the construction industry to help find solutions to the affordable housing crisis. • Boosting national awareness of the issue through celebrity ambassadors such as country music performers Darius Rucker, Brett Young, and Lauren Alaina. Ply Gem is also working with Habitat for Humanity of Wake County on a new initiative to renovate the exteriors of older homes. “This year we’re working with five families who already

own their own homes,” Campbell says. “The exterior renovations that we do will extend the life of the affordable units for those families.” Ply Gem donated all of the materials for those renovations, including vinyl siding and energy-efficient windows. Such efforts couldn’t come at a better time, Campbell says. Data suggests that not only is the construction of affordable housing down, but also Wake County is losing 900 affordable units a year. “We have been doing advocacy work to help the community understand the issue, and to help our elected officials know there is broad concern for affordable housing,” Campbell reports. “The people who reside in affordable housing are integral to the community. They do jobs that we all interact with, and we think they should be able to live here. We have also been working with county officials to look at the land use policies and modify them in a way that would allow more affordable housing to be developed.” Want to help? “Get involved,” Selle says. “Donate some hours of your time and put some sweat equity into building affordable houses. Become engaged with groups that are helping. And help spread the word.”


Facing family law issues? These faces can help.

From our office in the heart of North Hills, Wake Family Law Group has been helping clients with divorce and family law issues since 2005. Our team includes experienced mediators, courtroom litigators, negotiators, and financial strategists who focus solely on North Carolina family law.

Whatever you’re facing, we’ll help you move forward.

4350 Lassiter at North Hills Ave, Suite 360 Raleigh, North Carolina 27609

(919) 787-4040 | wakefamilylawgroup.com

Marc W. Sokol | Michael F. Schilawski | Helen M. O’Shaughnessy | Nancy L. Grace | Katie Hardersen King | Justin L. Mauney | Julianne B. Rothert | Kelley W. Cash | Melanie C. Phillips Sokol Schilawski O’Shaughnessy Grace King & Mauney, PLLC

midtownmag.com | 85


e m o c l e

W

Your beautiful smile is our passion!


!

raising thebar

SPONSORED CONTENT

BY KELLEY W. CASH Kelley W. Cash focuses her practice on all aspects of North Carolina family law litigation and negotiations. Wake Family Law Group WakeFamilyLawGroup.com

Premarital Agreements Avoid the expense and headache of managing future conflict if unforeseen difficulties arise after marriage. Are You Contemplating a Premarital Contract? A premarital agreement, sometimes called a prenuptial agreement or “prenup,� is a contract that couples enter into before their marriage to protect assets they are bringing into the marriage, future inheritance or estate rights, or business ownership interests. It can also define spousal support rights (for example, alimony) in the event of a separation or divorce.

Why have a premarital agreement?

When can I enter into a premarital agreement?

A premarital agreement is a way to avoid the expense and headache of managing future conflict if unforeseen difficulties arise after the marriage. Among other things, a premarital agreement can establish what will happen to ownership and use of property that is acquired before the marriage or during the marriage. It can also determine how the parties deal with debt incurred during the marriage and how they distribute property acquired during the marriage if there is a separation or divorce. The agreement may waive inheritance rights, articulate rights to insurance policies or other death benefits, establish or waive spousal support (alimony), and govern other aspects of the marriage. In a premarital agreement, parties can agree to waive their rights to an equitable distribution, or property division, as well as spousal support. A premarital agreement does not typically deal with custody or child support issues.

A premarital agreement must be executed before the marriage. The agreement becomes enforceable upon the marriage provided the agreement is in writing, entered into voluntarily, signed by the parties, and does not violate public policy. There also needs to be either a full disclosure of property and debts when entering into the agreement or a waiver of this disclosure.

If I am interested in a premarital agreement, what should I do? Prior to entering into a premarital agreement, you should consult with an attorney who can advise on whether a premarital agreement may be right for you, as well as help with drafting or reviewing a premarital agreement. An attorney can ensure that your rights and assets are protected. It is best to start thinking about a premarital agreement several months before your wedding to make sure there is time to draft and negotiate the agreement. Planning a wedding is stressful enough without trying to finish a last-minute premarital agreement.

This is paid legal advertisement. The information contained in this article is for informational purposes only and is not legal advice. No attorney client relationship is created by the publication and reading of this article. All domestic matters are different and all specific questions should be directed to an attorney who can answer those questions and provide legal advice based on your unique circumstances.

midtownmag.com | 87


JAXON, AGE 4, EXPLORES DIVERSITY THROUGH IMAGINATIVE PLAY.

88 | midtownmag.com


In 1965, Frankie Lemmon was finally old enough to go to kindergarten. Only, he wasn’t allowed. Of all the public schools in Raleigh, not one would accept him. Frankie Lemmon had Down syndrome, and at that time public schools typically could not accommodate children with special needs. Convinced that Frankie and other children with special needs should be allowed to go to school just like other boys and girls, Frankie’s parents—Frank Lemmon, who was the pastor of Hudson Memorial Presbyterian Church, and Frankie’s mother, Georgia— partnered with their congregation and the surrounding community to start a new kind of school, eventually named for their son.

Li fe Lessons

All

for

AFTER MORE THAN 50 YEARS AND national accolades as a model of progressive education for children with special needs, the Frankie Lemmon School has broadened its mission to include typically learning children. The inclusive-classroom setting provides advanced learning opportunities for all of its students.

BY

BETH PETERSON

PHOTOS COURTESY OF

FRANKIE LEMMON SCHOOL

When it began, the Frankie Lemmon School was housed within the Hudson Memorial Presbyterian Church building, and it had only three children on its roster. Before long, however, the school outgrew its space there. Frankie Lemmon School then operated out of the Hayes Barton Baptist Church basement, where it stayed for 45 years, growing to a maximum capacity of 25 students, with classes for children from age 3 through kindergarten. In 2016, Frankie Lemmon School and Developmental Center, as it is now known, moved into a larger, freestanding facility near WakeMed Raleigh. The move was made possible by the generous support of Michael Olander Jr., a local entrepreneur who purchased the building and enabled the Frankie Lemmon Foundation to rent it until the school was able to buy the building—a landmark event that just came to pass in June.

midtownmag.com | 89


TOP: NAY, AGE 5, AND AUBREY, AGE 5, PARTICIPATE IN MUSIC THERAPY WITH THERAPIST PAULA SCICLUNA. BOTTOM: JOSHUA, AGE 4, BUILDS HIS VOCABULARY WITH SPEECH THERAPIST SHARON HANEY.

A Permanent Home In its first year in the new building, the school’s population grew to 68 children. This year, the enrollment increased to 70 children, and in the coming year the plan calls for 91 students. Ultimately, the building will accommodate up to 125 students and—with its small teacher-to-student ratio (1:6 or lower)—each child receives an individualized preschool education, based on his or her specific needs. Recently, the school expanded its services to create

90 | midtownmag.com

inclusive classrooms so that children without disabilities may attend along with the children who have special needs. Transitioning to an inclusiveclassroom setting, where typically developing children learn alongside children with special needs, benefits all of the students. For children with disabilities, they are motivated and encouraged to learn through interaction with and imitation of their classmates without disabilities. For students without disabilities, they

receive invaluable life lessons about compassion and understanding, and what it means to respect others and support people who are living with different circumstances. In coming years, Frankie Lemmon School and Developmental Center has an eye toward even more growth. The school hopes to fill 91 seats in the fall, and they will no doubt be claimed. The numbers tell us why: In each of the last two school years, Frankie Lemmon School provided 1,333 hours of speech therapy; 1,166 hours of occupational therapy; 282 hours of music therapy; 282 hours of vision therapy; and 205 hours of physical therapy. That’s 3,268 hours of therapy completed in a single school year. Additionally, Frankie Lemmon’s full-time staff includes nine teachers holding bachelor’s degrees and eight possessing master’s degrees. Students are also served a healthy breakfast, lunch, and snack that’s prepared on-site every school day—a whopping 27,540 meals were served in each of the last two school years. And if you’re wondering about numbers as far as cost is concerned: Thanks to the generous donations from the fundraising events of the Triangle Wine Experience, no child is turned away because of money. (Visit TriangleWineExperience.org to learn more or attend an event, January 31st to February 2nd, 2019.)


Discoverers welcome.

INVENT YOUR SUMMER.

Engaging activities and projects

Exciting weekly themes Special projects Fun field trips SIGN UP TODAY!

Healthy meals and snacks Interesting visitors and field trips Call 877.217.9528 to schedule a tour.

877.217.9530 | LaPetite.com

Childtime.com

This institution is an equal opportunity provider. ©2018 La Petite Academy, Inc.

This institution is an equal opportunity provider. ©2018 Childtime Childcare, Inc. ECT45

Raleigh’s ultimate luxury hair salon

cut | color | styling | treatment texture | special occasion styling extensions | makeup

North Hills

Brier Creek

Falls Village

919.900.8212

919.598.7666

919.848.0555

@salonbluhair I salonbluhair.com

midtownmag.com | 91


LEFT: ELIJAH, AGE 5, PRACTICES WRITING HIS NAME. RIGHT: ASHLYN, AGE 4, PLAYS DRESS UP WITH FLS VOLUNTEER ETTA BUCKMAN.

Meet the Children

The numbers can only tell us so much. Parents of past and current students attest: There’s so much more to love about Frankie Lemmon than just the impressive number of hours of therapy offered or how well-qualified their teachers are. David Askew’s son, Dylan, has Down syndrome, and spent three and a half years at Frankie Lemmon. “That school has been a gift from God,” David

says, “They love our children as if they were their own.” Dylan is now in public school, but he formed such a tight bond with one of his teachers while attending Frankie Lemmon that the former teacher still calls to plan outings with Dylan. Allie and Landy Townsend were told by doctors that their son, Ben, would never talk or walk. Ben was born with a genetic condition so rare that it has no

name. But when Landy and Allie heard about Frankie Lemmon, they knew they had to try it. When he arrived at Frankie Lemmon at the age of 3, Ben could only scoot on the floor and he was non-verbal. But through what Landy describes as “simple tenderness,” the staff at Frankie Lemmon coached and supported Ben’s development. They used play—making every interaction into a game—until, by the end of his

By The Numbers SCHOOL YEAR

2015–2016 2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019*

Number of Children Served

29

68

70

91

Children with Special Needs

29

48

49

TBD

Low-Income Families Served

4

28

28

TBD

Tuition-Paying Typically Developing Children

0

0

3

10–12

92 | midtownmag.com

* PROJECTION


CUSTOMIZED FLOOR PLANS WITH SPACIOUS INTERIORS

CURATED FINISHES FROM AROUND THE WORLD

NOT HI NG CO M PA R ES Seventeen modernist brownstones nestled between Cameron Village and Downtown Raleigh. All with elevators, rooftop verandas, and stunning views. A downtown address in a serene setting, located on St. Mary’s St. between W. Jones and W. Lane.

www.TheSaintRaleigh.com

midtownmag.com | 93


TOP: PETER, AGE 5, ENJOYS HIS FAVORITE SONG ON HIS ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVICE. BOTTOM: NEIL, AGE 3, TAKING INDEPENDENT STEPS WITH PHYSICAL THERAPIST ELIZA BANKERT.

BEACH BOUND. nofo @ the pig

2014 fairview road 919.821.1240 www.nofo.com 94 | midtownmag.com

first year, Ben was walking unassisted. By the end of his second year, Ben was talking. Now 11, Ben isn’t just talking and walking. He’s running, reading, spelling, doing math. “[The school] changed his life. It changed our lives,” Landy says. Ben says he wants to go to college, and his parents believe he will get there. Jessica Moore’s daughter, Jaxon, who also has Down syndrome, is enrolled in the 4-year-old class at Frankie Lemmon. Jessica, a single parent, appreciates the love she knows Jaxon is receiving at school, and she feels supported as a single mother. Of the inclusive-classroom approach, Jessica says that it “challenges Jaxon to develop faster, utilize new things she’s learning, and prepares her for transition [into public school].” But the parents aren’t the only ones raving about Frankie Lemmon. Speed Rodriguez, who is also in the 4-year-old class, uses sign language

fluently and, every morning, the first words he signs to his mom are “School. Play. Friends.” School is his favorite place to be. When Speed walks down the hallway at Frankie Lemmon to his classroom, every teacher he passes gives him a high five—affirming with every step that he is valuable; he is special; he is loved. Rebecca Smith, the school’s director, says she doesn’t have to do much recruiting. Most of the Frankie Lemmon teachers have come to her for a job, because they truly love working with children with special needs. In fact, Rebecca worked at Frankie Lemmon for 15 years before becoming the director. What started as volunteer work blossomed into a love for the school and the children. That’s exactly the legacy Frank and Georgia Lemmon would be proud to have left behind—that their son’s namesake is still fueled primarily by love.


AWARD BEST MED SPA

2018

2017

DIAMOND

DIAMOND

AWARD BEST MED SPA

midtownmag.com | 95


financial focus

SPONSORED CONTENT

BY ANGIE COLE – OWNER/BIC OF A COLE REALTY About the author: A Cole Realty, a leading real estate team in the Triangle, served more than 400 clients in 2016 and 2017. 919.538.6477 AColeRealty.com

How to Be a

Cost-Savvy

HOMEBUYER in a Competitive Market

Most homebuyers anticipate the dollar amount (or percentage) required as their down payment. However, a first-time buyer must also be prepared for additional expenses such as due diligence money, earnest money, and appraisal/inspection fees—all of which are due prior to closing. In addition, expenses that are typically part of the closing costs, such as lender fees, attorney fees, escrow money, title insurance, the property survey, recording fees, any prepaid homeowner’s insurance, mortgage insurance, title insurance, or taxes, must be considered. Due diligence is the period when inspections are performed, the home is appraised, loan approval is obtained, etc. In today’s competitive market, other prospective buyers may offer more due diligence money—sometimes an

excessive amount—to show their level of sincerity to the seller. These monies are at risk immediately, should the buyer decide to terminate the agreement. Earnest money also shows a buyer’s good faith intentions in completing the purchase of the home. An earnest money deposit is typically 1 percent of the sales price, but may vary depending on the contract terms. Earnest money is refundable (based on the approval of both parties), should the contract be terminated by the buyer during the due diligence period. After due diligence expires, and before closing, any initial or additional earnest monies are forfeited by the buyer if they terminate. Both the due diligence and earnest monies are credited back to the buyer, provided they proceed to closing.

Understanding the financial responsibilities associated with purchasing a home will simplify the buying process. An appraisal normally ranges from $400 to $550; this is typically required up-front, and is paid directly to the buyer’s lender. Ordering an appraisal is highly recommended during the due diligence period. Inspections generally range from $500 to $1,000. In the case of a resale property, a home inspection, radon test, and a pest inspection are highly recommended. Closing costs are the buyer’s responsibility unless otherwise negotiated with the seller at the time of contract. As a general rule, closing costs average approximately 3 percent of the sales price of the home. Your realtor will happily guide you through each step of the buying process, and advise of any costs involved.

The information on this page is provided by the advertiser mentioned above to the public.

96 | midtownmag.com


S P E C I A L A D V E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

20 18 GUIDE EDUCATION

OPTIONS IN EDUCATION Whether parents are looking for the most nurturing preschool for their first child, the strongest academic setting to position their older children for the future, or ways to augment their child’s traditional education with enrichment opportunities, parents like learning about all of the options. In this sponsored section, some of the area’s most respected leaders in educational excellence share their profiles.

midtownmag.com | 97


2018 EDUCATION GUIDE

S P E C I A L A D V E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

LA PETITE ACADEMY What a great place to start. We offer nurturing care and creative learning experiences, every day. At La Petite Academy, your child will discover respect, collaboration, and the joy of learning in a safe, secure environment. Our exclusive School Readiness Pathway charts each child’s unique course to elementary school and future academic success, with specialized curriculum and developmentally appropriate programs for infants to school-age students. As a STEM school, science, technology, engineering, and math are part of everything we do in the classroom. Discover enhanced learning opportunities through our enrichment programs, such as soccer, yoga, and Spanish. In addition, our before- and afterschool programs for school-age students provide a great start and finish to every school day, in a program that has a strong focus on character development, plus team-building activities, homework support, and more. At Camp Innovate, your child will find a whole summer packed with excitement and adventure, including camp themes around art, science, games, and more; collaborative projects; and fun field trips. We’re also here for you during winter and spring break, or any other time you need some help. Our Flex Care cards enable you to purchase individual days to use whenever you need them. We also work hard to nurture growing bodies alongside growing minds. With our Grow Fit initiative, we offer healthy meals and snacks, plenty of physical activity, and nutritional education elements in the classroom. Our goal is to help children develop healthy habits for a healthy future.

Connect with us 877.861.5078 LaPetite.com

98 | midtownmag.com


S P E C I A L A D V E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

2018 EDUCATION GUIDE

THE MONTESSORI SCHOOL OF RALEIGH Your child was born ready—ready to contribute, to experience, to explore, to learn, to know, and to understand the world and how it works. School, as most of us think of it, is meant to help students get ready, to prepare them in many different ways for each advancing step toward success in college and, ultimately, in life. For students, school years are much more than just preparation for “real life;” they are real life. The ways in which our students learn and live today shape the people they will become tomorrow. At MSR—through our vigorous and encompassing program for toddlers through grade 12—our mission is to ensure that our students are ever more ready! We empower them to live their lives to the fullest— intellectually, interpersonally, and with independence— not only in the future but also now, and at every age and stage of their development. Each level of our curriculum has been specifically designed around the needs and characteristics of students to provide the optimal learning environment. MSR is now an authorized IB World School! Schedule a visit today at msr.org or call 919.848.1545 to learn more about The Montessori School of Raleigh and our new International Baccalaureate Program!

7005 Lead Mine Road Raleigh, NC 27615 919.848.1545 m s r. o r g

midtownmag.com | 99


2018 EDUCATION GUIDE

S P E C I A L A D V E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

RAVENSCROFT Equipping today’s students to succeed in tomorrow’s world. At Ravenscroft, we wondered: Why wait to teach leadership skills to children? Why not integrate leadership learning into everyday classroom education for all children? In fact, why not teach children to use those leadership skills to become better students, artists, athletes, and community members? Can those skills really be taught—to children of all ages? YES, they can! Ravenscroft has joined forces with the Center for Creative Leadership—one of the world’s top-ranked providers of executive education—to teach the citizen leadership skills that hundreds of business, government, nonprofit, and education leaders have identified as crucial. These leadership skills are frustratingly rare in today’s workforce. Together, we have created an innovative curriculum combining the best citizen leadership learning with the excellent academic program for which Ravenscroft is known. And we are teaching it to all of our students, in age-appropriate ways, Pre-K through 12th grade. We call it Lead From Here. As early as pre-kindergarten, our Lead From Here– trained faculty introduces students to a set of fundamental skills that they can apply to their academic, social, creative, and athletic challenges. These citizen leadership skills include being accountable, resilient, growth-minded, empathetic, inclusive, communicative, strategic, resourceful, adaptive, and more. The result? High-achieving students who have a leg up on academics and who possess the real-world leadership skills they need to succeed in the future. Our Ravens are prepared to soar to great heights. How do we do it? The best way to understand how we teach it is to experience it yourself. We invite you to join us for a visit to learn more!

7409 Falls of Neuse Road Raleigh, NC 27615 919.847.0900 admissions@ravenscroft.org ravenscroft.org/admissions

100 | midtownmag.com


S P E C I A L A D V E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

2018 EDUCATION GUIDE

SAINT MARY’S SCHOOL Now in its 177th year of educating young women, Saint Mary’s School knows what girls need to learn, grow, and thrive. As an independent, Episcopal, college-preparatory, boarding and day school for girls in grades 9 through 12, Saint Mary’s guides girls in building the skills and providing the experiences they require to successfully navigate college and life. We offer an extensive educational program that focuses on the development of key competencies, including critical thinking, collaboration, cross-cultural intelligence, and communication. Girls build these competencies through a comprehensive curriculum including elective courses like coding and computer science, a rich arts program, and 11 sports. Saint Mary’s provides leadership and character development, a dedicated college counseling program, access to new and emerging technologies, and values informed by an Episcopal tradition that respects the worth and dignity of all. Located in the heart of downtown Raleigh, the campus positions students with easy access to universities, museums, cultural organizations, and businesses. Our students engage in experiential learning with experts in the fields of technology, science, education, entrepreneurship, and more. An integrated part of the academic curriculum is the school’s new seminar programming, which provides learning opportunities in communication, health and wellness, innovation, and social impact. Seminars feature age-appropriate content and connect students with resources in the greater Raleigh area, which enables students to understand the relevance of what they are learning through real-world applications. As a boarding and day school, Saint Mary’s welcomes girls from across the state, the country, and the world. Saint Mary’s creates a safe environment where girls are inspired to grow as young women of intelligence, integrity, and purpose—ready to serve and shape their world. Day Family Visitation Day October 16, 2018 Admission Overnight and Visitation Days November 8-9, 2018 January 14-15, 2019

900 Hillsborough Street Raleigh, NC 27603 919.424.4100 admission@sms.edu sms.edu midtownmag.com | 101


2018 EDUCATION GUIDE

S P E C I A L A D V E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

DISCOVER ST. DAVID’S St. David’s School is a purposeful blend of a small educational setting, coupled with superior academics, athletics, and fine arts programs. Tradition and innovation define the St. David’s educational experience. Our students are encouraged to explore the depths of their Christian faith and are challenged to better understand the concept of virtue as they grow, mature, and progress through school, while simultaneously being exposed to a challenging, college-preparatory curriculum. Faith, Virtue, and Knowledge—these are the hallmarks of a St. David’s education, and they are what makes us unique. We invite you to take a closer look and “Discover St. David’s” for yourself.

3400 White Oak Road Raleigh, NC 27609 919.782.3331 admissions@sdsw.org sdsw.org

102 | midtownmag.com


S P E C I A L A D V E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

1

2018 EDUCATION GUIDE

La Petite Academy

7601 Six Forks Road, Raleigh lapetite.com | 877.861.5078

1

2

3

2

The Montessori School of Raleigh 7005 Lead Mine Road, Raleigh msr.org | 919.848.1545

3

Ravenscroft

7409 Falls of Neuse Road, Raleigh ravenscroft.org/admissions | 919.847.0900

5 4

Saint Mary’s School

900 Hillsborough Street, Raleigh sms.edu | 919.424.4100

4

5

St. David’s School

3400 White Oak Road, Raleigh sdsw.org | 919.782.3331

midtownmag.com | 103


EAT

YOUR WAY to Urban Ecstasy

BY

BRITTANY MURDOCK

BU•KU PHOTOS BY

NATHAN RICHARDS

RALEIGH RESTAURANTS ARE GIVING NATIONAL FOODIE TOWNS A RUN FOR THEIR REPS. Raleigh’s food scene is jam-packed with sophisticated dishes, craft cocktails, stunning outdoor patios, and locally sourced ingredients. These restaurants are built on the expertise of their hardworking owners and chefs, who keep their passions alive through the love of food. Dive into some of the best tastes in Raleigh, and fall in love with the city all over again.

104 | midtownmag.com


OWNERS: Sean Degnan and Tony Hopkins EXECUTIVE CHEF: Amanda Haisley CUISINE: Global Street Food LOCATION: Downtown Raleigh OPENED: February 2010

bu•ku

Looking for something out of the box? Inspired by street vendors in cities across the world, bu•ku: Global Street Food creates complex yet flavorful dishes. Indulge in their Korean Deviled Eggs or Beet and Vodka-cured Scottish Salmon. And make sure you leave room for dessert or a cold brew. They’ve got beers from abroad and a spiced caramel apple dessert that will have you coming back for more. NEW LOCATIONS: On the heels of its eight successful years in Raleigh, bu•ku scheduled the grand opening of its second location, this one in Wake Forest, on June 28th. More excitement is on the agenda, as they also announced plans to relocate the Raleigh bu•ku to Cary, moving in January to the space formerly held by AN restaurant. The original Raleigh restaurant will remain open through the end of this year and the New Year celebrations.

midtownmag.com | 105


TOP: GRILLED FISH AND CRAB BISQUE; PHOTO BY KAITLYN GOALEN. BOTTOM LEFT: OYSTERS; PHOTO BY KELSEY HANRAHAN. BOTTOM RIGHT: DEATH & TAXES INTERIOR PHOTO BY NICK PIRONIO

106 | midtownmag.com


LASER HAIR REMOVAL $45

&

Death Taxes

OWNER: Ashley Christensen

PAY AS YOU GO, NO PREPAY PACKAGES. Treat All Skin Types Including Tanned Skin. No Need to Grow Hair Out. Less Painful Than Waxing. Most Effective Lasers in Medical Journals.

CO-EXECUTIVE CHEFS: Ashley Christensen and Lauren Ivey CUISINE: New American LOCATION: Downtown Raleigh OPENED: June 2015

Before Death & Taxes came to town, the space was once a funeral home and then a bank. Focused on woodfired cuisine served familystyle, the elegant dining and sophisticated dishes are what keep customers coming back for more. Begin the night with roasted oysters before diving into the Heritage New York Strip Steak. And don’t forget to top off your meal with one of their specialty cocktails or a local beer. Check out the “Here’s Jonny” whiskey treat, with Scotch, rye whiskey, spiced Cheerwine, and Dolin Rouge. Really, who puts Cheerwine in a cocktail? Only the truly adventurous!

bluewaterspa.com

michaellawmd.com 919.256.0900 • 10941 RAVEN RIDGE ROAD, SUITE 103 RALEIGH, NC

midtownmag.com | 107


Mandolin EXECUTIVE CHEF/OWNER: Sean Fowler

ON THE

COVER

!

CUISINE: Elevated Modern American LOCATION: Hayes Barton neighborhood, Raleigh OPENED: November 2011 Sourcing produce, meats, and ingredients from farmers and artisans here in North Carolina is what Mandolin does best. They’re even sourcing vegetables and herbs from Chef Fowler’s very own farm here in Raleigh. Talk about local, fresh ingredients straight from the garden! A rotating menu inspired by seasonal produce keeps customers coming back for the next best thing. And don’t forget to order a cocktail from the bar. Their knowledgeable and skilled bartenders are serving up unique, quality cocktails to complement the menu and satisfy a variety of palates.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY NATHAN RICHARDS

108 | midtownmag.com


PHOTO BY NATHAN RICHARDS

Journey with us on a tour of gastronomic

proportions at the 2018 Culinary Adventures dining series. Experience delectable cuisine

created by our award-winning chef, Rich Carter, served at our exclusive venue, the Laurelbrook. Full course dinners inspired by intriguing destinations, paired with unique libations, and served by our exuberant team of tour guides. Charter your voyage at 919.828.5932 or cateringworks.com/culinaryadventures.

Group tickets are still available, please inquire. Carolinas n y Mind

MIDTOWN FAV’S: “Fox Farm Lion’s Mane and King Trumpet Mushrooms” with spring onion, Goat Lady chevre, panko, Mandolin Farm Green Espelette, and cilantro.

August 24, 2018 | 6:30 pm wayfarers experience elevated farm to table from Charleston to Manteo, Piedmont to Mountains Individual Ticket $95

includes dinner with wine pairing package

Sou America September 21, 2018 | 6:30 pm a nomadic adventure from Patagonia and beyond to taste the flavors influenced by ancient Incan culture Individual Ticket $95

includes dinner with wine pairing package

California Wine Country November 9, 2018 | 6:30 pm old-world culinary roots, seasonal and pristine fresh, nouveau dining from Napa to Sonoma Individual Ticket $95

includes dinner with wine pairing package

cocktails and hors d’oeuvres for boarding SPON SORED BY

2319 Laurelbrook Street, Raleigh, NC 27604 PHOTO BY BRITTANY MURDOCK

midtownmag.com | 109


PHOTOGRAPHY BY PAM VARELA

Pizza La Stella MANAGING PARTNER: Rudy Theale TYPE OF CUISINE: Neapolitan Pizza LOCATION: Downtown Raleigh OPENED: December 2016 Authentic Neapolitan pizza, specialty cocktails, craft beer, and wood-fired wings. What more could you ask for? Pizza La Stella is using a custom-made brick oven for its pies and importing the finest ingredients straight from Italy to perfect their craft of pizza and cocktails.

Their fresh, never frozen ingredients are what keep customers coming back for more. But they’re not just coming back for lunch and dinner. Pizza La Stella is serving some great brunch options, sure to spice up your weekend plans.

110 | midtownmag.com


41Hundred Casually sophisticated, local and straightforward. 4100 Main at North Hills St | Raleigh, NC 27609 | 919.278.1478

midtownmag.com | 111


ABOVE: WHOLE FRIED FISH (BLACK SEA BASS LOCAL TO NC). BELOW: NEGRONI. WHISKEY KITCHEN IMAGES COURTESY OF STACEY SPRENZ / TABLETOP MEDIA GROUP

Whiskey Kitchen OWNERS: Michael Thor and Jeff Mickel EXECUTIVE CHEF: Clayton Anderson CHEF DE CUISINE: Aaron Matyac CUISINE: Whiskey Bar / Southern Fare LOCATION: Downtown Raleigh OPENED: August 2016 If you’re looking for a cozy patio with a beautiful display of outdoor string lights in the heart of downtown Raleigh, Whiskey Kitchen is the place to be. Part neighborhood bar, part Southern kitchen, this spot is serving the finest whiskey in town, along with craft beer and specialty cocktails. Not to mention some fine dishes from the menu like fried oysters, huevos con chorizo (from their brunch menu), and an ice cream sandwich with scratch-made cookies and local ice cream.

112 | midtownmag.com


PHOTO COURTESY OF STACEY SPRENZ / TABLETOP MEDIA GROUP

midtownmag.com | 113


PHOTOS COURTESY OF VIDRIO

Vidrio OWNER: Lou Moshakos EXECUTIVE CHEF: Aaron Whitcomb CUISINE: Mediterranean LOCATION: Glenwood South District, Downtown Raleigh OPENED: January 2017

Since opening its doors little more than a year ago, Vidrio has remained authentic to its original mission. Centered on the concept of family and locally sourced ingredients, Vidrio is creating seasonal, chef-inspired dishes served family style. And the food isn’t the only thing inspired by Mediterranean flair. Along the wall of the dining room are 350 hand-blown glass bowls and orbs by artist Doug Frates—beautiful craftsmanship that emulates the gorgeous hues of a Mediterranean sunset. Want to toast a special moment? Check out the 50 wines on tap and 400 labels by the bottle that reflect the restaurant’s evolving menu.

114 | midtownmag.com


Empire Eats is reshaping downtown Raleigh and Durham as modern culinary destinations! Our passion for great food and excellent hospitality are woven through the unique dining experience you’ll have at each of our restaurants.

Let’s eat!

www.empireeats.com

Fall & Winter

TRUNK SHOW Friday, JULY 27 - Saturday, AUG. 4 10AM-6PM or by appointment

4351-111 THE CIRCLE AT NORTH HILLS • RALEIGH 919 420.0411 • CAMERONCLOTHING.COM CameronClothingMidtownJune2018.indd 1

6/5/18 8:52 AM

midtownmag.com | 115


Want to take a walk on the

WILD SIDE

l a m i n A ventures this summer? You’re in luck!

Ad

BY

C H E R Y L C A P A L D O T R AY L O R

AROUND OUR STATE

116 | midtownmag.com


E

North Carolina has wildlife sanctuaries, aquariums, and zoos where kids of all ages can observe and learn about native and exotic animals up close. Consider a mountainsto-sea tour and experience some of our state’s most exciting wildlife destinations. All locations offer tours and programs to educate the public about animal conservation and preservation efforts.

Grandfather Mountain Wildlife Habitats

2050 Blowing Rock Highway, Linville Grandfather.com You probably know about the mile-high swinging bridge and the breathtaking mountain views, but did you know Grandfather Mountain is also home to seven environmental habitats where visitors can observe bald eagles, black bears, and elk? The animal enclosures were built around existing native habitats, offering a unique opportunity to observe them in their natural homes. Enjoy watching river otters dive, splash, and sunbathe. Experience cougars, deer, and countless species of birds as they move throughout the area, only feet away from visitors. Learn how managed habitats play an important role in connecting humans with other species.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE GRANDFATHER MOUNTAIN STEWARDSHIP FOUNDATION

midtownmag.com | 117


Dressing Raleigh’s Leading Men

North Carolina Zoo 4401 Zoo Parkway, Asheboro NCZoo.org

The world’s largest natural-habitat zoo is located just 75 miles west of Raleigh, making it the perfect destination for a day trip. Make sure you schedule a full day, though, because there is so much to see and do. The 500-acre zoo is home to more than 1,600 animals, representing 225 species. Take the Zoofari Tour and experience white rhinos, elephants, and gazelles in the Watani Grasslands. See exotic and native birds in the Aviary’s spectacular “Birds in Flight” show. Don’t miss the new Hellbender Habitat, highlighting one of the largest salamanders in the world, nicknamed the Allegheny Alligator. From lions and zebras native to Africa’s grasslands to North America’s black bears, polar bears, and cougars, there’s something for everyone! PHOTOS COURTESY OF NORTH CAROLINA ZOO

Thank you, Bishop Patrick L. Wooden, Sr. Pastor of The Upper Room Church of God in Christ

919-510-5556

NORTH HILLS

www.LilesClothingStudio.com 118 | midtownmag.com


midtownmag.com | 119


PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE CONSERVATORS CENTER

Conservators Center

676 East Hughes Mill Road, Burlington ConservatorsCenter.org The Conservators Center is home to more than 80 animals, including a smiling arctic fox and more than 21 rare, threatened, and endangered species, many rescued from difficult living conditions. Each of the critter residents appear to possess a quirky personality that is guaranteed to make visitors smile and inspire everyone to learn more about our planet’s diverse wildlife. The Wild Overnights group tour allows tent camping right outside the park—and includes s’mores by the campfire! Twilight Tours invite visitors to experience animals at a time of day when the creatures are most active and vocal. You can even witness the thunderous moment when all 16 lions roar simultaneously— an act the staff nicknamed “oofing.” Be ready to get reconnected with wildlife!

Carolina Tiger Rescue

1940 Hanks Chapel Road, Pittsboro CarolinaTigerRescue.org If you’re looking for wildlife closer to home, neighboring Chatham County has just the place— but tigers aren’t the only big cats you’ll encounter at the Carolina Tiger Rescue. There are 10 additional rescued species that call the sanctuary home. Lions and cougars and cheetahs! Oh my! Come learn about kinkajous, amazing arboreal animals that look like primates, but are actually related to raccoons. The adult-only Twilight Tours thrill the over-18 crowd, while the Tiger Tales Tour is perfect for the younger set. All tours give visitors the opportunity to see the residents up-close and to learn more about the sanctuary’s mission of respect, rescue, education, and advocacy for all wildlife.

120 | midtownmag.com

RAJA, A CURRENT RESIDENT; PHOTO COURTESY OF CAROLINA TIGER RESCUE


CASPER, A WHITE ARCTIC FOX RESCUE, NOW RESIDES AT THE CONSERVATORS CENTER.

Tiger World Endangered Wildlife Preserve 4400 Cook Road, Rockwell TigerWorld.us

This nonprofit animal conservation and educational center is dedicated to the rescue, rehabilitation, and preservation of exotic animals. In addition to tigers from Asia, you’ll find exotic animals from Africa, Australia, and the Americas. Michael, the Timbavati white tiger may steal the show, but you’ll find a colorful assortment of critters ranging from an Indian blue peacock to a red kangaroo from down under. Guided tours are available to allow you to explore the conservation center with a licensed animal handler— just make note that Tiger World maintains a very natural environment, with rock and grass pathways, so come prepared for a wilderness hike.

midtownmag.com | 121


PHOTOS BY SARA CLARK/DUKE LEMUR CENTER

The Duke Lemur Center 3705 Erwin Road, Durham Lemur.Duke.edu

The Lemur Center at Duke University is home to the world’s largest and most diverse collection of lemurs outside of their native Madagascar. With several tour options available, visitors can observe the 17 rare species up-close in different settings: outdoor, indoor, and even in a separate nocturnal building. The Walking with Lemurs Tour allows guests to wander in the forest while lemurs roam freely. And if you want to take some lemur love home, you can even own a masterpiece by prosimian primates. Turns out lemurs love to paint, and you can watch the budding Picasso’s (okay, perhaps their work is more like Pollock) put fingers to canvas, and take the creation home with you.

122 | midtownmag.com


midtownmag.com | 123


Check out our new website! www.thebrapatch.com

Fitting the Needs of Women for Over 30 Years • Professional bra fitting • Specializing in hard-to-fit sizes • Sizes 28-56 in A-N cups • Bridal & formal foundation wear • Maternity & nursing bras • BOC Certified Mastectomy Fitters • Now carrying Bra Sized Swimwear 1603 North Market Drive • Raleigh • 919.876.8677 Tuesday-Friday 10am-6pm • Saturday 10am-5pm

www.thebrapatch.com 124 | midtownmag.com

North Carolina Aquarium at Fort Fisher 900 Loggerhead Road, Kure Beach NCAquariums.com/fort-fisher

Where can you meet a rare albino alligator, bald eagle, loggerhead sea turtles, and dinosaurs all in one day? The North Carolina Aquarium at Fort Fisher! Enter a world of underwater wonder where sharks, eels, and jellyfish swim just inches in front of your nose. Touch horseshoe crabs, stingrays, and sea stars. Come to see the sharks, but don’t leave without mingling with hundreds of exotic butterflies in the Butterfly Bungalow. More adventurous visitors may want to register for tours that include feeding sharks and learning how to care for the animals as an aquarist apprentice. You may even come face-to-face with life-sized dinosaurs, but watch out for the spitting Dilophosaurus!


A Century of Excellence 2018

DIAMOND

AWARD

BEST WOMEN’S BOUTIQUE AGES 36+

2018

DIAMOND

AWARD

BEST PLACE TO FIND MEN’S SHOES

2018

DIAMOND

AWARD BEST MEN’S BOUTIQUE

Located in Cameron Village WOMEN’S 2015 Cameron St. (919) 365-7074

MEN’S 435 Daniels St. (919) 366-6902

kannonsclothing.com

AGING IS AN OPTION Do you suffer from low energy, weight gain, low libido, poor sleep, lack of focus, mood swings, depression, or poor exercise tolerance? If you answered yes to any of these symptoms, then Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy may be for you! Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy (BHRT), is a therapy which incorporates individualized assessment and management of hormones that emulate those each of us have naturally in our bodies. Physicians Age Management Centers is the oldest and most experienced BHRT clinic in RTP.

“My husband and I started HRT at Physicians Age Management Center a few years ago and it changed our lives. Not only did it help me with Perimenopause symptoms, but it was a huge factor in bringing my marriage back…both emotionally and physically. Is it totally worth it…Yes!” - Kelly

Schedule your appointment before September 30, 2018 and receive FREE initial labs and consultation with our Doctor ($350 Value). 8300 Health Park, Suite 211 | Raleigh, NC, 27615 | 919-850-0880 | www.pagemc.com midtownmag.com | 125


N O RT H C A R O L I N A’ S T O P - R A N K E D G O L F C O U R S E S I N T H E T R I A N G L E ,

GOLFING

GREATS

BY

TIM PEELER

THE ELK RIVER CLUB IN BANNER ELK IS CONSISTENTLY RANKED AMONG THE TOP 10 GOLF COURSES IN THE STATE AND WAS THE FIRST NORTH CAROLINA COURSE DESIGNED BY JACK NICKLAUS. IN ADDITION TO THE MAJESTIC MOUNTAIN SETTING, THE PRIVATE CLUB FEATURES A LUXURY RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITY WITH A PRIVATE AIRPORT, AN EQUESTRIAN CENTER, AND A RANGE OF AMENITIES.

126 | midtownmag.com


E,

T H E M O U N T A I N S , A N D T H E C O A S T.

THERE ARE MORE THAN 13,000 GOLF COURSES across the country, but no state offers the unique variety that North Carolina’s 534 courses have on the coast, the mountains, or the rolling hills of the Piedmont. Yes, our state has hosted the men’s and women’s U.S. Open, the PGA Championship, the Ryder Cup, and multiple USGA championships, not to mention various PGA, LPGA, and senior tour stops in locations around the state. But it’s hardly just a spectator sport.

North Carolina’s vibrant golf industry employs some 37,000 people and adds $3.75 billion to the state’s economy through direct, indirect, and induced output, according to a 2016 study. It annually adds equals parts to the state’s manufacturing, real estate, and tourism sectors. Yet it’s hard, really, to put in perspective how the best courses in the state stack up with each other. There’s no way to compare the grandeur of Grandfather Mountain Country Club when the mountain laurel is blooming with Pinehurst No. 2’s history and championship tradition in the Sandhills, or with the stark beauty of watching a sunrise at Bald Head Island Golf Club while standing in a sandtrap bisected by the deep trail left by the tail of a wandering alligator. Here in the Triangle, golfers have their choice of highly rated courses by famed designers Donald Ross, Tom Fazio, Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer, and others. How in the world can you compare Raleigh Country Club’s elevated greens that Ross made as part of the final golf course design in his illustrious career with the downtown Raleigh skyline view Palmer incorporated into N.C. State’s Lonnie Poole Golf Course? How do you choose between Prestonwood Country Club’s three courses, the Governor Club’s two, or the freestanding excellence of Ross’ design at Hope Valley Country Club in the heart of Durham?

midtownmag.com | 127


The Top 12 Golf Courses IN THE N.C.

MOUNTAINS

1. Grandfather Golf and Country Club, Linville GrandfatherClubNC.com

2. Mountaintop Golf and Lake Club, Cashiers MountaintopGolfClub.com

3. Elk River Club, Banner Elk ElkRiverClub.com

4. Wade Hampton Golf Club, Cashiers WadeHamptonGC.com

5. Biltmore Forest Country Club, Asheville BiltmoreForestCC.com

For the last quarter century, the lucky loots on the North Carolina Golf Panel have diligently tried to rate the best courses in the state, including the variety of public and private courses around the Triangle. The panel was founded in 1995 by one of the state’s biggest tourism and golf boosters, Bill Hensley, a former sports information director at Wake Forest University and N.C. State University, who later served as the state’s director of tourism. He created the panel out of the disappointment he felt after seeing lazy lists published in national magazines. “I wanted the courses of our state to be rated by the men and women who play them every day,” Hensley says, “not by a few outsiders who really don’t know Tar Heel golf. Our annual ratings are a source of pride and reflect accurate appraisal.”

128 | midtownmag.com

6. Rock Barn Country Club (Jones), Conover RockBarn.com

7. Linville Golf Club, Linville LinvilleGolfClub.com

8. Balsam Mountain Preserve, Sylva BalsamMountainPreserve.com

9. Country Club of Asheville, Asheville CCofAsheville.com

10. Lake Toxaway Country Club, Lake Toxaway LakeToxawayCC.com

11. Jefferson Landing, Jefferson VisitJeffersonLanding.com

12. Linville Ridge, Linville LinvilleRidge.com

HOLE 17; PHOTO COURTESY OF MOUNTAINTOP GOLF CLUB


#YouDeserveThis

EST. 1974

V A C AT I O N R E N TA L S

www.TopsailRealty.com

|

800-526-6432


PINE NEEDLES AND ITS RECENTLY UPDATED SISTER CLUB MID PINES GOLF CLUB ARE BOTH TRADITIONAL DONALD ROSS DESIGNS OWNED BY THE FAMILY OF WOMEN’S GOLF PIONEER PEGGY KIRK BELL. EMBRACE HER LEGACY AND LOVE OF THE GAME ON THE COURSES SHE CALLED HOME.

Hensley didn’t just rely on fellow writers, however. He involved businessmen and women who knew North Carolina, and two of the state’s biggest golf legends, Peggy Kirk Bell and Billy Joe Patton. There are scratch golfers and highhandicappers on the panel, with the only membership requirement being a passion for the game. First published in North Carolina Magazine, the highly anticipated annual offering has appeared in the April issue of Business North Carolina since 2006 and has been managed by Kevin Brafford since Hensley handed over the reins in 2000. Brafford, who in addition to serving as the golf panel’s executive director is also the growth strategies director for the North Carolina Zoo Society and a member of the North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame selection committee, has grown the invitation-only golf panel to include about 150 active members. “Our members love the game and its prominent place in the sports landscape, and they have an appreciation for course design,” Brafford says. “We ask panelists to rate courses considering a number of factors, including routing, flow, strategy, fairness, memorability, and the variety of holes.”

130 | midtownmag.com

CARY’S PRESTONWOOD COUNTRY CLUB IS THE ONLY PRIVATE CLUB IN THE TRIANGLE THAT OFFERS 54 CHAMPIONSHIP HOLES. ORIGINALLY DESIGNED BY TOM JACKSON, IT WAS RECENTLY RENOVATED AND UPDATED BY RICK ROBBINS—A PRESTONWOOD RESIDENT UNTIL RECENTLY, WHEN HE MOVED TO COMPASS POINTE GOLF CLUB NEAR WILMINGTON—THE FULL-SERVICE COUNTRY CLUB ALSO INCLUDES A POOL, FITNESS CENTER, TENNIS COURSE, AND THE AREA’S LARGEST CLUBHOUSE.


MODERN SOLUTIONS FOR MODERN FAMILIES

BENDER LEFANTE LAW OFFICES, P.C. 313 E. Martin Street, Suite 100 | Raleigh, North Carolina 27601 info@benderlefante.com | (919)870-9600

midtownmag.com | 131


LONNIE POOLE GOLF COURSE, LOCATED JUST TWO MILES FROM DOWNTOWN RALEIGH ON N.C. STATE’S CENTENNIAL CAMPUS, IS THE ONLY COLLEGE COURSE BUILT BY THE ARNOLD PALMER DESIGN GROUP, WITH HEAVY INPUT FROM THE LATE LEGEND ALONG WITH ON-SITE DEVELOPMENT BY N.C. STATE GRADUATES AND NOTED GOLF COURSE ARCHITECTS ERIK LARSEN AND BRANDON JOHNSON.

132 | midtownmag.com


LAST YEAR, MACGREGOR DOWNS COUNTRY CLUB CELEBRATED ITS 50TH ANNIVERSARY AS CARY’S FIRST PRIVATE COUNTRY CLUB. WITH A WILLARD BYRD–DESIGNED CHAMPIONSHIP COURSE, IT REMAINS THE TOWN’S OLDEST HOME FOR GOLF AND IS A FAVORITE OF THE NORTH CAROLINA GOLF PANEL, WHICH REGULARLY RATES IT AS ONE OF THE BEST GOLF EXPERIENCES IN THE TRIANGLE.

The Top 12 Golf Courses IN THE TRIANGLE 1. Old Chatham Golf Club, Durham OldChathamGolf.org

2. Raleigh Country Club, Raleigh RaleighCC.com

3. MacGregor Downs Country Club, Cary MacGregorDowns.org

4. Prestonwood Country Club (Highlands), Cary Prestonwood.com

5. Governors Club, Chapel Hill GovernorsClubNC.com

6. Treyburn Country Club, Durham TreyburnCC.com

7. The Hasentree Club, Wake Forest Hasentree.com

8. UNC Finley Golf Course, Chapel Hill UNCFinley.com

9. Duke University Golf Club, Durham Golf.Duke.edu

10. Hope Valley Country Club, Durham HVCC.org

11. Prestonwood Country Club (Meadows), Cary Prestonwood.com

12. Lonnie Poole Golf Course, Raleigh LonniePooleGolfCourse.com

GOOD TO GREAT

www.carolinapartners.com

Success stories begin with great mental health.

GREAT Choice

132 clinicians in 37 statewide locations.

GREAT Savings Great everyday prices with or without insurance.

GREAT Service Quickest appointments and great customer service.

midtownmag.com | 133


ST. JAMES GOLF COMMUNITIES OFFER 81 HOLES OF SHEER GOLF PERFECTION. FOUR CHAMPIONSHIP GOLF COURSES SPREAD ACROSS OUR COASTAL LANDSCAPE. DESIGNED BY GOLF LEGENDS NICKLAUS DESIGN, P.B. DYE, HALE IRWIN, AND TIM CATE, OUR ELITE PRIVATE COURSES ARE HIGHLY ACCLAIMED.

ON BALD HEAD ISLAND, THE ONLY WAY TO TRAVEL IS BY GOLF CART—LITERALLY. THE RESORT COMMUNITY, ACCESSIBLE BY FERRY BOAT, DOESN’T ALLOW CARS, SO GUESTS MIGHT AS WELL STRAP ON A SET OF CLUBS AND PLAY A ROUND ON THE GEORGE COBB–DESIGNED, TIM CATE–RENOVATED COURSE, MOST OF WHICH INCLUDES VIEWS OF THE ISLAND’S 14 MILES OF PRISTINE BEACHES.

Through various full-panel outings and individual play around the state, members of the panel submit their ratings for best overall course and several subcategories annually. Durham’s Old Chatham Golf Club, designed by Rees Jones in 2001, tops the 2018 list for top courses in the Triangle, followed by the Raleigh Country Club, MacGregor Downs Country Club in Cary, Prestonwood’s Highlands course, and the Governor’s Club in Chapel Hill.

134 | midtownmag.com

All three of the university courses—North Carolina’s Finley Golf Course, the Duke University Golf Club, and N.C. State’s LPGC— are among the top 12 courses in the area. While the state’s golf industry suffered a downturn in the recession of 2008—longtime clubs like Cheviot Hills in Raleigh, Wake Forest Golf Club, and Crooked Creek Country Club in Fuquay-Varina all shut down—the sport, and the real estate opportunities it often creates, is

on the rebound. “Like in real estate, there was a market correction,” Brafford says. “But the golf industry has changed, the economy has rebounded, and the future looks good for both.” Author and writer Tim Peeler lives in Cary and is an original (but currently inactive) member of the North Carolina Golf Panel.


The

Top 12

Golf Courses ON THE N.C. COAST 1. Cape Fear Country Club, Wilmington CapeFearCountryClub.net

2. Eagle Point Golf Club, Wilmington EaglePoint.golf

3. Country Club of Landfall (Dye), Wilmington CountryClubofLandfall.com

4. Country Club of Landfall (Nicklaus), Wilmington 5. Bald Head Golf Club, Bald Head Island BHIclub.net/golf

2018

6. Leopard’s Chase, Sunset Beach 7. Tiger’s Eye, Sunset Beach 8. The Currituck Club, Corolla ClubCorp.com/Clubs/The-Currituck-Club/Golf

9. Thistle Golf Club, Sunset Beach ThistleGolf.com

B.O.B. AWARDS BEST OF THE BEST

10. St. James Plantation (Reserve), Southport StJamesPlantation.com

11. Porters Neck Country Club, Wilmington PortersNeckCountryClub.com

Vote for the BEST OF THE BEST in Western Wake! Your favorite salon, restaurant, grocery store, park trail, gallery and more!

12. Cape Fear National Golf Club, Leland BrunswickForest.com/championship-golf/

VOTING ENDS JULY 16th!

caryliving.com/bobs midtownmag.com | 135


DAVE SANSOM PHOTOGRAPHY

BEST GOLF

COMPASS POINTE GOLF CLUB, JUST OUTSIDE OF WILMINGTON, IS NORTH CAROLINA’S NEWEST PUBLIC GOLF CLUB, DESIGNED BY NOTED GOLF COURSE ARCHITECT AND PAST PRESIDENT OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF GOLF COURSE ARCHITECTS RICK ROBBINS, WHOSE COMPANY HAS BUILT DOZENS OF COURSES IN THE U.S. AND THE FAR EAST.

GETAWAYS BY

TIM PEELER

Golf is good in the Triangle, but where would you go for a quick golfing getaway? North Carolina’s varied topography makes any landscape an easy three- or four-hour drive. And there’s always a trio of places to play on your trip. Pinehurst bills itself as the home of American golf, and certainly deserves its spot at the top of the North Carolina Golf Panel’s list of Best Golf Getaways if you

136 | midtownmag.com

are looking to embrace the state’s links legacy. You can even do a taste of the Sandhills on a budget (No. 6). Each of the courses here are open to the public for daily play, whether you are on the Outer Banks (No. 2), on the Crystal Coast (Nos. 3, 4, and 7), in the Triangle (No. 8), the Triad (No. 9) or in any part of the mountains or foothills (Nos. 5 and 10).


The Top 10

Golf Getaways IN NORTH CAROLINA 1. Pinehurst No. 2, Pinehurst No. 8, Pine Needles Lodge & Golf Club (Sandhills) 2. Currituck Club, Kilmarlic Golf Club, Nags Head Golf Links (Coastal) 3. Crow Creek Golf Club, Leopard’s Chase, Thistle Golf Club (Coastal) 4. Cape Fear National Golf Club, Compass Pointe Golf Club, Magnolia Greens Golf Plantation (Coastal) 5. Boone Golf Club, Linville Golf Club, Mountain Glen Golf Club (Mountains) 6. Legacy Golf Links, The New Course at Talamore, Southern Pines Golf Club (Sandhills) 7. Beaufort Club, Carolina Colours Golf Club, Cutter Creek Golf Club (Eastern) 8. Duke University Golf Club, Finley Golf Course, Lonnie Poole Golf Course (Triangle) 9. Bryan Park Champions, Oak Hollow Golf Course, Tanglewood Park Championship (Triad) 10. The Golf Club at Ballantyne Hotel & Lodge, Highland Creek Golf Club, Olde Sycamore Golf Plantation (Charlotte)

SHOW SOME

LOCAL LOVE. sm

Shop Local Raleigh is about promoting and supporting locally-owned, independent businesses. It’s about fueling the local economy, and helping to preserve the unique character of Raleigh.

Make a difference.

SHOP LOCAL! www.ShopLocalRaleigh.org midtownmag.com | 137


138 | midtownmag.com


SPONSORED CONTENT

healthy you

Get YOUR

Summer shine on BY ANNA CHURCHILL

Synergy 919.510.5130 FeelSynergy.com

with RF Microneedling

Now that summer is upon us, you’re probably looking forward to long afternoons basking in the sun—slathered in SPF, of course! When it comes to skincare, though, summer can be a difficult time to squeeze in maintenance procedures because of the associated downtime. Microneedling with radiofrequency technology, also known as RF Microneedling, is a great summer treatment option. Microneedling works by creating micro channels in the skin, which causes a controlled wound-healing response in your body that stimulates the production of collagen and elastin. (These are the proteins responsible for your skin’s fullness, and they naturally diminish as you age.) Microneedling alone provides great benefits to the skin: It minimizes the appearance of fine lines, wrinkles, and thinning skin, and it even addresses acne scars and stretch marks. The addition of radiofrequency technology extends the treatment even further, reaching deep into the collagen-producing layers of the skin for even more dramatic results. While the treatment isn’t especially painful, your provider will administer a topical anesthetic to make sure you’re as comfortable as possible. The procedure itself is quick, as the insulated needles swiftly penetrate the skin. After your procedure, you may experience some temporary redness and slight swelling. Speaking from my own experience, my downtime was so minimal that I went out with my girlfriends the same afternoon after receiving the treatment—

with just a little bit of makeup. Along with minimal pain and no downtime from treatment, RF Microneedling is safe for all skin types, making this a great treatment for darker complexions, which aren’t candidates for laser treatments. It also can be used to treat scars and stretch marks on all areas of the body, not just your face. The ideal plan is to do three treatments scheduled one month apart; but with no downtime, it’s easy to fit into your schedule. The most collagen regeneration will be seen within the first three months of treatments and, in the six months following treatment, you’ll see maximum improvements in tightening, tone, and re-texturizing. If you’re looking for a way to spruce up your skin and don’t want to miss out on any summertime fun, RF Microneedling might be a good “no-downtime” option for you! Schedule a consultation with an experienced clinical skincare provider to learn more.

The information on this page is provided by the advertiser mentioned above to the public.

midtownmag.com | 139


140 | midtownmag.com


M Dining Guide Our directory of where to eat in Raleigh.

AFRICAN Abyssinia Ethopian Restaurant 2109-146 Avent Ferry Rd. 919.664.8151 abyssiniarestaurant.net

Capital Club 16 16 W. Martin St. 919.747.9345 capitalclub16.com

AMERICAN

Carroll’s Kitchen 19 E. Martin St. 919.670.3622 carrollskitchen.org

18 Seaboard 18 Seaboard Ave. 919.861.4318 18restaurantgroup.com

Clockwork 519 W. North St. 919.307.3215 clockworkraleigh.com Crawford and Son 618 N. Person St. 919.307.4647 crawfordandson restaurant.com

41Hundred 4100 Main at North Hills St. 919.278.1478 41hundredrestaurant.com Ba-Da Wings 2161 Avent Ferry Rd. 919.832.3902 badawings.com Berkeley Cafe 217 W. Martin St. 919.828.9190 facebook.com/ berkeleyraleigh/ Bloomsbury Bistro 509-101 W. Whitaker Mill Rd. 919.834.9011 bloomsburybistro.com

Death & Taxes 105 W. Hargett St. 984.242.0218 ac-restaurants.com/ death-taxes Edwards Mill Bar & Grill 3201 Edwards Mill Rd. 919.783.5447 edwardsmillbarandgrill.com

Glenwood Grill 2603 Glenwood Ave. #151 919.782.3102 glenwoodgrill.com

Trophy Tap + Table 225 S. Wilmington St. 919.424.7817 trophybrewing.com

Hayes Barton Cafe 2000 Fairview Rd. 919.856.8551 imaginarystudioonline.com/ hayes

Cameron Bar and Grill 2018 Clark Ave. 919.755.2231 cameronbarandgrill.com

Iris Restaurant 2110 Blue Ridge Rd. 919.664.6838 ncartmuseum.org/visit/dining

Kings 141 Park at North Hills St. 919.600.5700 kingsbowlamerica.com Lynnwood Grill & Brewing Concern 4821 Grove Barton Rd. 919.785.0043 lynnwoodgrill.com

Midtown Grille 4421 Six Forks Rd. 919.782.9463 themidtowngrille.com

North Ridge North Ridge Pub 6010 Falls of Neuse Rd. 919.790.9125 northridgepub.com Oak City Meatball Shoppe 180 E. Davie St. 919.714.9014 oakcitymeatball.com

Taste 3048 Medlin Dr. 919.322.0568 1912 Bernard St. 919.948.7815 jmrkitchens.com/taste

Bida Manda 222 S. Blount St. 919.829.9999 bidamanda.com

the Oak 4035 Lake Boone Tr. 919.787.9100 jmrkitchens.com/oak

Brewery Bhavana 218 S. Blount St. 919.829.9998 brewerybhavana.com

The Players’ Retreat 105 Oberlin Rd. 919.755.9589 playersretreat.net

bu•ku 110 E. Davie St. 919.834.6963 bukuraleigh.com

The Raleigh Times Bar 14 E. Hargett St. 919.833.0999 raleightimesbar.com

Chai’s Asian Bistro 8347 Creedmoor Rd. 919.341.3715 chaisasianbistro.com

The Rockford 320 ½ Glenwood Ave. 919.821.9020 therockfordrestaurant.com

Champa Thai & Sushi 8521 Brier Creek Pkwy. 919.806.0078 champathaisushi.com

The Station 701 N. Person St. 919.977.1567 stationraleigh.com

Chopstix 5607 Creedmoor Rd. 919.781.6268 chopstix.com

The Twisted Fork 3751 Sumner Blvd. 919.792.2535 thetwistedfork.com Village Grill 8470 Honeycut Rd. 919.890.5340 villagegrillraleigh.com

Second Empire Restaurant and Tavern 330 Hillsborough St. 919.829.3663 second-empire.com

Winston’s Grille 6401 Falls of Neuse Rd. 919.790.0700 winstonsgrille.com

Stanbury 938 N. Blount St. 919.977.4321 stanburyrestaurant.com

Zest Cafe & Home Art 8831 Six Forks Rd. 919.848.4792 zestcafehomeart.com

Standard Foods 205 E. Franklin St. 919.307.4652 standard-foods.com

ASIAN

CO Inside AC Hotel Raleigh North Hills eatatco.com David’s Dumpling & Noodle Bar 1900 Hillsborough St. 919.239.4536 ddandnb.com Five Star Restaurant 511 W. Hargett St. 919.833.3311 fivestarraleigh.com Hako Sushi 2603-155 Glenwood Ave. 919.235.0589 hakosushinc.com

midtownmag.com | 141


Imperial Garden 7713 Lead Mine Rd. 919.846.1988 imperialgardenrestaurant.com

ShabaShabu 3080 Wake Forest Rd. 919.501.7755 shabashabu.net

Kimbap Cafe 111 Seaboard Station #118 919.900.8053 kimbapcafe.com

Sono 319 Fayetteville St. 919.521.5328 sonoraleigh.com

Lemongrass Thai Restaurant 8320 Litchford Rd. #142 919.954.0377 lemongrassthairestaurant.net

Sushi Blues Cafe 301 Glenwood Ave. 919.664.8061 sushibluescafe.com

Mura 4121 Main at North Hills 919.781.7887 muranorthhills.com Neo-Asia 6602 Glenwood Ave. 919.783.8383 neo-china.com Ni Asian Kitchen 8817 Six Forks Rd. 919.916.5106 niasiankitchen.com Orchid Japanese Restaurant 7432 Creedmoor Rd. 919.890.5345 orchidjapanesebuffet.com Pho Pho Pho 510 Glenwood Ave. #103 phophophonc.com Pho Far East 4011 Capital Blvd. #133 919.876.8621 Pearl Chinese Restaurant 3215 Avent Ferry Rd. 919.233.8776 pearlchinesenc.com Red Dragon Chinese Restaurant 2513 Fairview Rd. 919.782.1102 reddragonraleigh.com Red Pepper Asian 4121-109 New Bern Ave. 919.594.1006 redpepperasiannc.com Seoul Garden 4701 Atlantic Ave. 919.850.9984 raleighseoulgarden.com

142 | midtownmag.com

Sugarland 2031 Cameron St. 919.835.2100 facebook.com/ sugarlandraleigh Duck Donuts 8323 Creedmoor Rd. 919.847.3800 duckdonuts.com

Sushi O Bistro + Sushi Bar 222 Glenwood Ave. 919.838.8868 sushioraleighnc.com Thaiphoon Bistro 301 Glenwood Ave. #190 919.720.4034 thaiphoonbistro.com Waraji Japanese Restaurant 5910 Duraleigh Rd. 919.783.1883 warajijapaneserestaurant.com

BAKERY & DESSERTS Anisette Sweet Shop 209 Bickett Blvd. 919.758.3565 sweetanisette.com Annelore’s German Bakery 1249 Farmers Market Dr. 919.294.8040 facebook.com/ anneloresgermanbakery

New World Cafe 4112 Pleasant Valley Rd. 919.786.0091 newworldcoffeehouse.com

BURGER & HOT DOG

Videri Chocolate Factory 327 W. Davie St. 919.755.5053 viderichocolatefactory.com

Spring Rolls Restaurant 4361 Lassiter at North Hills 919.783.8180 5433 Wade Park Blvd. 919.803.1118 springrollsrestaurant.com

Yellow Dog Bread Company 219 E. Franklin St. 984.232.0291 facebook.com/ yellowdogbread

The Morning Times 10 E. Hargett St. 919.836.1204 morningtimes-raleigh.com

BBQ Edible Art Bakery & Dessert Café 4351-115 The Circle at North Hills 919.856.0604 edibleartnc.com Escazú Artisan Chocolates 936 N. Blount St. 919.832.3433 escazuchocolates.com Goodberry’s Frozen Custard 2421 Spring Forest Rd. 919.878.8159 9700 Strickland Rd. 919.676.8580

Big Al’s BBQ 2920 Forestville Rd. 919.217.0653 bigalsbbqandcatering.com Clyde Cooper’s BBQ 327 S. Wilmington St. 919.832.7614 clydecoopersbbq.com Ole Time Barbecue 6309 Hillsborough St. 919.859.2544 oletimebarbecue.com The Pit Authentic Barbecue 328 W. Davie St. 919.890.4500 thepit-raleigh.com

2042 Clark Ave. 919.833.9998 goodberrys.com Groovy Duck Bakery 3434 Edwards Mill Rd. 919.787.9233 groovyduckbakeryllc.com Hayes Barton Cafe 2000 Fairview Rd. 919.856.8551 https://goo.gl/2aXSqM

Chow Pizza & Burgers 8311 Creedmoor Rd. 919.841.4995 chowraleigh.com Chuck’s 237 S. Wilmington St. 919.322.0126 ac-restaurants.com/chucks Cloos’ Coney Island 2233 Avent Ferry Rd. 919.834.3354 Jerry’s Grill 813 E. Whitaker Mill Rd. 919.832.7561 MoJoe’s Burger Joint 620 Glenwood Ave. 919.832.6799 mojoesburgerjoint.com Pharaoh’s Grill at North Hills 4421 Six Forks Rd. 919.420.0840

The Q Shack 4120 Main at North Hills 919.786.4381 theqshack.com

Snoopy’s Hot Dogs 600 Hillsborough St. 919.839.2176 snoopys.com

BREAKFAST SPECIALTY

CAFÉ Benelux Coffee 402 Oberlin Rd. 919.900.8294 beneluxcoffee.com

Bittersweet 16 E. Martin St. 919.977.3829 bittersweetraleigh.com

lucettegrace 235 S. Salisbury St. 919.307.4950 lucettegrace.com

Another Broken Egg Cafe 160 Park at North Hills St. 919.307.8195 anotherbrokenegg.com

Boulted Bread 614 W. South St. 919.999.3984 boultedbread.com

Premier Cakes 6617 Falls of Neuse Rd. #105 919.703.0095 premier-cakes.com

Brigs Restaurant 8111 Creedmoor Rd. 919.870.0994 brigs.com Jubala Coffee 8450 Honeycutt Rd. 919.758.8330 jubalacoffee.com

Despina’s Café 8369 Creedmoor Rd. 919.848.5007 despinascafe.com Manhattan Cafe 320 S. Wilmington St. 919.833.6105 manhattancafenc.com


Sola Coffee 7705 Lead Mine Rd. 919.803.8983 solacoffee.com Sosta Cafe 130 E. Davie St. 919.833.1006 sostacafe.com

Sunflowers Cafe 8 W. Peace St. 919.833.4676 sunflowersraleigh.com

Devolve Moto 304 Glenwood Ave. 919.803.3257 devolvemoto.com

Southland BBQ Catering 5000 Departure Dr. 919.757.4972 southlandbbqcatering.com

CARIBBEAN Caribbean Café 2645 E. Millbrook Rd. 919.872.4858 caribbeancafenc.com Jamaican Grille 5500 Atlantic Springs Rd. 919.873.0200

The Daily Planet Cafe 121 W. Jones St. 919.707.8060 thedailyplanetcafe.com

CATERING

Lee’s Kitchen 4638 Capital Blvd. 919.872.7422 leeskitchenjamaican.com

Catering Works 2319 Laurelbrook St. 919.828.5932 cateringworks.com

The Glenwood 3300 Woman’s Club Dr. 919.610.0872 theglenwoodvenue.com

Donovan’s Dish 800 W. Williams St. #112 Apex | 919.651.8309 10251 Little Brier Creek Ln. #107 | Raleigh donovansdish.com

DELI/SANDWICHES The Community Deli 901 Oberlin Rd. 919.896.6810 thecommunitydeli.com

Mum’s Jamaican Restaurant 3901 Capital Blvd. 919.615.2332 mumsjamaicanfood.com

The Pharmacy Cafe 702 N. Person St. 919.832.6432 personstreetrx.com

Groucho’s Deli 10 Horne St. 919.977.7747 grouchos.com

2018

Rocky Top Catering 1705 E. Millbrook Rd. 919.850.2340 rockytopcatering.com

Linus & Pepper’s 126 S. Salisbury St. 919.833.3866 Lunch Box Deli 2816 Trawick Rd. 919.872.7882 Poppyseed Market 8801 Lead Mine Rd. 919.870.4997 poppyseedmkt.com Village Deli & Grill 500 Daniels St. 919.828.1428 villagedeli.net

ECLECTIC 41Hundred 4100 Main at North Hills St. 919.278.1478 41hundredrestaurant.com ORO Restaurant & Lounge 18 E. Martin St. 919.239.4010 ororaleigh.com

DIAMOND

AWARD BEST PIZZA

Cary

100 Wrenn Dr #101, Cary, NC 27511

midtownmag.com | 143


Plates Neighborhood Kitchen 301 Glenwood Ave. 919.828.0018 plateskitchen.com

Kabab and Curry 2418 Hillsborough St. 919.977.6974 kababcurryraleigh.com

FRENCH

Kadhai the Indian Wok 6260-112 Glenwood Ave. 919.785.2864 theindianexpresskadhai.com

Crepe Traditions 141 Park at North Hills St. 919.977.3425 crepetraditions.com

Coquette Brasserie 4531 The Circle at North Hills 919.789.0606 coquetteraleigh.com Royale 200 E. Martin St. 919.977.3043 Saint Jacques 6112 Falls of Neuse Rd. 919.862.2770 saintjacquesfrench cuisine.com Simply Crêpes 8470 Honeycutt Rd. 919.322.2327 simplycrepes.com

GERMAN J. Betski’s 10 W. Franklin St. 919.833.7999 jbetskis.com

INDIAN Azitra 8411 Brier Creek Pkwy. 919.484.3939 azitra.com Garland 14 W. Martin St. 919.833.6886 garlandraleigh.com Godavari 9650 Strickland Rd. 919.847.1984 godavarius.com Indio Restaurant & Lounge 222 Glenwood Ave. 919.322.2760 indioraleigh.com

144 | midtownmag.com

Royal India 3901 Capital Blvd. 919.981.0849 royalindiannc.com Taj Mahal Indian Cuisine 6611 Falls of Neuse Rd. 919.848.2262 tajmahalindianraleigh.com The Wild Cook’s Indian Grill 3212 Hillsborough St. 984.232.8530 wildcooksgrill.com Zayka Indian Cuisine 10410 Moncreiffe Rd. Ste 103 919.361.5370 zaykaraleigh.com

IRISH Saints & Scholars Irish Pub  909 Spring Forest Rd. 919.878.8828 saintsandscholarspub.com The Hibernian 311 Glenwood Ave. 919.833.2258

Cafe Tiramisu Cafe Tiramisu 6008 Falls of Neuse Rd. 919.790.1006 cafetiramisu.net Caffé Luna 136 E. Hargett St. 919.832.6090 cafeluna.com Capri Restaurant   6325 Falls of Neuse Rd. 919.878.4424 caprirest.com Casa Carbone Ristorante Italiano 6019 Glenwood Ave. 919.781.8750 casacarbone.com Farina Neighborhood Italian 8450 Honeycutt Rd. 919.890.0143 farinaraleigh.com

Vic’s Italian Restaurant & Pizzeria 331 Blake St. 919.829.7090

Tarbouch 5645 Creedmoor Rd. 919.239.4408 tarbouch-nc.com

4035 Lake Boone Tr. 984.200.9292 vicsitalianrestaurant.com

Vivace 4209 Lassiter Mill Rd. 919.787.7747 vivaceraleigh.com

MEDITERRANEAN / MIDDLE EASTERN Aladdin’s Eatery 8201 Brier Creek Pkwy. 919.806.5700 aladdinseatery.com Fresh Levant Bistro 8450 Honeycutt Rd. 984.200.3999 freshlevant.com

Piccola Italia 423 Woodburn Rd. 919.833.6888 piccolaitalianc.com

Jasmin Mediterranean Bistro 424 E. Six Forks Rd. 919.743.3336 jasminbistro.com

Gravy 135 S. Wilmington St. 919.896.8513 gravyraleigh.com

ITALIAN

Jimmy V’s Osteria + Bar 420 Fayetteville St. 919.256.1451 jimmyvsraleigh.com

Assaggio Italian Restuarant 3501 W. Millbrook Rd. 919.785.2088 assaggios-nc.com

Sitti 137 S. Wilmington St. 919.239.4070 sitti-raleigh.com

Mulino Italian Kitchen & Bar 309 N. Dawson St. 919.838.8595 mulinoraleigh.com

8021 Falls Of Neuse Rd. 919.803.0290 hibernianpub.com

Amedeo’s Italian Restaurant 3905 Western Blvd. 919.851.0473 amedeosrestaurant.com

Tuscan Blu 327 W. Davie St. 919.834.5707 tuscanblu.com

Nina’s Ristorante 8801 Lead Mine Rd. 919.845.1122 ninasrestaurant.com

Bella Monica 3121 Edwards Mill Rd. 919.881.9778 bellamonica.com

Pulcinella’s Italian Restaurant 4711 Hope Valley Rd. 919.490.1172 pulcinellasitalianrestaurant.com

Bruno Seafood & Steaks 11211 Galleria Ave. 919.435.6640 brunoraleigh.com

Roma Pizzeria & Italian Restaurant 3805 Brentwood Rd. 919.876.2818

Mona Pita Mediterranean Grill 5260 Capital Blvd. 919.431.6500 monapita.com Neomonde 3817 Beryl Rd. 919.828.1628 neomonde.com Nur Mediterranean Deli & Market 2233 Avent Ferry Rd. 919.828.1523 nurdeli.com Petra Grill 6091 Capital Blvd. 919.599.4959 Sassool 9650 Strickland Rd. 919.847.2700 sassool.com

Taverna Agora 326 Hillsborough St. 919.881.8333 tavernaagora.com Taza Grill 6325 Falls of Neuse Rd. 919.872.7161 tazagrill.com Vidrio 500 Glenwood Ave. #100 919.803.6033 vidrioraleigh.com

MEXICAN Baja Burrito 2109 Avent Ferry Rd. #108 919.834.3431 bajaburrito.net Cafe Capistrano 8471 Garvey Dr. 919.872.1127 cafecapistrano.com Calavera Empanada & Tequila Bar 444 S. Blount St. 919.617.1661 calaveraempanadas.com Cantina 18 433 Daniels St. 919.835.9911 18restaurantgroup.com Centro 106 S. Wilmington St. 919.835.3593 centroraleigh.com Dos Taquitos 410 Glenwood Ave. 919.835.9010 dostaquitosnorth.com El Dorado 2811 Brentwood Rd. 919.872.8440 8111 Creedmoor Rd. 919.848.0788 eldoradomexicanrestaurant.com


El Rodeo 4112 Pleasant Valley Rd. 919.571.1188 elrodeoraleigh.com

Jose and Sons 327 W. Davie St. 919.755.0556 joseandsons.com

The Original Flying Burrito 4800 Grove Barton Rd. 919.785.2734 originalflyingburrito.com

El Tapatio 4511 New Bern Ave. 919.255.9161

La Carreta 1028 Oberlin Rd. 919.977.3271 lacarretaavl.com

Torero’s 4721 Atlantic Ave. 919.873.9116 torerosmexicanrestaurants.com

La Rancherita 2400 Hillsborough St. 919.755.9697 rancheritamex.com

Virgil’s Original Taqueria 126 S. Salisbury St. 919.833.3866 facebook.com/virgilstacos

Fogata Brava Mexican Bar & Grill 3351 Cypress Plantation Tr. 919.977.0168 fogatabrava.com Gallo Pelón Mezcaleria 106 S. Wilmington St. 919.835.3593 gallopelon.com

Los Cuates 4524 Old Wake Forest Rd. 919.872.6012 goo.gl/KHvrQe

Gonza Tacos Y Tequila 7713 Lead Mine Rd. 919.846.5478

Los Tres Magueyes 10410 Moncreiffe Rd. 919.484.9258 lostresnc.com

2100 Hillsborough St. 919.268.8965 gonzatacosytequila.com

San Jose Mexican Restaurant 5811 Poyner Village Pkwy. 919.790.1919

Gringo A Go Go 100 N. Person St. 919.977.1438 gringoraleigh.com

PIZZERIA Cristo’s NY Style Pizza 1302 E. Milbrook Rd. 919.872.6797 cristospizza.com DeMo’s Pizzeria & Deli 222 Glenwood Ave. 919.754.1050 demospizzeriadeli.com Donatos 111 Seaboard Ave. 919.828.5111 donatos.com

Lilly’s Pizza 1813 Glenwood Ave. 919.833.0226 lillyspizza.com

Moonlight Pizza Company 615 W. Morgan St. 919.755.9133 moonlightpizza.com

Pizza La Stella 219 Fayetteville St. 984.200.2441 pizzalastella.com

SOUTHLAND creative cuisine, superior service | BACKYARDS TO BOARD ROOMS |

renowned reputation

AWARD-WINNING BBQ Rocky Top chefs have combined their regional specialties into a menu chocked full of authentic, delicious cuisine. Call 919 850.2340 to get started with

THE BEST

our custom catering packages.

BBQ Y SOUTHLAND

| southlandbbqcatering.com |

PHOTO: F8 PHOTO STUDIOS

919 850.2340 ROCKYTOPCATERING.COM midtownmag.com | 145


Stromboli’s Express 2900 Spring Forest Rd. 919.876.4222 strombolisexpress.com

Trophy Brewing & Pizza 827 W. Morgan St. 919.803.4849 trophybrewing.com

SEAFOOD 42nd Street Oyster Bar 508 W. Jones St. 919.831.2811 42ndstoysterbar.com Captain Stanley’s Seafood 3333 S. Wilmington St. 919.779.7878 facebook.com/captainstanleys Dean’s Kitchen + Bar 1080 Darrington Dr. | Cary 919.459.5875 deanskitchenandbar.com Margaux’s Restaurant 8111 Creedmoor Rd. 919.846.9846 margauxsrestaurant.com Saltwater Seafood Market and Fry Shack 4 Fenton St. | 919.834.1813 saltwaterseafoodnc.com

Mami Nora’s 2401 Wake Forest Rd. 919.834.8572 maminoras.com

Poole’s Diner 426 S. McDowell St. 919.832.4477 ac-restaurants.com/pooles

Oakwood Cafe 300 E. Edenton St. 919.828.5994 oakwoodcaferaleigh.com

Provenance 120 E. Martin St. 984.269.5211 provenanceraleigh.com

Vinos Finos Tapas and Wine Bar 8450 Honeycutt Rd. 919.747.9233 vinosfinosypicadas.com

Relish Café & Bar 5625 Creedmoor Rd. 919.787.1855 relishraleigh.com

SOUTHERN Beasley’s Chicken + Honey 237 S. Wilmington St. 919.322.0127 ac-restaurants.com/beasleys Big Ed’s City Market Restaurant 220 Wolfe St. 919.836.9909 bigedscitymarket.com Driftwood Southern Kitchen 8460 Honeycutt Rd. 919.977.8360 driftwoodraleigh.com Humble Pie 317 S. Harrington St. 919.829.9222 humblepierestaurant.com Mandolin 2519 Fairview Rd. 919.322.0365 mandolinraleigh.com

The Cowfish Sushi Burger Bar 4208 Six Forks Rd. 919.784.0400 thecowfish.com

SOUTH AMERICAN Alpaca Peruvian Charcoal Chicken 4614 Capital Blvd. 919.713.0000 alpacachicken.com Guasaca Arepa & Salsa Grill 4025 Lake Boone Tr. 919.322.4928 guasaca.com

146 | midtownmag.com

Rye Bar & Southern Kitchen 500 Fayetteville St. 919.227.3370 ryeraleigh.com State Farmers’ Market Restaurant 1240 Farmers Market Dr. 919.755.1550 realbiscuits.com Tupelo Honey Cafe 425 Oberlin Rd. 919.723.9353 tupelohoneycafe.com Flying Biscuit Café 2016 Clark Ave. 919.833.6924 flyingbiscuit.com The Mecca Restaurant 13 E. Martin St. 919.832.5714 mecca-restaurant.com The Remedy Diner 137 E. Hargett St. 919.835.3553 theremedydiner.com

SPANISH NOFO @ the Pig 2014 Fairview Rd. 919.821.1240 nofo.com Pam’s Farmhouse 5111 Western Blvd. 919.859.9990 facebook.com/pamsfarmhouse

Latin Quarters 7335 Six Forks Rd. 919.900.8333 new.latinquartersnc.com Tasca Brava 607 Glenwood Ave. 919.828.0840 tascabrava.com

STEAKHOUSE Angus Barn 9401 Glenwood Ave. 919.791.2444 angusbarn.com Brasa Brazilian Steakhouse 8551 Brier Creek Pkwy. 919.544.3344 brasasteakhouse.com

Vinnie’s Steak House and Tavern 7440 Six Forks Rd. 919.847.7319 vinniessteakhouse.com

VEGETARIAN/VEGAN Fiction Kitchen 428 S. Dawson St. 919.831.4177 thefictionkitchen.com

Grabbagreen 4421 Six Forks Rd. #103 919.326.7799 Happy + Hale 443 Fayetteville St. 919.307.4148 happyandhale.com Irregardless Cafe & Catering 901 W. Morgan St. 919.833.8898 irregardless.com Living Kitchen 555 Fayetteville St. 919.324.3515 livingkitchen.com Raleigh Raw 7 W. Hargett St. 919.400.0944 raleighraw.com


Portraits, Wedding, Commercial & Lifestyle

PHOTOGRAPHY 919.389.5757 | f8photostudios.com

Let me help you reach your real estate goals for 2018.

Call me for a FREE

market analysis of your home.

Valerie Troupe

REALTOR | RCA | SPS 919.607.6118 | vtroupe@fmrealty.com

midtownmag.com | 147


OUT ABOUT &

JULY / AUGUST CALENDAR OF EVENTS | MIDTOWN MINGLES | NEW AROUND TOWN

POKE BOWL STATION Keep an eye out for these cool Poke Bowl stations at catered events this summer! cateringworks.com midtownmag.com| 149


calendar ofevents MARKET ON MARKET Every Wednesday, 11am–2pm 219 Fayetteville Street, Raleigh Market on Market, a program produced by the Downtown Raleigh Alliance, brings the highest quality of local growers and food artisans together for a Raleigh audience. godowntownraleigh.com MIDTOWN BEACH MUSIC SERIES Every Thursday in July–August 16, 6–9pm North Hills, Raleigh Spend some time movin’ and groovin’ to the beautiful sounds of beach music! visitnorthhills.com MIDTOWN FARMERS’ MARKET Every Saturday, 8am–12pm 4158 Main at North Hills Street, Raleigh Come to the market for a direct connection with 45+ new and returning vendors featuring locally produced breads, desserts, vegetables, produce, meats, and more. midtownfarmers.com THE ’WORKS! JULY 4TH AT THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE FAIRGROUNDS July 4, 6–9pm 1400 Edwards Mill Road, Raleigh Returning to the N.C. State Fairgrounds after six years, the annual July 4th fireworks will be launched from the Varsity Lot at North Carolina State University, adjacent to PNC Arena. visitraleigh.com MOVIES IN THE GARDEN: FROZEN July 5, 8:30pm 301 Pogue Street, Raleigh Movies in the Garden is a familyfriendly event including a free movie, concessions, and food trucks. raleighlittletheatre.org FIRST FRIDAY MARKET SERIES July 6 & August 3, 7–11pm 10 E Hargett Street, Raleigh This free street market features art and craft vendors, live music, and food. godowntownraleigh.com PIPPIN July 6–8 2 E South Street, Raleigh Circus spectacle and Fosse-style choreography explode from the stage in Pippin. This smash hit sweeps you into 150 | midtownmag.com

the hilarious and poignant quest of young Prince Pippin to find meaning in his life. nctheatre.com

And for those who secretly enjoy a reality show, this event is for you! visitraleigh.com

WORLD BEER FESTIVAL July 7, 12–4pm/6–10pm 1025 Blue Ridge Road, Raleigh Find, taste, and discover the beer of your dreams! It’s a chance to sample from over 250 craft beers from around the world. allaboutbeer.com

R’n’B & PAINT: 90s THROWBACK July 21, 7–10pm 300 S McDowell Street, Raleigh RnB performances will accompany you while you paint all night, including a performance by Janelle Symone. Attendants will receive a complimentary glass of wine or beer and snacks along with their ticket. visitraleigh.com

WELL FED, WELL SAID: A DINNER THEATER SERIES ABOUT FOOD AND HEALTH July 14, 7pm 3300 Woman’s Club Dr, Raleigh This Dinner Theater Series will explore food and health by discussing the health benefits of the evening’s menu. visitraleigh.com AFTER THE “I DOs” GAME SHOW July 20, 7:30pm 2 E South Street, Raleigh You know you love a good game show. You know you love a good comedy show.

DISNEY’S NEWSIES July 24–29 2 E South Street, Raleigh Adapted from the Disney film, New York City’s newsboys seize the day when they strike against unfair working conditions. nctheatre.com RALEIGH SPORTS CARD, MEMORABILIA & COMIC CON SHOW July 27–29, 9am–5pm 1025 Blue Ridge Road, Raleigh


Featuring 200+ vendor tables, guests can enjoy bargains from a huge variety of sports, hobby, memorabilia, and comic book dealers from across the region. visitraleigh.com RALEIGH SUPERCON July 27–29 500 S Salisbury Street, Raleigh Raleigh Supercon is a three-day festival for fans of pop culture, superheroes, science fiction, fantasy, and video games. It will take place at the Raleigh Convention Center. raleighsupercon.com DOWNTOWN RALEIGH FOOD TRUCK RODEO August 5, 3–9pm Fayetteville Street, Raleigh A half mile of food trucks and restaurants will be spread out over 11 city blocks for this fun event. downtownraleighfoodtruckrodeo.com FAMILY FUN NIGHT August 6, 5:30–7:30pm 201 E Hargett Street, Raleigh Join Marbles for this free, after-hours program exclusively for kids with special needs and their families to play in the museum in a calmer, quieter environment. marbleskidsmuseum.org

2018

Provide for low income families by donating fresh produce, frozen meats, and canned goods this summer

DIAMOND

AWARD BEST CAKES/SWEETS

midtownmag.com| 151


THE ’WORKS! JULY 4TH

at the North Carolina State Fairgrounds July 4, 6–9pm

CIRQUE DU SOLEIL CRYSTAL August 15–19 1400 Edwards Mill Road, Raleigh Cirque du Soleil Crystal is a brand-new arena creation that explores the artistic limits of ice for the first time in the company’s 34-year history. This unique production combines stunning skating and acrobatic feats that defy the imagination. visitraleigh.com NATURAL SELECTIONS August 17, 7–10pm 11 W Jones Street, Raleigh Join North Carolina brewers at the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences for this one-of-a-kind evening of beer and science among the museum’s dioramas. naturalsciences.org KICK-OFF TO KINDERGARTEN AT MARBLES KIDS MUSEUM August 18, 9am–5pm 201 E Hargett Street, Raleigh Celebrate starting school at Marbles Kids Museum! Practice a lunch line, get moving at recess, hop on a school bus, and much more. This event is free for rising kindergartners and their families. marbleskidsmuseum.org

152 | midtownmag.com

SUMMER DAZE MUSIC FESTIVAL August 18, 12–8pm 4011 Cardinal at North Hills Street, Raleigh The festival will be a celebration of music, local business, culture, and of course summertime vibes. It’s all taking place at Midtown Park in North Hills. visitnorthhills.com CAROLINAS IN MY MIND CULINARY ADVENTURE August 24, 6:30–10pm 2319 Laurelbrook Street, Raleigh Wayfarers experience elevated farm to table from Charleston to Manteo, Piedmont to the Mountains. cateringworks.com AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURAL FESTIVAL September 1–2 Fayetteville Street, Raleigh This annual festival celebrates African American Culture through art, food, music, and community. aacfestival.org


NATHAN RICHARDS PHOTO nathanrichardsphoto.com @@@nathanrichardsphoto nathanrichardsphoto@gmail.com 919.482.6700

midtownmag.com| 153


midtownmingles

KNACK DIY GRAND OPENING Knack DIY Grand Opening Day kicked off with a birthday for an awesome girl! We shared in the fun with 14 birthday crafters; we had lots of fun and there was lots of glitter!

WOMEN ON A MISSION This blowout dinner is a beloved annual event that was created by Eliza Kraft Olander and Ashley Christensen many years ago, with the purpose of raising money, through food and wine, to support the Frankie Lemmon School. They realized there must be many more women out there like them, with the same drive to make a difference. Thus, Women on a Mission was born. This is a ladies-only wine dinner where Ashley and some of the lady-bosses from her team of restaurants prepare a feast while Eliza pulls special bottles from her cellar.

NC THEATRE CAST PARTY NC Theatre celebrated the opening night of its production A Night with Janis Joplin at The Raleigh Times on Friday, May 4th. In attendance were the members of the cast, along with creator/ writer/director Randy Johnson, choreographer, associate director Grady McLeod Bowman, and members of the performance band.

midtownmag.com| 155


midtownmingles

ST. TIMOTHYS 60TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

On April 20th, more than 350 current and former parents, grandparents, faculty, and alumni attended the St. Timothy’s School Founders’ Day 60th Anniversary Celebration at the Pavillion at the Angus Barn. It was a fun-filled evening of fellowship, good food, and fundraising.

PACIFIC RIM CULINARY ADVENTURE DINNER Catering Works hosts globally inspired dinners called Global Culinary Adventures. Next Up: Carolinas in My Mind on August 2th.

LUNG CANCER INITIATIVE OF NC’S EVENING OF HOPE GALA

NORTH STATE BANK’S SUMMER SALUTE

On April 21st, more than 300 supporters were “Solving the Mystery of Lung Cancer” at the annual Lung Cancer Initiative of N.C.’s Evening of Hope Gala. More than $125,000 was raised to benefit lung cancer research, education, awareness, and advocacy initiatives in North Carolina. Attendees came together to build awareness, and raise critical research funding in the fight against lung cancer, while also enjoying live music, food, drinks, and silent and live auctions.

North State Bank’s Summer Salute for Transitions LifeCare was once again a fun time for all! Summer Salute kicks off the season North Carolina–style with beach music by The Embers, good food, and fun and games, all for a great cause.

156 | midtownmag.com


midtownmingles

ALBUM RELEASE PARTY FOR SMOKE FROM ALL THE FRICTION Our generation has so many doors open to us, yet we continue to stand in the doorways. Why? Raleigh-based Smoke From All The Friction released Transience, their first album, at Imurj on May 11th. Photos by Fon Denton.

JDRF HOPE GALA

VINNIE’S STEAK HOUSE FUNDRAISER Vinnie’s Steak House & Tavern graciously co-hosted a fundraising event with Get Stuff Done 4 Kids, which included raffle drawings, a silent auction, and a special five-course dinner with wine pairings. The event highlighted Chef Tom Armstrong and his team’s exceptional culinary skills while raising over $6,000, which will help fund Get Stuff Done 4 Kids’ mission to make a difference in the lives of deserving children.

The Triangle/Eastern North Carolina JDRF chapter, a nonprofit that raises money for type 1 diabetes research, recently held its 15th Anniversary Hope Gala at the Raleigh Convention Center. WRAL’s Debra Morgan was honored with the Living and Giving Award for supporting JDRF for more than 20 years. The event, which raised over $1.1 million for type 1 diabetes research, included a silent auction, a live auction, Fund A Cure spotlights, and to end the night dueling pianos and casino tables. It was truly an amazing night!

midtownmag.com| 157


midtownmingles

RALEIGH SENIORS CELEBRATE THE ROYAL WEDDING Residents of The Cardinal at North Hills, Raleigh’s premier continuing care retirement community, celebrated the Royal Wedding with a presentation titled “Queen Victoria and the Victorian Novel,” followed by the presentation of an authentic English wedding cake. One of the residents, a U.K. native, helped create the cake–a production in and of itself.

NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY’S ANNUAL “FRIENDS OF NOTE” LUNCHEON In May, the North Carolina Symphony held its annual “Friends of Note” luncheon, which has become known as one of Raleigh’s premier spring events. This year, the luncheon raised $93,000 in support of the Symphony’s extensive, statewide music education program.

158 | midtownmag.com


C O M I N G I N T H E SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER I S S U E

2018MEETTHEDOCTORS SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

PHOTO FEATURES DUKE CANCER INSTITUTE

D E A D L I N E T O R E S E RV E I S J U LY 2 7 919.782.4710

|

MIDTOWNMAG.COM

B.O.B. AWARDS VOTE FOR CARY LIVING’S 2018 B.O.B. AWARDS! THE BEST OF THE BEST IN WESTERN WAKE! DEADLINE TO VOTE IS JULY 16 W W W. C A RY L I V I N G . C O M / B O B S

2018

VOTE NOW !


160 | midtownmag.com


new aroundtown WAHLBURGERS RALEIGH “There is no better feeling than sitting at the table together, sharing good food, a few laughs, and lots of love. At Wahlburgers we strive to do this on a daily basis with every guest.” Wahlburgers in downtown Raleigh is serving up quite a lunch spread. Hint: Don’t leave without trying one of their adult frappes. The Fluffanuttahh is a staff favorite.

THE SAINT RALEIGH The Saint provides the premiere urban alternative to a suburban lifestyle. A landmark of luxury, this five–star location features 17 generously proportioned and gracefully appointed modern brownstone residences, laid out on four unique levels of composition.

KNACK DIY

PHOTO BY JOE REALE

KNACK DIY Craft Studio was built with you in mind! This craft studio is perfect for beginner to expert crafters ages 5 and up! Whether it’s a date or girls night, summer or track-out camp, birthday party or team-building event, they have you covered! Don’t worry, you got the KNACK of it! Check out our summer/track-out camps for ages 5 and up, they have hand sewing, wood signs, string art, pillows, and cupcake bath bombs. Check out all of their workshops at www.knackdiy.com. (Camp Tuesday through Friday from 9am to 12pm or 1pm to 4pm discounts for booking for a week.) PHOTO BY BRITTANY MURDOCK

midtownmag.com| 161


kaleidoscope living

F O O D FA N A RT Artist:Jennifer Heinser

“A simple ode to my favorite indulgence at Bad Daddy’s Burger Bar: A burger topped with tomatoes, house-made mozzarella, and banana peppers, then drizzled with olive oil and presented in a bun smothered in pesto. This “burger portrait” is the start of my adventuresome ambition to paint more local food and restaurants.” — Jennifer Heinser

Jennifer Heinser lives in western Wake and is a key contributor on the graphic design team at Midtown and Cary Living magazines. She enjoys watercolor painting, learning Arabic, kayaking, and indoor rock climbing. Mama Ricotta’s Burger Ink and watercolor, 8" x 5"

162 | midtownmag.com


OfďŹ cial Jeweler 4401 Glenwood Ave, Raleigh, NC 27612

(919) 571-2881

www.diamondsdirect.com Proud Sponsor


Profile for Midtown Magazine, Cary Living Magazine

Midtown magazine  

July/August 2018

Midtown magazine  

July/August 2018

Profile for midtown