Page 1

+

health & wellness report

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018

Growing Communities Cary Farms for Good Apex Funds Parks & Rec Holly Springs Goes Vertical


There’s a st�y behind every smile...

...we’d like to be part of yours. FAMILY DENTISTRY

|

TEETH WHITENING

ADULT ORTHODONTICS SEDATION DENTISTRY

|

C. ASHLEY

|

|

ONE-VISIT CROWNS

VENEERS

|

SNORING/SLEEP APNEA

|

IMPLANTS

DENTURES |

HEALTHY START

M A N N , DDS

Appointments available 7am-6pm Monday thru Friday

919.462.9338 | DrAshleyMann.com 315 E. Chatham Street | Suite 100 | Cary The Smile Makeover Center of North Carolina


2017

DIAMOND

AWARD BEST PLACE TO DE-AGE


publisher

A N O TE F R OM TH E

PUBLISHER/EDITOR Connie Gentry ADVERTISING SALES Mark Holmes | Charis Painter | Ashley Carter CREATIVE DIRECTOR Lori Lay GRAPHIC DESIGNER Jennifer Heinser SOCIAL MEDIA & MARKETING COORDINATOR Brittany Murdock

For instance in Apex, which is well known for its historic downtown, a $48 million bond passed in November that will fund the development of parks and recreation amenities, including the addition of a multi-use sports facility.

Everybody wants to know how Cary Living magazine is going to evolve. That’s the question I’ve been hearing since day one. The best part is that everyone also has a lot of ideas about how we should evolve: More food. More fashion. More home and garden. More health and wellness. More about neighborhoods, schools, and each downtown community. More about things to do and places to go and people who are making things happen. More, More, MORE! I love that everyone wants more of all the things that make for a fun and interesting lifestyle magazine. Another common theme in all of the suggestions I hear: more substance. Give us stories that matter, that showcase how each of the communities in Western Wake is evolving to become an even more integral part of the Triangle, while retaining all of the historical charm and individual character of its roots.

And Cary, which has long been recognized as the leading suburban community for Raleigh and RTP, seems to have no end to its potential for growth and its progressive initiatives. By itself, Cary ranks as the 7th largest city in the state, and the accolades just keep on coming: In 2017, Cary became the first Triangle community to be designated a certified Community Wildlife Habitat. Read more about the five communities in Western Wake (page 36), and how each is surging forward to become a destination for new residents, new businesses, and visitors from across the region.

PHOTOGRAPHERS Matt Williams Photography | Davies Photography Blaine Butler | F8 Photo Studios Davenport Projex Photography DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Joe Lizana

Cary Living is published six times annually. Any reproduction in part or in whole of any part of this publication is prohibited without the express written consent of the publisher. Cary Living is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photography or art. Unsolicited material is welcome and is considered intended for publication. Such material will become the property of the magazine and will be subject to editing. Material will be returned if accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. Cary Living will not knowingly accept any real estate advertising in violation of US equal opportunity law.

How are we going to evolve Cary Living? Exactly like Western Wake and the Triangle are evolving!

Connie

Please, keep telling me more!

Connie Gentry Publisher/Editor

Your opinions matter to us. Let us know what you think of this issue of Cary Living. Please email info@caryliving.com with your comments.

6 | caryliving.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Jackie Boeheim | Dave Droschak Kurt Dusterberg | Corbie Hill | Julie Johnson Bryan C. Reed | Monique M. Rogers Julianne Winkler Smith | Valerie Troupe Cheryl Capaldo Traylor | Ruhama Wolle

SUBSCRIPTIONS 6 print issues (1 year) only $20 Available online via paypal ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 4818 Six Forks Road, Suite 204 Raleigh, NC 27609 Phone 919.782.4710, Fax 919.782.4763 www.caryliving.com


Born in London, enjoyed around the world

ANY FURNITURE, ANY FINISH.

customize your furniture with over 200 finishes. 2030 Clark Avenue | Raleigh, NC | t: 919.803.0826 | StevenShellLiving.com

Furniture...Objets de vertu...Accessories and so much more.


w w w. z a k i . c o m

336-884-4407 SINCE 1977

Q u a l i t y • Va l u e Selection Your Finest Source for

the most diverse selection of quality

hand-knotted rugs imported from around the world.

100,000 sq. ft. Showroom with over 12,000 rugs individually selected by Zaki All sizes up to 17’x 28’ in stock Better Business Bureau award winner for promoting ethics in business Expert Rug Cleaning, Repair and Restoration

5,000 rugs (all sizes) available for even lower prices in our budget section.

600 South Main Street High Point, NC 27260

Monday-Saturday 9am-6pm


contents JANUARY/ FEBRUARY

2018

features 36 WESTERN WAKE SURGES FORWARD The five communities share a theme of progressive changes. 46 ROMANCING THE MEAL Valentine’s is the perfect excuse to visit our top romantic restaurants. 64 WELLNESS REPORT FOR THE NEW YEAR Pragmatic thoughts on fitness, nutrition, and coping with stress.

special section 57 HEART’S DESIRE Celebrate your love with fine jewelry that can be cherished for years to come.

departments 12 THE SOCIAL SCENE 14 TASTE 16 BEER & BARREL 18 CANDID CONVERSATION 22 MINDING YOUR BUSINESS 24 GIVING BACK 26 HEALTHY YOU 28 MUSIC SCENE

36 CARY BECOMES THE TRIANGLE’S FIRST CERTIFIED COMMUNITY WILDLIFE HABITAT

10 | caryliving.com

PHOTO BY MATT WILLIAMS PHOTOGRAPHY

30 STYLE LINE 32 WARES & WEARABLES 70 DINING GUIDE 77 OUT & ABOUT 82 KALEIDOSCOPE LIVING


socialscene

Let’s Connect!

Staci Soloway won our 2018 Diamond Awards Giveaway. She won a $500 gift card to North Hills, a night’s stay at the Renaissance Raleigh North Hills Hotel, with breakfast for two at 41Hundred.

// BY BRITTANY MURDOCK

BUILT Custom Burgers just opened in Alston Town Center. Their burgers and shakes make for the perfect lunch date.

Photo courtesy of BUILT Custom Burgers, Alston

Photo courtesy of Clean Juice Clean Juice has made its way to Park West Village. Best of all? Their juices, smoothies, and acai bowls are certified organic.

Shaun Russell was the winner of our B.O.B. Awards giveaway. He won a luxury one-night stay at The Mayton Inn, along with a couple’s 70-minute massage and a delicious Southernstyle dinner at The Verandah. L

Our very own Connie Gentry was a celebrity judge at the Stone Soup Supper put on by Urban Ministries of Wake County. It was a delicious event!

Get Social With Us! www.caryliving.com

12 | caryliving.com

c

CaryLivingMagazine caryliving caryliving


caryliving.com | 13


taste

The Best of Two Food Worlds LA FARM BAKERY ALIGNS WITH NEW WHOLE FOODS MARKET IN WEST CARY. // STORY BY JACKIE BOEHEIM, PHOTOS BY GINNY WILLIAMS

THE SUCCESS OF LA FARM BAKERY HAS BEEN CELEBRATED nationally through O, The Oprah Magazine, Garden & Gun, Food & Wine, and more, so it’s fitting that this savory local bakery would expand its business. Residents in West Cary are joyous that the bakery chose to open its third location close to home. Husband and wife team Lionel and Missy Vatinet opened their first bakery in Cary in 1999. The location features a dine-in area as well as a shopping space. Over the years, diners and shoppers have responded well to the centuries-old baking traditions that the team executes with passion. With a European-style hearth oven on hand, La Farm is able to crank out more than 15 different styles of bread. These breads are all hand-crafted and prepped for three days before serving. Not only do breads decorate the storefront, but diners can also relish in sweet treats and savory meals. This first location has picked up steam over the years, and it was evident that there was ample opportunity for another store and that the team needed to expand to meet the needs of its growing

14 | caryliving.com

customer base. Missy Vatinet knew right away that West Cary would be the ideal spot. “In West Cary we are closer to some of our current customers and, hopefully, more convenient to others who may not have had our breads and bakery items.” When Whole Foods Market opened a 40,000-square-foot location in Alston Town Center in November, the path was clear. Knowing the popularity surrounding La Farm Bakery, Whole Foods quickly gave La Farm an opportunity to be a part of the store. For La Farm, this was much more than just “another location,” this was a chance to connect with customers in a different way. “This gave us a rare opportunity to continue to educate our community and allow more people to be part of the grain movement that is starting throughout the world,” Vatinet states. “A place where our bakers can showcase breads made with grains from small farms, local mills, and scientists who are focused on heritage and heirloom grains.” The synergies between the two brands was undeniable: Whole Foods Market also believes in educating its customers about where


their food originates, how it affects the body, and how to stay healthy. The two companies share similar philosophies, and this is what makes the expansion work so well. La Farm Bakery has been open since November and, as with any new location, they have had their fair share of hiccups. In the beginning, the bakers had to find humor in the glitchridden ovens and the cashiers had to make customers laugh when the registers stopped working. But now, all the glitches have been worked out and Lionel and Missy have learned to laugh, a lot. An added treat at the West Cary location is that guests can experience Nitro Coffee, the process where nitrogen is added

to a cold brew. Coffee lovers often prefer a cup of nitro, as this method makes the coffee more potent, a bit creamier, and a touch sweeter. In January, La Farm will introduce breakfast sandwich sliders. Customers can grab a quick cup of coffee and a breakfast slider right at the coffee counter. If you think this is it for La Farm, you are wildly mistaken; the bakery continues to grow and is a proud staple in our community. “We’re excited to continue to develop our production bakery in downtown Cary. We will eventually finish the entire building, add a café, and possibly bring in other partners who are celebrating healthy grain as we are. We look forward to creating a real destination for bread and grain,” Vatinet states. L

c

caryliving.com | 15


beer&barrel

Design by Helms Workshop, Austin. Illustration by Kurt Lightner

Labels with

Artistic Allure // BY JULIE JOHNSON

TWO GRAPHIC DESIGNERS WALKED THE AISLES OF A LOCAL BOTTLE SHOP ON A MISSION: Without consulting one another, pick a beer based solely on the design qualities of its label, then talk about their choices over a pint. The challenge: Identify which designs work, and why? Nancy Frame, who is the creative director of her own eponymous design company in Durham, selected Paycheck Pilsner from Fullsteam Brewery in Durham. The can is wrapped in golden yellow and the name of the beer scrolls across the label. The only image is a small top hat in the lower right corner. “It’s just a gorgeous label. The brand mark is really interesting with the backwards ‘F,’” Frame says, pointing to the company’s logo that appears on all its products. “Then there is the gorgeous typography, and the cute little hat illustration. But what really sold me was this copy: ‘Beer from the Beautiful South. Crisp. Dependable. Rewarding. You’ve earned it!’ It’s got a tongue-in-cheek message. The look is very organized and well thought-out. It made me think that if they put that much into this package, the beer has to be good.” The typography, she explains, encompasses the selection and arrangement of type. “Each letter has a relationship to the next; it flows together in this really pleasing way. It has a nostalgic, vintage look. There’s a lovely shadow, and some transparent ink that is almost metallic-y. Someone who worked on it knew what they were doing, and that deserves to be rewarded.”

16 | caryliving.com

Her beer companion, David Watts, had been tempted to pick the same beer. The typography struck him, too. “The interesting characters they created with the ‘y’—the way the tail loops around— and the ‘k’ fills that space,” he says. “They designed the name of the beer, that whole unit, as a single area on the label.” Instead, Watts, the creative director with MSA Marketing in Raleigh, chose Bad Penny Brown Ale from Raleigh’s Big Boss Brewing Company. In a silk-screened image on the bottle, a woman stares straight at the viewer, wearing stylized flowers in her hair. Her look is challenging or sultry; the hair could be a bouffant or an Afro. “I probably could have selected any of their beers: as a whole line they work well,” he explains. “It’s a very retro look, it has some really interesting icons and graphic images they use on each beer. One of the things that attracted me was the name of the beers—I’m just intrigued by Bad Penny. There’s another one called Angry Angel. I have no clue what they mean for the most part, but I’m intrigued.” The label includes boxes beside a cryptic checklist: “Heads? Tails?” The brand mark is a shield outline enclosing the brewery name. “You might expect to see this stenciled on the back of a World War II airplane,” Watts adds. Lines of stylized figures in groups of five suggest a tally. The two labels were similar in some ways, each featuring a retro sensibility and a limited palette of two or three colors. Some other labels on the shelves suffered by comparison. “There are some down


Design by Scott Pridgeon, McKinney, Durham

there that have very elaborate illustrations, but you just kind of gloss over them,” Watts suggests. Frame had a different criticism. “There are a lot of bad looking labels. I saw a few that sort of put me off as a woman, a little misogynistic. That was kind of a turnoff.” In creating a label to catch a consumer’s attention, the designer has a canvas that measures a mere 3 by 3 inches, or so. “It needs few words, highly impactful visuals. You have to get their attention right away, and they have to sort of understand what you are trying to communicate quickly,” Watts says. But despite the limited space on each can or bottle, a unifying look across a whole brand can create what Frame calls a “billboard effect.” “You start seeing a pattern of repetition. It’s pleasing and creates strength on the shelf, something that’s consistent and powerful.” What competitors are doing is important, too. The Fullsteam and Big Boss images would not have been as effective if too many other North Carolina breweries were also going retro. “You want to zig when they zag,” Frame says. Ultimately, of course, all that a good design can do is tempt a consumer to pick up the bottle or can. If the contents disappoint, no amount of gorgeous typography will guarantee a second sale. L

c

caryliving.com | 17


candidconversation

The World is for Living // STORY BY KURT DUSTERBERG

18 | caryliving.com

PHOTO BY BLAINE BUTLER

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN ONE WOMAN SWAPS STATUS QUO FOR ADVENTURE AND GLOBAL TRAVELS.


LESLIE PRICE IS ALWAYS HEADED SOMEWHERE, although she rarely knows where she is going. Like so many people, Price spent years dreaming of places around the world she would like to visit. When her bucket list began to overflow and her job as a funeral director reminded her that life can be fleeting, she set out to change her work-life balance. A year ago, she quit the job in Orlando, reconnected with an old boyfriend in Cary, and moved to North Carolina. Since then, Price has been living out her adventures— arbitrarily. Along the way, she has gained a remarkable following on her blog, MyAdventureBucket.com. Her entries are rich with details about ancient temples, remote villages, and delicious meals. If all goes well, she hopes to leave the working world behind once and for all. Cary Living: It sounds like a 180-degree philosophical turn from funeral director to setting out to travel the world. Leslie Price: It was kind of a natural progression for me because I was confronted with that reality every single day. I remember the first person I buried who was younger than I was; he was 18. Actually seeing that happen, watching the family mourn his life and everything he never got to do, it makes you think of all the people with dreams unfulfilled. CL: Has travel always been a big part of your life? Price: I started traveling on vacations like normal people. Not everyone goes to Burma or Uganda on vacation. I would save up, go on one big trip a year, and show pictures to my friends and co-

workers and tell them stories. They would say, “You should write a book,” or, “You should write a travel blog.” In the back of my mind, I thought that would be cool. Being a funeral director is a high-stress job. I kind of got burned out. CL: How many trips have you written about on MyAdventureBucket.com? Price: When I started the blog, I got out my old handwritten journals and wrote posts about trips I had already taken over the past nine years. When I left the funeral home in February [2017], I gave away about 95 percent of my belongings, took my dog to summer camp in Virginia, and flew to India. I spent a couple of weeks there, and then went to Sri Lanka for a couple of months. When I came back, I got my dog and took her on a six-week road trip around the U.S. CL: I understand your destinations are chosen randomly. How does that happen? Price: I use a random number generator. About nine years ago when I was trying to figure out where I was going to go, my list was about 200 [places]. I couldn’t possibly prioritize them. So I plugged in my 200-something things just to see what it would spit out. It chose sailing down the Amazon. My husband at the time didn’t really want to go to South America. Nobody wants to go to all the places I want to go; that’s a constant issue with me. My random number generator sent me on the first solo trip I took, which was to Burma. But in 2009, the U.S. State Department was telling people not to go there. But [the number generator] picked this place, and that’s where I was going, end of story.

caryliving.com | 19


SRI LANKA

SRI LANKA

CL: Your writing and photography are very good. Have you done any writing in your past? Price: All I have written in the past 15 years are obituaries. I don’t have any formal training, it’s just something I enjoy. CL: How is this an affordable life? Price: When I quit my job, I took my life savings, which was maybe going to be for a house. But that’s too much commitment and too much of one place for me. I had enough to make a go of things for a year or two. I have had a little success monetizing the blog through affiliate sales, using links to travel websites, and I’ve sold a few articles. CL: Do hotels and resorts cover some of your expenses? Price: Some of them have, which I always disclose in the blog post. I had some success with that in Sri Lanka, especially, because it’s an up-and-coming travel destination. It’s not the first place people think of traveling to; they don’t get a lot of U.S. travelers. Right now, I have almost 85,000 Facebook followers. When I send out a request to a hotel or travel company to ask if they want to collaborate with me, I tell them how many followers I have on social media. If that’s more numbers than they have, they’ll say, “That sounds good.” CL: Since most of your trips are solo, what kinds of adventures do you seek out? Price: I want to see everything. I’m constantly out walking with my camera. I just want to absorb as much as I possibly can. 20 | caryliving.com

I don’t so much care for going to all-inclusive resorts. If all I see is a bunch of other Americans at the same resort, I’m not interested in that. I do need a little bit of luxury. I’m not 21 anymore; I can’t sleep in a rock-hard hostel bed. I need a little privacy and comfort, but I want to see how people actually live in other parts of the world. CL: What is your takeaway from this—about the world and the people you have encountered? Price: It’s that the world isn’t as scary a place as everyone thinks it is. When I went on my first solo trip to Burma, I had a secretary who was convinced she was never going to see me again. I get that a lot. People of a certain age, when they hear that a woman is traveling alone, they ask, “Aren’t you scared?” The world is not a scary place. Things can happen just as easily in Cary as in Rwanda. I’ve never had anything bad happen to me on my travels. If anything, people look out for you more when they see you are by yourself.

INDONESIA


CL: Do you plan to do this permanently, so you don’t have to get another “real” job? Price: I haven’t gotten to that point yet, and hopefully I won’t. I’ve been talking with Intrepid Travel about some larger projects down the road. I’ve got so many ideas about different things I want to write, that I don’t think I will have to go back to a conventional desk job—not yet, if ever. There are 618 things on my bucket list right now, and I’ve only checked off 100 of them. L

c

DHAMMA YA ZIKA PAGODA BAGAN, MYANMAR

GALLE SRI LANKA LIGHTHOUSE

caryliving.com | 21


mindingyourbusiness

Connecting in the Kitchen // STORY BY JULIANNE WINKLER SMITH, PHOTOS BY GINNY WILLIAMS

LIKE MANY CARY RESIDENTS, DAN AND DIANA SAKLAD CHOSE to relocate here because it’s touted as one of the best places to live, and they wanted to establish roots after moving frequently throughout their marriage. But unlike most transplants, they arrived 13 years ago with no jobs awaiting them—and a nebulous entrepreneurial dream seeded in their hearts. Dan had been in advertising, steadily ascending the corporate ladder and the pay scale. Unfortunately, the higher he rose, the less happy he became. When they landed in Cary, Dan changed his career trajectory and opened a franchise. Diana chose to stay home with their two children and focus on cultivating their Cary roots. “We knew we eventually wanted to run our own business,” Dan explains, “so a franchise was a good intermediary move for us.” But, Diana adds, “We were still ‘working for the man’ and knew this was just a stepping stone to our ultimate goal.” Over the next several years, they kept dreaming … and talking … and shaping their vision. “We’ve done a lot of global traveling,” Dan says, “and we always ended up in a kitchen store, so we felt this ‘ah-ha’ moment about what we could do.” And, according to Diana, “Cooking together has been a passion of ours since we first met, 22 | caryliving.com

serving as a stress reliever for us through the many seasons of life. It brings us a sense of peace and allows us to be creative.” With their idea for a kitchen/cooking business solidifying and their kids almost ready to leave the nest, they knew the time was right to launch their unique, local venture. In September 2013, the doors of Whisk opened—and, as envisioned, it was no typical kitchen store. “We were very careful to investigate the marketplace to find the gaps we could potentially fill,” Diana explains, and Dan adds, “We knew we couldn’t just do a kitchen store—that’s just products and anyone can do that. We wanted to create a true experience.” They looked around at the big-name companies in this niche business and intentionally worked to differentiate their brand and, simply, do it better. The Saklads had two primary goals for Whisk: They wanted to be an integral part of the community they love and bring together people with a common passion, creating a culture within the community that they could nurture and expand. They purposed to establish a place where people with no other commonality would have a reason to come together and form a bond. “More than a kitchen store, we wanted to be a destination,”


Dan says, “so we had cooking classes from the beginning.” In fact, they opened the doors with 25 cooking classes scheduled for the first month. By month two, every slot was filled. Diana adds, “We thought we’d have a kitchen store with cooking classes, but we are actually a cooking school with a kitchen store.” “Food is the great equalizer,” asserts Dan. “Food and cooking have been bringing people together for thousands of years. And it still does.” He talks about how customers and staff engage in daily conversations that might initiate on the topic of pot roast but that soon morph into heart-to-heart revelations of childhood memories, instantly connecting individuals who otherwise might never have spoken. “Despite where you’re from or how much money you make,” Dan continues, “we can all come together over the joyful experience of food.” Since Whisk opened its doors, the successes keep stacking up—evidenced not only by the awards they’ve received, like the Global Innovator Award from the International Housewares Association, but also by the breadth and depth of community they have created. “The recognition we’ve gotten for our innovative approach to creating this food experience has been amazing,” Dan says, “but that’s not what keeps our passion ignited. It’s our customers … our community.” This truth is evidenced by the numerous letters the Saklads receive sharing stories about how the Whisk community has changed lives. “This place often provides a haven, a reprieve for those whose lives are in a dark place,” Diana adds. “We support and encourage each other, and the impact is incredible.” Is Whisk a kitchen store? Yes. Is it a cooking school with hands-on learning meant to instruct and embolden the chef in all of us? You bet. But more than that, Whisk is a destination on life’s journey—an experience that inspires joy, passion, and connection. L

c

Visit whiskcarolina.com to learn more.

caryliving.com | 23


givingback

Living Out the Bucket List A LOCAL FOUNDATION HELPS MAKE WISHES COME TRUE FOR ADULTS WITH CANCER // STORY BY CORBIE HILL

BETWEEN THANKSGIVING AND THE NEW YEAR, PEGGY Carroll’s nonprofit granted seven wishes to adults coping with cancer. The wishes ranged from cross-country travel (a son was flown home for the holidays) to a local trip (one woman simply wanted to see Christmas lights). From big to small dreams, the Fill Your Bucket List Foundation obliged, making the holidays just a little bit happier for seven patients and their families. But that was only a portion of the 2017 giving for this Cary-based nonprofit. In just a few years, Fill Your Bucket List Foundation has risen to many challenges for granting the bucket list wishes of financially disadvantaged cancer patients, mostly within North Carolina. “We just celebrated our third anniversary,” Carroll says. “The first year we did two wishes, and by the end of ‘17, we [granted] 60 wishes. We have been busy.” Carroll knows firsthand how important it is for cancer patients to live their dreams. A little over nine years ago, it was her own father’s terminal cancer diagnosis that started this entire mission. He had late-stage lung cancer and Carroll, who has worked in cancer patient advocacy for 35 years, knew there wasn’t much time. So she asked, “What do you want to do? What is your bucket list?” Her dad’s wishes revolved around his grandchildren, Carroll’s children, who were in high school at the time. He wanted to see them play in the school band competitions, and he got his wish. He succumbed the next day, his bucket list complete. Carroll knew then that she wanted to do the same thing for other cancer patients, especially those who didn’t have the means to live their dreams. A few years later, she was able to launch Fill Your Bucket List Foundation. “Our mission is to grant wishes to North Carolina patients who have cancer, also are struggling financially, and are over 19 years old—because Make a Wish does such a great job under 19,” Carroll 24 | caryliving.com

says. “We help people who couldn’t afford to do what they wanted to do … maybe have a little bit of time and wonderful memories where they’re not thinking about cancer for a little bit.” It works like this: There’s a form on the Fill Your Bucket List Foundation’s website where anyone can nominate a person. The Foundation’s two criteria are that the person needs to be below the poverty line and their doctor has to give permission for them to participate (especially if the wish involves travel). Cancer puts everyone in a financial strain, Carroll knows, but she feels people who have the means are more likely to be able to pursue bucket list items than patients who were impoverished even before their diagnosis. “Unfortunately, the need is huge,” she says. “Cancer is huge, and everybody is touched by it.” Accordingly, Fill Your Bucket List wants to reach as many people as possible without losing its one-on-one emphasis: Each bucket list item, after all, is specific to the person and family touched by it. The wishes have included trips to New York City and Nashville, Tennessee. One golfer wanted to play Pinehurst No. 2, while others have taken their families to Disneyworld. Bucket list items run the gamut from seats at the Super Bowl and at Carolina/ Duke games, to birthday celebrations and anniversary parties. Some wishes are poignant for their simplicity. “One lady—we could not get her to do anything for [herself]— but she wanted to buy gifts for her family. We said, ‘We will do it, but you have to buy yourself something at Walmart,” Carroll recalls. “We’ve had a lot of patients who want to see the ocean. They live here and they’ve never seen the ocean. “ And this is one place where Fill Your Bucket List’s donors are able to step in and help: They’ll donate their beach house for a week to wish recipients who want to see the sea. UNC students donate their time to work on the foundation’s PR, and volunteers


range from individuals and families to youth groups and companies. These are the people who keep the foundation afloat. “Truly, Cary, Raleigh, and the Triangle are why we’re so effective,” Carroll says. “The people in this community are so giving of their time and their resources.” Every year, the foundation holds one big fundraiser: This year’s Bucket Bash will be March 24th at North Ridge Country Club in Raleigh, and this is when Fill Your Bucket List raises all the funds for a year’s worth of wish fulfillment. Wish recipients are invited to attend as the guests of honor, and the foundation is always looking for volunteers to help with the Bucket Bash. After all, this nonprofit has now checked off enough bucket list items to know the effect its work has. About half the people Fill Your Bucket List helps have positive health outcomes after having their wishes granted, Carroll notes. Indeed, many of them have simple, straightforward things they want to accomplish before they die, and seeing these things through is a relief and a cause for celebration. “I believe we all should live our bucket list all the time, but unfortunately sometimes it takes a diagnosis to go, ‘Okay, what do we want to do?’” Carroll says. “And then we do it. I’m a big believer of doing it all the time.” L

c

Fill Your Bucket List Foundation Learn more at fillyourbucketlistfoundation.org

BUCKET BASH GALA 2018 What: Fill Your Bucket List Foundation’s annual fundraiser Where: North Ridge Country Club, Raleigh When: March 24th @ 6pm. Learn about tickets, donation, and volunteer opportunities at fillyourbucketlistfoundation.org/bucket-bash

caryliving.com | 25


healthyyou

When Should You Schedule Your Child’s First Orthodontist Appointment? BY DR. HENRY ZAYTOUN, JR., ZAYTOUN ORTHODONTICS

THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF ORTHODONTISTS suggests that all children be seen by an orthodontist by age seven. By scheduling the first orthodontist check-up when children are young, early problems can be identified and addressed as needed. However, not all problems should be treated early. The only issues that warrant early intervention are those that would lead to more extensive problems and more aggressive treatment if they were left untreated until a later age when most permanent teeth have erupted. Technology in orthodontics is progressing at an amazingly fast rate, making that first orthodontics evaluation an easy experience even for very young children. In many cases, those yucky impressions (the ones that the parents of young children probably recall with a grimace) have been replaced with a digital scan. The scanner takes a series of pictures of the teeth, from which all sorts of orthodontic appliances can be made— including retainers and aligners.

26 | caryliving.com

Most people know that retainers are used after orthodontic treatment ends to keep teeth aligned for years to come. As for aligners, most people have heard of the Invisalign brand, which uses plastic trays instead of braces to move teeth and, in turn, improve your bite. Aligner treatment is almost invisible and, when designed properly by an orthodontist, it can be a very effective way to straighten teeth without braces. Aligners are often used by adults who were treated with braces as a child but have experienced shifting of their teeth as they grew older. And teenagers are also prime candidates for aligners—not only because the aligners are hardly noticeable, but also because of the ease of flossing and brushing with aligners. Plus, they can still eat all the hard, sticky foods that have to be avoided with braces. Regardless of whether braces or aligners are needed, visiting an orthodontist early will set your child on a course to a beautiful healthy smile for years into the future. L

c


2018

DIAMOND

AWARD

2018

BEST PET GROOMING

Cameron Village & Cary Premium Foods

Grooming

Training

Self-Wash

Collars & Leads

Accessories

Baked Treats

Toys & More

DIAMOND

AWARD BEST LOCAL PET STORE

WoofGangNC.com CARY

|

305 Ledgestone Way

CAMERON VILLAGE

|

|

2046 Clark Ave

919-297-2275 |

919-420-0065

We’re open 7 days a week and groom every day! Call for an appointment! caryliving.com | 27


musicscene

Distilling New Sounds WINCHOP SHARES SIPS AND SONGS WITH THEIR #WHISKEYCOVERS SERIES // BY BRYAN C. REED

THE SETUP IS SIMPLE: TAKE A SIP OF WHISKEY. Play a condensed version of a well-known song. Post the video. Those three ingredients make a Whiskey Cover, and—for the Raleigh-bred duo behind Winchop—this creative exercise might be the ticket to forging a fan base. Winchop wasn’t meant to be a band, not exactly. To wit, the “musical project” has never played in front of a live audience. It all started when songwriter Wilson Slagle decided he’d like to put some of his work to tape and enlisted the help of Gus Vieweg, a former classmate at the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics. “Wilson bought this knockoff microphone and this supercheap mixing interface and just plugged them into his aging MacBook Pro,” Vieweg recalls. “He was like, ‘Okay, we’re recording professionals now. Here we go.’” After five days over a break from college—Slagle is an architecture student at Syracuse University; Vieweg earned his engineering degree from N.C. State—the duo had cut 11 songs and assembled its first album, 2014’s Flintrock, a precocious and clever collection of rangy, lo-fi pop songs dashed with elements of classic rock, new wave, and pop punk. In 2016, they followed Flintrock with another five-day recording spree, yielding the punchier and more streamlined Passion Fruit. But when neither album managed to find an audience, Winchop reached a crossroads. Slagle recalls, “We had a period of wondering, ‘Do we want to do a third one? Do we want to do music anymore at all?’” “The logistics are super difficult because I’m Raleigh-based and Wilson goes to school in Syracuse, [New York],” Vieweg says. 28 | caryliving.com

“I can’t keep doing this ‘11 songs in five days’ nonsense. So we had a big talk and were like, ‘Okay, let’s do it again, but let’s do it right,’” Vieweg says. Winchop partnered with Raleigh producer Ryan Chabon, of Crimson Moon Records, to give the forthcoming Look Who’s One! a fuller, more professional sound. But a bolder sound alone doesn’t help attract new listeners. The other side of “doing it right” means marketing the music more effectively. “A lot of bands really suck at putting themselves out there and marketing themselves,” Slagle says. “I didn’t know this until we

PHOTO BY MIKAYLA TENCER


GUS VIEWEG (L), AND WILSON SLAGLE (R).

PHOTO BY MIKAYLA TENCER

started trying.” But with a long-distance band neither able nor inclined to play the usual bar gigs, Winchop needed a different angle. They found it in June, when Slagle posted an Instagram video of himself playing The Beatles’ I Saw Her Standing There after a few drinks. Friends liked it. The band was inspired. Between recording sessions with Chabon, the pair started recording similar videos together, giving them the hashtag #whiskeycovers. The idea grew.

“Once we turned it into a format,” Vieweg says, “we thought, ‘Okay, people are responding to this, how do we make it more interesting? How do we put ourselves out there a little bit more? We could actually do this at whiskey distilleries and whiskey bars.’” Before Slagle went back to school, the duo recorded covers at Mystic Distillery, TOPO Distillery, and Raleigh Rum Company, offering the local businesses a bit of potentially viral content, while helping to promote their own brand with the now-weekly series. The distillery videos are interspersed among clips of Vieweg and Slagle playing individually in living rooms or on Italian street corners. In addition to helping Winchop garner attention, the project has also affected the band’s artistic development. Exploring different styles and distilling popular songs to their most memorable 60 seconds have left an imprint on the duo. “Doing this has helped me grow as a singer and as a performer,” Vieweg says. And if the teaser single Meteoric Rise is any indication, that growth and polish promise to be on full display when Winchop’s third album arrives early this year. L

c

caryliving.com | 29


PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHNSON PUBLISHING COMPANY, LLC

PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHNSON PUBLISHING COMPANY, LLC

stylescene

EUNICE JOHNSON AT WORK, 1970

An Empire of Empowerment FASHION, HISTORY, AND COMPETITION COALESCE AT THIS year’s Ebony Fashion Fair. Since 1958, the Ebony Fashion Fair has exhibited exquisite ensembles that give vision to black America through fashion. At its inception, creator Eunice W. Johnson wanted every woman to experience fashion—and she overcame racial prejudice to create a world that really didn’t exist before. In a time when European fashion houses were segregated, Johnson was determined. Essentially by taking European fashions and putting them on black and brown models, she was able to influence perception so that people finally got a sense and a celebration of black style. Johnson’s imagination for her community created a surreal and inclusive consumer culture for African-Americans to explore design, fashion, and art. It’s a culture that has evoked a lasting impact: “The first time I saw women who looked like me be so fashionable was in the pages of Ebony,” says Desirée Rogers, former White House social secretary who is now CEO of Johnson Publishing Company. What started as a fashion show to raise money for a hospital in New Orleans has evolved into one of the largest traveling fashion tours of today, raising more than $55 million for charity. 30 | caryliving.com

// STORY BY RUHAMA WOLLE PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM OF ART

Designers including Oscar de la Renta, Yves Saint Laurent, Christian Dior, and Valentino came to respect Johnson, who is being honored as part of the “Inspiring Beauty: 50 Years of Ebony Fashion Fair” exhibit at the North Carolina Museum of Art. Open to the public from October 28th through January 21st, the exhibit features 40 ensembles from various designers as well as photographs and memorabilia from Ebony magazine. In many of the garments in the exhibit, you see a combination of diva stage wear and avant-garde pieces. One particular piece—the “I Love Fashion Scandal” (Fall/Winter 1986) by black designer Patrick Kelly—reveals the current conversation in fashion of “color and diversity.” His piece is a play on racial stereotypes in the U.S. from bygone eras. On the front of the gown is a facial caricature that relates back to the images of pickaninnies in the early 1900s. Kelly’s life and business partner, Bjorn Guil Amelan, explains that deliberately “focusing on stereotypes in his work was his way of celebrating [diversity], not hiding it. He wanted to make it ours and remove the poison.” To celebrate the opening of the “Inspiring Beauty” exhibit, a memorable runway fashion show featured design students from


local universities: Appalachian State, North Carolina A&T, North Carolina State, and UNC-Greensboro. The students competed for cash prizes and were evaluated by fashion industry icons, including Zang Toi, Faye Clerk Moseley, and Victor and Sarah Lytvenenko of Raleigh Denim. Desiree Hedrick, a student at N.C. A&T, took home the 1st Place Best of Show award and a $1000 prize. Her winning entry, titled “Power Meets Beauty,” was a purple jumpsuit with a wire vest. During the event, former model Shayla Simpson explained, “We touched so many lives, it wasn’t just about the models being on stage and selling beautiful fashions across the country and entertaining people. Thousands of young people went to college because of Ebony Fashion Fair.” The exhibit at the N.C. Museum of Art showcases how Eunice Johnson shaped fashion as a whole, paved the way for AfricanAmericans in the industry, and ultimately challenged the concept of beauty. L

c

shotsbyblaine.wixsite.com 336.908.3899

|

/blaynegretzky

caryliving.com | 31


wares&wearables

A Place to Gather

Cozy Spaces, Candlelight and Warm Fires

STYLED BY VALERIE TROUPE VALERIETROUPE.COM PHOTOS BY F8 PHOTO STUDIOS F8PHOTOSTUDIOS.COM

THE BITTER COLD OF WINTER CAN KEEP EVERYONE INDOORS. Having a warm, welcoming place to gather is key. An overstuffed sofa by the fire with snuggly blankets and fun pillows begs you to kick off your snow boots, relax, and enjoy your mug of cocoa. Don’t forget the aromatics! Potpourri keeps the house smelling great, and scented candles add a warm glow while tantalizing the nose with various invigorating or relaxing scents. When you have to step outside, wrap up tight in a beautiful cashmere scarf. You can even gather outside around the fire pit and roast marshmallows for s’mores! It’s easy to keep the dark days of winter at bay when you have all the things to stay warm and cozy with your loved ones.

1

2

3 32 | caryliving.com


4

5

6

1 Mason Jar Candles with choice of graphic, scent, and color, $35 per class The Devilish Egg 2 “Lucy” Ottoman by Norwalk Furniture, $1,374 | Furnish 3 Fire Bowl in “Ocean Mist,” $168 | Garden Supply Company 4 “Three Kings” Amber Glass Plate by Thomas McKeon, $85 Cary Gallery of Artists 5 Necklace, $58 | Cashmere Dress Topper, $102 Sophie & Mollies Boutique 6 Swivel/Glider Chair (blue), $840 | Transitional Three Cushion Sofa, $1739 Dexter

caryliving.com | 33


wares&wearables 7 “Let It Snow” Pillow, $49 | “Red & Blue” Throw, $49 | The Perfect Piece 8 Cashmere Scarves, $78 | Silver Heart Necklace and Earrings Set, $45 Elizabeth’s Home & Garden Shop 9 Custom Wood Plantation Shutters | Prices vary Southern Accent Shutters & Blinds 10 Dauphine King Bed, $1,686 | Steven Shell Living

7

9 8

10

34 | caryliving.com

PHOTO BY JOE REALE


2018

DIAMOND

AWARD BEST ORTHODONTIST

caryliving.com | 35


WESTERN WAKE

36 | caryliving.com

Surg For w


es ward Five communities with diverse characteristics share a theme of progressive changes and energized living. // BY CHERYL CAPALDO TRAYLOR

PHOTO BY KURT HILTON PHOTOGRAPHY

WHERE GREEN COLORS THE FUTURE Mention Cary and the word growth almost instantly enters the conversation. New roads, schools, homes, parks, and shopping centers are continually sprouting everywhere. But what else is growing in Cary? Wildlife habitat gardens, native plants, and sustainable food crops! In 2017, Cary became the first community in the Triangle to be designated a certified Community Wildlife Habitat. The in-depth certification process normally takes four to five years to complete. With the help of many eager citizens, Cary achieved it in two. The program began in January 2015 when the Town of Cary’s Environmental Advisory Board recommended it to the town council and garnered unanimous approval. The town partnered with the National Wildlife Federation to create the Cary Garden for Wildlife Program. The town was required to have 400 participants including a mix of homeowners, schools, and community groups like churches. Each of these contributors pledged to make their own gardens “certified wildlife gardens” by engaging in sustainable gardening practices and by providing wildlife with food and water sources, places to raise their young, and shelter from predators and weather. Cary Town Council at-large representative, Lori Bush, says, “The goal is to give people a way to connect to their natural world, whether through enticing birds, butterflies, bees, or other wildlife—right where they are.” To reach this goal, the town held environmental educational events such as compost workshops and nature walks to help inform citizens about the importance of creating healthy ecosystems. One of the town’s value statements is: “We will preserve and protect our environment. We will be good stewards of our finite resources.” This program affirms that Cary is a community dedicated to maintaining a healthy environment— not only for its citizens, but also for its wildlife. Bush says it is important to replace any natural habitat that is lost when development occurs. “When we do things like use rain barrels, [practice] composting, put in native plants, or hang bird feeders and add birdbaths, we encourage the wildlife to come back to the area. And that really helps all of us,” she explains. As a bonus, this program brings communities together by connecting people to one another as well as to nature. Homeowner associations came together and supported Gardens for Wildlife by creating community gardens, as did several schools. “It was a community effort that was across the board,” Bush says. caryliving.com | 37


PHOTO BY KURT HILTON PHOTOGRAPHY

Current Population: 160,000+ Projected Population in 2020: 192,925

Average Age: 39.9 What’s in store for Cary in 2018? More growing, specifically local food crops. The Town of Cary will continue working with Good Hope Farm, a working farm located at the corner of Morrisville Carpenter Road and Louis Stephens Drive. The farm is a partnership between the Town of Cary and a number of public and private organizations. Community support for the farm has been remarkable. “It’s really about creating and preserving farmland, and preserving our heritage and our history,” Bush says. “The goal is to support historical preservation, support food access so people can see where their food comes from, and support conservation and community education. It’s a great innovative use of open space so people can learn about farming.” Today, all of the farmers sell produce to local markets and restaurants. This year Good Hope Farm plans to begin a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) service and will also have a farm stand to sell produce directly to the public. Visitors and volunteers are welcome to come out and see for themselves what a special place it is. (For more information visit goodhopefarm.org.) Although Cary continues to grow rapidly, it manages to retain that hometown feel. “Even though we are 160,000 people, we’re still a town,” Bush says. “We know our neighbors. We help our community. It’s an amazing place to work, live, play, and serve.” 38 | caryliving.com

SOURCE: TOWN OF CARY

Average Household Income: $95,347


PHOTOS COURTESY OF GOOD HOPE FARM

A BARN AND GREENHOUSE AT GOOD HOPE FARMS.

VOLUNTEERS WORK AT GOOD HOPE FARM’S ENTRANCE.

A HERON AT UMSTEAD STATE PARK

PHOTO BY MATT WILLIAMS PHOTOGRAPHY

caryliving.com | 39


PHOTO BY FLYBOY PHOTO & MEDIA

Planning For All Generations Few question that Apex is indeed The Peak of Good Living, particularly as residents continue to take the town’s motto to heart. In the November election, a $48 million parks bond to fund the development of parks and recreation amenities passed with a 76 percent approval rate. Pleasant Park, one of the planned future parks, will include a multi-use sports facility near the intersection of 540 and old US Highway 1. Construction could begin as early as spring. “The passing of this bond is an exciting thing for Apex,” says Shannon Flaherty, executive director of the Apex Chamber of Commerce. “From a business perspective, the expansion of athletic fields, such as baseball and soccer, at 40 | caryliving.com

Pleasant Park will [position] Apex more in the market to be able to facilitate tournaments that other towns currently have. And when folks come from out of the community for these events, they bring their dollars to our community.” Other bond projects include the completion of two Apex greenways—Beaver Creek and Middle Creek—and the expansion of the Community Center/Senior Center. Flaherty says all of these projects benefit Apex residents. “Whether it’s the tournaments bringing in money to businesses or the senior center that will be exciting for our senior community, it’s all a good thing for Apex,” she says. “At the end of the day, we’re all in this together.”


Current Population: 50,671

Average Household Income: $89,392 Average Age: 35.9

SOURCES: CENSUS.GOV / APEXNC.ORG

Projected Population in 2020: 71,186

RENDERINGS COURTESY OF WITHERSRAVENEL AND THE TOWN OF APEX

ABOVE AND BELOW: PLANS FOR PLEASANT PARK

caryliving.com | 41


Downtown Rising— Figuratively and Literally

It’s an exciting time to be living in Holly Springs. The town recently became North Carolina’s first Certified Entrepreneurial Community under the leadership of economic development director Irena Krstanovic. One of the goals of this program is to support people who are starting and growing businesses. Another goal is to develop events and activities that will bring Holly Springs residents together downtown. As a result of this initiative, the Downtown Village District will experience rapid development in 2018. Work will begin on several projects that have been in the planning stages for more than a decade. Among them is the construction of more office and retail space, as well as the expansion of current businesses. The town will also add a parking deck, streetscaping, and sidewalks. “By June or July, we’ll be going vertical with both projects at the same time. Come down and you will see the town rising right before you,” town manager Charles Simmons says, with audible enthusiasm and pride. Simmons notes it isn’t all easy; Holly Springs faces the same challenges as other growing communities— managing growth, establishing long-range capital improvement plans, and continuing to invest in the town’s infrastructure. The biggest challenge? “Transportation,” he answers quickly. “But, it’s one that the town is up to.” He explains that, in addition to planning for future infrastructure needs, Holly Springs will be looking at the feasibility of a transportation bond referendum in 2018.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF RENDERING HOUSE

Current Population: 33,181 Projected Population in 2020: 42,500 Average Household Income: $91,470 Average Age: 34.3 SOURCE: HOLLYSPRINGSNC.US

42 | caryliving.com


PHOTO BY GREG DAVENPORT

Morrisville on the Fast Track Speaking of growth, have you visited Morrisville lately? Park West Village continues to be a shopper’s mecca with 100 acres of mixed-use development including retail, entertainment, offices, residential, and—perhaps best of all—a wide variety of dining choices. “Morrisville has rightfully been called a ‘foodie epicenter,’” says State Senator Jay Chaudhuri. “The Davis Drive/Chapel Hill Road corridor alone has outstanding Indian, Chinese, Vietnamese, and Middle Eastern restaurants. I haven’t quite eaten my way through Morrisville because it seems like a new restaurant is popping up every week— and that’s a good thing.” More exciting news involves the creation of the Morrisville Town Center, a mix of residential, commercial, retail, and park space that will be in the downtown district. Plans for the town center have been in the works since 2006, and—with the construction of a new Wake County Public Library slated to begin this year—they are finally coming to fruition. With growth comes the challenge of transportation and traffic problems. But Chaudhuri is optimistic about the approval of the Wake County Transit Plan. “It will be a game changer,” he says. “Morrisville residents will be able to hop on a commuter rail and go to Cary and Raleigh.” And those commuter trains will be running both ways, sure to bring residents from other communities into the thriving Morrisville market.

LUXURY REAL ESTATE & WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHY

Current Population: 24,732 Projected Population in 2020: 30,000* Average Household Income: $91,206 Average Age: 33.1

SOURCE: CENSUS.GOV; * CARY LIVING ESTIMATE

kurthilton.com caryliving.com | 43


Music, Arts, Craft Beer, and Dining: Fuquay-Varina Has it All! Mary Willis watched as Fuquay-Varina transformed from a tobacco farm town to one of Wake County’s fastest-growing communities. The town’s population has nearly tripled since 2000, and is projected to top 33,000 by 2020. Willis, president and CEO of Fidelity Bank, which has been headquartered in Fuquay-Varina for more than 100 years, remembers moving here in the 1970s when the town’s restaurant choices were Hardee’s and Tastee-Freeze. How times have changed! Today, downtown Fuquay-Varina is a vibrant space with many restaurants and four local breweries to choose among. The Follow Me To Fuquay-Varina (FM2FV) Concert Series brings families out for a variety of live music performances, and perhaps a dance or two in both spring and fall. And Willis says downtown is about to get even better with the addition of the Fuquay-Varina Arts Center. The center, located on Vance Street, will be dedicated to the visual and performing arts and will include classrooms, a dance studio, an art gallery, and a theater with more than 300 seats. Maureen Daly, director of the Fuquay-Varina Arts Center, says residents can expect an opening in late spring. The town is very excited to have the arts center, especially in its downtown area. “Not only will the center invigorate the economy, it will continue to bring people downtown to visit our local shops and participate in the small-town charm that is Fuquay-Varina,” she says. L

c

44 | caryliving.com

PHOTO BY FLYBOY PHOTO & MEDIA

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE THE TOWN OF FUQUAY-VARINA


Current Population: 25,865

Projected Population in 2020: 33,035

Average Household Income: $66,325

Average Age: 36 SOURCE: FUQUAY-VARINA.ORG

caryliving.com | 45


Big Romance

IN SMALL TOWNS // BY MONIQUE M. ROGERS

46 | caryliving.com


PHOTO BY JOJO CAMPBELL

Restaurants in Western Wake offer a range of romantic and polished dining experiences.

R

omantic dining means different things to different people. Some people appreciate the classical experience with a candlelit linen-covered table and the most elegant food and wine served, while others appreciate a more casual setting, perhaps eating comfort foods, admiring art, and listening to music. And even others enjoy being out on the town, sharing more exotic dishes and sipping a wine, beer, or fancy cocktail. But when you think of romantic restaurants, do you think it has to mean dining in a big city? Not necessarily. The communities around Raleigh offer some truly special romantic treasures right in Western Wake. Western Wake, indeed, has a variety of interesting and upscale restaurants that are perfect for that special romantic dinner. Here are 12 top romantic dining restaurants convenient to all of Western Wake communities.

CHEF’S PALETTE, CARY

caryliving.com | 47


Angus Barn 9401 Glenwood Avenue, Raleigh Elegant dining in a rustic barn? Never an oxymoron when you’re talking about the Triangle’s— arguably the South’s—most legendary steakhouse. It’s a legend that lives up to its own reputation, hardly an easy feat.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ANGUS BARN

48 | caryliving.com


Why go anywhere else? Anyone can provide advice. At Edward Jones, our goal is to provide advice and guidance tailored to your needs. That’s why we live and work in your community. When it comes to your financial needs and goals, we believe you deserve face-to-face attention.

Azitra 8411 Brier Creek Parkway, Raleigh 535 Zang Street, Broomfield, CO Vibrant tastes of contemporary cuisine from India, served in an elegant setting.

You talk, we listen, and we get to know you. • Retirement Plan Rollovers and Consolidation • Individual Retirement Accounts • Portfolio and Retirement Plan Reviews • Business Retirement Plans • Education Savings Strategies • Insurance • Fixed Income Investments For more information or to schedule a complimentary financial review, call or stop by today.

Bonnie Fischer, AAMS® Financial Advisor

113A North Salem Street Apex, NC 27502

919-362-5449 www.edwardjones.com PHOTOS COURTESY OF AZITRA

Member SIPC

caryliving.com | 49


PHOTO BY GINNY WILLIAMS

151 Airgate Drive, Morrisville Capital City Chop House Raleigh, actually located in Morrisville, offers a cozy romantic atmosphere with comfortable dining and an expansive seafood and steak selection. The personable waitstaff are informative in presenting their menu, and main dishes run the gamut from classic Filet Mignon to Australian Lamb and Pan-Roasted North Carolina Rainbow Trout. Complete your entrÊe with a signature sauce or a lobster tail, and choose among a variety of inventive sides and starters—like the Crispy Grit Napolean (fried grit cakes layered with pepper-jack pimento cheese and topped with roasted heirloom tomatoes, fresh cilantro, and a balsamic glaze).

PHOTO COURTESY OF CAPITAL CITY CHOP HOUSE

50 | caryliving.com

PHOTO BY GINNY WILLIAMS

Capital City Chop House


Garibaldi Trattoria

PHOTO COURTESY OF GARIBALDI

Authentic Italian cuisine from Chef Rob Sumber, complemented by a robust wine list.

PHOTO BY JEAN K. OF YELP

900 North Main Street, Fuquay-Varina Prefer a traditional Italian diner? Garibaldi Trattoria, located in Fuquay-Varina, may be just what you’re looking for. This casual, brightly colored cafe is welcoming in its simplicity and charm. But the food is far from simple, and the menu features all of the classics: Chicken Marsala, Veal Piccata, and pastas like Penna alla Vodka and Gnocchi Bolognese. However, it’s signature dishes like the Costolletta di Carolina—featuring a pan-seared double-cut pork chop, caramelized pears, Gorgonzola with a cider reduction, and roasted rosemary potatoes au gratin— that elevate the experience beyond the norm.

Jimmy V’s Steak House & Tavern MacGregor Village 107 Edinburgh South Drive, Cary Seafood and steaks showcased in comfortable upscale dining.

PHOTO BY ADAM SOBSEY PHOTO COURTESY OF ENDOEDIBLES.COM

caryliving.com | 51


PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE UMSTEAD HOTEL & SPA

Herons The Umstead Hotel and Spa 100 Woodland Pond Drive, Cary Celebrated American cuisine—Herons boasts the coveted Five-Star rating from Forbes and AAA’s Five-Diamond award— in a luxury setting known for serving the best in local, seasonal fare.

52 | caryliving.com


PHOTO BY JOJO CAMPBELL

In this polished-casual setting, Chef Ryan Summers, winner of the 2016 N.C. Competition Dining Series, brings an artistic flair to a menu of home-made dishes. PHOTO BY T. WAYNE GRIMES

Chef’s Palette 3460 Ten Ten Road, Cary For a more casual romantic ambiance, check out Chef’s Palette, located in Cary. Chef’s Palette has an eclectic environment including live music and trivia. The airy dining room offers the elegance of white linen tablecloths with the charm of local artwork displayed on the walls and available to purchase. But the artwork is not limited to the walls. Main dishes range from fish n’chips to filet mignon or duck breast. Gluten-free options are also available.

Individual, Couple and Family Portraits

     |    @ 

  caryliving.com | 53


Maximillians Grill & Wine Bar

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MAXIMILLIANS GRILL & WINE BAR

8314 Chapel Hill Road, Cary Locally sourced, globally inspired farm-to-fork fare that gives a nod to American, Asian, Caribbean, and Mediterranean cuisines.

Rey’s Restaurant 1130 Buck Jones Road, Cary Where continental cuisine meets New Orleans heat, served in an elegant ambiance that transports diners to the charm and allure of French Quarter fine dining.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF REY’S RESTAURANT

54 | caryliving.com


Celebrating 20 Years!

Lugano Ristorante 1060 Darrington Drive, Cary Modern Italian dining served in a classic setting of white linens and candlelight, complemented by a lengthy wine list.

Gift s cate r Ce tifi le! Availab • COUPLES P TISSUE HOT STONE • DEE THAI • CUPPING E L • TAB PREG NANCY • SWEDISH

Trusted as the official massage therapists for the North Carolina FC and NC Courage soccer teams. Make an appointment online today!

carymassagetherapy.com 919.651.9910 1330 SE Maynard Road, Suite 203 | Cary

Helping You Build Your Company HR Game Plan Defense Compliance Issues Offense Building your Team Special Teams Differentiator in the Marketplace

2017

FACES OF CARY

HR Coaching & Consulting for Entrepreneurs

closeHRconnections.com 919.238.3107 info@closehrconnections.com PHOTOS COURTESY OF LUGANO RISTORANTE

caryliving.com | 55


Lucky 32 Southern Kitchen

PHOTO BY GISELLE ROJAS

7307 Tryon Road, Cary Contemporary Southern cuisine in a classic farm-to-table motif, set in polished comfort.

PHOTO BY GISELLE ROJAS

The Verandah Restaurant & Bar at the Mayton Inn

PHOTO BY COLIN CROSSMAN

56 | caryliving.com

c

PHOTO BY COLIN CROSSMAN

PHOTO BY BARLOW PHOTOGRAPHY

301 S. Academy Street, Cary Subtle sophistication and signature seasonal dishes are defining elements at this lovely dining venue inside a charming and elegant inn, where Southern comfort and sincere hospitality know no bounds. L


The Heart’s Desire COLLECTION Give her what she wants!

Wondering what to do for your favorite Valentine? Jewelry is the most popular Valentine’s Day gift, according to the National Retail Federation, and last year consumers spent about $4.3 billion on jewelry. This year, celebrate your love with fine jewelry that can be cherished today and for years to come.

caryliving.com | 57


The Heart’s Desire COLLECTION

FOCAL POINT EXCEPTIONAL 38.50CT PEAR SHAPE, CABOCHON CUT TANZANITE AND DIAMOND PENDANT IN 18K WHITE GOLD

$92,000

HAYDON & COMPANY | 1803 OBERLIN ROAD | RALEIGH, NC 27608 | 919.781.1293 | HAYDONCO.COM

58 | caryliving.com


The Heart’s Desire COLLECTION 1

2

3

4

5

(1) TRILOGY 18K ROSE GOLD AND DIAMONDS LEFT: EXPANDABLE DIAMOND BAND $6,750 | CENTER: RIBBED DIAMOND RING $6,700 | RIGHT: EXPANDABLE PAVÉ DIAMOND BAND $10,950 (2) STUNNING STRAND MULTI-COLORED SOUTH SEA, TAHITIAN, AND FRESHWATER PEARLS IN A CAPTIVATING NECKLACE $16,500 (3) DELICATE DROPS BURMESE RUBY AND DIAMOND EARRINGS IN PLATINUM AND 18K ROSE GOLD $25,000 (4) WRIST CANDY UNTREATED JADEITE BANGLE BRACELETS UPRIGHT: $9,200 | FLAT: $3,300 (5) THE CLASSICS IMPERIAL JADE AND DIAMOND EARRINGS IN PLATINUM $44,000

HAYDON & COMPANY | 1803 OBERLIN ROAD | RALEIGH, NC 27608 | 919.781.1293 | HAYDONCO.COM

caryliving.com | 59


The Heart’s Desire COLLECTION

PINK SAPPHIRE 1.28CT, 14K WG DIAMONDS, 0.28CT $4979 | YELLOW SAPPHIRE 0.57, 14K WG DIAMONDS, 0.38CT $3559 | SAPPHIRE 2.00CT, 14K WG DIAMONDS 1.01CT $7995 | EMERALD 0.96CT, 14K WG DIAMONDS 0.44CT $4989 | CENTER DIAMOND 0.40CT, 14K WG DIAMONDS 0.30CT $4989 RALEIGH DIAMOND | 5925 GLENWOOD AVENUE, #100 | RALEIGH, NC 27612 | 919.725.3444 | RALEIGHDIAMOND.COM

60 | caryliving.com


The Heart’s Desire COLLECTION

1 2

3

4 5

(1) AQUAMARINE 2.59CT, 14K WG DIAMONDS 2.02CT $9,350 | (2) RUBY 1.49CT, 14K WG DIAMONDS 1.00CT $9,699 | (3) EMERALD 2.75CT, PLATINUM, DIAMONDS 1.41CT $18,750 | (4) TANZANITE 4.50CT, 18K WG DIAMONDS 1.44CT $14,439 | (5) BLUE ZIRCON 14.69CT, 14K WG DIAMONDS 1.51CT $17,250 RALEIGH DIAMOND | 5925 GLENWOOD AVENUE, #100 | RALEIGH, NC 27612 | 919.725.3444 | RALEIGHDIAMOND.COM

caryliving.com | 61


We want to be a part of

your story of extravagant love.

400 South Harrison Avenue, Cary | 919.462.8888 | StonehavenJewelry.com

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BLAINE BUTLER

human mind. Beauty born in the human spirit. Jewelry created by the human hand. Telling the story of the human heart.

Design conceived by the


caryliving.com | 63


HealthConscious CHASING A SEEMINGLY ELUSIVE GOAL BY DAVE DROSCHAK

64 | caryliving.com


R

ebecca Hale reached a milestone of sorts in January. It marked the fourth straight year in which she had gone without taking a prescription or over-the-counter drug. What may seem like a modest accomplishment to some is a big deal to Hale, who was plagued with chronic digestive issues, terrible sinus infections, horrible acne, and weight problems. By the age of 21, she was ingesting five prescription drugs a day as her health was in decline. “I had this wake-up moment, thinking that if I felt this horrible at 21, what is going to happen when I am 40 or 50?” she says. “So, I started to look into natural alternatives. I was closed-minded to it at the time, but it worked. Then I became really passionate about it, going back to school for it, and here I am.” Now 28, Hale ditched her accounting degree from the University of Maryland and enrolled online at the New Eden School of Natural Health & Herbal Studies, and now owns Natural Health Strategies in North Raleigh. “It was a total 180-degree switch for me,” Hale says of her career change and overall health outlook. “If you commit to it and stay consistent with it, it works and it’s awesome.” Experts on fitness, our surrounding environment, nutrition, and stress all agree that commitment and consistency are the two main variables and themes when it comes to trying to maintain a healthy lifestyle in one of the nation’s fastest-growing areas. Health often plummets down the list of importance behind such items as family, work, and overall indulgence. The excuses of why we can’t stay in shape or maintain a stress-free lifestyle are endless—ranging from “the gym is too far from my house” to reading emails after dinner so you won’t have to “play catch up” in the morning. “My buddy out in California and I have a saying: ‘You need to be fit enough to be able to do everything that you HAVE to do in life, most of the things you WANT to do … and then have a little left over in reserve,” says Jason Culbreth, a renowned trainer at Forged Fitness of Cary. “Fitness is a lifetime thing; it’s like eating an elephant, you have to do a little bit every day and the compounding result in the end is tremendous.” Culbreth, 50, was ahead of the game when it came to crossfit training in the Triangle area, opening up one of the first such facilities in the nation. The crossfit training craze has now exploded here. Forged Fitness is just one of three such locations within a mile of each other on Northwest Maynard in Cary. Crossfit can best be described as high intensity exercise and functional fitness. “When you get done with a workout at the end of the day, you should feel better about yourself and your body should feel better than when you went into the place,” Culbreth says. “The idea and the concept about running yourself into the ground day-in and day-out is not health, and it’s not fitness. If you think about life as a continuum, we’re all going to be healthy into our 40s, you pretty much can do what you want to do. But what happens between 40 and 85? Well, everything you do prior to 40 is going to affect how you live your life from 40 to 85. That’s when you actually need to be fit. That’s when things start breaking down.” caryliving.com | 65


PHOTO BY BYRON ESPINOZA

CLARK SOUERS, (LEFT AND BELOW), OWNER OF EXPERT EFFECT

PHOTO BY CLARK SOUERS

Beyond the time commitment, there’s the dollar investment. Crossfit training can start at $140 a month for personalized attention and workout regiments, while some “regular” gyms are as inexpensive as $10 per month. But that’s where the commitment and consistency comes into play again. “I am proud of so many of my clients because I really have changed people’s lives,” Culbreth says. “I give them a reason to come back—whether it’s the people they see, the quality of training they are receiving, or [simply] they went online and found an accountability program to sign up for. You need to have somebody like me care enough that when you don’t show up to the gym I give you call and say, ‘Where you at?’”

Living Well in a Busy World

Where you are at—i.e. your environment—can also affect your health. How? Well, Dr. Aaron Hipp, an associate professor of community health and sustainability at N.C. State University, has done extensive research on how your surroundings influence certain health-related decisions, like taking an elevator instead of stairs or making use of the connection of greenways. “Smart phones are an interesting part of the health equation because we are no longer bored,” Hipp explains. “At work, I have the option of taking the elevator or the stairs up to the fifth floor. Often times I choose the elevator—so I can check my email or social media for those 90 seconds waiting in the elevator, going up the elevator, and getting off the elevator—instead of walking up the stairs. I could be walking and getting some exercise, and get there just as quick.” Hipp says his environment on the Raleigh campus (Jordan Hall, which was designed in the 1990s) is not conducive to hiking up the stairs. “The stairwell is kind of hidden; it is more meant more for emergencies—to get out of the building—instead of designed to be taken,” he says. “It’s freezing now, or hot in the summer. It is just concrete and cinder blocks; there is nothing interesting about it that would make you want to take the stairs, where the elevators are front and center right by the door. You walk in the door and see two or three people there and, even if you aren’t 66 | caryliving.com

THE AREA’S GREENWAY SYSTEM CONNECTS MOST OF THE TRIANGLE.

going to speak to them, there is a social aspect of standing there.” The unintended consequence is less exercise because of the environment you are placed in, Hipp says. He is part of an ongoing study that took place in New York City this summer and will be extended to Raleigh in 2018. The study examines patterns of playground activity for children ages five to 10. “There is a great environment here [in the Triangle]; there are a lot of opportunities for recreational and leisure activities,” Hipp notes. “The greenway systems in Cary and in Raleigh are really great for leisure. The same with parks—there is nice diversity in size and in location, and amenities, so there are good places to play for sure. But the unintentional activities, like walking and biking, or running errands or transportation, getting from Point A to Point B, or getting to those play sites, options for those activities are still pretty lacking in the area.” Add the degree of stress in daily lives to the health equation and it complicates things tenfold. Clark Souers, the owner of Expert Effect, a California-based firm that specializes in stress resiliency for high performers, plans to open an office in Raleigh sometime this year. Our area is regarded by Souers as one “filled with people at the top of their game in life.” “Their dreams are coming true, they have the family they have always wanted, they have a job that they are proud of, but they are going to have more on their plate because they have numerous roles of responsibility,” he says. “We want to help them become more resilient to stress so they will perform better USING THE STAIRS INSTEAD OF THE ELEVATOR IS A HEALTHY CHOICE


and lead lives that have more happiness.”Souers explains that people “stress out” for a variety of reasons. “A lot of times it is feeling like you cannot adequately deal with your circumstances,” he says. “Our bodies tend to go into a stress mode when it feels that it is in danger, so all the stress hormones kick in and you can’t adequately deal with situations. It will impact your immune system; it will impact people’s ability to emotionally deal with things, so it impacts their relationships. It can also produce small things like headaches or feeling overly tired, but it can progress into serious illnesses because your system is not functioning properly.” Souers recently went on a vacation to Mexico and unplugged. He didn’t check his cell phone or email once. And he suggests others follow suit on a more regular basis.

“I find that the reason people don’t unplug is either addiction or fear,” he says. “It can be the fear of not knowing what’s going on. Or fear of emptiness, that if you are not connected to Facebook or work you will feel empty and lose your identity. And checking your phone triggers endorphins, so it can be an addiction. People need to break the addiction or address the fears.” When the road to health seems blocked for some, an unconventional method may not be so unconventional, says Hale, the expert nutritionist. “Most people don’t even know [natural health supplements] exist, so I can’t really blame them for coming to me late in the game,” Hale says. “It’s an education hurdle I have to overcome, getting people to realize there is a whole other option they can try. People come in for digestive disorders, or migraines, or low energy. They have been to the doctor and all of their blood work says they are fine, and they say ‘but I don’t feel fine.’” Hale recently treated a woman in her 40s who suddenly was stricken with a “mad itch” that was so irritating it kept her awake at night. “A doctor offered a few prescriptions, but she read the side effects—some scary things—and said she would rather try this,” Hale adds. “And within two appointments we got the itch to go away. It was a combination of simple diet changes and some supplements and herbs. She had been going to the doctor for six months, and in a matter of three weeks we were able to get her fixed.” L

c

caryliving.com | 67


SHOP LOCAL

CARY, APEX, MORRISVILLE, FUQUAY-VARINA, HOLLY SPRINGS support locally-owned, independent businesses

FEATURED ARTISTS January 5 - January 23 Reception: January 6, 2018, 1-4pm Bonnie Walker - Repurposed metal sculpture Ellen Jane Messina - Alcohol Inks 10th Annual

Small Treasures Juried Exhibit March 30 – April 21, 2018

Small original artworks by North Carolina artists. Highly acclaimed and respected artist, Bob Rankin, will jury, announce the winners, and award the prizes the evening of March 30th. Friends and customers are invited to attend the opening reception to view the art, applaud the winners, talk with the artists and enjoy refreshments.

Providing Cary with high quality, local art since 2005.

200 S. Academy St. STE 120 | 919.462.2035

EXQU IS ITE JE WE L RY. R E PA IR A N D M A IN TA IN A N CE . S IN CE 1 9 3 6 .

Dazzle Her

this Valentine's Day!

Bezel-set Diamond Pendants in Yellow, White, or Rose 14 kt. Gold

Diamond settings from .17 ct. Starting at $499

johnsonsjewelerscary.com 136 E. Chatham Street | Cary | 919-467-9431

Innovate Fuquay-Varina

A Startup Initiative for Aspiring Entrepreneurs Making your business dreams a reality! FIRST-TIME CLIENTS RECIEVE 15% OFF

Winter Specials: 4x Microneedling Facial Treatments + Personal Dermaroller $425 (save $110) Lash Extensions $150 (save $100) 3x Brazilian Wax Package $100 (save $35) Microblading $300 (save $200)

NATURAL ORGANIC SERVICES & PRODUCTS!

naturalesthetics.org 336-862-6946 201 W. Chatham St., Suite 101 | Cary 68 | caryliving.com

Launch weekend: January 26-28, 2018 Win cash and other prizes for your startup!

Presented by:

Sponsors:

InnovateFV.org | @InnovateFV | fb.com/InnovateFV | #InnovateFV


CARY, APEX, MORRISVILLE, FUQUAY-VARINA, HOLLY SPRINGS support locally-owned, independent businesses

SHOP LOCAL

Chocolate Smiles PREMIUM HANDMADE CHOCOLATES SINCE 1984

All you need is LOVE...but CHOCOLATE makes it sweeter!

919-469-5282 312 W. Chatham St., Ste 101 • Cary

Jewelers

Yo ur Ho m e Deco r an d Gi ft

St ore!

TraditionalJewelersNC.com 2440 Wycliff Road, Raleigh 919.783.6040

We are Jewelry Repair Experts 35 Years of Experience! Platinum | Gold | Silver | Chain Repair Ring Repair and Sizing | Pearl Restringing | Appraisals

home decor • furniture • jewelry garden decor • vendor boutiques • gifts local artistry • consignment

www.theperfectpiececary.com 200 E Chatham Street | Cary | 919.460.9841 Mon-Sat 9am-6pm | Sun 12:30-5:30pm caryliving.com | 69


WESTERN WAKE DINING GUIDE African

COOLEYS RESTAURANT 711 N Main St | (919) 552-0543 cooleysrestaurant.net

KABUKI JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE 220 Nottingham Dr (919) 380-8081 | kabukicary.com

ROCK HARBOR GRILL 132 S Fuquay Ave (984) 225-2256 | rockharborgrillfuquay.com

KASHIN JAPANESE RESTAURANT 309 Crossroads Blvd (919) 851-7101 | kashin.com

TRIPLE BARREL TAVERN 2221 N Grassland Dr (919) 762-0940

LUCKY 7 906 NE Maynard Rd (919) 380-7550 | lucky7nc.com

GOLDEN CHINA 1324 N Main St | (919) 552-9397 goldenchinafuquayvarina.com

American

HOLLY SPRINGS

HIBACHI & COMPANY 708 Judd Pkwy | (919) 552-8899

CARY

BASS LAKE DRAFT HOUSE 124 Bass Lake Rd (919) 567-3251 | basslakedrafthouse.com

NEW CHINA RESTAURANT 949 N Harrison Ave (919) 380-9328

CARY AWAZÉ CUISINE 904 NE Maynard Rd (919) 377-2599

ABBEY ROAD TAVERN & GRILL 1195 W Chatham St (919) 481-4434 | abbeyroadnc.com ACADEMY STREET BISTRO 200 S Academy St (919) 377-0509 BRIGS AT THE VILLAGE 1040 Tryon Village Dr (919) 859-2151 | brigs.com DAME’S CHICKEN & WAFFLES 1823 N Harrison Ave (919) 234-0824 DICED GOURMET SALADS & WRAPS 1377 Kildaire Farm Rd (919) 377-8572 | dicedsalads.com

MY WAY TAVERN   301 W Center St (919) 285-2412 | mywaytavern.com THE MASON JAR TAVERN 114 Grand Hill Pl (919) 964-5060 | themasonjartavern.com

MORRISVILLE B.GOOD 1000 Market Center Dr (919) 916-5410 | bgood.com TWO GUYS GRILLE 4149 Davis Dr (919) 462-9336 | twoguysgrill.com

HERONS 100 Woodland Pond Dr (919) 447-4200 | theumstead.com

Asian

LUCKY 32 7307 Tryon Rd (919) 233-1632 | lucky32.com

CARY

WOODY’S SPORTS TAVERN & GRILL 8322 Chapel Hill Rd (919) 380-7737 | woodyssportstavern.com

APEX ABBEY ROAD TAVERN & GRILL 1700 Center St (919) 372-5383 | abbeyroadnc.com APEX WINGS RESTAURANT & PUB 518 E Williams St (919) 387-0082 | apexwings.com OFF KILTER PUB AND GRILLE 1700 Center St (919) 387-3377 | offkilterpub.com PEAK CITY GRILL & BAR 126 N Salem St (919) 303-8001 | thepeakcitygrill.com ROOKIE’S SPORTS BAR 800 W Williams St (919) 363-1896 | rookiessportsbars.com RUDY’S PUB & GRILL 780 W Williams St (919) 303-5061 | rudysofapex.com SALEM STREET PUB 113 N Salem St (919) 387-9992 salemstreetpub.wixsite.com/salemstreetpub THE PROVINCIAL 119 Salem St (919) 372-5921 | theprovincialapex.com

FUQUAY-VARINA AVIATOR SMOKEHOUSE 525 E Broad St (919) 557-7675 | aviatorbrew.com

70 | caryliving.com

ASIAN GARDEN 242 Grande Heights Dr (919) 462-8598 | asiangardencarync.com BANANA LEAF 1026 Ryan Rd (919) 468-9958 | bananaleafcary.com CHINA KING 313 Crossroads Blvd (919) 233-8385 | chinakingcary.com CHINA ONE 661 Cary Towne Blvd (919) 461-0088 | chinaonecary.com

ORIENT GARDEN 1233 NW Maynard Rd (919) 380-1323 | orientgardencarync.com PEARL CHINESE RESTAURANT 3215 Avent Ferry Rd (919) 233-8776 | pearlchinesenc.com RED BOWL ASIAN BISTRO 2020 Boulderstone Way (919) 388-9977 | redbowlcary.com SUSHI-THAI CARY 106 Kilmayne Dr (919) 467-5747 | sushithaicary.com SUPER WOK 1401 SE Maynard Rd (919) 388-8338 | superwokcarync.com TASU ASIAN BISTRO 525 New Waverly Pl (919) 977-4037 | tasuwaverly.com THAI LOTUS 3450 Kildaire Farm Rd (984) 229-7333 THAI SPICES & SUSHI 986 High House Rd (919) 319-1818 | thaispicessushi.com TOM YUM THAI 685 Cary Towne Blvd (919) 463-5523 | tomyumthaicary.com YBA LITTLE TOKYO 1401 SE Maynard Rd (919) 467-5011 YOHO ASIAN BISTRO 8204 Tryon Woods Dr (919) 859-8081 | yohoasiancary.com

YAMATO STEAK, SEAFOOD & SUSHI BAR 700 E Williams St (919) 303-8088 | yamatoofapex.com

FUQUAY-VARINA

JUMBO CHINA   1518 Broad St | (919) 577-1268 KING CHINESE BUFFET 1029 E Broad St | (919) 567-8989 KUMO SUSHI   2916 N Main St (919) 986-0983 | kumosushifv.com MEI WEI ASIAN DINER 1424 N Main St (919) 762-7128 | meiweinc.com NEW RAINBOW 3427 N Main St (919) 567-8272 | newrainbowchinese.com

HOLLY SPRINGS CHENS GARDEN 523 N Main St | (919) 557-7363 CHINA BEST 632 Holly Springs Rd | (919) 577-0888 CHINA UNO 308 Village Walk Dr (919) 557-9888 | china-uno.com KOBE HIBACHI & SUSHI 515 N Main St (919) 557-1437 | kobehollyspringsnc.com THAI THAI CUISINE 108 Osterville Dr (919) 303-5700 | thaithaicuisinenc.com

MORRISVILLE C&T WOK 130 Morrisville Square Way (919) 467-8860 | ctwokrestaurant.com

CHINA WOK 2755 NC-55 (919) 387-9599 | chinawokcary.com

YUM YUM THAI CUISINE 1861 N Harrison Ave (919) 677-1166 facebook.com/yum-yum-thai-187986747889060

DAE JANG KUM KOREAN BBQ & SUSHI 101 Keybridge Dr (919) 677-1190

CHINESE # 1 3667 SW Cary Pkwy (919) 461-7008

YURI JAPANESE RESTAURANT 1361 Kildaire Farm Rd (919) 481-0068 | yurijapaneserestaurant.com

DIM SUM HOUSE 100 Jerusalem Dr (919) 380-3087 | dimsumhousemorrisville.com

EIGHTY8 ASIAN BISTRO 1077 Darrington Dr (919) 377-0152 | eighty8bistro.com

APEX

HIBACHI BLUE 1500 Village Market Pl (919) 462-9899

FIRST CHINA RESTAURANT 6452 Tryon Rd (919) 852-5857

BAAN THAI 758 W Williams St (919) 629-6399 | baanthaiapex.com

GENKI RESTAURANT & SUSHI BAR 3420 Ten-Ten Rd (919) 363-6636 | genkirestaurantsushi.com

FUJI EXPRESS 2143 Ten-Ten Rd (919) 367-8686 | fujiexpressapex.com

GINGER ASIAN CUISINE 2048 Kildaire Farm Rd (919) 859-8998 | gingerasiancuisine.com

LEE’S GARDEN 5470 Apex Peakway | (919) 387-7709

GOJI BISTRO 100 Maynard Crossing Ct (919) 466-8888 | gojibistro.us HONG KONG RESTAURANT 3490 Kildaire Farm Rd (919) 303-8439

SUSHI IWA 2026 Creekside Landing Dr (919) 387-7022 | sushiiwa.org WANG’S KITCHEN 712 Laura Duncan Rd (919) 363-8030

ORIENT GARDEN 10285 Chapel Hill Rd (919) 468-6878 orientgardenrestaurant.com/morrisville.htm PHO 919 3504 Davis Dr (919) 377-0318 | pho919.com RED DRAGON CHINESE CUISINE 4051 Davis Dr (919) 388-1836 | reddragoncuisine.com TAIPEI CAFE 9825-G Chapel Hill Rd (919) 380-8568 | taipeicafemorrisville.com TASTE VIETNAMESE CUISINE 152 Morrisville Square Way (919) 234-6385


TERIYAKIN’ 10970 Chapel Hill Rd (919) 443-2279

Bakery/Cafes/sweets CARY

APEX BUTTERCREAM’S BAKE SHOP 101 N Salem St (919) 362-8408 | buttercreamsbakeshop.com SWEET CHEEKS BAKERY 803 E Williams St (919) 303-9305 | sweetcheeksbakerync.com SWEET CHERRY BAKERY (919) 524-9132 | sweetcherrybakerync.com

FUQUAY-VARINA BREW-N-QUE

TRAVINIA

ANDIA’S HOMEMADE ICE CREAM 10120 Green Level Church Rd (919) 822-1866 | andiasicecream.com

CUPCAKEBITE 512 Broad St (919) 557-4300 | cupcakebite.com

CARIBOU COFFEE 109 SW Maynard Rd (919) 319-6265 | cariboucoffee.com

NIL’S CAFE 513 Broad St (919) 567-0887 | nilscafe.weebly.com

CHANTICLEER CAFE & BAKERY 6490 Tryon Rd (919) 781-4810 | chanticleercafe.com

STICK BOY BREAD COMPANY 127 S Main St (919) 557-2237 | stickboyfuquay.com

CHOCOLATE SMILES 312 W Chatham St, Ste 101 (919) 469-5282 | chocolatesmiles.com

MORRISVILLE

COFFEE & CREPES 315 Crossroads Blvd (919) 233-0288 | coffeeandcrepes.com CREMA COFFEE ROASTER & BAKERY 1983 High House Rd (919) 380-1840 | cremacoffeebakery.com DUCK DONUTS 100 Wrenn Drive (919) 468-8722 | duckdonuts.com FRESCA CAFÉ & GELATO 302 Colonades Way (919) 851-8171 | frescacafe.com FRESH LOCAL ICE CREAM 138 E Chatham St freshlocalicecream.com

HOT BREADS CAFE 1901 NW Cary Pkwy (919) 677-1331 | hotbreadscafe.com MANHATTEN BAKERY 100 Jerusalem Dr (919) 954-0948 NOTHING BUNDT CAKES 2008 Market Center Dr (919) 694-5300 | nothingbundtcakes.com RISE BISCUITS & DONUTS 1100 Market Center Dr (919) 377-0385 | risebiscuitsdonuts.com

BBQ CARY

SALVIO’S PIZZERIA GOODBERRY’S FROZEN CUSTARD 2325 Davis Dr (919) 469-3350 | goodberrys.com GOODBERRY’S FROZEN CUSTARD 1146 Kildaire Farm Rd (919) 467-2386 | goodberrys.com

CITY BARBEQUE 1305 Kildaire Farm Rd (919) 439-5191 | citybbq.com DANNY’S BAR-B-QUE 311 Ashville Ave G (919) 851-5541 | dannysbarbque.com

HAPPYCAKES CUPCAKERY 9958 Chapel Hill Rd thehappycupcakery.com

RALLY POINT SPORT GRILL 1837 N Harrison Ave (919) 678-1088 | rallypointsportgrill.com

JAVA JIVE 2425 Kildaire Farm Rd (919) 816-8888 | javajivecary.com

SMOK’T BBQ & TAPS

JUICEVIBES 1369 Kildaire Farm Rd (919) 377-8923 | juicevibes.com KALE ME CRAZY 302 Colonades Way, #209 (984) 200-2960 | kalemecrazy.net LA FARM BAKERY 4248 NW Cary Pkwy (919) 657-0657 | lafarmbakery.com ONCE IN A BLUE MOON BAKERY & CAFE 115 W Chatham St (919) 319-6554 | bluemoonbakery.com SUGAR BUZZ BAKERY 1231 Kildaire Farm Rd (919) 238-7224 | sugarbuzzbakery.com FAMOUS TOASTERY 316 Colonades Way (919) 655-1971 | famoustoastery.com

TURKUAZ MARKET

BREW N QUE 1222 NW Maynard Rd (919) 601-2430 | brewnquenc.com

1937 Highhouse Rd (919) 481-6775 | smoktbbq.com

APEX THE BLISTERED PIG SMOKEHOUSE 225 N Salem St (919) 446-3366 | chownow.com

MORRISVILLE SMOKEY’S BBQ SHACK 10800 Chapel Hill Rd (919) 469-1724 | smokeysshack.com

Breakfast/Specialty CARY BRIGS AT THE CROSSING 1225 NW Maynard Rd (919) 481-9300 | brigs.com

caryliving.com | 71


APEX DALLAS FAMOUS CHICKEN N’ BISCUITS 1101 E Williams St (919) 362-0051

FUQUAY-VARINA BAGELS PLUS 100 Dickens Rd (919) 285-4980 | bagelsplusfuquay.com EGGS UP GRILL 1436 N Main St (919) 285-4463 | eggsupgrill.com JUS’ ENUFF HOME COOKIN’ 736 N Main St (919) 567-0587 | jusenuffhomecookin.com

HOLLY SPRINGS FAMOUS TOASTERY 304 Grand Hill Place (919) 552-3102 | famoustoastery.com

Burgers/Hot Dogs CARY

REMINGTON GRILL 208 Crossroads Blvd (919) 233-1494 | remingtongrill.com

Eclectic

LA SHISH MEDITERRANEAN CUISINE 908 NE Maynard Rd (919) 388-8330 | lashish.net

APEX

CARY

HWY 55 BURGERS SHAKES & FRIES 802 Perry Rd (919) 303-3533 | hwy55.com

CHEF’S PALETTE 3460 Ten Ten Rd (919) 267-6011 | chefspalette.net

SASSOOL 1347 Kildaire Farm Rd (919) 300-5586 | sassool.com

Caribbean/Cuban MORRISVILLE CARMEN’S CUBAN CAFE & LOUNGE 108 Factory Shops Rd (919) 467-8080 | carmenscubancafe.com

Catering & food service APEX DONOVAN’S DISH 800 W Williams St, Ste 112 (919) 651-8309 | donovansdish.com

RALEIGH CATERING WORKS 2319 Laurelbrook St (919) 828-5932 | cateringworks.com

BARRY’S CAFE 2851 Jones Franklin Rd (919) 859-3555 | barryscafe.com BUILT CUSTOM BURGERS 5033 Arco St (919) 377-2775 | builtcustomburgers.com

ROCKY TOP CATERING 1705 E Millbrook Rd (919) 850-2340 | rockytopcatering.com

Call Today to advertise

HERE!

MAXIMILLIAN’S GRILL & WINE BAR 8314 Chapel Hill Rd (919) 465-2455 | maximilliansgrill.com TANGERINE CAFE 2422 SW Cary Pkwy (919) 468-8688 | tangerinecafecary.com

THE URBAN TURBAN 2757 NC-55 (919) 367-0888 | urbanturbanbistro.com TURKUAZ MARKET 203 N Harrison Ave, #110 (919) 455-1890

APEX FATTOUSH MEDITERRANEAN GRILL 781 Center St (919) 889-2990 | fattoushmediterraneangrillapex.com

French

HOLLY SPRINGS

CARY LA MADELEINE COUNTRY FRENCH CAFE 1115 Walnut St (919) 388-7282 | lamadeleine.com REY’S 1130 Buck Jones Rd | (919) 380-0122

Greek/Mediterranean

MEDITERRA GRILL 108 Grand Hill Pl (919) 762-7851 | mediterranc.com

MORRISVILLE NEOMONDE 10235 Chapel Hill Rd (919) 466-8100 | neomonde.com

Indian

CARY BABA GHANNOUJ MEDITERRANEAN BISTRO 2468 Walnut St (919) 233-0907 | babaghannouj1.com JASMIN MEDITERRANEAN BISTRO 1109 Ledsome Ln (919) 469-1112 | jasminbistro.com

CARY BIRYANI MAXX INDIAN CUISINE 590 E Chatham St (919) 377-0346 | biryanimaxxindiancuisine.com

900 N. Main Street | Fuquay-Varina • • • • • • •

Freshness & Quality Second to None Excellent Wine Selection Recommendations from the Head Chef Daily Specials Patio Seating for up to 50 Private Room for In-House Events Catering

garibalditrattoria.commm

919.552.8868 h t i a w F n a r i ench Ital twis c i s as t !” l “C

919.782.4710 caryliving.com 72 | caryliving.com


BIRYANI XPRX (EXPRESS) 748-A E Chatham St (919) 377-1801 | biryanixprx.com CILANTRO INDIAN CAFÉ 107 Edinburgh S Dr (919) 234-1264 | cilantroindia.com HIMALAYAN NEPALI CUISINE 746 E Chatham St (919) 466-0550 | himalayannepalicuisine.com KABABISH CAFÉ 201 W Chatham St (919) 377-8794 | kababishcafe.com NAZARA INDIAN BISTRO 1945 High House Rd (919) 694-5353 | nazaranc.com SRI MEENAKSHI BHAVAN 740 E Chatham St (919) 463-9130 | srimeenakshibhavan.com UDUPI CAFE 590 E Chatham St (919) 465-0898

FUQUAY-VARINA ZEERA INDIAN RESTAURANT 1311 E Broad St (919) 762-6215

Italian

GARIBALDI TRATTORIA 900 N Main St (919) 552-8868 | garibalditrattoria.com

CARY

MORRISVILLE

BELLINI FINE ITALIAN CUISINE 107 Edinburgh S Dr (919) 552-0303 | bellinifineitaliancuisinecary.com

BABYMOON CAFE 100 Jerusalem Dr (919) 465-9006 | babymooncafe.com LUBRANO’S ITALIAN 101 Keybridge Dr (919) 678-9030 | lubranosnc.com RUCKUS PIZZA, PASTA, & SPIRITS 101 Market Center Dr (919) 388-3500 | ruckuspizza.com

HYDERABADHOUSE | BIRYANI PLACE 3735 Davis Dr (919) 924-0503 | hyderababhouse.net

DANIEL’S RESTAURANT & CATERING 1430 W Williams St (919) 303-1006 | danielsapex.com

BOCCI TRATTORIA & PIZZERIA 2425 Kildaire Farm Rd (919) 803-5358 | bocciitalian.com

MAMMA MIA ITALIAN BISTRO 708 Laura Duncan Rd (919) 363-2228 | mammamianc.com RUCKUS PIZZA, PASTA, & SPIRITS

1055 Pine Plaza Dr 919-446-6333 | ruckuspizza.com

ENRIGO ITALIAN BISTRO 575 New Waverly Pl (919) 854-7731 | dineenrigo.com

Mexican

LUGANO RISTORANTE 1060 Darrington Dr (919) 468-7229

CARY

Irish

PAISAN’S ITALIAN RISTORANTE 1275 NW Maynard Rd (919) 388-3033 | caryitalian.com

BRAVO’S MEXICAN GRILL 208 Grande Heights Dr (919) 481-3811 | bravosmexicangrill.net

APEX

PRO’S EPICUREAN MARKET & CAFE 211 E Chatham Street (919) 377-1788

FIESTA MEXICANA CARY 2839 Jones Franklin Rd, Raleigh (919) 859-1303 | fiestamexicananc-cary.com

ROMA’S ITALIAN 203 N Harrison Ave (919) 468-1111 | romasitalian.net

FIESTA MEXICANA NW CARY 990 High House Rd (919) 378-9895 | fiestamexicananc-nwcary.com

RUCKUS PIZZA, PASTA, & SPIRITS 8111 Tryon Woods Dr (919) 851-3999 | ruckuspizza.com

GUAPO’S TACOS-AREPAS-CERVEZAS 3470 Kildaire Farm Rd (919) 372-5070 | guaposcary.com

RUCKUS PIZZA, PASTA, & SPIRITS 2025 Renaissance Park Pl (919) 851-3999 | ruckuspizza.com

LOS TRES MEXICAN RESTAURANT 10120 Green Level Church Rd (919) 267-5444 | lostres-nc.com

STELLINO’S ITALIANO 1150 Parkside Main St (919) 694-5761 | stellinositaliano.com

RANCHO GRANDE 1401 SE Maynard Rd (919) 469-4245

TRAVINIA ITALIAN KITCHEN & WINE BAR 1301 Market Center Dr (919) 467-1718 | traviniaitaliankitchen.com

TORERO’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT 1207 Kildaire Farm Rd (919) 468-8711 | torerosmexicanrestaurants.com

DOHERTY’S IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT 5490 Apex Peakway (919) 387-4100 | dohertysirishpubnc.com

MORRISVILLE

MORRISVILLE

APEX

FUQUAY-VARINA

TRALI IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT 3107 Grace Park Dr (919) 651-9083 | traliirishpub.com

SAFFRON RESTAURANT & LOUNGE 4121 Davis Dr (919) 469-5774 | saffronnc.com

Honorably Serving Our Community for 13 Years!

Pizzeria



     

salviospizza.com | 919-467-4600    

C

25 E

Y

     

E B R AT I N

AR

Y

   

EL

G

 

S IN CA

R

BREAKFAST SERVED ALL DAY Check out our daily features! Swift Creek Shopping Center 2851 Jones Franklin Rd (Near Food Lion)

BARRYSCAFE.COM | 919.859.3555 caryliving.com | 73


MEDITERRA GRILL

APEX ANNA’S PIZZERIA 100 N Salem St (919) 267-6237 | annaspizzeria.com J & S NEW YORK PIZZA 804 Perry Rd (919) 363-0071 | jandsnypizza.com JOHNNY’S PIZZA 96 Cornerstone Dr (919) 659-8700 MICHELANGELO’S PIZZA Lake Pine Plaza, 928 US-64 (919) 462-8880 | apexpizza.com NAMOLI’S NY PIZZERIA 5444 Apex Peakway (919) 303-4888 | namolisnypizza.com THE PIZZA DUDE 1763 W Williams St (919) 303-6686 | ncpizzadude.com

FUQUAY-VARINA

TOTOPOS STREET FOOD & TEQUILA 1388 Kildaire Farm Rd (919) 678-3449 | totoposfoodandtequila.com

APEX ARANDAS MEXICAN CUISINE 5460 Apex Peakway (919) 362-7363 | arandasmexcuisine.com LA RANCHERITA GRILL & TEQUILA BAR 102 N Salem St (919) 303-2448 | rancheritamex.com LOS TRES MEXICAN RESTAURANT 1301 E Williams St (919) 367-6797 | lostres-nc.com/apex.html TACOS MEXICO 209 E Williams St (919) 362-8074

FUQUAY-VARINA EL DORADO III 112 E Vance St (919) 557-0287 | eldoradomexicanrestaurant.com EL LOBO MEXICAN RESTAURANT 1311 E Broad St (919) 557-9540 LA TAQUERIA MEXICAN GRILL 973 E Broad St (919) 552-5532 LOS TRES MAGUEYES 401 Wake Chapel Rd (919) 762-6955 | lostresmagueyes.com TACOS MEXICO RESTAURANT 1430 N Main St (919) 557-1777 | tacosmexiconc.com

HOLLY SPRINGS FIESTA MEXICANA 428 Village Walk Dr (919) 346-1330 | fiestamexicananc-hollysprings.com LOS TRES MAGUEYES 120 Bass Lake Rd (919) 552-6272 | lostresmagueyes.com

MORRISVILLE MI CANCUN 1106 Grace Park Dr (919) 650-1718 | micancunmx.com LOS TRES MEXICAN RESTAURANT 995 Airport Blvd (919) 465-0217 | lostres-nc.com/morrisville.html

74 | caryliving.com

VIVA DF TEQUILA & TACO BAR 4075 Davis Dr (919) 467-2627 | vivadf.com

CARY MARCO POLLO 1871 Lake Pine Dr (919) 694-5524 | marcopollocary.com

Pizzeria CARY BROTHERS OF NEW YORK PIZZA 3450 Kildaire Farm Rd (919) 629-6000 | brothersofny.com PATRICK JANE’S GOURMET BAR & BISTRO 1353 Kildaire Farm Rd (919) 388-8001 | patrick-janes.com PIZZERIA FAULISI 215 E Chatham St, Ste 101 | pizzeriafaulisi.com RICCI’S TRATTORIA 10110 Green Level Rd (919) 380-8410 | riccistrattoria.com

SALVIO’S PIZZERIA 2428 SW Cary Parkway (919) 467-4600 | salviospizza.com

JASON’S DELI 210 Crossroads Blvd (919) 233-6901 | jasonsdeli.com NEW YORK BAGEL & DELI 2050 Kildaire Farm Rd (919) 851-9050 | newyorkbagelsanddeli.com PENN STATION EAST COAST SUBS 700 Cary Towne Blvd (919) 234-1342 | penn-station.co

MORRISVILLE

JASON’S PIZZA 726 N Main St (919) 552-4796 | jasonspizza.info

Peruvian

HOT POINT DELI 1718 Walnut St (919) 460-6299 | hotpointcary.com

ASSAGGIO’S 941 E Broad St (919) 557-9505 | assaggios-fuquay.com

CARY

TOWER INDIAN RESTAURANT 144 Morrisville Square Way (919) 465-2326 | towernc.com

CARY

SERENDIPITY GOURMET DELI 118 S Academy St (919) 469-1655 serendipitygourmetdelinc.com

Middle Eastern

SAI KRISHNA BHAVAN 10970 Chapel Hill Rd (919) 481-0910 | saikrishnabhavan.com

Sandwich/Deli

ANNA’S PIZZERIA 138 S Main St (919) 285-2497 | annaspizzeria.com

CAMOS BROTHERS PIZZA 2916 N Main St (919) 285-3749 | camosbrotherspizza.com

BOSPHORUS RESTAURANT 329 N Harrison Ave (919) 460-1300 | bosphorus-nc.com

ROSATI’S PIZZA 3605 Davis Dr (919) 380-7000 rosatispizza.com/locations/morrisville

J & S NEW YORK PIZZA 500 Broad St (919) 557-6921 | jandsnypizza.com MILANO PIZZA 7509 Purfoy Rd (919) 557-6093 sites.google.com/site/milanopizzafv

HOLLY SPRINGS ACME PIZZA 204 Village Walk Dr (919) 552-8800 | acmepizzaco.com BLAZE PIZZA Holly Springs Towne Center 316 Grand Hill Pl (919) 557-4990 | blazepizza.com

PEPPERS MARKET & SANDWICH SHOP 2107 Grace Park Dr (919) 380-7002 | peppersmrkt.com THE BRUNCH BOX 10970 Chapel Hill Rd (919) 380-7276 | thebrunchbox.net

Seafood CARY DEAN’S KITCHEN + BAR 1080 Darrington Dr (919) 459-5875 | deanskitchenandbar.com SHUCKIN’ SHACK OYSTER BAR 4214 NW Cary Pkwy (919) 377-2283 | theshuckinshack.com SHUCKIN’ SHACK OYSTER BAR 1010 Tryon Village Dr. #705 (984) 232-8463 | theshuckinshack.com TONY’S OYSTER BAR 107 Edinburgh Dr (919) 462-6226 | tonysoysterbar.com

HOMEGROWN PIZZA 4928 Linksland Dr (919) 577-5575 | homegrownpizza.com

APEX

MICHELANGELO’S PIZZA 7280 GB Alford Hwy (919) 303-7277 | michelangelospizza.com

SKIPPER’S FISH FRY 1001 E Williams St (919) 303-2400 | skippersfish.com

THE ORIGINAL NY PIZZA 634 Holly Springs Rd (919) 567-0505 | theoriginalnypizza.com

MORRISVILLE

PAPA’S SUBS & PIZZA 511 N Main St (919) 557-1919

THE FULL MOON OYSTER BAR 1600 Village Market Pl (919) 378-9524 | fullmoonoysterbar.com

SPRINGS PIZZA & WINGS 5217 Sunset Lake Rd (919) 363-8852 | springspw.com

Steakhouse

MORRISVILLE

CARY

BLAZE PIZZA 1024 Market Center Dr (919) 465-9590 | blazepizza.com

JIMMY V’S STEAK HOUSE & TAVERN 107 Edinburgh S Dr (919) 380-8210 | jimmyvssteakhouse.com

GEORGINA’S PIZZERIA 3536 Davis Dr (919) 388-3820 georginaspizzeriaandrestaurant.com

MORRISVILLE

RANDY’S PIZZA 4129 Davis Dr (919) 468-3737 | randys-pizza.com

CAPITAL CITY CHOP HOUSE 151 Airgate Dr (919) 484-7721 | chophousesofnc.com


919-302-6111

Whether you are a new resident seeking services, a local business or a civic organization hoping to grow, our newcomer welcome basket can help.

919-414-8820

To request a welcome visit or become a sponsor in our basket, go to

SERVING MOST OF WAKE COUNTY AND THE SURROUNDING AREAS

caryliving.com | 75


& OUT ABOUT

PHOTO BY ROB KINNAN PHOTOGRAPHY

JAN U ARY/FEB R UARY CAL END A R

|

NE W A R O UND T O WN

|

S IG HT INGS

CHINESE LANTERN FESTIVAL Until January 14th | Tuesdays–Sundays, 6–10pm Koka Booth Amphitheatre, Cary boothamphitheatre.com

caryliving.com | 77


WINTER WONDERLAND Bond Park | 801 High House Road, Cary January 26th and 27th | 7–9pm townofcary.org

CLEAN COMEDY WITH LEIGHANN LORD & SID DAVIS February 2, 7pm 300 W. Ballentine Street, Holly Springs Clean comedy edition–great for the whole family! Smart, sexy, savvy, and funny, Leighann Lord’s “heads-up humor” is stand-up comedy at its finest. hollyspringsnc.us ADULT COMEDY WITH LEIGHANN LORD & SID DAVIS February 2, 9pm Adult comedy edition–recommended for 18+. Smart, sexy, savvy, and funny. Leighann Lord’s “heads-up humor” a stand-up comedy at its finest. hollyspringsnc.us HOLLY SPRINGS OUTDOOR WINTER FARMERS MARKET February 3, 9:30am-12pm E. Center Street Parking, Holly Springs (Across from Town Hall) The Farmers Market offers farm-fresh produce, baked goods, artisanal foods, all-natural bath and body products, all-natural meats, and much more. hollyspringsnc.us

HOLLY SPRINGS OUTDOOR WINTER FARMERS MARKET January 6, 9:30am-12pm E. Center Street Parking, Holly Springs (Across from Town Hall) The Farmers Market offers farm-fresh produce, baked goods, artisanal foods, all-natural bath and body products, all-natural meats, and much more. hollyspringsnc.us

AND THEN THERE WERE NONE January 25-27 300 W. Ballentine Street, Holly Springs Stageworks Theatre of Holly Springs presents Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None. One of Christie’s darkest tales and a masterpiece of dramatic construction, its growing sense of dread and unfaltering tension will keep you guessing ‘til the very end. hollyspringsnc.us

THREE KINGS DAY PARADE January 6, 1-3pm 316 N. Academy Street, Cary Cary’s Three Kings Day includes dancing, music, food, and a colorful parade featuring members of different Latino cultures. townofcary.org TOWN OF CARY’S MLK JR. DREAMFEST 2018 January 13-15 Downtown Cary Each year, the Town of Cary recognizes and celebrates the life, work, and visions of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Join the town for a wide variety of programs that are free and open to the public. townofcary.org

WINTER WONDERLAND January 26-27 801 High House Road, Cary Experience winter fun for the whole family at Cary’s Bond Park! Come dressed to play on a snowcovered hill across from Bond Park Community Center. Snow tubes are provided. Pre-registration is required. townofcary.org CARY MEET YOURSELF: A CELEBRATION OF DIVERSITY January 28, 3-5pm Sister Cities Association of Cary in partnership with the Town of Cary invites you to the first annual “Cary Meet Yourself” multinational roundtable. The free event will celebrate our community’s unique customs, foods, arts, and innovation programs. townofcary.org

HOLLY SPRINGS INDOOR WINTER FARMERS MARKET February 17, 9:30am-12pm E. Center Street Parking, Holly Springs (Across from Town Hall) The Farmers Market offers farm-fresh produce, baked goods, artisanal foods, all-natural bath and body products, all-natural meats, and much more. hollyspringsnc.us

january

HOLLY SPRINGS INDOOR WINTER FARMERS MARKET January 20, 9:30am-12pm E. Center Street Parking, Holly Springs (Across from Town Hall) The Farmers Market offers farm-fresh produce, baked goods, artisanal foods, all-natural bath and body products, all-natural meats, and much more. hollyspringsnc.us

S M 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29

T 4 11 18 25

F 5 12 19 26

S 6 13 20 27

february

NC CHINESE LANTERN FESTIVAL January 1-14, 6-10pm 8003 Regency Parkway, Cary Come out to Koka Booth Amphitheatre this holiday season and enjoy the magnificent light displays of the Chinese Lantern Festival. Venue food and beverage stands will be open selling holiday treats and beverages. townofcary.org

JAZZLIVE PERFORMANCE February 10, 7:30-9:30pm 237 N. Salem Street, Apex This event features internationally renowned Steinway arts and jazz pianist Lenore Raphael. Enjoy this Valentine’s Day concert with special guests to be announced. apexnc.org

T 2 9 16 23 30

W 3 10 17 24 31

S M T W T 1 4 5 6 7 8 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28

F 2 9 16 23

S 3 10 17 24

Send events you’d like published to jennifer@caryliving.com

78 | caryliving.com


newaroundtown

CITY GARDEN DESIGNS Located in historic downtown Cary, this boutique garden shop features indoor and outdoor plants as well as accompaniment containers and gifts for the home. 266 W. Chatham Street, Cary 919.234.0933 | CityGardenDesign.com

BUILT CUSTOM BURGERS You choose, they build, you enjoy. They’re built for you. 5033 Arco Street, Cary | 919.377.2775 BuiltCustomBurgers.com

AUTUMN & AVERY RALEIGH NEUROSURGICAL CLINIC OPENS NEW HOLLY SPRINGS LOCATION

A premier women’s clothing and accessories boutique, with just the perfect mix of sparkle and glam, color and texture—where form and function perfectly translate into fashion. 1157 Parkside Main Street, Cary | 919.694.5410 | AutumnAndAvery.com.

A minimally invasive neurosurgical practice composed of seven compassionate providers with over 125 years of combined experience. 600-A Village Walk Drive, Holly Springs | 919.785.3400 | RaleighNeurosurgical.com

GYM GUYZ CLEAN JUICE A family-owned company founded with the purpose of giving your family access to clean, organic products while you are on the go. 3035 Village Market, Morrisville | 919.468.8286 | CleanJuiceBar.com

Mobile, personal training. Bringing the gym to you, with convenient, customized, and creative workouts tailored to you. They bring all the equipment, you choose the location. 919.629.3773 | GymGuyz.com/cary

caryliving.com | 79


carysightings SEARSTONE VERERANS DAY CELEBRATION On November 10th, the SearStone community honored veterans with a celebration. Music was provided by Saint Francis Brass Quintet. The in remembrance candle was lit by Searstone resident Edward Baisden, and the presentation of colors provided by Cary High School NJROTC. Jeff Smith, Military and Veterans Affairs Coordinator with UNC-TV, was the guest speaker.

TRIANGLE CHILI CHALLENGE Held during the November Downtown Cary Food & Flea in Ashworth Village, over $1,000 was raised and awarded to Durham’s Community of Hope & Special Olympics North Carolina. This event was held in partnership with the Town of Cary and sponsored by The Humble Pig, Crosstown Pub & Grill, Downtown Cary Food & Flea, and Pharmacy Bottle & Beverage.

21ST ANNUAL SANDHILLS CHILDREN’S CENTER FESTIVAL OF TREES The Festival of Trees took place November 29th–December 3rd at The Carolina Hotel in Pinehurst. The online auction raised over $80,000 to help pay for vital therapies for children who have special developmental needs.

80 | caryliving.com


WANT YOUR EVENT FEATURED IN SIGHTINGS? Send photographs and a description to us!

jennifer@caryliving.com

LANE & ASSOCIATES DONATES $10,000 TO KAY YOW CANCER FUND Lane & Associates Family Dentistry helped promote breast cancer awareness with a $10,000 Donation to the Kay Yow Cancer Fund. On December 12th, the Kay Yow Foundation hosted Lane & Associates and the media for a special presentation of the $10,000 check.

caryliving.com | 81


kaleidoscopeliving

G O N E P L AC E S

MIXED MEDIA ON BOND PAPER, 18” X 24”

“This is somewhat of an homage to Frank Lloyd Wright in that a friend has a very faded version of “Falling Water” in his office that always reminded me of Middle America in the 1900s.” 82 | caryliving.com

— Lewis Wilson

Lewis Wilson specializes in landscape expressionism and abstract work. His work has been sold throughout the U.S. and internationally. Originally from western New York, he’s spent more than 20 years in the Triangle. He lives in Apex with his wife, their two daughters, and their dog, Jack.


Profile for Midtown Magazine, Cary Living Magazine

Cary Living Magazine  

January/February 2018

Cary Living Magazine  

January/February 2018

Profile for midtown
Advertisement