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JULY 11-17, 2018

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Penn Hills YMCA New man to close Aug. 31 in charge Two other branches to close as part of reorganization by Christian Morrow and Rob Taylor Jr. Courier Staff Writers

Sheila Greene has loved her Penn Hills YMCA for 15 years. It’s been the source of a good workout after a hard day’s work, along with the place her godchildren go for fun activities. But come Aug. 31, the Penn Hills YMCA will be no more. “I am totally shocked,” Greene told the New Pittsburgh Courier, after learning from YMCA officials that the Penn Hills, Wilmerding and Coraopolis locations

Phillip Woods named principal at Woodland Hills High School

Wants to ‘raise expectations’ for students Woods, who most recently was principal at West Mifflin Area High School and, prior to West Mifflin, was principal at the former Hebron Elementary School in Penn Hills, is coming into a school district that has been a hotbed for controversy. Murray was placed on administrative leave after he was heard via audio recording in late 2016 threatening to knock the teeth out of a then-14-yearold Woodland Hills student. Even after a public outcry, the Woodland Hills School District

Courier Staff Writer

There’s a new leader at Woodland Hills Junior/Senior High School, a person who vows to be “highly visible,” “highly engaged,” and to “raise expectations.” Phillip K. Woods, EdD, was named Woodland Hills Junior/ Senior High School’s new principal last week, replacing Candee Nagy, an assistant principal who had served as acting principal, after Kevin Murray resigned last August.

SEE YMCA A4

Pittsburgh Blues and Roots Festival returns July 21-22

PHILLIP WOODS, EdD, was named Woodland Hills Junior/Senior High School principal on July 2.

by Rob Taylor Jr.

would be closing for good as part of the Y’s reorganization plan. “It’s so lively up here with the athletics and afterschool programming. I’m so disappointed that, out of all of them, they would close this one.” For the YMCA, the good news is they’ve asked to be released from bankruptcy protection months ahead of schedule. But it’s unfortunate for people like Greene, a Penn Hills resident, that more locations have to close by the end of the summer to accomplish this.

Board voted to make Murray the school’s football coach in early 2017. But Murray ultimately decided to walk away from both the head football coaching position and principal of the school. Also making news in the district was the number of students that have been killed by gun violence, most recently the shooting death of 17-year-old Antwon Rose II by East Pittsburgh police Officer Michael Rosfeld, SEE WOODS A4

WALTER TROUT

by Christian Morrow Courier Staff Writer

With a new venue, new partners and benefiting organizations, the blues returns to Pittsburgh with the Blues and Roots Festival, July 21 and 22, at the Syria Shrine Center in Cheswick. Also making a return is Bernard Allison, a guitar master who learned at the feet of his leg-

endary father, Luther, and who performed at the old Pittsburgh Blues Festival three times in 2007, 2012 and 2014. Allison picked up the guitar at age 10. Listening to Luther’s collection of Howlin’ Wolf, T-Bone Walker, and Lightning Hopkins while his father was away on tour, he garnered the same influences and the same passion. Along the way he also became an accomplished slide guitar player, having learned the technique from the late, great Johnny Winter. In addition to Allison, the two-day festival will feature a number of national and local performers as well as a Tribute to the Legendary Women of the Blues: Etta James, Sista Monica Parker, Bessie Smith, Koko SEE BLUES A5

Sen. Casey calls for more investment in opioid crisis and infrastructure by Christian Morrow Courier Staff Writer

In a fairly wide-ranging Q&A with members of the local African American Chamber of Commerce’s special breakfast event, July 9, at the Rivers Club, Downtown, U.S. Sen. Bob Casey said the federal government needs to reprioritize its spending to address critical issues that states and municipalities simply cannot afford to deal with—including the opioid crisis, the region’s failing bridges and roads, and the recurrent flooding that has

devastated multiple counties across the state. “With respect to the opioid crisis, everybody—especially in these rural counties—thinks they are hit hardest, but the next county over is the same or worse,” he said. “I remember visiting one and they told me, ‘We can’t keep up with the bodies.’ At the local level, the response and cooperation among police, hospitals, government and community agencies has been remarkable—they just need more resources.” He said the number of fatalities seems to be tick-

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ing down now, but this is a long-term fight. “The latest budget did allocate $1 billion and Pennsylvania got $52 million of that,” he said. “But I’ve proposed consistent funding on the order of $7 billion a year for 10 years because we’re going to be dealing with this for 25 years at least.” Senator Casey said he believed U.S. President Donald Trump wanted to address the country’s infrastructure deficiencies, but he delegated that fight to Congress and it was shoved aside for more partisan

considerations. “I thought he was going to build. He built hotels all over, but he deferred to the hard right,” said Sen. Casey. “We need a trillion-dollar infrastructure bill, it would put a lot of people to work and address the roads bridges and water issues, and even getting high speed wi-fi and phone access to rural regions.” Senator Casey also blamed the “hard right” for scuttling and delaying bi-partisan legislation on workforce development, prison and sentencing reform, and MWDBE promotion. He was then asked about the SEE CASEY A4

Kay Coles James says

SENATOR BOB CASEY (Photo by J.L. Martello)

Our children are at risk Opinion B3


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JULY 11-17, 2018

INTERNATIONAL

Commemorative events planned for Mandela’s Centenary (TriceEdneyWire.com/ GIN)—It is easy to break down and destroy. The heroes are those who make peace and build. Those were the prophetic words of President Nelson Mandela whose role in the long struggle waged against the racist system of apartheid is recalled on the anniversary of his birth on July 18, 1918. This year, the theme of the birthday Centenary is world peace. Events will take place worldwide to commemorate the former leader. A “Nelson Mandela Peace Summit” will take place at BLACK POWER—In this Feb. 13, 1990 file photo, Nelson Mandela the U.N. with speeches by and Winnie Mandela give Black Power salutes as they enter Soccer top UN officials, the chair of City stadium in the Soweto township of Johannesburg, South Afthe African Union Commis- rica, shortly after his release from 27 years in prison. (AP Photo/ sion and member states. Udo Weitz, File) In Johannesburg, the GLOBAL INFORMATION NETWORK Mandela Concerts have pledged to raise creates and distributes news and feamoney for literacy projects including 100 ture articles on current affairs in Africa new library units for schools in South to media outlets, scholars, students and Africa and a digital library. activists in the U.S. and Canada. Our goal On July 17, former president Barack is to introduce important new voices on Obama will deliver the Nelson Mandela topics relevant to Americans, to increase lecture, whose theme of renewing the the perspectives available to readers in Mandela legacy and promoting active citizenship in a changing world was developed after the passing of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela. Former Obama speechwriter Ben Rhodes commented: “The choice of Mandela and South Africa are freighted with symbolism for Obama at a time when his political legacy is being dismantled by his successor, Donald Trump, who has crudely disparaged African countries.” At press time, however, two South African organizations disputed the invite to Obama for “cultivating a new kind of colonialism in the name of the ‘War on Terror’, spreading fear, violence and destruction, in particular among Muslim communities, rubber-stamping over 100 military actions a day throughout Africa, and many more in the Middle East.” “US foreign policy has left destruction, division and suffering in its wake, and led to the rise of violent groups,” said Feroze Boda, spokesperson for CAGE Africa—an organization that opposes the so-called North America and to bring into their War on Terror. view information about global issues Palestine Solidarity Alliance spokesperthat are overlooked or under-reported by son Naazim Adam also objected to the mainstream media. decision to invite Obama, recalling the thousands of civilian casualties in Somalia, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Syria that continued under Obama’s presidency. Mandela Foundation chairperson Professor Njabulo Ndebele defended the decision to invite Obama, noting that Madiba had great respect for the first Black U.S. President. “In an era defined by worsening tensions between people, in which the spectre of exclusion and intolerance across the world seems to become normalized, the messages of President Obama, like those of Madiba, must be given space,” Ndebele said. “Furthermore, the foundation’s key focus areas, including the eradication of poverty and inequality and the dismantling of anti-Black racism, are causes that are close to President Obama’s heart. His historic election as the first Black president of the INSPIRATION—This Nov. 29, 2003 file photo shows former South African President Nelson Mandela kissing U.S. singer Beyonce United States does have Knowles, at the Nelson Mandela AIDS Benefit Concert in Cape resonance in South Africa, Town, South Africa. Heroic in his deeds, graceful in his manner, as do many of his pro-poor sainted in his image, Nelson Mandela long served as both cause policies, such as universal and muse in the entertainment community. From the 1960s, when healthcare.” he was a political prisoner and South Africa was under the laws of apartheid, right up to recent times, when the racist laws of the land had fallen and he was among the world’s most admired people, THE Mandela inspired concerts, songs, poems, fiction and movies. NEW PITTSBURGH COURIER PUBLISHING COMPANY

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This Week In Black History

Week of July 11-17 July 11 1905—The Niagara Movement (forerunner of the NAACP) is founded during a meeting near Niagara Falls, N.Y. Among the most prominent Blacks at the meeting were intellectual and activist W.E.B. DuBois and newspaper publishers William Monroe Trotter and Ida B. Wells Barnett. 1915—Mifflin Wistar Gibbs dies. Gibbs had worked on the Underground Railroad helping Blacks escape from slavery along with Frederick Douglas. He would later become publisher of Mirror of the Times—the first Black newspaper in California. He was also the first African-American MIFFLIN WISTAR GIBBS elected to a municipal judgeship in the state. 2010—Gospel legend Bishop Walter Hawkins dies. The Grammy award-winning Hawkins died at his home in Ripon, Calif. Hawkins was part of the influential Hawkins family. His brother was Edwin Hawkins and for a while he was married to gospel great Tramaine Hawkins. July 12 1887—Mound Bayou, Miss., perhaps the nation’s best known historically all-Black town, is founded by ex-slave Isaiah Montgomery and his cousin Benjamin T. Green. It was built as a sanctuary for former slaves during a period when Jim Crow racism and terrorism by groups such as the Ku Klux Klan were on the rise. It is considered the oldest surviving all-Black town in America. According to the 2000 Census, the town had 2,100 residents. 1937—Actor, comedian and political activist William “Bill” Cosby is born on this day in Philadelphia, Pa. Cosby would rise from nightclub comedian, to actor in several of WILLIAM “BILL” COSBY the so-called Black exploitation movies of the 1970s, to star of the hit NBC television series “The Cosby Show” from 1984-92. The show won numerous awards and praise for its portrayal of a middle-class African-American family. 1949—Although he is seldom mentioned today, Frederick M. Jones was one of Black America’s most productive inventors. There are at least 60 patents to his credit. However, Jones is best known for the invention of an air conditioning unit. Specifically, he designed an automatic refrigeration system for longhaul trucks and trains which he patented on this day in 1949. Jones was born in 1893 in Covington, Ky., near Cincinnati. He died in 1961. July 13 1863—One of the bloodiest race (or perhaps more appropriately “racist”) riots in America history begins. The event, known historically as New York City FREDERICK JONES Draft Riots, was sparked by angry opposition to the congressionally passed Enrollment Act—a mandatory draft requiring White men to fight in the Civil War. Many Whites went on a rampage out of opposition to the draft and fear of freed Blacks competing with them for jobs. The rioting lasted from July 13 to July 16 before it was finally put down with the aid of Federal troops. But before it was over, an estimated 100 people had been killed and 300 wounded—most of them Blacks. The mandatory draft also reflected a fact commonly omitted from standard American history texts: the class nature of much legislation. In this instance, the draft only applied to poor and working-class Whites. Wealthy Whites were officially exempted from the draft by paying a fee. 1868—Oscar J. Dunn, a former slave, is installed as Louisiana’s lieutenant governor. At the time, it was the highest elective state position ever achieved by any African-American. Another Black, Antoine Dubuclet, was installed as state treasurer. However, virtually all the Black political gains after the Civil War would be wiped out by the Hayes-Tilden Compromise of 1872 and the subsequent anti-Black Jim Crow laws. It would take nearly 100 years (during the 1960s) before Blacks would OSCAR J. DUNN once again begin to match the political gains they had made during the post-Civil War period. July 15 1779—Noted Black spy Pompey Lamb supplies the American revolutionary forces with information, which enables them to win the Battle of Stony Point—the last major battle of the Revolutionary War in New York State. Lamb had worked as a fruit and vegetable delivery man for the British Army. 1822—Philadelphia becomes one of the first major cities to open its public schools to Blacks. The first school was a segregated one just for Black boys. One for girls was opened four years later in 1826. The city’s public schools would remain segregated until the 1930s. July 16 1862—Crusading journalist and anti-lynching activist Ida IDA B. WELLS-BARNETT B. Wells-Barnett is born in Holly Springs, Miss. Wells-Barnett was a true militant activist. Her editorials so angered Whites in the Memphis, Tenn., area that a mob burned down the building which housed her newspaper. She was also one of the original founders of the NAACP and in 1884 she committed a “Rosa Parks” type act when she refused an order to give up her seat on a train to a White man. It took the conductor and two other men to remove her from the seat and throw her off the train. 1882—Violette A. Johnson is born. She would become the first Black female attorney allowed to practice before the United States Supreme Court. July 17 1794—Former slave and minister Richard Allen officially dedicated the Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Philadelphia, Pa. The church was the first all-Black denomination not affiliated with a larger White congregation. The incident leading to the dedication took place in 1787 when Allen, Absalom Jones and several other Blacks were thrown out of Philadelphia’s St. George’s Methodist Episcopal RICHARD ALLEN Church when they attempted to pray along-side Whites. The AME Church would go on to become one of the largest Black religious denominations in America. 1862—As the Southern, pro-slavery rebels prove more difficult in battle than expected, Congress passes a law giving President Abraham Lincoln the authority to begin recruiting free Blacks and recently freed slaves into military service during the Civil War. 1911—Frank M. Snowden is born in York County, Va. The Harvard educated Snowden would become a prominent professor at Washington, D.C.’s, Howard University and a leading authority on Blacks in ancient history. His major works include “Blacks in Antiquity: Ethiopians in the Greco-Roman Experience” and “Before Color Prejudice: The Ancient View of Blacks.” Snowden documented that “Ethiopians pioneered religion” and played a major role in the development of the greatness of ancient Egypt. Snowden also showed that Blacks influenced the development of both ancient Greek and Roman societies working in capacities FRANK M. SNOWDEN ranging from musicians to scholars. Snowden died in February 2007 at the age of 95. 1942—Heavyweight boxing champion Muhammad Ali is born Cassius Marcellus Clay in Louisville, Ky. Ali would join the Nation of Islam and become a major opponent of the U.S. war in Vietnam. He would later split with Malcolm X when Malcolm broke away from the Nation of Islam. 1944—The so-called Port of Chicago Mutiny takes place. In the middle of America’s involvement in World War II, an ammunitions depot at Port Chicago, Calif., explodes killing 320 men—most of them Black. It was the worse stateside disaster in U.S. military history. However, when 258 surviving Black soldiers refused to return to work until they received certain safety guarantees, their refusal was labeled a mutiny by military authorities. Fifty of the soldiers were convicted of mutiny and jailed. However, after the war, President Harry MUHAMMAD ALI S. Truman commuted their sentences.


NATIONAL

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JULY 11-17, 2018

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‘Conscience of the Nation’…Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. honored with 2018 NNPA Lifetime Legacy Award by Stacy M. Brown

He reminisced about the fateful night in Memphis NNPA Newswire Contributor in 1968 when an assassin’s bullet cut down King. Reverend Jesse L. Jack“I was with Dr. King on son Sr. received the highest that chilly night in Memhonor presented by the phis and I went to the NNPA at its annual conphone to talk to Mrs. King. vention in Norfolk, Va. I couldn’t really talk,” he The legendary activist said. “I told her, ‘I think Dr. received the NNPA LifeKing was shot in the shoultime Legacy Award for his der,’ even though I knew he decades of service as one was shot in the neck. I just of the country’s foremost couldn’t say it.” civil rights, religious and During the General Mopolitical figures. tors-sponsored ceremony, After a video tribute Leavell and Chavis said that chronicled Jackson’s Jackson has carried King’s life and a surprise solo legacy well. performance of “Hero,” by “We still need him,” Jackson favorite, Audrey Leavell said of Jackson. DuBois Harris, the iconChavis called Jackson ic preacher accepted the a “long-distance runner award from NNPA Preswho’s made a difference ident and CEO Dr. Bennot only in this country, but jamin F. Chavis, Jr., and all over the world.” NNPA Chairman Dorothy Leavell recalled Jackson’s R. Leavell. “I’m not easy to surprise,” historic run for the presidency in 1984 in a camJackson told the crowd, which gave him a standing paign that registered more ovation as he headed to the than 1 million new voters podium to accept the honor. and catapulting Democrats in their successful effort The Presidential Medal to regain control of the of Freedom winner, JackSenate. son has been called the Four years later, Jackson “Conscience of the Nation,” ran again, this time regisand “The Great Unifier,” tering more than 2 million challenging America to be new voters and earning 7 inclusive and to establish just and humane priorities million popular votes. “It’s a wonder that my for the benefit of all. neighbors didn’t call the Born in 1941 in Greenpolice the night he gave ville, South Carolina, that iconic speech at the Jackson began his theoDemocratic National logical studies at Chicago Convention [in 1984],” said Theological Seminary, but Leavell, whom Jackson deferred his studies when he began working full time presided over her wedding ceremony more than 40 in the Civil Rights Movement alongside Dr. Martin years ago. “There was so much emotion that night Luther King, Jr. that I felt, they told me “This honor takes on a that I could be anything special meaning for me that I wanted to be,” because my first job was Leavell said, pointing to selling the ‘Norfolk JourJackson and photographers nal and Guide’ newspaper flocked to take pictures of and then the ‘Baltimore AFRO-American’ and then the civil rights leader while holding his coveted NNPA the ‘Pittsburgh Courier,’” award. Jackson said of the iconic Dubois Harris said JackBlack-owned newspapers. son is a “King of a man,” “We couldn’t see the other side of Jackie Robinson. We and, although she had been under the weather all couldn’t see the other side of Sugar Ray Robinson,” he week, nothing would stop said, noting that the Black her from attending JackPress told the full stories of son’s big night, she said. “We stand on his shoulthose sports heroes.

Miami Times dominates 2018 NNPA Foundation Merit Awards by Stacy M. Brown NNPA Newswire Contributor

Karen Carter Richards, the first vice chair of the NNPA and publisher of the Houston Forward Times, received the highly-coveted Publisher of the Year Award during the 2018 NNPA Foundation Merit Awards in Norfolk, Va. The Merit Awards recognizes individual newspapers, publishers and other staff members that have excelled in various newspaper categories such as Best Editorial, Best Column Writing, Community Service, Best Layout & Design, Best Church Page, Best Sports Section and other areas. The NNPA Foundation also presented 21 scholarships that were funded by sponsors that included Ford, General Motors and Coca-Cola. The Miami Times took home 12 Merit Awards. The Birmingham Times won the John H. Sengstacke Award for General Excellence Award. The Miami Times also earned an award in the General Excellence category that focused on the number of points earned throughout the ceremony. The North Dallas Gazette earned first place in the Robert S. Abbott Best Editorial Award while The Washington Informer and The Final Call, respectively, took home second and third place awards in the category. The Los Angeles Wave took first place in the Emory O. Jackson Best Column Writing category with The Washington Informer and Insight News earning

second and third place finishes. The St. Louis American, a perennial winner at the NNPA Merit Awards, cashed in eight awards, this year, including first place finishes for Best Business Section, Best Entertainment Section, Best Use of Photographs, Best Original Advertising, Best Circulation Promotion, and the Miller Coors A. Phillip Randolph Messenger Award for Digital Excellence. The Philadelphia Tribune won eight awards, including first place awards for Best Church Section and Best Sports Section. Other winners included the Chicago Crusader, the AFRO-American, Seattle Medium, Los Angeles Sentinel, Houston Defender, the New Tri-State Defender, Richmond Free Press, the New Journal and Guide, the Atlanta Voice, the Indianapolis Recorder, and Insight News. “We are all winners, even if you didn’t hear your name called,” said Amelia Ashley-Ward, NNPA Foundation Chair and publisher of the San Francisco Sun-Reporter. “When one of us wins, we all wins.” For the 2018 Merit Awards, publishers were independently judged in 20 different journalistic categories and Ashley-Ward said it’s all part of the Foundation’s goal of continuing to deliver on its vision to preserve the historical legacy of the Black Press while expanding its reach and impact in the United States and abroad through technology and innovation in today’s marketplace.

He also negotiated the release of U.S. soldiers held hostage in Kosovo and, in 2000, Jackson helped negotiate the release of four journalists working on a documentary for Britain’s Channel 4 network who were held in Liberia. Jackson said President Trump should and can be defeated, with the aid of the Black Press, who this year has led a drive to register 5 million new African-American voters. “The first time I saw an image of Black achievement was in the Black Press,” Jackson said. “Today, the Black Press is more HIGHEST HONOR—Reverend Jesse Jackson Sr. accepts the 2018 NNPA Lifetime Legacy Award during the important than ever. 2018 NNPA Lifetime Legacy Award Black Tie Gala in Norfolk, Va. (Freddie Allen/AMG/NNPA) This is the season of ‘Fake News,’ but we need the truth now release of 48 Cuban and has aided countless Black ders,” Dubois Harris said. more than ever.” and minority families with Cuban-American prisoners “He continues to be a (Stacy Brown is an NNPA in Cuba. various struggles. pioneer of civil rights and Newswire Contributor and Jackson was the first But his work not only has humanity and he’s all co-author of “Michael Jackson: American to bring home that’s good and right in the helped the poor or minoriThe Man Behind the Mask: An citizens from the United ties. world.” Insider’s Story of the King of Kingdom, France, and In 1984, Jackson secured Over decades, Jackson Pop.” Follow Stacy on Twitter @ other countries who were has earned the respect and the release of captured stacybrownmedia.) held as human shields by Navy Lt. Robert Goodtrust of presidents and (This article was originally Saddam Hussein in Kuwait published at BlackPressUSA. man from Syria, and he dignitaries and his Rainand Iraq in 1990. also help shepherd the bow PUSH organization com.)


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METRO

JULY 11-17, 2018

NEW PITTSBURGH COURIER

Penn Hills YMCA to close Aug. 31 YMCA FROM A1

“Today is a bittersweet day because it means we are able to move forward now that our formal reorganization is complete,” said President Kevin Bolding at a July 10 press conference at its Homewood-Brushton Center. “However, it also means we have had to make very difficult decisions that impact communities we care deeply about.” When the organization filed for protection from creditors in May, it announced it would save about $1 million a year by closing its Downtown center on Fifth Avenue. It cited debts of up to $60 million and assets of $75 million. The newly announced closures would, Bolding said, save another $1 million

annually—but it will also affect more than 200 part-time and 23 full-time employees, and more than 3,000 members. Greene said she spoke with some YMCA officials after using the facility, July 10. “I understood when they said Homewood was staying open because the community needs it, but we need it, too. What are the kids going to do?” Despite the pending closures, Bolding said summer programs and camps at all three locations would continue through Aug. 31. “There is no doubt

this has been the most challenging time in the YMCA’s history for our employees, their families, our members and  the community,” he said. “As we worked through the plans for our reorganization, we knew we had more difficult days ahead, but it is our belief that these changes  are necessary for us to remain a vital service provider in  greater Pittsburgh, especially for those in  underserved communities.” “It’s just heartbreaking to know that this place is closing,” Greene said. “It’s part of the community.”

THE PENN HILLS YMCA, shown here, will close, Aug. 31. (Photo by Rob Taylor Jr.)

Woods wants to ‘raise expectations’ for Woodland Hills students Named new principal of the Jr./Sr. High School on July 2 WOODS FROM A1

June 19. “The school and community have experienced a great deal of hardship, specifically this past year. My plan is to accentuate the positive aspects of the school and community,” Woods told the New Pittsburgh Courier in an exclusive interview, July 10. “I want the community to

recognize the accomplishments of the students of Woodland Hills, as they receive their training to be successful in the real world, while giving back to their community.” Woods completed his doctorate degree in Education, Administration and Leadership studies from Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP) in 2017. He earned a Master of Education degree from Slippery Rock University in 2003, and a Bachelor of Science degree in Elementary Education from IUP in 2000. Woods hopes to provide stability to the Woodland Hills community, which encompasses communities such as North Brad-

dock, Braddock, Swissvale, Rankin, and Churchill. “One of my philosophies is high visibility, high support,” Woods said. “I will be highly engaged and I need those parents to welcome that approach, and I need them to mirror that and be highly engaged (as well).” The Woodland Hills School District recently saw the resignation of its superintendent, Alan Johnson, effective June 30. A month prior, a panel of community leaders, parents and educators submitted a series of recommendations to the board, which could improve the schools. Those recommendations included hiring more minorities as employees, possibly removing school resource officers (school resource officer Steve Shaulis was accused of punching a 14-year-old student in April 2017), and implicit-bias training. With all the troubles, Woods admitted that some people asked him why he wanted to become principal at Woodland Hills. “My response is why not?” Woods told the Courier. “Every student deserves access to a quality education, and I believe I can help facilitate that. My upbringing, educational background, professional experience and will to succeed are all a perfect match to the challenges of the Woodland Hills Junior/ Senior High School. I look forward to building upon the positive initiatives currently established and making improvements to any deficient areas. Once I have a grasp of the culture, we will grow together socially and then academically to continue to heal the community.”

“Every student deserves access to a quality education, and I believe I can help facilitate that. My upbringing, educational background, professional experience and will to succeed are all a perfect match to the challenges of the Woodland Hills Junior/Senior High School.” PHILLIP WOODS, EdD

Casey meets with African American Chamber of Commerce Senator wants more investment in opioid crisis and infrastructure CASEY FROM A1

Supreme Court nominee the president would announce later that evening (Brett Kavanaugh was se-

lected, July 9). He said it didn’t matter who the president selected, and he would release a press statement a few hours later announcing that he would oppose them all—because he said the process is corrupt because the candidates have been pre-selected by conservative think tanks. “We have hundreds of federal appellate court judges

and state Supreme Court judges to choose from— even if you threw out the Democrats, there’d still be hundreds of Republicans to choose from,” said Sen. Casey. “But we’re getting someone from a short list—and he said he would do this during his campaign— a list of 25 selected by the Heritage Foundation and the Federalist Society. This

is the radical right. It’s a corrupt process and I can’t support that.” As for working to increase the number of small, Blackowned businesses in the booming shale gas business, Sen. Casey said he hadn’t studied it enough, though he did say he was pleased that—unlike in the first years of the boom— more local companies, and workers are involved.


METRO

NEW PITTSBURGH COURIER

JULY 11-17, 2018

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IS EAST PITTSBURGH THE NEW FERGUSON?

Courier movie/TV critic Merecedes J. Howze says documentary ‘Stranger Fruit’ will have you ‘angry’ over what happened to Antwon Rose II by Merecedes J. Howze For New Pittsburgh Courier

While everybody was renewing their Starz subscription for the fifth season of “Power,” I was browsing through the new movies in my down time and

Merecedes on…

Movies stumbled across “Stranger Fruit.” The documentary originally premiered at the 2017 SXSW film festival and received some backlash for never-before-seen footage of Mike Brown the day before his murder. So, filmmaker and director Jason Pollock did some more digging and released an extended version of the film in April. Starz picked it up in June. And, now, we are here.

The most controversial part of the documentary was a key piece of evidence that the Ferguson, Missouri Police Department decided to bury. A surveillance video of Mike Brown the night before his murder showed him in the same convenience store where he was accused of a strong-arm robbery. The question begs: Why would Mike Brown, who seemed to have a working relationship with store staff, go in the very next day and “rob” the joint? The video was never admitted into evidence or released to the public, further proving the modern-day cover up in the death of Michael Brown Jr. The Ferguson Police Department, District Attorney Bob McCullough, and the media (Fox News at the top of the list) had a clear agenda in protecting and polishing the reputation of Officer Darren Wilson (who shot Mike Brown on Aug. 9, 2014), while creating a damaging narrative about the life of Mike Brown. Does this sound familiar? Although we are in the beginning stages of finding justice for Antwon Rose II, Pittsburgh news outlets were quick to inform us about how that young man had an empty clip in his pocket. Laws and processes go right out the window when African American victims

MICHAEL BROWN JR. are involved. Mike Brown’s body had lain in the middle of a Ferguson street for four and a half hours, which is completely against protocol. Here in Pittsburgh, an Allegheny County judge granted East Pittsburgh Officer Michael Rosfeld an unsecured bond, also completely against normal protocol. If you ask me, Darren Wilson and Michael Rosfeld are one in the same; timid White men with a racist agenda hiding behind a badge. Both officers were relieved of duties with other law enforcement agencies, or, at the very least, had questionable records as an officer. Both officers have a history of excessive

Pittsburgh Blues and Roots Festival returns July 21-22 BLUES FROM A1

Taylor, Dinah Washington and Marva Wright—their signature songs will be performed by local women of the blues—Nicole Beli, Joy Brown, Jeanie Shook, Freddye Stover, Stevee Wellons and Jill West. Ron “Moondog” Esser, who produced the old Blues Festival which ended in 2015, brought back this leaner, meaner version last year after pleas from longtime blues fans. Like last year, the festival proceeds will benefit the Autism Society of Pittsburgh and Band Together Pittsburgh, a nonprofit Esser and musician John Vento formed that uses music to enrich the lives of individuals on the autism spectrum and their families. And while the festival is steering clear of “highpriced” acts, the performers who are coming are, like Allison, The Gathering Field, John Nemeth, The Rhythm Aces. They’re are all high energy and high quality, and none more than headliner Walter Trout. Originally from New Jersey, Trout spent the bulk of his early performing career in Europe. He moved to California in the early 1970s, and after stints with Percy Mayfield, John Lee Hooker, Joe Tex and Canned Heat, he was invited join guitarist Coco Montoya in John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers. After leaving Mayall in 1989, he formed his own band and continue to tour Europe. He did not release his first U.S. album until 1998. Since then, Trout has released 16 albums, including the award-winning Luther’s Blues, Battle Scars—which chronicles his successful fight against liver disease, and last year’s We’re All In This Together, which featured guest all-stars Randy Bachman, Joe Bonamassa, Robben Ford, Eric Gales, Warren Haynes, Sonny Landreth, Charlie Musselwhite, John Németh, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Joe Louis Walker, Edgar Win-

ter, Mike Zito, John Mayall and Trout’s son Jon, who had fronted his band while he was ill. The Blues and Roots Festival will feature both a Pavilion Stage and a Festival Stage. The music begins at 1:30 p.m. both days. Day passes are $20 in advance,

weekend passes, $35. Day passes at the gate are $26. Children 16 and under are free. The Syria Shrine Center is located just off Rte. 28 at 1877 Shriners Way, Cheswick. For more information visit www.pghbluesrootsfest.com.

force. And still, they both took an oath and then took someone’s life. There’s no way you can watch “Stranger Fruit” and not be angry. It’s not even possible to watch “Stranger Fruit” and not think about how we have the same exact problems in our own backyard. East Pittsburgh is now the new Ferguson, Missouri. This epidemic occurs so frequently that soon there will be anoth-

ANTWON ROSE II er city crying the injustice woes of an unarmed Black man’s death at the hands of police. We, the people, have to begin the dialogue and action to create, implement, and enforce the counter-narrative. Black men are not disposable. We will not tolerate their slaughter. To the Rose family, I am so sorry for your loss! I have been protesting, I have been praying, and

I am hoping that we can bring about change. To the protestors, stay strong and healthy. Your voices are being heard! To my own Black son, Zaire, I wish mommy could protect you at all times. I can’t shield you from the target on your back. But, prayerfully, I can place some love, comfort, and resources at your feet to make you move in the right direction.


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JULY 11-17, 2018

HEALTH

NEW PITTSBURGH COURIER

Take charge of your health today. Be informed. Be involved. ESTHER BUSH

Sleep This month, the “Take Charge of Your Health Today” page focuses on sleep across the lifespan and its effect on our overall health. Erricka Hager, health advocate at the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, and Esther L. Bush, president and CEO of the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, spoke about this topic. EH: Good morning, Ms. Bush. It has been a few weeks since our last health page. It’s nice to talk with you again, especially when we get an opportunity to chat about a topic that is meaningful to all of us, no matter who we are. EB: Yes, Erricka; it’s great that you say that. Sleep is a topic that normally isn’t talked about as much in the African American community, especially as it relates so vitally to our health. We can all benefit from a better knowledge of the impact of sleep and how it affects us at various stages of our lives. EH: I absolutely agree, Ms. Bush. Did you know that studies consistently find that Black Americans sleep more poorly than White Americans? Roughly half of Black Americans don’t get enough sleep, and poor sleep contributes to a vicious cycle of poor health outcomes. Factors like living in neighborhoods with higher crime rates or having to work multiple jobs can contribute to Black Americans not getting enough sleep. Black Americans are suffering from a “sleep gap” due to unequal access to safe and comfortable sleep environments. EB: Wow! Thank you, Erricka, for all this new information. I also saw Dr. Buysse noting in the overview that African Americans are disproportionately represented in night-shift work, which contributes to an increase in poor sleep outcomes. EH: That’s right, Ms. Bush. Poor sleep outcomes in night-shift workers are being linked to an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease—both of which continue to disproportionally affect Black Americans. Dr. Buysse is currently recruiting retired nightshift workers for a study to help pinpoint how a lack of sleep contributes to poor health outcomes like obesity or diabetes. EB: Yes, Erricka. The study being conducted by Dr. Buysse and his team will be clearly beneficial to the communities we serve. I hope that African American readers of this column will consider participating. What would be your advice to folks reading this article, both night-shift workers and otherwise? EH: Foremost, it’s important to recognize that an ample amount of sleep is essential to the overall well-being and health of a community. But also, our readers should know that there are research studies being done at the University of Pittsburgh about sleep and its effect on our health. Getting involved with research studies is one of the best ways for us to help to improve health outcomes for future generations of Black Americans. EB: Thank you for having this chat with me, Erricka. We’ve provided all readers with some great information and ways they can take charge of their health today. I look forward to chatting with you next month as we discuss depression and its relationship to mental health.

Sleep Across the Lifespan Want to start taking care of your health? Begin by looking at your sleep habits. Research shows that not getting enough sleep can not only make people feel irritable and tired, it can negatively affect health. “Humans spend roughly one-third of their lives sleeping, so we know it’s important, biologically speaking,” says Daniel J. Buysse, MD, UPMC Professor of Sleep Medicine and professor of psychiatry and of clinical and translational science at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Sleep is important to people of all ages. Though babies and children may look peaceful when they (finally) go to sleep, their brains and bodies are working. Sleep is essential for brain development, helps protect the heart, helps keep children from being overweight and boosts the immune system. A consistent sleep routine can also help children become better sleepers. It can also help regulate circadian rhythms, the 24-hour sleepwake cycle often referred to as a “biological clock.” Adolescents’ sleep patterns change, which Dr. Buysse says has a biological basis as well as a social one. Teens’ biological clock shifts later, which explains their desire to stay up late and sleep later in the mornings. Dr. Buysse points to some school districts pushing their start times later because “simply changing school start times by about an hour in the morning can reduce absenteeism, improve standardized test score performance, reduce traffic accidents and maybe even improve mental health.” Dr. Buysse reminds parents that one of the most important things they can do for

J. BUYSSE, MD their children is model good sleep behavior. Parents can make it a part of their daily routine to get regular, appropriate amounts of sleep. Adults’ sleep needs also shift, but sleep is still important to maintaining health. According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, sleep allows the brain to prepare for the next day. Sleep deficiency is linked to an increased risk of heart disease, kidney disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, stroke, obesity, depression, suicide and risk-taking behavior. A brain functioning with a sleep deficiency has more trouble making decisions, solving problems and has slower reaction times. “The art of good sleep involves the amount, regularity and time of sleep,” says Dr. Buysse. “We need to get the right

amount of sleep, at the right time of day and on a regular basis. Not allowing our bedtime and wake time to vary too much can be a key to getting good sleep. Research shows that the right time is at night. For adults, the middle of our sleep should be 3-3:30 a.m. because that’s when our biological clock is best suited to sleep.” What if people cannot sleep in the middle of the night because they are working? Dr. Buysse is currently running a study to see how night-shift work affects people’s health, even after they have retired. He says that about 15-20 percent of the United States’ population works something other than day shift—and research shows that African Americans, in particular, are disproportionately represented in night-shift work. “This study is important because there’s increasing evidence that working the night shift may increase a person’s risk for certain diseases,” says Dr. Buysse. “When people work the night shift, their bodies have a hard time regulating their biological clock with the external world. This creates problems with metabolism and cardiovascular function.” Although you might think that people who work consistent night shifts also shift their biological clock to be on an opposite schedule, Dr. Buysse says that’s not the case. Night-shift workers are still exposed to some sunlight and to regular social activities. This keeps their clocks on a day schedule, which, in turn, affects their sleep quality. His study with retired nightshift workers may lead to identifying an under-recognized risk for heart disease, diabetes and obesity. Dr. Buysse reminds us that we should “pay attention to how our bodies prioritize, seek and regulate sleep. It’s a cornerstone of a set of behaviors we can use to be as healthy as we can be.”

The Importance of Sleep for Teenagers Sleep touches nearly every aspect of our lives. Sleep plays an important role in many areas of teenagers’ lives, including academic performance, athletic performance and physical health. Sleep is also critical to mood and irritability, as well as the risk for developing mental health problems. Some people who do not get enough sleep have even been rated as less attractive. Even though sleep is highly important to all of these areas of our lives, most teenagers do not get enough sleep. It is recommended that teens sleep eight to 10 hours every night to function at their best. But most teens get seven hours or fewer. Sometimes this is the result of normal biological changes to sleep that occur during adolescence, which contribute to teens wanting to go to bed later at night and wake up later in the morning. On school days, this may mean that they get fewer hours of sleep than is recommended. Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine are testing a program that aims to help teenagers get

more sleep. You may be eligible to participate in this research if you are 13-15 years old and you do not have serious health conditions. All participants will watch a two-minute video about sleep. Those who do not get enough sleep will be invited to participate in our sleep program, which includes completing questionnaires, meeting with a clinician to discuss sleep and using a smartphone to answer questions about sleep. If you are interested, please contact Brandy Núñez at 412-246-5693 or Dr. Jessica Levenson at 412-647-7937. You may also e-mail tapas@upmc.edu. Eligible participants will be compensated for their time.


PEOPLE

NEW PITTSBURGH COURIER

JULY 11-17, 2018

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The Gates Scholarship belongs to Brenden Jones

BRENDEN JONES graduated from Propel Andrew Street High School, June 6. He’s pictured with principal Lauren Reiber. (Photo courtesy Propel Schools)

One of only 300 students nationwide to receive the honor One email message changed Brenden Jones’ future plans. As of April 2018, the recent Propel Andrew Street High School graduate was wondering how he would close the gap between the amount of scholarship money he had been granted from a variety of colleges and universities and the total cost of pursuing his post-secondary education goals. Then he opened the email. The email informed him that he was one of 300 high school seniors in the United States to be awarded The Gates Scholarship. The highly selective award covers tuition for him to enroll full-time in a four-year degree program at a U.S.-accredited, not-for-profit, private or public college or university. “It took a big weight off my shoulders,” said Jones, a Homestead resident, in a release provided to the New Pittsburgh Courier. Recalling how his mother cried at the news, Jones

added: “My goal when I was starting (to consider college) was to not have any of my college costs fall back on her. I didn’t want to put that on her because we’re not rich or anything like that.” Paying college tuition, plus food, housing, books and supplies can be a steep challenge. The College Board reports that a moderate budget for an in-state public college for the 20172018 academic year averaged $25,290. A moderate budget at a private college averaged $50,900. When Jones was asked what colleges he applied to, he pulled out his cellphone and read a list of nearly 20 of the nation’s top schools. He decided on Northwestern University in the Chicago area, with a cost of attendance in excess of $72,000. He intends to have a double major—economics and, perhaps, psychology. “I had actually forgotten about the Gates at one point because when I started the application it was in

July and I didn’t hear back until April,” he explained. “I was preparing for the worst. You know, I didn’t expect it.” At one point, Jones had envisioned himself playing professional football or bas-

lot,” said Jones. During his eighth-grade year at Propel Homestead, he stopped playing basketball so that he could get a job and save some money. He also broke his foot and was on crutches for 11

“My teachers taught me that I could go as far as I wanted to. I wanted to learn and that’s what got me to where I am now.” BRENDEN JONES

ketball after high school. “I really didn’t mind school in elementary and middle school. It was easy for me. I didn’t really stress about it. I procrastinated a

weeks. “I had a lot of time to sit and reflect on my life without sports,” he said. “Learning was what filled that gap.”

In his ninth-grade year at Propel Andrew Street, Jones was inspired by a civics teacher. “He was the first teacher who made me think about life outside of Propel. He helped us learn about setting ourselves up after high school,” Jones said, adding that the small classroom sizes at Propel Schools made it possible for him to always have access to helpful teachers. With this new direction, Jones’ first post-high school plan was to attend a small college close to home because that was more affordable than attending a college further away. But he got involved with a pro-

gram called QuestBridge, which works to increase the number of talented students from low-income backgrounds attending the nation’s best universities. Jones entered the Carnegie Library Music Hall for the June 6 commencement ceremony wearing a blue cap and gown. Among the items showing his scholarship were a National Honor Society Member medal and pin, and blue and gold cords denoting his high honor roll status. “My teachers taught me that I could go as far as I wanted to,” Jones said. “I wanted to learn and that’s what got me to where I am now.”


LIFESTYLES New Pittsburgh Courier

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JULY 11-17, 2018

www.newpittsburghcourier.com

Debbie Norrell

Lifestyles Report

Wash your hands

Did you hear about the group of people that got sick after eating at a party? The conclusion was “someone did not wash their hands properly.” What does that mean? Does it mean that they did not use soap and water and sing the first chorus of “Happy Birthday” while they were washing their hands in a real sink? Since the invention of hand sanitizer people don’t wash their hands the way they used to. I bought a book on washing hands and in my overstocked library I cannot find it. It actually had the name washing your hands in the title. So I looked it up and there are thousands of titles out there about washing your hands geared towards children. That made me think, is washing hands just for kids? Or do people think that now that they are adults they don’t have to wash their hands? I am so tired of seeing a big jug of hand sanitizer at the beginning of a buffet table. Just the thought of hand sanitizer makes me ill. I watch people use it and many are “one handers.” That means they put one hand under the pump then rub a little into the other hand. I didn’t think the hand sanitizer was to be used like lotion. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, you should wash your hands for at least 20 seconds, lathering up with soap and warm water before rinsing. If you’re rushing through the process and skipping soap, those are both red flags that may mean bacteria or leftover food are still lingering on your hands. Reportedly 97 percent of the population does not wash their hands properly. Wait a minute...how about drying your hands after you’re done washing your hands, it might not hurt to be a bit more mindful of what towel you’re grabbing to dry off with. According to the USDA’s study, not only were participants washing their hands incorrectly, they were drying them with dirty hand towels. So what can happen if someone who is serving or preparing food does not wash their hands? Read this excerpt from a Charlotte newspaper: “Health officials say poor hand-washing led to contaminated food that sickened at least 40 people at a weekend party in North Carolina. Mecklenburg County Health Director Gibbie Harris told news outlets that some of those who attended the Saturday party in Charlotte are suffering from a highly contagious disease calls shigella. Harris said shigella causes diarrhea and is spread through contact with feces.” Harris says someone who prepared some food for the party did not wash hands thoroughly. So, commit this list to memory...wash hands: •Before, during, and after preparing food •Before eating food •Before and after caring for someone who is sick •Before and after treating a cut or wound •After using the toilet •After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet •After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing •After touching an animal, animal feed, or animal waste •After handling pet food or pet treats •After touching garbage.

ALPHA PHI ALPHA CHAPTER PRESIDENT—Davie Huddleston

by Debbie Norrell

ALPHA MEN—John Ayers, Sean Gibson, Gregg Lovelace, Leonard McClendon and William Gaskins

Alpha Weekend 2018

Lifestyles Editor

Summer is now in full swing; however the warm weather season always kicks off with Alpha Weekend. Some refer to it as Memorial Day Weekend but the brothers of Alpha Phi Alpha-Alpha Omicron Lambda Chapter have claimed this weekend as their own. This year the weekend began with a SkeePhi party at Preeti’s Pitt in the Strip District where the kings of black and gold (Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity) teamed with the queens of pink and green (Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority) for a great Friday night party. Saturday was reserved for a cookout in Monroeville Community Park and Sunday, of course, was the annual boat ride featuring the Brydge Band on the dock and DJ Tee Jay on the boat. Hundreds of guests enjoyed a great time on the Gateway Clipper Fleet, some even celebrated

BRYDGE BAND—Featuring Anita Levels (Photos by Debbie Norrell)

FIRST TIMERS—Duane Jubert with Amanda Jubert, and Chayla Carter and Shaquille Hall

their birthday. Davie Huddleston, Alpha Phi Alpha Pittsburgh Chapter president, said this great weekend this year themed “American Pharaohs” raises funds for scholarships and chapter expenses. Huddleston told everyone to mark their calendars for their black tie event scheduled for Nov. 10.

EVENT CO-CHAIRS—John Ayers and Sean Gibson

READY TO BOARD—India Hunter and Chauncey Alexander

READY TO CRUISE—Thomas Walllace, Kayla Higgins, Natasha Williams and Anthony Williams

TWO PINK & GREEN QUEENS—Karla Payne and Ruthie Walker

READY TO BOARD—Shonna Peters, Clark Steven, Qiana Shipman and Leonard McClendon

CELEBRATING FIFTY FABULOUS YEARS—Leah R. Evans, center, with family and friends


NEW PITTSBURGH COURIER

PEOPLE

United Way’s 5th Annual BUILD-A-BIKE

XAVIER SMITH, 11, and Cameron Saunders, 7, with their newly-constructed bikes at United Way’s 5th Annual Build-A-Bike event, June 21, at Heinz Field. (Photos by J.L. Martello)

United Way of Southwestern PA hosted its fifth annual Build-A-Bike in partnership with Williams, June 21, at the Heinz Field UPMC Club. The event provided team-building opportunities to local volunteers, including 75 teams of 400 volunteers. The professionals constructed bikes alongside participating youth ages 8 to 10 from the Pittsburgh area, teaching the impact of teamwork and physical activity. When the bikes were completed, they were then inspected, tested by experts and presented to the youth to keep. Other activities during the afternoon event included trivia on bike safety, physical activity, and fossil fuels and practice locking up their bikes. United Way is dedicated to helping local youth succeed by providing opportunities that teach the importance of health, good nutrition and physical activity.

SAMYJAH HAYMAN, 9, of Penn Hills, with his new bike…

SHAWN LEGION CAMPBELL, 9, is ready to ride his new bike as well…

JULY 11-17, 2018

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SPORTS New Pittsburgh Courier

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JULY 11-17, 2018

LOOKING OVER THE SHOULDER

www.newpittsburghcourier.com

Pirates pitcher Jameson Taillon not happy with quick hook by manager Hurdle by Aubrey Bruce For New Pittsburgh Courier

On July 7, the Pittsburgh Pirates were in the thick of a very nasty losing streak. They were facing a Philadelphia Phillies team with a nasty disposition, a nastier offense and one of the nastiest pitching staffs in the National League. I could spew a few stats to back up my claim. However, in many cases, stats are just footnotes to the passion, spirit and the psyche of any game. Any leader or star in any sport, rookie or veteran, high-priced draft choice or lowly free agent, will never be relaxed or be able to perform at their optimum, if he or she thinks

Inside Conditions

AUBREY BRUCE

that “the captain’s hook” is always somewhere just over the horizon. On this perfect afternoon for the game that was invented by Abner Doubleday, Pirates’ starting pitcher Jameson Taillon seemed to be pitching the sort of game that even Ol’ Abner would have admired if he would have had the opportunity to witness such a gem of a game. I don’t want to play “Rainman” and spew a bunch of stats at you because this game, this one game was based on confidence, spirit and heart and uncertainty. Taillon displayed confidence, spirit and heart. I never thought I would say this because professionally and personally, I regard Pirates manager Clint Hurdle as one of the managers in the NL that can play the baseball “chess game” with any of the them. But on this day, this very day, did Clint Hurdle unknowingly unleash the “pitbull” of uncertainty on the “three Chihuahuas” of Jameson Taillon—confidence, spirit and heart? During the first six innings, Taillon appeared as if he were a composite of Harry Houdini, David Copperfield, and David Blaine. Taillon caused the Phillies to appear as if they were batting with toothpicks in-

JAMESON TAILLON (AP PHOTO) stead of 32-inch MLB standard issue baseball bats. Taillon did not even remotely seem to be pleased when he glanced to the rear and saw someone warming up in the Pirates’ bullpen. Taillon had reason to be concerned about getting the win, based on the most recent performances of the Pirates relievers. However, the idea of Taillon notching a win, based on his performance through the first six innings, would have been an excellent wager by anyone

looking to snatch a few dollars out of the pockets the “Vegas” bookmakers. The Pirates eventually lost the game, 3-2. Let’s check out Jameson Taillon’s insight regarding the game. “It’s pretty unfortunate, that’s the human element of it, pitching looking over your shoulder and someone’s warming up, that’s tough.” I don’t care how much money these players earn, diluting their self-esteem and negatively impacting their confidence, especially

Taillon had shut down the Phillies for 6 1/3 innings, then got annoyed with manager Clint Hurdle when he saw Pirates pitcher Edgar Santana warming up in the bullpen.

when they could be in the midst of self-inflicted doubt is not recommended even if you didn’t complete the final course of MLB Manager 101. Jameson Taillon was not positively affected by the proactive and provocative strategy of his boss. “I know I haven’t been pitching the greatest, so I understand maybe the trust isn’t there. I was, again, looking forward to being the guy to give the bullpen a rest and go even deeper and end the streak,” Taillon told reporters after the game. “Today was one of the better total-package games. It was one of those days where everything was rolling together.” There have been many instances that baseball mangers have been jus-

tifiably and unjustifiably criticized for leaving a pitcher in too long or having wielded a leash that was far too short. Until the seventh inning offensively, the Phillies looked as if they were playing baseball on an almost pitch black field with black baseballs and white baseball bats, with lights focused only on home plate. The Phillies offense spent most of the day, second-guessing the pitches of Jameson Taillon. Pirates manager Clint Hurdle may have spent the remainder of the evening wondering if he made the wrong decision to pull Taillon out of the game in the seventh inning. I, for one, thought it was the wrong decision. (Aubrey Bruce: abruce@newpittsburghcourier.com.)

‘You hear me but you’re not listening!’

PROTESTERS BLOCK ELECTRIC AVENUE in East Pittsburgh, even as the rain falls, June 20. It was one day after the shooting death of Antwon Rose II by East Pittsburgh police Officer Michael Rosfeld. (Photo by Courier photographer J.L. Martello)

The objective of protests is…to…DISRUPT!! by Bill Neal For New Pittsburgh Courier

:10—As my “man among men” grandfather used to say, “You hear me but you’re not listening!” So from my pulpit and to all the good White folks out there that hear us, but just aren’t listening—the objective is to disrupt!!! If the protests were not disruptive there would have been no alarms going off in your head to signal to you that there’s a problem you need to pay attention to. History will tell you that the Boston Tea Party…clearly a protest…was not held in a dark alley somewhere. It was right up front for all to see, and correct me if I am wrong, but if memory serves me right, damn

near every college in this country, and nearly every highway and byway came to a standstill when young White America brought an end to the Vietnam War!!! History, it’ll keep you honest. :09—To that point, but deserving of its own byline—I am extremely proud of young Black Pittsburgh for taking a stand and forcing the issue. “And still we rise!” :08—“Ya’ll”…can keep with the back and forth and this and that, but if Magic Johnson has his golden hands on it there’s nothing you can do. LeBron James is a Laker now, and Hollywood is in for quite a ride. :07—Paul George resigns with Oklahoma

City for the max, four years for $137 million— leaving a lot of money on the negotiation table. That tells me there has

Overtime

BILL NEAL

to be a plethora of fine women in Oklahoma. I am just sayin’! :06—Movie This! Why do I continue to punish myself? The last time I went to see those dinosaurs I said it would be the last. This time I mean it. I mean, for goodness sakes how many ways can you slice a piece of Tyrannosaurus up. I am sorry, just no good. #1. So predictable. #2. Unbelievable even for Hollywood…you want me to believe that you unloaded these mammoth creatures in this guy’s backyard? C’mon, man! #3. Like me, I am sure you ask yourself for the dinosaurs that can fly—why don’t they just fly off the island? I am just askin’. I give it one basketball because Opie’s daugh-

ter is in it. (You know Opie, Andy’s son back in Mayberry. Pay attention will ya…) :05—Your Pittsburgh Steelers go to camp in exactly two weeks, July 25. Now we’ll have a partay! :04—To continue THAT thought…the other part of Magic Johnson’s game plan is to get Kawhi Leonard to Showtime. LBJ, Leonard, a more mature Lonzo Ball with Lopez, Kuzma and Ingram could compete with the best in the west in two years. :03—Hott Fun in the S u m m e r t i m e – Fa s h i o n Show and Dance Party was off the hook! The fashion show was directed by the legendary Rita Gregory and the DJ was the Master

Roland Ford. :02—For all you parents that see me every year and say you didn’t know. Know this, the annual Armen “the Hammer” Gilliam Hard Work Basketball Camp will be at the Penn Hills YMCA August 4-5, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day for boys and girls ages 8–16. There will be a ton of old school hard work, lunch, certificates, games, skills and drills and lots of love. Call to register now; limited space to first 100. Achieving Greatness Inc. 412-628-4856. :01—For the record, the tally for Franco Harris vs. Earl Campbell—of course Black and Gold wins again. Harris 178 Hits. Campbell 97. :00—GAME OVER.


RELIGION

NEW PITTSBURGH COURIER

JULY 11-17, 2018

Donnie McClurkin: ‘The God that gave me everything deserves everything from me’ World-renowned gospel artist and pastor part of Pentecostal Temple COGIC’s Men’s Day Celebration by Jacquelyn McDonald For New Pittsburgh Courier

For the second consecutive year, the Council Of Christian Men of Pentecostal Temple Church Of God In Christ, 6300 East Liberty Blvd., invited world-renowned recording artist and pastor, Donnie McClurkin, to initiate the start of the church’s Men’s Day Weekend Celebration. The two-service event, themed “I Am My Brother’s Keeper,” usually held in early fall, was moved to late June to accommodate the church’s busy itinerary.

The June 22 event brought together a melting pot of parishioners from the Pittsburgh and surrounding communities. Pastor Donnie McClurkin, a New York megachurch pastor and Pentecostal-styled preacher, initially excited those in attendance with his familiar, high-spirited praises to God for a recent healing of his eyes from a momentary episode of blindness.  With that testimony being shared, he belted out the words, “Watch my God work,” and further chanted, “The God that gave me everything deserves everything from me.” McClurkin had to calm himself and the animated crowd before he uttered a proper greeting or his Bible text, from the book of Genesis 1:26: “And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion...” was the scripture quoted to begin his message. The entire congregation marveled and was impacted by the clarity McClurkin gave describing God’s distinctive charac-

ter qualities, disposition and temperament, “And he (God) formed him (man) with total capacity of his brain and gave him dominion,” McClurkin said. “This world’s culture has turned our men into dysfunctional ticking time bombs afraid to express genuine emotion.” McClurkin’s lengthy discourse on a topic rarely preached and worthy of any Biblical study class brought many of the men and women to tears as they listened with intent. The men renewed their vows of commitment to God with great emotion at the altar call that followed the message. Everyone seemed to enjoy what appeared to be a second service, as McClurkin began to sing and direct the choir. The audience was delighted to see him play the keyboard and croon an impromptu medley of recognizable traditional church songs which, once again, got the crowd swaying. By popular demand, the Council of Christian Men

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Praise & Worship ST. BENEDICT THE MOOR CATHOLIC CHURCH Crawford & Centre Ave. Pgh., PA 15219 412-281-3141 Mass Sunday 9:00 A.M. & 11:00 A.M. www.stbtmchurch.org

East Liberty Presbyterian Church Rev. Dr. Randy Bush, Senior Pastor 412-441-3800 116 S. Highland Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15206

www.cathedralofhope.com

Summer Worship Hour.....10:00 a.m.

Curious about Quakerism? PASTOR DONNIE MCCLURKIN (Photos by Jacquelyn McDonald) of Pentecostal Temple requested their Bishop and Pastor, Loran E. Mann, along with First Lady Barbara Mann to headline and

finalize the weekend celebration on Sunday, June 24. Another powerful sermon ended the annual event on a high note.  

You Are Welcome at our Meetings for Worship Sundays at 10:30 a.m. Pittsburgh Friends Meeting 4836 Ellsworth Avenue 412-683-2669

New Destiny CME Church 114 North Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15233 412-231-7882 Rev. Kornelus Neal, pastor The Rt. Rev. Marvin Thomas Sr., presiding bishop Sunday School....................................9 A.M. Morning Worship Service............11:00 A.M.

PENTECOSTAL TEMPLE CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST celebrated their Men’s Day Weekend with three days of activities. It began, June 22, with Pastor Donnie McClurkin, who was loved by the Pentecostal Temple audience.

Join our growing Praise and Worship Church Community! For rate information, call 412481-8302, ext. 128.

PASTOR DONNIE MCCLURKIN, BISHOP LORAN E. MANN

TATE, EMMA “JEAN”

Emma “Jean” Tate, 82, of State College, died Thursday, June 28, 2018, at Centre Crest, Bellefonte. Born May 16, 1936, in Pittsburgh, she was the daughter of the late Richard Samuel and Bennie Lee Comer Dowdy. On June 5, 2005, she married Cornelius “Neal” Tate, who preceded her in death in November of 2005. She is survived by three children, Terri Lynn Parker and her husband, Curtis L., of State College, Rafeeq “Jerry” Salahuddin of State College and Keith Allen Dowdy of Bellefonte; and one granddaughter, Morgan Jenae Parker. In addition to her parents and husband, she was preceded in death by four siblings, Louise Justice, Richard S. Dowdy Jr., Fannie Kathryn Dowdy and Bernice M. Smith. Jean was a graduate of Peabody High School, Pittsburgh, and studied at Robert Morris University. She retired in 2002 as a Property Manager of Palisades Plaza for the Allegheny Housing Rehabilitation Corporation. After retiring and moving to State College, she worked several years, part-time for Foxdale Village Retirement Community. Jean was a member of Unity Church of Jesus Christ. She was a keyboardist and vocalist of gospel music and served as minister of music for various churches in the Pittsburgh area for over 35 years. She was also an avid jazz fan and vocalist and she enjoyed traveling. Visitation was held from 6 until 8 p.m., on Friday, July 6, 2018 at Koch Funeral Home, 2401 S. Atherton St., State College. An additional visitation was held from 10 a.m. until 12 p.m., on Saturday, July 7, 2018 at the funeral home. Memorial service was held at 2 p.m., on Saturday, July 7, 2018, at the Unity Church of Jesus Christ, 2280 Commercial Blvd, State College, with the Reverend Harold Mc enzie officiating. Burial was in Pine Grove Mills Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the Unity Church of Jesus Christ, 2280 Commercial Blvd, State College, PA 16801. Arrangements are under the care of Koch Funeral Home, State College. Online condolences and signing of the guest book may be entered at www.kochfuneralhome.com or visit us on Facebook.

TELL US ABOUT YOUR NEXT CHURCH EVENT! We want to place your event in our Church Circuit weekly calendar! Send info to: New Pittsburgh Courier 315 E. Carson St. Pittsburgh PA 15219 Or Email us!

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BUSINESS New Pittsburgh Courier

Both Black and White professed Christians hate! Forum B6

JULY 11-17, 2018

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Karris Jackson named COO of POISE Foundation Protect your

KARRIS JACKSON

PITTSBURGH—The POISE Foundation is pleased to announce the appointment of Karris M. Jackson, to the position of Chief Operating Officer of POISE, effective July 1. In this position, Ms. Jackson will assume leadership of the internal operations of the Foundation including human resource management, planning and day to day operations. She will continue to oversee the programmatic functions of the Foundation. “Over the last nine years since joining the Foundation, Karris has played a critical leadership role in expanding

the Foundation’s grantmaking and scholarship programs” said Mark Lewis, President and CEO. “She was a principal architect of the Foundation’s Strengthening Black Families strategy and implementation. Her previous experience leading nonprofit organizations in our community makes her a natural fit to help manage POISE Foundation’s growth over the next several years. Ms. Jackson is well-respected among both the foundation and nonprofit communities and pushes the boundaries of philanthropy to be more inclusive and effective at address-

ing issues impacting the Black community.” Jackson previously served as Vice President of Programs at POISE, where she was responsible for managing the Foundation’s grant making portfolio, convening community stakeholders and advancing the foundation’s mission through public policy, leadership and advocacy. Prior to joining the POISE, Jackson was executive director of Urban Youth Action, Inc. Before working at Urban Youth Action, Jackson was CAO of a charter school located SEE JACKSON B2

HISTORIC PARTNERSHIP—AME Church Bishops pose with Black bankers and business leaders after announcing historic partnership. (PHOTO: Klarque Garrison/Trice Edney News Wire)

AME Church and Black banks launch new partnership for Black wealth by Hazel Trice Edney For New Pittsburgh Courier

(TriceEdneyWire.com)—The Black church, among the most prosperous institutions in America, has long led movements for the spiritual, social and civic uplift of Black people. When the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968, he had just launched the Poor People’s Movement, which quickly fizzled after his death. With this historic backdrop, the African Methodist Episcopal Church—with a legacy of leadership in its own right—has announced an innovative economic partnership with Black-owned banks across the country. The partnership aims to be a catalyst to spur business development, homeownership and wealth in the Black community. “We are now pleased to announce a partnership with the presidents of the nineteen (19) Black banks in the United States, with the goal of increasing Black wealth,” said Bishop Reginald T. Jackson, president of the Council of AME Bishops. “This initiative will strengthen Black banks across the United States and increase their capacity to lend to small businesses, to secure mortgages, to provide personal lines of credit, and to offer

banks; •Increase Black homeownership to over 50 percent nationwide. This means 2,000,000 more Black homeowners than now exist; and •Grow the number of Black businesses from 2.6 million to 4 million and total gross receipts from an average of $72,500.00 to $150,000.00. “The spirit in which you all have shared the commitment to the community, to the banks and to BISHOP JACKSON PRESTON PINKETT what we can do together is outstanding,” responded other forms of credit to AME churches Preston Pinkett, III, chairman and CEO and our members. This, of course, in- of the City National Bank of New Jersey cludes enabling members and their fami- and chairman of the National Bankers lies to become homeowners.” Association. “Thank you for your willBishop Jackson made the announce- ingness to step outside of the norm to do ment during a press conference held something that I would say is extraordiduring the 2018 Council of Bishops and nary here in America and extraordinary General Board Meeting in Atlanta June in the world.” 26. The specific details of a memorandum Pinkett says the church-bank partnerof understanding are being formulated ships are already beginning around the and will be announced this summer. But nation. “It is safe to say that this kind of the goals are as follows: SEE AME B2 •Increase deposits and loans with Black

business from cybersecurity concerns

Whether you’re a long-standing community business or a new web-based start-up, many of your transactions will be conducted online. Digital transactions and communications can expand your marketing reach and enhance efficiency, but they can also expose you to the same types of security breaches that larger organizations experience. What’s a small business to do? The Pennsylvania Institute of Certified Public Accountants offers this advice. Recognize that you’re a target While we often see reports of hacking at large organizations, many owners of smaller companies incorrectly assume they’re immune from the danger. Small companies are just as vulnerable—and many have been victims already. A study by the Ponemon Institute found that more than 61 percent of small and medium-size businesses surveyed had security breaches in 2017, up from 55 percent in 2016. Being aware of the problem and the need to address it are critical first steps. Get employees on board How many of your employees use the word “password” as their password? It’s up to you to educate your people about the dangers that security breaches pose and to set clear tech policies. That includes requiring staff to use strong passwords that must be changed at specific intervals (i.e., monthly), encrypt data properly, recognize and avoid phishing attempts, and initiate automatic locking on computers when they’re not in use. All new staff should be trained in your computer security procedures, and it’s a good idea to regularly conduct updates for existing employees. Monitor Mobile Devices Your security procedures should encompass rules for employees’ cell phones, tablets, and laptops. Many organizations allow workers to bring their own devices, meaning they can use personal technology for work. Guidelines are needed for what kinds of data can be accessed or used on these or any other devices used in your business. Hacking or theft is of particular concern when devices are used remotely and connected to the internet through unsecured Wi-Fi. Employees should be trained on the importance of protecting confidential company and customer data. In addition, employees should be aware of how to report the loss or theft of a mobile device that contains business data or that connects to the organization’s systems. Keep your security up to date Make sure you have the latest version of security software and you download all necessary updates for your software as they become available. Install a firewall that prevents access to your data or systems by outsiders. Technology used by employees who work from home or other remote locations should also be protected by a firewall. Also, secure and password-protect your organization’s router. Set sensible limits Employees should have access to data or systems that relate to their jobs, and no more. That’s particularly true of confidenSEE PROTECT B2

Racial divide found in student loan defaults (NNPA)—With 44 million consumers owing student debt that now reaches $1.5 trillion and still climbing, a lot of people want to better understand how and why this unsustainable debt trajectory can be better managed. For Black consumers who typically have less family wealth than other races and ethnicities, borrowing is more frequent, and as a result, often leads to five figure debts for undergraduate programs and well beyond $100,000 for graduate or professional degrees. Besides deep debt incurred to gain a college education, another sphere of concern presents yet another financial hurdle: student loan defaults. New research by Judith Scott-Clayton of the Brookings Institution, focuses on explaining these defaults and what happens once they occur. Her research shows that a large racial gap exists in default rates between Black student loan borrowers and their White counterparts. This gap can only be partially explained by controlling for multiple socio-economic and educational attainment factors. After accounting for variations in family wealth and income, differences in degree attainment, college grade point average and even post-college income and employment, a stubborn and statistically significant 11percentage point gap remains between Black and White student loan borrowers. Before adjusting for these factors, the gap is 28 percent, with Black borrowers defaulting at a rate of more than double that of Whites—49 percent

compared to 21 percent to fully repay their over 12 years. student loans early, Charlene Crowell The research also finds “suggests that their a strong disadvantage required monthly to attending for-profit student loan paycolleges, in which Black ments constrained students disproportheir ability to pay tionately enroll. More down other debts.” than a decade after CFPB also found that leaving school, and acthe typical student counting for the same loan repayment lasts background and attaina full decade with ment factors listed above, loan defaults of equal monthly payments. Further, borrowfor-profit college borrowers exceed those of ers repaying on schedule are not more likely two–year public sector peers by 11 percent. to become first-time homeowners. The author points to the need to underA portion of the Brookings report prostand what influences the “stark” remain- vides useful information that could help ing divide. those at risk or in default. Loan “default “The better we can understand what is a status, not a permanent characterisdrives these patterns,” wrote Scott-Clayton, tic.”  Four ways to get out of default are “the better policymakers can target their cited: rehabilitation, consolidation, paying efforts to improve student loan outcomes.” in full, or have a loan discharged. Among these influences are the widenFor my money, paying in full is seldom a ing racial wealth gap. As Black student practical option unless someone’s lottery debt is typically heavier and often takes numbers hit a jackpot. But the other three longer to repay, the ability to build wealth options offered could begin to chart a path becomes a heightened challenge. Years in important ways. that might have been opportunities to beRehabilitation of student loan defaults come homeowners or begin other invest- can only be used one time. It also requires, ments can have lengthy deferrals, due to according to Brookings, successfully maklarge student loan debts. ing nine payments over 10 months. Similarly, a new report by the Consumer A second option, consolidating defaulted Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) that loans, can end default more quickly and focused largely on student loan repayment is used by more than half of Blacks who reached a similar conclusion. Authored by have defaulted. Thomas Conkling, the new CFPB research In recent years, loan discharge has been examining borrowers who were unable frequently pursued, especially by former

Commentary

students of now-defunct for-profit institutions. Others choosing public service careers may be eligible for loan forgiveness depending upon the type of loan, servicer assistance and employment. Any loan default will worsen credit scores and will be a part of a consumer’s credit record for up to seven years. During this time, the cost of credit for other goods and services will be higher. It will also cost many job applicants to lose out on employment opportunities. For several years, credit score screening has become a part of the job application process for many employers. “The numbers show that our current system is not working, and that higher education is not providing the pathway to financial stability that it once accomplished,” Policy Counsel and Special Assistant to the President of the Center for Responsible Lending, Ashley Harrington said. “We need federal and state policymakers to take concrete steps to effectively address this crisis, such as better regulation of for-profit colleges. “As for loan servicers, it is time to hold them accountable for their errors,” continued Harrington. “Standardizing income-based repayment plans, and when appropriate, refinancing of student loans, should be offered as alternative options before allowing borrowers to default.”

(Charlene Crowell is the Communications Deputy Director with the Center for Responsible Lending. She can be reached at charlene.crowell@ responsiblelending.org.)


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BUSINESS

NEW PITTSBURGH COURIER

AME Church and Walter Lewis sheds the interim tag Black banks launch Officially appointed president/CEO new partnership of Homewood Children’s Village AME FROM B1

commitment; this kind of demonstration will go a long way in supporting our banks and the banks to be able to support the community…With God’s blessings, we will accomplish great things.” Amidst an atmosphere of excitement, the bankers, bishops and supporters of the movement packed into a meeting room in a Downtown Atlanta hotel. Jackson was surrounded by all 20 Bishops of the 231-year-old denomination as well as supporters of the movement. They included principals of the growing economic movement, Black Wealth 2020, which Jackson credited as inspiration for the idea. “This partnership grows out of an initiative formed in Washington, DC in 2015, called Black Wealth 2020 which is providing an economic blueprint for Black America,” Jackson said. Michael Grant, one of the founders of Black Wealth 2020, presided at the press conference. He connected the new partnership directly with the movement begun by Dr. King. “The great civil rights movement led by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and others has now morphed into a fullfledged movement for economic empowerment,” Grant said. “The offspring of African slaves and their unrewarded labor have catapulted a small Colonial outpost into the greatest industrial giant the world has ever known. Now, as a people, we are turning our efforts toward our own enrichment. We must now create those economic opportunities for ourselves.” Opening the press conference, Grant underscored the historicity of the moment. “For those of you who are students of history, you would not be surprised that the Church of Richard Allen would be leading an effort to close the wealth gap across the United States of America.” Allen, among America’s most influential Black leaders, founded the AME church in 1794. It was the first independent Black denomination in the U. S. “And we do this with malice towards none,” stressed Grant. Bishop James L. Davis, of the Second Episcopal District, likened the partnership to a marriage – a marriage between a church and its community.  “It is a marriage that says a church that is concerned about its people, concerned about the good and the bad, all of the things our people have had to go through.” The prophetic voices of Black church leaders not only articulate ideas, but strategies. “In the next decade in the global church and in the AME church and in Black banking, we will see both evolution and revolution. Banks must reinvent themselves, not just to respond to the pressures of the day, but to be flexible enough to adapt to the world of tomorrow. The ecclesia, the church, must also evolve its business knowledge, educational platform, and its missional thrust without losing its stance in the Word of God,” said General Board Chair Bishop Vashti Murphy Mckenzie. “Both of our institutions are dealing with increasing assertive governmental intrusion, higher membership and customer demands along with increasing change in the wider world.” The announcement of the new partnership was met with applause from national civil rights leaders. “Thank you and your fellow bishops for making economic development a priority of your denomination,” wrote civil rights icon Georgia Congressman John Lewis in a letter to Bishop Jackson. “Hopefully, your visionary leadership will inspire other denominations to replicate your efforts nationwide.” National Urban League President/CEO Marc Morial also weighed in with a letter: “I want to express the support of the National Urban League for your leadership and initiative in addressing the challenges of Black homeownership and the need to increase the support, viability and profitability of our African American businesses,” he wrote. Morial is among economic leaders who have determined that among the reasons homeownership among African-Americans is disparately low is, in part, because of discriminatory lending practices. Mortgage Banker Lois Johnson, president/CEO of Salt Lake City-based United Security Financial, said she takes “great pride in our HUD designation as a fair practice lender. We provide loans to all who meet the minimum criteria, especially people of color who have been denied the opportunity to have their own homes.” Johnson, who is licensed to operate in 49 states, says she intends to travel to each of the AME church’s episcopal districts to “create hope and opportunities.” The principals agreed that the key to the success of the partnership must be mutual respect for Black spending power and mutual support of Black businesses. “We hear about Black folks have a trillion dollars in spending power,” said Ron Busby, president/CEO of the U. S. Black Chamber, Inc. and co-founder of Black Wealth 2020. “But that’s usually White folk talking about our dollar sand how can they get their share of it. We came together to say how can we deal with the Black wealth, the gap of it and really to move our agenda forward inside our own community.” Busby pointed to the USBC’s new AP called the USBC Mobile Directory with 109,000 Black-owned businesses in order to help consumers make targeted purchases inside the Black business community. Robert James, CEO of the Carver State Bank in Savannah discussed how the movement will be sustained. “There was a time that no church got financed in Savannah Georgia unless we financed them at Carver State Bank,” James said to applause. “This program will get us back on the path.” James says he knows the relationship can be sustained because the bishops have authority to oversee and encourage AME church leaders to do business with Blackowned banks.  “We can talk to the Bishops about those local churches. And you can talk to your elders and your preachers,” he said.

Protect your business PROTECT FROM B1

tial, personal employee or customer data in your systems. But don’t stop there. An IT staff member’s login may allow him or her to make changes to the system, but other workers should have separate logins that prohibit that access. In addition, workers shouldn’t be allowed to load their own software onto company computers. Turn to your CPA Worried about the many challenges a small business may face? Whether you’re concerned about technology issues, the need to raise capital, marketing, or any other challenge, your local certified public accountant (CPA) can help. Turn to him or her for expert advice on all your business issues. To find a CPA in your area or for more financial tips, visit www.picpa.org/moneyandlife.

REFLECTION—Ready to make new memories, Walter Lewis remembers of his favorite moments during his six years at the Homewood Children’s Village.

by Diane I. Daniels For New Pittsburgh Courier

After serving as interim CEO of the Homewood Children’s Village for the past six months, Walter Lewis has been officially named president/CEO. Effective July 1, HCV board president Dr. John M. Wallace said a full regional search was conducted, and Lewis was selected after receiving more than 500 resumes. “It feels good. I’m excited about what we are going to be able to do, for what’s possible for us to do in the community,” Lewis said. “The last six months for me has solidified just what is possible. We have made a lot of good strides in the past few months building off the legacy of the former presidents and CEOs of the organization. We are trying to strengthen the model as we get better and better each year. I am really excited about what we have accomplished over the last six months and look forward to what’s ahead.” With the mission to improve the lives of Homewood’s children and simultaneously reweave the fabric of the community in which they live, the concept is modeled after the nationally-recognized comprehensive community initiative inspired by Geoffrey Canada’s Harlem Children’s Zone. The HCV operates on the premise that families and

guardians are children’s first teacher; that building adult capacities improves child outcomes and strengthens the community; that all children have the right and potential to succeed; and that all children have the right to equitable opportunities. Lewis affiliated with the HCV since its inception, started as a Student Advocate/Program Instructor. He is credited for developing and launching the Bridge to College Program and as manager has doubled its revenues and increased participant enrollment. Next, he was promoted to the Director, Office of Promise Fulfillment, where he continued to secure significant foundational support for the work and led the development and pilot of the HCV Personal Opportunity Plan. He then advanced to the position of Director, Office of Education, where he was successful in merging departments, advancing the fundraising for the organization and grew the program to greater than $1 million in support. For the past four years, Lewis also has been involved with the City of Pittsburgh and Allegheny County Learn and Earn Summer Youth Employment Program. Helping to bring it to the HCV, he labels it as a very valuable program. Within the four years he says student participants have grown

from 36 the first year, 57 the second, 91 the third and this year to approxitmately130. HCV is hosting 24 sites. Learn and Earn is a six-week summer employment program for teens and young adults ages 14 to 21 in the Pittsburgh region. HCV board of directors recognized that as Interim CEO, Lewis had been impactful in advancing community partnerships that led to collective impact with strong community partnerships being organized under the leadership of HCV. Along with fulfilling the HCV mission, Lewis says moving forward his goal is to continue strengthening their partnerships and pushing towards a collective impact approach. “There is a lot of work to be done within the community. None of us are going to be able to resolve all the challenges by ourselves.” By the conversations currently occurring with a number of their partners and exploring what can happen by working collectively, Lewis said he is excited about the possibilities. “The conversations have been enforcing and solidifying the relationships we already have with our partners.” Located in the heart of Homewood at 801 N. Homewood Avenue, HCV is considered a comprehensive community initiative that partners with residents, government, schools, philanthropic foundations, faith- and community-based organizations to revitalize the neighborhood with expectations of making it a place where children can thrive. Its aim is to not only serve the children of Homewood, but their families as well as the total neighbor. HCV is involved in three Homewood schools; Faison, Lincoln and Westinghouse. Lewis is a former researcher at Brookhaven National Lab, Wistar Institute and Carnegie Mellon University where his research ranged from cancer progression and genomic sequence identification to gene regulation and development. The Baltimore-area native received his Master of Science degree from Carnegie Mellon University in Computational Biology after earning his Bachelor of Science degree from Cheyney University in Computer Science. His six years at the HCV, he says, has provided him the opportunity to marry his desire to teach and passions for social justice and community activism.

Genesis exec joins Executive Leadership Council At their 2018 Summer General Memthe world. Since taking over its U.S. operabership meeting in Seattle, the Executive tions in 2016, Raphael is credited with the Leadership Council (ELC) gathered to incompany’s increased sales and expanded duct 20 new members into their exclusive marketing platform to include African ranks. Erwin Raphael, executive direcAmericans, Hispanics and women. In a tor and general manager at Genesis was recent study, JD Power recognized Geneamong those pinned as a new member. sis as the highest ranked auto brand for The ELC is the preeminent professional initial quality. Genesis’ G90 placed first in organization for African American corpothe large premium car segment. rate executives in the country. In addition to his executive leaderRaphael, a 25year auto company veteran, is the only African American head of a major car company and has served in leadership positions at Chrysler, Toyota and Hyundai, before joining Genesis. “Having been selected to join the ELC is a huge honor for me. The work ELC MEMBER—Lynton Scotland, left, of W.L. Gore & Associates and ELC Board being done by Secretary Jeffrey Webster, right, welcomed new member Erwin Raphael, Execthe organiza- utive Director and General Manager of Genesis Motors America. (Photo credit: tion’s leader- ELC) ship and staff is not easy but essential to the growth ship role at Genesis, Raphael has also and ongoing presence of African Americo-chaired Hyundai’s Diversity Council. cans in corporate America,” commented He has been applauded for increasing Raphael. minority dealers while at Hyundai and Based in Orange County, CA, Genesis is positioning more African Americans to the fastest growing luxury car company in assume leadership roles at Genesis.

BUSINESS CALENDAR Diversity Certification Workshop

JULY 11—The Chatham University Women’s Business Center presents Is My Business Certifiable, 9-10:30 a.m. at Colab18 @ Nova Place (Former Allegheny Center Mall), 100 South Commons, Pgh. 15212. The interactive workshop will allow attendees to learn about the different types of diversity certification programs for Minority, Women and Disadvantaged Business Enterprises, including DBE, WOSB, EDWOSB, VOSB, MBE, WBE, MWBE, SBA 8(a) or SBA HUBZone, and is designed to help business owners determine if they should consider diversity certification, then assist in strategizing and selecting which program might best fit. The session is free, but registration is required. For more information, call 412-365-1448.

Diversity Golf Outing and Fundraiser

JULY 23—The Eastern Minority Supplier Development Council will host its Youth Entrepreneurship Golf Invitational, 7:30 a.m.5:30 p.m. at Fox Chapel Golf Club, 426 Fox Chapel Rd, Pittsburgh, 15238. The event provides certified MBEs and corporate representatives the opportunity to network, build relationships, and develop partnerships, and also supports the council’s activities, programs and scholarships. The event includes breakfast, golf or a clinic and seminar, cocktails and networking and an awards dinner. Registration for Sponsorship opportunities closes July 13, for participants July 19. Visit www.EMSDgolf.org for more information.

Communications Workshop

JULY 26—The African American Chamber of Commerce of Western Pennsylvania will host a Business Communications Workshop presented by former WTAE-TV reporter Bofta Yiman, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the Koppers Building, 9th Floor conference room, 436 Seventh Ave., Pittsburgh, 15219. Yiman will discuss how storytelling can be a key component in business engagement and visibility, and how creating a dynamic signature can generate leads and boost sales. Cost: $10 for members, $20 for non-members, and includes lunch. RSVP by July 24 to 412-3920610 or information@aaccwp.com.

Start-up Financing Workshop

AUG. 2—The Chatham University Women’s Business Center presents Financing Your Business, 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Colab18 @ Nova Place (Former Allegheny Center Mall), 100 South Commons, Pgh. 15212. The workshop will look at various new business financing options and is presented in collaboration with PNC Foundation, the Diversity Business Resource Center, Urban Innovation21, Riverside Center for Innovation, and Colab18. Programming will be facilitated by Jonnet Solomon, Founder & CEO of J. Solomon and Associates, LLC. The workshop is free, but registration is required. For more information, call 412-365-1448.

Jackson named COO of Poise Foundation JACKSON FROM B1

in Harrisburg, Pa. Born and raised in Pittsburgh, she is a graduate of Wilkinsburg Senior High School. Ms. Jackson holds a BA in English from Allegheny College, a MS in Secondary School Administration from Duquesne University and a Certificate in Nonprofit Management from Harvard University. Ms. Jackson serves as a board member of Neighborhood Allies and is a graduate of Leadership Pittsburgh XXV. She is a founding member of the Sankofa Fund Giving Circle, the African American Funders Group of Southwestern PA and the 2012-2013 ABFE Connecting Leaders Fellows Class. Ms. Jackson has received numerous awards including the 2014 Emerging Leader in Philanthropy Award from the Association of Black Foundation Executives, Pittsburgh Magazine’s 40 under 40, the New Pittsburgh Courier’s 50 Women of Excellence and the Pittsburgh Pirates Community Champion Award. She is a member of Mt. Olive Baptist Church in Coraopolis, PA where she serves as a Trustee and Sunday School Teacher.


OPINION

NEW PITTSBURGH COURIER

Commentary

Another assault on the Black Press by Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. Amid the rush to comprehend the ramifications of a full-scale international trade war initiated by the errant and backward tariff policies of the Trump Administration, there are results of the tariffs that need to be challenged by Black America. The financial sustainability of the Black Press of America is now facing a catastrophic and a possible deadly impact, because of these new tariffs. The current dispute over the rising costs of the paper product termed “newsprint,” because of tariffs on Canadian newsprint threatens the future of member publishers of the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) and could further isolate and disenfranchise African American businesses and communities in cities and towns across the United States. Import duties the U.S. Commerce Department is now applying to Canadian-made newsprint is already increasing costs enough to prompt layoffs and scaled-back news coverage by some of the nation’s major dailies and weekly publications. If these tariffs remain in place, scores of newspapers with smaller circulations, notably those that serve African American communities, could be forced to cease publishing a print edition or close altogether. During the past 191 years, the Black Press has survived, endured and overcome past firebombing and improvised explosive attacks, as well as other deadly manifestations of racial violence. The newsprint tariffs appear to have been put in place by the Trump Administration after being encouraged by the interests of a single paper mill in Washington State called NORPAC. NORPAC argues that Canadian government policies give Canadian paper producers an unfair advantage in the U.S. market. NORPAC says the added duties, or tariffs, at the border are protecting it. NORPAC can fight for its self-interest but the U.S. government has an obligation to consider the impact the tariffs are having on the nation as a whole, and in particular the impact on African American owned newspapers and businesses. We forthrightly oppose the Trump tariffs on newsprint and demand an end to the disastrous trade policies that are hurting our businesses and communities. Given that newsprint and labor account for most of the cost of running a newspaper, it is easy to see how jacking up the price of newsprint by more than 30 percent could spell the difference between these publications eking out a modest profit or going out of business. Around 2,000 newspapers have closed or morphed into something else in the last 15 years. The NNPA is proud that its 215 member-publications are moving forward even in the face of these new contrived dangers and obstacles in the marketplace. Our newspapers enliven and inform the debate within African American and other communities that we serve and help to empower with news, information, and the reaffirmation of the vitality of Black cultural genius and excellence in all fields of endeavor. Our printed editions are especially important in communities where people are less likely to be able to afford or take full advantage of broadband Internet access. However useful today’s technological innovations are in sharing information, for many people, there is no substitute or affordable alternative to the local weekly newspaper of, by, and for the African American community. Our newspapers are the lifeblood for our communities. The tariffs threaten more than local newspapers. Newsprint is used for promotional materials by retailers and civic groups. It is used by book publishers and printers. Often these are small businesses serving local communities. If newsprint goes up in price, printers will get fewer contracts and have fewer customers. Ironically, the tariffs NORPAC wants in place will actually threaten paper producers and a range of related business. A coalition of these businesses, the STOPP Alliance, estimates some 650,000 jobs could be at risk—all to help one company that has no allies or supporters within the U.S. paper industry. The U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) is reviewing the facts in this case and is expected to announce its recommendations on what to do with the tariffs later the summer. In the meantime, members of Congress from both parties have introduced legislation to suspend the tariffs immediately. The STOPP Alliance has also created an online petition to urge the ITC to end the tariffs. Consider adding your voice to this effort by clicking on this link. After all, the threat the duties on newsprint pose to daily and weekly print publications serving communities in urban and rural areas is especially acute. If there was ever a time when the country needed a range of authentic and “trusted” outlets to share news and perspectives, it is today. In today’s world, the newspapers that serve African American communities will continue to play a crucial role. Errant trade policies and duties championed by a single company must not be allowed to diminish the meaningful role of the Black Press of America. (Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr. is the president and CEO of the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) based in Washington, D.C. Dr. Chavis can be contacted at dr.bchavis@nnpa.org. Follow Dr. Chavis on Twitter @ DrBenChavis.)

Founded 1910

Rod Doss Editor & Publisher Stephan A. Broadus Assistant to the Publisher Allison Palm

Rob Taylor Jr.

Jeff Marion

Office Manager

Managing Editor

Circulation Consultant

John. H. Sengstacke

Editor & Publisher Emeritus (1912-1997)

JULY 11-17, 2018

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Rise Up Ye Women (TriceEdneyWire.com)—Black women have long understood the vineyard would fail without us. We’ve always been about the business of protecting and prospering our people. We’ve never allowed the vineyard to fail without our putting up our very best fight. Our struggles have been reaping rewards as we’ve understood the importance of our working together for the greater good of our community. As Dr. Dorothy Irene Height would say, “We Black women don’t always get to do what we want to do, but we always do what we have to do.” I’m so proud of the accomplishments of Black women, and we just keep on getting up and doing even greater things despite the troubles that so often get in our way. We work in accordance with our family values daily. We’ve signed those petitions, raised our voices, been on those picket lines, voted in great numbers when others have tried to crush our efforts. We care about numerous issues, including the children of our immigrant brothers and sisters. Black women Members of Congress are standing their ground on the issue. We vote on the right side in every election. When we can’t get the best, we vote together for the lesser of two evils. We attend meetings and are never afraid to stand up and speak out when others try to crush our voices. We’re never afraid of finding ways

Dr. E. Faye Williams, Esq.

Commentary

much about the children, go and find another way to influence resolution of putting children back with their families. Surely doing nothing is not the answer. President Theodore Roosevelt said: “It’s not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds;….who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.” Hers was an inspiring act of disobedience in the spirit of Amelia Boynton, Rep. John Lewis, Dick Gregory, Harriet Tubman, Sojourner Truth, Dr. Martin Luther King and as so many did in their work for justice. She’s one more Black woman who has taken an amazing action to support what she believes is right.

to get our message heard. I marvel at the courage of the sister who scaled the Statue of Liberty to protest the treatment of babies whose parents were simply seeking a better life for their families. I’m proud of Theresa Patricia Okoumou who scaled the wall of the statue for family values. Many would consider her action too dangerous to try, but as Black women, we have often had to do dangerous things. That is our history. Danger has never got in our way of doing what is right. She didn’t wait for the approval of anybody. She did what she felt had to be done. If the Rise and Resist banner had been the only action, few would’ve known about an action against what’s happening at the U.S border regarding the separation and action against babies whose parents were simply trying to make America live up to its so-called welcoming arms. (Dr. E. Faye Williams, president of the NaHer courageous act surely motivated others to get involved. To those tional Congress of Black Women. www.nawho would criticize her, if you care so tionalcongressbw.org.)

Our children are at risk (NNPA)—I’m sure President Obama’s heart was in the right place. A few years ago, his Department of Education, in conjunction with the Department of Justice, studied school discipline data and came to a troubling conclusion: African American students in the 2011-12 school year had been suspended or expelled at a rate three times higher than White students. This news sent shock waves throughout the community and government. There were already concerns of a “school-to-prison pipeline” that funneled disadvantaged children to jail. Now, there was renewed agreement that things had to change. And so, in 2014, the Departments of Education and Justice put public schools on notice. If they suspended or expelled students of any racial group more than any other, they could face a federal investigation. In place of discipline to punish bad behavior, they were urged to use positive reinforcement instead. As the grandmother of five schoolage kids, I watched this closely. And as one of the Black students who integrated an all-White Richmond, Va., school in 1961, I was hopeful. I hoped this policy would lead to safer schools. I prayed it would help students get a better education. And I felt confident it would open the door to a brighter future for our kids. But like so many other parents and grandparents, I was wrong. The federal government’s warning had an immediate impact. Schools across America quickly changed their discipline policies and reduced their suspension and expulsion rates. In doing so, they avoided the investigation threatened by the President. But at the same time, they put our children at risk. Today, kids who bully and assault their classmates too often do so without fear of punishment. They know teachers have lost control. And they

Kay Coles James

Commentary

derly and more dangerous. As Walter E. Williams has observed, the policy President Obama put into place has allowed “miscreants and thugs to sabotage the education process.” Teachers apparently agree. In anonymous surveys, they describe how badly school safety has deteriorated. As one stated, “We have fights here almost every day. The kids walk around and say ‘We can’t get suspended—we don’t care what you say.’” That sentiment was echoed by another teacher: “Students are yelling, cursing, hitting and screaming at teachers and nothing is being done but teachers are being told to teach and ignore the behaviors. These students know there is nothing a teacher can do.” This is crazy. Every child deserves to get the tools they need to make their dreams come true. But if they are too scared to focus, they won’t get them. Many will drop out, limiting their chance to get a job, raise a family, and pursue their life goals. All because directives from Washington have made school districts fear they’ll be investigated for keeping their classrooms safe. We can’t bring Joevon back, and Jared and Tamar may never forget the trauma they’ve experienced. But we can take action to fix the mistake that has been made. For starters, the Education and Justice Departments’ school discipline policy should be rescinded. And if any threats remain, every family should be empowered with school choice so they can choose safer learning options for their children. I know President Obama meant well, but his administration’s action was wrong. So it’s now time to make things right. Our children should be at risk no more.

realize they can get away with behavior that never used to be tolerated. As a result, when this summer is over, many students will once again face the fear of going back to school. That’s a tragedy! Schools should be joyous places where learning takes place. That’s what my classmates and I fought for in 1961. And it’s what should be the reality today. Instead, danger lurks behind schoolhouse doors. Joevon Smith is a heartbreaking example. A 17-year-old student with special needs who attended Ballou High School in Washington, D.C., Joeven was beaten up in his classroom and sprayed with a chemical. He was rushed to a nearby hospital, but never recovered. A few weeks after his brutal assault, Joevon died. According to media reports, Joevon’s assailants wanted to steal his cell phone. That may be so. But because they were repeat offenders, loosened school discipline policies are also at fault. That’s the case up the road in Baltimore, too. There, Jared Haga (age 10) and his 12-year-old sister Tamar have been bullied and threatened with violence. Tamar has even been sexually harassed and assaulted. In school! As chronicled by “The Daily Signal,” Jared and Tamar’s mother tried to get this to stop. But when she complained to the principal, she was told nothing would—or could—be done. (Kay Coles James is the president of The Joevon, Jared, and Tamar aren’t alone. According to numerous re- Heritage Foundation. You can follow Kay on ports, public schools are now less or- Twitter @KayColesJames.)

Letter To The Editor

Need for police and community face-to-face training Dear Editor: Following the tragic shooting of 17-year-old Antwon Rose II, politicians and community residents alike are demanding that Racial Reconciliation and Implicit Bias training be provided to law enforcement officers, in boroughs and municipalities throughout Allegheny County. I had the opportunity to help organize a recent Implicit Bias session, held a few weeks ago, in Woodland Hills, with officers and residents from Braddock, Duquesne and Rankin. This event was hosted by Black Women for Positive Change, an inter-faith, multi-cultural organization of men and women, in collaboration with community partners including Aunt Cheryl’s Café –Braddock Business Owner. The event brought together various elements of the community that do not speak with each other often. We put a priority on Racial Reconciliation, Implicit Bias and De-Escalation at the federal and local levels over the past six years and having trying to bring groups together in

Pittsburgh, and around the nation. We believe that in addition to the important and timely protests being organized by the Alliance for Police Accountability, B-PEP and countless other organizations, there must be opportunities for police and community leaders to sit down face-to-face and discuss how to achieve justice and equity in community/police relationships. BW4PC Pittsburgh is working in partnership with Pittsburgh police officers to facilitate more training sessions about Implicit Bias, Racial Reconciliation and Procedural Justice. We want more sessions to be made available to the public and to families of victims of violence. So far, the interest and feedback from program participants has been very positive.  We have found that both police officers and Pittsburgh and East Pittsburgh residents want to have the opportunity to learn from one another. We believe regular training sessions can be an effective tool to break down stereotypes and barriers of mistrust be-

tween police and the public. And, we are hopeful that Allegheny County will soon begin to offer this training to borough and municipal police departments and we are ready to help.   We believe BW4PC and the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police can provide a high quality of services and continued resources because support is urgently needed in the critical area of improving communications. We need support from local politicians to assist in advocating for more training sessions that can address Racial Reconciliation, Implicit Bias and Procedural Justice problems and can help to bridge the growing gap between the police and the community. Our motto in Black Women for Positive Change is to “Change the Culture of Violence in America, and the World” and we believe these workshops can help. We hope community leaders will provide resources and support efforts to have more Police Community Training. Diane Powell, Chair Pittsburgh, Black Women for Positive Change

Letters to the editor for publication The New Pittsburgh Courier welcomes all responsible viewpoints for publication. All letters should be typewritten and contain writer’s address and phone number for verification. All letters will be edited for clarity and length. Address all letters to: Letters to the Editor, New Pittsburgh Courier, 315 East Carson Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15219 You may fax your letter to 412-481-1360, or via e-mail to letters@newpittsburghcourier.com


CLASSIFIED New Pittsburgh Courier

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JULY 11-17, 2018

www.newpittsburghcourier.com

JOB OPPORTUNITIES

JOB OPPORTUNITIES

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

DV LEGAL ADVOCATE

TRANSPORTATION PLANNER

FT, Legal Advocacy Dept. of local non-profit agency. Responsible for counseling victims of domestic violence and court accompaniment. Knowledge of domestic violence issues. Min. BS or equiv. plus one year crisis exper. Must have Act 33/34 & FBI clearances. Salary high $20’s plus exc. Benefits. Send resume, cover letter, and salary requirements by 7/13/2018 to: halereedj@wcspittsburgh.org EOE

WATER RESOURCE PLANNER

Participate in the development, implementation and administration of water resource planning and stormwater management programs. Communication, organizational, analytical and database/ computer skills. Bachelor’s degree in Planning, Public Administration, Environmental Biology, Environmental Education. Details @ www. spcregion.org. Letter of interest, resume and salary history to hr@ spcregion.org EEO/AA/M/F/Vet/Disability Employer

MUNICIPAL MANAGER, PENN HILLS, PA

Salary DOQ; exc. benefits. Req. MPA/related field 10 yrs. progressive administrative experience. Reports to 5-member Mayor and Council. Strong knowledge of municipal management, budget, finances, personnel, labor contract admin.; strong communication, interpersonal, public relations, leadership, decision-making, community and business relation skills. Residency req. within 1 yr. of appt. Resume, cover letter and references to: Manager Search Committee, Municipality of Penn Hills, 102 Duff Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15235 by July 27, 2018. No telephone inquiries. Emails will not be accepted.

IT MANAGER

Pittsburgh Community Broadcasting Company is an independent, locally owned, community-supported public media organization and is home to Pittsburgh’s NPR News station, 90.5 WESA and 91.3 WYEP, home of Pittsburgh’s Adult Alternative Music. PCBC is seeking an experienced and successful IT Manager to join its team. This is a key role in our organization and this individual will be responsible for all technology maintenance and updates. For complete job description and to apply, go to: www.wesa. fm and follow the employment link. Please no phone calls. PCBC is an Equal Opportunity Employer and actively seeks diversity in its workforce.

FULL-TIME POLICE OFFICER WEST MIFFLIN BOROUGH

Qualified persons are invited to apply to the Borough of West Mifflin Civil Service Commission to take competitive examinations to establish a Full-Time Police Officer Eligibility List. General Requirements: Candidates, at the time of application must: (1) Possess a diploma from an accredited high school or a graduate equivalency diploma (GED); (2) Be Act 120 Certified under the Municipal Police Officers Education and Training Act (Act 120), or shall have successfully completed Act 120 Training and successfully passed the final exam, (3) Be a United States Citizen; (4) Be physically and mentally fit to perform the full duties of a police officer; (5) Be at least twenty-one (21) years of age; and (6) Possess a valid motor vehicle license and be legally eligible to operate a motor vehicle in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Also, (7) Candidates must have successfully completed at least sixty (60) college credits at an accredited university, or served in one of the US Military branches with at least two (2) years active duty, or four (4) years reserves with honorable discharge, or worked at least one (1) year as a full-time police officer, and/or at least three (3) years as a part-time police officer. Residency Requirement: Applicants, if selected, must within six (6) months of the successfully completion of the probationary period obtain residency within twelve (12) air miles a border of the Borough of West Mifflin Successful applicants must also meet all the requirements of the Borough’s Civil Service Rules and Regulations that will include a background investigation, and if selected, be required to successfully pass a physical and psychological examination. An application form and details of the selection process may be obtained at the West Mifflin Borough Building, located at 1020 Lebanon Road, 15122, West Mifflin PA, A completed application, with a Fifty Dollar {$50.00} non-refundable application fee, must be filed by 4:00pm Monday, July 30, 2018 at the West Mifflin Borough Building. The written test and physical agility test will be conducted at the Allegheny County Police Academy on Tuesday, August 7, 2018 at 9:00AM. An Equal Opportunity Employer

SONNY BOY

(SOUTHWESTERN PENNSYLVANIA COMMISSION) Assist with the development, implementation, and administration of various regional transportation programs. Degree in Planning, Public Administration or related field with a minimum of 2 years experience. Details at www.spcregion.org . EEO/AA/M/F/Vet/Disability Employer

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MANAGER – EMPLOYEE RELATIONS

Port Authority is seeking a Manager – Employee Relations to be a representative in activities involved in contract interpretation and administration, grievance, discipline, and mediation/arbitration cases with employees. Provides advice to managers, employees, and Employee Relations Representatives regarding the interpretation and implementation of various laws and agreements, including Port Authority’s company policies and procedures affecting terms and conditions of employment. Oversees the administration of Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA), attendance tracking and unemployment compensation. Direct activities of Employee Relations staff members and FMLA / Attendance Administrator within assigned operating locations. Job requirements include: BA/BS degree in Industrial Relations/Labor Relations, Human Resources Management, or related field from an accredited school. •Minimum of two (2) years supervisory experience. Minimum of five (5) years experience in the area of employee/industrial relations, including a minimum of three (3) years in a unionized environment. •Knowledge of labor and employment laws. •Professional, effective and interpersonal communication skills. •Demonstrated ability in the use of Windows, Microsoft Word and Excel. •Good organizational skills. •Valid PA driver’s license. Preferred attributes: General Human Resource experience. •Updated knowledge of laws governing human resource functions.

We offer a comprehensive compensation and benefits package. Interested candidates should forward a cover letter (with salary requirements) and resume to: Inez Colon Employment Department 345 Sixth Avenue, 3rd Floor Pittsburgh, PA 15222-2527 IColon@portauthority.org EOE ANNOUNCEMENTS Meetings

HOUSING OPPORTUNITY FUND ADVISORY BOARD MEETING

In accordance with the Pennsylvania Sunshine Act, 65 Pa.C.S.A. §§ 701 et seq., notice is hereby given that the Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh (URA) is hosting a Housing Opportunity Fund (HOF) Advisory Board Meeting on Friday, July 13 at 9:00 AM at the URA’s offices located at 200 Ross Street, 13th floor, Pittsburgh, PA 15219. The HOF was created by the City of Pittsburgh to help support the development and preservation of affordable and accessible housing in the City. The 17-member advisory board was appointed to help oversee the Fund. The HOF Advisory Board Meeting is open to the public. Jessica Smith Perry Deputy Housing Director Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh 200 Ross Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-255-6575 jsmithperry@ura.org www.ura.org LEGAL ADVERTISING Legal Notices

Estate of GARY NATHAN PARKER, Deceased of Pittsburgh, PA No. 03576 of 2018 Administratrix Diana James, 2376 E. 37th Street, Cleveland, OH 44115 or to Thelma C. Spells, Esquire, Atty., 1533 Bidwell Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15233. Estate of TAMIKA BOLT deceased, of Pittsburgh, PA File Number is 031562018. The Administrator of the Estate is Andrew Stewart, but all correspondence should be sent to Quinntarra Morant, Esq. at Kraemer, Manes & Associates, LLC US Steel Tower, 48th Floor, 600 Grant St., Suite 4875, Pittsburgh, PA 15219

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ANNOUNCEMENTS

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Public Notice

Public Notice

Public Notice

NOTICE CITY OF PITTSBURGH

Notice is hereby given that the following amendments are being made to the 2014, 2015, 2016, and 2017 budgets of the City of Pittsburgh’s Community Development Block Grant Program: PROJECT

YEAR

ORIGINAL AMOUNT

NEW AMOUNT

CHANGE /-

ACTIVITY

SERVICE AREA

Poise Foundation

2014

$75,000.00

$61,300.00

Eastside Neighborhood Employment Center

2014

$0.00

$11,000.00

-$13,700.00

Public Service

Citywide

$11,000.00

Public Service

East Liberty

Brothers & Sisters Emerging

2014

$0.00

$2,700.00

Poise Foundation

2015

$75,000.00

$71,000.00

Eastside Neighborhood Employment Center

2015

$0.00

Poise Foundation

2016

Brothers & Sisters Emerging

2016

ings of ings/Higher Living

$2,700.00

Public Service

Garfield

-$4,000.00

Public Service

Citywide

$4,000.00

$4,000.00

Public Service

East Liberty

$75,000.00

$21,000.00

-$54,000.00

Public Service

Citywide

$0.00

$8,500.00

$8,500.00

Public Service

Garfield

2016

$0.00

$4,500.00

$4,500.00

Public Service

East Liberty

Reading is Fundamental

2016

$0.00

$8,500.00

$8,500.00

Public Service

Citywide

Earthen Vessels

2016

$0.00

$7,000.00

$7,000.00

Public Service

Friendship

Eastside Neighborhood Employment Center

2016

$0.00

$8,500.00

$8,500.00

Public Service

East Liberty

Habitat for Humanity

2016

$0.00

$8,500.00

$8,500.00

Public Service

Citywide

Afro-American Music Institute

2016

$0.00

$8,500.00

$8,500.00

Public Service

Homewood

Poise Foundation

2017

$75,000.00

$5,000.00

-$70,000.00

Public Service

Citywide

Big Brothers/Big Sisters

2017

$0.00

$5,000.00

$6,000.00

Public Service

Citywide

Naomi’s Place

2017

$0.00

$15,300.00

$15,300.00

Public Service

Citywide

Brothers & Sisters Emerging

2017

$0.00

$10,000.00

$10,000.00

Public Service

Garfield

Urban Academy

2017

$0.00

$15,300.00

$15,300.00

Public Service

Citywide

Earthen Vessels

2017

$0.00

$8,400.00

$8,400.00

Public Service

Friendship

Reading is Fundamental

2017

$0.00

$10,000.00

$10,000.00

Public Service

Citywide

Center for Employment Opportunities

2017

$0.00

$5,000.00

$5,000.00

Public Service

Citywide

The City of Pittsburgh is requesting comments on its proposed use of Community Development Block Grant funds and on the City’s past CDBG performance. Comments may be sent to: Michael Petrucci Assistant Director for Community Development Office of Management and Budget 200 Ross Street, Suite 201 Pittsburgh, PA 15219 It is requested that comments be sent in no later than Thursday, July 26, 2018. LEGAL ADVERTISING

LEGAL ADVERTISING

LEGAL ADVERTISING

Legal Notices

Bids/Proposals

Bids/Proposals

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

ALLEGHENY COUNTY SANITARY AUTHORITY LEGAL NOTICE CONTRACT NO. 1697

CHANGE OF NAME

In the Court of Common Pleas of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania: No. GD-18-5407 Term, 2018 In re Petition of Leanne Elizabeth McKelvey for change of name to Leanne Elizabeth Dallaba. To all persons interested: Notice is hereby given that an order of said Court authorized the filing of said petition and fixed the 25th day of July, 2018, at 9:45 A.M., as the time and the Motions Room, City-County Building Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, as the place for a hearing, when and where all persons may show cause, if any they have, why said name should not be changed as prayed for. Self-represented, 2245 South Braddock Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15218 (412)713-4376.

REGISTRATION OF FICTITIOUS NAME

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT an application for Registration of Fictitious Name (the “Application”) was filed with the Pennsylvania Department of State Bureau of Corporations and Charitable Organizations on June 25, 2018. The fictitious name is Hillvue Self Storage. The name of the person who is party to the registration is Fairfield Southpointe, L.P. The address of the principal office of the business to be carried on under the fictitious name, as well as the address of the person who is party to the registration, is 401 Washington Avenue, P.O. Box 36, Bridgeville, PA 15017. The application was filed under the Fictitious Names Act.

LEGAL ADVERTISING Bids/Proposals

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

The Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh (URA) is accepting competitive proposals from experienced property maintenance firms to perform year-long maintenance of its vacant land real estate portfolio. Approximately 400 properties are involved in bundles of two sizes (small and mid) and are located in geographic clusters throughout the City of Pittsburgh. A listing of properties is available for review at the URA offices for those companies wishing to submit a proposal. The initial contract period will be for twelve (12) months. Interested companies must secure a copy of the RFP from the URA website at https://www.ura.org/pages/pro posals-bids. A mandatory pre-proposal meeting will be held on Wednesday, July 11, 2018 at 10:30 AM ET in the Wherrett Memorial Conference Room, 13th floor at the URA, 200 Ross Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15219. Proposals are due Wednesday, July 25, 2018 4:00pm prevailing time.

The Allegheny County Department of Human Services (DHS) recently issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) for HUD 2018 Domestic Violence Bonus Funding. Proposals are due by 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Monday, July 23, 2018. For more details and submission information, visit: www.alleghenycounty.us/ Human-Services/Resources/ Doing-Business/Solicitations(RFP/RFQ/RFI).aspx. Marc Cherna Director Allegheny County Department of Human Services

ADVERTISEMENT

Sealed bid proposals are hereby solicited for the Community College of Allegheny County, 800 Allegheny Avenue, Pittsburgh PA 15233 (412.237.3020) on the following items: Bid Proposal No. 1027 – Install Mechanical/Electrical Service to MDF/IDF Closet at Homewood Brushton Center A mandatory pre-bid meeting and site-visitation will be held at 9:30 a.m. on Tuesday, July 17, 2018. The assembly point will be the front entrance to the center, 701 N. Homewood Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15208. Proposals will be received at the Purchasing Department until 2:00 P.M. Prevailing Time on Wednesday, July 25, 2018. The CCAC Purchasing Department publishes all bids and RFPs via the CCAC website at https:// www.ccac.edu/Bid-RFP_Oppor tunities.aspx It will be each vendor’s responsibility to monitor the bid activity within the given website (“Bid and RFP Opportunities”) and ensure compliance with all applicable bid documents inclusive of any issued addenda. Failure to incorporate any applicable addenda in the final submittal may result in the rejection of your bid. The Board of Trustees reserves the right to reject any and all bids. The Community College of Allegheny County is an Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity Employer and encourages bids from Minority/Disadvantaged owned businesses.

Sealed Bids for CONTRACT NO. 1697 – MODIFICATION OF NOZZLE CAPS IN FLUID BED INCINERATOR #2 shall be received at the office of the Allegheny County Sanitary Authority, 3300 Preble Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA, 15233, until 1:30 P.M., Prevailing Time, Tuesday, July 24, 2018 and then shall be publicly opened and read. ALCOSAN encourages businesses owned and operated by minorities and women to submit bids on Authority Contracts or to participate as subcontractors or suppliers to successful Bidders. Successful Bidders are to use minority and women’s businesses to the fullest extent possible. A non-mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting will be held at the Authority’s Plant, on Friday, July 13, 2018 at 10:00 A.M. Prevailing Time. Attendance at this meeting is strongly suggested. Contract Documents may be examined and obtained at the office of the Authority. A non-refundable fee of $100 (no cash will be accepted) will be charged for each set of Contract Documents received. Bid Security shall be furnished by providing with the Bid a Certified Check or Bid Bond in the amount of 10% of the Bid Price. Any questions regarding the Contract Documents should be directed to Jeffrey S. Mazza, P.E. at 412734-8359, or fax to 412-734-8716, or by email at Jeffrey.Mazza @ Alcosan.org. The Authority reserves the right to reject any or all bids, to waive any informality in any bid and to accept any bid should it be deemed in the interest of the Authority to do so. ALLEGHENY COUNTY SANITARY AUTHORITY Kimberly Kennedy, P.E. Director of Engineering and Construction

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Bids/Proposals

Bids/Proposals

HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY OF PITTSBURGH INVITATION FOR BIDS (IFB) FOR WALK IN-ROLL IN SHOWER INSTALLATION IFB# 300-26-18

HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY OF PITTSBURGH INVITATION FOR BIDS (IFB) FOR FIRE ALARM SENSITIVITY TESTING REBID IFB# 300-18-18REBID

The Housing Authority of the City of Pittsburgh (HACP) hereby request proposals from qualified Firms or Individuals capable of providing the following service(s): WALK IN-ROLL IN SHOWER INSTALLATION IFB# 300-26-18 The documents will be available no later than July 2, 2018 and signed, sealed bids will be accepted until 9:00 a.m. on August 3, 2018 at which time they will be Time and Date Stamped at 100 Ross Street 2nd Floor, Suite 200, Pittsburgh, PA 15219, at which time they will be opened and read aloud. Parties or individuals interested in responding may download a copy of the Solicitation from the Business Opportunities page of www.HACP. org. Questions or inquiries should be directed to: Mr. Kim Detrick Housing Authority of the City of Pittsburgh Procurement Department 100 Ross Street 2nd Floor, Suite 200 Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-456-5116 Opt 1 A pre bid meeting will be held: Housing Authority of the City of Pittsburgh Procurement Dept. 100 Ross Street 2nd. Fl. Ste. 200 Pittsburgh, PA 15213 July 25, 2018 9:00 A.M. The Housing Authority of the City of Pittsburgh strongly encourages certified minority business enterprises and women business enterprises to respond to this solicitation. HACP’s has revised their website. As part of those revisions, vendors must now register and log-in, in order to view and download IFB/RFPs documentation. Caster D. Binion, Executive Director Housing Authority of the City of Pittsburgh HACP conducts business in accordance with all federal, state, and local civil rights laws, including but not limited to Title VII, the Fair Housing Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act, The PA Human Relations Act, etc. and does not discriminate against any individuals protected by these statutes.

The Housing Authority of the City of Pittsburgh (HACP) hereby request proposals from qualified Firms or Individuals capable of providing the following service(s): FIRE ALARM SENSITIVITY TESTING REBID IFB# 300-18-18REBID The documents will be available no later than July 2, 2018 and signed, sealed bids will be accepted until 10:00 a.m. on August 3, 2018 at which time they will be Time and Date Stamped at 100 Ross Street 2nd Floor, Suite 200, Pittsburgh, PA 15219, at which time they will be opened and read aloud. Parties or individuals interested in responding may download a copy of the Solicitation from the Business Opportunities page of www.HACP. org. Questions or inquiries should be directed to: Mr. Kim Detrick Housing Authority of the City of Pittsburgh Procurement Department 100 Ross Street 2nd Floor, Suite 200 Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-456-5116 Opt 1 A pre bid meeting will be held: Housing Authority of the City of Pittsburgh Procurement Dept. 100 Ross Street 2nd. Fl. Ste. 200 Pittsburgh, PA 15213 July 25, 2018 10:00 A.M. The Housing Authority of the City of Pittsburgh strongly encourages certified minority business enterprises and women business enterprises to respond to this solicitation. HACP’s has revised their website. As part of those revisions, vendors must now register and log-in, in order to view and download IFB/RFPs documentation. Caster D. Binion, Executive Director Housing Authority of the City of Pittsburgh HACP conducts business in accordance with all federal, state, and local civil rights laws, including but not limited to Title VII, the Fair Housing Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act, The PA Human Relations Act, etc. and does not discriminate against any individuals protected by these statutes.

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SONNY BOY

COMBINED NOTICE OF FINDING OF NO SIGNFICANT IMPACT AND NOTICE OF INTENT TO REQUEST RELEASE OF FUNDS

July 11, 2018 City of Pittsburgh Office of Management and Budget 200 Ross Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-255-2211 These notices shall satisfy two separate but related procedural requirements for activities to be undertaken by the City of Pittsburgh. REQUEST FOR RELEASE OF FUNDS On or about July 27, 2018 the City of Pittsburgh (“City”) will submit a request to the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (“HUD”) for the release of Community Development Block Grant funds under Title 1 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, to undertake projects known as ADA Compliance $40,000, Remediation of Condemned Buildings $250,000, Ramp and Public Sidewalk $300,000, Street Resurfacing $3,100,150, Slope Failure $500,000, Facility Improvements - Sport Facilities $161,250, Play Area Improvements $197,800, Facility Improvements – City Facilities $63,919, Facility Improvements – Recreation & Senior Centers $285,000, Urban Redevelopment Authority Economic Development & Housing $1,550,000, Urban Redevelopment Authority Choice Neighborhood $1,090,800, Urban Redevelopment Authority Personnel $2,000,000, for the purpose of improving infrastructure, public facilities and services for low-moderate income City of Pittsburgh residents. FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT The City of Pittsburgh has determined that the project will have no significant impact on the human environment. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) is not required. Additional project information is contained in the Environmental Review Record (ERR) on file at City of Pittsburgh 200 Ross Street, 2nd Floor, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 and may be examined or copied weekdays from 9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. PUBLIC COMMENTS Any individual, group, or agency may submit written comments on the ERR to: Michael Petrucci City of Pittsburgh, 200 Ross Street, 2nd Floor Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-255-2211 All comments received by July 26, 2018, will be considered by the City of Pittsburgh prior to authorizing submission of a request for release of funds. Comments should specify which Notice they are addressing. ENVIRONMENTAL CERTIFICATION The City of Pittsburgh certifies to HUD that William Peduto in his capacity as Mayor, City of Pittsburgh, consents to accept the jurisdiction of the Federal Courts if an action is brought to enforce responsibilities in relation to the environmental review process and that these responsibilities have been satisfied. HUD’s approval of the certification satisfies its responsibilities under NEPA and related laws and authorities and allows the City of Pittsburgh to use program funds. OBJECTIONS TO RELEASE OF FUNDS HUD will accept objections to its release of fund and the City of Pittsburgh’s certification for a period of fifteen days following the anticipated submission date or its actual receipt of the request (whichever is later) only if they are on one of the following bases: (a) the certification was not executed by the Certifying Officer of the City of Pittsburgh; (b) the City of Pittsburgh has omitted a step or failed to make a decision or finding required by HUD regulations at 24 CFR part 58; (c) the grant recipient or other participants in the development process have committed funds, incurred costs or undertaken activities not authorized by 24 CFR Part 58 before approval of a release of funds by HUD; or (d) another Federal agency acting pursuant to 40 CFR Part 1504 has submitted a written finding that the project is unsatisfactory from the standpoint of environmental quality. Objections must be prepared and submitted in accordance with the required procedures (24 CFR Part 58, Sec. 58.76) and shall be addressed to: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Community Planning and Development Division The Moorhead Federal Building 1000 Liberty Ave.-10th floor Pittsburgh, PA 15222 Potential objectors should contact HUD to verify the actual last day of the objection period. WILLIAM PEDUTO Mayor City of Pittsburgh

JULY 11-17, 2018

LEGAL ADVERTISING

LEGAL ADVERTISING

LEGAL ADVERTISING

Bids/Proposals

Bids/Proposals

Bids/Proposals

INVITATION FOR BIDS

THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

INVITATION TO BIDDERS THE PITTSBURGH WATER AND SEWER AUTHORITY ADVERTISEMENT

SEPARATE and SEALED BIDS for the following solicitation, will be received by the Office of Procurement, Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority, 1200 Penn Ave., Second Floor, Pittsburgh, PA 15222, until 2:00 PM Prevailing Time July 12, 2018. Bids must be received in the hands of and stamped in by a PWSA Procurement Officer in sufficient time prior to the opening in order for a bid to be considered. INVITATION FOR BIDS (IFB) FOR LIME SLURRY PWSA PROJECT NO. PWSA98 Re-Bid All bids must be submitted in accordance with the solicitation that can be obtained by sending an e-mail to cjuratovic@pgh2o.com. There will be no charge for the solicitation, as it will be sent via e-mail. All questions relating to the solicitation itself shall be directed to Nicole Dickun, Procurement Manager, via e-mail to: ndickun@pgh2o.com, no later than June 9, 2018 at 4:00 p.m. No bonds are required. The Contractor must assure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their race, color, religion, sexual preference, sex, or national origin. The Authority reserves the right to withhold the award of the Contract for a period of 90 calendar days after the opening of the bids. The Authority reserves the right to reject any or all proposals, and to waive any informality or minor irregularity in any bid or bids. The Authority also retains the right to investigate the qualifications of bidders prior to any award and to award contracts only to contractors who, in the sole judgment of the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority, are qualified and equipped to properly execute the specified work.

ALLEGHENY COUNTY SANITARY AUTHORITY LEGAL NOTICE CONTRACT NO. 1698

The Allegheny County Sanitary Authority is soliciting Bids for CONTRACT NO. 1698 - FURNISH AND DELIVER SPROCKETS FOR PRIMARY SEDIMENTATION TANKS. Proposals will be received until 11:00 A.M., Prevailing Time, Tuesday, July 24, 2018 at the office of the Authority. ALCOSAN encourages businesses owned and operated by minorities and women to submit bids on Authority Proposals or to participate as subcontractors or suppliers to the successful bidders. Successful Bidders are to use minority or women’s businesses to the fullest extent possible. The Authority reserves the right to reject any or all Proposals, to waive any informality in any Proposal and to accept any Proposal should it be deemed in the interest of the Authority to do so. Bid Security in the amount of One Thousand Dollars ($1,000.00) is required. Documents pertaining to the submission of Bids are available at the office of the Authority, 3300 Preble Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15233. Any questions regarding this contract document should be directed to Benjamin J. Heilman, Contract Supervisor (412) 734-6204 or Benjamin.Heilman@alcosan.org ALLEGHENY COUNTY SANITARY AUTHORITY Benjamin J. Heilman Contract Supervisor

COURIER CLASSIFIEDS GET RESULTS!

The URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY OF PITTSBURGH will receive bids from qualified contractors for construction of a 4 acre Liberty Green/River Roots Park, a playground and public area in the City of Pittsburgh’s East Liberty neighborhood, including 20,000 CY of grading, excavation, and fill, 40,000 SF of concrete sidewalks, stormwater basins and underground storage tanks, 1,200 LF of 12” - 24” HDPE stormwater sewers, 14,000 SF or resilient play surfaces, playground equipment, picnic equipment, approximately 200 trees and shrubs, 45,000 SF of lawn, and 31 pedestrian and street light poles and luminaires, and all work incidental thereto required to complete East Liberty Site Preparation Contract No. 4,until 11:00a.m. prevailing time on Tuesday, the 7th day of August, 2018, at its office on the 11th Floor, 200 Ross Street, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219, at which time all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud in the 11th Floor Conference Room. Contract documents will be available on publicpurchase.com on Wednesday, July 11, 2018. A pre-bid meeting will be held at the Environmental and Energy Community Outreach Center (EECO) at 200 Larimer Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15206 at 1:00p.m. on Tuesday, July 24, 2018, to discuss the specifications for this project and review the bid drawings. Attendance by prospective bidders is mandatory. A certified check or bank draft payable to the order of the Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh, negotiable U.S. Government Bonds (at par value), or a satisfactory Bid Bond executed by the Bidder and an acceptable surety, in a dollar amount equal to 5% of the total bid for East Liberty Site Preparation Contract No. 4 (Liberty Green/ River Roots Park) shall be submitted for each bid. The bid submittal must include the Bid, Non-collusion Affidavit of Prime Bidder, Bid Bond, Statement of Bidder’s Qualifications, Certificate of Compliance Section 3, and the Certificate of Minority and Women’s Participation. Wages paid on this project shall not be less than the minimum wages determined by the U.S. Department of Labor as set forth in the Contract Documents. The Contractor will be required to comply with all applicable Equal Employment Opportunity requirements for Federally-Assisted construction contracts. The Contractor must assure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their age, race, color, religion, disability, ancestry, national origin, age or sexual preference, gender identity, gender expression, political and/or union affiliation. Attention is called to Executive Order 11246, to Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968, 12 U.S.C. 1701U, and to the Section 3 Clause and Regulations set forth in 24 CFR, Part 135. Bidders will be required to submit the package of certifications included with the contract documents relating to the Equal Employment Opportunity and the participation of Minority and Women’s Business Enterprises. The Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh requires that all bidders complete and submit an MBE/WBE Solicitation and Commitment Statement along with the bid. The Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh reserves the right to reject any or all bids or to waive any informality in the bidding. Bids may be held by the Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh for a period not to exceed ninety (90) days from the date of the opening of Bids for the purpose of reviewing the Bids and investigation of Bidders prior to awarding the Contract.

Sealed bids will be received in the Office Of The Chief Operations Officer, Room 251, Administration Building, 341 South Bellefield Avenue until 11:00 A.M. prevailing time July 17, 2018 and will be opened at the same hour for the purchase of the following equipment and supplies: Window Cleaning Calculators General Information regarding bids may be obtained at the Office of the Purchasing Agent, Service Center, 1305 Muriel Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15203. The bid documents are available on the School District’s Purchasing web site at: http://www.pghboe.net/pps/site/ default.asp Click on Bid Opportunities under Quick Links. The Board of Public Education reserves the right to reject any and all bids, or select a single item from any bid. M. Jordan Purchasing Agent We are an equal rights and opportunity school district

Soul Readers REV. O’NEIL SPIRITUAL READER & ADVISOR

Helps with all problems with life. Call for a free reading by phone 973-338-2492.

TO PLACE AN AD IN SOUL READERS Call 412-481-8302, Ext. 140 The deadline for all ads to be placed is Monday at 12 p.m. All ads must be paid for in advance. We accept Money Orders, Credit Cards and Western Union “Quick Collect” payments.

To place a display ad in the New Pittsburgh Courier call 412-481-8302 ext. 128 or 129

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Classifieds

412-481-8302 Ext. 140 E-mail: ads@newpittsburghcourier.com Deadline/Closing/Cancellation Schedule for copy, corrections, and cancellations: Friday noon preceding Wednesday publication


B6

FORUM

JULY 11-17, 2018

Roland Martin is pleading our case

Both Black and White professed Christians hate!

(TriceEdneyWire.com)—Kudos to Roland Martin, the pioneering journalist who has taken his departure from TV One and turned it into a digital platform. He’ll be back with a daily program, but he’ll be online instead of traditional media.  He has financing from AFSCME, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, and he is also hoping for funding from us, the folks who say they miss the program and say they want unfiltered news.  From his website,  www.rolandmartin.com, you can join his #BringtheFunk support group and help Roland bring the funk! Roland has had it with the traditional media, and he is right to point out the lack of commentators and hosts on conventional media—the

The other day and how long he while eating Louis ‘Hop’ Kendrick had served as lunch, a person an officer. It was from the past my first time walked over that we had and said, “May been invited so I sit down?” I was somewhat And I said, “Of reluctant to encourse.” gage in a conHe almost inversation about stantly started race, so I just a conversation about race and police listened and allowed another Black killing young Blacks and continued by male guest who they knew to reply. stating, “I hate all White folks.” However, the professed Christian exOnce I got a chance to respond, I said, posed himself when he used the code “First of all, you don’t know all White word, “YOU PEOPLE are confusing,” people and you would do well to find a and that is when it became my opporchurch home.” Now, he’s really agitat- tunity to clarify the confusion. The ed. He says, “I go to church every Sun- questions I asked were basic—how day, I am a Christian who is working many Blacks attend your church? on the building (striving to improve Does the minister ever expound on himself),” and we both laughed. solutions to the racial problems? Are Now he begins to expound on why there any Black neighbors of yours or he hates all White people and I real- any in the school system? How many ly was familiar with all of the argu- Blacks are employed at your workments, but I listened. Father was beat- place? Have you or any of the other en up by racism in the workplace and officers ever suggested to your minisit affected his ability to provide for his ter to address the congregation about family. The school system was second; working to improve the racial situall of the teachers, counselors, janitors ation? Does it disturb you about the were White and had no interest in fact that in your lifestyle, every facet helping Blacks take full advantage of is totally White? the educational system. The next step I then explained to him how the in his career was joining the U.S. Ma- word “picnic” came into our vocaburines and racism was rampant there. lary. It was important that I remind Third, he began to focus on slavery, him about the fact that the Crusades slave masters of yesteryear and mod- killed two million infidels, and last ern versions of slave masters. Now he but not least I reminded all of them concludes by saying how things have that when the KKK was killing, burnchanged, but regretfully too much re- ing, etc., there were the Klan chapmains the same, but Hop, “believe me, lains riding with them. I did not want I am working on the building.” to abuse the fact that I was a firstMy wife and I were guests at an in- time guest so I just slowed down, but terracial dinner that consisted of 16 a guest asked, “Why are you not angry persons, 10 White and six Black. After or full of hate?” My response was simdining it was conversation time and it ply, “I am the son of a Christian family eventually got around to race issues. A who instilled in all of us God’s greatcertain guest was the most outspoken est commandment; LOVE.” (Louis “Hop” Kendrick is a contributor to the and discussed it at length about his involvement in the local organization New Pittsburgh Courier.)

Julianne Malveaux

Commentary networks and the “key” cable outlets. Many of those folks have to toe the line, and can’t be but so “controversial.”  But sometimes one person’s controversy is another person’s truth.  The corporate media squirms with journalists call our 45th President on his many lies because some of them are still currying favor with him.  And unless light shines on the filth that is occurring in Washington, it will continue. Forty-five said he would “drain the swamp,” but he has become one of the world’s great alligators, profiting from his Presidency both through ties to China (even as he imposes tariffs), through his many name-branded hotels, and through all kinds of other shady deals. Chicago Crusader publisher Dorothy Leavell Chairs the Board of the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA).  At the organization’s June conference, she convened a panel that focused on fake news and the Black press. I was privileged to participate with the National Association of Black Journalist (NABJ) President Sarah Glover, pugnacious attorney A. Scott Bolden, and marketing expert Deborah Gray-Young.  I think that fake news is not only about the Trump shenanigans and lies, but also about that which is unreported or distorted.  For example, how come every time a White person shoots up a classroom, movie theatre, or public space, the focus is on their “mental illness,” while whenever a Black person commits a crime of any sort, the focus is on criminality.  Why has Rev. Barber’s Poor People’s campaign been so underreported, and why was the June 12 shackling of faith leaders outside Supreme Court wholly ignored by the mainstream (and even the sidestream) media? Why has there been so little focus on the economic status of African American people, except when 45 crows about all the improvements he has made (not) on the economy! Just the other day, I was commiserating with someone about the ways the mainstream media ignores the African American community. The brother I was talking to said, “this is why I miss Roland.” So Roland is coming back roaring, lifting up the oft-quoted 1827 line from Freedom’s Journal, the nation’s first Black newspaper,  “We wish to plead our own cause. Too long have others spoken for us.” Roland Martin and the NNPA have made the case that if we want our story told, we have to support it. It is a shame that the Black press is so poorly embraced. NNPA papers need ads, and they also need subscriptions, but while many of us talk a good game, we don’t sustain our press enough to help it thrive. So they go seeking ads to survive, perhaps compromising integrity while doing so.  The Black press, those who plead our case, must not feel that they have to buck-dance to the whim of advertisers.  Advertising, all too often, is contingent on the support of a specific position, or avoidance of controversy.  Thus in launching his #Bring the Funk group, Roland is challenging African Americans who want real news to support it. That means contributing a little or a lot to grow the digital platform Roland is building.  Everybody wants to go to heaven, but nobody wants to die.  In other words, everyone wants real news, and nobody wants to pay for it.  One of the ways to support real news is to take out a subscription to an NNPA newspaper, or three.  Another way is to help Roland bring his particular brand of reporting and analysis to us through his digital platform.  Check his powerful statement out at  www. rolandmartin.com. And check out the ways you support fake news by failing to challenge the mainstream media. Do you write letters to the editor? Reach out to producers?  Ask hard questions about representation?  Silence is consent. (Julianne Malveaux is an author and economist.)

To Tell The Truth

Do police killings of unarmed Blacks create a national mental health burden? Recently, Pulitcentage is an anzer Prize-winning J. Pharaoh Doss nual pattern, that newspaper colwould be probumnist, Charles lematic, because K r a u t h a m m e r, Black Americans passed away. He are only 14 perwas once asked cent of the U.S. what motivated population. So, it him to write and has to be asked is Krauthammer rethat a fact? plied, “History is Let’s return to shaped by its battleground of ideas, the database. and I wanted to be in the arena, not In 2016, 963 people were fatally shot because I want to fight, but because by the police. Fifty-one were unarmed, some things need to be said, and some 22 were White, 19 were Black, nine things need to be defended.” were Hispanic, and one other person. Some things, also, need to be asked. Unarmed victims were five percent For example, it’s been reported that of the total body count, and unarmed a new study found, “When an un- Black victims were two percent. armed Black American dies at the In 2017, 987 people were fatally shot hands of the police, the emotional im- by the police. 68 were unarmed, 30 pact reverberates so widely that Black were White, 20 were Back, 13 were Americans who didn’t even know the Hispanic, and five others. Unarmed victim report distress, anxiety and victims were seven percent of the todepression, creating a national men- tal body count, and unarmed Black tal health burden nearly comparable victims were two percent. to the stress caused by a chronic illIn 2018 (the database’s last update ness like diabetes.” This report also was June 20), 519 people were fatally stated that in the United States an shot by the police. Twenty-nine were unarmed Black person is three times unarmed, 15 were White, 11 were more likely to be shot by the police Black, two were Hispanic, and one than an unarmed White person, and other person. Unarmed victims are in 2015, 30 percent of Black victims currently six percent of the total body were unarmed compared to 21 percent count, and once again unarmed Black of White unarmed victims. All of this victims are two percent. data came from the Washington Post This new study wants intelligent database that has tracked fatal police people to believe that the deaths of shootings since 2015. six individuals in 2015 and two perHere’s what needs to be asked. cent of the total body count of fatal poWhy is a phrase like “three times lice shootings during the subsequent more likely” used when the database years is straining the mental health of has the actual body count, and why the Black community. Whenever sciwere the percentages of 2015 featured entific research revealed Blacks have when the database includes the fol- lower IQ test scores than other ethnic lowing years? groups the data was immediately disLet’s see. missed as racist pseudoscience, but According to the Washington Post Po- this study brings into question the lice Shooting Database for 2015 there mental strength of the Black commuwere 995 fatal police shootings. The po- nity and it hasn’t been dismissed at lice killed 401 Whites who were in pos- all, and it won’t be, because it reinforcsession of a deadly weapon compared es a divisive narrative fueled by racial to 188 Blacks for the same reason (over causation and single-mindedness. 200 more Whites). There were 94 fatal I think Krauthammer would agree police shootings of unarmed people, 32 that some things need to be dewere White, 38 were Black, 19 were nounced and some things need to be Hispanic, and there were five others. rebelled against. (J. Pharaoh Doss is a contributor to the New When you hear unarmed Black Americans are “three times more likely” to be Pittsburgh Courier.) shot by the police it gives the impression that the difference in body count would be as dramatic as the deadly weapons comparison. But it’s not. The great disparity between Black and White unarmed victims of fatal police shootings in 2015 was six people. So, the percentages (however they were calculated) 30 percent Black, 21 percent White, were used to dramatize the difference. But if this higher per-

Check It Out

NEW PITTSBURGH COURIER

Jesse Jackson Sr.

Commentary

Arrogant Supreme Court justices trample the law in service of the rich (TriceEdneyWire.com)—We are witnessing an astounding attack on democracy by the five male rightwing majority of the Supreme Court—“black robed rulers,” Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan called them, “overruling citizens’ choices” in a series of 5-4 decisions. These are right-wing lawless judges ignoring the laws and will of our elected representatives and trampling the dictates of legal precedent. Their arrogance seems to have no bounds. The damage that they have already done to our democracy is profound. The most recent 5-4 decision of the Supreme Court was the case of Janus v. AFSCME. The majority, throwing out the laws of state legislatures and legal precedent, ruled that state legislatures cannot authorize public employee unions to collect a fee for the cost of bargaining and representing workers who benefit from the negotiations but don’t want to join the union. Protecting freeloaders seems bizarre, but the court’s ideologues are interested less in upholding the law and far more in weakening the workers’ voice as represented by unions. Now in states across the nation, right-wing corporate funded groups will launch campaigns to get workers to quit their unions in the hope of dramatically weakening the voice of teachers, sanitation workers, police officers and firefighters. The decision is but one of many undermining our democracy. A right-wing majority gutted the Voting Rights Act in Shelby v. Holder. This term, the five upheld Texas redistricting that lower courts found discriminated against minority voters. In Citizens United, five conservative judges—again ignoring law and precedent—held that corporations could not be prohibited from spending money in elections. Somehow corporations, they suggested, had the same political rights as citizens. The gang of five has also systematically favored corporate rights over women’s rights, gay rights, consumer and environmental protection. That the Congress—elected by the people—passes laws expressing different values doesn’t deter them. They have elevated themselves as “black robed rulers,” legislating their own choices from the bench. Now Justice Anthony Kennedy has chosen to resign, apparently timing his announcement so President Trump can use the fight over his successor to rouse his base in the upcoming elections. (That suggestion gains credibility with the revelation that Kennedy’s son, working at Deutsche Bank, lent Donald Trump and his operations nearly a billion—with a b—billion dollars at a time when U.S. banks wouldn’t go near him because of his record of bankruptcies and scams.) Kennedy gained a reputation as a “moderate” because of his votes on abortion and on gay marriage, but he has been a leader in the assault on democracy and the elevation of corporate rights over worker rights. Now, his resignation is timed so that Trump can name, and the Republican majority in the Senate confirm, a younger right-wing zealot to carry on the assault on democracy. In the Civil Rights movement, we looked to the Supreme Court to enforce the Constitution against the Jim Crow laws of the apartheid South. Now we must take back the Congress and the statehouses and rally the democratic bodies against the usurpations of the ideological majority of the court. Only if the pressure is constant will one or more of the Justices realize the dangers and errors of their course. The pushback can start with our election laws and come from the bottom up. Localities and states should be passing laws to make voter registration automatic, to extend the days for voting, to expand the franchise, and rollback restrictions on voting. Districts and states can pass laws matching small donations three or four to one, to encourage independence from the corruptions of big money. Localities might pass legislation demanding that candidates get their “oats and their votes” from the district itself – limiting funds to those provided by those who live in the district. Nonpartisan citizen panels can put an end to partisan gerrymandering, ensuring the voters pick their representatives rather than politicians designing districts to pick their voters. It is long past time that we recognize what the right-wing Supreme Court gang of five is doing. They claim to be simply enforcing the laws, but they overturn legislation and ignore legal precedent. They are lawless in the service of the rich and the corporations. They are expanding the corrupting rule of big money even as they limit the rights of workers, consumers, women and people of color. George Wallace stood in the schoolhouse door defying the dictates of the Constitution and the unanimous decision of the Supreme Court. Now a shameless majority of five stands in that door against the laws of the Congress and states, eroding the democracy they are sworn to protect. Just as it took a movement to challenge George Wallace and segregation, it will take a movement to reclaim our democracy from these “black robed rulers.” Progressive activists should demand that every Democratic candidate for elected office at the local, state or national level make empowering workers a central part of his or her platform. They should demand support for measures that will make it easier for workers to organize and crack down on labor law violations. Companies that violate basic worker rights should be penalized in public procurement decisions. At the same time, progressives need to expose the reality that the right wing gang of five in the Supreme Court is trampling the will of the people and overturning established precedents to serve the interests of the plutocrats and the right. These “black robed rulers” are legislating from the bench, scorning even an effort to find common ground with their own colleagues. In a time of deep polarization, the lawless majority of court has chosen to stand with the powerful few against the vast majority. That too will not stand.

NPC Digital 7.11.18  
NPC Digital 7.11.18