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RY O IST SUE H K H IS C A BL MONT

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE SUN SENTINEL

MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2020

Living MLK’s ‘Dream’

Meet Keith James West Palm Beach’s First Black ‘Strong’ Mayor

Remembering

W. George Allen

2020 Focus:

The University of Florida’s First Black Graduate

How To Enter A New Era of Black Prosperity Mayor Keith James


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A BLACK MAN DID THIS

MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2020

0DUN'HDQGHYHORSHGWKHÆ“UVWLQGXVWU\VWDQGDUG3&LQWHUIDFH This Black History Month, we celebrate unknown and unsung Black innovators, inventors and contributors who have helped shape, change and improve our world.

Learn more at aarp.org/blackcommunity


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EDITOR’S NOTE 4 BROWARD MAYOR’S REPORT

By Mayor Dale V.C. Holness

PALM BEACH REPORT

By Ann Marie Sorrell

6 BROWARD BLACK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

By Shaheewa Jarrett Gelin

MEDIATION/ARBITRATION

By Stanley Zamor

8 W. GEORGE ALLEN’S SELFLESS LEGACY BLAZES TRAILS FOR OTHERS

By Janiah Adams

10 CAREER LEADERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT

By Mary Davids

SOCIAL MEDIA

By Dr. Tracy Timberlake

12 COVER STORY West Palm Beach ‘Strong’ Mayor Not Afraid to Make History

By Michelle Solomon

14 PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP NFL Executive Works to Bring Super Bowl Experiences to Local Residents

By Kallan Louis

16

City of Miramar Announces Exciting Black History Month Celebrations

MIRAMAR REPORT

Muhammad credits Malcolm X for inspiring him to become a Muslim at the age of 24. He says it was his close association with three of Malcolm X’s close NOI brothers that prompted him to do some investigative reporting, which led him to draw new conclusions revealed in the series. “There are some explosive revelations in it,” claims Muhammad, who majored in philosophy and minored in history at Howard University. Muhammad stopped short of revealing too much about the docu-series, leaving dozens of curious attendees at the screening in suspense. “We believe this will be the definitive account of what happened to Brother Malcolm X — the forces that were involved in bringing about his demise,” said Muhammad. “We believe it will be definitive and close the book on the subject.” So will this account change history as we know it? Muhammad maintains, no, it won’t change history. Instead, he suggests it will “establish” history. Happy Black History Month.

Russell Motley Legacy Editor-in-Chief rm@miamediagrp.com n

PALM BEACH URBAN LEAGUE

By Soulan Johnson

MEDIA GROUP LLC

MONEY MATTERS

By Joann Milord

18 BUSINESS REPORT

“Who Killed Malcolm X?” This gripping title intrigued me enough to recently commit a Friday evening to watch an advance screening of one episode of the docu-series at Fort Lauderdale’s African American Research Library and Cultural Center. Just in time for Black History Month, the six-part series debuts on Netflix Feb. 7, raising doubts about who actually assassinated the American Muslim minister nearly 55 years ago at Harlem’s Audubon Ballroom. As a scholar and history buff, I’m curious to learn what revelations could have now possibly surfaced and whether these “findings” will, ultimately, rewrite history. Tackling this subject is historian, activist and investigative journalist AbdurRahman Muhammad of Washington, D.C.,

who appears in the series. (The project’s executive producer is Harvard’s Dr. Henry Louis Gates Jr.) At the South Florida screening, Muhammad offered historical context for a subject matter that’s bound to raise eyebrows. “The issue of his assassination is something that always troubled me because I was disturbed by just the lack of academic interest in it,” Muhammad told Legacy. “Before Spike Lee’s movie (Malcolm X) in 1992, the subject of Malcolm’s assassination scholastically was a dead letter issue. Nobody was talking about it.” Nearly three decades after Spike’s 3-and-a-half-hour drama was released, Muhammad’s docu-series promises to ignite renewed interest in a case that convicted three members of the Nation of Islam for Malcolm X’s murder. In part, Muhammad suggests that two of the three convicted — Norman 3X Butler and Thomas 15X Johnson — did not commit the crime. In fact, he says the two men had the weakest case of the three. However, all three suspects were tried together. Thomas Hagan, the third man convicted for Malcolm’s murder, has maintained Butler and Johnson were innocent. Muhammad, 57, was almost 4 years old when Malcolm X was gunned down.

By Beatrice Louissaint

BROWARD HEALTH

By Jennifer Smith

20 22

The King’s Table presents a “Meal Fit For a King” Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce 14th Annual Holiday Gala

ABOUT TOWN

LEGACY BRIEFS

Cover photo location: Martin Luther King Jr. Landmark Memorial, Currie Park, West Palm Beach.

LIFESTYLE

LU X U RY

E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Subscribe to and view the digital version of Legacy Magazine and view additional articles at http://bitly.com/legacymagazines Facebook: Facebook.com/TheMIAMagazine • Twitter and Instagram: @TheMIAMagazine Russell Motley Editor-in-Chief

Yanela G. McLeod

#BeInformed #BeInfluential #BlackHistoryMonth

Copy Editor

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Sabrina Moss-Solomon

Dexter A. Bridgeman CEO & Founder

Designer

Member of the Black Owned Media Alliance (BOMA)

Joe Wesley Cover Photo

CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS

“The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world away from racial and national antagonisms when it accords to every one regardless of race, color or creed, full human and legal rights. Hating no person, fearing no person, the Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief that all hurt as long as anyone is held back.”


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MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2020

BROWARD MAYOR'S REPORT

Supporting Black Businesses Improves Lives of Broward Residents

BY MAYOR DALE V. C. HOLNESS Historically, the underlying ideologies throughout the United States regarding capitalism and the creation of wealth have been corrupted by racist practices that unjustly exploited the wealth established from black labor and empowered other communities. Unfortunately, the system of economic development referenced by W.E.B. Du Bois, a founding member of the NAACP, over a century ago continues to negatively impact black communities today as income from black labor has perpetually proven insufficient to cover increasing expenses.

PALM BEACH REPORT

BY ANN MARIE SORRELL Since 1865, the average American black family has just one-tenth the wealth of the average American white family. The stagnation of black wealth is attributed to discrimination and the many hurdles put in place by institutions, systems of economic oppression, and often people placed in power. February is approaching and we are launching into our Black History Month celebrations. Our history tells a story of

According to data collected about median household income in Broward County, black households are dwarfed at a meager $42,000 in comparison to Hispanic and white households at $54,000 and $74,000. Local communities are not immune to crises that plague the nation, such as: unemployment, criminal justice, education, healthcare, homeownership and transportation. Research from McKinsey & Co. regarding the racial wealth gap shows this economic inefficiency hasn’t solely created a negative impact on black individuals, but the “overall economy.” By creating wealth through the establishment of more black-owned businesses with support from the Broward County Black Chamber of Commerce, our communities will retain a greater portion of the $6.5 billion black households in Broward County received through income that has traditionally escaped our local economy. As research suggests, the money earned within the Black community remains on average, only six hours. In comparison, money earned within the Asian community remains on average 28 days, and 19 days within the Jewish community. Specifically, the focus of increasing

economic wealth by building stronger black-owned businesses throughout Broward County will objectively encompass: ● Strengthening black-owned businesses through loyalty buying by supporting the South Florida Black Business Directory/ Resource to increase distribution to 10,000 printed copies and 20,000 online subscriptions ● Identifying, creating and mentoring 200 new black-owned businesses (50 annually) ● Facilitating entrepreneurship training, including outreach to Historical Black Colleges and Alumni Associations ● Encouraging/creating opportunities for Black entrepreneurs to own businesses in diverse industries and sectors ● Building a strong Black Chamber of Commerce ● Increasing membership to 250 by 2024 ● Increasing government contracting ● Increasing the participation of Blackowned businesses with Broward County and other governmental entities ● Increasing access to capital available for black-owned businesses ● Providing assistance to Blacks needing to prepare for the pre-qualification process for loans and assist 200 Black firms by December 2024

● Hosting an annual Broward County Black Business Expo ● Showcasing at least 100 black-owned businesses scheduled for February 2024 ● Launching a Black Business Advocacy Campaign ● Establishing agreements with all branches of government to conduct annual surveys identifying race, gender, diversity of all vendors ● Increasing the number of local municipal governments that recognize race conscience programs ● Identifying and encouraging elected officials to support increasing opportunities for black businesses ● Utilizing funds and training programs available from Broward County’s Office of Economic and Small Business Development ● Setting baselines for the number of certified black-owned businesses, obtaining data from: Broward Health, Broward County School Board, and Broward County ● Ensuring economic development without gentrification ● Increasing job creation with livable wages in Black communities To become a certified County business, please visit www.broward.org/econdev. n

We Have Entered A New Era for Black Prosperity a people binding together in a fight for physical, mental, emotional, spiritual, and economic freedoms in the post slavery era. Communities were built, business enterprises were created, land and real estate were acquired, and black people began to survive and thrive despite the many injustices, hardships, and socioeconomic challenges. However, these accomplishments were met with hate, fear, violence, and destruction. The wealth that was being created was destroyed through fires, raids, and the violent killings of families. The civil rights era presented its own set of challenges. Yet, we pressed on. The Great 2008 Recession created a tremendous setback in the loss of wealth for black families. Home values crashed and black customers were steered to sub-prime loans and consequently faced a higher foreclosure rate than white borrowers. In addition, many jobs were lost, businesses closed, and wages diminished. Yet, we pressed on. We have a story of resilience. Historically, we have faced slavery’s

institutionalized theft, job, housing and school discrimination, disenfranchisement, surcharges on opportunities including high rents, price gouging, redlining, racist lending policies, low quality schools, and mass incarcerations. As we have entered this new decade, I am optimistic as I see more businesses being launched, especially among black women, families are purchasing homes again, and we are taking better control of our finances. However, more advocacy is needed to end discrimination and systematic barriers to wealth creation. We must elect people who understand and create opportunities for economic equity. We must focus on homeownership, business ownership, real estate investments, and more. Lastly, we can no longer just be the largest consumer of goods and services, but must once again become the greatest innovators, creators, and inventors as we have historically been. On April 23-24, The Mosaic Group, in partnership with the Urban League of Broward County, will host The National

Black Economic Conference, an annual initiative to connect, engage, and inform black business owners and professionals about opportunities, resources, and programs that will increase the number and scale of black-owned businesses in the United States and globally. The forum aims to create dialogue and solutions for creating multigenerational wealth and building sustainable communities. The three-day conference will feature a kickoff reception, “Experience Blk: Booze, Bites, Beats,” a day-long forum with panel discussions, a keynote luncheon, breakout workshops, and an all-day Buy Black Expo. The NBEC’s goal is to empower community members to take necessary steps to grow and develop their enterprise, create wealth for their families, support black businesses, and foster growth and sustainability, while reducing unemployment and bridging the wealth gap. Learn more at www. nationalblackeconomicconference.com or call (561) 651-9565. n


MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2020

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE SUN SENTINEL

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MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2020

BROWARD BLACK CHAMBER

A New Decade Means Renewed Activism

Shaheewa Jarrett Gelin, Esq.

BY SHAHEEWA JARRETT, ESQ.

A new decade creates the perfect time to reflect on our personal and professional life. Since we begin each year honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Black History Month, we should also critique our community activism. King would’ve turned 91 this year.

We must not forget his commitment to economic justice for the millions of black people who were legally prevented from living out their full economic potential. In the “Other America,” a speech he gave on April 14, 1967, King discussed economic deprivation. He said, “One America is beautiful for situation… millions of young people grow up in the sunlight of opportunity. But tragically and unfortunately, there is another America. This other America has a daily ugliness about it that constantly transforms the ebulliency of hope into the fatigue of despair… They find themselves perishing on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity.” While much has improved through the decades because of the sacrifice of lives and civil disobedience, we still have unequal pay for black men and women in this country, a racial wealth gap, and racial disparities in government and private sector contracting. Things

aren’t equal and there is still a need for King’s dream in 2020. We have to engage the system. 1) Visit your elected officials and develop relationships. Ask them about their commitment to equity and utilizing diverse vendors. Tell them about your experiences as a small, black business owner to help them understand the unique needs and issues you face. 2) Ask every candidate how they have demonstrated their commitment to equity and fairness through ACTION in the past and their plans for the future. Share that information and, of course, vote! 3) Get involved. Serve on a board in your local city. Learn how local government works. Get to know staff. Communicate how they can improve certain policies and procedures to be business-friendly and more inclusive. Inquire about small business programs and diversity of their annual spending. Ask your friends in the private sector as well. King spoke about the “silence of

friends” and its deafening effects. Speak up for fairness and equity. Mentor and partner with our companies. Introduce our members to new opportunities and urge your colleague to be equitable and fair in their utilization of black businesses. It is time for us all to stand up for an America and a Broward that will include every community in current and future prosperity. In the March 25, 1965 speech “Our God is Marching On,” King reminded us about how justice works. He said, ”How long? Not long, because no lie can live forever. How long? Not long, you shall reap what you sow… How long? Not long, because the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.” This Chamber will lean in to help bend that arc. We will celebrate Black History Month with action 365! Shaheewa Jarrett, Esq. is president of the Broward County Black Chamber. n

MEDIATION/ARBITRATION

Consider Applying Three Rarely Used Mediation Techniques that Work

BY STANLEY ZAMOR

As I gestured for everyone to take their seats, I began the mediation by saying, “Thank you for allowing me to be your mediator. In full disclosure, I have mediated with both attorneys (or their firms) in the past. So, they are familiar with my mediator’s orientation/opening statement. The orientation statement is mandatory… it sets the tone and explains the mediation

process. But most importantly, it is for you, the decision-makers, to learn how beneficial this process can be, should you choose it to be… It is the decisionmakers who are empowered and control if you choose to reach a resolution or not….” As I looked at both partyclients, I seemed to have grabbed their attention. The introduction contains excerpt of statements strategically used to impact the party-clients’ mediation awareness and set expectations. The following are three rarely used techniques that work after a complete orientation/opening statement: 1. Stay in joint session, for as long as possible – In various industries, the playing field is small. Controversy and discourse can damage reputations and the future business of both sides. So, an important regret I hear from the litigants (not their lawyers) is how they wish to regain a once profitable business relationship. With a mediator trained in conflict resolution skills, the mediation process often becomes

an opportunity to model better communication styles while in a joint session. Although there are instances where immediately separating the parties is wise, far too many mediators separate parties too fast as a control method. They are wrong, and lose a valuable opportunity while they lengthen the negotiation process and become a number-runner in between private rooms without reducing the barriers of communication. 2. Make your opponent smarter, SMILE at them. There is undeniable neuroscience evidence that people are smarter and make better decisions when they are in a better mood. Simply put, stare downs and scowls do not exhibit strength or intimidate anyone. Keeping the mood encouraging and constructive will yield more respectful dialogue and better communication efforts. 3. Stay Away from the “F” Bomb! The word “fair” is an overused idea that is simply not real in negotiations. Everyone is “being fair” when they negotiate for what

they want, right? So “fair” is relative to a perspective and context of how a position justifies someone’s wants and needs. Saying “you are being fair” implicitly forces your opponent to be defensive and challenge your idea of fair. Stay away from the term fair if you want to have better negotiations. Stanley Zamor is a Florida Supreme Court certified circuit/family/county mediator and primary trainer and qualified arbitrator. Zamor serves on several federal and state mediation/ arbitration rosters and mediates with the ATD (Agree2Disagree) Mediation & Arbitration, PA throughout Florida. As an ADR consultant, he regularly lectures about a variety of topics from ethics, cross-cultural issues, diversity, bullying, and family/business relationships. szamor@effectivemediationconsultants.com www.effectivemediationconsultants.com www.LinkedIn.com/in/stanleyzamoradr (954) 261-8600 n


Ailey II’s Kyle H. Martin. Photo by Nir Arieli.

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MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2020

W. George Allen’s Selfless Legacy Blazes Trails for Others

ingrained in history.” Eugene Pettis, the former president of the Florida Bar, told the Allen family When you have a trailblazer for that W. George Allen was “a true a father, it’s hard not to speak about legal giant, who him with pride had the courage in your voice. and conviction That’s exactly how to confront evil, Jonathan Allen bigotry and speaks about his injustice wherever father, the late W. they existed. George Allen. Because of “He’s always George’s unselfish been the one who service to society, would pave a he left us a better path for others to world.” follow,” Allen said He’s been of his father who honored at the died on November University of 7 at age 83. Florida, with the “He always school’s Black had the ability to Law Students look forward to say Association naming how can I impact their chapter after others through my him. service and my Jonathan Allen with father George Allen attending the OIC George Allen Pavillion established at Dr. Von D. Mizell-Eula Johnson State Park “So many sacrifice.” Annual Gala. people have just W. George said great things Allen was the first Black about him and recognized man to graduate from the his work and recognized University of Florida Law his contribution to School during a period of the state of Florida, to bigotry and blatant racism. the county as a legal He was admitted to Harvard trailblazer, and I am University and the University forever grateful for those of California at Berkeley, recognitions,” Jonathan but he opted to attend the Allen said. University of Florida instead. A scholarship fund He told the Florida is being established Trend in a 2013 interview he in his name, and will “felt that somebody had to provide opportunities to integrate the University of two African-American Florida. The racists told me high school graduates I didn’t belong there and I’d in Broward County, and never graduate.” George Allen addresses an audience at the 50th anniversary of the Seminole County, from But he would defy the Fort Lauderdale Wade-In Demonstrations. which W. George Allen odds and become the first graduated. W. George Black man to graduate from Allen will be remembered for his Numerous lives have been touched UF’s law school in 1962. selfless legacy that paved the way for by the work of W. George Allen. Jonathan Allen and George Allen attending the recognition of “For as long as I can the Broward Bar Association. many African Americans. Florida Congressman Alcee Hastings remember, he’s been that “He not only paved a path for released a statement, saying, “George selfless and he’s been a those who look like him,” Jonathan leaves behind a principled legacy of trailblazer,” Jonathan Allen said. Allen said, “he had a mindset to look service to our country, the Civil Rights Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc. W. George Allen’s beginnings Movement, and South Florida. I know Jonathan Allen says his father’s forward, and that is what he did.” originated from Sanford in 1936. He n his loss will be felt in Broward County example became a motivator for him.“I received his undergraduate degree from for years to come and his contributions think it was very motivational for me Florida A&M University in 1958, then BY JANIAH ADAMS

served in the army before attending law school. He served in numerous organizations, including the NAACP, the Florida Bar Association, and Alpha

because he was always a firm believer that hard work beats talent. So it allowed me to at least remain humble and hungry and hard working,” he said.


MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2020

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE SUN SENTINEL

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CAREER & LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

Three Reasons Why You Haven’t Been Promoted at Work Here are just a few areas I’ve found most impactful:

BY MARY V. DAVIDS

As a career coach, I get tons of requests from professionals looking to get to the next level within their careers. While many of these professionals are very good at what they do, they are often overlooked for promotions for reasons that rarely have anything to do with their actual work product.

1. Not Being Approachable. Your facial expressions and engagement with staff can greatly impact your influence and the way colleagues feel about your ability to lead. When I work with corporate clients having challenges with employee engagement, one of the most common things I see is employees wearing earphones while they work. While it is understandable that music or podcasts may help you to focus or relax more at work, it doesn’t increase your chances of engaging with others and building valuable relationships. Wearing earphones is signaling to those around you that you don’t want to be bothered. Approaching you will feel like an interruption and a deterrent to those who may already be intimidated to approach you. Being mindful of non-verbal cues like these will help you build authentic relationships with

your colleagues.

2. Doing the Minimum. Doing what’s required is expected, but it is not something that can be viewed as remarkable or outstanding. What you do beyond your required role is what will get you noticed. Problem solving often requires us to go beyond our safe zone and access resources and information that others were unable to find. So instead of thinking, “I don’t get paid enough for doing this extra work,” try to think about what you’d like your employees to do if you were the owner of the business. Everything you do at work impacts your work environment and your specific role. Become the person that makes the job easier, and one who makes their workplace better. 3. Not speaking up. You may have tons of solutions and great ideas, but no one will ever know if you continue to sit in that dreadful meeting without

sharing them. Just because you may not have a leadership title doesn’t mean you don’t have the right to say what you know. The only way people recognize your value is when you open your mouth and share your thoughts. The best environment to show others your ability to lead is when you’re in a room with your co-workers and management. The environment you’re in doesn’t change what you know, it just changes the audience you share it with. Don’t bother getting caught up in whether people agree or not. That is a distraction. What matters is that you contribute to the conversation, add your perspective, and let your voice be heard.

Mary V. Davids is an executive career and leadership development coach and owner of D&M Consulting Services, LLC. For more career tips and advice visit www.slaytheworkplace.comor follow @MVDavids on Instagram and Twitter. n

SOCIAL MEDIA

Work to Scale Your Small Business in 2020 Scaling vs. Growing

These two terms are often used interchangeably, but there is one major difference. Growth is simply an increase in revenue. Scaling implies the growth business revenue is happening without significantly needing to increase operating budget. As you consider the future of your small business, be focused more on scale, not necessarily growth. There are four strategies that will help you grow your business to new heights in 2020. Dr. Tracy Timberlake, award-winning business coach

BY DR. TRACY TIMBERLAKE

The 2019 “Small Business Trends” reports that black business growth is at an all-time high, capping in at a 400 percent growth. Growth is always great news, but it does not exempt them from facing small business issues. Blackowned businesses are still plagued with all the things SBEs tend to struggle with in the early stages, one of which is the ability to scale.

Play the Long Game

This is going to require the proverbial “go big, or go home” mentality. Maintaining a status quo in business should never be the goal, no matter how good the books look. The economy shifts quickly. Emerging technologies and resources can flip your industry on its head in a microsecond. If you want to grow and scale, part of your work is to stay ahead of the curve. Lets not forget the Blockbuster fiasco. Not paying attention to what’s happening in your industry can leave

you left behind and obsolete. Notice the trends and deploy internal strategies that keep you relevant.

Focus on Personal Branding

This is a critical strategy that often goes neglected in today’s marketplace. We are no longer a strictly B2B/ B2C economy. Now, it’s all about the P2P (people-to-people). Your target customers want to get to know the leader behind the brand. The reputation of the company’s leadership can significantly contribute to the business’ bottom line. Staying in touch with your consumers through social media platforms is an easy way to do this and is 100 percent free. This keeps your expenses low, but visibility high.

Network and Collaborate

There is so much truth to the saying “it’s who you know,” especially in today’s business environment. Be excellent at what you do. Deliver the best product to your audience. Show up and be seen, but your network matters a great deal. These connections can be a

gateway to your next contract. Expansion requires resources. You have the option of choosing time or money. Looking under the hood of some of the small businesses that seemed to have skyrocketed overnight (think Uber and the like), very few of them are selffunded. You’re going to need capital to hire more, build more, make more. You have several options, from small business loans, angel investors, access to government contracts or even business grants. Don’t be afraid to explore them. There is a lot of money out there for the taking. As minority-owned business, you have more available to you than you think. Take action on these steps in 2020 and use them to scale your business to new horizons. Dr. Tracy Timberlake www.tracytimberlake.com/freeresources Instagram.com/tracytimberlake Facebook.com/drtracytimberlake n


MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2020

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE SUN SENTINEL

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COVER STORY

West Palm Beach ‘Strong’ Mayor Not Afraid To Make History BY MICHELLE SOLOMON

While campaigning for mayor of West Palm Beach, Keith A. James said he didn’t talk about race, but after making history as the first AfricanAmerican “strong” mayor, he said that question has been posed frequently since he took office. He tells the story of the overwhelming pride he felt when Los Angeles elected Thomas J. Bradley as its first black mayor in 1973, Maynard Jackson in Atlanta in the same year, and, 10 years later when Chicago voted in Harold Washington as its first African-American mayor. Originally from Wichita, Kansas, James said: “Even though I didn’t live in those cities, it was a source of pride that those cities had black mayors. It added a little pep to my step as I went about my duties as a student and into my professional life. I hope that a young boy or girl that looks like me in this city can glean some pride from my role. And if it does that, then I’m very pleased.” James was sworn in on April 4, 2019. He has already made some tough decisions as the first AfricanAmerican “strong” mayor since the city rewrote its charter in 1991 to give mayors the power to oversee the government. He explained the rationale for implementing the “strong” mayor form of government emerged when West Palm Beach citizens wanted an elected official who could make executive decisions and be accountable to them. Before the change, a city manager hired by the city commission was in charge. The mayor’s role was more ceremonial. “In essence, it means I am chief executive officer of an enterprise that has 1,600 employees, combined budgets of half a billion dollars, overseeing a city of 115,000 people, so it is a big deal. The buck stops with me on significant executive decisions.” James recognizes with personal

Keith James

Citing 52 murders in 2017-2018, pride the historical significance of his James said, “Even one murder is one position as mayor, but adds that he too many. Most of the victims were can’t rest on his laurels. young men who look like me and that “I can’t stop there,” James said candidly. “I have to continue to do the work that the voters elected me to do. I’m sure it “I wasn’t one of those kids in law comes with an increased school who said, ‘I’m going to use amount of scrutiny in certain circles if I can my law degree to vault me into the do this job, so I am very political arena.” sensitive to that.” James doesn’t shy away from the tough stuff. Exactly a month was disconcerting. One of the first after his swearing in, the new mayor announced a restructuring of the West things I did after getting elected was replace the police chief.” Palm Beach police department in an The Harvard law school graduate effort to fight violent crime. has lived in West Palm Beach since “One of the major concerns I 1987, when he was transferred by had when I was campaigning, and it a law firm in Philadelphia. “They continues to be, is public safety.”

sent me here and I’ve been here ever since.” He said while he always knew he wanted to be a lawyer, politics was never at the top of mind. “I wasn’t one of those kids in law school who said, ‘I’m going to use my law degree to vault me into the political arena.” It was former mayor Lois Frankel, who James considers his mentor, that got him started in politics when she approached him to run for city council. “I do enjoy the governing aspect immensely,” he said. On James’s watch as mayor, he has plans for West Palm Beach to not only prosper but also emerge as an urban metropolis. “We have always been the stepchild of Palm Beach. Soon, we will be a true sister city,” he affirmed. n


MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2020

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NFL PLAY FOOTBALL FAMILY FESTIVAL

The NFL will host a Play Football Family Festival to celebrate coaches, players, and the football community that bring passion, fun and excitement to the sport.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2020 10AM – 1PM NORTH MIAMI ATHLETIC STADIUM 2555 NE 151 STREET NORTH MIAMI, FL 33160 • NFL PLAYER AUTOGRAPHS • FOOTBALL CLINICS • EQUIPMENT FITTING

www.playfootball.com

• SPECIAL GUEST SPEAKERS • USAF TACKLE STATION • YOUTH LEAGUE SIGN-UP

#PlayFootball

• PARENTS FORUM • DJ & GIVEAWAYS • FOOD TRUCKS & FUN!

RSVP: https://nflplayfootball.eventbrite.com

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MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2020

PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP

NFL Executive Works to Bring Super Bowl Experiences to Local Residents

residents of the host city as well. “In many cases, the Super Bowl or other large events will dominate a downtown and all the branding, and it may or may not positively affect people in the community unless you patronize some of the things going on downtown, said Roman Oben,” NFL vice president of Youth & High School Football Strategy. Starting with Super Bowl LI in Houston, the NFL began celebrating youth Roman Oben, NFL vice president of Youth & High School and high school football Football Strategy. Photo credit: National Football League participants, coaches, programs and partners the BY KALLAN LOUIS week of the game. The economic impact a city earns This season, the 2020 Play Football from hosting a Super Bowl is significant. Family Festival takes place February The Atlanta Metro Chamber estimated a 1, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the North nearly $400 million impact on the region Miami Athletic Stadium. The free event last year from hosting the big game. will feature appearances from NFL This year, Miami will host the players, football clinics, a parents’ forum signature event for the 11th time, more and breakout panel sessions, food, music, than any other city. The NFL knows local giveaways and more. businesses immediately benefit from “It really creates a fun atmosphere for its presence, but the league is working families that may not want to drive down to bring Super Bowl experiences to

to South Beach or downtown and deal with the traffic,” Oben said. “The event is growing substantially every year.” Oben said his team uses the NFL calendar and league activations to determine when to roll out programming. For example, the NFL Pro Bowl takes place in Orlando this year, and Oben says the event is youth focused and will celebrate all levels of the game. His team will also have some programming around the NFL Combine and Draft. Before playing 12 seasons in the NFL and winning Super Bowl XXXVII as a member of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Oben was born in Cameroon, Africa He migrated to Washington D.C. as a child. He reflected on one of his favorite NFL memories as a youth. “The first Super Bowl I watched was Super Bowl XVII, when the Washington Redskins played the Miami Dolphins,” he recalled. “It made me fall in love with the game. Imagine first starting to watch football and your team wins the championship.” Oben didn’t play organized football until high school. He later played for the University of Louisville where he earned

a bachelor’s in economics before he was drafted by the New York Giants in 1996. While playing professionally, he earned a master’s in public health from Fairleigh Dickinson University. He went on to intern for Congressional leaders, work as a sports broadcast analyst, and joined the NFL league offices in 2015. He is involved in various charitable work through the Roman Oben Foundation. Oben has served as a spokesperson for Big Brothers Big Sisters and was named 2007 Big Brothers Big Sisters San Diego Man of the Year. As a youth sports advocate and philanthropist, Oben uses that passion when speaking with parents about the importance of protecting the future of football. He says NFL youth programming helps to push the narrative. “The game equips young people for success in the classroom by inspiring character, leadership, resilience and teamwork. I can never give back what football has done for me and my family. It’s a game I love dearly and I want future generations to feel the same way.”

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MIRAMAR REPORT

City of Miramar Announces Exciting Black History Month Celebrations The City of Miramar invites the community to join us for a month-long celebration of Black History Month activities. The city has various family-friendly events planned for residents to gather, learn and reflect on the accomplishments, history, culture and contributions of black Americans in Miramar and throughout our nation’s history. Vice Mayor Alexandra P. Davis said, “We are thrilled to be celebrating Black History Month with our Miramar residents. This gives us a chance to recognize the achievements of African Americans in our community.” Black History Month also coincides with Reggae Month, which the city will celebrate for the first time in collaboration with the Honorable Olivia Grange, Jamaica’s Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport. “The events that the city has planned for the month of February will also celebrate the history of Reggae music and the impact it has had on a global level,” Davis said. “The month of February will feature exciting events for our community members of all ages.” Celebrate with the City of Miramar at one (or all) of our events:

Art & Soul: The Ernie Barnes Exhibition This exhibit will feature 11 iconic works of art from NFL Legend, Ernie Barnes. Monday-Thursday, January 9 through February 29t| 9 p.m.-5 p.m. Free Exhibit UniverSoul Circus Thursday, February 6-Sunday, February 23 Miramar Regional Park 16801 Miramar Parkway, Miramar, Fla. 33027 Tickets: $21 and up Ticketmaster.com Babyface Live MCC Presents: Kenny “Babyface” Edmonds Friday, February 7 | 8 p.m. Miramar Cultural Center 2400 Civic Center Place, Miramar, Fla. 33025 Tickets: $65, $75, $100 Miramarculturalcenter.org Reggae Icon Awards Black History Meets Reggae Presented by Vice Mayor Davis; under the patronage of Honorable Olivia ‘Babsy’ Grange, MP, CD, Jamaica’s Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport; endorsed by Oliver Mair, Jamaican Consul

General of Miami Honoring International Reggae Artist Freddie McGregor Saturday, February 8 | 6:30 p.m.–11 p.m. Free Event Reggae Movie Night Previewing: Movements of Jah Peopledocumentary trailer by GCUED Main Feature: YARDIE-2018 crime drama film directed by Idris Elba Tuesday, February 18 | 7 p.m. Miramar Cultural Center 2400 Civic Center Place, Miramar, Fla. 33025 Free Event Africa Umoja: Spirit of Togetherness Tuesday, February 25-Sunday, March 8 Miramar Cultural Center 2400 Civic Center Place, Miramar, Fla. 33025 Tickets: $50, $75, $100 Miramarculturalcenter.org Afro Carib Festival Hosted by Vice Mayor Alexandra P. Davis Featuring Stonebwoy, Amara La Negra, Capleton and more! Saturday, February 29 | 6 p.m.–11 p.m. The Amphitheater at Miramar Regional Park |

16801 Miramar Parkway, Miramar, Fla. 33027 Free event, $10 Parking fee to benefit United Way’s Hurricane Dorian Fund & Food for the Poor Miramar Branch Library Programs 2050 Civic Center Place, Miramar, FL 33025 Notable Women Trivia Thursday, February 6 | 4 p.m.-5 p.m. Let’s Talk Africa Saturday, February 8 | 4 p.m.-5:30 p.m. Fact and Trivia Black History Thursday, February 13 | 4 p.m.-5 p.m. JJ Book Club- “A Lesson Before Dying” Saturday, February 15 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. African Dance Performance and Story-telling Saturday, February 22 | 2:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m. For more information about any of these events, please call the Office of Marketing and Communications at (954) 602-3254 or visit MiramarFL.gov. n


MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2020

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Being Strong Starts with Having a Healthy Heart

IT’S BLACK HISTORY MONTH AND THERE’S NO BETTER TIME TO TAKE A CLOSER LOOK AT YOUR HEART’S HEALTH Did you know that according to the American Heart Association, African Americans are more than three times as likely to die from heart disease? African Americans have higher rates of diabetes and high blood pressure, which are the most common conditions that increase the risk of heart disease. The good news is there are simple lifestyle changes you can make to reduce your heart disease risk: 1

Get moving: Start by exercising 30 minutes a day

4

Monitor cholesterol: Choose foods low in saturated fat

2

Eat heart healthy: Consume more fish, fruits and beans

5

3

Hold on the salt shaker: Limit consumption of sodium

Know your numbers: Regularly check your blood pressure and cholesterol levels

To attend a free heart lecture or health screening, visit BrowardHealth.org. Broward Health Coral Springs • Broward Health Imperial Point • Broward Health Medical Center • Broward Health North Follow us:


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MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2020

PALM BEACH URBAN LEAGUE

‘Black People Do Not Vote’ is a Myth

BY SOULAN JOHNSON

We have to challenge the stereotypes and assumptions we make about each other and recognize that real barriers to voting continue to persist but are not insurmountable. During his 2016 keynote address at the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, President Barack Obama said, “Even if all restrictions on voting

were eliminated, African Americans would still have one of the lowest voting rates. That’s not good. That is on us.’” Donald Trump insinuated that black voters stayed home during the election. “They didn’t come out to vote for Hillary. They didn’t come out… so thank you to the African American community.” The same message reverberated through political commentary and activism. Brando Starkey of The Undefeated wrote that, “Black people who didn’t vote let us down,” in the 2016 election. Two years later, the Detroit News’ Bankole Thompson wrote, “It is not enough to raise your fist in a political frenzy as a symbol of Black power and solidarity if you are failing to exercise the power of the ballot and not showing up at the polls.” The myth that “black people don’t vote” is not based on data. Though African Americans are only 13 percent of the U.S. population, black voters are among the most stable voting block in

politics, despite the concerted efforts to stop them. The misconception is rooted in an exaggerated narrative derived from Reconstruction-era stereotypes about work ethic, opportunity and culpability. Similar to how black people were the economic scapegoat for the downfall of southern states once slavery was outlawed, they also became the political scapegoat for the losses of the Republican Party in the late 1800s,according to The Guardian News. In 1870, Congress passed the Fifteenth Amendment that prohibits denying the right to vote based on race, color, or previous condition of servitude. Yet, states found ways to circumvent the Constitution and prevent blacks from voting. Poll taxes, literacy tests, fraud and intimidation all turned African Americans away from the polls. Despite the apparent preference for voting Democrat, black voters are not a monolith. And generally, women vote at higher rates than men across race.

While it is true that black voter turnout decreased from 2012 to 2016, it does not mean that black people are to blame for the Democratic loss of the 2016 election. Twelve percent of whites who voted for Obama in 2012 voted for Trump in 2016. Considering Hillary Clinton lost by less than 11,000 votes in Michigan and 44,000 votes in Pennsylvania, these changes made a difference too. If we really want to create racial equity in the political process, The Voting Rights Act will be fully restored and expanded, the Shelby v Holder decision will be revisited to prevent gerrymandering, millions of returning citizens will have their voting rights restored, and election day will become a federal day of service to remove barriers related to employment. Soulan Johnson is vice president of Development and Marketing for the Urban League of Palm Beach County Inc. n

MONEY MATTERS

Preparing Your Business for Financing is Necessary for Growth

BY JOANN MILORD

Whether you are starting a business, expanding, or have been awarded a new contract, financing is necessary for growth at any stage of a business. While you may not need funding today, circumstances can change rapidly. Here are a few things to keep in mind to be prepared for financing your business. 1. Check your Credit: What is your

credit score? Are there any inaccuracies or recent late payments? Are you maxed out on your credit cards? What steps can you take to improve your credit score before applying for a loan? A strong credit score shows financial responsibility and is a lower risk to lenders.

steps to achieve them.

2. Record Keeping: Have you been maintaining proper accounting and administrative records? Do you routinely review your bank account statements and monthly expense budget? Are your business licenses up to date? Accurate financial statements verify the value and growth potential of a business.

5. Financing Costs: What costs are related to the financing? What are the closing costs? Is there a prepayment penalty fee? What is a reasonable interest rate? Make sure you know all the costs associated with the financing to accurately compare options. Obtaining financing can be an involved process. If you do not prepare in advance, your business could find itself suddenly needing to secure funds with the only option available being a high-interest, short-term lender. Even if traditional bank financing is not available to you, that does not mean there are no viable options, such as the Miami Bayside Foundation.

3. Business Plan: Do you have a clear strategic plan to grow your business? Based on trends in your industry what does growth for your business look like? Is it adding an additional product or service? Is it increasing marketing or adding staff? It is important to outline your goals for the business and the action

4. Research Funding Options: Is a line of credit for short-term operational expenses or a term loan for equipment financing best for you and your business? Make sure to consider all available financing options.

MBF is a nonprofit organization with a mission to further economic development in Miami. MBF accomplishes this through loans and technical assistance to minority- and women-owned small businesses and through educational scholarships and grants. In 2018, MBF partnered with the State of Florida’s Department of Economic Opportunity to become the administrator of the Black Business Loan Program for Miami-Dade County. Since 2011, and with amounts ranging from $2,500 to $150,000, MBF has awarded more than 100 low-interest loans totaling more than $5.3 million, helping create more than 450 jobs in Miami. Joann Milord is manager of the Black Business Loan Program at the Miami Bayside Foundation. She can be reached at joann@mbf.miamior 786-703-5768. For more information, visit www. miamibaysidefoundation.org. n


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MEDIA GROUP LLC LIFESTYLE

LU X U RY

E N T E RTA I N M E N T

“The Home of Black Intellectual Capital and Providers of News and Information to South Florida’s Black Affluencers and Influencers!”

PUBLISHERS OF LEGACY MIAMI, LEGACY SOUTH FLORIDA AND MIA MAGAZINES

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SUCCESS PROFILES

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

ABOUT TOWN

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MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2020

BUSINESS REPORT

Black-owned Businesses Making History in South Florida

BY BEATRICE LOUISSAINT

Small businesses, particularly minorityowned businesses, are fueling South Florida’s economy. As we celebrate Black History Month, let’s applaud the successes of these black-owned businesses making history, and support blackowned companies by doing business and partnering with them. 2Lyons Aerospace is a certified distributor of aviation parts domestically and internationally with customers in

South America, Indonesia, Thailand, Kenya, South Africa, Nigeria and other countries. Firm President Mike Cantave, a commercial pilot for a major airline, started the company in 2014. Cantave has more than 25 years of experience in the aviation industry, including managing the FedEx location in Fort Lauderdale. 2Lyons Aerospace ensures that customers receive the highest-quality aviation spare parts possible by utilizing only FAA certified repair stations that meet the most stringent quality standards and ISO/ASA certification requirements. www.2lyonsaero.com DeEtta Jones and Associates is a leading management consulting and training company that has been in business for more than 15 years. The firm specializes in equity, diversity and inclusion, leadership development, and individual and organizational transformation. The company’s founder and principal, DeEtta Jones has 25 years of experience guiding people and organizations through the process of fundamental change. Jones’ years of experience as a management consultant and trainer have turned her into one of the

most sought-after speakers and consultants in her field. Clients include higher education institutions, nonprofits, financial services firms, advertising companies and healthcare organizations. www. deettajones.com Dr. Angelo P. Thrower is a medical doctor specializing in ethnic skin and hair conditions. He opened his private practice more than 25 years ago. Thrower formulated the Dr. Thrower Skin Type Specific care products and authored three textbooks covering skin and hair care for ethnic skin. Since 1992, he has also served as one of the team physicians for the NBA’s Miami Heat. Thrower is a graduate of the University of Miami School of Medicine and George Washington University Medical Center in Washington, D.C. His over-the-counter products are sold in his practice, in beauty supply stores and online. Thrower also created the Thro-Grower Rx Hair Regrowth products, which are scalp-friendly for all hair types. www.drthrowerskincare.com Imaginart Media Productions, a marketing and production company, offers services in Caribbean communities throughout the United States, Canada and

the Caribbean Islands. The company is a one-stop shop for audio/video production services, including TV and radio commercials. Additionally, the firm helps its clients develop and expand their media presence by developing and executing promotional campaigns tailored to targeted customers through local or national print, online, television and radio outlets. Imaginart president, Elizabeth Guerin strives for the company to consistently exceed client expectations, using unparalleled creativity to help brands reach their target markets. www.imaginartmedia. com/about-us To meet these and many other minority entrepreneurs, attend the Florida State Minority Supplier Development Council’s 35thAnnual Business Expo, April 16-17 at The Charles F. Dodge City Center in Pembroke Pines (greater Fort Lauderdale). Learn more about the Business Expo at www.fsmsdc.org, or call (305) 762-6151. Beatrice Louissaint is president and CEO of the Florida State Minority Supplier Development Council. n

BROWARD HEALTH

Physician-Patient Relationship Key to Reducing Heart Disease Among African Americans

BY JENNIFER SMITH

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S. and across the world. Recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, United States Census Bureau, and Florida Department of Health indicates that rates are event higher in South Florida. It’s estimated that 56 percent of African-Americans in Miami-Dade County, and 57.3 percent of African Americans in Broward County, suffer from heart disease, rates significantly

higher than those found in Caucasians. Violeta McCormack, M.D., medical director of interventional cardiology, Broward Health Medical Center; Aldo Calvo, D.O., medical director of ambulatory care, Broward Health Community Health Services; and Arnoux Blanchard, M.D., director of the cardiology fellowship program, Broward Health Medical Center, gave their reasoning as to why we are seeing these discrepancies. “When we look at higher death rates for minorities living within counties with more of their ethnic peers, we have to consider that those counties and areas also have a higher poverty rate, which impacts access to proper treatment,” said Calvo, a primary care physician. Calvo explained, for example, from a cultural perspective, Hispanic diets can have a higher concentration of complex carbohydrates that are associated with a higher risk for diabetes, which is a risk factor for developing heart disease.”

Calvo, Blanchard, and McCormack, who are all part of the Broward Health Physician Group, said they also feel socioeconomic and environmental issues can be key in recognizing risk factors in minorities and creating a map to manage existing health disparities. “In the black community, one of the reasons the outcomes are so bad is because many patients don’t take their medicine,” said Blanchard, a cardiologist. “Yes, the medicine is expensive, but we can work it out. They often don’t understand why a doctor is giving them 10 medications. There’s an issue of mistrust. They are suspicious. The doctor-patient relationship is critical.” “In these populations, their first encounter with a doctor is often in the ER with a heart attack,” McCormack said. “We save their lives, but it’s sad that because of their circumstances the attack wasn’t prevented or the onset delayed.” “I’ve seen people who have been unknowingly walking around with heart

disease for decades,” added Blanchard. “This sheds light on the importance of timely checkups and promoting the physician-patient relationship.” Calvo, McCormack, and Blanchard also agreed that education is critical to create necessary lifestyle changes and overcome patient mistrust. “The patient-physician relationship is key,” said Blanchard. “Physicians need to sit down with a patient with socioeconomic distress and be sensitive to their cultural nuances.” Calvo added, “To be more effective, you have to understand the cultural norms that make Broward, Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties this beautiful melting pot. The most important person is the patient. For an hour of their time, we can go over nutrition and the side effects of medication. We’d rather know their complications now so we can prevent a heart attack later. We are just trying to get them healthy, happy and with access to what they need.” n


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e Family! Æ&#x;r En e th r fo nd ke ee W g in az Am e On ts, en Ev e Thre FOODIE MOVIE NIGHT IN THE PARK

FOODIE MOVIE NIGHT IN THE PARK

HALLANDALE BEACH FOOD & GROOVE: A WINE, FOOD AND ART EXPERIENCE

Friday, February 21 7 - 10 PM

Saturday, February 22 1 - 4 PM

Saturday, February 22 7 - 10 PM

Peter Bluesten Park 501 SE 1st Avenue Hallandale Beach

Gulfstream Pegasus Park 901 Federal Highway Hallandale Beach

Peter Bluesten Park 501 SE 1st Avenue Hallandale Beach

hosted by Jacques Torres featuring a Special Screening of The Hundred-Foot Journey

es i d o o F ges a l l a of e! m o c l we

hosted by Valerie Bertinelli featuring a Special Screening of Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs

$25* ADULT PER EVENT | $10* CHILD PER EVENT *All Food And Drink Included. Does not include tax and service fees.

Learn more and purchase tickets at https://sobewff.org or call (954) 457-2228


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MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2020

ABOUT TOWN The King’s Table presented “A Meal Fit for a King” featuring keynote speaker Pastor Jamal Bryant, Jan. 16, 2020, Florida Memorial University, Miami Gardens. 1

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1. Event participant, Dr. Jaffus

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Hardrick, Florida Memorial University president; Dr. Adrienne Cooper, FMU provost Delrish Moss Santonio “Blaze” Cooper Pastor Jamal Bryant Terry Wright, Eric Knowles, Rep. Kionne McGee, Santonio “Blaze” Cooper, Pastor Jamal Bryant, Larry Handfield Pastor Jamal Bryant leads participants in prayer

- Photos by AJ Shorter

Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce hosted 14th Annual Holiday Gala, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, Hilton Miami Downtown.

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1. G. Eric Knowles, president & CEO, Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce; H.T. Smith, Al Dotson Jr.; Alvin West, Gala committee chairman 2. G. Eric Knowles, State Representative Kionne McGhee, Alvin West 3. G. Eric Knowles; Jeff Lozama, Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce Board vice-chairman; Gepsie Metellus, Alvin West. 4. G. Eric Knowles, Alvin West, Kenasha Paul, CEO of the Black Professionals Network; Kevin Smith, chairman of Young Professional Network. Photo Credit: Ryan Nelson, Hip Rock Star Media 5. Joy Vickers, Alvin West, Beverly James, G. Eric Knowles, Timothy Parker during the reception. 6. NBC 6 Anchor Jawan Strader and his wife Yolanda Strader. Photo Credit: TK 7. Quincy Cohen, Sr., State Rep. Kionne McGhee, Bill Diggs, Rick Beasley, Henry Crespo, Sr. 8. The Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce presented a $5,000 check to Florida Memorial University for students effected by Hurricane Dorian. Cory Witherspoon, FMU vice president of University Advancement; Shelia Cohen, FMU director of Alumni Affairs. Eric Knowles


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MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2020

LEGACY BRIEFS LOCAL 10 NAMES ALEX FINNIE WEEKEND EVENING CO-ANCHOR

WPLG, Miami/ Fort Lauderdale’s ABC affiliate, has promoted Alex Finnie to co-anchor of the station’s weekend evening newscasts. Finnie joins Andrew Perez on the anchor desk for the Saturday and Sunday 5 p.m., Finnie 6 p.m., and 11 p.m. newscasts. Finnie, who grew up in Miami Shores, joined the station in May 2018. She’s a graduate of St. John’s University in New York. CHANEL ROWE JOINS SEC MIAMI

MCGARRELL LEADS NAHSE FLORIDA

Rowe

Natoia Adella McGarrell serves as the first president of the National Association of Health Services

McGarrell

LUCIDO GLOBAL KELLER WILLIAMS PARTNERS REALTY

let’s talk REAL ESTATE.

Chanel Rowe recently joined the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Miami Regional Office as an enforcement attorney. As an enforcement attorney,

she is responsible for conducting investigations into possible violations of federal securities laws, recommending the Commission bring civil actions in federal district courts or in administrative proceedings before an administrative law judge, and litigating those cases once they are filed. Additionally, she works closely with law enforcement agencies to bring criminal cases where appropriate. Before joining the SEC, Rowe clerked for two years with Senior Judge Donald L. Graham, in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida. Prior to that, she practiced at two AmLaw 100 firms, Akerman LLP and Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP. Rowe earned a bachelor’s of business administration from Florida Atlantic University where she majored in Economics. She was valedictorian of FIU Law Class of 2014.

Executives’ Florida chapter, formerly NAHSE South Florida. The non-profit association of minority health care executives was founded 25 years ago for the purpose of promoting the advancement and development of minority health care leaders and elevating the quality of health care services rendered to minority communities. McGarrell is currently an account manager with Masimo Corporation. SAUN LIGHTBOURNE LEADS EDEN ROC AS DIRECTOR OF SALES

Saun Lightbourne has been hired as director of sales at Nobu Eden Roc Miami Beach. Lightbourne has extensive experience in hotel sales and marketing. He is responsible for the most demanding Lightbourne clientele in the hospitality industry at four Forbes travel-rated 5-star resorts and one AAArated 4-Diamond Hotel & Casino in North America and the Caribbean.

JONES PROMOTED AT FIRE DEPARTMENT

Xavier Jones, 32, has been promoted to division chief of Professional Standards at the Coral Gables Fire Department. Since beginning his career with the department in 2006 at age 19, Jones Jones has climbed the ranks and served the Department in many roles, including firefighter, assigned paramedic, lieutenant, recruit academy lead instructor, accreditation manager, and captain of Emergency Medical Services. n

DID YOU RECENTLY GET A PROMOTION? ARE YOU A NEW HIRE AT A SOUTH FLORIDA COMPANY? DOES YOUR FIRM HAVE A MAJOR ANNOUNCEMENT TO MAKE? Let us know by sharing your good news in Legacy Briefs. Send a press release and your professional headshot to rm@miamediagrp.com.


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Profile for miamediagrp

Legacy South Florida - Black History Month (January 2020)  

Legacy South Florida - Black History Month (January 2020)  

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